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  1. Hepatic Encephalopathy due to Congenital Multiple Intrahepatic Portosystemic Venous Shunts Successfully Treated by Percutaneous Transhepatic Obliteration

    PubMed Central

    Takenaga, Shinsuke; Narita, Kenichi; Matsui, Yo; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy due to intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunts (IPSVS) in a non-cirrhotic condition is rare. Here we report a rare case of a patient with congenital multiple IPSVS successfully treated by percutaneous transhepatic obliteration. The patient was a 67-year-old woman who presented to our hospital with progressive episodes of consciousness disorder and vomiting. Laboratory tests revealed hyperammonemia (192.0 μg/dL), and computed tomography revealed multiple IPSVS in both lobes. There was no evidence of underlying liver disease or hepatic trauma. Transcatheter embolization for IPSVS was performed because conservative therapy was not sufficiently effective. After endovascular shunt closure, hepatic encephalopathy improved. The serum ammonia level normalized during the 5-year follow-up period. Thus, transcatheter embolization may be an effective therapy for patients with symptomatic and refractory IPSVS. Careful follow-up is necessary for portal hypertension-related complications after transcatheter embolization for IPSVS. PMID:27990104

  2. Combination therapy using PSE and TIO ameliorates hepatic encephalopathy due to intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt in idiopathic portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Seiichiro; Ito, Hiroyuki; Takashimizu, Shinji; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Hasebe, Terumitsu

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman treated for anemia and ascites exhibited hepatic encephalopathy. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) showed communication between the portal vein and the middle hepatic vein, indicating an intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt (PSS). Since hepatic encephalopathy of the patient was resistant to medical treatment, interventional radiology was performed for the treatment of shunt obliteration. Hepatic venography showed anastomosis between the hepatic vein branches, supporting the diagnosis of idiopathic portal hypertension (IPH). To minimize the increase in portal vein pressure after shunt obliteration, partial splenic artery embolization (PSE) was first performed to reduce portal vein blood flow. Transileocolic venous obliteration (TIO) was then performed, and intrahepatic PSS was successfully obliterated using coils with n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA). In the present case, hepatic encephalopathy due to intrahepatic PSS in the patient with IPH was successfully treated by combination therapy using PSE and TIO. PMID:27651930

  3. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    ... is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain function in people with advanced liver disease. When ... travel through your body until they reach your brain, causing mental and physical symptoms of HE. Hepatic ...

  4. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Zamora Nava, Luis Eduardo; Torre Delgadillo, Aldo

    2011-06-01

    The term minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) refers to the subtle changes in cognitive function, electrophysiological parameters, cerebral neurochemical/neurotransmitter homeostasis, cerebral blood flow, metabolism, and fluid homeostasis that can be observed in patients with cirrhosis who have no clinical evidence of hepatic encephalopathy; the prevalence is as high as 84% in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. Physician does generally not perceive cirrhosis complications, and neuropsychological tests and another especial measurement like evoked potentials and image studies like positron emission tomography can only make diagnosis. Diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy may have prognostic and therapeutic implications in cirrhotic patients. The present review pretends to explore the clinic, therapeutic, diagnosis and prognostic aspects of this complication.

  5. Management of covert hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Waghray, Abhijeet; Waghray, Nisheet; Mullen, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a reversible progressive neuropsychiatric disorder that encompasses a wide clinical spectrum. Covert hepatic encephalopathy is defined as patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy and Grade I encephalopathy by West-Haven Criteria. Terminology such as "sub-clinical", "latent", and "minimal" appear to trivialize the disease and have been replaced by the term covert. The lack of clinical signs means that covert hepatic encephalopathy is rarely recognized or treated outside of clinical trials with options for therapy based on patients with episodic hepatic encephalopathy. This review discusses the current available options for therapy in covert hepatic encephalopathy and focuses on non-absorbable disacharides (lactulose or lactitol), antibiotics (rifaximin), probiotics/synbiotics and l-ornithine-l-aspartate.

  6. Current pathogenetic aspects of hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Cichoż-Lach, Halina; Michalak, Agata

    2013-01-07

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a medical phenomenon that is described as a neuropsychiatric manifestation of chronic or acute liver disease that is characterized by psychomotor, intellectual and cognitive abnormalities with emotional/affective and behavioral disturbances. This article focuses on the underlying mechanisms of the condition and the differences between hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious condition that can cause neurological death with brain edema and intracranial hypertension. It is assumed that approximately 60%-80% of patients with liver cirrhosis develop hepatic encephalopathy. This review explores the complex mechanisms that lead to hepatic encephalopathy. However, noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is not associated with hepatic diseases and has a completely different etiology. Noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a severe occurrence that is connected with multiple pathogeneses.

  7. Challenges in diagnosing hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Weissenborn, K

    2015-02-01

    The term "hepatic encephalopathy" (HE) covers the neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with acute, chronic and acute-on-chronic liver disease (CLD). This paper deals with clinical features and diagnosis of HE in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension or porto-systemic shunts. The possible impact of concomitant disorders and the cirrhosis underlying liver disease upon brain function is described emphasizing the need of a detailed diagnostic work up of every individual case before diagnosing HE. Currently used methods for diagnosing minimal or covert hepatic encephalopathy are compared with regard to their sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing HE against the background of a multitude of concomitant disorders and diseases that could contribute to brain dysfunction.

  8. GABAergic transmission in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Olga A

    2013-08-15

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE)(1) is a neuropsychiatric disorder caused by chronic or acute liver failure. Nearly thirty years ago a hypothesis was formulated explaining the neuropathology of HE by increased GABAergic tone. Recent progress in the GABAA-receptor (GABAAR) molecular pharmacology and biochemistry as well as the physiology of GABAergic transmission provided better understanding of GABA's role in health and disease. A detailed analysis of neuronal populations and their GABAergic afferents affected in HE is still missing. The slow progress in understanding the pathology of GABAergic transmission in HE is due to the high complexity of brain circuitries controlled by multiple types of GABAergic interneurons and the large variety of GABAAR, which are differently affected by pathological conditions and not yet fully identified. The mechanisms of action of the GABAAR agonist taurine, allosteric positive modulators (inhibitory neurosteroids, anaesthetics, benzodiazepines and histamine) and inhibitors of the GABAAR (excitatory neurosteroids, Ro15-4513) are discussed with respect to HE pathophysiology. Perspectives for GABAergic drugs in the symptomatic treatment of HE are suggested.

  9. Nutritional support in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Mizock, B A

    1999-03-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a syndrome of global cerebral dysfunction resulting from underlying liver disease or portal-systemic shunting. HE can present as one of four syndromes, depending on the rapidity of onset of hepatic failure and the presence or absence of preexisting liver disease. The precise pathogenesis is unknown but likely involves impaired hepatic detoxification of ammonia as well as alterations in brain transport and metabolism of amino acids and amines. The etiology of malnutrition in hepatic failure is multifactorial. Nutritional deficits may be clinically manifest as marasmus or kwashiorkor, or both. Nutritional support in HE is directed toward reducing morbidity related to underlying malnutrition and concurrent disease. However, reaching nutritional goals is often complicated by protein and carbohydrate intolerance. The use of protein restriction in HE is controversial. Modified formulas that are supplemented in branched chain amino acids may be of value in patients who exhibit protein intolerance with standard feeding solutions or in patients who present with advanced degrees of encephalopathy.

  10. Rifaximin in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Iadevaia, Maddalena Diana; Prete, Anna Del; Cesaro, Claudia; Gaeta, Laura; Zulli, Claudio; Loguercio, Carmelina

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a challenging complication in patients with advanced liver disease. It can be defined as a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by portosystemic venous shunting, ranging from minimal to overt hepatic encephalopathy or coma. Its pathophysiology is still unclear, although increased levels of ammonia play a key role. Diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy is currently based on specific tests evaluating the neuropsychiatric state of patients and their quality of life; the severity of hepatic encephalopathy is measured by the West Haven criteria. Treatment of hepatic encephalopathy consists of pharmacological and corrective measures, as well as nutritional interventions. Rifaximin received approval for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in 2010 because of its few side effects and pharmacological benefits. The aim of this work is to review the use and efficacy of rifaximin both in acute and long-term management of hepatic encephalopathy. Treatment of overt hepatic encephalopathy involves management of the acute episode as well as maintenance of remission in those patients who have previously experienced an episode, in order to improve their quality of life. The positive effect of rifaximin in reducing health care costs is also discussed. PMID:24367227

  11. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy: A review.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Taylor, Alexandra C; Höller, Yvonne; Brigo, Francesco; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-10-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the earliest form of hepatic encephalopathy and can affect up to 80% of patients with liver cirrhosis. By definition, MHE is characterized by cognitive function impairment in the domains of attention, vigilance and integrative function, but obvious clinical manifestation are lacking. MHE has been shown to affect daily functioning, quality of life, driving and overall mortality. The diagnosis can be achieved through neuropsychological testing, recently developed computerized psychometric tests, such as the critical flicker frequency and the inhibitory control tests, as well as neurophysiological procedures. Event related potentials can reveal subtle changes in patients with normal neuropsychological performances. Spectral analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) and quantitative analysis of sleep EEG provide early markers of cerebral dysfunction in cirrhotic patients with MHE. Neuroimaging, in particular MRI, also increasingly reveals diffuse abnormalities in intrinsic brain activity and altered organization of functional connectivity networks. Medical treatment for MHE to date has been focused on reducing serum ammonia levels and includes non-absorbable disaccharides, probiotics or rifaximin. Liver transplantation may not reverse the cognitive deficits associated with MHE. We performed here an updated review on epidemiology, burden and quality of life, neuropsychological testing, neuroimaging, neurophysiology and therapy in subjects with MHE.

  12. CLIF-SOFA score and SIRS are independent prognostic factors in patients with hepatic encephalopathy due to alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Hee; Park, In Sung; Kim, Dong Hoon; Kim, Seong Chun; Kang, Changwoo; Lee, Soo Hoon; Kim, Tae Yun; Lee, Sang Bong

    2016-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complication associated with worst prognosis in decompensated liver cirrhosis (LC) patients. Previous studies have identified prognostic factors for HE, and recent studies reported an association between systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and liver disease. This study aimed to identify prognostic factors for 30-day mortality in alcoholic LC patients with HE who visited the emergency department (ED).This was a retrospective study of alcoholic LC patients with HE from January 1, 2010, to April 30, 2015. The baseline characteristics, complications of portal hypertension, laboratory values, Child-Pugh class, Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, chronic liver failure-sequential organ failure assessment (CLIF-SOFA) score, and SIRS criteria were assessed. The presence of 2 or more SIRS criteria was considered SIRS. The primary outcomes were 30-day mortality and prognostic factors for patients with HE visiting the ED.In total, 105 patients who met the inclusion criteria were analyzed. Overall, the 30-day mortality rate was 6.7% (7 patients).Significant variables were hepatorenal syndrome, international normalized ratio, white blood cell count, total bilirubin level, MELD score CLIF-SOFA score, and SIRS in univariate analysis. CLIF-SOFA score and SIRS were the significant factors in the multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 5.56, 15.98; 95% confidence interval 1.18-26.18, 1.58-161.37; P = 0.03, P = 0.02). The mortality rates differed according to the CLIF-SOFA score (P < 0.01).The CLIF-SOFA score and SIRS in alcoholic LC patients with HE visiting the ED are independent predictors of 30-day mortality.

  13. [Clinical importance and diagnostic methods of minimal hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Stawicka, Agnieszka; Zbrzeźniak, Justyna; Świderska, Aleksandra; Kilisińska, Natalia; Świderska, Magdalena; Jaroszewicz, Jerzy; Flisiak, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) encompasses a number of neuropsychological and neurophysiological disorders in patients suffering from liver cirrhosis, who do not display abnormalities during a medical interview or physical examination. A negative influence of MHE on the quality of life of patients suffering from liver cirrhosis was confirmed, which include retardation of ability of operating motor vehicles and disruption of multiple health-related areas, as well as functioning in the society. The data on frequency of traffic offences and accidents amongst patients diagnosed with MHE in comparison to patients diagnosed with liver cirrhosis without MHE, as well as healthy persons is alarming. Those patients are unaware of their disorder and retardation of their ability to operate vehicles, therefore it is of utmost importance to define this group. The term minimal hepatic encephalopathy (formerly "subclinical" encephalopathy) erroneously suggested the unnecessity of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in patients with liver cirrhosis. Diagnosing MHE is an important predictive factor for occurrence of overt encephalopathy - more than 50% of patients with this diagnosis develop overt encephalopathy during a period of 30 months after. Early diagnosing MHE gives a chance to implement proper treatment which can be a prevention of overt encephalopathy. Due to continuing lack of clinical research there exist no commonly agreed-upon standards for definition, diagnostics, classification and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. This article introduces the newest findings regarding the importance of MHE, scientific recommendations and provides detailed descriptions of the most valuable diagnostic methods.

  14. Hepatic encephalopathy therapy: An overview.

    PubMed

    Riggio, Oliviero; Ridola, Lorenzo; Pasquale, Chiara

    2010-04-06

    Type-C hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a severe complication of cirrhosis, which seriously affects quality of life and is strongly related to patient survival. Treatment based on a classical pharmacological approach that is aimed at reducing the production of gut-derived toxins, such as ammonia, is still under debate. Currently, results obtained from clinical trials do not support any specific treatment for HE and our competence in testing old and new treatment modalities by randomized controlled trials with appropriate clinically relevant end-points urgently needs to be improved. On the other hand, patients who are at risk for HE are now identifiable, based on studies on the natural history of the disease. Today, very few studies that are specifically aimed at establishing whether HE may be prevented are available or in progress. Recent studies have looked at non absorbable disaccharides or antibiotics and other treatment modalities, such as the modulation of intestinal flora. In the treatment of severe stage HE, artificial liver supports have been tested with initial positive results but more studies are needed.

  15. Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy Impairs Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Swastik; Umapathy, Sridharan; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2015-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the mildest form of the spectrum of neurocognitive impairment in cirrhosis. It is a frequent occurrence in patients of cirrhosis and is detectable only by specialized neurocognitive testing. MHE is a clinically significant disorder which impairs daily functioning, driving performance, work capability and learning ability. It also predisposes to the development of overt hepatic encephalopathy, increased falls and increased mortality. This results in impaired quality of life for the patient as well as significant social and economic burden for health providers and care givers. Early detection and treatment of MHE with ammonia lowering therapy can reverse MHE and improve quality of life. PMID:26041957

  16. Hepatic encephalopathy associated with hepatic lipidosis in llamas (Lama glama).

    PubMed

    Pillitteri, C A; Craig, L E

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy has been listed as a differential for llamas displaying neurologic signs, but it has not been histopathologically described. This report details the neurologic histopathologic findings associated with 3 cases of hepatic lipidosis with concurrent neurologic signs and compares them to 3 cases of hepatic lipidosis in the absence of neurologic signs and 3 cases without hepatic lipidosis. Brain from all 3 llamas displaying neurologic signs contained Alzheimer type II cells, which were not detected in either subset of llamas without neurologic signs. Astrocytic immunohistochemical staining intensity for glial fibrillary acid protein was decreased in llamas with neurologic signs as compared to 2 of 3 llamas with hepatic lipidosis and without neurologic signs and to 2 of 3 llamas without hepatic lipidosis. Immunohistochemical staining for S100 did not vary between groups. These findings suggest that hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with hepatic lipidosis in llamas.

  17. Value of plasmapheresis in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Riviello, J J; Halligan, G E; Dunn, S P; Widzer, S J; Foley, C M; Breningstall, G N; Grover, W D

    1990-01-01

    Plasmapheresis is used for treating the complications of liver failure. We performed plasmapheresis on 6 children with hepatic encephalopathy resulting from acute hepatic failure and prospectively assessed its effects on neurologic and electrophysiologic (electroencephalography and evoked potentials) function. Clinical improvement was observed in 3 of 6 patients; changes in the serum ammonia value or the results of initial electrophysiologic tests did not predict the patient response. Two patients underwent transplantation after neurologic improvement was produced by plasmapheresis; however, despite plasmapheresis, 4 patients progressed to brain death. Our data demonstrate that plasmapheresis may transiently improve the encephalopathy of acute hepatic failure but is not curative alone. Therefore, plasmapheresis may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of liver failure, potentially improving the pretransplantation status of the patient.

  18. Qualifying and quantifying minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Marsha Y; Amodio, Piero; Cook, Nicola A; Jackson, Clive D; Kircheis, Gerald; Lauridsen, Mette M; Montagnese, Sara; Schiff, Sami; Weissenborn, Karin

    2016-12-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy is the term applied to the neuropsychiatric status of patients with cirrhosis who are unimpaired on clinical examination but show alterations in neuropsychological tests exploring psychomotor speed/executive function and/or in neurophysiological variables. There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of this syndrome. As these patients have, by definition, no recognizable clinical features of brain dysfunction, the primary prerequisite for the diagnosis is careful exclusion of clinical symptoms and signs. A large number of psychometric tests/test systems have been evaluated in this patient group. Of these the best known and validated is the Portal Systemic Hepatic Encephalopathy Score (PHES) derived from a test battery of five paper and pencil tests; normative reference data are available in several countries. The electroencephalogram (EEG) has been used to diagnose hepatic encephalopathy since the 1950s but, once popular, the technology is not as accessible now as it once was. The performance characteristics of the EEG are critically dependent on the type of analysis undertaken; spectral analysis has better performance characteristics than visual analysis; evolving analytical techniques may provide better diagnostic information while the advent of portable wireless headsets may facilitate more widespread use. A large number of other diagnostic tools have been validated for the diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy including Critical Flicker Frequency, the Inhibitory Control Test, the Stroop test, the Scan package and the Continuous Reaction Time; each has its pros and cons; strengths and weaknesses; protagonists and detractors. Recent AASLD/EASL Practice Guidelines suggest that the diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy should be based on the PHES test together with one of the validated alternative techniques or the EEG. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy has a detrimental effect on the well-being of patients and their care

  19. Hepatic Encephalopathy: From the Pathogenesis to the New Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Cordoba, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a frequent and serious complication of liver cirrhosis; the pathophysiology of this complication is not fully understood although great efforts have been made during the last years. There are few prospective studies on the epidemiology of this complication; however, it is known that it confers with high short-term mortality. Hepatic encephalopathy has been classified into different groups depending on the degree of hepatic dysfunction, the presence of portal-systemic shunts, and the number of episodes. Due to the large clinical spectra of overt EH and the complexity of cirrhotic patients, it is very difficult to perform quality clinical trials for assessing the efficacy of the treatments proposed. The physiopathology, clinical manifestation, and the treatment of HE is a challenge because of the multiple factors that converge and coexist in an episode of overt HE. PMID:27335836

  20. Acetyl-L-carnitine in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Malaguarnera, Michele

    2013-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a common complication of hepatic cirrhosis. The clinical diagnosis is based on two concurrent types of symptoms: impaired mental status and impaired neuromotor function. Impaired mental status is characterized by deterioration in mental status with psychomotor dysfunction, impaired memory, and increased reaction time, sensory abnormalities, poor concentration, disorientation and coma. Impaired neuromotor function include hyperreflexia, rigidity, myoclonus and asterixis. The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy has not been clearly defined. The general consensus is that elevated levels of ammonia and an inflammatory response work in synergy to cause astrocyte to swell and fluid to accumulate in the brain which is thought to explain the symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy. Acetyl-L-carnitine, the short-chain ester of carnitine is endogenously produced within mitochondria and peroxisomes and is involved in the transport of acetyl-moieties across the membranes of these organelles. Acetyl-L-carnitine administration has shown the recovery of neuropsychological activities related to attention/concentration, visual scanning and tracking, psychomotor speed and mental flexibility, language short-term memory, attention, and computing ability. In fact, Acetyl-L-carnitine induces ureagenesis leading to decreased blood and brain ammonia levels. Acetyl-L-carnitine treatment decreases the severity of mental and physical fatigue, depression cognitive impairment and improves health-related quality of life. The aim of this review was to provide an explanation on the possible toxic effects of ammonia in HE and evaluate the potential clinical benefits of ALC.

  1. Medium chain triglycerides and hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, M. Hilary; Bolton, C. H.; Morris, J. S.; Read, A. E.

    1974-01-01

    The oral administration of short (C6) and medium (C8 and (C10) chain triglycerides produced no clinical or electroencephalographic changes in patients with cirrhosis of the liver. Arterial ammonia levels were also monitored in these patients and showed no significant change after medium chain triglycerides. It was concluded that medium chain triglycerides, known to be of potential value in the treatment of malabsorption in patients with cirrhosis, are not clinically contraindicated, even in patients with evidence of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:4841275

  2. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in alcoholic hepatitis: Hepatic encephalopathy a common theme.

    PubMed

    John, Elizabeth S; Sedhom, Ramy; Dalal, Ishita; Sharma, Ranita

    2017-01-14

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neuro-radiologic diagnosis that has become more widely recognized and reported over the past few decades. As such, there are a number of known risk factors that contribute to the development of this syndrome, including volatile blood pressures, renal failure, cytotoxic drugs, autoimmune disorders, pre-eclampsia, and eclampsia. This report documents the first reported case of PRES in a patient with severe alcoholic hepatitis with hepatic encephalopathy and delves into a molecular pathophysiology of the syndrome.

  3. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in alcoholic hepatitis: Hepatic encephalopathy a common theme

    PubMed Central

    John, Elizabeth S; Sedhom, Ramy; Dalal, Ishita; Sharma, Ranita

    2017-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neuro-radiologic diagnosis that has become more widely recognized and reported over the past few decades. As such, there are a number of known risk factors that contribute to the development of this syndrome, including volatile blood pressures, renal failure, cytotoxic drugs, autoimmune disorders, pre-eclampsia, and eclampsia. This report documents the first reported case of PRES in a patient with severe alcoholic hepatitis with hepatic encephalopathy and delves into a molecular pathophysiology of the syndrome. PMID:28127211

  4. Prognostic Assessment in Patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, Rita; Simón-Talero, Macarena; Córdoba, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of liver failure that is associated with poor prognosis. However, the prognosis is not uniform and depends on the underlying liver disease. Acute liver failure is an uncommon cause of HE that carries bad prognosis but is potentially reversible. There are several prognostic systems that have been specifically developed for selecting patients for liver transplantation. In patients with cirrhosis the prognosis of the episode of HE is usually dictated by the underlying precipitating factor. Acute-on-chronic liver failure is the most severe form of decompensation of cirrhosis, the prognosis depends on the number of associated organ failures. Patients with cirrhosis that have experienced an episode of HE should be considered candidates for liver transplant. The selection depends on the underlying liver function assessed by the Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) index. There is a subgroup that exhibits low MELD and recurrent HE, usually due to the coexistence of large portosystemic shunts. The recurrence of HE is more common in patients that develop progressive deterioration of liver function and hyponatremia. The bouts of HE may cause sequels that have been shown to persist after liver transplant. PMID:22045403

  5. Resolution of Hepatic Encephalopathy Following Hepatic Artery Embolization in a Patient with Well-Differentiated Neuroendocrine Tumor Metastatic to the Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Erinjeri, Joseph P. Deodhar, Ajita; Thornton, Raymond H.; Allen, Peter J.; Getrajdman, George I.; Brown, Karen T.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Reidy, Diane L.

    2010-06-15

    Hepatic encephalopathy is considered a contraindication to hepatic artery embolization. We describe a patient with a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor metastatic to the liver with refractory hepatic encephalopathy and normal liver function tests. The encephalopathy was refractory to standard medical therapy with lactulose. The patient's mental status returned to baseline after three hepatic artery embolization procedures. Arteriography and ultrasound imaging before and after embolization suggest that the encephalopathy was due to arterioportal shunting causing hepatofugal portal venous flow and portosystemic shunting. In patients with a primary or metastatic well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor whose refractory hepatic encephalopathy is due to portosystemic shunting (rather than global hepatic dysfunction secondary to tumor burden), hepatic artery embolization can be performed safely and effectively.

  6. Hepatic Encephalopathy and Sleepiness: An Interesting Connection?

    PubMed Central

    Montagnese, Sara; Turco, Matteo; Amodio, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Sleep-wake abnormalities in patients with cirrhosis have been traditionally associated with hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In recent years, a certain amount of work has been devoted to the study of this relationship. This has lead to a modified picture, with weakening of the association between HE and poor night sleep, and the emergence of stronger links between HE and excessive daytime sleepiness. This brief review focuses on the evidence in favor of the interpretation of HE as a sleepiness syndrome, and on the diagnostic, therapeutic and social implications of such an interpretation. PMID:26041958

  7. Rifaximin, Microbiota Biology, and Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Peleman, Cedric; Camilleri, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Rifaximin is beneficial in the treatment of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). Kang et al. (Clin Transl Gastroenterol 7: e187; doi:10.1038/ctg.2016.44) investigated the effects of rifaximin in a mouse model of MHE-associated microbiota without concomitant liver disease. In addition to some impact on the composition of microbiota, rifaximin altered bacterial functions, ameliorated local and systemic inflammation, and reduced enterocyte glutaminase activity. We discuss these effects as well as the interpretation of the permeability studies, given the potential interaction of dysbiosis with dysfunctional intestinal barrier, leading to systemic inflammation and increased uptake of bacterial metabolites that contribute to MHE in the presence of hepatic dysfunction. PMID:27711069

  8. Diagnosis and Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy in Fulminant Hepatic Failure.

    PubMed

    Kodali, Sudha; McGuire, Brendan M

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is associated with cerebral edema (CE), increased intracranial pressure (ICP), and subsequent neurologic complications; it is the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in fulminant hepatic failure. The goal of therapy should be early diagnosis and treatment of HE with measures to reduce CE. A combination of clinical examination and diagnostic modalities can aid in prompt diagnosis. ICP monitoring and transcranial Doppler help diagnose and monitor response to treatment. Transfer to a transplant center and intensive care unit admission with airway management and reduction of CE with hypertonic saline, mannitol, hypothermia, and sedation are recommended as a bridge to liver transplantation.

  9. Legal Responsibilities of Physicians When They Diagnose Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Vierling, John M

    2015-08-01

    Both covert hepatic encephalopathy (CHE) and overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) impair the ability to operate machinery. The legal responsibilities of US physicians who diagnose and treat patients with hepatic encephalopathy vary among states. It is imperative that physicians know the laws regarding reporting in their state. OHE represents a neuropsychiatric impairment that meets general reporting criteria. The medical advisory boards of the states have not identified OHE as a reportable condition. In the absence of validated diagnostic guidelines, physicians are not obligated to perform tests for CHE. There is a need for explicit guidance from professional associations regarding this issue.

  10. Clinical and Neurologic Manifestation of Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy and Overt Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Basu, P Patrick; Shah, Niraj James

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) shows a wide spectrum of neuropsychiatric manifestations. A combined effort with neuropsychological and psychometric evaluation has to be performed to recognize the syndrome, whereas minimal HE (MHE) is largely under-recognized. Subtle symptoms of MHE can only be diagnosed through specialized neuropsychiatric testing. Early diagnosis and treatment may drastically improve the quality of life for many cirrhotic patients. Further research to gain better insight into the pathophysiology and diagnostic accuracy of HE will help determine future management strategies.

  11. The role of methanethiol in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Blom, H J; Ferenci, P; Grimm, G; Yap, S H; Tangerman, A

    1991-03-01

    Mixed disulfides of methanethiol represent a relative estimate for an exposure to methanethiol. The concentrations of methanethiol-mixed disulfides, methionine, 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyrate and ammonia were measured in patients with different stages of hepatic encephalopathy, in patients with chronic kidney failure and in healthy subjects. In patients with hepatic encephalopathy, the mean serum concentrations of all these compounds were elevated. However, the elevations of methanethiol-mixed disulfides were small and partly caused by decreased renal function. In addition, the levels of methanethiol-mixed disulfides did not differ significantly between the different grades of hepatic encephalopathy. The concentrations of methanethiol-mixed disulfides were substantially lower than those previously observed in healthy subjects after an oral methionine load or in a patient with a deficiency in methionine adenosyltransferase, the latter without causing encephalopathy. We concluded that the role of methanethiol in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is probably minor, if not insignificant. In the patients with hepatic encephalopathy, a significant correlation was found between the concentrations of methionine and 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyrate and between 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyrate and methanethiol-mixed disulfides, supporting the theory that methanethiol is formed by way of the methionine transamination pathway. Evidence is provided that, besides the methionine transsulfuration pathway, the transamination pathway is also impaired in patients with hepatic encephalopathy.

  12. Management of hepatic encephalopathy in the hospital.

    PubMed

    Leise, Michael D; Poterucha, John J; Kamath, Patrick S; Kim, W Ray

    2014-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) develops in up to 50% of patients with cirrhosis and is a feature of decompensated cirrhosis. With the goal of reviewing the evidence for treatment and prevention of overt hepatic encephalopathy, pubmed was searched using search terms hepatic encephalopathy AND treatment, limited to human studies from January 1, 2003, through December 1, 2013, and supplemented by key references. The inpatient incidence of HE is approximately 23,000 annually, and management of these patients is common for internists and subspecialists. Treatment of the hospitalized patient with HE has changed in recent years. Treatment entails 2 phases: induction and maintenance of remission. Most cases of significant HE are precipitated by infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, medications, or other culprits. All patients should be evaluated for secondary triggers of HE, and treatment should be initiated with a nonabsorbable disaccharide (ie, lactulose) in most patients. Rifaximin (off label) can be added in patients not responding to lactulose. Neomycin is a less preferred alternative to rifaximin owing to its adverse effect profile. Other therapies, including zinc, L-ornithine-L-aspartate, and branched-chain amino acids, can be considered for patients not responding to disaccharides and nonabsorbable antibiotics. Large portosystemic shunts may be embolized in patients with medically refractory recurrent or severe HE with otherwise well-compensated cirrhosis. Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System is now available for patients with severe HE who do not respond to medical therapy. It is critically important that patients hospitalized with significant HE continue maintenance therapy at the time of dismissal to prevent further episodes. Patients with a first-time episode of HE can be administered lactulose, and careful instructions should be provided to patients and caregivers about dose titration to achieve 3 bowel movements daily. Patients with recurrent HE episodes

  13. Neuronal cell death in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Roger F

    2007-12-01

    It is generally assumed that neuronal cell death is minimal in liver failure and is insufficient to account for the neuropsychiatric symptoms characteristic of hepatic encephalopathy. However, contrary to this assumption, neuronal cell damage and death are well documented in liver failure patients, taking the form of several distinct clinical entities namely acquired (non-Wilsonian) hepatocerebral degeneration, cirrhosis-related Parkinsonism, post-shunt myelopathy and cerebellar degeneration. In addition, there is evidence to suggest that liver failure contributes to the severity of neuronal loss in Wernicke's encephalopathy. The long-standing nature of the thalamic and cerebellar lesions, over 80% of which are missed by routine clinical evaluation, together with the probability that they are nutritional in origin, underscores the need for careful nutritional management (adequate dietary protein, Vitamin B(1)) in liver failure patients. Mechanisms identified with the potential to cause neuronal cell death in liver failure include NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity, lactic acidosis, oxidative/nitrosative stress and the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The extent of neuronal damage in liver failure may be attenuated by compensatory mechanisms that include down-regulation of NMDA receptors, hypothermia and the presence of neuroprotective steroids such as allopregnanolone. These findings suggest that some of the purported "sequelae" of liver transplantation (gait ataxia, memory loss, confusion) could reflect preexisting neuropathology.

  14. Pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sheasgreen, Christopher; Lu, Lucy; Patel, Ameen

    2014-12-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of cirrhosis of the liver. It is also extremely debilitating, with an untreated 3-year survival of only 23 %. While the exact pathophysiology of HE has yet to be elucidated, a number of contributing factors have been described. Abnormal levels and altered metabolism of ammonia play a central role. Recently, inflammation has also been identified as a contributor to HE. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of HE is crucial, as current therapy centers on reduction of the body's ammonia load. Lactulose is the first-line therapy for HE, with some antibiotics recently showing promise for improved outcomes in patients with HE. The role of anti-inflammatory therapies has yet to be evaluated.

  15. Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Atluri, Dileep K; Prakash, Ravi; Mullen, Kevin D

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder seen in patients with advanced liver disease or porto-systemic shunts. Based on etiology and severity of HE, the World Congress of Gastroenterology has divided HE into categories and sub-categories. Many user-friendly computer-based neuropsychiatric tests are being validated for diagnosing covert HE. Currently, emphasis is being given to view HE deficits as a continuous spectrum rather than distinct stages. Ammonia is believed to play crucial role in pathogenesis of HE via astrocyte swelling and cerebral edema. However, evidence has been building up which supports the synergistic role of oxidative stress, inflammation and neurosteroids in pathogenesis of HE. At present, treatment of HE aims at decreasing the production and intestinal absorption of ammonia. But as the role of new pathogenetic mechanisms becomes clear, many potential new treatment strategies may become available for clinician. PMID:25755319

  16. Leucine metabolism in patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, A.S.; Kassouny, M.E.; Matthews, D.E.; Millikan, W.

    1986-03-01

    A primed continuous infusion of (/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C)leucine was used to determine whether increased oxidation and/or protein synthesis of leucine occurs in patients with cirrhosis. Five controls and patients were equilibrated on a metabolic balance diet (0.6 g protein per kg ideal body weight (IBW)). An additional four patients were equilibrated in the same manner with the same type of diet with a protein level of 0.75 g per kg IBW. Plasma leucine and breath CO/sub 2/ enrichments were measured by mass spectrometry. Protein synthesis and leucine metabolism were identical in controls and patients when both were fed a diet with 0.6 g protein/kg IBW. Results indicate that systemic derangements of leucine metabolism are not the cause of Hepatic Encephalopathy.

  17. Hyponatremia in hepatic encephalopathy: an accomplice or innocent bystander?

    PubMed

    Yun, Byung Cheol; Kim, W Ray

    2009-06-01

    Hyponatremia, a common complication inpatients with advanced liver disease and impaired free water clearance, has been shown to be an important predictor of short-term mortality. Hepatic encephalopathy, also a late complication of end-stage liver disease, has been associated with low-grade cerebral edema as a result of swelling of astrocytes. Guevara et al. hypothesized that hyponatremia and the resultant depletion of organic osmolytes (e.g.,myo-inositol) from brain cells contribute to brain edema, playing an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. Using a multivariable analysis, they demonstrated that hyponatremia increased the risk of hepatic encephalopathy more than eightfold, after adjustment for serum bilirubin and creatinine concentrations and previous history of encephalopathy. Their magnetic resonance spectroscopy data correlated low brain concentrations of myoinositol with hepatic encephalopathy. As both hyponatremia and encephalopathy occur in patients with advanced liver disease, it has been difficult to implicate hyponatremia independently in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. Guevara's data do suggest that hyponatremia is more likely an accomplice than an innocent bystander.

  18. Hepatic encephalopathy: Ever closer to its big bang.

    PubMed

    Souto, Pablo A; Marcotegui, Ariel R; Orbea, Lisandro; Skerl, Juan; Perazzo, Juan Carlos

    2016-11-14

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder that commonly complicates the course of patients with liver disease. Despite the fact that the syndrome was probably first recognized hundreds of years ago, the exact pathogenesis still remains unclear. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the earliest form of HE and is estimated to affect more that 75% of patients with liver cirrhosis. It is characterized by cognitive impairment predominantly attention, reactiveness and integrative function with very subtle clinical manifestations. The development of MHE is associated with worsen in driving skills, daily activities and the increase of overall mortality. Skeletal muscle has the ability to shift from ammonia producer to ammonia detoxifying organ. Due to its large size, becomes the main ammonia detoxifying organ in case of chronic liver failure and muscular glutamine-synthase becomes important due to the failing liver and brain metabolic activity. Gut is the major glutamine consumer and ammonia producer organ in the body. Hepatocellular dysfunction due to liver disease, results in an impaired clearance of ammonium and in its inter-organ trafficking. Intestinal bacteria, can also represent an extra source of ammonia production and in cirrhosis, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and symbiosis can be observed. In the study of HE, to get close to MHE is to get closer to its big bang; and from here, to travel less transited roads such as skeletal muscle and intestine, is to go even closer. The aim of this editorial is to expose this road for further and deeper work.

  19. Hepatic encephalopathy: Ever closer to its big bang

    PubMed Central

    Souto, Pablo A; Marcotegui, Ariel R; Orbea, Lisandro; Skerl, Juan; Perazzo, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder that commonly complicates the course of patients with liver disease. Despite the fact that the syndrome was probably first recognized hundreds of years ago, the exact pathogenesis still remains unclear. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the earliest form of HE and is estimated to affect more that 75% of patients with liver cirrhosis. It is characterized by cognitive impairment predominantly attention, reactiveness and integrative function with very subtle clinical manifestations. The development of MHE is associated with worsen in driving skills, daily activities and the increase of overall mortality. Skeletal muscle has the ability to shift from ammonia producer to ammonia detoxifying organ. Due to its large size, becomes the main ammonia detoxifying organ in case of chronic liver failure and muscular glutamine-synthase becomes important due to the failing liver and brain metabolic activity. Gut is the major glutamine consumer and ammonia producer organ in the body. Hepatocellular dysfunction due to liver disease, results in an impaired clearance of ammonium and in its inter-organ trafficking. Intestinal bacteria, can also represent an extra source of ammonia production and in cirrhosis, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and symbiosis can be observed. In the study of HE, to get close to MHE is to get closer to its big bang; and from here, to travel less transited roads such as skeletal muscle and intestine, is to go even closer. The aim of this editorial is to expose this road for further and deeper work. PMID:27895414

  20. Hepatic encephalopathy: An approach to its multiple pathophysiological features

    PubMed Central

    Perazzo, Juan Carlos; Tallis, Silvina; Delfante, Amalia; Souto, Pablo Andrés; Lemberg, Abraham; Eizayaga, Francisco Xavier; Romay, Salvador

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric complex syndrome, ranging from subtle behavioral abnormalities to deep coma and death. Hepatic encephalopathy emerges as the major complication of acute or chronic liver failure. Multiplicity of factors are involved in its pathophysiology, such as central and neuromuscular neurotransmission disorder, alterations in sleep patterns and cognition, changes in energy metabolism leading to cell injury, an oxidative/nitrosative state and a neuroinflammatory condition. Moreover, in acute HE, a condition of imminent threat of death is present due to a deleterious astrocyte swelling. In chronic HE, changes in calcium signaling, mitochondrial membrane potential and long term potential expression, N-methyl-D-aspartate-cGMP and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors alterations, and changes in the mRNA and protein expression and redistribution in the cerebral blood flow can be observed. The main molecule indicated as responsible for all these changes in HE is ammonia. There is no doubt that ammonia, a neurotoxic molecule, triggers or at least facilitates most of these changes. Ammonia plasma levels are increased two- to three-fold in patients with mild to moderate cirrhotic HE and up to ten-fold in patients with acute liver failure. Hepatic and inter-organ trafficking of ammonia and its metabolite, glutamine (GLN), lead to hyperammonemic conditions. Removal of hepatic ammonia is a differentiated work that includes the hepatocyte, through the urea cycle, converting ammonia into GLN via glutamine synthetase. Under pathological conditions, such as liver damage or liver blood by-pass, the ammonia plasma level starts to rise and the risk of HE developing is high. Knowledge of the pathophysiology of HE is rapidly expanding and identification of focally localized triggers has led the development of new possibilities for HE to be considered. This editorial will focus on issues where, to the best of our knowledge, more research is needed in

  1. [Minimal hepatic encephalopathy: characteristics, diagnosis and clinical implications].

    PubMed

    Torre Delgadillo, Aldo; Guerrero-Hernández, Ignacio; Uribe, Misael

    2006-01-01

    The term minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) refers to the subtle changes in cognitive function, electrophysiological parameters, cerebral neurochemical/neurotransmitter homeostasis, cerebral blood flow, metabolism, and fluid homeostasis that can be observed in patients with cirrhosis who have no clinical evidence of hepatic encephalopathy; the prevalence is as high as 84% in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. This cirrhosis complication is generally not perceived by physician, and diagnosis can only be made by neuropsychological tests and other especial measurements like evoked potentials and image studies like positron emission tomography. Diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy may have prognostic and therapeutic implications in cirrhotic patients. The present review pretends to explore the clinic, therapeutic, diagnosis and prognostic aspects of this complication.

  2. The why and wherefore of hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Vijay PB; Tognarelli, Joshua M; Massie, Nicolas; Crossey, Mary ME; Cook, Nicola A; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a common neuropsychiatric abnormality, which complicates the course of patients with liver disease. It was probably first described by Hippocrates over 2000 years ago, who said that “those whose madness arises from phlegm are quiet and neither shout nor make a disturbance, while those whose madness arises from bile shout, play tricks and will not keep still, but are always up to some mischief ”. He was presumably describing the differences between patients with pneumonia and acute liver failure. Despite the fact that the syndrome was probably first recognized thousands of years ago, the exact pathogenesis still remains unclear. Furthermore, a precise definition of the syndrome is lacking, as are definitive methods of diagnosing this condition. It is important as both patients with cirrhosis and the general population with whom they interact may be affected as a consequence. At a minimum, the individual may be affected by impaired quality of life, impaired ability to work, and slowed reaction times, which are relevant to the population at large if affected individuals operate heavy machinery or drive a car. Pathogenic mechanisms, diagnostic tools, and treatment options are discussed. PMID:26719720

  3. Antibiotics for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Patidar, Kavish R; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2013-06-01

    The treatment of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is complex and therapeutic regimens vary according to the acuity of presentation and the goals of therapy. Most treatments for HE rely on manipulating the intestinal milieu and therefore antibiotics that act on the gut form a key treatment strategy. Prominent antibiotics studied in HE are neomycin, metronidazole, vancomycin and rifaximin. For the management of the acute episode, all antibiotics have been tested. However the limited numbers studied, adverse effects (neomycin oto- and nephrotoxicity, metronidazole neurotoxicity) and potential for resistance emergence (vancomycin-resistant enterococcus) has limited the use of most antibiotics, apart from rifaximin which has the greatest evidence base. Rifaximin has also demonstrated, in conjunction with lactulose, to prevent overt HE recurrence in a multi-center, randomized trial. Despite its cost in the US, rifaximin may prove cost-saving by preventing hospitalizations for overt HE. In minimal/covert HE, rifaximin is the only systematically studied antibiotic. Rifaximin showed improvement in cognition, inflammation, quality-of-life and driving simulator performance but cost-analysis does not favor its use at the current time. Antibiotics, especially rifaximin, have a definite role in the management across the spectrum of HE.

  4. Paroxysmal Amnesia Attacks due to Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nar Senol, Pelin; Bican Demir, Aylin; Bora, Ibrahim; Bakar, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a rare disease which is thought to be autoimmune and steroid responsive. The syndrome is characterized by cognitive impairment, encephalopathy, psychiatric symptoms, and seizures associated with increased level of anti-thyroid antibodies. The exact pathophysiology underlying cerebral involvement is still lesser known. Although symptoms suggest a nonlesional encephalopathy in most of the cases, sometimes the clinical appearance can be subtle and may not respond to immunosuppressants or immunomodulatory agents. Here we report a case who presented with drowsiness and amnestic complaints associated with paroxysmal electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities which could be treated only with an antiepileptic drug. PMID:27034679

  5. Hepatic encephalopathy in acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guan-Huei

    2015-10-01

    The presence of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) within 4 weeks is part of the criteria for defining acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). The pathophysiology of HE is complex, and hyperammonemia and cerebral hemodynamic dysfunction appear to be central in the pathogenesis of encephalopathy. Recent data also suggest that inflammatory mediators may have a significant role in modulating the cerebral effect of ammonia. Multiple prospective and retrospective studies have shown that hepatic encephalopathy in ACLF patients is associated with higher mortality, especially in those with grade III-IV encephalopathy, similar to that of acute liver failure (ALF). Although significant cerebral edema detected by CT in ACLF patients appeared to be less common, specialized MRI imaging was able to detect cerebral edema even in low grade HE. Ammonia-focused therapy constitutes the basis of current therapy, as in the treatment of ALF. Emerging treatment strategies focusing on modulating the gut-liver-circulation-brain axis are discussed.

  6. Concise review of current concepts on nomenclature and pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Savlan, Ilona; Liakina, Valentina; Valantinas, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a neuropsychiatric complication of liver cirrhosis the symptoms of which may vary from imperceptible to severe, invaliding, and even lethal. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy is also important because of its tendency to impair patients' cognitive functions and quality of life. The polyetiological pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is intensively studied. A general consensus exists that not only excess of ammonia but also inflammatory, oxidative, and other processes are significant in the development of hepatic encephalopathy.

  7. Acetylcholinesterase activity in an experimental rat model of Type C hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Marta; Méndez-López, Magdalena; López, Laudino; Aller, María A; Arias, Jaime; Arias, Jorge L

    2011-05-01

    Patients with liver malfunction often suffer from hepatic encephalopathy, a neurological complication which can affect attention and cognition. Diverse experimental models have been used to study brain alterations that may be responsible for hepatic encephalopathy symptoms. The aim of the study was to determine whether cognitive impairment found in cirrhosis could be due to disturbance of acetylcholinesterase activity. Acetylcholinesterase activity was assessed in the brains of Wistar rats with thioacetamide-induced cirrhosis. The cirrhotic group displayed up-regulation of acetylcholinesterase levels in the entorrhinal cortex, anterodorsal and anteroventral thalamus and accumbens, whereas down-regulation was found in the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Our results indicate that the experimental model of hepatic encephalopathy by chronic administration of thioacetamide presents alterations of acetylcholinesterase activity in brain limbic system regions, which play a role in attention and memory.

  8. Covert and Overt Hepatic Encephalopathy: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Patidar, Kavish R; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2015-11-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is part of a spectrum of neurocognitive changes in cirrhosis. HE is divided into 2 broad categories based on severity: covert hepatic encephalopathy (CHE) and overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE). CHE has a significant impact on a patient's quality of life, driving performance, and recently has been associated with increased hospitalizations and death. Likewise, OHE is associated with increased rates of hospitalizations and mortality, and poor quality of life. Given its significant burden on patients, care takers, and the health care system, early diagnosis and management are imperative. In addition, focus also should be directed on patient and family member education on the disease progression and adherence to medications. Treatment strategies include the use of nonabsorbable disaccharides, antibiotics (ie, rifaximin), and, potentially, probiotics. Other therapies currently under further investigation include L-ornithine-L-aspartate, ornithine phenylacetate, glycerol phenylbutyrate, molecular adsorbent recirculating system, and albumin infusion.

  9. Gut Microbiota: Its Role in Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Rahul; Saraswat, Vivek A.; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia, a key factor in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE), is predominantly derived from urea breakdown by urease producing large intestinal bacteria and from small intestine and kidneys, where the enzyme glutaminases releases ammonia from circulating glutamine. Non-culture techniques like pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid are used to characterize fecal microbiota. Fecal microbiota in patients with cirrhosis have been shown to alter with increasing Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) and Model for End stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores, and with development of covert or overt HE. Cirrhosis dysbiosis ratio (CDR), the ratio of autochthonous/good bacteria (e.g. Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae and Clostridiales) to non-autochthonous/pathogenic bacteria (e.g. Enterobacteriaceae and Streptococcaceae), is significantly higher in controls and patients with compensated cirrhosis than patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Although their stool microbiota do not differ, sigmoid colonic mucosal microbiota in liver cirrhosis patients with and without HE, are different. Linkage of pathogenic colonic mucosal bacteria with poor cognition and inflammation suggests that important processes at the mucosal interface, such as bacterial translocation and immune dysfunction, are involved in the pathogenesis of HE. Fecal microbiome composition does not change significantly when HE is treated with lactulose or when HE recurs after lactulose withdrawal. Despite improving cognition and endotoxemia as well as shifting positive correlation of pathogenic bacteria with metabolites, linked to ammonia, aromatic amino acids and oxidative stress, to a negative correlation, rifaximin changes gut microbiome composition only modestly. These observations suggest that the beneficial effects of lactulose and rifaximin could be associated with a change in microbial metabolic function as well as an improvement in dysbiosis. PMID:26041954

  10. Higher Grades and Repeated Recurrence of Hepatic Encephalopathy May Be Related to High Serum Manganese Levels.

    PubMed

    Kobtan, Abdelrahman A; El-Kalla, Ferial S; Soliman, Hanan H; Zakaria, Soha S; Goda, Mohamed A

    2016-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious complication of liver failure. Until now, the precise pathophysiologic mechanisms are not fully determined. It has been demonstrated that manganese plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. Therefore, we studied manganese levels in serum of cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy in relation to grading and recurrence of hepatic encephalopathy. One hundred persons were enrolled in the study, 80 cirrhotic patients with or without encephalopathy and 20 healthy controls. Hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed clinically and by laboratory findings. Serum manganese levels were measured in all participants. The grading of hepatic encephalopathy was significantly correlated to the severity of liver dysfunction. The mean serum manganese level was significantly higher in cirrhotic patients than in controls and in cirrhotic patients with encephalopathy than in those without encephalopathy. It was also significantly higher in patients with advanced grading of hepatic encephalopathy. Serum manganese level was positively correlated to number of recurrences of encephalopathy during a 6-month follow-up period. Serum manganese levels were able to predict recurrence of hepatic encephalopathy within 6 months following the episode. Serum manganese levels are positively correlated to the modified Child-Pugh score of cirrhosis as well as grading and number of recurrences of hepatic encephalopathy. Higher manganese levels seem to be related to worsening of the condition, and its measurement may be used as a predictor of repeated recurrences.

  11. Nutritional assessment in cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Romeiro, Fernando Gomes; Augusti, Laís

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is one of the worst complications of liver disease and can be greatly influenced by nutritional status. Ammonia metabolism, inflammation and muscle wasting are relevant processes in HE pathophysiology. Malnutrition worsens the prognosis in HE, requiring early assessment of nutritional status of these patients. Body composition changes induced by liver disease and limitations superimposed by HE hamper the proper accomplishment of exams in this population, but evidence is growing that assessment of muscle mass and muscle function is mandatory due to the role of skeletal muscles in ammonia metabolism. In this review, we present the pathophysiological aspects involved in HE to support further discussion about advantages and drawbacks of some methods for evaluating the nutritional status of cirrhotic patients with HE, focusing on body composition. PMID:26730273

  12. Should We Treat Minimal/Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy, and with What?

    PubMed

    Henderson, Phillip K; Herrera, Jorge L

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy exists along a continuum from abnormal neuropsychiatric testing in the absence of clinical findings to varying degrees of detectable clinical findings. The International Society for Hepatic Encephalopathy and Nitrogen Metabolism has endorsed the term "covert" to encompass minimal hepatic encephalopathy and grade I overt hepatic encephalopathy. Covert hepatic encephalopathy has been associated with poor quality of life, decreased employment, increased falls, and increased traffic accidents that significantly impact quality of life and health care expenditures. Probiotics, nonabsorbable dissacharides, rifaximin, and l-ornithine-l-aspartate have been evaluated with varying levels of success. Because of the lack of universally accepted diagnostic tools, optimal timing of testing and treatment remains controversial.

  13. Evaluation and Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Current Status and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Suraweera, Duminda; Sundaram, Vinay; Saab, Sammy

    2016-07-15

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a spectrum of neurocognitive manifestations often seen in patients with liver injury or rarely in patients with portosystemic shunting without liver injury. It can be divided into minimal (covert) hepatic encephalopathy and overt hepatic encephalopathy, depending on the severity. Patients with hepatic encephalopathy have compromised clinical outcomes, decreased quality of life, and increased healthcare utilization, often resulting in a heavy financial and personal burden on caregivers. The diagnosis remains largely clinical, with the exclusion of possible other causes for the altered mental status. Current treatment strategies include nonabsorbable disaccharides and antibiotics. This review will focus on the diagnosis, management and clinical impact of hepatic encephalopathy.

  14. Evaluation and Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Suraweera, Duminda; Sundaram, Vinay; Saab, Sammy

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a spectrum of neurocognitive manifestations often seen in patients with liver injury or rarely in patients with portosystemic shunting without liver injury. It can be divided into minimal (covert) hepatic encephalopathy and overt hepatic encephalopathy, depending on the severity. Patients with hepatic encephalopathy have compromised clinical outcomes, decreased quality of life, and increased healthcare utilization, often resulting in a heavy financial and personal burden on caregivers. The diagnosis remains largely clinical, with the exclusion of possible other causes for the altered mental status. Current treatment strategies include nonabsorbable disaccharides and antibiotics. This review will focus on the diagnosis, management and clinical impact of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:27377741

  15. Quantitative analysis of brain magnetic resonance imaging for hepatic encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syh, Hon-Wei; Chu, Wei-Kom; Ong, Chin-Sing

    1992-06-01

    High intensity lesions around ventricles have recently been observed in T1-weighted brain magnetic resonance images for patients suffering hepatic encephalopathy. The exact etiology that causes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gray scale changes has not been totally understood. The objective of our study was to investigate, through quantitative means, (1) the amount of changes to brain white matter due to the disease process, and (2) the extent and distribution of these high intensity lesions, since it is believed that the abnormality may not be entirely limited to the white matter only. Eleven patients with proven haptic encephalopathy and three normal persons without any evidence of liver abnormality constituted our current data base. Trans-axial, sagittal, and coronal brain MRI were obtained on a 1.5 Tesla scanner. All processing was carried out on a microcomputer-based image analysis system in an off-line manner. Histograms were decomposed into regular brain tissues and lesions. Gray scale ranges coded as lesion were then brought back to original images to identify distribution of abnormality. Our results indicated the disease process involved pallidus, mesencephalon, and subthalamic regions.

  16. The role of astrocytes in the development of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, M; Yamamoto, T; Gemba, H

    1999-09-01

    Thioacetamide (TAA), a hepatotoxin used to ascertain the role of astrocytes in hepatic encephalopathy, was administered to prepare four experimental groups of rats. (The TAA1D, TAA1.5D, TAA2D, and TAA2.5D group rats were perfusion fixated with formalin at 1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5 days, respectively, after initial administration of TAA. In addition, TAA was readministered to the TAA2D and TAA2.5D rats 24 h after the first dose.) Abnormalities of higher brain function and equilibrium that progressed with time were apparent in the rats receiving TAA. On the other hand, innate reflexes (e.g. pupillary reflex) were similar to those in the normal control group. Astrocyte cell areas in the hippocampus, neocortex, hypothalamus, cerebellum, and basal ganglia (striatum) from the TAA rats were significantly larger than in corresponding sites from the normal rats (maximum in TAA1D and TAA1.5D groups). However, there were no differences with respect to the midbrain. Any morphological difference was not observed in neurons between the hepatic encephalopathy and normal rats. Administration of TAA caused hepatic tissue injury that progressed over time. Surprisingly, encephalopathy was apparent even when hepatic injury was mild. These findings suggest that abnormalities in astrocytes, which precede any abnormal change in neurons, play a role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy.

  17. Protein restriction in hepatic encephalopathy is appropriate for selected patients: a point of view.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Douglas L; Morgan, Timothy

    2014-09-01

    Since the late nineteenth century, protein restriction has been shown to improve hepatic encephalopathy. However, malnutrition has been described in up to 60 % of cirrhotic patients and is associated with increased mortality. Furthermore, emerging clinical evidence has revealed that a large proportion of cirrhotic patients may tolerate normal protein intake. However, approximately one third of cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy may need a short course of protein restriction, in addition to maximum medical therapy, to ameliorate the clinical course of their hepatic encephalopathy. For patients with chronic hepatic encephalopathy who are protein-sensitive, modifying their sources of nitrogen by using more vegetable protein, less animal protein, and branched-chain amino acids may improve their encephalopathy without further loss of lean body mass. In conclusion, among cirrhotics with hepatic encephalopathy, modulation of normal protein intake must take into account the patient's hepatic reserve, severity of hepatic encephalopathy, and current nutritional status.

  18. Post-TIPS Hepatic Encephalopathy Treated by Occlusion Balloon-Assisted Retrograde Embolization of a Coexisting Spontaneous Splenorenal Shunt

    SciTech Connect

    Shioyama, Yasukazu; Matsueda, Kiyoshi; Horihata, Koushi; Kimura, Masashi; Nishida, Norifumi; Kishi, Kazushi; Terada, Masaki; Sato, Morio; Yamada, Ryusaku

    1996-11-15

    A 51-year-old man with posthepatitis cirrhosis underwent a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) for bleeding of recurrent esophageal varices. The patient had a coexisting, spontaneous, splenorenal shunt. He subsequently developed hepatic encephalopathy, presumably due to excessive portosystemic shunting. Since medical management resulted in no significant improvement, the splenorenal shunt was embolized from the jugular vein approach via renal vein access during temporary balloon occlusion. Within a few days, the patient's hepatic encephalopathy resolved. Twelve months later the patient showed no recurrence of encephalopathy and had maintained a patent TIPS.

  19. Fatal rhinocerebral mucormycosis under the shade of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Ataseven, Hilmi; Yüksel, Ilhami; Gültuna, Selcan; Köklü, Seyfettin; Uysal, Serkan; Basar, Omer; Sasmaz, Nurgül

    2010-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an acutely fatal infection that occurs in immuncompromised patients. Cirrhosis is an acquired immune deficiency state and those patients are more prone to develop opportunistic infections. A 42-years-old cirrhotic man was admitted to our gastroenterology clinic with hepatic encephalopathy. Although he recovered from encephalopathy with supportive measurements, he developed paresthesia on the face. He was diagnosed with rhinocerebral mucormycosis and antifungal therapy was administered. Surgical treatment couldn.t be performed because of his bleeding diathesis and poor general condition. He succumbed on the 12th day of his admission.

  20. The Role of Sarcopenia and Frailty in Hepatic Encephalopathy Management.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Catherine; Verna, Elizabeth C

    2015-08-01

    Normal regulation of total body and circulating ammonia requires a delicate interplay in ammonia formation and breakdown between several organ systems. In the setting of cirrhosis and portal hypertension, the decreased hepatic clearance of ammonia leads to significant dependence on skeletal muscle for ammonia detoxification; however, cirrhosis is also associated with muscle depletion and decreased functional muscle mass. Thus, patients with diminished muscle mass and sarcopenia may have a decreased ability to compensate for hepatic insufficiency and a higher likelihood of developing physiologically significant hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy.

  1. The burden of hepatic encephalopathy in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Dávalos Moscol, Milagros; Bustios Sanchez, Carla

    2011-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by changes in cognitive function, behavior, and personality, as well as by transient neurological symptoms and electroencephalographic changes, which occur in the context of acute or chronic liver failure. Cirrhosis is the main disease associated to HE, and it is known that its incidence is increasing worldwide. As a cause of mortality, cirrhosis is ranked 14 worldwide, but 10 in developed countries. It has been demonstrated that the incidence of liver disease is increasing, in part because of the ascending prevalence of NAFLD, HCV, HCC, as well of alcohol consumption. The real incidence of cirrhosis in Latin America is unknown, although in some Latin American countries that provided national data, cirrhosis death rates were between 5 and 17/100,000 for men and 3 and 5/100,000 for women. Disability, quality of life, and social aspects should be considered when assessing the impact of a disease. In this context, preliminary estimates of the global burden of disease attributable to chronic liver disease seem to be substantial. Hepatic encephalopathy, a main complication of liver failure, occurs in 30-45% of patients as overt encephalopathy, but when subclinical or minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is considered, estimates of the incidence of encephalopathy vary from 20 to 60%. In USA, the 2009 NIH Report on the Costs of Digestive Diseases stated that liver disease was the second most costly disease in direct and indirect costs (13.1 billion dollars). Although the economic cost of HE has not been assessed, it is obvious that the economic impact of HE on daily activities of living is extremely high, as the costs of diminished work performance and lost wages are substantial.

  2. Contributions of Microdialysis to New Alternative Therapeutics for Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Sampieri, Aristides; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of cirrhosis, of largely reversible impairment of brain function occurring in patients with acute or chronic liver failure or when the liver is bypassed by portosystemic shunts. The mechanisms causing this brain dysfunction are still largely unclear. The need to avoid complications caused by late diagnosis has attracted interest to understand the mechanisms underlying neuronal damage in order to find markers that will allow timely diagnosis and to propose new therapeutic alternatives to improve the care of patients. One of the experimental approaches to study HE is microdialysis; this technique allows evaluation of different chemical substances in several organs through the recollection of samples in specific places by semi-permeable membranes. In this review we will discuss the contributions of microdialysis in the understanding of the physiological alterations in human hepatic encephalopathy and experimental models and the studies to find novel alternative therapies for this disease. PMID:23921686

  3. Contributions of microdialysis to new alternative therapeutics for hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Sampieri, Aristides Iii; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-08-05

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of cirrhosis, of largely reversible impairment of brain function occurring in patients with acute or chronic liver failure or when the liver is bypassed by portosystemic shunts. The mechanisms causing this brain dysfunction are still largely unclear. The need to avoid complications caused by late diagnosis has attracted interest to understand the mechanisms underlying neuronal damage in order to find markers that will allow timely diagnosis and to propose new therapeutic alternatives to improve the care of patients. One of the experimental approaches to study HE is microdialysis; this technique allows evaluation of different chemical substances in several organs through the recollection of samples in specific places by semi-permeable membranes. In this review we will discuss the contributions of microdialysis in the understanding of the physiological alterations in human hepatic encephalopathy and experimental models and the studies to find novel alternative therapies for this disease.

  4. Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy: Who Should Be Tested and Treated?

    PubMed

    Flamm, Steven L

    2015-08-01

    Covert hepatic encephalopathy is a common problem in cirrhosis, affecting up to 80% of patients. It is defined as test-dependent brain dysfunction with clinical consequences in the setting of cirrhosis in patients who are not disoriented. Because it is not apparent clinically, and diagnostic testing has not been standardized, the issue has often been ignored in clinical practice. Yet, the clinical consequences are notable, including impaired quality of life, diminished work productivity, and poor driving skills.

  5. Percutaneous transhepatic obliteration and percutaneous transhepatic sclerotherapy for intractable hepatic encephalopathy and gastric varices improves the hepatic function reserve.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Toru; Imai, Michitaka; Ko, Masayoshi; Sato, Hiroki; Nozawa, Yujiro; Sano, Tomoe; Iwanaga, Akito; Seki, Keiichi; Honma, Terasu; Yoshida, Toshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic obliteration (PTO) and percutaneous transhepatic sclerotherapy (PTS) are widely performed as an emergency measure in cases of variceal hemorrhage and intractable hepatic encephalopathy. The PTO/PTS technique is capable of directly blocking the blood supply in cases in which balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) is not effective, or in cases with complicated collateral flow. Although PTO/PTS is not currently the first choice due to the invasiveness of transhepatic puncture, this procedure can modify the blood flow in an antegrade manner. The present study examined the changes in hepatic function reserve following PTO/PTS for intractable hepatic encephalopathy and/or gastric varices. In total, the study included 37 patients (mean age, 61.75±12.77 years; age range, 32-88 years; male to female ratio, 23:14) with a variety of gastrorenal shunts, or B-RTO-intractable hepatic encephalopathy and gastric varices without gastrorenal shunts. The patients underwent PTO/PTS by embolizing a microcoil or injection of a sclerosing agent (5% ethanolamine oleate iopamidol). Alterations in hepatic function reserve prior to and following the procedure were compared. The patients were treated for hepatic encephalopathy in 11 patients, gastric varices in 19 patients, and both conditions in 7 patients. The results indicated that the blood ammonia level improved from 135.76±75.23 mg/dl to 88.00±42.16 and 61.81±33.75 mg/dl at 3 and 6 months after therapy, respectively. In addition, the Child-Pugh score improved from 8.48±2.01 prior to therapy to 7.70±1.84 and 7.22±2.01 at 3 and 6 months after the procedure, respectively. Although there was a concern that PTO/PTS may cause complications due to an increase in portal venous pressure (PVP) arising from shunt occlusion, no severe complications were observed. In conclusion, for patients with various gastrorenal shunts or those with B-RTO-intractable hepatic encephalopathy and gastric

  6. Surgical attenuation of spontaneous congenital portosystemic shunts in dogs resolves hepatic encephalopathy but not hypermanganesemia.

    PubMed

    Gow, Adam G; Frowde, Polly E; Elwood, Clive M; Burton, Carolyn A; Powell, Roger M; Tappin, Simon W; Foale, Rob D; Duncan, Andrew; Mellanby, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    Hypermanganesemia is commonly recognized in human patients with hepatic insufficiency and portosystemic shunting. Since manganese is neurotoxic, increases in brain manganese concentrations have been implicated in the development of hepatic encephalopathy although a direct causative role has yet to be demonstrated. Evaluate manganese concentrations in dogs with a naturally occurring congenital shunt before and after attenuation as well as longitudinally following the changes in hepatic encephalopathy grade. Our study demonstrated that attenuation of the shunt resolved encephalopathy, significantly reduced postprandial bile acids, yet a hypermanganasemic state persisted. This study demonstrates that resolution of hepatic encephalopathy can occur without the correction of hypermanganesemia, indicating that increased manganese concentrations alone do not play a causative role in encephalopathy. Our study further demonstrates the value of the canine congenital portosystemic shunt as a naturally occurring spontaneous model of human hepatic encephalopathy.

  7. Hepatic Encephalopathy Secondary to Intrahepatic Portosystemic Venous Shunt: Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Embolization with n-Butyl Cyanoacrylate and Microcoils

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Iida, Shigeharu; Kato, Takeharu; Tanaka, Osamu; Matsushima, Shigenori; Ito, Hirotoshi; Okuyama, Chio; Ushijima, Yo; Shiga, Kensuke; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2002-06-15

    We report a 70-year-old woman with hepatic encephalopathy due to an intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt that was successfully occluded by percutaneous transcatheter embolization with n-butyl cyanoacrylate and microcoils.

  8. Advances in cirrhosis: Optimizing the management of hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Andy; Perumpail, Ryan B; Kumari, Radhika; Younossi, Zobair M; Wong, Robert J; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a major complication of cirrhosis resulting in significant socioeconomic burden, morbidity, and mortality. HE can be further subdivided into covert HE (CHE) and overt HE (OHE). CHE is a subclinical, less severe manifestation of HE and requires psychometric testing for diagnosis. Due to the time consuming screening process and lack of standardized diagnostic criteria, CHE is frequently underdiagnosed despite its recognized role as a precursor to OHE. Screening for CHE with the availability of the Stroop test has provided a pragmatic method to promptly diagnose CHE. Management of acute OHE involves institution of lactulose, the preferred first-line therapy. In addition, prompt recognition and treatment of precipitating factors is critical as it may result in complete resolution of acute episodes of OHE. Treatment goals include improvement of daily functioning, evaluation for liver transplantation, and prevention of OHE recurrence. For secondary prophylaxis, intolerance to indefinite lactulose therapy may lead to non-adherence and has been identified as a precipitating factor for recurrent OHE. Rifaximin is an effective add-on therapy to lactulose for treatment and prevention of recurrent OHE. Recent studies have demonstrated comparable efficacy of probiotic therapy to lactulose use in both primary prophylaxis and secondary prophylaxis. PMID:26692331

  9. Hepatic encephalopathy: what the multidisciplinary team can do

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Andy; Yoo, Eric R; Siddique, Osama; Perumpail, Ryan B; Cholankeril, George; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complex disease requiring a multidisciplinary approach among specialists, primary care team, family, and caregivers. HE is currently a diagnosis of exclusion, requiring an extensive workup to exclude other possible etiologies, including mental status changes, metabolic, infectious, traumatic, and iatrogenic causes. The categorization of HE encompasses a continuum, varying from the clinically silent minimal HE (MHE), which is only detectable using psychometric tests, to overt HE, which is further divided into four grades of severity. While there has been an increased effort to create fast and reliable methods for the detection of MHE, screening is still underperformed due to the lack of standardization and efficient methods of diagnosis. The management of HE requires consultation from various disciplines, including hepatology, primary care physicians, neurology, psychiatry, dietician/nutritionist, social workers, and other medical and surgical subspecialties based on clinical presentation and clear communication among these disciplines to best manage patients with HE throughout their course. The first-line therapy for HE is lactulose with or without rifaximin. Following the initial episode of overt HE, secondary prophylaxis with lactulose and/or rifaximin is indicated with the goal to prevent recurrent episodes and improve quality of life. Recent studies have demonstrated the negative impact of MHE on quality of life and clinical outcomes. In light of all this, we emphasize the importance of screening and treating MHE in patients with liver cirrhosis, particularly through a multidisciplinary team approach. PMID:28392702

  10. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy due to suture line breakdown after bladder operation.

    PubMed

    Boogerd, W; Zoetmulder, F A; Moffie, D

    1990-01-01

    A patient is described with a severe encephalopathy and hyperammonemia in absence of liver dysfunction, attributed to urine absorption into the systemic circulation due to suture line breakdown after bladder dome resection. At autopsy characteristic Alzheimer type II astrocytes were found in the basal ganglia.

  11. Diagnosis and Treatment of Low-Grade Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Direkze, Shamindra; Jalan, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (mHE) is common among patients with cirrhotic liver disease and causes significant morbidity and mortality. It may present as cognitive impairment, behavioural changes and, less frequently, with neurological symptoms which make diagnosis of the disease challenging. A history of falls and accidents may also be suggestive of mHE. Diagnosis primarily relies on at least two positive psychometric tests of which the psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score (PHES) is essential. Alternatively, PHES and an electroencephalogram may be used to establish a diagnosis. Biochemical markers of encephalopathy currently have no role in the diagnosis of mHE. Treatment is not always advocated for a diagnosis of mHE but is dependent on the degree of impairment caused by the symptoms. After treatment of other metabolic abnormalities and co-morbidities associated with cirrhosis, more specific treatment for mHE largely relies on therapies used to lower ammonia levels. Laxatives and rifaximin are commonly used in treatment and work through decreasing ammonia absorption from the gut. Other therapies, such as BCAA, LOLA, L-carnitine and phenylbutyrate, modify responses to ammonia as well as enhancing metabolism and excretion. mHE resulting from spontaneous portosystemic shunts or transhepatic intraportal systemic shunts may require ablation or reduction of the shunt. Early detection and appropriate treatment of mHE is important to prevent significant cognitive impairments and progression to overt HE.

  12. Evaluation of two experimental models of hepatic encephalopathy in rats.

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, L M; Conejo, N M; González-Pardo, H; Aller, M A; Nava, M P; Arias, J; Arias, J L

    2005-01-01

    The serious neuropsychological repercussions of hepatic encephalopathy have led to the creation of several experimental models in order to better understand the pathogenesis of the disease. In the present investigation, two possible causes of hepatic encephalopathy, cholestasis and portal hypertension, were chosen to study the behavioral impairments caused by the disease using an object recognition task. This working memory test is based on a paradigm of spontaneous delayed non-matching to sample and was performed 60 days after surgery. Male Wistar rats (225-250 g) were divided into three groups: two experimental groups, microsurgical cholestasis (N = 20) and extrahepatic portal hypertension (N = 20), and a control group (N = 20). A mild alteration of the recognition memory occurred in rats with cholestasis compared to control rats and portal hypertensive rats. The latter group showed the poorest performance on the basis of the behavioral indexes tested. In particular, only the control group spent significantly more time exploring novel objects compared to familiar ones (P < 0.001). In addition, the portal hypertension group spent the shortest time exploring both the novel and familiar objects (P < 0.001). These results suggest that the existence of portosystemic collateral circulation per se may be responsible for subclinical encephalopathy.

  13. [Role of rifaximin in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Delgado, Jordi; Miquel, Mireia

    2016-04-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a frequent and serious complication of liver cirrhosis. In addition to correction of the precipitating factors, the most commonly used treatments are non-absorbable disaccharides and rifaximin. Many of the recommendations are based on current clinical practice and there are few randomized controlled trials. Currently, rifaximin should be initiated during an episode of EH if, after 24-48 hours of non-absorbable disaccharide therapy, there is no clinical improvement. In recurrent EH, it is advisable to add rifaximin in patients under non-absorbable disaccharide therapy who develop a new episode. Currently, standard treatment with rifaximin for minimal EH is not recommended. Rifaximin is effective in the acute treatment of overt encephalopathy and in preventing recurrence.

  14. Hepatic encephalopathy: cause and possible management with botanicals.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Suyash; Tripathi, Yamini B

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a brain functional disorder, characterized by neuropsychiatric abnormalities with liver failure. High blood ammonia, causing glutamate neurotoxicity is the basic cause, finally leading to low-grade cerebral edema. Its manifestation is more likely in patients of sepsis, oxidative stress, generalized inflammation, gut mal-functioning, amoebiaesis, viral hepatitis, nervous imbalance, etc. Thus, the therapeutic goals primarily include the maintenance of proper blood supply and prevention of hypoxic condition in liver, along with management of factors responsible for high blood ammonia, oxidative stress, inflammation, and high GI- serotonin. The drugs in clinical practice include lactulose, sodium benzoate, flumazenil and rifaximin, supplementation of zinc, branched chain amino acids (BCAA), l-ornithine-l aspartate, antioxidants and iNOS inhibitors. However, herbal formulations would be of great importance as it shows multi-targeted action because it possesses a natural cocktail of secondary metabolites. It can collectively act as an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, prebiotic, hepatoprotective and neuron-protective agents. We have briefly outlined some of these plants and also recent patents useful in the management of hepatic encephalopathy.

  15. Current Concepts in the Pathophysiology and Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) represents a broad continuum of neuropsychological dysfunction in patients with acute or chronic liver disease and/or portosystemic shunting of blood flow. The pathophysiology of this disease is quite complex, as it involves overproduction and reduced metabolism of various neurotoxins, particularly ammonia. Recent hypotheses implicate low-grade cerebral edema as a final common pathway for the pathophysiology of HE. Management of this condition is multifaceted and requires several steps: elimination of precipitating factors; removal of toxins, both by reducing them at their source and by augmenting scavenging pathways; modulation of resident fecal flora; proper nutritional support; and downregulation of systemic and gut-derived inflammation. PMID:21857820

  16. Ammonia and Its Role in the Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Parth J; Balart, Luis A

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a commonly encountered sequela of chronic liver disease and cirrhosis with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Although ammonia is implicated in the pathogenesis of HE, the exact underlying mechanisms still remain poorly understood. Its role in the urea cycle, astrocyte swelling, and glutamine and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid systems suggests that the pathogenesis is multifaceted. Greater understanding in its underlying mechanism may offer more targeted therapeutic options in the future, and thus further research is necessary to fully understand the pathogenesis of HE.

  17. Elevated cerebral lactate: Implications in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Bosoi, Cristina R; Rose, Christopher F

    2014-12-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome, is a frequent complication of liver failure/disease. Increased concentrations of lactate are commonly observed in HE patients, in the systemic circulation, but also in the brain. Traditionally, increased cerebral lactate is considered a marker of energy failure/impairment however alterations in lactate homeostasis may also lead to a rise in brain lactate and result in neuronal dysfunction. The latter may involve the development of brain edema. This review will target the significance of increased cerebral lactate in the pathogenesis of HE.

  18. Comparative Neuroprotective Effects of Dexamethasone and Minocycline during Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Gamal, Maha; Abdel Wahab, Zainab; Eshra, Mohamed; Rashed, Laila; Sharawy, Nivin

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Encephalopathy and brain edema are serious complications of acute liver injury and may lead to rapid death of patients. The present study was designed to investigate the role of the inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress in the cytotoxic brain oedema and the neuroprotective effects of both minocycline and dexamethasone. Methods. 48 male albino rats were divided into 4 groups: control group, acute liver injury (ALI) group, minocycline pretreated ALI group, and dexamethasone pretreated ALI group. 24 hours after acute liver injury serum ammonia, liver enzymes, brain levels of heme oxygenase-1 gene, iNOS gene expression, nitrite/nitrate, and cytokines were measured. In addition, the grades of encephalopathy and brain water content were assessed. Results. ALI was associated with significant increases in all measured inflammatory mediators, oxidative stress, iNOS gene expression, and nitrite/nitrate. Both minocycline and dexamethasone significantly modulated the inflammatory changes and the oxidative/nitrosative stress associated with ALI. However, only minocycline but not dexamethasone significantly reduced the cytotoxic brain oedema. Conclusion. Both minocycline and dexamethasone could modulate inflammatory and oxidative changes observed in brain after ALI and could be novel preventative therapy for hepatic encephalopathy episodes.

  19. Abnormal cortical synaptic plasticity in minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Golaszewski, Stefan; Langthaler, Patrick B; Schwenker, Kerstin; Florea, Cristina; Christova, Monica; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen; Nardone, Raffaele

    2016-07-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) represents the earliest stage of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). MHE is characterized by cognitive function impairment in the domains of attention, vigilance and integrative function, while obvious clinical manifestations are lacking. In the present study, we aimed at assessing whether subjects with MHE showed alterations in synaptic plasticity within the motor cortex. Previous findings suggest that learning in human motor cortex occurs through long-term potentiation (LTP)-like mechanisms. We employed therefore the paired associative stimulation (PAS) protocol by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which is able to induce LTP-like effects in the motor cortex of normal subjects. Fifteen patients with MHE and 15 age- and sex-matched cirrhotic patients without MHE were recruited. PAS consisted of 180 electrical stimuli of the right median nerve paired with a single TMS over the hotspot of right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) at an ISI of 25ms (PAS25). We measured motor evoked potentials (MEPs) before and after each intervention for up to 30min. In healthy subjects the PAS25 protocol was followed by a significant increase of the MEP amplitude. On the contrary, in patients with MHE the MEP amplitude was slightly reduced after PAS. These findings demonstrated that associative sensorimotor plasticity, an indirect probe for motor learning, is impaired in MHE patients.

  20. Associative learning deficit in two experimental models of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Marta; Méndez-López, Magdalena; López, Laudino; Aller, María Angeles; Arias, Jaime; Arias, Jorge L

    2009-03-17

    People with hepatic insufficiency can develop hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a complex neuropsychological syndrome covering a wide range of neurological and cognitive and motor alterations. The cognitive deficits include disturbances in intellectual functions such as memory and learning. In spite of its high prevalence in western societies, the causes of HE have not yet been clearly established. For this reason, experimental models of HE are used to study this condition. In this work, two experimental models were used, one Type B HE (portacaval shunt) and the other Type C HE (cirrhosis by intoxication with thioacetamide), to evaluate its effect on two tasks of associative learning: two-way active avoidance and step-through passive avoidance. The results show an impediment both in acquisition and retention of active avoidance in both models of HE. However, in passive avoidance, only the rats with portacaval shunt presented a memory deficit for the aversive event. In our opinion, these results can be explained by alterations in the neurotransmission system presented by animals with hepatic insufficiency, which are mainly caused by a rise in cerebral histamine and a dysfunction of the glutamatergic system.

  1. Contemporary Understanding and Management of Overt and Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    NeSmith, Meghan; Ahn, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a major complication of liver disease that leads to significant morbidity and mortality. Caring for hospitalized patients with HE is becoming more complex, and the economic burden of HE continues to rise. Defining and diagnosing HE, particularly covert HE (CHE), remain challenging. In this article, we review new tools and those currently under development for the diagnosis of CHE and the latest advances in the acute and long-term management of overt HE (OHE) and CHE. In particular, we review the latest data on the use of lactulose and rifaximin for treatment of OHE and summarize the data on adjunctive agents such as sodium benzoate and probiotics. PMID:27182210

  2. Covert and Overt Hepatic Encephalopathy: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Patidar, Kavish R.; Bajaj, Jasmohan S.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is part of a spectrum of neurocognitive changes in cirrhosis. HE is divided into two broad categories based on severity, covert (CHE) and overt (CHE). CHE has a significant impact on a patient’s quality of life, driving performances, and has recently been associated with increased hospitalizations and death. Likewise, OHE is associated with increased rates of hospitalizations and mortality, and poor quality of life. Given its significant burden on patients, care takers, and the health care system, it’s imperative for early diagnosis and management. In addition, a focus should also be directed on patient and family member education on the disease progression and adherence to medications. Treatment strategies include the use of non-absorbable disaccharides, antibiotics (i.e. rifaximin), and potentially probiotics. Other therapies currently under further investigation include: L-ornithine-L-aspartate, ornithine phenylacetate, glycerol phenylbutyrate, molecular adsorbent recirculating system, and albumin infusion. PMID:26164219

  3. Mapping Metabolic Brain Activity in Three Models of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Marta; Fidalgo, Camino; Aller, María Ángeles; Arias, Jaime; Arias, Jorge L.

    2013-01-01

    Cirrhosis is a common disease in Western countries. Liver failure, hyperammonemia, and portal hypertension are the main factors that contribute to human cirrhosis that frequently leads to a neuropsychiatric disorder known as hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In this study, we examined the differential contribution of these leading factors to the oxidative metabolism of diverse brain limbic system regions frequently involved in memory process by histochemical labelling of cytochrome oxidase (COx). We have analyzed cortical structures such as the infralimbic and prelimbic cotices, subcortical structures such as hippocampus and ventral striatum, at thalamic level like the anterodorsal, anteroventral, and mediodorsal thalamus, and, finally, the hypothalamus, where the mammillary nuclei (medial and lateral) were measured. The severest alteration is found in the model that mimics intoxication by ammonia, followed by the thioacetamide-treated group and the portal hypertension group. No changes were found at the mammillary bodies for any of the experimental groups. PMID:23573412

  4. [Research advances in diagnosis and treatment of post-transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Yang, J F; Zhang, B Q

    2016-07-20

    Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) has become an important minimally invasive interventional technique for the treatment of complications of cirrhotic portal hypertension, and currently, it is often used in cirrhotic patients with esophagogastric variceal bleeding (EVB), intractable ascites, hepatic hydrothorax, and Budd-Chiari syndrome. On one hand, TIPS can effectively reduce portal vein pressure and the risk of EVB and intractable ascites; on the other hand, it may reduce the blood flow in liver perfusion, aggravate liver impairment, and cause porto-systemic encephalopathy. Related influencing factors should be evaluated comprehensively in order to prevent the development of post-TIPS hepatic encephalopathy. The diagnosis and treatment of post-TIPS hepatic encephalopathy is still a great challenge in current clinical practice. This article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of post-TIPS hepatic encephalopathy to enhance people's knowledge of this disease.

  5. Brain concentrations of benzodiazepines are elevated in an animal model of hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Pannell, L.; Jaouni, T.; Gammal, S.H.; Fales, H.M.; Jones, E.A.; Skolnick, P. )

    1990-07-01

    Brain extracts from rats with hepatic encephalopathy due to thioacetamide-induced fulminant hepatic failure contained 4- to 6-fold higher concentrations of substances that inhibit radioligand binding to benzodiazepine receptors than corresponding control rat extracts. Both isocratic and gradient-elution HPLC indicated that this inhibitory activity was localized in 3-8 peaks with retention times corresponding to deschlorodiazepam, deschlorolorazepam, lorazepam, oxazepam, diazepam, and N-desmethyldiazepam. The presence of diazepam and N-desmethyldiazepam was confirmed by mass spectroscopy. Both mass spectroscopic and radiometric techniques indicated that the concentrations of N-desmethyldiazepam and diazepam in brain extracts from encephalopathic rats were 2-9 and 5-7 times higher, respectively, than in control brain extracts. While benzodiazepines have been identified previously in mammalian and plant tissues, this report demonstrates that concentrations of these substances are increased in a pathophysiological condition. These findings provide a rational basis for the use of benzodiazepine receptor antagonists in the management of hepatic encephalopathy in humans.

  6. The Effects of Probiotics and Symbiotics on Risk Factors for Hepatic Encephalopathy: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Viramontes Hörner, Daniela; Avery, Amanda; Stow, Ruth

    2017-01-05

    Alterations in the levels of intestinal microbiota, endotoxemia, and inflammation are novel areas of interest in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Probiotics and symbiotics are a promising treatment option for HE due to possible beneficial effects in modulating gut microflora and might be better tolerated and more cost-effective than the traditional treatment with lactulose, rifaximin or L-ornithine-L-aspartate. A systematic search of the electronic databases PubMed, ISI Web of Science, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library was conducted for randomized controlled clinical trials in adult patients with cirrhosis, evaluating the effect of probiotics and symbiotics in changes on intestinal microflora, reduction of endotoxemia, inflammation, and ammonia, reversal of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE), prevention of overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE), and improvement of quality of life. Nineteen trials met the inclusion criteria. Probiotics and symbiotics increased beneficial microflora and decreased pathogenic bacteria and endotoxemia compared with placebo/no treatment, but no effect was observed on inflammation. Probiotics significantly reversed MHE [risk ratio, 1.53; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14, 2.05; P=0.005] and reduced OHE development (risk ratio, 0.62; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.80; P=0.0002) compared with placebo/no treatment. Symbiotics significantly decreased ammonia levels compared with placebo (15.24; 95% CI: -26.01, -4.47; P=0.006). Probiotics did not show any additional benefit on reversal of MHE and prevention of OHE development when compared with lactulose, rifaximin, and L-ornithine-L-aspartate. Only 5 trials considered tolerance with minimal side effects reported. Although further research is warranted, probiotics and symbiotics should be considered as an alternative therapy for the treatment and management of HE given the results reported in this systematic review.

  7. Persistent repeated measurements by magnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrate minimal hepatic encephalopathy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Scheau, C; Popa, G A; Ghergus, A E; Preda, E M; Capsa, R A; Lupescu, I G

    2013-09-15

    Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy (MHE), previously referred to as infraclinical or subclinical is a precursor in the development of clinical hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The demonstration of MHE is done through neuropsychological testing in the absence of clinical evidence of HE, patients showing only a mild cognitive impairment. Neuropsychological tests employed consist of Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) and portosystemic encephalopathy (PSE) test score. Unfortunately, there are numerous occasions when the tests prove irrelevant: in the situation of inexperienced investigators, the patient's poor education, vision problems or concurring central nervous system disease, all of which may delay or deviate from the correct diagnosis.

  8. Ammonia and amino acid profiles in liver cirrhosis: effects of variables leading to hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Holecek, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Hyperammonemia and severe amino acid imbalances play central role in hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the article is demonstrated that the main source of ammonia in cirrhotic subjects is activated breakdown of glutamine (GLN) in enterocytes and the kidneys and the main source of GLN is ammonia detoxification to GLN in the brain and skeletal muscle. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA; valine, leucine, and isoleucine) decrease due to activated GLN synthesis in muscle. Aromatic amino acids (AAA; phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan) and methionine increase due to portosystemic shunts and reduced ability of diseased liver. The effects on aminoacidemia of the following variables that may affect the course of liver disease are discussed: nutritional status, starvation, protein intake, inflammation, acute hepatocellular damage, bleeding from varices, portosystemic shunts, hepatic cancer, and renal failure. It is concluded that (1) neither ammonia nor amino acid concentrations correlate closely with the severity of liver disease; (2) BCAA/AAA ratio could be used as a good index of liver impairment and for early detection of derangements in amino acid metabolism; (3) variables potentially leading to overt encephalopathy exert substantial but uneven effects; and (4) careful monitoring of ammonia and aminoacidemia may discover important break points in the course of liver disease and indicate appropriate therapeutic approach. Of special importance might be isoleucine deficiency in bleeding from varices, arginine deficiency in sepsis, and a marked rise of GLN and ammonia levels that may appear in all events leading to HE.

  9. Encephalopathy with retinitis due to cat-scratch disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, R A; Scott, B; Beverley, D W; Lyon, F; Taylor, R

    2007-12-01

    Cat-scratch disease is one of several diseases known to be caused by Bartonella species. Some infections due to Bartonella resolve spontaneously without treatment with antibiotics, but in other cases the disease can be fatal without treatment. This case study reports a 7-year-old male who presented with an unexplained encephalopathy and unusual retinal findings associated with evidence supporting infection by B. henselae. The 7-year-old male presented with a 2-week history of general malaise and cervical lymphadenopathy progressing onto fever, headache, vomiting, and confusion associated with meningism. Lumbar puncture revealed a raised cerebrospinal fluid protein, low glucose, and raised white cell count. Abnormal retinal findings and raised antibodies titres to B. quintana indicated a diagnosis of cat-scratch disease. He was treated with azithromycin orally for 3 weeks and made a complete recovery.

  10. Low phase angle is associated with the development of hepatic encephalopathy in patients with cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Margáin, Astrid; Macías-Rodríguez, Ricardo Ulises; Ampuero, Javier; Cubero, Francisco Javier; Chi-Cervera, Luis; Ríos-Torres, Silvia L; Duarte-Rojo, Andrés; Espinosa-Cuevas, Ángeles; Romero-Gómez, Manuel; Torre, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    AIM Evaluate the association between phase angle and the development of hepatic encephalopathy in the long-term follow-up of cirrhotic patients. METHODS This was a prospective cohort study. Clinical, nutritional and biochemical evaluations were performed. Mann-Whitney’s U and χ2 tests were used as appropriate. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional Hazards analysis were used to evaluate the prediction and incidence of hepatic encephalopathy. RESULTS Two hundred and twenty were included; the most frequent etiology of cirrhosis was hepatitis C infection, 52% of the patients developed hepatic encephalopathy (18.6% covert and 33.3% overt); the main precipitating factors were infections and variceal bleeding. Kaplan-Meier curves showed a higher proportion of HE in the group with low phase angle (39%) compared to the normal phase angle group (13%) (P = 0.012). Furthermore, creatinine and phase angle remained independently associated to hepatic encephalopathy in the Cox regression multivariate analysis [hazard ratio = 1.80 (1.07-3.03)]. CONCLUSION In our cohort of patients low phase angle was associated with an increased incidence of hepatic encephalopathy. Phase angle is a useful nutritional marker that evaluates cachexia and could be used as a part of the integral assessment in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:28018114

  11. Intermittent hyperammonemic encephalopathy after ureterosigmoidostomy: spontaneous onset in the absence of hepatic failure

    PubMed Central

    Viertmann, Anne-Odette; Janßen, Claudia; Birklein, Frank; Thüroff, Joachim W.; Stein, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent hyperammonemic encephalopathy after ureterosigmoidostomy is a rare, but if unrecognized, potentially lethal condition. Ureterosigmoidostomy was performed in a male patient with bladder extrophy. After 35 years, he developed hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Diagnostic procedures did not reveal hepatic nor metabolic disorders. Despite administration of preventive medical treatment, several episodes recurred. A durable prevention was finally achieved by conversion into an ileal conduit. Intermittent hyperammonemic encephalopathy can occur decades after ureterosigmoidostomy. In the case of absence of metabolic disorders and resistance to medical treatment, conversion into a urinary diversion using an ileal segment constitutes an effective ultima ratio. PMID:25914851

  12. Tranilast reduces serum IL-6 and IL-13 and protects against thioacetamide-induced acute liver injury and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Rania R; Elkashef, Wagdi F; Said, Eman

    2015-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious neuropsychiatric disorder usually affecting either acute or chronic hepatic failure patients. Hepatic encephalopathy was replicated in a validated rat model to assess the potential protective efficacy of tranilast against experimentally induced hepatic encephalopathy. Thioacetamide injection significantly impaired hepatic synthetic, metabolic and excretory functions with significant increase in serum NO, IL-6 and IL-13 levels and negative shift in the oxidant/antioxidant balance. Most importantly, there was a significant increase in serum ammonia levels with significant astrocytes' swelling and vacuolization; hallmarks of hepatic encephalopathy. Tranilast administration (300 mg/kg, orally) for 15 days significantly improved hepatic functions, restored oxidant/antioxidant balance, reduced serum NO, IL-6 and IL-13 levels. Meanwhile, serum ammonia significantly declined with significant reduction in astrocytes' swelling and vacuolization. Several mechanisms can be implicated in the observed hepato- and neuroprotective potentials of tranilast, such as its anti-inflammatory potential, its antioxidant potential as well as its immunomodulatory properties.

  13. Rifaximin therapy and hepatic encephalopathy: Pros and cons

    PubMed Central

    Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Ridola, Lorenzo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Campo, Salvatore MA; Riggio, Oliviero

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is the second most common major complication in cirrhotics and it significantly impacts quality of life. Therapeutic approaches for HE treatment and prevention mainly continue to rely on ammonia-lowering strategies and non-absorbable disaccharides are currently considered the cornerstone therapy. Non-absorbable antibiotics, such as neomycin and paramomycin, are effective in treatment of acute HE episodes but their prolonged use for recurrence prevention is hampered by possible side-effects. To overcome these limitations, rifaximin use has been proposed. Rifaximin has been shown to be not superior to non-absorbable disaccharides for either HE treatment or prevention, with a similar incidence of side-effects. Cirrhosis significantly increases rifaximin absorption and this could be a cause for concern. Following long-term rifaximin therapy, Clostridium difficile colitis has been observed and Candida albicans has been isolated from 20% of patients. In addition, selection of resistant mutants of both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract cannot be definitely ruled out. Electrolyte alterations (sodium and potassium) have been reported during rifaximin therapy, a warning for its long-term use in cirrhotics. Moreover, a potential interference with vitamin K production should be considered which could further impair the already altered clotting status of these patients. The therapeutic cost of rifaximin is markedly higher than non-absorbable disaccharides. While waiting for further safety data, caution should be used to limit the use of rifaximin therapy for a very short-term period in selected HE cirrhotics not responding to non-absorbable disaccharides. PMID:22966484

  14. The slowed brain: cortical oscillatory activity in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Butz, Markus; May, Elisabeth S; Häussinger, Dieter; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2013-08-15

    Oscillatory activity of the human brain has received growing interest as a key mechanism of large-scale integration across different brain regions. Besides a crucial role of oscillatory activity in the emergence of other neurological and psychiatric diseases, recent evidence indicates a key role in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). This review summarizes the current knowledge on pathological alterations of oscillatory brain activity in association with liver dysfunction and HE in the context of spontaneous brain activity, motor symptoms, sensory processing, and attention. The existing literature demonstrates a prominent slowing of the frequency of oscillatory activity as shown for spontaneous brain activity at rest, with respect to deficits of motor behavior and motor symptoms, and in the context of visual attention processes. The observed slowing extends across different subsystems of the brain and has been confirmed across different frequency bands, providing evidence for ubiquitous changes of oscillatory activity in HE. For example, the frequency of cortico-muscular coherence in HE patients appears at the frequency of the mini-asterixis (⩽12Hz), while cirrhotics without overt signs of HE show coherence similar to healthy subjects, i.e. at 13-30Hz. Interestingly, the so-called critical flicker frequency (CFF) as a measure of the processing of an oscillating visual stimulus has emerged as a useful tool to quantify HE disease severity, correlating with behavioral and neurophysiological alterations. Moreover, the CFF reliably distinguishes patients with manifest HE from cirrhotics without any signs of HE and healthy controls using a cut-off frequency of 39Hz. In conclusion, oscillatory activity is globally slowed in HE in close association with HE symptoms and disease severity. Although the underlying causal mechanisms are not yet understood, these results indicate that pathological changes of oscillatory activity play an important role in the

  15. Frontal assessment battery: A tool for screening minimal hepatic encephalopathy?

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Karina Zamprogno; Zago-Gomes, Maria Penha

    2016-01-01

    AIM To apply the Frontal Assessment Battery to cirrhotic patients with or without overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) and controls. METHODS The frontal assessment battery (FAB) was applied to 87 patients with liver cirrhosis (16 with and 71 without OHE) and 40 control subjects without cirrhosis treated at the alcohol and liver outpatient clinics and the gastroenterology ward of the Cassiano Antônio de Moraes University Hospital (Hospital Universitário Cassiano Antônio de Moraes - HUCAM), Espírito Santo, Brazil. RESULTS The average FAB score was lower for the cirrhotic than for the non-cirrhotic patients (10.6 ± 3.67 vs 12.25 ± 2.72, P = 0.015). The FAB score was lower for the cirrhotic patients with OHE than for the patients without OHE (8.25 ± 4.55 vs 11.14 ± 3.25, P = 0.027). The total FAB score was lower for the cirrhotic patients without OHE than for the non-cirrhotic patients, although this difference was not significant (11.14 ± 3.25 vs 12.25 ± 2.72, P = 0.067). Nevertheless, the difference in the scores on the subtest that assessed the ability to inhibit a response previously conditioned to a stimulus was significant (1.72 ± 0.93 vs 2.2 ± 0.85, P = 0.011). CONCLUSION The present study indicates that the FAB is a promising tool for outpatient minimal HE screening and the assessment of HE severity. PMID:27843536

  16. Rifaximin therapy and hepatic encephalopathy: Pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Ridola, Lorenzo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Campo, Salvatore Ma; Riggio, Oliviero

    2012-08-06

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is the second most common major complication in cirrhotics and it significantly impacts quality of life. Therapeutic approaches for HE treatment and prevention mainly continue to rely on ammonia-lowering strategies and non-absorbable disaccharides are currently considered the cornerstone therapy. Non-absorbable antibiotics, such as neomycin and paramomycin, are effective in treatment of acute HE episodes but their prolonged use for recurrence prevention is hampered by possible side-effects. To overcome these limitations, rifaximin use has been proposed. Rifaximin has been shown to be not superior to non-absorbable disaccharides for either HE treatment or prevention, with a similar incidence of side-effects. Cirrhosis significantly increases rifaximin absorption and this could be a cause for concern. Following long-term rifaximin therapy, Clostridium difficile colitis has been observed and Candida albicans has been isolated from 20% of patients. In addition, selection of resistant mutants of both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract cannot be definitely ruled out. Electrolyte alterations (sodium and potassium) have been reported during rifaximin therapy, a warning for its long-term use in cirrhotics. Moreover, a potential interference with vitamin K production should be considered which could further impair the already altered clotting status of these patients. The therapeutic cost of rifaximin is markedly higher than non-absorbable disaccharides. While waiting for further safety data, caution should be used to limit the use of rifaximin therapy for a very short-term period in selected HE cirrhotics not responding to non-absorbable disaccharides.

  17. Brain Training with Video Games in Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Jasmohan S; Ahluwalia, Vishwadeep; Thacker, Leroy R; Fagan, Andrew; Gavis, Edith A; Lennon, Michael; Heuman, Douglas M; Fuchs, Michael; Wade, James B

    2017-02-01

    Despite the associated adverse outcomes, pharmacologic intervention for covert hepatic encephalopathy (CHE) is not the standard of care. We hypothesized that a video game-based rehabilitation program would improve white matter integrity and brain connectivity in the visuospatial network on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), resulting in improved cognitive function in CHE subjects on measures consistent with the cognitive skill set emphasized by the two video games (e.g., IQ Boost-visual working memory, and Aim and Fire Challenge-psychomotor speed), but also generalize to thinking skills beyond the focus of the cognitive training (Hopkins verbal learning test (HVLT)-verbal learning/memory) and improve their health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The trial included three phases over 8 weeks; during the learning phase (cognitive tests administered twice over 2 weeks without intervening intervention), training phase (daily video game training for 4 weeks), and post-training phase (testing 2 weeks after the video game training ended). Thirty CHE patients completed all visits with significant daily achievement on the video games. In a subset of 13 subjects that underwent brain MRI, there was a significant decrease in fractional anisotropy, and increased radial diffusivity (suggesting axonal sprouting or increased cross-fiber formation) involving similar brain regions (i.e., corpus callosum, internal capsule, and sections of the corticospinal tract) and improvement in the visuospatial resting-state connectivity corresponding to the video game training domains. No significant corresponding improvement in HRQOL or HVLT performance was noted, but cognitive performance did transiently improve on cognitive tests similar to the video games during training. Although multimodal brain imaging changes suggest reductions in tract edema and improved neural network connectivity, this trial of video game brain training did not improve the HRQOL or produce lasting improvement in

  18. Current diagnosis and management of post-transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt refractory hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Keith; Carrion, Andres F; Martin, Paul; Vaheesan, Kirubahara; Salsamendi, Jason; Doshi, Mehul; Yrizarry, Jose M

    2015-12-01

    Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt has evolved into an important option for management of complications of portal hypertension. The use of polytetrafluoroethylene covered stents enhances shunt patency. Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) remains a significant problem after TIPS placement. The approach to management of patients with refractory hepatic encephalopathy typically requires collaboration between different specialties. Patient selection for TIPS requires careful evaluation of risk factors for HE. TIPS procedure-related technical factors like stent size, attention to portosystemic pressure gradient reduction and use of adjunctive variceal embolization maybe important. Conservative medical therapy in combination with endovascular therapies often results in resolution or substantial reduction of symptoms. Liver transplantation is, however, the ultimate treatment.

  19. Brain metabolism in patients with hepatic encephalopathy studied by PET and MR.

    PubMed

    Keiding, Susanne; Pavese, Nicola

    2013-08-15

    We review PET- and MR studies on hepatic encephalopathy (HE) metabolism in human subjects from the point of views of methods, methodological assumptions and use in studies of cirrhotic patients with clinically overt HE, cirrhotic patients with minimal HE, cirrhotic patients with no history of HE and healthy subjects. Key results are: (1) Cerebral oxygen uptake and blood flow are reduced to 2/3 in cirrhotic patients with clinically overt HE but not in cirrhotic patients with minimal HE or no HE compared to healthy subjects. (2) Cerebral ammonia metabolism is enhanced due to increased blood ammonia in cirrhotic patients but the kinetics of cerebral ammonia uptake and metabolism is not affected by hyperammonemia. (3) Recent advantages in MR demonstrate low-grade cerebral oedema not only in astrocytes but also in the white matter in cirrhotic patients with HE.

  20. Brain proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for hepatic encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Chin-Sing; McConnell, James R.; Chu, Wei-Kom

    1993-08-01

    Liver failure can induce gradations of encephalopathy from mild to stupor to deep coma. The objective of this study is to investigate and quantify the variation of biochemical compounds in the brain in patients with liver failure and encephalopathy, through the use of water- suppressed, localized in-vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (HMRS). The spectral parameters of the compounds quantitated are: N-Acetyl Aspartate (NAA) to Creatine (Cr) ratio, Choline (Cho) to Creatine ratio, Inositol (Ins) to Creatine ratio and Glutamine-Glutamate Amino Acid (AA) to Creatine ratio. The study group consisted of twelve patients with proven advanced chronic liver failure and symptoms of encephalopathy. Comparison has been done with results obtained from five normal subjects without any evidence of encephalopathy or liver diseases.

  1. Effects of raloxifene on portal hypertension and hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic rats.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Chih; Lee, Wen-Shin; Chuang, Chiao-Lin; Hsin, I-Fang; Hsu, Shao-Jung; Chang, Ting; Huang, Hui-Chun; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2017-05-05

    Raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, has been used extensively for osteoporosis. In addition to the effect of osteoporosis treatment, emerging evidences show that raloxifene affects the vascular function in different tissues. Cirrhosis is characterized with portal hypertension and complicated with hepatic encephalopathy. Portal hypertension affects portal-systemic shunt which leads to hepatic encephalopathy that the vascular modulation might influence severity of hepatic encephalopathy. Herein, we evaluated the impact of raloxifene on bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced cirrhotic rats. The female Sprague-Dawley rats received BDL plus ovariectomy or sham-operation. Four weeks later, rats were divided into 2 subgroups respectively to receive of raloxifene (10mg/kg/day) or saline (vehicle) for 14 days. On the 43th day, motor activities and hemodynamic parameters were measured. Hepatic and vascular mRNA and protein expressions were determined. The histopathological change of liver was examined. We found that the liver biochemistry, ammonia level and motor activity were similar between cirrhotic rats with or without raloxifene administration. The hemodynamic parameters were not significantly different except that raloxifene reduced portal venous inflow. Raloxifene exacerbated hepatic fibrosis and up-regulated hepatic endothelin-1 and cyclooxygenase 2 protein expressions. In addition, raloxifene modulated the mRNA expressions of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase and endothelin-1 in the superior mesenteric artery and collateral vessel. In conclusion, raloxifene aggravates hepatic fibrosis and decreases portal venous inflow in cirrhotic rats without adversely affecting portal hypertension and hepatic encephalopathy. The modulation of hepatic and vascular endothelin-1, endothelial nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase expressions may play a role in the mechanism.

  2. Hyperammonemia Is Associated with Increasing Severity of Both Liver Cirrhosis and Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ayub, Maimoona; Khan, Wazir Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hyperammonemia resulting from chronic liver disease (CLD) can potentially challenge and damage any organ system of the body, particularly the brain. However, there is still some controversy regarding the diagnostic or prognostic values of serum ammonia in patients with over hepatic encephalopathy, especially in the setting of acute-on-chronic or chronic liver failure. Moreover, the association of serum ammonia with worsening Child-Pugh grade of liver cirrhosis has not been studied. Objective. This study was conducted to solve the controversy regarding the association between hyperammonemia and cirrhosis, especially hepatic encephalopathy in chronically failed liver. Material and Methods. In this study, 171 cirrhotic patients had their serum ammonia measured and analyzed by SPSS version 16. Chi-squared test and one-way ANOVA were applied. Results. The study had 110 male and 61 female participants. The mean age of all the participants in years was 42.33 ± 7.60. The mean duration (years) of CLD was 10.15 ± 3.53 while the mean Child-Pugh (CP) score was 8.84 ± 3.30. Chronic viral hepatitis alone was responsible for 71.3% of the cases. Moreover, 86.5% of participants had hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The frequency of hyperammonemia was 67.3%, more frequent in males (N = 81, z-score = 2.4, and P < 0.05) than in females (N = 34, z-score = 2.4, and P < 0.05), and had a statistically significant relationship with increasing CP grade of cirrhosis (χ2(2) = 27.46, P < 0.001, Phi = 0.40, and P < 0.001). Furthermore, serum ammonia level was higher in patients with hepatic encephalopathy than in those without it; P < 0.001. Conclusion. Hyperammonemia is associated with both increasing Child-Pugh grade of liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:27847646

  3. Altered metal metabolism in patients with HCV-related cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Marano, Massimo; Vespasiani Gentilucci, Umberto; Altamura, Claudia; Siotto, Mariacristina; Squitti, Rosanna; Bucossi, Serena; Quintiliani, Livia; Migliore, Simone; Greco, Federico; Scarciolla, Laura; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Picardi, Antonio; Vernieri, Fabrizio

    2015-12-01

    Dysfunctional metal homeostasis contributes to oxidative stress and neuronal damage. These have been implicated in hepatic encephalopathy pathogenesis. To investigate whether altered metal metabolism is associated with hepatic encephalopathy. Twenty-one controls and 34 HCV-cirrhotic patients (ENC/NEC patients according to presence/absence of previous overt episodes of hepatic encephalopathy) and a control group were studied. Serum iron, copper, ceruloplasmin, ceruloplasmin activity, transferrin, and ceruloplasmin/transferrin ratio were determined. Neuropsychological tests were performed by the repeatable battery of neuropsychological status. Magnetic resonance assessed basal ganglia volumes and metal deposition (pallidal index and T2*). Cirrhotic patients performed worse than controls at cognitive tests, especially ENC patients,. At biochemical analysis copper concentrations, ceruloplasmin activity and transferrin levels were lower in ENC than in NEC patients and controls (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Ceruloplasmin/transferrin ratio was higher in ENC compared to NEC patients (p < 0.05), and controls (p < 0.01). By brain magnetic resonance, ENC patients showed reduced caudate and globus pallidus volumes compared to controls (p < 0.05), and ENC and NEC patients an increased pallidal index compared to controls (p < 0.01). In ENC patients, ceruloplasmin activity correlated with caudate volume and pallidal index (ρ = 0.773 and ρ = -0.683, p < 0.05). Altered metal metabolism likely contributes to cirrhotic hepatic encephalopathy.

  4. How to diagnose and manage hepatic encephalopathy: a consensus statement on roles and responsibilities beyond the liver specialist

    PubMed Central

    Dunk, Arthur A.; Jalan, Rajiv; Kircheis, Gerald; de Knegt, Robert J.; Laleman, Wim; Ramage, John K.; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Morgan, Ian E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatic encephalopathy is defined as brain dysfunction caused by liver insufficiency and/or portosystemic shunting. Symptoms include nonspecific cognitive impairment, personality changes and changes in consciousness. Overt (symptomatic) hepatic encephalopathy is a common complication of cirrhosis that is associated with a poor prognosis. Patients with hepatic encephalopathy may present to healthcare providers who do not have primary responsibility for management of patients with cirrhosis. Therefore, we developed a series of ‘consensus points’ to provide some guidance on management. Methods Using a modified ‘Delphi’ process, consensus statements were developed that summarize our recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with hepatic encephalopathy. Points on which full consensus could not be reached are also discussed. Results Our recommendations emphasize the role of all healthcare providers in the identification of cognitive impairment in patients with cirrhosis and provide guidance on steps that might be considered to make a diagnosis of overt hepatic encephalopathy. In addition, treatment recommendations are summarized. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy can have a significant impact on patients; however, in most circumstances identification and management of minimal hepatic encephalopathy remains the responsibility of specialists in liver diseases. Conclusion Our opinion statements aim to define the roles and responsibilities of all healthcare providers who at times care for patients with cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. We suggest that these recommendations be considered further by colleagues in other disciplines and hope that future guidelines consider the management of patients with cirrhosis and with a ‘suspicion’ of cognitive impairment through to a formal diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:26600154

  5. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. 96.2 Section 96.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. (b) Casings from... spongiform encephalopathy. (a) Swine casings. The importation of swine casings that originated in or...

  6. Reversible weakness and encephalopathy while on long-term valproate treatment due to carnitine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Al-sharefi, Ahmed; Bilous, Rudy

    2015-09-02

    We describe a case of a 35-year-old woman who presented with bilateral leg weakness and encephalopathy while on long-term valproate therapy. She was diagnosed with valproate-induced encephalopathy due to carnitine deficiency. Clinical improvement occurred with oral carnitine supplementation. Our case report highlights the importance of considering carnitine deficiency in patients presenting with unexplained neurological signs while on long-term valproate treatment.

  7. Klüver-Bucy syndrome following status epilepticus associated with hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Naito, Kosuke; Hashimoto, Takao; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2008-02-01

    Described here is the case of a patient with liver cirrhosis who developed bilateral temporo-occipital lobe lesions on MRI and Klüver-Bucy syndrome following status epilepticus. Herpes encephalitis, paraneoplastic syndrome, Hashimoto's encephalopathy, reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episode syndrome were judged not to be involved on the basis of laboratory results. The possible cause of the temporo-occipital lesions on MRI in this patient was cortical damage related mainly to status epilepticus and partially to coexisting hepatic encephalopathy.

  8. Capsaicin affects brain function in a model of hepatic encephalopathy associated with fulminant hepatic failure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Avraham, Y; Grigoriadis, NC; Magen, I; Poutahidis, T; Vorobiav, L; Zolotarev, O; Ilan, Y; Mechoulam, R; Berry, EM

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hepatic encephalopathy is a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by liver failure. In view of the effects of cannabinoids in a thioacetamide-induced model of hepatic encephalopathy and liver disease and the beneficial effect of capsaicin (a TRPV1 agonist) in liver disease, we assumed that capsaicin may also affect hepatic encephalopathy. Experimental approach: Fulminant hepatic failure was induced in mice by thioacetamide and 24 h later, the animals were injected with one of the following compound(s): 2-arachidonoylglycerol (CB1, CB2 and TRPV1 receptor agonist); HU308 (CB2 receptor agonist), SR141716A (CB1 receptor antagonist); SR141716A+2-arachidonoylglycerol; SR144528 (CB2 receptor antagonist); capsaicin; and capsazepine (TRPV1 receptor agonist and antagonist respectively). Their neurological effects were evaluated on the basis of activity in the open field, cognitive function in an eight-arm maze and a neurological severity score. The mice were killed 3 or 14 days after thioacetamide administration. 2-arachidonoylglycerol and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, respectively. Results: Capsaicin had a neuroprotective effect in this animal model as shown by the neurological score, activity and cognitive function. The effect of capsaicin was blocked by capsazepine. Thioacetamide induced astrogliosis in the hippocampus and the cerebellum and raised brain 5-hydroxytryptamine levels, which were decreased by capsaicin, SR141716A and HU-308. Thioacetamide lowered brain 2-arachidonoylglycerol levels, an effect reversed by capsaicin. Conclusions: Capsaicin improved both liver and brain dysfunction caused by thioacetamide, suggesting that both the endocannabinoid and the vanilloid systems play important roles in hepatic encephalopathy. Modulation of these systems may have therapeutic value. PMID:19764982

  9. Phospholipid and cholesterol alterations accompany structural disarray in myelin membrane of rats with hepatic encephalopathy induced by thioacetamide.

    PubMed

    Swapna, I; Kumar, K V Sathya Sai; Reddy, P Vijaya Bhaskar; Murthy, Ch R K; Reddanna, P; Senthilkumaran, B

    2006-08-01

    Fulminant hepatic failure is often associated with a wide range of neurological symptoms which are collectively referred to as hepatic encephalopathy. Fulminant hepatic failure with associated hepatic encephalopathy has a poor prognosis with the currently available sure treatment being only liver transplantation. This is largely owing to the lack of understanding of critical factors involved in the etiology of the condition. Lipid changes have been implicated in cerebral derangements characteristic of hepatic encephalopathy. About 79% of the brain lipid is concentrated in the myelin fraction where they play an important role in ion balance and conduction of nerve impulses. Hence, in the present study we aimed to investigate changes in myelin lipid composition and structure. Myelin was isolated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation from cerebral cortex of male Wistar rats (250-300 g body weight) treated with 300 mg/kg body weight thioacetamide administered twice at 24h interval to induce hepatic encephalopathy. Significant decrease was observed in the cholesterol and phospholipids content of myelin from treated rats. Sphingomyelin, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine content also decreased significantly following 18 h of thioacetamide administration. However, phosphatidylcholine levels remained unaltered. Transmission electron microscopic observation of myelin membrane from cerebral cortex sections showed considerable disorganization in myelin structure. Increase in malondialdehyde levels precede lipid changes leading to the speculation that oxidative damage may be the critical factor leading to decrease in the anionic phospholipids. Changes in myelin were evident only in later stages of hepatic encephalopathy indicating that myelin alteration may not play a role in early stages of hepatic encephalopathy. Nevertheless, myelin alteration may have a crucial role to play in various psycho-motor alterations during later stages of hepatic encephalopathy.

  10. Creutzfeldt-Jakob-Like Syndrome due to Hypercalcemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Rösche, Johannes; Sieveking, Catharina; Kampf, Christina; Benecke, Reiner

    2015-10-01

    Hypercalcemia can cause a subacute syndrome of progressive dementia and marked changes in the electroencephalogram (EEG). We report a case of iatrogenic hypercalcemia with a close correlation between the clinical course and the EEG changes. A 73-year-old woman presented with a subacute syndrome of progressive dementia and bursts of 1.5 to 2 Hz intermittent rhythmic delta activity superimposed on a low-voltage background activity in the EEG. Clinical and EEG abnormalities rapidly resolved after normalization of serum calcium levels. As part of the diagnostic workup of a subacute progressive dementia, a serum calcium level and an EEG should be obtained to detect a Creutzfeldt-Jakob like syndrome in hypercalcemia. Unlike in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob-like syndrome induced by lithium intoxication, there are rarely myoclonic jerks and periodic discharges in hypercalcemic encephalopathy.

  11. Acute cortical blindness due to posterior reversible encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Lam, Jenny; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2008-10-01

    An acutely hypertensive 55 year-old male experienced seizures and cortical blindness post-operatively. CT scans demonstrated hypointensities in the occipital lobes bilaterally. MRI revealed symmetrical bilateral hyperintense signals in the same region, involving both grey and white matter. Thromboembolic screening investigations including vertebral artery doppler studies were normal and echocardiography demonstrated borderline left ventricular hypertrophy. A diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) was reached and there was complete resolution of blindness with antihypertensive therapy. This case supports the vasogenic theory of PRES which suggests that sustained high grade fluctuations in blood pressure lead to a reduction in cerebral vascular autoregulatory function. The resultant failure of compensatory vasoconstriction to prevent hyperperfusion causes fluid to extravasate into the occipital lobes, which in the present case resulted in cortical blindness.

  12. Recent developments in the diagnosis and treatment of covert/minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    De Rui, M; Montagnese, S; Amodio, P

    2016-01-01

    The terms minimal hepatic encephalopathy and covert hepatic encephalopathy are defined. Clinical assessment is unreliable and both require the use of diagnostic tools. Of these, psychometric tests are the most widely used. They require proper standardization and may be biased by patient cooperation or lack thereof. The measure of the critical flicker frequency and of the electroencephalogram, possibly quantified, are also useful. The alteration of any of them is not strictly parallel in size and may vary from patient to patient. When possible, the use of multiple measures might increase diagnostic reliability. These functional measures should be interpreted within the clinical/biochemical profile of the patient to exclude other disorders. A flow chart for treatment is proposed on the basis of current knowledge.

  13. Hepatic encephalopathy with reversible focal neurologic signs resembling acute stroke: case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiya; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Katsura, Ken-Ichiro; Yamazaki, Mineo; Katayama, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    A 64-year-old female with a history of primary biliary cirrhosis and esophageal varices starting at age 39 was brought to our Stroke Care Unit by ambulance with right-side weakness and speech difficulty. Physical examination revealed right hemiparesis (including the face), sensory disturbances, pathological reflexes, and slightly decreased consciousness, with a Glasgow Coma Scale rating of E3V4M6. Flapping tremors and speech disturbance, as well as anarithmia, construction apraxia, and ideomotor apraxia, were noted, and her National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 13. Initially, the patient was diagnosed with acute stroke and treated accordingly; however, subsequent findings from clinical images and electroencephalography led to a diagnosis of focal neurologic signs due to hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The patient had significantly reduced cerebral blood flow in the left side of the brain, probably due to microsurgical repair of an aneurysm done 2 years earlier. HE with exaggerated chronic liver damage might have made the previously silent ischemia clinically apparent. This interpretation is supported by the fact that the patient's neurologic deficits resolved once HE was adequately controlled. This case illustrates the need for careful assessment of background pathophysiology when diagnosing patients with stroke-like symptoms.

  14. Clinical scenarios for the use of S100β as a marker of hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Duarte-Rojo, Andrés; Ruiz-Margáin, Astrid; Macias-Rodriguez, Ricardo U; Cubero, Francisco Javier; Estradas-Trujillo, José; Muñoz-Fuentes, Rosa Ma; Torre, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the association between serum concentrations of S100β in patients with cirrhosis and the presence of low grade hepatic encephalopathy (HE). METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study. The population was categorized into four groups healthy subjects, cirrhosis without HE, cirrhosis with covert hepatic encephalopathy (CHE) and cirrhosis with overt HE. Kruskal-Wallis, Mann Whitney’s U with Bonferroni adjustment Spearman correlations and area under the ROC were used as appropriate. RESULTS: A total of 61 subjects were included, 46 cirrhotic patients and 15 healthy volunteers. S100β values were different among all groups, and differences remained significant between groups 1 and 2 (P < 0.001), and also between groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.016), but not between groups 3 and 4. In cirrhotic patients with HE S100β was higher than in patients without HE [0.18 (0.14-0.28) ng/mL vs 0.11 (0.06-0.14) ng/mL, P < 0.001]. There was a close correlation between serum concentrations of S100β and psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score in patients with cirrhosis without HE compared to the patients with cirrhosis with CHE (r = -0.413, P = 0.019). ROC curve analysis yielded > 0.13 ng/mL as the best cutoff value of S100β for the diagnosis of HE (sensitivity 83.3%, specificity 63.6%). CONCLUSION: Serum concentrations of S100β are higher in patients with cirrhosis than in healthy volunteers, and are further increased in the presence of hepatic encephalopathy. The results suggest that serum biomarkers such as S100β could help in the correct characterization of incipient stages of HE. PMID:27158209

  15. Methanethiol metabolism and its role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy in rats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Blom, H J; Chamuleau, R A; Rothuizen, J; Deutz, N E; Tangerman, A

    1990-04-01

    The metabolism of methanethiol was studied in rats. Administration of a noncomatogenic dose of methanethiol through inspired air or injection into the upper colon resulted in an elevation of the concentrations of methanethiol mixed disulfides in serum (protein--S--S--CH3 and X--S--S--CH3, X yet unknown) and in urine (X--S--S--CH3). The concentrations of methanethiol mixed disulfides proved to be a relative measure of exposure to methanethiol. The levels of volatile sulfur compounds methanethiol, dimethylsulfide and dimethyldisulfide in the air expired by rats exposed to a noncomatogenic dose of methanethiol through the colon were also elevated. Rats with acute hepatic encephalopathy caused by liver ischemia also showed elevation of methanethiol mixed disulfide levels on challenge of methanethiol through the colon or inspired air, but to a significantly smaller extent than did the corresponding sham-operated rats. This suggests that the liver is at least partly responsible for formation of methanethiol mixed disulfides. No additional toxic effects were observed in the rats with ischemic livers on methanethiol exposition when compared with normal rats, suggesting that the liver does not play an essential role in methanethiol detoxification. Metabolism of methanethiol by blood to sulfate, for example, might be more important. In rats with acute hepatic encephalopathy caused by liver ischemia and in dogs suffering from hepatic encephalopathy resulting from chronic liver disease, large and significant increases in ammonia levels were measured. However, the mean levels of methanethiol mixed disulfides in rats and dogs with hepatic encephalopathy were not different from the mean normal levels in these animals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Interplay between glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission alterations in cognitive and motor impairment in minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Llansola, Marta; Montoliu, Carmina; Agusti, Ana; Hernandez-Rabaza, Vicente; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Gomez-Gimenez, Belen; Malaguarnera, Michele; Dadsetan, Sherry; Belghiti, Majedeline; Garcia-Garcia, Raquel; Balzano, Tiziano; Taoro, Lucas; Felipo, Vicente

    2015-09-01

    The cognitive and motor alterations in hepatic encephalopathy (HE) are the final result of altered neurotransmission and communication between neurons in neuronal networks and circuits. Different neurotransmitter systems cooperate to modulate cognitive and motor function, with a main role for glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in different brain areas and neuronal circuits. There is an interplay between glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission alterations in cognitive and motor impairment in HE. This interplay may occur: (a) in different brain areas involved in specific neuronal circuits; (b) in the same brain area through cross-modulation of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission. We will summarize some examples of the (1) interplay between glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission alterations in different areas in the basal ganglia-thalamus-cortex circuit in the motor alterations in minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE); (2) interplay between glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission alterations in cerebellum in the impairment of cognitive function in MHE through altered function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway. We will also comment the therapeutic implications of the above studies and the utility of modulators of glutamate and GABA receptors to restore cognitive and motor function in rats with hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy.

  17. Functional brain network changes associated with clinical and biochemical measures of the severity of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Jao, Tun; Schröter, Manuel; Chen, Chao-Long; Cheng, Yu-Fan; Lo, Chun-Yi Zac; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Patel, Ameera X; Lin, Wei-Che; Lin, Ching-Po; Bullmore, Edward T

    2015-11-15

    Functional properties of the brain may be associated with changes in complex brain networks. However, little is known about how properties of large-scale functional brain networks may be altered stepwise in patients with disturbance of consciousness, e.g., an encephalopathy. We used resting-state fMRI data on patients suffering from various degrees of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) to explore how topological and spatial network properties of functional brain networks changed at different cognitive and consciousness states. Severity of HE was measured clinically and by neuropsychological tests. Fifty-eight non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis patients and 62 normal controls were studied. Patients were subdivided into liver cirrhosis with no outstanding HE (NoHE, n=23), minimal HE with cognitive impairment only detectable by neuropsychological tests (MHE, n=28), and clinically overt HE (OHE, n=7). From the earliest stage, the NoHE, functional brain networks were progressively more random, less clustered, and less modular. Since the intermediate stage (MHE), increased ammonia level was accompanied by concomitant exponential decay of mean connectivity strength, especially in the primary cortical areas and midline brain structures. Finally, at the OHE stage, there were radical reorganization of the topological centrality-i.e., the relative importance-of the hubs and reorientation of functional connections between nodes. In summary, this study illustrated progressively greater abnormalities in functional brain network organization in patients with clinical and biochemical evidence of more severe hepatic encephalopathy. The early-than-expected brain network dysfunction in cirrhotic patients suggests that brain functional connectivity and network analysis may provide useful and complementary biomarkers for more aggressive and earlier intervention of hepatic encephalopathy. Moreover, the stepwise deterioration of functional brain networks in HE patients may suggest that hierarchical

  18. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Evaluating Portal-Systemic Encephalopathy in Patients with Chronic Hepatic Schistosomiasis Japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Mei, Lihong; Qiang, Jinwei; Ju, Shuai; Zhao, Shuhui

    2016-01-01

    Portal-systemic encephalopathy (PSE) is classified as type B hepatic encephalopathy. Portal-systemic shunting rather than liver dysfunction is the main cause of PSE in chronic hepatic schistosomiasis japonicum (HSJ) patients. Owing to lack of detectable evidence of intrinsic liver disease, chronic HSJ patients with PSE are frequently clinically undetected or misdiagnosed, especially chronic HSJ patients with covert PSE (subclinical encephalopathy). In this study, we investigated whether magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) could be a useful tool for diagnosing PSE in chronic HSJ patients. Magnetic resonance (MR) T1-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and MRS were performed in 41 chronic HSJ patients with suspected PSE and in 21 age-matched controls. The T1 signal intensity index (T1SI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value were obtained in the Globus pallidus. Liver function was also investigated via serum ammonia and liver function tests. Higher T1SI and ADC values, increased lactate and glutamine levels, and decreased myo-inositol were found in the bilateral Globus pallidus in chronic HSJ patients with PSE. No significantly abnormal serum ammonia or liver function tests were observed in chronic HSJ patients with PSE. On the basis of these findings, we propose a diagnostic procedure for PSE in chronic HSJ patients. This study reveals that MRS can be useful for diagnosing PSE in chronic HSJ patients. PMID:27977668

  19. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Evaluating Portal-Systemic Encephalopathy in Patients with Chronic Hepatic Schistosomiasis Japonicum.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Mei, Lihong; Qiang, Jinwei; Ju, Shuai; Zhao, Shuhui

    2016-12-01

    Portal-systemic encephalopathy (PSE) is classified as type B hepatic encephalopathy. Portal-systemic shunting rather than liver dysfunction is the main cause of PSE in chronic hepatic schistosomiasis japonicum (HSJ) patients. Owing to lack of detectable evidence of intrinsic liver disease, chronic HSJ patients with PSE are frequently clinically undetected or misdiagnosed, especially chronic HSJ patients with covert PSE (subclinical encephalopathy). In this study, we investigated whether magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) could be a useful tool for diagnosing PSE in chronic HSJ patients. Magnetic resonance (MR) T1-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and MRS were performed in 41 chronic HSJ patients with suspected PSE and in 21 age-matched controls. The T1 signal intensity index (T1SI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value were obtained in the Globus pallidus. Liver function was also investigated via serum ammonia and liver function tests. Higher T1SI and ADC values, increased lactate and glutamine levels, and decreased myo-inositol were found in the bilateral Globus pallidus in chronic HSJ patients with PSE. No significantly abnormal serum ammonia or liver function tests were observed in chronic HSJ patients with PSE. On the basis of these findings, we propose a diagnostic procedure for PSE in chronic HSJ patients. This study reveals that MRS can be useful for diagnosing PSE in chronic HSJ patients.

  20. [A case of cryptococcal meningitis mimicking hepatic encephalopathy in a patient with liver cirrhosis caused by chronic hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye Mi; Jung, Gum Mo; Lee, Woong Ki; Lee, Hyeuk Soo; Kim, Byung Sun; Seong, Choong Sil; Yoon, So Hee; Cho, Yong Keun

    2014-11-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans, an encapsulated fungus, is an important opportunistic pathogen that can cause meningitis in im-munocompromised patients. Since patients with cryptococcemia have high mortality, it is essential to make an early diagnosis and promptly initiate antifungal therapy. However, it is often very difficult to differentiate between cryptococcal meningitis and hepatic encephalopathy in patients with liver cirrhosis, and there is delay in making the diagnosis. Therefore, these patients have a particularly grave prognosis and consequently many patients die before culture results become available. In one study, starting antifungal therapy within 48 hours of the blood culture was associated with improved survival, but patients with liver cirrhosis were significantly less likely to receive antifungal therapy within 48 hours compared to those without liver cirrhosis. Recently, the authors experience a case of a 68-year-old woman with liver cirrhosis who presented with fever and a drowsy mental status. She had a previous history of having been admitted for infection-associated hepatic encephlopathy. Cryptococcal meningitis and cryptococcemia were diagnosed by spinal puncture and culture of cerebrospinal fluid. In spite of adequate treatment, the patient developed multi-system organ failure and eventually expired. Herein, we report a case of cryptococcal meningitis mimicking hepatic encephalopathy in a patient with liver cirrhosis.

  1. Hepatic encephalopathy in a pregnant mare: identification of histopathological changes in the brain of a mare and fetus.

    PubMed

    Johns, I C; Del Piero, F; Wilkins, P A

    2007-08-01

    An 11-year-old Thoroughbred broodmare was evaluated for suspected hepatic dysfunction. Clinical signs of hepatic encephalopathy were evident at admission. Hepatic ultrasonographic evaluation revealed an increase in hepatic size, rounded borders and normal echogenicity. There was no evidence of cholelithiasis or bile duct distention. Increased activity of hepatic enzymes, increased bile acid and bilirubin concentration and an increased ammonia concentration were supportive of a diagnosis of hepatic disease and hepatic encephalopathy. Histopathological evaluation of a liver biopsy specimen was consistent with chronic active hepatitis. The mare was treated with intravenous fluids and antimicrobials, pentoxyfilline, branched-chain amino acids and dietary manipulation. Clinical improvement was observed initially; however, 3 weeks later, deterioration in the mare's condition necessitated euthanasia. Pathological lesions at necropsy were restricted to the liver and brain. The liver was diffusely firm with a prominent reticular pattern on the cut surface. A large choledocholith was present in the main bile duct of the left liver lobe. Histopathological examination of the liver revealed severe fibrosis, with hyperplastic bile ducts and mononuclear and neutrophilic inflammation. Pathological changes consistent with hepatic encephalopathy, (Alzheimer type II cells), were evident in the cerebrum of both the mare and the fetus.

  2. Cannabidiol improves brain and liver function in a fulminant hepatic failure-induced model of hepatic encephalopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Avraham, Y; Grigoriadis, NC; Poutahidis, T; Vorobiev, L; Magen, I; Ilan, Y; Mechoulam, R; Berry, EM

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Hepatic encephalopathy is a neuropsychiatric disorder of complex pathogenesis caused by acute or chronic liver failure. We investigated the effects of cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa with anti-inflammatory properties that activates the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 5-HT1A, on brain and liver functions in a model of hepatic encephalopathy associated with fulminant hepatic failure induced in mice by thioacetamide. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Female Sabra mice were injected with either saline or thioacetamide and were treated with either vehicle or cannabidiol. Neurological and motor functions were evaluated 2 and 3 days, respectively, after induction of hepatic failure, after which brains and livers were removed for histopathological analysis and blood was drawn for analysis of plasma liver enzymes. In a separate group of animals, cognitive function was tested after 8 days and brain 5-HT levels were measured 12 days after induction of hepatic failure. KEY RESULTS Neurological and cognitive functions were severely impaired in thioacetamide-treated mice and were restored by cannabidiol. Similarly, decreased motor activity in thioacetamide-treated mice was partially restored by cannabidiol. Increased plasma levels of ammonia, bilirubin and liver enzymes, as well as enhanced 5-HT levels in thioacetamide-treated mice were normalized following cannabidiol administration. Likewise, astrogliosis in the brains of thioacetamide-treated mice was moderated after cannabidiol treatment. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Cannabidiol restores liver function, normalizes 5-HT levels and improves brain pathology in accordance with normalization of brain function. Therefore, the effects of cannabidiol may result from a combination of its actions in the liver and brain. PMID:21182490

  3. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. 96.2 Section 96.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES § 96.2 Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. (a) Swine casings. The importation of swine casings that originated in or...

  4. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. 96.2 Section 96.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES § 96.2 Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. (a) Swine casings. The importation of swine casings that originated in or...

  5. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. 96.2 Section 96.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES § 96.2 Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. (a) Swine casings. The importation of swine casings that originated in or...

  6. 9 CFR 96.2 - Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. 96.2 Section 96.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES § 96.2 Prohibition of casings due to African swine fever and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. (a) Swine casings. The importation of swine casings that originated in or...

  7. Refining the ammonia hypothesis: a physiology-driven approach to the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Tapper, Elliot B; Jiang, Z Gordon; Patwardhan, Vilas R

    2015-05-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is one of the most important complications of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Although the etiology is incompletely understood, it has been linked to ammonia directly and indirectly. Our goal is to review for the clinician the mechanisms behind hyperammonemia and the pathogenesis of HE to explain the rationale for its therapy. We reviewed articles collected through a search of MEDLINE/PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Google Scholar between October 1, 1948, and December 8, 2014, and by a manual search of citations within retrieved articles. Search terms included hepatic encephalopathy, ammonia hypothesis, brain and ammonia, liver failure and ammonia, acute-on-chronic liver failure and ammonia, cirrhosis and ammonia, portosytemic shunt, ammonia and lactulose, rifaximin, zinc, and nutrition. Ammonia homeostatsis is a multiorgan process involving the liver, brain, kidneys, and muscle as well as the gastrointestinal tract. Indeed, hyperammonemia may be the first clue to poor functional reserves, malnutrition, and impending multiorgan dysfunction. Furthermore, the neuropathology of ammonia is critically linked to states of systemic inflammation and endotoxemia. Given the complex interplay among ammonia, inflammation, and other factors, ammonia levels have questionable utility in the staging of HE. The use of nonabsorbable disaccharides, antibiotics, and probiotics reduces gut ammoniagenesis and, in the case of antibiotics and probiotics, systemic inflammation. Nutritional support preserves urea cycle function and prevents wasting of skeletal muscle, a significant site of ammonia metabolism. Correction of hypokalemia, hypovolemia, and acidosis further assists in the reduction of ammonia production in the kidney. Finally, early and aggressive treatment of infection, avoidance of sedatives, and modification of portosystemic shunts are also helpful in reducing the neurocognitive effects of hyperammonemia. Refining the

  8. The role of antioxidants and zinc in minimal hepatic encephalopathy: a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Nasser; Abdel-Razik, Ahmed; Zaher, Ashraf; Hamed, Magdy; Shiha, Gamal; Effat, Narmin; Elbaz, Sherif; Elhelaly, Rania; Hafez, Mohamed; El-Wakeel, Niveen; Eldars, Waleed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) has a far-reaching impact on quality and function ability in daily life and may progress to overt hepatic encephalopathy. There is a synergistic effect between systemic oxidative stress and ammonia that is implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of oral supplementation of antioxidants and zinc gluconate on MHE versus lactulose. Methods: Our study included 58 patients with cirrhosis diagnosed as having MHE by neuropsychometric tests, including number connection test part A (NCT-A), digit symbol test (DST) and block design tests (BDTs). Patients were randomized to receive 175 mg zinc gluconate, 50,000 IU vitamin A, 500 mg vitamin C and 100 mg vitamin E once daily plus lactulose, dose 30–60 ml/day for 3 months [group A (n = 31)] or initiated and maintained on lactulose dose 30–60 ml/day for 3 months [group B (n = 27)]. Neuropsychometric tests and laboratory investigations were repeated after 3 months of therapy. Results: Compared with the baseline neuropsychometric tests, a significant improvement was reported in patients with MHE after 3 months of antioxidant and zinc therapy (group A) versus patients with lactulose therapy (group B) (NCT-A, p <0.001; DST, p = 0.006; BDT, p < 0.001). Antioxidant and zinc supplementation significantly decreased arterial ammonia level, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (p < 0.001) and improved Child–Pugh score in MHE after 3 months of therapy (p= 0.024). Conclusion: Antioxidant and zinc supplementation can improve MHE in patients with liver cirrhosis. PMID:27582881

  9. Pathological Role for Exocytotic Glutamate Release from Astrocytes in Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Montana, Vedrana; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Liver failure can lead to generalized hyperammonemia, which is thought to be the underlying cause of hepatic encephalopathy. This neuropsychiatric syndrome is accompanied by functional changes of astrocytes. These glial cells enter ammonia-induced self-amplifying cycle characterized by brain oedema, oxidative and osmotic stress that causes modification of proteins and RNA. Consequently, protein expression and function are affected, including that of glutamine synthetase and plasmalemmal glutamate transporters, leading to glutamate excitotoxicity; Ca2+-dependent exocytotic glutamate release from astrocytes contributes to this extracellular glutamate overload. PMID:25342940

  10. Cholestatic hepatitis due to Ecballium elaterium ingestion.

    PubMed

    Bizid, Sondès; Sabbah, Mériam; Msakni, Issam; Ben Slimene, Baha; Mohamed, Ghanem; Bouali, Riadh; Ben Abdallah, Hatem; Abdelli, Nabil

    2015-10-01

    Ecballium elaterium is an herbaceous plant belonging to the Cucurbitaceae family. This plant is fairly common in the Mediterranean regions. It is frequently consumed in infusion, mixture of fruit or even in aerosol in cases of fever or flu. This plant is known for its respiratory and ocular toxicity. Hepatotoxicity has never been described in the literature. We report a case of acute cholestatic hepatitis due to Ecballium elaterium in a 39 years old patient, with no past medical history.

  11. Pannexin1 as a novel cerebral target in pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Papia; Trigun, Surendra Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) represents a nervous system disorder caused due to liver dysfunction. HE is broadly classified as acute/overt and moderate-minimal HE. Since HE syndrome severely affects quality of life of the patients and it may be life threatening, it is important to develop effective therapeutic strategy against HE. Mainly ammonia neurotoxicity is considered accountable for HE. Increased level of ammonia in the brain activates glutamate-NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor (NMDAR) pathway leading to Ca(2+) influx, energy deficit and oxidative stress in the post synaptic neurons. Moreover, NMDAR blockage has been found to be a poor therapeutic option, as this neurotransmitter receptor plays important role in maintaining normal neurophysiology of the brain. Thus, searching new molecular players in HE pathogenesis is of current concern. There is an evolving concept about roles of the trans-membrane channels in the pathogenesis of a number of neurological complications. Pannexin1 (Panx1) is one of them and has been described to be implicated in stroke, epilepsy and ischemia. Importantly, the pathogenesis of these complications relates to some extent with NMDAR over activation. Thus, it is speculated that HE pathogenesis might also involve Panx1. Indeed, some recent observations in the animal models of HE provide support to this argument. Since opening of Panx1 channel is mostly associated with the neuronal dysfunctions, down regulation of this channel could serve as a relevant therapeutic strategy without producing any serious side effects. In the review article an attempt has been made to summarize the current information on implication of Panx1 in the brain disorders and its prospects for being examined as pharmacological target in HE pathogenesis.

  12. Albumin dialysis has a favorable effect on amino acid profile in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Koivusalo, Anna-Maria; Teikari, Taru; Höckerstedt, Krister; Isoniemi, Helena

    2008-12-01

    According to one popular theory, hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is partly caused by an imbalance in plasma amino acid levels. The Fischer's ratio between branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) and aromatic amino acids (AAAs) correlates with the degree of HE; the lower Fischer's ratio, the higher the grade of HE. Extra-corporeal liver support systems, like MARS(R)-albumin dialysis (Molecular Adsorbents Recirculating System), can improve HE. The MARS(R) system uses a hyperosmolar albumin circuit to remove both water-soluble and albumin-bound substances. Plasma levels of neuroactive amino acids were analyzed in 82 consecutive patients with life-threatening liver failure admitted to our ICU. All patients fulfilled our indications for MARS treatment and most also fulfilled the criteria for liver transplantation (LTx). In patients with acute liver failure (ALF), as compared to those with acute decompensation of chronic liver failure (AcOChr), levels of leucine and isoleucine were significantly higher before MARS(R) treatment. In all patients, before MARS(R) treatment the higher the grade of HE grade the lower was the Fischer's ratio and higher were the levels of inhibitory neuroactive amino acids. During MARS(R) treatments the Fischer's ratio increased, and the grade of HE decreased. The increase in Fischer's ratio was mainly due to the decrease in AAAs. The plasma levels of neuroactive amino acids, methionine, glutamine, glutamate, histidine and taurine decreased during MARS(R)-treatment. In this study MARS(R)-albumin dialysis had a favorable effect on the plasma amino acid profile of patients with HE.

  13. Plasma concentrations of endogenous benzodiazepine-receptor ligands in patients with hepatic encephalopathy: a comparative study.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Avila, C A; Shoemaker, W J; Ortega-Soto, H A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder secondary to acute or chronic liver failure. Although the exact causes of HE have not been clarified, enhanced central nervous system inhibition at the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-benzodiazepine receptor complex, mediated by increased levels of endogenous benzodiazepine-receptor ligands (BZRL), has been proposed. Research exploring this hypothesis has yielded contradictory findings. This study evaluated the presence and levels of BZRL in plasma from patients with HE and 3 comparison groups. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. PATIENTS: Twenty-four patients with HE, 10 patients with liver cirrhosis without encephalopathy (LC), 4 patients with uremic encephalopathy (UE), and 9 healthy subjects. INTERVENTIONS: Radio-receptor assay of plasma samples from patients and controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Plasma levels of BZRL. RESULTS: The patients in the HE group had significantly higher plasma BZRL levels than the patients with UE and the healthy subjects, but not than those with LC, in whom these compounds were also detected in significant concentrations. When patients were classified according to the severity of HE, plasma of BZRL showed a modest correlation with stage of severity (r = 0.37). Interestingly, approximately one-third of the patients with HE did not have detectable levels of BZRL. CONCLUSION: Endogenous BZRL may play a role in the pathogenesis of HE, although neuropsychiatric symptoms in HE are difficult to explain in terms of these compounds alone. Images Fig. 1 PMID:9785700

  14. Is it time to target gut dysbiosis and immune dysfunction in the therapy of hepatic encephalopathy?

    PubMed

    Shawcross, Debbie L

    2015-05-01

    The development of overt hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in a patient with cirrhosis confers a damning prognosis with a 1-year mortality approaching 64%. This complex neuropsychiatric syndrome arises as a consequence of a dysfunctional gut-liver-brain axis. HE has been largely neglected over the past 30 years, with the reliance on therapies aimed at lowering ammonia production or increasing metabolism following the seminal observation that the hepatic urea cycle is the major mammalian ammonia detoxification pathway and is key in the pathogenesis of HE. The relationship with ammonia is more clear-cut in acute liver failure; but in cirrhosis, it has become apparent that inflammation is a key driver and that a disrupted microbiome resulting in gut dysbiosis, bacterial overgrowth and translocation, systemic endotoxemia and immune dysfunction may be more important drivers. Therefore, it is important to re-focus our efforts into developing therapies that modulate the disrupted microbiome or alleviating its downstream consequences.

  15. Low-protein diets for hepatic encephalopathy debunked: let them eat steak.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Chad Michael; Burns, David L

    2011-04-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is an incompletely understood phenomenon and serves as a poor prognosis in patients with cirrhosis. Confusion from HE can affect the ability to eat adequately. Despite the prevalence of malnutrition in cirrhotic patients in the 1950s, it was reported that bouts of overt HE were controlled with low protein intake. This largely uncontrolled observation led to restriction of protein intake in cirrhotic patients with or without HE and was an accepted standard of care for many decades to follow. Published in 2004, the pivotal article "Normal Protein Diet for Episodic Hepatic Encephalopathy: Results of a Randomized Study" by Cordoba and colleagues was the first controlled study randomizing cirrhotic patients with HE to receive different amounts of dietary protein. At the completion of the study, the authors concluded that a normal-protein diet was safe and did not exacerbate HE. The Cordoba study suggests that low-protein diets should be abandoned. In light of this evidence, nutrition guidelines have proposed that protein restriction should be avoided in patients with HE as protein requirements are increased in cirrhosis. Despite the advice of experts in the field, it has been shown in recent years that some physicians still believe that protein restriction is needed in patients with HE. This belief has not been substantiated in controlled studies, and societal recommendations have changed. There is no real evidence documenting the advantages of protein restriction in HE. On the contrary, Cordoba and colleagues' article has shown that there are disadvantages to restricting protein in HE.

  16. Ibuprofen hepatic encephalopathy, hepatomegaly, gastric lesion and gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 in rats.

    PubMed

    Ilic, Spomenko; Drmic, Domagoj; Zarkovic, Kamelija; Kolenc, Danijela; Brcic, Luka; Radic, Bozo; Djuzel, Viktor; Blagaic, Alenka Boban; Romic, Zeljko; Dzidic, Senka; Kalogjera, Livije; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2011-09-30

    Chronic ibuprofen (0.4 g/kg intraperitoneally, once daily for 4 weeks) evidenced a series of pathologies, not previously reported in ibuprofen-dosed rats, namely hepatic encephalopathy, gastric lesions, hepatomegaly, increased AST and ALT serum values with prolonged sedation/unconsciousness, and weight loss. In particular, ibuprofen toxicity was brain edema, particularly in the cerebellum, with the white matter being more affected than in gray matter. In addition, damaged and red neurons, in the absence of anti-inflammatory reaction was observed, particularly in the cerebral cortex and cerebellar nuclei, but was also present although to a lesser extent in the hippocampus, dentate nucleus and Purkinje cells. An anti-ulcer peptide shown to have no toxicity, the stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, MW 1419, 10 μg, 10 ng/kg) inhibited the pathology seen with ibuprofen (i) when given intraperitoneally, immediately after ibuprofen daily or (ii) when given in drinking water (0.16 μg, 0.16 ng/ml). Counteracted were all adverse effects, such as hepatic encephalopathy, the gastric lesions, hepatomegaly, increased liver serum values. In addition, BPC 157 treated rats showed no behavioral disturbances and maintained normal weight gain. Thus, apart from efficacy in inflammatory bowel disease and various wound treatments, BPC 157 was also effective when given after ibuprofen.

  17. Intracortical inhibitory and excitatory circuits in subjects with minimal hepatic encephalopathy: a TMS study.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; De Blasi, Pierpaolo; Höller, Yvonne; Brigo, Francesco; Golaszewski, Stefan; Frey, Vanessa N; Orioli, Andrea; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-10-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the earliest form of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and affects up to 80 % of patients with liver cirrhosis. By definition, MHE is characterized by psychomotor slowing and subtle cognitive deficits,  but obvious clinical manifestations are lacking. Given its covert nature, MHE is often underdiagnosed. This study was aimed at detecting neurophysiological changes, as assessed by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), involved in the early pathogenesis of the HE. We investigated motor cortex excitability in 15 patients with MHE and in 15 age-matched age-matched cirrhotic patients without MHE; the resting motor threshold, the short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and the intracortical facilitation (ICF) were examined. Paired-pulse TMS revealed significant increased SICI and reduced ICF in the patients with MHE. These findings may reflect abnormalities in intrinsic brain activity and altered organization of functional connectivity networks. In particular, the results suggest a shift in the balance between intracortical inhibitory and excitatory mechanisms towards a net increase of inhibitory neurotransmission. Together with other neurophysiological (in particular EEG) and neuroimaging techniques, TMS may thus provide early markers of cerebral dysfunction in cirrhotic patients with MHE.

  18. Embolization of portal-systemic shunts in cirrhotic patients with chronic recurrent hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurabayashi, Shin; Sezai, Shuichi; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Masanori; Oka, Hiroshi

    1997-03-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of embolization of portal-systemic shunts in cirrhotic patients with chronic recurrent hepatic encephalopathy (CRHE). Methods. Seven cirrhotic patients with CRHE refractory to medical treatment (3 men and 4 women, mean age 66 years) were studied. Five patients had splenorenal shunts, 1 had a gastrorenal shunt, and 1 had an intrahepatic portal vein-hepatic vein shunt. Shunt embolization was performed using stainless steel coils, with a percutaneous transhepatic portal vein approach in 4 patients and a transrenal vein approach in 3 patients. Results. After embolization, the shunt disappeared in 4 patients on either ultrasound pulsed Doppler monitoring or portography. Complications observed in the 7 patients were fever, transient pleural effusion, ascites, and mild esophageal varices. For 3-6 months after embolization, the 4 patients whose shunts disappeared showed minimal or no reappearance of a shunt, and had no recurrence of encephalopathy. The serum ammonia levels decreased and electroencephalograms also improved. One of the 4 patients, who developed mild esophageal varices, required no treatment. Treatment was effective in 3 of the 4 patients (75%) who underwent embolization via a transhepatic portal vein. Conclusion. Transvascular embolization of shunts improved the outcome in 4 of 7 patients. The most effective embolization was achieved via the percutaneous transhepatic portal vein approach.

  19. Blood methanethiol in alcoholic liver disease with and without hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    McClain, C J; Zieve, L; Doizaki, W M; Gilberstadt, S; Onstad, G R

    1980-04-01

    Blood methanethiol and ammonia concentrations were measured in 16 healty volunteers, 52 consecutive alcoholic cirrhotics without overt hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and 42 consecutive patients with alcoholic liver disease and overt HE. The mean concentration of blood methanethiol was significantly greater than normal in the cirrhotics without overt HE, and the means of both methanethiol and ammonia were significantly greater in the patients with than in those without overt HE. Only one patient with overt HE had both normal ammonia and methanethiol blood concentrations. Twenty of the patients with HE were followed serially. The directions of change in methanethiol and ammonia were consistent with the direction of change in mental status in 85% adn 60% respectively. All of the patients who deteriorated and died had changes in blood methanethiol that correlated with the change in mental status. We conclude that blood methanethiol is a valuable adjunct to the ammonia determination in the evaluation of the patient with possible HE. It is especially helpful in following the course of a patient with hepatic encephalopathy, both as to prognosis and as an indicator of response to therapy.

  20. Congenital portosystemic shunts and hepatic encephalopathy in goat kids in California: 11 cases (1999-2012).

    PubMed

    Kinde, Hailu; Pesavento, Patricia A; Loretti, Alexandre P; Adaska, John M; Barr, Bradd C; Moore, Janet D; Anderson, Mark L; Rimoldi, Guillermo; Hill, Ashley E; Jones, Megan E B

    2014-01-01

    Between 1999 and 2012, 11 cases of congenital portosystemic shunts (cPSS) resulting in hepatic encephalopathy were diagnosed in goat kids necropsied at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System and at the Department of Pathology, Immunology & Microbiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis. Affected animals included 6 females and 5 males of various breeds including Boer (5/11), Nigerian Dwarf (1/11), Saanen (1/11), Toggenburg (1/11), and mixed-breed (3/11) aged between 1.5 months and 11 months, submitted live (2/11) or dead (9/11) for necropsy. The most frequent clinical signs in these goats were ataxia, blindness, tremors, head bobbing, head pressing, seizures, circling, weakness, and ill thrift. Bile acids were measured in 2 animals, and were elevated in both cases (134 and 209 µmol/l, reference interval = 0-50 µmol/l). Necropsy findings were poor to fair body condition. Grossly, the livers of 4 animals were subjectively small. Microscopic lesions included portal spaces with increased numbers of arteriolar profiles and hypoplastic or absent portal veins, diffuse atrophy of the hepatic parenchyma with the presence of small hepatocytes and, in some cases, multifocal hepatocellular macrovesicular vacuolation. In the brain and spinal cord of all animals, there was bilateral and symmetric spongy degeneration affecting the cerebrum, mesencephalon, cerebellum, brainstem, and cervical spinal cord. In all cases, the brain lesions were consistent with hepatic encephalopathy. Congenital portosystemic shunts should be considered in the differential diagnosis of young goats with a history of ill thrift, and nonspecific neurological signs.

  1. Non invasive blood flow measurement in cerebellum detects minimal hepatic encephalopathy earlier than psychometric tests

    PubMed Central

    Felipo, Vicente; Urios, Amparo; Giménez-Garzó, Carla; Cauli, Omar; Andrés-Costa, Maria-Jesús; González, Olga; Serra, Miguel A; Sánchez-González, Javier; Aliaga, Roberto; Giner-Durán, Remedios; Belloch, Vicente; Montoliu, Carmina

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether non invasive blood flow measurement by arterial spin labeling in several brain regions detects minimal hepatic encephalopathy. METHODS: Blood flow (BF) was analyzed by arterial spin labeling (ASL) in different brain areas of 14 controls, 24 cirrhotic patients without and 16 cirrhotic patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). Images were collected using a 3 Tesla MR scanner (Achieva 3T-TX, Philips, Netherlands). Pulsed ASL was performed. Patients showing MHE were detected using the battery Psychometric Hepatic Encephalopathy Score (PHES) consisting of five tests. Different cognitive and motor functions were also assessed: alterations in selective attention were evaluated using the Stroop test. Patients and controls also performed visuo-motor and bimanual coordination tests. Several biochemical parameters were measured: serum pro-inflammatory interleukins (IL-6 and IL-18), 3-nitrotyrosine, cGMP and nitrates+nitrites in plasma, and blood ammonia. Bivariate correlations were evaluated. RESULTS: In patients with MHE, BF was increased in cerebellar hemisphere (P = 0.03) and vermis (P = 0.012) and reduced in occipital lobe (P = 0.017). BF in cerebellar hemisphere was also increased in patients without MHE (P = 0.02). Bimanual coordination was impaired in patients without MHE (P = 0.05) and much more in patients with MHE (P < 0.0001). Visuo-motor coordination was impaired only in patients with MHE (P < 0.0001). Attention was slightly affected in patients without MHE and more strongly in patients with MHE (P < 0.0001). BF in cerebellar hemisphere and vermis correlated with performance in most tests of PHES [(number connection tests A (NCT-A), B (NCT-B)and line tracing test] and in the congruent task of Stroop test. BF in frontal lobe correlated with NCT-A. Performance in bimanual and visuomotor coordination tests correlated only with BF in cerebellar hemisphere. BF in occipital lobe correlates with performance in the PHES battery and with

  2. Endovascular Management of Refractory Hepatic Encephalopathy Complication of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS): Comprehensive Review and Clinical Practice Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Keith; Carrion, Andres F; Salsamendi, Jason; Doshi, Mehul; Baker, Reginald; Kably, Issam

    2016-02-01

    Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) has evolved as an effective intervention for treatment of complications of portal hypertension. The use of polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stents have improved the patency of the shunts and diminished the incidence of TIPS dysfunction. However, TIPS-related refractory hepatic encephalopathy (rHE) poses a significant challenge. Approximately 3-7 % of patients with TIPS develop rHE. Refractory hepatic encephalopathy is defined as a recurrent or persistent encephalopathy despite appropriate medical treatment. Hepatic encephalopathy can be an extremely debilitating complication that profoundly affects quality of life. The approach to management of patients with rHE is complex and typically requires collaboration between different specialties. Liver transplantation is the ultimate treatment for rHE; however, the ongoing shortage of organ donation markedly limits this treatment option. Alternative therapies such as shunt occlusion or reduction can control symptoms and serve as a 'bridge' therapy to liver transplantation. Therefore, interventional radiologists play a key role in the management of these patients by offering a variety of endovascular techniques. The purpose of this review is to highlight some of these endovascular techniques and to develop a therapeutic algorithm that can be applied in clinical practice for the management of rHE.

  3. Endovascular Management of Refractory Hepatic Encephalopathy Complication of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS): Comprehensive Review and Clinical Practice Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Keith

    2016-02-15

    Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) has evolved as an effective intervention for treatment of complications of portal hypertension. The use of polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stents have improved the patency of the shunts and diminished the incidence of TIPS dysfunction. However, TIPS-related refractory hepatic encephalopathy (rHE) poses a significant challenge. Approximately 3–7 % of patients with TIPS develop rHE. Refractory hepatic encephalopathy is defined as a recurrent or persistent encephalopathy despite appropriate medical treatment. Hepatic encephalopathy can be an extremely debilitating complication that profoundly affects quality of life. The approach to management of patients with rHE is complex and typically requires collaboration between different specialties. Liver transplantation is the ultimate treatment for rHE; however, the ongoing shortage of organ donation markedly limits this treatment option. Alternative therapies such as shunt occlusion or reduction can control symptoms and serve as a ‘bridge’ therapy to liver transplantation. Therefore, interventional radiologists play a key role in the management of these patients by offering a variety of endovascular techniques. The purpose of this review is to highlight some of these endovascular techniques and to develop a therapeutic algorithm that can be applied in clinical practice for the management of rHE.

  4. Hepatic encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be made by the body, such as ammonia. Or they may be substances that you take ... MRI EEG Liver function tests Prothrombin time Serum ammonia level Sodium level in the blood Potassium level ...

  5. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in hepatic encephalopathy: current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Wu, Shengyong; Ren, Jiaqian; Lu, Guang Ming

    2014-09-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric syndrome which develops in patients with severe liver diseases and/or portal-systemic shunting. Minimal HE, the earliest manifestation of HE, has drawn increasing attention in the last decade. Minimal HE is associated with a series of brain functional changes, such as attention, working memory, and so on. Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI), especially resting-state fMRI has been used to explore the brain functional changes of HE, yielding important insights for understanding pathophysiological mechanisms and functional reorganization of HE. This paper briefly reviews the principles of BOLD fMRI, potential applications of resting-state fMRI with advanced post-processing algorithms such as regional homogeneity, amplitude of low frequency fluctuation, functional connectivity and future research perspective in this field.

  6. Piscine Insights into Comparisons of Anoxia Tolerance, Ammonia Toxicity, Stroke and Hepatic Encephalopathy*

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Patrick J.; Veauvy, Clemence M.; McDonald, M. Danielle; Pamenter, Matthew E.; Buck, Leslie T.; Wilkie, Michael P.

    2007-01-01

    Although the number of fish species that have been studied for both hypoxia/anoxia tolerance and ammonia tolerance are few, there appears to be a correlation between the ability to survive these two insults. After establishing this correlation with examples from the literature, and after examining the role Peter Lutz played in catalyzing this convergent interest in two variables, this article explores potential mechanisms underpinning this correlation. We draw especially on the larger body of information for two human diseases with the same effected organ (brain), namely stroke and hepatic encephalopathy. While several dissimilarities exist between the responses of vertebrates to anoxia and hyperammonemia, one consistent observation in both conditions is an overactivation of NMDA receptors or glutamate neurotoxicity. We propose a glutamate excitotoxicity hypothesis to explain the correlation between ammonia and hypoxia resistance in fish. Furthermore, we suggest several experimental paths to test this hypothesis. PMID:17046301

  7. Plasmapheresis as adjuvant therapy in Stevens-Johnson syndrome and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Hung, Po-Cheng; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Wong, Alex M-C

    2014-04-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a severe idiosyncratic reaction, most commonly triggered by medications, which is characterized by fever and mucocutaneous lesions, leading to necrosis and sloughing of the epidermis. Aside from skin and mucosal manifestations, SJS may also compromise heart, liver, kidney, lung, and gastrointestinal tract. Although cholestatic liver disease has been reported to occur in SJS, hepatic encephalopathy (HE) as a delayed complication has never been reported. We report a 4-year-old female child with anticonvulsant-induced SJS complicated by HE who was completely cured with a combination of systemic corticosteroid, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and plasmapheresis therapy. We suggested that plasmapheresis may be used as an adjuvant therapy for SJS with HE.

  8. Identifying minimal hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic patients by measuring spontaneous brain activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua-Jun; Zhang, Ling; Jiang, Long-Feng; Chen, Qiu-Feng; Li, Jun; Shi, Hai-Bin

    2016-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is associated with aberrant regional intrinsic brain activity in cirrhotic patients. However, few studies have investigated whether altered intrinsic brain activity can be used as a biomarker of MHE among cirrhotic patients. In this study, 36 cirrhotic patients (with MHE, n = 16; without MHE [NHE], n = 20) underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Spontaneous brain activity was measured by examining the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) in the fMRI signal. MHE was diagnosed based on the Psychometric Hepatic Encephalopathy Score (PHES). A two-sample t-test was used to determine the regions of interest (ROIs) in which ALFF differed significantly between the two groups; then, ALFF values within ROIs were selected as classification features. A linear discriminative analysis was used to differentiate MHE patients from NHE patients. The leave-one-out cross-validation method was used to estimate the performance of the classifier. The classification analysis was 80.6 % accurate (81.3 % sensitivity and 80.0 % specificity) in terms of distinguishing between the two groups. Six ROIs were identified as the most discriminative features, including the bilateral medial frontal cortex/anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus, left precentral and postcentral gyrus, right lingual gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, and inferior/superior parietal lobule. The ALFF values within ROIs were correlated with PHES in cirrhotic patients. Our findings suggest that altered regional brain spontaneous activity is a useful biomarker for MHE detection among cirrhotic patients.

  9. Low-light-level therapy as a treatment for minimal hepatic encephalopathy: behavioural and brain assessment.

    PubMed

    Arias, Natalia; Méndez, Marta; Arias, Jorge L

    2016-11-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) has been shown to affect daily functioning, quality of life, driving and overall mortality. However, little is known about treating or diagnosing early impairments involved in MHE. We studied one of its precipitating factors, portal hypertension. The purpose was to evaluate an enhancement in neuronal metabolism through low-light-level therapy (LLLT) and whether this therapy has effects on behavioural task acquisition. Rats were trained to perform a stimulus-response task using the Morris water maze. Three groups of animals were used: a SHAM (sham-operated) group (n = 7), a portal hypertension (PH) group (n = 7) and a PH + LLLT group (n = 7). The triple portal vein ligation method was used to create an animal model of the early developmental phase of HE, and then the animals were exposed to 670 + 10 nm LED light at a dose of 9 J/cm(2) once a day for 7 days. The metabolic activity of the brains was studied with cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry. There were differences in behavioural performance, with an improvement in the PH + LLLT group. Energetic brain metabolism revealed significant differences between the groups in all the brain structures analysed, except the anterodorsal thalamus. At the same time, in different brain networks, the PH group showed a more complicated relationship among the structures, while the SHAM and PH + LLLT groups had similar patterns. In this study, we provide the first preliminary insights into the validity of LLLT as a possible intervention to improve memory under minimal hepatic encephalopathy conditions.

  10. Reversibility of minimal hepatic encephalopathy following liver transplantation in Egyptian cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Mahmoud A; Sayed, Moataz M; Mansour, Khaled A; Saleh, Shereen A; Ibrahim, Wesam A; Abdelhakam, Sara M; Bahaa, Mohamed; Yousry, Wael A; Elbaz, Hosam S; Mikhail, Reginia N; Hassan, Azza M; Elsayed, Ehab H; Mahmoud, Dalia A

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the reversibility of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) following liver transplantation (LT) in Egyptian cirrhotic patients. METHODS This prospective study included twenty patients with biopsy-proven liver cirrhosis listed for LT and twenty age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. All underwent neuro-psychiatric examination, laboratory investigations, radiological studies and psychometric tests including trail making test A (TMT A), TMT B, digit symbol test and serial dotting test. The psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score (PHES) was calculated for patients to diagnose MHE. Psychometric tests were repeated six months following LT in the cirrhotic patient group. RESULTS Before LT, psychometric tests showed highly significant deficits in cirrhotic patients in comparison to controls (P < 0.001). There was a statistically significant improvement in test values in the patient group after LT; however, their values were still significantly worse than those of the controls (P < 0.001). The PHES detected MHE in 16 patients (80%) before LT with a median value of -7 ± 3.5. The median PHES value was significantly improved following LT, reaching -4.5 ± 5 (P < 0.001), and the number of patients with MHE decreased to 11 (55%). The pre-transplant model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score ≥ 15 was significantly related to the presence of post-transplant MHE (P = 0.005). More patients in whom reversal of MHE was observed had a pre-transplant MELD score < 15. CONCLUSION Reversal of MHE in cirrhotic patients could be achieved by LT, especially in those with a MELD score < 15. PMID:27843538

  11. The contribution of endogenous benzodiazepine receptor ligands to the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S. )

    1991-02-01

    The involvement of the gamma-aminobutyric acid A(GABAA) receptor complex in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) was examined in galactosamine-treated rabbits with HE caused by fulminant hepatic failure. Radioligand binding to the constituent components of the GABAA receptor complex was unchanged in rabbits with HE. However, partially purified extracts from encephalopathic rabbit brain were approximately three times more potent in inhibiting ({sup 3}H)Ro 15-1788 binding to benzodiazepine (BZ) receptors than extracts from control rabbits. The inhibition of radioligand binding to the BZ receptor produced by these extracts was competitive and reversible and was significantly enhanced by GABA. Further purification of these extracts by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) indicated that the inhibitory activity was localized in several peaks, some of which had retention times corresponding to 1,4-benzodiazepine standards. The presence of diazepam in these extracts was confirmed using mass spectroscopy. Both mass spectroscopic and radiometric techniques demonstrated that the concentration of diazepam in brain extracts from encephalopathic rabbits was approximately 4 times greater than control extracts. These findings link the presence of BZ receptor agonists to the development of a neuropathological condition, thereby providing a rational basis for the use of BZ receptor antagonists in the management of HE in man.

  12. Reduced brain levels of DHEAS in hepatic coma patients: significance for increased GABAergic tone in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Ahboucha, Samir; Talani, Giuseppe; Fanutza, Tomas; Sanna, Enrico; Biggio, Giovanni; Gamrani, Halima; Butterworth, Roger F

    2012-07-01

    Increased neurosteroids with allosteric modulatory activity on GABA(A) receptors such as 3α-5α tertrahydroprogesterone; allopregnanolone (ALLO), are candidates to explain the phenomenon of "increased GABAergic tone" in hepatic encephalopathy (HE). However, it is not known how changes of other GABA(A) receptor modulators such as dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) contribute to altered GABAergic tone in HE. Concentrations of DHEAS were measured by radioimmunoassay in frontal cortex samples obtained at autopsy from 11 cirrhotic patients who died in hepatic coma and from an equal number of controls matched for age, gender, and autopsy delay intervals free from hepatic or neurological diseases. To assess whether reduced brain DHEAS contributes to increased GABAergic tone, in vitro patch clamp recordings in rat prefrontal cortex neurons were performed. A significant reduction of DHEAS (5.81±0.88 ng/g tissue) compared to control values (9.70±0.79 ng/g, p<0.01) was found. Brain levels of DHEAS in patients with liver disease who died without HE (11.43±1.74 ng/g tissue), and in a patient who died in uremic coma (12.56 ng/g tissue) were within the control range. Increasing ALLO enhances GABAergic tonic currents concentration-dependently, but increasing DHEAS reduces these currents. High concentrations of DHEAS (50 μM) reduce GABAergic tonic currents in the presence of ALLO, whereas reduced concentrations of DHEAS (1 μM) further stimulate these currents. These findings demonstrate that decreased concentrations of DHEAS together with increased brain concentrations of ALLO increase GABAergic tonic currents synergistically; suggesting that reduced brain DHEAS could further increase GABAergic tone in human HE.

  13. Ketogenic diet in early myoclonic encephalopathy due to non ketotic hyperglycinemia.

    PubMed

    Cusmai, Raffaella; Martinelli, Diego; Moavero, Romina; Dionisi Vici, Carlo; Vigevano, Federico; Castana, Cinzia; Elia, Mirella; Bernabei, Silvia; Bevivino, Elsa

    2012-09-01

    Non ketotic hyperglycinemia is a rare inborn error of glycine metabolism due to deficient activity of glycine cleavage system, a multienzymatic complex consisting of four protein subunits: the P-protein, the H-protein, the T-protein and the L-protein. The neonatal form of non ketotic hyperglycinemia presents in the first days of life with encephalopathy, seizures, multifocal myoclonus and characteristic "hiccups". Rapid progression may lead to intractable seizures, coma and respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Clinical trial with scavenges drugs decreasing glycine levels such as sodium benzoate, and with drugs reducing NMDA receptors excitatory properties, such as ketamine and dextromethorphan, have been tried but the outcome is usually poor; antiepileptic therapy, moreover, is unable to control epileptic seizures. Ketogenic diet has been successfully tried for refractory epilepsy in pediatric patients. We report three cases affected by neonatal non ketotic hyperglycinemia and early myoclonic encephalopathy treated with ketogenic diet. In our patients ketogenic diet, in association with standard pharmacological therapy, determined dramatic reduction of seizures and improved quality of life.

  14. Effect of antibiotics, prebiotics and probiotics in treatment for hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Bongaerts, Ger; Severijnen, René; Timmerman, Harro

    2005-01-01

    In order to reduce ammonia production by urease-positive bacteria Solga recently hypothesised (S.F. Solga, Probiotics can treat hepatic encephalopathy, Medical Hypotheses 2003; 61: 307-13), that probiotics are new therapeutics for hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and that they may replace antibiotics and lactulose. This influenced our view of the effect of antibiotics, prebiotics, e.g., lactulose, and probiotics on intestinal bacteria in the treatment of HE. Intestinal ammonia arises from aminoacids after bacterial de-amination and not from urea making urease-positive bacteria irrelevant. Antibiotics are not preferred in the treatment of HE, since ammonia-producing antibiotic-resistant bacteria may survive and replace ammonia-producing antibiotic-susceptible bacteria. Intestinal prebiotics are carbohydrate-like compounds, such as lactulose and resistant starch, that beneficially affects host's health in a different manner than normal food. In the small bowel prebiotics are not absorbed and digested, but are fermented in the colon by colonic bacteria. Fermentation of prebiotics yields lactic, acetic and butyric acids, as well as gas especially hydrogen (H2). The massive H2 volumes cause rapid intestinal hurry and thus massive amounts of colonic bacteria, not only urease-positive bacteria, but also deaminating bacteria, are removed and intestinal uptake of toxic bacterial metabolites, e.g., ammonia, reduced. As living non-pathogenic micro-organisms, probiotics beneficially affect the host's health by fermenting non-absorbed sugars, especially in the small bowel. Thus, they reduce the substrate of the other bacteria, and simultaneously they create a surplus of fermentation products which may affect the non-probiotic flora. Regarding the fermentation products (lactic acid, ethanol, acetic acid and CO2) five groups of probiotic micro-organisms are known. It is argued that probiotic, CO2-producing (facultatively) heterolactic lactobacilli, i.e., lactobacilli, that produce

  15. Pharmacological manipulation of cyclic GMP levels in brain restores learning ability in animal models of hepatic encephalopathy: therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Regina; Monfort, Pilar; Cauli, Omar; Erceg, Slaven; Felipo, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome present in patients with liver disease that includes impaired intellectual function. To develop therapeutic treatments to restore cognitive function, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms that impair cognitive function in HE. This review summarizes data showing that: (a) cognitive function and learning are impaired in patients with liver disease and in animal models of chronic liver failure or hyperammonemia; (b) the glutamate–NO–cGMP pathway modulates some forms of learning; and (c) the function of this pathway is impaired in brain in vivo in rats with chronic hyperammonemia or liver failure and from patients who died from HE. Learning ability of hyperammonemic rats was restored by increasing cGMP by: (1) continuous intracerebral administration of zaprinast, an inhibitor of the cGMP-degrading phosphodiesterase; (2) chronic oral administration of sildenafil, an inhibitor of the phosphodiesterase that crosses the blood–brain barrier; and (3) continuous intracerebral administration of cGMP. The data summarized indicate that impairment of learning ability in rats with chronic liver failure or hyperammonemia is due to impairment of the glutamate–NO–cGMP pathway. Moreover, increasing extracellular cGMP by pharmacological means may be a new therapeutic approach to improve cognitive function in patients with HE. PMID:19412446

  16. Oxidative metabolism of astrocytes is not reduced in hepatic encephalopathy: a PET study with [11C]acetate in humans

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Peter; Mouridsen, Kim; Hansen, Mikkel B.; Jensen, Svend B.; Sørensen, Michael; Bak, Lasse K.; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Schousboe, Arne; Ott, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Keiding, Susanne; Gjedde, Albert

    2014-01-01

    In patients with impaired liver function and hepatic encephalopathy (HE), consistent elevations of blood ammonia concentration suggest a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HE. Ammonia and acetate are metabolized in brain both primarily in astrocytes. Here, we used dynamic [11C]acetate PET of the brain to measure the contribution of astrocytes to the previously observed reduction of brain oxidative metabolism in patients with liver cirrhosis and HE, compared to patients with cirrhosis without HE, and to healthy subjects. We used a new kinetic model to estimate uptake from blood to astrocytes and astrocyte metabolism of [11C]acetate. No significant differences of the rate constant of oxidation of [11C]acetate (k3) were found among the three groups of subjects. The net metabolic clearance of [11C]acetate from blood was lower in the group of patients with cirrhosis and HE than in the group of healthy subjects (P < 0.05), which we interpret to be an effect of reduced cerebral blood flow rather than a reflection of low [11C]acetate metabolism. We conclude that the characteristic decline of whole-brain oxidative metabolism in patients with cirrhosis with HE is not due to malfunction of oxidative metabolism in astrocytes. Thus, the observed decline of brain oxidative metabolism implicates changes of neurons and their energy turnover in patients with HE. PMID:25404890

  17. Co-administration of C-Phycocyanin ameliorates thioacetamide-induced hepatic encephalopathy in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sathyasaikumar, K V; Swapna, I; Reddy, P V B; Murthy, Ch R K; Roy, K R; Dutta Gupta, A; Senthilkumaran, B; Reddanna, P

    2007-01-15

    Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is a condition with a sudden onset of necrosis followed by degeneration of hepatocytes, without any previously established liver disease, generally occurring within hours or days. FHF is associated with a wide spectrum of neuropsychiatric alterations ranging from stupor to coma, culminating in death. In the present study FHF was induced in rats by the administration of thioacetamide (TAA). Oxidative stress is thought to play a prominent role in the pathophysiology of cerebral changes during FHF leading to the assumption that antioxidants might offer protection. Hence, in the present study the protective effect of C-Phycocyanin (C-PC), a natural antioxidant, was evaluated on TAA-induced tissue damage. C-Phycocyanin was administered intraperitoneally twice at 24 h interval (50 mg/kg body weight) along with the hepatotoxin TAA (300 mg/kg body weight). The animals were sacrificed 18 h after the second injection of TAA treatment and various biochemical parameters were analysed in liver, serum and brain tissues. These studies revealed significant prevention of TAA-induced liver damage by C-PC, as evidenced by a) increase in survival rate; b) the prevention of leakage of liver enzymes (AAT and AST) and ammonia into serum; c) increase in prothrombin time and d) liver histopathology. Ultrastructural studies of astrocytes of different regions of brain clearly showed a decrease in edema after C-PC treatment. TAA-induced histopathological lesions in different regions of the brain namely cerebral cortex, cerebellum and pons medulla were significantly reduced by the co-administration of C-PC with TAA. Further C-PC treatment resulted in a) decrease in the levels of tryptophan and markers of lipid peroxidation and b) elevation in the activity levels of catalase, glutathione peroxidase in different regions of brain. These studies reveal the potential of C-PC in ameliorating TAA-induced hepatic encephalopathy by improving antioxidant defenses.

  18. Pathological Predictors of Shunt Stenosis and Hepatic Encephalopathy after Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt

    PubMed Central

    He, Fuliang; Dai, Shan; Xiao, Zhibo; Wang, Lei; Yue, Zhendong; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhao, Mengfei; Lin, Qiushi; Dong, Xiaoqun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is an artificial channel from the portal vein to the hepatic vein or vena cava for controlling portal vein hypertension. The major drawbacks of TIPS are shunt stenosis and hepatic encephalopathy (HE); previous studies showed that post-TIPS shunt stenosis and HE might be correlated with the pathological features of the liver tissues. Therefore, we analyzed the pathological predictors for clinical outcome, to determine the risk factors for shunt stenosis and HE after TIPS. Methods. We recruited 361 patients who suffered from portal hypertension symptoms and were treated with TIPS from January 2009 to December 2012. Results. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the risk of shunt stenosis was increased with more severe inflammation in the liver tissue (OR, 2.864; 95% CI: 1.466–5.592; P = 0.002), HE comorbidity (OR, 6.266; 95% CI, 3.141–12.501; P < 0.001), or higher MELD score (95% CI, 1.298–1.731; P < 0.001). Higher risk of HE was associated with shunt stenosis comorbidity (OR, 6.266; 95% CI, 3.141–12.501; P < 0.001), higher stage of the liver fibrosis (OR, 2.431; 95% CI, 1.355–4.359; P = 0.003), and higher MELD score (95% CI, 1.711–2.406; P < 0.001). Conclusion. The pathological features can predict individual susceptibility to shunt stenosis and HE. PMID:27975051

  19. Genistein Alleviates Neuroinflammation and Restores Cognitive Function in Rat Model of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Underlying Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ganai, Ajaz Ahmad; Husain, Mohammad

    2017-02-21

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from acute liver failure. Previously, we demonstrated hepatoprotective effects of genistein in D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-induced fulminant hepatic failure (FHF). In this study, we evaluated behavioural and neuroprotective effects of genistein in rat model of HE. HE was induced by intraperitonial administration of D-GalN (250 mg/kg BW) twice a week for 30 days Genistein was given as co-treatment through oral gavage daily at dose of 5 mg/kg BW. D-GalN administration significantly resulted in acute liver failure which was further associated with hyperammonemia, neurological dysfunction, as evident from behavioural and functional impairment and reduced learning ability in Morris water maze. Genistein significantly alleviated behavioural and functional impairment and restored learning ability in Morris water maze. Considerable histopathological changes, including portal inflammation, sinusoidal dilation, necrotic lesions and swelled astrocytes with pale nuclei, were seen in the liver and brain sections of D-GalN-challenged rats while genistein co-treated rats revealed normal cellular and morphological architecture as no pathological features were seen. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory markers (interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4, IL-1β and TNF-α) and membrane expression of subunits α1 of GABAA receptor and GluR2 of AMPA marked significant increase, while subunits GluR1 of AMPA receptors showed reduced expression in D-GalN-challenged rats leading to neuroinflammation and dysregulated neurotransmission. Genistein significantly normalized altered expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and membrane receptor of GABA and GluR. Our study suggests strong therapeutic potential of genistein in animal model of HE. Genistein can be used a strong anti-oxidant to attenuate neurotoxic effects of xenobiotics.

  20. Finasteride improves motor, EEG, and cellular changes in rat brain in thioacetamide-induced hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Mladenović, Dušan; Hrnčić, Dragan; Petronijević, Nataša; Jevtić, Gordana; Radosavljević, Tatjana; Rašić-Marković, Aleksandra; Puškaš, Nela; Maksić, Nebojša; Stanojlović, Olivera

    2014-11-01

    Neurosteroids are involved in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). This study evaluated the effects of finasteride, inhibitor of neurosteroid synthesis, on motor, EEG, and cellular changes in rat brain in thioacetamide-induced HE. Male Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: 1) control; 2) thioacetamide-treated group, TAA (300 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)); 3) finasteride-treated group, FIN (50 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)); and 4) group treated with FIN and TAA (FIN + TAA). Daily doses of TAA and FIN were administered in three subsequent days intraperitoneally, and in the FIN + TAA group FIN was administered 2 h before every dose of TAA. Motor and reflex activity was determined at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 24 h, whereas EEG activity was registered about 24 h after treatment. The expressions of neuronal (NeuN), astrocytic [glial fibrilary acidic protein (GFAP)], microglial (Iba1), and oligodendrocyte (myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein) marker were determined 24 h after treatment. While TAA decreased all tests, FIN pretreatment (FIN + TAA) significantly improved equilibrium, placement test, auditory startle, head shake reflex, motor activity, and exploratory behavior vs. the TAA group. Vital reflexes (withdrawal, grasping, righting and corneal reflex) together with mean EEG voltage were significantly higher (P < 0.01) in the FIN + TAA vs. the TAA group. Hippocampal NeuN expression was significantly lower in TAA vs. control (P < 0.05). Cortical Iba1 expression was significantly higher in experimental groups vs. control (P < 0.05), whereas hippocampal GFAP expression was increased in TAA and decreased in the FIN + TAA group vs. control (P < 0.05). Finasteride improves motor and EEG changes in TAA-induced HE and completely prevents the development of hepatic coma.

  1. Evaluation of the impact of rehospitalization in the management of hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Saab, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    Background Overt hepatic encephalopathy (HE), which is associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms and neuromuscular dysfunction in patients with liver cirrhosis, is often managed in the hospital setting. Approximately 60% of eligible patients do not receive prophylactic therapy after an overt HE episode. Objective The aim of this review is to evaluate the impact of rehospitalization on costs and clinical outcomes in HE. Methods A PubMed search of English-language articles through July 9, 2014 was conducted, and bibliographies of identified publications were reviewed. Abstracts from relevant professional society meetings from 2010 to 2014 were searched. The selected references and abstracts reported on the prevalence, costs, or clinical consequences of rehospitalization in adults with HE. Data synthesis HE is a key reason for readmission among patients hospitalized for complications of cirrhosis. Almost 40% of patients previously hospitalized for HE may be readmitted within 1 year for HE-related reasons. Furthermore, in-hospital US mortality for patients admitted for HE is about 7% to 15%. Recurrent HE and hospitalization for cirrhosis complications are associated with impaired quality of life. In addition, recurrences (especially those requiring hospitalization) may contribute to persistent cognitive deficits (eg, impairments in reaction time, attention, and working memory) after resolution of an acute episode of overt HE. Conclusion The economic and clinical consequences of rehospitalization for patients with overt HE underscore the importance of secondary prevention and highlight the need to identify reasons for the undertreatment of patients after hospitalization for overt HE. PMID:25999756

  2. Voxel-based analyses of magnetization transfer imaging of the brain in hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Miese, Falk R; Wittsack, Hans-Jörg; Kircheis, Gerald; Holstein, Arne; Mathys, Christian; Mödder, Ulrich; Cohnen, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the spatial distribution of cerebral abnormalities in cirrhotic subjects with and without hepatic encephalopathy (HE) found with magnetization transfer imaging (MTI). METHODS: Nineteen cirrhotic patients graded from neurologically normal to HE grade 2 and 18 healthy control subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging. They gave institutional-review-board-approved written consent. Magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) maps were generated from MTI. We tested for significant differences compared to the control group using statistical non-parametric mapping (SnPM) for a voxel-based evaluation. RESULTS: The MTR of grey and white matter was lower in subjects with more severe HE. Changes were found in patients with cirrhosis without neurological deficits in the basal ganglia and bilateral white matter. The loss in magnetization transfer increased in severity and spatial extent in patients with overt HE. Patients with HE grade 2 showed an MTR decrease in white and grey matter: the maximum loss of magnetization transfer effect was located in the basal ganglia [SnPM (pseudo-)t = 17.98, P = 0.0001]. CONCLUSION: The distribution of MTR changes in HE points to an early involvement of basal ganglia and white matter in HE. PMID:19891014

  3. Inflammation: A novel target of current therapies for hepatic encephalopathy in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming; Guo, Jian-Yang; Cao, Wu-Kui

    2015-11-07

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a severe neuropsychiatric syndrome that most commonly occurs in decompensated liver cirrhosis and incorporates a spectrum of manifestations that ranges from mild cognitive impairment to coma. Although the etiology of HE is not completely understood, it is believed that multiple underlying mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of HE, and one of the main factors is thought to be ammonia; however, the ammonia hypothesis in the pathogenesis of HE is incomplete. Recently, it has been increasingly demonstrated that inflammation, including systemic inflammation, neuroinflammation and endotoxemia, acts in concert with ammonia in the pathogenesis of HE in cirrhotic patients. Meanwhile, a good number of studies have found that current therapies for HE, such as lactulose, rifaximin, probiotics and the molecular adsorbent recirculating system, could inhibit different types of inflammation, thereby improving the neuropsychiatric manifestations and preventing the progression of HE in cirrhotic patients. The anti-inflammatory effects of these current therapies provide a novel therapeutic approach for cirrhotic patients with HE. The purpose of this review is to describe the inflammatory mechanisms behind the etiology of HE in cirrhosis and discuss the current therapies that target the inflammatory pathogenesis of HE.

  4. Changes in the regional homogeneity of resting-state brain activity in minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua-Jun; Zhu, Xi-Qi; Yang, Ming; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yu; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2012-01-17

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has facilitated the study of spontaneous brain activity by measuring low-frequency oscillations in blood-oxygen-level-dependent signals. Analyses of regional homogeneity (ReHo), which reflects the local synchrony of neural activity, have been used to reveal the mechanisms underlying the brain dysfunction in various neuropsychiatric diseases. However, it is not known whether the ReHo is altered in cirrhotic patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). We recruited 18 healthy controls and 18 patients with MHE. The ReHo was calculated to assess the strength of the local signal synchrony. Compared with the healthy controls, the patients with MHE had significantly decreased ReHo in the cuneus and adjacent precuneus, and left inferior parietal lobe, whereas the regions showing increased ReHo in patients with MHE included the left parahippocampal gyrus, right cerebellar vermis, and bilateral anterior cerebellar lobes. We found a positive correlation between the mean ReHo in the cuneus and adjacent precuneus and the score on the digit-symbol test in the patient group. In conclusion, the analysis of the regional homogeneity of resting-state brain activity may provide additional information with respect to a clinical definition of MHE.

  5. Rifaximin: a review of its use in reducing recurrence of overt hepatic encephalopathy episodes.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lesley J

    2014-12-01

    Oral rifaximin 550 mg (Refero(®); Targaxan(®); Tixteller(®); Xifaxan(®)) twice daily, either alone or more commonly with medicines containing lactulose, is approved in several countries, including the UK, EU and USA, for use in adults with liver disease to reduce the recurrence of episodes of overt hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Rifaximin is a broad-spectrum antibacterial that acts locally in the gut to reduce intestinal flora, including ammonia-producing species, with hyperammonaemia considered to play a central role in the pathogenesis of HE. In a 6-month, multinational trial in patients with liver disease, rifaximin 550 mg twice daily (± lactulose) was an effective and well tolerated treatment for reducing the recurrence of HE episodes. At study end, rifaximin therapy significantly prolonged the time to the first breakthrough HE episode compared with placebo (± lactulose), irrespective of geographical region or baseline patient and disease characteristics. Rifaximin treatment also significantly reduced HE-related hospitalizations and improved health-related quality of life compared with placebo. Furthermore, the efficacy of rifaximin with or without lactulose in reducing the recurrence of overt HE episodes was maintained after up to 2.5 years of treatment, with no new safety signals arising during this period. This article reviews the pharmacology and therapeutic efficacy of rifaximin 550 mg twice daily in reducing the recurrence of overt HE episodes in adults with liver disease.

  6. Hypercalcemia due to Primary Hepatic Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gagnier, Michael; Ryer, Elizabeth; Salhab, Mohammed; Rosmarin, Alan G.

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old female with a history of mixed connective tissue disease and pulmonary fibrosis on azathioprine, hydroxychloroquine, and prednisone (osteoporosis on teriparatide) presented with a 1-month history of hypercalcemia. After discontinuation of teriparatide, the patient's hypercalcemia persisted. Further evaluation revealed primary hepatic lymphoma as the source of her hypercalcemia. PMID:28116183

  7. Treatment of encephalopathy during fulminant hepatic failure by haemodialysis with high permeability membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Denis, J; Opolon, P; Nusinovici, V; Granger, A; Darnis, F

    1978-01-01

    Forty-one patients with fulminant hepatic failure and coma underwent 180 periods of haemodialysis with polyacrylonitrile membrane (AN 69 HD). Hepatic failure was due to viral hepatitis in 40 and drugs in one. Total recovery of consciousness occurred in 17 patients (43.6%), and partial in seven (17.9%)--that is, an overall figure of 61.5%. Regain of consciousness was not related to liver regeneration as assessed by levels of factor V and hepatocyte volume fraction. At the time of the first haemodialysis, neurological status was significantly impaired in the patients who could not be aroused. Mean duration of coma grade IV averaged 6.1 +/- 4.3 days and mean duration of illness until death or decerebration 8.6 +/- 8.3 days. Of the 17 patients who totally regained consciousness, nine recovered and eight died (three from intercurrent complications and five with no liver regeneration). PMID:710967

  8. Reversible Encephalopathy due to Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonemia in a Patient with Bipolar I Disorder: A Cautionary Report

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Neel; Landry, Katherine B.; Fargason, Rachel E.; Birur, Badari

    2017-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is an FDA-approved medication widely prescribed for seizures, migraines, and mixed or manic episodes in bipolar disorder. Hyperammonemia is a rare complication of VPA use, which can result in high morbidity and occasionally fatal encephalopathy. The scant literature on Valproate Induced Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy (VIHE) is characterized by acute onset of decreasing level of consciousness, drowsiness, lethargy which in rare instances can lead to seizures, stupor, coma, and persistent morbidity and cortical damage. Below we describe a case report of a patient with Bipolar I Disorder with no primary evidence of hepatic dysfunction that was initiated on VPA and olanzapine to address manic and psychotic symptoms. This patient subsequently developed elevated ammonia (NH4) levels that led to a reversible encephalopathy. This cautionary case report highlights the potential for a rare but serious complication from VPA, a medication increasingly used in both neurologic and neuropsychiatric settings. It is imperative that clinicians perform a thorough physical, neurological and diagnostic evaluation, routinely check NH4 and VPA levels when prescribing these agents and exercise caution when VPA is concomitantly prescribed with antipsychotics and cytochrome P450 inducing antiepileptic medications. PMID:28138203

  9. Ketogenic diet - A novel treatment for early epileptic encephalopathy due to PIGA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Charuta; Kolbe, Diana L; Mansilla, M Adela; Mason, Sara; Smith, Richard J H; Campbell, Colleen A

    2016-10-01

    We describe the presentation and workup of two brothers with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy who became seizure-free on a ketogenic diet. Extensive testing culminated in whole exome sequencing, which led to the diagnosis of phosphatidyl inositol glycan biosynthesis class A protein (PIGA) deficiency. This familial case highlights the importance of genetic testing for early-onset epileptic encephalopathies and underscores the potential value of a ketogenic diet in the treatment of this condition.

  10. MINIMAL HEPATIC ENCEPHALOPATHY IS ASSOCIATED WITH MOTOR VEHICLE CRASHES: THE REALITY BEYOND THE DRIVING TEST

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Jasmohan S; Saeian, Kia; Schubert, Christine M; Hafeezullah, Muhammad; Franco, Jose; Varma, Rajiv R; Gibson, Douglas P; Hoffmann, Raymond G; Stravitz, R Todd; Heuman, Douglas M; Sterling, Richard K; Shiffman, Mitchell; Topaz, Allyne; Boyett, Sherry; Bell, Debulon; Sanyal, Arun J

    2009-01-01

    Patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) have impaired driving skills, but association of MHE with motor vehicle crashes is unclear. Standard psychometric tests (SPT) or inhibitory control test (ICT) can be used to diagnose MHE. The aim was to determine the association of MHE with crashes and traffic violations over the preceding year and on 1-year follow-up. Cirrhotics were diagnosed with MHE by ICT (MHEICT) and SPT (MHESPT). Self and department-of-transportation (DOT)-reports were used to determine crashes and violations over the preceding year. Agreement between self and DOT-reports was analyzed. Patients then underwent 1 year follow-up for crash/violation occurrence. Crashes in those with/without MHEICT and MHESPT were compared. 167 cirrhotics had DOT-reports, of which 120 also had self-reports. A significantly higher proportion of MHEICT cirrhotics experienced crashes in the preceding year compared to those without MHE by self-report (17% vs. 0%, p=0.0004) and DOT-reports (17% vs. 3%, p=0.004, relative risk:5.77). SPT did not differentiate between those with/without crashes. A significantly higher proportion of patients with crashes had MHEICT compared to MHESPT, both self-reported (100% vs. 50%, p=0.03) and DOT-reported (89% vs. 44%, p=0.01). There was excellent agreement between self and DOT-reports for crashes and violations (Kappa 0.90 and 0.80). 109 patients were followed prospectively. MHEICT patients had a significantly higher future crashes/violations compared to those without (22% vs. 7%, p=0.03) but MHESPT did not. MHEICT (Odds ratio:4.51) and prior year crash/violation (Odds ratio:2.96) were significantly associated with future crash/violation occurrence. PMID:19670416

  11. Reduction of manganese intake improves neuropsychological manifestations in rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Mei, Li Hong; Qiang, Jin Wei; Ji, Chang Xue; Ju, Shuai

    2017-04-07

    Brain manganese deposition is led by liver dysfunction and/or portal-systemic shunting in minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). Manganese is toxic and can cause cognitive disorders and extrapyramidal symptoms. Thus, reduction of manganese intake might be considered as a potential treatment strategy for MHE. In this study we aimed to investigate whether low- or no-manganese feed can improve the neuropsychological manifestations in MHE rats. Rats with MHE were established by partially ligating the portal vein and fed a manganese diet (MHE-M, 10mg per kg feed; n=24), a no-manganese diet (MHE-N; n=24) and a half-manganese diet (MHE-H; n=24) for 2, 4, 6 and 8weeks, with six rats in each subgroup. Morris water maze (MWM), open-field test and narrow beam test (NBT) were used to evaluate the cognitive and locomotor situations. Fasted blood ammonia, manganese content and glutamine synthetase (GS) activity in basal ganglia and cortex were measured. A significantly longer MWM escape latency, less locomotor activity, longer NBT latency and total time, higher blood ammonia, higher brain manganese content and GS activity were found in MHE-M rats. However, a significantly shorter MWM escape latency, increased locomotor activity, shorter NBT latency and total time, lower blood ammonia, lower brain manganese content and lower GS activity were found in MHE-N rats after no-manganese feed treatment. Partial improvements were found in MHE rats with half-manganese feed treatment. Reduction of manganese intake can significantly improve the cognitive and locomotor situations in MHE rats by reducing brain manganese content and regulating GS activity.

  12. Precipitants of hepatic encephalopathy induce rapid astrocyte swelling in an oxidative stress dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Lachmann, Vera; Görg, Boris; Bidmon, Hans Jürgen; Keitel, Verena; Häussinger, Dieter

    2013-08-15

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is seen as the clinical manifestation of a low grade cerebral edema with formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RNOS). Astrocyte swelling is a crucial event and in cultured astrocytes HE-relevant factors almost instantaneously induce the formation of RNOS. However, short term effects of ammonia, inflammatory cytokines and RNOS on the volume of astrocytes and other brain cells as well as the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown, although a pathogenic link between RNOS formation and swelling in HE has been proposed. This issue was addressed in the present study by means of live-cell volume microscopy of brain cells in vitro. Ammonia, diazepam and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor-necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ, interleukin-1β induced within 20min astrocyte swelling by about 25% accompanied by nuclear swelling of similar magnitude. Astrocyte swelling in response to NH4Cl, TNF-α or diazepam was abolished by the antioxidant epigallocatechin-gallate pointing to an involvement of RNOS. NH4Cl-induced astrocyte swelling was sensitive to inhibition of glutamine synthetase, NADPH oxidase or nitric oxide synthases. In line with a NMDA receptor-, prostanoid- and Ca(2+)-dependence of NH4Cl-induced RNOS formation, Ca(2+) chelation and inhibition of NMDA receptors or cyclooxygenase suppressed NH4Cl-induced astrocyte swelling, whereas the Ca(2+)-ionophore ionomycin, NMDA, glutamate and prostanoids induced rapid astrocyte swelling. NH4Cl also induced swelling of cultured microglia in a glutamine-synthesis dependent way, but had no effect on cell volume of cultured neurons. It is concluded that the pathways which trigger RNOS formation in astrocytes also trigger astrocyte swelling, whereas conversely and as shown previously hypoosmotic astrocyte swelling can induce RNOS formation. This establishes a complex interplay with an auto-amplificatory loop between RNOS formation and astrocyte swelling as an important event in

  13. Osmotic and oxidative/nitrosative stress in ammonia toxicity and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Görg, Boris; Schliess, Freimut; Häussinger, Dieter

    2013-08-15

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric complication of acute or chronic liver failure. Currently, HE in cirrhotic patients is seen as a clinical manifestation of a low grade cerebral edema which exacerbates in response to a variety of precipitating factors after an ammonia-induced exhaustion of the volume-regulatory capacity of the astrocyte. Astrocyte swelling triggers a complex signaling cascade which relies on NMDA receptor activation, elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and prostanoid-driven glutamate exocytosis, which result in increased formation of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species (RNOS) through activation of NADPH oxidase and nitric oxide synthase. Since RNOS in turn promote astrocyte swelling, a self-amplifying signaling loop between osmotic- and oxidative stress ensues, which triggers a variety of downstream consequences. These include protein tyrosine nitration (PTN), oxidation of RNA, mobilization of zinc, alterations in intra- and intercellular signaling and multiple effects on gene transcription. Whereas PTN can affect the function of a variety of proteins, such as glutamine synthetase, oxidized RNA may affect local protein synthesis at synapses, thereby potentially interfering with protein synthesis-dependent memory formation. PTN and RNA oxidation are also found in post mortem human cerebral cortex of cirrhotic patients with HE but not in those without HE, thereby confirming a role for oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of HE. Evidence derived from animal experiments and human post mortem brain tissue also indicates an up-regulation of microglia activation markers in the absence of increased synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines. However, the role of activated microglia in the pathophysiology of HE needs to be worked out in more detail. Most recent observations made in whole genome micro-array analyses of post mortem human brain tissue point to a hitherto unrecognized activation of multiple anti

  14. Clinical and Pathophysiological Characteristics of Cirrhotic Patients with Grade 1 and Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Karen Louise; Macnaughtan, Jane; Tritto, Giovanni; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P.; Jalan, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims EASL/AASLD hepatic encephalopathy (HE) guidelines proposed the alternative use of the term ‘Covert HE’ combining minimal HE (mHE) and Grade 1 HE into a single entity. However, longitudinal data to indicate that these are indeed a single entity are lacking. The aims of this study were to determine whether the occurrence of complications of cirrhosis requiring hospital admission and mortality were similar in these sub-groups of patients. Methods Clinically-stable cirrhotic patients (n = 106) with no previous history of ‘Overt HE’ were included over a 2-year period and classified as having no HE (n = 23), mHE (n = 39) or Grade 1 HE (n = 44). Standard biochemistry, venous ammonia, bacterial DNA and neutrophil function were measured at inclusion and the patients were followed for a mean of 230±95 days. Results Patients with Grade 1 HE had significantly more complications requiring hospitalisation (infection 9/18/34%; HE 4/8/18%; other 13/10/11%; P = 0.02) and significantly greater mortality (4/5/20%; P = 0.04) compared to patients with no HE or mHE respectively. Patients with mHE and grade 1 HE had similar ammonia levels, but higher than the no HE group (P<0.001). MELD score was similar between groups but Grade 1 HE patients had increased frequency of bacterial translocation (P = 0.06) and neutrophil spontaneous respiratory burst (P = 0.02) compared to patients with mHE. Conclusions The results of this study show for the first time that ‘Covert HE’ is a heterogeneous entity with significantly greater hospitalisations and mortality in the Grade 1 HE patients compared with mHE. Further prospective longer-term studies are required before EASL/AASLD guidance is fully implemented. PMID:26745876

  15. Main target of minimal hepatic encephalopathy: Morphophysiological, inflammatory and metabolic view.

    PubMed

    Arias, Natalia; Méndez, Marta; Gómez-Lázaro, Eneritz; Azpiroz, Arantxa; Arias, Jorge L

    2015-10-01

    Although often not considered clinically relevant and, therefore, not diagnosed or treated, minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) has been shown to affect daily functioning, quality of life, driving and overall mortality. To discover early impairments involved in MHE, we studied one of its precipitating factors, portal hypertension. Rats were trained on a stimulus-response task using the Morris water maze. Two groups of animals were used: a SHAM (sham-operated) group (n= 13) and a portal hypertension (PH) group (n= 13). The triple portal vein ligation method was used to create an animal model of an early developmental phase of HE. Brain metabolic activity was studied with cytochrome c-oxidase histochemistry (C.O.). Neuronal nuclear volume was assessed by nucleator probe; the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunoreactive astrocytes (GFAP-IR) and proinflammatory mediators was measured. The results revealed that the PH group was not able to reach the behavioural criterion, in contrast to the SHAM group. The metabolic brain consumption revealed decreased C.O. activity in the ventral striatum. The PH group showed lower density of GFAP-IR and an increase in the tumour necrotic factor-α (TNF-α). The PH group showed decreased neuronal nuclear volume in the dorsal striatum. On the contrary, increased neuronal nuclear volume was found in the ventral striatum. For the first time, a relationship has been established between inflammation, astrocytic and neural damage, and brain metabolic impairment in a model of MHE. Disruption of the striatum and related structures was highlighted as the main target in early stages of HE. Finally, a simple task was presented to assess the subtle impairments found in the clinic, which could provide fresh insights into the development of new tools for the assessment of MHE.

  16. Retrospective Cross-Sectional Pilot Study of Rifaximin Dosing for the Prevention of Recurrent Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Kelsey C; Likar, Eric; Martello, Jay L; Regier, Michael

    2017-02-08

    Standard treatment for hepatic encephalopathy (HE) includes medications that reduce ammonia and bacterial translocation in the gut. Rifaximin can be used off-label for the reduction of overt HE. The study purpose was to determine efficacy of traditional rifaximin dosing (400 mg three times daily) compared to newer dosing (550 mg twice daily) via readmission rates for the prevention of recurrent HE. This was a retrospective, observational, cross-sectional pilot study conducted in a tertiary medical center. A total of 226 patients 18-89 years of age with documentation of HE via ICD-9 code who started rifaximin therapy while inpatient between April 2009 and June 2014 were evaluated. Data collected included rifaximin dosing, other medications used to treat HE, duration of therapy, time to readmission, and various laboratory values. There were no differences in readmission rates at 30 days, 60 days, or 6 months between treatment groups. Additionally, there was no difference in the odds of readmission between the treatment groups (OR = 0.77, 95% CI: (0.201, 4.365), p = 0.718). Patients had a low overall probability of readmission over the observational period. Based on average wholesale price (AWP) data, the cost for a 9 day supply of rifaximin for the 400 mg dosing regimen is $952.56 versus $605.16 for the 550 mg dosing regimen. The rifaximin 550 mg dosing strategy should be utilized in hospitalized patients for the prevention of recurrent HE as there was no difference in readmission rate or time to readmission between dosing groups. The 550 mg regimen had a lower acquisition cost for a 9-day duration of treatment in the studied institution.

  17. Salivary Microbiota Reflects Changes in Gut Microbiota in Cirrhosis with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Jasmohan S; Betrapally, Naga S; Hylemon, Phillip B; Heuman, Douglas M; Daita, Kalyani; White, Melanie B; Unser, Ariel; Thacker, Leroy R; Sanyal, Arun J; Kang, Dae Joong; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Gillevet, Patrick M

    2015-01-01

    Background Altered gut microbiome is associated with systemic inflammation and cirrhosis decompensation. However, the correlation of the oral microbiome with inflammation in cirrhosis is unclear. Aim Evaluate the oral microbiome in cirrhosis and compare with stool microbiome. Methods Cirrhotic outpatients [with/without hepatic encephalopathy (HE)] and controls underwent stool/saliva microbiome analysis (for composition and function) and also systemic inflammatory evaluation. 90-day liver-related hospitalizations were recorded. Salivary inflammation was studied using Th1 cytokines/secretory IgA, histatins and lysozyme in a subsequent group. Results 102 cirrhotics (43 prior-HE) and 32 age-matched controls were included. On PCO, stool and saliva microbiome clustered far apart showing differences between sites as a whole. Salivary microbiome With prior-HE, relative abundance of autochthonous families decreased while potentially pathogenic ones (Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcaceae) increased in saliva. Endotoxin-related predicted functions were significantly higher in cirrhotic saliva. Stool microbiome Relative autochthonous taxa abundance reduced in prior-HE, along with increased Enterobacteriaceae and Enterococcaceae. Cirrhotic stool microbiota demonstrated a significantly higher correlation with systemic inflammation compared to saliva microbiota on correlation networks. Outcomes 38 patients were hospitalized within 90 days. Their salivary dysbiosis was significantly worse and predicted this outcome independent of cirrhosis severity. Salivary inflammation was studied in an additional 86 age-matched subjects (43 controls/43 cirrhotics); significantly higher IL-6/IL-1β, secretory IgA and lower lysozyme, and histatins 1 and 5 were found in cirrhotics compared to controls. Conclusions Dysbiosis, represented by reduction in autochthonous bacteria, is present in both saliva and stool in cirrhosis patients compared to controls. Cirrhotic patients have impaired salivary

  18. 23.4% saline decreases brain tissue volume in severe hepatic encephalopathy as assessed by a quantitative computed tomography marker

    PubMed Central

    Liotta, Eric M; Lizza, Bryan D; Romanova, Anna L; Guth, James C; Berman, Michael D; Carroll, Timothy J; Francis, Brandon; Ganger, Daniel; Ladner, Daniela P; Maas, Matthew B; Naidech, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cerebral edema is common in severe hepatic encephalopathy and may be life-threatening. Bolus 23.4% hypertonic saline (HTS) improves surveillance neuromonitoring scores, although its mechanism of action is not clearly established. We investigated the hypothesis that bolus HTS decreases cerebral edema in severe hepatic encephalopathy utilizing a quantitative technique to measure brain and CSF volume changes. Design Retrospective analysis of serial computed tomography (CT) scans and clinical data for a case-control series was performed. Setting Intensive care units of a tertiary care hospital. Patients Patients with severe hepatic encephalopathy treated with 23.4% HTS and control patients who did not receive 23.4% HTS. Methods We used clinically obtained CT scans to measure volumes of the ventricles, intracranial CSF, and brain using a previously validated semi-automated technique (Analyze Direct; Overland Park, KS). Volumes before and after 23.4% HTS were compared with Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Associations between total CSF volume, ventricular volume, serum sodium, and Glasgow Coma Scale Scores were assessed using Spearman correlation. Results Eleven patients with 18 administrations of 23.4% HTS met inclusion criteria. Total CSF (median 47.6 [35.1–69.4] to 61.9 [47.7–87.0] mL, p<0.001) and ventricular volumes (median 8.0 [6.9–9.5] to 9.2 [7.8–11.9] mL, p=0.002) increased and Glasgow Coma Scale Scores improved (median 4 [3–6] to 7 [6–9], p=0.008) after 23.4% HTS. In contrast, total CSF and ventricular volumes decreased in untreated control patients. Serum sodium increase was associated with increase in total CSF volume (r=0.83, p<0.001) and change in total CSF volume was associated with ventricular volume change (r=0.86, p<0.001). Conclusions Total CSF and ventricular volumes increased after 23.4% HTS, consistent with a reduction in brain tissue volume. Total CSF and ventricular volume change may be useful quantitative measures to assess

  19. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy in a child with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency due to a novel combined heterozygous mutations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiandi; Gao, Feng; Hong, Fang; Yu, Huimin; Jiang, Peifang

    2015-03-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is an X-linked disorder of metabolism of the urea cycle. It usually causes hyperammonemic encephalopathy in males during the neonatal to-infantile period, whereas female carriers present with variable manifestations depending on their pattern of random chromosome X inactivation in the liver. Early clinical manifestations of hyperammonemiaare nonspecific often leading to a delay in the diagnosis of OTCD.Unfortunately, delays in initiating treatment often lead to poor neurologic outcomes and overall survival. Presentation of hyperammonemic encephalopathy in children with OTCD is rare, and the mortality and morbidity rates are high. The diagnosis of OTCD and aggressive management of hyperammonemia were of paramount importance for appropriate treatment and successful recovery. Here, we report theclinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in a child with OTCD who presented with acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

  20. Reversal learning impairment and alterations in the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus in a model of portosystemic hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Marta; Méndez-López, Magdalena; López, Laudino; Begega, Azucena; Aller, María Angeles; Arias, Jaime; Arias, Jorge L

    2010-09-01

    Patients with liver dysfunction often suffer from hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a neurological complication that affects attention and memory. Various experimental animal models have been used to study HE, the most frequently used being the portocaval shunt (PCS). In order to determine brain substrates of cognitive impairment in this model, we assessed reversal learning and c-Fos expression in a rat model of portosystemic derivation. PCS and sham-operated rats (SHAM) were tested for reversal learning. Brains were processed for c-Fos immunocytochemistry. The total number of c-Fos positive nuclei was quantified in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. The spatial reference memory task showed no differences between groups in escape latencies. The no-platform probe test showed that both the PCS and the SHAM learned the location of platform. However, the PCS group perseverated in the old target during reversal. The PCS group presented less c-Fos- positive cells in prelimbic cortex, CA1 and dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus than SHAM. Overall, these results suggest that this specific model of portosystemic hepatic encephalopathy produces reversal learning impairment that could be linked to dysfunction in neuronal activity in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus.

  1. Reducing Peripheral Inflammation with Infliximab Reduces Neuroinflammation and Improves Cognition in Rats with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dadsetan, Sherry; Balzano, Tiziano; Forteza, Jerónimo; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Taoro-Gonzalez, Lucas; Hernandez-Rabaza, Vicente; Gil-Perotín, Sara; Cubas-Núñez, Laura; García-Verdugo, José-Manuel; Agusti, Ana; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation contributes to cognitive impairment in patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE). However, the process by which peripheral inflammation results in cognitive impairment remains unclear. In animal models, neuroinflammation and altered neurotransmission mediate cognitive impairment. Taking into account these data, we hypothesized that in rats with HE: (1) peripheral inflammation is a main contributor to neuroinflammation; (2) neuroinflammation in hippocampus impairs spatial learning by altering AMPA and/or NMDA receptors membrane expression; (3) reducing peripheral inflammation with infliximab (anti-TNF-a) would improve spatial learning; (4) this would be associated with reduced neuroinflammation and normalization of the membrane expression of glutamate receptors. The aims of this work were to assess these hypotheses. We analyzed in rats with portacaval shunt (PCS) and control rats, treated or not with infliximab: (a) peripheral inflammation by measuring prostaglandin E2, IL10, IL-17, and IL-6; (b) neuroinflammation in hippocampus by analyzing microglial activation and the content of TNF-a and IL-1b; (c) AMPA and NMDA receptors membrane expression in hippocampus; and (d) spatial learning in the Radial and Morris water mazes. We assessed the effects of treatment with infliximab on peripheral inflammation, on neuroinflammation and AMPA and NMDA receptors membrane expression in hippocampus and on spatial learning and memory. PCS rats show increased serum prostaglandin E2, IL-17, and IL-6 and reduced IL-10 levels, indicating increased peripheral inflammation. PCS rats also show microglial activation and increased nuclear NF-kB and expression of TNF-a and IL-1b in hippocampus. This was associated with altered AMPA and NMDA receptors membrane expression in hippocampus and impaired spatial learning and memory in the radial and Morris water maze. Treatment with infliximab reduces peripheral inflammation in PCS rats, normalizing prostaglandin E2, IL-17, IL-6, and

  2. [Disorders of mental function in patients with circulatory encephalopathy due to hypertension and atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Voloshin, P V; Kryzhenko, T V; Mishchenko, T S; Shestopalova, L F

    1989-07-01

    The authors described the dynamics of disorders of memory, attention and thinking in the course of treatment of patients with circulatory encephalopathy. It was shown that treatment resulted a prevailing regression of neurodynamic disorders of the higher psychic functions that was more productive at early stages of cerebrovascular insufficiency.

  3. Polyethylene Glycol and Lactulose versus Lactulose Alone in the Treatment of Hepatic Encephalopathy in Patients with Cirrhosis: A Non-Inferiority Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Naderian, Mohammadreza; Akbari, Heshmatollah; Saeedi, Morteza; Sohrabpour, Amir Ali

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND In this clinical trial, polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution was compared with lactulose in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in patients with cirrhosis. METHODS This randomized controlled trial was performed on 40 patients in two groups. The patients in the lactulose group received either 20-30 grams of lactulose orally or by a nasogastric tube, or 200 grams of lactulose enema by a rectal tube. The patients in the PEG–lactulose group received the same amount of oral or rectal lactulose, plus 280 grams of PEG in 4 liters of water orally as a single dose in 30-120 minutes. Serial physical examinations, hepatic encephalopathy scoring algorithm (HESA), blood level of ammonia, and serum biochemical studies were used to evaluate the severity of hepatic encephalopathy. RESULTS In comparison with lactulose alone, PEG-lactulose could improve HESA score in 24 hours more effectively (p =0.04). Overall, PEG-lactulose regimen was associated with a decrease in length of hospital stay compared with lactulose treatment (p =0.03) but in subgroup analysis we found that PEG-lactulose regimen could only decrease the length of hospital stay in women significantly (p =0.01). CONCLUSION The use of PEG along with lactulose in comparison with lactulose alone is more effective in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in patients with cirrhosis and results in more rapid discharge from hospital. PMID:28316761

  4. Obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekhara, K.L.; Iyer, S.K.

    1984-10-01

    A case of obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture is reported. The patient received postoperative radiation for left adrenal carcinoma, seven years prior to this admission. The sequelae of hepatobiliary radiation and their management are discussed briefly.

  5. Albumin dialysis with molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in liver failure.

    PubMed

    Kobashi-Margáin, Ramón A; Gavilanes-Espinar, Juan G; Gutiérrez-Grobe, Ylse; Gutiérrez-Jiménez, Angel A; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto; Ponciano-Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Uribe, Misael; Méndez Sánchez, Nahum

    2011-06-01

    Acute, acute-on-chronic and chronic liver diseases are major health issues worldwide, and most cases end with the need for liver transplantation. Up to 90% of the patients die waiting for an organ to be transplanted. Hepatic encephalopathy is a common neuropsychiatric syndrome that usually accompanies liver failure and impacts greatly on the quality of life. The molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) is a recently developed form of artificial liver support that functions on a base of albumin dialysis. It facilitates the dialysis of albumin-bound and water-soluble toxins, allowing the patient to survive and even improving some clinical features of liver failure. The following manuscript reviews the technical features of MARS operation and some of the clinical trials that analyze the efficacy of the system in the therapy of liver diseases.

  6. Comparison of the effects of Hepatic-Aid and a Casein modular diet on encephalopathy, plasma amino acids, and nitrogen balance in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed Central

    McGhee, A; Henderson, J M; Millikan, W J; Bleier, J C; Vogel, R; Kassouny, M; Rudman, D

    1983-01-01

    Hepatic-Aid is purported to ameliorate encephalopathy and promote positive nitrogen balance in protein-intolerant, cirrhotic patients by correcting their imbalanced amino acid profile. This study evaluated Hepatic-Acid by comparing a 50-g Casein diet with an identical diet with 20-g Casein/30-g Hepatic-Aid per day in a cross-over study. Four patients with biopsy-proven stable cirrhosis, encephalopathy, and under-nutrition were studied. Each study period included three days of equilibration and eight days of metabolic balance, with the following measured at baseline and on balance days 5 and 8: routine biochemistry, fasting ammonia, psychometric tests, EEG, and plasma amino acid profiles. There was no significant change in clinical status, routine biochemistry, fasting ammonia, psychometrics or EEG between the two study periods. Mean (+/-SD) nitrogen balance on the Casein diet at 1.5 +/- 1.5 g/day was not significantly different from that on the Hepatic-Aid diet at 1.5 +/- 1.2 g/day. Plasma amino acid profiles showed a significant fall (p less than 0.05) in fasting and intraprandial tyrosine (tyr) and phenylalanine (phe) on Hepatic-Aid, but only intraprandial leucine (leu), isoleucine (ile), and valine (val) were significantly increased (p less than 0.05) on Hepatic-Aid. The ratio leu + ile + val to tyr + phe was significantly increased (p less than 0.05) on Hepatic-Aid. It is concluded that Hepatic-Aid, as given in this study, maintains N balance similar to Casein, alters the amino acid profile towards normal, but does not ameliorate encephalopathy. PMID:6830337

  7. Wernicke's encephalopathy due to hyperemesis gravidarum: Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, V V; Prijesh, J; Praveenkumar, R; Saifudheen, K

    2016-01-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum-induced Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is an underestimated condition. The purpose of this study is to improve its awareness and early diagnosis. We report five cases of WE secondary to hyperemesis gravidarum. Classic triad of encephalopathy, ataxia, and ocular signs was seen in four out of five patients. Two unusual features noted in this series were papilledema in one patient and severe sensory-motor peripheral neuropathy in one patient. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was abnormal in all the five patients, and high signal in medial thalamus and surrounding the aqueduct was the most common abnormality (5/5). Involvement of caudate nucleus was seen in two patients with severe psychosis, and two patients had bilateral cerebellar peduncle involvement. Median time delay between onset of neurological symptoms and diagnosis was 7 days. All patients improved with thiamine, but minor sequelae were seen in four patients at 12 months follow-up. One patient had a fetal demise. Hyperemesis gravidarum-induced WE is a common cause of maternal morbidity. Typical MRI findings of symmetric medial thalamic and periaqueductal signal changes may permit a specific diagnosis. A delay in diagnosis, therefore treatment, leads to worse prognosis.

  8. Wernicke's encephalopathy due to hyperemesis gravidarum: Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, VV; Prijesh, J; Praveenkumar, R; Saifudheen, K

    2016-01-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum-induced Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is an underestimated condition. The purpose of this study is to improve its awareness and early diagnosis. We report five cases of WE secondary to hyperemesis gravidarum. Classic triad of encephalopathy, ataxia, and ocular signs was seen in four out of five patients. Two unusual features noted in this series were papilledema in one patient and severe sensory-motor peripheral neuropathy in one patient. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was abnormal in all the five patients, and high signal in medial thalamus and surrounding the aqueduct was the most common abnormality (5/5). Involvement of caudate nucleus was seen in two patients with severe psychosis, and two patients had bilateral cerebellar peduncle involvement. Median time delay between onset of neurological symptoms and diagnosis was 7 days. All patients improved with thiamine, but minor sequelae were seen in four patients at 12 months follow-up. One patient had a fetal demise. Hyperemesis gravidarum-induced WE is a common cause of maternal morbidity. Typical MRI findings of symmetric medial thalamic and periaqueductal signal changes may permit a specific diagnosis. A delay in diagnosis, therefore treatment, leads to worse prognosis. PMID:27763485

  9. Nitric oxide mediates effects of acute, not chronic, naltrexone on LPS-induced hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic rats.

    PubMed

    Ghiassy, Bentolhoda; Rahimi, Nastaran; Javadi-Paydar, Mehrak; Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest endogenous opioids and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In this study, the interaction between the opioid receptor antagonist and NO was investigated on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced HE in cirrhotic rats. Male rats were divided in the sham- and bile duct ligation (BDL)-operated groups. Animals were treated with saline; naltrexone (10 mg/kg, i.p.); or L-NAME (3 mg/kg, i.p.), alone or in combination with naltrexone. To induce HE, LPS (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected 1 h after the final drug treatment. HE scoring, hepatic histology, and plasma NO metabolites levels and mortality rate were recorded. Deteriorated level of consciousness and mortality after LPS administration significantly ameliorated following both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone in cirrhotic rats. However, acute and chronic administration of L-NAME did not change HE scores in cirrhotic rats. The effects of acute but not chronic treatment of naltrexone on HE parameters were reversed by L-NAME. Plasma NOx concentrations elevated in BDL rats, which were decreased after acute and chronic treatment by naltrexone or L-NAME, significantly. We suggest both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone improved LPS-induced HE. But, only acute treatment with naltrexone may affect through NO pathway.

  10. Vitamin B1 in the treatment of Wernicke's encephalopathy due to hyperemesis after gastroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kühn, A L; Hertel, F; Boulanger, T; Diederich, N J

    2012-09-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a severe brain disorder, first described in 1881, and is caused by a nutritional deficiency of thiamine (vitamin B1) found mostly in patients suffering from chronic alcoholism. In addition, WE can also complicate bariatric surgery if adequate vitamin supplementation is not insured. Without immediate treatment, the prognosis is poor and the mortality rate is high. Most patients present with atypical neurological symptoms, which hampers rapid diagnosis. We present a 40-year-old woman who underwent gastroplasty combined with gastric banding for severe obesity. She experienced repetitive vomiting and her diet was without vitamin supplementation. After three months she developed convergent strabismus, apathy and urinary incontinence, which was diagnosed as WE and treated as such. Six months later her recovery was incomplete, still showing gait difficulties and nystagmus. We aim to show that adequate vitamin supplementation in patients undergoing gastroplasty is necessary, especially considering the risk of permanent neurological deficits.

  11. GR3027 antagonizes GABAA receptor-potentiating neurosteroids and restores spatial learning and motor coordination in rats with chronic hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Maja; Agusti, Ana; Llansola, Marta; Montoliu, Carmina; Strömberg, Jessica; Malinina, Evgenya; Ragagnin, Gianna; Doverskog, Magnus; Bäckström, Torbjörn; Felipo, Vicente

    2015-09-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is one of the primary complications of liver cirrhosis. Current treatments for HE, mainly directed to reduction of ammonia levels, are not effective enough because they cannot completely eliminate hyperammonemia and inflammation, which induce the neurological alterations. Studies in animal models show that overactivation of GABAA receptors is involved in cognitive and motor impairment in HE and that reducing this activation restores these functions. We have developed a new compound, GR3027, that selectively antagonizes the enhanced activation of GABAA receptors by neurosteroids such as allopregnanolone and 3α,21-dihydroxy-5α-pregnan-20-one (THDOC). This work aimed to assess whether GR3027 improves motor incoordination, spatial learning, and circadian rhythms of activity in rats with HE. GR3027 was administered subcutaneously to two main models of HE: rats with chronic hyperammonemia due to ammonia feeding and rats with portacaval shunts (PCS). Motor coordination was assessed in beam walking and spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze and the radial maze. Circadian rhythms of ambulatory and vertical activity were also assessed. In both hyperammonemic and PCS rats, GR3027 restores motor coordination, spatial memory in the Morris water maze, and spatial learning in the radial maze. GR3027 also partially restores circadian rhythms of ambulatory and vertical activity in PCS rats. GR3027 is a novel approach to treatment of HE that would normalize neurological functions altered because of enhanced GABAergic tone, affording more complete normalization of cognitive and motor function than current treatments for HE.

  12. GR3027 antagonizes GABAA receptor-potentiating neurosteroids and restores spatial learning and motor coordination in rats with chronic hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Maja; Agusti, Ana; Llansola, Marta; Montoliu, Carmina; Strömberg, Jessica; Malinina, Evgenya; Ragagnin, Gianna; Doverskog, Magnus; Bäckström, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is one of the primary complications of liver cirrhosis. Current treatments for HE, mainly directed to reduction of ammonia levels, are not effective enough because they cannot completely eliminate hyperammonemia and inflammation, which induce the neurological alterations. Studies in animal models show that overactivation of GABAA receptors is involved in cognitive and motor impairment in HE and that reducing this activation restores these functions. We have developed a new compound, GR3027, that selectively antagonizes the enhanced activation of GABAA receptors by neurosteroids such as allopregnanolone and 3α,21-dihydroxy-5α-pregnan-20-one (THDOC). This work aimed to assess whether GR3027 improves motor incoordination, spatial learning, and circadian rhythms of activity in rats with HE. GR3027 was administered subcutaneously to two main models of HE: rats with chronic hyperammonemia due to ammonia feeding and rats with portacaval shunts (PCS). Motor coordination was assessed in beam walking and spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze and the radial maze. Circadian rhythms of ambulatory and vertical activity were also assessed. In both hyperammonemic and PCS rats, GR3027 restores motor coordination, spatial memory in the Morris water maze, and spatial learning in the radial maze. GR3027 also partially restores circadian rhythms of ambulatory and vertical activity in PCS rats. GR3027 is a novel approach to treatment of HE that would normalize neurological functions altered because of enhanced GABAergic tone, affording more complete normalization of cognitive and motor function than current treatments for HE. PMID:26138462

  13. Differential Impact of Hyponatremia and Hepatic Encephalopathy on Health-Related Quality of Life and Brain Metabolite Abnormalities in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahluwalia, Vishwadeep; Wade, James B; Thacker, Leroy; Kraft, Kenneth A; Sterling, Richard K; Stravitz, R Todd; Fuchs, Michael; Bouneva, Iliana; Puri, Puneet; Luketic, Velimir; Sanyal, Arun J; Gilles, HoChong; Heuman, Douglas M; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia (HN) and hepatic encephalopathy (HE) together can impair health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) and cognition in cirrhosis. Aim To study effect of hyponatremia on cognition, HRQOL and brain MR spectroscopy (MRS) independent of HE. Methods Four cirrhotic groups(no HE/HN, HE alone, HN alone (sodium<130mEq/L),HE+HN) underwent cognitive testing, HRQOL using Sickness Impact Profile (SIP: higher score is worse; has psycho-social and physical sub-scores) and brain MRS (myoinositol(mI) and glutamate+glutamine(Glx)), which were compared across groups. A subset underwent HRQOL testing before/after diuretic withdrawal. Results 82 cirrhotics (30 no HE/HN, 25 HE, 17 HE+HN and 10 HN, MELD 12, 63% Hepatitis C) were included. Cirrhotics with HN alone and without HE/HN had better cognition compared to HE groups (median abnormal tests no-HE/HN:3, HN:3.5, HE:6.5,HE+HN:7, p=0.008). Despite better cognition, HN only patients had worse HRQOL in total and psychosocial SIP while both HN groups (with/without HE) had a significantly worse physical SIP(p<0.0001, all comparisons). Brain MRS showed lowest Glx in HN and highest in HE groups (p<0.02). mI levels were comparably decreased in the three affected (HE,HE+HN and HN) groups compared to no HE/HN and were associated with poor HRQOL. Six HE+HN cirrhotics underwent diuretic withdrawal which improved serum sodium and total/psycho-social SIP scores. Conclusions Hyponatremic cirrhotics without HE have poor HRQOL despite better cognition than those with concomitant HE. Glx levels were lowest in HN without HE but mI was similar across affected groups. HRQOL improved after diuretic withdrawal. Hyponatremia has a complex, non-linear relationship with brain Glx and mI, cognition and HRQOL. PMID:23665182

  14. Nitrosative Stress-Induced Disruption of Baroreflex Neural Circuits in a Rat Model of Hepatic Encephalopathy: A DTI Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ching-Yi; Su, Chia-Hao; Chan, Julie Y. H.; Chan, Samuel H. H.

    2017-01-01

    The onset of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in liver failure is associated with high mortality; the underlying mechanism is undecided. Here we report that in an acute liver failure model employing intraperitoneal administration of thioacetamide in Sprague-Dawley rats, diffusion weighted imaging revealed a progressive reduction in apparent diffusion coefficient in the brain stem. Diffusion tensor imaging further showed that the connectivity between nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), the terminal site of baroreceptor afferents in brain stem and rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the origin of sympathetic innervation of blood vessels, was progressively disrupted until its disappearance, coincidental with the irreversible cessation of baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone signifying clinically the occurrence of brain death. In addition, superoxide, nitric oxide, peroxynitrite and ammonia levels in the NTS or RVLM were elevated, alongside swelling of astroctytes. A scavenger of peroxynitrite, but not an antioxidant, delivered intracisternally reversed all these events. We conclude that nitrosative stress because of augmented peroxynitrite related to accumulation of ammonia and swelling of astrocytes in the NTS or RVLM, leading to cytotoxic edema in the brain stem and severance of the NTS-RVLM connectivity, underpins the defunct baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone that accounts for the high mortality associated with HE. PMID:28079146

  15. The Mind and Liver Test: A New Approach to the Diagnosis of Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy in Resource-Poor Settings

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Sajjadh M. J.; Seward, James; Venkataraman, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is diagnosed using neuropsychometric tests or neurophysiological tests that are either inapplicable to illiterate patient population in resource-poor settings or require sophisticated and expensive equipment. The available tests assess discrete domains of mental impairment. Our aim was (a) to design a neuropsychometric test that measures all domains of mental impairment in MHE using one metric; (b) to evaluate its sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility. Methods. The mind and liver test (MALT), a psychometric test assessing cognition, memory, and psychometric impairment, each on a scale of 20, was designed keeping in mind the requirements of a universal test. 40 cirrhotics and 36 controls were subjected to critical flicker frequency (CFF) and MALT in same sitting. ROC curve was plotted for MALT using CFF as gold standard. Bland-Altman plot was used to find test-retest agreement. Results. CFF values and MALT scores varied significantly between the cases and the controls (P < 0.05). MALT was 94% sensitive and 83% specific. Using ROC with CFF as gold standard, the AUC for diagnosis of MHE using MALT score was 0.89. Test-retest agreement was high (ICC = 0.89). Conclusion. In this pilot study, MALT proved to be highly sensitive, specific, inexpensive, and reproducible. PMID:25548682

  16. Dopamine Burden Triggers Neurodegeneration via Production and Release of TNF-α from Astrocytes in Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Saidan; Wang, Weikan; Wang, Xuebao; Liang, Yong; Liu, Leping; Ye, Yiru; Yang, Jianjing; Gao, Hongchang; Zhuge, Qichuan

    2016-10-01

    Dopamine (DA)-induced learning and memory impairment is well documented in minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE), but the contribution of DA to neurodegeneration and the involved underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, the effect of DA on neuronal apoptosis was initially detected. The results showed that MHE/DA (10 μg)-treated rats displayed neuronal apoptosis. However, we found that DA (10 μM) treatment did not induce evident apoptosis in primary cultured neurons (PCNs) but did produce TNF-α in primary cultured astrocytes (PCAs). Furthermore, co-cultures between PCAs and PCNs exposed to DA exhibited increased astrocytic TNF-α levels and neuronal apoptosis compared with co-cultures exposed to the vehicle, indicating the attribution of the neuronal apoptosis to astrocytic TNF-α. We also demonstrated that DA enhanced TNF-α production from astrocytes by activation of the TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB pathway, and secreted astrocytic TNF-α-potentiated neuronal apoptosis through inactivation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Overall, the findings from this study suggest that DA stimulates substantial production and secretion of astrocytic TNF-α, consequently and indirectly triggering progressive neurodegeneration, resulting in cognitive decline and memory loss in MHE.

  17. Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, H C; Marsharani, U

    2000-05-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a subacute condition associated with autoimmune thyroiditis. Its presentation varies from focal neurologic deficits to global confusion. Unlike encephalopathy associated with hypothyroidism, Hashimoto's encephalopathy responds to steroid therapy and not thyroxine replacement.

  18. Intensive enteral feeding in advanced cirrhosis: reversal of malnutrition without precipitation of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Charlton, C P; Buchanan, E; Holden, C E; Preece, M A; Green, A; Booth, I W; Tarlow, M J

    1992-05-01

    Ten children with advanced cirrhosis and malnutrition (less than 90% weight for height) were fed for eight weeks with a nasogastric feed comprising whey protein (enriched with branched chain amino acids), fat as 34% medium chain and 66% long chain triglycerides, and glucose polymer. Six of the children were studied for an eight week control period before feeding. Weight, triceps skinfold thickness, mid-arm circumference, mid-arm muscle area, and fasting plasma ammonia and amino acid concentrations were measured before and after the control period and after the consequent feed period. Results showed that despite high energy and protein intakes the children remained malnourished over the control period. All anthropometric indices improved significantly during the feed period, and no child developed clinical encephalopathy. The feed period was associated with a small, and not clinically significant, increase in the plasma ammonia concentration, but no consistent trend in the plasma amino acid concentrations. Thus, in children with advanced hepatobiliary disease awaiting liver transplantation, enteral feeding improved nutritional status without adverse clinical or biochemical effects.

  19. Glycosylation patterns and PHA-E-associated glycoprotein profiling associated with early hepatic encephalopathy in Chinese hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tian-Hua; Liu, Deng-He; Mo, Cui-Ju; Sun, Lu; Liu, Xiao-Xia; Li, Wei; Zhang, Shu; Liu, Yin-Kun; Guo, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) as a severe neuropsychiatric complication is commonly present in the end stage of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC). However, widely accepted biomarkers for diagnosing early HE are still absent. Here, we screened glycosylation patterns of serum proteins from Chinese HCC patients with or without early HE by lectin microarray. Then, phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin (PHA-E) as a lectin binding with bisecting GlcNAc structure which was significantly decreased in sera from Chinese HCC patients with early HE, was chosen to perform lectin affinity chromatography, following by in-gel digestion, Mass Spectrometry (MS) analysis and bioinformatics analysis. Here we found, 13 lectins showed statistically significant reduction suggesting GalNAc, terminal α-1,3 Man, bisecting GlcNAc, (GlcNAc)n, O-GlcNAc, Neu5Ac, tetra-antennary complex-type N-glycan and GalNAc α/β1-3/6 Gal were decreased in serum glycoproteins from Chinese HCC patients with early HE. Furthermore, a total of 141 PHA-E-associated glycoproteins were identified in MS, of which 12 serum glycoproteins only in Chinese HCC patients without early HE and 26 serum glycoproteins only in Chinese HCC patients with early HE. In addition, bioinformatics analysis revealed the PHA-E-associated serum glycoproteins only in Chinese HCC patients with early HE might be related to early HE occurrence through p38 MAPK signaling pathway and MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. Collectively, this was the first glycomics study of serum proteins in HCC patients with early HE and it could provide a database for discovering and developing serum biomarkers to identify and predict early HE in HCC patients. PMID:27830009

  20. Probiotic and lactulose: influence on gastrointestinal flora and pH value in minimal hepatic encephalopathy rats

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Man; Jia, Lin; Zhang, Mei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to investigate the influence on gastrointestinal flora, counts of bifidobacteria and Enterobacterceae in colon and pH value of gastrointestinal after lactulose and probiotic treatment on rat experimental minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) induced by thioactamide (TAA). Methods: MHE was induced by intraperitoneal injection of TAA. 48 male MHE models were then randomly divided into 4 groups: control group (n = 12); MHE group (n = 12) received tap water ad libitum only; lactulose group (n = 12) and probiotics group (n = 12) gavaged respectively with 8 ml/kg of lactulose and 1.5 g/kg of probiotic preparation Golden Bifid (highly concentrated combination probiotic) dissolved in 2 ml of normal saline, once a day for 8 days. The latency of Brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) I was used as objective index of MHE. Counts of gastrointestinal flora, counts of bifidobacteria and Enterobacterceae in colon and pH value of gastrointestinal were examined respectively. Results: Compared to MHE group, counts of gastrointestinal flora has greatly decreased, ratio of bifidobacteria and Enterobacterceae has greatly increased, pH value of colon has greatly descended (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference between lactulose group and probiotic group (P > 0.05). Both lactulose and probiotics can effectively prevent bacteria translocation and overgrowth, intensify CR, improved value of B/E, and acidify intestinal, decreased pH value of colon. Conclusion: Probiotic compound Golden Bifid is as useful as lactulose for the prevention and treatment of MHE. Probiotic therapy may be a safe, natural, well-tolerated therapy appropriate for the long-term treatment of MHE. PMID:26309689

  1. Effects of oral branched-chain amino acids on hepatic encephalopathy and outcome in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Takumi; Taniguchi, Eitaro; Sata, Michio

    2013-10-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) constituting of valine, leucine, and isoleucine act as both substrates of proteins and as key regulators for various nutrient metabolisms. Patients with liver cirrhosis frequently lack sufficient BCAAs and therefore suffer from various metabolic disorders. Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a severe metabolic disorder with neurologic manifestations such as flapping tremors and coma in patients with liver cirrhosis. In addition, a mild form of HE known as minimal HE (MHE) is an important social issue because it occurs in up to 80% of patients with chronic liver disease and affects prognosis and activities of daily living, possibly resulting in falls and motor vehicle accidents. Although HE/MHE can be caused by various pathological conditions, including in an accumulation of mercaptans, short-chain fatty acids, and alterations in the gut flora, hyperammonemia has also been implicated in an important pathogenesis of HE/MHE. Besides urea cycle of liver, ammonia can be detoxified in the skeletal muscles by the amidation process for glutamine synthesis using BCAAs. Thus, BCAA supplementation may enhance detoxification of ammonia in skeletal muscle and may be a possible therapeutic strategy for HE/MHE. In this review, we summarize the clinical impacts of BCAA supplementation on HE/MHE and discuss possible mechanisms for a BCAA-induced improvement of HE/MHE. Furthermore, we present some modifications of oral BCAA therapy for improvement of efficacy in HE treatment. We also briefly describe pleiotropic benefits of BCAAs on life-threatening events and overall prognosis in patients with liver cirrhosis.

  2. The GABAA receptor complex in hepatic encephalopathy. Autoradiographic evidence for the presence of elevated levels of a benzodiazepine receptor ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Ostrowski, N.L.; Gammal, S.H.; Jones, E.A.; Skolnick, P. )

    1990-02-01

    Autoradiographic analysis was used to examine radioligand binding to benzodiazepine (BZ) and GABAA receptors in the brains of rabbits with hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Thin sections of whole brain from normal rabbits and rabbits with HE were mounted on slides and subdivided into two groups. One group was washed before incubation with radioligand, while the second group was not prewashed. (3H)Flunitrazepam binding to BZ receptors was decreased by 22% to 42% (p less than 0.05) in the cerebral cortex, superior and inferior colliculi, and cerebellum of unwashed sections from rabbits with HE compared to all other groups. The binding of (3H)Ro 15-1788 to unwashed sections from rabbits with HE was reduced by a similar degree (18% to 37%, p less than 0.05) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, superior colliculus, and cerebellar cortex. Incubation of sections with the GABA-mimetic muscimol and NaCl produced an additional decrease in (3H)flunitrazepam binding to the cortex and hippocampus (25% to 31%, p less than 0.05) in unwashed HE rabbit brain, but increased radioligand binding (27% to 71%, p less than 0.05) to several regions in control rabbits. No changes in radioligand binding to either GABAA or peripheral benzodiazepine receptors was observed between HE and control rabbit sections. These findings are consistent with previous electrophysiologic and neurochemical observations indicating no significant changes in either the function or density of GABAA or BZ receptors in this model of HE. Further, they indicate that a reversible BZ receptor ligand with agonist properties is present in the brain in HE. This substance may contribute to the enhancement of GABAergic tone observed in this syndrome.

  3. [A Case of Clinically Mild Encephalitis/encephalopathy with a Reversible Splenial Lesion due to Dengue Fever].

    PubMed

    Saito, Nobuo; Kitashouji, Emi; Kojiro, Maiko; Furumoto, Akitugu; Morimoto, Konosuke; Morita, Kouichi; Ariyoshi, Koya

    2015-07-01

    Clinically mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS) has been recently proposed as a clinical-radiological syndrome. Several causes of MERS have been reported including infectious diseases. We present herein on a case of MERS induced by dengue fever in a Japanese traveler. A 48-year-old male returning from Thailand and Cambodia was admitted for an unknown fever. Following admission, the dengue virus was diagnosed with a positive RT-PCR result. On day 5 of the illness, regardless of reduced fever, weakness suddenly developed in both upper limbs. A cerebral MRI showed hyperintensities in the splenium of the corpus callosum on T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted images. The symptoms resolved completely within two days of onset. The patient was diagnosed as having MERS due to the MRI features and the mild clinical course. Although only a few cases of MERS caused by dengue fever have been reported, the condition is possibly underdiagnosed. It is hypothesized that dengue fever can induce MERS as dengue fever can cause increased endothelium permeability and hypo-sodium which have been proposed in the pathogenesis of MERS. However, there is currently limited evidence for this. Further research is recommended to demonstrate a causal association between dengue fever and MERS.

  4. Increased susceptibility of transgenic mice expressing human PrP to experimental sheep bovine spongiform encephalopathy is not due to increased agent titre in sheep brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Plinston, Chris; Hart, Patricia; Hunter, Nora; Manson, Jean C; Barron, Rona M

    2014-08-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans have previously been shown to be caused by the same strain of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy agent. It is hypothesized that the agent spread to humans following consumption of food products prepared from infected cattle. Despite evidence supporting zoonotic transmission, mouse models expressing human prion protein (HuTg) have consistently shown poor transmission rates when inoculated with cattle BSE. Higher rates of transmission have however been observed when these mice are exposed to BSE that has been experimentally transmitted through sheep or goats, indicating that humans may potentially be more susceptible to BSE from small ruminants. Here we demonstrate that increased transmissibility of small ruminant BSE to HuTg mice was not due to replication of higher levels of infectivity in sheep brain tissue, and is instead due to other specific changes in the infectious agent.

  5. Increased toll-like receptor 4 in cerebral endothelial cells contributes to the astrocyte swelling and brain edema in acute hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Arumugam R; Tong, Xiao Y; Curtis, Kevin M; Ruiz-Cordero, Roberto; Abreu, Maria T; Norenberg, Michael D

    2014-03-01

    Astrocyte swelling and the subsequent increase in intracranial pressure and brain herniation are major clinical consequences in patients with acute hepatic encephalopathy. We recently reported that conditioned media from brain endothelial cells (ECs) exposed to ammonia, a mixture of cytokines (CKs) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), when added to astrocytes caused cell swelling. In this study, we investigated the possibility that ammonia and inflammatory agents activate the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in ECs, resulting in the release of factors that ultimately cause astrocyte swelling. We found a significant increase in TLR4 protein expression when ECs were exposed to ammonia, CKs or LPS alone, while exposure of ECs to a combination of these agents potentiate such effects. In addition, astrocytes exposed to conditioned media from TLR4-silenced ECs that were treated with ammonia, CKs or LPS, resulted in a significant reduction in astrocyte swelling. TLR4 protein up-regulation was also detected in rat brain ECs after treatment with the liver toxin thioacetamide, and that thioacetamide-treated TLR4 knock-out mice exhibited a reduction in brain edema. These studies strongly suggest that ECs significantly contribute to the astrocyte swelling/brain edema in acute hepatic encephalopathy, likely as a consequence of increased TLR4 protein expression by blood-borne noxious agents.

  6. Hepatitis Due to Equine Abortion Virus. Comparison Between the Liver Histology in Human, Canine, Duckling, and Equine Viral Hepatitis1

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, W. M.; Nilsson, M. R.

    1966-01-01

    Five livers of equine fetuses, aborted due to the action of equine abortion virus, five livers from men, two of whom died of epidemic hepatitis and three obtained by needle biopsies, 5 livers of dogs with infectious canine hepatitis and 7 livers of ducklings that had hepatitis, were studied histopathologically. The foals' livers were studied by several staining methods and the others by H. E. only. The results indicate that the lesions are quite similar in the four species with the appearance of nuclear inclusion bodies only in foals and dogs. The strong staining properties of the nuclear inclusion bodies in infectious canine hepatitis and the weak staining properties of the equine virus abortion reveal that the protein-DNA association is different resulting in a different electropolarity. The lesions in foals are of two main types, one a Necrotic-Mosaic Type in which the hepatocyte degeneration is irregularly distributed within the hepatic lobules and the other an Hyperplastic Type in which marked regeneration occurs. In the Hyperplastic Type the practical absence of plasmocytes in foals' livers might suggest that if the newborn is a female, abortions may occur later in life because the virus remained alive in colts which were born in an immune tolerance state. Histologically the picture in the livers of aborted foals assume features of a viral hepatitis similar to the viral hepatitis in men, dogs and ducklings. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 8.Fig. 9. PMID:4225286

  7. Development of quantitative neuropsychological tests for diagnosis of subclinical hepatic encephalopathy in liver cirrhosis patients and establishment of diagnostic criteria-multicenter collaborative study in Japanese.

    PubMed

    Kato, Akinobu; Kato, Motoichiro; Ishii, Hiromasa; Ichimiya, Yosuke; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Kawasaki, Hironaka; Yamamoto, Shin-Ichiro; Kumashiro, Ryukichi; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Kawamura, Naohiro; Hayashi, Naoaki; Matsuzaki, Shohei; Terano, Akira; Okita, Kiwamu; Watanabe, Akiharu

    2004-10-01

    At present, there are no generally accepted diagnostic criteria or methods for subclinical hepatic encephalopathy (SHE) associated with liver cirrhosis. We therefore developed an easily conducted computer-aided quantitative neuropsychiatric function test system for use in routine medical practice. We established normal values in healthy Japanese subjects and determined differences between healthy persons and liver cirrhosis patients without clinical encephalopathy in a multi-center clinical trial. The test system consists of eight tests: number connection tests A and B, a figure position test, a digit symbol test, a block design test, and reaction time tests A, B and C. The test results were affected by age, but not by gender or facility. No learning effect was noted. The results were therefore reported by 5-year quartile ranges and differences were evaluated between 542 healthy subjects and 292 cirrhotic patients. When the cut-off value was set at the 10th/90th percentile of the results in healthy subjects, the results of each of the 8 tests were abnormal in about 25% of cirrhotic patients, and at least 1 of the 8 tests gave values greater than the 10th/90th percentile cut-off value in 58.2% of the 292 liver cirrhosis patients. SHE patients were thought to be included in these 58.2% of patients. The developed test makes it possible to quantitatively assess neuropsychiatric function, and the results obtained can be used as a basis for the diagnosis of SHE.

  8. Portosystemic hepatic encephalopathy model shows reversal learning impairment and dysfunction of neural activity in the prefrontal cortex and regions involved in motivated behavior.

    PubMed

    Méndez, M; Méndez-López, M; López, L; Aller, M A; Arias, J; Arias, J L

    2011-05-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neurological complication that affects attention and memory. Experimental animal models have been used to study HE, the most frequent being the portacaval shunt (PCS). In order to investigate learning impairment and brain functional alterations in this model, we assessed reversal learning and neural metabolic activity in a PCS rat model. PCS and sham-operated rats were tested for reversal learning in the Morris water maze. Brains were then processed for cytochrome oxidase (CO) histochemistry. The PCS group had reversal learning impairment and a reduction in CO activity in the prefrontal cortex, ventral tegmental area and accumbens shell nucleus. These results suggest that this model of portosystemic HE shows learning impairments that could be linked to dysfunction in neural activity in the prefrontal cortex and regions involved in motivated behavior.

  9. Regional cerebral blood flow assessed by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in dogs with congenital portosystemic shunt and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Or, Matan; Peremans, Kathelijne; Martlé, Valentine; Vandermeulen, Eva; Bosmans, Tim; Devriendt, Nausikaa; de Rooster, Hilde

    2017-02-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in eight dogs with congenital portosystemic shunt (PSS) and hepatic encephalopathy (HE) was compared with rCBF in eight healthy control dogs using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with a (99m)technetium-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime ((99m)Tc-HMPAO) tracer. SPECT scans were abnormal in all PSS dogs. Compared to the control group, rCBF in PSS dogs was significantly decreased in the temporal lobes and increased in the subcortical (thalamic and striatal) area. Brain perfusion imaging alterations observed in the dogs with PSS and HE are similar to those in human patients with HE. These findings suggest that dogs with HE and PSS have altered perfusion of mainly the subcortical and the temporal regions of the brain.

  10. Approach to clinical syndrome of jaundice and encephalopathy in tropics.

    PubMed

    Anand, Anil C; Garg, Hitendra K

    2015-03-01

    A large number of patients present with jaundice and encephalopathy in tropical country like India and acute liver failure is the usual cause. Clinical presentation like ALF is also a complication of many tropical infections, and these conditions may mimic ALF but may have subtle differences from ALF. Moreover, what hepatologists see as acute liver failure in tropics is different from what is commonly described in Western Textbooks. Paracetamol overdose, which is possibly the commonest cause of ALF in UK and USA, is hardly ever seen in India. Most common etiology here is viral hepatitis (hepatitis E > hepatitis B> hepatitis A). Apart from ALF, one may also come across subacute hepatic failure (SAHF) as well as acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) due to viral hepatitis. Interestingly, a host of other conditions can mimic ALF because clinical presentation in these conditions can be dominated by jaundice and encephalopathy. Malarial hepatopathy is possibly the best-known condition out of these and is not an uncommon manifestation of severe malaria. A similar presentation can also be seen in other common infections in tropics such as dengue fever, typhoid fever, leptospirosis, scrub typhus, amoebic liver abscesses, tuberculosis and other bacterial and fungal infections with or without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) related disease. In many of these conditions, liver failure may not be underlying pathophysiology. Some pregnancy related liver diseases could also present with jaundice and encephalopathy. This review summarizes the commonly seen presentations in tropical country like India, where jaundice and encephalopathy dominate the clinical picture.

  11. Toxic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Woo

    2012-01-01

    This article schematically reviews the clinical features, diagnostic approaches to, and toxicological implications of toxic encephalopathy. The review will focus on the most significant occupational causes of toxic encephalopathy. Chronic toxic encephalopathy, cerebellar syndrome, parkinsonism, and vascular encephalopathy are commonly encountered clinical syndromes of toxic encephalopathy. Few neurotoxins cause patients to present with pathognomonic neurological syndromes. The symptoms and signs of toxic encephalopathy may be mimicked by many psychiatric, metabolic, inflammatory, neoplastic, and degenerative diseases of the nervous system. Thus, the importance of good history-taking that considers exposure and a comprehensive neurological examination cannot be overemphasized in the diagnosis of toxic encephalopathy. Neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging typically play ancillary roles. The recognition of toxic encephalopathy is important because the correct diagnosis of occupational disease can prevent others (e.g., workers at the same worksite) from further harm by reducing their exposure to the toxin, and also often provides some indication of prognosis. Physicians must therefore be aware of the typical signs and symptoms of toxic encephalopathy, and close collaborations between neurologists and occupational physicians are needed to determine whether neurological disorders are related to occupational neurotoxin exposure. PMID:23251840

  12. Acute amnestic encephalopathy in amyloid-β oligomer-injected mice is due to their widespread diffusion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Epelbaum, Stéphane; Youssef, Ihsen; Lacor, Pascale N; Chaurand, Pierre; Duplus, Eric; Brugg, Bernard; Duyckaerts, Charles; Delatour, Benoît

    2015-06-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers are the suspected culprit as initiators of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, their diffusion in the brain remains unknown. Here, we studied Aβ oligomers' dissemination and evaluated their in vivo toxicity. Wild-type mice were injected with 50 pmol of synthetic Aβ oligomers (of different size) in the hippocampus. Oligomers diffused largely in the brain as soon as 1 hour and up to 7 days after injection. A transient encephalopathy with memory impairment was induced by this unique injection. The immunoreactivity of the postsynaptic marker PSD95 was diffusely decreased. Similar results (both on memory and PSD95 immunoreactivity) were obtained with delipidated and high molecular weight oligomers (>50 kDa) but not with smaller assemblies. Tau hyperphosphorylation was observed in the oligomer-injected brains. Finally, fos immunostaining was increased in Aβ-derived diffusible ligands-injected mice, suggesting neuronal hyperactivity. Rapid and widespread diffusion of Aβ oligomers was demonstrated in vivo and associated with decreased synaptic markers and memory deficits which gives new insight to the pathogenicity of Aβ.

  13. [Anesthetic Management of a Parturient with Eclampsia, Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome and Pulmonary Edema due to Pregnancy-induced Hypertension].

    PubMed

    Aida, Junko; Okutani, Hiroai; Oda, Yutaka; Okutani, Ryu

    2015-08-01

    A 27-year-old woman with mental retardation was admitted to a nearby hospital for an abrupt onset of seizure. Physical examination revealed remarkable hypertension and pregnancy with estimated gestational age of 28th week. Severe pulmonary edema and hypoxia led to a diagnosis of pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) accompanied by eclampsia. She was orotracheally intubated because of refractory seizure and hypoxemia, and transferred to our hospital for further treatment. Besides severe hypoxia and hypercapnea, an enhanced lesion was detected in the left posterior cerebrum by brain MRI. No abnormal findings were detected in the fetus, with heart rate of 150 beats x min. She was diagnosed with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) caused by PIH and emergency cesarean section under general anesthesia was scheduled. A male newborn was delivered with Apgar score of 1/4 (1/5 min), followed by starting continuous infusion of nicardipine for controlling hypertension. Chest X-P on completion of surgery revealed remarkably alleviated pulmonary edema. She received intensive treatment and continued positive pressure ventilation for four days after delivery. She recovered with no neurological deficits and her child was well without any complications.

  14. [Wernicke encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Djelantik, M; Bloemkolk, D; Tijdink, J

    2015-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is an acute neuropsychiatric disease with heterogeneous symptoms, including changes in mental status, ataxia and ocular abnormalities; if left untreated, these symptoms can lead to morbidity and even to mortality. The treatment is thiamine suppletion. Because of the heterogeneity of the symptoms and the high risk of morbidity and mortality if the symptoms are not treated, it is vitally important that on observing a patient's early symptoms the clinician immediately suspects that the symptoms could point to Wernicke encephalopathy.

  15. Bacopa monnieri Extract (CDRI-08) Modulates the NMDA Receptor Subunits and nNOS-Apoptosis Axis in Cerebellum of Hepatic Encephalopathy Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Papia; Trigun, Surendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE), characterized by impaired cerebellar functions during chronic liver failure (CLF), involves N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) overactivation in the brain cells. Bacopa monnieri (BM) extract is a known neuroprotectant. The present paper evaluates whether BM extract is able to modulate the two NMDAR subunits (NR2A and NR2B) and its downstream mediators in cerebellum of rats with chronic liver failure (CLF), induced by administration of 50 mg/kg bw thioacetamide (TAA) i.p. for 14 days, and in the TAA group rats orally treated with 200 mg/kg bw BM extract from days 8 to 14. NR2A is known to impart neuroprotection and that of NR2B induces neuronal death during NMDAR activation. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase- (nNOS-) apoptosis pathway is known to mediate NMDAR led excitotoxicity. The level of NR2A was found to be significantly reduced with a concomitant increase of NR2B in cerebellum of the CLF rats. This was consistent with significantly enhanced nNOS expression, nitric oxide level, and reduced Bcl2/Bax ratio. Moreover, treatment with BM extract reversed the NR2A/NR2B ratio and also normalized the levels of nNOS-apoptotic factors in cerebellum of those rats. The findings suggest modulation of NR2A and NR2B expression by BM extract to prevent neurochemical alterations associated with HE. PMID:26413124

  16. Acute hepatitis due to hepatitis A virus subgenotype IA as an imported infectious disease from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Takako; Yano, Yoshihiko; Amin, Mochamad; Lusida, Maria I; Soetjipto; Hotta, Hak; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2014-10-01

    A 25-year-old Japanese man was admitted with general malaise and fever, which had developed 12 days after coming back to Japan from Indonesia. Blood examination revealed elevated transaminase levels and positivity for the IgM anti-HAV antibody; therefore, he was diagnosed with acute hepatitis A. HAV-RNA was detected in his serum and phylogenetically classified as subgenotype IA. The partial genome in the VP1/P2A region was consistent with the strain recently isolated from Surabaya, which indicated that he had been infected during his stay in Indonesia. Thus, HAV vaccination is recommended before visiting HAV-endemic countries for a long period of time.

  17. Hot Topics in Primary Care: Diagnosis of Cirrhosis and Evaluation of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Common Errors and Their Significance for the PCP.

    PubMed

    Flamm, Steven L

    2017-04-01

    Cirrhosis has become the focus of greater attention in recent years largely because of the increasing prevalence of 2 of its most common causes: chronic viral hepatitis and steatohepatitis (a subset of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease [NAFLD]). Cirrhosis is the result of progressive destruction and regeneration of the liver parenchyma due to chronic liver disease (CLD).

  18. Cerebral glucose metabolism after portacaval shunting in the rat. Patterns of metabolism and implications for the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, A H; Ginsberg, M D; Rhoades, H M; Gutierrez, M T

    1986-01-01

    The regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was measured in normal and portacaval shunted rats and the effects of unilateral carotid infusions of "threshold" amounts of ammonia were assessed. 8 wk after shunting the glucose metabolic rate was increased in all 20 brain regions sampled. Effects on subcortical and phylogenetically older regions of the brain were most pronounced with a 74% increase observed in the reticular formation at the collicular level. Increases in the cerebral cortex ranged from 12 to 18%. Unilateral infusions of ammonia did not affect behavior but altered the electroencephalogram and selectively increased the glucose metabolic rate in the thalamus, hypothalamus, and substantia nigra in half of the animals, a pattern similar to that seen after a portacaval shunt, suggesting hyperammonemia as the cause of postshunt increases in glucose metabolism. Visual inspection of autoradiograms, computed correlation coefficients relating interregional metabolism, and principal component analysis suggest that normal cerebral metabolic and functional interrelationships are altered by shunting. Ammonia stimulation of the hypothalamic satiety centers may suppress appetite and lead to cachexia. Reductions in the ammonia detoxification capacity of skeletal muscle may increase the probability of developing future episodes of hyperammonemia, perpetuating the process. Direct effects of ammonia on specific brain centers such as the dorsomedial hypothalamus and reticular activating system may combine with global disruptions of cerebral metabolic-functional relationships to produce the protean manifestations of portal-systemic encephalopathy. Images PMID:3722388

  19. Hashimoto's Encephalopathy Presenting with Acute Cognitive Dysfunction and Convulsion.

    PubMed

    Kang, Woo-Hyuk; Na, Ju-Young; Kim, Meyung-Kug; Yoo, Bong-Goo

    2013-12-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by acute or subacute encephalopathy related to increased anti-thyroid antibodies. Clinical manifestations of Hashimoto's encephalopathy may include stroke-like episodes, altered consciousness, psychosis, myoclonus, abnormal movements, seizures, and cognitive dysfunction. Acute cognitive dysfunction with convulsion as initial clinical manifestations of Hashimoto's encephalopathy is very rare. We report a 65-year-old man who developed acute onset of cognitive decline and convulsion due to Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

  20. Oral mucosa alterations in chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis due to HBV or HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Sulka, Agnieszka; Simon, Krzysztof; Piszko, Paweł; Kalecińska, Ewa; Dominiak, Marzena

    2006-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the character of lesions within oral mucosa in patients suffering from chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis of the liver due to either HBV or HCV infection. A total of 74 patients treated at the Clinic of Infectious Diseases in Wrocław for chronic hepatitis B (20 patients, group I) and for chronic hepatitis C (23 patients group III) and cirrhosis of the liver due to HBV (15 patients , group II) and HCV (16 patients, group IV) infection. The control group comprised 29 healthy subjects. Lesions within the oral mucosa found on clinical examinations were confirmed with a histopathological evaluation. Patients suffering from chronic hepatitis B revealed leukoplakia (1/20), melanoplakia (1/20), petechiae (1/20), 17 patients from this group did not show any changes. Patients suffering from chronic hepatitis C revealed leukoplakia (6/23), Delbanco's disease (2/23), melanoplakia (1/23), lichen planus (1/23), petechiae (1/23), 12 patients from this group did not show any changes. Patients suffering from cirrhosis of the liver due of HBV infection revealed leukoplakia (3/15) petechiae (2/15), Delbanco's disease (1/15), angular cheilitis (1/15), aphthae (1/15), 7 patients from this group did not reveal any changes. Patients suffering from cirrhosis of the liver due of HCV infection revealed petechiae (2/16), melanoplakia (1/16), candidosis (1/16), labial herpes (1/16), 11 patients from this group did not reveal any changes. In control group we observed leukoplakia (3/29), Delbanco's disease (1/29), labial herpes (1/29), petechiae (1/29), and 23 subjects did not present pathological lesions within the oral mucosa. Results indicate the lack of connection between chronic HBV and HCV infection as well as the stage of the disease with the incidence and character of oral lesions in oral mucosa.

  1. Treatment of portal systemic encephalopathy: standard and new treatments.

    PubMed

    Marín, E; Uribe, M

    1990-07-01

    The management of hepatic encephalopathy should be considered accordingly with the precipitating factor and the type of encephalopathy. Ideally the therapeutic approach must be useful for both acute and chronic forms of encephalopathy. Current treatment of hepatic encephalopathy consists of certain well-established measures attempting to identify and treat the precipitating factors, and to reduce the intestinal nitrogenous compounds formation and absorption by dietary restriction or bowel-cleansing with catartics or antibiotics such as neomycin, metronidazol, etc. This review describes briefly several therapeutic modalities.

  2. Management of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)-associated Refractory Hepatic Encephalopathy by Shunt Reduction Using the Parallel Technique: Outcomes of a Retrospective Case Series

    SciTech Connect

    Cookson, Daniel T. Zaman, Zubayr; Gordon-Smith, James; Ireland, Hamish M.; Hayes, Peter C.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To investigate the reproducibility and technical and clinical success of the parallel technique of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) reduction in the management of refractory hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Materials and Methods: A 10-mm-diameter self-expanding stent graft and a 5-6-mm-diameter balloon-expandable stent were placed in parallel inside the existing TIPS in 8 patients via a dual unilateral transjugular approach. Changes in portosystemic pressure gradient and HE grade were used as primary end points. Results: TIPS reduction was technically successful in all patients. Mean {+-} standard deviation portosystemic pressure gradient before and after shunt reduction was 4.9 {+-} 3.6 mmHg (range, 0-12 mmHg) and 10.5 {+-} 3.9 mmHg (range, 6-18 mmHg). Duration of follow-up was 137 {+-} 117.8 days (range, 18-326 days). Clinical improvement of HE occurred in 5 patients (62.5%) with resolution of HE in 4 patients (50%). Single episodes of recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhage occurred in 3 patients (37.5%). These were self-limiting in 2 cases and successfully managed in 1 case by correction of coagulopathy and blood transfusion. Two of these patients (25%) died, one each of renal failure and hepatorenal failure. Conclusion: The parallel technique of TIPS reduction is reproducible and has a high technical success rate. A dual unilateral transjugular approach is advantageous when performing this procedure. The parallel technique allows repeat bidirectional TIPS adjustment and may be of significant clinical benefit in the management of refractory HE.

  3. pH-sensitive microemulsion-based gels for removal of colonic ammonia: a novel preventative oral preparation for hepatic encephalopathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Le; Duan, Zhi-Jun; Tian, Ge; Tian, Yan; He, Gao-Hong; Bian, Teng-Fei; Jin, Xue; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Zhen; Chang, Qing-Yong

    2015-05-01

    Microemulsions with limited stability in mimetic gastrointestinal environments have previously demonstrated potential for the effective removal of ammonia from artificial colonic fluid. Specialized pH‑sensitive microemulsion‑based gels for the removal of colonic ammonia (MBG‑RCA), however, possess relative stability in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of normal rats, indicating potential use in in vivo applications. An investigation of the effects of oral MBG‑RCA was conducted in order to evaluate the reduction of intestinal ammonia and the prevention of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in rat models. Eighty rats were allocated into eight 4‑day treatment groups: The HE model (intraperitoneal injection of thioacetamide) group; the high‑, medium‑ and low‑dose MBG‑RCA therapeutic groups (15, 10 and 5 ml/kg MBG‑RCA, respectively); and the normal, blank, lactulose and acetic acid control groups, each of which received daily treatment administration. Oral MBG‑RCA effects were identified using behavioral monitoring observed by an infrared night vision supervisory control system, electroencephalograms, blood ammonia levels, intestinal ammonia levels, liver functionality and pathological observation. High‑ and medium‑dose oral administrations of MBG‑RCA significantly decreased the blood and intestinal ammonia levels (P<0.05), improved liver functionality and reduced the clinical manifestations of HE in rats. MBG‑RCA demonstrated high clearance of rat colonic ammonia while maintaining sufficient stability in the GI tract, indicating the potential for the development of new clinically relevant oral preparations for the prevention of HE. Additionally, such preparations are advantageous in that ammonia is eliminated without the production of potentially harmful metabolic byproducts.

  4. Rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy show reduced cGMP-dependent protein kinase activity in hypothalamus correlating with circadian rhythms alterations.

    PubMed

    Felipo, Vicente; Piedrafita, Blanca; Barios, Juan A; Agustí, Ana; Ahabrach, Hanan; Romero-Vives, María; Barrio, Luis C; Rey, Beatriz; Gaztelu, Jose M; Llansola, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Patients with liver cirrhosis show disturbances in sleep and in its circadian rhythms which are an early sign of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). The mechanisms of these disturbances are poorly understood. Rats with porta-caval shunt (PCS), a model of MHE, show sleep disturbances reproducing those of cirrhotic patients. The aims of this work were to characterize the alterations in circadian rhythms in PCS rats and analyze the underlying mechanisms. To reach these aims, we analyzed in control and PCS rats: (a) daily rhythms of spontaneous and rewarding activity and of temperature, (b) timing of the onset of activity following turning-off the light, (c) synchronization to light after a phase advance and (d) the molecular mechanisms contributing to these alterations in circadian rhythms. PCS rats show altered circadian rhythms of spontaneous and rewarding activities (wheel running). PCS rats show more rest bouts during the active phase, more errors in the onset of motor activity and need less time to re-synchronize after a phase advance than control rats. Circadian rhythm of body temperature is also slightly altered in PCS rats. The internal period length (tau) of circadian rhythm of motor activity is longer in PCS rats. We analyzed some mechanisms by which hypothalamus modulate circadian rhythms. PCS rats show increased content of cGMP in hypothalamus while the activity of cGMP-dependent protein kinase was reduced by 41% compared to control rats. Altered cGMP-PKG pathway in hypothalamus would contribute to altered circadian rhythms and synchronization to light.

  5. Nano optical sensor binuclear Pt-2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid -bipyridine for enhancement of the efficiency of 3-nitrotyrosine biomarker for early diagnosis of liver cirrhosis with minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Attia, M S; Al-Radadi, Najlaa S

    2016-12-15

    A new, precise, and very selective method for increasing the impact and assessment of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-Nty) as a biomarker for early diagnosis of liver cirrhosis with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) disease was developed. The method depends on the formation of the ion pair associate between 3-nitrotyrosine and the optical sensor binuclear Pt-2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid (pca)-Bipyridine (bpy) complex doped in sol-gel matrix in buffer solution of pH 7.3. The binuclear Pt (pca)(bpy) has +II net charge which is very selective and sensitive for [3-Nty](-2) at pH 7.3 in serum sample of liver cirrhosis with MHE diseases. 3-nitrotyrosine (3-Nty) quenches the luminescence intensity of the nano optical sensor binuclear Pt(pca) (bpy) at 528nm after excitation at 370nm, pH 7.3. The remarkable quenching of the luminescence intensity at 528nm of nano binuclear Pt(pca) (bpy) doped in sol-gel matrix by various concentrations of the 3-Nty was successfully used as an optical sensor for the assessment of 3-Nty in different serum samples of (MHE) in patients with liver cirrhosis. The calibration plot was achieved over the concentration range 1.85×10(-5) - 7.95×10(-10)molL(-1) 3-Nty with a correlation coefficient of (0.999) and a detection limit of (4.7×10(-10)molL(-1)). The method increases the sensitivity (93.75%) and specificity (96.45%) of 3-Nty as a biomarker for early diagnosis of liver cirrhosis with MHE in patients.

  6. Carnitine, acylcarnitine and amino acid profiles analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry in a surfactant/virus mouse model of acute hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M G; Crocker, J F S; O'Regan, P; Lee, S H S; Geldenhuys, L; Dooley, K; Al-Khalidi, M; Acott, P D

    2007-08-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to analyze multiple serum metabolites for the first time in a surfactant/virus mouse model of acute hepatic encephalopathy (AHE). AHE is characterized by acute liver failure that can lead to potentially lethal increases in intracranial pressure. We have reproduced AHE in young CD-1 mice exposed from postnatal day (P) 2-13 to the industrial surfactant, Toximul 3409F (Tox), and then infected intranasally on P14 with sublethal doses (LD(10-30)) of mouse-adapted human influenza B (Lee) virus (FluB). The sera analyzed by MS/MS were from mice exhibiting typical markers of Tox-mediated potentiation of viral illness, including reduced weights and blood glucose levels. Most metabolite abnormalities were not evident until five days after viral infection (P19), the time corresponding to the onset of weight loss and mortality. Values for fatty acylcarnitines and amino acids in the Tox+FluB-treated mice were either additive or supra-additive relative to the effects of either treatment alone. Amino acid profiles were consistent with those reported for human AHE. None of the treated mice exhibited signs of carnitine deficiency, and propionylcarnitine levels were normal. On P19, mice given combined Tox+FluB treatment had significant increases in levels of both medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines (C6:0-C12:0 and C14:0-C20:0, respectively), including their monounsaturated metabolites. Levels of medium-chain dicarboxylic and long-chain hydroxy-acylcarnitines were also elevated in the combined treatment group. The results of this study indicate a diffuse mitochondrial dysfunction in Tox+FluB-treated mice that results in a serum metabolite profile unique from those observed in classic inherited metabolic disorders.

  7. The Influence of Finasteride on Mean and Relative Spectral Density of EEG Bands in Rat Model of Thioacetamide-Induced Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Mladenović, D; Hrnčić, D; Rašić-Marković, A; Macut, Dj; Stanojlović, O

    Liver failure is associated with a neuropsychiatric syndrome, known as hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Finasteride, inhibitor of neurosteroid synthesis, may improve the course of HE. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of finasteride on mean and relative power density of EEG bands, determined by spectral analysis, in rat model of thioacetamide-induced HE. Male Wistar rats were divided into groups: (1) control; (2) thioacetamide-treated group, TAA (900 mg/kg); (3) finasteride-treated group, FIN (150 mg/kg); and (4) group treated with finasteride (150 mg/kg) and thioacetamide (900 mg/kg), FIN + TAA. Daily doses of FIN (50 mg/kg) and TAA (300 mg/kg) were administered during 3 subsequent days, and in FIN + TAA group FIN was administered 2 h before every dose of TAA. EEG was recorded 22-24 h after treatment and analyzed by fast Fourier transformation. While TAA did not induce significant changes in the beta band, mean and relative power in this band were significantly higher in FIN + TAA versus control group (p < 0.01). TAA caused a significant decline in mean power in alpha, theta, and delta band, and in FIN + TAA group the mean power in these bands was significantly higher compared with control. While in TAA group relative power was significantly decreased in theta (p < 0.01) and increased in delta band (p < 0.01) versus control, the opposite changes were found in FIN + TAA group: an increase in theta (p < 0.01) and a decrease in delta relative power (p < 0.01). In this study, finasteride pretreatment caused EEG changes that correspond to mild TAA-induced HE.

  8. Down-regulation of Kir4.1 in the cerebral cortex of rats with liver failure and in cultured astrocytes treated with glutamine: Implications for astrocytic dysfunction in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Obara-Michlewska, Marta; Pannicke, Thomas; Karl, Anett; Bringmann, Andreas; Reichenbach, Andreas; Szeliga, Monika; Hilgier, Wojciech; Wrzosek, Antoni; Szewczyk, Adam; Albrecht, Jan

    2011-12-01

    Brain edema in acute hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is due mainly to swelling of astrocytes. Efflux of potassium is implicated in the prevention of glial swelling under hypoosmotic conditions. We investigated whether pathogenic factors of HE, glutamine (Gln) and/or ammonia, induce alterations in the expression of glial potassium channels (Kir4.1, Kir2.1) and Na(+) -K(+) -2Cl(-) cotransporter-1 (NKCC1) in rat cerebral cortex and cultured rat cortical astrocytes and whether these alterations have consequences for potassium efflux and astrocytic swelling. Thioacetamide-induced acute liver failure in rats resulted in significant decreases in the Kir4.1 mRNA and protein contents of cerebral cortex, whereas expression of Kir2.1 and NKCC1 remained unaltered. Incubation of primary cortical astrocytes for 72 hr in the presence of Gln (5 mM), but not of ammonia (5 mM or 10 mM), induced a decrease in the levels of Kir4.1 mRNA and protein. Similarly to incubation with Gln, reduction of Kir4.1 mRNA expression by RNA interference caused swelling of astrocytes as shown by confocal imaging followed by 3D computational analysis. Gln reduced the astrocytic uptake of D-[(3) H]aspartate, but, in contrast to the earlier reported effect of ammonia, this reduction was not accompanied by decreased expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1 mRNA. Both Gln and ammonia decreased hypoosmolarity-induced (86) Rb efflux from the cells, but the effect was more pronounced with Gln. The results indicate that down-regulation of Kir4.1 may mediate distinct aspects of Gln-induced astrocytic dysfunction in HE.

  9. Wernicke encephalopathy and ethanol-related syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Eun; Lee, Eun Ja; Young, Jeong Bo; Shin, Dong Jae; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2014-04-01

    Ethanol causes diverse neurologic conditions caused by acute and chronic brain damage. This review provides an overview of Wernicke encephalopathy and other ethanol-related brain changes, such as chronic brain atrophy, Marchiafava-Bignami disease, osmotic demyelination syndrome, chronic hepatic encephalopathy, and acute alcohol withdrawal. As clinical symptoms of this spectrum of diseases have nonspecific neurologic alterations, radiologists should have current radiologic information and understand the imaging findings pertaining to the pathophysiology to support diagnosis.

  10. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Teens > Hepatitis Print A A A ... to a liver condition called hepatitis . What Is Hepatitis? The liver is one of the body's powerhouses. ...

  11. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... an important digestive liquid called bile . What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  12. Pulmonary and hepatic granulomatous disorders due to the inhalation of cement and mica dusts.

    PubMed Central

    Cortex Pimentel, J; Peixoto Menezes, A

    1978-01-01

    Hepatic and pulmonary granulomas were recognised in two workers exposed respectively to Portland cement and to muscovite dusts. The pulmonary lesions in the patient exposed to cement consisted of histiocytic granulomas and irregular fibrohyaline scars, and in the patient exposed to mica of a diffuse thickening of all interalveolar septa due to new formation of reticulin and collagen fibres and proliferation of fibroblasts and histiocytes. In the liver the following pathological findings were observed: focal or diffuse swelling of sinusoidal lining cells, sarcoid-type granulomas, and, in the case of mica exposure, perisinusoidal and portal tract fibrosis. Abundant inclusions of the inhaled material were identified within the pulmonary and hepatic lesions by histochemical and x-ray diffraction techniques. Images PMID:663882

  13. KCNQ2 encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Millichap, John J.; Park, Kristen L.; Tsuchida, Tammy; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Carmant, Lionel; Flamini, Robert; Joshi, Nishtha; Levisohn, Paul M.; Marsh, Eric; Nangia, Srishti; Narayanan, Vinodh; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma R.; Patterson, Marc C.; Pearl, Phillip L.; Porter, Brenda; Ramsey, Keri; McGinnis, Emily L.; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Tracy, Molly; Tran, Baouyen; Venkatesan, Charu; Weckhuysen, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To advance the understanding of KCNQ2 encephalopathy genotype–phenotype relationships and to begin to assess the potential of selective KCNQ channel openers as targeted treatments. Methods: We retrospectively studied 23 patients with KCNQ2 encephalopathy, including 11 treated with ezogabine (EZO). We analyzed the genotype–phenotype relationships in these and 70 previously described patients. Results: The mean seizure onset age was 1.8 ± 1.6 (SD) days. Of the 20 EEGs obtained within a week of birth, 11 showed burst suppression. When new seizure types appeared in infancy (15 patients), the most common were epileptic spasms (n = 8). At last follow-up, seizures persisted in 9 patients. Development was delayed in all, severely in 14. The KCNQ2 variants identified introduced amino acid missense changes or, in one instance, a single residue deletion. They were clustered in 4 protein subdomains predicted to poison tetrameric channel functions. EZO use (assessed by the treating physicians and parents) was associated with improvement in seizures and/or development in 3 of the 4 treated before 6 months of age, and 2 of the 7 treated later; no serious side effects were observed. Conclusions: KCNQ2 variants cause neonatal-onset epileptic encephalopathy of widely varying severity. Pathogenic variants in epileptic encephalopathy are clustered in “hot spots” known to be critical for channel activity. For variants causing KCNQ2 channel loss of function, EZO appeared well tolerated and potentially beneficial against refractory seizures when started early. Larger, prospective studies are needed to enable better definition of prognostic categories and more robust testing of novel interventions. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that EZO is effective for refractory seizures in patients with epilepsy due to KCNQ2 encephalopathy. PMID:27602407

  14. Hepatic structural enhancement and insulin resistance amelioration due to AT1 receptor blockade

    PubMed Central

    Souza-Mello, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, the role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) on the development of obesity and its comorbidities has been extensively addressed. Both circulating and local RAS components are up-regulated in obesity and involved in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease onset. Pharmacological manipulations of RAS are viable strategies to tackle metabolic impairments caused by the excessive body fat mass. Renin inhibitors rescue insulin resistance, but do not have marked effects on hepatic steatosis. However, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) yield beneficial hepatic remodeling. ARBs elicit body mass loss and normalize insulin levels, tackling insulin resistance. Also, this drug class increases adiponectin levels, besides countering interleukin-6, tumoral necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor-beta 1. The latter is essential to prevent from liver fibrosis. When conjugated with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha activation, ARB fully rescues fatty liver. These effects might be orchestrated by an indirect up-regulation of MAS receptor due to angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R) blockade. These associations of ARB with PPAR activation and ACE2-angiotensin (ANG) (1-7)-MAS receptor axis deserve a better understanding. This editorial provides a brief overview of the current knowledge regarding AT1R blockade effects on sensitivity to insulin and hepatic structural alterations as well as the intersections of AT1R blockade with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activation and ACE2-ANG (1-7) - MAS receptor axis. PMID:28144388

  15. Hepatic structural enhancement and insulin resistance amelioration due to AT1 receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Souza-Mello, Vanessa

    2017-01-18

    Over the last decade, the role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) on the development of obesity and its comorbidities has been extensively addressed. Both circulating and local RAS components are up-regulated in obesity and involved in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease onset. Pharmacological manipulations of RAS are viable strategies to tackle metabolic impairments caused by the excessive body fat mass. Renin inhibitors rescue insulin resistance, but do not have marked effects on hepatic steatosis. However, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) yield beneficial hepatic remodeling. ARBs elicit body mass loss and normalize insulin levels, tackling insulin resistance. Also, this drug class increases adiponectin levels, besides countering interleukin-6, tumoral necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor-beta 1. The latter is essential to prevent from liver fibrosis. When conjugated with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha activation, ARB fully rescues fatty liver. These effects might be orchestrated by an indirect up-regulation of MAS receptor due to angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R) blockade. These associations of ARB with PPAR activation and ACE2-angiotensin (ANG) (1-7)-MAS receptor axis deserve a better understanding. This editorial provides a brief overview of the current knowledge regarding AT1R blockade effects on sensitivity to insulin and hepatic structural alterations as well as the intersections of AT1R blockade with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activation and ACE2-ANG (1-7) - MAS receptor axis.

  16. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... clotting problems or chronic liver disease. previous continue Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Although hep A is a ... does — through direct contact with infected body fluids. Hepatitis B and C are even more easily passed in ...

  17. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A if they've been vaccinated against it. Hepatitis B Hepatitis B is a more serious infection. It may lead ... of which cause severe illness and even death. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is transmitted from person to person ...

  18. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Hepatitis Page Content Article Body Hepatitis means “inflammation of ... it has been associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses Type Transmission Prognosis A Fecal-oral (stool ...

  19. Canine congenital portosystemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Maddison, J E

    1988-08-01

    The case records of 21 dogs with congenital portosystemic encephalopathy are reviewed. The disorder was most common in Australian cattledogs (blue heelers; 8 cases), Old English sheepdogs (3 cases) and Maltese terriers (3 cases). Extra-hepatic shunts occurred in small breeds, with the exception of 1 cattledog, while intra-hepatic shunts occurred in the medium to large breeds. The most common clinical pathology abnormalities were abnormal ammonia tolerance, mild to moderate increases in plasma alanine aminotransferase or alkaline phosphatase concentrations, decreased total serum protein concentrations, increased fasting ammonia concentrations and ammonium biurate crystalluria. Radiological examination revealed that all the dogs had a small liver. The kidneys were enlarged in 5 of 10 dogs in which kidney size could be estimated. Surgical ligation of an extra-hepatic shunt was successful in 2 of 4 dogs in which it was attempted. Medical management resulted in alleviation of clinical signs in 5 of 8 dogs. The period of successful treatment ranged from a few months to over a year.

  20. Affinities and densities of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)muscimol (GABA-A) binding sites and of central benzodiazepine receptors are unchanged in autopsied brain tissue from cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, R.F.; Lavoie, J.; Giguere, J.F.; Pomier-Layrargues, G.

    1988-09-01

    The integrity of GABA-A receptors and of central benzodiazepine receptors was evaluated in membrane preparations from prefrontal cortex and caudate nuclei obtained at autopsy from nine cirrhotic patients who died in hepatic coma and an equal number of age-matched control subjects. Histopathological studies revealed Alzheimer Type II astrocytosis in all cases in the cirrhotic group; controls were free from neurological, psychiatric or hepatic diseases. Binding to GABA-A receptors was studied using (/sup 3/H)muscimol as radioligand. The integrity of central benzodiazepine receptors was evaluated using (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam and (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788. Data from saturation binding assays was analyzed by Scatchard plot. No modifications of either affinities (Kd) or densities (Bmax) of (/sup 3/H)muscimol of central benzodiazepine binding sites were observed. These findings do not support recent suggestions that alterations of either high-affinity GABA or benzodiazepine receptors play a significant role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  1. Pathologic Femoral Neck Fracture Due to Fanconi Syndrome Induced by Adefovir Dipivoxil Therapy for Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon-Suk; Kim, Byung-Kook; Lee, Ho-Jae

    2016-01-01

    In Fanconi syndrome, hypophosphatemic osteomalacia is caused by proximal renal tubule dysfunction which leads to impaired reabsorption of amino acids, glucose, urate, and phosphate. We present a rare case of a 43-year-old Korean male who was found to have insufficiency stress fracture of the femoral neck secondary to osteomalacia due to Fanconi syndrome. He had been receiving low-dose adefovir dipivoxil (ADV, 10 mg/day) for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection for 7 years and he subsequently developed severe hypophosphatemia and proximal renal tubule dysfunction. The incomplete femoral neck fracture was fixed with multiple cannulated screws to prevent further displacement of the initial fracture. After cessation of ADV and correction of hypophosphatemia with oral phosphorus supplementation, the patient's clinical symptoms, such as bone pain, muscle weakness, and laboratory findings improved. PMID:27247753

  2. HEPATIC VISCERAL LARVA MIGRANS DUE TO TOXOCARA CANIS IN A 72-YEAR-OLD MAN.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ki Dong; Lee, Jae Joon; Kim, Kyoung Kon; Suh, Heuy Sun; Hwang, In Cheol; Choi, Seung Joon

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic toxocariasis is visceral larva migrans caused by Toxocara. We report a case of hepatic toxocariasis detected incidentally during a health checkup. The patient had elevated levels of eosinophils, total IgE, and anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies. On contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) imaging he had a single, 2.16 cm, oval, ill-defined, low-attenuation hepatic nodule which was best appreciated during the portal venous phase of the scan. Clinicians should consider hepatic toxocariasis as a possible diagnosis in any individual who presents with eosinophilia of unknown etiology and an ill-defined hepatic lesion on CT imaging.

  3. Hepatic steatosis in hepatitis C is a storage disease due to HCV interaction with microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP).

    PubMed

    Mirandola, Silvia; Bowman, David; Hussain, Mahmood M; Alberti, Alfredo

    2010-02-23

    Liver steatosis is a frequent histological feature in patients chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The relationship between HCV and hepatic steatosis seems to be the result of both epigenetic and genetic factors. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that HCV can alter intrahepatic lipid metabolism by affecting lipid synthesis, oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, insulin resistance and the assembly and secretion of VLDL. Many studies suggest that HCV-related steatosis might be the result of a direct interaction between the virus and MTP. It has been demonstrated that MTP is critical for the secretion of HCV particles and that inhibition of its lipid transfer activity reduces HCV production. However, higher degrees of hepatic steatosis were found in chronic hepatitis C patients carrying the T allele of MTP -493G/T polymorphism that seems to be associated with increased MTP transcription. We propose here that liver steatosis in hepatitis C could be a storage disease induced by the effects of the virus and of its proteins on the intracellular lipid machinery and on MTP. Available data support the hypothesis that HCV may modulate MTP expression and activity through a number of mechanisms such as inhibition of its activity and transcriptional control. Initial up regulation could favour propagation of HCV while down regulation in chronic phase could cause impairment of triglyceride secretion and excessive lipid accumulation, with abnormal lipid droplets facilitating the "storage" of virus particles for persistent infection.

  4. Multicenter clinical study on Fuzhenghuayu capsule against liver fibrosis due to chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Hu, Yi-Yang; Liu, Cheng; Xu, Lie-Ming; Liu, Cheng-Hai; Sun, Ke-Wei; Hu, De-Chang; Yin, You-Kuan; Zhou, Xia-Qiu; Wan, Mo-Bin; Cai, Xiong; Zhang, Zhi-Qing; Ye, Jun; Zhou, Ren-Xing; He, Jia; Tang, Bao-Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the efficacy and safety of Fuzhenghuayu capsule (FZHY capsule, a capsule for strengthening body resistance to remove blood stasis) against liver fibrosis due to chronic hepatitis B. METHODS: Multicenter, randomized, double blinded and parallel control experiment was conducted in patients (aged from 18 to 65 years) with liver fibrosis due to chronic hepatitis B. Hepatic histologic changes and HBV markers were examined at wk 0 and 24 during treatment. Serologic parameters (HA, LM, P-III-P, IV-C) were determined and B ultrasound examination of the spleen and liver was performed at wk 0, 12 and 24. Liver function (liver function and serologic parameters for liver fibrosis) was observed at wk 0, 6, 12, 18 and 24. Blood and urine routine test, renal function and ECG were examined before and after treatment. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between experimental group (110 cases) and control group (106 cases) in demographic features, vital signs, course of illness, history for drug anaphylaxis and previous therapy, liver function, serologic parameters for liver fibrosis, liver histologic examination (99 cases in experimental group, 96 cases in control group), HBV markers, and renal function. According to the criteria for liver fibrosis staging, mean score of fibrotic stage(s) in experimental group after treatment (1.80) decreased significantly compared to the previous treatment (2.33, P<0.05), but there was no significant difference in mean score of fibrotic stage(s) (2.11 and 2.14 respectively). There was a significant difference in reverse rate between experimental group (52%) and control group (23.3%) in liver biopsy. With marked effect on decreasing the mean value of inflammatory activity and score of inflammation (P<0.05), Fuzhenghuayu capsule had rather good effects on inhibiting inflammatory activity and was superior to that of Heluoshugan capsule. Compared to that of pretreatment, there was a significant decrease in HA, LM, P-III-P and IV

  5. [A Case of Renal Cell Carcinoma with High Everolimus Blood Concentrations and Hyperglycemia Due to Everolimus-Induced Hepatic Dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Shinya; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Kawasaki, Yoshihide; Ito, Akihiro; Arai, Yoichi; Yamaguchi, Hiroaki; Mano, Nariyasu

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a patient who had renal cell carcinoma with high everolimus blood concentrations and hyperglycemia due to everolimus-induced hepatic dysfunction. A 74-year-old man who underwent right nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma was administered everolimus for multiple lung metastases. Everolimus caused grade 3 hepatic dysfunction and hyperglycemia; hence, high blood levels of everolimus were observed. Although the patient was re-administrated everolimus after recovering from hepatic dysfunction, hepatic function test values worsened again. Everolimus was discontinued before its blood concentration increased, and the patient was switched to axitinib treatment. Therefore, the measurement of everolimus blood level is considered useful for the management of adverse events in renal cell carcinoma.

  6. Autoimmune encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, Frank; Armangue, Thaís; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 10 years the continual discovery of novel forms of encephalitis associated with antibodies to cell-surface or synaptic proteins has changed the paradigms for diagnosing and treating disorders that were previously unknown or mischaracterized. We review here the process of discovery, the symptoms, and the target antigens of twelve autoimmune encephatilic disorders, grouped by syndromes and approached from a clinical perspective. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis, several subtypes of limbic encephalitis, stiff-person spectrum disorders, and other autoimmune encephalitides that result in psychosis, seizures, or abnormal movements are described in detail. We include a novel encephalopathy with prominent sleep dysfunction that provides an intriguing link between chronic neurodegeneration and cell-surface autoimmunity (IgLON5). Some of the caveats of limited serum testing are outlined. In addition, we review the underlying cellular and synaptic mechanisms that for some disorders confirm the antibody pathogenicity. The multidisciplinary impact of autoimmune encephalitis has been expanded recently by the discovery that herpes simplex encephalitis is a robust trigger of synaptic autoimmunity, and that some patients may develop overlapping syndromes, including anti-NMDAR encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica or other demyelinating diseases. PMID:25315420

  7. Analysis of hepatic gene expression during fatty liver change due to chronic ethanol administration in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, H.-Q.; Je, Young-Tae; Kim, Mingoo; Kim, Ju-Han; Kong, Gu; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Yoon, Byung-IL; Lee, Mi-Ock; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2009-03-15

    Chronic consumption of ethanol can cause cumulative liver damage that can ultimately lead to cirrhosis. To explore the mechanisms of alcoholic steatosis, we investigated the global intrahepatic gene expression profiles of livers from mice administered alcohol. Ethanol was administered by feeding the standard Lieber-DeCarli diet, of which 36% (high dose) and 3.6% (low dose) of the total calories were supplied from ethanol for 1, 2, or 4 weeks. Histopathological evaluation of the liver samples revealed fatty changes and punctate necrosis in the high-dose group and ballooning degeneration in the low-dose group. In total, 292 genes were identified as ethanol responsive, and several of these differed significantly in expression compared to those of control mice (two-way ANOVA; p < 0.05). Specifically, the expression levels of genes involved in hepatic lipid transport and metabolism were examined. An overall net increase in gene expression was observed for genes involved in (i) glucose transport and glycolysis, (ii) fatty acid influx and de novo synthesis, (iii) fatty acid esterification to triglycerides, and (iv) cholesterol transport, de novo cholesterol synthesis, and bile acid synthesis. Collectively, these data provide useful information concerning the global gene expression changes that occur due to alcohol intake and provide important insights into the comprehensive mechanisms of chronic alcoholic steatosis.

  8. A global amnesia associated with the specific variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) that developed due to severe preeclampsia and malignant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Borovac, Josip Anđelo; Božić, Joško; Žaja, Nikola; Kolić, Krešimir; Hrboka, Vedran

    2016-04-01

    A case is reported of a 26-year-old primiparous woman in the 32nd week of gestation who presented to the emergency department with the symptoms of a severe headache, nausea and vomiting. The patient was diagnosed with preeclampsia that later progressed to eclampsia. This state was characterized by a sudden onset of a headache and diplopia that advanced to cortical blindness and precipitated significant alterations in mental status, most notable being global amnesia that resolved within 48 h. A post-partum magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in FLAIR mode revealed multiple cortico-subcortical areas of hyperintense signals suggestive of edematous lesions that chiefly involved occipital and parietal lobes with additional atypical manifestations. Such radiologic findings suggested a posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome variant with the global amnesia as an extraordinary constituent. This unique feature should be acknowledged when treating a preeclamptic or hypertensive patient that exhibits neurological symptomatology and vision disturbances.

  9. A global amnesia associated with the specific variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) that developed due to severe preeclampsia and malignant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Borovac, Josip Anđelo; Božić, Joško; Žaja, Nikola; Kolić, Krešimir; Hrboka, Vedran

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported of a 26-year-old primiparous woman in the 32nd week of gestation who presented to the emergency department with the symptoms of a severe headache, nausea and vomiting. The patient was diagnosed with preeclampsia that later progressed to eclampsia. This state was characterized by a sudden onset of a headache and diplopia that advanced to cortical blindness and precipitated significant alterations in mental status, most notable being global amnesia that resolved within 48 h. A post-partum magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in FLAIR mode revealed multiple cortico-subcortical areas of hyperintense signals suggestive of edematous lesions that chiefly involved occipital and parietal lobes with additional atypical manifestations. Such radiologic findings suggested a posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome variant with the global amnesia as an extraordinary constituent. This unique feature should be acknowledged when treating a preeclamptic or hypertensive patient that exhibits neurological symptomatology and vision disturbances. PMID:27099774

  10. Wernicke encephalopathy in alcoholics with diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Antonio J; Marcos-Martin, Miguel; Martin-Polo, Jorge; Garcia-Diez, Luis Carlos; Luna, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is caused by thiamine deficiency in the central nervous system, and is defined by the triad of confusional symptoms, ocular alterations and ataxia. Some other factors may also predispose alcoholic patients to this deficiency. We report two patients with hyperglicaemia and ketoacidosis due to diabetes mellitus decompensation and chronic alcoholism who developed Wernicke encephalopathy before their hospital admission. The outcome was successful after intravenous thiamine administration and insulinotherapy. The presence of Wernicke encephalopathy in alcoholics with diabetic ketoacidosis, suggests that metabolic decompensation is essential in the onset of the disease.

  11. Wernicke encephalopathy in a patient with liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Pan; Zhao, Yanling; Wei, Zhenman; Chen, Jing; Yan, Lilong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early recognition and diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy is pivotal for the prognosis of this medical emergency, especially in patients with liver failure which predisposes individuals to develop hepatic encephalopathy. For these patients, distinguishing between hepatic encephalopathy and Wernicke encephalopathy is a challenge in real-world clinical practice. A male patient with 21-year medical history of liver cirrhosis presented diarrhea and ascites. One month before this visit, he was noted to have poor appetite and progressive fatigue. After admission, although several major symptoms, including diarrhea, ascites, hyponatremia, and hypoproteinemia, were greatly improved through appropriate treatments, his laboratory indicators were not changed much. His appetite was not reversed at discharge. On the 5th day after discharge, the patient suddenly became reluctant to speak and did not remember the recent happenings. Simultaneously, unsteady gait and strabismus occurred. On the basis of clinical manifestations and brain magnetic resonance imaging scan results, the patient was diagnosed as Wernicke encephalopathy and these relative symptoms were resolved after intravenous vitamin B1. To our knowledge, this is the second case report of Wernicke encephalopathy developing in a critically ill cirrhotic patient without hepatocellular carcinoma or operative intervention. Wernicke encephalopathy may be underdiagnosed in these patients and this case raises physicians’ awareness of its possible onset. PMID:27399058

  12. [Interferon-alpha and liver fibrosis in patients with chronic damage due to hepatitis C virus].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Huezo, María Sarai; Gallegos-Orozco, Juan Fernando

    2003-01-01

    The present review focuses on the published information published regarding the effects of interferon alpha therapy on liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver damage secondary to hepatitis C infection. Data reviewed included results of the in vitro effects of interferon on hepatic cell line cultures with regards to indirect markers of fibrosis, activation of hepatic stellate cells and oxidative stress response. In the clinical arena, there is current clear evidence of a favorable histological outcome in patients with sustained viral response to interferon therapy. For this reason, the current review focuses more on the histological outcomes regarding liver fibrosis in patients who have not attained viral response to therapy (non-responders) or who already have biopsy defined cirrhosis. Data in these patients were analyzed according to the results of objective testing of fibrosis through the assessment of liver biopsy and its change during time, specially because the morbidity and mortality of this disease is directly related to the complications of liver cirrhosis and not necessarily to the persistence of the hepatitis C virus. Lastly, it is concluded that the process of liver fibrosis/cirrhosis is a dynamic one and that there is some evidence to support the usefulness of interferon alpha therapy as a means to halt or retard the progression of hepatic fibrosis. The result of current clinical trials in which interferon therapy is being used to modify the progression of fibrosis in non-responders or cirrhotic patients is eagerly awaited.

  13. Acute hepatitis due to shen-min: a herbal product derived from Polygonum multiflorum.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Andrés; Restrepo, Juan Carlos; Sierra, Fernando; Correa, Gonzalo

    2006-08-01

    Shen-Min is a herbal product sold as a supplement for women to enhance hair growth. It is widely available across Asia, Europe, and the United States and sold without prescription as a hair nutritional supplement. We describe a case of acute liver injury in a 28-year-old white woman who developed symptomatic hepatitis 8 weeks after starting Shen-Min. All other potential causes of acute hepatitis including viral, hypoxic/ischemic, metabolic, and autoimmune etiologies were excluded. The liver injury slowly resolved over 3 weeks after discontinuing the herbal product. Although the mechanism of Shen-Min hepatotoxicity is unknown, we suspect an idiosyncratic reaction because the patient developed a fine maculopapular rash, mild eosinophilia, and did not overdose. Shen-Min is a Chinese herbal product with a mixture of several plants and vitamins including Polygonum multiflorum, a root that has been previously associated with hepatotoxicity. Nonetheless to our knowledge this is the first reported case of herbal-induced hepatotoxicity in a patient taking Shen-Min per se. Clinicians taking care of patients with acute hepatitis of unclear etiology should be aware that the consumption of Shen-Min, a hair supplement widely available in the United States and Western countries might cause acute hepatitis.

  14. Hepatitis A virus genotype IA-infected patient with marked elevation of aspartate aminotransferase levels.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yoshifumi; Kanda, Tatsuo; Yasui, Shin; Takahashi, Koji; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Nakamura, Masato; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Arai, Makoto; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2017-02-01

    We describe a case of acute liver failure (ALF) without hepatic encephalopathy with marked elevation of aminotransferase due to hepatitis A, according to the revised Japanese criteria of ALF. This liver biopsy of the patient showed compatible to acute viral hepatitis and she immediately recovered without intensive care. She had no comorbid disorders. Of interest, phylogenetic tree analysis using almost complete genomes of hepatitis A virus (HAV) demonstrated that the HAV isolate from her belonged to the HAV subgenotype IA strain and was similar to the HAJFF-Kan12 strain (99% nucleotide identity) or FH1 strain (98% nucleotide identity), which is associated with severe or fulminant hepatitis A. Careful interpretation of the association between HAV genome variations and severity of hepatitis A is needed and the mechanism of the severe hepatitis should be explored.

  15. Modification in CSF specific gravity in acutely decompensated cirrhosis and acute on chronic liver failure independent of encephalopathy, evidences for an early blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Nicolas; Rosselli, Matteo; Mouri, Sarah; Galanaud, Damien; Puybasset, Louis; Agarwal, Banwari; Thabut, Dominique; Jalan, Rajiv

    2017-04-01

    Although hepatic encephalopathy (HE) on the background of acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF) is associated with high mortality rates, it is unknown whether this is due to increased blood-brain barrier permeability. Specific gravity of cerebrospinal fluid measured by CT is able to estimate blood-cerebrospinal fluid-barrier permeability. This study aimed to assess cerebrospinal fluid specific gravity in acutely decompensated cirrhosis and to compare it in patients with or without ACLF and with or without hepatic encephalopathy. We identified all the patients admitted for acute decompensation of cirrhosis who underwent a brain CT-scan. Those patients could present acute decompensation with or without ACLF. The presence of hepatic encephalopathy was noted. They were compared to a group of stable cirrhotic patients and healthy controls. Quantitative brain CT analysis used the Brainview software that gives the weight, the volume and the specific gravity of each determined brain regions. Results are given as median and interquartile ranges and as relative variation compared to the control/baseline group. 36 patients presented an acute decompensation of cirrhosis. Among them, 25 presented with ACLF and 11 without ACLF; 20 presented with hepatic encephalopathy grade ≥ 2. They were compared to 31 stable cirrhosis patients and 61 healthy controls. Cirrhotic patients had increased cerebrospinal fluid specific gravity (CSF-SG) compared to healthy controls (+0.4 %, p < 0.0001). Cirrhotic patients with ACLF have decreased CSF-SG as compared to cirrhotic patients without ACLF (-0.2 %, p = 0.0030) that remained higher than in healthy controls. The presence of hepatic encephalopathy did not modify CSF-SG (-0.09 %, p = 0.1757). Specific gravity did not differ between different brain regions according to the presence or absence of either ACLF or HE. In patients with acute decompensation of cirrhosis, and those with ACLF, CSF specific gravity is modified compared to

  16. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also referred to as “mad cow disease” is a chronic, non-febrile, neuro-degenerative disease affecting the central nervous system. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of domestic animals, of which BSE is a member includes scrapie of sheep...

  17. Decreased exposure of atorvastatin in diabetic rats partly due to induction of hepatic Cyp3a and Oatp2.

    PubMed

    Shu, Nan; Hu, Mengyue; Liu, Can; Zhang, Mian; Ling, Zhaoli; Zhang, Ji; Xu, Ping; Zhong, Zeyu; Chen, Yang; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiaodong

    2016-10-01

    1. Atorvastatin is frequently prescribed for lowering blood cholesterol and for prevention of events associated with cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of atorvastatin in diabetic rats. 2. Diabetes was induced in rats by combination of high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin (35 mg/kg). Plasma concentrations of atorvastatin following oral (10 mg/kg) and intravenous (2 mg/kg) administrations to rats were measured by LC-MS. Metabolism and uptake of atorvastatin in primary hepatocytes of experimental rats were assessed. Protein expressions and activities of hepatic Cyp3a and Oatp2 were further investigated. 3. Clearances of atorvastatin in diabetic rats following oral and intravenous administrations were remarkably increased, leading to marked decreases in area-under-the-plasma concentration-time curve (AUC). The estimated oral and systematic clearances of atorvastatin in diabetic rats were 4.5-fold and 2.0-fold of control rats, respectively. Metabolism and uptake of atorvastatin in primary hepatocytes isolated from diabetic rats were significantly increased, which were consistent with the up-regulated protein expressions and activities of hepatic Cyp3a and Oatp2. 4. All these results demonstrated that the plasma exposure of atorvastatin was significantly decreased in diabetic rats, which was partly due to the up-regulated activities and expressions of both hepatic Cyp3a and Oatp2.

  18. Metabolic encephalopathy in Egyptian children.

    PubMed

    Hindawy, A; Gouda, A; El-Ayyadi, A; Megahed, H; Bazaraa, H

    2007-01-01

    Fatty Acid Oxidation disorders represent an expanding group of inborn errors of metabolism. Clinical manifestations include episodic encephalopathy, hypoketotic hypoglycemia, Reye like episodes, hepatic, muscular, cardiac affection and sudden death. Analysis of urinary organic acids and plasma fatty acids of 44 clinically suspected patients by Gas Chromatography Mass spectrometry revealed 4 cases of Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD), 3 cases of Very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, 9 cases of multiple defects of acyl-CoA dehydrogenation in addition to 3 patients with other metabolic disorders. Timely detection of these disorders including screening for MCADD can have a favorable impact on the outcome of these patients (Tab. 11, Fig. 3, Ref. 24) Full Text (Free, PDF).

  19. The influence of hepatic insufficiency due to alcoholic cirrhosis on the erythrocyte transketolase activity (ETKA).

    PubMed

    Graudal, N; Torp-Pedersen, K; Bonde, J; Hanel, H K; Kristensen, M; Milman, N; Thomsen, A C

    1987-04-01

    The erythrocyte transketolase activity (ETKA), the stimulated erythrocyte transketolase activity (ETKAS), and the thiaminepyrophosphate effect (TPPE) were measured in 21 alcoholic patients with cirrhosis and hepatic insufficiency, 13 alcoholic patients without cirrhosis and 21 non-alcoholic persons before and after oral treatment with 100 mg of thiamine daily for 2 weeks in order to investigate the influence of hepatic insufficiency on these variables. A statistically significant rise in ETKA and fall in TPPE were found in all three groups. ETKA, ETKAS and TPPE did not differ from each other in alcoholic patients with and without cirrhosis, but TPPE was significantly higher in these patients than in the non-alcoholic persons. The conclusions are that severe cirrhosis does not affect the erythrocyte transketolase apoenzyme, the ability of the tissues to convert thiamine to thiaminepyrophosphate for use in the erythrocytes or the absorption of thiamine from the gastrointestinal tract. Besides alcoholism seems to dispose to thiamine deficiency to a higher degree than cirrhosis, and the role of the liver as a thiamine store appears to be of minor importance in the development of thiamine deficiency. Finally, ETKA, ETKAS, and TPPE are considered to be usable as thiamine deficiency indicators in patients with cirrhosis as well as in patients without cirrhosis.

  20. Metabolic Causes of Epileptic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, Phillip L.

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy can be induced by inborn metabolic defects that may be rare individually but in aggregate represent a substantial clinical portion of child neurology. These may present with various epilepsy phenotypes including refractory neonatal seizures, early myoclonic encephalopathy, early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, infantile spasms, and generalized epilepsies which in particular include myoclonic seizures. There are varying degrees of treatability, but the outcome if untreated can often be catastrophic. The importance of early recognition cannot be overemphasized. This paper provides an overview of inborn metabolic errors associated with persistent brain disturbances due to highly active clinical or electrographic ictal activity. Selected diseases are organized by the defective molecule or mechanism and categorized as small molecule disorders (involving amino and organic acids, fatty acids, neurotransmitters, urea cycle, vitamers and cofactors, and mitochondria) and large molecule disorders (including lysosomal storage disorders, peroxisomal disorders, glycosylation disorders, and leukodystrophies). Details including key clinical features, salient electrophysiological and neuroradiological findings, biochemical findings, and treatment options are summarized for prominent disorders in each category. PMID:23762547

  1. Noncirrhotic hyperammonaemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Laish, Ido; Ben Ari, Ziv

    2011-10-01

    Adult hyperammonaemia is associated with severe liver disease in 90% of cases. In the remainder, noncirrhotic causes should be considered. Measurements of serum ammonia level must be part of the basic work-up in all patients presenting with encephalopathy of unknown origin, even when liver function is normal. Clinician awareness of noncirrhotic hyperammonaemic encephalopathy can contribute to early diagnosis and the initiation of sometimes life-saving treatment. This review focuses on the physiology, aetiology and underlying mechanisms of noncirrhotic hyperammonaemic encephalopathy and discusses the available treatment modalities.

  2. [Cerebral manifestations in the hepatic coma syndrome (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Funovics, J

    1975-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy has been investigated in a two-stage devascularization model in the rat with portavacal shunt and hepatic artery ligation. There is a significant increase in brain octopamine and phenylethanolamine and a decrease in brain norepinephrine (NE) 6 to 9 hours after hepatic artery ligation. The depletion of NE seems the sequel of diminished synthesis in the presence of an unaltered turnover rate, due to a blockade of tyrosine hydroxylase either by accumulation of false neurochemical transmitters or by phenylalanine. It is most marked in the cortex and midbrain. The high-energy phosphate compounds, ATP, phosphocreatine and glucose-6-phosphate are not diminished in hepatic coma, nor is glucose, indicating that other mechanism are involved in the pathogenesis of metabolic state by the increased ammonia level. "intestinal sterilization" and total colectomy have no significant effect on the ammonia level, but cause a decrease in the level or aromatic precursor amino acids in the plasma and brain, with normalization of the level of cerebral transmitters. These results permit the formulation of a unified concept of the hepatic coma syndrome and its clinical manifestations such as flapping tremor, the hyperdynamic cardiovascular state and the hepatorenal syndrome. Moreover, they form the basis for the introduction of a new therapeutic principle in the management of hepatic encephalopathy by L-dopa or modified amino acid solutions, which act by altering the central and peripheral neurotransmitters.

  3. Portal-systemic encephalopathy in two patients without liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    K C, Sudhamshu; Matsutani, Shoichi; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Fukamachi, Tadahiro; Nomoto, Hiromasa; Akiike, Taro; Ebara, Masaaki; Saisho, Hiromitsu

    2002-06-01

    The portal-systemic venous shunt is uncommon in patients without portal hypertension. We present two cases of portal-systemic encephalopathy due to extrahepatic shunt without liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Two women in their seventies were admitted to our hospital because of recurrent episodes of altered sensorium, drowsiness, slurred speech, disorientation, asterexis and high blood ammonia levels. There was no history of abdominal surgery or abdominal trauma. Clinical examination revealed no signs of portal hypertension or stigmata of chronic liver diseases. Brain CT and MRI scanning were unremarkable except for a high intensity signal in the basal ganglia on T1 weighted MRI images. Laboratory tests were almost normal except for the hyperammonemia occurring on several occasions. There was no evidence of liver cirrhosis by imaging. However, color Doppler showed an extra-hepatic shunt in both patients and pulsed Doppler showed decreased velocity and volume of the portal venous flow. These sonographic findings were confirmed during percutaneous transhepatic portography (PTP). Portal pressures measured during PTP were 9 and 11 mmHg. Needle biopsy ruled out idiopathic portal hypertension and liver cirrhosis. The diagnosis was portal systemic encephalopathy due to extra-hepatic portosystemic venous shunting. Both patients were treated by embolization of the shunting vessel with metallic coils.

  4. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Gofton, Teneille E; Young, G Bryan

    2012-10-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a diffuse brain dysfunction that occurs secondary to infection in the body without overt CNS infection. SAE is frequently encountered in critically ill patients in intensive care units, and in up to 70% of patients with severe systemic infection. The severity of SAE can range from mild delirium to deep coma. Seizures and myoclonus are infrequent and cranial nerves are almost always spared, but most severe cases have an associated critical illness neuromyopathy. Development of SAE probably involves a number of mechanisms that are not mutually exclusive and vary from patient to patient. Substantial neurological and psychological morbidities often occur in survivors. Mortality is almost always due to multiorgan failure rather than neurological complications, and is almost 70% in patients with severe SAE. Further research into the pathophysiology, management and prevention of SAE is needed. This Review discusses the epidemiology and clinical presentation of SAE. Recent evidence for SAE pathophysiology is outlined and a diagnostic approach to patients with this syndrome is presented. Lastly, prognosis and management of SAE is discussed.

  5. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Juneyoung; Padalino, David J; Chin, Lawrence S; Montenegro, Philip; Cantu, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Sports-related concussion has gained increased prominence, in part due to media coverage of several well-known athletes who have died from consequences of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE was first described by Martland in 1928 as a syndrome seen in boxers who had experienced significant head trauma from repeated blows. The classic symptoms of impaired cognition, mood, behavior, and motor skills also have been reported in professional football players, and in 2005, the histopathological findings of CTE were first reported in a former National Football League (NFL) player. These finding were similar to Alzheimer's disease in some ways but differed in critical areas such as a predominance of tau protein deposition over amyloid. The pathophysiology is still unknown but involves a history of repeated concussive and subconcussive blows and then a lag period before CTE symptoms become evident. The involvement of excitotoxic amino acids and abnormal microglial activation remain speculative. Early identification and prevention of this disease by reducing repeated blows to the head has become a critical focus of current research.

  6. A family cluster of hepatitis A virus due to an uncommon IA strain circulating in Campania (southern Italy), not associated with raw shellfish or berries: a wake-up call to implement vaccination against hepatitis A?

    PubMed

    Tosone, Grazia; Mascolo, Silvia; Bruni, Roberto; Taffon, Stefania; Equestre, Michele; Tosti, Maria Elena; Ciccaglione, Anna Rita; Martucci, Fiorella; Liberti, Alfonso; Iannece, Maria Donata; Orlando, Raffaele

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis A virus is a widely occurring disease, with different prevalence rates between countries in the North and West and those in the South and East. In Italy endemicity is low/medium, but not homogeneously distributed: in the northern/central regions a large hepatitis A outbreak due to genotype IA, related to the consumption of contaminated mixed frozen berries, occurred between 2013 and 2014, whereas in southern Italian regions recurrent outbreaks of hepatitis A, due to the IB genotype, still result from consumption of raw seafood. In 2014 an uncommon genotype IA strain was isolated from five patients (2 adults and 3 children) with hepatitis A, living in the surroundings of Naples (Campania) who did not have any of the most common risk factors for hepatitis A in Italy, such as consumption of raw shellfish or frozen berries, or travel to endemic countries. Moreover, based on the analysis of viral sequences obtained, this strain differed from several others in the national database, which had been recently isolated during Italian outbreaks. This case report reinforces the need to implement both information campaigns about the prevention of hepatitis A and vaccination programmes in childhood; in addition, it would be suitable to sequence strains routinely not only during large outbreaks of hepatitis A in order to obtain a more detailed national database of HAV strains circulating in Italy.

  7. The association between indirect bilirubin levels and liver fibrosis due to chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Mustafa; Yılmaz, Guldal; Ozenirler, Seren

    2014-08-01

    We proposed to evaluate the association between serum indirect bilirubin levels and liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) genotype 1b. Biopsy proven CHC genotype 1b patients' demographics, clinical and histopathological characteristics were evaluated. Logistic regression analysis was done to evaluate the clinical, laboratory and demographic features of the histologically proven liver fibrosis in CHC patients. A total of 112 biopsy proven CHC genotype 1b patients were enrolled into the study. Liver fibrosis scores were measured by using Ishak fibrosis scores and were divided into two groups; fibrosis scores ≤ 2 were categorized as mild fibrosis, 82 patients (73.2%), whereas fibrosis scores >2 were categorized as advanced fibrosis group, 30 patients (26.8%). Patients with advanced fibrosis had lower indirect bilirubin levels than the mild fibrosis group (0.28 ± 0.02 mg/dl vs. 0.44 ± 0.032 mg/dl, p<0.001, respectively). Indirect bilirubin level was negatively correlated with advanced fibrosis scores (r=-0.416 and p<0.001). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, low indirect bilirubin level was an independent predicting factor of advanced liver fibrosis (OR: 0.001, 95% CI: 0.0-0.005, p<0.001). There is an inverse relationship between indirect bilirubin levels and advanced liver fibrosis caused by CHC genotype 1b.

  8. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy - rare encephalopathy with good prognosis].

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Patalong-Ogiewa, M; Krzystanek, E

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with increased level of antithyroid antibodies. Two types of clinical manifestation can be described: a vasculitic type with stroke like episodes and diffuse progressive type with deterioration of mental function. Neurologic symptoms are present in euthyreosis as well as in thyroid dysfunction. Because of good response to immunosuppressive therapy, the prompt diagnosis and management of HE are crucial. In this study we present the review of current literature and discuss two representative cases.

  9. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: A rare cause of recurrent encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Raashda Ainuddin; Shaheen, Marwan Yassin; Al-Zaidan, Hamad; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair; Al-Sayed, Moeenaldeen; Rahbeeni, Zuhair; Bakshi, Nasir Ahmed; Kaya, Namik; Aldosary, Mazhor; Al-Owain, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Summary We report an unusual case of recurrent encephalopathy due to acquired hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) in a patient with propionic acidemia (PA). PA is an inherited metabolic disorder in which patients often present with encephalopathy and pancytopenia during metabolic decompensation. However, these patients may rarely develop HLH with similar presentation. This case illustrates the need to distinguish HLH induced encephalopathy from the one secondary to metabolic decompensation in these patients, as early diagnosis and treatment of HLH improves prognosis. This case also highlights the importance of considering HLH in patients presenting with unexplained encephalopathy, as early diagnosis and treatment is lifesaving in this otherwise lethal condition. To our knowledge this is the first case report of acquired HLH presenting as recurrent encephalopathy followed by complete recovery, in a metabolically stable patient with PA. PMID:27672548

  10. Epileptic Encephalopathies in Adults and Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Kural, Zekiye; Ozer, Ali Fahir

    2012-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are motor-mental retardations or cognitive disorders secondary to epileptic seizures or epileptiform activities. Encephalopaties due to brain damage, medications, or systemic diseases are generally not in the scope of this definition, but they may rarely accompany the condition. Appropriate differential diagnosis of epileptic seizures as well as subclinical electroencephalographic discharges are crucial for management of seizures and epileptiform discharges and relative regression of cognitive deterioration in long-term followup. Proper antiepileptic drug, hormonal treatment, or i.v. immunoglobulin choice play major role in prognosis. In this paper, we evaluated the current treatment approaches by reviewing clinical electrophysiological characteristics of epileptic encephalopathies. PMID:23056934

  11. Potent antiviral therapy improves survival in acute on chronic liver failure due to hepatitis B virus reactivation.

    PubMed

    Philips, Cyriac Abby; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2014-11-21

    Acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a disease entity with a high mortality rate. The acute event arises from drugs and toxins, viral infections, bacterial sepsis, interventions (both surgical and non-surgical) and vascular events on top of a known or occult chronic liver disease. ACLF secondary to reactivation of chronic hepatitis B virus is a distinct condition; the high mortality of which can be managed in the wake of new potent antiviral therapy. For example, lamivudine and entecavir use has shown definite short-term survival benefits, even though drug resistance is a concern in the former. The renoprotective effects of telbivudine have been shown in a few studies to be useful in the presence of renal dysfunction. Monotherapy with newer agents such as tenofovir and a combination of nucleos(t)ides is promising for improving survival in this special group of liver disease patients. This review describes the current status of potent antiviral therapy in patient with acute on chronic liver failure due to reactivation of chronic hepatitis B, thereby providing an algorithm in management of such patients.

  12. Daclatasvir and Asunaprevir Combination Therapy-induced Hepatitis and Cholecystitis with Coagulation Disorder due to Hypersensitivity Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Miyashima, Yuichi; Honma, Yuichi; Miyagawa, Koichiro; Oe, Shinji; Senju, Michio; Shibata, Michihiko; Hiura, Masaaki; Abe, Shintaro; Harada, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman with chronic hepatitis C was admitted to our hospital due to liver injury, cholecystitis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation with a fever and skin rash. She had been on a combination regimen of daclatasvir and asunaprevir for 2 weeks of a 24-week regimen. Because of the symptoms, laboratory findings, results of a drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test, and pathological findings of liver biopsy, we diagnosed her with drug-induced liver injury. Although daclatasvir and asunaprevir combination therapy is generally well-tolerated, some serious adverse effects have been reported. Our findings indicate that immunoallergic mechanisms were associated with daclatasvir and asunaprevir-induced liver injury. PMID:27980259

  13. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy and autoantibodies].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Encephalopathy occasionally occurs in association with thyroid disorders, but most of these are treatable. These encephalopathies include a neuropsychiatric disorder associated with hypothyroidism, called myxedema encephalopathy. Moreover, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) has been recognized as a new clinical disease based on an autoimmune mechanism associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Steroid treatment was successfully administered to these patients. Recently, we discovered that the serum autoantibodies against the NH2-terminal of α-enolase (NAE) are highly specific diagnostic biomarkers for HE. Further, we analyzed serum anti-NAE autoantibodies and the clinical features in many cases of HE from institutions throughout Japan and other countries. Approximately half of assessed HE patients carry anti-NAE antibodies. The age was widely distributed with 2 peaks (20-30 years and 50-70 years). Most HE patients were in euthyroid states, and all patients had anti-thyroid (TG) antibodies and anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies. Anti-TSH receptor (TSH-R) antibodies were observed in some cases. The common neuropsychiatry features are consciousness disturbance and psychosis, followed by cognitive dysfunction, involuntary movements, seizures, and ataxia. Abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow on brain SPECT were common findings, whereas abnormal findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were rare. HE patients have various clinical phenotypes such as the acute encephalopathy form, the chronic psychiatric form, and other particular clinical forms, including limbic encephalitis, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)-like form. The cerebellar ataxic form of HE clinically mimics spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and is characterized by the absence of nystagmus, absent or mild cerebellar atrophy, and lazy background activities on EEG. Taken together, these data suggest that the possibility of

  14. Severe de novo Hepatitis B Recovered from Late-Onset Liver Insufficiency with Prolonged Ascites and Hypoalbuminemia due to Hepatitis B Virus Genotype Bj with Precore Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Akira; Ishii, Toshiya; Sano, Fumiaki; Yamada, Takayuki; Takahashi, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    De novo hepatitis B is associated with a high risk of hepatic failure often resulting in fatal fulminant hepatitis even when nucleotide analogues are administered. A 77-year-old female developed de novo hepatitis B after R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone) treatment for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) isolated from the patient was of genotype Bj, with a precore mutation (G1896A) exhibiting an extremely high viral load at the onset of hepatitis. She showed markedly high levels of transaminase with mild jaundice on admission and rapid decrease of prothrombin activity after admission. Although acute liver failure was averted by the administration of entecavir and corticosteroid pulse therapy, liver volume decreased to 860 ml, and marked hypoalbuminemia accompanying massive ascites occurred 2 months after the onset of hepatitis and persisted for 3 months with high levels of HBV DNA and mild abnormal alanine aminotransferase levels. Frequent infusions of albumin solution, nutrition support, and alleviation therapy showed limited effect. However, overall improvement along with HBV DNA reduction was observed after increasing the dose of entecavir and completion of prednisolone that was administered with a minimum dose for adrenal insufficiency. An immediate and sufficient suppression of virus replication with potent antiviral therapy is critical, particularly in patients infected with HBV precore mutation (G1896A) and/or Bj genotype, which may have a high viral replication and direct hepatocellular damage. PMID:27920641

  15. Burn encephalopathy in children.

    PubMed

    Mohnot, D; Snead, O C; Benton, J W

    1982-07-01

    Among 287 children with burns treated over a recent two-year period, 13 (5%) showed evidence of encephalopathy. The major clinical symptoms were an altered sensorium and seizures. The majority of symptoms began later than 48 hours after the burn and were accompanied by multiple metabolic aberrations including hypocalcemia. Three children had a relapsing course, and 1 had temporarily enlarged cerebral ventricles. Eleven children improved to normal. In the majority of instances, burn encephalopathy probably reflects central nervous system dysfunction resulting from complex metabolic, hematological, and hemodynamic abnormalities rather than from a single metabolic abnormality.

  16. Manganic encephalopathy due to "ephedrone" abuse.

    PubMed

    Sanotsky, Yanush; Lesyk, Roman; Fedoryshyn, Lyudmyla; Komnatska, Iryna; Matviyenko, Yuriy; Fahn, Stanley

    2007-07-15

    We describe the clinical and neuroimaging features of 6 drug-abuse patients with self-inflicted manganese poisoning. The patients injected a home-brewed mixture called "ephedrone" (slang term) that contained manganese to produce an amphetamine-like euphoria. The desired chemical product, phenylpropanoneamine (also called methcathinone), was synthesized from a common-cold-remedy compound using permanganate as the catalyst. Manganese was a by-product in the ephedrone mixture. After months of self-injections, a clinical picture emerged, consisting of apathy, bradykinesia, gait disorder with postural instability, and spastic-hypokinetic dysarthria. There was no response to levodopa. The MRI revealed symmetric hyperintense T1-weighted signals in the basal ganglia, typical of manganese accumulation.

  17. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is caused by a novel contagion, known to as a prion. Prions are proteins capable of converting a normal cellular protein into a prion, thereby propagating an infection. BSE is the first known prion zoonotic. As such it has attracted broad scientific and, to a r...

  18. Association of increased rate of condemnation of broiler carcasses due to hepatic abnormalities with immunosuppressive diseases in the broiler chicken industry in Saskatchewan

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Keyvan; Zachar, Tara; Popowich, Shelly; Knezacek, Tennille; Goodhope, Bob; Willson, Philip; Gomis, Susantha

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the causative agents of hepatitis observed in broiler chickens at processing. Livers of chickens from 16 broiler farms in Saskatchewan with gross lesions of hepatitis were collected at processing. In addition to routine bacterial isolation and histopathological examination, serologic studies for infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) and Chicken anaemia virus (CAV), calculation of the ratio of the weight of the bursa of Fabricius (BF) to body weight (BBW), and histopathological examination of the BF were done. Of the 264 livers with gross lesions, 83% had multifocal to coalescing necrotizing hepatitis, 16% had perihepatitis, and 1% had hemorrhages. No definitive causative microorganisms were isolated from the hepatic lesions; however, no significant bacterial isolations were made. Bursal atrophy, low BBW ratio, and high titer of antibody against IBDV each correlated with the rate of total condemnations (P = 0.0188, P = 0.0001, and P = 0.0073, respectively). Nucleotide sequencing of IBDV isolated from the BF identified the variant strains Delaware-E and 586. Condemnation because of hepatic lesions was correlated with titer of antibody against IBDV and BBW (P = 0.016 and P = 0.027). The results of this study demonstrate that hepatic lesions in Saskatchewan chickens are not currently caused by a primary bacterial pathogen but are associated with indicators of immunosuppression that is likely due to variant IBDV. PMID:26424905

  19. Endotoxemia, encephalopathy, and mortality in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Bigatello, L M; Broitman, S A; Fattori, L; Di Paoli, M; Pontello, M; Bevilacqua, G; Nespoli, A

    1987-01-01

    Endotoxemia without sepsis was detected with a chromogenic Limulus assay in 36 of 39 (92.3%) cirrhotic patients and was absent in seven healthy volunteers. In 11 patients who underwent elective portasystemic shunt, portal vein endotoxemia was higher than inferior vena caval: p less than 0.05, systemic endotoxin levels did not change, compared to preoperative levels, on the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd postoperative days, attendant to an uneventful recovery. In 21 patients in hepatic encephalopathy after esophagogastric hemorrhage, systemic endotoxemia was higher than in well-compensated cirrhotics: p less than 0.001; it was higher in deep than in light coma: p less than 0.05; it was higher in those who died than in those who survived: p less than 0.001. Endotoxin levels showed a positive correlation with serum bilirubin: r = 0.59, p less than 0.001, and a negative correlation with prothrombin activity: r = -0.59, p less than 0.001. These data show endotoxemia without sepsis is a constant finding in cirrhosis and increasing levels of endotoxemia are associated with hepatic failure, encephalopathy, and death.

  20. Wernicke encephalopathy in a patient with liver failure: Clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pan; Zhao, Yanling; Wei, Zhenman; Chen, Jing; Yan, Lilong

    2016-07-01

    Early recognition and diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy is pivotal for the prognosis of this medical emergency, especially in patients with liver failure which predisposes individuals to develop hepatic encephalopathy. For these patients, distinguishing between hepatic encephalopathy and Wernicke encephalopathy is a challenge in real-world clinical practice.A male patient with 21-year medical history of liver cirrhosis presented diarrhea and ascites. One month before this visit, he was noted to have poor appetite and progressive fatigue. After admission, although several major symptoms, including diarrhea, ascites, hyponatremia, and hypoproteinemia, were greatly improved through appropriate treatments, his laboratory indicators were not changed much. His appetite was not reversed at discharge. On the 5th day after discharge, the patient suddenly became reluctant to speak and did not remember the recent happenings. Simultaneously, unsteady gait and strabismus occurred. On the basis of clinical manifestations and brain magnetic resonance imaging scan results, the patient was diagnosed as Wernicke encephalopathy and these relative symptoms were resolved after intravenous vitamin B1.To our knowledge, this is the second case report of Wernicke encephalopathy developing in a critically ill cirrhotic patient without hepatocellular carcinoma or operative intervention. Wernicke encephalopathy may be underdiagnosed in these patients and this case raises physicians' awareness of its possible onset.

  1. Cyp8b1 ablation prevents western diet-induced weight gain and hepatic steatosis due to impaired fat absorption.

    PubMed

    Bertaggia, Enrico; Jensen, Kristian K; Castro-Perez, Jose; Xu, Yimeng; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Chan, Robin B; Wang, Liangsu; Haeusler, Rebecca A

    2017-04-04

    Bile acids (BAs) are cholesterol derivatives that regulate lipid metabolism, through their dual abilities to promote lipid absorption and activate BA receptors. However, different BA species have varying abilities to perform these functions. Eliminating 12α-hydroxy BAs in mice via Cyp8b1 knockout causes low body weight and improved glucose tolerance. The goal of this study was to determine mechanisms of low body weight in Cyp8b1(-/-) mice. We challenged Cyp8b1(-/-) mice with western type diet and assessed body weight and composition. We measured energy expenditure, fecal calories, lipid absorption and performed lipidomic studies on feces and intestine. We investigated the requirement for dietary fat in the phenotype using a fat-free diet. Cyp8b1(-/-) mice were resistant to western diet-induced body weight gain, hepatic steatosis, and insulin resistance. These changes were associated with increased fecal calories, due to malabsorption of hydrolyzed dietary triglycerides. This was reversed by treating the mice with taurocholic acid, the major 12α-hydroxylated BA species. The improvements in body weight and steatosis were normalized by feeding mice a fat-free diet. The effects of BA composition on intestinal lipid handling are important for whole-body energy homeostasis. Thus, modulating BA composition is a potential tool for obesity or diabetes therapy.

  2. Fetal and neonatal exposure to nicotine leads to augmented hepatic and circulating triglycerides in adult male offspring due to increased expression of fatty acid synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Noelle; Nicholson, Catherine J.; Wong, Michael; Holloway, Alison C.; Hardy, Daniel B.

    2014-02-15

    While nicotine replacement therapy is assumed to be a safer alternative to smoking during pregnancy, the long-term consequences for the offspring remain elusive. Animal studies now suggest that maternal nicotine exposure during perinatal life leads to a wide range of adverse outcomes for the offspring including increased adiposity. The focus of this study was to investigate if nicotine exposure during pregnancy and lactation leads to alterations in hepatic triglyceride synthesis. Female Wistar rats were randomly assigned to receive daily subcutaneous injections of saline (vehicle) or nicotine bitartrate (1 mg/kg/day) for two weeks prior to mating until weaning. At postnatal day 180 (PND 180), nicotine exposed offspring exhibited significantly elevated levels of circulating and hepatic triglycerides in the male offspring. This was concomitant with increased expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS), the critical hepatic enzyme in de novo triglyceride synthesis. Given that FAS is regulated by the nuclear receptor Liver X receptor (LXRα), we measured LXRα expression in both control and nicotine-exposed offspring. Nicotine exposure during pregnancy and lactation led to an increase in hepatic LXRα protein expression and enriched binding to the putative LXRE element on the FAS promoter in PND 180 male offspring. This was also associated with significantly enhanced acetylation of histone H3 [K9,14] surrounding the FAS promoter, a hallmark of chromatin activation. Collectively, these findings suggest that nicotine exposure during pregnancy and lactation leads to an increase in circulating and hepatic triglycerides long-term via changes in the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of the hepatic lipogenic pathway. - Highlights: • Our data reveals the links nicotine exposure in utero and long-term hypertriglyceridemia. • It is due to nicotine-induced augmented expression of hepatic FAS and LXRα activity. • Moreover, this involves nicotine-induced enhanced

  3. Cat scratch encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Silver, B E; Bean, C S

    1991-06-01

    Cat scratch disease is usually benign, self-limited and without sequelae. Margileth has established four clinical criteria, three of which must be satisfied to make the diagnosis: 1) a history of animal exposure, usually kitten, with primary skin or ocular lesions; 2) regional chronic adenopathy without other apparent cause; 3) a positive cat scratch disease antigen skin test; and 4) lymph node biopsy demonstrating noncaseating granulomas and germinal center hyperplasia. Central nervous system involvement in cat scratch disease has been previously reported, although it is extremely uncommon. In a several-month period, we encountered two cases of cat scratch disease complicated by encephalopathy. The intents of this paper are twofold: 1) to briefly review the current literature on cat scratch disease, 2) to demonstrate that cat scratch disease complicated by encephalopathy presents acutely with seizures, posturing and coma and resolves rapidly with supportive care.

  4. Wernicke's Encephalopathy following Hyperemesis Gravidarum

    PubMed Central

    Kotha, V.K.; De Souza, A.

    2013-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) due to causes other than chronic alcohol abuse is an uncommon and often misdiagnosed condition. In the setting of hyperemesis gravidarum, an acute deficiency of thiamine results from body stores being unable to meet increased metabolic demands. The condition produces typical clinical and radiological findings and when diagnosed early and treated promptly has a good prognosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is sensitive and specific for diagnosis. We describe three patients with hyperemesis gravidarum who developed WE, and highlight a range of clinical and imaging features important for appropriate diagnosis. A high degree of clinical suspicion is essential. Treatment is often empirical pending results of investigation, and consists of parenteral repletion of thiamine stores. Reversal of MRI findings parallels clinical improvement. Neurologic outcomes are usually good, but half the pregnancies complicated by this condition do not produce healthy children. PMID:23859165

  5. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided transmural drainage of an infected hepatic cyst due to Edwardsiella tarda: a case report.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Hiroki; Tamai, Tsutomu; Numata, Masatsugu; Maeda, Hitomi; Ohshige, Akihiko; Iwaya, Hiromichi; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Kanmura, Shuji; Funakawa, Keita; Fujita, Hiroshi; Ido, Akio; Tsubouchi, Hirohito

    2014-10-01

    Infected hepatic cysts are very rare compared to simple liver cysts and abscesses. We treated a 77-year-old man with an infected hepatic cyst in the lateral segment caused by Edwardsiella tarda, which has not been previously reported as a pathogenic organism associated with infected hepatic cysts. Percutaneous drainage was temporarily effective, but infection recurred after the drainage tube was removed. We then inserted two drainage tubes into the cyst using an endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided technique, which was developed from EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). The internal drainage tube was a 7 Fr double pigtail stent, and the external tube was a 6 Fr nasobiliary drainage tube. Lavage through the external drainage tube was carried out for one week. The external drainage tube was discontinued when the patient's condition improved significantly. Sixteen days after tube insertion, he was discharged with the internal tube draining the hepatic cyst into the stomach. Fifteen months after EUS-guided drainage, CT examination showed no recurrence of the hepatic cyst. EUS-guided drainage is an effective treatment for infected hepatic cysts.

  6. Thiamine in the treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy in patients with alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Latt, N; Dore, G

    2014-09-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is an acute, reversible neuropsychiatric emergency due to thiamine deficiency. Urgent and adequate thiamine replacement is necessary to avoid death or progression to Korsakoff syndrome with largely irreversible brain damage. Wernicke Korsakoff syndrome refers to a condition where features of Wernicke encephalopathy are mixed with those of Korsakoff syndrome. Although thiamine is the cornerstone of treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy, there are no universally accepted guidelines with regard to its optimal dose, mode of administration, frequency of administration or duration of treatment. Currently, different dose recommendations are being made. We present recommendations for the assessment and treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy based on literature review and our clinical experience.

  7. Wernicke's encephalopathy in a patient with masticator and parapharyngeal space abscess: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a fatal neurological disease caused by thiamine deficiency. Many reports indicate that Wernicke's encephalopathy is caused by malnutrition. We report the case of a 79-year-old female patient who had a left masticator space and parapharyngeal space abscess who was diagnosed with Wernicke's encephalopathy. She reported problems while eating due to the presence of the abscess, but the true quantities of food she was ingesting were never assessed. Clinicians have a responsibility to provide adequate nutritional support by ensuring that patients receive adequate nutrition. Clinicians should also keep in mind that Wernicke's encephalopathy may occur in patients who experienced prolonged periods of malnutrition. PMID:27162754

  8. Maternal undernutrition leads to elevated hepatic triglycerides in male rat offspring due to increased expression of lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei-Fen; Zhu, Jian-Fang; Liang, Li; Shen, Zheng; Wang, Ying-Min

    2016-05-01

    Small for gestational age (SGA) at birth increases the risk of developing metabolic syndrome, which encompasses various symptoms including hypertriglyceridemia. The aim of the present study was to determine whether maternal undernutrition during pregnancy may lead to alterations in hepatic triglyceride content and the gene expression levels of hepatic lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in SGA male offspring. The present study focused on the male offspring in order to prevent confounding factors, such as estrus cycle and hormone profile. Female Sprague Dawley rats were arbitrarily assigned to receive an ad libitum chow diet or 50% food restricted diet from pregnancy day 1 until parturition. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were used to measure the gene expression levels of hepatic LPL at day 1 and upon completion of the third week of age. Chromatin immunoprecipitation quantified the binding activity of liver X receptor‑α (LXR‑α) gene to the LXR response elements (LXRE) on LPL promoter and LPL epigenetic characteristics. At 3 weeks of age, SGA male offspring exhibited significantly elevated levels of hepatic triglycerides, which was concomitant with increased expression levels of LPL. Since LPL is regulated by LXR‑α, the expression levels of LXR‑α were detected in appropriate for gestational age and SGA male offspring. Maternal undernutrition during pregnancy led to an increase in the hepatic expression levels of LXR‑α, and enriched binding to the putative LXR response elements in the LPL promoter regions in 3‑week‑old male offspring. In addition, enhanced acetylation of histone H3 [H3 lysine (K)9 and H3K14] was detected surrounding the LPL promoter. The results of the present study indicated that maternal undernutrition during pregnancy may lead to an increase in hepatic triglycerides, via alterations in the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of the LPL gene.

  9. Pathophysiology of epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Lado, Fred A; Rubboli, Guido; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Capovilla, Pippo; Avanzini, Giuliano; Moshé, Solomon L

    2013-11-01

    The application of metabolic imaging and genetic analysis, and now the development of appropriate animal models, has generated critical insights into the pathogenesis of epileptic encephalopathies. In this article we present ideas intended to move from the lesions associated with epileptic encephalopathies toward understanding the effects of these lesions on the functioning of the brain, specifically of the cortex. We argue that the effects of focal lesions may be magnified through the interaction between cortical and subcortical structures, and that disruption of subcortical arousal centers that regulate cortex early in life may lead to alterations of intracortical synapses that affect a critical period of cognitive development. Impairment of interneuronal function globally through the action of a genetic lesion similarly causes widespread cortical dysfunction manifesting as increased delta slow waves on electroencephalography (EEG) and as developmental delay or arrest clinically. Finally, prolonged focal epileptic activity during sleep (as occurring in the syndrome of continuous spike-wave in slow sleep, or CSWSS) might interfere with local slow wave activity at the site of the epileptic focus, thereby impairing the neural processes and, possibly, the local plastic changes associated with learning and other cognitive functions. Seizures may certainly add to these pathologic processes, but they are likely not necessary for the development of the cognitive pathology. Nevertheless, although seizures may be either a consequence or symptom of the underlying lesion, their effective treatment can improve outcomes as both clinical and experimental studies may suggest. Understanding their substrates may lead to novel, effective treatments for all aspects of the epileptic encephalopathy phenotype.

  10. SCN2A encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Katherine B.; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Tambunan, Dimira; Mackay, Mark T.; Rodriguez-Casero, Victoria; Webster, Richard; Clark, Damian; Freeman, Jeremy L.; Calvert, Sophie; Olson, Heather E.; Mandelstam, Simone; Poduri, Annapurna; Mefford, Heather C.; Harvey, A. Simon

    2015-01-01

    Objective: De novo SCN2A mutations have recently been associated with severe infantile-onset epilepsies. Herein, we define the phenotypic spectrum of SCN2A encephalopathy. Methods: Twelve patients with an SCN2A epileptic encephalopathy underwent electroclinical phenotyping. Results: Patients were aged 0.7 to 22 years; 3 were deceased. Seizures commenced on day 1–4 in 8, week 2–6 in 2, and after 1 year in 2. Characteristic features included clusters of brief focal seizures with multiple hourly (9 patients), multiple daily (2), or multiple weekly (1) seizures, peaking at maximal frequency within 3 months of onset. Multifocal interictal epileptiform discharges were seen in all. Three of 12 patients had infantile spasms. The epileptic syndrome at presentation was epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS) in 7 and Ohtahara syndrome in 2. Nine patients had improved seizure control with sodium channel blockers including supratherapeutic or high therapeutic phenytoin levels in 5. Eight had severe to profound developmental impairment. Other features included movement disorders (10), axial hypotonia (11) with intermittent or persistent appendicular spasticity, early handedness, and severe gastrointestinal symptoms. Mutations arose de novo in 11 patients; paternal DNA was unavailable in one. Conclusions: Review of our 12 and 34 other reported cases of SCN2A encephalopathy suggests 3 phenotypes: neonatal-infantile–onset groups with severe and intermediate outcomes, and a childhood-onset group. Here, we show that SCN2A is the second most common cause of EIMFS and, importantly, does not always have a poor developmental outcome. Sodium channel blockers, particularly phenytoin, may improve seizure control. PMID:26291284

  11. Hypertension and hypertensive encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Price, Raymond S; Kasner, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    The definition of hypertension has continuously evolved over the last 50 years. Hypertension is currently defined as a blood pressure greater than 140/90mmHg. One in every four people in the US has been diagnosed with hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension increases further with age, affecting 75% of people over the age of 70. Hypertension is by far the most common risk factor identified in stroke patients. Hypertension causes pathologic changes in the walls of small (diameter<300 microns) arteries and arterioles usually at short branches of major arteries, which may result in either ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage. Reduction of blood pressure with diuretics, β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have all been shown to markedly reduce the incidence of stroke. Hypertensive emergency is defined as a blood pressure greater than 180/120mmHg with end organ dysfunction, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, encephalopathy, or focal neurologic deficits. Hypertensive encephalopathy is believed to be caused by acute failure of cerebrovascular autoregulation. Hypertensive emergency is treated with intravenous antihypertensive agents to reduce blood pressure by 25% within the first hour. Selective inhibition of cerebrovascular blood vessel permeability for the treatment of hypertensive emergency is beginning early clinical trials.

  12. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Omalu, Bennet

    2014-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative syndrome, which is caused by single, episodic, or repetitive blunt force impacts to the head and transfer of acceleration-deceleration forces to the brain. CTE presents clinically as a composite syndrome of mood disorders and behavioral and cognitive impairment, with or without sensorimotor impairment. Symptoms of CTE may begin with persistent symptoms of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) following a documented episode of brain trauma or after a latent period that may range from days to weeks to months and years, up to 40 years following a documented episode of brain trauma or cessation of repetitive TBI. Posttraumatic encephalopathy is distinct from CTE, can be comorbid with CTE, and is a clinicopathologic syndrome induced by focal and/or diffuse, gross and/or microscopic destruction of brain tissue following brain trauma. The brain of a CTE sufferer may appear grossly unremarkable, but shows microscopic evidence of primary and secondary proteinopathies. The primary proteinopathy of CTE is tauopathy, while secondary proteinopathies may include, but are not limited to, amyloidopathy and TDP proteinopathy. Reported prevalence rates of CTE in cohorts exposed to TBI ranges from 3 to 80% across age groups.

  13. Absence of melatonin induces night-time hepatic insulin resistance and increased gluconeogenesis due to stimulation of nocturnal unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Tatiane C; Lellis-Santos, Camilo; Jesus, Daniel S; Taneda, Marco; Rodrigues, Sandra C; Amaral, Fernanda G; Lopes, Ana Maria S; Cipolla-Neto, José; Bordin, Silvana; Anhê, Gabriel F

    2011-04-01

    It is known that the circadian rhythm in hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression (a limiting catalytic step of gluconeogenesis) and hepatic glucose production is maintained by both daily oscillation in autonomic inputs to the liver and night feeding behavior. However, increased glycemia and reduced melatonin (Mel) levels have been recently shown to coexist in diabetic patients at the end of the night period. In parallel, pinealectomy (PINX) is known to cause glucose intolerance with increased basal glycemia exclusively at the end of the night. The mechanisms that underlie this metabolic feature are not completely understood. Here, we demonstrate that PINX rats show night-time hepatic insulin resistance characterized by reduced insulin-stimulated RAC-α serine/threonine-protein kinase phosphorylation and increased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression. In addition, PINX rats display increased conversion of pyruvate into glucose at the end of the night. The regulatory mechanism suggests the participation of unfolded protein response (UPR), because PINX induces night-time increase in activating transcription factor 6 expression and prompts a circadian fashion of immunoglobulin heavy chain-binding protein, activating transcription factor 4, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein expression with Zenith values at the dark period. PINX also caused a night-time increase in Tribble 3 and regulatory-associated protein of mammalian target of rapamycin; both were reduced in liver of PINX rats treated with Mel. Treatment of PINX rats with 4-phenyl butyric acid, an inhibitor of UPR, restored night-time hepatic insulin sensitivity and abrogated gluconeogenesis in PINX rats. Altogether, the present data show that a circadian oscillation of UPR occurs in the liver due to the absence of Mel. The nocturnal UPR activation is related with night-time hepatic insulin resistance and increased gluconeogenesis in PINX rats.

  14. CT-angiographic demonstration of hepatic collateral pathways due to superior vena cava obstruction in Behçet disease.

    PubMed

    Temizöz, Osman; Genchellac, Hakan; Yekeler, Ensar; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Unlü, Ercüment; Ozdemir, Hüseyin

    2010-12-01

    Behçet disease (BD) is a chronic multisystemic inflammatory disorder, mainly characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers, skin lesions, and uveitis. Large vein thrombosis in BD is unusual; when present, it is most frequently seen in the inferior or superior vena cava (SVC). The authors describe an unusual hepatic pseudolesion caused by abnormal focal enhancement through collateral pathways to the liver in two BD patients with SVC occlusion on three-dimensional multi-detector computed tomography, using volume rendering and maximum intensity projection techniques. BD should be suspected in patients presenting a focal increased hepatic enhancement area with collaterals caused by occlusion of the SVC without evidence of a hypercoagulable state or malignant mediastinal or thoracic venous inlet obstruction.

  15. Glyphosate-surfactant herbicide-induced reversible encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, R C; Ghia, D K; Cordato, D J; Beran, R G

    2010-11-01

    Glyphosate-surfactant (GlySH) is a commonly used herbicide that has been used in attempted suicide. Most reports of GlySH toxicity in patients have followed ingestion of the commercial product "Round-up" (Monsanto Ltd; Melbourne, Victoria, Australia), which consists of a mixture of glyphosate (as a isopropylanine salt) and a surfactant (polyoxyethyleneamine). Ingestion of Round-up is reported to cause significant toxicity including nausea, vomiting, oral and abdominal pain. Renal and hepatic impairment and pulmonary oedema may also occur. Impaired consciousness and encephalopathy have been reported as sequelae but there are limited data on the central nervous system (CNS) effects of Round-up toxicity. We report a 71-year-old male who attempted suicide with GlySH and developed a prolonged but reversible encephalopathy suggestive of acute CNS toxicity.

  16. Fatal spontaneous subdural bleeding due to neonatal giant cell hepatitis: a rare differential diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guddat, Saskia S; Ehrlich, Edwin; Martin, Hubert; Tsokos, Michael

    2011-09-01

    A 7-week-old girl showed vomiting after feeding, facial pallor, loss of muscle tone and respiratory depression. An emergency doctor performed successful resuscitation and after arrival in hospital, cranial ultrasound showed left-sided subdural hemorrhage, cerebral edema with a shift of the midline, and a decrease in cerebral perfusion. Ophthalmologic examination showed retinal hemorrhage. In view of this, the doctors suspected shaken baby syndrome and approached the parents with their suspicions, but they denied any shaking or trauma. Despite surgery for the subdural hemorrhage the girl died a few hours later with a severe coagulopathy. Autopsy verified subdural hemorrhage, cerebral edema and retinal hemorrhage, but also revealed intact bridging veins and a lack of optic nerve sheath hemorrhage, therefore shaken baby syndrome could not be proven by autopsy. Histological examination showed severe neonatal giant cell hepatitis as the cause of the severe coagulopathy and the associated spontaneous subdural bleeding. Neonatal giant cell hepatitis may be responsible for unexpected deaths in infancy and, although rarely associated with subdural bleeding, must be considered as a potential differential diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome.

  17. Adverse Skin Reactions due to Ribavirin in Hepatitis C Combination Therapy with Pegylated Interferon-α2a

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, Masahisa; Terai, Isamu

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of ribavirin to hepatitis C combination therapy with pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN)-α2a has improved sustained responses, but it has been accompanied by an increased incidence of cutaneous side effects. Most cases of drug eruption caused by ribavirin and PEG-IFN-α2 or IFN-α combination therapy were not severe and we progressed without discontinuation of the antiviral treatment. We describe a 59-year-old Japanese woman with a chronic hepatitis C infection who developed erythema during PEG-IFN-α2a and ribavirin combination therapy. The eruption at the injection site of IFN occurred after each injection, and then, eruption on her exposed skin was observed. Twenty milligrams of prednisolone was administered. The eruption recurred after each administration of prednisolone and ribavirin. She finally had infiltrative erythema without any mucosal symptoms on her body. It seemed to be an erythema multiforme type drug eruption of PEG-IFN-α2a, ribavirin and/or fluvastatin sodium from the clinical course. The lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) of ribavirin was positive. This is the first case of a positive result of an LTT for ribavirin. A photosensitive type drug eruption with ribavirin treatment has been reported. We should not only consider IFN, but also ribavirin in case of a generalized eruption, especially on an exposed area with combination therapy for HCV. PMID:24516409

  18. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saulle, Michael; Greenwald, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE. PMID:22567320

  19. Hepatitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  20. Reversible cortical blindness: posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Mondal, Kanchan Kumar; Das, Somnath; Gupta, Anindya; Biswas, Jaya; Bhattacharyya, Subir Kumar; Biswas, Gautam

    2010-11-01

    Cortical blindness is defined as visual failure with preserved pupillary reflexes in structurally intact eyes due to bilateral lesions affecting occipital cortex. Bilateral oedema and infarction of the posterior and middle cerebral arterial territory, trauma, glioma and meningioma of the occipital cortex are the main causes of cortical blindness. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) refers to the reversible subtype of cortical blindness and is usually associated with hypertension, diabetes, immunosuppression, puerperium with or without eclampsia. Here, 3 cases of PRES with complete or partial visual recovery following treatment in 6-month follow-up are reported.

  1. A Case of Fulminant Hepatitis due to Echovirus 9 in a Patient on Maintenance Rituximab Therapy for Follicular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, S. J.; Legg, Joanne; Narat, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Rituximab is a CD20 monoclonal antibody commonly used in the treatment of haematological malignancies. It causes lymphopenia with subsequent compromised humoral immunity resulting in an increased risk of infection. A number of infections and viral reactivations have been described as complicating Rituximab therapy. We report an apparently unique case of echovirus 9 (an enterovirus) infection causing an acute hepatitis and significant morbidity in an adult patient on maintenance treatment of Rituximab for follicular lymphoma. We also describe potential missed opportunities to employ more robust screening for viral infections which may have prevented delays in the appropriate treatment and thus may have altered the patient's clinical course. We also make suggestions for lowering the threshold of viral testing in similar patients in the future. PMID:26106492

  2. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies of livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. TSEs have been described in several species including bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids, tr...

  3. Sepsis Associated Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Neera; Duggal, Ashish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a common but poorly understood neurological complication of sepsis. It is characterized by diffuse brain dysfunction secondary to infection elsewhere in the body without overt CNS infection. The pathophysiology of SAE is complex and multifactorial including a number of intertwined mechanisms such as vascular damage, endothelial activation, breakdown of the blood brain barrier, altered brain signaling, brain inflammation, and apoptosis. Clinical presentation of SAE may range from mild symptoms such as malaise and concentration deficits to deep coma. The evaluation of cognitive dysfunction is made difficult by the absence of any specific investigations or biomarkers and the common use of sedation in critically ill patients. SAE thus remains diagnosis of exclusion which can only be made after ruling out other causes of altered mentation in a febrile, critically ill patient by appropriate investigations. In spite of high mortality rate, management of SAE is limited to treatment of the underlying infection and symptomatic treatment for delirium and seizures. It is important to be aware of this condition because SAE may present in early stages of sepsis, even before the diagnostic criteria for sepsis can be met. This review discusses the diagnostic approach to patients with SAE along with its epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis.

  4. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Cotena, Simona; Piazza, Ornella

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is defined as a diffuse or multifocal cerebral dysfunction induced by the systemic response to the infection without clinical or laboratory evidence of direct brain infection. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial. SAE generally occurs early during severe sepsis and precedes multiple-organ failure. The most common clinical feature of SAE is the consciousness alteration which ranges from mildly reduced awareness to unresponsiveness and coma. Diagnosis of SAE is primarily clinical and depends on the exclusion of other possible causes of brain deterioration. Electroencephalography (EEG) is almost sensitive, but it is not specific for SAE. Computed Tomography (CT) head scan generally is negative in case of SAE, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can show brain abnormalities in case of SAE, but they are not specific for this condition. Somatosensitive Evoked Potentials (SEPs) are sensitive markers of developing cerebral dysfunction in sepsis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CBF) analysis is generally normal, a part an inconstant elevation of proteins concentration. S100B and NSE have been proposed like biomarkers for diagnosis of SAE, but the existing data are controversial. SAE is reversible even if survivors of severe sepsis have often long lasting or irreversible cognitive and behavioral sequel; however the presence of SAE can have a negative influence on survival. A specific therapy of SAE does not exist and the outcome depends on a prompt and appropriate treatment of sepsis as whole.

  5. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Algahtani, Abdulhadi; Aldarmahi, Ahmad; Hmoud, Mohammed; Marzuk, Yousef; Shirah, Bader

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiological syndrome characterized by headache, altered mental status, seizures, or loss of vision. In this study, we report the largest series of PRES coming from Saudi Arabia and explore the etiology, clinical presentation, and outcome. We also report new imaging findings associated with this condition. Methods: We performed a retrospective study of all cases of PRES admitted to King Abdulaziz Medical City, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, between the years 2005 and 2015. A neurologist reviewed all charts and analyzed the clinical presentations, etiological factors, and outcomes, and a neuroradiologist reviewed the imaging studies. Only patients with clinical and imaging features consistent with PRES were included in the study. Results: We collected 31 patients who had clinical and radiological features consistent with PRES. Females were more affected than males (18 females and 13 males), and patients’ age ranged from 6 to 95 years, with a mean of 38.3 years. Patients were treated by removing the precipitating causes and treating the underlying conditions. Resolution of neurologic signs occurred within 2 to 3 weeks in all patients. Conclusion: In our opinion, PRES itself is usually a benign condition with complete recovery if the condition is recognized early and managed appropriately. Although clinical signs are nonspecific, the constellation of symptoms including headache, visual problems, seizures, and altered level of consciousness should suggest the possibility of PRES, especially in high-risk group. Abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging are often characteristic and may be the first clue to the diagnosis. PMID:28042366

  6. Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE): a review.

    PubMed

    Green, Rebecca; Scott, L Keith; Minagar, Alireza; Conrad, Steven

    2004-05-01

    Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a poorly understood condition that is associated with severe sepsis and appears to have a negative influence on survival. The incidence of encephalopathy secondary to sepsis is unknown. Amino acid derangements, blood-brain barrier disruption, abnormal neurotransmitters, and direct CNS effect are possible causes of septic encephalopathy. Research has not defined the pathogenesis of SAE.

  7. Parent Experience of Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Lemmon, Monica E; Donohue, Pamela K; Parkinson, Charlamaine; Northington, Frances J; Boss, Renee D

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to characterize the parent experience of caring for an infant with neonatal encephalopathy. In this mixed-methods study, we performed semistructured interviews with parents whose infants were enrolled in an existing longitudinal cohort study of therapeutic hypothermia between 2011 and 2014. Thematic saturation was achieved after 20 interviews. Parent experience of caring for a child with neonatal encephalopathy was characterized by 3 principal themes. Theme 1: Many families described cumulative loss and grief throughout the perinatal crisis, critical neonatal course, and subsequent missed developmental milestones. Theme 2: Families experienced entangled infant and broader family interests. Theme 3: Parents evolved into and found meaning in their role as an advocate. These data offer insight into the lived experience of parenting an infant with neonatal encephalopathy. Primary data from parents can serve as a useful framework to guide the development and interpretation of parent-centered outcomes.

  8. Electroencephalography of autoimmune limbic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Peter W; Sutter, Raoul

    2013-10-01

    There is an increasing recognition of autoimmune limbic encephalopathy with the hope for earlier diagnosis and expedited and improved treatment. Although antibody testing remains the definitive clinical diagnostic feature, the presentation of a rapid dementia, behavioral changes, and seizures leads to investigation using cerebral imaging, electroencephalography, and cerebrospinal fluid to confirm the diagnosis and also to exclude similar disorders. The electroencephalographer may be asked to comment on the types of electroencephalography abnormality and provide input toward the diagnosis of limbic encephalopathy. This article reviews the literature on limbic paraneoplastic and nonparaneoplastic encephalopathies, providing descriptions and examples of the electroencephalography findings. Typically, there are patterns of slow theta and delta activity and different patterns of temporal and frontal epileptic activity.

  9. GNAO1 encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Danti, Federica Rachele; Galosi, Serena; Romani, Marta; Montomoli, Martino; Carss, Keren J.; Raymond, F. Lucy; Parrini, Elena; Bianchini, Claudia; McShane, Tony; Dale, Russell C.; Mohammad, Shekeeb S.; Shah, Ubaid; Mahant, Neil; Ng, Joanne; McTague, Amy; Samanta, Rajib; Vadlamani, Gayatri; Valente, Enza Maria; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Kurian, Manju A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To describe better the motor phenotype, molecular genetic features, and clinical course of GNAO1-related disease. Methods: We reviewed clinical information, video recordings, and neuroimaging of a newly identified cohort of 7 patients with de novo missense and splice site GNAO1 mutations, detected by next-generation sequencing techniques. Results: Patients first presented in early childhood (median age of presentation 10 months, range 0–48 months), with a wide range of clinical symptoms ranging from severe motor and cognitive impairment with marked choreoathetosis, self-injurious behavior, and epileptic encephalopathy to a milder phenotype, featuring moderate developmental delay associated with complex stereotypies, mainly facial dyskinesia and mild epilepsy. Hyperkinetic movements were often exacerbated by specific triggers, such as voluntary movement, intercurrent illnesses, emotion, and high ambient temperature, leading to hospital admissions. Most patients were resistant to drug intervention, although tetrabenazine was effective in partially controlling dyskinesia for 2/7 patients. Emergency deep brain stimulation (DBS) was life saving in 1 patient, resulting in immediate clinical benefit with complete cessation of violent hyperkinetic movements. Five patients had well-controlled epilepsy and 1 had drug-resistant seizures. Structural brain abnormalities, including mild cerebral atrophy and corpus callosum dysgenesis, were evident in 5 patients. One patient had a diffuse astrocytoma (WHO grade II), surgically removed at age 16. Conclusions: Our findings support the causative role of GNAO1 mutations in an expanded spectrum of early-onset epilepsy and movement disorders, frequently exacerbated by specific triggers and at times associated with self-injurious behavior. Tetrabenazine and DBS were the most useful treatments for dyskinesia. PMID:28357411

  10. A Proposed Physiopathological Pathway to Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy in a Non-Cirrhotic Patient with Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma without Ornithine Transcarbamylase (OTC) Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Surjan, Rodrigo C.; dos Santos, Elizabeth S.; Basseres, Tiago; Makdissi, Fabio F.; Machado, Marcel A.

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 31 Final Diagnosis: Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma Symptoms: Encephalopathy Medication:— Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a potentially fatal condition that may progress to irreversible neuronal damage and is usually associated with liver failure or portosystemic shunting. However, other less common conditions can lead to hyperammonemia in adults, such as fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. Clinical awareness of hyperammonemic encephalopathy in patients with normal liver function is paramount to timely diagnosis, but understanding the underlying physiopathology is decisive to initiate adequate treatment for complete recovery. Case Report: A 31-year-old male with fibrolamellar carcinoma and peritoneal carcinomatosis presented with rapid onset hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Despite usual treatment for hepatic encephalopathy, his hyperammonemia was aggravated. A physiopathological pathway to encephalopathy resulting from hepatocellular dysfunction or portosystemic shunting was suspected and proper treatment was initiated, which resulted in complete remission of encephalopathy. Thus, we propose there is a physiopathology path to hyperammonemic encephalopathy in non-cirrhotic patients with fibrolamellar carcinoma independent of ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) mutation. An ornithine metabolism imbalance resulting from overexpression of Aurora Kinase A as a result of a single, recurrent heterozygous deletion on chromosome 19, common to all fibrolamellar carcinomas, can lead to a c-Myc and ornithine decarboxylase overexpression that results in ornithine transcarboxylase dysfunction with urea cycle disorder and subsequent hyperammonemia. Conclusions: The identification of a physiopathological pathway allowed adequate medical treatment and full patient recovery from severe hyperammonemic encephalopathy. PMID:28270654

  11. Delayed hypersensitivity reaction resulting in maculopapular-type eruption due to entecavir in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Tae; Jeong, Hye Won; Choi, Ki Hwa; Yoon, Tae Young; Sung, Nohyun; Choi, Young Ki; Kim, Eun Ha; Chae, Hee Bok

    2014-01-01

    Several clinical trials have demonstrated the potent antiviral efficacy of entecavir (ETV), and this relatively new nucleoside analogue drug has rapidly become a frequently prescribed therapy for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) worldwide. While the studies have also shown a good overall safety profile for ETV, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in patients with advanced cirrhosis have been reported and represent a broad spectrum of drug-induced injuries, including lactic acidosis, myalgia, neuropathy, azotemia, hypophosphatemia, muscular weakness, and pancreatitis, as well as immune-mediated responses (i.e., allergic reactions). Cutaneous ADRs associated with ETV are very rare, with only two case reports in the publicly available literature; both of these cases were classified as unspecified hypersensitivity allergic (type I) ADR, but neither were reported as pathologically proven or as evaluated by cytokine release analysis. Here, we report the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with a generalized maculopapular rash after one week of ETV treatment for lamivudine-resistant CHB. The patient reported having experienced a similar skin eruption during a previous three-month regimen of ETV, for which she had self-discontinued the medication. Histopathological analysis of a skin biopsy showed acanthotic epidermis with focal parakeratosis and a perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate admixed with interstitial eosinophils in the papillary and reticular dermis, consistent with a diagnosis of drug sensitivity. A lymphocyte stimulation test showed significantly enhanced IL-4, indicating a classification of type IVb delayed hypersensitivity. The patient was switched to an adefovir-lamivudine combination regimen and the skin eruption resolved two weeks after the ETV withdrawal. This case represents the first pathologically and immunologically evidenced ETV-induced delayed type hypersensitivity skin reaction reported to date. Physicians should be aware of the potential, although rare

  12. Is montelukast as effective as N-acetylcysteine in hepatic injury due to acetaminophen intoxication in rats?

    PubMed

    İçer, Mustafa; Zengin, Yilmaz; Gunduz, Ercan; Dursun, Recep; Durgun, Hasan Mansur; Turkcu, Gul; Yuksel, Hatice; Üstündağ, Mehmet; Guloglu, Cahfer

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the acute protective effect of montelukast sodium in hepatic injury secondary to acetaminophen (APAP) intoxication. This study used 60 rats. The rats were grouped into 6 groups. The control group was administered oral distilled water 10 ml/kg, the APAP group oral APAP 1 g/kg, the montelukast sodium (MK) group oral MK 30 mg/kg, the acetaminophen+N-acetylcysteine (APAP+NAC) group oral APAP 1 g/kg, followed by a single dose of intraperitoneal NAC 1.5 g/kg three hours later, the acetaminophen+montelukast sodium (APAP+MK) group oral APAP 1 g/kg, followed by oral MK 30 mg/kg 3 h later, the acetaminophen+N-acetylcysteine+montelukast sodium (APAP+NAC+MK) group oral APAP 1 g/kg, followed by a single intraperitoneal NAC 1.5 g/kg plus oral MK 30 mg/kg 3 h later. Blood and liver tissue samples were taken 24h after drug administration. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and total bilirubin were studied from the blood samples. Liver tissue samples were used for histopathological examination. Compared with the control group, serum AST and ALT activities were higher in the APAP and APAP+NAC groups. APAP+NAC, APAP+MK, and APAP+NAC+MK groups had reduced serum ALT and AST activities than the group administered APAP alone. APAP+MK and APAP+NAC+MK groups had a lower serum ALP activity than the control group. Histopathologically, there was a difference between the group administered APAP alone and the APAP+MK and APAP+NAC+MK groups. MK is as protective as NAC in liver tissue in APAP intoxication in rats.

  13. Delayed hypersensitivity reaction resulting in maculopapular-type eruption due to entecavir in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Tae; Jeong, Hye Won; Choi, Ki Hwa; Yoon, Tae Young; Sung, Nohyun; Choi, Young Ki; Kim, Eun Ha; Chae, Hee Bok

    2014-11-14

    Several clinical trials have demonstrated the potent antiviral efficacy of entecavir (ETV), and this relatively new nucleoside analogue drug has rapidly become a frequently prescribed therapy for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) worldwide. While the studies have also shown a good overall safety profile for ETV, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in patients with advanced cirrhosis have been reported and represent a broad spectrum of drug-induced injuries, including lactic acidosis, myalgia, neuropathy, azotemia, hypophosphatemia, muscular weakness, and pancreatitis, as well as immune-mediated responses (i.e., allergic reactions). Cutaneous ADRs associated with ETV are very rare, with only two case reports in the publicly available literature; both of these cases were classified as unspecified hypersensitivity allergic (type I) ADR, but neither were reported as pathologically proven or as evaluated by cytokine release analysis. Here, we report the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with a generalized maculopapular rash after one week of ETV treatment for lamivudine-resistant CHB. The patient reported having experienced a similar skin eruption during a previous three-month regimen of ETV, for which she had self-discontinued the medication. Histopathological analysis of a skin biopsy showed acanthotic epidermis with focal parakeratosis and a perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate admixed with interstitial eosinophils in the papillary and reticular dermis, consistent with a diagnosis of drug sensitivity. A lymphocyte stimulation test showed significantly enhanced IL-4, indicating a classification of type IVb delayed hypersensitivity. The patient was switched to an adefovir-lamivudine combination regimen and the skin eruption resolved two weeks after the ETV withdrawal. This case represents the first pathologically and immunologically evidenced ETV-induced delayed type hypersensitivity skin reaction reported to date. Physicians should be aware of the potential, although rare

  14. YMDD Motif Mutation Profile Among Patients Receiving Liver Transplant Due to Hepatitis B Virus Infection With Long Term Lamivudine/Immunoglobulin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Rahim; Hosseini, Seyed Younes; Fattahi, Mohammad Reza; Sepehrimanesh, Masood; Safarpour, Alireza; Malekhosseini, Seyed Ali; Nejabat, Maryam; Khodadad, Mahboobeh; Ardebili, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recurrence of Hepatitis B Virus infection in patients undergoing liver transplanted (LT) is a serious and often fatal problem. Lamivudine (LAM) and Hepatitis B Immunoglobulin (HBIG) are widely used to manage hepatitis B recurrence after liver transplantation. However, the outcomes in patients are less elucidated. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the YMDD motif mutations profile among the patients undergoing LT infected with HBV and treated with LAM/HBIG at least for one year. Patients and Methods: Thirty patients with liver transplantation due to HBV were enrolled, while DNA level remained under detection limit of 50 IU/mL before transplantation and abnormal higher levels of liver enzymes after LT. The HBV genome detection was performed by two different Polymerase Chain Reaction methods following viral quantification by commercial Real-Time PCR. HbsAg detection, besides liver function tests were conducted as complementary assays. To assess nucleotide analogue mutations, the major part of polymerase gene (aa 80 - 240) was amplified by Nested-PCR, introduced to sequencing and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Results: Totally, according to the laboratory criteria there were 13 cases with detectable HBV genome, while the mean liver enzyme levels were higher in recurrent patients and HBsAg was detected only in four out of the 13 cases. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that all isolated genomes belonged to genotype D. Critical M204I mutation, as a proof for resistance to LAM, was detected among 46% of the subjects and natural entecavir resistance (S202I) was also distinguished in one subject. Viral quantification showed higher titer in LAM resistant group in comparison to the group with undetectable drug resistance mutant (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Although the patients carrying M204I mutation were more likely to show lack of responses to LAM therapy, LAM replacing by other nucleoside/tide analogs plus HBIG maybe still effective in

  15. Wernicke’s Encephalopathy in a Patient with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Law, Huong Ling; Tan, Suzet; Sedi, Rosleena

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of Wernicke’s encephalopathy in a patient with nasopharyngeal carcinoma with a 3-month history of poor oral intake related to nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy. The patient later developed deep coma while receiving in-patient therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed typical findings of Wernicke’s encephalopathy. The patient was treated with thiamine injections, which resulted in subsequent partial recovery of neurological function. This paper stresses the importance of magnetic resonance imaging for prompt diagnosis of Wernicke’s encephalopathy. PMID:22135604

  16. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Hepatitis B » Hepatitis B Entire Lesson Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Hepatitis B Entire Lesson for Veterans and the Public ...

  17. Wernicke’s Encephalopathy: Increasing Clinician Awareness of This Serious, Enigmatic, Yet Treatable Disease

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Alexandra; D’Empaire, Inna; Troutman, Megan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Undiagnosed and/or undertreated Wernicke’s encephalopathy can result in permanent brain damage, long-term institutionalization, and death. The purpose of this article is to heighten clinical awareness of Wernicke’s encephalopathy and shed light on its diagnosis and treatment, which are often inconsistent due to unclear diagnostic criteria and limited practice guidelines. An update on the management of Wernicke’s encephalopathy is presented and several case reports and a quality improvement project from our hospital are described. Data Sources: PubMed, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and PsycINFO were searched for English-language articles published between January 1991 and January 2014 using combinations of the following keywords: Wernicke’s encephalopathy, diagnosis, treatment/guideline(s), and thiamine. Study Selection: The automated search identified over 500 articles. A manual review of the related citations and reference lists from articles of interest was also conducted. The articles reviewed were chosen on the basis of author consensus and because they represented expert opinion or the highest quality of evidence available. Results: Diagnostic criteria are reviewed in this article and should be used to diagnose Wernicke’s encephalopathy with high sensitivity and specificity. The European Federation of Neurologic Societies and the Royal College of Physicians issued national guidelines for the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of Wernicke’s encephalopathy. No benchmark national guidelines for treating Wernicke’s encephalopathy exist in the United States. Conclusions: Whenever Wernicke’s encephalopathy is suspected, treatment should be initiated immediately with intravenous thiamine because oral thiamine is inadequate for preventing permanent brain damage. An adequate dose of intravenous thiamine administrated in a timely manner is a safe and life-saving treatment for Wernicke’s encephalopathy that could preserve

  18. Clinically mild infantile encephalopathy associated with excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Nozomi; Yoshimaru, Daisuke; Moriyama, Yoko; Honda, Takafumi; Yasukawa, Kumi; Takanashi, Jun-Ichi

    2017-02-15

    Acute infectious encephalopathy is very frequently observed in children in East Asia including Japan. Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) is the most common subtype in Japan; however, more than 40% of the patients remain unclassified into specific syndromes. To investigate the underlying pathomechanism in those with unclassified acute encephalopathy, we evaluated brain metabolism by MR spectroscopy. Among 20 patients with acute encephalopathy admitted to our hospital during January 2015 to May 2016, 12 could not be classified into specific syndromes. MR spectroscopy was performed in 8 of these 12 patients with unclassified encephalopathy. MR spectroscopy showed an increase of glutamine with a normal N-acetyl aspartate level on days 3 to 8 in three of the 8 patients, which had normalized by follow-up studies. The three patients clinically recovered completely. This study suggests that excitotoxicity may be the underlying pathomechanism in some patients with unclassified mild encephalopathy.

  19. Preterm Hypoxic–Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gopagondanahalli, Krishna Revanna; Li, Jingang; Fahey, Michael C.; Hunt, Rod W.; Jenkin, Graham; Miller, Suzanne L.; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a recognizable and defined clinical syndrome in term infants that results from a severe or prolonged hypoxic–ischemic episode before or during birth. However, in the preterm infant, defining hypoxic–ischemic injury (HII), its clinical course, monitoring, and outcomes remains complex. Few studies examine preterm HIE, and these are heterogeneous, with variable inclusion criteria and outcomes reported. We examine the available evidence that implies that the incidence of hypoxic–ischemic insult in preterm infants is probably higher than recognized and follows a more complex clinical course, with higher rates of adverse neurological outcomes, compared to term infants. This review aims to elucidate the causes and consequences of preterm hypoxia–ischemia, the subsequent clinical encephalopathy syndrome, diagnostic tools, and outcomes. Finally, we suggest a uniform definition for preterm HIE that may help in identifying infants most at risk of adverse outcomes and amenable to neuroprotective therapies. PMID:27812521

  20. [Wernicke encephalopathy accompanying linitis plastica].

    PubMed

    Soós, Zsuzsanna; Salamon, Mónika; Oláh, Roland; Czégeni, Anna; Salamon, Ferenc; Folyovich, András; Winkler, Gábor

    2014-01-05

    Wernicke encephalopathy (or Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy) is a rarely diagnosed neurological disorder, which is caused by vitamin B1 deficiency. In the classical form it is characterized by a typical triad (confusion, oculomotor disturbance and ataxia), however, in the majority of the cases only confusion is present. It can be frequently observed in subjects with chronic alcohol consumption, but it may accompany different pathological states of which end stage malignant diseases are the most importants, where confusion may have different backgrounds. The authors present the case of an old male patient with advanced gastric cancer recognised and treated vitamin B1 deficiency, and they draw attention to difficulties of the diagnosis of Wernicke's disease.

  1. Serological misdiagnosis of acute liver failure associated with echovirus 25 due to immunological similarities to hepatitis A virus and prozone effect.

    PubMed

    Wollersheim, Susan K; Humphries, Romney M; Cherry, James D; Krogstad, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of acute liver failure caused by echovirus 25 (E25) in a previously healthy 2-year-old boy. Initial serological studies were consistent with hepatitis A virus (HAV), with prozone phenomenon. The similarity of E25 to HAV may obscure accurate diagnosis in some cases of hepatitis.

  2. HEV infection as an aetiologic factor for acute hepatitis: experience from a tertiary hospital in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Mamun-Al-Mahtab; Rahman, Salimur; Khan, Mobin; Karim, Fazal

    2009-02-01

    Acute hepatitis is seen sporadically round the year in Bangladesh. The incidence of acute viral hepatitis E increases after floods as this allows sewerage contamination of piped and groundwater. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the burden of hepatitis E virus (HEV infection) in Bangladesh. Patients attending the Hepatology Unit III of the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, during June 2004-December 2006, were included in the study. All viral markers were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The study population was divided in four groups. Group 1 included 144 patients with acute viral hepatitis. The inclusion criteria were: nausea and/or vomiting, loss of appetite, serum bilirubin >200 micromol/L, raised serum transaminases, and prothrombin time >3 seconds prolonged beyond control value. In Group 2, there were 31 pregnant women with acute viral hepatitis. All the patients had prodrome, icterus, raised serum bilirubin and raised serum transaminase levels. Group 3 included 23 patients presenting with fulminant hepatic failure. In Group 4, 69 patients with cirrhosis of liver were included. They presented with features of decompensation for the first time. The inclusion criteria were: patients with established cirrhosis with jaundice and/or ascites and/or hepatic encephalopathy. In Group 1, 58.33% of the 144 patients had acute viral hepatitis E. In Group 2, 45.16% of the pregnant women also had acute viral hepatitis E. HEV was responsible for 56.52% cases of fulminant hepatic failure in Group 3. In 21.7% cases in Group 4, decompensation of cirrhosis was due to HEV. Acute viral hepatitis E in the third trimester of pregnancy and HEV-induced fulminant hepatic failure were associated with 80% of mortality despite the best possible care. In this clinical context, acute viral hepatitis E is the leading cause of wide spectrum of liver disease ranging from severe acute viral hepatitis, fulminant hepatic failure, to decompensation of liver in

  3. Hepatic parasitosis in two wood mice, Apodemus sylvaticus (Rodentia: Muridae), due to Aonchotheca annulosa (Nematoda: Trichuridae), and Eucoleus bacillatus (Nematoda: Trichuridae). Erratic parasitism or post mortem migration?

    PubMed

    Debenedetti, Ángela L; Sáez-Durán, Sandra; Sainz-Elipe, Sandra; Galán-Puchades, Maria Teresa; Fuentes, Màrius V

    2014-10-01

    Aonchotheca annulosa and Eucoleus bacillatus are two capillariin nematodes parasitizing the intestinal and stomach mucosa, respectively, of various rodent species, and two, among others, component species of the helminth fauna of the wood mouse, Apodemus sylvaticus. A capillariin each was found in the liver parenchyma of two wood mice in a post-fire regeneration enclave in Serra Calderona Natural Park (Valencian Community, Spain). Due to their location, the preliminary identification of the helminths corresponded to Calodium hepaticum, a hepatic capillariin with rodents as its main host. So far, this species had never been found in Serra Calderona. To verify the preliminary identification, a comparative morphometric study between the specimens from Serra Calderona and a preserved individual of C. hepaticum from another enclave was carried out. Morphometric analysis revealed that the adult helminth as well as the eggs found in the liver of the first mouse belonged to A. annulosa, whereas the second one was identified as a male E. bacillatus. Moreover, the liver from both hosts showed a visible pathology, being the consequence of aberrant migration of the parasites. This is the first evidence that A. annulosa and E. bacillatus may migrate erratically and thus produce ectopic foci in other organs.

  4. Acute Budd-Chiari syndrome due to a simple liver cyst.

    PubMed

    Long, J; Vaughan-Williams, H; Moorhouse, J; Sethi, H; Kumar, N

    2014-01-01

    Simple liver cysts are common, rarely causing significant morbidity or mortality. Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is caused by obstruction of hepatic venous outflow and is the leading cause of postsinusoidal liver failure. We present a rare case of BCS caused by a simple hepatic cyst. A 16 cm × 16 cm liver cyst was found on computed tomography of a 66-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain. The cyst had become infected, thus enlarged, exerting mass effect with almost complete compression of the inferior vena cava. Shortly after admission, the patient developed acute liver failure, with deranged clotting and hepatic encephalopathy requiring full organ support on the intensive care unit. Cardiac output studies showed a low cardiac index of 1.4 l/min/m(2). An emergency laparotomy with fenestration of the cyst and drainage of 2l of purulent material led to a full recovery. Intraoperative cystic fluid aspirates later confirmed no evidence of Echinococcus. Histology confirmed a simple cyst. Liver biopsies showed severe, confluent, bridging necrosis, without background parenchymal liver disease. Acute BCS due to rapid compression of all major hepatic veins leading to fulminant hepatic failure is rare. Our case highlights a clinically significant complication of a simple liver cyst of which clinicians should be aware when managing these 'innocent' lesions.

  5. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A Hepatitis A Hepatitis A is a contagious viral infection that can easily affect children and adults. It is one of the most common types of hepatitis virus. Often when you hear about hepatitis A ...

  6. Hashimoto's encephalopathy in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Erol, Ilknur; Saygi, Semra; Alehan, Füsun

    2011-12-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is an underdiagnosed, steroid-responsive, progressive or relapsing encephalopathy associated with high titers of serum antithyroid antibodies. Although Hashimoto's encephalopathy is well documented in adults, it is rarely observed or studied in children and adolescents. We describe the clinical and laboratory findings of four children (aged 9-15 years) with Hashimoto's encephalopathy. The clinical features of two patients at presentation included epileptic seizures and confusion. The other presenting signs included breath-holding spells, behavioral problems, psychosis, and ataxia (one patient each). During their presentation, three patients were euthyroid, and one was hyperthyroid. All patients manifested increased antithyroid antibodies, and all improved with steroid treatment. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is rarely suspected at presentation. Therefore, greater awareness of its signs by clinicians is necessary for proper diagnoses.

  7. Hepatitis C virus and neurological damage

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Shilu; Faheem, Muhammed; Ibrahim, Sara M; Iqbal, Waqas; Rauff, Bisma; Fatima, Kaneez; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection exhibits a wide range of extrahepatic complications, affecting various organs in the human body. Numerous HCV patients suffer neurological manifestations, ranging from cognitive impairment to peripheral neuropathy. Overexpression of the host immune response leads to the production of immune complexes, cryoglobulins, as well as autoantibodies, which is a major pathogenic mechanism responsible for nervous system dysfunction. Alternatively circulating inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and HCV replication in neurons is another factor that severely affects the nervous system. Furthermore, HCV infection causes both sensory and motor peripheral neuropathy in the mixed cryoglobulinemia as well as known as an important risk aspect for stroke. These extrahepatic manifestations are the reason behind underlying hepatic encephalopathy and chronic liver disease. The brain is an apt location for HCV replication, where the HCV virus may directly wield neurotoxicity. Other mechanisms that takes place by chronic HCV infection due the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders includes derangement of metabolic pathways of infected cells, autoimmune disorders, systemic or cerebral inflammation and alterations in neurotransmitter circuits. HCV and its pathogenic role is suggested by enhancement of psychiatric and neurological symptoms in patients attaining a sustained virologic response followed by treatment with interferon; however, further studies are required to fully assess the impact of HCV infection and its specific antiviral targets associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27134702

  8. Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome presenting with encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Naeini, Alireza E.; Daneshmand, Dana; Khorvash, Farzin; Chitsaz, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) is a rare syndrome affecting tissues containing melanocytes. The possibility of its autoimmune pathogenesis is supported by high frequent HLA-DR4 presentation, commonly associated with other autoimmune diseases. Eyes are the main affected organs, resulting in blindness. Brain disease is a late-onset event, and is extremely rare. Here, we are reporting a 57-year-old woman, a known case of VKH syndrome, presenting with brain encephalopathy several decades after the initial presentation. We think this long period between initial presentation and presentation of encephalopathy due to VKH syndrome has not been described before. She was treated with corticosteroids and discharged home with a good general condition. PMID:24753681

  9. Unusually Prolonged Presentation of Designer Drug Encephalopathy Responsive to Steroids.

    PubMed

    Albadareen, Rawan; Thornton, Stephen; Heshmati, Arezou; Gerona, Roy; Lowry, Jennifer

    2015-07-01

    The availability and use of novel psychoactive substances has risen dramatically over the last decade. The unpredictability of their toxicity constitutes a real challenge. We report a case of an adolescent who developed prolonged encephalopathy after ingesting "Hot Molly," which was found to contain the novel psychoactive substance, methylenedioxybenzylpiperazine when analyzed by high resolution mass spectrometry assay. This is the first case of human toxicity from methylenedioxybenzylpiperazine ingestion in the medical literature confirmed by body fluid analysis presenting with significant and prolonged encephalopathy. The prolonged course may be due to CYP2D6 inhibition from a combination of the methylenedioxyphenyl moiety and the patient's ultrarapid metabolizer pharmacokinetics. The response to high dose corticosteroids suggests a possible inflammatory effect that warrants further investigation.

  10. Laboratory activities involving transmissible spongiform encephalopathy causing agents

    PubMed Central

    Leunda, Amaya; Van Vaerenbergh, Bernadette; Baldo, Aline; Roels, Stefan; Herman, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Since the appearance in 1986 of epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a new form of neurological disease in cattle which also affected human beings, many diagnostic and research activities have been performed to develop detection and therapeutic tools. A lot of progress was made in better identifying, understanding and controlling the spread of the disease by appropriate monitoring and control programs in European countries. This paper reviews the recent knowledge on pathogenesis, transmission and persistence outside the host of prion, the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) in mammals with a particular focus on risk (re)assessment and management of biosafety measures to be implemented in diagnostic and research laboratories in Belgium. Also, in response to the need of an increasing number of European diagnostic laboratories stopping TSE diagnosis due to a decreasing number of TSE cases reported in the last years, decontamination procedures and a protocol for decommissioning TSE diagnostic laboratories is proposed. PMID:24055928

  11. The EEG of tropical encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Mallewa, Macpherson; Birbeck, Gretchen L

    2013-10-01

    In addition to encountering most of the conditions treated by clinicians in the West, clinicians in the tropics are faced with unique tropical encephalopathies. These are largely but not entirely infectious in nature. Despite the relatively low cost of EEG technology, it remains unavailable in many low-income tropical settings even at the tertiary care level. Where available, the EEG recordings and interpretation are often of unacceptable quality. Nonetheless, there are existing data on the EEG patterns seen in malaria and a number of tropical viral, bacterial, and parasitic infestations.

  12. [Wernicke encephalopathy in alcoholic patients].

    PubMed

    Chamorro Fernández, A J; Marcos Martín, M; Laso Guzmán, F J

    2011-10-01

    A 67-year old male was brought to the hospital by his family because he had been suffering from somnolence, bradypsychia and gait disturbance for one week. He lived alone, reported an ethanol intake higher than 100-120 g/day. His diet was limited in quality and amount. The physical examination showed stigmata of chronic liver disease. The neurological exam revealed right-side cerebellar tremor, bilateral dysmetria and gait ataxia as well as hyporeflexia in the lower limbs. He was diagnosed of Wernicke encephalopathy. How should this patient be evaluated and treated?

  13. Endogenous benzodiazepine-like compounds and diazepam binding inhibitor in serum of patients with liver cirrhosis with and without overt encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Avallone, R; Zeneroli, M; Venturini, I; Corsi, L; Schreier, P; Kleinschnitz, M; Ferrarese, C; Farina, F; Baraldi, C; Pecora, N; Frigo, M; Baraldi, M

    1998-01-01

    Background/Aim—Despite some controversy, it has been suggested that endogenous benzodiazepine plays a role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the concentrations of endogenous benzodiazepines and the peptide, diazepam binding inhibitor, in the blood of patients with liver cirrhosis with and without overt encephalopathy, and to compare these levels with those of consumers of commercial benzodiazepines. 
Subjects—Normal subjects (90), benzodiazepine consumers (14), and cirrhotic patients (113) were studied. 
Methods—Endogenous benzodiazepines were measured by the radioligand binding technique after high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) purification. The presence of diazepam and N-desmethyldiazepam was assayed by HPLC-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Diazepam binding inhibitor was studied in serum by radioimmunoassay. 
Results—Endogenous benzodiazepines were below the limit of detection in 7% of patients with encephalopathy. When detectable, their levels were at least comparable with those of benzodiazepine consumers and correlated with the liver dysfunction but not the stage of encephalopathy. Serum levels of diazepam binding inhibitor tended to decrease when endogenous benzodiazepines levels increased. 
Conclusions—Endogenous benzodiazepines may accumulate in patients with liver cirrhosis during the course of the disease, and the phenomenon appears to be independent of the presence or absence of encephalopathy. 

 Keywords: benzodiazepine consumers; diazepam binding inhibitor; endogenous benzodiazepines; liver cirrhosis; overt hepatic encephalopathy PMID:9691927

  14. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... Châu và vùng Thái Bình Dương Hepatitis C Hepatitis C What is hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a viral infection that ... can cure most cases of hepatitis C. Acute hepatitis C Acute hepatitis C is a short-term ...

  15. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Châu và vùng Thái Bình Dương Hepatitis C Hepatitis A What is hepatitis A? Hepatitis A is a viral infection that ... spreading hepatitis A to others . How common is hepatitis A? In the United States, hepatitis A has ...

  16. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Châu và vùng Thái Bình Dương Hepatitis C Hepatitis B What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a viral infection that ... to prevent spreading hepatitis B to others . Acute hepatitis B Acute hepatitis B is a short-term ...

  17. Defining encephalopathy in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Fridinger, S E; Alper, Gulay

    2014-06-01

    The International Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group requires the presence of encephalopathy to diagnose acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Clinical characteristics of encephalopathy are inadequately delineated in the pediatric demyelinating literature. The authors' purpose was to better define encephalopathy in pediatric acute disseminated encephalomyelitis by describing the details of the mental status change. A retrospective chart review was conducted for 25 children diagnosed with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis according to the International Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group guidelines. Frequency of encephalopathy-defining features was determined. Clinical characteristics, cerebrospinal fluid findings, and electroencephalography (EEG) findings were compared between patients with different stages of encephalopathy. The authors found irritability (36%), sleepiness (52%), confusion (8%), obtundation (20%), and coma (16%) as encephalopathy-defining features in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Twenty-eight percent had seizures, and 65% demonstrated generalized slowing on EEG. Approximately half of the patients in this study were diagnosed with encephalopathy based on the presence of irritability and/or sleepiness only. Such features in young children are often subtle and transient and thus difficult to objectively determine.

  18. Encephalopathy in Wilson Disease: Copper Toxicity or Liver Failure?

    PubMed Central

    Ferenci, Peter; Litwin, Tomasz; Seniow, Joanna; Czlonkowska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complex syndrome of neurological and psychiatric signs and symptoms that is caused by portosystemic venous shunting with or without liver disease irrespective of its etiology. The most common presentation of Wilson disease (WD) is liver disease and is frequently associated with a wide spectrum of neurological and psychiatric symptoms. The genetic defect in WD leads to copper accumulation in the liver and later in other organs including the brain. In a patient presenting with Wilsonian cirrhosis neuropsychiatric symptoms may be caused either by the metabolic consequences of liver failure or by copper toxicity. Thus, in clinical practice a precise diagnosis is a great challenge. Contrary to HE in neurological WD consciousness, is very rarely disturbed and pyramidal signs, myoclonus dominate. Asterixis and many other clinical symptoms may be present in both disease conditions and are quite similar. However details of neurological assessment as well as additional examinations could help in differential diagnosis. PMID:26041965

  19. Management and investigation of neonatal encephalopathy: 2017 update.

    PubMed

    Martinello, Kathryn; Hart, Anthony R; Yap, Sufin; Mitra, Subhabrata; Robertson, Nicola J

    2017-04-06

    This review discusses an approach to determining the cause of neonatal encephalopathy, as well as current evidence on resuscitation and subsequent management of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE). Encephalopathy in neonates can be due to varied aetiologies in addition to hypoxic-ischaemia. A combination of careful history, examination and the judicious use of investigations can help determine the cause. Over the last 7 years, infants with moderate to severe HIE have benefited from the introduction of routine therapeutic hypothermia; the number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome is 7 (95% CI 5 to 10). More recent research has focused on optimal resuscitation practices for babies with cardiorespiratory depression, such as delayed cord clamping after establishment of ventilation and resuscitation in air. Around a quarter of infants with asystole at 10 min after birth who are subsequently cooled have normal outcomes, suggesting that individualised decision making on stopping resuscitation is needed, based on access to intensive treatment unit and early cooling. The full benefit of cooling appears to have been exploited in our current treatment protocols of 72 hours at 33.5°C; deeper and longer cooling showed adverse outcome. The challenge over the next 5-10 years will be to assess which adjunct therapies are safe and optimise hypothermic brain protection in phase I and phase II trials. Optimal care may require tailoring treatments according to gender, genetic risk, injury severity and inflammatory status.

  20. Early myoclonic epileptic encephalopathy (E.M.E.E.).

    PubMed

    Dalla Bernardina, B; Dulac, O; Fejerman, N; Dravet, C; Capovilla, G; Bondavalli, S; Colamaria, V; Roger, J

    1983-01-01

    The authors describe the electroclinical aspects and evolution of nine cases of myoclonic epileptic encephalopathy which began between two days and ten weeks of life. At onset it is associated with: myoclonic jerks, partial fits and periodic paroxysmal EEG abnormalities. Repeated spasms coexisting with partial fits and 'suppression-bursts' (both appearing later) complete the electroclinical picture. The neurological status (initially normal) progressively deteriorates leading within a few months to a decerebrate posture with opisthotonos. In spite of thorough neuroradiological, biochemical, cytological, metabolic, and ultrastructural investigations, the etiology remained unknown. However, the electroclinical and evolutive patterns are similar to those of some metabolic diseases (Polyodystrophy, Non-Ketotic Hyperglycinemia, etc.). All these observations display a homogeneous electroclinical pattern for which the authors propose the name of Early Myoclonic Epileptic Encephalopathy. This type deserves to be classified as a particular electroclinical entity among the epileptic encephalopathies of the first year of life; since its course is regularly downhill in all cases there may be a familial recurrence due to the possibility of a metabolic etiology.

  1. Fetal and neonatal exposure to nicotine leads to augmented hepatic and circulating triglycerides in adult male offspring due to increased expression of fatty acid synthase.

    PubMed

    Ma, Noelle; Nicholson, Catherine J; Wong, Michael; Holloway, Alison C; Hardy, Daniel B

    2014-02-15

    While nicotine replacement therapy is assumed to be a safer alternative to smoking during pregnancy, the long-term consequences for the offspring remain elusive. Animal studies now suggest that maternal nicotine exposure during perinatal life leads to a wide range of adverse outcomes for the offspring including increased adiposity. The focus of this study was to investigate if nicotine exposure during pregnancy and lactation leads to alterations in hepatic triglyceride synthesis. Female Wistar rats were randomly assigned to receive daily subcutaneous injections of saline (vehicle) or nicotine bitartrate (1mg/kg/day) for two weeks prior to mating until weaning. At postnatal day 180 (PND 180), nicotine exposed offspring exhibited significantly elevated levels of circulating and hepatic triglycerides in the male offspring. This was concomitant with increased expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS), the critical hepatic enzyme in de novo triglyceride synthesis. Given that FAS is regulated by the nuclear receptor Liver X receptor (LXRα), we measured LXRα expression in both control and nicotine-exposed offspring. Nicotine exposure during pregnancy and lactation led to an increase in hepatic LXRα protein expression and enriched binding to the putative LXRE element on the FAS promoter in PND 180 male offspring. This was also associated with significantly enhanced acetylation of histone H3 [K9,14] surrounding the FAS promoter, a hallmark of chromatin activation. Collectively, these findings suggest that nicotine exposure during pregnancy and lactation leads to an increase in circulating and hepatic triglycerides long-term via changes in the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of the hepatic lipogenic pathway.

  2. Clinical and Neuroradiological Spectrum of Metronidazole Induced Encephalopathy: Our Experience and the Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Panwar, Ajay; Pandit, Alak; Das, Susanta Kumar; Joshi, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Metronidazole is an antimicrobial agent mainly used in the treatment of several protozoal and anaerobic infections, additionally, is often used in hepatic encephalopathy and Crohn disease. Apart from peripheral neuropathy, metronidazole can also cause symptoms of central nervous system dysfunction like ataxic gait, dysarthria, seizures, and encephalopathy which may result from both short term and chronic use of this drug and is collectively termed as “metronidazole induced encephalopathy”(MIE). Neuroimaging forms the backbone in clinching the diagnosis of this uncommon entity, especially in cases where there is high index of suspicion of intoxication. Although typical sites of involvement include cerebellum, brain stem and corpus callosum, however, lesions of other sites have also been reported. Once diagnosed, resolution of findings on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the Brain along with clinical improvement remains the mainstay of monitoring. Here we review the key clinical features and MRI findings of MIE as reported in medical literature. We also analyze implication of use of this drug in special situations like hepatic encephalopathy and brain abscess and discuss our experience regarding this entity. PMID:27504340

  3. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy: Atypical Pros and Cons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal neurologic diseases that affect several mammalian species including human beings. Four animal TSE agents have been reported: scrapie of sheep and goats; chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk, and moose; transmissible mink encephalopath...

  4. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: The unknown disease.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, R; Paredes, I; Munarriz, P M; Paredes, B; Alén, J F

    2017-04-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a neurodegenerative disease produced by accumulated minor traumatic brain injuries; no definitive premortem diagnosis and no treatments are available for chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Risk factors associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy include playing contact sports, presence of the apolipoprotein E4, and old age. Although it shares certain histopathological findings with Alzheimer disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy has a more specific presentation (hyperphosphorylated tau protein deposited as neurofibrillary tangles, associated with neuropil threads and sometimes with beta-amyloid plaques). Its clinical presentation is insidious; patients show mild cognitive and emotional symptoms before progressing to parkinsonian motor signs and finally dementia. Results from new experimental diagnostic tools are promising, but these tools are not yet available. The mainstay of managing this disease is prevention and early detection of its first symptoms.

  5. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jan-Shun; Chang, Tien-Chun

    2014-11-01

    Both severe thyrotoxicosis and hypothyroidism may affect brain function and cause a change in consciousness, as seen with a thyroid storm or myxedema coma. However, encephalopathy may also develop in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases independent of actual thyroid function level, and this is known as Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Although most patients are found to have Hashimoto's thyroiditis, less frequently they have Graves' disease. Clinical manifestations include epilepsy, disturbance of consciousness, cognitive impairment, memory loss, myoclonus, hallucinations, stroke-like episodes, tremor, involuntary movements, language impairment, and gait impairment. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a relatively rare disease. As a good response can be obtained with corticosteroid therapy, early diagnosis and treatment is very beneficial for patients. Here we report three patients with Hashimoto's encephalopathy with typical manifestations of hallucinations that were associated with hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and euthyroid status, respectively. They all showed a dramatic response to methylprednisolone pulse therapy.

  6. [Cortexin effectiveness in circulatory encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Morozov, V G; Rybnikov, V Iu; Zakutskiĭ, N G

    1999-01-01

    A clinical trial of cortexin, a new peptide bioregulator of cerebral functions, in combined therapy of dyscirculatory encephalopathy (DE) stage I-II was made in 76 patients. They were divided into two groups: a control group of 31 patients on standard therapy and the study group of 45 patients on standard therapy with adjuvant cortexin delivered via nasal electrophoresis (NE). The effect was estimated by clinical symptoms, psychophysiological tests, computed EEG, quantitative parameters of rehabilitation. Cortexin NE produced a positive effect on psychoemotional state, neurological status, intellectual-mnestic and CNS functions. Adjuvant cortexin aroused efficiency of rehabilitation in DE stage I and II by 22.7%. The response of intellectual-mnestic and CNS functions was the highest. Cortexin improves attention, perception, memory, thinking, cortical neurodynamic processes. It is well tolerated and has no side effects. Cortexin is recommended as a drug of choice in combined treatment of patients with DE stage I-II.

  7. Encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle or group of muscles), nystagmus (rapid, involuntary eye movement), tremor, muscle atrophy and weakness, dementia, seizures, and ... muscle or group of muscles), nystagmus (rapid, involuntary eye movement), tremor, muscle atrophy and weakness, dementia, seizures, and ...

  8. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » For Veterans and the Public Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... the Public Veterans and Public Home How is Hepatitis C Treated? Find the facts about the newest ...

  9. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cholangitis Wilson Disease Liver Disease A-Z Autoimmune Hepatitis What is autoimmune hepatitis? Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic—or long lasting— ... bacteria, viruses, toxins, and medications. What causes autoimmune hepatitis? A combination of autoimmunity, environmental triggers, and a ...

  10. Cognitive Outcomes After Neonatal Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Seetha; McDonald, Scott A.; Vohr, Betty R.; Hintz, Susan R.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Tyson, Jon E.; Yolton, Kimberly; Das, Abhik; Bara, Rebecca; Hammond, Jane; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the spectrum of cognitive outcomes of children with and without cerebral palsy (CP) after neonatal encephalopathy, evaluate the prognostic value of early developmental testing and report on school services and additional therapies. METHODS: The participants of this study are the school-aged survivors of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network randomized controlled trial of whole-body hypothermia. Children underwent neurologic examinations and neurodevelopmental and cognitive testing with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development–II at 18 to 22 months and the Wechsler intelligence scales and the Neuropsychological Assessment–Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment at 6 to 7 years. Parents were interviewed about functional status and receipt of school and support services. We explored predictors of cognitive outcome by using multiple regression models. RESULTS: Subnormal IQ scores were identified in more than a quarter of the children: 96% of survivors with CP had an IQ <70, 9% of children without CP had an IQ <70, and 31% had an IQ of 70 to 84. Children with a mental developmental index <70 at 18 months had, on average, an adjusted IQ at 6 to 7 years that was 42 points lower than that of those with a mental developmental index >84 (95% confidence interval, −49.3 to −35.0; P < .001). Twenty percent of children with normal IQ and 28% of those with IQ scores of 70 to 84 received special educational support services or were held back ≥1 grade level. CONCLUSIONS: Cognitive impairment remains an important concern for all children with neonatal encephalopathy. PMID:25713280

  11. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  12. Direct acting inhibitors of ammoniagenesis: a role in post-TIPS encephalopathy?

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Nitin K; Ally, Winston A; Caldwell, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    A limited number of medications are typically considered for the management of hepatic encephalopathy occurring as a complication of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement. Multiple alternative compounds aimed at disrupting ammoniagenesis are or will soon be available, though their use tends to be limited by a lack of large data sets and of clinical awareness. In this review, we provide a targeted overview of the mechanisms and availability of five anti-ammoniagenic compounds (sodium phenylbutyrate, glycerol phenylbutyrate, sodium benzoate, L-ornithine L-aspartate, and ornithine phenylacetate) identified as possibly useful alternative therapeutic agents for cirrhotic encephalopathy. Three of these medications have been FDA approved for use in congenital urea cycle disorders only, while two are under active investigation for use in cirrhotic patients. In spite of limitations posed by cost and comorbidities, familiarity with these options may prove beneficial in cases refractory to conventional management.

  13. Steroid-responsive Encephalopathy Subsequently Associated with Alzheimer Disease Pathology: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Mateen, Farrah J.; Josephs, Keith A.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Drubach, Daniel A.; Caselli, Richard J.; Kantarci, Kejal; Lennon, Vanda; Jack, Clifford; Boeve, Bradley F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Steroid-responsive encephalopathies can considered vasculitic or nonvasculitic. Clinicopathological studies of nonvasculitic steroid-responsive encephalopathy are unusual, but can explain the range of diagnoses consistent with a steroid responsive presentation in life. Objective To extend the range of clinical features and pathological findings consistent with steroid-responsive encephalopathy. Design, Methods, and Patients A clinicopathological case series of four patients (ages 54–71 years, 2 women) with steroid-responsive encephalopathy followed at this institution until the time of death. Results Clinical features were suggestive of Creutzfeld-Jakob disease, dementia with Lewy Bodies, and parkinsonism, but pathological examination revealed only Alzheimer’s Disease-related findings without evidence of Lewy bodies or prion disease in all cases. All patients demonstrated marked, sustained improvement following steroid treatment, based on clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and/or electroencephalogram studiesAlzheimer’s Disease was not diagnosed in life due to a lack of hippocampal atrophy on brain imaging and a dramatic symptomatic response to steroids. Conclusions Steroid-responsive encephalopathy is the clinical presentation of some patients with Alzheimer’s Disease related pathology at autopsy, and can be consistent with the clinical diagnoses of parkisonism, dementia with Lewy Bodies, or Creutzfeld-Jakob Disease in life. PMID:21714739

  14. Acute hepatic encephalopathy presenting as cortical laminar necrosis: case report.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong Mun; Kim, Yoon Hee; Roh, Sook Young

    2013-01-01

    We report on a 55-year-old man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis who presented with status epilepticus. Laboratory analysis showed markedly elevated blood ammonia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed widespread cortical signal changes with restricted diffusion, involving both temporo-fronto-parietal cortex, while the perirolandic regions and occipital cortex were uniquely spared. A follow-up brain MRI demonstrated diffuse cortical atrophy with increased signals on T1-weighted images in both the basal ganglia and temporal lobe cortex, representing cortical laminar necrosis. We suggest that the brain lesions, in our case, represent a consequence of toxic effect of ammonia.

  15. Fulminant liver failure model with hepatic encephalopathy in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Tomohide; Chen, Feng; Baine, Ann-Marie T.; Gardner, Lindsay B.; Nguyen, Justin H.

    2011-01-01

    Aim To develop a reliable murine model for fulminant liver failure (FLF). Material and Methods We treated three groups of male C57BL/6 mice:as controls, with azoxymethane (AOM), and with galactosamine (Gal) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα). Effects of body temperature (BT) control on survival, in all three groups were investigated. Using BT control, survival, histopathological findings and biochemical/coagulation profiles were compared between the experimental groups. Effects of hydration on international normalized ratios of prothrombin time (PT-INR) were also checked. Dose-dependent survival curves were made for both experimental groups. Neurological behaviors were assessed using a coma scale. Results No unexpected BT effects were seen in the control group. The AOM group, but not the Gal+TNFα group, showed significant differences in survival curves between those with and without BT care. Histopathological assessment showed consistent FLF findings in both experimental groups with BT care. Between the experimental groups, there were significant differences in aspartate aminotransferase levels and PT-INR; and significant differences in PT-INRs between sufficiently- and insufficiently-hydrated groups. There were significant differences between FLF models, in the duration of each coma stage, with significant differences in stages 1 and 3 as percentages of the diseased state (stages 1-4). The two FLF models with BT care showed different survival curves in the dose-dependent survival study. Conclusion Azoxymethane can provide a good FLF model, but requires a specialized environment and careful BT control. Other FLF models may also be useful, depending on research purpose. Thoughtful attention to caregiving and close observation are indispensable for successful FLF models. PMID:24713795

  16. Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy: The Reality Beyond Our Eyes.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Mara; Marinho, Carla; Mota, Paula; Cotter, José

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: A encefalopatia hepática mínima define-se como um défice neurocognitivo ligeiro, não detectável ao exame clínico, que pode estar presente nos doentes cirróticos. Objectivo: Determinar a prevalência da encefalopatia hepática mínima num hospital prestador de cuidados de saúde secundários no Norte de Portugal. Material e Métodos: Realizou-se um estudo transversal em que foram incluídos os doentes cirróticos seguidos na consulta externa. Critérios de exclusão: encefalopatia hepática clínica, iliteracia, consumo activo de álcool e terapêutica com fármacos psicotrópicos ou lactulose. A presença de encefalopatia hepática mínima foi definida como um valor ≥ -4 na Pontuação Psicométrica da Encefalopatia Hepática, calculado de acordo com as normas portuguesas. Analisaram-se as variáveis: etiologia e gravidade da doença hepática e concentração da amónia sanguínea venosa. Considerou-se o valor de p < 0,05 como significativo. Resultados: Dos 102 doentes avaliados, 41 foram incluídos: 31 homens, idade média de 57 ± 10 anos, escolaridade média de 5 ± 2 anos, 31 Child-Pugh classe A, score MELD médio de 6 ± 3. Foi diagnosticada encefalopatia hepática mínima em 14 (34%) doentes. A presença de encefalopatia hepática mínima não se relacionou com a gravidade da doença hepática. Apesar de mais elevado, o valor médio da concentração da amónia venosa nos doentes com encefalopatia hepática mínima não foi significativamente diferente do valor médio da concentração da amónia venosa nos doentes sem encefalopatia hepática mínima (48,5 ± 13,3 vs. 45,6 ± 15,6 μmol/L, p = 0,555). Discussão: A prevalência da encefalopatia hepática mínima descrita está de acordo com os dados internacionais. Conclusão: A encefalopatia hepática mínima é uma entidade frequente que está presente precocemente na história natural da cirrose, mesmo em doentes compensados. Consequentemente, esta condição escondida deve ser activamente procurada e os doentes devidamente orientados após o diagnóstico.

  17. Leucine metabolism in cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether increased oxidation of or protein synthesis requiring leucine occurs in cirrhotic patients. Five control subjects and four subjects with cirrhosis were equilibrated on a baseline diet (0.6 g protein per kg ideal body weight (IBW)) with sufficient nonprotein calories to preclude negative nitrogen balance. An additional four patients were equilibrated on the same type of diet with a higher protein level (0.75 g per kg IBW). Control subjects and the patients were then studied during continuous infusion of L-(/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C) leucine in the fasted state and, in the fed state, with a Propac diet which had the same distribution of energy nutrients as the baseline diets. Plasma levels of L-(/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C), L-(1-/sup 13/C) and L-(/sup 15/N) leucine were measured during isotopic steady state by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and fractional excretion of /sup 13/CO/sup 2/ in breath samples were analyzed by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry. During the fasted and fed states leucine metabolism was measured to quantitate rates of nitrogen flux (Q/sub N/), carbon flux (Q/sub c/) and oxidation to carbon dioxide and water (C). From these measured values, proteins breakdown (B), protein synthesis (S), deamination (X/sup 0/) and reamination (X/sub N/) were calculated. The results showed that protein synthesis and leucine metabolism were identical in controls and patients when both were fed a diet with 0.6 g protein/kg IBW and maintenance level of nonprotein calories. The data also showed that leucine metabolism can be quantitatively and reproducibly measured in subjects with cirrhosis.

  18. [Analysis of the complete hepatitis B virus genomes in a patient for repeated seroconversion to anti-HBe antibody due to co-infection with two virus clones].

    PubMed

    Yukimasa, Nobuyasu; Uzawa, Ryuichi; Fukuchi, Kunihiko

    2012-04-01

    We report a case of repeated seroconversion to anti-HBe antibody in a patient with chronic hepatitis B. We amplified and cloned sections of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and sequenced the PCR products. The results were analyzed by connecting all of the sequences to generate complete genomes. As a result, we confirmed the coexistence of two different HBV clones, both of which had the same subtype (adr) and genotype (C2). Neither clone had mutations in the S gene region in sequences involved in gene expression or in sequences involved in drug resistance. However, both clones had mutations in the core promoter(A1762T, G1764A). In one HBe antibody-positive clone, a pre-core mutation associated with HBe antigen negativity (G1896A) was found. In addition, pre-S2 deletion and 6 amino acid substitutions in the core protein gene were detected in this clone. The other HBe antigen-positive clone was essentially wild-type. Interestingly, this clone had accumulated mutations, which participated in DNA polymerase inactivation in the P gene region. Therefore, it is expected that this clone cannot replicate its own DNA polymerase. Consequently, this repeated seroconversion phenomenon was suggested to be responsible for the observed findings. In conclusion, analysis of the complete HBV genome has greatly expanded the number of mutations identified, and this method is useful for understanding the causes of rare cases of hepatitis B.

  19. Reflex gelastic-dacrystic seizures following hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Praharaj, Heramba Narayan

    2013-07-12

    Reflex or stimulus-sensitive epilepsies are uncommon epileptic syndromes triggered by exogenous-specific sensory stimulus or endogenous various mental activities. Gelastic-dacrystic seizures are rare epileptic manifestations characterised by ictal laughter and crying. Gelastic-dacrystic seizures are commonly caused by hypothalamic hamartoma but rarely described due to cortical dysplasia, lesions of frontal and temporal lobes, tumours and vascular malformations. We report a young woman who presented with somatosensory-evoked gelastic-dacrystic seizures. This patient had a positive history of perinatal insult substantiated by MRI findings. Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy as the cause of gelastic-dacrystic seizures has not been reported so far in the literature.

  20. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in a Postpartum Preeclamptic Woman without Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Ural, Ülkü Mete; Balik, Gülsah; Şentürk, Şenol; Üstüner, Işık; Çobanoğlu, Uğur; Şahin, Figen Kır

    2014-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a cliniconeuroradiological entity presenting with headache, confusion, visual disturbances or blindness, and seizures. Parieto-occipital white matter changes due to vasogenic oedema can be observed on imaging modalities. It rarely occurs without seizures and after delivery. We report a 33-year-old multigravida with a history of preeclampsia in term pregnancy complicated by PRES without seizures at the postpartum period. Clinical improvement with complete resolution without any complications was observed on the 6th day after delivery. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is reversible when early diagnosis is established and appropriate treatment is started without delay. PMID:24592342

  1. Wernicke's encephalopathy and anabolic steroid drug abuse. Is there any possible relation?

    PubMed Central

    Christopoulos, P; Katsanoulas, C; Timplalexi, G; Lathyris, D; Vasiliagkou, S; Antoniadou, E

    2012-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a reversible, neurologic disorder due to thiamine deficiency which is mainly related to chronic alcohol abuse. We report a case of a young male patient, who was bodybuilder and anabolic drug user, in whom encephalopathy was diagnosed after a short medical course in the ICU after a major upper gastrointestinal bleeding (Mallory-Weiss syndrome) and hypovolemic shock. His clinical condition was typical for Wernicke's encephalopathy and although neuroimaging tests were not indicative, the patient received thiamine supplement therapy, which resulted in rapid clinical improvement. The diagnosis was based only on clinical sings and anabolic drug abuse was considered as a possible predisposing factor for the manifestation of the syndrome. PMID:23935320

  2. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or Mad Cow Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or Mad Cow Disease Note: Javascript is ... gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy) is a progressive neurological disorder of cattle that ...

  3. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Mimicking Acute Onset Stroke Diagnosed by CT Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Rajiv; Kurz, Kathinka D.; Kurz, Martin W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Metabolic syndromes such as Wernicke's encephalopathy may present with a sudden neurological deficit, thus mimicking acute onset stroke. Due to current emphasis on rapid admission and treatment of acute stroke patients, there is a significant risk that these stroke mimics may end up being treated with thrombolysis. Rigorous clinical and radiological skills are necessary to correctly identify such metabolic stroke mimics, in order to avoid doing any harm to these patients due to the unnecessary use of thrombolysis. Patient. A 51-year-old Caucasian male was admitted to our hospital with suspicion of an acute stroke due to sudden onset dysarthria and unilateral facial nerve paresis. Clinical examination revealed confusion and dysconjugate gaze. Computed tomography (CT) including a CT perfusion (CTP) scan revealed bilateral thalamic hyperperfusion. The use of both clinical and radiological findings led to correctly diagnosing Wernicke's encephalopathy. Conclusion. The application of CTP as a standard diagnostic tool in acute stroke patients can improve the detection of stroke mimics caused by metabolic syndromes as shown in our case report. PMID:24716022

  4. Hashimoto's encephalopathy : epidemiology, pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Mocellin, Ramon; Walterfang, Mark; Velakoulis, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a term used to describe an encephalopathy of presumed autoimmune origin characterised by high titres of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies. In a similar fashion to autoimmune thyroid disease, Hashimoto's encephalopathy is more common in women than in men. It has been reported in paediatric, adult and elderly populations throughout the world. The clinical presentation may involve a relapsing and remitting course and include seizures, stroke-like episodes, cognitive decline, neuropsychiatric symptoms and myoclonus. Thyroid function is usually clinically and biochemically normal.Hashimoto's encephalopathy appears to be a rare disorder, but, as it is responsive to treatment with corticosteroids, it must be considered in cases of 'investigation negative encephalopathies'. Diagnosis is made in the first instance by excluding other toxic, metabolic and infectious causes of encephalopathy with neuroimaging and CSF examination. Neuroimaging findings are often not helpful in clarifying the diagnosis. Common differential diagnoses when these conditions are excluded are Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, rapidly progressive dementias, and paraneoplastic and nonparaneoplastic limbic encephalitis. In the context of the typical clinical picture, high titres of antithyroid antibodies, in particular antithyroid peroxidase antibodies, are diagnostic. These antibodies, however, can be detected in elevated titres in the healthy general population. Treatment with corticosteroids is almost always successful, although relapse may occur if this treatment is ceased abruptly. Other forms of immunomodulation, such as intravenous immune-globulin and plasma exchange, may also be effective. Despite the link to autoimmune thyroid disease, the aetiology of Hashimoto's encephalopathy is unknown. It is likely that antithyroid antibodies are not pathogenic, but titres can be a marker of treatment response. Pathological findings can suggest an inflammatory process, but features

  5. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and athletes

    PubMed Central

    Mannix, Rebekah; Zafonte, Ross; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Recent case reports have described athletes previously exposed to repetitive head trauma while participating in contact sports who later in life developed mood disorders, headaches, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, difficulties with speech, and aggressive behavior. Postmortem discoveries show that some of these athletes have pathologic findings that are collectively termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Current hypotheses suggest that concussions or perhaps blows to the head that do not cause the signs and symptoms necessary for making the diagnosis of concussion, so-called subconcussive blows, cause both the clinical and pathologic findings. There are, however, some athletes who participate in contact sports who do not develop the findings ascribed to CTE. Furthermore, there are people who have headaches, mood disorders, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, and other clinical problems who have neither been exposed to repeated head trauma nor possessed the pathologic postmortem findings of those currently diagnosed with CTE. The current lack of prospective data and properly designed case-control studies limits the current understanding of CTE, leading to debate about the causes of the neuropathologic findings and the clinical observations. Given the potential for referral and recall bias in available studies, it remains unclear whether or not the pathologic findings made postmortem cause the presumed neurobehavioral sequela and whether the presumed risk factors, such as sports activity, cerebral concussions, and subconcussive blows, are solely causative of the clinical signs and symptoms. This article discusses the current evidence and the associated limitations. PMID:26253448

  6. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and athletes.

    PubMed

    Meehan, William; Mannix, Rebekah; Zafonte, Ross; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2015-10-27

    Recent case reports have described athletes previously exposed to repetitive head trauma while participating in contact sports who later in life developed mood disorders, headaches, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, difficulties with speech, and aggressive behavior. Postmortem discoveries show that some of these athletes have pathologic findings that are collectively termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Current hypotheses suggest that concussions or perhaps blows to the head that do not cause the signs and symptoms necessary for making the diagnosis of concussion, so-called subconcussive blows, cause both the clinical and pathologic findings. There are, however, some athletes who participate in contact sports who do not develop the findings ascribed to CTE. Furthermore, there are people who have headaches, mood disorders, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, and other clinical problems who have neither been exposed to repeated head trauma nor possessed the pathologic postmortem findings of those currently diagnosed with CTE. The current lack of prospective data and properly designed case-control studies limits the current understanding of CTE, leading to debate about the causes of the neuropathologic findings and the clinical observations. Given the potential for referral and recall bias in available studies, it remains unclear whether or not the pathologic findings made postmortem cause the presumed neurobehavioral sequela and whether the presumed risk factors, such as sports activity, cerebral concussions, and subconcussive blows, are solely causative of the clinical signs and symptoms. This article discusses the current evidence and the associated limitations.

  7. Encephalopathy caused by lanthanum carbonate.

    PubMed

    Fraile, Pilar; Cacharro, Luis Maria; Garcia-Cosmes, Pedro; Rosado, Consolacion; Tabernero, Jose Matias

    2011-06-01

    Lanthanum carbonate is a nonaluminum, noncalcium phosphate-binding agent, which is widely used in patients with end-stage chronic kidney disease. Until now, no significant side-effects have been described for the clinical use of lanthanum carbonate, and there are no available clinical data regarding its tissue stores. Here we report the case of a 59-year-old patient who was admitted with confusional syndrome. The patient received 3750 mg of lanthanum carbonate daily. Examinations were carried out, and the etiology of the encephalopathy of the patient could not be singled out. The lanthanum carbonate levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid were high, and the syndrome eased after the drug was removed. The results of our study confirm that, in our case, the lanthanum carbonate did cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Although lanthanum carbonate seems a safe drug with minimal absorption, this work reveals the problem derived from the increase of serum levels of lanthanum carbonate, and the possibility that it may cross the BBB. Further research is required on the possible pathologies that increase serum levels of lanthanum carbonate, as well as the risks and side-effects derived from its absorption.

  8. Opsoclonus as a manifestation of Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Salazar, R; Mehta, C; Zaher, N; Miller, D

    2012-10-01

    We present a 59-year-old male with early manifestation of opsoclonus associated with gait ataxia as a rare clinical presentation of Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Empiric use of intravenous immunoglobulin followed by intravenous high dose methylprednisolone was initiated with subsequent remittance of opsoclonus, encephalopathy, ataxia, and tremor. Extensive workup for infectious, autoimmune, and paraneoplastic etiologies were undertaken and all studies were negative. Thyroglobulin antibodies (312 U/mL) and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (457 U/mL) were elevated (normal <60 U/mL) with a euthyroid state (thyroid stimulating hormone 3.13 μIU/mL). Three months after intravenous steroid therapy, the concentrations of thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase antibodies were retested and found to have decreased considerably. Thus, with steroid therapy, the patient's opsoclonus and encephalopathy improved. We have presented a patient with a rare case of opsoclonus as the principal presenting feature of Hashimoto's encephalopathy that was incompletely responsive to intravenous immunoglobulin and resolved with corticosteroids. This report underscores the importance for clinical practitioners to maintain a high index of suspicion for Hashimoto's encephalopathy in cases of opsoclonus, especially when accompanied by an atypical presentation.

  9. Use of Wisteria Floribunda Agglutinin-Positive Human Mac-2 Binding Protein in Assessing Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Due to Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Ja Yoon; Kim, Seung Up; Kim, Beom Kyung; Park, Jun Yong; Kim, Do Young; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Park, Young Nyun; Ahn, Sung Soo; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Kim, Hyon-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive human Mac-2 binding protein (WFA+-M2BP) is a serologic marker corresponding with degree of hepatic fibrosis. We evaluated its accuracy in assessing hepatic fibrosis and in predicting the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). In a 5-year period (2009–2013), a total of 95 CHB patients with available serum WFA+-M2BP assay and transient elastography assessment [to assess liver stiffness (LS)] who had undergone liver biopsy were recruited for retrospective analysis. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for predicting fibrosis stages via serum WFA+-M2BP level were as follows: ≥F2, 0.688; ≥F3, 0.694; and F4, 0.704 (all P < 0.05). During the follow-up period (median, 45 months), HCC developed in 7 patients (7.4%). In patients with HCC, age, use of antiviral therapy, test parameters (HBV DNA, WFA+-M2BP, and LS determinations), and histologic stage of fibrosis were all significantly greater than in those free of HCC, whereas platelet count was significantly lower (all P < 0.05). On multivariate analysis, WFA+-M2BP was found independently predictive of emergent HCC [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.375; P = 0.036], although LS and histologic stage of fibrosis were not (P > 0.05). Risk of developing HCC was significantly greater in patients with high WFA+-M2BP levels (≥1.8) (adjusted HR = 11.5; P = 0.025). Cumulative incidence rates of HCC were also significantly higher in patients with high (vs. low) levels of WFA+-M2BP (log-rank test, P = 0.016). WFA+-M2BP determination significantly reflected degree/extent of hepatic fibrosis and independently predicted the risk of developing HCC in patients with CHB. PMID:27057911

  10. Use of Wisteria Floribunda Agglutinin-Positive Human Mac-2 Binding Protein in Assessing Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Due to Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Heo, Ja Yoon; Kim, Seung Up; Kim, Beom Kyung; Park, Jun Yong; Kim, Do Young; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Park, Young Nyun; Ahn, Sung Soo; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Kim, Hyon-Suk

    2016-04-01

    Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive human Mac-2 binding protein (WFA-M2BP) is a serologic marker corresponding with degree of hepatic fibrosis. We evaluated its accuracy in assessing hepatic fibrosis and in predicting the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB).In a 5-year period (2009-2013), a total of 95 CHB patients with available serum WFA-M2BP assay and transient elastography assessment [to assess liver stiffness (LS)] who had undergone liver biopsy were recruited for retrospective analysis.Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for predicting fibrosis stages via serum WFA-M2BP level were as follows: ≥F2, 0.688; ≥F3, 0.694; and F4, 0.704 (all P < 0.05). During the follow-up period (median, 45 months), HCC developed in 7 patients (7.4%). In patients with HCC, age, use of antiviral therapy, test parameters (HBV DNA, WFA-M2BP, and LS determinations), and histologic stage of fibrosis were all significantly greater than in those free of HCC, whereas platelet count was significantly lower (all P < 0.05). On multivariate analysis, WFA-M2BP was found independently predictive of emergent HCC [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.375; P = 0.036], although LS and histologic stage of fibrosis were not (P > 0.05). Risk of developing HCC was significantly greater in patients with high WFA-M2BP levels (≥1.8) (adjusted HR = 11.5; P = 0.025). Cumulative incidence rates of HCC were also significantly higher in patients with high (vs. low) levels of WFA-M2BP (log-rank test, P = 0.016).WFA-M2BP determination significantly reflected degree/extent of hepatic fibrosis and independently predicted the risk of developing HCC in patients with CHB.

  11. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor may want you to get the hepatitis B vaccine (and maybe the hepatitis A vaccine, too), if you don't already have these viruses. If you have hepatitis C, you are more likely to catch hepatitis A or hepatitis B, which would cause more damage to your liver. ...

  12. Clinical review of genetic epileptic encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Grace J.; Asher, Y. Jane Tavyev; Graham, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Seizures are a frequently encountered finding in patients seen for clinical genetics evaluations. The differential diagnosis for the cause of seizures is quite diverse and complex, and more than half of all epilepsies have been attributed to a genetic cause. Given the complexity of such evaluations, we highlight the more common causes of genetic epileptic encephalopathies and emphasize the usefulness of recent technological advances. The purpose of this review is to serve as a practical guide for clinical geneticists in the evaluation and counseling of patients with genetic epileptic encephalopathies. Common syndromes will be discussed, in addition to specific seizure phenotypes, many of which are refractory to anti-epileptic agents. Divided by etiology, we overview the more common causes of infantile epileptic encephalopathies, channelopathies, syndromic, metabolic, and chromosomal entities. For each condition, we will outline the diagnostic evaluation and discuss effective treatment strategies that should be considered. PMID:22342633

  13. Surgical Treatment of Pediatric Epileptic Encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Fridley, J.; Reddy, G.; Curry, D.; Agadi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric epileptiform encephalopathies are a group of neurologically devastating disorders related to uncontrolled ictal and interictal epileptic activity, with a poor prognosis. Despite the number of pharmacological options for treatment of epilepsy, many of these patients are drug resistant. For these patients with uncontrolled epilepsy, motor and/or neuropsychological deterioration is common. To prevent these secondary consequences, surgery is often considered as either a curative or a palliative option. Magnetic resonance imaging to look for epileptic lesions that may be surgically treated is an essential part of the workup for these patients. Many surgical procedures for the treatment of epileptiform encephalopathies have been reported in the literature. In this paper the evidence for these procedures for the treatment of pediatric epileptiform encephalopathies is reviewed. PMID:24288601

  14. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy: not just delirium

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Fernando Godinho; Park, Marcelo; Machado, Fabio Santana; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in intensive care units. Organ dysfunction is triggered by inflammatory insults and tissue hypoperfusion. The brain plays a pivotal role in sepsis, acting as both a mediator of the immune response and a target for the pathologic process. The measurement of brain dysfunction is difficult because there are no specific biomarkers of neuronal injury, and bedside evaluation of cognitive performance is difficult in an intensive care unit. Although sepsis-associated encephalopathy was described decades ago, it has only recently been subjected to scientific scrutiny and is not yet completely understood. The pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy involves direct cellular damage to the brain, mitochondrial and endothelial dysfunction and disturbances in neurotransmission. This review describes the most recent findings in the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of sepsis-associated encephalopathy and focuses on its many presentations. PMID:22012058

  15. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Complicating Hyperemesis during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Berdai, Mohamed Adnane; Labib, Smael; Harandou, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is caused by severe thiamine deficiency; it is mostly observed in alcoholic patients. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman, at 17 weeks of gestational age, with severe hyperemesis gravidarum. She presented with disturbance of consciousness, nystagmus, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. The resonance magnetic imagery showed bilaterally symmetrical hyperintensities of thalamus and periaqueductal area. The case was managed with very large doses of thiamine. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was confirmed later by a low thiamine serum level. The patient was discharged home on day 46 with mild ataxia and persistent nystagmus. Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum. It should be diagnosed as early as possible to prevent long-term neurological sequela or death. Thiamine supplementation in pregnant women with prolonged vomiting should be initiated, especially before parenteral dextrose infusion. Early thiamine replacement will reduce maternal morbidity and fetal loss rate. PMID:26989522

  16. [Liver cirrhosis and encephalopathy: clinical and metabolic consequences and nutritional support].

    PubMed

    Mesejo, A; Juan, M; Serrano, A

    2008-05-01

    Cirrhosis represents the final stage of many chronic liver diseases and is associated to more or less pronounced hyponutrition, independently of the etiology, particularly at advanced stages. Its origin is multifactorial, with three factors contributing to it: a) limitation or decrease of intake; b) impairment in nutrients digestion or absorption; and c) the interference with nutrients metabolism. A poor nutritional status is associated with a poor survival prognosis. Whether caloric-protein malnourishment (CPM) is an independent predictor of mortality or only a marker of the severity of liver failure is subject to controversy. There is no consensus on which are the best diagnostic criteria for CPM in cirrhosis. Assessment of hyponutrition is extremely difficult since both the disease itself and the triggering or etiologic factors affect many of the parameters used. Metabolic impairments mimic a hypercatabolic state. These patients have decreased carbohydrate utilization and storage capacity and increased protein and fat catabolism leading to depletion of protein and lipid reserves. These abnormalities together with decreased nutrients intake and absorption are the bases for CPM. The most important metabolic impairment in patients with advanced liver disease is the change in amino acids metabolism. The plasma levels of branched amino acids (BAA) are decreased and of aromatic amino acids (AAA) are increased, which has therapeutic implications. Among the consequences of the structural impairments taking place in cirrhosis, we may highlight hepatic encephalopathy, defined as impaired central nervous system functioning that manifests as a series of neuropsychiatric, neuromuscular, and behavioral symptoms. These are due to the inability of the diseased liver to metabolize neurotoxins that accumulate in the brain affecting neurotransmitters and are attributed to the toxic effect of ammonium on the brain tissue. Nutritional therapy brings benefits in the different stages

  17. Experimental Interspecies Transmission Studies of the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies to Cattle: Comparison to Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy in Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of animals include scrapie of sheep and goats; transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME); chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk and moose; and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) of cattle. Since the emergence of BSE and its pr...

  18. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Thor D.; Alvarez, Victor E.; McKee, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE. PMID:26260277

  19. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Stein, Thor D; Alvarez, Victor E; McKee, Ann C

    2015-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE.

  20. Cell culture models of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Béranger, F; Mangé, A; Solassol, J; Lehmann, S

    2001-11-30

    In this review, we describe the generation and use of cell culture models of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, also known as prion diseases. These models include chronically prion-infected cell lines, as well as cultures expressing variable amounts of wild-type, mutated, or chimeric prion proteins. These cell lines have been widely used to investigate the biology of both the normal and the pathological isoform of the prion protein. They have also contributed to the comprehension of the pathogenic processes occurring in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies and in the development of new therapeutic approaches of these diseases.

  1. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis C Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Hepatitis C is a viral infection that causes liver inflammation, sometimes leading to serious liver damage. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) spreads through contaminated ...

  2. Toxic Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Toxic hepatitis is an inflammation of your liver in reaction to certain substances to which you're exposed. Toxic hepatitis can be caused by alcohol, chemicals, drugs or ...

  3. Understanding Genotypes and Phenotypes in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Helbig, Ingo; Tayoun, Abou Ahmad N.

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are severe often intractable seizure disorders where epileptiform abnormalities contribute to a progressive disturbance in brain function. Often, epileptic encephalopathies start in childhood and are accompanied by developmental delay and various neurological and non-neurological comorbidities. In recent years, this concept has become virtually synonymous with a group of severe childhood epilepsies including West syndrome, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, Dravet syndrome, and several other severe childhood epilepsies for which genetic factors are increasingly recognized. In the last 5 years, the field has seen a virtual explosion of gene discovery, raising the number of bona fide genes and possible candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathies to more than 70 genes, explaining 20-25% of all cases with severe early-onset epilepsies that had otherwise no identifiable causes. This review will focus on the phenotypic variability as a characteristic aspect of genetic epilepsies. For many genetic epilepsies, the phenotypic presentation can be broad, even in patients with identical genetic alterations. Furthermore, patients with different genetic etiologies can have seemingly similar clinical presentations, such as in Dravet syndrome. While most patients carry mutations in SCN1A, similar phenotypes can be seen in patients with mutations in PCDH19, CHD2, SCN8A, or in rare cases GABRA1 and STXBP1. In addition to the genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity, both benign phenotypes and severe encephalopathies have been recognized in an increasing number of genetic epilepsies, raising the question whether these conditions represent a fluid continuum or distinct entities. PMID:27781027

  4. PRIONS AND THE TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter is an invited, scholarly review of the mechanism(s) of TSEs for the 2nd edition of Metabolic Encephalopathies. Each chapter in the book assumes a professional knowledge of neuroscience and biochemistry, and the focus of the book is on the metabolic basis of dise...

  5. Encephalopathy in children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Baluarte, H J; Gruskin, A B; Hiner, L B; Foley, C M; Grover, W D

    1977-01-01

    The progressive encephalopathy observed in 5 children with chronic renal failure was clinically similar to the so-called dialysis encephalopathy of adults, except that it was not related to dialysis therapy. Renal osteodystrophy is more prevalent in children than in adults and often more severe. The attempt to control the crippling deformities of renal osteodystrophy in growing children with renal insufficiency has led to the use of large quantities of aluminum containing antacids. The encephalopathy observed in children with chronic renal failure may be related to the oral ingestion of aluminum containing compounds in the presence of persistent secondary hyperparathyroidism. We suggest that alternative methods for the adequate control of serum phosphorus levels should be sought and indications for parathyroidectomy in children reevaluated. During the past 18 mos we have lowered the dose of aluminum containing compounds to 50 to 100 mg/Kg/day in our patients with progressive renal failure and recommend parathyroidectomy. No new cases of the encephalopathy have occurred.

  6. Neuropsychological functioning in Wernicke's encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Behura, Sushree Sangita; Swain, Sarada Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    Context: Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is caused by thiamine (Vitamin B1) deficiency and most commonly found in chronic alcoholism and malnutrition. Clinically, the key features are mental status disturbances (global confusion), oculomotor abnormalities, and gait disturbances (ataxia). Apart from these clinical features, we can find deficits in neuropsychological functioning in patients with WE, which is more prominent after the improvement in the physical conditions. Neuropsychological functioning includes both basic cognitive processes (i.e., attention-concentration) as well as higher order cognitive processes (i.e., memory, executive functioning, reasoning), which is much vital for the maintenance of quality of life of an individual. However, unfortunately, in most of the cases, neuropsychological functioning is ignored by the clinicians. Materials and Methods: In this study four case reports of WE have been presented. The patients were taken from the outdoor department of Mental Health Institute, S.C.B. Medical College, Cuttack, Odisha. Neuropsychological functioning was measured by administration of PGIBBD and Quality of Life was measured by WHO-QOL BREF Odia Version. Discussion: As described in the literature, among the three cardinal signs (global confusion, ataxia, and ocular sings), the first two were present in all cases, but nystagmus was present in only two cases. Memory dysfunction was so disabling that the persons were unable to maintain a good Quality of Life and occupational impairment was prominent. There are disturbances in recent, remote memory, immediate recall, delayed recall, and attention and concentration, ultimately creating both physical and mental disability. PGI-BBD findings also suggest the overall impairment in neuropsychological functioning other than memory, that is, executive functioning, visual acuity, and depth perception. Findings of WHO-QOL BREF suggest the impairment of four domains of QOL in all the cases, but the severity

  7. Hepatic necrosis following halothane anesthesia in goats.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, T D; Raffe, M R; Cox, V S; Stevens, D L; O'Leary, T P

    1986-12-15

    One goat anesthetized with thiamylal sodium, xylazine, and halothane for repair of an abominal hernia, and 7 of 29 goats similarly anesthetized for an experiment unrelated to considerations of anesthesia, developed signs of hepatic failure within 24 hours of anesthesia. Affected goats had high values for serum aspartate transaminase and serum total bilirubin by 12 to 24 hours after induction of anesthesia. Necropsy of the 8 affected goats revealed centrilobular to massive hepatic necrosis (8 of 8), brain lesions consistent with hepatic encephalopathy (3 of 4), and acute renal tubular necrosis (6 of 6). Two unaffected goats had no hepatic necrosis. Causes of hepatic necrosis other than those related to anesthesia (eg, infectious agents, toxins) were ruled out by lack of supporting necropsy findings or were considered unlikely because of lack of opportunity for exposure. Hepatic lesions in these goats closely resembled those described in human beings with halothane-associated hepatic injury, although in both species these lesions are nonspecific at the gross and light microscopic levels. The pathogenesis of halothane-associated hepatic injury in goats, as in human beings, remains to be determined.

  8. Hepatitis B and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems : Hepatitis B Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis B What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. This condition ... our related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis C . Hepatitis B and HIV About 10% of people living ...

  9. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... transaminase enzyme levels Treatment There is no specific treatment for hepatitis A. You should rest when the symptoms are ... and have not had hepatitis A or the hepatitis A vaccine. Common reasons for getting one or both of these treatments include: You live with someone who has hepatitis ...

  10. Diabetic myonecrosis in a patient with hepatic cirrhosis: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic myonecrosis was first reported by Angervall and Stener in 1965. In its classical clinical expression, it affects type 1 diabetes mellitus patients with long-standing poor metabolic control and advanced chronic microvascular complications. A sudden-onset of severe pain in the region of the involved muscle, usually the quadriceps, is the typical clinical manifestation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirms the clinical diagnosis; in some cases of diagnostic uncertainty, a muscle biopsy may be required. Case Presentation We present the case of a 38 year-old Hispanic male from Mexico, with alcohol-induced hepatic cirrhosis (Child-Pugh C/MELD 45) and type 2 diabetes mellitus admitted to the emergency room due to hepatic encephalopathy with intense pain and an increase in volume of the left thigh. MRI showed edema and inflammatory changes of the quadriceps muscle with a hyperintense signal on T2-weighted images; in addition, there was a subacute hematoma. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of diabetic myonecrosis associated with and complicated by advanced hepatic cirrhosis reported in the literature. PMID:20062734

  11. Effect of lamivudine treatment in patients with decompensated cirrhosis due to anti-HBe positive/HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidis, Nikolaos; Vassiliadis, Themistoklis; Giouleme, Olga; Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Grammatikos, Nikolaos; Patsiaoura, Kalliopi; Orfanou-Koumerkeridou, Eleni; Balaska, Aikaterini; Eugenidis, Nikolaos

    2005-06-01

    Lamivudine has been shown to improve liver function and reduce the need for liver transplantation (LT) in patients with decompensated HBeAg-positive cirrhosis. Nevertheless, there is only limited experience with lamivudine in patients with anti-HBe-positive/HBeAg-negative cirrhosis. The primary aim of this study was to determine whether lamivudine treatment improves liver function and subsequently pre-LT survival or delays or obviates the need for LT in patients with anti-HBe-positive/HBeAg-negative cirrhosis. Between July 1998 and June 2003, 20 consecutive patients awaiting LT were enrolled in the study. All patients showed active viral replication and were treated with lamivudine 100 mg daily. Significant clinical improvement, defined as a decrease in the Child-Pugh-Turcotte score by >or=2 points, was observed in 11 (55%) patients. The median change in the Child-Pugh-Turcotte score was -2 (range -5 to +2). The median time required to achieve a 2-point or greater reduction in Child-Pugh-Turcotte score was 6 months (range 3-12 months). In nine patients (45%), the Child-Pugh-Turcotte score decreased to hepatitis B.

  12. Persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection impairs HCV-specific cytotoxic T cell reactivity through Mcl-1/Bim imbalance due to CD127 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Larrubia, J R; Lokhande, M U; García-Garzón, S; Miquel, J; González-Praetorius, A; Parra-Cid, T; Sanz-de-Villalobos, E

    2013-02-01

    In persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, HCV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) reactivity is impaired and this affects HCV control. Interleukin-7 receptor (CD127) expression on these cells could regulate CTL reactivity through Mcl-1/Bim balance modulation. Bim is a pro-apoptotic molecule blocked by the action of Mcl-1. Mcl-1/Bim expression and T cell reactivity on HCV-specific CTLs were compared according to CD127 phenotype. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from HLA-A2(+) HCV(+) patients were obtained. HCV-specific CTLs were visualized by staining PBL with anti-CD8 and HLA-A2/peptide pentameric complexes (pentamer). Mcl-1/Bim/CD127 phenotype of HCV-specific CTLs was tested by staining detectable CD8(+)/pentamer(+) cells with anti-Mcl-1/Bim/CD127 antibodies. HCV-specific CTL proliferation ability after specific in vitro challenge was tested in the presence and absence of pancaspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. All stained cells were analysed by flow cytometry. CD127(low)-expressing HCV-specific CTLs associated with high HCV viraemia, while CD127(high) correlated with undetectable viral loads (P < 0.001). Directly ex vivo, pentamer(+) cell frequency was similar according to CD127 expression level. Nevertheless, CD127(low) pentamer(+) cell proliferation after specific in vitro challenge was impaired (P < 0.05), although this was corrected by z-VAD-fmk treatment (P < 0.05). Mcl-1 expression was low directly ex vivo (P < 0.01), and Bim was up-regulated after antigen encounter (P < 0.05) of CD127(low) pentamer(+) cells. The ex vivo difference between Mcl-1 and Bim expression on pentamer(+) cells correlated positively with CD127 expression level (P < 0.001) and with pentamer(+) cell reactivity (P < 0.05). In summary, a low ex vivo Mcl-1 expression and Bim up-regulation after antigen encounter are involved in CD127(low) HCV-specific CTL hyporeactivity during chronic infection, but it can be overcome by apoptosis blockade.

  13. Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0399 TITLE: Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John F...Include area code) October 2015 Annual Report 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy John...encephalopathy (CTE), but the underlying molecular changes remain unclear. Here, biochemical and genetic studies that deepen our understanding of the

  14. Current Management of Alcoholic Hepatitis and Future Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Behnam; Dadabhai, Alia S.; Jang, Yoon-Young; Gurakar, Ahmet; Mezey, Esteban

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Alcohol is one of the most common etiologies of liver disease, and alcoholic liver disease overall is the second most common indication for liver transplantation in the United States. It encompasses a spectrum of disease, including fatty liver disease, alcoholic hepatitis (AH), and alcoholic cirrhosis. AH can range from mild to severe disease, with severe disease being defined as: Discriminant Function (DF) ≥ 32, or Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) ≥ 21, or presence of hepatic encephalopathy. Management of the mild disease consists mainly of abstinence and supportive care. Severe AH is associated with significant mortality. Currently, there is no ideal medical treatment for this condition. Besides alcohol cessation, corticosteroids have been used with conflicting results and are associated with an inherent risk of infection. Overall steroids have shown short term benefit when compared to placebo, but they have no obvious long term benefits. Pentoxifylline does not improve survival in patients with severe AH and is no longer recommended based on the results of the STOPAH (Steroid Or Pentoxifylline for Alcoholic Hepatitis) trial. Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are associated with increased risk of life threatening infections and death. Currently, early stage trials are underway, mainly targeting novel pathways based on disease pathogenesis, including modulation of innate immune system, inhibition of gut-liver axis and cell death pathways, and activation of transcription factor farnesyl X receptor (FXR). Future treatment may lie in human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology, which is currently under investigation for the study of pathogenesis, drug discovery, and stem cell transplantation. Liver transplantation has been reported with good results in highly selected patients but is controversial due to limited organ supply. PMID:27350941

  15. Pathophysiology of septic encephalopathy - an unsolved puzzle

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The exact cellular and molecular mechanisms of sepsis-induced encephalopathy remain elusive. The breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is considered a focal point in the development of sepsis-induced brain damage. Contributing factors for the compromise of the BBB include cytokines and chemokines, activation of the complement cascade, phagocyte-derived toxic mediators, and bacterial products. To date, we are far from fully understanding the neuropathology that develops as a secondary remote organ injury as a consequence of sepsis. However, recent studies suggest that bacterial proteins may readily cross the functional BBB and trigger an inflammatory response in the subarachnoid space, in absence of a bacterial invasion. A better understanding of the pathophysiological events leading to septic encephalopathy appears crucial to advance the clinical care for this vulnerable patient population. PMID:20565858

  16. Head stereotypies in STXBP1 encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ok; Korff, Christian M; Villaluz, Mel Michel G; Suls, Arvid; Weckhuysen, Sarah; De Jonghe, Peter; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2013-08-01

    STXBP1 encephalopathy is associated with a range of movement disorders. We observed head stereotypies in three patients. These comprised a slow (<1Hz), high-amplitude, horizontal, 'figure-of-eight' pattern, beginning at age 4-6 years and resulting in neck muscle hypertrophy, in two males; a faster (2-3Hz), side-to-side, 'no' movement, starting at the age of 9 years 6 months was observed in one female. Upper limb and truncal stereotypies and vocalization occurred intermittently with the head movements. The stereotypies increased with excitement but settled with concentration and sleep. Head and upper limb stereotypies are valuable clinical clues to the diagnosis of STXBP1 encephalopathy in patients with profound impairments.

  17. [Metabolic encephalopathy secondary to vitamin D intoxication].

    PubMed

    Herrera Martínez, Aura; Viñals Torràs, Montserrat; Muñoz Jiménez, Ma Concepción; Arenas de Larriva, Antonio Pablo; Molina Puerta, Ma José; Manzano García, Gregorio; Gálvez Moreno, Ma Ángeles; Calañas-Continente, Alfonso

    2014-10-25

    The association between vitamin D deficiency and increased risk of, among others, cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases has lead in the last years to an enhanced interest in the usage of supplements to achieve the normalization of plasmatic values at 25(OH) D. Apparently this search for normalization is resulting in an higher incidence on vitamin D intoxication. We present the case of an 81 years old woman with metabolic encephalopathy and renal failure secondary to iatrogenic vitamin D intoxication. Calcium and vitamin D oral supplements were prescribed after an osteoporotic vertebral fracture. The patient improved clinically as well as analytically after receiving treatment with diuretics and hydration. We emphasize the importance of discarding hypercalcemia as a cause of metabolic encephalopathy; moreover we highly recommend keeping vitamin D intoxication in mind as an uncommon although always possible etiology of reversible hypercalcemia and renal failure.

  18. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: A rare proteiform disorder.

    PubMed

    Montagna, Giacomo; Imperiali, Mauro; Agazzi, Pamela; D'Aurizio, Federica; Tozzoli, Renato; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Giovanella, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare not well understood, progressive and relapsing multiform disease, characterized by seizures, movement disorders, subacute cognitive dysfunction, psychiatric symptoms and responsiveness to steroid therapy. The disorder is generally associated with thyroid diseases and the most common feature is the presence of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Patients are usually euthyroid or mildly hypothyroid at presentation. All age groups can be affected. The pathophysiology is still unclear, especially the link between elevated serum TPOAb and the encephalopathy. Most reported cases occurred in women and girls. Unspecific symptoms, non-pathognomonic laboratory neurophysiology and neuroimaging features make its diagnosis a real challenge for clinicians. The case of a 16 year old boy, with a clinical picture of HE associated with hypothyroidism, demonstrating an excellent response to high dose steroids is presented together with a systematic review of the literature.

  19. Retinal function and morphology are altered in cattle infected with the prion disease transmissible mink encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Smith, J D; Greenlee, J J; Hamir, A N; Richt, J A; Greenlee, M H West

    2009-09-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of diseases that result in progressive and invariably fatal neurologic disease in both animals and humans. TSEs are characterized by the accumulation of an abnormal protease-resistant form of the prion protein in the central nervous system. Transmission of infectious TSEs is believed to occur via ingestion of prion protein-contaminated material. This material is also involved in the transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("mad cow disease") to humans, which resulted in the variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Abnormal prion protein has been reported in the retina of TSE-affected cattle, but despite these observations, the specific effect of abnormal prion protein on retinal morphology and function has not been assessed. The objective of this study was to identify and characterize potential functional and morphologic abnormalities in the retinas of cattle infected with a bovine-adapted isolate of transmissible mink encephalopathy. We used electroretinography and immunohistochemistry to examine retinas from 10 noninoculated and 5 transmissible mink encephalopathy-inoculated adult Holstein steers. Here we show altered retinal function, as evidenced by prolonged implicit time of the electroretinogram b-wave, in transmissible mink encephalopathy-infected cattle before the onset of clinical illness. We also demonstrate disruption of rod bipolar cell synaptic terminals, indicated by decreased immunoreactivity for the alpha isoform of protein kinase C and vesicular glutamate transporter 1, and activation of Müller glia, as evidenced by increased glial fibrillary acidic protein and glutamine synthetase expression, in the retinas of these cattle at the time of euthanasia due to clinical deterioration. This is the first study to identify both functional and morphologic alterations in the retinas of TSE-infected cattle. Our results support future efforts to focus on the retina for the development of

  20. Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy in the Term Infant

    PubMed Central

    Fatemi, Ali; Wilson, Mary Ann; Johnston, Michael V.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Hypoxia-ischemia in the perinatal period is an important cause of cerebral palsy and associated disabilities in children. There has been significant research progress in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy over the last two decades and many new molecular mechanisms have been identified. Despite all these advances, therapeutic interventions are still limited. In this review paper, we discuss a number of molecular pathways involved in hypoxia-ischemia, and potential therapeutic targets. PMID:19944838

  1. Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy and Meat Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Hester J. T.; Knight, Richard S. G.

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) comprise a wide-ranging group of neurodegenerative diseases found in animals and humans. They have diverse causes and geographical distributions, but have similar pathological features, transmissibility and, are ultimately, fatal. Central to all TSEs is the presence of an abnormal form of a normal host protein, namely the prion protein. Because of their potential transmissibility, these diseases have wide public health ramifications.

  2. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  3. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. PMID:27625729

  4. Vitamin-Responsive Epileptic Encephalopathies in Children

    PubMed Central

    Agadi, Satish; Quach, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    Untreated epileptic encephalopathies in children may potentially have disastrous outcomes. Treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) often may not control the seizures, and even if they do, this measure is only symptomatic and not specific. It is especially valuable to identify potential underlying conditions that have specific treatments. Only a few conditions have definitive treatments that can potentially modify the natural course of disease. In this paper, we discuss the few such conditions that are responsive to vitamin or vitamin derivatives. PMID:23984056

  5. Reflex gelastic–dacrystic seizures following hypoxic–ischaemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Praharaj, Heramba Narayan

    2013-01-01

    Reflex or stimulus-sensitive epilepsies are uncommon epileptic syndromes triggered by exogenous-specific sensory stimulus or endogenous various mental activities. Gelastic–dacrystic seizures are rare epileptic manifestations characterised by ictal laughter and crying. Gelastic–dacrystic seizures are commonly caused by hypothalamic hamartoma but rarely described due to cortical dysplasia, lesions of frontal and temporal lobes, tumours and vascular malformations. We report a young woman who presented with somatosensory-evoked gelastic–dacrystic seizures. This patient had a positive history of perinatal insult substantiated by MRI findings. Hypoxic–ischaemic encephalopathy as the cause of gelastic–dacrystic seizures has not been reported so far in the literature. PMID:23853086

  6. Wernicke's encephalopathy following Hyperemesis gravidarum. A report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Kotha, V K; De Souza, A

    2013-02-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) due to causes other than chronic alcohol abuse is an uncommon and often misdiagnosed condition. In the setting of hyperemesis gravidarum, an acute deficiency of thiamine results from body stores being unable to meet increased metabolic demands. The condition produces typical clinical and radiological findings and when diagnosed early and treated promptly has a good prognosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is sensitive and specific for diagnosis. We describe three patients with hyperemesis gravidarum who developed WE, and highlight a range of clinical and imaging features important for appropriate diagnosis. A high degree of clinical suspicion is essential. Treatment is often empirical pending results of investigation, and consists of parenteral repletion of thiamine stores. Reversal of MRI findings parallels clinical improvement. Neurologic outcomes are usually good, but half the pregnancies complicated by this condition do not produce healthy children.

  7. Extending the KCNQ2 encephalopathy spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Weckhuysen, Sarah; Ivanovic, Vanja; Hendrickx, Rik; Van Coster, Rudy; Hjalgrim, Helle; Møller, Rikke S.; Grønborg, Sabine; Schoonjans, An-Sofie; Ceulemans, Berten; Heavin, Sinead B.; Eltze, Christin; Horvath, Rita; Casara, Gianluca; Pisano, Tiziana; Giordano, Lucio; Rostasy, Kevin; Haberlandt, Edda; Albrecht, Beate; Bevot, Andrea; Benkel, Ira; Syrbe, Steffan; Sheidley, Beth; Guerrini, Renzo; Poduri, Annapurna; Lemke, Johannes R.; Mandelstam, Simone; Scheffer, Ingrid; Angriman, Marco; Striano, Pasquale; Marini, Carla; Suls, Arvid

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of KCNQ2 mutations in patients with neonatal epileptic encephalopathy (NEE), and to expand the phenotypic spectrum of KCNQ2 epileptic encephalopathy. Methods: Eighty-four patients with unexplained NEE were screened for KCNQ2 mutations using classic Sanger sequencing. Clinical data of 6 additional patients with KCNQ2 mutations detected by gene panel were collected. Detailed phenotyping was performed with particular attention to seizure frequency, cognitive outcome, and video-EEG. Results: In the cohort, we identified 9 different heterozygous de novo KCNQ2 missense mutations in 11 of 84 patients (13%). Two of 6 missense mutations detected by gene panel were recurrent and present in patients of the cohort. Seizures at onset typically consisted of tonic posturing often associated with focal clonic jerking, and were accompanied by apnea with desaturation. One patient diagnosed by gene panel had seizure onset at the age of 5 months. Based on seizure frequency at onset and cognitive outcome, we delineated 3 clinical subgroups, expanding the spectrum of KCNQ2 encephalopathy to patients with moderate intellectual disability and/or infrequent seizures at onset. Recurrent mutations lead to relatively homogenous phenotypes. One patient responded favorably to retigabine; 5 patients had a good response to carbamazepine. In 6 patients, seizures with bradycardia were recorded. One patient died of probable sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. Conclusion: KCNQ2 mutations cause approximately 13% of unexplained NEE. Patients present with a wide spectrum of severity and, although rare, infantile epilepsy onset is possible. PMID:24107868

  8. Blood Biomarkers for Evaluation of Perinatal Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Ernest M.; Burd, Irina; Everett, Allen D.; Northington, Frances J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research in identification of brain injury after trauma shows many possible blood biomarkers that may help identify the fetus and neonate with encephalopathy. Traumatic brain injury shares many common features with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Trauma has a hypoxic component, and one of the 1st physiologic consequences of moderate-severe traumatic brain injury is apnea. Trauma and hypoxia-ischemia initiate an excitotoxic cascade and free radical injury followed by the inflammatory cascade, producing injury in neurons, glial cells and white matter. Increased excitatory amino acids, lipid peroxidation products, and alteration in microRNAs and inflammatory markers are common to both traumatic brain injury and perinatal encephalopathy. The blood-brain barrier is disrupted in both leading to egress of substances normally only found in the central nervous system. Brain exosomes may represent ideal biomarker containers, as RNA and protein transported within the vesicles are protected from enzymatic degradation. Evaluation of fetal or neonatal brain derived exosomes that cross the blood-brain barrier and circulate peripherally has been referred to as the “liquid brain biopsy.” A multiplex of serum biomarkers could improve upon the current imprecise methods of identifying fetal and neonatal brain injury such as fetal heart rate abnormalities, meconium, cord gases at delivery, and Apgar scores. Quantitative biomarker measurements of perinatal brain injury and recovery could lead to operative delivery only in the presence of significant fetal risk, triage to appropriate therapy after birth and measure the effectiveness of treatment. PMID:27468268

  9. Management of hepatic injury.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, S. S.; Jirsch, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Liver injuries may be due to either blunt or penetrating trauma to the thorax or abdomen. Specific treatment depends on the site and extent of hepatic injury. Following resuscitation with intravenous fluids and blood as needed, surgical therapy is directed to provide hemostasis, remove necrotic liver tissue and promote adequate external drainage in the postoperative period. While local measures are usually sufficient, complex hepatic wounds may require extensive resection and vascular ligature or repair. PMID:890631

  10. [A Case of an Elderly Diabetic Patient Developing Wernicke Encephalopathy without Alcohol Abuse or an Unbalanced Diet].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuji; Tsurutani, Yuya; Sagawa, Naoko; Kondo, Mai; Sata, Akira; Miyao, Mariko; Azuma, Reo; Orimo, Satoshi; Mizuno, Yuzo

    2015-01-01

    A 70-year-old man with a 28-year history of type 2 diabetes mellitus was admitted due to persistent vomiting and neurological abnormalities in Nov 2012. He had developed gait disturbance and diplopia for six months during antiplatelet therapy, which was initiated following the diagnosis of a cerebellar infarction in June 2012. He had nystagmus, truncal ataxia and an ocular motility disorder, and the MRI study showed increased FLAIR and DWI signals in the peri-third ventricle and periaqueductal region, in addition to the cerebellar vermis. Wernicke encephalopathy was suspected according to his symptoms, and thiamine administration dramatically improved his condition. He did not have a history of alcohol abuse or poor eating habits; however, various coexisting factors, including diabetes mellitus, pyloric stenosis and the use of antiulcer drugs and insulin, were considered to be responsible for Wernicke encephalopathy. This case demonstrates the importance of distinguishing Wernicke encephalopathy from cerebrovascular disease in elderly patients.

  11. Hepatitis G virus: is it a hepatitis virus?

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, R C; Keeffe, E B; Greenberg, H B

    1997-01-01

    Hepatitis G virus (HGV) and GB virus C (GBV-C) are two newly discovered viral agents, different isolates of a positive-sense RNA virus that represents a new genus of Flaviviridae. The purpose of this review is to analyze new data that have recently been published on the epidemiology and associations between HGV and liver diseases such as posttransfusion hepatitis, acute and chronic non-A-E hepatitis, fulminant hepatitis, cryptogenic cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The role of HGV in coinfection with other hepatitis viruses, the response to antiviral therapy, and the impact of HGV on liver transplantation are also discussed. HGV is a transmissible blood-borne viral agent that frequently occurs as a coinfection with other hepatitis viruses due to common modes of transmission. The prevalence of HGV ranges from 0.9 to 10% among blood donors throughout the world and is found in 1.7% of volunteer blood donors in the United States. The majority of patients infected with HGV by blood transfusion do not develop chronic hepatitis, but hepatitis G viremia frequently persists without biochemical evidence of hepatitis. Serum HGV RNA has been found in 0 to 50% of patients with fulminant hepatitis of unknown etiology and 14 to 36% of patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis. The association between HGV and chronic non-A-E hepatitis remains unclear. Although HGV appears to be a hepatotrophic virus, its role in independently causing acute and chronic liver diseases remains uncertain. PMID:9265860

  12. Neem oil poisoning: Case report of an adult with toxic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ajay; Dave, Nikhil

    2013-09-01

    Neem oil has widespread use in Indian subcontinent due to its many bioactive properties. Azadirachtin, an active ingredient, is implicated in causing the effects seen in neem oil poisoning. Neem oil poisoning is rare in adults. This report highlights the toxicity associated with neem oil poisoning in an elderly male. The patient presented with vomiting, seizures, metabolic acidosis, and toxic encephalopathy. The patient recovered completely with symptomatic treatment.

  13. Hepatitis C: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » Hepatitis C » Hepatitis C Treatment Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Hepatitis C Treatment for Veterans and the Public Treatment ...

  14. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... washed in untreated water Putting into your mouth a finger or object that came into contact with ...

  15. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... commonly used with viral hepatitis and related conditions. Web Resources American Liver Foundation A national nonprofit organization ... other liver diseases through research, education, and advocacy. Web site features a database directory of hepatitis clinical ...

  16. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000279.htm Hepatitis B To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis B is irritation and swelling (inflammation) of the ...

  17. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Lupoid hepatitis; Chronic acute liver disease ... This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy body tissue and harmful, outside ...

  18. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... times more infectious than HIV. Which adults need hepatitis B vaccine? Any sexually active adult who is not in ... share needles, syringes, or other drug-injection equipment. Hepatitis B vaccine is available alone or in a combination with ...

  19. Can hepatic coma be caused by a reduction of brain noradrenaline or dopamine?

    PubMed Central

    Zieve, L; Olsen, R L

    1977-01-01

    Intraventricular infusions of octopamine which raised brain octopamine concentrations more than 20 000-fold resulted in reductions in brain noradrenaline and dopamine by as much as 90% without affecting the alertness or activity of normal rats. As this reduction of brain catecholamines is much greater than any reported in hepatic coma, we do not believe that values observed in experimental hepatic failure have aetiological significance for the encephalopathy that ensues. PMID:342358

  20. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis C, is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with ... childbirth. Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. If ...

  1. Acute Pancreatitis, Hepatitis and Bone Erosion in Acute Yellow Phosphorous Compound Poisoning – A Rare Complication

    PubMed Central

    Kamarthi, Prabhakar; Gopu, Arun Vardharaju; Prasad, Reddy; Srinivasa, Chandrakala

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of acute pancreatitis and hepatitis following ingestion of yellow phosphorous. The condition of the patient progressed to encephalopathy and bony erosion of the nasal septum. Fungal mass was observed in both the nasal cavities by endoscopy. Microbiological investigation revealed the identity of the fungus as Aspergillus flavus and Candida tropicalis. Patient improved with fluconazole treatment. PMID:27504287

  2. Evaluation of the zoonotic potential of transmissible mink encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Successful transmission of Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy (TME) to cattle supports the bovine hypothesis to the still controversial origin of TME outbreaks. Human and primate susceptibility to classical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (c-BSE) and the transmissibility of L-type BSE to macaques as...

  3. Typical and atypical cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cattle, first detected in 1986 in the United Kingdom and subsequently in other countries. It is the most likely cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans, but the origin of BSE has not been eluci...

  4. Comparison of Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy Isolates in Raccoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Owing to its susceptibility to various transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) and relatively short incubation times, the raccoon (Procyon lotor) has been suggested as a model for TSE strain differentiation. Transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) is a prion disease of undetermined origin in...

  5. The Spectrum of Disease in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Stern, Robert A.; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Hall, Garth; Wojtowicz, Sydney M.; Baugh, Christine M.; Riley, David O.; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Cormier, Kerry A.; Jacobs, Matthew A.; Martin, Brett R.; Abraham, Carmela R.; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Reichard, Robert Ross; Wolozin, Benjamin L.; Budson, Andrew E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Cantu, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive tauopathy that occurs as a consequence of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. We analysed post-mortem brains obtained from a cohort of 85 subjects with histories of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury and found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in 68 subjects: all males, ranging…

  6. Laboratory activities involving transmissible spongiform encephalopathy causing agents: risk assessment and biosafety recommendations in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Leunda, Amaya; Van Vaerenbergh, Bernadette; Baldo, Aline; Roels, Stefan; Herman, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Since the appearance in 1986 of epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a new form of neurological disease in cattle which also affected human beings, many diagnostic and research activities have been performed to develop detection and therapeutic tools. A lot of progress was made in better identifying, understanding and controlling the spread of the disease by appropriate monitoring and control programs in European countries. This paper reviews the recent knowledge on pathogenesis, transmission and persistence outside the host of prion, the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) in mammals with a particular focus on risk (re)assessment and management of biosafety measures to be implemented in diagnostic and research laboratories in Belgium. Also, in response to the need of an increasing number of European diagnostic laboratories stopping TSE diagnosis due to a decreasing number of TSE cases reported in the last years, decontamination procedures and a protocol for decommissioning TSE diagnostic laboratories is proposed.

  7. Ammonia encephalopathy and awake craniotomy for brain language mapping: cause of failed awake craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Villalba Martínez, G; Fernández-Candil, J L; Vivanco-Hidalgo, R M; Pacreu Terradas, S; León Jorba, A; Arroyo Pérez, R

    2015-05-01

    We report the case of an aborted awake craniotomy for a left frontotemporoinsular glioma due to ammonia encephalopathy on a patient taking Levetiracetam, valproic acid and clobazam. This awake mapping surgery was scheduled as a second-stage procedure following partial resection eight days earlier under general anesthesia. We planned to perform the surgery with local anesthesia and sedation with remifentanil and propofol. After removal of the bone flap all sedation was stopped and we noticed slow mentation and excessive drowsiness prompting us to stop and control the airway and proceed with general anesthesia. There were no post-operative complications but the patient continued to exhibit bradypsychia and hand tremor. His ammonia level was found to be elevated and was treated with an infusion of l-carnitine after discontinuation of the valproic acid with vast improvement. Ammonia encephalopathy should be considered in patients treated with valproic acid and mental status changes who require an awake craniotomy with patient collaboration.

  8. Clinical Characteristics of Transplant-associated Encephalopathy in Children

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to analyze characteristics of encephalopathy after both hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ pediatric transplantation. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 662 pediatric transplant recipients (201 with liver transplantation [LT], 55 with heart transplantation [HT], and 67 with kidney transplantation [KT], 339 with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation [HSCT]) who received their graft organs at Asan Medical Center between January 2000 and July 2014. Of the 662 patients, 50 (7.6%) experienced encephalopathy after transplantation. The incidence of encephalopathy was significantly different according to the type of organ transplant: LT, 16/201 (8.0%), HT, 13/55 (23.6%), KT, 5/67 (7.5%), and HSCT, 16/339 (4.7%) (P < 0.001). Drug-induced encephalopathy (n = 14) was the most common encephalopathy for all transplant types, but particularly after HSCT. Hypertensive encephalopathy was the most common after KT and HT, whereas metabolic encephalopathy was the most common after LT. The median time to encephalopathy onset also differed according to the transplant type: 5 days after KT (range 0–491 days), 10 days after HT (1–296 days), 49.5 days after HSCT (9–1,405 days), and 39 days after LT (1–1,092 days) (P = 0.018). The mortality rate among patients with encephalopathy was 42.0% (n = 21/50). Only 5 patients died of neurologic complications. Transplant-associated encephalopathy presented different characteristics according to the type of transplant. Specialized diagnostic approach for neurologic complications specific to the type of transplant may improve survival and quality of life in children after transplantation. PMID:28145649

  9. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in a child with Wernicke encephalopathy treated with fludrocortisone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Min Jeong; Kim, Soon Chul; Joo, Chan Uhng; Kim, Sun Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale for this case report: Cerebral Salt-Wasting Syndrome (CSWS) is characterized by hyponatremia and sodium wasting in the urine.[1] These conditions are triggered by various neurosurgical disorders such as subarachnoid hemorrhage, brain tumor, head injury, and brain surgery.[2,3] To our knowledge, CSWS caused by Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) has been rarely reported. Presenting concerns of the patient: A 2-year-old male patient presented to our hospital due to a seizure attack. He had been neglected and refused to take food for a long time (body weight < 3rd percentile). During admission, the patient showed low serum osmolality, high urine osmolality, dehydration state, increased urine output, and negative water balance, a diagnosis of CSWS was made. Diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes: Brain MRI displayed symmetrical lesions of T2WI and FLAIR high signal intensity in the peri-aqueductal and hypothalamic areas, which suggests Wernicke encephalopathy. For the early diagnosis of WE, neuroimaging studies can be an important marker. Thiamine hydrochloride was administered at a dose of 100 mg/day for 3 weeks. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome was subsequently diagnosed due to persistent hyponatremia, dehydrated state, and high urine sodium with massive urination. Main lessons learned from this case: Wernicke encephalopathy is a very rare cause of cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in pediatrics patients. The patient had a good outcome after hypertonic solution and fludrocortisone therapy. PMID:27603336

  10. Reducing the Cost of the Diagnostic Odyssey in Early Onset Epileptic Encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla, M. Adela; Campbell, Colleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) has revolutionized the way we think about and diagnose epileptic encephalopathies. Multiple recent review articles discuss the benefits of WES and suggest various algorithms to follow for determining the etiology of epileptic encephalopathies. Incorporation of WES in these algorithms is leading to the discovery of new genetic diagnoses of early onset epileptic encephalopathies (EOEEs) at a rapid rate; however, WES is not yet a universally utilized diagnostic tool. Clinical WES may be underutilized due to provider discomfort in ordering the test or perceived costliness. At our hospital WES is not routinely performed for patients with EOEE due to limited insurance reimbursement. In fact for any patient with noncommercial insurance (Medicaid) the institution does not allow sending out WES as this is not “established”/“proven to be highly useful and cost effective”/“approved test” in patients with epilepsy. Recently, we performed WES on four patients from three families and identified novel mutations in known epilepsy genes in all four cases. These patients had State Medicaid as their insurance carrier and were followed up for several years for EOEE while being worked up using the traditional/approved testing methods. Following a recently proposed diagnostic pathway, we analyzed the cost savings (US dollars) that could be accrued if WES was performed earlier in the diagnostic odyssey. This is the first publication that addresses the dollar cost of traditional testing in EOEE as performed in these four cases versus WES and the potential cost savings. PMID:27243033

  11. Ifosfamide associated myoclonus-encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Savica, Rodolfo; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Josephs, Keith A

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of movement disorders associated with ifosfamide toxicity. One of the most common adverse events of ifosfamide treatment is central nervous system toxicity. However, little is known about the occurrence of movement disorders associated with ifosfamide toxicity. We performed a retrospective computer search of the electronic medical records database of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN from 1 January 1997-30 June 2010, using a series of search terms to identify all patients that had been treated with ifosfamide for systemic cancer. Among 400 patients that have ever used ifosfamide, we selected those patients that had any neurological complication in their medical records after the use of ifosfamide. Fifty-two had a neurological complication after ifosfamide administration. The most common neurological complication was encephalopathy that was present in 11 cases (21%). The presence of a movement disorder time locked to the administration of ifosfamide was reported in seven cases (13%). Generalized myoclonus was most common, occurring in four patients while postural tremor was documented in the other three. All patients with myoclonus had asterixis. Four of the patients also had encephalopathy. In six patients the movement disorders resolved within 48 h, spontaneously, after the discontinuation of ifosfamide, while in one case resolved in 24 h after the treatment with methylene blue. Our study demonstrates that although encephalopathy is the most common adverse neurological event associated with ifosfamide toxicity, movement disorders, including generalized myoclonus, asterixis, and postural tremors may also occur. Treatment with methylene blue may be further considered as useful to ameliorate the movement disorders.

  12. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of flumazenil in the treatment of portal systemic encephalopathy: a double blind, randomised, placebo controlled multicentre study.

    PubMed Central

    Gyr, K; Meier, R; Häussler, J; Boulétreau, P; Fleig, W E; Gatta, A; Holstege, A; Pomier-Layrargues, G; Schalm, S W; Groeneweg, M; Scollo-Lavizzari, G; Ventura, E; Zeneroli, M L; Williams, R; Yoo, Y; Amrein, R

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Portal systemic encephalopathy (PSE) is a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with hepatic failure. Small scale studies have shown the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil to be effective in ameliorating PSE. AIMS: To determine the efficacy of flumazenil in patients with non-comatous mild to moderate PSE (stages I to III) due to severe chronic liver disease. PATIENTS: 49 male and female adults without symptoms of severe bleeding and sepsis and who screened negative for benzodiazepine in both blood and urine, were included in the study. METHODS: Patients were randomised to receive either three sequential bolus injections of flumazenil (0.4, 0.8, and 1 mg) or placebo at one minute intervals, followed by intravenous infusions of either flumazenil (1 mg/h) or placebo for three hours. Clinical PSE grading and vital signs were assessed hourly during baseline and post-treatment periods and half hourly during treatment. The main outcome measures were improvement in group average PSE score and reduction of two points in individual PSE score (clinically relevant improvement). RESULTS: The mean average improvement in the PSE score in the subjects treated with flumazenil was not statistically significantly different from placebo. However, for patients showing clinically relevant improvement, the difference between flumazenil and placebo was statistically significant (seven of 28 v none of 21; p = 0.015). Flumazenil was well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: A subgroup of patients with PSE resulting from chronic liver disease may benefit from the administration of flumazenil. PMID:8977350

  13. [Star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) toxic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Signaté, A; Olindo, S; Chausson, N; Cassinoto, C; Edimo Nana, M; Saint Vil, M; Cabre, P; Smadja, D

    2009-03-01

    Ingestion of star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) can induce severe intoxication in subjects with chronic renal failure. Oxalate plays a key role in the neurotoxicity of star fruit. We report the cases of two patients with unknown chronic renal insufficiency who developed severe encephalopathy after ingestion of star fruit. The two patients developed intractable hiccups, vomiting, impaired consciousness and status epilepticus. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging showed cortical and thalamic hyperintense lesions related to epileptic status. They improved after being submitted to continuous hemofiltration which constitutes the most effective treatment during the acute phase.

  14. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the availability cascade.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gary S; Sills, Allen

    2014-09-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in sports has been known for > 85 years, and has experienced a resurgence of interest over the past decade, both in the media and in the scientific community. However, there appears to be a disconnection between the public's perception of CTE and the currently available scientific data. The cognitive bias known as the "availability cascade" has been suggested as a reason to explain this rift in knowledge. This review summarizes and updates the history of CTE in sports, discusses recent epidemiological and autopsy studies, summarizes the evidence base related to CTE in sports, and offers recommendations for future directions.

  15. Hashimoto's encephalopathy mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Angela C; Baehring, Joachim M

    2017-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a rare, imprecisely defined autoimmune neurologic syndrome associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis that normally responds to corticosteroids. Here, we describe the case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with subacute cognitive decline and ataxia. Neoplastic, paraneoplastic, infectious, and metabolic etiologies were ruled out. Anti-TPO antibody level was markedly elevated at 966U/mL. After one month of 60mg/day of oral prednisone, she felt back to baseline and her Montreal Cognitive Assessment dramatically improved. Physicians should strongly consider this uncommon diagnosis in patients with rapid cognitive decline and no other clear etiology.

  16. Repetitive Head Impacts and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    McKee, Ann C; Alosco, Michael L; Huber, Bertrand R

    2016-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a distinctive neurodegenerative disease that occurs as a result of repetitive head impacts. CTE can only be diagnosed by postmortem neuropathologic examination of brain tissue. CTE is a unique disorder with a pathognomonic lesion that can be reliably distinguished from other neurodegenerative diseases. CTE is associated with violent behaviors, explosivity, loss of control, depression, suicide, memory loss and cognitive changes. There is increasing evidence that CTE affects amateur athletes as well as professional athletes and military veterans. CTE has become a major public health concern.

  17. Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy through a Port-Catheter System as Preoperative Initial Therapy in Patients with Advanced Liver Dysfunction due to Synchronous and Unresectable Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Iguchi, Toshihiro; Arai, Yasuaki; Inaba, Yoshitaka Yamaura, Hidekazu; Sato, Yozo; Miyazaki, Masaya; Shimamoto, Hiroshi

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. We retrospectively evaluated the safety and efficacy of preoperative initial hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) through a port-catheter system in patients with liver dysfunction due to synchronous and unresectable liver metastases. The aim of HAIC was to improve patients' clinical condition for later surgical removal of primary colorectal cancer. Methods. Port-catheter systems were placed radiologically in 21 patients (mean age 58.6 {+-} 8.1 years) with liver dysfunction due to synchronous liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Initial HAIC of 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil was administered weekly as a 5 hr continuous infusion through this system. Surgical removal of the primary lesion was planned after HAIC improved the liver function. Results. Port-catheter system placement was successful in all patients without severe complications. Patients were followed up for a median of 309 days (range 51-998 days). After starting HAIC, no severe adverse events that caused drug loss and treatment postponement or suspension were observed in any of the patients. HAIC was performed a mean of 4.5 {+-} 3.0 times and the liver function improved in all patients. Curative (n = 18) or palliative (n = 1) surgical removal of the primary lesion was performed. The remaining 2 patients died because extrahepatic metastases developed and their performance status worsened; thus, surgery could not be performed. The median survival times of all patients and the operated patients were 309 and 386 days, respectively. Conclusion. Initial HAIC administration is a safe and efficacious method for improving liver function prior to operative resection of primary colorectal cancer in patients with liver dysfunction due to synchronous and unresectable liver metastases.

  18. HIV coinfection shortens the survival of patients with hepatitis C virus-related decompensated cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Juan A; Romero-Gómez, Manuel; Díaz-García, Fernando; Girón-González, José A; Montero, José L; Torre-Cisneros, Julián; Andrade, Raúl J; González-Serrano, Mercedes; Aguilar, José; Aguilar-Guisado, Manuela; Navarro, José M; Salmerón, Javier; Caballero-Granado, Francisco J; García-García, José A

    2005-04-01

    The impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection on the survival of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related end-stage liver disease (ESLD) is unknown. Because HIV infection is no longer considered an absolute contraindication for liver transplantation in some countries, it has become a priority to address this topic. The objective of this study was to compare the survival of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients with decompensated cirrhosis due to HCV. In a retrospective cohort study, the survival of 1,037 HCV monoinfected and 180 HCV/HIV-coinfected patients with cirrhosis after the first hepatic decompensation was analyzed. Of the group, 386 (37%) HCV-monoinfected and 100 (56%) HCV/HIV-coinfected subjects died during the follow-up. The median survival time of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients was 16 and 48 months, respectively (P < .001). The relative risk (95% CI) of death for HIV-infected patients was 2.26 (1.51-3.38). Other independent predictors of survival were age older than 63 years (2.25 [1.53-3.31]); Child-Turcotte-Pugh class B versus class A (1.95 [1.41-2.68]) and class C versus class A (2.78 [1.66-4.70]); hepatitis D virus infection (1.56 [1.12-4.77]); model for end-stage liver disease score, (1.05 [1.01-1-11]); more than one simultaneous decompensation (1.23 [1.12-3.33]); and the type of the first hepatic decompensation, with a poorer prognosis associated with encephalopathy compared with portal hypertensive gastrointestinal bleeding (2.03 [1.26-3.10]). In conclusion, HIV coinfection reduces considerably the survival of patients with HCV-related ESLD independently of other markers of poor prognosis. This fact must be taken into account to establish the adequate timing of liver transplantation in HIV-coinfected subjects.

  19. Wernicke encephalopathy with atypical magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Liou, Kuang-Chung; Kuo, Shu-Fan; Chen, Lu-An

    2012-11-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is a medical emergency caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. Typical clinical manifestations are mental change, ataxia, and ocular abnormalities. Wernicke encephalopathy is an important differential diagnosis in all patients with acute mental change. However, the disorder is greatly underdiagnosed. Clinical suspicion, detailed history taking, and neurologic evaluations are important for early diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently considered the diagnostic method of choice. Typical MRI findings of WE are symmetrical involvement of medial thalamus, mammillary body, and periaqueductal gray matter. Prompt thiamine supplement is important in avoiding unfavorable outcomes. Here, we report a case of alcoholic WE with typical clinical presentation but with atypical MRI. Axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images showing symmetrical hyperintensity lesions in dentate nuclei of cerebellum, olivary bodies, and dorsal pons. Although atypical MRI findings are more common in nonalcoholic WE, it can also occur in alcoholic WE. This article is aimed to highlight the potential pitfalls in diagnosing acute mental change, the importance of clinical suspicion, and early treatment in WE.

  20. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy: An Underrecognized Clinicoradiologic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiujuan; Wu, Wei; Pan, Wei; Wu, Limin; Liu, Kangding; Zhang, Hong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rare but distinctive type of acute encephalopathy with global distribution. Occurrence of ANE is usually preceded by a virus-associated febrile illness and ensued by rapid deterioration. However, the causal relationship between viral infections and ANE and the exact pathogenesis of ANE remain unclear; both environmental and host factors might be involved. Most cases of ANE are sporadic and nonrecurrent, namely, isolated or sporadic ANE; however, few cases are recurrent and with familial episodes. The recurrent and familial forms of ANE were found to be incompletely autosomal-dominant. Further the missense mutations in the gene encoding the nuclear pore protein Ran Binding Protein 2 (RANBP2) were identified. Although the clinical course and the prognosis of ANE are diverse, the hallmark of neuroradiologic manifestation of ANE is multifocal symmetric brain lesions which are demonstrated by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The treatment of ANE is still under investigation. We summarize the up-to-date knowledge on ANE, with emphasis on prompt diagnosis and better treatment of this rare but fatal disease. PMID:25873770

  1. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table ... from all walks of life are affected by hepatitis, especially hepatitis C, the most common form of ...

  2. Hepatitis A through E (Viral Hepatitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... travelers How can hepatitis B be prevented? The hepatitis B vaccine offers the best protection. All infants and unvaccinated ... should receive hepatitis B immune globulin and the hepatitis B vaccine within 12 hours of birth to help prevent ...

  3. Natural history and risk factors in fulminant hepatic failure

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, U; Thapa, B; Prasad, A; Sharma, A; Singh, K

    2002-01-01

    Background: The natural history of fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) without liver transplantation is not well known. Aims: To study the natural history and prognostic factors, especially the presence of ascites and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), in children with FHF. Methods: FHF was defined by the onset of encephalopathy within 12 weeks of onset of jaundice. From August 1997 to December 2000, 67 children (≤12 years) were diagnosed with FHF. Their clinical features, investigations and outcome were noted. Viral markers A to E (IgM, anti-HAV; IgM, anti-HEV, HBsAg, and anti-HCV) were determined by ELISA. SBP was defined by the presence of ≥250 neutrophils with or without a positive culture in ascitic fluid. Results: Mean age of the children was 5.8 years with an almost equal sex distribution. Viral markers were positive in 63 (94%) cases: hepatitis A in 34 (54%), E in 17 (27%), A+E in seven (11%), and B in five (8%). Thirty one children presented with grade I or II encephalopathy and all recovered, whereas 17 of 36 children who had grade III or IV encephalopathy died. Ascites was detected (both clinically and ultrasonically) in 34 (51%) cases, nine (26%) of which had SBP. Overall mortality was 25%. Mortality was higher in those who had ascites than in those who did not (32% v 18%); among those with ascites it was maximum in those who had SBP (78% v 16%). Total serum bilirubin and grade of encephalopathy were significantly higher, serum albumin was significantly lower, and prothrombin time was significantly prolonged in those who died than in those who recovered. Conclusion: The natural history of FHF in Indian children depends on age, grade of encephalopathy, ascites, and SBP. SBP depicts worse outcome. In all cases of FHF with ascites, the presence of SBP should be investigated. PMID:12089125

  4. Harnessing gene expression networks to prioritize candidate epileptic encephalopathy genes.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Karen L; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets.

  5. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants.

  6. Hepatitis C Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hepatitis C Antibody; Anti-HCV; HCV-PCR; HCV-RNA; Hepatitis C Viral Load Formal name: Viral Hepatitis C Antibody Screen; Viral Hepatitis C RNA by PCR; Hepatitis C Virus Genotype Related tests: ...

  7. Alcohol and Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Living with Hepatitis » Daily Living: Alcohol Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... Alcohol for Veterans and the Public Alcohol and Hepatitis: Entire Lesson Overview Alcohol is one of the ...

  8. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Public Home » Hepatitis C » Treatment Decisions Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... can I find out about participating in a hepatitis C clinical trial? Many trials are being conducted ...

  9. Hepatitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Parents > Hepatitis Print A A A ... to Call the Doctor en español Hepatitis About Hepatitis The word hepatitis simply means an inflammation of ...

  10. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chapter 3 - Hepatitis A Chapter 3 - Hepatitis C Hepatitis B Francisco Averhoff INFECTIOUS AGENT Hepatitis B is ... their exposures. Map 3-04. Prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus infection among adults PDF Version (printable) ...

  11. [Acute toxic hepatitis due to drinking water].

    PubMed

    Martínez Amate, Eva; Rodríguez Manrique, Marco A; González Sánchez, Mercedes; Casado Martin, Marta

    2010-11-01

    Toxic-induced liver disease is uncommon, although the true proportion of cases of hepatotoxicity is unknown, as this entity is underdiagnosed and underreported. The main reasons why toxic-induced liver disease goes unnoticed is the lack of pathognomonic data and the lack of spontaneous reporting by doctors and pharmacists. In some cases, the toxic substance can leave its «signature» in the form of clinical semiology suggestive of an underlying toxic cause. We present a case of hepatotoxicity induced by drinking water (chlorinated), which produced a reactive metabolites syndrome (trihalomethanes from the reaction of chlorine with organic products). Although the clinical presentation was typical, the case posed a diagnostic challenge for the various professionals involved.

  12. Proton Resonance Spectroscopy Study of the Effects of L-Ornithine-L-Aspartate on the Development of Encephalopathy, Using Localization Pulses with Reduced Specific Absorption Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotboom, J.; Vogels, B. A. P. M.; Dehaan, J. G.; Creyghton, J. H. N.; Quack, G.; Chamuleau, R. A. F. M.; Bovee, W. M. M. J.

    Using the SADLOVE ( single-shot adiabatic localized volume excitation) localization technique with reduced specific absorption rate phase-compensated 2π pulses for localization, in vivo rat brain spectra were obtained in order to study the possible beneficial effects of L-ornithine-L-aspartate (OA) on the development of encephalopathy induced by hyperammonemia in portacaval shunted rats, an experimental model for subacute hepatic encephalopathy. The in vivo1H spectra were quantified using a conjugate-gradient-based frequency-domain fitting procedure. OA treatment resulted in an about threefold lower increase in train lactate ( P < 0.0001) and a slower increase of brain glutamine ( P = 0.022) concentration. However, these changes in brain metabolism, including a significantly lower ammonia concentration during OA treatment, were not associated with a sig significant improvement in clinical symptoms of encephalopathy, suggesting either insufficient decrease in brain ammonia concentration or another effect of OA treatment counteracting the lowering effect on blood and brain ammonia and on brain glutamine and lactate. It is concluded that localized in vivo1H MRS of the brain in combination with other analytical techniques, such as in vivo microdialysis, is helpful in explaining pathophysiological changes during hyperammonemia-induced encephalopathy.

  13. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation of the liver.” This inflammation can be caused by a wide variety of toxins, drugs, and metabolic diseases, as well as infection. There are at least 5 hepatitis viruses. Hepatitis A is contracted when a child eats food or drinks water that is contaminated with the virus or has ...

  14. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... B to come back?Should I get the hepatitis B vaccine?What are the side effects of antiviral medicines?Will my liver ever be normal again? Last Updated: October 1996 This article ... B, hepatitis virus, Interferon alpha-2b, jaundice, Lamivudine, liver ...

  15. Another cause of vaccine encephalopathy: a case of Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Novy, Jan; Catarino, Claudia B; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Smith, Shelagh M; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Hammond, Peter; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2012-05-01

    Dravet syndrome has been found recently as an important underlying condition in cases of alleged vaccine encephalopathy after pertussis vaccination, where vaccination seemed to have precipitated the occurrence of the disease without modifying the long-term course. We report on a patient diagnosed with Angelman syndrome in her fifth decade, in whom the intellectual disability and epilepsy had been assumed to be caused by a vaccine encephalopathy following smallpox vaccination. Clinical features of Angelman syndrome had faded away. The history of the present patient suggests that genetic conditions other than Dravet syndrome can be associated with an alleged vaccine encephalopathy. A history of vaccine encephalopathy is rare among patients with learning disability and refractory epilepsy (1.4% in our cohort), but it should lead to consideration of a comprehensive genetic work-up if Dravet syndrome is excluded. The early history of the patient, when available, should guide the investigations. Medico-legal aspects are also discussed.

  16. [Follow-up of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Biarge, M; Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Salas, S

    2014-07-01

    Hypothermia treatment for newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy reduces the number of neonates who die or have permanent neurological deficits. Although this therapy is now standard of care, neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy still has a significant impact on the child's neurodevelopment and quality of life. Infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be enrolled in multidisciplinary follow-up programs in order to detect impairments, to initiate early intervention, and to provide counselling and support for families. This article describes the main neurodevelopmental outcomes after term neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We offer recommendations for follow-up based on the infant's clinical condition and other prognostic indicators, mainly neonatal neuroimaging. Other aspects, such as palliative care and medico-legal issues, are also briefly discussed.

  17. Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a Patient with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Rebecca A; Vu, Trung; Hunter, Alan J

    2006-01-01

    Clinically, we most often associate Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) with an alcohol abusing population. However, it is important to consider other causes of malnutrition and vitamin deficiency as risk factors for the development of this disorder. We present a case of a 51-year-old man with schizophrenia and malnutrition who presented with delirium, ophthalmoplegia, and seizures. He responded rapidly to the administration of IV thiamine. Because of the high rate of mortality and morbidity, WE should be high on the differential of any patient at risk for malnutrition or with ophthalmoplegia, regardless of alcohol history. This is particularly important in psychiatric patients where the syndrome may be masked and thus treatment delayed. PMID:16925799

  18. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Impact on Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, Robert; Chin, Lawrence S.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a devastating neuropsychological condition afflicting a small percentage of athletes partaking in high-impact sports. The onset of symptoms lags years behind the inciting events. Repetitive minor head injuries are felt to be the main etiology behind CTE. Routine radiographic imaging generally is unremarkable in cases of CTE. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are advanced MRI-based sequences that have shown promise in detecting early radiographic findings that may be reflective of CTE. Progressive neuronal loss is the histopathological hallmark of this neurodegenerative disease. Strategizing earlier detection techniques is paramount in delivering optimal care to athletes afflicted with CTE. PMID:27088064

  19. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid tau in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Frijlink, Daphne W; Tilanus, Joachim J; Roks, Gerwin

    2012-08-08

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) commonly presents with oculomotor abnormalities, gait ataxia and confusion. WE can mimic rapidly progressive dementia syndromes, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau is frequently used for diagnosis of several dementia subtypes, predominantly CJD and Alzheimer's disease. The combination of very high CSF tau (tau) and normal phosphorylated tau (p-tau) levels is almost exclusively seen in aggressive diseases, such as CJD. The authors present a case of a woman with WE, caused by chronic insufficient dietary intake, with highly elevated CSF tau and normal p-tau. The clinical symptoms and CSF findings raised the suspicion of CJD. However, shortly after immediate treatment with thiamine the patient clinically improved. At follow-up, 2.5 months later, she had made a good recovery. This case of rapidly progressive dementia illustrates that, even in the case of a highly elevated CSF tau, clinicians should be alert for treatable causes such as WE.

  20. Neuroprotective Strategies after Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Brandon J.; Reis, Cesar; Ho, Wing Mann; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a devastating disease that primarily causes neuronal and white matter injury and is among the leading cause of death among infants. Currently there are no well-established treatments; thus, it is important to understand the pathophysiology of the disease and elucidate complications that are creating a gap between basic science and clinical translation. In the development of neuroprotective strategies and translation of experimental results in HIE, there are many limitations and challenges to master based on an appropriate study design, drug delivery properties, dosage, and use in neonates. We will identify understudied targets after HIE, as well as neuroprotective molecules that bring hope to future treatments such as melatonin, topiramate, xenon, interferon-beta, stem cell transplantation. This review will also discuss some of the most recent trials being conducted in the clinical setting and evaluate what directions are needed in the future. PMID:26389893

  1. Wernicke encephalopathy and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, A; Brandel, J P; Grignon, Y; Sazdovitch, V; Seilhean, D; Faucheux, B; Privat, N; Brault, J L; Vital, A; Uro-Coste, E; Pluot, M; Chapon, F; Maurage, C A; Letournel, F; Vespignani, H; Place, G; Degos, C F; Peoc'h, K; Haïk, S; Hauw, J J

    2009-06-01

    We assessed the prevalence of Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) in all 657 cases suspected of Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD) referred from 2001 to 2006 to the French Neuropathology Network of CJD. Clinical, biological and imaging data were reviewed when the diagnosis of WE was made at autopsy. No CJD was found in five cases suspected of sporadic CJD. In these five cases, myoclonus had been observed in four, CSF 14-3-3 protein in two. In 14 other cases, WE was combined with CJD, 13 of which were sporadic. These belonged mainly to the molecular variants of sporadic CJD associated with a long duration of disease. This stresses the necessity of remaining alert to the diagnosis of WE when CJD is suspected.

  2. National Childhood Encephalopathy Study: an interim report.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D L; Ross, E M

    1978-01-01

    Data from the first year of the National Childhood Encephalopathy Study were reviewed to see whether any relation was apparent between pertussis vaccination and brain disease. Three hundred and eighty-seven cases of encephalitis and other specified neurological conditions in which the children were admitted to hospital were reported, of which 267 satisfied the study criteria. Control children were matched for age with the index cases, and medical and immunisation histories were reviewed. Few of the index cases had been vaccinated within 28 days before admission to hospital, so that no close association between vaccination and brain disease existed in most cases. The number of children who had recently been immunised was too small for any statistically useful conclusion to be reached about the risk associated with pertussis vaccine. The study is continuing. PMID:709204

  3. Brain MRI findings in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Wicklund, Meredith R; Knopman, David S

    2013-08-01

    A 71-year-old woman with myelofibrosis on chemotherapy experienced an acute illness with nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Two weeks later, she developed an acute confusional state characterized by disorientation and fluctuating alertness with normal speech and language. Her neurologic examination demonstrated an upper motor neuron pattern of right hemiparesis. She reported double vision though ophthalmoparesis was not appreciated. Her gait was normal. While hospitalized, she developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Brain MRI revealed a small area of restricted diffusion of the left precentral gyrus (figure). She was diagnosed with a stroke with secondary seizures; however, as the confusional state resolved, she developed profound retrograde and anterograde amnesia. Review of the brain MRI showed high T2 signal in the medial thalamus and contrast enhancement of the mamillary bodies; a diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome was entertained and she was started on thiamine replacement. The encephalopathy and hemiparesis resolved though she remains severely amnestic.

  4. Wernicke's encephalopathy: expanding the diagnostic toolbox.

    PubMed

    Lough, Mary E

    2012-06-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a life threatening neurological disorder that results from thiamine (Vitamin B1) deficiency. Clinical signs include mental status changes, ataxia, occulomotor changes and nutritional deficiency. The conundrum is that the clinical presentation is highly variable. WE clinical signs, brain imaging, and thiamine blood levels, are reviewed in 53 published case reports from 2001 to 2011; 81 % (43/53) were non-alcohol related. Korsakoff Syndrome or long-term cognitive neurological changes occurred in 28 % (15/53). Seven WE cases (13 %) had a normal magnetic resonance image (MRI). Four WE cases (8 %) had normal or high thiamine blood levels. Neither diagnostic tool can be relied upon exclusively to confirm a diagnosis of WE.

  5. Quantitative Risk Assessment of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Kasuga, Fumiko

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a progressive neurological disease of cattle affecting the central nervous system and was first diagnosed in the United Kingdom (UK) in 1986 (Wells et al., 1987). This disease is one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) which includes Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans and scrapie in sheep. The causative agent of TSE is considered to be an abnormal form of prion protein. However, the details of its pathogenic mechanism have not been fully identified. Scrapie, which causes neurological symptoms in sheep and goats, has existed in the UK for 200 years (Hoinville, 1996) and spread across the rest of the world in the 1900s (Detwiler & Baylis, 2003). There has been no report so far that scrapie can be transmitted to humans. Initially, BSE was also considered as a disease affecting only animals. However, a variant type of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) was first reported in the UK, and exposure to a BSE agent was suspected (Collinge, Sidle, Meads, Ironside, & Hill, 1996). vCJD is clinically and pathologically different from the sporadic type of CJD, and age at clinical onset of vCJD is younger than sporadic type (Will et al., 1996). Since the UK government announced the possible association between BSE and vCJD in 1996, BSE has become a huge public health concern all over the world. Of particular concern about vCJD, the fatal disease in younger age, distorted consumer confidence in beef safety, and as a result reduced beef consumption has been seen in many BSE-affected countries.

  6. Early progressive encephalopathy in boys and MECP2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kankirawatana, P; Leonard, H; Ellaway, C; Scurlock, J; Mansour, A; Makris, C M; Dure, L S; Friez, M; Lane, J; Kiraly-Borri, C; Fabian, V; Davis, M; Jackson, J; Christodoulou, J; Kaufmann, W E; Ravine, D; Percy, A K

    2006-07-11

    MECP2 mutations mainly occur in females with Rett syndrome. Mutations have been described in 11 boys with progressive encephalopathy: seven of nine with affected sisters and two de novo. The authors report four de novo occurrences: three pathogenic and one potentially pathogenic. Common features include failure to thrive, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly, and abnormal motor control. MECP2 mutations should be assessed in boys with progressive encephalopathy and one or more of respiratory insufficiency, abnormal movements or tone, and intractable seizures.

  7. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood (ANEC): A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    HASSANZADEH RAD, Afagh; AMINZADEH, Vahid

    2017-01-01

    Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of childhood (ANEC) is a specific type of encephalopathy. After viral infection, it can be diagnosed by bilateral symmetrical lesions predominantly observed in thalami & brainstem of infants & children. Although, it is commonly occurred in Japanese and Taiwanese population. The goal of this article is to report a rare case of ANEC in a 15 months old girl infant from Thaleghani Hospital, Ramian, Gorgan, northern Iran. PMID:28277560

  8. Late onset arginase deficiency presenting with encephalopathy and midbrain hyperintensity

    PubMed Central

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Raja, Rajat; Balagopal, Anuroop

    2016-01-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCD) are very rare metabolic disorders that present with encephalopathy and hyperammonemia. Of the UCDs, Arginase deficiency (ARD) is the rarest and presents in childhood with a progressive spastic diplegia or seizures. Acute presentation in adulthood is extremely unusual.[1] We present the first case of adult onset ARD presenting with encephalopathy and diffusion weighted MRI findings that resembled a moustache in the midbrain. PMID:27570396

  9. Diagnosis and Management of Epileptic Encephalopathies in Children

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Puneet; Tripathi, Manjari

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies refer to a group of disorders in which the unremitting epileptic activity contributes to severe cognitive and behavioral impairments above and beyond what might be expected from the underlying pathology alone, and these can worsen over time leading to progressive cerebral dysfunction. Several syndromes have been described based on their electroclinical features (age of onset, seizure type, and EEG pattern). This review briefly describes the clinical evaluation and management of commonly encountered epileptic encephalopathies in children. PMID:23970964

  10. Etiological spectrum of viral hepatitis and prevalence of markers of hepatitis A and B virus infection in north India*

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, B. N.; Gandhi, B. M.; Joshi, Y. K.

    1984-01-01

    The etiological spectrum of viral hepatitis and the prevalence of serological markers of hepatitis A and B virus infection in healthy persons in north India were studied. Hepatitis A virus was found to be the most common cause of acute hepatitis in children (67%). It was a less frequent cause of this disease in adults (14%). Hepatitis A virus was only rarely the cause of acute (12%) and subacute (4%) liver failure. It was recorded as the etiological agent in an epidemic among schoolchildren. Exposure to hepatitis A virus occurs in early childhood, and by the age of 10 years, 90% of healthy persons have serological evidence of hepatitis A virus infection. Hepatitis non-A non-B virus was the cause of acute hepatitis in 44% of adults and 24% of children with this disease. This virus was also the most important etiological agent in acute liver failure (55%) and subacute hepatic failure (51%). It was the cause of all the hepatitis epidemics in the general population. Only 9% of hepatitis cases in children were due to hepatitis B virus whereas 42% of cases in adults were attributable to this virus. Hepatitis B virus was the causative agent in 33% of cases of acute hepatic failure and 45% of cases of subacute hepatic failure. The carrier rate for hepatitis B virus was 5% and antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen was found in up to 38% of specific population groups. PMID:6424958

  11. [The other types of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Miguet, J P; Coaquette, A; Bresson-Hadni, S; Lab, M

    1990-06-21

    Hepatitis due to viruses other than A, B, C, D, E are numerous but uncommon in adults. Among the group of Herpesviridae (HSV, CMV, EBV, VZV), clinical hepatitis is usually suggestive of disseminated viral infection. Fulminant hepatitis occasionally observed in immunocompromised hosts are due to HSV, and VZV, but exceptionally to EBV. Many new techniques using specific monoclonal antibodies permit an accurate and fast diagnosis. Three drugs (vidarabine, acyclovir, ribavirine) have been shown to be efficient in the treatment of severe forms of the disease. Hepatitis due to exotic viruses (Amaril, Ebola, Lassa) are exceptional in France, but require specific prophylactic measures.

  12. Umbilical venous catheterization gone wrong: Hepatic complications

    PubMed Central

    Sherwani, Poonam; Vire, Adweta; Anand, Rama; Jajoo, Mamta

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic complications of malposition of umbilical venous catheter (UVC) are uncommon and occur due to extravasation of hypertonic fluids and the blood products in the liver tissue. Various hepatic complications include thrombosis of hepatic vessels, hepatic necrosis, hepatic fluid collections, and hematoma, with the intraparenchymal liver lesions seen along the course of ductus venosus. Radiologists must be aware of these complications and their imaging findings, as the timely recognition and immediate management can prevent the fatal outcome. Here, we present a rare case of intraparenchymal liver lesions associated with malposition of UVC in a preterm baby. PMID:27081222

  13. MRI gadolinium enhancement precedes neuroradiological findings in acute necrotizing encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Tamura, Takuya; Nagai, Yuhki; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Awaya, Tomonari; Shibata, Minoru; Kato, Takeo; Heike, Toshio

    2013-11-01

    We report a 2-year-old Japanese boy with acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) triggered by human herpes virus-6, who presented insightful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. He was admitted due to impaired consciousness and a convulsion, 2 days after the onset of an upper respiratory infection. At admission, cranial MRI showed marked gadolinium enhancement at the bilateral thalami, brainstem and periventricular white matter without abnormal findings in noncontrast MRI sequences. On the following day, noncontrast computed tomography demonstrated homogeneous low-density lesions in the bilateral thalami and severe diffuse brain edema. The patient progressively deteriorated and died on the 18th day of admission. The pathogenesis of ANE remains mostly unknown, but it has been suggested that hypercytokinemia may play a major role. Overproduced cytokines cause vascular endothelial damage and alter the permeability of the vessel wall in the multiple organs, including the brain. The MRI findings in our case demonstrate that blood-brain barrier permeability was altered prior to the appearance of typical neuroradiological findings. This suggests that alteration of blood-brain barrier permeability is the first step in the development of the brain lesions in ANE, and supports the proposed mechanism whereby hypercytokinemia causes necrotic brain lesions. This is the first report demonstrating MRI gadolinium enhancement antecedent to typical neuroradiological findings in ANE.

  14. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... bowel movements Loss of appetite Low-grade fever Dark urine Joint pain Yellowing of the skin and ... person ingests even tiny amounts of contaminated fecal matter. The hepatitis A virus infects liver cells and ...

  15. Hepatitis E

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a positive-sense, single-stranded ribonucleic acid (RNA) genome. The virus has at least 4 different ... RT-PCR) to detect the hepatitis E virus RNA in blood and/or stool; this assay requires ...

  16. Autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Heneghan, Michael A; Yeoman, Andrew D; Verma, Sumita; Smith, Alastair D; Longhi, Maria Serena

    2013-10-26

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a disease of the hepatic parenchyma that can present in acute or chronic forms. In common with many autoimmune diseases, autoimmune hepatitis is associated with non-organ-specific antibodies in the context of hepatic autoimmunity. This dichotomy has made definition of a unifying hypothesis in the pathophysiology of the disease difficult, although data from the past 8 years have drawn attention to the role of regulatory T cells. Several triggers have been identified, and the disease arises in genetically susceptible individuals. Clinical and biochemical remission is achievable in up to 85% of cases. For the remaining patients, alternative immunosuppression strategies are an option. Liver transplantation provides an excellent outcome for patients with acute liver failure or complications of end-stage liver disease, including hepatocellular carcinoma. Variant or overlapping syndromes are worthy of consideration when unexpected disease features arise.

  17. Fulminant herpes hepatitis mimicking hepatic abscesses.

    PubMed

    Wolfsen, H C; Bolen, J W; Bowen, J L; Fenster, L F

    1993-01-01

    Fulminant hepatitis due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) in adults is a rare and deadly disease. We describe a 23-year-old woman with a 20-year history of Crohn's disease (CD) who was hospitalized with an acute febrile illness and diarrhea. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen demonstrated an intramural sigmoid colon abscess and multiple abscesses in the liver. Despite high-dose parenteral corticosteroids and broad-spectrum antibiotics, the patient remained acutely ill, with high fever and markedly elevated serum transaminase levels, but no jaundice. Sigmoid resection and wedge liver biopsy were performed at laparotomy. Histologic examination documented HSV-type intranuclear inclusions and inflammation with necrosis in both the sigmoid colon and liver specimens. The patient subsequently died despite parenteral acyclovir treatment. Although rare, fulminant hepatitis due to HSV simplex virus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with severe hepatitis. Of special note, the necrotizing liver lesions may be mistaken for pyogenic abscesses on CT scan.

  18. Wernicke Encephalopathy and Sleeve Gastrectomy: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lin

    As the number of obese patients increases, as will the number of bariatric procedures. Malabsorptive bariatric procedures have emerged as one of common causes of Wernicke encephalopathy (WE), an acute neuropsychiatric disorder due to thiamine deficiency. However, restrictive procedures such as sleeve gastrectomy (SG) are less prone to cause nutrient deficiencies. WE occurred after SG is an uncommon complication because the main absorptive sites for thiamine are intact after SG. Here, we report a case of WE after SG. With rapid increase in the use of SG for morbid obesity, this case deserves particular attention from clinicians.

  19. Stem Cell Transplant-Associated Wernicke Encephalopathy in a Patient with High-Risk Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Darlington, Wendy S; Pinto, Navin; Hecktman, Hillary M; Cohn, Susan L; LaBelle, James L

    2015-12-01

    Children undergoing intense cancer treatment frequently require total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Rarely, vitamins are removed due to hypersensitivity to the carrier vehicle in the formulation. We present the case of a 5-year-old patient with stage 4, high-risk neuroblastoma who developed altered mental status, ataxia, and tachycardia during consolidative autologous stem cell transplantation. Skin findings and brain MRI were consistent with thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency and Wernicke encephalopathy. Vitamin B1 administration rapidly reversed all skin and neurologic symptoms. This case highlights the importance of close monitoring of micronutrients in pediatric patients receiving prolonged courses of chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation.

  20. The use of plasma exchange in Hashimoto's encephalopathy: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cook, Melissa K; Malkin, Mark; Karafin, Matthew S

    2015-06-01

    Hashimoto's Encephalopathy (HE) is a very rare condition characterized by psychosis, seizures, cognitive fluctuations, and myoclonus. In a few published cases, plasma exchange has been used due to the theoretical removal of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (anti-TPO), one of the postulated causes of the condition. We report a case of HE treated by plasma exchange where no clinical or neurophysiologic improvement was observed despite documented reduction of the anti-TPO antibody to levels below the limits of laboratory detection. We discuss these findings in the context of the known literature for this disease process.

  1. Wernicke's encephalopathy complicating hyperemesis gravidarum: from the background to the present.

    PubMed

    Di Gangi, Stefania; Gizzo, Salvatore; Patrelli, Tito Silvio; Saccardi, Carlo; D'Antona, Donato; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista

    2012-08-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a neuropsychiatric syndrome due to thiamine deficiency, which is potentially fatal but preventable. In Obstetrics, it can complicate hyperemesis gravidarum because of major daily requirement. Nowadays there is no consensus on early diagnosis, treatment and prevention of this disorder. We present a case report of hyperemesis gravidarum which degenerated into WE and Korsakoff's syndrome. It highlights that the clinical suspicion is necessary to recognize signs and symptoms, to apply the available effective preventive measures in situations at risk and to begin urgent treatment in presence of characteristic clinical features.

  2. Hepatitis E.

    PubMed

    Krawczynski, K; Aggarwal, R; Kamili, S

    2000-09-01

    Hepatitis E, previously known as enterically transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis, is an infectious viral disease with clinical and morphologic features of acute hepatitis. Its causative agent, hepatitis E virus, consists of small, 32- to 34-nm diameter, icosahedral, nonenveloped particles with a single-stranded, positive-sense, 7.5-kb RNA. The virus has two main geographically distinct strains, Asian and Mexican; recently, novel isolates from nonendemic areas and a genetically related swine HEV have been described. HEV is responsible for large epidemics of acute hepatitis and a proportion of sporadic hepatitis cases in the Indian subcontinent, southeast and central Asia, the Middle East, parts of Africa, and Mexico. The virus is excreted in feces and is transmitted predominantly by fecal-oral route, usually through contaminated water. Person-to-person transmission is uncommon. Clinical attack rates are the highest among young adults. Recent evidence suggests that humans with subclinical HEV infection and animals may represent reservoirs of HEV; however, further data are needed. Diagnosis of hepatitis E is usually made by detection of specific IgM antibody, which disappears rapidly over a few months; IgG anti-HEV persists for at least a few years. Clinical illness is similar to other forms of acute viral hepatitis except in pregnant women, in whom illness is particularly severe with a high mortality rate. Subclinical and unapparent infections may occur; however, chronic infection is unknown. No specific treatment is yet available. Use of clean drinking water and proper sanitation is currently the most effective method of prevention. Passive immunization has not been proved to be effective, and recombinant vaccines for travelers to disease-endemic areas and for pregnant women currently are being developed.

  3. Hepatitis A Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Hepatitis A Testing Share this page: Was this page ... HAV-Ab total; Anti-HAV Formal name: Viral Hepatitis A Antibody Related tests: Hepatitis B Testing ; Hepatitis ...

  4. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 - Helminths, Soil-Transmitted Chapter 3 - Hepatitis B Hepatitis A Noele P. Nelson, Trudy V. Murphy INFECTIOUS ... hepatitis/HAV Table 3-02. Vaccines to prevent hepatitis A VACCINE TRADE NAME (MANUFACTURER) AGE (Y) DOSE ...

  5. Hepatitis B Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... worldwide 2 Billion People have been infected with Hepatitis B Worldwide The Hepatitis B Foundation is working ... of people living with hepatitis B. Learn About Hepatitis B in 11 Other Languages . Resource Video See ...

  6. Hepatitis A FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professional Resources Patient Education Resources Quick Links to Hepatitis … A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Grantees Policy and Programs Resource Center Viral Hepatitis Hepatitis A Questions and Answers for the Public Recommend ...

  7. Hepatitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... people at risk for contracting hepatitis. But frequent hand washing and good hygiene practices can reduce this risk. ... After Having Hepatitis B? Hepatitis B (HBV) Hepatitis Hand Washing Blood Transfusions Body Piercing Tattoos Contact Us Print ...

  8. Fulminant hepatic failure from primary hepatic lymphoma: successful treatment with orthotopic liver transplantation and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Andrew M; Truty, Jadwiga; Truell, Jeff; Lassman, Charles; Zimmerman, Michael A; Kelly, Burnett S; Farmer, Douglas G; Hiatt, Jonathan R; Ghobrial, Rafik; Busuttil, Ronald W

    2005-10-15

    Systemic lymphomas may involve the liver but rarely cause fulminant hepatic failure (FHF). Acute liver failure from primary hepatic lymphoma (PHL) is even less common with most patients succumbing to the sequelae of FHF before the correct diagnosis is made. We report a patient who underwent successful orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) and chemotherapy for FHF secondary to PHL. This previously-well male developed profound coagulopathy and encephalopathy 6 weeks after the onset of jaundice and fatigue. Workup failed to reveal the underlying cause of his liver failure and the patient soon required urgent OLT. Pathologic evaluation of his explanted liver revealed a malignant T-cell rich, large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with widespread hepatocellular necrosis. The patient made an excellent clinical recovery and is undergoing CHOP-Rituxan chemotherapy. This scenario demonstrates that lymphoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of FHF without clear etiology because of the potential for intervention with transplant and chemotherapy.

  9. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will test your blood. You ...

  10. Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Burra, Patrizia

    2009-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of end-stage liver disease worldwide and the most common indication for liver transplantation in the United States and Europe. HCV nearly always recurs in liver-transplanted patients, and 10 to 25% of them develop cirrhosis within 5 to 10 years. One of the strategies suggested to limit virological HCV recurrence is pretransplant antiviral treatment, but studies are warranted on the pharmacokinetics of antiviral drugs in cirrhotic patients, the benefits of fixed or escalating antiviral drug dosage schedules, the duration of the treatment, and the indications for using growth factors. Several risk factors are associated with a more aggressive recurrent HCV and early allograft failure, such as an older donor age. The relationship between immunosuppression and fibrosis progression in HCV recurrence remains uncertain. Concerning the antiviral treatment, treating established recurrent disease with a combination of interferon and ribavirin has been the mainstay of management to date, but when it is best to start and how to manage the side effects are still controversial issues. Antiviral treatment should be started once the disease has been confirmed by a biopsy when the fibrosis develops, providing that ongoing acute or chronic rejection, biliary obstruction, vascular damage, autoimmune diseases and sepsis, and any other standard contraindications for antiviral therapy, have been excluded. HCV recurrence after liver transplantation may well lead to graft failure and become an indication for retransplantation, but this is done in a relatively small number of cases, accounting for only 3 to 5% of retransplanted patients, since retransplantation is associated with much worse results than primary liver transplant procedures. We must be prepared for the fact that increasing numbers of HCV-positive recipients with allografts failing due to recurrent HCV will be asking to be retransplanted-and we do not know yet how to respond to this

  11. The mechanisms and treatment of asphyxial encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wassink, Guido; Gunn, Eleanor R.; Drury, Paul P.; Bennet, Laura; Gunn, Alistair J.

    2013-01-01

    Acute post-asphyxial encephalopathy occurring around the time of birth remains a major cause of death and disability. The recent seminal insight that allows active neuroprotective treatment is that even after profound asphyxia (the “primary” phase), many brain cells show initial recovery from the insult during a short “latent” phase, typically lasting approximately 6 h, only to die hours to days later after a “secondary” deterioration characterized by seizures, cytotoxic edema, and progressive failure of cerebral oxidative metabolism. Although many of these secondary processes are potentially injurious, they appear to be primarily epiphenomena of the “execution” phase of cell death. Animal and human studies designed around this conceptual framework have shown that moderate cerebral hypothermia initiated as early as possible but before the onset of secondary deterioration, and continued for a sufficient duration to allow the secondary deterioration to resolve, has been associated with potent, long-lasting neuroprotection. Recent clinical trials show that while therapeutic hypothermia significantly reduces morbidity and mortality, many babies still die or survive with disabilities. The challenge for the future is to find ways of improving the effectiveness of treatment. In this review, we will dissect the known mechanisms of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in relation to the known effects of hypothermic neuroprotection. PMID:24578682

  12. The Neuropathology of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Kiernan, Patrick T.; Alvarez, Victor E.

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive brain trauma is associated with a progressive neurological deterioration, now termed as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Most instances of CTE occur in association with the play of sports, but CTE has also been reported in association with blast injuries and other neurotrauma. Symptoms of CTE include behavioral and mood changes, memory loss, cognitive impairment and dementia. Like many other neurodegenerative diseases, CTE is diagnosed with certainty only by neuropathological examination of brain tissue. CTE is a tauopathy characterized by the deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) protein as neurofibrillary tangles, astrocytic tangles and neurites in striking clusters around small blood vessels of the cortex, typically at the sulcal depths. Severely affected cases show p-tau pathology throughout the brain. Abnormalities in phosphorylated 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein are found in most cases of CTE; beta-amyloid is identified in 43%, associated with age. Given the importance of sports participation and physical exercise to physical and psychological health as well as disease resilience, it is critical to identify the genetic risk factors for CTE as well as to understand how other variables, such as stress, age at exposure, gender, substance abuse and other exposures, contribute to the development of CTE. PMID:25904048

  13. The neuropathology of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    McKee, Ann C; Stein, Thor D; Kiernan, Patrick T; Alvarez, Victor E

    2015-05-01

    Repetitive brain trauma is associated with a progressive neurological deterioration, now termed as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Most instances of CTE occur in association with the play of sports, but CTE has also been reported in association with blast injuries and other neurotrauma. Symptoms of CTE include behavioral and mood changes, memory loss, cognitive impairment and dementia. Like many other neurodegenerative diseases, CTE is diagnosed with certainty only by neuropathological examination of brain tissue. CTE is a tauopathy characterized by the deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) protein as neurofibrillary tangles, astrocytic tangles and neurites in striking clusters around small blood vessels of the cortex, typically at the sulcal depths. Severely affected cases show p-tau pathology throughout the brain. Abnormalities in phosphorylated 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein are found in most cases of CTE; beta-amyloid is identified in 43%, associated with age. Given the importance of sports participation and physical exercise to physical and psychological health as well as disease resilience, it is critical to identify the genetic risk factors for CTE as well as to understand how other variables, such as stress, age at exposure, gender, substance abuse and other exposures, contribute to the development of CTE.

  14. Neuroimaging of Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young-Chul; Chanraud, Sandra; Sullivan, Edith V

    2012-06-01

    There is considerable evidence that neuroimaging findings can improve the early diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) in clinical settings. The most distinctive neuroimaging finding of acute WE are cytotoxic edema and vasogenic edema, which are represented by bilateral symmetric hyperintensity alterations on T2-weighted MR images in the periphery of the third ventricle, periaqueductal area, mammillary bodies and midbrain tectal plate. An initial bout of WE can result in Korsakoff's syndrome (KS), but repeated bouts in conjunction with its typical comorbidity, chronic alcoholism, can result in signs of tissue degeneration in vulnerable brain regions. Chronic abnormalities identified with neuroimaging enable examination of brain damage in living patients with KS and have expanded the understanding of the neuropsychological deficits resulting from thiamine deficiency, alcohol neurotoxicity, and their comorbidity. Brain structure and functional studies indicate that the interactions involving the thalamus, mammillary bodies, hippocampus, frontal lobes, and cerebellum are crucial for memory formation and executive functions, and the interruption of these circuits by WE and chronic alcoholism can contribute substantially to the neuropsychological deficits in KS.

  15. [Current management of hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Lange, Christian M

    2015-09-01

    During the last decade, the therapeutic management of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has changed dramatically. Due to the recent approval of several directly acting antiviral agents (DAAs) such as sofosbuvir, daclatasvir, or ledipasvir, HCV eradication is possible in the vast majority of HCV infected individuals by DAA combinations with or without pegylated interferon-α. This review summarized these exciting developments with a focus on current recommendations for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

  16. Electroencephalogram of Age-Dependent Epileptic Encephalopathies in Infancy and Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Kisiel, Lily C.; Nickels, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy syndromes are disorders in which the epileptiform abnormalities are thought to contribute to a progressive cerebral dysfunction. Characteristic electroencephalogram findings have an important diagnostic value in classification of epileptic encephalopathy syndromes. In this paper, we focus on electroencephalogram findings of childhood epileptic encephalopathy syndromes and provide sample illustrations. PMID:24024028

  17. 77 FR 29914 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products AGENCY... live bovines and products derived from bovines with regard to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. This... with regard to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Comments on the proposed rule were required to......

  18. Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Our Accomplishments Annual Reports Our Videos What Is Hepatitis B? What Is Hepatitis B? The ABCs of Viral Hepatitis Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B Hepatitis Delta Coinfection Hepatitis C Coinfection HIV/AIDS ...

  19. Hepatitis C: Sex and Sexuality

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Hepatitis » Sex and Sexuality: Entire Lesson Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... hepatitis C virus through sex. Can you pass hepatitis C to a sex partner? Yes, but it ...

  20. Scrub typhus hepatitis confirmed by immunohistochemical staining.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jong-Hoon; Lim, Sung-Chul; Yun, Na-Ra; Shin, Sung-Heui; Kim, Choon-Mee; Kim, Dong-Min

    2012-09-28

    Scrub typhus is an acute febrile disease caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi (O. tsutsugamushi). We report herein the case of a woman who presented with fever and elevated serum levels of liver enzymes and who was definitively diagnosed with scrub typhus by histopathological examination of liver biopsy specimens, serological tests and nested polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemical staining using a monoclonal anti-O. tsutsugamushi antibody showed focally scattered positive immunoreactions in the cytoplasm of some hepatocytes. This case suggests that scrub typhus hepatitis causes mild focal inflammation due to direct liver damage without causing piecemeal necrosis or interface hepatitis. Thus, scrub typhus hepatitis differs from acute viral hepatitis secondary to liver damage due to host immune responses, which causes severe lobular disarray with diffuse hepatocytic degeneration, necrosis and apoptosis as well as findings indicative of hepatic cholestasis, such as hepatic bile plugs or brown pigmentation of hepatocytes.