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Sample records for hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes

  1. Introduction to hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme induction in drug safety evaluation studies.

    PubMed

    Botts, Suzanne; Ennulat, Daniela; Francke-Carroll, Sabine; Graham, Mark; Maronpot, Robert R; Mohutsky, Michael

    2010-08-01

    The following three articles represent the output of a combined effort initiated by the Scientific Regulatory Policy Committee of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology to provide a unified review of current scientific practices and relevant literature and provide suggestions regarding the recognition, interpretation, and risk assessment of hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme (DME) induction studies. The core objective was to provide a review that the scientific community including pathologists, regulatory scientists, toxicologists, investigative scientists, and others would find valuable for managing, designing, and interpreting toxicity studies supporting regulatory filings. Three working groups composed of scientists from industry, academia, and regulatory agencies were convened to review the available literature on important aspects of the interpretation and risk assessment of hepatic microsomal DME enzyme induction in three publications. The three reviews are as follows: "Effects of Hepatic Drug Metabolizing Enzyme Induction on Clinical Pathology Parameters in Animals and Man," Toxicol Pathol "Hepatic Drug Metabolizing Enzyme Induction: Microscopic and Ultrastructural Appearance," Toxicol Pathol "Hepatic Drug Metabolizing Enzyme Induction and Implications for Preclinical and Clinical Risk Assessment," Toxicol Pathol The purpose of this introduction is not to summarize the articles but rather to frame the series and to provide a common mechanistic introduction.

  2. Regulation of Hepatic Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes in Germ-Free Mice by Conventionalization and Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Felcy Pavithra; Cheng, Sunny Lihua; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known regarding the effect of intestinal microbiota modifiers, such as probiotics and conventionalization with exogenous bacteria, on host hepatic drug metabolism. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine the effect of these modifiers on the expression of various drug-metabolizing enzymes of the host liver. VSL3 is a probiotic that contains eight live strains of bacteria. Five groups of mice were used: 1) conventional mice (CV), 2) conventional mice treated with VSL3 in drinking water, 3) germ-free (GF) mice, 4) GF mice treated with VSL3, and 5) GF mice exposed to the conventional environment for 2 months. All mice were 3 months old at tissue collection. GF conditions markedly downregulated the cytochrome P450 (P450) 3a gene cluster, but upregulated the Cyp4a cluster, whereas conventionalization normalized their expression to conventional levels [reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and western blot]. Changes in the Cyp3a and 4a gene expression correlated with alterations in the pregnane X receptor and peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor α–DNA binding, respectively (chromatin immunoprecipitation–qPCR). VSL3 increased each bacterial component in the large intestinal content of the CV mice, and increased these bacteria even more in GF mice, likely due to less competition for growth in the GF environment. VSL3 given to conventional mice increased the mRNAs of Cyp4v3, alcohol dehydrogenase 1, and carboxyesterase 2a, but decreased the mRNAs of multiple phase II glutathione-S-transferases. VSL3 given to germ-free mice decreased the mRNAs of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases 1a9 and 2a3. In conclusion, conventionalization and VSL3 alter the expression of many drug-metabolizing enzyme s in the liver, suggesting the importance of considering “bacteria-drug” interactions for various adverse drug reactions in patients. PMID:26586378

  3. Gene Expression Variability in Human Hepatic Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lun; Price, Elvin T.; Chang, Ching-Wei; Li, Yan; Huang, Ying; Guo, Li-Wu; Guo, Yongli; Kaput, Jim; Shi, Leming; Ning, Baitang

    2013-01-01

    Interindividual variability in the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (DMETs) in human liver may contribute to interindividual differences in drug efficacy and adverse reactions. Published studies that analyzed variability in the expression of DMET genes were limited by sample sizes and the number of genes profiled. We systematically analyzed the expression of 374 DMETs from a microarray data set consisting of gene expression profiles derived from 427 human liver samples. The standard deviation of interindividual expression for DMET genes was much higher than that for non-DMET genes. The 20 DMET genes with the largest variability in the expression provided examples of the interindividual variation. Gene expression data were also analyzed using network analysis methods, which delineates the similarities of biological functionalities and regulation mechanisms for these highly variable DMET genes. Expression variability of human hepatic DMET genes may affect drug-gene interactions and disease susceptibility, with concomitant clinical implications. PMID:23637747

  4. Effects of naturally occurring coumarins on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes inmice

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiner, Heather E. Xia, Xiaojun; Sonoda, Junichiro; Zhang, Jun; Pontius, Elizabeth; Abey, Jane; Evans, Ronald M.; Moore, David D.; DiGiovanni, John

    2008-10-15

    Cytochromes P450 (P450s) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute two important enzyme families involved in carcinogen metabolism. Generally, P450s play activation or detoxifying roles while GSTs act primarily as detoxifying enzymes. We previously demonstrated that oral administration of the linear furanocoumarins, isopimpinellin and imperatorin, modulated P450 and GST activities in various tissues of mice. The purpose of the present study was to compare a broader range of naturally occurring coumarins (simple coumarins, and furanocoumarins of the linear and angular type) for their abilities to modulate hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes when administered orally to mice. We now report that all of the different coumarins tested (coumarin, limettin, auraptene, angelicin, bergamottin, imperatorin and isopimpinellin) induced hepatic GST activities, whereas the linear furanocoumarins possessed the greatest abilities to induce hepatic P450 activities, in particular P450 2B and 3A. In both cases, this corresponded to an increase in protein expression of the enzymes. Induction of P4502B10, 3A11, and 2C9 by xenobiotics often is a result of activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and/or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Using a pregnane X receptor reporter system, our results demonstrated that isopimpinellin activated both PXR and its human ortholog SXR by recruiting coactivator SRC-1 in transfected cells. In CAR transfection assays, isopimpinellin counteracted the inhibitory effect of androstanol on full-length mCAR, a Gal4-mCAR ligand-binding domain fusion, and restored coactivator binding. Orally administered isopimpinellin induced hepatic mRNA expression of Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11, and GSTa in CAR(+/+) wild-type mice. In contrast, the induction of Cyp2b10 mRNA by isopimpinellin was attenuated in the CAR(-/-) mice, suggesting that isopimpinellin induces Cyp2b10 via the CAR receptor. Overall, the current data indicate that naturally occurring coumarins have

  5. Can chronic maternal drug therapy alter the nursing infant's hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme pattern?

    PubMed

    Toddywalla, V S; Patel, S B; Betrabet, S S; Kulkarni, R D; Kombo, I; Saxena, B N

    1995-10-01

    This study was carried out to investigate whether minute quantities of maternal drugs ingested over an extended period of time by a breast-feeding infant can alter the activity pattern of the infant's hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme (HDME). The HDME activity patterns of 12 breast-fed infants whose mothers were not on drug therapy were compared with those of 11 infants whose mothers had been taking 30 micrograms levo-norgesterel daily for 90 to 195 days (oral contraceptives group) and of 10 infants whose mothers had been taking ethambutol and isoniazid daily since pregnancy (tuberculosis group). As 6 beta hydroxycortisol in urine is considered to be a good and acceptable reflector of HDME activity, it was estimated from the infants' urine using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. A comparison of the patterns between 90 days of age and 195 days of age of the infants in the control group and the two study groups indicated an increase from 36.6 ng/mL to 58.4 ng/mL at 195 days in the control group. An initial decrease from 36.6 ng/mL to 26.2 ng/mL was noted with commencement of maternal levo-norgesterel therapy, followed by a slow and steady rise to 47.8 ng/mL at 195 days of age, with a shift in the peak from 120 to 135 days of infants age in the oral contraceptive group. A suppressed pattern with decreased levels of 6 beta hydroxycortisol ranging from 19.3 ng/mL to 26.5 ng/mL at 195 days was found in the tuberculosis group. The data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) coupled with Duncan's Multiple range test. Both treatment group showed significant differences from the control group at the 0.050 level. The HDME plays an important role in determining the final outcome of any drug in humans, as it controls the metabolism of drugs. Hence, alterations in its activity caused by the transfer of maternal drugs over a prolonged period of time could pose a serious problem to nurslings when they require drugs for their own benefit.

  6. Influence of dietary macronutrients on induction of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes by Coleus forskohlii extract in mice.

    PubMed

    Yokotani, Kaori; Chiba, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Yoko; Nakanishi, Tomoko; Murata, Masatsune; Umegaki, Keizo

    2013-01-01

    From studies in mice, we have reported that Coleus forskohlii extract (CFE), a popular herbal weight-loss ingredient, markedly induced hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes, especially cytochrome P450 (CYP), and interacted with co-administered drugs. This study was designed to examine how the induction of drug metabolizing enzymes by CFE was influenced by different levels of macronutrients in the diet. Mice were fed a non-purified diet or semi-purified diet with and without CFE (0.3-0.5%) for 14-18 d, and changes in the ratio of liver weight to body weight, an indicator of hepatic CYP induction, and hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes were analyzed. The ratio of liver weight to body weight, content and activities of CYPs, and activity of glutathione S-transferase were higher in a semi-purified standard diet (AIN93G formula) group than in high sucrose (62.9%) and high fat (29.9%) diet groups. Different levels of protein (7%, 20%, and 33%) in the diets did not influence CFE-induced CYP induction or increase the ratio of liver weight to body weight. The effect of CFE on the ratio of liver weight to body weight was higher with a semi-purified diet than with a non-purified diet, and was similar between dietary administration and intragastric gavage when the CFE dose and the diet were the same. There was a positive correlation between CFE-induced CYP induction and the content of starch in the diets, suggesting that dietary starch potentiates CFE-induced CYP induction in mice. The mechanism of enhanced CYP induction remains unclear.

  7. The Effects of Chloroquine-Resistant and Chloroquine-Sensitive Strains of Berghei on Rodent Hepatic Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-14

    Dipetolllonema M<’I:stomys 42.94 106 58.46 viteolle Schistosollloll mansoni S . I1\\I!lnsoni Fasciola hepatica matalensis Mi ce (SWiss) Mice (Swiss...infected with Fasciola hepatica (Table 4). This may be due to direct residence of the parasites in their host’s liver and severe injury of the liver...vitro drug- metabolizing activity of the hepatic mixed function oxidase system in rats infected experimentally with Fasciola hepatica

  8. Drug-metabolizing enzymes: mechanisms and functions.

    PubMed

    Sheweita, S A

    2000-09-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes are called mixed-function oxidase or monooxygenase and containing many enzymes including cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and other components. The hepatic cytochrome P450s (Cyp) are a multigene family of enzymes that play a critical role in the metabolism of many drugs and xenobiotics with each cytochrome isozyme responding differently to exogenous chemicals in terms of its induction and inhibition. For example, Cyp 1A1 is particularly active towards polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), activating them into reactive intermediates those covalently bind to DNA, a key event in the initiation of carcinogenesis. Likewise, Cyp 1A2 activates a variety of bladder carcinogens, such as aromatic amines and amides. Also, some forms of cytochrome P450 isozymes such as Cyp 3A and 2E1 activate the naturally occurring carcinogens (e.g. aflatoxin B1) and N-nitrosamines respectively into highly mutagenic and carcinogenic agents. The carcinogenic potency of PAHs, and other carcinogens and the extent of binding of their ultimate metabolites to DNA and proteins are correlated with the induction of cytochrome P450 isozymes. Phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase, aryl sulfatase and UDP-glucuronyl transferase inactivate chemical carcinogens into less toxic or inactive metabolites. Many drugs change the rate of activation or detoxification of carcinogens by changing the activities of phases I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes. The balance of detoxification and activation reactions depends on the chemical structure of the agents, and is subjected to many variables that are a function of this structure, or genetic background, sex, endocrine status, age, diet, and the presence of other chemicals. It is important to realize that the enzymes involved in carcinogen metabolism are also involved in the metabolism of a variety of substrates, and thus the introduction of specific xenobiotics may change

  9. Similarities and Differences in the Expression of Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes between Human Hepatic Cell Lines and Primary Human HepatocytesS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lei; Dial, Stacey; Shi, Leming; Branham, William; Liu, Jie; Fang, Jia-Long; Green, Bridgett; Deng, Helen; Kaput, Jim

    2011-01-01

    In addition to primary human hepatocytes, hepatoma cell lines, and transfected nonhepatoma, hepatic cell lines have been used for pharmacological and toxicological studies. However, a systematic evaluation and a general report of the gene expression spectra of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (DMETs) in these in vitro systems are not currently available. To fill this information gap and to provide references for future studies, we systematically characterized the basal gene expression profiles of 251 drug-metabolizing enzymes in untreated primary human hepatocytes from six donors, four commonly used hepatoma cell lines (HepG2, Huh7, SK-Hep-1, and Hep3B), and one transfected human liver epithelial cell line. A large variation in DMET expression spectra was observed between hepatic cell lines and primary hepatocytes, with the complete absence or much lower abundance of certain DMETs in hepatic cell lines. Furthermore, the basal DMET expression spectra of five hepatic cell lines are summarized, providing references for researchers to choose carefully appropriate in vitro models for their studies of drug metabolism and toxicity, especially for studies with drugs in which toxicities are mediated through the formation of reactive metabolites. PMID:21149542

  10. [Dosing time based on molecular mechanism of biological clock of hepatic drug metabolic enzyme].

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Naoya

    2009-11-01

    The mammalian circadian pacemaker stays in the paired suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). Recent several studies reveal that the circadian rhythms of physiology and behavior are controlled by clock genes. In addition, the effectiveness and toxicity of many drugs vary depending on dosing time associated with 24-h rhythms of biochemical, physiological, and behavioral processes under the control of the circadian clock. Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic drug, and is mainly biotransformed and eliminated as nontoxic conjugates with glucuronic acid and sulfuric acid. Only a small portion of the dose is mainly bioactivated by CYP2E1 to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), a reactive toxic intermediate. For APAP overdose, glucuronidation and sulfation are saturated and the formation of NAPQI increases. However, the exact mechanisms underlying the chronotoxicity of APAP have not been clarified yet. In the present study, we have clarified that there was a significant dosing time-dependent difference in hepatotoxicity induced by APAP in mice. The mechanism may be related to the rhythmicity of CYP2E1 activity and GSH conjugation. In additon, we investigated whether the liver transcription factor hepatic nuclear factor-1alpha (HNF-1alpha) and clock genes undergoing astriking 24-h rhythm in mouse liver contribute to the 24-h regulation of CYP2E1 activity. A significant 24-h rhythmicity was demonstrated for CYP2E1 activity, protein levels and mRNA levels. HNF-1alpha and clock genes may contribute to produce the 24-h rhythm of CYP2E1 mRNA levels. Metabolism by CYP and GSH conjugation are common metabolic pathways for many drugs such as APAP. These findings support the concept that choosing the most appropriate time of day to administer the drugs associated with metabolic rhythmicity such as CYP and GSH conjugation may reduce hepatotoxicity in experimental and clinical situations. 24-h rhythm of CYP2E1 activity was controlled by HNF-1alpha and clock gene, in a

  11. Effects of Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes and plasma tolbutamide concentration in rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hsien-Tsung; Chang, Yi-Wei; Uramaru, Naoto; Watanabe, Yoko; Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lii, Chong-Kuei; Yeh, Teng-Kuang

    2012-06-26

    Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang (BT) is the dry powder derived from the aqueous extract of a mixture of 10 medicinal herbs. It is a traditional Chinese medicine being used for the treatment of various immune-related diseases. To investigate the effect of BT on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes and its effect on plasma concentrations of tolbutamide, a substrate of CYP2C, in rats. EXP 1: Thirty-two male Wistar rats were divided into four groups. Rats were fed a control diet and a control diet containing 1, 2.5 and 5% (w/w) of BT, respectively, for eight weeks. The activities of the major CYP and Phase II conjugating enzymes in rat liver microsomes as well as the antioxidant system in rat liver were assessed. Exp 2: Male Wistar rats were fed a control diet or a control diet containing 2.5% of BT, respectively, for eight weeks. A single 20-mg/kg oral dose of tolbutamide was then administered to each rat. Plasma samples were collected from each rat at 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8h after dosing. The concentrations of tolbutamide and glucose level in plasma were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer (HPLC/MS) and enzymatic method, respectively. Significant decrease in microsomal CYP2C-catalyzed diclofenac 4-hydroxylation in the liver of rats fed the BT diet was observed. Increased UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities were also observed in the liver of rats fed the diet containing 2.5 and 5% of BT. Immunoblot analyses also showed decreases of CYP2C11 proteins in the liver of BT fed rats. In addition, rats fed the 2.5% BT diet for eight weeks had no effects on the disposition of tolbutamide and reduction of glucose level in plasma after orally administered of tolbutamide. Rats fed the BT diet for eight weeks may decrease CYP2C enzyme activity and protein expression and increase Phase II conjugating enzyme activities in liver. However, BT may not affect the disposition and efficacy of tolbutamide. Crown Copyright © 2012

  12. Effects of human diets of two different Japanese populations on cancer incidence in rat hepatic drug-metabolizing and antioxidant enzyme systems.

    PubMed

    Kanke, Y; Iitoi, Y; Iwasaki, M; Iwase, Y; Iwama, M; Kimira, M; Takahashi, T; Tsugane, S; Watanabe, S; Akabane, M

    1996-01-01

    Hepatic enzyme systems of drug metabolism and antioxidation were investigated in rats fed the complete human diets consumed in the two Japanese prefectures, Akita and Okinawa, where the incidence of cancers was quite different: Okinawa had the lowest and Akita the highest age-adjusted mortality rate. In rats fed the human diet consumed in Okinawa, hepatic glutathione S-transferase activity was higher and lipid peroxide content was lower than in rats fed the diet consumed in Akita. These data might indicate that the number and/or quantity of the dietary components attributed to the detoxification of carcinogens and the scavenging reactive carcinogen species was much higher in the foods consumed in the population having lower cancer mortality rate.

  13. Evaluation of the synergistic effect of Allium sativum, Eugenia jambolana, Momordica charantia, Ocimum sanctum, and Psidium guajava on hepatic and intestinal drug metabolizing enzymes in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Devendra; Trivedi, Neerja; Dixit, Rakesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims/Background: This study was to investigated the synergistic effect of polyherbal formulations (PHF) of Allium sativum L., Eugenia jambolana Lam., Momordica charantia L., Ocimum sanctum Linn., and Psidium guajava L. in the inhibition/induction of hepatic and intestinal cytochrome P450 (CYPs) and Phase-II conjugated drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs). Consumption of these herbal remedy has been extensively documented for diabetes treatment in Ayurveda. Methodology: PHF of these five herbs was prepared, and different doses were orally administered to Sprague–Dawley rats of different groups except control group. Expression of mRNA and activity of DMEs were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and high performance liquid chromatography in isolated liver and intestine microsomes in PHF pretreated rats. Results: The activities of hepatic and intestinal Phase-II enzyme levels increased along with mRNA levels except CYP3A mRNA level. PHF administration increases the activity of hepatic and intestinal UDP-glucuronyltransferase and glutathione S-transferase in response to dose and time; however, the activity of hepatic sulfotransferase increased at higher doses. Conclusions: CYPs and Phase-II conjugated enzymes levels can be modulated in dose and time dependent manner. Observations suggest that polyherbal formulation might be a possible cause of herb-drug interaction, due to changes in pharmacokinetic of crucial CYPs and Phase-II substrate drug. PMID:27757267

  14. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in rats treated with a hepatic drug-metabolizing enzyme inducer p,p'-DDT.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yuko; Tomita, Mariko; Yoshida, Toshinori; Fukuyama, Tomoki; Katoh, Yoshitaka; Ohnuma-Koyama, Aya; Takahashi, Naofumi; Soma, Katsumi; Kojima, Sayuri; Ohtsuka, Ryoichi; Takeda, Makio; Kuwahara, Maki; Harada, Takanori

    2015-03-01

    Hepatocellular hypertrophy in association with drug-metabolizing enzyme induction is considered to be an adaptive change associated with drug metabolism. To improve our understanding of liver hypertrophy, we determined the effect of a single ip injection of either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or vehicle in male F344 rats with hepatocellular hypertrophy induced by oral delivery of p,p'-DDT for 2 weeks. The rats were sacrificed 3h or 24h after LPS or vehicle injection. LPS induced a focal hepatocellular necrosis in rats fed the control diet. When rats pre-treated with p,p'-DDT were injected with LPS, necrotic foci surrounded by ballooned hepatocytes were observed in the liver. The change was consistent with reduced LPS-mediated increases in plasma hepatic biomarkers, neutrophil influx, and apoptosis, and also associated with hepatic mRNA levels of TNF-α, CYPs, and NOS2. By contrast, when combined with p,p'-DDT and LPS, faint hepatocellular fatty change was extended, together with a synergistic increase in total blood cholesterol. These results suggest that hepatocytes exposed to p,p'-DDT are protected from the cell-lethal toxic effects of an exogenous stimulus, resulting in cell ballooning rather than necrosis in association with reduced inflammation and apoptosis, but compromised by an adverse effect on lipid metabolism.

  15. Expression of hepatic drug-metabolizing cytochrome p450 enzymes and their intercorrelations: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Achour, Brahim; Barber, Jill; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2014-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 is a family of enzymes that catalyze reactions involved in the metabolism of drugs and other xenobiotics. These enzymes are therefore important in pharmacologic and toxicologic studies, and information on their abundances is of value in the process of scaling in vitro data to in vivo metabolic parameters. A meta-analysis was applied to data on the abundance of human hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes in Caucasian adult livers (50 studies). Despite variations in the methods used to measure the abundance of enzymes, agreement between the studies in 26 different laboratories was generally good. Nonetheless, some heterogeneity was detected (Higgins and Thompson heterogeneity test). More importantly, large interindividual variability was observed in the collated data. Positive correlations between the expression levels of some cytochrome P450 enzymes were found in the abundance data, including the following pairs: CYP3A4/CYP3A5*1/*3 (Rs = 0.70, P < 0.0001, n = 52), CYP3A4/CYP2C8 (Rs = 0.68, P < 0.0001, n = 134), CYP3A4/CYP2C9 (Rs = 0.55, P < 0.0001, n = 71), and CYP2C8/CYP2C9 (Rs = 0.55, P < 0.0001, n = 99). These correlations can be used to demonstrate common genetic transcriptional mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  16. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA...

  17. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA...

  18. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA...

  19. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA...

  20. Chemoprotective activity of boldine: modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kubínová, R; Machala, M; Minksová, K; Neca, J; Suchý, V

    2001-03-01

    Possible chemoprotective effects of the naturally occurring alkaloid boldine, a major alkaloid of boldo (Peumus boldus Mol.) leaves and bark, including in vitro modulations of drug-metabolizing enzymes in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1 cell line and mouse hepatic microsomes, were investigated. Boldine manifested inhibition activity on hepatic microsomal CYP1A-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and CYP3A-dependent testosterone 6 beta-hydroxylase activities and stimulated glutathione S-transferase activity in Hepa-1 cells. In addition to the known antioxidant activity, boldine could decrease the metabolic activation of other xenobiotics including chemical mutagens.

  1. Methadone induces the expression of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes through the activation of pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor.

    PubMed

    Tolson, Antonia H; Li, Haishan; Eddington, Natalie D; Wang, Hongbing

    2009-09-01

    Methadone (MD) is the most established substance abuse pharmacotherapy of choice for the management of heroin dependence. To date, drug-drug interactions involving MD have been characterized asymmetrically among existing reports, which describe how other drugs affect the metabolic or pharmacokinetic profiles of MD; however, limited information is available regarding the potential for MD to influence similar fates of coadministered drugs. Moreover, little to no mechanistic evidence has been explored. Here, we show that MD induces hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) through the activation of pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of human hepatocyte cultures revealed that MD induces the mRNA expression of CYP2B6, CYP3A4, UGT1A1, and multidrug resistance 1 in a concentration-related manner, with the maximal induction of CYP2B6 challenging that of the induction by rifampicin. Furthermore, MD-mediated induction of CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 proteins was observed in Western blot analysis. In cell-based reporter assays, MD significantly increased human (h) PXR-mediated CYP2B6 reporter activities but exhibited minimal effect on hCAR activation as a result of the constitutive activity of hCAR in HepG2 cells. Further studies revealed that treatment with MD resulted in significant nuclear accumulation of adenovirus/enhanced yellow fluorescent protein tagged-hCAR in human hepatocytes, which has been regarded as the initial step of CAR activation. Additional analysis of the two enantiomers of MD, R-(-)-MD (active) and S-(+)-MD (inactive), indicates the lack of stereoselectivity pertaining to MD-mediated DME induction. Overall, our results show that MD induces the hepatic expression of multiple DMEs by activating PXR- and CAR-mediated pathways.

  2. Methadone Induces the Expression of Hepatic Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes through the Activation of Pregnane X Receptor and Constitutive Androstane Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tolson, Antonia H.; Li, Haishan; Eddington, Natalie D.; Wang, Hongbing

    2009-01-01

    Methadone (MD) is the most established substance abuse pharmacotherapy of choice for the management of heroin dependence. To date, drug-drug interactions involving MD have been characterized asymmetrically among existing reports, which describe how other drugs affect the metabolic or pharmacokinetic profiles of MD; however, limited information is available regarding the potential for MD to influence similar fates of coadministered drugs. Moreover, little to no mechanistic evidence has been explored. Here, we show that MD induces hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) through the activation of pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of human hepatocyte cultures revealed that MD induces the mRNA expression of CYP2B6, CYP3A4, UGT1A1, and multidrug resistance 1 in a concentration-related manner, with the maximal induction of CYP2B6 challenging that of the induction by rifampicin. Furthermore, MD-mediated induction of CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 proteins was observed in Western blot analysis. In cell-based reporter assays, MD significantly increased human (h) PXR-mediated CYP2B6 reporter activities but exhibited minimal effect on hCAR activation as a result of the constitutive activity of hCAR in HepG2 cells. Further studies revealed that treatment with MD resulted in significant nuclear accumulation of adenovirus/enhanced yellow fluorescent protein tagged-hCAR in human hepatocytes, which has been regarded as the initial step of CAR activation. Additional analysis of the two enantiomers of MD, R-(–)-MD (active) and S-(+)-MD (inactive), indicates the lack of stereoselectivity pertaining to MD-mediated DME induction. Overall, our results show that MD induces the hepatic expression of multiple DMEs by activating PXR- and CAR-mediated pathways. PMID:19520773

  3. Effect of intratracheally instilled benzo(a)pyrene on the pulmonary and hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes in normal and vitamin A deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Dogra, S C; Khanduja, K L; Sharma, R R

    1985-03-01

    The effect of intratracheal instillation of different doses of benzo(a)pyrene (0.1, 1.0 and 2.0 mg) on the drug metabolizing enzymes of lung and liver was analysed in rats fed diet with or without vitamin A for 5-6 weeks. Benzo(a)pyrene exposure at 2.0 mg dose only elevated the level of cytochrome P-450 and b5, and activity of benzopyrene hydroxylase in liver, and extent of increase was similar in normal and vitamin A deficient groups. Contrary to this, pulmonary contents of cytochrome P-450 and b5, and benzopyrene hydroxylase activity increased over control values in both the groups even at lower doses of benzo(a)pyrene. Moreover, their values were higher in vitamin A deficient-treated groups compared to normal-treated controls. Increase in these parameters was greater in lung as compared to increase in liver. NADPH cytochrome C-reductase in lung and liver was not affected either by inducing vitamin A deficiency or exposing these rats further to benzo(a)pyrene. Uridine-diphospho-glucuronosyl-transferase (UDP-GT) activity in normal and vitamin A deficient groups was enhanced following exposure to benzo(a)pyrene both in lung and liver. However, activity of this enzyme remained impaired in vitamin A deficient groups, benzo(a)pyrene exposed or not exposed when compared to respective normal controls. Glutathione S-transferase activity remained unchanged following exposure to benzo(a)pyrene both in lung and liver. The apparent increase in hepatic glutathione S-transferase and decrease in pulmonary glutathione S-transferase activity in vitamin A deficiency was only due to vitamin A deficient status of rats with no further effect of benzo(a)pyrene.

  4. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862.3360 Section 862.3360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... drug metabolizing enzyme. This device is used as an aid in determining treatment choice...

  5. Alteration of drug metabolizing enzymes in sulphite oxidase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tutuncu, Begum; Kuçukatay, Vural; Arslan, Sevki; Sahin, Barbaros; Semiz, Asli; Sen, Alaattin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible effects of sulphite oxidase (SOX, E.C. 1.8.3.1) deficiency on xenobiotic metabolism. For this purpose, SOX deficiency was produced in rats by the administration of a low molybdenum diet with concurrent addition of 200 ppm tungsten to their drinking water. First, hepatic SOX activity in deficient groups was measured to confirm SOX deficiency. Then, aminopyrine N-demethylase, aniline 4-hydroxylase, aromatase, caffeine N-demethylase, cytochrome b5 reductase, erythromycin N-demethylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, glutathione S-transferase, N-nitrosodimethylamine N-demethylase and penthoxyresorufin O-deethylase activities were determined to follow changes in the activity of drug metabolizing enzymes in SOX-deficient rats. Our results clearly demonstrated that SOX deficiency significantly elevated A4H, caffeine N-demethylase, erythromycin N-demethylase and N-nitrosodimethylamine N-demethylase activities while decreasing ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and aromatase activities. These alterations in drug metabolizing enzymes can contribute to the varying susceptibility and response of sulphite-sensitive individuals to different drugs and/or therapeutics used for treatments. PMID:22798713

  6. Modulation of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes and oxidative status by rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) and Honeybush (Cyclopia intermedia), green and black (Camellia sinensis) teas in rats.

    PubMed

    Marnewick, Jeanine L; Joubert, Elizabeth; Swart, Pieter; Van Der Westhuizen, Francois; Gelderblom, Wentzel C

    2003-12-31

    Rooibos and honeybush teas significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced the activity of cytosolic glutathione S-transferase alpha. A significant (P < 0.05) to marginal (P < 0.1) increase in the activity of the microsomal UDP-glucuronosyl transferase was obtained with unprocessed rooibos and honeybush teas, respectively. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in the liver of all tea treated rats while reduced glutathione (GSH) was markedly increased in the liver of the herbal tea treated rats. These changes resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) increase in the GSH/GSSG ratio by the unprocessed, processed rooibos and unprocessed honeybush teas. Green and black teas markedly to significantly decreased the oxygen radical absorbance capacity in liver homogenates, respectively. Modulation of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes and oxidative status in the liver may be important events in the protection against adverse effects related to mutagenesis and oxidative damage.

  7. Drug metabolizing enzyme systems in the houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata).

    PubMed

    Bailey, T A; John, A; Mensah-Brown, E P; Garner, A; Samour, J; Raza, H

    1998-10-01

    This study compared catalytic and immunochemical properties of drug metabolizing phase I and II enzyme systems in houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata) liver and kidney and rat liver. P450 content in bustard liver (0.34 +/- 0.03 nmol mg-1 protein) was 50% lower than that of rat liver (0.70 +/- 0.02 nmol mg-1 protein). With the exception of aniline hydroxylase activity, monooxygenase activities using aminopyrine, ethoxyresorufin and ethoxycoumarin as substrates were all significantly lower than corresponding rat liver enzymes. As found in mammalian systems the P450 activities in the bird liver were higher than in the kidney. Immunohistochemical analysis of microsomes using antibodies to rat hepatic P450 demonstrated that bustard liver and kidney express P4502C11 homologous protein; no appreciable cross-reactivity was observed in bustards using antibodies to P4502E1, 1A1 or 1A2 isoenzymes. Glutathione content and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in bustard liver were comparable with those of rat liver. GST activity in the kidney was 65% lower than the liver. Western blotting of liver and kidney cytosol with human GST isoenzyme-specific antibodies revealed that the expression of alpha-class of antibodies exceeds mu in the bustard. In contrast, the pi-class of GST was not detected in the bustard liver. This data demonstrates that hepatic and renal microsomes from the bustard have multiple forms of phase I and phase II enzymes. The multiplicity and tissue specific expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in bustards may play a significant role in determining the pharmacokinetics of drugs and susceptibility of the birds to various environmental pollutants and toxic insults.

  8. Pharmacogenetics of drug-metabolizing enzymes in Italian populations.

    PubMed

    Serpe, Loredana; Canaparo, Roberto; Scordo, Maria Gabriella; Spina, Edoardo

    2015-06-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes play a major role in the biotransformation and subsequent elimination of most drugs and xenobiotics from the body. Both phase I and phase II enzymes are highly polymorphic. Inter-individual differences in genes coding for drug-metabolizing enzymes are important for understanding variability in drug response and for individualization of drug prescription. The prevalence of genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolism varies widely with ethnicity, and marked differences in the distribution of allelic variants of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes have been documented in populations of different racial origin. This review aimed to summarize the available studies on genetic polymorphisms associated with drug metabolism conducted in Italian populations and to compare the frequency of the various metabolizer phenotypes and most common variant alleles (and resulting genotypes) with corresponding values from other populations. Notably, published data are not extensive, and most studies were performed on relatively low numbers of individuals. In general, the frequency of polymorphisms in the cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes as well as in the investigated phase II enzymes in the Italian population was similar to values reported for other Caucasian populations. However, the prevalence of CYP2D6 gene duplication among Italians was found to be very high, confirming the higher frequency of CYP2D6 ultrarapid metabolizers in the Mediterranean area compared to Northern Europe. It is worth noting that a geographic gradient in the flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 polymorphism distribution was also seen, the Italian population showing higher similarity to other Mediterranean populations than to North Europeans.

  9. Role of constitutive androstane receptor in Toll-like receptor-mediated regulation of gene expression of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pranav; Guo, Tao; Moore, David D; Ghose, Romi

    2014-01-01

    Impairment of drug disposition in the liver during inflammation has been attributed to downregulation of gene expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and drug transporters. Inflammatory responses in the liver are primarily mediated by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). We have recently shown that activation of TLR2 or TLR4 by lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), respectively, leads to the downregulation of gene expression of DMEs/transporters. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this downregulation is not fully understood. The xenobiotic nuclear receptors, pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), regulate the expression of DMEs/transporter genes. Downregulation of DMEs/transporters by LTA or LPS was associated with reduced expression of PXR and CAR genes. To determine the role of CAR, we injected CAR(+/+) and CAR(-/-) mice with LTA or LPS, which significantly downregulated (~40%-60%) RNA levels of the DMEs, cytochrome P450 (Cyp)3a11, Cyp2a4, Cyp2b10, uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1a1, amine N-sulfotransferase, and the transporter, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, in CAR(+/+) mice. Suppression of most of these genes was attenuated in LTA-treated CAR(-/-) mice. In contrast, LPS-mediated downregulation of these genes was not attenuated in CAR(-/-) mice. Induction of these genes by mouse CAR activator 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene was sustained in LTA- but not in LPS-treated mice. Similar observations were obtained in humanized CAR mice. We have replicated these results in primary hepatocytes as well. Thus, LPS can downregulate DME/transporter genes in the absence of CAR, whereas the effect of LTA on these genes is attenuated in the absence of CAR, indicating the potential involvement of CAR in LTA-mediated downregulation of DME/transporter genes.

  10. Role of Constitutive Androstane Receptor in Toll-Like Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Gene Expression of Hepatic Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pranav; Guo, Tao; Moore, David D.

    2014-01-01

    Impairment of drug disposition in the liver during inflammation has been attributed to downregulation of gene expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and drug transporters. Inflammatory responses in the liver are primarily mediated by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). We have recently shown that activation of TLR2 or TLR4 by lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), respectively, leads to the downregulation of gene expression of DMEs/transporters. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this downregulation is not fully understood. The xenobiotic nuclear receptors, pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), regulate the expression of DMEs/transporter genes. Downregulation of DMEs/transporters by LTA or LPS was associated with reduced expression of PXR and CAR genes. To determine the role of CAR, we injected CAR+/+ and CAR−/− mice with LTA or LPS, which significantly downregulated (∼40%–60%) RNA levels of the DMEs, cytochrome P450 (Cyp)3a11, Cyp2a4, Cyp2b10, uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1a1, amine N-sulfotransferase, and the transporter, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, in CAR+/+ mice. Suppression of most of these genes was attenuated in LTA-treated CAR−/− mice. In contrast, LPS-mediated downregulation of these genes was not attenuated in CAR−/− mice. Induction of these genes by mouse CAR activator 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene was sustained in LTA- but not in LPS-treated mice. Similar observations were obtained in humanized CAR mice. We have replicated these results in primary hepatocytes as well. Thus, LPS can downregulate DME/transporter genes in the absence of CAR, whereas the effect of LTA on these genes is attenuated in the absence of CAR, indicating the potential involvement of CAR in LTA-mediated downregulation of DME/transporter genes. PMID:24194512

  11. A Comparative Study for the Evaluation of Two Doses of Ellagic Acid on Hepatic Drug Metabolizing and Antioxidant Enzymes in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Gurbet; Semiz, Aslı; Karakurt, Serdar; Arslan, Sevki; Adali, Orhan; Sen, Alaattin

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate different doses of ellagic acid (EA) in vivo in rats for its potential to modulate hepatic phases I, II, and antioxidant enzymes. EA (10 or 30 mg/kg/day, intragastrically) was administered for 14 consecutive days, and activity, protein, and mRNA levels were determined. Although the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B and CYP2E enzyme activities were decreased significantly, the activities of all other enzymes were unchanged with the 10 mg/kg/day EA. In addition, western-blot and qRT-PCR results clearly corroborated the above enzyme expressions. On the other hand, while the NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities were increased significantly, CYP1A, 2B, 2C, 2E, and 19 enzyme activities were reduced significantly with 30 mg/kg/day EA. In addition, CYP2B, 2C6, 2E1, and 19 protein and mRNA levels were substantially decreased by the 30 mg/kg/day dose of EA, but the CYP1A protein, and mRNA levels were not changed. CYP3A enzyme activity, protein and mRNA levels were not altered by neither 10 nor 30 mg/kg/day ellagic acid. These results indicate that EA exerts a dose-dependent impact on the metabolism of chemical carcinogens and drugs by affecting the enzymes involved in xenobiotics activation/detoxification and antioxidant pathways. PMID:23971029

  12. Interplay of drug metabolizing enzymes with cellular transporters.

    PubMed

    Böhmdorfer, Michaela; Maier-Salamon, Alexandra; Riha, Juliane; Brenner, Stefan; Höferl, Martina; Jäger, Walter

    2014-11-01

    Many endogenous and xenobiotic substances and their metabolites are substrates for drug metabolizing enzymes and cellular transporters. These proteins may not only contribute to bioavailability of molecules but also to uptake into organs and, consequently, to overall elimination. The coordinated action of uptake transporters, metabolizing enzymes, and efflux pumps, therefore, is a precondition for detoxification and elimination of drugs. As the understanding of the underlying mechanisms is important to predict alterations in drug disposal, adverse drug reactions and, finally, drug-drug interactions, this review illustrates the interplay between selected uptake/efflux transporters and phase I/II metabolizing enzymes.

  13. Clinically Relevant Genetic Variations in Drug Metabolizing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Navin; Dolan, M. Eileen

    2011-01-01

    In the field of pharmacogenetics, we currently have a few markers to guide physicians as to the best course of therapy for patients. For the most part, these genetic variants are within a drug metabolizing enzyme that has a large effect on the degree or rate at which a drug is converted to its metabolites. For many drugs, response and toxicity are multi-genic traits and understanding relationships between a patient's genetic variation in drug metabolizing enzymes and the efficacy and/or toxicity of a medication offers the potential to optimize therapies. This review will focus on variants in drug metabolizing enzymes with predictable and relatively large impacts on drug efficacy and/or toxicity; some of these drug/gene variant pairs have impacted drug labels by the United States Food and Drug Administration. The challenges in identifying genetic markers and implementing clinical changes based on known markers will be discussed. In addition, the impact of next generation sequencing in identifying rare variants will be addressed. PMID:21453273

  14. Enzyme kinetics in drug metabolism: fundamentals and applications.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Swati; Argikar, Upendra A; Tweedie, Donald J

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are protein catalysts that lower the energy barrier for a reaction and speed the rate of a chemical change. The kinetics of reactions catalyzed by enzymes, as well as several mechanisms underlying the kinetics, have been comprehensively studied and written in textbooks (1, 2). The importance of quantitative evaluation of enzymatic processes has been recognized in many fields of study, including biochemistry, molecular biology, and pharmaceutical sciences to name a few. In pharmaceutical sciences, the applications of enzyme kinetics range from hit finding efforts for new chemical entities on a pharmacological target to concentration effect relationships to large-scale biosynthesis. The study of the science of drug metabolism has two principal concepts-rate and extent. While understanding disposition pathways and identification of metabolites provides an insight into the extent of metabolism, kinetics of depletion of substrates (endogenous or exogenous) and formation of metabolites deals with the rate of metabolism. The current textbook specifically focuses on kinetics of drug-metabolizing enzymes, detailing specific enzyme classes, and discusses kinetics as they apply to drug transporters. This textbook also outlines additional factors that contribute to the kinetics of reactions catalyzed by these proteins such as variability in isoforms (pharmacogenomics) and experimental factors including key concepts such as alterations of substrate concentrations due to binding. Applications of these approaches in predicting kinetic parameters and alternative approaches for enzymes (systems biology) and transporters are also discussed. The final section focuses on real-life examples (case studies) to try and exemplify the applications of enzyme kinetic principles. This chapter provides a brief overview outlining some key concepts within each of the sections and the chapters within this textbook.

  15. The Role of Intracellular Signaling in Insulin-mediated Regulation of Drug Metabolizing Enzyme Gene and Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang K.; Novak, Raymond F.

    2007-01-01

    Endogenous factors, including hormones, growth factors and cytokines, play an important role in the regulation of hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme expression in both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Alterations of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes gene and protein expression, observed in diabetes, fasting, obesity, protein-calorie malnutrition and long-term alcohol consumption alters the metabolism of xenobiotics, including procarcinogens, carcinogens, toxicants, and therapeutic agents and may also impact the efficacy and safety of therapeutic agents, as well as result in drug-drug interactions. Although the mechanisms by which xenobiotics regulate drug metabolizing enzymes have been studied intensively, less is known regarding the cellular signaling pathways and components which regulate drug metabolizing enzyme gene and protein expression in response to hormones and cytokines. Recent findings, however, have revealed that several cellular signaling pathways are involved in hormone- and growth factor-mediated regulation of drug metabolizing enzymes. Our laboratory, and others, have demonstrated that insulin and growth factors regulate drug metabolizing enzyme gene and protein expression, including cytochromes P450, glutathione S-transferases and microsomal epoxide hydrolase, through receptors which are members of the large receptor tyrosine kinase family, and by downstream effectors such as phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, the mitogen activated protein kinase, Akt/protein kinase B, mTOR, and the p70S6 kinase. Here, we review current knowledge of the signaling pathways implicated in regulation of drug metabolizing enzyme gene and protein expression in response to insulin and growth factors, with the goal of increasing our understanding of how chronic disease affects these signaling pathways, components, and ultimately gene expression and translational control. PMID:17097148

  16. Regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes by local and systemic liver injuries

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan; Hu, Bingfang; Xie, Yang; Billiar, Timothy R.; Sperry, Jason L.; Huang, Min; Xie, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Drug metabolism and disposition are critical in maintaining the chemical and functional homeostasis of xenobiotics/drugs and endobiotics. The liver plays an essential role in drug metabolism and disposition due to its abundant expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and transporters. There is growing evidence to suggest that many hepatic and systemic diseases can affect drug metabolism and disposition by regulating the expression and/or activity of DMEs and transporters in the liver. Areas covered This review focuses on the recent progress on the regulation of DMEs by local and systemic liver injuries. Liver ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) and sepsis are used as examples of local and systemic injury, respectively. The reciprocal effect of the expression and activity of DMEs on animals' sensitivity to local and systemic liver injuries is also discussed. Expert opinion Local and systemic liver injuries have a major effect on the expression and activity of DMEs in the liver. Understanding the disease effect on DMEs is clinically important due to the concern of disease-drug interactions. Future studies are necessary to understand the mechanism by which liver injury regulates DMEs. Human studies are also urgently needed in order to determine whether the results in animals can be replicated in human patients. PMID:26751558

  17. Regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes by local and systemic liver injuries.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; Hu, Bingfang; Xie, Yang; Billiar, Timothy R; Sperry, Jason L; Huang, Min; Xie, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Drug metabolism and disposition are critical in maintaining the chemical and functional homeostasis of xenobiotics/drugs and endobiotics. The liver plays an essential role in drug metabolism and disposition due to its abundant expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and transporters. There is growing evidence to suggest that many hepatic and systemic diseases can affect drug metabolism and disposition by regulating the expression and/or activity of DMEs and transporters in the liver. This review focuses on the recent progress on the regulation of DMEs by local and systemic liver injuries. Liver ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) and sepsis are used as examples of local and systemic injury, respectively. The reciprocal effect of the expression and activity of DMEs on animals' sensitivity to local and systemic liver injuries is also discussed. Local and systemic liver injuries have a major effect on the expression and activity of DMEs in the liver. Understanding the disease effect on DMEs is clinically important due to the concern of disease-drug interactions. Future studies are necessary to understand the mechanism by which liver injury regulates DMEs. Human studies are also urgently needed in order to determine whether the results in animals can be replicated in human patients.

  18. Cadmium effect on microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme activity in rat livers with respect to differences in age and sex

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, M.

    1982-04-01

    The effect of cadmium on the hepatic microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme system was investigated. Cadmium chloride caused the conversion of cytochrome P-450 to P-420 in rat liver microsomes. The destruction of cytochrome P-450 by cadmium caused the reduction of microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme activity and prolonged the pentobarbital sleeping time. There is a sex-related difference in the ability of cadmium to inhibit the hepatic drug metabolism in rats: male rats are more sensitive to cadmium than females. The effective period when cadmium prolonged their sleep depended upon the age of rats; older rats were more sensitive to cadmium than younger ones. The maximum increase of sleeping time depended upon the dose level of cadium, and the rate constant of the equations seems to depend upon the age of the animals.

  19. Expression profile of early estradiol-responsive genes in cynomolgus macaque liver: implications for drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ise, Ryota; Kito, Go; Uno, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen plays important roles in estrogen-responsive tissues, such as mammary glands, ovaries, and the uterus. In the liver, the major drug metabolizing organ, estrogen is known to regulate expression of some drug-metabolizing enzymes. Due to the lack of information on the role of estrogen in hepatic gene expression in primate species, we previously investigated the late response of hepatic gene expression to estradiol in cynomolgus macaques. To understand the early response of hepatic gene expression to estradiol, in this study, microarray analysis was conducted using cynomolgus macaque liver samples collected at 1 h and 5 h after estradiol injection. Comparison of expression profiles in estradiol and solvent (control)-treated ovariectomized cynomolgus macaques revealed 27 differentially expressed genes (>2.0-fold), including 18 at 1 h and 9 at 5 h after estradiol injection. As indicated by Gene Ontology analysis, these genes were related to oxidoreductase activity and transferase activity, partly representing important aspects of drug-metabolizing enzymes. Further analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that estradiol down-regulated CYP2A24, CYP2C76, and CYP2E1 (>2.0-fold) at 1 h and up-regulated GSTM5 (>2.0-fold) at 5 h after estradiol injection. These results suggest that the short-term estradiol treatment influenced expression of hepatic genes, including drug-metabolizing enzyme genes, in cynomolgus macaque liver.

  20. Hepatic drug metabolizing profile of Flinders Sensitive Line rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Kotsovolou, Olga; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Lang, Matti A; Marselos, Marios; Overstreet, David H; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Zoi; Johanson, Inger; Fotopoulos, Andrew; Konstandi, Maria

    2010-08-16

    The Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rat model of depression exhibits some behavioral, neurochemical, and pharmacological features that have been reported in depressed patients and has been very effective in screening antidepressants. Major factor that determines the effectiveness and toxicity of a drug is the drug metabolizing capacity of the liver. Therefore, in order to discriminate possible differentiation in the hepatic drug metabolism between FSL rats and Sprague-Dawley (SD) controls, their hepatic metabolic profile was investigated in this study. The data showed decreased glutathione (GSH) content and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and lower expression of certain major CYP enzymes, including the CYP2B1, CYP2C11 and CYP2D1 in FSL rats compared to SD controls. In contrast, p-nitrophenol hydroxylase (PNP), 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD) and 16alpha-testosterone hydroxylase activities were higher in FSL rats. Interestingly, the wide spread environmental pollutant benzo(alpha)pyrene (B(alpha)P) induced CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B1/2 and ALDH3c at a lesser extend in FSL than in SD rats, whereas the antidepressant mirtazapine (MIRT) up-regulated CYP1A1/2, CYP2C11, CYP2D1, CYP2E1 and CYP3A1/2, mainly, in FSL rats. The drug also further increased ALDH3c whereas suppressed GSH content in B(alpha)P-exposed FSL rats. In conclusion, several key enzymes of the hepatic biotransformation machinery are differentially expressed in FSL than in SD rats, a condition that may influence the outcome of drug therapy. The MIRT-induced up-regulation of several drug-metabolizing enzymes indicates the critical role of antidepressant treatment that should be always taken into account in the designing of treatment and interpretation of insufficient pharmacotherapy or drug toxicity.

  1. Pharmacogenetics of drug-metabolizing enzymes in US Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Duconge, Jorge; Cadilla, Carmen L.; Ruaño, Gualberto

    2015-01-01

    Although the Hispanic population is continuously growing in the United States, they are underrepresented in pharmacogenetic studies. This review addresses the need for compiling available pharmacogenetic data in US Hispanics, discussing the prevalence of clinically relevant polymorphisms in pharmacogenes encoding for drug-metabolizing enzymes. CYP3A5*3 (0.245–0.867) showed the largest frequency in a US Hispanic population. A higher prevalence of CYP2C9*3, CYP2C19*4, and UGT2B7 IVS1+985 A>Gwas observed in US Hispanic vs. non-Hispanic populations. We found interethnic and intraethnic variability in frequencies of genetic polymorphisms for metabolizing enzymes, which highlights the need to define the ancestries of participants in pharmacogenetic studies. New approaches should be integrated in experimental designs to gain knowledge about the clinical relevance of the unique combination of genetic variants occurring in this admixed population. Ethnic subgroups in the US Hispanic population may harbor variants that might be part of multiple causative loci or in linkage-disequilibrium with functional variants. Pharmacogenetic studies in Hispanics should not be limited to ascertain commonly studied polymorphisms that were originally identified in their parental populations. The success of the Personalized Medicine paradigm will depend on recognizing genetic diversity between and within US Hispanics and the uniqueness of their genetic backgrounds. PMID:25431893

  2. Polyhalogenated biphenyls and phenobarbital: evaluation as inducers of drug metabolizing enzymes in the sheepshead, Archosargus probatocephalus.

    PubMed

    James, M O; Little, P J

    1981-08-01

    Several doses of Aroclor 1254 (polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture), Firemaster FF1 (polybrominated biphenyl (PBB) mixture), 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl (HBB), 3,3',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (HCB) and phenobarbital (PB) were administered to the marine fish sheepshead (Archosargus probatocephalus). The PCB and PBB mixtures caused induction of hepatic microsomal benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase (AHH), 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (7-EC) and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (ERF) activities, but not benzphetamine N-demethylase (BND), epoxide hydrolase (EH) or glutathione S-transferase (GSH-T) activities. This induction pattern is typical of that caused by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in fish and mammals or by tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in mammals. The extent of induction of AHH-activity and cytochrome P-450 content was higher when experiments were carried out in summer (water temperature 25 +/- 4 degrees C) than in winter (water temperature 11 +/- 3 degrees C). Firemaster FF1 (15 mg/kg) induced fish for at least 56 days in both summer and winter at which time the liver concentrations of PBB were in the ppm range. PCB concentrations in the ppm range have been found in fish from polluted lakes and seas, thus we may expect that environmental exposure to PCB is sufficient to induce hepatic mixed function oxidase (MFO) activities. The PCB isomer 3,3'4,4'5,5'-HCB, which induces the same spectrum of hepatic drug-metabolizing activities as TCDD and PAH in rats, had a broadly similar effect in the sheepshead. Another purified isomer, 2,2',4,4',5,5'-HBB, which induces the same enzymes as PB in rats, had no effect on drug-metabolizing activities in sheepshead. PB was also without effect on sheepshead hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes, although a typical narcotic effect was produced in PB-treated sheepshead. Our studies provide further evidence that drug-metabolizing activities in fish liver are readily induced by chemicals like TCDD or PAH, but we fail to

  3. Effect of zinc on hepatic drug metabolism under ethanol toxicity.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Ashima; Mahmood, A; Pathak, R; Dhawan, D

    2008-01-01

    The effects of zinc on drug-metabolizing enzymes in the liver were examined in male Wistar rats following ethanol intoxication. Rats were orally fed 3 mL of 30% ethanol daily for either two, four, or eight weeks and were orally administered zinc sulfate (ZnSO4.7H2O) at a dose level of 227 mg/L. Levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and the activities of cytochrome P-450, cytochrome b(5), NADPH cytochrome-C-reductase and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) were determined in liver after two, four, and eight weeks. Significant elevation was observed in the activities of the enzymes of the mixed function oxidase system in response to toxicity induced by ethanol at all the intervals. These effects of were ascribed to the enhanced activity of the microsomal ethanol oxidizing system and the associated increase in reactive oxygen species production. Zinc supplementation to these ethanol-intoxicated animals resulted in normalization of these elevated values significantly, but still they do not attain normal levels. Significant increase was observed in reduced glutathione content in animals after four and eight weeks of ethanol feeding, which appeared to be further elevated in combined zinc and ethanol treatment. Significant elevation in the activity of GST was illustrated on ethanol-fed animals at all the three treatment intervals. Furthermore, the activity of this enzyme was only moderately normalized following zinc treatment. This was accredited to the antioxidant potential of zinc, as well as its ability to induce metallothionein content, which provide protection against the toxic effects of ethanol. To conclude, zinc was able to normalize the effects of ethanol in the liver.

  4. Sex- and age-dependent gene expression in human liver: An implication for drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Takata, Ryo; Kito, Go; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Kazuko; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kamataki, Tetsuya; Katagiri, Toyomasa

    2017-02-01

    Sex and age differences in hepatic expression of drug-metabolizing enzyme genes could cause variations in drug metabolism, but has not been fully elucidated, especially in Asian population. In this study, the global expression of human hepatic genes was analyzed by microarrays in 40 Japanese subjects (27 males and 13 females). Thirty-five sex-biased genes were identified (P < 0.005). Whereas, 60 age-biased genes in two age groups, <60 years and ≥70 years (P < 0.001), were identified in males. By Gene Ontology analysis, the sex-biased genes were related to protein catabolism and modification, while the age-biased genes were related to transcription regulation and cell death. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction confirmed the female-biased expression of drug-metabolizing enzyme genes BChE, CYP4X1, and SULT1E1 (≥1.5-fold, P < 0.05). Further analysis of drug-metabolizing enzyme genes indicated that expression of CYP2A6 and CYP3A4 in females in the ≥70 age group was less than in the <60 age group (≥1.5-fold, P < 0.05), and this trend was also observed for PXR expression in males (≥1.5-fold, P < 0.05). The results presented provide important insights into hepatic physiology and function, especially drug metabolism, with respect to sex and age. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of tacrine hydrochloride on hepatic drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Danbury, T C; Eccles, M; Ford, J; Roberts, C J

    1999-01-01

    The aim was to assess tacrine hydrochloride (THA) as an inhibitor of rat hepatic oxidative enzymes. A model of hepatic microsome oxidative metabolism was established using antipyrine (AP) incubated with NADPH. AP and its metabolites, 3-hydroxymethyl antipyrine (HMA). 4-hydroxy antipyrine (OHA) and norantipyrine (NORA) were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Aliquots of 200, 400 and 600 microg/ml antipyrine were incubated with the microsomal preparation alone, with 20 microg/ml cimetidine or with 40, 80 or 200 microg/ml THA. Cimetidine inhibited HMA production by 35-38% (P<0.001) and OHA production by 49-52% (P<0.001). Incubation with the 3 concentrations of THA inhibited HMA production by 17%, 24% and 41% (P<0.001) and OHA production by 52%, 55% and 79%, respectively (P<0.001). NORA was identifiable when antipyrine was incubated with NADPH alone, but could not be identified after incubation with either cimetidine or THA. This study has shown that THA causes the inhibition of AP metabolism to HMA, OHA and possibly NORA. We suggest THA is an inhibitor of three different hepatic microsomal cytochrome P-450 enzyme sub-families.

  6. Induction and inhibition of cytochrome P450 and drug-metabolizing enzymes by climbazole.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasuna; Suzuki, Michiya; Ohshiro, Naomi; Sunagawa, Takashi; Sasaki, Tadanori; Oguro, Takiko; Tokuyama, Shogo; Yamamoto, Toshinori; Yoshida, Takemi

    2002-01-01

    To determine the effect of climbazole on hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 (P450) and drug-metabolizing enzymes, four different P450 isoforms (CYP2B1, 3A2, 2E1, and 2C12) were examined in female Long-Evans rats. Treatment of rats with climbazole resulted in the induction of P450 content. Climbazole both induced and inhibited aminopyrine N-demethylase activity, but not erythromycin N-demethylase activity. Uridine 5'-phosphate (UDP)-glucuronosyl transferase and glutathione S-transferase activities were also increased with climbazole treatment. Immunoblot analyses revealed that climbazole induces CYP2B1 and CYP3A2 at the lower dose examined, but it failed to increase CYP2B1 at the higher dose. Northern blot analysis revealed that climbazole markedly increases P450 2B1 mRNA. These results indicate that climbazole induces and inhibits P450-dependent drug-metabolizing enzymes in vivo and may have the dose-differential effect on CYP2B1 in rat liver.

  7. Upgrading HepG2 cells with adenoviral vectors that encode drug-metabolizing enzymes: application for drug hepatotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Lechón, M José; Tolosa, Laia; Donato, M Teresa

    2017-02-01

    Drug attrition rates due to hepatotoxicity are an important safety issue considered in drug development. The HepG2 hepatoma cell line is currently being used for drug-induced hepatotoxicity evaluations, but its expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes is poor compared with hepatocytes. Different approaches have been proposed to upgrade HepG2 cells for more reliable drug-induced liver injury predictions. Areas covered: We describe the advantages and limitations of HepG2 cells transduced with adenoviral vectors that encode drug-metabolizing enzymes for safety risk assessments of bioactivable compounds. Adenoviral transduction facilitates efficient and controlled delivery of multiple drug-metabolizing activities to HepG2 cells at comparable levels to primary human hepatocytes by generating an 'artificial hepatocyte'. Furthermore, adenoviral transduction enables the design of tailored cells expressing particular metabolic capacities. Expert opinion: Upgraded HepG2 cells that recreate known inter-individual variations in hepatic CYP and conjugating activities due to both genetic (e.g., polymorphisms) or environmental (e.g., induction, inhibition) factors seems a suitable model to identify bioactivable drug and conduct hepatotoxicity risk assessments. This strategy should enable the generation of customized cells by reproducing human pheno- and genotypic CYP variability to represent a valuable human hepatic cell model to develop new safer drugs and to improve existing predictive toxicity assays.

  8. Drug-Metabolizing Enzyme, Transporter and Nuclear Receptor Genetically Modified Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xi-Ling; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Determining the in vivo significance of a specific enzyme, transporter or xenobiotic receptor in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics may be hampered by gene multiplicity and complexity, levels of expression and interaction between various components involved. The development of knockout (loss-of-function) and transgenic (gain-of-function) mouse models opens the door to the improved understanding of gene function in a whole body system. There is also growing interest in the development of humanized mice to overcome species difference in drug metabolism and disposition. This review, therefore, aims to summarize and discuss some successful examples of drug-metabolizing enzyme, transporter, and nuclear receptor genetically modified mouse models. These genetically modified mouse models have proven as invaluable models for understanding in vivo function of drug-metabolizing enzymes, transporters and xenobiotic receptors in drug metabolism and transport, as well as predicting potential drug-drug interaction and toxicity in humans. Nevertheless, concerns remain about interpretation of data obtained from such genetically modified mouse models in which the expression of related genes is altered significantly. PMID:20854191

  9. DMET™ (Drug Metabolism Enzymes and Transporters): a pharmacogenomic platform for precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Arbitrio, Mariamena; Martino, Maria Teresa Di; Scionti, Francesca; Agapito, Giuseppe; Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Cannataro, Mario

    2016-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, high-throughput technologies have allowed the investigation of genetic variations underlying the inter-individual variability in drug pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics. Several studies have recently moved from a candidate gene-based pharmacogenetic approach to genome-wide pharmacogenomic analyses to identify biomarkers for selection of patient-tailored therapies. In this aim, the identification of genetic variants affecting the individual drug metabolism is relevant for the definition of more active and less toxic treatments. This review focuses on the potentiality, reliability and limitations of the DMET™ (Drug Metabolism Enzymes and Transporters) Plus as pharmacogenomic drug metabolism multi-gene panel platform for selecting biomarkers in the final aim to optimize drugs use and characterize the individual genetic background. PMID:27304055

  10. Anti-inflammatory agents and inducibility of hepatic drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pappas, P; Stephanou, P; Vasiliou, V; Marselos, M

    1998-01-01

    Two rat liver cytosolic aldehyde dehydrogenases, ALDH1 and ALDH3c, are of particular interest because they are inducible by different classes of xenobiotics. ALDHI is mainly increased by phenobarbital-type inducers; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as 3- methylcholanthrene (3MC), increase ALDH3c enzyme activity in all rat species currently tested. In addition, ALDH3c has been found to reflect the subfamily CYPIA of cytochrome P-450, as well as other enzymes functionally related to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (the "Ah-receptor enzyme battery"), which is activated by the same type of inducers. In the present study we investigated whether the induction of ALDH3c might be connected with a chemically produced aseptic inflammation of the hepatocyte. To answer this question, we examined the relationship between the induction of ALDH3c by 3MC and the arachidonic acid cascade. Different non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were tested in combination with 3MC and in post-treatment. The 3MC-induced ALDH3c activity was significantly diminished by the co-administered anti-inflammatory agents. Two microsomal enzyme activities (ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase, EROD; aryl-hydrocarbon-hydroxylase, AHH) were also decreased. Similar results were obtained with NSAIDs administered to animals pre- treated with 3MC, as far as the ALDH3c activity was concerned, but not for the microsomal enzyme activity (EROD and AHH). In conclusion, the induction of ALDH3c, after PAH treatment, may be related to an aseptic inflammation of the hepatocytes. This effect is reduced by commonly used steroid and non-steroid anti- inflammatory drugs, and although the mechanism of inhibition has not yet been elucidated, it appears likely that ALDH3c and CYP1A activities are associated with the "acute phase" response.

  11. Ocular non-P450 oxidative, reductive, hydrolytic, and conjugative drug metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Argikar, Upendra A; Dumouchel, Jennifer L; Dunne, Christine E; Bushee, Andrea J

    2017-08-01

    Metabolism in the eye for any species, laboratory animals or human, is gaining rapid interest as pharmaceutical scientists aim to treat a wide range of so-called incurable ocular diseases. Over a period of decades, reports of metabolic activity toward various drugs and biochemical markers have emerged in select ocular tissues of animals and humans. Ocular cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes and transporters have been recently reviewed. However, there is a dearth of collated information on non-P450 drug metabolizing enzymes in eyes of various preclinical species and humans in health and disease. In an effort to complement ocular P450s and transporters, which have been well reviewed in the literature, this review is aimed at presenting collective information on non-P450 oxidative, hydrolytic, and conjugative ocular drug metabolizing enzymes. Herein, we also present a list of xenobiotics or drugs that have been reported to be metabolized in the eye.

  12. Increase in bile flow and biliary excretion of glutathione-derived sulfhydryls in rats by drug-metabolizing enzyme inducers is mediated by multidrug resistance protein 2.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David R; Habeebu, Sultan S M; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2002-03-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is an important cellular constituent for normal liver homeostasis. Certain drug-metabolizing enzyme inducers (i.e., phenobarbital [PB] and pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile [PCN]) increase biliary excretion of GSH-derived sulfhydryls (SH) as well as bile flow, whereas other drug-metabolizing enzyme inducers (i.e., 3-methylcholanthrene [3MC] and benzo(a)pyrene [BaP]), do not. The purpose of the study was to determine whether rat multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2) is the inducible transporter responsible for increasing biliary SH excretion and bile flow. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were injected ip daily for 4 days with PB, PCN, 3MC, BaP, or vehicle; Mrp2-null Eisai hyperbilirubinemic (EHBR) rats were injected ip daily for 4 days with PCN or vehicle. Although no drug-metabolizing enzyme inducer altered hepatic GSH in SD rats, PB and PCN significantly increased the rate of biliary SH excretion and bile flow. Neither 3MC nor BaP affected the biliary SH excretion rate or bile flow. In control EHBR rats, despite elevated hepatic GSH, the rate of biliary SH excretion was almost completely eliminated and bile flow was dramatically reduced compared with SD rats. Furthermore, PCN treatment did not affect bile flow or the biliary SH excretion rate in EHBR rats. PB and PCN also increased Mrp2 protein levels, but 3MC and BaP did not. None of the drug-metabolizing enzyme inducers tested significantly increased Mrp2 mRNA levels. PCN increased Mrp2 protein, but not Mrp2 mRNA, in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, Mrp2 is the inducible efflux transporter responsible for increased biliary SH excretion and bile flow after administration of some drug-metabolizing enzyme inducers.

  13. Induction of xenobiotic receptors, transporters, and drug metabolizing enzymes by oxycodone.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hazem E; Myers, Alan L; Lee, Insong J; Mason, Clifford W; Wang, Duan; Sinz, Michael W; Wang, Hongbing; Eddington, Natalie D

    2013-05-01

    Perturbations of the expression of transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) by opioids can be the locus of deleterious drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Many transporters and DMEs are regulated by xenobiotic receptors [XRs; e.g., pregnane X receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), and Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)]; however, there is a paucity of information regarding the influence of opioids on XRs. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of oxycodone administration (15 mg/kg intraperitoneally twice daily for 8 days) on liver expression of XRs, transporters, and DMEs in rats. Microarray, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting analyses were used to identify significantly regulated genes. Three XRs (e.g., PXR, CAR, and AhR), 27 transporters (e.g., ABCB1 and SLC22A8), and 19 DMEs (e.g., CYP2B2 and CYP3A1) were regulated (P < 0.05) with fold changes ranging from -46.3 to 17.1. Using MetaCore (computational platform), we identified a unique gene-network of transporters and DMEs assembled around PXR, CAR, and AhR. Therefore, a series of transactivation/translocation assays were conducted to determine whether the observed changes of transporters/DMEs are mediated by direct activation of PXR, CAR, or AhR by oxycodone or its major metabolites (noroxycodone and oxymorphone). Neither oxycodone nor its metabolites activated PXR, CAR, or AhR. Taken together, these findings identify a signature hepatic gene-network associated with repeated oxycodone administration in rats and demonstrate that oxycodone alters the expression of many transporters and DMEs (without direct activation of PXR, CAR, and AhR), which could lead to undesirable DDIs after coadministration of substrates of these transporters/DMEs with oxycodone.

  14. Fasting-Induced Changes in Hepatic P450 Mediated Drug Metabolism Are Largely Independent of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor CAR.

    PubMed

    de Vries, E M; Lammers, L A; Achterbergh, R; Klümpen, H-J; Mathot, R A A; Boelen, A; Romijn, J A

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic drug metabolism by cytochrome P450 enzymes is altered by the nutritional status of patients. The expression of P450 enzymes is partly regulated by the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Fasting regulates the expression of both P450 enzymes and CAR and affects hepatic drug clearance. We hypothesized that the fasting-induced alterations in P450 mediated drug clearance are mediated by CAR. To investigate this we used a drug cocktail validated in humans consisting of five widely prescribed drugs as probes for specific P450 enzymes: caffeine (CYP1A2), metoprolol (CYP2D6), omeprazole (CYP2C19), midazolam (CYP3A4) and s-warfarin (CYP2C9). This cocktail was administered to wild type (WT, C57Bl/6) mice or mice deficient for CAR (CAR-/-) that were either fed ad libitum or fasted for 24 hours. Blood was sampled at predefined intervals and drug concentrations were measured as well as hepatic mRNA expression of homologous/orthologous P450 enzymes (Cyp1a2, Cyp2d22, Cyp3a11, Cyp2c37, Cyp2c38 and Cyp2c65). Fasting decreased Cyp1a2 and Cyp2d22 expression and increased Cyp3a11 and Cyp2c38 expression in both WT and CAR-/- mice. The decrease in Cyp1a2 was diminished in CAR-/- in comparison with WT mice. Basal Cyp2c37 expression was lower in CAR-/- compared to WT mice. Fasting decreased the clearance of all drugs tested in both WT and CAR-/- mice. The absence of CAR was associated with an decrease in the clearance of omeprazole, metoprolol and midazolam in fed mice. The fasting-induced reduction in clearance of s-warfarin was greater in WT than in CAR-/-. The changes in drug clearance correlated with the expression pattern of the specific P450 enzymes in case of Cyp1a2-caffeine and Cyp2c37-omeprazole. We conclude that CAR is important for hepatic clearance of several widely prescribed drugs metabolized by P450 enzymes. However the fasting-induced alterations in P450 mediated drug clearance are largely independent of CAR.

  15. Systems biology approaches to enzyme kinetics: analyzing network models of drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Finn, Nnenna A; Kemp, Melissa L

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular drug metabolism involves transport, bioactivation, conjugation, and other biochemical steps. The dynamics of these steps are each dependent on a number of other cellular factors that can ultimately lead to unexpected behavior. In this review, we discuss the confounding processes and coupled reactions within bioactivation networks that require a systems-level perspective in order to fully understand the time-varying behavior. When converting known in vitro characteristics of drug-enzyme interactions into descriptions of cellular systems, features such as substrate availability, cell-to-cell variability, and intracellular redox state deserve special focus. An example of doxorubicin bioactivation is used for discussing points of consideration when constructing and analyzing network models of drug metabolism.

  16. Biotransformation of anthelmintics and the activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes in the tapeworm Moniezia expansa.

    PubMed

    Prchal, Lukáš; Bártíková, Hana; Bečanová, Aneta; Jirásko, Robert; Vokřál, Ivan; Stuchlíková, Lucie; Skálová, Lenka; Kubíček, Vladimír; Lamka, Jiří; Trejtnar, František; Szotáková, Barbora

    2015-04-01

    The sheep tapeworm Moniezia expansa is very common parasite, which affects ruminants such as sheep, goats as well as other species. The benzimidazole anthelmintics albendazole (ABZ), flubendazole (FLU) and mebendazole (MBZ) are often used to treat the infection. The drug-metabolizing enzymes of helminths may alter the potency of anthelmintic treatment. The aim of our study was to assess the activity of the main drug-metabolizing enzymes and evaluate the metabolism of selected anthelmintics (ABZ, MBZ and FLU) in M. expansa. Activities of biotransformation enzymes were determined in subcellular fractions. Metabolites of the anthelmintics were detected and identified using high performance liquid chromatography/ultra-violet/VIS/fluorescence or ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Reduction of MBZ, FLU and oxidation of ABZ were proved as well as activities of various metabolizing enzymes. Despite the fact that the conjugation enzymes glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronosyl transferase and UDP-glucosyl transferase were active in vitro, no conjugated metabolites of anthelmintics were identified either ex vivo or in vitro. The obtained results indicate that sheep tapeworm is able to deactivate the administered anthelmintics, and thus protects itself against their action.

  17. Endotoxin administration to humans inhibits hepatic cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Shedlofsky, S I; Israel, B C; McClain, C J; Hill, D B; Blouin, R A

    1994-01-01

    In experimental animals, injection of gram-negative endotoxin (LPS) decreases hepatic cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism. To evaluate this phenomenon in a human model of gram-negative sepsis, LPS was administered on two consecutive days to healthy male volunteers during which time a cocktail of antipyrine (AP-250 mg), hexobarbital (HB-500 mg), and theophylline (TH-150 mg) was ingested and the apparent oral clearance of each drug determined. Each subject had a control drug clearance study with saline injections. In the first experiment, six subjects received the drug cocktail 0.5 h after the first dose of LPS. In the second experiment, another six subjects received the drug cocktail 0.5 h after the second dose of LPS. In both experiments, LPS caused the expected physiologic responses of inflammation including fever with increases in serum concentrations of TNF alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6, and acute phase reactants. In the first experiment, only minor decreases in clearances of the probe drugs were observed (7-12%). However in the second experiment, marked decreases in the clearances of AP (35, 95% CI 18-48%), HB (27, 95% CI 14-34%), and TH (22, 95% CI 12-32%) were seen. The decreases in AP clearance correlated with initial peak values of TNF alpha (r = 0.82) and IL-6 (r = 0.86). These data show that in humans the inflammatory response to even a very low dose of LPS significantly decreases hepatic cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism and this effect evolves over a 24-h period. It is likely that septic patients with much higher exposures to LPS have more profound inhibition of drug metabolism. PMID:7989576

  18. Xanthine Oxidoreductase in Drug Metabolism: Beyond a Role as a 
Detoxifying Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Battelli, Maria Giulia; Polito, Letizia; Bortolotti, Massimo; Bolognesi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) catalyzes the last two steps of purine catabolism in the highest uricotelic primates. XOR is an enzyme with dehydrogenase activity that, in mammals, may be converted into oxidase activity under a variety of pathophysiologic conditions. XOR activity is highly regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels and may generate reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which trigger different consequences, ranging from cytotoxicity to inflammation. The low specificity for substrates allows XOR to metabolize a number of endogenous metabolites and a variety of exogenous compounds, including drugs. The present review focuses on the role of XOR as a drug-metabolizing enzyme, specifically for drugs with anticancer, antimicrobial, antiviral, immunosuppressive or vasodilator activities, as well as drugs acting on metabolism or inducing XOR expression. XOR has an activating role that is essential to the pharmacological action of quinone drugs, cyadox, antiviral nucleoside analogues, allopurinol, nitrate and nitrite. XOR activity has a degradation function toward thiopurine nucleotides, pyrazinoic acid, methylxanthines and tolbutamide, whose half-life may be prolonged by the use of XOR inhibitors. In conclusion, to avoid potential drug interaction risks, such as a toxic excess of drug bioavailability or a loss of drug efficacy, caution is suggested in the use of XOR inhibitors, as in the case of hyperuricemic patients affected by gout or tumor lysis syndrome, when it is necessary to simultaneously administer therapeutic substances that are activated or degraded by the drug-metabolizing activity of XOR. PMID:27458036

  19. Relevance of induction of human drug-metabolizing enzymes: pharmacological and toxicological implications

    PubMed Central

    PARK, B. K.; KITTERINGHAM, N. R.; PIRMOHAMED, M.; TUCKER, G. T.

    1996-01-01

    1Human drug-metabolizing systems can be induced, or activated, by a large number of exogenous agents including drugs, alcohol, components in the diet and cigarette smoke, as well as by endogenous factors. 2Such perturbation of enzyme activity undoubtedly contributes to both intra- and inter-individual variation both with respect to the rate and route of metabolism for a particular drug. Induction may, in theory, either attenuate the pharmacological response or exacerbate the toxicity of a particular drug, or both. 3The clinical impact of enzyme induction will depend upon the number of different enzyme isoforms affected and the magnitude of the inductive response within an individual, and also on the therapeutic indices of the affected substrates. 4The toxicological implications will be determined either by any change in the route of metabolism, or by a disturbance of the balance between activation and detoxication processes, which may be isozyme selective. PMID:8799511

  20. Effect of commercially available green and black tea beverages on drug-metabolizing enzymes and oxidative stress in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hsien-Tsung; Hsu, Ya-Ru; Lii, Chong-Kuei; Lin, Ai-Hsuan; Chang, Keng-Hao; Yang, Hui-Ting

    2014-08-01

    The effect of commercially available green tea (GT) and black tea (BT) drinks on drug metabolizing enzymes (DME) and oxidative stress in rats was investigated. Male Wistar rats were fed a laboratory chow diet and GT or BT drink for 5 weeks. Control rats received de-ionized water instead of the tea drinks. Rats received the GT and BT drinks treatment for 5 weeks showed a significant increase in hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and CYP1A2, and a significant decrease in CYP2C, CYP2E1 and CYP3A enzyme activities. Results of immunoblot analyses of enzyme protein contents showed the same trend with enzyme activity. Significant increase in UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activity and reduced glutathione content in liver and lungs were observed in rats treated with both tea drinks. A lower lipid peroxide level in lungs was observed in rats treated with GT drink. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that both tea drinks decreased pregnane X receptor binding to DNA and increased nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 binding to DNA. These results suggest that feeding of both tea drinks to rats modulated DME activities and reduced oxidative stress in liver and lungs. GT drink is more effective on reducing oxidative stress than BT drink.

  1. Update on the Genetic Polymorphisms of Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes in Antiepileptic Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Saruwatari, Junji; Ishitsu, Takateru; Nakagawa, Kazuko

    2010-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in the genes that encode drug-metabolizing enzymes are implicated in the inter-individual variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmaco-dynamics of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). However, the clinical impact of these polymorphisms on AED therapy still remains controversial. The defective alleles of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9 and/or CYP2C19 could affect not only the pharmacokinetics, but also the pharmacodynamics of phenytoin therapy. CYP2C19 deficient genotypes were associated with the higher serum concentration of an active metabolite of clobazam, N-desmethylclobazam, and with the higher clinical efficacy of clobazam therapy than the other CYP2C19 genotypes. The defective alleles of CYP2C9 and/or CYP2C19 were also found to have clinically significant effects on the inter-individual variabilities in the population pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital, valproic acid and zonisamide. EPHX1 polymorphisms may be associated with the pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine and the risk of phenytoin-induced congenital malformations. Similarly, the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 genotype may affect the pharmacokinetics of lamotrigine. Gluthatione S-transferase null genotypes are implicated in an increased risk of hepatotoxicity caused by carbamazepine and valproic acid. This article summarizes the state of research on the effects of mutations of drug-metabolizing enzymes on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of AED therapies. Future directions for the dose-adjustment of AED are discussed. PMID:27713373

  2. The challenges of dealing with promiscuous drug-metabolizing enzymes, receptors and transporters.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiang; Lu, Anthony Y H

    2008-06-01

    Unlike classical enzymes, drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), such as the liver microsomal cytochrome P450, UDP-glucuronyltransferase, epoxide hydrolase, and flavin-containing monooxygenase, all exhibit broad substrate specificities, low turnover rates, atypical kinetics, and other unusual properties. Receptors (the pregnane X receptor, NR1I2; the constitutive androstane receptor, NR1I3; and the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor) responsible for the induction of DMEs and transporters (P-glycoprotein) responsible for drug transport also have broad substrate specificities. These promiscuous proteins are all intimately involved in drug disposition. Promiscuous proteins, by definition, are known for diversity, but not specificity, in their interaction with drugs. In this review, we analyzed recent advances on the three dimensional structures and kinetic properties of DMD proteins from crystallography, mutational, and kinetic studies to gain insights into the structural and biochemical basis for the promiscuous ligand-protein interactions of the proteins. Large substrate-binding cavities (SBCs), binding of more than one substrate/effector and binding of substrates in alternative orientations and locations within the SBCs, rotation of a substrate at the active site, and substantial substrate-induced conformational changes of the SBCs are common features of the promiscuous DMEs, receptors, and transporters, and therefore, are important parameters to be considered in dealing with drug metabolism issues and safety evaluation of drugs and environmental chemicals.

  3. In vivo cytochrome P450 drug metabolizing enzyme characterization using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanfang; Bachmann, Kenneth A.; Cameron, Brent D.

    2003-07-01

    The development of a rapid, inexpensive, and accurate in vivo phenotyping methodology for characterizing drug-metabolizing phenotypes with reference to the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes would be very beneficial. In terms of application, in the wake of the human genome project, considerable interest is focused on the development of new drugs whose uses will be tailored to specific genetic polymorphisms, and on the individualization of dosing regimens that are also tailored to meet individual patient needs depending upon genotype. In this investigation, chemical probes for CYP450 enzymes were characterized and identified with Raman spectroscopy. Furthermore, gold-based metal colloid clusters were utilized to generate surface enhanced Raman spectra for each of the chemical probes. Results will be presented demonstrating the ability of SERS to identify minute quantities of these probes on the order needed for in vivo application.

  4. A Multiscale Approach to Modelling Drug Metabolism by Membrane-Bound Cytochrome P450 Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sansom, Mark S. P.; Mulholland, Adrian J.

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are found in all life forms. P450s play an important role in drug metabolism, and have potential uses as biocatalysts. Human P450s are membrane-bound proteins. However, the interactions between P450s and their membrane environment are not well-understood. To date, all P450 crystal structures have been obtained from engineered proteins, from which the transmembrane helix was absent. A significant number of computational studies have been performed on P450s, but the majority of these have been performed on the solubilised forms of P450s. Here we present a multiscale approach for modelling P450s, spanning from coarse-grained and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to reaction modelling using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. To our knowledge, this is the first application of such an integrated multiscale approach to modelling of a membrane-bound enzyme. We have applied this protocol to a key human P450 involved in drug metabolism: CYP3A4. A biologically realistic model of CYP3A4, complete with its transmembrane helix and a membrane, has been constructed and characterised. The dynamics of this complex have been studied, and the oxidation of the anticoagulant R-warfarin has been modelled in the active site. Calculations have also been performed on the soluble form of the enzyme in aqueous solution. Important differences are observed between the membrane and solution systems, most notably for the gating residues and channels that control access to the active site. The protocol that we describe here is applicable to other membrane-bound enzymes. PMID:25033460

  5. Cytochrome P450 Drug Metabolizing Enzymes in Roma Population Samples: Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Szalai, Renata; Hadzsiev, Kinga; Melegh, Bela

    2016-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 drug metabolizing enzymes are highly polymorphic and show inter-individual differences in variability in drug response, which varies widely also with ethnicity. This study aims to summarize the available data on genetic polymorphisms associated with cytochrome enzymes conducted on Roma populations. Our goal was to compare the frequency of the variant alleles, genotypes and predicted phenotypes with corresponding rates from other populations. We carried out a systematic review including the papers published on the pharmacogenetically relevant variants of cytochrome P450 genes related to Roma population. The study was performed using several articles, websites and databases, including PubMed, Ensembl, dbSNP, HapMap and 1000 Genomes Project. This review attempts to summarize and discuss our current knowledge about the frequency distribution of the ever investigated 20 allelic variants of 9 cytochrome genes (CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2C8, CYP2D6, CYP3A5, CYP4F2) in Roma DNA samples and compare them with other populations. Differences between Roma and Hungarian samples are reported for 7 variant genotypes. CYP2C9 *2/*3 and CYP2C19 *2/*2 genotypes showed more than 3-fold differences. Additional differences are displayed for allele frequency of 7 variants (rs762551, rs3745274, rs1058930, rs1065852, rs3892097, rs1057910 and rs4244285) in Roma population samples. The interethnic variability in clinically relevant genetic polymorphisms of drug metabolizing enzymes, which may explain distinct drug response, highlights the need to allow for the ancestry of participants in pharmacogenetic studies.

  6. Changes of drug metabolizing enzymes in the liver of male sheep exposed to either cypermethrin or dimethoate.

    PubMed

    Sheweita, S A; Yousef, M I; Baghdadi, H H; Elshemy, A G

    2012-03-01

    Xenobiotics such as insecticides are metabolized to more or less toxic metabolites by drug-metabolizing enzymes including cytochrome P450 (Cyp P450), cytochrome b5 (Cyp b5), NADPH-cytochrome c reductase (Cyt.c R), N-nitrosdimethylamine-N-demethylase I (NDMA-dI), glutathione (GSH), glutathione s-transferase (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR). Therefore, the present study showed the influence of oral administration of cypermethrin (6 and 12 mg/kg/day) and dimethoate (1.6 and 3.2 mg/kg/day) for 63 consecutive days on the activities of the above mentioned enzymes in the livers of male sheep. Low and high-treatments of sheep with cypermethrin significantly increased the levels of Cyp P450 by 56% and 98%, Cyp b5 by 65% and 80%, GSH by 68% and 74%, and Cyt.c R by 67% and 98%, respectively in a dose-dependent manner. However, low dose of cypermethrin increased the activities of GST and GR by 56% and 91% respectively. In addition, low and high dose-treatments with dimethoate increased the hepatic contents of Cyp P450 by 27% and 40%, GSH by 259% and 132%, whereas NDMA-dI decreased by 27 and 55% respectively, and no change in the content of Cyp b5 and the activity of Cyt.c-R at any given dose of this compound. It is concluded that exposure to cypermethrin and dimethoate significantly changed the hepatic activity of phases I & II drugmetabolizing enzymes in sheep, and these changes are mainly dependent on the administred dose, and also on the type of the tested insecticides. Also, such changes should be considered when therapeutic drugs administered to people exposed to such insecticides.

  7. Methodologies for investigating drug metabolism at the early drug discovery stage: prediction of hepatic drug clearance and P450 contribution.

    PubMed

    Emoto, Chie; Murayama, Norie; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2010-10-01

    The attrition rate in drug development is being reduced by continuous advances in science and technology introduced by various academic institutions and pharmaceutical companies. This has been certainly noticeable in reducing the frequency with which unfavorable absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME) characteristics of any candidate drug causes failure in clinical development. Nonetheless, it is important that the objectives in reducing attrition during later stages of development are matched by information generated in the earliest stage of discovery. In this review, we summarize the methodologies employed during the early stages of drug discovery and discuss new findings in the areas of (1) drug metabolism enzymes, (2) the contribution of cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450, CYP) to hepatic metabolism, (3) prediction of hepatic intrinsic clearance, (4) reaction phenotyping, and (5) the metabolic differences between highly homologous enzymes such as CYP3A4 and CYP3A5. The total contribution of P450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases to drug metabolism is reported to be more than 80%; therefore, glucuronidation is increasingly recognized as an important clearance pathway in addition to that of P450 enzymes. When estimating the contribution of P450, interpreting the results of inhibition studies using a single P450 inhibitor can lead to false conclusions. For instance, 1-aminobenzotriazole and SKF-525A have a varying range of IC(50) values for inhibition of drug exidation-reaction by different CYP450 enzymes. There are disparities between methodologies at early stage drug discovery and late stage development. For example, although the drug depletion approach for the prediction of hepatic intrinsic clearance may not be desirable at late stages of development, it is suitable at the early drug discovery stage since kinetic characterization and measurement of specific drug metabolites are not required. Data from protein binding assays in plasma and

  8. Correlating Structure and Function of Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes: Progress and Ongoing Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Eric F.; Connick, J. Patrick; Reed, James R.; Backes, Wayne L.; Desai, Manoj C.; Xu, Lianhong; Estrada, D. Fernando; Laurence, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes a symposium sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at Experimental Biology held April 20-24 in Boston, MA. Presentations discussed the status of cytochrome P450 (P450) knowledge, emphasizing advances and challenges in relating structure with function and in applying this information to drug design. First, at least one structure of most major human drug-metabolizing P450 enzymes is known. However, the flexibility of these active sites can limit the predictive value of one structure for other ligands. A second limitation is our coarse-grain understanding of P450 interactions with membranes, other P450 enzymes, NADPH–cytochrome P450 reductase, and cytochrome b5. Recent work has examined differential P450 interactions with reductase in mixed P450 systems and P450:P450 complexes in reconstituted systems and cells, suggesting another level of functional control. In addition, protein nuclear magnetic resonance is a new approach to probe these protein/protein interactions, identifying interacting b5 and P450 surfaces, showing that b5 and reductase binding are mutually exclusive, and demonstrating ligand modulation of CYP17A1/b5 interactions. One desired outcome is the application of such information to control drug metabolism and/or design selective P450 inhibitors. A final presentation highlighted development of a CYP3A4 inhibitor that slows clearance of human immunodeficiency virus drugs otherwise rapidly metabolized by CYP3A4. Although understanding P450 structure/function relationships is an ongoing challenge, translational advances will benefit from continued integration of existing and new biophysical approaches. PMID:24130370

  9. Correlating structure and function of drug-metabolizing enzymes: progress and ongoing challenges.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Eric F; Connick, J Patrick; Reed, James R; Backes, Wayne L; Desai, Manoj C; Xu, Lianhong; Estrada, D Fernando; Laurence, Jennifer S; Scott, Emily E

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes a symposium sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at Experimental Biology held April 20-24 in Boston, MA. Presentations discussed the status of cytochrome P450 (P450) knowledge, emphasizing advances and challenges in relating structure with function and in applying this information to drug design. First, at least one structure of most major human drug-metabolizing P450 enzymes is known. However, the flexibility of these active sites can limit the predictive value of one structure for other ligands. A second limitation is our coarse-grain understanding of P450 interactions with membranes, other P450 enzymes, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, and cytochrome b5. Recent work has examined differential P450 interactions with reductase in mixed P450 systems and P450:P450 complexes in reconstituted systems and cells, suggesting another level of functional control. In addition, protein nuclear magnetic resonance is a new approach to probe these protein/protein interactions, identifying interacting b5 and P450 surfaces, showing that b5 and reductase binding are mutually exclusive, and demonstrating ligand modulation of CYP17A1/b5 interactions. One desired outcome is the application of such information to control drug metabolism and/or design selective P450 inhibitors. A final presentation highlighted development of a CYP3A4 inhibitor that slows clearance of human immunodeficiency virus drugs otherwise rapidly metabolized by CYP3A4. Although understanding P450 structure/function relationships is an ongoing challenge, translational advances will benefit from continued integration of existing and new biophysical approaches.

  10. [Involvement of microRNA in the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes].

    PubMed

    Shizu, Ryota; Numazawa, Satoshi; Yoshida, Takemi

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs of about 20 nucleotides in length and participate in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Accumulating evidence indicates that miRNA binds to 3'-UTR of its target mRNAs and thereby destabilizes the transcripts or suppresses the translation. It is expected that miRNAs could have diverse functions and therefore play a role in the gene expression caused by the drug treatment, which have yet to be determined. Demonstration of the participation of specific miRNA in the drug-mediated gene expression would make it a biomarker for the toxicological assessment and help an understanding of molecular machinery of the drug-drug interaction. Under these backgrounds, we investigated the change of miRNAs in the liver of mice treated with phenobarbital, a typical inducer for drug-metabolizing enzymes, and demonstrate the participation of miRNAs in the phenobarbital-regulated gene expression. We investigated the relationship between phenobarbital-mediated changes in miRNA and mRNA by using Agilent miRNA microarray and DNA microarray, followed by real time RT-PCR. From these experiments, it was suggested that the phenobarbital-induced changes in cyp2c29 and mrp3 are regulated by miR-30a and miR-29b, respectively. In addition, we obtained evidence that indicates a phenobarbital-mediated decrease in miR-122, a highly abundant liver-specific miRNA, leads to the activation of the transcription factor CAR and thereby induces drug-metabolizing enzymes.

  11. Effects of Buyang Huanwu Decoction on antioxidant and drug-metabolizing enzymes in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xing-Hua; Shi, Wei-Zhou; Cheng, Yun-Xiang; Yang, Xiu-Fen

    2014-06-01

    To study the effect of Buyang Huanwu Decoction (BYHWD) on the antioxidant enzymes and drug-metabolizing enzymes in rat liver. Following treatment of rats with BYHWD at 6.42, 12.83, or 25.66 g·kg(-1) per day for 15 days, microsomes and cytosols isolated from the liver tissues were prepared by differential centrifugation according to standard procedures. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes and cytochrome b5, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, CYP3A, CYP2E1, UGT, and GST of the rat livers were determined by UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The activities of ALT, AST, antioxidant enzymes, and the Hepatosomatic Index in serum were not significantly affected. In cytosols, the activity of CAT was significantly increased at the dosage of 12.83 g·kg(-1), and all the other antioxidant activities and MDA levels were not affected by this treatment. BYHWD had no effect on cytochrome b5, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, CYP3A, and UGT. At the highest dose (25.66 g·kg(-1)), the activity of CYP2E1 was significantly inhibited, and the activities of GST and the level of GSH were increased. BYHWD is safe for the liver, and has the functions of detoxification and antioxidant. Patients should be cautioned about the herb-drug interaction of BYHWD and CYP2E1 substrates. Copyright © 2014 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Role of Constitutive Androstane Receptor in Oxazaphosphorine-mediated Induction of Drug-metabolizing Enzymes in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Duan; Li, Linhao; Fuhrman, Jennifer; Ferguson, Stephen; Wang, Hongbing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to investigate the roles of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) in cyclophosphamide (CPA)- and ifosfamide (IFO)-mediated induction of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes (DME). Methods Induction of DMEs was evaluated using real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis in human primary hepatocyte (HPH) cultures. Activation of CAR, pregnane X receptor (PXR), and aryl hydrocarbon receptor by CPA and IFO was assessed in cell-based reporter assays in HepG2 cells and/or nuclear translocation assays in HPHs. Results CYP2B6 reporter activity was significantly enhanced by CPA and IFO in HepG2 cells co-transfected with CYP2B6 reporter plasmid and a chemical-responsive human CAR variant (CAR1+A) construct. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis in HPHs showed that both CPA and IFO induced the expressions of CYP2B6 and CYP3A4. Notably, treatment of HPHs with CPA but not IFO resulted in significant nuclear accumulation of CAR, which represents the initial step of CAR activation. Further studies in HPHs demonstrated that selective inhibition of PXR by sulforaphane preferentially repressed IFO- over CPA-mediated induction of CYP2B6. Conclusion These results provide novel insights into the differential roles of CAR in the regulation of CPA- and IFO-induced DME expression and potential drug-drug interactions. PMID:21487929

  13. Effect of coexposure to asbestos and kerosene soot on pulmonary drug-metabolizing enzyme system.

    PubMed Central

    Arif, J M; Khan, S G; Mahmood, N; Aslam, M; Rahman, Q

    1994-01-01

    This article reports the effect of coexposure to Indian chrysotile asbestos (5 mg/rat) and kerosene soot (5 mg/rat) on the pulmonary phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes 1, 4, 8, 16, 30, 90, and 150 days after a single intratracheal inoculation. Exposure to soot resulted in a significant induction of the pulmonary microsomal cytochrome P450 and the activity of dependent monooxygenase, benzo(a)pyrene (B[a]P) hydroxylase, and epoxide hydrase at all time intervals. On the other hand, the cytosolic glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity was induced at days 1, 4, 8, 16, and 30 after exposure, followed by inhibition in the enzyme activity. In contrast, chrysotile exposure depleted cytochrome P450, B[a]P hydroxylase, epoxide hydrase, and GST at initial stages, while all these parameters except GST were induced at later stages. However, coexposure to chrysotile and soot led to a significant inhibition in the cytochrome P450 levels, activities of B[a]P hydroxylase, epoxide hydrase, and GST at initial stages of exposure. At advanced stages, however, an additional increase in cytochrome P450, B[a]P hydroxylase, and epoxide hydrase but a decrease in GST was observed. These results clearly show that the intratracheal coexposure to high levels of asbestos and kerosene soot alters the metabolic activity of the lung, which is turn may retain toxins in the system for a longer period, resulting in adverse pathological disorders. PMID:7882926

  14. Polymorphisms in drug-metabolizing enzymes: What is their clinical relevance and why do they exist?

    SciTech Connect

    Nebert, D.W.

    1997-02-01

    The beautiful report by Sachse in this issue of the journal represents the culmination of 2 decades of increasingly exciting work on the {open_quotes}debrisoquine oxidation polymorphism,{close_quotes} one of dozens of pharmacogenetic or ecogenetic polymorphisms that have been shown to have an important impact on innumerable clinical diseases. Pharmacogenetics is the study of the hereditary basis of the differences in responses to drugs. Ecogenetics is the broader field of interindividual differences in response to all environmental chemical and physical agents (e.g., heavy metals, insecticides, compounds formed during combustion, and UV radiation). It is now clear that each of us has his or her own {open_quotes}individual fingerprint{close_quotes} of unique alleles encoding the so-called drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and the receptors that regulate these enzymes. In this invited editorial, I first introduce the current thinking in the field of DME (and DME-receptor) research and how DMEs have evolved from animal-plant interactions. I then describe the debrisoquine oxidation polymorphism, as well as two other relevant DME polymorphisms; show the relationship between these polymorphisms and human disease; provide examples of synergistic effects caused by the combination of two DME polymorphisms; and discuss the ethical considerations of such research. Last, I speculate on why these allelic frequencies of the DME genes might exist in human populations in the first place. 35 refs.

  15. Constitutive expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and related transcription factors in cattle testis and their modulation by illicit steroids.

    PubMed

    Lopparelli, Rosa Maria; Zancanella, Vanessa; Giantin, Mery; Ravarotto, Licia; Cozzi, Giulio; Montesissa, Clara; Dacasto, Mauro

    2010-10-01

    In veterinary species, little information about extrahepatic drug metabolism is actually available. Therefore, the presence of foremost drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and related transcription factors mRNAs was initially investigated in cattle testis; then, their possible modulation following the in vivo exposure to illicit growth promoters (GPs), which represent a major issue in cattle farming, was explored. All target genes were expressed in cattle testis, albeit to a lower extent compared to liver ones; furthermore, illicit protocols containing dexamethasone and 17β-oestradiol significantly up-regulated cytochrome P450 1A1, 2E1, oestrogen receptor-α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α mRNA levels. Overall, the constitutive expression of foremost DMEs and related transcription factors was demonstrated for the first time in cattle testis and illicit GPs were shown to affect pre-transcriptionally some of them, with possible consequences upon testicular xenobiotic drug metabolism.

  16. Differences in Toxicological and Pharmacological Responses Mediated by Polymorphic Cytochromes P450 and Related Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2017-01-17

    Research over the past 30 years has elucidated the roles of polymorphic human liver cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes associated with toxicological and/or pharmacological actions. Thalidomide exerts its various pharmacological and toxic actions in primates through multiple mechanisms, including nonspecific modification of many protein networks after bioactivation by autoinduced human P450 enzymes. To overcome species differences between rodents, currently, nonhuman primates and/or mouse models with transplanted human hepatocytes are used. Interindividual variability of P450-dependent drug clearances in cynomolgus monkeys and common marmosets is partly accounted for by polymorphic P450 variants and/or aging, just as it is in humans with increased prevalence of polypharmacy. Genotyping of P450 genes in nonhuman primates would be beneficial before and/or after drug metabolism and toxicity testing and evaluation as well in humans. Genome-wide association studies in humans have been rapidly advanced; however, unique whole-gene deletion of P450 2A6 was subsequently developed to cover nicotine-related lung cancer risk study. Regarding polypharmacy, toxicological research should generally be aimed at identifying the risk of adverse drug events following specific potential drug exposures by examining single or multiple metabolic pathways involving single or multiple drug-metabolizing enzymes. Current and next-generation research of drug metabolism and disposition resulting in drug toxicity would be addressed under advanced knowledge of polymorphic and age-related intra- and/or interspecies differences of drug-metabolizing enzymes. In the near future, humanized animal models combining transplanted hepatocytes and a humanized immune system may be available to study human immune reactions caused by human-type drug metabolites. Such sophisticated models should provide preclinical predictions of human drug metabolism and potential toxicity.

  17. Effect of honokiol on the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes in human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong-Yeon; Jeong, Hyeon-Uk; Kim, Jeong-Han; Lee, Hye Suk

    2014-01-01

    Honokiol, 2-(4-hydroxy-3-prop-2-enyl-phenyl)-4-prop-2-enyl-phenol, an active component of Magnolia officinalis and Magnolia grandiflora, exerts various pharmacological activities such as antitumorigenic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic, and antithrombotic effects. To investigate whether honokiol acts as a perpetrator in drug interactions, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels of phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1), were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction following 48-hour honokiol exposure in three independent cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. Honokiol treatment at the highest concentration tested (50 μM) increased the CYP2B6 mRNA level and CYP2B6-catalyzed bupropion hydroxylase activity more than two-fold in three different hepatocyte cultures, indicating that honokiol induces CYP2B6 at higher concentrations. However, honokiol treatment (0.5–50 μM) did not significantly alter the mRNA levels of phase I enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19) or phase II enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and SULT2A1) in cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylase and CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1′-hydroxylase activities were not affected by 48-hour honokiol treatment in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. These results indicate that honokiol is a weak CYP2B6 inducer and is unlikely to increase the metabolism of concomitant CYP2B6 substrates and cause pharmacokinetic-based drug interactions in humans. PMID:25395831

  18. Effect of honokiol on the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong-Yeon; Jeong, Hyeon-Uk; Kim, Jeong-Han; Lee, Hye Suk

    2014-01-01

    Honokiol, 2-(4-hydroxy-3-prop-2-enyl-phenyl)-4-prop-2-enyl-phenol, an active component of Magnolia officinalis and Magnolia grandiflora, exerts various pharmacological activities such as antitumorigenic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic, and antithrombotic effects. To investigate whether honokiol acts as a perpetrator in drug interactions, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels of phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1), were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction following 48-hour honokiol exposure in three independent cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. Honokiol treatment at the highest concentration tested (50 μM) increased the CYP2B6 mRNA level and CYP2B6-catalyzed bupropion hydroxylase activity more than two-fold in three different hepatocyte cultures, indicating that honokiol induces CYP2B6 at higher concentrations. However, honokiol treatment (0.5-50 μM) did not significantly alter the mRNA levels of phase I enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19) or phase II enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and SULT2A1) in cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylase and CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activities were not affected by 48-hour honokiol treatment in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. These results indicate that honokiol is a weak CYP2B6 inducer and is unlikely to increase the metabolism of concomitant CYP2B6 substrates and cause pharmacokinetic-based drug interactions in humans.

  19. Curcumin and resveratrol in combination modulate drug-metabolizing enzymes as well as antioxidant indices during lung carcinogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Wu, Y-M; Yu, Y; Cao, C-S; Zhang, J-H; Li, K; Zhang, P-Y

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated combined chemopreventive potential of curcumin and resveratrol during benzo(a)pyrene (BP)-induced lung carcinogenesis in mice. The mice were segregated into five groups that included normal control, BP-treated, BP + curcumin-treated, BP + resveratrol-treated, and BP + curcumin + resveratrol-treated groups. A statistically significant increase in the levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) was observed in the lungs of mice after 22 weeks of single dose of benzo(a)pyrene. Further, BP treatment also resulted in a significant increase in the enzyme activities of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase as well as drug-metabolizing enzymes, namely cytocrome P450 and cytochrome b5. On the other hand, reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) were found to be significantly decreased following BP treatment. Supplementation with curcumin and resveratrol to BP-treated mice significantly decreased the LPO levels, GSH levels, and enzyme activities of drug-metabolizing enzymes. Further, treatment of curcumin and resveratrol to BP-treated mice significantly elevated the activities of SOD, GR, and GST. Histoarchitectural studies showed well-differentiated signs of lung carcinogenesis following BP administration to mice. However, combined treatment with curcumin and resveratrol resulted in a noticeable improvement in the lung histoarchitecture. This study, therefore, concludes that curcumin and resveratrol when supplemented in combination regulate drug-metabolizing enzymes as well as antioxidant enzymes during lung carcinogenesis in mice. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes by xenobiotic receptors: PXR and CAR☆

    PubMed Central

    Tolson, Antonia H.; Wang, Hongbing

    2010-01-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and transporters play pivotal roles in the disposition and detoxification of numerous foreign and endogenous chemicals. To accommodate chemical challenges, the expression of many DMEs and transporters is up-regulated by a group of ligand-activated transcription factors namely nuclear receptors (NRs). The importance of NRs in xenobiotic metabolism and clearance is best exemplified by the most promiscuous xenobiotic receptors: pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) and constitutive androstane/activated receptor (CAR, NR1I3). Together, these two receptors govern the inductive expression of a largely overlapping array of target genes encoding phase I and II DMEs, and drug transporters. Moreover, PXR and CAR also represent two distinctive mechanisms of NR activation, whereby CAR demonstrates both constitutive and ligand-independent activation. In this review, recent advances in our understanding of PXR and CAR as xenosensors are discussed with emphasis placed on the differences rather than similarities of these two xenobiotic receptors in ligand recognition and target gene regulation. PMID:20727377

  1. Role of the Drug-Metabolizing Enzyme CYP during Mouse Liver Development.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Wataru; Hirose, Akiyo; Kawamura, Taisuke; Komachi, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Yuka; Kitaoka, Satoshi; Hatogai, Jo; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Kon, Risako; Ikarashi, Nobutomo; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP is mainly involved in the metabolism of various substances in the liver, such as drugs, endogenous substances, and carcinogens. Recent reports have also revealed that CYP1B1 plays a major role in the developmental process. Because the level of CYP expression is markedly high in the liver, we hypothesize that CYP plays a role in the developmental process of the liver. To verify this hypothesis, we analyzed the expression patterns of various CYP molecular species and their functions during the differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ES cells) into hepatocytes and the developmental process in mice. The results demonstrated that CYP2R1 and CYP26A1 are expressed at an earlier stage of the differentiation of ES cells into hepatocytes than hepatoblast-specific markers. Additionally, during the development of the mouse liver, CYP2R1 and CYP26A1 were mostly up-regulated during the stage when hepatoblasts appeared. In addition, when CYP2R1 and CYP26A1 expressions were forced in ES cells and liver of adult mice, they differentiated into hepatoblast marker positive cells. These results suggest that CYP2R1 and CYP26A1 may play a major role in hepatoblast cell differentiation during the development of the liver.

  2. Recovery of hepatic function determined by cytochrome P450-dependent drug metabolism lags after compensatory hepatic volume changes after portal vein ligation in rats.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Shigekazu; Minamiyama, Yukiko; Hirohashi, Kazuhiro; Kubo, Shoji; Funae, Yoshihiko; Kinoshita, Hiroaki

    2006-08-01

    Clinically, portal vein embolization has been proven to be useful as a preoperative treatment for major hepatic surgeries with impaired liver function. However, its effects on the metabolism and elimination of various drugs after portal vein embolization or ligation remain to be elucidated. A portal vein branch that perfuses the central and left lobes of the liver of male Wistar rat was ligated, and changes in the weights of ligated and nonligated lobules as well as hepatic levels and activities of cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms, such as CYP3A2 and CYP2C11, were determined. To evaluate in vivo the effect of PVL on hepatic drug metabolism, the narcotic activity (sleep time) of midazolam, a specific substrate for CYP3A2, was measured. Although plasma levels of alanine aminotransferase and hepatic weight returned to basal levels at day 7 after the portal vein ligation, hepatic activities of CYP3A2 and CYP2C11 still remained low (53% and 54% of control levels, respectively), and returned to their initial levels after about day 14. The metabolism of midazolam was prolonged by approximately three times at day 7 after ligation and returned to basal levels at day 14. Because hepatic CYP-dependent drug metabolism by CYP isoforms recovered more slowly than the apparent recovery of hepatic volume and plasma alanine aminotransferase levels, the therapeutics of drugs metabolized by the CYP isoforms should be used carefully in patients who receive major hepatectomy with portal vein branch embolization.

  3. Microarray Analysis of Differentially-Expressed Genes Encoding CYP450 and Phase II Drug Metabolizing Enzymes in Psoriasis and Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Sumantran, Venil N.; Mishra, Pratik; Bera, Rakesh; Sudhakar, Natarajan

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 drug metabolizing enzymes are implicated in personalized medicine for two main reasons. First, inter-individual variability in CYP3A4 expression is a confounding factor during cancer treatment. Second, inhibition or induction of CYP3A4 can trigger adverse drug–drug interactions. However, inflammation can downregulate CYP3A4 and other drug metabolizing enzymes and lead to altered metabolism of drugs and essential vitamins and lipids. Little is known about effects of inflammation on expression of CYP450 genes controlling drug metabolism in the skin. Therefore, we analyzed seven published microarray datasets, and identified differentially-expressed genes in two inflammatory skin diseases (melanoma and psoriasis). We observed opposite patterns of expression of genes regulating metabolism of specific vitamins and lipids in psoriasis and melanoma samples. Thus, genes controlling the turnover of vitamin D (CYP27B1, CYP24A1), vitamin A (ALDH1A3, AKR1B10), and cholesterol (CYP7B1), were up-regulated in psoriasis, whereas melanomas showed downregulation of genes regulating turnover of vitamin A (AKR1C3), and cholesterol (CYP39A1). Genes controlling abnormal keratinocyte differentiation and epidermal barrier function (CYP4F22, SULT2B1) were up-regulated in psoriasis. The up-regulated CYP24A1, CYP4F22, SULT2B1, and CYP7B1 genes are potential drug targets in psoriatic skin. Both disease samples showed diminished drug metabolizing capacity due to downregulation of the CYP1B1 and CYP3A5 genes. However, melanomas showed greater loss of drug metabolizing capacity due to downregulation of the CYP3A4 gene. PMID:26901218

  4. Drug Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Variation, Nicotine Metabolism, Prospective Abstinence, and Cigarette Consumption.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Andrew W; Michel, Martha; Nishita, Denise; Krasnow, Ruth; Javitz, Harold S; Conneely, Karen N; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N; Hops, Hyman; Zhu, Andy Z X; Baurley, James W; McClure, Jennifer B; Hall, Sharon M; Baker, Timothy B; Conti, David V; Benowitz, Neal L; Lerman, Caryn; Tyndale, Rachel F; Swan, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    The Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (NMR, ratio of trans-3'-hydroxycotinine and cotinine), has previously been associated with CYP2A6 activity, response to smoking cessation treatments, and cigarette consumption. We searched for drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter (DMET) gene variation associated with the NMR and prospective abstinence in 2,946 participants of laboratory studies of nicotine metabolism and of clinical trials of smoking cessation therapies. Stage I was a meta-analysis of the association of 507 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 173 DMET genes with the NMR in 449 participants of two laboratory studies. Nominally significant associations were identified in ten genes after adjustment for intragenic SNPs; CYP2A6 and two CYP2A6 SNPs attained experiment-wide significance adjusted for correlated SNPs (CYP2A6 PACT=4.1E-7, rs4803381 PACT=4.5E-5, rs1137115, PACT=1.2E-3). Stage II was mega-regression analyses of 10 DMET SNPs with pretreatment NMR and prospective abstinence in up to 2,497 participants from eight trials. rs4803381 and rs1137115 SNPs were associated with pretreatment NMR at genome-wide significance. In post-hoc analyses of CYP2A6 SNPs, we observed nominally significant association with: abstinence in one pharmacotherapy arm; cigarette consumption among all trial participants; and lung cancer in four case:control studies. CYP2A6 minor alleles were associated with reduced NMR, CPD, and lung cancer risk. We confirmed the major role that CYP2A6 plays in nicotine metabolism, and made novel findings with respect to genome-wide significance and associations with CPD, abstinence and lung cancer risk. Additional multivariate analyses with patient variables and genetic modeling will improve prediction of nicotine metabolism, disease risk and smoking cessation treatment prognosis.

  5. Induction of drug metabolizing enzymes in polybrominated biphenyl-fed lactating rats and their pups.

    PubMed

    Moore, R W; Dannan, G A; Aust, S D

    1978-04-01

    Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) cause a mixed-type (phenobarbital- plus 3-methylcholanthrene-like) induction of liver microsomal drug metabolizing enzymes in rats. However, 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl and 2,2',3,4,4',5,5'-heptabromobiphenyl, which together comprise less than 80% of PBBs (FireMaster), were shown to be strictly phenobarbital-type inducers. Other components (unidentified) must therefore cause the 3-methylcholanthrene-like effects. The potential for PBBs to exert effects on neonates through milk was examined. Lactating rats were fed 0, 0.1, 1.0, or 10 ppm FireMaster for the 18 days following delivery, at which time mothers and most pups were sacrificed. Pups nursing from mothers fed 10 ppm PBBs showed significant increases in liver weights and microsomal protein, and both mothers and pups had increased cytochrome P-450, aminopyrine demethylation, benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylation, and UDP-glucuronyltransferase. Pups nursing from rats fed 1.0 ppm had increases in microsomal protein, cytochrome P-450, aminopyrine demethylation, and benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylation, while their mothers were unaffected. Several pups from the 0, 0.1, and 1.0 ppm groups were maintained on their mother's diets, raised, and allowed to mate. Their pups showed much the same responses to PBBs as did the original group of pups. The effects on both generations of adult female rats were also comparable. PBBs cause a mixed-type induction in both lactating rats and their nursing pups; PBB components responsible for both aspects of this induction must be transmitted through milk. Nursing rats are approximately tenfold more sensitive to the effects of PBBs in their mother's diets than are the dams. The approximate no-effect level for microsomal induction in nursing rats is 0.1 ppm PBBs in the diet of the adult.

  6. Pharmacogenetics of tacrolimus after renal transplantation: analysis of polymorphisms in genes encoding 16 drug metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tavira, Beatriz; Coto, Eliecer; Garciá, Eliecer Coto; Díaz-Corte, Carmen; Ortega, Francisco; Arias, Manuel; Torres, Armando; Díaz, Juan M; Selgas, Rafael; López-Larrea, Carlos; Campistol, Josep M; Alvarez, Victoria; Alvarezca, Victoria

    2011-05-01

    Tacrolimus (Tac) is an immunosuppressive drug used to prevent post-transplant (PT) organ rejection. Continuous Tac monitoring is necessary to adjust the dose and prevent toxicity or rejection. Tac is metabolized by cytochrome-P450 (CYP) enzymes, and variation at the CYP and other drug metabolizing enzymes could influence Tac bio-availability and dose requirements. Our aim was to define the effect of DNA variants at 16 drug metabolising enzymes on Tac dose in patients with kidney transplants. The REDINREN Pharmacogenetics Project was a multicenter study designed to evaluate the effect of DNA polymorphisms on Tac dose requirements. A total of 200 patients who received a first cadaveric kidney and Tac as primary immunosuppressive drug were genotyped for 96 DNA polymorphisms on 16 genes. Significant associations were further replicated in a second group of 200 patients. The Tac daily dose was adjusted to achieve a blood concentration of 10-15 ng/mL in the period 0-3 months PT, and 5-10 ng/mL thereafter. The dose of tacrolimus dose and blood concentrations were compared between genotypes at 1 week, 6 months, and 1 year PT. The CYP3A5 genotype (SNP rs776746) was the strongest predictor of Tac dose requirements. Patients who were CYP3A5*3*3 (CYP3A5 non-expressors) received significantly higher Tac dose at 1 week, 6 months, and 1 year PT (p<0.0001). At 1 week, 41% of the CYP3A5 non-expressors achieved target blood concentrations compared to 26% of the CYP3A5 expressors (p=0.007). We also found a significant effect of CYP3A4 genotype (SNP rs2740574) on Tac dose requirements in patients who were CYP3A5 non-expressors. None of the other polymorphisms were related to Tac dose requirements or modified the effect of the CYP3A5 genotype. rs776746 (CYP3A5) and rs2740574 (CYP3A4) were the only SNPs associated with Tac dosage. The genotyping of these polymorphisms could be a useful pharmacogenetic tool to determine the Tac dose immediately after transplantation.

  7. Characterizing drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters that are bona fide CAR-target genes in mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Park, Shinhee; Cheng, Sunny Lihua; Cui, Julia Yue

    2016-09-01

    Intestine is responsible for the biotransformation of many orally-exposed chemicals. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR/Nr1i3) is known to up-regulate many genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (drug-processing genes/DPGs) in liver, but less is known regarding its effect in intestine. Sixty-day-old wild-type and Car(-/-) mice were administered the CAR-ligand TCPOBOP or vehicle once daily for 4 days. In wild-type mice, Car mRNA was down-regulated by TCPOBOP in liver and duodenum. Car(-/-) mice had altered basal intestinal expression of many DPGs in a section-specific manner. Consistent with the liver data (Aleksunes and Klaassen, 2012), TCPOBOP up-regulated many DPGs (Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11, Aldh1a1, Aldh1a7, Gsta1, Gsta4, Gstm1-m4, Gstt1, Ugt1a1, Ugt2b34, Ugt2b36, and Mrp2-4) in specific sections of small intestine in a CAR-dependent manner. However, the mRNAs of Nqo1 and Papss2 were previously known to be up-regulated by TCPOBOP in liver but were not altered in intestine. Interestingly, many known CAR-target genes were highest expressed in colon where CAR is minimally expressed, suggesting that additional regulators are involved in regulating their expression. In conclusion, CAR regulates the basal expression of many DPGs in intestine, and although many hepatic CAR-targeted DPGs were bona fide CAR-targets in intestine, pharmacological activation of CAR in liver and intestine are not identical.

  8. Effect of Various Diets on the Expression of Phase-I Drug Metabolizing Enzymes in Livers of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ying; Cui, Julia Yue; Lu, Hong; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that diets can alter the metabolism of drugs; however, it is difficult to compare the effects of multiple diets on drug metabolism among different experimental settings. Phase-I related genes play a major role in the biotransformation of pro-drugs and drugs.In the current study, effects of nine diets on the mRNA expression of phase-I drug-metabolizing enzymes in livers of mice were simultaneously investigated. Compared to the AIN-93M purified diet (control), 73 of the 132 critical phase-I drug metabolizing genes were differentially regulated by at least one diet. Diet restriction produced the most number of changed genes (51), followed by the atherogenic diet (27), high-fat diet (25), standard rodent chow (21), western diet (20), high-fructose diet (5), EFA deficient diet (3), and low n-3 FA diet (1). The mRNAs of the Fmo family changed most, followed by Cyp2b and 4a subfamilies, as well as Por (From 1121 to 21-fold increase of theses mRNAs). There were 59 genes not altered by any of these diets.The present results may improve the interpretation of studies with mice and aid in determining effective and safe doses for individuals with different nutritional diets. PMID:25733028

  9. Effect of various diets on the expression of phase-I drug-metabolizing enzymes in livers of mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Cui, Julia Yue; Lu, Hong; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2015-01-01

    1. Previous studies have shown that diets can alter the metabolism of drugs; however, it is difficult to compare the effects of multiple diets on drug metabolism among different experimental settings. Phase-I-related genes play a major role in the biotransformation of pro-drugs and drugs. 2. In the current study, effects of nine diets on the mRNA expression of phase-I drug metabolizing enzymes in livers of mice were simultaneously investigated. Compared to the AIN-93M purified diet (control), 73 of the 132 critical phase-I drug-metabolizing genes were differentially regulated by at least one diet. Diet restriction produced the largest number of changed genes (51), followed by the atherogenic diet (27), high-fat diet (25), standard rodent chow (21), western diet (20), high-fructose diet (5), EFA deficient diet (3) and low n-3 FA diet (1). The mRNAs of the Fmo family changed most, followed by Cyp2b and 4a subfamilies, as well as Por (from 1121- to 21-fold increase of theses mRNAs). There were 59 genes not altered by any of these diets. 3. The present results may improve the interpretation of studies with mice and aid in determining effective and safe doses for individuals with different nutritional diets.

  10. DrugMetZ DB: an anthology of human drug metabolizing Chytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Antony, Tresa Remya Thomas; Nagarajan, Shanthi

    2006-11-14

    Understandings the basics of Cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) will help to discern drug metabolism. CYP, a super-family of heme-thiolate proteins, are found in almost all living organisms and is involved in the biotransformation of a diverse range of xenobiotics, therapeutic drugs and toxins. Here, we describe DrugMetZ DB, a database for CYP metabolizing drugs. The DB is implemented in MySQL, PHP and HTML. www.bicpu.edu.in/DrugMetZDB/

  11. Andrographis paniculata Extract and Andrographolide Modulate the Hepatic Drug Metabolism System and Plasma Tolbutamide Concentrations in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haw-Wen; Huang, Chin-Shiu; Liu, Pei-Fen; Li, Chien-Chun; Liu, Cheng-Tzu; Chiang, Jia-Rong; Yao, Hsien-Tsung; Lii, Chong-Kuei

    2013-01-01

    Andrographolide is the most abundant terpenoid of A. paniculata which is used in the treatment of diabetes. In this study, we investigated the effects of A. paniculata extract (APE) and andrographolide on the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes in rat liver and determined whether modulation of these enzymes changed the pharmacokinetics of tolbutamide. Rats were intragastrically dosed with 2 g/kg/day APE or 50 mg/kg/day andrographolide for 5 days before a dose of 20 mg/kg tolbutamide was given. APE and andrographolide reduced the AUC0–12 h of tolbutamide by 37% and 18%, respectively, compared with that in controls. The protein and mRNA levels and enzyme activities of CYP2C6/11, CYP1A1/2, and CYP3A1/2 were increased by APE and andrographolide. To evaluate whether APE or andrographolide affected the hypoglycemic action of tolbutamide, high-fat diet-induced obese mice were used and treated in the same manner as the rats. APE and andrographolide increased CYP2C6/11 expression and decreased plasma tolbutamide levels. In a glucose tolerance test, however, the hypoglycemic effect of tolbutamide was not changed by APE or andrographolide. These results suggest that APE and andrographolide accelerate the metabolism rate of tolbutamide through increased expression and activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes. APE and andrographolide, however, do not impair the hypoglycemic effect of tolbutamide. PMID:23997806

  12. Nuclear receptors CAR and PXR cross talk with FOXO1 to regulate genes that encode drug-metabolizing and gluconeogenic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Susumu; Koike, Chika; Negishi, Masahiko; Yamamoto, Yukio

    2004-09-01

    The nuclear receptors CAR and PXR activate hepatic genes in response to therapeutic drugs and xenobiotics, leading to the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes, such as cytochrome P450. Insulin inhibits the ability of FOXO1 to express genes encoding gluconeogenic enzymes. Induction by drugs is known to be decreased by insulin, whereas gluconeogenic activity is often repressed by treatment with certain drugs, such as phenobarbital (PB). Performing cell-based transfection assays with drug-responsive and insulin-responsive enhancers, glutathione S-transferase pull down, RNA interference (RNAi), and mouse primary hepatocytes, we examined the molecular mechanism by which nuclear receptors and FOXO1 could coordinately regulate both enzyme pathways. FOXO1 was found to be a coactivator to CAR- and PXR-mediated transcription. In contrast, CAR and PXR, acting as corepressors, downregulated FOXO1-mediated transcription in the presence of their activators, such as 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) and pregnenolone 16alpha-carbonitrile, respectively. A constitutively active mutant of the insulin-responsive protein kinase Akt, but not the kinase-negative mutant, effectively blocked FOXO1 activity in cell-based assays. Thus, insulin could repress the receptors by activating the Akt-FOXO1 signal, whereas drugs could interfere with FOXO1-mediated transcription by activating CAR and/or PXR. Treatment with TCPOBOP or PB decreased the levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 mRNA in mice but not in Car(-/-) mice. We conclude that FOXO1 and the nuclear receptors reciprocally coregulate their target genes, modulating both drug metabolism and gluconeogenesis.

  13. Quantitative Assessment of Population Variability in Hepatic Drug Metabolism Using a Perfused Three-Dimensional Human Liver Microphysiological System

    PubMed Central

    Tsamandouras, N.; Kostrzewski, T.; Stokes, C. L.; Griffith, L. G.; Hughes, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we first describe the population variability in hepatic drug metabolism using cryopreserved hepatocytes from five different donors cultured in a perfused three-dimensional human liver microphysiological system, and then show how the resulting data can be integrated with a modeling and simulation framework to accomplish in vitro–in vivo translation. For each donor, metabolic depletion profiles of six compounds (phenacetin, diclofenac, lidocaine, ibuprofen, propranolol, and prednisolone) were measured, along with metabolite formation, mRNA levels of 90 metabolism-related genes, and markers of functional viability [lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, albumin, and urea production]. Drug depletion data were analyzed with mixed-effects modeling. Substantial interdonor variability was observed with respect to gene expression levels, drug metabolism, and other measured hepatocyte functions. Specifically, interdonor variability in intrinsic metabolic clearance ranged from 24.1% for phenacetin to 66.8% for propranolol (expressed as coefficient of variation). Albumin, urea, LDH, and cytochrome P450 mRNA levels were identified as significant predictors of in vitro metabolic clearance. Predicted clearance values from the liver microphysiological system were correlated with the observed in vivo values. A population physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed for lidocaine to illustrate the translation of the in vitro output to the observed pharmacokinetic variability in vivo. Stochastic simulations with this model successfully predicted the observed clinical concentration-time profiles and the associated population variability. This is the first study of population variability in drug metabolism in the context of a microphysiological system and has important implications for the use of these systems during the drug development process. PMID:27760784

  14. Quantitative Assessment of Population Variability in Hepatic Drug Metabolism Using a Perfused Three-Dimensional Human Liver Microphysiological System.

    PubMed

    Tsamandouras, N; Kostrzewski, T; Stokes, C L; Griffith, L G; Hughes, D J; Cirit, M

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we first describe the population variability in hepatic drug metabolism using cryopreserved hepatocytes from five different donors cultured in a perfused three-dimensional human liver microphysiological system, and then show how the resulting data can be integrated with a modeling and simulation framework to accomplish in vitro-in vivo translation. For each donor, metabolic depletion profiles of six compounds (phenacetin, diclofenac, lidocaine, ibuprofen, propranolol, and prednisolone) were measured, along with metabolite formation, mRNA levels of 90 metabolism-related genes, and markers of functional viability [lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, albumin, and urea production]. Drug depletion data were analyzed with mixed-effects modeling. Substantial interdonor variability was observed with respect to gene expression levels, drug metabolism, and other measured hepatocyte functions. Specifically, interdonor variability in intrinsic metabolic clearance ranged from 24.1% for phenacetin to 66.8% for propranolol (expressed as coefficient of variation). Albumin, urea, LDH, and cytochrome P450 mRNA levels were identified as significant predictors of in vitro metabolic clearance. Predicted clearance values from the liver microphysiological system were correlated with the observed in vivo values. A population physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed for lidocaine to illustrate the translation of the in vitro output to the observed pharmacokinetic variability in vivo. Stochastic simulations with this model successfully predicted the observed clinical concentration-time profiles and the associated population variability. This is the first study of population variability in drug metabolism in the context of a microphysiological system and has important implications for the use of these systems during the drug development process. Copyright © 2016 by The Author(s).

  15. Genetic variability of drug-metabolizing enzymes: the dual impact on psychiatric therapy and regulation of brain function.

    PubMed

    Stingl, J C; Brockmöller, J; Viviani, R

    2013-03-01

    Polymorphic drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) are responsible for the metabolism of the majority of psychotropic drugs. By explaining a large portion of variability in individual drug metabolism, pharmacogenetics offers a diagnostic tool in the burgeoning era of personalized medicine. This review updates existing evidence on the influence of pharmacogenetic variants on drug exposure and discusses the rationale for genetic testing in the clinical context. Dose adjustments based on pharmacogenetic knowledge are the first step to translate pharmacogenetics into clinical practice. However, also clinical factors, such as the consequences on toxicity and therapeutic failure, must be considered to provide clinical recommendations and assess the cost-effectiveness of pharmacogenetic treatment strategies. DME polymorphisms are relevant not only for clinical pharmacology and practice but also for research in psychiatry and neuroscience. Several DMEs, above all the cytochrome P (CYP) enzymes, are expressed in the brain, where they may contribute to the local biochemical homeostasis. Of particular interest is the possibility of DMEs playing a physiological role through their action on endogenous substrates, which may underlie the reported associations between genetic polymorphisms and cognitive function, personality and vulnerability to mental disorders. Neuroimaging studies have recently presented evidence of an effect of the CYP2D6 polymorphism on basic brain function. This review summarizes evidence on the effect of DME polymorphisms on brain function that adds to the well-known effects of DME polymorphisms on pharmacokinetics in explaining the range of phenotypes that are relevant to psychiatric practice.

  16. Assessment of drug metabolism enzyme and transporter pharmacogenetics in drug discovery and early development: perspectives of the I-PWG.

    PubMed

    Brian, William; Tremaine, Larry M; Arefayene, Million; de Kanter, Ruben; Evers, Raymond; Guo, Yingying; Kalabus, James; Lin, Wen; Loi, Cho-Ming; Xiao, Guangqing

    2016-04-01

    Genetic variants of drug metabolism enzymes and transporters can result in high pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variability, unwanted characteristics of efficacious and safe drugs. Ideally, the contributions of these enzymes and transporters to drug disposition can be predicted from in vitro experiments and in silico modeling in discovery or early development, and then be utilized during clinical development. Recently, regulatory agencies have provided guidance on the preclinical investigation of pharmacogenetics, for application to clinical drug development. This white paper summarizes the results of an industry survey conducted by the Industry Pharmacogenomics Working Group on current practice and challenges with using in vitro systems and in silico models to understand pharmacogenetic causes of variability in drug disposition.

  17. Lead Optimization in Discovery Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics/Case study: The Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Protease Inhibitor SCH 503034.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K-C; Korfmacher, Walter A; White, Ronald E; Njoroge, F George

    2007-06-26

    Lead optimization using drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) parameters has become one of the primary focuses of research organizations involved in drug discovery in the last decade. Using a combination of rapid in vivo and in vitro DMPK screening procedures on a large array of compounds during the lead optimization process has resulted in development of compounds that have acceptable DMPK properties. In this review, we present a general screening paradigm that is currently being used as part of drug discovery at Schering-Plough and we describe a case study using the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) protease inhibitor program as an example. By using the DMPK optimization tools, a potent HCV protease inhibitor, SCH 503034, was selected for development as a candidate drug.

  18. Coordinated Regulation of Hepatic Phase I and II Drug-Metabolizing Genes and Transporters using AhR-, CAR-, PXR-, PPARα-, and Nrf2-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aleksunes, Lauren M.

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factors aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulate genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in livers of mice after chemical activation. However, the specificity of their transcriptional regulation has not been determined systematically in vivo. The purpose of this study was to identify genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters altered by chemical activators in a transcription factor-dependent manner using wild-type and transcription factor-null mice. Chemical activators were administered intraperitoneally to mice once daily for 4 days. Livers were collected 24 h after the final dose, and total RNA was isolated for mRNA quantification of cytochromes P450, NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1), aldehyde dehydrogenases (Aldhs), glutathione transferases (Gsts), sulfotransferases (Sults), UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (Ugts), organic anion-transporting polypeptides (Oatps), and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (Mrps). Pharmacological activation of each transcription factor leads to mRNA induction of drug metabolic and transport genes in livers of male and female wild-type mice, but no change in null mice: AhR (Cyp1a2, Nqo1, Aldh7a1, Ugt1a1, Ugt1a6, Ugt1a9, Ugt2b35, Sult5a1, Gstm3, and Mrp4), CAR (Cyp2b10, Aldh1a1, Aldh1a7, Ugt1a1, Ugt2b34, Sult1e1, Sult3a1, Sult5a1, Papps2, Gstt1, Gsta1, Gsta4, Gstm1–4, and Mrp2–4), PXR (Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Ugt1a5, Ugt1a9, Gsta1, Gstm1–m3, Oatp1a4, and Mrp3), PPARα (Cyp4a14, Aldh1a1, mGst3, Gstm4, and Mrp4), and Nrf2 (Nqo1, Aldh1a1, Gsta1, Gsta4, Gstm1–m4, mGst3, and Mrp3–4). Taken together, these data reveal transcription factor specificity and overlap in regulating hepatic drug disposition genes by chemical activators. Coordinated regulation of phase I, phase II, and transport genes by

  19. Regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes in infectious and inflammatory disease: implications for biologics-small molecule drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Pankajini; Taneja, Guncha; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Ghose, Romi

    2017-06-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) are primarily down-regulated during infectious and inflammatory diseases, leading to disruption in the metabolism of small molecule drugs (smds), which are increasingly being prescribed therapeutically in combination with biologics for a number of chronic diseases. The biologics may exert pro- or anti-inflammatory effect, which may in turn affect the expression/activity of DMEs. Thus, patients with infectious/inflammatory diseases undergoing biologic/smd treatment can have complex changes in DMEs due to combined effects of the disease and treatment. Areas covered: We will discuss clinical biologics-SMD interaction and regulation of DMEs during infection and inflammatory diseases. Mechanistic studies will be discussed and consequences on biologic-small molecule combination therapy on disease outcome due to changes in drug metabolism will be highlighted. Expert opinion: The involvement of immunomodulatory mediators in biologic-SMDs is well known. Regulatory guidelines recommend appropriate in vitro or in vivo assessments for possible interactions. The role of cytokines in biologic-SMDs has been documented. However, the mechanisms of drug-drug interactions is much more complex, and is probably multi-factorial. Studies aimed at understanding the mechanism by which biologics effect the DMEs during inflammation/infection are clinically important.

  20. Role of farnesoid X receptor in establishment of ontogeny of phase-I drug metabolizing enzyme genes in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lai; Piekos, Stephanie; Guo, Grace L; Zhong, Xiao-Bo

    2016-09-01

    The expression of phase-I drug metabolizing enzymes in liver changes dramatically during postnatal liver maturation. Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is critical for bile acid and lipid homeostasis in liver. However, the role of FXR in regulating ontogeny of phase-I drug metabolizing genes is not clear. Hence, we applied RNA-sequencing to quantify the developmental expression of phase-I genes in both Fxr-null and control (C57BL/6) mouse livers during development. Liver samples of male C57BL/6 and Fxr-null mice at 6 different ages from prenatal to adult were used. The Fxr-null showed an overall effect to diminish the "day-1 surge" of phase-I gene expression, including cytochrome P450s at neonatal ages. Among the 185 phase-I genes from 12 different families, 136 were expressed, and differential expression during development occurred in genes from all 12 phase-I families, including hydrolysis: carboxylesterase (Ces), paraoxonase (Pon), and epoxide hydrolase (Ephx); reduction: aldoketo reductase (Akr), quinone oxidoreductase (Nqo), and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (Dpyd); and oxidation: alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh), aldehyde dehydrogenase (Aldh), flavin monooxygenases (Fmo), molybdenum hydroxylase (Aox and Xdh), cytochrome P450 (P450), and cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (Por). The data also suggested new phase-I genes potentially targeted by FXR. These results revealed an important role of FXR in regulation of ontogeny of phase-I genes.

  1. Effect of zinc supplementation on oxidative drug metabolism in patients with hepatic cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, M G; Macmathuna, P; Younger, K; Keeling, P W; Feely, J

    1991-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of antipyrine were studied in seven zinc deficient patients with hepatic cirrhosis, before and after zinc supplementation. Each patient received zinc sulphate 660 mg daily for 30 days, restoring zinc status to normal as assessed by leucocyte zinc concentration. Antipyrine clearance was significantly reduced (P less than 0.05) and antipyrine elimination half-life increased (P less than 0.05) following administration of zinc sulphate without significant alteration in the apparent volume of distribution. It is concluded that supplementation of the zinc deficiency associated with hepatic cirrhosis impaired the hepatic oxidative metabolism of antipyrine. PMID:2049261

  2. Genetic polymorphisms in human drug-metabolizing enzymes: potential uses of reverse genetics to identify genes of toxicological relevance.

    PubMed

    Puga, A; Nebert, D W; McKinnon, R A; Menon, A G

    1997-03-01

    The human mind was engaged with fundamental questions on the nature of heredity long before the study of genetics became a scientific discipline. Many traits, such as height, eye color, blood pressure, or cancer susceptibility, have been known to run in families, although the genes or combination of genes that underlie these observable characteristics remain unknown in most cases. Differences in susceptibility to environmental agents in humans are likewise determined by variations in genetic background--genetic polymorphisms. In this article, we review the current status of studies on human polymorphisms in drug-metabolizing enzymes and discuss various approaches to the analysis of genetic polymorphisms. We expect that in the near future, novel methods in genetic analysis of human populations will be likely to play a key role in the identification of genes of toxicological relevance.

  3. Effect of radio-detoxified endotoxin on the liver microsomal drug metabolizing enzyme system in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bertok, L.; Szeberenyi, S.

    1983-06-01

    E. coli endotoxin (LPS) depresses the hepatic microsomal mono-oxygenase activity. Radio-detoxified LPS (TOLERIN: /sup 60/Co irradiated endotoxin preparation) decreases this biotransforming activity to a smaller extent. Phenobarbital, an inducer of this mono-oxygenase system, failed to induce in LPS-treated animals. In radio-detoxified LPS-treated rats, phenobarbital induced the mono-oxygenase and almost fully restored the biotransformation.

  4. Reaction phenotyping: advances in the experimental strategies used to characterize the contribution of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zientek, Michael A; Youdim, Kuresh

    2015-01-01

    During the process of drug discovery, the pharmaceutical industry is faced with numerous challenges. One challenge is the successful prediction of the major routes of human clearance of new medications. For compounds cleared by metabolism, accurate predictions help provide an early risk assessment of their potential to exhibit significant interpatient differences in pharmacokinetics via routes of metabolism catalyzed by functionally polymorphic enzymes and/or clinically significant metabolic drug-drug interactions. This review details the most recent and emerging in vitro strategies used by drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic scientists to better determine rates and routes of metabolic clearance and how to translate these parameters to estimate the amount these routes contribute to overall clearance, commonly referred to as fraction metabolized. The enzymes covered in this review include cytochrome P450s together with other enzymatic pathways whose involvement in metabolic clearance has become increasingly important as efforts to mitigate cytochrome P450 clearance are successful. Advances in the prediction of the fraction metabolized include newly developed methods to differentiate CYP3A4 from the polymorphic enzyme CYP3A5, scaling tools for UDP-glucuronosyltranferase, and estimation of fraction metabolized for substrates of aldehyde oxidase.

  5. 2D SMARTCyp reactivity-based site of metabolism prediction for major drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruifeng; Liu, Jin; Tawa, Greg; Wallqvist, Anders

    2012-06-25

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, 2D6, 2C9, 2C19, and 1A2 are the most important drug-metabolizing enzymes in the human liver. Knowledge of which parts of a drug molecule are subject to metabolic reactions catalyzed by these enzymes is crucial for rational drug design to mitigate ADME/toxicity issues. SMARTCyp, a recently developed 2D ligand structure-based method, is able to predict site-specific metabolic reactivity of CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 substrates with an accuracy that rivals the best and more computationally demanding 3D structure-based methods. In this article, the SMARTCyp approach was extended to predict the metabolic hotspots for CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP1A2 substrates. This was accomplished by taking into account the impact of a key substrate-receptor recognition feature of each enzyme as a correction term to the SMARTCyp reactivity. The corrected reactivity was then used to rank order the likely sites of CYP-mediated metabolic reactions. For 60 CYP1A2 substrates, the observed major sites of CYP1A2 catalyzed metabolic reactions were among the top-ranked 1, 2, and 3 positions in 67%, 80%, and 83% of the cases, respectively. The results were similar to those obtained by MetaSite and the reactivity + docking approach. For 70 CYP2C9 substrates, the observed sites of CYP2C9 metabolism were among the top-ranked 1, 2, and 3 positions in 66%, 86%, and 87% of the cases, respectively. These results were better than the corresponding results of StarDrop version 5.0, which were 61%, 73%, and 77%, respectively. For 36 compounds metabolized by CYP2C19, the observed sites of metabolism were found to be among the top-ranked 1, 2, and 3 sites in 78%, 89%, and 94% of the cases, respectively. The computational procedure was implemented as an extension to the program SMARTCyp 2.0. With the extension, the program can now predict the site of metabolism for all five major drug-metabolizing enzymes with an accuracy similar to or better than that achieved by the best 3D structure

  6. Effects of atorvastatin metabolites on induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes and membrane transporters through human pregnane X receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hoffart, E; Ghebreghiorghis, L; Nussler, AK; Thasler, WE; Weiss, TS; Schwab, M; Burk, O

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Atorvastatin metabolites differ in their potential for drug interaction because of differential inhibition of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. We here investigate whether they exert differential effects on the induction of these genes via activation of pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Ligand binding to PXR or CAR was analysed by mammalian two-hybrid assembly and promoter/reporter gene assays. Additionally, surface plasmon resonance was used to analyse ligand binding to CAR. Primary human hepatocytes were treated with atorvastatin metabolites, and mRNA and protein expression of PXR-regulated genes was measured. Two-hybrid co-activator interaction and co-repressor release assays were utilized to elucidate the molecular mechanism of PXR activation. KEY RESULTS All atorvastatin metabolites induced the assembly of PXR and activated CYP3A4 promoter activity. Ligand binding to CAR could not be proven. In primary human hepatocytes, the para-hydroxy metabolite markedly reduced or abolished induction of cytochrome P450 and transporter genes. While significant differences in co-activator recruitment were not observed, para-hydroxy atorvastatin demonstrated only 50% release of co-repressors. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Atorvastatin metabolites are ligands of PXR but not of CAR. Atorvastatin metabolites demonstrate differential induction of PXR target genes, which results from impaired release of co-repressors. Consequently, the properties of drug metabolites have to be taken into account when analysing PXR-dependent induction of drug metabolism and transport. The drug interaction potential of the active metabolite, para-hydroxy atorvastatin, might be lower than that of the parent compound. PMID:21913896

  7. Drug metabolism and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Kinirons, M T; O'Mahony, M S

    2004-01-01

    Important changes in drug metabolism occur with ageing. Age-associated reductions in function of some but not all cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) have been described. Induction and inhibition of CYPs needs to be revisited in light of recent advances. The function and pharmacology of transporters have not yet been examined for an age-related effect. Finally, the concept of frailty is being underpinned by studies documenting a decline in drug metabolism and changes in disposition in frail older people compared with either healthy elderly or the young. PMID:15089805

  8. Effect of caffeine-coconut products interactions on induction of microsomal drug-metabolizing enzymes in Wistar albino rats.

    PubMed

    Abara, A E; Obochi, G O; Malu, S P; Obi-Abang, M; Ekam, V S; Uboh, F E

    2007-01-01

    Effect of caffeine-coconut products interactions on induction of drug-metabolizing enzyme in Wistar albino rats was studied. Twenty rats were randomly divided into four groups: The control group (1) received via oral route a placebo (4.0 ml of distilled water). Groups 2 to 4 were treated for a 14-day period with 50 mg/kg body weight of caffeine, 50 mg/kg body weight of caffeine and 50 mg/kg body weight of coconut water, and 50 mg/kg body weight of caffeine and 50 mg/kg body weight of coconut milk in 4.0 ml of the vehicle via gastric intubation respectively. One day after the final exposure, the animals were anaesthetized by inhalation of an overdose of chloroform. The blood of each rat was collected by cardiac puncture while the liver of each rat was harvested and processed to examine several biochemical parameters, i.e., total protein and RNA levels, protein/RNA ratios, and activities of alanine and aspartate amino transferase (ALT and AST, respectively). The results showed that while ingestion of coconut milk and coconut water increased the values of protein and protein/RNA ratios, it decreased alanine and aspartate amino transferase (ALT and AST) activities. These effects, in turn, enhanced the induction of the metabolizing enzymes and a resultant faster clearance and elimination of the caffeine from the body, there by reducing the toxic effect on the liver.

  9. Nerve Agent Hydrolysis Activity Designed into a Human Drug Metabolism Enzyme

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-18

    butyrylcholinesterase. Biochemistry 36: 786–795. 19. Vocadlo DJ, Davies GJ, Laine R, Withers SG (2001) Catalysis by hen egg - white lysozyme proceeds via a...residues (grey surface) including V146 and L363 (light blue), as well as the oxyanion hole ( white ). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0017441.g002 Enzyme Design... lysozyme and protein tyrosine phosphatases [19,20], and apparently support the same role in hCE1. The V146H addition synergistically increased base

  10. The influence of starvation upon hepatic drug metabolism in rats, mice, and guinea pigs.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furner, R. L.; Feller, D. D.

    1971-01-01

    Male rats, mice, and guinea pigs were starved for 1, 2, or 3 days, and the metabolism of ethylmorphine, p-nitroanisole, and aniline was studied. Results suggest that the oxidative enzyme systems studied are not interdependent, and the pathways studied appear to be species dependent.

  11. The influence of starvation upon hepatic drug metabolism in rats, mice, and guinea pigs.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furner, R. L.; Feller, D. D.

    1971-01-01

    Male rats, mice, and guinea pigs were starved for 1, 2, or 3 days, and the metabolism of ethylmorphine, p-nitroanisole, and aniline was studied. Results suggest that the oxidative enzyme systems studied are not interdependent, and the pathways studied appear to be species dependent.

  12. Toxicity of xanthene food dyes by inhibition of human drug-metabolizing enzymes in a noncompetitive manner.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Takaharu

    2009-01-01

    The synthetic food dyes studied were rose bengal (RB), phroxine (PL), amaranth, erythrosine B (ET), allura red, new coccine, acid red (AR), tartrazine, sunset yellow FCF, brilliant blue FCF, and indigo carmine. First, data confirmed that these dyes were not substrates for CYP2A6, UGT1A6, and UGT2B7. ET inhibited UGT1A6 (glucuronidation of p-nitrophenol) and UGT2B7 (glucuronidation of androsterone). We showed the inhibitory effect of xanthene dye on human UGT1A6 activity. Basic ET, PL, and RB in those food dyes strongly inhibited UGT1A6 activity, with IC(50) values = 0.05, 0.04, and 0.015 mM, respectively. Meanwhile, AR of an acidic xanthene food dye showed no inhibition. Next, we studied the inhibition of CYP3A4 of a major phase I drug-metabolizing enzyme and P-glycoprotein of a major transporter by synthetic food dyes. Human CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein were also inhibited by basic xanthene food dyes. The IC(50) values of these dyes to inhibit CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein were the same as the inhibition level of UGT1A6 by three halogenated xanthene food dyes (ET, PL, and RB) described above, except AR, like the results with UGT1A6 and UGT2B7. We also confirmed the noninhibition of CYP3A4 and P-gp by other synthetic food dyes. Part of this inhibition depended upon the reaction of (1)O(2) originating on xanthene dyes by light irradiation, because inhibition was prevented by (1)O(2) quenchers. We studied the influence of superoxide dismutase and catalase on this inhibition by dyes and we found prevention of inhibition by superoxide dismutase but not catalase. This result suggests that superoxide anions, originating on dyes by light irradiation, must attack drug-metabolizing enzymes. It is possible that red cosmetics containing phloxine, erythrosine, or rose bengal react with proteins on skin under lighting and may lead to rough skin.

  13. Polymorphisms of drug-metabolizing enzymes and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pakakasama, S; Mukda, E; Sasanakul, W; Kadegasem, P; Udomsubpayakul, U; Thithapandha, A; Hongeng, S

    2005-07-01

    The involvement of phase I and II enzymes is well documented in the metabolism of a wide range of drugs and xenobiotics. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of these enzymes are also known to alter their protein expression and function. Moreover, genetic susceptibility and environmental exposure have been proposed to be an etiology of cancer. We hypothesized that polymorphisms of these enzymes might affect the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). CYP 1A1, CYP 3A4*1B, CYP 3A5*3, CYP 3A5*6, GSTM1, and GSTT1 polymorphisms were genotyped by using PCR-RFLP in 107 children with ALL and 320 healthy controls. Allele and genotype frequencies of each of the SNPs were compared between two groups. It was found that the allele frequencies of CYP 1A1*1, *2A, *2B, and *4 were not different between cases and controls. CYP 3A4*1B allele frequency was only 0.8% and 0.9% in ALL and controls, respectively. CYP 3A5*1/*1, *1/*3, and *3/*3 genotype frequencies showed no statistically significant difference between patients and controls. CYP 3A5*6 was not detected in our population. The GSTM1 null genotype was significantly increased in children with ALL (OR 1.7; 95% CI, 1.0, 2.7). In contrast, the GSTT1 null genotype did not show this effect. Our data thus demonstrate that the GSTM1 null genotype might increase the risk of childhood ALL in a Thai population.

  14. Gallic acid and gallic acid derivatives: effects on drug metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ow, Yin-Yin; Stupans, Ieva

    2003-06-01

    Gallic acid and its structurally related compounds are found widely distributed in fruits and plants. Gallic acid, and its catechin derivatives are also present as one of the main phenolic components of both black and green tea. Esters of gallic acid have a diverse range of industrial uses, as antioxidants in food, in cosmetics and in the pharmaceutical industry. In addition, gallic acid is employed as a source material for inks, paints and colour developers. Studies utilising these compounds have found them to possess many potential therapeutic properties including anti-cancer and antimicrobial properties. In this review, studies of the effects of gallic acid, its esters, and gallic acid catechin derivatives on Phase I and Phase II enzymes are examined. Many published reports of the effects of the in vitro effects of gallic acid and its derivatives on drug metabolising enzymes concern effects directly on substrate (generally drug or mutagen) metabolism or indirectly through observed effects in Ames tests. In the case of the Ames test an antimutagenic effect may be observed through inhibition of CYP activation of indirectly acting mutagens and/or by scavenging of metabolically generated mutagenic electrophiles. There has been considerable interest in the in vivo effects of the gallate esters because of their incorporation into foodstuffs as antioxidants and in the catechin gallates with their potential role as chemoprotective agents. Principally an induction of Phase II enzymes has been observed however more recent studies using HepG2 cells and primary cultures of human hepatocytes provide evidence for the overall complexity of actions of individual components versus complex mixtures, such as those in food. Further systematic studies of mechanisms of induction and inhibition of drug metabolising enzymes by this group of compounds are warranted in the light of their distribution and consequent ingestion, current uses and suggested therapeutic potential. However, it

  15. Pharmacokinetic interactions between herbal medicines and prescribed drugs: focus on drug metabolic enzymes and transporters.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qiang; Liu, Kexin

    2014-01-01

    Herbal medicines have been widely used for thousands of years, and now are gaining continued popularity worldwide as a complementary or alternative treatment for a variety of diseases, rehabilitation and health care. Since herbal medicines contain more than one pharmacologically active ingredient and are commonly used with many prescribed drugs, there are potential herb-drug interactions. A variety of reported herb-drug interactions are of pharmacokinetic origin, arising from the effects of herbal medicines on metabolic enzymes and/or transporters. Such an alteration in metabolism or transport can result in changes in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (e.g., induction or inhibition of metabolic enzymes, and modulation of uptake and efflux transporters), leading to changed pharmacokinetics of the concomitantly prescribed drugs. Pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions have more clinical significance as pharmacokinetic parameters such as the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) or the elimination half-life (t1/2) of the concomitant drug alter. This review summarizes the mechanism underlying herb-drug interactions and the approaches to identify the interactions, and discusses pharmacokinetic interactions of eight widely used herbal medicines (Ginkgo biloba, ginseng, garlic, black cohosh, Echinacea, milk thistle, kava, and St. John's wort) with conventional drugs, using various in vitro, animal in vivo, and clinical studies. The increasing understanding of pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions will make health care professionals and patients pay more attention to the potential interactions.

  16. Comparison of metabolism of sesamin and episesamin by drug-metabolizing enzymes in human liver.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kaori; Ikushiro, Shinichi; Wakayama, Shuto; Itoh, Toshimasa; Yamamoto, Keiko; Kamakura, Masaki; Munetsuna, Eiji; Ohta, Miho; Sakaki, Toshiyuki

    2012-10-01

    Sesamin and episesamin are two epimeric lignans that are found in refined sesame oil. Commercially available sesamin supplements contain both sesamin and episesamin at an approximate 1:1 ratio. Our previous study clarified the sequential metabolism of sesamin by cytochrome P450 (P450) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase in human liver. In addition, we revealed that sesamin caused a mechanism-based inhibition (MBI) of CYP2C9, the P450 enzyme responsible for sesamin monocatecholization. In the present study, we compared the metabolism and the MBI of episesamin with those of sesamin. Episesamin was first metabolized to the two epimers of monocatechol, S- and R-monocatechols in human liver microsomes. The P450 enzymes responsible for S- and R-monocatechol formation were CYP2C9 and CYP1A2, respectively. The contribution of CYP2C9 was much larger than that of CYP1A2 in sesamin metabolism, whereas the contribution of CYP2C9 was almost equal to that of CYP1A2 in episesamin metabolism. Docking of episesamin to the active site of CYP1A2 explained the stereoselectivity in CYP1A2-dependent episesamin monocatecholization. Similar to sesamin, the episesamin S- and R-monocatechols were further metabolized to dicatechol, glucuronide, and methylate metabolites in human liver; however, the contribution of each reaction was significantly different between sesamin and episesamin. The liver microsomes from CYP2C19 ultra-rapid metabolizers showed a significant amount of episesamin dicatechol. In this study, we have revealed significantly different metabolism by P450, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, and catechol-O-methyltransferase for sesamin and episesamin, resulting in different biological effects.

  17. Impact of enzalutamide and its main metabolite N-desmethyl enzalutamide on pharmacokinetically important drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Johanna; Kocher, Jutta; Mueller, Corina; Rosenzweig, Stephanie; Theile, Dirk

    2017-09-01

    Enzalutamide is a new drug against castration-resistant prostate cancer. Recent data indicate profound induction of drug metabolizing enzymes (e.g. cytochrome P450 isoenzyme (CYP) 3A4) but comprehensive in vitro data on other CYP enzymes, drug conjugating enzymes or drug transporters is scarce. Moreover, mechanisms of induction are poorly investigated and the effects of the active metabolite N-desmethyl enzalutamide are unknown. Using LS180 cells as an induction model and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, our study demonstrated a concentration-dependent induction of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP3A5, CYP3A4, UGT1A3, UGT1A9, ABCB1, ABCC2, and ABCG2 mRNA. Induction of CYP3A4 and ABCB1 was confirmed by western blot analysis and is likely mediated by activation of the nuclear receptor pregnane x receptor, elucidated by a luciferase-based reporter gene assay. Enzalutamide's main active metabolite N-desmethyl enzalutamide exhibited only weak induction properties. mRNA expression of UGT2B7 was suppressed by enzalutamide and its metabolite. Both compounds are apparently not transported by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). N-desmethyl enzalutamide more potently inhibited important drug transporters (P-gp, BCRP, OATPs) than enzalutamide. Taken together, pharmacokinetics of concurrently administered drugs is likely altered during enzalutamide therapy. Levels of metabolically (mainly CYP3A4) eliminated drugs are expected to be decreased, whereas abundance of compounds with solely transporter-determined pharmacokinetics (P-gp, OATPs) is likely enhanced. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhanced enzymatic reactivity for electrochemically driven drug metabolism by confining cytochrome P450 enzyme in TiO₂ nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jusheng; Li, Henan; Cui, Dongmei; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin

    2014-08-05

    Understanding the enzymatic reaction kinetics that occur within a confined space or interface is a significant challenge. Herein, a nanotube array enzymatic reactor (CYP2C9/Au/TNA) was constructed by electrostatically adsorbing enzyme on the inner wall of TiO2 nanotube arrays (TNAs). TNAs with different dimensions could be fabricated by the anodization of titanium foil through varying the anodization potential or time. The electrical conductivity of TNAs was improved by electrodepositing Au nanoparticles on the inner wall of TNAs. The cytochrome P450 2C9 enzyme (CYP2C9) was confined inside TNAs as a model. The enzymatic activity of CYP2C9 and tolbutamide metabolic yield could be effectively regulated by changing the nanotube diameter and length of TNAs. The enzymatic rate constant k(cat) and apparent Michaelis constant K(m)(app) were determined to be 9.89 s(-1) and 4.8 μM at the tube inner diameter of about 64 nm and length of 1.08 μm. The highest metabolic yield of tolbutamide reached 14.6%. Furthermore, the designed nanotube array enzymatic reactor could be also used in situ to monitor the tolbutamide concentration with sensitivity of 28.8 μA mM(-1) and detection limit of 0.52 μM. Therefore, the proposed nanotube array enzymatic reactor was a good vessel for studying enzyme biocatalysis and drug metabolism, and has potential applications including efficient biosensors and bioreactors for chemical synthesis.

  19. Effects of Curcuma xanthorrhiza Extracts and Their Constituents on Phase II Drug-metabolizing Enzymes Activity

    PubMed Central

    Salleh, Nurul Afifah Mohd; Ismail, Sabariah; Ab Halim, Mohd Rohaimi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Curcuma xanthorrhiza is a native Indonesian plant and traditionally utilized for a range of illness including liver damage, hypertension, diabetes, and cancer. Objective: The study determined the effects of C. xanthorrhiza extracts (ethanol and aqueous) and their constituents (curcumene and xanthorrhizol) on UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and glutathione transferase (GST) activities. Materials and Methods: The inhibition studies were evaluated both in rat liver microsomes and in human recombinant UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 enzymes. p-nitrophenol and beetle luciferin were used as the probe substrates for UGT assay while 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as the probe for GST assay. The concentrations of extracts studied ranged from 0.1 to 1000 μg/mL while for constituents ranged from 0.01 to 500 μM. Results: In rat liver microsomes, UGT activity was inhibited by the ethanol extract (IC50 =279.74 ± 16.33 μg/mL). Both UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 were inhibited by the ethanol and aqueous extracts with IC50 values ranging between 9.59–22.76 μg/mL and 110.71–526.65 μg/Ml, respectively. Rat liver GST and human GST Pi-1 were inhibited by ethanol and aqueous extracts, respectively (IC50 =255.00 ± 13.06 μg/mL and 580.80 ± 18.56 μg/mL). Xanthorrhizol was the better inhibitor of UGT1A1 (IC50 11.30 ± 0.27 μM) as compared to UGT2B7 while curcumene did not show any inhibition. For GST, both constituents did not show any inhibition. Conclusion: These findings suggest that C. xanthorrhiza have the potential to cause herb-drug interaction with drugs that are primarily metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. SUMMARY Findings from this study would suggest which of Curcuma xanthorrhiza extracts and constituents that would have potential interactions with drugs which are highly metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. Further clinical studies can then be designed if needed to evaluate the in vivo pharmacokinetic relevance of these interactions Abbreviations Used: BSA: Bovine serum albumin

  20. Distribution of genetic polymorphisms of genes encoding drug metabolizing enzymes & drug transporters - a review with Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Umamaheswaran, Gurusamy; Kumar, Dhakchinamoorthi Krishna; Adithan, Chandrasekaran

    2014-01-01

    Phase I and II drug metabolizing enzymes (DME) and drug transporters are involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism as well as elimination of many therapeutic agents, toxins and various pollutants. Presence of genetic polymorphisms in genes encoding these proteins has been associated with marked inter-individual variability in their activity that could result in variation in drug response, toxicity as well as in disease predisposition. The emergent field pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics (PGx) is a promising discipline, as it predicts disease risk, selection of proper medication with regard to response and toxicity, and appropriate drug dosage guidance based on an individual's genetic make-up. Consequently, genetic variations are essential to understand the ethnic differences in disease occurrence, development, prognosis, therapeutic response and toxicity. For that reason, it is necessary to establish the normative frequency of these genes in a particular population before unraveling the genotype-phenotype associations. Although a fair amount of allele frequency data are available in Indian populations, the existing pharmacogenetic data have not been compiled into a database. This review was intended to compile the normative frequency distribution of the variants of genes encoding DMEs (CYP450s, TPMT, GSTs, COMT, SULT1A1, NAT2 and UGTs) and transporter proteins (MDR1, OCT1 and SLCO1B1) with Indian perspective. PMID:24604039

  1. Effects of liver diseases on drug-metabolizing enzymes: implications for drug fate alterations and nano-therapeutic openings.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Shi, J; Li, Q; Peng, X; Dong, L; Li, Y; Dai, P; Wang, Y; Guo, E; Zhou, F; Liu, Z

    2014-01-01

    Metabolizing and eliminating toxic chemicals in the liver are key processes in the body's defense system. Drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) play central roles in such processes. The activity and expression of several key DMEs are changed in various liver diseases and thus lead to significantly altered drug disposition. This phenomenon severely affects the pharmacotherapy of clinical medications in terms of the safety and efficacy of drug responses. This review highlights liver physiological functions, altered DMEs, and altered drug disposition in liver diseases. Moreover, the implications of changes in DMEs on the fate of clinically relevant drugs are also discussed. Pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor are two liver-enriched nuclear receptors originally defined as xenobiotic sensors that affect regulation of DMEs. Altered regulation of DMEs in liver diseases contributes to the development of powerful in vitro and in vivo tools to predict drug responses and options for improved drug delivery and development. Although a number of treatment drugs are available for liver diseases, they are limited by their low drug concentration in the target site, presence of side effects, and instability in the human body. The nanoparticle drug delivery system has recently attracted research attention because of its potential to offer solutions to current obstacles that involve the use of therapeutic drugs for liver diseases. Conclusively, this review aims to improve understanding on the regulation of DMEs in liver diseases and on corresponding implications in drug disposition, including novel therapeutic medications.

  2. Nuclear receptors in the multidrug resistance through the regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Yakun; TANG, Yong; GUO, Changxiong; WANG, Jiuhui; BORAL, Debasish; NIE, Daotai

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the three most common treatment modalities for cancer. However, its efficacy is limited by multidrug resistant cancer cells. Drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and efflux transporters promote the metabolism, elimination, and detoxification of chemotherapeutic agents. Consequently, elevated levels of DMEs and efflux transporters reduce the therapeutic effectiveness of chemotheraputics and, often, lead to treatment failure. Nuclear receptors, especially pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) and constitutive androstane activated receptor (CAR, NR1I3), are increasingly recognized for their role in xenobiotic metabolism and clearance as well as their role in the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) during chemotherapy. Promiscuous xenobiotic receptors, including PXR and CAR, govern the inducible expressions of a broad spectrum of target genes that encode phase I DMEs, phase II DMEs, and efflux transporters. Recent studies conducted by a number of groups, including ours, have revealed that PXR and CAR play pivotal roles in the development of MDR in various human carcinomas, including prostate, colon, ovarian, and esophageal squamous cell carcinomas. Accordingly, PXR/CAR expression levels and/or activation statuses may predict prognosis and identify the risk of drug resistance in patients subjected to chemotherapy. Further, PXR/CAR antagonists, when used in combination with existing chemotherapeutics that activate PXR/CAR, are feasible and promising options that could be utilized to overcome or, at least, attenuate MDR in cancer cells. PMID:22326308

  3. Effects of interferon-alpha monotherapy on hepatic drug metabolism in cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Israel, B C; Blouin, R A; McIntyre, W; Shedlofsky, S I

    1993-01-01

    1. The influence of interferon-alpha (IFN alpha) on the clearances of theophylline (TH), antipyrine (AP) and hexobarbitone (HB) was studied in seven cancer patients given IFN alpha as their only treatment. In addition, IFN alpha effects on drug clearance were correlated with changes in serum inflammatory cytokines and acute phase proteins. 2. A 'baseline' study was performed by administering an oral drug 'cocktail' of TH (150 mg), AP (250 mg) and HB (250 mg) with saline injected simultaneously and again 24 h later. One week later, an 'acute' study was performed at the initiation of IFN alpha therapy, 3 x 10(6) units injected with the drug cocktail and again 24 h later. After 2 weeks of IFN alpha treatment three times per week, a 'chronic' study was performed with IFN alpha injected the day prior to, simultaneously with, as well as 24 h after the drug cocktail. 3. Plasma samples were collected over 48 h and the clearances of TH, AP and HB were estimated. Serum samples were collected at various times for the measurement of tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (C-RP) and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP). 4. IFN alpha caused a 33% decrease in the oral clearance of TH during the chronic study compared with baseline (P < or = 0.05). Although IFN alpha inhibited TH clearance by 16% during the acute study and AP clearance by 20-21% during both acute and chronic studies, these changes did not reach statistical significance. IFN alpha caused minimal changes in HB clearance. There were no chronic effects of IFN alpha on serum cytokines or acute phase proteins. 5. The findings confirm that the most commonly used dose of IFN alpha inhibits the hepatic clearance in humans of some but not all drugs and that this inhibition persists during IFN alpha therapy. Because inhibition was not associated with increases in serum cytokines or acute phase proteins, the mechanism by which IFN alpha inhibits cytochrome P450 activities in

  4. Potential risks resulting from fruit/vegetable-drug interactions: effects on drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Fragoso, Lourdes; Martínez-Arismendi, José Luis; Orozco-Bustos, Danae; Reyes-Esparza, Jorge; Torres, Eliseo; Burchiel, Scott W

    2011-05-01

    It has been well established that complex mixtures of phytochemicals in fruits and vegetables can be beneficial for human health. Moreover, it is becoming increasingly apparent that phytochemicals can influence the pharmacological activity of drugs by modifying their absorption characteristics through interactions with drug transporters as well as drug-metabolizing enzyme systems. Such effects are more likely to occur in the intestine and liver, where high concentrations of phytochemicals may occur. Alterations in cytochrome P450 and other enzyme activities may influence the fate of drugs subject to extensive first-pass metabolism. Although numerous studies of nutrient-drug interactions have been published and systematic reviews and meta-analyses of these studies are available, no generalizations on the effect of nutrient-drug interactions on drug bioavailability are currently available. Several publications have highlighted the unintended consequences of the combined use of nutrients and drugs. Many phytochemicals have been shown to have pharmacokinetic interactions with drugs. The present review is limited to commonly consumed fruits and vegetables with significant beneficial effects as nutrients and components in folk medicine. Here, we discuss the phytochemistry and pharmacokinetic interactions of the following fruit and vegetables: grapefruit, orange, tangerine, grapes, cranberry, pomegranate, mango, guava, black raspberry, black mulberry, apple, broccoli, cauliflower, watercress, spinach, tomato, carrot, and avocado. We conclude that our knowledge of the potential risk of nutrient-drug interactions is still limited. Therefore, efforts to elucidate potential risks resulting from food-drug interactions should be intensified in order to prevent undesired and harmful clinical consequences. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  5. Murine atrial HL-1 cell line is a reliable model to study drug metabolizing enzymes in the heart.

    PubMed

    Elshenawy, Osama H; Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; Abdelhamid, Ghada; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2013-04-01

    HL-1 cells are currently the only cells that spontaneously contract while maintaining a differentiated cardiac phenotype. Thus, our objective was to examine murine HL-1 cells as a new in vitro model to study drug metabolizing enzymes. We examined the expression of cytochrome P450s (Cyps), phase II enzymes, and nuclear receptors and compared their levels to mice hearts. Our results demonstrated that except for Cyp4a12 and Cyp4a14 all Cyps, phase II enzymes: glutathione-S-transferases (Gsts), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase (Nqo1), nuclear receptors: aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR-alpha) were all constitutively expressed in HL-1 cells. Cyp2b19, Cyp2c29, Cyp2c38, Cyp2c40, and Cyp4f16 mRNA levels were higher in HL-1 cells compared to mice hearts. Cyp2b9, Cyp2c44, Cyp2j9, Cyp2j11, Cyp2j13, Cyp4f13, Cyp4f15 mRNA levels were expressed to the same extent to that of mice hearts. Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1, Cyp2b10, Cyp2d10, Cyp2d22, Cyp2e1, Cyp2j5, Cyp2j6, Cyp3a11, Cyp4a10, and Cyp4f18 mRNA levels were lower in HL-1 cells compared to mice hearts. Moreover, 3-methylcholanthrene induced Cyp1a1 while fenofibrate induced Cyp2j9 and Cyp4f13 mRNA levels in HL-1 cells. Examining the metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) by HL-1 cells, our results demonstrated that HL-1 cells metabolize AA to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids, and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. In conclusion, HL-1 cells provide a valuable in vitro model to study the role of Cyps and their associated AA metabolites in addition to phase II enzymes in cardiovascular disease states.

  6. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) - pathogenesis, classification, and effect on drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters.

    PubMed

    Cobbina, Enoch; Akhlaghi, Fatemeh

    2017-03-17

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a spectrum of liver disorders. It is defined by the presence of steatosis in more than 5% of hepatocytes with little or no alcohol consumption. Insulin resistance, the metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes and genetic variants of PNPLA3 or TM6SF2 seem to play a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The pathological progression of NAFLD follows tentatively a "three-hit" process namely steatosis, lipotoxicity and inflammation. The presence of steatosis, oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators like TNF-α and IL-6 has been implicated in the alterations of nuclear factors such as CAR, PXR, PPAR-α in NAFLD. These factors may result in altered expression and activity of drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) or transporters. Existing evidence suggests that the effect of NAFLD on CYP3A4, CYP2E1 and MRP3 is more consistent across rodent and human studies. CYP3A4 activity is down-regulated in NASH whereas the activity of CYP2E1 and the efflux transporter MRP3 is up-regulated. However, it is not clear how the majority of CYPs, UGTs, SULTs and transporters are influenced by NAFLD either in vivo or in vitro. The alterations associated with NAFLD could be a potential source of drug variability in patients and could have serious implications for the safety and efficacy of xenobiotics. In this review, we summarize the effects of NAFLD on the regulation, expression and activity of major DMEs and transporters. We also discuss the potential mechanisms underlying these alterations.

  7. An enhanced in vivo stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) model for quantification of drug metabolism enzymes.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, A Kenneth; Fallon, Padraic G; Sharp, Sheila; Henderson, Colin J; Wolf, C Roland; Huang, Jeffrey T-J

    2015-03-01

    Many of the enzymes involved in xenobiotic metabolism are maintained at a low basal level and are only synthesized in response to activation of upstream sensor/effector proteins. This induction can have implications in a variety of contexts, particularly during the study of the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and drug-drug interaction profile of a candidate therapeutic compound. Previously, we combined in vivo SILAC material with a targeted high resolution single ion monitoring (tHR/SIM) LC-MS/MS approach for quantification of 197 peptide pairs, representing 51 drug metabolism enzymes (DME), in mouse liver. However, as important enzymes (for example, cytochromes P450 (Cyp) of the 1a and 2b subfamilies) are maintained at low or undetectable levels in the liver of unstimulated metabolically labeled mice, quantification of these proteins was unreliable. In the present study, we induced DME expression in labeled mice through synchronous ligand-mediated activation of multiple upstream nuclear receptors, thereby enhancing signals for proteins including Cyps 1a, 2a, 2b, 2c, and 3a. With this enhancement, 115 unique, lysine-containing, Cyp-derived peptides were detected in the liver of a single animal, as opposed to 56 in a pooled sample from three uninduced animals. A total of 386 peptide pairs were quantified by tHR/SIM, representing 68 Phase I, 30 Phase II, and eight control proteins. This method was employed to quantify changes in DME expression in the hepatic cytochrome P450 reductase null (HRN) mouse. We observed compensatory induction of several enzymes, including Cyps 2b10, 2c29, 2c37, 2c54, 2c55, 2e1, 3a11, and 3a13, carboxylesterase (Ces) 2a, and glutathione S-transferases (Gst) m2 and m3, along with down-regulation of hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (Hsd) 11b1 and 17b6. Using DME-enhanced in vivo SILAC material with tHR/SIM, therefore, permits the robust analysis of multiple DME of importance to xenobiotic metabolism, with improved utility for the study of

  8. Utility of non-human primates in drug development: Comparison of non-human primate and human drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Uehara, Shotaro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis, an Old World Monkey) have been widely used as a non-human primate model in preclinical studies because of their genetic and physiological similarity to humans. This trend has been followed by common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus, a New World Monkey). However, drug-metabolism properties in these non-human primates have not been fully understood due to limited information on cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes, major drug-metabolizing enzymes in humans. Multiple forms of cynomolgus monkey P450 enzymes have been identified and characterized in comparison to those of humans, including a cynomolgus monkey specific form, P450 2C76. Similarly, marmoset P450 1A/B, 2A, 2C, 2D, and 4F enzymes were recently identified and characterized to understand drug metabolism properties. In this research update, updates for marmoset, cynomolgus monkey, and human P450 cDNAs are provided. Marmoset and cynomolgus monkey P450 enzymes showed high sequence homology to their human counterparts and generally had similar substrate recognition functionality to human P450 enzymes; however, they also possibly contribute to limited specific differences in drug oxidative metabolism partly due to small differences in amino acid residues. These findings provide a foundation for successful use of non-human primates as preclinical models and will help to further understand molecular mechanisms of human P450 function. In addition to the P450 enzymes, flavin-containing monooxygenases, another monooxygenase family, in these non-human primates have been found to be involved in the oxidation of a variety of compounds associated with pharmacological and/or toxicological effects in humans and are also described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Intestinal Flora on Protein Expression of Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters in the Liver and Kidney of Germ-Free and Antibiotics-Treated Mice.

    PubMed

    Kuno, Takuya; Hirayama-Kurogi, Mio; Ito, Shingo; Ohtsuki, Sumio

    2016-08-01

    Dysbiosis (alteration of intestinal flora) is associated with various host physiologies, including diseases. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of dysbiosis on protein expression levels in mouse liver and kidney by quantitative proteomic analysis, focusing in particular on drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in order to investigate the potential impact of dysbiosis on drug pharmacokinetics. Germ-free (GF) mice and antibiotics-treated mice were used as dysbiosis models. Expression levels of 825 and 357 proteins were significantly changed in the liver and kidney, respectively, of GF mice (vs specific-pathogen-free mice), while 306 and 178 proteins, respectively, were changed in antibiotics-treated mice (vs vehicle controls). Among them, 52 and 16 drug-metabolizing enzyme and transporter proteins were significantly changed in the liver and kidney, respectively, of GF mice, while 25 and 8, respectively were changed in antibiotics-treated mice. Expression of mitochondrial proteins was also changed in the liver and kidney of both model mice. In GF mice, Oatp1a1 was decreased in both the liver and kidney, while Sult1a1 and two Cyp enzymes were increased and Gstp1, four Cyp enzymes, three Ces enzymes, Bcrp1, and Oct1 were decreased in the liver. In antibiotics-treated mice, Cyp51a1 was increased and three Cyp enzymes, Bcrp1, and Bsep were decreased in the liver. Notably, the expression of Cyp2b10 and Cyp3a11 was greatly decreased in the liver of both models. Cyp2b activity in the liver microsomal fraction was also decreased. Our results indicate that dysbiosis changes the protein expression of multiple drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in the liver and kidney and may alter pharmacokinetics in the host.

  10. Hepatic cytochrome P450 3A drug metabolism is reduced in cancer patients who have an acute-phase response

    PubMed Central

    Rivory, L P; Slaviero, K A; Clarke, S J

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory disease states (infection, arthritis) are associated with reduced drug oxidation by the cytochrome P450 3A system. Many chemotherapy agents are metabolised through this pathway, and disease may therefore influence inter-individual differences in drug pharmacokinetics. The purpose of this study was to assess cytochrome P450 3A function in patients with advanced cancer, and its relation to the acute-phase response. We evaluated hepatic cytochrome P450 3A function in 40 patients with advanced cancer using the erythromycin breath test. Both the traditional C20min measure and the recently proposed 1/TMAX values were estimated. The marker of acute-phase response, C-reactive protein and the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β, TNFα and IL-8 were measured in serum or plasma at baseline. Cancer patients with an acute phase response (C-reactive protein >10 mg l−1, n=26) had reduced metabolism as measured with the erythromycin breath test 1/TMAX (Kruskal–Wallis Anova, P=0.0062) as compared to controls (C-reactive protein ⩽10 mg l−1, n=14). Indeed, metabolism was significantly associated with C-reactive protein over the whole concentration range of this acute-phase marker (r=−0.64, Spearman Rank Correlation, P<0.00001). C-reactive protein serum levels were significantly correlated with those of IL-6 (Spearman coefficient=0.58, P<0.0003). The reduction in cytochrome P450 3A function with acute-phase reaction was independent of the tumour type and C-reactive protein elevation was associated with poor performance status. This indicates that the sub-group of cancer patients with significant acute-phase response have compromised drug metabolism, which may have implications for the safety of chemotherapy in this population. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 277–280. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600448 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12177794

  11. Analysis of gene expression changes of drug metabolizing enzymes in the livers of F344 rats following oral treatment with kava extract.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Li, Quanzhen; Xia, Qingsu; Dial, Stacey; Chan, Po-Chuen; Fu, Peter

    2009-02-01

    The association of kava product use with liver-related risks has prompted regulatory action in many countries. We studied the changes in gene expression of drug metabolizing enzymes in the livers of Fischer 344 male rats administered kava extract by gavage for 14 weeks. Analysis of 22,226 genes revealed that there were 14, 41, 110, 386, and 916 genes significantly changed in the 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g/kg treatment groups, respectively. There were 16 drug metabolizing genes altered in all three high-dose treatment groups, among which seven genes belong to cytochrome P450 isozymes. While gene expression of Cyp1a1, 1a2, 2c6, 3a1, and 3a3 increased; Cyp 2c23 and 2c40 decreased, all in a dose-dependent manner. Real-time PCR analyses of several genes verified these results. Our results indicate that kava extract can significantly modulate drug metabolizing enzymes, particularly the CYP isozymes, which could cause herb-drug interactions and may potentially lead to hepatotoxicity.

  12. Schisandra chinensis regulates drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters via activation of Nrf2-mediated signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    He, Jin-Lian; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yin, Juan-Juan; He, Chang-Qiang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Yu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and drug transporters are regulated via epigenetic, transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and translational and posttranslational modifications. Phase I and II DMEs and drug transporters play an important role in the disposition and detoxification of a large number of endogenous and exogenous compounds. The nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a critical regulator of a variety of important cytoprotective genes that are involved in disposition and detoxification of xenobiotics. Schisandra chinensis (SC) is a commonly used traditional Chinese herbal medicine that has been primarily used to protect the liver because of its potent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. SC can modulate some DMEs and drug transporters, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore the role of Nrf2 in the regulatory effect of SC extract (SCE) on selected DMEs and drug transporters in human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cells. The results showed that SCE, schisandrin A, and schisandrin B significantly increased the expression of NAD(P)H: Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate-oxidase or:quinone oxidoreductase 1, heme oxygenase-1, glutamate–cysteine ligase, and glutathione S-transferase A4 at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Incubation of HepG2 cells with SCE resulted in a significant increase in the intracellular level of glutathione and total glutathione S-transferase content. SCE significantly elevated the messenger ribonucleic acid and protein levels of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 and 4, whereas the expression of organic anion transporting peptide 1A2 and 1B1 was significantly downregulated by SCE. Knockdown of Nrf2 by small interfering ribonucleic acid attenuated the regulatory effect of SCE on these DMEs and drug transporters. SCE significantly upregulated Nrf2 and promoted the translocation of Nrf2 from cytoplasm to

  13. Stereoselectivity in drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong

    2007-04-01

    Many chiral drugs are used as their racemic mixtures in clinical practice. Two enantiomers of a chiral drug generally differ in pharmacodynamic and/or pharmacokinetic properties as a consequence of the stereoselective interaction with optically active biological macromolecules. Thus, a stereospecific assay to discriminate between enantiomers is required in order to relate plasma concentrations to pharmacological effect of a chiral drug. Stereoselective metabolism of drugs is most commonly the major contributing factor to stereoselectivity in pharmacokinetics. Metabolizing enzymes often display a preference for one enantiomer of a chiral drug over the other, resulting in enantioselectivity. The structural characteristics of enzymes dictate the enantiomeric discrimination associated with the metabolism of chiral drugs. The stereoselectivity can, therefore, be viewed as the physical property characteristic that phenotypes the enzyme. This review provides a comprehensive appraisal of stereochemical aspects of drug metabolism (i.e., enantioselective metabolism and first-pass effect, enzyme-selective inhibition or induction and drug interaction, species differences and polymorphic metabolism).

  14. Functional proteomic analysis of corticosteroid pharmacodynamics in rat liver: Relationship to hepatic stress, signaling, energy regulation, and drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ayyar, Vivaswath S; Almon, Richard R; DuBois, Debra C; Sukumaran, Siddharth; Qu, Jun; Jusko, William J

    2017-03-14

    Corticosteroids (CS) are anti-inflammatory agents that cause extensive pharmacogenomic and proteomic changes in multiple tissues. An understanding of the proteome-wide effects of CS in liver and its relationships to altered hepatic and systemic physiology remains incomplete. Here, we report the application of a functional pharmacoproteomic approach to gain integrated insight into the complex nature of CS responses in liver in vivo. An in-depth functional analysis was performed using rich pharmacodynamic (temporal-based) proteomic data measured over 66h in rat liver following a single dose of methylprednisolone (MPL). Data mining identified 451 differentially regulated proteins. These proteins were analyzed on the basis of temporal regulation, cellular localization, and literature-mined functional information. Of the 451 proteins, 378 were clustered into six functional groups based on major clinically-relevant effects of CS in liver. MPL-responsive proteins were highly localized in the mitochondria (20%) and cytosol (24%). Interestingly, several proteins were related to hepatic stress and signaling processes, which appear to be involved in secondary signaling cascades and in protecting the liver from CS-induced oxidative damage. Consistent with known adverse metabolic effects of CS, several rate-controlling enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism, gluconeogenesis, and fatty-acid metabolism were altered by MPL. In addition, proteins involved in the metabolism of endogenous compounds, xenobiotics, and therapeutic drugs including cytochrome P450 and Phase-II enzymes were differentially regulated. Proteins related to the inflammatory acute-phase response were up-regulated in response to MPL. Functionally-similar proteins showed large diversity in their temporal profiles, indicating complex mechanisms of regulation by CS.

  15. Effect of naturally occurring plant phenolics on the induction of drug metabolizing enzymes by o-toluidine.

    PubMed

    Szaefer, Hanna; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga; Cichocki, Michał; Matuszewska, Arleta; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2003-04-15

    Plant phenolics modify the metabolic activation of several carcinogens, including aromatic amines. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of three structurally diversified plant phenolics, protocatechuic acid (PCA), tannic acid (TA) and ellagic acid (EA) on cytochrome p450-dependent enzymes and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities after oral administration alone or in combination with o-toluidine in rat liver and kidney. Protocatechuic and ellagic acids significantly decreased the activities of ethoxy- (EROD), methoxy- (MROD) and penthoxyresorufin (PROD) dealkylases in liver. In kidney, all phenolics inhibited only the activity of PROD. Enzyme modulation in liver correlated with CA metabolism measured in plasma. Treatment of rats with ellagic acid 1 h before o-toluidine administration diminished the activities of all hepatic alkoxyresorufine dealkylases induced by o-toluidine but increased renal EROD. In contrast to EA, protocatechuic and tannic acids increased the activities of p450-dependent enzymes in liver. All phenolics administered in combination with o-toluidine increased the activity of GST, which was reduced after the treatment with o-toluidine alone. In addition, CA metabolism in plasma resulting from oral treatment with CA was measured. The formation of CA metabolites was reduced by PCA and EA, and the metabolism of CA induced by o-toluidine was depressed by administration of all three phenolics. Our results indicate that plant phenolics, especially EA, may modulate the genotoxic effects of o-toluidine by modifying pathways leading to the formation of its reactive metabolite. Moreover, as the result of CYP1A modification these compounds may affect the metabolism of CA.

  16. Overview of Extracellular Microvesicles in Drug Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Vancells, Javier; Gonzalez, Esperanza; Lu, Shelly C.; Mato, Jose M.; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Liver is the major body reservoir for enzymes involved in the metabolism of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds. Recently, it has been shown that hepatocytes release exosome-like vesicles to the extracellular medium, and the proteomic characterization of these hepatocyte-secreted exosomes has revealed the presence of several of these enzymes on them. Areas covered in this review A systematic bibliographic search focus on two related aspects: 1) xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes that have been detected in microvesicles, and 2) microvesicles which are in the blood stream or secreted by cell-types with clear interactions with this fluid. What the reader will gain A discussion of these hepatocyte-secreted vesicles along with others microvesicles as enzymatic carriers in the context of extrahepatic drug-metabolizing systems. Take home message The contribution of many tissues including the liver to the microvesicles plasma population is supported by several reports. On the other hand, many enzymes involved in the metabolism of drugs have been detected in microvesicles. Together, these observations argue positively through a role of hepatic-microvesicles in spreading the liver metabolizing activities through the body contributing in this manner to extrahepatic drug metabolism systems what could be relevant for body homeostasis and pharmaceutical interests. PMID:20192903

  17. Impact of quercetin-induced changes in drug-metabolizing enzyme and transporter expression on the pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yani; Luo, Xiaomei; Yang, Chunxiao; Yang, Tingyu; Zhou, Jiali; Shi, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether quercetin (Que) modulates the mRNA and protein expression levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and drug transporters (DTs) in the small intestine and liver, and thus modifies the pharmacokinetic profile of cyclosporine (CsA) in rats. This two-part study evaluated the pharmacokinetic profiles of CsA in the presence or absence of Que (experiment I) and the involvement of DMEs and DTs (experiment II). In experiment I, 24 rats received single-dose CsA (10 mg/kg) on day 1, single-dose Que (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg/day; eight rats in each group) on days 3–8, and concomitant CsA/Que on day 9. In experiment II, the mRNA and protein expression levels of cytochrome P (CYP)3A1, CYP3A2, UDP glucuronosyltransferase family 1 member A complex locus, organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP)2B1, OATP1B2, P-glycoprotein, breast cancer resistance protein, and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 in the small intestine and liver of rats were analyzed following oral administration of Que at 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg in the presence or absence of CsA (10 mg/kg) for seven consecutive days. Co-administration of Que (25,50 and 100 mg/kg) decreased the maximum serum concentration of CsA by 46, 50 and 47% in a dose-independent manner. In addition, the area under the curve to the last measurable concentration and area under the curve to infinite time were decreased, by 21 and 16%, 30 and 33%, and 33 and 34% (P<0.01), respectively. However, the mRNA and protein expression levels of the above-mentioned DMEs and DTs were inhibited by Que in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.01) to a similar extent in the small intestine and liver. It was demonstrated that Que was able to reduce the bioavailability of CsA following multiple concomitant doses in rats. Overlapping modulation of intestinal and hepatic DMEs and DTs, as well as the DME-DT interplay are potential explanations for these observations. PMID:27510982

  18. A microscale in vitro physiological model of the liver: predictive screens for drug metabolism and enzyme induction.

    PubMed

    Sivaraman, A; Leach, J K; Townsend, S; Iida, T; Hogan, B J; Stolz, D B; Fry, R; Samson, L D; Tannenbaum, S R; Griffith, L G

    2005-12-01

    In vitro models of the liver using isolated primary hepatocytes have been used as screens for measuring the metabolism, toxicity and efficacy of xenobiotics, for studying hepatocyte proliferation, and as bioartificial liver support systems. Yet, primary isolated hepatocytes rapidly lose liver specific functions when maintained under standard in vitro cell culture conditions. Many modifications to conventional culture methods have been developed to foster retention of hepatocyte function. Still, not all of the important functions -- especially the biotransformation functions of the liver -- can as yet be replicated at desired levels, prompting continued development of new culture systems. In the first part of this article, we review primary hepatocyte in vitro systems used in metabolism and enzyme induction studies. We then describe a scalable microreactor system that fosters development of 3D-perfused micro-tissue units and show that primary rat cells cultured in this system are substantially closer to native liver compared to cells cultured by other in vitro methods, as assessed by a broad spectrum of gene expression, protein expression and biochemical activity metrics. These results provide a foundation for extension of this culture model to other applications in drug discovery -- as a model to study drug-drug interactions, as a model for the assessment of acute and chronic liver toxicity arising from exposure to drugs or environmental agents; and as a disease model for the study of viral hepatitis infection and cancer metastasis.

  19. The effects of estrus cycle on drug metabolism in the rat.

    PubMed

    Brandstetter, Y; Kaplanski, J; Leibson, V; Ben-Zvi, Z

    1986-01-01

    The effect of the female rat estral cycle on microsomal drug metabolism in-vivo and in-vitro has been studied. Two microsomal enzymes, aminopyrine-N-demethylase and aniline hydroxylase showed a greater specific activity (p less than 0.01) in the diestrus phase of the estral cycle while the oxidative enzyme aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase and the conjugative enzyme, glucuronyl transferase, were not affected. In vivo studies which included theophylline and antipyrine metabolism, and hexobarbital sleeping times showed no difference between the different phases of the estral cycle. Conflicting evidence about the effect of steroid sex hormones on hepatic drug metabolism is discussed.

  20. Drug metabolism alterations in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Merrell, Matthew D.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes play a vital role in the elimination of the majority of therapeutic drugs. The major organ involved in drug metabolism is the liver. Chronic liver diseases have been identified as a potential source of significant interindividual variation in metabolism. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the United States, affecting between 60 and 90 million Americans, yet the vast majority of NAFLD patients are undiagnosed. NAFLD encompasses a spectrum of pathologies, ranging from steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and fibrosis. Numerous animal studies have investigated the effects of NAFLD on hepatic gene expression, observing significant alterations in mRNA, protein, and activity levels. Information on the effects of NAFLD in human patients is limited, though several significant investigations have recently been published. Significant alterations in the activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes may affect the clearance of therapeutic drugs, with the potential to result in adverse drug reactions. With the enormous prevalence of NAFLD, it is conceivable that every drug currently on the market is being given to patients with NAFLD. The current review is intended to present the results from both animal models and human patients, summarizing the observed alterations in the expression and activity of the phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes. PMID:21612324

  1. Garlic attenuates chrysotile-mediated pulmonary toxicity in rats by altering the phase I and phase II drug metabolizing enzyme system.

    PubMed

    Ameen, Mohamed; Musthapa, M Syed; Abidi, Parveen; Ahmad, Iqbal; Rahman, Qamar

    2003-01-01

    Asbestos and its carcinogenic properties have been extensively documented. Asbestos exposure induces diverse cellular events associated with lung injury. Previously, we have shown that treatment with chrysotile shows significant alteration in phase I and phase II drug metabolizing enzyme system. In this study we have examined some potential mechanisms by which garlic treatment attenuates chrysotile-mediated pulmonary toxicity in rat. Female Wistar rats received an intratracheal instillation of 5 mg chrysotile (0.5 mL saline) as well as intragastric garlic treatment (1% body weight (v/w); 6 days per week). Effect of garlic treatment was evaluated after 1, 15, 30, 90, and 180 days by assaying aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH), glutathione (GSH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in rat lung microsome. The results showed that AHH and TBARS formation were significantly reduced at day 90 and day 180 in chrysotile treated garlic cofed rats; GSH recovered 15 days later to the near normal level and GST elevated significantly after treatment of garlic as compared to chrysotile alone treated rat lung microsome. The data obtained shows that inhibition of AHH activity and induction of GST activity could be contributing factor in chrysotile-mediated pulmonary toxicity in garlic cofed rats. However, recovery of GSH and inhibition of TBARS formation by garlic and its constituent(s) showed that garlic may give protection by altering the drug metabolizing enzyme system.

  2. Differences in the drug-metabolizing enzyme activities among fish and bivalves living in waters near industrial and non-industrial areas

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Hidaka, C.; Izu, S.; Imada, N. )

    1994-07-01

    Fish and shellfishes, living in coastal areas receiving agricultural, industrial and domestic wastewaters, have been exposed to various chemicals. Identifing the various harmful chemicals in the environments and accumulated in aquatic organisms is difficult. Even if concentrations of pollutants are low so that no mortality of fish and shellfishes occurs, the pollutants may affect the biochemistry and physiology of aquatic organisms. Activities of some drug-metabolizing enzymes, especially the cytochrome P-450 dependent monooxygenase (MO) in fish livers, increase when fish are exposed to environmental pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, halogenated organic chemicals. However, most studies have been done on the field evaluation only by MO induction in fish as a monitor for marine pollution with crude-oil and halogenated organic compounds, without regard for other chemicals. In a previous paper, the activity of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase (AHH) was induced by 22 times at 2-wk, although the cytochrome P-450 content increased only twice. Activity of phenol-sulfate transferase in the mid-gut gland of short-necked clam was induced by exposure to some phenolic compounds, especially pentachlorophenol (PCP), resulting in the increase of the enzyme activity by approximately 7 times the control after 5 wk exposure. Induced activity was maintained at least for 3 wk, even after the clam had been transferred to running clean sea water, although PCP accumulated in its body is rapidly excreted. Although the activity of this enzyme in the clam is easily induced by exposure to phenols, the induction of this enzyme activity in fish is very low as compared with that of clam. This paper examines the activities of drug-metabolizing enzymes of fish and bivalves living in waters near industrial and non-industrial areas to elucidate the applicability of the sulfate transferase activity in bivalves as a monitor for marine pollution, as well as the MO activity in fish.

  3. High-quality genotyping data from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue on the drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters plus array.

    PubMed

    Vos, Hanneke I; van der Straaten, Tahar; Coenen, Marieke J H; Flucke, Uta; te Loo, D Maroeska W M; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    The Affymetrix Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters (DMET) Plus array covers 1936 markers in 231 genes involved in drug metabolism and transport. Blood- and saliva-derived DNA works well on the DMET array, but the utility of DNA from FFPE tissue has not been reported for this array. As the ability to use DNA from FFPE tissue on the array could open the potential for large retrospective sample collections, we examined the performance and reliability of FFPE-derived DNA on the DMET Plus array. Germline DNA isolated from archived normal FFPE tissue blocks stored for 3 to 19 years and matched blood or saliva from 16 patients with osteosarcoma were genotyped on the DMET Plus array. Concordance was assessed by calculating agreement and the κ-statistic. We observed high call rates for both the blood- or saliva-derived DNA samples (99.4%) and the FFPE-derived DNA samples (98.9%). Moreover, the concordance among the 16 blood- or saliva-derived DNA and FFPE DNA pairs was high (97.4%, κ = 0.915). This is the first study showing that DNA from normal FFPE tissue provides accurate and reliable genotypes on the DMET Plus array compared with blood- or saliva-derived DNA. This finding provides an opportunity for pharmacogenetic studies in diseases with high mortality rates and prevents a bias in studies where otherwise only alive patients can be included.

  4. The Effect of Yokukansan, a Traditional Herbal Preparation Used for the Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia, on the Drug-Metabolizing Enzyme Activities in Healthy Male Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Soraoka, Hiromi; Oniki, Kentaro; Matsuda, Kazuki; Ono, Tatsumasa; Taharazako, Kosuke; Uchiyashiki, Yoshihiro; Kamihashi, Ryoko; Kita, Ayana; Takashima, Ayaka; Nakagawa, Kazuko; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Kadowaki, Daisuke; Miyata, Keishi; Saruwatari, Junji

    2016-01-01

    The concomitant use of herb and prescription medications is increasing globally. Herb-drug interactions are therefore a clinically important problem. Yokukansan (YKS), a Japanese traditional herbal medicine, is one of the most frequently used herbal medicines. It is effective for treating the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. We investigated the potential effects of YKS on drug-metabolizing enzyme activities in humans. An open-label repeat-dose study was conducted in 26 healthy Japanese male volunteers (age: 22.7±2.3 years) with no history of smoking. An 8-h urine sample was collected after a 150-mg dose of caffeine and a 30-mg dose of dextromethorphan before and after the administration of YKS (2.5 g, twice a day for 1 week). The activities of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, CYP2D6, CYP3A, xanthine oxidase (XO) and N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) were assessed based on the urinary metabolic indices of caffeine and dextromethorphan, and the urinary excretion ratio of 6β-hydroxycortisol to cortisol. There were no statistically significant differences in the activities of the examined enzymes before or after the 7-d administration of YKS. Although further studies assessing the influence of YKS on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the substrates of the drug-metabolizing enzymes are needed to verify the present results, YKS is unlikely that a pharmacokinetic interaction will occur with concomitantly administered medications that are predominantly metabolized by the CYP1A2, CYP2D6, CYP3A, XO and NAT2.

  5. Bioinformatics research on inter-racial difference in drug metabolism II. Analysis on relationship between enzyme activities of CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 and their relevant genotypes.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takako; Ochiai, Hirohide; Asell, Fredrik; Yokono, Yoshiya; Kikuchi, Yoshiharu; Nitta, Masashi; Hama, Yoshimasa; Yamaguchi, Shizuyo; Hashimoto, Munehiro; Taki, Katsuhiko; Nakata, Kotoko; Aida, Yoshitaka; Ohashi, Akira; Ozawa, Naoki

    2003-01-01

    The enzyme activities of CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 show a genetic polymorphism, and the frequency of poor metabolizers (PMs) on these enzymes depends on races. We have analyzed frequencies of mutant alleles and PMs based on the published data in previous study (Shimizu, T. et al.: Bioinformatics research on inter-racial difference in drug metabolism, I. Analysis on frequencies of mutant alleles and poor metabolizers on CYP2D6 and CYP2C19.). The study shows that there were racial differences in the frequencies of each mutant allele and PMs. In the present study, the correlation between genotypes and drug-metabolizing enzyme activities was investigated. The result showed that enzyme activities varied according to the genotypes of subjects even in the same race. On the other hand, if subjects had the same genotypes, almost no racial differences were observed in drug-metabolizing enzyme activities. From these results, it was supposed that the racial differences in activities of these enzymes could be explained by the differences in distribution of genotypes. It would be possible to explain the racial differences in drug-metabolizing enzyme activities based on the differences on individual pharmacogenetic background information, not merely by comparison of frameworks such as races and nations.

  6. Drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy subjects: biological variations and importance of pre-analytical steps.

    PubMed

    Siest, Gérard; Jeannesson, Elise; Marteau, Jean-Brice; Samara, Anastasia; Pfister, Michèle; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie

    2009-05-01

    Quantification in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of mRNA of drug metabolizing enzymes or drug targets could give interesting, new information in the field of pharmacogenomics and molecular mechanisms. However, for the interpretation of these data, it is necessary to know mRNA biological variations. In this review, we propose a strategy based on the production and interpretation of clinical chemistry reference values. We discuss the concept of reference values; the necessity to master pre-analytical variations of CYP and ABC transporters; the choice of the analytical methods and of the reference genes; and finally the biological variations themselves. In particular, we focus on the importance of considering homogeneity for age, sex, degree of adiposity, tobacco and alcohol intake, food habits, and drug consumption, including their inductive effects, at the phase of subject recruitment. All this information is useful to define the partition and exclusion factors to obtain mRNA reference limits.

  7. In vitro metabolic stability and intestinal transport of P57AS3 (P57) from Hoodia gordonii and its interaction with drug metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Madgula, Vamsi L M; Avula, Bharathi; Pawar, Rahul S; Shukla, Yatin J; Khan, Ikhlas A; Walker, Larry A; Khan, Shabana I

    2008-08-01

    Hoodia gordonii, a succulent cactus-like plant growing in South Africa, has been used in traditional medicine for its appetite suppressant properties. Its use as a dietary supplement to promote weight loss has recently gained popularity. An oxypregnane steroidal glycoside P57AS3 (P57) is reported to be the active constituent of the sap extract responsible for anorexigenic activity. No information is available about its metabolic stability, intestinal transport and interaction with drug metabolizing enzymes. In the present investigation, the metabolic stability of P57 in human liver microsomes and its interaction with drug metabolizing enzymes (CYP1A2, 2C9, 3A4 and 2D6) were determined. Intestinal transport of P57 was studied in the Caco-2 cell model of intestinal transport and absorption. P57 was metabolically stable in the presence of human liver microsomes. The compound inhibited CYP3A4 activity with an IC50 value of 45 microM, whereas the activity of CYP 1A2, 2C9 and 2D6 was not inhibited. In the Caco-2 model, P57 exhibited a higher transport in the secretory direction than in the absorptive direction with efflux ratios of 3.1 and 3.8 at 100 and 200 microM, respectively. The efflux was inhibited by selective inhibitors of multidrug resistance associated proteins MRP1/MRP2 (MK-571) and P-gp (verapamil). In conclusion, intestinal transport of P57 was mediated by P-gp and MRP transporters. The compound was metabolically stable and showed weak inhibition of CYP 3A4.

  8. Pharmacogenetics of P450 oxidoreductase: implications in drug metabolism and therapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lei; Zhuo, Wei; He, Yi-Jing; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Fan, Lan

    2012-11-01

    The redox reaction of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP) is an important physiological and biochemical reaction in the human body, as it is involved in the oxidative metabolism of both endogenous and exogenous substrates. Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the only obligate electron donor for all of the hepatic microsomal CYP enzymes. It plays a crucial role in drug metabolism and treatment by not only acting as an electron donor involved in drug metabolism mediated by CYP enzymes but also by directly inducing the transformation of some antitumor precursors. Studies have found that the gene encoding human POR is highly polymorphic, which is of considerable clinical significance as it affects the metabolism and curative effects of clinically used drugs. This review aims to discuss the effect of POR and its genetic polymorphisms on drug metabolism and therapy, as well as the potential mechanisms of POR pharmacogenetics.

  9. Summary of Information on the Effects of Ionizing and Non-ionizing Radiation on Cytochrome P450 and Other Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Rendic, Slobodan; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2014-01-01

    The present paper is an update of data on the effects of ionizing radiation (γ-rays, X-rays, high energy UV, fast neutron) caused by environmental pollution or clinical treatments and the effects of non-ionizing radiation (low energy UV) on the expression and/or activity of drug metabolism (e.g., cytochrome P450,, glutathione transferase), enzymes involved in oxidative stress (e.g., peroxidases, catalase,, aconitase, superoxide dismutase), and transporters. The data are presented in tabular form (Tables 1–3) and are a continuation of previously published summaries on the effects of drugs and other chemicals on cytochrome P450 enzymes (Rendic, S.; Di Carlo, F. Drug Metab. Rev., 1997, 29 (1–2), 413–580, Rendic, S. Drug Metab. Rev., 2002, 34 (1–2), 83–448) and of the data on the effects of diseases and environmental factors on the expression and/or activity of human cytochrome P450 enzymes and transporters (Guengerich, F.P.; Rendic, S. Curr. Drug Metab., 2010, 11(1), 1–3, Rendic, S.; Guengerich, F.P. Curr. Drug Metab., 2010, 11 (1), 4–84). The collective information is as presented by the cited author(s) in cases where several references are cited the latest published information is included. Remarks and conclusions suggesting clinically important impacts are highlighted, followed by discussion of the major findings. The searchable database is available as an Excel file (for information about file availability contact the corresponding author). PMID:22571481

  10. Carboxymefloquine, the major metabolite of the antimalarial drug mefloquine, induces drug-metabolizing enzyme and transporter expression by activation of pregnane X receptor.

    PubMed

    Piedade, Rita; Traub, Stefanie; Bitter, Andreas; Nüssler, Andreas K; Gil, José P; Schwab, Matthias; Burk, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Malaria patients are frequently coinfected with HIV and mycobacteria causing tuberculosis, which increases the use of coadministered drugs and thereby enhances the risk of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. Activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) by xenobiotics, which include many drugs, induces drug metabolism and transport, thereby resulting in possible attenuation or loss of the therapeutic responses to the drugs being coadministered. While several artemisinin-type antimalarial drugs have been shown to activate PXR, data on nonartemisinin-type antimalarials are still missing. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate the potential of nonartemisinin antimalarial drugs and drug metabolites to activate PXR. We screened 16 clinically used antimalarial drugs and six major drug metabolites for binding to PXR using the two-hybrid PXR ligand binding domain assembly assay; this identified carboxymefloquine, the major and pharmacologically inactive metabolite of the antimalarial drug mefloquine, as a potential PXR ligand. Two-hybrid PXR-coactivator and -corepressor interaction assays and PXR-dependent promoter reporter gene assays confirmed carboxymefloquine to be a novel PXR agonist which specifically activated the human receptor. In the PXR-expressing intestinal LS174T cells and in primary human hepatocytes, carboxymefloquine induced the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters on the mRNA and protein levels. The crucial role of PXR for the carboxymefloquine-dependent induction of gene expression was confirmed by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of the receptor. Thus, the clinical use of mefloquine may result in pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions by means of its metabolite carboxymefloquine. Whether these in vitro findings are of in vivo relevance has to be addressed in future clinical drug-drug interaction studies.

  11. Correlation of intrinsic in vitro and in vivo clearance for drugs metabolized by hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferases in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamori, Fumihiro; Naritomi, Yoichi; Furutani, Masako; Takamura, Fujiko; Miura, Hiroya; Murai, Hidetsugu; Terashita, Shigeyuki; Teramura, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    A method for quantitatively predicting the hepatic clearance of drugs by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) from in vitro data has not yet been established. We examined the relationship between in vitro and in vivo intrinsic clearance by rat hepatic UGTs using 10 drugs. For these 10 drugs, the in vitro intrinsic clearance by UGTs (CL(int, in vitro)) measured using alamethicin-activated rat liver microsomes was in the range 0.10-4500 ml/min/kg. Microsomal binding (f(u, mic)) was determined to be in the range 0.29-0.95 and the unbound intrinsic clearance (CL(uint, in vitro)) to be in the range 0.11-9600 ml/min/kg. The contribution of rat hepatic glucuronidation to drug elimination was 12.0%-76.6% and in vivo intrinsic clearance by UGTs was 5.7-9000 ml/min/kg. To evaluate the discrepancy between the in vitro and in vivo values, a scaling factor was calculated (CL(int, in vivo)/CL(int, in vitro)); the values were found to be in the range 0.89-110. The average fold error of the scaling factor values incorporating f(u, mic) was closer to unity than that without f(u, mic). The scaling factor values incorporating f(u, mic) were <10 in 8/10 drugs and <2 in 6/10 drugs, indicating a small discrepancy between in vitro and in vivo values. Thus, using alamethicin-activated liver microsomes, incorporating f(u, mic) into CL(int, in vitro), and considering the contribution of glucuronidation may enable us to quantitatively predict in vivo hepatic glucuronidation from in vitro data.

  12. Choice of LC-MS methods for the absolute quantification of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in human tissue: a comparative cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Al Feteisi, Hajar; Achour, Brahim; Barber, Jill; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2015-03-01

    The quantification of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters is important for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) of xenobiotic clearance, which has become an integral part of drug development. There are different mass spectrometry-based techniques used for quantitative proteomics, and as more laboratories are opting for the use of these methods, selecting the most appropriate tool is becoming a concern. For the first time, we attempt to determine the significance of cost of different LC-MS methods of quantitative analysis of these proteins and to present a framework to objectively assess the choice of the techniques. Based on our analysis, quantification using labeled internal standards is more expensive per sample but provides higher quality data than label-free quantification. Quantification using absolute quantification synthetic peptides is the approach of choice for analyzing less than nine proteins, whereas when quantifying a defined set of proteins (10-50), such as enzymes, in a reasonably large number of samples (20-100), the quantification concatemer technique is more economical, followed by label-free quantification. When analyzing proteomes or sub-proteomes (≥500 proteins), label-free quantification is more cost-effective than the use of labeled internal standards. A cost-benefit approach is described to assess the choice of the most appropriate mass spectrometry-based approach for the quantification of proteins relevant to IVIVE.

  13. Effect of penicillin-based antibiotics, amoxicillin, ampicillin, and piperacillin, on drug-metabolizing activities of human hepatic cytochromes P450.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Toshiro; Morimoto, Mari; Hirai, Takako; Hata, Tomomi; Hayashi, Misato; Imagawa, Yurie

    2016-02-01

    The effects of three kinds of penicillin-based antibiotics, amoxicillin, ampicillin, and piperacillin, on drug-metabolizing activity of human hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) were investigated. Metabolic activities of P450s expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli at substrate concentrations around the Michaelis constant were compared in the presence or absence of the antibiotics. Amoxicillin, ampicillin, and piperacillin at 0.5 or 1 mM concentrations neither inhibited nor stimulated CYP2C9-mediated tolbutamide methylhydroxylation, CYP2D6-mediated dopamine formation from p-tyramine, or CYP3A4- or CYP3A5-mediated testosterone 6β-hydroxylation. However, amoxicillin and piperacillin inhibited CYP2C8-mediated aminopyrine N-demethylation at 50% inhibitory concentration of 0.83 and 1.14 mM, respectively. These results suggest that piperacillin might inhibit CYP2C8 clinically, although the interactions between these three penicillin-based antibiotics and other drugs that are metabolized by P450s investigated would not be clinically significant.

  14. Emerging roles for brain drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes in neuropsychiatric conditions and responses to drugs.

    PubMed

    Toselli, Francesca; Dodd, Peter R; Gillam, Elizabeth M J

    2016-08-01

    P450s in the human brain were originally considered unlikely to contribute significantly to the clearance of drugs and other xenobiotic chemicals, since their overall expression was a small fraction of that found in the liver. However, it is now recognized that P450s play substantial roles in the metabolism of both exogenous and endogenous chemicals in the brain, but in a highly cell type- and region-specific manner, in line with the greater functional heterogeneity of the brain compared to the liver. Studies of brain P450 expression and the characterization of the catalytic activity of specific forms expressed as recombinant enzymes have suggested possible roles for xenobiotic-metabolizing P450s in the brain. It is now possible to confirm these roles through the use of intracerebroventricular administration of selective P450 inhibitors in animal models, coupled with brain sampling techniques to measure drug concentrations in vivo, and modern neuroimaging techniques. The purpose of this review is to discuss the evidence behind the functional importance of P450s from the "xenobiotic-metabolizing" families, CYP1, CYP2 and CYP3 in the brain. Approaches used to define the quantitative and qualitative significance of these P450s in determining tissue-specific levels of xenobiotics in brain will be considered. Finally, the possible roles of these enzymes in brain biochemistry will be examined in light of the demonstrated activity of these enzymes in vitro and the association of particular P450 forms with disease states.

  15. Highly miniaturized formats for in vitro drug metabolism assays using vivid fluorescent substrates and recombinant human cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, Olga V; Gibson, Jasmin R; Marks, Bryan D

    2005-02-01

    Highly miniaturized P450 screening assays designed to enable facile analysis of P450 drug interactions in a 1536-well plate format with the principal human cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP3A4, 2D6, 2C9, 2C19, and 1A2) and Vivid fluorogenic substrates were developed. The detailed characterization of the assays included stability, homogeneity, and reproducibility of the recombinant P450 enzymes and the kinetic parameters of their reactions with Vivid fluorogenic substrates, with a focus on the specific characteristics of each component that enable screening in a low-volume 1536-well plate assay format. The screening assays were applied for the assessment of individual cytochrome P450 inhibition profiles with a panel of selected assay modifiers, including isozyme-specific substrates and inhibitors. IC(50) values obtained for the modifiers in 96- and 1536-well plate formats were similar and comparable with values obtained in assays with conventional substrates. An overall examination of the 1536-well assay statistics, such as signal-to-background ratio and Z' factor, demonstrated that these assays are a robust, successful, and reliable tool to screen for cytochrome P450 metabolism and inhibition in an ultra-high-throughput screening format.

  16. Pharmacokinetic changes in drugs during protein-calorie malnutrition: correlation between drug metabolism and hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 isozymes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Hyun; Suh, Ok Kyung; Lee, Myung Gull

    2004-07-01

    The rats with protein-calorie malnutrition (PCM, 5% casein diet for a period of 4-week) were reported to exhibit 60 and 80% suppression in the hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2 and CYP2C11 levels, respectively, and 40-50% decreases in CYP2E1 and CYP3A1/2 levels compared to control (23% casein diet for a period of 4-week) based on Western blot analysis. In addition, Northern blot analysis showed that CYP1A2, CYP2E1, CYP2C11, and CYP3A1/2 mRNAs decreased in the state of PCM as well. Hence, pharmacokinetic changes of the drugs in rats with PCM [especially the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to time infinity (AUC) changes of metabolite(s)] reported from literatures were tried to explain in terms of CYP isozyme changes in the rats. Otherwise, the time-averaged nonrenal clearance (CL NR) of parent drug was compared. Pharmacokinetic changes of the drugs in other types of malnutritional state, such as kwashiorkor and marasmus, in both human and animal models were also compared. The drugs reviewed are as follows: diuretics, antibiotics, anticancer agents, antiepileptics, antiarrythmics, analgesics, xanthines, antimalarials, and miscellaneous.

  17. Evolution of a Major Drug Metabolizing Enzyme Defect in the Domestic Cat and Other Felidae: Phylogenetic Timing and the Role of Hypercarnivory

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Binu; Reed, J. Michael; Starks, Philip T.; Kaufman, Gretchen E.; Goldstone, Jared V.; Roelke, Melody E.; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Frank, Laurence G.; Court, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    The domestic cat (Felis catus) shows remarkable sensitivity to the adverse effects of phenolic drugs, including acetaminophen and aspirin, as well as structurally-related toxicants found in the diet and environment. This idiosyncrasy results from pseudogenization of the gene encoding UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A6, the major species-conserved phenol detoxification enzyme. Here, we established the phylogenetic timing of disruptive UGT1A6 mutations and explored the hypothesis that gene inactivation in cats was enabled by minimal exposure to plant-derived toxicants. Fixation of the UGT1A6 pseudogene was estimated to have occurred between 35 and 11 million years ago with all extant Felidae having dysfunctional UGT1A6. Out of 22 additional taxa sampled, representative of most Carnivora families, only brown hyena (Parahyaena brunnea) and northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) showed inactivating UGT1A6 mutations. A comprehensive literature review of the natural diet of the sampled taxa indicated that all species with defective UGT1A6 were hypercarnivores (>70% dietary animal matter). Furthermore those species with UGT1A6 defects showed evidence for reduced amino acid constraint (increased dN/dS ratios approaching the neutral selection value of 1.0) as compared with species with intact UGT1A6. In contrast, there was no evidence for reduced amino acid constraint for these same species within UGT1A1, the gene encoding the enzyme responsible for detoxification of endogenously generated bilirubin. Our results provide the first evidence suggesting that diet may have played a permissive role in the devolution of a mammalian drug metabolizing enzyme. Further work is needed to establish whether these preliminary findings can be generalized to all Carnivora. PMID:21464924

  18. Evolution of a major drug metabolizing enzyme defect in the domestic cat and other felidae: phylogenetic timing and the role of hypercarnivory.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Binu; Reed, J Michael; Starks, Philip T; Kaufman, Gretchen E; Goldstone, Jared V; Roelke, Melody E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Frank, Laurence G; Court, Michael H

    2011-03-28

    The domestic cat (Felis catus) shows remarkable sensitivity to the adverse effects of phenolic drugs, including acetaminophen and aspirin, as well as structurally-related toxicants found in the diet and environment. This idiosyncrasy results from pseudogenization of the gene encoding UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A6, the major species-conserved phenol detoxification enzyme. Here, we established the phylogenetic timing of disruptive UGT1A6 mutations and explored the hypothesis that gene inactivation in cats was enabled by minimal exposure to plant-derived toxicants. Fixation of the UGT1A6 pseudogene was estimated to have occurred between 35 and 11 million years ago with all extant Felidae having dysfunctional UGT1A6. Out of 22 additional taxa sampled, representative of most Carnivora families, only brown hyena (Parahyaena brunnea) and northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) showed inactivating UGT1A6 mutations. A comprehensive literature review of the natural diet of the sampled taxa indicated that all species with defective UGT1A6 were hypercarnivores (>70% dietary animal matter). Furthermore those species with UGT1A6 defects showed evidence for reduced amino acid constraint (increased dN/dS ratios approaching the neutral selection value of 1.0) as compared with species with intact UGT1A6. In contrast, there was no evidence for reduced amino acid constraint for these same species within UGT1A1, the gene encoding the enzyme responsible for detoxification of endogenously generated bilirubin. Our results provide the first evidence suggesting that diet may have played a permissive role in the devolution of a mammalian drug metabolizing enzyme. Further work is needed to establish whether these preliminary findings can be generalized to all Carnivora.

  19. Circulating lysosomal enzymes and acute hepatic necrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gove, C D; Wardle, E N; Williams, R

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the lysosomal enzymes acid and neutral protease, N-acetylglucosaminidase, and acid phosphatase were measured in the serum of patients with fulminant hepatic failure. Acid protease (cathepsin D) activity was increased about tenfold in patients who died and nearly fourfold in those who survived fulminant hepatic failure after paracetamol overdose, whereas activities were increased equally in patients with fulminant hepatic failure due to viral hepatitis whether or not they survived. A correlation was found between serum acid protease activity and prothrombin time, and the increase in cathepsin D activity was sustained over several days compared with aspartate aminotransferase, which showed a sharp early peak and then a fall. Circulating lysosomal proteases can damage other organs, and measurement of their activity may therefore be of added value in assessing prognosis in this condition. PMID:7007443

  20. Clinically relevant genetic variants of drug-metabolizing enzyme and transporter genes detected in Thai children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Medhasi, Sadeep; Pasomsub, Ekawat; Vanwong, Natchaya; Ngamsamut, Nattawat; Puangpetch, Apichaya; Chamnanphon, Montri; Hongkaew, Yaowaluck; Limsila, Penkhae; Pinthong, Darawan; Sukasem, Chonlaphat

    2016-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (DMETs) influence the pharmacokinetic profile of drugs and exhibit intra- and interethnic variations in drug response in terms of efficacy and safety profile. The main objective of this study was to assess the frequency of allelic variants of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination-related genes in Thai children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder. Blood samples were drawn from 119 patients, and DNA was extracted. Genotyping was performed using the DMET Plus microarray platform. The allele frequencies of the DMET markers were generated using the DMET Console software. Thereafter, the genetic variations of significant DMET genes were assessed. The frequencies of SNPs across the genes coding for DMETs were determined. After filtering the SNPs, 489 of the 1,931 SNPs passed quality control. Many clinically relevant SNPs, including CYP2C19*2, CYP2D6*10, CYP3A5*3, and SLCO1B1*5, were found to have frequencies similar to those in the Chinese population. These data are important for further research to investigate the interpatient variability in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs in clinical practice. PMID:27110117

  1. Genetic polymorphisms of the drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP2C19 in the Uyghur population in northwest China.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tianbo; Zhang, Mingxia; Yang, Hua; Geng, Tingting; Zhang, Ning; Feng, Tian; Ma, Yajuan; Yuan, Dongya; Kang, Longli

    2015-11-02

    1. CYP2C19 is a clinically important enzyme and is involved in the metabolism of approximately 10% of drugs used in daily clinical practice. Previous studies mainly focused on Chinese Han populations or other ethnic groups, little is known about Uyghur populations. 2. The present study was designed to determine the genetic basis of CYP2C19 polymorphisms. 3. We used direct sequencing to investigate the promoter, exons and surrounding introns, and 3'-untranslated region of the CYP2C19 gene in 96 unrelated healthy Uyghur individuals. 4. A total of 31 different CYP2C19 polymorphisms were identified in the Uyghur population, three of which were novel, including two nonsynonymous variants (57807A > M, Gln279Pro and 19257G > R, Asp262Asn) and one synonymous variants in exon 5 (19184T > Y, Leu237Leu). In addition, CYP2C19*1, *2 and *3 alleles showed frequencies of 83.34%, 14.06% and 2.08%, respectively. 5. This is the first study that systematically screened the polymorphisms of the whole CYP2C19 gene in Uyghur population. Hence, our results provided important information on CYP2C19 polymorphisms in Uyghur population and could be helpful for future personalized medicine studies in Uyghur population generally.

  2. Chemoprotective potentials of homoisoflavonoids and chalcones of Dracaena cinnabari: modulations of drug-metabolizing enzymes and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Machala, M; Kubínová, R; Horavová, P; Suchý, V

    2001-03-01

    A series of homoisoflavonoids and chalcones, isolated from the endemic tropical plant Dracaena cinnabari Balf. (Agavaceae), were tested for their potential to inhibit cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) enzymes and Fe-enhanced in vitro peroxidation of microsomal lipids in C57B1/6 mouse liver. The effects of the polyphenolic compounds were compared with those of prototypal flavonoid modulators of CYP1A and the well-known antioxidant, butylated hydroxytoluene. 2-Hydroxychalcone and partly 4,6-dihydroxychalcone were found to be strong inhibitors of CYP1A-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity in vitro comparable to the effects of quercetin and chrysin. The first screening of flavonoids and chalcones of Dracaena cinnabari for antioxidant activity was done in an in vitro microsomal peroxidation assay. While chalcones were shown to be poor antioxidants, 7,8-methylenedioxy-3(4-hydroxybenzyl) chromane, as one of the tested homoisoflavonoids, exhibited a strong antioxidant activity comparable to that of the strongest flavonol antioxidant, quercetin.

  3. Effects of hexaammine cobalt (III) chloride on oxidative stress-related parameters and drug metabolizing enzymes in mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amarjit; Kalla, Natwar R; Sharma, Raj P; Sharma, Rajeshwar

    2007-01-01

    Hexaammine cobalt (III) chloride has been advocated as a potential anticarcinogenic compound. There is no information on the effects of this compound on oxidative stress-related parameters in animals. In the present study the effects of administration of hexaammine cobalt (III) chloride in drinking water to balb/c male mice at doses of 25, 50, and 100 ppm for 14 weeks were examined. The tissue distribution of the compound was seen in liver, kidney, lung, intestine, blood, and spleen. The effects of the compound were monitored on levels of lipid peroxidation, GSH content, and activities of SOD, catalase, GST, and Cyt P450, along with the liver and kidney function tests. The results show that the cobalt accumulated maximally in kidney followed by liver, intestine, blood, spleen, and lung in decreasing order, in a dose-dependent manner. GSH and GST also showed increase in a dose-dependent manner while SOD and catalase showed increase with the highest dose only. Liver and kidney function tests showed no untoward change with any dose at the end of the study. The results suggest an antioxidant potentiating effect of the hexaammine cobalt (III) chloride besides nontoxicity to liver and kidney. Since the ability to induce an increase of GSH and GST along with other detoxifying enzymes by anticarcinogenic agents has been reported to correlate with the inhibition of tumorigenesis, the cobalt complex might qualify as a potential cancer chemopreventive agent.

  4. Phosphorylation of cytochromes P450: First discovery of a posttranslational modification of a drug-metabolizing enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Oesch-Bartlomowicz, B. . E-mail: oeschb@uni-mainz.de; Oesch, F.

    2005-12-09

    Cytochromes P450 (CYP) are important components of xenobiotic-metabolizing monooxygenases (CYP-dependent monooxygenases). Their regulation by induction, most commonly by transcriptional activation, mediated by xenobiotics, normally substrates of the corresponding CYP, is well known and has been widely studied. Our team has discovered an additional important regulation of xenobiotic-metabolizing CYPs pertaining to posttranslational modification by phosphorylation. Individual CYPs are phosphorylated by different protein kinases, leading to CYP isoenzyme-selective changes in the metabolism of individual substrates and consequent drastic changes in the control of genotoxic metabolites. Best studied are the CYP phosphorylations by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. Most recently, we discovered that cAMP not only leads to drastic changes in the activity of individual CYPs, but also to drastic changes in the nuclear localization of the CYP-related transcription factor Ah receptor (AHR). The consequences are very different from those of AHR nuclear translocation mediated by the classical ligands (enzyme inducers such as dioxin) and are likely to represent the long-sought physiological function of the AHR, its persistent disturbance by long-lived ligands such as dioxin may well be the reason for its high toxicity.

  5. Pharmacogenetic aspects of drug metabolizing enzymes in busulfan based conditioning prior to allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Huezo-Diaz, Patricia; Uppugunduri, Chakradhara Rao S; Tyagi, Anuj Kumar; Krajinovic, Maja; Ansari, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a well established but complex treatment option for malignant and non-malignant disorders in pediatric patients. Most commonly used myeloablative and non-myeloablative conditioning regimens in children comprise alkylating agents, such as busulfan (BU) and cyclophosphamide. Inter-individual variability in the pharmacokinetics of BU can result in altered conditioning of the patient and therefore lead to relapse or rejection due to under exposures, or occurrence of toxicities due to over exposures. With the introduction of the intravenous formulation of BU, this variability has been reduced but still cannot be fully predicted. Inter and intra-individual variability of BU kinetics is more common in children compared to adults and toxicity of BU based regimens is still a concern. It has been hypothesized that some of this variability in BU pharmacokinetics and treatment outcomes, especially the toxicity, might be predicted by genetic variants of enzymes involved in the metabolism of BU. This review intends to summarize the studies performed to date on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics of BU based conditioning, specifically in relation to children.

  6. Hepatic and pulmonary enzyme activities in horses.

    PubMed

    Lakritz, J; Winder, B S; Noorouz-Zadeh, J; Huang, T L; Buckpitt, A R; Hammock, B D; Plopper, C G

    2000-02-01

    To determine hepatic and pulmonary phase-I and phase-II enzyme activities in horses. Pulmonary and hepatic tissues from 22 horses that were 4 months to 32 years old. Pulmonary and hepatic tissues from horses were used to prepare cytosolic (glutathione S-transferase and soluble epoxide hydrolase) and microsomal (cytochrome P450 monooxygenases) enzymes. Rates of microsomal metabolism of ethoxyresorufin, pentoxyresorufin, and naphthalene were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Activities of glutathione S-transferase and soluble epoxide hydrolase were determined spectrophotometrically. Cytochrome P450 content was determined by carbon monoxide bound-difference spectrum of dithionite-reduced microsomes. Activity was expressed relative to total protein concentration. Microsomal protein and cytochromeP450 contents were detectable in all horses and did not vary with age. Hepatic ethoxyresorufin metabolism was detected in all horses; by comparison, pulmonary metabolism of ethoxyresorufin and hepatic and pulmonary metabolism of pentoxyresorufin were detected at lower rates. Rate of hepatic naphthalene metabolism remained constant with increasing age, whereas rate of pulmonary naphthalene metabolism was significantly lower in weanlings (ie, horses 4 to 6 months old), compared with adult horses. Hepatic glutathione S-transferase activity (cytosol) increased with age; however, these changes were not significant. Pulmonary glutathione S-transferase activity (cytosol) was significantly lower in weanlings than adult horses. Hepatic and pulmonary soluble epoxide hydrolase did not vary with age of horses. Activity of cytochrome P450 isoforms that metabolize naphthalene and glutathione S-transferases in lungs are significantly lower in weanlings than adult horses, which suggests reduced ability of young horses to metabolize xenobiotics by this organ.

  7. The conduct of drug metabolism studies considered good practice (II): in vitro experiments.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lee; Liu, Xiaodong

    2007-12-01

    In vitro drug metabolism studies, which are inexpensive and readily carried out, serve as an adequate screening mechanism to characterize drug metabolites, elucidate their pathways, and make suggestions for further in vivo testing. This publication is a sequel to part I in a series and aims at providing a general framework to guide designs and protocols of the in vitro drug metabolism studies considered good practice in an efficient manner such that it would help researchers avoid common pitfalls and misleading results. The in vitro models include hepatic and non-hepatic microsomes, cDNA-expressed recombinant human CYPs expressed in insect cells or human B lymphoblastoid, chemical P450 inhibitors, S9 fraction, hepatocytes and liver slices. Important conditions for conducting the in vitro drug metabolism studies using these models are stated, including relevant concentrations of enzymes, co-factors, inhibitors and test drugs; time of incubation and sampling in order to establish kinetics of reactions; appropriate control settings, buffer selection and method validation. Separate in vitro data should be logically integrated to explain results from animal and human studies and to provide insights into the nature and consequences of in vivo drug metabolism. This article offers technical information and data and addresses scientific rationales and practical skills related to in vitro evaluation of drug metabolism to meet regulatory requirements for drug development.

  8. Genetic polymorphisms of the drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 3A5 in a Uyghur Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhengshuai; Li, Jingjie; Chen, Peng; Wang, Fengjiao; Zhang, Ning; Yang, Min; Jin, Tianbo; Chen, Chao

    2016-09-01

    1.  Detection of CYP3A5 variant alleles, and knowledge about their allelic frequency in Uyghur ethnic groups, is important to establish the clinical relevance of screening for these polymorphisms to optimize pharmacotherapy. 2. We used DNA sequencing to investigate the promoter, exons and surrounding introns, and 3'-untranslated region of the CYP3A5 gene in 96 unrelated healthy Uyghur individuals. We also used SIFT and PolyPhen-2 to predict the protein function of the novel non-synonymous mutation in CYP3A5 coding regions. 3. We found 24 different CYP3A5 polymorphisms in the Uyghur population, three of which were novel: the synonymous mutation 43C > T in exon 1, two mutations 32120C > G and 32245T > C in 3'-untranslated region, and we detected the allele frequencies of CYP3A5*1 and *3 as 64.58% and 35.42%, respectively. While no subjects with CYP3A5*6 were identified. Other identified genotypes included the heterozygous genotype 1A/3A (59.38%) and 1A/3E (11.46%), which lead to decreased enzyme activity. In addition, the frequency of haplotype "TTAGGT" was the most prevalent with 0.781. 4. Our data provide new information regarding CYP3A5 genetic polymorphisms in Uyghur individuals, which may help to improve individualization of drug therapy and offer a preliminary basis for more rational use of drugs.

  9. Establishing population distribution of drug-metabolizing enzyme activities for the use of salivary caffeine as a dynamic liver function marker in a Singaporean Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Chia, Hazel Yiting; Yau, Wai-Ping; Ho, Han Kiat

    2016-04-01

    The salivary paraxanthine/caffeine molar ratio has been proposed as a novel dynamic liver function test to guide dose adjustments of drugs hepatically cleared by CYP1A2. Its usability requires an established population norm as well as the factors influencing the ratio and actual concentrations. To address this knowledge gap, salivary caffeine and paraxanthine concentrations were measured at 4 h post caffeine dose in healthy Chinese individuals who had undergone 24 h of caffeine abstinence. The metabolic ratio was calculated and statistical analysis was performed. From the 52 participants (26 males; 30 regular caffeine consumers) recruited, the salivary paraxanthine/caffeine molar ratio was normally distributed with a mean and SD of 0.5 ± 0.2. No statistically significant factors (BMI, body weight, gender and regularity of caffeine intake) affecting the metabolic ratio were found. The caffeine concentration and total caffeine plus paraxanthine concentrations were lower in males than in females, and lower in regular caffeine consumers than in non-regular caffeine consumers. The 4 h salivary metabolic ratio (mean: 0.5) was generally not significantly different from the literature reported salivary, serum and plasma ratios measured at 4-9 h in healthy individuals (mean range 0.4-0.7) but was significantly higher than the literature reported 6 h plasma ratio and salivary ratios measured at 1-6 h in patients with liver disease or mild abnormal liver function tests (mean range 0.03-0.2). Overall, the population norm of the salivary metabolic ratio in a Singaporean Chinese population established in this study is distinct from individuals with liver disease or mild abnormal liver function tests and provides the benchmark for dosage adjustments of drugs metabolized by CYP1A2. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Effect of an ethanol extract of Descurainia sophia seeds on Phase I and II drug metabolizing enzymes and P-glycoprotein activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jin-Mu; Kim, Young Ah; Lee, You Jin; Bang, Ok-Sun; Kim, No Soo

    2015-12-18

    Descurainia sophia seeds have a variety of pharmacological functions and been widely used in traditional folk medicine. However, their effects on human drug metabolizing enzyme (DME) activities have not been elucidated. The present study investigated the inhibitory effects of an ethanol extract of D. sophia seeds (EEDS) on human Phase I/II (DMEs) and P-glycoprotein (p-gp) in vitro. The enzyme activities of human Phase I (cytochrome P450s, CYPs), Phase II (uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferases, UGTs) DMEs, and the drug transporter P-gp were determined in the presence of various concentrations of EEDS using commercially available luminogenic assay systems. The mode of enzyme inhibition and the inhibitory constant (Ki) value of EEDS were graphically determined with Lineweaver-Burk double reciprocal plots and secondary plots, respectively. The enzyme activity assays showed that EEDS moderately inhibited the CYP1A2, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 isoforms with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of 47.3, 25.8, and 38.7 μg/mL, respectively. Graphical analyses with Lineweaver-Burk double reciprocal plots and secondary plots indicated that EEDS competitively inhibited CYP2C9 with a Ki value of 19.8 μg/mL; however, it inhibited CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 in a mixed mode with Ki values of 5.2, and 11.9 μg/mL, respectively. Other Phase I (CYP2C8, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4) and Phase II (UGT1A1 and UGT2B7) enzymes as well as P-gp were weakly or negligibly affected by EEDS with concentrations up to 500 μg/mL. EEDS is a selective inhibitor of CYP1A2, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 with moderate enzymatic inhibition. Clinically, full consideration should be given to a potential toxic adverse effect from a herb-drug interaction when drugs that are particularly susceptible to CYP1A2, CYP2C9, or CYP2C19-mediated metabolism are taken together with EEDS. Characterization of metabolic profiles of specific herbal drugs could help consumers and medical specialists to use them safely as a

  11. Black soybean seed coat polyphenols prevent B(a)P-induced DNA damage through modulating drug-metabolizing enzymes in HepG2 cells and ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianshun; Jiang, Songyan; He, Chao; Kimura, Yuki; Yamashita, Yoko; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2013-04-15

    Black soybean seed coat is a rich source of polyphenols that have been reported to have various physiological functions. The present study investigated the potential protective effects of polyphenolic extracts from black soybean seed coat on DNA damage in human hepatoma HepG2 cells and ICR mice. The results from micronucleus (MN) assay revealed that black soybean seed coat extract (BE) at concentrations up to 25μg/mL was non-genotoxic. It is noteworthy that BE (at 4.85μg/mL) and its main components, procyanidins (PCs) and cyanidin 3-glucoside (C3G), at 10μM significantly reduced the genotoxic effect induced by benzo[a]pyrene [B(a)P]. To obtain insights into the underlying mechanism, we investigated BE and its main components on drug-metabolizing enzyme expression. The results of this study demonstrate that BE and its main components, PCs and C3G, down-regulated B(a)P-induced cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) expression by inhibiting the transformation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Moreover, they increased expression of detoxifying defense enzymes, glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) via increasing the binding of nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 to antioxidant response elements. Collectively, we found that PCs and C3G, which are the main active compounds of BE, down-regulated CYP1A1 and up-regulated GST expression to protect B(a)P-induced DNA damage in HepG2 cells and ICR mice effectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Human urinary amylolytic enzymes in acute hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Franzini, C.; Moda, S.

    1965-01-01

    Using paper eletrophoresis two amylolytic enzymes in human urine were demonstrated. A main peak was shown in the gamma globulin zone in normal urine and a second minor peak, in contrast to earlier findings, in the beta globulin zone. The organic source of the minor peak is probably in the liver. Urines from cases of acute hepatitis were studied in the same way and showed that the electrophoretic beta peak was raised in acute hepatitis, also pointing to a possible origin in the liver. Further studies are required to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:5844206

  13. Individualization of treatments with drugs metabolized by CES1: combining genetics and metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Bjerre, Ditte; Linnet, Kristian; Jürgens, Gesche; Dalhoff, Kim; Stefansson, Hreinn; Hankemeier, Thomas; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Taboureau, Olivier; Brunak, Søren; Houmann, Tine; Jeppesen, Pia; Pagsberg, Anne Katrine; Plessen, Kerstin; Dyrborg, Jørgen; Hansen, Peter Riis; Hansen, Poul Erik; Hughes, Tim; Werge, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    CES1 is involved in the hydrolysis of ester group-containing xenobiotic and endobiotic compounds including several essential and commonly used drugs. The individual variation in the efficacy and tolerability of many drugs metabolized by CES1 is considerable. Hence, there is a large interest in individualizing the treatment with these drugs. The present review addresses the issue of individualized treatment with drugs metabolized by CES1. It describes the composition of the gene encoding CES1, reports variants of this gene with focus upon those with a potential effect on drug metabolism and provides an overview of the protein structure of this enzyme bringing notice to mechanisms involved in the regulation of enzyme activity. Subsequently, the review highlights drugs metabolized by CES1 and argues that individual differences in the pharmacokinetics of these drugs play an important role in determining drug response and tolerability suggesting prospects for individualized drug therapies. Our review also discusses endogenous substrates of CES1 and assesses the potential of using metabolomic profiling of blood to identify proxies for the hepatic activity of CES1 that predict the rate of drug metabolism. Finally, the combination of genetics and metabolomics to obtain an accurate prediction of the individual response to CES1-dependent drugs is discussed.

  14. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Phase II Drug Metabolizing/Antioxidant Enzymes Gene Response by Anti-cancer Agent Sulforaphane in Rat Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hu; Khor, Tin Oo; Yang, Qian; Huang, Ying; Wu, Tien-yuan; Saw, Constance Lay-Lay; Lin, Wen; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE This study assesses the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of Nrf2-mediated increased expression of Phase II drug metabolizing enzyme (DME) and antioxidant enzymes which represents an important component of cancer chemoprevention in rat lymphocytes following intravenous (i.v.) administration of an anti-cancer phytochemical sulforaphane (SFN) METHODS SFN was administered intravenously to four groups of male Sprague-Dawley JVC rats each group comprising four animals. Blood samples were drawn at selected time points. Plasma were obtained from half of the blood samples and analyzed using a validated LC-MS/MS method. Lymphocytes were collected from the remaining blood samples using Ficoll-Paque™ Plus centrifuge medium. Lymphocyte RNAs were extracted, converted to cDNA, and quantitative real-time PCR analyses were performed and fold changes were calculated against those at time zero for the relative expression of Nrf2-target genes of phase II DME/antioxidant enzymes. PK-PD modeling was conducted based on Jusko’s indirect response model (IDR) using GastroPlus™ and Bootstrap Method. RESULTS SFN plasma concentration declined biexponentially and the pharmacokinetic parameters were generated. Rat lymphocyte mRNA expression levels showed no change for GSTM1, SOD, NF-κB, UGT1A1, or UGT1A6. Moderate increases (2-5 folds) over the time zero were seen for HO-1, Nrf2, and NQO1, and significant increase (> 5 folds) for GSTT1, GPx1, and Maf. PK-PD analyses using GastroPlus™ and Bootstrap method provided reasonable fitting for the PK and PD profiles and parameter estimates. CONCLUSION Our present study shows that SFN could induce Nrf2-mediated phase II DME/antioxidant mRNA expression for NQO1, GSTT1, Nrf2, GPx, Maf, and HO-1 in rat lymphocytes after i.v. administration, suggesting that Nrf2-mediated mRNA expression in lymphocytes may serve as surrogate biomarkers. The PK-PD IDR model simultaneously linking the plasma concentrations of SFN and the PD

  15. Transporter-Enzyme Interplay: Deconvoluting Effects of Hepatic Transporters and Enzymes on Drug Disposition Using Static and Dynamic Mechanistic Models.

    PubMed

    Varma, Manthena V; El-Kattan, Ayman F

    2016-07-01

    A large body of evidence suggests hepatic uptake transporters, organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs), are of high clinical relevance in determining the pharmacokinetics of substrate drugs, based on which recent regulatory guidances to industry recommend appropriate assessment of investigational drugs for the potential drug interactions. We recently proposed an extended clearance classification system (ECCS) framework in which the systemic clearance of class 1B and 3B drugs is likely determined by hepatic uptake. The ECCS framework therefore predicts the possibility of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) involving OATPs and the effects of genetic variants of SLCO1B1 early in the discovery and facilitates decision making in the candidate selection and progression. Although OATP-mediated uptake is often the rate-determining process in the hepatic clearance of substrate drugs, metabolic and/or biliary components also contribute to the overall hepatic disposition and, more importantly, to liver exposure. Clinical evidence suggests that alteration in biliary efflux transport or metabolic enzymes associated with genetic polymorphism leads to change in the pharmacodynamic response of statins, for which the pharmacological target resides in the liver. Perpetrator drugs may show inhibitory and/or induction effects on transporters and enzymes simultaneously. It is therefore important to adopt models that frame these multiple processes in a mechanistic sense for quantitative DDI predictions and to deconvolute the effects of individual processes on the plasma and hepatic exposure. In vitro data-informed mechanistic static and physiologically based pharmacokinetic models are proven useful in rationalizing and predicting transporter-mediated DDIs and the complex DDIs involving transporter-enzyme interplay. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  16. Grapefruit and oroblanco enhance hepatic detoxification enzymes in rats: possible role in protection against chemical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hahn-Obercyger, Michal; Stark, Aliza H; Madar, Zecharia

    2005-03-09

    Citrus fruits are considered to be functional foods that promote good health. This study was carried out to assess the effect of oroblanco and grapefruit consumption on hepatic detoxification enzymes. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were provided with either regular drinking water (control) or experimental treatments of oroblanco juice, grapefruit juice, or a sugar mix for 6 weeks. After 1 week of treatment, half the animals in each group were injected with the procarcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine. Grapefruit juice significantly increased activity and expression of the hepatic phase I enzyme, cytochrome P450 CYP1A1, with a marked trend toward enhanced NAD(P)H:quinone reductase (QR) activity. Oroblanco juice significantly increased glutathione S-transferase phase II enzyme activity along with CYP1A1 expression and a notable trend toward increased activity of both CYP1A1 and QR. These results suggest that these citrus fruits are bifunctional inducers, modulating both phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes to enhance hepatic detoxification.

  17. Drug-induced liver injury: the role of drug metabolism and transport.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Alberto; Bortolini, Michele

    2013-05-01

    Many studies have pinpointed the significant contribution of liver-mediated drug metabolism and transport to the complexity of drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Phase I cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes can lead to altered drug metabolism and formation of toxic metabolites, whilst Phase II enzymes are also associated with DILI. The emerging role of hepatic transporters in regulating the movement of endogenous and exogenous chemicals (e.g., bile acids and drugs) across cellular and tissue membranes is critical in determining the pathophysiology of liver disease as well as drug toxicity and efficacy. Genetic and environmental factors can have a significant impact on drug metabolism and transporter proteins, consequently increasing the risk of DILI in susceptible individuals. The assessment of these factors therefore represents an important approach for predicting and preventing DILI, by better understanding the pharmacological profile of a specific drug. This review focuses on the mechanisms of DILI associated with drug metabolism and hepatic transport, and how they can be influenced by underlying factors. © The Author(s) 2013.

  18. Differentiation of monkey embryonic stem cells to hepatocytes by feeder-free dispersion culture and expression analyses of cytochrome p450 enzymes responsible for drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Junya; Matsunaga, Tamihide; Yamaori, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Sakae; Kamada, Noboru; Nakamura, Katsunori; Kikuchi, Shinji; Ohmori, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    We reported previously that monkey embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were differentiated into hepatocytes by formation of embryoid bodies (EBs). However, this EB formation method is not always efficient for assays using a large number of samples simultaneously. A dispersion culture system, one of the differentiation methods without EB formation, is able to more efficiently provide a large number of feeder-free undifferentiated cells. A previous study demonstrated the effectiveness of the Rho-associated kinase inhibitor Y-27632 for feeder-free dispersion culture and induction of differentiation of monkey ESCs into neural cells. In the present study, the induction of differentiation of cynomolgus monkey ESCs (cmESCs) into hepatocytes was performed by the dispersion culture method, and the expression and drug inducibility of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in these hepatocytes were examined. The cmESCs were successfully differentiated into hepatocytes under feeder-free dispersion culture conditions supplemented with Y-27632. The hepatocytes differentiated from cmESCs expressed the mRNAs for three hepatocyte marker genes (α-fetoprotein, albumin, CYP7A1) and several CYP enzymes, as measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. In particular, the basal expression of cmCYP3A4 (3A8) in these hepatocytes was detected at mRNA and enzyme activity (testosterone 6β-hydroxylation) levels. Furthermore, the expression and activity of cmCYP3A4 (3A8) were significantly upregulated by rifampicin. These results indicated the effectiveness of Y-27632 supplementation for feeder-free dispersed culture and induction of differentiation into hepatocytes, and the expression of functional CYP enzyme(s) in cmESC-derived hepatic cells.

  19. Automated method for study of drug metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furner, R. L.; Feller, D. D.

    1973-01-01

    Commercially available equipment can be modified to provide automated system for assaying drug metabolism by continuous flow-through. System includes steps and devices for mixing drug with enzyme and cofactor in the presence of pure oxygen, dialyzing resulting metabolite against buffer, and determining amount of metabolite by colorimetric method.

  20. [Interactions of food and drug metabolism].

    PubMed

    Delzenne, N M; Verbeeck, R K

    2001-01-01

    The nutritional state, and/or the ingestion of specific nutrients, is/are able to modify drug disposition, by interfering with drug absorption, distribution, storage, and metabolism. Recent data report that nutrients interfere with drug metabolism either by modifying key enzymes of phase I (cytochromeP450 dependent mixed function oxidase) and II (glucuronosyl, sulfonyl- ... transferases), or by modulating coenzymes availability (NADPH, UDPglucuronic acid...). Food components involved in drug metabolism modifications are either macro-nutrients (carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, ethanol), micronutriments (vitamins, minerals), or phytochemicals. Drug-nutrients interactions may be beneficials, and thus could constitute, i.e. a way to improve drug therapeutic index, or generate adverse effects.

  1. In Vitro Drug Metabolism Using Liver Microsomes.

    PubMed

    Knights, Kathleen M; Stresser, David M; Miners, John O; Crespi, Charles L

    2016-09-16

    Knowledge of the metabolic stability of newly discovered drug candidates eliminated by metabolism is essential for predicting the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters that underpin dosing and dosage frequency. Further, characterization of the enzyme(s) responsible for metabolism (reaction phenotyping) allows prediction, at least at the qualitative level, of factors (including metabolic drug-drug interactions) likely to alter the clearance of both new chemical entities (NCEs) and established drugs. Microsomes are typically used as the enzyme source for the measurement of metabolic stability and for reaction phenotyping because they express the major drug-metabolizing enzymes cytochrome P450 (CYP) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), along with others that contribute to drug metabolism. Described in this unit are methods for microsome isolation, as well as for the determination of metabolic stability and metabolite formation (including kinetics). © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Ethanol-Drug Metabolic Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-13

    ethanol, the mice were first characterized for the inductive effects of the classical microsomal enzyme inducers (PB), 3-raethylcholanthrene (3-MC...that ethanol differs in its inducing properties, when compared to the properties of the two classical hepatic microsomal enzyme inducers PB and 3-MC...substrate for this enzyme , whereas p-amlnobenzoic acid (PABA) showed high activity and was polymorphically acetylated. Neither acute nor chronic

  3. A QUANTITATIVE MODEL FOR XENOBIOTIC METABOLIZING ENZYME (XME) INDUCTION REGULATED BY THE PREGNANE X RECEPTOR (PXR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor, PXR, is an integral part of the regulation of hepatic metabolism. It has been shown to regulate specific CYPs (phase I drug-metabolizing enzymes) as well as certain phase II drug metabolism activities, including UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT), sulfotran...

  4. A QUANTITATIVE MODEL FOR XENOBIOTIC METABOLIZING ENZYME (XME) INDUCTION REGULATED BY THE PREGNANE X RECEPTOR (PXR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor, PXR, is an integral part of the regulation of hepatic metabolism. It has been shown to regulate specific CYPs (phase I drug-metabolizing enzymes) as well as certain phase II drug metabolism activities, including UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT), sulfotran...

  5. Dosing recommendations for pharmacogenetic interactions related to drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Filipski, Kelly K; Pacanowski, Michael A; Ramamoorthy, Anuradha; Feero, William Gregory; Freedman, Andrew N

    2016-07-01

    Pharmacogenomic studies have established the important contribution of drug-metabolizing enzyme genotype toward drug toxicity and treatment failure; however, clinical implementation of pharmacogenomics has been slow. The aim of this study was to systematically review the information on drug-metabolizing enzyme pharmacogenomics available in the US drug labeling, practice guidelines, and recommendations. Drug-metabolizing enzyme genotype and phenotype information was assessed in US FDA drug labeling, clinical practice guidelines, and independent technology assessors to evaluate the consistency in information sources for healthcare providers. Eighty four gene-drug pairs were identified as having drug-metabolizing enzyme genotype or phenotype information within the label. The manner in which pharmacogenomic information was presented was heterogeneous both within the label and between clinical practice recommendations. For proper implementation of pharmacogenomics in clinical practice, information sources for healthcare providers should relay consistent and clear information for the appropriate use of biomarkers.

  6. [Relationship between the genetic polymorphisms of phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes, as well as the outcome of chemotherapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Li, Weiying; Yue, Wentao; Yang, Xuehui; Zhang, Chunyan; Wang, Yue

    2011-11-01

    Currently available studies on the polymorphisms of drug-metabolizing enzymes and their chemotherapeutic effects in non-small cell lung cancer are not consistent. In the present study, the relationship of the gene polymorphisms of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6), and glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) enzymes with chemotherapeutic effects were investigated. The effects of these relationships on the survival of advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients were also examined. Four drug metabolism enzymes were genotyped in lung cancer patients by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. These patients were followed for five years. The chemotherapeutic effect on patients carrying B-type CYP1A1 and null-type GSTM1 was better than on those carrying other types (P<0.001). The chemotherapeutic effect on patients carrying A-type CYP1A1 was better than on those carrying the B and C types when non-platinum drugs were administered (P=0.041). The chemotherapeutic effect on patients carrying null-type GSTM1 was better than on those carrying the functional type when platinum drugs were administered (P=0.011). The four enzymes did not affect the overall survival (OS) of advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients (P>0.05). The chemotherapeutic effect on patients carrying A-type CYP1A1 was better than on those carrying the B and C types when non-platinum drugs were administered. The chemotherapeutic effect on patients carrying null-type GSTM1 was better than on those carrying the functional type when platinum drugs were administered. The four enzymes did not affect the OS of advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients.

  7. Effect of tetrahydrocurcumin on the profiles of drug-metabolizing enzymes induced by a high fat and high fructose diet in mice.

    PubMed

    Jearapong, Nattharat; Chatuphonprasert, Waranya; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan

    2015-09-05

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP), a superfamily of hepatic monooxygenase enzymes, catalyzes biotransformation of endogenous compounds and xenobiotics. Modification of CYPs associated with metabolic diseases and continuous consumption of diet with excessive energy levels. Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) exhibited beneficial effects in metabolic syndromes such as diabetic mellitus and dyslipidemia. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of THC and vitamin E (vitE) on the expression profiles of CYPs in the livers of mice fed with the high fat and high fructose diet. In addition to ad libitum access to commercial regular diet, the high fat and high fructose diet (HFD) group of adult male ICR mice was administered a HFD, which consisted of intragastric administration of hydrogenated soybean oil (1mL/day) and the addition of 20% fructose to the drinking water for 8weeks. During the induction period, subgroups of mice (n=5) were daily intragastrically administered with THC (100 or 200mg/kg/day) or vitE (100mg/kg/day). The expressions of CYP mRNA and protein were quantified using real-time PCR and the levels of these proteins were quantified using immunoblotting. Continuous consuming of high fat and high fructose for 8weeks significantly increased the expressions of Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1, Cyp2c29, and Cyp3a11 while THC ultimately normalized these CYPs profiles. In the control mice, most of the investigated CYPs was unchanged by THC, with the exception that the Cyp1a1, Cyp2b9, and Cyp3a11 proteins were elevated. These findings provided additional important information on the effects of THC on diet induced-metabolic dysfunctions. However, drug interactions due to the use of THC as an alternative supplement are of concern, particularly in the combinations that include a drug that is a substrate of Cyp1a1, Cyp2b9, and Cyp3a11.

  8. Effects of surfactants on the contents of metallothionein, heme and hemoproteins and on the activities of heme oxygenase and drug-metabolizing enzymes in rats pretreated with phenobarbital or. beta. -naphthoflavone

    SciTech Connect

    Ariyoshi, Toshihiko; Hasegawa, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Hideki; Arizono, Koji )

    1991-01-01

    Synthetic surfactants as major constituent of detergent products are widely used in consumer and industrial fields, and hence environmental and toxicological investigations of surfactants are numerous. In the previous study, the authors observed that intraperitoneal administration of surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium n-dodecylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) and polyoxyethyleneglycol nonylphenyl ether (Emulgen 913) to rats depressed the content of microsomal cytochrome P-450, while they enhanced markedly the activity of heme oxygenase, the first and rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation. In addition, they noted an increase of metallothionein content in the liver of rats treated with LAS. In this study, the authors investigated the effects of surfactants on metallothionein, heme, hemoproteins, heme oxygenase and drug-metabolizing enzymes in the liver of rats pretreated with phenobarbital or {beta}-naphthoflavone.

  9. Polymorphisms in drug-metabolizing enzymes and risk to head and neck cancer: evidence for gene-gene and gene-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Shailendra S; Anand, Gautam; Dhawan, Ankur; Khan, Anwar J; Jain, Swatantra K; Pant, Mohan C; Parmar, Devendra

    2014-03-01

    A case-control study involving 750 cases with squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) and an equal number of healthy controls was initiated to investigate the association of polymorphisms in the drug metabolizing genes cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), CYP1B1, CYP2E1 and glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) with the risk of developing cancer. Attempts were also made to identify the role and nature of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in modifying the susceptibility to HNSCC. Polymorphisms in drug metabolizing CYPs or GSTM1 showed modest associations with cancer risk. However, cases carrying haplotypes with variant alleles of both CYP1A1*2A and *2C or CYP1B1*2 and *3 or CYP2E1*5B and *6 were at significant risk of developing HNSCC. Likewise, cases carrying a combination of variant genotypes of CYPs and GSM1 (null) were at higher risk (up to 5-fold) of developing HNSCC. HNSCC risk also increased several-fold in cases carrying variant genotypes of CYPs who were regular tobacco smokers (8-18-fold), tobacco chewers (3-7-fold), or alcohol users (2-4-fold). Statistical analysis revealed a more than multiplicative interaction between combinations of the variant genotypes of CYPs and GSTM1 (null) and between variant genotypes and tobacco smoking or chewing or alcohol consumption, in both case-control and case-only designs. The data thus suggest that although polymorphisms in carcinogen-metabolizing CYPs may be a modest risk factor for developing HNSCC, gene-gene, and gene-environment interactions play a significant role in modifying the susceptibility to HNSCC. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Short-term fasting alters cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Laureen A; Achterbergh, Roos; de Vries, Emmely M; van Nierop, F Samuel; Klümpen, Heinz-Josef; Soeters, Maarten R; Boelen, Anita; Romijn, Johannes A; Mathôt, Ron A A

    2015-06-01

    Experimental studies indicate that short-term fasting alters drug metabolism. However, the effects of short-term fasting on drug metabolism in humans need further investigation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of short-term fasting (36 h) on P450-mediated drug metabolism. In a randomized crossover study design, nine healthy subjects ingested a cocktail consisting of five P450-specific probe drugs [caffeine (CYP1A2), S-warfarin (CYP2C9), omeprazole (CYP2C19), metoprolol (CYP2D6), and midazolam (CYP3A4)] on two occasions (control study after an overnight fast and after 36 h of fasting). Blood samples were drawn for pharmacokinetic analysis using nonlinear mixed effects modeling. In addition, we studied in Wistar rats the effects of short-term fasting on hepatic mRNA expression of P450 isoforms corresponding with the five studied P450 enzymes in humans. In the healthy subjects, short-term fasting increased oral caffeine clearance by 20% (P = 0.03) and decreased oral S-warfarin clearance by 25% (P < 0.001). In rats, short-term fasting increased mRNA expression of the orthologs of human CYP1A2, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 (P < 0.05), and decreased the mRNA expression of the ortholog of CYP2C9 (P < 0.001) compared with the postabsorptive state. These results demonstrate that short-term fasting alters cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism in a nonuniform pattern. Therefore, short-term fasting is another factor affecting cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism in humans.

  11. The biochemistry of drug metabolism--an introduction: part 6. Inter-individual factors affecting drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Stefanie D; Testa, Bernard

    2008-12-01

    This review is part of a series of review articles on the metabolism of drugs and other xenobiotics published in Chemistry & Biodiversity. After a thorough discussion of metabolic reactions and their enzymes, this article focuses on genetically determined differences in drug and xenobiotic metabolism. After a short introduction on the causes for genetic differences, the first focus is on species differences in drug and xenobiotic metabolism. A major chapter is then dedicated to clinically relevant genetic polymorphisms in human drug metabolism and resultant ethnic differences. The last two chapters deal with sex-dependent differences in drug metabolism and personalized pharmacotherapy related to inter-individual differences in drug metabolism.

  12. Hepatic cytochrome P450s, phase II enzymes and nuclear receptors are downregulated in a Th2 environment during Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    PubMed

    Mimche, Sylvie M; Nyagode, Beatrice A; Merrell, Matthew D; Lee, Choon-Myung; Prasanphanich, Nina S; Cummings, Richard D; Morgan, Edward T

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation and infection downregulate the activity and expression of cytochrome P450s (P450s) and other drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) involved in hepatic drug clearance. Schistosoma mansoni infection was reported to cause a downregulation of hepatic P450-dependent activities in mouse liver, but little is known about the specific enzymes affected or whether phase II DMEs are also affected. Here we describe the effect of murine schistosomiasis on the expression of hepatic P450s, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (Cpr), phase II drug metabolizing enzymes, and nuclear receptors at 30 and 45 days postinfection (dpi). Although the hepatic expression of some of these genes was altered at 30 dpi, we observed substantial changes in the expression of the majority of P450 mRNAs and proteins measured, Cpr protein, as well as many of the UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and sulfotransferases at 45 dpi. S. mansoni infection also altered nuclear receptor expression, inducing mRNA levels at 30 dpi and depressing levels at 45 dpi. S. mansoni evoked a T helper 2 (Th2) inflammatory response at 45 dpi, as indicated by the induction of hepatic Th2 cytokine mRNAs [interleukins 4, 5, and 13], whereas the hepatic proinflammatory response was relatively weak. Thus, chronic schistosomiasis markedly and selectively alters the expression of multiple DMEs, which may be associated with Th2 cytokine release. This would represent a novel mechanism of DME regulation in disease states. These findings have important implications for drug testing in infected mice, whereas the relevance to humans with schistosomiasis needs to be determined.

  13. Reduction in hepatic drug metabolizing CYP3A4 activities caused by P450 oxidoreductase mutations identified in patients with disordered steroid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Flueck, Christa E.; Mullis, Primus E.; Pandey, Amit V.

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), metabolizes 50% of drugs in clinical use and requires NADPH-P450 reductase (POR). {yields} Mutations in human POR cause congenital adrenal hyperplasia from diminished activities of steroid metabolizing P450s. {yields} We are reporting that mutations in POR may reduce CYP3A4 activity. {yields} POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X lost 99%, while A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 60-85% CYP3A4 activity. {yields} Reduction of CYP3A4 activity may cause increased risk of drug toxicities/adverse drug reactions in patients with POR mutations. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), the major P450 present in human liver metabolizes approximately half the drugs in clinical use and requires electrons supplied from NADPH through NADPH-P450 reductase (POR, CPR). Mutations in human POR cause a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia from diminished activities of steroid metabolizing P450s. In this study we examined the effect of mutations in POR on CYP3A4 activity. We used purified preparations of wild type and mutant human POR and in vitro reconstitution with purified CYP3A4 to perform kinetic studies. We are reporting that mutations in POR identified in patients with disordered steroidogenesis/Antley-Bixler syndrome (ABS) may reduce CYP3A4 activity, potentially affecting drug metabolism in individuals carrying mutant POR alleles. POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X had more than 99% loss of CYP3A4 activity, while POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 60-85% activity. Loss of CYP3A4 activity may result in increased risk of drug toxicities and adverse drug reactions in patients with POR mutations.

  14. Graphic rule for drug metabolism systems.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2010-05-01

    Using graphic rules to deal with kinetic systems is an elegant approach by combining the graph representation (schematic representation) and rigorous mathematical derivation. It bears the following advantages: (1) providing an intuitive picture or illuminative insights; (2) helping grasp the key points from complicated details; (3) greatly simplifying many tedious, laborious, and error-prone calculations; and (4) able to double-check the final results. In this mini review, the non-steady state graphic rule in enzyme-catalyzed kinetics and protein-folding kinetics was extended to cover drug-metabolic systems. As a demonstration, a step-by-step illustration is presented showing how to use the graphic rule to derive the concentrations of the parent drug and its metabolites vs. time for the seliciclib, vildagliptin, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (AG-024322) metabolic systems, respectively. It can be seen from these paradigms that the graphic rule is particularly useful to analyze complicated drug metabolic systems and ensure the correctness of the derived results. Meanwhile, the intuitive feature of graphic representation may facilitate analyzing and classifying drug metabolic systems; e.g., according to their directed graphs, the metabolism of seliciclib and the metabolism of vildagliptin can be categorized as 0-->5 mechanism while that of AG-024322 as 0-->4-->3 mechanism.

  15. Drug metabolism for the perplexed medicinal chemist.

    PubMed

    Testa, Bernard

    2009-11-01

    Two related and significant issues may elicit perplexity in medicinal chemists and are discussed here. First, a broad presentation of the pharmacological and toxicological consequences of drug metabolism should justify the significance of drug metabolism and serve as an incentive to further study. When comparing the pharmacological activities of a drug and its metabolite(s), a continuum is found which ranges from soft drugs (no active metabolites) to prodrugs (inactive per se, as illustrated here with clopidogrel and prasugrel). Innumerable intermediate cases document drugs whose activity is shared by one or more metabolites, as exemplified with tamoxifen. The toxicological consequences of metabolism at the molecular, macromolecular, and macroscopic levels are manyfold. A brief overview is offered together with a summary of the reactions of toxification and detoxification of the antiepileptic valproic acid. The second issue discussed in the review is a comparison of the relative significance of cytochromes P450 and other oxidoreductases (EC 1), hydrolases (EC 3), and transferases (EC 2) in drug metabolism, based on a 'guesstimate' of the number of drug metabolites that are known to be produced by them. The conclusion is that oxidoreductases are the main enzymes responsible for the formation of toxic or active metabolites, whereas transferases play the major role in producing inactive and nontoxic metabolites.

  16. The use of liposomes in the study of drug metabolism: a method to incorporate the enzymes of the cytochrome p450 monooxygenase system into phospholipid, bilayer vesicles.

    PubMed

    Reed, James R

    2010-01-01

    Although lipids are essential for the optimal activity of the cytochromes P450 monooxygenase system, relatively little is known about the membrane environment in which these enzymes function. One approach used to mimic the structural arrangement of lipids and enzymes within the endoplasmic reticulum is to physically incorporate the cytochromes P450 and their redox partners in a vesicle bilayer of phospholipids. Several methods have been devised for this purpose. This chapter describes a method in which the P450 monooxygenase system is incorporated by first, solubilizing the enzymes and lipid with sodium glycocholate. After the protein and lipid aggregates are dispersed, the detergent is removed by adsorption using BioBeads SM-2 resin which leads to the formation of bilayer vesicles of phospholipid containing incorporated cytochrome P450 and NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase. This procedure requires relatively a short preparation time, provides concentrated reconstituted systems that can be used in a wide range of applications, allows for several enzyme samples to be prepared simultaneously so that different conditions can be compared, and results in minimal loss of active enzyme.

  17. Validation of in vitro cell models used in drug metabolism and transport studies; genotyping of cytochrome P450, phase II enzymes and drug transporter polymorphisms in the human hepatoma (HepG2), ovarian carcinoma (IGROV-1) and colon carcinoma (CaCo-2, LS180) cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Brandon, Esther F.A.; Bosch, Tessa M.; Deenen, Maarten J.; Levink, Rianne; Wal, Everdina van der; Meerveld, Joyce B.M. van; Bijl, Monique; Beijnen, Jos H. |; Schellens, Jan H.M. |; Meijerman, Irma . E-mail: I.Meijerman@pharm.uu.nl

    2006-02-15

    Human cell lines are often used for in vitro biotransformation and transport studies of drugs. In vivo, genetic polymorphisms have been identified in drug-metabolizing enzymes and ABC-drug transporters leading to altered enzyme activity, or a change in the inducibility of these enzymes. These genetic polymorphisms could also influence the outcome of studies using human cell lines. Therefore, the aim of our study was to pharmacogenotype four cell lines frequently used in drug metabolism and transport studies, HepG2, IGROV-1, CaCo-2 and LS180, for genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation enzymes and drug transporters. The results indicate that, despite the presence of some genetic polymorphisms, no real effects influencing the activity of metabolizing enzymes or drug transporters in the investigated cell lines are expected. However, this characterization will be an aid in the interpretation of the results of biotransformation and transport studies using these in vitro cell models.

  18. Drug metabolizing capacity in vitro and in vivo--II. Correlations between hepatic microsomal monooxygenase markers in phenobarbital-induced rats.

    PubMed

    Matthew, D E; Houston, J B

    1990-08-15

    Pretreatment with various doses of phenobarbital (PB) has been used to create a pool of rats with a wide range of hepatic microsomal monooxygenase activity to systematically examine relationships between and within in vivo and in vitro markers. The in vivo clearance of tolbutamide (TOL), theophylline (TH), antipyrine (AP) and its metabolites were determined in the same rats used for hepatic microsome preparation and assessment of P450 content and activities (via 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD), 7 ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, 7-methoxycoumarin O-demethylase (MCOD) and aldrin epoxidase determinations). A graded dose-response relationship was found between PB treatment and most but not all parameters. The need for careful selection of in vivo and as well as in vitro markers is apparent from these studies. The most responsive parameters--TOL and AP clearances, MCOD and ECOD activities--were also those producing the strongest in vivo-in vitro correlations. Despite the diffuse nature of the PB induced response in P450 complement, good predictive relationships were apparent between ECOD and TOL clearance (r2 = 0.88).

  19. [Quantification of the drug-metabolizing enzyme system in liver diseases: a comparison between antipyrine saliva clearance and the aminopyrine breath test].

    PubMed

    von Mandach, U; Jost, G; Preisig, R

    1985-05-11

    The metabolic activity of the hepatic cytochrome P450 system was studied in 53 ambulatory subjects. 18 of these were cirrhotics and 23 had non-cirrhotic liver disease, documented by biopsy, serologic, ultrasound or computerized tomography findings, and characterized by quantitative liver function tests, such as galactose elimination capacity and indocyanine green fractional clearance. For comparison, 12 normal control subjects were also included. All subjects were given 10 mg/kg body weight antipyrine and saliva concentrations determined with an HPLC-method at 24 and 48 hours after dosing. Antipyrine saliva clearance (ASC) was calculated according to a two-point method (Cl1), and compared with a one-point method (Cl2) using the 24 h sample only. These subjects also underwent an aminopyrine breath test (ABT), breath samples being collected at regular intervals during 60 minutes following injection of a tracer dose of 1.5 muCi (14C-dimethylamino)antipyrine. Cl1 and Cl2 correlated strongly (r = 0.93). On the basis of smaller variations (particularly in control subjects), better definition of disease severity and convenience and time saving, Cl2 is to be preferred. Comparison of Cl2 with ABT showed that both procedures apparently quantify overlapping enzymatic activities. However, the relationship between Cl2 and ABT values, albeit highly significant (r = 0.72), suggests that only about half of the variables are subject to the same determinant. In addition, a positive intercept of the regression line extrapolated to the Cl2 axis points to quantitatively important extrahepatic breakdown of antipyrine. The results suggest that, in view of the wide variation in normal values (presumably in part influenced by exogenous pollutants), ASC only provides an approximation of hepatic metabolic activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Short-term calorie restriction feminizes the mRNA profiles of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in livers of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is one of the most effective anti-aging interventions in mammals. A modern theory suggests that aging results from a decline in detoxification capabilities and thus accumulation of damaged macromolecules. The present study aimed to determine how short-term CR alters mRNA profiles of genes that encode metabolism and detoxification machinery in the liver. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed CR (0, 15, 30, or 40%) diets for one month, followed by mRNA quantification of 98 xenobiotic processing genes (XPGs) in the liver, including 7 uptake transporters, 39 phase-I enzymes, 37 phase-II enzymes, 10 efflux transporters, and 5 transcription factors. In general, 15% CR did not alter mRNAs of most XPGs, whereas 30 and 40% CR altered over half of the XPGs (32 increased and 29 decreased). CR up-regulated some phase-I enzymes (fold increase), such as Cyp4a14 (12), Por (2.3), Nqo1 (1.4), Fmo2 (5.4), and Fmo3 (346), and numerous number of phase-II enzymes, such as Sult1a1 (1.2), Sult1d1 (2.0), Sult1e1 (33), Sult3a1 (2.2), Gsta4 (1.3), Gstm2 (1.3), Gstm3 (1.7), and Mgst3 (2.2). CR feminized the mRNA profiles of 32 XPGs in livers of male mice. For instance, CR decreased the male-predominantly expressed Oatp1a1 (97%) and increased the female-predominantly expressed Oatp1a4 (11). In conclusion, short-term CR alters the mRNA levels of over half of the 98 XPGs quantified in livers of male mice, and over half of these alterations appear to be due to feminization of the liver. - Highlights: • Utilized a graded CR model in male mice • The mRNA profiles of xenobiotic processing genes (XPGs) in liver were investigated. • CR up-regulates many phase-II enzymes. • CR tends to feminize the mRNA profiles of XPGs.

  1. Significant inhibitory impact of dibenzyl trisulfide and extracts of Petiveria alliacea on the activities of major drug-metabolizing enzymes in vitro: An assessment of the potential for medicinal plant-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Murray, J; Picking, D; Lamm, A; McKenzie, J; Hartley, S; Watson, C; Williams, L; Lowe, H; Delgoda, R

    2016-06-01

    Dibenzyl trisulfide (DTS) is the major active ingredient expressed in Petiveria alliacea L., a shrub widely used for a range of conditions, such as, arthritis, asthma and cancer. Given its use alone and concomitantly with prescription medicines, we undertook to investigate its impact on the activities of important drug metabolizing enzymes, the cytochromes P450 (CYP), a key family of enzymes involved in many adverse drug reactions. DTS and seven standardized extracts from the plant were assessed for their impact on the activities of CYPs 1A2, 2C19, 2C9, 2D6 and 3A4 on a fluorometric assay. DTS revealed significant impact against the activities of CYPs 1A2, 2C19 and 3A4 with IC50 values of 1.9, 4.0 and 3.2μM, respectively, which are equivalent to known standard inhibitors of these enzymes (furafylline, and tranylcypromine), and the most potent interaction with CYP1A2 displayed irreversible enzyme kinetics. The root extract, drawn with 96% ethanol (containing 2.4% DTS), displayed IC50 values of 5.6, 3.9 and 4.2μg/mL respectively, against the same isoforms, CYPs 1A2, 2C19 and 3A4. These investigations identify DTS as a valuable CYP inhibitor and P. alliacea as a candidate plant worthy of clinical trials to confirm the conclusions that extracts yielding high DTS may lead to clinically relevant drug interactions, whilst extracts yielding low levels of DTS, such as aqueous extracts, are unlikely to cause adverse herb-drug interactions.

  2. Predicting tumor responses to mitomycin C on the basis of DT-diaphorase activity or drug metabolism by tumor homogenates: implications for enzyme-directed bioreductive drug development.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R M; Burger, A M; Loadman, P M; Jarrett, C M; Swaine, D J; Fiebig, H H

    2000-11-15

    Mitomycin C (MMC) is a clinically used anticancer drug that is reduced to cytotoxic metabolites by cellular reductases via a process known as bioreductive drug activation. The identification of key enzymes responsible for drug activation has been investigated extensively with the ultimate aim of tailoring drug administration to patients whose tumors possess the biochemical machinery required for drug activation. In the case of MMC, considerable interest has been centered upon the enzyme DT-diaphorase (DTD) although conflicting reports of good and poor correlations between enzyme activity and response in vitro and in vivo have been published. The principle aim of this study was to provide a definitive answer to the question of whether tumor response to MMC could be predicted on the basis of DTD activity in a large panel of human tumor xenografts. DTD levels were measured in 45 human tumor xenografts that had been characterized previously in terms of their sensitivity to MMC in vitro and in vivo (the in vivo response profile to MMC was taken from work published previously). A poor correlation between DTD activity and antitumor activity in vitro as well as in vivo was obtained. This study also assessed the predictive value of an alternative approach based upon the ability of tumor homogenates to metabolize MMC. This approach is based on the premise that the overall rate of MMC metabolism may provide a better indicator of response than single enzyme measurements. MMC metabolism was evaluated in tumor homogenates (clarified by centrifugation at 1000 x g for 1 min) by measuring the disappearance of the parent compound by HPLC. In responsive [T/C <10% (T/C defined as the relative size of treated and control tumors)] and resistant (T/C >50%) tumors, the mean half life of MMC was 75+/-48.3 and 280+/-129.6 min, respectively. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P < 0.005). In conclusion, these results unequivocally demonstrate that response to

  3. CYP1A2 is more variable than previously thought: a genomic biography of the gene behind the human drug-metabolizing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Browning, Sarah L; Tarekegn, Ayele; Bekele, Endashaw; Bradman, Neil; Thomas, Mark G

    2010-11-01

    CYP1A2 metabolizes various drugs, endogenous compounds and procarcinogens. As human genetic diversity has been reported to decrease with distance from Ethiopia, we resequenced CYP1A2 in five Ethiopian ethnic groups representing a rough northeast to southwest transect across Ethiopia to establish: (i) what variation exists in comparison with what is already known globally and (ii) what CYP1A2 pharmacogenetic profiles may be present as several CYP1A2-metabolized drugs are administered to Ethiopians. We found 49 different variable sites (30 of which are novel), nine nonsynonymous changes (seven of which are novel), one synonymous change and 55 different haplotypes, only three of which are previously reported. When haplotypes were constructed using only nonsynonymous polymorphisms to restrict haplotypes to those most likely to affect enzyme structure/function, 10 haplotypes were identified (seven contain previously unidentified nonsynonymous variants and four are predicted to alter the enzyme structure/function). Most individuals have at least one copy of the ancestral haplotype. Comparing these data with those from publically available databases, Ethiopian groups display twice the variation seen in all other populations combined (gene diversity using nonsynonymous variants): Ethiopia=0.17±0.02, other populations=0.08±0.03. Across the entire gene, Ethiopia also evidences all common variation found on a global scale. We provide evidence of weak purifying selection acting on CYP1A2 and show that the time to most recent common ancestor, calculated using variation in a nearby microsatellite, places several variants into a period predating the expansion of modern humans out of Africa less than 100,000 years ago.

  4. Drug metabolism and transport during pregnancy: how does drug disposition change during pregnancy and what are the mechanisms that cause such changes?

    PubMed

    Isoherranen, Nina; Thummel, Kenneth E

    2013-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that pregnancy alters the function of drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters in a gestational-stage and tissue-specific manner. In vivo probe studies have shown that the activity of several hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes, such as CYP2D6 and CYP3A4, is increased during pregnancy, whereas the activity of others, such as CYP1A2, is decreased. The activity of some renal transporters, including organic cation transporter and P-glycoprotein, also appears to be increased during pregnancy. Although much has been learned, significant gaps still exist in our understanding of the spectrum of drug metabolism and transport genes affected, gestational age-dependent changes in the activity of encoded drug metabolizing and transporting processes, and the mechanisms of pregnancy-induced alterations. In this issue of Drug Metabolism and Disposition, a series of articles is presented that address the predictability, mechanisms, and magnitude of changes in drug metabolism and transport processes during pregnancy. The articles highlight state-of-the-art approaches to studying mechanisms of changes in drug disposition during pregnancy, and illustrate the use and integration of data from in vitro models, animal studies, and human clinical studies. The findings presented show the complex inter-relationships between multiple regulators of drug metabolism and transport genes, such as estrogens, progesterone, and growth hormone, and their effects on enzyme and transporter expression in different tissues. The studies provide the impetus for a mechanism- and evidence-based approach to optimally managing drug therapies during pregnancy and improving treatment outcomes.

  5. Drug Metabolism and Transport During Pregnancy: How Does Drug Disposition Change during Pregnancy and What Are the Mechanisms that Cause Such Changes?

    PubMed Central

    Thummel, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that pregnancy alters the function of drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters in a gestational-stage and tissue-specific manner. In vivo probe studies have shown that the activity of several hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes, such as CYP2D6 and CYP3A4, is increased during pregnancy, whereas the activity of others, such as CYP1A2, is decreased. The activity of some renal transporters, including organic cation transporter and P-glycoprotein, also appears to be increased during pregnancy. Although much has been learned, significant gaps still exist in our understanding of the spectrum of drug metabolism and transport genes affected, gestational age–dependent changes in the activity of encoded drug metabolizing and transporting processes, and the mechanisms of pregnancy-induced alterations. In this issue of Drug Metabolism and Disposition, a series of articles is presented that address the predictability, mechanisms, and magnitude of changes in drug metabolism and transport processes during pregnancy. The articles highlight state-of-the-art approaches to studying mechanisms of changes in drug disposition during pregnancy, and illustrate the use and integration of data from in vitro models, animal studies, and human clinical studies. The findings presented show the complex inter-relationships between multiple regulators of drug metabolism and transport genes, such as estrogens, progesterone, and growth hormone, and their effects on enzyme and transporter expression in different tissues. The studies provide the impetus for a mechanism- and evidence-based approach to optimally managing drug therapies during pregnancy and improving treatment outcomes. PMID:23328895

  6. Pharmacogenomic Study Reveals New Variants of Drug Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Genes Associated with Steady-State Plasma Concentrations of Risperidone and 9-Hydroxyrisperidone in Thai Autism Spectrum Disorder Patients

    PubMed Central

    Medhasi, Sadeep; Pinthong, Darawan; Pasomsub, Ekawat; Vanwong, Natchaya; Ngamsamut, Nattawat; Puangpetch, Apichaya; Chamnanphon, Monpat; Hongkaew, Yaowaluck; Pratoomwun, Jirawat; Limsila, Penkhae; Sukasem, Chonlaphat

    2016-01-01

    The present study sought to investigate the genetic variants in drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter (DMET) genes associated with steady-state plasma concentrations of risperidone among Thai autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patients. ASD patients taking risperidone for at least 1 month were enrolled for this pharmacogenomic study. Genotyping profile was obtained using Affymetrix DMET Plus array interrogating 1931 variants in 231 genes. Steady-state plasma risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone were measured using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry assay. The final analysis included 483 markers for 167 genes. Six variants, ABCB11 (c.3084A > G, c.∗420A > G, c.∗368G > A, and c.∗236G > A) and ADH7 (c.690G > A and c.-5360G > A), were found to be associated with plasma concentrations of risperidone. 9-Hydroxyrisperidone and the total active-moiety levels were associated with six gene variants, SCLO1B1 (c.-11187G > A and c.521T > C), SLCO1B3 (c.334G > T, c.699A > G, and c.1557G > A), and SLC7A5 c.∗438C > G. Polymorphisms in UGT2B4 c.∗448A > G and CYP2D6 (c.1661G > C, c.4180G > C, and c.-2178G > A) showed considerable but not significant associations with metabolic ratio. This pharmacogenomic study identifies new genetic variants of DMET genes in monitoring risperidone therapy. PMID:28018217

  7. Novel drug metabolism indices for pharmacogenetic functional status based on combinatory genotyping of CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 genes

    PubMed Central

    Villagra, David; Goethe, John; Schwartz, Harold I; Szarek, Bonnie; Kocherla, Mohan; Gorowski, Krystyna; Windemuth, Andreas; Ruaño, Gualberto

    2011-01-01

    Aims We aim to demonstrate clinical relevance and utility of four novel drug-metabolism indices derived from a combinatory (multigene) approach to CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 allele scoring. Each index considers all three genes as complementary components of a liver enzyme drug metabolism system and uniquely benchmarks innate hepatic drug metabolism reserve or alteration through CYP450 combinatory genotype scores. Methods A total of 1199 psychiatric referrals were genotyped for polymorphisms in the CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 gene loci and were scored on each of the four indices. The data were used to create distributions and rankings of innate drug metabolism capacity to which individuals can be compared. Drug-specific indices are a combination of the drug metabolism indices with substrate-specific coefficients. Results The combinatory drug metabolism indices proved useful in positioning individuals relative to a population with regard to innate drug metabolism capacity prior to pharmacotherapy. Drug-specific indices generate pharmacogenetic guidance of immediate clinical relevance, and can be further modified to incorporate covariates in particular clinical cases. Conclusions We believe that this combinatory approach represents an improvement over the current gene-by-gene reporting by providing greater scope while still allowing for the resolution of a single-gene index when needed. This method will result in novel clinical and research applications, facilitating the translation from pharmacogenomics to personalized medicine, particularly in psychiatry where many drugs are metabolized or activated by multiple CYP450 isoenzymes. PMID:21861665

  8. Differences in metabolite burden of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate in pregnant and postpartum dams and their offspring in relation to drug-metabolizing enzymes in mice.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yumi; Ito, Yuki; Yanagiba, Yukie; Kamijima, Michihiro; Naito, Hisao; Nakajima, Tamie

    2012-04-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) induced adverse effects on mice offspring, and the metabolite mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (MEHP) may be essential to determine the toxicity. In this experiment, we measured liver MEHP levels and the factors determining the metabolism, two enzyme activities [lipase and uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)] or expression of cytochrome P450 4A14 (CYP4A14) in dams (on gestational day 18 and postnatal day 2) and their offspring. MEHP concentrations in the liver from pregnant dams were 1.5 times higher than those of postpartum dams at exposure to 0.05% DEHP. Accordingly, MEHP concentrations were 1.7 times higher in fetuses than in pups at the dose. Interestingly, lipase activity was 1.8-fold higher in pregnant dams than postpartum ones, but no such difference was noted in the activity between fetuses and pups. UGT activity was also 1.5-fold higher in pregnant dams than postpartum ones, whereas the activity in the fetuses was 1/2 that of pups. No difference was noted in CYP4A14 levels between pregnant and postpartum mice, whereas the levels in the fetuses were <1/10 those of pups. DEHP exposure did not influence lipase activity, whereas it slightly enhanced UGT activity and exclusively increased CYP4A14 levels in pregnant and/or postpartum dams. Taken together, the higher MEHP levels in pregnant dams than postpartum ones may be primarily due to higher lipase activities in pregnant dams, which may closely reflect those in fetuses and pups.

  9. Genetic polymorphism analysis of the drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP1A2 in a Uyghur Chinese population: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Geng, Tingting; Zhang, Xi Yang; Wang, Li; Wang, Huijuan; Shi, Xugang; Kang, Longli; Hou, Peng; Jin, Tianbo

    2016-01-01

    1. CYP1A2 is a highly polymorphic gene and CYP1A2 enzyme results in broad inter-individual variability in response to certain pharmacotherapies, while little is known about the genetic variation of CYP1A2 in Uyghur Chinese population. The aim of the present study was to screen Uyghur volunteers for CYP1A2 genetic polymorphisms. 2. We used DNA sequencing to investigate promoter, exons, introns, and 3' UTR of the CYP1A2 gene in 96 unrelated healthy Uyghur individuals. We also used SIFT (Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant) and PolyPhen-2 (Polymorphism Phenotyping v2) to predict the protein function of the novel non-synonymous mutation in CYP1A2 coding regions. 3. We identified 20 different CYP1A2 polymorphisms in the Uyghur Chinese population, including two novel variants (119A > G and 2410G > A). Variant 119A > G was predicted to be probably damaging on protein function by PolyPhen-2, by contrast, 2410G > A was identified as benign. The allele frequencies of CYP1A2*1A, *1B, *1F, *1G, *1J, *1M, *4, and *9 were 23.4%, 53.1%, 3.7%, 2.6%, 2.6%, 13.5%, 0.5%, and 0.5%, respectively. The frequency of *1F, a putative high inducibility allele, was higher in our sample population compared with that in the Caucasian population (p < 0.05). The most common genotype combinations were *1A/*1B (46.9%) and *1B/*1M (27.1%). 4. Our results provide basic information on CYP1A2 polymorphisms in Uyghur individuals and suggest that the enzymatic activities of CYP1A2 may differ among the diverse ethnic populations of the world.

  10. The phenotype of a flavin-containing monooyxgenase knockout mouse implicates the drug-metabolizing enzyme FMO1 as a novel regulator of energy balance.

    PubMed

    Veeravalli, Sunil; Omar, Bilal A; Houseman, Lyndsey; Hancock, Matthew; Gonzalez Malagon, Sandra G; Scott, Flora; Janmohamed, Azara; Phillips, Ian R; Shephard, Elizabeth A

    2014-07-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) of mammals are thought to be involved exclusively in the metabolism of foreign chemicals. Here, we report the unexpected finding that mice lacking Fmos 1, 2 and 4 exhibit a lean phenotype and, despite similar food intake, weigh less and store less triglyceride in white adipose tissue (WAT) than wild-type mice. This is a consequence of enhanced whole-body energy expenditure, due mostly to increased resting energy expenditure (REE). This is fuelled, in part, by increased fatty acid β-oxidation in skeletal muscle, which would contribute to depletion of lipid stores in WAT. The enhanced energy expenditure is attributed, in part, to an increased capacity for exercise. There is no evidence that the enhanced REE is due to increased adaptive thermogenesis; instead, our results are consistent with the operation in WAT of a futile energy cycle. In contrast to FMO2 and FMO4, FMO1 is highly expressed in metabolic tissues, including liver, kidney, WAT and BAT. This and other evidence implicates FMO1 as underlying the phenotype. The identification of a novel, previously unsuspected, role for FMO1 as a regulator of energy homeostasis establishes, for the first time, a role for a mammalian FMO in endogenous metabolism. Thus, FMO1 can no longer be considered to function exclusively as a xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme. Consequently, chronic administration of drugs that are substrates for FMO1 would be expected to affect energy homeostasis, via competition for endogenous substrates, and, thus, have important implications for the general health of patients and their response to drug therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Advances in drug metabolism and pharmacogenetics research in Australia.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Peter I; Somogyi, Andrew A; Miners, John O

    2017-02-01

    Metabolism facilitates the elimination, detoxification and excretion in urine or bile (as biotransformation products) of a myriad of structurally diverse drugs and other chemicals. The metabolism of drugs, non-drug xenobiotics and many endogenous compounds is catalyzed by families of drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs). These include the hemoprotein-containing cytochromes P450, which function predominantly as monooxygenases, and conjugation enzymes that transfer a sugar, sulfate, acetate or glutathione moiety to substrates containing a suitable acceptor functional group. Drug and chemical metabolism, especially the enzymes that catalyse these reactions, has been the research focus of several groups in Australia for over four decades. In this review, we highlight the role of recent and current drug metabolism research in Australia, including elucidation of the structure and function of enzymes from the various DME families, factors that modulate enzyme activity in humans (e.g. drug-drug interactions, gene expression and genetic polymorphism) and the application of in vitro approaches for the prediction of drug metabolism parameters in humans, along with the broader pharmacological/clinical pharmacological and toxicological significance of drug metabolism and DMEs and their relevance to drug discovery and development, and to clinical practice.

  12. Hepatocytes as a tool in drug metabolism, transport and safety evaluations in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Sahi, Jasminder; Grepper, Susan; Smith, Cornelia

    2010-09-01

    The liver is the primary site of metabolism for most drugs. Its major roles include detoxification of the systemic and portal blood, and production and secretion of critical blood and biliary components. A number of liver-derived in vitro systems, such as slices, primary and immortalized hepatocytes, microsomes and S9 fractions are used to assess the metabolism and potential toxicity of new chemical entities. Over the past decade, primary hepatocytes have become a standard in vitro tool to evaluate hepatic drug metabolism, cytochrome P450 (P450) induction, and drug interactions affecting hepatic metabolism. While earlier, hepatocytes were used in suspension for metabolic stability evaluations, more recent studies have demonstrated the added value of using these over longer terms in primary culture. Primary hepatocyte cultures are particularly useful in the evaluation of low turn-over compounds. Hepatic transporter studies are recommended for drug candidates that are predominantly eliminated through the bile. An appropriate strategy is to use primary hepatocytes to assess uptake, followed by singly transfected cell lines to identify the specific transporter(s) involved. Primary hepatocytes can also be used to assess biliary clearance to enable improved hepatic clearance predictions. Newer technologies such as siRNA can be used to knock out specific transporters for more predictive evaluations of potential clinically-based drug-drug interactions. In vitro safety (toxicology) studies have historically been conducted using cell lines. There is increasing evidence that co-cultures of primary hepatocytes and Kupffer cells would be more predictive of the in vivo outcome, as this system provides the complete complement of drug metabolizing enzymes, transcription factors and cytokines necessary to get a more in vivo-like toxicological response. In this review, we will discuss standard and novel in vitro approaches for using primary hepatocytes to extrapolate clinical

  13. Regulation of drug metabolism in man by environmental chemicals and diet.

    PubMed

    Conney, A H; Pantuck, E J; Hsiao, K C; Kuntzman, R; Alvares, A P; Kappas, A

    1977-04-01

    Studies in animals have shown that many environmental pollutants induce the synthesis or inhibit the activity of microsomal mixed-function oxygenases that metabolize drugs, carcinogens and normal body constituents such as steroid hormones. These effects on microsomal enzyme activity alter the duration and intensity of action of foreign and endogenous chemicals in animals, and such effects on metabolism may influence the carcinogenicity of some pollutants in man. Studies on the effects of environmental chemicals on drug metabolism in man are sparse. Exposure of humans to DDT or lindane in a pesticide factory results in an enhanced rate of metabolism of antipyrine and phenylbutazone and an increased urinary excretion of 6-beta-hydroxycortisol. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in cigarette smoke, in charcoal-broiled meats, and in polluted city air are potent inducers of drug-metabolizing enzymes in animals. In humans, cigarette smoking stimulates the activity of placental enzymes that metabolize several drugs and carcinogens. In addition, cigarette smokers metabolize phenacetin, theophylline, and other drugs more rapidly in vivo than nonsmokers. Dietary factors are important in the regulation of drug metabolism in animals and man. Feeding rats brussels sprouts or cabbage stimulates the intestinal and hepatic metabolism of drugs in animals. This effect is caused, at least in part, by certain indoles normally present in these vegetables. The feeding of a charcoal-broiled beef diet to rats stimulates the metabolism of phenacetin in vitro, and a similar diet stimulates the in vivo metabolism of phenacetin in man. It is likely that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are the major inducers in charcoal-broiled beef.

  14. Hepatic Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs). No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been carried out through life stages in any species. RESULTS: Using full-genome arrays, the mRNA expression of all XMETs and their regulatory proteins was examined during fetal (gestation day (GD) 19), neonatal (postnatal day (PND) 7), prepubescent (PND32), middle age (12 months), and old age (18 and 24 months) in the C57BL/6J (C57) mouse liver and compared to adults. Fetal and neonatal life stages exhibited dramatic differences in XMET mRNA expression compared to the relatively minor effects of old age. The total number of XMET probe sets that differed from adults was 636, 500, 84, 5, 43, and 102 for GD19, PND7, PND32, 12 months, 18 months and 24 months, respectively. At all life stages except PND32, under-expressed genes outnumbered over-expressed genes. The altered XMETs included those in all of the major metabolic and transport phases including introduction of reactive or polar groups (Phase I), conjugation (Phase II) and excretion (Phase III). In the fetus and neonate, parallel increases in expression were noted in the dioxin receptor, Nrf2 components and their regulated genes while nuclear receptors and regulated genes were generally down-regulated. Suppression of male-specific XMETs w

  15. Low-Turnover Drug Molecules: A Current Challenge for Drug Metabolism Scientists.

    PubMed

    Hutzler, J Matthew; Ring, Barbara J; Anderson, Shelby R

    2015-12-01

    In vitro assays using liver subcellular fractions or suspended hepatocytes for characterizing the metabolism of drug candidates play an integral role in the optimization strategy employed by medicinal chemists. However, conventional in vitro assays have limitations in their ability to predict clearance and generate metabolites for low-turnover (slowly metabolized) drug molecules. Due to a rapid loss in the activity of the drug-metabolizing enzymes, in vitro incubations are typically performed for a maximum of 1 hour with liver microsomes to 4 hours with suspended hepatocytes. Such incubations are insufficient to generate a robust metabolic response for compounds that are slowly metabolized. Thus, the challenge of accurately estimating low human clearance with confidence has emerged to be among the top challenges that drug metabolism scientists are confronted with today. In response, investigators have evaluated novel methodologies to extend incubation times and more sufficiently measure metabolism of low-turnover drugs. These methods include plated human hepatocytes in monoculture, and a novel in vitro methodology using a relay of sequential incubations with suspended cryopreserved hepatocytes. In addition, more complex in vitro cellular models, such as HepatoPac (Hepregen, Medford, MA), a micropatterned hepatocyte-fibroblast coculture system, and the HµREL (Beverley Hills, CA) hepatic coculture system, have been developed and characterized that demonstrate prolonged enzyme activity. In this review, the advantages and disadvantages of each of these in vitro methodologies as it relates to the prediction of clearance and metabolite identification will be described in an effort to provide drug metabolism scientists with the most up-to-date experimental options for dealing with the complex issue of low-turnover drug candidates.

  16. Effect of Traumatic Brain Injury, Erythropoietin, and Anakinra on Hepatic Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters in an Experimental Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gail D; Peterson, Todd C; Vonder Haar, Cole; Farin, Fred M; Bammler, Theo K; MacDonald, James W; Kantor, Eric D; Hoane, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    In contrast to considerable data demonstrating a decrease in cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity in inflammation and infection, clinically, traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in an increase in CYP and UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of TBI alone and with treatment with erythropoietin (EPO) or anakinra on the gene expression of hepatic inflammatory proteins, drug-metabolizing enzymes, and transporters in a cortical contusion impact (CCI) injury model. Microarray-based transcriptional profiling was used to determine the effect on gene expression at 24 h, 72 h, and 7 days post-CCI. Plasma cytokine and liver protein concentrations of CYP2D4, CYP3A1, EPHX1, and UGT2B7 were determined. There was no effect of TBI, TBI + EPO, or TBI + anakinra on gene expression of the inflammatory factors shown to be associated with decreased expression of hepatic metabolic enzymes in models of infection and inflammation. IL-6 plasma concentrations were increased in TBI animals and decreased with EPO and anakinra treatment. There was no significant effect of TBI and/or anakinra on gene expression of enzymes or transporters known to be involved in drug disposition. TBI + EPO treatment decreased the gene expression of Cyp2d4 at 72 h with a corresponding decrease in CYP2D4 protein at 72 h and 7 days. CYP3A1 protein was decreased at 24 h. In conclusion, EPO treatment may result in a significant decrease in the metabolism of Cyp-metabolized drugs. In contrast to clinical TBI, there was not a significant effect of experimental TBI on CYP or UGT metabolic enzymes.

  17. Influence of Sulforaphane Metabolites on Activities of Human Drug-Metabolizing Cytochrome P450 and Determination of Sulforaphane in Human Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Vanduchova, Alena; Tomankova, Veronika; Anzenbacher, Pavel; Anzenbacherova, Eva

    2016-12-01

    The influence of metabolites of sulforaphane, natural compounds present in broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis italica) and in other cruciferous vegetables, on drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in human liver microsomes and possible entry of sulforaphane into human hepatic cells were investigated. Metabolites studied are compounds derived from sulforaphane by the mercapturic acid pathway (conjugation with glutathione and by following reactions), namely sulforaphane glutathione and sulforaphane cysteine conjugates and sulforaphane-N-acetylcysteine. Their possible effect on four drug-metabolizing CYP enzymes, CYP3A4 (midazolam 1'-hydroxylation), CYP2D6 (bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation), CYP1A2 (7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation), and CYP2B6 (7-ethoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin O-deethylation), was tested. Inhibition of four prototypical CYP activities by sulforaphane metabolites was studied in pooled human liver microsomes. Sulforaphane metabolites did not considerably affect biological function of drug-metabolizing CYPs in human liver microsomes except for CYP2D6, which was found to be inhibited down to 73-78% of the original activity. Analysis of the entry of sulforaphane into human hepatocytes was done by cell disruption by sonication, methylene chloride extraction, and modified high-performance liquid chromatography method. The results have shown penetration of sulforaphane into the human hepatic cells.

  18. Changes in Human Drug Metabolism after Long-term Exposure to Hypnotics

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, I. H.; Browning, Margaret; Crooks, J.; O'Malley, K.

    1972-01-01

    The influence of the newer, non-barbiturate hypnotics Mandrax (diphenhydramine-methaqualone) and nitrazepam on drug-metabolizing capacity was assessed and compared with the effect of amylobarbitone, a known inducer of drug-metabolizing enzymes. Plasma antipyrine and phenylbutazone half-lives and urinary output of 6β-hydroxycortisol were used as indices. Volunteer subjects were exposed to therapeutic amounts of these agents and, in the case of Mandrax and barbiturates, further studies were carried out in dependent patients. Mandrax but not nitrazepam increased the rate of drug metabolism, presumably by enzyme induction. The degree of induction was comparable with that produced by hypnotic doses of amylobarbitone. The Mandrax-dependent and barbiturate-dependent patients were the fastest metabolizers studied. It is concluded that drug interactions resulting from interference with drug metabolism are as likely to occur with Mandrax as with barbiturates. On the other hand, it is unlikely that such drug interactions would occur with nitrazepam. PMID:4637511

  19. Drug metabolism in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Pichette, Vincent; Leblond, François A

    2003-04-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies conducted in patients with CRF demonstrate that the nonrenal clearance of multiple drugs is reduced. Although the mechanism by which this occurs is unclear, several studies have shown that CRF affects the metabolism of drugs by inhibiting key enzymatic systems in the liver, intestine and kidney. The down-regulation of selected isoforms of the hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP450) has been reported secondary to a decrease in gene expression. This is associated with major reductions in metabolism of drugs mediated by CYP450. The main hypothesis to explain the decrease in liver CYP450 activity in CRF appears to be the accumulation of circulating factors which can modulate CYP450 activity. Liver phase II metabolic reactions are also reduced in CRF. On the other hand, intestinal drug disposition is affected in CRF. Increased bioavailability of several drugs has been reported in CRF, reflecting decrease in either intestinal first-pass metabolism or extrusion of drugs (mediated by P-glycoprotein). Indeed, intestinal CYP450 is also down-regulated secondary to reduced gene expression, whereas, decreased intestinal P-glycoprotein activity has been described. Finally, although the kidneys play a major role in the excretion of drugs, it has the capacity to metabolize endogenous and exogenous compounds. CRF will lead to a decrease in the ability of the kidney to metabolize drugs, but the repercussions on the systemic clearance of drugs is still poorly defined, except for selected xenobiotics. In conclusion, reduced drug metabolism should be taken into account when evaluating the pharmacokinetics of drugs in patients with CRF.

  20. Exploring the Role of CYP3A4 Mediated Drug Metabolism in the Pharmacological Modulation of Nitric Oxide Production.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Del Palacio, José; Díaz, Caridad; Vergara, Noemí; Algieri, Francesca; Rodríguez-Nogales, Alba; de Pedro, Nuria; Rodríguez-Cabezas, M Elena; Genilloud, Olga; Gálvez, Julio; Vicente, Francisca

    2017-01-01

    Nitric-oxide synthase, the enzyme responsible for mammalian nitric oxide generation, and cytochrome P450, the major enzymes involved in drug metabolism, share striking similarities. Therefore, it makes sense that cytochrome P450 drug mediated biotransformations might play an important role in the pharmacological modulation of nitric oxide synthase. In this work, we have undertaken an integrated in vitro assessment of the hepatic metabolism and nitric oxide modulation of previously described dual inhibitors (imidazoles and macrolides) of these enzymes in order assess the implication of CYP450 activities over production of nitric oxide. In vitro systems based in human liver microsomes and activated mouse macrophages were developed for these purposes. Additionally in vitro production the hepatic metabolites of dual inhibitor, roxithromycin, was investigated achieving the identification and isolation of main hepatic biotransformation products. Our results suggested that for some macrolide compounds, the cytochrome P450 3A4 derived drug metabolites have an important effect on nitric oxide production and might critically contribute to the pharmacological immunomodulatory activity observed.

  1. Exploring the Role of CYP3A4 Mediated Drug Metabolism in the Pharmacological Modulation of Nitric Oxide Production

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-del Palacio, José; Díaz, Caridad; Vergara, Noemí; Algieri, Francesca; Rodríguez-Nogales, Alba; de Pedro, Nuria; Rodríguez-Cabezas, M. Elena; Genilloud, Olga; Gálvez, Julio; Vicente, Francisca

    2017-01-01

    Nitric-oxide synthase, the enzyme responsible for mammalian nitric oxide generation, and cytochrome P450, the major enzymes involved in drug metabolism, share striking similarities. Therefore, it makes sense that cytochrome P450 drug mediated biotransformations might play an important role in the pharmacological modulation of nitric oxide synthase. In this work, we have undertaken an integrated in vitro assessment of the hepatic metabolism and nitric oxide modulation of previously described dual inhibitors (imidazoles and macrolides) of these enzymes in order assess the implication of CYP450 activities over production of nitric oxide. In vitro systems based in human liver microsomes and activated mouse macrophages were developed for these purposes. Additionally in vitro production the hepatic metabolites of dual inhibitor, roxithromycin, was investigated achieving the identification and isolation of main hepatic biotransformation products. Our results suggested that for some macrolide compounds, the cytochrome P450 3A4 derived drug metabolites have an important effect on nitric oxide production and might critically contribute to the pharmacological immunomodulatory activity observed. PMID:28446877

  2. Regulation of CYP1A1 by heavy metals and consequences for drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; Elbekai, Reem H; El-Kadi, Ayman Os

    2009-05-01

    Cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) is a hepatic and extrahepatic enzyme that is regulated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway. With the growing human exposure to heavy metals, emerging evidence suggests that heavy metals exposure alter CYP1A1 enzyme activity. Heavy metals regulate CYP1A1 at different levels of its aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway in a metal- and species-dependent manner. The importance of CYP1A1 emerges from the fact that it has been always associated with the metabolism of pro-carcinogenic compounds to highly carcinogenic metabolites. However, recently CYP1A1 has gained status along with other cytochrome P450 enzymes in the metabolism of drugs and mediating drug-drug interactions. In addition, CYP1A1 has become a therapeutic tool for the bioactivation of prodrugs, particularly cytotoxic agents. In this review, we shed light on the effect of seven heavy metals, namely arsenic, mercury, lead, cadmium, chromium, copper and vanadium, on CYP1A1 and the consequences on drug metabolism.

  3. Characterization of increased drug metabolism activity in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-treated Huh7 hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, S; Sainz, B; Corcoran, P; Uprichard, S; Jeong, H

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize Huh7 cells' baseline capacity to metabolize drugs and to investigate whether the drug metabolism was enhanced upon treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of major Phase I and Phase II enzymes were determined by quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and activities of major drug-metabolizing enzymes were examined using probe drugs by analysing relevant metabolite production rates. The expression levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes in control Huh7 cells were generally very low, but DMSO treatment dramatically increased the mRNA levels of most drug-metabolizing enzymes as well as other liver-specific proteins. Importantly, functionality assays confirmed concomitant increases in drug-metabolizing enzyme activity. Additionally, treatment of the Huh7 cells with 3-methylcholanthrene induced cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 expression. The results indicate that DMSO treatment of Huh7 cells profoundly enhances their differentiation state, thus improving the usefulness of this common cell line as an in vitro hepatocyte model.

  4. Computational prediction of human drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Andreyev, Sergey; Ryabov, Andy; Kirillov, Eugene; Rakhmatulin, Eugene A; Bugrim, Andrej; Nikolskaya, Tatiana

    2005-08-01

    There is an urgent requirement within the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, regulatory authorities and academia to improve the success of molecules that are selected for clinical trials. Although absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADME/Tox) properties are some of the many components that contribute to successful drug discovery and development, they represent factors for which we currently have in vitro and in vivo data that can be modelled computationally. Understanding the possible toxicity and the metabolic fate of xenobiotics in the human body is particularly important in early drug discovery. There is, therefore, a need for computational methodologies for uncovering the relationships between the structure and the biological activity of novel molecules. The convergence of numerous technologies, including high-throughput techniques, databases, ADME/Tox modelling and systems biology modelling, is leading to the foundation of systems-ADME/Tox. Results from experiments can be integrated with predictions to globally simulate and understand the likely complete effects of a molecule in humans. The development and early application of major components of MetaDrug (GeneGo, Inc.) software will be described, which includes rule-based metabolite prediction, quantitative structure-activity relationship models for major drug metabolising enzymes, and an extensive database of human protein-xenobiotic interactions. This represents a combined approach to predicting drug metabolism. MetaDrug can be readily used for visualising Phase I and II metabolic pathways, as well as interpreting high-throughput data derived from microarrays as networks of interacting objects. This will ultimately aid in hypothesis generation and the early triaging of molecules likely to have undesirable predicted properties or measured effects on key proteins and cellular functions.

  5. Coleus forskohlii extract induces hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes in mice.

    PubMed

    Virgona, Nantiga; Yokotani, Kaori; Yamazaki, Yuko; Shimura, Fumio; Chiba, Tsuyoshi; Taki, Yuko; Yamada, Shizuo; Shinozuka, Kazumasa; Murata, Masatsune; Umegaki, Keizo

    2012-03-01

    Coleus forskohlii root extract (CFE) is popular for use as a weight loss dietary supplement. In this study, the influence of standardized CFE containing 10% active component forskolin on the hepatic drug metabolizing system was investigated to evaluate the safety through its drug interaction potential. Male ICR mice were fed AIN93G-based diets containing 0-5% CFE or 0.05% pure forskolin for 2-3 weeks. Intake of two different sources of 0.5% CFE significantly increased the relative liver weight, total content of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) and induced CYPs (especially 2B, 2C, 3A types) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities. CFE significantly increased mRNA expression of CYPs and GST with dose related responses. However, unlike the CFE, intake of 0.05% pure forskolin was found to be associated with only weak induction in CYP3A and GST activities with no significant increases in relative liver weight, total hepatic content or other CYPs activities. The inductions of CYPs and GST by CFE were observed at 1 week of feeding and rapidly recovered by discontinuation of CFE. These results indicated the induction potential of CFE on CYPs, and that this effect was predominantly due to other, as yet unidentified constituents, and not forskolin contained in CFE. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dietary effects of marine food intake on intestinal and hepatic enzyme activities in rats.

    PubMed

    González, M; Caride, B; Lamas, A; Taboada, C

    2001-03-01

    Dietary effects of two diets high in protein from two marine species (Haliotis tuberculata and Anemonia viridis) as compared to a high-quality patron protein such as casein (or casein supplemented with olive oil) on intestinal and hepatic enzymes were studied. After 23 days, the two marine species as diet compared to casein increased the disaccharidase and alkaline phosphatase activities. Feeding Haliotis tuberculata meal produced a decrease on intestinal leucine aminopeptidase activity. The hepatic gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity decreased slightly in animals fed Haliotis tuberculata meal. Supplementation of casein with olive oil tended to decrease the intestinal and hepatic enzyme activity.

  7. Discussion-Based Instruction in Drug Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruenitz, Peter C.

    1995-01-01

    A flexible strategy for large-group pharmacy instruction in drug metabolism has students prepare and discuss answers to fact-oriented study questions, addressing fundamentals covered in a textbook, with regular evaluation of in-class student responses to higher-order review questions. This discussion-based approach has brought sustained…

  8. Part 3: Pharmacogenetic Variability in Phase II Anticancer Drug Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Deenen, Maarten J.; Cats, Annemieke; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2011-01-01

    Equivalent drug doses may lead to wide interpatient variability in drug response to anticancer therapy. Known determinants that may affect the pharmacological response to a drug are, among others, nongenetic factors, including age, gender, use of comedication, and liver and renal function. Nonetheless, these covariates do not explain all the observed interpatient variability. Differences in genetic constitution among patients have been identified to be important factors that contribute to differences in drug response. Because genetic polymorphism may affect the expression and activity of proteins encoded, it is a key covariate that is responsible for variability in drug metabolism, drug transport, and pharmacodynamic drug effects. We present a series of four reviews about pharmacogenetic variability. This third part in the series of reviews is focused on genetic variability in phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (glutathione S-transferases, uridine diphosphoglucuronosyl transferases, methyltransferases, sulfotransferases, and N-acetyltransferases) and discusses the effects of genetic polymorphism within the genes encoding these enzymes on anticancer drug therapy outcome. Based on the literature reviewed, opportunities for patient-tailored anticancer therapy are proposed. PMID:21659608

  9. A Pharmacogenetic Screening Experiment Demonstrating Principles of Genetic Constitution on Drug Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Doris K.; Wedlund, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed to provide rapid, inexpensive student exposure to pharmacogenetics in drug elimination and patient therapy is described. The test, performed on students, determines expression of a drug metabolism enzyme following ingestion of a probe drug. (Author/MSE)

  10. Large-scale multiplex absolute protein quantification of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in human intestine, liver, and kidney microsomes by SWATH-MS: Comparison with MRM/SRM and HR-MRM/PRM.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kenji; Hirayama-Kurogi, Mio; Ito, Shingo; Kuno, Takuya; Yoneyama, Toshihiro; Obuchi, Wataru; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Ohtsuki, Sumio

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine simultaneously the absolute protein amounts of 152 membrane and membrane-associated proteins, including 30 metabolizing enzymes and 107 transporters, in pooled microsomal fractions of human liver, kidney, and intestine by means of SWATH-MS with stable isotope-labeled internal standard peptides, and to compare the results with those obtained by MRM/SRM and high resolution (HR)-MRM/PRM. The protein expression levels of 27 metabolizing enzymes, 54 transporters, and six other membrane proteins were quantitated by SWATH-MS; other targets were below the lower limits of quantitation. Most of the values determined by SWATH-MS differed by less than 50% from those obtained by MRM/SRM or HR-MRM/PRM. Various metabolizing enzymes were expressed in liver microsomes more abundantly than in other microsomes. Ten, 13, and eight transporters listed as important for drugs by International Transporter Consortium were quantified in liver, kidney, and intestinal microsomes, respectively. Our results indicate that SWATH-MS enables large-scale multiplex absolute protein quantification while retaining similar quantitative capability to MRM/SRM or HR-MRM/PRM. SWATH-MS is expected to be useful methodology in the context of drug development for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of drug absorption, metabolism, and excretion in the human body based on protein profile information.

  11. Hepatocytes--the choice to investigate drug metabolism and toxicity in man: in vitro variability as a reflection of in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Lechón, María José; Castell, José Vicente; Donato, María Teresa

    2007-05-20

    The pharmaceutical industry is committed to marketing safer drugs with fewer side effects, predictable pharmacokinetic properties and quantifiable drug-drug interactions. Drug metabolism is a major determinant of drug clearance and interindividual pharmacokinetic differences, and an indirect determinant of the clinical efficacy and toxicity of drugs. Progressive advances in the knowledge of metabolic routes and enzymes responsible for drug biotransformation have contributed to understanding the great metabolic variations existing in human beings. Phenotypic as well genotypic differences in the expression of the enzymes involved in drug metabolism are the main causes of this variability. However, only a minor part of phenotypic variability in man is attributable to gene polymorphisms, thus making the definition of a normal liver complex. At present, the use of human in vitro hepatic models at early preclinical stages means that the process of selecting drug candidates is becoming much more rational. Cultured human hepatocytes are considered to be the closest model to human liver. However, the fact that hepatocytes are located in a microenvironment that differs from that of the cell in the liver raises the question: to what extent does drug metabolism variability observed in vitro actually reflect that of the liver in vivo? By comparing the metabolism of a model compound both in vitro and in vivo in the same individual, a good correlation between the in vitro and in vivo relative abundance of oxidized metabolites and the hydrolysis of the compound was observed. Thus, it is reasonable to consider that the variability observed in human hepatocytes reflects the existing phenotypic heterogeneity of the P450 expression in human liver.

  12. The ameliorating effects of vitamin E on hepatic antioxidant system and xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in fenvalerate-exposed iodine-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Kocer-Gumusel, Belma; Erkekoglu, Pinar; Caglayan, Aydan; Hincal, Filiz

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of vitamin E (VE) on hepatic antioxidant system and drug-metabolizing enzymes in fenvalerate (FEN)-exposed iodine-deficient (ID) Wistar rats. ID was produced by perchlorate containing drinking water. VE was introduced by a loading dose of 100 mg/kg/d, i.g. for the first three days in the last week of feeding period; then with a single maintenance dose of 40 mg/kg on the 4th day. During last week, FEN groups (F) received 100 mg/kg/d, i.p. FEN. VE alone did not significantly affect thyroid hormones and antioxidant parameters; however, significantly increased total cytochrome P450 (38%) and cytochrome b5 levels (36%). In all ID groups, plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels increased markedly, but remained at control level in vitamin E plus FEN receiving iodine-deficient group (IDVF) group. Glutathione peroxidase activity showed marked increases in F (19%) and FEN-exposed iodine-deficient group (IDF, 48%) groups. FEN treatment significantly increased total cytochrome P450 (28%) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance levels (36%), as well as 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (120%), 7-penthoxyresorufin O-deethylase (139%) and glutathione S-transferase (15%) activities and decreased total glutathione concentrations (28%) versus control. Overall results suggest that vitamin E has ameliorating effects on the measured parameters in ID and/or FEN exposure.

  13. Clinical review: Drug metabolism and nonrenal clearance in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Vilay, A Mary; Churchwell, Mariann D; Mueller, Bruce A

    2008-01-01

    Decreased renal drug clearance is an obvious consequence of acute kidney injury (AKI). However, there is growing evidence to suggest that nonrenal drug clearance is also affected. Data derived from human and animal studies suggest that hepatic drug metabolism and transporter function are components of nonrenal clearance affected by AKI. Acute kidney injury may also impair the clearance of formed metabolites. The fact that AKI does not solely influence kidney function may have important implications for drug dosing, not only of renally eliminated drugs but also of those that are hepatically cleared. A review of the literature addressing the topic of drug metabolism and clearance alterations in AKI reveals that changes in nonrenal clearance are highly complicated and poorly studied, but they may be quite common. At present, our understanding of how AKI affects drug metabolism and nonrenal clearance is limited. However, based on the available evidence, clinicians should be cognizant that even hepatically eliminated drugs and formed drug metabolites may accumulate during AKI, and renal replacement therapy may affect nonrenal clearance as well as drug metabolite clearance. PMID:19040780

  14. Novel aspects of drug metabolism and transport.

    PubMed

    Afzelius, Lovisa; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Karlgren, Maria; Rodriguez-Antona, Cristina

    2006-12-01

    The 16th International Symposium on Microsomes and Drug Oxidations (MDO2006) in Budapest, Hungary, had almost 400 attendees and was nicely organized by Laszlo Vereczkey and colleagues. The meeting had a very high standard in the field of drug metabolism, drug transport and related areas and in addition, the social events were much appreciated. At the meeting 70 invited lectures were presented in plenary sessions and in three parallel symposia sessions, and about 178 posters were shown, among them 26 posters in the young investigators workshop. The review herein is given of a majority (57) of the lectures presented at the Symposium.

  15. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Chandra; Zuniga, Baltazar; Song, Chung Seog; Jiang, Shoulei; Cropper, Jodie; Park, Sulgi; Chatterjee, Bandana

    2016-01-01

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR), due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification) facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs) on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome) of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug’s impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse models and

  16. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Chandra; Zuniga, Baltazar; Song, Chung Seog; Jiang, Shoulei; Cropper, Jodie; Park, Sulgi; Chatterjee, Bandana

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR), due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification) facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs) on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome) of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug's impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse models and

  17. High-throughput screening to estimate single or multiple enzymes involved in drug metabolism: microtitre plate assay using a combination of recombinant CYP2D6 and human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Suzuki, A; Kohno, Y

    2003-08-01

    1. The purpose of this study was to estimate readily involvement of single or multiple enzymes in the metabolism of a drug through inhibitory assessment. Inhibitory effects of various compounds on CYP2D6 activity assayed by formation of fluorescent metabolite from 3-[2-(N,N-diethyl-N-methyl-ammonium)ethyl]-7-methoxy-4-methyl-coumarin (AMMC) were assessed using microtitre plate (MTP) assays with a combination of recombinant CYP2D6 and human liver microsomes (HLM). 2. Among various compounds studied, antipsychotic drugs extensively inhibited recombinant CYP2D6 activity and the IC50 values were generally lower than those of antidepressants and antiarrhythmic drugs. 3. After pre-incubation, the IC50 values of mianserin, chlorpromadine, risperidone, thioridazine, alprenolol, propafenone and dextromethorphan increased but the values of timolol, S-metoprolol and propranolol substantially decreased compared with those in case of co-incubation. 4. The IC50 values of typical substrates of CYP2D6 (bufuralol and dextromethorphan at lower substrate concentration) in inhibition studies using HLM, were similar to those in the case of recombinant CYP2D6, but the values of the compounds that are metabolized by multiple CYP forms (perphenazine and chlorpromazine) in HLM were much larger. 5. If the ratio (HLM/rCYP ratio) of IC50 values between HLM and recombinant CYP2D6 exceeds approximately 2, it suggests that other CYP forms in addition to CYP2D6 might be involved in the metabolism of the test compounds. From the advantage such as speed, high throughput and ease of the technique, the MTP assay using a combination of the recombinant CYP2D6 and HLM is useful to estimate the involvement of single or multiple enzymes in the metabolism of drugs at the stage of drug discovery.

  18. Expression of hepatic antioxidant enzymes in non-obese type-2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Chang Seon; Oh, Soo Jin; Oh, Jung Min; Lee, Sang Yoon; Kwak, Hui Chan; Yun, Kang Uk; Lee, Ji-Yoon; Park, Song-Kyu; Kim, Bong-Hee; Ma, Jin Yeul; Kim, Sang Kyum

    2014-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus and its complications have been attributed in part to oxidative stress, against which antioxidant enzymes constitute a major protective mechanism. The present study was performed to investigate the effects of early stage type 2 diabetes in the absence of obesity and liver damage on hepatic antioxidant enzyme expression and oxidative stress using 9-week-old Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats. Hepatic total antioxidant capacity determined by total oxygen radical scavenging capacity and lipid peroxidation determined by malondialdehyde in plasma and liver were not significantly different between normal Wistar rats and GK rats. These results indicated that oxidative stress is not evident in these type 2 diabetic rats. Hepatic expression levels of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase-1, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and reductase, thioredoxin-1, mu- and pi-class glutathione S-transferase (GST), and the gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit, were not different between normal rats and GK rats. But, hepatic level and activity of alpha-class GST were decreased and peroxiredoxin-1 level was increased in GK rats, suggesting that upregulation of peroxiredoxin-1 compensates for downregulation of alpha-class GST. These results suggest that alpha-class GST and peroxiredoxin-1 in liver can be altered during the early stages of type 2 diabetes in the absence of obesity and severe oxidative stress.

  19. Functional crosstalk of CAR-LXR and ROR-LXR in drug metabolism and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lei; Xie, Xinni; Zhai, Yonggong

    2010-10-30

    Nuclear receptor crosstalk represents an important mechanism to expand the functions of individual receptors. The liver X receptors (LXR, NR1H2/3), both the α and β isoforms, are nuclear receptors that can be activated by the endogenous oxysterols and other synthetic agonists. LXRs function as cholesterol sensors, which protect mammals from cholesterol overload. LXRs have been shown to regulate the expression of a battery of metabolic genes, especially those involved in lipid metabolism. LXRs have recently been suggested to play a novel role in the regulation of drug metabolism. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is a xenobiotic receptor that regulates the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Disruption of CAR alters sensitivity to toxins, increasing or decreasing it depending on the compounds. More recently, additional roles for CAR have been discovered. These include the involvement of CAR in lipid metabolism. Mechanistically, CAR forms an intricate regulatory network with other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily, foremost the LXRs, in exerting its effect on lipid metabolism. Retinoid-related orphan receptors (RORs, NR1F1/2/3) have three isoforms, α, β and γ. Recent reports have shown that loss of RORα and/or RORγ can positively or negatively influence the expression of multiple drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in the liver. The effects of RORs on expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes were reasoned to be, at least in part, due to the crosstalk with LXR. This review focuses on the CAR-LXR and ROR-LXR crosstalk, and the implications of this crosstalk in drug metabolism and lipid metabolism.

  20. Human carboxylesterase 1: from drug metabolism to drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Redinbo, M R; Bencharit, S; Potter, P M

    2003-06-01

    Human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) is a serine esterase involved in both drug metabolism and activation, as well as other biological processes. hCE1 catalyses the hydrolysis of heroin and cocaine, and the transesterification of cocaine in the presence of ethanol to the toxic metabolite cocaethylene. We have determined the crystal structures of hCE1 in complex with either the cocaine analogue homatropine or the heroin analogue naloxone. These are the first structures of a human carboxylesterase, and they provide details about narcotic metabolism in humans. hCE1's active site contains rigid and flexible pockets, explaining the enzyme's ability to act both specifically and promiscuously. hCE1 has also been reported to contain cholesteryl ester hydrolase, fatty acyl-CoA hydrolase and acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase activities, and thus appears to be involved in cholesterol metabolism. Since the enzyme may be useful as a treatment for cocaine overdose, and may afford protection against chemical weapons like Sarin, Soman and VX gas, hCE1 could serve as both a drug and a drug target. Selective hCE1 inhibitors targeted to several sites on the enzyme may also pave the way for novel clinical tools to manage cholesterol homoeostasis in humans.

  1. Effect of Helicteres isora bark extract on blood glucose and hepatic enzymes in experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G; Murugesan, A G; Rajasekara Pandian, M

    2006-04-01

    The effect of oral administration of an aqueous extract of the bark of Helicteres isora was investigated on blood glucose and plasma antioxidant status in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. The study was also undertaken to evaluate the role of hepatic enzymes in experimental diabetes. Oral administration of a bark extract of Helicteres isora (100, 200 mg/kg) in STZ diabetic rats caused a significant increase in body weight, hepatic hexokinase activity and significant decrease in hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase, serum acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Based on these findings, we suggest that Helicteres isora possesses hypoglycemic and hepatoprotective activity and is able to ameliorate biochemical damage in STZ induced diabetic rats.

  2. ecoAO: A Simple System for the Study of Human Aldehyde Oxidases Role in Drug Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Although aldehyde oxidase (AO) is an important hepatic drug-metabolizing enzyme, it remains understudied and is consequently often overlooked in preclinical studies, an oversight that has resulted in the failure of multiple clinical trials. AO’s preclusion to investigation stems from the following: (1) difficulties synthesizing metabolic standards due to the chemospecificity and regiospecificity of the enzyme and (2) significant inherent variability across existing in vitro systems including liver cytosol, S9 fractions, and primary hepatocytes, which lack specificity and generate discordant expression and activity profiles. Here, we describe a practical bacterial biotransformation system, ecoAO, addressing both issues simultaneously. ecoAO is a cell paste of MoCo-producing Escherichia coli strain TP1017 expressing human AO. It exhibits specific activity toward known substrates, zoniporide, 4-trans-(N,N-dimethylamino)cinnamaldehyde, O6-benzylguanine, and zaleplon; it also has utility as a biocatalyst, yielding milligram quantities of synthetically challenging metabolite standards such as 2-oxo-zoniporide. Moreover, ecoAO enables routine determination of kcat and V/K, which are essential parameters for accurate in vivo clearance predictions. Furthermore, ecoAO has potential as a preclinical in vitro screening tool for AO activity, as demonstrated by its metabolism of 3-aminoquinoline, a previously uncharacterized substrate. ecoAO promises to provide easy access to metabolites with the potential to improve pharmacokinetic clearance predictions and guide drug development. PMID:28884164

  3. Drug metabolism in human brain: high levels of cytochrome P4503A43 in brain and metabolism of anti-anxiety drug alprazolam to its active metabolite.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Varsha; Kommaddi, Reddy P; Valli, Khader; Ryder, Daniel; Hyde, Thomas M; Kleinman, Joel E; Strobel, Henry W; Ravindranath, Vijayalakshmi

    2008-06-11

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) is a super-family of drug metabolizing enzymes. P450 enzymes have dual function; they can metabolize drugs to pharmacologically inactive metabolites facilitating their excretion or biotransform them to pharmacologically active metabolites which may have longer half-life than the parent drug. The variable pharmacological response to psychoactive drugs typically seen in population groups is often not accountable by considering dissimilarities in hepatic metabolism. Metabolism in brain specific nuclei may play a role in pharmacological modulation of drugs acting on the CNS and help explain some of the diverse response to these drugs seen in patient population. P450 enzymes are also present in brain where drug metabolism can take place and modify therapeutic action of drugs at the site of action. We have earlier demonstrated an intrinsic difference in the biotransformation of alprazolam (ALP) in brain and liver, relatively more alpha-hydroxy alprazolam (alpha-OHALP) is formed in brain as compared to liver. In the present study we show that recombinant CYP3A43 metabolizes ALP to both alpha-OHALP and 4-hydroxy alprazolam (4-OHALP) while CYP3A4 metabolizes ALP predominantly to its inactive metabolite, 4-OHALP. The expression of CYP3A43 mRNA in human brain samples correlates with formation of relatively higher levels of alpha-OH ALP indicating that individuals who express higher levels of CYP3A43 in the brain would generate larger amounts of alpha-OHALP. Further, the expression of CYP3A43 was relatively higher in brain as compared to liver across different ethnic populations. Since CYP3A enzymes play a prominent role in the metabolism of drugs, the higher expression of CYP3A43 would generate metabolite profile of drugs differentially in human brain and thus impact the pharmacodynamics of psychoactive drugs at the site of action.

  4. Drug Metabolism in Human Brain: High Levels of Cytochrome P4503A43 in Brain and Metabolism of Anti-Anxiety Drug Alprazolam to Its Active Metabolite

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Varsha; Kommaddi, Reddy P.; Valli, Khader; Ryder, Daniel; Hyde, Thomas M.; Kleinman, Joel E.; Strobel, Henry W.; Ravindranath, Vijayalakshmi

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) is a super-family of drug metabolizing enzymes. P450 enzymes have dual function; they can metabolize drugs to pharmacologically inactive metabolites facilitating their excretion or biotransform them to pharmacologically active metabolites which may have longer half-life than the parent drug. The variable pharmacological response to psychoactive drugs typically seen in population groups is often not accountable by considering dissimilarities in hepatic metabolism. Metabolism in brain specific nuclei may play a role in pharmacological modulation of drugs acting on the CNS and help explain some of the diverse response to these drugs seen in patient population. P450 enzymes are also present in brain where drug metabolism can take place and modify therapeutic action of drugs at the site of action. We have earlier demonstrated an intrinsic difference in the biotransformation of alprazolam (ALP) in brain and liver, relatively more α-hydroxy alprazolam (α-OHALP) is formed in brain as compared to liver. In the present study we show that recombinant CYP3A43 metabolizes ALP to both α-OHALP and 4-hydroxy alprazolam (4-OHALP) while CYP3A4 metabolizes ALP predominantly to its inactive metabolite, 4-OHALP. The expression of CYP3A43 mRNA in human brain samples correlates with formation of relatively higher levels of α-OH ALP indicating that individuals who express higher levels of CYP3A43 in the brain would generate larger amounts of α-OHALP. Further, the expression of CYP3A43 was relatively higher in brain as compared to liver across different ethnic populations. Since CYP3A enzymes play a prominent role in the metabolism of drugs, the higher expression of CYP3A43 would generate metabolite profile of drugs differentially in human brain and thus impact the pharmacodynamics of psychoactive drugs at the site of action. PMID:18545703

  5. Activity of hepatic enzymes from week sixteen of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Extremera, Angeles; López-Garrido, María A; Barranco, Enriqueta; Quintero, María D; Ocete-Hita, Esther; Muñoz de Rueda, Paloma; Gila, Ana; Salmerón, Javier

    2005-12-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence, epidemiology, and mother-child repercussions of increased alanine-aminotransferase levels from week 16 of pregnancy. A longitudinal observational study of 381 pregnant women. The cause of increased alanine-aminotransferase levels during pregnancy and repercussions on the neonate were studied in 283 cases. Statistical analysis was performed with Mann-Whitney test, chi2 test, or the Fisher exact test. The mean age of the mothers was 29.9 +/- 4.8 years. Twenty-five percent presented increased gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase, alkaline phophatase, and dehydrogenase lactate from week 32. Increased alanine-aminotransferase was observed in 7.4% (95% CI, 5.00%-10.57%) of cases. Clinical disorders were light, transitory, and with no apparent cause, except for 1 hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets (HELLP) syndrome, 3 preeclampsias, and 1 gravidic cholestasis. No statistically significant differences were observed in the group of mother-child with alanine-aminotransferase normal or increased. Most increases in alanine-aminotransferase from week 16 of pregnancy are transitory, non-specific, and have no repercussions on mother or child.

  6. Cancer and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sheweita, S A; Tilmisany, A K

    2003-02-01

    Cancer development results from the interaction between genetic factors, the environment, and dietary factors have been identified as modulators of carcinogenesis process. The formation of DNA adducts is recognized as the initial step in chemical carcinogenesis. Accordingly, blocking DNA adducts formation would be the first line of defense against cancer caused by carcinogens. Glutathione-S-transferases inactivate chemical carcinogens into less toxic or inactive metabolite through reduction of DNA adducts formation. There are many different types of glutathione S-transferase isozymes. For example, GST delta serves as a marker for hepatotoxicity in rodent system, and also plays an important role in carcinogen detoxification. Therefore, inhibition of GST activity might potentiate the deleterious effects of many environmental toxicants and carcinogens. In addition, approximately half of the population lacks GST Mu expression. Epidemiological evidence showed that persons possessing this genotype are predisposed to a number of cancers including breast, prostate, liver and colon cancers. In addition, individual risk of cancer depends on the frequency of mutational events in target oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes which could lead to loss of chromosomal materials and tumor progression. The most frequent genetic alteration in a variety of human malignant tumors is the mutation of the coding sequence of the p53 tumor suppressor gene. O(6)-alkylguanine in DNA leads to very high rates of G:C deltaA:T transitions in p53 gene. These alterations will modulate the expression of p53 gene and consequently change DNA repair, cell division, and cell death by apoptosis. Also, changes in the expression of BcI-2 gene results in extended viability of cells by over-riding programmed cell death (apoptosis) induced under various conditions. The prolonged life-span increases the risk of acquiring genetic changes resulting in malignant transformation. In addition, a huge variety of food ingredients have been shown to affect cell proliferation rates. They, therefore, may either reduce or increase the risk of cancer development and progression. For example, it has been found that a high intake of dietary fat accelerates the development of breast cancer in animal models. Certain diets have been suggested to act as tumor promoters also in other types of cancer such as colon cancer, where high intake of fat and phosphate have been linked to colonic hyper-proliferation and colon cancer development. Different factors such as oncogenes, aromatic amines, alkylating agents, and diet have a significant role in cancer induction. Determination of glutathione S-transferase isozymes in plasma or serum could be used as a biomarker for cancer in different organs and could give an early detection.

  7. Inflammation, hepatic enzymes and resistance training in individuals with metabolic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Levinger, I; Goodman, C; Peake, J; Garnham, A; Hare, D L; Jerums, G; Selig, S

    2009-03-01

    Increases in inflammatory markers, hepatic enzymes and physical inactivity are associated with the development of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). We examined whether inflammatory markers and hepatic enzymes are correlated with traditional risk factors for MetS and studied the effects of resistance training (RT) on these emerging risk factors in individuals with a high number of metabolic risk factors (HiMF, 2.9 +/- 0.8) and those with a low number of metabolic risk factors (LoMF, 0.5 +/- 0.5). Twenty-eight men and 27 women aged 50.8 +/- 6.5 years (mean +/- sd) participated in the study. Participants were randomized to four groups, HiMF training (HiMFT), HiMF control (HiMFC), LoMF training (LoMFT) and LoMF control (LoMFC). Before and after 10 weeks of RT [3 days/week, seven exercises, three sets with intensity gradually increased from 40-50% of one repetition maximum (1RM) to 75-85% of 1RM], blood samples were obtained for the measurement of pro-inflammatory cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). At baseline, HiMF had higher interleukin-6 (33.9%), CRP (57.1%), GGT (45.2%) and ALT (40.6%) levels, compared with LoMF (all P < 0.05). CRP, GGT and ALT correlated with the number of risk factors (r = 0.48, 0.51 and 0.57, respectively, all P < 0.01) and with other anthropometric and clinical measures (r range from 0.26 to 0.60, P < 0.05). RT did not significantly alter inflammatory markers or hepatic enzymes (all P > 0.05). HiMF was associated with increased inflammatory markers and hepatic enzyme concentrations. RT did not reduce inflammatory markers and hepatic enzymes in individuals with HiMF.

  8. Potential Role of Epigenetic Mechanisms in the Regulation of Drug Metabolism and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Zhong, Xiao-Bo; Hankinson, Oliver; Beedanagari, Sudheer; Yu, Ai-Ming; Peng, Lai

    2013-01-01

    This is a report of a symposium on the potential role of epigenetic mechanisms in the control of drug disposition sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics and held at the Experimental Biology 2013 meeting in Boston, MA, April 21, 2013. Epigenetics is a rapidly evolving area, and recent studies have revealed that expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters is regulated by epigenetic factors, including histone modification, DNA methylation, and noncoding RNAs. The symposium speakers provided an overview of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying variable drug metabolism and drug response, as well as the implications for personalized medicine. Considerable insight into the epigenetic mechanisms in differential regulation of the dioxin-inducible drug and carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes CYP1A1 and 1B1 was provided. The role of noncoding microRNAs in the control of drug metabolism and disposition through targeting of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes and ATP-binding cassette membrane transporters was discussed. In addition, potential effects of xenobiotics on chromatin interactions and epigenomics, as well as the possible role of long noncoding RNAs in regulation of P450s during liver maturation were presented. PMID:23918665

  9. Can vaccines interact with drug metabolism?

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Paolo; Clementi, Emilio; Capuano, Annalisa; Radice, Sonia

    2015-02-01

    Vaccines are safe and efficacious in reducing the burden of several serious infections affecting children and adults. Due to their efficacy, vaccines are often administered in patients with chronic diseases, likely to be under poly-therapy. Because of several case reports indicating changes in drug metabolism after vaccination, the hypothesis of an interaction between vaccines and specific drugs has been put forward. These interactions are conceivably of great concern, especially in patients treated with molecules characterised by a narrow therapeutic index. Herein, we review and systematise the available evidence on vaccine-drug interactions. The picture that emerges indicates that reduction in the activity of specific CYPs following vaccination may occur, most likely via interferon γ overproduction, and for specific drugs such as anticonvulsivant and theophylline may have significant clinical relevance. Clinical interaction between vaccines and drugs that are metabolised by cytochromes uninfluenced by INFγ levels, such as warfarin, are instead unlikely to happen. Further studies are however needed to gain a complete picture of vaccine-drug interactions and define their relevance in terms of possible negative clinical impact.

  10. Development of Targeted, Enzyme-Activated Nano-Conjugates for Hepatic Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuruvilla, Sibu Philip

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 5th most commonly-occurring cancer worldwide and the 2nd highest cause for cancer-related deaths globally. The current treatment strategy is the direct injection of a chemotherapeutic agent (e.g. doxorubicin; DOX) into the hepatic artery, through a process called hepatic arterial infusion (HAI). Unfortunately, HAI is severely hindered by limited therapeutic efficacy against the tumor and high systemic toxicity to surrounding organs (e.g. cardiotoxicity). This thesis focuses on the development of a targeted, nanoparticle-based drug delivery system aimed to improve the clinical treatment of HCC. In particular, we employ generation 5 (G5) poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers targeted to hepatic cancer cells via N-acetylgalactosamine (NAcGal) ligands attached to the surface through a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) brush. DOX is attached to the G5 surface through two different enzyme-sensitive linkages, L3 or L4, to achieve controllable release of the drug inside hepatic cancer cells. The combination of NAcGal-PEG targeting branches with either L3- or L4-DOX linkages led to the development of P1 and P2 particles, respectively. In Part 1, we discuss the development of these particles and measure their ability to target and kill hepatic cancer cells in vitro. In Part 2, we investigate the antitumor activity of P1 and P2 particles in tumor-bearing mice in comparison to the free drug, and we measure the cardiac function of mice undergoing treatment to assess differences in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Finally, in Part 3, we explore multi-valent targeting of G5 dendrimers in pursuit of further improving their specificity to hepatic cancer cells. Ultimately, this thesis provides insight into the utility of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems that can potentially be translated to the clinic to improve cancer therapy.

  11. SOLUBLE HEPATIC δ-AMINOLEVULINIC ACID SYNTHETASE: END-PRODUCT INHIBITION OF THE PARTIALLY PURIFIED ENZYME*

    PubMed Central

    Scholnick, Perry L.; Hammaker, Lydia E.; Marver, Harvey S.

    1969-01-01

    The present study confirms the existence of hepatic δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase in the cytosol of the liver, suggests that this enzyme may be in transit to the mitochondria, and defines some of the characteristics of the partially purified enzyme. The substrate and cofactor requirements are similar to those of mitochondrial δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase. Heme strongly inhibits the partially purified enzyme. A number of proteins that bind heme block this inhibition, which explains previous failures to demonstrate heme inhibition in crude systems. End-product inhibition of δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase in the mitochondria may play an important role in the regulation of heme biosynthesis in eukaryotic cells. PMID:5257968

  12. Naturalistic observation on the hepatic enzyme changes in patients treated with either risperidone or olanzapine alone.

    PubMed

    Pae, Chi-Un; Lim, Hyun-Kook; Kim, Tae-Suk; Kim, Jung-Jin; Lee, Chang-Uk; Lee, Soo-Jung; Lee, Chul; Paik, In-Ho

    2005-05-01

    This retrospective study aimed to compare differences in hepatic enzyme elevation during treatment with either risperidone or olanzapine alone in patients with psychotic disorders. The charts were reviewed for six hundred and sixty-seven (667) inpatients with psychotic disorders who were treated with either risperidone (n=289) or olanzapine (n=145) alone at a university-affiliated hospital between 1998 and 2002. Frequencies of elevation greater than the reference level in any enzyme among aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphotase (ALP) were higher in the olanzapine-treated group (26.9%) than in the risperidone-treated group (14.2%) [odds ratio (OR)=2.225, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.362-3.638, P=0.002]. Frequencies of elevation greater than the reference level in ALT were higher in the olanzapine-treated group than in the risperidone-treated group (OR=2.182, P=0.004), as were frequencies with two-fold (OR=3.064, P=0.017) and three-fold (OR=2.883, P=0.039) elevation. Recovery time was longer in the olanzapine-treated group than in the risperidone-treated group (P=0.0059), as was latency time (P=0.0044). These results suggest that there are potential differences in antipsychotic-associated hepatic enzyme alterations between risperidone and olanzapine treatment. Controlled, prospective studies should be conducted to identify the risk factors associated with an alteration in hepatic enzymes related to treatment with risperidone and olanzapine.

  13. Activities of the enzymes of hepatic gluconeogenesis in periparturient dairy cows with induced fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Murondoti, Absolom; Jorritsma, Ruurd; Beynen, Anton C; Wensing, Theo; Geelen, Math J H

    2004-05-01

    The objective was to measure the activities of all the enzymes essential for hepatic gluconeogenesis in dairy cows with induced fatty liver. We aimed to induce severe fatty liver in ten experimental cows by overfeeding them during the dry period while seven control cows were maintained on a restricted diet. To induce a marked negative energy balance, the experimental cows were deprived of feed for 8 h immediately after parturition. In addition, the experimental cows were given a restricted amount of diet during the first 5 d of lactation. Liver samples were collected 1 week before and 1, 2 and 4 weeks after parturition. Before parturition, liver triacylglycerol concentrations did not differ between the two groups. After parturition, the experimental cows developed marked fatty liver as indicated by a higher level of triacylglycerols in the liver compared with the control cows. Before parturition, all gluconeogenic enzymes in the liver were lower in experimental cows than in control cows. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, pyruvate carboxylase and propionyl-CoA carboxylase were significantly lower and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase and glucose 6-phosphatase tended to be lower in the experimental cows. The activities of two crucial enzymes for gluconeogenesis in ruminants, i.e., phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and propionyl-CoA carboxylase, remained low throughout the sampling period post partum. Activities of pyruvate carboxylase and glucose 6-phosphatase in the experimental cows post partum were upgraded to values similar to those of the control cows. The results showed that the capacity for hepatic gluconeogenesis before parturition was lower in cows with induced fatty liver than in control cows. After parturition, the low activities of crucial gluconeogenic enzymes indicated insufficient production of glucose. It is suggested that the low gluconeogenic capacity leads successively to low blood glucose concentrations, low insulin levels and high rates of

  14. The angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril rescues mice from endotoxin-induced lethal hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Ge, Pu; Jiang, Rong; Yao, Xin; Li, Jing; Dai, Jie; Zhang, Li; Ye, Bin

    2017-02-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is classically regarded as a crucial regulator of circulatory homeostasis, but recent studies also revealed its pro-inflammatory roles. The beneficial effects of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) in severe inflammatory injury in the lung and heart have been previously reported, but its potential effects on lethal hepatitis were unknown. In this study, a mouse model with LPS/d-galactosamine (GalN)-induced fulminant hepatitis were used to test the protective potential of captopril, a representative ACEI. The results indicated that treatment with captopril significantly decreased the plasma level of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, alleviated the histopathological damage of the liver tissue and improve the survival rate of LPS/GalN-challenged mice. These effects were accompanied by reduced mRNA levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in the liver, and decreased protein level of TNF-α and IL-6 in the plasma. In addition, the activation of caspases 3, 8 and 9, and the presence of TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells, were also suppressed by captopril treatment. The above evidence suggested that the renin-angiotensin system might be involved in the development of LPS/GalN-induced fulminant hepatitis and ACEI might have potential value in lethal hepatitis.

  15. Drug metabolism by the human fetus.

    PubMed

    Juchau, M R; Chao, S T; Omiecinski, C J

    1980-01-01

    A review of the literature that pertains to drug biotransformation in human fetal tissues reveals that, in spite of several publications in this comparatively new area of research, only very limited definitive information is currently available. The large majority of the studies performed have dealt with the cytochrome P-450-dependent microsomal mono-oxygenase systems and for several of the common drug metabolising reactions, very little or no data are available at this time. Some of the more important data that have emerged include observations that important bioactivation reactions can be demonstrated in human fetal tissues obtained during the period of late embryogenesis (high susceptibility to chemical dysmorphogenesis) and that the human fetal adrenal gland possesses considerable capacity to catalyse several important oxidation-reduction reactions. From the data available to date, it would appear that, in most instances, the biotransformation of drugs in the human embryo and fetus would not affect maternal plasma concentrations significantly. From the viewpoint of parameters of the pharmacokinetics of parent drug (or other xenobiotic) substrates under steady-state conditions, human fetal drug metabolism probably is of little consequence in most cases, although exceptions may exist. Pharmacokinetic parameters observed after isolated exposure, however, are very likely to be affected, perhaps markedly, in some instances. The demonstrated capacity of human prenatal tissues and cells to generate reactive intermediary metabolites, including those that produce mutations, has attracted the greatest attention recently. This capacity may be associated with extremely important adverse reactions to drugs and other environmental chemicals. Such adverse responses include transplacental mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, dysmorphogenesis, and perhaps several other undesirable effects. Although far from conclusive, the data tend to suggest that humans and subhuman primates may be

  16. PXR variants: the impact on drug metabolism and therapeutic responses.

    PubMed

    Brewer, C Trent; Chen, Taosheng

    2016-09-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) plays an important and diverse role in mediating xenobiotic induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Several protein isoforms of PXR exist, and they have differential transcriptional activity upon target genes; transcript variants 3 (PXR3) and 4 (PXR4) do not induce target gene expression, whereas transcript variants 1 (PXR1) and 2 (PXR2) respond to agonist by activating target gene expression. PXR protein variants also display differences in protein-protein interactions; PXR1 interacts with p53, whereas PXR3 does not. Furthermore, the transcript variants of PXR that encode these protein isoforms are differentially regulated by methylation and deletions in the respective promoters of the variants, and their expression differs in various human cancers and also in cancerous tissue compared to adjacent normal tissues. PXR1 and PXR4 mRNA are downregulated by methylation in cancerous tissue and have divergent effects on cellular proliferation when ectopically overexpressed. Additional detailed and comparative mechanistic studies are required to predict the effect of PXR transcript variant expression on carcinogenesis, therapeutic response, and the development of toxicity.

  17. Present and future in vitro approaches for drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ekins, S; Ring, B J; Grace, J; McRobie-Belle, D J; Wrighton, S A

    2000-01-01

    The 1980s through 1990s witnessed the widespread incorporation of in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) approaches into drug development by drug companies. This has been exemplified by the integration of the basic science of cytochrome P450s (CYPs) into most drug metabolism departments so that information on the metabolic pathways of drugs and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is no longer an academic exercise, but essential for regulatory submission. This has come about due to the application of a variety of new technologies and in vitro models. For example, subcellular fractions have been widely used in metabolism studies since the 1960s. The last two decades has seen the increased use of hepatocytes as the reproducibility of cell isolations improved. The 1990s saw the rejuvenation of liver slices (as new slicers were developed) and the utilization of cDNA expressed enzymes as these technologies matured. In addition, there has been considerable interest in extrapolating in vitro data to in vivo for parameters such as absorption, clearance and DDIs. The current philosophy of drug development is moving to a 'fail early--fail cheaply' paradigm. Therefore, in vitro ADME approaches are being applied to drug candidates earlier in development since they are essential for identifying compounds likely to present ADME challenges in the latter stages of drug development. These in vitro tools are also being used earlier in lead optimization biology, in parallel with approaches for optimizing target structure activity relationships, as well as identification of DDI and the involvement of metabolic pathways that demonstrate genetic polymorphisms. This would suggest that the line between discovery and development drug metabolism has blurred. In vitro approaches to ADME are increasingly being linked with high-throughput automation and analysis. Further, if we think of perhaps the fastest available way to screen for successful drugs with optimal ADME

  18. [Current seroprevalence, vaccination and predictive value of liver enzymes for hepatitis B among refugees in Germany].

    PubMed

    Hampel, Annika; Solbach, Philipp; Cornberg, Markus; Schmidt, Reinhold E; Behrens, Georg M N; Jablonka, Alexandra

    2016-05-01

    Currently only vague estimates exist for the seroprevalence and vaccination status for viral hepatitis B (HBV) in refugees arriving in Germany during the current refugee crisis. To assess the prevalence of hepatitis B in refugees arriving in northern Germany in 2015. In a cross-sectional study in 793 patients from all age groups tests for serological markers of hepatitis B virus infection (HBsAg, anti-HBc) and liver enzymes (ALT, AST, bilirubin, γGT, alkaline phosphatase) were performed in August 2015 at six reception centers in northern Germany. In 258 patients anti-HBs antibodies were assessed additionally. Of the tested refugees, 76.7 % were male, the median age was 28.8 ± 11.4 years, and 7.8 % were children under the age of 18. The overall prevalence of HBsAg and total anti-HBc was 2.3 % and 14.0 % respectively (2.5 % and 14.5 % in men; 1.2 % and 13.5 % in women). Prevalence was highest in 35 to 49-year-old patients for HBsAg (3.1 %) and for refugees over 50 years for anti-HBc (38 %). No immunity to Hepatitis B was found in 62 %, 18.6 % had been vaccinated against Hepatitis B, while 50 % of children aged up to 15 years (n = 12) had been vaccinated. Positive predictive values of elevated AST and ALT for detection of HBsAg was 0 and 0.016, respectively. Only two patients with a positive HBsAg had elevated transaminases. This study showed a high prevalence of HBsAg in a German refugee sample in comparison to the general German population. Liver enzymes are not an appropriate tool for screening for hepatitis B virus infection.

  19. Hepatic biotransformation and antioxidant enzyme activities in Mediterranean fish from different habitat depths.

    PubMed

    Ribalta, C; Sanchez-Hernandez, J C; Sole, M

    2015-11-01

    Marine fish are threatened by anthropogenic chemical discharges. However, knowledge on adverse effects on deep-sea fish or their detoxification capabilities is limited. Herein, we compared the basal activities of selected hepatic detoxification enzymes in several species (Solea solea, Dicentrarchus labrax, Trachyrhynchus scabrus, Mora moro, Cataetix laticeps and Alepocehalus rostratus) collected from the coast, middle and lower slopes of the Blanes Canyon region (Catalan continental margin, NW Mediterranean Sea). The xenobiotic-detoxifying enzymes analysed were the phase-I carboxylesterases (CbEs), and the phase-II conjugation activities uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase (UDPGT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). Moreover, some antioxidant enzyme activities, i.e., catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione reductase (GR), were also included in this comparative study. Because CbE activity is represented by multiple isoforms, the substrates α-naphthyl acetate (αNA) and ρ-nitrophenyl acetate (ρNPA) were used in the enzyme assays, and in vitro inhibition kinetics with dichlorvos were performed to compare interspecific CbE sensitivity. Activity of xenobiotic detoxification enzymes varied among the species, following a trend with habitat depth and body size. Thus, UDPGT and some antioxidant enzyme activities decreased in fish inhabiting lower slopes of deep-sea, whereas UDPGT and αNA-CbE activities were negatively related to fish size. A trend between CbE activities and the IC50 values for dichlorvos suggested S. solea and M. moro as potentially more sensitive to anticholinesterasic pesticides, and T. scabrus as the most resistant one. A principal component analysis considering all enzyme activities clearly identified the species but this grouping was not related to habitat depth or phylogeny. Although these results can be taken as baseline levels of the main xenobiotic detoxification enzymes in Mediterranean fish, further research is

  20. Acute Liver Injury Induces Nucleocytoplasmic Redistribution of Hepatic Methionine Metabolism Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Miguel; Garrido, Francisco; Pérez-Miguelsanz, Juliana; Pacheco, María; Partearroyo, Teresa; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The discovery of methionine metabolism enzymes in the cell nucleus, together with their association with key nuclear processes, suggested a putative relationship between alterations in their subcellular distribution and disease. Results: Using the rat model of d-galactosamine intoxication, severe changes in hepatic steady-state mRNA levels were found; the largest decreases corresponded to enzymes exhibiting the highest expression in normal tissue. Cytoplasmic protein levels, activities, and metabolite concentrations suffered more moderate changes following a similar trend. Interestingly, galactosamine treatment induced hepatic nuclear accumulation of methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) α1 and S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase tetramers, their active assemblies. In fact, galactosamine-treated livers showed enhanced nuclear MAT activity. Acetaminophen (APAP) intoxication mimicked most galactosamine effects on hepatic MATα1, including accumulation of nuclear tetramers. H35 cells that overexpress tagged-MATα1 reproduced the subcellular distribution observed in liver, and the changes induced by galactosamine and APAP that were also observed upon glutathione depletion by buthionine sulfoximine. The H35 nuclear accumulation of tagged-MATα1 induced by these agents correlated with decreased glutathione reduced form/glutathione oxidized form ratios and was prevented by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and glutathione ethyl ester. However, the changes in epigenetic modifications associated with tagged-MATα1 nuclear accumulation were only prevented by NAC in galactosamine-treated cells. Innovation: Cytoplasmic and nuclear changes in proteins that regulate the methylation index follow opposite trends in acute liver injury, their nuclear accumulation showing potential as disease marker. Conclusion: Altogether these results demonstrate galactosamine- and APAP-induced nuclear accumulation of methionine metabolism enzymes as active oligomers and unveil the implication of

  1. Electrochemistry-on-chip for on-line conversions in drug metabolism studies.

    PubMed

    Odijk, M; Baumann, A; Olthuis, W; van den Berg, A; Karst, U

    2010-12-15

    We have designed an integrated 3-electrode electrochemical cell on-chip with high analyte conversion rates for use in drug metabolism studies. The electrochemical cell contains platinum working and counter electrodes and an iridium oxide pseudo-reference electrode. The pseudo-reference electrode has a pH sensitivity of -52 mV/s, and thus will provide a constant potential in solutions with known and constant pH. The average drift of the iridium oxide electrode is below 5 mV for a typical 15 min conversion experiment. We have been able to mimic the oxidative drug metabolism reactions catalysed by enzymes of the cytochrome P-450 family, normally occurring in the human body. With the chip, the different reaction products of both rat liver cell microsome and human liver cell microsome incubations have been observed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of Enzyme Immunoassays for Detection of Antibodies to Hepatitis D Virus in Serum

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Siu-Kei; Atienza, Ederlyn E.; Cook, Linda; Prince, Harry; Slev, Patricia; Lapé-Nixon, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Serology remains critical for diagnosing hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection, which affects 15 to 20 million people worldwide, but the literature on characterizing commercial enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) dates back to 15 years ago. We evaluated 2 commercial EIAs currently available for detecting anti-HDV antibodies. The DiaSorin assay demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity. Using a modified cutoff value, the Cusabio assay demonstrated a sensitivity of 81.3% and specificity of 90.9%. Our data show that recently developed EIAs are reliable for anti-HDV antibody detection. PMID:27280621

  3. Predicting drug metabolism: experiment and/or computation?

    PubMed

    Kirchmair, Johannes; Göller, Andreas H; Lang, Dieter; Kunze, Jens; Testa, Bernard; Wilson, Ian D; Glen, Robert C; Schneider, Gisbert

    2015-06-01

    Drug metabolism can produce metabolites with physicochemical and pharmacological properties that differ substantially from those of the parent drug, and consequently has important implications for both drug safety and efficacy. To reduce the risk of costly clinical-stage attrition due to the metabolic characteristics of drug candidates, there is a need for efficient and reliable ways to predict drug metabolism in vitro, in silico and in vivo. In this Perspective, we provide an overview of the state of the art of experimental and computational approaches for investigating drug metabolism. We highlight the scope and limitations of these methods, and indicate strategies to harvest the synergies that result from combining measurement and prediction of drug metabolism.

  4. Effect of peppermint oil on serum lipid peroxidation and hepatic enzymes after immobility stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Marjani, Abdoljalal; Rahmati, Reza; Mansourian, Azad Reza; Veghary, Gholamreza

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the influences of various doses of peppermint oil on the hepatic en-zymes, alanine transaminase, apartate tranaminase, alkaline phosphotase and gamma glutamyl transferase and the level of malondialdehyde in the serum of mice with and without immobility stress. The mice exposed to drink water, 0.9, 27 and 60 mg/kg peppermint oil from the days 1 to 5 for a period of 4 h before and after immobility stress. Serum MDA in-creased in treatment group II, III and IV after immobility stress. There was a significant decrease in ALT in treatment group III and IV after immobility stress. There were also significant decreases in ALP and GGT in treatment group IV af-ter immobility stress. This result may suggest that, MDA level is higher in immobilization stress group than in the un-immobilized animals in serum and this results show that enzyme activities decreased after immobilization stress.

  5. Effect of Peppermint Oil on Serum Lipid Peroxidation and Hepatic Enzymes after Immobility Stress in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marjani, Abdoljalal; Rahmati, Reza; Mansourian, Azad Reza; Veghary, Gholamreza

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the influences of various doses of peppermint oil on the hepatic en-zymes, alanine transaminase, apartate tranaminase, alkaline phosphotase and gamma glutamyl transferase and the level of malondialdehyde in the serum of mice with and without immobility stress. The mice exposed to drink water, 0.9, 27 and 60 mg/kg peppermint oil from the days 1 to 5 for a period of 4 h before and after immobility stress. Serum MDA in-creased in treatment group II, III and IV after immobility stress. There was a significant decrease in ALT in treatment group III and IV after immobility stress. There were also significant decreases in ALP and GGT in treatment group IV af-ter immobility stress. This result may suggest that, MDA level is higher in immobilization stress group than in the un-immobilized animals in serum and this results show that enzyme activities decreased after immobilization stress. PMID:22654997

  6. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... have liver damage because of it. What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  7. Interindividual Variability in Cytochrome P450–Mediated Drug Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Timothy S.; Chaudhry, Amarjit S.; Prasad, Bhagwat; Thummel, Kenneth E.; Schuetz, Erin G.; Zhong, Xiao-bo; Tien, Yun-Chen; Pan, Xian; Shireman, Laura M.; Tay-Sontheimer, Jessica; Lin, Yvonne S.

    2016-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes are the predominant enzyme system involved in human drug metabolism. Alterations in the expression and/or activity of these enzymes result in changes in pharmacokinetics (and consequently the pharmacodynamics) of drugs that are metabolized by this set of enzymes. Apart from changes in activity as a result of drug–drug interactions (by P450 induction or inhibition), the P450 enzymes can exhibit substantial interindividual variation in basal expression and/or activity, leading to differences in the rates of drug elimination and response. This interindividual variation can result from a myriad of factors, including genetic variation in the promoter or coding regions, variation in transcriptional regulators, alterations in microRNA that affect P450 expression, and ontogenic changes due to exposure to xenobiotics during the developmental and early postnatal periods. Other than administering a probe drug or cocktail of drugs to obtain the phenotype or conducting a genetic analysis to determine genotype, methods to determine interindividual variation are limited. Phenotyping via a probe drug requires exposure to a xenobiotic, and genotyping is not always well correlated with phenotype, making both methodologies less than ideal. This article describes recent work evaluating the effect of some of these factors on interindividual variation in human P450-mediated metabolism and the potential utility of endogenous probe compounds to assess rates of drug metabolism among individuals. PMID:26681736

  8. Modulatory effects of Kaempferia parviflora extract on mouse hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mekjaruskul, Catheleeya; Jay, Michael; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn

    2012-06-14

    Kaempferia parviflora is a herbal plant, the extracts of which are commonly used as alternative medicines. It widely uses as aphrodisiac, anti-inflammation, anti-microbacterial, and anti-peptic ulcer. In order to obtain an effective utilization and safety of the herb, the influence of Kaempferia parviflora on hepatic CYP450 metabolizing enzymes including CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B, CYP2E1, and CYP3A was investigated. The impact of Kaempferia parviflora on CYP450 both in vitro and in vivo was examined by using ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylation, methoxyresorufin O-dealkylation, pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylation, p-nitrophenol hydroxylation, and erythromycin N-demethylation assays, respectively. In vitro studies using non-induced mouse hepatic microsomes in the presence or absence of Kaempferia parviflora extract showed that Kaempferia parviflora extract altered CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B, and CYP2E1 activities by non-competitive, mixed-competitive, competitive, and uncompetitive mechanisms, respectively. Among these enzymes, CYP1A2 was affected by Kaempferia parviflora based on the highest value of V(max) (15.276±0.206 nmol/min) and lowest of K(i) value (0.008±0.002 μg/ml). In addition, the plant extract also modulated CYP2B activity based on the low K(m) value (1.599±0.147 pmol). For in vivo studies, mice were orally treated with 250 mg/kg of Kaempferia parviflora extract for 7, 14, and 21 days. The results demonstrated that Kaempferia parviflora extract significantly induced CYP1A1, CYP1A2 enzyme activities following short-term treatment. CYP2B enzyme activities were markedly increased all Kaempferia parviflora extract treatment timepoints, whereas Kaempferia parviflora extract significantly enhanced CYP2E1 activity only after long-term treatment. However, Kaempferia parviflora extract did not affect the CYP3A enzyme activity. Kaempferia parviflora extract modulated several CYP450 enzyme activities, thus, its utilization with drugs or other herbs should raise concern for

  9. IDSite: An accurate approach to predict P450-mediated drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianing; Schneebeli, Severin T.; Bylund, Joseph; Farid, Ramy; Friesner, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate prediction of drug metabolism is crucial for drug design. Since a large majority of drugs metabolism involves P450 enzymes, we herein describe a computational approach, IDSite, to predict P450-mediated drug metabolism. To model induced-fit effects, IDSite samples the conformational space with flexible docking in Glide followed by two refinement stages using the Protein Local Optimization Program (PLOP). Sites of metabolism (SOMs) are predicted according to a physical-based score that evaluates the potential of atoms to react with the catalytic iron center. As a preliminary test, we present in this paper the prediction of hydroxylation and O-dealkylation sites mediated by CYP2D6 using two different models: a physical-based simulation model, and a modification of this model in which a small number of parameters are fit to a training set. Without fitting any parameters to experimental data, the Physical IDSite scoring recovers 83% of the experimental observations for 56 compounds with a very low false positive rate. With only 4 fitted parameters, the Fitted IDSite was trained with the subset of 36 compounds and successfully applied to the other 20 compounds, recovering 94% of the experimental observations with high sensitivity and specificity for both sets. PMID:22247702

  10. Xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors involved in drug metabolism: a structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Bret D; Redinbo, Matthew R

    2013-02-01

    Xenobiotic compounds undergo a critical range of biotransformations performed by the phase I, II, and III drug-metabolizing enzymes. The oxidation, conjugation, and transportation of potentially harmful xenobiotic and endobiotic compounds achieved by these catalytic systems are significantly regulated, at the gene expression level, by members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family of ligand-modulated transcription factors. Activation of NRs by a variety of endo- and exogenous chemicals are elemental to induction and repression of drug-metabolism pathways. The master xenobiotic sensing NRs, the promiscuous pregnane X receptor and less-promiscuous constitutive androstane receptor are crucial to initial ligand recognition, jump-starting the metabolic process. Other receptors, including farnesoid X receptor, vitamin D receptor, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, liver X receptor, and RAR-related orphan receptor, are not directly linked to promiscuous xenobiotic binding, but clearly play important roles in the modulation of metabolic gene expression. Crystallographic studies of the ligand-binding domains of nine NRs involved in drug metabolism provide key insights into ligand-based and constitutive activity, coregulator recruitment, and gene regulation. Structures of other, noncanonical transcription factors also shed light on secondary, but important, pathways of control. Pharmacological targeting of some of these nuclear and atypical receptors has been instituted as a means to treat metabolic and developmental disorders and provides a future avenue to be explored for other members of the xenobiotic-sensing NRs.

  11. Electrochemistry in the mimicry of oxidative drug metabolism by cytochrome P450s.

    PubMed

    Nouri-Nigjeh, Eslam; Bischoff, Rainer; Bruins, Andries P; Permentier, Hjalmar P

    2011-05-01

    Prediction of oxidative drug metabolism at the early stages of drug discovery and development requires fast and accurate analytical techniques to mimic the in vivo oxidation reactions by cytochrome P450s (CYP). Direct electrochemical oxidation combined with mass spectrometry, although limited to the oxidation reactions initiated by charge transfer, has shown promise in the mimicry of certain CYP-mediated metabolic reactions. The electrochemical approach may further be utilized in an automated manner in microfluidics devices facilitating fast screening of oxidative drug metabolism. A wide range of in vivo oxidation reactions, particularly those initiated by hydrogen atom transfer, can be imitated through the electrochemically-assisted Fenton reaction. This reaction is based on O-O bond activation in hydrogen peroxide and oxidation by hydroxyl radicals, wherein electrochemistry is used for the reduction of molecular oxygen to hydrogen peroxide, as well as the reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). Metalloporphyrins, as surrogates for the prosthetic group in CYP, utilizing metallo-oxo reactive species, can also be used in combination with electrochemistry. Electrochemical reduction of metalloporphyrins in solution or immobilized on the electrode surface activates molecular oxygen in a manner analogous to the catalytical cycle of CYP and different metalloporphyrins can mimic selective oxidation reactions. Chemoselective, stereoselective, and regioselective oxidation reactions may be mimicked using electrodes that have been modified with immobilized enzymes, especially CYP itself. This review summarizes the recent attempts in utilizing electrochemistry as a versatile analytical and preparative technique in the mimicry of oxidative drug metabolism by CYP.

  12. Xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors involved in drug metabolism: a structural perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Bret D.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    Xenobiotic compounds undergo a critical range of biotransformations performed by the phase I, II, and III drug-metabolizing enzymes. The oxidation, conjugation, and transportation of potentially harmful xenobiotic and endobiotic compounds achieved by these catalytic systems are significantly regulated, at the gene expression level, by members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family of ligand-modulated transcription factors. Activation of NRs by a variety of endo- and exogenous chemicals are elemental to induction and repression of drug-metabolism pathways. The master xenobiotic sensing NRs, the promiscuous pregnane X receptor and less-promiscuous constitutive androstane receptor are crucial to initial ligand recognition, jump-starting the metabolic process. Other receptors, including farnesoid X receptor, vitamin D receptor, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, liver X receptor, and RAR-related orphan receptor, are not directly linked to promiscuous xenobiotic binding, but clearly play important roles in the modulation of metabolic gene expression. Crystallographic studies of the ligand-binding domains of nine NRs involved in drug metabolism provide key insights into ligand-based and constitutive activity, coregulator recruitment, and gene regulation. Structures of other, noncanonical transcription factors also shed light on secondary, but important, pathways of control. Pharmacological targeting of some of these nuclear and atypical receptors has been instituted as a means to treat metabolic and developmental disorders and provides a future avenue to be explored for other members of the xenobiotic-sensing NRs. PMID:23210723

  13. Intestinal Detoxification Limits the Activation of Hepatic Pregnane X Receptor by Lithocholic AcidS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Bryn M.; Milona, Alexandra; van Mil, Saskia; Clements, Peter; Holder, Julie; Boudjelal, Mohamed; Cairns, William; Parker, Malcolm; White, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The intestinal-derived secondary bile acid (BA) lithocholic acid (LCA) is hepatotoxic and is implicated in the pathogenesis of cholestatic diseases. LCA is an endogenous ligand of the xenobiotic nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR), but there is currently no consensus on the respective roles of hepatic and intestinal PXR in mediating protection against LCA in vivo. Under the conditions reported here, we show that mice lacking Pxr are resistant to LCA-mediated hepatotoxicity. This unexpected phenotype is found in association with enhanced urinary BA excretion and elevated basal expression of drug metabolism enzymes and the hepatic sulfate donor synthesis enzyme Papss2 in Pxr(−/−) mice. By subsequently comparing molecular responses to dietary and intraperitoneal administration of LCA, we made two other significant observations: 1) LCA feeding induces intestinal, but not hepatic, drug-metabolizing enzymes in a largely Pxr-independent manner; and 2) in contrast to LCA feeding, bypassing first-pass gut transit by intraperitoneal administration of LCA did induce hepatic detoxification machinery and in a Pxr-dependent manner. These data reconcile important discrepancies in the reported molecular responses to this BA and suggest that Pxr plays only a limited role in mediating responses to gut-derived LCA. Furthermore, the route of administration must be considered in the future planning and interpretation of experiments designed to assess hepatic responses to BAs, orally administered pharmaceuticals, and dietary toxins. PMID:19797606

  14. Hesperidin a citrus bioflavonoid modulates hepatic biotransformation enzymes and enhances intrinsic antioxidants in experimental breast cancer rats challenged with 7, 12-dimethylbenz (a) anthracene.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Natarajan; Balasubramanian, Maruthaiveeran Periyasamy

    2012-01-01

    DMBA is a major class of potent genotoxic chemical carcinogen present in the environment and it may increase breast cancer risk. Flavonoids have been shown to have interesting biological activities in many experimental investigations. Hesperidin is one of the citrus flavonoid shown to be active against various oxidative stress mediated diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the beneficial impact of a natural citrus flavonoglycoside hesperidin against 7, 12-Dimethylbenz [a] anthracene challenged experimental breast carcinogenesis with reference to drug metabolizing enzymes and intrinsic antioxidant status. The female Sprague-Dawley rats were orally administered with single dose of 7, 12-DMBA to induce breast cancer and were treated with hesperidin [30mg/kg/body weight] for a consecutive 45 days. The results revealed that there was a significant reduction in the status of antioxidants levels and also significant alterations in the drug metabolizing enzymes were found in genotoxin DMBA exposed animals. Interestingly these, altered levels were significantly revered back to near normal in hesperidin administered animals via enhancing the intrinsic antioxidant levels and induction in Phase II enzymes and modulation in Phase I enzyme levels. Thus the antigenotoxic activity of hesperidin may be due to the modulatory effect in biotransformation enzymes and excellent antioxidant potentials which paving a way to consider hesperidin against the genotoxin involved oxidative stress mediated diseases.

  15. Liver Enzymes in Children with beta-Thalassemia Major: Correlation with Iron Overload and Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Khaled M.; Ibrahim, Ola M.; Kaddah, Ahmed M.; Boseila, Samia; Ismail, Leila Abu; Hamid, May M. Abdel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Beta Thalassemia is the most common chronic hemolytic anemia in Egypt (85.1%) with an estimated carrier rate of 9-10.2%. Injury to the liver, whether acute or chronic, eventually results in an increase in serum concentrations of Alanine transaminase (ALT) and Aspartate transaminase (AST). AIM: Evaluating the potentiating effect of iron overload & viral hepatitis infection on the liver enzymes. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty (80) thalassemia major patients were studied with respect to liver enzymes, ferritin, transferrin saturation, HBsAg, anti-HCV antibody and HCV-PCR for anti-HCV positive patients. RESULTS: Fifty % of the patients were anti-HCV positive and 55% of them were HCV-PCR positive. Patients with elevated ALT and AST levels had significantly higher mean serum ferritin than those with normal levels. Anti-HCV positive patients had higher mean serum ferritin, serum ALT, AST and GGT levels and higher age and duration of blood transfusion than the negative group. HCV-PCR positive patients had higher mean serum ferritin and serum ALT and also higher age and duration of blood transfusion than the negative group. CONCLUSION: Iron overload is a main leading cause of elevated liver enzymes, and presence of HCV infection is significantly related to the increased iron overload. PMID:27275237

  16. Differential regulation of hepatic enzymes by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and glucocorticoids

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.A.; Linder, M.W.; Fernandez, D.; Prough, R.A. )

    1991-03-15

    A putative glucocorticoid (GC) response element has been identified within the first intron of the P450IA1 gene and is apparently necessary for GC-dependent potentiation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) induction of P450IA1. In cultured rat hepatocytes, the synthetic GC, dexamethasone (DEX), potentiated PAH induction of both P450IA1 and glutathione S-transferase protein and mRNA. However, DEX caused a small decrease in PAH-dependent induction of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (QOR) subunit protein and mRNA in culture. The potentiation of 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) dependent induction of hepatic P450IA1, GST and QOR by low doses of DEX was evaluated in neonatal and adult rats. In neonates, MC induction was potentiated 2-, 1.5-, and 1.4-fold for P450IA1, GST, and QOR activities, respectively, by DEX. However, in adult rats, DEX potentiated MC induction of P450IA1 activity, but repressed MC induction of GST and QOR. Western immunoanalysis and Northern analysis indicated that the changes in these activities were associated with parallel changes in the levels of immunoreactive proteins and mRNA. Glucocorticoids may have an age-dependent influence on the induction of hepatic enzymes by PAH possibly involving other regulatory factors, in addition to Ah and GC receptors.

  17. Gene expression profiling and pathway network analysis of hepatic metabolic enzymes targeted by baicalein.

    PubMed

    Qin, Si; Chen, Jihua; Tanigawa, Shunsuke; Hou, De-Xing

    2012-03-06

    Baicalein is a flavone originally isolated from the roots of traditional Chinese medicinal herb, Scutellaria baicalensis, which has been proved as a promising chemopreventive compound for many chronic human diseases. The present study aimed to clarify the molecular mechanism targeted by baicalein. Gene expression profiling of HepG2 cells treated with baicalein was carried out, using the Affymetrix 42K oligonucleotide microarray in the present study. Microarray data analyzed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), further study performed by real time PCR, reporter gene assay, and Western blot. Among total 42K gene probes, baicalein treatment up-regulated the signals of 440 gene probes (1.04% of total gene probes) and down-regulated signals of 254 gene probes (0.6% of total gene probes) by ≥2-fold. These genes were categorized into 35 groups and hit for biological processes, molecular functions, and signaling pathways. The network and pathway analyses of these data further revealed that an Nrf2 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2)-mediated ARE (antioxidant response element) pathway is involved in baicalein-induced gene expression of hepatic metabolic enzymes. The representative enzymes involved in Nrf2/ARE pathway were further confirmed at mRNA level by real time PCR and at protein level by Western blot analysis. Moreover, the ARE-reporter gene assay demonstrated that baicalein stimulated Nrf2-mediated ARE transactivation. Our results provide a comprehensive data for understanding the hepatic metabolism, bioactive role and the molecular mechanisms of baicalein. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... clotting problems or chronic liver disease. previous continue Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Although hep A is a ... does — through direct contact with infected body fluids. Hepatitis B and C are even more easily passed in ...

  19. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A if they've been vaccinated against it. Hepatitis B Hepatitis B is a more serious infection. It may lead ... of which cause severe illness and even death. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is transmitted from person to person ...

  20. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... a problem with the liver itself What Is Hepatitis A? Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is contagious, usually spreading to others ... objects contaminated by feces (poop) containing HAV. The hepatitis A vaccine has helped to make the infection rare ...

  1. Dietary lipid-induced changes in enzymes of hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    de Catalfo, Graciela E Hurtado; de Alaniz, María J T; Marra, Carlos A

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the effect of different dietary oils on the main hepatic enzymes involved in metabolism and their impact on oxidative stress status. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were fed for 60 d on the same basal diet plus different lipid sources from commercial oils: soybean (S), olive (O), coconut (C), and grape seed (G). After sacrifice, the liver lipid fatty acid composition, enzymatic and non-enzymatic components of the antioxidant defense system, and the activity of enzymes involved in lipid metabolism were determined. The concentration of Ca(2+) in plasma and liver homogenates was also measured. The diets produced significant changes in the total and polar lipid fatty acid compositions and alterations in key enzyme activities involved in lipid metabolism. The S and G groups showed significantly increased oxidative stress biomarkers. The enzymatic and non-enzymatic components of the antioxidant defense system were increased in the O and C groups. The highest levels of nitrite plus nitrate were observed in the S and G groups compared with the O and C groups in plasma and in liver homogenates. These were directly correlated with the Ca(2+) concentration. The most beneficial effects were obtained with olive oil. However, it is necessary to study in more detail appropriate mixtures of olive and soybean oils to provide an adequate balance between ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids. Different dietary oils modify the lipid composition of the plasma and liver, local and systemic antioxidant statuses, and the activity of the key enzymes of lipid metabolism. The interrelation between Ca(2+) and nitrite plus nitrate could be the causal factor underlying the observed changes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of human carboxylesterases in drug metabolism: have we overlooked their importance?

    PubMed

    Laizure, S Casey; Herring, Vanessa; Hu, Zheyi; Witbrodt, Kevin; Parker, Robert B

    2013-02-01

    Carboxylesterases are a multigene family of mammalian enzymes widely distributed throughout the body that catalyze the hydrolysis of esters, amides, thioesters, and carbamates. In humans, two carboxylesterases, hCE1 and hCE2, are important mediators of drug metabolism. Both are expressed in the liver, but hCE1 greatly exceeds hCE2. In the intestine, only hCE2 is present and highly expressed. The most common drug substrates of these enzymes are ester prodrugs specifically designed to enhance oral bioavailability by hydrolysis to the active carboxylic acid after absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. Carboxylesterases also play an important role in the hydrolysis of some drugs to inactive metabolites. It has been widely believed that drugs undergoing hydrolysis by hCE1 and hCE2 are not subject to clinically significant alterations in their disposition, but evidence exists that genetic polymorphisms, drug-drug interactions, drug-disease interactions and other factors are important determinants of the variability in the therapeutic response to carboxylesterase-substrate drugs. The implications for drug therapy are far-reaching, as substrate drugs include numerous examples from widely prescribed therapeutic classes. Representative drugs include angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, antiplatelet drugs, statins, antivirals, and central nervous system agents. As research interest increases in the carboxylesterases, evidence is accumulating of their important role in drug metabolism and, therefore, the outcomes of pharmacotherapy.

  3. Time-dependent inhibition of human drug metabolizing cytochromes P450 by tricyclic antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Polasek, Thomas M; Miners, John O

    2008-01-01

    AIMS To investigate time-dependent inhibition (TDI) of human drug metabolizing CYP enzymes by tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). METHODS CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A/CYP3A4 activities were investigated following co- and preincubation with TCAs using human liver microsomes (HLM) and human recombinant CYP proteins (expressed in Escherichia coli) as the enzyme sources. A two-step incubation method was employed to examine the in vitro mechanism-based inactivation (MBI) criteria. Potential metabolite–intermediate complex (MIC) formation was studied by spectral analysis. RESULTS TCAs generally exhibited significant TDI of recombinant CYP1A2, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 (>10% positive inhibition differences between co- and preincubation conditions). TDI of recombinant CYP2C9 was minor (<10%), and was minor or absent in experiments utilizing recombinant CYP3A4 or HLM as the enzyme sources. Where observed, TDI of recombinant CYP occurred via alkylamine MIC formation, but evidence to support similar behaviour in HLM was limited. Indeed, only secondary amine TCAs reduced the apparent P450 content of HLM (3–6%) consistent with complexation. As a representative TCA, nortriptyline fulfilled the in vitro MBI criteria using recombinant CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 (KI and kinact values of 4 µm and 0.19 min−1, and 70 µm and 0.06 min−1), but not with the human liver microsomal enzymes. CONCLUSIONS TCAs appear to have minimal potential for MBI of human liver microsomal CYP enzymes involved in drug metabolism. HLM and recombinant CYP (expressed in E. coli) are not equivalent enzyme sources for evaluating the TDI associated with some drugs. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT Much of the literature evidence for mechanism-based inactivation (MBI) of CYP by tricyclic antidepressants is limited to studies in rat liver microsomes. One report from this laboratory characterized MBI of human recombinant CYP2C8 by nortriptyline. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS Tricyclic antidepressants form

  4. Urinary D-glucaric acid and serum hepatic enzyme levels in chronic alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Tutor, J C; Alvarez-Prechous, A; Bernabeu, F; Pardiñas, M C; Paz, J M; Lareu, V

    1988-06-01

    Urinary D-glucaric acid (DGA) and the activities of gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and other hepatic enzymes in serum were determined in 33 noncirrhotic male alcoholics who had continued to consume alcohol until at least 24 h prior to the taking of samples. DGA excretion was significantly greater in them than in a group of 30 healthy controls (p less than 0.001), exceeding the upper reference level in 38% of the alcoholic cases (as compared with 88% for GGT). In the alcoholic patients, there was highly significant correlation between urinary DGA and serum GGT (r = 0.613, p less than 0.001), suggesting that in both cases the increased levels are due to enzyme induction. None of the biochemical variables studied were significantly correlated with estimated daily alcohol consumption. Urinary DGA levels fell off rapidly with abstinence, and in 31 alcoholic patients who had consumed no alcohol for 5 days, there was no statistically significant correlation between DGA excretion and serum GGT (r = 0.158, p congruent to 0.4).

  5. Prevalence of poor and rapid metabolizers of drugs metabolized by CYP2B6 in North Indian population residing in Indian national capital territory.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Ekta; Saha, Nilanjan; Tandon, Monika; Shrivastava, Vikesh; Ali, Shakir

    2012-01-01

    Identification of poor and rapid metabolizers for the category of drugs metabolized by cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) is important for understanding the differences in clinical responses of drugs metabolized by this enzyme. This study reports the prevalence of poor and rapid metabolizers in North Indian population residing in the National Capital Territory. The prevalence of poor and rapid metabolizers was determined in the target population for the category of drugs metabolized by CYP2B6 by measuring plasma bupropion, a drug metabolized by CYP2B6, and its metabolite. Bupropion (75 mg) was administered to 107 volunteers, and the drug (bupropion) and its metabolite (hydroxybupropion) were determined simultaneously by LCMS/MS in the plasma. CYP2B6 activity was measured as hydroxybupropion/bupropion ratio, and volunteers were categorized as rapid or poor metabolizers on the basis of cutoff value of log (hydroxybupropion/bupropion). Significant differences were observed between the mean metabolite/drug ratio of rapid metabolizers (Mean = 0.59) and poor metabolizers (Mean = 0.26) with p<0.0001. Results indicate that 20.56% individuals in the target population were poor metabolizers for the category of drugs metabolized by CYP2B6. Cutoff value defined in this study can be used as a tool for evaluating the status of CYP2B6 using bupropion as a probe drug. The baseline information would be clinically useful before administering the drugs metabolized by this isoform.

  6. DrugBank 4.0: shedding new light on drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Law, Vivian; Knox, Craig; Djoumbou, Yannick; Jewison, Tim; Guo, An Chi; Liu, Yifeng; Maciejewski, Adam; Arndt, David; Wilson, Michael; Neveu, Vanessa; Tang, Alexandra; Gabriel, Geraldine; Ly, Carol; Adamjee, Sakina; Dame, Zerihun T.; Han, Beomsoo; Zhou, You; Wishart, David S.

    2014-01-01

    DrugBank (http://www.drugbank.ca) is a comprehensive online database containing extensive biochemical and pharmacological information about drugs, their mechanisms and their targets. Since it was first described in 2006, DrugBank has rapidly evolved, both in response to user requests and in response to changing trends in drug research and development. Previous versions of DrugBank have been widely used to facilitate drug and in silico drug target discovery. The latest update, DrugBank 4.0, has been further expanded to contain data on drug metabolism, absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMET) and other kinds of quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) information. These enhancements are intended to facilitate research in xenobiotic metabolism (both prediction and characterization), pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and drug design/discovery. For this release, >1200 drug metabolites (including their structures, names, activity, abundance and other detailed data) have been added along with >1300 drug metabolism reactions (including metabolizing enzymes and reaction types) and dozens of drug metabolism pathways. Another 30 predicted or measured ADMET parameters have been added to each DrugCard, bringing the average number of quantitative ADMET values for Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs close to 40. Referential nuclear magnetic resonance and MS spectra have been added for almost 400 drugs as well as spectral and mass matching tools to facilitate compound identification. This expanded collection of drug information is complemented by a number of new or improved search tools, including one that provides a simple analyses of drug–target, –enzyme and –transporter associations to provide insight on drug–drug interactions. PMID:24203711

  7. Drug metabolism and antibiotic resistance in micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Sim, Edith; Ryan, Ali

    2017-07-01

    This article is part of a themed section on Drug Metabolism and Antibiotic Resistance in Micro-organisms. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v174.14/issuetoc. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Effects of Chinese, Japanese and Western tea on hepatic P450 enzyme activities in rats.

    PubMed

    Niwattisaiwong, N; Luo, X X; Coville, P F; Wanwimolruk, S

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that green tea effectively protects against cancers caused by various dietary carcinogens. As P450 enzymes are the major system responsible for the metabolism of many carcinogens, we hypothesise that tea consumption may alter the catalytic activities of P450 enzymes. We conducted this study to screen the effects of four different teas on the activities of P450 enzymes. Tea solutions (2.5%) were prepared by adding boiling water to tea leaves and filtering. Female Wistar rats were divided into five groups (n = 4 each); each had free access to tea solutions while the control group was supplied with water for 4 weeks. Animals were sacrificed and livers were removed for preparation of microsomes. Enzyme activities were determined by incubation of liver microsomes with the appropriate CYP substrate. The activity of CYP1A1 in livers from rats receiving Oolong (Chinese) tea (185 +/- 63 pmol/mg/min), Japanese green tea (197 +/- 22 pmol/mg/min) and Earl Grey tea (228 +/- 40 pmol/mg/min) was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than in the control group (94 +/- 34 pmol/mg/min), whereas no change was observed in the activity of CYP1A2 in any of tested animals. The hepatic activity of CYP2D6 was greater only in rats drinking Earl Grey tea compared to the controls (235 +/- 37 vs 161 +/- 41 pmol/mg/min, p < 0.05). There were also significant increases (p < 0.05) in the activity of CYP3A in livers of animals given Oolong tea (653 +/- 174 vs 382 +/- 114 pmol/mg/min) and Earl Grey tea (751 +/- 202 pmol/mg/min), while Jasmine and Japanese green tea had no significant effect. These results indicate that not all types of tea cause alterations in liver CYP enzymes as some elevated activities and some did not. Further studies are needed to determine whether there is a relationship between the effect of tea on CYP activities and anti-carcinogenesis.

  9. Pregnane X receptor regulates drug metabolism and transport in the vasculature and protects from oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Swales, Karen E.; Moore, Rick; Truss, Nicola J.; Tucker, Arthur; Warner, Timothy D.; Negishi, Masahiko; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2012-01-01

    Aims Circulating endogenous, dietary, and foreign chemicals can contribute to vascular dysfunction. The mechanism by which the vasculature protects itself from these chemicals is unknown. This study investigates whether the pregnane X receptor (PXR), the major transcriptional regulator of hepatic drug metabolism and transport that responds to such xenobiotics, mediates vascular protection by co-ordinating a defence gene programme in the vasculature. Methods and results PXR was detected in primary human and rat aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells (SMC) and blood vessels including the human and rat aorta. Metabolic PXR target genes cytochrome P450 3A, 2B, 2C, and glutathione S-transferase mRNA and activity were induced by PXR ligands in rodent and human vascular cells and absent in the aortas from PXR-null mice stimulated in vivo or in rat aortic SMC expressing dominant-negative PXR. Activation of aortic PXR by classical agonists had several protective effects: increased xenobiotic metabolism demonstrated by bioactivation of the pro-drug clopidogrel, which reduced adenosine diphosphate-induced platelet aggregation; increased expression of multidrug resistance protein 1, mediating chemical efflux from the vasculature; and protection from reactive oxygen species-mediated cell death. Conclusion PXR co-ordinately up-regulates drug metabolism, transport, and antioxidant genes to protect the vasculature from endogenous and exogenous insults, thus representing a novel gatekeeper for vascular defence. PMID:22166712

  10. Virus-Specific mRNA Capping Enzyme Encoded by Hepatitis E Virus

    PubMed Central

    Magden, Julia; Takeda, Naokazu; Li, Tiancheng; Auvinen, Petri; Ahola, Tero; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Merits, Andres; Kääriäinen, Leevi

    2001-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), a positive-strand RNA virus, is an important causative agent of waterborne hepatitis. Expression of cDNA (encoding amino acids 1 to 979 of HEV nonstructural open reading frame 1) in insect cells resulted in synthesis of a 110-kDa protein (P110), a fraction of which was proteolytically processed to an 80-kDa protein. P110 was tightly bound to cytoplasmic membranes, from which it could be released by detergents. Immunopurified P110 catalyzed transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to GTP and GDP to yield m7GTP or m7GDP. GMP, GpppG, and GpppA were poor substrates for the P110 methyltransferase. There was no evidence for further methylation of m7GTP when it was used as a substrate for the methyltransferase. P110 was also a guanylyltransferase, which formed a covalent complex, P110-m7GMP, in the presence of AdoMet and GTP, because radioactivity from both [α-32P]GTP and [3H-methyl]AdoMet was found in the covalent guanylate complex. Since both methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase reactions are strictly virus specific, they should offer optimal targets for development of antiviral drugs. Cap analogs such as m7GTP, m7GDP, et2m7GMP, and m2et7GMP inhibited the methyltransferase reaction. HEV P110 capping enzyme has similar properties to the methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase of alphavirus nsP1, tobacco mosaic virus P126, brome mosaic virus replicase protein 1a, and bamboo mosaic virus (a potexvirus) nonstructural protein, indicating there is a common evolutionary origin of these distantly related plant and animal virus families. PMID:11413290

  11. Short communication: Regulation of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes by dietary glycerol in transition dairy cows.

    PubMed

    White, H M; Carvalho, E R; Koser, S L; Schmelz-Roberts, N S; Pezzanite, L M; Slabaugh, A C; Doane, P H; Donkin, S S

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional status and glucose precursors are known regulators of gluconeogenic gene expression. Glycerol can replace corn in diets fed to dairy cows and use of glycerol is linked to increased rumen propionate production. The effect of dietary glycerol on the regulation of gluconeogenic enzymes is unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of glycerol on expression of pyruvate carboxylase (PC), cytosolic and mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C and PEPCK-M), and glucose-6-phosphatase. Twenty-six multiparous Holstein cows were fed either a control diet or a diet where high-moisture corn was replaced by glycerol from -28 through +56 d relative to calving (DRTC). Liver tissue was collected via percutaneous liver biopsy at -28, -14, +1, +14, +28, and +56 DRTC for RNA analysis. Expression of PC mRNA increased 6-fold at +1 and 4-fold at +14 DRTC relative to precalving levels. Dietary glycerol did not alter expression of PC mRNA expression. Expression of PEPCK-C increased 2.5-fold at +14 and 3-fold at +28 DRTC compared with +1 DRTC. Overall, dietary glycerol increased PEPCK-C expression compared with that of cows fed control diets. The ratio of PC to PEPCK-C was increased 6.3-fold at +1 DRTC compared with precalving and tended to be decreased in cows fed glycerol. We detected no effect of diet or DRTC on PEPCK-M or glucose-6-phosphatase mRNA, and there were no interactions of dietary treatment and DRTC for any transcript measured. Substituting corn with glycerol increased the expression of PEPCK-C mRNA during transition to lactation and suggests that dietary energy source alters hepatic expression. The observed increase in PEPCK-C expression with glycerol feeding may indicate regulation of hepatic gene expression by changes in rumen propionate production.

  12. Role of Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase in Carcinogen and Chemotherapeutic Drug Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wahlang, B; Falkner, K Cameron; Cave, Matt C; Prough, Russell A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide insight into which human cytochromes P450 (CYPs) may be involved in metabolism of chemical carcinogens and anticancer drugs. A historical overview of this field and the development of literature using relevant animal models and expressed human CYPs have provided information about which specific CYPs may be involved in carcinogen metabolism. Definition of the biochemical properties of CYP activity came from several groups who studied the reaction stoichiometry of butter yellow and benzo[α]pyrene, including their role in induction of these enzyme systems. This chapter will list as much as is known about the human CYPs involved in carcinogen and anticancer drug metabolism, as well as summarize studies with rodent CYPs. A review of three major classes of anticancer drugs and their metabolism in humans is covered for cyclophosphamide, procarbazine, and anthracycline antibiotics, cancer chemotherapeutic compounds extensively metabolized by CYPs. The emerging information about human CYP gene polymorphisms as well as other enzymes involved in foreign compound metabolism provides considerable information about how these genetic variants affect carcinogen and anticancer drug metabolism. With information available from individual's genomic sequences, consideration of populations who may be at risk due to environmental exposure to carcinogens or how to optimize their cancer therapy regimens to enhance efficacy of the anticancer drugs appears to be an important field of study to benefit individuals in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of a novel chemiluminescent microplate enzyme immunoassay for hepatitis B surface antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Song, Liu-Wei; Fang, Lin-Lin; Wu, Yong; Ge, Sheng-Xiang; Li, Hui; Yuan, Quan; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) is an important biomarker used in the diagnosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, but false-negative results are still reported in the detection of HBsAg using commercial assays. In this study, we evaluated the qualitative properties of a novel HBsAg chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) assay--WTultra. WHO standard sample dilution series and samples from low-level HBsAg carriers (<1 ng/mL) were used to evaluate the sensitivity of the WTultra assay. Boston Biomedica, Inc. (BBI) hepatitis B seroconversion panels were used to assess the ability of the WTultra assay to detect the window period. In addition, dilution series of 22 serum samples with different genotypes, serotypes and HBsAg mutations were used to assess the WTultra assay, and these were compared with other commercial assays. The lower detection limit of the WTultra assay was 0.012 IU/mL, and it showed a high sensitivity (97.52%, 95% CI, 94.95-99.00) in the detection of 282 low-level HBsAg carriers (<1 ng/mL). In samples with various HBV genotypes, serotypes and HBsAg mutations, the WTultra assay yielded 117 positive results in 132 samples, which was significantly higher than the results with the other four commercial assays (89, 83, 65 and 45, respectively, p<0.01). In the assays of mutant strains, the WTultra assay detected 82 positive results in 90 samples, which was significantly better than the results for the Hepanostika HBsAg Ultra (58 positive) and Architect (55 positive) (p<0.01) assays, which in turn were significantly better than the Murex V.3 (41 positive, p=0.026) and AxSYM V2 (29 positive, p<0.01) assays. However, in the detection of 42 samples of wild-type strains with various genotypes and serotypes, no significant differences were observed among the WTultra (35 positive), Architect (28 positive) and Hepanostika HBsAg Ultra (31 positive) assays. However, the WTultra assay detected significantly more samples than the Murex V.3 (24

  14. Expression profile of hepatic genes in cynomolgus macaques bred in Cambodia, China, and Indonesia: implications for cytochrome P450 genes.

    PubMed

    Ise, Ryota; Nakanishi, Yasuharu; Kohara, Sakae; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Tsuyoshi; Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Nagata, Ryoichi; Fukuzaki, Koichiro; Utoh, Masahiro; Nakamura, Chika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Uno, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques, frequently used in drug metabolism studies, are bred mainly in the countries of Asia; however, comparative studies of drug metabolism between cynomolgus macaques bred in these countries have not been conducted. In this study, hepatic gene expression profiles of cynomolgus macaques bred in Cambodia (mfCAM), China (mfCHN), and Indonesia (mfIDN) were analyzed. Microarray analysis revealed that expression of most hepatic genes, including drug-metabolizing enzyme genes, was not substantially different between mfCAM, mfCHN, and mfIDN; only 1.1% and 3.0% of all the gene probes detected differential expression (>2.5-fold) in mfCAM compared with mfCHN and mfIDN, respectively. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that the expression levels of 14 cytochromes P450 (P450s) important for drug metabolism did not differ (>2.5-fold) in mfCAM, mfCHN, and mfIDN, validating the microarray data. In contrast, expression of CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 differed (>2.5-fold, p < 0.05) between cynomolgus (mfCAM, mfCHN, or mfIDN) and rhesus macaques, indicating greater differences in expression of P450 genes between the two lineages. Moreover, metabolic activities measured using 14 P450 substrates did not differ substantially (<1.5-fold) between mfCAM and mfCHN. These results suggest that gene expression profiles, including drug-metabolizing enzyme genes such as P450 genes, are similar in mfCAM, mfCHN, and mfIDN.

  15. Hepatic Enzyme Decline after Pediatric Blunt Trauma: A Tool for Timing Child Abuse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Amy L.; Lindberg, Daniel M.; Burke, Bonnie L.; Shults, Justine; Holmes, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Previous research in adult patients with blunt hepatic injuries has suggested a pattern of serum hepatic transaminase concentration decline. Evaluating this decline after pediatric blunt hepatic trauma could establish parameters for estimating the time of inflicted injuries. Deviation from a consistent transaminase resolution pattern…

  16. Hepatic Enzyme Decline after Pediatric Blunt Trauma: A Tool for Timing Child Abuse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Amy L.; Lindberg, Daniel M.; Burke, Bonnie L.; Shults, Justine; Holmes, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Previous research in adult patients with blunt hepatic injuries has suggested a pattern of serum hepatic transaminase concentration decline. Evaluating this decline after pediatric blunt hepatic trauma could establish parameters for estimating the time of inflicted injuries. Deviation from a consistent transaminase resolution pattern…

  17. Perifusion of co-cultured hepatocytes: optimization of studies on drug metabolism and cytotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, R; Wegner, H; Alber, J

    1996-04-01

    The combination of co-cultivation of hepatocytes and epithelial cell lines with a newly developed perifusion system was used for in vitro studies on drug metabolism and cytotoxicity. This approach improved the viability and enhanced the induction of the biotransforming capacity of the hepatocytes. As demonstrated for the induction of 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity by 3-methylcholanthrene or benzanthracene, co-cultured hepatocytes in the perifusion system responded more sensitively to these inducers than without perifusion, most likely owing to stable (steady-state) concentrations of the inducers under the former conditions and rapidly declining concentrations under the latter conditions. The perifusion approach rendered it possible to determine the kinetics of drug metabolism during single or sequential incubations. After induction with 3-methylcholanthrene and phenobarbital, phase I metabolism of lonazolac to the monohydroxylated product in perifused co-cultures closely (87%) approached the values reported for the in vivo production, whereas in stationary co-cultures only 52% could be reached. Likewise, cytotoxic effects could be detected more precisely in the perifused co-cultures. If cells were pretreated with 0.2 mmol/L galactosamine for 3 h, perifusion with increasing concentrations of menadione differentially killed epithelial RL-ET-14 cells and hepatocytes at low and high concentrations, respectively, while in stationary co-cultures no differential effect was observed and only the higher concentrations were cytotoxic for both cells. Prevention by incubation with S-adenosylmethionine of menadione cytotoxicity up to a menadione concentration of 250 micromol/L was seen only in the perifused co-cultures, whereas in stationary cultures only a slight shift of the cytotoxic concentration exerting 50% cell damage to higher values was noted. These results demonstrate the versatile application of perifused co-cultures for studies on drug metabolism including

  18. The cytochrome P450 superfamily: biochemistry, evolution and drug metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Danielson, P B

    2002-12-01

    Cytochrome p450s comprise a superfamily of heme-thiolate proteins named for the spectral absorbance peak of their carbon-monoxide-bound species at 450 nm. Having been found in every class of organism, including Archaea, the p450 superfamily is believed to have originated from an ancestral gene that existed over 3 billion years ago. Repeated gene duplications have subsequently given rise to one of the largest of multigene families. These enzymes are notable both for the diversity of reactions that they catalyze and the range of chemically dissimilar substrates upon which they act. Cytochrome p450s support the oxidative, peroxidative and reductive metabolism of such endogenous and xenobiotic substrates as environmental pollutants, agrochemicals, plant allelochemicals, steroids, prostaglandins and fatty acids. In humans, cytochrome p450s are best know for their central role in phase I drug metabolism where they are of critical importance to two of the most significant problems in clinical pharmacology: drug interactions and interindividual variability in drug metabolism. Recent advances in our understanding of cytochrome p450-mediated drug metabolism have been accelerated as a result of an increasing emphasis on functional genomic approaches to p450 research. While human cytochrome p450 databases have swelled with a flood of new human sequence variants, however, the functional characterization of the corresponding gene products has not kept pace. In response researchers have begun to apply the tools of proteomics as well as homology-based and ab initio modeling to salient questions of cytochrome p450 structure/function. This review examines the latest advances in our understanding of human cytochrome p450s.

  19. Schisandra Chinensis Baillon regulates the gene expression of phase II antioxidant/detoxifying enzymes in hepatic damage induced rats

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Han I; Do, Gyeong-Min; Lee, Hye Min; Ok, Hyang Mok; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES This study investigated the antioxidant activities and hepatoprotective effects of Schisandra chinensis Baillon extract (SCE) against tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced oxidative hepatic damage in rats. MATERIALS/METHODS Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were pretreated with SCE (300, 600, and 1,200 mg/kg BW) or saline once daily for 14 consecutive days. On day 14, each animal, except those belonging to the normal control group, were injected with t-BHP (0.8 mmol/kg BW/i.p.), and all of the rats were sacrificed 16 h after t-BHP injection. RESULTS Although no significant differences in AST and ALT levels were observed among the TC and SCE groups, the high-dose SCE group showed a decreasing tendency compared to the TC group. However, erythrocyte SOD activity showed a significant increase in the low-dose SCE group compared with the TC group. On the other hand, no significant differences in hepatic total glutathione (GSH) level, glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were observed among the TC and SCE groups. Hepatic histopathological evaluation revealed that pretreatment with SCE resulted in reduced t-BHP-induced incidence of lesions, such as neutrophil infiltration, swelling of liver cells, and necrosis. In particular, treatment with a high dose of SCE resulted in induction of phase II antioxidant/detoxifying enzyme expression, such as glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC). CONCLUSIONS Based on these results, we conclude that SCE exerts protective effects against t-BHP induced oxidative hepatic damage through the reduction of neutrophil infiltration, swelling of liver cells, and necrosis. In addition, SCE regulates the gene expression of phase II antioxidant/detoxifying enzymes independent of hepatic antioxidant enzyme activity. PMID:24944771

  20. Effects of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors on Liver Fibrosis in HIV and Hepatitis C Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Reese, Lindsey J; Tider, Diane S; Stivala, Alicia C; Fishbein, Dawn A

    2012-01-01

    Background. Liver fibrosis is accelerated in HIV and hepatitis C coinfection, mediated by profibrotic effects of angiotensin. The objective of this study was to determine if angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is) attenuate liver fibrosis in coinfection. Methods. A retrospective review of 156 coinfected subjects was conducted to analyze the association between exposure to ACE-Is and liver fibrosis. Noninvasive indices of liver fibrosis (APRI, FIB-4, Forns indices) were compared between subjects who had taken ACE-Is and controls who had not taken them. Linear regression was used to evaluate ACE-I use as an independent predictor of fibrosis. Results. Subjects taking ACE-Is for three years were no different than controls on the APRI and the FIB-4 but had significantly higher scores than controls on the Forns index, indicating more advanced fibrosis. The use of ACE-Is for three years remained independently associated with an elevated Forns score when adjusted for age, race, and HIV viral load (P < 0.001). There were significant associations between all of the indices and significant fibrosis, as determined clinically and radiologically. Conclusions. There was not a protective association between angiotensin inhibition and liver fibrosis in coinfection. These noninvasive indices may be useful for ruling out significant fibrosis in coinfection.

  1. Electrochemistry-mass spectrometry in drug metabolism and protein research.

    PubMed

    Permentier, Hjalmar P; Bruins, Andries P; Bischoff, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    The combination of electrochemistry coupled on-line to mass spectrometry (EC-MS) forms a powerful analytical technique with unique applications in the fields of drug metabolism and proteomics. In this review the latest developments are surveyed from both instrumental and application perspectives. The limitations and solutions for coupling an electrochemical system to a mass spectrometer are discussed. The electrochemical mimicking of drug metabolism, specifically by Cytochrome P450, is high-lighted as an application with high biomedical relevance. The EC-MS analysis of proteins also has promising new applications for both proteomics research and biomarker discovery. EC-MS has furthermore advantages for improved analyte detection with mass spectrometry, both for small molecules and large biomolecules. Finally, potential future directions of development of the technique are briefly discussed.

  2. The effects of fenvalerate on hepatic and cerebral xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in selenium and/or iodine deficient rats

    PubMed Central

    Caglayan, Aydan; Kocer-Gumusel, Belma; Erkekoglu, Pinar; Hincal, Filiz

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Particularly in developing countries, selenium and/or iodine deficiencies are encountered and use of pesticides in agriculture are not well-controlled. Fenvalerate is a pyrethroid insectide used in agriculture and has applications against a wide range of pests. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of fenvalerate on hepatic and cerebral xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities in the presence of iodine and/or selenium deficiency on a rat model. Materials and Methods: Iodine and/or selenium deficiency was induced by feeding three-week-old Wistar rats with a diet containing <0.005 mg selenium kg-1, and/or administering 1% sodium perchlorate in drinking water for 7 weeks. Test groups received fenvalerate (100 mg kg-1 BW IP) for the last 7 days. Hepatic and cerebral microsomal aniline hydroxylase (CYP2E1) and cytosolic glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities were determined. Besides, hepatic NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (P450R), ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD, CYP1A1/1A2) and penthoxyresorufin O-depenthylase (PROD, CYP2B1/2B2), activities were also measured. Results: Fenvalerate had a general inductive effect on the hepatic and cerebral xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities. Moreover, enzyme activities were also altered by iodine and/or selenium deficiency, but the effects seemed to be enzyme- and tissue-specific. Conclusion: The inductive effect of fenvalerate, particularly in high dose exposures, may change the metabolism of several xenobiotics, including drugs, as well as endogenous substrates. The effects may vary depending on the selenium and/or iodine status of individual. PMID:27872699

  3. Multicentric evaluation of new commercial enzyme immunoassays for the detection of immunoglobulin M and total antibodies against hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed

    Arcangeletti, M C; Dussaix, E; Ferraglia, F; Roque-Afonso, A M; Graube, A; Chezzi, C

    2011-08-01

    A multicentric clinical study was conducted on representative sera from 1,738 European and U.S. subjects for the evaluation of new anti-hepatitis A virus enzyme immunoassays from Bio-Rad Laboratories. Comparison with reference DiaSorin S.p.A. tests confirmed the good performance of Bio-Rad assays (99.85% and 99.47% overall agreement in detecting total antibodies and IgM, respectively).

  4. Multicentric Evaluation of New Commercial Enzyme Immunoassays for the Detection of Immunoglobulin M and Total Antibodies against Hepatitis A Virus▿

    PubMed Central

    Arcangeletti, M. C.; Dussaix, E.; Ferraglia, F.; Roque-Afonso, A. M.; Graube, A.; Chezzi, C.

    2011-01-01

    A multicentric clinical study was conducted on representative sera from 1,738 European and U.S. subjects for the evaluation of new anti-hepatitis A virus enzyme immunoassays from Bio-Rad Laboratories. Comparison with reference DiaSorin S.p.A. tests confirmed the good performance of Bio-Rad assays (99.85% and 99.47% overall agreement in detecting total antibodies and IgM, respectively). PMID:21653739

  5. Liver enzymes are associated with hepatic insulin resistance, insulin secretion, and glucagon concentration in healthy men and women.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Fabrice; Ducluzeau, Pierre-Henri; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Laville, Martine; Anderwald, Christian H; Konrad, Thomas; Mari, Andrea; Balkau, Beverley

    2011-06-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms to explain the association between risk of type 2 diabetes and elevated concentrations of γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and alanineaminotransferase (ALT) remain poorly characterized. We explored the association of liver enzymes with peripheral and hepatic insulin resistance, insulin secretion, insulin clearance, and glucagon concentration. We studied 1,309 nondiabetic individuals from the Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular disease (RISC) study; all had a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with assessment of insulin secretion and hepatic insulin extraction. The hepatic insulin resistance index was calculated in 393 individuals. In both men and women, plasma concentrations of GGT and ALT were inversely related with insulin sensitivity (M/I) (all P < 0.01). Likewise, the hepatic insulin resistance index was positively correlated with both GGT (r = 0.37, P < 0.0001, men; r = 0.36, P < 0.0001, women) and ALT (r = 0.25, P = 0.0005, men; r = 0.18, P = 0.01, women). These associations persisted in multivariable models. Increased GGT and ALT were significantly associated with higher insulin secretion rates and with both reduced endogenous clearance of insulin and hepatic insulin extraction during the OGTT (P = 0.0005 in men; P = 0.003 in women). Plasma fasting glucagon levels increased over ALT quartiles (men, quartile 4 vs. quartile 1 11.2 ± 5.1 vs. 9.3 ± 3.8 pmol/L, respectively, P = 0.0002; women, 9.0 ± 4.3 vs. 7.6 ± 3.1, P = 0.001). In healthy individuals, increased GGT and ALT were biomarkers of both systemic and hepatic insulin resistance with concomitant increased insulin secretion and decreased hepatic insulin clearance. The novel finding of a positive correlation between ALT and fasting glucagon level concentrations warrants confirmation in type 2 diabetes.

  6. Di2-ethylhexyl phthalate disrupts thyroid hormone homeostasis through activating the Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and inducing hepatic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hanfeng; Ha, Mei; Yang, Min; Yue, Ping; Xie, Zhengyuan; Liu, Changjiang

    2017-01-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), as a widespread environmental pollutant and an endocrine disruptor, can disturb the homeostasis of thyroid hormones (THs). In order to elucidate roles of the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways and hepatic enzymes in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP, Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with DEHP by gavage for 30 consecutive days; Nthy-ori 3-1 cells were treated with DEHP with NAC, k-Ras siRNA or inhibitors (U0126 and wortmannin). Results showed that DEHP led to histopathologic changes in rat thyroid and liver, such as the decrease in thyroid follicular cavity diameter, hepatocyte edema. Triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) were reduced. DEHP caused ROS production, oxidative stress and k-Ras upregulation, thereby activating the ERK and Akt pathways in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, TRH receptor (TRHr) level was elevated after the activation of the Akt pathway and was downregulated after the inhibition of the Akt pathway. However, TRHr was not modulated by the ERK pathway. Additionally, hepatic enzymes, including Ugt1a1, CYP2b1, Sult1e1, and Sult2b1, were significantly induced after DEHP exposure. Taken together, DEHP can perturb TH homeostasis and reduce TH levels. The activated Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and induced hepatic enzymes play vital roles in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP. PMID:28065941

  7. Di2-ethylhexyl phthalate disrupts thyroid hormone homeostasis through activating the Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and inducing hepatic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hanfeng; Ha, Mei; Yang, Min; Yue, Ping; Xie, Zhengyuan; Liu, Changjiang

    2017-01-09

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), as a widespread environmental pollutant and an endocrine disruptor, can disturb the homeostasis of thyroid hormones (THs). In order to elucidate roles of the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways and hepatic enzymes in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP, Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with DEHP by gavage for 30 consecutive days; Nthy-ori 3-1 cells were treated with DEHP with NAC, k-Ras siRNA or inhibitors (U0126 and wortmannin). Results showed that DEHP led to histopathologic changes in rat thyroid and liver, such as the decrease in thyroid follicular cavity diameter, hepatocyte edema. Triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) were reduced. DEHP caused ROS production, oxidative stress and k-Ras upregulation, thereby activating the ERK and Akt pathways in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, TRH receptor (TRHr) level was elevated after the activation of the Akt pathway and was downregulated after the inhibition of the Akt pathway. However, TRHr was not modulated by the ERK pathway. Additionally, hepatic enzymes, including Ugt1a1, CYP2b1, Sult1e1, and Sult2b1, were significantly induced after DEHP exposure. Taken together, DEHP can perturb TH homeostasis and reduce TH levels. The activated Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and induced hepatic enzymes play vital roles in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP.

  8. Gut microbiome interactions with drug metabolism, efficacy, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ian D; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiota has both direct and indirect effects on drug and xenobiotic metabolisms, and this can have consequences for both efficacy and toxicity. Indeed, microbiome-driven drug metabolism is essential for the activation of certain prodrugs, for example, azo drugs such as prontosil and neoprontosil resulting in the release of sulfanilamide. In addition to providing a major source of reductive metabolizing capability, the gut microbiota provides a suite of additional reactions including acetylation, deacylation, decarboxylation, dehydroxylation, demethylation, dehalogenation, and importantly, in the context of certain types of drug-related toxicity, conjugates hydrolysis reactions. In addition to direct effects, the gut microbiota can affect drug metabolism and toxicity indirectly via, for example, the modulation of host drug metabolism and disposition and competition of bacterial-derived metabolites for xenobiotic metabolism pathways. Also, of course, the therapeutic drugs themselves can have effects, both intended and unwanted, which can impact the health and composition of the gut microbiota with unforeseen consequences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hepatic steroid inactivating enzymes, hepatic portal blood flow, and corpus luteum blood perfusion in lactating dairy cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In ruminants, a decrease in pregnancy rates may be due to decreased concentrations of progesterone (P4). It is important to note that both production from the corpus luteum and/or hepatic steroid inactivation impacts peripheral concentrations of P4. Cattle with an elevated dry matter intake have inc...

  10. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  11. Citrus unshiu peel extract ameliorates hyperglycemia and hepatic steatosis by altering inflammation and hepatic glucose- and lipid-regulating enzymes in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Hae-Jin; Jung, Un Ju; Cho, Su-Jung; Jung, Hee-Kyung; Shim, Sangphil; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2013-02-01

    Insulin resistance in Type 2 diabetes leads to hepatic steatosis that can accompanied by progressive inflammation of the liver. Citrus unshiu peel is a rich source of citrus flavonoids that possess anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic and lipid-lowering effects. However, the ability of citrus unshiu peel ethanol extract (CPE) to improve hyperglycemia, adiposity and hepatic steatosis in Type 2 diabetes is unknown. Thus, we evaluated the effects of CPE on markers for glucose, lipid metabolism and inflammation in Type 2 diabetic mice. Male C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice were fed a normal diet with CPE (2 g/100 g diet) or rosiglitazone (0.001 g/100 g diet) for 6 weeks. Mice supplemented with the CPE showed a significant decrease in body weight gain, body fat mass and blood glucose level. The antihyperglycemic effect of CPE appeared to be partially mediated through the inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA expression and its activity and through the induction of insulin/glucagon secretion. CPE also ameliorated hepatic steatosis and hypertriglyceridemia via the inhibition of gene expression and activities of the lipogenic enzymes and the activation of fatty acid oxidation in the liver. These beneficial effects of CPE may be related to increased levels of anti-inflammatory adiponectin and interleukin (IL)-10, and decreased levels of pro-inflammatory markers (IL-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α) in the plasma or liver. Taken together, we suggest that CPE has the potential to improve both hyperglycemia and hepatic steatosis in Type 2 diabetes.

  12. Fundamentals of enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Seibert, Eleanore; Tracy, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides a general introduction to the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions, with a focus on drug-metabolizing enzymes. A prerequisite to understanding enzyme kinetics is having a clear grasp of the meanings of "enzyme" and "catalysis." Catalysts are reagents that can increase the rate of a chemical reaction without being consumed in the reaction. Enzymes are proteins that form a subset of catalysts. These concepts are further explored below.

  13. Drug Metabolism by the Host and Gut Microbiota: A Partnership or Rivalry?

    PubMed

    Swanson, Hollie I

    2015-10-01

    The importance of the gut microbiome in determining not only overall health, but also in the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics, is rapidly emerging. It is becoming increasingly clear that the gut microbiota can act in concert with the host cells to maintain intestinal homeostasis, cometabolize drugs and xenobiotics, and alter the expression levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters and the expression and activity levels of nuclear receptors. In this myriad of activities, the impact of the microbiota may be beneficial or detrimental to the host. Given that the interplay between the gut microbiota and host cells is likely subject to high interindividual variability, this work has tremendous implications for our ability to predict accurately a particular drug's pharmacokinetics and a given patient population's response to drugs. In this issue of Drug Metabolism and Disposition, a series of articles is presented that illustrate the progress and challenges that lie ahead as we unravel the intricacies associated with drug and xenobiotic metabolism by the gut microbiota. These articles highlight the underlying mechanisms that are involved and the use of in vivo and in vitro approaches that are currently available for elucidating the role of the gut microbiota in drug and xenobiotic metabolism. These articles also shed light on exciting new avenues of research that may be pursued as we consider the role of the gut microbiota as an endocrine organ, a component of the brain-gut axis, and whether the gut microbiota is an appropriate and amenable target for new drugs.

  14. Comparative effects of medetomidine enantiomers on in vitro and in vivo microsomal drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pelkonen, O; Puurunen, J; Arvela, P; Lammintausta, R

    1991-09-01

    The effects of dexmedetomidine, a selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, and its levo enantiomer (MPV-1441), on in vitro microsomal P450-dependent drug-metabolizing activities as well as on in vivo aminopyrine elimination and hexobarbital sleeping time were studied. Both enantiomers inhibited the oxidative metabolism of several model substrates and testosterone in rat liver microsomal incubations. Microsomal activities derived from control animals or rats pretreated with phenobarbital were more sensitive to inhibitory effects of dexmedetomidine than those from rats treated with 3-methylcholanthrene. Enzyme activities in human liver microsomes were also inhibited by dexmedetomidine. Retardation of the elimination of aminopyrine was dose-dependent; elimination was marginally retarded with doses up to 100 micrograms/kg (from 17 to 23 min.; both enantiomers). Higher doses of the levo enantiomer prolonged aminopyrine half-life to 78 (1 mg/kg) and 162 min. (10 mg/kg). The hexobarbital sleeping time was prolonged by the dose of 1 mg/kg of the levo enantiomer (128 min. versus 20 min. in controls), while the dose of 0.1 mg/kg had no effect (23 versus 20 min.). These studies indicate that both enantiomers of medetomidine are inhibitors of microsomal drug metabolism in vitro, but significant effects on aminopyrine elimination or hexobarbital sleeping time are apparent only at doses, which do not allow the use of dexmedetomidine because of excessive sedative effect.

  15. Drug metabolism and pharmacogenetics: the British contribution to fields of international significance

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, John

    2006-01-01

    The branch of pharmacology we now call ‘drug metabolism', the consideration of the enzymes and procesess determining the disposition of drugs in the body, emerged in the 1840s on the continent of Europe, but British science made little or no contribution until the 1920s. From this point on, the development of the field through the 20th century was shaped to a very significant extent by a series of influential British workers, whose contributions were of global significance and who can now be seen as fathers of the subject. Since the 1950s, and gaining pace inexorably from the 1970s, the significance of drug metabolism to human therapeutics has been greatly added to by the emergence of pharmacogenetics, clinically important hereditary variation in response to drugs, which underpins the current emphasis on personalised medicine. This review examines the British contributions to both these fields through the lives of seven key contributors and attempts to place their work both in the context of its time and its lasting influence. PMID:16402125

  16. Hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in two species of benthic fish showing different prevalences of contaminant-associated liver neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, T.K.; Singh, S.V.; Awasthi, Y.C.; Varanasi, U. )

    1992-04-01

    English sole (Parophrys vetulus) and starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus) are closely related benthic fish which show substantial differences in prevalences of contaminant-associated hepatic neoplasms and putatively preneoplastic foci of cellular alteration when captured from estuaries containing a variety of organic chemical contaminants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Because PAH are strongly implicated as causative agents in the etiology of these lesions, several of the hepatic enzymes involved in activation and detoxication of PAH were studied in these two species. Hepatic aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH), epoxide hydrolase (EH), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities were measured in animals sampled from both contaminated and reference areas. English sole, the species showing higher prevalences of contaminant-associated hepatic lesions, had higher (1- to 2-fold) hepatic activities of AHH and lower activities of EH (0.8-fold) and GST (1.8-fold) than those of starry flounder, regardless of site of capture. These results are largely consistent with increased activation and decreased detoxication of PAH by English sole in comparison to starry flounder. Both laboratory and field data suggested that the observed species differences in enzyme activities were constitutive and not related to differential exposure to contaminants. There were also substantial differences between these species with respect to expression of GST isoenzymes, in that starry flounder expressed two highly anionic GST isoenzymes which did not correspond to any GST isoenzymes expressed in English sole liver; a previous study in an elasmobranch fish showed that an anionic GST was most active toward PAH oxides.

  17. [Enzyme alterations during chemical hepatocarcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Satoh, K; Hatayama, I

    1987-06-01

    Biochemical phenotypes such as the forms of enzyme proteins alter during the promotion and progression stages in chemical hepatocarcinogenesis. Many enzymes or isoenzymes have been identified as markers of (pre) neoplastic hepatic tissues and used for analysis of the carcinogenic process. The levels of hepatic isoenzymes decrease and those of prototypic or fetal isozymes increase during the progression of hepatocarcinogenesis. Some drug-metabolizing enzymes are also very variable at the promotion stage in rat chemical carcinogenesis; Phase I enzymes such as cytochrome P-450 decrease and Phase II (iso)-enzymes such as UDP-glucuronyl-transferase, glutathione S-transferase (GST) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GTP) increase. A new neutral GST form with pI 7.0 (GST-P) has been identified by us as one of the best markers for rat chemical hepatocarcinogenesis. GST-P is a homodimer consisting of a subunit (Mr 26,000, more accurately 23,307, and pI 6.7), the smallest among rat GST subunits, and differs immunochemically from any other GST form. It is present in very low levels in normal rat liver and is not inducible by most drugs including carcinogens without the appearance of preneoplastic hepatocyte nodules (HN) but it is increased by several ten-fold in HN-bearing liver and hepatomas induced by different carcinogens. Immunohistochemically, it is localized in HN and very early and small GST-positive foci are detectable using anti-GST-P antibody. (Pre) neoplastic hepatic lesions induced by nongenotoxic carcinogens such as hypolipidemic peroxisome-proliferating agents do not express GST-P as well as gamma-GTP.

  18. Defective Cytochrome P450-Catalysed Drug Metabolism in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease.

    PubMed

    Nicoli, Elena-Raluca; Al Eisa, Nada; Cluzeau, Celine V M; Wassif, Christopher A; Gray, James; Burkert, Kathryn R; Smith, David A; Morris, Lauren; Cologna, Stephanie M; Peer, Cody J; Sissung, Tristan M; Uscatu, Constantin-Daniel; Figg, William D; Pavan, William J; Vite, Charles H; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in either the NPC1 or NPC2 gene. NPC is characterised by storage of multiple lipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment, resulting in cellular and organ system dysfunction. The underlying molecular mechanisms that lead to the range of clinical presentations in NPC are not fully understood. While evaluating potential small molecule therapies in Npc1-/- mice, we observed a consistent pattern of toxicity associated with drugs metabolised by the cytochrome P450 system, suggesting a potential drug metabolism defect in NPC1 disease. Investigation of the P450 system in the context of NPC1 dysfunction revealed significant changes in the gene expression of many P450 associated genes across the full lifespan of Npc1-/- mice, decreased activity of cytochrome P450 reductase, and a global decrease of multiple cytochrome P450 catalysed dealkylation reactions. In vivo drug metabolism studies using a prototypic P450 metabolised drug, midazolam, confirmed dysfunction in drug clearance in the Npc1-/- mouse. Expression of the Phase II enzyme uridinediphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) was also significantly reduced in Npc1-/- mice. Interestingly, reduced activity within the P450 system was also observed in heterozygous Npc1+/- mice. The reduced activity of P450 enzymes may be the result of bile acid deficiency/imbalance in Npc1-/- mice, as bile acid treatment significantly rescued P450 enzyme activity in Npc1-/- mice and has the potential to be an adjunctive therapy for NPC disease patients. The dysfunction in the cytochrome P450 system were recapitulated in the NPC1 feline model. Additionally, we present the first evidence that there are alterations in the P450 system in NPC1 patients.

  19. Defective Cytochrome P450-Catalysed Drug Metabolism in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wassif, Christopher A.; Gray, James; Burkert, Kathryn R.; Smith, David A.; Morris, Lauren; Cologna, Stephanie M.; Peer, Cody J.; Sissung, Tristan M.; Uscatu, Constantin-Daniel; Figg, William D.; Pavan, William J.; Vite, Charles H.; Porter, Forbes D.; Platt, Frances M.

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in either the NPC1 or NPC2 gene. NPC is characterised by storage of multiple lipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment, resulting in cellular and organ system dysfunction. The underlying molecular mechanisms that lead to the range of clinical presentations in NPC are not fully understood. While evaluating potential small molecule therapies in Npc1-/- mice, we observed a consistent pattern of toxicity associated with drugs metabolised by the cytochrome P450 system, suggesting a potential drug metabolism defect in NPC1 disease. Investigation of the P450 system in the context of NPC1 dysfunction revealed significant changes in the gene expression of many P450 associated genes across the full lifespan of Npc1-/- mice, decreased activity of cytochrome P450 reductase, and a global decrease of multiple cytochrome P450 catalysed dealkylation reactions. In vivo drug metabolism studies using a prototypic P450 metabolised drug, midazolam, confirmed dysfunction in drug clearance in the Npc1-/- mouse. Expression of the Phase II enzyme uridinediphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) was also significantly reduced in Npc1-/- mice. Interestingly, reduced activity within the P450 system was also observed in heterozygous Npc1+/- mice. The reduced activity of P450 enzymes may be the result of bile acid deficiency/imbalance in Npc1-/- mice, as bile acid treatment significantly rescued P450 enzyme activity in Npc1-/- mice and has the potential to be an adjunctive therapy for NPC disease patients. The dysfunction in the cytochrome P450 system were recapitulated in the NPC1 feline model. Additionally, we present the first evidence that there are alterations in the P450 system in NPC1 patients. PMID:27019000

  20. Effects of tin-protoporphyrin administration on hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in the juvenile rat

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, D.L.; Becker, F.F.

    1988-01-01

    The heme analogue tin-protoporphyrin IX (SnP) is a potent inhibitor of microsomal heme oxygenase. Administration of SnP to neonatal rats can prevent hyperbilirubinemia by blocking the postnatal increase of heme oxygenase activity. Apparently innocuous at therapeutic doses, it is of potential clinical value for chemoprevention of neonatal jaundice. We found that when 50-g male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated daily with 50 mumol of SnP/kg sc for 6 days, hepatic microsomal cytochromes b5 and P-450 were significantly diminished. Cytochrome P-450 reductase, two P-450-dependent monooxygenases, aminopyrine demethylase and benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase, and catalase, a peroxisomal hemoprotein, were also significantly diminished. These results suggested that SnP might significantly affect the metabolism of other xenobiotics. This possibility was confirmed by the finding that hexobarbital-induced sleep lasted 4 times longer in SnP-treated rats than in controls. Inhibition of protein synthesis by SnP was ruled out as the cause of hemoprotein loss when administration of (/sup 3/H)leucine to SnP-treated and control rats demonstrated that proteins of the microsomal, cytosolic, and plasma membrane fractions of the livers from both groups incorporated similar levels of leucine. When /sup 55/FeCl/sub 3/ and (2-/sup 14/C)glycine were administered to measure heme synthesis, heme extract from the livers of SnP-treated rats contained 4 times more label from iron and glycine than did heme from control livers. Despite the apparent increased rate of heme synthesis in SnP-treated rats, each of the three cell fractions demonstrated a significant loss of heme but contained sizable amounts of SnP. These findings suggest that SnP causes a decrease of functional hemoprotein and partial loss of enzymic activity by displacing intracellular heme.

  1. Effect of curcumin on hepatic antioxidant enzymes activities and gene expressions in rats intoxicated with aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    El-Bahr, S M

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight rats were examined in a 5-week experiment to investigate the effect of curcumin on gene expression and activities of hepatic antioxidant enzymes in rats intoxicated with aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 ). The rats were divided into four groups. Rats in 1-4 groups served as control, oral curcumin treated (15 mg/kg body weight), single i.p. dose of AFB1 (3 mg/kg body weight) and combination of single i.p. dose of AFB1 with oral curcumin treated, respectively. AFB1 Liver damage and oxidative stress were evident in untreated AFB1 -intoxicated rats as indicated by a significant elevation in hepatic transaminases, elevation in lipid peroxide biomarkers (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances; TBARS), reduction of reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration, reduction in the activities of antioxidant enzymes namely catalase (CAT), total superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and down-regulation of gene expression of these antioxidant enzymes compared to control. Liver sections of rats intoxicated with AFB1 showed a disrupted lobular architecture, scattered necrotic cells and biliary proliferation. Administration of curcumin with AFB1 resulted in amelioration of AFB1 -induced effects compared to untreated AFB1 -intoxicated rats via an up-regulation of antioxidant enzyme gene expression, activation of the expressed genes and increase in the availability of GSH. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Effects of Radiation and Dietary Iron on Expression of Genes and Proteins Involved in Drug Metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faust, K. M.; Wotring, V. E.

    2014-01-01

    Liver function, especially the rate of metabolic enzyme activities, determines the concentration of circulating drugs and the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand any effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Dietary factors and exposure to radiation are aspects of spaceflight that are potential oxidative stressors and both can be modeled in ground experiments. In this experiment, we examined the effects of high dietary iron and low dose gamma radiation (individually and combined) on the gene expression of enzymes involved in drug metabolism, redox homeostasis, and DNA repair. METHODS All procedures were approved by the JSC Animal Care and Use Committee. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups (n=8); control, high Fe diet (650 mg iron/kg), radiation (fractionated 3 Gy exposure from a Cs- 137 source) and combined high Fe diet + radiation exposure. Animals were euthanized 24h after the last treatment of radiation; livers were removed immediately and flash -frozen in liquid nitrogen. Expression of genes thought to be involved in redox homeostasis, drug metabolism and DNA damage repair was measured by RT-qPCR. Where possible, protein expression of the same genes was measured by western blotting. All data are expressed as % change in expression normalized to reference gene expression; comparisons were then made of each treatment group to the sham exposed/ normal diet control group. Data was considered significant at p< 0

  3. The Effects of Subacute Exposure of Peracetic Acid on Lipid Peroxidation and Hepatic Enzymes in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Marjani, Abdoljalal; Golalipour, Mohammad J.; Gharravi, Anneh M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study was undertaken to determine the effect of subacute exposure of peracetic acid on lipid peroxidation and hepatic enzymes in Wistar rats. Methods 48 male animals in Treatment Group I, II and III received 0.2%, 2% and 20% peracetic acid daily for 2 and 4 weeks. Results Serum malondialdehyde increased and Alanine Transaminase and Aspartate Transaminase decreased significantly in groups 2 and 3, compared to the control group. The malondialdehyde, Alanine Transaminase and Aspartate Transaminase with 0.2% and 2% doses of peracetic acid for 2 weeks do not lead to the alteration of malondialdehyde and enzyme activities. Conclusion This study demonstrated that the enhancement of malondialdehyde could provide an oxidative damage induced by disinfectant peroxidation at 20% and 2% doses at 2 and 4 weeks. The consumption of peroxidation with 20% for 2 weeks and 2% for 4 weeks can cause the increase of malondialdehyde and the decrease of enzyme activities, respectively. PMID:22043353

  4. Purification and characterization of hepatic glutathione S-transferases of rhesus monkeys. A family of enzymes similar to the human hepatic glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed Central

    Hoesch, R M; Boyer, T D

    1988-01-01

    Thirteen forms of glutathione S-transferase were purified from the livers of female rhesus monkeys (Macaque mulatta). Most (74.7%) of the activity in the hepatic cytosol adhered well to the GSH affinity column and could be eluted only with the addition of GSH to the eluting buffer. The predominant isoenzymes (n = 5) in this 'high-affinity' fraction had alkaline pI values (greater than 9.0) and contained a subunit with an Mr value of 24,000. All of these isoenzymes had high organic peroxidase activity and, on the basis of amino acid analysis, substrate specificities and affinity for non-substrate ligands, appear to belong to the family of glutathione S-transferases that have been termed alpha [Mannervik, Alin, Guthenberg, Jensson, Tahir, Warholm & Jörnvall (1985) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 82, 7202-7206]. Also within the high-affinity fraction was an isoenzyme with an acidic (5.8) pI value. This acidic isoenzyme was composed of a unique subunit (Mr 23,000). The N-terminal sequence (ten residues) of this acidic enzyme was identical with that of a human form that is referred to as pi. The predominant form of enzyme in the 'low-affinity' (eluted from the GSH affinity column with an increase in buffer pH) fraction was a homodimer of a 26,000-Mr subunit. It had an alkaline pI (greater than 9.0) but it lacked organic peroxidase activity. The N-terminal sequence (ten residues) of this enzyme was identical with that of a human enzyme referred to as mu. The substrate specificities and affinity for non-substrate ligands of this monkey enzyme also were similar to those of the human enzyme. In conclusion, the liver cytosol of rhesus monkeys contains a number of glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes that are very similar to the human hepatic enzymes. Images Fig. 3. PMID:3390162

  5. Effect of the combined probiotics with aflatoxin B₁-degrading enzyme on aflatoxin detoxification, broiler production performance and hepatic enzyme gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Rui-yu; Chang, Juan; Yin, Qing-qiang; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu-rong; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Guo-qiang; Zheng, Qiu-hong

    2013-09-01

    In order to degrade aflatoxin B₁ (AFB₁), AFB₁-degrading microbes (probiotics) such as Lactobacillus casei, Bacillus subtilis and Pichia anomala, and the AFB₁-degrading enzyme from Aspergillus oryzae were selected and combined to make feed additive. Seventy-five 43-day-old male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly divided into 5 groups, 15 broilers for each group. The broilers were given with 5 kinds of diets such as the basal diet, 400 μg/kg AFB₁ supplement without feed additive, and 200, 400, 800 μg/kg AFB₁ supplement with 0.15% feed additive. The feeding experimental period was 30 d, which was used to determine production performance of broilers. In addition, serum, liver and chest muscle were selected for measuring AFB₁ residues, gene expressions, microscopic and antioxidant analyses. The results showed that adding 0.15% feed additive in broiler diets could significantly relieve the negative effect of AFB₁ on chicken's production performance and nutrient metabolic rates (P<0.05). It could also improve AFB₁ metabolism, hepatic cell structure, antioxidant activity, and many hepatic enzyme gene expressions involved in oxidoreductase, apoptosis, cell growth, immune system and metabolic process (P<0.05). It could be concluded that the feed additive was able to degrade AFB₁ and improve animal production.

  6. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... transaminase enzyme levels Treatment There is no specific treatment for hepatitis A. You should rest when the symptoms are ... and have not had hepatitis A or the hepatitis A vaccine. Common reasons for getting one or both of these treatments include: You live with someone who has hepatitis ...

  7. Effects of PCBs on plasma enzymes, testosterone level, and hepatic xenobiotic metabolism in the grey partridge, perdix perdlx

    SciTech Connect

    Abiola, F. ); Lorgue, G.; Riviere, J.L. ); Benoit, E. ); Soyez, D. )

    1989-09-01

    The hepatic cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase (MO) system functions in oxidative biotransformation of a wide variety of both endogenous and exogenous (xenobiotic) compounds in many animal species. However, most of the previous studies were carried out with a narrow range of species and investigations on wild species are lacking. In this report, the authors describe the effects of a commercial mixture of PCBs (DP5) on the hepatic MO activities of the grey partridge (Perdix perdix). To more thoroughly investigate the inducing effects of DP5, they used two series of homologous substrates, alkylresorufins and alkoxycoumarins, and an endogenous compound, testosterone, which were shown in mammals to differentiate between different forms of cytochrome P-450. Furthermore, to more carefully assess the effects of DP5, they also measured the activity of two plasma marker enzymes, alanine transpeptidase (ALAT) and gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT), and the plasmatic concentration of testosterone.

  8. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin-(1–7)/Mas axis activates Akt signaling to ameliorate hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xi; Yang, Fangyuan; Shi, Tingting; Yuan, Mingxia; Xin, Zhong; Xie, Rongrong; Li, Sen; Li, Hongbing; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2016-01-01

    The classical axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE)/Ang II/AT1, contributes to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the role of bypass axis of RAS (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang-(1–7)/Mas) in hepatic steatosis is still unclear. Here we showed that deletion of ACE2 aggravates liver steatosis, which is correlated with the increased expression of hepatic lipogenic genes and the decreased expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in the liver of ACE2 knockout (ACE2−/y) mice. Meanwhile, oxidative stress and inflammation were also aggravated in ACE2−/y mice. On the contrary, overexpression of ACE2 improved fatty liver in db/db mice, and the mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes were up-regulated. In vitro, Ang-(1–7)/ACE2 ameliorated hepatic steatosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in free fatty acid (FFA)-induced HepG2 cells, and what’s more, Akt inhibitors reduced ACE2-mediated lipid metabolism. Furthermore, ACE2-mediated Akt activation could be attenuated by blockade of ATP/P2 receptor/Calmodulin (CaM) pathway. These results indicated that Ang-(1–7)/ACE2/Mas axis may reduce liver lipid accumulation partly by regulating lipid-metabolizing genes through ATP/P2 receptor/CaM signaling pathway. Our findings support the potential role of ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas axis in prevention and treatment of hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:26883384

  9. Changes in hepatic phase I and phase II biotransformation enzyme expression and glutathione levels following atrazine exposure in female rats.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Arthur D; Breckenridge, Charles B; Yi, Kun D; Sawhney Coder, Pragati; Wanders, Desiree; Judd, Robert L; Foradori, Chad D

    2017-10-05

    1. To determine the effects of repeated atrazine (ATR) treatment on hepatic phase I and II enzymes, adult female rats were treated with vehicle or 100 mg/kg of ATR for 1, 2, 3 or 4 days. Glutathione-s-transferases (GST) mRNA expression, protein levels (mu, pi, alpha, omega), and activity (cytosolic and microsomal), along with bioavailable glutathione (GSH) were assayed. 2. GST expression, concentrations and activity were increased, along with GSH levels, in animals treated with ATR for 3 and 4 days. 3. A subsequent study was performed with animals treated with vehicle, 6.5, 50 or 100 mg/kg/day for 4, 8 or 14 days. Expression of hepatic phase I CYP 450 enzymes was evaluated in conjugation with GST expression, protein and activity. Nineteen of the 45 CYP enzymes assayed displayed increased mRNA levels after eight days of treatment in animals treated with 50 or 100 mg/kg/day. After 14 days of treatment, all CYP expression levels returned to control levels except for CYP2B2, CYP2B3, CYP2C7, CYP2C23, CYP2E1, CYP3A9, CYP4A3 and CYP27A1, which remained elevated. 4. Results indicate that there may be a habituation or adaptation of liver phase I and phase II expression following repeated ATR treatment.

  10. Hepatic fatty acid oxidation enzyme activities are stimulated in rats fed the brown seaweed, Undaria pinnatifida (wakame).

    PubMed

    Murata, M; Ishihara, K; Saito, H

    1999-01-01

    The activities of hepatic enzymes involved in fatty acid synthesis and oxidation were compared in rats fed diets containing different proportions of dried powder of the brown seaweed, Undaria pinnatifida (wakame). Rats were fed diets containing 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2. 0, 5.0 and 10 g/100 g of dried wakame powder. Experimental diets were adjusted to provide consistent amounts of most nutrients, but mineral concentrations were not standardized. After the 21-d feeding period, serum and liver triacylglycerol levels in rats fed diets in which wakame constituted at least 2% were significantly lower than those in rats fed the control diet. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was significantly lower in rats fed the 5 and 10% wakame diets than in rats fed the control diet. In contrast, 10% wakame diet increased activities of enzymes involved in the beta-oxidation pathway including hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, acyl-CoA oxidase, enoyl-CoA hydratase and 2,4-dienoyl-CoA reductase. Some differences were detected in rats fed 5% wakame as well. These results suggest that alterations of the activities of enzymes involved in fatty acid metabolism in the liver are responsible for the serum triacylglycerol-lowering effect of dietary wakame. Thus, wakame may be useful as a food to prevent hyperlipidemia.

  11. Undiagnosed hepatitis C virus infection in hemodialysis patients: value of HCV RNA and liver enzyme levels.

    PubMed

    Caramelo, C; Bartolomé, J; Albalate, M; de Sequera, P; Navas, S; Bermejillo, T; Oliva, H; Marriott, E; Ortiz, A; Ruiz Tuñón, C; Casado, S; Carreño, V

    1996-12-01

    At present, routine screening for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is based on the detection of antiviral antibodies. Underdiagnosis of HCV infection by using HCV antibody tests, however, still occurs. Additional diagnostic means are provided by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The measurement of aminotransferase (ASAT and ALAT) has served as an auxiliary, less specific test. The present research aimed to design practical and low cost strategies to diminish underdiagnosis of HCV infection in dialysis patients. With this purpose in mind, we examined whether aminotransferases values in HCV antibody-negative patients could be related to undiagnosed HCV infection, by using HCV RNA testing by PCR as the gold standard. In 112 hemodialysis patients, we found 78 negative and 34 positive for HCV antibodies. A major finding was that 222 (28.2%) out of the 78 HCV antibodies-negative patients had positive HCV RNA by PCR. In repeated samples taken at six months follow-up from 19 out of these 22 patients, only one of them was positive for anti-HCV antibodies; moreover, a positive HCV RNA by PCR was confirmed in 13 (68.5%) of them. Within the HCV antibody-negative group, the mean values of ASAT, ALAT and gammaglutamiltransferase were higher (P < 0.001, P < 0.001 and P < 0.02, respectively) in the HCV PCR-positive versus the HCV PCR-negative patients. No significant differences were found in the liver enzyme values between the HCV antibody-negative, HCV RNA positive and the HCV antibody positive, HCV RNA positive individuals. Histological samples from two HCV RNA positive, HCV antibody-negative patients disclosed the presence of a mild liver disease. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates the critical importance of HCV RNA determination by PCR in hemodialysis patients who have no detectable circulating antibodies against the HCV. Furthermore, in conditions in which PCR technology is not readily available, we have established that the existence of a moderate increase of

  12. Efficacy of azelaic acid on hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in high fat diet induced type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Muthulakshmi, Shanmugam; Saravanan, Ramalingam

    2013-06-01

    Azelaic acid (AzA), a C9 linear α,ω-dicarboxylic acid, is found in whole grains namely wheat, rye, barley, oat seeds and sorghum. The study was performed to investigate whether AzA exerts beneficial effect on hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in high fat diet (HFD) induced type 2 diabetic C57BL/6J mice. C57BL/6J mice were fed high fat diet for 10 weeks and subjected to intragastric administration of various doses (20 mg, 40 mg and 80 mg/kg BW) of AzA daily for the subsequent 5 weeks. Rosiglitazone (RSG) was used as reference drug. Body weight, food intake, plasma glucose, plasma insulin, blood haemoglobin (Hb), blood glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), liver glycolytic enzyme (hexokinase), hepatic shunt enzyme (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), gluconeogenic enzymes(glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase), liver glycogen, plasma and liver triglycerides were examined in mice fed with normal standard diet (NC), high fat diet (HFD), HFD with AzA (HFD + AzA) and HFD with rosiglitazone (HFD + RSG). Among the three doses, 80 mg/kg BW of AzA was able to positively regulate plasma glucose, insulin, blood HbA1c and haemoglobin levels by significantly increasing the activity of hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and significantly decreasing the activity of glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase thereby increasing the glycogen content in the liver. From this study, we put forward that AzA could significantly restore the levels of plasma glucose, insulin, HbA1c, Hb, liver glycogen and carbohydrate metabolic key enzymes to near normal in diabetic mice and hence, AzA may be useful as a biomaterial in the development of therapeutic agents against high fat diet induced T2DM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Omics Approaches To Probe Microbiota and Drug Metabolism Interactions.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Robert G; Hume, Nicole E; Smith, Philip B; Peters, Jeffrey M; Patterson, Andrew D

    2016-12-19

    The drug metabolism field has long recognized the beneficial and sometimes deleterious influence of microbiota in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs. Early pioneering work with the sulfanilamide precursor prontosil pointed toward the necessity not only to better understand the metabolic capabilities of the microbiota but also, importantly, to identify the specific microbiota involved in the generation and metabolism of drugs. However, technological limitations important for cataloging the microbiota community as well as for understanding and/or predicting their metabolic capabilities hindered progress. Current advances including mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling as well as culture-independent sequence-based identification and functional analysis of microbiota have begun to shed light on microbial metabolism. In this review, case studies will be presented to highlight key aspects (e.g., microbiota identification, metabolic function and prediction, metabolite identification, and profiling) that have helped to clarify how the microbiota might impact or be impacted by drug metabolism. Lastly, a perspective of the future of this field is presented that takes into account what important knowledge is lacking and how to tackle these problems.

  14. Long-term effect of medium-chain triglyceride on hepatic enzymes catalyzing lipogenesis and cholesterogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Takase, S; Morimoto, A; Nakanishi, M; Muto, Y

    1977-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the long-term effect of dietary medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) as compared with that of corn oil feeding on lipid metabolism in rats. Both serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels in MCT-fed rats showed significant decrease during the experimental period of eight weeks, although liver cholesterol and triglyceride contents were not distinguishable between the two groups. Significant elevation of the activity of lipogenic enzymes, such as fatty acid synthetase (FAS) and malic enzyme (ME) of the liver, was observed in MCT-fed rats without any fat accumulation of the liver (fatty liver). The increase of lipogenic enzyme activity was accompanied by a significant reduction of essential fatty acids (EFA) such as 18:2 (omega6) and 20:4 (omega6) in total liver lipid. In contrast, hepatic beta-hydroxy-beta-methylglutaryl CoA(HMG-CoA) reductase activity was significantly decreased in MCT-fed rats, that would play an important role in achieving hypocholesterolemia. From these results obtained in a long-term experiment, it is concluded that exogenous MCT depresses the key enzyme catalyzing cholesterol synthesis with a concomitant elevation of lipogenic enzyme activity in the rat liver.

  15. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... low because of routine testing of donated blood. Sexual transmission and transmission among family members through close contact ... associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses ... B Blood, needles, sexual 10% of older children develop chronic infection. 90% ...

  16. Effects of dietary phenochlor DP5 on microsomal enzymes, liver, and blood lipids in adult male and female rats after subchronic and perinatal exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Poul, J.M.

    1987-08-01

    PCBs have numerous toxic effects on laboratory animals, namely hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity, reproductive and hormonal effects, mutagenic and carcinogenic potency (Safe 1984). They have been recognized as potent inducers of many microsomal drug metabolizing enzymes in several species. Moreover, treatment of rats with PCBs gave rise to altered lipid metabolism with accumulation of lipids in the liver. In most of these studies male rats have been used. However, sex differences in the effects of xenobiotics on microsomal drug metabolizing enzymes have been shown particularly with PCBs and little was known about differences in the effects of PCBs on lipid metabolism. This study was designed to investigate the effects of a subchronic treatment with Phenochlor DP5 on some microsomal drug metabolizing enzyme activities and on liver and blood lipids of male and female rats. The long-term effects of DP5 administration during pre and postnatal period on adult microsomal enzyme activities and liver and blood lipids of both sexes have also been studied. A possible xenobiotic imprinting of the hepatic monooxygenase system during neonatal period has been shown recently, and it has been recognized that some functional defects which often manifest themselves in adult period may be induced prenatally or before weaning.

  17. Activity and mRNA Levels of Enzymes Involved in Hepatic Fatty Acid Synthesis in Rats Fed Naringenin.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Toru; Ide, Takashi

    2015-11-04

    We investigated the physiological activity of naringenin in affecting hepatic lipogenesis and serum and liver lipid levels in rats. Rats were fed diets containing 0, 1, or 2.5 g/kg naringenin for 15 d. Naringenin at a dietary level of 2.5 g/kg significantly decreased the activities and the mRNA levels of various lipogenic enzymes and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) mRNA level. The activities and the mRNA levels were also 9-22% and 12-38% lower, respectively, in rats fed a 1 g/kg naringenin diet than in the animals fed a naringenin-free diet, although the differences were not significant in many cases. Naringenin at 2.5 g/kg significantly lowered serum triacylglycerol, cholesterol, and phospholipid and hepatic triacylglycerol and cholesterol. This flavonoid at 1.0 g/kg also significantly lowered these parameters except for serum triacylglycerol. Naringenin levels in serum and liver dose-dependently increased, and hepatic concentrations reached levels that can affect various signaling pathways.

  18. Hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes belonging to the CYP2C subfamily from an Australian marsupial, the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Jones, Brett R; El-Merhibi, Adaweyah; Ngo, Suong N T; Stupans, Ieva; McKinnon, Ross A

    2008-09-01

    Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) are critically important in the oxidative metabolism of a diverse array of xenobiotics and endogenous substrates. We have previously reported that the obligate Eucalyptus feeder koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) exhibits a higher hepatic CYP2C activity as compared to non-Eucalyptus feeders human or rat, with stimulation of CYP2C activity by cineole. In the present study, we examine CYP2C expression by immunohistochemistry and describe the identification and cloning of koala CYP2Cs. Utilising anti-rat CYP2C6 antibody, the expression of CYP2C was found to be uniform across the hepatic sections, being consistent with that observed in human and rat. Two 1647 and 1638 bp koala liver CYP2C complete cDNAs, designated CYP2C47 and CYP2C48 respectively, were cloned by cDNA library screening. The koala CYP2C cDNAs encode a protein of 495 amino acids. Three additional partial CYP2C sequences were also identified from the koala, indicating the multiplicity of the CYP2C subfamily in this unique marsupial species. The results of this study demonstrate the presence of koala hepatic CYP2Cs that share several common features with other published CYP2Cs; however CYP2C47 and CYP2C48 contain four extra amino acid residues at the NH2-terminal, a transmembrane anchor which was reported being a fundamentally conserved structure core of all eukaryote CYP enzymes.

  19. Hepatic antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in response to pesticide methomyl and recovery pattern.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shun Long; Chen, Jia Zhang; Xu, Pao; Qu, Jian Hong; Fan, Li Min; Song, Chao; Qiu, Li Ping

    2014-04-01

    Hepatic antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) of Nile tilapia in response to pesticide methomyl and recovery pattern were researched by exposing tilapia to sub-lethal methomyl concentrations of 0, 0.2, 2, 20 and 200 μg/L for 30 days, and then transferred to methomyl-free water for 18 days. Hepatic SOD and CAT were measured at 10 min (day 0), 6, 12, 18, 24 and 30 days after starting the experiment and at 18 days after transferring to methomyl-free water. The results showed hepatic SOD and CAT activities in 2, 20 and 200 μg/L groups were affected significantly, however, that in 0.2 μg/L group didn't change significantly compared to control during 30-day exposure period. Thus it would appear the 0.2 μg/L methomyl might be considered the no observed adverse effect level. Recovery data showed that, for SOD, the effects produced by lower concentration of methomyl 2 μg/L were reversible but not at concentrations higher than 20 μg/L, however, for CAT, the effects produced by all the concentrations were reversible.

  20. Application of quantitative targeted absolute proteomics to profile protein expression changes of hepatic transporters and metabolizing enzymes during cholic acid-promoted liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takayuki; Tachikawa, Masanori; Ohtsuka, Hideo; Fukase, Koji; Nakayama, Shun; Sakata, Naoaki; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Naitoh, Takeshi; Katayose, Yu; Uchida, Yasuo; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Unno, Michiaki

    2017-02-26

    Preoperative administration of cholic acid (CA) may be an option to increase the liver volume before elective liver resection surgery, so it is important to understand its effects on liver functionality for drug transport and metabolism. The purpose of this study was to clarify the absolute protein expression dynamics of transporters and metabolizing enzymes in the liver of mice fed CA-containing diet for 5 days (CA1) and mice fed CA-containing diet for 5 days followed by diet without CA for 7 days (CA2), in comparison with non CA-fed control mice. The CA1 group showed the increased liver weight, cell proliferation index, and oxidative stress, but no increase of apoptosis. Quantitative targeted absolute proteomics revealed (i) decreases in basolateral bile acid transporters ntcp, oatp1a1, oatp1b2, bile acid synthesis-related enzymes cyp7a1 and cyp8b1, and drug transporters bcrp, mrp6, ent1, oatp2b1, and (ii) increases in glutathione biosynthetic enzymes and drug-metabolizing enzyme cyp3a11. Liver concentrations of reduced and oxidized glutathione were both increased. In the CA2 group, the increased liver weight was maintained, while the biochemical features and protein profiles were restored to the non-CA-fed control levels. These findings suggest that CA administration alters liver functionality per body during liver regeneration and restoration.

  1. Effect of Nigella sativa fixed and essential oils on antioxidant status, hepatic enzymes, and immunity in streptozotocin induced diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nigella sativa fixed (NSFO) and essential (NSEO) oils have been used to treat diabetes mellitus and its complications. Present study was undertaken to explore and validate these folkloric uses. Methods Sprague dawley rats having streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetes mellitus were used to assess the role of NSFO and NSEO in the management of diabetes complications. Parameters investigated were antioxidant potential, oxidative stress, and the immunity by in vivo experiments. Results The results indicated that STZ decreased the glutathione contents (25.72%), while NSFO and NSEO increased the trait significantly (P < 0.05). Experimental diets increased the tocopherol contents (P < 0.01) and enhanced the expression of hepatic enzymes (P < 0.01). Correlation matrix further indicated that antioxidant potential is positively associated (P < 0.05) responsible for the modulation of hepatic enzymes and the decrease of the nitric oxide production thus controlling the diabetes complications. Conclusions Overall, results of present study supported the traditional use of N. sativa and its derived products as a treatment for hyperglycemia and allied abnormalities. Moreover, N. sativa fixed and essential oils significantly ameliorate free radicals and improve antioxidant capacity thus reducing the risk of diabetic complications. PMID:24939518

  2. DEHP reduces thyroid hormones via interacting with hormone synthesis-related proteins, deiodinases, transthyretin, receptors, and hepatic enzymes in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changjiang; Zhao, Letian; Wei, Li; Li, Lianbing

    2015-08-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is used extensively in many personal care and consumer products, resulting in widespread nonoccupational human exposure through multiple routes and media. Limited studies suggest that exposure to DEHP may be associated with altered thyroid function, but detailed mechanisms are unclear. In order to elucidate potential mechanisms by which DEHP disturbs thyroid hormone homeostasis, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were dosed with DEHP by gavage at 0, 250, 500, and 750 mg/kg/day for 30 days and sacrificed within 24 h after the last dose. Gene expressions of thyroid hormone receptors, deiodinases, transthyretin, and hepatic enzymes were measured by RT-PCR; protein levels of transthyretin were also analyzed by Western blot. Results showed that DEHP caused histological changes in the thyroid and follicular epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia were observed. DEHP significantly reduced thyroid hormones (T3, T4) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) levels, whereas thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was not affected. After exposure to DEHP, biosynthesis of thyroid hormones was suppressed, and sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) levels were significantly reduced. Additionally, levels of deiodinases and transthyretin were also affected. TSH receptor (TSHr) level was downregulated, while TRH receptor (TRHr) level was upregulated. Metabolism of thyroid hormones was accelerated due to elevated gene expression of hepatic enzymes (UDPGTs and CYP2B1) by DEHP. Taken together, observed findings indicate that DEHP could reduce thyroid hormones through influencing biosynthesis, biotransformation, biotransport, receptor levels, and metabolism of thyroid hormones.

  3. Drug Metabolism by the Host and Gut Microbiota: A Partnership or Rivalry?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the gut microbiome in determining not only overall health, but also in the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics, is rapidly emerging. It is becoming increasingly clear that the gut microbiota can act in concert with the host cells to maintain intestinal homeostasis, cometabolize drugs and xenobiotics, and alter the expression levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters and the expression and activity levels of nuclear receptors. In this myriad of activities, the impact of the microbiota may be beneficial or detrimental to the host. Given that the interplay between the gut microbiota and host cells is likely subject to high interindividual variability, this work has tremendous implications for our ability to predict accurately a particular drug’s pharmacokinetics and a given patient population’s response to drugs. In this issue of Drug Metabolism and Disposition, a series of articles is presented that illustrate the progress and challenges that lie ahead as we unravel the intricacies associated with drug and xenobiotic metabolism by the gut microbiota. These articles highlight the underlying mechanisms that are involved and the use of in vivo and in vitro approaches that are currently available for elucidating the role of the gut microbiota in drug and xenobiotic metabolism. These articles also shed light on exciting new avenues of research that may be pursued as we consider the role of the gut microbiota as an endocrine organ, a component of the brain-gut axis, and whether the gut microbiota is an appropriate and amenable target for new drugs. PMID:26261284

  4. Purification and characterization of mouse hepatic enzyme that converts selenomethionine to methylselenol by its alpha,gamma-elimination.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Tomofumi; Motobayashi, Shinji; Ueno, Hitoshi; Nakamuro, Katsuhiko

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to purify and characterize a mouse hepatic enzyme that directly generates CH3SeH from seleno-l-methionine (l-SeMet) by the alpha,gamma-elimination reaction. The l-SeMet alpha,gamma-elimination enzyme was ubiquitous in tissues from ICR mice and the activity was relatively high in the large intestine, brain, and muscle, as well as the liver. Aging and sex of the mice did not have any significant influence on the activity in the liver. The enzyme was purified from the mouse liver by ammonium sulfate precipitation and four kinds of column chromatography. These procedures yielded a homogeneous enzyme, which was purified approx 1000-fold relative to mouse liver extract. Overall recovery was approx 8%. The purified enzyme had a molecular mass of approx 160 kDa with four identical subunits. The Km value of the enzyme for the catalysis of l-SeMet was 15.5 mM, and the Vmax was 0.29 units/mg protein. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (pyridoxal-P) was required as a cofactor because the holoenzyme could be resolved to the apoenzyme by incubation with hydroxylamine and reconstituted by addition of pyridoxal-P. The enzyme showed the optimum activity at around pH 8.0 and the highest activity at 50 degrees C; it catalyzed the alpha,gamma-elimination reactions of several analogs such as d,l-homocysteine and l-homoserine in addition to l-SeMet. This enzyme also catalyzed the alpha,beta-elimination reaction of Se-methylseleno-l-cysteine. However, l-methionine was inert. Therefore, the purified enzyme was different from the bacterial l-methionine gamma-lyase that metabolizes l-SeMet to CH3SeH, in terms of the substrate specificity. These results were the first identification of a mammalian enzyme that specifically catalyzes the alpha,gamma-elimination reaction of l-SeMet and immediately converts it to CH3SeH, an important metabolite of Se.

  5. Hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1 mediates alcohol-induced regulation of bile acid enzyme genes expression via CREBH.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Dipanjan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Li, Tiangang; Misra, Jagannath; Kim, Don-Kyu; Kim, Jung Ran; Kwon, Joseph; Jeong, Won-Il; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Park, Tae-Sik; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Chiang, John Y L; Lee, Chul-Ho; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Bile acids concentration in liver is tightly regulated to prevent cell damage. Previous studies have demonstrated that deregulation of bile acid homeostasis can lead to cholestatic liver disease. Recently, we have shown that ER-bound transcription factor Crebh is a downstream effector of hepatic Cb1r signaling pathway. In this study, we have investigated the effect of alcohol exposure on hepatic bile acid homeostasis and elucidated the mediatory roles of Cb1r and Crebh in this process. We found that alcohol exposure or Cb1r-agonist 2-AG treatment increases hepatic bile acid synthesis and serum ALT, AST levels in vivo alongwith significant increase in Crebh gene expression and activation. Alcohol exposure activated Cb1r, Crebh, and perturbed bile acid homeostasis. Overexpression of Crebh increased the expression of key bile acid synthesis enzyme genes via direct binding of Crebh to their promoters, whereas Cb1r knockout and Crebh-knockdown mice were protected against alcohol-induced perturbation of bile acid homeostasis. Interestingly, insulin treatment protected against Cb1r-mediated Crebh-induced disruption of bile acid homeostasis. Furthermore, Crebh expression and activation was found to be markedly increased in insulin resistance conditions and Crebh knockdown in diabetic mice model (db/db) significantly reversed alcohol-induced disruption of bile acid homeostasis. Overall, our study demonstrates a novel regulatory mechanism of hepatic bile acid metabolism by alcohol via Cb1r-mediated activation of Crebh, and suggests that targeting Crebh can be of therapeutic potential in ameliorating alcohol-induced perturbation of bile acid homeostasis.

  6. Effect of long-term phenothiazine treatment on drug metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Kolakowska, T; Franklin, M; Alapin, B

    1975-01-01

    1 The half-life of plasma antipyrine was measured in twelve chronic schizophrenic patients during long-term phenothiazine treatment and again following 4-5 weeks on placebo. 2 The mean antipyrine half-life was low during phenothiazine administration (6.1 +/- 4.2 h), rising after withdrawal of drugs to the range reported for untreated subjects by other authors (9.5 +/- 4.2 h). The prolongation of antipyrine half-life following the drug-free period occurred in nine of twelve subjects and the difference was significant for the group at P less than 0.05. 3 The finding suggests that prolonged administration of phenothiazines stimulates the rate of drug metabolism. PMID:1234485

  7. Update information on drug metabolism systems--2009, part I.

    PubMed

    Guengerich, F Peter; Rendic, Slobodan

    2010-01-01

    The field of drug metabolism has changed dramatically in the past generation. Two of the driving forces are the advances in analytical chemistry and our understanding of the biological systems. With regard to the former, the advances in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) are extremely impressive, and the speed of analysis has been increased even more with the recent developments in ultraperformance LC (UPLC). NMR analysis on a sub-microgram scale is not unusual, and the 2-dimensional methods are also very impressive. The biology underlying gene regulation is highly developed, and the recombinant methods have greatly facilitated progress in the field. Today it is common to design discovery and development efforts focused on critical human phenomena from the very start, with animal studies supporting the efficacy and safety efforts.

  8. Chemomodulatory effect of Moringa oleifera, Lam, on hepatic carcinogen metabolising enzymes, antioxidant parameters and skin papillomagenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Bharali, Rupjyoti; Tabassum, Jawahira; Azad, Mohammed Rekibul Haque

    2003-01-01

    The modulatory effects of a hydro-alcoholic extract of drumsticks of Moringa oliefera Lam at doses of 125 mg/kg bodyweight and 250 mg/ kg body weight for 7 and 14 days, respectively, were investigated with reference to drug metabolising Phase I (Cytochrome b(5) and Cytochrome p(450) ) and Phase II (Glutathione-S- transferase) enzymes, anti-oxidant enzymes, glutathione content and lipid peroxidation in the liver of 6-8 week old female Swiss albino mice. Further, the chemopreventive efficacy of the extract was evaluated in a two stage model of 7,12 - dimethylbenz(a)anthracene induced skin papillomagenesis. Significant increase (p<0.05 to p<0.01) in the activities of hepatic cytochrome b(5), cytochrome p(450), catalase, glutathione peroxidase ( GPx ), glutathione reductase (GR), acid soluble sulfhydryl content (-SH ) and a significant decrease ( p<0.01 ) in the hepatic MDA level were observed at both dose levels of treatment when compared with the control values. Glutathione-S- transferase ( GST )activity was found to be significantly increased (p<0.01 ) only at the higher dose level. Butylated hydroxyanisol (BHA ) fed at a dose of 0.75% in the diet for 7 and 14 days (positive control ) caused a significant increase (p<0.05 to p<0.01) in the levels of hepatic phase I and phase II enzymes, anti- oxidant enzymes, glutathione content and a decrease in lipid peroxidation. The skin papillomagenesis studies demonstrated a significant decrease (p<0.05 ) in the percentage of mice with papillomas, average number of papillomas per mouse and papillomas per papilloma bearing mouse when the animals received a topical application of the extract at a dose of 5mg/ kg body weight in the peri-initiation phase 7 days before and 7 days after DMBA application, Group II ), promotional phase (from the day of croton oil application and continued till the end of the experiment, Group III ) and both peri and post initiation stages (from 7 days prior to DMBA application and continued till the

  9. Induction of hepatic CYP3A enzymes by pregnancy-related hormones: studies in human hepatocytes and hepatic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Ioannis; Grepper, Susan; Unadkat, Jashvant D

    2013-02-01

    CYP3A activity is induced by approximately 2-fold during the third trimester of human pregnancy. Placental growth hormone (PGH), estrogens (primarily 17β-estradiol), cortisol, and progesterone have the potential to modulate CYP3A activity. Therefore, we determined whether the elevated plasma concentrations of these hormones during pregnancy induce hepatic CYP3A expression. We incubated sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes (SCHH) from premenopausal female donors (n = 2) with the physiologic (unbound, 1× total) and the 10× total third trimester hormone plasma concentrations (individually and in combination) and determined their effect on CYP3A activity and the transcripts of CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and the respective hormone receptors (growth hormone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, and estrogen receptor alpha). Of all the hormones, cortisol was the most potent inducer of CYP3A activity and CYP3A4, CYP3A5 mRNA expression. The combination of PGH/growth hormone and cortisol induced CYP3A activity and expression significantly more than did cortisol alone. When incubated with the unbound or total plasma concentration of all the hormones, CYP3A activity in SCHH was induced to an extent comparable to that observed in vivo during the third trimester. These hormones had only a modest effect on the mRNA expression of the hormone receptors. The pattern of induction observed in SCHH was reproduced in HepaRG cells but not in HuH7/HepG2 cells. SCHH or HepaRG cells could be used to determine the mechanistic basis of CYP3A induction during pregnancy and to predict the magnitude of induction likely to be observed during the first and second trimesters, when phenotyping studies to measure in vivo CYP3A activity are logistically difficult to perform.

  10. Effects of hepatic enzyme inducers on thyroxine (T4) catabolism in primary rat hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptor agonists such as phenobarbital (PB), 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), and 3-methylcholantrene (3-MC) decrease circulating thyroxine (T4) concentrations in rats. It is suspected that this decrease occurs through the induction of hepatic metabolizing en...

  11. Effects of hepatic enzyme inducers on thyroxine (T4) catabolism in primary rat hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptor agonists such as phenobarbital (PB), 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), and 3-methylcholantrene (3-MC) decrease circulating thyroxine (T4) concentrations in rats. It is suspected that this decrease occurs through the induction of hepatic metabolizing en...

  12. Lycopene attenuated hepatic tumorigenesis via differential mechanisms depending on carotenoid cleavage enzyme in mice.

    PubMed

    Ip, Blanche C; Liu, Chun; Ausman, Lynne M; von Lintig, Johannes; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2014-12-01

    Obesity is associated with increased liver cancer risks and mortality. We recently showed that apo-10'-lycopenoic acid, a lycopene metabolite generated by beta-carotene-9',10'-oxygenase (BCO2), inhibited carcinogen-initiated, high-fat diet (HFD)-promoted liver inflammation, and hepatic tumorigenesis development. The present investigation examined the outstanding question of whether lycopene could suppress HFD-promoted hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression, and if BCO2 expression is important using BCO2-knockout (BCO2-KO) and wild-type male mice. Results showed that lycopene supplementation (100 mg/kg diet) for 24 weeks resulted in comparable accumulation of hepatic lycopene (19.4 vs. 18.2 nmol/g) and had similar effects on suppressing HFD-promoted HCC incidence (19% vs. 20%) and multiplicity (58% vs. 62%) in wild-type and BCO2-KO mice, respectively. Intriguingly, lycopene chemopreventive effects in wild-type mice were associated with reduced hepatic proinflammatory signaling (phosphorylation of NK-κB p65 and STAT3; IL6 protein) and inflammatory foci. In contrast, the protective effects of lycopene in BCO2-KO but not in wild-type mice were associated with reduced hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated unfolded protein response (ER(UPR)), through decreasing ER(UPR)-mediated protein kinase RNA-activated like kinase-eukaryotic initiation factor 2α activation, and inositol requiring 1α-X-box-binding protein 1 signaling. Lycopene supplementation in BCO2-KO mice suppressed oncogenic signals, including Met mRNA, β-catenin protein, and mTOR complex 1 activation, which was associated with increased hepatic microRNA (miR)-199a/b and miR214 levels. These results provided novel experimental evidence that dietary lycopene can prevent HFD-promoted HCC incidence and multiplicity in mice, and may elicit different mechanisms depending on BCO2 expression. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Chronic alcohol intake upregulates hepatic expression of carotenoid cleavage enzymes and PPAR in rats.

    PubMed

    Luvizotto, Renata A M; Nascimento, André F; Veeramachaneni, Sudipta; Liu, Chun; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2010-10-01

    Excessive and chronic alcohol intake leads to a lower hepatic vitamin A status by interfering with vitamin A metabolism. Dietary provitamin A carotenoids can be converted into vitamin A mainly by carotenoid 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 (CMO1) and, to a lesser degree, carotenoid 9'10'-monooxygenase 2 (CMO2). CMO1 has been shown to be regulated by several transcription factors, such as the PPAR, retinoid X receptor, and thyroid receptor (TR). The regulation of CMO2 has yet to be identified. The impact of chronic alcohol intake on hepatic expressions of CMO1 and CMO2 and their related transcription factors are unknown. In this study, Fischer 344 rats were pair-fed either a liquid ethanol Lieber-DeCarli diet (n = 10) or a control diet (n = 10) for 11 wk. Hepatic retinoid concentration and expressions of CMO1, CMO2, PPARγ, PPARα, and TRβ as well as plasma thyroid hormones levels were analyzed. We observed that administering alcohol decreased hepatic retinoid levels but increased mRNA concentrations of CMO1, CMO2, PPARγ, PPARα, and TRβ and upregulated protein levels of CMO2, PPARγ, and PPARα. There was a positive correlation of PPARγ with CMO1 (r = 0.89; P < 0.0001) and both PPARγ and PPARα with CMO2 (r = 0.72, P < 0.001 and r = 0.62, P < 0.01, respectively). Plasma thyroid hormone concentrations did not differ between the control rats and alcohol-fed rats. This study suggests that chronic alcohol intake significantly upregulates hepatic expression of CMO1 and, to a much lesser extent, CMO2. This process may be due to alcohol-induced PPARγ expression and lower vitamin A status in the liver.

  14. Effect of amphetamine on the hepatic endoplasmic reticulum of the pregnant rat.

    PubMed

    Feuer, G; de la Iglesia, F

    1977-02-01

    Search for the elucidation of the mode of action of amphetamines has revealed that this drug brought about changes in the activity of some enzymes bound to the hepatic endoplasmic reticulum of the pregnant and non-pregnant rat. Amphetamine administration caused loss of appetite and changes in enzyme activity due to starvation, however, its effects were assessed applying pair-feeding conditions. Drug-metabolizing activity was increased by amphetamine as measured by coumarin 3-hydroxylase and aminopyrine N-demethylase in both pregnant and non-pregnant animals; aniline hydroxylase was elevated only in pregnant rats. These changes were associated with the enhanced synthesis of microsomal phospholipids as indicated by the increased activity of [14C-Me]S-adenosyl-L-methionine : microsomal phospholipid methyl transferase, de novo synthesis and levels of microsomal phospholipids. These effects were mainly manifest in phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine fractions. Glucose-6-phosphatase activity remained unaltered by amphetamine. Pregnancy alone brought about a reduction of all these microsomal parameters. The rise of hepatic drug metabolism following the administration of amphetamine indicated a compensatory mechanism by means of stimulating enzyme induction processes.

  15. Sex difference in induction of hepatic CYP2B and CYP3A subfamily enzymes by nicardipine and nifedipine in rats.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yoshihiro; Sekimoto, Masashi; Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Degawa, Masakuni

    2004-04-01

    Male and female of F344 rats were treated per os with nicardipine (Nic) and nifedipine (Nif), and changes in the levels of mRNA and protein of hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes, CYP2B1, CYP2B2, CYP3A1, CYP3A2, CYP3A9, and CYP3A18 were examined. Furthermore, hepatic microsomal activities for pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (PROD) and nifedipine oxidation, which are mainly mediated by CYP2B and CYP3A subfamily enzymes, respectively, were measured. Analyses of RT-PCR and Western blotting revealed that Nic and Nif induced predominantly CYP3A and CYP2B enzymes, respectively. As for the gene activation of CYP2B enzymes, especially CYP2B1, Nif showed high capacity in both sexes of rats, whereas Nic did a definite capacity in the males but little in the females. Gene activations of CYP3A1, CYP3A2, and CYP3A18 by Nic occurred in both sexes of rats, although that of CYP3A9 did only in the male rats. Although gene activations of CYP3A1 and CYP3A2 by Nif were observed in both sexes of rats, a slight activation of the CYP3A9 gene occurred only in female rats, and the CYP3A18 gene activation, in neither male nor female rats. Thus, changes in levels of the mRNA or protein of CYP2B and CYP3A enzymes, especially CYP2B1 and CYP3A2, were closely correlated with those in hepatic PROD and nifedipine oxidation activities, respectively. The present findings demonstrate for the first time the sex difference in the Nic- and Nif-mediated induction of hepatic P450 enzymes in rats and further indicate that Nic and Nif show different specificities and sex dependencies in the induction of hepatic P450 enzymes.

  16. The effect of therapeutic hypothermia on drug metabolism and drug response: cellular mechanisms to organ function

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiangquan; Poloyac, Samuel M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Therapeutic hypothermia is being employed, clinically based, on its neuro-protective benefits. Both critical illness and therapeutic hypothermia significantly affect drug disposition, potentially contributing to drug-therapy and drug-disease interaction. Currently, there is limited written information of the known alterations in drug concentration and response during mild hypothermia treatment and there is a limited understanding of the specific mechanisms that underlie alterations in drug concentrations and the potential clinical importance of these changes. Areas covered A systemic review of the effect of therapeutic hypothermia on drug metabolism, disposition, and response is provided. Specifically, the clinical and preclinical evidence of the effects of therapeutic hypothermia on blood flow, specific hepatic metabolism pathways, transporter, renal excretion, pharmacodynamics and rewarming effect are reviewed. Expert Opinion Available evidence demonstrates that mild hypothermia decreases the clearance of a variety of drugs with apparently little change in drug protein binding. Recent evidence suggests that the magnitude of the change is elimination route specific. Further research is needed to determine the impact of these alterations on both drug concentration and response in order to optimize the hypothermia therapy in this vulnerable patient population. PMID:21473710

  17. The effect of bamboo extract on hepatic biotransforming enzymes – Findings from an obese–diabetic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Cheryl L.K.; Collier, Abby C.; Berry, Marla J.; Panee, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study Bamboo leaves are used as a component in traditional Chinese medicine for the anti-inflammatory function. Our previous studies have demonstrated that an ethanol/water extract from Phyllostachys edulis ameliorated obesity-associated chronic systemic inflammation in mice, and therefore relieving the symptoms of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this project was to further investigate the effects of this bamboo extract on hepatic biotransformation enzymes in both lean and obese mice, as an initial step in the toxicological evaluation of using this traditional medicine in obese/diabetic population. Materials and methods Male C57BL/6J mice were randomized to 4 groups and fed standard (10% kcal from fat) diet with or without bamboo extract supplementation at a dose of 10 gram per kilogram diet (n = 10 and n = 9, respectively), or high fat (45% kcal from fat) diet with or without bamboo extract (n = 8 and N = 7, respectively). The dietary treatment lasted for 6 months. Subsequently, the activities and expression of the major Phase I and II hepatic biotransformation enzymes were assessed in subcellular fractions from murine livers. Results Three groups of mice, lean bamboo extract-supplemented, obese/diabetic, and bamboo extract-supplemented obese/diabetic, showed greater activities of cytochromes P450 1a2 and 3a11 compared to control but no changes in the expression level of these proteins. For Phase II enzymes, bamboo extract supplementation in lean mice caused decreased glutathione-S-transferase activity (−12%) and greater uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase activity (+46%), but had no effect on sulfotransferase activity. Conversely, the obese/diabetic condition itself increased glutathione-S-transferase and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase activities, but decreased total sulfotransferase activity and sulfotransferase 2a1 expression. Conclusions Bamboo extract and obesity/diabetes show significant independent effects on hepatic bio

  18. Antidiabetic activity of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides F31 down-regulated hepatic glucose regulatory enzymes in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chun; Wu, Qingping; Zhang, Jumei; Xie, Yizhen; Cai, Wen; Tan, Jianbin

    2017-01-20

    Ganoderma lucidum (Lin Zhi) has been used to treat diabetes in Chinese folk for centuries. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GLPs) had hypoglycemic effects in diabetic mice. Our aim was to identify the main bioactives in GLPs and corresponding mechanism of action. Four polysaccharide-enriched fraction were isolated from GLPs and the antidiabetic activities were evaluated by type 2 diabetic mice. Fasting serum glucose (FSG), fasting serum insulin (FSI) and epididymal fat/BW ratio were measured at the end of the experiment. In liver, the mRNA levels of hepatic glucose regulatory enzymes were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and the protein levels of phospho-AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK)/AMPK were determined by western blotting test. In epididymal fat tissue, the mRNA and protein levels GLUT4, resistin, fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC1) were determined by qPCR and immuno-histochemistry. The structure of polysaccharide F31 was obtained from GPC, FTIR NMR and GC-MS spectroscopy, RESULTS: F31 significantly decreased FSG (P<0.05), FSI and epididymal fat/BW ratio (P<0.01). In liver, F31 decreased the mRNA levels of hepatic glucose regulatory enzymes, and up-regulated the ratio of phospho-AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK)/AMPK. In epididymal fat tissue, F31 increased the mRNA levels of GLUT4 but decreased fatty acid synthase (FAS), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC1) and resistin. Immuno-histochemistry results revealed F31 increased the protein levels of GLUT4 and decreased resistin. Data suggested that the main bioactives in GLPs was F31, which was determined to be a β-heteropolysaccharide with the weight-average molecular weight of 15.9kDa. The possible action mechanism of F31 may be associated with down-regulation of the hepatic glucose regulated enzyme mRNA levels via AMPK activation, improvement of insulin resistance and decrease of epididymal fat/BW ratio. These

  19. The trans-10,cis-12 isomer of conjugated linoleic acid reduces hepatic triacylglycerol content without affecting lipogenic enzymes in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Zabala, Amaia; Churruca, Itziar; Macarulla, M Teresa; Rodríguez, Víctor M; Fernández-Quintela, Alfredo; Martínez, J Alfredo; Portillo, María P

    2004-09-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) refers to the positional and geometric dienoic isomers of linoleic acid. The dietary intake of CLA has been associated with changes in lipid metabolism. The aim of the present work was to assess the effects of the two main isomers of CLA on sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1a and SREBP-1c mRNA levels, as well as on mRNA levels and the activities of several lipogenic enzymes in liver. For this purpose hamsters were fed an atherogenic diet supplemented with 5 g linoleic acid, cis-9,trans-11 or trans-10,cis-12 CLA/kg diet for 6 weeks. The trans-10,cis-12 isomer intake produced significantly greater liver weight, but also significantly decreased liver fat accumulation. No changes in mRNA levels of SREBP-1a, SREBP-1c and lipogenic enzymes, or in the activities of these enzymes, were observed. There was no effect of feeding cis-9,trans-11 CLA. These results suggest that increased fat accumulation in liver does not occur on the basis of liver enlargement produced by feeding the trans-10,cis-12 isomer of CLA in hamsters. The reduction in hepatic triacylglycerol content induced by this isomer was not attributable to changes in lipogenesis.

  20. Identification of protons position in acid-base enzyme catalyzed reactions: the hepatitis C viral NS3 protease.

    PubMed

    Shokhen, Michael; Albeck, Amnon

    2004-05-01

    General acid-base catalysis is a key element of the catalytic activity of most enzymes. Therefore, any explicit molecular modeling of enzyme-catalyzed chemical reactions requires correct identification of protons location on the catalytic groups. In this work, we apply our quantum mechanical/self-consistent reaction field in virtual solvent [QM/SCRF(VS)] method for identification of the position of protons shared by the enzyme catalytic groups and the polar groups of the inhibitor in a covalent tetrahedral complex (TC) of the hepatitis C virus NS3 protease with a peptidyl alpha-ketoacid inhibitor. To identify the relevant protonation states, we have analyzed relative stabilities of R and S configurations of the TC that depend on the specific proton distribution over the polar groups and correlated it with experimental NMR and X-ray crystallography data, both at low and neutral pH ranges. The tentative assignment of the single resonance in the (13)C NMR spectrum of the hemiketal carbon at physiological pH to the S configuration of TC is confirmed. Both R and S configurations are equally stable at acidic pH in our modeling, in good agreement with the (13)C NMR observation. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Crystallographic identification of a noncompetitive inhibitor binding site on the hepatitis C virus NS5B RNA polymerase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Love, Robert A; Parge, Hans E; Yu, Xiu; Hickey, Michael J; Diehl, Wade; Gao, Jingjin; Wriggers, Hilary; Ekker, Anne; Wang, Liann; Thomson, James A; Dragovich, Peter S; Fuhrman, Shella A

    2003-07-01

    The virus-encoded nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and is absolutely required for replication of the virus. NS5B exhibits significant differences from cellular polymerases and therefore has become an attractive target for anti-HCV therapy. Using a high-throughput screen, we discovered a novel NS5B inhibitor that binds to the enzyme noncompetitively with respect to nucleotide substrates. Here we report the crystal structure of NS5B complexed with this small molecule inhibitor. Unexpectedly, the inhibitor is bound within a narrow cleft on the protein's surface in the "thumb" domain, about 30 A from the enzyme's catalytic center. The interaction between this inhibitor and NS5B occurs without dramatic changes to the structure of the protein, and sequence analysis suggests that the binding site is conserved across known HCV genotypes. Possible mechanisms of inhibition include perturbation of protein dynamics, interference with RNA binding, and disruption of enzyme oligomerization.

  2. Antihypertensive Drugs Metabolism: An Update to Pharmacokinetic Profiles and Computational Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Zisaki, Aikaterini; Miskovic, Ljubisa; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2015-01-01

    Drug discovery and development is a high-risk enterprise that requires significant investments in capital, time and scientific expertise. The studies of xenobiotic metabolism remain as one of the main topics in the research and development of drugs, cosmetics and nutritional supplements. Antihypertensive drugs are used for the treatment of high blood pressure, which is one the most frequent symptoms of the patients that undergo cardiovascular diseases such as myocardial infraction and strokes. In current cardiovascular disease pharmacology, four drug clusters - Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Beta-Blockers, Calcium Channel Blockers and Diuretics - cover the major therapeutic characteristics of the most antihypertensive drugs. The pharmacokinetic and specifically the metabolic profile of the antihypertensive agents are intensively studied because of the broad inter-individual variability on plasma concentrations and the diversity on the efficacy response especially due to the P450 dependent metabolic status they present. Several computational methods have been developed with the aim to: (i) model and better understand the human drug metabolism; and (ii) enhance the experimental investigation of the metabolism of small xenobiotic molecules. The main predictive tools these methods employ are rule-based approaches, quantitative structure metabolism/activity relationships and docking approaches. This review paper provides detailed metabolic profiles of the major clusters of antihypertensive agents, including their metabolites and their metabolizing enzymes, and it also provides specific information concerning the computational approaches that have been used to predict the metabolic profile of several antihypertensive drugs. PMID:25341854

  3. Part 2: Pharmacogenetic Variability in Drug Transport and Phase I Anticancer Drug Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Deenen, Maarten J.; Cats, Annemieke; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2011-01-01

    Equivalent drug doses in anticancer chemotherapy may lead to wide interpatient variability in drug response reflected by differences in treatment response or in severity of adverse drug reactions. Differences in the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) behavior of a drug contribute to variation in treatment outcome among patients. An important factor responsible for this variability is genetic polymorphism in genes that are involved in PK/PD processes, including drug transporters, phase I and II metabolizing enzymes, and drug targets, and other genes that interfere with drug response. In order to achieve personalized pharmacotherapy, drug dosing and treatment selection based on genotype might help to increase treatment efficacy while reducing unnecessary toxicity. We present a series of four reviews about pharmacogenetic variability in anticancer drug treatment. This is the second review in the series and is focused on genetic variability in genes encoding drug transporters (ABCB1 and ABCG2) and phase I drug-metabolizing enzymes (CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, DPYD, CDA and BLMH) and their associations with anticancer drug treatment outcome. Based on the literature reviewed, opportunities for patient-tailored anticancer therapy are presented. PMID:21632461

  4. Phenobarbital in the genetically obese Zucker rat. II. In vivo and in vitro assessments of microsomal enzyme induction.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, K L; Kostenbauder, H B; McNamara, P J; Blouin, R A

    1984-12-01

    In vivo and in vitro alterations in drug metabolism and the extent of enzyme induction of the hepatic microsomal cytochrome P-450 system were evaluated in obese and lean Zucker and lean Sprague-Dawley rats. Phenobarbital enzyme-inducing regimens were administered p.o. to achieve similar steady-state phenobarbital plasma concentrations. Control rats received p.o. placebo solution. No significant intra- or inter-strain differences in antipyrine clearance (milliliters per hour) or apparent volume of distribution (liters) were observed between the placebo-treated lean Sprague-Dawley, lean Zucker and obese Zucker rats. Intra- and inter-strain differences in hepatic microsomal protein and cytochrome P-450 content were observed. Compared to placebo, antipyrine clearance (milliliters per hour) after chronic phenobarbital pretreatment was increased in the Sprague-Dawley (198%) and lean Zucker rats (131%), but not significantly altered in the obese Zucker rats. Similarly, increases in hepatic weight, whole liver microsomal protein and cytochrome P-450 content were also observed in the Sprague-Dawley (34, 124 and 352%, respectively) and the lean Zucker rats (24, 96 and 249%, respectively). However, no significant alterations in these parameters were observed in the obese Zucker rats after phenobarbital treatment. Results from these in vivo and in vitro studies implicate alterations in drug metabolism and genetic differences in cytochrome P-450 content in Zucker rats relative to the Sprague-Dawley strain. Obese Zucker rats failed to exhibit a significant induction response after phenobarbital pretreatment.

  5. Drug Metabolism in Preclinical Drug Development: A Survey of the Discovery Process, Toxicology, and Computational Tools.

    PubMed

    Issa, Naiem T; Wathieu, Henri; Ojo, Abiola; Byers, Stephen W; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan

    2017-03-15

    Increased R & D spending and high failure rates exist in drug development, due in part to inadequate prediction of drug metabolism and its consequences in the human body. Hence, there is a need for computational methods to supplement and complement current biological assessment strategies. In this review, we provide an overview of drug metabolism in pharmacology, and discuss the current in vitro and in vivo strategies for assessing drug metabolism in preclinical drug development. We highlight computational tools available to the scientific community for the in silico prediction of drug metabolism, and examine how these tools have been implemented to produce drug-target signatures relevant to metabolic routes. Computational workflows that assess drug metabolism and its toxicological and pharmacokinetic effects, such as by applying the adverse outcome pathway framework for risk assessment, may improve the efficiency and speed of preclinical drug development.

  6. Effect of Antiviral Therapy on Serum Activity of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Husic-Selimovic, Azra; Sofic, Amela; Huskic, Jasminko; Bulja, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Renin-angiotenzin system (RAS) is frequently activated in patients with chronic liver disease. Angiotenzin - II (AT-II), produced by angiotenzin converting enzyme (ACE), has many physiological effects, including an important role in liver fibrogenesis. Combined antiviral therapy with PEG-IFN and ribavirin besides its antiviral effect also leads to a reduction in liver parenchyma fibrosis. Aim of the study: Determining the value of ACE in serum of patients with chronic hepatitis C before and after combined antiviral therapy, as well as the value of ACE activities in sera of the control group. Materials and methods: We studied 50 patients treated at Gastroenterohepatology Department, in the time-period of four years. Value of ACE in serum was determined by Olympus AU 400 device, with application of kit “Infinity TN ACE Liquid Stable Reagent”. HCV RNA levels in sera were measured by real time PCR. HCV RNA test was performed with modular analysis of AMPLICOR and COBAS AMPLICOR HCV MONITOR test v2.0, which has proved infection and was used for quantification of the viruses and monitoring of the patients’ response to therapy. Liver histology was evaluated in accordance with the level of necroinflammation activity and stage of fibrosis. Results: Serum activities of ACE in chronic hepatitis C patients is statistically higher than the values in the control group (p=0.02). Antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients statistically decreases serum activities of ACE (p= 0.02) and indirectly affects fibrogenesis of the liver parenchyma. Correlation between ACE and ALT activity after the therapy was proved (0.3934). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the activity of ACE in serum is a good indirect parameter of the liver damage, and could be used as an indirect prognostic factor of the level of liver parenchyma damage. Serum activity of ACE can be used as a parameter for non-invasive assessment of intensity of liver damage. PMID:27147779

  7. Effects of dietary retinyl acetate on the promotion of hepatic enzyme-altered foci by polybrominated biphenyls in initiated rats.

    PubMed

    Rezabek, M S; Sleight, S D; Jensen, R K; Aust, S D

    1989-08-01

    Vitamin A inhibits the development of some chemically-induced tumours. Since polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) are hepatic tumour promoters and they affect vitamin A homeostasis in rats, we put forward the hypothesis that dietary levels of vitamin A would influence tumour promotion by PBBs. In the study described here, female Sprague-Dawley rats were initiated on day 1 by ip administration of diethylnitrosamine. On day 7 after initiation, the rats were fed a vitamin A-deficient basal diet that was supplemented with either 2000 IU (low-vitamin A) or 200,000 IU (high-vitamin A) retinyl acetate/kg feed. From day 30 after initiation until the end of the study the following PBBs were added to the diets: Firemaster BP-6 (10 ppm), 2,4,5,2',4',5'-hexabromobiphenyl (10 ppm) or 3,4,5,3',4',5'-hexabromobiphenyl (1 ppm). The control animals received low- or high-vitamin A diets containing no PBBs. On day 180, the rats were necropsied, sections of various tissues were stained for histopathological examination and an evaluation of hepatic enzyme-altered foci was performed. Numbers of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase-positive foci/cm3 liver and the mean volumes of these foci were lower in the high-vitamin A groups than those in the corresponding low-vitamin A groups, but these differences were not significant. The percentage of the liver volume occupied by foci was significantly greater in the low-vitamin A with 345-HBB group than in the corresponding high-vitamin A group. Thus, high dietary levels of vitamin A had some inhibitory effect on the promotion of hepatic-altered foci by 345-HBB in initiated rats.

  8. Physical properties, lipid composition and enzyme activities of hepatic subcellular membranes from chick embryo after ethanol treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Amate, M.C.; Marco, C.; Segovia, J.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Exposure of chick embryos to ethanol resulted in significant alterations to the lipid composition of various different hepatic subcellular membranes. A marked decrease in cholesterol levels and an increase in the phospholipid content of microsomes and mitochondria was observed. Ethanol also affected the fatty acid profiles, mainly by decreasing the percentage of oleic acid in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine in the mitochondria and phosphatidylethanolamine in the microsomes. In spite of these changes ethanol only induced alterations in the fluidity of the mitochondrial membranes, which showed a more rigid core, in contrast to the phospholipid-head region, which was not affected. In accordance with the changes observed in the physical state of the membrane, the enzymes involved in the microsomal electron-transport systems were not modified by ethanol, while cytochrome oxidase activity decreased by 50% compared to the activity in the mitochondria from control chick embryos.

  9. The Action of Antidiabetic Plants of the Canadian James Bay Cree Traditional Pharmacopeia on Key Enzymes of Hepatic Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Nachar, Abir; Vallerand, Diane; Musallam, Lina; Lavoie, Louis; Arnason, John; Haddad, Pierre S.

    2013-01-01

    We determined the capacity of putative antidiabetic plants used by the Eastern James Bay Cree (Canada) to modulate key enzymes of gluconeogenesis and glycogen synthesis and key regulating kinases. Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and glycogen synthase (GS) activities were assessed in cultured hepatocytes treated with crude extracts of seventeen plant species. Phosphorylation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK), Akt, and Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) were probed by Western blot. Seven of the seventeen plant extracts significantly decreased G6Pase activity, Abies balsamea and Picea glauca, exerting an effect similar to insulin. This action involved both Akt and AMPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, several plant extracts activated GS, Larix laricina and A. balsamea, far exceeding the action of insulin. We also found a significant correlation between GS stimulation and GSK-3 phosphorylation induced by plant extract treatments. In summary, three Cree plants stand out for marked effects on hepatic glucose homeostasis. P. glauca affects glucose production whereas L. laricina rather acts on glucose storage. However, A. balsamea has the most promising profile, simultaneously and powerfully reducing G6Pase and stimulating GS. Our studies thus confirm that the reduction of hepatic glucose production likely contributes to the therapeutic potential of several antidiabetic Cree traditional medicines. PMID:23864882

  10. The action of antidiabetic plants of the canadian james bay cree traditional pharmacopeia on key enzymes of hepatic glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Nachar, Abir; Vallerand, Diane; Musallam, Lina; Lavoie, Louis; Badawi, Alaa; Arnason, John; Haddad, Pierre S

    2013-01-01

    We determined the capacity of putative antidiabetic plants used by the Eastern James Bay Cree (Canada) to modulate key enzymes of gluconeogenesis and glycogen synthesis and key regulating kinases. Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and glycogen synthase (GS) activities were assessed in cultured hepatocytes treated with crude extracts of seventeen plant species. Phosphorylation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK), Akt, and Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) were probed by Western blot. Seven of the seventeen plant extracts significantly decreased G6Pase activity, Abies balsamea and Picea glauca, exerting an effect similar to insulin. This action involved both Akt and AMPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, several plant extracts activated GS, Larix laricina and A. balsamea, far exceeding the action of insulin. We also found a significant correlation between GS stimulation and GSK-3 phosphorylation induced by plant extract treatments. In summary, three Cree plants stand out for marked effects on hepatic glucose homeostasis. P. glauca affects glucose production whereas L. laricina rather acts on glucose storage. However, A. balsamea has the most promising profile, simultaneously and powerfully reducing G6Pase and stimulating GS. Our studies thus confirm that the reduction of hepatic glucose production likely contributes to the therapeutic potential of several antidiabetic Cree traditional medicines.

  11. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Pregnant Women to Predict the Pharmacokinetics of Drugs Metabolized Via Several Enzymatic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Dallmann, André; Ince, Ibrahim; Coboeken, Katrin; Eissing, Thomas; Hempel, Georg

    2017-09-18

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling is considered a valuable tool for predicting pharmacokinetic changes in pregnancy to subsequently guide in-vivo pharmacokinetic trials in pregnant women. The objective of this study was to extend and verify a previously developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for pregnant women for the prediction of pharmacokinetics of drugs metabolized via several cytochrome P450 enzymes. Quantitative information on gestation-specific changes in enzyme activity available in the literature was incorporated in a pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic model and the pharmacokinetics of eight drugs metabolized via one or multiple cytochrome P450 enzymes was predicted. The tested drugs were caffeine, midazolam, nifedipine, metoprolol, ondansetron, granisetron, diazepam, and metronidazole. Pharmacokinetic predictions were evaluated by comparison with in-vivo pharmacokinetic data obtained from the literature. The pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic model successfully predicted the pharmacokinetics of all tested drugs. The observed pregnancy-induced pharmacokinetic changes were qualitatively and quantitatively reasonably well predicted for all drugs. Ninety-seven percent of the mean plasma concentrations predicted in pregnant women fell within a twofold error range and 63% within a 1.25-fold error range. For all drugs, the predicted area under the concentration-time curve was within a 1.25-fold error range. The presented pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic model can quantitatively predict the pharmacokinetics of drugs that are metabolized via one or multiple cytochrome P450 enzymes by integrating prior knowledge of the pregnancy-related effect on these enzymes. This pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic model may thus be used to identify potential exposure changes in pregnant women a priori and to eventually support informed decision making when clinical trials are designed in this

  12. Protective potential of Averrhoa bilimbi fruits in ameliorating the hepatic key enzymes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Surya B; S, Mini

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is a mutifactorial disease which leads to several complications. Currently available drug regimens for management of diabetes have certain drawbacks. Need for safer and effective medicines from natural sources having potent antidiabetic activity. Averrhoa bilimbi Linn. (Oxalidaceae) is a medicinal plant and is reported to possess hypoglycemic activity. To investigate the antidiabetic potential of Averrhoa bilimbi fruit extract in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in male Sprague Dawley rats by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (40mg/kg body weight). The diabetic rats were treated orally with ethyl acetate fraction of A. bilimbi fruits (ABE) (25mg/kg body weight) and metformin (100mg/kg body weight) by intragastric intubation for 60days. After 60days, the rats were sacrificed; blood, liver and pancreas were collected. Several indices such as blood glucose, plasma insulin, toxicity markers and the activities of carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes were assayed. The phytochemicals present in the ABE was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. ABE significantly (p<0.05) reduced the level of blood glucose and hepatic toxicity markers and increased plasma insulin in diabetic rats. ABE modulated the activities of carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes, significantly increased the activities of hexokinase (59%) and pyruvate kinase (68%) and reduced the activities of glucose-6-phosphatase (32%) and fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase (20%). The histological studies of the pancreas also supported our findings. The results were compared with metformin, a standard oral hypoglycemic drug. GC-MS analysis of ABE revealed the presence of 11 chemical constituents in the extract. ABE exerts its antidiabetic effect by promoting glucose metabolism via glycolysis and inhibiting hepatic endogenous glucose production via gluconeogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Altered liver acini induced in diabetic rats by portal vein islet isografts resemble preneoplastic hepatic foci in their enzymic pattern.

    PubMed Central

    Dombrowski, F.; Filsinger, E.; Bannasch, P.; Pfeifer, U.

    1996-01-01

    As demonstrated previously, liver acini draining the blood from intraportally transplanted pancreatic islets in streptozotocin-diabetic rats are altered in various respects. The hepatocytes in these acini store glycogen and/or fat, and they show an increase in proliferation as well as in apoptotic activity. Thus, they are phenotypically similar to carcinogen-induced preneoplastic liver foci (glycogen-storing foci and sometimes also mixed cell foci). By means of catalytic enzyme histochemistry or immunohistochemistry, we investigated the activity of key enzymes of alternative pathways of carbohydrate metabolism and some additional marker enzymes (well known from studies on preneoplastic hepatic foci) in the altered liver acini surrounding the islet isografts. In addition, the expression of glucose transporter proteins 1 and 2 (GLUT-1 and GLUT-2) were investigated immunohistochemically. The activities of hexokinase, pyruvate kinase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were increased, whereas the activities of glycogen phosphorylase, adenylate cyclase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and membrane-bound adenosine triphosphatase were decreased in the altered liver acini. The expression of GLUT-2 was also decreased. GLUT-1 and glutathione S-transferase placental form were not expressed, and the activities of glycogen synthase and gamma-glutamyl-transferase remained unchanged. All changes of the enzyme activities were in line with the well known effects of insulin and resembled alterations characteristic of preneoplastic liver foci observed in different models of hepatocarcinogenesis. It remains to be clarified in long-term experiments whether or not these foci represent preneoplastic lesions and may proceed to neoplasia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8644865

  14. Carbonated soft drinks alter hepatic cytochrome P450 isoform expression in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Alkhedaide, Adel; Soliman, Mohamed Mohamed; Ibrahim, Zein Shaban

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the effects of chronic consumption of soft drinks (SDs) on hepatic oxidative stress and cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) expression in the livers of Wistar rats. For 3 consecutive months, the rats had free access to three different soft drinks, Coca-Cola, Pepsi-Cola and 7-UP. The rats were subsequently compared with control group rats that had consumed water. Blood and hepatic tissue samples were assayed for the changes in antioxidants, liver function biomarkers and hepatic gene expression for different isoforms of hepatic CYP. The results indicated that SD consumption (SDC) decreased serum antioxidant levels and increased malondialdehyde secretion, and increased liver biomarkers (glutamate pyruvate transaminase and glutamate oxaloacetate). SD induced alterations in mRNA expression of hepatic antioxidants and cytochrome isoforms. The expression of peroxidase, catalase, CYP1A2, CYP3A2 and CYP2C11 in the liver were upregulated following SDC. By contrast, CYP2B1 was downregulated after 3 months of SDC in liver tissue samples. Thus, the present findings indicate that SDs induced oxidative stress in the liver of Wistar rats and for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, indicate that SDC disrupts hepatic CYP enzymes that may affect drug metabolism. Therefore, drug-dosing programs should be carefully designed to take these novel findings into consideration for the treatment of diseases.

  15. Carbonated soft drinks alter hepatic cytochrome P450 isoform expression in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Alkhedaide, Adel; Soliman, Mohamed Mohamed; Ibrahim, Zein Shaban

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the effects of chronic consumption of soft drinks (SDs) on hepatic oxidative stress and cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) expression in the livers of Wistar rats. For 3 consecutive months, the rats had free access to three different soft drinks, Coca-Cola, Pepsi-Cola and 7-UP. The rats were subsequently compared with control group rats that had consumed water. Blood and hepatic tissue samples were assayed for the changes in antioxidants, liver function biomarkers and hepatic gene expression for different isoforms of hepatic CYP. The results indicated that SD consumption (SDC) decreased serum antioxidant levels and increased malondialdehyde secretion, and increased liver biomarkers (glutamate pyruvate transaminase and glutamate oxaloacetate). SD induced alterations in mRNA expression of hepatic antioxidants and cytochrome isoforms. The expression of peroxidase, catalase, CYP1A2, CYP3A2 and CYP2C11 in the liver were upregulated following SDC. By contrast, CYP2B1 was downregulated after 3 months of SDC in liver tissue samples. Thus, the present findings indicate that SDs induced oxidative stress in the liver of Wistar rats and for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, indicate that SDC disrupts hepatic CYP enzymes that may affect drug metabolism. Therefore, drug-dosing programs should be carefully designed to take these novel findings into consideration for the treatment of diseases. PMID:27882225

  16. Venlafaxine pharmacokinetics focused on drug metabolism and potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Paulo; Alves, Gilberto; Llerena, Adrián; Falcão, Amílcar

    2014-01-01

    Venlafaxine (VEN) is one of the safest and most effective drugs used in the treatment of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors-resistant depression, and thereby it is nowadays one of the most commonly prescribed antidepressants. Nevertheless, patients treated with antidepressant drugs including VEN have exhibited large inter-individual variability in drug outcomes, possibly due to the influence of genetic and nongenetic factors on the drug pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics. Among them, an increased interest has emerged over the last few years on the genetic and/or phenotypic profile for drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and drug transporters such as potential predictive pharmacokinetic-based biomarkers of the variability found in drug biodisposition and antidepressant response. The integration of some of these key therapeutic biomarkers with classic therapeutic drug monitoring constitutes a promising way to individualization of VEN's pharmacotherapy, offering to clinicians the ability to better predict and manage pharmacological treatments to maximize the drug effectiveness. Thus, this review provides an extensive discussion of the pharmacokinetics of VEN focusing in particular on metabolism issues, without forgetting the clinically relevant sources of pharmacokinetics variability (mainly the genetic sources) and aiming on the identification of phenotypic and/or genetic biomarkers for therapy optimization.

  17. In silico approaches to predicting drug metabolism, toxicology and beyond.

    PubMed

    Ekins, S

    2003-06-01

    The discovery and optimization of new drug candidates is becoming increasingly reliant upon the combination of experimental and computational approaches related to drug metabolism, toxicology and general biopharmaceutical properties. With the considerable output of high-throughput assays for cytochrome-P450-mediated drug-drug interactions, metabolic stability and assays for toxicology, we have orders of magnitude more data that will facilitate model building. A recursive partitioning model for human liver microsomal metabolic stability based on over 800 structurally diverse molecules was used to predict molecules with known log in vitro clearance data (Spearman's rho -0.64, P <0.0001). In addition, with solely published data, a quantitative structure-activity relationship for 66 inhibitors of the potassium channel human ether-a-gogo (hERG) that has been implicated in the failure of a number of recent drugs has been generated. This model has been validated with further published data for 25 molecules (Spearman's rho 0.83, P <0.0001). If continued value is to be realized from these types of computational models, there needs to be some applied research on their validation and optimization with new data. Some relatively simple approaches may have value when it comes to combining data from multiple models in order to improve and focus drug discovery on the molecules most likely to succeed.

  18. Antidiabetic efficacy of citronellol, a citrus monoterpene by ameliorating the hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Subramani; Muruganathan, Udaiyar

    2016-04-25

    Diabetes mellitus is a clinically complex disease characterized by chronic hyperglycemia with metabolic disturbances. During diabetes, endogenous hepatic glucose production is increased as a result of impaired activities of the key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the antidiabetic efficacy of citronellol, a citrus monoterpene in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes mellitus was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (40 mg/kg b.w). STZ induced diabetic rats received citronellol orally at the doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg b.w for 30 days. In this study the levels of plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin (Hb), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), glycogen, and the activities of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes, liver and kidney markers were evaluated. Oral administration of citronellol (50 mg/kg) for 30 days dose dependently improved the levels of insulin, Hb and hepatic glycogen with significant decrease in glucose and HbA1C levels. The altered activities of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes, hepatic and kidney markers were restored to near normal. Citronellol supplement was found to be effective in preserving the normal histological appearance of hepatic cells and insulin-positive β-cells in STZ-rats. Our results suggest that administration of citronellol attenuates the hyperglycemia in the STZ-induced diabetic rats by ameliorating the key carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and could be developed as a functional and nutraceutical ingredient in combating diabetes mellitus.

  19. Decrease of serum Angiotensin converting enzyme levels upon telbivudine treatment for chronic hepatitis B virus infection and negative correlations between the enzyme levels and estimated glumerular filtration rates.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kung-Hao; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Hsu, Chao-Wei; Chang, Ming-Ling; Yeh, Chau-Ting

    2014-01-01

    During antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B, renal function impairment could be a critical concern when oral nucleot(s)ide analogues were used. Paradoxically, long-term telbivudine treatment was associated with an increase of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) through unknown mechanisms. We aimed to investigate changes in serum protein abundances associated with renal function in response to antiviral treatments. Primarily, a transcriptomic assay was performed to identify differentially expressed genes in peripheral blood cells caused by the telbivudine treatment. Two genes coding angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and complement factor H (CFH) were screened from 14 candidate renal function-related genes. ACE and CFH production were further investigated using enzyme-linked immunoassays. Verification studies showed no significant change of serum CFH levels, but there was a significant reduction of serum ACE levels by continuous telbivudine treatment for 330.00 ± 0.85 days (34 patients; paired t-test, P = 0.022). Serum HBV DNA and ALT levels also decreased (P = 0.008 and < 0.001, respectively). A significant increase in eGFR was found (33 patients, paired t-test, P = 0.002) at 708.64 ± 31.63 days. Patients' eGFRs were negatively correlated with serum ACE levels (r = -0.375, P = 0.002) but not with serum HBV DNA and ALT levels (P = 0.241 and 0.088 respectively). Significant decreases of the ACE levels were also observed upon entecavir treatment (20 patients; paired t-test, P = 0.020) at 412.88 ± 36.92 days. No significant correlation was found between serum ACE levels and eGFRs (r = -0.239, P = 0.138) in entecavir-treated patients. We discovered a consistent reduction of serum ACE levels by two oral antiviral monotherapies, entecavir and telbivudine. Serum ACE levels were negatively correlated with eGFRs in telbivudine treated patients.

  20. Hepatic effects of phthalate esters.

    PubMed Central

    Seth, P K

    1982-01-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), a commonly used plasticizer and microchemical environmental pollutant, produces subtle changes in hepatic function as judged by increase in liver weight and morphological and biochemical alterations. It can modify the biological response of drugs and other xenobiotics. Such interactions appear to occur at the pharmacokinetic phase, as DEHP was found to alter the activity of microsomal drug-metabolizing enzymes and ethanol metabolism. DEHP produced a time- and route-dependent effect on the hepatic cytochrome P-450 contents and activity of aminopyrine N-demethylase, aniline hydroxylase, alcohol dehydrogenase and high and low Km aldehyde dehydrogenases when given orally or intraperitoneally. Under in vitro conditions, DEHP produced no effect on the activity of aminopyrine N-demethylase or aniline hydroxylase, while mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) and 2-ethylhexanol (2-EH) significantly inhibited their activity at concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 15.0 mM. Activity of aminopyrine N-demethylase and aniline hydroxylase was also inhibited by dimethyl phthalate (DMP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) after a single oral administration. In view of the possibility of the human exposure to phthalates and other xenobiotics simultaneously, these observations are of great significance. PMID:6754361

  1. Hepatic Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression Through the Life Stages of the Mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs). No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been ca...

  2. Hepatic Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression Through the Life Stages of the Mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs). No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been ca...

  3. Effect of selenium-containing compounds on hepatic chemoprotective enzymes in mice.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Wael M; Aboul-Fadl, Tarek; Lamb, John G; Roberts, Jeanette C; Franklin, Michael R

    2006-03-15

    Selenite and organoselenium compounds have been examined at supranutritional levels for their ability to influence the activity and mRNA levels of chemoprotective enzymes in the livers of selenium-sufficient mice and the changes compared to those elicited by oltipraz. Compounds investigated included novel selenocysteine prodrugs that have previously been evaluated for their ability to reduce the tumorigenicity of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) in mice. Following seven daily doses (i.g.), all compounds except 2-methylselenazolidine-4(R)-carboxylic acid (MSCA) increased thioredoxin reductase activity (43-92%) but only for 2-oxoselenazolidine-4(R)-carboxylic acid (OSCA) was there an accompanying increase in mRNA. No compound enhanced glutathione peroxidase activity, although sodium selenite significantly elevated the mRNA of this enzyme. Oltipraz was an efficacious inducer of both thioredoxin reductase and glutathione peroxidase mRNAs. Sodium selenite, selenazolidine-4(R)-carboxylic acid (SCA), and OSCA elevated NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase mRNA but only for OSCA was the elevation in mRNA accompanied by an increase in enzyme activity. L-Selenocystine significantly increased this activity without increasing mRNA levels. Sodium selenite, L-selenocystine, L-selenomethionine, and Se-methyl-L-selenocysteine all enhanced glutathione S-transferase activity. The increased activity with sodium selenite was accompanied by increases in mRNAs of Gst alpha, Gst mu and Gst pi classes, while for L-selenocystine and Se-methyl-L-selenocysteine, only an elevation in the mRNA for the Gst alpha class was observed. Gst alpha and Gst mu class mRNAs were elevated by OSCA without a significant elevation in enzyme activity. SCA and MSCA both elevated a Gst pi mRNA and MSCA elevated Gst mu in addition. By comparison, oltipraz only significantly elevated the mRNA of Gst mu, adding to the conclusion that across the entire study, no selenium compound appears to be acting

  4. Contaminants in eggs of colonial waterbirds and hepatic cytochrome P450 enzyme levels in pipped tern embryos, Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Melancon, M.J.; Hoffman, D.J.; Henny, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    Eggs of Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri) collected in 1991 from nesting colonies on Crescent Island (Columbia River) and the Potholes Reservoir in south central Washington generally contained low residues of organochlorine pesticides and metabolites, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Hepatic cytochrome P450 enzyme activity in pipped embryos of Forster's terns from the two colonies seemed unaffected by contaminants. At Crescent Island, examination of 23 Forster's tern eggs with large embryos (19 viable [10 pipped] and four dead [two pipped]) revealed developmental abnormalities in two viable pipped embryos (missing maxilla and deformed pelvic girdle) and a viable prepipping embryos (shortened beak). Our limited sample sizes and number of compounds analyzed preclude us from determining whether or not the abnormalities are related to contaminants. No abnormalities were noted in 10 pipped eggs (nine viable and one dead at collection) of Forster's terns collected from the Potholes Reservoir colony. Eggs of Caspian terns (Sterna caspia) collected from Crescent Island in 1991 also contained generally low residues of contaminants, only one developmental abnormality was noted, and limited data indicated that cytochrome P450 enzyme activity apparently was unaffected by contaminants. Organochlorine contaminants were generally low in addled eggs of American white pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) collected from Crescent Island in 1994

  5. Contaminants in eggs of colonial waterbirds and hepatic cytochrome P450 enzyme levels in pipped tern embryos, Washington State.

    PubMed

    Blus, L J; Melancon, M J; Hoffman, D J; Henny, C J

    1998-10-01

    Eggs of Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri) collected in 1991 from nesting colonies on Crescent Island (Columbia River) and the Potholes Reservoir in south central Washington generally contained low residues of organochlorine pesticides and metabolites, 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Hepatic cytochrome P450 enzyme activity in pipped embryos of Forster's terns from the two colonies seemed unaffected by contaminants. At Crescent Island, examination of 23 Forster's tern eggs with large embryos (19 viable [10 pipped] and four dead [two pipped]) revealed developmental abnormalities in two viable pipped embryos (missing maxilla and deformed pelvic girdle) and a viable prepipping embryo (shortened beak). Our limited sample sizes and number of compounds analyzed preclude us from determining whether or not the abnormalities are related to contaminants. No abnormalities were noted in 10 pipped eggs (nine viable and one dead at collection) of Forster's terns collected from the Potholes Reservoir colony. Eggs of Caspian terns (Sterna caspia) collected from Crescent Island in 1991 also contained generally low residues of contaminants, only one developmental abnormality was noted, and limited data indicated that cytochrome P450 enzyme activity apparently was unaffected by contaminants. Organochlorine contaminants were generally low in addled eggs of American white pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) collected from Crescent Island in 1994.

  6. Influence of Piper betle on hepatic marker enzymes and tissue antioxidant status in D-galactosamine-induced hepatotoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Pushpavalli, Ganesan; Veeramani, Chinnadurai; Pugalendi, Kodukkur Viswanathan

    2008-01-01

    D-galactosamine is a well-established hepatotoxicant that induces a diffuse type of liver injury closely resembling human viral hepatitis. D-galactosamine by its property of generating free radicals causes severe damage to the membrane and affects almost all organs of the human body. The leaves of Piper betle L., a commonly used masticatory in Asian countries, possess several biological properties. Our aim is to investigate the in vivo antioxidant potential of P. betle leaf-extract against oxidative stress induced by D-galactosamine intoxication in male albino Wistar rats. Toxicity was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of D-galactosamine, 400 mg/kg body weight (BW) for 21 days. Rats were treated with P. betle extract (200 mg/kg BW) via intragastric intubations. We assessed the activities of liver marker enzymes (aspartate amino-transferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase) and levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), lipid hydroperoxides, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, vitamin C, vitamin E, and reduced glutathione. The extract significantly improved the status of antioxidants and decreased TBARS, hydroperoxides, and liver marker enzymes when compared with the D-galactosamine treated group, demonstrating its hepatoprotective and antioxidant properties.

  7. Influence of Piper betle on hepatic marker enzymes and tissue antioxidant status in ethanol-treated Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, R; Prakasam, A; Ramesh, B; Pugalendi, K V

    2002-01-01

    Piper betle L. is a commonly used masticatory in Asia. This study was carried out to investigate the hepatoprotective and antioxidant properties of P. betle, using ethanol intoxication as a model of hepatotoxic and oxidative damage. Ethanol-treated rats exhibited elevation of hepatic marker enzymes and disturbances in antioxidant defense when compared with normal rats. Oral administration of P. betle extract (100, 200, or 300 mg/kg body weight) for 30 days significantly (P <.05) decreased aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and lipid hydroperoxides in ethanol treated rats. The extract also improved the tissue antioxidant status by increasing the levels of nonenzymatic antioxidants (reduced glutathione, vitamin C, and vitamin E) and the activities of free radical-detoxifying enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in liver and kidney of ethanol-treated rats. The highest dose of P. betle extract (300 mg/kg body weight) was most effective. The results were comparable with the known hepatoprotective drug, silymarin. These results indicate that P. betle could afford a significant hepatoprotective and antioxidant effect.

  8. Characterization of human hepatic and extrahepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes involved in the metabolism of classic cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Anna; Lichti, Cheryl F; Prather, Paul L; Zielinska, Agnieszka K; Bratton, Stacie M; Gallus-Zawada, Anna; Finel, Moshe; Miller, Grover P; Radomińska-Pandya, Anna; Moran, Jeffery H

    2009-07-01

    Tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the primary psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, is subject to cytochrome P450 oxidation and subsequent UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)-dependent glucuronidation. Many studies have shown that CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 are the primary enzymes responsible for these cytochrome P450-dependent oxidations, but little work has been done to characterize phase II metabolic pathways. In this study, we test the hypothesis that there are specific human UGTs responsible for classic cannabinoid metabolism. The activities of 12 human recombinant UGTs toward classic cannabinoids [cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD), (-)-Delta(8)-THC, (-)-Delta(9)-THC, (+/-)-11-hydroxy-Delta(9)-THC (THC-OH), and (-)-11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-THC (THC-COOH)] were evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and labeling assays. Despite activity by UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, and 2B7 toward CBN, CBD, THC-OH, and THC-COOH, only selected UGTs demonstrate sufficient activity for further characterization of steady-state kinetics. CBN was the most recognized substrate as evidenced by activities from hepatic UGT1A9 and extrahepatic UGT1A7, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10. These results may reflect the introduction of an aromatic ring to Delta(9)-THC, leading to favorable pi stacking with phenylalanines in the UGT active site. Likewise, oxidation of Delta(9)-THC to THC-OH results in UGT1A9 and UGT1A10 activity toward the cannabinoid. Further oxidation to THC-COOH surprisingly leads to a loss in metabolism by UGT1A9 and UGT1A10, while creating a substrate recognized by UGT1A1 and UGT1A3. The resulting glucuronide of THC-COOH is the main metabolite found in urine, and thus these hepatic enzymes play a critical role in the metabolic clearance of cannabinoids. Taken together, glucuronidation of cannabinoids depends on upstream processing including enzymes such as CYP2C9 and CYP3A4.

  9. Characterization of Human Hepatic and Extrahepatic UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase Enzymes Involved in the Metabolism of Classic Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Anna; Lichti, Cheryl F.; Prather, Paul L.; Zielinska, Agnieszka K.; Bratton, Stacie M.; Gallus-Zawada, Anna; Finel, Moshe; Miller, Grover P.; Radomińska-Pandya, Anna; Moran, Jeffery H.

    2009-01-01

    Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), the primary psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, is subject to cytochrome P450 oxidation and subsequent UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)-dependent glucuronidation. Many studies have shown that CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 are the primary enzymes responsible for these cytochrome P450-dependent oxidations, but little work has been done to characterize phase II metabolic pathways. In this study, we test the hypothesis that there are specific human UGTs responsible for classic cannabinoid metabolism. The activities of 12 human recombinant UGTs toward classic cannabinoids [cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD), (–)-Δ8-THC, (–)-Δ9-THC, (±)-11-hydroxy-Δ9-THC (THC-OH), and (–)-11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-THC (THC-COOH)] were evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and labeling assays. Despite activity by UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, and 2B7 toward CBN, CBD, THC-OH, and THC-COOH, only selected UGTs demonstrate sufficient activity for further characterization of steady-state kinetics. CBN was the most recognized substrate as evidenced by activities from hepatic UGT1A9 and extrahepatic UGT1A7, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10. These results may reflect the introduction of an aromatic ring to Δ9-THC, leading to favorable π stacking with phenylalanines in the UGT active site. Likewise, oxidation of Δ9-THC to THC-OH results in UGT1A9 and UGT1A10 activity toward the cannabinoid. Further oxidation to THC-COOH surprisingly leads to a loss in metabolism by UGT1A9 and UGT1A10, while creating a substrate recognized by UGT1A1 and UGT1A3. The resulting glucuronide of THC-COOH is the main metabolite found in urine, and thus these hepatic enzymes play a critical role in the metabolic clearance of cannabinoids. Taken together, glucuronidation of cannabinoids depends on upstream processing including enzymes such as CYP2C9 and CYP3A4. PMID:19339377

  10. Coral calcium hydride prevents hepatic steatosis in high fat diet-induced obese rats: A potent mitochondrial nutrient and phase II enzyme inducer.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chen; Wang, Yongyao; Zhu, Erkang; Yan, Chunhong; Zhao, Lin; Wang, Xiaojie; Qiu, Yingfeng; Shen, Hui; Sun, Xuejun; Feng, Zhihui; Liu, Jiankang; Long, Jiangang

    2016-03-01

    Diet-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by profound lipid accumulation and associated with an inflammatory response, oxidative stress and hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that some mitochondrial nutrients effectively ameliorated high fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic steatosis and metabolic disorders. Molecular hydrogen in hydrogen-rich liquid or inhaling gas, which has been confirmed in scavenging reactive oxygen species and preventing mitochondrial decay, improved metabolic syndrome in patients and animal models. Coral calcium hydride (CCH) is a new solid molecular hydrogen carrier made of coral calcium. However, whether and how CCH impacts HFD-induced hepatic steatosis remains uninvestigated. In the present study, we applied CCH to a HFD-induced NAFLD rat model for 13 weeks. We found that CCH durably generated hydrogen in vivo and in vitro. CCH treatment significantly reduced body weight gain, improved glucose and lipid metabolism and attenuated hepatic steatosis in HFD-induced obese rats with no influence on food and water intake. Moreover, CCH effectively improved HFD-induced hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction, reduced oxidative stress, and activated phase II enzymes. Our results suggest that CCH is an efficient hydrogen-rich agent, which could prevent HFD-induced NAFLD via activating phase II enzymes and improving mitochondrial function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Novel Mathematical Model Describing Adaptive Cellular Drug Metabolism and Toxicity in the Chemoimmune System

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Attila; Brózik, Anna; Szakács, Gergely; Sarkadi, Balázs; Hegedüs, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Cells cope with the threat of xenobiotic stress by activating a complex molecular network that recognizes and eliminates chemically diverse toxic compounds. This “chemoimmune system” consists of cellular Phase I and Phase II metabolic enzymes, Phase 0 and Phase III ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) membrane transporters, and nuclear receptors regulating these components. In order to provide a systems biology characterization of the chemoimmune network, we designed a reaction kinetic model based on differential equations describing Phase 0–III participants and regulatory elements, and characterized cellular fitness to evaluate toxicity. In spite of the simplifications, the model recapitulates changes associated with acquired drug resistance and allows toxicity predictions under variable protein expression and xenobiotic exposure conditions. Our simulations suggest that multidrug ABC transporters at Phase 0 significantly facilitate the defense function of successive network members by lowering intracellular drug concentrations. The model was extended with a novel toxicity framework which opened the possibility of performing in silico cytotoxicity assays. The alterations of the in silico cytotoxicity curves show good agreement with in vitro cell killing experiments. The behavior of the simplified kinetic model suggests that it can serve as a basis for more complex models to efficiently predict xenobiotic and drug metabolism for human medical applications. PMID:25699998

  12. A novel mathematical model describing adaptive cellular drug metabolism and toxicity in the chemoimmune system.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Attila; Brózik, Anna; Szakács, Gergely; Sarkadi, Balázs; Hegedüs, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Cells cope with the threat of xenobiotic stress by activating a complex molecular network that recognizes and eliminates chemically diverse toxic compounds. This "chemoimmune system" consists of cellular Phase I and Phase II metabolic enzymes, Phase 0 and Phase III ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) membrane transporters, and nuclear receptors regulating these components. In order to provide a systems biology characterization of the chemoimmune network, we designed a reaction kinetic model based on differential equations describing Phase 0-III participants and regulatory elements, and characterized cellular fitness to evaluate toxicity. In spite of the simplifications, the model recapitulates changes associated with acquired drug resistance and allows toxicity predictions under variable protein expression and xenobiotic exposure conditions. Our simulations suggest that multidrug ABC transporters at Phase 0 significantly facilitate the defense function of successive network members by lowering intracellular drug concentrations. The model was extended with a novel toxicity framework which opened the possibility of performing in silico cytotoxicity assays. The alterations of the in silico cytotoxicity curves show good agreement with in vitro cell killing experiments. The behavior of the simplified kinetic model suggests that it can serve as a basis for more complex models to efficiently predict xenobiotic and drug metabolism for human medical applications.

  13. In Vitro Evaluation of the Effects of Eurycoma longifolia Extract on CYP-Mediated Drug Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Han, Young Min; Kim, In Sook; Rehman, Shaheed Ur; Choe, Kevin; Yoo, Hye Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Eurycoma longifolia (Simaroubaceae) is a popular folk medicine that has traditionally been used in Southeast Asia as an antimalarial, aphrodisiac, antidiabetic, and antimicrobial and in antipyretic remedies. This study evaluates the effects of Eurycoma longifolia extract on cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme-mediated drug metabolism to predict the potential for herb-drug interactions. Methanolic extract of E. longifolia root was tested at concentrations of 1, 3, 10, 30, 100, 300, and 1000 µg/mL in human liver microsomes or individual recombinant CYP isozymes. The CYP inhibitory activity was measured using the cocktail probe assay based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. E. longifolia showed weak, concentration-dependent inhibition of CYP1A2, CYP2A6, and CYP2C19. The inhibitory effects on these CYP isozymes were further tested using individual recombinant CYP isozymes, showing IC50 values of 324.9, 797.1, and 562.9 μg/mL, respectively. In conclusion, E. longifolia slightly inhibited the metabolic activities of CYP1A2, CYP2A6, and CYP2C19 but this issue requires careful attention in taking herbal medicines or dietary supplements containing E. longifolia extracts. PMID:26240600

  14. An update on ethnic differences in drug metabolism and toxicity from anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Phan, Viet Hong; Tan, Cindy; Rittau, Anneliese; Xu, Hongmei; McLachlan, Andrew J; Clarke, Stephen J

    2011-11-01

    Based on recent emerging evidence of inter-ethnic differences in drug response and toxicity, ethnic diversity in pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenomics and clinical outcomes are being increasingly investigated. Ultimately, this will promote improved understanding of inter-individual differences in the pharmacokinetics and tolerance of cytotoxic drugs. This article reviews potential explanations for the observed ethnic differences in treatment outcomes and provides clinical data to support this concept. A literature search was implemented on PubMed and PharmGKB to investigate the areas of ethnic differences in pharmacogenomics, pharmacogenetics and clinical outcomes of cancer therapies. There has been a relative paucity of clinical evidence linking genetic polymorphisms of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes to the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and tolerance of anti-cancer drugs. Future research should focus on studies using large sample sizes, in the hope that they will provide results of high clinical significance. Due to the potential for ethnic differences to impact on both toxicities and benefits of systemic cancer therapies, the development of new therapeutic agents should include patients from diverse geographical ancestries in each phase of drug development.

  15. Dietary fat unsaturation enhances drug metabolism in cebus but not in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Meydani, M; Blumberg, J B; Hayes, K C

    1985-05-01

    Antipyrine disappearance and sleeping time following barbiturate anesthesia were assessed to evaluate the effects of dietary corn oil and coconut oil on the drug-metabolizing enzyme systems (DMES) in cebus (Cebus albifrons) and squirrel (Saimiri sciureus) monkeys. Plasma antipyrine clearance (half-life) was measured in both species before and after induction of DMES by i.v. injection of barbiturates on two consecutive days. Sleeping time was measured after administration of either pentobarbital or hexobarbital and proved to be the most demonstrable measure of diet-drug interaction. In neither cebus nor squirrel monkeys was antipyrine half-life significantly affected by dietary fat. Sleeping time for the coconut oil-fed squirrel monkeys was shorter than for those fed corn oil, whereas corn oil-fed cebus awoke sooner than the coconut oil-fed cebus. Thus, barbiturate but not antipyrine metabolism in monkeys can be influenced by dietary fat unsaturation, and the effect appears to be species dependent. Genetic differences in phospholipid metabolism are thought to underlie this difference.

  16. In Vitro Evaluation of the Effects of Eurycoma longifolia Extract on CYP-Mediated Drug Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Han, Young Min; Kim, In Sook; Rehman, Shaheed Ur; Choe, Kevin; Yoo, Hye Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Eurycoma longifolia (Simaroubaceae) is a popular folk medicine that has traditionally been used in Southeast Asia as an antimalarial, aphrodisiac, antidiabetic, and antimicrobial and in antipyretic remedies. This study evaluates the effects of Eurycoma longifolia extract on cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme-mediated drug metabolism to predict the potential for herb-drug interactions. Methanolic extract of E. longifolia root was tested at concentrations of 1, 3, 10, 30, 100, 300, and 1000 µg/mL in human liver microsomes or individual recombinant CYP isozymes. The CYP inhibitory activity was measured using the cocktail probe assay based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. E. longifolia showed weak, concentration-dependent inhibition of CYP1A2, CYP2A6, and CYP2C19. The inhibitory effects on these CYP isozymes were further tested using individual recombinant CYP isozymes, showing IC50 values of 324.9, 797.1, and 562.9 μg/mL, respectively. In conclusion, E. longifolia slightly inhibited the metabolic activities of CYP1A2, CYP2A6, and CYP2C19 but this issue requires careful attention in taking herbal medicines or dietary supplements containing E. longifolia extracts.

  17. African Genetic Diversity: Implications for Cytochrome P450-mediated Drug Metabolism and Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Rajman, Iris; Knapp, Laura; Morgan, Thomas; Masimirembwa, Collen

    2017-03-01

    Genetic diversity is greater in Africa than in other continental populations. Genetic variability in genes encoding drug metabolizing enzymes may contribute to the high numbers of adverse drug reactions reported in Africa. We reviewed publications (1995-April 2016) reporting frequencies of known cytochrome P450 (CYP) variants in African populations. Using principal components analysis (PCA) we identified CYP alleles of potential clinical relevance with a marked difference in distribution in Africa, compared with Asian and Caucasian populations. These were CYP2B6*6, CYP2C8*2, CYP2D6*3, CYP2D6*17, CYP2D6*29, CYP3A5*6, and CYP3A5*7. We show clearly that there is greater diversity in CYP distribution in Africa than in other continental populations and identify a need for optimization of drug therapy and drug development there. Further pharmacogenetic studies are required to confirm the CYP distributions we identified using PCA, to discover uniquely African alleles and to identify populations at a potentially increased risk of drug-induced adverse events or drug inefficacy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases: structure/function, genetic polymorphisms and role in drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Sharon K.; Williams, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) oxygenates drugs and xenobiotics containing a “soft-nucleophile”, usually nitrogen or sulfur. FMO, like cytochrome P450 (CYP), is a monooxygenase, utilizing the reducing equivalents of NADPH to reduce 1 atom of molecular oxygen to water, while the other atom is used to oxidize the substrate. FMO and CYP also exhibit similar tissue and cellular location, molecular weight, substrate specificity, and exist as multiple enzymes under developmental control. The human FMO functional gene family is much smaller (5 families each with a single member) than CYP. FMO does not require a reductase to transfer electrons from NADPH and the catalytic cycle of the 2 monooxygenases is strikingly different. Another distinction is the lack of induction of FMOs by xenobiotics. In general, CYP is the major contributor to oxidative xenobiotic metabolism. However, FMO activity may be of significance in a number of cases and should not be overlooked. FMO and CYP have overlapping substrate specificities, but often yield distinct metabolites with potentially significant toxicological/pharmacological consequences. The physiological function(s) of FMO are poorly understood. Three of the 5 expressed human FMO genes, FMO1, FMO2 and FMO3, exhibit genetic polymorphisms. The most studied of these is FMO3 (adult human liver) in which mutant alleles contribute to the disease known as trimethylaminuria. The consequences of these FMO genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolism and human health are areas of research requiring further exploration. PMID:15922018

  19. Kinetics of conjugation and oxidation of nitrobenzyl alcohols by rat hepatic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rickert, D E; deBethizy, J D; Glover, M R; Kedderis, G L

    1985-12-01

    Previous work has suggested that quantitative differences in the in vitro and in vivo metabolism of mononitrotoluene isomers are a result of differences in the hepatic conjugation and oxidation of the first metabolic intermediates, the mononitrobenzyl alcohols. We have determined the steady-state kinetic parameters, Vmax, Km and V/K, for the metabolism of the nitrobenzyl alcohols by rat hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase, glucuronyltransferase, and sulfotransferase. 3-Nitrobenzyl alcohol was the best substrate for cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase (Vmax = 1.48 nmoles/min/mg protein, V/K = 3.15 X 10(-3) nmoles/min/mg protein/microM, Km = 503 microM). Vmax and Km values for 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol were similar, but V/K was about 60% of that for 3-nitrobenzyl alcohol. 2-Nitrobenzyl alcohol was not metabolized by the alcohol dehydrogenase preparation used here, but it was metabolized to 2-nitrobenzoic acid by a rat liver mitochondrial preparation. 2-Nitrobenzyl alcohol was the best substrate for microsomal glucuronyltransferase (Vmax = 3.59 nmoles/min/mg protein, V/K = 11.28 X 10(-3) nmoles/min/mg protein/microM, Km = 373 microM). The Vmax for 3-nitrobenzyl alcohol was similar, but the V/K was about half and the Km was about twice that for 2-nitrobenzyl alcohol. The Vmax for 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol was about 40% and the V/K was about half that for 2-nitrobenzyl alcohol. The best substrate for cytosolic sulfotransferase was 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol (Vmax = 1.69 nmoles/min/mg protein, V/K = 37.21 X 10(-3) nmoles/min/mg protein/microM, Km = 48 microM). The Vmax values for the other two benzyl alcohols were similar, but the V/K and Km values were about 11 and 400%, respectively, of those for 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol. These data are in qualitative agreement with results obtained when the nitrobenzyl alcohols were incubated with isolated hepatocytes, but they do not allow quantitative modeling of the data from hepatocytes.

  20. Development of a Highly Sensitive Bioluminescent Enzyme Immunoassay for Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigen Capable of Detecting Divergent Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Takehara, Shizuka; Takahashi, Masaharu

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are sometimes overlooked when using commercial kits to measure hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) due to their low sensitivities and reactivities to mutant strains of various genotypes. We developed an ultrasensitive bioluminescent enzyme immunoassay (BLEIA) for HBsAg using firefly luciferase, which is adaptable to a variety of HBsAg mutants, by combining four monoclonal antibodies with a polyclonal antibody against HBsAg. The measurement of seroconversion panels showed trace amounts of HBsAg during the early infection phase by the BLEIA because of its high sensitivity of 5 mIU/ml. The BLEIA detected HBsAg as early as did PCR in five of seven series and from 2.1 to 9.4 days earlier than commercial immunoassay methods. During the late infection phase, the BLEIA successfully detected HBsAg even 40 days after the disappearance of HBV DNA and the emergence of antibodies against HBsAg. The HBsAg BLEIA successfully detected all 13 recombinant HBsAg and 45 types of HBsAg mutants with various mutations within amino acids 90 to 164 in the S gene product. Some specimens had higher values determined by the BLEIA than those by a commercial chemiluminescent immunoassay; this suggests that such discrepancies were caused by the dissociation of preS1/preS2 peptides from the particle surface. With its highly sensitive detection of low-titer HBsAg, including various mutants, the HBsAg BLEIA is considered to be useful for the early diagnosis and prevention of HBV infection because of the shorter window of infection prior to detection, which facilitates early prediction of recurrence in HBV-infected individuals. PMID:23761660

  1. Hepatic and extrahepatic distribution of ornithine urea cycle enzymes in holocephalan elephant fish (Callorhinchus milii).

    PubMed

    Takagi, Wataru; Kajimura, Makiko; Bell, Justin D; Toop, Tes; Donald, John A; Hyodo, Susumu

    2012-04-01

    Cartilaginous fish comprise two subclasses, the Holocephali (chimaeras) and Elasmobranchii (sharks, skates and rays). Little is known about osmoregulatory mechanisms in holocephalan fishes except that they conduct urea-based osmoregulation, as in elasmobranchs. In the present study, we examined the ornithine urea cycle (OUC) enzymes that play a role in urea biosynthesis in the holocephalan elephant fish, Callorhinchus milii (cm). We obtained a single mRNA encoding carbamoyl phosphate synthetase III (cmCPSIII) and ornithine transcarbamylase (cmOTC), and two mRNAs encoding glutamine synthetases (cmGSs) and two arginases (cmARGs), respectively. The two cmGSs were structurally and functionally separated into two types: brain/liver/kidney-type cmGS1 and muscle-type cmGS2. Furthermore, two alternatively spliced transcripts with different sizes were found for cmgs1 gene. The longer transcript has a putative mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS) and was predominantly expressed in the liver and kidney. MTS was not found in the short form of cmGS1 and cmGS2. A high mRNA expression and enzyme activities were found in the liver and muscle. Furthermore, in various tissues examined, mRNA levels of all the enzymes except cmCPSIII were significantly increased after hatching. The data show that the liver is the important organ for urea biosynthesis in elephant fish, but, extrahepatic tissues such as the kidney and muscle may also contribute to the urea production. In addition to the role of the extrahepatic tissues and nitrogen metabolism, the molecular and functional characteristics of multiple isoforms of GSs and ARGs are discussed.

  2. Comparative toxicology of tetrachlorobiphenyls in mink and rats. I. Changes in hepatic enzyme activity and smooth endoplasmic reticulum volume

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, D.M.; Corey, R.D.; Helferich, W.G.; McFarland, J.M.; Lowenstine, L.J.; Moody, D.E.; Hammock, B.D.; Shull, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    Mink have been shown previously to be extraordinarily sensitive to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and related classes of halogenated hydrocarbons. This study explored several aspects of the acute response of mink to two purified tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB) congeners and compared their response with that of the rat, a less sensitive and more thoroughly studied species. Young female pastel mink and young female Sprague-Dawley rats received three daily intraperitoneal injections with equimolar doses of either 2,4,2',4'-TCB or 3,4,3',4'-TCB, and were sacrificed after 7 days. Two control groups were used for each species; one was allowed free access to food and the other was pair-fed to the 3,4,3',4'-TCB treatment group. Rats remained clinically normal, while mink treated with 3,4,3',4'-TCB developed severe anorexia, diarrhea, and melena. Both species had significant increases in hepatic cytochrome P-450 content and the characteristic shift in the spectral maxima from 450 to 448 nm in the 3,4,3',4'-TCB- but not in the 2,4,2',4'-TCB-treated animals. Rats but not mink had increased activities of several hepatic monooxygenases in response to both congeners while microsomal epoxide hydrolase was increased in rats after 2,4,2',4'-TCB and in mink after 3,4,3',4'-TCB. Significant increases in the relative volume of smooth endoplasmic reticulum within hepatocytes of 2,4,2',4'-TCB-treated rats but not mink were confirmed by ultrastructural morphometry. Accumulation of both congeners was greater in adipose tissue than in the liver of either species. In both species, concentrations in adipose tissue were much greater for 2,4,2',4'-TCB than for 3,4,3',4'-TCB. PCB toxicosis in mink, as in other species, appeared to be dependent on isomeric arrangement of chlorine substituents. However, unlike other species, the toxicosis was not associated with biochemical or morphological evidence of hepatic enzyme induction.

  3. Hepatic enzyme activity after combined administration of methylmercury, lead and cadmium in the pekin duck

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, S.A.; Bhatnagar, M.K. )

    1990-04-01

    In order to assess adequately the environmental impact of heavy metals it is important to consider that they may occur simultaneously in the environment, where they may interact to alter their individual toxicities on living systems. Metals such as mercury (Hg), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) can be found in all levels of the polluted ecosystem, and in animals inhabiting such areas. In the polluted aquatic environment waterfowl have been noted to accumulate high levels of these metals in their tissues. A major toxic manifestation of heavy metal exposure is the perturbation of a wide range of enzyme systems in virtually all subcellular compartments. With the exception of lead, little data is available on the effects of metals on avian enzyme systems. The present report describes the effects observed in vivo on acid phosphatase (AP), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and cytochrome c oxidase (cyt c ox) in the liver of pekin ducks exposed to combinations of methylmercury (MeHg), lead and cadmium.

  4. Gene expression profiling in male B6C3F1 mouse livers exposed to kava identifies--changes in drug metabolizing genes and potential mechanisms linked to kava toxicity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Shi, Qiang; Dial, Stacey; Xia, Qingsu; Mei, Nan; Li, Quan-zhen; Chan, Po-Chuen; Fu, Peter

    2010-02-01

    The association of kava products with liver-related health risks has prompted regulatory action in many countries. We used a genome-wide gene expression approach to generate global gene expression profiles from the livers of male B6C3F1 mice administered kava extract by gavage for 14 weeks, and identified the differentially expressed drug metabolizing genes in response to kava treatments. Analyses of gene functions and pathways reveal that the levels of significant numbers of genes involving drug metabolism were changed and that the pathways involving xenobiotics metabolism, Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress response, mitochondrial functions and others, were altered. Our results indicate that kava extract can significantly modulate drug metabolizing enzymes, potentially leading to herb-drug interactions and hepatotoxicity.

  5. Feline drug metabolism and disposition: pharmacokinetic evidence for species differences and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Although it is widely appreciated that cats respond differently to certain drugs when compared with other companion animal species, the causes of these differences are poorly understood. This review critically evaluates published evidence for altered drug effects in cats, focusing on pharmacokinetic differences between cats, dogs and humans, and the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences. Pharmacokinetic studies indicate that acetaminophen, propofol, carprofen, and acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) are cleared significantly more slowly in cats versus dogs and humans. All of these drugs are metabolized by conjugation. Cats lack the major phenol UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes, including UGT1A6 and UGT1A9, that glucuronidate acetaminophen and propofol. Deficient glucuronidation may also explain slower carprofen clearance, although there is no direct evidence for this. However, poor aspirin clearance in cats appears to be mainly a consequence of slower glycine conjugation. Cats are also deficient in several other conjugation enzymes, including N-acetyltransferase (NAT) 2 and thiopurine methyltransferase (TMPT). NAT2 deficiency may be the reason cats are more prone to developing methemoglobinemia rather than hepatotoxicity from acetaminophen. TMPT deficiency may predispose cats to azathioprine toxicity. No evidence was found for slower elimination of drugs cleared by oxidation or unchanged into urine or bile. Piroxicam, an oxidized drug, was cleared much more rapidly in cats than humans and dogs, although the mechanism for this difference is unclear. More work is needed to better understand drug metabolism and disposition differences in cats, thereby enabling more rational prescribing of existing medications, and the development of safer drugs for this species. PMID:23890237

  6. Arylamine N-acetyltransferases: from drug metabolism and pharmacogenetics to drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Sim, E; Abuhammad, A; Ryan, A

    2014-01-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are polymorphic drug-metabolizing enzymes, acetylating arylamine carcinogens and drugs including hydralazine and sulphonamides. The slow NAT phenotype increases susceptibility to hydralazine and isoniazid toxicity and to occupational bladder cancer. The two polymorphic human NAT loci show linkage disequilibrium. All mammalian Nat genes have an intronless open reading frame and non-coding exons. The human gene products NAT1 and NAT2 have distinct substrate specificities: NAT2 acetylates hydralazine and human NAT1 acetylates p-aminosalicylate (p-AS) and the folate catabolite para-aminobenzoylglutamate (p-abaglu). Human NAT2 is mainly in liver and gut. Human NAT1 and its murine homologue are in many adult tissues and in early embryos. Human NAT1 is strongly expressed in oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer and may contribute to folate and acetyl CoA homeostasis. NAT enzymes act through a catalytic triad of Cys, His and Asp with the architecture of the active site-modulating specificity. Polymorphisms may cause unfolded protein. The C-terminus helps bind acetyl CoA and differs among NATs including prokaryotic homologues. NAT in Salmonella typhimurium supports carcinogen activation and NAT in mycobacteria metabolizes isoniazid with polymorphism a minor factor in isoniazid resistance. Importantly, nat is in a gene cluster essential for Mycobacterium tuberculosis survival inside macrophages. NAT inhibitors are a starting point for novel anti-tuberculosis drugs. Human NAT1-specific inhibitors may act in biomarker detection in breast cancer and in cancer therapy. NAT inhibitors for co-administration with 5-aminosalicylate (5-AS) in inflammatory bowel disease has prompted ongoing investigations of azoreductases in gut bacteria which release 5-AS from prodrugs including balsalazide. PMID:24467436

  7. Effect of L-carnitine supplementation on xenobiotic-metabolizing hepatic enzymes exposed to methanol.

    PubMed

    Olszowy, Zofia; Plewka, Andrzej; Czech, Ewa; Nowicka, Joanna; Plewka, Danuta; Nowaczyk, Grazyna; Kamiński, Marcin

    2006-07-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of L-carnitine on hepatic cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases exposed to methanol. Male Spraque-Dawley rats were given methanol (1/4 LD50 and 1/2 LD50) together with L-carnitine (1g/kg body weight). The parameters of microsome electron transport chains I and II and the levels of CYP2E1, CYP2B1/2 and CYP1A2 were measured 8, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after exposure. L-carnitine did not affect cytochrome P450 but it significantly increased at 72 and 96 h NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. It stimulated cytochrome b5 at 48 and 96 h and NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase activity at 12, 72 and 96 h. Methanol, especially the lower dose, inhibited cytochrome P450 after 48 h, but the higher methanol dose inhibited NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase activity in this time. L-carnitine, combined with the lower dose of methanol, stimulated NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase after 48 h and cytochrome b5 and NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase over the whole period of observation. L-carnitine stimulated CYP2B1/2 but not CYP2E1 and CYP1A2. Methanol stimulated CYP2E1 at 24 h, but CYP1A2 at 96 h in the studied doses. CYP2B1/2 was induced by the lower dose of methanol at 24 h but by the higher one at 96 h. When given together, L-carnitine and methanol (1/2 LD50) significantly stimulated CYP2E1 up to 170% at 24 h and 145% at 96 h.

  8. An update on the role of intestinal cytochrome P450 enzymes in drug disposition.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Ding, Xinxin; Zhang, Qing-Yu

    2016-09-01

    Oral administration is the most commonly used route for drug treatment. Intestinal cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated metabolism can eliminate a large proportion of some orally administered drugs before they reach systemic circulation, while leaving the passage of other drugs unimpeded. A better understanding of the ability of intestinal P450 enzymes to metabolize various clinical drugs in both humans and preclinical animal species, including the identification of the CYP enzymes expressed, their regulation, and the relative importance of intestinal metabolism compared to hepatic metabolism, is important for improving bioavailability of current drugs and new drugs in development. Here, we briefly review the expression of drug-metabolizing P450 enzymes in the small intestine of humans and several preclinical animal species, and provide an update of the various factors or events that regulate intestinal P450 expression, including a cross talk between the liver and the intestine. We further compare various clinical and preclinical approaches for assessing the impact of intestinal drug metabolism on bioavailability, and discuss the utility of the intestinal epithelium-specific NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-null (IECN) mouse as a useful model for studying in vivo roles of intestinal P450 in the disposition of orally administered drugs.

  9. Gluconeogenic substrates and hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes in streptozotocin-diabetic rats: effect of mulberry (Morus indica L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Andallu, B; Varadacharyulu, N C

    2007-03-01

    Mulberry (Morus indica L.) leaves, the sole food of the silk worm, were evaluated for antidiabetic effects in streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats. Treatment with dried mulberry leaf powder at 25% of the diet for a period of 8 weeks was found to be remarkably beneficial to STZ-diabetic rats as evidenced by controlled hyperglycemia and glycosuria. In addition, mulberry leaves countered (reversed) the alterations in gluconeogenic substrates in STZ-diabetic rats as indicated by significant reduction in serum pyruvic and lactic acid levels, a significant increase in proteins and a significant decrease in free amino acid, urea, and creatinine levels in blood, and a decreased urinary excretion of urea and creatinine. Anomalies in the activities of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes associated with impaired glucose homeostasis in STZ-diabetic rats were ameliorated by feeding the mulberry leaf-supplemented diet, indicating that control over hyperglycemia and associated complications in the diabetic state by mulberry leaves is by way of regulation of gluconeogenesis. With respect to all the parameters, mulberry leaves were more effective than the oral hypoglycemic drug glibenclamide.

  10. Irreversible enzyme inhibition kinetics and drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Mohutsky, Michael; Hall, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes the types of irreversible inhibition of drug-metabolizing enzymes and the methods commonly employed to quantify the irreversible inhibition and subsequently predict the extent and time course of clinically important drug-drug interactions.

  11. Rapid and accurate liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantification of ten metabolic reactions catalyzed by hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rong; Ma, Bingliang; Wu, Jiasheng; Wang, Tianming; Ma, Yueming

    2015-10-01

    The hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes play a central role in the biotransformation of endogenous and exogenous substances. A sensitive high-throughput liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry assay was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of the products of ten metabolic reactions catalyzed by hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes. After the substrates were incubated separately, the samples were pooled and analyzed by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry using an electrospray ionization source in the positive and negative ion modes. The method exhibited linearity over a broad concentration range, insensitivity to matrix effects, and high accuracy, precision, and stability. The novel method was successfully applied to study the kinetics of phenacetin-O deethylation, coumarin-7 hydroxylation, bupropion hydroxylation, taxol-6 hydroxylation, omeprazole-5 hydroxylation, dextromethorphan-O demethylation, tolbutamide-4 hydroxylation, chlorzoxazone-6 hydroxylation, testosterone-6β hydroxylation, and midazolam-1 hydroxylation in rat liver microsomes.

  12. Exploratory Studies of (-)-Epicatechin, a Bioactive Compound of Phyllanthus niruri, on the Antioxidant Enzymes and Oxidative Stress Markers in D-galactosamine-induced Hepatitis in Rats: A Study with Reference to Clinical Prospective.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Bhasha; Shanmugam, Kondeti Ramudu; Ravi, Sahukari; Subbaiah, Ganjikunta Venkata; Ramakrishana, Chilakala; Mallikarjuna, Korivi; Reddy, Kesireddy Sathyavelu

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis is a health problem affecting millions of people worldwide and it is the major risk factor for liver cirrhosis. In India, many plants are used to treat hepatitis. But little is known about the effects of (-)-epicatechin a bioactive compound of Phyllanthus niruri (PN) in hepatitis rats. The present study was designed to explore the antioxidant property of (-)-epicatechin isolated from PN in D-Galactosamine (D-GalN) induced hepatitis rats. The rats are divided into five groups as per the experimental design. (-)-Epicatchin pretreatment was given to the hepatitis rats for 21 days and biochemical analysis was carried out. The hepatic antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST), reduced glutathione (GSH), and malondialdehyde (MDA) and serum markers aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), albumin, and bilirubin are estimated. All the antioxidant enzymes activities and albumin levels are depleted in hepatitic rats. Whereas GST, ALP, AST, ALT activities and MDA, and bilirubin levels are elevated in hepatitis rats, (-)-epicatechin pretreatment increased all the antioxidant enzymes and decreased the GST, ALP, AST, ALT, and MDA levels in hepatitis rats. However, histopatholoigic studies also proves that (-)-epicatechin pretreatment decreased the tissue damage in hepatitis condition. This is the first report on the antioxidant enzymes and hepatoprotective effect of (-)-epicatechin in hepatitis rats. From this study, we conclude that (-)-epicatechin treatment decreased the oxidative damage in hepatitis rats. The present study was carried out to know the impact of (-)-epicatechin on antioxidant enzymes activities in hepatitis rats. From this study, we found that the antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT, GPx, GR, GSH depleted in hepatitis rats and increased with (-)-epicatechin in hepatitis rats.MDA levels

  13. Exploratory Studies of (-)-Epicatechin, a Bioactive Compound of Phyllanthus niruri, on the Antioxidant Enzymes and Oxidative Stress Markers in D-galactosamine-induced Hepatitis in Rats: A Study with Reference to Clinical Prospective

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Bhasha; Shanmugam, Kondeti Ramudu; Ravi, Sahukari; Subbaiah, Ganjikunta Venkata; Ramakrishana, Chilakala; Mallikarjuna, Korivi; Reddy, Kesireddy Sathyavelu

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis is a health problem affecting millions of people worldwide and it is the major risk factor for liver cirrhosis. In India, many plants are used to treat hepatitis. But little is known about the effects of (-)-epicatechin a bioactive compound of Phyllanthus niruri (PN) in hepatitis rats. Objective: The present study was designed to explore the antioxidant property of (-)-epicatechin isolated from PN in D-Galactosamine (D-GalN) induced hepatitis rats. Materials and Methods: The rats are divided into five groups as per the experimental design. (-)-Epicatchin pretreatment was given to the hepatitis rats for 21 days and biochemical analysis was carried out. The hepatic antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST), reduced glutathione (GSH), and malondialdehyde (MDA) and serum markers aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), albumin, and bilirubin are estimated. Results: All the antioxidant enzymes activities and albumin levels are depleted in hepatitic rats. Whereas GST, ALP, AST, ALT activities and MDA, and bilirubin levels are elevated in hepatitis rats, (-)-epicatechin pretreatment increased all the antioxidant enzymes and decreased the GST, ALP, AST, ALT, and MDA levels in hepatitis rats. However, histopatholoigic studies also proves that (-)-epicatechin pretreatment decreased the tissue damage in hepatitis condition. This is the first report on the antioxidant enzymes and hepatoprotective effect of (-)-epicatechin in hepatitis rats. Conclusion: From this study, we conclude that (-)-epicatechin treatment decreased the oxidative damage in hepatitis rats. SUMMARY The present study was carried out to know the impact of (-)-epicatechin on antioxidant enzymes activities in hepatitis rats. From this study, we found that the antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT, GPx, GR, GSH depleted in

  14. Comparison of constitutive gene expression levels of hepatic cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes between Wistar-Kyoto and stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Ikeda, Ayaka; Ito, Sei; Miyata, Misaki; Yoshida, Chiaki; Degawa, Masakuni

    2013-01-01

    Serum total cholesterol amounts in the stroke-prone hypertensive rat (SHRSP) strain are lower than in the normotensive control strain, Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat. To understand the strain difference, constitutive gene expression levels of hepatic cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes in male 8-week-old SHRSP and WKY rats were comparatively examined by DNA microarray and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses. Of 22 cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme genes, expression levels of 8 genes, Pmvk, Idi1, Fdps, Fdft1, Sqle, Lss, Sc4mol, and Hsd17b7, in SHRSP were less than 50% those of the WKY rats; especially, the expression level of Sqle gene, encoding squalene epoxidase, a rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, was about 20%. The gene expression level of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2), which functions as a transcription factor upregulating gene expression of cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes, in SHRSP was about 70% of that in WKY rats. These results demonstrate the possibility that the lower serum total cholesterol level in SHRSP is defined by lower gene expression of most hepatic cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes. In particular, decreased gene expression level of Sqle gene might be the most essential factor. Moreover, the broad range of lowered rates of these genes in SHRSP suggests that the abnormal function and/or expression not only of SREBP-2 but also of one or more other transcription factors for those gene expressions exist in SHRSP.

  15. Effect of Liver Disease on Hepatic Transporter Expression and Function.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Nilay; Slizgi, Jason R; Brouwer, Kim L R

    2017-09-01

    Liver disease can alter the disposition of xenobiotics and endogenous substances. Regulatory agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Evaluation Agency recommend, if possible, studying the effect of liver disease on drugs under development to guide specific dose recommendations in these patients. Although extensive research has been conducted to characterize the effect of liver disease on drug-metabolizing enzymes, emerging data have implicated that the expression and function of hepatobiliary transport proteins also are altered in liver disease. This review summarizes recent developments in the field, which may have implications for understanding altered disposition, safety, and efficacy of new and existing drugs. A brief review of liver physiology and hepatic transporter localization/function is provided. Then, the expression and function of hepatic transporters in cholestasis, hepatitis C infection, hepatocellular carcinoma, human immunodeficiency virus infection, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and primary biliary cirrhosis are reviewed. In the absence of clinical data, nonclinical information in animal models is presented. This review aims to advance the understanding of altered expression and function of hepatic transporters in liver disease and the implications of such changes on drug disposition. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cytochrome P450 genetic polymorphism in neonatal drug metabolism: role and practical consequences towards a new drug culture in neonatology.

    PubMed

    Fanni, D; Ambu, R; Gerosa, C; Nemolato, S; Castagnola, M; Van Eyken, P; Faa, G; Fanos, V

    2014-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 superfamily (CYP450) in humans is formed by 57 functional monooxygenases critical for the metabolism of numerous endogenous and exogenous compounds. The superfamily is organized into 18 families and 44 subfamilies. CYP nomenclature is based on the identity of amino acids. The most important functions of the CYP450 are related to metabolism of endogenous compounds, detoxification of exogenous xenobiotics and decomposition of the vast majority of currently used drugs. The expression of CYP450 enzymes in the human body is characterized by a marked substrate and tissue specificity, the most important being localized in the liver, but also present in kidney, lung, brain, breast, prostate and in the small intestine. The human cytochrome P450 3A gene family (CYP3A) accounts for the largest portion of CYP450 proteins in human liver and includes 4 genes: CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP3A7, CYP3A43. Multiple and complex genetic variations, marked interindividual, interethnic and gender variability have been reported regarding CYP3A isoform expression and activity. Multiple factors may affect CYP3A expression and activity, such as inducers like rifampicin, phenobarbital, 3-methylcholantrene, beta-naphtoflavone, and dexamethasone. The maturation of organ systems, paralleled by ontogeny of drug-metabolizing enzymes during fetal life and in the first months of postnatal life, surely exerts profound effects on drug disposition, probably being the predominant factor accounting for age-associated changes in drug clearance. In fact, drug dosage in the perinatal period represents a continuous challenge for neonatologists. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief review of the pharmacokinetic differences between neonates and adults, showing the peculiarities of liver CYP450-related drug metabolism in the perinatal period and at birth, and to report the toxic mechanisms of liver injury in neonates, due to the most frequently utilized drugs in NICU centers.

  17. Piezotronic-effect enhanced drug metabolism and sensing on a single ZnO nanowire surface with the presence of human cytochrome P450.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Gao, Caizhen; Xue, Fei; Han, Yu; Li, Tao; Cao, Xia; Zhang, Xueji; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-03-24

    Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) enzymes are involved in catalyzing the metabolism of various endogenous and exogenous compounds. A rapid analysis of drug metabolism reactions by CYPs is required because they can metabolize 95% of current drugs in drug development and effective therapies. Here, we describe a study of piezotronic-effect enhanced drug metabolism and sensing by utilizing a single ZnO nanowire (ZnO NW) device. Owing to the unique hydrophobic feature of a ZnO NW that provides a desirable "microenvironment" for the immobilization of biomolecules, our device can effectively stimulate the tolbutamide metabolism by decorating a ZnO NW with cytochrome P4502C9/CYPs reductase (CYP2C9/CPR) microsomes. By applying an external compressive strain to the ZnO nanowire, the piezotronic effect, which plays a primary role in tuning the transport behavior of a ZnO NW utilizing the created piezoelectric polarization charges at the local interface, can effectively enhance the performance of the device. A theoretical model is proposed using an energy band diagram to explain the experimental data. This study provides a potential approach to study drug metabolism and trace drug detection based on the piezotronic effect.

  18. Development of gold-immobilized P450 platform for exploring the effect of oligomer formation on P450-mediated metabolism for in vitro to in vivo drug metabolism predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabulski, Jarod L.

    The cytochrome P450 (P450) enzyme family is responsible for the biotransformation of a wide range of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds, as well as being the major metabolic enzyme in first pass drug metabolism. In vivo drug metabolism for P450 enzymes is predicted using in vitro data obtained from a reconstituted expressed P450 system, but these systems have not always been proven to accurately represent in vivo enzyme kinetics, due to interactions caused by oligomer formation. These in vitro systems use soluble P450 enzymes prone to oligomer formation and studies have shown that increased states of protein aggregation directly affect the P450 enzyme kinetics. We have developed an immobilized enzyme system that isolates the enzyme and can be used to elucidate the effect of P450 aggregation on metabolism kinetics. The long term goal of my research is to develop a tool that will help improve the assessment of pharmaceuticals by better predicting in vivo kinetics in an in vitro system. The central hypothesis of this research is that P450-mediated kinetics measured in vitro is dependent on oligomer formation and that the accurate prediction of in vivo P450-mediated kinetics requires elucidation of the effect of oligomer formation. The rationale is that the development of a P450 bound to a Au platform can be used to control the aggregation of enzymes and bonding to Au may also permit replacement of the natural redox partners with an electrode capable of supplying a constant flow of electrons. This dissertation explains the details of the enzyme attachment, monitoring substrate binding, and metabolism using physiological and electrochemical methods, determination of enzyme kinetics, and the development of an immobilized-P450 enzyme bioreactor. This work provides alternative approaches to studying P450-mediated kinetics, a platform for controlling enzyme aggregation, electrochemically-driven P450 metabolism, and for investigating the effect of protein

  19. The roles of nuclear receptors CAR and PXR in hepatic energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yoshihiro; Negishi, Masahiko; Kodama, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear receptors constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) were originally characterized as transcription factors regulating the hepatic genes that encode drug metabolizing enzymes. Recent works have now revealed that these nuclear receptors also play the critical roles in modulating hepatic energy metabolism. While CAR and PXR directly bind to their response sequences phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module (PBREM) and xenobiotic responsive enhancer module (XREM) in the promoter of target genes to increase drug metabolism, the receptors also cross talk with various hormone responsive transcription factors such as forkhead box O1 (FoxO1), forkhead box A2 (FoxA2), cAMP-response element binding protein, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC 1alpha) to decrease energy metabolism through down-regulating gluconeogenesis, fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis and up-regulating lipogenesis. In addition, CAR modulates thyroid hormone activity by regulating type 1 deiodinase in the regenerating liver. Thus, CAR and PXR are now placed at the crossroad where both xenobiotics and endogenous stimuli co-regulate liver function.

  20. The Conduct of Drug Metabolism Studies Considered Good Practice (I): Analytical Systems and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaodong; Jia, Lee

    2009-01-01

    This review serial outlines practical and scientifically-based approaches to conducting contemporary drug metabolism studies considered good practice for drug development and regulatory filing. The present part addresses analytical methods used in the drug metabolism studies and evaluates advantages and disadvantages of these methods as well as the related sample preparations. The methods described here cover from conventional radioactive labeling of drugs, which includes selection of a proper radioisotope, its labeling position, and modern radio-pharmacokinetics employed in microdosing by using a radionuclide to visualize drug distribution in vivo, to currently widely-used liquid chromatography (LC) in conjunction with mass spectrometry (MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for quantitative detection of metabolites and characterization of their structures. Although the analytical tools have progressed sufficiently to allow determination of metabolites, proper in vitro models and in vivo studies have to be carefully designed in order to understand drug metabolism. Points for consideration when conducting in vivo drug metabolism studies include interspecies differences in systemic exposure and metabolism pathways, identification of the major metabolites and unique human metabolites that become the regulatory focus, local metabolism in addition to liver metabolism, time points for sampling, and synthesis of the authentic metabolites to confirm their formation. The next part of this serial article will focus on in vitro drug metabolism studies. PMID:18220562

  1. Update Information on Drug Metabolism Systems—2009, Part II

    PubMed Central

    Rendic, S.; Guengerich, F.P.

    2014-01-01

    The present paper is an update of the data on the effects of diseases and environmental factors on the expression and/or activity of human cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and transporters. The data are presented in tabular form (Tables 1 and 2) and are a continuation of previously published summaries on the effects of drugs and other chemicals on CYP enzymes. The collected information presented here is as stated by the cited author(s), and in cases when several references are cited the latest published information is included. Inconsistent results and conclusions obtained by different authors are highlighted, followed by discussion of the major findings. The searchable database is available as an Excel file, for information about file availability contact the corresponding author. PMID:20302566

  2. Effect of Aerobic and Resistance Exercise Training on Liver Enzymes and Hepatic Fat in Iranian Men With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shamsoddini, Alireza; Sobhani, Vahid; Ghamar Chehreh, Mohammad Ebrahim; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Zaree, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has different prevalence rates in various parts of the world and is a risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease that could progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the effect of Aerobic Training (AT) and resistance training (RT) on hepatic fat content and liver enzyme levels in Iranian men. Patients and Methods: In a randomized clinical trial study, 30 men with clinically defined NAFLD were allocated into three groups (aerobic, resistance and control). An aerobic group program consisted of 45 minutes of aerobic exercise at 60% - 75% maximum heart rate intensity, a resistance group performed seven resistance exercises at intensity of 50% - 70% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM ) and the control group had no exercise training program during the study. Before and after training, anthropometry, insulin sensitivity, liver enzymes and hepatic fat were elevated. Results: After training, hepatic fat content was markedly reduced, to a similar extent, in both the aerobic and resistance exercise training groups (P ≤ 0.05). In the two exercise training groups, alanine amino transferase and aspartate amino transferase serum levels were significantly decreased compared to the control group (P = 0.002) and (P = 0.02), respectively. Moreover, body fat (%), fat mass (kg), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (HOMI-IR) were all improved in the AT and RT. These changes in the AT group were independent of weight loss. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that RT and AT are equally effective in reducing hepatic fat content and liver enzyme levels among patients with NAFLD. However, aerobic exercise specifically improves NAFLD independent of any change in body weight. PMID:26587039

  3. Fisetin improves glucose homeostasis through the inhibition of gluconeogenic enzymes in hepatic tissues of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Prasath, Gopalan Sriram; Pillai, Subramanian Iyyam; Subramanian, Sorimuthu Pillai

    2014-10-05

    Liver plays a vital role in blood glucose homeostasis. Recent studies have provided considerable evidence that hepatic glucose production (HGP) plays an important role in the development of fasting hyperglycemia in diabetes. From this perspective, diminution of HGP has certainly been considered for the treatment of diabetes. In the present study, we have analyzed the modulatory effects of fisetin, a flavonoid of strawberries, on the expression of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in STZ induced experimental diabetic rats. The physiological criterions such as food and fluid intake were regularly monitored. The levels of blood glucose, plasma insulin, hemoglobin and glycosylated hemoglobin were analyzed. The mRNA and protein expression levels of gluconeogenic genes such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) were determined by immunoblot as well as PCR analysis. Diabetic group of rats showed significant increase in food and water intake when compared with control group of rats. Upon oral administration of fisetin as well as gliclazide to diabetic group of rats, the levels were found to be decreased. Oral administration of fisetin (10 mg/kg body weight) to diabetic rats for 30 days established a significant decline in blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels and a significant increase in plasma insulin level. The mRNA and protein expression levels of gluconeogenic genes, such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), were decreased in liver tissues upon treatment with fisetin. The results of the present study suggest that fisetin improves glucose homeostasis by direct inhibition of gluconeogenesis in liver. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Boswellia serrata supplementation on blood lipid, hepatic enzymes and fructosamine levels in type2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is an endocrine disorder that affects a large percentage of patients. High blood glucose causes fatty deposits in the liver which is likely to increase in SGOT and SGPT activities. Significant increase in SGOT/SGPT and low HDL levels is observed in patients with diabetes. Serum fructosamine concentration reflects the degree of blood glucose control in diabetic patients. This study was aimed to investigate the antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and hepatoprotective effects of supplementation of Boswellia serrata in type2 diabetic patients. Methods 60 type 2 diabetic patients from both sexes (30 males and 30 females) were dedicated to the control and intervention groups (30 subjects per group). Boswellia serrata gum resin in amount of 900 mg daily for 6 weeks were orally administered (as three 300 mg doses) in intervention group and the control group did not receive anything. Blood samples were taken at the beginning of the study and after 6 weeks. Blood levels of fructosamine, lipid profiles as well as hepatic enzyme in type 2 diabetic patients were measured. Results Treatment of diabetic patient with Boswellia serrata was caused to significant increase in blood HDL levels as well as a remarkable decrease in cholesterol, LDL, fructosamine (p < 0.05) SGPT and SGOT levels after 6 weeks (p < 0.01). In spite of reduction of serum triglyceride, VLDL levels in intervention group, we did not detect a significant difference after 6 weeks. Conclusion This study showed that Boswellia serrata supplementation can be beneficial in controlling blood parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, its use can be useful in patients with medicines. PMID:24495344

  5. Fulminant hepatitis and fatal toxic epidermal necrolysis (Lyell disease) coincident with clarithromycin administration in an alcoholic patient receiving disulfiram therapy.

    PubMed

    Masiá, Mar; Gutiérrez, Félix; Jimeno, Araceli; Navarro, Andrés; Borrás, Joaquín; Matarredona, Jaime; Martín-Hidalgo, Alberto

    2002-02-25

    Disulfiram is widely used in the treatment of chronic alcoholism. Adverse drug reactions with fatal outcome following disulfiram therapy are infrequent, and hepatic failure accounts for most of them. Since disulfiram is a cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme system inhibitor, numerous interactions with several drugs metabolized in the liver have been reported. Like disulfiram, clarithromycin inhibits a CYP450 isoenzyme, but, despite its widespread use for the treatment of respiratory tract infections, no interactions with disulfiram have been described as yet. We report a case of fatal toxic epidermal necrolysis (Lyell disease) and fulminant hepatitis shortly after starting treatment with clarithromycin in a patient who was receiving disulfiram. This is the first case of such a severe dermatosis in a patient receiving either disulfiram or clarithromycin therapy. The temporal relationship between drug administration and clinical symptoms in this case suggests a probable interaction between the 2 drugs.

  6. Profiles in drug metabolism and toxicology: Richard Tecwyn Williams (1909-1979).

    PubMed

    Jones, Alan Wayne

    2015-01-01

    This article pays homage to the life and work of a veritable pioneer in toxicology and drug metabolism, namely a Welshman, Richard Tecwyn Williams, FRS. Professor Williams, or RT as he was known, made major contributions to knowledge about the metabolism and toxicology of drugs and xenobiotics during a scientific career spanning nearly 50 years. Author or coauthor of close to 400 research articles and reviews, including a classic book, entitled Detoxication Mechanisms, Williams and his research school investigated virtually all aspects of drug metabolism, especially conjugations. In particular, the concepts of phase 1 and phase II metabolic pathways were introduced by Williams; the biliary excretion of drugs was extensively studied as were species differences in drug metabolism and detoxication. Besides investigating the metabolism of many pharmaceutical drugs, such as sulfonamides and thalidomide, Williams and his group investigated the disposition and fate in the body of organic pesticides and recreational drugs of abuse, such as amphetamine, methamphetamine and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD).

  7. Effect of Pterocarpus santalinus bark, on blood glucose, serum lipids, plasma insulin and hepatic carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kondeti, Vinay Kumar; Badri, Kameswara Rao; Maddirala, Dilip Rajasekhar; Thur, Sampath Kumar Mekala; Fatima, Shaik Sameena; Kasetti, Ramesh Babu; Rao, Chippada Appa

    2010-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of bark of Pterocarpus santalinus, an ethnomedicinal plant, on blood glucose, plasma insulin, serum lipids and the activities of hepatic glucose metabolizing enzymes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were treated (acute/short-term and long-term) with ethyl acetate:methanol fractions of ethanolic extract of the bark of P. santalinus. Fasting blood glucose, HbA(1C), plasma insulin and protein were estimated before and after the treatment, along with hepatic glycogen, and activities of hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Further anti-hyperlipidemic activity was studied by measuring the levels of serum lipids and lipoproteins. Phytochemical analysis of active fraction showed the presence of flavonoids, glycosides and phenols. Biological testing of the active fraction demonstrated a significant antidiabetic activity by reducing the elevated blood glucose levels and glycosylated hemoglobin, improving hyperlipidemia and restoring the insulin levels in treated experimental induced diabetic rats. Further elucidation of mechanism of action showed improvement in the hepatic carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes after the treatment. Our present investigation suggests that active fraction of ethanolic extract of bark of P. santalinus decreases streptozotocin induced hyperglycemia by increasing glycolysis and decreasing gluconeogenesis. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Micropatterned coculture of hepatocytes on electrospun fibers as a potential in vitro model for predictive drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaowen; Wei, Jiaojun; Lu, Jinfu; Lei, Dongmei; Yan, Shili; Li, Xiaohong

    2016-06-01

    The liver is the major organ of importance to determine drug dispositions in the body, thus the development of hepatocyte culture systems is of great scientific and practical interests to provide reliable and predictable models for in vitro drug screening. In the current study, to address the challenges of a rapid function loss of primary hepatocytes, the coculture of hepatocytes with fibroblasts and endothelial cells (Hep-Fib-EC) was established on micropatterned fibrous scaffolds. Liver-specific functions, such as the albumin secretion and urea synthesis, were well maintained in the coculture system, accompanied by a rapid formation of multicellular hepatocyte spheroids. The activities of phase I (CYP3A11 and CYP2C9) and phase II enzymes indicated a gradual increase for cocultured hepatocytes, and a maximum level was achieved after 5 days and maintained throughout 15 days of culture. The metabolism testing on model drugs indicated that the scaled clearance rates for hepatocytes in the Hep-Fib-EC coculture system were significantly higher than those of other culture methods, and a linear regression analysis indicated good correlations between the observed data of rats and in vitro predicted values during 15 days of culture. In addition, the enzyme activities and drug clearance rates of hepatocytes in the Hep-Fib-EC coculture model experienced sensitive responsiveness to the inducers and inhibitors of metabolizing enzymes. These results demonstrated the feasibility of micropatterned coculture of hepatocytes as a potential in vitro testing model for the prediction of in vivo drug metabolism.

  9. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of a gene encoding cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase into hamsters increases hepatic enzyme activity and reduces plasma total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Spady, D K; Cuthbert, J A; Willard, M N; Meidell, R S

    1995-01-01

    Clinical interventions that accelerate conversion of cholesterol to bile acids reduce circulating low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations. The initial and rate-limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway is catalyzed by hepatic cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase. To examine the effects of transient primary overexpression of this enzyme on sterol metabolism and lipoprotein transport, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus in which a cDNA encoding rat 7 alpha-hydroxylase is expressed from the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter (AdCMV7 alpha). Syrian hamsters administered AdCMV7 alpha intravenously accumulated transgene-specific mRNA in the liver and demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in hepatic microsomal 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity. The increased conversion of cholesterol to bile acids resulted in a compensatory increase in hepatic cholesterol synthesis. In addition, overexpression of 7 alpha-hydroxylase reduced the rate of LDL cholesterol entry into the plasma space and, in animals maintained on a Western-type diet, restored hepatic LDL receptor expression. As a consequence, plasma LDL concentrations fell by approximately 60% in animals maintained on control diet and by approximately 75% in animals consuming a Western-type diet. Plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were reduced to a lesser degree. These results demonstrate that transient upregulation of bile acid synthesis by direct transfer of a 7 alpha-hydroxylase gene favorably alters circulating lipoprotein profiles and suggest one potential molecular target for genetic strategies aimed at reducing cardiovascular risk. Images PMID:7635963

  10. Relative potency based on hepatic enzyme induction predicts immunosuppressive effects of a mixture of PCDDS/PCDFS and PCBS

    SciTech Connect

    Smialowicz, R.J.; DeVito, M.J. Williams, W.C.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    2008-03-15

    The toxic equivalency factor (TEF) approach was employed to compare immunotoxic potency of mixtures containing polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans and polychlorinated biphenyls relative to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), using the antibody response to sheep erythrocytes (SRBC). Mixture-1 (MIX-1) contained TCDD, 1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (PeCDD), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF), 1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (1-PeCDF), 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (4-PeCDF), and 1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9-octachlorodibenzofuran (OCDF). Mixture-2 (MIX-2) contained MIX-1 and the following PCBs, 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (IUPAC No. 77), 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (126), 3,3',4,4',5,5N-hexachlorobiphenyl (169), 2,3,3',4,4'-pentachlorobiphenyl (105), 2,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (118), and 2,3,3',4,4',5-hexachlorobiphenyl (156). The mixture compositions were based on relative chemical concentrations in food and human tissues. TCDD equivalents (TEQ) of the mixture were estimated using relative potency factors from hepatic enzyme induction in mice [DeVito, M.J., Diliberto, J.J., Ross, D.G., Menache, M.G., Birnbaum, L.S., 1997. Dose-response relationships for polyhalogenated dioxins and dibenzofurans following subchronic treatment in mice. I .CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 enzyme activity in liver, lung and skin. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 130, 197-208; DeVito, M.J., Menache, G., Diliberto, J.J., Ross, D.G., Birnbaum L.S., 2000. Dose-response relationships for induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 enzyme activity in liver, lung, and skin in female mice following subchronic exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 167, 157-172] Female mice received 0, 1.5, 15, 150 or 450 ng TCDD/kg/day or approximately 0, 1.5, 15, 150 or 450 ng TEQ/kg/day of MIX-1 or MIX-2 by gavage 5 days per week for 13 weeks. Mice were immunized 3 days after the last exposure and 4 days later, body, spleen, thymus, and liver weights were measured

  11. Comparison of minipig, dog, monkey and human drug metabolism and disposition.

    PubMed

    Dalgaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the drug metabolism and disposition (ADME) characteristics of the most common non-rodent species used in toxicity testing of drugs (minipigs, dogs, and monkeys) and compares these to human characteristics with regard to enzymes mediating the metabolism of drugs and the transport proteins which contribute to the absorption, distribution and excretion of drugs. Literature on ADME and regulatory guidelines of relevance in drug development of small molecules has been gathered. Non-human primates (monkeys) are the species that is closest to humans in terms of genetic homology. Dogs have an advantage due to the ready availability of comprehensive background data for toxicological safety assessment and dogs are easy to handle. Pigs have been used less than dogs and monkeys as a model in safety assessment of drug candidates. However, when a drug candidate is metabolised by aldehyde oxidase (AOX1), N-acetyltransferases (NAT1 and NAT2) or cytochrome (CYP2C9-like) enzymes which are not expressed in dogs, but are present in pigs, this species may be a better choice than dogs, provided that adequate exposure can be obtained in pigs. Conversely, pigs might not be the right choice if sulfation, involving 3-phospho-adenosyl-5-phosphosulphate sulphotransferase (PAPS) is an important pathway in the human metabolism of a drug candidate. In general, the species selection should be based on comparison between in vitro studies with human cell-based systems and animal-cell-based systems. Results from pharmacokinetic studies are also important for decision-making by establishing the obtainable exposure level in the species. Access to genetically humanized mouse models and highly sensitive analytical methods (accelerator mass spectrometry) makes it possible to improve the chance of finding all metabolites relevant for humans before clinical trials have been initiated and, if necessary, to include another animal species before long term toxicity studies are

  12. Lack of effect of spinal anesthesia on drug metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, E.; Wood, A.J.; Shay, S.; Wood, M. )

    1989-09-01

    The effect of spinal anesthesia on drug disposition was determined in six dogs with chronically implanted vascular catheters using propranolol as a model compound. On the first study day, 40 mg of unlabeled propranolol and 200 microCi of (3H)propranolol were injected into the portal and femoral veins respectively. Arterial blood samples were taken for 4 hr for measurement of plasma concentrations of labeled and unlabeled propranolol by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and of (3H)propranolol by liquid scintillation counting of the HPLC eluant corresponding to each propranolol peak. Twenty-four hr later, spinal anesthesia was induced with tetracaine (mean dose 20.7 +/- 0.6 mg) with low sacral to midthoracic levels and the propranolol infusions and sampling were then repeated. Spinal anesthesia had no significant effect on either the intrinsic clearance of propranolol (2.01 +/- 0.75 L/min before and 1.9 +/- 0.7 L/min during spinal anesthesia), or on mean hepatic plasma flow (2.01 +/- 0.5 L/min before and 1.93 +/- 0.5 L/min during spinal anesthesia). The systemic clearance and elimination half-life of propranolol were also unchanged by spinal anesthesia (0.9 +/- 0.23 L/min on the first day, 0.7 +/- 0.1 L/min during spinal anesthesia; and 101 +/- 21 min on the first day, 115 +/- 16 min during spinal anesthesia, respectively). The volume of distribution (Vd) of propranolol was similarly unaffected by spinal anesthesia.

  13. Chromium–Insulin Reduces Insulin Clearance and Enhances Insulin Signaling by Suppressing Hepatic Insulin-Degrading Enzyme and Proteasome Protein Expression in KKAy Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhong Q.; Yu, Yongmei; Zhang, Xian H.; Komorowski, James

    2014-01-01

    JDS–chromium–insulin (CRI)-003 is a novel form of insulin that has been directly conjugated with chromium (Cr) instead of zinc. Our hypothesis was that CRI enhances insulin’s effects by altering insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) and proteasome enzymes. To test this hypothesis, we measured hepatic IDE content and proteasome parameters in a diabetic animal model. Male KKAy mice were randomly divided into three groups (n = 8/group); Sham (saline), human regular insulin (Reg-In), and chromium conjugated human insulin (CRI), respectively. Interventions were initiated at doses of 2 U insulin/kg body weight daily for 8-weeks. Plasma glucose and insulin were measured. Hepatic IDE, proteasome, and insulin signaling proteins were determined by western blotting. Insulin tolerance tests at week 7 showed that both insulin treatments significantly reduced glucose concentrations and increased insulin levels compared with the Sham group, CRI significantly reduced glucose at 4 and 6 h relative to Reg-In (P < 0.05), suggesting the effects of CRI on reducing glucose last longer than Reg-In. CRI treatment significantly increased hepatic IRS-1 and Akt1 and reduced IDE, 20S as well as 19S protein abundance (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, and P < 0.001, respectively), but Reg-In only significantly increased Akt1 (P < 0.05). Similar results were also observed in Reg-In- and CRI-treated HepG2 cells. This study, for the first time, demonstrates that CRI reduces plasma insulin clearance by inhibition of hepatic IDE protein expression and enhances insulin signaling as well as prevents degradation of IRS-1 and IRS-2 by suppressing ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in diabetic mice. PMID:25071716

  14. Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... related side effects. The hepatic function panel evaluates: Alanine aminotransferase (ALT). This enzyme, found in the liver, ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Mononucleosis Hepatitis Blood Test: Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT, or SGPT) Blood Test: Aspartate Aminotransferase ( ...

  15. Modulation of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 hepatic enzymes after oral administration of Chios mastic gum to male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Katsanou, Efrosini S; Kyriakopoulou, Katerina; Emmanouil, Christina; Fokialakis, Nikolas; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Machera, Kyriaki

    2014-01-01

    Chios mastic gum (CMG), a resin derived from Pistacia lentiscus var. chia, is known since ancient times for its pharmacological activities. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 enzymes are among the most involved in the biotransformation of chemicals and the metabolic activation of pro-carcinogens. Previous studies referring to the modulation of these enzymes by CMG have revealed findings of unclear biological and toxicological significance. For this purpose, the modulation of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 enzymes in the liver of male Wistar rats following oral administration of CMG extract (CMGE), at the levels of mRNA and CYP1A1 enzyme activity, was compared to respective enzyme modulation following oral administration of a well-known bioactive natural product, caffeine, as control compound known to involve hepatic enzymes in its metabolism. mRNA levels of Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 were measured by reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction and their relative quantification was calculated. CYP1A1 enzyme induction was measured through the activity of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD). The results indicated that administration of CMGE at the recommended pharmaceutical dose does not induce significant transcriptional modulation of Cyp1a1/2 and subsequent enzyme activity induction of CYP1A1 while effects of the same order of magnitude were observed in the same test system following the administration of caffeine at the mean daily consumed levels. The outcome of this study further confirms the lack of any toxicological or biological significance of the specific findings on liver following the administration of CMGE.

  16. Role of interleukin-1 in the depression of liver drug metabolism by endotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Ghezzi, P; Saccardo, B; Villa, P; Rossi, V; Bianchi, M; Dinarello, C A

    1986-01-01

    Endotoxin-resistant C3H/HeJ mice were used to test the hypothesis that a macrophage product, possibly interleukin-1, might mediate the depression of liver cytochrome P-450-dependent drug metabolism in endotoxin-treated mice. Depression of liver drug metabolism by endotoxin was observed in normal mice (C3H/HeN) but not in C3H/HeJ mice. Serum transfer experiments demonstrated that a serum factor was responsible for the depression of liver drug metabolism. Experiments of passive transfer of peritoneal macrophages showed that this endotoxin-induced factor might be a macrophage product. In vitro experiments showed that endotoxin-stimulated monocytes produced a factor that depressed cytochrome P-450-dependent metabolism in cultured hepatocytes. Homogeneous human monocyte and recombinant interleukin-1 also depressed liver drug metabolism both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that this macrophage product might be involved in the regulation of liver function by the immune system. PMID:3491050

  17. Bimodal targeting of microsomal cytochrome P450s to mitochondria: implications in drug metabolism and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sangar, Michelle C; Bansal, Seema

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Microsomal cytochrome P450s are critical for drug metabolism and toxicity. Recent studies show that these CYPs are also present in the mitochondrial compartment of human and rodent tissues. Mitochondrial CYP1A1 and 2E1 show both overlapping and distinct metabolic activities compared to microsomal forms. Mitochondrial CYP2E1 also induces oxidative stress. The mechanisms of mitochondria targeting of CYPs and their role in drug metabolism and toxicity are important factors to consider while determining the drug dose and in drug development. Areas covered in this review This review highlights the mechanisms of bimodal targeting of CYP1A1, 2B1, 2E1 and 2D6 to mitochondria and microsomes. The review also discusses differences in structure and func