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  1. [Helicobacter pylori gastritis: assessment of OLGA and OLGIM staging systems].

    PubMed

    Ben Slama, Sana; Ben Ghachem, Dorra; Dhaoui, Amen; Jomni, Mohamed Taieb; Dougui, Mohamed Hédi; Bellil, Khadija

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) gastritis presents a risk of cancer related to atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. Two recent classifications OLGA (Operative Link on Gastritis Assessment) and OLGIM (Operative Link on Gastritic Intestinal Metaplasia assessment) have been proposed to identify high-risk forms (stages III and IV). The aim of this study is to evaluate the OLGA and OLGIM staging systems in H pylori gastritis. A descriptive study of 100 cases of chronic H pylori gastritis was performed. The revaluation of Sydney System parameters of atrophy and intestinal metaplasia, of gastric antrum and corpus, allowed identifying respectively the stages of OLGA and OLGIM systems. The progressive risk of our H pylori gastritis was 6% according to OLGA staging and 7% according to OLGIM staging. Significant correlation was revealed between age and OLGA staging. High-risk gastritis according to OLGIM staging was significantly associated with moderate to severe atrophy. High-risk forms according to OLGA staging were associated in 80% of the cases to intestinal metaplasia. OLGA and OLGIM systems showed a highly significant positive correlation between them with a mismatch at 5% for H pylori gastritis. The OLGA and OLGIM staging systems in addition to Sydney System, allow selection of high risk forms of chronic gastritis requiring accurate observation.

  2. [Evaluation of Gastric Atrophy. Comparison between Sidney and OLGA Systems].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Mendoza, Pablo; González-Angulo, Jorge; Angeles-Garay, Ulises; Segovia-Cueva, Gustavo Adolfo

    2008-01-01

    histopathologic identification of atrophy and metaplasia is decisive to stop the way of gastritis?carcinoma in patients with chronic gastritis. to compare diagnostic concordance between Sidney system and the operative Link on Gastritis Assessment (OLGA) system. 120 consecutive biopsies were analyzed by general pathologists according to the Sidney system. All of them were evaluated by a second pathologist who used OLGA System. We employed kappa index to evaluate diagnostic concordance between the classifications. the clinical picture includes dyspepsia (94 %), abdominal pain (50 %), gastroesophageal reflux (30 %), bleed of the upper digestive system (24 %), and presence of Helicobacter pylori (47.5 %). Four were diagnosed as atrophy by Sidney system and 26 cases with atrophy by OLGA system. The concordance between two classifications systems was too low (p = 0.05). the atrophy diagnosis, between systems, had low concordance. The description of metaplastic atrophy in the OLGA system represents the only one difference. The non-metaplastic atrophy is the same for both classifications. Therefore, the general pathologist should include this evaluation more consistently using OLGA system.

  3. Gastritis staging: interobserver agreement by applying OLGA and OLGIM systems.

    PubMed

    Isajevs, Sergejs; Liepniece-Karele, Inta; Janciauskas, Dainius; Moisejevs, Georgijs; Putnins, Viesturs; Funka, Konrads; Kikuste, Ilze; Vanags, Aigars; Tolmanis, Ivars; Leja, Marcis

    2014-04-01

    Atrophic gastritis remains a difficult histopathological diagnosis with low interobserver agreement. The aim of our study was to compare gastritis staging and interobserver agreement between general and expert gastrointestinal (GI) pathologists using Operative Link for Gastritis Assessment (OLGA) and Operative Link on Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia (OLGIM). We enrolled 835 patients undergoing upper endoscopy in the study. Two general and two expert gastrointestinal pathologists graded biopsy specimens according to the Sydney classification, and the stage of gastritis was assessed by OLGA and OLGIM system. Using OLGA, 280 (33.4 %) patients had gastritis (stage I-IV), whereas with OLGIM this was 167 (19.9 %). OLGA stage III- IV gastritis was observed in 25 patients, whereas by OLGIM stage III-IV was found in 23 patients. Interobserver agreement between expert GI pathologists for atrophy in the antrum, incisura angularis, and corpus was moderate (kappa = 0.53, 0.57 and 0.41, respectively, p < 0.0001), but almost perfect for intestinal metaplasia (kappa = 0.82, 0.80 and 0.81, respectively, p < 0.0001). However, interobserver agreement between general pathologists was poor for atrophy, but moderate for intestinal metaplasia. OLGIM staging provided the highest interobserver agreement, but a substantial proportion of potentially high-risk individuals would be missed if only OLGIM staging is applied. Therefore, we recommend to use a combination of OLGA and OLGIM for staging of chronic gastritis.

  4. OLGA and OLGIM stage distribution according to age and Helicobacter pylori status in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ji Hyung; Choi, Il Ju; Kook, Myeong-Cherl; Lee, Jong Yeul; Cho, Soo-Jeong; Nam, Su Youn; Kim, Chan Gyoo

    2014-04-01

    The Operative Link for Gastritis Assessment (OLGA) and the Operative Link on Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia Assessment (OLGIM) staging systems have been suggested to provide risk assessment for gastric cancer. This study aimed to evaluate the distribution of OLGA and OLGIM staging by age and Helicobacter pylori status. We studied 632 subjects who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy for gastric cancer screening. Helicobacter pylori status and histologic changes were assessed using the updated Sydney system. Stage III and IV OLGA or OLGIM stages were considered as high-risk stages. The rate of H. pylori infection was 59.0% (373/632). Overall, the proportion of high OLGA and OLGIM stages was significantly increased with older age (p < .001 for both). Old age (OR = 5.17, 6.97, and 12.23 for ages in the 40's, 50's, and 60's, respectively), smoking (OR = 2.54), and H. pylori infection (OR = 8.46) were independent risk factors for high-risk OLGA stages. These risk factors were the same for high-risk OLGIM stages. In the H. pylori-positive subgroup, the proportion of high-risk OLGA stages was low (6.9%) before the age of 40, but increased to 23.0%, 29.1%, and 41.1% for those in their 40s, 50s, and 60s, respectively (p < .001). High-risk OLGIM stages showed a similar trend of 2.8% before the age of 40 and up to 30.1% for those in their 60s. High-risk OLGA and OLGIM stages were uncommon in the H. pylori-negative group, with a respective prevalence of 10.3% and 3.4% even among those in their 60s. Because high-risk OLGA and OLGIM stages are uncommon under the age of 40, H. pylori treatment before that age may reduce the need for endoscopic surveillance for gastric cancer. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Redemptive Family Narratives: Olga Lengyel and the Textuality of the Holocaust: In Memoriam Elie Wiesel.

    PubMed

    Turda, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Memoirs written by Holocaust survivors and (in some cases) their testimonies retain a salience unmatched by other historical sources. This article discusses one such memoir, Olga Lengyel's Five Chimneys, alongside her 1998 testimony, aiming to engage with broader methodological issues relating to the history of the Holocaust, particularly those about memory, narrative and textuality. Through a detailed discussion of certain moments shaping Olga Lengyel's personal experience, both pre-and post-arrival in Auschwitz, the article captures the tensions and contradictions characterizing the harrowing story of one woman's loss of family in the Holocaust.

  6. Redemptive Family Narratives: Olga Lengyel and the Textuality of the Holocaust*

    PubMed Central

    Turda, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Memoirs written by Holocaust survivors and (in some cases) their testimonies retain a salience unmatched by other historical sources. This article discusses one such memoir, Olga Lengyel’s Five Chimneys, alongside her 1998 testimony, aiming to engage with broader methodological issues relating to the history of the Holocaust, particularly those about memory, narrative and textuality. Through a detailed discussion of certain moments shaping Olga Lengyel’s personal experience, both pre-and post-arrival in Auschwitz, the article captures the tensions and contradictions characterizing the harrowing story of one woman’s loss of family in the Holocaust. PMID:27959969

  7. Gastrites chroniques à hélicobacter pylori: évaluation des systèmes OLGA et OLGIM

    PubMed Central

    Slama, Sana Ben; Ghachem, Dorra Ben; Dhaoui, Amen; Jomni, Mohamed Taieb; Dougui, Mohamed Hédi; Bellil, Khadija

    2016-01-01

    La gastrite chronique à Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) présente un risque de cancérisation en rapport avec l'atrophie et la métaplasie intestinale. Deux nouvelles classifications, OLGA (Operative Link on Gastritis Assessment) et OLGIM (Operative Link on Gastritic Intestinal Metaplasia assessment) ont été proposées pour individualiser les formes à haut risque évolutif (stades III et IV). Le but de ce travail est d’évaluer les classifications de OLGA et de OLGIM au cours des gastrites chroniques à H pylori. Nous avons réalisé une étude descriptive transversale portant sur 100 cas de gastrite chronique à H pylori. La réévaluation des paramètres du Sydney System de l'atrophie et de la métaplasie intestinale, de l'antre et du corps gastrique, a permis de définir respectivement les stades OLGA et OLGIM. Le risque évolutif de nos gastrites à H pylori était de 6% selon OLGA et de 7% selon OLGIM. Une liaison significative a été révélée entre l’âge et OLGA. Les gastrites à haut risque selon OLGIM, étaient significativement associées à une atrophie modérée à sévère. Les formes à haut risque selon OLGA s'associaient dans plus de 80% des cas à une métaplasie intestinale. OLGA et OLGIM présentaient une corrélation positive et hautement significative entre elles avec une discordance évaluée à 5%. Les classifications de OLGA et OLGIM, en complément au Sydney System, permettent de sélectionner les formes de gastrites à haut risque nécessitant une surveillance étroite. PMID:27200133

  8. [Olga Palić-Szanto (1890-1971), M.D., Ophthalmologist: biographical notes].

    PubMed

    Litričin, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Olga Palić-Szanto lived in Serbia working as an ophthalmologist from 1919 to 1947. We were able to follow her life and work from documents found in the archives of Belgrade and Novi Sad. Olga Szanto was born in 1890 in Gyoma, Hungary. Having completed the studies of medicine in Budapest and Berlin she worked with the First Eye Clinic of the University of Budapest with the famous Professor Emil Gross for six years. In 1919 she moved to Novi Sad and in 1921 to Belgrade and worked at the Eye Department of the General State Hospital for one and a half years. Until the beginning of the Second World War she worked at several outpatient ophthalmology departments of several hospitals. Olga Palić-Szanto published a great number of papers in prominent medical journals of Europe and America. We were able to identify as many as 58 titles of her published works which cover different fields of ophthalmology. In the journal "Serbian Archives of Medicine"we traced four of her studies published in between the two world wars, two of which we discuss in this paper. She was an active public figure in Belgrade and elsewhere, not only in the field of ophthalmology but also as a member of the Association of University-Educated Women and Women's League for Peace and Freedom. She returned to Hungary probably in 1947, where she continued to write and publish a number of papers. Dr. Olga Palić-Szanto died in Budapest in 1971.

  9. New insights into the crustal configuration of the Olga Basin from deep seismic and geochemistry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klitzke, Peter; Franke, Dieter; Blumenberg, Martin; Weniger, Philipp; Lutz, Rüdiger; Berglar, Kai; Ehrhardt, Axel

    2017-04-01

    The Norwegian Barents Sea, as the westernmost part of the Arctic Eurasian shelf, is located between the Proterozoic East-European Craton in the south and Cenozoic passive margins in the north and the west. This region has experienced multiple changes of the stress regime including Paleozoic continental collision, multi-stage late Paleozoic to Mesozoic rifting and Pliocene/Pleistocene uplift and erosion. Particularly the southwestern Barents Sea is in focus of academic as well as industry-driven studies since decades due to its hydrocarbon potential. This contributed to a comprehensive database and the corresponding petroleum systems are well understood. Opposed to that, potential petroleum systems of the northern Barents Sea are only poorly investigated. It is widely agreed that late Cenozoic uplift and erosion episodes were more pronounced to the north. As a consequence, potential Triassic source rocks are covered only locally by Jurassic strata but by a thin layer of Quaternary deposits. One objective of our Arctic activities is to shed new light on the evolution of potential petroleum systems in the northern Barents Sea. Therefore, geophysical and geological data were acquired southeast of Svalbard in the area of the Olga Basin in 2015. The obtained data include 1750 km of 2D multi-channel seismic lines, 350 km of wide angle seismic lines by means of sonobuoys, sediment echosounder data, multi-beam data and potential field data. First interpretation of the seismic profiles reveals a locally dense network of Triassic normal faults bordering the Olga basin and partly reaching as deep as to the acoustic basement. In particular, north of the Olga Basin this Triassic fault system seems to have experienced post-glacial reactivation as indicated by sediment echosounder data. Surface sediments were sampled by use of gravity and multi coring. Low concentrations of methane in the adsorbed fraction of hydrocarbon gases within the center of the Olga Basin imply that the

  10. [Atrophy in the mucosa neighboring an intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma by comparing the Sydney vs. OLGA systems].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Mendoza, Pablo; Hernández-Briseño, Liliana; Casarrubias-Ramírez, Moisés; Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Ángeles-Garay, Ulises

    2015-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma causes about 700 000 deaths worldwide per year. Is feasible detect it in earlier stages. The aim of this article is to assess the atrophy in the mucosa neighboring an intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma by comparing the Sydney vs. OLGA systems. Twenty-eight individuals with intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma (Lauren) were compared with 32 non-neoplastic cases. Both groups had undergone total gastrectomy. Two pathologists made a consensus-based assessment of the atrophy in non-neoplastic corpus and antral epithelium using the Sydney and OLGA Systems. The mean, median, and distribution of the frequencies were obtained using the measuring and distribution scales of the study variables. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values, both positive and negative, for gastric cancer were calculated through the dichotomy of advanced atrophy-positive and advanced atrophy-negative scales. Twenty-four of the 28 cases with intestinal-type gastric carcinoma showed an advanced atrophy with the OLGA system, with a sensitivity and specificity of 77 and 85 %, respectively. Conversely, 4 of the 28 individuals showed an advanced atrophy with the Sydney system, with a sensitivity and specificity of 14 and 100 %, respectively. The OLGA system has a high sensitivity and specificity (77 y 85 % respectively) for the recognition of preneoplastic changes in the mucosa neighboring a gastric carcinoma.

  11. Surface Hydrology in Global River Basins in the Off-Line Land-Surface GEOS Assimilation (OLGA) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Yang, Runhua; Houser, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    Land surface hydrology for the Off-line Land-surface GEOS Analysis (OLGA) system and Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-1) Data Assimilation System (DAS) has been examined using a river routing model. The GEOS-1 DAS land-surface parameterization is very simple, using an energy balance prediction of surface temperature and prescribed soil water. OLGA uses near-surface atmospheric data from the GEOS-1 DAS to drive a more comprehensive parameterization of the land-surface physics. The two global systems are evaluated using a global river routing model. The river routing model uses climatologic surface runoff from each system to simulate the river discharge from global river basins, which can be compared to climatologic river discharge. Due to the soil hydrology, the OLGA system shows a general improvement in the simulation of river discharge compared to the GEOS-1 DAS. Snowmelt processes included in OLGA also have a positive effect on the annual cycle of river discharge and source runoff. Preliminary tests of a coupled land-atmosphere model indicate improvements to the hydrologic cycle compared to the uncoupled system. The river routing model has provided a useful tool in the evaluation of the GCM hydrologic cycle, and has helped quantify the influence of the more advanced land surface model.

  12. Validation of ESP Oil Wells Measured Parameters Using Simulation Olga Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganat, T. A.; Hrairi, M.; Hawlader, MNA

    2017-03-01

    The significant challenge in the oil and gas industry is the concurrent measurement of commingled gas, oil and water production, either using three phase test separator or multiphase flow meter (MPFM). A major issue in these applications is the uncertainty of the measurements, due to different measurement operations conditions. A new computational approach has been generated to estimate oil well flow rate of 48 oil wells using Electrical Submersible pump (ESP) from D, G, and W oil fields located in North Africa. The idea is to close the wellhead wing valve and the ESP is kept running normally and the wellhead flowing pressure before shut-in the well and the build-up of wellhead flowing pressure after shut-in the well are measured. OLGA software has been used to make comparison with multiphase flow model available in the OLGA software against each nominated ESP oil well parameters obtained from measured field data. The objective was to verify the obtained shut-in wellhead pressure after closing the choke wing valve (WHPa) from the measured field data with the obtained shut-in wellhead pressure valve from the simulation model. In this paper the simulation results showed that the estimated WHPa are in agreement with the measured WHPa. The relative errors for individual oil field are within accuracy standard specification (typically +/- 10%). The overall relative errors are low and within acceptable uncertainty range, where the aggregate relative error for all wells was less than +/-4% which is considered acceptable. Therefore, the results have demonstrated that the new computational method can work under ESP oil wells conditions and has the ability to perform accurate results even when closing the wellhead wing valve for short time span.

  13. OLGA- and OLGIM-based staging of gastritis using narrow-band imaging magnifying endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Saka, Akiko; Yagi, Kazuyoshi; Nimura, Satoshi

    2015-11-01

    As atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia as a result of Helicobacter pylori are considered risk factors for gastric cancer, it is important to assess their severity. In the West, the operative link for gastritis assessment (OLGA) and operative link for gastric intestinal metaplasia assessment (OLGIM) staging systems based on biopsy have been widely adopted. In Japan, however, narrow-band imaging (NBI)-magnifying endoscopic diagnosis of gastric mucosal inflammation, atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia has been reported to be fairly accurate. Therefore, we investigated the practicality of NBI-magnifying endoscopy (NBI-ME) for gastritis staging. We enrolled 55 patients, in whom NBI-ME was used to score the lesser curvature of the antrum (antrum) and the lesser curvature of the lower body (corpus). The NBI-ME score classification was established from images obtained beforehand, and then biopsy specimens taken from the observed areas were scored according to histological findings. The NBI-ME and histology scores were then compared. Furthermore, we assessed the NBI-ME and histology stages using a combination of scores for the antrum and corpus, and divided the stages into two risk groups: low and high. The degree to which the stage assessed by NBI-ME approximated that assessed by histology was then ascertained. Degree of correspondence between the NBI-ME and histology scores was 69.1% for the antrum and 72.7% for the corpus, and that between the high- and low-risk groups was 89.1%. Staging of gastritis using NBI-ME approximates that based on histology, and would be a practical alternative to the latter. © 2015 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  14. Quantitative determination of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids from Galanthus reginae-olgae subsp. vernalis and in vitro activities relevant for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Filomena; Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Marrelli, Mariangela; Menichini, Federica; Statti, Giancarlo A; Uzunov, Dimitar; Menichini, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    In the present work the qualitative and quantitative analysis of Amaryllidaceae-type alkaloids in the aerial parts and bulbs of Galanthus reginae-olgae Orph. subsp. vernalis Kamari is presented for the first time using GC-MS analysis. The alkaloids galanthamine, lycorine, and tazettine were identified in both extracts while crinine and neronine were found only in the bulbs. The yield of alkaloid fraction from bulbs (36.8%) is very high compared to the yield from aerial parts (9.34%). Lycorine was the major component in both fractions. The antioxidant potential was determined by three complementary methods. The preparations to reduce the stable free radical DPPH to the yellow-colored 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl with IC(50) values of 39 and 29 mug/mL for MeOH extracts from aerial parts and bulbs, respectively. The higher activity was given by EtOAc fraction of aerial parts with IC(50) of 10 mug/mL. This activity is probably due to the presence in EtOAc fraction of polar compounds such as polyphenols. The fraction exhibited a significant antioxidant capacity also in the beta-carotene-linoleic acid test system. A higher level of antioxidant activity was observed for EtOAc fraction from bulbs with IC(50) of 10 mug/mL after 30 min and 9 mug/mL after 60 min of incubation. In contrast, the fraction from bulbs performed poorly in the lipid peroxidation liposomes assay. Significant activity was obtained for dichloromethane fraction from aerial parts (IC(50) of 74 mug/mL). The major abundance of alkaloid in dichloromethane fraction may be responsible of the bulbs anti-cholinesterase highest activity (38.5%) at 0.5 mg/mL.

  15. 77 FR 59186 - Notice of Receipt of Pesticide Products; Registration Applications To Register New Uses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    .... Proposed Use: For formulation into an insecticide for use on pepper and eggplant. Contact: Olga Odiott, RD... eggplant. Contact: Olga Odiott, RD, (703) 308-9369, email address: odiott.olga@epa.gov . 12. EPA...

  16. Very Large Array Observations of the Sun with Related Observations Using the SMM (Solar Maximum Mission) Satellite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-12

    Department of Physics University College of Wales Aberystwyth , UK ABSTRACT. A general review is given of the various techniques which have been used to...M. R. 1981. Ap. J. lLettersl, 243. L103. Pye. J. P.. Evans . K. D.. Hutcheon. R. J.. Gerassimenko. M., Davis, J. M.. Vesecky. J. F.. Antiochos. S. K...STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS A Festschrift in Honor of Dr. John W. Evans PROCEEDINGS OF THE NINTH SACRAMENTO PEAK SUMMER SYMPOSIUM. SUNSPOT. NM 17 - 21 AUGUST 1987

  17. Final grant report to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE): Olga Taussky Todd Celebration of Careers in Mathematics for Women.

    SciTech Connect

    Case, Bettye Anne

    2002-06-03

    This grant was proposed to be supplemental funding for a conference which would be documented by publication of conference information in the AWM Newsletter, and then inclusion of the Proceedings and other information generated in a book. The conference was held and documented in the AWM Newsletter (Vol. 29, No. 6; Vol. 30, No. 1 (attached)). Work is in progress on the extensive and complicated related publication which involves 50 authors beyond those from the conference. The Celebration was held at the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute in Berkeley, Calif. It was attended by over 100 women and men mathematicians. Plenary talks, panels, and poster sessions were held.

  18. 75 FR 71132 - Availability of Draft Toxicological Profiles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... via e-mail to cdcinfo@cdc.gov , or to Ms. Olga Dawkins, Division of Toxicology and Environmental... notice. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Olga Dawkins, Division of Toxicology and Environmental...

  19. Chief Stephen's Parky: One Year in the Life of an Athapascan Girl. The Council for Indian Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandonnet, Ann

    This book tells the fictional story of Olga, the wife of Chief Stephen, leader of a Tanaina Athapascan village on Cook Inlet, northwest of Anchorage, Alaska. Olga works for one full year with great courage and independence trapping ground squirrels and gathering materials needed to tan, dye, and sew furs to make a parka for her husband. She uses…

  20. Language across Cultures. Proceedings of a Symposium (St. Patrick's College, Dublin, Ireland, July 8-9, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathuna, Liam Mac; Singleton, David

    Papers presented at the symposium on the relationship between language and culture include, in addition to an opening adress: "Sociosemiotics Across Cultures" (Wolfgang Kuhlwein); "Translation Across Languages or Across Cultures?" (Albrecht Neubert); "Grammatical Categories Across Cultures" (Olga Tomic); "On…

  1. 76 FR 12317 - Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... Forest Service Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee (Committee) will meet in Thermopolis, Wyoming... Broadway, Thermopolis, Wyoming. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Olga Troxel, Resource Advisory...

  2. 76 FR 22672 - Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ... Forest Service Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee (Committee) will meet in Thermopolis, Wyoming... CONTACT: Olga Troxel, Resource Advisory Committee Coordinator, Shoshone National Forest...

  3. 76 FR 41196 - Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... Forest Service Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee (Committee) will meet in Thermopolis, Wyoming...: Olga Troxel, Resource Advisory Committee Coordinator, Shoshone National Forest Supervisor's...

  4. 76 FR 3081 - Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... Forest Service Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee (Committee) will hold a conference call on.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Olga Troxel, Resource Advisory Committee Coordinator,...

  5. Study Hints At Link Between Some Statins, Parkinson's Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... But so far, studies have come to mixed conclusions, according to Huang. Some have tied statins to ... been controversial. "We can't really make any conclusions," said Dr. Olga Waln, who specializes in treating ...

  6. 77 FR 47360 - Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... Forest Service Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee (Committee) will hold a conference call on.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Olga Troxel, Resource Advisory Committee Coordinator, Shoshone...

  7. A test of flushing procedures to control salt-water intrusion at the W. P. Franklin Dam near Ft. Myers, Florida and The magnitude and extent of salt-water contamination in the Caloosahatchee River between La Belle and Olga, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boggess, Durward H.

    1970-01-01

    During low-flow periods, salty water from the tidal part of the Caloosahatchee River moves upstream during boat lockages at the W. P. Franklin Darn near Ft. Myers, Florida, as shown on figure L Salty water enters the lock chamber through openings of the downstream sector gates which separate tidal and fresh water; when the upstream gates open, some of the salty water moves into the upper pool, probably as a density current. Repeated injections of salty water cause a progressive increase in the salinity of the upstream water. The salty water moves upstream within the deeper parts of the river channel as far as 5 or more miles above the lock. Some mixing of the high-chloride deeper water and the fresher shallow water occurs in the affected reach above the lock, probably as a result of wind and waves, and turbulence created by boat traffic.

  8. On-line Gibbs learning. II. Application to perceptron and multilayer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. W.; Sompolinsky, H.

    1998-08-01

    In the preceding paper (``On-line Gibbs Learning. I. General Theory'') we have presented the on-line Gibbs algorithm (OLGA) and studied analytically its asymptotic convergence. In this paper we apply OLGA to on-line supervised learning in several network architectures: a single-layer perceptron, two-layer committee machine, and a winner-takes-all (WTA) classifier. The behavior of OLGA for a single-layer perceptron is studied both analytically and numerically for a variety of rules: a realizable perceptron rule, a perceptron rule corrupted by output and input noise, and a rule generated by a committee machine. The two-layer committee machine is studied numerically for the cases of learning a realizable rule as well as a rule that is corrupted by output noise. The WTA network is studied numerically for the case of a realizable rule. The asymptotic results reported in this paper agree with the predictions of the general theory of OLGA presented in paper I. In all the studied cases, OLGA converges to a set of weights that minimizes the generalization error. When the learning rate is chosen as a power law with an optimal power, OLGA converges with a power law that is the same as that of batch learning.

  9. Operative link on gastritis assessment stage is an appropriate predictor of early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Li, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Chen, Xiao-Yu; Ge, Zhi-Zheng; Li, Xiao-Bo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the predictive value of Operative Link on Gastritis Assessment (OLGA) and Operative Link on Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia Assessment (OLGIM) stages in gastric cancer. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted with 71 patients with early gastric cancer (EGC) and 156 patients with non-EGC. All patients underwent endoscopic examination and systematic biopsy. Outcome measures were assessed and compared, including the Japanese endoscopic gastric atrophy (EGA) classification method and the modified OLGA method as well as the modified OLGIM method. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) status was determined for all study participants. Stepwise logistic regression modeling was performed to analyze correlations between EGC and the EGA, OLGA and OLGIM methods. RESULTS: For patients with EGC and patients with non-EGC, the proportions of moderate-to-severe EGA cases were 64.8% and 44.9%, respectively (P = 0.005), the proportions of OLGA stages III-IV cases were 52.1% and 22.4%, respectively (P < 0.001), and the proportions of OLGIM stages III-IV cases were 42.3% and 19.9%, respectively (P < 0.001). OLGA stage and OLGIM stage were significantly related to EGA classification; specifically, logistic regression modeling showed significant correlations between EGC and moderate-to-severe EGA (OR = 1.95, 95% CI: 1.06-3.58, P = 0.031) and OLGA stages III-IV (OR = 3.14, 95%CI: 1.71-5.81, P < 0.001), but no significant correlation between EGC and OLGIM stages III-IV (P = 0.781). H. pylori infection rate was significantly higher in patients with moderate-to-severe EGA (75.0% vs 54.1%, P = 0.001) or OLGA/OLGIM stages III-IV (OLGA: 83.6% vs 55.8%, P < 0.001; OLGIM: 83.6% vs 57.8%, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: OLGA classification is optimal for EGC screening. A surveillance program including OLGA stage and H. pylori infection status may facilitate early detection of gastric cancer. PMID:27053859

  10. Comparison of Surface Ground Temperature from Satellite Observations and the Off-Line Land Surface GEOS Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, R.; Houser, P.; Joiner, J.

    1998-01-01

    The surface ground temperature (Tg) is an important meteorological variable, because it represents an integrated thermal state of the land surface determined by a complex surface energy budget. Furthermore, Tg affects both the surface sensible and latent heat fluxes. Through these fluxes. the surface budget is coupled with the atmosphere above. Accurate Tg data are useful for estimating the surface radiation budget and fluxes, as well as soil moisture. Tg is not included in conventional synoptical weather station reports. Currently, satellites provide Tg estimates globally. It is necessary to carefully consider appropriate methods of using these satellite data in a data assimilation system. Recently, an Off-line Land surface GEOS Assimilation (OLGA) system was implemented at the Data Assimilation Office at NASA-GSFC. One of the goals of OLGA is to assimilate satellite-derived Tg data. Prior to the Tg assimilation, a thorough investigation of satellite- and model-derived Tg, including error estimates, is required. In this study we examine the Tg from the n Project (ISCCP DI) data and the OLGA simulations. The ISCCP data used here are 3-hourly DI data (2.5x2.5 degree resolution) for 1992 summer months (June, July, and August) and winter months (January and February). The model Tg for the same periods were generated by OLGA. The forcing data for this OLGA 1992 simulation were generated from the GEOS-1 Data Assimilation System (DAS) at Data Assimilation Office NASA-GSFC. We examine the discrepancies between ISCCP and OLGA Tg with a focus on its spatial and temporal characteristics, particularly on the diurnal cycle. The error statistics in both data sets, including bias, will be estimated. The impact of surface properties, including vegetation cover and type, topography, etc, on the discrepancies will be addressed.

  11. Die Kometenmission Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Harald

    2016-11-01

    Die Rosetta-Mission ist ein Meilenstein in der Erforschung der Kometen und ihrer Entstehung. Eine der größten üerraschungen war die unregelmäßge hantelförmige Gestalt des Zielkometen 67P/Tschurjumow-Gerassimenko. Er besteht wahrscheinlich aus zwei Einzelkörpern, die durch ihre Schwerkraft aneinander gehalten werden. Seine Oberfläche ist sehr rau und zeigt eine sehr vielf ältige Morphologie, die auf eine Vielzahl von ablaufenden Prozessen hindeutet. Der Kometenkern ist vermutlich auf Gr ößnskalen von mehr als etwa 10 bis 100 Metern homogen, Inhomogenitäten auf kleineren Skalen k nnten f r seine Aktivä t verantwortlich sein. Diese ist auf kleine Gebiete konzentriert, und auch Oberflächenveränderungen, die sich innerhalb von einigen Tagen bis wenigen Wochen abspielen, sind lokal. Im Kometenmaterial wurde eine Vielzahl an organischen Substanzen gemessen, die zum Teil als Schlüsselmoleküle für die Synthese der Grundbausteine des Lebens gelten, wie wir es kennen.

  12. Anton Chekhov: Yalta Years, 1899-1904.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkle, Lydle

    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov spent 6 of the last 7 years of his life at Yalta (located on the Crimean Peninsula) where he had a house constructed in order that he might live in a climate favorable to his failing health. During these years Chekhov married the actress Olga Knipper and met Leo Tolstoy, who was near the end of his life. Chekhov also…

  13. [Recommendations of the Chilean Association for Digestive Endoscopy for the management of gastric pre-malignant lesions].

    PubMed

    Rollán, Antonio; Cortés, Pablo; Calvo, Alfonso; Araya, Raúl; Bufadel, María Ester; González, Robinson; Heredia, Carolina; Muñoz, Pablo; Squella, Freddy; Nazal, Roberto; Gatica, María de Los Ángeles; Gobelet, Jaquelina; Estay, René; Pisano, Raúl; Contreras, Luis; Osorio, Ingrid; Estela, Ricardo; Fluxá, Fernando; Parra-Blanco, Adolfo

    2014-09-01

    An expert panel analyzed the available evidence and reached a consensus to release 24 recommendations for primary and secondary prevention of gastric cancer (CG) in symptomatic patients, with indication for upper GI endoscopy. The main recommendations include (1) Search for and eradicate H. pylori infection in all cases. (2) Systematic gastric biopsies (Sydney protocol) in all patients over 40 years of age or first grade relatives of patient with CG, to detect gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia or dysplasia. (3) Incorporate the OLGA system (Operative Link on Gastritis Assessment) to the pathological report, to categorize the individual risk of CG. (4) Schedule endoscopic follow-up according to the estimated risk of CG, namely annual for OLGA III- IV, every 3 years for OLGA I- II or persistent H. pylori infection, every 5 years for CG relatives without other risk factors and no follow-up for OLGA 0, H. pylori (-). (4) Establish basic human and material resources for endoscopic follow-up programs, including some essential administrative processes, and (5) Suggest the early CG/total CG diagnosis ratio of each institution and the proportion of systematic recording of endoscopic images, as quality indicators. These measures are applicable using currently available resources, they can complement any future screening programs for asymptomatic population and may contribute to improve the prognosis of CG in high-risk populations.

  14. Anton Chekhov: Yalta Years, 1899-1904.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkle, Lydle

    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov spent 6 of the last 7 years of his life at Yalta (located on the Crimean Peninsula) where he had a house constructed in order that he might live in a climate favorable to his failing health. During these years Chekhov married the actress Olga Knipper and met Leo Tolstoy, who was near the end of his life. Chekhov also…

  15. Dialogue on Dialogic Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matusov, Eugene; Miyazaki, Kiyotaka

    2014-01-01

    In September 2011 in Rome at the International Society for Cultural and Activity Research conference, Eugene Matusov (USA), Kiyotaka Miyazaki (Japan), Jayne White (New Zealand), and Olga Dysthe (Norway) organized a symposium on Dialogic Pedagogy. Formally during the symposium and informally after the symposium several heated discussions started…

  16. Access and Success with Less: Improving Productivity in Broad-Access Postsecondary Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Davis; Rodriguez, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Achieving national goals for increased college completion in a time of scarce resources will require the postsecondary institutions that enroll the majority of undergraduates--community colleges and less-selective public universities--to graduate more students at a lower cost. Davis Jenkins and Olga Rodriguez examine research on how these…

  17. Experimental Method of Generating Electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model Beams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    pain, having patience with me, and keeping me on track throughout my Master’s program and research process. Matthew J. Gridley v Table of Contents...ISOLATION OF SPECKLE FOR TARGET-IN-THE-LOOP COHERENT BEAM COMBINING. Thesis, Air Force Institute of Technology, 2014. [11] Korotkova, Olga. Random Light Beams

  18. Information Fusion for Image Analysis: Neural Methods and Technology Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-30

    Ogas Angela Chapman Santiago Olivera Suhas Chelian Olga Parsons Chaitanya Sai Gaddam Arun Ravindran Timothy McKenna Matthew Woods High school intern...01-1-0423 Boston University 10 DISCOV (DImensionless Shunting COlor Vision) MODEL: PHYSIOLOGY, IMAGE PROCESSING, AND CLASSIFICATION ( Suhas Chelian, Ogi

  19. Revision of the new world genus Crassomicrodus Ashmead (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Agathidinae), with an identification key to species

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, José Isaac; Sharkey, Michael Joseph; Nápoles, Jesus Romero; García, José Antonio Sánchez; Martínez, Ana Mabel; López-Martínez, Victor; Pineda, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A key to species and descriptions are presented for 14 species of the New World genus Crassomicrodus Ashmead. Seven new species, Crassomicrodus azteca, Crassomicrodus clypealis, Crassomicrodus costaricensis, Crassomicrodus jalisciensis, Crassomicrodus mariae, Crassomicrodus oaxaquensis,and Crassomicrodus olgae are described. Crassomicrodus fenestratus (Viereck) is synonymized with Crassomicrodus nigriceps (Cresson). Crassomicrodus melanopleurus (Ashmead) is recognized as a valid species. PMID:22144862

  20. Comparison of Meglumine Antimoniate and Pentamidine for Peruvian Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    CUENTAS , MARIA LUZ-CJUNO, JUAN ECHEVARRIA, CESAR MIRANDA-VERASTEGUI, OLGA COLINA, AND JONATHAN D. BERMAN Navy Environmental and Preventive Medicine...Social, Cusco, Peru. Alejandro Llanos Cuentas , Juan Echevarria, and Cesar Miranda-Verastegui, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Casilla Postal 4314

  1. 78 FR 23827 - Designation of Eighteen Individuals Pursuant to the Sergei Magnitsky Rule of Law Accountability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... Moscow, Russia (individual) . 12. PROKOPENKO, Ivan Pavlovitch; DOB 28 Sep 1973; POB Vinnitsa, Ukraine... (a.k.a. KRIVORUCHKO, Alex; a.k.a. KRIVORUCHKO, Alexei); DOB 25 Aug 1977; POB Moscow Region, Russia..., Olga G.; DOB 29 Jul 1962; POB Moscow, Russia (individual) . 5. DROGANOV, Aleksey O.; DOB 11 Oct 1975...

  2. 77 FR 47593 - Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... Forest Service Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Shoshone Resource Advisory Committee (Committee) will hold a meeting on September 19...-6241 to facilitate entry into the building. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Olga Troxel,...

  3. Special Educational Needs and Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keil, Sue; Miller, Olga; Cobb, Rory

    2006-01-01

    Issues relating to the categorisation and labelling of pupils, and, the use of the terms "special educational needs" and "disability" in particular, have been the topic of debate in "BJSE" before. In this article, Sue Keil, a research officer at the Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB), Olga Miller, of the…

  4. Special Educational Needs and Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keil, Sue; Miller, Olga; Cobb, Rory

    2006-01-01

    Issues relating to the categorisation and labelling of pupils, and, the use of the terms "special educational needs" and "disability" in particular, have been the topic of debate in "BJSE" before. In this article, Sue Keil, a research officer at the Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB), Olga Miller, of the…

  5. Effect of fall-applied nitrogen on growth, nitrogen storage, and frost hardiness of bareroot Larix olgensis seedlings

    Treesearch

    Guolei Li; Yong Liu; Yan Zhu; Qingmei Li; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2012-01-01

    Nursery response of evergreen trees to fall fertilization has been studied widely, but little attention has been given to deciduous trees. Bareroot Olga Bay larch (Larix olgensis Henry) seedlings were fertilized in the nursery with urea at four rates (0, 30, 60, 90 kg N ha-1), with half of each rate applied on two dates (September 16 and October 1, 2009). The seedlings...

  6. Mentoring in Educational Settings: Unresolved Issues and Unanswered Questions. WEEA Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAuliffe, Anne, Ed.

    This digest contains the following two articles on mentoring: "Mentoring in Educational Settings: Unresolved Issues and Unanswered Questions" (Olga M. Welch); and "Learning from the Field: Mentoring Projects in Field-based Settings" (Heidi Lynch). The first article describes mentoring in general and mentoring in the schools, examines some studies…

  7. Creative Dramatics. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Julia; Sidlovskaya, Olga; Stotter, Ruth; Haugen, Kirsten; Leithold, Naomi

    2000-01-01

    Presents five articles on using creative dramatics in early childhood education: (1) "Drama: A Rehearsal for Life" (Julia Gabriel); (2) "Fairy Tales Enhance Imagination and Creative Thinking" (Olga Sidlovskaya); (3) "Starting with a Story" (Ruth Stotter); (4) "Using Creative Dramatics to Include All…

  8. Creative Dramatics. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Julia; Sidlovskaya, Olga; Stotter, Ruth; Haugen, Kirsten; Leithold, Naomi

    2000-01-01

    Presents five articles on using creative dramatics in early childhood education: (1) "Drama: A Rehearsal for Life" (Julia Gabriel); (2) "Fairy Tales Enhance Imagination and Creative Thinking" (Olga Sidlovskaya); (3) "Starting with a Story" (Ruth Stotter); (4) "Using Creative Dramatics to Include All…

  9. 78 FR 3402 - Marine Mammals; File No. 16919

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... of the Whale (Olga von Ziegesar, Responsible Party and Principal Investigator), P.O. Box 15191, Fitz Creek, AK 99603 to conduct research on humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae). ADDRESSES: The permit... humpback whales had been submitted by the above-named applicant. The requested permit has been issued...

  10. White matter integrity, hippocampal volume, and cognitive performance of a world-famous nonagenarian track-and-field athlete.

    PubMed

    Burzynska, A Z; Wong, C N; Chaddock-Heyman, L; Olson, E A; Gothe, N P; Knecht, A; Voss, M W; McAuley, E; Kramer, A F

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) are associated with successful brain and cognitive aging. However, little is known about the effects of PA, CRF, and exercise on the brain in the oldest-old. Here we examined white matter (WM) integrity, measured as fractional anisotropy (FA) and WM hyperintensity (WMH) burden, and hippocampal (HIPP) volume of Olga Kotelko (1919-2014). Olga began training for competitions at age of 77 and as of June 2014 held over 30 world records in her age category in track-and-field. We found that Olga's WMH burden was larger and the HIPP was smaller than in the reference sample (58 healthy low-active women 60-78 years old), and her FA was consistently lower in the regions overlapping with WMH. Olga's FA in many normal-appearing WM regions, however, did not differ or was greater than in the reference sample. In particular, FA in her genu corpus callosum was higher than any FA value observed in the reference sample. We speculate that her relatively high FA may be related to both successful aging and the beneficial effects of exercise in old age. In addition, Olga had lower scores on memory, reasoning and speed tasks than the younger reference sample, but outperformed typical adults of age 90-95 on speed and memory. Together, our findings open the possibility of old-age benefits of increasing PA on WM microstructure and cognition despite age-related increase in WMH burden and HIPP shrinkage, and add to the still scarce neuroimaging data of the healthy oldest-old (>90 years) adults.

  11. Empirically Based Leadership: Integrating the Science of Psychology in Building a Better Leadership Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    and Olga Epitropaki, “Transformational Leadership and Moral Reasoning,” Journal of Applied Psychology 87(2) (2002): 304-11. 9. Daniel Goleman ...beyond the scope of this paper, so the discussion in this section will primarily focus on the key areas of interest within the empirical literature on...in recent years has been the focus of considerable attention in relationship to leadership efficacy. Emotional intel- ligence involves an awareness

  12. Understanding the Structure of Large, Diverse Collections of Shapes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    surfaces. PNAS, 108(45), 2011. [15] Yuri Boykov, Olga Veksler, and Ramin Zabih. Efficient approximate energy mini- mization via graph cuts. IEEE ...Zisserman. Object class recognition by unsupervised scale-invariant learning. In IEEE CVPR, 2003 . [35] Matthew Fisher, Daniel Ritchie, Manolis Savva...Scaringella, G. Zoia, and D. Mlynek. Automatic genre classification of music content: a survey. Signal Processing Magazine , IEEE , 23(2):133 –141

  13. Quality Circles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-09

    wi11. examine the origin, the elements +or a sucCessful program and problems in managing Luality Circles. END NOTES 1. Olga L. Crocker. Johnny...detailed plans are prepared for formal presentation to management. 15 END NOTES t J. M. Juran. "The 4C Circle Fhenomenon" In Quality Circles Selected...Management must advertise its commitment not to lay off employees as a result of quality circle sugqestions. 22 END NOTES 1. La-wrence J. Korb. "Progress

  14. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Monitoring Lactate and Glucose

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    7121/847-491-4928/ m-glucksbergX~northwestern.edu Home Address 3450 N Lake Shore Dr , Chicago, IL 60657 Citizenship USA 19 SERS Measurement of GLuose and...McFarland, Dr . Douglas Stuart, and Ms. Olga Lyandres. The rise to slightly larger SERS intensities, authors are grateful to Professor Milan Mrksich...find Dr . Eunhee Moreover, the glucose partition!departition capability of the Jeoung at the University of Chicago for the donation of the EG3 EG3

  15. Points of Contact for Oceanographic Institutes in Europe and Russia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-20

    Notes: Director educational with r&d capability Frolov Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute 3520160 First Name: Ivan Middle Initial: Last Name...V.G. IW generation Pavlov , V.I. IW generation Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas Ukrainian Academy of Sciences Nalhimov av. 2 335000 Sevastopol... Pavlov , Vadim I. Ocean surface waves, air-sea Rumiantseva, Olga D. with Burov Rychagov, M.N. with Burov Saskovets, A.V. with Burov Solodov, 1.Yu

  16. China’s Strategy Toward South and Central Asia: An Empty Fortress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    research quality and objectivity. C O R P O R A T I O N Research Report China’s Strategy Toward South and Central Asia An Empty Fortress Andrew Scobell...www.rand.org/t/RR525 Published by the RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, Calif. © Copyright 2014 RAND Corporation R ® is a registered trademark. iii Preface...Chase of RAND. The authors also acknowledge the considerable research contributions of Olga Oliker and David Thaler , as well as the superb research

  17. Results from Global Land-Surface Data Assimilation Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radakovich, Jon D.; Houser, Paul R.; daSilva, Arlindo; Bosilovich, Michael G.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Realistic representation of the land surface is crucial in global climate modeling (GCM). Recently, the Mosaic land-surface Model (LSM) has been driven off-line using GEOS DAS (Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System) atmospheric forcing, forming the Off-line Land-surface Global Assimilation (OLGA) system. This system provides a computationally efficient test bed for land surface data assimilation. Here, we validate the OLGA simulation of surface processes and the assimilation of ISCCP surface temperatures. Another component of this study as the incorporation of the Physical-space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS) into OLGA, in order to assimilate surface temperature observations from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). To counteract the subsequent forcing of the analyzed skin temperature back to the initial state following the analysis. incremental bias correction (IBC) was included in the assimilation. The IBC scheme effectively removed the time mean bias, but did not remove him in the mean diurnal cycle. Therefore, a diurnal him correction (DBC) scheme was developed, where the time-dependent bias was modeled with a sine wave parameterization. In addition, quality control of the ISCCP data and anisotropic temperature correction were implemented in PSAS. Preliminary results showed a substantial impact from the inclusion of PSAS and DBC that was visible in the surface meteorology fields and energy budget. Also, the monthly mean diurnal cycle from the experiment closely matched the diurnal cycle from the observations.

  18. Results From Global Land-surface Data Assimilation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radakovich, J. D.; Houser, P. R.; da Silva, A.; Bosilovich, M. G.

    2001-05-01

    Realistic representation of the land surface is crucial in global climate modeling (GCM). Recently, the Mosaic land-surface Model (LSM) has been driven off-line using GEOS DAS (Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System) atmospheric forcing, forming the Off-line Land-surface Global Assimilation (OLGA) system. This system provides a computationally efficient test bed for land surface data assimilation. Here, we validate the OLGA simulation of surface processes and the assimilation of ISCCP surface temperatures. Another component of this study was the incorporation of the Physical-space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS) into OLGA, in order to assimilate surface temperature observations from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). To counteract the subsequent forcing of the analyzed skin temperature back to the initial state following the analysis, incremental bias correction (IBC) was included in the assimilation. The IBC scheme effectively removed the time mean bias, but did not remove bias in the mean diurnal cycle. Therefore, a diurnal bias correction (DBC) scheme was developed, where the time-dependent bias was modeled with a sine wave parameterization. In addition, quality control of the ISCCP data and anisotropic temperature correction were implemented in PSAS. Preliminary results showed a substantial impact from the inclusion of PSAS and DBC that was visible in the surface meteorology fields and energy budget. Also, the monthly mean diurnal cycle from the experiment closely matched the diurnal cycle from the observations.

  19. Severe gastritis decreases success rate of Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    PubMed

    Kalkan, Ismail Hakki; Sapmaz, Ferdane; Güliter, Sefa; Atasoy, Pınar

    2016-05-01

    In several studies, different risk factors other than antibiotic resistance have been documented with Helicobacter pylori eradication failure. We aimed in this study to investigate the relationship of gastric density of H. pylori, the occurrence/degree of gastric atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia (IM) with success rate of H. pylori eradication. Two hundred consecutive treatment naive patients who received bismuth containing standart quadruple treatment due to H. pylori infection documented by histopathological examination of two antral or two corpal biopsies entered this retrospective study. The updated Sydney system was used to grade the activity of gastritis, density of H. pylori colonization, atrophy, and IM. Stages III and IV of operative link for gastritis assessment (OLGA) or the operative link on gastric intestinal metaplasia assessment (OLGIM) stages was considered as severe gastritis. H. pylori eradication was determined via stool H. pylori antigen test performed 4 weeks after the end of therapy. The presence of gastric atrophy and IM was significantly higher in patients with eradication failure (p = 0.001 and 0.01, respectively). Severe gastritis (OLGA III-IV and OLGIM III-IV) rates were higher in eradication failure group. A multiple linear regression analysis showed that OLGA and OLGIM stages were to be independent risk factors for eradication failure (p = 0.03 and 0.01, respectively). Our results suggested that histopathologically severe gastritis may cause H. pylori eradication failure. In addition, we found that H. pylori density was not a risk factor for treatment failure in patients who receive quadruple treatment.

  20. Real Time Mud Gas Logging During Drilling of DFDP-2B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathewson, L. A.; Toy, V.; Menzies, C. D.; Zimmer, M.; Erzinger, J.; Niedermann, S.; Cox, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) aims to improve our understanding of the Alpine Fault Zone, a tectonically active mature fault system in New Zealand known to rupture in large events, by deep scientific drilling. The borehole DFDP-2B approached the Alpine Fault at depth, reaching a final depth of 892 m (820 m true vertical depth). Online gas analysis (OLGA) while drilling tracked changes in the composition of gases extracted from the circulating drill mud. The composition of fluids from fault zones can provide information about their origins, flow rates and -paths, fluid-rock interactions along these paths, and the permeability structure of the faulted rock mass. Apart from an atmospheric input, the gases in drilling mud derive from the pore space of rock, crushed at the drill bit, and from permeable layers intersected by the borehole. The rapid formation of mud wall cake seals the borehole from further fluid inflow, hence formation-derived gases enter mostly at the depth of the drill bit. OLGA analyses N2, O2, Ar, CO2, CH4, He, and H2 on a mass spectrometer, hydrocarbons CH4, C2H6, C3H8, i-C4H10, and n-C4H10 on a gas chromatograph, and Rn using a lucas-cell detector. Gas was sampled for offline analyses on noble gas and stable isotopes to complement the OLGA dataset. The principle formation-derived gases found in drilling mud during drilling of DFDP-2 were CO2 and CH4, with smaller component of H2 and He2. High radon activity is interpreted to reflect intervals of active fluid flow through highly fractured and faulted rock. 3He/4He values in many samples were extremely air-contaminated, i.e. there was almost no excess of non-atmospheric He. The 3He/4He values measured at 236 m and 610 m, which are the only analyses with uncertainties <100%, are very similar to those measured in hot springs along the Alpine Fault, e.g. Fox River (0.64 Ra), Copland (0.42 Ra), Lower Wanganui (0.81 Ra). We will compare these data to those gathered using OLGA and discuss the

  1. Reconnaissance of Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Selected Bottom Sediments of the Caloosahatchee River and Estuary, Tributaries, and Contiguous Bays, Lee County, Florida, July 20-30, 1998

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    areas of Lee County discharge through stormwater conveyances into the Caloosahatchee River estuary (Tony Pellicer , Natural Resource Manager, Lee County... Pellicer , Tony, Natural Resource Manager, Lee County, Florida, 1999, verbal communication. Seal, Thomas, Florida Department of Environmental...23 24 25 26 2829 30 31 32 33 34 35 38 39 40 40A 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 7 9 13 27 37 51 52 21 8 Franklin Lock Olga Fort

  2. High resolution dating of moraines on Kodiak Island, Alaska links Atlantic and North Pacific climatic changes during the late glacial

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, D.H. . Alaska Quaternary Center)

    1992-01-01

    Much less is known about the paleoclimate and paleoceanography of the North Pacific than the North Atlantic despite the North Pacific's important role in the global ocean-climate system. Kodiak Island lies in the northwestern Gulf of Alaska astride the eastern end of the Aleutian Low. On southwestern Kodiak Island, coastal bluffs section a series of moraines, kettle ponds, and bogs formed between 15 and 9 ka BP. Distinctive tephras from volcanoes on the Alaska Peninsula provide time-lines within the stratigraphy. Deformation events recorded in sediment stacks from basins within glaciotectonic landforms allows precise dating of glacial events. An ice cap occupied the Kodiak archipelago during the last glaciation. Three glacial advances of the southwestern margin of this ice cap occurred after 15 ka BP. At 13.4 ka, piedmont ice lobes formed large push moraines extending into Shelikof Strait during the Low Cape Advance. The less-extensive Tundra Advance culminated between 12 and 11.7 ka BP followed by glacier retreat then readvance to form the prominent Olga Moraine system between 11 and 10 ka BP. The timing of the Tundra and Olga Advances correlates closely with that of the Older and Younger Dryas cold episodes in northwestern Europe suggesting that these climatic oscillations were synchronous throughout the northern hemisphere.

  3. Gastritis: the histology report.

    PubMed

    Rugge, Massimo; Pennelli, Gianmaria; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Fassan, Matteo; Ingravallo, Giuseppe; Russo, Valentina M; Di Mario, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    Gastritis is defined as inflammation of the gastric mucosa. In histological terms, it is distinguishable into two main categories, i.e. non-atrophic and atrophic. In the gastric mucosa, atrophy is defined as the loss of appropriate glands. There are several etiological types of gastritis, their different etiology being related to different clinical manifestations and pathological features. Atrophic gastritis (resulting mainly from long-standing Helicobacter pylori infection) is a major risk factor for the onset of (intestinal type) gastric cancer. The extent and site of the atrophic changes correlate significantly with the cancer risk. The current format for histology reporting in cases of gastritis fails to establish an immediate link between gastritis phenotype and risk of malignancy. Building on current knowledge of the biology of gastritis, an international group of pathologists [Operative Link for Gastritis Assessment (OLGA)] has proposed a system for reporting gastritis in terms of its stage (the OLGA Staging System): this system places the histological phenotypes of gastritis on a scale of progressively increasing gastric cancer risk, from the lowest (Stage 0) to the highest (Stage IV). The aim of this tutorial is to provide unequivocal information on how to standardize histology reports on gastritis in diagnostic practice.

  4. The Russian Calendars after the Christianization of the Country

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodossiou, E.; Manimanis, V. N.; Danezis, E.

    2002-01-01

    The Russians became acquainted with the Christian religion in 860 A.D. In the middle of the 10th Century, Princess Olga of Kiev visited Constantinople and was baptized under the name Elene. Later, when her grandson Vladimir became a Christian, all the Russians became Christians too. Moreover, the Russians adopted the Cyrillic alphabet and the Julian calendar. In 1918 the government replaced the Julian calendar with the Gregorian one. However, the Russian Orthodox Church never accepted the Gregorian or the New Rectified Julian calendar. Even today it retains the old Julian calendar. An important but short-lived change in the history of the Russian calendar took place in the year 1929. Then the seven-day week was abolished being substituted with five-day intervals. This attempt was unsuccessful and finally the Soviet government restored the use of the initial Gregorian calendar and the ancient seven-day week.

  5. First chemical separation and identification of Seaborgium

    SciTech Connect

    Tuerler, A.; Eichler, B.; Jost, D.T.; Hoffman, D.C.

    1997-12-31

    The chemical properties of element 106 (Seaborgium, Sg) were successfully studied using the On-line Gas Chromatography Apparatus (OLGA III). After chemical separation of Sg in the form of volatile oxichlorides the nuclides {sup 265}Sg and {sup 266}Sg were unambiguously identified and their half-lives were determined for the first time. The Sg nuclides were produced from the {sup 248}Cm({sup 22}Ne, 4,5n){sup 266,265}Sg reaction at the GSI Darmstadt UNILAC accelerator. Simultaneously, short-lived W nuclides were produced from a small admixture of {sup 152}Gd to the Cm target material. As predicted by relativistic calculations and by extrapolations of chemical properties, it was demonstrated that Sg oxichlorides are indeed less volatile than their lighter homologue W- and Mo-oxichlorides.

  6. A survey of Eupithecia Curtis, 1825 (Lepidoptera, Geometridae, Larentiinae) in Mongolia with descriptions of two new species.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladimir; Galsworthy, Anthony

    2014-03-05

    The Eupithecia fauna of Mongolia is surveyed in this paper, drawing on previous publications and newly collected material. In total 57 species are recorded. Two species Eupithecia anikini Mironov & Galsworthy, sp. n. and Eupithecia munguata Mironov & Galsworthy, sp. n. are described as new. Twelve species are recorded as new for the fauna of Mongolia, E. olgae, E. illaborata, E. bastelbergeri, E. pusillata, E. actaeata, E. vicariata, E. saisanaria, E. simpliciata, E. impolita, E. assimilata, E. thalictrata and E. exactata. Habitus and genitalia are illustrated for new species, and for little known older species where illustrations are not available in recent papers. A further 2 previously described species are synonymised, E. mongolica Vojnits of E. satyrata Hübner, and E. procera Vojnits of E. exactata Staudinger.

  7. Acceleration Disturbances onboard of Geodetic Precision Space Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterseim, Nadja; Jakob, Flury; Schlicht, Anja

    Bartlomiej Oszczak, b@dgps.pl University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland, Olsztyn, Poland Olga Maciejczyk, omaciejczyk@gmail.com Poland In this paper there is presented the study on the parameters of the ASG-EUPOS real-time RTK service NAWGEO such as: accuracy, availability, integrity and continuity. Author's model is used for tests. These parameters enable determination of the quality of received information and practical applications of the service. Paper includes also the subject related to the NAWGEO service and algorithms used in determination of mentioned parameters. The results of accuracy and precision analyses and study on availability demonstrated that NAWGEO service enables a user a position determination with a few centimeters accuracy with high probability in any moment of time.

  8. Using Superconducting Magnet to Reproduce Quick Variations of Gravity in Liquid Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichavant, Guillaume; Beysens, Daniel; Chatain, Denis; Communal, Daniel; Lorin, Clément; Mailfert, Alain

    2011-02-01

    A ground based facility (OLGA), providing magnetic compensation of gravity in oxygen, has been developed. A 2-T superconducting magnetic solenoid is used to create the required magnetic field. A novel electrical supply permits to quickly vary the magnetic field, leading to rapid variation of the acceleration forces applied to oxygen. These variations can be made from overcompensation of gravity (-0.5 g) to zero gravity or from zero gravity to reduced gravity (0.4 g) with a time constant of 340 ms. This time is typical of the cutoff or reignition of spacecraft engines. Preliminary results on the transient flows induced by these acceleration variations in a reservoir filled with liquid and gaseous oxygen are presented.

  9. Earth Observations taken by the Expedition 23 Crew

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-30

    ISS023-E-029806 (30 April 2010) --- Kata Tjuta, Australia is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 23 crew member on the International Space Station. Located in the Northern Territory of Australia, Uluru – Kata Tjuta National Park hosts some of the world’s most spectacular examples of inselbergs, or isolated mountains. The most famous of these inselbergs is Uluru (also known as Ayers Rock). An equally massive inselberg located approximately 30 kilometers to the northwest is known as Kata Tjuta– like Uluru, this is a sacred site to the native Anangu or Aboriginal people. Explorers named the highest peak Mount Olga, with the entire grouping of rocks informally known as “the Olgas”. Mount Olga has a peak elevation of 1,069 meters above sea level, making it 206 meters higher than Uluru. Kata Tjuta is comprised of gently dipping Mount Currie Conglomerate, a sedimentary rock that includes abundant rounded fragments of other rock types (here, primarily granite with less abundant basalt and rhyolite) in a coarse sandy matrix. Geologists interpret the Mount Currie Conglomerate as a remnant of a large fan of material rapidly eroded from mountains uplifted approximately 550 million years ago. Subsequent burial under younger sediments consolidated the eroded materials to form the conglomerate exposed at the surface today. In this photograph, afternoon sunlight highlights the rounded summits of Kata Tjuta against the surrounding sandy plains. Sand dunes are visible at upper right; while in other areas (image top and image left) sediments washed from the rocks have been anchored by a variety of grasses and bushes adapted to the arid climate. Green vegetation in the ephemeral stream channels that drain Kata Tjuta (bottom center) provides colorful contrast with the red rocks and surrounding soils. Large gaps in the rocks (highlighted by shadows) are thought to be fractures that have been enlarged due to erosion.

  10. Large-scale properties of the solar wind in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga; Obridko, Vladimir; Zharkova, Valentina; Veselov, Mikhail

    Since the solar wind phenomenon has been revealed and confirmed, one of the most intriguing problems was to understand processes in the solar atmosphere and their relation with the solar wind characteristics at different distances from the Sun. Analysis of multi-spacecraft measurements of plasma parameters and the interplanetary magnetic field provides us with knowledge about the heliosphere from global to small scales. Comparisons of observations with models, describing small-scale processes, usually give more positive results than in the case of models comparison with the solar wind properties at the scales larger than several proton gyroradii. For example, Parker-like models face with big problems in their attempts to predict the solar wind plasma and, especially, the behaviour of the interplanetary magnetic field. Observations show that the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field depends on heliolatitude and radially decreases with a slope of -5/3 instead of the predicted slope of -2 (Khabarova, Obridko, ApJ, 2012; Khabarova, Astronomy Reports, 2013). This may be determined by small-scale processes occurring in some vicinity of the heliospheric current sheet and related to the magnetic reconnection (Zharkova, Khabarova, ApJ, 2012). In this report we present results of data analysis of eight spacecraft to study variations of plasma, the electric and magnetic field with distance and heliolatitude. begin{enumerate} Zharkova V., Khabarova O., Particle Acceleration in the Reconnecting Heliospheric Current Sheet: Solar Wind Data Versus 3D PIC Simulations, Astrophysical Journal, 2012, V.752, 1, 35 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/752/1/35 begin{enumerate} Khabarova Olga, and Obridko Vladimir, Puzzles of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field in the Inner Heliosphere, 2012, Astrophysical Journal, 761, 2, 82, doi:10.1088/0004-637X/761/2/82 begin{enumerate} Khabarova Olga V., The interplanetary magnetic field: radial and latitudinal dependences. Astronomy Reports, 2013

  11. The origin of fluids and gases in the DFDP-2B borehole, New Zealand; insight from on-line mud gas monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathewson, Loren; Wiersberg, Thomas; Niedermann, Samuel; Erzinger, Joerg; Menzies, Catriona; Toy, Virginia; Zimmer, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) aims to improve our understanding of the Alpine Fault Zone, a tectonically active fault system in New Zealand known to rupture in large events, by deep scientific drilling. The borehole DFDP-2B approached the Alpine Fault at depth, reaching a final depth of 892 m. During drilling, gas was extracted from returning drilling mud and changes in the gas composition were tracked by mass spectrometry (N2, O2, Ar, CO2, CH4, He, and H2), gas chromatography (CH4, C2H6, C3H8, i/n-C4H10), and alpha-spectrometry for 222Rn. The rapid formation of mud wall cake seals the borehole from fluid inflow along the borehole; hence formation-derived gases enter mostly at the drill bit during drilling. Gas was sampled for offline analyses on noble gas and stable isotopes to complement the dataset. Apart from an atmospheric input, the gases in drilling mud derive from the pore space of rock, crushed at the drill bit, and from permeable layers intersected by the borehole. OLGA thus may provide information on fluid origins, flow rates and paths, fluid-rock interactions along these paths, and the permeability structure of the faulted rock mass. The principle formation-derived gases found in drilling mud during drilling of DFDP-2 were CO2 (≤1.7 vol.-%), H2 (<2.5 vol.-%), and CH4 (≤0.18 vol.-%), with minor contributions of He. Zones of enhanced gas concentrations and high radon activity are interpreted to reflect intervals of active fluid flow through highly fractured and faulted rock. Air-corrected 3He/4He values of samples from 236m (0.68 Ra), 610m (1.03 Ra) and 707m (0.63 Ra) show mantle helium contributions similar to those measured in hot springs along the Alpine Fault, e.g. Fox River (0.64 Ra), Copland (0.42 Ra), Lower Wanganui (0.81 Ra). CH4/C2H6 (~20) and δ13C of methane (-31.7 ‰ PDB) underpin a thermogenic origin of hydrocarbons at depths below 600m, while mixing with biogenic gas is indicated at shallower depth (δ13C of methane= -46.7

  12. Investigation of geotechnical parameters from CSEM mapping and monitoring data at the oases Kharga and Baris of Sahara desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachay, Olga; Khachay, Oleg; Attia, Magdy; Khalil, Ahmed; Mekkawi, Mahmoud; Soliman, Mamdouh

    2016-04-01

    The site of investigation, oasis Kharga, is located at about 600 km south of Cairo, Egypt; Baris is about 90 km from Kharga also to south and towards more inside the desert. The work was aimed to investigate the rock mass stability at Baris and to estimate the water intake in the Oasis Kharga. A controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) approach developed earlier by IGF UB RAS (Geophysical Federal Institute, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Science) is applied to image the ranked deformation levels in the massive structure of the Baris. The wide profile system of observation has been used to monitor the three components of the alternating magnetic field along predefined measuring lines in the study area. Here we can show the first results that we shall continue during some cycles of monitoring. The second part of our work was linked with mapping the massif structure inside the oasis City, where only using our device we could construct the geoelectrical sections for 5 profiles and show the real structure of the water volume and its complicated structure up to 200 meters depth recording the values of real not apparent resistivity. The analytical treatments provided good information about the structure of the rock massive and its rank of degradation, the lateral distribution of the geotechnical heterogeneity, and finally a conclusive outcome about foundation stability. We can conclude that the general dynamic state close to the destruction level within the investigation areas is getting worse over the time; this is reflected in the crack's densities and positions, also on the changes in the lateral distribution of geoelectrical heterogeneity as an indicator of the saturation of the surface rock in the study area with water [1,2]. References 1. Magdy A. Atya, Olga A. Hachay, Mamdouh M. Soliman, Oleg Y. Khachay, Ahmed B. Khalill, Mahmoud Gaballah, Fathy F.Shaaban and Ibrahim A.El. Hemali. CSEM imaging of the near surface dynamics and its impact for foundation stability

  13. The magnetic flux excess effect as a consequence of non-Parker radial evolution of interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    The “magnetic flux excess” effect is exceeding of magnetic flux Fs=4π|Br|r2 measured by distant spacecraft over the values obtained through measurements at the Earth’s orbit (Owens et al., JGR, 2008). Theoretically, its conservation should take place at any heliocentric distance r further than 10 solar radii, which means that the difference between the flux measured at 1 AU and Fs observed in another point in the heliosphere should be zero. However, the difference is negative closer to the Sun and increasingly positive at larger heliocentric distances. Possible explanations of this effect are continuously discussed, but the consensus is yet not reached.It is shown that a possible source of this effect is the solar wind expansion not accordingly with the Parker solution at least at low heliolatitudes. The difference between the experimentally found (r-5/3) and commonly used (r-2) radial dependence of the radial component of the IMF Br may lead to mistakes in the IMF point-to-point recalculations (Khabarova & Obridko, ApJ, 2012; Khabarova, Astronomy Reports, 2013). Using the observed Br (r) dependence, it is easy to find the variation of difference between the magnetic flux Fs(r) at certain heliocentric distance r and Fs_1AU at 1 AU, which can be calculated as Fs(r)-Fs_1AU =4π·(B1AU /[1AU]-5/3) (r2-5/3 -[1AU]2-5/3) (Khabarova, Astronomy Reports, 2013).The possible influence of presence of the heliospheric current sheet near the ecliptic plane on the picture of magnetic field lines and consequent deviation from the Parker's model is discussed.- Khabarova Olga, and Obridko Vladimir, Puzzles of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field in the Inner Heliosphere, 2012, Astrophysical Journal, 761, 2, 82, doi:10.1088/0004-637X/761/2/82, http://arxiv.org/pdf/1204.6672v2.pdf- Olga V. Khabarova, The interplanetary magnetic field: radial and latitudinal dependences. Astronomy Reports, 2013, Vol. 57, No. 11, pp. 844-859, http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1305/1305.1204.pdf

  14. Predictability of Malaria Transmission Intensity in the Mpumalanga Province, South Africa, Using Land Surface Climatology and Autoregressive Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grass, David; Jasinski, Michael F.; Govere, John

    2003-01-01

    There has been increasing effort in recent years to employ satellite remotely sensed data to identify and map vector habitat and malaria transmission risk in data sparse environments. In the current investigation, available satellite and other land surface climatology data products are employed in short-term forecasting of infection rates in the Mpumalanga Province of South Africa, using a multivariate autoregressive approach. The climatology variables include precipitation, air temperature and other land surface states computed by the Off-line Land-Surface Global Assimilation System (OLGA) including soil moisture and surface evaporation. Satellite data products include the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and other forcing data used in the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-1) model. Predictions are compared to long- term monthly records of clinical and microscopic diagnoses. The approach addresses the high degree of short-term autocorrelation in the disease and weather time series. The resulting model is able to predict 11 of the 13 months that were classified as high risk during the validation period, indicating the utility of applying antecedent climatic variables to the prediction of malaria incidence for the Mpumalanga Province.

  15. Anton P. Chekhov, MD (1860-1904): dual medical and literary careers.

    PubMed

    Carter, R

    1996-05-01

    This is a story of a physician who was one of the world's greatest short story writers. Anton Pavlovich Chekhov successfully performed dual careers of writing and practicing medicine during a short but productive life. Many biographers overlook Dr Chekhov's role, although his medical training and practice flowed over into his writing, influencing both his subject matter and his style. His stories and plays reveal the insights that Dr Chekhov discovered about the human psyche at work, thus delving into psychosomatic medicine nearly 50 years before its time. Despite orders to stop practicing medicine because of his own deteriorating health, Chekhov devoted himself further to the study of medicine, publishing a landmark study in social medicine that advocated reform of the Russian penal system. Meanwhile, his fictional works earned him the coveted Pushkin prize for the best literary work of the year in 1888. Shortly after celebrating his third wedding anniversary to actress Olga Knipper, Anton Chekhov died at age 44, victim of a nearly lifelong battle with tuberculosis.

  16. Collection methods and descriptions of coral cores extracted from massive corals in Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weinzierl, Michael S.; Reich, Christopher D.; Hickey, T. Donald; Bartlett, Lucy A.; Kuffner, Ilsa B.

    2016-11-29

    Cores from living coral colonies were collected from Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida, U.S.A., to obtain skeletal records of past coral growth and allow geochemical reconstruction of environmental variables during the corals’ centuries-long lifespans. The samples were collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Coral Reef Ecosystems Studies project (http:/coastal.er.usgs.gov/crest) that provides science to assist resource managers tasked with the stewardship of coral reef resources. Three colonies each of the coral species Orbicella faveolata and Siderastrea siderea were collected in May 2012 using the methods described herein and as approved under National Park Service scientific collecting permit number DRTO-2012-SCI-0001 and are cataloged under accession number DRTO-353. These coral samples can be used to retroactively construct environmental parameters, including sea-surface temperature, by measuring the elemental composition of the coral skeleton. The cores described here, and others (see http://olga.er.usgs.gov/coreviewer/), can be requested, on loan, for scientific study. Photographic images for each coral in its ocean environment, the coral cores as curated and slabbed, and the X-rays of the slabs can be found in an associated U.S. Geological Survey Data Release.

  17. Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudritz, Ralph; Higgs, Paul; Stone, Jonathon

    2013-01-01

    Preface; Part I. Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life: 1. Observations of extrasolar planetary systems Shay Zucker; 2. The atmospheres of extrasolar planets L. Jeremy Richardson and Sara Seager; 3. Terrestrial planet formation Edward Thommes; 4. Protoplanetary disks, amino acids and the genetic code Paul Higgs and Ralph Pudritz; 5. Emergent phenomena in biology: the origin of cellular life David Deamer; Part II. Life on Earth: 6. Extremophiles: defining the envelope for the search for life in the Universe Lynn Rothschild; 7. Hyperthermophilic life on Earth - and on Mars? Karl Stetter; 8. Phylogenomics: how far back in the past can we go? Henner Brinkmann, Denis Baurain and Hervé Philippe; 9. Horizontal gene transfer, gene histories and the root of the tree of life Olga Zhaxybayeva and J. Peter Gogarten; 10. Evolutionary innovation versus ecological incumbency Adolf Seilacher; 11. Gradual origins for the Metazoans Alexandra Pontefract and Jonathan Stone; Part III. Life in the Solar System?: 12. The search for life on Mars Chris McKay; 13. Life in the dark dune spots of Mars: a testable hypothesis Eörs Szathmary, Tibor Ganti, Tamas Pocs, Andras Horvath, Akos Kereszturi, Szaniszlo Berzci and Andras Sik; 14. Titan: a new astrobiological vision from the Cassini-Huygens data François Raulin; 15. Europa, the Ocean Moon: tides, permeable ice, and life Richard Greenberg; Index.

  18. Shallow water sea slugs (Gastropoda: Heterobranchia) from the northwestern coast of the Sea of Japan, north of Peter the Great Bay, Russia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The coast of northern Primorye region, north of Peter the Great Bay has been sparsely studied in regards to its molluscan fauna, with just a few works reviewing the distribution of local mollusks. This work presents a survey of the shallow water heterobranch sea slugs currently occurring around Kievka Bay to Oprichnik Bay, Russia. Thirty-nine species of sea slugs were found in this study and the new species Cadlina olgae sp. nov., described herein. Most (24) of the species occurring in the area have widespread ranges in the northern Pacific Ocean. The eight species are endemic for the Sea of Japan and adjacent part of the Sea of Okhotsk. Seven other occur also in northern Atlantic and Arctic waters. Thirteen found species are not known from Peter the Great Bay but known from adjacent northern Pacific waters. The finding of a previously undescribed species emphasizes the need of further surveys, particularly in subtidal and deeper waters, in order to improve the knowledge on this neglected fauna in Primorye. PMID:27957399

  19. Australian Red Dune Sand: A Potential Martian Regolith Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K. R.; Marshall, J.; Evans, N. D.; Luttge, A.

    2001-01-01

    To demonstrate the potential scientific and technical merits of in situ microscopy on Mars, we analyzed a possible Martian regolith analog - an acolian red dune sand from the central Australian desert (near Mt. Olga). This sand was chosen for its ubiquitous red coating and the desert environment in which is it found. Grains of this sand were analyzed using a variety of microanalytical techniques. A database of detailed studies of such terrestrial analogs would assist the study of geological and astrobiological specimens in future missions to Mars. Potential instrument concepts for in situ deployment on Mars include local electrode atom probe nanoanalysis (LEAP), vertical scanning white light interferometry (VSWLI), scanning electron microscopies, energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). While in situ deployment of these techniques is many years away, ground-based studies using these analytical techniques extend our understanding of the data obtained from instruments to be flown in the near future.

  20. Australian Red Dune Sand: A Potential Martian Regolith Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K. R.; Marshall, J.; Evans, N. D.; Luttge, A.

    2001-01-01

    To demonstrate the potential scientific and technical merits of in situ microscopy on Mars, we analyzed a possible Martian regolith analog - an acolian red dune sand from the central Australian desert (near Mt. Olga). This sand was chosen for its ubiquitous red coating and the desert environment in which is it found. Grains of this sand were analyzed using a variety of microanalytical techniques. A database of detailed studies of such terrestrial analogs would assist the study of geological and astrobiological specimens in future missions to Mars. Potential instrument concepts for in situ deployment on Mars include local electrode atom probe nanoanalysis (LEAP), vertical scanning white light interferometry (VSWLI), scanning electron microscopies, energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). While in situ deployment of these techniques is many years away, ground-based studies using these analytical techniques extend our understanding of the data obtained from instruments to be flown in the near future.

  1. Fast Variation of Gravitational Acceleration in Fluids Using Magnetic Levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandikota, G.; Beysens, D.; Chatain, D.; Pichavant, G.; Mailfert, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present an experimental setup (OLGA: Oxygen Low Gravity Apparatus) designed to compensate, partially or totally, gravity forces in a sample of O 2 by means of magnetic forces. The compensation remains within 1 % in a 5 cm 3 volume and within 5 % in a 40 cm 3 volume. The experiments can be carried out at intermediate controlled gravity levels, between Earth (1g 0) and zero (0g 0) gravity by adjusting the magnetic field intensity. The setup can also be used to perform fast variations of gravity, with a time constant of 340ms, from -0.5g 0 maximum (overcompensation) to 0g 0, or from 0g 0 to 0.4g 0 maximum. The sharp acceleration or deceleration of spacecrafts can thus be reproduced to investigate in detail for instance, the transient behavior of life support systems or, when properly rescaled, fuel in rocket tanks. Numerical simulations and experiments also show that high conductive materials (copper) near the cell can modify the magnetic forces during the transient and then the accelerations. In contrast, low conductive materials (titanium) have negligible effect.

  2. Comparison of different methods for the assessment of the urban heat island in Stuttgart, Germany.

    PubMed

    Ketterer, Christine; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    This study of the urban heat island (UHI) aims to support planning authorities by going beyond the traditional way of urban heat island studies. Therefore, air temperature as well as the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) were applied to take into account the effect of the thermal atmosphere on city dwellers. The analysis of the urban heat island phenomenon of Stuttgart, Germany, includes a long-term frequency analysis using data of four urban and one rural meteorological stations. A (high resolution map) of the UHI intensity and PET was created using stepwise multiple linear regression based on data of car traverses as well as spatial data. The mapped conditions were classified according to the long-term frequency analysis. Regarding climate change, the need for adaptation measures as urban greening is obvious. Therefore, a spatial analysis of quantification of two scenarios of a chosen study area was done by the application of a micro-scale model. The nocturnal UHI of Stuttgart is during 15 % stronger than 4 K in the city center during summer when daytime heat stress occurs during 40 %. A typical summer condition is mapped using statistical approach to point out the most strained areas in Stuttgart center and west. According to the model results, the increase in number of trees in a chosen area (Olga hospital) can decrease PET by 0.5 K at 22:00 CET but by maximum 27 K at 14:00 CET.

  3. Free-living nematode species (Nematoda) dwelling in hydrothermal sites of the North Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchesunov, Alexei V.

    2015-12-01

    Morphological descriptions of seven free-living nematode species from hydrothermal sites of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge are presented. Four of them are new for science: Paracanthonchus olgae sp. n. (Chromadorida, Cyatholaimidae), Prochromadora helenae sp. n. (Chromadorida, Chromadoridae), Prochaetosoma ventriverruca sp. n. (Desmodorida, Draconematidae) and Leptolaimus hydrothermalis sp. n. (Plectida, Leptolaimidae). Two species have been previously recorded in hydrothermal habitats, and one species is recorded for the first time in such an environment. Oncholaimus scanicus (Enoplida, Oncholaimidae) was formerly known from only the type locality in non-hydrothermal shallow milieu of the Norway Sea. O. scanicus is a very abundant species in Menez Gwen, Lucky Strike and Lost City hydrothermal sites, and population of the last locality differs from other two in some morphometric characteristics. Desmodora marci (Desmodorida, Desmodoridae) was previously known from other remote deep-sea hydrothermal localities in south-western and north-eastern Pacific. Halomonhystera vandoverae (Monhysterida, Monhysteridae) was described and repeatedly found in mass in Snake Pit hydrothermal site. The whole hydrothermal nematode assemblages are featured by low diversity in comparison with either shelf or deep-sea non-hydrothermal communities. The nematode species list of the Atlantic hydrothermal vents consists of representatives of common shallow-water genera; the new species are also related to some shelf species. On the average, the hydrothermal species differ from those of slope and abyssal plains of comparable depths by larger sizes, diversity of buccal structures, presence of food content in the gut and ripe eggs in uteri.

  4. Summary of the 2nd International Symposium on Arthrogryposis, St. Petersburg, Russia, September 17-19, 2014.

    PubMed

    Hall, Judith G; Agranovich, Olga; Ogranovich, Alga; Pontén, Eva; Pontén, Ava; van Bosse, Harold J P

    2015-06-01

    Enormous progress has been made in understanding the etiology and therapies for arthrogryposis (multiple congenital contractures). A 2nd International Symposium on Arthrogryposis was sponsored by the Turner Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. Olga Agranovich, Head of the Arthrogryposis Department of the Turner Institute, organized this special meeting. Care providers from multiple disciplines from all over the world representing 18 nations attended. Participants included: Pediatric orthopedic specialists, rehabilitation physicians, occupational therapists, physical therapists, medical geneticists, neurologists, craniofacial physicians, psychologists, developmental biologists, as well as representatives from parent support groups. The 1st symposium established the need for a collaborative and interdisciplinary approach to the treatment of arthrogryposis, engagement of parent support organizations, and the aim for more research. The Second Symposium highlighted the continuing need for more research on various therapies, identification of different types of arthrogryposis, standardized descriptions of severity, development of new orthotics, improved prenatal diagnosis, and studying adult outcome. Major progress has been made on both upper and lower limb treatments. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Women in medicine through the ages.

    PubMed

    Zuskin, Eugenija; Pucarin-Cvetkovic, Jasna; Schachter, E N; Mustajbegovic, Jadranka; Vitale, Ksenija; Deckovic-Vukres, Vlasta; Milosevic, M; Jelinic, Jagoda Doko

    2008-01-01

    Female practitioners of the medical arts have been active since the ancient world The role of women in science, and particularly in medicine, has changed significantly over time. We provide a chronological review of the growing knowledge in medicine related to women's activities through the ages with particular attention to occupational medicine. Throughout history hazards have been shaped by the forces that shape work itself social evolution, shifting economic powers and demographic changes. Mythical Greece, Egypt and ancient Rome were the cradle of ancient medicine. In the past century, women were allowed to enter the medical profession with increasing acceptance. Some of the most important women in ancient and modern medicine are recalled, such as Mother Peseshet in ancient Egypt, Artemisia of Caria and Phanostrate and Philista in the Greek period, Hildegard of Bingen, Marie Marguerite Biheron in England, Elisabeth Blackwell, Emily Jennings, Maude E. Abbott and others. Women in occupational medicine are described separately, such as Alice Hamilton, Harriet L. Hardy, Molly Newhouse and Olga Macek. Certainly, the first few women who iluminated the way for the generations that followed them into medicine, the women who made outstanding contributions to medicine, and the women who are currently finding success in medicine deserve our respect and admiration.

  6. New Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize announced for 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    At the 2011 Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., AGU announced the creation of a new award: the Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize. The prize, which is being made possible by a generous contribution from longtime AGU members and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, scientists Bruce Tsurutani and Olga Verkhoglyadova, will recognize an AGU member scientist and will come with a $10,000 award. Tsurutani has served as a researcher with JPL since 1972 and is currently a senior research scientist. He was also the president of AGU's Space Physics and Aeronomy section from 1990 to 1992 and is a recipient of AGU's John Adam Fleming Medal, given “for original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, space physics, and related sciences.” Verkhoglyadova served as a professor of space physics in the Department of Astrophysics and Space Physics at Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, in the Ukraine, prior to coming to the United States. Their leadership and dedication to AGU and to their field are apparent in their passion for this prize.

  7. BIOSYNTHESIS OF ERGOTHIONEINE AND HERCYNINE BY MYCOBACTERIA

    PubMed Central

    Genghof, Dorothy S.; Damme, Olga Van

    1964-01-01

    Genghof, Dorothy S. (Yeshiva University, New York, N.Y.), and Olga Van Damme. Biosynthesis of ergothioneine and hercynine by mycobacteria. J. Bacteriol. 87:852–862. 1964.—Ergothioneine and hercynine were found to be synthesized by a wide variety of mycobacteria grown in chemically defined media free from these compounds. The cultures examined included 53 recently isolated and laboratory strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, 26 “unclassified” mycobacteria (Runyon groups I to IV), and representatives of most other species in the genus. Purification and separation of the betaines was achieved by means of chromatography on two successive alumina columns. Photometric measurement of the diazotized effluents from the second column permitted amounts of each compound to be determined. Measurement of hercynine by this method was made possible for the first time by the development of a standard curve. The pathway of ergothioneine biosynthesis in mycobacteria, as judged by the use S35-sulfate and l-histidine-2-C14 as tracers, appears similar to that found in Neurospora crassa and Claviceps purpurea, that is, from histidine to ergothioneine via hercynine. None of a small group of bacteria other than mycobacteria was found to produce ergothioneine. Two strains of group A streptococci and one of Escherichia coli produced hercyninelike material, as yet unidentified. PMID:14137624

  8. The STS-91 crew participate in the CEIT for their mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. Seen here are STS-91 Mission Specialist Valery Ryumin with the Russian Space Agency and his Russian Interpreter Olga Belozerova.

  9. The STS-91 crew participate in the CEIT for their mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. From left to right are STS-91 Pilot Dominic Gorie, STS-91 Commander Charles Precourt, Boeing SPACEHAB Payload Operations Senior Engineer Jim Behling, Boeing SPACEHAB Program Senior Engineer Shawn Hicks, Boeing SPACEHAB Program Specialist in Engineering Ed Saenger, STS-91 Mission Specialist Valery Ryumin with the Russian Space Agency, Boeing SPACEHAB Program Manager in Engineering Brad Reid, and Russian Interpreter Olga Belozerova.

  10. The STS-91 crew participate in the CEIT for their mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. From left to right are STS-91 Pilot Dominic Gorie, Russian Interpreter Olga Belozerova, STS-91 Commander Charles Precourt, and STS-91 Mission Specialist Valery Ryumin with the Russian Space Agency.

  11. The STS-91 crew participate in the CEIT for their mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. From left to right are STS-91 Pilot Dominic Gorie, STS-91 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., STS-91 Commander Charles Precourt, Boeing SPACEHAB Program Senior Engineer Shawn Hicks, Russian Interpreter Olga Belozerova, and STS-91 Mission Specialist Valery Ryumin with the Russian Space Agency.

  12. The STS-91 crew participate in the CEIT for their mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The STS-91 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their upcoming Space Shuttle mission at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-91 will be the ninth and final scheduled Mir docking and will include a single module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Discovery and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nearly 10-day flight of STS-91 also is scheduled to include the return of the last astronaut to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost, Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Ph.D. Liftoff of Discovery and its six-member crew is targeted for May 28, 1998, at 8:05 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. From left to right are Mission Specialist Janet Kavandi, Ph.D., Pilot Dominic Gorie, Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., Commander Charles Precourt, Russian Interpreter Olga Belozerova, and Mission Specialist Valery Ryumin with the Russian Space Agency.

  13. Comparison of different methods for the assessment of the urban heat island in Stuttgart, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketterer, Christine; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    This study of the urban heat island (UHI) aims to support planning authorities by going beyond the traditional way of urban heat island studies. Therefore, air temperature as well as the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) were applied to take into account the effect of the thermal atmosphere on city dwellers. The analysis of the urban heat island phenomenon of Stuttgart, Germany, includes a long-term frequency analysis using data of four urban and one rural meteorological stations. A (high resolution map) of the UHI intensity and PET was created using stepwise multiple linear regression based on data of car traverses as well as spatial data. The mapped conditions were classified according to the long-term frequency analysis. Regarding climate change, the need for adaptation measures as urban greening is obvious. Therefore, a spatial analysis of quantification of two scenarios of a chosen study area was done by the application of a micro-scale model. The nocturnal UHI of Stuttgart is during 15 % stronger than 4 K in the city center during summer when daytime heat stress occurs during 40 %. A typical summer condition is mapped using statistical approach to point out the most strained areas in Stuttgart center and west. According to the model results, the increase in number of trees in a chosen area (Olga hospital) can decrease PET by 0.5 K at 22:00 CET but by maximum 27 K at 14:00 CET.

  14. Population based Helicobacter pylori screening and eradication: advances versus side effects.

    PubMed

    Tepes, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the world and second most common reason for cancer related death. Projections for the future predict that gastric cancer incidence will continue to rise. Risk factors for gastric cancer are Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection, host genetic factors and environmental factors. H pylori is a class I carcinogen and responsible for 60 % - 80 % of all gastric cancers of intestinal and diffuse type, as well as gastric MALT lymphoma. From animal and intervention studies we know that premalignant gastric lesions development and gastric cancer can be prevented with early H pylori eradication. In countries with gastric cancer incidence higher than 20 / 100 000 per year national screening for H pylori infection and eradication of all H pylori infections should be performed. Type of eradication therapy depends on local antimicrobial resistance rates. Quadruple bismuth or non- bismuth therapies can achive more than 90 % eradication rate. The success of eradication therapy must be controlled with noninvasive test. Patients with extensive preneoplastic changes (atrophy, intestinal metaplasia) should have endoscopic and histologic controls. Endoscopic screening should be performed in intervals according to the risk stratification by OLGA / OLGIM staging system or A-D staging system. In countries with high gastric cancer incidence national screening with serological tests for pepsinogen I (PGI), PGI/PGII ratio and H pylori antibodies can select patients at higher risk for gastric cancer.

  15. Report on the 2011 Critical Assessment of Function Annotation (CAFA) meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, Iddo

    2015-01-21

    The Critical Assessment of Function Annotation meeting was held July 14-15, 2011 at the Austria Conference Center in Vienna, Austria. There were 73 registered delegates at the meeting. We thank the DOE for this award. It helped us organize and support a scientific meeting AFP 2011 as a special interest group (SIG) meeting associated with the ISMB 2011 conference. The conference was held in Vienna, Austria, in July 2011. The AFP SIG was held on July 15-16, 2011 (immediately preceding the conference). The meeting consisted of two components, the first being a series of talks (invited and contributed) and discussion sections dedicated to protein function research, with an emphasis on the theory and practice of computational methods utilized in functional annotation. The second component provided a large-scale assessment of computational methods through participation in the Critical Assessment of Functional Annotation (CAFA). The meeting was exciting and, based on feedback, quite successful. There were 73 registered participants. The schedule was only slightly different from the one proposed, due to two cancellations. Dr. Olga Troyanskaya has canceled and we invited Dr. David Jones instead. Similarly, instead of Dr. Richard Roberts, Dr. Simon Kasif gave a closing keynote. The remaining invited speakers were Janet Thornton (EBI) and Amos Bairoch (University of Geneva).

  16. Isolation and Physicochemical Characterization of Laccase from Ganoderma lucidum-CDBT1 Isolated from Its Native Habitat in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Prabin; Joshi, Bishnu; Joshi, Jarina; Malla, Rajani; Sreerama, Lakshmaiah

    2016-01-01

    At present, few organisms are known to and capable of naturally producing laccases and white rot fungi are one such group. In the present study, three fungal species, namely, Ganoderma lucidum-CDBT1, Ganoderma japonicum, and Lentinula edodes, isolated from their native habitat in Nepal were screened for laccase production, and G. lucidum-CDBT1 was found to express highest levels of enzyme (day 10 culture media showed 0.92 IU/mg total protein or 92 IU/mL laccase activity with ABTS as substrate). Lignin extracted from rice straw was used in Olga medium for laccase production and isolation from G. lucidum-CDBT1. Presence of lignin (5 g/L) and copper sulfate (30 μM) in the media increased the extracellular laccase content by 111% and 114%, respectively. The laccase enzyme produced by G. lucidum-CDBT1 was fractionated by ammonium sulfate and purified by DEAE Sepharose anion exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme was found to have a molecular mass of 43 kDa and exhibits optimal activity at pH 5.0 and 30°C. The isolated laccase was thermally stable for up to 70°C for 1 h and exhibited broad pH stability. The kinetic constants, Km , Vmax, and Kcat, determined using 2,2'-azinobis-(-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) as substrate were found to be 110 μM, 36 μmol/min/mg, and 246 min(-1), respectively. The isolated thermostable laccase will be used in future experiments for delignification process.

  17. Isolation and Physicochemical Characterization of Laccase from Ganoderma lucidum-CDBT1 Isolated from Its Native Habitat in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Jarina; Malla, Rajani

    2016-01-01

    At present, few organisms are known to and capable of naturally producing laccases and white rot fungi are one such group. In the present study, three fungal species, namely, Ganoderma lucidum-CDBT1, Ganoderma japonicum, and Lentinula edodes, isolated from their native habitat in Nepal were screened for laccase production, and G. lucidum-CDBT1 was found to express highest levels of enzyme (day 10 culture media showed 0.92 IU/mg total protein or 92 IU/mL laccase activity with ABTS as substrate). Lignin extracted from rice straw was used in Olga medium for laccase production and isolation from G. lucidum-CDBT1. Presence of lignin (5 g/L) and copper sulfate (30 μM) in the media increased the extracellular laccase content by 111% and 114%, respectively. The laccase enzyme produced by G. lucidum-CDBT1 was fractionated by ammonium sulfate and purified by DEAE Sepharose anion exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme was found to have a molecular mass of 43 kDa and exhibits optimal activity at pH 5.0 and 30°C. The isolated laccase was thermally stable for up to 70°C for 1 h and exhibited broad pH stability. The kinetic constants, Km, Vmax, and Kcat, determined using 2,2′-azinobis-(-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) as substrate were found to be 110 μM, 36 μmol/min/mg, and 246 min−1, respectively. The isolated thermostable laccase will be used in future experiments for delignification process. PMID:27822471

  18. Ancient founder mutation is responsible for Imerslund-Gräsbeck Syndrome among diverse ethnicities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (IGS) was described just over 50 years ago by Olga Imerslund and Ralph Gräsbeck and colleagues. IGS is caused by specific malabsorption of cobalamin (Cbl) due to bi-allelic mutations in either the cubilin gene (CUBN) or the human amnionless homolog (AMN). Mutations in the two genes are commonly seen in founder populations or in societies with a high degree of consanguineous marriages. One particular mutation in AMN, c.208-2A>G, causing an out-of-frame loss of exon 4 in the mRNA, is responsible for some 15% of IGS cases globally. We present evidence that this founder mutation causes a substantial percentage of cases among diverse ethnicities and that the mutation is as old as human civilization. Methods Partial genotyping indicated a founder event but its presence in diverse peoples of Arabic, Turkish, Jewish, and Hispanic ancestry suggested that the mutation might be recurrent. We therefore studied the flanking sequence spanning 3.5 Mb to elucidate the origin of the haplotype and estimate the age of the mutation using a Bayesian inference method based on observed linkage disequilibrium. Results The mutation's distribution, the size of the shared haplotype, and estimates of growth rate and carrier frequency indicated that the mutation was a single prehistoric event. Dating back to the ancient Middle East around 11,600 BC, the mutation predates the advent of writing, farming, and the monotheistic religions of the region. Conclusions This mutation causes over 50% of the IGS cases among Arabic, Turkish, and Sephardic Jewish families, making it a primary target for genetic screening among diverse IGS cases originating from the Middle East. Thus, rare founder mutations may cause a substantial number of cases, even among diverse ethnicities not usually thought to be related. PMID:22078000

  19. Access and success with less: improving productivity in broad-access postsecondary institutions.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Davis; Rodríguez, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Achieving national goals for increased college completion in a time of scarce resources will require the postsecondary institutions that enroll the majority of undergraduates--community colleges and less-selective public universities--to graduate more students at a lower cost. Davis Jenkins and Olga Rodriguez examine research on how these "broad-access" institutions can do so without sacrificing access or quality. Research indicates that the strategies broad-access institutions have relied on in the past to cut costs--using part-time instructors and increasing student-faculty ratios--may in fact reduce productivity and efficiency. The limited evidence available suggests that some of the most popular strategies for improving student success are not cost-effective. New strategies to cut costs and improve college success are therefore imperative. Some believe that redesigning courses to make use of instructional technologies will lead to better outcomes at lower cost, although the evidence is mixed. Recently, a growing number of institutions are going beyond redesigning courses and instead changing the way they organize programs and supports along the student's "pathway" through college. These efforts are promising, but their effects on cost per completion are not yet certain. Meager funding has so far hampered efforts by policy makers to fund colleges based on outcomes rather than how many students they enroll, but some states are beginning to increase the share of appropriations tied to outcomes. Jenkins and Rodriquez argue that as policy makers push colleges to lower the cost per graduate, they must avoid providing incentives to lower academic standards. They encourage policy makers to capitalize on recent research on the economic value of postsecondary education to measure quality, and urge colleges and universities to redouble efforts to define learning outcomes and measure student mastery.

  20. Gastric cancer: Prevention, screening and early diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Pasechnikov, Victor; Chukov, Sergej; Fedorov, Evgeny; Kikuste, Ilze; Leja, Marcis

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer continues to be an important healthcare problem from a global perspective. Most of the cases in the Western world are diagnosed at late stages when the treatment is largely ineffective. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a well-established carcinogen for gastric cancer. While lifestyle factors are important, the efficacy of interventions in their modification, as in the use of antioxidant supplements, is unconvincing. No organized screening programs can be found outside Asia (Japan and South Korea). Although several screening approaches have been proposed, including indirect atrophy detection by measuring pepsinogen in the circulation, none of them have so far been implemented, and more study data is required to justify any implementation. Mass eradication of H. pylori in high-risk areas tends to be cost-effective, but its adverse effects and resistance remain a concern. Searches for new screening biomarkers, including microRNA and cancer-autoantibody panels, as well as detection of volatile organic compounds in the breath, are in progress. Endoscopy with a proper biopsy follow-up remains the standard for early detection of cancer and related premalignant lesions. At the same time, new advanced high-resolution endoscopic technologies are showing promising results with respect to diagnosing mucosal lesions visually and targeting each biopsy. New histological risk stratifications (classifications), including OLGA and OLGIM, have recently been developed. This review addresses the current means for gastric cancer primary and secondary prevention, the available and emerging methods for screening, and new developments in endoscopic detection of early lesions of the stomach. PMID:25320521

  1. Enhancements of Tow-Steering Design Techniques: Design of Rectangular Panel Under Combined Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatting, Brian F.; Setoodeh, Shahriar; Gurdal, Zafer

    2005-01-01

    An extension to existing design tools that utilize tow-steering is presented which is used to investigate the use of elastic tailoring for a flat panel with a central hole under combined loads of compression and shear. The elastic tailoring is characterized by tow-steering within individual lamina as well as a novel approach based on selective reinforcement, which attempts to minimize compliance through the use of Cellular Automata design concepts. The selective reinforcement designs lack any consideration of manufacturing constraints, so a new tow-steered path definition was developed to translate the prototype selective reinforcement designs into manufacturable plies. The minimum weight design of a flat panel under combined loading was based on a model provided by NASA-Langley personnel and analyzed by STAGS within the OLGA design environment. Baseline designs using traditional straight fiber plies were generated, as well as tow-steered designs which incorporated parallel, tow-drop, and overlap plies within the laminate. These results indicated that the overlap method provided the best improvement with regards to weight and performance as compared to traditional constant stiffness monocoque panels, though the laminates did not measure up to similar designs from the literature using sandwich and isogrid constructions. Further design studies were conducted using various numbers of the selective reinforcement plies at the core and outer surface of the laminate. None of these configurations exhibited notable advantages with regard to weight or buckling performance. This was due to the fact that the minimization of the compliance tended to direct the major stresses toward the center of the panel, which decreased the ability of the structure to withstand loads leading to instability.

  2. Online gas monitoring and sampling during drilling of the INFLUINS borehole EF-FB 1/12 into the Thuringian Syncline, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görlitz, Marco; Abratis, Michael; Wiersberg, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Online monitoring and sampling of drill mud gas (OLGA) was conducted during standard rotary drilling and core drilling of the INFLUINS borehole EF-FB 1/12 to gain information on the composition of gases and their distribution at depth within the Thuringian Syncline (Germany). The method can help to identify areas of enhanced permeability and/or porosity, open fractures, and other strata associated with gases at depth. The gas-loaded drill mud was continuously degassed in a modified gas-water separator, which was installed in the mud ditch in close distance to the drill mud outlet. The extracted gas phase was pumped in a nearby field laboratory for continuous on-line analysis. First information on the gas composition (H2, He, N2, O2, CO2, CH4, Ar, Kr) was available only few minutes after gas extraction. More than 40 gas samples were taken from the gas line during drilling and pumping tests for further laboratory studies. Enhanced concentration of methane, helium, hydrogen and carbon dioxide were detected in drill mud when the drill hole encountered gas-rich strata. Down to a depth of 620 m, the drill mud contained maximum concentration of 55 ppmv He, 1400 ppmv of CH4, 400 ppmv of hydrogen and 1.1 vol-% of CO2. The drilling mud gas composition is linked with the drilled strata. Buntsandstein and Muschelkalk show different formation gas composition and are therefore hydraulically separated. Except for helium, the overall abundance of formation gases in drilling mud is relatively low. We therefore consider the INFLUINS borehole to be dry. The correlation between hydrogen and helium and the relatively high helium abundance rules out any artificial origin of hydrogen and suggest a radiolytic origin of hydrogen. Values CH4/(C2H6/C3H8)

  3. Gastric cancer: prevention, screening and early diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pasechnikov, Victor; Chukov, Sergej; Fedorov, Evgeny; Kikuste, Ilze; Leja, Marcis

    2014-10-14

    Gastric cancer continues to be an important healthcare problem from a global perspective. Most of the cases in the Western world are diagnosed at late stages when the treatment is largely ineffective. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a well-established carcinogen for gastric cancer. While lifestyle factors are important, the efficacy of interventions in their modification, as in the use of antioxidant supplements, is unconvincing. No organized screening programs can be found outside Asia (Japan and South Korea). Although several screening approaches have been proposed, including indirect atrophy detection by measuring pepsinogen in the circulation, none of them have so far been implemented, and more study data is required to justify any implementation. Mass eradication of H. pylori in high-risk areas tends to be cost-effective, but its adverse effects and resistance remain a concern. Searches for new screening biomarkers, including microRNA and cancer-autoantibody panels, as well as detection of volatile organic compounds in the breath, are in progress. Endoscopy with a proper biopsy follow-up remains the standard for early detection of cancer and related premalignant lesions. At the same time, new advanced high-resolution endoscopic technologies are showing promising results with respect to diagnosing mucosal lesions visually and targeting each biopsy. New histological risk stratifications (classifications), including OLGA and OLGIM, have recently been developed. This review addresses the current means for gastric cancer primary and secondary prevention, the available and emerging methods for screening, and new developments in endoscopic detection of early lesions of the stomach.

  4. Estimating the geotechnical Parameters from CSEM monitoring Data for the Buildings and the Environment at the City of 15th May, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachay, Olga; Atya, Magdy; Khachay, Oleg

    2015-04-01

    The site of investigation, 15th May city, is a new suburb of Helwan, at about 35 km south of Cairo, Egypt. The work is aimed to investigate the rock mass stability at "Quarter 27" in 15th May City, which is linked with cracks formation into the buildings. A controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) approach developed earlier by IGF UB RAS (Geophysical Federal Institute, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Science) is applied to image the ranked deformation levels in the massive structure. The wide profile system of observation has been used to monitor the three components of the alternating magnetic field along predefined measuring lines in the study area. Four cycles of observation have been carried out in 2008, 2010, 2011, and 2012. The acquired data sets have been subjected to analytical processing procedure to estimate the changes in the geotechnical parameters during the time of these four cycles of observation. The analytical treatments provided good information about the structure of the rock massive and its rank of degradation, the lateral distribution of the geotechnical heterogeneity, and finally a conclusive outcome about foundation stability. We conclude that the general dynamic state close to the destruction level within the investigation area is getting worse over the time; this is reflected in the crack's densities and positions, also on the changes in the lateral distribution of geoelectric heterogeneity as an indicator of the saturation of the surface rock in the study area with water [1]. Reference 1. Magdy A. Atya, Olga A. Hachay, Mamdouh M. Soliman, Oleg Y. Khachay, Ahmed B. Khalill, Mahmoud Gaballah, Fathy F.Shaaban and Ibrahim A.El. Hemali. CSEM imaging of the near surface dynamics and its impact for foundation stability at quarter 27,15-th of May City, Helwan, Egypt. // Earth sciences research journal, 2010,Vol.14, N1, p.76-87.

  5. Estimating the Soil Instability from CSEM Monitoring Data at the City of 15th May, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachay, Olga, ,, Prof.; Atya, Magdy, ,, Prof.; Khachay, Oleg; El Sayed, El Said A. El Sayed1 A.

    2014-05-01

    The site of investigation, 15th May city, is a new suburb of Helwan, at about 35 km south of Cairo, Egypt. The work is aimed to investigate the rock mass stability at 'Quarter 27' in 15th May City. A controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) approach developed earlier by IGF UB RAS (Geophysical Federal Institute, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Science) is applied to image the ranked deformation levels in the massive structure. The wide profile system of observation has been used to monitor the three components of the alternating magnetic field along predefined measuring lines in the study area. Four cycles of observation have been carried out in 2008, 2010, 2011, and 2012. The acquired data sets have been subjected to analytical processing procedure to estimate the changes in the geotechnical parameters during the time of these four cycles of observation. The analytical treatments provided good information about the structure of the rock massive and its rank of degradation, the lateral distribution of the geotechnical heterogeneity, and finally a conclusive outcome about foundation stability. We conclude that the general dynamic state close to the destruction level within the investigation area is getting worse over the time; this is reflected in the crack's densities and positions, also on the changes in the lateral distribution of geoelectric heterogeneity as an indicator of the saturation of the surface rock in the study area with water [1]. 1. Magdy A. Atya, Olga A. Hachay, Mamdouh M. Soliman, Oleg Y. Khachay, Ahmed B. Khalill, Mahmoud Gaballah, Fathy F.Shaaban and Ibrahim A.El. Hemali. CSEM imaging of the near surface dynamics and its impact for foundation stability at quarter 27,15-th of May City, Helwan, Egypt. // Earth sciences research journal, 2010,Vol.14, N1, p.76-87.

  6. Unlocking the secrets of the universe, Rosetta lander named Philae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-02-01

    Philae is the island in the river Nile on which an obelisk was found that had a bilingual inscription including the names of Cleopatra and Ptolemy in Egyptian hieroglyphs. This provided the French historian Jean-François Champollion with the final clues that enabled him to decipher the hieroglyphs of the Rosetta Stone and unlock the secrets of the civilisation of ancient Egypt. Just as the Philae Obelisk and the Rosetta Stone provided the keys to an ancient civilisation, the Philae lander and the Rosetta orbiter aim to unlock the mysteries of the oldest building blocks of our Solar System - comets. Germany, France, Italy and Hungary are the main contributors to the lander, working together with Austria, Finland, Ireland and the UK. The main contributors held national competitions to select the most appropriate name. Philae was proposed by 15-year-old Serena Olga Vismara from Arluno near Milan, Italy. Her hobbies are reading and surfing the internet, where she got the idea of naming the lander Philae. Her prize will be a visit to Kourou to attend the Rosetta launch. Study of Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko will allow scientists to look back 4600 million years to an epoch when no planets existed and only a vast swarm of asteroids and comets surrounded the Sun. On arrival at the comet in 2014, Philae will be commanded to self-eject from the orbiter and unfold its three legs, ready for a gentle touchdown. Immediately after touchdown, a harpoon will be fired to anchor Philae to the ground and prevent it escaping from the comet's extremely weak gravity. The legs can rotate, lift or tilt to return Philae to an upright position. Philae will determine the physical properties of the comet's surface and subsurface and their chemical, mineralogical and isotopic composition. This will complement the orbiter's studies of the overall characterisation of the comet's dynamic properties and surface morphology. Philae may provide the final clues enabling the Rosetta mission to unlock

  7. [CLINICAL AND ENDOSCOPIC, MORPHOLOGIC AND IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL FEATURES OF GASTRIC ULCER IN H. PYLORI-INFECTED INDIVIDUALS RECEIVING CYTOTOXIC THERAPY].

    PubMed

    Sazonova, O V; Davydkin, I L; Osadchuk, A M; Gritsenko, T A

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prognostic significance of the expression of molecules of PCNA, Bcl-2, NF-Kb and tachykinins (substance P, neurokinin A) in patients with gastric ulcer (CU) receiving cytotoxic therapy. Total surveyed 90 patients divided into 3. equal groups. The first comparison group consisted of patients with chronic atrophic H. pylori-associated gastritis (CAG) (30 pers.). A second control group consisted of patients with gastric ulcer (30 pers.). Third, the study group consisted of 30 people. with CU suffering from hematological malignancies, in a period of complete clinical remission of the disease and receiving supportive polychemotherapy (PCT). Patients underwent endoscopy, morphological and immunohistochemical study of the mucous membrane of the antrum and body of the stomach to detect the expression of molecules of PCNA, Bcl-2, neurokinin A, substance P and factor Nf-Kb. The total level of dyspeptic syndrome on visual scale analogue in patients receiving chemotherapy and GU (GUpct) was significantly higher (p < 0.05) compared with patients with GU. It should be noted that patients with GUpct reducing clinical symptoms is much slower (p < 0.05). At the same time in 13 (43.3%) patients with GUpct determines the duration of ulcer healing, whereas in patients with GU in only 4 (13.3%) patients. Patients with GUpct more frequently (p < 0.05) were verified II and stage Ill chronic gastritis (CG), while Stage I--less (p < 0.05). Patients with GUpct significantly more often (p<0.05) was determined by the II degree of CG and significantly less (p < 0.05)--IV degree. Patients with GUpct determined significantly lower (p < 0.05), the expression performance PCNA, substance P and neurokinin A and higher (p < 0.05)--Bcl-2 and factor Nf-kB. GU in patients receiving chemotherapy, dyspeptic syndrome is characterized by severe, advanced stage of CG on the background of relatively low severity of CG in accordance with the classification of OLGA (2008). Patients with GUpht

  8. Coral cores collected in Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida, U.S.A.: Photographs and X-rays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Weinzierl, Michael S.; Reich, Christopher D.; Bartlett, Lucy A.; Flannery, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Cores from living coral colonies were collected from Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida, to obtain skeletal records of past coral growth and allow geochemical reconstruction of environmental variables during the corals’ centuries-long lifespans. The samples were collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coral Reef Ecosystems Studies project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/crest/) that provides science to assist resource managers tasked with the stewardship of coral reef resources. Three colonies each of the coral species Orbicella faveolata and Siderastrea siderea were collected in May 2012 as approved under National Park Service (NPS) scientific collecting permit number DRTO-2012-SCI-0001. These coral samples can be used to retroactively construct sea-surface temperature records by measuring the elemental ratio of strontium (Sr) to calcium (Ca), and are valuable for measuring additional paleoproxies as new methods are developed. Flannery et al. (In press) includes temperature reconstructions using samples from one of the six (coral CG2) collected in this study. The core slabs described here, as well as others (see http://olga.er.usgs.gov/coreviewer/), can be requested on loan for further scientific study. Here we provide photographic images for each core depicting 1) the coral in its ocean environment, 2) the core as curated and slabbed, and 3) the X-rays of the slabs. More information on coring methods can be found in the associated U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2016-1182 (Weinzierl et al., 2016). These coral samples are presently on loan from the NPS, stored at the USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center in St. Petersburg, Florida, and cataloged under accession number DRTO-353.Flannery, J. A., J. N. Richey, K. Thirumalai, R. Z. Poore, and K. L. DeLong, in press, Multi-species coral Sr/Ca based sea-surface temperature reconstruction using Orbicella faveolata and Siderastrea siderea from the Florida Straits: Palaeogeography

  9. [Ol'ha Petrivna Chepinoha--a founder of investigations of nucleic acids in biochemistry in Ukraine. To the 100th anniversary of birthday, 1.07.1907--27.04.1983].

    PubMed

    Vynohradova, R P

    2008-01-01

    Olga Petrivna Chepinoga, doctor of science (biology), senior scientific worker, was born on July 1, 1907, in Kyiv. She graduated from the 1st Kyiv Medical Institute (1927-1931). In 1931-1935 she worked at various medical institutions of Ukraine. In 1935 O. P. Chepinoga was employed by the Institute of Biochemistry of the National Academy of Sciences of the Ukr.SSR as a laborant, then as an assistant, junior and senior scientific worker. In 1940 O. P. Chepinoga defended a thesis for a Candidate's degree, and from 1941 she was given a rank of the senior scientific worker. During the Great Patriotic War she served in the armed forces of the Soviet Army (1941-1945) as a medical officer in the rank of captain. In 1944-1963 she worked at the Instutute of Biochemistry of the AS of the Ukr.SSR as a senior scientific worker, and in 1963-1965 headed the Laboratory of Nucleic Acids. In 1952 O. P. Chepinoga defended a thesis for Doctor's degree in biology On Biologic Role of Nucleic Acids. Investigations of O. P. Chepinoga were first devoted to oxidation processes in muscles in various physiologic conditions, physico-chemical properties of myosin and its ATPase activity. Since 1948 her scientific interests had been concentrating on studying the biologic role and metabolism of nucleic acids, their transformation in the organism in norm and in pathological states. She was the first to find that various proteins interacted with DNA molecule. The highest activity of DNAse and RNAse was revealed in the organs which permanently synthesize proteins (liver, spleen, pancreas). Under quantitative undifferentiated growth of malignant tumors (Brown-Pierse carcinoma and Crocker sarcoma) the great part belongs to the process of DNA disintegrations; DNAse activity increases considerably in the animal and human blood that is not observed at other somatic diseases and is of great diagnostic value. Considerable shifts in DNAse activity at various pathologies were not found. The enrichment of

  10. [It is a long way from Slagelse to Sebastopol].

    PubMed

    Braun, E

    1999-01-01

    Frederik Lov, Olga Kulago, participated in the defense of Sebastopol in 1942 and was evacuated to Caucasus. After the war she studied medicine and graduated in 1950. She worked as an obstetrician until her retirement in 1977.

  11. Gas Phase Chromatography of some Group 4, 5, and 6 Halides

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, Eric Robert

    1998-10-01

    Gas phase chromatography using The Heavy Element Volatility Instrument (HEVI) and the On Line Gas Apparatus (OLGA III) was used to determine volatilities of ZrBr4, HfBr4, RfBr4, NbBr5, TaOBr3, HaCl5, WBr6, FrBr, and BiBr3. Short-lived isotopes of Zr, Hf, Rf, Nb, Ta, Ha, W, and Bi were produced via compound nucleus reactions at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and transported to the experimental apparatus using a He gas transport system. The isotopes were halogenated, separated from the other reaction products, and their volatilities determined by isothermal gas phase chromatography. Adsorption Enthalpy (ΔHa) values for these compounds were calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation program modeling the gas phase chromatography column. All bromides showed lower volatility than molecules of similar molecular structures formed as chlorides, but followed similar trends by central element. Tantalum was observed to form the oxybromide, analogous to the formation of the oxychloride under the same conditions. For the group 4 elements, the following order in volatility and ΔHa was observed: RfBr4 > ZrBr4 > HfBr4. The ΔHa values determined for the group 4, 5, and 6 halides are in general agreement with other experimental data and theoretical predictions. Preliminary experiments were performed on Me-bromides. A new measurement of the half-life of 261Rf was performed. 261Rf was produced via the 248Cm(18O, 5n) reaction and observed with a half-life of 74-6+7 seconds, in excellent agreement with the previous measurement of 78-6+11 seconds. We recommend a new half-life of 75±7 seconds for 261Rf based on these two measurements. Preliminary studies in transforming HEVI from an isothermal (constant

  12. Effect of nursery nitrogen application of bare-root Larix olgensis seedlings on growth, nitrogen uptake and initial field performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo Lei; Zhu, Yan; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Le; Shi, Wenhui; Liu, Jiajia; Wang, Jiaxi; Cheng, Zhongqian

    2013-01-01

    Nursery nitrogen application has been used to improve seedling quality. The technique has received little attention with bare-root seedlings and their subsequent field performance on weed competition sites. Our research objective was to examine responses of one- and two- year-old bare-root Olga Bay larch (Larix olgensis Henry) seedlings to nursery nitrogen supplements and subsequent one-year field performance on a competitive site. The fertilizer levels (kg N ha(-1)) were 0 (control), 60 (conventional fertilization, 60 C), 120 (additional nitrogen applied two times, 120 L), 180 (additional nitrogen applied three times, 180 L) and N were applied in increments of 30 kg ha(-1 )at 15-day interval to maintain a base nutrient level Although pre-planting morphological attributes and nitrogen status of one-year-old (la) seedlings were more sensitive to 60 C than for two-year-old (2a) seedlings, the conventional application failed to enhance their field survival (15.6% vs 17.8%), relative height growth (89.0% vs 79.6%), and relative diameter growth (17.0% vs 22.9%). The la seedlings' field survival (15.6% for 0, 17.8% for 60 C) and 2a seedlings' relative height growth rate (11.0% for 0, 8.9% for 60 C) were not increased significantly until they were provided the 120 L (survival of 23.3% for la, relative height growth rate of 15.0% for 2a). According to pre-planting attributes and field performance, optimum nursery nitrogen application was 120 L for the 2a seedlings and 180 L for la seedlings. Except for component nitrogen concentration, pre-planting morphological attributes and component N content for the 2a seedlings were as much 3.3 to 37.7 times that of la seedlings. In conclusion, the contrasting survival of poor (15.6%-28.9%) for la seedlings and high (84.4%-91.1%) for 2a seedlings indicated that additional nitrogen fertilizer would not equal the benefits of an another year's growth in the nursery. Successful reforestation could not be fulfilled by la seedlings

  13. Results of the round table "Impact of natural and man-made hazards on urban areas"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostenaru-Dan, Maria; Olga Gociman, Cristina; Hostiuc, Constantin; Mihaila, Marina; Gheorghe (Popovici), Diana Alexandra; Anghelache, Mirela Adriana; Dutu, Andreea; Tascu-Stavre, Miroslav

    2015-04-01

    On Thursday the 6th of November a round table was organised at the Centre of Architectural and Urban Studies of the "Ion Mincu" University of Architecture and Urban Planning on the topic of this session. It included a review of the previous editions, and an outlook to the edition this year. We shared publications, and a publication is in work from the round table itself. The series of round tables at the Centre of Architectural and Urban Studies is an innitiative of Constantin Hostiuc, the secretary general of the centre. This round table was organised by Maria Bostenaru Dan, and moderated by Cristina Olga Gociman, who currently runs a project on a related topic. From the various ways to approach the effects of hazards, up to the disatrous ones, on urban areas, we consider the most suitable the approach to the impact. From the point of view of natural sciences and of the engineering ones this was approached a number of times, and newly social sciences are included as well. The role of planning and design for a better prevention, and even post-disaster intervention is ignored many times though. The goal of the round table was to bring together multidisciplinary approaches (architecture, urban planning, seismology, geography, structural engineering, ecology, communication sciences, art history) on a problem set from this point of view. Discussed topics were: 1. Assessment and mapping methods of the impact of natural hazards on urban areas (preventive, postdisaster) 2. Visualisation and communication techniques of the assessed impact, including GIS, internet, 3D 3. Strategies for the reduction of the impact of natural hazards on urban areas 4. Suitable methods of urban design for the mitigation of the effects of disasters in multihazard case 5. Partnership models among the involved actors in the decision process for disaster mitigaton 6. Urban planning instruments for risc management strategies (ex. master plan) 7. Lessons learned from the relationship between hazard

  14. Online guideline assist in intensive care medicine--is the login-authentication a sufficient trigger for reminders?

    PubMed

    Röhrig, Rainer; Meister, Markus; Michel-Backofen, Achim; Sedlmayr, Martin; Uphus, Dirk; Katzer, Christian; Rose, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Rising cost pressure due to the implementation of the DRG-System and quality assurance lead to an increased use of therapy standards and standard operating procedures (SOPs) in intensive care medicine. The intention of the German Scientific Society supported project "OLGA" (Online Guideline Assist) is to develop a prototype of a knowledge based system supporting physicians of an intensive care unit in recognizing the indication for and selecting a specific guideline or SOP. While the response of the prototype on user entries can be displayed as a signal on the used workstation itself, the location and time for a reminder of scheduled or missed procedures or reactions to imported information is a difficult issue. One possible approach to this task is the display of non acknowledged reminders or recommendations while logging on to a system. The objective of this study is to analyse user behaviour of the physicians working on the surgical intensive care unit to decide whether the login authentication is a sufficient trigger for clinical reminding. The surgical intensive care unit examined in this study comprises 14 beds. Medical care is provided by physicians working in shifts 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, with two anaesthetists at a time and an additional senior consultant during daytime. The entire documentation (examinations, medication, orders, care) is performed using the patient data management system ICUData. The authentication process of the physicians was logged and analysed. Throughout the observation period from December 13th 2005 to January 11th 2006 3563 physician logins were counted in total. The mean span between logins was in 11.3 minutes (SD 14.4), the median 7 minutes. The 75% centile was 14 minutes, the 95% centile 38 min. Intervals greater than 60 minutes occurred in 75%, and greater than 90 minutes in 25% of the days. It seems reasonable that reminders sent during authentication are able to enforce workflow compliance. It is possible to send

  15. Sequence variability of Rhizobiales orthologs and relationship with physico-chemical characteristics of proteins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    , volume and electrostatic charge. Conclusions These findings revealed that even when orthologs perform the same function in each genomic background, their sequences reveal important evolutionary tendencies and differences related to adaptation. This article was reviewed by: Dr. Purificación López-García, Prof. Jeffrey Townsend (nominated by Dr. J. Peter Gogarten), and Ms. Olga Kamneva. PMID:21970442

  16. Development of Extended Content Standards for Biodiversity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugo, Wim; Schmidt, Jochen; Saarenmaa, Hannu

    2013-04-01

    , SOS, NetCDF), with a use-case dependent 'payload' embedded into the data stream. This enables the re-use of the abstract schema, and sometimes the implementation specification (for example XML, JSON, or NetCDF conventions) across services. An explicit aim will be to make the XML implementation specification re-usable as a DwC and a GML (SOS end WFS) extension. (1) Olga Lyashevska, Keith D. Farnsworth, How many dimensions of biodiversity do we need?, Ecological Indicators, Volume 18, July 2012, Pages 485-492, ISSN 1470-160X, 10.1016/j.ecolind.2011.12.016. (2) GEO BON: Workshop on Essential Biodiversity Variables (27-29 February 2012, Frascati, Italy). (http://www.earthobservations.org/geobon_docs_20120227.shtml)

  17. Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashonkina, Lyudmila I.

    2013-05-01

    The JENAM symposium "Physics of Stars" took place on the 5th and 6th July of 2011 in Saint-Petersburg. This symposium had a wide-ranging look at observational and theoretical studies of stars and stellar systems. Several talks were devoted to accurate determination of fundamental stellar parameters, such as star's mass, radius, effective temperature, surface gravity, chemical composition. This is particularly crucial to fully exploit the data from the new generation of large ground-based telescopes and future space missions like the GAIA one. Viktor Orlov reported the measurements of stellar mass for a few multiple systems and also the investigation of their dynamical stability. To improve the determination of parameters of the components in an eclipsing binary system including a Wolf-Rayet star, Eleonora Antokhina and her co-workers updated their synthesis model by accounting for the absorption in the expanding stellar wind. The variable stars are excellent laboratories to study the physical processes either occurring at certain stages of stellar evolution or caused by the interaction of a star with its companion or circumstellar medium. Nikolay Samus reported the discovery of hundreds of new variable stars in their work on digitalization of the Moscow stacks of sky photographs. The exotic star VSX J052807.9+725606, with a very strong asymmetry of maxima, wavelength dependence of amplitude, and the shift of the secondary minimum from the phase 0.5, was discovered by Natalia Virnina. Michael E. Contadakis and his co-workers presented the additional observational evidences for weak transient optical oscillations of the red dwarf AD Leo. Spectral variability of the two massive luminous stars in the M33 galaxy was studied by Olga Maryeva. Alex Dudorov and Sergei Zamozdra and Alexander Grigoriev et al. discussed the theoretical and observational problems of star formation. Galina Dremova presented the numerical algorithm for computing the tidal torque constants for a

  18. Verochka Zingan or recollections from the Physics Department of the Moscow University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex; Gaina, Danielle A.

    . Laufer, Yu. El'nitskii, Gh. Nemtoi, Yu. Oprunenko, N.N. Semenov, Varun Sahni, A.A. Starobinskii, Liusea Burca, Serge Rollet, Tatyana Davydova, Zinaida Uglichina (Khafizova), T.Filippova, V.S. Filippov, Vera Zingan (Stefanovici), B.A. Gaina, E.F. Gaina, Valeri Gaina, A. Kirnitskii, M. Kavalerchik, Margarita Kavalerchik, Mark Rainis, L.I. Sedov, D. Mangeron, S. Taltu (Coanda), Z. Sali(Chitoroaga, Kitoroage), Raisa M. Gorbachova, Maria Bulgaru, S. Pavlichenko, Nadezhda Shishkan, A.N. Matveev, N.Ya. Tyapunina, D.F. Kiselev, V.A. Petukhov, N.Ch. Krutitskaya, G.N. Medvedev, A.A. Shishkin,I.A. Shishmarev,A.G. Sveshnikov, A.B. Vasil'eva, A.G. Yagola, I.I. Ol'hovskii, V.V. Kravtsov, V.V.Petkevich, V.I. Grigor'ev, V.S. Rostovskii, V.V. Balashov, B.I. Spasskii, V.D. Krivchenkov, M.B. Menskii, V.Ya. Fainberg, V.G. Kadyshevskii, B.K. Kerimov, V.A. Matveev, I.A. Kvasnikov, D.V. Gal'tsov, V.R. Khalilov, G.A. Chizhov,I.A. Obukhov, V.N. Melnikov, A.A. Logunov, A.N. Tavkhelidze,Yu.S. Vladimirov, N.F. Florea (Floria), B.A. Lysov, V.D. Kukin, 601-academic group (1977), A.R. Khokhlov, P.L. Kapitza, S.P. Kapitza, Ion C. Inculet, Ion I. Inculet,W. Bittner, Nikolay Florea (Floria), M.M. Heraskov, N.V. Sklifosovskii, N.N. Bantysh-Kamenskii, N.D. Zelinskii, Olga Crusevan (Krushevan), Eugenia Crusevan (Krushevan),L.S. Berg, I. Buzdugan (Buzdyga),S.G. Lazo, M.K. Grebenchya (Grebencea), V.T. Kondurar (Conduraru), E.A. Grebenikov, K.F. Teodorchik, V.A. Albitzky, M.V. Nazarov, Tatiana Nazarova, V. P. Oleinikov, O.V. Bolshakov, D.M. Nikolaev, V. Afanas'ev, Olga Tatarinskaya, Yu.V. Karaganchou, B.A. Volkov, V.K. Turta, S. Varzar, C. Sochichiu, V.B. Braginsky, V.S. Fursov, L.I. Brezhnev, V.I. Sobolev (INP MSU), V.A. Smirnov (INP MSU), L.D. Landau, M.A. Leontovich, A.G. Loskutova, Yu.M. Loskutov, N.S. Akulov, V.B. Gostev, A.R. Frenkin, N.N. Kolesnikov, A. Vasil'ev, V.N. Tsytovich, Ya.A. Frenkel, N.V. Mitskievich, E.A. Grebenikov, A.N. Prokopenya, A. Einstein, L.I. Sedov, A.N. Kolmogorov, V.I. Arnold, G

  19. Quetiapine extended release versus aripiprazole in children and adolescents with first-episode psychosis: the multicentre, double-blind, randomised tolerability and efficacy of antipsychotics (TEA) trial.

    PubMed

    Pagsberg, Anne Katrine; Jeppesen, Pia; Klauber, Dea Gowers; Jensen, Karsten Gjessing; Rudå, Ditte; Stentebjerg-Olesen, Marie; Jantzen, Peter; Rasmussen, Simone; Saldeen, Eva Ann-Sofie; Lauritsen, Maj-Britt Glenn; Bilenberg, Niels; Stenstrøm, Anne Dorte; Nyvang, Louise; Madsen, Sarah; Werge, Thomas M; Lange, Theis; Gluud, Christian; Skoog, Maria; Winkel, Per; Jepsen, Jens Richardt M; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Correll, Christoph U; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2017-08-01

    in severity of psychopathology after 12 weeks of treatment. Quetiapine-ER was associated with more metabolic adverse events and aripiprazole with more initial akathisia and, unexpectedly, more sedation. The limited antipsychotic efficacy and high level of adverse events were noticeable. This trial provides novel information for the treatment of early-onset psychosis and highlights the importance of adverse event profiles when choosing among antipsychotics for children and adolescents who often require chronic treatment. The National Research Council for Health and Disease Foundation for Health Promotion, AP Møller Foundation, Rosalie Petersens Foundation, Stevn and Rindom Foundation, Foundation for the Promotion of Medical Science, The Capital Region Psychiatric Research Foundation, Tryg Foundation, Region of Southern Denmark Research Foundation, Danish Psychiatric Research Educational Fund, Psychiatry Foundation, Foundation of 17-12-1981, Psychiatric Research Foundation Region Zealand, Capital Region Strategic Research Foundation, Knud og Dagny Andresens Foundation, Psychiatric Research Foundation of 1967, The Capital Region Research Foundation, Dr Sofus Carl Emil Friis and Hustru Olga Friis Scholarship, Tømrerhandler Johannes Fogs Foundation, Brdr Hartmanns Foundation DKK, Aase and Ejnar Danielsens Foundation, Jacob Madsen and wife Olga Madsens Foundation, CC Klestrup and wife Scholarship, Lundbeck Foundation Scholarship, and Tømrermester Jørgen Holm and wife Elisas Scholarship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Key mechanisms of metabolic changes in mountain pine and larch under drought in the Swiss National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churakova, Olga; Bigler, Christof; Bryukhanova, Marina; Siegwolf, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    intrinsic water use efficiency. Carbon isotopes ratios of specific sugar compounds such as sucrose, raffinose, fructose, ribose and pinitol in needle and wood samples will help to evaluate the impact of drought on the carbohydrate balance and carbon allocation. Analyzing the oxygen isotopic compositions of soil water, sap water (water in branches) and precipitation we will determine the role of the different water sources for tree growth under drought conditions. The proposed work will provide a unique opportunity to assess the survival potential of mountain pine and larch trees exposed to drought that will help to estimate risks of modern climatic changes and forest damage. This project was supported by Marie Heim-Vögtlin Programme PMPDP2_145507/1 granted to Olga Churakova (Sidorova). References: Allen CD et al. (2010) A global overview of drought and heat-induced tree mortality reveals emerging climate change risks for forests Forest Ecology and Management 259:660-684 Bigler C, Rigling A (2013) Precision and accuracy of tree-ring-based death dates of mountain pines in the Swiss National Park. Trees - Structure and Function. 27: 1703-1712 CH 2011 Swiss Climate Change Scenarios CH2011. In. C2SM, MeteoSwiss, ETH, NCCR Climate, and OcCC, p 88

  1. Geomorphic Processes Along the Coastal Cliff, Central Coastline - Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, J. Y.

    2007-12-01

    A study aimed at finding the nature, rate and causes of the morphological changes in the coastal cliff in central part of Israeli coastline, was carried out between 1991 and 1996, along the coast of Michmoret - Giv'at Olga, Israel. The stratigraphical sequence of this cliff, which is of Pleistocene age, consists of alternating layers of Kurkar (a carbonate cemented quartz eolianite) and Hamra (a red brown sandy loam). The morphological changes occurring in the coastal cliff were documented, prior, during and immediately after storms, by field observation, redundant surveying and photography. The retreat of the coastal cliff is composed of several steps. As a rule the moisture level in the Hamra layers is higher than that of the Kurkar layers because of the higher content of silt and clay in the Hamra. During the rainy season the increase of moisture in the Hamra increases the relative weight and lowers its friction. This in turn intensifies the process of rill development in the Hamra layers and slides of material from this layer occur. As a result the overlying Kurkar remains without support, until the overhanging Kurkar breaks down and falls to the bottom of the cliff. The debris, which accumulates at the foot of the cliff, forms a moderate slope and a stable cliff profile, which prevents continuation of the erosion process. This does not last for long, because sea waves remove the debris from the foot of the cliff leaving it with a precipitous slope and vulnerable to further erosion. The magnitude of the landslide or rock fall event determines, to a certain degree, the frequency of the event. The larger the event, the less likely another landslide or rock fall will occur at the same point in the near future. Losses of soil and rill development at the cliff slopes are a result of runoff action. The wind action has an effect on the erosion of the coastal cliff by blowing the loose sand from Kurkar and Hamra layers. The main factors influencing the changes (retreat

  2. A Giant of Astronomy and a Quantum of Solace - James Bond filming at Paranal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-03-01

    our director, Marc Forster and production designer, Dennis Gassner, both for its exceptional design and its remote location in the Atacama desert. It is a true oasis and the perfect hide-out for Dominic Greene, our villain, whom 007 is tracking in our new James Bond film." In addition to the shooting at the Residencia, further action will take place at the Paranal airstrip. The film crew present on Paranal includes Englishman Daniel Craig, taking again the role of James Bond, French actor Mathieu Amalric, leading lady Olga Kurylenko, from the Ukraine, as well as acclaimed Mexican actors, Joaquin Cosio and Jesus Ochoa. This cast from across Europe and Latin America mirrors the international staff that works for ESO at Paranal. After leaving Paranal at the end of the week, the film crew will shoot in other locations close to Antofagasta. Other sequences have been filmed in Panama and, following the Chilean locations, the unit will be travelling to Italy and Austria before returning to Pinewood Studios near London in May. QUANTUM OF SOLACE will be released in the UK on 31 October 2008, and in the US and internationally on 7 November 2008.

  3. A Long-Term Space Astrophysics Research Program: The Evolution of the Quasar Continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, M.; Oliversen, Ronald K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Four papers have been written. One reports on the major study funded by this grant: a pan-chromatic study of the quasar continuum at redshift 3. Two others make use of the quasar continuum shapes to find the minimum total accretion luminosity of the Universe, and hence the efficiency and spin of supermassive black holes; the second shows that the reemission of absorbed quasar radiation alleviates a major problem with galaxy formation and the FIR background. The last paper recognizes the role quasars may play in the initial formation of dust in the early Universe. The major study of a sample of z=3 and its comparison with a sample of z=0.l quasars across the whole X-ray to radio spectrum was completed and accepted for publication in ApJ Supplements. This study comprises the thesis work of Olga Kuhn. The two samples are matched in evolved luminosity, and so should be sampling the same black hole population at different z, and in different accretion states. Despite this no strong differences were found between the samples, except in the 'small bump' region of the optical/UV. This region is dominated by FeII emission, and may indicate abundance evolution in quasars. The lack of overall spectral changes argues strongly against a single population of quasars fading over cosmic time, and for a multiple generation, or multiple outburst model for quasars. A study of the total luminosity absorbed from quasars and re-emitted in the infrared produced two results (reported in two papers): The minimum intrinsic luminosity/Gpc(3) from AGN compared with the measured mass density in supermassive black holes [Gpc(-3)] requires a conversion efficiency of accreted mass into luminosity of greater than 15%. Non-rotating black holes cannot exceed 5% efficiency, while rapidly rotating black holes can reach 47%. Hence our result requires that most supermassive black holes must be rapidly rotating. The second result comes from considering the contribution that the re-radiated quasar

  4. In memoriam: George Martin Baer, DVM, MPH, 1936-2009. The father of oral rabies vaccination.

    PubMed

    Grunenwald, Paul E

    2009-01-01

    George Martin Baer, known for his development of the oral rabies vaccine instrumental in rabies control in Europe, died on 2 June 2009 at the age of 73 in Mexico City, Mexico. He was born on 12 January 1936 in London, England, to German immigrants who had fled Nazi Germany. His family emigrated to the United States in 1940 where he grew up in New Rochelle, New York. George had a love of animals, particularly horses, which may have influenced his career path. He earned an undergraduate degree in agricultural sciences in 1954 from Cornell University followed by a degree in veterinary medicine in 1959. He then went on to earn a master's degree in public health in 1960 from the University of Michigan. During some time in Mexico, George met and fell in love with his wife, Maria Olga Lara. Thanks to James H. Steele, his long-time friend and mentor, he started his public health career with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and was assigned to the New York State Health Department where he learned epidemiology and virology. He went on to work on bat rabies at the CDC's Southwest Rabies Investigations Laboratory in New Mexico. From 1966 to 1969, he worked with the National Institute for Livestock Research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Pecuarias: INIP) in Mexico and helped develop the Plan Derriengue to control paralytic bovine rabies which became the early work in the development of Mexico's rabies control programmes. He returned to Atlanta in 1969 to direct the CDC Rabies Laboratory. There, he led a team of researchers in developing an oral rabies vaccine for wildlife, earning him the title 'The Father of Oral Rabies Vaccination'. His text, The Natural History of Rabies, first published in 1975 and again in 1991, continues to be a definitive international reference for rabies control. After his retirement, George returned to Mexico and continued his research and training, working to develop not only public health programmes, but new researchers as well. At the

  5. Decay properties of {sup 265}Sg(Z=106) and {sup 266}Sg(Z=106)

    SciTech Connect

    Tuerler, A.; Dressler, R.; Eichler, B.; Gaeggeler, H.W.; Jost, D.T. |; Schaedel, M.; Bruechle, W.; Gregorich, K.E.; Trautmann, N.; Taut, S.

    1998-04-01

    The presently known most neutron-rich isotopes of element 106 (seaborgium, Sg), {sup 265}Sg and {sup 266}Sg, were produced in the fusion reaction {sup 22}Ne+{sup 248}Cm at beam energies of 121 and 123 MeV. Using the On-Line Gas chemistry Apparatus OLGA, a continuous separation of Sg was achieved within a few seconds. Final products were assayed by {alpha}-particle and spontaneous fission (SF) spectrometry. {sup 265}Sg and {sup 266}Sg were identified by observing time correlated {alpha}-{alpha}-({alpha}) and {alpha}-SF decay chains. A total of 13 correlated decay chains of {sup 265}Sg (with an estimated number of 2.8 random correlations) and 3 decay chains of {sup 266}Sg (0.6 random correlations) were identified. Deduced decay properties were T{sub 1/2}=7.4{sub {minus}2.7}{sup +3.3} s (68{percent} c.i.) and E{sub {alpha}}=8.69 MeV (8{percent}), 8.76 MeV (23{percent}), 8.84 MeV (46{percent}), and 8.94 MeV (23{percent}) for {sup 265}Sg; and T{sub 1/2}=21{sub {minus}12}{sup +20} s (68{percent} c.i.) and E{sub {alpha}}=8.52 MeV (33{percent}) and 8.77 MeV (66{percent}) for {sup 266}Sg. The resolution of the detectors was between 50{endash}100 keV (full width at half maximum). Upper limits for SF of {le}35{percent} and {le}82{percent} were established for {sup 265}Sg and {sup 266}Sg, respectively. The upper limits for SF are given with a 16{percent} error probability. Using the lower error limits of the half-lives of {sup 265}Sg and {sup 266}Sg, the resulting lower limits for the partial SF half-lives are T{sub 1/2}{sup SF}({sup 265}Sg){ge}13 s and T{sub 1/2}{sup SF}({sup 266}Sg){ge}11 s. Correspondingly, the partial {alpha}-decay half-lives are between T{sub 1/2}{sup {alpha}}({sup 265}Sg)=4.7{endash}16.5 s (68{percent} c.i.) and T{sub 1/2}{sup {alpha}}({sup 266}Sg)=9{endash}228 s (68{percent} c.i.), using the upper and lower error limits of the half-lives of {sup 265}Sg and {sup 266}Sg. The lower limit on the partial SF half-life of {sup 266}Sg is in good agreement with

  6. Environmental Project of I.E.S. Antoni Maura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespi Salom, Pere

    2010-05-01

    Environmental Project of I.E.S. Antoni Maura Author(s): Pere Crespí i Salom Teacher of Department of Biology and Geology and Environmental Coordinator (2009-2010) from I.E.S. Antoni Maura . Mallorca. Illes Balears. Spain Teachers participating in the project : Myriam Fuentes Milani, Olga Ballester Nebot, Antoni Salom Ruiz, Julio René Loayza Casanova, Puy Aguirre Rémirez, Yolanda Martínez Laserna, Jaume Puppo Lama, Carme Arrom , Dolors Aguiló Segura, Marga Ordinas Boter, Angel Fernàndez Albertí , Immaculada Suau López, Antònia Florit Torrandell, Isabel Mateu Arcos, Román Piña Valls i Pere Crespí Salom. Our institute takes part since 2004 in adapting environmentally the schools in the Balearics which consists of developing activities which aim is that both teachers and students acquire habits so as to apply to their ordinary lives though different participative commissions ( 10-15 teachers): 1st commission: recycling and reusing materials. Enough bins in the classrooms and floors: yellow for plastic, blue for paper, and green for the other. We tend to use recycled materials in different celebrations such as Carnival, Christmas, Saint Jordi and Environmental day. We also organise workshops for the teachers to develop afterwards with the students and nature of environmental exposures. 2nd commission: Scatter information ( MonMaura, Maurifull, Green window and website).Throughout different means we inform the teachers and students about all the school activities and where to consult.( www.iesantonimaura.net, Playful area , environmental project ). 3rd commission: Reusing text books.( there is a students service of borrowing books and giving them back at the end of the school year if the book is in good use.) 4th commission: Improving the school surroundings, the back garden and garden with native plants. Department of Biology and Geology is responsible for caring for an organic garden and in turn improve the center's garden with native plants within the

  7. EDITORIAL: XIII Mexican Workshop on Particles and Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco, Juan; Contreras, Guillermo; Delepine, David; Napsuciale, Mauro

    2012-08-01

    Electroweak and Flavor Physics in whose classification we had Quark masses and mixing, Electroweak Symmetry Breaking, Heavy Quark Physics, Neutrinos, CP Violation, CKM and Rare Decays. The working group for this topic was formed by David Delepine, Lorenzo Díaz, Gerardo Herrera and Olga Félix Beltrán. The three topics included invited talks dedicated to reviewing theoretical and experimental aspects of the corresponding topic. We had also plenary topical sessions during the mornings and early afternoons and parallel thematic sessions were held late in the afternoons. The reviews sessions were delivered by invited speakers of international prestige on the corresponding subjects and having an active collaboration with the Mexican scientific community. The plenary topical sessions and parallel thematic sessions were given by active researchers both from abroad and working in México. The program included also a permanent poster session and the organizing committee awarded the best poster - a decision made by the three working groups - with a silver medal. On Sunday 23 October, we had an excursion to the ancient archaeological site of Plazuelas near Penjamo (Guanajuato). Plazuelas is a prehispanic archaeological site located just north of San Juan el Alto, some 2.7 kilometers north of federal highway 90 (Penjamo-Guadalajara), and about 11 kilometers west of the city of Penjamo in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico. The site has been recently opened to the public. This site is a very complex city, it was edified following the natural landscape surrounding it. This city was occupied between 600 and 900 a.C. After spending some time at this very interesting archaeological site, we went to Hacienda Corralejo, an hacienda where Tequila Corralejo is produced and we had a guided visit of the 'Tequilera' where the famous Corralejo blue bottle of Tequila is made. Hacienda Corralejo is very close to the orginal Hacienda where Miguel Hidalgo (a Mexican independence hero) was born which now

  8. Leaf and wood carbon isotope ratios, specific leaf areas and wood growth of Eucalyptus species across a rainfall gradient in Australia.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Turner, Neil C; Nicolle, Dean; Schumacher, Jens

    2006-04-01

    Leaves and samples of recent wood of Eucalyptus species were collected along a rainfall gradient parallel to the coast of Western Australia between Perth in the north and Walpole in the south and along a southwest to northeast transect from Walpole in southwestern Australia, to near Mount Olga in central Australia. The collection included 65 species of Eucalyptus sampled at 73 sites and many of the species were collected at several sites along the rainfall gradient. Specific leaf area (SLA) and isotopic ratio of 13C to 12C (delta 13C) of leaves that grew in 2002, and tree ring growth and delta 13C of individual cell layers of the wood were measured. Rainfall data were obtained from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology for 29 locations that represented one or a few closely located collection sites. Site-averaged data and species-specific values of delta 13C decreased with decreasing annual rainfall between 1200 and 300 mm at a rate of 1.63 per thousand per 1000 mm decrease in rainfall. Responses became variable in the low rainfall region (< 300 mm), with some species showing decreasing delta 13C with rainfall, whereas delta 13C increased or remained constant in other species. The range of delta 13C values in the low rainfall region was as large as the range observed at sites receiving > 300 mm of annual rainfall. Specific leaf area varied between 2 and 6 m2 kg(-1) and tended to increase with decreasing annual rainfall in some species, but not all, whereas delta 13C decreased with SLA. The relationship between delta 13C and SLA was highly species and soil-type specific. Leaf-area-based nitrogen (N) content varied between 2 and almost 6 g m(-2) and decreased with rainfall. Thus, thicker leaves were associated with higher N content and this compensated for the effect of drought on delta 13C. Nitrogen content was also related to soil type and species identity. Based on a linear mixed model, statistical analysis of the whole data set showed that 27% of the variation in

  9. Argonne National Laboratory summary site environmental report for calendar year 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.

    2009-05-22

    , partners divided work equally and began to carefully summarize. Groups summaries were edited, not only within groups, but also by other groups, in order to acquire a different perspective. Finally, Mr. Howard, our Biology II instructor, took a final look at the products before sending them off for the final review by Argonne. The final project was a 16-page pamphlet. The students reacted positively to the project. Asked if she was glad that she chose to work on the Argonne project, Katie Hanson said, 'Yes. I have enjoyed having the opportunity to become a published author. Also, it is an honor to be able to work with a prestigious, nationally recognized laboratory such as Argonne'. There were difficult aspects as well. Student Olga Zagariya said the hardest part of the project was 'trying to choose which information to put in the summary and which information to leave out, because it all seemed to be important'. It seems that everyone was satisfied with his or her section.

  10. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijevic, M. S.; Popovic, L. C.

    . Orlov Paolo Paolicchi Paul Paquet Genadij I. Pinigin Sylvie Sahal-Brechot Dan Selaru N. D. Simonenko Eduardo Simonneau A. Shul'ga Magdalena Stavinschi Cristina Stoica T. I. Suchkova Emil Tatomir Svetlana A. Tolchelnikova-Muri V. I. Turenkov Margarita Yu. Volyanskaya A. Yu. Yacenko Vincento Zappala G. Zhen-Nian We are grateful to these authors for having chosen our journal, thereby conferring on the Serbian Astronomical Journal an international standing. This is also a suitable opportunity to thank the numerous referees who contributed to our Journal being better. During this period the referees officially registered (a number of them, mainly belonging to the editorial boards, remain unregistered) have been (in Brackets is the number of papers they reviewed): Trajko Angelov (11) Jelisaveta Arsenijevic (4) Olga Atanackovic-Vukmanovic (4) Milutin Blagojevic (1) Markyan S. Chubey (1) B. Ciric (2) Miodrag Dacic (2) Milan S. Dimitrijevic (43) Gojko Djurasevic (1) B. Djuric (1) Dragutin Djurovic (5) Stevica Djurovic (3) Petar Grujic (5) Slobodan Jankov (1) Zoran Knezevic (7) Nikola Konjevic (6) Vladimir Krsljanin (2) Aleksandar Kubicela (12) Mike Kuzmanoski (10) Jaroslav Labat (1) Jovan Lazovic (1) Ilija Lukacevic (5) Jovan Malisic (1) Milan Mijatov (1) Jelena Milogradov-Turin (2) Vladeta Milovanovic (6) Ljubisa Mitic (22) Radovan Mrkic (1) Ranko Muzijevic (4) Slobodan Ninkovic (30) Dragomir Olevic (3) Nada Pejovic (1) Georgije Popovic (18) Luka C. Popovic (12) Sofija Sadzakov (28) Jovan Simovljevic (7) Nicholas Spyrou (1) Bozidar Stanic (1) Miroljub Starcevic (1) S. Starcevic (1) Magdalena Stavinschi (1) Dragoljub Stefanovic (1) Dusan Saletic (9) Stevo Segan (1) Branislav Sevarlic (16) Djordje Teleki (10) Istvan Vince (42) Mirjana Vukicevic-Karabin (1) Vincento Zappala (1) Danilo Zulevic (2) In our register, in which M.S.D. began entering the submitted articles from January 1st, 1984, up to now, 455 of them are inscribed. A part of them has been published in Publications of

  11. Experimental investigation of effect of surface gravity waves and spray on heat and momentum flux at strong wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Vdovin, Maxim; Kandaurov, Alexander; Ermakova, Olga; Kazakov, Vassily

    2015-04-01

    instability. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation of Basic Research (13-05-00865, 14-05-91767, 13-05-12093, 15-05-) and Alexander Kandaurov, Maxim Vdovin and Olga Ermakova acknowledge partial support from Russian Science Foundation (Agreement No. 14-17-00667).

  12. PREFACE: International Conference on Inverse Problems 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Yiu-Chung; Ling, Leevan

    2011-03-01

    Sciences, South KoreaYu Jiang, Hokkaido University, JapanDe-Xing Kong, Zhejiang University, ChinaOlga Krivorotko, Novosibirsk State University, RussiaPhilipp Küegler, Austrian Academy of Sciences, AustriaKiwoon Kwon, Dongguk University, South KoreaChun-Kong Law, National Sun Yat-sen University, TaiwanJune-Yub Lee, Ewha Womans University, South KoreaMing Li, City University of Hong Kong, HKSARMikyoung Lim, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), South KoreaJijun Liu, Southeast University, ChinaXiaodong Liu, Chinese Academy of Sciences, ChinaFuming Ma, Jilin University, ChinaHang Ma, Shanghai University, ChinaValdemar Melicher, Ghent University, BelgiumGen Nakamura, Hokkaido University, JapanLong Tuan Nguyen, Ruhr-Universitat Bochum, GermanyEtibar Panakhov, Firat University, TurkeyRobert Plato, University of Siegen, GermanyJean-Pierre Puel, The University of Tokyo, JapanHans-Jürgen Reinhardt, University of Siegen, GermanyMaxim Shishlenin, Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, RussiaIlya Silvestrov, Institute of Petroleum Geology and Geophysics SB RAS, RussiaMourad Sini, Austrian Academy of Sciences, AustriaJán Sládek, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SlovakiaZhijun Tan, Sun Yat-sen University, ChinaQuan-Fang Wang, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, HKSARWenyan Wang, The University of Tokyo, JapanPihua Wen, Queen Mary, University of London, UKZhihai Xiang, Tsinghua University, ChinaXiang-Tuan Xiong, Northwest Normal University, ChinaDinghua Xu, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, ChinaYongzhi Steve Xu, University of Louisville, USAJiaqing Yang, Chinese Academy of Sciences, ChinaJian Zhang, Sichuan Normal University, ChinaYing Zhang, Fudan University, ChinaTing Zhou, University of Washington, USAJianxin Zhu, Zhejiang University, China Advisory BoardH Thomas Banks, North Carolina State University, USATony F Chan, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, HKSARHeinz W Engl, Johannes Kepler Universitát Linz, AustriaRainer Kress, Georg-August-Universitát G

  13. PREFACE: 6th International Conference on Aperiodic Crystals (APERIODIC'09)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Uwe; McGrath, Rónán; Degtyareva, Olga; Sharma, Hem Raj

    2010-04-01

    essential support during the organising stage and during the conference itself, and we would particularly like to thank the conference secretary, Mrs Angie Reid, for her excellent administrative support before, during and after the conference, and for her help in the production of this volume. We are very much indebted to out co-editors, Dr Olga Degtyareva (Edinburgh) and Dr Hem Raj Sharma (Liverpool), for their contributions to the editing of this volume. Finally, and most of all, we would like to thank all participants of the conference for coming to Liverpool, for contributing by presenting their recent work and taking part in discussions, and for creating such an enjoyable and fruitful collegiate atmosphere throughout the week. Last but not least we would like to express our gratitude for the generous financial support we received from the Open University, the University of Liverpool and the Institute of Physics (Mathematical and Theoretical Physics Group and Thin Films and Surfaces Group). The International Union of Crystallography provided financial sponsorship which was allocated to support the participation of 15 young scientists. The European Network of Excellence on Complex Metallic Alloys provided travel and subsistence support to members of participating organisations. Rónán McGrath Uwe Grimm Conference photograph

  14. Reproductive health indicators and fetal medicine - many things will change.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Jørn; Pedersen, Lars Henning

    2016-06-01

    become pregnant and this may affect estimates of recurrence risk. In any case, calculating recurrence risk for newborns following siblings with the CA in question will probably no longer work (maybe it never worked) since the desire to reach a given family size depends on many factors, including the perceived risk of a CA. Access to prenatal diagnostic data may therefore well produce data closer to recurrence risk than data recorded at the time of birth. Pediatrics and Perinatal Epidemiology recently published a series of papers initiated by Olga Basso (3, 4) addressing in part the problem of moving from time scale one (starting at conception) to time scale two (starting at birth). Part of the addressed problems relate to a lack of options for starting observations on causal factors at the onset of exposure or, at best, before exposure. If that exposure happens early in fetal life, outcomes will be complicated by fetal deaths that probably end observation for ≥30% of subjects. That equals mortality rates we see for ≥95-year-olds or equals a cumulative death risk seen for newborns from birth to ≥65 years of age. If the exposure of interest is related to fetal death that opens up for strong collider stratification bias and selection when we condition on survival in our analyses for observations at the beginning of the second time scale (5). A negative association on that time scale need not reflect "prevention" in any sense other than suicides early in life will prevent later cancer deaths. It is difficult to imagine a counterfactual comparison to an exposed had he/she not been exposed and had survived fetal life. Those who were susceptible did not all survive. If we study fetal programming of adult diseases, we have to "condition on birth" in our studies, but we should be aware of the selection bias that follows. Fetal medicine will in many ways produce better data or data we never have had before, but it will change the conditions in many aspects of reproductive

  15. PREFACE: Nano- and microfluidics Nano- and microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2011-05-01

    compressible fluids Kerstin Falk and Klaus Mecke Wetting, roughness and flow boundary conditions Olga I Vinogradova and Aleksey V Belyaev Molecular transport and flow past hard and soft surfaces: computer simulation of model systems F Léonforte, J Servantie, C Pastorino, and M Müller Simulations of slip flow on nanobubble-laden surfaces J Hyväluoma, C Kunert and J Harting Electrophoretic transport of biomolecules across liquid-liquid interfaces Thomas Hahn, Götz Münchow and Steffen Hardt Wetting morphologies and their transitions in grooved substrates Ralf Seemann, Martin Brinkmann, Stephan Herminghaus, Krishnacharya Khare, Bruce M Law, Sean McBride, Konstantina Kostourou, Evgeny Gurevich, Stefan Bommer, Carsten Herrmann and Dominik Michler Imbibition in mesoporous silica: rheological concepts and experiments on water and a liquid crystal Simon Gruener, and Patrick Huber Theory and simulations of water flow through carbon nanotubes: prospects and pitfalls Douwe Jan Bonthuis, Klaus F Rinne, Kerstin Falk, C Nadir Kaplan, Dominik Horinek, A Nihat Berker, Lydéric Bocquet, and Roland R Netz Structure and flow of droplets on solid surfaces P Müller-Buschbaum, D Magerl, R Hengstler, J-F Moulin, V Körstgens, A Diethert, J Perlich, S V Roth, M Burghammer, C Riekel, M Gross, F Varnik, P Uhlmann, M Stamm, J M Feldkamp and C G Schroer Stability and dynamics of droplets on patterned substrates: insights from experiments and lattice Boltzmann simulations F Varnik, M Gross, N Moradi, G Zikos, P Uhlmann, P Müller-Buschbaum, D Magerl, D Raabe, I Steinbach and M Stamm Micro-capsules in shear flow R Finken, S Kessler and U Seifert Micro-rheology on (polymer-grafted) colloids using optical tweezers C Gutsche, M M Elmahdy, K Kegler, I Semenov, T Stangner, O Otto, O Ueberschär, U F Keyser, M Krueger, M Rauscher, R Weeber, J Harting, Y W Kim, V Lobaskin, R R Netz, and F Kremer Dynamics of colloids in confined geometries L Almenar and M Rauscher Dynamics of red blood cells and vesicles in

  16. EDITORIAL: Ongoing climatic change in Northern Eurasia: justification for expedient research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groisman, Pavel; Soja, Amber J.

    2009-12-01

    season weather in Kazakhstan C K Wright, K M de Beurs, Z K Akhmadieva, P Y Groisman and G M Henebry Climate change in Inner Mongolia from 1955 to 2005—trends at regional, biome and local scales N Lu, B Wilske, J Ni, R John and J Chen Application of the Snowmelt Runoff model in the Kuban river basin using MODIS satellite images M V Georgievsky Record Russian river discharge in 2007 and the limits of analysis A I Shiklomanov and R B Lammers Paleoclimatic reconstructions for the south of Valdai Hills (European Russia) as paleo-analogs of possible regional vegetation changes under global warming E Novenko, A Olchev, O Desherevskaya and I Zuganova Diagnosis of the record discharge of Arctic-draining Eurasian rivers in 2007 Michael A Rawlins, Mark C Serreze, Ronny Schroeder, Xiangdong Zhang and Kyle C McDonald Studies of the cryosphere in Northern Eurasia Groundwater storage changes in arctic permafrost watersheds from GRACE and in situ measurements Reginald R Muskett and Vladimir E Romanovsky Changes in snow cover over Northern Eurasia in the last few decades O N Bulygina, V N Razuvaev and N N Korshunova Modeling sub-sea permafrost in the East Siberian Arctic Shelf: the Dmitry Laptev Strait D Nicolsky and N Shakhova Snow cover basal ice layer changes over Northern Eurasia since 1966 Olga N Bulygina, Pavel Ya Groisman, Vyacheslav N Razuvaev and Vladimir F Radionov Snow cover and permafrost evolution in Siberia as simulated by the MGO regional climate model in the 20th and 21st centuries I M Shkolnik, E D Nadyozhina, T V Pavlova, E K Molkentin and A A Semioshina Studies of the biosphere in Northern Eurasia The influence of regional surface soil moisture anomalies on forest fires in Siberia observed from satellites A Bartsch, H Balzter and C George Change and persistence in land surface phenologies of the Don and Dnieper river basins V Kovalskyy and G M Henebry Effects of climatic changes on carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes in boreal forest ecosystems of European part of