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Sample records for hepa wash treatment

  1. Evaluation of the Hepa Wash® treatment in pigs with acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mortality of patients with acute liver failure (ALF) is still unacceptably high. Available liver support systems are still of limited success at improving survival. A new type of albumin dialysis, the Hepa Wash® system, was newly introduced. We evaluated the new liver support system as well as the Molecular Adsorbent Recycling System (MARS) in an ischemic porcine model of ALF. Methods In the first study animals were randomly allocated to control (n=5) and Hepa Wash (n=6) groups. In a further pilot study, two animals were treated with the MARS-system. All animals received the same medical and surgical procedures. An intraparenchymal intracranial pressure was inserted. Hemodynamic monitoring and goal-directed fluid therapy using the PiCCO system was done. Animals underwent functional end-to-side portacaval shunt and ligation of hepatic arteries. Treatment with albumin dialysis was started after fall of cerebral perfusion pressure to 45 mmHg and continued for 8 h. Results All animals in the Hepa Wash group survived the 13-hour observation period, except for one that died after stopping treatment. Four of the control animals died within this period (p=0.03). Hepa Wash significantly reduced impairment of cerebral perfusion pressure (23±2 vs. 10±3 mmHg, p=0.006) and mean arterial pressure (37±1 vs. 24±2 mmHg, p=0.006) but had no effect on intracranial pressure (14±1 vs. 15±1 mmHg, p=0.72). Hepa Wash also enhanced cardiac index (4.94±0.32 vs. 3.36±0.25 l/min/m2, p=0.006) and renal function (urine production, 1850 ± 570 vs. 420 ± 180 ml, p=0.045) and eliminated water soluble (creatinine, 1.3±0.2 vs. 3.2±0.3 mg/dl, p=0.01; ammonia 562±124 vs. 1382±92 μg/dl, p=0.006) and protein-bound toxins (nitrate/nitrite 5.54±1.57 vs. 49.82±13.27 μmol/l, p=0.01). No adverse events that could be attributed to the Hepa Wash treatment were observed. Conclusions Hepa Wash was a safe procedure and improved multiorgan system failure in pigs with ALF. The survival

  2. Altered Hepa1-6 cells by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-treatment induce anti-tumor immunity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhengyu; Zhang, Hongxia; Wang, Ye; Yu, Bin; Wang, Chen; Liu, Changcheng; Lu, Juan; Chen, Fei; Wang, Minjun; Yu, Xinlu; Lin, Jiahao; Pan, Xinghua; Wang, Pin; Zhu, Haiying

    2016-02-23

    Cancer immunotherapy is the use of the immune system to treat cancer. Our current research proposed an optional strategy of activating immune system involving in cancer immunotherapy. When being treated with 2% DMSO in culture medium, Hepa1-6 cells showed depressed proliferation with no significant apoptosis or decreased viability. D-hep cells, Hepa1-6 cells treated with DMSO for 7 days, could restore to the higher proliferation rate in DMSO-free medium, but alteration of gene expression profile was irreversible. Interestingly, tumors from D-hep cells, not Hepa1-6 cells, regressed in wild-type C57BL/6 mice whereas D-hep cells exhibited similar tumorigenesis as Hep1-6 cells in immunodeficient mice. As expected, additional Hepa1-6 cells failed to form tumors in the D-hep-C57 mice in which D-hep cells were eliminated. Further research confirmed that D-hep-C57 mice established anti-tumor immunity against Hepa1-6 cells. Our research proposed viable tumor cells with altered biological features by DMSO-treatment could induce anti-tumor immunity in vivo.

  3. Washing treatment of automotive shredder residue (ASR).

    PubMed

    Cossu, Raffaello; Lai, Tiziana

    2013-08-01

    Worldwide, the amount of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) reaches 50 million units per year. Once the ELV has been processed, it may then be shredded and sorted to recover valuable metals that are recycled in iron and steelmaking processes. The residual fraction, called automotive shredder residue (ASR), represents 25% of the ELV and is usually landfilled. In order to deal with the leachable fraction of ASR that poses a potential threat to the environment, a washing treatment before landfilling was applied. To assess the potential for full-scale application of washing treatment, tests were carried out in different conditions (L/S = 3 and 5L/kgTS; t = 3 and 6 h). Moreover, to understand whether the grain size of waste could affect the washing efficiency, the treatment was applied to ground (<4 mm) and not-ground samples. The findings obtained revealed that, on average, washing treatment achieved removal rates of more than 60% for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN). With regard to metals and chlorides, sulphates and fluoride leachable fraction, a removal efficiency of approximately 60% was obtained, as confirmed also by EC values. The comparison between the results for ground and not-ground samples did not highlight significant differences.

  4. HEPA Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2006-01-01

    Poor indoor air quality in school facilities can detract from the health and productivity of students, teachers and other employees. Asthma--often triggered or aggravated by dust--is the No. 1 cause of chronic absenteeism in schools. Using vacuum cleaners equipped with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters to clean education institutions…

  5. Aging assessment of nuclear air-treatment system HEPA filters and adsorbers. Volume 1, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Winegardner, W.K.

    1993-08-01

    A Phase I aging assessment of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and activated carbon gas adsorption units (adsorbers) was performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. Information concerning design features; failure experience; aging mechanisms, effects, and stressors; and surveillance and monitoring methods for these key air-treatment system components was compiled. Over 1100 failures, or 12 percent of the filter installations, were reported as part of a Department of Energy (DOE) survey. Investigators from other national laboratories have suggested that aging effects could have contributed to over 80 percent of these failures. Tensile strength tests on aged filter media specimens indicated a decrease in strength. Filter aging mechanisms range from those associated with particle loading to reactions that alter properties of sealants and gaskets. Low radioiodine decontamination factors associated with the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident were attributed to the premature aging of the carbon in the adsorbers. Mechanisms that can lead to impaired adsorber performance include oxidation as well as the loss of potentially available active sites as a result of the adsorption of pollutants. Stressors include heat, moisture, radiation, and airborne particles and contaminants.

  6. Enrichment of hepatocytes in a HepaRG culture using spatially selective photodynamic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarkiewicz, Artur; Rodrigues, Robim M.; Whelan, Maurice P.

    2010-03-01

    The human hepatoma HepaRG cell line is an in vitro cell model that is becoming an important tool in drug metabolism, hepatotoxicity, genotoxicity, and enzyme induction studies. The cells are highly proliferative during their undifferentiated state but once committed, they differentiate into two distinctly different cell types, namely, hepatocyte-like and biliary epithelial-like cells. The presence of the latter in the cell culture is considered to be a drawback of the cell model. Since the proliferating undifferentiated HepaRG cells have a bipotent character, the only way to improve the content ratio of hepatic versus biliary cells of differentiated HepaRG cells is to eradicate biliary cells in situ, in a way that free surface space does not become available and thus no transdifferentiation can occur. Spatially selective photodynamic therapy has proven to be effective for that purpose. First, all the cells were administered aminolevulinic acid (δ-ALA) to stimulate the synthesis of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), a naturally occurring photosensitizer. Then, the biliary cells were automatically identified and outlined by bright-field image processing. Last, UV light patterns were projected onto the epithelial cells alone by a spatial light modulation device connected to an optical microscope; therefore, only these cells were destroyed by photodynamic therapy.

  7. Durable titania films for solar treatment of biomethanated spent wash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarzadeh, Rokhsareh; S. Ghole, Vikram; Javadpour, Sirus

    2016-10-01

    The use of TiO2 films for treatment of biomethanated spent wash is reported. The films of TiO2 were formed and photocatalytic performance of the prepared films in degradation of methylene blue and biomethanated spent wash were studied. Photocatalytic use of these films was found to be effective for degradation of biomethanated spent wash. The photocatalyst was used up for 20 cycles without significant reduction in activities showing long life of the catalyst.

  8. Car wash wastewater treatment and water reuse - a case study.

    PubMed

    Zaneti, R N; Etchepare, R; Rubio, J

    2013-01-01

    Recent features of a car wash wastewater reclamation system and results from a full-scale car wash wastewater treatment and recycling process are reported. This upcoming technology comprises a new flocculation-column flotation process, sand filtration, and a final chlorination. A water usage and savings audit (22 weeks) showed that almost 70% reclamation was possible, and fewer than 40 L of fresh water per wash were needed. Wastewater and reclaimed water were characterized by monitoring chemical, physicochemical and biological parameters. Results were discussed in terms of aesthetic quality (water clarification and odour), health (pathological) and chemical (corrosion and scaling) risks. A microbiological risk model was applied and the Escherichia coli proposed criterion for car wash reclaimed water is 200 CFU 100 mL(-1). It is believed that the discussions on car wash wastewater reclamation criteria may assist institutions to create laws in Brazil and elsewhere.

  9. HEPA filter dissolution process

    DOEpatents

    Brewer, K.N.; Murphy, J.A.

    1994-02-22

    A process is described for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal. 4 figures.

  10. Hepa filter dissolution process

    DOEpatents

    Brewer, Ken N.; Murphy, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal.

  11. HEPA filter dissolution process

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, K.N.; Murphy, J.A.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a process for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal.

  12. Development of a Pulp Process Treating Contaminated HEPA Filters (III)

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J. S.; Ramer, J.; Argyle, M. D.; Demmer, R. L.

    2002-02-28

    The Pulp Process (PP) Treatment option was conceived as a replacement for the current Filter Leaching System (FLS). The FLS has operated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory since 1995 to treat radioactive, mixed waste HEPA filters. In recent years, the FLS has exhibited difficulty in removing mercury from the HEPA filters as the concentration of mercury in the spent HEPA filters has increased. The FLS leaches and washes the whole filter without any preparation or modification. The filter media and the trapped calcine particles are confined in a heavy filter housing that contributes to poor mixing zones around the edges of the filter, low media permeability, channeling of the liquid through cracks and tears in the filter media, and liquid retention between leach and rinse cycles. In the PP, the filter media and the trapped calcine particles are separated from the filter housing and treated as a pulp, taking advantage of improved contact with the leach solution that cannot be achieved when the media is still in the HEPA filter housing. In addition to removing the mercury more effectively, the PP generates less volume of liquid waste, requires a shorter leach cycle time, and possesses the versatility for treating filters of different sizes. A series of tests have been performed in the laboratory to demonstrate the advantages of the PP concept. These tests compare the PP with the FLS under controlled conditions that simulate the current operating parameters. A prior study using blended feed, a mixture of shredded clean HEPA filter media and non-radioactive calcine particles, indicated that the PP would significantly increases the calcine dissolution percentages. In this study, hazardous-metal contaminated HEPA filter media was studied. The results of side-by-side tests indicated that the PP increased the mercury removal percentage by 80% and might be a solution to the mercury removal

  13. Distillery spent wash: treatment technologies and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Mohana, Sarayu; Acharya, Bhavik K; Madamwar, Datta

    2009-04-15

    Distillery spent wash is the unwanted residual liquid waste generated during alcohol production and pollution caused by it is one of the most critical environmental issue. Despite standards imposed on effluent quality, untreated or partially treated effluent very often finds access to watercourses. The distillery wastewater with its characteristic unpleasant odor poses a serious threat to the water quality in several regions around the globe. The ever-increasing generation of distillery spent wash on the one hand and stringent legislative regulations of its disposal on the other has stimulated the need for developing new technologies to process this effluent efficiently and economically. A number of clean up technologies have been put into practice and novel bioremediation approaches for treatment of distillery spent wash are being worked out. Potential microbial (anaerobic and aerobic) as well as physicochemical processes as feasible remediation technologies to combat environmental pollution are being explored. An emerging field in distillery waste management is exploiting its nutritive potential for production of various high value compounds. This review presents an overview of the pollution problems caused by distillery spent wash, the technologies employed globally for its treatment and its alternative use in various biotechnological sectors.

  14. HEPA air filter (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pet dander and other irritating allergens from the air. Along with other methods to reduce allergens, such ... controlling the amount of allergens circulating in the air. HEPA filters can be found in most air ...

  15. DOE HEPA filter test program

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This standard establishes essential elements of a Department of Energy (DOE) program for testing HEPA filters to be installed in DOE nuclear facilities or used in DOE-contracted activities. A key element is the testing of HEPA filters for performance at a DOE Filter Test Facility (FTF) prior to installation. Other key elements are (1) providing for a DOE HEPA filter procurement program, and (2) verifying that HEPA filters to be installed in nuclear facilities appear on a Qualified Products List (QPL).

  16. HEPA filter encapsulation

    DOEpatents

    Gates-Anderson, Dianne D.; Kidd, Scott D.; Bowers, John S.; Attebery, Ronald W.

    2003-01-01

    A low viscosity resin is delivered into a spent HEPA filter or other waste. The resin is introduced into the filter or other waste using a vacuum to assist in the mass transfer of the resin through the filter media or other waste.

  17. Treatment of car wash wastewater by UF membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istirokhatun, Titik; Destianti, Puti; Hargianintya, Adenira; Oktiawan, Wiharyanto; Susanto, Heru

    2015-12-01

    The existence of car wash service facilitates car owners to remove dirt and grime from their vehicles. However, the dirt washed off vehicles as well as the cleaning materials themselves may be harmful to the environment if they are not properly managed and discharged. Many technologies have been proposed to treat car wash wastewater such as coagulation flocculation, tricking filter and flocculation-flotation. Nevertheless, these technologies have low efficiency to eliminate oil and small organic compounds. Ultrafiltration (UF) membranes were used in this study to treat car wash wastewater. This study investigated the performance of UF membranes under various pressures to remove COD, oil and grease, and also turbidity from car wash waste water. The membrane performance was examined by investigation of permeate flux and membrane rejection. The results meet the standard of environmental regulation and it is possible to be reused. The highest rejection was shown by PES10 (polyethersulfone 10 kDa) in 1 bar operation with complete rejection for both turbidity and oil and grace and 95% rejection for COD.

  18. Recirculating sand filters for treatment of synthetic dairy parlor washings.

    PubMed

    Healy, M G; Rodgers, M; Mulqueen, J

    2004-01-01

    Land-spreading and spray irrigation are the most widely used practices for the disposal of dairy wastewaters in Ireland but in some cases there can be problems due to contamination of surface and ground water. The use of intermittent sand filtration has been suggested as an alternative treatment process. However, a single pass through a sand filter limits denitrification because of the absence of reducing conditions following nitrification and the lack of an available carbon source. This leads to poor total nitrogen (TN) reduction and an effluent that is high in nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N). This paper follows a previous paper in which two instrumented stratified sand filter columns (0.9 and 0.425 m deep, and both 0.3 m in diameter) were intermittently loaded with synthetic dairy parlor washings at a number of hydraulic loading rates, leading to a TN reduction of 27 to 41%. In the present study, under a chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 23.4 g m(-2) d(-1), the TN was reduced by 83.2% when three-quarters of the sand filter effluent was recirculated through an anoxic zone. This produced an effluent NO3-N concentration of 60 mg L(-1). With recirculation, the improvement in the removal of organic matter and ammonia N (NH4-N) is minimal. Recirculating sand filters appear to offer a mechanically simple and effective method for the removal of nitrogen from dairy parlor effluents and are a significant improvement over a single-pass sand filter.

  19. ANAEROBIC TREATMENT OF SOIL WASH FLUIDS FROM A WOOD PRESERVING SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An integrated system has been developed to remediate sols contaminated with pentachlorophenol (PCP) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This system involves the coupling of two treatment technologies, soil solvent washing and anaerobic biotreatment of the extract. Specif...

  20. Integrated treatment of PAH contaminated soil by soil washing, ozonation and biological treatment.

    PubMed

    Haapea, Pia; Tuhkanen, Tuula

    2006-08-21

    The aim of the study was to optimise three different treatment methods and to find out if the integration of soil washing, ozonation and biological treatment could be a feasible method for the remediation of aged oil contaminated with PAHs. Three different ozone doses and soil washing were studied in different pHs in order to assess their effect to the degradation and enhancement of biodegradability of PAH in the soil and water phase. Main target of the study was to find out a method with which the PAH concentrations could be decreased below the Finnish guideline level for total PAHs. In this case, the initial concentration of PAHs was 1200 mg kg(-1) and therefore almost 85% degradation of PAHs was required. Any of the methods studied was not able to reach this target level alone, but by several combinations of the methods studied achieved 90% reduction of PAHs. The consumption of ozone was 5-10 times lower in the integrated treatments of soil washing, ozonation and biological treatment than without prewashing.

  1. Treatment of hepatitis C virus infection in patients with cirrhosis and predictive value of MELD: Analysis of data from the Hepa-C registry.

    PubMed

    Fernández Carrillo, Carlos; Lens, Sabela; Llop, Elba; Pascasio, Juan Manuel; Crespo, Javier; Arenas, Juan; Fernández, Inmaculada; Baliellas, Carme; Carrión, José Antonio; de la Mata, Manuel; Buti, Maria; Castells, Lluís; Albillos, Agustín; Romero, Manuel; Turnes, Juan; Pons, Clara; Moreno-Planas, José María; Moreno-Palomares, José Javier; Fernández-Rodriguez, Conrado; García-Samaniego, Javier; Prieto, Martín; Fernández Bermejo, Miguel; Salmerón, Javier; Badia, Ester; Salcedo, Magdalena; Herrero, José Ignacio; Granados, Rafael; Blé, Michel; Mariño, Zoe; Calleja, José Luis

    2017-02-07

    Direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) are highly effective and well tolerated in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, including those with compensated cirrhosis. However, fewer data are available in patients with more advanced liver disease. Our retrospective, non-interventional, national, multi-center study in patients from the Spanish Hepa-C registry investigated the effectiveness and safety of interferon-free DAA regimens in patients with advanced liver disease, including those with decompensated cirrhosis, in routine practice (all currently approved regimens were registered). Patients transplanted during treatment or within 12 weeks of completing treatment were excluded. Among 843 cirrhotic patients (Child A, n=564; Child B/C, n=175), 90% achieved sustained virologic response 12 weeks post-treatment (SVR12). Significant differences in SVR12 and relapse rates were observed between Child A and Child B/C patients (94% vs. 78%, and 4% vs. 14%, respectively; both P<0.001). Serious adverse events (SAEs) were more common in Child B/C vs. Child A patients (50% vs. 12%, respectively; P<0.001). Incident decompensation was the most common SAE (7% overall). Death rate during the study period was 16/843 (2%), significantly higher among Child B/C vs. Child A patients (6.4% vs. 0.9%; P<0.001). Baseline Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score alone (cut-off 18) was the best predictor of survival. Conclusions Patients with decompensated cirrhosis receiving DAAs present lower response rates and experience more SAEs. In this setting, a MELD score ≥18 may help clinicians to identify those patients with a higher risk of complications and to individualize treatment decisions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Performance of a Small-scale Treatment Wetland for Treatment of Landscaping Wash Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R. J.; Fayed, E.; Fish, W.

    2011-12-01

    A large number of lawn mowers and related equipment must be cleaned each day by commercial landscaping operations and state and local highway maintenance crews. Washing these devices produces wastewater that contains high amounts of organic matter and potentially problematic nutrients, as well as oil and grease and other chemicals and metals that come from the machinery itself. Dirty water washes off the mowers, flows off the pavement and into nearby storm drains without any kind of treatment. A better idea would be to collect such wastewater, retain it in an appropriate catchment such as an engineered wetland where natural processes could break down any pollutants in the wash water, and allow the water to naturally evaporate or percolate into the soil where it could recharge ground water resources safely. This research examines the performance of a small-scale treatment wetland tailored to remove nitrogen from landscaping wash water by incorporating both aerobic and anaerobic phases. Contaminants are analyzed through physical and chemical methods. Both methods involve collection of samples, followed by standardized, validated analytical laboratory tests for measuring total solids, total kjeldahl nitrogen, nitrates, total and dissolved phosphorus, COD, BOD, oil and grease, and metals (Zn and Cu). High levels of total solids, total kjeldahl nitrogen, nitrates, total and dissolved phosphorus, COD, BOD, oil and grease are found. Zinc and copper levels are low. Wetland treatment removes 99% total solids, 77% total kjeldahl nitrogen, 100% nitrates, 94% total phosphorus, 86% dissolved phosphorus, 94% COD, 97% BOD, and 76% oil and grease. The results will be a critical step towards developing a sustainable low-energy system for treating such wastewater that could be used by private landscaping companies and government agencies.

  3. Ceramic HEPA Filter Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M A; Bergman, W; Haslam, J; Brown, E P; Sawyer, S; Beaulieu, R; Althouse, P; Meike, A

    2012-04-30

    Potential benefits of ceramic filters in nuclear facilities: (1) Short term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) CalPoly HTTU provides unique testing capability to answer questions for DOE - High temperature testing of materials, components, filter, (b) Several DNFSB correspondences and presentations by DNFSB members have highlighted the need for HEPA filter R and D - DNFSB Recommendation 2009-2 highlighted a nuclear facility response to an evaluation basis earthquake followed by a fire (aka shake-n-bake) and CalPoly has capability for a shake-n-bake test; (2) Intermediate term benefit for DOE and industry - (a) Filtration for specialty applications, e.g., explosive applications at Nevada, (b) Spin-off technologies applicable to other commercial industries; and (3) Long term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) Across industry, strong desire for better performance filter, (b) Engineering solution to safety problem will improve facility safety and decrease dependence on associated support systems, (c) Large potential life-cycle cost savings, and (d) Facilitates development and deployment of LLNL process innovations to allow continuous ventilation system operation during a fire.

  4. Treatment techniques for the recycling of bottle washing water in the soft drinks industry.

    PubMed

    Ramirez Camperos, E; Mijaylova Nacheva, P; Diaz Tapia, E

    2004-01-01

    The soft drink production is an important sector in the manufacturing industry of Mexico. Water is the main source in the production of soft drinks. Wastewater from bottle washing is almost 50% of the total wastewater generated by this industry. In order to reduce the consumption of water, the water of the last bottle rinse can be reused in to the bottle pre-rinse and pre-washing cycles. This work presents the characterization of the final bottle washing rinse discharge and the treatability study for the most appropriate treatment system for recycling. Average characteristics of the final bottle wash rinse were as follows: Turbidity 40.46 NTU, COD 47.7 mg/L, TSS 56 mg/L, TS 693.6 mg/L, electrical conductivity 1,194 microS/cm. The results of the treatability tests showed that the final rinse water can be used in the pre-rinse and pre-washing after removing the totality of the suspended solids, 80% of the COD and 75% of the dissolved solids. This can be done using the following treatment systems: filtration-adsorption-reverse osmosis, or filtration-adsorption-ion exchange. The installation of these treatment techniques in the soft drink industry would decrease bottle washing water consumption by 50%.

  5. Treatment of table olive washing water using trickling filters, constructed wetlands and electrooxidation.

    PubMed

    Tatoulis, Triantafyllos; Stefanakis, Alexandros; Frontistis, Zacharias; Akratos, Christos S; Tekerlekopoulou, Athanasia G; Mantzavinos, Dionissios; Vayenas, Dimitrios V

    2017-01-01

    The production of table olives is a significant economic activity in Mediterranean countries. Table olive processing generates large volumes of rinsing water that are characterized by high organic matter and phenol contents. Due to these characteristics, a combination of more than one technology is imperative to ensure efficient treatment with low operational cost. Previously, biological filters were combined with electrooxidation to treat table olive washing water. Although this combination was successful in reducing pollutant loads, its cost could be further reduced. Constructed wetlands could be an eligible treatment method for integrated table olive washing water treatment as they have proved tolerant to high organic matter and phenol loads. Two pilot-scale horizontal subsurface constructed wetlands, one planted and one unplanted, were combined with a biological filter and electrooxidation over a boron-doped diamond anode to treat table olive washing water. In the biological filter inlet, chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations ranged from 5500 to 15,000 mg/L, while mean COD influent concentration in the constructed wetlands was 2800 mg/L. The wetlands proved to be an efficient intermediate treatment stage, since COD removal levels for the planted unit reached 99 % (mean 70 %), while the unplanted unit presented removal rates of around 65 %. Moreover, the concentration of phenols in the effluent was typically below 100 mg/L. The integrated trickling filter-constructed wetland-electrooxidation treatment system examined here could mineralize and decolorize table olive washing water and fully remove its phenolic content.

  6. Anaerobic digestion of distillery spent wash: Influence of enzymatic pre-treatment of intact yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Mallick, P; Akunna, J C; Walker, G M

    2010-03-01

    The potential benefits of enzymatic digestion of intact yeast cells on anaerobic digestion of Scotch whisky distillery spent wash and pot ale were investigated. Various yeast cell wall hydrolytic enzymes were studied based on their effect on dissolution of cell wall glucan and mannoprotein. The synergistic activity of beta-glucanase and protease showed greater than 90% yeast cell digestion at 37 degrees C in 24h. The widely-used industrial enzyme papain showed 95% yeast cell digestion in spent wash at 1% enzyme concentration within 22h at 50 degrees C. Anaerobic digestion of pot ale residues containing intact yeast cells pre-treated with lytic enzymes showed COD reductions of 87%, compared with only 13% without enzymes. Similar results were observed with distillery spent wash centrate. The hydrolysis of intact yeast cells in distillery liquid residues was found to be a rate-limiting step in anaerobic treatment of such residues.

  7. HEPA Filter Use at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kriskovich, J. R.

    2002-02-28

    High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters are relied upon at the Hanford site to support several different activities. Each facility relies upon the filters to provide the same function; remove radioactive particulate from various air streams. However, HEPA filters are operated in differing environmental conditions from one facility to another and the constituents in the air streams also differ. In addition, some HEPA filters at the Hanford site have been in service for several years. As a result, an assessment was performed which evaluated the service life and conditions of the HEPA filters at the Hanford site.

  8. Electrochemical treatment of spent solution after EDTA-based soil washing.

    PubMed

    Voglar, David; Lestan, Domen

    2012-04-15

    The use of EDTA in soil washing technologies to remediate soils contaminated with toxic metals is prohibitive because of the large volumes of waste washing solution generated, which must be treated before disposal. Degradation of EDTA in the waste solution and the removal of Pb, Zn and Cd were investigated using electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOP) with a boron-doped diamond anode (BDDA), graphite and iron anodes and a stainless-steel cathode. In addition to EAOP, the efficiency of electro-Fenton reactions, induced by the addition of H(2)O(2) and the regulation of electrochemical systems to pH 3, was also investigated. Soil extraction with 15 mmol kg(-1) of soil EDTA yielded waste washing solution with 566 ± 1, 152 ± 1 and 5.5 ± 0.1 mg L(-1) of Pb, Zn and Cd, respectively. Treatments of the waste solution in pH unregulated electrochemical systems with a BDDA and graphite anode (current density 67 mA cm(-2)) were the most efficient and removed up to 98 ± 1, 96 ± 1, 99 ± 1% of Pb, Zn and Cd, respectively, by electrodeposition on the cathode and oxidatively degraded up to 99 ± 1% of chelant. In the electrochemical system with an Fe anode operated at pH 3, the chelant remained preserved in the treated solution, while metals were removed by electrodeposition. This separation opens up the possibility of a new EDTA recycling method from waste soil washing solution.

  9. Water washable stainless steel HEPA filter

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Terrance D.

    2001-01-01

    The invention is a high efficiency particulate (HEPA) filter apparatus and system, and method for assaying particulates. The HEPA filter provides for capture of 99.99% or greater of particulates from a gas stream, with collection of particulates on the surface of the filter media. The invention provides a filter system that can be cleaned and regenerated in situ.

  10. Remediation of arsenic contaminated soil by coupling oxalate washing with subsequent ZVI/Air treatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Menghua; Ye, Yuanyao; Chen, Jing; Lu, Xiaohua

    2016-02-01

    The application of a novel coupled process with oxalate washing and subsequent zero-valent iron (ZVI)/Air treatment for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil was investigated in the present study. Oxalate is biodegradable and widely present in the environment. With addition of 0.1 mol L(-1) oxalate under circumneutral condition, 83.7% and 52.6% of arsenic could be removed from a spiked kaolin and an actual contaminated soil respectively. Much more oxalate adsorption on the actual soil was attributed to the higher soil organic matter and clay content. Interestingly, oxalate retained in the washing effluent could act as an organic ligand to promote the oxidation efficiency of ZVI/Air at near neutral pH. Compared with the absence of oxalate, much more As(III) was oxidized. Arsenic was effectively adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides as the consumption of oxalate and the increase of pH value. For the actual soil washing effluent, about 94.9% of total arsenic was removed after 120 min's treatment without pH adjustment. It has been demonstrated that As(V) was the dominant arsenic speciation adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides. This study provides a promising alternative for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil in view of its low cost and environmental benign.

  11. Impact of electrochemical treatment of soil washing solution on PAH degradation efficiency and soil respirometry.

    PubMed

    Mousset, Emmanuel; Huguenot, David; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Oturan, Nihal; Guibaud, Gilles; Esposito, Giovanni; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2016-04-01

    The remediation of a genuinely PAH-contaminated soil was performed, for the first time, through a new and complete investigation, including PAH extraction followed by advanced oxidation treatment of the washing solution and its recirculation, and an analysis of the impact of the PAH extraction on soil respirometry. The study has been performed on the remediation of genuine PAH-contaminated soil, in the following three steps: (i) PAH extraction with soil washing (SW) techniques, (ii) PAH degradation with an electro-Fenton (EF) process, and (iii) recirculation of the partially oxidized effluent for another SW cycle. The following criteria were monitored during the successive washing cycles: PAH extraction efficiency, PAH oxidation rates and yields, extracting agent recovery, soil microbial activity, and pH of soil. Two representative extracting agents were compared: hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) and a non-ionic surfactant, Tween(®) 80. Six PAH with different numbers of rings were monitored: acenaphthene (ACE), phenanthrene (PHE), fluoranthene (FLA), pyrene (PYR), benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), and benzo(g,h,i)perylene (BghiP). Tween(®) 80 showed much better PAH extraction efficiency (after several SW cycles) than HPCD, regardless of the number of washing cycles. Based on successive SW experiments, a new mathematical relation taking into account the soil/water partition coefficient (Kd*) was established, and could predict the amount of each PAH extracted by the surfactant with a good correlation with experimental results (R(2) > 0.975). More HPCD was recovered (89%) than Tween(®) 80 (79%), while the monitored pollutants were completely degraded (>99%) after 4 h and 8 h, respectively. Even after being washed with partially oxidized solutions, the Tween(®) 80 solutions extracted significantly more PAH than HPCD and promoted better soil microbial activity, with higher oxygen consumption rates. Moreover, neither the oxidation by-products nor the acidic media (p

  12. Butter making from caprine creams: effect of washing treatment on phospholipids and milk fat globule membrane proteins distribution.

    PubMed

    Lamothe, Sophie; Robitaille, Gilles; St-Gelais, Daniel; Britten, Michel

    2008-11-01

    A washing treatment was applied to caprine cream before churning in order to improve phospholipids and MFGM protein purification from buttermilk and butter serum. Cream obtained from a first separation was diluted with water and separated a second time using pilot plant equipment. Regular and washed creams were churned to produce buttermilk and butter, from which butter serum was extracted. The washing treatment allowed a significant decrease of the casein content. As a result, the phospholipids-to-protein ratios in washed buttermilk and butter serum were markedly increased by 2.1 and 1.7-folds respectively, which represents an advantage for the production of phospholipids concentrates. However, when compared with bovine cream, lower phospholipids-to-protein ratios were observed when the washing treatment was applied to caprine cream. A higher concentration of MFGM protein and a lower retention of phospholipids during washing treatment are responsible for the lower phospholipids-to-protein ratios in buttermilk and butter serum obtained from caprine cream. The phospholipids distribution in the butter making process was similar to the one obtained from bovine regular and washed cream. Phospholipids were preferentially concentrated in the butter serum rather than the buttermilk fraction. This simple approach permitted the production of caprine and bovine butter sera extracts containing up to 180 and 240 g phospholipids/kg sera, respectively, on a dry basis.

  13. Combination of surfactant enhanced soil washing and electro-Fenton process for the treatment of soils contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Huguenot, David; Mousset, Emmanuel; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2015-04-15

    In order to improve the efficiency of soil washing treatment of hydrocarbon contaminated soils, an innovative combination of this soil treatment technique with an electrochemical advanced oxidation process (i.e. electro-Fenton (EF)) has been proposed. An ex situ soil column washing experiment was performed on a genuinely diesel-contaminated soil. The washing solution was enriched with surfactant Tween 80 at different concentrations, higher than the critical micellar concentration (CMC). The impact of soil washing was evaluated on the hydrocarbons concentration in the leachates collected at the bottom of the soil columns. These eluates were then studied for their degradation potential by EF treatment. Results showed that a concentration of 5% of Tween 80 was required to enhance hydrocarbons extraction from the soil. Even with this Tween 80 concentration, the efficiency of the treatment remained very low (only 1% after 24 h of washing). Electrochemical treatments performed thereafter with EF on the collected eluates revealed that the quasi-complete mineralization (>99.5%) of the hydrocarbons was achieved within 32 h according to a linear kinetic trend. Toxicity was higher than in the initial solution and reached 95% of inhibition of Vibrio fischeri bacteria measured by Microtox method, demonstrating the presence of remaining toxic compounds even after the complete degradation. Finally, the biodegradability (BOD₅/COD ratio) reached a maximum of 20% after 20 h of EF treatment, which is not enough to implement a combined treatment with a biological treatment process.

  14. Apple quality, storage, and washing treatments affect patulin levels in apple cider.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Lauren S; Beacham-Bowden, Tina; Keller, Susanne E; Adhikari, Chaitali; Taylor, Kirk T; Chirtel, Stewart J; Merker, Robert I

    2003-04-01

    Patulin is a mycotoxin produced primarily by Penicillium expansum, a mold responsible for rot in apples and other fruits. The growth of this fungus and the production of patulin are common in fruit that has been damaged. However, patulin can be detected in visibly sound fruit. The purpose of this project was to determine how apple quality, storage, and washing treatments affect patulin levels in apple cider. Patulin was not detected in cider pressed from fresh tree-picked apples (seven cultivars) but was found at levels of 40.2 to 374 microg/liter in cider pressed from four cultivars of fresh ground-harvested (dropped) apples. Patulin was not detected in cider pressed from culled tree-picked apples stored for 4 to 6 weeks at 0 to 2 degrees C but was found at levels of 0.97 to 64.0 microg/liter in cider pressed from unculled fruit stored under the same conditions. Cider from controlled-atmosphere-stored apples that were culled before pressing contained 0 to 15.1 microg of patulin per liter, while cider made from unculled fruit contained 59.9 to 120.5 microg of patulin per liter. The washing of ground-harvested apples before pressing reduced patulin levels in cider by 10 to 100%, depending on the initial patulin levels and the type of wash solution used. These results indicate that patulin is a good indicator of the quality of the apples used to manufacture cider. The avoidance of ground-harvested apples and the careful culling of apples before pressing are good methods for reducing patulin levels in cider.

  15. Treatment of spent wash in anaerobic thermophilic suspended growth reactor (ATSGR).

    PubMed

    Banu, Rajesh; Kaliappan, S; Beck, Dieter

    2007-04-01

    Pollution through spent wash is a major problem in India. There is an urgent need to develop wastewater treatment technologies for safer disposal. In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to examine a few aspects of thermophilic anaerobic digestion of spent wash collected from a distillery. The study was carried out in a 4 liter laboratory scale anaerobic thermophilic suspended growth reactor After the successful startup, the organic loading was increased stepwise to assess the performance of the reactor. During the study period, biogas generated was recorded and the maximum gas generated was found to be 11.9 liter at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 29 g COD/l. A 500% increase in the volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration (1850 mg/l) was observed, when the OLR was increased from 29 to 30 g COD/l. During the souring phase the removal of COD, total solids (TS) and volatile solids (VS) were in the order of 52%, 40% and 46% respectively The methane content in the biogas varied from 65% to 75%.

  16. Emery 3004 as a challenge aerosol for HEPA filter testing

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, J.D.; Gilles, D.A.

    1994-02-01

    HEPA filters are used in nuclear facilities for contamination control and air treatment and are constructed to be 99.97% efficient in trapping particles of 0.3 microns or larger in size. Prior to installation at Hanford facilities HEPA filters are tested against the manufacturer`s efficiency specifications by the Hanford Environmental Health Foundation using an aerosol with a monodispersed particle size of 0.3 microns. The oil or material used for generating the aerosol, has historically been Dioctl Phthalate (DOP). But, in 1980 DOP was classified as a suspected carcinogen, and the search for substitute materials was under way. Corn oil produced good quantities of the correct sized particles but it tended to clog the generating equipment; Polyethylene Glycol 400 (PEG) and Dioctl Sebacate (DOS) were also tried but failed for various reasons. Emery 304 was tested and produced a good quantity of correctly sized aerosol and did not clog or damage the equipment in any way. Upon further testing, in September 1992, the DOE Richland Operations authorized the use of Emery 304 for in situ HEPA filter testing on the Hanford site.

  17. Membrane autopsy based bio-fouling investigation of distillery spent wash RO treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pinki; Joshi, Himanshu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a thorough investigation has been done to evaluate the effects of different pollutants on membrane performance by autopsy. Autopsy was performed on fresh and fouled reverse osmosis (RO) membrane elements from a distillery spent wash treatment plant by different analyses, such as field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, to identify the cause of poor performance of an RO plant. Results obtained from the analysis of membranes indicate that a mixture of colloids and organic matters (polysaccharides and amines) along with the presence of multivalent ions (Ca, Mg, Fe and SO4) causes membrane fouling, which in turn affects membrane performance. Possible measures to improve treated effluent quality and mitigate fouling have been suggested for this particular case study.

  18. Analysis of an MCU HEPA filter

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T. B.; Fondeur, F. F.

    2017-01-01

    A series of direct analyses on three portions (inlet, center, and outlet) of the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter material from the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) have been performed; this includes x-ray methods such as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Contained Scanning Electron Microscopy (CSEM) and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), as well as Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy (FTIR). Additionally, two leaching studies (one with water, one with dichloromethane) have been performed on three portions (inlet, center, and outlet) of the HEPA filter material, with the leachates being analyzed by Inductively-coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES), Semi-Volatile Organic Analysis (SVOA) and gammascan. From the results of the analyses, SRNL feels that cesium-depleted solvent is being introduced into the HEPA filter. The most likely avenue for this is mechanical aerosolization of solvent, where the aerosol is then carried along an airstream into the HEPA filter. Once introduced into the HEPA filter media, the solvent wicks throughout the material, and migrates towards the outlet end. Once on the outlet end, continual drying could cause particulate flakes to exit the filter and travel farther down the airstream path.

  19. Biological treatment of fishery washing water using Bacillus sphaericus coupled with production of spores that are toxic to mosquito larvae.

    PubMed

    Ariff, A B; Rosfarizan, M; Sobri, M A; Karim, M I

    2001-06-01

    Research was undertaken to investigate the treatment of fishery washing water using Bacillus sphaericus, and to recover the spores for subsequent use as bioinsecticide to control the population of mosquitoes. This treatment method could reduce pollution due to organic matter by decreasing the value of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD) by about 85% and 92%, respectively. The maximum concentration of spores (83.3 x 10(7) spores ml(-1)) using normal concentration of filtered fishery washing water was only about 27% lower than that obtained in fermentation using 0.25% (w/v) yeast extract. The larvicidal activity of the spores produced in fermentation using fishery washing water to Culex quinquefaciatus, as measured by LD50 after 48 h, was almost the same as the larvicidal activity of spores obtained from fermentation using yeast extract.

  20. Treatment of Wastewater From Car Washes Using Natural Coagulation and Filtration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Gheethi, A. A.; Mohamed, R. M. S. R.; Rahman, M. A. A.; Johari, M. R.; Kassim, A. H. M.

    2016-07-01

    Wastewater generated from carwash is one of the main wastewater resources, which contribute effectively in the increasing of environmental contamination due to the chemical characteristics of the car wastes. The present work aimed to develop an integrated treatment system for carwash wastewater based on coagulation and flocculation using Moringa oleifera and Ferrous Sulphate (FeSO4.7H2O) as well as natural filtration system. The carwash wastewater samples were collected from carwash station located at Parit Raja, Johor, Malaysia. The treatment system of car wash wastewater was designed in the lab scale in four stages included, aeration, coagulation and flocculation, sedimentation and filtration. The coagulation and flocculation unit was carried out using different dosage (35, 70, 105 and 140 mg L-1) of M. oleifera and FeSO4.7H2O, respectively. The efficiency of the integrated treatment system to treat carwash wastewater and to meet Environmental Quality Act (EQA 1974) was evaluated based on the analysis of pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and turbidity (NTU). The integrated treatment system was efficient for treatment of raw carwash wastewater. The treated carwash wastewaters meet EQA 1974 regulation 2009 (Standards A) in the term of pH and DO while, turbidity and COD reduced in the wastewater to meet Standards B. The integrated treatment system designed here with natural coagulant (M. oleifera) and filtration unit were effective for primary treatment of carwash wastewater before the final disposal or to be reused again for carwash process.

  1. In-place HEPA filter penetration test

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, K.; Elliott, J.

    1997-08-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of conducting penetration tests on high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters as installed in nuclear ventilation systems. The in-place penetration test, which is designed to yield equivalent penetration measurements as the standard DOP efficiency test, is based on measuring the aerosol penetration of the filter installation as a function of particle size using a portable laser particle counter. This in-place penetration test is compared to the current in-place leak test using light scattering photometers for single HEPA filter installations and for HEPA filter plenums using the shroud method. Test results show the in-place penetration test is more sensitive than the in-place leak test, has a similar operating procedure, but takes longer to conduct. Additional tests are required to confirm that the in-place penetration test yields identical results as the standard dioctyl phthalate (DOP) penetration test for HEPA filters with controlled leaks in the filter and gasket and duct by-pass leaks. Further development of the procedure is also required to reduce the test time before the in-place penetration test is practical. 14 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Stabilization of heavy metals in wastewater treatment sludge from power plants air heater washing.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Mohsen; Amini, Hamid Reza

    2009-05-01

    In the present investigation, for the first time in Iran, dewatered sludge waste from the air heater washing wastewater treatment of a thermal power plant was subject to investigation with regard to cement-based stabilization in order to reduce the mobility of heavy metals. Studies of the chemical composition, mineralogy, morphology and leaching characteristics of the untreated and treated waste were conducted. The stabilization was done with two cement-based mix designs with different waste/cement ratios in different samples. In the cement stabilization process the leaching of V, Ni, Zn and Cr could be decreased from 314.1, 209.1, 24.8 and 5.5 mg L(-1), respectively, in the untreated waste to 6.02, 32.11, 3.57 and 3.68 mg L(-1) in a mixture with 20% waste/cement ratio, while during stabilization with cement + sand, the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachate contents of the mentioned metals were decreased to 4.24, 16.2, 2.51 and 2.2 mg L(-1) for the same waste/cement ratio. Stabilization with sand/cement seemed to be more efficient in reducing metal leaching from the waste. X-ray diffraction studies showed that portlandite, calcite, lime, larnite and quartz were produced during the stabilization process.

  3. Gas chromatographic evaluation of pesticide residue contents in nectarines after non-toxic washing treatments.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, P; Moltó, J C; Damiani, P; Marín, R; Cossignani, L; Mañes, J

    2004-10-01

    Washing with aqueous solutions of citric acid, ethanol, glycerol, hydrogen peroxide, potassium permanganate, sodium metabisulfite, sodium laurylsulfate (SLS), sodium hypochlorite, and urea is evaluated for pesticide residue reduction in nectarines and compared with simple tap water washing. Residues of pesticides commonly utilized in nectarines (chlorpyrifos, fenarimol, iprodione, malathion, methidathion, myclobutanil, parathion and pirimicarb) are extracted with ethyl acetate and anhydrous sodium sulfate, extract is concentred and analyzed by GC with nitrogen-phosphorus detection. The formation of possible toxic by-products (chlorpyrifos oxon, malaoxon, methidaoxon and paraoxon methyl) is studied by GC-MS. No toxic by-products are identified in the extracts of the washed samples for the washing-time and concentrations studied, but high levels of sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide and potassium permanganate form oxons from the organophosphorus pesticides. Ethanol, glycerol and SLS solutions removed near the 50% of the pesticide residues. The other solutions were not more effective than tap water washing. The amount of pesticide removed by washings is related to its water solubility and octanol-water partition coefficient.

  4. Define and Quantify the Physics of Air Flow, Pressure Drop and Aerosol Collection in Nuclear Grade HEPA Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Murray E.

    2015-02-23

    Objective: Develop a set of peer-review and verified analytical methods to adjust HEPA filter performance to different flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. Experimental testing will measure HEPA filter flow rate, pressure drop and efficiency to verify the analytical approach. Nuclear facilities utilize HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters to purify air flow for workspace ventilation. However, the ASME AG-1 technical standard (Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment) does not adequately describe air flow measurement units for HEPA filter systems. Specifically, the AG-1 standard does not differentiate between volumetric air flow in ACFM (actual cubic feet per minute)compared to mass flow measured in SCFM (standard cubic feet per minute). More importantly, the AG-1 standard has an overall deficiency for using HEPA filter devices at different air flow rates, temperatures, and altitudes. Technical Approach: The collection efficiency and pressure drops of 18 different HEPA filters will be measured over a range of flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. The experimental results will be compared to analytical scoping calculations. Three manufacturers have allocated six HEPA filters each for this effort. The 18 filters will be tested at two different flow rates, two different temperatures and two different altitudes. The 36 total tests will be conducted at two different facilities: the ATI Test facilities (Baltimore MD) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos NM). The Radiation Protection RP-SVS group at Los Alamos has an aerosol wind tunnel that was originally designed to evaluate small air samplers. In 2010, modifications were started to convert the wind tunnel for HEPA filter testing. (Extensive changes were necessary for the required aerosol generators, HEPA test fixtures, temperature control devices and measurement capabilities.) To this date, none of these modification activities have been funded through a specific DOE or NNSA program. This is

  5. Effectiveness of soil washing, nanofiltration and electrochemical treatment for the recovery of metal ions coming from a contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Lina M; Lebrun, Rémi; Blais, Jean-François; Hausler, Robert; Drogui, Patrick

    2008-04-01

    This research was conducted to integrate soil washing, nanofiltration (NF) membranes and electrochemical treatment as feasible methods for the remediation of contaminated soils. For this investigation, two acidic leachates (pH=2) were prepared using HCl and H(2)SO(4)-NaCl as soil-washing agents. The results of the soil washing indicated that HCl and the combined H(2)SO(4)-NaCl were effective for the extraction of ions resulting from a contaminated soil. It was observed that both leachates presented similar chemical compositions. Following this procedure, the leachate solutions were pre-filtered by microfiltration, followed by NF using the Desal-5 (DK) membrane. The experiment results showed that NF membranes presented a high ion-retention rate for the two leachates. In general, better retentions were observed with the leachate prepared with HCl than H(2)SO(4)-NaCl. In order to treat the concentrate resulting from the NF treatment, it underwent an electrochemical procedure (electrochemical deposition) as an alternative method for safe disposal. The results showed a high reduction of toxic ions, such as Pb and Cu, from the solution. These three processes applied in conjunction not only indicated that the treatment of solutions heavily contaminated with inorganic pollutants resulting from contaminated soils were feasible but also suggested the possibility of treating different types of heavy industrial effluents.

  6. Multi-Canister overpack internal HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH, K.E.

    1998-11-03

    The rationale for locating a filter assembly inside each Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) rather than include the filter in the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) process piping system was to eliminate the potential for contamination to the operators, processing equipment, and the MCO. The internal HEPA filters provide essential protection to facility workers from alpha contamination, both external skin contamination and potential internal depositions. Filters installed in the CVD process piping cannot mitigate potential contamination when breaking the process piping connections. Experience with K-Basin material has shown that even an extremely small release can result in personnel contamination and costly schedule disruptions to perform equipment and facility decontamination. Incorporating the filter function internal to the MCO rather than external is consistent with ALARA requirements of 10 CFR 835. Based on the above, the SNF Project position is to retain the internal HEPA filters in the MCO design.

  7. Degradation of HEPA filters exposed to DMSO

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, K.; Larsen, G.

    1995-02-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) sprays are being used to remove the high explosive (HE) from nuclear weapons in the process of their dismantlement. A boxed 50 cmf HEPA filter with an integral prefilter was exposed to DMSO vapor and aerosols that were generated by a spray nozzle to simulate conditions expected in the HE dissolution operation. After 198 hours of operation, the pressure drop of the filter had increased form 1.15 inches to 2,85 inches, and the efficiency for 0.3 {mu}m dioctyl sebacate (DOS) aerosols decreased form 99.992% to 98.6%. Most of the DMSO aerosols had collected as a liquid pool inside the boxed HEPA. The liquid was blown out of the filter exit with 100 cmf air flow at the end of the test. Since the filter still met the minimum allowed efficiency of 99.97% after 166 hours of exposure, we recommend replacing the filter every 160 hours of operation or sooner if the pressure drop increases by 50%. Examination of the filter showed that visible cracks appeared at the joints of the wooden frame and a portion of the sealant had pulled away from the frame. Since all of the DMSO will be trapped in the first HEPA filter, the second HEPA filter should not suffer from DMSO degradation. Thus the combined efficiency for the first filter (98.6%) and the second filter (99.97%) is 99.99996% for 0.3 {mu}m particles. If the first filter is replaced prior to its degradation, each of the filters will have 99.97% efficiency, and the combined efficiency will be 99.999991%. The collection efficiency for DMSO/HE aerosols will be much higher because the particle size is much greater.

  8. The effect of washing treatments on the surface cleanliness of Michigan Red Delicious apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most Red Delicious apples on the U.S. market are coated with food grade wax. The surface of the fruit needs to be prepared adequately by thorough cleaning prior to waxing and subsequent packaging for the consumer. The objective of the research was to evaluate the packing line washing conditions for ...

  9. BESCORP SOIL WASHING SYSTEM FOR LEAD BATTERY SITE TREATMENT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report evaluates the Brice Environmental Services Corporation (BESCORP) Soil Washing System (BSWS) and Its applicability in remediating lead-contaminated soil at lead battery sites. It presents performance and economic data, developed from the U.S. Environmental Protection A...

  10. SOLVENT EXTRACTION AND SOIL WASHING TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED SOILS FROM WOOD PRESERVING SITES: BENCH SCALE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench-scale solvent extraction and soil washing studies were performed on soil samples obtained from three abandoned wood preserving sites that included in the NPL. The soil samples from these sites were contaminated with high levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pentachlo...

  11. Anaerobic treatment of distillery spent wash - a study on upflow anaerobic fixed film bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Bhavik K; Mohana, Sarayu; Madamwar, Datta

    2008-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion of wastewater from a distillery industry having very high COD (1,10,000-1,90,000 mg/L) and BOD (50,000-60,000 mg/L) was studied in a continuously fed, up flow fixed film column reactor using different support materials such as charcoal, coconut coir and nylon fibers under varying hydraulic retention time and organic loading rates. The seed consortium was prepared by enrichment with distillery spent wash in a conventional type reactor having working capacity of 3 L and was used for charging the anaerobic column reactor. Amongst the various support materials studied the reactor having coconut coir could treat distillery spent wash at 8d hydraulic retention time with organic loading rate of 23.25 kg COD m(-3)d(-1) leading to 64% COD reduction with biogas production of 7.2 m3 m(-3)d(-1) having high methane yield without any pretreatment or neutralization of the distillery spent wash. This study indicates fixed film biomethanation of distillery spent wash using coconut coir as the support material appears to be a cost effective and promising technology for mitigating the problems caused by distillery effluent.

  12. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: BIOTROL SOIL WASHING SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF A WOOD PRESERVING SITE - VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SITE Program demonstration of one configuration of the BioTrol Soil Washing System (BSWS) was conducted to obtain reliable performance and cost data that can be used to evaluate the potential applicability of the technology as a remediation alternative for sites contaminated ...

  13. Residues of azoxystrobin, fenhexamid and pyrimethanil in strawberry following field treatments and the effect of domestic washing.

    PubMed

    Angioni, A; Schirra, M; Garau, V L; Melis, M; Tuberoso, C I G; Cabras, P

    2004-11-01

    Residues of the pesticides azoxystrobin, fenhexamid and pyrimethanil were determined in strawberry after field treatment. The effect of 'home' washing with tap water and a commercially available vegetable detergent on residue levels was also studied. After treatment, azoxystrobin and pyrimethanil residues on strawberry were on average 0.55 and 2.98 mg kg(-1), respectively, values below the maximum residue level (MRL) fixed by the European Union (2.0 and 5 mg kg(-1), respectively), while fenhexamid residues were on average 2.99 mg kg(-1), which is very close to the MRL of 3.0 mg kg(-1), but some samples were over the MRL. Thereafter, all residues declined, with a half-life of about 8 days (azoxystrobin and fenhexamid) and 4.8 days (pyrimethanil). Washing the fruit with tap water reduced the residues of azoxystrobin and fenhexamid but did not affect pyrimethanil residues. Finally, when fruits were washed with a commercial detergent, greater amounts were removed (about 45% of azoxystrobin and pyrimethanil and 60% of fenhexamid).

  14. Influence of bentonite in polymer membranes for effective treatment of car wash effluent to protect the ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Kiran, S Aditya; Arthanareeswaran, G; Thuyavan, Y Lukka; Ismail, A F

    2015-11-01

    In this study, modified polyethersulfone (PES) and cellulose acetate (CA) membranes were used in the treatment of car wash effluent using ultrafiltration. Hydrophilic sulfonated poly ether ether ketone (SPEEK) and bentonite as nanoclay were used as additives for the PES and CA membrane modification. Performances of modified membranes were compared with commercial PES membrane with 10kDa molecular weight cut off (MWCO). The influencing parameters like stirrer speed (250-750rpm) and transmembrane pressure (100-600kPa) (TMP) were varied and their effects were studied as a function of flux. In the treatment of car wash effluent, a higher permeate flux of 52.3L/m(2)h was obtained for modified CA membrane at TMP of 400kPa and stirrer speed of 750rpm. In comparison with modified PES membrane and commercial PES membrane, modified CA membranes showed better performance in terms of flux and flux recovery ratio. The highest COD removal (60%) was obtained for modified CA membrane and a lowest COD removal (47%) was observed for commercial PES membrane. The modified membranes were better at removing COD, turbidity and maintained more stable flux than commercial PES membrane, suggesting they will provide better economic performance in car wash effluent reclamation.

  15. Conformational changes in proteins recovered from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) muscle through pH shift washing treatments.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Ruiz, Juan A; Pacheco-Aguilar, Ramón; Ramírez-Suárez, Juan C; Lugo-Sánchez, Maria E; García-Orozco, Karina D; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Peña-Ramos, Aida

    2016-04-01

    Conformational and thermal-rheological properties of acidic (APC) and neutral (NPC) protein concentrates were evaluated and compared to those of squid (Dosidicus gigas) muscle proteins (SM). Surface hydrophobicity, sulfhydryl status, secondary structure profile, differential scanning calorimetry and oscillatory dynamic rheology were used to evaluate the effect of treatments on protein properties. Acidic condition during the washing process (APC) promoted structural and conformational changes in the protein present in the concentrate produced. These changes were enhanced during the heat setting of the corresponding sol. Results demonstrate that washing squid muscle under the proposed acidic conditions is a feasible technological alternative for squid-based surimi production improving its yield and gel-forming ability.

  16. A Survey of Mixed-Waste HEPA Filters in the DOE Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Felicione, F. S.; Barber, D. B.; Carney, K. P.

    2002-02-28

    A brief investigation was made to determine the quantities of spent, mixed-waste HEPA filters within the DOE Complex. The quantities of both the mixed-waste filters that are currently being generated, as well as the legacy mixed-waste filters being stored and awaiting disposition were evaluated. Seven DOE sites representing over 89% of the recent HEPA filter usage were identified. These sites were then contacted to determine the number of these filters that were likely destined to become mixed waste and to survey the legacy-filter quantities. Inquiries into the disposition plans for the filters were also made. It was determined that the seven sites surveyed possess approximately 500 m3 of legacy mixed-waste HEPA filters that will require processing, with an annual generation rate of approximately 25 m3. No attempt was made to extrapolate the results of this survey to the entire DOE Complex. These results were simply considered to be the lower bound of the totality of mixed-waste HEPA filters throughout the Complex. The quantities determined encourage the development of new treatment technologies for these filters, and provide initial data on which an appropriate capacity for a treatment process may be based.

  17. Application of an electrochemical treatment for EDDS soil washing solution regeneration and reuse in a multi-step soil washing process: Case of a Cu contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Alberto; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Huguenot, David; Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Esposito, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Soil washing is an extensively used process for remediation of heavy metals contaminated soils. However the amount of fresh washing solution to be used represents a significant economical drawback of this process. This paper investigates the application of an electrochemical process (Fe/Fe electrodes couple) for the regeneration of a spent EDDS solution, containing Cu and major competitor cations (Ca, Fe, Mg, and Mn). The effect of current density, pH and conductivity of the washing solution on the recovery process performances was investigated. Current density showed the highest influence on Cu, Mg and Mn removal yields. Maximum removal yields reached 99% for Cu, 77% for Mn and 49% for Mg. No influence of the investigated parameters on Ca removal was observed, while an increase of Fe concentration due to anode dissolution occurred. Characterization of sludge produced from the 2 h electrochemical test (5 mA cm(-2), pH = 8, 8 mS cm(-1)) displayed concentrations of 2.8 g kg(-1) for Ca, 0.4 g kg(-1) for Cu, 535.6 g kg(-1) for Fe, 2.6 g kg(-1) for Mg. TCLP tests at pH 2.88 and 4.93 showed a low leaching percentage (Ca, 10-21%; Cu, 6-12%; Fe, 0.22% Mg, 27-36%). Multi-washing tests were carried out to assess the decrease of the chelating ability of the regenerated washing solution and the Cu extraction efficiency.

  18. Efficacy and tolerability of fitostimoline (vaginal cream, ovules, and vaginal washing) and of benzydamine hydrochloride (tantum rosa vaginal cream and vaginal washing) in the topical treatment of symptoms of bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Boselli, F; Petrella, E; Campedelli, A; Muzi, M; Rullo, V; Ascione, L; Papa, R; Saponati, G

    2012-01-01

    Two hundred and 91 patients showing signs and symptoms of bacterial vaginosis (BV) were randomized to receive topical treatment with Fitostimoline (vaginal cream and vaginal ovules + vaginal washing) or benzydamine hydrochloride (vaginal cream + vaginal washing) for 7 days. Signs (leucorrhoea, erythema, oedema, and erosion) and symptoms (burning, pain, itching, vaginal dryness, dyspareunia, and dysuria) (scored 0-3) were evaluated at baseline and at the end of treatment; the total symptoms score (TSS) was also calculated. In 125 patients, a bacterial vaginosis was confirmed by vaginal swab test. The primary efficacy variable analysis, that is, the percentage of patients with therapeutic success (almost complete disappearance of signs and symptoms), demonstrated that Fitostimoline ovules and vaginal cream were therapeutically equivalent and that pooled Fitostimoline treatment was not inferior to benzydamine hydrochloride. All the treatments were well tolerated, with only minor local adverse events infrequently reported. The results of this study confirmed that gynaecological Fitostimoline is a safe and effective topical treatment for BV.

  19. Comparison between treatment of kitchen-sink wastewater and a mixture of kitchen-sink and washing-machine wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Huelgas, A; Nakajima, M; Nagata, H; Funamizu, N

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a submerged membrane bioreactor was used to treat 'higher-load' grey water: (a) kitchen-sink wastewater only, and (b) a mixture of kitchen-sink wastewater and washing-machine wastewater. For each type of wastewater, three systems operated at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) were investigated. In the mixture of kitchen-sink wastewater and washing-machine wastewater, the reactor with a short HRT of four hours was stopped due to foaming. It has been observed that for both types of wastewater, an HRT of eight hours or longer can be used for the treatment. However, it has been observed that a higher COD in the permeate of the mixture can be obtained compared with that of the kitchen-sink wastewater only. This indicated that washing-machine wastewater has some component that is not easily biodegradable. The total linear akylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) removal was > 99% even at a concentration of 10-23 mg 1(-1).

  20. Treatment of spent wash in anaerobic mesophilic suspended growth reactor (AMSGR).

    PubMed

    Banu, J Rajesh; Kaliappan, S; Rajkumar, M; Beck, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    Approximately 400 KL of spent wash or vinasse per annum is generated at an average COD concentration of 100,000 mg/l, by over 250 distilleries in India. There is an urgent need to develop, assess and use ecofriendly methods for the disposal of this high strength wastewater. Therefore, an attempt was made to investigate a few aspects of anaerobic digestion of spent wash collected from a distillery. The study was carried out in a 4 L laboratory scale anaerobic mesophilic suspended growth reactor. After the successful startup, the organic loading was increased stepwise to assess the performance of the reactor. During the study period, biogas generated was recorded and the maximum gas generated was found to be 16.9 L at an Organic Loading Rate (OLR) of 38 g COD/L. A 500% increase in the Volatile Fatty Acid (VFA) concentration (2150 mg/L) was observed, when the OLR was increased from 38 to 39 g COD/L. During the souring phase the removal of COD, Total Solids (TS) and Volatile Solids (VS) were in the order of 52%, 40% and 46% respectively. The methane content in the biogas varied from 65% to 75%.

  1. Treatment of real wastewater produced from Mobil car wash station using electrocoagulation technique.

    PubMed

    El-Ashtoukhy, E-S Z; Amin, N K; Fouad, Y O

    2015-10-01

    This paper deals with the electrocoagulation of real wastewater produced from a car wash station using a new cell design featuring a horizontal spiral anode placed above a horizontal disc cathode. The study dealt with the chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction and turbidity removal using electrodes in a batch mode. Various operating parameters such as current density, initial pH, NaCl concentration, temperature, and electrode material were examined to optimize the performance of the process. Also, characterization of sludge formed during electrocoagulation was carried out. The results indicated that the COD reduction and turbidity removal increase with increasing the current density and NaCl concentration; pH from 7 to 8 was found to be optimum for treating the wastewater. Temperature was found to have an insignificant effect on the process. Aluminum was superior to iron as a sacrificial electrode material in treating car wash wastewater. Energy consumption based on COD reduction ranged from 2.32 to 15.1 kWh/kg COD removed depending on the operating conditions. Finally, the sludge produced during electrocoagulation using aluminum electrodes was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analysis.

  2. SEPARATION OF HAZARDOUS ORGANICS BY LOW PRESSURE MEMBRANES: TREATMENT OF SOIL-WASH RINSE-WATER LEACHATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil washing is a promising technology for treating contaminated soils. In the present work, low-pressure, thin-film composite membranes were evaluated to treat the soil-wash leachates so that the treated water could be recycled back to the soil washing step. Experiments were don...

  3. Evaluation of performance and community dynamics of microorganisms during treatment of distillery spent wash in a three stage bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Garima; Gopal, Madhuban; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2010-06-01

    The ability of Emericella nidulans var. lata, Neurospora intermedia and Bacillus sp. to treat distillery spent wash in a three stage bioreactor was investigated. Process parameters were optimized in shake flask cultures with the individual strains before treatment of the effluent in a 15-l bioreactor. Treatment was first carried out by the fungi followed by bacteria. The treated effluent showed significant reduction in color (82%) and COD (93%) after 30 h. Metabolites formed after degradation of complex polymers in distillery effluent were assayed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and included furan, simple acid types and organic compounds. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA and 18S rDNA sequences amplified from DNA isolated from the reactor communities indicated the presence of other organisms besides those introduced initially. The microbial communities were able to carry out bioremediation of distillery effluent and produce discharge that conforms to safety standards.

  4. Specification for HEPA filters used by DOE contractors

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This standard establishes specification and testing requirements for High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters procured to provide personnel and environmental protection when installed in DOE nuclear facilities. The standard specifies minimum requirements to be included in contractor specifications.

  5. Efficacy and Tolerability of Fitostimoline (Vaginal Cream, Ovules, and Vaginal Washing) and of Benzydamine Hydrochloride (Tantum Rosa Vaginal Cream and Vaginal Washing) in the Topical Treatment of Symptoms of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Boselli, F.; Petrella, E.; Campedelli, A.; Muzi, M.; Rullo, V.; Ascione, L.; Papa, R.; Saponati, G.

    2012-01-01

    Two hundred and 91 patients showing signs and symptoms of bacterial vaginosis (BV) were randomized to receive topical treatment with Fitostimoline (vaginal cream and vaginal ovules + vaginal washing) or benzydamine hydrochloride (vaginal cream + vaginal washing) for 7 days. Signs (leucorrhoea, erythema, oedema, and erosion) and symptoms (burning, pain, itching, vaginal dryness, dyspareunia, and dysuria) (scored 0–3) were evaluated at baseline and at the end of treatment; the total symptoms score (TSS) was also calculated. In 125 patients, a bacterial vaginosis was confirmed by vaginal swab test. The primary efficacy variable analysis, that is, the percentage of patients with therapeutic success (almost complete disappearance of signs and symptoms), demonstrated that Fitostimoline ovules and vaginal cream were therapeutically equivalent and that pooled Fitostimoline treatment was not inferior to benzydamine hydrochloride. All the treatments were well tolerated, with only minor local adverse events infrequently reported. The results of this study confirmed that gynaecological Fitostimoline is a safe and effective topical treatment for BV. PMID:23209922

  6. Efficacy of plant-derived antimicrobials as antimicrobial wash treatments for reducing enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 on apples.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Upadhyay, Abhinav; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Upadhyaya, Indu; Mooyottu, Shankumar; Roshni Amalaradjou, Mary Anne; Schreiber, David; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of 3 GRAS-status, plant-derived antimicrobials (PDAs), trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC), carvacrol (CR), and β-resorcylic acid (BR) applied as an antimicrobial wash for killing Escherichia coli O157:H7 on apples. "Red delicious" apples inoculated with a 5 strain mixture of E. coli O157:H7 were subjected to washing in sterile deionized water containing 0% PDA (control), 0.15% TC, 0.35% TC, 0.15% CR, 0.30% CR, 0.5% BR, or 1% BR for 1, 3, and 5 min at 23 °C in the presence and absence of 1% soil, and surviving pathogen populations on apples were enumerated at each specified time. All PDAs were more effective in reducing E. coli O157:H7 compared to the water wash treatment (P < 0.05) and reduced the pathogen by 4- to 5-log CFU/apple in 5 min. Chlorine (1%) was the most effective treatment reducing the pathogen on apples to undetectable levels in 1 min (P < 0.05). Moreover, the antimicrobial effect of CR and BR was not affected by the presence of soil, whereas the efficacy of TC and BR was decreased in the presence of soil. Further, no bacteria were detected in the wash solution containing CR and BR; however, E. coli O157:H7 was recovered in the control wash water and treatment solutions containing TC and chlorine, in the presence of 1% soil (P < 0.05). Results suggest that the aforementioned PDAs, especially CR and BR could be used effectively to kill E. coli O157:H7 on apples when used as a wash treatment. Studies on the sensory and quality characteristics of apples treated with PDAs are needed before recommending their usage.

  7. The effect of media area on the dust holding capacity of deep pleat HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Dyment, J.; Loughborough, D.

    1997-08-01

    The high potential cost of storage, treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes places a premium on the longevity of installed HEPA filters in situations in radioactive processing facilities where dust capacity is a life determining factor. Previous work investigated the dust holding capacity v pressure drop characteristics of different designs of HEPA filter and also the effect of using graded density papers. This paper records an investigation of the effect of media area variation on the dust holding capacity of the {open_quotes}deep-pleat{close_quotes} design of HEPA filter. As in the previously reported work two test dusts (carbon black and sub micron sodium chloride) in the range (0.15 - 0.4{mu}m) were used. Media area adjustment was effected by varying the number of separators within the range 60 - 90. Results with the coarser dust allowed an optimum media area to be identified. Media areas greater or smaller than this optimum retained less dust than the optimum for the same terminal pressure drop. Conversely with the finer sodium chloride aerosol the dust holding capacity continued to increase up to the maximum area investigated. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  8. HEPA Filter Performance under Adverse Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Michael; Hogancamp, Kristina; Alderman, Steven; Waggoner, Charles

    2007-07-01

    This study involved challenging nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under a variety of conditions that can arise in Department of Energy (DOE) applications such as: low or high RH, controlled and uncontrolled challenge, and filters with physically damaged media or seals (i.e., leaks). Reported findings correlate filter function as measured by traditional differential pressure techniques in comparison with simultaneous instrumental determination of up and down stream PM concentrations. Additionally, emission rates and failure signatures will be discussed for filters that have either failed or exceeded their usable lifetime. Significant findings from this effort include the use of thermocouples up and down stream of the filter housing to detect the presence of moisture. Also demonstrated in the moisture challenge series of tests is the effect of repeated wetting of the filter. This produces a phenomenon referred to as transient failure before the tensile strength of the media weakens to the point of physical failure. An evaluation of the effect of particle size distribution of the challenge aerosol on loading capacity of filters is also included. Results for soot and two size distributions of KCl are reported. Loading capacities for filters ranged from approximately 70 g of soot to nearly 900 g for the larger particle size distribution of KCl. (authors)

  9. Soil washing treatability study

    SciTech Connect

    Krstich, M.

    1995-12-01

    Soil washing was identified as a viable treatment process option for remediating soil at the FEMP Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Little information relative to the specific application and potential effectiveness of the soil washing process exists that applies to the types of soil at the FEMP. To properly evaluate this process option in conjunction with the ongoing FEMP Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS), a treatability testing program was necessary to provide a foundation for a detailed technical evaluation of the viability of the process. In August 1991, efforts were initiated to develop a work plan and experimental design for investigating the effectiveness of soil washing on FEMP soil. In August 1992, the final Treatability Study Work Plan for Operable Unit 5: Soil Washing (DOE 1992) was issued. This document shall be referenced throughout the remainder of this report as the Treatability Study Work Plan (TSWP). The purpose of this treatability study was to generate data to support initial screening and the detailed analysis of alternatives for the Operable Unit 5 FS.

  10. Effect of DOP heterodispersion on HEPA-filter-penetration measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Biermann, A.

    1984-08-09

    The accuracy of the standard US test method for certifying High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters has been in question since the finding by Hinds, et al. that the dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosol used in the test is not monodisperse as had been assumed and that particle-size analyzers, or owls, could not distinguish between different particle-size distributions with the same owl reading. We have studied theoretically and experimentally the filter efficiency for different DOP size distributions with the same owl reading. Our studies show that the effect of varying DOP size distributions on the measured HEPA-filter penetration depends on the light-scattering-photometer response and on the HEPA-filter penetration curve, both measured as a function of particle size. HEPA-filter penetration for a heterodisperse DOP aerosol may be increased, decreased, or remain the same when compared to the filter penetration for monodisperse aerosols. Using experimental HEPA-filter penetration and photometer response curves, we show that heterodisperse DOP aerosols (D/sub cmd/ 0.19 and sigma g = 1.4) yield 24% lower penetrations than that for monodisperse DOP aerosols (D/sub cmd/ = 0.3 and sigma g = 1.0). This surprisingly small effect of the DOP heterodispersion on HEPA-filter penetration is due to the response function of the owl that is similar to the response of the photometer. Changes in the particle-size distribution are therefore seen in a similar fashion by both the photometer and the owl. We also show that replacing the owl with modern particle-size spectrometers may lead to large errors in filter penetration because the particle-size spectrometers do not provide measurements that correspond to the photometer measurements. 15 references, 16 figures.

  11. Valorization of aluminum scrap via an acid-washing treatment for reductive removal of toxic bromate from water.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew; Lin, Jia-Yin; Lien, Hsing-Lung

    2017-04-01

    Aluminum scrap (AS) is adopted for the first time as a readily available aluminum source to prepare zero-valent aluminum (ZVAl) for removing bromate from water via a reductive reaction. Since aluminum is easily oxidized to aluminum oxide (Al2O3) on exposure to air, an acid-washing pretreatment on AS is developed to remove the layer of Al2O3. HCl is found as the most effective acid to pretreat AS and the HCl-pretreated or acid-washed AS (AWAS) is able to remove bromate from water and convert it to bromide. Factors, such as temperature, pH, co-existing anions, and particle size, which influence the bromate removal using AWAS are also investigated. The mechanism of bromate removal by AWAS can be attributed to both reduction and adsorption. The elevated temperature also significantly improves bromate removal capacity of AWAS as well as the reaction kinetics. The bromate removal capacity of AWAS is substantially improved under acidic conditions. However, the basic conditions and co-existing anions suppress or interfere with the interaction between bromate and AWAS, leading to much lower removal capacities. The recyclability of AWAS is also evaluated and the acid-washing regeneration is necessary to restore its capacity. However, the mass of AWAS can gradually decrease due to multi-cycle acid-washing regeneration. Through this study, the valorization of AS via acid-washing is demonstrated and optimization of acid-washing parameters is presented. Our findings reveal that the acid-washing is a useful technique to utilize AS as an inexpensive and efficient material for removing bromate from water.

  12. Nasal Wash Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... months or if it becomes discolored. Cleaning the Bulb Syringe (dropper, syringe or nasal spray bottle) After ... may be several times a day), fill the bulb syringe with water (described above), swish the water ...

  13. Ultrasonic washing of textiles.

    PubMed

    Choi, Junhee; Kim, Tae-Hong; Kim, Ho-Young; Kim, Wonjung

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of experimental investigation of ultrasonic washing of textiles. The results demonstrate that cavitation bubbles oscillating in acoustic fields are capable of removing soils from textiles. Since the washing performance is mitigated in a large washing bath when using an ultrasonic transducer, we propose a novel washing scheme by combining the ultrasonic vibration with a conventional washing method utilizing kinetic energy of textiles. It is shown that the hybrid washing scheme achieves a markedly enhanced performance up to 15% in comparison with the conventional washing machine. This work can contribute to developing a novel laundry machine with reduced washing time and waste water.

  14. Two-stage electrochemical treatment of bio-digested distillery spent wash using stainless steel and aluminum electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pinki; Joshi, Himanshu; Srivastava, Vimal C

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of two-stage electro-coagulation (EC) process using multi-parameter optimization for treating bio-digested distillery spent wash by stainless steel (SS) and aluminum (Al) electrodes. Operating parameters have been optimized and treatment efficiency of SS and Al electrodes have been compared by central composite design of response surface analysis in terms of COD, color and total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Individual and interactive effects of four independent parameters namely initial pH (pHo: 2-10 and 4-10 for SS and Al electrodes, respectively), current density (j: 30.86-154.32 A m(-2)), inter-electrode distance (g: 0.5-2.5 cm) and electrolysis time (t: 30-150 min) on the COD, color and TOC removal efficiency were evaluated for both the electrodes. SS electrode was found to be more effective for the removal of COD, color and TOC with removal efficiencies of 70%, 93% and 72%, respectively, as compared to Al electrode, which showed respective removal efficiencies of 59%, 80% and 55%. A two-stage EC process was also conducted to study the predominance of different types of electrodes, and to increase the efficiency of EC process. Results shows that SS followed by Al electrode (with total COD, color and TOC removal efficiency of 81%, 94% and 78%, respectively) was found to be more effective than Al followed by SS electrode combination (with total COD, color and TOC removal efficiency of 78%, 89% and 76%, respectively). Present study shows that EC process can be used as an additional step to bio-methanation process so as to meet effluent discharge standards in distilleries.

  15. HEPA filter leaching concept validation trials at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravartty, A.C.

    1995-04-01

    The enclosed report documents six New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) HEPA filter leaching trials conducted at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant using a filter leaching system to validate the filter leaching treatment concept. The test results show that a modified filter leaching system will be able to successfully remove both hazardous and radiological constituents to RCRA disposal levels. Based on the success of the filter leach trials, the existing leaching system will be modified to provide a safe, simple, effective, and operationally flexible filter leaching system.

  16. HEPA/Vaccine Plan for Indoor Anthrax Remediation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yifan; Leighton, Terrance J.

    2005-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model to compare 2 indoor remediation strategies in the aftermath of an outdoor release of 1.5 kg of anthrax spores in lower Manhattan. The 2 strategies are the fumigation approach used after the 2001 postal anthrax attack and a HEPA/vaccine plan, which relies on HEPA vacuuming, HEPA air cleaners, and vaccination of reoccupants. The HEPA/vaccine approach leads to few anthrax cases among reoccupants if applied to all but the most heavily contaminated buildings, and recovery is much faster than under the decades-long fumigation plan. Only modest environmental sampling is needed. A surge capacity of 10,000 to 20,000 Hazmat workers is required to perform remediation within 6 to 12 months and to avoid permanent mass relocation. Because of the possibility of a campaign of terrorist attacks, serious consideration should be given to allowing or encouraging voluntary self-service cleaning of lightly contaminated rooms by age-appropriate, vaccinated, partially protected (through masks or hoods) reoccupants or owners. PMID:15705325

  17. ALTERNATE HIGH EFFICIENCY PARTICULATE AIR (HEPA) FILTRATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Bishop; Robert Goldsmith; Karsten Nielsen; Phillip Paquette

    2002-08-16

    In Phase IIA of this project, CeraMem has further developed and scaled up ceramic HEPA filters that are appropriate for use on filtration of vent gas from HLW tanks at DOE sites around the country. This work included procuring recrystallized SiC monoliths, developing membrane and cement materials, and defining a manufacturing process for the production of prototype full sizes HEPA filters. CeraMem has demonstrated that prototype full size filters can be manufactured by producing 9 full size filters that passed DOP aerosol testing at the Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility. One of these filters was supplied to the Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC) for process tests using simulated HLW tank waste. SRTC has reported that the filter was regenerable (with some increase in pressure drop) and that the filter retained its HEPA retention capability. CeraMem has also developed a Regenerable HEPA Filter System (RHFS) design and acceptance test plan that was reviewed by DOE personnel. The design and acceptance test plan form the basis of the system proposal for follow-on work in Phase IIB of this project.

  18. Effects of integrated treatment of nonthermal UV-C light and different antimicrobial wash on Salmonella enterica on plum tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Produce contamination by foodborne pathogens remains a serious threat. This study investigated synergistic effects of ultraviolet-C and various active sanitizers’ washes against Salmonella enterica on plum tomatoes. A bacterial cocktail containing three serotypes of Salmonella enterica (S. Newport H...

  19. Pilot-scale tests of HEME and HEPA dissolution process

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, Z.H.; Strege, D.K.

    1994-06-01

    A series of pilot-scale demonstration tests for the dissolution of High Efficiency Mist Eliminators (HEME`s) and High Efficiency Particulate Airfilters (HEPA) were performed on a 1/5th linear scale. These fiberglass filters are to be used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to decontaminate the effluents from the off-gases generated during the feed preparation process and vitrification. When removed, these filters will be dissolved in the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT) using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The contaminated fiberglass is converted to an aqueous stream which will be transferred to the waste tanks. The filter metal structure will be rinsed with process water before its disposal as low-level solid waste. The pilot-scale study reported here successfully demonstrated a simple one step process using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The proposed process requires the installation of a new water spray ring with 30 nozzles. In addition to the reduced waste generated, the total process time is reduced to 48 hours only (66% saving in time). The pilot-scale tests clearly demonstrated that the dissolution process of HEMEs has two stages - chemical digestion of the filter and mechanical erosion of the digested filter. The digestion is achieved by a boiling 5 wt% caustic solutions, whereas the mechanical break down of the digested filter is successfully achieved by spraying process water on the digested filter. An alternate method of breaking down the digested filter by increased air sparging of the solution was found to be marginally successful are best. The pilot-scale tests also demonstrated that the products of dissolution are easily pumpable by a centrifugal pump.

  20. Comparison of cold wind box and hot wind box operations of an RCFB incineration system for the treatment of distillery spent wash

    SciTech Connect

    Alappat, B.J.; Rane, V.C.

    1995-12-31

    Incineration has become an acceptable and feasible method of waste treatment. In the process of incinerating distillery spent wash, evaporation of the raw dilute waste to higher concentrations prior to combustion causes lot of difficulties and high expenditure. Recirculating Fluidized Bed (RCFB) with a central draft tube system has been suggested for the incineration of distillery spent wash to reduce the evaporation requirements in external evaporators prior to combustion. Cold wind box and hot wind box operations of this incineration system are described and calculated performance details are compared. Hot wind box operations increase the quantity of waste that can be treated in the system and also reduce considerably the concentrations to be achieved in the external evaporators. For the appropriate selection of the operation, cost involved in the heat recuperation needs to be assessed.

  1. A review of DOE HEPA filter component test activities

    SciTech Connect

    Slawski, J.W.; Bresson, J.F.; Scripsick, R.C.

    1997-08-01

    All HEPA filters purchased for installation in DOE nuclear facilities are required to be tested at a Filter Test Facility (FTF) prior to installation. The number of HEPA filters purchased by DOE has been reduced so much that the Hanford FTF was closed. From Fiscal Year (FY) 1992 to 1994, funding was not provided to the FTF Technical Support Group (TSG) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. As a consequence, Round Robin Tests (RRTs), performed twice each year by the FTFs to assess constituency of test results among the FTFs, were not performed in FY 1992 and FY 1993. The Annual Reports of FTF test activities were not prepared for FY 1992 - 1995. Technical support provided to the FTFs was minimal. There is talk of closing a second FTF, and ongoing discussions as to whether DOE will continue to fund operation of the FTFs. In FY 1994, DOE Defense Programs commenced funding the TSG. RRT data for FY 1994 and 1995 have been entered into the database; the FY 1994 RRT report has been issued; and the FY 1995 RRT report is in progress. Data from semiannual reports have been retrieved and entered into the database. Standards related to HEPA filter test and procurement activities are now scheduled for issuance by FY 1996. Continuation of these activities depends on whether DOE will continue to support the HEPA filter test program. The history and activities of the FTFs and the TSG at Los Alamos have been reported at previous Air Cleaning Conferences. Data from the FY 1991 Annual Report of FTF activities was presented at the 1992 Air Cleaning Conference. Preparation of the Annual Reports was temporarily suspended in 1992. However, all of the FTF Semiannual report data have been retrieved and entered into the data base. This paper focuses primarily on the results of HEPA filter tests conducted by FTFs during FY 1992 - FY 1995, and the possible effects of the DOE program uncertainties on the quality of HEPA filters for installation at the DOE sites. 15 refs., 13 tabs.

  2. Treatment of distillery spent-wash by ozonation and biodegradation: significance of pH reduction and inorganic carbon removal before ozonation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Saroj, Devendra P; Tare, Vinod; Bose, Purnendu

    2006-09-01

    This study is aimed at exploring strategies for mineralization of refractory compounds in distillery effluent by anaerobic biodegradation/ozonation/aerobic biodegradation. Treatment of distillery spent-wash used in this research by anaerobic-aerobic biodegradation resulted in overall COD removal of 70.8%. Ozonation of the anaerobically treated distillery spent-wash was carried out as-is (phase I experiments) and after pH reduction and removal of inorganic carbon (phase II experiments). Introduction of the ozonation step resulted in an increase in overall chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, with the highest COD removals of greater than 95% obtained when an ozone dose of approximately 5.3 mg ozone absorbed/mg initial total organic carbon was used. The COD removal during phase II experiments was slightly superior compared with phase I experiments at similar ozone doses. Moreover, efficiency of ozone absorption from the gas phase into distillery spent-wash aliquots was considerably enhanced during phase II experiments.

  3. Utility of /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and bronchial washings in the diagnosis and treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tuazon, C.U.; Delaney, M.D.; Simon, G.L.; Witorsch, P.; Varma, V.M.

    1985-11-01

    Twenty patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and suspected Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia were evaluated by /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and fiberoptic bronchoscopy for initial diagnosis and response to therapy. Lung uptake of /sup 67/Ga was demonstrated in 100% of AIDS patients with P. carinii pneumonia, including those with subclinical infection. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy identified P. carinii in the bronchial washings of 100% of cases (19 patients), whereas only 13 of 16 (81%) patients had P. carinii in lung tissue obtained by transbronchial biopsy. Repeat fiberoptic bronchoscopy was performed in 16 of 20 patients. After 2 to 4 wk of therapy, P. carinii was identified in bronchial washings in 8 of 16 (50%) patients and in transbronchial biopsy in 1 of 10 (10%) patients examined. Bronchial washing has a higher yield than transbronchial biopsy in demonstrating P. carinii in patients with AIDS and may evolve as the procedure of choice in such patients. Based on the clinical course and results of /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and fiberoptic bronchoscopy in AIDS patients with P. carinii pneumonia, optimal therapy may require at least 3 wk of treatment.

  4. Wash Your Hands

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Wash Your Hands Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... facilities and hospitals . When should you wash your hands? You can help yourself and others stay healthy ...

  5. Viral Penetration of High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    threatened deployment of biological 34 agents to produce casualties or disease in man or animals and damage to plants or 35 material. It is...viral weapons is not clearly defined. From a weapons standpoint, it 88 would be advantageous to create smaller particles, because they would remain...studies that 107 used an animal model (Burmester 1972, Hopkins1971) to assay the protection provided 108 by HEPA filters. The turn of the 21st

  6. Technology demonstration summary: Bio Trol soil-washing system for treatment of a wood-preserving site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program was instituted in 1986 to promote the development and application of innovative technologies to the remediation of Superfund and other sites contaminated with hazardous wastes. The Project Summary highlights the results of an evaluation of a specific arrangement of the three technologies of the BSWS. The system consists of multiple stages of physical abrasion, attrition, flotation, and washing of excavated soil in the BSW. The site selected for the evaluation is a wood preserving facility in New Brighton, MN, where creosote and pentachlorophenol were used for several decades.

  7. Performance of HEPA filters under hot dynamic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Frankum, D.P.; Costigan, G.

    1995-02-01

    Accidents in nuclear facilities involving fires may have implications upon the ventilation systems where high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are used to minimise the airborne release of radioactive or toxic particles. The Filter Development Section at Harwell Laboratory has been investigating the effect of temperature on the performance of HEPA filters under hot dynamic conditions[{sub 1}] for a number of years. The test rig is capable of delivering air flows of 10001/s (at ambient conditions) at temperatures up to 500{degrees}C, where measurements of the penetration and pressure drop across the filter are obtained. This paper reports the experiments on different constructions of HEPA filters; rectangular and circular. The filters were tested at an air temperature of 200{degrees}C for up to 48 hours at the rated airflow to assess their performance. The penetration measurements for rectangular filters were observed to be below 0.021% after prolonged operation. In a number of cases, holes appeared along the pleat creases of circular filters although the penetration remained below 1%. The sealing gasket for these filters was noted to deform with temperature, permitting a leakage path. A prototype high strength circular filter was evaluated at temperatures of up to 400{degrees}C with a penetration less than 0.65%.

  8. Performance Evaluation of Axial Flow AG-1 FC and Prototype FM (High Strength) HEPA Filters - 13123

    SciTech Connect

    Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Wilson, John A.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2013-07-01

    High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are routinely used in DOE nuclear containment activities. The Nuclear Air Cleaning Handbook (NACH) stipulates that air cleaning devices and equipment used in DOE nuclear applications must meet the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1) standard. This testing activity evaluates two different axial flow HEPA filters, those from AG-1 Sections FC and FM. Section FM is under development and has not yet been added to AG-1 due to a lack of qualification data available for these filters. Section FC filters are axial flow units that utilize a fibrous glass filtering medium. The section FM filters utilize a similar fibrous glass medium, but also have scrim backing. The scrim-backed filters have demonstrated the ability to endure pressure impulses capable of completely destroying FC filters. The testing activities presented herein will examine the total lifetime loading for both FC and FM filters under ambient conditions and at elevated conditions of temperature and relative humidity. Results will include loading curves, penetration curves, and testing condition parameters. These testing activities have been developed through collaborations with representatives from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), New Mexico State University, and Mississippi State University. (authors)

  9. Hydrology of Cornfield Wash area and effects of land treatment practices, Sandoval County, New Mexico, 1951-60

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkham, D.E.

    1967-01-01

    The collection of runoff and sediment data was the primary objective of the 10-year (1951-60) study in the Cornfield Wash basin, which has an area of 21.3 square miles. However, reconnaissance investigations also were made of (1) precipitation; (2) the effects of reservoirs on runoff, erosion, and sediment yield; (3) the effects of range pitting on runoff, sediment, and vegetation yields; and (4) the effects of wire sediment barriers on sediment accumulations. Precipitation averaged 6.07 inches for the warm season (May 1 through October 31). From 1951 to 1955 much of the precipitation came in short torrential downpours. Since 1955, precipitation usually has been of lower intensity, resulting in a low runoff-precipitation ratio. The total composite inflow to the 19 reservoirs in the Cornfield Wash basin--12 constructed in 1950 and 7 constructed from 1953 to 1956--was 5,720 acre-feet. The reservoirs permanently retained 1,370 acre-feet of water, 43 percent of which was apparently lost by evaporation. The average seasonal runoff (1951-59) from the ephemeral streams of the Cornfield Wash basin and nearby watersheds can be expressed, with a high coefficient of correlation, by the equation: runoff = 29.4 (area) 0.82 acre-feet. This relation suggests that there is a good correlation between the size of the drainage basin and the basin characteristics that most influence travel time of runoff. Comparisons of readily measurable basin characteristics that influence travel time indicate: 1. Land slope is proportional to (area) .0.035; 2. Length of longest watercourse is proportional to (area) 0.52; 3. Distance along the longest watercourse from gaging station to a point opposite the center of drainage basin is proportional to (area)0.52; and 4. Equivalent channel slope is proportional to (area)- 0.027. Except for land slope, the coefficients of correlation for each of the basin characteristics-area relations were relatively high. The correlation between seasonal runoff (1951

  10. Bacterial Selection during the Formation of Early-Stage Aerobic Granules in Wastewater Treatment Systems Operated Under Wash-Out Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Weissbrodt, David G; Lochmatter, Samuel; Ebrahimi, Sirous; Rossi, Pierre; Maillard, Julien; Holliger, Christof

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic granular sludge is attractive for high-rate biological wastewater treatment. Biomass wash-out conditions stimulate the formation of aerobic granules. Deteriorated performances in biomass settling and nutrient removal during start-up have however often been reported. The effect of wash-out dynamics was investigated on bacterial selection, biomass settling behavior, and metabolic activities during the formation of early-stage granules from activated sludge of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) over start-up periods of maximum 60 days. Five bubble-column sequencing batch reactors were operated with feast-famine regimes consisting of rapid pulse or slow anaerobic feeding followed by aerobic starvation. Slow-settling fluffy granules were formed when an insufficient superficial air velocity (SAV; 1.8 cm s(-1)) was applied, when the inoculation sludge was taken from a WWTP removing organic matter only, or when reactors were operated at 30°C. Fast-settling dense granules were obtained with 4.0 cm s(-1) SAV, or when the inoculation sludge was taken from a WWTP removing all nutrients biologically. However, only carbon was aerobically removed during start-up. Fluffy granules and dense granules were displaying distinct predominant phylotypes, namely filamentous Burkholderiales affiliates and Zoogloea relatives, respectively. The latter were predominant in dense granules independently from the feeding regime. A combination of insufficient solid retention time and of leakage of acetate into the aeration phase during intensive biomass wash-out was the cause for the proliferation of Zoogloea spp. in dense granules, and for the deterioration of BNR performances. It is however not certain that Zoogloea-like organisms are essential in granule formation. Optimal operation conditions should be elucidated for maintaining a balance between organisms with granulation propensity and nutrient removing organisms in order to form granules with BNR activities in short

  11. Bacterial Selection during the Formation of Early-Stage Aerobic Granules in Wastewater Treatment Systems Operated Under Wash-Out Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Weissbrodt, David G.; Lochmatter, Samuel; Ebrahimi, Sirous; Rossi, Pierre; Maillard, Julien; Holliger, Christof

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic granular sludge is attractive for high-rate biological wastewater treatment. Biomass wash-out conditions stimulate the formation of aerobic granules. Deteriorated performances in biomass settling and nutrient removal during start-up have however often been reported. The effect of wash-out dynamics was investigated on bacterial selection, biomass settling behavior, and metabolic activities during the formation of early-stage granules from activated sludge of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) over start-up periods of maximum 60 days. Five bubble-column sequencing batch reactors were operated with feast-famine regimes consisting of rapid pulse or slow anaerobic feeding followed by aerobic starvation. Slow-settling fluffy granules were formed when an insufficient superficial air velocity (SAV; 1.8 cm s−1) was applied, when the inoculation sludge was taken from a WWTP removing organic matter only, or when reactors were operated at 30°C. Fast-settling dense granules were obtained with 4.0 cm s−1 SAV, or when the inoculation sludge was taken from a WWTP removing all nutrients biologically. However, only carbon was aerobically removed during start-up. Fluffy granules and dense granules were displaying distinct predominant phylotypes, namely filamentous Burkholderiales affiliates and Zoogloea relatives, respectively. The latter were predominant in dense granules independently from the feeding regime. A combination of insufficient solid retention time and of leakage of acetate into the aeration phase during intensive biomass wash-out was the cause for the proliferation of Zoogloea spp. in dense granules, and for the deterioration of BNR performances. It is however not certain that Zoogloea-like organisms are essential in granule formation. Optimal operation conditions should be elucidated for maintaining a balance between organisms with granulation propensity and nutrient removing organisms in order to form granules with BNR activities in short

  12. MicroRNA Responses to the Genotoxic Carcinogens Aflatoxin B1 and Benzo[a]pyrene in Human HepaRG Cells.

    PubMed

    Marrone, April K; Tryndyak, Volodymyr; Beland, Frederick A; Pogribny, Igor P

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in toxicogenomics present an opportunity to develop new in vitro testing methodologies to identify human carcinogens. We have investigated microRNA expression responses to the treatment of human liver HepaRG cells with the human genotoxic carcinogens aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), and the structurally similar compounds aflatoxin B2 (AFB2) and benzo[e]pyrene (B[e]P) that exhibit minimal carcinogenic potential. We demonstrate that treatment of HepaRG cells with AFB1 or B[a]P resulted in specific changes in the expression of miRNAs as compared with their non-carcinogenic analogues, particularly in a marked over-expression of miR-410. An additional novel finding is the dose- and time-dependent inhibition of miR-122 in AFB1-treated HepaRG cells. Mechanistically, the AFB1-induced down-regulation of miR-122 was attributed to inhibition of the HNF4A/miR-122 regulatory pathway. These results demonstrate that HepaRG cells can be used to investigate miRNA responses to xenobiotic exposure, and illustrate the existence of early non-genotoxic events, in addition to a well-established genotoxic mode of action changes, in the mechanism of AFB1 and B[a]P carcinogenicity.

  13. Combined mild soil washing and compost-assisted phytoremediation in treatment of silt loams contaminated with copper, nickel, and chromium.

    PubMed

    Sung, Menghau; Lee, Chi-Yi; Lee, Suen-Zone

    2011-06-15

    A new soil remediation option, combining the soil washing process using pure water followed by the compost-assisted phytoextraction, is evaluated using silt loams contaminated with plating wastewater containing Cu, Ni, and Cr. Plants utilized in this study are the rapeseeds, sunflowers, tomatoes, and soapworts. Phytoextraction operation was carried out in pot experiments over a period of 4 months. Metal concentrations in roots and shoots of plants were analyzed upon completion of each pot experiment. Hypothesis testing was employed in assessing the significance of difference in the experimental data. Results indicated that the rapeseed, a hyperaccumulator, is most effective in extracting metals from the compost-amended silt loams. The fast-growing sunflowers and tomatoes are comparable to rapeseeds in accumulating metals despite their relatively low metal concentrations in tissues. Bioaccumulation coefficients obtained for all plants are less than one, indicating that phytostabilization rather than phytoextraction is the dominant mechanism at this simulated final-phase condition.

  14. PPAR agonists reduce steatosis in oleic acid-overloaded HepaRG cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rogue, Alexandra; Anthérieu, Sébastien; Vluggens, Aurore; Umbdenstock, Thierry; Claude, Nancy; Moureyre-Spire, Catherine de la; Weaver, Richard J.; Guillouzo, André

    2014-04-01

    Although non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common form of chronic liver disease there is no pharmacological agent approved for its treatment. Since peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are closely associated with hepatic lipid metabolism, they seem to play important roles in NAFLD. However, the effects of PPAR agonists on steatosis that is a common pathology associated with NAFLD, remain largely controversial. In this study, the effects of various PPAR agonists, i.e. fenofibrate, bezafibrate, troglitazone, rosiglitazone, muraglitazar and tesaglitazar on oleic acid-induced steatotic HepaRG cells were investigated after a single 24-hour or 2-week repeat treatment. Lipid vesicles stained by Oil-Red O and triglycerides accumulation caused by oleic acid overload, were decreased, by up to 50%, while fatty acid oxidation was induced after 2-week co-treatment with PPAR agonists. The greatest effects on reduction of steatosis were obtained with the dual PPARα/γ agonist muraglitazar. Such improvement of steatosis was associated with up-regulation of genes related to fatty acid oxidation activity and down-regulation of many genes involved in lipogenesis. Moreover, modulation of expression of some nuclear receptor genes, such as FXR, LXRα and CAR, which are potent actors in the control of lipogenesis, was observed and might explain repression of de novo lipogenesis. Conclusion: Altogether, our in vitro data on steatotic HepaRG cells treated with PPAR agonists correlated well with clinical investigations, bringing a proof of concept that drug-induced reversal of steatosis in human can be evaluated in in vitro before conducting long-term and costly in vivo studies in animals and patients. - Highlights: • There is no pharmacological agent approved for the treatment of NAFLD. • This study demonstrates that PPAR agonists can reduce fatty acid-induced steatosis. • Some nuclear receptors appear to be potent actors in the control

  15. Enhanced sludge washing evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program mission is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford Site waste (current and future tank waste and the strontium/cesium capsules) in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The scope of the TWRS Waste Pretreatment Program is to treat tank waste and separate that waste into HLW and LLW fractions and provide additional treatment as required to feed LLW and HLW immobilization facilities. Enhanced sludge washing was chosen as the baseline process for separating Hanford tank waste sludge. Section 1.0 briefly discusses the purpose of the evaluation plan and provides the background that led to the choice of enhanced sludge washing as the baseline process. Section 2.0 provides a brief summary of the evaluation plan details. Section 3.0 discusses, in some detail, the technical work planned to support the evaluation of enhanced sludge washing. Section 4.0 briefly discusses the potential important of policy issues to the evaluation. Section 5.0 discusses the methodology to be used in the evaluation process. Section 6.0 summarizes the milestones that have been defined to complete the enhanced sludge washing evaluation and provides a summary schedule to evaluate the performance of enhanced sludge washing. References are identified in Section 7.0, and additional schedule and milestone information is provided in the appendices.

  16. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  17. Histamine H2 receptor antagonism by T-593: studies on cAMP generation in Hepa cells expressing histamine H2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, T; Ono, K; Watanabe, T; Inoie, M; Arai, H; Kimura, S; Kurokawa, K

    1999-07-01

    Histamine H2 receptor antagonism by T-593 was investigated in Hepa cells expressing canine histamine H2 receptors. T-593 inhibited generation of cAMP in Hepa cells stimulated by 10(-5) mol/l histamine with an IC50 value of 2.3 x 10(-6) mol/l, (S)-(-)-T-593, one of the enantiomers comprising racemic T-593, inhibited cAMP generation with an IC50 value of 6.1 x 10(-7) mol/l. On the other hand, the other enantiomer (R)-(+)-T-593 exhibited only a negligible effect. Incubation of the cell with (S)-(-)-T-593 for 60 min depressed the maximal response of the concentration-response curve of histamine with a nonparallel rightward shift. The slope of a Schild plot was 1.27. In contrast, (S)-(-)-T-593 caused a parallel rightward shift of the curve, with a Schild plot slope that did not significantly differ from unity, by treating the cells for 15 min. The H2 receptor-blocking action of (S)-(-)-T-593 remained almost unaffected after washing out the drug, whereas the effect of ranitidine was reversible after washing. These results suggest that T-593 possesses a time-dependent insurmountable antagonistic action against histamine H2 receptor. T-593 may interact with the histamine H2 receptor molecule in a slowly associable and dissociable manner.

  18. Method of treating contaminated HEPA filter media in pulp process

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Jian S.; Argyle, Mark D.; Demmer, Ricky L.; Mondok, Emilio P.

    2003-07-29

    A method for reducing contamination of HEPA filters with radioactive and/or hazardous materials is described. The method includes pre-processing of the filter for removing loose particles. Next, the filter medium is removed from the housing, and the housing is decontaminated. Finally, the filter medium is processed as pulp for removing contaminated particles by physical and/or chemical methods, including gravity, flotation, and dissolution of the particles. The decontaminated filter medium is then disposed of as non-RCRA waste; the particles are collected, stabilized, and disposed of according to well known methods of handling such materials; and the liquid medium in which the pulp was processed is recycled.

  19. Wash water recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckman, G.; Rousseau, J. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The Wash Water Recovery System (WWRS) is intended for use in processing shower bath water onboard a spacecraft. The WWRS utilizes flash evaporation, vapor compression, and pyrolytic reaction to process the wash water to allow recovery of potable water. Wash water flashing and foaming characteristics, are evaluated physical properties, of concentrated wash water are determined, and a long term feasibility study on the system is performed. In addition, a computer analysis of the system and a detail design of a 10 lb/hr vortex-type water vapor compressor were completed. The computer analysis also sized remaining system components on the basis of the new vortex compressor design.

  20. HEPA Filter Disposal Write-Up 10/19/16

    SciTech Connect

    Loll, C.

    2016-10-20

    Process knowledge (PK) collection on HEPA filters is handled via the same process as other waste streams at LLNL. The Field technician or Characterization point of contact creates an information gathering document (IGD) in the IGD database, with input provided from the generator, and submits it for electronic approval. This document is essentially a waste generation profile, detailing the physical, chemical as well as radiological characteristics, and hazards, of a waste stream. It will typically contain a general, but sometimes detailed, description of the work processes which generated the waste. It will contain PK as well as radiological and industrial hygiene analytical swipe results, and any other analytical or other supporting knowledge related to characterization. The IGD goes through an electronic approval process to formalize the characterization and to ensure the waste has an appropriate disposal path. The waste generator is responsible for providing initial process knowledge information, and approves the IGD before it routed to chemical and radiological waste characterization professionals. This is the standard characterization process for LLNL-generated HEPA Filters.

  1. Preliminary studies to determine the shelf life of HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, H.; Fretthold, J.K.; Rainer, F.

    1995-02-01

    We have completed a preliminary study using filter media tests and filter qualification tests to investigate the effect of shelf-life on HEPA filter performance. Our media studies showed that the tensile strength decreased with age, but the data were not sufficient to establish a shelf-life. Thermogravimetric analyses demonstrated that one manufacturer had media with low tensile strength due to insufficient binder. The filter qualification tests (heated air and overpressure) conducted on different aged filters showed that filter age is not the primary factor affecting filter performance; materials and the construction design have a greater effect. An unexpected finding of our study was that sub-standard HEPA filters have been installed in DOE facilities despite existing regulations and filter qualification tests. We found that the filter with low tensile strength failed the overpressure test. The same filter had passed the heated air test, but left the filter so structurally weak, it was prone to blow-out. We recommend that DOE initiate a filter qualification program to prevent this occurrence.

  2. 3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT CHINA WASH FLUME SHOWING WASH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT CHINA WASH FLUME SHOWING WASH - San Carlos Irrigation Project, China Wash Flume, Main (Florence-Case Grande) Canal at Station 137+00, T4S, R10E, S14, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  3. Impact of inflammation on chlorpromazine-induced cytotoxicity and cholestatic features in HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Bachour-El Azzi, Pamela; Sharanek, Ahmad; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad; Antherieu, Sebastien; Al-Attrache, Houssein; Savary, Camille C; Lepage, Sylvie; Morel, Isabelle; Labbe, Gilles; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Guillouzo, André

    2014-09-01

    Several factors are thought to be implicated in the occurrence of idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions. The present work aimed to question as to whether inflammation is a determinant factor in hepatic lesions induced by chlorpromazine (CPZ) using the human HepaRG cell line. An inflammation state was induced by a 24-hour exposure to proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-1β; then the cells were simultaneously treated with CPZ and/or cytokine for 24 hours or daily for 5 days. The inflammatory response was assessed by induction of C-reactive protein and IL-8 transcripts and proteins as well as inhibition of CPZ metabolism and down-regulation of cytochrome 3A4 (CYP3A4) and CYP1A2 transcripts, two major cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes involved in its metabolism. Most effects of cotreatments with cytokines and CPZ were amplified or only observed after five daily treatments; they mainly included increased cytotoxicity and overexpression of oxidative stress-related genes, decreased Na(+)-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide mRNA levels and activity, a key transporter involved in bile acids uptake, and deregulation of several other transporters. However, CPZ-induced inhibition of taurocholic acid efflux and pericanalicular F-actin distribution were not affected. In addition, a time-dependent induction of phospholipidosis was noticed in CPZ-treated cells, without obvious influence of the inflammatory stress. In summary, our results show that an inflammatory state induced by proinflammatory cytokines increased cytotoxicity and enhanced some cholestatic features induced by the idiosyncratic drug CPZ in HepaRG cells. These changes, together with inhibition of P450 activities, could have important consequences if extrapolated to the in vivo situation.

  4. Hand Washing: Do's and Dont's

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Adult health Hand-washing is an easy way to prevent infection. Understand when to wash your ... 14, 2016 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/hand-washing/art-20046253 . ...

  5. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Solids Washing

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, David L.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Toth, James J.; Huckaby, James L.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

    2009-08-14

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.” The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. Two operating scenarios were evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-VSL-T01A/B ultrafiltration feed vessels, identified as Integrated Test A. The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-VSL-T02A ultrafiltration feed preparation vessel, identified as Integrated Test B. Washing operations in PEP Integrated Tests A and B were conducted successfully as per the approved run sheets. However, various minor instrumental problems occurred, and some of the process conditions specified in the run sheet were not met during the wash operations, such as filter-loop flow-rate targets not being met. Five analytes were selected based on full solubility and monitored in the post-caustic-leach wash as successful indicators of washing efficiency. These were aluminum, sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, and free hydroxide. Other analytes, including sodium, oxalate, phosphate, and total dissolved solids, showed indications of changing solubility; therefore, they were unsuitable for monitoring washing efficiency. In the post-oxidative-leach wash, two analytes with full solubility were selected as suitable indicators of washing

  6. Separation of hazardous organics by low-pressure membranes: treatment of soil-wash rinse-water leachates. Rept. for Jan 90-Jan 92

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Kothari, A.

    1992-03-01

    Soil washing is a promising technology for treating contaminated soils. In the present work, low-pressure, thin-film composite membranes were evaluated to treat the soil-wash leachates so that the treated water could be recycled back to the soil washing step. Experiments were done with SARM (Synthetic Analytical Reference Matrix) soils. Membrane performance was evaluated with leachates obtained from different wash solutions. The effect of fine suspensions in the leachates was also studied. A solution-diffusion model was modified to include an adsorption resistance term in water flux, and this term was correlated with bulk concentration using the Freundlich isotherm. The correlation was then used to predict water flux drop at different bulk concentrations or to predict water flux at different recoveries. Thin-film composite membranes were found to effectively treat the leachate from rinse water used to wash contaminated soil. In addition, feed preozonation significantly improved water flux.

  7. Evaluation of the impact of a simple hand-washing and water-treatment intervention in rural health facilities on hygiene knowledge and reported behaviours of health workers and their clients, Nyanza Province, Kenya, 2008.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, N; Gotestrand, S A; Ombeki, S; Oluoch, G; Fischer, T K; Quick, R

    2015-03-01

    Many clinics in rural western Kenya lack access to safe water and hand-washing facilities. To address this problem, in 2005 a programme was initiated to install water stations for hand washing and drinking water in 109 health facilities, train health workers on water treatment and hygiene, and motivate clients to adopt these practices. In 2008, we evaluated this intervention's impact by conducting observations at facilities, and interviewing staff and clients about water treatment and hygiene. Of 30 randomly selected facilities, 97% had water stations in use. Chlorine residuals were detectable in at least one container at 59% of facilities. Of 164 interviewed staff, 79% knew the recommended water-treatment procedure. Of 298 clients, 45% had received training on water treatment at a facility; of these, 68% knew the recommended water-treatment procedure. Use of water stations, water treatment, and client training were sustained in some facilities for up to 3 years.

  8. Method for HEPA filter leak scanning with differentiating aerosol detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, B.J.; Banks, E.M.; Wikoff, W.O.

    1997-08-01

    While scanning HEPA filters for leaks with {open_quotes}Off the Shelf{close_quote} aerosol detection equipment, the operator`s scanning speed is limited by the time constant and threshold sensitivity of the detector. This is based on detection of the aerosol density, where the maximum signal is achieved when the scanning probe resides over the pinhole longer than several detector time-constants. Since the differential value of the changing signal can be determined by observing only the first small fraction of the rising signal, using a differentiating amplifier will speed up the locating process. The other advantage of differentiation is that slow signal drift or zero offset will not interfere with the process of locating the leak, since they are not detected. A scanning hand-probe attachable to any NUCON{reg_sign} Aerosol Detector displaying the combination of both aerosol density and differentiated signal was designed. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Wash water solids removal system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    During wash water purification, surfactants tend to precipitate and foul the RO membranes, causing water flux decline and loss of salt rejection. The use of 165 to 190 ppm ferric chloride and optionally 0.25 to 1.0 ppm polymeric flocculate precipitates 92 to 96 percent of the surfactant from an Olive Leaf Soap based wash water. Crossflow filtration and pressure filtration yield good soap rejection at high water flux rates. Post-treatment of the chemically pretreated and filtered wash water with activated charcoal removes the residual soap down to an undetectable level.

  10. Electrochemical disinfection: an efficient treatment to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 in process wash water containing organic matter.

    PubMed

    López-Gálvez, Francisco; Posada-Izquierdo, Guiomar D; Selma, María V; Pérez-Rodríguez, Fernando; Gobet, Jean; Gil, María I; Allende, Ana

    2012-05-01

    The efficacy of an electrochemical treatment in water disinfection, using boron-doped diamond electrodes, was studied and its suitability for the fresh-cut produce industry analyzed. Tap water (TW), and tap water supplemented with NaCl (NaClW) containing different levels of organic matter (Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) around 60, 300, 550 ± 50 and 750 ± 50 mg/L) obtained from lettuce, were inoculated with a cocktail of Escherichia coli O157:H7 at 10⁵ cfu/mL. Changes in levels of E. coli O157:H7, free, combined and total chlorine, pH, oxidation-reduction potential, COD and temperature were monitored during the treatments. In NaClW, free chlorine was produced more rapidly than in TW and, as a consequence, reductions of 5 log units of E. coli O157:H7 were achieved faster (0.17, 4, 15 and 24 min for water with 60, 300, 500 and 750 mg/L of COD, respectively) than in TW alone (0.9, 25, 60 min and 90 min for water with 60, 300, 600 and 800 mg/L of COD, respectively). Nonetheless, the equipment showed potential for water disinfection and organic matter reduction even without adding NaCl. Additionally, different mathematical models were assessed to account for microbial inactivation curves obtained from the electrochemical treatments.

  11. Bio-efficacy, physical integrity, community usage and washing practices of mosquito nets treated with ICON MAXX long-lasting insecticidal treatment in India

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Sudhansu Sekhar; Gunasekaran, Kasinathan; Vijayakumar, Kilakootil Narayanan; Jambulingam, Purushothaman

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND New brands of potential long lasting insecticide nets (LLINs) and LLIN treatment kits require field evaluation before they are used in a vector control programme. OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to evaluate the bio-efficacy, usage, washing practice and physical integrity of nets treated with LLIN treatment kit, ICON MAXX in a phase III field trial in Odisha state, India. METHODS A total of 300 polyester nets treated with ICON MAXX and 140 polyester nets treated conventionally with lambda-cyhalothrin CS 2.5% ITNs were distributed. The bio-efficacy was evaluated with WHO cone bioassay. The chemical analysis of netting pieces was done at the beginning, after 12 and 36 months of the trial. FINDINGS After one year of distribution of nets, the bioassay showed 100% mortality on both ITNs and ICON MAXX treated nets. At 36 months, the overall pass rate was 58.8% and the mean lambda-cyhalothrin content of LLINs was 34.5 mg ai/m2, showing a loss of 44.4% of the original concentration. CONCLUSION ICON MAXX treated LLIN was found to retain bio-efficacy causing 97% knockdown of Anopheles stephensi up to 30 months and met the WHOPES criteria. However, the desired bio-efficacy was not sustained up to 36 months. PMID:28125134

  12. A modified multiparametric assay using HepaRG cells for predicting the degree of drug-induced liver injury risk.

    PubMed

    Tomida, Takafumi; Okamura, Hayao; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Konno, Yoshihiro

    2017-03-01

    The approach for predicting the degree of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) risk was investigated quantitatively in a modified multiparametric assay using HepaRG cells. Thirty-eight drugs were classified by DILI risk into five categories based on drug labels approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as follows: withdrawn (WDN), boxed warning (BW), warnings and precautions (WP), adverse reactions (AR), and no match (NM). Also, WP was classified into two categories: high and low concern. Differentiated HepaRG cells were treated with drugs for 24 h. The maximum concentration was set at 100-fold the therapeutic maximum plasma concentration (Cmax ). After treatment with drugs, the cell viability, glutathione content, caspase 3/7 activity, lactate dehydrogenase leakage and albumin secretion were measured. As modified cut-off values of each parameter, the TC50 (toxic concentration that decreased the response by 50%) and EC200 (effective concentration giving a response equal to 200% of controls) were calculated. In addition, the toxicity score (total sum score of the cytotoxic level of each parameter) was calculated. This modified multiparametric assay showed an 87% sensitivity and 87% specificity for predicting the DILI risk. The toxicity score showed a good predictive performance for WDN, BW and WP (high concern) categories [cut-off: score ≥ 1; area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC): 0.88], and for WDN and BW categories (cut-off: score ≥ 3; ROC-AUC: 0.88). This study newly indicated that the degree of DILI risk might be predictable quantitatively by assessing the toxicity score in the modified multiparametric assay using HepaRG cells. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Dose- and time-dependent effects of phenobarbital on gene expression profiling in human hepatoma HepaRG cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Carine B.; Spire, Catherine Claude, Nancy; Guillouzo, Andre

    2009-02-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) induces or represses a wide spectrum of genes in rodent liver. Much less is known about its effects in human liver. We used pangenomic cDNA microarrays to analyze concentration- and time-dependent gene expression profile changes induced by PB in the well-differentiated human HepaRG cell line. Changes in gene expression profiles clustered at specific concentration ranges and treatment times. The number of correctly annotated genes significantly modulated by at least three different PB concentration ranges (spanning 0.5 to 3.2 mM) at 20 h exposure amounted to 77 and 128 genes (p {<=} 0.01) at 2- and 1.8-fold filter changes, respectively. At low concentrations (0.5 and 1 mM), PB-responsive genes included the well-recognized CAR- and PXR-dependent responsive cytochromes P450 (CYP2B6, CYP3A4), sulfotransferase 2A1 and plasma transporters (ABCB1, ABCC2), as well as a number of genes critically involved in various metabolic pathways, including lipid (CYP4A11, CYP4F3), vitamin D (CYP24A1) and bile (CYP7A1 and CYP8B1) metabolism. At concentrations of 3.2 mM or higher after 20 h, and especially 48 h, increased cytotoxic effects were associated with disregulation of numerous genes related to oxidative stress, DNA repair and apoptosis. Primary human hepatocyte cultures were also exposed to 1 and 3.2 mM PB for 20 h and the changes were comparable to those found in HepaRG cells treated under the same conditions. Taken altogether, our data provide further evidence that HepaRG cells closely resemble primary human hepatocytes and provide new information on the effects of PB in human liver. These data also emphasize the importance of investigating dose- and time-dependent effects of chemicals when using toxicogenomic approaches.

  14. Protective effect of Porphyra yezoensis glycoprotein on D-galactosamine‑induced cytotoxicity in Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Wook; Kim, Young-Min; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, In-Hye; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2015-05-01

    The present study aimed to examine the signaling pathways and enzyme activity associated with the protective effect of Porphyra yezoensis glycoprotein (PYGP) on D‑galactosamine (D‑GaIN)‑induced cytotoxicity in Hepa 1c1c7 cells. D‑GaIN is commonly used to induce hepatic injury models in vivo as well as in vitro. PYGP was extracted from Porphyra yezoensis, a red algae distributed along the coasts of Republic of Korea, China and Japan. In the present study, Hepa 1c1c7 cells were pre‑treated with PYGP (20 and 40 µg/ml) for 24 h and then the media was replaced with D‑GaIN (20 mM) and PYGP (20 and 40 µg/ml). The results demonstrated that D‑GaIN induced Hepa 1c1c7 cell death and pretreatment with PYGP was found to attenuate D‑GaIN toxicity. In addition, D‑GaIN decreased the antioxidant activity and increased lipid peroxidation processes; however, pre‑treatment with PYGP reduced the generation of lipid peroxidation products, such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, as well as increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione‑s‑transferase (GST). PYGP was shown to suppress the overexpression of extracellular signal‑regulated kinase, c‑jun N‑terminal kinase and p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation induced by D‑GaIN. Furthermore, PYGP increased the protein expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2‑related factor 2 (Nrf2), quinine oxidoreductase 1, GST and heme oxygenase 1 protein expression. These results suggested that PYGP had cytoprotective effects against D‑GaIN‑induced cell damage, which may be associated with MAPKs and the Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  15. Criteria for calculating the efficiency of HEPA filters during and after design basis accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; First, M.W.; Anderson, W.L.; Gilbert, H.; Jacox, J.W.

    1994-12-01

    We have reviewed the literature on the performance of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under normal and abnormal conditions to establish criteria for calculating the efficiency of HEPA filters in a DOE nonreactor nuclear facility during and after a Design Basis Accident (DBA). The literature review included the performance of new filters and parameters that may cause deterioration in the filter performance such as filter age, radiation, corrosive chemicals, seismic and rough handling, high temperature, moisture, particle clogging, high air flow and pressure pulses. The deterioration of the filter efficiency depends on the exposure parameters; in severe exposure conditions the filter will be structurally damaged and have a residual efficiency of 0%. Despite the many studies on HEPA filter performance under adverse conditions, there are large gaps and limitations in the data that introduce significant error in the estimates of HEPA filter efficiencies under DBA conditions. Because of this limitation, conservative values of filter efficiency were chosen when there was insufficient data.

  16. Single-stage fermentation process for high-value biohythane production with the treatment of distillery spent-wash.

    PubMed

    Pasupuleti, Suresh Babu; Venkata Mohan, S

    2015-01-01

    The current communication reports the development of a single-stage biosystem for biohythane production from wastewater treatment. A semi-pilot scale bioreactor with 34 L capacity was used for this study. Maximum biohythane production of 147.5 ± 2.4 L was observed after five cycles of operation with production rate of 4.7 ± 0.1L/h. The biohythane composition (H2/(H2+CH4)) varied from 0.60 to 0.23 during stabilized fifth cycle of operation. During each cycle of operation, higher H2 fraction was noticed within 12h of cycle period followed by CH4 production for rest of operation (36 h). During biohythane production, COD removal efficiency of 60 ± 5% (SDR, 29.0 ± 1.9 kg CODr/m(3)-day) was also achieved. The synergistic function of volatile fatty acids (VFA) production and consumption during process in hybrid biosystem played vital role on the composition of biohythane. The single-stage biosystem facilitates production of high valued and cost efficient biofuel (biohythane) with fewer controls than individual acidogenic and methanogenic processes.

  17. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory HEPA filter box

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, J.C.

    1998-07-15

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) evaluates and documents the safe onsite transport of eight high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory HEPA Filter Box from the 300 Area of the Hanford Site to the Central Waste Complex and on to burial in the 200 West Area. Use of this SEP is authorized for 1 year from the date of release.

  18. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, J.C.

    1984-03-13

    A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  19. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  20. Soil washing technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Suer, A.

    1995-04-01

    Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

  1. 5-HT3 receptor influences the washing phenotype and visual organization in obsessive-compulsive disorder supporting 5-HT3 receptor antagonists as novel treatment option.

    PubMed

    Lennertz, Leonhard; Wagner, Michael; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Franke, Petra E; Guttenthaler, Vera; Rampacher, Friederike; Schulze-Rauschenbach, Svenja; Vogeley, Andrea; Benninghoff, Jens; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Pukrop, Ralf; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Falkai, Peter; Maier, Wolfgang; Mössner, Rainald

    2014-01-01

    A role of the HTR3A-E genes in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) can be expected based on promising effects of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists as adjunctive treatment of OCD. We therefore genotyped six common coding or promoter variants within the HTR3A-E genes in a case-control-sample consisting of N=236 OCD patients and N=310 control subjects and in N=58 parent-child-trios. Given the heterogeneous OCD phenotype, we also investigated OCD symptom dimensions and cognitive endophenotypes in subsamples. OCD patients scoring high for the washing subtype were significantly more likely to carry the c.256G-allele of the HTR3E variant rs7627615 (p=0.0001) as compared to OCD patients low for this symptom dimension. Visual organization was impaired in OCD patients and unaffected relatives as compared to healthy control subjects and carriers of the HTR3E c.256G/c.256G-genotype performed significantly worse (p=0.007). The case-control analyses revealed a nominal significant association of the HTR3D variant rs1000592 (p.H52R) with OCD (p=0.029) which was also evident after combination of the case-control and the trio-results (p=0.024). In male subjects, the variant rs6766410 (p.N163K) located in the HTR3C was significantly associated with OCD (p=0.007). The association findings of the HTR3C and the HTR3E remained significant after correction for the number of variants investigated. These findings indicate a role of common variants of the HTR3A-E genes in OCD and OCD-related phenotypes and further support the use of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists as novel treatment options. The HTR3E gene is a novel candidate gene impacting on the individual expression of OC symptoms and OCD-related cognitive dysfunction.

  2. The rodent malaria liver stage survives in the rapamycin-induced autophagosome of infected Hepa1–6 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chenghao; Liu, Taiping; Zhou, Taoli; Fu, Yong; Zheng, Hong; Ding, Yan; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Wenyue

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that non-selective autophagy of infected hepatocytes could facilitate the development of malaria in the liver stage, but the fate of parasites following selective autophagy of infected hepatocytes is still not very clear. Here, we confirmed that sporozoite infection can induce a selective autophagy-like process targeting EEFs (exo-erythrocytic forms) in Hepa1–6. Rapamycin treatment greatly enhanced this process in EEFs and non-selective autophagy of infected Hepa1-6 cells and enhanced the development of the malaria liver stage in vivo. Although rapamycin promoted the fusion of autophagosomes containing the malaria parasite with lysosomes, some parasites inside the autophagosome survived and replicated normally. Further study showed that the maturation of affected autolysosomes was greatly inhibited. Therefore, in addition to the previously described positive role of rapamycin-induced nonselective autophagy of hepatocytes, we provide evidence that the survival of EEFs in the autophagosome of the infected hepatocytes also contributes to rapamycin-enhanced development of the malaria liver stage, possibly due to the suppression of autolysosome maturation by EEFs. These data suggest that the inhibition of autolysosome maturation might be a novel escape strategy used by the malaria liver stage. PMID:27901110

  3. Mold colonization during use of preservative-treated and untreated air filters, including HEPA filters from hospitals and commercial locations over an 8-year period (1996-2003).

    PubMed

    Price, Daniel L; Simmons, Robert B; Crow, Sidney A; Ahearn, Donald G

    2005-07-01

    High efficiency particulate arrestance (HEPA; 99.97% efficient at 0.3 microm) filters, filters with ASHRAE particulate arrestance rating of 90-95% at 1 mum (90-95% filters), and lower efficiency cellulosic-polyester filters from air conditioning systems in hospitals and commercial buildings were removed from the systems and examined microscopically for mold colonization. Cellulosic-type filters from systems with water entrainment problems typically were colonized, or became colonized upon incubation in moisture chambers. Species of Acremonium, Aspergillus, and Cladosporium were most common. With air filters of all types, treatment of filter media with an antimicrobial preservative tended to reduce or delay colonization. Mold colonization of HEPA and 90-95% filters was observed most often on the load surfaces, but two untreated HEPA filters were permeated with fungi, one with Aspergillus flavus, the other with Cladosporium sp. Air filters in heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, particularly those with chronic or periodic exposure to moisture, may serve as point sources for indoor molds.

  4. Domestic wash water reclamation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. B., Jr.; Batten, C. E.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    System consists of filtration unit, reverse-osmosis module, tanks, pumps, plumbing, and various gauges, meters, and valves. After water is used in washing machine or shower, it is collected in holding tank. Water is pumped through series of five particulate filters. Pressure tank supplies processed water to commode water closet.

  5. Development of the sampling and nuclide analysis methods for spent HEPA filter wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Young-Yong Ji; Dae Seok Hong; Il-Sik Kang; Bum-Kyoung Seo; Jong-Sik Shon

    2007-07-01

    Spent filter wastes of about 2,160 units have been stored in the waste storage facility of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute since its operation. These spent filters have generally consisted of a HEPA filter after its filtering of all the contaminants in the gas stream generated during the operation of the HANARO research reactor and the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. At the moment, to secure enough storage space, it is necessary to make a volume reduction of the stored radioactive wastes through a compression treatment or a regulatory clearance. There have been many studies on a treatment and a clearance of the low level radioactive wastes generated from nuclear facilities. These methods are used in view of a reduction of a management cost and disposal cost and the security of free space for a waste storage facility approaching saturation. In order to dispose of the spent filters, it is first necessary to conduct a radionuclide assessment of them. To do that, a sampling procedure should be prepared to obtain a representative sample from a spent filter. As for conducting a nuclide analysis for this representative sample, a corresponding spent filter can be determined as either a regulatory clearance waste or a radioactive waste. (authors)

  6. Single treatment with ethanol hand rub is ineffective against human rhinovirus--hand washing with soap and water removes the virus efficiently.

    PubMed

    Savolainen-Kopra, Carita; Korpela, Terttu; Simonen-Tikka, Marja-Leena; Amiryousefi, Ali; Ziegler, Thedi; Roivainen, Merja; Hovi, Tapani

    2012-03-01

    Ethanol-containing hand rubs are used frequently as a substitute for hand washing with water and soap. However, not all viruses are inactivated by a short term rubbing with alcohol. The capacity of a single round of instructed and controlled hand cleaning with water and soap or ethanol-containing hand rub, respectively, was tested for removal of human rhinovirus administered onto the skin of healthy volunteers on the back of the hands. Hand washing with soap and water appeared to be much more efficient for removing rhinoviruses from skin than rubbing hands with an ethanol-containing disinfectant. After washing with soap and water the virus was detected in 3/9 (33.3%) test persons from the left hand and 1/9 (11.1%) cases from the right hand, whereas the virus was detected invariably by real-time RT-PCR from both hands after cleaning with alcohol hand rub (P-value <0.01). Both substances evaluated clinically were also tested in vitro for virucidal efficacy against Human rhinovirus2 (HRV2) using a standardized assay. Both tested substances were poor within the contact time used in the hand-cleaning test. In conclusion, thorough and conventional hand washing with water and soap can clean efficiently hands contaminated with the virus responsible for an extensive share of common cold episodes.

  7. Washing Out the Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    AJT Associates, Inc. (AJT) worked with NASA to develop a revolutionary ozone-based laundry system. AJT's TecH2Ozone(R) wash system presents its customers with an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally safe way to perform commercial laundering. TecH2Ozone significantly reduces the amount of water and chemical used as compared to traditional commercial laundry systems. This reduction has resulted in lower cost and shorter wash cycles. And due to the reduced use of chemicals, a significant portion of the rinse water is recycled back into the system for reuse. TecH2Ozone customers, such as hotels and other large commercial laundry facilities, have felt the benefits of this equipment. Because of the reduced cycle times, fewer washers are needed and there is a notable increase in the cleanliness of the laundry. The reduction in chemical residues is a boon to customers with allergies and those prone to skin irritation from chemicals retained in regular laundry. AJT Associates, Inc. (AJT) worked with NASA to develop a revolutionary ozone-based laundry system. AJT's TecH2Ozone(R) wash system presents its customers with an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally safe way to perform commercial laundering.

  8. Testing cleanable/reuseable HEPA prefilters for mixed waste incinerator air pollution control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.B.; Wong, A.; Walker, B.W.; Paul, J.D.

    1997-08-01

    The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the US DOE Savannah River Site is undergoing preoperational testing. The CIF is designed to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes from site operations and clean-up activities. The technologies selected for use in the air pollution control system (APCS) were based on reviews of existing incinerators, air pollution control experience, and recommendations from consultants. This approach resulted in a facility design using experience from other operating hazardous/radioactive incinerators. In order to study the CIF APCS prior to operation, a 1/10 scale pilot facility, the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), was constructed and has been in operation since late 1994. Its mission is to demonstrate the design integrity of the CIF APCS and optimize equipment/instrument performance of the full scale production facility. Operation of the pilot facility has provided long-term performance data of integrated systems and critical facility components. This has reduced facility startup problems and helped ensure compliance with facility performance requirements. Technical support programs assist in assuring all stakeholders the CIF can properly treat combustible hazardous, mixed, and low-level radioactive wastes. High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters are used to remove hazardous and radioactive particulates from the exhaust gas strewn before being released into the atmosphere. The HEPA filter change-out frequency has been a potential issue and was the first technical issue to be studied at the OCTF. Tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of HEPA filters under different operating conditions. These tests included evaluating the impact on HEPA life of scrubber operating parameters and the type of HEPA prefilter used. This pilot-scale testing demonstrated satisfactory HEPA filter life when using cleanable metal prefilters and high flows of steam and water in the offgas scrubber. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Summary of meeting on disposal of LET&D HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-21

    This report is a compilation of correspondence between Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company and the US EPA over a period of time from 1988 to 1992 (most from 1991-92) regarding waste management compliance with EPA regulations. Typical subjects include: compliance with satellite accumulation requirements; usage of ``Sure Shot`` containers in place of aerosol cans; notice of upcoming recyclable battery shipments; disposition of batteries; HEPA filter leach sampling and permit impacts; functional and operation requirements for the spent filter handling system; summary of meeting on disposal of LET and D HEPA filters; solvent substitution database report; and mercury vapor light analytical testing.

  10. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOIL WASHING SYSTEM - BIOTROL, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The three component technologies of the BioTrol Soil Washing System (BSWS). Tested in the SITE demonstration were a Soil Washer (SW), and Aqueous Treatment System (ATS), and a Slurry Bio-Reactor (SBR). The Soil Washer operates on the principle that a significant fraction of the...

  11. Development of a DsRed-expressing HepaRG cell line for real-time monitoring of hepatocyte-like cell differentiation by fluorescence imaging, with application in screening of novel geometric microstructured cell growth substrates.

    PubMed

    Uta, Mihaela; Sima, Livia E; Hoffmann, Patrik; Dinca, Valentina; Branza-Nichita, Norica

    2017-03-01

    The bipotent nature of the HepaRG cell line is a unique property among human hepatoma-derived cells. Cell treatment with specific differentiation inducers results in a mixture of hepatocyte- and biliary-like cells, accompanied by upregulation of liver-specific proteins, drug metabolizing enzymes, transcription regulators, membrane receptors or innate immune response effectors. These features make the HepaRG cells a suitable and handy replacement for primary hepatocytes, to study hepatic functions in vitro. However, cell differentiation is a long, variable process, requiring special culture conditions, while the resulting mixed cell populations is usually a major drawback. This process can potentially be controlled by interface characteristics, such as substrate topography. To screen for such novel substrates, we have first developed a new HepaRG cell line, designated as HepaRG(DsRed), expressing the reporter gene DsRed. The fluorescent protein was expressed in hepatocyte- and not biliary-like cells, in a differentiation dependent-manner. We have further used replicated microstructured gradients of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) that allow three-dimensional manipulation in vitro, to monitor HepaRG(DsRed) differentiation in real time. We demonstrate that this approach enables the controlled assembly of viable hepatocyte-like cells for functional studies, which can be maintained in culture without loss of differentiation. The regulated expression of the DsRed reporter proved a valuable tool not only for rapid screening of novel cell growth substrates favoring cell differentiation, but also, to enrich the hepatocyte-like cell population by fluorescence-activated cell sorting to investigate liver-specific processes in vitro.

  12. Scaling-up parameters for site restoration process using surfactant-enhanced soil washing coupled with wastewater treatment by Fenton and Fenton-like processes.

    PubMed

    Bandala, Erick R; Cossio, Horacio; Sánchez-Lopez, Adriana D; Córdova, Felipe; Peralta-Herández, Juan M; Torres, Luis G

    2013-01-01

    Estimation of scaling-up parameters for a site restoration process using a surfactant-enhanced soil washing (SESW) process followed by the application of advanced oxidation processes (Fenton and photo-Fenton) was performed. For the SESW, different parameters were varied and the soil washing efficiency for pesticide (2,4-D) removal assessed. The resulting wastewater was treated using the Fenton reaction in the absence and presence of ultraviolet (UV) radiation for pesticide removal. Results showed that agitation speed of 1550 rpm was preferable for the best pesticide removal from contaminated soil. It was possible to wash contaminated soils with different soil concentrations; however the power drawn was higher as the soil concentration increased. Complete removal of the pesticide and the remaining surfactant was achieved using different reaction conditions. The best degradation conditions were for the photo-Fenton process using [Fe(II)] = 0.3 mM; [H2O2] = 4.0 mM where complete 2,4-D and sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) removal was observed after 8 and 10 minutes of reaction, respectively. Further increase in the hydrogen peroxide or iron salt concentration did not show any improvement in the reaction rate. Kinetic parameters, i.e. reaction rate constant and scaling-up parameters, were determined. It was shown that, by coupling both processes (SESW and AOPs), it is possible the restoration of contaminated sites.

  13. Soil washing of fluorine contaminated soil using various washing solutions.

    PubMed

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Jo, Raehyun; Koutsospyros, Agamemnon; Cheong, Kyung Hoon; Park, Jeong-Hun

    2015-03-01

    Bench-scale soil washing experiments were conducted to remove fluoride from contaminated soils. Five washing solutions including hydrochloric acid (HCl), nitric acid (HNO3), sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and tartaric acid (C4H6O6) were tested. The concentration of the washing solutions used ranged from 0.1 to 3 M with a liquid to solid ratio of 10. The soil washing results showed that the most effective washing solution for the removal of fluoride from contaminated soils was HCl. The highest fluoride removal results of approximately 97 % from the contaminated soil were obtained using 3 M HCl. The fluoride removal efficiency of the washing solution increases in the following order: C4H6O6 < NaOH < H2SO4 < HNO3 < HCl.

  14. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING WEST. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING WEST. THE NONHISTORIC CHEMICAL BUILDING IS SEEN IN THE BACKGROUND. - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  15. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST. PIPING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST. PIPING IN FOREGROUND IS NOT RELATED TO THE MACHINE. THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SETTLING RESERVOIR NO. 3 IS SEEN AT THE LOWER LEFT. - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  16. Software Verification and Validation Test Report for the HEPA filter Differential Pressure Fan Interlock System

    SciTech Connect

    ERMI, A.M.

    2000-09-05

    The HEPA Filter Differential Pressure Fan Interlock System PLC ladder logic software was tested using a Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Test Plan as required by the ''Computer Software Quality Assurance Requirements''. The purpose of his document is to report on the results of the software qualification.

  17. Potential for HEPA filter damage from water spray systems in filter plenums

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Fretthold, J.K.; Slawski, J.W.

    1997-08-01

    The water spray systems in high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums that are used in nearly all Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for protection against fire was designed under the assumption that the HEPA filters would not be damaged by the water sprays. The most likely scenario for filter damage involves filter plugging by the water spray, followed by the fan blowing out the filter medium. A number of controlled laboratory tests that were previously conducted in the late 1980s are reviewed in this paper to provide a technical basis for the potential HEPA filter damage by the water spray system in HEPA filter plenums. In addition to the laboratory tests, the scenario for BEPA filter damage during fires has also occurred in the field. A fire in a four-stage, BEPA filter plenum at Rocky Flats in 1980 caused the first three stages of BEPA filters to blow out of their housing and the fourth stage to severely bow. Details of this recently declassified fire are presented in this paper. Although these previous findings suggest serious potential problems exist with the current water spray system in filter plenums, additional studies are required to confirm unequivocally that DOE`s critical facilities are at risk. 22 refs., 15 figs.

  18. Differential toxicity of heterocyclic aromatic amines and their mixture in metabolically competent HepaRG cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dumont, Julie; Josse, Rozenn; Lambert, Carine; Antherieu, Sebastien; Le Hegarat, Ludovic; Aninat, Caroline; Robin, Marie-Anne; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane

    2010-06-01

    Human exposure to heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) usually occurs through mixtures rather than individual compounds. However, the toxic effects and related mechanisms of co-exposure to HAA in humans remain unknown. We compared the effects of two of the most common HAA, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), individually or in combination, in the metabolically competent human hepatoma HepaRG cells. Various endpoints were measured including cytotoxicity, apoptosis, oxidative stress and DNA damage by the comet assay. Moreover, the effects of PhIP and/or MeIQx on mRNA expression and activities of enzymes involved in their activation and detoxification pathways were evaluated. After a 24 h treatment, PhIP and MeIQx, individually and in combination, exerted differential effects on apoptosis, oxidative stress, DNA damage and cytochrome P450 (CYP) activities. Only PhIP induced DNA damage. It was also a stronger inducer of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression and activity than MeIQx. In contrast, only MeIQx exposure resulted in a significant induction of CYP1A2 activity. The combination of PhIP with MeIQx induced an oxidative stress and showed synergistic effects on apoptosis. However, PhIP-induced genotoxicity was abolished by a co-exposure with MeIQx. Such an inhibitory effect could be explained by a significant decrease in CYP1A2 activity which is responsible for PhIP genotoxicity. Our findings highlight the need to investigate interactions between HAA when assessing risks for human health and provide new insights in the mechanisms of interaction between PhIP and MeIQx.

  19. Test plan for N2 HEPA filters assembly shop stock used on PFP E4 exhaust system

    SciTech Connect

    DICK, J.D.

    1999-09-01

    At Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) Self-contained HEPA filters, encased in wooden frames and boxes, are installed in the E4 Exhaust Ventilation System to provide confinement of radioactive releases to the environment and confinement of radioactive contamination within designated zones inside the facility. Recently during the routine testing in-leakage was discovered downstream of the Self-contained HEPA filters boxes. This Test Plan describes the approach to conduct investigation of the root causes for the in-leakage of HEPA filters.

  20. Washing of the AW-101 entrained solids

    SciTech Connect

    GJ Lumetta

    2000-03-31

    BNFL Inc. (BNFL) is under contract with the US Department of Energy, River Protection Project (DOE-RPP) to design, construct, and operate facilities for treating wastes stored in the single-shell and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The DOE-BNFL RPP contract identifies two feeds to the waste treatment plant: (1) primarily liquid low-activity waste (LAW) consisting of less than 2 wt% entrained solids and (2) high-level waste (HLW) consisting of 10 to 200 g/L solids slurry. This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing on the composition of the entrained solids in the diluted AW-101 low-activity waste (LAW) sample. The objective of this work was to gather data on the solubility of the AW-101 entrained solids in 0.01 M NaOH, so that BNFL can evaluate whether these solids require caustic leaching. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-9, Rev. 0, LAW Entrained Solids Water Wash and Caustic Leach Testing. The test went according to plan, with no deviations from the test plan. Based on the results of the 0.01 M NaOH washing, a decision was made by BNFL to not proceed with the caustic leaching test. The composition of the washed solids was such that caustic leaching would not result in significant reduction in the immobilized HLW volume.

  1. Sludge pretreatment chemistry evaluation: Enhanced sludge washing separation factors

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, N.G.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the work conducted in Fiscal Year 1994 by the Sludge Pretreatment Chemistry Evaluation Subtask for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Tank Waste Treatment Science Task. The main purpose of this task, is to provide the technical basis and scientific understanding to support TWRS baseline decisions and actions, such as the development of an enhanced sludge washing process to reduce the volume of waste that will require high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. One objective within the Sludge Pretreatment Chemistry Evaluation Subtask was to establish wash factors for various SST (single-shell tank) sludges. First, analytical data were compiled from existing tank waste characterization reports. These data were summarized on tank-specific worksheets that provided a uniform format for reviewing and comparing data, as well as the means to verify whether the data set for each tank was complete. Worksheets were completed for 27 SST wastes. The analytical water wash data provided tank-specific information about the fraction of each component that dissolves with water, i.e., an estimate of tank-specific wash factors for evaluating tank-by-tank processing. These wash data were then used collectively to evaluate some of the wash factors that are assumed for the overall SST waste inventory; specifically, wash factors for elements that would be found primarily in sludges. The final step in this study was to incorporate the characterization and wash factor data into a spreadsheet that provides insight into the effect of enhanced sludge washing on individual tank sludges as well as for groups of sludges that may be representative of different waste types. Spreadsheet results include the estimated mass and percentage of each element that would be removed with washing and leaching. Furthermore, estimated compositions are given of the final wash and leach streams and residual solids, in terms of both concentration and dry weight percent.

  2. 40 CFR 429.110 - Applicability; description of the log washing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability; description of the log... Log Washing Subcategory § 429.110 Applicability; description of the log washing subcategory. This... pollutants into publicly owned treatment works from the log washing process in which water under pressure...

  3. 40 CFR 429.110 - Applicability; description of the log washing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability; description of the log... Log Washing Subcategory § 429.110 Applicability; description of the log washing subcategory. This... pollutants into publicly owned treatment works from the log washing process in which water under pressure...

  4. 40 CFR 429.110 - Applicability; description of the log washing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicability; description of the log... Log Washing Subcategory § 429.110 Applicability; description of the log washing subcategory. This... pollutants into publicly owned treatment works from the log washing process in which water under pressure...

  5. Evaluation of the effect of media velocity on HEPA filter performance

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, Steven; Parsons, Michael; Hogancamp, Kristina; Norton, O. Perry; Waggoner, Charles

    2007-07-01

    Section FC of the ASME AG-1 Code addresses glass fiber HEPA filters and restricts the media velocity to a maximum of 2.54 cm/s (5 ft/min). Advances in filter media technology allow glass fiber HEPA filters to function at significantly higher velocities and still achieve HEPA performance. However, diffusional capture of particles < 100 nm is reduced at higher media velocities due to shorter residence times within the media matrix. Therefore, it is unlikely that higher media velocities for HEPA filters will be allowed without data to demonstrate the effect of media velocity on removal of particles in the smaller size classes. In order to address this issue, static testing has been conducted to generate performance related data and a range of dynamic testing has provided data regarding filter lifetimes, loading characteristics, changes in filter efficiency and the most penetrating particle size over time. Testing was conducted using 31 cm x 31 cm x 29 cm deep pleat HEPA filters supplied from two manufacturers. Testing was conducted at media velocities ranging from 2.0-4.5 cm/s with a solid aerosol challenge composed of potassium chloride. Two set of media velocity data were obtained for each filter type. In one set of evaluations, the maximum aerosol challenge particle size was limited to 3 {mu}m, while particles above 3 {mu}m were not constrained in the second set. This provided for considerable variability in the challenge mass mean diameter and overall mass loading rate. Results of this testing will be provided to the ASME AG-1 FC Committee for consideration in future versions of the HEPA standard. In general, the initial filter efficiency decreased with increasing media velocity. However, initial filter efficiencies were generally good in all cases. Filter efficiency values averaged over the first ten minute of the loading cycle ranged from 99.970 to 99.996 %. Additionally, the most penetrating particle size was observed to decrease with increasing media velocity

  6. Suppressive effects of alpha-Hederin on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-mediated murine Cyp1a-1 expression in the mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H G; Lee, S S

    1999-04-26

    Cultured mouse hepatoma cell line Hepa-1c1c7 cells were treated with alpha-Hederin to assess the role of alpha-Hederin in the process of Cyp1a-1 induction. Treatment of Hepa-1c1c7 cultures with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced Cyp1a-1, as indicated by analysis of 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation (EROD) activity and Cyp1a-1 protein. When alpha-Hederin and TCDD were both added to cultures, TCDD-inducible EROD activity was greatly suppressed by alpha-Hederin in a dose-dependent manner. TCDD-induced Cyp1a-1 protein and mRNA levels were markedly reduced in the concomitant treatment of TCDD and alpha-Hederin consistent with EROD activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay using nuclear extraction of cells revealed that alpha-Hederin reduced transformation of the Ah receptor to a form capable of specifically binding to an oligonucleotide containing a dioxin-response element (DRE) sequence of the Cyp1a-1 gene. These results suggest that the suppressive effect of alpha-Hederin on TCDD-induced Cyp1a-1 gene expression in Hepa-1c1c7 cells might be an antagonist of the DNA binding potential of a nuclear Ah receptor.

  7. Feasibility study for an additional HEPA filter leaching system in NWCF

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, W.D.

    1992-11-01

    This report documents the feasibility of installing a second high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter leaching system in the New Waste Calcining Facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). A large spent filter backlog already exists at the ICPP, and it has been uncertain whether the existing HEPA filter leaching system will have a throughput rate sufficient to work off the existing backlog in a timely manner. Three areas within the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) have been identified as possible locations for a second filter leaching system. This report examines the suitability of each location, identifies modifications that would be necessary-to install a filter leaching system at each location, examines the impact of modifying each location, and discusses recent efforts to estimate filter throughput using the existing filter leaching system. Based on all available information, installation of a second filter leaching system is not recommended at the present time.

  8. ASME AG-1 Section FC Qualified HEPA Filters; a Particle Loading Comparison - 13435

    SciTech Connect

    Stillo, Andrew; Ricketts, Craig I.

    2013-07-01

    High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters used to protect personnel, the public and the environment from airborne radioactive materials are designed, manufactured and qualified in accordance with ASME AG-1 Code section FC (HEPA Filters) [1]. The qualification process requires that filters manufactured in accordance with this ASME AG-1 code section must meet several performance requirements. These requirements include performance specifications for resistance to airflow, aerosol penetration, resistance to rough handling, resistance to pressure (includes high humidity and water droplet exposure), resistance to heated air, spot flame resistance and a visual/dimensional inspection. None of these requirements evaluate the particle loading capacity of a HEPA filter design. Concerns, over the particle loading capacity, of the different designs included within the ASME AG-1 section FC code[1], have been voiced in the recent past. Additionally, the ability of a filter to maintain its integrity, if subjected to severe operating conditions such as elevated relative humidity, fog conditions or elevated temperature, after loading in use over long service intervals is also a major concern. Although currently qualified HEPA filter media are likely to have similar loading characteristics when evaluated independently, filter pleat geometry can have a significant impact on the in-situ particle loading capacity of filter packs. Aerosol particle characteristics, such as size and composition, may also have a significant impact on filter loading capacity. Test results comparing filter loading capacities for three different aerosol particles and three different filter pack configurations are reviewed. The information presented represents an empirical performance comparison among the filter designs tested. The results may serve as a basis for further discussion toward the possible development of a particle loading test to be included in the qualification requirements of ASME AG-1

  9. Comparison of MERV 16 and HEPA filters for cab filtration of underground mining equipment

    PubMed Central

    Cecala, A.B.; Organiscak, J.A.; Noll, J.D.; Zimmer, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Significant strides have been made in optimizing the design of filtration and pressurization systems used on the enclosed cabs of mobile mining equipment to reduce respirable dust and provide the best air quality to the equipment operators. Considering all of the advances made in this area, one aspect that still needed to be evaluated was a comparison of the efficiencies of the different filters used in these systems. As high-efficiency particulate arrestance (HEPA) filters provide the highest filtering efficiency, the general assumption would be that they would also provide the greatest level of protection to workers. Researchers for the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) speculated, based upon a previous laboratory study, that filters with minimum efficiency reporting value, or MERV rating, of 16 may be a more appropriate choice than HEPA filters in most cases for the mining industry. A study was therefore performed comparing HEPA and MERV 16 filters on two kinds of underground limestone mining equipment, a roof bolter and a face drill, to evaluate this theory. Testing showed that, at the 95-percent confidence level, there was no statistical difference between the efficiencies of the two types of filters on the two kinds of mining equipment. As the MERV 16 filters were less restrictive, provided greater airflow and cab pressurization, cost less and required less-frequent replacement than the HEPA filters, the MERV 16 filters were concluded to be the optimal choice for both the roof bolter and the face drill in this comparative-analysis case study. Another key finding of this study is the substantial improvement in the effectiveness of filtration and pressurization systems when using a final filter design. PMID:27524838

  10. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction HEPA filtered vacuum radioactive air emission units

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, R.E.

    1999-09-01

    This notice of construction (NOC) requests a categorical approval for construction and operation of certain portable high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtered vacuum radionuclide airborne emission units (HVUs). Approval of this NOC application is intended to allow operation of the HVUs without prior project-specific approval. This NOC does not request replacement or supersedence of any previous agreements/approvals by the Washington State Department of Health for the use of vacuums on the Hanford Site. These previous agreement/approvals include the approved NOCs for the use of EuroClean HEPA vacuums at the T Plant Complex (routine technical meeting 12/10/96) and the Kelly Decontamination System at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant (routine technical meeting 06/25/96). Also, this NOC does not replace or supersede the agreement reached regarding the use of HEPA hand-held/shop-vacuum cleaners for routine cleanup activities conducted by the Environmental Restoration Project. Routine cleanup activities are conducted during the surveillance and maintenance of inactive waste sites (Radioactive Area Remedial Action Project) and inactive facilities. HEPA hand-held/shop-vacuum cleaners are used to clean up spot surface contamination areas found during outdoor radiological field surveys, and to clean up localized radiologically contaminated material (e.g., dust, dirt, bird droppings, animal feces, liquids, insects, spider webs, etc.). This agreement, documented in the October 12, 1994 Routine Meeting Minutes, is based on routine cleanup consisting of spot cleanup of low-level contamination provided that, in each case, the source term potential would be below 0.1 millirem per year.

  11. Development, differentiation, and vascular components of subcutaneous and intrahepatic Hepa129 tumors in a mouse model of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Richard T; Gutierrez, Paula M; Baratta, Janie L; Thordarson, Kristoffer; Braslow, Joshua; Haynes, Sherry M; Longmuir, Kenneth J

    2016-04-01

    Tumor models in mice offer opportunities for understanding tumor formation and development of therapeutic treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, subcutaneous or intra-hepatic Hepa129 tumors were established in C3H mice. Tumor growth was determined by daily measurements of subcutaneous tumors and post-mortem studies of subcutaneous and intrahepatic tumors. Administration of Edu was used to determine cell generation dates of tumor cells. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies directed at CD31 or CD34, and intravenous injection of labeled tomato lectin revealed tumor vasculature. Tissue sections also were processed for immunohistochemistry using a panel of antibodies to proteoglycans. Comparison of Edu labeled cells with immunoreactivity allowed determination of development and differentiation of tumor cells after cell generation. Subcutaneous and intrahepatic tumors displayed similar growth over 3 weeks. Immunohistochemistry showed strong labeling for glypican-3, 9BA12, and chondroitin sulfate of tumors in both loci, while normal liver was negative. Tumor regions containing Edu labeled cells did not show significant immunohistochemical labeling for the tumor markers until 2-3 days after Edu treatment; overlap of Edu labeled cells and immunohistochemically labeled tumor regions appeared to reach a maximum at 5 days after Edu treatment. Ectopic subcutaneous tumors displayed vascular ingrowth as the tumor cells expressed immunocytochemical markers; subcutaneous tumors displayed significantly more vascular elements than did intrahepatic tumors.

  12. 100 Area Hanford soil washing treatability tests

    SciTech Connect

    Field, J.G.; Belden, R.D.; Serne, R.J.; Mattigod, S.V.; Freeman, H.D.; Scheck, R.W.

    1993-09-01

    Soil washing laboratory tests performed at Hanford in support of 100 Area Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) feasibility studies included characterization of soils, physical separation, chemical extraction, and water treatment. Results to date show that < 20 % of the soil is finer than 0.25 mm ({minus}40 mesh). The highest concentration of {sup 60}Co, {sup 152}Eu, and {sup 137}Cs contaminants is generally associated with fine soil particles. However, measurable concentrations of contaminants were found in all sizes of soil particles. In initial testing, attrition scrubbing was generally sufficient to treat soils to meet selected performance levels for {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu. However, more intense attrition scrubbing, autogenous grinding, or chemical extraction was required to enhance removal of {sup 137}Cs. Additional tests and assessment of the feasibility of using soil washing techniques are in progress.

  13. Fostering hand washing before lunch by students attending a special needs young adult program.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, Christopher; Mahoney, Amanda; Durgin, Amy; Poling, Alan

    2013-01-01

    A multiple baseline across groups design was used to investigate the effects of a treatment package on hand washing before lunch by five students with disabilities who attended a young adult educational program. To evaluate hand washing, a lotion called Glo Germ was applied to participants' hands. Glo Germ is visible under a black light, which allowed the quality of hand washing to be assessed by comparing the amount visible before and after hand washing using a 3-point scale. Following a baseline period in which hand washing was assessed, participants were exposed to a hand washing training procedure, which improved one participant's hand washing. Next, a lottery system was imposed in which the number of lottery tickets earned each day depended on the quality of hand washing, specifically, on the rating assigned (0, 1, or 2). This condition was associated with improved hand washing by the other four participants. Finally, a condition adding feedback to the lottery system resulted in further improvements in the quality of hand washing for all participants. Follow up data indicated modest maintenance of hand washing after lunch. These results suggest that treatment packages similar to that used in the present study merit further investigation and that Glo Germ is of value in ascertaining the quality of hand washing.

  14. Further development of the cleanable steel HEPA filter, cost/benefit analysis, and comparison with competing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Lopez, R.; Wilson, K.

    1997-08-01

    We have made further progress in developing a cleanable steel fiber HEPA filter. We fabricated a pleated cylindrical cartridge using commercially available steel fiber media that is made with 1 {mu}m stainless steel fibers and sintered into a sheet form. Test results at the Department of Energy (DOE) Filter Test Station at Oak Ridge show the prototype filter cartridge has 99.99% efficiency for 0.3 {mu}m dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols and a pressure drop of 1.5 inches. Filter loading and cleaning tests using AC Fine dust showed the filter could be repeatedly cleaned using reverse air pulses. Our analysis of commercially optimized filters suggest that cleanable steel HEPA filters need to be made from steel fibers less than 1{mu}m, and preferably 0.5 {mu}m, to meet the standard HEPA filter requirements in production units. We have demonstrated that 0.5 {mu}m steel fibers can be produced using the fiber bundling and drawing process. The 0.5 {mu}m steel fibers are then sintered into small filter samples and tested for efficiency and pressure drop. Test results on the sample showed a penetration of 0.0015 % at 0.3 {mu}m and a pressure drop of 1.15 inches at 6.9 ft/min (3.5 cm/s) velocity. Based on these results, steel fiber media can easily meet the requirements of 0.03 % penetration and 1.0 inch of pressure drop by using less fibers in the media. A cost analysis of the cleanable steel HEPA filter shows that, although the steel HEPA filter costs much more than the standard glass fiber HEPA filter, it has the potential to be very cost effective because of the high disposal costs of contaminated HEPA filters. We estimate that the steel HEPA filter will save an average of $16,000 over its 30 year life. The additional savings from the clean-up costs resulting from ruptured glass HEPA filters during accidents was not included but makes the steel HEPA filter even more cost effective. 33 refs., 28 figs., 1 tab.

  15. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. THE OUTSIDE FACE OF THE NORTH WALL OF SETTLING RESERVOIR NO. 3 IS SEEN AT THE RIGHT. THE SETTLING RESERVOIR IS ELEVATED ABOVE THE FILTERING RESERVOIR TO ACHIEVE GRAVITY WATER FLOW FROM THE SETTLING RESERVOIR INTO THE FILTERING RESERVOIR. - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  16. Further development of the cleanable steel HEPA filter, cost/benefit analysis, and comparison with competing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.; Wilson, K.; Witherell, C.; McGregor, M.

    1997-01-01

    We have made further progress in developing a cleanable steel fiber HEPA filter. We fabricated a pleated cylindrical cartridge using commercially available steel fiber media that is made with 1 {mu}m stainless steel fibers and sintered into a sheet form. Test results at the Department of Energy (DOE) Filter Test Station at Oak Ridge show the prototype filter cartridge has 99.99% efficiency for 0.3 {mu}m dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols and a pressure drop of 1.5 inches. Filter loading and cleaning tests using AC Fine dust showed the filter could be repeatedly cleaned using reverse air pulses. Our analysis of commercially optimized filters suggest that cleanable steel HEPA filters need to be made from steel fibers less than 1 {mu}m, and preferably 0.5 {mu}m, to meet the standard HEPA filter requirements in production units. We have demonstrated that 0.5 {mu}m steel fibers can be produced using the fiber bundling and drawing process. The 0.5 {mu}m steel fibers are then sintered into small filter samples and tested for efficiency and pressure drop. Test results on the sample showed a penetration of 0.0015% at 0.3 {mu}m and a pressure drop of 1.15 inches at 6.9 ft/min (3.5 cm/s) velocity. Based on these results, steel fiber media can easily meet the requirements of 0.03% penetration and 1.0 inch of pressure drop by using less fibers in the media. A cost analysis of the cleanable steel HEPA filter shows that, although the steel HEPA filter costs much more than the standard glass fiber HEPA filter, it has the potential to be very cost effective because of the high disposal costs of contaminated HEPA filters. We estimate that the steel HEPA filter will save an average of $16,000 over its 30 year life. The additional savings from the clean-up costs resulting from ruptured glass HEPA filters during accidents was not included but makes the steel HEPA filter even more cost effective. We also present the results of our evaluation of competing technologies with metallic and

  17. 27 CFR 19.310 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wash water. 19.310 Section 19.310 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Byproducts § 19.310 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits may be run into a wash...

  18. 27 CFR 19.310 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wash water. 19.310 Section 19.310 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Byproducts § 19.310 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits may be run into a wash...

  19. 27 CFR 19.310 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wash water. 19.310 Section 19.310 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Byproducts § 19.310 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits may be run into a wash...

  20. 27 CFR 19.328 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wash water. 19.328 Section... THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Production Chemical By-Products § 19.328 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits therefrom may be run into a wash tank or a...

  1. 27 CFR 19.310 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wash water. 19.310 Section 19.310 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Byproducts § 19.310 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits may be run into a wash...

  2. Evidence for the mechanism of action of the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-mediated decrease of nuclear estrogen receptor levels in wild-type and mutant mouse Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Zacharewski, T; Harris, M; Safe, S

    1991-06-15

    Treatment of wild-type Hepa 1c1c7 cells with 1 nM [3H]-17 beta-estradiol resulted in the rapid accumulation of the nuclear estrogen receptor complex whose levels were maximized within 1 hr. Cotreatment of the cells with 10 nM 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and [3H]-17 beta-estradiol did not affect the nuclear estrogen receptor levels 1 hr after addition of the radioligand; however, pretreatment of the cells for 1, 6, 24 or 42 hr with 10 nM TCDD prior to the addition of the radiolabeled hormone caused a greater than 50% decrease in nuclear estrogen receptor levels (determined by velocity sedimentation analysis) 1 hr after the addition of [3H]-17 beta-estradiol. In parallel experiments in which 10 nM TCDD was added 6 hr prior to the radiolabeled hormone, TCDD caused a 63 and 74% decrease in immunodetectable cytosolic and nuclear estrogen receptor protein levels, respectively, in the wild-type Hepa 1c1c7 cells. The nuclear estrogen receptor was also detected in two Hepa 1c1c7 mutant (class 1 and class 2) cell lines which have been characterized previously as TCDD non-responsive due to either decreased aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor levels or a defect in the accumulation of transcriptionally active nuclear Ah receptor complexes, respectively. Treatment of these mutant cell lines with TCDD and [3H]-17 beta-estradiol (as described above) caused only a minimum (class 1) or non-detectable (class 2) decrease in nuclear estrogen receptor binding activity or immunodetectable protein levels. These results, coupled with the structure-dependent differences in the activities of TCDD (a strong Ah receptor agonist) and 2,8-dichlordibenzo-p-dioxin (a weak Ah receptor agonist) in this assay system, support a role for the Ah receptor in the TCDD-mediated decrease of the nuclear estrogen receptor in mouse Hepa 1c1c7 cells. In addition, actinomycin D and cycloheximide both inhibited the TCDD-mediated decrease of nuclear estrogen receptor levels in the Hepa 1c1c7 wild

  3. Decolorization of anaerobically digested molasses spent wash by Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, M; Ganguli, A; Tripathi, A K

    2009-01-01

    The distillery wastewater (spent wash) contains dark-brown colored recalcitrant organic compounds that are not amenable to conventional biological treatment. The characteristic recalcitrance to decolorization is due to the presence of brown melanoidin polymers. In the present study, feasibility of using Pseudomonas putida strain U for decolorization of spent wash was demonstrated. Batch cultures of P. putida decolourized spent wash by 24%, 2- fold higher decolorization was achieved following immobilization in calcium alginate beads. Glucose concentration was critical for decolourization and improved color removal efficiency was obtained by periodic replenishment of glucose. Decolourization was also observed with lactose or whey as alternative carbon sources. The results of our study suggest that P. putida could be used for biological decolorization of molasses spent washes and that supplementation with whey (a by-product from cheese industry) can offer economical viability to the process.

  4. A Window-Washing Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Skyscrapers sure do have a lot of windows, and these windows are cleaned and checked regularly. All this takes time, money, and puts workers at potential risk. Might there be a better way to do it? In this article, the author discusses a window-washing challenge and describes how students can tackle this task, pick up the challenge, and creatively…

  5. Abdominopelvic washings: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Erika F.; Monaco, Sara E.; Khalbuss, Walid; Austin, R. Marshall; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2013-01-01

    Intraperitoneal spread may occur with gynecological epithelial neoplasms, as well as with non-gynecological malignancies, which may result in serosal involvement with or without concomitant effusion. Therefore, washings in patients with abdominopelvic tumors represent important specimens for cytologic examination. They are primarily utilized for staging ovarian cancers, although their role has decreased in staging of endometrial and cervical carcinoma. Abdominopelvic washings can be positive in a variety of pathologic conditions, including benign conditions, borderline neoplastic tumors, locally invasive tumors, or distant metastases. In a subset of cases, washings can be diagnostically challenging due to the presence of co-existing benign cells (e.g., mesothelial hyperplasia, endosalpingiosis, or endometriosis), lesions in which there is only minimal atypia (e.g., serous borderline tumors) or scant atypical cells, and the rarity of specific tumor types (e.g., mesothelioma). Ancillary studies including immunocytochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization may be required in difficult cases to resolve the diagnosis. This article provides a comprehensive and contemporary review of abdominopelvic washings in the evaluation of gynecologic and non-gynecologic tumors, including primary peritoneal and mesothelial entities. PMID:23858317

  6. Health hazards associated with the use of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (commonly referred to as DOP) in HEPA filter test

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), commonly referred to as di-octyl phthalate, is an important production chemical in the US. In addition to its major use as an additive in plastics, DEHP is widely used to evaluate the effectiveness of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. Historically, DEHP was also used in quantitative fit testing for respirators. Evaluations of this compound a decade ago showed that it can induce hepatocellular carcinomas in laboratory animals. Although most Department of Energy (DOE) facilities have since discontinued using DEHP in respirator fit testing, DEHP continues to be used for evaluating HEPA filters. This report summarizes available information on the toxicity, mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and other hazards and problems posed by DEHP, specifically with reference to HEPA filter testing. Information on work practice improvements as well as the availability and suitability of DEHP substitutes are also presented. This material should assist the DOE in the safe use of this material.

  7. A Custom Robotic System for Inspecting HEPA Filters in the Payload Changeout Room at the NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, James E., Jr.; Looney, Joe

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the prime objective is to describe a custom 4-dof (degree-of-freedom) robotic arm capable of autonomously or telerobotically performing systematic HEPA filter inspection and certification in the Shuttle Launch Pad Payload Changeout Rooms (PCR's) on pads A and B at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This HEPA filter inspection robot (HFIR) has been designed to be easily deployable and is equipped with the necessary sensory devices, control hardware, software and man-machine interfaces needed to implement HEPA filter inspection reliably and efficiently without damaging the filters or colliding with existing PCR structures or filters. The main purpose of the HFIR is to implement an automated positioning system to move special inspection sensors in pre-defined or manual patterns for the purpose of verifying filter integrity and efficiency. This will ultimately relieve NASA Payload Operations from significant problems associated with time, cost and personnel safety, impacts realized during non-automated PCR HFIR filter certification.

  8. Criteria for calculating the efficiency of deep-pleated HEPA filters with aluminum separators during and after design basis accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; First, M.W.; Anderson, W.L.

    1995-02-01

    We have reviewed the literature on the performance of HEPA filters under normal and abnormal conditions to establish criteria for calculating the efficiency of HEPA filters in a DOE nonreactor nuclear facility during and after a Design Basis Accident (DBA). This study is only applicable to the standard deep-pleated HEPA filter with aluminum separators as specified in ASME N509[1]. Other HEPA filter designs such as the mini-pleat and separatorless filters are not included in this study. The literature review included the performance of new filters and parameters that may cause deterioration in the filter performance such as filter age, radiation, corrosive chemicals, seismic and rough handling, high temperature, moisture, particle clogging, high air flow and pressure pulses. The deterioration of the filter efficiency depends on the exposure parameters; in severe exposure conditions the filter will be damaged and have a residual efficiency of 0%. There are large gaps and limitations in the data that introduce significant error in the estimates of HEPA filter efficiencies under DBA conditions. Because of this limitation, conservative values of filter efficiency were chosen. The estimation of the efficiency of the HEPA filters under DBA conditions involves three steps: (1) The filter pressure drop and environmental parameters are determined during and after the DBA, (2) Comparing the filter pressure drop to a set of threshold values above which the filter is damaged. There is a different threshold value for each combination of environmental parameters, and (3) Determining the filter efficiency. If the filter pressure drop is greater than the threshold value, the filter is damaged and is assigned 0% efficiency. If the pressure drop is less, then the filter is not damaged and the efficiency is determined from literature values of the efficiency at the environmental conditions.

  9. Effect of different soil washing solutions on bioavailability of residual arsenic in soils and soil properties.

    PubMed

    Im, Jinwoo; Yang, Kyung; Jho, Eun Hea; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2015-11-01

    The effect of soil washing used for arsenic (As)-contaminated soil remediation on soil properties and bioavailability of residual As in soil is receiving increasing attention due to increasing interest in conserving soil qualities after remediation. This study investigates the effect of different washing solutions on bioavailability of residual As in soils and soil properties after soil washing. Regardless of washing solutions, the sequential extraction revealed that the residual As concentrations and the amount of readily labile As in soils were reduced after soil washing. However, the bioassay tests showed that the washed soils exhibited ecotoxicological effects - lower seed germination, shoot growth, and enzyme activities - and this could largely be attributed to the acidic pH and/or excessive nutrient contents of the washed soils depending on washing solutions. Overall, this study showed that treated soils having lower levels of contaminants could still exhibit toxic effects due to changes in soil properties, which highly depended on washing solutions. This study also emphasizes that data on the As concentrations, the soil properties, and the ecotoxicological effects are necessary to properly manage the washed soils for reuses. The results of this study can, thus, be utilized to select proper post-treatment techniques for the washed soils.

  10. In-place HEPA (high efficiency, particulate air) filter testing at Hanford: Operating experiences, calibrations, and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, D.S.; Decelis, D.G.

    1989-10-01

    High Efficiency, Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters provide a minimum of 99.97% removal efficiency for particles greater than or equal to .3 microns in diameter. Each HEPA filter installation at Hanford is, at specified intervals, functionally tested for leaks. The test procedure involves a dioctylphthalate (DOP) smoke generator and a calibrated airborne particle detector. The DOP generator produces smoke of a known quantitative particle size distribution upstream of the filter. The airborne particle detector is first placed upstream, and then downstream of the filter to determine percent penetration. The smoke generator is characterized using a calibrated laser spectrometer, and the particle detector is calibrated using a calibrated picoammeter. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Comparative evaluation of N-acetylcysteine and N-acetylcysteineamide in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in human hepatoma HepaRG cells

    PubMed Central

    Tobwala, Shakila; Khayyat, Ahdab; Fan, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP) is one of the most widely used over-the-counter antipyretic analgesic medications. Despite being safe at therapeutic doses, an accidental or intentional overdose can result in severe hepatotoxicity; a leading cause of drug-induced liver failure in the U.S. Depletion of glutathione (GSH) is implicated as an initiating event in APAP-induced toxicity. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a GSH precursor, is the only currently approved antidote for an APAP overdose. Unfortunately, fairly high doses and longer treatment times are required due to its poor bioavailability. In addition, oral and intravenous administration of NAC in a hospital setting are laborious and costly. Therefore, we studied the protective effects of N-acetylcysteineamide (NACA), a novel antioxidant, with higher bioavailability and compared it with NAC in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in a human-relevant in vitro system, HepaRG. Our results indicated that exposure of HepaRG cells to APAP resulted in GSH depletion, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, increased lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial dysfunction (assessed by JC-1 fluorescence), and lactate dehydrogenase release. Both NAC and NACA protected against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity by restoring GSH levels, scavenging ROS, inhibiting lipid peroxidation, and preserving mitochondrial membrane potential. However, NACA was better than NAC at combating oxidative stress and protecting against APAP-induced damage. The higher efficiency of NACA in protecting cells against APAP-induced toxicity suggests that NACA can be developed into a promising therapeutic option for treatment of an APAP overdose. PMID:25245075

  12. Performance of HEPA filters at LLNL following the 1980 and 1989 earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Elliott, J.; Wilson, K.

    1994-11-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National laboratory has experienced two significant earthquakes for which data is available to assess the ability of HEPA filters to withstand seismic conditions. A 5.9 magnitude earthquake with an epicenter 10 miles from LLNL struck on January 24, 1980. Estimates of the peak ground accelerations ranged from 0.2 to 0.3 g. A 7.0 magnitude earthquake with an epicenter about 50 miles from LLNL struck on October 17, 1989. Measurements of the ground accelerations at LLNL averaged 0.1 g. The results from the in-place filter tests obtained after each of the earthquakes were compiled and studied to determine if the earthquakes had caused filter leakage. Our study showed that only the 1980 earthquake resulted in a small increase in the number of HEPA filters developing leaks. In the 12 months following the 1980 and 1989 earthquakes, the in-place filter tests showed 8.0% and 4.1% of all filters respectively developed leaks . The average percentage of filters developing leaks from 1980 to 1993 was 3.3% {plus_minus} 1.79%. The increase in the filter leaks is significant for the 1980 earthquake, but not for the 1989 earthquake. No contamination was detected following the earthquakes that would suggest transient releases from the filtration system.

  13. Replacement of HEPA Filters at the LANL CMR Facility: Risks Reduced by Comprehensive Waste Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Corpion, J.; Barr, A.; Martinez, P.; Bader, M.

    2002-02-28

    In March 2001, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) completed the replacement of 720 radioactively contaminated HEPA filters for $5.7M. This project was completed five months ahead of schedule and $6.0M under budget with no worker injuries or contaminations. Numerous health and safety, environmental, and waste disposal problems were overcome, including having to perform work in a radioactively contaminated work environment, that was also contaminated with perchlorates (potential explosive). High waste disposal costs were also an issue. A project risk analysis and government cost estimate determined that the cost of performing the work would be $11.8M. To reduce risk, a $1.2M comprehensive condition assessment was performed to determine the degree of toxic and radioactive contamination trapped on the HEPA filters; and to determine whether explosive concentrations of perchlorates were present. Workers from LANL and personnel from Waldheim International of Knoxville, TN collected hundreds of samples wearing personnel protective gear against radioactive, toxic, and explosive hazards. LANL also funded research at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology to determine the explosivity of perchlorates. The data acquired from the condition assessment showed that toxic metals, toxic organic compounds, and explosive concentrations of perchlorates were absent. The data also showed that the extent of actinide metal contamination was less than expected, reducing the potential of transuranic waste generation by 50%. Consequently, $4.2M in cost savings and $1.8M in risk reduction were realized by increased worker productivity and waste segregation.

  14. Replacement of HEPA Filters at the LANL CMR Facility : risk reduced by comprehensive waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Corpion, J. C.

    2002-01-01

    In March 2001, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) completed the replacement of 720 radioactively contaminated HEPA filters for $5.7M. This project was completed five months ahead of schedule and $6.0M under budget with no worker injuries or contaminations. Numerous health and safety, environmental, and waste disposal problems were overcome, including having to perform work in a radioactively contaminated work environment, that was also contaminated with perchlorates (potential explosive). High waste disposal costs were also an issue. A project risk analysis and government cost estimate determined that the cost of performing the work would be $11.8M. To reduce risk, a $1.2M comprehensive condition assessment was performed to determine the degree of toxic and radioactive contamination trapped on the HEPA filters; and to determine whether explosive concentrations of perchlorates were present. Workers from LANL and personnel from Waldheim International of Knoxville, TN collected hundreds of samples wearing personnel protective gear against radioactive, toxic, and explosive hazards. LANL also funded research at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology to determine the explosivity of perchlorates. The data acquired from the condition assessment showed that toxic metals, toxic organic compounds, and explosive concentrations of perchlorates were absent. The data also showed that the extent of actinide metal contamination was less than expected, reducing the potential of transuranic waste generation by 50%. Consequently, $4.2M in cost savings and $1.8M in risk reduction were realized by increased worker productivity and waste segregation.

  15. Face washing promotion for preventing active trachoma

    PubMed Central

    Ejere, Henry OD; Alhassan, Mahmoud B; Rabiu, Mansur

    2015-01-01

    Background Trachoma remains a major cause of avoidable blindness among underprivileged populations in many developing countries. It is estimated that about 146 million people have active trachoma and nearly six million people are blind due to complications associated with repeat infections. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effects of face washing promotion for the prevention of active trachoma in endemic communities. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2015, Issue 1), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to January 2015), EMBASE (January 1980 to January 2015), PubMed (January 1948 to January 2015), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to January 2015), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com) (accessed 10 January 2014), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 26 January 2015. To identify further relevant trials we checked the reference lists of the included trials. Also, we used the Science Citation Index to search for references to publications that cited the trials included in the review. We contacted investigators and experts in the field to identify additional trials. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs that compared face washing with no treatment or face washing combined with antibiotics against antibiotics alone. Trial participants were residents of endemic trachoma communities. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. We contacted trial

  16. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  17. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  18. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  19. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  20. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  1. Alternative antimicrobial commercial egg washing procedures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercial table eggs are washed prior to packaging. Standard wash procedures use an alkaline pH and warm water. If a cool water method could be developed that would still provide a microbiologically safe egg, the industry may save energy costs associated with water heating. Four wash procedures ...

  2. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: BIOGENESIS SOIL WASHING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil washing technologies are designed to transfer contaminants from soil to a liquid phase. The BloGenesis™ soil washing technology uses a proprietary surfactant solution to transfer organic contaminants from soil to wastewater. The surfactant used in the soil washing process wa...

  3. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  4. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  5. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  6. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  7. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  8. Wash resistance of insecticide-treated materials.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez González, José; Kroeger, Axel; Aviña, Ana Isabel; Pabón, Eulides

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of insecticide-treated materials (ITMs) for malaria control is reduced by washing them. This research in Colombia and Bolivia investigated the resistance of different insecticide formulations and, in particular, a commercially available impregnated bednet (PermaNet) which provides chemical protection for the insecticide. The fabrics studied were all polyester; the pyrethroids used for impregnation were deltamethrin (tablet and suspension concentrate both at 25 mg/m2 target dose), lambdacyhalothrin (capsule suspension at 15 mg/m2; laboratory study only), alphacypermethrin (suspension concentrate at 40 mg/m2) and, in the case of PermaNet, deltamethrin (55 mg/m2). The indicator of wash resistance was Anopheles spp. mortality (using the bioassay cone method) before and after different numbers and intensities of washing. When the fabrics were washed under controlled conditions, gently with water and a bar of soap, the wash resistance of all formulations was good (100% Anopheles mortality after 3 washes). However, when the impregnated nets were soaked for 30-60 min and washed with soap powder and tap water by local women in the usual way, the mortality after 4 washes declined considerably (43.5% and 41.3% for deltamethrin tablets and liquid respectively when washing every second day). Alphacypermethrin showed slightly better results after 3 washes every 7th day compared to deltamethrin tablets (63.8% and 43.3% mortality, respectively). The wash resistance offered by PermaNet was much better and longer lasting: Anopheles mortality after 4 washes was 92.6%, after 10 washes 83.7% and after 20 washes 87.1%. The limitations of commercially available wash-resistant nets are, however, their limited accessibility and the difficulty of replacing all existing bednets with a new product.

  9. Use of the HepaRG Cell Line to Assess Potential Human Hepatotoxicity of ToxCast™ Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HepaRG cell line is a promising model system for predicting human hepatotoxicity in part because of the greater capacity to metabolize chemicals than other cell models. We hypothesized that this cell line would be a relevant model for toxicity testing of industrial chemicals....

  10. Evaluation of genotoxicity using automated detection of γH2AX in metabolically competent HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Quesnot, Nicolas; Rondel, Karine; Audebert, Marc; Martinais, Sophie; Glaise, Denise; Morel, Fabrice; Loyer, Pascal; Robin, Marie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    The in situ detection of γH2AX was recently reported to be a promising biomarker of genotoxicity. In addition, the human HepaRG hepatoma cells appear to be relevant for investigating hepatic genotoxicity since they express most of drug metabolizing enzymes and a wild type p53. The aim of this study was to determine whether the automated in situ detection of γH2AX positive HepaRG cells could be relevant for evaluation of genotoxicity after single or long-term repeated in vitro exposure compared to micronucleus assay. Metabolically competent HepaRG cells were treated daily with environmental contaminants and genotoxicity was evaluated after 1, 7 and 14 days. Using these cells, we confirmed the genotoxicity of aflatoxin B1 and benzo(a)pyrene and demonstrated that dimethylbenzanthracene, fipronil and endosulfan previously found genotoxic with comet or micronucleus assays also induced γH2AX phosphorylation. Furthermore, we showed that fluoranthene and bisphenol A induced γH2AX while no effect had been previously reported in HepG2 cells. In addition, induction of γH2AX was observed with some compounds only after 7 days, highlighting the importance of studying long-term effects of low doses of contaminants. Together, our data demonstrate that automated γH2AX detection in metabolically competent HepaRG cells is a suitable high-through put genotoxicity screening assay.

  11. 3-Nitrobenzanthrone and 3-aminobenzanthrone induce DNA damage and cell signalling in Hepa1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Landvik, N E; Arlt, V M; Nagy, E; Solhaug, A; Tekpli, X; Schmeiser, H H; Refsnes, M; Phillips, D H; Lagadic-Gossmann, D; Holme, J A

    2010-02-03

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a mutagenic and carcinogenic environmental pollutant found in diesel exhaust and urban air pollution. In the present work we have characterised the effects of 3-NBA and its metabolite 3-aminobenzanthrone (3-ABA) on cell death and cytokine release in mouse hepatoma Hepa1c1c7 cells. These effects were related to induced DNA damage and changes in cell signalling pathways. 3-NBA resulted in cell death and caused most DNA damage as judged by the amount of DNA adducts ((32)P-postlabelling assay), single strand (ss)DNA breaks and oxidative DNA lesions (comet assay) detected. An increased phosphorylation of H2AX, chk1, chk2 and partly ATM was observed using flow cytometry and/or Western blotting. Both compounds increased phosphorylation of p53 and MAPKs (ERK, p38 and JNK). However, only 3-NBA caused an accumulation of p53 in the nucleus and a translocation of Bax to the mitochondria. The p53 inhibitor pifithrin-alpha inhibited 3-NBA-induced apoptosis, indicating that cell death was a result of the triggering of DNA signalling pathways. The highest phosphorylation of Akt and degradation of IkappaB-alpha (suggesting activation of NF-kappaB) were also seen after treatment with 3-NBA. In contrast 3-ABA increased IL-6 release, but caused little or no toxicity. Cytokine release was inhibited by PD98059 and curcumin, suggesting that ERK and NF-kappaB play a role in this process. In conclusion, 3-NBA seems to have a higher potency to induce DNA damage compatible with its cytotoxic effects, while 3-ABA seems to have a greater effect on the immune system.

  12. Different Dose-Dependent Mechanisms Are Involved in Early Cyclosporine A-Induced Cholestatic Effects in HepaRG Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharanek, Ahmad; Azzi, Pamela Bachour-El; Al-Attrache, Houssein; Savary, Camille C.; Humbert, Lydie; Rainteau, Dominique; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Guillouzo, André

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms involved in drug-induced cholestasis in humans remain poorly understood. Although cyclosporine A (CsA) and tacrolimus (FK506) share similar immunosuppressive properties, only CsA is known to cause dose-dependent cholestasis. Here, we have investigated the mechanisms implicated in early cholestatic effects of CsA using the differentiated human HepaRG cell line. Inhibition of efflux and uptake of taurocholate was evidenced as early as 15 min and 1 h respectively after addition of 10μM CsA; it peaked at around 2 h and was reversible. These early effects were associated with generation of oxidative stress and deregulation of cPKC pathway. At higher CsA concentrations (≥50μM) alterations of efflux and uptake activities were enhanced and became irreversible, pericanalicular F-actin microfilaments were disorganized and bile canaliculi were constricted. These changes were associated with induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress that preceded generation of oxidative stress. Concentration-dependent changes were observed on total bile acid disposition, which were characterized by an increase and a decrease in culture medium and cells, respectively, after a 24-h treatment with CsA. Accordingly, genes encoding hepatobiliary transporters and bile acid synthesis enzymes were differently deregulated depending on CsA concentration. By contrast, FK506 induced limited effects only at 25–50μM and did not alter bile canaliculi. Our data demonstrate involvement of different concentration-dependent mechanisms in CsA-induced cholestasis and point out a critical role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in the occurrence of the major cholestatic features. PMID:24973091

  13. 16 CFR 1630.61 - Hide carpets and rugs-alternative washing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... fire-retardant treatment, or is made of fibers which have had a fire-retardant treatment, the sample or...: DO NOT WASH OR DRY CLEAN This rug has been treated with a flame retardant. To keep rug attractive...

  14. 16 CFR 1631.61 - Hide carpets and rugs-alternative washing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... fire-retardant treatment, or is made of fibers which have had a fire-retardant treatment, the sample or...: DO NOT WASH OR DRY CLEAN This rug has been treated with a flame retardant. To keep rug attractive...

  15. 16 CFR 1631.61 - Hide carpets and rugs-alternative washing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... fire-retardant treatment, or is made of fibers which have had a fire-retardant treatment, the sample or...: DO NOT WASH OR DRY CLEAN This rug has been treated with a flame retardant. To keep rug attractive...

  16. 16 CFR 1630.61 - Hide carpets and rugs-alternative washing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... fire-retardant treatment, or is made of fibers which have had a fire-retardant treatment, the sample or...: DO NOT WASH OR DRY CLEAN This rug has been treated with a flame retardant. To keep rug attractive...

  17. Disruption of BSEP Function in HepaRG Cells Alters Bile Acid Disposition and Is a Susceptive Factor to Drug-Induced Cholestatic Injury.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xi; Zhang, Yueping; Liu, Tongtong; Shen, Hong; Xiao, Yongling; Bourner, Maureen J; Pratt, Jennifer R; Thompson, David C; Marathe, Punit; Humphreys, W Griffith; Lai, Yurong

    2016-04-04

    In the present study, we characterized in vitro biosynthesis and disposition of bile acids (BAs) as well as hepatic transporter expression followed by ABCB11 (BSEP) gene knockout in HepaRG cells (HepaRG-KO cells). BSEP KO in HepaRG cells led to time-dependent BA accumulation, resulting in reduced biosynthesis of BAs and altered BA disposition. In HepaRG-KO cells, the expression of NTCP, OATP1B1, OATP2B1, BCRP, P-gp, and MRP2 were reduced, whereas MRP3 and OCT1 were up-regulated. As a result, BSEP KO altered the disposition of BAs and subsequently underwent adaptive regulations of BA synthesis and homeostasis to enable healthy growth of the cells. Although BSEP inhibitors caused no or slight increase of BAs in HepaRG wild type cells (HepaRG-WT cells), excessive intracellular accumulation of BAs was observed in HepaRG-KO cells exposed to bosentan and troglitazone, but not dipyridamole. LDH release in the medium was remarkably increased in HepaRG-KO cultures exposed to troglitazone (50 μM), suggesting drug-induced cellular injury. The results revealed that functional impairment of BSEP predisposes the cells to altered BA disposition and is a susceptive factor to drug-induced cholestatic injury. In total, BSEP inhibition might trigger the processes but is not a sole determinant of cholestatic cellular injury. As intracellular BA accumulation is determined by BSEP function and the subsequent adaptive gene regulation, assessment of intracellular BA accumulation in HepaRG-KO cells could be a useful approach to evaluate drug-induced liver injury (DILI) potentials of drugs that could disrupt other BA homeostasis pathways beyond BSEP inhibition.

  18. BERGMANN USA SOIL SEDIMENT WASHING TECHNOLOGY - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document provides an evaluation of the performance of the Bergmann USA Soil/Sediment Washing System and its applicability for the treatment of soils or sediments contaminated with organic and/or inorganic compounds. Both the technical and economic aspects of the technology w...

  19. WASHING STUDIES FOR PCP AND CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Protection Agency has conducted a series of bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to evaluate the feasibility of washing pentachlorophenol (PCP) and creosote from the soil at an abandoned wood-treatment Superfund site in Pensacola, FL. The high sand content and lo...

  20. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST. THE ELECTRIC TROLLEY IS SEEN AT THE LEFT. THE BULKHEAD SEEN AT THE LOWER RIGHT IS NOT PART OF THE MACHINE; IT WAS INSTALLED TO RETAIN THE FILTER SAND AFTER THE MACHINE WAS NO LONGER USED. THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SETTLING RESERVOIR NO. 4 IS SEEN IN THE DISTANCE BELOW THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE TROLLEY. - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  1. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. THE SUCTION (INTAKE) HOSE IS SEEN AT THE LEFT RESTING ON THE FILTER BED SURFACE; THE DISCHARGE HOSE IS AT THE RIGHT, RUNNING FROM THE BOTTOM OF THE CENTRAL VERTICAL AXLE TO THE CENTRIFUGAL PUMP. FROM THE PUMP WATER IS DISCHARGED THROUGH THE HORIZONTAL PIPE LOCATED UNDER THE EDGE OF PLATFORM DECK INTO THE WASTE-WATER TROUGH (NOT SEEN IN THIS VIEW). - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  2. Electrical Switchability and Dry-Wash Durability of Conductive Textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bangting; Zhang, Bowu; Wu, Jingxia; Wang, Ziqiang; Ma, Hongjuan; Yu, Ming; Li, Linfan; Li, Jingye

    2015-06-01

    There is growing interest in the area of conductive textiles in the scientific and industrial community. Herein, we successfully prepared a conductive textile via covalently grafting polyaniline (PANI) onto cotton by a multi-step treatment process. The conductivity of the resultant fabric could be tuned by immersing in water having different pH values. The conductive and insulating properties of the textile could be conveniently switched by alternately immersing in acidic and alkaline bath solutions. Most importantly, the resultant conductive fabrics were able to withstand 40 simulated dry-wash cycles, with almost no decay in the electrical conductivity, indicating their excellent dry-wash durability. The present strategy for fabricating conductive fabrics with excellent switchability of electrical properties and dry-wash durability is expected to provide inspiration for the production of multifunctional conductive textiles for use in hash or sensitive conditions.

  3. Electrical Switchability and Dry-Wash Durability of Conductive Textiles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bangting; Zhang, Bowu; Wu, Jingxia; Wang, Ziqiang; Ma, Hongjuan; Yu, Ming; Li, Linfan; Li, Jingye

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the area of conductive textiles in the scientific and industrial community. Herein, we successfully prepared a conductive textile via covalently grafting polyaniline (PANI) onto cotton by a multi-step treatment process. The conductivity of the resultant fabric could be tuned by immersing in water having different pH values. The conductive and insulating properties of the textile could be conveniently switched by alternately immersing in acidic and alkaline bath solutions. Most importantly, the resultant conductive fabrics were able to withstand 40 simulated dry-wash cycles, with almost no decay in the electrical conductivity, indicating their excellent dry-wash durability. The present strategy for fabricating conductive fabrics with excellent switchability of electrical properties and dry-wash durability is expected to provide inspiration for the production of multifunctional conductive textiles for use in hash or sensitive conditions. PMID:26066704

  4. Hepatitis B vaccine induces apoptotic death in Hepa1-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Hamza, Heyam; Cao, Jianhua; Li, Xinyun; Li, Changchun; Zhu, Mengjin; Zhao, Shuhong

    2012-05-01

    Vaccines can have adverse side-effects, and these are predominantly associated with the inclusion of chemical additives such as aluminum hydroxide adjuvant. The objective of this study was to establish an in vitro model system amenable to mechanistic investigations of cytotoxicity induced by hepatitis B vaccine, and to investigate the mechanisms of vaccine-induced cell death. The mouse liver hepatoma cell line Hepa1-6 was treated with two doses of adjuvanted (aluminium hydroxide) hepatitis B vaccine (0.5 and 1 μg protein per ml) and cell integrity was measured after 24, 48 and 72 h. Hepatitis B vaccine exposure increased cell apoptosis as detected by flow cytometry and TUNEL assay. Vaccine exposure was accompanied by significant increases in the levels of activated caspase 3, a key effector caspase in the apoptosis cascade. Early transcriptional events were detected by qRT-PCR. We report that hepatitis B vaccine exposure resulted in significant upregulation of the key genes encoding caspase 7, caspase 9, Inhibitor caspase-activated DNase (ICAD), Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK-1), and Apoptotic protease activating factor 1 (Apaf-1). Upregulation of cleaved caspase 3,7 were detected by western blot in addition to Apaf-1 and caspase 9 expressions argues that cell death takes place via the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in which release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria triggers the assembly of a caspase activation complex. We conclude that exposure of Hepa1-6 cells to a low dose of adjuvanted hepatitis B vaccine leads to loss of mitochondrial integrity, apoptosis induction, and cell death, apoptosis effect was observed also in C2C12 mouse myoblast cell line after treated with low dose of vaccine (0.3, 0.1, 0.05 μg/ml). In addition In vivo apoptotic effect of hepatitis B vaccine was observed in mouse liver.

  5. Performance testing of HEPA filters: Progress towards a European standard procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Dyment, J.

    1997-08-01

    Proposals for a future European testing procedure for {open_quotes}High Efficiency Particulate Air Filters (HEPA and ULPA){close_quotes} are being developed by CEN (Comite Europeen de Normalisation). The new standard will be given the status of national standard in participating countries, conflicting national standards being withdrawn. The standard will comprise 5 parts covering the grouping and classification of HEPA and ULPA filters according to their efficiency, fundamental principles of testing, marking etc (in part 1). Part 2 will cover aerosol production, measurement principles, counting equipment and statistics. Parts 3-5 will cover testing flat sheet media, leak testing of filter elements and the efficiency testing of filter elements respectively. The efficiency test methods allow the use of either homogeneous monodisperse or polydisperse aerosols for the determination of particulate filtration efficiencies as a function of particle size. The particle size at which maximum penetration occurs is first determined in flat sheet media tests; tests on filter elements (constructed using the same filter medium) may be carried out using either a homogeneous monodisperse aerosol of the size at which maximum penetration occurs (MPPS) or a polydisperse aerosol whose median size is close to the MPPS. Tests with monodisperse aerosols may be conducted using condensation nucleus counting equipment; tests using polydisperse test aerosols require the use of optical sizing particle counters. When determining the efficiency of filter elements the downstream aerosol concentrations may be determined from air samples obtained using either an overall method (single point sampling after mixing) or a scan method. The scan method also allows {open_quotes}local{close_quotes} efficiency values to be determined. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. In-place testing of tandem HEPA filter stages using fluorescent aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, J.C.; Kyle, T.G.; Tillery, M.I.; Ettinger, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    Fluorescent test aerosols were used in field testing of large multiple-stage HEPA filter systems. The technique excluded interference from non-fluorescent background particles known to leak into the plenum or ducting between the filters and the downstream sampling probe. This technique solved the problem of measuring extremely low concentrations of the test aerosol in the presence of background aerosol. The upstream fluorescent test aerosol was diluted with clean air and drawn into a single particle aerosol spectrometer capable of counting, sizing, and detecting fluorescence of each particle. The particle sizing function was performed on light scattered by the particle passing through the beam of a helium-cadmium laser. Concurrently the fluorescence excited by the laser illumination was detected at a longer wavelength. Since spectrometer response in the fluorescent mode was <2% of naturally occurring aerosols, background aerosols were insignificant as an interference to the downstream concentration measurement. Decontamination factors (DF) on the order of 10/sup 8/ were measured in the field studies on >9.4 m/sup 3//s (20,000 cfm) systems. Additional generator capacity and acceptably lower test aerosol to background aerosol concentraion ratios could be used to extend this capability to measure DF greater than 10/sup 8/. Dye-tagged DOP aerosols were generated either by gas-thermal or sonic nozzle generators. Experiments with the gas-thermal generator showed only 20% of fluorescence from the dye was degraded by the vaporization process. A single sonic nozzle was shown to aerosolize 0.7 to 1.0 L/h of dye-tagged DOP aerosol in the proper size range for HEPA filter testing. A multiple sonic nozzle generator is a practical consideration to provide greater capacity.

  7. Fostering Hand Washing before Lunch by Students Attending a Special Needs Young Adult Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walmsley, Christopher; Mahoney, Amanda; Durgin, Amy; Poling, Alan

    2013-01-01

    A multiple baseline across groups design was used to investigate the effects of a treatment package on hand washing before lunch by five students with disabilities who attended a young adult educational program. To evaluate hand washing, a lotion called Glo Germ was applied to participants' hands. Glo Germ is visible under a black light, which…

  8. Washing machine usage in remote aboriginal communities.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, C R

    1998-10-01

    The use of washing machines was investigated in two remote Aboriginal communities in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara homelands. The aim was to look both at machine reliability and to investigate the health aspect of washing clothes. A total of 39 machines were inspected for wear and component reliability every three months over a one-year period. Of these, 10 machines were monitored in detail for water consumption, hours of use and cycles of operation. The machines monitored were Speed Queen model EA2011 (7 kg washing load) commercial units. The field survey results suggested a high rate of operation of the machines with an average of around 1,100 washing cycles per year (range 150 and 2,300 cycles per year). The results were compared with available figures for the average Australian household. A literature survey, to ascertain the health outcomes relating to washing clothes and bedding, confirmed that washing machines are efficient at removal of bacteria from clothes and bedding but suggested that recontamination of clothing after washing often negated the prior removal. High temperature washing (> 60 degrees C) appeared to be advantageous from a health perspective. With regards to larger organisms, while dust mites and body lice transmission between people would probably be decreased by washing clothes, scabies appeared to be mainly transmitted by body contact and thus transmission would be only marginally decreased by the use of washing machines.

  9. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Solids Washing

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, David L.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Toth, James J.; Huckaby, James L.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  10. Release of synthetic microplastic plastic fibres from domestic washing machines: Effects of fabric type and washing conditions.

    PubMed

    Napper, Imogen E; Thompson, Richard C

    2016-11-15

    Washing clothes made from synthetic materials has been identified as a potentially important source of microscopic fibres to the environment. This study examined the release of fibres from polyester, polyester-cotton blend and acrylic fabrics. These fabrics were laundered under various conditions of temperature, detergent and conditioner. Fibres from waste effluent were examined and the mass, abundance and fibre size compared between treatments. Average fibre size ranged between 11.9 and 17.7μm in diameter, and 5.0 and 7.8mm in length. Polyester-cotton fabric consistently shed significantly fewer fibres than either polyester or acrylic. However, fibre release varied according to wash treatment with various complex interactions. We estimate over 700,000 fibres could be released from an average 6kg wash load of acrylic fabric. As fibres have been reported in effluent from sewage treatment plants, our data indicates fibres released by washing of clothing could be an important source of microplastics to aquatic habitats.

  11. Suppressive effects of estradiol on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-mediated transcriptional activation of murine Cyp1a-1 in mouse hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H G; Lee, S S

    1998-11-27

    Cultured mouse hepatoma Hepa lclc7 cells were treated with either estradiol or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) or in combination to assess the role of estradiol in the process of Cypla-1 induction. Estradiol at a concentration as high as 1 microM slightly increased the activity of Cypla-1-specific 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD); in contrast, TCDD-induced EROD activity and Cypla-1 mRNA levels were markedly reduced in the concomitant treatment of TCDD and estradiol in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with tamoxifen, an anti-estrogen which acts through the estrogen receptor, did not affect the suppressive effects of estradiol on TCDD-induced EROD activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay using nuclear extract of cells revealed that estradiol reduced transformation of the Ah receptor to the form capable of specifically binding to an oligonucleotide containing dioxin-response element (DRE) sequence. Consistent with this, estradiol decreased TCDD-induced increased chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity from a DRE-containing CAT reporter plasmid after transient transfection into the cells. The levels of the cytosolic [3H]TCDD-Ah receptor complex were reduced by estradiol in competitive Ah receptor binding assay using [3H]TCDD. This study demonstrated that estradiol acts as an antagonist to TCDD and can regulate Cyp1a-1 expression in an Ah receptor-dependent manner but not through estradiol receptor in Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

  12. [Machine for washing hospital laboratory vessels].

    PubMed

    Smotriaev, V M; Solov'ev, A A; Shvedov, Iu A; Zakharov, A G

    1977-01-01

    To improve washing laboratory vessels a selection of effective detergents was made and the technology of washing has been worked out. These data formed a groundwork for the construction of the washing machine, model BII-200, whose pilot unit has passed technical and medical tests and is recommended for batch production. The capacity of the machine with the use of the synthetic detergent "Trias" (per cycle): 252 test tubes, 96 microscope slides, 30 Petri dishes. The duration of the washing cycle is 27 min.

  13. Wash water waste pretreatment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Investigations were completed on wash waters based on each candidate personal cleansing agent. Evaluations of coagulants, antifoam agents, and the effect of promising antifoams on the chemical precipitation were included. Based on these evaluations two candidate soaps as well as their companion antifoam agents were selected for further work. Operating parameters included the effect of soap concentration, ferric chloride concentration, duration of mixing, and pore size of depth filters on the degree of soap removal. The effect of pressure on water flow through filter cartridges and on the rate of decline of water flow was also investigated. The culmination of the program was the recommendation of a pretreatment concept based on chemical precipitation followed by pressure filtration.

  14. A comparison of whole genome gene expression profiles of HepaRG cells and HepG2 cells to primary human hepatocytes and human liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Hart, Steven N; Li, Ye; Nakamoto, Kaori; Subileau, Eva-anne; Steen, David; Zhong, Xiao-bo

    2010-06-01

    HepaRG cells, derived from a female hepatocarcinoma patient, are capable of differentiating into biliary epithelial cells and hepatocytes. More importantly, differentiated HepaRG cells are able to maintain activities of many xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, and expression of the metabolizing enzyme genes can be induced by xenobiotics. The ability of these cells to express and induce xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes is in stark contrast to the frequently used HepG2 cells. The previous studies have mainly focused on a set of selected genes; therefore, it is of significant interest to know the extent of similarity of gene expression at whole genome levels in HepaRG cells and HepG2 cells compared with primary human hepatocytes and human liver tissues. To accomplish this objective, we used Affymetrix (Santa Clara, CA) U133 Plus 2.0 arrays to characterize the whole genome gene expression profiles in triplicate biological samples from HepG2 cells, HepaRG cells (undifferentiated and differentiated cells), freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes, and frozen liver tissues. After using similarity matrix, principal components, and hierarchical clustering methods, we found that HepaRG cells globally transcribe genes at levels more similar to human primary hepatocytes and human liver tissues than HepG2 cells. In particular, many genes encoding drug-processing proteins are transcribed at a more similar level in HepaRG cells than in HepG2 cells compared with primary human hepatocytes and liver samples. The transcriptomic similarity of HepaRG with primary human hepatocytes is encouraging for use of HepaRG cells in the study of xenobiotic metabolism, hepatotoxicology, and hepatocyte differentiation.

  15. Heterogeneous photocatalytic disinfection of wash waters from the fresh-cut vegetable industry.

    PubMed

    Selma, María Victoria; Allende, Ana; López-Gálvez, Francisco; Conesa, María Angeles; Gil, María Isabel

    2008-02-01

    The effectiveness of photocatalytic disinfection for control of natural and potentially pathogenic microflora in wash waters used for fresh-cut vegetables was evaluated. Wash waters for lettuce, escarole, chicory, carrot, onion, and spinach from a fresh-cut vegetable processing plant were treated with a titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalytic system. The vegetable wash waters were impelled out with a pump at a flow rate of 1,000 liters/h and conducted through a stainless steel circuit to the filtration system to reach the TiO2 photocatalyst fiber, which was illuminated with a 40-W UV-C lamp. The microbial and physicochemical qualities of the wash water were analyzed. Heterogeneous photocatalysis was an effective disinfection method, reducing counts of bacteria, molds, and yeasts. Most of the treated wash waters had total bacteria reductions of 4.1 +/- 1.3 to 4.8 +/- 0.4 log CFU/ml after 10 min of treatment when compared with untreated water. Higher decontamination efficacy was observed in carrot wash water (6.2 +/- 0.1-log reductions), where turbidity and organic matter were lower than those in the wash waters for other vegetables. The tested heterogeneous photocatalytic system also was effective for reducing water turbidity, although chemical oxygen demand was unaffected after the treatments. The efficacy of the photocatalytic system for reducing microbial load depended on the physicochemical characteristics of the wash water, which depended on the vegetable being washed. The conclusions derived from this study illustrate that implementation of a heterogeneous photocatalytic system in the fresh-cut vegetable washing processes could allow the reuse of wash water.

  16. Closed circuit rebreathing to achieve inert gas wash-in for multiple breath wash-out

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Katherine; Downey, Damian G.; Elborn, J. Stuart; Bell, Nicholas J.; Smith, Jaclyn; Owers-Bradley, John

    2016-01-01

    Multiple breath wash-out (MBW) testing requires prior wash-in of inert tracer gas. Wash-in efficiency can be enhanced by a rebreathing tracer in a closed circuit. Previous attempts to deploy this did not account for the impact of CO2 accumulation on patients and were unsuccessful. We hypothesised that an effective rebreathe wash-in could be delivered and it would not alter wash-out parameters. Computer modelling was used to assess the impact of the rebreathe method on wash-in efficiency. Clinical testing of open and closed circuit wash-in–wash-out was performed in healthy controls and adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) using a circuit with an effective CO2 scrubber and a refined wash-in protocol. Wash-in efficiency was enhanced by rebreathing. There was no difference in mean lung clearance index between the two wash-in methods for controls (6.5 versus 6.4; p=0.2, n=12) or patients with CF (10.9 versus 10.8; p=0.2, n=19). Test time was reduced by rebreathe wash-in (156 versus 230 s for CF patients, p<0.001) and both methods were well tolerated. End wash-in CO2 was maintained below 2% in most cases. Rebreathe–wash-in is a promising development that, when correctly deployed, reduces wash-in time and facilitates portable MBW testing. For mild CF, wash-out outcomes are equivalent to an open circuit. PMID:27730167

  17. Closed circuit rebreathing to achieve inert gas wash-in for multiple breath wash-out.

    PubMed

    Horsley, Alex R; O'Neill, Katherine; Downey, Damian G; Elborn, J Stuart; Bell, Nicholas J; Smith, Jaclyn; Owers-Bradley, John

    2016-01-01

    Multiple breath wash-out (MBW) testing requires prior wash-in of inert tracer gas. Wash-in efficiency can be enhanced by a rebreathing tracer in a closed circuit. Previous attempts to deploy this did not account for the impact of CO2 accumulation on patients and were unsuccessful. We hypothesised that an effective rebreathe wash-in could be delivered and it would not alter wash-out parameters. Computer modelling was used to assess the impact of the rebreathe method on wash-in efficiency. Clinical testing of open and closed circuit wash-in-wash-out was performed in healthy controls and adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) using a circuit with an effective CO2 scrubber and a refined wash-in protocol. Wash-in efficiency was enhanced by rebreathing. There was no difference in mean lung clearance index between the two wash-in methods for controls (6.5 versus 6.4; p=0.2, n=12) or patients with CF (10.9 versus 10.8; p=0.2, n=19). Test time was reduced by rebreathe wash-in (156 versus 230 s for CF patients, p<0.001) and both methods were well tolerated. End wash-in CO2 was maintained below 2% in most cases. Rebreathe-wash-in is a promising development that, when correctly deployed, reduces wash-in time and facilitates portable MBW testing. For mild CF, wash-out outcomes are equivalent to an open circuit.

  18. Application and evaluation of the washing effect in the collector well using pilot plant with washing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, K. H.; Kim, B. J.; Choi, N. C.; Lee, S. J.; Lee, B. H.

    2012-04-01

    Riverbed/bank filtration (RBF) is a natural process used as a first step in drinking water treatment. RBF systems consist of well fields that draw water from an aquifer that is hydraulically connected to surface waters. The benefits of RBF are multiple and include a reduction of turbidity, total coliform, microbial contaminants natural organic matter, and organic contaminants. Some of the disadvantages of RBF include the difficulty of preventing river water from infiltrating the aquifer in in-stances of severe river contamination, the geochemical reaction of the infiltrate with aquifer materials that may raise the aqueous concentrations of Fe2+, Mn2+, As, NH4+, CH4, Ca2+ and HCO3- , and clogging of the riverbed. For example, has demonstrated that riverbed clogging may decrease the specific capacity of RBF wells (flow reduction in the collector well etc.). The objective of this study is to optimization and evaluation the washing effect on various nozzle type and intervals, soil retention rate in the collector well using pilot plant with washing device for prevention flow reduction in the collector well. The Pilot plant experiments were conducted under various conditions; two kinds nozzle type (spray nozzle of circle type (single - Full Cone, multi - Hollow Cone) and spray nozzle of fan shape type (Veejet)), two different nozzle intervals (200 mm, 400mm) and a various soil retention rate in the collector well (10 ~ 40%). The results of experiment showed that in the nozzle type case, the washing effect of the veeject nozzle was more effective than other (Full Cone, Hollow Cone) nozzle through spray results (range, strength and height). In the nozzle interval conditions, washing effect is 200 mm better than 400 mm through spray distance and soil height. The washing efficiency in the collector well increased on soil retention rate decreased and the nozzle injection pressure increased using washing device

  19. Comparative Localization and Functional Activity of the Main Hepatobiliary Transporters in HepaRG Cells and Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bachour-El Azzi, Pamela; Sharanek, Ahmad; Burban, Audrey; Li, Ruoya; Guével, Rémy Le; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad; Stieger, Bruno; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Guillouzo, André

    2015-01-01

    The role of hepatobiliary transporters in drug-induced liver injury remains poorly understood. Various in vivo and in vitro biological approaches are currently used for studying hepatic transporters; however, appropriate localization and functional activity of these transporters are essential for normal biliary flow and drug transport. Human hepatocytes (HHs) are considered as the most suitable in vitro cell model but erratic availability and inter-donor functional variations limit their use. In this work, we aimed to compare localization of influx and efflux transporters and their functional activity in differentiated human HepaRG hepatocytes with fresh HHs in conventional (CCHH) and sandwich (SCHH) cultures. All tested influx and efflux transporters were correctly localized to canalicular [bile salt export pump (BSEP), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2), multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1), and MDR3] or basolateral [Na+-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) and MRP3] membrane domains and were functional in all models. Contrary to other transporters, NTCP and BSEP were less abundant and active in HepaRG cells, cellular uptake of taurocholate was 2.2- and 1.4-fold and bile excretion index 2.8- and 2.6-fold lower, than in SCHHs and CCHHs, respectively. However, when taurocholate canalicular efflux was evaluated in standard and divalent cation-free conditions in buffers or cell lysates, the difference between the three models did not exceed 9.3%. Interestingly, cell imaging showed higher bile canaliculi contraction/relaxation activity in HepaRG hepatocytes and larger bile canaliculi networks in SCHHs. Altogether, our results bring new insights in mechanisms involved in bile acids accumulation and excretion in HHs and suggest that HepaRG cells represent a suitable model for studying hepatobiliary transporters and drug-induced cholestasis. PMID:25690737

  20. Expression of cytochromes P450, conjugating enzymes and nuclear receptors in human hepatoma HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Aninat, Caroline; Piton, Amélie; Glaise, Denise; Le Charpentier, Typhen; Langouët, Sophie; Morel, Fabrice; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Guillouzo, André

    2006-01-01

    Most human hepatocyte cell lines lack a substantial set of liver-specific functions, especially major cytochrome P450 (P450)-related enzyme activities, making them unrepresentative of in vivo hepatocytes. We have used the HepaRG cells, derived from a human hepatocellular carcinoma, which exhibit a high differentiation pattern after 2 weeks at confluency to determine whether they could mimic human hepatocytes for drug metabolism and toxicity studies. We show that when passaged at low density, these cells reversed to an undifferentiated morphology, actively divided, and, after having reached confluency, formed typical hepatocyte-like colonies surrounded by biliary epithelial-like cells. By contrast, when seeded at high density, hepatocyte-like clusters retained their typical differentiated morphology. Transcripts of various nuclear receptors (aryl hydrocarbon receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha), P450s (CYP1A2, 2C9, 2D6, 2E1, 3A4), phase 2 enzymes (UGT1A1, GSTA1, GSTA4, GSTM1), and other liver-specific functions were estimated by reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and were found to be expressed, for most of them, at comparable levels in both confluent differentiated and high-density differentiated HepaRG cells and in cultured primary human hepatocytes. For several transcripts, the levels were strongly increased in the presence of 2% dimethyl sulfoxide. Measurement of basal activities of several P450s and their response to prototypical inducers as well as analysis of metabolic profiles and cytotoxicity of several compounds confirmed the functional resemblance of HepaRG cells to primary cultured human hepatocytes. In conclusion, HepaRG cells constitute the first human hepatoma cell line expressing high levels of the major P450s involved in xenobiotic metabolism and represent a reliable surrogate to human hepatocytes for drug metabolism and toxicity studies.

  1. Inhibition Of Washed Sludge With Sodium Nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J. W.; Lozier, J. S.

    2012-09-25

    This report describes the results of electrochemical tests used to determine the relationship between the concentration of the aggressive anions in washed sludge and the minimum effective inhibitor concentration. Sodium nitrate was added as the inhibitor because of its compatibility with the DWPF process. A minimum of 0.05M nitrite is required to inhibit the washed sludge simulant solution used in this study. When the worst case compositions and safety margins are considered, it is expected that a minimum operating limit of nearly 0.1M nitrite will be specified. The validity of this limit is dependent on the accuracy of the concentrations and solubility splits previously reported. Sodium nitrite additions to obtain 0.1M nitrite concentrations in washed sludge will necessitate the additional washing of washed precipitate in order to decrease its sodium nitrite inhibitor requirements sufficiently to remain below the sodium limits in the feed to the DWPF. Nitrite will be the controlling anion in "fresh" washed sludge unless the soluble chloride concentration is about ten times higher than predicted by the solubility splits. Inhibition of "aged" washed sludge will not be a problem unless significant chloride dissolution occurs during storage. It will be very important tomonitor the composition of washed sludge during processing and storage.

  2. Extraction of semivolatile organic compounds from high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters by supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, J.B.

    1997-09-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) using unmodified carbon dioxide has been explored as an alternative method for the extraction of semivolatile organic compounds from high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. HEPA filters provide the final stage of containment on many exhaust systems in US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities by preventing the escape of chemical and radioactive materials entrained in the exhausted air. The efficiency of the filters is tested by the manufacturer and DOE using dioctylphthalate (DOP), a substance regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Therefore, the filters must be analyzed for semivolatile organics before disposal. Ninety-eight acid, base, and neutral semivolatile organics were spiked onto blank HEPA material and extracted using SFE, Soxhlet, automated Soxhlet, and sonication techniques. The SFE conditions were optimized using a Dionex SFE-703 instrument. Average recoveries for the 98 semivolatile compounds are 82.7% for Soxhlet, 74.0% for sonication, 70.2% for SFE, and 62.9% for Soxtec. Supercritical fluid extraction reduces the extraction solvent volume to 10--15 mL, a factor of 20--30 less than Soxhlet and more than 5 times less than Soxtec and sonication. Extraction times of 30--45 min are used compared to 16--18 h for Soxhlet extraction.

  3. Transcriptional, functional and mechanistic comparisons of stem cell-derived hepatocytes, HepaRG cells and 3D human hepatocyte spheroids as predictive in vitro systems for drug-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Bell, Catherine C; Lauschke, Volker M; Vorrink, Sabine U; Palmgren, Henrik; Duffin, Roger; Andersson, Tommy B; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2017-01-30

    Reliable and versatile hepatic in vitro systems for the prediction of drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity are essential constituents of preclinical safety assessment pipelines for new medicines. Here, we compared three emerging cell systems, hepatocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS-Hep), HepaRG cells and 3D primary human hepatocyte (PHH) spheroids at transcriptional and functional levels in a multi-center study to evaluate their potential as predictive models for drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed widespread gene expression differences between the three cell models, with 8,148 out of 17,462 analyzed genes (47%) being differentially expressed. Expression levels of genes involved in the metabolism of endogenous as well as xenobiotic compounds were significantly elevated in PHH spheroids, whereas genes involved in cell division and endocytosis were significantly upregulated in HepaRG and hiPS-Hep cells, respectively. Consequently, PHH spheroids were more sensitive to a panel of drugs with distinctly different toxicity mechanisms, an effect that was amplified by long-term exposure using repeated treatments. Importantly, toxicogenomic analyses revealed that transcriptomic changes in PHH spheroids were in compliance with cholestatic, carcinogenic or steatogenic in vivo toxicity mechanisms at clinically relevant drug concentrations. Combined, the data reveal important phenotypic differences between the three cell systems and suggest that PHH spheroids can be used for functional investigations of drug-induced liver injury in vivo in man.

  4. Transcriptional, Functional, and Mechanistic Comparisons of Stem Cell–Derived Hepatocytes, HepaRG Cells, and Three-Dimensional Human Hepatocyte Spheroids as Predictive In Vitro Systems for Drug-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Catherine C.; Vorrink, Sabine U.; Palmgren, Henrik; Duffin, Rodger; Andersson, Tommy B.; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Reliable and versatile hepatic in vitro systems for the prediction of drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity are essential constituents of preclinical safety assessment pipelines for new medicines. Here, we compared three emerging cell systems—hepatocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, HepaRG cells, and three-dimensional primary human hepatocyte (PHH) spheroids—at transcriptional and functional levels in a multicenter study to evaluate their potential as predictive models for drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed widespread gene expression differences between the three cell models, with 8148 of 17,462 analyzed genes (47%) being differentially expressed. Expression levels of genes involved in the metabolism of endogenous as well as xenobiotic compounds were significantly elevated in PHH spheroids, whereas genes involved in cell division and endocytosis were significantly upregulated in HepaRG cells and hepatocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, respectively. Consequently, PHH spheroids were more sensitive to a panel of drugs with distinctly different toxicity mechanisms, an effect that was amplified by long-term exposure using repeated treatments. Importantly, toxicogenomic analyses revealed that transcriptomic changes in PHH spheroids were in compliance with cholestatic, carcinogenic, or steatogenic in vivo toxicity mechanisms at clinically relevant drug concentrations. Combined, the data reveal important phenotypic differences between the three cell systems and suggest that PHH spheroids can be used for functional investigations of drug-induced liver injury in vivo in humans. PMID:28137721

  5. Viability and functional integrity of washed platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda, A.A.; Zylstra, V.W.; Clare, D.E.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Forstrom, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    The viability and functional integrity of saline- and ACD-saline-washed platelets were compared with those of unwashed platelets. After template bleeding time (TBT) was measured, 15 healthy volunteers underwent plateletpheresis and ingested 600 mg of aspirin. Autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets were transfused: unwashed (n = 5), washed with 0.9 percent saline solution (SS) (n = 5), and washed with a buffered 12.6 percent solution of ACD-A in 0.9 percent saline solution (n = 5). After transfusion, we measured TBT at 1, 4, and 24 hours; platelet survival at 10 minutes and 1, 4, and 24 hours and daily for 6 days; and the percentage of uptake in liver and spleen by quantitative whole-body radionuclide scintigraphy at 24 and 190 hours. We found that saline washing affected platelet recovery, 23.47 +/- 12 percent (p less than 0.001) as compared to 52.43 +/- 17 percent (p less than 0.002) for ACD-saline and 73.17 +/- 8 percent for control; that saline washing resulted in a greater liver uptake than control and ACD-saline-washed platelets (31.9 +/- 8% (p less than 0.001) vs 17.7 +/- 4.1 and 19.3 +/- 2.1% (p greater than 0.1), respectively); that, unlike control and ACD-saline-washed platelets, saline-washed platelets did not shorten bleeding time; and that neither type of washing affected survival. Although ACD-saline washing affects recovery, it also results in intact function, normal survival, higher recovery than SS platelets, and no significant liver uptake.

  6. Short communication: Automatic washing of hooves can help control digital dermatitis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Peter T; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Sørensen, Jan Tind

    2012-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop and test a system for automatic washing of the hooves of dairy cows and to evaluate the effect of frequent automatic washing on the prevalence of digital dermatitis (DD). An automatic hoof washer was developed in an experimental dairy herd and tested in 6 commercial dairy herds in 2 experiments (1 and 2). In the experimental herd, automatic hoof washing resulted in cleaner hooves. In experiments 1 and 2, cows were washed after each milking on the left side only, leaving the right side unwashed as a within-cow control. In experiment 1, hooves were washed with a water and 0.4% soap solution. In experiment 2, hooves were washed with water only. In each experiment, DD was scored in a hoof-trimming chute approximately 60 d after the start of hoof washing. Data were analyzed using a generalized linear mixed model. The outcome was the DD status of each leg (DD positive or DD negative). Herd and cow within herd were included as random effects, and treatment (washing or control) was included as a fixed effect. The statistical analyses showed that the odds ratio of having DD was 1.48 in the control leg compared with the washed leg in experiment 1. In experiment 2, the odds ratio of having DD was 1.27 in the control leg compared with the washed leg. We concluded that automatic washing of hooves with water and soap can help decrease the prevalence of DD in commercial dairy herds.

  7. Contaminant resorption during soil washing

    SciTech Connect

    Gombert, D.

    1993-10-01

    To evaluate the applicability of soil washing to a specific site requires some basic research in how contaminants are bound. Much can be learned from sequential extraction methodology based on micronutrient bioavailability studies wherein the soil matrix is chemically dissected to selectively remove particular fixation mechanisms independently. This procedure uses a series of progressively more aggressive solvents to dissolve the principle phases that make up a soil, however, the published studies do not appear to consider the potential for a contaminant released from one type of site to resorb on another site during an extraction. This physical model assumes no ion exchange or adsorption at sites either previously occupied by other ions, or exposed by the dissolution. Therefore, to make engineering use of the sequential extraction data, the release of contamination must be evaluated relative to the effects of resorption. Time release studies were conducted to determine the optimum duration for extraction to maximize complete destruction of the target matrix fraction while minimizing contaminant resorption. Tests with and without a potassium brine present to inhibit cesium resorption indicated extraction efficiency could be enhanced by as much as a factor of ten using the brine.

  8. 49 CFR 230.60 - Time of washing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Washing Boilers § 230.60 Time of washing. (a) Frequency of washing. All boilers shall thoroughly be washed... inspection. The date of the boiler wash shall be noted on the FRA Form No. 1 or FRA Form No. 3. (See...

  9. The histone deacetylase inhibiting drug Entinostat induces lipid accumulation in differentiated HepaRG cells

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Abigail D. G.; Scopigno, Tullio; Pediconi, Natalia; Levrero, Massimo; Hagman, Henning; Kiskis, Juris; Enejder, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Dietary overload of toxic, free metabolic intermediates leads to disrupted insulin signalling and fatty liver disease. However, it was recently reported that this pathway might not be universal: depletion of histone deacetylase (HDAC) enhances insulin sensitivity alongside hepatic lipid accumulation in mice, but the mechanistic role of microscopic lipid structure in this effect remains unclear. Here we study the effect of Entinostat, a synthetic HDAC inhibitor undergoing clinical trials, on hepatic lipid metabolism in the paradigmatic HepaRG liver cell line. Specifically, we statistically quantify lipid droplet morphology at single cell level utilizing label-free microscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, supported by gene expression. We observe Entinostat efficiently rerouting carbohydrates and free-fatty acids into lipid droplets, upregulating lipid coat protein gene Plin4, and relocating droplets nearer to the nucleus. Our results demonstrate the power of Entinostat to promote lipid synthesis and storage, allowing reduced systemic sugar levels and sequestration of toxic metabolites within protected protein-coated droplets, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases such as diabetes and metabolic syndrome. PMID:27320682

  10. Survey of HEPA filter applications and experience at Department of Energy sites

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.

    1981-11-01

    Results indicated that approximately 58% of the filters surveyed were changed out in the 1977 to 1979 study period and some 18% of all filters were changed out more than once. Most changeouts (60%) were due to the existence of a high pressure drop across the filter, indicative of filter plugging. The next most recurrent reasons for changeout and their percentage changeouts were leak test failure (15%) and preventive maintenance service life limit (12%). An average filter service life was calculated to be 3.0 years with a 2.0-year standard deviation. The labor required for filter changeout was calculated as 1.5 manhours per filter changed. Filter failures occurred with approximately 12% of all installed filters. Most failures (60%) occurred for unknown reasons and handling or installation damage accounted for an additional 20% of all failures. Media ruptures, filter frame failures and seal failures occurred with approximately equal frequency at 5 to 6% each. Subjective responses to the questionnaire indicate problems are: need for improved acid and moisture resistant filters; filters more readily disposable as radioactive waste; improved personnel training in filter handling and installation; and need for pretreatment of air prior to HEPA filtration.

  11. The development of a HEPA filter with improved dust holding characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Dyment, J.; Hamblin, C.

    1995-02-01

    A limitation of the HEPA filters used in the extract of nuclear facilities is their relatively low capacity for captured dust. The costs associated with the disposal of a typical filter means that there are clear incentives to extend filter life. The work described in this report are the initial stages in the development of a filter which incorporates a medium which enhances its dust holding capacity. Experimental equipment was installed to enable the dust loading characteristics of candidate media to be compared with those of the glass fibre based papers currently used in filter construction. These tests involved challenging representative samples of the media with an air stream containing a controlled concentration of thermally generated sodium chloride particles. The dust loading characteristics of the media were then compared in terms of the rate of increasing in pressure differential. A number of {open_quotes}graded density{close_quotes} papers were subsequently identified which appeared to offer significant improvements in dust holding. In the second phase of the programme deep-pleat filters (1,700 M{sup 3}h{sup {minus}1}) incorporating graded density papers were manufactured and tested. Improvements of up to 50% were observed in their capacity for the sub-micron sodium chloride test dust. Smaller differences (15%) were measured when a coarser, carbon black, challenge was used. This is attributed to the differences in the particles sizes of the two dusts.

  12. The histone deacetylase inhibiting drug Entinostat induces lipid accumulation in differentiated HepaRG cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, Abigail D. G.; Scopigno, Tullio; Pediconi, Natalia; Levrero, Massimo; Hagman, Henning; Kiskis, Juris; Enejder, Annika

    2016-06-01

    Dietary overload of toxic, free metabolic intermediates leads to disrupted insulin signalling and fatty liver disease. However, it was recently reported that this pathway might not be universal: depletion of histone deacetylase (HDAC) enhances insulin sensitivity alongside hepatic lipid accumulation in mice, but the mechanistic role of microscopic lipid structure in this effect remains unclear. Here we study the effect of Entinostat, a synthetic HDAC inhibitor undergoing clinical trials, on hepatic lipid metabolism in the paradigmatic HepaRG liver cell line. Specifically, we statistically quantify lipid droplet morphology at single cell level utilizing label-free microscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, supported by gene expression. We observe Entinostat efficiently rerouting carbohydrates and free-fatty acids into lipid droplets, upregulating lipid coat protein gene Plin4, and relocating droplets nearer to the nucleus. Our results demonstrate the power of Entinostat to promote lipid synthesis and storage, allowing reduced systemic sugar levels and sequestration of toxic metabolites within protected protein-coated droplets, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases such as diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

  13. Particle size separation via soil washing to obtain volume reduction.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R; Rasor, E; Van Ryn, F

    1999-04-23

    A pilot-plant study was performed using a soil washing pilot plant originally designed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to demonstrate scale-up and potential full-scale remediation. This pilot plant named VORCE (Volume Reduction/Chemical Extraction) was modified to meet the specific requirements for treatment of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and a Department of Energy site soils. After a series of tests on clean soils to develop operating parameters and system performance, the machine was used to treat soils, one contaminated with Thorium-232 and the other with Cesium-137. All indicate that soil washing is very promising for volume reduction treatment. In addition, cost data was generated and is given herein.

  14. Bauxite washing for the removal of clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ishaq; Hartge, Ernst-Ulrich; Werther, Joachim; Wischnewski, Reiner

    2014-11-01

    Clay impurities associated with bauxite negatively affect the Bayer process for alumina production. These impurities should be removed as far as possible by a beneficiation technique before the ore is used as feed for the Bayer process. In this current investigation, bauxite washing was conducted in the laboratory. Bauxite washing is a physical process that causes the disintegration and deagglomeration of the clay matrix, and bauxite is liberated from the clay (mainly rich in silica). Subsequently, separation occurs with the assistance of wet screening at a predetermined cut size. Three techniques were investigated in the laboratory: drum washing, water-jet washing, and ultrasonic washing. Various operating parameters were investigated for drum washing and water-jet washing, including materials retention time, drum rotation speed, solid concentration, water-jet spray duration, pressure, and height. We concluded that the retention time of bauxite inside the drum at a solid concentration of 55wt% and a drum rotation speed of 31 r/min is the dominant parameter for the removal of clay from the bauxite surface.

  15. Development assessment of wash water reclamation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, D. F.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical study assessment of state-of-the-art wash water reclamation technology is presented. It covers all non-phase-change unit operations, unit processes and subsystems currently under development by NASA. Each approach to wash water reclamation is described in detail. Performance data are given together with the projected weights and sizes of key components and subsystems. It is concluded that a simple multifiltration subsystem composed of surface-type cartridge filters, carbon adsorption and ion exchange resins is the most attractive approach for spacecraft wash water reclamation in earth orbital missions of up to 10 years in duration.

  16. Water wash apparatus for cleaning radioactively contaminated garments

    SciTech Connect

    Sewter, B.R.; Jarvis, T.A.; Kirchner, M.A.; Prisco, A.J. Jr.; Bonneau, A.M.; Trendler, K.E.; Briggs, W.E.; Godfrey, L.E.

    1990-03-20

    This patent describes an apparatus for water washing fabrics and removing radioactive contaminants therefrom without the generation of liquid effluents. It comprises: a washing machine means for washing the fabrics having a wash water inlet, a rinse water inlet, and an outlet, and a hydraulically closed wash water system which includes a reservoir means of polished water connected to the wash water inlet of the machine means, a particulate filtration means connected to the outlet for removing particulate impurities from the wash water discharged from the outlet, and a water polishing means connected between the particulate filtration means and the wash water inlet for supplying the reservoir means with filtered and polished water.

  17. Wash water waste pretreatment system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The use of real wash water had no adverse effect on soap removal when an Olive Leaf soap based system was used; 96 percent of the soap was removed using ferric chloride. Numerous chemical agents were evaluated as antifoams for synthetic wash water. Wash water surfactants used included Olive Leaf Soap, Ivory Soap, Neutrogena and Neutrogena Rain Bath Gel, Alipal CO-436, Aerosol 18, Miranol JEM, Palmeto, and Aerosol MA-80. For each type of soapy wash water evaluated, at least one antifoam capable of causing nonpersistent foam was identified. In general, the silicones and the heavy metal ions (i.e., ferric, aluminum, etc.) were the most effective antifoams. Required dosage was in the range of 50 to 200 ppm.

  18. [Ritual washing, another aspect of care].

    PubMed

    Brisse, Joëlle; Ghoul, Abderrahman; Samoun, Ary

    2011-12-01

    After death, mortuary staff attend to the deceased and his or her family until the deceased leaves the institution. Washing, dressing, presentation of the body and dealing with requests for information form part of this aspect of care. Religious practices, such as the ritual washing of the body may be requested by the family. As with all forms of care given to the deceased, staff facilitate the carrying out of such practices.

  19. Efficacy of different washing solutions and contact times on the microbial quality and safety of fresh-cut paprika.

    PubMed

    Das, B Kumar; Kim, Ji Gang; Choi, Ji Weon

    2011-10-01

    The role of different washing solutions and contact times was investigated to determine their use as potential sanitizers for maintaining the microbial quality and food safety of fresh-cut paprika. Samples were cut into small pieces, washed for both 90 and 180 s by different washing solutions: tap water, chlorinated water (100 mg/L and pH 6.5-7), electrolyzed water (pH 7.2) and ozonized water (4 mg/L). Then, samples were packaged in 50 µm polypropylene bags and stored at 5 °C for 12 days, followed by an evaluation of the antimicrobial efficacy of the treatments. Various quality and safety parameters, such as gas composition, color, off-odor, electrical conductivity and microbial numbers, were evaluated during storage. Results revealed insignificant differences in gas composition, and no off-odor was observed in any of the samples during the storage period. However, longer contact time resulted in slightly lower hue angle value than a short one for all washing solutions. Moreover, samples washed with ozone washings showed lower electrolyte leakage than other washing solutions. Samples washed for longer contact time except those washed in ozonized water showed increased microbial numbers during storage. Hence, it has been concluded that longer contact time with ozone has positive effects, whereas the other washing solutions adversely affect the microbial quality and safety aspects of fresh-cut paprika.

  20. Evaluation of HEPA vacuum cleaning and dry steam cleaning in reducing levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and house dust mite allergens in carpets

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chang Ho; Yiin, Lih-Ming; Fan, Zhi-Hua (Tina); Rhoads, George G.

    2014-01-01

    Dry steam cleaning, which has gained recent attention as an effective method to reduce house dust mite (HDM) allergen concentration and loading in carpets, was evaluated in this study for its efficacy in lowering levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as well as HDM allergens. Fifty urban homes with wail-to-wall carpets, mostly low-income and with known lead contamination, were studied in 2003 and 2004. Two carpet-cleaning interventions were compared: Repeated HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air filtered) vacuuming alone and repeated HEPA vacuuming supplemented with dry steam cleaning. Vacuum samples were collected to measure carpet loading of dust and contaminants immediately before and after cleaning. Paired comparisons were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the cleaning protocols in reducing the levels of PAHs and HDM allergens in carpets. The results indicated that both cleaning methods substantially reduced the loading of PAHs and HDM allergens as well as dust in carpets (p < 0.0001). The reductions in loading of dust (64.4%), PAHs (69.1%), and HDM allergens (85.5%), by dry steam cleaning plus repetitive HEPA vacuuming were larger than the reductions by regular HEPA vacuuming alone: dust (55.5%), PAHs (58.6%), and HDM allergens (80.8%), although the difference was statistically significant only for dust and PAHs. We conclude that intensive HEPA vacuum cleaning substantially reduced the loading of PAHs and HDM allergens in carpets in these urban homes and that dry steam cleaning added modestly to cleaning effectiveness. PMID:19137159

  1. Comparative Proteomics Reveals Novel Components at the Plasma Membrane of Differentiated HepaRG Cells and Different Distribution in Hepatocyte- and Biliary-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Alisa G.; Lazar, Catalin; Radu, Gabriel L.; Darie, Costel C.; Branza-Nichita, Norica

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a human pathogen causing severe liver disease and eventually death. Despite important progress in deciphering HBV internalization, the early virus-cell interactions leading to infection are not known. HepaRG is a human bipotent liver cell line bearing the unique ability to differentiate towards a mixture of hepatocyte- and biliary-like cells. In addition to expressing metabolic functions normally found in liver, differentiated HepaRG cells support HBV infection in vitro, thus resembling cultured primary hepatocytes more than other hepatoma cells. Therefore, extensive characterization of the plasma membrane proteome from HepaRG cells would allow the identification of new cellular factors potentially involved in infection. Here we analyzed the plasma membranes of non-differentiated and differentiated HepaRG cells using nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify the differences between the proteomes and the changes that lead to differentiation of these cells. We followed up on differentially-regulated proteins in hepatocytes- and biliary-like cells, focusing on Cathepsins D and K, Cyclophilin A, Annexin 1/A1, PDI and PDI A4/ERp72. Major differences between the two proteomes were found, including differentially regulated proteins, protein-protein interactions and intracellular localizations following differentiation. The results advance our current understanding of HepaRG differentiation and the unique properties of these cells. PMID:23977166

  2. Surfactant-enhanced in-situ soils washing. Final report, March 1985-April 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, J.; Traver, R.P.; Downey, D.C.

    1987-09-01

    The objective of this joint Air Force - Environmental Protection Agency project was to demonstrate the feasibility of using surfactants to enhance the washing of petroleum and solvent-contaminated soils. A pilot-scale test of in-situ soils washing was performed at an abandoned fire training area using several surfactant solutions. The results of this study did not show in-situ soils washing as a proven and reliable remediation technology. Several shortfalls were observed and are documented in this report. The report also contains information on the operation of a groundwater treatment system which were successfully used to decontaminate highly polluted groundwater at the site.

  3. DEGRADED TBP SOLVENT REGENERATION TECHNOLOGY USING BUTYLAMINE AS A SOLVENT WASHING TO REDUCE SOLID SALT WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Asakura, T.; Itoh, Y.; Hotoku, S.; Morita, Y.; Uchiyama, G.

    2003-02-27

    Normal butylamine compounds are studied as salt-free wash reagents for degraded solvent used in PUREX process in spent fuel reprocessing. The solvent wash tests were carried out with two types of butylamine compounds, n-butylamine oxalate and n-butylamine bicarbonate, by counter-current mode using a small size mixer-settler composed of two 4-stage wash steps. Di-n-butyl phosphoric acid (HDBP), the main degradation product from TBP, was removed from real degraded solvent with decontamination factor of 2.5 {approx} 7.9. The study on electrolytic decomposition of butylamine compounds was also conducted for waste treatment.

  4. The case for improved HEPA-filter mechanical performance standards revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, C.I.; Smith, P.R.

    1997-08-01

    Under benign operating conditions, High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter units serve as reliable and relatively economical components in the air cleaning systems of nuclear facilities worldwide. Despite more than four decades of filter-unit evaluation and improvements, however, the material strength characteristics of the glass fiber filter medium continue to ultimately limit filter functional reliability. In worst-case scenarios involving fire suppression, loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA`s), or exposure to shock waves or tornado induced flows, rupture of the filter medium of units meeting current qualification standards cannot be entirely ruled out. Even under so-called normal conditions of operation, instances of filter failure reported in the literature leave open questions of filter-unit reliability. Though developments of filter units with improved burst strengths have been pursued outside the United States, support for efforts in this country has been comparatively minimal. This despite user requests for filters with greater moisture resistance, for example. Or the fact that conventional filter designs result in not only the least robust component to be found in a nuclear air cleaning system, but also the one most sensitive to the adverse effects of conditions deviating from those of normal operation. Filter qualification-test specifications of current codes, standards, and regulatory guidelines in the United States are based primarily upon research performed in a 30-year period beginning in the 1950`s. They do not seem to reflect the benefits of the more significant developments and understanding of filter failure modes and mechanisms achieved since that time. One overseas design, based on such knowledge, has proven reliability under adverse operating conditions involving combined and serial challenges. Its widespread use, however, has faltered on a lack of consensus in upgrading filter performance standards. 34 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. ANALYSIS OF VAPORS FROM METHYLENE CHLORIDE EXTRACTS OF NUCLEAR GRADE HEPA FILTER FIBERGLASS SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    FRYE JM; ANASTOS HL; GUTIERREZ FC

    2012-06-07

    While several organic compounds were detected in the vapor samples used in the reenactment of the preparation of mounts from the extracts of nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air filter fiberglass samples, the most significant species present in the samples were methylene chloride, phenol, phenol-d6, and 2-fluorophenol. These species were all known to be present in the extracts, but were expected to have evaporated during the preparation of the mounts, as the mounts appeared to be dry before any vapor was collected. These species were present at the following percentages of their respective occupational exposure limits: methylene chloride, 2%; phenol, 0.4%; and phenol-d6, 0.6%. However, there is no established limit for 2-fluorophenol. Several other compounds were detected at low levels for which, as in the case of 2-fluorophenol, there are no established permissible exposure limits. These compounds include 2-chlorophenol; N-nitroso-1-propanamine; 2-fluoro-1,1{prime}-biphenyl; 1,2-dihydroacenaphthylene; 2,5-cyclohexadiene-1,4-dione,2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl); trimethyl oxirane; n-propylpropanamine; 2-(Propylamino)ethanol; 4-methoxy-1-butene; 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one; and 3,4-dimethylpyridine. Some of these were among those added as surrogates or spike standards as part ofthe Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. preparation ofthe extract of the HEPA filter media and are indicated as such in the data tables in Section 2, Results; other compounds found were not previously known to be present. The main inorganic species detected (sulfate, sodium, and sulfur) are also consistent with species added in the preparation of the methylene chloride extract of the high-efficiency particulate air sample.

  6. A Wash-Free Homogeneous Colorimetric Immunoassay Method

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiqiao; Rong, Pengfei; Jia, Hongwei; Yang, Jie; Dong, Bo; Dong, Qiong; Yang, Cejun; Hu, Pengzhi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Haitao; Liu, Dingbin

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and convenient biosensing platforms could be beneficial to timely diagnosis and treatment of diseases in virtually any care settings. Sandwich immunoassays, the most commonly used methods for protein detection, often rely on expensive tags such as enzyme and tedious wash and incubation procedures operated by skilled labor. In this report, we revolutionized traditional sandwich immunoassays by providing a wash-free homogeneous colorimetric immunoassay method without requirement of any separation steps. The proposed strategy was realized by controlling the growth of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to mediate the interparticle spacing in the protein-AuNP oligomers. We have demonstrated the successful in vitro detection of cancer biomarker in serum samples from patients with high clinical sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26722373

  7. Self-reported hand washing behaviors and foodborne illness: a propensity score matching approach.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mir M; Verrill, Linda; Zhang, Yuanting

    2014-03-01

    Hand washing is a simple and effective but easily overlooked way to reduce cross-contamination and the transmission of foodborne pathogens. In this study, we used the propensity score matching methodology to account for potential selection bias to explore our hypothesis that always washing hands before food preparation tasks is associated with a reduction in the probability of reported foodborne illness. Propensity score matching can simulate random assignment to a condition so that pretreatment observable differences between a treatment group and a control group are homogenous on all the covariates except the treatment variable. Using the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's 2010 Food Safety Survey, we estimated the effect of self-reported hand washing behavior on the probability of self-reported foodborne illness. Our results indicate that reported washing of hands with soap always before food preparation leads to a reduction in the probability of reported foodborne illness.

  8. Biokinetics of chlorpromazine in primary rat and human hepatocytes and human HepaRG cells after repeated exposure.

    PubMed

    Broeders, Jessica J W; Parmentier, Céline; Truisi, Germaine L; Jossé, Rozenn; Alexandre, Eliane; Savary, Camille C; Hewitt, Philip G; Mueller, Stefan O; Guillouzo, André; Richert, Lysiane; van Eijkeren, Jan C H; Hermens, Joop L M; Blaauboer, Bas J

    2015-12-25

    Since drug induced liver injury is difficult to predict in animal models, more representative tests are needed to better evaluate these effects in humans. Existing in vitro systems hold great potential to detect hepatotoxicity of pharmaceuticals. In this study, the in vitro biokinetics of the model hepatotoxicant chlorpromazine (CPZ) were evaluated in three different liver cell systems after repeated exposure in order to incorporate repeated-dose testing into an in vitro assay. Primary rat and human hepatocytes, cultured in sandwich configuration and the human HepaRG cell line were treated daily with CPZ for 14 days. Samples were taken from medium, cells and well plastic at specific time points after the first and last exposure. The samples were analysed by HPLC-UV to determine the amount of CPZ in these samples. Based on cytotoxicity assays, the three models were tested at 1-2 μM CPZ, while the primary rat hepatocytes and the HepaRG cell line were in addition exposed to a higher concentration of 15-20 μM. Overall, the mass balance of CPZ decreased in the course of 24 h, indicating the metabolism of the compound within the cells. The largest decrease in parent compound was seen in the primary cultures; in the HepaRG cell cultures the mass balance only decreased to 50%. CPZ accumulated in the cells during the 14-day repeated exposure. Possible explanations for the accumulation of CPZ are a decrease in metabolism over time, inhibition of efflux transporters or binding to phospholipids. The biokinetics of CPZ differed between the three liver cell models and were influenced by specific cell properties as well as culture conditions. These results support the conclusion that in vitro biokinetics data are necessary to better interpret chemical-induced cytotoxicity data.

  9. In Vivo Evaluation of a New Embolic Spherical Particle (HepaSphere) in a Kidney Animal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Luis, Esther de Bilbao, Jose I.; Ciercoles, Jose A. Garcia Jalon de; Martinez-Cuesta, Antonio; Martino Rodriguez, Alba de; Lozano, Maria D.

    2008-03-15

    HepaSphere is a new spherical embolic material developed in a dry state that absorbs fluids and adapts to the vessel wall, leaving no space between the particle and the arterial wall. The aim of this study was to elucidate the final in vivo size, deformation, final location, and main properties of the particles when reconstituted with two different contrast media (Iodixanol and Ioxaglate) in an animal model. Two sizes of 'dry-state' particles (50-100 and 150-200 {mu}m) were reconstituted using both ionic and nonionic contrast media. The mixture was used to partly embolize both kidneys in an animal model (14 pigs). The animals were sacrificed 4 weeks after the procedure and the samples processed. The final size of the particles was 230.2 {+-} 62.5 {mu}m for the 50- to 100-{mu}m dry-state particles and 314.4 {+-} 71 {mu}m for the 150- to 200-{mu}m dry-state particles. When the contrast medium (ionic versus nonionic) used for the reconstitution was studied to compare (Student's t-test) the final size of the particles, no differences were found (p > 0.05). The mean in vivo deformation for HepaSphere was 17.1% {+-} 12.3%. No differences (p > 0.05) were found in the deformation of the particle regarding the dry-state size or the contrast medium (Mann-Whitney test). We conclude that HepaSphere is stable, occludes perfectly, and morphologically adapts to the vessel lumen of the arteries embolized. There is no recanalization of the arteries 4 weeks after embolization. Its final in vivo size is predictable and the particle has the same properties in terms of size and deformation with the two different contrast media (Iodixanol and Ioxaglate)

  10. Disinfection potential of ozone, ultraviolet-C and their combination in wash water for the fresh-cut vegetable industry.

    PubMed

    Selma, María V; Allende, Ana; López-Gálvez, Francisco; Conesa, María A; Gil, María I

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the disinfection efficacy of ozone (O(3)) and UV-C illumination (UV), and their combination (O(3)-UV) for reducing microbial flora of fresh-cut onion, escarole, carrot, and spinach wash waters collected from the industry. Furthermore, the influence of water physicochemical parameters on the decontamination efficacy and the effect of these technologies on physicochemical quality of wash water were analyzed. O(3), UV, and O(3)-UV were effective disinfection treatments on vegetable wash water, with a maximum microbial reduction of 6.6 log CFU mL(-1) after 60 min treatment with O(3)-UV. However, maximum total microbial reductions achieved by UV and O(3) treatments after 60 min were 4.0 and 5.9 log CFU mL(-1), lower than by O(3)-UV treatment. Furthermore, turbidity of wash water was reduced significantly by O(3) and O(3)-UV treatments, while UV treatment did not affect the physicochemical quality of the water. Conclusions derived from this study illustrate that O(3) and O(3)-UV are alternatives to other sanitizers used in the fresh-cut washing processes. The use of these technologies would allow less frequent changing of spent water and the use of much lower sanitizer doses. Nevertheless, in specific applications such as carrot wash water, where levels of undesirable microbial and chemical constituents are lower than other vegetable wash water, UV treatment could be an appropriate treatment considering cost-effectiveness criteria.

  11. Hand washing promotion for preventing diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Ejemot-Nwadiaro, Regina I; Ehiri, John E; Arikpo, Dachi; Meremikwu, Martin M; Critchley, Julia A

    2015-01-01

    Background Diarrhoea accounts for 1.8 million deaths in children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). One of the identified strategies to prevent diarrhoea is hand washing. Objectives To assess the effects of hand washing promotion interventions on diarrhoeal episodes in children and adults. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register (27 May 2015); CENTRAL (published in the Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 5); MEDLINE (1966 to 27 May 2015); EMBASE (1974 to 27 May 2015); LILACS (1982 to 27 May 2015); PsycINFO (1967 to 27 May 2015); Science Citation Index and Social Science Citation Index (1981 to 27 May 2015); ERIC (1966 to 27 May 2015); SPECTR (2000 to 27 May 2015); Bibliomap (1990 to 27 May 2015); RoRe, The Grey Literature (2002 to 27 May 2015); World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trial Registry Platform (ICTRP), metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT), and reference lists of articles up to 27 May 2015. We also contacted researchers and organizations in the field. Selection criteria Individually randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-RCTs that compared the effects of hand washing interventions on diarrhoea episodes in children and adults with no intervention. Data collection and analysis Three review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We stratified the analyses for child day-care centres or schools, community, and hospital-based settings. Where appropriate, incidence rate ratios (IRR) were pooled using the generic inverse variance method and random-effects model with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We used the GRADE approach to assess the quality of evidence. Main results We included 22 RCTs: 12 trials from child day-care centres or schools in mainly high-income countries (54,006 participants), nine community-based trials in LMICs (15,303 participants), and one hospital-based trial among people with acquired immune deficiency

  12. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  13. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  14. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  15. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  16. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  17. 30 CFR 1206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.459 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 1206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  18. 30 CFR 1206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.459 Section... INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 1206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it...

  19. 30 CFR 206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 206.459 Section 206... MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b) When the...

  20. 30 CFR 1206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.459 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 1206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  1. 30 CFR 1206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.260 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 1206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  2. 30 CFR 1206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.260 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 1206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  3. 30 CFR 1206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.459 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 1206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  4. 30 CFR 1206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.260 Section... INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 1206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it...

  5. 30 CFR 1206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.260 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 1206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  6. 30 CFR 206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 206.260 Section 206... MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b) When the...

  7. Soil washing enhancement with solid sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    El-Shoubary, Y.M.; Woodmansee, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Soil washing is a dynamic, physical process that remediates contaminated soil through two mechanisms: particle size separation and transfer of the contaminant into the (mostly) liquid stream. The performance of different sorbents and additives to remove motor oil from sea sand was tested. Hydrocyclone, attrition scrubber, and froth flotation equipment were used for the decontamination study. Sorbents and additives were mixed with soils in the attrition scrubber prior to flotation. Sorbents used were granular activated carbon, powder activated carbon, and rubber tires. Chemical additives used were calcium hydroxide, sodium carbonate, Alconox{reg_sign}, Triton{reg_sign} X-100 and Triton{reg_sign} X-114. When a froth flotation run was performed using no additive, washed soils {open_quotes}tails{close_quotes} contained 4000 ppm of total oil and grease (TOG). However, when carbon or rubber (6% by weight) was added to the contaminated soils the washed soils {open_quotes}tails{close_quotes} contained 4000 ppm of total oil and grease (TOG). The addition of sodium carbonate or calcium hydroxide (6% by weight) had same effects as sorbents. In both cases washed soil {open_quotes}tails{close_quotes} contained total oil and grease of less than 1000 ppm. The use of these non-hazardous additives or sorbent can enhance the soil washing process and consequently saves on time (residence time in equipment design) required to achieve the target clean up levels. 18 refs., 12 figs.

  8. Wash-out of ambient air contaminations for breath measurements.

    PubMed

    Maurer, F; Wolf, A; Fink, T; Rittershofer, B; Heim, N; Volk, T; Baumbach, J I; Kreuer, S

    2014-06-01

    In breath analysis, ambient air contaminations are ubiquitous and difficult to eliminate. This study was designed to investigate the reduction of ambient air background by a lung wash-out with synthetic air. The reduction of the initial ambient air volatile organic compound (VOC) intensity was investigated in the breath of 20 volunteers inhaling synthetic air via a sealed full face mask in comparison to inhaling ambient air. Over a period of 30 minutes, breath analysis was conducted using ion mobility spectrometry coupled to a multi-capillary column. A total of 68 VOCs were identified for inhaling ambient air or inhaling synthetic air. By treatment with synthetic air, 39 VOCs decreased in intensity, whereas 29 increased in comparison to inhaling ambient air. In total, seven VOCs were significantly reduced (P-value < 0.05). A complete wash-out of VOCs in this setting was not observed, whereby a statistically significant reduction up to 65% as for terpinolene was achieved. Our setting successfully demonstrated a reduction of ambient air contaminations from the airways by a lung wash-out with synthetic air.

  9. Washing studies for PCP and creosote-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Tobia, R.J.; Camacho, J.M.; Augustin, P.; Griffiths, R.A.; Frederick, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency has conducted a series of bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to evaluate the feasibility of washing pentachlorophenol (PCP) and creosote from the soil at an abandoned wood-treatment Superfund site in Pensacola, FL. The high sand content and low silt/fines content of the soil made soil washing a promising alternative to incineration. The bench-scale tests confirmed the feasibility of washing the PCP and the carcinogenic creosote compounds from the soil using a nonionic surfactant at the pH of nine to ten and a water temperature of approximately 120 F. The target concentrations for total creosote were not achieved, but the results were sufficiently close to warrant further testing. The pilot-scale tests using the EPA's mobile Volume Reduction Unit produced residual PCP, carcinogenic creosote, and total creosote levels below the target levels. The tests also produced comparison data on the effects of surfactant concentration, pH, temperature, and liquid:solid ratio. (Copyright (c) 1994 Elsevier Science B.V.)

  10. Study of the effect of humidity, particle hygroscopicity and size on the mass loading capacity of HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.

    1992-09-01

    The effect of humidity, particle hygroscopicity and size on the mass loading capacity of glass fiber HEPA filters has been studied. At humidifies above the deliquescent point, the pressure drop across the HEPA filter increased non-linearly with the areal loading density (mass collected/filtration area) of NaCl aerosol, thus significantly reducing the mass loading capacity of the filter compared to dry hygroscopic or non-hygroscopic particle mass loadings. The specific cake resistance, K{sub 2}, has been computed for different test conditions and used as a measure of the mass loading capacity. K. was found to decrease with increasing humidity for the non-hygroscopic aluminum oxide particles and the hygroscopic NaCl particles (at humidities below the deliquescent point). It is postulated that an increase in humidity leads to the formation of a more open particulate cake which lowers the pressure drop for a given mass loading. A formula for predicting K{sub 2} for lognormally distributed aerosols (parameters obtained from impactor data) is derived. The resistance factor, R, calculated using this formula was compared to the theoretical R calculated using the Rudnick-Happel expression. For the non-hygroscopic aluminum oxide the agreement was good but for the hygroscopic sodium chloride, due to large variation in the cake porosity estimates, the agreement was poor.

  11. Study of the effect of humidity, particle hygroscopicity and size on the mass loading capacity of HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of humidity, particle hygroscopicity and size on the mass loading capacity of glass fiber HEPA filters has been studied. At humidifies above the deliquescent point, the pressure drop across the HEPA filter increased non-linearly with the areal loading density (mass collected/filtration area) of NaCl aerosol, thus significantly reducing the mass loading capacity of the filter compared to dry hygroscopic or non-hygroscopic particle mass loadings. The specific cake resistance, K{sub 2}, has been computed for different test conditions and used as a measure of the mass loading capacity. K. was found to decrease with increasing humidity for the non-hygroscopic aluminum oxide particles and the hygroscopic NaCl particles (at humidities below the deliquescent point). It is postulated that an increase in humidity leads to the formation of a more open particulate cake which lowers the pressure drop for a given mass loading. A formula for predicting K{sub 2} for lognormally distributed aerosols (parameters obtained from impactor data) is derived. The resistance factor, R, calculated using this formula was compared to the theoretical R calculated using the Rudnick-Happel expression. For the non-hygroscopic aluminum oxide the agreement was good but for the hygroscopic sodium chloride, due to large variation in the cake porosity estimates, the agreement was poor.

  12. Walking in the high-rise city: a Health Enhancement and Pedometer-determined Ambulatory (HEPA) program in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Leung, Angela Y M; Cheung, Mike K T; Tse, Michael A; Shum, Wai Chuen; Lancaster, B J; Lam, Cindy L K

    2014-01-01

    Due to the lack of good infrastructure in the public estates, many older adults in urban areas are sedentary. The Health Enhancement and Pedometer-Determined Ambulatory (HEPA) program was developed to assist older adults with diabetes and/or hypertension to acquire walking exercise habits and to build social support, while engaged in regular physical activity. This study aimed to describe the HEPA program and to report changes in participants' walking capacity and body strength after 10-week walking sessions. A pre- and postintervention design was used. Pedometers were used to measure the number of steps taken per day before and after the 10-week intervention. Upper and lower body strength, lower body flexibility, and quality of life were assessed. A total of 205 older adults completed the program and all health assessments. After the 10-week intervention, the average number of steps per day increased by 36%, from 6,591 to 8,934. Lower body strength, upper body strength, and aerobic fitness increased significantly after 10 weeks, along with improvement in the 12-item Short Form Health Survey (SF™-12) physical and mental health component summary scores. A social support network was built in the neighborhood, and the local environment was utilized to make walking possible and enjoyable.

  13. Walking in the high-rise city: a Health Enhancement and Pedometer-determined Ambulatory (HEPA) program in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Angela YM; Cheung, Mike KT; Tse, Michael A; Shum, Wai Chuen; Lancaster, BJ; Lam, Cindy LK

    2014-01-01

    Due to the lack of good infrastructure in the public estates, many older adults in urban areas are sedentary. The Health Enhancement and Pedometer-Determined Ambulatory (HEPA) program was developed to assist older adults with diabetes and/or hypertension to acquire walking exercise habits and to build social support, while engaged in regular physical activity. This study aimed to describe the HEPA program and to report changes in participants’ walking capacity and body strength after 10-week walking sessions. A pre- and postintervention design was used. Pedometers were used to measure the number of steps taken per day before and after the 10-week intervention. Upper and lower body strength, lower body flexibility, and quality of life were assessed. A total of 205 older adults completed the program and all health assessments. After the 10-week intervention, the average number of steps per day increased by 36%, from 6,591 to 8,934. Lower body strength, upper body strength, and aerobic fitness increased significantly after 10 weeks, along with improvement in the 12-item Short Form Health Survey (SF™-12) physical and mental health component summary scores. A social support network was built in the neighborhood, and the local environment was utilized to make walking possible and enjoyable. PMID:25170259

  14. Solutions for Dioctyl Phthalate (DOP) tested high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters destined for disposal at Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Gablin, K.A.

    1992-11-01

    In January 1992, Argonne National Laboratory East, Environmental and Waste Management Program, learned that a chemical material used for testing of all HEPA filters at the primary source, Flanders Filter, Inc. in Washington, NC, was considered a hazardous chemical by Washington State Dangerous Waste Regulations. These regulations are under the jurisdiction of the Washington Administration Code, Chapter 173-303, and therefore directly under impact the Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria. Dioctyl Phthalate, DOP'' as it is referred to in chemical abbreviation form, is added in small test quantities at the factory, at three Department of Energy (DOE) operated HEPA filter test facilities, and in the installed duct work at various operating laboratories or production facilities. When small amounts of radioactivity are added to the filter media in operation, the result is a mixed waste. This definition would normally only develop in the state of Washington since their acceptance criteria is ten times more stringent then the US Environmental Protection Agencys' (US EPA). Methods of Processing will be discussed, which will include detoxification, physical separation, heat and vacuum separation, and compaction. The economic impact of a mixed waste definition in the State of Washington, and an Low Level Waste (LLW) definition in other locations, may lend this product to be a prime candidate for commercial disposal in the future, or a possible de-listing by the State of Washington.

  15. Solutions for Dioctyl Phthalate (DOP) tested high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters destined for disposal at Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Gablin, K.A.

    1992-11-01

    In January 1992, Argonne National Laboratory East, Environmental and Waste Management Program, learned that a chemical material used for testing of all HEPA filters at the primary source, Flanders Filter, Inc. in Washington, NC, was considered a hazardous chemical by Washington State Dangerous Waste Regulations. These regulations are under the jurisdiction of the Washington Administration Code, Chapter 173-303, and therefore directly under impact the Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria. Dioctyl Phthalate, ``DOP`` as it is referred to in chemical abbreviation form, is added in small test quantities at the factory, at three Department of Energy (DOE) operated HEPA filter test facilities, and in the installed duct work at various operating laboratories or production facilities. When small amounts of radioactivity are added to the filter media in operation, the result is a mixed waste. This definition would normally only develop in the state of Washington since their acceptance criteria is ten times more stringent then the US Environmental Protection Agencys` (US EPA). Methods of Processing will be discussed, which will include detoxification, physical separation, heat and vacuum separation, and compaction. The economic impact of a mixed waste definition in the State of Washington, and an Low Level Waste (LLW) definition in other locations, may lend this product to be a prime candidate for commercial disposal in the future, or a possible de-listing by the State of Washington.

  16. Kinetics Studies in a Washing Bottle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teggins, John; Mahaffy, Chris

    1997-05-01

    The kinetics of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide using iodide ion in aqueous solution is studied in sealed completely-filled washing bottles. Oxygen gas produced by the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide forces liquid out of a bottom feeding washing bottle. After an initiation period of a few minutes at room temperature, the rate at which the liquid is expelled from the spout of the of the washing bottle stabilizes. A comparison of the rates for different reaction concentrations results in a rate law that is approximately first-order with respect to both hydrogen peroxide and iodide concentrations. Because the need for a gas buret to measure oxygen volumes is not necessary, the experiment can be conveniently performed by a student seated in a wheelchair.

  17. Lead removal via soil washing and leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H. K.; Man, X. D.; Walsh, D. E.

    2001-12-01

    A soil washing and leaching process was tested for removing lead from soils. A soil-washing circuit, including size and gravity separations, was employed to remove the coarse metallic lead particles, while the leaching was applied to remove fine metallic lead particles and other lead species. The soil-washing tests proved that the metallic lead particles larger than 0.15 mm (100 mesh) could be effectively removed. The sodium-chloride-based leaching solution with ferric chloride or sodium hypochlorite as oxidants was adopted in the leaching. The leaching experimental results indicated that under the pH of 2 and Eh of 1,300 mV, the metallic lead particles smaller than 0.15 mm and other lead species can be dissolved in the leaching solution within 60 minutes.

  18. The integration of innovative technologies into a physical-separation-based soil washing system

    SciTech Connect

    Krstich, M.A.

    1995-11-01

    An innovative system`s approach to the treatment of soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has been proposed to effectively and cost competitively treat a significant mass of soil. The use of an integrated soil treatment system to decontaminate FEMP soils is a unique application of the soil washing technology. Due to the unfavorable soil particle size distribution and the ubiquitous distribution of uranium among these particle size fractions, conventional soil washing processes commonly used on predominantly sandy soils alone may not achieve the desirable waste minimization level without the inclusion of innovative technologies. This objective of this paper is to briefly describe the physical separation and chemical extraction process commonly used in soil washing operation and to present the baseline soil washing approach used on FEMP soils. Noting the successful and not-so-successful processes within the soil washing operation at the FEMP, a proposed innovative system`s approach to treating FEMP soils will be described. This system`s approach will integrate a conventional soil washing operation with proposed innovative technologies.

  19. Microfiber Masses Recovered from Conventional Machine Washing of New or Aged Garments.

    PubMed

    Hartline, Niko L; Bruce, Nicholas J; Karba, Stephanie N; Ruff, Elizabeth O; Sonar, Shreya U; Holden, Patricia A

    2016-11-01

    Synthetic textiles can shed numerous microfibers during conventional washing, but evaluating environmental consequences as well as source-control strategies requires understanding mass releases. Polyester apparel accounts for a large proportion of the polyester market, and synthetic jackets represent the broadest range in apparel construction, allowing for potential changes in manufacturing as a mitigation measure to reduce microfiber release during laundering. Here, detergent-free washing experiments were conducted and replicated in both front- and top-load conventional home machines for five new and mechanically aged jackets or sweaters: four from one name-brand clothing manufacturer (three majority polyester fleece, and one nylon shell with nonwoven polyester insulation) and one off-brand (100% polyester fleece). Wash water was filtered to recover two size fractions (>333 μm and between 20 and 333 μm); filters were then imaged, and microfiber masses were calculated. Across all treatments, the recovered microfiber mass per garment ranged from approximately 0 to 2 g, or exceeding 0.3% of the unwashed garment mass. Microfiber masses from top-load machines were approximately 7 times those from front-load machines; garments mechanically aged via a 24 h continuous wash had increased mass release under the same wash protocol as new garments. When published wastewater treatment plant influent characterization and microfiber removal studies are considered, washing synthetic jackets or sweaters as per this study would account for most microfibers entering the environment.

  20. Hand washing compliance among retail food establishment workers in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Allwood, Paul B; Jenkins, Timothy; Paulus, Colleen; Johnson, Lars; Hedberg, Craig W

    2004-12-01

    Inadequate hand washing by food workers is an important contributing factor to foodborne disease outbreaks in retail food establishments (RFEs). We conducted a survey of RFEs to investigate the effect of hand washing training, availability of hand washing facilities, and the ability of the person in charge (PIC) to describe hand washing according to the Minnesota Food Code (food code) on workers' ability to demonstrate food code-compliant hand washing. Only 52% of the PICs could describe the hand washing procedure outlined in the food code, and only 48% of workers could demonstrate code-compliant hand washing. The most common problems observed were failure to wash for 20 s and failure to use a fingernail brush. There was a strong positive association between the PIC being a certified food manager and being able to describe the food code hand washing procedure (odds ratio [OR], 5.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2 to 13.7), and there was an even stronger association between the PIC being able to describe hand washing and workers being able to demonstrate code-compliant hand washing (OR, 15; 95% CI, 6 to 37). Significant associations were detected among correct hand washing demonstration, physical infrastructure for hand washing, and the hand washing training methods used by the establishment. However, the principal determinant of successful hand washing demonstration was the PIC's ability to describe proper hand washing procedure. These results suggest that improving hand washing practices among food workers will require interventions that address PIC knowledge of hand washing requirement and procedure and the development and implementation of effective hand washing training methods.

  1. Prototype wash water renovation system integration with government-furnished wash fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The requirements of a significant quantity of proposed life sciences experiments in Shuttle payloads for available wash water to support cleansing operations has provided the incentive to develop a technique for wash water renovation. A prototype wash water waste renovation system which has the capability to process the waste water and return it to a state adequate for reuse in a typical cleansing fixture designed to support life science experiments was investigated. The resulting technology is to support other developments efforts pertaining to water reclamation by serving as a pretreatment step for subsequent reclamation procedures.

  2. SOIL-WASHING TECHNOLOGY AND PRACTICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil washing in the United States has been studied and evaluated with increasing thoroughness during the last 15 to 20 years. It is now entering a phase of actual use and acceptance as its applicability and economics become clearer. This paper reviews the principles behind soil...

  3. An Alternative Antimicrobial Commercial Egg Washing Procedure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Presently, commercial eggs are washed with water containing an alkali detergent at approximately pH 11 followed by a chlorine rinse. At this pH, it is likely that there is little, if any, free chlorine in the final rinse to act as an antimicrobial against pathogens like Salmonella. Using a chlorine ...

  4. EVALUATION OF THE BIOGENESIS SOIL WASHING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The BioGenesis Enterprises, Inc. (BioGenesis) soil washing technology was demonstrated as part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program in November 1992. The demonstration was conducted over three days at a petrol...

  5. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: BIOGENESIS SOIL WASHING TECHNOLOGY - BIOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The BioGenesisSM soil washing technology was developed by BioGenesis Enterprises, Inc. to remove organic compounds from soil. The technology uses a proprietary solution (BioGenesisSM cleaner) to transfer organic compounds from the soil matrix to a liquid phase. BioGenesis claims...

  6. What Happens at a Car Wash?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallick, Barbara; Lee, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    A class of 3- to 5-year-old children in a child care center in the midwestern United States chose to study a car wash as a group project. This article discusses how the project evolved, describes the three phases of the project, and provides the teachers' reflections on the project. Photos taken during the project and children's sketches are…

  7. Reliability and Validity of the SE-HEPA: Examining Physical Activity- and Healthy Eating-Specific Self-Efficacy among a Sample of Preadolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Michael M.; Burns, Leonard G.; Whitaker, Brandi N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the self-efficacy for healthy eating and physical activity measure (SE-HEPA) for preadolescents. Method. The reliability of the measure was examined to determine if the internal consistency of the measure was adequate (i.e., [alpha]s greater than 0.70). Next, in an…

  8. The behavior of silver nanotextiles during washing.

    PubMed

    Geranio, L; Heuberger, M; Nowack, B

    2009-11-01

    The widespread use of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) in commercial products, especially textiles, will likely result in an unknown spread of Ag into the environment. The quantification and characterization of the Ag released from nano-Ag-products is an important parameter needed to predict the effect of Ag-NPs on the environment. The aim of this study was to determine the amount and the form of Ag released during washing from nine fabrics with different ways of silver incorporation into or onto the fibers. The effect of pH, surfactants, and oxidizing agents was evaluated. The results show that little dissolution of Ag-NPs occurs under conditions relevant to washing (pH 10) with dissolved concentrations 10 times lower than at pH 7. However, bleaching agents such as hydrogen peroxide or peracetic acid (formed by the perborate/TAED system) can greatly accelerate the dissolution of Ag. The amount and form of Ag released from the fabrics as ionic and particulate Ag depended on the type of Ag-incorporation into the textile. The percentage of the total silver emitted during one washing of the textiles varied considerably among products (from less than 1 to 45%). In the washing machine the majority of the Ag (at least 50% but mostly >75%) was released in the size fraction >450 nm, indicating the dominant role of mechanical stress. A conventional silver textile did not show any significant difference in the size distribution of the released silver compared to many of the textiles containing nano-Ag. These results have important implications for the risk assessment of Ag-textiles and also for environmental fate studies of nano-Ag, because they show that under conditions relevant to washing, primarily coarse Ag-containing particles are released.

  9. A Novel Glycinate-based Body Wash

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Jamie; Ananthapadmanabhan, K.P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the properties of a novel body wash containing the mild surfactant glycinate. Design: Biochemical and clinical assays. Setting: Research laboratories and clinical sites in the United States and Canada. Participants: Women 18 to 65 years of age (cleansing efficacy); male and female subjects 26 to 63 years of age with mild or moderate dryness and erythema (leg-controlled application test); subjects 5 to 65 years of age with mild-to-moderate eczema (eczema compatibility); and women 18 to 64 years of age (home use). Measurements: Assessments across studies included colorimetric dye exclusion to assess skin damage potential (corneosurfametry), efficacy of cosmetic product removal from skin, change from baseline in visual dryness, change from baseline in Eczema Area and Severity Index, and self-perceived eczema attributes and self-reported product preference. Results: The glycinate-based cleanser demonstrated mildness to skin components when evaluated in a corneosurfametry assay. Short-term use under exaggerated wash conditions in subjects with dryness scores <3 and erythema scores <2 (both on a 0-6 scale) indicated an initial reduction in visual dryness. In subjects with eczema, normal use resulted in significant improvements (p<0.05) at Week 4 compared with baseline in skin dryness (change from baseline = −0.73), rash (−0.56), itch (−0.927), tightness (−0.585), and all eczema (−0.756). The glycinate-based body wash removed 56 percent of a long-lasting cosmetic foundation from skin compared with less than 30 percent removed by two competitive products tested. The glycinate-based body wash was preferred over a competitive mild cleansing product overall. Conclusion: The patented glycinate-containing body wash demonstrated better product mildness and patient-preferred attributes and clinical benefits. PMID:23882306

  10. Automated detection of hepatotoxic compounds in human hepatocytes using HepaRG cells and image-based analysis of mitochondrial dysfunction with JC-1 dye

    SciTech Connect

    Pernelle, K.; Le Guevel, R.; Glaise, D.; Stasio, C. Gaucher-Di; Le Charpentier, T.; Bouaita, B.; Corlu, A.; Guguen-Guillouzo, C.

    2011-08-01

    In this study, our goal was to develop an efficient in situ test adapted to screen hepatotoxicity of various chemicals, a process which remains challenging during the early phase of drug development. The test was based on functional human hepatocytes using the HepaRG cell line, and automation of quantitative fluorescence microscopy coupled with automated imaging analysis. Differentiated HepaRG cells express most of the specific liver functions at levels close to those found in primary human hepatocytes, including detoxifying enzymes and drug transporters. A triparametric analysis was first used to evaluate hepatocyte purity and differentiation status, mainly detoxication capacity of cells before toxicity testing. We demonstrated that culturing HepaRG cells at high density maintained high hepatocyte purity and differentiation level. Moreover, evidence was found that isolating hepatocytes from 2-week-old confluent cultures limited variations associated with an ageing process occurring over time in confluent cells. Then, we designed a toxicity test based on detection of early mitochondrial depolarisation associated with permeability transition (MPT) pore opening, using JC-1 as a metachromatic fluorescent dye. Maximal dye dimerization that would have been strongly hampered by efficient efflux due to the active, multidrug-resistant (MDR) pump was overcome by coupling JC-1 with the MDR inhibitor verapamil. Specificity of this test was demonstrated and its usefulness appeared directly dependent on conditions supporting hepatic cell competence. This new hepatotoxicity test adapted to automated, image-based detection should be useful to evaluate the early MPT event common to cell apoptosis and necrosis and simultaneously to detect involvement of the multidrug resistant pump with target drugs in a human hepatocyte environment. - Highlights: > We define conditions to preserve differentiation of selective pure HepaRG hepatocyte cultures. > In these conditions, CYPs

  11. 16 CFR 1630.62 - Wool flokati carpets and rugs-alternative washing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... carpet or rug has had a fire-retardant treatment, or is made of fibers which have had a fire-retardant treatment, the sample or oversized specimens thereof selected for testing under the standard shall be washed... or Brushing While Damp This flokati carpet or rug has been treated with a flame retardant....

  12. 16 CFR 1631.62 - Wool flokati carpets and rugs-alternative washing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... carpet or rug has had a fire-retardant treatment, or is made of fibers which have had a fire-retardant treatment, the sample or oversized specimens thereof selected for testing under the standard shall be washed... or Brushing While Damp This Flokati carpet or rug has been treated with a flame retardant....

  13. 16 CFR 1631.62 - Wool flokati carpets and rugs-alternative washing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... carpet or rug has had a fire-retardant treatment, or is made of fibers which have had a fire-retardant treatment, the sample or oversized specimens thereof selected for testing under the standard shall be washed... or Brushing While Damp This Flokati carpet or rug has been treated with a flame retardant....

  14. 16 CFR 1631.62 - Wool flokati carpets and rugs-alternative washing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... carpet or rug has had a fire-retardant treatment, or is made of fibers which have had a fire-retardant treatment, the sample or oversized specimens thereof selected for testing under the standard shall be washed... or Brushing While Damp This Flokati carpet or rug has been treated with a flame retardant....

  15. 16 CFR 1630.62 - Wool flokati carpets and rugs-alternative washing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... carpet or rug has had a fire-retardant treatment, or is made of fibers which have had a fire-retardant treatment, the sample or oversized specimens thereof selected for testing under the standard shall be washed... or Brushing While Damp This flokati carpet or rug has been treated with a flame retardant....

  16. 16 CFR 1630.62 - Wool flokati carpets and rugs-alternative washing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... carpet or rug has had a fire-retardant treatment, or is made of fibers which have had a fire-retardant treatment, the sample or oversized specimens thereof selected for testing under the standard shall be washed... or Brushing While Damp This flokati carpet or rug has been treated with a flame retardant....

  17. Interactions of endosulfan and methoxychlor involving CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 in human HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Savary, Camille C; Jossé, Rozenn; Bruyère, Arnaud; Guillet, Fabrice; Robin, Marie-Anne; Guillouzo, André

    2014-08-01

    Humans are usually exposed to several pesticides simultaneously; consequently, combined actions between pesticides themselves or between pesticides and other chemicals need to be addressed in the risk assessment. Many pesticides are efficient activators of pregnane X receptor (PXR) and/or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), two major nuclear receptors that are also activated by other substrates. In the present work, we searched for interactions between endosulfan and methoxychlor, two organochlorine pesticides whose major routes of metabolism involve CAR- and PXR-regulated CYP3A4 and CYP2B6, and whose mechanisms of action in humans remain poorly understood. For this purpose, HepaRG cells were treated with both pesticides separately or in mixture for 24 hours or 2 weeks at concentrations relevant to human exposure levels. In combination they exerted synergistic cytotoxic effects. Whatever the duration of treatment, both compounds increased CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 mRNA levels while differently affecting their corresponding activities. Endosulfan exerted a direct reversible inhibition of CYP3A4 activity that was confirmed in human liver microsomes. By contrast, methoxychlor induced this activity. The effects of the mixture on CYP3A4 activity were equal to the sum of those of each individual compound, suggesting an additive effect of each pesticide. Despite CYP2B6 activity being unchanged and increased with endosulfan and methoxychlor, respectively, no change was observed with their mixture, supporting an antagonistic effect. Altogether, our data suggest that CAR and PXR activators endosulfan and methoxychlor can interact together and with other exogenous substrates in human hepatocytes. Their effects on CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 activities could have important consequences if extrapolated to the in vivo situation.

  18. EPA SITE demonstration of the BioTrol soil washing process.

    PubMed

    Stinson, M K; Skovronek, H S; Ellis, W D

    1992-01-01

    A pilot-scale soil washing process, patented by BioTrol, Inc., was demonstrated on soil contaminated by wood treating waste, primarily pentachlorophenol (PCP) and creosote-derived polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although soil washing was the main object of this demonstration, the treatment train that was evaluated included two other BioTrol technologies for treatment of waste streams from the soil washer. The three technologies were: The BioTrol Soil Washer (BSW)--a volume reduction process, which uses water to separate contaminated soil fractions from the bulk of the soil. The BioTrol Aqueous Treatment System (BATS)--a biological water treatment process. The Slurry Bioreactor (SBR)--a BioTrol biological slurry treatment process conducted in an EIMCO BIOLIFT reactor. The sandy soil at the site, consisting of less than 10 percent of fines, was well suited for treatment by soil washing. The soil washer was evaluated in two tests on soil samples containing 130 ppm and 680 ppm of PCP, respectively. The BSW successfully separated the feed soil (dry weight basis) into 83 percent of washed soil, 10 percent of woody residues, and 7 percent of fines. The washed soil retained about 10 percent of the feed soil contamination while 90 percent of the feed soil contamination was contained within the woody residues, fines, and process water. The soil washer achieved up to 89 percent removal of PCP and 88 percent of total PAHs, based on the difference between their levels in the as-is (wet) feed soil and the washed soil.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Food worker hand washing practices: an observation study.

    PubMed

    Green, Laura R; Selman, Carol A; Radke, Vincent; Ripley, Danny; Mack, James C; Reimann, David W; Stigger, Tammi; Motsinger, Michelle; Bushnell, Lisa

    2006-10-01

    Improvement of food worker hand washing practices is critical to the reduction of foodborne illness and is dependent upon a clear understanding of current hand washing practices. To that end, this study collected detailed observational data on food worker hand washing practices. Food workers (n = 321) were observed preparing food, and data were recorded on specific work activities for which hand washing is recommended (e.g., food preparation, handling dirty equipment). Data were also recorded on hand washing behaviors that occurred in conjunction with these work activities. Results indicated that workers engaged in approximately 8.6 work activities per hour for which hand washing is recommended. However, workers made hand washing attempts (i.e., removed gloves, if worn, and placed hands in running water) in only 32% of these activities and washed their hands appropriately (i.e., removed gloves, if worn, placed hands in running water, used soap, and dried hands) in only 27% of these work activities. Attempted and appropriate hand washing rates varied by work activity--they were significantly higher in conjunction with food preparation than other work activities (46 versus < or = 37% for attempted hand washing; 41 versus < or = 30% for appropriate hand washing) and were significantly lower in conjunction with touching the body than other work activities (13 versus > or = 27% for attempted hand washing; 10 versus > or = 23% for appropriate hand washing). Attempted and appropriate hand washing rates were significantly lower when gloves were worn (18 and 16%) than when gloves were not worn (37 and 30%). These findings suggest that the hand washing practices of food workers need to be improved, glove use may reduce hand washing, and restaurants should consider reorganizing their food preparation activities to reduce the frequency with which hand washing is needed.

  20. DIFFERENTIAL REGULATION OF POLYSOME mRNA LEVELS IN MOUSE HEPA-1C1C7 CELLS EXPOSED TO DIOXIN

    PubMed Central

    Thornley, Jessica A.; Trask, Heidi W.; Ridley, Christian J. A.; Korc, Murray; Gui, Jiang; Ringelberg, Carol S.; Wang, Sinny; Tomlinson, Craig R.

    2011-01-01

    The environmental agent 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD or dioxin) causes a multitude of human illnesses. In order to more fully understand the underlying biology of TCDD toxicity, we tested the hypothesis that new candidate genes could be identified using polysome RNA from TCDD-treated mouse Hepa-1c1c7 cells. We found that (i) differentially expressed whole cell and cytoplasm RNA levels are both poor predictors of polysome RNA levels; (ii) for a majority of RNAs, differential RNA levels are regulated independently in the nucleus, cytoplasm, and polysomes; (iii) for the remaining polysome RNAs, levels are regulated via several different mechanisms, including a “tagging” of mRNAs in the nucleus for immediate polysome entry; and (iv) most importantly, a gene list derived from differentially expressed polysome RNA generated new genes and cell pathways potentially related to TCDD biology. PMID:21570461

  1. The Impacts of Traffic-Related and Woodsmoke Particulate Matter on Measures of Cardiovascular Health: A HEPA Filter Intervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Kajbafzadeh, Majid; Brauer, Michael; Karlen, Barbara; Carlsten, Chris; van Eeden, Stephan; Allen, Ryan W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Combustion-generated fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is associated with cardiovascular morbidity. Both traffic-related air pollution and residential wood combustion may be important, but few studies have compared their impacts. Objectives To assess and compare effects of traffic-related and woodsmoke PM2.5 on endothelial function and systemic inflammation (C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and band cells) among healthy adults in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada using high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration to introduce indoor PM2.5 exposure gradients. Methods We recruited 83 healthy adults from 44 homes in traffic- or woodsmoke-impacted areas to participate in this randomized, single-blind crossover intervention study. PM2.5 concentrations were measured during two consecutive 7-day periods, one with filtration and the other with “placebo filtration”. Endothelial function and biomarkers of systematic inflammation were measured at the end of each 7-day period. Results HEPA filtration was associated with a 40% decrease in indoor PM2.5 concentrations. There was no relationship between PM2.5 exposure and endothelial function. There was evidence of an association between indoor PM2.5 and C-reactive protein among those in traffic-impacted locations [42.1% increase in C-reactive protein per interquartile range increase in indoor PM2.5, 95% CI, 1.2 to 99.5] but not among those in woodsmoke-impacted locations. There were no associations with interleukin-6 or band cells. Conclusions Evidence of an association between C-reactive protein and indoor PM2.5 among healthy adults in traffic-impacted areas is consistent with the hypothesis that traffic-related particles, even at relatively low concentrations, play an important role in the cardiovascular effects of the urban PM mixture. Trial registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01570062) PMID:25896330

  2. Tailored liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis improves the coverage of the intracellular metabolome of HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Cuykx, Matthias; Negreira, Noelia; Beirnaert, Charlie; Van den Eede, Nele; Rodrigues, Robim; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Laukens, Kris; Covaci, Adrian

    2017-03-03

    Metabolomics protocols are often combined with Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) using mostly reversed phase chromatography coupled to accurate mass spectrometry, e.g. quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometers to measure as many metabolites as possible. In this study, we optimised the LC-MS separation of cell extracts after fractionation in polar and non-polar fractions. Both phases were analysed separately in a tailored approach in four different runs (two for the non-polar and two for the polar-fraction), each of them specifically adapted to improve the separation of the metabolites present in the extract. This approach improves the coverage of a broad range of the metabolome of the HepaRG cells and the separation of intra-class metabolites. The non-polar fraction was analysed using a C18-column with end-capping, mobile phase compositions were specifically adapted for each ionisation mode using different co-solvents and buffers. The polar extracts were analysed with a mixed mode Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography (HILIC) system. Acidic metabolites from glycolysis and the Krebs cycle, together with phosphorylated compounds, were best detected with a method using ion pairing (IP) with tributylamine and separation on a phenyl-hexyl column. Accurate mass detection was performed with the QTOF in MS-mode only using an extended dynamic range to improve the quality of the dataset. Parameters with the greatest impact on the detection were the balance between mass accuracy and linear range, the fragmentor voltage, the capillary voltage, the nozzle voltage, and the nebuliser pressure. By using a tailored approach for the intracellular HepaRG metabolome, consisting of three different LC techniques, over 2200 metabolites can be measured with a high precision and acceptable linear range. The developed method is suited for qualitative untargeted LC-MS metabolomics studies.

  3. Translational control plays a prominent role in the hepatocytic differentiation of HepaRG liver progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Romain; Beretta, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Background We investigated the molecular events associated with the differentiation of liver progenitor cells into functional and polarized hepatocytes, using human HepaRG cells that display potent hepatocytic differentiation-inducible properties and share some features with liver progenitor cells. Results Profiling of total and of polysome-bound transcripts isolated from HepaRG cells undergoing hepatocytic differentiation was performed. A group of 3,071 probe sets was reproducibly regulated by at least 2-fold in total or in polysome-bound RNA populations, upon differentiation. The fold changes in the total and the polysome-bound RNA populations for these 3,071 probe sets were poorly correlated (R = 0.38). Moreover, while the majority of the regulated polysome-bound RNA probe sets were up-regulated upon differentiation, the majority of the regulated probe sets selected from the total RNA population was down-regulated. Genes translationally up-regulated were associated with cell cycle inhibition, increased susceptibility to apoptosis and innate immunity. In contrast, genes transcriptionally up-regulated during differentiation corresponded in the majority to liver-enriched transcripts involved in lipid homeostasis and drug metabolism. Finally, several epithelial and hepato-specific transcripts were strongly induced in the total RNA population but were translationally repressed. Conclusion Translational regulation is the main genomic event associated with hepatocytic differentiation of liver progenitor cells in vitro and targets genes critical for moderating hepatocellular growth, cell death and susceptibility to pathogens. Transcriptional regulation targets specifically liver-enriched transcripts vital for establishing normal hepatic energy homeostasis, cell morphology and polarization. The hepatocytic differentiation is also accompanied by a reduction of the transcript content complexity. PMID:18221535

  4. 6. GENE WASH DAM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. SURVEY REFLECTOR IN FOREGROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. GENE WASH DAM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. SURVEY REFLECTOR IN FOREGROUND FOR MONITORING MOVEMENT OF DAM AND EARTH. - Gene Wash Reservoir & Dam, 2 miles west of Parker Dam, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  5. Why Is Hand Washing So Important? (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Why Is Hand Washing So Important? KidsHealth > For Parents > Why Is ... and most types of infectious diarrhea . continue Washing Hands Correctly Here's how to scrub those germs away. ...

  6. 4. AERIAL VIEW OF GENE WASH RESERVOIR AND GENE CAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERIAL VIEW OF GENE WASH RESERVOIR AND GENE CAMP LOOKING SOUTHWEST. DAM AND SPILLWAY VISIBLE IN BOTTOM OF PHOTO. - Gene Wash Reservoir & Dam, 2 miles west of Parker Dam, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  7. 21 CFR 211.52 - Washing and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... § 211.52 Washing and toilet facilities. Adequate washing facilities shall be provided, including hot and cold water, soap or detergent, air driers or single-service towels, and clean toilet facilities...

  8. 21 CFR 211.52 - Washing and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... § 211.52 Washing and toilet facilities. Adequate washing facilities shall be provided, including hot and cold water, soap or detergent, air driers or single-service towels, and clean toilet facilities...

  9. Washing of the AN-107 entrained solids

    SciTech Connect

    GJ Lumetta; FV Hoopes

    2000-03-31

    This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing on the composition of the entrained solids in the diluted AN-107 low-activity waste (LAW) sample. The objective of this work was to gather data on the solubility of the AN-107 entrained solids in 0.01 M NaOH, so that BNFL can evaluate whether these solids require caustic leaching.

  10. Modelling the wash from a ship's propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewster, Paul Michael

    The characteristics of the velocity field produced by a ship's propeller were investigated using a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software package. A CFD model of the propeller wash was developed using a sliding mesh technique to simulate the rotating blades of the propeller. Experimental measurements using Laser Doppler Anemometry and Pitot tube methods were used to validate the computational approach. Measurements and predictions of the axial and radial velocity fields for two propellers operating over a range of speeds were used in the validation. The results from the CFD simulation are in reasonable agreement. However, improvements to the approach used to model the turbulence in the flow may lead to a more accurate simulation. The validated CFD approach is used to investigate the propeller wash where an experimental study has been difficult or impossible to undertake. The velocity field close to the rotating blades was found to exhibit a pulsing behaviour. The characteristics of the pulsing are related to the speed of rotation and the geometrical characteristics of the rotating propeller. The tangential velocity field was found to be more prominent in the wash than the radial component of velocity. However, the axial component of velocity is the largest contributor to the resultant velocity field in the propeller wash. The formation of the tangential velocity field is related to the geometrical characteristics of the rotating blades. The diffusion characteristics of the tangential velocity field appear to be influenced by the behaviour of the axial velocity field. The maximum tangential velocity decays exponentially. The simulation of a full-size propeller was used to verify the scaling approach adopted for previous experimental investigations. The results indicated that scale effects due to viscosity were negligible, and the use of Froudian scaling for the experimental investigations was justified.

  11. Ceramic wash-coat for catalyst support

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Subramanian, Ramesh; Sabol, Stephen M.

    2012-08-14

    A wash-coat (16) for use as a support for an active catalyst species (18) and a catalytic combustor component (10) incorporating such wash-coat. The wash-coat is a solid solution of alumina or alumina-based material (Al.sub.2O.sub.3-0-3 wt % La.sub.2O.sub.3) and a further oxide exhibiting a coefficient of thermal expansion that is lower than that exhibited by alumina. The further oxide may be silicon dioxide (2-30 wt % SiO.sub.2), zirconia silicate (2-30 wt % ZrSiO.sub.4), neodymium oxide (0-4 wt %), titania (Al.sub.2O.sub.3-3-40% TiO.sub.2) or alumina-based magnesium aluminate spinel (Al.sub.2O.sub.3-25 wt % MgO) in various embodiments. The active catalyst species may be palladium and a second metal in a concentration of 10-50% of the concentration of the palladium.

  12. Bacterial Exchange in Household Washing Machines.

    PubMed

    Callewaert, Chris; Van Nevel, Sam; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Granitsiotis, Michael S; Boon, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Household washing machines (WMs) launder soiled clothes and textiles, but do not sterilize them. We investigated the microbial exchange occurring in five household WMs. Samples from a new cotton T-shirt were laundered together with a normal laundry load. Analyses were performed on the influent water and the ingoing cotton samples, as well as the greywater and the washed cotton samples. The number of living bacteria was generally not lower in the WM effluent water as compared to the influent water. The laundering process caused a microbial exchange of influent water bacteria, skin-, and clothes-related bacteria and biofilm-related bacteria in the WM. A variety of biofilm-producing bacteria were enriched in the effluent after laundering, although their presence in the cotton sample was low. Nearly all bacterial genera detected on the initial cotton sample were still present in the washed cotton samples. A selection for typical skin- and clothes-related microbial species occurred in the cotton samples after laundering. Accordingly, malodour-causing microbial species might be further distributed to other clothes. The bacteria on the ingoing textiles contributed for a large part to the microbiome found in the textiles after laundering.

  13. Bacterial Exchange in Household Washing Machines

    PubMed Central

    Callewaert, Chris; Van Nevel, Sam; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Granitsiotis, Michael S.; Boon, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Household washing machines (WMs) launder soiled clothes and textiles, but do not sterilize them. We investigated the microbial exchange occurring in five household WMs. Samples from a new cotton T-shirt were laundered together with a normal laundry load. Analyses were performed on the influent water and the ingoing cotton samples, as well as the greywater and the washed cotton samples. The number of living bacteria was generally not lower in the WM effluent water as compared to the influent water. The laundering process caused a microbial exchange of influent water bacteria, skin-, and clothes-related bacteria and biofilm-related bacteria in the WM. A variety of biofilm-producing bacteria were enriched in the effluent after laundering, although their presence in the cotton sample was low. Nearly all bacterial genera detected on the initial cotton sample were still present in the washed cotton samples. A selection for typical skin- and clothes-related microbial species occurred in the cotton samples after laundering. Accordingly, malodour-causing microbial species might be further distributed to other clothes. The bacteria on the ingoing textiles contributed for a large part to the microbiome found in the textiles after laundering. PMID:26696989

  14. STAR system combines soil washing and biodegradation to clean all soil fractions

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Soil washing has advanced to full-scale commercial operation in the past few years. The technology significantly reduces the volume of contaminated materials requiring further treatment. Despite its success, soil washing does not clean all fractions of the contaminated soil; a secondary process has been necessary to remove contaminants from soil fines. To meet this need, a process has recently been developed that combines soil washing and biodegradation. The soil treatment and recycling (STAR) process remediates all fractions of soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. Genesis Eco Systems, Inc. is offering mobile and fixed-site version of the STAR system, for which a patent is pending. The company continues to develop the process with the goal of applying it to a broader array of contaminants, including heavy metals, pesticides, solvents, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). 3 refs., 1 fig.

  15. 7 CFR 2902.51 - Parts wash solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parts wash solutions. 2902.51 Section 2902.51... Items § 2902.51 Parts wash solutions. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to clean parts in... wash solutions. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or...

  16. 7 CFR 3201.51 - Parts wash solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Parts wash solutions. 3201.51 Section 3201.51... Designated Items § 3201.51 Parts wash solutions. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to clean parts in... wash solutions. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or...

  17. 7 CFR 3201.51 - Parts wash solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Parts wash solutions. 3201.51 Section 3201.51... Designated Items § 3201.51 Parts wash solutions. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to clean parts in... wash solutions. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or...

  18. 7 CFR 3201.51 - Parts wash solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Parts wash solutions. 3201.51 Section 3201.51... Designated Items § 3201.51 Parts wash solutions. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to clean parts in... wash solutions. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or...

  19. 7 CFR 2902.51 - Parts wash solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Parts wash solutions. 2902.51 Section 2902.51... Items § 2902.51 Parts wash solutions. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to clean parts in... wash solutions. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or...

  20. 30 CFR 206.458 - Determination of washing allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 206.458 Determination of washing allowances. (a) Arm's-length... allowance shall be the reasonable actual costs incurred by the lessee for washing the coal under that... deduction may be taken, the lessee must submit a completed page one of Form MMS-4292, Coal Washing...

  1. 30 CFR 206.259 - Determination of washing allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 206.259 Determination of washing allowances. (a) Arm's-length... shall be the reasonable actual costs incurred by the lessee for washing the coal under that contract... allowances shall be expressed as a cost per ton of coal washed. (b) Non-arm's-length or no contract. (1) If...

  2. 30 CFR 1206.259 - Determination of washing allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... claim a washing allowance by reporting it as a separate line entry on the Form MMS-4430. (2) In... must claim a washing allowance by reporting it as a separate line entry on the Form MMS-4430. When... installation of capital equipment) which are an integral part of the wash plant. (i) Allowable...

  3. Irreversible Wash Aid Additive for Cesium Mitigation: WARRP Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This activity demonstrated, on a practical scale, the primary unit operations for building a containment structure for radioactive wash waters, washing down a hypothetically radioactively contaminated vehicle, collecting the hypothetically radioactive slurry waste water, filtering the hypothetically radioactive wash waters, disassembling the containment, and transporting the materials for final disposition.

  4. Changes in the morphometry of Las Vegas Wash and the impact on water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roline, Richard A.; Sartoris, James J.

    1988-01-01

    Las Vegas Wash, a natural wash east of Las Vegas, Nevada, carries stormwater, groundwater drainage, and sewage effluent from two sewage treatment plants to Lake Mean. Over 80 percent of the normal discharge of approximately 3.4 m3/s (120 ft3/s) consists of effluent from the City of Las Vegas and Clark County sewage treatment plants. Beginning in the 1950s, a large wetland area developed along the wash that supported waterfowl populations and contributed to some water quality transformations. Heavy rains and subsequent flooding in the area in 1983 and 1984 resulted in erosion and channelization that greatly reduced the wetland area within Las Vegas Wash. The reduction in wetland area shortened water travel time in the wash and affected water quality. The primary impacts on the water entering Lake Mead have been an increase in temperature, a decrease in dissolved oxygen concentration, and an increase in ammonia levels. Other physical-chemical parameters and changes in nutrient transformations are also discussed.

  5. Fresh produce washing aid, T-128, enhances inactivation of salmonella and pseudomonas biofilms on stainless steel in chlorinated wash solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of chlorine wash solutions, with/without the washing aid, T-128, on inactivation of Salmonella and Pseudomonas populations in biofilms on stainless steel coupons was evaluated under conditions of increasing organic matter loads in the wash water. Biofilms were formed statically on stai...

  6. Hand washing practices in a college town environment.

    PubMed

    Borchgrevink, Carl P; Cha, JaeMin; Kim, SeungHyun

    2013-04-01

    Many people do not wash their hands when the behavior in which they engage would warrant it. Most research of hand washing practices to date has taken place in high-traffic environments such as airports and public attraction venues. These studies have established a persistent shortcoming and a gender difference in hand washing compliance. Using field observations of 3,749 people in a college town environment, the research described in this article replicates and extends earlier work while identifying potential environmental and demographic predictors of hand washing compliance. Additionally, the authors' research suggests that proper hand washing practices, as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, are not being practiced. Finally, the authors' research raises a question as to the accuracy of earlier measurements of "proper" hand washing practices, suggesting that compliance rates are inflated. The results can help increase hand washing rates for the general public and thus decrease the risk of transmitting disease.

  7. Standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based cell washing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sixing; Ding, Xiaoyun; Mao, Zhangming; Chen, Yuchao; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; Wang, Lin; Cameron, Craig E.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Cell/bead washing is an indispensable sample preparation procedure used in various cell studies and analytical processes. In this article, we report a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based microfluidic device for cell and bead washing in a continuous flow. In our approach, the acoustic radiation force generated in a SSAW field is utilized to actively extract cells or beads from their original medium. A unique configuration of tilted-angle standing surface acoustic wave (taSSAW) is employed in our device, enabling us to wash beads with >98% recovery rate and >97% washing efficiency. We also demonstrate the functionality of our device by preparing high-purity (>97%) white blood cells from lysed blood samples through cell washing. Our SSAW-based cell/bead washing device has the advantages of label-free manipulation, simplicity, high biocompatibility, high recovery rate, and high washing efficiency. It can be useful for many lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:25372273

  8. "Wash leather scrotum" (scrotal dermatitis): a treatable cause of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Hendry, W F; Munro, D D

    1990-02-01

    A group of 16 male patients with infertility had dermatitis of the scrotum and groins giving lichenified oedematous skin; the resulting thickening and loss of rugosity produced a characteristic appearance that we have termed wash leather scrotum. Treatment of the dermatosis resulted in an improvement in sperm count and motility in most patients, and 5 couples produced one or more pregnancies.

  9. Phase I characterization of the HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filter media used in the airborne activity confinement system at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, V.J.; Higgins, P.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to characterize the HEPA filter media material. This work consisted of two major tasks. First, the pressure drop characteristics of the HEPA filter material were measured as a function of the aerosol mass loading. Particle size effects were studied by using three different particle size distributions to load the filter material. The second task was to determine the filtration efficiency spectrum for solid particles as a function of particle diameter. The filtration efficiency was measured at two different media velocities, one corresponding to the equivalent flow rate under normal operating conditions, the other corresponding to the minimum equivalent flow rate expected through the filter compartments. These tests were conducted at the Argonne National Laboratory between September 1988 and February 1989. 20 refs., 31 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. Washed cell salvage in surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Meybohm, Patrick; Choorapoikayil, Suma; Wessels, Anke; Herrmann, Eva; Zacharowski, Kai; Spahn, Donat R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cell salvage is commonly used as part of a blood conservation strategy. However concerns among clinicians exist about the efficacy of transfusion of washed cell salvage. Methods: We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in which patients, scheduled for all types of surgery, were randomized to washed cell salvage or to a control group with no cell salvage. Data were independently extracted, risk ratio (RR), and weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Data were pooled using a random effects model. The primary endpoint was the number of patients exposed to allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Results: Out of 1140 search results, a total of 47 trials were included. Overall, the use of washed cell salvage reduced the rate of exposure to allogeneic RBC transfusion by a relative 39% (RR = 0.61; 95% CI 0.57 to 0.65; P < 0.001), resulting in an average saving of 0.20 units of allogeneic RBC per patient (weighted mean differences [WMD] = −0.20; 95% CI −0.22 to −0.18; P < 0.001), reduced risk of infection by 28% (RR = 0.72; 95% CI 0.54 to 0.97; P = 0.03), reduced length of hospital stay by 2.31 days (WMD = −2.31; 95% CI −2.50 to −2.11; P < 0.001), but did not significantly affect risk of mortality (RR = 0.92; 95% CI 0.63 to 1.34; P = 0.66). No statistical difference could be observed in the number of patients exposed to re-operation, plasma, platelets, or rate of myocardial infarction and stroke. Conclusions: Washed cell salvage is efficacious in reducing the need for allogeneic RBC transfusion and risk of infection in surgery. PMID:27495095

  11. Reuse of washing effluent containing oxalic acid by a combined precipitation-acidification process.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mihee; Kim, Myoung-Jin

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the reuse feasibility of effluent produced by the soil washing of mine tailings with oxalic acid. Alkaline chemicals such as NaOH, Ca(OH)(2), and Na(2)CO(3) are used for the precipitation of arsenic and heavy metals in the effluent containing oxalic acid. All of the target contaminants are removed with very high efficiency (up to 100%) at high pH. The precipitation using NaOH at pH 9 is determined to be the most cost-effective method for the removal of arsenic as well as heavy metals in the effluent. The effluent decontaminated by NaOH is consecutively reused for the soil washing of raw mine tailings, resulting in considerable efficiency. Furthermore, even more arsenic and heavy metals are extracted from raw mine tailings by acidifying the decontaminated effluent under the alkaline condition, compared with direct reuse of the decontaminated effluent. Here, the oxalic acid, which is a weak complex-forming ligand as well as a weak acid, has noticeable effects on both soil washing and effluent treatment by precipitation. It extracts efficiently the contaminants from the mine tailings without adverse change of soil and also makes possible the precipitation of the contaminants in the effluent unlike strong chelating reagent. Reuse of the washing effluent containing oxalic acid would make the existing soil washing process more environment-friendly and cost-effective.

  12. Enhanced inactivation of Salmonella and Pseudomonas biofilms on stainless steel by use of T-128, a fresh-produce washing aid, in chlorinated wash solutions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cangliang; Luo, Yaguang; Nou, Xiangwu; Bauchan, Gary; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Qin; Millner, Patricia

    2012-10-01

    The effect of the washing aid T-128 (generally recognized as safe [GRAS] formulation, composed mainly of phosphoric acid and propylene glycol) on inactivation of Salmonella and Pseudomonas populations in biofilms on stainless steel was evaluated under conditions of increasing organic matter loads in chlorinated wash solutions dominated by hypochlorous acid. Biofilms were formed statically on stainless steel coupons suspended in 2% lettuce extract after inoculation with Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson or Newport or with Pseudomonas fluorescens. Coupons with biofilms were washed in chlorine solutions (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, or 20 mg/liter at pH 6.5, 5.0 and 2.9), with or without T-128, and with increasing loads of organic matter (0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, or 1.0% lettuce extract). Cell populations on coupons were dispersed using intermittent, pulsed ultrasonication and vortexing and enumerated by colony counts on XLT-4 or Pseudomonas agars. Cell responses to fluorescent viability staining of biofilm treatment washing solutions were examined using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results showed that 0.1% T-128 (without chlorine) reduced P. fluorescens biofilm populations by 2.5 log(10) units but did not reduce Salmonella populations. For both Salmonella and Pseudomonas, the sanitizing effect of free chlorine (1.0 to 5.0 mg/liter) was enhanced (P < 0.05) when it was combined with T-128. Application of T-128 decreased the free chlorine depletion rate caused by increasing organic matter in wash waters and significantly (P < 0.05) augmented inactivation of bacteria in biofilms compared to treatments without T-128. Image analysis of surfaces stained with SYTO and propidium iodide corroborate the cultural assay results showing that T-128 can aid in reducing pathogen viability in biofilms and thus can aid in sanitizing stainless steel contact surfaces during processing of fresh-cut produce.

  13. Enhanced Inactivation of Salmonella and Pseudomonas Biofilms on Stainless Steel by Use of T-128, a Fresh-Produce Washing Aid, in Chlorinated Wash Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Cangliang; Luo, Yaguang; Nou, Xiangwu; Bauchan, Gary; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Qin

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the washing aid T-128 (generally recognized as safe [GRAS] formulation, composed mainly of phosphoric acid and propylene glycol) on inactivation of Salmonella and Pseudomonas populations in biofilms on stainless steel was evaluated under conditions of increasing organic matter loads in chlorinated wash solutions dominated by hypochlorous acid. Biofilms were formed statically on stainless steel coupons suspended in 2% lettuce extract after inoculation with Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson or Newport or with Pseudomonas fluorescens. Coupons with biofilms were washed in chlorine solutions (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, or 20 mg/liter at pH 6.5, 5.0 and 2.9), with or without T-128, and with increasing loads of organic matter (0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, or 1.0% lettuce extract). Cell populations on coupons were dispersed using intermittent, pulsed ultrasonication and vortexing and enumerated by colony counts on XLT-4 or Pseudomonas agars. Cell responses to fluorescent viability staining of biofilm treatment washing solutions were examined using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results showed that 0.1% T-128 (without chlorine) reduced P. fluorescens biofilm populations by 2.5 log10 units but did not reduce Salmonella populations. For both Salmonella and Pseudomonas, the sanitizing effect of free chlorine (1.0 to 5.0 mg/liter) was enhanced (P < 0.05) when it was combined with T-128. Application of T-128 decreased the free chlorine depletion rate caused by increasing organic matter in wash waters and significantly (P < 0.05) augmented inactivation of bacteria in biofilms compared to treatments without T-128. Image analysis of surfaces stained with SYTO and propidium iodide corroborate the cultural assay results showing that T-128 can aid in reducing pathogen viability in biofilms and thus can aid in sanitizing stainless steel contact surfaces during processing of fresh-cut produce. PMID:22752180

  14. Protective effects of an ethanol extract of Angelica keiskei against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in HepG2 and HepaRG cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon-Hee; Lee, Hyun Sook; Chung, Cha-Kwon

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE Although Angelica keiskei (AK) has widely been utilized for the purpose of general health improvement among Asian, its functionality and mechanism of action. The aim of this study was to determine the protective effect of ethanol extract of AK (AK-Ex) on acute hepatotoxicity induced by acetaminophen (AAP) in HepG2 human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cells and HepaRG human hepatic progenitor cells. MATERIALS/METHODS AK-Ex was prepared HepG2 and HepaRG cells were cultured with various concentrations and 30 mM AAP. The protective effects of AK-Ex against AAP-induced hepatotoxicity in HepG2 and HepaRG cells were evaluated using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, flow cytometry, and Western blotting. RESULTS AK-Ex, when administered prior to AAP, increased cell growth and decreased leakage of LDH in a dose-dependent manner in HepG2 and HepaRG cells against AAP-induced hepatotoxicity. AK-Ex increased the level of Bcl-2 and decreased the levels of Bax, Bok and Bik decreased the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane in HepG2 cells intoxicated with AAP. AK-Ex decreased the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and the activation of caspase-9, -7, and -3. CONCLUSIONS These results demonstrate that AK-Ex downregulates apoptosis via intrinsic and extrinsic pathways against AAP-induced hepatotoxicity. We suggest that AK could be a useful preventive agent against AAP-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes. PMID:28386382

  15. Reciprocal regulation of farnesoid X receptor α activity and hepatitis B virus replication in differentiated HepaRG cells and primary human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Radreau, Pauline; Porcherot, Marine; Ramière, Christophe; Mouzannar, Karim; Lotteau, Vincent; André, Patrice

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and bile salt metabolism seem tightly connected. HBV enters hepatocytes by binding to sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), the genome of which contains 2 active farnesoid X receptor (FXR) α response elements that participate in HBV transcriptional activity. We investigated in differentiated HepaRG cells and in primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) effects of FXR activation on HBV replication and of infection on the FXR pathway. In HepaRG cells, FXR agonists (6-ethyl chenodeoxycholic acid and GW4064), but no antagonist, and an FXR-unrelated bile salt inhibited viral mRNA, DNA, and protein production (IC50, 0.1-0.5 μM) and reduced covalently closed circular DNA pool size. These effects were independent of the NTCP inhibitor cyclosporine-A, which suggests inhibition occurred at a postentry step. Similar results were obtained in PHHs with GW4064. Infection of these cells increased expression of FXR and modified expression of FXR-regulated genes SHP, APOA1, NTCP, CYP7A1, and CYP8B1 with a more pronounced effect in PHHs than in HepaRG cells. FXR agonists reversed all but one of the HBV-induced FXR gene profile modifications. HBV replication and FXR regulation seem to be interdependent, and altered bile salt metabolism homeostasis might contribute to the persistence of HBV infection.-Radreau, P., Porcherot, M., Ramière, C., Mouzannar, K., Lotteau, V., André, P. Reciprocal regulation of farnesoid X receptor α activity and hepatitis B virus replication in differentiated HepaRG cells and primary human hepatocytes.

  16. Fire tests to evaluate the potential fire threat and its effects on HEPA filter integrity in cell ventilation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Building 7920

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, H.K.; Staggs, K.J.; Doughty, S.M.

    1992-12-01

    As a result of a DOE (Tiger Team) Technical Safety Appraisal (November 1990) of the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC), ORNL Building 7920, a number of fire protection concerns were identified. The primary concern was the perceived loss of ventilation system containment due to the thermal destruction and/or breaching of the prefilters and/or high-efficiency particulate air filters (HEPA `s) and the resultant radioactive release to the external environment. The following report describes the results of an extensive fire test program performed by the Fire Research Discipline (FRD) of the Special Projects Division of Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) and funded by ORNL to address these concerns. Full scale mock-ups of a REDC hot cell tank pit, adjacent cubicle pit, and associated ventilation system were constructed at LLNL and 13 fire experiments were conducted to specifically answer the questions raised by the Tiger Team. Our primary test plan was to characterize the burning of a catastrophic solvent spill (kerosene) of 40 liters and its effect on the containment ventilation system prefilters and HEPA filters. In conjunction with ORNL and Lockwood Greene we developed a test matrix that assessed the fire performance of the prefilters and HEPA filters; evaluated the fire response of the fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) epoxy ventilation duct work; the response and effectiveness of the fire protection system, the effect of fire in a cubicle on the vessel off-gas (VOG) elbow, and other fire safety questions.

  17. [Washing copper (II)-contaminated soil using surfactant solutions].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bao-wei; Wu, Yong-qi; Ma, Chan-Yuan; Zhu, Rui-jia

    2009-10-15

    The batch equilibrium washing of copper (II) in the soil matrix by anionic surfactant, sodium dodecylbenzyl sulfonate (SDBS), nonionic surfactant, octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (TX100), and their mixture (SDBS-TX100), was studied and compared. The influences of surfactant concentrations, washing time, pH values of solutions, ratios of soil to water and inorganic salts on washing efficiency were investigated. It was shown that the washing efficiency differed with the kinds of surfactants. Given the initial surfactant concentrations, the washing of copper (II) by single SDBS was greater than those by single TX100 and the mixed SDBS-TX100. The washing efficiency by 6 000 mg x L(-1) of SDBS was up to 46.3%, which was 5.8, 10.8, 10.8 and 19.3 times as those by SDBS-TX100 (3:1), SDBS-TX100 (1:1), SDBS-TX100 (1:3) and single TX100 respectively. When the ratio of soil to water was 1 to 10 and washing time reached 24 h, the washing efficiency achieved the maximum. pH values of solutions had obvious effect on the washing of copper (II). The washing efficiency of copper decreased sharply with the increase of pH. At the high acidity (pH = 1.50), the washing efficiency of copper (II) was up to 95%. The smaller the ratios of soil to water were, the higher the washing efficiencies would be. The existence of inorganic salts with the certain concentrations, such as Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+, could not influence the washing capacity of surfactants, but the excessive Mg2+ (more than 500 mg x L(-1)) could resulted in the precipitation of SDBS. The results will make an implication for surfactant-enhanced remediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals.

  18. Microbial decolorization and bioremediation of melanoidin containing molasses spent wash.

    PubMed

    Singh, K D; Sharma, S; Dwivedi, A; Pandey, P; Thakur, R L; Kumar, V

    2007-07-01

    Molasses spent wash from cane-molasses based distilleries contains a brown coloured recalcitrantpolymer melanoidin, which if disposed untreated poses a great threat to environment. Microbial decolorization and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction was found to be dependent on specific carbon and nitrogen source. Under optimal condition of pH, carbon and nitrogen concentration for each treatment, it was found that Bacillus sp isolated from soil was capable of removing COD (85. 35%) and colour (81.10%) from distillery waste to the maximum extent after 9 days atpH 7 in the medium containing 0.5% peptone, 2% glucose and 10% (v/v), followed by Phanerochaete chrysosporium and lowest reduction was obtained by using native microbial consortium.

  19. Removal of oxyfluorfen from ex-situ soil washing fluids using electrolysis with diamond anodes.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Elisama Vieira; Sáez, Cristina; Martínez-Huitle, Carlos Alberto; Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel Andres

    2016-04-15

    In this research, firstly, the treatment of soil spiked with oxyfluorfen was studied using a surfactant-aided soil-washing (SASW) process. After that, the electrochemical treatment of the washing liquid using boron doped diamond (BDD) anodes was performed. Results clearly demonstrate that SASW is a very efficient approach in the treatment of soil, removing the pesticide completely by using dosages below 5 g of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) per Kg of soil. After that, complete mineralization of organic matter (oxyflourfen, SDS and by-products) was attained (100% of total organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand removals) when the washing liquids were electrolyzed using BDD anodes, but the removal rate depends on the size of the particles in solution. Electrolysis of soil washing fluids occurs via the reduction in size of micelles until their complete depletion. Lower concentrations of intermediates are produced (sulfate, chlorine, 4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenol and ortho-nitrophenol) during BDD-electrolyzes. Finally, it is important to indicate that, sulfate (coming from SDS) and chlorine (coming from oxyfluorfen) ions play an important role during the electrochemical organic matter removal.

  20. Effect of alternatives to chlorine washing for sanitizing fresh coriander.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haiyan; Fang, Xiangjun; Li, Yunlong; Chen, Hangjun; Zhao, Qi Fa; Jin, Tony Z

    2017-01-01

    Fresh coriander leaves are highly perishable in nature and their sensory quality and nutritional value decreases without proper processing or preservation. In the present study, three aqueous solutions of sodium hypochlorite (SH, 100 mg/L), chlorine dioxide (CD, 10 mg/L), and sodium butyl p-hydroxybenzoate (SBPH, 12 mg/L), and tap water, were used to treat fresh coriander for 15 min. The treated samples were packed in PVC boxes with ambient air under packaged under passive modified atmosphere packaging conditions and stored at 4 °C for 10 days. Effects of washing treatments on color, total chlorophyll contents, ascorbic acid contents, total contents of phenolic compounds, and total aerobic bacterial counts (APC) were investigated. CD treatment has the least detrimental effects on color, total chlorophyll contents and ascorbic acid contents of fresh coriander, followed by SH treatment. In addition, CD treatment showed a greater reduction in APC and maintained the microbial load at lower levels than other treatments during the 10-day storage period.

  1. Microanalysis of indoor aerosols and the impact of a compact high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter system.

    PubMed

    Abraham, M E

    1999-03-01

    Aerosol particles in municipal atmospheres are of increasing public health concern; however, since most of our time is spent indoors, indoor aerosols must be researched in counterpart. Compact High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter systems are commonly employed in residences to alleviate airborne dust concentrations. In this study, a detailed and original methodology was used to determine concentrations and types of submicrometer aerosols, as well as of large (> 4 microns) dust particles. Scanning electron microscopy was used to quantify and characterize ambient aerosols collected from filtered and non-filtered rooms. Particle concentrations were significantly lower in samples collected in the presence of the filter system (mean 23 to 8 coarse particles liter-1, 63% reduction; 13 to 3 inorganic submicron particles cm-3, 76% reduction; 85 to 33 total submicron particles cm-3, 62% reduction; all P < 0.05). This study provides a new methodology for analysis of indoor aerosols and new data on their physico-chemical characteristics. Since the filter systems are effective at reducing submicron aerosol concentrations, they may improve the health of individuals such as asthmatics, who experience health problems caused by anthropogenic fine particles.

  2. Shift in aggregation, ROS generation, antioxidative defense, lysozyme and acetylcholinesterase activities in the cells of an Indian freshwater sponge exposed to washing soda (sodium carbonate).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Ray, Mitali; Ray, Sajal

    2016-09-01

    Washing soda, chemically identified as anhydrous sodium carbonate, is a popular cleaning agent among the rural and urban populations of India which often contaminates the freshwater ponds and lakes, the natural habitat of sponge Eunapius carteri. Present investigation deals with estimation of cellular aggregation, generation of ROS and activities of antioxidant enzymes, lysozyme and acetylcholinesterase in the cells of E. carteri under the environmentally realistic concentrations of washing soda. Prolonged treatment of washing soda inhibited the degree of cellular aggregation. Experimental exposure of 8 and 16mg/l of sodium carbonate for 48h elevated the physiological level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the agranulocytes, semigranulocytes and granulocytes of E. carteri, whereas, treatment of 192h inhibited the ROS generation in three cellular morphotypes. Activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were recorded to be inhibited under prolonged exposure of washing soda. Washing soda mediated inhibition of ROS generation and depletion in the activities of antioxidant enzymes were indicative to an undesirable shift in cytotoxic status and antioxidative defense in E. carteri. Inhibition in the activity of lysozyme under the treatment of sodium carbonate was suggestive to a severe impairment of the innate immunological efficiency of E. carteri distributed in the washing soda contaminated habitat. Washing soda mediated inhibition in the activity of acetylcholinesterase indicated its neurotoxicity in E. carteri. Washing soda, a reported environmental contaminant, affected adversely the immunophysiological status of E. carteri with reference to cellular aggregation, oxidative stress, antioxidative defense, lysozyme and acetylcholinesterase activity.

  3. Factors affecting the bacteriological contamination of commercial washing machines.

    PubMed

    Legnani, P P; Leoni, E

    1997-10-01

    Wash water from self-service washing machines in three commercial launderettes of Bologna (Italy) were examined to verify which factors affect their bacterial contamination and to determine which procedures in the laundering process have the most significant effects on the removal of bacteria. Four washing formulas were compared: a delicates cycle (programmed temperature 25-30 degrees C; actual temperature: 28-31 degrees C); a whites cycle (programmed temperature: 80-90 degrees C; actual temperature: 50-57.5 degrees C); a delicates cycle with the addition of an oxygen-based bleach safe for delicate fabrics and a whites cycle with the addition of an oxygen-based bleach. Bacterial contamination of washing machines was higher in the launderette most heavely used, and, furthermore, it was in relation with the washing temperature and the use of bleaches. The low temperature laundering cycle (20-30 degrees C) did not guarantee elimination of bacterial content from either the inside of the washing machine or from the fabric being washed. Washing with water at a higher temperature, of about 55 degrees C, or adding an oxygen-based bleach to the low temperature cycle did ensure a significant reduction in bacterial recovery from water samples and fabrics, but did not prevent bacteria such as P. aeruginosa from surviving inside the washing machine. Only the addition of bleaches to the hot water program ensured the almost total elimination of bacteria and also guaranteed their elimination from protected parts of the drum.

  4. Presence of nanoparticles in wash water from conventional silver and nano-silver textiles.

    PubMed

    Mitrano, Denise M; Rimmele, Elisa; Wichser, Adrian; Erni, Rolf; Height, Murray; Nowack, Bernd

    2014-07-22

    Questions about how to regulate nanoenhanced products regularly arise as researchers determine possible nanoparticle transformation(s). Focusing concern on the incorporation and subsequent release of nano-Ag in fabrics often overshadows the fact that many "conventional silver" antimicrobials such as ionic silver, AgCl, metallic Ag, and other forms will also form different species of silver. In this study we used a laboratory washing machine to simulate the household laundering of a number of textiles prepared with known conventional Ag or nano-Ag treatments and a commercially available fabric incorporating yarns coated with bulk metallic Ag. Serial filtration allowed for quantification of total Ag released in various size fractions (>0.45 μm, < 0.45 μm, <0.1 μm, and <10 kDa), while characterization of particles with TEM/EDX provided insight on Ag transformation mechanisms. Most conventional Ag additives yielded more total Ag and more nanoparticulate-sized Ag in the washing liquid than fabrics that used nano-Ag treatments. Incorporating nano-silver into the fiber (as opposed to surface treatments) yielded less total Ag during fabric washing. A variety of metallic Ag, AgCl, and Ag/S particles were observed in washing solution by TEM/EDX to various extents depending on the initial Ag speciation in the fabrics. Very similar particles were also observed when dissolved ionic Ag was added directly into the washing liquid. On the basis of the present study, we can state that all silver-treated textiles, regardless of whether the treatment is "conventional" or "nano", can be a source of silver nanoparticles in washing solution when laundering fabrics. Indeed, in this study we observed that textiles treated with "conventional" silver have equal or greater propensity to form nano-silver particles during washing conditions than those treated with "nano"-silver. This fact needs to be strongly considered when addressing the risks of nano-silver and emphasizes that regulatory

  5. Evaluation of management techniques to conserve water in a mechanical head wash blood removal system.

    PubMed

    Galloway, H O; Deotte, R E; Lawrence, T E

    2013-11-01

    This research objectively evaluated methods to conserve water in a mechanical beef head wash system. Digital images of pre-wash and post-wash beef heads were analyzed to quantify the percentage change in red saturation of the image, which was used as an objective measure of cleanliness. Three types of nozzles (fan, three-hole, venturi) and three water pressures (344, 516, 689kPa) were evaluated in a two-way treatment structure. An interaction (P=0.07) was observed between water pressure and nozzle type; the change in red saturation increased as pressure decreased for fan and three-hole nozzles which contrasted with venturi nozzles. The fan nozzle×516kPa pressure treatment used 25L of water per head washed and was used to evaluate the effect of three water temperatures (15, 38, 57°C). Water temperature did not impact (P=0.21) change in red saturation. Reducing water wastage and minimizing the use of heated water could have positive economic benefits to the beef processor.

  6. Effect of alfalfa seed washing on the organic carbon concentration in chlorinated and ozonated water.

    PubMed

    Rajkowski, Kathleen T; Rice, Eugene W

    2004-04-01

    The bioassays assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and coliform growth response are better indexes than biological oxygen demand to determine water quality and water's ability to support the growth of bacteria. Ozonated (5 mg/liter) and chlorinated tap water were used to wash alfalfa seeds for 30 min. After washing in the ozonated tap water, the AOC concentration increased 25-fold, whereas the dissolved ozone decreased to undetectable levels. The AOC levels for the chlorinated water after washing the seeds also increased. These increases are due to ozone's strong oxidizing ability to break down refractory, large-molecular-weight compounds, forming smaller ones, which are readily used as nutrient sources for microorganisms. This same phenomenon was observed when using ozone in the treatment of drinking water. The AOC value increased from 1,176 to 1,758 micrograms C-eq/liter after the reconditioned wastewater was ozonated. When the ozonated wastewater was inoculated with Salmonella serotypes, the cells survived and increased generation times were observed. The increased nutrients would now become more readily available to any pathogenic microorganisms located on alfalfa seed surface as seen with the increase in the inoculated levels of Salmonella in the ozonated wastewater. If the washing process using ozonated water is not followed by the recommended hypochlorite treatment or continually purged with ozone, pathogen growth is still possible.

  7. Evidence on the Effectiveness of Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) Interventions on Health Outcomes in Humanitarian Crises: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Anita; Blanchet, Karl; Ensink, Jeroen H. J.; Roberts, Bayard

    2015-01-01

    Background Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) interventions are amongst the most crucial in humanitarian crises, although the impact of the different WASH interventions on health outcomes remains unclear. Aim To examine the quantity and quality of evidence on WASH interventions on health outcomes in humanitarian crises, as well as evaluate current evidence on their effectiveness against health outcomes in these contexts. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted of primary and grey quantitative literature on WASH interventions measured against health outcomes in humanitarian crises occurring from 1980–2014. Populations of interest were those in resident in humanitarian settings, with a focus on acute crisis and early recovery stages of humanitarian crises in low and middle-income countries. Interventions of interest were WASH-related, while outcomes of interest were health-related. Study quality was assessed via STROBE/CONSORT criteria. Results were analyzed descriptively, and PRISMA reporting was followed. Results Of 3963 studies initially retrieved, only 6 published studies measured a statistically significant change in health outcome as a result of a WASH intervention. All 6 studies employed point-of-use (POU) water quality interventions, with 50% using safe water storage (SWS) and 35% using household water treatment (HWT). All 6 studies used self-reported diarrhea outcomes, 2 studies also reported laboratory confirmed outcomes, and 2 studies reported health treatment outcomes (e.g. clinical admissions). 1 study measured WASH intervention success in relation to both health and water quality outcomes; 1 study recorded uptake (use of soap) as well as health outcomes. 2 studies were unblinded randomized-controlled trials, while 4 were uncontrolled longitudinal studies. 2 studies were graded as providing high quality evidence; 3 studies provided moderate and 1 study low quality evidence. Conclusion The current evidence base on the impact of WASH

  8. Effect of different washing procedures on phenolic metabolism of shredded, packaged iceberg lettuce during storage.

    PubMed

    Baur, Sascha; Klaiber, Ralph G; Koblo, Arjuna; Carle, Reinhold

    2004-11-17

    Different washing treatments applying chlorinated, ozonated, and tap water were examined for their effect on the phenolic metabolism of minimally processed iceberg lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) during storage in consumer-sized bags at 4 degrees C for up to 9 days. To eliminate problems associated with raw material inhomogeneity, processing was conducted on a pilot-plant scale under operating conditions of industrial practice. Inherent product heterogeneity caused by diverse lettuce leaf tissues was compensated for by pooling large-sized samples, and frequent sampling ensured significant data about the activities of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), and peroxidase (POD), as well as the contents of caffeic acid derivatives over storage time. In the homogeneous lettuce samples, specific responses caused by different washing procedures were detectable. PAL activity in the samples increased for up to 5-8 days of storage. Compared to tap and ozonated water, the use of chlorinated water (100-200 mg/L free chlorine) for washing trimmed heads or shredded lettuce significantly reduced PAL activity and the concomitant rise of 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (isochlorogenic acid isomer) concentrations. The phenolic acids O-caffeoyltartaric (caftaric acid), di-O-caffeoyltartaric (chicoric acid), 5-O-caffeoylquinic (chlorogenic acid isomer), and O-caffeoylmalic were less influenced by different washing treatments. Individual contents either were constant or decreased during storage. Additionally, the novel finding of a further caffeic acid isomer, tentatively identified as meso-di-O-caffeoyltartaric acid, is reported. PPO and POD activities were less affected by different washing treatments and thus were less suitable physiological indicators of stress reactions triggered by alternative processing.

  9. Prototype wash water renovation system integration with goverment-furnished wash fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A total renovation concept for removing objectionable materials from spacecraft wash water to make the water reusable was developed. This concept included ferric chloride pretreatment to coagulate suspended solids such as soap and lint, pressure filtration, and carbon adsorption and ion exchange to remove trace dissolved organics and inorganic salts. A breadboard model which was developed to demonstrate the design adequacy of the various system components and the limits on system capacities and efficiencies.

  10. Life cycle assessment of animal feeds prepared from liquid food residues: a case study of rice-washing water.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Akifumi; Ishida, Mitsuyoshi; Ohmori, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Yamashita, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Tatsugawa, Kenji; Ijiri, Satoru; Kawashima, Tomoyuki

    2012-01-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) was used to compare the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and energy consumption of three methods used to produce animal feed from concentrated rice-washing water (CRW) and disposing of the rice-washing water through wastewater treatment. Four scenarios were compared using LCA: (i) producing concentrated liquid feed by centrifugation (CC) of CRW with wastewater treatment and discharge of the supernatant, (ii) producing concentrated liquid feed by heating evaporation (HC) of CRW, (iii) producing dehydrated feed by dehydration (DH) of CRW, and (iv) wastewater treatment and discharge of nonconcentrated rice-washing water (WT). The functional unit (FU) was defined as 1 metric ton of rice washed for cooking or processing. Our results suggested that the energy consumptions of CC, HC, DH, and WT were 108, 322, 739, and 242 MJ per FU, respectively, and the amounts of GHG emissions from CC, HC, DH, and WT were 6.4, 15.8, 45.5, and 22.5 kg of CO equivalents per FU, respectively. When the produced feed prepared from CRW was assumed to be transported 200 km to farms, CC and HC still emitted smaller GHGs than the other scenarios, and CC consumed the smallest amount of energy among the scenarios. The present study indicates that liquid feed production from CRW by centrifugation has a remarkably reduced environmental impact compared with the wastewater treatment and discharge of rice-washing water.

  11. Physicochemical and microbial quality of stored green slender pepper treated with different washing solutions and packaging films.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Dulal; Kim, Ji Gang; Kim, Yong Phil

    2014-03-01

    The effects of different washing solutions and packaging films on textural, biochemical and microbial quality of green slender peppers (Capsicum annuum L.) were evaluated. Fresh pepper samples were packaged either in 35 µm polypropylene or polyethylene bag without washing or after washing in tap water (TW), 100-ppm chlorine solution, 0.5% calcinated calcium solution followed by 25% ethanol rinsing (CC+E) and 1% citric acid solution followed by 50% ethanol spray (CA+E) and then stored at 10  for 4 weeks. Significant differences were found in gas composition between the two packaging films. Changes in skin puncture force, hue angle, soluble solid content, titratable acidity and pH were statistically insignificant. Chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll content declined significantly (P < 0.05) in all treatments during storage. Significant reduction (P < 0.05) in aerobic plate count was found in all washing treatments compared to unwashed sample except in TW. Yeast and mold count of chlorine and CC+E-treated samples were lower than other treatments. Samples of these two treatments also received marketable limit of visual quality scores until 4 weeks of storage in polypropylene film. Results suggest that CC+E could be a potential sanitizer and alternative to chlorine washing and polypropylene film would provide a little better advantage than polyethylene for green slender pepper.

  12. 33 CFR 157.124 - COW tank washing machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false COW tank washing machines. 157....124 COW tank washing machines. (a) COW machines must be permanently mounted in each cargo tank. (b) The COW machines in each tank must have sufficient nozzles with the proper diameter, working...

  13. 33 CFR 157.124 - COW tank washing machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false COW tank washing machines. 157....124 COW tank washing machines. (a) COW machines must be permanently mounted in each cargo tank. (b) The COW machines in each tank must have sufficient nozzles with the proper diameter, working...

  14. 33 CFR 157.124 - COW tank washing machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false COW tank washing machines. 157....124 COW tank washing machines. (a) COW machines must be permanently mounted in each cargo tank. (b) The COW machines in each tank must have sufficient nozzles with the proper diameter, working...

  15. 33 CFR 157.124 - COW tank washing machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false COW tank washing machines. 157....124 COW tank washing machines. (a) COW machines must be permanently mounted in each cargo tank. (b) The COW machines in each tank must have sufficient nozzles with the proper diameter, working...

  16. 33 CFR 157.124 - COW tank washing machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false COW tank washing machines. 157....124 COW tank washing machines. (a) COW machines must be permanently mounted in each cargo tank. (b) The COW machines in each tank must have sufficient nozzles with the proper diameter, working...

  17. 30 CFR 1206.259 - Determination of washing allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... allowance by reporting it as a separate line entry on the Form MMS-4430. (2) In conducting reviews and... washing allowance by reporting it as a separate line entry on the Form MMS-4430. When necessary or...) which are an integral part of the wash plant. (i) Allowable operating expenses include:...

  18. 30 CFR 1206.458 - Determination of washing allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... installation of capital equipment) which are an integral part of the wash plant. (i) Allowable operating.... (A) To compute depreciation, the lessee may elect to use either a straight-line depreciation method... reporting period. (4) Washing allowances must be reported as a separate line on the Form MMS-4430,...

  19. 2. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT CHINA WASH FLUME ON MAIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT CHINA WASH FLUME ON MAIN CANAL - San Carlos Irrigation Project, China Wash Flume, Main (Florence-Case Grande) Canal at Station 137+00, T4S, R10E, S14, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  20. 1. VIEW LOOKING WEST AT CHINA WASH FLUME ON MAIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW LOOKING WEST AT CHINA WASH FLUME ON MAIN CANAL. - San Carlos Irrigation Project, China Wash Flume, Main (Florence-Case Grande) Canal at Station 137+00, T4S, R10E, S14, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  1. Wash room, bunkhouse, first floor interior. This room is a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Wash room, bunkhouse, first floor interior. This room is a screened porch with the original sinks extant. Light and ventilation was borrowed from the wash room into the toilets and bathing rooms. - Sespe Ranch, Bunkhouse, 2896 Telegraph Road, Fillmore, Ventura County, CA

  2. EPA SITE DEMONSTRATION OF THE BIOTROL SOIL WASHING PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot-scale soil washing process, patented by BioTrol, Inc., was demonstrate on soil contaminated by wood treating waste, primarily pentachlorophenol (PCP) and creosote-derived polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although soil washing was the main object of this demonstra...

  3. 2. VIEW OF WASH TANKS Skins are brought in through ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF WASH TANKS Skins are brought in through hatches, seen on rear wall, and washed of blood and flesh in redwood tanks, with wooden grates to hold skins down in water. Superstructure and screening on tanks are a later alteration, unrelated to this process. - Sealing Plant, St. George Island, Pribilof Islands, Saint George, Aleutians West Census Area, AK

  4. 33 CFR 110.230 - Puget Sound Area, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound Area, Wash. 110.230... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.230 Puget Sound Area, Wash. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... shores of Whidbey Island. (4) Port Gardner General Anchorage, Possession Sound. Beginning at a...

  5. 33 CFR 110.230 - Puget Sound Area, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound Area, Wash. 110.230... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.230 Puget Sound Area, Wash. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... shores of Whidbey Island. (4) Port Gardner General Anchorage, Possession Sound. Beginning at a...

  6. 33 CFR 110.230 - Puget Sound Area, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound Area, Wash. 110.230... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.230 Puget Sound Area, Wash. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... shores of Whidbey Island. (4) Port Gardner General Anchorage, Possession Sound. Beginning at a...

  7. Metabolism of Red Beet Slices I. Effects of Washing 1

    PubMed Central

    Reed, D. J.; Kolattukudy, P. E.

    1966-01-01

    The changes in relative participation of pathways of glucose catabolism in red beet slices during washing have been examined using specifically 14C labeled glucoses. Washing of these slices brings about an increase in participation of the pentose phosphate pathway. The composition of the washing medium influences slightly the extent of change in pathway participation. The activity level of certain enzymes participating in the initial stages of glucose catabolism has been measured in fresh and washed beet slices. Fresh slices which barely metabolized gluconate were found to have very little 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activity. Washing brings about a dramatic increase in 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activity and this increase was accompanied by a marked increase in the ability of the slices to metabolize gluconate. In red beet slices the TPNH generated via pentose phosphate pathway appears to be utilized for biosynthetic reductions rather than as respiratory substrate. PMID:16656302

  8. Sequential Washing with Electrolyzed Alkaline and Acidic Water Effectively Removes Pathogens from Metal Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Yuichiro; Akamatsu, Norihiko; Mori, Tsuyoshi; Sano, Kazunori; Satoh, Katsuya; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Yoshiaki; Sugio, Tomomi; Sakai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Eiji; Ichimiya, Kazuko; Hamada, Masahisa; Nakayama, Takehisa; Fujita, Yuhzo; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Removal of pathogenic organisms from reprocessed surgical instruments is essential to prevent iatrogenic infections. Some bacteria can make persistent biofilms on medical devices. Contamination of non-disposable equipment with prions also represents a serious risk to surgical patients. Efficient disinfection of prions from endoscopes and other instruments such as high-resolution cameras remains problematic because these instruments do not tolerate aggressive chemical or heat treatments. Herein, we develop a new washing system that uses both the alkaline and acidic water produced by electrolysis. Electrolyzed acidic water, containing HCl and HOCl as active substances, has been reported to be an effective disinfectant. A 0.15% NaCl solution was electrolyzed and used immediately to wash bio-contaminated stainless steel model systems with alkaline water (pH 11.9) with sonication, and then with acidic water (pH 2.7) without sonication. Two bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and a fungus (Candida albicans) were effectively removed or inactivated by the washing process. In addition, this process effectively removed or inactivated prions from the stainless steel surfaces. This washing system will be potentially useful for the disinfection of clinical devices such as neuroendoscopes because electrolyzed water is gentle to both patients and equipment and is environmentally sound. PMID:27223116

  9. Exploratory Disposal and Reuse Feasibility Analysis of Winter Maintenance Wash Water

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Ohio Department of Transportation has more than 60 facilities without sewer access generating approximately 19 million gallons of winter maintenance wash water. Off-site disposal is costly, creating the need for sustainable management strategies. The objective of this study was to conduct an exploratory feasibility analysis to assess wash water disposal and potential reuse as brine. Based on a comprehensive literature review and relevant environmental chemistry, a sampling protocol consisting of 31 water quality constituents was utilized for monthly sampling at three geographically distinct Ohio Department of Transportation garages during the winter of 2012. Results were compared to local disposal and reuse guidance limits. Three constituents, including a maximum copper concentration of 858 ppb, exceeded disposal limits, and many constituents also failed to meet reuse limits. Some concentrations were orders of magnitude higher than reuse limits and suggest pre-treatment would be necessary if wash water were reused as brine. These water quality results, in conjunction with copper chemical equilibrium modeling, show pH and dissolved carbon both significantly impact the total dissolved copper concentration and should be measured to assess reuse potential. The sampling protocol and specific obstacles highlighted in this paper aid in the future development of sustainable wash water management strategies. PMID:26908148

  10. Genesis Eco Systems, Inc. soil washing process

    SciTech Connect

    Cena, R.J.

    1994-10-11

    The Genesis soil washing system is an integrated system of modular design allowing for maximum material handling capabilities, with optimized use of space for site mobility. The Surfactant Activated Bio-enhanced Remediation Equipment-Generation 1 (SABRE-1, Patent Applied For) modification was developed specifically for removing petroleum byproducts from contaminated soils. Scientifically formulated surfactants, introduced by high pressure spray nozzles, displace the contaminant from the surface of the soil particles into the process solution. Once the contaminant is dispersed into the liquid fraction of the process, it is either mechanically removed, chemically oxidized, or biologically oxidized. The contaminated process water is pumped through the Genesis Biosep (Patent Applied For) filtration system where the fines portion is flocculated, and the contaminant-rich liquid portion is combined with an activated mixture of nutrients and carefully selected bacteria to decompose the hydrocarbon fraction. The treated soil and dewatered fines are transferred to a bermed stockpile where bioremediation continues during drying. The process water is reclaimed, filtered, and recycled within the system.

  11. Preferential induction of the AhR gene battery in HepaRG cells after a single or repeated exposure to heterocyclic aromatic amines

    SciTech Connect

    Dumont, Julie Josse, Rozenn Lambert, Carine Antherieu, Sebastien Laurent, Veronique Loyer, Pascal Robin, Marie-Anne Guillouzo, Andre

    2010-11-15

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) are two of the most common heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) produced during cooking of meat, fish and poultry. Both HAA produce different tumor profiles in rodents and are suspected to be carcinogenic in humans. In order to better understand the molecular basis of HAA toxicity, we have analyzed gene expression profiles in the metabolically competent human HepaRG cells using pangenomic oligonucleotide microarrays, after either a single (24-h) or a repeated (28-day) exposure to 10 {mu}M PhIP or MeIQx. The most responsive genes to both HAA were downstream targets of the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR): CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 after both time points and CYP1B1 and ALDH3A1 after 28 days. Accordingly, CYP1A1/1A2 induction in HAA-treated HepaRG cells was prevented by chemical inhibition or small interference RNA-mediated down-regulation of the AhR. Consistently, HAA induced activity of the CYP1A1 promoter, which contains a consensus AhR-related xenobiotic-responsive element (XRE). In addition, several other genes exhibited both time-dependent and compound-specific expression changes with, however, a smaller magnitude than previously reported for the prototypical AhR target genes. These changes concerned genes mainly related to cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, and cancer. In conclusion, these results identify the AhR gene battery as the preferential target of PhIP and MeIQx in HepaRG cells and further support the hypothesis that intake of HAA in diet might increase human cancer risk.

  12. The use of HepaRG and human hepatocyte data in predicting CYP induction drug-drug interactions via static equation and dynamic mechanistic modelling approaches.

    PubMed

    Grime, Ken; Ferguson, Douglas D; Riley, Robert J

    2010-12-01

    The method of predicting CYP induction drug-drug interactions (DDIs) from a relative induction score (RIS) calibration has been developed to provide a novel model facilitating predictions for any CYP-inducer substrate combination by inclusion of parameters such as the fraction of hepatic clearance mediated by a specific CYP and fraction of the dose escaping intestinal extraction. In vitro HepaRG CYP3A4 induction data were used as a basis for the approach and a large number of DDIs were well predicted. Primary human hepatocyte data were also used to make predictions, using the HepaRG calibration as a foundation. Similar predictive accuracy suggests that HepaRG and primary hepatocyte data can be used inter-changeably within the same laboratory. A comparison of this 'indirect' calibration method with a direct in vitro-in vivo scaling approach was made and investigations undertaken to define the most appropriate in vivo inducer concentration to use. Additionally, a reasonably effective prediction model based on F(2) (the concentration of inducer taken to increase the CYP mRNA 2-fold above background) was established. An accurate prediction for the CYP1A2-dependent omeprazole-caffeine interaction was also made, demonstrating that the methods are useful for the evaluation of DDIs from induction involving mechanisms other than PXR activation. Finally, a dynamic mechanistic model accounting for the simultaneous influence of CYP induction and reversible and irreversible CYP inhibition in both the liver and intestine was written to provide a prediction of the overall DDI when several interactions occur concurrently. The rationale for using the various models described, alongside commercially available prediction tools, at various stages of the drug discovery process is described.

  13. Evaluation of cytochrome P450 inductions by anti-epileptic drug oxcarbazepine, 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine, and carbamazepine using human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Ikuo; Murayama, Norie; Kuroki, Ayaka; Kota, Jagannath; Iwano, Shunsuke; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Hirota, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Anti-epileptic drug oxcarbazepine is structurally related to carbamazepine, but has reportedly different metabolic pathway. Auto-induction potentials of oxcarbazepine, its pharmacologically active metabolite 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine and carbamazepine were evaluated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 mRNA levels and primary metabolic rates using human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells. For the CYP1A2 the induction potential determined as the fold change in mRNA levels was 7.2 (range: 2.3-11.5) and 10.0 (6.2-13.7) for oxcarbazepine and carbamazepine, respectively, while 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine did not induce. The fold change in mRNA levels for CYP2B6 was 11.5 (3.2-19.3), 7.0 (2.5-10.8) and 14.8 (3.1-29.1) for oxcarbazepine, 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine and carbamazepine, respectively. The fold change for CYP3A4 induction level by oxcarbazepine, 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine and carbamazepine was 3.5 (1.2-7.4), 2.7 (0.8-5.7) and 8.3 (3.5-14.5), respectively. The data suggest lower induction potential of oxcarbazepine and 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine relative to carbamazepine. The results in HepaRG cells showed similar trend as the human hepatocytes. After incubation for 72 h in hepatocytes and HepaRG cells, auto-induction was evident for only carbamazepine metabolism. The 10-keto group instead of double bond at C10 position is evidently a determinant factor for limited auto-induction of P450 enzymes by oxcarbazepine.

  14. Remediation of toxic metal contaminated soil by washing with biodegradable aminopolycarboxylate chelants.

    PubMed

    Begum, Zinnat A; Rahman, Ismail M M; Tate, Yousuke; Sawai, Hikaru; Maki, Teruya; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Ex situ soil washing with synthetic extractants such as, aminopolycarboxylate chelants (APCs) is a viable treatment alternative for metal-contaminated site remediation. EDTA and its homologs are widely used among the APCs in the ex situ soil washing processes. These APCs are merely biodegradable and highly persistent in the aquatic environments leading to the post-use toxic effects. Therefore, an increasing interest is focused on the development and use of the eco-friendly APCs having better biodegradability and less environmental toxicity. The paper deals with the results from the lab-scale washing treatments of a real sample of metal-contaminated soil for the removal of the ecotoxic metal ions (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) using five biodegradable APCs, namely [S,S]-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid, imminodisuccinic acid, methylglycinediacetic acid, DL-2-(2-carboxymethyl) nitrilotriacetic acid (GLDA), and 3-hydroxy-2,2'-iminodisuccinic acid. The performance of those biodegradable APCs was evaluated for their interaction with the soil mineral constituents in terms of the solution pH and metal-chelant stability constants, and compared with that of EDTA. Speciation calculations were performed to identify the optimal conditions for the washing process in terms of the metal-chelant interactions as well as to understand the selectivity in the separation ability of the biodegradable chelants towards the metal ions. A linear relationship between the metal extraction capacity of the individual chelants towards each of the metal ions from the soil matrix and metal-chelant conditional stability constants for a solution pH greater than 6 was observed. Additional considerations were derived from the behavior of the major potentially interfering cations (Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, and Mn), and it was hypothesized that use of an excess of chelant may minimize the possible competition effects during the single-step washing treatments. Sequential extraction procedure was used to determine the

  15. Machine washing or brushing of clothing and its influence on shooting distance estimation.

    PubMed

    Vinokurov, A; Zeichner, A; Glattstein, B; Koffman, A; Levin, N; Rosengarten, A

    2001-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the effect of machine washing or brushing of clothing items on Gunshot Residue (GSR) patterns (gunpowder residues, lead, and copper, deposits) around bullet entrance holes. Results show that those treatments decrease considerably the amount and density of GSR. However, for close shooting distances not all of the GSR deposits are removed. Remaining patterns may be visualized by specific color reactions and used for shooting distance estimation.

  16. Hand washing frequencies and procedures used in retail food services.

    PubMed

    Strohbehn, Catherine; Sneed, Jeannie; Paez, Paola; Meyer, Janell

    2008-08-01

    Transmission of viruses, bacteria, and parasites to food by way of improperly washed hands is a major contributing factor in the spread of foodborne illnesses. Field observers have assessed compliance with hand washing regulations, yet few studies have included consideration of frequency and methods used by sectors of the food service industry or have included benchmarks for hand washing. Five 3-h observation periods of employee (n = 80) hand washing behaviors during menu production, service, and cleaning were conducted in 16 food service operations for a total of 240 h of direct observation. Four operations from each of four sectors of the retail food service industry participated in the study: assisted living for the elderly, childcare, restaurants, and schools. A validated observation form, based on 2005 Food Code guidelines, was used by two trained researchers. Researchers noted when hands should have been washed, when hands were washed, and how hands were washed. Overall compliance with Food Code recommendations for frequency during production, service, and cleaning phases ranged from 5% in restaurants to 33% in assisted living facilities. Procedural compliance rates also were low. Proposed benchmarks for the number of times hand washing should occur by each employee for each sector of food service during each phase of operation are seven times per hour for assisted living, nine times per hour for childcare, 29 times per hour for restaurants, and 11 times per hour for schools. These benchmarks are high, especially for restaurant employees. Implementation would mean lost productivity and potential for dermatitis; thus, active managerial control over work assignments is needed. These benchmarks can be used for training and to guide employee hand washing behaviors.

  17. Immersion freezing of birch pollen washing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin, S.; Wex, H.; Niedermeier, D.; Pummer, B.; Grothe, H.; Hartmann, S.; Tomsche, L.; Clauss, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Ignatius, K.; Stratmann, F.

    2013-11-01

    Birch pollen grains are known to be ice nucleating active biological particles. The ice nucleating activity has previously been tracked down to biological macromolecules that can be easily extracted from the pollen grains in water. In the present study, we investigated the immersion freezing behavior of these ice nucleating active (INA) macromolecules. Therefore we measured the frozen fractions of particles generated from birch pollen washing water as a function of temperature at the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS). Two different birch pollen samples were considered, with one originating from Sweden and one from the Czech Republic. For the Czech and Swedish birch pollen samples, freezing was observed to start at -19 and -17 °C, respectively. The fraction of frozen droplets increased for both samples down to -24 °C. Further cooling did not increase the frozen fractions any more. Instead, a plateau formed at frozen fractions below 1. This fact could be used to determine the amount of INA macromolecules in the droplets examined here, which in turn allowed for the determination of nucleation rates for single INA macromolecules. The main differences between the Swedish birch pollen and the Czech birch pollen were obvious in the temperature range between -17 and -24 °C. In this range, a second plateau region could be seen for Swedish birch pollen. As we assume INA macromolecules to be the reason for the ice nucleation, we concluded that birch pollen is able to produce at least two different types of INA macromolecules. We were able to derive parameterizations for the heterogeneous nucleation rates for both INA macromolecule types, using two different methods: a simple exponential fit and the Soccer ball model. With these parameterization methods we were able to describe the ice nucleation behavior of single INA macromolecules from both the Czech and the Swedish birch pollen.

  18. Effects of different floor types and levels of washing of waterers on broiler performance and bacteria count of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Andrews, L D; Stamps, L K; Moore, R W; Newberry, L A

    1993-07-01

    The objective of the present experiment was to determine the effect of different flooring materials and washing of waterers on broiler performance. The floor treatments were 1) black, plastic-coated expanded metal, relatively rigid (B); 2) white plastic, semi-rigid, with rectangular openings (WR); 3) white plastic, semi-rigid, with square openings (WS); and 4) 3 cm of rice hull litter (C). One hanging waterer was placed in each pen. Wash treatments were 1) trough and bell washed every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday (AW); 2) wash trough only on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday (TW); and 3) the waterers were never washed after the 2nd wk (NW). Broilers reared on C has significantly lower BW than those broilers on B floors. Broilers reared on the B and WS floors had significantly higher breast blister scores and percentage of birds with blisters than broilers reared on C floors. Broilers reared on C had lower enlarged feather follicle scores than those reared on all raised floors and a lower percentage of enlarged feather follicles than those broilers reared on WS or WR floors. Broilers reared on WS+TW had significantly better feed conversion than WS+AW, B+TW, and B+AW treatments. Broilers reared on WR+TW treatment were significantly higher in breast blister score than broilers reared on WR+AW, C+TW, and C+AW treatments. Broilers reared on C+TW and C+AW treatments were significantly lower in breast blister score except for broilers reared on C+NW, WR+AW, and WS+AW treatments. Broilers reared on C+NW treatment were significantly lower in enlarged feather follicle score than those broilers reared on B+TW, WR+AW, and WS+NW treatments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. [Screening and identification of microorganisms for decolorization of molasses spent wash].

    PubMed

    Li, Bi-Jin; Liu, You-Yan; He, Kai; Teng, Fang-Ming; He, Xi-Pu; Li, Qing-Yun

    2012-09-01

    Microorganisms were screened from the natural environment for decolorization of molasses spent wash, and the isolated strains were then employed in the treatment of actual wastewater. The primary screening was carried out on agar plates supplemented with synthesized melanoidin as the target substrate, since melanoidin is one of the most refractory pigments in wastewater. Promising microorganisms were further selected through secondary screening by decolorization of untreated actual wastewater in shaking flask cultures. Gel filtration chromatography was used to determine the molecular weight distribution of pigments in molasses spent wash before and after decolorization. A strain named A5P1 was isolated from the soil samples collected, showing a good ability of decolorizing molasses spent wash, and was later identified as Aspergillus flavus by morphology and ITS sequence analysis. Experimental study of factors affecting the decolorization performance of strain A5P1 gave the optimal conditions as follows: 4.3 x 10(4) mL(-1) of inoculum size, medium with initial pH of 4.5 and cultivation at 39 degrees C. It could decolorize 53.0% of the pigments in the untreated molasses spent wash and decreased 80% of chemical oxygen demand after four-day incubation. The result of gel filtration chromatography demonstrated that both the large and small molecular weight fractions of pigments in the molasses spent wash could be removed by strain A5P1. Based on the measurement of enzyme activities, at least three different kinds of enzymes, i. e. the enzyme with H2O2-producing activity, laccase and manganese peroxidase were involved in the decolorization process. Therefore, the decolorization mechanism of strain A5P1 was preliminarily considered to be mainly biodegradation, with bioadsorption as a minor reaction.

  20. Experimental study of the constituents of space wash water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, D. F.; Colombo, G. V.

    1975-01-01

    This report presents experimental data, obtained under controlled conditions, which quantify the various constituents of human origin that may be expected in space wash water. The experiments were conducted with a simulated crew of two male and two female subjects. The data show that the expected wash water contaminants originating from human secretions are substantially lower than theoretical projections indicated. The data presented are immediately useful and may have considerable impact on the tradeoff comparisons among various unit processes and systems under consideration by NASA for recycling space wash water.

  1. Effects of soap-water wash on human epidermal penetration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hanjiang; Jung, Eui-Chang; Phuong, Christina; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard

    2016-08-01

    Skin decontamination is a primary interventional method used to decrease dermal absorption of hazardous contaminants, including chemical warfare agents, pesticides and industrial pollutants. Soap and water wash, the most common and readily available decontamination system, may enhance percutaneous absorption through the "wash-in effect." To understand better the effect of soap-water wash on percutaneous penetration, and provide insight to improving skin decontamination methods, in vitro human epidermal penetration rates of four C(14) -labeled model chemicals (hydroquinone, clonidine, benzoic acid and paraoxon) were assayed using flow-through diffusion cells. Stratum corneum (SC) absorption rates of these chemicals at various hydration levels (0-295% of the dry SC weights) were determined and compared with the results of the epidermal penetration study to clarify the effect of SC hydration on skin permeability. Results showed accelerated penetration curves of benzoic acid and paraoxon after surface wash at 30 min postdosing. Thirty minutes after washing (60 min postdosing), penetration rates of hydroquinone and benzoic acid decreased due to reduced amounts of chemical on the skin surface and in the SC. At the end of the experiment (90 min postdosing), a soap-water wash resulted in lower hydroquinone penetration, greater paraoxon penetration and similar levels of benzoic acid and clonidine penetration compared to penetration levels in the non-wash groups. The observed wash-in effect agrees with the enhancement effect of SC hydration on the SC chemical absorption rate. These results suggest SC hydration derived from surface wash to be one cause of the wash-in effect. Further, the occurrence of a wash-in effect is dependent on chemical identity and elapsed time between exposure and onset of decontamination. By reducing chemical residue quantity on skin surface and in the SC reservoir, the soap-water wash may decrease the total quantity of chemical absorbed in the

  2. Endotoxins in cotton: washing effects and size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Olenchock, S.A.; Mull, J.C.; Jones, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Endotoxin contamination was measured in washed and unwashed cottons from three distinct growing areas, California, Mississippi, and Texas. The data show differences in endotoxin contamination based upon the geographic source of the cotton. It is also shown that washing bulk cotton before the carding process results in lower endotoxin in the cotton dust. Washing conditions can affect the endotoxin levels, and all size fractions of the airborne dust contain quantifiable endotoxin contamination. Endotoxin analyses provide a simple and reliable method for monitoring the cleanliness of cotton or airborne cotton dusts.

  3. Percutaneous penetration and pharmacodynamics: Wash-in and wash-off of sunscreen and insect repellent.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jocelyn; Maibach, Howard I

    2016-01-01

    Increased awareness of skin cancer and mosquito-transmitted diseases has increased use of insect repellents and sunscreens. The challenge in setting recommendations for use and reapplication, especially when used concomitantly, lies in finding the balance between applying a durable product effective in withstanding natural and physical factors such as water, sweat, temperature and abrasion, while limiting percutaneous absorption and decreasing risk of potential dermal and systemic toxicity. Inorganic sunscreens show no or little percutaneous absorption or toxic effects in comparison to organic sunscreens, which show varying levels of dermal penetration and cutaneous adverse effects. An alternative to N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET), the traditional gold standard compound in insect repellents, picaridin appears as efficacious, has lower risk of toxicity, and when used simultaneously with sunscreen may decrease percutaneous absorption of both compounds. Conversely, combined use of DEET and sunscreen results in significantly higher absorption of both compounds. It is important to increase consumer awareness of "washing in" of various compounds leading to increased risk of toxicity, as well as differences in reapplication need due to "washing off" caused by water, sweat and abrasion. Although much remains to be studied, to maximize efficacy and decrease toxicity, contemporary research tools, including dermatopharmokinetics, should aid these prospective advances.

  4. Cross contamination of Escherichia coli O157:H7 between lettuce and wash water during home-scale washing.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Dane A; Friedrich, Loretta M; Harris, Linda J; Danyluk, Michelle D; Schaffner, Donald W

    2015-04-01

    Lettuce and leafy greens have been implicated in multiple foodborne disease outbreaks. This study quantifies cross contamination between lettuce pieces in a small-scale home environment. A five-strain cocktail of relevant Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains was used. Bacterial transfer between single inoculated lettuce leaf pieces to 10 non-inoculated lettuce leaf pieces that were washed in a stainless steel bowl of water for 30 s, 1 min, 2 min, and 5 min was quantified. Regardless of washing time, the wash water became contaminated with 90-99% of bacteria originally present on the inoculated lettuce leaf piece. The E. coli O157:H7 concentration on initially inoculated leaf pieces was reduced ∼ 2 log CFU. Each initially uncontaminated lettuce leaf piece had ∼ 1% of the E. coli O157:H7 from the inoculated lettuce piece transferred to it after washing, with more transfer occurring during the shortest (30 s) and longest (5 min) wash times. In all cases the log percent transfer rates were essentially normally distributed. In all scenarios, most of the E. coli O157:H7 (90-99%) transferred from the inoculated lettuce pieces to the wash water. Washing with plain tap water reduces levels of E. coli O157:H7 on the inoculated lettuce leaf pieces, but also spreads contamination to previously uncontaminated leaf pieces.

  5. Evaluation of DNA extraction techniques for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms in Asian elephant trunk wash samples.

    PubMed

    Kay, Meagan K; Linke, Lyndsey; Triantis, Joni; Salman, M D; Larsen, R Scott

    2011-02-01

    Rapid and sensitive diagnostic assays for the detection of tuberculous mycobacteria in elephants are lacking. DNA extraction with PCR analysis is useful for tuberculosis screening in many species but has not been validated on elephant trunk wash samples. We estimated the analytical sensitivity and specificity of three DNA extraction methods to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms in trunk wash specimens. A ZR soil microbe DNA kit (ZR) and a traditional salt and ethanol precipitation (TSEP) approach were evaluated under three different treatment conditions: heat treatment, phenol treatment, and contamination with Mycobacterium avium. A third approach, using a column filtration method, was evaluated for samples contaminated with soil. Trunk wash samples from uninfected elephants were spiked with various concentrations of M. bovis cells and subjected to the described treatment conditions prior to DNA extraction. Extracted DNA was amplified using IS6110-targeted PCR analysis. The ZR and TSEP methods detected as low as 1 to 5 M. bovis cells and 10 M. bovis cells, respectively, per 1.5 ml of trunk wash under all three conditions. Depending on the amount of soil present, the column filtration method detected as low as 5 to 50 M. bovis cells per 1.5 ml of trunk wash. Analytical specificity was assessed by DNA extraction from species of nontuberculous mycobacteria and amplification using the same PCR technique. Only M. bovis DNA was amplified, indicating 100% analytical specificity of this PCR technique. Our results indicate that these DNA extraction techniques offer promise as useful tests for detection of M. tuberculosis complex organisms in elephant trunk wash specimens.

  6. Metabolomics analysis of the toxicity pathways of triphenyl phosphate in HepaRG cells and comparison to oxidative stress mechanisms caused by acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Van den Eede, Nele; Cuykx, Matthias; Rodrigues, Robim M; Laukens, Kris; Neels, Hugo; Covaci, Adrian; Vanhaecke, Tamara

    2015-12-01

    Since the publication of REACH guidelines, the need for in vitro tools for toxicity testing has increased. We present here the development of a hepatotoxicity testing tool using human HepaRG cell cultures and metabolomics. HepaRG cells were exposed to either 4mM acetaminophen (APAP) as reference toxicant for oxidative stress or 50 μM triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) as toxicant with unknown toxicity pathways (TPs). After 72 h exposure, cells were subjected to quenching and liquid-liquid extraction which resulted in a polar and an apolar fraction. Analysis of fractions was performed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF-MS). Significantly up or down regulated metabolites were selected by univariate statistics prior to identification. In order to obtain robust and specific TP biomarkers, the experiment was also repeated using a different culture medium composition to assess which metabolites show consistent changes. Potential biomarkers belonging to different TPs were found for APAP and TPHP. For APAP, the biomarkers were related to a decrease in unsaturated phospholipids, and for TPHP to an accumulation of phosphoglycerolipids and increase of palmitoyl lysophosphatidylcholine. This first proof-of-concept opens new perspectives for the analysis of other (reference) toxicants with different TPs and it can be used to expand the in vitro tool for hepatotoxicity screening of various compounds.

  7. Qualification testing and full-scale demonstration of titanium-treated zeolite for sludge wash processing

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, W.J.

    1997-06-30

    Titanium-treated zeolite is a new ion-exchange material that is a variation of UOP (formerly Union Carbide) IONSIV IE-96 zeolite (IE-96) that has been treated with an aqueous titanium solution in a proprietary process. IE-96 zeolite, without the titanium treatment, has been used since 1988 in the West Valley Demonstration Project`s (WVDP) Supernatant Treatment System (STS) ion-exchange columns to remove Cs-137 from the liquid supernatant solution. The titanium-treated zeolite (TIE-96) was developed by Battelle-Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Following successful lab-scale testing of the PNL-prepared TIE-96, UOP was selected as a commercial supplier of the TIE-96 zeolite. Extensive laboratory tests conducted by both the WVDP and PNL indicate that the TIE-96 will successfully remove comparable quantities of Cs-137 from Tank 8D-2 high-level radioactive liquid as was done previously with IE-96. In addition to removing Cs-137, TIE-96 also removes trace quantities of Pu, as well as Sr-90, from the liquid being processed over a wide range of operating conditions: temperature, pH, and dilution. The exact mechanism responsible for the Pu removal is not fully understood. However, the Pu that is removed by the TIE-96 remains on the ion-exchange column under anticipated sludge wash processing conditions. From May 1988 to November 1990, the WVDP processed 560,000 gallons of liquid high-level radioactive supernatant waste stored in Tank 8D-2. Supernatant is an aqueous salt solution comprised primarily of soluble sodium salts. The second stage of the high-level waste treatment process began November 1991 with the initiation of sludge washing. Sludge washing involves the mixing of Tank 8D-2 contents, both sludge and liquid, to dissolve the sulfate salts present in the sludge. Two sludge washes were required to remove sulfates from the sludge.

  8. 6. VIEW OF THREE BEARS LAKE, SHOWING WASHED UP 12' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF THREE BEARS LAKE, SHOWING WASHED UP 12' x 12' DAM SUPPORT TIMBERS, LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SOUTH SIDE OF LAKE - Three Bears Lake & Dams, North of Marias Pass, East Glacier Park, Glacier County, MT

  9. 7. CLOSEUP VIEW OF WASHED UP 12' x 12' DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. CLOSE-UP VIEW OF WASHED UP 12' x 12' DAM SUPPORT TIMBERS, THREE BEARS LAKE, LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SOUTH SIDE OF LAKE - Three Bears Lake & Dams, North of Marias Pass, East Glacier Park, Glacier County, MT

  10. 29. CIRCULAR WASH BASIN, TOILETS ABOVE ROOF PANEL STORAGE AREA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. CIRCULAR WASH BASIN, TOILETS ABOVE ROOF PANEL STORAGE AREA. VIEW TO WEST-NORTHWEST. - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. SOIL WASHING TREATABILITY TESTS FOR PESTICIDE- CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1987 Sand Creek Operable Unit 5 record of decision (ROD) identified soil washing as the selected technology to remediate soils contaminated with high levels of organochlorine pesticides, herbicides, and metals. Initial treatability tests conducted to assess the applicability...

  12. Control of IPMSM drive system for drum washing machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woncheol; Park, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Jung-Hyo; Yu, Jae-Sung; Kim, Gyu-Sik; Won, Chung-Yuen

    2007-12-01

    The use of the interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM) has increased in the industrial field because of its excellent characteristics such as high efficiency, wide range of speed operation, and flexibility of the rotor structure. Therefore, IPMSM, especially one using the rare earth permanent magnet, is being actively studied. In IPMSM using the rare earth permanent magnet, typically the permanent magnet is deeply embedded in the rotor. The washing machine has large load variation and needs high torque. So, IPMSM is better than any other motor types for washing machines. This paper suggests a control algorithm of IPMSM for washing machines. Some experimental results are given in order to show the feasibility of the proposed control schemes for washing machines.

  13. [The effectiveness of ozonated water for hand washing before surgery].

    PubMed

    Isosu, T; Kan, K; Hayashi, T; Fujii, M

    2001-06-01

    Using an ozonated water-dispensing machine for sterilization of hands (Mediaqua MA-III; Core Medical Co., Ltd, Tokyo, Japan), we investigated the effectiveness of ozonated water as a disinfectant for hand washing before surgery. The effectiveness of this new hand-washing method, using 4 ppm of ozonated water, which is expected to have a short-term bactericidal effect, and 0.2% benzalkonium chloride/83% ethanol solution (Welpas), which is expected to have a long-term bactericidal effect, was compared with that of the conventional hand-washing method (Fürbringer's method using a scrubbing agent containing povidone-iodine). The results showed no significant differences in the numbers of live bacteria and exponential reduction rates in live bacteria. Thus, this new method for hand washing using ozonated water is an effective method for sterilization of the hands before surgery.

  14. 22. Bosun's locker from port side, washing machine, and bottom ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Bosun's locker from port side, washing machine, and bottom of ladder to buoy deck. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE SUMAC, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, 4640 Urquhart Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA

  15. PARTS WASHING ALTERNATIVES STUDY - UNITED STATES COAST GUARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report has been written to assist the United States Coast Guard (USCG) industrial managers in determining the most cost effective and environmentally acceptable parts washing alternatives for their specific applications. An; evaluation was conducted on four different cleane...

  16. Documentation of a decision framework to support enhanced sludge washing

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    This document describes a proposed decision model that, if developed to its fullest, can provide a wide range of analysis options and insights to pretreatment/sludge washing alternatives. A recent decision has been made to terminate this work

  17. Emissions of microplastic fibers from microfiber fleece during domestic washing.

    PubMed

    Pirc, U; Vidmar, M; Mozer, A; Kržan, A

    2016-11-01

    Microplastics are found in marine and freshwater environments; however, their specific sources are not yet well understood. Understanding sources will be of key importance in efforts to reduce emissions into the environment. We examined the emissions of microfibers from domestic washing of a new microfiber polyester fleece textile. Analyzing released fibers collected with a 200 μm filter during 10 mild, successive washing cycles showed that emission initially decreased and then stabilized at approx. 0.0012 wt%. This value is our estimation for the long-term release of fibers during each washing. Use of detergent and softener did not significantly influence emission. Release of fibers during tumble drying was approx. 3.5 times higher than during washing.

  18. View of Steel Flume Bridge #2 crossing over wash. Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Steel Flume Bridge #2 crossing over wash. Looking downstream, southwest - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Childs System, Flume Bridge No. 2, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  19. Appraisal of guidelines for pre-operative body wash.

    PubMed

    Edström, Elisabet; Westerberg, Lisa; Henricson, Maria

    The pre-operative body wash is a strategy for reducing post-operative infection. However, there is a lack of knowledge about its importance. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the quality of guidelines for the pre-operative body wash using the AGREE instrument--35 guidelines containing instructions for the pre-operative body wash or preparation were included. The AGREE instrument was employed to establish a quality assessment framework that facilitated a comparison of the guidelines. The results were based on the six domains of the AGREE instrument, all of which were found to have low adherence. Descriptive statistics were used to present the assessment score. The AGREE instrument is useful for evaluating the quality of clinical guidelines. The development of evidence-based guidelines must include clinical activities. Further research is required to clarify the pre-operative body wash process and how it should be performed to reduce post-operative infection.

  20. Metal removal and associated binding fraction transformation in contaminated river sediment washed by different types of agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Liu, Tongzhou; Feng, Shuai; Zhang, Weihua

    2017-01-01

    In ex-situ washing, HCl, EDTA and H2O2 solutions can effectively extract heavy metals in river sediment. Nevertheless they often target different sediment components, possibly transforming metal species into more bioavailable and hence toxic ones. This study, in batch settings, investigated the influences of different types of washing agents (i.e. HCl, EDTA and H2O2) on metal (i.e. Cu and Zn) removal from contaminated river sediment, destroy or dissolution of sediment components, and transformation of metal fractions during chemical washing treatment. Additionally, bioavailability of these metals left in the washed sediment was assessed. Results showed that HCl obtained the highest Cu and Zn removal through destroying the reducible, oxidizable and residual sediment components. Meanwhile, it transformed metal fractions to acid extractable one, resulting in an increase in metal bioavailability. Thus, the feasibility of washing with HCl for sediment remediation shall be reconsidered due to the caused high metal bioavailability. EDTA was capable of removing metals via direct complexation of labile metal species and indirect dissolution of reducible and oxidizable sediment components, where the transformation of corresponding metal binding fraction may occur. H2O2 obtained the lowest total Cu and Zn removal, but it preferentially removed the oxidizable metal species by oxidizing sulfides in the sediment. The bioavailable levels of Cu and Zn in the sediment washed by EDTA or H2O2 seemed not increase. To maintain a good balance between labile metal species removal and avoiding increase of metal bioavailability, EDTA and H2O2 are promising additives for metal removal by sediment washing. PMID:28350832

  1. Metal removal and associated binding fraction transformation in contaminated river sediment washed by different types of agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Liu, Tongzhou; Feng, Shuai; Zhang, Weihua

    2017-01-01

    In ex-situ washing, HCl, EDTA and H2O2 solutions can effectively extract heavy metals in river sediment. Nevertheless they often target different sediment components, possibly transforming metal species into more bioavailable and hence toxic ones. This study, in batch settings, investigated the influences of different types of washing agents (i.e. HCl, EDTA and H2O2) on metal (i.e. Cu and Zn) removal from contaminated river sediment, destroy or dissolution of sediment components, and transformation of metal fractions during chemical washing treatment. Additionally, bioavailability of these metals left in the washed sediment was assessed. Results showed that HCl obtained the highest Cu and Zn removal through destroying the reducible, oxidizable and residual sediment components. Meanwhile, it transformed metal fractions to acid extractable one, resulting in an increase in metal bioavailability. Thus, the feasibility of washing with HCl for sediment remediation shall be reconsidered due to the caused high metal bioavailability. EDTA was capable of removing metals via direct complexation of labile metal species and indirect dissolution of reducible and oxidizable sediment components, where the transformation of corresponding metal binding fraction may occur. H2O2 obtained the lowest total Cu and Zn removal, but it preferentially removed the oxidizable metal species by oxidizing sulfides in the sediment. The bioavailable levels of Cu and Zn in the sediment washed by EDTA or H2O2 seemed not increase. To maintain a good balance between labile metal species removal and avoiding increase of metal bioavailability, EDTA and H2O2 are promising additives for metal removal by sediment washing.

  2. Assessment and optimization of an ultrasound-assisted washing process using organic solvents for polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Bezama, Alberto; Flores, Alejandra; Araneda, Alberto; Barra, Ricardo; Pereira, Eduardo; Hernández, Víctor; Moya, Heriberto; Konrad, Odorico; Quiroz, Roberto

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this work was to evaluate a washing process that uses organic solutions for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated soil, and includes an ultrasound pre-treatment step to reduce operational times and organic solvent losses. In a preliminary trial, the suitability of 10 washing solutions of different polarities were tested, from which three n-hexane-based solutions were selected for further evaluation. A second set of experiments was designed using a three-level Taguchi L27 orthogonal array to model the desorption processes of seven different PCB congeners in terms of the variability of their PCB concentration levels, polarity of the washing solution, sonication time, the ratio washing solution/soil, number of extraction steps and total washing time. Linear models were developed for the desorption processes of all congeners. These models provide a good fit with the results obtained. Moreover, statistically significant outcomes were achieved from the analysis of variance tests carried out. It was determined that sonication time and ratio of washing solution/soil were the most influential process parameters. For this reason they were studied in a third set of experiments, constructed as a full factorial design. The process was eventually optimized, achieving desorption rates of more than 90% for all congeners, thus obtaining concentrations lower than 5 ppb in all cases. The use of an ultrasound-assisted soil washing process for PCB-contaminated soils that uses organic solvents seems therefore to be a viable option, especially with the incorporation of an extra step in the sonication process relating to temperature control, which is intended to prevent the loss of the lighter congeners.

  3. Enhanced antimicrobial effect of organic acid washing against foodborne pathogens on broccoli by vacuum impregnation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun-Won; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-01-18

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of vacuum impregnation applied to the washing process for removal of Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes from broccoli surfaces. Broccoli was inoculated with the two foodborne pathogens and treated with simple dipping washing or with vacuum impregnation in 2% malic acid for 5, 10, 20, or 30 min. There were two methods of vacuum impregnation: continuous and intermittent. After 30 min of 101.3 kPa (=14.7 psi, simple dipping), 61.3 kPa (=8.9 psi), and 21.3 kPa (=3.1 psi) of continuous vacuum impregnation treatment, there were 1.6, 2.0, and 2.4 log 10 CFU/g reductions of S. Typhimurium and 1.5, 1.7, and 2.3 log 10 CFU/g reductions of L. monocytogenes, respectively. After 30 min of 101.3, 61.3, and 21.3 kPa of intermittent vacuum impregnation treatment, there were 1.5, 2.3, and 3.7 log 10 CFU/g reductions of S. Typhimurium and 1.6, 2.1, and 3.2 log 10 CFU/g reductions of L. monocytogenes, respectively. Scanning electron photomicrographs showed that bacteria tend to attach to or become entrapped in protective sites after simple wash processing (dipping). However, most bacteria were washed out of protective sites after intermittent treatment. Direct treatment of cell suspensions with vacuum impregnation showed that it had no inactivation capacity in itself since there were no significant differences (P ≥ 0.05) between the reduction rates of non- and vacuum impregnation treatment. These results demonstrate that the increased antimicrobial effect of vacuum impregnation can be attributed to increased accessibility of sanitizer and an enhanced washing effect in protected sites on produce. Color, texture and titratable acidity values of broccoli treated with intermittent vacuum impregnation in 2% malic acid for 30 min were not significantly (P ≥ 0.05) different from those of untreated samples even though a storage interval was needed for titratable acidity values to be reduced to levels comparable to those of

  4. Immunotoxicity of washing soda in a freshwater sponge of India.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Ray, Mitali; Ray, Sajal

    2015-03-01

    The natural habitat of sponge, Eunapius carteri faces an ecotoxicological threat of contamination by washing soda, a common household cleaning agent of India. Washing soda is chemically known as sodium carbonate and is reported to be toxic to aquatic organisms. Domestic effluent, drain water and various human activities in ponds and lakes have been identified as the major routes of washing soda contamination of water. Phagocytosis and generation of cytotoxic molecules are important immunological responses offered by the cells of sponges against environmental toxins and pathogens. Present study involves estimation of phagocytic response and generation of cytotoxic molecules like superoxide anion, nitric oxide and phenoloxidase in E. carteri under the environmentally realistic concentrations of washing soda. Sodium carbonate exposure resulted in a significant decrease in the phagocytic response of sponge cells under 4, 8, 16 mg/l of the toxin for 96h and all experimental concentrations of the toxin for 192h. Washing soda exposure yielded an initial increase in the generation of the superoxide anion and nitric oxide followed by a significant decrease in generation of these cytotoxic agents. Sponge cell generated a high degree of phenoloxidase activity under the experimental exposure of 2, 4, 8, 16 mg/l of sodium carbonate for 96 and 192 h. Washing soda induced alteration of phagocytic and cytotoxic responses of E. carteri was indicative to an undesirable shift in their immune status leading to the possible crises of survival and propagation of sponges in their natural habitat.

  5. Pollutant removal from oily wastewater discharged from car washes through sedimentation-coagulation.

    PubMed

    Rubí, H; Fall, C; Ortega, R E

    2009-01-01

    Wastewater from car washes represents a potential problem for the sewer system due to its emulsified oils and suspended material. Treatment of wastewater discharged from four car washes was investigated by sedimentation and coagulation. The effect of the coagulants Servical P (aluminium hydroxychloride), Servican 50 (poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)), aluminium sulfate and ferric chloride was evaluated. The achieved removal using sedimentation was of 82%, 88% 73% and 51% for oils, total suspended solids, COD, and turbidity, respectively. In the treatment by coagulation we achieved average efficiencies nearly to 74% for COD removal, greater than 88% in the case of total suspended solids removal and 92% in the case of turbidity and except the performance of Servican 50 greater than 90% in oil removal. We concluded that the oil residual concentration and COD in the treated water allows pouring it in the sewer system complying with the limits of the Mexican rule NOM-002-ECOL-1996 and it is possible even its reuse, at least in the case of the chassis washing of cars.

  6. Natural attenuation of NDMA precursors in an urban, wastewater-dominated wash.

    PubMed

    Woods, Gwen C; Dickenson, Eric R V

    2016-02-01

    N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is a disinfection by-product (DBP) that is potentially carcinogenic and has been found to occur in drinking water treatment systems impacted with treated wastewater. A major gap in NDMA research is an understanding of the persistence of wastewater-derived precursors within the natural environment. This research sought to fill this knowledge gap by surveying NDMA precursors across the length of a wastewater effluent-dominated wash. Significant precursor reduction (17%) was found to occur from introduction into the wash to a point 9 h downstream. This reduction translates into a half-life of roughly 32 h for bulk NDMA precursors. Further laboratory experiments examining rates of photolysis, biodegradation and loss to sediments, illustrated that both photolytic and biological degradation were effective removal mechanisms for NDMA precursors. Loss to sediments that were acquired from the wash did not appear to reduce NDMA precursors in the water column, although a control conducted with DI water provided evidence that significant NDMA precursors could be released from autoclaved sediments (suggesting that sorption does occur). Microbial experiments revealed that microbes associated with sediments were much more effective at degrading precursors than microbes within the water column. Overall, this study demonstrated that natural processes are capable of attenuating NDMA precursors relatively quickly within the environment, and that utilities might benefit from maximizing source water residency time in the environment, prior to introduction into treatment plants.

  7. Induced phytoextraction/soil washing of lead using biodegradable chelate and permeable barriers.

    PubMed

    Kos, Bostjan; Lestan, Domen

    2003-02-01

    Chelate-induced remediation has been proposed as an effective tool for the extraction of lead (Pb) from contaminated soils by plants. However, side-effects, mainly mobilization and leaching of Pb, raise environmental concerns. Biodegradable, synthetic organic chelate ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS), and commonly used ethylenedimanetetraacetic acid (EDTA) were used for induced phytoextraction with a test plant Brassica rapa and in situ washing of soil contaminated with 1350 mg/kg of Pb. Horizontal permeable barriers were placed 20 cm deep in soil columns and tested for their ability to prevent leaching of Pb. The reactive materials in the barriers were nutrient enriched vermiculite, peat or agricultural hydrogel, and apatite. EDTA and EDDS addition increased Pb concentrations in the test plant by 158 and 89 times compared to the control, to 817 and 464 mg/kg, respectively. In EDTA treatments, approximately 25% or more of total initial soil Pb was leached in single cycle of chelate addition. In EDDS treatments, 20% of the initial Pb was leached from columns with no barrier, while barriers with vermiculite or hydrogel and apatite decreased leaching by more than 60 times, to 0.35%. 11.6% of total initial Pb was washed from the soil above the barrier with vermiculite and apatite, where almost all leached Pb was accumulated. Results indicate that use of biodegradable chelate EDDS and permeable barriers may lead to environmentally safe induced Pb phytoextraction and in situ washing of Pb.

  8. Extraction agents for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from soil in soil washing technologies.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ee Von; Gan, Suyin; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Poh, Phaik Eong

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil have been recognised as a serious health and environmental issue due to their carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic properties. One of the commonly employed soil remediation techniques to clean up such contamination is soil washing or solvent extraction. The main factor which governs the efficiency of this process is the solubility of PAHs in the extraction agent. Past field-scale soil washing treatments for PAH-contaminated soil have mainly employed organic solvents or water which is either toxic and costly or inefficient in removing higher molecular weight PAHs. Thus, the present article aims to provide a review and discussion of the alternative extraction agents that have been studied, including surfactants, biosurfactants, microemulsions, natural surfactants, cyclodextrins, vegetable oil and solution with solid phase particles. These extraction agents have been found to remove PAHs from soil at percentages ranging from 47 to 100% for various PAHs.

  9. Slurry filtration and cake washing after the HCl-leach of magnesite and serpentine—continuous washing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, Denis; Nagamori, Meguru

    1994-06-01

    Four different ores of magnesite and serpentine were leached with hydrochloric acid to produce concentrated magnesium chloride liquors. The neutralized slurries were filtered at a constant pressure, and the cakes were washed with water. As for filtration, the mass balance was calculated based on magnesium analyses, while the Darcy-Ruth equation was used to investigate the kinetics and assess the specific resistance of cakes. As for washing, the mass balance and kinetics were accounted for in terms of a continuous mathematical model, which is compatible with the Moncrieff equation. This new model explains well the washing test results. Washing operations can be optimized only in economical terms, and a complete set of mathematical formulae was presented for the optimization procedure.

  10. The Potential of Wash-and-Dry Toilets to Improve the Toileting Experience for Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Biddison, James R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the feasibility of using a "wash-and-dry" toilet in the nursing home. Design and Methods: We used a controlled comparison baseline-versus-treatment design with 22 female nursing home residents aged 75 and older living in a 562-bed, not-for-profit nursing home facility in Maryland. The Luscence Luxury Lavage…

  11. Additive approach for inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Shigella spp. on contaminated fresh fruits and vegetables using bacteriophage cocktail and produce wash.

    PubMed

    Magnone, Joshua P; Marek, Patrick J; Sulakvelidze, Alexander; Senecal, Andre G

    2013-08-01

    The incidence of foodborne outbreaks involving fresh produce is of worldwide concern. Lytic bacteriophage cocktails and a levulinic acid produce wash were investigated for their effectiveness against the foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shigella spp., and Salmonella on broccoli, cantaloupe, and strawberries. Inoculated samples were treated with bacteriophage cocktails (BC) before storage at 10°C for 24 h, a levulinic acid produce wash (PW) after storage at 10°C for 24 h, or a combination of the washes (BCPW) before and after storage. All three treatments were compared against a 200-ppm free available chlorine wash. Wash solutions were prepared using potable water and water with an increased organic content of 2.5 g/liter total dissolved solids and total organic carbon. BCPW was the most effective treatment, producing the highest log reductions in the pathogens. Produce treated with BCPW in potable water with a PW exposure time of 5 min resulted in the highest reduction of each pathogen for all samples tested. The type of produce and wash solution had significant effects on the efficacy of the individual treatments. The chlorine wash in water with higher organic content was the least effective treatment tested. An additive effect of BCPW was seen in water with higher organic content, resulting in greater than 4.0-log reductions in pathogens. Our findings indicate that the combination of antimicrobial BC with a commercial produce wash is a very effective method for treating produce contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, Shigella spp., and Salmonella even in the presence of high loads of organic matter.

  12. Selecting Cells for Bioartificial Liver Devices and the Importance of a 3D Culture Environment: A Functional Comparison between the HepaRG and C3A Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    van Wenum, Martien; Adam, Aziza A.A.; Hakvoort, Theodorus B.M.; Hendriks, Erik J.; Shevchenko, Valery; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Chamuleau, Robert A.F.M.; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the first clinical trials on Bioartificial Livers (BALs) loaded with a proliferative human hepatocyte cell source have started. There are two cell lines that are currently in an advanced state of BAL development; HepaRG and HepG2/C3A. In this study we aimed to compare both cell lines on applicability in BALs and to identify possible strategies for further improvement. We tested both cell lines in monolayer- and BAL cultures on growth characteristics, hepatic differentiation, nitrogen-, carbohydrate-, amino acid- and xenobiotic metabolism. Interestingly, both cell lines adapted the hepatocyte phenotype more closely when cultured in BALs; e.g. monolayer cultures produced lactate, while BAL cultures showed diminished lactate production (C3A) or conversion to elimination (HepaRG), and urea cycle activity increased upon BAL culturing in both cell lines. HepaRG-BALs outperformed C3A-BALs on xenobiotic metabolism, ammonia elimination and lactate elimination, while protein synthesis was comparable. In BAL cultures of both cell lines ammonia elimination correlated positively with glutamine production and glutamate consumption, suggesting ammonia elimination was mainly driven by the balance between glutaminase and glutamine synthetase activity. Both cell lines lacked significant urea cycle activity and both required multiple culture weeks before reaching optimal differentiation in BALs. In conclusion, culturing in BALs enhanced hepatic functionality of both cell lines and from these, the HepaRG cells are the most promising proliferative cell source for BAL application. PMID:27489500

  13. EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

    2008-05-01

    The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The

  14. Camel milk modulates the expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-regulated genes, Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1, in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Korashy, Hesham M; El Gendy, Mohamed A M; Alhaider, Abdulqader A; El-Kadi, Ayman O

    2012-01-01

    There is a traditional belief in the Middle East that camel milk may aid in prevention and treatment of numerous cases of cancer yet, the exact mechanism was not investigated. Therefore, we examined the ability of camel milk to modulate the expression of a well-known cancer-activating gene, Cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1), and cancer-protective genes, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1) and glutathione S-transferase a1 (Gsta1), in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cell line. Our results showed that camel milk significantly inhibited the induction of Cyp1a1 gene expression by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most potent Cyp1a1 inducer and known carcinogenic chemical, at mRNA, protein, and activity levels in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, camel milk significantly decreased the xenobiotic responsive element (XRE)-dependent luciferase activity, suggesting a transcriptional mechanism is involved. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of camel milk was associated with a proportional increase in heme oxygenase 1. On the other hand, camel milk significantly induced Nqo1 and Gsta1 mRNA expression level in a concentration-dependent fashion. The RNA synthesis inhibitor, actinomycin D, completely blocked the induction of Nqo1 mRNA by camel milk suggesting the requirement of de novo RNA synthesis through a transcriptional mechanism. In conclusion, camel milk modulates the expression of Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1 at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels.

  15. Opsonisation of nanoparticles prepared from poly(β-hydroxybutyrate) and poly(trimethylene carbonate)-b-poly(malic acid) amphiphilic diblock copolymers: Impact on the in vitro cell uptake by primary human macrophages and HepaRG hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Vene, Elise; Barouti, Ghislaine; Jarnouen, Kathleen; Gicquel, Thomas; Rauch, Claudine; Ribault, Catherine; Guillaume, Sophie M; Cammas-Marion, Sandrine; Loyer, Pascal

    2016-11-20

    The present work reports the investigation of the biocompatibility, opsonisation and cell uptake by human primary macrophages and HepaRG cells of nanoparticles (NPs) formulated from poly(β-malic acid)-b-poly(β-hydroxybutyrate) (PMLA-b-PHB) and poly(β-malic acid)-b-poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PMLA-b-PTMC) diblock copolymers, namely PMLA800-b-PHB7300, PMLA4500-b-PHB4400, PMLA2500-b-PTMC2800 and PMLA4300-b-PTMC1400. NPs derived from PMLA-b-PHB and PMLA-b-PTMC do not trigger lactate dehydrogenase release and do not activate the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines demonstrating the excellent biocompatibility of these copolymers derived nano-objects. Using a protein adsorption assay, we demonstrate that the binding of plasma proteins is very low for PMLA-b-PHB-based nano-objects, and higher for those prepared from PMLA-b-PTMC copolymers. Moreover, a more efficient uptake by macrophages and HepaRG cells is observed for NPs formulated from PMLA-b-PHB copolymers compared to that of PMLA-b-PTMC-based NPs. Interestingly, the uptake in HepaRG cells of NPs formulated from PMLA800-b-PHB7300 is much higher than that of NPs based on PMLA4500-b-PHB4400. In addition, the cell internalization of PMLA800-b-PHB7300 based-NPs, probably through endocytosis, is strongly increased by serum pre-coating in HepaRG cells but not in macrophages. Together, these data strongly suggest that the binding of a specific subset of plasmatic proteins onto the PMLA800-b-PHB7300-based NPs favors the HepaRG cell uptake while reducing that of macrophages.

  16. In vitro evaluation of major in vivo drug metabolic pathways using primary human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells in suspension and a dynamic three-dimensional bioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Darnell, Malin; Ulvestad, Maria; Ellis, Ewa; Weidolf, Lars; Andersson, Tommy B

    2012-10-01

    Major human specific metabolites, not detected during in vivo and in vitro preclinical studies, may cause unexpected drug interactions and toxicity in human and delays in clinical programs. Thus, reliable preclinical tools for the detection of major human metabolites are of high importance. The aim of this study was to compare major drug metabolic pathways in HepaRG cells, a human hepatoma cell line, to fresh human hepatocytes, cryopreserved human hepatocytes, and human in vivo data. Furthermore, the maintenance of cytochrome P450 (P450) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activities in a dynamic three-dimensional (3D) bioreactor were evaluated over time by using HepaRG cells and human hepatocytes. (14)C-diclofenac and a candidate from AstraZeneca's drug development program, (14)C-AZD6610, which are metabolized by P450 and UGT in vivo, were used as model substrates. The proportion of relevant biotransformation pathways of the investigated drug was clearly different in the various cell systems. The hydroxylation route was favored in primary human hepatocytes, whereas the glucuronidation route was favored in HepaRG cells. The human in vivo metabolite profile of AZD6610 was best represented by human hepatocytes, whereas all major diclofenac metabolites were detected in HepaRG cells. Moreover, the metabolite profiles in cryopreserved and fresh human hepatocytes were essentially the same. The liver bioreactor using both fresh human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells retained biotransformation capacity over 1 week. Thus, the incubation time can be increased from a few hours in suspension to several days in 3D cultures, which opens up for detection of metabolites from slowly metabolized drugs.

  17. [Comparison of antibacterial effects of different antiseptics after hand washing].

    PubMed

    Buluş, Nesrin; Kaleli, Ilknur

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 4% chlorhexidine gluconate, 7.5% povidone iodine and liquid soap, which are used as hand washing solutions for the immediate, cumulative and residual effects in bacterial growth. For this purpose, 18 volunteers washed their hands with 7.5% povidone iodine, 4% chlorhexidine gluconate and liquid soap by applying standard hygienic hand washing technique. In order to find out the bacterial amount in the hands of study group, glove liquid test was used. For the evaluation of immediate effects, samples were collected just after the washing procedure, for the residual effects samples were collected from gloved hands after 3 hours, and for the cumulative effects, samples were collected after 5 days with daily hand washings. It is found that the immediate effects of 4% chlorhexidine gluconate was superior than others, and 7.5% povidone iodine was superior to liquid soap. There was no difference between 4% chlorhexidine gluconate and 7.5% povidone iodine for residual effects. The cumulative effects were observed for 4% chlorhexidine gluconate and 7.5% povidone iodine, while there was no cumulative effect for liquid soap. According to these results, it can be suggested that 4% chlorhexidine gluconate can be used as a reliable antiseptic agent in the hospitals, especially for laboratories, intensive care units and operating rooms, owing to its favourable immediate, residual and cumulative effects.

  18. The potential impact of washing machines on laundry malodour generation.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, K; Hill, K; Day, K; Perry, J D; Dean, J R

    2013-04-01

    A multidisciplinary approach has been adopted to investigate and identify the source of malodour in washing machines and the potential for cross-contamination of laundry. Four washing machines were olfactively graded, and the number of colony-forming units (CFUs) bacteria was determined in four specific locations. Then, samples of terry-towel and fleece were washed, without the use of detergent, in the machines, and the occurrence of malodour over a 52-h period was assessed. Analysis of the scrapings from the four locations in the two malodorous machines identified a plethora of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by either olfactory detection or mass spectral identification post-gas chromatographic separation. In addition, microbiological analysis from the swabs from the four locations within all four washing machines was carried out. Quantitative analysis of VOCs from 66 microbiological isolates from either the washing machines or fabrics was carried out. In total, 10 VOCs were identified: dimethyl disulfide, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2,4-dithiapentane, dimethyl trisulfide, 2-tridecanone, indole, 2-phenylethanol, isovaleric acid, isobutyric acid and 1-undecene.

  19. Consumers' Risk Perception of Household Cleaning and Washing Products.

    PubMed

    Bearth, Angela; Miesler, Linda; Siegrist, Michael

    2016-05-10

    A large share of accidental and nonaccidental poisonings are caused by household cleaning and washing products, such as drain cleaner or laundry detergent. The main goal of this article was to investigate consumers' risk perception and misconceptions of a variety of cleaning and washing products in order to inform future risk communication efforts. For this, a sorting task including 33 commonly available household cleaning and washing products was implemented. A total of 60 female consumers were asked to place the cleaning and washing products on a reference line 3 m in length with the poles "dangerous" and "not dangerous." The gathered data were analyzed qualitatively and by means of multidimensional scaling, cluster analysis, and linear regression. The dimensionality of the sorting data suggests that both analytically (i.e., written and graphical hazard notes and perceived effectiveness) and intuitively driven risk judgments (i.e., eco vs. regular products) were applied by the participants. Furthermore, results suggest the presence of misconceptions, particularly related to consumers' perceptions of eco cleaning products, which were generally regarded as safer than their regular counterparts. Future risk communication should aim at dispelling these misconceptions and promoting accurate risk perceptions of particular household cleaning and washing products.

  20. Combining sieving and washing, a way to treat MSWI boiler fly ash.

    PubMed

    De Boom, Aurore; Degrez, Marc

    2015-05-01

    Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) fly ashes contain some compounds that could be extracted and valorised. A process based on wet sieving and washing steps has been developed aiming to reach this objective. Such unique combination in MSWI fly ash treatment led to a non-hazardous fraction from incineration fly ashes. More specifically, MSWI Boiler Fly Ash (BFA) was separately sampled and treated. The BFA finer particles (13wt%) were found to be more contaminated in Pb and Zn than the coarser fractions. After three washing steps, the coarser fractions presented leaching concentrations acceptable to landfill for non-hazardous materials so that an eventual subsequent valorisation may be foreseen. At the contrary, too much Pb leached from the finest particles and this fraction should be further treated. Wet sieving and washing permit thus to reduce the leachability of MSWI BFA and to concentrate the Pb and Zn contamination in a small (in particle size and volume) fraction. Such combination would therefore constitute a straightforward and efficient basis to valorise coarse particles from MSWI fly ashes.

  1. 100 Area soil washing: Bench scale tests on 116-F-4 pluto crib soil

    SciTech Connect

    Field, J.G.

    1994-06-10

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a bench-scale treatability study on a pluto crib soil sample from 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of physical separation (wet sieving), treatment processes (attrition scrubbing, and autogenous surface grinding), and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating radioactively-contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The soil washing treatability study was conducted on a soil sample from the 116-F-4 Pluto Crib that had been dug up as part of an excavation treatability study. Trace element analyses of this soil showed no elevated concentrations above typically uncontaminated soil background levels. Data on the distribution of radionuclide in various size fractions indicated that the soil-washing tests should be focused on the gravel and sand fractions of the 116-F-4 soil. The radionuclide data also showed that {sup 137}Cs was the only contaminant in this soil that exceeded the test performance goal (TPG). Therefore, the effectiveness of subsequent soil-washing tests for 116-F-4 soil was evaluated on the basis of activity attenuation of {sup 137}Cs in the gravel- and sand-size fractions.

  2. Optimal operational conditions for the electrochemical regeneration of a soil washing EDTA solution.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Raffaele; Esposito, Giovanni

    2009-02-01

    The present research deals with the optimization of the operating parameters (cathode replacement time, hydraulic retention time, current intensity and pH) of an electrochemical process aimed at the regeneration of a soil washing EDTA solution used for heavy metal extraction from a natural contaminated soil (excavated from Bellolampo, Palermo, Italy), which was vastly polluted with Cu (59 261.0 mg kg(-1)), Pb (14 178.1 mg kg(-1)) and Zn (14 084.9 mg kg(-1)). The electrolytic regeneration of the exhausted washing solution was performed in a laboratory scale electrolytic cell with 50 ml each cathodic and anodic chambers divided by a cation exchange membrane. Experiments II and III showed maximum Cu and Zn removal efficiencies from the EDTA solution, of 99.2+/-0.2 and 31.5+/-9.3%, respectively, when a current intensity of 0.25 A and a hydraulic retention time of 60 min were applied to the electrolytic cell, while the maximum Pb removal efficiency of 70.9+/-4.6% was obtained with a current intensity of 1.25 A and a hydraulic retention time of 60 min. During Experiment I the overall heavy metals removal efficiency was stable and close to 90% up to 20 h, while decreased to values lower than 80% after 40 h, indicating the occurrence of a significant saturation of the cathode graphite bed between 20 and 40 h. The capability of the regenerated EDTA solution to treat heavy metals polluted soils was tested in further experiments applying both a single and a multi-step washing treatment procedure. In particular, the latter showed the feasibility to increase heavy metal soil extractions over subsequent washing steps with Cu, Pb and Zn total removal efficiencies of 52.6, 100.0 and 41.3%, respectively.

  3. Soil washing results for mixed waste pond soils at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.A.

    1991-09-01

    Soil washing technology was assessed as a means for remediating soil contaminated with mixed wastes primarily composed of heavy metals and radionuclides. The soils at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site are considered suitable for soil washing because of their relatively low quantities of silt and clay. However, in a limited number of soil washing experiments using soils from different locations in the north pond of the 300 Area, the degree of decontamination achieved for the coarse fraction of the soil varied considerably. Part of this variation appears to be due to the presence of a discrete layer of contaminated sediment found in some of the samples. 7 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Design, development and demonstration of an improved bird washing machine.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, H; Monsef, H; Moghadami, M; Zare, M; Armandei, A

    2014-07-01

    Since oil was first extracted, pollution of the seas and oceans or adjacent coasts has been an obstacle for the oil industry and environmental activists. The major concern is oil discharge into the water which may lead to birds' affliction or death, besides putting marine life in jeopardy. This paper presents the first description of the design and implementation of a new bird washing machine that can be utilized for cleaning of oil-coated birds with the minimum of stress. The machine is equipped with a pneumatic system comprised of 19 moving nozzles which evenly cover the bird's body and is designed to be used in contaminated environments where a vast number of birds are affected. Experimental trials show an improvement in operation efficiency compared to other methods in a reduction in washing time, energy consumption and a decrease in fatality rate of washed birds.

  5. Increasing hand washing compliance with a simple visual cue.

    PubMed

    Ford, Eric W; Boyer, Brian T; Menachemi, Nir; Huerta, Timothy R

    2014-10-01

    We tested the efficacy of a simple, visual cue to increase hand washing with soap and water. Automated towel dispensers in 8 public bathrooms were set to present a towel either with or without activation by users. We set the 2 modes to operate alternately for 10 weeks. Wireless sensors were used to record entry into bathrooms. Towel and soap consumption rates were checked weekly. There were 97,351 hand-washing opportunities across all restrooms. Towel use was 22.6% higher (P=.05) and soap use was 13.3% higher (P=.003) when the dispenser presented the towel without user activation than when activation was required. Results showed that a visual cue can increase hand-washing compliance in public facilities.

  6. Wash-out in N2-dominated leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn-Woernle, F.

    2010-08-01

    We study the wash-out of a cosmological baryon asymmetry produced via leptogenesis by subsequent interactions. Therefore we focus on a scenario in which a lepton asymmetry is established in the out-of-equilibrium decays of the next-to-lightest right-handed neutrino. We apply the full classical Boltzmann equations without the assumption of kinetic equilibrium and including all quantum statistical factors to calculate the wash-out of the lepton asymmetry by interactions of the lightest right-handed state. We include scattering processes with top quarks in our analysis. This is of particular interest since the wash-out is enhanced by scatterings and the use of mode equations with quantum statistical distribution functions. In this way we provide a restriction on the parameter space for this scenario.

  7. Gravity and magnetic study of Yucca Wash, southwest Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Langenheim, V.E.; Ponce, D.A.; Oliver, H.W.; Sikora, R.F.

    1993-12-31

    Gravity and ground magnetic data were collected along five traverses across and one traverse along Yucca Wash in the southwest quadrant of the Nevada Test Site. Two additional ground magnetic profiles were collected approximately 100 m to either side of the longitudinal profile. These data do not indicate major vertical offsets greater than 100 m using a density contrast of 0.2 to 0.3 g/cm{sup 3} along the proposed Yucca Wash fault. A broad magnetic high coincides with the location of the hydrologic gradient. Density profiling, a technique used to determine the average density of small topographic features, suggests that the density of near-surface material in the vicinity of Yucca Wash is about 2.0 g/cm{sup 3}.

  8. Increasing Hand Washing Compliance With a Simple Visual Cue

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Brian T.; Menachemi, Nir; Huerta, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the efficacy of a simple, visual cue to increase hand washing with soap and water. Automated towel dispensers in 8 public bathrooms were set to present a towel either with or without activation by users. We set the 2 modes to operate alternately for 10 weeks. Wireless sensors were used to record entry into bathrooms. Towel and soap consumption rates were checked weekly. There were 97 351 hand-washing opportunities across all restrooms. Towel use was 22.6% higher (P = .05) and soap use was 13.3% higher (P = .003) when the dispenser presented the towel without user activation than when activation was required. Results showed that a visual cue can increase hand-washing compliance in public facilities. PMID:24228670

  9. Genome-wide Analysis of Human Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) Transcriptome in Wild-type and CAR-knockout HepaRG cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Daochuan; Mackowiak, Bryan; Brayman, Timothy G.; Mitchell, Michael; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Shiew-Mei; Wang, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) modulates the transcription of numerous genes involving drug metabolism, energy homeostasis, and cell proliferation. Most functions of CAR however were defined from animal studies. Given the known species difference of CAR and the significant cross-talk between CAR and the pregnane X receptor (PXR), it is extremely difficult to decipher the exact role of human CAR (hCAR) in gene regulation, relying predominantly on pharmacological manipulations. Here, utilizing a newly generated hCAR-knockout (KO) HepaRG cell line, we carried out RNA-seq analysis of the global transcriptomes in wild-type (WT) and hCAR-KO HepaRG cells treated with CITCO, a selective hCAR agonist, phenobarbital (PB), a dual activator of hCAR and hPXR, or vehicle control. Real-time PCR assays in separate experiments were used to validate RNA-seq findings. Our results indicate that genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes are among the main clusters altered by both CITCO and PB. Specifically, CITCO significantly changed the expression of 135 genes in an hCAR-dependent manner, while PB altered the expression of 227 genes in WT cells of which 94 were simultaneously modulated in both cell lines reflecting dual effects of PB on hCAR/PXR. Notably, we found that many genes promoting cell proliferation and tumorigenesis were up-regulated in hCAR-KO cells, suggesting that hCAR may play an important role in cell growth that differs from mouse CAR. Together, our results reveal both novel and known targets of hCAR and support the role of hCAR in maintaining the homeostasis of metabolism and cell proliferation in the liver. PMID:26275810

  10. Genome-wide analysis of human constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) transcriptome in wild-type and CAR-knockout HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Daochuan; Mackowiak, Bryan; Brayman, Timothy G; Mitchell, Michael; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Shiew-Mei; Wang, Hongbing

    2015-11-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) modulates the transcription of numerous genes involving drug metabolism, energy homeostasis, and cell proliferation. Most functions of CAR however were defined from animal studies. Given the known species difference of CAR and the significant cross-talk between CAR and the pregnane X receptor (PXR), it is extremely difficult to decipher the exact role of human CAR (hCAR) in gene regulation, relying predominantly on pharmacological manipulations. Here, utilizing a newly generated hCAR-knockout (KO) HepaRG cell line, we carried out RNA-seq analysis of the global transcriptomes in wild-type (WT) and hCAR-KO HepaRG cells treated with CITCO, a selective hCAR agonist, phenobarbital (PB), a dual activator of hCAR and hPXR, or vehicle control. Real-time PCR assays in separate experiments were used to validate RNA-seq findings. Our results indicate that genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes are among the main clusters altered by both CITCO and PB. Specifically, CITCO significantly changed the expression of 135 genes in an hCAR-dependent manner, while PB altered the expression of 227 genes in WT cells of which 94 were simultaneously modulated in both cell lines reflecting dual effects of PB on hCAR/PXR. Notably, we found that many genes promoting cell proliferation and tumorigenesis were up-regulated in hCAR-KO cells, suggesting that hCAR may play an important role in cell growth that differs from mouse CAR. Together, our results reveal both novel and known targets of hCAR and support the role of hCAR in maintaining the homeostasis of metabolism and cell proliferation in the liver.

  11. Improving protein array performance: focus on washing and storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Nath, Nidhi; Hurst, Robin; Hook, Brad; Meisenheimer, Poncho; Zhao, Kate Q; Nassif, Nadine; Bulleit, Robert F; Storts, Douglas R

    2008-10-01

    For protein microarrays, maintaining protein stability during the slide processing steps of washing, drying, and storage is of major concern. Although several studies have focused on the stability of immobilized antibodies in antibody microarrays, studies on protein-protein interaction arrays and enzyme arrays are lacking. In this paper we used five bait-prey protein interaction pairs and three enzymes to optimize the washing, drying, and storage conditions for protein arrays. The protein arrays for the study were fabricated by combining HaloTag technology and cell-free protein expression. The HaloTag technology, in combination with cell-free expression, allowed rapid expression and immobilization of fusion proteins on hydrogel-coated glass slides directly from cell extracts without any prior purification. Experimental results indicate enzyme captured on glass slides undergoes significant loss of activity when washed and spin-dried using only phosphate buffer, as is typically done with antibody arrays. The impact of washing and spin-drying in phosphate buffer on protein-protein interaction arrays was minimal. However, addition of 5% glycerol to the wash buffer helps retain enzyme activity during washing and drying. We observed significant loss of enzyme activity when slides were stored dry at 4 degrees C, however immobilized enzymes remained active for 30 days when stored at -20 degrees C in 50% glycerol. We also found that cell-free extract containing HaloTag-fused enzymes could undergo multiple freeze/thaw cycles without any adverse impact on enzyme activity. The findings indicate that for large ongoing studies, proteins of interest expressed in cell-free extract can be stored at -70 degrees C and repeatedly used to print small batches of protein array slides to be used over a few weeks.

  12. Method of producing UO2 wherein methanol wash is provided

    SciTech Connect

    Sondermann, T.

    1981-03-24

    In the production of UO2, ammonium uranyl carbonate is an intermediate product wet with water and contaminated with ammonium carbonate and is washed with methanol to remove water and ammonium carbonate. The spent methanol containing 50% water and up to 10% ammonium carbonate is subjected to rectification in a column under subatmospheric pressure with cooling the top of the tower to a low temperature to retard decomposition of ammonium carbonate and condense a liquid water fraction. Clogging of the column, vapor lines and condenser by recombination of the decomposition products is prevented. The purified methanol contains less than 5% water and may be returned for further washing of ammonium uranyl carbonate.

  13. 100 Area soil washing bench-scale test procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, H.D.; Gerber, M.A.; Mattigod, S.V.; Serne, R.J.

    1993-03-01

    This document describes methodologies and procedures for conducting soil washing treatability tests in accordance with the 100 Area Soil Washing Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1992, Draft A). The objective of this treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. These data will be primarily used for determining feasibility of the individual unit operations and defining the requirements for a system, or systems, for pilot-scale testing.

  14. Effectiveness of a nonrinse, alcohol-free antiseptic hand wash.

    PubMed

    Moadab, A; Rupley, K F; Wadhams, P

    2001-06-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a novel surfactant, allantoin, and benzalkonium chloride hand sanitizer using the US Food and Drug Administration's method for testing antiseptic hand washes that podiatric physicians and other health-care personnel use. The alcohol-free product, HandClens, was compared with an alcohol-based product, Purell. Independent researchers from the California College of Podiatric Medicine conducted the study using 40 volunteer students from the class of 2001. The results show that HandClens outperformed Purell and met the regulatory requirements for a hand sanitizer. Purell failed as an antimicrobial hand wash and was less effective than a control soap used in the study.

  15. Investigation of Rheological Impacts on Sludge Batch 3 as Insoluble Solids and Wash Endpoints are Adjusted

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, T. L.

    2005-07-12

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing and immobilizing radioactive sludge slurry into a durable borosilicate glass. The DWPF has already processed three sludge batches (Sludge Batch 1A, Sludge Batch 1B, and Sludge Batch 2) and is currently processing the fourth sludge batch (Sludge Batch 3). A sludge batch is defined as a single tank of sludge slurry or a combination of sludge slurries from different tanks that has been or will be qualified before being transferred to DWPF. As a part of the Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) qualification task, rheology measurements of the sludge slurry were requested at different insoluble solids loadings. These measurements were requested in order to gain insight into potential processing problems that may occur as the insoluble solids are adjusted up or down (by concentration or dilution) during the process. As a part of this study, a portion of the ''as received'' SB3 sample was washed with inhibited water (0.015 M NaOH and 0.015 M NaNO2) to target 0.5M Na versus a measured 1M Na in the supernate. The purpose of the ''washing'' step was to allow a comparison of the SB3 rheological data to the rheological data collected for Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) and to determine if there was a dependence of the yield stress and consistency as a function of washing. The ''as received'' SB3 rheology data was also compared to SB3 simulants prepared by the Simulant Development Program in order to provide guidance for selecting a simulant that is more representative of the rheological properties of the radioactive sludge slurry. A summary of the observations, conclusions are: (1) The yield stress and plastic viscosity increased as the weight percent insoluble solids were increased for the ''as received'' and ''washed'' SB3 samples, at a fixed pH. (2) For the same insoluble solids loading, the yield stress for the SB2 sample is approximately a factor of three higher than the ''as received'' SB3 sample. There also appears to be small

  16. Potential of water-washing of rape straw on thermal properties and interactions during co-combustion with bituminous coal.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiulin; Han, Lujia; Huang, Guangqun

    2017-03-07

    The aim of this work was to study the thermal properties and interactions during co-combustion of rape straw (RS) before and after water-washing with bituminous coal. A series of experiments was conducted to investigate the properties and interactions during co-combustion of RS with bituminous coal (at 10, 20, 40 and 60% RS). The feasibility and potential of water-washing as an RS pre-treatment was also explored. Reactivity and the amount of heat released followed a quadratic trend, while changes to the degree of interactions between the fuels conformed to a cosine curve. Water-washing increased the ignition and burn-out temperatures and slightly decreased reactivity. Demineralization negatively affected the previously synergistic co-firing relationship, nevertheless, the amount of heat released increased by 10.28% and the average activation energy (146kJ/mol) was lower than that of the unwashed blend (186kJ/mol). Overall, water-washing of RS could prove a useful pre-treatment before co-combustion with bituminous coal.

  17. Laboratory and pilot scale soil washing of PAH and arsenic from a wood preservation site: changes in concentration and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Elgh-Dalgren, Kristin; Arwidsson, Zandra; Camdzija, Aida; Sjöberg, Ragnar; Ribé, Veronica; Waara, Sylvia; Allard, Bert; von Kronhelm, Thomas; van Hees, Patrick A W

    2009-12-30

    Soil washing of a soil with a mixture of both polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and As was evaluated in laboratory and pilot scale, utilizing both single and mixtures of different additives. The highest level of decontamination was achieved with a combination of 0.213 M of the chelating agent MGDA and 3.2 x CMC* of a non-ionic, alkyl glucoside surfactant at pH 12 (Ca(OH)(2)). This combination managed to reach Swedish threshold values within 1 0 min of treatment when performed at elevated temperature (50 degrees C), with initial contaminant concentrations of As=105+/-4 mg/kg and US-EPA PAH(16)=46.0+/-2.3mg/kg. The main mechanisms behind the removal were the pH effect for As and a combination of SOM ionization as a result of high pH and micellar solubilization for PAHs. Implementation of the laboratory results utilizing a pilot scale equipment did not improve the performance, which may be due to the shorter contact time between the washing solution and the particles, or changes in physical characteristics of the leaching solution due to the elevated pressure utilized. The ecotoxicological evaluation, Microtox, demonstrated that all soil washing treatments increased the toxicity of soil leachates, possibly due to increased availability of contaminants and toxicity of soil washing solutions to the test organism.

  18. Competitive Electrochemiluminescence Wash and No-Wash Immunoassays for Detection of Serum Antibodies to Smooth Brucella Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Iain; McGiven, John; Sawyer, Jason; Thirlwall, Rachel; Commander, Nicola; Stack, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Brucellosis is a bacterial zoonotic disease of major global importance. Natural hosts for Brucella species include animals of economic significance, such as cattle and small ruminants. Controlling brucellosis in natural hosts by high-throughput serological testing followed by the slaughter of seropositive animals helps to prevent disease transmission. This study aimed to convert an existing competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA), used for the serodiagnosis of brucellosis in ruminants, to two electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunoassays on the Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) platform. The first assay employed a conventional plate washing step as part of the protocol. The second was a no-wash assay, made possible by the proximity-based nature of ECL signal generation by the MSD platform. Both ECL wash and no-wash assays closely matched the parent cELISA for diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. The results also demonstrated that both ECL assays met World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) standards, as defined by results for the OIE standard serum (OIEELISASPSS). This report is the first to describe an ECL assay incorporating lipopolysaccharide, an ECL assay for serodiagnosis of a bacterial infectious disease, a separation-free (no-wash) ECL assay for the detection of serum antibodies, and the use of the MSD platform for serodiagnosis. The simple conversion of the cELISA to the MSD platform suggests that many other serodiagnostic tests could readily be converted. Furthermore, the alignment of these results with the multiplex capability of the MSD platform offers the potential of no-wash multiplex assays to screen for several diseases. PMID:19261777

  19. Continuous circulation water wash apparatus and method for cleaning radioactively contaminated garments

    SciTech Connect

    Sewter, B.R.; Clemons, L. Jr.; Battaglia, J.A.; DeBarber, T.A.

    1992-02-25

    This patent describes an apparatus for water washing fabrics and removing particulate radioactive contaminants. It comprises: a washing machine means for washing and rinsing the fabrics having a wash-water inlet, rinse water inlet, a circulation inlet, and a water outlet; a particulate removal system connected between the circulation inlet and the water outlet for continuously circulating water introduced into the washing machine means through a particulate removal means while the machine means washes and rinses the fabric, and a hydraulically closed wash-water system and rinse water inlet and the rinse water inlet, respectively, for supplying polished wash-water and polished rinse water to the washing machine means, wherein each system includes it won separate water polisher.

  20. 21 CFR 211.52 - Washing and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Washing and toilet facilities. 211.52 Section 211.52 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Buildings and...

  1. Soil washing: A preliminary assessment of its applicability to Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M A; Freeman, H D; Baker, E G; Riemath, W F

    1991-09-01

    Soil washing is being considered for treating soils at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. As a result of over 50 years of operations to produce plutonium for the US Department of Defense and research for DOE, soils in areas within the Site are contaminated with hazardous wastes and radionuclides. In the soil washing process, contaminated soil is mixed with a liquid and then physically and/or chemically treated to dissolve the contaminants into solution and/or concentrate them in a small fraction of the soil. The purpose of this procedure is to separate the contaminants from the bulk of the soil. The key to successful application is to match the types of contaminants and soil characteristics with physical-chemical methods that perform well under the existing conditions. The applicability of soil washing to Hanford Site contaminated soils must take into account both the characteristics of the oil and the type of contamination. Hanford soils typically contain up to 90% sand, gravel, and cobbles, which generally are favorable characteristics for soil washing. For example, in soil samples from the north pond in the 300 Area, 80% to 90% of the soil particles were larger than 250 {mu}m. The principal contaminants in the soil are radionuclides, heavy metals, and nitrate and sulfate salts. For most of the sites, organic contaminants are either not present or are found in very low concentration. 28 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. 23. Road view at Jim Camp Wash. Note Rainbow Museum ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Road view at Jim Camp Wash. Note Rainbow Museum at rear. Road is on east-west axis here as original design of Rainbow Museum area. Long Logs Road to left foreground. Park Road to right foreground. Looking W. - Petrified Forest National Park Roads & Bridges, Holbrook, Navajo County, AZ

  3. 49 CFR 393.78 - Windshield wiping and washing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Windshield wiping and washing systems. 393.78 Section 393.78 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR... the centerline of the windshield. Motor vehicles which depend upon vacuum to operate the...

  4. 49 CFR 393.78 - Windshield wiping and washing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Windshield wiping and washing systems. 393.78 Section 393.78 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR... the centerline of the windshield. Motor vehicles which depend upon vacuum to operate the...

  5. 49 CFR 393.78 - Windshield wiping and washing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Windshield wiping and washing systems. 393.78 Section 393.78 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR... the centerline of the windshield. Motor vehicles which depend upon vacuum to operate the...

  6. 30 CFR 1206.458 - Determination of washing allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of delivery and installation of capital equipment) which are an integral part of the wash plant. (i... of ONRR. (A) To compute depreciation, the lessee may elect to use either a straight-line depreciation... separate line on the Form MMS-4430, unless ONRR approves a different reporting procedure. (d)...

  7. Efficacy of Post-Wash Shell Egg Sanitizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine (Cl) solutions of 100-200 ppm are the standard by which post-wash shell egg sanitizers are measured. Any facility that packages eggs with the USDA grade shields must use a comparable sanitizer. While chlorine solutions are inexpensive, non-corrosive, and safe to handle, they are not very ...

  8. View of gantry crane (manufactured by Ederer Corporation, Seattle, Wash., ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of gantry crane (manufactured by Ederer Corporation, Seattle, Wash., 1971) for Powerhouse No. 3, looking north. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  9. The population of coloured textile fibres in domestic washing machines.

    PubMed

    Watt, Rebecca; Roux, Claude; Robertson, James

    2005-01-01

    A population survey was carried out to analyse examples of the coloured fibre population that may be expected to exist in both front- and top-loading domestic washing machines during Spring, in Sydney, Australia. White cotton T-shirts were washed both individually, and with a normal household wash load, then taped to recover extraneous fibres transferred during the wash cycle. Twelve thousand one hundred and seventy-eight fibres were classified according to length, colour and generic class. Cotton fibres were most prevalent (69.4%), followed by man-made fibres (24.2%). The most common colour/generic class combinations were black/grey cotton (27%), blue cotton (20%) and red cotton (15.6%). Other combinations generally represented under 2% of the total fibre population. Two thirds (65.9%) of the recovered fibres were under 2 mm in length, the proportion of fibres decreasing with increasing fibre length. Variations in machine type did not affect the distribution of fibres with respect to fibre type, colour or length.

  10. Conservation of water for washing beef heads at harvest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to develop methods to conserve water necessary to cleanse beef heads prior to USDA–FSIS inspection. This was to be accomplished by establishing a baseline for the minimum amount of water necessary to adequately wash a head and application of image analysis to provi...

  11. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOIL/SEDIMENT WASHING SYSTEM BERGMANN USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Bergmann USA Soil/Sediment Washing System is a waste minimization technique designed to separate or "partition" soils and sediments by grain size and density. In this water-based volume reduction process, hazardous contaminants are concentrated into a small residual portion...

  12. Ink and Wash Painting for Children with Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Chih-Ming; Chao, Hsin-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Five children with visual impairments received instruction in drawing, using ink and wash painting and calligraphy techniques. A special system developed by a blind Taiwanese Chinese calligrapher, Tsann-Cherng Liaw, was used to help the children orient and refine their work. Children's performance on simple drawing tasks was compared before and…

  13. 62. May 1985. NORTH END OF WASH HOUSE (Negative slightly ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. May 1985. NORTH END OF WASH HOUSE (Negative slightly reticulated. Tree behind fence is common fig, Ficus carica.) - Borough House, West Side State Route 261, about .1 mile south side of junction with old Garners Ferry Road, Stateburg, Sumter County, SC

  14. Conservation of water for washing beef heads at harvest.

    PubMed

    DeOtte, R E; Spivey, K S; Galloway, H O; Lawrence, T E

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this research was to develop methods to conserve water necessary to cleanse beef heads prior to USDA-FSIS inspection. This was to be accomplished by establishing a baseline for the minimum amount of water necessary to adequately wash a head and application of image analysis to provide an objective measure of head cleaning. Twenty-one beef heads were manually washed during the harvest process. An average 18.75 L (2.49 SD) and a maximum of 23.88 L were required to cleanse the heads to USDA-FSIS standards. Digital images were captured before and after manual washing then evaluated for percentage red saturation using commercially available image analysis software. A decaying exponential curve extracted from these data indicated that as wash water increased beyond 20 L the impact on red saturation decreased. At 4 sigma from the mean of 18.75 L, red saturation is 16.0 percent, at which logistic regression analysis indicates 99.994 percent of heads would be accepted for inspection, or less than 1 head in 15,000 would be rejected. Reducing to 3 sigma would increase red saturation to 27.6 percent, for which 99.730 percent of heads likely would be accepted (less than 1 in 370 would be rejected).

  15. 1. GENERAL VIEW FROM BONY PILE LOOKING SOUTH. WASH HOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW FROM BONY PILE LOOKING SOUTH. WASH HOUSE IN LEFT BACKGROUND. TIPPLE AND CLEANING PLANT TO RIGHT. IN CENTER IS A TANK USED FOR TREATING MINE REFUSE AND ACID RUNOFF. - Eureka No. 40, Tipple & Cleaning Plant, East of State Route 56, north of Little Paint Creek, Scalp Level, Cambria County, PA

  16. Environmental Impacts Of Zirab Coal Washing Plant, Mazandaran, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, F.; Esmaeili, A.

    2009-04-01

    Extraction and beneficiation operations associated with coal mining increase the rate of chemical reaction of waste material to air and water media. Zirab coal washing plant is located on the bank of the Cherat stream in Mazandaran province, Iran. coal Mined from central Alborz coalfield mines is not suitable for use in Iranian Steel Corporation. Hence, coal ash content is reduced by physical and chemical processes in this plant. These processes leave a large quantity of liquid and solid wastes that accumulate in waste dump and tailing dam. sediment and water samples taken from Sheshrudbar and Cherat streams and also from Talar river show high concentration of Cd, Mo and As in water samples of coal washing plant and the associated drainage. Eh-pH diagrams revealed the chemical species of elements in water. The enrichment factor and geoaccumulation index show that Cd, Hg, Mo and V are enriched in bottom sediments of the coal washing plant and decrease with increasing distance from the plant. Sequential extraction analysis Results of three sediment samples of Cherat stream show that silicate bound is the major phase in samples taken before and after the plant, but adjacent to the plant, organic bound is dominant. The high concentration of Cd and Mo in the water soluble phase, is noticeable and may result in high mobility and bioavailability of these elements. Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests on six samples, before and after the coal washing plant support the obtained results. Keywords: Zirab; coal washing plant; Sequential extraction analysis; Mann-whitney; Wilcoxon; Enrichment factor; Geoaccumulation index.

  17. A pilot plant scale evaluation of a new process aid for enhancing chlorine efficacy against pathogen survival and cross-contamination during produce wash.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yaguang; Nou, Xiangwu; Millner, Patricia; Zhou, Bin; Shen, Cangliang; Yang, Yang; Wu, Yunpeng; Wang, Qin; Feng, Hao; Shelton, Dan

    2012-08-17

    Developing food safety intervention technology that can be readily adopted by the industry often requires test conditions that match as closely as possible to those of commercial food processing operations; yet biosafety risks inherent in pathogen studies constrain most experiments to laboratory settings. In this study, we report the first semi-commercial pilot-scale evaluation of a new process aid, T128, for its impact on enhancing the antimicrobial efficacy of chlorinated wash water against pathogen survival and cross-contamination. A non-pathogenic, BSL-1, strain of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was inoculated onto freshly harvested baby spinach leaves and washed with large amounts of freshly cut un-inoculated iceberg lettuce shreds in wash water with free chlorine periodically replenished, in the presence or absence of T128. Changes in water quality and pathogen survival and cross-contamination were monitored at every 2 min intervals for up to 36 min for each treatment during the wash operation. Results indicated that the use of T128 did not significantly (P>0.05) influence the rate of wash water deterioration, nor the pathogen populations remaining on the inoculated spinach leaves. However, in the absence of T128 (control), survival of E. coli O157:H7 in wash water and cross-contamination of un-inoculated lettuce frequently occurred when free chlorine in solution dropped below 1mg/l during the wash process. In contrast, the use of T128 significantly reduced the occurrence of E. coli O157:H7 surviving in wash water and of cross-contamination to un-inoculated shredded iceberg lettuce under the same operational conditions, suggesting that the application of T128 in a chlorine-based fresh produce sanitization system could increase the safety margin of process control on fresh-cut operations.

  18. Effect of freezing, hot tumble drying and washing with eucalyptus oil on house dust mites in soft toys.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Fu; Wu, Francis Fu-Sheng; Chen, Chi-Ying; Crane, Julian; Siebers, Rob

    2011-09-01

    Soft toys are a major source of house dust mites (HDM) and HDM allergens, and sleeping with soft toys is a significant risk factor for HDM sensitization. We studied three techniques to eliminate HDM from soft toys, namely freezing, hot tumble drying and washing with eucalyptus oil. Thirty-six toys (12 in each treatment group) were enumerated for live HDM by the heat escape method before and after freezing overnight, hot tumble drying for 1 h and washing in 0.2% to 0.4% eucalyptus oil. Freezing, hot tumble drying and washing with eucalyptus oil resulted in significant reductions in live HDM, an average reduction of 95.1%, 89.1% and 95.1%, respectively. Additionally, washing with eucalyptus oil resulted in a significant reduction in HDM allergens as well from a geometric mean of 9.12 μg/g to 0.37 μg/g (p = 0.033). These three HDM elimination techniques give parents of infants effective and acceptable methods of limiting HDM exposure.

  19. Using electrocoagulation for metal and chelant separation from washing solution after EDTA leaching of Pb, Zn and Cd contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Pociecha, Maja; Lestan, Domen

    2010-02-15

    Electrocoagulation with an Al sacrificial anode was tested for the separation of chelant and heavy metals from a washing solution obtained after leaching Pb (3200 mg kg(-1)), Zn (1100 mg kg(-1)), and Cd (21 mg kg(-1)) contaminated soil with EDTA. In the electrochemical process, the sacrificial anode corroded to release Al(3+) which served as coagulant for precipitation of chelant and metals. A constant current density of 16-128 mAc m(-2) applied between the Al anode and the stainless-steel cathode removed up to 95% Pb, 68% Zn and 66% Cd from the soil washing solution. Approximately half of the initial EDTA remained in the washing solution after treatment, up to 16.3% of the EDTA was adsorbed on Al coagulant and precipitated, the rest of the EDTA was degraded by anodic oxidation. In a separate laboratory-scale remediation experiment, we leached a soil with 40 mmol EDTA per kg of soil and reused the washing solution (after electrocoagulation) in a closed loop. It removed 53% of Pb, 26% of Zn and 52% of Cd from the soil. The discharge solution was clear and colourless, with pH 7.52 and 170 mg L(-1) Pb, 50 mg L(-1) Zn, 1.5 mg L(-1) Cd and 11 mM EDTA.

  20. Effects of Washing Produce Contaminated with the Snail and Slug Hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis with Three Common Household Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Norine W; Hayes, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    The emerging infectious disease angiostrongyliasis (rat lungworm disease) is caused by ingesting snails and slugs infected by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The definitive hosts of A. cantonensis are rats and the obligatory intermediate hosts are slugs and snails. Many cases result from accidentally ingesting infected snails or slugs on produce (eg, lettuce). This study assessed three readily available household products as washing solutions for removing snails and slugs from produce (romaine lettuce) to lower the probability of accidentally ingesting them. The solutions were acetic acid (vinegar), sodium hypochlorite (bleach), and sodium chloride (domestic salt). Snail and slug species known to be intermediate hosts and that are common in the Hawaiian Islands were used in the experiments: the alien snail Succinea tenella, the alien semi-slug Parmarion martensi, and the alien slugs Veronicella cubensis and Deroceras laeve. None of the products was any more effective than washing and rinsing with tap water alone. Most snails and slugs were removed after treatment but some remained on the lettuce even after washing and rinsing the produce. Only washing, rinsing, and then rinsing each leaf individually resulted in complete removal of all snails and slugs. The study did not address removal of any remaining slime left by the snails and slugs, nor did it address killing of worms. PMID:23901391

  1. Effects of washing produce contaminated with the snail and slug hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis with three common household solutions.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Norine W; Hayes, Kenneth A; Cowie, Robert H

    2013-06-01

    The emerging infectious disease angiostrongyliasis (rat lungworm disease) is caused by ingesting snails and slugs infected by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The definitive hosts of A. cantonensis are rats and the obligatory intermediate hosts are slugs and snails. Many cases result from accidentally ingesting infected snails or slugs on produce (eg, lettuce). This study assessed three readily available household products as washing solutions for removing snails and slugs from produce (romaine lettuce) to lower the probability of accidentally ingesting them. The solutions were acetic acid (vinegar), sodium hypochlorite (bleach), and sodium chloride (domestic salt). Snail and slug species known to be intermediate hosts and that are common in the Hawaiian Islands were used in the experiments: the alien snail Succinea tenella, the alien semi-slug Parmarion martensi, and the alien slugs Veronicella cubensis and Deroceras laeve. None of the products was any more effective than washing and rinsing with tap water alone. Most snails and slugs were removed after treatment but some remained on the lettuce even after washing and rinsing the produce. Only washing, rinsing, and then rinsing each leaf individually resulted in complete removal of all snails and slugs. The study did not address removal of any remaining slime left by the snails and slugs, nor did it address killing of worms.

  2. Potential of activated carbon to recover randomly-methylated-β-cyclodextrin solution from washing water originating from in situ soil flushing.

    PubMed

    Sniegowski, K; Vanhecke, M; D'Huys, P-J; Braeken, L

    2014-07-01

    Despite the overall high efficacy of cyclodextrins to accelerate the treatment of soil aquifer remediation by in-situ soil flushing, the use in practice remains limited because of the high costs of cyclodextrin and high concentrations needed to significantly reduce the treatment time. The current study tested the potential of activated carbon to treat washing water originating from soil flushing in order to selectively separate hydrocarbon contaminants from washing water containing cyclodextrin and subsequently reuse the cyclodextrin solution for reinfiltration. A high recovery of the cyclodextrin from the washing water would reduce the costs and would make the technique economically feasible for soil remediation. This study aimed to investigate whether cyclodextrin can pass through the activated carbon filter without reducing the cyclodextrin concentration when the contaminated washing water is treated and whether the presence of cyclodextrin negatively affects the purification potential of activated carbon to remove the organic pollutants from the pumped soil water. Lab-scale column experiments showed that with the appropriate activated carbon 100% of cyclodextrin (randomly-methylated-β-cyclodextrin) can be recovered from the washing water and that the effect on the efficiency of activated carbon to remove the hydrocarbon contaminants remains limited. These results show that additional field tests are useful to make in-situ soil flushing with cyclodextrin both a technical and an economical interesting technique. These results might stimulate the application of cyclodextrin in soil treatment technology.

  3. Toxicological assessment and management options for boat pressure-washing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Gerić, Marko; Gajski, Goran; Oreščanin, Višnja; Kollar, Robert; Franekić, Jasna; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2015-04-01

    Boats are washed periodically for maintenance in order to remove biofoulants from hulls, which results in the generation of wastewater. This study aimed at evaluating the cyto/genotoxic and mutagenic properties of wastewater produced by pressure washing of boats. The chemical characterisation of this wastewater showed that Cu, Zn, V, Cr, Fe, Pb, and select organic contaminants exceeded the maximum allowable values from 1.7 up to 96 times. The wastewater produced negative effects on human lymphocytes resulting in decreased cell viability after 4 and 24h of exposure. Chromosome aberration, micronucleus, and comet assay parameters were significantly higher after 24h of exposure. At the same time, the Salmonella typhimurium test showed negative for both TA98 and TA100 strains at all of the concentrations tested. After the treatment of wastewater using electrochemical methods/ozonation during real scale treatment plant, removal rates of colour, turbidity and heavy metals ranged from 99.4% to 99.9%, while the removal of total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) was above 85%. This was reflected in the removal of the wastewater's cyto/genotoxicity, which was comparable to negative controls in all of the conducted tests, suggesting that such plants could be implemented in marinas to minimise human impact on marine systems.

  4. Detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii in oral wash from immunosuppressed patients as a diagnostic tool

    PubMed Central

    Hviid, Cecilie Juul; Lund, Marianne; Sørensen, Allan; Ellermann- Eriksen, Svend; Jespersen, Bente; Dam, Mette Yde; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Benfield, Thomas; Jespersen, Sanne; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen; Laursen, Alex Lund

    2017-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of Pneumocystis jirovecii (PJ) pneumonia ordinarily requires invasive procedures that could be avoided by PCR methodologies, if these could be designed with adequate cut-off values for confounding background carriage. Methods We designed a novel quantitative real-time PCR assay to detect the mitochondrial large subunit rRNA gene of PJ in oral washes. To benchmark levels of PJ carriage versus infection, we tested asymptomatic immunosuppressed patients including Danish (n = 88) and West African HIV-infected (n = 142) patients, renal transplant recipients (n = 51), rheumatologic patients (n = 102), patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (n = 98), and healthy blood donors (controls, n = 50). The fungal burden in patients with PJ pneumonia (PCP, n = 7) was also investigated. Results Danish HIV-infected patients (with viremia/low CD4) and recent transplant recipients were at most risk of being carriers (prevalence of 23% and 16.7% respectively), whereas PJ was rarely detected among rheumatologic patients, patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, and untreated West African HIV patients. PJ was not detected among healthy controls. The fungal burden in patients with PCP fell rapidly on treatment. Conclusions The quantitative PCR method described could conceivably discriminate between carriage and disease, given suitable threshold values for the former, and predict treatment efficacy by measures of the fungal burden in daily oral washes. PMID:28358900

  5. Enhancement of chemical-oxygen demand and color removal of distillery spent-wash by ozonation.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, S; Bose, P; Tare, V

    2006-04-01

    Distillery spent-wash has very high organic content (75,000 to 125,000 mg/L chemical-oxygen demand [COD]), color, and contains difficult-to-biodegrade organic compounds. For example, anaerobic treatment of the distillery spent-wash used in this study resulted in 60% COD reduction and low color removal. Subsequent aerobic treatment of the anaerobic effluent resulted in enhancement of COD removal to 66%. In this paper, the effect of ozonation on various properties of the anaerobically treated distillery effluent, including the effect on its subsequent aerobic biodegradation, was investigated. Ozonation of the anaerobically treated distillery effluent at various ozone doses resulted in the reduction of total-organic carbon (TOC), COD, COD/TOC ratio, absorbance, color, and increase in the biochemical-oxygen demand (BOD)/COD ratio of the effluent. Further, ozonation of the anaerobically treated distillery effluent at an ozone dose of 2.08 mg/mg initial TOC and subsequent aerobic biodegradation resulted in 87.4% COD removal, as compared to 66% removal when ozonation was not used.

  6. Apparatus for washing particulate material. [Removal of silicone oil from microspheres by trichloroethylene

    DOEpatents

    Rivera, A.L.; Fowler, V.L.; Justice, G.V.

    1983-12-29

    Transport of nuclear fuel microspheres through a wash liquid is facilitated by feeding a slurry containing the microspheres into the wash liquid via a column having a vibrating tubular screen located under its lower end.

  7. Scavenging of BHCs and DDTs from soil by thermal desorption and solvent washing.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan Fei; Yang, Hong; Zhan, Xin Hua; Zhou, Li Xiang

    2013-03-01

    Intensive remediation of abandoned former organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) manufacturing areas is necessary because the central and surrounding soils contaminated by OCPs are harmful to crop production and food safety. Organochlorine and its residues are persistent in environments and difficult to remove from contaminated soils due to their low solubility and higher sorption to the soils. We performed a comprehensive study on the remediation of OCPs-contaminated soils using thermal desorption technique and solvent washing approaches. The tested soil was thermally treated at 225, 325, 400, and 500 °C for 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, and 90 min, respectively. In addition, we tested soil washing with several organic solvents including n-alcohols and surfactants. The optimal ratio of soil/solvent was tested, and the recycling of used ethanol was investigated. Finally, activities of polyphenol oxidase (PPO), urease (URE), alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase (ACP), and invertase (INV) were assayed in the treated soils. The tested soil was thermally treated at 500 °C for 30 min, and the concentration of contaminants in soil was decreased from 3,115.77 to 0.33 mg kg(-1). The thermal desorption in soil was governed by the first-order kinetics model. For the chemical washing experiment, ethanol showed a higher efficiency than any other solvent. Using a 1:20 ratio of soil/solvent, the maximum removal of OCPs was achieved within 15 min. Under this condition, approximately 87 % of OCPs was removed from the soils. More than 90 % of ethanol in the spent wash fluid could be recovered. Activities of some enzymes in soils were increased after ethanol treatment. But ALP, ACP, and INV activities were decreased and PPO and URE showed slightly higher activities following remediation by thermal treatment. Both heating temperature and time were the key factors for thermal desorption of OCPs. The n-alcohol solvent showed higher removal of OCPs from soils than surfactants. The highly efficient

  8. Will Astronauts Wash Clothes on the Way to Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewert, Michael K.; Jeng, Frank F.

    2015-01-01

    Future human space exploration missions will lengthen to years, and keeping crews clothed without a huge resupply burden is an important consideration for habitation systems. A space laundry system could be the solution; however, the resources it uses must be accounted for and must win out over the reliable practice of simply bringing along enough spare underwear. NASA has conducted trade-off studies through its Logistics Reduction Project to compare current space clothing systems, life extension of that clothing, traditional water-based clothes washing, and other sanitizing techniques. The best clothing system depends on the mission and assumptions but, in general, analysis results indicate that washing clothes on space missions will start to pay off as mission durations approach a year.

  9. COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    HARRINGTON SJ

    2011-01-06

    This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

  10. Effect of soil washing with only chelators or combining with ferric chloride on soil heavy metal removal and phytoavailability: Field experiments.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaofang; Wei, Zebin; Wu, Qitang; Li, Chunping; Qian, Tianwei; Zheng, Wei

    2016-03-01

    In a field experiment on multi-metal contaminated soil, we investigated the efficiency of Cd, Pb, Zn, and Cu removal by only mixture of chelators (MC) or combining with FeCl3. After washing treatment, a co-cropping system was performed for heavy metals to be extracted by Sedum alfredii and to produce safe food from Zea mays. We analyzed the concentration of heavy metals in groundwater to evaluate the leashing risk of soil washing with FeCl3 and MC. Results showed that addition of FeCl3 was favorable to the removal of heavy metals in the topsoil. Metal leaching occurred mainly in rain season during the first co-cropping. The removal rates of Cd, Zn, Pb, and Cu in topsoil were 28%, 53%, 41%, and 21% with washing by FeCl3+MC after first harvest. The application of FeCl3 reduced the yield of S. alfredii and increased the metals concentration of Z. mays in first harvest. However, after amending soil, the metals concentration of Z. mays in FeCl3+MC treatment were similar to that only washing by MC. The grains and shoots of Z. mays were safe for use in feed production. Soil washing did not worsen groundwater contamination during the study period. But the concentration of Cd in groundwater was higher than the limit value of Standard concentrations for Groundwater IV. This study suggests that soil washing using FeCl3 and MC for the remediation of multi-metal contaminated soil is potential feasibility. However, the subsequent measure to improve the washed soil environment for planting crop is considered.

  11. 33 CFR 157.162 - Crude oil washing during a voyage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crude oil washing during a voyage... OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.162 Crude oil washing... § 157.10c(b)(2) shall ensure that each cargo tank that is crude oil washed during a voyage other than...

  12. Filtration of Runoff From Pressure Washing Vessel Hull in Drydock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    FINAL REPORT FILTRATION OF RUNOFF FROM PRESSURE WASHING VESSEL HULL IN DRYDOCK Prepared by National Steel and Shipbuilding Company (NASSCO) For...NATIONAL STEEL AND SHIPBUILDING COMPANY Harbor Drive and 28th Street Post Office Box 85278 San Diego, California 92186-5278 In BehaIf of SNAME SPC PANEL SP...cooperative cost sharing effort between the U.S. Navy and National Steel and Shipbuilding Company (NASSCO). The Facility and Environmental Effects Panel (SP-1

  13. Food washing and placer mining in captive great apes.

    PubMed

    Allritz, Matthias; Tennie, Claudio; Call, Josep

    2013-10-01

    Sweet potato washing and wheat placer mining in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) are among the most well known examples of local traditions in non-human animals. The functions of these behaviors and the mechanisms of acquisition and spread of these behaviors have been debated frequently. Prompted by animal caretaker reports that great apes [chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), bonobos (Pan paniscus), gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), and orangutans (Pongo abelii)] at Leipzig Zoo occasionally wash their food, we conducted a study of food washing behaviors that consisted of two parts. In the first part we assessed the current distribution of the behavior on the basis of caretaker reports. In the second (experimental) part, we provided subjects individually with a water basin and two types of food (apples and cereal) that was either clean or covered/mixed with sand. We found that subjects of all species (except gorillas) placed apples in the water before consumption, and that they did so more often when the apples were dirty than when they were clean. Several chimpanzees and orangutans also engaged in behaviors resembling wheat placer mining.

  14. Generation of chlorine by-products in simulated wash water.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cangliang; Norris, Pauline; Williams, Olivia; Hagan, Stephanie; Li, KaWang

    2016-01-01

    Free chlorine (FC) reacting with organic matter in wash water promotes the formation of chlorine by-products. This study aims to evaluate the dynamic impact of FC and organic load on the generation of haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs) in simulated wash water. Lettuce juice was sequentially added into FC solution with FC periodically replenished. Water samples were collected after each lettuce juice addition to measure water qualities and determine HAAs and THMs using US-Environmental-Protection-Agency (EPA) methods. Concentrations of 88-2103 μg/l of total HAAs and 20.79-859.47 μg/l of total THMs were detected during the study. Monobromoacetic, tribromoacetic, chlorodibromoacetic and trichloroacetic acid were the major HAAs components. Chloroform (trichloromethane) was the primary THMs present. A significant correlation of HAAs with chemical oxygen demand and THMs with FC was observed. Results indicated that optimizing wash water sanitizing systems to limit organic matters and maintain minimal effective FC concentration is critical.

  15. Status and progress in sludge washing: A pivotal pretreatment method

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, W.B.; MacLean, G.T.; Meng, C.D.; Winkler, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    Separation of the bulk soluble chemical salts from the insoluble metal hydroxides and radionuclides is central to the strategy of disposing Hanford tank waste. Sludge washing and caustic leaching have been selected as the primary methods for processing the 230 million L (61,000,000 gal) of Hanford tank waste. These processes are very similar to those selected for processing waste at the West Valley Site in New York and the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The purpose of sludge washing is to dissolve and remove the soluble salts in the waste. Leaching of the insoluble solids with caustic will be used to dissolve aluminum hydroxide and chromium hydroxide, and convert insoluble bismuth phosphate to soluble phosphate. The waste will be separated into a high-level solids fraction and a liquid fraction that can be disposed of as low-level waste after cesium removal. The washing and leaching operations involve batchwise mixing, settling, and decanting within the existing underground storage tanks.

  16. Evaluation of soil washing for radiologically contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Gombert, D. II

    1994-03-01

    Soil washing has been applied internationally to decontaminate soils due to the widespread increase in environmental awareness manifested in the United States by promulgation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, yet we continue to lack understanding on why the technique works in one application and not in another. A soil washing process typically integrates a variety of modules, each designed to decontaminate the matrix by destroying a particular phase or segregating a particle size fraction in which the contaminants are concentrated. The more known about how the contaminants are fixed, the more likely the process will succeed. Much can be learned from bioavailability studies on heavy metals in soils. Sequential extraction experiments designed to destroy one fixation mechanism at a time can be used to determine how contaminants are bound. This knowledge provides a technical basis for designing a processing strategy to efficiently decontaminate soil while creating a minimum of secondary wastes. In this study, a soil from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was physically and chemically characterized, then sequentially extracted to determine if soil washing could be effectively used to remove cesium, cobalt and chromium.

  17. Recovery of MSWI and soil washing residues as concrete aggregates.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Abbà, Alessandro; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the present work was to study if municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) residues and aggregates derived from contaminated soil washing could be used as alternative aggregates for concrete production. Initially, chemical, physical and geometric characteristics (according to UNI EN 12620) of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ashes and some contaminated soils were evaluated; moreover, the pollutants release was evaluated by means of leaching tests. The results showed that the reuse of pre-treated MSWI bottom ash and washed soil is possible, either from technical or environmental point of view, while it is not possible for the raw wastes. Then, the natural aggregate was partially and totally replaced with these recycled aggregates for the production of concrete mixtures that were characterized by conventional mechanical and leaching tests. Good results were obtained using the same dosage of a high resistance cement (42.5R calcareous Portland cement instead of 32.5R); the concrete mixture containing 400 kg/m(3) of washed bottom ash and high resistance cement was classified as structural concrete (C25/30 class). Regarding the pollutants leaching, all concrete mixtures respected the limit values according to the Italian regulation.

  18. Hand Washing Practices Among Emergency Medical Services Providers

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, Joshua; Donovan, Colleen; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; McCoy, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hand hygiene is an important component of infection control efforts. Our primary and secondary goals were to determine the reported rates of hand washing and stethoscope cleaning in emergency medical services (EMS) workers, respectively. Methods We designed a survey about hand hygiene practices. The survey was distributed to various national EMS organizations through e-mail. Descriptive statistics were calculated for survey items (responses on a Likert scale) and subpopulations of survey respondents to identify relationships between variables. We used analysis of variance to test differences in means between the subgroups. Results There were 1,494 responses. Overall, reported hand hygiene practices were poor among pre-hospital providers in all clinical situations. Women reported that they washed their hands more frequently than men overall, although the differences were unlikely to be clinically significant. Hygiene after invasive procedures was reported to be poor. The presence of available hand sanitizer in the ambulance did not improve reported hygiene rates but improved reported rates of cleaning the stethoscope (absolute difference 0.4, p=0.0003). Providers who brought their own sanitizer were more likely to clean their hands. Conclusion Reported hand hygiene is poor amongst pre-hospital providers. There is a need for future intervention to improve reported performance in pre-hospital provider hand washing. PMID:26587098

  19. 40 CFR 447.10 - Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash ink subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-base solvent wash ink subcategory. 447.10 Section 447.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INK FORMULATING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Oil-Base Solvent Wash Ink Subcategory § 447.10 Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash...

  20. 40 CFR 447.10 - Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash ink subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-base solvent wash ink subcategory. 447.10 Section 447.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INK FORMULATING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Oil-Base Solvent Wash Ink Subcategory § 447.10 Applicability; description of the oil-base solvent wash...

  1. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  2. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  3. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...

  4. 7 CFR 57.801 - Nest run or washed ungraded eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nest run or washed ungraded eggs. 57.801 Section 57... Identification of Restricted Eggs Or Egg Products Not Intended for Human Consumption § 57.801 Nest run or washed ungraded eggs. Nest run or washed ungraded eggs are exempt from the labeling provisions in §...

  5. 7 CFR 57.801 - Nest run or washed ungraded eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Nest run or washed ungraded eggs. 57.801 Section 57... Identification of Restricted Eggs Or Egg Products Not Intended for Human Consumption § 57.801 Nest run or washed ungraded eggs. Nest run or washed ungraded eggs are exempt from the labeling provisions in §...

  6. Impact of alternative antimicrobial commercial egg washes on reducing Salmonella contamination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Table eggs are washed with an alkaline detergent at approximately pH 11 and at a temperature at least 32°C, followed by a chlorine rinse. Both wash temperature and an antimicrobial rinse are required by regulation, but wash pH is not specified. At this pH, little, if any, free chlorine...

  7. Wash resistance of PermaNets in comparison to hand-treated nets.

    PubMed

    Gunasekaran, K; Vaidyanathan, K

    2008-02-01

    The wash resistance of factory produced PermaNets (with deltamethrin bonded to the netting with a resin) was studied by bioassays with Anopheles stephensi. Commercial detergent powders were used to wash the nets. For comparison, conventionally treated nets were washed and bio-assayed. Nets were washed under laboratory conditions using a Rotary shaker for 10min. Mosquito bioassays used standard WHO plastic cones with an exposure time of 3min. The PermaNet caused almost a 100% mortality of An. stephensi after up to 18 washes and >80% mortality up to 26 washes but after 30 washes mortality declined. The differences between the mortality of An. stephensi on treated nets washed with detergent or soap (uncoloured, non-perfumed) were not significant. When conventional nets dipped in deltamethrin (25mg/m(2)) or lambdacyhalothrin (10mg/m(2)) were washed under similar laboratory conditions, the wash resistance was markedly less than that of the PermaNet. In the case of deltamethrin, mosquito mortality remained >80% up to 12 washes and with lambdacyhalothrin mortality remained above 80% up to 11 washes. The relationship of 80% mortality from a 3min bioassay to effectiveness against free flying mosquitoes remains to be determined.

  8. 33 CFR 157.114 - Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual: Not approved.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Crude Oil Washing Operations and... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels General § 157.114 Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual: Not approved. If the manuals submitted...

  9. 33 CFR 157.114 - Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual: Not approved.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Crude Oil Washing Operations and... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels General § 157.114 Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual: Not approved. If the manuals submitted...

  10. 33 CFR 157.112 - Approved Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approved Crude Oil Washing... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels General § 157.112 Approved Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual. If the manuals submitted under §...

  11. 33 CFR 157.112 - Approved Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approved Crude Oil Washing... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels General § 157.112 Approved Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual. If the manuals submitted under §...

  12. 33 CFR 157.112 - Approved Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Approved Crude Oil Washing... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels General § 157.112 Approved Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual. If the manuals submitted under §...

  13. 33 CFR 157.112 - Approved Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approved Crude Oil Washing... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels General § 157.112 Approved Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual. If the manuals submitted under §...

  14. 33 CFR 157.114 - Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual: Not approved.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Crude Oil Washing Operations and... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels General § 157.114 Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual: Not approved. If the manuals submitted...

  15. 33 CFR 157.114 - Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual: Not approved.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Crude Oil Washing Operations and... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels General § 157.114 Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual: Not approved. If the manuals submitted...

  16. 33 CFR 157.150 - Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual: Recording information after inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Crude Oil Washing Operations and... MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Inspections § 157.150 Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual: Recording...

  17. 33 CFR 157.138 - Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... washing each tank. (iv) The number of COW machines that operate simultaneously in each tank. (v) The... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Crude Oil Washing Operations and... VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Design, Equipment,...

  18. Live-line insulator washing: Experimental investigation to assess safety and efficiency requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Perin, D.; Pigini, A.; Visintainer, I.; Channakeshava; Ramamoorty, M.

    1994-12-31

    A laboratory investigation was carried out to study live-line washing of insulators, with special attention to the two washing procedures which adopt hand-held nozzles or helicopter mounted nozzles. The aspects related to safety and those related to efficiency and reliability were considered. On the basis of the results, safe working distances and indications to define optimal washing procedures were derived.

  19. Testing the Effects of Social Norms and Behavioral Privacy on Hand Washing: A Field Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapinski, Maria Knight; Maloney, Erin K.; Braz, Mary; Shulman, Hillary C.

    2013-01-01

    A 2-part study examines the influence of normative messages on college males' hand washing perceptions and behaviors. Study 1 tests for the appropriateness of hand washing as a target of social norms campaigns and tests messages designed to change perceived descriptive norms. Results indicated that hand washing behavior is appropriate for health…

  20. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device...