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  1. First Description of Reduced Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Enzyme Activity Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (SAH)

    PubMed Central

    Lilla, Nadine; Füllgraf, Hannah; Stetter, Christian; Köhler, Stefan; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo; Westermaier, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Object: Several previous studies reported metabolic derangements and an accumulation of metabolic products in the early phase of experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), which may contribute to secondary brain damage. This may be a result of deranged oxygen utilization due to enzymatic dysfunction in aerobic glucose metabolism. This study was performed to investigate, if pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme (PDH) is affected in its activity giving further hints for a derangement of oxidative metabolism. Methods: Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups (n = 9): (1) SAH induced by the endovascular filament model and (2) sham-operated controls. Mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), intracranial pressure (ICP), and local cerebral blood flow (LCBF; laser-Doppler flowmetry) were continuously monitored from 30 min before until 3 h after SAH. Thereafter, the animals were sacrificed and PDH activity was measured by ELISA. Results: PDH activity was significantly reduced in animals subjected to SAH compared to controls. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate for the first time a reduction of PDH activity following SAH, independent of supply of substrates and may be an independent factor contributing to a derangement of oxidative metabolism, failure of oxygen utilization, and secondary brain damage. PMID:28261039

  2. Crohns disease with central nervous system vasculitis causing subarachnoid hemorrhage due to aneurysm and cerebral ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Garge, Shaileshkumar S.; Vyas, Pooja D.; Modi, Pranav D.; Ghatge, Sharad

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral vasculitis secondary to Crohn's disease (CD) seems to be a very rare phenomenon. We report a 39-year-old male who presented with headache, vomiting, and left-sided weakness in the known case of CD. Cross-sectional imaging (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging,) showed right gangliocapsular acute infarct with supraclinoid cistern subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Cerebral digital substraction angiography (DSA) showed dilatation and narrowing of right distal internal carotid artery (ICA). Left ICA was chronically occluded. His inflammatory markers were significantly raised. Imaging features are suggestive of cerebral vasculitis. Arterial and venous infarcts due to thrombosis are known in CD. Our case presented with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage in supraclinoid cistern due to rupture of tiny aneurysm of perforator arteries causing SAH and infarction in right basal ganglia. Patient was treated conservatively with immunosuppression along with medical management of SAH. PMID:25506170

  3. Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to retained lumbar drain.

    PubMed

    Guppy, Kern H; Silverthorn, James W; Akins, Paul T

    2011-12-01

    Intrathecal spinal catheters (lumbar drains) are indicated for several medical and surgical conditions. In neurosurgical procedures, they are used to reduce intracranial and intrathecal pressures by diverting CSF. They have also been placed for therapeutic access to administer drugs, and more recently, vascular surgeons have used them to improve spinal cord perfusion during the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Insertion of these lumbar drains is not without attendant complications. One complication is the shearing of the distal end of the catheter with a resultant retained fragment. The authors report the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to the migration of a retained lumbar drain that sheared off during its removal. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of rostral migration of a retained intrathecal catheter causing subarachnoid hemorrhage. The authors review the literature on retained intrathecal spinal catheters, and their findings support either early removal of easily accessible catheters or close monitoring with serial imaging.

  4. Pulmonary hemorrhage due to inhalation of vapor containing pyromellitic dianhydride.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, V; Baur, X; Czuppon, A; Ruegger, M; Russi, E; Speich, R

    1993-08-01

    Pulmonary hemorrhage due to inhalation of fumes or powders containing trimellitic anhydride (TMA) is well known. We report pulmonary hemorrhage in a young man exposed to epoxy resin vapor containing pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA). Serum IgG antibodies to PMDA could be detected. We conclude that the pulmonary hemorrhage was mediated by a reaction to PMDA in analogy to the TMA-induced disease. We suggest that exposure to any acid anhydride should be considered a possible cause of pulmonary hemorrhage since these compounds share structural and functional similarities.

  5. Modern Approach to SAH in Intensive Care Unit (ICU)

    PubMed Central

    Bruder, N.; Velly, L.; Codaccioni, J.-L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary SAH is still a severe pathology carrying a high risk of death or severe neurological morbidity. New diagnostic, monitoring and therapeutic methods are available for the detection and treatment of vasospasm. This includes transcranial Doppler, CT or MRI perfusion scan, protein S100B dosage, cerebral blood flow monitoring at the bedside. Medical treatment of vasospasm relies on increased blood pressure and dobutamine. Emergency balloon angioplasty or arterial vasodilator infusion is mandatory in case of vasospam-induced ischemic deficit. Despite several medical advances in the treatment of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture, particularly interventional neuroradiology, it remains a potentially devastating illness with a high mortality rate. The most important determinant of outcome is neurologic state on arrival in the hospital, assessed with the World Federation of Neurological Surgeons (WFNS) scale (table 1)1. Delayed cerebral ischemia due to cerebral vasospasm and medical complications due to SAH have both a major impact on outcome. The cooperative aneurysm study, including 457 patients with SAH, showed that the proportion of deaths from medical complications (23%) was comparable with the proportion of deaths attributed to the direct effects of the initial hemorrhage (19%), rebleeding (22%), and vasospasm (23%) after aneurysmal rupture (2). Thus, the aim of ICU management is to prevent or to limit the consequences of vasospasm and to treat medical complications that can have an adverse effect on the brain. Table 1Classification of the World Federation of Neurological Surgeons (WFNS)GradeGlasgow Coma ScoreMotor deficitGOS 1-3 at 6 months (%)*I  15     absent13II 13-14absent20III13-14present42IV7-12  present or absent51V 3-6   present or absent68GOS: Glasgow Outcome Score (1-3 : dead, persistent vegetative state or severe disability) PMID:20557769

  6. Pseudo-subarachnoid hemorrhage and death after a bee sting.

    PubMed

    Yasar Tekelioglu, Umit; Demirhan, Abdullah; Akkaya, Akcan; Gurel, Kamil; Ocak, Tarik; Duran, Arif; Kocoglu, Hasan

    2013-02-01

    We report a case of a 33-year-old woman who developed severe brain edema and pseudo-subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) at 36-hour follow-up after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation for anaphylactic shock as a result of a bee sting. The patient died on the sixth day of the follow-up due to multiple organ failure and brain herniation. Our case suggests that the SAH-like findings on computed tomography scanning were not a new complication ("real" SAH) arising from the bee sting; rather, it was a pseudo-SAH related to prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation).

  7. Management of SAH with traditional Chinese medicine in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxue; Zhao, Xingquan; Mao, Shujing; Wang, Yongjun; Cui, Xiangning; Pu, Yuehua

    2006-06-01

    China lacks large scale authorized epidemiological study results in allusion to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) within recent 15 years since MONICA (multinational monitoring of trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease) study revealed SAH situation in China in 2000. The main cause of SAH in China is aneurysm which takes up 30-50%, while over 90% aneurysm locates at Willis circle. Early surgery for SAH after aneurysm rupture is the dominant procedure to deal with SAH in China. Moreover, calcium antagonists rank the absolute leading position for cerebral vascular spasm (CVS) among medication-based treatment options. However, traditional Chinese medicine such as Salvia miltiorrhiza, Acanthopanax senticosus, Ginkgo biloba, Pueraria lobata, Liguisticum chuanxiong, cow bezoar, Diospyros kaki and Gynostemma pentaphyllum have been proven beneficial in CVS prevention and treatment, while Salvia miltiorrhiza and TCM soup have unique effects on bleeding absorption. In addition, aescine and some TCM soup might relieve strong headache after SAH. In general, TCM integrated with western medicine have shown unique advantages in the current treatment of SAH in China. However, it is a pity that China still lacks larger scale randomized controlled trials and research on SAH treatment focusing on TCM and the related mechanism of TCM on SAH still need to be investigated further.

  8. Neutrophil depletion after subarachnoid hemorrhage improves memory via NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Provencio, Jose Javier; Swank, Valerie; Lu, Haiyan; Brunet, Sylvain; Baltan, Selva; Khapre, Rohini V; Seerapu, Himabindu; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N; Lamb, Bruce T; Ransohoff, Richard M

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive deficits after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are common and disabling. Patients who experience delayed deterioration associated with vasospasm are likely to have cognitive deficits, particularly problems with executive function, verbal and spatial memory. Here, we report neurophysiological and pathological mechanisms underlying behavioral deficits in a murine model of SAH. On tests of spatial memory, animals with SAH performed worse than sham animals in the first week and one month after SAH suggesting a prolonged injury. Between three and six days after experimental hemorrhage, mice demonstrated loss of late long-term potentiation (L-LTP) due to dysfunction of the NMDA receptor. Suppression of innate immune cell activation prevents delayed vasospasm after murine SAH. We therefore explored the role of neutrophil-mediated innate inflammation on memory deficits after SAH. Depletion of neutrophils three days after SAH mitigates tissue inflammation, reverses cerebral vasoconstriction in the middle cerebral artery, and rescues L-LTP dysfunction at day 6. Spatial memory deficits in both the short and long-term are improved and associated with a shift of NMDA receptor subunit composition toward a memory sparing phenotype. This work supports further investigating suppression of innate immunity after SAH as a target for preventative therapies in SAH.

  9. [Neurologic complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to intracranial aneurysm rupture].

    PubMed

    Rama-Maceiras, P; Fàbregas Julià, N; Ingelmo Ingelmo, I; Hernández-Palazón, J

    2010-12-01

    The high rates of morbidity and mortality after subarachnoid hemorrhage due to spontaneous rupture of an intracranial aneurysm are mainly the result of neurologic complications. Sixty years after cerebral vasospasm was first described, this problem remains unsolved in spite of its highly adverse effect on prognosis after aneurysmatic rupture. Treatment is somewhat empirical, given that uncertainties remain in our understanding of the pathophysiology of this vascular complication, which involves structural and biochemical changes in the endothelium and smooth muscle of vessels. Vasospasm that is refractory to treatment leads to cerebral infarction. Prophylaxis, early diagnosis, and adequate treatment of neurologic complications are key elements in the management of vasospasm if neurologic damage, lengthy hospital stays, and increased use of health care resources are to be avoided. New approaches to early treatment of cerebral lesions and cortical ischemia in cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to aneurysm rupture should lead to more effective, specific management.

  10. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cavernous internal carotid artery aneurysm after medical prolactinoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Khalsa, Siri Sahib; Hollon, Todd C; Shastri, Ravi; Trobe, Jonathan D; Gemmete, Joseph J; Pandey, Aditya S

    2016-06-08

    Aneurysms of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) are believed to have a low risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), given the confines of the dural rings and the anterior clinoid process. The risk may be greater when the bony and dural protection has been eroded. We report a case of spontaneous SAH from rupture of a cavernous ICA aneurysm in a patient whose large prolactinoma had markedly decreased in size as the result of cabergoline treatment. After passing a balloon test occlusion, the patient underwent successful endovascular vessel deconstruction. This case suggests that an eroding skull base lesion may distort normal anterior cranial base anatomy and allow communication between the cavernous ICA and subarachnoid space. The potential for SAH due to cavernous ICA aneurysm rupture should be recognised in patients with previous pituitary or other skull base lesions adjacent to the cavernous sinus.

  11. Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Due to Duodenal Erosion by a Biliary Wallstent

    SciTech Connect

    Roebuck, Derek J.; Stanley, Philip; Katz, Michael D.; Parry, Robert L.; Haight, Michael A.

    1998-01-15

    A self-expanding metallic stent (Wallstent) was used to relieve obstruction of the common bile duct in a young male with a desmoplastic small cell tumor of the abdomen. Two months after insertion and following a course of chemotherapy the lower end of the stent eroded the mucosa of the second part of the duodenum causing severe gastrointestinal hemorrhage which necessitated laparotomy and trimming of the stent. This complication may have been due to shrinking of the tumor as well as thrombocytopenia following chemotherapy.

  12. Spontaneous Unilateral Adrenal Hemorrhage in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahem, Rawaa; Munguti, Cyrus; Mortada, Rami

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious medical condition associated with variable clinical presentation depending on the extent of the hemorrhage. Pregnancy-induced adrenal hemorrhage is poorly understood. A low cortisol level in the peripartum period with radiological findings is sufficient to establish the diagnosis. Prompt hormone replacement and supportive care to ensure good clinical outcomes is crucial. Due to the potentially life-threatening complications, physicians should have a high suspicion for adrenal hemorrhage when they evaluate patients with hypotension, fatigue, and abdominal pain during the peripartum period. PMID:28191381

  13. Postcatheterization Retroperitoneal Hematoma Due to Spontaneous Lumbar Arterial Hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinowski, E. Anthony; Trerotola, Scott O.

    1998-07-15

    A patient developed retroperitoneal hemorrhage after cardiac catheterization, initially thought to be a complication of the puncture. Diagnostic evaluation revealed the source to be spontaneous bleeding from a lumber artery, which was successfully embolized. Spontaneous hemorrhage is a recognized complication of anticoagulation therapy and must be considered in the differential diagnosis even in the face of a seemingly obvious source of bleeding.

  14. Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis due to enterovirus 70 in India.

    PubMed Central

    Maitreyi, R. S.; Dar, L.; Muthukumar, A.; Vajpayee, M.; Xess, I.; Vajpayee, R. B.; Seth, P.; Broor, S.

    1999-01-01

    An outbreak of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis occurred in Delhi, India, during August and September 1996. The etiologic agent was confirmed as enterovirus type 70 by a modified centrifugation-enhanced culture method followed by immunofluorescence and neutralization tests. After nearly a decade, this virus is reemerging as a cause of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis in India. PMID:10221880

  15. Brainstem opioidergic system is involved in early response to experimental SAH.

    PubMed

    Cetas, Justin S; McFarlane, Robin; Kronfeld, Kassi; Smitasin, Phoebe; Liu, Jesse J; Raskin, Jeffrey S

    2015-04-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a form of stroke with high rates of mortality and permanent disability for patients who survive the initial event. Previous research has focused on delayed cerebral vasospasm of large conduit arteries as the cause of poor long-term outcomes after SAH. New evidence suggests that acute failure to restore cerebral blood flow (CBF) after SAH may be setting the stage for delayed ischemic neurological deficits. Our lab previously demonstrated that the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM), an autonomic and sensorimotor integration center, is important for maintaining CBF after experimental SAH. In this study, we have demonstrated that ablation of μ-opioid receptor containing cells with dermorphin conjugates in the RVM results in a high mortality rate after experimental SAH and, in survivors, causes a dramatic decrease in CBF. Further, locally blocking the μ-opioid receptor with the antagonist naltrexone attenuated the reduction in CBF secondary to experimental SAH. Saturating μ-opioid receptors with the agonist [D-Ala(2),NMe-Phe(4),Gly-ol(5)]-encephalin (DAMGO) had no effect. Taken together, these results suggest that SAH activates opioidergic signaling in the RVM with a resultant reduction in CBF. Further, cells in the RVM that contain μ-opioid receptors are important for survival after acute SAH. We propose that failure of the RVM μ-opioid receptor cells to initiate the compensatory CBF response sets the stage for acute and delayed ischemic injury following SAH.

  16. Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ali; Ahmad, Bakhtiar; Ahmed, Zahoor; Al-Quliti, Khalid W.

    2015-01-01

    Ruptured cerebral aneurysm is the most common cause of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Rarely cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) may present initially as acute SAH, and clinically mimics aneurysmal bleed. We report 2 cases of CVST who presented with severe headache associated with neck pain and focal seizures. Non-contrast brain CT showed SAH, involving the sulci of the convexity of hemisphere (cSAH) without involving the basal cisterns. Both patients received treatment with anticoagulants and improved. Awareness of this unusual presentation of CVST is important for early diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the inclusion of vascular neuroimaging like MRI with venography or CT venography in the diagnostic workup of SAH, especially in a patient with strong clinical suspicion of CVST or in a patient where neuroimaging showed cSAH. PMID:25630784

  17. Decorin alleviated chronic hydrocephalus via inhibiting TGF-β1/Smad/CTGF pathway after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Chen, Yujie; Li, Lingyong; Jiang, Jiaode; Wu, Guangyong; Zuo, Yuchun; Zhang, John H; Feng, Hua; Yan, Xiaoxin; Liu, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hydrocephalus is one of the severe complications after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). However, there is no efficient treatment for the prevention of chronic hydrocephalus, partially due to poor understanding of underlying pathogenesis, subarachnoid fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1) is a potent fibrogenic factor implicated in wide range of fibrotic diseases. To investigate whether decorin, a natural antagonist for TGF-β1, protects against subarachnoid fibrosis and chronic hydrocephalus after SAH, two-hemorrhage-injection SAH model was conducted in 6-week-old rats. Recombinant human decorin(rhDecorin) (30ug/2ul) was administered before blood injection and on the 10th day after SAH. TGF-β1, p-Smad2/3, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), collagen I and pro-collagen I c-terminal propeptide were assessed via western blotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, radioimmunoassay and immunofluorescence. And neurobehavioral tests and Morris water maze were employed to evaluate long-term neurological functions after SAH. We found that SAH induced heightened activation of TGF-β1/Smad/CTGF axis, presenting as a two peak response of TGF-β1 in cerebrospinal fluid, elevation of TGF-β1, p-Smad2/3, CTGF, collagen I in brain parenchyma and pro-collagen I c-terminal propeptide in cerebrospinal fluid, and increased lateral ventricle index. rhDecorin treatment effectively inhibited up-regulation of TGF-β1, p-Smad2/3, CTGF, collagen I and pro-collagen I c-terminal propeptide after SAH. Moreover, rhDecorin treatment significantly reduced lateral ventricular index and incidence of chronic hydrocephalus after SAH. Importantly, rhDecorin improved neurocognitive deficits after SAH. In conclusion, rhDecorin suppresses extracellular matrix accumulation and following subarachnoid fibrosis via inhibiting TGF-β1/Smad/CTGF pathway, preventing development of hydrocephalus and attenuating long-term neurocognitive defects after SAH.

  18. Progesterone alleviates acute brain injury via reducing apoptosis and oxidative stress in a rat experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage model.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Cao, Shenglong; Chen, Jingyin; Yan, Feng; Chen, Gao; Dai, Yuying

    2015-07-23

    This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic effect of progesterone on acute brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=72) by endovascular perforation. Progesterone (8 mg/kg or 16 mg/kg) was administered to rats at 1, 6, and 12h after SAH. Mortality, neurologic deficits, cell apoptosis, expression of apoptotic markers, the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were assayed at 24h after experimental SAH. Mortality, cell apoptosis and the expression of caspase-3 were decreased, and improved neurological function was observed in the progesterone-treated SAH rats. Further, exploration demonstrated that progesterone significantly reduced the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and attenuated the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Progesterone also induced anti-oxidative effects by elevating the activity of SOD and decreasing MDA content after SAH. Furthermore, dose-response relationships for progesterone treatment were observed, and high doses of progesterone enhanced the neuroprotective effects. Progesterone treatment could alleviate acute brain injury after SAH by inhibiting cell apoptosis and decreasing damage due to oxidative stress. The mechanism involved in the anti-apoptotic effect was related to the mitochondrial pathway. These results indicate that progesterone possesses the potential to be a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of acute brain injury after SAH.

  19. Modeling of vision loss due to vitreous hemorrhage by Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Al-Saeed, Tarek A; El-Zaiat, Sayed Y

    2014-08-01

    Vitreous hemorrhage is the leaking of blood into the vitreous humor which results from different diseases. Vitreous hemorrhage leads to vision problems ranging from mild to severe cases in which blindness occurs. Since erythrocytes are the major scatterers in blood, we are modeling light propagation in vitreous humor with erythrocytes randomly distributed in it. We consider the total medium (vitreous humor plus erythrocytes) as a turbid medium and apply Monte Carlo simulation. Then, we calculate the parameters characterizing vision loss due to vitreous hemorrhage. This work shows that the increase of the volume fraction of erythrocytes results in a decrease of the total transmittance of the vitreous body and an increase in the radius of maximum transmittance, the width of the circular strip of bright area, and the radius of the shadow area.

  20. Sulforaphane activates the cerebral vascular Nrf2-ARE pathway and suppresses inflammation to attenuate cerebral vasospasm in rat with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xudong; Wen, Liting; Dong, Min; Lu, Xiaojie

    2016-12-15

    Nrf2-ARE pathway reportedly plays a protective role in several central nervous system diseases. No study has explored the role of the Nrf2-ARE pathway in cerebral vasospasm(CVS) after subarachnoid hemorrhage(SAH). The purpose of the present study was to investigate the activation of the cerebral vascular Nrf2-ARE pathway and to determine the potential role of this pathway in the development of CVS following SAH. We investigated whether the administration of sulforaphane (SFN, a specific Nrf2 activator) modulated vascular caliber, Nrf2-ARE pathway activity, proinflammatory cytokine expression, and clinical behavior in a rat model of SAH. A two-hemorrhage protocol was used to generate an animal model of SAH in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Administration of SFN to these rats following SAH enhanced the activity of the Nrf2-ARE pathway and suppressed the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Vasospasm was markedly attenuated in the basilar arteries after SFN therapy. Additionally, SFN administration significantly ameliorated two behavioral functions disrupted by SAH. These results suggest that SFN has a therapeutic benefit in post-SAH, and this may be due to elevated Nrf2-ARE pathway activity and inhibition of cerebral vascular proinflammatory cytokine expression.

  1. Recovery from a Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Days 1 through 22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brice, Alejandro E.; Brice, Roanne G.; Wallace, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhages (SAHs) are a serious medical emergency, as 30% to 50% of all SAHs can result in death. Personal accounts and case studies are an important aspect of evidence-based practice. This first article of two presents a review of AB's (patient) condition immediately following an SAH in the intensive care and immediately post…

  2. Risk-Benefit Analysis of Lumbar Puncture to Evaluate for Nontraumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Adult ED Patients

    PubMed Central

    Migdal, Victoria L.; Wu, W. Kelly; Long, Drew; McNaughton, Candace D.; Ward, Michael J.; Self, Wesley H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the risks and benefits of lumbar puncture (LP) to evaluate for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) after a normal head computed tomography (CT) scan. Methods This was an observational study of adult emergency department (ED) patients at a single hospital who presented with headache and underwent LP after a normal head CT to evaluate for SAH. LP results classified as indicating a SAH included: xanthochromia in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF); or red blood cells in the final tube of CSF with an aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation on cerebral angiography. An LP-related complication was defined as hospitalization or a return visit due to symptoms attributed to the LP. Proportions of the study patients who had SAH diagnosed by LP and who experienced an LP-related complication were compared. Results The study included 302 patients, including 2 (0.66%) who were diagnosed with SAH based on LP (number-needed-to diagnose: 151); both of these patients had a known intracranial aneurysm. Eighteen (5.96%) patients experienced a LP-related complication (p<0.01 compared to number with SAH diagnosed; number-needed-to-harm: 17). Complications included 12 patients with low-pressure headaches, 4 with pain at the LP site, and 2 with contaminated CSF cultures. Conclusion The yield of LP for diagnosing SAH in adults with nontraumatic headache after a normal head CT was very low. The severity of LP-related complications was low, but complications were more common than SAH diagnoses. LP may not be advisable after a normal head CT to evaluate for SAH, particularly in patients with low-risk clinical features for SAH. PMID:26189054

  3. Melatonin attenuated early brain injury induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage via regulating NLRP3 inflammasome and apoptosis signaling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yushu; Fan, Chongxi; Hu, Wei; Jiang, Shuai; Ma, Zhiqiang; Yan, Xiaolong; Deng, Chao; Di, Shouyin; Xin, Zhenlong; Wu, Guiling; Yang, Yang; Reiter, Russel J; Liang, Guobiao

    2016-04-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating condition with high morbidity and mortality rates due to the lack of effective therapy. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation associated with the upregulation of apoptotic signaling pathway has been implicated in various inflammatory diseases including hemorrhagic insults. Melatonin is reported to possess substantial anti-inflammatory properties, which is beneficial for early brain injury (EBI) after SAH. However, the molecular mechanisms have not been clearly identified. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of melatonin against EBI induced by SAH and to elucidate the potential mechanisms. The adult mice were subjected to SAH. Melatonin or vehicle was injected intraperitoneally 2 hr after SAH. Melatonin was neuroprotective, as shown by increased survival rate, as well as elevated neurological score, greater survival of neurons, preserved brain glutathione levels, and reduced brain edema, malondialdehyde concentrations, apoptotic ratio, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. Melatonin also attenuated the expressions of NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), cleaved caspase-1, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6); these changes were also associated with an increase in the anti-apoptotic factor (Bcl2) and reduction in the pro-apoptotic factor (Bim). In summary, our results demonstrate that melatonin treatment attenuates the EBI following SAH by inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome-associated apoptosis.

  4. Pure sensory stroke due to bilateral basal ganglion hemorrhage: a case report.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Murat; Akkaya, Omer; Onar, Musa

    2010-07-01

    Bilateral simultaneous hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhages are extremely rare. The predisposing factors and pathophysiological mechanisms leading to the development of this picture are not well known. Possible mechanisms of simultaneous multiple hemorrhages include concomitant primary hemorrhages in two or more regions, or development of a second hemorrhage in another region shortly after the primary hemorrhage. The etiology of the cases presenting with bilateral simultaneous basal ganglion hemorrhage include migraine, lightning stroke, hyperglycemic hyperosmolar coma, hypertension and diabetic ketoacidosis coma. Bilateral simultaneous hemorrhage has a poor prognosis. The case of bilateral simultaneous intracerebral hemorrhage presented here had a good clinical course similar to a pure sensorial stroke.

  5. Intracranial hemorrhage due to vitamin K deficiency in infants: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, C; Yuca, S A; Yilmaz, N; Bektaş, M S; Caksen, H

    2009-01-01

    The hospital records of 30 infants with a diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) due to late onset of vitamin K deficiency, seen during a 5-year period (2001-2005) were retrospectively evaluated. Signs and symptoms of the patients were convulsions (80%), poor sucking (50%), irritability (40%), vomiting (47%), acute diarrhea (33%), and fever (40%). On physical examination there were bulging or full fontanel in 19 patients (63%), collapsed fontanel in one (3%), diminished or absent neonatal reflexes in 11 (37%), pallor in 14 (47%), and cyanosis in one (3%) patient. Gastrointestinal disorder, skin hemorrhagic findings, and epistaxis each were noted in two (7%) patients. All the infants had prolonged prothrombin time (PT) and seven had prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), both of which were corrected by the administration of vitamin K. All the infants had ICH, with the most common being intraparenchymal hemorrhage, followed by multiple type ICH (27%). Neurosurgical intervention was performed in five patients (17%). The overall case fatality rate was 33%. In conclusion, we would like to stress that ICH due to vitamin K deficiency in infants is still an important health problem in Turkey resulting in high mortality rate.

  6. Cerebellar Hemorrhage due to a Direct Carotid–Cavernous Fistula after Surgery for Maxillary Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kamio, Yoshinobu; Hiramatsu, Hisaya; Kamiya, Mika; Yamashita, Shuhei; Namba, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    Infratentorial cerebral hemorrhage due to a direct carotid–cavernous fistula (CCF) is very rare. To our knowledge, only four such cases have been reported. Cerebellar hemorrhage due to a direct CCF has not been reported. We describe a 63-year-old female who presented with reduced consciousness 3 days after undergoing a maxillectomy for maxillary cancer. Computed tomography showed a cerebellar hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance angiography showed a left-sided direct CCF draining into the left petrosal and cerebellar veins through the left superior petrosal sinus (SPS). Her previous surgery had sacrificed the pterygoid plexus and facial vein. Increased blood flow and reduced drainage could have led to increased venous pressure in infratentorial veins, including the petrosal and cerebellar veins. The cavernous sinus has several drainage routes, but the SPS is one of the most important routes for infratentorial venous drainage. Stenosis or absence of the posterior segment of the SPS can also result in increased pressure in the cerebellar and pontine veins. We emphasize that a direct CCF with cortical venous reflux should be precisely evaluated to determine the hemodynamic status and venous drainage from the cavernous sinus. PMID:28061497

  7. Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system due to chronic hemorrhage from a giant invasive prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Jacob; Cohen, José E; Gomori, John M; Fraifeld, Shifra; Moscovici, Samuel; Rosenthal, Guy; Shoshan, Yigal; Itshayek, Eyal

    2013-07-01

    Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system (CNS) is a rare disorder caused by deposition of hemosiderin in neuronal tissue in the subpial layer of the CNS due to slow subarachnoid or intraventricular hemorrhage. The most common neurologic manifestations include progressive gait ataxia, sensorineural hearing loss, and corticospinal tract signs. We present a case of superficial siderosis in a 43-year-old man who presented to the Emergency Department with sudden onset bilateral visual deterioration and a loss of consciousness. A hemorrhagic giant prolactinoma was diagnosed based on brain CT scan, T1-weighted MRI, and an endocrine blood examination. Susceptibility-weighted non-contrast MRI showed pathognomonic signs of superficial siderosis in the form of a hypointensity rim surrounding the brainstem, cerebellar fissures, and cranial nerves VII and VIII. This report demonstrates that superficial siderosis can be caused by pituitary apoplexy.

  8. Multimodality Monitoring, Inflammation, and Neuroregeneration in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Ariel B.; Esteves Veiga, José C.; Teixeira, Manoel J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke, including subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The mortality rate of poor-grade SAH ranges from 34% to 52%. In an attempt to improve SAH outcomes, clinical research on multimodality monitoring has been performed, as has basic science research on inflammation and neuroregeneration (which can occur due to injury-induced neurogenesis). Nevertheless, the current literature does not focus on the integrated study of these fields. Multimodality monitoring corresponds to physiological data obtained during clinical management by both noninvasive and invasive methods. Regarding inflammation and neuroregeneration, evidence suggests that, in all types of stroke, a proinflammatory phase and an anti-inflammatory phase occur consecutively; these phases affect neurogenesis, which is also influenced by other pathophysiological features of stroke, such as ischemia, seizures, and spreading depression. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether injury-induced neurogenesis is a prognostic factor in poor-grade SAH that can be monitored and modulated. METHODS: We propose a protocol for multimodality monitoring-guided hypothermia in poor-grade SAH in which cellular and molecular markers of inflammation and neuroregeneration can be monitored in parallel with clinical and multimodal data. EXPECTED OUTCOMES: This study may reveal correlations between markers of inflammation and neurogenesis in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, based on clinical and multimodality monitoring parameters. DISCUSSION: This protocol has the potential to lead to new therapies for acute, diffuse, and severe brain diseases. ABBREVIATIONS: BBB, blood-brain barrier CPP, cerebral perfusion pressure EEG, electroencephalography ICP, intracranial pressure IL, interleukin MCA, middle cerebral artery SAH, subarachnoid hemorrhage SD, spreading depression SGZ, subgranular zone SVZ, subventricular zone TCD, transcranial Doppler PMID:25050583

  9. Neurogenic stunned myocardium in subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kerro, Ali; Woods, Timothy; Chang, Jason J

    2017-04-01

    "Stunned myocardium," characterized by reversible left ventricular dysfunction, was first described via animal models using transient coronary artery occlusion. However, this phenomenon has also been noted with neurologic pathologies and collectively been labeled "neurogenic stunned myocardium" (NSM). Neurogenic stunned myocardium resulting from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a challenging pathology due to its diagnostic uncertainty. Traditional diagnostic criteria for NSM after SAH focus on electrocardiographic and echocardiographic abnormalities and troponemia. However, tremendous heterogeneity still exists. Traditional pathophysiological mechanisms for NSM encompassed hypothalamic and myocardial perivascular lesions. More recently, research on pathophysiology has centered on myocardial microvascular dysfunction and genetic polymorphisms. Catecholamine surging as a mechanism has also gained attention with particular focus placed on the role of adrenergic blockade in both the prehospital and acute settings. Management remains largely supportive with case reports acknowledging the utility of inotropes such as dobutamine and milrinone and intra-aortic balloon pump when NSM is accompanied by cardiogenic shock. Neurogenic stunned myocardium that follows SAH can result in many complications such as arrhythmias, pulmonary edema, and prolonged intubation, which can negatively impact long-term recovery from SAH and increase morbidity and mortality. This necessitates the need to accurately diagnose and treat NSM.

  10. MRI-detection rate and incidence of lumbar bleeding sources in 190 patients with non-aneurysmal SAH

    PubMed Central

    Kashefiolasl, Sepide; Brawanski, Nina; Platz, Johannes; Bruder, Markus; Senft, Christian; Marquardt, Gerhard; Seifert, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Background Up to 15% of all spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhages (SAH) have a non-aneurysmal SAH (NASAH). The evaluation of SAH patients with negative digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is sometimes a diagnostic challenge. Our goal in this study was to reassess the yield of standard MR-imaging of the complete spinal axis to rule out spinal bleeding sources in patients with NASAH. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the spinal MRI findings in 190 patients with spontaneous NASAH, containing perimesencephalic (PM) and non-perimesencephalic (NPM) SAH, diagnosed by computer tomography (CT) and/or lumbar puncture (LP), and negative 2nd DSA. Results 190 NASAH patients were included in the study, divided into PM-SAH (n = 87; 46%) and NPM-SAH (n = 103; 54%). Overall, 23 (22%) patients had a CT negative SAH, diagnosed by positive LP. MR-imaging of the spinal axis detected two patients with lumbar ependymoma (n = 2; 1,05%). Both patients complained of radicular sciatic pain. The detection rate raised up to 25%, if only patients with radicular sciatic pain received an MRI. Conclusion Routine radiological investigation of the complete spinal axis in NASAH patients is expensive and can not be recommended for standard procedure. However, patients with clinical signs of low-back/sciatic pain should be worked up for a spinal pathology. PMID:28369075

  11. [Subarachnoid hemorrhage: epidemiology, social impact and a multidisciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Ingelmo Ingelmo, I; Fàbregas Julià, N; Rama-Maceiras, P; Hernández-Palazón, J; Rubio Romero, R; Carmona Aurioles, J

    2010-12-01

    Cerebrovascular disease, whether ischemic or hemorrhagic, is a worldwide problem, representing personal tragedy, great social and economic consequences, and a heavy burden on the health care system. Estimated to be responsible for up to 10% of mortality in industrialized countries, cerebrovascular disease also affects individuals who are still in the workforce, with consequent loss of productive years. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a type of cerebrovascular accident that leads to around 5% of all strokes. SAH is most often due to trauma but may also be spontaneous, in which case the cause may be a ruptured intracranial aneurysm (80%) or arteriovenous malformation or any other abnormality of the blood or vessels (20%). Although both the diagnosis and treatment of aneurysmal SAH has improved in recent years, related morbidity and mortality remains high: 50% of patients die from the initial hemorrhage or later complications. If patients whose brain function is permanently damaged are added to the count, the percentage of cases leading to severe consequences rises to 70%. The burden of care of patients who are left incapacitated by SAH falls to the family or to private and public institutions. The economic cost is considerable and the loss of quality of life for both the patient and the family is great. Given the magnitude of this problem, the provision of adequate prophylaxis is essential; also needed are organizational models that aim to reduce mortality as well as related complications. Aneurysmal SAH is a condition which must be approached in a coordinated, multidisciplinary way both during the acute phase and throughout rehabilitation in order to lower the risk of unwanted outcomes.

  12. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage International Trialists data repository (SAHIT).

    PubMed

    Macdonald, R Loch; Cusimano, Michael D; Etminan, Nima; Hanggi, Daniel; Hasan, David; Ilodigwe, Don; Jaja, Blessing; Lantigua, Hector; Le Roux, Peter; Lo, Benjamin; Louffat-Olivares, Ada; Mayer, Stephan; Molyneux, Andrew; Quinn, Audrey; Schweizer, Tom A; Schenk, Thomas; Spears, Julian; Todd, Michael; Torner, James; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Wong, George K C

    2013-01-01

    The outcome of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has improved slowly over the past 25 years. This improvement may be due to early aneurysm repair by endovascular or open means, use of nimodipine, and better critical care management. Despite this improvement, mortality remains at about 40%, and many survivors have permanent neurologic, cognitive, and neuropsychologic deficits. Randomized clinical trials have tested pharmacologic therapies, but few have been successful. There are numerous explanations for the failure of these trials, including ineffective interventions, inadequate sample size, treatment side effects, and insensitive or inappropriate outcome measures. Outcome often is evaluated on a good-bad dichotomous scale that was developed for traumatic brain injury 40 years ago. To address these issues, we established the Subarachnoid Hemorrhage International Trialists (SAHIT) data repository. The primary aim of the SAHIT data repository is to provide a unique resource for prognostic analysis and for studies aimed at optimizing the design and analysis of phase III trials in aneurysmal SAH. With this aim in mind, we convened a multinational investigator meeting to explore merging individual patient data from multiple clinical trials and observational databases of patients with SAH and to create an agreement under which such a group of investigators could submit data and collaborate. We welcome collaboration with other investigators.

  13. Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Due to Splenic Artery Aneurysm Pancreatic Duct Fistula in Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Blumgart, Leslie H.

    1993-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to splenic artery aneurysm pancreatic duct fistula in chronic pancreatitis is rare. It is, however, important to diagnose this condition particularly in patients having chronic pancreatitis, since it may result in a life-threatening situation. The diagnosis is usually difficult to establish and it may take repeated admissions for intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding until the real source is recognized. Clinical attacks of epigastric pain followed by GI-bleeding 30–40 minutes later are characteristic. Occasionally these attacks are followed by transient jaundice. The present case report describes this rare complication and reviews the current literature. PMID:8268107

  14. Cerebral hemorrhage due to tuberculosis meningitis: a rare case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Zou, Hai; Pan, Ke-Hua; Pan, Hong-Ying; Huang, Dong-Sheng; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2015-12-29

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a common disease to threaten human health. TB of the central nervous system (CNS) is rare but the most serious type of systemic TB because of its high mortality rate, serious neurological complications and sequelae. In this case report, we describe a woman who presented with walking instability, intracerebral hemorrhage and leptomeningeal enhancement due to tuberculosis meningitis. The patient had no significant medical history and the initial clinical symptoms were walking instability. On analysis, the cerebrospinal fluid was colorless and transparent, the pressure was more than 400 mm H2O, there was lymphocytic pleocytosis, increased protein, and decreased glucose levels present. No tuberculosis or other bacteria were detected. The patient's brain computed tomography image showed intra-cerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and contrast magnetic resonance imaging showed ICH in the right frontal lob, and leptomeningeal enhancement. CNS TB is rare but has a high mortality rate. As this disease has no unique characteristics at first presentation such as epidemiology and obvious clinical manifestation, a diagnosis of CNS TB remains difficult.

  15. Spontaneous Intra-Abdominal Hemorrhage Due to Rupture of Jejunal Artery Aneurysm in Behcet Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-yan; Wei, Jiang-peng; Zhao, Xiu-yuan; Wang, Yue; Wu, Huan-huan; Shi, Tao; Liu, Tong; Liu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rupture of jejunal artery aneurysm is a very rare event resulting in life-threatening hemorrhage in Behcet disease (BD). We report a case of ruptured jejunal artery aneurysm in a 35-year-old patient with BD. The patient had a 1-year history of intermittent abdominal pain caused by superior mesenteric artery aneurysm with thrombosis. Anticoagulation treatment showed a good response. Past surgical history included stenting for aortic pseudoaneurysm. On admission, the patient underwent an urgent operation due to sudden hemorrhagic shock. Resection was performed for jejunal artery aneurysm and partial ischemia of intestine. The patient was diagnosed with BD, based on a history of recurrent oral and skin lesions over the past 6 years. Treatment with anti-inflammatory medications showed a good response during the 8-month follow-up. An increased awareness of BD and its vascular complications is essential. Aneurysms in BD involving jejunal artery are rare, neglected and require proper management to prevent rupture and death. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of jejunal artery aneurysm caused by BD. PMID:26559278

  16. Spinal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Migrated from Traumatic Intracranial Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Jin; Koh, Eun Jung

    2016-01-01

    Very rarely, spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SSAH) can occur without any direct spinal injury in patients with traumatic intracranial SAH. A-59-year-old male with traumatic intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) presented with pain and numbness in his buttock and thigh two days after trauma. Pain and numbness rapidly worsened and perianal numbness and voiding difficulty began on the next day. Magnetic resonance imaging showed intraspinal hemorrhage in the lumbosacral region. The cauda equina was displaced and compressed. Emergent laminectomy and drainage of hemorrhage were performed and SSAH was found intraoperatively. The symptoms were relieved immediately after the surgery. Patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage who present with delayed pain or neurological deficits should be evaluated for intraspinal hemorrhage promptly, even when the patients had no history of direct spinal injury and had no apparent symptoms related to the spinal injury in the initial period of trauma. PMID:27857928

  17. Time trends in outcome of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lovelock, C.E.; Rinkel, G.J.E.; Rothwell, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has changed substantially over the last 25 years but there is a lack of reliable population-based data on whether case-fatality or functional outcomes have improved. Methods: We determined changes in the standardized incidence and outcome of SAH in the same population between 1981 and 1986 (Oxford Community Stroke Project) and 2002 and 2008 (Oxford Vascular Study). In a meta-analysis with other population-based studies, we used linear regression to determine time trends in outcome. Results: There were no reductions in incidence of SAH (RR = 0.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.48–1.29, p = 0.34) and in 30-day case-fatality (RR = 0.67, 95% CI 0.39–1.13, p = 0.14) in the Oxford Vascular Study vs Oxford Community Stroke Project, but there was a decrease in overall mortality (RR = 0.47, 0.23–0.97, p = 0.04). Following adjustment for age and baseline SAH severity, patients surviving to hospital had reduced risk of death or dependency (modified Rankin score > 3) at 12 months in the Oxford Vascular Study (RR = 0.51, 0.29–0.88, p = 0.01). Among 32 studies covering 39 study periods from 1980 to 2005, 7 studied time trends within single populations. Unadjusted case-fatality fell by 0.9% per annum (0.3–1.5, p = 0.007) in a meta-analysis of data from all studies, and by 0.9% per annum (0.2–1.6%, p = 0.01) within the 7 population studies. Conclusion: Mortality due to subarachnoid hemorrhage fell by about 50% in our study population over the last 2 decades, due mainly to improved outcomes in cases surviving to reach hospital. This improvement is consistent with a significant decrease in case-fatality over the last 25 years in our pooled analysis of other similar population-based studies. GLOSSARY CI = confidence interval; mRS = modified Rankin score; OCSP = Oxford Community Stroke Project; OXVASC = Oxford Vascular Study; SAH = subarachnoid hemorrhage; WFNS = World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies

  18. Simulated pituitary apoplexy: report of an unusual case due to hemorrhage into hypothalamic astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Glew, W B

    1977-02-01

    An unusual case of acute bilateral loss of vision simulating pituitary apoplexy but due instead to a fatal hemorrhage into a hypothalamic glioma is reported. The clinician dealing with abrupt loss of vision must promptly rule out ocular and orbital causes and then proceed immediately to a consideration of the variety of intracranial lesions which may cause sudden visual loss. Uihlein and Rucker have listed them in descending order of frequency: pituitary adenoma, tumors of the optic nerve and chiasm, supraclinoid aneurysm, parasellar lesion, thrombosis of the carotid artery, hydrocephalus of the third ventricle, chiasmal arachnoiditis, fracture of the anterior cranial fossa, basofrontal tumor of the skull, and pseudotumor cerebri. Neurologic, ophthalmologic, and neuroradiologic evaluations should be obtained without delay and will usually define the lesion and point to the appropriate treatment.

  19. [Acquired hemorrhagic coagulopathy due to contact with the rodenticide brodifacoum in the Nutcracker bait].

    PubMed

    Voĭtsekhovskiĭ, V V; Pivnik, A V; Bitiutskaia, L G; Protsko, T T

    2012-01-01

    Rodenticide (RD) application is the most effective chemical procedure against rodents. RDs containing indirect-action anticoagulants have received currently wide acceptance. When the recommended standards for handling these agents and precautionary measures in their use are violated, there may be poisoning, the main manifestation of which is hemorrhagic coagulation. The paper provides a literature review on poisoning by RDs having anticoagulant properties. This communication gives a detailed description of a clinical case of poisoning with brodifacoum contained in the ready-to-use Nutcracker bait due to long-term exposure to the rat poison that has a cumulative effect. Careful history data collection and coagulogram analysis make it possible to establish a correct clinical diagnosis and to use appropriate therapy that leads to patient recovery.

  20. The Effects of Vasospasm and Re-Bleeding on the Outcome of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage from Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Filipce, Venko; Caparoski, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Vasospasm and re-bleeding after subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm are devastating complication that can severely affect the outcome of the patients. We are presenting a series of total number of 224 patients treated and operated at our Department due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, out of which certain number developed vasospasm and re-bleeding. We are evaluating the effect of these complications on the outcome of the patients according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale at the day of discharge. In our experience both vasospasm and ReSAH can significantly influence the outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

  1. Subarachnoid hemorrhage in Kashmir: Causes, risk factors, and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Abdul Rashid; AfzalWani, Mohammed; Kirmani, Altaf R.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Kashmir, a snow bound and mountain locked valley, is populated by about 7 million ethnic and non-migratory Kashmiris who have specific dietary and social habits than rest of the world. The neurological disorders are common in Kashmiri population. Aims: To study the prevalence and outcome of spontaneous intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in Kashmir compared withother parts of the world. Settings and Design: A retrospective and hospital based study from 1982 to 2010 in the single and only Neurosurgical Centre of the State of Jammu and Kashmir. Materials and Methods: A hospital based study, in which, information concerning all Kashmiri patients was collected from the case sheets, patient files, discharge certificates, death certificates, and telephonic conversations with the help of Medical Records Department and Central Admission Register of Sher–i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Kashmir India. Statistical Analysis: Analysis of variance and students T-test were used at occasions. Results: Incidence of SAH in Kashmiris is about 13/100,000 persons per year. SAH comprises 31.02% of total strokes and aneurysmal ruptures are cause of 54.35% SAHs. The female suffers 1.78 times more than the male. Total mortality of 36.60% was recorded against a good recovery of 14.99%. The familial SAHs and multiple aneurysms were also common. Intra-operative finding of larger aneurysmal size than recorded on pre-operative computed tomography (CT) angiogram of same patients was noteworthy. In 493 patients of SAH, the angiography revealed 705 aneurysms. Conclusion: Spontaneous intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage, due to aneurysmal rupture, is common in Kashmir, with worst outcome. Food habits like “salt-tea twice a day”, group-smoking of wet tobacco like “Jejeer”, winter season, female gender, hypertension, and inhalation of “Kangri” smoke are special risk factorsof SAH, in Kashmiris. The plain CT brain and CT angiography are best diagnostic tools. The

  2. Evaluation of a Murine Single-Blood-Injection SAH Model

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Clemens; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Schneider, Toni; Hänggi, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The molecular pathways underlying the pathogenesis after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) are poorly understood and continue to be a matter of debate. A valid murine SAH injection model is not yet available but would be the prerequisite for further transgenic studies assessing the mechanisms following SAH. Using the murine single injection model, we examined the effects of SAH on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the somatosensory (S1) and cerebellar cortex, neuro-behavioural and morphological integrity and changes in quantitative electrocorticographic and electrocardiographic parameters. Micro CT imaging verified successful blood delivery into the cisterna magna. An acute impairment of rCBF was observed immediately after injection in the SAH and after 6, 12 and 24 hours in the S1 and 6 and 12 hours after SAH in the cerebellum. Injection of blood into the foramen magnum reduced telemetric recorded total ECoG power by an average of 65%. Spectral analysis of ECoGs revealed significantly increased absolute delta power, i.e., slowing, cortical depolarisations and changes in ripples and fast ripple oscillations 12 hours and 24 hours after SAH. Therefore, murine single-blood-injection SAH model is suitable for pathophysiological and further molecular analysis following SAH. PMID:25545775

  3. Management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: State of the art and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Giovanni; Alafaci, Concetta; Macdonald, R. Loch

    2017-01-01

    Background: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) accounts for 5% of strokes and carries a poor prognosis. It affects around 6 cases per 100,000 patient years occurring at a relatively young age. Methods: Common risk factors are the same as for stroke, and only in a minority of the cases, genetic factors can be found. The overall mortality ranges from 32% to 67%, with 10–20% of patients with long-term dependence due to brain damage. An explosive headache is the most common reported symptom, although a wide spectrum of clinical disturbances can be the presenting symptoms. Brain computed tomography (CT) allow the diagnosis of SAH. The subsequent CT angiography (CTA) or digital subtraction angiography (DSA) can detect vascular malformations such as aneurysms. Non-aneurysmal SAH is observed in 10% of the cases. In patients surviving the initial aneurysmal bleeding, re-hemorrhage and acute hydrocephalus can affect the prognosis. Results: Although occlusion of an aneurysm by surgical clipping or endovascular procedure effectively prevents rebleeding, cerebral vasospasm and the resulting cerebral ischemia occurring after SAH are still responsible for the considerable morbidity and mortality related to such a pathology. A significant amount of experimental and clinical research has been conducted to find ways in preventing these complications without sound results. Conclusions: Even though no single pharmacological agent or treatment protocol has been identified, the main therapeutic interventions remain ineffective and limited to the manipulation of systemic blood pressure, alteration of blood volume or viscosity, and control of arterial dioxide tension. PMID:28217390

  4. Intraarticular hemorrhage due to bevacizumab in a patient with metastatic colorectal cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor. It is widely used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. It has some specific side effects including severe bleeding, wound healing problems, gastrointestinal perforation, proteinuria and hypertension. Case presentation We present the case of a 65-year old Asian man with synovial metastasis of the knee who experienced intraarticular hemorrhage after bevacizumab treatment. He presented with monoarthritis of the left knee. Conclusion Bevacizumab-related hemorrhage can cause serious morbidity and unusual sites of hemorrhage may be seen. PMID:22776219

  5. Subarachnoid hemorrhage in a case of segmental arterial mediolysis with coexisting intracranial and intraabdominal aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ryosuke; Hironaka, Yasuo; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Park, Young-Su; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2012-05-01

    The authors report the rare case of a 58-year-old man with segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) with associated intracranial and intraabdominal aneurysms, who suffered subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm. This disease primarily involves the intraabdominal arterial system, resulting in intraabdominal and retroperitoneal hemorrhage in most cases. The patient presented with severe headache and vomiting. The CT scans of the head revealed SAH. Cerebral angiography revealed 3 aneurysms: 1 in the right distal anterior cerebral artery (ACA), 1 in the distal portion of the A(1) segment of the right ACA, and 1 in the left vertebral artery. The patient had a history of multiple intraabdominal aneurysms involving the splenic, gastroepiploic, gastroduodenal, and bilateral renal arteries. He underwent a right frontotemporal craniotomy and fibrin coating of the dissecting aneurysm in the distal portion of the A(1) segment of the right ACA, which was the cause of the hemorrhage. Follow-up revealed no significant changes in the residual intracranial and intraabdominal aneurysms. An SAH due to SAM with associated multiple intraabdominal aneurysms is extremely rare. The authors describe their particular case and review the literature pertaining to SAM with associated intracranial and intraabdominal aneurysms.

  6. Histopathological Findings in Brains of Patients Who Died in the Acute Stage of Poor-grade Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    SATOMI, Junichiro; HADEISHI, Hiromu; YOSHIDA, Yasuji; SUZUKI, Akifumi; NAGAHIRO, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Patients with poor-grade aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are likely to die due to irreversible acute-stage primary brain damage. However, the mechanism(s) and pathology responsible for their high mortality rate remain unclear. We report our findings on the brains of individuals who died in the acute stage of SAH. An autopsy was performed on the brains of 11 SAH patients (World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade 5) who died within 3 days of admission and who did not receive respiratory assistance. All brains were free of intracranial hematoma and hydrocephalus; all harbored ruptured aneurysms. In all brains, multiple infarcts with perifocal edema were scattered throughout the cortex and subcortical white matter of the whole brain. Infarcts with a patchy – were more often seen than infarcts with a wedge-shaped pattern. Microscopic examination revealed multiple areas with cytotoxic edema and neuronal death indicative of acute ischemic changes. Edema and congestion were more obvious in areas where the subarachnoid clot tightly adhered to the pia mater. Pathologically, the brains of deceased patients with acute poor-grade SAH were characterized by edema and multifocal infarcts spread throughout the whole brain; they were thought to be attributable to venous ischemia. Diffuse disturbance in venous drainage attributable to an abrupt increase in the intracranial pressure and focal disturbances due to tight adhesion of the subarachnoid clot to the pia mater, may contribute strongly to irreversible brain damage in the acute stage of SAH. PMID:27357086

  7. Anterior circulation model of subarachnoid hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Attia, Mohammed Sabri; Loch Macdonald, R

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains one of the most morbid subtypes of stroke around the world and has been the focus of hemorrhagic stroke research for longer than five decades. Animal models have been instrumental in shaping the progress and advancement of SAH research, particularly models that allow for transgenic manipulation. The anterior circulation mouse model provides the research community with a rodent model that depicts very similar clinical findings of SAH; from the location of the hemorrhages to the secondary complications that arise after the hemorrhagic insult. The model allows for the recreation of clinically relevant findings such as large vessel vasospasm, oxidative stress, microcirculatory spasm and microthrombosis, and delayed neuronal injury - all of which appear in human cases of SAH. The model is also not technically demanding, is highly reproducible, and allows for an array of transgenic manipulation, which is essential for mechanistic investigations of the pathogenesis of SAH. The anterior circulation mouse model of SAH is one of a few models that are currently used in mice, and provides the research community with a relatively easy, reliable, and clinically relevant model of SAH - one that could be effectively be used to test for early brain injury (EBI) and delayed neurological injury after SAH.

  8. Fatal postpartum air embolism due to uterine inversion and atonic hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Banaschak, Sibylle; Janßen, Katharina; Becker, Katrin; Friedrich, Krischan; Rothschild, Markus A

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 19-year-old woman who developed a persistent uterine hemorrhage after spontaneous delivery of a healthy child. Emergency laparotomy was indicated and then begun under stable circulatory conditions. Cardiac arrest occurred during the course of massive manual compression and packing of the uterus. After successful resuscitation, a supracervical hysterectomy was performed. During the suturing of the remaining cervix, a second cardiac arrest followed. The procedure was completed under constant external heart massage. Resuscitation was terminated due to the persistence of widened pupils. An autopsy was ordered by the public prosecutor as the manner of death was declared to be unascertained. An X-ray and a CT scan prior to the autopsy showed extensive gas embolism in both arterial and venous vessels extending from the pelvic region to the head. During the autopsy, gas was collected by aspirometer from the right ventricle of the heart. The autopsy showed no additional relevant findings, and gas analysis confirmed the suspicion of air embolism. The histological examination of the excised uterus especially in the corpus/fundus revealed an edema of the local smooth muscle cells and dilated vessels showing no sign of thrombogenesis. Upon evaluation of the clinical records, it became evident that, in addition to uterine atony, there had been a complete uterine inversion. This inversion was manually repositioned. After this maneuver, manual compression was performed. The air embolism, thus, was a complication of the manual repositioning of the uterine inversion. There is no evidence for other possible entries of the detected gas. In order to perform an effective exploration, the availability of all clinical records should be mandatory for medico-legal investigations of unexpected postpartum deaths.

  9. Neuroinflammation responses after subarachnoid hemorrhage: A review.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Vera Zhiyuan; Wong, George Kwok Chu

    2017-03-13

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is an important cause of stroke mortality and morbidity, especially in the young stroke population. Recent evidences indicate that neuroinflammation plays a critical role in both early brain injury and the delayed brain deterioration after SAH, including cellular and molecular components. Cerebral vasospasm (CV) can lead to death after SAH and independently correlated with poor outcome. Neuroinflammation is evidenced to contribute to the etiology of vasospasm. Besides, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) commonly occurs in the SAH patients, with the presence of non-infectious fever and systematic complications. In this review, we summarize the evidences that indicate the prominent role of inflammation in the pathophysiology of SAH. That may provide the potential implications on diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  10. Aphasia and unilateral spatial neglect due to acute thalamic hemorrhage: clinical correlations and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Aiko; Maeshima, Shinichiro

    2016-04-01

    Thalamic hemorrhages are associated with a variety of cognitive dysfunctions, and it is well known that such cognitive changes constitute a limiting factor of recovery of the activities of daily living (ADL). The relationship between cognitive dysfunction and hematomas is unclear. In this study, we investigated the relationship between aphasia/neglect and hematoma volume, hematoma type, and the ADL. One hundred fifteen patients with thalamic hemorrhage (70 men and 45 women) were studied. Their mean age was 68.9 ± 10.3 years, and patients with both left and right lesions were included. We calculated hematoma volume and examined the presence or absence of aphasia/neglect and the relationships between these dysfunctions and hematoma volume, hematoma type, and the ADL. Fifty-nine patients were found to have aphasia and 35 were found to have neglect. Although there was no relationship between hematoma type and cognitive dysfunction, hematoma volume showed a correlation with the severity of cognitive dysfunction. The ADL score and ratio of patient discharge for patients with aphasia/neglect were lower than those for patients without aphasia/neglect. We observed a correlation between the hematoma volume in thalamic hemorrhage and cognitive dysfunction. Aphasia/neglect is found frequently in patients with acute thalamic hemorrhage and may influence the ADL.

  11. Coiled coils and SAH domains in cytoskeletal molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    Cytoskeletal motors include myosins, kinesins and dyneins. Myosins move along tracks of actin filaments, whereas kinesins and dyneins move along microtubules. Many of these motors are involved in trafficking cargo in cells. However, myosins are mostly monomeric, whereas kinesins are mostly dimeric, owing to the presence of a coiled coil. Some myosins (myosins 6, 7 and 10) contain an SAH (single α-helical) domain, which was originally thought to be a coiled coil. These myosins are now known to be monomers, not dimers. The differences between SAH domains and coiled coils are described and the potential roles of SAH domains in molecular motors are discussed.

  12. Effect of early mobilization and rehabilitation on complications in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Karic, Tanja; Røe, Cecilie; Nordenmark, Tonje Haug; Becker, Frank; Sorteberg, Wilhelm; Sorteberg, Angelika

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Early rehabilitation is effective in an array of acute neurological disorders but it is not established as part of treatment guidelines after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). This may in part be due to the fear of aggravating the development of cerebral vasospasm, which is the most feared complication of aSAH. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of early rehabilitation and mobilization on complications during the acute phase and within 90 days after aSAH. METHODS This was a prospective, interventional study that included patients with aSAH at the neuro-intermediate ward after aneurysm repair. The control group received standard treatment, whereas the early rehab group underwent early rehabilitation and mobilization in addition to standard treatment. Clinical and radiological characteristics of patients with aSAH, progression in mobilization, and treatment variables were registered. The frequency and severity of cerebral vasospasm, cerebral infarction acquired in conjunction with the aSAH, and acute and chronic hydrocephalus, as well as pulmonary and thromboembolic complications, were compared between the 2 groups. RESULTS Clinical and radiological characteristics of patients with aSAH were similar between the groups. The early rehab group was mobilized beginning on the first day after aneurysm repair. The significantly quicker and higher degree of mobilization in the early rehab group did not increase complications. Clinical cerebral vasospasm was not as frequent in the early rehab group and it also tended to be less severe. Each step of mobilization achieved during the first 4 days after aneurysm repair reduced the risk of severe vasospasm by 30%. Acute and chronic hydrocephalus were similar in both groups, but there was a tendency toward earlier shunt implantation among patients in the control group. Pulmonary infections, thromboembolic events, and death before discharge or within 90 days after the ictus were similar between the 2

  13. Recurrent Hemorrhagic Pericardial Effusion and Tamponade due to Filariasis Successfully Treated with Ivermectin and Albendazole.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Goel, Amit; Sachan, Mohit; Saraf, Sameer; Verma, Chandra Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Filariasis presenting with pericardial effusion with tamponade is rare. We report a case of a 30-year-old female who was admitted with severe dyspnea and chest pain since 2 days. Echocardiogram showed massive pericardial effusion with tamponade. Pericardial fluid aspiration drained 1.2 L of hemorrhagic fluid. Cytology examination revealed microfilaria of Wuchereria bancrofti. She was treated with diethyl carbamazine and discharged. Six weeks later, she presented again with massive pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade. Pericardiocentesis was done. Cytology examination revealed microfilaria of W. bancrofti. This time she was treated with ivermectin and albendazole and cured. Hemorrhagic effusion resolved completely. Though relatively uncommon, tropical diseases must always be considered in the etiological diagnosis of recurrent pericardial effusion.

  14. Syringomyelia and arachnoid cysts associated with spinal arachnoiditis following subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ishizaka, Shunsuke; Hayashi, Kentaro; Otsuka, Munehiro; Fukuda, Shuji; Tsunoda, Keishi; Ushijima, Ryujiro; Kitagawa, Naoki; Suyama, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Izumi

    2012-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman with primary Sjogren syndrome developed syringomyelia following two episodes of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to the rupture of basilar artery aneurysms. Gait disturbance and abnormal sensation with pain over the foot and abdomen appeared 3 years after the last SAH. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a syringomyelia throughout the thoracic cord, from the T2 to T11 levels. In addition, the thoracic cord was compressed by multiple arachnoid cysts in the ventral side of spinal cord. Computed tomography myelography revealed complete block of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow at the T7 level. Surgery for microlysis of the adhesions and restoration of the CSF flow pathway was performed. Postoperatively, leg motor function slowly improved and she could walk unaided. However, abdominal paresthesia was persisted. Postoperative MR imaging revealed diminished size of the syrinxes. We should recognize syringomyelia and arachnoid cysts due to adhesive arachnoiditis as a late complication of SAH. Microlysis of the adhesions focusing on the lesion thought to be the cause of the symptoms is one of the choices to treat massive syringomyelia and arachnoid cysts associated with arachnoiditis following SAH.

  15. Spinal axis imaging in non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Germans, Menno R; Coert, Bert A; Majoie, Charles B L M; van den Berg, René; Verbaan, Dagmar; Vandertop, W Peter

    2014-11-01

    In 15 % of all spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhages (SAH), no intracranial vascular pathology is found. Those non-aneurysmal hemorrhages are categorized into perimesencephalic SAH (PMSAH) and non-perimesencephalic SAH (NPSAH). Searching for spinal pathology might reveal a cause for the hemorrhage in some patients. Our goal was to assess the yield of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the complete spinal axis in search for a spinal origin in non-aneurysmal SAH. In a prospective, observational study at a tertiary SAH referral center, we assessed clinical and radiological characteristics of patients who consecutively presented with spontaneous non-aneurysmal SAH, diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) or lumbar puncture, and negative CT angiography and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Eligible patients were enrolled for investigation of the complete spinal axis by standard T1- and T2-weighted MR-imaging. Ninety-seven non-aneurysmal SAH patients were included in the study. Baseline characteristics were comparable between PMSAH and NPSAH patients. DSA and spinal MR-imaging were performed in 95 and 91 % of patients, respectively. This revealed one lumbar ependymoma in a 43-year-old male who was diagnosed by LP (yield 1 %). No spinal origin for the SAH was found in 51 PMSAH patients. The yield of MR-imaging of the complete spinal axis in spontaneous non-aneurysmal SAH patients is low. Routine radiological investigation of the spinal axis in non-aneurysmal SAH patients is therefore not recommended.

  16. Controversies and Evolving New Mechanisms in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Feng, Hua; Sherchan, Prativa; Klebe, Damon; Zhao, Gang; Sun, Xiaochuan; Zhang, Jianmin; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite decades of study, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) continues to be a serious and significant health problem in the United States and worldwide. The mechanisms contributing to brain injury after SAH remain unclear. Traditionally, most in vivo research has heavily emphasized the basic mechanisms of SAH over the pathophysiological or morphological changes of delayed cerebral vasospasm after SAH. Unfortunately, the results of clinical trials based on this premise have mostly been disappointing, implicating some other pathophysiological factors, independent of vasospasm, as contributors to poor clinical outcomes. Delayed cerebral vasospasm is no longer the only culprit. In this review, we summarize recent data from both experimental and clinical studies of SAH and discuss the vast array of physiological dysfunctions following SAH that ultimately lead to cell death. Based on the progress in neurobiological understanding of SAH, the terms “early brain injury” and “delayed brain injury” are used according to the temporal progression of SAH-induced brain injury. Additionally, a new concept of the vasculo-neuronal-glia triad model for SAH study is highlighted and presents the challenges and opportunities of this model for future SAH applications. PMID:24076160

  17. [Pharyngeal hemorrhaging due to iatrogenic false aneurysm. Complication after cannulation of the internal jugular vein].

    PubMed

    Kreckel, V; Langwara, H

    2009-03-01

    Catheterization of the internal jugular vein is used for temporary access to the central vein in patients with acute or chronic renal failure. The most frequent problem is the arterial puncture and accidental placement of the large catheter in an artery. This case report describes a rare secondary complication by accidental catheterization of the right common carotid artery after intended dual lumen catheter insertion into the right internal jugular vein. A false aneurysm with pharyngeal hemorrhaging developed 2 weeks after the puncture. The diagnosis was made using colour-Doppler ultrasound and the aneurysm was treated with vascular surgery.

  18. Extreme volume expansion of a vestibular schwannoma due to intratumoral hemorrhage after gamma knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Miki, Shunichiro; Ishikawa, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Akutsu, Hiroyoshi; Matsuda, Masahide; Sakamoto, Noriaki; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-07-01

    A 48-year-old man with right hemi-facial palsy and cerebellar ataxia was referred to our hospital. Three years and 10 months earlier he had undergone gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) at the referring hospital for an 18 mm right vestibular schwannoma. Slight tumor enlargement had been observed on MRI performed at the referring hospital 3 years after the GKRS. On close follow-up after another 6 months an MRI showed an obvious enlargement of the tumor. An MRI on admission revealed an iso-intense mass lesion measuring 36 mm in maximum diameter at the right cerebellopontine angle. A two stage surgery was conducted using a retrosigmoid approach because bleeding from the tumor wall was difficult to control intraoperatively during the first operation. At the second operation, the majority of the tumor capsule had converted to necrotic tissue. A large hematoma cavity was present inside the tumor capsule which explained the rapid increase in size over a short period of time. Near total removal was achieved. Histopathological examination revealed massive intratumoral hemorrhage within a typical vestibular schwannoma with no malignancy. The complication of intratumoral hemorrhage is very rare and the utility of stereotactic radiation surgery/therapy, including GKRS, for vestibular schwannoma is well known. However, we must emphasize that careful follow-up is still required, even after several years.

  19. Prevalence and clinical demographics of cerebral salt wasting in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kao, Lily; Al-Lawati, Zahraa; Vavao, Joli; Steinberg, Gary K; Katznelson, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a frequent complication following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and is commonly attributed either to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) or cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSW). The object of this study is to elucidate the clinical demographics and sequelae of hyponatremia due to CSW in subjects with aneurysmal SAH. Retrospective chart review of patients >18 years with aneurysmal SAH admitted between January 2004 and July 2007 was performed. Subjects with moderate to severe hyponatremia (serum sodium <130 mmol l(-1)) were divided into groups consistent with CSW and SIADH based on urine output, fluid balance, natriuresis, and response to saline infusion. Clinical demographics were compared. Of 316 subjects identified, hyponatremia (serum sodium <135 mmol l(-1)) was detected in 187 (59.2%) subjects and moderate to severe hyponatremia in 48 (15.2%). Of the latter group, 35.4% were categorized with SIADH and 22.9% with CSW. Compared to eunatremic subjects, hyponatremia was associated with significantly longer hospital stay (15.7 +/- 1.9 vs. 9.6 +/- 1.1 days, p < 0.001). Subjects with CSW had similar mortality and duration of hospital stay vs. those with SIADH. Though less common than SIADH, CSW was detected in approximately 23% of patients with history of aneurysmal SAH and was not clearly associated with enhanced morbidity and mortality compared to subjects with SIADH. Further studies regarding the pathogenesis and management, along with the medical consequences, of CSW are important.

  20. Angiopoietin-1 and Angiopoietin-2 Expression Imbalance Influence in Early Period After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Microvascular endothelial integrity is important for maintaining the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) disrupts this integrity, making the BBB dysfunctional—an important pathophysiological change after SAH. Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) and angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) regulate microvascular permeability by balancing each other’s expression. Methods This study investigated the dynamics of Ang-1 and Ang-2 expression after SAH and the protective effect of Ang-1 on BBB functioning using an endovascular puncture model of rat SAH. The Ang-1 and Ang-2 expression in brain tissue was determined by immunohistochemistry. In addition, Western blotting was used to estimate Ang-1 and Ang-2 concentration and to compare them at 6–72 hours post-SAH cortex and hippocampus. Evans blue viability assay was used to evaluate BBB permeability, and neurological testing was implemented to evaluate neurological impairment during SAH. Results It was found that following SAH, Ang-1 expression decreases and Ang-2 expression increases in the cortex, hippocampus, and microvessels. The Ang-1/Ang-2 ratio decreased as quickly as 6 hours after SAH and reached its lowest 1 day after SAH. Finally, it was found that exogenous Ang-1 reduces SAH-associated BBB leakage and improves neurological function in post-SAH rats. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the equilibrium between Ang-1 and Ang-2 is broken in a period shortly after SAH, and the treatment of exogenous Ang-1 injection alleviates neurological dysfunctions through decreasing BBB destruction. PMID:28043115

  1. An experimental study of the acute stage of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, K; Kuyama, H; Symon, L

    1983-12-01

    A baboon model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has been developed to study the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), intracranial pressure (ICP), and cerebral edema associated with the acute stage of SAH. In this model, hemorrhage was caused by avulsion of the posterior communicating artery via a periorbital approach, with the orbit sealed and ICP restored to normal before SAH was produced. Local CBF was measured in six sites in the two hemispheres, and ICP monitored by an implanted extradural transducer. Following sacrifice of the animal, the effect of the induced SAH on ICP, CBF, autoregulation, and CO2 reactivity in the two hemispheres was assessed. Brain water measurements were also made in areas of gray and white matter corresponding to areas of blood flow measurements, and also in the deep nuclei. Two principal patterns of ICP change were found following SAH; one group of animals showed a return to baseline ICP quite quickly and the other maintained high ICP for over an hour. The CBF was reduced after SAH to nearly 20% of control values in all areas, and all areas showed impaired autoregulation. Variable changes in CO2 reactivity were evident, but on the side of the hemorrhage CO2 reactivity was predominantly reduced. Differential increase in pressure lasting for over 7 minutes was evident soon after SAH on the side of the ruptured vessel. There was a significant increase of water in all areas, and in cortex and deep nuclei as compared to control animals.

  2. Seizures and Epileptiform Patterns in SAH and Their Relation to Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Carolina B; Gilmore, Emily J

    2016-06-01

    In subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), seizures are frequent and occur at different time points, likely reflecting heterogeneous pathophysiology. Young patients, those with more severe SAH (by clot burden or presence of severe mental status changes at onset or focal neurologic deficits at any time), those with associated increased cortical irritation (by infarction or presence of underlying hematoma), and patients undergoing craniotomy are at higher risk. Advanced neurophysiologic monitoring allows for seizure burden quantification, identification of subclinical seizures, and interictal patterns as well as neurovascular complications that may have an independent impact on the outcome in this population. Practice regarding seizure prophylaxis varies widely; its institution is often guided by the risk-benefit ratio of seizures and medication side effects. Newer anticonvulsants seem to be equally effective and may have a more favorable profile. However, questions regarding the association of seizures and vasospasm, the therapeutic dosing, timing, and duration of antiepileptic treatment and the impact of seizures and antiepileptics on the outcome remain unanswered. In this review, we provide a broad overview of the work in this area and offer a diagnostic and therapeutic approach based on our own expert opinion.

  3. Subarachnoid hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... snapping feeling in the head. Other symptoms: Decreased consciousness and alertness Eye discomfort in bright light ( photophobia ) ... time, the outlook is much worse. Changes in consciousness and alertness due to a subarachnoid hemorrhage may ...

  4. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Promotes Proliferation, Differentiation, and Migration of Neural Stem Cells via BDNF Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Di; Wang, Kuo-Chuan; Tsai, Yi-Fen; Chou, Pin-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Chien, Chung-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Patients who suffer from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) usually have long-term neurological impairments. Endogenous neurogenesis might play a potential role in functional recovery after SAH; however, the underlying neurogenesis mechanism is still unclear. We assessed the extent of neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) to better understand the neurogenesis mechanism after SAH. We performed a rat model of SAH to examine the extent of neurogenesis in the SVZ and assessed functional effects of the neurotrophic factors in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on neural stem cells (NSCs) after SAH. In this study, the proliferation, differentiation, and migratory capacities of NSCs in the SVZ were significantly increased on days 5 and 7 post SAH. Furthermore, treatment of cultured rat fetal NSCs with the CSF collected from rats on days 5 and 7 post SAH enhanced their proliferation, differentiation, and migration. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of the CSF detected a marked increase in the concentration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Treating the cultured NSCs with recombinant BDNF (at the same concentration as that in the CSF) or with CSF from SAH rats, directly, stimulated proliferation, differentiation, and migration to a similar extent. BDNF expression was upregulated in the SVZ of rats on days 5 and 7 post SAH, and BDNF release occurred from NSCs, astrocytes, and microglia in the SVZ. These results indicate that SAH triggers the expression of BDNF, which promotes the proliferation, differentiation, and migration of NSCs in the SVZ after SAH. PMID:27832087

  5. Cerebral salt wasting in subarachnoid hemorrhage rats: model, mechanism, and tool.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Jun; Katayama, Yoichi; Moro, Nobuhiro; Kawai, Hiroyuki; Yoneko, Maki; Mori, Tatsuro

    2005-04-01

    Cerebral salt wasting (CSW) frequently occurs concomitantly with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). CSW induces excessive natriuresis and osmotic diuresis, and reduces total blood volume. As a result, the risk of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm may be elevated. Therefore, it is important to determine the mechanism of CSW. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the rat SAH model exhibits CSW and to investigate the relationship between CSW and natriuretic peptides. A SAH model was produced in 24 rats by perforating a cerebral artery with a nylon thread up through the common carotid artery. To evaluate CSW, urine was cumulatively collected from SAH onset to 12 hours and sodium (Na) excretion was analyzed. Body weight and hematocrit were analyzed before and after SAH onset. Concentrations of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in plasma were also analyzed. Urine volume and total Na excretion of SAH rats were significantly higher than those of sham rats (p<0.05). Body weight of SAH rats significantly decreased and hematocrit significantly increased (p < 0.05). ANP concentration was significantly decreased in SAH rats (p<0.05). However, BNP concentrations did not change. This study demonstrated for the first time that a rat SAH model exhibited CSW. It was suggested that the cause of CSW was neither ANP nor BNP. In addition, this rat SAH model will be useful for study of CSW after SAH.

  6. Mainly adrenal gland involving NK/T-cell nasal type lymphoma diagnosed with delay due to mimicking adrenal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seon Mee; Kim, Woong Ji; Lee, Kyung Ae; Baek, Hong Sun; Park, Tae Sun; Jin, Heung Yong

    2011-10-01

    A 29-yr-old man, presented with abdominal pain and fever, had an initial computed tomography (CT) scan revealing low attenuation of both adrenal glands. The initial concern was for tuberculous adrenalitis or autoimmune adrenalitis combined with adrenal hemorrhage. The patient started empirical anti-tuberculous medication, but there was no improvement. Enlargement of cervical lymph nodes were developed after that and excisional biopsy of cervical lymph nodes was performed. Pathological finding of excised lymph nodes was compatible to NK/T-cell lymphoma. The patient died due to the progression of the disease even after undergoing therapeutic trials including chemotherapy. Lymphoma mainly involving adrenal gland in the early stage of the disease is rare and the vast majority of cases that have been reported were of B-cell origin. From this case it is suggested that extra-nodal NK/T-cell lymphoma should be considered as a cause of bilateral adrenal masses although it is rare.

  7. Current management and treatment of cerebral vasospasm complicating SAH.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Anna Luisa; Balami, Joyce Saleh; Grunwald, Iris Quasar

    2013-03-01

    Cerebral vasospasm is a common and serious complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. Despite the improvements in treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH), cerebral vasospasm complicating aSAH has remained the main cause of morbidity and mortality. Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH)-induced vasospasm is a complex entity caused by vasculopathy, impaired autoregulation, and hypovolaemia, causing a regional reduction of cerebral brain perfusion which can then induce ischaemia. Cerebral vasospasm can present either asymptomatically detected only radiologically or symptomatically (delayed ischaemic neurologic deficit). The various diagnostic approaches include the use of transcranial doppler, digital subtraction angiography and multimodal computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) techniques. Although digital subtraction angiography is usually the gold standard for the diagnosis of cerebral vasospam, transcranial doppler is commonly the first-screening method for the detection of cerebral vasospam. The treatment of subarachnoid haemorrhage -induced vasospasm include the use of both medical and endovascular therapy. The aim of this review is to discuss the various current therapeutic options and future perspective measures for reducing cerebral vasospasm induced stroke after SAH.

  8. [Complete remission of consciousness disturbances and spasticity due to a severe subarachnoid hemorrhage after intrathecal baclofen therapy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Asahi, Takashi; Kashiwazaki, Daina; Koh, Masaki; Matsumura, Nobuhisa; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2015-03-01

    Typically, intrathecal baclofen therapy(ITB)for spasticity is continuously required because the spasticity can recur if the ITB is stopped. Thus, an infusion pump for the ITB is permanently implanted. Some sporadic cases exhibiting remarkable improvements in their spasticity and consciousness disturbances have been reported after implanting the ITB pump. We experienced a rare case involving removal of the ITB pump after the spasticity resolved and the consciousness disturbances markedly improved. A 15-year-old girl developed a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of an aneurysm in the right anterior cerebral artery. Her initial Glasgow Coma Scale score was 4(E1V1M2). Trapping of the aneurysm and decompression craniotomy were performed. Subsequently, she underwent a tracheotomy, and a percutaneous gastrostomy(PEG)tube was implanted because of persistent consciousness disturbances. Cranioplasty and lumbar-peritoneal shunt for normal pressure hydrocephalus were performed after 1 month. An ITB pump was implanted to improve the spasticity observed mainly in the lower extremities 61 days after hemorrhage onset. Right hemiparesis remained due to Kernohan's notch. After transfer to the rehabilitation hospital, her consciousness disturbances and spasticity remarkably improved(1.9 to 1.0 and 3.5 to 1.0 on the Ashworth scale for the upper and lower extremities, respectively). The tracheostomy and PEG tubes were removed, and the baclofen dose was gradually reduced. She was completely off baclofen after 7 months, and she was discharged with a short leg brace and a cane for walking. The baclofen pump was then removed. In this case, temporary ITB improved the spasticity and consciousness disturbances.

  9. [Simvastatin efficacy in vasospasm treatment in patients after aneurysm SAH].

    PubMed

    Shekhtman, O D; Éliava, Sh Sh; Belousova, O B; Tseĭtlin, A M; Okishev, D N; Sarshaev, M A

    2012-01-01

    Number of trials had previously demonstrated cerebroprotective effect of statin therapy in SAH patients. Aim of the current study was to assess effects of simvastatin on vasospasm in clinical practice. The study group comprised 35 patients admitted to Burdenko Neurosurgery Institute with aneurysmal SAH in 2007-2011. All patients were treated with surgery within 14 days post-SAH and received simvastatin 40 mg/day. Mean age was 46,5 (16-69) years, male: female ratio - 20:15, Hunt-Hess scale breakdown: I - 7 (20%), II - 12 (34.3%), III - 11 (31.4%), IV - 4 (11.4%), V - 1 (2.8%). In 31 (88.6%) patients aneurysm was clipped, in 4 (11.4%)--coiled. Outcomes at discharge and at follow-up (modified Rankin scale), vasospasm dynamics, delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND), duration of hospital stay and number of home discharged patients were evaluated and analyzed in comparison to control group (n = 30). Statin group did not demonstrated valid difference in immediate and late outcomes (mean 20,5 month), risk of DIND, length of hospital stay and percentage of discharged home patients. Statin group showed significantly lower rates of vasospam progression--42.9% vs. 76.7% in control (chi2-test, p = 0.01). Our evidence corresponds with outcomes of international trials of statin application in SAH patients. As follows from our results and existing randomized and clinical trials data there is no strong evidence nowadays to recommend statin prescription in SAH patients.

  10. [Effect of normobaric hyperoxia on cerebral oxygenation, metabolism and oxidative stress in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by intracranial aneurysm rupture].

    PubMed

    Solodov, A A; Petrikov, S S; Klychnikova, E V; Tazina, E V; Krylov, V V; Godkov, M A; Khamidova, L T

    2013-01-01

    The development of cerebral vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to cerebral aneurysms rupture results in cerebral circulation disturbances. Application of normobaric hyperoxia can be an effective way for improving of oxygen delivery to injured brain tissues. The purpose of this study was to assess of normobaric hyperoxia influence on intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral oxygenation and metabolism, oxidative stress and endogenous factors of vascular regulation in II critically ill patients with nontraumatic SAH due to cerebral aneurysms rupture. Increase of FiO2 from 0.3 to 0.5 and 1.0 was accompanied with brain oxygen tension (PbrO2) increase and cerebral extraction ratio for oxygen (O2ER) decrease. Application of normobaric hyperoxia had no effect on ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure, arterial blood pressure and cerebral metabolism. The results obtained from patients with nontraumatic SAH showed an evident increase of oxidative stress which had a significant effect on vascular endothelial function, causing an imbalance in the endogenous regulation of vascular tone. Application of normobaric hyperoxia was not accompanied by an increase of free-radical processes in critically ill patients with nontraumatic SAH due to cerebral aneurysms rupture.

  11. Deficiency of tenascin-C and attenuation of blood-brain barrier disruption following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Masashi; Shiba, Masato; Kawakita, Fumihiro; Liu, Lei; Shimojo, Naoshi; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Tenascin-C (TNC), a matricellular protein, is induced in the brain following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The authors investigated if TNC causes brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption following experimental SAH. METHODS C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) or TNC knockout (TNKO) mice were subjected to SAH by endovascular puncture. Ninety-seven mice were randomly allocated to WT sham-operated (n = 16), TNKO sham-operated (n = 16), WT SAH (n = 34), and TNKO SAH (n = 31) groups. Mice were examined by means of neuroscore and brain water content 24-48 hours post-SAH; and Evans blue dye extravasation and Western blotting of TNC, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and zona occludens (ZO)-1 at 24 hours post-SAH. As a separate study, 16 mice were randomized to WT sham-operated, TNKO sham-operated, WT SAH, and TNKO SAH groups (n = 4 in each group), and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) was immunohistochemically evaluated at 24 hours post-SAH. Moreover, 40 TNKO mice randomly received an intracerebroventricular injection of TNC or phosphate-buffered saline, and effects of exogenous TNC on brain edema and BBB disruption following SAH were studied. RESULTS Deficiency of endogenous TNC prevented neurological impairments, brain edema formation, and BBB disruption following SAH; it was also associated with the inhibition of both MMP-9 induction and ZO-1 degradation. Endogenous TNC deficiency also inhibited post-SAH MAPK activation in brain capillary endothelial cells. Exogenous TNC treatment abolished the neuroprotective effects shown in TNKO mice with SAH. CONCLUSIONS Tenascin-C may be an important mediator in the development of brain edema and BBB disruption following SAH, mechanisms for which may involve MAPK-mediated MMP-9 induction and ZO-1 degradation. TNC could be a molecular target against which to develop new therapies for SAH-induced brain injuries.

  12. Case Studies in Cardiac Dysfunction After Acute Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Jason C.; Korn-Naveh, Lauren; Crago, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) often present with more than just neurological compromise. A wide spectrum of complicating cardiopulmonary abnormalities have been documented in patients with acute SAH, presenting additional challenges to the healthcare providers who attempt to treat and stabilize these patients. The patients described in this article presented with both acute aneurysmal SAH and cardiopulmonary compromise. Education and further research on this connection is needed to provide optimal care and outcomes for this vulnerable population. Nurses play a key role in balancing the critical and diverse needs of patients presenting with these symptoms. PMID:18856247

  13. Myocarditis in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage: A histopathologic study.

    PubMed

    van der Bilt, Ivo A C; Vendeville, Jean-Paul; van de Hoef, Tim P; Begieneman, Mark P V; Lagrand, Wim K; Kros, Johan M; Wilde, Arthur A M; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Niessen, Hans W M

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac abnormalities after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) such as electrocardiographic changes, echocardiographic wall motion abnormalities, and elevated troponin levels are independently associated with a poor prognosis. They are caused by catecholaminergic stress coinciding with influx of inflammatory cells into the heart. These abnormalities could be a sign of a myocarditis, potentially giving insight in pathophysiology and treatment options. These inflammatory cells are insufficiently characterized, and it is unknown whether myocarditis is associated with SAH. Myocardium of 25 patients who died of SAH and 18 controls was stained with antibodies identifying macrophages (CD68), lymphocytes (CD45), and neutrophil granulocytes (myeloperoxidase). Myocytolysis was visualized using complement staining (C3d). CD31 was used to identify putative thrombi. We used Mann-Whitney U testing for analysis. In the myocardium of SAH patients, the amount of myeloperoxidase-positive (P < .005), CD45-positive (P < .0005), and CD68-positive (P < .0005) cells was significantly higher compared to controls. Thrombi in intramyocardial arteries were found in 22 SAH patients and 1 control. Myocytolysis was found in 6 SAH patients but not in controls. Myocarditis, consisting of an influx of neutrophil granulocytes, lymphocytes, and macrophages, coinciding with myocytolysis and thrombi in intramyocardial arteries, occurs in patients with SAH but not in controls. These findings might explain the cardiac abnormalities after SAH and may have implications for treatment.

  14. Pituitary hormone level changes and hypxonatremia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    MAIMAITILI, AISHA; MAIMAITILI, MIJITI; REXIDAN, AIKEREMU; LU, JUNYI; AJIMU, KUERBAN; CHENG, XIAOJIANG; LUO, KUN; SAILIKE, DUISHANBAI; LIU, YUAN; KAHEERMAN, KADEER; TANG, CHANGJIU; ZHANG, TINGRONG

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in serum pituitary hormone levels and the mechanism of hyponatremia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Nuclear medical tests and serum electrolyte monitoring were performed in 49 aneurysmal SAH cases and 10 healthy volunteers. The levels of serum pituitary hormones were significantly higher in the SAH patients compared with the control group on days 1–3 and 7–9 after SAH onset (P<0.05). The peak value occurred on days 7–9. The rate of hyponatremia was 49.0% in the 49 SAH patients. The incidence of severe hyponatremia was significantly higher in Fisher grades III–IV and Hunt-Hess grades III–IV compared with Fisher grades I–II and Hunt-Hess grades I–II, respectively (P<0.05). There was no correlation between the site of aneurysm and the rate of hyponatremia. The incidence of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm was significantly higher in the hyponatremia group and Fisher grades III–IV compared with the normal serum sodium group and Fisher grades I–II, respectively. Serum pituitary hormone levels were positively correlated with blood loss and disease severity in patients with aneurysmal SAH. Hyponatremia may be considered an important indicator of SAH. SAH patients are likely to benefit from intense monitoring and regulation of serum sodium. PMID:23837049

  15. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Models: Do They Need a Fix?

    PubMed Central

    Sehba, Fatima A.; Pluta, Ryszard M.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of tissue plasminogen activator to treat acute stroke is a success story of research on preventing brain injury following transient cerebral ischemia (TGI). That this discovery depended upon development of embolic animal model reiterates that proper stroke modeling is the key to develop new treatments. In contrast to TGI, despite extensive research, prevention or treatment of brain injury following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) has not been achieved. A lack of adequate aSAH disease model may have contributed to this failure. TGI is an important component of aSAH and shares mechanism of injury with it. We hypothesized that modifying aSAH model using experience acquired from TGI modeling may facilitate development of treatment for aSAH and its complications. This review focuses on similarities and dissimilarities between TGI and aSAH, discusses the existing TGI and aSAH animal models, and presents a modified aSAH model which effectively mimics the disease and has a potential of becoming a better resource for studying the brain injury mechanisms and developing a treatment. PMID:23878760

  16. Melatonin mitigate cerebral vasospasm after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage: a study of synchrotron radiation angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, J.; He, C.; Chen, L.; Han, T.; Huang, S.; Huang, Y.; Bai, Y.; Bao, Y.; Zhang, H.; Ling, F.

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating and unsolved clinical issue. In this study, the rat models, which had been induced SAH by prechiasmatic cistern injection, were treated with melatonin. Synchrotron radiation angiography (SRA) was employed to detect and evaluate CV of animal models. Neurological scoring and histological examinations were used to assess the neurological deficits and CV as well. Using SRA techniques and histological analyses, the anterior cerebral artery diameters of SAH rats with melatonin administration were larger than those without melatonin treatment (p < 0.05). The neurological deficits of SAH rats treated with melatonin were less than those without melatonin treatment (p < 0.05). We concluded that SRA was a precise and in vivo tool to observe and evaluate CV of SAH rats; intraperitoneally administration of melatonin could mitigate CV after experimental SAH.

  17. Ischemic optic neuropathy associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage after rupture of anterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Hara, Naoto; Mukuno, Kazuo; Ohtaka, Hironori; Shimizu, Kimiya

    2003-01-01

    Two clinical cases in which ischemic optic neuropathy (ION) occurred after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are reported. Hemorrhage in the proximity of the optic chiasm was confirmed in 2 cases following rupture of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Optic disk atrophy with excavation and permanent visual field defect (altitudinal superior hemianopia) occurred in both cases. ION seems to occur in association with the optic nerve coincidental with the hyperdensity side of SAH on head CT scan. The incidence of ION appears to be attributable to an insufficient blood supply to arteries distributed in the posterior part of the optic nerve as a result of SAH.

  18. Methazolamide improves neurological behavior by inhibition of neuron apoptosis in subarachnoid hemorrhage mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingchang; Wang, Wei; Mai, Haojian; Zhang, Xinmu; Wang, Jian; Gao, Yufeng; Wang, Yuefei; Deng, Gang; Gao, Ling; Zhou, Shuanhu; Chen, Qianxue; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) results in significant nerve dysfunction, such as hemiplegia, mood disorders, cognitive and memory impairment. Currently, no clear measures can reduce brain nerve damage. The study of brain nerve protection after SAH is of great significance. We aim to evaluate the protective effects and the possible mechanism of methazolamide in C57BL/6J SAH animal model in vivo and in blood-induced primary cortical neuron (PCNs) cellular model of SAH in vitro. We demonstrate that methazolamide accelerates the recovery of neurological damage, effectively relieves cerebral edema, and improves cognitive function in SAH mice as well as offers neuroprotection in blood- or hemoglobin-treated PCNs and partially restores normal neuronal morphology. In addition, western blot analyses show obviously decreased expression of active caspase-3 in methazolamide-treated SAH mice comparing with vehicle-treated SAH animals. Furthermore, methazolamide effectively inhibits ROS production in PCNs induced by blood exposure or hemoglobin insult. However, methazolamide has no protective effects in morality, fluctuation of cerebral blood flow, SAH grade, and cerebral vasospasm of SAH mice. Given methazolamide, a potent carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, can penetrate the blood–brain barrier and has been used in clinic in the treatment of ocular conditions, it provides potential as a novel therapy for SAH. PMID:27731352

  19. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Stanlies

    2015-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome.

  20. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  1. “REBOA” – Is it Really Safe? A Case with Massive Intracranial Hemorrhage Possibly due to Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA)

    PubMed Central

    Uchino, Hayaki; Tamura, Nobuichiro; Echigoya, Ryosuke; Ikegami, Tetsunori; Fukuoka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 86 Final Diagnosis: Polytrauma Symptoms: Shock Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Non-compressible torso hemorrhage continues to be the leading cause of preventable death in trauma patients. Recent case series report that resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) in the trauma population is a technically feasible method to manage the patients with exsanguinating hemorrhage. On the other hand, it seems that REBOA is being widely promoted prematurely. Complications due to REBOA haven’t been reported much in the literature, and they could have been underestimated. Case Report: An 86-year-old female presented to our emergency department following a pedestrian-vehicle accident. On admission, she was hemodynamically unstable with systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 78 mm Hg. She responded to fluid administration, and computed tomography (CT) scan showed cerebral contusion, subarachnoid hemorrhage, pelvic fracture with contrast extravasation, and thoracic spine fracture. Her condition deteriorated after the CT scan, and she became hemodynamically unstable. REBOA was inserted and inflated. Her blood pressure recovered and even became as high as SBP of 180 mm Hg. Transarterial embolization for pelvic fracture was successfully performed. A subsequent head CT scan showed massive intracranial hemorrhage with penetration to the ventricle, which was fatal. She died on the same day due to cerebral herniation. Conclusions: REBOA is now considered as an alternative to resuscitative thoracotomy or even widely indicated to control hemorrhage. We should be more cautious about using REBOA for polytrauma patients since it could make hemorrhage worse. Further research, assessing its potential complications and safety, will be required to elucidate clear indications for REBOA in trauma

  2. [Increased urinary sodium excretion in the early phase of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage as a predictor of cerebral salt wasting syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Ichiro; Kurokawa, Shinichiro; Takayama, Katsutoshi; Wada, Takeshi; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2009-12-01

    Cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS) in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is considered to correlate with delayed ischemic neurological deficits (DIND) induced by cerebral vasospasm; however, its exact mechanism is still not well-known. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the relationship between hyponatremia caused by CSWS and the increase of the urinary sodium excretion in early phase following SAH. Fifty-four patients with SAH were divided into 2 groups, normonatremia group and hyponatremia group which suffered hyponatremia after SAH. The hyponatremia group comprise 14 patients (26%) in whom the hyponatremia developed of the SAH. In this group, the serum level of sodium significantly decreased 7 days after SAH and then gradually normalised. Further, excretion of sodium in the urine tended to increase 3 days after SAH and significantly increased 7 days after SAH. In conclusion, the increased urinary sodium excretion in the early phase of SAH would serve as a predictive factor for CSWS after SAH. We consider that it is important to start sodium and fluid supplementation and inhibit natriuresis by fludrocortisone acetate administration before hyponatremia occurs in order to prevention delayed ischemic neurological deficits in SAH patients.

  3. [Alveolar hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Parrot, A; Fartoukh, M; Cadranel, J

    2015-04-01

    Alveolar hemorrhage occurs relatively rarely and is a therapeutic emergency because it can quickly lead to acute respiratory failure, which can be fatal. Hemoptysis associated with anemia and pulmonary infiltrates suggest the diagnosis of alveolar hemorrhage, but may be absent in one third of cases including patients in respiratory distress. The diagnosis of alveolar hemorrhage is based on the findings of a bronchoalveolar lavage. The causes are numerous. It is important to identify alveolar hemorrhage due to sepsis, then separate an autoimmune cause (vasculitis associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, connective tissue disease and Goodpasture's syndrome) with the search for autoantibodies and biopsies from readily accessible organs, from a non-immune cause, performing echocardiography. Lung biopsy should be necessary only in exceptional cases. If the hemorrhage has an immune cause, treatment with steroids and cyclophosphamide may be started. The indications for treatment with rituximab are beginning to be established (forms that are not severe and refractory forms). The benefit of plasma exchange is unquestionable in Goodpasture's syndrome. In patients with an immune disease that can lead to an alveolar hemorrhage, removing any source of infection is the first priority.

  4. Blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter prevents iron accumulation in a model of experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Huiying; Hao, Shuangying; Sun, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Dingding; Gao, Xin; Yu, Zhuang; Li, Kuanyu; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2015-01-24

    Highlights: • Iron accumulation was involved in the acute phase following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could attenuate cellular iron accumulation following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could decrease ROS generation and improve cell energy supply following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could alleviate apoptosis and brain injury following SAH. - Abstract: Previous studies have shown that iron accumulation is involved in the pathogenesis of brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and chelation of iron reduced mortality and oxidative DNA damage. We previously reported that blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) provided benefit in the early brain injury after experimental SAH. This study was undertaken to identify whether blockage of MCU could ameliorate iron accumulation-associated brain injury following SAH. Therefore, we used two reagents ruthenium red (RR) and spermine (Sper) to inhibit MCU. Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups including sham, SAH, SAH + RR, and SAH + Sper. Biochemical analysis and histological assays were performed. The results confirmed the iron accumulation in temporal lobe after SAH. Interestingly, blockage of MCU dramatically reduced the iron accumulation in this area. The mechanism was revealed that inhibition of MCU reversed the down-regulation of iron regulatory protein (IRP) 1/2 and increase of ferritin. Iron–sulfur cluster dependent-aconitase activity was partially conserved when MCU was blocked. In consistence with this and previous report, ROS levels were notably reduced and ATP supply was rescued; levels of cleaved caspase-3 dropped; and integrity of neurons in temporal lobe was protected. Taken together, our results indicated that blockage of MCU could alleviate iron accumulation and the associated injury following SAH. These findings suggest that the alteration of calcium and iron homeostasis be coupled and MCU be considered to be a therapeutic target for patients suffering from SAH.

  5. Impact of External Ventricular Drainage Volumes on Shunt Dependency after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Muhammad Ali; Roth, Christian; Kaestner, Stefanie; Deinsberger, Wolfgang

    2016-07-22

    Background The indication for and the timing of a permanent shunt operation in patients following acute hydrocephalus (HC) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains controversial because risk factors for chronic HC fail to predict permanent shunt dependency. The amount of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drained via an external ventricular drain (EVD) may predict shunt dependency. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of our HC database from January 2006 to December 2011. All patients receiving an EVD due to acute HC after SAH were analyzed. The daily amount of drained CSF was documented until the EVD was removed or converted to a permanent shunt either immediately or during a follow-up period of 6 months. Results A total of 139 patients (48 male, 91 female; mean age: 57 ± 14 years) were eligible for the study. Mean duration of EVD was 16 ± 10 days (range: 4-60 days). A permanent shunt was necessary in 32% of cases (n = 45). The mean daily CSF volume was 139 ± 17 mL (range: 15-460 mL). Using repeated-measures analysis of variance, there was a significant difference of daily drained CSF volumes between both the groups in the first 15 days after the EVD. Conclusion Our results suggest that the daily amount of external CSF drainage volume in the acute state of SAH might influence the development of HC.

  6. The Early Endocrine Stress Response in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Christoffer; Karlsson, Torbjörn; Hillered, Lars; Stridsberg, Mats; Ronne Engström, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In patients with severe illness, such as aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a physiologic stress response is triggered. This includes activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the very early responses of these systems. Methods A porcine animal model of aneurysmal SAH was used. In this model, blood is injected slowly to the basal cisterns above the anterior skull base until the cerebral perfusion pressure is 0 mm Hg. Sampling was done from blood and urine at -10, +15, +75 and +135 minutes from time of induction of SAH. Analyses of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, aldosterone, catecholamines and chromogranin-A were performed. Results Plasma ACTH, serum cortisol and plasma aldosterone increased in the samples following induction of SAH, and started to decline after 75 minutes. Urine cortisol also increased after SAH. Urine catecholamines and their metabolites were found to increase after SAH. Many samples were however below detection level, not allowing for statistical analysis. Plasma chromogranin-A peaked at 15 minutes after SAH, and thereafter decreased. Conclusions The endocrine stress response after aneurysmal SAH was found to start within 15 minutes in the HPA axis with early peak values of ACTH, cortisol and aldosterone. The fact that the concentrations of the HPA axis hormones decreased 135 minutes after SAH may suggest that a similar pattern exists in SAH patients, thus making it difficult to catch these early peak values. There were also indications of early activation of the sympathetic nervous system, but the small number of valid samples made interpretation difficult. PMID:27007694

  7. Time-course of cerebral perfusion and tissue oxygenation in the first 6 h after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Westermaier, Thomas; Jauss, Alina; Eriskat, Jörg; Kunze, Ekkehard; Roosen, Klaus

    2009-04-01

    Present knowledge about hemodynamic and metabolic changes after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) originates from neuromonitoring usually starting with aneurysm surgery and animal studies that have been focusing on the first 1 to 3 h after SAH. Most patients, however, are referred to treatment several hours after the insult. We examined the course of hemodynamic parameters, cerebral blood flow, and tissue oxygenation (ptiO2) in the first 6 h after experimental SAH. Sixteen Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to SAH using the endovascular filament model or served as controls (n=8). Bilateral local cortical blood flow, intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, and ptiO2 were followed for 6 h after SAH. After induction of SAH, local cortical blood flow rapidly declined to 22% of baseline and returned to 80% after 6 h. The decline of local cortical blood flow markedly exceeded the decline of cerebral perfusion pressure. ptiO2 declined to 57%, recovered after 2 h, and reached > or =140% of baseline after 6 h. Acute vasoconstriction after SAH is indicated by the marked discrepancy of cerebral perfusion pressure and local cortical blood flow. The excess tissue oxygenation several hours after SAH suggests disturbed oxygen utilization and cerebral metabolic depression. Aside from the sudden increase of intracranial pressure at the time of hemorrhage and delayed cerebral vasospasm, the occurrence of acute vasoconstriction and disturbed oxygen utilization may be additional factors contributing to secondary brain damage after SAH.

  8. Distribution and evolution of stable single α-helices (SAH domains) in myosin motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Simm, Dominic; Hatje, Klas

    2017-01-01

    Stable single-alpha helices (SAHs) are versatile structural elements in many prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins acting as semi-flexible linkers and constant force springs. This way SAH-domains function as part of the lever of many different myosins. Canonical myosin levers consist of one or several IQ-motifs to which light chains such as calmodulin bind. SAH-domains provide flexibility in length and stiffness to the myosin levers, and may be particularly suited for myosins working in crowded cellular environments. Although the function of the SAH-domains in human class-6 and class-10 myosins has well been characterised, the distribution of the SAH-domain in all myosin subfamilies and across the eukaryotic tree of life remained elusive. Here, we analysed the largest available myosin sequence dataset consisting of 7919 manually annotated myosin sequences from 938 species representing all major eukaryotic branches using the SAH-prediction algorithm of Waggawagga, a recently developed tool for the identification of SAH-domains. With this approach we identified SAH-domains in more than one third of the supposed 79 myosin subfamilies. Depending on the myosin class, the presence of SAH-domains can range from a few to almost all class members indicating complex patterns of independent and taxon-specific SAH-domain gain and loss. PMID:28369123

  9. Control of methionine metabolism by the SahR transcriptional regulator in Proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Novichkov, Pavel S; Li, Xiaoqing; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Arkin, Adam P; Price, Morgan N; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2014-01-01

    Sulphur is an essential element in the metabolism. The sulphur-containing amino acid methionine is a metabolic precursor for S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which serves as a coenzyme for ubiquitous methyltrtansferases. Recycling of organic sulphur compounds, e.g. via the SAM cycle, is an important metabolic process that needs to be tightly regulated. Knowledge about transcriptional regulation of these processes is still limited for many free-living bacteria. We identified a novel transcription factor SahR from the ArsR family that controls the SAM cycle genes in diverse microorganisms from soil and aquatic ecosystems. By using comparative genomics, we predicted SahR-binding DNA motifs and reconstructed SahR regulons in the genomes of 62 Proteobacteria. The conserved core of SahR regulons includes all enzymes required for the SAM cycle: the SAH hydrolase AhcY, the methionine biosynthesis enzymes MetE/MetH and MetF, and the SAM synthetase MetK. By using a combination of experimental techniques, we validated the SahR regulon in the sulphate-reducing Deltaproteobacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis. SahR functions as a negative regulator that responds to the S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH). The elevated SAH level in the cell dissociates SahR from its DNA operators and induces the expression of SAM cycle genes. The effector-sensing domain in SahR is related to SAM-dependent methylases that are able to tightly bind SAH. SahR represents a novel type of transcriptional regulators for the control of sulphur amino acid metabolism.

  10. The role of the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway in early brain injury after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Rong-Yao; Lian, Zhi-Gang; Chen, Xiao-Lin; Ma, Li; Sun, Hao-Min; Zhao, Yuan-Li

    2013-09-27

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway plays a neuro-protective role. However, whether the Shh pathway is induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has not been investigated. We sought to investigate Shh activation in the cortex in the early stage of SAH, and assessed the effect of cyclopamine (a specific inhibitor of the Shh pathway) on Shh pathway regulation and evaluated the impact of cyclopamine on SAH. We found that the Shh pathway was up-regulated in the cortex after SAH, and that blocking the Shh pathway increased cell apoptosis. Early brain damages, including brain edema, blood-brain barrier impairment, and cortical apoptosis were significantly aggravated following with cyclopamine treatment compared with vehicle treatment. Our results suggest that the Shh pathway should be activated in the brain after SAH, and plays a beneficial role in SAH development, possibly by inhibiting cerebral oxidative stress through induction of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes.

  11. Cysteamine alleviates early brain injury via reducing oxidative stress and apoptosis in a rat experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zong-Yong; Yang, Ming-Feng; Wang, Tao; Li, Da-Wei; Liu, Yun-Lin; Zhang, Jin-Hui; Sun, Bao-Liang

    2015-05-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The aim of this study was to assess whether cysteamine prevents post-SAH oxidative stress injury via its antioxidative and anti-apoptotic effects. It was observed that intraperitoneal administration of cysteamine (20 mg/kg/day) could significantly alleviate EBI (including neurobehavioral deficits, brain edema, blood-brain barrier permeability, and cortical neuron apoptosis) after SAH in rats. Meanwhile, cysteamine treatment reduced post-SAH elevated the reactive oxygen species level, the concentration of malondialdehyde, 3-nitrotyrosine, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and increased the glutathione peroxidase enzymatic activity, the concentration of glutathione and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in brain cortex at 48 h after SAH. These results indicated that administration of cysteamine may ameliorate EBI and provide neuroprotection after SAH in rat models.

  12. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS-2) in subarachnoid hemorrhage: Regulatory mechanisms and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Sana; Hayman, Erik G; Hong, Caron; Stokum, Jesse A; Kurland, David B; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) typically carries a poor prognosis. Growing evidence indicates that overabundant production of nitric oxide (NO) may be responsible for a large part of the secondary injury that follows SAH. Although SAH modulates the activity of all three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), the inducible isoform, NOS-2, accounts for a majority of NO-mediated secondary injuries after SAH. Here, we review the indispensable physiological roles of NO that must be preserved, even while attempting to downmodulate the pathophysiologic effects of NO that are induced by SAH. We examine the effects of SAH on the function of the various NOS isoforms, with a particular focus on the pathological effects of NOS-2 and on the mechanisms responsible for its transcriptional upregulation. Finally, we review interventions to block NOS-2 upregulation or to counteract its effects, with an emphasis on the potential therapeutic strategies to improve outcomes in patients afflicted with SAH. There is still much to be learned regarding the apparently maladaptive response of NOS-2 and its harmful product NO in SAH. However, the available evidence points to crucial effects that, on balance, are adverse, making the NOS-2/NO/peroxynitrite axis an attractive therapeutic target in SAH.

  13. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: relationship to solar activity in the United States, 1988-2010.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Benjamin P; Weil, Robert J

    2014-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a common condition treated by neurosurgeons. The inherent variability in the incidence and presentation of ruptured cerebral aneurysms has been investigated in association with seasonality, circadian rhythm, lunar cycle, and climate factors. We aimed to identify an association between solar activity (solar flux and sunspots) and the incidence of aneurysmal SAH, all of which appear to behave in periodic fashions over long time periods. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) provided longitudinal, retrospective data on patients hospitalized with SAH in the United States, from 1988 to 2010, who underwent aneurysmal clipping or coiling. Solar activity and SAH incidence data were modeled with the cosinor methodology and a 10-year periodic cycle length. The NIS database contained 32,281 matching hospitalizations from 1988 to 2010. The acrophase (time point in the cycle of highest amplitude) for solar flux and for sunspots were coincident. The acrophase for aneurysmal SAH incidence was out of phase with solar activity determined by non-overlapping 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Aneurysmal SAH incidence peaks appear to be delayed behind solar activity peaks by 64 months (95% CI; 56-73 months) when using a modeled 10-year periodic cycle. Solar activity (solar flux and sunspots) appears to be associated with the incidence of aneurysmal SAH. As solar activity reaches a relative maximum, the incidence of aneurysmal SAH reaches a relative minimum. These observations may help identify future trends in aneurysmal SAH on a population basis.

  14. Protein expression levels in the medullary visceral zone of rats with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sun, L H; Xing, L F; Zhang, G H; Pan, S Y

    2015-08-03

    We investigated protein expression in the medullary visceral zone (MVZ) of rats with multiple-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) caused by subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) to discuss the possible regulatory mechanism of the MVZ in the course of SAH-induced MODS. A SAH-induced MODS model was established in rats by injecting arterial blood into the Willis' circle. Protein expression in the MVZ was analyzed by immunohistochemistry assay. Protein expression in the MVZ peaked 24-36 h after SAH, and was significantly higher than in the control and sham operation groups. Organs at each time point exhibited inflammatory injuries to varying degrees after SAH, which reached a maximum at 24-36 h. Incidences of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and MODS were 100 and 71.67%, respectively, after SAH. There is a consistency between MVZ protein expression and inflammatory changes in each organ after SAH. This prompts the suggestion that the MVZ may be one of the direct regulative centers in SAH-induced MODS, and may be involved in the functional regulation of the surrounding organs after SAH.

  15. Neurological and neurobehavioral assessment of experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyojin; Ai, Jinglu; Sabri, Mohamed; Tariq, Asma; Shang, Xueyuan; Chen, Gang; Macdonald, R Loch

    2009-01-01

    About 50% of humans with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) die and many survivors have neurological and neurobehavioral dysfunction. Animal studies usually focused on cerebral vasospasm and sometimes neuronal injury. The difference in endpoints may contribute to lack of translation of treatments effective in animals to humans. We reviewed prior animal studies of SAH to determine what neurological and neurobehavioral endpoints had been used, whether they differentiated between appropriate controls and animals with SAH, whether treatment effects were reported and whether they correlated with vasospasm. Only a few studies in rats examined learning and memory. It is concluded that more studies are needed to fully characterize neurobehavioral performance in animals with SAH and assess effects of treatment. PMID:19706182

  16. Sirtuin 1 activation protects against early brain injury after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang-Sheng; Wu, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Ye, Zhen-Nan; Jiang, Tian-Wei; Li, Wei; Zhuang, Zong; Zhou, Meng-Liang; Zhang, Xin; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is implicated in a wide range of cellular functions, such as oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the change of SIRT1 in the brain after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and its role on SAH-induced early brain injury (EBI). In the first set of experiments, rats were randomly divided into sham group and SAH groups at 2, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h. The expression of SIRT1 was evaluated by western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. In another set of experiments, SIRT1-specific inhibitor (sirtinol) and activator (activator 3) were exploited to study the role of SIRT1 in SAH-induced EBI. It showed that the protein level of SIRT1 was markedly elevated at the early stage of SAH and peaked at 24 h after SAH. The expression of SIRT1 could be observed in neurons and microglia, and the enhanced SIRT1 was mainly located in neurons after SAH. Administration of sirtinol inhibited the expression and activation of SIRT1 pathways after SAH, while activator 3 enhanced the expression and activation of SIRT1 pathways after SAH. In addition, inhibition of SIRT1 could exacerbate forkhead transcription factors of the O class-, nuclear factor-kappa B- and p53-induced oxidative damage, neuroinflammation and neuronal apoptosis, leading to aggravated brain injury after SAH. In contrast, activator 3 treatment could reduce forkhead transcription factors of the O class-, nuclear factor-kappa B-, and p53-induced oxidative damage, neuroinflammation and neuronal apoptosis to protect against EBI. These results suggest that SIRT1 plays an important role in neuroprotection against EBI after SAH by deacetylation and subsequent inhibition of forkhead transcription factors of the O class-, nuclear factor-kappa B-, and p53-induced oxidative, inflammatory and apoptotic pathways. SIRT1 might be a new promising molecular target for SAH. PMID:27735947

  17. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Dredla, Brynn

    2015-01-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient’s medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis. PMID:27053985

  18. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Due to Rupture of an Intracavernous Carotid Artery Aneurysm Coexisting with a Prolactinoma under Cabergoline Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Akutsu, Nobuyuki; Hosoda, Kohkichi; Ohta, Kohei; Tanaka, Hirotomo; Taniguchi, Masaaki; Kohmura, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    We report an unusual case of subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by intraoperative rupture of an intracavernous carotid artery aneurysm coexisting with a prolactinoma. A 58-year-old man presenting with diplopia was found to have a left intracavernous carotid artery aneurysm encased by a suprasellar tumor on magnetic resonance imaging. His serum prolactin level was 5036 ng/mL. Proximal ligation of the left internal carotid artery with a superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery anastomosis was scheduled. Because the patient's diplopia had deteriorated, we started him on cabergoline at a dose of 0.25 mg once a week. One month after administration of cabergoline, the diplopia was improved to some extent and serum prolactin was decreased to 290 ng/ml. Six weeks after starting the cabergoline, the patient underwent a left frontotemporal craniotomy to treat the aneurysm. When the dura mater was opened, abnormal brain swelling and obvious subarachnoid hemorrhage were observed. Postoperative computed tomography demonstrated a thick subarachnoid hemorrhage. This case suggests that medical therapy for a pituitary adenoma should be started after treatment for a coexisting intracavernous aneurysm is completed. PMID:25083394

  19. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Due to Rupture of an Intracavernous Carotid Artery Aneurysm Coexisting with a Prolactinoma under Cabergoline Treatment.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Nobuyuki; Hosoda, Kohkichi; Ohta, Kohei; Tanaka, Hirotomo; Taniguchi, Masaaki; Kohmura, Eiji

    2014-08-01

    We report an unusual case of subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by intraoperative rupture of an intracavernous carotid artery aneurysm coexisting with a prolactinoma. A 58-year-old man presenting with diplopia was found to have a left intracavernous carotid artery aneurysm encased by a suprasellar tumor on magnetic resonance imaging. His serum prolactin level was 5036 ng/mL. Proximal ligation of the left internal carotid artery with a superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery anastomosis was scheduled. Because the patient's diplopia had deteriorated, we started him on cabergoline at a dose of 0.25 mg once a week. One month after administration of cabergoline, the diplopia was improved to some extent and serum prolactin was decreased to 290 ng/ml. Six weeks after starting the cabergoline, the patient underwent a left frontotemporal craniotomy to treat the aneurysm. When the dura mater was opened, abnormal brain swelling and obvious subarachnoid hemorrhage were observed. Postoperative computed tomography demonstrated a thick subarachnoid hemorrhage. This case suggests that medical therapy for a pituitary adenoma should be started after treatment for a coexisting intracavernous aneurysm is completed.

  20. Depression and Anxiety Following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Are Associated With Higher Six-Month Unemployment Rates.

    PubMed

    Al Yassin, Altaib; Ouyang, Bichun; Temes, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Although survival has dramatically improved following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), the reasons for persistent high rates of unemployment in this population remain unknown. Retrospective review for medical records of patients with aSAH admitted to Rush University Medical Center was undertaken. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to test the association of either depression or anxiety with the 6-month employment status. Among the 29 patients who developed depression or anxiety, 86.2% were unemployed at 6 months following their aSAH. After controlling for confounding factors, anxiety and depression were significantly associated with higher 6-month unemployment rates (odds ratio [OR]=0.08, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.02-0.3, p=0.0002). Depression and anxiety are common following aSAH and are associated with increased unemployment rates 6 months post aSAH.

  1. Life satisfaction and return to work after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Passier, Patricia E C A; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Lindeman, Eline; Post, Marcel W M

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate life satisfaction and employment status after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and to explain the associations between life satisfaction and demographic, disease-related, psychological, and personality characteristics. Subjects with SAH (n = 141) living at home 2-4 years after the SAH responded to a mailed questionnaire. Outcomes were life satisfaction, as measured with the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire 9 (LiSat-9), and employment status. Determinants in multiple regression analysis were demographic and SAH characteristics, subjective complaints (eg, mood disorder, fatigue, cognitive complaints), and personality characteristics (eg, neuroticism, passive coping style). Of the 141 subjects, 64 (46.7%) had a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of V (good outcome) at discharge. Mean subject age was 51.4 ± 12.3 years, and mean time after SAH was 36.1 ± 7.9 months. Of the 88 subjects who were working at the time of the SAH, 54 (61.4%) returned to work, but only 31 (35.2%) resumed their work completely. The subjects were least satisfied with their vocational situation (51.9% satisfied) and sexual life (51.7%) and were most satisfied with their relationships (75.2%-88.7%) and self-care ability (88.6%). Age (β value = 0.17), return to work after SAH (0.19), disability at hospital discharge (0.25), worsened mood (-0.37), and passive coping (-0.25) together accounted for 47.2% of the life satisfaction scores. Our data indicate that return to work is a major issue for individuals who survive an SAH. Not returning to work, disability, depression, and passive coping are associated with reduced life satisfaction. Thus, vocational reintegration after SAH merits more attention during rehabilitation.

  2. Changes in trace elements of cerebrospinal fluid after subarachnoid hemorrhage, and effects of trace elements on vasospasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, N.; Kuroda, K.; Suzuki, M.; Ogawa, A.; Sera, K.

    1999-04-01

    Various causal factors have been proposed for cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), such as serotonin, acetylcholine, angiotensin, thrombin and thromboxane A2. However, none of them explain the whole pathomechanism of vasospasm. To evaluate the role of trace elements on vasospasm, we have examined these sequential changes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after SAH by PIXE, and have investigated the relation between trace elements and vasospasm. We obtained the CSF samples from cisternal drainage in patients with SAH who underwent radical surgery within 48 h from the onset. The drainage was placed into basal cisterns at the end of the operation. Three sampling times (3-5, 7-9 and 12-14 days from the onset) has been scheduled because vasospasm is likely to occur from day 4 to day 14 after the onset. In this study, we focused on the levels of Mg, Ca, Mn, Al, Zn, P, Pb, Sr, Br, Co, Cu, Si, Ti, Mn,Co, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr, Mo and Pb, and we found a significantly lower level of Mg in the CSF of patients with vasospasm on days 7-9 after the onset. These results suggest that Mg in the CSF may ameliorate vasoconstriction due to Ca in the pathomechanism of vasospasm.

  3. Cerebral Salt-wasting Syndrome and Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Syndrome after Subarachnoid Hemorrhaging.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hanako; Okada, Hiroshi; Hirose, Kazuki; Murakami, Toru; Shiotsu, Yayoi; Kadono, Mayuko; Inoue, Mamoru; Hasegawa, Goji

    2017-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a common finding after subarachnoid hemorrhaging (SAH) and can be caused by either cerebral salt-wasting syndrome (CSWS) or syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). Distinguishing between these two entities can be difficult because they have similar manifestations, including hyponatremia, serum hypo-osmolality, and high urine osmolality. We herein report the case of a 60-year-old man who suffered from SAH complicated by hyponatremia. During his initial hospitalization, he was diagnosed with CSWS. He was readmitted one week later with hyponatremia and was diagnosed with SIADH. This is the first report of SAH causing CSWS followed by SIADH. These two different sources of hyponatremia require different treatments.

  4. Intraoperative idiopathic subarachnoid hemorrhage during carotid artery stenting: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Nakaoka, Mitsuo; Ohbayashi, Naohiko; Yahara, Kaita; Nabika, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) has a fatal complication of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) associated with cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS), i.e. brain hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Although SAH accounts for a small percentage of these patients, it is difficult to make a differential diagnosis of this syndrome from CHS without ICH because the clinical presentations resemble each other. Furthermore, not only does the cause of SAH following CAS remain unclear but also the role of controlling postoperative blood pressure is not detected in preventing ICH after CAS. Herein, we report a case of SAH following CAS and review previous literature to discuss the mechanism and the management of this fatal complication. A 78-year-old woman with a history of arteriosclerotic obliteration and myocardial infarction was referred to our department for intervention to asymptomatic severe stenosis of the right internal carotid artery. We performed CAS under local anesthesia. Although her blood pressure was controlled to normotension during the procedure, the patient complained of headache following predilation. Postoperative emergent non-contrast computed tomography revealed SAH with leakage of contrast medium occupying the right sylvian fissure. We continued strict blood pressure control, and the patient was discharged without any neurological deficit. A well-opened lumen of the stent was recognized three months later at the outpatient visit. Strict control of intraoperative and postoperative blood pressure may improve the outcome of SAH following CAS though the role in preventing ICH after CAS is unclear. PMID:26184053

  5. Involvement of Nox2 and Nox4 NADPH oxidases in early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Li, Zhen; Feng, Dongxia; Shen, Haitao; Tian, Xiaodi; Li, Haiying; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Gang

    2017-04-09

    Oxidative stress is responsible for a poor prognosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients. Nox2 has been shown to participate in SAH-induced early brain injury (EBI). Nox4 is another major subtype of Nox family widely expressed in central nervous system (CNS). Here, we investigated the role of Nox4 and whether there was a synergistic effect of Nox2 and Nox4 in SAH-induced EBI. Clinical brain biopsies of four patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and perihematomal brain tissue from six subjects with SAH were examined. Gp91ds-tat (a specific inhibitor of Nox2), GKT137831 (a specific inhibitor of Nox4), and apocynin (a non-specific Nox inhibitor) were used to test the role of Nox2 and Nox4. The protein levels of Nox2 and Nox4 were elevated in rat neurons and astrocytes at 12 h after SAH, and in cultured brain microvascular endothelial cells at 24 h after exposure to OxyHb. Similarly, there were higher Nox2 and Nox4 protein levels in perihematomal neurons and astrocytes in SAH patients than that in brain tissue from subjects with TBI. In SAH rat model, gp91ds-tat and GKT137831 could reduce SAH-induced neuronal death and degeneration, whereas apocynin did not induce a more intense neuroprotection. Consistently, in in vitro SAH model, siRNA-mediated silencing of Nox2 and Nox4 suppressed the OxyHb-induced neuronal apoptosis, whereas Nox2 and Nox4 co-knockdown also did not show a remarkable overlay effect. In conclusion, Nox4 should contribute to the pathological processes in SAH-induced EBI, and there was not an overlay effect of Nox2 inhibition and Nox4 inhibition on preventing SAH-induced EBI.

  6. Postmortem angiography in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in a case of fatal hemorrhage due to an arterio-venous malformation in the brain.

    PubMed

    Franckenberg, Sabine; Schulze, Claudia; Bolliger, Stephan A; Gascho, Dominic; Thali, Michael J; Flach, Patricia M

    2015-05-01

    Autopsy is the traditional gold standard for determining the cause and manner of death in a forensic death investigation. However, postmortem imaging plays an ever-growing role in preliminary examination, even replacing conventional autopsy in some cases. This case report presents a case of massive intra-axial brain hemorrhage due to an arterio-venous malformation. The cause and manner of death were exclusively determined by postmortem radiology. Based on radiological findings, the autopsy was considered redundant and cancelled by the public prosecutor.

  7. Effects of deferoxamine on blood-brain barrier disruption after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Wei; Gu, Yuxiang

    2017-01-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a key mechanism of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced brain injury. This study examined the mechanism of iron-induced BBB disruption after SAH and investigated the potential therapeutic effect of iron chelation on SAH. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats had an endovascular perforation of left internal carotid artery bifurcation or sham operation. The rats were treated with deferoxamine (DFX) or vehicle (100mg/kg) for a maximum of 7 days. Brain edema, BBB leakage, behavioral and cognitive impairment were examined. In SAH rat, the peak time of brain edema and BBB impairment in the cortex was at day 3 after SAH. SAH resulted in a significant increase in ferritin expression in the cortex. The ferritin positive cells were colocalized with endothelial cells, pericytes, astrocytes, microglia and neurons. Compared with vehicle, DFX caused less ferritin upregulation, brain water content, BBB impairment, behavioral and cognitive deficits in SAH rats. The results suggest iron overload could be a therapeutic target for SAH induced BBB damage. PMID:28249040

  8. Role of Gap Junctions in Early Brain Injury Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ayer, Robert; Chen, Wanqiu; Sugawara, Takashi; Suzuki, Hidenori; Zhang, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Gap junction inhibition has been demonstrated to reverse the vascular contraction that follows experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage. This study hypothesizes that the use of established gap junction inhibitors: octonal and carbenoxolone, to interrupt cell to cell communication will provide neuroprotection against early brain injury after SAH. The filament perforation model of SAH was performed in male Sprague–Dawley rats weighing between 300 and 380g. Octanol (260.46mg or 781.38 mg/kg), carbenoxolone (100 mg/kg), or vehicles were given via intraperitoneal injection 1 hour after SAH. Neurologic deficits and cerebral apoptosis were assessed 24 and 72 hours after SAH. In addition, Western blot analysis was performed to confirm the in vivo inhibition of CNS gap junctions. The administration of octanol and carbenoxolone both failed to attenuate the neurological deficits induced by SAH, and they did not reduce neuronal apoptosis. Additionally, carbenoloxone increased post SAH mortality and exacerbated SAH induced apoptosis. Despites previous studies that show gap junction inhibitors reverse vasospasm following experimental SAH, they failed to improve clinical outcomes or provide neuroprotection in this study. PMID:20018179

  9. Effects of deferoxamine on blood-brain barrier disruption after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanjiang; Yang, Heng; Ni, Wei; Gu, Yuxiang

    2017-01-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a key mechanism of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced brain injury. This study examined the mechanism of iron-induced BBB disruption after SAH and investigated the potential therapeutic effect of iron chelation on SAH. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats had an endovascular perforation of left internal carotid artery bifurcation or sham operation. The rats were treated with deferoxamine (DFX) or vehicle (100mg/kg) for a maximum of 7 days. Brain edema, BBB leakage, behavioral and cognitive impairment were examined. In SAH rat, the peak time of brain edema and BBB impairment in the cortex was at day 3 after SAH. SAH resulted in a significant increase in ferritin expression in the cortex. The ferritin positive cells were colocalized with endothelial cells, pericytes, astrocytes, microglia and neurons. Compared with vehicle, DFX caused less ferritin upregulation, brain water content, BBB impairment, behavioral and cognitive deficits in SAH rats. The results suggest iron overload could be a therapeutic target for SAH induced BBB damage.

  10. Long-term assessment of motor and cognitive behaviours in the intraluminal perforation model of subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Silasi, Gergely; Colbourne, Frederick

    2009-03-17

    The endovascular perforation model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a commonly used model in rats as it is performed without a craniotomy and accurately mimics the physiological effects of SAH in humans. The long-term behavioural profile of the model, however, has not been characterized. Given that humans often have cognitive deficits following SAH, we set out to characterize the behavioural profile as well as the spontaneous temperature changes of rats following intraluminal perforation. Rats were pre-trained on three motor tasks (tapered beam, limb-use asymmetry and the horizontal ladder tasks) prior to receiving a SAH. The animals were then assessed on post-surgical days 3, 7, 14 and 21 on these tasks. At the completion of motor testing, the rats were assessed on a moving platform version of the Morris water task. Despite significant mortality (33%), SAH did not result in lasting motor deficits on any of the tasks examined. However, the SAH group did show a minor cognitive impairment in the Morris water task. In addition, SAH produced a slight, but significant elevation in body temperature (vs. sham operated rats) despite an acute decrease in general home cage activity. The majority of the animals did not have any observable infarcts and the SAH did not significantly affect cortical thickness. In summary, the endovascular perforation model of SAH results in no lasting motor deficits and only minor cognitive impairment in survivors, which alone would be difficult to evaluate in neuroprotection or rehabilitation studies.

  11. Acute impairment of saccadic eye movements is associated with delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Matthew J; Garry, Payashi; Westbrook, Jon; Corkill, Rufus; Antoniades, Chrystalina A; Pattinson, Kyle T S

    2016-12-09

    OBJECTIVE Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) causing cerebral infarction remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Early brain injury in the first 72 hours following rupture is likely to play a key role in the pathophysiology underlying DCI but remains difficult to quantify objectively. Current diagnostic modalities are based on the concept of vasoconstriction causing cerebral ischemia and infarction and are either invasive or have a steep learning curve and user variability. The authors sought to determine whether saccadic eye movements are impaired following aSAH and whether this measurement in the acute period is associated with the likelihood of developing DCI. METHODS As part of a prospective, observational cohort study, 24 male and female patients (mean age 53 years old, range 31-70 years old) were recruited. Inclusion criteria included presentation with World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) Grades 1 or 2 ("good grade") aSAH on admission and endovascular treatment within 72 hours of aneurysmal rupture. DCI and DCI-related cerebral infarction were defined according to consensus guidelines. Saccadometry data were collected at 3 time points in patients: in the first 72 hours, between Days 5 and 10, and at 3 months after aSAH. Data from 10 healthy controls was collected on 1 occasion for comparison. RESULTS Age-adjusted saccadic latency in patients was significantly prolonged in the first 72 hours following aSAH when compared with controls (188.7 msec [95% CI 176.9-202.2 msec] vs 160.7 msec [95% CI 145.6-179.4 msec], respectively; p = 0.0054, t-test). By 3 months after aSAH, there was no significant difference in median saccadic latency compared with controls (188.7 msec [95% CI 176.9-202.2 msec] vs 180.0 msec [95% CI 165.1-197.8 msec], respectively; p = 0.4175, t-test). Patients diagnosed with cerebral infarction due to DCI had a significantly higher age-adjusted saccadic latency in the

  12. Cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome after elective triplet cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Albano, Beatrice; Del Sette, Massimo; Roccatagliata, Luca; Gandolfo, Carlo; Primavera, Alberto

    2011-06-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes (RCVS) comprise a group of disorders characterized by prolonged, but reversible vasoconstriction of the cerebral arteries, usually associated with acute-onset, severe, recurrent headaches, with or without additional neurological signs and symptoms. Various complications of this condition have been observed, such as cortical subarachnoid hemorrhages (cSAH), intracerebral hemorrhages, reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy, ischaemic strokes and transient ischaemic attacks. It is important to include RCVS in thunderclap headache differential diagnosis and among non-aneurismatic subarachnoid hemorrhage causes. In the past years, thanks to the major diffusion of new diagnostic tools such as magnetic resonance, computed tomography and digital subtraction angiography, RCVS have been demonstrated to be more frequent than previously thought. We report an illustrative case of a woman affected by a small cSAH, associated to RCVS, after elective triplet cesarean delivery. To our knowledge, this is the first case of cSAH associated to RCVS after a triplet pregnancy.

  13. A multicenter prospective cohort study of volume management after subarachnoid hemorrhage: circulatory characteristics of pulmonary edema after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Obata, Yoshiki; Takeda, Junichi; Sato, Yohei; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Matsui, Toru; Isotani, Eiji

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often accompanied by pulmonary complications, which may lead to poor outcomes and death. This study investigated the incidence and cause of pulmonary edema in patients with SAH by using hemodynamic monitoring with PiCCO-plus pulse contour analysis. METHODS A total of 204 patients with SAH were included in a multicenter prospective cohort study to investigate hemodynamic changes after surgical clipping or coil embolization of ruptured cerebral aneurysms by using a PiCCO-plus device. Changes in various hemodynamic parameters after SAH were analyzed statistically. RESULTS Fifty-two patients (25.5%) developed pulmonary edema. Patients with pulmonary edema (PE group) were significantly older than those without pulmonary edema (non-PE group) (p = 0.017). The mean extravascular lung water index was significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group throughout the study period. The pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) was significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group on Day 6 (p = 0.029) and Day 10 (p = 0.011). The cardiac index of the PE group was significantly decreased biphasically on Days 2 and 10 compared with that of the non-PE group. In the early phase (Days 1-5 after SAH), the daily water balance of the PE group was slightly positive. In the delayed phase (Days 6-14 after SAH), the serum C-reactive protein level and the global end-diastolic volume index were significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group, whereas the PVPI tended to be higher in the PE group. CONCLUSIONS Pulmonary edema that occurs in the early and delayed phases after SAH is caused by cardiac failure and inflammatory (i.e., noncardiogenic) conditions, respectively. Measurement of the extravascular lung water index, cardiac index, and PVPI by PiCCO-plus monitoring is useful for identifying pulmonary edema in patients with SAH.

  14. Immune and inflammatory gene signature in rat cerebrum in subarachnoid hemorrhage with microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chu-I; Chou, An-Kuo; Lin, Ching-Chih; Chou, Chia-Hua; Loh, Joon-Khim; Lieu, Ann-Shung; Wang, Chih-Jen; Huang, Chi-Ying F; Howng, Shen-Long; Hong, Yi-Ren

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has been studied in terms of a contraction of the major cerebral arteries, but the effect of cerebrum tissue in SAH is not yet well understood. To gain insight into the biology of SAH-expressing cerebrum, we employed oligonucleotide microarrays to characterize the gene expression profiles of cerebrum tissue at the early stage of SAH. Functional gene expression in the cerebrum was analyzed 2 h following stage 1-hemorrhage in Sprague-Dawley rats. mRNA was investigated by performing microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analyses, and protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. In this study, 18 upregulated and 18 downregulated genes displayed at least a 1.5-fold change. Five genes were verified by real-time PCR, including three upregulated genes [prostaglandin E synthase (PGES), CD14 antigen, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1)] as well as two downregulated genes [KRAB-zinc finger protein-2 (KZF-2) and γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor 1 (GABA B receptor)]. Notably, there were functional implications for the three upregulated genes involved in the inflammatory SAH process. However, the mechanisms leading to decreased KZF-2 and GABA B receptor expression in SAH have never been characterized. We conclude that oligonucleotide microarrays have the potential for use as a method to identify candidate genes associated with SAH and to provide novel investigational targets, including genes involved in the immune and inflammatory response. Furthermore, understanding the regulation of MMP9/TIMP1 during the early stages of SAH may elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms in SAH rats.

  15. Severe ataxia due to injuries of neural tract detected by diffusion tensor tractography in a patient with pontine hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Chang, Chul Hoon; Jung, Young Jin; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: We examined injuries of the dentato-rubro-thalamic tract (DRTT), cortico-ponto-cerebellar tract (CPCT), dorsal spinocerebellar tract (SCT), and inferior cerebellar peduncle (ICP) in a patient with severe ataxia following bilateral tegmental pontine hemorrhage (PH), using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). Patient concerns: A 75-year-old female patient underwent conservative management for bilateral tegmental PH. She presented with moderate motor weakness, severe resting and intentional tremor on both hands, and severe truncal ataxia (Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia [25 points/0–40 points: a higher score indicates a worse state]), and she was not able to sit independently. Diagnoses and outcomes: On DTT taken at 2 weeks after initial presentation, both DRTTs and the left dorsal SCT were not reconstructed, whereas the CPCTs showed thinning of the entire pathways between the primary sensorimotor cortex and cerebellum in both hemispheres. The right ICP was discontinued at the transverse cerebellar branch of the ICP and thinning of the left ICP was observed in the vertical and transverse cerebellar branch of the ICP. Lessons: Using DTT, concurrent injuries of the DRTT, CPCT, dorsal SCT, and ICP were demonstrated in a patient with severe ataxia following PH. Our result suggests the necessity of evaluation of these neural tracts in patients who develop ataxia after brain injury. PMID:27977594

  16. Spontaneous nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage without cerebrovascular malformations in a maintenance hemodialysis patient

    PubMed Central

    Jayasurya, R.; Murugesan, N.; Kumar, R.; Dubey, A. K.; Priyamvada, P. S.; Swaminathan, R. P.; Parameswaran, S.

    2015-01-01

    Nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in a dialysis patient is an uncommon occurrence and is often associated with high mortality. We report for the first time in India, a case of spontaneous nontraumatic, nonaneurysmal SAH without any cerebrovascular malformation in a maintenance hemodialysis patient, following a session of hemodialysis. The dialysis prescription needs to be modified in these patients, in order to prevent worsening of cerebral edema and progression of hemorrhage. Where available, continuous forms of renal replacement therapies, with regional anticoagulation seem to be the best option for such patients, till neurologic stabilization is achieved. PMID:26628800

  17. Multiple outbreaks of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis due to a variant of coxsackievirus A24: Guangdong, China, 2007.

    PubMed

    Wu, De; Ke, Chang-Wen; Mo, Yan-Ling; Sun, Li-Mei; Li, Hui; Chen, Qiu-Xia; Zou, Li-Rong; Fang, Ling; Huang, Ping; Zhen, Huan-ying

    2008-10-01

    Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) is usually caused by enterovirus 70, coxsackievirus A24(CA24v) and adenoviruses. Several outbreaks of AHC caused by a CA24v have occurred since it was imported into China in 1971. Multiple outbreaks of AHC reappeared in 10 cities of Guangdong during June to November in 2007. The epidemic began in the June, and spread extensively, with a peak in the September. A total of 31,659 cases were reported to center for disease control and prevention of Guangdong, it was estimated that the number of actual AHC was >200 thousands. Forty conjunctival swab specimens were collected from the cases diagnosed clinically with AHC. (RT)-PCR testing on these conjunctival specimens revealed the presence of an enterovirus, and this was confirmed by 16 isolates. We demonstrated the most likely etiological agent for the multiple outbreaks was a variant of coxsackievirus A24 by molecular typing using a partial VP1 sequence. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analyses of the VP1 and 3Cpro gene regions were performed by Neighbor-joining method, the strains from different outbreaks and different geographical areas within Guangdong had no sequence divergence in 2007. The representative isolates from mainland of China including Hangzhou, Ningbo, Beijing, Yunnan, Liaoning, and Henan were analyzed in this study. Phylogenetic analysis revealed theses isolates were located in different clusters, a close phylogenetic and chronological relationship with Singaporean, South Korean and Thailand isolates had been observed. This confirms CA24v circulated in China's mainland has not evolved independently, but co-evolved with the isolates of Southeast Asia.

  18. Plasma ADAMTS13 activity and von Willebrand Factor Antigen and Activity In Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Monisha; Cao, Wenjing; McDaniel, Jenny K.; Pham, Huy P.; Raju, Dheeraj; Nawalinski, Kelsey; Frangos, Suzanne; Kung, David; Zager, Eric E.; Kasner, Scott E.; Levine, Joshua M.; Zheng, X. Long

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Increased von Willebrand factor (VWF) and reduced ADAMTS13 activity are associated with arterial thrombosis. This may also be the culprit mechanism implicated in delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Objective To determine plasma VWF and ADAMTS13 in patients with SAH and healthy subjects; and to explore the levels of those markers and outcome after SAH. Methods 40 consecutive patients were enrolled between September 2007 and April 2014 in a pilot study. Plasma samples were collected from SAH patients on post-bleed day (PBD) 0, 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 and healthy controls. VWF antigen (VWFAg) and VWF activity (VWFAc) were determined by enzyme-linked immunoassay and collagen binding assay, respectively. ADAMTS13 activity was determined by the cleavage of a fluorescent substrate. Univariate descriptive statistics and cluster analyses were performed based on outcomes in the group with SAH only. Results Mean age of SAH patients was 52.4 years (26–84 years) and 30 (75%) were women. 12/40 (30%) had a high Hunt and Hess grade (IV–V) and 25 (62.5%) were treated with coil embolization. Plasma VWFAg and VWFAc were significantly higher in SAH patients than those in healthy subjects on each PBD (p<0.0001). Concurrently, plasma ADAMTS13 activity in SAH patients was significantly lower than that in healthy subjects (p<0.0001). Among those with SAH, cluster analysis demonstrated that patients with higher VWFAg and VWFAc and/or lower ADAMTS13 activity might be at risk of increased mortality. Conclusions The relative deficiency of plasma ADAMTS13 activity in SAH patients may associate with worse outcome. PMID:28102428

  19. Effect of subarachnoid hemorrhage on contractile responses and noradrenaline release evoked in cat cerebral arteries by histamine

    SciTech Connect

    Lobato, R.D.; Marin, J.; Salaices, M.; Rico, M.L.; Sanchez, C.F.

    1981-10-01

    This study analyzes the changes induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on the contractile responses and the noradrenaline release evoked in cat cerebral arteries by histamine. The dose-dependent vasoconstriction induced by histamine on the cerebral arteries of normal cats was significantly reduced by diphenhydramine and phentolamine. When SAH was produced 3 and 7 days before the experiment, the histamine-induced vasoconstriction also decreased. Thereafter, a tendency to normalization in the contractile vascular responses was observed such that in 15 days after the hemorrhage it was not significantly different from that found in controls animals. The decrease in the contractile responses to histamine provoked by SAH was similar to that seen after pretreatment with intracisternal injections of 6-hydroxydopamine. The amount of radioactivity released by histamine following preincubation with /sup 3/H-noradrenaline from the cerebral arteries of cats exposed to SAH 3, 7, and 15 days before the experiment was significantly reduced when compared with controls. Moreover, the basal level of tritium release and the radioactivity retained at the end of the experiment were also decreased after SAH. Results indicate histamine releases noradrenaline from cat cerebral arteries, and SAH produce a transient denervation of the perivascular adrenergic nerve endings, which explained by the impairment of the indirect adrenergic mechanism involved in the overall contractile response elicited by this amine in cerebral arteries. Histamine does not seem to play a significant role in the production of the cerebral vasospasm occurring after SAH.

  20. Functional response of cerebral blood flow induced by somatosensory stimulation in rats with subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiguo; Huang, Qin; Liu, Peng; Li, Pengcheng; Ma, Lianting; Lu, Jinling

    2015-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often accompanied by cerebral vasospasm (CVS), which is the phenomenon of narrowing of large cerebral arteries, and then can produce delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND) such as lateralized sensory dysfunction. CVS was regarded as a major contributor to DIND in patients with SAH. However, therapy for preventing vasospasm after SAH to improve the outcomes may not work all the time. It is important to find answers to the relationship between CVS and DIND after SAH. How local cerebral blood flow (CBF) is regulated during functional activation after SAH still remains poorly understood, whereas, the regulation of CBF may play an important role in weakening the impact of CVS on cortex function. Therefore, it is worthwhile to evaluate the functional response of CBF in the activated cortex in an SAH animal model. Most evaluation of the effect of SAH is presently carried out by neurological behavioral scales. The functional imaging of cortical activation during sensory stimulation may help to reflect the function of the somatosensory cortex more locally than the behavioral scales do. We investigated the functional response of CBF in the somatosensory cortex induced by an electrical stimulation to contralateral forepaw via laser speckle imaging in a rat SAH model. Nineteen Sprague-Dawley rats from two groups (control group, n=10 and SAH group, n=9) were studied. SAH was induced in rats by double injection of autologous blood into the cisterna magna after CSF aspiration. The same surgical procedure was applied in the control group without CSF aspiration or blood injection. Significant CVS was found in the SAH group. Meanwhile, we observed a delayed peak of CBF response in rats with SAH compared with those in the control group, whereas no significant difference was found in magnitude, duration, and areas under curve of relative CBF changes between the two groups. The results suggest that the regulation function of local CBF during

  1. A Systematic and Meta-Analysis of Mortality in Experimental Mouse Models Analyzing Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Marcel A; Lieshout, Jasper H van; Dibué-Adjei, Maxine; Weber, Jasmin K; Schneider, Toni; Restin, Tanja; Fischer, Igor; Steiger, Hans-Jakob

    2017-01-30

    Animal models are established to display the pathophysiological changes following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The aim of the present study was to determine case fatality in mouse delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) models, to compare mortality in mouse DCI models to case fatality in human SAH patients, and to identify factors influencing mouse mortality. A systematic search of the PubMed database was performed to identify all studies that assessed mouse DCI models. Mortality rates and predictor variables were extracted and compared to the human case fatality after SAH as previously reported. Predictors for mouse mortality were identified through multivariate analysis. Forty-eight studies were included in the quantitative analysis. The mean overall mortality rate was 21% in mouse DCI models. However, the time period between induction of SAH and evaluation of mortality rates is a significant variable influencing the mortality rate in mouse SAH models. The experimental SAH model was the only significant predictor for mouse mortality after 48 h. In contrast, neither the genetic background nor the anesthetic changed the case fatality rate. Mouse mortality at 24, 48, and 72 h after experimental SAH in DCI models was significantly lower than human case fatality following aneurysmal SAH. The mean overall mortality rate in mouse DCI models is significantly lower than human case fatality following aneurysmal SAH. However, time between SAH induction and evaluation is a significant variable influencing the mortality rate in mouse SAH models. Further analyses will be required to establish whether and to which extent different DCI models affect mortality and reflect human pathophysiology.

  2. Cannabinoid type 2 receptor stimulation attenuates brain edema by reducing cerebral leukocyte infiltration following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Mutsumi; Sherchan, Prativa; Krafft, Paul R; Rolland, William B; Soejima, Yoshiteru; Zhang, John H

    2014-07-15

    Early brain injury (EBI), following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), comprises blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and consequent edema formation. Peripheral leukocytes can infiltrate the injured brain, thereby aggravating BBB leakage and neuroinflammation. Thus, anti-inflammatory pharmacotherapies may ameliorate EBI and provide neuroprotection after SAH. Cannabinoid type 2 receptor (CB2R) agonism has been shown to reduce neuroinflammation; however, the precise protective mechanisms remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate whether the selective CB2R agonist, JWH133 can ameliorate EBI by reducing brain-infiltrated leukocytes after SAH. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: sham-operated, SAH with vehicle, SAH with JWH133 (1.0mg/kg), or SAH with a co-administration of JWH133 and selective CB2R antagonist SR144528 (3.0mg/kg). SAH was induced by endovascular perforation, and JWH133 was administered 1h after surgery. Neurological deficits, brain water content, Evans blue dye extravasation, and Western blot assays were evaluated at 24h after surgery. JWH133 improved neurological scores and reduced brain water content; however, SR144528 reversed these treatment effects. JWH133 reduced Evans blue dye extravasation after SAH. Furthermore, JWH133 treatment significantly increased TGF-β1 expression and prevented an SAH-induced increase in E-selectin and myeloperoxidase. Lastly, SAH resulted in a decreased expression of the tight junction protein zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1); however, JWH133 treatment increased the ZO-1 expression. We suggest that CB2R stimulation attenuates neurological outcome and brain edema, by suppressing leukocyte infiltration into the brain through TGF-β1 up-regulation and E-selectin reduction, resulting in protection of the BBB after SAH.

  3. Lipocalin 2 and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in White Matter after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Egashira, Yusuke; Hua, Ya; Keep, Richard F; Iwama, Toru; Xi, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    We reported previously that subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) causes acute white matter injury in mice. In this study, we investigated lipocalin 2 (LCN2) mediated blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in white matter, which may lead to subsequent injury. SAH was induced by endovascular perforation in wild-type (WT) and LCN2-knockout (LCN2(-/-)) mice. Sham mice underwent the same procedure without perforation. Mice underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 24 h after SAH to confirm the development of T2-hyperintensity in white matter. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to elucidate the mechanisms of LCN2-mediated white matter injury and BBB disruption. It was confirmed that LCN2 expression was significantly increased in white matter of WT mice after SAH by Western blotting (versus sham; p < 0.05). Immunohistochemistry showed that LCN2 receptor 24p3R was expressed in oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, endothelial cells, and pericytes in the white matter. In WT mice with SAH, albumin leakage along the white matter was prominently observed and was consistent with T2-hyperintensity on MRI. As with our previous report, LCN2(-/-) mice scarcely developed T2-hyperintensity on MRI or albumin leakage in white matter. Our results suggest that BBB leakage occurs in white matter after SAH and that LCN2 contributes to SAH-induced BBB disruption.

  4. Clinical trials in cardiac arrest and subarachnoid hemorrhage: lessons from the past and ideas for the future.

    PubMed

    Frontera, Jennifer A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Elevated intracranial pressure that occurs at the time of cerebral aneurysm rupture can lead to inadequate cerebral blood flow, which may mimic the brain injury cascade that occurs after cardiac arrest. Insights from clinical trials in cardiac arrest may provide direction for future early brain injury research after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods. A search of PubMed from 1980 to 2012 and clinicaltrials.gov was conducted to identify published and ongoing randomized clinical trials in aneurysmal SAH and cardiac arrest patients. Only English, adult, human studies with primary or secondary mortality or neurological outcomes were included. Results. A total of 142 trials (82 SAH, 60 cardiac arrest) met the review criteria (103 published, 39 ongoing). The majority of both published and ongoing SAH trials focus on delayed secondary insults after SAH (70%), while 100% of cardiac arrest trials tested interventions within the first few hours of ictus. No SAH trials addressing treatment of early brain injury were identified. Twenty-nine percent of SAH and 13% of cardiac arrest trials showed outcome benefit, though there is no overlap mechanistically. Conclusions. Clinical trials in SAH assessing acute brain injury are warranted and successful interventions identified by the cardiac arrest literature may be reasonable targets of the study.

  5. Apigenin protects blood-brain barrier and ameliorates early brain injury by inhibiting TLR4-mediated inflammatory pathway in subarachnoid hemorrhage rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingting; Su, Jingyuan; Guo, Bingyu; Wang, Kaiwen; Li, Xiaoming; Liang, Guobiao

    2015-09-01

    Early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Inflammation has been considered as the major contributor to brain damage after SAH. SAH induces a systemic increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) facilitates the influx of inflammatory cells. It has been reported that the activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/NF-κB signaling pathway plays a vital role in the central nervous system diseases. Apigenin, a common plant flavonoid, possesses anti-inflammation effect. In this study, we focused on the effects of apigenin on EBI following SAH and its anti-inflammation mechanism. Our results showed that apigenin (20mg/kg) administration significantly attenuated EBI (including brain edema, BBB disruption, neurological deficient, severity of SAH, and cell apoptosis) after SAH in rats by suppressing the expression of TLR4, NF-κB and their downstream pro-inflammatory cytokines in the cortex and by up-regulating the expression of tight junction proteins of BBB. Double immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that TLR4 was activated following SAH in neurons, microglia cells, and endothelial cells but not in astrocytes. Apigenin could suppress the activation of TLR4 induced by SAH and inhibit apoptosis of cells in the cortex. These results suggested that apigenin could attenuate EBI after SAH in rats by suppressing TLR4-mediated inflammation and protecting against BBB disruption.

  6. Inhibition of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products (RAGE) Attenuates Neuroinflammation While Sensitizing Cortical Neurons Towards Death in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Yu, Jia-Sheng; Zhang, Ding-Ding; Yang, Yi-Qing; Huang, Li-Tian; Yu, Zhuang; Chen, Ru-Dong; Yang, Hong-Kuan; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a threatening and devastating neurological insult with high mortality and morbidity rates. Despite considerable efforts, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are still poorly understood. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor that has been implicated in various pathological conditions. We previously showed that RAGE was upregulated and may be involved in pathophysiology of SAH. In the current study, we investigated its potential role in SAH. We found that the upregulation of RAGE after SAH was NF-κB-dependent positive feedback regulation. Further, pharmacological inhibition of RAGE attenuated neuroinflammation, indicating a possible contributive role of RAGE in inflammation-associated brain injury after SAH. Conversely, however, inhibition of RAGE sensitized neurons, exacerbating cell death, which correlated with augmented apoptosis and diminished autophagy, suggesting that activation of RAGE may protect against SAH-induced neuronal injury. Furthermore, we demonstrate that inhibition of RAGE significantly reduced brain edema and improved neurological function at day 1 but not at day 3 post-SAH. Taken together, these results suggest that RAGE exerts dual role after SAH. Our findings also suggest caution should be exercised in setting RAGE-targeted treatment for SAH.

  7. Anti-high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) antibody attenuates delayed cerebral vasospasm and brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Haruma, Jun; Teshigawara, Kiyoshi; Hishikawa, Tomohito; Wang, Dengli; Liu, Keyue; Wake, Hidenori; Mori, Shuji; Takahashi, Hideo Kohka; Sugiu, Kenji; Date, Isao; Nishibori, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Although delayed cerebral vasospasm (DCV) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is closely related to the progression of brain damage, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying its development. High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) plays an important role as an initial inflammatory mediator in SAH. In this study, an SAH rat model was employed to evaluate the effects of anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) on DCV after SAH. A vasoconstriction of the basilar artery (BA) associated with a reduction of nuclear HMGB1 and its translocation in vascular smooth muscle cells were observed in SAH rats, and anti-HMGB1 mAb administration significantly suppressed these effects. Up-regulations of inflammation-related molecules and vasoconstriction-mediating receptors in the BA of SAH rats were inhibited by anti-HMGB1 mAb treatment. Anti-HMGB1 mAb attenuated the enhanced vasocontractile response to thrombin of the isolated BA from SAH rats and prevented activation of cerebrocortical microglia. Moreover, locomotor activity and weight loss recovery were also enhanced by anti-HMGB1 mAb administration. The vasocontractile response of the BA under SAH may be induced by events that are downstream of responses to HMGB1-induced inflammation and inhibited by anti-HMGB1 mAb. Anti-HMGB1 mAb treatment may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for DCV and early brain injury after SAH. PMID:27883038

  8. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage following ischemia in vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Arseny A.; Husain, Shakir; Sztajzel, Roman; Croquelois, Alexandre; Lobrinus, Johannes A.; Thaler, David; Städler, Claudio; Hungerbühler, Hansjörg; Caso, Valeria; Rinkel, Gabriel J.; Michel, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBD) is a chronic disorder with various cerebrovascular and compressive manifestations, involving subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Occurrence of SAH shortly after worsening of clinical VBD symptoms has occasionally been reported. The goal of the study was to examine this association, in particular its pathophysiology, clinical precursor signs, time course, and outcome. To this end, in a retrospective multicenter study, we analyzed 20 patients with VBD and SAH in regard to preceding clinical symptoms, presence of vertebrobasilar thrombosis and ischemia, outcome and neuropathological correlates. Median age of the 7 female and 13 male patients was 70 years (interquartile range [IQR] 18.3 years). Fourteen patients (70%) presented with new or acutely worsening posterior fossa signs at a median of 3 days prior to SAH (IQR 2, range 0.5–14). A thrombus within the VBD was detected in 12 patients (60%). Thrombus formation was associated with clinical deterioration (χ2 = 4.38, P = 0.04) and ponto-cerebellar ischemia (χ2 = 8.09, P = 0.005). During follow-up after SAH, 13 patients (65%) died, after a median survival time of 24 hours (IQR 66.2, range 2–264 hours), with a significant association between proven ponto-cerebellar ischemia and case fatality (χ2 = 6.24, P = 0.01). The data establish an association between clinical deterioration in patients with VBD, vertebrobasilar ischemia, and subsequent SAH. Antithrombotic treatment after deterioration appears controversial and SAH outcome is frequently fatal. Our data also indicate a short window of 3 days that may allow for evaluating interventional treatment, preferably within randomized trials. PMID:27399083

  9. Hemorrhagic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Hemorrhagic stroke is the less common type. It happens when ... an artery wall that breaks open. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, ...

  10. Delayed Rebleeding of Cerebral Aneurysm Misdiagnosed as Traumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Song, Seung-Yoon; Park, Jong-Tae; Kang, Sung-Don

    2016-01-01

    An intracranial saccular aneurysm is uncommonly diagnosed in a patient with closed head trauma. We herein present a patient with delayed rebleeding of a cerebral aneurysm misdiagnosed as traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 26-year-old female visited our emergency department because of headache after a motorcycle accident. Brain computed tomography (CT) showed a right-side dominant SAH in Sylvian fissure. Although traumatic SAH was strongly suggested because of the history of head trauma, we performed a CT angiogram to exclude any vascular abnormalities. The CT angiogram showed no vascular abnormality. She was discharged after conservative treatment. One day after discharge, she returned to the emergency department because of mental deterioration. Brain CT showed diffuse SAH, which was dominant in the right Sylvian fissure. The CT angiogram revealed a right middle cerebral artery bifurcation aneurysm. During operation, a non-traumatic true saccular aneurysm was found. The patient recovered fully after successful clipping of the aneurysm and was discharged without neurologic deficit. Normal findings on a CT angiogram do not always exclude aneurysmal SAH. Follow-up vascular study should be considered in trauma patients who are highly suspicious of aneurysmal rupture. PMID:27847770

  11. Impact of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage on Parenchymal Arteriolar Function

    PubMed Central

    Wellman, George C.; Koide, Masayo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Intracerebral or parenchymal arterioles play an important role in the regulation of both global and regional blood flow within the brain. Brain cortex lacks significant collateral sources of blood and are thus at risk if blood flow through parenchymal arterioles is restricted. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating that abnormal parenchymal arteriolar constriction contributes to the development of neurological deficits caused by subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). For example, parenchymal arterioles isolated from SAH model rats exhibit enhanced constriction in response to increased intravascular pressure. This increased pressure-dependent constriction or myogenic tone would result in a shift in the cerebral autoregulatory response and decreased cerebral perfusion. Here, we summarize our current knowledge regarding cellular mechanisms contributing to enhanced contractility of parenchymal arteriolar myocytes following SAH. Our studies demonstrate SAH-induced membrane potential depolarization involving altered K+ homeostasis leads to enhanced voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel activity, increased smooth muscle cytosolic Ca2+ and parenchymal arteriolar constriction. In summary, emerging evidence demonstrates that SAH can profoundly affect parenchymal arteriolar tone promoting decreased cortical blood flow and compromised neuronal viability. PMID:22890665

  12. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, Spreading Depolarizations and Impaired Neurovascular Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Masayo; Sukhotinsky, Inna; Ayata, Cenk; Wellman, George C.

    2013-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has devastating consequences on brain function including profound effects on communication between neurons and the vasculature leading to cerebral ischemia. Physiologically, neurovascular coupling represents a focal increase in cerebral blood flow to meet increased metabolic demand of neurons within active regions of the brain. Neurovascular coupling is an ongoing process involving coordinated activity of the neurovascular unit—neurons, astrocytes, and parenchymal arterioles. Neuronal activity can also influence cerebral blood flow on a larger scale. Spreading depolarizations (SD) are self-propagating waves of neuronal depolarization and are observed during migraine, traumatic brain injury, and stroke. Typically, SD is associated with increased cerebral blood flow. Emerging evidence indicates that SAH causes inversion of neurovascular communication on both the local and global level. In contrast to other events causing SD, SAH-induced SD decreases rather than increases cerebral blood flow. Further, at the level of the neurovascular unit, SAH causes an inversion of neurovascular coupling from vasodilation to vasoconstriction. Global ischemia can also adversely affect the neurovascular response. Here, we summarize current knowledge regarding the impact of SAH and global ischemia on neurovascular communication. A mechanistic understanding of these events should provide novel strategies to treat these neurovascular disorders. PMID:23577279

  13. Subarachnoid hemorrhage in the rat: cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism after selective lesions of the catecholamine systems in the brainstem

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado, T.J.; Diemer, N.H.; Svendgaard, N.A.

    1986-10-01

    A double-isotope autoradiographic technique was used to evaluate CBF and glucose metabolism 2 days after a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in rats with lesions in the lower brainstem. Lesioning in the mesencephalon of the ascending catecholamine pathways from locus ceruleus and from the A1 and A2 nuclei, or lesioning in the medulla oblongata of the ascending fibers from A1 and A2, prevents the development of the global changes in flow and metabolism seen in normal animals post SAH. Also the focal low-flow areas with markedly elevated deoxyglucose uptake, which can develop in normal animals 2 days post SAH, were not seen in the lesioned animals after the SAH. The findings indicate that the A1 and A2 nuclei, which project to the hypothalamus-pituitary, are essential for the flow and metabolic changes after an SAH. The lesions per se did not change baseline flow and metabolism as compared with sham-lesioned animals.

  14. The first clinical case due to AP92 like strain of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever virus and a field survey

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) is a fatal infection, but no clinical case due to AP92 strain was reported. We described the first clinical case due to AP92 like CCHFV. Methods A case infected by a AP92 like CCHFV was detected in Balkanian part of Turkey. Diagnosis was confirmed by RT-PCR and sequencing. A human serologic and tick survey studies were performed in the region, where the case detected. Results Thirty eight individuals out of 741 were found to be anti CCHFV IgM positive. The attack rate for overall CCHFV was calculated as 5.2%. In univariate analyses, CCHFV IgM positivity was found to be associated with the age (p < 0.001), male gender (p = 0.001), agricultural activity (p = 0.036), and history of tick bite (p = 0.014). In multivariate analysis, older age (OR: 1.03, CI:1.01–1.05, p < 0.001), male gender were found to be the risk factors (OR: 2.5, CI:1.15–5.63, p = 0.020) for CCHFV infection. Conclusion This is the first human case with AP92 like CCHFV infection. Furthermore, this is the first report of AP92 like strain in Turkey. In the region, elderly males carry the highest risk for CCHFV infection. PMID:19515251

  15. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related atraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage: an ARIA before the tsunami

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Lizana, Eva; Carmona-Iragui, María; Alcolea, Daniel; Gómez-Choco, Manuel; Vilaplana, Eduard; Sánchez-Saudinós, María B; Clarimón, Jordi; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Munuera, Josep; Gelpi, Ellen; Gómez-Anson, Beatriz; de Juan-Delago, Manel; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Montaner, Joan; Ois, Angel; Amaro, Sergi; Blesa, Rafael; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Atraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH) in elderly patients is a rare entity that has been associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and intracerebral hematomas (ICH). To characterize this entity and to study these associations, 22 patients over 60 with cSAH were included in a multicenter ambispective cohort study. Clinical data, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, APOE genotyping, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers were evaluated. Results were compared with data from healthy controls (HC), non-cSAH CAA patients (CAAo), and Alzheimer disease patients. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage presented with transient sensory or motor symptoms. At follow-up (median 30.7 months), 5 patients had died, 6 survivors showed functional disability (modified Rankins Scale (mRS)>2), and 12 cognitive impairment. Four patients had prior ICH and six had an ICH during follow-up. CSF-Aß40 and Aß42 levels were lower in cSAH and CAAo compared with HC. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage presented an APOE-ɛ2 overrepresentation and CAAo had an APOE-ɛ4 overrepresentation. On MRI, all patients fulfilled CAA-modified Boston criteria and 9 showed cortical ischemia in the surrounding cortex or the vicinity of superficial siderosis. The neuropathologic study, available in one patient, showed severe CAA and advanced Alzheimer-type pathology. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the elderly is associated with cognitive impairment and lobar ICH occurrence. Our findings support the existence of an underlying CAA pathology. PMID:25735919

  16. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is correlated with delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and poor prognosis in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunxiao; Zhou, Wei; Yan, Zhaoyue; Qu, Mingqi; Bu, Xingyao

    2015-12-15

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is one of key players in regulation of inflammation. Animal experiments have suggested an important role of TLR4 in the pathophysiology of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In present study, TLR4 is investigated in clinical SAH patients to explore its clinical significance. 30 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and 20 healthy control patients (HC) were enrolled in this prospective study. Blood samples were collected on days 1, 3 and 7 after admission. TLR4 expression level on cell surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was determined by flow cytometry and presented as mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). Patients were clinically assessed every day after admission to monitor the occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Participants were followed up until completion of 3 months after SAH. Functional outcome was defined by modified Rankin score (mRs). Results show that SAH patients presented a significantly higher TLR4 levels on days 1 and 3 post SAH compared to HC; TLR4 levels in SAH patients on day 1 was highest compared with that on days 3 and 7 and in HC. TLR4 of SAH patients on day 7 declined to the level showing no significant difference with that of HC. In patients with Hunt-Hess grades I-III lower TLR4 levels were observed. Patients with DCI showed significantly higher TLR4 levels than those without DCI. High TLR4 levels were statistically significantly associated with poor functional outcome after 3 months. Logistic regression analysis showed that TLR4 level on day 1 was independent predictor for DCI and 3-month poor neurological outcome of aneurysmal SAH patients. In summary, admission TLR4 level on PBMCs (day 1) is an independent risk factor to predict the occurrence of DCI and 3-month poor neurological outcome in aneurysmal SAH patients.

  17. Astrocyte Ca2+ Signaling Drives Inversion of Neurovascular Coupling after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Anthony C; Koide, Masayo; Wellman, George C

    2015-09-30

    Physiologically, neurovascular coupling (NVC) matches focal increases in neuronal activity with local arteriolar dilation. Astrocytes participate in NVC by sensing increased neurotransmission and releasing vasoactive agents (e.g., K(+)) from perivascular endfeet surrounding parenchymal arterioles. Previously, we demonstrated an increase in the amplitude of spontaneous Ca(2+) events in astrocyte endfeet and inversion of NVC from vasodilation to vasoconstriction in brain slices obtained from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model rats. However, the role of spontaneous astrocyte Ca(2+) signaling in determining the polarity of the NVC response remains unclear. Here, we used two-photon imaging of Fluo-4-loaded rat brain slices to determine whether altered endfoot Ca(2+) signaling underlies SAH-induced inversion of NVC. We report a time-dependent emergence of endfoot high-amplitude Ca(2+) signals (eHACSs) after SAH that were not observed in endfeet from unoperated animals. Furthermore, the percentage of endfeet with eHACSs varied with time and paralleled the development of inversion of NVC. Endfeet with eHACSs were present only around arterioles exhibiting inversion of NVC. Importantly, depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores using cyclopiazonic acid abolished SAH-induced eHACSs and restored arteriolar dilation in SAH brain slices to two mediators of NVC (a rise in endfoot Ca(2+) and elevation of extracellular K(+)). These data indicate a causal link between SAH-induced eHACSs and inversion of NVC. Ultrastructural examination using transmission electron microscopy indicated that a similar proportion of endfeet exhibiting eHACSs also exhibited asymmetrical enlargement. Our results demonstrate that subarachnoid blood causes a delayed increase in the amplitude of spontaneous intracellular Ca(2+) release events leading to inversion of NVC. Significance statement: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)--strokes involving cerebral aneurysm rupture and release of blood onto the

  18. VAP-1 blockade prevents subarachnoid hemorrhage-associated cerebrovascular dilating dysfunction via repression of a neutrophil recruitment-related mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haoliang; Testai, Fernando D; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; N Pavuluri, Mani; Zhai, Fengguo; Nanegrungsunk, Danop; Paisansathan, Chanannait; Pelligrino, Dale A

    2015-04-07

    Our previous findings indicated that in rats subjected to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), suppression of post-SAH neuroinflammation via vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) blockade provides significant neuroprotection. We and others have reported that neuroinflammation contributes to cerebral microvascular impairment. Thus, in the present study, we tested the hypotheses that: (1) treatment with LJP-1586, a selective VAP-1 blocker, prevents SAH-associated pial arteriolar dilating dysfunction; and (2) the vasculoprotective effect of LJP-1586 arises from inhibiting SAH-elicited neutrophil recruitment. We utilized an endovascular perforation model of SAH. Rats subjected to SAH were either treated with LJP-1586 or rendered neutropenic via anti-neutrophil-antibody treatment. Findings from these groups were compared to their respective control groups. At 48 h post-SAH, rats were evaluated for neurobehavioral function, pial venular leukocyte trafficking, and pial arteriolar reactivity to topically-applied acetylcholine (ACh) and S-nitroso-N-acetyl penicillamine (SNAP). Pial arteriolar responses decreased at 48 h post-SAH. However, in the presence of LJP-1586, those responses were significantly preserved. Neutrophil-depletion yielded a substantial suppression of SAH-associated leukocyte adhesion and infiltration. This was accompanied by a significant preservation of pial arteriolar dilating function, suggesting a direct link between neutrophil recruitment and the loss of cerebral microvascular reactivity. Moreover, neutrophil depletion also was associated with significant protection of neurobehavioral function. The present findings suggest that attenuating SAH-linked elevation in neutrophil trafficking will protect against the development of microvascular dysfunction and subsequent neurological impairment.

  19. Simvastatin Attenuation of Cerebral Vasospasm After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats Via Increased Phosphorylation of Akt and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Takashi; Ayer, Robert; Jadhav, Vikram; Chen, Wanqiu; Tsubokawa, Tamiji; Zhang, John H.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in simvastatin-mediated attenuation of cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are unclear. We investigated the role of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) pathway and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the cerebral vasculature in statin-mediated attenuation of cerebral vasospasm using wortmannin, an irreversible pharmacological PI3K inhibitor, and a rat SAH endovascular perforation model. Simvastatin was administered intraperitoneally in two dosages (1 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg) at 0.5, 24, and 48 hr after SAH and histological parameters of ipsilateral intracranial carotid artery (ICA) were assessed at 24 and 72 hr. SAH significantly decreased ICA diameter and perimeter while increasing wall thickness at both 24 and 72 hr. High-dosage simvastatin prevented the reduction of ICA diameter and perimeter following SAH, whereas both high and low dosages reduced wall thickness significantly at 24 and 72 hr. The effects of simvastatin were significantly reversed by wortmannin. High-dosage simvastatin increased pAkt and peNOS (phosphorylated forms) levels without increasing Akt and eNOS expression compared with the SAH group and also improved neurological deficits at 24 and 72 hr. Simvastatin did not affect protein levels by itself compared with untreated sham group. The present study elucidates the critical role of the PI3K activation leading to phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS in simvastatin-mediated attenuation of cerebral vasospasm after SAH. PMID:18683242

  20. Transient receptor potential channel 1/4 reduces subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced early brain injury in rats via calcineurin-mediated NMDAR and NFAT dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong; Wang, Yibin; Tian, Xiaodi; Shen, Haitao; Dou, Yang; Li, Haiying; Chen, Gang

    2016-09-19

    Transient receptor potential channel 1/4 (TRPC1/4) are considered to be related to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced cerebral vasospasm. In this study, a SAH rat model was employed to study the roles of TRPC1/4 in the early brain injury (EBI) after SAH. Primary cultured hippocampal neurons were exposed to oxyhemoglobin to mimic SAH in vitro. The protein levels of TRPC1/4 increased and peaked at 5 days after SAH in rats. Inhibition of TRPC1/4 by SKF96365 aggravated SAH-induced EBI, such as cortical cell death (by TUNEL staining) and degenerating (by FJB staining). In addition, TRPC1/4 overexpression could increase calcineurin activity, while increased calcineurin activity could promote the dephosphorylation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Calcineurin antagonist FK506 could weaken the neuroprotection and the dephosphorylation of NMDAR induced by TRPC1/4 overexpression. Contrarily, calcineurin agonist chlorogenic acid inhibited SAH-induced EBI, even when siRNA intervention of TRPC1/4 was performed. Moreover, calcineurin also could lead to the nuclear transfer of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), which is a transcription factor promoting the expressions of TRPC1/4. TRPC1/4 could inhibit SAH-induced EBI by supressing the phosphorylation of NMDAR via calcineurin. TRPC1/4-induced calcineurin activation also could promote the nuclear transfer of NFAT, suggesting a positive feedback regulation of TRPC1/4 expressions.

  1. Transient receptor potential channel 1/4 reduces subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced early brain injury in rats via calcineurin-mediated NMDAR and NFAT dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhong; Wang, Yibin; Tian, Xiaodi; Shen, Haitao; Dou, Yang; Li, Haiying; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential channel 1/4 (TRPC1/4) are considered to be related to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced cerebral vasospasm. In this study, a SAH rat model was employed to study the roles of TRPC1/4 in the early brain injury (EBI) after SAH. Primary cultured hippocampal neurons were exposed to oxyhemoglobin to mimic SAH in vitro. The protein levels of TRPC1/4 increased and peaked at 5 days after SAH in rats. Inhibition of TRPC1/4 by SKF96365 aggravated SAH-induced EBI, such as cortical cell death (by TUNEL staining) and degenerating (by FJB staining). In addition, TRPC1/4 overexpression could increase calcineurin activity, while increased calcineurin activity could promote the dephosphorylation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Calcineurin antagonist FK506 could weaken the neuroprotection and the dephosphorylation of NMDAR induced by TRPC1/4 overexpression. Contrarily, calcineurin agonist chlorogenic acid inhibited SAH-induced EBI, even when siRNA intervention of TRPC1/4 was performed. Moreover, calcineurin also could lead to the nuclear transfer of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), which is a transcription factor promoting the expressions of TRPC1/4. TRPC1/4 could inhibit SAH-induced EBI by supressing the phosphorylation of NMDAR via calcineurin. TRPC1/4-induced calcineurin activation also could promote the nuclear transfer of NFAT, suggesting a positive feedback regulation of TRPC1/4 expressions. PMID:27641617

  2. Pseudo-subarachnoid hemorrhage in cryptococcal meningitis: MRI findings and pathological study.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Yoshiharu; Kudo, Yosuke; Yamamoto, Ryoo; Johkura, Ken

    2013-12-01

    A pseudo-subarachnoid hemorrhage (pseudo-SAH) is a brain computed tomography (CT) finding that is seen as high-density areas along the basal cisterns, the sylvian vallecula/fissure, the tentorium cerebella, or the cortical sulci, although no SAH is found upon lumbar puncture or at autopsy. There is one report of cryptococcal meningitis presenting as pseudo-SAH, but the explanatory pathology is unknown. A 68-year-old woman with headache, fever, decreased hearing, and decreased vision was admitted to our hospital. Cerebrospinal fluid India ink staining was positive, and culture yielded Cryptococcus neoformans. Cryptococcus meningitis was diagnosed. Head CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no abnormality upon admission, but 1 month later, head CT showed iso- to high-density areas within the sulci, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MRI showed high signal intensity within the convexity sulci resembling an SAH. These areas were enhanced by gadolinium on T1-weighted images. Lumber puncture produced no evidence of bleeding. Biopsy of the left frontal lobe sulci was performed, and histopathological study revealed inflammation and granulation with capsules of C. neoformans. The inflammation and granulation at the convexity sulci induced by the C. neoformans infection explained the pseudo-SAH in this case. Physicians should be aware that cryptococcal meningitis-induced inflammation and granulation at the sulci can present as pseudo-SAH on CT and MRI.

  3. Determining rural risk for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhages: A structural equation modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Linda Jayne; Gall, Seana; Stirling, Christine

    2016-01-01

    An aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) carries a high disability burden. The true impact of rurality as a predictor of outcome severity is unknown. Our aim is to clarify the relationship between the proposed explanations of regional and rural health disparities linked to severity of outcome following an aSAH. An initial literature search identified limited data directly linking geographical location, rurality, rural vulnerability, and aSAH. A further search noting parallels with ischemic stroke and acute myocardial infarct literature presented a number of diverse and interrelated predictors. This a priori knowledge informed the development of a conceptual framework that proposes the relationship between rurality and severity of outcome following an aSAH utilizing structural equation modeling. The presented conceptual framework explores a number of system, environmental, and modifiable risk factors. Socioeconomic characteristics, modifiable risk factors, and timely treatment that were identified as predictors of severity of outcome following an aSAH and within each of these defined predictors a number of contributing specific individual predictors are proposed. There are considerable gaps in the current knowledge pertaining to the impact of rurality on the severity of outcome following an aSAH. Absent from the literature is any investigation of the cumulative impact and multiplicity of risk factors associated with rurality. The proposed conceptual framework hypothesizes a number of relationships between both individual level and system level predictors, acknowledging that intervening predictors may mediate the effect of one variable on another.

  4. Protective effect 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol in subarachnoid hemorrhage provoked oxidative neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yu-Wen; Wu, Juan; Hu, Hua-Long; Li, Wei-Xin; Zhong, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies have indicated that early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with fatal outcomes. Oxidative stress and brain edema are the characteristic pathological events in occurrence EBI following SAH. The present study aimed to examine the effect of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (DOPET) against SAH-induced EBI, and to demonstrate whether the effect is associated with its potent free radical scavenging property. SAH was induced in rats using an endovascular perforation technique, and 24 h later the rats displayed diminished neurological scores and brain edema. Furthermore, elevated malondialdehyde (an index of lipid peroxidation) and depleted levels of antioxidants were observed in the rat cerebral cortex tissue. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated the upregulated mRNA expression of the apoptotic markers caspase-3 and −9 in the cerebral cortex. Furthermore, the protein expression levels of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 were significantly upregulated in SAH-induced rats. By constrast, treatment with DOPET significantly attenuated EBI by reducing brain edema, elevation of antioxidant status, inhibition of apoptosis and inflammation. In this context, DOPET may be a potent agent in the treatment of EBI following SAH, as a result of its free radical scavenging capacity. PMID:27588109

  5. Determining rural risk for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhages: A structural equation modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Linda Jayne; Gall, Seana; Stirling, Christine

    2016-01-01

    An aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) carries a high disability burden. The true impact of rurality as a predictor of outcome severity is unknown. Our aim is to clarify the relationship between the proposed explanations of regional and rural health disparities linked to severity of outcome following an aSAH. An initial literature search identified limited data directly linking geographical location, rurality, rural vulnerability, and aSAH. A further search noting parallels with ischemic stroke and acute myocardial infarct literature presented a number of diverse and interrelated predictors. This a priori knowledge informed the development of a conceptual framework that proposes the relationship between rurality and severity of outcome following an aSAH utilizing structural equation modeling. The presented conceptual framework explores a number of system, environmental, and modifiable risk factors. Socioeconomic characteristics, modifiable risk factors, and timely treatment that were identified as predictors of severity of outcome following an aSAH and within each of these defined predictors a number of contributing specific individual predictors are proposed. There are considerable gaps in the current knowledge pertaining to the impact of rurality on the severity of outcome following an aSAH. Absent from the literature is any investigation of the cumulative impact and multiplicity of risk factors associated with rurality. The proposed conceptual framework hypothesizes a number of relationships between both individual level and system level predictors, acknowledging that intervening predictors may mediate the effect of one variable on another. PMID:27695237

  6. Protective effects of perfluorooctyl-bromide nanoparticles on early brain injuries following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huan; Xu, Rui; Xie, Fei; Xu, Wei; Zeng, Meng-Fei; Wang, Xin; Zhu, Ji

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the protective effects of perfluorooctyl-bromide (PFOB) nanoparticles on early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a total of 120 rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: Sham operation group (n = 40), SAH group (n = 40), and SAH + PFOB group (n = 40). Endovascular perforation was performed to induce subarachnoid hemorrhage. Brain water content was measured 24 h after surgery. Meanwhile, morphological changes in the rat hippocampal CA1 region were examined using light and transmission electron microscopy. The rate of neuronal apoptosis in rat hippocampal CA1 region was determined using TUNEL assay. Protein and mRNA expression levels of Caspase-3, Bax, and Bcl-2 were measured using western blot and RT-PCR assays 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after surgery. Compared to the SAH group, the SAH + PFOB group had significantly lower brain water content (P<0.01), with alleviated morphological abnormalities in HE-stained neurons and significantly decreased neurons with karyopyknosis and hyperchromatism in the hippocampal CA1 region. Electron microscopy revealed reduction of neuronal apoptosis, alleviation of glial cell swelling, and mitigation of perivascular edema in the hippocampal region. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the expression of apoptosis-related factors Caspase-3 and Bax was significantly reduced, while that of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2 was significantly increased. TUNEL staining showed that neuronal apoptosis was significantly reduced in the hippocampal CA1 region (P<0.01). RT-PCR and Western-blot data indicated that expressions of Caspase-3 and Bax were both significantly reduced, while bcl-2 expression was increased significantly at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after SAH (P<0.01). Together, our data support that PFOB nanoparticles with high oxygen content could counteract ischemia and hypoxia, block neuronal apoptotic pathways, reduce neuronal apoptosis, and therefore, achieve neuroprotective effects in EBI

  7. Intrapartum hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Alexander, James M; Wortman, Alison C

    2013-03-01

    Intrapartum hemorrhage is a serious and sometimes life-threatening event. Several etiologies are known and include placental abruption, uterine atony, placenta accreta, and genital tract lacerations. Prompt recognition of blood loss, identification of the source of the hemorrhage, volume resuscitation, including red blood cells and blood products when required, will result in excellent maternal outcomes.

  8. Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Saracen, A; Kotwica, Z; Woźniak-Kosek, A; Kasprzak, P

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is observed in cerebral injuries and has an impact on treatment results, being a predictor of fatal prognosis. In this study we retrospectively reviewed medical records of 250 consecutive patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) for the frequency and treatment results of NPE. The following factors were taken under consideration: clinical status, aneurysm location, presence of NPE, intracranial pressure (ICP), and mortality. All patients had plain- and angio-computer tomography performed. NPE developed most frequently in case of the aneurysm located in the anterior communicating artery. The patients with grades I-III of SAH, according to the World Federation of Neurosurgeons staging, were immediately operated on, while those with poor grades IV and V had only an ICP sensor's implantation procedure performed. A hundred and eighty five patients (74.4 %) were admitted with grades I to III and 32 patients (12.8 %) were with grade IV and V each. NPE was not observed in SAH patients with grade I to III, but it developed in nine patients with grade IV and 11 patients with grade V. Of the 20 patients with NPE, 19 died. Of the 44 poor grade patients (grades IV-V) without NPE, 20 died. All poor grade patients had elevated ICP in a range of 24-56 mmHg. The patients with NPE had a greater ICP than those without NPE. Gender and age had no influence on the occurrence of NPE. We conclude that the development of neurogenic pulmonary edema in SAH patients with poor grades is a fatal prognostic as it about doubles the death rate to almost hundred percent.

  9. Role of hepcidin and its downstream proteins in early brain injury after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guanping; Liu, Liu; He, Zhaohui; Sun, Jiujun; Xing, Wenli; Sun, Xiaochuan

    2016-07-01

    Early brain injury (EBI) is a major cause of mortality from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We aimed to study the pathophysiology of EBI and explore the role of hepcidin, a protein involved in iron homeostatic regulation, and its downstream proteins. One hundred and thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned into groups (n = 24/group): sham, SAH, SAH + hepcidin, SAH + hepcidin-targeting small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA), and SAH + scramble siRNA. Three hepcidin-targeting siRNAs and one scramble siRNA for hepcidin were injected 24 h before hemorrhage induction, and hepcidin protein was injected 30 min before induction. The rats were neurologically evaluated at 24 h and euthanized at 72 h. Hepcidin, ferroportin-1, and ceruloplasmin protein expression were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Brain water content, blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage, non-heme tissue iron and Garcia scale were evaluated. Hepcidin expression increased in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus after experimental SAH (P < 0.05 compared to sham), while ferroportin-1 and ceruloplasmin decreased (P < 0.05). Hepcidin injection lowered the expression of ferroportin-1 and ceruloplasmin further but siRNA reduced the levels of hepcidin (P < 0.05 compared to SAH) resulting in recovery of ferroportin-1 and ceruloplasmin levels. Apoptosis was increased in SAH rats compared to sham (P < 0.05) and increased slightly more by hepcidin, but decreased by siRNA (P < 0.05 compared to SAH). SAH rats had lower neurological scores, high brain water content, BBB permeability, and non-heme tissue iron (P < 0.05). In conclusion, downregulation of ferroportin-1 and ceruloplasmin caused by hepcidin enhanced iron-dependent oxidative damage and may be the potential mechanism of SAH.

  10. Pharmacological Inhibition of PERK Attenuates Early Brain Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats Through the Activation of Akt.

    PubMed

    Yan, Feng; Cao, Shenglong; Li, Jianru; Dixon, Brandon; Yu, Xiaobo; Chen, Jingyin; Gu, Chi; Lin, Wang; Chen, Gao

    2017-04-01

    Neuronal apoptosis is a central pathological process in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced early brain injury. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was reported to have a vital role in the pathophysiology of neuronal apoptosis in the brain. The present study was designed to investigate the potential effects of ER stress and its downstream signals in early brain injury after SAH. One hundred thirty-four rats were subjected to an endovascular perforation model of SAH. The RNA-activated protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK) inhibitor GSK2606414 and the Akt inhibitor MK2206 were injected intracerebroventricularly. SAH grade, neurologic scores, and brain water content were measured 72 h after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Expression of PERK and its downstream signals, Akt, Bcl-2, Bax, and cleaved caspase-3, were examined using Western blot analysis. Specific cell types that expressed PERK were detected with double immunofluorescence staining. Neuronal cell death was demonstrated with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Our results showed that the expression of p-PERK and its downstream targets, p-eIF2α and ATF4, increased after SAH and peaked at 72 h after SAH. PERK was expressed mostly in neurons. The inhibition of PERK with GSK2606414 reduced p-PERK, p-eIF2α, and ATF4 expression. Furthermore, GSK2606414 treatment increased p-Akt levels and the Bcl-2/Bax ratio as well as decreased cleaved caspase-3 expression and neuronal death, thereby improving neurological deficits at 72 h after SAH. The selective Akt inhibitor MK2206 abolished the beneficial effects of GSK2606414. PERK, the major transducer of ER stress, is involved in neuronal apoptosis after SAH. The inhibition of PERK reduces early brain injury via Akt-related anti-apoptosis pathways. PERK may serve as a promising target for future therapeutic intervention.

  11. Convulsion during intra-arterial infusion of fasudil hydrochloride for the treatment of cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Yukiko; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Iwama, Toru

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of convulsion and associated factors were retrospectively analyzed in 23 patients with symptomatic cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) who underwent a total of 31 intra-arterial infusion of fasudil hydrochloride (IAFH) procedures in 49 vessels. Fasudil hydrochloride was administered by superselective infusion via a microcatheter positioned at the proximal portion of the affected artery. Thirteen procedures were performed by manually controlled infusion of 30-75 mg fasudil hydrochloride (1.2-3.75 mg/ml) for approximately 10 minutes. Eighteen procedures were performed by continuous infusion of 60 mg fasudil hydrochloride (1.2 mg/ml) by infusion pump at a constant rate of 3 mg/min. Neurological improvement was observed after 18 of 22 procedures in patients with neurological deterioration due to vasospasm. Convulsion during IAFH developed in 4 patients, all treated by manual infusion (p < 0.05). The manual infusion method (p < 0.05) and infusion rate greater than 3 mg/min (p < 0.01) were significantly associated with the incidence of convulsion during IAFH. IAFH was effective for treating cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal SAH. IAFH at a constant rate of 3 mg/min delivered by infusion pump improved the symptoms of cerebral vasospasm and prevented convulsions during IAFH.

  12. Fatal Hemorrhagic Shock and Acetate Solutions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    trauma victims occur within 1 hourvOf injury and are due to rapid hemorrhage or CNS trauma . We developed a rapid hemorrhage model in unanesthetized swine...UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGErmUen Data Enteed) q g ABSTRACT One-half of deaths among trauma victims occur within 1 hour of injury and...are due to rapid hemorrhage or CNS trauma . We developed a rapid hemorrhage model in unanesthetized swine to simulate human exsanguination. We compared

  13. [Intravitreous injection of bevacizumab and C3F8 gas for the treatment of submacular hemorrhage due to age-related macular degeneration: case reports].

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Daniel Araújo; Bressanim, Gláucio Luciano; Morita, Celso; Takahashi, Walter Yukihiko

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this case series is to describe if the intravitreal use of bevacizumab and perfluoropropane gas (C3F8) would be beneficial to the displacement of subretinal hemorrhage in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). A retrospective study of 5 eyes that received concurrent intravitreal injection of bevacizumab and C3F8 was performed. The results were graded according to blood displacement under the fovea, best final visual acuity and intraoperative complications. At the initial presentation, mean age of patients was 72.6 +/- 8.9 years-old and duration of symptoms was 13 +/- 9.7 days. From the 5 patients, 3 (60%) were male and 2 (40%) female. The success of submacular hemorrhage full displacement was achieved in 4 patients. The mean preoperative visual acuity (VA) was 1.12 +/- 0.34 logMAR and the mean postoperative VA was 0.92 +/- 0.4 logMAR. No cases of retinal detachment, endophthalmitis, vitreous hemorrhage, uveitis, cataracts and increased intraocular pressure were noted during the follow-up period. Intravitreal bevacizumab and C3F8 injection, associated to prone position can be a valuable therapeutic option for eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration and subretinal hemorrhage to the blood displacement out of the foveal area.

  14. Characteristics of Patients With Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Risk Factors Related to Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the characteristics and risk factors of dysphagia with the Videofluoroscopic Dysphagia Scale (VDS) using a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) in patients with ruptured aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Methods Data of 64 patients presenting with first-ever ruptured aSAH were analyzed. Characteristics of dysphagia were evaluated using VFSS and all subjects were divided into a high (>47) and low risk group (≤47) by the VDS score. Clinical and functional parameters were assessed by medical records including demographics, hypertension and diabetes mellitus (DM), the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), the Hunt and Hess scale, endotracheal intubation, acute management modalities, as well as Korean version of the Mini-Mental Status Examination (K-MMSE) and Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI). Radiologic factors identified the amount of hemorrhage, ventricular rupture, and aneurysmal location. Results About a half of the subjects showed oral phase abnormalities and the oral transit time was delayed in 46.8% of the patients. The pharyngeal transit time was also prolonged in 39.0% of the subjects and the proportion of penetration and aspiration observed was 46.8%. The parameters-GCS score (p=0.048), hemorrhagic volume (p=0.028), presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (p=0.038), and K-MMSE (p=0.007)-were predisposing factors for dysphagia in patients with aSAH. Conclusion Abnormalities in the oral phase were more prominent in patients with aSAH than in those with other types of stroke. The risk factors associated with dysphagia persisting over 6 months after stroke onset were the initial GCS, hemorrhage volume, presence of intraventricular hemorrhage, and cognitive status as measured by the K-MMSE. PMID:28119832

  15. Artesunate Protected Blood-Brain Barrier via Sphingosine 1 Phosphate Receptor 1/Phosphatidylinositol 3 Kinase Pathway After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Shilun; Ge, Hongfei; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Xuan; Hu, Rong; Hu, Shengli; Liu, Xin; Zhang, John H; Chen, Yujie; Feng, Hua

    2017-03-01

    Blood-brain barrier preservation plays an important role in attenuating vasogenic brain edema after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This study was designed to investigate the protective effect and mechanism of artesunate, a traditional anti-malaria drug, on blood-brain barrier after SAH. Three hundred and seventy-seven (377) male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to endovascular perforation model for SAH. The rats received artesunate alone or in combination with Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1P1) small interfering RNA (siRNA), antagonist VPC23019, or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin after SAH. Modified Garcia score, SAH grades, brain water content, Evans blue leakage, transmission electron microscope, immunohistochemistry staining, Western blot, and cultured endothelial cells were used to investigate the optimum concentration and the therapeutic mechanism of artesunate. We found that artesunate (200 mg/kg) could do better in raising modified Garcia score, reducing brain water content and Evans blue leakage than other groups after SAH. Moreover, artesunate elevated S1P1 expression, enhanced phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation, lowered GSK-3β activation, stabilized β-catenin, and improved the expression of Claudin-3 and Claudin-5 after SAH in rats. These effects were eliminated by S1P1 siRNA, VPC23019, and wortmannin. This study revealed that artesunate could preserve blood-brain barrier integrity and improve neurological outcome after SAH, possibly through activating S1P1, enhancing phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation, stabilizing β-catenin via GSK-3β inhibition, and then effectively raising the expression of Claudin-3 and Claudin-5. Therefore, artesunate may be favorable for the blood-brain barrier (BBB) protection after SAH and become a potential candidate for the treatment of SAH patients.

  16. Perioperative critical care management for patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Choi, H. Alex; Edwards, Nancy; Chang, Tiffany; Sladen, Robert N.

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant regional and risk factor-related variations, the overall mortality rate in patients suffering from aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains high. Compared to ischemic stroke, which is typically irreversible, hemorrhagic stroke tends to carry a higher mortality, but patients who do survive have less disability. Technologies to monitor and treat complications of SAH have advanced considerably in recent years, but good long-term functional outcome still depends on prompt diagnosis, early aggressive management, and avoidance of premature withdrawal of support. Endovascular procedures and open craniotomy to secure a ruptured aneurysm represent some of the numerous critical steps required to achieve the best possible result. In this review, we have attempted to provide a contemporary, evidence-based outline of the perioperative critical care management of patients with SAH. This is a challenging and potentially fatal disease with a wide spectrum of severity and complications and an often protracted course. The dynamic nature of this illness, especially in its most severe forms, requires considerable flexibility in clinician management, especially given the panoply of available treatment modalities. Judicious hemodynamic monitoring and adaptive therapy are essential to respond to the fluctuating nature of cerebral vasospasm and the varying oxygen demands of the injured brain that may readily induce acute or delayed cerebral ischemia. PMID:25237442

  17. Carotid rete mirabile associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage from intracranial aneurysm: A case report and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Yamaki, Vitor Nagai; Júnior, Fernando Mendes Paschoal; Piske, Ronie Leo; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Carotid rete mirabile (CRM) is a rare physiological vascular network in humans that is most often found in Eastern populations. This paper describes a CRM associated with an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and discusses the details of the patient’s treatment. A 28-year-old woman was admitted to our service with clinical signs and symptoms of a spontaneous aSAH. Computed tomography revealed a diffuse and extensive SAH (Fisher group IV), while an angiogram showed an abnormal collateral network in the right carotid system and a hypoplastic aspect to the internal carotid artery (ICA) on the same side. In addition, a saccular aneurysm with a diameter of 9.5 mm was present in the ophthalmic segment of the left ICA. This case is extremely uncommon. To avoid rebleeding in the patient, we successfully treated the patient by clipping the aneurysmal lesion. No procedure was performed for the CRM. PMID:25934776

  18. Mdivi-1 Alleviates Early Brain Injury After Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats, Possibly via Inhibition of Drp1-Activated Mitochondrial Fission and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei; Li, Yuchen; Zhu, Shiyi; Wang, Chunlei; Dai, Jiaxing; Zhang, Guang; Zheng, Bingjie; Xu, Shancai; Wang, Ligang; Zhang, Tongyu; Zhou, PeiQuan; Zhang, John H; Shi, Huaizhang

    2017-02-16

    Mdivi-1 is a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial fission protein, Drp1, and can penetrate the blood-brain barrier. Previous studies have shown that Mdivi-1 improves neurological outcomes after ischemia, seizures and trauma but it remains unclear whether Mdivi-1 can attenuate early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We thus investigated the therapeutic effect of Mdivi-1 on early brain injury following SAH. Rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham; SAH; SAH + vehicle; and SAH + Mdivi-1. The SAH model was induced by standard intravascular perforation and all of the rats were subsequently sacrificed 24 h after SAH. Mdivi-1 (1.2 mg/kg) was administered to rats 30 min after SAH. We found that Mdivi-1 markedly improved neurologic deficits, alleviated brain edema and BBB permeability, and attenuated apoptotic cell death. Mdivi-1 also significantly reduced the expression of cleaved caspase-3, Drp1 and p-Drp1((Ser616)), attenuated the release of Cytochrome C from mitochondria, inhibited excessive mitochondrial fission, and restored the ultra-structure of mitochondria. Furthermore, Mdivi-1 reduced levels of MDA, 3-NT, and 8-OHdG, and improved SOD activity. Taken together, our data suggest that Mdivi-1 exerts neuroprotective effects against cell death induced by SAH and the underlying mechanism may be inhibition of Drp1-activated mitochondrial fission and oxidative stress.

  19. Blood-filled cerebrospinal fluid-enhanced pericyte microvasculature contraction in rat retina: A novel in vitro study of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi; Li, Qiang; Cui, Gaoyu; Zhu, Gang; Tang, Weihua; Zhao, Hengli; Zhang, John H; Chen, Yujie; Feng, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Previously, it was widely accepted that the delayed ischemic injury and poor clinical outcome following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was caused by cerebral vasospasm. This classical theory was challenged by a clazosentan clinical trial, which failed to improve patient outcome, despite reversing angiographic vasospasm. One possible explanation for the results of this trial is the changes in microcirculation following SAH, particularly in pericytes, which are the primary cell type controlling microcirculation in the brain parenchyma. However, as a result of technical limitations and the lack of suitable models, there was no direct evidence of microvessel dysfunction following SAH. In the present study, whole-mount retinal microvasculature has been introduced to study microcirculation in the brain following experimental SAH in vitro. Artificial blood-filled cerebrospinal fluid (BSCF) was applied to the retinal microvasculature to test the hypothesis that the presence of subarachnoid blood affects the contractile properties of the pericytes containing cerebral microcirculation during the early phase of SAH. It was observed that BCSF induced retina microvessel contraction and that this contraction could be resolved by BCSF wash-out. Furthermore, BCSF application accelerated pericyte-populated collagen gel contraction and increased the expression of α-smooth muscle actin. In addition, BCSF induced an influx of calcium in cultured retinal pericytes. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates increased contractility of retinal microvessels and pericytes in the presence of BCSF in vitro. These findings suggest that pericyte contraction and microvascular dysfunction is induced following SAH, which could lead to greater susceptibility to SAH-induced ischemia.

  20. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylethanol alleviates early brain injury by modulating oxidative stress and Akt and nuclear factor-κB pathways in a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    FU, PENG; HU, QUAN

    2016-01-01

    3,4-Dihydroxyphenylethanol (DOPET) is a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound, present in olive oil and in the wastewater generated during olive oil processing. DOPET has various biological and pharmacological activities, including anticancer, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. This study was designed to determine whether DOPET alleviates early brain injury (EBI) associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) through suppression of oxidative stress and Akt and nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathways. Rats were randomly divided into the following groups: Sham group, SAH group, SAH + vehicle group and SAH + DOPET group. Mortality, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and brain water content were assessed. Oxidative stress, Akt, NF-κB p65 and caspase-3 assays were also performed. DOPET induced a reduction in brain water content, and decreased the BBB permeability of SAH model rats. Furthermore, DOPET effectively controlled oxidative stress, NF-κB p65 and caspase-3 levels, in addition to significantly increasing Akt levels in the cortex following SAH. These results provide evidence that DOPET attenuates apoptosis in a rat SAH model through modulating oxidative stress and Akt and NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:27168841

  1. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms and recovery from aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Sheila; Poloyac, Samuel; Hoffman, Leslie; Gallek, Matthew; Dianxu Ren; Balzer, Jeffrey; Kassam, Amin; Conley, Yvette

    2009-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a hemorrhagic stroke subtype with a poor recovery profile. Cerebral vasospasm (CV), a narrowing of the cerebral vasculature, significantly contributes to the poor recovery profile. Variation in the endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) gene has been implicated in CV and outcome after SAH. The purpose of this project was to explore the potential association between three eNOS tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and recovery from SAH. We included 195 participants with a diagnosis of SAH and DNA and 6-month outcome data available but without preexisting neurologic disease/deficit. Genotyping was performed using an ABI Prism 7000 Sequence Detection System and TaqMan assays. CV was verified by cerebral angiogram independently read by a neurosurgeon on 118 participants. Modified Rankin Scores (MRS) and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores were collected 6 months posthemorrhage. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and chi-square analysis as appropriate. The sample was primarily female (n=147; 75.4%) and White (n=178; 91.3%) with a mean age of 54.6 years. Of the participants with CV data, 56 (47.5%) developed CV within 14 days of SAH. None of the SNPs individually were associated with CV presence; however, a combination of the three variant SNPs was significantly associated with CV (p=.017). Only one SNP (rs1799983, variant allele) was associated with worse 6-month GOS scores (p<.001) and MRS (p<.001). These data indicate that the eNOS gene plays a role in the response to SAH, which may be explained by an influence on CV.

  2. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis inhibits apoptosis and preserves the blood-brain barrier after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cheng; Yu, Hongwei; Yan, Cong; Zhao, Wenyang; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Dongdong; Li, Jingwei; Liu, Nan

    2017-03-22

    Early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) strongly determines the prognosis of patients suffering from an aneurysm rupture, and apoptosis is associated with early brain injury after SAH. This study was designed to explore the role of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) in early brain injury following SAH. The expression of XIAP was detected using western blotting and real-time RT-PCR in an autologous blood injection model of SAH. We also studied the role of XIAP in early brain injury and detected apoptosis-related proteins. The results showed that XIAP was significantly up-regulated in the cortex and hippocampus and that XIAP was mainly expressed in neuronal cells following SAH. The inhibition of endogenous XIAP aggravated blood-brain barrier disruption, neurological deficits and brain edema. Recombinant XIAP preserved the blood-brain barrier, improved the neurological scores and ameliorated brain edema. Recombinant XIAP treatment also decreased the expression of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9, whereas there was no effect on the expression of p53, apoptosis-inducing factor or cytochrome c. These results show that XIAP acts as an endogenous neuroprotective and anti-apoptotic agent following SAH. The effects of XIAP on early brain injury was associated with the inhibition of the caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway.

  3. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis inhibits apoptosis and preserves the blood-brain barrier after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Cheng; Yu, Hongwei; Yan, Cong; Zhao, Wenyang; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Dongdong; Li, Jingwei; Liu, Nan

    2017-01-01

    Early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) strongly determines the prognosis of patients suffering from an aneurysm rupture, and apoptosis is associated with early brain injury after SAH. This study was designed to explore the role of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) in early brain injury following SAH. The expression of XIAP was detected using western blotting and real-time RT-PCR in an autologous blood injection model of SAH. We also studied the role of XIAP in early brain injury and detected apoptosis-related proteins. The results showed that XIAP was significantly up-regulated in the cortex and hippocampus and that XIAP was mainly expressed in neuronal cells following SAH. The inhibition of endogenous XIAP aggravated blood-brain barrier disruption, neurological deficits and brain edema. Recombinant XIAP preserved the blood-brain barrier, improved the neurological scores and ameliorated brain edema. Recombinant XIAP treatment also decreased the expression of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9, whereas there was no effect on the expression of p53, apoptosis-inducing factor or cytochrome c. These results show that XIAP acts as an endogenous neuroprotective and anti-apoptotic agent following SAH. The effects of XIAP on early brain injury was associated with the inhibition of the caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway. PMID:28327595

  4. NONCONVULSIVE SEIZURES IN SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE LINK INFLAMMATION AND OUTCOME

    PubMed Central

    Claassen, Jan; Albers, David; Schmidt, J. Michael; De Marchis, Gian Marco; Pugin, Deborah; Falo, Christina Maria; Mayer, Stephan A.; Cremers, Serge; Agarwal, Sachin; Elkind, Mitchell SV; Connolly, E. Sander; Dukic, Vanja; Hripcsak, George; Badjatia, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nonconvulsive seizures (NCSz) are frequent following acute brain injury and have been implicated as a cause of secondary brain injury but mechanisms that cause NCSz are controversial. Pro-inflammatory states are common after many brain injuries and inflammatory mediated changes in blood-brain-barrier permeability have experimentally been linked to seizures. Methods In this prospective observational study of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients we explored the link between the inflammatory response following SAH and in-hospital NCSz studying clinical (systemic inflammatory response syndrome,SIRS) and laboratory markers of inflammation (tumor necrosis factor receptor 1,TNF-R1; high sensitivity C-reactive protein,hsCRP). Logistic regression, cox proportional hazards regression, and mediation analyses were performed to investigate temporal and causal relationships. Results Among 479 SAH patients, 53(11%) had in-hospital NCSz. Patients with in-hospital NCSz had a more pronounced SIRS response (OR1.9 per point increase in SIRS; 95%-CI1.3-2.9), inflammatory surges were more likely immediately preceding NCSz onset, and the negative impact of SIRS on functional outcome at 3 months was mediated in part through in-hospital NCSz. In a subset with inflammatory serum biomarkers we confirmed these findings linking higher serum TNF-R1 and hsCRP to in-hospital NCSz (OR1.2 per 20 point hsCRP increase [95%-CI1.1-1.4]; OR2.5 per 100 point TNF-R1 increase [95%-CI2.1-2.9]). The association of inflammatory biomarkers with poor outcome was mediated in part through NCSz. Interpretation In-hospital NCSz were independently associated with a pro-inflammatory state following SAH reflected in clinical symptoms and serum biomarkers of inflammation. Our findings suggest that inflammation following SAH is associated with poor outcome and this effect is at least in part mediated through in-hospital NCSz. PMID:24771589

  5. The role of microglia and the TLR4 pathway in neuronal apoptosis and vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although microglia and the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway have long been thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), thus far only correlations have been made. In this study, we attempted to solidify the relationship between microglia and the TLR pathway using depletion and genetic knockouts, respectively. Methods Subarachnoid hemorrhage was induced in TLR4−/−, TRIF−/−, MyD88−/− and wild type C57BL/6 mice by injecting 60 μl of autologous blood near the mesencephalon; animals were euthanized 1 to 15 days after SAH for immunohistochemical analysis to detect microglia or apoptotic cells. Lastly, microglial depletion was performed by intracerebroventricular injection of clodronate liposomes. Results On post operative day (POD) 7 (early phase SAH), neuronal apoptosis was largely TLR4-MyD88-dependent and microglial-dependent. By POD 15 (late phase SAH), neuronal apoptosis was characterized by TLR4- toll receptor associated activator of interferon (TRIF)-dependence and microglial-independence. Similarly, vasospasm was also characterized by an early and late phase with MyD88 and TRIF dependence, respectively. Lastly, microglia seem to be both necessary and sufficient to cause vasospasm in both the early and late phases of SAH in our model. Conclusion Our results suggest that SAH pathology could have different phases. These results could explain why therapies tailored to aSAH patients have failed for the most part. Perhaps a novel strategy utilizing immunotherapies that target Toll like receptor signaling and microglia at different points in the patient’s hospital course could improve outcomes. PMID:23849248

  6. Relationship between weather conditions and admissions for ischemic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Tarnoki, Adam D.; Türker, Acar; Tarnoki, David L.; İyisoy, Mehmet S; Szilagyi, Blanka K.; Duong, Hoang; Miskolczi, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    Aim To assess impacts of different weather conditions on hospitalizations of patients with ischemic strokes and subarachnoid hemorrhages (SAH) in South Florida. Methods Diagnostic data of patients with spontaneous SAH and strokes were recorded between June 2010 and July 2013. Daily synchronous forecast charts were collected from the National Weather Service and the whole data were matched prospectively. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) was calculated. Results Increased incidence rate of ischemic stroke was consistent with the daily lowest and highest air pressure (IRR 1.03, P = 0.128 and IRR 0.98, P = 0.380, respectively), highest air temperature (IRR 0.99, P = 0.375), and presence of hurricanes or storms (IRR 0.65, P = 0.054). Increased incidence of SAH cases was consistent with daily lowest and highest air pressure (IRR 0.87, P < 0.001 and IRR 1.08, P = 0.019, respectively) and highest air temperature (IRR 0.98, P < 0.001). Presence of hurricanes and/or tropical storms did not influence the frequency of SAH. We found no relationship between the presence of fronts and the admissions for ischemic stroke or SAH. Conclusion Higher number of ischemic stroke and SAH cases can be expected with the daily lowest and highest air pressure, highest air temperature. Presence of hurricanes or tropical storms increased the risk of ischemic stroke but not the SAH. These findings can help to develop preventive health plans for cerebrovascular diseases. PMID:28252876

  7. [Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the Yaeyama Islands, Japan, from 1989 to 2002].

    PubMed

    Izumihara, Akifumi; Shimoji, Takashi; Uesugi, Masashi; Fujisawa, Hirosuke; Suzuko, Michiyasu; Ie, Tomoji

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze epidemiological and clinical data of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in the Yaeyama islands, an isolated subtropical region of Japan. A total of 94 patients (31 men and 63 women, mean age 57.3 years) were diagnosed as having non-traumatic SAH during a 13-year period from 1989 to 2002. The age-and sex-adjusted annual incidence rate of SAH was 17.4 per 100,000 population. The incidence of SAH was the highest in August. Seventy-nine patients were hospitalized within 24 hours after onset of SAH. Seventeen patients were transferred by helicopter. The Hunt and Kosnik grade was I in 29 patients (30.9%). The CT Fisher group was 3 in 42 patients (44.7%). Ruptured aneurysm was detected in 78 patients (saccular type in 70 patients, small size in 49 patients, and internal carotid artery in 28 patients). Rebleeding occurred in 20 patients (21.3%). Symptomatic vasospasm occurred in 26 patients (27.7%). Acute and chronic hydrocephalus occurred in 25 (26.6%) and 22 (23.4%) patients respectively. A total of 120 neurosurgical operations were performed in 70 patients (operation for ruptured aneurysm in 62, early operation in 39). A total of 42 operative complications occurred in 29 patients. Fifty-one patients (54.3%) had a good outcome. The number of full-time neurosurgeons did not influence the performance of neurosurgical operation and outcome. In conclusion, epidemiologically, the high incidence of SAH in August is unusual. Patients with aneurysmal SAH in the Yaeyama islands have common clinical characteristics and undergo standard neurosurgical treatment.

  8. Retinal Vessel Analysis (RVA) in the Context of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - A Proof of Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Miriam; Clusmann, Hans; Fuest, Matthias; Mueller, Marguerite; Brockmann, Marc Alexander; Vilser, Walthard; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Hoellig, Anke; Seiz, Marcel; Thomé, Claudius; Kotliar, Konstantin; Schubert, Gerrit Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background Timely detection of impending delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is essential to improve outcome, but poses a diagnostic challenge. Retinal vessels as an embryological part of the intracranial vasculature are easily accessible for analysis and may hold the key to a new and non-invasive monitoring technique. This investigation aims to determine the feasibility of standardized retinal vessel analysis (RVA) in the context of SAH. Methods In a prospective pilot study, we performed RVA in six patients awake and cooperative with SAH in the acute phase (day 2–14) and eight patients at the time of follow-up (mean 4.6±1.7months after SAH), and included 33 age-matched healthy controls. Data was acquired using a manoeuvrable Dynamic Vessel Analyzer (Imedos Systems UG, Jena) for examination of retinal vessel dimension and neurovascular coupling. Results Image quality was satisfactory in the majority of cases (93.3%). In the acute phase after SAH, retinal arteries were significantly dilated when compared to the control group (124.2±4.3MU vs 110.9±11.4MU, p<0.01), a difference that persisted to a lesser extent in the later stage of the disease (122.7±17.2MU, p<0.05). Testing for neurovascular coupling showed a trend towards impaired primary vasodilation and secondary vasoconstriction (p = 0.08, p = 0.09 resp.) initially and partial recovery at the time of follow-up, indicating a relative improvement in a time-dependent fashion. Conclusion RVA is technically feasible in patients with SAH and can detect fluctuations in vessel diameter and autoregulation even in less severely affected patients. Preliminary data suggests potential for RVA as a new and non-invasive tool for advanced SAH monitoring, but clinical relevance and prognostic value will have to be determined in a larger cohort. PMID:27388619

  9. Roller coaster-associated subarachnoid hemorrhage--report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Rutsch, Sebastian; Niesen, Wolf-Dirk; Meckel, Stephan; Reinhard, Matthias

    2012-04-15

    The most common neurological injuries associated with roller coaster rides are subdural hematoma and cervical artery dissection. We report two cases of roller-coaster associated subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 40-year-old healthy man developed a strong, holocephalic headache during a roller coaster ride. SAH Hunt & Hess grade II and Fisher grade 3 was diagnosed. An underlying aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery was successfully treated with coil embolization. A 41-year-old female (smoker, otherwise healthy) experienced a sudden, strong headache and diplopia during a roller coaster ride. A perimesencephalic SAH (Hunt & Hess grade II, Fisher grade 3) was disclosed by a CT scan. No aneurysm was detected on angiography. Both patients were discharged without neurological disability. In conclusion, SAH is a rare but relevant differential diagnosis in cases of acute headache during roller coaster rides. Both aneurysmal and non-aneurysmal perimesencephalic SAH can occur. A combination of mechanical factors and excessive blood pressure rises in vulnerable persons is discussed.

  10. Microglia regulate blood clearance in subarachnoid hemorrhage by heme oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Schallner, Nils; Pandit, Rambhau; LeBlanc, Robert; Thomas, Ajith J.; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Gallo, David; Otterbein, Leo E.; Hanafy, Khalid A.

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) carries a 50% mortality rate. The extravasated erythrocytes that surround the brain contain heme, which, when released from damaged red blood cells, functions as a potent danger molecule that induces sterile tissue injury and organ dysfunction. Free heme is metabolized by heme oxygenase (HO), resulting in the generation of carbon monoxide (CO), a bioactive gas with potent immunomodulatory capabilities. Here, using a murine model of SAH, we demonstrated that expression of the inducible HO isoform (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1) in microglia is necessary to attenuate neuronal cell death, vasospasm, impaired cognitive function, and clearance of cerebral blood burden. Initiation of CO inhalation after SAH rescued the absence of microglial HO-1 and reduced injury by enhancing erythrophagocytosis. Evaluation of correlative human data revealed that patients with SAH have markedly higher HO-1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared with that in patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Furthermore, cisternal hematoma volume correlated with HO-1 activity and cytokine expression in the CSF of these patients. Collectively, we found that microglial HO-1 and the generation of CO are essential for effective elimination of blood and heme after SAH that otherwise leads to neuronal injury and cognitive dysfunction. Administration of CO may have potential as a therapeutic modality in patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysms. PMID:26011640

  11. The role of the microcirculation in delayed cerebral ischemia and chronic degenerative changes after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, Leif; Aamand, Rasmus; Karabegovic, Sanja; Tietze, Anna; Blicher, Jakob Udby; Mikkelsen, Irene Klærke; Iversen, Nina Kerting; Secher, Niels; Engedal, Thorbjørn Søndergaard; Anzabi, Mariam; Jimenez, Eugenio Gutierrez; Cai, Changsi; Koch, Klaus Ulrik; Næss-Schmidt, Erhard Trillingsgaard; Obel, Annette; Juul, Niels; Rasmussen, Mads; Sørensen, Jens Christian Hedemann

    2013-01-01

    The mortality after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is 50%, and most survivors suffer severe functional and cognitive deficits. Half of SAH patients deteriorate 5 to 14 days after the initial bleeding, so-called delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Although often attributed to vasospasms, DCI may develop in the absence of angiographic vasospasms, and therapeutic reversal of angiographic vasospasms fails to improve patient outcome. The etiology of chronic neurodegenerative changes after SAH remains poorly understood. Brain oxygenation depends on both cerebral blood flow (CBF) and its microscopic distribution, the so-called capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH). In theory, increased CTH can therefore lead to tissue hypoxia in the absence of severe CBF reductions, whereas reductions in CBF, paradoxically, improve brain oxygenation if CTH is critically elevated. We review potential sources of elevated CTH after SAH. Pericyte constrictions in relation to the initial ischemic episode and subsequent oxidative stress, nitric oxide depletion during the pericapillary clearance of oxyhemoglobin, vasogenic edema, leukocytosis, and astrocytic endfeet swelling are identified as potential sources of elevated CTH, and hence of metabolic derangement, after SAH. Irreversible changes in capillary morphology and function are predicted to contribute to long-term relative tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and neurodegeneration. We discuss diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these predictions. PMID:24064495

  12. Microglia regulate blood clearance in subarachnoid hemorrhage by heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Schallner, Nils; Pandit, Rambhau; LeBlanc, Robert; Thomas, Ajith J; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Zuckerbraun, Brian S; Gallo, David; Otterbein, Leo E; Hanafy, Khalid A

    2015-07-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) carries a 50% mortality rate. The extravasated erythrocytes that surround the brain contain heme, which, when released from damaged red blood cells, functions as a potent danger molecule that induces sterile tissue injury and organ dysfunction. Free heme is metabolized by heme oxygenase (HO), resulting in the generation of carbon monoxide (CO), a bioactive gas with potent immunomodulatory capabilities. Here, using a murine model of SAH, we demonstrated that expression of the inducible HO isoform (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1) in microglia is necessary to attenuate neuronal cell death, vasospasm, impaired cognitive function, and clearance of cerebral blood burden. Initiation of CO inhalation after SAH rescued the absence of microglial HO-1 and reduced injury by enhancing erythrophagocytosis. Evaluation of correlative human data revealed that patients with SAH have markedly higher HO-1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared with that in patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Furthermore, cisternal hematoma volume correlated with HO-1 activity and cytokine expression in the CSF of these patients. Collectively, we found that microglial HO-1 and the generation of CO are essential for effective elimination of blood and heme after SAH that otherwise leads to neuronal injury and cognitive dysfunction. Administration of CO may have potential as a therapeutic modality in patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysms.

  13. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Replacement Reduces Delayed Cerebral Vasospasm After Embolization of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Geng, Liming; Ma, Fei; Liu, Yun; Mu, Yanchun; Zou, Zhongmin

    2016-07-10

    BACKGROUND Delayed cerebral vasospasm (DCVS) following aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a leading cause of poor prognosis and death in SAH patients. Effective management to reduce DCVS is needed. A prospective controlled trial was conducted to determine if massive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) replacement (CR) could reduce DCVS occurrence and improve the clinical outcome after aneurysmal SAH treated with endovascular coiling. MATERIAL AND METHODS Patients treated with endovascular coiling after aneurysmal SAH were randomly divided into a control group receiving regular therapy alone (C group, n=42) and a CSF replacement group receiving an additional massive CSF replacement with saline (CR group, n=45). CSF examination, head CT, DCVS occurrence, cerebral infarction incidence, Glasgow Outcome Scale prognostic score, and 1-month mortality were recorded. RESULTS The occurrence of DCVS was 30.9% in the C group and 4.4% in the CR group (P<0.005). The cerebral infarction incidences in the C and CR groups were 19.0% and 2.2% (P<0.05), respectively, 1 month after the treatments. Mortality was not significantly different between the 2 groups during the follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS Massive CR after embolization surgery for aneurysmal SAH can significantly reduce DCVS occurrence and effectively improve the outcomes.

  14. Acute cardiac support with intravenous milrinone promotes recovery from early brain injury in a murine model of severe subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Tomoko; Mutoh, Tatsushi; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Yukiko; Tsuru, Yoshiharu; Tsubone, Hirokazu; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Taki, Yasuyuki

    2016-12-23

    Early brain injury/ischemia (EBI) is a serious complication early after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) that contributes to development of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). This study aimed to determine the role of inotropic cardiac support using milrinone (MIL) on restoring acute cerebral hypoperfusion attributable to EBI and improving outcomes after experimental SAH. Forty-three male C57BL/6 mice were assigned to either sham surgery (SAH-sham), SAH induced by endovascular perforation plus postconditioning with 2% isoflurane (Control), or SAH plus isoflurane combined with MIL with and without hypoxia-inducible factor inhibitor (HIF-I) pretreatment. Cardiac output (CO) during intravenous MIL infusion (0.25-0.75 μg/kg/min) between 1.5 and 2.5h after SAH induction was monitored with Doppler-echocardiography. MRI-continuous arterial spin labeling was used for quantitative CBF measurements. Neurobehavioral function was assessed daily by neurological score and open field test. DCI was analyzed 3 days later by determining infarction on MRI. Mild reduction of cardiac output (CO) and global cerebral blood flow (CBF) depression were notable early after SAH. MIL increased CO in a dose-dependent manner (P <0.001), which was accompanied by improved hypoperfusion, incidence of DCI and functional recovery than Control (P <0.05). The neuroprotective effects afforded by MIL or Control were attenuated by HIF inhibition (P <0.05). These results suggest that MIL improves acute hypoperfusion by its inotropic effect, leading to neurobehavioral improvement in mice after severe SAH, in which HIF may be acting as a critical mediator. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Time course of the diameter of the major cerebral arteries after subarachnoid hemorrhage using corrosion cast technique.

    PubMed

    Ono, Shigeki; Date, Isao; Onoda, Keisuke; Ohmoto, Takashi

    2003-06-01

    In this report, we examined whether corrosion cast method is also applicable for the measurement and estimation of the rat major arteries in which subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is produced. Additionally, we have examined the diameters of the rat major arteries following SAH. A total of 0.3 ml autologous blood was injected into the cisterna magna of male Sprague-Dawley rats for the SAH model. A perfusion of a semi-polymerized casting medium was performed, 10 min, 30 min, 1 h, 4 h, 8 h, 1 day, 2 days, 3 days, 5 days, and 7 days after SAH. The brains were corroded in a 10% NaOH solution. The BA and the other major arteries were then measured using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Macroscopic observation and hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining were also performed. Using the corrosion cast method, the biphasic contractile response was observed in the BA; 8.3% and 11.6% contractions were observed 30 min and 1 day after SAH, respectively. In addition, there was almost no smooth muscle or adventitial thickening in the chronic stage. In contrast, the dilative response was observed in the internal carotid artery and middle cerebral artery 10 min after SAH. Macroscopic findings and HE staining revealed that the extensive basal subarachnoid hematoma had almost disappeared by day 2. These results indicate that in this model, the minimal spasm, which occurs one day after SAH, can be explained by the small capacity of the rat subarachnoid space and the rapid cerebrospinal fluid washout around major vessels at the cerebral base. Moreover, the present data also show the compensatory dilatation in the ICA and MCA in the early stage after SAH.

  16. Resveratrol Attenuates Acute Inflammatory Injury in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats via Inhibition of TLR4 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang-Sheng; Li, Wei; Wu, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Ye, Zhen-Nan; Liu, Jing-Peng; Zhuang, Zong; Zhou, Meng-Liang; Zhang, Xin; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been proven to play a critical role in neuroinflammation and to represent an important therapeutic target following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Resveratrol (RSV), a natural occurring polyphenolic compound, has a powerful anti-inflammatory property. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of RSV in protecting against early brain injury (EBI) after SAH remain obscure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of RSV on the TLR4-related inflammatory signaling pathway and EBI in rats after SAH. A prechiasmatic cistern SAH model was used in our experiment. The expressions of TLR4, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The expressions of Iba-1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines in brain cortex were determined by Western blot, immunofluorescence staining, or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological function were further evaluated to investigate the development of EBI. We found that post-SAH treatment with RSV could markedly inhibit the expressions of TLR4, HMGB1, MyD88, and NF-κB. Meanwhile, RSV significantly reduced microglia activation, as well as inflammatory cytokines leading to the amelioration of neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological behavior impairment at 24 h after SAH. However, RSV treatment failed to alleviate brain edema and neurological deficits at 72 h after SAH. These results indicated that RSV treatment could alleviate EBI after SAH, at least in part, via inhibition of TLR4-mediated inflammatory signaling pathway. PMID:27529233

  17. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Study for Medical Decision-Making Heuristics.

    PubMed

    Dredla, Brynn; Freeman, William D

    2016-04-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient's medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis.

  18. Neuroprotective role of an N-acetyl serotonin derivative via activation of tropomyosin-related kinase receptor B after subarachnoid hemorrhage in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Tang, Junjia; Hu, Qin; Chen, Yujie; Liu, Fei; Zheng, Yun; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, Jianmin; Zhang, John H

    2015-06-01

    N-[2-(5-hydroxy-1H-indol-3-yl) ethyl]-2-oxopiperidine-3-carboxamide (HIOC), an N-acetyl serotonin derivative, selectively activates tropomyosin-related kinase receptor B (TrkB). This study is to investigate a potential role of HIOC on ameliorating early brain injury after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). One hundred and fifty-six adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. SAH model was induced by endovascular perforation. TrkB small interfering RNA (siRNA) or scramble siRNA was injected intracerebroventricularly 24h before SAH. HIOC was administrated intracerebroventricularly 3h after SAH and compared with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). SAH grade and neurologic scores were evaluated for the outcome study. For the mechanism study, the expression of TrkB, phosphorylated TrkB (p-TrkB), phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase (p-ERK), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and cleaved caspase 3 (CC3) was detected by Western blots, and neuronal injury was determined by double immunofluorescence staining of neuronal nuclei and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated uridine 5'-triphosphate-biotin nick end-labeling. Knocking down of TrkB decreased the expression of Bcl-2 and aggravated neurologic deficits 24h after SAH. HIOC activated TrkB/ERK pathway, decreased neuronal cell death, and improved neurobehavioral outcome, and these effects were abolished by TrkB siRNA. HIOC was more potent than BDNF in reduction of apoptosis 24h post-SAH. Thus, we conclude that administration of HIOC activated TrkB/ERK signaling cascade and attenuated early brain injury after SAH. HIOC may be a promising agent for further treatment for SAH and other stroke events.

  19. Sudden death and cervical spine: A new contribution to pathogenesis for sudden death in critical care unit from subarachnoid hemorrhage; first report – An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Kazdal, Hizir; Kanat, Ayhan; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Yazar, Ugur; Guvercin, Ali Riza; Calik, Muhammet; Gundogdu, Betul

    2017-01-01

    Context: Sudden death from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is not uncommon. Aims: The goal of this study is to elucidate the effect of the cervical spinal roots and the related dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) on cardiorespiratory arrest following SAH. Settings and Design: This was an experimental study conducted on rabbits. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 22 rabbits which were randomly divided into three groups: control (n = 5), physiologic serum saline (SS; n = 6), SAH groups (n = 11). Experimental SAH was performed. Seven of 11 rabbits with SAH died within the first 2 weeks. After 20 days, other animals were sacrificed. The anterior spinal arteries, arteriae nervorum of cervical nerve roots (C6–C8), DRGs, and lungs were histopathologically examined and estimated stereologically. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using the PASW Statistics 18.0 for Windows (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA). Intergroup differences were assessed using a one-way ANOVA. The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: In the SAH group, histopathologically, severe anterior spinal artery (ASA) and arteriae nervorum vasospasm, axonal and neuronal degeneration, and neuronal apoptosis were observed. Vasospasm of ASA did not occur in the SS and control groups. There was a statistically significant increase in the degenerated neuron density in the SAH group as compared to the control and SS groups (P < 0.05). Cardiorespiratory disturbances, arrest, and lung edema more commonly developed in animals in the SAH group. Conclusion: We noticed interestingly that C6–C8 DRG degenerations were secondary to the vasospasm of ASA, following SAH. Cardiorespiratory disturbances or arrest can be explained with these mechanisms. PMID:28250634

  20. Value of Three-Dimensional Maximum Intensity Projection Display to Assist in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Based Grading in a Mouse Model of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Tomoko; Mutoh, Tatsushi; Sasaki, Kazumasu; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Taki, Yasuyuki; Ishikawa, Tatsuya

    2016-06-16

    BACKGROUND Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is one of the most devastating cerebrovascular disorders. We report on the diagnostic value of three-dimensional (3-D) maximum intensity projection (MIP) reconstruction of T2*-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI), processed using graphical user interface-based software, to aid in the accurate grading of endovascular-perforation-induced SAH in a mouse model. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 30 mice were subjected to SAH by endovascular perforation; three (10%) were scored as grade 0, six (20%) as grade 1, six (20%) as grade 2, eight (27%) as grade 3, and seven (23%) as grade 4 according to T2*-weighted coronal slices. In comparison, none of mice were scored as grade 0, eight (27%) as grade 1, five (17%) as grade 2, nine (30%) as grade 3, and eight (27%) as grade 4 based on subsequent evaluation using reconstructed 3-D MIP images. RESULTS Mice scored as grade 0 (10%; no visible SAH) on T2*-coronal images were categorized as grades 1 (thin/localized SAH) and 3 (thick/diffuse SAH) according to 3-D MIP images. Grades based on T2* 3-D MIP images were more closely correlated with conventional SAH score (r2=0.59; P<0.0001) and neurological score (r2=0.25; P=0.005) than those based on T2*-coronal slices (r2=0.46; P<0.0001 for conventional score and r2=0.15; P=0.035 for neurological score). CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that 3-D MIP images generated from T2*-weighted MRI data may be useful for the simple and precise grading of SAH severity in mice to overcome the weakness of the current MRI-based SAH grading system.

  1. Bromo-deaza-SAH: a potent and selective DOT1L inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Tempel, Wolfram; Fedorov, Oleg; Nguyen, Kong T.; Bolshan, Yuri; Al-Awar, Rima; Knapp, Stefan; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Vedadi, Masoud; Brown, Peter J.; Schapira, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Chemical inhibition of proteins involved in chromatin-mediated signaling is an emerging strategy to control chromatin compaction with the aim to reprogram expression networks to alter disease states. Protein methyltransferases constitute one of the protein families that participate in epigenetic control of gene expression, and represent a novel therapeutic target class. Recruitment of the protein lysine methyltransferase DOT1L at aberrant loci is a frequent mechanism driving acute lymphoid and myeloid leukemias, particularly in infants, and pharmacological inhibition of DOT1L extends survival in a mouse model of mixed lineage leukemia. A better understanding of the structural chemistry of DOT1L inhibition would accelerate the development of improved compounds. Here, we report that the addition of a single halogen atom at a critical position in the cofactor product S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH, an inhibitor of SAM-dependent methyltransferases) results in an 8-fold increase in potency against DOT1L, and reduced activities against other protein and non-protein methyltransferases. We solved the crystal structure of DOT1L in complex with Bromo-deaza-SAH and rationalized the observed effects. This discovery reveals a simple strategy to engineer selectivity and potency towards DOT1L into the adenosine scaffold of the cofactor shared by all methyltransferases, and can be exploited towards the development of clinical candidates against mixed lineage leukemia. PMID:23433670

  2. Bromo-deaza-SAH: a potent and selective DOT1L inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenyu; Smil, David; Li, Fengling; Tempel, Wolfram; Fedorov, Oleg; Nguyen, Kong T; Bolshan, Yuri; Al-Awar, Rima; Knapp, Stefan; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Vedadi, Masoud; Brown, Peter J; Schapira, Matthieu

    2013-04-01

    Chemical inhibition of proteins involved in chromatin-mediated signaling is an emerging strategy to control chromatin compaction with the aim to reprogram expression networks to alter disease states. Protein methyltransferases constitute one of the protein families that participate in epigenetic control of gene expression, and represent a novel therapeutic target class. Recruitment of the protein lysine methyltransferase DOT1L at aberrant loci is a frequent mechanism driving acute lymphoid and myeloid leukemias, particularly in infants, and pharmacological inhibition of DOT1L extends survival in a mouse model of mixed lineage leukemia. A better understanding of the structural chemistry of DOT1L inhibition would accelerate the development of improved compounds. Here, we report that the addition of a single halogen atom at a critical position in the cofactor product S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH, an inhibitor of SAM-dependent methyltransferases) results in an 8-fold increase in potency against DOT1L, and reduced activities against other protein and non-protein methyltransferases. We solved the crystal structure of DOT1L in complex with Bromo-deaza-SAH and rationalized the observed effects. This discovery reveals a simple strategy to engineer selectivity and potency towards DOT1L into the adenosine scaffold of the cofactor shared by all methyltransferases, and can be exploited towards the development of clinical candidates against mixed lineage leukemia.

  3. Vasospasm on transcranial Doppler is predictive of delayed cerebral ischemia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gyanendra; Shahripour, Reza Bavarsad; Harrigan, Mark R

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT The impact of transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography evidence of vasospasm on patient-centered clinical outcomes following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is unknown. Vasospasm is known to lead to delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and poor outcomes. This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluates the predictive value of vasospasm on DCI, as diagnosed on TCD. METHODS MEDLINE, Scopus, the Cochrane trial register, and clinicaltrials.gov were searched through September 2014 using key words and the terms "subarachnoid hemorrhage," "aneurysm," "aneurysmal," "cerebral vasospasm," "vasospasm," "transcranial Doppler," and "TCD." Sensitivities, specificities, and positive and negative predictive values were pooled by a DerSimonian and Laird random-effects model. RESULTS Seventeen studies (n = 2870 patients) met inclusion criteria. The amount of variance attributable to heterogeneity was significant (I(2) > 50%) for all syntheses. No studies reported the impact of TCD evidence of vasospasm on functional outcome or mortality. TCD evidence of vasospasm was found to be highly predictive of DCI. Pooled estimates for TCD diagnosis of vasospasm (for DCI) were sensitivity 90% (95% confidence interval [CI] 77%-96%), specificity 71% (95% CI 51%-84%), positive predictive value 57% (95% CI 38%-71%), and negative predictive value 92% (95% CI 83%-96%). CONCLUSIONS TCD evidence of vasospasm is predictive of DCI with high accuracy. Although high sensitivity and negative predictive value make TCD an ideal monitoring device, it is not a mandated standard of care in aSAH due to the paucity of evidence on clinically relevant outcomes, despite recommendation by national guidelines. High-quality randomized trials evaluating the impact of TCD monitoring on patient-centered and physician-relevant outcomes are needed.

  4. Syringomyelia and spinal arachnoiditis resulting from aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: Report of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Taylor J.; Howard, Matthew A.; Menezes, Arnold

    2014-01-01

    Syringomyelia resulting from arachnoiditis secondary to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is an extremely rare clinical entity with few cases reported in the literature. The presentation, management, and pathogenesis of syringomyelia in this setting is poorly understood. We describe the presentation, radiology, management, and outcomes in two patients with syringomyelia resulting from arachnoiditis secondary to aneurysmal SAH and review the literature on this rare condition. Case number 1 was treated successfully with syrinx-subarachnoid shunt after extensive lysis of adhesions. Case number 2 was treated with syringoperitoneal shunt. Both patients had radiographic decreased syrinx size postoperatively. These patients add to the small literature on syringomyelia occurring secondary to SAH-associated arachnoiditis. The radiographic outcomes demonstrate that in the appropriately selected patient, syrinx-subarachnoid or syringoperitoneal shunting are viable options. PMID:25013348

  5. Severe microvascular injury induced by lysosomal releasates of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Increase in vasopermeability, hemorrhage, and microthrombosis due to degradation of subendothelial and perivascular matrices.

    PubMed Central

    Movat, H. Z.; Wasi, S.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the nature of the lesions in the microcirculation of the dermis of rabbits induced with lysosomal releasates of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). No attempt was made in the studies presented in this publication to deal with the offending agent in the releasate. Four parameters of microvascular injury were quantitated: increase in vascular permeability with 125I-labeled serum albumin, hemorrhage with 59Fe-labeled erythrocytes, accumulation (aggregation) of platelets with 111In-labeled platelets. In one experiment accumulation of 51Cr-PMNs was investigated. The lysosomal releasate induced a rapid increase in vasopermeability, but both hemorrhage and exudate formation peaked 1 hour after intradermal injection. Platelet accumulation was also demonstrable in these lesions, and microthrombosis was a very prominent feature. The microvascular injury, including microthrombosis, could be elicited also in animals rendered leukopenic with nitrogen mustard. Simultaneous injection of prostaglandin E2 with the releasate enhanced the microvascular injury. The morphologic changes in the microcirculation of the rabbit's dermis were assessed in lesions 5 minutes to 5 hours old. Several changes were encountered, primarily in the wall of venules and small veins and to a lesser degree in small arteries and capillaries. Ultrastructurally very early lesions (up to 15 minutes) had gaps or spaces in the endothelium, resembling those induced by mediators such as histamine or bradykinin. Older lesions were different, quite characteristic, and represent the hallmark of these lesions. Lysis and disappearance of vascular basement membrane, of perivascular collagen, and of the internal elastic lamina were a frequent finding, best demonstrable when microthrombi did not abut on vessel walls. Cellular components of vessels (endothelium, pericytes, smooth muscle) showed fragmentation, leading to complete disappearance of cellular elements. These

  6. Arctigenin, a Potent Ingredient of Arctium lappa L., Induces Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Attenuates Subarachnoid Hemorrhage-Induced Vasospasm through PI3K/Akt Pathway in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Zen; Wu, Shu-Chuan; Chang, Chia-Mao; Lin, Chih-Lung; Kwan, Aij-Lie

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt) is observed within the cerebral arteries of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) animals. This study is of interest to examine Arctigenin, a potent antioxidant, on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and Akt pathways in a SAH in vitro study. Basilar arteries (BAs) were obtained to examine phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), phospho-PI3K, Akt, phospho-Akt (Western blot) and morphological examination. Endothelins (ETs) and eNOS evaluation (Western blot and immunostaining) were also determined. Arctigenin treatment significantly alleviates disrupted endothelial cells and tortured internal elastic layer observed in the SAH groups (p < 0.01). The reduced eNOS protein and phospho-Akt expression in the SAH groups were relieved by the treatment of Arctigenin (p < 0.01). This result confirmed that Arctigenin might exert dural effects in preventing SAH-induced vasospasm through upregulating eNOS expression via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and attenuate endothelins after SAH. Arctigenin shows therapeutic promise in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm following SAH. PMID:26539501

  7. Arctigenin, a Potent Ingredient of Arctium lappa L., Induces Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Attenuates Subarachnoid Hemorrhage-Induced Vasospasm through PI3K/Akt Pathway in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Zen; Wu, Shu-Chuan; Chang, Chia-Mao; Lin, Chih-Lung; Kwan, Aij-Lie

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt) is observed within the cerebral arteries of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) animals. This study is of interest to examine Arctigenin, a potent antioxidant, on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and Akt pathways in a SAH in vitro study. Basilar arteries (BAs) were obtained to examine phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), phospho-PI3K, Akt, phospho-Akt (Western blot) and morphological examination. Endothelins (ETs) and eNOS evaluation (Western blot and immunostaining) were also determined. Arctigenin treatment significantly alleviates disrupted endothelial cells and tortured internal elastic layer observed in the SAH groups (p < 0.01). The reduced eNOS protein and phospho-Akt expression in the SAH groups were relieved by the treatment of Arctigenin (p < 0.01). This result confirmed that Arctigenin might exert dural effects in preventing SAH-induced vasospasm through upregulating eNOS expression via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and attenuate endothelins after SAH. Arctigenin shows therapeutic promise in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm following SAH.

  8. SIRT3 Expression Decreases with Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Rat Cortical Neurons during Early Brain Injury Induced by Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Huang, Yong; Huang, Ren-qiang; Gu, Jin-mao; Dong, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuin3 (SIRT3) is an important protein deacetylase which predominantly presents in mitochondria and exhibits broad bioactivities including regulating energy metabolism and counteracting inflammatory effect. Since inflammatory cascade was proved to be critical for pathological damage following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), we investigated the overall expression and cell-specific distribution of SIRT3 in the cerebral cortex of Sprague-Dawley rats with experimental SAH induced by internal carotid perforation. Results suggested that SIRT3 was expressed abundantly in neurons and endothelia but rarely in gliocytes in normal cerebral cortex. After experimental SAH, mRNA and protein expressions of SIRT3 decreased significantly as early as 8 hours and dropped to the minimum value at 24 h after SAH. By contrast, SOD2 expression increased slowly as early as 12 hours after experimental SAH, rose up sharply at the following 12 hours, and then was maintained at a higher level. In conclusion, attenuated SIRT3 expression in cortical neurons was associated closely with enhanced reactive oxygen species generation and cellular apoptosis, implying that SIRT3 might play an important neuroprotective role during early brain injury following SAH. PMID:28053989

  9. Rutin Inhibits Neuroinflammation and Provides Neuroprotection in an Experimental Rat Model of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, Possibly Through Suppressing the RAGE-NF-κB Inflammatory Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guangzhi; Dong, Yushu; Huo, Rentao; Wen, Kai; Zhang, Yinsong; Liang, Guobiao

    2016-06-01

    As is known to all, neuroinflammation plays a vital role in early brain injury pathogenesis following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). It has been shown that rutin have a property of inhibiting inflammation in many kinds of animal models. However, the effect of rutin on neuroinflammation after SAH remains uninvestigated. In this study, we investigated the potential effects of rutin on neuroinflammation and the underlying mechanism in an experimental rat model of SAH performed by endovascular perforation. Adult male SD rats were randomly divided into three groups, including sham group, SAH + vehicle group and SAH + rutin group (50 mg/kg) intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered at 30 min after SAH. After sacrificed at 24 h after SAH, all rats were examined by following tests, including neurologic scores, blood-brain barrier permeability, brain water content and neuronal cell death in cerebral cortex. The level of inflammation in brain was estimated by means of multiple molecules, including RAGE, NF-κB, and inflammation cytokines. Our results indicated that rutin could significantly downregulate the increased level of REGE, NF-κB and inflammatory cytokines in protein level. In addition, rutin could also ameliorate a series of secondary brain injuries such as brain edema, destruction of blood-brain barrier, neurological deficits and neuronal death. This study indicated that rutin administration had a neuroprotective effect in an experimental rat model of SAH, possibly through inhibiting RAGE-NF-κB mediated inflammation signaling pathway.

  10. Melatonin Attenuates Early Brain Injury via the Melatonin Receptor/Sirt1/NF-κB Signaling Pathway Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Liu, Haixiao; Yue, Liang; Zhang, Jingbo; Li, Xia; Wang, Bodong; Lin, Yan; Qu, Yan

    2017-04-01

    Melatonin (Mel) has been reported to alleviate early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The activation of silent information regulator 1 (Sirt1), a histone deacetylase, has been suggested to be beneficial in SAH. However, the precise role of Sirt1 in Mel-mediated protection against EBI following SAH has not been elucidated. The present study aims to evaluate the role of melatonin receptor/Sirt1/nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in this process. The endovascular perforation SAH model was used in male C57BL/6J mice, and melatonin was administrated intraperitoneally (150 mg/kg). The mortality, SAH grade, neurological score, brain water content, and neuronal apoptosis were evaluated. The expression of Sirt1, acetylated-NF-κB (Ac-NF-κB), Bcl-2, and Bax were detected by western blot. To study the underlying mechanisms, melatonin receptor (MR) antagonist luzindole and Sirt1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) were administrated to different groups. The results suggest that Mel improved the neurological deficits and reduced the brain water content and neuronal apoptosis. In addition, Mel enhanced the expression of Sirt1 and Bcl-2 and decreased the expression of Ac-NF-κB and Bax. However, the protective effects of Mel were abolished by luzindole or Sirt1 siRNA. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that Mel attenuates EBI following SAH via the MR/Sirt1/NF-κB signaling pathway.

  11. Role of L-type Ca(2+) channels, sarcoplasmic reticulum and Rho kinase in rat basilar artery contractile properties in a new model of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Egea-Guerrero, Juan José; Murillo-Cabezas, Francisco; Muñoz-Sánchez, María Ángeles; Vilches-Arenas, Angel; Porras-González, Cristina; Castellano, Antonio; Ureña, Juan; González-Montelongo, María del Carmen

    2015-09-01

    We have previously described that L-type Ca(2+) channels' (LTCCs) activation and metabotropic Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) regulate RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) activity and sustained arterial contraction. We have investigated whether this signaling pathway can be altered in a new experimental model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). For this purpose, arterial reactivity was evaluated on days 1 to 5 after surgery. A significant increase of basal tone, measured 4 and 60min after normalization, was observed on day 5 after SAH and at 60min on days 2 and 3 after SAH. This phenomenon was suppressed with LTCCs and ROCK inhibitors. We have also studied arterial rings vasoreactivity in response to high K(+) solutions. Interestingly, there were no significant differences in the phasic component of the high K(+)-induced contraction between sham and SAH groups, whereas a significant increase in the sustained contraction was observed on day 5 after SAH. This latter component was sensitive to fasudil, and selectively reduced by low nifedipine concentration, and phospholipase C and SR-ATPase inhibitors. Therefore, our data suggest that the metabotropic function of LTCCs is potentiated in SAH. Our results could provide a new strategy to optimize the pharmacological treatment of this pathological process.

  12. Asymptomatic Mild Hyperperfusion for the Prediction of Clinical Outcome in Postoperative Patients After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Manabu; Mutoh, Tatsushi; Takenaka, Shunsuke; Mutoh, Tomoko; Totsune, Tomoko; Taki, Yasuyuki; Ishikawa, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Background Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is one of the main causes of poor outcomes after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The early identification of DCI by noninvasive imaging modalities would provide valuable information of therapeutic intervention for improving the patient outcomes. We aimed to describe the clinical features of cerebral blood flow (CBF) data obtained from the single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) during the risk period for DCI after SAH. Material/Methods Clinical data from 94 SAH patients who underwent surgical clipping of anterior circulation aneurysms were reviewed retrospectively. 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT images were visually and semiquantitatively analyzed on days 7 and 14 after SAH. Results In all cases, the areas of hypoperfusion were found in the middle cerebral artery territories. By contrast, the areas of mild hyperperfusion were always detected on the surgical side, the prevalence which increased from days 7 (n=28; 30%) to 14 (n=48; 51%) without neurological defects. Univariate analysis revealed that the hyperperfusion on day 14 had a significant relationship with functional outcome at 3 months (P=0.04). Multivariate analysis including age, clinical SAH grade, DCI, and hyperperfusion on day 14 showed that DCI (P=0.004; odds ratio [OR], 0.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.02–0.48) and hyperperfusion on day 14 (P=0.002; OR, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.40–4.29) were independently associated with functional outcome at 3 months. Conclusions Delayed mild hyperperfusion around the surgical site can predict good prognosis after SAH, although it may hinder the CBF diagnosis of focal ischemia attributable to DCI. PMID:28093563

  13. Ischemia modified albumin increase indicating cardiac damage after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac complications are often developed after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and may cause sudden death of the patient. There are reports in the literature addressing ischemia modified albumin (IMA) as an early and useful marker in the diagnosis of ischemic heart events. The aim of this study is to evaluate serum IMA by using the albumin cobalt binding (ACB) test in the first, second, and seventh days of experimental SAH in rats. Twenty-eight Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups each consisting of seven animals. These were classified as control group, 1st, 2nd and 7th day SAH groups. SAH was done by transclival basilar artery puncture. Blood samples were collected under anesthesia from the left ventricles of the heart using the cardiac puncture method for IMA measurement. Histopathological examinations were performed on the heart and lung tissues. Albumin with by colorimetric, creatine kinase (CK), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined on an automatic analyser using the enzymatic method. IMA using by ACB test was detected with spectrophotometer. Results Serum IMA (p = 0.044) in seventh day of SAH were higher compared to the control group. Total injury scores of heart and lung tissue, also myocytolysis at day 7 were significantly higher than control group (p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001), day 1 (p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001) and day 2 (p = 0.001, p = 0.007, p = 0.001). A positive correlation between IMA - myocytolysis (r = 0.48, p = 0.008), and between IMA – heart tissue total injury score (r = 0.41, p = 0.029) was found. Conclusion The results revealed that increased serum IMA may be related to myocardial stress after SAH. PMID:24564759

  14. Coffee Consumption and Incidence of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: The Jichi Medical School Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sakamaki, Tsuyako; Hara, Motohiko; Kayaba, Kazunori; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Shizukiyo

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies on the association between coffee consumption and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have provided inconsistent results. We examine the risk of SAH from coffee consumption in a Japanese population. Methods Our analyses were based on the Jichi Medical School Cohort Study, a large-scale population-based prospective cohort study. A total of 9941 participants (3868 men and 6073 women; mean age 55 years) with no history of cardiovascular disease or carcinoma were examined. Participants were asked to choose one of five options to indicate their daily coffee consumption: none, less than 1 cup a day, 1–2 cups a day, 3–4 cups a day, or 5 or more cups a day. The incidence of SAH was assessed independently by a diagnostic committee. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) after adjustment for age and sex (HR1) and for additional potential confounders (HR2). Results During 10.7 years of follow-up, SAH occurred in 47 participants. When compared with the participants who consumed less than 1 cup of coffee a day, the HR of SAH was significantly higher in the group who consumed 5 or more cups a day in both models (HR1 4.49; 95% CI, 1.44–14.00; HR2 3.79; 95% CI, 1.19–12.05). Conclusions The present community-based cohort study showed that heavy coffee consumption was associated with an increased incidence of SAH after adjusting for age, sex, and multiple potential cardiovascular confounders. PMID:26460383

  15. Heart Rate Variability for Preclinical Detection of Secondary Complications after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, J. Michael; Sow, Daby; Crimmins, Michael; Albers, David; Agarwal, Sachin; Claassen, Jan; Connolly, E. Sander; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Hripcsak, George; Mayer, Stephan A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We sought to determine if monitoring heart rate variability (HRV) would enable preclinical detection of secondary complications after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods We studied 236 SAH patients admitted within the first 48 hours of bleed onset, discharged after SAH day 5, and had continuous electrocardiogram records available. The diagnosis and date of onset of infections and DCI events were prospectively adjudicated and documented by the clinical team. Continuous ECG was collected at 240 Hz using a high-resolution data acquisition system. The Tompkins Hamilton algorithm was used to identify R-R intervals excluding ectopic and abnormal beats. Time, frequency, and regularity domain calculations of HRV were generated over the first 48 hours of ICU admission and 24 hours prior to the onset of each patient's first complication, or SAH day 6 for control patients. Clinical prediction rules to identify infection and DCI events were developed using bootstrap aggregation and cost sensitive meta-classifiers. Results The combined infection and DCI model predicted events 24 hours prior to clinical onset with high sensitivity (87%) and moderate specificity (66%), and was more sensitive than models that predicted either infection or DCI. Models including clinical and HRV variables together substantially improved diagnostic accuracy (AUC 0.83) compared to models with only HRV variables (AUC 0.61). Conclusions Changes in HRV after SAH reflect both delayed ischemic and infectious complications. Incorporation of concurrent disease severity measures substantially improves prediction compared to using HRV alone. Further research is needed to refine and prospectively evaluate real-time bedside HRV monitoring after SAH. PMID:24610353

  16. Subarachnoid hemorrhage and visuospatial and visuoperceptive impairment: disruption of the mirror neuron system.

    PubMed

    Plata-Bello, Julio; Modroño, Cristián; Acosta-López, Silvia; Pérez-Martín, Yaiza; Marcano, Francisco; García-Marín, Víctor; González-Mora, José Luis

    2016-10-12

    Nearly 20 % of patients who suffer a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) still display cognitive impairment even a year after follow-up. Visuospatial and visuoperceptive domains may be impaired in this cognitive impairment and may not have been fully studied in these patients. Furthermore, these cognitively impaired domains have been associated with activity in the so-called mirror neuron system (MNS). The aim of the study is to analyze the pattern of brain activity with an MNS task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in SAH patients. A complete neuropsychological assessment and fMRI study (with observation and execution conditions) were performed in patients with a history of SAH registered in the database of the Hospital Universitario de Canarias and a healthy control group. The patients had to meet all the following inclusion criteria for the study (less than 50 years old; SAH with a Fisher score 1-3; no vasospasm or ischemia; minimum follow-up of one year). Twelve SAH patients were studied. Three of which displayed visuospatial/visuoperceptive impairment. fMRI study showed the presence of higher activity in MNS regions in these patients than in patients with normal visuospatial/visuoperceptive functions. Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between the test scores and brain activity in premotor regions of the studied patients. SAH patients with visuospatial/visuoperceptive impairment have greater activity in the MNS regions. This finding may be associated with a subcortical dysfunction, leading to a disruption of neural activity and less efficient behavior of this brain network.

  17. Postpartum hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Su, Cindy W

    2012-03-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a very common obstetric emergency with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. Understanding its etiology is fundamental to effectively managing PPH in an acute setting. Active management of the third stage of labor is also a key component in its prevention. Management strategies include conservative measures (medications, uterine tamponade, and arterial embolization) as well as surgical interventions (arterial ligations, compression sutures, and hysterectomy). Creating a standardized PPH protocol and running simulation-based drills with a multidisciplinary team may also help decrease maternal morbidity and improve perinatal outcomes, although further studies are needed.

  18. [Postpartum hemorrhage--an update].

    PubMed

    Gogarten, Wiebke

    2011-07-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage remains a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. The incidence of postpartum hemorrhage appears to be increasing in developed countries due to an increased number of placenta accreta or percreta after previous Cesarean deliveries. The initial therapy of postpartum hemorrhage consists of uterotonic drugs and inspection of the uterine cavum. At the same time, optimization of the clotting potential should be initiated early. Tranexamic acid may be considered as a first line choice, followed by fibrinogen if necessary. If bleeding continues, fresh frozen plasma and packed red cells should be ordered in a ratio of 1:1, as this ratio has been shown to improve survival in trauma victims. All labor and delivery suites should have standard operating procedures for the management of postpartum hemorrhage in place with regular drills.

  19. Soluble and Catalytically Active Endothelin Converting Enzyme-1 is Present in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Chou, Sherry H.-Y.; Feske, Steven K.; Suh, Sarah; Hanchapola, Iresha; Lo, Eng H.; Ning, MingMing; Smith, A. Ian

    2014-01-01

    Endothelin converting Enzyme-1 (ECE-1) is essential for the production of Endothelin-1 (ET-1), which is associated with vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We have previously demonstrated the presence of a catalytically active soluble form of ECE-1 in the media of endothelial cells. We aimed to determine if this form of ECE-1 exists in vivo, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of SAH patients. We examined CSF taken from SAH subjects for the presence of soluble ECE-1 using a bradykinin based quenched fluorescent substrate assay. We obtained further confirmation by characterizing the CSF mediated cleavage products of BigET-1 and BigET18–34 (6 μg/ml) using mass spectrometry. The specificity of cleavage was confirmed using the ECE-1 inhibitor CGS35066 5nmol/L. SAH CSF samples had mean ECE-1 activity of 0.127 ± 0.037 μmols of substrate cleaved/μl of CSF/24 h. The C-terminal peptides generated upon the cleavage of BigET-1 and BigET18–34 were detected 48 h after incubation of these substrates with CSF. Cleavage of these substrates was inhibited by CGS35066. Results of Western blots also produced strong evidence for the presence of truncated soluble ECE-1 in CSF. These results strongly suggest the presence of a truncated but catalytically active form of ECE-1 in the CSF of SAH subjects. Further studies are necessary to determine the biological significance of soluble ECE-1 in CSF of SAH subjects, including an association with vasospasm after SAH. PMID:23816989

  20. Neuroprotective Effects of a Smoothened Receptor Agonist against Early Brain Injury after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Quan; Li, Tong; Wang, Lingxiao; Xie, Yunkai; Liu, Song; Bai, Xuemei; Zhang, Tiantian; Bo, Shishi; Xin, Danqing; Xue, Hao; Li, Gang; Wang, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway plays a fundamental role in the central nervous system (CNS) development, but its effects on neural cell survival and brain repair after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has not been well-investigated. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of an agonist of the Shh co-receptor Smoothened (Smo), purmorphamine (PUR), on early brain injury (EBI) as well as the underlying mechanisms after SAH. PUR was administered via an intraperitoneal injection with a dose of 0.5, 1, and 5 mg/kg at 2, 6, 24, and 46 h after SAH in rat model. The results showed that PUR treatment significantly ameliorated brain edema, improved neurobehavioral function, and attenuated neuronal cell death in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), associated with a decrease in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and suppression of caspase-3 activation at 48 h after SAH. PUR also promoted phospho-ERK levels. Additionally, PUR treatment markedly decreased MDA concentration accompanied with the elevation in the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase-1 in PFC. Notably, PUR treatment significantly reversed the changes of Shh pathway mediators containing Patched, Gli1, and Shh by SAH insult, and the neuroprotection of PUR on SAH was blocked by Smo antagonist cyclopamine. These results indicated that PUR exerts neuroprotection against SAH-evoked injury in rats, mediated in part by anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidant mechanism, up-regulating phospho-ERK levels, mediating Shh signaling molecules in the PFC. PMID:28149272

  1. Alterations of caveolin-1 expression in a mouse model of delayed cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Ye; Wang, Xue-Min; Zhong, Ming; Li, Ze-Qun; Wang, Zhi; Tian, Zuo-Fu; Zheng, Kuang; Tan, Xian-Xi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression levels of caveolin-1 in the basilar artery following delayed cerebral vasospasm (DCVS) in a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), in order to investigate the association between caveolin-1 and DCVS, and its potential as a treatment for DCVS of SAH. A total of 150 Sprague Dawley rats were randomly allocated into blank, saline and SAH groups. The SAH and saline groups were subdivided into days 3, 5, 7 and 14 following the establishment of the model. The murine model of SAH was established by double injection of autologous arterial blood into the cisterna magana and DCVS was detected using Bederson neurological severity scores. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining was used to observe the inner perimeter of the basilar artery pipe and variations in the thickness of the basilar artery wall. Alterations in the levels of caveolin-1 protein in the basilar artery were measured using immunofluorescence and western blot analysis; whereas alterations in the mRNA expression levels of caveolin-1 were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In the present study, 15 mice succumbed to SAH-induced DCVS in the day 3 (n=3), 5 (n=5) and 7 (n=2) groups. No mortality was observed in the blank control and saline groups during the process of observation in the SAH group, All mice in the SAH groups exhibited Bederson neurological severity scores ≥1; whereas no neurological impairment was detected in the blank and normal saline groups, demonstrating the success of the model. HE staining was used to assess vasospasm and the results demonstrated that the inner perimeter of the basal artery pipe decreased at day 3 in the SAH group; whereas values peaked in the day 7 group. The thickness of the basal artery wall significantly increased (P<0.05), as compared with the blank and saline groups, in which no significant alterations in the wall thickness and the inner perimeter of the basal artery pipe

  2. Prostaglandin E2 EP4 Receptor Activation Attenuates Neuroinflammation and Early Brain Injury Induced by Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Xu, Zhen; Yan, Ai

    2017-02-27

    Activation of E prostanoid 4 receptor (EP4) shows neuroprotective effects in multiple central nervous system (CNS) lesions, but the roles of EP4 receptor in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are not explored. This study was designed to research the effects of EP4 modulation on early brain injury (EBI) after experimental SAH in rats. We found that the administration of EP4 selective agonist AE1-329 significantly improved neurological dysfunction, blood brain barrier (BBB) damage and brain edema at 24 h after SAH. Furthermore, AE1-329 obviously reduced the number of activated microglia and the mRNA and protein levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased Ser1177 phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (Ser1177 p-eNOS). Moreover, AE1-329 significantly reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells and active caspase-3 in cortex after SAH. The EP4 selective antagonist AE3-208 was also administrated and the opposite effects were achieved. Our results indicate that activation of EP4 protects brain from EBI through downregulating neuroinflammation reaction after SAH.

  3. Effects of statins-use for patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shao-Hua; Xu, Wei; Hai, Jian; Wu, Yi-Fang; Yu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH)-induced cerebral vasospasm and delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND) are the major causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with aSAH. The effects of statins-use for patients with aSAH remain controversial. Here,a total of 249 patients from six randomized controlled trials(RCTs) were subjected to meta-analysis. No significant decrease was found in the incidence of vasospasm(RR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.54–1.17), with substantial heterogeneity (I2 = 49%, P = 0.08), which was verified by the further sensitivity analysis and subgroup meta-analysis. Furthermore, no significant difference was presented in the incidence of poor neurological outcome(RR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.77–1.16), and potential side effects(RR, 2.49; 95% CI, 0.75–8.33). Nevertheless, significant difference was reported in the occurrence of DIND(RR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.37–0.92) and mortality(RR, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.14–0.64). At present, although statins-use in the patients with aSAH should not be considered standard care at present, statins-use may have the potential effects in the prevention of mortality in patients with aSAH. PMID:24763190

  4. Problems with diagnosis by fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging in patients with acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Masami; Hoshikawa, Kaori; Shiramizu, Hideki; Oda, Shinri; Matsumae, Mitsunori

    2010-01-01

    The diagnostic efficacy of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography (CT) for acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) were compared and the problems with diagnosis were investigated in 81 patients with aneurysmal SAH within 24 hours after onset who underwent FLAIR imaging and CT on admission. The number of hematomas in the cisterns and ventricles were evaluated by clot scores. In addition, the frequency of undetected hematomas was calculated for the cisterns and ventricles. Clot scores were significantly higher for FLAIR imaging than for CT in the lateral sylvian, quadrigeminal, and convexity cisterns. On the other hand, clot scores were significantly higher for CT than for FLAIR imaging in the interhemispheric and medial sylvian cisterns. The overall frequency of undetected SAH was 2% for FLAIR imaging and 14% for CT. With the exception of the interhemispheric and medial sylvian cisterns, the frequency of undetected SAH was higher for CT than for FLAIR imaging. In this study, FLAIR imaging was more sensitive than CT for the detection of acute SAH within 24 hours after onset. However, the diagnostic efficacy of FLAIR imaging was reduced in comparatively tight cisterns.

  5. Voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs) promote mitophagy to protect neuron from death in an early brain injury following a subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Lu, Jianfei; Mi, Yongjie; Shi, Zhao; Chen, Chunhua; Riley, John; Zhou, Changman

    2014-07-21

    The term mitophagy is coined to describe the selective removal of mitochondria by autophagy but the process itself is still contentious, especially in the early period following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In the present study, we investigated the role of mitophagy following 48h after SAH injury in rats. Specifically evaluating whether mitophagy, through voltage dependant anion channels (VDACs) interacting with microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3, could orchestrate the induction of apoptotic and necrotic cell death in neurons, a VDAC1siRNA and an activitor Rapamycian (RAPA), were engaged. One hundred and twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: Sham, SAH, SAH+VDAC1siRNA, and SAH+RAPA. Outcomes measured included mortality rate, brain edema, BBB disruption, and neurobehavioral testing. We also used western blotting techniques to analyze the expressions of key mitophagic/autophagic proteins and pro-apoptotic protein such as ROS, VDAC1, LC-3II and Caspase-3. Rapamycin treatment significantly improved the mortality rate, cerebral edema, and neurobehavioral deficits; apoptotic and necrotic cell death in neurons were reduced by Rapamycin following SAH injury. However, VDAC1siRNA worsened the brain injury following SAH. Immunohistochemical staining and western blot analysis demonstrated a decreased expression of VDAC1, LC3II, and an increase of ROS and Caspase-3 followed by VDAC1siRNA administration. In conclusion, mitophagy induced by VDAC1 following SAH injury may in fact play a significant role in neuroprotection, the mechanism which may be through the attenuation of the apoptosic and necrosic molecular pathways. This translates a preservation of functional integrity and an improvement in mortality.

  6. Expression of NR2B in different brain regions and effect of NR2B antagonism on learning deficits after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chen, G; Li, Q; Feng, D; Hu, T; Fang, Q; Wang, Z

    2013-02-12

    Approximately 50% of patients who survived after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have cognitive or neurobehavioral dysfunction. The mechanisms are not known. NR2B, one of the subunits of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, has been proved to be an important factor for synapse function and behavior cognition. Experiment 1 aimed to investigate the timecourse of the NR2B expression in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum after SAH in rats. In experiment 2, we assessed the effect of Ro 25-6981 (a specific NR2B antagonist) on regulation of learning deficits and behavioral activity following SAH. All SAH animals were subjected to injection of autologous blood into the prechiasmatic cistern once on day 0. NR2B was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Cognitive and memory changes were investigated in the Morris water maze. As a result, the expression of NR2B was decreased remarkably in SAH groups compared with the control group and the low ebb was on days 1-3. The immunohistochemical staining demonstrated expression of NR2B was present mainly in the neurons in all of the three different regions, such as the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. After Ro 25-6981 intraperitoneal administration, learning deficits induced by SAH was markedly aggravated and clinical behavior scale was also significantly decreased. Our results suggest that NR2B expression is down-regulated in the brain after experimental SAH and NR2B antagonism resulted in augmentation of the development of cognitive dysfunction after SAH.

  7. [Normal pressure hydrocephalus after subarachnoid hemorrhage--with regard to pathogenesis and factors influencing the efficacy of shunt surgery].

    PubMed

    Kitami, K; Suzuki, A; Hadeishi, H; Nishimura, H; Yasui, N

    1986-08-01

    Twenty-four adult cases of suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) were investigated clinically from the aspect of predicting the efficacy of the shunting procedure. They consisted of 13 men and 11 women, with the mean age of 55-y-o. In addition to checking neurological signs, pre- and postoperative CT scans, RI (or CT) cisternography and bolus infusion test were performed in each of them. Shunt surgery was done, all of which ventriculoperitoneal shunt, in 17 patients. They were divided into three groups, namely, shunt effective group (A), neurologically unchanged group after surgery (B) and worsened group (C). The A group had 8 cases, B had 8 also and C contained only one. Effectiveness of shunt procedure was measured by an improvement in the activity of daily life (ADL). Compared with group B, group A tended to have more cases of delayed onset of NPH (mean days of 112 from SAH attack in group A while 55 days in group B), cases with "trias" (3 against 0) and moderate ventricular dilatation with periventricular lucency (8 against 2). The finding of delayed clearance in cisternogram did not make an accurate judgement in the efficacy of shunt surgery. By using the bolus method of infusion test, the true cause of shunt non-effective ventricular dilatation was suggested to the disturbance of cerebral blood circulation due to elevation of intracranial venous outflow resistance. This suggestion was elicited by the analysis of pressure response curve gained from the bolus injection, in which group A cases mainly reached the baseline pressure within 22 minutes, but on the contrary group B showed more than 22 minutes as a rule.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. The secular trend in the incidence of hemorrhagic stroke in the region of Osijek, Eastern Croatia in the period 1988-2000--a hospital based study.

    PubMed

    Kadojić, D; Barac, B; Trkanjec, Z; Kadojić, M

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish the possible environmental influences in the observed peculiar rising and falling oscillations in the numbers of hemorrhagic stroke (HS) in Eastern Croatia (region of Osijek) during the last thirteen-years' period (1988-2000). In this period 1,222 HS were registered and treated. A constant increase in the incidence of HS was observed, from 60 (in 1988) to 139 (in 1998), with an average annual proportion of 16.5% of all stroke cases. A sharp increase in proportion of HS in total stroke incidence was recorded during the war in Croatia (1991-1995), with a peak incidence of 27.4% in 1993. Typical hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) was the most common (57.1%), atypical ICH occurred in 26.4%, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in 16.5%. Analysis of the annual number of hypertensive-ICH and SAH disclosed peculiar rising and falling oscillations. These variations were in correlation with heavy living conditions. During the war-period the SAH incidence sharply rose. Immediately after the war it suddenly decreased. The authors named this phenomenon a "pool depletion", supposing the relatively stable proportion of the bearers of aneurysms in population. The observed variations seem to be the consequence of the war stress and other negative psychosocial and economic factors in post-war period, which increases the risk for SAH and typical hypertensive-ICH through complex pathophysiological mechanisms.

  9. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Predicts Cerebral Vasospasm following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Starke, Robert M.; Kim, Grace H.; Komotar, Ricardo J.; Hickman, Zachary L.; Black, Eric M.; Rosales, Maritza B.; Kellner, Christopher P.; Hahn, David K.; Otten, Marc L.; Edwards, John; Wang, Tao; Russo, James J.; Mayer, Stephan A.; Connolly, E. Sander

    2009-01-01

    Summary Vasospasm is a major cause of morbidity and mortality following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Studies have demonstrated a link between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene and the incidence of coronary spasm and aneurysms. Alterations in the eNOS T-786 SNP may lead to an increased risk of post-aSAH cerebral vasospasm. In this prospective clinical study, 77 aSAH patients provided genetic material and were followed for the occurrence of vasospasm. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, genotype was the only factor predictive of vasospasm. The odds ratio for symptomatic vasospasm in patients with one T allele was 3.3 (95% CI 1.1–10.0, p=0.034) and 10.9 for TT. Patients with angiographic spasm were 3.6 times more likely to have a T allele (95% CI 1.3–9.6, p=0.013, TT OR 12.6). Patients with severe vasospasm requiring endovascular therapy were more likely to have a T allele (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.3–9.5, p=0.016, TT OR 12.0). Patients with the T allele of the eNOS gene are more likely have severe vasospasm. Presence of this genotype may allow the identification of individuals at high risk for post-aSAH vasospasm and lead to early treatment and improved outcome. PMID:18319732

  10. Effect of intrathecal milrinone injection via lumbar catheter on delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Masaomi; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Lo, Benjamin; Uezato, Minami; Kurosaki, Yoshitaka; Sadamasa, Nobutake; Handa, Akira; Chin, Masaki; Yamagata, Sen

    2017-03-03

    OBJECTIVE Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is an important complication after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Although intrathecal milrinone injection via lumbar catheter to prevent DCI has been previously reported to be safe and feasible, its effectiveness remains unknown. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether intrathecal milrinone injection treatment after aSAH significantly reduced the incidence of DCI. METHODS The prospectively maintained aSAH database was used to identify patients treated between January 2010 and December 2015. The cohort included 274 patients, with group assignment based on treatment with intrathecal milrinone injection or not. A propensity score model was generated for each patient group, incorporating relevant patient variables. RESULTS After propensity score matching, 99 patients treated with intrathecal milrinone injection and 99 without treatment were matched on the basis of similarities in their demographic and clinical characteristics. There were significantly fewer DCI events (4% vs 14%, p = 0.024) in patients treated with intrathecal milrinone injection compared with those treated without it. However, there were no significant differences between the 2 groups with respect to their 90-day functional outcomes (46% vs 36%, p = 0.31). The likelihood of chronic secondary hydrocephalus, meningitis, and congestive heart failure as complications of intrathecal milrinone injection therapy was also similar between the groups. CONCLUSIONS In propensity score-matched groups, the intrathecal administration of milrinone via lumbar catheter showed significant reduction of DCI following aSAH, without an associated increase in complications.

  11. Hemostasis and fibrinolysis in delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Boluijt, Jacoline; Meijers, Joost C M; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2015-05-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) has been associated with microthrombosis, which can result from activated hemostasis, inhibited fibrinolysis, or both. We systematically searched the PUBMED and EMBASE databases to identify hemostatic or fibrinolytic parameters that can be used for the prediction or diagnosis of DCI, or that inform on the pathogenesis of DCI and may serve as treatment targets. We included 24 studies that fulfilled predefined criteria and described 39 biomarkers. Only one study fulfilled predefined criteria for high quality. Since no parameter on admission was associated with DCI and in none of the included studies blood was drawn at the time of clinical deterioration, none of the studied parameters can presently be used for the prediction or diagnosis of DCI. Regarding the pathogenesis of DCI, it was shown that compared with patients without DCI those with DCI had higher levels of von Willebrand factor and platelet activating factor in plasma 5 to 9 days after aSAH, membrane tissue factor in cerebrospinal fluid 5 to 9 days after aSAH, and D-dimer in plasma 11 to 14 days after aSAH. Confirmation in high-quality studies is needed to investigate whether these parameters can serve as targets for new intervention studies.

  12. Aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage in a Chilean population, with emphasis on risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (SAH) is caused principally by the rupture of intracranial aneurisms. Important risk factors have been described such as age, sex, hypertension (HT) and season of the year, among others. The objective is to investigate the demographic characteristics and possible risk factors in a population of Chilean patients. Methods This retrospective study was based on the analysis of 244 clinical records of patients diagnosed with aneurismal SAH who were discharged from the Instituto de Neurocirugía ASENJO in Santiago, Chile. Results The mean age of patients was 49.85 years and the male:female ratio was 1:2.7. The signs and symptoms were not different between sexes; cephalea (85.7%) was predominant, followed by loss of consciousness, vomiting/nausea and meningeal signs. Risk factors included sex, age and HT. Concordant with other reports, the incidence of SAH was greatest in spring. Conclusions The demographic characteristics and risk factors observed in patients with aneurismal SAH treated in ASENJO were comparable to those of other populations. We were not able to conclude that tobacco and alcohol consumption were risk factors for this population. PMID:22035203

  13. Postoperative luxury perfusion syndrome in patients with severe subarachnoid hemorrhage treated by early aneurysmal clipping.

    PubMed

    Ohta, H

    1990-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured in 90 patients who underwent early aneurysmal clipping after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Measurements were made by a noninvasive, two-dimensional method involving intravenous injection of 133Xe. Patients of Hunt and Hess grades I and II exhibited normal to slightly subnormal CBF, without significant changes, during the study period. Grades III-V patients had almost normal CBF in the early postoperative period, but their CBF gradually decreased, becoming significantly low after day 31. It is noteworthy that in grades IV and V patients, CBF was abnormally high in the acute stage, relative to their poor neurological condition; these patients were considered to have the "global luxury perfusion syndrome." The syndrome was not uncommon in patients with severe SAH. Possible causative or contributory factors are attempts to surgically reduce intracranial pressure, which leads to increased cerebral perfusion pressure, and concomitant global dysautoregulation. In patients with this syndrome, maneuvers intended to increase CBF should be avoided, as they may aggravate brain swelling or cause hemorrhagic events. Positron emission tomographic studies will provide more accurate and useful information concerning the management of SAH patients.

  14. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from a thoracic radicular artery pseudoaneurysm after methamphetamine and synthetic cannabinoid abuse: case report.

    PubMed

    Ray, Wilson Z; Krisht, Khaled M; Schabel, Alex; Schmidt, Richard H

    2013-06-01

    Background Context Isolated spinal artery aneurysms not associated with vascular malformations are exceedingly rare. Purpose To present a rare case of subarachnoid hemorrhage after thoracic radiculomedullary artery pseudoaneurysm rupture in a patient who abused synthetic cannabinoids and methamphetamines. Study Design Case report. Methods A 41-year-old man with a history of polysubstance abuse presented with acute-onset headache, back pain, and transient bilateral lower-extremity numbness. He reported daily use of the synthetic cannabinoid "Spice." He denied use of other illegal drugs, but laboratory testing was positive for methamphetamines. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a focal hematoma at T2-3, and spinal angiography was negative for vascular abnormalities; however, a follow-up angiogram 6 days later revealed interval development of an irregular dilation of the left T3 radiculomedullary artery originating from the left supreme intercostal artery. Results Surgical trapping and resection of the lesion yielded a good clinical outcome. Conclusions Although two previous case reports have described patients with thoracic radiculomedullary pseudoaneurysm causing spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), this is the first reported case associated with synthetic cannabinoids and methamphetamine abuse. Although this diagnosis is exceptionally rare, clinical presentation of SAH with associated back pain and lower-extremity symptoms warrants an aggressive imaging workup. Even in the setting of negative angiography, repeat cerebral and spinal angiograms may be necessary to identify a potentially treatable cause of spinal SAH.

  15. Brainstem control of cerebral blood flow and application to acute vasospasm following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Cetas, J S; Lee, D R; Alkayed, N J; Wang, R; Iliff, J J; Heinricher, M M

    2009-10-06

    Symptomatic ischemia following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is common but poorly understood and inadequately treated. Severe constriction of the major arteries at the base of the brain, termed vasospasm, traditionally has been thought to be a proximal event underlying these ischemias, although microvascular changes also have been described. The vast majority of studies aimed at understanding the pathogenesis of ischemic deficits, and vasospasm have focused on the interaction of the "spasmogen" of the extravasated blood with the smooth muscle and endothelium of the arteries. This has led to a comparative neglect of the contribution of the CNS to the maintenance of cerebral perfusion. In the present study, we focused on the role of the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) in modulating cerebral perfusion at rest and following an experimental SAH in the rat. Changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) were measured using laser-Doppler flowmetry and three-dimensional optical microangiography. Focal application of a GABA(A) receptor agonist and antagonist was used to respectively inactivate and activate the RVM. We show here that the RVM modulates cerebral blood flow under resting conditions, and further, contributes to restoration of cerebral perfusion following a high-grade SAH. Failure of this brainstem compensatory mechanism could be significant for acute perfusion deficits seen in patients following subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  16. ECG pattern in reverse takotsubo cardiomyopathy demonstrated in 5 cases with intracranial hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Elikowski, Waldemar; Małek-Elikowska, Małgorzata; Kudliński, Bartosz; Skrzywanek, Paweł; Smól, Sławomir; Rzymski, Stanisław

    2016-09-29

    In typical takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) apical transient left ventricular dysfunction with concomitant ECG changes mimicking acute anterior myocardial infarction can be observed. Reverse TC (RTC) characterized by contractile disturbances in all basal and often simultaneous mid-ventricular segments is definitely less frequent. ECG pattern of RTC is less known. The authors present ECG findings in 5 cases of RTC in course of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH); 3 patients were diagnosed with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and the other two with intracerebral hemorrhage or subdural posttraumatic hematoma. In all patients, initial ECG appearance was dominated by ST segment depression in inferior leads (II, III, avF) and/or lateral leads (V4-6). In 4 patients, concurrent ST segment elevation in avR and avL leads was seen, additionally 4 patients had low QRS voltage in high lateral leads (I, avL). Potential normalization of these changes did not influence the patient`s survival. In one woman, immediately before death, early repolarization was recorded. In subjects with an increased risk of TC, for example in intracranial hemorrhage, particularly in SAH, the ECG abnormalities presented may indicate a need for further search of its atypical echocardiographic variants.

  17. Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Describing the Diagnostic Accuracy of History, Physical Exam, Imaging, and Lumbar Puncture with an Exploration of Test Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Hussain, Adnan M.; Ward, Michael J.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Fowler, Susan; Pines, Jesse M.; Sivilotti, Marco L.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a rare, but serious etiology of headache. The diagnosis of SAH is especially challenging in alert, neurologically intact patients, as missed or delayed diagnosis can be catastrophic. Objectives To perform a diagnostic accuracy systematic review and meta-analysis of history, physical examination, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tests, computed tomography (CT), and clinical decision rules for spontaneous SAH. A secondary objective was to delineate probability of disease thresholds for imaging and lumbar puncture (LP). Methods PUBMED, EMBASE, SCOPUS, and research meeting abstracts were searched up to June 2015 for studies of emergency department (ED) patients with acute headache clinically concerning for spontaneous SAH. QUADAS-2 was used to assess study quality and, when appropriate, meta-analysis was conducted using random effects models. Outcomes were sensitivity, specificity, positive (LR+) and negative (LR−) likelihood ratios. To identify test- and treatment-thresholds, we employed the Pauker-Kassirer method with Bernstein test-indication curves using the summary estimates of diagnostic accuracy. Results A total of 5,022 publications were identified, of which 122 underwent full text-review; 22 studies were included (average SAH prevalence 7.5%). Diagnostic studies differed in assessment of history and physical exam findings, CT technology, analytical techniques used to identify xanthochromia, and criterion standards for SAH. Study quality by QUADAS-2 was variable; however, most had a relatively low-risk of biases. A history of neck pain (LR+ 4.1 [95% CI 2.2-7.6]) and neck stiffness on physical exam (LR+ 6.6 [4.0-11.0]) were the individual findings most strongly associated with SAH. Combinations of findings may rule out SAH, yet promising clinical decision rules await external validation. Non-contrast cranial CT within 6 hours of headache onset accurately ruled-in (LR+ 230 [6-8700]) and ruled-out SAH (LR− 0

  18. Imaging of Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Heit, Jeremy J.; Iv, Michael; Wintermark, Max

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is common and is caused by diverse pathology, including trauma, hypertension, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, hemorrhagic conversion of ischemic infarction, cerebral aneurysms, cerebral arteriovenous malformations, dural arteriovenous fistula, vasculitis, and venous sinus thrombosis, among other causes. Neuroimaging is essential for the treating physician to identify the cause of hemorrhage and to understand the location and severity of hemorrhage, the risk of impending cerebral injury, and to guide often emergent patient treatment. We review CT and MRI evaluation of intracranial hemorrhage with the goal of providing a broad overview of the diverse causes and varied appearances of intracranial hemorrhage. PMID:28030895

  19. Compressive Cervicothoracic Adhesive Arachnoiditis following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Kamian, Kambiz

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 55-year-old woman with diffuse adhesive arachnoiditis in the posterior fossa and cervicothoracic spine following posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). She underwent aneurysm clipping with subsequent gradual neurologic decline associated with sensory disturbances, gait ataxia, and spastic paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse adhesive arachnoiditis in the posterior fossa and cervicothoracic spine, syringobulbia, and multiple arachnoid cysts in the cervicothoracic spine along with syringohydromyelia. Early surgical intervention with microlysis of the adhesions and duraplasty at the clinically relevant levels resulted in clinical improvement. Although adhesive arachnoiditis, secondary arachnoid cysts, and cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities resulting in syrinx are rare following aneurysmal SAH, early recognition and appropriate intervention lead to good clinical outcomes. PMID:25083391

  20. Compressive Cervicothoracic Adhesive Arachnoiditis following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Kamian, Kambiz

    2014-08-01

    We present the case of a 55-year-old woman with diffuse adhesive arachnoiditis in the posterior fossa and cervicothoracic spine following posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). She underwent aneurysm clipping with subsequent gradual neurologic decline associated with sensory disturbances, gait ataxia, and spastic paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse adhesive arachnoiditis in the posterior fossa and cervicothoracic spine, syringobulbia, and multiple arachnoid cysts in the cervicothoracic spine along with syringohydromyelia. Early surgical intervention with microlysis of the adhesions and duraplasty at the clinically relevant levels resulted in clinical improvement. Although adhesive arachnoiditis, secondary arachnoid cysts, and cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities resulting in syrinx are rare following aneurysmal SAH, early recognition and appropriate intervention lead to good clinical outcomes.

  1. Fusiform Lenticulostriate Artery Aneurysm with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: The Role for Superselective Angiography in Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Kochar, P.S.; Morrish, W.F.; Hudon, M.E.; Wong, J.H.; Goyal, M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Aneurysms of the lenticulostriatal perforating arteries are rare and either involve the middle cerebral artery-perforator junction or are located distally in basal ganglia. We describe a rare ruptured fusiform lenticulostriatal perforating artery aneurysm arising from a proximal M2 MCA branch, discerned on superselective microcatheter angiography, presenting solely with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 50-year-old previously healthy man presented with diffuse SAH and negative CT angiogram. Cerebral angiogram demonstrated a 2 mm fusiform aneurysm presumably arising from the right lateral lenticulostriate perforator but the exact origin of the perforator was unclear. Superselective angiography was required to precisely delineate the aneurysm and its vessel of origin and directly influenced treatment planning (surgical trapping). Superselective microcatheter angiography provides both an option for endovascular therapy as well as more accurate delineation for surgical planning for these rare aneurysms. PMID:20977857

  2. Global end-diastolic volume is associated with the occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia and pulmonary edema after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akihiro; Tagami, Takashi; Yokobori, Shoji; Matsumoto, Gaku; Igarashi, Yutaka; Suzuki, Go; Onda, Hidetaka; Fuse, Akira; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2012-11-01

    Predictive variables of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and pulmonary edema following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remain unknown. We aimed to determine associations between transpulmonary thermodilution-derived variables and DCI and pulmonary edema occurrence after SAH. We reviewed 34 consecutive SAH patients monitored by the PiCCO system. Six patients developed DCI at 7 days after SAH on average; 28 did not (non-DCI). We compared the variable measures for 1 day before DCI occurred (DCI day -1) in the DCI group and 6 days after SAH (non-DCI day -1) in the non-DCI group for control. The mean value of the global end-diastolic volume index (GEDI) for DCI day -1 was lower than that for non-DCI day -1 (676 ± 65 vs. 872 ± 85 mL/m, P = 0.04). Central venous pressure (CVP) was not significantly different (7.8 ± 3.1 vs. 9.4 ± 1.9 cm H2O, P = 0.45). At day -1 for both DCI and non-DCI, 11 patients (32%) had pulmonary edema. Global end-diastolic volume index was significantly higher in patients with pulmonary edema than in those without this condition (947 ± 126 vs. 766 ± 81 mL/m, P = 0.02); CVP was not significantly different (8.7 ± 2.8 vs. 9.2 ± 2.1 cm H2O, P = 0.78). Although significant correlation was found between extravascular lung water (EVLW) measures and GEDI (r = 0.58, P = 0.001), EVLW and CVP were not correlated (r = 0.03, P = 0.88). Thus, GEDI might be associated with DCI occurrence and EVLW accumulation after SAH.

  3. Toll-like receptor 4 as a possible therapeutic target for delayed brain injuries after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Takeshi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2017-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a well-recognized consequence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 may be an important therapeutic target for post-SAH neuroinflammation. Of the TLR family members, TLR4 is expressed in various cell types in the central nervous system, and is unique in that it can signal through both the myeloid differentiation primary-response protein 88-dependent and the toll receptor associated activator of interferon-dependent cascades to coordinate the maximal inflammatory response. TLR4 can be activated by many endogenous ligands having damage-associated molecular patterns including heme and fibrinogen at the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, and the resultant inflammatory reaction and thereby tissue damages may furthermore activate TLR4. It is widely accepted that the excreted products of TLR4 signaling alter neuronal functions. Previous studies have focused on the pathway through nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling among TLR4 signaling pathways as to the development of early brain injury (EBI) such as neuronal apoptosis and blood-brain barrier disruption, and cerebral vasospasm. However, many findings suggest that both pathways via NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases may be involved in EBI and cerebral vasospasm development. To overcome EBI and cerebral vasospasm is important to improve outcomes after SAH, because both EBI and vasopasm are responsible for delayed brain injuries or delayed cerebral ischemia, the most important preventable cause of poor outcomes after SAH. Increasing evidence has shown that TLR4 signaling plays an important role in SAH-induced brain injuries. Better understanding of the roles of TLR4 signaling in SAH will facilitate development of new treatments.

  4. Protective effect of HIF-1α against hippocampal apoptosis and cognitive dysfunction in an experimental rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yushu; Li, Yue; Feng, Dayun; Wang, Julei; Wen, Hua; Liu, Debao; Zhao, Dandan; Liu, Haiying; Gao, Guodong; Yin, Zhongmin; Qin, Huaizhou

    2013-06-23

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is a master regulator of cellular adaptation to hypoxia and has been proposed as a potent therapeutic target for cerebral ischemia. However, research on the expression and effects of HIF-1α in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is limited. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of HIF-1α in the hippocampus and its possible protective effect against hippocampal apoptosis and cognitive dysfunction in a rat model of SAH. Seventy-two Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into the sham group, the SAH+vehicle group, and the SAH+YC-1 group. Immunohistochemical staining and western blotting analyses revealed that the expression of HIF-1α and its downstream effectors, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), erythropoietin (EPO), and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), increased in the hippocampus 48h after the induction of SAH. YC-1 blocked this upregulation. The number of active caspase-3-positive cells and the expression of active caspase-3 in the hippocampus significantly increased in the YC-1 group relative to the vehicle group. A cell death assay further revealed that DNA fragmentation was significantly increased at 48h in the YC-1 group compared with the vehicle group. In Morris water maze (MWM) tests, the YC-1 group showed increased escape latency times and distances as well as reduced time spent and distance traveled in the target quadrant. These results indicate that hippocampal apoptosis increased and cognitive function deteriorated when HIF-1α was inhibited, suggesting that HIF-1α has a neuroprotective effect in SAH and may represent an effective therapeutic target.

  5. Association of Fisher scale and changes of language in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Souza, Moysés Loiola Ponte de

    2014-11-01

    Cognitive deficits caused by subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) after rupture of cerebral aneurysms are common, as approximately half of patients have severe, or at least striking, declines in one or more functions of the cognitive domain. The Fisher Scale is associated with the development of vasospasm and thus with the final performance of the patient after SAH. The association of this scale with language disorders in the period preceding the treatment has not been reported yet in the literature. Associate the presence of language deficits with varying degrees of the Fisher Scale in patients with SAH in the period preceding the treatment of aneurysm, as well as compare the various degrees of this scale, identifying the Fisher Scale degrees more associated with the decline of language. The database of 185 preoperative evaluations of language was studied, through the Montreal Toulouse Protocol Alpha version and verbal fluency through CERAD battery, of patients of Hospital da Restauração with aneurysmal SAH. The data relating to the Fisher Scale, the location of the aneurysm, the age and the gender of patients were obtained through review of medical records. Patients were divided according to the Fisher Scale (Fisher I, II, III or IV) and compared with a control group of individuals considered normal. Disorders in language and verbal fluency in patients with SAH in the preoperative period were evidenced. The classification of the patients according to the Fisher Scale allowed to identify differences between the sub-groups and to conclude that patients with bulkier bleeding (Fisher III and IV) have larger declines in the analyzed functions.

  6. Plasma D-dimer may predict poor functional outcomes through systemic complications after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Hitoshi; Lo, Benjamin; Yamamoto, Yu; Handa, Akira; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Kurosaki, Yoshitaka; Yamagata, Sen

    2016-08-12

    OBJECTIVE Plasma D-dimer levels elevate during acute stages of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and are associated with poor functional outcomes. However, the mechanism in which D-dimer elevation on admission affects functional outcomes remains unknown. The aim of this study is to clarify whether D-dimer levels on admission are correlated with systemic complications after aneurysmal SAH, and to investigate their additive predictive value on conventional risk factors for poor functional outcomes. METHODS A total of 187 patients with aneurysmal SAH were retrospectively analyzed from a single-center, observational cohort database. Correlations of plasma D-dimer levels on admission with patient characteristics, initial presentation, neurological complications, and systemic complications were identified. The authors also evaluated the additive value of D-dimer elevation on admission for poor functional outcomes by comparing predictive models with and without D-dimer. RESULTS D-dimer elevation on admission was associated with increasing age, female sex, and severity of SAH. Patients with higher D-dimer levels had increased likelihood of nosocomial infections (OR 1.22 [95% CI 1.07-1.39], p = 0.004), serum sodium disorders (OR 1.11 [95% CI 1.01-1.23], p = 0.033), and cardiopulmonary complications (OR 1.20 [95% CI 1.04-1.37], p = 0.01) on multivariable analysis. D-dimer elevation was an independent risk factor of poor functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale Score 3-6, OR 1.50 [95% CI 1.15-1.95], p = 0.003). A novel prediction model with D-dimer had significantly better discrimination ability for poor outcomes than conventional models without D-dimer. CONCLUSIONS Elevated D-dimer levels on admission were independently correlated with systemic complication, and had an additive value for outcome prediction on conventional risk factors after aneurysmal SAH.

  7. Antihypertensives are administered selectively in emergency department patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Culyer, Virginia; McDonough, Erin; Lindsell, Christopher J; Alwell, Kathleen; Moomaw, Charles J; Kissela, Brett M; Flaherty, Matthew L; Khatri, Pooja; Woo, Daniel; Ferioli, Simona; Broderick, Joseph P; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Adeoye, Opeolu

    2013-11-01

    Elevated blood pressure is common in patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). American Heart Association guidelines do not specify a blood pressure target, but limited data suggest that systolic blood pressure (SBP)≥160 mmHg is associated with increased risk of rebleeding and neurologic decline. In a population-based study, we determined the frequency of antihypertensive therapy in emergency department (ED) patients with SAH and the proportion of those patients with SBP≥160 mmHg who received this therapy. In 2005, nontraumatic SAH cases were retrospectively ascertained at 16 hospitals in our region by screening for International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision diagnostic codes 430-436. Blood pressure was recorded at ED presentation and also before and after any treatment with antihypertensives. Hypotension was defined as SBP<100 mmHg. The Mann-Whitney U test and χ2 test were used for comparisons. Our cohort comprised 82 patients with SAH presenting to an ED; 4 patients were excluded. The median age of the included patients was 54 years, 74.4% were female, 29.5% were black, and 31 (39.7%) had SBP≥160 mmHg. Antihypertensive therapy was given to 22 of 31 patients (70.9%) with SBP≥160 mmHg and to 4 of 47 patients (8.5%) with SBP<160 mmHg. No patients became hypotensive after receiving treatment. Age, sex, Glascow Coma Scale score, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score were similar between treated and untreated patients. In the absence of definitive evidence, current blood pressure management in local EDs appears reasonable. Further studies of blood pressure management in acute SAH are warranted.

  8. Fisetin alleviates early brain injury following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats possibly by suppressing TLR 4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen-hui; Wang, Chun-xi; Xie, Guang-bin; Wu, Ling-yun; Wei, Yong-xiang; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Hua-sheng; Hang, Chun-hua; Zhou, Meng-liang; Shi, Ji-xin

    2015-12-10

    Early brain injury (EBI) determines the unfavorable outcomes after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Fisetin, a natural flavonoid, has anti-inflammatory and neuroprotection properties in several brain injury models, but the role of fisetin on EBI following SAH remains unknown. Our study aimed to explore the effects of fisetin on EBI after SAH in rats. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the sham and SAH groups, fisetin (25mg/kg or 50mg/kg) or equal volume of vehicle was given at 30min after SAH. Neurological scores and brain edema were assayed. The protein expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR 4), p65, ZO-1 and bcl-2 was examined by Western blot. TLR 4 and p65 were also assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to detect the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated uridine 5'-triphosphate-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) was perform to assess neural cell apoptosis. High-dose (50mg/kg) fisetin significantly improved neurological function and reduced brain edema at both 24h and 72h after SAH. Remarkable reductions of TLR 4 expression and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) translocation to nucleus were detected after fisetin treatment. In addition, fisetin significantly reduced the productions of pro-inflammatory cytokines, decreased neural cell apoptosis and increased the protein expression of ZO-1 and bcl-2. Our data provides the evidence for the first time that fisetin plays a protective role in EBI following SAH possibly by suppressing TLR 4/NF-κB mediated inflammatory pathway.

  9. Blood-filled cerebrospinal fluid-enhanced pericyte microvasculature contraction in rat retina: A novel in vitro study of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Li, Qiang; Cui, Gaoyu; Zhu, Gang; Tang, Weihua; Zhao, Hengli; Zhang, John H.; Chen, Yujie; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Previously, it was widely accepted that the delayed ischemic injury and poor clinical outcome following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was caused by cerebral vasospasm. This classical theory was challenged by a clazosentan clinical trial, which failed to improve patient outcome, despite reversing angiographic vasospasm. One possible explanation for the results of this trial is the changes in microcirculation following SAH, particularly in pericytes, which are the primary cell type controlling microcirculation in the brain parenchyma. However, as a result of technical limitations and the lack of suitable models, there was no direct evidence of microvessel dysfunction following SAH. In the present study, whole-mount retinal microvasculature has been introduced to study microcirculation in the brain following experimental SAH in vitro. Artificial blood-filled cerebrospinal fluid (BSCF) was applied to the retinal microvasculature to test the hypothesis that the presence of subarachnoid blood affects the contractile properties of the pericytes containing cerebral microcirculation during the early phase of SAH. It was observed that BCSF induced retina microvessel contraction and that this contraction could be resolved by BCSF wash-out. Furthermore, BCSF application accelerated pericyte-populated collagen gel contraction and increased the expression of α-smooth muscle actin. In addition, BCSF induced an influx of calcium in cultured retinal pericytes. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates increased contractility of retinal microvessels and pericytes in the presence of BCSF in vitro. These findings suggest that pericyte contraction and microvascular dysfunction is induced following SAH, which could lead to greater susceptibility to SAH-induced ischemia. PMID:27698742

  10. Vasospasm Risk in Surgical ICU Patients With Grade I Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lessen, Samantha; Keene, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with high mortality. The initial hemorrhage causes death in approximately 25% of patients, with most subsequent mortality being attributable to delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Delayed cerebral ischemia generally occurs on post-bleed days 4 through 20, with the incidence peaking at day 8. Because of the risks of DCI, patients with SAH are usually monitored in an intensive care unit (ICU) for 14 to 21 days. Unfortunately, prolonged ICU admissions are expensive and are associated with well-documented risks to patients. We hypothesized that a subset of patients who are at low risk of DCI should be safe to transfer out of the ICU early. All patients admitted to Montefiore Medical Center from 2008 to 2013 with grade I SAH who had their aneurysms successfully protected, had an uncomplicated postoperative course, and had no clinical or ultrasonographic evidence of DCI after day 8 were retrospectively studied. The primary outcome was clinical or ultrasonographic evidence of the development of DCI after day 8. Secondary outcomes included length of ICU and hospital stay and hospital mortality. Forty patients who met the above-mentioned criteria were identified. Of these, only 1 (2.5%) developed ultrasonographic evidence of DCI after day 8 but required no intervention. The mean length of stay in the ICU was until post-bleed day 13, and the mean hospital length of stay was until post-bleed day 14. The in-hospital mortality was 0 of 40. Thus, we identified a low-risk subset of patients with grade I SAH who may be candidates for early transfer out of the ICU. PMID:26740854

  11. Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers (VHFs) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers (VHFs) Virus Families Arenaviruses Old World/New World ...

  12. Metabolic Pattern of the Acute Phase of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in a Novel Porcine Model: Studies with Cerebral Microdialysis with High Temporal Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Christoffer; Karlsson, Torbjörn; Hillered, Lars; Engström, Elisabeth Ronne

    2014-01-01

    Background Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may produce cerebral ischemia and systemic responses including stress. To study immediate cerebral and systemic changes in response to aneurysm rupture, animal models are needed. Objective To study early cerebral energy changes in an animal model. Methods Experimental SAH was induced in 11 pigs by autologous blood injection to the anterior skull base, with simultaneous control of intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures. Intracerebral microdialysis was used to monitor concentrations of glucose, pyruvate and lactate. Results In nine of the pigs, a pattern of transient ischemia was produced, with a dramatic reduction of cerebral perfusion pressure soon after blood injection, associated with a quick glucose and pyruvate decrease. This was followed by a lactate increase and a delayed pyruvate increase, producing a marked but short elevation of the lactate/pyruvate ratio. Glucose, pyruvate, lactate and lactate/pyruvate ratio thereafter returned toward baseline. The two remaining pigs had a more severe metabolic reaction with glucose and pyruvate rapidly decreasing to undetectable levels while lactate increased and remained elevated, suggesting persisting ischemia. Conclusion The animal model simulates the conditions of SAH not only by deposition of blood in the basal cisterns, but also creating the transient global ischemic impact of aneurysmal SAH. The metabolic cerebral changes suggest immediate transient substrate failure followed by hypermetabolism of glucose upon reperfusion. The model has features that resemble spontaneous bleeding, and is suitable for future research of the early cerebral and systemic responses to SAH that are difficult to study in humans. PMID:24940881

  13. Nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Fischbein, Nancy J; Wijman, Christine A C

    2010-11-01

    Nontraumatic (or spontaneous) intracranial hemorrhage most commonly involves the brain parenchyma and subarachnoid space. This entity accounts for at least 10% of strokes and is a leading cause of death and disability in adults. Important causes of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage include hypertension, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, aneurysms, vascular malformations, and hemorrhagic infarcts (both venous and arterial). Imaging findings in common and less common causes of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage are reviewed.

  14. Trehalose treatment suppresses inflammation, oxidative stress, and vasospasm induced by experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) frequently results in several complications, including cerebral vasospasm, associated with high mortality. Although cerebral vasospasm is a major cause of brain damages after SAH, other factors such as inflammatory responses and oxidative stress also contribute to high mortality after SAH. Trehalose is a non-reducing disaccharide in which two glucose units are linked by α,α-1,1-glycosidic bond, and has been shown to induce tolerance to a variety of stressors in numerous organisms. In the present study, we investigated the effect of trehalose on cerebral vasospasm, inflammatory responses, and oxidative stress induced by blood in vitro and in vivo. Methods Enzyme immunoassay for eicosanoids, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and endothelin-1, and western blotting analysis for cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and inhibitor of NF-κB were examined in macrophage-like cells treated with hemolysate. After treatment with hemolysate and hydrogen peroxide, the levels of lipid peroxide and amounts of arachidonic acid release were also analyzed. Three hours after the onset of experimental SAH, 18 Japanese White rabbits received an injection of saline, trehalose, or maltose into the cisterna magna. Angiographic and histological analyses of the basilar arteries were performed. In a separate study, the femoral arteries from 60 rats were exposed to fresh autologous blood. At 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 20 days after treatment, cryosections prepared from the femoral arteries were histologically analyzed. Results When cells were treated with hemolysate, trehalose inhibited the production of several inflammatory mediators and degradation of the inhibitor of NF-κB and also suppressed the lipid peroxidation, the reactive oxygen species-induced arachidonic acid release in vitro. In the rabbit model, trehalose produced an inhibitory effect on vasospasm after the onset of experimental SAH, while maltose had only a moderate effect. When the

  15. Concurrent cervical dural and multiple perimedullary arteriovenous fistulas presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage: The source of bleeding was invisible at initial angiography

    PubMed Central

    Nambu, Iku; Uchiyama, Naoyuki; Misaki, Kouichi; Mohri, Masanao; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Background: We report the concurrence of a spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) and multiple perimedullary arteriovenous fistulas (PAVFs) presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Moreover, the bleeding site was detected 1 month after onset. Case Description: A 56-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with an SAH. A DAVF and two PAVFs were detected at the C2 level by two rounds of digital subtraction angiography. The source of bleeding, an aneurysm on the feeding artery of PAVF, was detected at the second angiogram, which was performed 1 month after the onset of SAH. The aneurysm was not demonstrated at initial angiogram because of thrombosis in the aneurysm. The DAVF was interrupted by transarterial embolization, and the two PAVFs were subsequently treated with surgery. Conclusion: A part of the whole AVFs or the source of bleeding may be invisible in the acute stage just after hemorrhage. Repeated angiography is necessary to diagnose such complex AVFs especially in case of an SAH and treatment should be performed during the subacute stage. PMID:28217381

  16. Transient elevation of serum bilirubin (a heme oxygenase-1 metabolite) level in hemorrhagic stroke: bilirubin is a marker of oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Dohi, K; Mochizuki, Y; Satoh, K; Jimbo, H; Hayashi, M; Toyoda, I; Ikeda, Y; Abe, T; Aruga, T

    2003-01-01

    Bilirubin (Bil) is the end product of heme catabolism. The production of Bil reflects heme oxygenase-1 expression in response to oxidative stress in various diseases. To assess the role of Bil as a marker of oxidative stress in cases of brain damage, we measured serum Bil concentrations in patients with hemorrhagic stroke. Serum levels of total Bil were measured in 20 subarachnoid hemorrhage patients with symptomatic vasospasms and in 23 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage; concentrations were measured every day for 14 consecutive days. Serum Bil levels were significantly elevated in the early phases in both groups. Moreover, transient elevation was observed on the day prior to the observation of clinical manifestations of symptomatic vasospasm after SAH. Bil, known to be a powerful antioxidant, was induced after hemorrhagic stroke, reflecting the intensity of oxidative stress. Plasma Bil concentrations might serve as a useful marker of oxidative stress in hemorrhagic stroke patients.

  17. External validation of the Practical Risk Chart for the prediction of delayed cerebral ischemia following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Paul M; Chua, Michelle H; Harrigan, Mark R; Fisher, Winfield S; Tubbs, R Shane; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Griessenauer, Christoph J

    2016-05-13

    OBJECTIVE Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) occurs in approximately 30% of patients. The Practical Risk Chart was developed to predict DCI based on admission characteristics; the authors seek to externally validate and critically appraise this prediction tool. METHODS A prospective cohort of aSAH patients was used to externally validate the previously published Practical Risk Chart. The model consists of 4 variables: clinical condition on admission, amount of cisternal and intraventricular blood on CT, and age. External validity was assessed using logistic regression. Model discrimination was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). RESULTS In a cohort of 125 patients with aSAH, the Practical Risk Chart adequately predicted DCI, with an AUC of 0.66 (95% CI 0.55-0.77). Clinical grade on admission and amount of intracranial blood on CT were the strongest predictors of DCI and clinical vasospasm. The best-fit model used a combination of the Hunt and Hess grade and the modified Fisher scale to yield an AUC of 0.76 (95% CI 0.675-0.85) and 0.70 (95% CI 0.602-0.8) for the prediction of DCI and clinical vasospasm, respectively. CONCLUSIONS The Practical Risk Chart adequately predicts the risk of DCI following aSAH. However, the best-fit model represents a simpler stratification scheme, using only the Hunt and Hess grade and the modified Fisher scale, and produces a comparable AUC.

  18. Effect of endothelin receptor antagonists on clinically relevant outcomes after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Laban, Kamil G; Vergouwen, Mervyn DI; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Sena, Emily S; Macleod, Malcolm R; Rinkel, Gabriel JE; van der Worp, H Bart

    2015-01-01

    In clinical trials, endothelin receptor antagonists (ETRAs) reduced vasospasm but did not improve functional outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We assessed the effects of treatment with ETRAs on clinically relevant outcomes in animal studies modelling SAH by performing a systematic review of the literature for controlled animal studies of ETRAs for the treatment of SAH. Primary outcomes were neurobehavioral outcomes and case fatality. Secondary outcomes were cerebral vasospasm and cerebral blood flow. Summary estimates were calculated using normalized mean difference random effects meta-analysis. We included 27 studies (55 experiments, 639 animals). Neurobehavioral scores were reported in none of the experiments, and case fatality in 8 (15%). Treatment with ETRAs was associated with a pooled odds ratio for case fatality of 0.61 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.27 to 1.39); a 54% increase (95% CI, 39 to 69) in cerebral arterial diameter; and a 93% increase (95% CI, 58 to 129) in cerebral blood flow. We conclude that there is no evidence from animal studies that treatment with an ETRA improves clinically relevant outcomes after SAH. The reduction in cerebral vasospasm observed in animal studies is consistent with that observed in clinical trials, an effect that is not associated with better functional outcome in patients. PMID:25944590

  19. Tetramethylpyrazine Protects against Early Brain Injury after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage by Affecting Mitochondrial-Dependent Caspase-3 Apoptotic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiaolan

    2017-01-01

    This study was to test the hypothesis that tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) protected against early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by affecting the mitochondrial-dependent caspase-3 apoptotic pathway. TMP was administrated after the rats' prechiasmatic SAH mode. Animal neurobehavioral functions were assessed and the mitochondrial morphology, mitochondrial and cytoplasmic calcium, and mitochondrial membrane potential changes (Δψm) of the brain tissues were measured. The expressions of cytoplasmic cytochrome c (cyt c), second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac), and cleaved caspase-3 B-cell lymphoma 2 (bcl-2) in cells were determined and cellular apoptosis was detected. The treatment of TMP resulted in less apoptotic cells and milder mitochondrial injury and potentially performed better in the neurobehavioral outcome compared to those with saline. Also, TMP ameliorated calcium overload in mitochondria and cytoplasm and alleviated the decrease of Δψm. In addition, TMP inhibited the expression of cytoplasmic cyt c, Smac, and cleaved caspase-3, yet it upregulated the expression of bcl-2. These findings suggest that TMP exerts an antiapoptosis property in the SAH rat model and this is probably mediated by the caspase-3 apoptotic pathway triggered by mitochondrial calcium overload. The finding offers a new therapeutic candidate for early brain injury after SAH. PMID:28337226

  20. Chronic basilar artery dissection with an associated symptomatic aneurysm presenting with massive subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Moscovici, Samuel; Rajz, Gustavo; Vargas, Andres; Itshayek, Eyal

    2016-08-01

    Basilar artery dissection (BAD) is a rare condition with a worse prognosis than a dissection limited to the vertebral artery. We report a rare case of chronic BAD with an associated symptomatic aneurysm presenting with massive subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in a 54-year-old woman. The diagnosis of acute BAD could only be made retrospectively, based on clinical and neuroradiological studies from a hospital admission 10months earlier. Angiography performed after her SAH showed unequivocal signs of imperfect healing; she was either post-recanalization of a complete occlusion or post-dissection. Residual multi-channel intraluminal defects led to the development of a small aneurysm, which was responsible for the massive hemorrhage. The occurrence of an associated aneurysm, and wall disease, but not an intraluminal process, reinforces the diagnosis of dissection. The patient was fully recovered at 90day follow-up. This case reinforces the need for long-term neuroradiological surveillance after non-hemorrhagic intracranial dissections to detect the development of de novo aneurysms.

  1. [Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and gastrointestinal hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Abe, Koichiro; Kuyama, Yasushi

    2013-04-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are widely used antidepressants characterized by less-frequent adverse effects compared with classical anti-depressive agents. On the other hand, SSRI can cause hemorrhagic events more due to impaired platelet aggregation induced by a depletion of serotonin in the peripheral platelet. Epidemiological studies have indicated that patients taking SSRI are predisposed to gastrointestinal hemorrhage, especially in case that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are prescribed concomitantly. Here we describe a risk of the gastrointestinal hemorrhage in patients taking SSRI.

  2. [Subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured aneurysms in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Collice, M

    1998-04-01

    Advanced age is a recognized risk factor in patients with SAH. A strong correlation has been found between advanced age and impairment of consciousness at admission, presence of thick subarachnoid clot, intraventricular hemorrhage and acute hydrocephalus. Thus suggesting a more severe disease in elderly. Moreover the incidence of rebleeding increases with advancing age. As to the results of surgery a linear correlation between age and outcome has been found in most of series and it is difficult to identify a critical age. However the rate of patients with a poor outcome is significantly higher when an age cut off 60-65 years is considered. Significant improvements have been obtained in the last 30 years in elderly but mortality rate still remains at high level: in the order of 20% in the patients 60-70 years old. For patients over 70 years only results from single series are available and these suggest favourable results in very selected cases. The introduction of GDC coil in the treatment of cerebral aneurysms has changed the management of most SAH patients and particularly of the older ones. The guidelines of current management of such patients followed at the Niguarda Hospital of Milan are presented. Age is one of the four "factors" taken into consideration for a selection of treatment (surgery or coil).

  3. Ethyl Pyruvate Attenuates Early Brain Injury Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in the Endovascular Perforation Rabbit Model Possibly Via Anti-inflammation and Inhibition of JNK Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lv, Tao; Miao, Yi-Feng; Jin, Yi-Chao; Yang, Shao-Feng; Wu, Hui; Dai, Jiong; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2017-02-25

    Early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is the main cause to poor outcomes of SAH patients, and early inflammation plays an important role in the acute pathophysiological events. It has been demonstrated that ethyl pyruvate (EP) has anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in various critical diseases, however, the role of EP on EBI following SAH remains to be elucidated. Our study aimed to evaluate the effects of EP on EBI following SAH in the endovascular perforation rabbit model. All rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: sham, SAH + Vehicle (equal volume) and SAH + EP (30 mg/kg/day). MRI was performed to estimate the reliability of the EBI at 24 and 72 h after SAH. Neurological scores were recorded to evaluate the neurological deficit, ELISA kit was used to measure the level of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and western blot was used to detect the expression of TNF-α, tJNK, pJNK, bax and bcl-2 at 24 and 72 h after SAH. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and Fluoro-jade B (FJB) staining were used to detect neuronal apoptosis and neurodegeneration respectively, meanwhile hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was used to assess the degree of vasospasm. Our results demonstrated that EP alleviated brain tissue injury (characterized by diffusion weighted imaging and T2 sequence in MRI scan), and significantly improved neurological scores at 72 h after SAH. EP decreased the level of TNF-α and downregulated pJNK/tJNK and bax/bcl-2 in cerebral cortex and hippocampus effectively both at 24 and 72 h after SAH. Furthermore, EP reduced TUNEL and FJB positive cells significantly. In conclusion, the present study supported that EP afforded neuroprotective effects possibly via reducing TNF-α expression and inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway. Therefore, EP may be a potent therapeutic agent to attenuate EBI following SAH.

  4. Hydrocephalus after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jinqi; Reis, Cesar; Manaenko, Anatol

    2017-01-01

    Hydrocephalus (HCP) is a common complication in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In this review, we summarize the advanced research on HCP and discuss the understanding of the molecular originators of HCP and the development of diagnoses and remedies of HCP after SAH. It has been reported that inflammation, apoptosis, autophagy, and oxidative stress are the important causes of HCP, and well-known molecules including transforming growth factor, matrix metalloproteinases, and iron terminally lead to fibrosis and blockage of HCP. Potential medicines for HCP are still in preclinical status, and surgery is the most prevalent and efficient therapy, despite respective risks of different surgical methods, including lamina terminalis fenestration, ventricle-peritoneal shunting, and lumbar-peritoneal shunting. HCP remains an ailment that cannot be ignored and even with various solutions the medical community is still trying to understand and settle why and how it develops and accordingly improve the prognosis of these patients with HCP. PMID:28373987

  5. Early ischemic lesions following subarachnoid hemorrhage: common cold remedy as precipitating factor?

    PubMed

    Genonceaux, Sandrine; Cosnard, Guy; Van De Wyngaert, Françoise; Hantson, Philippe

    2011-03-01

    A 46-year-old woman presented with tetraplegia contrasting with a relatively preserved consciousness following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Multiple ischemic lesions were detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in the absence of vasospasm or signs of increased intracranial pressure. During the weeks before SAH, the patient had repeatedly used a nasal decongestant containing phenylephrine. After coiling of the aneurysm harboured by the right posterior cerebral artery, symptomatic vasospasm developed in the territory of the right middle cerebral artery and required aggressive therapy by intra-arterial infusion of milrinone followed by continuous intravenous administration. Follow-up MRI did not reveal new ischemic lesions. Echocardiography had demonstrated the presence of a patent foramen ovale. At 3 months follow-up, a major motor deficit persisted with akinetic mutism. The mechanisms of multiple early infarction following aneurysmal SAH are still debated, as vasospasm is usually not seen on the first imaging. Among precipitating factors of microvascular vasospasm, vasoactive substances like phenylephrine, may play a significant role.

  6. Measuring Serum Amyloid A for Infection Prediction in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Azurmendi, Leire; Degos, Vincent; Tiberti, Natalia; Kapandji, Natacha; Sanchez, Paola; Sarrafzadeh, Asita; Puybasset, Louis; Turck, Natacha; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2015-09-04

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity. Nosocomial infections, such as pneumonia or urinary tract infections, are among the main causes of worsening outcomes and death. The aim of this study was to discover a biomarker to predict infection in aSAH patients. For this purpose, the plasma of infected and noninfected patients was compared using quantitative mass spectrometry. The most interesting differentially expressed proteins were selected for validation by immunoassays on plasma samples taken from patients (n = 81) over 10 days of hospitalization. Predictive performances were established using Mann-Whitney U tests and receiver operating characteristic curves. Quantitative proteomics identified 17 significantly regulated proteins. Of these, levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) were significantly higher in infected patients (p < 0.007). ELISA confirmed that the concentrations were significantly higher (p < 0.002) already at hospital admission in patients who subsequently developed an infection during their hospitalization, (AUC of 76%) for a cutoff value of 90.9 μg/mL. Our data suggested that measuring SAA could be an efficient means of detecting patients susceptible of developing an infection during hospitalization after an aSAH. Its predictive capacity could lead to earlier antibiotherapy, improved patient management, and potentially better long-term outcomes.

  7. Pramipexole-Induced Hypothermia Reduces Early Brain Injury via PI3K/AKT/GSK3β pathway in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junwei; Wang, Zhong; Liu, Chenglin; Shen, Haitao; Chen, Zhouqing; Yin, Jia; Zuo, Gang; Duan, Xiaochun; Li, Haiying; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown neuroprotective effects of hypothermia. However, its effects on subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced early brain injury (EBI) remain unclear. In this study, a SAH rat model was employed to study the effects and mechanisms of pramipexole-induced hypothermia on EBI after SAH. Dose-response experiments were performed to select the appropriate pramipexole concentration and frequency of administration for induction of mild hypothermia (33–36 °C). Western blot, neurobehavioral evaluation, Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) staining were used to detect the effects of pramipexole-induced hypothermia on SAH-induced EBI, as well as to study whether controlled rewarming could attenuate these effects. Inhibitors targeting the PI3K/AKT/GSK3β pathway were administered to determine whether the neuroprotective effect of pramipexole-induced hypothermia was mediated by PI3K/AKT/GSK3β signaling pathway. The results showed that intraperitoneal injection of pramipexole at 0.25 mg/kg body weight once per 8 hours was found to successfully and safely maintain rats at mild hypothermia. Pramipexole-induced hypothermia ameliorated SAH-induced brain cell death, blood-brain barrier damage and neurobehavioral deficits in a PI3K/AKT/GSK3β signaling-dependent manner. Therefore, we may conclude that pramipexole-induced hypothermia could effectively inhibit EBI after SAH in rats via PI3K/AKT/GSK3β signaling pathway. PMID:27026509

  8. Neopterin plasma concentrations in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: correlation with infection and long-term outcome.

    PubMed

    Azurmendi, Leire; Degos, Vincent; Tiberti, Natalia; Kapandji, Natacha; Sanchez-Peña, Paola; Sarrafzadeh, Asita; Puybasset, Louis; Turck, Natacha; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity. The main predictor for the poor outcome is the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) scale. However, this scale does not take into account proinflammatory events, such as infection occurring after the aSAH, which could modify the long-term status of patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate neopterin as an inflammatory biomarker for outcome and infection prediction in aSAH patients. METHODS Plasma concentrations of neopterin were measured in 61 aSAH patients (22 male and 39 female; mean age [± SD] 52.8 ± 11.8 years) using a commercial ELISA kit. Samples were collected daily for 10 days. Outcome at 12 months was determined using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) and dichotomized as poor (GOS score 1, 2, or 3) or good (GOS score 4 or 5). Infection was determined by the presence of a positive bacterial culture. RESULTS Patients with poor outcome at 12 months had higher concentrations of neopterin than patients with good outcome. In the same way, patients who had an infection during the hospitalization had significantly higher concentrations of neopterin than patients without infection (p = 0.001). Moreover, neopterin concentrations were significantly (p < 0.008) elevated in infected patients 2 days before infection detection and antibiotic therapy. CONCLUSIONS Neopterin is an efficient outcome predictor after aSAH. Furthermore, it is able to differentiate between infected and uninfected patients as early as 2 days before clinical signs of infection, facilitating earlier antibiotic therapy and better management.

  9. Structured assessment of hypopituitarism after traumatic brain injury and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in 1242 patients: the German interdisciplinary database.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Harald J; Schneider, Manfred; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka; Tuschy, Ulrich; Wallaschofski, Henri; Fleck, Steffen; Faust, Michael; Renner, Caroline I E; Kopczak, Anna; Saller, Bernhard; Buchfelder, Michael; Jordan, Martina; Stalla, Günter K

    2011-09-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that traumatic brain injury (TBI) and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are frequent causes of long-term disturbances of hypothalamo-pituitary function. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and associated factors of post-traumatic hypopituitarism in a large national registry of patients with TBI and SAH. Data were collected from 14 centers in Germany and Austria treating patients for TBI or SAH and performing endocrine assessments. Data were collected using a structured, internet-based study sheet, obtaining information on clinical, radiological, and hormonal parameters. A total of 1242 patients (825 TBI, age 43.5±19.7 years; 417 SAH, age 49.7±11.8 years) were included. We studied the prevalence of hypopituitarism reported based on different definitions of laboratory values and stimulation tests. Stimulation tests for the corticotropic and somatotropic axes were performed in 26% and 22% of the patients, respectively. The prevalence of hypopituitarism in the chronic phase (at least 5 months after the event) by laboratory values, physician diagnoses, and stimulation tests, was 35%, 36%, and 70%, respectively. Hypopituitarism was less common in the acute phase. According to the frequency of endocrine dysfunction, pituitary hormone secretion was impaired in the following sequence: ACTH, LH/FSH, GH, and TSH. TBI patients with abnormal stimulation tests had suffered from more severe TBI than patients with normal stimulation tests. In conclusion, our data confirm that hypopituitarism is a common complication of TBI and SAH. It is possible that patients with a higher likelihood of hypopituitarism were selected for endocrine stimulation tests.

  10. Fetal hydrocephalus caused by cryptic intraventricular hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lategan, Belinda; Chodirker, Bernard N; Del Bigio, Marc R

    2010-03-01

    Cryptic intracerebral hemorrhage as an etiological factor in fetal hydrocephalus has been postulated but not described at autopsy. Four fetuses with overt hydrocephalus diagnosed by in utero ultrasound examination were examined at autopsy at 19-22 weeks gestation. Although a hemorrhagic etiology was not evident on ultrasound, hemosiderin-containing macrophages and associated reactive changes were found to obstruct the otherwise well-formed cerebral aqueduct in all four. Coagulopathy due to thrombocytopenia was implicated in one case. Anomalies involving other parts of the body were identified in two cases, although a direct link to the hydrocephalus was not obvious. The abnormality was isolated in one case. In three cases, possible sites of hemorrhage in the ventricles were identified. This abnormality represents a significant proportion of the fetuses examined for hydrocephalus in our referral center. We discuss the importance of careful autopsy examination in the diagnosis of cryptic intracerebral hemorrhage and the implications for counseling.

  11. Molsidomine for the prevention of vasospasm-related delayed ischemic neurological deficits and delayed brain infarction and the improvement of clinical outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage: a single-center clinical observational study.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Angelika; Schmidt, Christoph; Wölfer, Johannes; Manthei, Gerd; Jacobs, Andreas H; Brüning, Roland; Heindel, Walter; Ringelstein, E Bernd; Stummer, Walter; Pluta, Ryszard M; Hesselmann, Volker

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Delayed ischemic neurological deficits (DINDs) and cerebral vasospasm (CVS) are responsible fora poor outcome in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), most likely because of a decreased availability of nitric oxide (NO) in the cerebral microcirculation. In this study, the authors examined the effects of treatment with the NO donor molsidomine with regard to decreasing the incidence of spasm-related delayed brain infarctions and improving clinical outcome in patients with SAH. METHODS Seventy-four patients with spontaneous aneurysmal SAH were included in this post hoc analysis. Twenty-nine patients with SAH and proven CVS received molsidomine in addition to oral or intravenous nimodipine. Control groups consisted of 25 SAH patients with proven vasospasm and 20 SAH patients without. These patients received nimodipine therapy alone. Cranial computed tomography (CCT) before and after treatment was analyzed for CVS-related infarcts. A modified National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (mNIHSS) and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) were used to assess outcomes at a 3-month clinical follow-up. RESULTS Four of the 29 (13.8%) patients receiving molsidomine plus nimodipine and 22 of the 45 (48%) patients receiving nimodipine therapy alone developed vasospasm-associated brain infarcts (p < 0.01). Follow-up revealed a median mNIHSS score of 3.0 and a median mRS score of 2.5 in the molsidomine group compared with scores of 11.5 and 5.0, respectively, in the nimodipine group with CVS (p < 0.001). One patient in the molsidomine treatment group died, and 12 patients in the standard care group died (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS In this post hoc analysis, patients with CVS who were treated with intravenous molsidomine had a significant improvement in clinical outcome and less cerebral infarction. Molsidomine offers a promising therapeutic option in patients with severe SAH and CVS and should be assessed in a prospective study.

  12. Inhibitory effects of omega-3 fatty acids on early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats: Possible involvement of G protein-coupled receptor 120/β-arrestin2/TGF-β activated kinase-1 binding protein-1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia; Li, Haiying; Meng, Chengjie; Chen, Dongdong; Chen, Zhouqing; Wang, Yibin; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Gang

    2016-06-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids have been reported to improve neuron functions during aging and in patients affected by mild cognitive impairment, and mediate potent anti-inflammatory via G protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) signal pathway. Neuron dysfunction and inflammatory response also contributed to the progression of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced early brain injury (EBI). This study was to examine the effects of omega-3 fatty acids on SAH-induced EBI. Two weeks before SAH, 30% Omega-3 fatty acids was administered by oral gavage at 1g/kg body weight once every 24h. Specific siRNA for GPR120 was exploited. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, fluoro-Jade B staining, and neurobehavioral scores and brain water content test showed that omega-3 fatty acids effectively suppressed SAH-induced brain cell apoptosis and neuronal degradation, behavioral impairment, and brain edema. Western blot, immunoprecipitation, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays results showed that omega-3 fatty acids effectively suppressed SAH-induced elevation of inflammatory factors, including cyclooxygenase-2, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. In addition, omega-3 fatty acids could inhibit phosphorylation of transforming growth factor β activated kinase-1 (TAK1), MEK4, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and IkappaB kinase as well as activation of nuclear factor kappa B through regulating GPR120/β-arrestin2/TAK1 binding protein-1 pathway. Furthermore, siRNA-induced GPR120 silencing blocked the protective effects of omega-3 fatty acids. Here, we show that stimulation of GPR120 with omega-3 fatty acids pretreatment causes anti-apoptosis and anti-inflammatory effects via β-arrestin2/TAK1 binding protein-1/TAK1 pathway in the brains of SAH rats. Fish omega-3 fatty acids as part of a daily diet may reduce EBI in an experimental rat model of SAH.

  13. Impaired Fracture Healing after Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Lichte, Philipp; Kobbe, Philipp; Pfeifer, Roman; Campbell, Graeme C; Beckmann, Rainer; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Bergmann, Christian; Kadyrov, Mamed; Fischer, Horst; Glüer, Christian C; Hildebrand, Frank; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Pufe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Impaired fracture healing can occur in severely injured patients with hemorrhagic shock due to decreased soft tissue perfusion after trauma. We investigated the effects of fracture healing in a standardized pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock model in mice, to test the hypothesis that bleeding is relevant in the bone healing response. Male C57/BL6 mice were subjected to a closed femoral shaft fracture stabilized by intramedullary nailing. One group was additionally subjected to pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock (HS, mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 35 mmHg for 90 minutes). Serum cytokines (IL-6, KC, MCP-1, and TNF-α) were analyzed 6 hours after shock. Fracture healing was assessed 21 days after fracture. Hemorrhagic shock is associated with a significant increase in serum inflammatory cytokines in the early phase. Histologic analysis demonstrated a significantly decreased number of osteoclasts, a decrease in bone quality, and more cartilage islands after hemorrhagic shock. μCT analysis showed a trend towards decreased bone tissue mineral density in the HS group. Mechanical testing revealed no difference in tensile failure. Our results suggest a delay in fracture healing after hemorrhagic shock. This may be due to significantly diminished osteoclast recruitment. The exact mechanisms should be studied further, particularly during earlier stages of fracture healing.

  14. Higher brain extracellular potassium is associated with brain metabolic distress and poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Elevated brain potassium levels ([K+]) are associated with neuronal damage in experimental models. The role of brain extracellular [K+] in patients with poor-grade aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and its association with hemorrhage load, metabolic dysfunction and outcome has not been studied so far. Methods Cerebral microdialysis (CMD) samples from 28 poor grade aSAH patients were analyzed for CMD [K+] for 12 consecutive days after ictus, and time-matched to brain metabolic and hemodynamic parameters as well as corresponding plasma [K+]. Statistical analysis was performed using a generalized estimating equation with an autoregressive function to handle repeated observations of an individual patient. Results CMD [K+] did not correlate with plasma [K+] (Spearman’s ρ = 0.114, P = 0.109). Higher CMD [K+] was associated with the presence of intracerebral hematoma on admission head computed tomography, CMD lactate/pyruvate ratio >40 and CMD lactate >4 mmol/L (P < 0.05). In vitro retrodialysis data suggest that high CMD [K+] was of brain cellular origin. Higher CMD [K+] was significantly associated with poor 3-month outcome, even after adjusting for age and disease severity (P < 0.01). Conclusions The results of this pilot study suggest that brain extracellular [K+] may serve as a biomarker for brain tissue injury in poor-grade aSAH patients. Further studies are needed to elucidate the relevance of brain interstitial K+ levels in the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury after aSAH. PMID:24920041

  15. Medicare expenditures for elderly patients undergoing surgical clipping or endovascular intervention for subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bekelis, Kimon; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Su, Yin; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Lawton, Michael T; MacKenzie, Todd A

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE The impact of treatment method-surgical clipping or endovascular coiling-on the cost of care for patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is debated. Here, the authors investigated the association between treatment method and long-term Medicare expenditures in elderly patients with aneurysmal SAH. METHODS The authors performed a cohort study of 100% of the Medicare fee-for-service claims data for elderly patients who had undergone treatment for ruptured cerebral aneurysms in the period from 2007 to 2012. To control for measured confounding, the authors used propensity score-adjusted multivariable regression analysis with mixed effects to account for clustering at the hospital referral region (HRR) level. An instrumental variable (regional rates of coiling) analysis was used to control for unmeasured confounding by creating pseudo-randomization on the treatment method. RESULTS During the study period, 3210 patients underwent treatment for ruptured cerebral aneurysms and met the inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 1206 (37.6%) had surgical clipping and 2004 (62.4%) had endovascular coiling. The median total Medicare expenditures in the 1st year after admission for SAH were $113,000 (IQR $77,500-$182,000) for surgical clipping and $103,000 (IQR $72,900-$159,000) for endovascular coiling. When the authors adjusted for unmeasured confounders by using an instrumental variable analysis, clipping was associated with increased 1-year Medicare expenditures by $19,577 (95% CI $4492-$34,663). CONCLUSIONS In a cohort of Medicare patients with aneurysmal SAH, after controlling for unmeasured confounding, surgical clipping was associated with increased 1-year expenditures in comparison with endovascular coiling.

  16. Seizure burden in subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with functional and cognitive outcome

    PubMed Central

    De Marchis, Gian Marco; Pugin, Deborah; Meyers, Emma; Velasquez, Angela; Suwatcharangkoon, Sureerat; Park, Soojin; Falo, M. Cristina; Agarwal, Sachin; Mayer, Stephan; Schmidt, J. Michael; Connolly, E. Sander

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the relationship between seizure burden on continuous EEG (cEEG) and functional as well as cognitive outcome 3 months after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods: The study included all consecutive patients with a spontaneous SAH admitted to the Columbia University Medical Center Neurological Intensive Care Unit and monitored with cEEG between 1996 and 2013. Seizure burden was defined as the duration, in hours, of seizures on cEEG. Cognitive outcomes were measured with the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS, ranging from 0 to 51, indicating poor to good global mental status). Results: Overall, 402 patients with SAH were included with a median age of 58 years (interquartile range [IQR] 46–68 years). The median duration of cEEG monitoring was 96 hours (IQR 48–155 hours). Seizures were recorded in 50 patients (12%), in whom the median seizure burden was 6 hours (IQR 1–13 hours). At 3 months, in multivariate analysis, seizure burden was associated with unfavorable functional and cognitive outcome. Every hour of seizure on cEEG was associated with an odds ratio of 1.10 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01–1.21, p = 0.04) to 3-month disability and mortality, and the TICS-score decreased, on average, by 0.16 points (adjusted coefficient −0.19, 95% CI −0.33 to −0.05, p = 0.01). Conclusion: In this study, after adjusting for established predictors, seizure burden was associated with functional outcome and cognitive impairment 3 months after SAH. PMID:26701381

  17. Effectiveness of Nicardipine for Blood Pressure Control in Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Yong; Kim, Seong Min; Park, Moon Sun; Kim, Han Kyu; Park, Ki Seok

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the study is to determine the effectiveness and safety of nicardipine infusion for controlling blood pressure in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods We prospectively evaluated 52 patients with SAH and treated with nicardipine infusion for blood pressure control in a 29 months period. The mean blood pressure of pre-injection, bolus injection and continuous injection period were compared. This study evaluated the effectiveness of nicardipine for each Fisher grade, for different dose of continuous nicardipine infusion, and for the subgroups of systolic blood pressure. Results The blood pressure measurement showed that the mean systolic blood pressure / diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP) in continuous injection period (120.9/63.0 mmHg) was significantly lower than pre-injection period (145.6/80.3 mmHg) and bolus injection period (134.2/71.3 mmHg), and these were statistically significant (p < 0.001). In each subgroups of Fisher grade and different dose, SBP/DBP also decreased after the use of nicardipine. These were statistically significant (p < 0.05), but there was no significant difference in effectiveness between subgroups (p > 0.05). Furthermore, controlling blood pressure was more effective when injecting higher dose of nicardipine in higher SBP group rather than injecting lower dose in lower SBP group, and it also was statistically significant (p < 0.05). During the infusion, hypotension and cardiogenic problems were transiently combined in five cases. However, patients recovered without any complications. Conclusion Nicardipine is an effective and safe agent for controlling acutely elevated blood pressure after SAH. A more systemic study with larger patients population will provide significant results and will bring solid evidence on effectiveness of nicardipine in SAH. PMID:23210033

  18. [Characteristics of serum albumin in patients with intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke].

    PubMed

    Martynov, M Iu; Koplik, E V; Shchukin, I A; Smolina, N V; Kapel'nitskiĭ, P V; Chubykin, V I; Glukhareva, A P; Makarov, A N; Sudakov, K V

    2012-01-01

    Authors studied the influence of the psychoemotional stress preceding the stroke on the dynamics of neurological symptoms (Glasgo coma scale, Scandinavian stroke scale and Barthel index) and on the conformational changes of albumin in 59 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage due to arterial hypertension. The psychoemotional stress was associated with less favorable clinical course and outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage. Conformational properties of albumin were changed in all patients with intracerebral hemorrhage compared to controls. Psychoemotional stress preceding stroke aggravated changes in albumin molecule.

  19. Predictive value of signs and symptoms in the diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage among stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Talavera, J O; Wacher, N H; Laredo, F; Halabe, J; Rosales, V; Madrazo, I; Lifshitz, A

    1996-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is frequently misdiagnosed with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) or cerebral infarction (CI), which delays appropriate referral. This study was undertaken to create a clinical index to select, among stroke patients, those with the highest probability of having a SAH. Clinical data of patients with acute stroke were evaluated with the X2 and the Fisher exact test; a p value < 0.05 was considered significant. Significant variables were included in a "log-lineal regression analysis" where those with an odds ratio (OR) 95% confidence limits not including the unit were considered to construct an index using the odds ratio coefficient (C). The results indicated that of 197 records which were included, 22 cases of SAH and 175 of ICH or CI were demonstrated. Kappa coefficients for observer variation in clinical data retrieval was 0.91. After "log-lineal regression analysis" was carried out the following variables were significant: neck stiffness (C = 3, OR = 21); lack of focal neurologic signs (C = 2, OR = 6.88); and age < or = 60 years (C = 1.5, OR = 4.35). A fourth variable, seizures (C = 1, OR = 3.25), was marginally significant (p = 0.07), but added predictive value to the index. The positive predictive values of the sum of the coefficients were: 0 = 0%; 1-2 = 3%; 2.5-3.5 = 21%; 4-5 = 40%; 6.5 = 75%; 7.5 = 100%. In conclusion, when a stroke patient shows neck stiffness, or any combination of young age, lack of focal neurologic signs or seizures (a score > or = 2.5, the index has a 91% sensitivity and 82% specificity), he/she must be referred to a tertiary care center.

  20. Cortical non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage post-carotid endarterectomy: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Thanabalasundaram, Gopiga; Hernández-Durán, Silvia; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele; Ogilvy, Christopher S

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome is a well-recognized and potentially fatal complication of carotid revascularization. However, the occurrence of non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage as a manifestation of cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome post-carotid endarterectomy is uncommon. We report a case of a patient who presented with headache following carotid endarterectomy for a critically occluded common carotid artery. This progressed to deteriorating consciousness and seizures. Investigations revealed a left cortical non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is a rare post-operative complication of carotid endarterectomy. Immediate management with aggressive blood pressure control is key to prevent permanent neurological deficits. Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) after carotid revascularization procedures is an uncommon and potentially fatal complication. Pathophysiologically it is attributed to impaired autoregulatory mechanisms and results in disruption of cerebral hemodynamics with increased regional cerebral blood flow (Cardiol Rev 20:84-89, 2012; J Vasc Surg 49:1060-1068, 2009). The condition is characterized by throbbing ipsilateral frontotemporal or periorbital headache. Other symptoms include vomiting, confusion, macular edema, focal motor seizures with frequent secondary generalization, focal neurological deficits, and intraparenchymal or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) (Lancet Neurol 4:877-888, 2005). The incidence of CHS varies from 0.2% to 18.9% after carotid endarterectomy (CEA), with a typical reported incidence of less than 3% in larger studies (Cardiol Rev 20:84-89, 2012; Neurosurg 107:1130-1136, 2007). Uncontrolled hypertension, an arterially isolated cerebral hemisphere, and contralateral carotid occlusion are the main risk factors (Lancet Neurol 4:877-888, 2005; J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 83:543-550, 2012). We present a case of non-aneurysmal SAH after CEA, with focus on its presentation, risk factors

  1. PPARβ/δ, a Novel Regulator for Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Phenotypic Modulation and Vascular Remodeling after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongrong; Jiang, Li; Guo, Zongduo; Zhong, Jianjun; Wu, Jingchuan; He, Junchi; Liu, Han; He, Zhaohui; Wu, Haitao; Cheng, Chongjie; Sun, Xiaochuan

    2017-03-22

    Cerebral vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotypic switch is involved in the pathophysiology of vascular injury after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), whereas the molecular mechanism underlying it remains largely speculative. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) has been implicated to modulate the vascular cells proliferation and vascular homeostasis. In the present study, we investigated the potential role of PPARβ/δ in VSMC phenotypic switch following SAH. Activation of PPARβ/δ by GW0742 and adenoviruses PPARβ/δ (Ad-PPARβ/δ) significantly inhibited hemoglobin-induced VSMC phenotypic switch. However, the effects of PPARβ/δ on VSMC phenotypic switch were partly obstacled in the presence of LY294002, a potent inhibitor of Phosphatidyl-Inositol-3 Kinase-AKT (PI3K/AKT). Furthermore, following study demonstrated that PPARβ/δ-induced PI3K/AKT activation can also contribute to Serum Response Factor (SRF) nucleus localization and Myocardin expression, which was highly associated with VSMC phenotypic switch. Finally, we found that Ad-PPARβ/δ positively modulated vascular remodeling in SAH rats, i.e. the diameter of basilar artery and the thickness of vessel wall. In addition, overexpression of PPARβ/δ by adenoviruses significantly improved neurological outcome. Taken together, this study identified PPARβ/δ as a useful regulator for VSMC phenotypic switch and vascular remodeling following SAH, providing novel insights into the therapeutic strategies of delayed cerebral ischemia.

  2. PPARβ/δ, a Novel Regulator for Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Phenotypic Modulation and Vascular Remodeling after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongrong; Jiang, Li; Guo, Zongduo; Zhong, Jianjun; Wu, Jingchuan; He, Junchi; Liu, Han; He, Zhaohui; Wu, Haitao; Cheng, Chongjie; Sun, Xiaochuan

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotypic switch is involved in the pathophysiology of vascular injury after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), whereas the molecular mechanism underlying it remains largely speculative. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) has been implicated to modulate the vascular cells proliferation and vascular homeostasis. In the present study, we investigated the potential role of PPARβ/δ in VSMC phenotypic switch following SAH. Activation of PPARβ/δ by GW0742 and adenoviruses PPARβ/δ (Ad-PPARβ/δ) significantly inhibited hemoglobin-induced VSMC phenotypic switch. However, the effects of PPARβ/δ on VSMC phenotypic switch were partly obstacled in the presence of LY294002, a potent inhibitor of Phosphatidyl-Inositol-3 Kinase-AKT (PI3K/AKT). Furthermore, following study demonstrated that PPARβ/δ-induced PI3K/AKT activation can also contribute to Serum Response Factor (SRF) nucleus localization and Myocardin expression, which was highly associated with VSMC phenotypic switch. Finally, we found that Ad-PPARβ/δ positively modulated vascular remodeling in SAH rats, i.e. the diameter of basilar artery and the thickness of vessel wall. In addition, overexpression of PPARβ/δ by adenoviruses significantly improved neurological outcome. Taken together, this study identified PPARβ/δ as a useful regulator for VSMC phenotypic switch and vascular remodeling following SAH, providing novel insights into the therapeutic strategies of delayed cerebral ischemia. PMID:28327554

  3. Administration of a PTEN inhibitor BPV(pic) attenuates early brain injury via modulating AMPA receptor subunits after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yujie; Luo, Chunxia; Zhao, Mingyue; Li, Qiang; Hu, Rong; Zhang, John H; Liu, Zhi; Feng, Hua

    2015-02-19

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) inhibitor dipotassium bisperoxo(pyridine-2-carboxyl) oxovanadate (BPV(pic)) attenuates early brain injury by modulating α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxa-zolep-propionate (AMPA) receptor subunits after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A standard intravascular perforation model was used to produce the experimental SAH in Sprague-Dawley rats. BPV(pic) treatment (0.2mg/kg) was evaluated for effects on neurological score, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, hippocampal neuronal death and AMPA receptor subunits alterations after SAH. We found that BPV(pic) is effective in attenuating BBB disruption, lowering edema, reducing hippocampal neural death and improving neurological outcomes. In addition, the AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 protein expression at cytomembrane was downregulated, whereas the expression of GluR2 and GluR3 was upregulated after BPV(pic) treatment. Our results suggest that PTEN inhibited by BPV(pic) plays a neuroprotective role in SAH pathophysiology, possibly by alterations in glutamate AMPA receptor subunits.

  4. An unusual case of repeated intracranial hemorrhage in vestibular schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Banaama, Saeed; van Overbeeke, Jacobus; Temel, Yasin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Symptomatic intratumoral hemorrhage (ITH) in vestibular schwannoma (VS) is rare. A repeated hemorrhage is, therefore, even more exceptional. Repeated ITH has been reported in four cases thus far in English literature. Here, we describe a patient with a Koos grade D VS who presented to our Skull Base team with repeated ITH and an unexpected disease course. Case Description: A 76-year-old woman presented with hearing loss due to polycystic VS on the left side. Five years later, the patient was presented with facial palsy caused by hemorrhage in the VS. The patient had an eventful medical history that necessitated the use of anti-coagulants. The patient suffered from three subsequent hemorrhages preoperatively and one hemorrhage 36 h postoperatively. Conclusion: We have experienced multiple repeated hemorrhages in a patient with a polycystic VS, and despite surgical intervention, the outcome was unfavorable. PMID:27999710

  5. Acitretin-induced subungual hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Aydogan, Kenan; Karadogan, Serap Koran; Tunali, Sukran

    2007-05-01

    A 20-year-old woman with a 2-year history of histologically confirmed palmoplantar keratoderma due to psoriasis, resistant to several topical agents, was admitted to the Department of Dermatology, Uludag University, Bursa, Turkey. Therapy with oral acitretin (0.5 mg/kg/day, 35 mg/day) was initiated. A month after starting acitretin treatment, she noted slight reddening of the second left fingernail. Clinical examination revealed red-brown discoloration of the second fingernail associated with subungual hemorrhage involving the proximal nail bed (lunula region) (Fig. 1). The nail change was asymptomatic. The patient complained only of discoloration underneath the nail plate. No abnormalities were detected on the skin, mucous membranes, or toenails/other fingernails. The patient denied exposure to microtrauma or any other drugs. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate, full blood cell count, electrolytes, renal and hepatic tests, and serum lipids were normal. Coagulation tests, including blood clotting time, international normalized ratio, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, platelet number, and function tests, were within normal levels. Treatment with acitretin was discontinued, and the nail change resolved completely after 3 weeks. A similar episode of subungual hemorrhage recurred, however, within 48 h after re-challenge with a lower dose of acitretin (25 mg/day). The drug was definitively stopped and the eruption faded again within a week. An objective causality assessment suggests that subungual hemorrhage was probably related to acitretin in this patient.

  6. Hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Pigott, David C

    2005-10-01

    This article reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical management of patients with suspected or confirmed viral hemorrhagic fever infection. The focus is on clinical management based on case series from naturally occuring outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever infection as well as imported cases of viral hemorrhagic fever encountered in industrialized nations. The potential risk of bioterrorism involving these agents is discussed as well as emergency department and critical care management of isolated cases or larger outbreaks. Important aspects of management, including recognition of infected patients, isolation and decontamination procedures, as well as available vaccines and therapies are emphasized.

  7. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stroke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  8. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2007-06-05

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  9. Simian hemorrhagic fever virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biological pro...

  10. Ebola hemorrhagic Fever.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is an often-fatal disease caused by a virus of the Filoviridae family, genus Ebolavirus. Initial signs and symptoms of the disease are nonspecific, often progressing on to a severe hemorrhagic illness. Special Operations Forces Medical Providers should be aware of this disease, which occurs in sporadic outbreaks throughout Africa. Treatment at the present time is mainly supportive. Special care should be taken to prevent contact with bodily fluids of those infected, which can transmit the virus to caregivers.

  11. [Hemorrhagic cystitis due to adenovirus in a renal transplant recipient: the first reported case in black Africa in a setting of a very beginning of a kidney transplantation program and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Ackoundou-N'Guessan, Clément; Coulibaly, Noël; Guei, Cyr Monley; Aye, Denis; N'guessan, Francis Yapi; N'Dah, Justin Kouame; Lagou, Delphine Amélie; Tia, Mélanie Weu; Coulibaly, Pessa Albert; Nzoue, Sita; Konan, Serges; Gnionsahe, Daze Apollinaire

    2015-04-01

    Viral infections are an important complication of transplantation. Polyomavirus are the commonest viruses that infect the renal allograft. Herpes virus nephropathy has also been described. In the past 15 years, adenovirus nephritis has emerged as a potentially life-threatening disease in renal transplant patients in developed countries. Most of the papers devoted to adenovirus nephritis are reported cases. The fate of such patients in resources-limited countries is not known. Herein, we describe the clinical, biological and prognostic findings of a black African transplanted patient with adenoviral hemorrhagic cystitis. This case is the very first of its kind reported in black Africa in a setting of a start of a renal transplantation pilot project. The patient is a 54-year-old man admitted at the nephrology service for gross haematuria and fever occurred 1 month after kidney transplantation. The diagnosis of adenoviral hemorrhagic cystitis has been suspected because the patient has displayed recurrent conjunctivitis and gastroenteritis well before transplantation, which was then confirmed by the real-time polymerase chain reaction performed on the blood. Conservatory measures associated with immunosuppression reduction have permitted the discontinuation of haematuria. This case has been discussed in regard of the epidemiology, the diagnosis, the treatment, the evolution and the prognosis of the adenoviral infection in the renal transplant patient. A review of the literature has been performed subsequently.

  12. GDC Embolization of Intracranial Aneurysms with SAH and Mass Effect by Subdural Haematoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J.-K.; Kim, Y.-J.

    2004-01-01

    Summary A 43-year-old woman was brought to the emergency room due to the sudden onset of severe headache and stuporous consciousness. She had no history of head injury. Computerized tomography scan revealed subarachnoid haemorrhage and left SDH with midline shift of about 10 mm. Cerebral angiography demonstrated anterior communicating artery and right middle cerebral artery bifurcation aneurysms. Her family refused operation due to her religion never to permit blood transfusion. So just aneurysm coiling and medical ICP control was planned. Guglielmi detachable coil (GDCs) embolization of the two aneurysms was successfully performed. She made a neurological recovery after embolization without evacuation of the SDH. She was discharged from hospital with no neurological deficit on day 21. We report our experience of successful GDC embolization on multiple aneurysms without craniotomy even in the selected case of mass effect. PMID:20587263

  13. Higher Cerebrospinal Fluid pH may Contribute to the Development of Delayed Cerebral Ischemia after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidenori; Shiba, Masato; Nakatsuka, Yoshinari; Nakano, Fumi; Nishikawa, Hirofumi

    2017-04-01

    Recent investigations have shown that many factors may cause delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). To find new potential contributors to DCI, this retrospective study compared gas data in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) between patients with and without DCI. The subjects were 61 consecutive patients with SAH classified as Fisher group III on admission computed tomography scans, whose aneurysms were obliterated by clipping or coiling within 24 h post-SAH. Thirty-three patients were treated with CSF drainage. CSF samples were chronologically obtained from CSF drains or lumbar taps. Patients with DCI were more frequently treated with CSF drainage, especially cisternal drainage, and were associated with significantly higher pH and lower partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) in the CSF compared with patients without DCI, although CSF concentrations of bicarbonate ion as well as arterial blood gas data were not different between the two groups. Total hemoglobin concentrations in the drained or tapped CSF were higher in patients with no DCI compared with patients with DCI at any sampling time, suggesting that CSF hemoglobin was not efficiently removed in patients with DCI. This study revealed higher CSF pH and lower CSF PCO2 as new potential contributors to the development of DCI, which might result from inappropriate CSF drainage that failed to remove clot and acid metabolites in it efficiently. Both of the disturbed CSF gas and inappropriate CSF drainage may cause constriction of the arteries and arterioles, leading to DCI.

  14. Bloody cerebrospinal fluid from patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage alters intracellular calcium regulation in cultured human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, K; Hirai, K; Aoyagi, M; Yamamoto, K; Hirakawa, K; Katayama, Y

    2000-09-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction may contribute to cerebral vasospasm and aggravation of ischemic brain damage following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). It has been suggested that oxyhemoglobin derived from subarachnoid blood clots might be a prime candidate for cerebral vasospasm. In this study, cisternal bloody cerebrospinal fluid (bCSF) was collected from SAH patients four and seven days after aneurysmal rupture, and the effects of bCSF on the cell growth and intracellular calcium ion ([Ca2+]i) dynamics were investigated in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. CSF collected from patients undergoing other intracranial surgeries was used as a control. Pre-treatment with bCSF4 significantly facilitated cell proliferation and DNA synthesis in the cultured endothelial cells, and significantly enhanced histamine-induced [Ca2+]i increase, while acute treatment of the bCSF elicited no [Ca2+]i change. Pre-treatment with interleukin-1 beta showed a similar significant enhancement of the histamine-induced [Ca2+]i response, while pre-treatment with high concentrations of serum or interleukin-6 did not change the [Ca2+]i response. It is concluded that bCSF collected from SAH patients contains some substances which enhance endothelial cell proliferation and sensitivity to inflammatory mediator.

  15. Effect of the drainage of cerebrospinal fluid in patients with aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Cong; Yu, Xiaobo; Chen, Jingyin; Gu, Chi; Wang, Lin; Chen, Gao; Dai, Yuying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and objectives: Vasospasm-related injury such as delayed ischemic neurological defect (DIND) or cerebral infarction is an important prognostic factor for aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage can achieve a better outcome in aneurismal SAH patients after coiling or clipping remains the subject of debate. Here, we report a meta-analysis of the related available literature to assess the effect of continuous CSF drainage on clinical outcomes in patients with aneurismal SAH. Methods: Case-control studies regarding the association between aneurismal SAH and CSF drainage were systematically identified through online databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Elsevier Science Direct, and Springer Link). Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined for the eligible studies. The fixed-effects model was performed when homogeneity was indicated. Alternatively, the random-effects model was utilized. Results: This meta-analysis included 11 studies. Continuous CSF drainage obviously improved patients’ long-term outcome (odds ratio [OR] of 2.86, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37–5.98, P < 0.01). CSF drainage also reduced angiographic vasospasm (OR of 0.35, 95% CI, 0.23–0.51, P < 0.01), symptomatic vasospasm (OR of 0.32, 95% CI, 0.32–0.43, P < 0.01), and DIND (OR of 0.48, 95% CI, 0.25–0.91, P = 0.03), but there was no significant difference between the CSF drainage group and the no CSF drainage group on shunt-dependent hydrocephalus (SDHC) prevention (OR of 1.04, 95% CI, 0.52–2.07, P = 0.91). Further analysis on lumbar drainage (LD) and external ventricular drainage (EVD) indicated that LD had a better outcome (OR of 3.11, 95% CI, 1.18–8.23, P = 0.02), whereas no significant difference in vasospasm-related injury was detected between the groups (OR of 1.13, 95% CI, 0.54–2.37, P = 0.75). Conclusion: Continuous CSF drainage is an effective treatment for aneurismal SAH patients; lumbar drainage

  16. Contralateral Intraparenchymal Hemorrhage Following Aneurysmal Clipping

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2008-01-01

    Post-clipping intraparenchymal hemorrhage of the contralateral hemisphere is a very unusual phenomenon in a patient with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, unless there is an underlying condition. We report a complicated case of 47-year-old man, who underwent uneventful clipping of ruptured aneurysm and experienced vasospasm two weeks later. Vasospasm was treated by intra-arterial nimodipine and systemic hyperdynamic therapy. One week thereafter, he became unconscious due to intraparenchymal hemorrhage on the anterior border-zone of contalateral hemisphere, but intraoperative and pathologic findings failed to disclose any vascular anomaly. We suggest that the anti-spastic regimens cause local hemodynamic redistribution through the vasodilatory effect and in turn, resulted in such an unexpected bleeding. PMID:19096626

  17. Hemorrhagic Colloid Cyst Presenting with Acute Hydrocephaly

    PubMed Central

    Akhavan, Reza; Zandi, Behrouz; Pezeshki-Rad, Masoud; Farrokh, Donya

    2017-01-01

    Colloid cysts are benign slow-growing cystic lesions located on the roof of the third ventricle that usually present with symptoms related to gradual rise of intracranial pressure. They mostly remain asymptomatic and sometimes grow progressively and cause diverse symptoms associated with increased intracranial pressure such as headache, diplopia, and sixth cranial nerve palsy. Here we report a 47-year-old female who presented to the emergency department with acute severe headache and nausea/vomiting. On MRI examination acute hydrocephaly due to hemorrhagic colloid cyst was detected. Acute hemorrhage in colloid cysts is extremely rare and may present with symptoms of acute increase in the intracranial pressure. Intracystic hemorrhage is very rarely reported as a complication of colloid cyst presenting with paroxysmal symptoms of acute hydrocephaly. PMID:28210514

  18. Incidence of delayed seizures, delayed cerebral ischemia and poor outcome with the use of levetiracetam versus phenytoin after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Karamchandani, Rahul Ramesh; Fletcher, Jeffrey James; Pandey, Aditya Swarup; Rajajee, Venkatakrishna

    2014-09-01

    Current guidelines recommend against the use of phenytoin following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) but consider other anticonvulsants, such as levetiracetam, acceptable. Our objective was to evaluate the risk of poor functional outcomes, delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and delayed seizures in aSAH patients treated with levetiracetam versus phenytoin. Medical records of patients with aSAH admitted between 2005-2012 receiving anticonvulsant prophylaxis with phenytoin or levetiracetam for >72 hours were reviewed. The primary outcome measure was poor functional outcome, defined as modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score >3 at first recorded follow-up. Secondary outcomes measures included DCI and the incidence of delayed seizures. The association between the use of levetiracetam and phenytoin and the outcomes of interest was studied using logistic regression. Medical records of 564 aSAH patients were reviewed and 259 included in the analysis after application of inclusion/exclusion criteria. Phenytoin was used exclusively in 43 (17%), levetiracetam exclusively in 132 (51%) while 84 (32%) patients were switched from phenytoin to levetiracetam. Six (2%) patients had delayed seizures, 94 (36%) developed DCI and 63 (24%) had mRS score >3 at follow-up. On multivariate analysis, only modified Fisher grade and seizure before anticonvulsant administration were associated with DCI while age, Hunt-Hess grade and presence of intraparenchymal hematoma were associated with mRS score >3. Choice of anticonvulsant was not associated with any of the outcomes of interest. There was no difference in the rate of delayed seizures, DCI or poor functional outcome in patients receiving phenytoin versus levetiracetam after aSAH. The high rate of crossover from phenytoin suggests that levetiracetam may be better tolerated.

  19. Viral hemorrhagic septicemia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batts, William N.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) is one of the most important viral diseases of finfish worldwide. In the past, VHS was thought to affect mainly rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reared at freshwater facilities in Western Europe where it was known by various names including Egtved disease and infectious kidney swelling and liver degeneration (Wolf 1988). Today, VHS is known as an important source of mortality for cultured and wild fish in freshwater and marine environments in several regions of the northern hemisphere (Dixon 1999; Gagné et al. 2007; Kim and Faisal 2011; Lumsden et al. 2007; Marty et al. 1998, 2003; Meyers and Winton 1995; Skall et al. 2005b; Smail 1999; Takano et al. 2001). Viral hemorrhagic septicemia is caused by the fish rhabdovirus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a member of the genus Novirhabdovirus of the family Rhabdoviridae

  20. Travelers' Health: Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... VHFs) are caused by several families of enveloped RNA viruses: filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fever), arenaviruses ( ... in hemorrhagic fever with high death rates. Old World (Eastern Hemisphere) and New World (Western Hemisphere) viruses ...

  1. Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever (Marburg HF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Marburg hemorrhagic fever (Marburg HF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... was first recognized in 1967, when outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever occurred simultaneously in laboratories in Marburg and Frankfurt, ...

  2. Of hemorrhagic shock, spherical cows and Aloe vera.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Guillermo; Fuller, Stephanie P

    2004-12-01

    The central question explored in this commentary is whether the beneficial effects of an Aloe vera derived drag-reducing polymer during hemorrhagic shock is due to its O2 radical scavenging properties or to changes in blood rheology.

  3. The changes of von willebrand factor/a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type I repeats-13 balance in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qi-Feng; Lu, Shi-Qi; Zhao, Yi-Ming; Qian, Jin-Xian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Von Willebrand Factor/thrombospondin type I repeats-13 (VWF/ADAMTS13) balance in aSAH. Fifty eight patients with aSAH at the First Affiliated hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, China, between January 2012 and January 2014 were eligible for the study. They were divided into delayed cerebral ischemia group (DCI group) and non-delayed cerebral ischemia group (no DCI group), or cerebral vasospasm group (CVS group) and no spasm group (no CVS group), or good outcome group and poor outcome group. The control group consisted of twenty healthy people. All patients underwent CT, DSA, or (and) CTA diagnosed with intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage which is caused by aneurysm rupture. Venous blood was drawn in tubes at 3 time points: 1 day after SAH (T1), (4±1) days after SAH (T2), and (9±1) days after SAH (T3) to determine plasma concentrations of ADAMTS13, VWF, P-selectin and IL-6 via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Transcranial doppler sonography (TCD) was used to measure mean blood flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery (VMCA). Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) was measured before discharge. Among 58 patients, 12 (20.7%) had DCI, 40 (68.9%) had TCD evidence of CVS, and 20 (34.5%) had poor outcome. The concentrations of VWF, P-selectin and IL-6 on T1, T2 and T3 after SAH were significantly higher in DCI, CVS and poor outcome groups compared with those of the control group (P < 0.05). The concentrations of VWF, P-selectin and IL-6 were significantly higher in DCI, CVS and poor outcome groups compared with those of the no DCI, no CVS and good outcome groups. The activity of ADAMTS13 was lower in DCI and poor outcome groups compared with those of the no DCI and good outcome groups (P < 0.05). The activity of ADAMTS13 showed no difference in CVS group and no CVS group (P > 0.05). The results of our study suggest that the increased VWF and decreased ADAMTS13 activity were associated with DCI and poor outcome

  4. Korean Hemorrhagic Fever.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    AD-A<m 761 KOREA UNIV SEOUL COLL OF MEDICINE KOREAN HEM0RRHA6IC FEVER.(U) MAR 80 H W LEE UNCLASSIFIED ICFI F/6 6/5 DAM017-79-6-9<*55 NL...I» > I,,iu. •Uli ••-. SUMMARY There were 364 hospitalized cases of Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF) in 1979 in Korea . Lee et al...STANDARDS-1963-A ?H "LEVEtf® AD <o KOREAN HEMORRHAGIC F EVER A D A 09 47 Final Report HO WANG LEE, M. D. March 1980 i MIL. IIB«I . Mm k iw

  5. Hemorrhagic Longitudinally Extensive Transverse Myelitis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chris Y; Riangwiwat, Tanawan; Nakamoto, Beau K

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM) may be associated with viral triggers, including both infections and vaccinations. We present a case of a healthy immunocompetent 33-year-old woman who developed a hemorrhagic LETM 2 weeks after seasonal influenza vaccination. Hemorrhagic LETM has not to our knowledge been reported after influenza vaccination. It may represent a forme fruste variant of acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis.

  6. Korean Hemorrhagic Fever (Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS)).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    RD-RI55 255 KOREAN HEMORRHAGIC FEVER (HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL 11 SYNDROME (HFRS))(U) KOREA UNIV SEOUL DEPT OF MICROBIOLOGY H U LEE RUG 83 DRMDi...the first time in Korea (4,13). WHO has recently adapted to call Korean hemorrhagic fever and clinically similar diseases with a different name, HFRS...AD_______ I •. KOREAN HEMORRHAGIC FEVER • (HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL SYNDROME (HFRS)) I Final Report 0 In HO WANG LEE, M.D. August 1983 Supported by U.S

  7. Clinical review: Hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Guillermo; Reines, H David; Wulf-Gutierrez, Marian E

    2004-01-01

    This review addresses the pathophysiology and treatment of hemorrhagic shock – a condition produced by rapid and significant loss of intravascular volume, which may lead sequentially to hemodynamic instability, decreases in oxygen delivery, decreased tissue perfusion, cellular hypoxia, organ damage, and death. Hemorrhagic shock can be rapidly fatal. The primary goals are to stop the bleeding and to restore circulating blood volume. Resuscitation may well depend on the estimated severity of hemorrhage. It now appears that patients with moderate hypotension from bleeding may benefit by delaying massive fluid resuscitation until they reach a definitive care facility. On the other hand, the use of intravenous fluids, crystalloids or colloids, and blood products can be life saving in those patients who are in severe hemorrhagic shock. The optimal method of resuscitation has not been clearly established. A hemoglobin level of 7–8 g/dl appears to be an appropriate threshold for transfusion in critically ill patients with no evidence of tissue hypoxia. However, maintaining a higher hemoglobin level of 10 g/dl is a reasonable goal in actively bleeding patients, the elderly, or individuals who are at risk for myocardial infarction. Moreover, hemoglobin concentration should not be the only therapeutic guide in actively bleeding patients. Instead, therapy should be aimed at restoring intravascular volume and adequate hemodynamic parameters. PMID:15469601

  8. Korean Hemorrhagic Fever.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF) occurred for the first time in Korea , 1951, although it had previously been known to both the Japanese and Russians...After Korean war, the disease has been fixed in the areas of DMZ as an endemic one, and from 100 to 400 cases have been being reportee every year

  9. Treatment of Argentine hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Enria, Delia A; Briggiler, Ana M; Sánchez, Zaida

    2008-04-01

    Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF) is a rodent-borne illness caused by the arenavirus Junin that is endemic to the humid pampas of Argentina. AHF has had significant morbidity since its emergence in the 1950s, with a case-fatality rate of the illness without treatment between 15% and 30%. The use of a live attenuated vaccine has markedly reduced the incidence of AHF. Present specific therapy involves the transfusion of immune plasma in defined doses of neutralizing antibodies during the prodromal phase of illness. However, alternative forms of treatment are called for due to current difficulties in early detection of AHF, related to its decrease in incidence, troubles in maintaining adequate stocks of immune plasma, and the absence of effective therapies for severely ill patients that progress to a neurologic-hemorrhagic phase. Ribavirin might be a substitute for immune plasma, provided that the supply is guaranteed. Immune immunoglobulin or monoclonal antibodies should also be considered. New therapeutic options such as those being developed for systemic inflammatory syndromes should also be valuated in severe forms of AHF.

  10. Derivation of a Predictive Score for Hemorrhagic Progression of Cerebral Contusions in Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Randall Z.; Nakagawa, Kazuma; Hayashi, Michael; Donovan, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds After traumatic brain injury (TBI), hemorrhagic progression of contusions (HPCs) occurs frequently. However, there is no established predictive score to identify high-risk patients for HPC. Methods Consecutive patients who were hospitalized (2008–2013) with non-penetrating moderate or severe TBI were studied. The primary outcome was HPC, defined by both a relative increase in contusion volume by ≥30 % and an absolute increase by ≥10 mL on serial imaging. Logistic regression models were created to identify independent risk factors for HPC. The HPC Score was then derived based on the final model. Results Among a total of 286 eligible patients, 61 (21 %) patients developed HPC. On univariate analyses, HPC was associated with older age, higher initial blood pressure, antiplatelet medications, anticoagulants, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) subdural hematoma (SDH), skull fracture, frontal contusion, larger contusion volume, and shorter interval from injury to initial CT. In the final model, SAH (OR 6.33, 95 % CI, 1.80–22.23), SDH (OR 3.46, 95 % CI, 1.39–8.63), and skull fracture (OR 2.67, 95 % CI, 1.28–5.58) were associated with HPC. Based on these factors, the HPC Score was derived (SAH = 2 points, SDH = 1 point, and skull fracture = 1 point). This score had an area under the receiver operating curve of 0.77. Patients with a score of 0–2 had a 4.0 % incidence of HPC, while patients with a score of 3–4 had a 34.6 % incidence of HPC. Conclusions A simple HPC Score was developed for early risk stratification of HPC in patients with moderate or severe TBI. PMID:27473209

  11. Association of nosocomial infections with delayed cerebral ischemia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Paul M; Chua, Michelle; Harrigan, Mark R; Fisher, Winfield S; Vyas, Nilesh A; Lipsky, Robert H; Walters, Beverly C; Tubbs, R Shane; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Griessenauer, Christoph J

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a recognized complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) that contributes to poor outcome. This study seeks to determine the effect of nosocomial infection on the incidence of DCI and patient outcome. METHODS An exploratory analysis was performed on 156 patients with aSAH enrolled in the Cerebral Aneurysm Renin Angiotensin System study. Clinical and radiographic data were analyzed with univariate analysis to detect risk factors for the development of DCI and poor outcome. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of DCI. RESULTS One hundred fifty-three patients with aSAH were included. DCI was identified in 32 patients (20.9%). Nosocomial infection (odds ratio [OR] 3.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-11.2, p = 0.04), ventriculitis (OR 25.3, 95% CI 1.39-458.7, p = 0.03), aneurysm re-rupture (OR 7.55, 95% CI 1.02-55.7, p = 0.05), and clinical vasospasm (OR 43.4, 95% CI 13.1-143.4, p < 0.01) were independently associated with the development of DCI. Diagnosis of nosocomial infection preceded the diagnosis of DCI in 15 (71.4%) of 21 patients. Patients diagnosed with nosocomial infection experienced significantly worse outcomes as measured by the modified Rankin Scale score at discharge and 1 year (p < 0.01 and p = 0.03, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Nosocomial infection is independently associated with DCI. This association is hypothesized to be partly causative through the exacerbation of systemic inflammation leading to thrombosis and subsequent ischemia.

  12. Urea for treatment of acute SIADH in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage: a single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia occurring as a result of the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) or cerebral salt wasting syndrome is a common complication in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The efficacy and safety of urea as treatment for SIADH-induced hyponatremia has not been reported in this population. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of all patients admitted to our department for nontraumatic SAH between January 2003 and December 2008 (n = 368). All patients with SIADH-induced hyponatremia (plasma sodium < 135 mEq/L, urine sodium > 20 mEq/L, and osmolality > 200 mOsm/kg; absence of overt dehydration or hypovolemia; no peripheral edema or renal failure; no history of adrenal or thyroid disease) routinely received urea per os when hyponatremia was associated with clinical deterioration or remained less than 130 mEq/L despite saline solution administration. Results Forty-two patients developed SIADH and were treated with urea. Urea was started after a median of 7 (IQR, 5–10) days and given orally at doses of 15–30 g tid or qid for a median of 5 (IQR, 3–7) days. The median plasma sodium increase over the first day of treatment was 3 (IQR, 1–6) mEq/L. Hyponatremia was corrected in all patients, with median times to Na+ >130 and >135 mEq/L of 1 (IQR, 1–2) and 3 (IQR, 2–4) days, respectively. Urea was well tolerated, and no adverse effects were reported. Conclusions Oral urea is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for SIADH-induced hyponatremia in SAH patients. PMID:22647340

  13. Subhyaloid hemorrhage treated with SF6 gas injection.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Woo; Seo, Man-Seong

    2004-01-01

    A 72-year old woman with a premacular subhyaloid hemorrhage could not be treated by laser photodisruption due to a thick posterior cortical vitreous. Pure sulfur hexafluoride (SF6, 0.3 mL) gas was injected intravitreally without recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, and facedown positioning was recommended for 5 days. Posterior vitreous detachment was induced and the hemorrhage dispersed into the vitreous cavity. Eight weeks later, her visual acuity had recovered from hand motions to 20/40. Fluorescein angiography revealed an arterial macroaneurysm in the inferotemporal retina. Intravitreal SF6 gas injection without recombinant tissue plasminogen activator may be an alternative method for treating a relatively new subhyaloid hemorrhage.

  14. Symptomatic intracystic hemorrhage in pineal cysts. Report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya-Seiwert, Sevgi; Turowski, Bernd; Hänggi, Daniel; Janssen, Giesela; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Stummer, Walter

    2009-08-01

    Pineal cysts are benign and often asymptomatic intracranial entities. Occasionally they can lead to neurological symptoms through growth or due to intracystic hemorrhage. The purpose of the current report is to describe their clinical characteristics and treatment options. In the current study, the authors illustrate the course of disease in 3 patients who developed neurological symptoms due to hemorrhage into a pineal cyst. Two of their patients had additional cerebral disease, and regular MR imaging examinations were conducted. This circumstance allowed documentation of growth and intracystic hemorrhage. After the occurrence of new neurological symptoms with severe headache, MR images showed a fluid-fluid interface due to intracystic hemorrhage. The third patient presented with acute triventricular hydrocephalus and papilledema due to aqueductal stenosis caused by intracystic hemorrhage. In all 3 cases, excision of the pineal cysts via an infratentorial/supracerebellar approach was performed. Histological examination revealed the characteristic structure of pineal cyst in all cases, with hemorrhagic residues in the form of hemosiderin deposits. All patients recovered fully after surgical removal of the cysts. Furthermore, resolution of occlusive hydrocephalus could be demonstrated in those cases with ventricular enlargement. Pineal cysts without neurological symptoms are often discovered as incidental findings on cranial MR images. In contrast, neurological symptoms such as severe headache, diplopia, or Parinaud syndrome, may occur as a result of pineal apoplexy due to intracystic hemorrhage. The authors' cases confirm that MR imaging can identify intracystic hemorrhage by a characteristic fluid-fluid interface. Their experience suggests that microsurgical resection of cysts may be an effective and curative treatment option.

  15. Possible overlap between reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome and symptomatic vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Forget, Patrice; Goffette, Pierre; van de Wyngaert, Françoise; Raftopoulos, Christian; Hantson, Philippe

    2009-08-01

    A 34-year-old woman with a previous history of severe headache ("thunderclap") was admitted with a diagnosis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The patient developed symptomatic vasospasm on day 5 that resolved rapidly after having increased arterial blood pressure. She experienced also short-lasting excruciating headache. On day 12, while velocities had normalised, as revealed by transcranial Doppler (TCD), for more than 48 h, she developed aphasia and right hemiplegia associated with diffuse segmental vasospasm on the left middle cerebral artery. Intra-arterial infusion of vasodilatory agents was required. Recurrence of symptomatic vasospasm was noted on day 25, with a great number of territories involved as shown in the cerebral angiogram. A second intra-arterial treatment was needed. The patient complained of multiple episodes of extremely severe headache ("thunderclap"), with also transient dysarthria and hemiparesia on day 30. She was discharged on day 38 after full recovery. The clinical and TCD/radiological findings were consistent with a reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome overlapping SAH related symptomatic vasospasm.

  16. Hydrocephalus Onset after Microsurgical or Endovascular Treatment for Acute Subarachnoid Hemorrhage. Retrospective Italian Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Gangemi, Michelangelo; Cavallo, Luigi Maria; Di Somma, Alberto; Mazzucco, Grazia Marina; Bono, Paolo Sebastiano; Ghetti, Giovanni; Zambon, Giampaolo

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic shunt-dependent hydrocephalus is a complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Its incidence and risk factors have been described while the hydrocephalus onset in terms of days after treatment (microsurgical or endovascular) has not been yet analyzed. Materials and Methods 45 patients, treated for aSAH in 4 Italian Neurosurgical Departments, were retrospectively analyzed. It was calculated the time that elapses between treatment and hydrocephalus onset in 36 patients. Results Of the 45 shunted patients, 15 (33.3%) were included in the microsurgical group (group A) and 30 (66.6%) were in the endovascular one (group B). There was no difference of the hydrocephalus onset between the two groups (24,1 days, group A vs. 27,7 days, group B). The presence of intracerebral hematoma (ICH) caused a delay in the hydrocephalus onset after endovascular treatment in terms of 11,5 days compared to microsurgical group as well the absence of vasospasm determined a delay of 13,7 days (not statistically significant). Conclusion No difference in terms of hydrocephalus onset after microsurgical or endovascular treatment has been demonstrated. Only the presence of ICH or the absence of vasospasm can cause a slight delay in the time of hydrocephalus onset in the endovascular series (not statistically significant). Long-term follow-up studies involving higher numbers of subjects are needed to better demonstrate this issue. PMID:24809036

  17. [Hemorrhage in cataract extraction].

    PubMed

    Radian, A B; Corşatea, L; Alupei, L

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents the evolution at ten eyes (nine patients) that presented expulsive hemorrhage during surgical act of extracapsular extraction with implant of crystalline lens. There are several cases of extracapsular extraction than intracapsular extraction which were more short like duration. The frequency of female was 90% from cases. The good results show the efficiency of associated treatment: closing of the eyeball with scleral punctura and internal tamponing. Only one eye was lost functionally.

  18. Management of gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Hilsden, R. J.; Shaffer, E. A.

    1995-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a common problem that requires prompt recognition and management to prevent serious morbidity and mortality. Management goals are stabilization of the patient with vigorous fluid resuscitation followed by investigation and definitive treatment of the bleeding source. Endoscopy is often the initial diagnostic test and allows therapeutic measures to be performed at the same time. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8563510

  19. Korean Hemorrhagic Fever.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    Medicine Seoul, Korea * S 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 SUM ARY Urban rats captured in Seoul and four nearby Korean cities were found to have...rattus, urban Korean cities, 1980. . . . 15 Table 2. Isolation of Hantaan virus from antigen-positive wild house rats, Korea , 1980 .... ........... .. 16...Figures Figure 1. Map of Seoul City, South Korea and metropolitan area showing locations of urban Korean hemorrhagic fever cases, andRattu s positive

  20. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (Korean Hemorrhagic Fever)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-30

    53 INTRODUCTION During the Korean War more than 3,200 United Nations troops in Korea devel6ped a rare hemorrhagic fever which attracted...patients in the Republic of Korea . Year Korean Korean US Total civilian soldiers soldiers 1951 ...... 627 827 1952 .... 833 833 1953 ... ... 455 455...0 RI m HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL SYNDROME ( KOREAN HEMORRHAGIC FEVER) ANNUAL SUMMARY REPORT HO WANG LEE, M.D. June 30, 1988 Door., Supported by U.S

  1. Fatal case of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in an adult due to a rare serogroup O91 Entero hemorrhagic Escherichia coli associated with a Clostridium difficile infection. More than meets the eye.

    PubMed

    Guillard, Thomas; Limelette, Anne; Le Magrex-Debar, Elisabeth; Wynckel, Alain; Gouali, Malika; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Guyot-Colosio, Charlotte; de Champs, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic-uremic syndrome due to enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, belonging to serogroup O91 has rarely been described. We report here a case of post-diarrheal HUS due to EHEC O91 in an elderly patient for whom diagnosis was delayed given a previously diagnosed C. difficile infection. This case highlights the usefulness of Shiga-toxin detection.

  2. Hemorrhagic Longitudinally Extensive Transverse Myelitis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chris Y.; Riangwiwat, Tanawan

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM) may be associated with viral triggers, including both infections and vaccinations. We present a case of a healthy immunocompetent 33-year-old woman who developed a hemorrhagic LETM 2 weeks after seasonal influenza vaccination. Hemorrhagic LETM has not to our knowledge been reported after influenza vaccination. It may represent a forme fruste variant of acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis. PMID:27847660

  3. Incidence and Predictors of Angiographic Vasospasm, Symptomatic Vasospasm and Cerebral Infarction in Chinese Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Axier, Aximujiang; Amuti, Maiwulanjiang; Guohua, Zhu; Xiaojiang, Cheng; Kadeer, Kaheerman; Xixian, Wang; Geng, Dangmurenjiafu; Maimaitili, Aisha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral vasospasm (CVS) is the most common neurological complication after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and associated with poor functional outcome and mortality. Reports on incidence and predictors of CVS in Chinese patients with aSAH were scarce. We aimed to estimate the incidence and predictors of angiographic vasospasm (AV), symptomatic vasospasm (SV), and cerebral infarction in Chinese patients with aSAH. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 542 consecutive aSAH patients admitted to neurosurgery department of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University in Urumqi city of China between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2015. AV, SV and cerebral infarction were defined based on clinical data and neuroimaging findings. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of AV, SV or cerebral infarction. Results 343 (63.3%) patients fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Of them, 182(53.1%) developed AV, 99 (28.9%) developed SV, and 87 (25.4%) developed cerebral infarction. A history of hypertension, poor modified Fisher grade (3–4) and poor Hunt-Hess grade (4–5) on admission were common risk factors for AV, SV and cerebral infarction. Patients from Uyghur ethnic group or other minorities were less likely to develop AV, SV or cerebral infarction, compared to those from Han ethic group after adjustment of other potential confounders. Additionally, age ≥53 years, leukocyte count ≥11× 109/L on admission and being current or former smokers were independent risk factors of cerebral infarction. Leukocyte count ≥11× 109/L on admission and aneurysm size ≥ 10 mm were independent risk factors of SV. Serum glucose level ≥7.0 mmol/L on admission was an independent risk factor of AV. Conclusion Risk factors of different definitions of CVS were diverse in Chinese patients with aSAH; however, risk factors of SV and cerebral infarction seem to be similar. We recommend

  4. Neuropsychological function after endovascular and neurosurgical treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Egeto, Peter; Loch Macdonald, R; Ornstein, Tisha J; Schweizer, Tom A

    2017-04-14

    OBJECTIVE Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is treated with either surgical clipping or endovascular coiling, though the latter is the preferred treatment method given its more favorable functional outcomes. However, neuropsychological functioning after treatment is rarely taken into account. In this meta-analysis, the authors synthesized relevant data from the literature and compared neuropsychological functioning in patients after coiling and clipping of SAH. They hypothesized that the coiled patients would outperform the clipped patients; that group differences would be greater with higher posterior circulation rupture rates, in older patients, and in more recent publications; that group differences would be smaller with greater rates of middle cerebral artery (MCA) rupture; and that anterior communicating artery (ACoA) rupture rates would not influence effect sizes. METHODS The MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO databases were searched for clinical studies that compared neuropsychological functioning after either endovascular coiling or surgical clipping for SAH. Hedge's g and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using random effects models. Patients who had undergone coiling or clipping were compared on test performance in 8 neuropsychological domains: executive functions, language, attention/processing speed, verbal memory, visual memory, spatial memory, visuospatial functions, and intelligence. Patients were also compared with healthy controls, and meta-regressions were used to explore the relation between effect sizes and publication year, delay between treatment and neuropsychological testing, mean patient age, and rates of posterior circulation, ACoA, and MCA ruptures. RESULTS Thirteen studies with 396 clipped cases, 314 coiled cases, and 169 healthy controls were included in the study. The coil-treated patients outperformed the clip-treated patients on executive function (g = 0.17, 95% CI 0.08-0.25) and language tests (g = 0.23, 95% CI 0.07-0.39), and all

  5. Serial angiographic appearance of segmental arterial mediolysis manifesting as vertebral, internal mammary and intra-abdominal visceral artery aneurysms in a patient presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Daniel L; Meisel, Karl M; Kim, Warren T; Stout, Charles E; Halbach, Van V; Dowd, Christopher F; Higashida, Randall T

    2013-09-01

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is a rare, non-inflammatory, non-atherosclerotic vasculopathy typically affecting the abdominal arteries although it may also affect the great vessels and cerebral vasculature. Diseased vessels manifest with aneurysms and/or dissections, often presenting clinically with catastrophic thromboembolic injury and less frequently with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The etiology of SAM remains indeterminate although there is evidence it may be an endogenous pathological response to vasospasm. The SAM literature is reviewed and a case of SAH related to a ruptured dissecting-type vertebral artery aneurysm is described. In addition to furthering awareness of SAM, this unique case offers insight into the acute phase of the disease and the potential role of vasospastic induction.

  6. Korean Hemorrhagic Fever.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF) occurred for the first time in Korea , 1951, although it had previously been known to both the Japanese and Russians...After Korean war, the disease has been fixed in the areas of DMZ as an endemic one, and from 100 to 300 cases have been reported every year. The aims...but in 1971 affected the middle districts and in 1972 invaded the southern parts of South Korea . The number of patients and the areas of KHF in 1972

  7. Lethal Hemorrhage Caused by Aortoenteric Fistula Following Endovascular Stent Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlke, Volker; Brossmann, Joachim; Klomp, Hans-Juergen

    2002-06-15

    A 55-year-old women developed an aortointestinal fistula between the bifurcation of the aorta and the distal ileum following implantation of multiple endovascular stents into both common iliac arteries for treatment of aortoiliac occlusive disease. Ten months before the acute onset of the gastrointestinal hemorrhage two balloon-expandable steel stents had been implanted into both common iliac arteries. Due to restenosis and recurrent intermittent claudication, three balloon-expandable covered stents were implanted 4 months later on reintervention. The patient presented with abdominal pain and melena, and fell into hemorrhagic shock with signs of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. After transfer to our hospital, she again developed hemorrhagic shock with massive upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding and died during emergency laparotomy. The development of aortoenteric fistulas following endovascular surgery/stent implantation is very rare and has to be considered in cases of acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

  8. Impact of Comorbidity on Early Outcome of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Caused by Cerebral Aneurysm Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Avdagic, Selma Sijercic; Brkic, Harun; Avdagic, Harun; Smajic, Jasmina; Hodzic, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the complications aneurysms subarachnoid hemorrhage is the development of vasospasm, which is the leading cause of disability and death from ruptured cerebral aneurysm. Aim: To evaluate the significance of previous comorbidities on early outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by rupture of a cerebral aneurysm in the prevention of vasospasm. Patients and methods: The study had prospective character in which included 50 patients, whose diagnosed with SAH caused by the rupture of a brain aneurysm in the period from 2011to 2013. Two groups of patients were formed. Group I: patients in addition to the standard initial treatment and “3H therapy” administered nimodipine at a dose of 15-30 mg / kg bw / h (3-10 ml) for the duration of the initial treatment. Group II: patients in addition to the standard initial treatment and “3H therapy” administered with MgSO4 at a dose of 12 grams in 500 ml of 0.9% NaCl / 24 h during the initial treatment. Results: Two-thirds of the patients (68%) from both groups had a good outcome measured with values according to GOS scales, GOS IV and V. The poorer outcome, GOS III had 20% patients, the GOS II was at 2% and GOS I within 10% of patients. If we analyze the impact of comorbidity on the outcome, it shows that there is a significant relationship between the presence of comorbidity and outcomes. The patients without comorbidity (83.30%) had a good outcome (GOS IV and V), the same outcome was observed (59.4%) with comorbidities, which has a statistically significant difference (p = 0.04). Patients without diabetes (32%) had a good outcome (GOS IV and V), while the percentage of patients with diabetes less frequent (2%) with a good outcome, a statistically significant difference (p = 0.009). Conclusion: The outcome of treatment 30 days after the subarachnoid hemorrhage analyzed values WFNS and GOS, is not dependent on the method of prevention and treatment of vasospasm. Most concomitant diseases in

  9. Effect of statin treatment on vasospasm-related morbidity and functional outcome in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jian; Huang, Kai-Yuan; Zhu, Yu; Pan, Jian-Wei; Jiang, Hao; Weng, Yu-Xiang; Zhan, Ren-Ya

    2016-10-07

    OBJECTIVE The efficacy of statin therapy in treating aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains controversial. In this meta-analysis, the authors investigated whether statin treatment significantly reduced the incidence of cerebral vasospasm and delayed neurological deficits, promoting a better outcome after aneurysmal SAH. METHODS A literature search of the PubMed, Ovid, and Cochrane Library databases was performed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and prospective cohort studies investigating the effect of statin treatment. The end points of cerebral vasospasm, delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND), delayed cerebral infarction, mortality, and favorable outcome were statistically analyzed. RESULTS Six RCTs and 2 prospective cohort studies met the eligibility criteria, and a total of 1461 patients were included. The meta-analysis demonstrated a significant decrease in the incidence of cerebral vasospasm (relative risk [RR] 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.96) in patients treated with statins after aneurysmal SAH. However, no significant benefit was observed for DIND (RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.70-1.12), delayed cerebral infarction (RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.33-1.31), mortality (RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.39-1.24) or favorable outcome, according to assessment by the modified Rankin Scale or Glasgow Outcome Scale (RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.92-1.17). CONCLUSIONS Treatment with statins significantly decreased the occurrence of vasospasm after aneurysmal SAH. The incidence of DIND, delayed cerebral infarction, and mortality were not affected by statin treatment. Future research should focus on DIND and how statins influence DIND.

  10. [Spontaneous dissection of the anterior cerebral artery that simultaneously presented with cerebral infarction and subarachnoid hemorrhage, successfully treated with conservative management: a case report].

    PubMed

    Nanbara, Sho; Tsutsumi, Keisuke; Takahata, Hideaki; Fujimoto, Takashi; Kawahara, Ichiro; Ono, Tomonori; Toda, Keisuke; Baba, Hiroshi; Yonekura, Masahiro

    2012-07-01

    We recently encountered a rare case of anterior cerebral artery dissection (ACAD) that accompanied fresh cerebral infarction (CI) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). An initial head CT showed a thin SAH in the interhemispheric cistern and cortical sulcus of the left frontal surface. Subsequent MRI performed 10 min after head CT scan revealed a fresh infarction in the left ACA region. MR-and digital subtraction angiograms demonstrated a dissection in the A2 portion of the left ACA with a leak of contrast media around the left A3 portion, suggesting that the bleeding occurred in a distal portion of the main dilation. Without anti-thrombotic therapy, the patient recovered without complications by blood pressure control and administration of brain-function protection therapies. We found 11 cases similar to the present case in the literature. All cases presented with lower-extremity dominant hemiparesis; however, sudden onset headache was rare. Blood pressure was not well-controlled in 4 out of the 6 known hypertensive cases. Main sites of dissection were located at the A2 portion in all cases except one A3 lesion, and extended to A3 in 2 cases. Conservative therapy led to favorable outcome in 8 cases, while 4 cases underwent surgical interventions for increasing risk of aneurysm rupture after initial observational therapies. Re-bleeding did not occur in any of the 12 cases reviewed. These data suggest that conservative treatment can be considered for an initial management of ACAD with simultaneous CI and SAH. More evidence needs to be accumulated to establish the optimal therapeutic approach for ACAD associated with CI and SAH.

  11. Argentine hemorrhagic fever vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Ana; Saavedra, Maria; Mariani, Mauricio; Gamboa, Graciela; Maiza, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), an acute disease caused by Junin virus (JUNV, Arenaviridae), has been an important issue to public health in Argentina since the early 1950s. The field rodent Calomys musculinus is JUNV natural reservoir and human disease is a consequence of contact with infected rodents. A steady extention of AHF endemic area is being observed since the first reports of the disease. Important achievements have been made in: (a) improvement of methods for the etiological diagnosis; (b) implementation and validation of therapeutical measures; (c) development of vaccines to protect against AHF. Reference is made to different research strategies used to obtain anti-AHF vaccines in the past and anti-arenaviral diseases in the present. Information is updated on features and field performance of Candid #1 vaccine, a live attenuted vaccine currently used to prevent AHF. This vaccine was developed through a joint international effort that envisioned it as an orphan drug. With transferred technology, Argentine government was committed to be Candid #1 manufacturer and to register this vaccine as a novel medical product under the Argentine regulatory authority. Candid #1 vaccine is the first one used to control an arenaviral hemorrhagic fever, the first live viral vaccine to be manufactured and registered in Argentina, reaching its target population through governmental effort.

  12. Prognosis of patients in coma after acute subdural hematoma due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Torné, Ramon; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana; Romero-Chala, Fabián; Arikan, Fuat; Vilalta, Jordi; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Acute subdural hematomas (aSDH) secondary to intracranial aneurysm rupture are rare. Most patients present with coma and their functional prognosis has been classically considered to be very poor. Previous studies mixed good-grade and poor-grade patients and reported variable outcomes. We reviewed our experience by focusing on patients in coma only and hypothesized that aSDH might worsen initial mortality but not long-term functional outcome. Between 2005 and 2013, 440 subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients were admitted to our center. Nineteen (4.3%) were found to have an associated aSDH and 13 (2.9%) of these presented with coma. Their prospectively collected clinical and outcome data were reviewed and compared with that of 104 SAH patients without aSDH who presented with coma during the same period. Median aSDH thickness was 10mm. Four patients presented with an associated aneurysmal cortical laceration and only one had good recovery. Overall, we observed good long-term outcomes in both SAH patients in coma with aSDH and those without aSDH (38.5% versus 26.4%). Associated aSDH does not appear to indicate a poorer long-term functional prognosis in SAH patients presenting with coma. Anisocoria and brain herniation are observed in patients with aSDH thicknesses that are smaller than those observed in trauma patients. Despite a high initial mortality, early surgery to remove the aSDH results in a good outcome in over 60% of survivors. Aneurysmal cortical laceration appears to be an independent entity which shows a poorer prognosis than other types of aneurysmal aSDH.

  13. Korean Hemorrhagic Fever (Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS)).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    AD-Ai55 228 KOREAN HEMORRHAGIC FEVER (HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL in. SYNDROME (HFRS))(U) KOREA UNIV SEOUL DEPT OF MICROBIOLOGY H W LEE JUL 84...INTRODUCTION During the Korean War, more than 2,400 United Nations troops stationed in the 38th Parallel in Korea developed a rare disease which had not... Korean hemorrhagic fever patients in urban areas of Seoul. Korean J. Virol. 10: 1-6, 1980. 8. Lee, H. W. New epidemiological findings of HFRS in Korea . J

  14. Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Racsa, Lori D.; Kraft, Colleen S.; Olinger, Gene G.; Hensley, Lisa E.

    2016-01-01

    There are 4 families of viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF), including Filoviridae. Ebola virus is one virus within the family Filoviridae and the cause of the current outbreak of VHF in West Africa. VHF-endemic areas are found throughout the world, yet traditional diagnosis of VHF has been performed in large reference laboratories centered in Europe and the United States. The large amount of capital needed, as well as highly trained and skilled personnel, has limited the availability of diagnostics in endemic areas except in conjunction with governmental and nongovernmental entities. However, rapid diagnosis of VHF is essential to efforts that will limit outbreaks. In addition, increased global travel suggests VHF diagnoses may be made outside of the endemic areas. Thus, understanding how to diagnose VHF is imperative for laboratories worldwide. This article reviews traditional and current diagnostic modalities for VHF. PMID:26354968

  15. Neuroinflammation after intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mracsko, Eva; Veltkamp, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a particularly severe type of stroke for which no specific treatment has been established yet. Although preclinical models of ICH have substantial methodological limitations, important insight into the pathophysiology has been gained. Mounting evidence suggests an important contribution of inflammatory mechanisms to brain damage and potential repair. Neuroinflammation evoked by intracerebral blood involves the activation of resident microglia, the infiltration of systemic immune cells and the production of cytokines, chemokines, extracellular proteases and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies focused on innate immunity including microglia, monocytes and granulocytes. More recently, the role of adaptive immune cells has received increasing attention. Little is currently known about the interactions among different immune cell populations in the setting of ICH. Nevertheless, immunomodulatory strategies are already being explored in ICH. To improve the chances of translation from preclinical models to patients, a better characterization of the neuroinflammation in patients is desirable. PMID:25477782

  16. Hemostasis in Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Deepak; Dua, Dharti; Torbey, Michel T.

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with high morbidity and mortality throughout the world with no proven effective treatment. Majority of hematoma expansion occur within 4 h after symptom onset and is associated with early deterioration and poor clinical outcome. There is a vital role of ultra-early hemostatic therapy in ICH to limit hematoma expansion. Patients at risk for hematoma expansion are with underlying hemostatic abnormalities. Treatment strategy should include appropriate intervention based on the history of use of antithrombotic use or an underlying coagulopathy in patients with ICH. For antiplatelet-associated ICH, recommendation is to discontinue antiplatelet agent and transfuse platelets to those who will undergo neurosurgical procedure with moderate quality of evidence. For vitamin K antagonist-associated ICH, administration of 3-factor or 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs) rather than fresh frozen plasma to patients with INR >1.4 is strongly recommended. For patients with novel oral anticoagulant-associated ICH, administering activated charcoal to those who present within 2 h of ingestion is recommended. Idarucizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody fragment against dabigatran (direct thrombin inhibitor) is approved by FDA for emergency situations. Administer activated PCC (50 U/kg) or 4-factor PCC (50 U/kg) to patients with ICH associated with direct thrombin inhibitors (DTI) if idarucizumab is not available or if the hemorrhage is associated with a DTI other than dabigatran. For factor Xa inhibitor-associated ICH, administration of 4-factor PCC or aPCC is preferred over recombinant FVIIa because of the lower risk of adverse thrombotic events. PMID:28360881

  17. Subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to a ruptured middle cerebral aneurysm in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders that occur owing to the abnormalities in type 1 collagen, and is characterized by increased bone fragility and other extraskeletal manifestations. We report the case of a patient who was diagnosed with OI following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) secondary to a ruptured saccular intracranial aneurysm (IA). Case Presentation A 37-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of sudden headache and vomiting. She was diagnosed with SAH (World Federation of Neurosurgical Society grade 2) owing to an aneurysm of the middle cerebral artery. She then underwent surgical clipping of the aneurysm successfully. She had blue sclerae, a history of several fractures of the extremities, and a family history of bone fragility and blue sclerae in her son. According to these findings, she was diagnosed with OI type 1. We performed genetic analysis for a single nucleotide G/C polymorphism (SNP) of exon 28 of the gene encoding for alpha-2 polypeptide of collagen 1, which is a potential risk factor for IA. However, this SNP was not detected in this patient or in five normal control subjects. Other genetic analyses did not reveal any mutations of the COL1A1 or COL1A2 gene. The cerebrovascular system is less frequently involved in OI. OI is associated with increased vascular weakness owing to collagen deficiency in and around the blood vessels. SAH secondary to a ruptured IA with OI has been reported in only six cases. Conclusion The patient followed a good clinical course after surgery. It remains controversial whether IAs are caused by OI or IAs are coincidentally complicated with OI. PMID:25056440

  18. Prolonged Cerebral Circulation Time Is the Best Parameter for Predicting Vasospasm during Initial CT Perfusion in Subarachnoid Hemorrhagic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun Fu; Hsu, Sanford P. C.; Lin, Chung Jung; Guo, Wan Yuo; Liao, Chih Hsiang; Chu, Wei Fa; Hung, Sheng Che; Shih, Yang Shin; Lin, Yen Tzu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We sought to imitate angiographic cerebral circulation time (CCT) and create a similar index from baseline CT perfusion (CTP) to better predict vasospasm in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods Forty-one SAH patients with available DSA and CTP were retrospectively included. The vasospasm group was comprised of patients with deterioration in conscious functioning and newly developed luminal narrowing; remaining cases were classified as the control group. The angiography CCT (XA-CCT) was defined as the difference in TTP (time to peak) between the selected arterial ROIs and the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). Four arterial ROIs were selected to generate four corresponding XA-CCTs: the right and left anterior cerebral arteries (XA-CCTRA2 and XA-CCTLA2) and right- and left-middle cerebral arteries (XA-CCTRM2 and XA-CCTLM2). The CCTs from CTP (CT-CCT) were defined as the differences in TTP from the corresponding arterial ROIs and the SSS. Correlations of the different CCTs were calculated and diagnostic accuracy in predicting vasospasm was evaluated. Results Intra-class correlations ranged from 0.96 to 0.98. The correlations of XA-CCTRA2, XA-CCTRM2, XA-CCTLA2, and XA-CCTLM2 with the corresponding CT-CCTs were 0.64, 0.65, 0.53, and 0.68, respectively. All CCTs were significantly prolonged in the vasospasm group (5.8–6.4 s) except for XA-CCTLA2. CT-CCTA2 of 5.62 was the optimal cut-off value for detecting vasospasm with a sensitivity of 84.2% and specificity 82.4% Conclusion CT-CCTs can be used to interpret cerebral flow without deconvolution algorithms, and outperform both MTT and TTP in predicting vasospasm risk. This finding may help facilitate management of patients with SAH. PMID:26986626

  19. Spontaneous Absorption of Extensive Subinternal Limiting Membrane Hemorrhage in Shaken Baby Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Tatiana Tarules; Zacharias, Leandro Cabral; Pimentel, Sérgio Luis Gianotti

    2014-01-01

    The Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS) is characterized by subdural hematomas (SH), retinal hemorrhages (RH), and multiple fractures of long bones without external evidence of head trauma. Subinternal limiting membrane (ILM) hemorrhage, also known as macular schisis, is a characteristic finding of this entity. There is no guideline on the right time to indicate surgical treatment. This report describes an abused child with massive sub-ILM hemorrhage, which showed spontaneous absorption after less than two months of follow-up. Due to the possible spontaneous resolution, we suggest an initial conservative treatment in cases of sub-ILM hemorrhage related to SBS. PMID:25548698

  20. Two cases of asymptomatic massive fetomaternal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Peedin, Alexis R; Mazepa, Marshall A; Park, Yara A; Weimer, Eric T; Schmitz, John L; Raval, Jay S

    2015-04-01

    Evaluation of fetomaternal hemorrhage (FMH) in the immediate postpartum period is critical for the timely administration of Rh immunoglobulin (RhIG) prophylaxis to minimize the risk of alloimmunization in D-negative mothers of D-positive newborns. We report a series of two clinically-unsuspected cases of massive FMHs identified at our university medical center. Retrospective records of two cases of massive FMH were investigated using the electronic medical record. After positive fetal bleed screens, flow cytometric analysis for hemoglobin F was performed to quantify the volume of the hemorrhages in both cases. Flow cytometric enumeration with anti-D was also performed in one case. The two patients had 209.5 and 75 mL of fetal blood in circulation, resulting in 8 and 4 doses of RhIG administered, respectively. For the former patient, flow cytometric analysis with anti-D ruled out hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin and supported the fetal origin of the red cells. Due to the clinically-silent nature of both hemorrhages, further evaluation of the newborns' blood was not performed. These cases highlight the importance of rapidly obtaining accurate measurements of fetal blood loss via flow cytometric analysis in cases of FMH, particularly in clinically-unsuspected cases, to ensure timely administration of adequate immunoprophylaxis to D-negative mothers.

  1. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever as causes of acute undifferentiated febrile illness in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Christova, Iva; Younan, Rasha; Taseva, Evgenia; Gladnishka, Teodora; Trifonova, Iva; Ivanova, Vladislava; Spik, Kristin; Schmaljohn, Connie; Mohareb, Emad

    2013-03-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) are the 2 widespread viral hemorrhagic fevers occurring in Europe. HFRS is distributed throughout Europe, and CCHF has been reported mainly on the Balkan Peninsula and Russia. Both hemorrhagic fevers are endemic in Bulgaria. We investigated to what extent acute undifferentiated febrile illness in Bulgaria could be due to hantaviruses or to CCHF virus. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), we tested serum samples from 527 patients with acute febrile illness for antibodies against hantaviruses and CCHF virus. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies against hantaviruses were detected in 15 (2.8%) of the patients. Of the 15 hantavirus-positive patients, 8 (1.5%) were positive for Dobrava virus (DOBV), 5 (0.9%) were positive for Puumala virus (PUUV), and the remaining 2 were positive for both hantaviruses. A plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) confirmed 4 of the 10 DOBV-positive samples. PRNT was negative for all PUUV-positive samples. Serologic evidence of recent CCHF virus infection was found in 13 (2.5%) of the patients. Interestingly, HFRS and CCHF were not only detected in well-known endemic areas of Bulgaria but also in nonendemic regions. Our results suggested that in endemic countries, CCHF and/or HFRS might appear as a nonspecific febrile illness in a certain proportion of patients. Physicians must be aware of possible viral hemorrhagic fever cases, even if hemorrhages or renal impairment are not manifested.

  2. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (Korean Hemorrhagic Fever)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-31

    36 DISTRIBUTION LIST. .................... 40 INTRODUCTION During the Korean War more than 3,200 United Nations troops in Korea developed a rare...hemorrhagic fever, a situa- tion that attracted worldwide attention (1). Since then it has been known as Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF) in Korea . This...Kyunggido and Kangwondo, northern parts of South Korea . All of the 97 HFRS patients among Korean soldiers occurred in Kyunggido, Kangwondo and Seoul

  3. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (Korean Hemorrhagic Fever)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-29

    DISTRIBUTION LIST .............. .................... 47 5 INTRODUCTION During the Korean War more than 3,200 United Nations troops in Korea developed a...rare hemorrhagic fever, a situa- tion that attracted worldwide attention (1). Since then it has been known as Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF) in Korea ...Chungchoongnsmdo, and Kangwendo, norLhern parts of South Korea . Almost all HFRS patients among Korean soldiers occurred in Kyunggido aind Ksngwmndo where

  4. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (Korean Hemorrhagic Fever).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-23

    13 Table 5. Monthly incidence of HFRS among Korean in the Republic of Korea , 1966-1985 . . . . . . . 14 A Table 6. Incidence of HFRS by...GRANT SUPPORT .. ........ 57.... 5 INTRODUCTION During the Korean War more than 3,000 United Nations .00 troops in Korea developed a rare hemorrhagic...8217;.-.* * S.’ . " 10 ... Table 1. Hospitalized cases of Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome patients in the Republic of Korea Year US Korean Korean

  5. Hemorrhagic Aspects of Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an inherited lysosomal disorder, originating from deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase). Normally, GCase hydrolyzes glucocerebroside (GC) to glucose and ceramide; however, impaired activity of this enzyme leads to the accumulation of GC in macrophages, termed “Gaucher cells.” Gaucher disease is associated with hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenias, skeletal complications and in some forms involves the central nervous system. Coagulation abnormalities are common among GD patients due to impaired production and chronic consumption of coagulation factors. Bleeding phenomena are variable (as are other symptoms of GD) and include mucosal and surgical hemorrhages. Four main etiological factors account for the hemostatic defect in GD: thrombocytopenia, abnormal platelet function, reduced production of coagulation factors, and activation of fibrinolysis. Thrombocytopenia relates not only to hypersplenism and decreased megakaryopoiesis by the infiltrated bone marrow but also to immune thrombocytopenia. Autoimmunity, especially the induction of platelet antibody production, might cause persistent thrombocytopenia. Enzyme replacement therapy reverses only part of the impaired coagulation system in Gaucher disease. Other therapeutic and supportive measures should be considered to prevent and/or treat bleeding in GD. Gaucher patients should be evaluated routinely for coagulation abnormalities especially prior to surgery and dental and obstetric procedures. PMID:25386355

  6. Hemorrhagic aspects of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Hanna

    2014-10-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an inherited lysosomal disorder, originating from deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase). Normally, GCase hydrolyzes glucocerebroside (GC) to glucose and ceramide; however, impaired activity of this enzyme leads to the accumulation of GC in macrophages, termed "Gaucher cells." Gaucher disease is associated with hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenias, skeletal complications and in some forms involves the central nervous system. Coagulation abnormalities are common among GD patients due to impaired production and chronic consumption of coagulation factors. Bleeding phenomena are variable (as are other symptoms of GD) and include mucosal and surgical hemorrhages. FOUR MAIN ETIOLOGICAL FACTORS ACCOUNT FOR THE HEMOSTATIC DEFECT IN GD: thrombocytopenia, abnormal platelet function, reduced production of coagulation factors, and activation of fibrinolysis. Thrombocytopenia relates not only to hypersplenism and decreased megakaryopoiesis by the infiltrated bone marrow but also to immune thrombocytopenia. Autoimmunity, especially the induction of platelet antibody production, might cause persistent thrombocytopenia. Enzyme replacement therapy reverses only part of the impaired coagulation system in Gaucher disease. Other therapeutic and supportive measures should be considered to prevent and/or treat bleeding in GD. Gaucher patients should be evaluated routinely for coagulation abnormalities especially prior to surgery and dental and obstetric procedures.

  7. Pathogenesis of arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) caused by arenaviruses belong to the most devastating emerging human diseases and represent serious public health problems. Arenavirus VHFs in humans are acute diseases characterized by fever and, in severe cases, different degrees of hemorrhages associated with a shock syndrome in the terminal stage. Over the past years, much has been learned about the pathogenesis of arenaviruses at the cellular level, in particular their ability to subvert the host cell's innate antiviral defenses. Clinical studies and novel animal models have provided important new information about the interaction of hemorrhagic arenaviruses with the host's adaptive immune system, in particular virus-induced immunosuppression, and have provided the first hints towards an understanding of the terminal hemorrhagic shock syndrome. The scope of this article is to review our current knowledge on arenavirus VHF pathogenesis with an emphasis on recent developments.

  8. CT perfusion and delayed cerebral ischemia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Charlotte H P; van der Schaaf, Irene C; Wensink, Emerens; Greving, Jacoba P; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2014-02-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is at presentation a diagnosis per exclusionem, and can only be confirmed with follow-up imaging. For treatment of DCI a diagnostic tool is needed. We performed a systematic review to evaluate the value of CT perfusion (CTP) in the prediction and diagnosis of DCI. We searched PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases to identify studies on the relationship between CTP and DCI. Eleven studies totaling 570 patients were included. On admission, cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), and time-to-peak (TTP) did not differ between patients who did and did not develop DCI. In the DCI time-window (4 to 14 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)), DCI was associated with a decreased CBF (pooled mean difference -11.9 mL/100 g per minute (95% confidence interval (CI): -15.2 to -8.6)) and an increased MTT (pooled mean difference 1.5 seconds (0.9-2.2)). Cerebral blood volume did not differ and TTP was rarely reported. Perfusion thresholds reported in studies were comparable, although the corresponding test characteristics were moderate and differed between studies. We conclude that CTP can be used in the diagnosis but not in the prediction of DCI. A need exists to standardize the method for measuring perfusion with CTP after SAH, and optimize and validate perfusion thresholds.

  9. The Effectiveness of Lumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage to Reduce the Cerebral Vasospasm after Surgical Clipping for Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soojeong; Yang, Narae

    2015-01-01

    Objective Removal of blood from subarachnoid space with a lumbar drainage (LD) may decrease development of cerebral vasospasm. We evaluated the effectiveness of a LD for a clinical vasospasm and outcomes after clipping of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods Between July 2008 and July 2013, 234 patients were included in this study. The LD group consisted of 126 patients, 108 patients in the non LD group. We investigated outcomes as follow : 1) clinical vasospasm, 2) angioplasty, 3) cerebral infarction, 4) Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) score at discharge, 5) GOS score at 6-month follow-up, and 6) mortality. Results Clinical vasospasm occurred in 19% of the LD group and 42% of the non LD group (p<0.001). Angioplasty was performed in 17% of the LD group and 38% of the non LD group (p=0.001). Cerebral infarctions were detected in 29% and 54% of each group respectively (p<0.001). The proportion of GOS score 5 at 6 month follow-up in the LD group was 69%, and it was 58% in the non LD group (p=0.001). Mortality rate showed 5% and 10% in each group respectively. But, there was no difference in shunt between the two groups. Conclusion LD after aneurysmal SAH shows marked reduction of clinical vasospasm and need for angioplasty. With this technique we have shown favorable GOS score at 6 month follow-up. PMID:25810855

  10. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  11. A case of hypertensive intraventricular hemorrhage bled from the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Motomasa; Kuroda, Kenji; Miyashita, Minoru; Saura, Ryuichi; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko

    2012-04-01

    The hippocampus is not a usual origin of bleeding due to hypertension. A 66-year-old male suffered from headache and abnormal behavior. Computed tomographic images showed an intraventricular hemorrhage predominantly located in the right lateral ventricle. His arterial blood pressure was 198/92 mmHg on admission. No apparent vascular anomaly was demonstrated on a digital subtraction angiogram. Two months after the onset, his mini-mental status examination showed full recovery from the score of 19 at onset, and most of his memory disturbances were improved except for visual memory disturbance. A follow-up magnetic resonance image revealed that the hemosiderin was stained in the atrophic right hippocampus, and the final diagnosis was hypertensive intraventricular hemorrhage bled from the right hippocampus. It is difficult to diagnose hippocampal hemorrhage immediately when it is combined with intraventricular hemorrhage, because the hippocampus is covered with hematoma in the inferior horn. Moreover, with regard to neurologic examination, the patients do not show any focal sign such as hemiparesis or aphasia. In elderly patients with compensatory ventricular dilatation, one must also be attentive to a misdiagnosis of obstructive hydrocephalus due to intraventricular hemorrhage.

  12. Bilateral large traumatic hemorrhage of the basal ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Nityanand; Mahapatra, Ashok; Singh, Pankaj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic bilateral basal ganglia bleed is extremely rare. It is defined as a hemorrhagic lesion located in the basal ganglia or neighboring structures such as the internal capsule and the thalamus. This report describes a 37-year-old man who had large bilateral basal ganglia hemorrhage (BGH) with subdural hematoma and traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage. With regards to an etiology of bilateral hemorrhage of the basal ganglia, we could not disclose any possible cause except head injury in spite of full diagnostic work-up. Our final diagnosis was bilateral traumatic BGH (TBGH). The pathomechanism of such injuries is still not clear and it is proposed to be due to shear injury to the lenticulostriate and choroidal arteries. Rather than any features of the TBGH itself, duration of coma and/or associated temporal herniation predicted slower recovery and worse outcome. Bilateral TBGH is an extremely rare entity, compatible with a favorable recovery, if not associated with damage to other cortical and subcortical structures and occurring in isolation. TBGH can be considered as a marker of poor outcome rather than its cause. The BGHs seem to be hemorrhagic contusions resulting from a shearing injury, due to high velocity impact. PMID:25685230

  13. Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Management

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Yup; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) remains a significant cause of mortality and morbidity throughout the world. To improve the devastating course of ICH, various clinical trials for medical and surgical interventions have been conducted in the last 10 years. Recent large-scale clinical trials have reported that early intensive blood pressure reduction can be a safe and feasible strategy for ICH, and have suggested a safe target range for systolic blood pressure. While new medical therapies associated with warfarin and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants have been developed to treat ICH, recent trials have not been able to demonstrate the overall beneficial effects of surgical intervention on mortality and functional outcomes. However, some patients with ICH may benefit from surgical management in specific clinical contexts and/or at specific times. Furthermore, clinical trials for minimally invasive surgical evacuation methods are ongoing and may provide positive evidence. Upon understanding the current guidelines for the management of ICH, clinicians can administer appropriate treatment and attempt to improve the clinical outcome of ICH. The purpose of this review is to help in the decision-making of the medical and surgical management of ICH. PMID:28178413

  14. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to ileal metastasis from primary lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zhou, Wei; Qi, Wei-Lin; Ma, Ya-Dan; Xu, Yun-Yun

    2015-03-21

    We report a patient with small intestinal metastasis from lung squamous cell carcinoma. A 66-year-old man who underwent radical lung cancer surgery was admitted to our hospital. Before starting his fifth cycle of chemotherapy, he was found to have a positive fecal occult blood test. Abdominal computed tomography scan revealed an ileal tumor with mesenteric lymph node enlargement. He underwent laparoscopic resection of the involved small intestine and mesentery. Histopathological analysis confirmed metastasis from lung cancer. We conducted a review of the literature and 64 documented cases of small intestinal metastasis from lung cancer were found. The pathologic diagnosis, clinical presentation, site of metastasis, and survival time in these cases were reviewed.

  15. Pathogenic role of B-cells in the development of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage induced by pristane

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Tolga; Lee, Pui Y.; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra; Weinstein, Jason; Nacionales, Dina C.; Kumagai, Yutaro; Akira, Shizuo; Croker, Byron P.; Sobel, Eric S.; Reeves, Westley H.; Satoh, Minoru

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is an uncommon yet often fatal complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Advances in the treatment of alveolar hemorrhage have been hampered due to the heterogeneity of clinical findings and the lack of suitable animal models. A single intraperitoneal injection of pristane induces a lupus-like syndrome characterized by lupus-related autoantibodies and glomerulonephritis in non-autoimmune prone strains of mice. In addition, C57BL/6 (B6) mice frequently develop alveolar hemorrhage within a few weeks of pristane injection. Immunopathogenesis of pristane-induced alveolar hemorrhage was investigated in the present study. Early (2-4 weeks after injection) mortality due to hemorrhage was unique to C57BL/6 and C57BL/10 strains of mice. Recruitment of the macrophages and neutrophils preceded the hemorrhage by several days and hemorrhage started 3-7 days after pristane injection in some mice, peaked at 2 weeks (84% in B6) and then resolved by 4 weeks in a majority of mice. Alveolar hemorrhage was independent of MyD88-, or TLR7 pathways, in contrast to autoantibody production and glomerulonephritis, and also was independent of FcγR or Fas. Rag1-/- mice had a reduced prevalence of alveolar hemorrhage compared to B6 (P = 0.01) congenics. However, T-cell receptor deficient mice developed alveolar hemorrhage at a rate comparable to wild type controls, while B6 Igμ-/- mice surprisingly had a strikingly reduced prevalence (7% vs 84% in B6, P < 0.0001). Reconstitution of B6 Igμ-/- mice with wild type B cells increased the prevalence to 50% (P = 0.028). Pristane-induced alveolar hemorrhage is a useful model to study the pathogenesis and develop new therapy for this underappreciated and often life-threatening complication of SLE. PMID:21808234

  16. Ultra-early angiographic vasospasm associated with delayed cerebral ischemia and infarction following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Al-Mufti, Fawaz; Roh, David; Lahiri, Shouri; Meyers, Emma; Witsch, Jens; Frey, Hans-Peter; Dangayach, Neha; Falo, Cristina; Mayer, Stephan A; Agarwal, Sachin; Park, Soojin; Meyers, Philip M; Sander Connolly, E; Claassen, Jan; Michael Schmidt, J

    2016-05-27

    OBJECTIVE The clinical significance of cerebral ultra-early angiographic vasospasm (UEAV), defined as cerebral arterial narrowing within the first 48 hours of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), remains poorly characterized. The authors sought to determine its frequency, predictors, and impact on functional outcome. METHODS The authors prospectively studied UEAV in a cohort of 1286 consecutively admitted patients with aSAH between August 1996 and June 2013. Admission clinical, radiographic, and acute clinical course information was documented during patient hospitalization. Functional outcome was assessed at 3 months using the modified Rankin Scale. Logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models were generated to assess predictors of UEAV and its relationship to delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and outcome. Multiple imputation methods were used to address data lost to follow-up. RESULTS The cohort incidence rate of UEAV was 4.6%. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that younger age, sentinel bleed, and poor admission clinical grade were significantly associated with UEAV. Patients with UEAV had a 2-fold increased risk of DCI (odds ratio [OR] 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-3.9, p = 0.002) and cerebral infarction (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.0-3.9, p = 0.04), after adjusting for known predictors. Excluding patients who experienced sentinel bleeding did not change this effect. Patients with UEAV also had a significantly higher hazard for DCI in a multivariable model. UEAV was not found to be significantly associated with poor functional outcome (OR 0.8, 95% CI 0.4-1.6, p = 0.5). CONCLUSIONS UEAV may be less frequent than has been reported previously. Patients who exhibit UEAV are at higher risk for refractory DCI that results in cerebral infarction. These patients may benefit from earlier monitoring for signs of DCI and more aggressive treatment. Further study is needed to determine the long-term functional significance of UEAV.

  17. Post-operative monitoring of cortical taurine in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage: a microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    De Micheli, E; Pinna, G; Alfieri, A; Caramia, G; Bianchi, L; Colivicchi, M A; Della Corte, L; Bricolo, A

    2000-01-01

    Intracerebral MD enables the retrieval of endogenous substances from the extracellular fluid (ECF) of the brain and has been demonstrated to be a sensitive technique for early detection of subtle vasospasm-induced neurometabolic abnormalities in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The aim of this study was to monitor cortical extracellular concentrations of energy metabolism markers, such as glucose and lactate, neurotransmitter amino acids, such as glutamate, aspartate, GABA and taurine to identify any neurochemical patterns of cerebral ischemia. A prospective clinical study was conducted on a group of 16 patients with non-severe SAH operated on within 72 hours after initial bleeding. Following aneurysm clipping, an MD catheter was inserted in the cortical region where vasospasm could be expected to develop, and perfused with artificial CSF at 0.3 microl/min flow rate. Dialysate was collected every 6 hours and then analyzed on High Performance Liquid Cromatography (HPLC) for glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glutamate, aspartate, GABA and taurine. Mean ECF taurine concentrations ranged from 1.4 + 0.7 to 12.3 + 7.8 micromol/l in single patients: global mean value was 5.8 + 3.8 micromol/l. In this series, the highest absolute taurine value was 25.7 micromol/l, observed in a patient who developed clinical and radiological signs of cerebral ischemia. Nine patients presented clinical disturbances related to cerebral vasospasm. In this setting, representing a mild-to-moderate hypoxic condition, MD data demonstrated that lactate is the most sensitive marker of cellular energy imbalance. Increased lactate levels positively correlated with glutamate (P<0.0001), aspartate (P<0.0001), GABA (P<0.0001) and taurine (P<0.0001) concentrations. These results suggest that also in humans increased taurine levels reflect a condition of cellular stress. This study confirms that MD is a sensitive technique to reveal subtle metabolic abnormalities possibly resulting in cell damage.

  18. Spontaneous Iliopsoas Muscle Hemorrhage Secondary to Ibrutinib (Imbruvica; Pharmacyclics)

    PubMed Central

    Sarcon, Anna; Botta, Gregory P.; Patel, Nikunj; Saven, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Ibrutinib (Imbruvica; Pharmacyclics) is the first Food and Drug Administration–approved inhibitor of Burton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK). Attenuation of BTK signaling ultimately leads to inhibition of B-cell proliferation and apoptosis. After a series of clinical trials, the Food and Drug Administration approved ibrutinib in patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia in 2014 and Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia in 2015. Those trials included rare grade 3+ hemorrhagic events associated with ibrutinib. Herein, we report a unique presentation of back pain due to iliopsoas muscle hemorrhage in a patient with Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia after initiation of ibrutinib. PMID:27231694

  19. An Unusual Reason for Gastric Variceal Hemorrhage: Wandering Spleen.

    PubMed

    Köseoğlu, Hüseyin; Atalay, Roni; Büyükaşık, Naciye Şemnur; Canyiğit, Murat; Özer, Mehmet; Solakoğlu, Tevfik; Akın, Fatma Ebru; Bolat, Aylin Demirezer; Yürekli, Öykü Tayfur; Ersoy, Osman

    2015-12-01

    Wandering spleen is the displacement of the spleen due to the loss or weakening of the ligaments of the spleen and is seen very rarely with an incidence of less than 0.5 %. It can cause portal hypertension, but gastric variceal hemorrhage is a quite rare condition within the spectrum of this uncommon disease. We report a 22-year-old woman with wandering spleen presenting with life-threatening gastric variceal hemorrhage. Her diagnosis was made by computerized tomography. Endoscopic therapy was not adequate to stop the bleeding, and urgent splenectomy was performed. After surgery she has been well with no symptoms until now.

  20. Impaired hematopoietic progenitor cells in trauma hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Bhoi, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) is the major cause of death during trauma. Mortality due to HS is about 50%. Dysfunction of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) has been observed during severe trauma and HS. HS induces the elevation of cytokines, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), peripheral blood HPCs, and circulating catecholamines, and decreases the expression of erythropoietin receptor connected with suppression of HPCs. Impaired HPCs may lead to persistent anemia and risk of susceptibility to infection, sepsis, and MOF. There is a need to reactivate impaired HPCs during trauma hemorrhagic shock.

  1. Increased risk of delayed cerebral ischemia in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients with additional intracerebral hematoma.

    PubMed

    Platz, Johannes; Güresir, Erdem; Wagner, Marlies; Seifert, Volker; Konczalla, Juergen

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) has a major impact on the outcome of patients suffering from aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The aim of this study was to assess the influence of an additional intracerebral hematoma (ICH) on the occurrence of DCI. METHODS The authors conducted a single-center retrospective analysis of cases of SAH involving patients treated between 2006 and 2011. Patients who died or were transferred to another institution within 10 days after SAH without the occurrence of DCI were excluded from the analysis. RESULTS Additional ICH was present in 123 (24.4%) of 504 included patients (66.7% female). ICH was classified as frontal in 72 patients, temporal in 24, and perisylvian in 27. DCI occurred in 183 patients (36.3%). A total of 59 (32.2%) of these 183 patients presented with additional ICH, compared with 64 (19.9%) of the 321 without DCI (p = 0.002). In addition, DCI was detected significantly more frequently in patients with higher World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) grades. The authors compared the original and modified Fisher Scales with respect to the occurrence of DCI. The modified Fisher Scale (mFS) was superior to the original Fisher Scale (oFS) in predicting DCI. Furthermore, they suggest a new classification based on the mFS, which demonstrates the impact of additional ICH on the occurrence of DCI. After the different scales were corrected for age, sex, WFNS score, and aneurysm site, the oFS no longer was predictive for the occurrence of DCI, while the new scale demonstrated a superior capacity for prediction as compared with the mFS. CONCLUSIONS Additional ICH was associated with an increased risk of DCI in this study. Furthermore, adding the presence or absence of ICH to the mFS improved the identification of patients at the highest risk for the development of DCI. Thus, a simple adjustment of the mFS might help to identify patients at high risk for DCI.

  2. Obstetric hemorrhage: A global review.

    PubMed

    Goffman, Dena; Nathan, Lisa; Chazotte, Cynthia

    2016-03-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage remains the number one cause of maternal death globally despite the fact that it is largely a preventable and most often a treatable condition. While the global problem is appreciated, some may not realize that in the United States postpartum hemorrhage is a leading cause of mortality and unfortunately, the incidence is on the rise. In New York, obstetric hemorrhage is the second leading cause of maternal mortality in the state. National data suggests that hemorrhage is disproportionally overrepresented as a contributor to severe maternal morbidity and we suspect as we explore further this will be true in New York State as well. Given the persistent and significant contribution to maternal mortality, it may be useful to analyze the persistence of this largely preventable cause of death within the framework of the historic "Three Delays" model of maternal mortality. The ongoing national and statewide problem with postpartum hemorrhage will be reviewed in this context of delays in an effort to inform potential solutions.

  3. Controversies in the neurosurgical management of cerebellar hemorrhage and infarction.

    PubMed

    Amar, Arun Paul

    2012-04-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of hemorrhagic and ischemic cerebellar stroke are sparse, and most available data come from Class III studies. As a result, opinions and practices regarding the nature and role of neurosurgical intervention vary widely. A comprehensive literature review was conducted to adjudicate several contentious issues, such as the difference in the management of cerebellar hemorrhage versus infarction, criteria for imaging to exclude an underlying structural lesion, the value of MRI for patient selection, the role of external ventricular drainage, the indications for operative management, the timing of surgical intervention, and various options of surgical technique, among others. Treatment algorithms proposed in several different studies are compared and contrasted. This analysis is concluded by a summary of the recommendations from the American Stroke Association, which advises that patients with cerebellar hemorrhage who experience neurological deterioration or who have brainstem compression and/or hydrocephalus due to ventricular obstruction should undergo surgical evacuation of the hemorrhage as soon as possible, and that initial treatment of such patients with ventricular drainage alone rather than surgical removal of the hemorrhage is not recommended.

  4. Glioblastoma Multiforme with Hemorrhage Mimicking an Aneurysm: Lessons Learnt

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Navneet; Aggarwal, Ashish; Vyas, Sameer; Sanghvi, Ankur; Salunke, Pravin; Garg, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Background A sudden onset of neurological symptoms in patients is conventionally thought to be due to vascular phenomenon, with one common differential diagnosis being subarachnoid hemorrhage. Another important differential diagnosis is ischemic stroke. An uncommon cause of such acute symptoms can be hemorrhage in a pre-existing tumor, that is, intratumoral hemorrhage (ITH). Purpose ITH is an important, though uncommon differential diagnosis in cases of sudden onset of neurological deterioration. Methods and Result A 60-year-old male presented with seizures and loss of consciousness 12 h prior to admission. The episode was sudden in onset. After detailed clinical and radiological investigations, the patient was diagnosed with glioma with bleed and was successfully operated upon. Conclusion The combination of hemorrhage and ischemic stroke pointed more towards an aneurysm rather than a tumor bleed. There were pointers both in favor of and against both the diagnosis. Therefore, a complex hemorrhagic cerebral tumor with acute presentation and discordant finding on CT or CT angiography should be characterized preoperatively. A large thrombosed aneurysm remains an important differential diagnosis. PMID:27780994

  5. Hypercoagulability in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Sehnal, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Recent data indicate that in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic teleangiectasia (HHT), low iron levels due to inadequate replacement after hemorrhagic iron losses are associated with elevated factor-VIII plasma levels and consecutively increased risk of venous thrombo-embolism. Here, we report a patient with HHT, low iron levels, elevated factor-VIII, and recurrent venous thrombo-embolism. A 64-year-old multimorbid Serbian gipsy was diagnosed with HHT at age 62 years. He had a history of recurrent epistaxis, teleangiectasias on the lips, renal and pulmonary arterio-venous malformations, and a family history positive for HHT. He had experienced recurrent venous thrombosis (mesenteric vein thrombosis, portal venous thrombosis, deep venous thrombosis), insufficiently treated with phenprocoumon during 16 months and gastro-intestinal bleeding. Blood tests revealed sideropenia and elevated plasma levels of coagulation factor-VIII. His history was positive for diabetes, arterial hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, cerebral abscess, recurrent ischemic stroke, recurrent ileus, peripheral arterial occluding disease, polyneuropathy, mild renal insufficiency, and epilepsy. Following recent findings, hypercoagulability was attributed to the sideropenia-induced elevation of coagulation factor-VIII. In conclusion, HHT may be associated with hypercoagulability due to elevated factor-VIII associated with low serum iron levels from recurrent bleeding. Iron substitution may prevent HHT patients from hypercoagulability. PMID:26167029

  6. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) [PDF - 2 pages] Virus Ecology Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) Information for Specific Groups ... Diagnosis Treatment Prevention Outbreak Distribution Map Resources Virus Ecology File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  7. Peri-Hemorrhagic Edema and Secondary Hematoma Expansion after Intracerebral Hemorrhage: From Benchwork to Practical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Babi, Marc-Alain; James, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH) is the most lethal type of stroke. Half of these deaths occur within the acute phase. Frequently observed deterioration during the acute phase is often due to rebleeding or peri-hematomal expansion. The exact pathogenesis that leads to rebleeding or peri-hemorrhagic edema remains under much controversy. Numerous trials have investigated potential predictor of peri-hemorrhagic edema formation or rebleeding but have yet to come with consistent results. Unfortunately, almost all of the “classical” approaches have failed to show a significant impact in regard of significant clinical outcome in randomized clinical trials. Current treatment strategies may remain “double-edged swords,” for inherent reasons to the pathophysiology of sICH. Therefore, the right balance and possibly the combination of current accepted strategies as well as the evaluation of future approaches seem urgent. This article reviews the role of disturbed autoregulation following SICH, surgical and non-surgical approaches in management of SICH, peri-hematoma edema, peri-hematoma expansion, and future therapeutic trends. PMID:28154550

  8. [Digestive tract hemorrhages of cirrhotic patients. Relation between hepatic insufficiency and the hemorrhagic lesion].

    PubMed

    Franco, D; Deporte, A; Darragon, T; Bismuth, H

    1975-12-06

    The cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding was studied in 85 cirrhotic patients by emergency endoscopy. In every patient, one or several lesions were observed and the site of bleeding was ascertained in 59. The two main causes were oesophago-gastric varices (46 p.cent) and acute mucosal lesions(42 p.cent). The source of bleeding appeared to be related to the degree of liver function impairment. In patients with no or moderate liver function impariment, bleeding usually originated from varices or from drug-associated mucosal erosions. Patients with severe impairment of liver function most often bled from spontaneous acute oeso-gastro-duodenal ulcerations. These ulcerations resembled what has been described in "stress" hemorrhage. Because of the relationship between liver function and the cause of hemorrhage, mortality was lower in variceal bleeders (29 p.cent) than in patients with spontaneous ulcerations (83 p.cent). In patients with severely impaired liver function, portacaval shunt was rarely indicated since hemorrhage was generally due to acute mucosal ulcerations.

  9. [Infratentorial hemorrhage following supratentorial surgery].

    PubMed

    Tomii, M; Nakajima, M; Ikeuchi, S; Ogawa, T; Abe, T

    1999-10-01

    Hemorrhage in regions remote from the site of initial intracranial operations is rare, but does occur. We report three cases of cerebellar hemorrhage that developed after supratentorial surgery, all of which had similar clinical findings and CT images. The first case was a 37-year-old man with a craniopharyngioma in the suprasellar lesion. Partial removal of the tumor was performed through frontal craniotomy and the translaminaterminals approach. A large quantity of cerebospinal fluid (CSF) was suctioned from the third ventricle during the operation, resulting in marked brain shrinkage. The second and third cases were 34- and 51-year-old women with unruptured right middle cerebral aneurysms. Clipping of the aneurysms through the pterional approach was performed in both cases. In the second case, CSF was suctioned in large quantity from the carotid and prechiasmal cistern at the operation, resulting in marked brain shrinkage. In the third case, however, only a small volume of CSF was suctioned from the carotid and prechiasmal cistern during the operation, and no marked brain shrinkage was observed. CT scan showed that the hematomas were located mainly in the subdural or the subarachnoid spaces over the cerebellar hemisphere and partially extending into the cerebellar cortex. The mechanism of cerebellar hemorrhage in these series of patients was thought to be multifactorial. The possible etiology for cerebellar hemorrhage in the three cases presented was examined, including the role of CSF suction during surgery and disturbance of venous circulation in the posterior fossa. Suction of the CSF may cause intracranial hypotension. Further reduction of intracranial pressure leads to an increased transluminal venous pressure. There was no episode of hypertension or disturbed blood coagulation during or after the operation. The preoperative angiogram also revealed no abnormality at the region of the posterior fossa. Neuroimaging of infratentorial hemorrhage after

  10. Growing Hemorrhagic Choroidal Fissure Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Gelal, Fazıl; Gurkan, Gokhan; Feran, Hamit

    2016-01-01

    Choroidal fissure cysts are often incidentally discovered. They are usually asymptomatic. The authors report a case of growing and hemorrhagic choroidal fissure cyst which was treated surgically. A 22-year-old female presented with headache. Cranial MRI showed a left-sided choroidal fissure cyst. Follow-up MRI showed that the size of the cyst had increased gradually. Twenty months later, the patient was admitted to our emergency department with severe headache. MRI and CT showed an intracystic hematoma. Although such cysts usually have a benign course without symptoms and progression, they may rarely present with intracystic hemorrhage, enlargement of the cyst and increasing symptomatology. PMID:26962426

  11. Ebola and marburg hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Amy L; Towner, Jonathan S; Nichol, Stuart T

    2010-03-01

    Ebola and Marburg viruses cause a severe viral hemorrhagic fever disease mainly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Although outbreaks are sporadic, there is the potential for filoviruses to spread to other continents unintentionally because of air travel or intentionally because of bioterrorism. This article discusses the natural history, epidemiology, and clinical presentation of patients infected with Ebola and Marburg viruses. Clinicians in the United States should be aware of the symptoms of these viral infections in humans and know the appropriate procedures for contacting local, state, and national reference laboratories in the event of a suspected case of filoviral hemorrhagic fever.

  12. [Sheehan's syndrome after obstetric hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Ramos-López, L; Pons-Canosa, V; Juncal-Díaz, J L; Núñez-Centeno, M B

    2014-12-01

    Sheehan's syndrome is described as panhypopituitarism secondary to a pituitary hypoperfusion during or just after obstetric hemorrhage. Advances in obstetric care make this syndrome quite unusual, but some cases are reported in underdeveloped countries. Clinical presentation may change depending on the severity of the hormone deficiencies. The diagnosis is clinical, but abnormalities are observed in the magnetic resonance in up to 70% of patients. We present a case of a woman with hypotension, hypothermia and edemas in relation to a previous massive postpartum hemorrhage. Failure in lactation was the clue to the diagnosis. A review of its main features, its diagnosis and treatment in the current literature is also presented.

  13. Symptomatic tarlov cyst following spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kong, Woo Keun; Cho, Keun-Tae; Hong, Seung-Koan

    2011-08-01

    Most of Tarlov or perineurial cysts remain asymptomatic throughout the patient's life. The pathogenesis is still unclear. Hemorrhage has been suggested as one of the possible causes and trauma with resultant hemorrhage into subarachnoid space has been suggested as an origin of these cysts. However, Tarlov cysts related to spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been reported. The authors report a case of Tarlov cyst which was symptomatic following spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  14. Symptomatic Tarlov Cyst Following Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Woo Keun; Hong, Seung-Koan

    2011-01-01

    Most of Tarlov or perineurial cysts remain asymptomatic throughout the patient's life. The pathogenesis is still unclear. Hemorrhage has been suggested as one of the possible causes and trauma with resultant hemorrhage into subarachnoid space has been suggested as an origin of these cysts. However, Tarlov cysts related to spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been reported. The authors report a case of Tarlov cyst which was symptomatic following spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:22053232

  15. CT demonstration of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, D.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1983-08-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage with subsequent adrenal insufficiency is a recognized complication of anticoagulant therapy. Because the clinical manifestations are often nonspecific, the antemortem diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage has been a difficult clinical problem. Computed tomography (CT) provides detailed images of the adrenal glands that are not possible with conventional imaging methods. The CT findings of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in an anticoagulated patient are reported.

  16. Intramural hemorrhage simulating gastric neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Sheward, S E; Davis, M; Amparo, E G; Gogel, H K

    1988-01-01

    We report a case of benign gastric ulcer with secondary extensive intramural hemorrhage causing a radiographic appearance consistent with a large ulcerated gastric neoplasm. This is the second such case reported and the first studied with sonography and computed tomographic scan. A brief review of the literature on intramural gastric hematoma is presented.

  17. Role of external ventricular drainage in the management of intraventricular hemorrhage; its complications and management

    PubMed Central

    Kirmani, Altaf Rehman; Sarmast, Arif Hussain; Bhat, Abdul Rashid

    2015-01-01

    Background: External ventricular drainage (EVD) is the procedure of choice for the treatment of acute hydrocephalus and increased intracranial pressure in patients of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and intracerebral hemorrhage with hydrocephalus and its sequelae. We evaluated the use of EVD in patients of SAHs (spontaneous/posttraumatic with/without hydrocephalus), hypertensive intracerebral bleeds with interventricular extensions, along with evaluation of the frequency of occurrence of complications of the procedure, infectious and noninfectious, and their management. Methods: During the period of 2½ years, between September 2012 and February 2015, 130 patients were subjected to external drainage procedure and were prospectively enrolled in this study. Information was collected on each patient regarding age, sex, diagnosis, underlying illness, secondary complications, other coexisting infections, use of systemic steroids, antibiotic treatment (systemic and intraventricular), and whether any other neurosurgical procedures were performed within 2 weeks of EVD insertion or any time the duration of ventriculostomy. Results: The study population of 130 patients underwent a total of 193 ventriculostomies. Thirty-six patients had ventriculostomy infection (27.6%). Evaluation of the use of EVD was done by comparing preoperative and postoperative grading scores. Forty-nine patients survived and improved their score from Grade 3–5 to Grade 2–4. Twenty-nine patients were moderately disable, 16 were severely disable, and 5 were left in the vegetative state. Evaluation of outcome of patients revealed that there was an overall mortality of 61 (46.9%) patients both in the acute phase and later. 33 of the 39 patients having Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) 3–5 at the time of EVD insertion expired, as against 20 of the 51 patients in GCS 6–8. Patients in GCS 9–12 had an even better outcome, with 8 of the 35 patients in this group expiring. Conclusions: The use of EVD should be

  18. [Enteroviruses responsible for acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis].

    PubMed

    Lévêque, N; Huguet, P; Norder, H; Chomel, J-J

    2010-04-01

    Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) is an epidemic form of highly contagious conjunctivitis, characterized by conjunctival hemorrhages. The first AHC outbreak was described in 1969 in Ghana, West Africa, and was called Apollo disease, from the Apollo landing on the moon. This outbreak was caused by Enterovirus 70 (EV70) together with a Coxsackievirus A24 (CVA24v) variant, which are the major etiological agents involved in AHC outbreaks worldwide. AHC is known to be directly transmitted by close person-to-person contact or indirectly through soiled ophthalmological materials or unsafe recreational water. Recently, a possible airborne virus spread was suggested which could explain the high transmission rate of the disease. In the absence of a specific antiviral therapy, a rapid diagnosis of the causative agent is required to distinguish AHC due to enteroviruses from other ocular infectious diseases, for there are active drugs, or to quickly implement proper public health measures to limit the extension of the outbreak. However, virus identification remains difficult and time-consuming. Moreover, virological diagnosis is difficult to implement in developing countries where AHC has recently become a major problem for public health.

  19. Identification of two vicinal operons for the degradation of 2-aminobenzenesulfonate encoded on plasmid pSAH in Alcaligenes sp. strain O-1.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Jürgen; Smits, Theo H M; Cook, Alasdair M; Schleheck, David

    2010-05-30

    Alcaligenes sp. strain O-1 inducibly deaminates 2-aminobenzenesulfonate (ABS) via dioxygenation to 3-sulfocatechol, which is desulfonated during meta ring-cleavage to yield 2-hydroxymuconate. This intermediate is transformed through the oxalocrotonate-branch of the sulfocatechol meta-pathway (Scm). The complete pathway is encoded on the 180-kb plasmid pSAH, 20kb of which was sequenced. Twenty open reading frames (ORFs) were detected. Two clusters (abs and scm) with degradative genes were surrounded by several transposon-related ORFs. The six genes of the abs cluster were shown to be co-transcribed, and contained the genes for two characterised subunits of the oxygenase component of the ABS-dioxygenase system, and genes putatively encoding ABS-transport functions with similarities to (a) an ABC-type transporter system and (b) a putative major facilitator superfamily transporter. No gene encoding the reductase for the oxygenase system was present in the abs gene cluster, but a candidate gene was found in the scm cluster. The seven-gene scm cluster was also transcribed as single polycistronic message. Functions could be attributed to the gene products, but one enzyme, which was shown to be present, 2-hydroxymuconate isomerase, was not encoded in the scm cluster. No transcriptional regulator was found. This genetic information on the degradation of ABS in strain O-1 provides another example of both split operons and dispersed pathway genes.

  20. Neuroprotective Mechanisms of Melatonin in Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai-Jian; Wu, Cheng; Niu, Huan-Jiang; Wang, Kun; Mo, Lian-Jie; Shao, An-Wen; Dixon, Brandon J; Zhang, Jian-Min; Yang, Shu-Xu; Wang, Yi-Rong

    2017-01-28

    Hemorrhagic stroke which consists of subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracerebral hemorrhage is a dominant cause of death and disability worldwide. Although great efforts have been made, the physiological mechanisms of these diseases are not fully understood and effective pharmacological interventions are still lacking. Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), a neurohormone produced by the pineal gland, is a broad-spectrum antioxidant and potent free radical scavenger. More importantly, there is extensive evidence demonstrating that melatonin confers neuroprotective effects in experimental models of hemorrhagic stroke. Multiple molecular mechanisms such as antioxidant, anti-apoptosis, and anti-inflammation, contribute to melatonin-mediated neuroprotection against brain injury after hemorrhagic stroke. This review article aims to summarize current knowledge regarding the beneficial effects of melatonin in experimental models of hemorrhagic stroke and explores the underlying mechanisms. We propose that melatonin is a promising neuroprotective candidate that is worthy of further evaluation for its potential therapeutic applications in hemorrhagic stroke.

  1. Hemorrhage and Hemorrhagic Shock in Swine: A Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    Hillman N, Peoples JB (1982): The effects of dehydration on the dynamics of transcapillary refill. Am Surg 48:412-416. Becker H, Hottenrott C ...hemorrhagic shock: improved outcome with hypertonic saline/6% Dextran 70. Am J Emerg Med 7:357-363. Coli G, Frascaroli C , Guibilei G, Grillone G, Nanni...Di Nino GF, Melcni C ’, Rossi R (1982a): Considerazioni sulle modificaziomi della viscosita del sangue nel circolo polmonare ed in quello sistemico

  2. User preference comparing a conventional videolaryngoscope blade vs. a novel suction videolaryngoscope blade in simulated hemorrhagic airway intubation.

    PubMed

    Boedeker, Ben H; Bernhagen, Mary; Miller, David J; Murray, W Bosseau

    2012-01-01

    The hemorrhagic airway makes visualization during laryngoscopy and intubation difficult. A specially designed videolaryngoscope blade with integrated suction was developed and studied in a simulated hemorrhagic airway at the Omaha VA Medical Center. Results show that, if available, many users would choose to include this new suction device in their standard airway carts due to its "always there" design.

  3. Cerebellar hemorrhage provoked by combined use of nattokinase and aspirin in a patient with cerebral microbleeds.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yung-Yee; Liu, Jia-Shou; Lai, Shung-Lon; Wu, Hsiu-Shan; Lan, Min-Yu

    2008-01-01

    Nattokinase is used as a health-promoting medicine for preventing thrombosis due to its fibrinolytic activity. Cerebral microbleed is remnant of blood extravasations from the damaged vessels related to cerebral microangiopathies. We report a patient, having used aspirin for secondary stroke prevention, who had an acute cerebellar hemorrhage after taking nattokinase 400 mg daily for 7 consecutive days. In addition to the hemorrhagic lesion, multiple microbleeds were demonstrated on brain MR images. We suggest that nattokinase may increase risk of intracerebral hemorrhage in patients who have bleeding-prone cerebral microangiopathy and are receiving other antithrombotic agent at the same time.

  4. Clinical outcome following ultra-early operation for patients with intracerebral hematoma from aneurysm rupture--focussing on the massive intra-sylvian type of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Su, C C; Saito, K; Nakagawa, A; Endo, T; Suzuki, Y; Shirane, R

    2002-01-01

    Of 250 patients admitted with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from 1994 to 2000, 16 had massive intra-sylvian hematomas. To predict the useful determinants of the clinical outcome for such patients we analyzed our last 16 cases. The study was performed in 2 parts. Part 1 covered the period from 1994 to 1996 and included 5 patients who underwent early surgery. Immediately before operation, Hunt & Kosnik grade (H&K) III was observed in 1, IV in 3 and V in 1 patient. Part 2, from 1997 to 2000, included 11 patients who underwent ultra-early surgery (within 3 hours after admission) with ventriculostomy and with 2 weeks' postoperative management in the ICU. Preoperatively, there were 2 patients with H&K III, 7 with IV, and 2 with V. The results in part 1 showed that 3 out of the 5 patients had poor outcome with symptomatic vasospasm. While in Part 2, seven returned to work, 2 had minimal and 1 had severe neurological deficits with symptomatic vasospasm, and 1 died. We therefore suggest that ultra-early surgery with ventriculostomy and postoperative management in the ICU is the most useful determinant to improve the clinical outcome in the treatment of SAH patients with massive intra-sylvian hematoma.

  5. Imaging of adrenal and renal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Nancy A; Lostumbo, Antonella; Adam, Sharon Z; Remer, Erick M; Nikolaidis, Paul; Yaghmai, Vahid; Berggruen, Senta M; Miller, Frank H

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhage of the kidneys and adrenal glands has many etiologies. In the adrenal glands, trauma, anticoagulation, stress, sepsis, surgery, and neoplasms are common causes of hemorrhage. In the kidneys, reasons for hemorrhage include trauma, bleeding diathesis, vascular diseases, infection, infarction, hemorrhagic cyst rupture, the Antopol-Goldman lesion, and neoplasms. Angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma are the neoplasms most commonly associated with hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal cortical carcinoma, metastases, and pheochromocytoma are associated with hemorrhage in the adrenal glands. Understanding the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features, and causes of hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal glands is critical. It is also important to keep in mind that mimickers of hemorrhage exist, including lymphoma in both the kidneys and adrenal glands, and melanoma metastases in the adrenal glands. Appropriate imaging follow-up of renal and adrenal hemorrhage should occur to exclude an underlying malignancy as the cause. If there is suspicion for malignancy that cannot be definitively diagnosed on imaging, surgery or biopsy may be warranted. Angiography may be indicated when there is a suspected underlying vascular disease. Unnecessary intervention, such as nephrectomy, may be avoided in patients with benign causes or no underlying disease. Appropriate management is dependent on accurate diagnosis of the cause of renal or adrenal hemorrhage and it is incumbent upon the radiologist to determine the etiology.

  6. [Misoprostol for treating postpartum hemorrhages].

    PubMed

    Godard, Clémence; Berhoune, Malik; Bertrand, Eric; Schlatter, Joël; Chiadmi, Fouad; Toledano, Audrey; Cisternino, Salvatore; Fontan, Jean-Eudes

    2008-03-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage is defined by bleeding > 500 mL through the vagina. It is one of the obstetrical complications that obstetricians fear most. It is the leading cause of maternal mortality in the world, especially in developing countries. The reference treatments in France are parenteral oxytocin and sulprostone. Sulprostone involves sometimes fatal side effects, and must be administered only in appropriate health care facilities. It also has the major disadvantage of requiring refrigeration. Misoprostol has uterotonic properties that have led to its occasional off-label use in the treatment of postpartum hemorrhage, by rectal or sublingual administration, as an alternative to sulprostone. A careful review of the literature on this particular use of misoprostol is essential.

  7. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever.

    PubMed

    Shayan, Sara; Bokaean, Mohammad; Shahrivar, Mona Ranjvar; Chinikar, Sadegh

    2015-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a member of the Bunyaviridae family and Nairovirus genus. The viral genome consists of 3 RNA segments of 12 kb (L), 6.8 kb (M), and 3 kb (S). Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is the most widespread tickborne viral infection worldwide: it has been reported in many regions of Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. The geographical distribution of CCHFV corresponds most closely with the distribution of members of the tick genera, and Hyalomma ticks are the principal source of human infection. In contrast to human infection, CCHFV infection is asymptomatic in all species. Treatment options for CCHF are limited; immunotherapy and ribavirin are effective in the treatment of CCHF; the efficacy of ribavirin in the treatment of CCHF has not yet been proven. This article reviews the history, epidemiology, clinical symptoms, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of CCHFV, as well as the development of a vaccine against it.

  8. MANAGEMENT OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL HEMORRHAGE

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Claude E.

    1956-01-01

    In the past few years gastric resection has become the therapy of choice for patients with massive hemorrhage from duodenal ulcer. When this is done as an emergency procedure the ability of the surgeon is often taxed to the limit. Although sometimes easy, control is often extraordinarily difficult. Many important technical details must be considered in order to attain a successful outcome. This method of therapy has proved to be very satisfactory with patients who are in good condition for operation, and even in the poorer risks seen on ward service has resulted in a surgical mortality of only 7 per cent in all patients less than 60 years of age treated for this extremely severe type of hemorrhage. In the older age groups mortality rates still remain high. PMID:13284635

  9. Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy.

    PubMed

    Serra E Moura Garcia, C; Sokolova, A; Torre, M L; Amaro, C

    2016-01-01

    Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy is a small vessel leucocytoclastic vasculitis affecting young infants. It is characterized by large, target-like, macular to purpuric plaques predominantly affecting the face, ear lobes and extremities. Non-pitting edema of the distal extremities and low-grade fever may also be present. Extra-cutaneous involvement is very rare. Although the lesions have a dramatic onset in a twenty-four to forty-eight hour period, usually the child has a non-toxic appearance. In most cases there are no changes in laboratory parameters. The cutaneous biopsy reveals an inflammatory perivascular infiltrate. It is a benign and auto-limited disease, with complete resolution within two to three weeks leaving no sequelae in the majority of cases. No recurrences are described. We report a case of a 42-day old girl admitted at our hospital with Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy.

  10. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Mark W

    2015-01-01

    In mid-September 2009, a 22-year-old critically ill Soldier was medically evacuated from a treatment facility in southern Afghanistan to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany. Despite the efforts of the team at Landstuhl, this patient died and became the US military's first known victim of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF). CCHF is caused by a virus, which bears the same name. Because a vaccine is lacking, as well as an effective antiviral treatment, prevention is key.

  11. Effects of plasma D-dimer levels on early mortality and long-term functional outcome after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Fang, Yuan; Ye, Feng; Lin, Sen; Li, Hao; You, Chao; Liu, Ming

    2014-08-01

    The activation of hemostatic systems has been detected in spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) patients. The influence of plasma D-dimer levels on clinical outcome remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the impact of elevated plasma D-dimer levels on early mortality and long-term functional outcome in spontaneous ICH. A total of 259 spontaneous ICH patients (<24hours from ictus) between November 2010 and October 2011 were included. Clinical information and radiological findings were collected at admission. Spearman correlation analyses revealed that D-dimer concentrations were correlated with midline shift, hematoma volume, intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) score and Glasgow Coma Scale score. Patients with subarachnoid extension had significantly higher D-dimer levels than those without SAH extension. Comparison of patients with IVH and those without yielded a similar result. Multivariate stepwise backward logistic analysis identified plasma D-dimer levels as an independent risk factor for 7 day mortality (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=1.237, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.017-1.504, p=0.033) and 3 month poor functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale score ≥ 3) (adjusted OR=2.279, 95% CI 1.130-6.595, p=0.026). The mechanisms by which elevated D-dimer affects the prognoses of spontaneous ICH patients remain unclear and require clarification in future studies.

  12. Clinical Features and Patient Management of Lujo Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Sewlall, Nivesh H.; Richards, Guy; Duse, Adriano; Swanepoel, Robert; Paweska, Janusz; Blumberg, Lucille; Dinh, Thu Ha; Bausch, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2008 a nosocomial outbreak of five cases of viral hemorrhagic fever due to a novel arenavirus, Lujo virus, occurred in Johannesburg, South Africa. Lujo virus is only the second pathogenic arenavirus, after Lassa virus, to be recognized in Africa and the first in over 40 years. Because of the remote, resource-poor, and often politically unstable regions where Lassa fever and other viral hemorrhagic fevers typically occur, there have been few opportunities to undertake in-depth study of their clinical manifestations, transmission dynamics, pathogenesis, or response to treatment options typically available in industrialized countries. Methods and Findings We describe the clinical features of five cases of Lujo hemorrhagic fever and summarize their clinical management, as well as providing additional epidemiologic detail regarding the 2008 outbreak. Illness typically began with the abrupt onset of fever, malaise, headache, and myalgias followed successively by sore throat, chest pain, gastrointestinal symptoms, rash, minor hemorrhage, subconjunctival injection, and neck and facial swelling over the first week of illness. No major hemorrhage was noted. Neurological signs were sometimes seen in the late stages. Shock and multi-organ system failure, often with evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, ensued in the second week, with death in four of the five cases. Distinctive treatment components of the one surviving patient included rapid commencement of the antiviral drug ribavirin and administration of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), N-acetylcysteine, and recombinant factor VIIa. Conclusions Lujo virus causes a clinical syndrome remarkably similar to Lassa fever. Considering the high case-fatality and significant logistical impediments to controlled treatment efficacy trials for viral hemorrhagic fever, it is both logical and ethical to explore the use of the various compounds used in the treatment of the surviving case reported here

  13. A New Model of Severe Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rönn, Thomas; Lendemans, Sven; de Groot, Herbert; Petrat, Frank

    2011-01-01

    We here introduce a fixed-pressure model of hemorrhagic shock in rats that maximizes effects on mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) during shock and yet maintains high reproducibility and controllability. The MAP of rats was adjusted to 25 to 30 mm Hg by blood withdrawals during 30 min. After a shock period of 60 min, rats were resuscitated either with lactated Ringer solution (LR) only or with the collected blood 3-fold diluted with LR (LR + blood) and monitored for further 150 min. Throughout the experiment, vital parameters and plasma marker enzyme activities and creatinine concentration were assessed. Thereafter, liver, kidneys, small intestine, heart, and lung were harvested and evaluated histopathologically. Vital parameters, plasma marker enzyme activities, creatinine concentration, and histopathology indicated pronounced but reliable and reproducible systemic effects and marked organ damage due to hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. In contrast to rats that received LR + blood, which survived the postresuscitation period, rats receiving LR only invariably died shortly after resuscitation. The hemorrhagic shock model we present here maximally affects MAP and yet is highly reproducible in rats, allowing the study of various aspects of hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation under clinically relevant conditions. PMID:22330349

  14. Pulmonary hemorrhage in pediatric lupus anticoagulant hypoprothrombinemia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Soo; Kim, Min Jae; Bae, E Young

    2014-01-01

    Lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome (LAHPS), a very rare disease that is caused by the presence of antifactor II antibodies, is usually counterbalanced by the prothrombotic effect of lupus anticoagulant (LAC). Patients with LAHPS are treated using fresh frozen plasma, steroids, immunosuppressive agents, and immunoglobulins for managing the disease and controlling hemorrhages. Notably, steroids are the important treatment for treating hypoprothrombinemia and controlling the bleeding. However, some patients suffer from severe, life-threatening hemorrhages, when factor II levels remain very low in spite of treatment with steroids. Here, we report a case of LAHPS in a 15-year-old girl who experienced pulmonary hemorrhage with rapid progression. She was referred to our hospital owing to easy bruising and prolonged bleeding. She was diagnosed with LAHPS that presented with pancytopenia, positive antinuclear antibody, proloned prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, positive LAC antibody, and factor II deficiency. Her treatment included massive blood transfusion, high-dose methylprednisolone, vitamin K, and immunoglobulin. However, she died due to uncontrolled pulmonary hemorrhage. PMID:24868219

  15. Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage Image Analysis Methods: A Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Noel; Valdés, Jose; Guevara, Miguel; Silva, Augusto

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH) account for 10-30% of all strokes and are a result of acute bleeding into the brain due to ruptures of small penetrating arteries. Despite major advancements in the management of ischemic strokes and other causes of hemorrhagic strokes, such as ruptured aneurysm, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), or cavernous angioma, during the past several decades, limited progress has been made in the treatment of ICH, and the prognosis for patients who suffer them remains poor. The societal impact of these hemorrhagic strokes is magnified by the fact that affected patients typically are a decade younger than those afflicted with ischemic strokes. The ICH continues to kill or disable most of their victims. Some studies show that those who suffer ICH have a 30-day mortality rate of 35-44% and a 6-month mortality rate approaching 50%. Approximately 700,000 new strokes occur in the United States annually and approximately 15% are hem-orrhagic strokes related to ICH. The poor outcome associated with ICH is related to the extent of brain damage. ICH produces direct destruction and compression of surrounding brain tissue. Direct compression causes poor perfusion and venous drainage to surrounding penumbra at risk, resulting in ischemia to the tissues that most need perfusion [16].

  16. Peptidomic Analysis of Rat Plasma: Proteolysis in Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Aletti, Federico; Maffioli, Elisa; Negri, Armando; Santamaria, Marco H; DeLano, Frank A; Kistler, Erik B; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W; Tedeschi, Gabriella

    2016-05-01

    It has been previously shown that intestinal proteases translocate into the circulation during hemorrhagic shock and contribute to proteolysis in distal organs. However, consequences of this phenomenon have not previously been investigated using high-throughput approaches. Here, a shotgun label-free quantitative proteomic approach was utilized to compare the peptidome of plasma samples from healthy and hemorrhagic shock rats to verify the possible role of uncontrolled proteolytic activity in shock. Plasma was collected from rats after hemorrhagic shock (HS) consisting of 2-h hypovolemia followed by 2-h reperfusion, and from healthy control (CTRL) rats. A new two-step enrichment method was applied to selectively extract peptides and low molecular weight proteins from plasma, and directly analyze these samples by tandem mass spectrometry. One hundred twenty-six circulating peptides were identified in CTRL and 295 in HS animals. Ninety-six peptides were present in both conditions; of these, 57 increased and 30 decreased in shock. In total, 256 peptides were increased or present only in HS confirming a general increase in proteolytic activity in shock. Analysis of the proteases that potentially generated the identified peptides suggests that the larger relative contribution to the proteolytic activity in shock is due to chymotryptic-like proteases. These results provide quantitative confirmation that extensive, system-wide proteolysis is part of the complex pathologic phenomena occurring in hemorrhagic shock.

  17. The Inner Centromere Protein (INCENP) Coil Is a Single α-Helix (SAH) Domain That Binds Directly to Microtubules and Is Important for Chromosome Passenger Complex (CPC) Localization and Function in Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Samejima, Kumiko; Platani, Melpomeni; Wolny, Marcin; Ogawa, Hiromi; Vargiu, Giulia; Knight, Peter J; Peckham, Michelle; Earnshaw, William C

    2015-08-28

    The chromosome passenger complex (CPC) is a master regulator of mitosis. Inner centromere protein (INCENP) acts as a scaffold regulating CPC localization and activity. During early mitosis, the N-terminal region of INCENP forms a three-helix bundle with Survivin and Borealin, directing the CPC to the inner centromere where it plays essential roles in chromosome alignment and the spindle assembly checkpoint. The C-terminal IN box region of INCENP is responsible for binding and activating Aurora B kinase. The central region of INCENP has been proposed to comprise a coiled coil domain acting as a spacer between the N- and C-terminal domains that is involved in microtubule binding and regulation of the spindle checkpoint. Here we show that the central region (213 residues) of chicken INCENP is not a coiled coil but a ∼ 32-nm-long single α-helix (SAH) domain. The N-terminal half of this domain directly binds to microtubules in vitro. By analogy with previous studies of myosin 10, our data suggest that the INCENP SAH might stretch up to ∼ 80 nm under physiological forces. Thus, the INCENP SAH could act as a flexible "dog leash," allowing Aurora B to phosphorylate dynamic substrates localized in the outer kinetochore while at the same time being stably anchored to the heterochromatin of the inner centromere. Furthermore, by achieving this flexibility via an SAH domain, the CPC avoids a need for dimerization (required for coiled coil formation), which would greatly complicate regulation of the proximity-induced trans-phosphorylation that is critical for Aurora B activation.

  18. [Clinical aspects of viral hemorrhagic fever].

    PubMed

    Saijo, Masayuki

    2005-12-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) is defined as virus infections that usually cause pyrexia and hemorrhagic symptoms with multiple organ failure. VHF includes following viral infections: Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF), Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF), Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) and Lassa fever. In particular, the causative agents of EHF, MHF, CCHF, and Lassa fever are Ebola, Marburg, CCHF, Lassa viruses, respectively, and regarded as biosafety level-4 pathogens because of their high virulence to humans. Recently, relatively large outbreaks of EHF and MHF have occurred in Africa, and areas of EHF- and MHF-outbreaks seem to be expanding. Although outbreaks of VHF have not been reported in Japan, there is a possibility that the deadly hemorrhagic fever viruses would be introduced to Japan in future. Therefore, preparedness for possible future outbreaks of VHF is necessary in areas without VHF outbreaks.

  19. Behavior outcome after ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, with similar brain damage, in rats.

    PubMed

    Mestriner, Régis Gemerasca; Miguel, Patrícia Maidana; Bagatini, Pamela Brambilla; Saur, Lisiani; Boisserand, Lígia Simões Braga; Baptista, Pedro Porto Alegre; Xavier, Léder Leal; Netto, Carlos Alexandre

    2013-05-01

    Stroke causes disability and mortality worldwide and is divided into ischemic and hemorrhagic subtypes. Although clinical trials suggest distinct recovery profiles for ischemic and hemorrhagic events, this is not conclusive due to stroke heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to produce similar brain damage, using experimental models of ischemic (IS) and hemorrhagic (HS) stroke and evaluate the motor spontaneous recovery profile. We used 31 Wistar rats divided into the following groups: Sham (n=7), ischemic (IS) (n=12) or hemorrhagic (HS) (n=12). Brain ischemia or hemorrhage was induced by endotelin-1 (ET-1) and collagenase type IV-S (collagenase) microinjections, respectively. All groups were evaluated in the open field, cylinder and ladder walk behavioral tests at distinct time points as from baseline to 30 days post-surgery (30 PS). Histological and morphometric analyses were used to assess the volume of lost tissue and lesion length. Present results reveal that both forms of experimental stroke had a comparable long-term pattern of damage, since no differences were found in volume of tissue lost or lesion size 30 days after surgery. However, behavioral data showed that hemorrhagic rats were less impaired at skilled walking than ischemic ones at 15 and 30 days post-surgery. We suggest that experimentally comparable stroke design is useful because it reduces heterogeneity and facilitates the assessment of neurobiological differences related to stroke subtypes; and that spontaneous skilled walking recovery differs between experimental ischemic and hemorrhagic insults.

  20. Pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from bungee jumping.

    PubMed

    Manos, Daria; Hamer, Okka; Müller, Nestor L

    2007-11-01

    Pulmonary hemorrhage is a relatively common complication of blunt chest trauma. Occasionally, it may result from pulmonary barotrauma after scuba diving or from sports activities not associated with barotrauma such as long breath-hold diving. We report a case of symmetric diffuse upper lobe hemorrhage resulting from a bungee jump in a previously healthy man. Bungee jumping is an increasingly popular sport with relatively few reported injuries. To our knowledge pulmonary hemorrhage in this setting has not yet been described.

  1. Simian Hemorrhagic Fever (SHF) Virus. Phase 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-31

    tlll AD111 CONTRACT NO: DAMDI7-91-C-1006 TITLE: SIMIAN HEMORRHAGIC FEVER (SHF) VIRUS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Margo A. Brinton, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Simian Hemorrhagic Fever (SHF) Virus DAMD17-91-C-1006 6. AUTHOR(S) Margo A. Brinton, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...simian hemorrhagic fever (SHF) virus -specific hybridoma cultures, expand two clones from each clone as well as 50 ml of supernatant fluid from

  2. Transillumination enhances photographs of retinal hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Nolte, K B

    1997-09-01

    Light stand photography with direct illumination of the retina is a common method of demonstrating retinal hemorrhages. The lack of contrast between dark hemorrhages and surrounding dark retina, and the difficulty of photographing into the concavity of an eye limit this technique. Transillumination of a bivalved globe with a bright external light source such as a colonoscope or microscope light yields high contrast superior photographs. This technique is useful to document retinal hemorrhages, and provides quality photographs for courtroom demonstrations.

  3. Spontaneous perirenal hemorrhage: what radiologists need to know.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Jesus R; Agriantonis, Demetrios J; Aguila, Jorge; Calleros, Jesus E; Ayyappan, Anoop P

    2011-08-01

    Spontaneous perirenal hemorrhage (SPH), also known as Wünderlich's syndrome, is a rare urological emergency. This article reviews the most common causes of SPH and the role of imaging in establishing the correct diagnosis and in guiding the appropriate therapy. A thorough understanding of underlying etiologies, imaging appearances, optimal imaging techniques, and follow-up protocols are crucial to recognize patients with SPH due to benign disease and avoid unnecessary nephrectomies.

  4. Spontaneous Massive Adrenal Hemorrhage: A Management Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anshuman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a rare but life-threatening condition. Small focal hemorrhage may present subclinically, but massive hemorrhage may lead to rapid cardiovascular collapse and ultimately death if not diagnosed appropriately and treated quickly. Most cases reported in the literature have been treated conservatively. In an event of increasing hemorrhage during conservative management, it may be tricky to intervene surgically because of the hematoma around the gland. Here we describe a case where we managed a large spontaneous AH by a combination of angioembolization and laparoscopic adrenalectomy. PMID:27579389

  5. Hemorrhagic cystitis: A challenge to the urologist

    PubMed Central

    Manikandan, R.; Kumar, Santosh; Dorairajan, Lalgudi N.

    2010-01-01

    Severe hemorrhagic cystitis often arises from anticancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy for pelvic malignancies. Infectious etiologies are less common causes except in immunocompromised hosts. These cases can be challenging problems for the urologist and a source of substantial morbidity and sometimes mortality for the patients. A variety of modalities of treatment have been described for the management of hemorrhagic cystitis but there is none that is uniformly effective. Some progress has been made in the understanding and management of viral hemorrhagic cystitis. This article reviews the common causes of severe hemorrhagic cystitis and the currently available management options. PMID:20877590

  6. Early whole-brain CT perfusion for detection of patients at risk for delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Malinova, Vesna; Dolatowski, Karoline; Schramm, Peter; Moerer, Onnen; Rohde, Veit; Mielke, Dorothee

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT This prospective study investigated the role of whole-brain CT perfusion (CTP) studies in the identification of patients at risk for delayed ischemic neurological deficits (DIND) and of tissue at risk for delayed cerebral infarction (DCI). METHODS Forty-three patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) were included in this study. A CTP study was routinely performed in the early phase (Day 3). The CTP study was repeated in cases of transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD)-measured blood flow velocity (BFV) increase of > 50 cm/sec within 24 hours and/or on Day 7 in patients who were intubated/sedated. RESULTS Early CTP studies revealed perfusion deficits in 14 patients, of whom 10 patients (72%) developed DIND, and 6 of these 10 patients (60%) had DCI. Three of the 14 patients (21%) with early perfusion deficits developed DCI without having had DIND, and the remaining patient (7%) had neither DIND nor DCI. There was a statistically significant correlation between early perfusion deficits and occurrence of DIND and DCI (p < 0.0001). A repeated CTP was performed in 8 patients with a TCD-measured BFV increase > 50 cm/sec within 24 hours, revealing a perfusion deficit in 3 of them (38%). Two of the 3 patients (67%) developed DCI without preceding DIND and 1 patient (33%) had DIND without DCI. In 4 of the 7 patients (57%) who were sedated and/or comatose, additional CTP studies on Day 7 showed perfusion deficits. All 4 patients developed DCI. CONCLUSIONS Whole-brain CTP on Day 3 after aSAH allows early and reliable identification of patients at risk for DIND and tissue at risk for DCI. Additional CTP investigations, guided by TCD-measured BFV increase or persisting coma, do not contribute to information gain.

  7. Difference in Transcranial Doppler Velocity and Patient Age between Proximal and Distal Middle Cerebral Artery Vasospasms after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kohama, Misaki; Sugiyama, Shinichiro; Sato, Kenichi; Endo, Hidenori; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Endo, Toshiki; Ohta, Makoto; Matsumoto, Yasushi; Fujimura, Miki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcranial Doppler (TCD) is used to monitor cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), but its diagnostic ability is reported to be limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the diagnosability of TCD and the localization of the vasospasm. Methods This retrospective study included 20 patients who presented with symptomatic vasospasm after SAH. All 20 patients underwent daily TCD examinations and cerebral angiography after the onset of delayed cerebral ischemia. We defined positive findings on TCD as a maximum flow velocity >200 cm/s or as a mean flow velocity >120 cm/s at the horizontal part of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). We also examined the site of vasospasm on cerebral angiography. Results Fourteen patients had true-positive findings on TCD examination, and cerebral angiography showed diffuse vasospasm involving the horizontal segment of the MCA. However, 6 patients had false-negative findings on TCD examination, and cerebral angiography showed vasospasm localized at the distal part of the MCA (the insular and/or cortical segments). The patients with proximal vasospasm were significantly younger than those with distal vasospasm. Blood flow velocity at initial TCD and the increase in velocity at the onset of vasospasm were lower and smaller, respectively, in the distal vasospasm group. Conclusions In patients with cerebral vasospasm localized at the distal part of the MCA, flow velocity at the horizontal segment of the MCA did not increase to the level we defined as positive. To avoid such false negatives, a slight increase in velocity on TCD should be considered as positive in distal vasospasm cases, especially in older patients. PMID:27665361

  8. Post-coital intra-cerebral venous hemorrhage in a 78-year-old man with jugular valve incompetence: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Spontaneous intra-cerebral hemorrhage can occur in patients with venous disease due to obstructed venous outflow. Case presentation We report the case of a 78-year-old Caucasian man with jugular valve incompetence who experienced an intra-cerebral temporo-occipital hemorrhage following sexual intercourse. He had no other risk factors for an intra-cerebral hemorrhage. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of intra-cerebral hemorrhage due to jugular valve incompetence in association with the physical exertion associated with sexual intercourse. PMID:20659320

  9. Relation of Elevation in Cardiac Troponin I to Clinical Severity, Cardiac Dysfunction, and Pulmonary Congestion in Patients With Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Masaki; Crago, Elizabeth A.; Suffoletto, Matthew S.; Hravnak, Marilyn; Frangiskakis, J. Michael; Kassam, Amin B.; Horowitz, Michael B.; Gorcsan, John

    2013-01-01

    An increase in cardiac troponin I (cTnI) occurs often after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), but its significance is not well understood. One hundred three patients with SAH were prospectively evaluated in the SAHMII Study to determine the relations of cTnI to clinical severity, systolic and diastolic cardiac function, pulmonary congestion, and length of intensive care unit stay. Echocardiographic ejection fraction, wall motion score, mitral inflow early diastolic (E) and mitral annular early (E′) velocities were assessed. Thirty patients (29%) had mildly positive cTnI (0.1 to 1.0 ng/ml), 24 (23%) had highly positive cTnI (>1.0 ng/ml), and 49 (48%) had negative cTnI (<0.1 ng/ml). Highly positive cTnI was associated with worse neurologic disease, longer intensive care unit stay, and slight depression of ejection fraction (51 ± 11% [p <0.05] vs 59 ± 8% and 63 ± 6% in mildly positive or negative cTnI groups, respectively). Highly positive cTnI was also associated with abnormal wall motion acutely (>1.31 ng/ml; 76% sensitivity, 91% specificity), which typically resolved within 5 to 10 days. Both mildly or highly positive cTnI were associated with acute diastolic dysfunction, with E/E′ of 17 ± 6 and 16 ± 6 (both p <0.05) vs 13 ± 4 in patients with negative cTnI. Prevalences of pulmonary congestion were 79% (p <0.05) in patients with highly positive cTnI, 53% (p <0.05) in patients with mildly positive cTnI, and 29% in cTnI-negative patients. In conclusion, highly positive cTnI with SAH was associated with clinical neurologic severity, systolic and diastolic cardiac dysfunction, pulmonary congestion, and longer intensive care unit stay. Even mild increases in cTnI were associated with diastolic dysfunction and pulmonary congestion. PMID:19026312

  10. A dynamic nonlinear relationship between the static and pulsatile components of intracranial pressure in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Eide, Per K.; Rapoport, Benjamin I.; Gormley, William B.; Madsen, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Object In the search for optimal monitoring and predictive tools in neurocritical care, the relationship of the pulsatile component of intracranial pressure (ICP) and the pressure itself has long been of great interest. Higher pressure often correlates with a higher pulsatile response to the heartbeat, interpreted as a type of compliance curve. Various mathematical approaches have been used, but regardless of the formula used, it is implicitly assumed that a reproducible curve exists. The authors investigated the stability of the correlation between static and pulsatile ICPs in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) who were observed for several hours by using data sets large enough to allow such calculations to be made. Methods The ICP recordings were obtained in 39 patients with SAH and were parsed into 6-second time windows (1,998,944 windows in 197 recordings). The ICP parameters were computed for each window as follows: static ICP was defined as the mean ICP, and pulsatile ICP was characterized by mean ICP wave amplitude, rise time, and rise time coefficient. Results The mean ICP and ICP wave amplitudes were simultaneously high or low (the expected correlation) in only ~ 60% of observations. Furthermore, static and pulsatile ICP correlated well only over short intervals; the degree of correlation weakened over periods of hours and was inconsistent across patients and within individual patients over time. Decorrelation originated with abrupt shifting and gradual drifting of mean ICP and ICP wave amplitude over several hours. Conclusions The relationship between the static and pulsatile components of ICPs changes over time. It evolves, even in individual patients, over a number of hours. This can be one reason the observation of high pulsatile ICP (indicative of reduced intracranial compliance) despite normal mean ICP that is seen in some patients with SAH. The meaning and potential clinical usefulness of such changes in the curves is uncertain, but it

  11. Optimal management of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Neetika; Khunger, Monica; Gupta, Arjun; Kumar, Nilay

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), also known by the eponym Osler–Weber–Rendu syndrome, is a group of related disorders inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and characterized by the development of arteriovenous malformations (AVM) in the skin, mucous membranes, and/or internal organs such as brain, lungs, and liver. Its prevalence is currently estimated at one in 5,000 to 8,000. Most cases are due to mutations in the endoglin (HHT1) or ACVRLK1 (HHT2) genes. Telangiectasias in nasal and gastrointestinal mucosa generally present with recurrent/chronic bleeding and iron deficiency anemia. Larger AVMs occur in lungs (~40%–60% of affected individuals), liver (~40%–70%), brain (~10%), and spine (~1%). Due to the devastating and potentially fatal complications of some of these lesions (for example, strokes and brain abscesses with pulmonary AVMs), presymptomatic screening and treatment are of utmost importance. However, due to the rarity of this condition, many providers lack an appreciation for the whole gamut of its manifestations and complications, age-dependent penetrance, and marked intrafamilial variation. As a result, HHT remains frequently underdiagnosed and many families do not receive the appropriate screening and treatments. This article provides an overview of the clinical features of HHT, discusses the clinical and genetic diagnostic strategies, and presents an up-to-date review of literature and detailed considerations regarding screening for visceral AVMs, preventive modalities, and treatment options. PMID:25342923

  12. [Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by jaundice: a case report].

    PubMed

    Oulmaati, A; Hays, S; Mory-Thomas, N; Bretones, P; Bensaid, M; Jordan, I; Bonfils, M; Godbert, I; Picaud, J-C

    2012-04-01

    The clinical presentation of adrenal hemorrhage varies, depending on the extent of hemorrhage as well as the amount of adrenal cortex involved by the hemorrhage. We report here a case of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by late onset of neonatal jaundice. This adrenal hemorrhage most probably resulted from shoulder dystocia. The aim of this work was to focus on the fact that jaundice can be caused by adrenal hemorrhage and to emphasize the crucial importance of abdominal ultrasound in cases of persistent jaundice.

  13. [Whole-blood transfusion for hemorrhagic shock resuscitation: two cases in Djibouti].

    PubMed

    Cordier, P Y; Eve, O; Dehan, C; Topin, F; Menguy, P; Bertani, A; Massoure, P L; Kaiser, E

    2012-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock requires early aggressive treatment, including transfusion of packed red blood cells and hemostatic resuscitation. In austere environments, when component therapy is not available, warm fresh whole-blood transfusion is a convenient treatment. It provides red blood cells, clotting factors, and functional platelets. Therefore it is commonly used in military practice to treat hemorrhagic shock in combat casualties. At Bouffard Hospital Center in Djibouti, the supply of packed red blood cells is limited, and apheresis platelets are unavailable. We used whole blood transfusion in two civilian patients with life-threatening non-traumatic hemorrhages. One had massive bleeding caused by disseminated intravascular coagulation due to septic shock; the second was a 39 year-old pregnant woman with uterine rupture. In both cases, whole blood transfusion (twelve and ten 500 mL bags respectively), combined with etiological treatment, enabled coagulopathy correction, hemorrhage control, and satisfactory recovery.

  14. [Two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia with Bacillus cereus bacteremia resulting in fatal intracranial hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, H; Moriyama, Y; Tatekawa, T; Tominaga, N; Teshima, H; Hiraoka, A; Masaoka, T; Yoshinaga, T

    1993-12-01

    This manuscript reports Bacillus cereus sepsis in two cases with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) who suffered complications of fatal intracranial hemorrhage during remission induction therapy. The first case was 43-year-old male with AML (M0) receiving first consolidation chemotherapy who developed sudden diarrhea, abdominal pain and spiking fever. Two days later, he died of intracranial hemorrhage. The second case was 15-year-old male with AML (M5b) who was receiving first induction chemotherapy. He developed headache and vomiting following spiking fever and diarrhea. He died of subarachnoid hemorrhage the next day. In both cases, Bacillus cereus was isolated from blood culture. Fatal intracranial hemorrhage due to severe bleeding tendency caused rapid to death in both cases. These bleeding tendencies might have been induced by B. cereus sepsis. In addition, we should not overlook B. cereus as contamination, but rather consider it as a potential pathogen, when isolated from blood culture.

  15. [Application of antihelicobacter therapy in patients, suffering pyloroduodenal zone ulcers, complicated by hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Iaroshenko, K O

    2012-02-01

    There were examined 113 patients, suffering pyloroduodenal zone ulcers, complicated by an acute hemorrhage. H. pylori was revealed in 108 (96%) patients. To escape a false-negative results a serological method was applied, which was used to determine a content of IgG antibodies to H. pylori with the help of diagnostic panel GastroPanel (Biohit PLc firm, Finland). The H. pylori presence in patients must be considered as a risk factor for the early recurrent hemorrhage occurrence. A timely conducted examination, determination of H. pylori and timely prescription of antihelicobacter therapy promote the improvement of the treatment results in patients, suffering gastroduodenal ulcers, complicated by an acute hemorrhage due to reduction of the occurrence rate of early recurrence of hemorrhage.

  16. MR-angiography allows defining severity grades of cerebral vasospasm in an experimental double blood injection subarachnoid hemorrhage model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Malinova, Vesna; Psychogios, Marios N.; Tsogkas, Ioannis; Koennecke, Birte; Bleuel, Kim; Iliev, Bogdan; Rohde, Veit; Mielke, Dorothee

    2017-01-01

    Objective Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been used for the detection of cerebral vasospasm (VSP) related infarction in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (eSAH) in rats. Conventional angiography is generally used to visualize VSP, which is an invasive technique with a possible increase in morbidity and mortality. In this study we evaluated the validity of MR-angiography (MRA) in detecting VSP and its feasibility to define VSP severity grades after eSAH in rats. Methods SAH was induced using the double-hemorrhage model in 12 rats. In two rats, saline solution was injected instead of blood (sham group). MR was performed on day 1, 2 and on day 5. T1-, T2-, T2*-weighted and time-of-flight MR sequences were applied, which were analyzed by two blinded neuroradiologists. Vessel narrowing of 25–50% was defined as mild, 50–75% as moderate and >75% as severe VSP. Results We performed a total of 34 MRAs in 14 rats. In 14 rats, MRA was performed on day 2 and day 5. In six rats MRA was additionally performed on day1 before the blood injection. A good visualization of cerebral vessels was possible in all cases. No VSP was seen in the sham group neither on day 2 nor on day 5. We found vasospasm on day 2 in 7 of the 14 rats (50%) whereas all 7 rats had mild and one rat had additionally moderate and severe vasospasm in one vessel, respectively. On day 5 we found vasospasm in 8 of the 14 rats (60%) whereas 4 rats had severe vasospasm, 1 rat had moderate vasospasm and 3 rats demonstrated mild vasospasm. In 4 of the 14 rats (30%) an ischemic lesion was detected on day 5. Three of these rats had severe vasospasm and one rat had mild vasospasm. Severe vasospasm on day 5 was statistically significant correlated with the occurrence of ischemic lesions (Fisher’s Exact test, OR 19.5, p = 0.03). Conclusions MRA is a noninvasive diagnostic tool, which allows a good visualization of the cerebral vasculature and provides reproducible results concerning the detection of VSP and the

  17. Spontaneous bilateral adrenal hemorrhage following cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dahan, Meryl; Lim, Chetana; Salloum, Chady

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative bilateral adrenal hemorrhage is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. This diagnosis is often missed because the symptoms and laboratory results are usually nonspecific. We report a case of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage associated with acute primary adrenal insufficiency following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The knowledge of this uncommon complication following any abdominal surgery allows timey diagnosis and rapid treatment. PMID:27275469

  18. Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage from Adrenal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez Valverde, F.M. Balsalobre, M.; Torregrosa, N.; Molto, M.; Gomez Ramos, M.J.; Vazquez Rojas, J.L.

    2007-04-15

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage is a very rare but serious disorder of the adrenal gland that can require emergent treatment. We report on a 42-year-old man who underwent selective angiography for diagnosis and treatment of retroperitoneal hemorrhage from small adrenal artery aneurysm. This case gives further details about the value of transluminal artery embolization in the management of visceral aneurysm rupture.

  19. Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage caused by superwarfarin poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shu-Lei; Li, Peng; Ji, Ming; Zong, Ye; Zhang, Shu-Tian

    2010-01-01

    Superwarfarins are a class of rodenticides. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a fatal complication of superwarfarin poisoning, requiring immediate treatment. Here, we report a 55-year-old woman with tardive upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage caused by superwarfarin poisoning after endoscopic cold mucosal biopsy. PMID:20355251

  20. Spontaneous bilateral adrenal hemorrhage following cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Meryl; Lim, Chetana; Salloum, Chady; Azoulay, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative bilateral adrenal hemorrhage is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. This diagnosis is often missed because the symptoms and laboratory results are usually nonspecific. We report a case of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage associated with acute primary adrenal insufficiency following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The knowledge of this uncommon complication following any abdominal surgery allows timey diagnosis and rapid treatment.

  1. Communicating hydrocephalus accompanied by arachnoid cyst in aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Young; Cha, Seung Heon; Cho, Won Ho; Ko, Jun Kyeung

    2013-12-01

    The authors describe a case of communicating hydrocephalus accompanied by an arachnoid cyst in an aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A 69-year-old female was referred to our clinic due to the sudden onset of a headache. A head computed tomography scan demonstrated an arachnoid cyst in the right middle fossa with a mass effect and diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage. Digital subtraction angiography then revealed a left internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysm. The neck of the aneurysm was clipped successfully and the post-operative period was uneventful. However, two months after discharge, the patient reported that her mental status had declined over previous weeks. A cranial computed tomography scan revealed an interval increase in the size of the ventricle and arachnoid cyst causing a midline shift. Simultaneous navigation guided ventriculoperitoneal shunt and cystoperitoneal shunt placement resulted in remarkable radiological and clinical improvements.

  2. [Alveolar hemorrhage associated with intestinal inflammatory disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Rabec, C; Barcat, J; Rey, D

    2003-06-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is characterized by diffuse bleeding into alveolar spaces. Three histopathological patterns may be seen: 1) pulmonary capillaritis due to immunological aggression to the membrane, 2) diffuse alveolar damage within the context of acute respiratory distress syndrome, and 3) and "bland" DAH without alveolar or capillary damage. In the first two groups, pulmonary damage usually occurs within the context of a systemic disease. In the last, injury is usually found only in the lung, an entity called pulmonary hemosiderosis. We present a case of DAH with neither capillaritis nor diffuse alveolar damage in association with inflammatory bowel disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis. The case is interesting both because the association has not yet been described in the literature and because the presence of alveolar bleeding without evident tissue damage within the context of known autoimmune diseases may extend the field to include a new pathophysiological mechanism of pulmonary hemorrhage.

  3. Recent advances in research on Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Mirazimi, Ali; Köksal, Iftihar; Estrada-Pena, Augustin; Feldmann, Heinz

    2015-03-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an expanding tick-borne hemorrhagic disease with increasing human and animal health impact. Immense knowledge was gained over the past 10 years mainly due to advances in molecular biology, but also driven by an increased global interest in CCHFV as an emerging/re-emerging zoonotic pathogen. In the present article, we discuss the advances in research with focus on CCHF ecology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, prophylaxis and treatment. Despite tremendous achievements, future activities have to concentrate on the development of vaccines and antivirals/therapeutics to combat CCHF. Vector studies need to continue for better public and animal health preparedness and response. We conclude with a roadmap for future research priorities.

  4. Thrombo-hemorrhagic deaths in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Lo Coco, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has become the most curable form of acute myeloid leukemia after the advent of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). However, early deaths (ED) mostly due to the disease-associated coagulopathy remain the major cause of treatment failure. In particular, hemorrhagic events account for 40-65% of ED and several prognostic factors have been identified for such hemorrhagic deaths, including poor performance status, high white blood cell (WBC) count and coagulopathy. Occurrence of thrombosis during treatment with ATRA may be associated with differentiation syndrome (DS) or represent an isolated event. Some prognostic factors have been reported to be associated with thrombosis, including increased WBC or aberrant immunophenotype of leukemic promyelocytes. Aim of this review is to report the incidence, severity, possible pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of thrombo-haemorrhagic deaths in APL.

  5. Neck and scleral hemorrhage in drowning.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Russell T; Jentzen, Jeffrey M

    2011-03-01

    The determination of the cause and manner of death for a body recovered from the water can be difficult because of a lack of autopsy findings specific for drowning. This case report describes a 30-year-old man found submerged at the bottom of a hotel pool. An autopsy revealed scleral hemorrhages and fascial hemorrhages of multiple muscles of the anterior and posterior neck bilaterally. No evidence of traumatic injury was on the surface of the body. An investigation by law enforcement found no evidence of foul play. The occurrence of petechial and neck hemorrhage in a body recovered from the water is controversial, and a review of this literature will be given. We suggest that fascial hemorrhages of the muscles of the neck, as well as cephalic hemorrhages, can be explained by drowning-related elevated central venous pressure that is communicated to the head through the valveless veins of the neck.

  6. Screening for hypopituitarism in 509 patients with traumatic brain injury or subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kopczak, Anna; Kilimann, Ingo; von Rosen, Friedrich; Krewer, Carmen; Schneider, Harald Jörn; Stalla, Günter Karl; Schneider, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    We performed a screening on patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) to determine the prevalence of post-traumatic hypopituitarism in neurorehabilitation in a cross-sectional, observational single-center study. In addition, the therapeutic consequences of our screening were analyzed retrospectively. From February 2006 to August 2009, patients between 18 and 65 years (n=509) with the diagnosis of TBI (n=340) or SAH (n=169) were screened within two weeks of admittance to neurorehabilitation as clinical routine. Blood was drawn to determine fasting cortisol, free thyroxine (fT4), prolactin, testosterone or estradiol, and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). Patients with abnormalities in the screening or clinical signs of hypopituitarism received further stimulation tests: growth hormone releasing hormone -L-arginine-test and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-test (n=36); ACTH-test alone (n=26); or insulin tolerance test (n=56). In our screening of 509 patients, 28.5% showed lowered values in at least one hormone of the hypothalamus-pituitary axis and 4.5% in two or more axes. The most common disturbance was a decrease of testosterone in 40.7% of all men (in the following 13/131 men were given substitution therapy). Low fT4 was detected in 5.9% (n=3 were given substitution therapy). Low IGF-I was detected in 5.8%, low cortisol in 1.4%, and low prolactin in 0.2%; none were given substitution therapy. Further stimulation tests revealed growth hormone deficiency in 20.7% (n=19/92) and hypocortisolism in 23.7% (n=28/118). Laboratory values possibly indicating hypopituitarism (33%) were common but did not always implicate post-traumatic hypopituitarism. Laboratory values possibly indicating hypopituitarism were common in our screening but most patients were clinically not diagnosed as pituitary insufficient and did not receive hormone replacement therapy. A routine screening of all patients in neurorehabilitation without considering

  7. Mycotic brain aneurysm and cerebral hemorrhagic stroke: a pediatric case report.

    PubMed

    Flor-de-Lima, Filipa; Lisboa, Lurdes; Sarmento, António; Almeida, Jorge; Mota, Teresa

    2013-09-01

    Endocarditis due to Abiotrophia spp. is rare and often associated with negative blood cultures, infection relapse, and high rates of treatment failure and mortality (Lainscak et al., J Heart Valve Dis 14(1):33-36, 2005). The authors describe a case of an adolescent with cerebral hemorrhagic stroke due to mycotic brain aneurysm rupture.

  8. Clinical Features and Prognosis of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss Secondary to Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Woo; Park, Yoon Ah; Park, Sang Man; Kong, Tae Hoon; Park, Sang Yoo; Bong, Jeong Pyo; Park, Dong-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives A number of etiologies of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) have been proposed, including viral infection, vascular disturbance, and immune-mediated mechanisms. Intralabyrinthine hemorrhage (ILH) as a cause of SSNHL is extremely rare, and there have been no studies defining the characteristics of hearing impairment and prognosis in patients with ISSNHL due to ILH. This study aimed to investigate the difference in impaired hearing patterns and prognosis for hearing recovery between patients with ISSNHL due to ILH confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and sex- and age-matched patients with ISSNHL due to causes other than ILH. Subjects and Methods We compared the results of audiometry and MRI in 12 patients who had ILH on MRI (hemorrhage group) and in 23 sex- and age-matched controls without abnormal findings related to their hearing loss on MRI (non-hemorrhage group). Initial hearing impairment, progression, and recovery of hearing loss were compared between the two groups. Results A majority of patients (92%) in the hemorrhage group complained of dizziness. Initial hearing impairment was more frequent in the hemorrhage group than in the non-hemorrhage group (94.09±35.9 vs. 66.66±30.1, p-value=0.036). The final recovery threshold in the hemorrhage group was worse (78.19±46.26 vs. 37.17±31.96, p-value=0.014) than that in the non-hemorrhage group. In the hemorrhage group, hearing recovery seemed to occur less often at high frequencies (2,000, 4,000, and 8,000 Hz) than at low frequencies (250, 500, and 1,000 Hz). Conclusions The presence of ILH was associated with poor hearing prognosis and the occurrence of vertigo. The abrupt onset of hearing loss associated with vertigo and the presence of hyperresonance on fat-suppressed T1-weighted MRI images of labyrinthic fluid strongly suggests acute intralabyrinthine hemorrhage, and is predictive of considerable hearing impairment and poor prognosis. PMID:27144231

  9. Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity in hemispheric intraparenchymal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Billy; Pollock, Jeffrey A; Hinson, Holly E

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH) is a hyperadrenergic syndrome that may follow acute brain injury characterized by episodic, hyperadrenergic alterations in vital signs. Identifying commonality in lesion localization in patients with PSH is challenging, but intraparenchymal hemorrhage (IPH) represents a focal injury that might provide insight. We describe a series of patients with IPH that developed PSH, and review the literature. Methods Patients with IPH who developed PSH were identified from OHSU hospital records. A literature review was conducted to identify similar cases through PUBMED, OVID, and Google Scholar. Results Three cases meeting criteria for PSH were identified. Hemorrhage volume ranged from 70 to 128 mL, and intracranial hemorrhage score ranged from 2 to 3. The laterality of the hemorrhage and significant volume of hemorrhage was similar in each of the patients, specifically all hemorrhages were large, subcortical, and right-sided. A literature search identified six additional cases, half of whom reported a right hemisphere hemorrhage and the majority also had subcortical localization. Conclusions Our literature review identified six cases of IPH associated with PSH with five cases having subcortical lesion locations, echoing the areas of disruption in our three cases. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesize that injuries along the pathway from the insular cortex to downstream sympathetic centers may remove tonic inhibition leading to unchecked sympathetic outflow. Prospective investigations of lesion location in patients with IPH and PSH are warranted to test this hypothesis, especially with advanced neuroimaging techniques. PMID:24904923

  10. Airbag-Associated Severe Blunt Eye Injury Causes Choroidal Rupture and Retinal Hemorrhage: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shih Hao; Lim, Chen Chee; Teng, Yu Ti

    2017-01-01

    A case of choroidal rupture caused by airbag-associated blunt eye trauma and complicated with massive subretinal hemorrhage and vitreous hemorrhage that was successfully treated with intravitreal injection of expansile gas and bevacizumab is presented. A 53-year-old man suffered from loss of vision in his right eye due to blunt eye trauma by a safety airbag after a traffic accident. On initial examination, the patient had no light perception in his right eye. Dilated ophthalmoscopy revealed massive subretinal hemorrhage with macular invasion and faint vitreous hemorrhage. We performed intravitreal injection of pure sulfur hexafluoride twice for displacement, after which visual acuity improved to 0.03. For persistent subretinal hemorrhage and suspicion of choroidal neovascularization (CNV), intravitreal bevacizumab (1.25 mg/0.05 mL) injection was administered. After 3 weeks, the visual acuity of his right eye recovered to 0.4. For early-stage choroidal rupture-induced subretinal hemorrhage and complications of suspected CNV, intravitreal injection of expandable gas and intraocular injection of antiangiogenesis drugs seem to be an effective treatment. PMID:28203191

  11. Imaging of Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Carette, Marie-France Nedelcu, Cosmina; Tassart, Marc; Grange, Jean-Didier; Wislez, Marie; Khalil, Antoine

    2009-07-15

    This pictorial review is based on our experience of the follow-up of 120 patients at our multidisciplinary center for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or HHT is a multiorgan autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance, characterized by epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasis, and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The research on gene mutations is fundamental and family screening by clinical examination, chest X-ray, research of pulmonary shunting, and abdominal color Doppler sonography is absolutely necessary. The angioarchitecture of pulmonary AVMs can be studied by unenhanced multidetector computed tomography; however, all other explorations of liver, digestive bowels, or brain require administration of contrast media. Magnetic resonance angiography is helpful for central nervous system screening, in particular for the spinal cord, but also for pulmonary, hepatic, and pelvic AVMs. Knowledge of the multiorgan involvement of HHT, mechanism of complications, and radiologic findings is fundamental for the correct management of these patients.

  12. Trans sodium crocetinate for hemorrhagic shock: effect of time delay in initiating therapy.

    PubMed

    Giassi, Lisa J; Poynter, A Kennon; Gainer, John L

    2002-12-01

    A new drug, trans sodium crocetinate (TSC), has been suggested for use in resuscitation after trauma. TSC has been shown to increase survival in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock. It also results in an increase in blood pressure and a decrease in plasma lactate levels when given immediately after hemorrhage. TSC increases whole-body oxygen consumption rates, and it is thought that its physiological effects are due to the increased oxygen availability. In fact, TSC therapy and 100% oxygen therapy show similar results when used in the same rat hemorrhage model. It has been suggested, however, that 100% oxygen therapy is effective only if begun immediately after hemorrhage. Such a window of opportunity has been said to exist for other resuscitation methods; thus, the current study is to determine if this is true for TSC. In one series of experiments, rats were bled 60% of their blood volumes and given an injection of TSC (or saline) 20 min after the hemorrhage ended. The injection was then repeated four times, spaced 10 min apart. Thirty minutes after the final injection, the animals were infused with normal saline. TSC again restored blood pressure and other parameters, but repeated dosing was necessary. In addition, this therapy prevented an increase in liver enzymes (transaminases) as measured 24 h after hemorrhage. In a second study, rats were bled 60% of their blood volumes, followed by a second bleeding (an additional 10%) done 10 min later. No subsequent fluid was infused in this group. The majority of the animals treated with TSC after the second hemorrhage survived, whereas the controls did not. These data suggest that TSC is effective when given after a delay. The dosing regimen must be different, however, presumably because of the blood acidosis that develops after hemorrhage. The results also suggest that TSC may be protective against secondary liver damage resulting from trauma.

  13. [Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fever viruses: update on filoviruses].

    PubMed

    Leroy, E; Baize, S; Gonzalez, J P

    2011-04-01

    The Ebola and Marburg viruses are the sole members of the Filoviridae family of viruses. They are characterized by a long filamentous form that is unique in the viral world. Filoviruses are among the most virulent pathogens currently known to infect humans. They cause fulminating disease characterized by acute fever followed by generalized hemorrhagic syndrome that is associated with 90% mortality in the most severe forms. Epidemic outbreaks of Marburg and Ebola viruses have taken a heavy toll on human life in Central Africa and devastated large ape populations in Gabon and Republic of Congo. Since their discovery in 1967 (Marburg) and 1976 (Ebola), more than 2,300 cases and 1,670 deaths have been reported. These numbers pale in comparison with the burden caused by malnutrition or other infectious disease scourges in Africa such as malaria, cholera, AIDS, dengue or tuberculosis. However, due to their extremely high lethality, association with multifocal hemorrhaging and specificity to the African continent, these hemorrhagic fever viruses have given rise to great interest on the part not only of the international scientific community but also of the general public because of their perceived potential as biological weapons. Much research has been performed on these viruses and major progress has been made in knowledge of their ecology, epidemiology and physiopathology and in development of vaccine candidates and therapeutic schemes. The purpose of this review is to present the main developments in these particular fields in the last decade.

  14. Circulatory contributors to the phenotype in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Shovlin, Claire L.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is mechanistically and therapeutically challenging, not only because of the molecular and cellular perturbations that generate vascular abnormalities, but also the modifications to circulatory physiology that result, and are likely to exacerbate vascular injury. First, most HHT patients have visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Significant visceral AVMs reduce the systemic vascular resistance: supra-normal cardiac outputs are required to maintain arterial blood pressure, and may result in significant pulmonary venous hypertension. Secondly, bleeding from nasal and gastrointestinal telangiectasia leads to iron losses of such magnitude that in most cases, diet is insufficient to meet the ‘hemorrhage adjusted iron requirement.’ Resultant iron deficiency restricts erythropoiesis, leading to anemia and further increases in cardiac output. Low iron levels are also associated with venous and arterial thromboses, elevated Factor VIII, and increased platelet aggregation to circulating 5HT (serotonin). Third, recent data highlight that reduced oxygenation of blood due to pulmonary AVMs results in a graded erythrocytotic response to maintain arterial oxygen content, and higher stroke volumes and/or heart rates to maintain oxygen delivery. Finally, HHT-independent factors such as diet, pregnancy, sepsis, and other intercurrent illnesses also influence vascular structures, hemorrhage, and iron handling in HHT patients. These considerations emphasize the complexity of mechanisms that impact on vascular structures in HHT, and also offer opportunities for targeted therapeutic approaches. PMID:25914716

  15. [The efficacy of treating patients with intraocular hemorrhages with emoxypin].

    PubMed

    Mokhammad, I; Cherkasov, I S

    1990-01-01

    Emoxipin, a home-made preparation approved by the Pharmacological Committee for clinical usage in 1986, is a retinal protector. Its usage is indicated for treatment of chorioretinitis, diabetic retinopathy, thrombosis of retinal vessels as well as to protects the retina from a damaging action of light of high intensity. In order to study therapeutic effectiveness of emoxipin in intraocular hemorrhages of different genesis, the preparation was used subconjunctivally, 0.5 ml of a 1% solution daily for 10-15 days. Emoxipin was used in 29 patients (29 eyes) with intraocular hemorrhages, of them, due to contusion of the eye--in 19, hypertonic disease--in 6, thrombosis of the central retinal vein--in 2, after intraocular operations--in 2 patients. As a result of the treatment, partial or almost total resolution of hemorrhages and a rise of visual acuity of different degree were recorded in all patients. Before treatment, visual acuity was from light perception to 0.04 in 26 eyes, from 0.09 to 0.3 in 3 eyes. After treatment, it rose to 0.1-0.2 in 12 eyes, to 0.3-1.0--in 17 eyes.

  16. Antiviral treatment of Argentine hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Enria, D A; Maiztegui, J I

    1994-01-01

    Argentine hemorrhagic fever is a systemic viral disease caused by Junin virus, with a mortality of 15-30% in untreated individuals. Current specific therapy is highly effective in reducing mortality, and consists of the early administration of immune plasma in defined doses of specific neutralizing antibodies per kg of body weight. However, several reasons suggest the need to investigate alternative therapies. Ribavirin, a broad spectrum antiviral agent, is effective in the treatment of other viral hemorrhagic fevers, and the studies done with Junin virus infections to date indicate that this drug may also have a beneficial effect in Argentine hemorrhagic fever.

  17. Meckel's cave meningiomas with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, G A; Herz, D A; Leeds, N; Strully, K

    1975-06-01

    Two patients with Meckel's Cave meningiomas were initially hospitalized as a result of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Four-vessel angiography was necessary to exclude other causes of bleeding while demonstrating these lesions. Apoplectic presentation in both cases led to early diagnosis and successful surgical therapy. A review of the literature reveals subarachnoid hemorrhage to be a rarity in association with meningiomas. The two patients currently reported are believed to be the only examples on record of hemorrhagic meningiomas arising from the region of Meckel's Cave.

  18. Acute gastric changes after intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Smelley, Christopher; Specian, Robert D; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2005-03-21

    Severe intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) produces gastric pathology in about 30% of the patient population, even after the standard treatment of H2 receptor blockers or proton pump inhibitors. This study was undertaken to establish a rat model of ICH-induced gastric ulcer. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-350 g) were divided into two hemorrhage groups and a sham control group. ICH was produced either by injection of 100 microl of autologous arterial blood or by injection of 4 microl saline containing 0.6 unit of bacterial collagenase VII into the right basal ganglia. Rats were sacrificed at 24, 48, 72 h, and 7 days after ICH to harvest brains and stomachs. Greater degrees of hemorrhage and brain edema were observed in collagenase-induced ICH. Motor behavior decreased significantly after 24 h in both models. The incidence of acute ulceration with destruction of the forestomach epithelium was extremely low at 8.7% in the collagenase injection model and 4.8% in the blood injection rats. Small, pinpoint hemorrhages (petechiae) were noticed in 38% of rats after blood injection and 22% after collagenase injection, in the glandular portion of the gastric mucosa with penetration of red blood cells and inflammatory cells into the gastric mucosa. Enhanced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) expressions were observed in gastric tissues after ICH with more intense staining occurring at 24 and 48 h. Due to the low incidence of ulceration, ICH-induced gastric ulceration in rodents may not appropriate for evaluating the potential human risk of gastric ulceration after ICH.

  19. Idiopathic Bilateral Adrenal Hemorrhage in a 63-Year-Old Male: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bodukam, Vijay Kumar; Thakur, Kshitij; Singh, Amandeep; Jenkins, Donald; Bahl, Jaya

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal hemorrhage is a largely uncommon condition typically caused by a number of factors including infection, MI, CHF, anticoagulants, trauma, surgery, and antiphospholipid syndrome. Yet, idiopathic bilateral hemorrhage is rare. The authors present a case of a 63-year-old male who presented with abdominal pain that was eventually diagnosed as bilateral adrenal hemorrhages due to an unknown origin. Abdominal CT revealed normal adrenal glands without enlargement, but an MRI displayed enlargement due to hemorrhage in both adrenals. There was no known cause; the patient had not suffered from an acute infection and was not on anticoagulants, and the patient's history did not reveal any of the other known causative factors. The case underscores the importance of keeping bilateral adrenal hemorrhages on the list of differentials even when a cause is not immediately clear. It also raises the question of whether CT is the most sensitive test in the diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage and whether the diagnostic approach should place greater weight on MRI. The case highlights the need for prompt therapy with steroids once bilateral hemorrhage is suspected to avert the development or progression of adrenal insufficiency. PMID:25973281

  20. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage in aluminum phosphide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Hugar, Basappa S; Praveen, Shivaramareddy; Hosahally, Jayanth S; Kainoor, Sunilkumar; Shetty, Akshith Raj S

    2015-01-01

    Poisoning, both accidental and intentional, is a significant contributor to the mortality and morbidity throughout the world. The commonest pesticide poisoning is organophosphates followed by phosphides. Ingestion of phosphides can induce severe gastrointestinal irritation leading to hemorrhage and ulcerations. Gastrointestinal hemorrhages and ulcerations beyond the duodenum have not been reported in the literature. Here, we report a case of severe hemorrhages and ulcerations in stomach, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum observed in a 45-year-old male who had consumed five tablets of Celphos(®) (each 3 g with 56% aluminum phosphide and 44% Ammonium carbonate) to commit suicide. He started vomiting after consumption, and the vomitus was blood-tinged. Once the treatment was instituted, he was stable for a day and thereafter his condition gradually deteriorated. He died on the 4th day of hospitalization, and autopsy revealed features of multiorgan failure and extensive gastrointestinal hemorrhages.

  1. Clinical aspects of Marburg hemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Mehedi, Masfique; Groseth, Allison; Feldmann, Heinz; Ebihara, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Marburg virus belongs to the genus Marburgvirus in the family Filoviridae and causes a severe hemorrhagic fever, known as Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF), in both humans and nonhuman primates. Similar to the more widely known Ebola hemorrhagic fever, MHF is characterized by systemic viral replication, immunosuppression and abnormal inflammatory responses. These pathological features of the disease contribute to a number of systemic dysfunctions including hemorrhages, edema, coagulation abnormalities and, ultimately, multiorgan failure and shock, often resulting in death. A detailed understanding of the pathological processes that lead to this devastating disease remains elusive, a fact that contributes to the lack of licensed vaccines or effective therapeutics. This article will review the clinical aspects of MHF and discuss the pathogenesis and possible options for diagnosis, treatment and prevention. PMID:22046196

  2. Peribulbar anesthesia causing bilateral orbital hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Garft, Kyla; Burt, Peter; Burt, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral orbital hemorrhage as a complication of peribulbar anesthesia in a 78 year old man. Initially, unilateral orbital hemorrhage occurred but quickly spread to the contralateral side. Neuroophthalmological assessment revealed a proptosed tense globe with normal retinovascular findings. Visual acuity was adversely affected and this was conservatively managed with no lasting ophthalmic sequela. This patient’s case was reported as it illustrates an unusual complication of bilateral spread of orbital hemorrhage secondary to peribulbar anesthesia. It highlights how early ophthalmic assessment can ensure a good visual outcome in the setting of appropriate ophthalmic monitoring. The mechanisms of orbital hemorrhage spread and appropriate management options are discussed. PMID:27013899

  3. Splenic Involvement in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kota; Kato, Shunsuke; Nagano, Hiroto; Ohtsukasa, Shunro; Kawachi, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 33-year-old man who presented with prolonged epigastric pain was referred to our hospital. He had experienced recurrent epistaxis and had a family history of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed splenomegaly and a 9 cm hypervascular mass in his spleen. Computed tomography also showed a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation and heterogeneous enhancement of the liver parenchyma, suggesting the presence of arteriosystemic shunts and telangiectases. Based on these findings, the patient was definitely diagnosed with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia according to Curaçao criteria. He underwent splenectomy, and his symptoms disappeared after surgery. Pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed that the hypervascular lesion of the spleen was not a tumor but was composed of abnormal vessels associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Symptomatic splenic involvement may be a rare manifestation of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia but can be revealed by imaging modalities. PMID:27807449

  4. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... telangiectases (the singular is telangiectasia). Without the normal buffer of the capillaries, the blood moves from the ... Bailly S, Plauchu H. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: from molecular biology to patient care. J Thromb Haemost. 2010 Jul; ...

  5. Submacular hemorrhage secondary to congenital toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ana Luiza Fontes de Azevedo; Martins, Thiago Gonçalves dos Santos; Moncada, Francisco Javier Solano; Motta, Mário Martins dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report the case of a patient with congenital toxoplasmosis and submacular hemorrhage caused by a neovascular membrane who underwent an intravitreal injection of C3F8 and bevacizumab, and had a good visual recovery. PMID:24728255

  6. Fatal intracerebral hemorrhage during dental treatment.

    PubMed

    Massalha, R; Valdman, S; Farkash, P; Merkin, L; Herishanu, Y

    1996-09-01

    Although chronic arterial hypertension is the leading cause of intracranial hemorrhage, an abrupt rise in systemic arterial pressure in normotensive people may sometimes induce a hemorrhagic stroke. Dental treatment is rarely associated with such an event. We report here on two middle-aged women, apparently healthy, who suffered from a fatal intracerebral hemorrhage following a dental treatment. On admission, high levels of arterial hypertension were found. It seems that trigeminal manipulation during dental treatment as well as increased serum levels of induced epinephrine mainly by stress and pain, and the small amounts absorbed from the site of local anesthesia might produce abrupt elevation of blood pressure, subsequent increase in cerebral blood flow and severe, even fatal intracerebral hemorrhage. The addition of catecholamines to local anesthetics should be considered. We recommend the use of benzodiazepin as a premedication drug to reduce stress during dental treatment.

  7. Splenic Involvement in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, Susumu; Sato, Kota; Kato, Shunsuke; Nagano, Hiroto; Ohtsukasa, Shunro; Kawachi, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 33-year-old man who presented with prolonged epigastric pain was referred to our hospital. He had experienced recurrent epistaxis and had a family history of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed splenomegaly and a 9 cm hypervascular mass in his spleen. Computed tomography also showed a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation and heterogeneous enhancement of the liver parenchyma, suggesting the presence of arteriosystemic shunts and telangiectases. Based on these findings, the patient was definitely diagnosed with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia according to Curaçao criteria. He underwent splenectomy, and his symptoms disappeared after surgery. Pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed that the hypervascular lesion of the spleen was not a tumor but was composed of abnormal vessels associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Symptomatic splenic involvement may be a rare manifestation of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia but can be revealed by imaging modalities.

  8. Hemorrhagic sarcoid pleural effusion: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Onkar; Nair, Vidya; Talwar, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of pleura by sarcoidosis remains a rare manifestation and varies from pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pleural thickening, hydropneumothorax, trapped lung, hemothorax, or chylothorax. Sarcoid pleural effusions presenting as hemorrhagic effusions are even more rare. We report a case of active pulmonary sarcoidosis presenting as hemorrhagic pleural effusion requiring tissue diagnosis to rule out malignancy. The rarity of the presentation prompted us to report this case. PMID:27625449

  9. Pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from roller coaster.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ming; Tian, Qing; Shen, Hong

    2011-03-01

    Roller coasters are probably one of the more popular rides at amusement parks around the world, and there are few reported injuries. We report a case of symmetric diffuse upper lobe hemorrhage resulting from roller coaster in a previously healthy woman. The clinical course, management, and etiology of her case are discussed; and the literature is reviewed. To our knowledge, pulmonary hemorrhage in this setting has not yet been described.

  10. Reperfusion Hemorrhage Following Superior Mesenteric Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Michael; McSweeney, Sean; Fulton, Gregory; Buckley, John; Maher, Michael Guiney, Michael

    2008-07-15

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement is now an established treatment option for chronic mesenteric ischemia and is associated with low mortality and morbidity rates. We present a case of reperfusion hemorrhage complicating endovascular repair of superior mesenteric artery stenosis. Although a recognized complication following repair of carotid stenosis, hemorrhage has not previously been reported following mesenteric endovascular reperfusion. We describe both spontaneous cessation of bleeding and treatment with coil embolization.

  11. Spontaneous Splenic Hemorrhage in the Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Tiboni, Sonia; Abdulmajid, Umar; Pooboni, Suneel; Wighton, Christopher; Eradi, Balgopal; Dagash, Haitham

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous splenic hemorrhage in the newborn is a rare entity. The presentation is usually with a triad of bleeding, abdominal distension, and hemoperitoneum. Rapid diagnosis is essential as left untreated, death is inevitable. We present a case with an unusual initial presentation of a scrotal hematocele and ultrasonography suggesting an adrenal hemorrhage. At laparotomy, splenic preservation was unsuccessful, and therefore, splenectomy was performed. The child recovered well from the procedure. PMID:26788451

  12. Congenital hepatic cyst with intracystic hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Qingqiang; Zhang, Minfeng; Yang, Cheng; Cai, Wenchang; Zhao, Qian; Shen, Weifeng; Yang, Jiamei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Fast-growing congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage are rare in clinical practice. Additionally, the clinical manifestations of and laboratory and imaging findings for this condition are often nonspecific and are particularly difficult to differentiate from those of hepatobiliary cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma, thus posing great challenges for diagnosis and treatment. The 2 case reports presented here aim to analyze the diagnosis and treatment of 2 rare cases of congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage in the Chinese Han population to provide an important reference for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of this condition. Diagnoses: These 2 case reports present 2 rare cases of congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage. Case 1 involved a 31-year-old patient with a very large, fast-growing hepatic cyst with intracystic hemorrhage and elevated carbohydrate antigen 199. Case 2 involved a patient with intense, paroxysmal right upper abdominal pain; computed tomography suggested a hepatic cyst with intracystic hemorrhage and possibly hepatobiliary cystadenoma. Outcomes: Both patients underwent liver resection. Postoperative follow-up showed that for both patients, the symptoms improved, the laboratory findings returned to normal levels, and the surgical outcomes were satisfactory. Conclusion: Liver resection is an ideal treatment for patients with congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage, and especially those with fast-growing, symptomatic hepatic cysts or hepatic cysts that are difficult to differentiate from hepatobiliary cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma. PMID:27759646

  13. Vasospasm after intraventricular hemorrhage caused by arteriovenous malformation

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Wei-Lung; Tsai, Yi-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) induced vasospasm is rare in clinical practice. We report a case with vasospasm 10 days after IVH due to thalamic bleeding from an arteriovenous malformation. The vasospasm was so severe that transarterial embolization failed. Follow-up angiography could not reveal the vascular lesion and spontaneous thrombosis was considered. The discussion includes literature review and possible mechanism of such phenomenon. IVH-related vasospasm is rare but should always be kept in mind. Early detection with proper treatment provides better clinical outcome in such cases. PMID:25972942

  14. Supernova hemorrhage: obliterative hemorrhage of brain arteriovenous malformations following γ knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew D; Hetts, Steven W; Young, William L; Halbach, Van V; Dowd, Christopher F; Higashida, Randall T; English, Joey D

    2012-09-01

    Hemorrhage represents the most feared complication of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in both untreated patients and those treated with gamma knife radiosurgery. Radiosurgery does not immediately lead to obliteration of the malformation, which often does not occur until years following treatment. Post-obliteration hemorrhage is rare, occurring months to years after radiosurgery, and has been associated with residual or recurrent AVM despite prior apparent nidus elimination. Three cases are reported of delayed intracranial hemorrhage in patients with cerebral AVMs treated with radiosurgery in which no residual AVM was found on catheter angiography at the time of delayed post-treatment hemorrhage. That the pathophysiology of these hemorrhages involves progressive venous outflow occlusion is speculated and the possible mechanistic link to subsequent vascular rupture is discussed.

  15. A Case of Sudden Deafness with Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage and Sudden Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Jin; Jeong, Se Won; Lee, Jae Wook

    2015-01-01

    Sudden hearing deterioration may occur in our population, but it is difficult to explain the exact pathophysiology and the cause. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is usually useful to evaluate neural lesions such as acoustic schwannoma and hemorrhage in labyrinth. Recently some cases of SSNHL caused by intralabyrintine hemorrhage were reported by the advance of MRI. In the case of intralabyrintine hemorrhage, MRI showed a hyperintense signal in the labyrinth on the pre-contrast and contrast enhanced T1-weighted image and relatively weak intensity on T2-weighted image. The prognosis SSNHL by intralabyrintine hemorrhage is generally known to be poor. We report a case of sudden deafness with intralabyrintine hemorrhage who has a history of anticoagulant administration, with a review of literature. PMID:26771018

  16. Gastric angiodysplasia in a hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia type 2 patient.

    PubMed

    Ha, Minsu; Kim, Yoon Jae; Kwon, Kwang An; Hahm, Ki Baik; Kim, Mi-Jung; Kim, Dong Kyu; Lee, Young Jae; Oh, S Paul

    2012-04-21

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a rare autosomal-dominantly inherited disease that occurs in approximately one in 5000 to 8000 people. Clinical diagnosis of HHT is made when a person presents three of the following four criteria: family history, recurrent nosebleeds, mucocutaneous telangiectasis, and arteriovenous malformations (AVM) in the brain, lung, liver and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Although epistaxis is the most common presenting symptom, AVMs affecting the lungs, brain and GI tract provoke a more serious outcome. Heterozygous mutations in endoglin, activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ACVRL1; ALK1), and SMAD4, the genes involved in the transforming growth factor-β family signaling cascade, cause HHT. We report here the case of a 63 year-old male patient who presented melena and GI bleeding episodes, proven to be caused by bleeding from multiple gastric angiodysplasia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed multiple angiodysplasia throughout the stomach. Endoscopic argon plasma coagulation was performed to control bleeding from a gastric angiodysplasia. The patient has been admitted several times with episodes of hemoptysis and hematochezia. One year ago, the patient was hospitalized due to right-sided weakness, which was caused by left basal ganglia hemorrhage as the part of HHT presentation. In family history, the patient's mother and elder sister had died, due to intracranial hemorrhage, and his eldest son has been suffered from recurrent epistaxis for 20 years. A genetic study revealed a mutation in exon 3 of ALK1 (c.199C > T; p.Arg67Trp) in the proband and his eldest son presenting epistaxis.

  17. Thrombotic and hemorrhagic strokes complicating early therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Priest, J R; Ramsay, N K; Latchaw, R E; Lockman, L A; Hasegawa, D K; Coates, T D; Coccia, P F; Edson, J R; Nesbit, M E; Krivit, W

    1980-10-01

    Sudden cerebrovascular insults occurred during or immediately following remission induction therapy in 4 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In 3, cerebral infarction was due to thrombosis. In the fourth, an intracerebral hematoma developed representing either frank hemorrhaging or a hemorrhagic infarction. None of the patients had central nervous system leukemia or extreme leukocytosis at the time of diagnosis. Symptoms were obtundation, hemiparesis, seizures, and headache. The induction chemotherapy included L-asparaginase which causes deficiencies of antithrombin, plasminogen, fibrinogen, and factors IX and XI. These hemostatic abnormalities may explain the thromboses and bleeding observed in these children.

  18. Spontaneous Iliopsoas Muscle Hemorrhage Secondary to Ibrutinib (Imbruvica; Pharmacyclics): Brief Report.

    PubMed

    Sarcon, Anna; Botta, Gregory P; Patel, Nikunj; Saven, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Ibrutinib (Imbruvica; Pharmacyclics) is the first Food and Drug Administration-approved inhibitor of Burton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Attenuation of BTK signaling ultimately leads to inhibition of B-cell proliferation and apoptosis. After a series of clinical trials, the Food and Drug Administration approved ibrutinib in patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia in 2014 and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia in 2015. Those trials included rare grade 3+ hemorrhagic events associated with ibrutinib. Herein, we report a unique presentation of back pain due to iliopsoas muscle hemorrhage in a patient with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia after initiation of ibrutinib.

  19. Monitoring of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism Bedside in Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage – A Xenon-CT and Microdialysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Elham; Engquist, Henrik; Johnson, Ulf; Howells, Timothy; Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth; Nilsson, Pelle; Hillered, Lars; Lewén, Anders; Enblad, Per

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Although 70% of the patients show angiographic vasospasm only 30% develop symptomatic vasospasm defined as delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Early detection and management of reversible ischemia is of critical importance in patients with SAH. Using a bedside Xenon enhanced computerized tomography (Xenon-CT) scanner makes it possible to measure quantitative regional Cerebral blood flow (CBF) bedside in the neurointensive care setting and intracerebral microdialysis (MD) is a method that offers the possibility to monitor the metabolic state of the brain continuously. Here, we present results from nine SAH patients with both MD monitoring and bedside Xenon-CT measurements. CBF measurements were performed within the first 72 h following bleeding. Six out of nine patients developed DCI at a later stage. Five out of six patients who developed DCI had initial global CBF below 26 ml/100 g/min whereas one had 53 ml/100 g/min. The three patients who did not develop clinical vasospasm all had initial global CBF above 27 ml/100 g/min. High lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio was associated with lower CBF values in the area surrounding the catheter. Five out of nine patients had L/P ratio ≥25 and four of these patients had CBF ≤ 22 ml/100 g/min. These preliminary results suggest that patients with initially low global CBF on Xenon-CT may be more likely to develop DCI. Initially low global CBF was accompanied with metabolic disturbances determined by the MD. Most importantly, pathological findings on the Xenon-CT and MD could be observed before any clinical signs of DCI. Combining bedside Xenon-CT and MD was found to be useful and feasible. Further studies are needed to evaluate if DCI can be detected before any other signs of DCI to prevent progress to infarction. PMID:24917850

  20. Traumatic hemorrhagic shock: advances in fluid management.

    PubMed

    Cherkas, David

    2011-11-01

    A number of concerns have been raised regarding the advisability of the classic principles of aggressive crystalloid resuscitation in traumatic hemorrhagic shock. This issue reviews the advances that have led to a shift in the emergency department (ED) protocols in resuscitation from shock state, including recent literature regarding the new paradigm for the treatment of traumatic hemorrhagic shock, which is most generally known as damage control resuscitation (DCR). Goals and endpoints for resuscitation and a review of initial fluid choice are discussed, along with the coagulopathy of trauma and its management, how to address hemorrhagic shock in traumatic brain injury (TBI), and new pharmacologic treatment for hemorrhagic shock. The primary conclusions include the administration of tranexamic acid (TXA) for all patients with uncontrolled hemorrhage (Class I), the implementation of a massive transfusion protocol (MTP) with fixed blood product ratios (Class II), avoidance of large-volume crystalloid resuscitation (Class III), and appropriate usage of permissive hypotension (Class III). The choice of fluid for initial resuscitation has not been shown to affect outcomes in trauma (Class I).

  1. Intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Brian D.; Boorjian, Stephen A.; Ziegelmann, Matthew J.; Joyce, Daniel D.; Linder, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hemorrhagic cystitis is a challenging clinical entity with limited evidence available to guide treatment. The use of intravesical silver nitrate has been reported, though supporting literature is sparse. Here, we sought to assess outcomes of patients treated with intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis. Material and methods We identified nine patients with refractory hemorrhagic cystitis treated at our institution with intravesical silver nitrate between 2000–2015. All patients had failed previous continuous bladder irrigation with normal saline and clot evacuation. Treatment success was defined as requiring no additional therapy beyond normal saline irrigation after silver nitrate instillation prior to hospital discharge. Results Median patient age was 80 years (IQR 73, 82). Radiation was the most common etiology for hemorrhagic cystitis 89% (8/9). Two patients underwent high dose (0.1%–0.4%) silver nitrate under anesthesia, while the remaining seven were treated with doses from 0.01% to 0.1% via continuous bladder irrigation for a median of 3 days (range 2–4). All nine patients (100%) had persistent hematuria despite intravesical silver nitrate therapy, requiring additional interventions and red blood cell transfusion during the hospitalization. There were no identified complications related to intravesical silver nitrate instillation. Conclusion Although well tolerated, we found that intravesical silver nitrate was ineffective for bleeding control, suggesting a limited role for this agent in the management of patients with hemorrhagic cystitis. PMID:27635296

  2. Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Hemorrhagic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Neeraj; Pandey, Aditya S; Gemmete, Joseph J; Hua, Ya; Huang, Yining; Gu, Yuxiang; Xi, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) has evolved considerably over the last decade to now be knocking on the doors of wider clinical applications. There have been several efforts over the last decade to seek valuable and reliable application of DTI in different neurological disorders. The role of DTI in predicting outcomes in patients with brain tumors has been extensively studied and has become a fairly established clinical tool in this scenario. More recently DTI has been applied in mild traumatic brain injury to predict clinical outcomes based on DTI of the white matter tracts. The resolution of white matter fiber tractography based on DTI has improved over the years with increased magnet strength and better tractography post processing. The role of DTI in hemorrhagic stroke has been studied preliminarily in the scientific literature. There is some evidence that DTI may be efficacious in predicting outcomes of motor function in animal models of intracranial hemorrhage. Only a handful of studies of DTI have been performed in subarachnoid hemorrhage or intraventricular hemorrhage scenarios. In this manuscript we will review the evolution of DTI, the existing evidence for its role in hemorrhagic stroke and discuss possible application of this non-invasive evaluation technique of human cerebral white matter tracts in the future. PMID:26015333

  3. Anti-apoptotic and neuroprotective effects of Tetramethylpyrazine following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cheng; Liu, Xiangzhen; Liu, Wei; Shi, Huaizhang; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Chen, Huirong; Zhao, Shiguang

    2008-08-18

    This study was designed to explore the effects of Tetramethylpyrazine on cerebral vasospasm and early brain injury and its underlying mechanisms after experimental SAH in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=164) were allocated randomly to SAH+TMP, SAH+vehicle (sodium chloride), or sham-operated group. The SAH model was induced through perforating internal carotid artery. TMP (30 mg/kg) or the vehicle was injected via vena caudalis 60 min before the perforation. Mortality, neurological scores, water content of brain and cerebral vasospasm were recorded at 24 h after SAH. Apoptosis of cerebral cortex was determined by TUNEL staining; caspase-3, bax and bcl-2 by Western blotting; P53 expression by immunohistochemical staining. TMP administrated in advance improved neurological scores, ameliorated cerebral edema and cerebral vasospasm. TUNEL-positive cells were reduced significantly in TMP-treated group. P53 was not found significantly different between TMP-treated and vehicle-treated group, while P53 positive cells were markedly higher in SAH group than that in sham-operated group. Cleaved caspase-3 protein was decreased significantly in TMP-treated group, while bax, bcl-2 protein expression did not differ statistically among the three groups. In conclusion, TMP ameliorated cerebral vasospasm and early brain injury after experimental SAH in rats. The underlying mechanisms may be partly related to inhibition of caspase-3 dependent proapoptosis pathway.

  4. Right atrial myxoma as a possible cause of hemorrhagic stroke and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Sabageh, Donatus; Odujoko, Oluwole Olaniyi; Komolafe, Akinwumi Oluwole

    2012-04-01

    Right atrial myxomas are rare primary tumors of the heart. They may remain asymptomatic or eventually cause constitutional signs and symptoms. Less frequently, obstruction of the tricuspid valve occurs, resulting in exertional dyspnea, syncope, or sudden death. Neurological manifestation as initial presentation of atrial myxomas is rarely, if ever, associated with right atrial myxomas and may be secondary to cerebral infarction, cerebral hemorrhage and, more rarely subarachnoid hemorrhage. We review the case of a previously unknown, middle-aged Nigerian man who presented to hospital with severe headache and sudden loss of consciousness. A clinical diagnosis of hypertensive hemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident was made. The patient died suddenly a few hours after presentation. Post-mortem examination revealed a small intracerebral hemorrhage in the left superior temporal lobe as well as a large right atrial myxoma, a ventricular septal defect in the muscular septum, and right ventricular hypertrophy. The liver showed fatty change while the kidneys showed evidence of benign nephrosclerosis. Right atrial myxomas may, therefore, be remotely considered as a cause of intracranial hemorrhage, especially in the presence of predisposing cardiac anomalies such as a ventricular septal defect. Similarly, being a known cause of right heart failure, sudden death, and other constitutional derangements, it may contribute significantly to disease outcome. Hence, it should be given due consideration in the differential diagnosis of cerebrovascular accidents.

  5. PDGFR Inhibition Results in Pericyte Depletion and Hemorrhage into the Corpus Luteum of the Rat Ovary.

    PubMed

    Hall, Anthony P; Ashton, Susan; Horner, Judith; Wilson, Zena; Reens, Jaimini; Richmond, Graham H P; Barry, Simon T; Wedge, Steve R

    2016-01-01

    The growth plate, ovary, adrenal gland, and rodent incisor tooth are sentinel organs for antiangiogenic effects since they respond reliably, quantitatively, and sensitively to inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR). Here we report that treatment of rats with platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) inhibitors that target pericytes results in severe ovarian hemorrhage with degeneration and eventual rupture of the corpus luteum. Evaluation of the growth plate, adrenal gland, and incisor tooth that are typical target organs for antiangiogenic treatment in the rodent revealed no abnormalities. Histologically, the changes in the ovary were characterized by sinusoidal dilatation, increased vessel fragility, and hemorrhage into the corpus luteum. Immunocytochemical staining of vessels with alpha smooth muscle actin and CD31 that recognize pericytes and vascular endothelium, respectively, demonstrated that this effect was due to selective pericyte deficiency within corpora lutea. Further experiments in which rats were treated concurrently with both PDGFRβ and VEGFR inhibitors ablated the hemorrhagic response, resulting instead in corpus luteum necrosis. These changes are consistent with the notion that selective pericyte loss in the primitive capillary network resulted in increased vessel fragility and hemorrhage, whereas concomitant VEGFR inhibition resulted in vessel regression and reduced vascular perfusion that restricted development of the hemorrhagic vessels. These results also highlight the utility of the rodent ovary to respond differentially to VEGFR and PDGFR inhibitors, which may provide useful information during routine safety assessment for determining target organ toxicity.

  6. Treatment of Hemorrhagic Vocal Polyps by Pulsed Dye Laser-Assisted Laryngomicrosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Hyung Kwon; Han, Ji Hyuk; Choi, Byeong Il; Hwang, Hye Jin; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Choi, Hong-Shik

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Conventional surgical techniques of laryngomicrosurgery (LMS) on hemorrhagic vocal polyps are often difficult due to obscuration of the surgical field by inadvertent bleeding from the lesion, and there are often significant amounts of mucosal epithelium loss. Here, we introduce our surgical technique using pulsed dye laser (PDL), which can effectively resect the polyp with vocal fold mucosa preservation. Methods. Patients who were diagnosed with hemorrhagic vocal polyp and who were surgically managed using PDL from March 2013 to October 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Preoperative and postoperative clinical outcomes and surgical findings were evaluated. Results. A total of 39 patients were treated with PDL-assisted enucleation LMS. The average age was 43.7 years (range 20–73), and there were 20 males and 19 females (17 professional voice users). In all cases, the hemorrhagic polyp was successfully enucleated after application of PDL, thereby preserving the overlying epithelium. Postoperative voice outcomes were favorable with clear preservation of the vocal fold mucosal wave. Conclusion. PDL-assisted enucleation LMS for the treatment of hemorrhagic vocal polyps can be a safe and effective surgical technique. It can be considered a promising treatment option for hemorrhagic vocal polyps. PMID:26557700

  7. Intraspinal hemorrhage in spontaneous intracranial hypotension: link to superficial siderosis? Report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Schievink, Wouter I; Wasserstein, Philip; Maya, M Marcel

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension due to a spinal CSF leak has become a well-recognized cause of headaches, but such spinal CSF leaks also are found in approximately half of patients with superficial siderosis of the CNS. It has been hypothesized that friable vessels at the site of the spinal CSF leak are the likely source of chronic bleeding in these patients, but such an intraspinal hemorrhage has never been visualized. The authors report on 2 patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension and intraspinal hemorrhage, offering support for this hypothesis. A 33-year-old man and a 62-year-old woman with spontaneous intracranial hypotension were found to have a hemorrhage within the ventral spinal CSF collection and within the thecal sac, respectively. Treatment consisted of microsurgical repair of a ventral dural tear in the first patient and epidural blood patching in the second patient. The authors suggest that spontaneous intracranial hypotension should be included in the differential diagnosis of spontaneous intraspinal hemorrhage, and that the intraspinal hemorrhage can account for the finding of superficial siderosis when the CSF leak remains untreated.

  8. Free intra-abdominal hemorrhage after open-heart surgery: an unusual gastrointestinal complication.

    PubMed

    Iriz, Erkan; Ereren, Emrah; Yuksel, Osman; Kalaycioglu, Sedat

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal complications after open-heart surgery are rare. Many preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors may predispose patients to these complications or cause them. Our patient was a 64-year-old woman who underwent aortic valve replacement due to aortic stenosis. Free intra-abdominal hemorrhage occurred on the 2nd postoperative day. During exploratory laparotomy, it was determined that the hemorrhage was from a vein near the falciform ligament of the liver and from a bleeding laceration of the splenic capsule. The complication was repaired surgically. To our knowledge, intra-abdominal hemorrhage of both liver and spleen after open-heart surgery has never been reported before, even in large patient series. We report the case and present our ideas regarding the cause of the bleeding.

  9. Low-dose ribavirin potentiates the antiviral activity of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses

    PubMed Central

    Westover, Jonna B.; Sefing, Eric J.; Bailey, Kevin W.; Van Wettere, Arnaud J.; Jung, Kie-Hoon; Dagley, Ashley; Wandersee, Luci; Downs, Brittney; Smee, Donald F.; Furuta, Yousuke; Bray, Mike; Gowen, Brian B.

    2016-01-01

    Favipiravir is approved in Japan to treat novel or re-emerging influenza viruses, and is active against a broad spectrum of RNA viruses, including Ebola. Ribavirin is the only other licensed drug with activity against multiple RNA viruses. Recent studies show that ribavirin and favipiravir act synergistically to inhibit bunyavirus infections in cultured cells and laboratory mice, likely due to their different mechanisms of action. Convalescent immune globulin is the only approved treatment for Argentine hemorrhagic fever caused by the rodent-borne Junin arenavirus. We previously reported that favipiravir is highly effective in a number of small animal models of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. We now report that addition of low dose of ribavirin synergistically potentiates the activity of favipiravir against Junin virus infection of guinea pigs and another arenavirus, Pichinde virus infection of hamsters. This suggests that the efficacy of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses can be further enhanced through the addition of low-dose ribavirin. PMID:26711718

  10. Retrieval of intracranial hemorrhages in computed tomography brain images using binary coherent vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, W. Mimi Diyana W.; Fauzi, M. Faizal A.; Besar, Rosli

    2010-10-01

    We investigate the use of a new binary coherent vector approach, integrated in a proposed content-based medical retrieval (CBMIR) system, to retrieve computed tomography (CT) brain images. Five types of hemorrhages consisting of 150 plain axial CT brain images are queried from a database of 2500 normal and abnormal CT brain images. Possible combinations of shape features are portrayed as feature vectors and are evaluated based on precision-recall plots. Solidity, form factor, equivalent circular diameter (ECD), and Hu moment are proposed as identifying features of intracranial hemorrhages in CT brain images. In addition to identifying hemorrhages, the proposed approach significantly improves the CBMIR system performance. This retrieval system can be widely useful due to rapid development in computer vision and computer database management, both of which motivated this application of CBMIR.

  11. Low-dose ribavirin potentiates the antiviral activity of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Westover, Jonna B; Sefing, Eric J; Bailey, Kevin W; Van Wettere, Arnaud J; Jung, Kie-Hoon; Dagley, Ashley; Wandersee, Luci; Downs, Brittney; Smee, Donald F; Furuta, Yousuke; Bray, Mike; Gowen, Brian B

    2016-02-01

    Favipiravir is approved in Japan to treat novel or re-emerging influenza viruses, and is active against a broad spectrum of RNA viruses, including Ebola. Ribavirin is the only other licensed drug with activity against multiple RNA viruses. Recent studies show that ribavirin and favipiravir act synergistically to inhibit bunyavirus infections in cultured cells and laboratory mice, likely due to their different mechanisms of action. Convalescent immune globulin is the only approved treatment for Argentine hemorrhagic fever caused by the rodent-borne Junin arenavirus. We previously reported that favipiravir is highly effective in a number of small animal models of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. We now report that addition of low dose of ribavirin synergistically potentiates the activity of favipiravir against Junin virus infection of guinea pigs and another arenavirus, Pichinde virus infection of hamsters. This suggests that the efficacy of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses can be further enhanced through the addition of low-dose ribavirin.

  12. Radiation-induced spinal cord hemorrhage (hematomyelia).

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Thamburaj, Krishnamurthy; Vijay, Kanupriya

    2014-10-23

    Intraspinal hemorrhage is very rare and intramedullary hemorrhage, also called hematomyelia, is the rarest form of intraspinal hemorrhage, usually related to trauma. Spinal vascular malformations such intradural arteriovenous malformations are the most common cause of atraumatic hematomyelia. Other considerations include warfarin or heparin anticoagulation, bleeding disorders, spinal cord tumors. Radiation-induced hematomyelia of the cord is exceedingly rare with only one case in literature to date. We report the case of an 8 year old girl with Ewing's sarcoma of the thoracic vertebra, under radiation therapy, presenting with hematomyelia. We describe the clinical course, the findings on imaging studies and the available information in the literature. Recognition of the clinical pattern of spinal cord injury should lead clinicians to perform imaging studies to evaluate for compressive etiologies.

  13. Bullous and hemorrhagic lichen sclerosus - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Raquel Sucupira Andrade; Maquiné, Gustavo Ávila; Schettini, Antônio Pedro Mendes; Santos, Mônica

    2015-01-01

    Lichen sclerosus is a chronic inflammatory disease, usually located in the genital area. The etiology of lichen sclerosus is multifactorial, with participation of genetic, autoimmune, infectious and hormonal factors. Bullous clinical form stems from hydropic degeneration of the basal membrane, constituting a less frequent variant of the disease. In this work, we report the case of a female patient, 55 years old, who in the last three years presented whitish plaques, with horny spikes, located on back and arms. Some of these lesions evolved with hemorrhagic blisters, which after histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of bullous and hemorrhagic lichen sclerosus. The patient was treated with high-potency topical corticosteroid for two months, resulting in remission of bullous and hemorrhagic lesions. PMID:26312692

  14. Hemorrhage Detection and Segmentation in Traumatic Pelvic Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Davuluri, Pavani; Wu, Jie; Tang, Yang; Cockrell, Charles H.; Ward, Kevin R.; Najarian, Kayvan; Hargraves, Rosalyn H.

    2012-01-01

    Automated hemorrhage detection and segmentation in traumatic pelvic injuries is vital for fast and accurate treatment decision making. Hemorrhage is the main cause of deaths in patients within first 24 hours after the injury. It is very time consuming for physicians to analyze all Computed Tomography (CT) images manually. As time is crucial in emergence medicine, analyzing medical images manually delays the decision-making process. Automated hemorrhage detection and segmentation can significantly help physicians to analyze these images and make fast and accurate decisions. Hemorrhage segmentation is a crucial step in the accurate diagnosis and treatment decision-making process. This paper presents a novel rule-based hemorrhage segmentation technique that utilizes pelvic anatomical information to segment hemorrhage accurately. An evaluation measure is used to quantify the accuracy of hemorrhage segmentation. The results show that the proposed method is able to segment hemorrhage very well, and the results are promising. PMID:22919433

  15. Alterations of Mg(2+) After Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mun-Young; Yang, Dong Kwon; Kim, Shang-Jin

    2017-03-17

    Hemorrhagic shock is generally characterized by hemodynamic instability with cellular hypoxia and diminishing cellular function, resulting from an imbalance between systemic oxygen delivery and consumption and redistribution of fluid and electrolytes. Magnesium (Mg) is the fourth most abundant cation overall and second most abundant intracellular cation in the body and an essential cofactor for the energy production and cellular metabolism. Data for blood total Mg (tMg; free-ionized, protein-bound, and anion-bound forms) and free Mg(2+) levels after a traumatic injury are inconsistent and only limited information is available on hemorrhagic effects on free Mg(2+) as the physiologically active form. The aim of this study was to determine changes in blood Mg(2+) and tMg after hemorrhage in rats identifying mechanism and origin of the changes in blood Mg(2+). Hemorrhagic shock produced significant increases in blood Mg(2+), plasma tMg, Na(+), K(+), Cl(-), anion gap, partial pressures of oxygen, glucose, and blood urea nitrogen but significant decreases in RBC tMg, blood Ca(2+), HCO3(-), pH, partial pressures of carbon dioxide, hematocrit, hemoglobin, total cholesterol, and plasma/RBC ATP. During hemorrhagic shock, K(+), anion gap, and BUN showed significant positive correlations with changes in blood Mg(2+) level, while Ca(2+), pH, and T-CHO correlated to Mg(2+) in a negative manner. In conclusion, hemorrhagic shock induced an increase in both blood-free Mg(2+) and tMg, resulted from Mg(2+) efflux from metabolic damaged cell with acidosis and ATP depletion.

  16. Acute hemorrhagic pellagra in an Albanian refugee.

    PubMed

    Chaidemenos, George C; Mourellou, Olga; Karakatsanis, George; Koussidou, Thallia; Xenidis, Efthimios; Charalampidou, Haroula; Avgoloupis, Dimitris

    2002-02-01

    We report a peculiar case of hemorrhagic pellagra in an exhausted Albanian refugee who had walked for 3 days under sunny skies on his way from his country to Greece. The peculiarities of the case are the fulminant course of the disorder; the "terrifying" appearance of the patient (initially he was admitted to an emergency unit); the gangrenous appearance of the hemorrhagic lesions of the palms and fingernails; the disturbed hepatic function that gradually returned to normal; and the absence of a history of alcohol consumption, alcohol malabsorption, or drug intake.

  17. Closed-Loop Resuscitation of Hemorrhagic Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-21

    thank ONR for the last 9 years of basic and applied research on titrated fluid therapy of hypovolemic shock . This grant was instrumental in not only the...Phone: 409-772-3969 Fax: 409-772-8895 Project Title: Closed-Loop Resuscitation of Hemorrhagic Shock ONR Award No: N000140610300 Organization...Resuscitation Of Hemorrhagic Shock 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK

  18. Two cases of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage presenting with persistent jaundice.

    PubMed

    Ruffini, E; De Petris, L; Zorzi, G; Paoletti, P; Mambelli, G; Carlucci, A

    2013-01-01

    The adrenal hemorrhage is a relatively rare event in newborns but must be considered in the presence of a persistent unexplained jaundice, especially in presence of predisposing factors. Serial ultrasonography is the modality of choice for initial diagnosis and follow-up of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage. We report two cases of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage presenting with persistent jaundice. The causes of the neonatal adrenal hemorrhages were a difficult vaginal delivery in macrosomic infant and a neonatal infection.

  19. [Intensive care management [corrected] of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Diedler, J; Sykora, M; Herweh, C; Orakcioglu, B; Zweckberger, K; Steiner, T; Hacke, W

    2011-04-01

    Approximately 10-15% of acute strokes are caused by non-aneurysmatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and incidences are expected to increase due to an aging population. Studies from the 1990s estimated mortality of ICH to be as high as 50%. However, these figures may partly be attributed to the fact that patients suffering from ICH frequently received only supportive therapy and the poor prognosis may therefore be more a self-fulfilling prophecy. Recently it has been shown that treatment in a specialized neurological intensive care unit alone was associated with better outcomes after ICH. In recent years considerable efforts have been undertaken in order to develop new therapies for ICH and to assess them in randomized controlled trials. Apart from admission status, hemorrhage volume is considered to be the main prognostic factor and impeding the spread of the hematoma is thus a basic therapeutic principle. The use of activated factor VIIa (aFVIIa) to stop hematoma enlargement has been assessed in two large randomized controlled trials, however the promising results of the dose-finding study could not be confirmed in a phase III trial. Although hemostatic therapy with aFVIIa reduced growth of the hematoma it failed to improve clinical outcome. Similar results were found in a randomized controlled trial on blood pressure management in acute ICH. The link between reduction of hematoma growth and improved outcome is therefore still lacking. Likewise the value of surgical hematoma evacuation remains uncertain. In the largest randomized controlled trial on surgical treatment in ICH so far, only a small subgroup of patients with superficial hemorrhages seemed to benefit from hematoma evacuation. Whether improved intensive care can contribute to improved outcome after ICH will be shown by data obtained in the coming years.

  20. Hemorrhage-Adjusted Iron Requirements, Hematinics and Hepcidin Define Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia as a Model of Hemorrhagic Iron Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Finnamore, Helen; Le Couteur, James; Hickson, Mary; Busbridge, Mark; Whelan, Kevin; Shovlin, Claire L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anemia remains a major global health problem. Higher iron demands provide the potential for a targeted preventative approach before anemia develops. The primary study objective was to develop and validate a metric that stratifies recommended dietary iron intake to compensate for patient-specific non-menstrual hemorrhagic losses. The secondary objective was to examine whether iron deficiency can be attributed to under-replacement of epistaxis (nosebleed) hemorrhagic iron losses in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Methodology/Principal Findings The hemorrhage adjusted iron requirement (HAIR) sums the recommended dietary allowance, and iron required to replace additional quantified hemorrhagic losses, based on the pre-menopausal increment to compensate for menstrual losses (formula provided). In a study population of 50 HHT patients completing concurrent dietary and nosebleed questionnaires, 43/50 (86%) met their recommended dietary allowance, but only 10/50 (20%) met their HAIR. Higher HAIR was a powerful predictor of lower hemoglobin (p = 0.009), lower mean corpuscular hemoglobin content (p<0.001), lower log-transformed serum iron (p = 0.009), and higher log-transformed red cell distribution width (p<0.001). There was no evidence of generalised abnormalities in iron handling Ferritin and ferritin2 explained 60% of the hepcidin variance (p<0.001), and the mean hepcidinferritin ratio was similar to reported controls. Iron supplement use increased the proportion of individuals meeting their HAIR, and blunted associations between HAIR and hematinic indices. Once adjusted for supplement use however, reciprocal relationships between HAIR and hemoglobin/serum iron persisted. Of 568 individuals using iron tablets, most reported problems completing the course. For patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, persistent anemia was reported three-times more frequently if iron tablets caused diarrhea or needed to be stopped

  1. Effects of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction Program on Depression, Anxiety and Stress in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hye Myung; Lee, Sung Jae; Chung, Yong Gu

    2010-01-01

    Objective In this study, the Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program was applied to patients presenting with depression and anxiety after surgery from spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and the effects were assessed. Methods The subjects were patients admitted for cerebral aneurysm rupture and treated by means of surgery from March to December, 2007. More than 6 months had passed after surgery, without any special lesions showing up on computed tomography (CT), and the Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) was 5 points. Among patients with anxiety and depression symptoms, 11 patients completed the program. The MBSR program was conducted once a week, 2.5 hours each, for 8 weeks. The evaluation criteria were : 1) the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI): it measures the type and level of depression, 2) the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory : the anxiety state of normal adults without mental disorder, and 3) Heart Rate Variability (HRV) : the influence of the autonomous nervous system on the sinoarterial node varies continuously in response to the change of the internal/external environment. Results The BDI value was decreased from 18.5 ± 10.9 to 9.5 ± 7.1 (p = 0.013) : it was statistically significant, and the depression level of patients was lowered. The state anxiety was decreased from 51.3 ± 13.9 to 42.3 ± 15.2; the trait anxiety was reduced from 50.9 ± 12.3 to 41.3 ± 12.8, and a borderline significant difference was shown (p = 0.091, p = 0.056). In other words, after the treatment, although it was not statistically significant, a decreased tendency in anxiety was shown. In the HRV measurement, standard deviation normal to normal (SDNN), square root of the square root of the mean sum of squared differences between adjacent normal to normal intervals (RMSSD), and total power (TP) showed significant increase, Physical Stress Index (PSI) showed a significant reduction, and thus an improvement in the homeostatic control mechanism of the autonomic nervous system

  2. Basal ganglia hemorrhage related to lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Ozgun, B; Castillo, M

    1995-01-01

    We describe a case of bilateral basal ganglia hemorrhage after a lightning strike to the head documented by a CT scan. Review of the literature shows this to be the most common brain imaging finding that can be attributed to a lightning strike. Several mechanistic theories are discussed, with the most plausible one being related to preferential conduction pathways through the brain.

  3. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease in Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Pybus, Margo J; Ravi, Madhu; Pollock, Colleen

    2014-07-01

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) virus serotype 2 was identified by reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR in a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) found dead in southern Alberta in September 2013. Field observations indicate at least 50 deer, primarily white-tailed deer, and three pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana) died during a suspected localized EHD outbreak.

  4. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Greece.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Sidira, Persefoni; Larichev, Victor; Gavrilova, Ludmila; Kuzmina, Ksenia; Mousavi-Jazi, Mehrdad; Mirazimi, Ali; Ströher, Ute; Nichol, Stuart

    2014-02-01

    Seroprevalence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is high in some regions of Greece, but only 1 case of disease has been reported. We used 4 methods to test 118 serum samples that were positive for CCHFV IgG by commercial ELISA and confirmed the positive results. A nonpathogenic or low-pathogenicity strain may be circulating.

  5. Massive obstetric hemorrhage: Current approach to management.

    PubMed

    Guasch, E; Gilsanz, F

    2016-01-01

    Massive obstetric hemorrhage is a major cause of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide. It is defined (among others) as the loss of>2,500ml of blood, and is associated to a need for admission to critical care and/or hysterectomy. The relative hemodilution and high cardiac output found in normal pregnancy allows substantial bleeding before a drop in hemoglobin and/or hematocrit can be identified. Some comorbidities associated with pregnancy can contribute to the occurrence of catastrophic bleeding with consumption coagulopathy, which makes the situation even worse. Optimization, preparation, rational use of resources and protocolization of actions are often useful to improve outcomes in patients with postpartum hemorrhage. Using massive obstetric hemorrhage protocols is useful for facilitating rapid transfusion if needed, and can also be cost-effective. If hypofibrinogenemia during the bleeding episode is identified, early fibrinogen administration can be very useful. Other coagulation factors in addition to fibrinogen may be necessary during postpartum hemorrhage replacement measures in order to effectively correct coagulopathy. A hysterectomy is recommended if the medical and surgical measures prove ineffective.

  6. Spontaneous hemorrhage into a lumbar synovial cyst

    PubMed Central

    Alen, Jose F.; Ramos, Ana; Lobato, Ramiro D.; Lagares, Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    Lumbar synovial cysts frequently present with back pain, chronic radiculopathy and/or progressive symptoms of spinal canal compromise. These cysts generally appear in the context of degenerative lumbar spinal disease. Few cases of spontaneous hemorrhage into synovial cysts have been reported in the literature. PMID:20174835

  7. Relation between stress cardiomyopathy and hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mansencal, Nicolas; N'Guetta, Roland; Desperramons, Julien; Dubourg, Olivier

    2011-02-17

    We present the case of an 89-year-old woman with no previous cardiovascular disease who presented a stress cardiomyopathy secondary to acute hemorrhagic stroke. Contrast and two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography was helpful to perform the diagnosis and the follow-up.

  8. Unilateral adrenal hemorrhagic infarction in essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Burnet, G; Lambert, M; Annet, L; Lefebvre, C

    2015-12-01

    Adrenal hemorrhage is a rare disease associated with various conditions. We report a case of a 68-year-old woman with abdominal and back pain. The diagnostic work-up showed a left adrenal gland infarction associated with essential thrombocythemia. Treatment consisted in painkillers and treating the underlying condition in order to prevent further thrombotic events.

  9. Hypertension and Cerebral Hemorrhage: A Malpractice Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Stanley S.; Hunt, Marshall T.; Vogt, Thomas; Walsh, Gregory; Paglia, Donald E.

    1980-01-01

    The plaintiff alleged that failure of the attending physician to manage her husband's hypertension properly resulted in his death from intracerebral hemorrhage. Four lines of evidence supported the defendant: (1) In 1970 to 1971 there was uncertainty in the medical community whether mild hypertension should be treated with drugs; this uncertainty still existed at the time of the trial. (2) Severe hypertension and advanced age are the two most important predisposing factors leading to intracerebral hemorrhage; the deceased patient had neither. (3) Hemorrhage into the cerebral cortex and underlying white matter is not typical of hypertensive intracerebral bleeding; more likely, rupture of an arteriovenous malformation occurred. (4) A diagnosis of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage is not one of exclusion but requires objective evidence of vascular change in the brain, heart and kidney; these changes were not found in the deceased patient. In conclusion, an expert witness should testify objectively rather than be the advocate of a lawyer's theory of liability. ImagesFig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 9.Fig. 10. PMID:7233893

  10. Embolization of Rectal Arteries: An Alternative Treatment for Hemorrhagic Shock Induced by Traumatic Intrarectal Hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Pichon, Nicolas E-mail: nicolas.pichon@chu-limoges.fr; Francois, Bruno; Pichon-Lefievre, Florence; Mathonnet, Murielle; Maubon, Antoine; Vignon, Philippe

    2005-05-15

    Rectal injuries caused by foreign bodies or iatrogenic insertions may lead to severe complications whose therapeutic management remains controversial. At times, both the rapid identification and treatment of subsequent active rectal bleeding may be challenging, especially when endoscopy fails to locate and control the arterial hemorrhage. We present the first two successful cases of middle rectal artery embolization in patients presenting with sustained bleeding and hemorrhagic shock.

  11. Role of ischemia in acute pancreatitis. Hemorrhagic shock converts edematous pancreatitis to hemorrhagic pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kyogoku, T; Manabe, T; Tobe, T

    1992-09-01

    Ischemia has been considered to play a role in the development of acute pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ischemia, caused by hemorrhagic shock, on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats. Acute pancreatitis was induced by the intravenous infusion of a supramaximally stimulating dose of cerulein (10 micrograms/kg/hr) for 6 hr. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by the removal of blood until the mean arterial blood pressure reached 35 mm Hg. This level was maintained for 30 min, after which time all the blood was reinfused. Hemorrhagic shock alone induced no morphological change in the pancreas. However, after the induction of hemorrhagic shock in animals treated with cerulein, hemorrhage and parenchymal necrosis were frequently observed in the pancreas. Seven of 20 rats (35%) receiving cerulein plus hemorrhagic shock had died by 48 hr after the start of cerulein infusion, whereas none of the rats in the cerulein or shock group died during this experiment. Cathepsin B activity in the pancreas of the cerulein plus shock group was significantly higher than in the other groups at 48 hr. These results suggest that ischemia may be a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

  12. Unraveling the distinctive features of hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic snake venom metalloproteinases using molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Raoni Almeida; Díaz, Natalia; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado; Suárez, Dimas

    2016-01-01

    Snake venom metalloproteinases are important toxins that play fundamental roles during envenomation. They share a structurally similar catalytic domain, but with diverse hemorrhagic capabilities. To understand the structural basis for this difference, we build and compare two dynamical models, one for the hemorrhagic atroxlysin-I from Bothrops atrox and the other for the non-hemorraghic leucurolysin-a from Bothrops leucurus. The analysis of the extended molecular dynamics simulations shows some changes in the local structure, flexibility and surface determinants that can contribute to explain the different hemorrhagic activity of the two enzymes. In agreement with previous results, the long Ω-loop (from residue 149 to 177) has a larger mobility in the hemorrhagic protein. In addition, we find some potentially-relevant differences at the base of the S1' pocket, what may be interesting for the structure-based design of new anti-venom agents. However, the sharpest differences in the computational models of atroxlysin-I and leucurolysin-a are observed in the surface electrostatic potential around the active site region, suggesting thus that the hemorrhagic versus non-hemorrhagic activity is probably determined by protein surface determinants.

  13. Protective Role of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in Filovirus Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Warfield, Kelly Lyn; Olinger, Gene Garrard

    2011-01-01

    Infection with many emerging viruses, such as the hemorrhagic fever disease caused by the filoviruses, Marburg (MARV), and Ebola virus (EBOV), leaves the host with a short timeframe in which to mouse a protective immune response. In lethal cases, uncontrolled viral replication and virus-induced immune dysregulation are too severe to overcome, and mortality is generally associated with a lack of notable immune responses. Vaccination studies in animals have demonstrated an association of IgG and neutralizing antibody responses against the protective glycoprotein antigen with survival from lethal challenge. More recently, studies in animal models of filovirus hemorrhagic fever have established that induction of a strong filovirus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response can facilitate complete viral clearance. In this review, we describe assays used to discover CTL responses after vaccination or live filovirus infection in both animal models and human clinical trials. Unfortunately, little data regarding CTL responses have been collected from infected human survivors, primarily due to the low frequency of disease and the inability to perform these studies in the field. Advancements in assays and technologies may allow these studies to occur during future outbreaks. PMID:22253531

  14. Whole blood: the future of traumatic hemorrhagic shock resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Murdock, Alan D; Berséus, Olle; Hervig, Tor; Strandenes, Geir; Lunde, Turid Helen

    2014-05-01

    Toward the end of World War I and during World War II, whole-blood transfusions were the primary agent in the treatment of military traumatic hemorrhage. However, after World War II, the fractionation of whole blood into its components became widely accepted and replaced whole-blood transfusion to better accommodate specific blood deficiencies, logistics, and financial reasons. This transition occurred with very few clinical trials to determine which patient populations or scenarios would or would not benefit from the change. A smaller population of patients with trauma hemorrhage will require massive transfusion (>10 U packed red blood cells in 24 h) occurring in 3% to 5% of civilian and 10% of military traumas. Advocates for hemostatic resuscitation have turned toward a ratio-balanced component therapy using packed red blood cells-fresh frozen plasma-platelet concentration in a 1:1:1 ratio due to whole-blood limited availability. However, this "reconstituted" whole blood is associated with a significantly anemic, thrombocytopenic, and coagulopathic product compared with whole blood. In addition, several recent military studies suggest a survival advantage of early use of whole blood, but the safety concerns have limited is widespread civilian use. Based on extensive military experience as well as recent published literature, low-titer leukocyte reduced cold-store type O whole blood carries low adverse risks and maintains its hemostatic properties for up to 21 days. A prospective randomized trial comparing whole blood versus ratio balanced component therapy is proposed with rationale provided.

  15. Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage caused by segmental arterial mediolysis.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Courtney K; Lepor, Herbert

    2006-01-01

    Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage is a rare clinical entity; signs and symptoms include pain, hematuria, and shock. Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage can be caused by tumors, such as renal cell carcinoma and angiomyolipoma; polyarteritis nodosa; and nephritis. The least common cause is segmental arterial mediolysis. Although computed tomography is used for the diagnosis of spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage, it can miss segmental arterial mediolysis as the cause of the hemorrhage. The diagnosis of segmental arterial mediolysis as a cause of spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage requires angiography, with pathologic confirmation for a definitive diagnosis.

  16. Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage Caused by Segmental Arterial Mediolysis

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Courtney K; Lepor, Herbert

    2006-01-01

    Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage is a rare clinical entity; signs and symptoms include pain, hematuria, and shock. Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage can be caused by tumors, such as renal cell carcinoma and angiomyolipoma; polyarteritis nodosa; and nephritis. The least common cause is segmental arterial mediolysis. Although computed tomography is used for the diagnosis of spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage, it can miss segmental arterial mediolysis as the cause of the hemorrhage. The diagnosis of segmental arterial mediolysis as a cause of spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage requires angiography, with pathologic confirmation for a definitive diagnosis. PMID:16985559

  17. Therapeutic Hypothermia and the Risk of Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih-Hung; Chen, Nai-Chuan; Tsai, Min-Shan; Yu, Ping-Hsun; Wang, An-Yi; Chang, Wei-Tien; Huang, Chien-Hua; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Current guidelines recommend a period of moderate therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for comatose patients after cardiac arrest to improve clinical outcomes. However, in-vitro studies have reported platelet dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, and coagulopathy, results that might discourage clinicians from applying TH in clinical practice. We aimed to quantify the risks of hemorrhage observed in clinical studies. Medline and Embase were searched from inception to October 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing patients undergoing TH with controls were selected, irrespective of the indications for TH. There were no restrictions for language, population, or publication year. Data on study characteristics, which included patients, details of intervention, and outcome measures, were extracted. Forty-three trials that included 7528 patients were identified from 2692 potentially relevant references. Any hemorrhage was designated as the primary outcome and was reported in 28 studies. The pooled results showed no significant increase in hemorrhage risk associated with TH (risk difference [RD] 0.005; 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.001–0.011; I2, 0%). Among secondary outcomes, patients undergoing TH were found to have increased risk of thrombocytopenia (RD 0.109; 95% CI 0.038–0.179; I2 57.3%) and transfusion requirements (RD 0.021; 95% CI 0.003–0.040; I2 0%). The meta-regression analysis indicated that prolonged duration of cooling may be associated with increased risk of hemorrhage. TH was not associated with increased risk of hemorrhage despite the increased risk of thrombocytopenia and transfusion requirements. Clinicians should cautiously assess each patient's risk-benefit profile before applying TH. PMID:26632746

  18. Complications and mortality in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    McKeever, Tricia M.; Hall, Ian P.; Hubbard, Richard B.; Fogarty, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Studies report that the risks of significant neurologic complications (including stroke, cerebral abscess, and migraine) and hemorrhagic sequelae are high in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), and that life expectancy in this cohort is reduced. However, most published cohorts derive from specialist centers, which may be susceptible to bias. Methods: We used a population-based approach to estimate the risks of developing neurologic and hemorrhagic complications of HHT, the association of a diagnosis of HHT with common cardiovascular and malignant comorbidities, and also long-term survival of those with the disease. Results: From a UK primary care database of 3.5 million patients (The Health Improvement Network), we identified 675 cases with a diagnosis of HHT and compared them with 6,696 controls matched by age, sex, and primary care practice. Risks of stroke (odds ratio [OR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2–2.6), cerebral abscess (OR 30.0, CI 3.1–288), and migraine (OR 1.7, CI 1.3–2.2) were elevated over controls. Bleeding complications including epistaxis (OR 11.6, CI 9.1–14.7) and gastrointestinal hemorrhage (OR 6.1, CI 2.8–13.4) were more common in cases with HHT. Survival of cases with HHT was poorer than controls with a hazard ratio for death of 2.0 (CI 1.6–2.6) and a median age at death 3 years younger. Conclusions: Patients with HHT are at substantially increased risk of serious neurologic and hemorrhagic complications of the disease. Because a diagnosis of HHT is associated with a significantly poorer survival compared with those who have no disease, evaluation of new strategies to improve clinical management is required. PMID:25862798

  19. Effects of hemorrhage on cytokine gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Shenkar, R; Abraham, E

    1993-08-01

    Injury and blood loss are often followed by infection and the rapid development of organ system dysfunction, frequently involving mucosal sites, such as the lung and intestine. To examine possible mechanisms contributing to these conditions, we used semiquantitative polymerase chain reactions to determine cytokine mRNA expression among cellular populations isolated from mucosal and systemic anatomic sites of mice at predetermined time points following 30% blood volume hemorrhage with resuscitation 1 hr later. Within 1 hr after hemorrhage, significant increases were observed in mRNA levels for IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-5, and TGF-beta in intraparenchymal pulmonary mononuclear cells. The levels of TGF-beta transcripts among alveolar macrophages were increased 1 hr following blood loss, and increase in IL-1 alpha transcripts was found starting 2 hr posthemorrhage. Cells from Peyer's patches showed significant increases in mRNA levels for IL-1 beta, IL-2, IL-5, IL-6, IFN-gamma, and TGF-beta during the 4 hr following hemorrhage. Significant increases in mRNA levels for IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and TGF-beta were present within 4 hr of blood loss among cells isolated from mesenteric lymph nodes. The expression of mRNA for most cytokines was not significantly altered in splenocytes or peripheral blood mononuclear cells at any time point following hemorrhage. These experiments demonstrate that blood loss, even if resuscitated, produces significant increases in proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokine gene transcription as early as 1 hr following hemorrhage. These posthemorrhage alterations in cytokine mRNA expression were particularly prominent at mucosal sites, suggesting a mechanism for the increased incidence of pulmonary and intestinal involvement in organ system failure following severe blood loss and injury.

  20. Extensive intraalveolar pulmonary hemorrhage in infants dying after surfactant therapy.

    PubMed

    Pappin, A; Shenker, N; Hack, M; Redline, R W

    1994-04-01

    To assess the possible relationship between exogenous surfactant therapy and pulmonary hemorrhage in premature infants, we compared autopsy findings in 15 infants treated with exogenous surfactant and in 29 who died before the introduction of surfactant therapy. Infants who met the following criteria were included: birth weight 501 to 1500 gm, survival 4 hours to 7 days, and no congenital anomalies. Average birth weight, gestational age, and age at death were equivalent for the two groups. High rates of pulmonary hemorrhage were present in both groups (treated 80% vs untreated 83%). The untreated group had higher incidences of interstitial hemorrhage and lung hematomas and significantly more large interstitial hemorrhages: 31% untreated versus 0% treated (p < 0.05). The overall rate of intraalveolar hemorrhage was similar in the two groups, but surfactant-treated infants were more likely to have extensive intraalveolar hemorrhage: 53% versus 14% (p < 0.05). Most surfactant-treated infants who survived more than 24 hours had extensive intraalveolar hemorrhage (8/9). Patients who had extensive intraalveolar hemorrhage, with or without prior surfactant therapy, frequently had clinically significant pulmonary hemorrhage (7/12). These findings indicate that infants who die after surfactant therapy have higher rates of a specific type of pulmonary hemorrhage--extensive intraalveolar hemorrhage.