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Sample records for hepatic enzyme activity

  1. Hepatic and pulmonary enzyme activities in horses.

    PubMed

    Lakritz, J; Winder, B S; Noorouz-Zadeh, J; Huang, T L; Buckpitt, A R; Hammock, B D; Plopper, C G

    2000-02-01

    To determine hepatic and pulmonary phase-I and phase-II enzyme activities in horses. Pulmonary and hepatic tissues from 22 horses that were 4 months to 32 years old. Pulmonary and hepatic tissues from horses were used to prepare cytosolic (glutathione S-transferase and soluble epoxide hydrolase) and microsomal (cytochrome P450 monooxygenases) enzymes. Rates of microsomal metabolism of ethoxyresorufin, pentoxyresorufin, and naphthalene were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Activities of glutathione S-transferase and soluble epoxide hydrolase were determined spectrophotometrically. Cytochrome P450 content was determined by carbon monoxide bound-difference spectrum of dithionite-reduced microsomes. Activity was expressed relative to total protein concentration. Microsomal protein and cytochromeP450 contents were detectable in all horses and did not vary with age. Hepatic ethoxyresorufin metabolism was detected in all horses; by comparison, pulmonary metabolism of ethoxyresorufin and hepatic and pulmonary metabolism of pentoxyresorufin were detected at lower rates. Rate of hepatic naphthalene metabolism remained constant with increasing age, whereas rate of pulmonary naphthalene metabolism was significantly lower in weanlings (ie, horses 4 to 6 months old), compared with adult horses. Hepatic glutathione S-transferase activity (cytosol) increased with age; however, these changes were not significant. Pulmonary glutathione S-transferase activity (cytosol) was significantly lower in weanlings than adult horses. Hepatic and pulmonary soluble epoxide hydrolase did not vary with age of horses. Activity of cytochrome P450 isoforms that metabolize naphthalene and glutathione S-transferases in lungs are significantly lower in weanlings than adult horses, which suggests reduced ability of young horses to metabolize xenobiotics by this organ.

  2. Dietary effects of marine food intake on intestinal and hepatic enzyme activities in rats.

    PubMed

    González, M; Caride, B; Lamas, A; Taboada, C

    2001-03-01

    Dietary effects of two diets high in protein from two marine species (Haliotis tuberculata and Anemonia viridis) as compared to a high-quality patron protein such as casein (or casein supplemented with olive oil) on intestinal and hepatic enzymes were studied. After 23 days, the two marine species as diet compared to casein increased the disaccharidase and alkaline phosphatase activities. Feeding Haliotis tuberculata meal produced a decrease on intestinal leucine aminopeptidase activity. The hepatic gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity decreased slightly in animals fed Haliotis tuberculata meal. Supplementation of casein with olive oil tended to decrease the intestinal and hepatic enzyme activity.

  3. Activity of hepatic enzymes from week sixteen of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Extremera, Angeles; López-Garrido, María A; Barranco, Enriqueta; Quintero, María D; Ocete-Hita, Esther; Muñoz de Rueda, Paloma; Gila, Ana; Salmerón, Javier

    2005-12-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence, epidemiology, and mother-child repercussions of increased alanine-aminotransferase levels from week 16 of pregnancy. A longitudinal observational study of 381 pregnant women. The cause of increased alanine-aminotransferase levels during pregnancy and repercussions on the neonate were studied in 283 cases. Statistical analysis was performed with Mann-Whitney test, chi2 test, or the Fisher exact test. The mean age of the mothers was 29.9 +/- 4.8 years. Twenty-five percent presented increased gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase, alkaline phophatase, and dehydrogenase lactate from week 32. Increased alanine-aminotransferase was observed in 7.4% (95% CI, 5.00%-10.57%) of cases. Clinical disorders were light, transitory, and with no apparent cause, except for 1 hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets (HELLP) syndrome, 3 preeclampsias, and 1 gravidic cholestasis. No statistically significant differences were observed in the group of mother-child with alanine-aminotransferase normal or increased. Most increases in alanine-aminotransferase from week 16 of pregnancy are transitory, non-specific, and have no repercussions on mother or child.

  4. Hepatic biotransformation and antioxidant enzyme activities in Mediterranean fish from different habitat depths.

    PubMed

    Ribalta, C; Sanchez-Hernandez, J C; Sole, M

    2015-11-01

    Marine fish are threatened by anthropogenic chemical discharges. However, knowledge on adverse effects on deep-sea fish or their detoxification capabilities is limited. Herein, we compared the basal activities of selected hepatic detoxification enzymes in several species (Solea solea, Dicentrarchus labrax, Trachyrhynchus scabrus, Mora moro, Cataetix laticeps and Alepocehalus rostratus) collected from the coast, middle and lower slopes of the Blanes Canyon region (Catalan continental margin, NW Mediterranean Sea). The xenobiotic-detoxifying enzymes analysed were the phase-I carboxylesterases (CbEs), and the phase-II conjugation activities uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase (UDPGT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). Moreover, some antioxidant enzyme activities, i.e., catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione reductase (GR), were also included in this comparative study. Because CbE activity is represented by multiple isoforms, the substrates α-naphthyl acetate (αNA) and ρ-nitrophenyl acetate (ρNPA) were used in the enzyme assays, and in vitro inhibition kinetics with dichlorvos were performed to compare interspecific CbE sensitivity. Activity of xenobiotic detoxification enzymes varied among the species, following a trend with habitat depth and body size. Thus, UDPGT and some antioxidant enzyme activities decreased in fish inhabiting lower slopes of deep-sea, whereas UDPGT and αNA-CbE activities were negatively related to fish size. A trend between CbE activities and the IC50 values for dichlorvos suggested S. solea and M. moro as potentially more sensitive to anticholinesterasic pesticides, and T. scabrus as the most resistant one. A principal component analysis considering all enzyme activities clearly identified the species but this grouping was not related to habitat depth or phylogeny. Although these results can be taken as baseline levels of the main xenobiotic detoxification enzymes in Mediterranean fish, further research is

  5. Activities of the enzymes of hepatic gluconeogenesis in periparturient dairy cows with induced fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Murondoti, Absolom; Jorritsma, Ruurd; Beynen, Anton C; Wensing, Theo; Geelen, Math J H

    2004-05-01

    The objective was to measure the activities of all the enzymes essential for hepatic gluconeogenesis in dairy cows with induced fatty liver. We aimed to induce severe fatty liver in ten experimental cows by overfeeding them during the dry period while seven control cows were maintained on a restricted diet. To induce a marked negative energy balance, the experimental cows were deprived of feed for 8 h immediately after parturition. In addition, the experimental cows were given a restricted amount of diet during the first 5 d of lactation. Liver samples were collected 1 week before and 1, 2 and 4 weeks after parturition. Before parturition, liver triacylglycerol concentrations did not differ between the two groups. After parturition, the experimental cows developed marked fatty liver as indicated by a higher level of triacylglycerols in the liver compared with the control cows. Before parturition, all gluconeogenic enzymes in the liver were lower in experimental cows than in control cows. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, pyruvate carboxylase and propionyl-CoA carboxylase were significantly lower and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase and glucose 6-phosphatase tended to be lower in the experimental cows. The activities of two crucial enzymes for gluconeogenesis in ruminants, i.e., phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and propionyl-CoA carboxylase, remained low throughout the sampling period post partum. Activities of pyruvate carboxylase and glucose 6-phosphatase in the experimental cows post partum were upgraded to values similar to those of the control cows. The results showed that the capacity for hepatic gluconeogenesis before parturition was lower in cows with induced fatty liver than in control cows. After parturition, the low activities of crucial gluconeogenic enzymes indicated insufficient production of glucose. It is suggested that the low gluconeogenic capacity leads successively to low blood glucose concentrations, low insulin levels and high rates of

  6. Development of Targeted, Enzyme-Activated Nano-Conjugates for Hepatic Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuruvilla, Sibu Philip

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 5th most commonly-occurring cancer worldwide and the 2nd highest cause for cancer-related deaths globally. The current treatment strategy is the direct injection of a chemotherapeutic agent (e.g. doxorubicin; DOX) into the hepatic artery, through a process called hepatic arterial infusion (HAI). Unfortunately, HAI is severely hindered by limited therapeutic efficacy against the tumor and high systemic toxicity to surrounding organs (e.g. cardiotoxicity). This thesis focuses on the development of a targeted, nanoparticle-based drug delivery system aimed to improve the clinical treatment of HCC. In particular, we employ generation 5 (G5) poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers targeted to hepatic cancer cells via N-acetylgalactosamine (NAcGal) ligands attached to the surface through a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) brush. DOX is attached to the G5 surface through two different enzyme-sensitive linkages, L3 or L4, to achieve controllable release of the drug inside hepatic cancer cells. The combination of NAcGal-PEG targeting branches with either L3- or L4-DOX linkages led to the development of P1 and P2 particles, respectively. In Part 1, we discuss the development of these particles and measure their ability to target and kill hepatic cancer cells in vitro. In Part 2, we investigate the antitumor activity of P1 and P2 particles in tumor-bearing mice in comparison to the free drug, and we measure the cardiac function of mice undergoing treatment to assess differences in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Finally, in Part 3, we explore multi-valent targeting of G5 dendrimers in pursuit of further improving their specificity to hepatic cancer cells. Ultimately, this thesis provides insight into the utility of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems that can potentially be translated to the clinic to improve cancer therapy.

  7. Effects of Chinese, Japanese and Western tea on hepatic P450 enzyme activities in rats.

    PubMed

    Niwattisaiwong, N; Luo, X X; Coville, P F; Wanwimolruk, S

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that green tea effectively protects against cancers caused by various dietary carcinogens. As P450 enzymes are the major system responsible for the metabolism of many carcinogens, we hypothesise that tea consumption may alter the catalytic activities of P450 enzymes. We conducted this study to screen the effects of four different teas on the activities of P450 enzymes. Tea solutions (2.5%) were prepared by adding boiling water to tea leaves and filtering. Female Wistar rats were divided into five groups (n = 4 each); each had free access to tea solutions while the control group was supplied with water for 4 weeks. Animals were sacrificed and livers were removed for preparation of microsomes. Enzyme activities were determined by incubation of liver microsomes with the appropriate CYP substrate. The activity of CYP1A1 in livers from rats receiving Oolong (Chinese) tea (185 +/- 63 pmol/mg/min), Japanese green tea (197 +/- 22 pmol/mg/min) and Earl Grey tea (228 +/- 40 pmol/mg/min) was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than in the control group (94 +/- 34 pmol/mg/min), whereas no change was observed in the activity of CYP1A2 in any of tested animals. The hepatic activity of CYP2D6 was greater only in rats drinking Earl Grey tea compared to the controls (235 +/- 37 vs 161 +/- 41 pmol/mg/min, p < 0.05). There were also significant increases (p < 0.05) in the activity of CYP3A in livers of animals given Oolong tea (653 +/- 174 vs 382 +/- 114 pmol/mg/min) and Earl Grey tea (751 +/- 202 pmol/mg/min), while Jasmine and Japanese green tea had no significant effect. These results indicate that not all types of tea cause alterations in liver CYP enzymes as some elevated activities and some did not. Further studies are needed to determine whether there is a relationship between the effect of tea on CYP activities and anti-carcinogenesis.

  8. Circulating lysosomal enzymes and acute hepatic necrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gove, C D; Wardle, E N; Williams, R

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the lysosomal enzymes acid and neutral protease, N-acetylglucosaminidase, and acid phosphatase were measured in the serum of patients with fulminant hepatic failure. Acid protease (cathepsin D) activity was increased about tenfold in patients who died and nearly fourfold in those who survived fulminant hepatic failure after paracetamol overdose, whereas activities were increased equally in patients with fulminant hepatic failure due to viral hepatitis whether or not they survived. A correlation was found between serum acid protease activity and prothrombin time, and the increase in cathepsin D activity was sustained over several days compared with aspartate aminotransferase, which showed a sharp early peak and then a fall. Circulating lysosomal proteases can damage other organs, and measurement of their activity may therefore be of added value in assessing prognosis in this condition. PMID:7007443

  9. Di2-ethylhexyl phthalate disrupts thyroid hormone homeostasis through activating the Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and inducing hepatic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hanfeng; Ha, Mei; Yang, Min; Yue, Ping; Xie, Zhengyuan; Liu, Changjiang

    2017-01-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), as a widespread environmental pollutant and an endocrine disruptor, can disturb the homeostasis of thyroid hormones (THs). In order to elucidate roles of the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways and hepatic enzymes in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP, Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with DEHP by gavage for 30 consecutive days; Nthy-ori 3-1 cells were treated with DEHP with NAC, k-Ras siRNA or inhibitors (U0126 and wortmannin). Results showed that DEHP led to histopathologic changes in rat thyroid and liver, such as the decrease in thyroid follicular cavity diameter, hepatocyte edema. Triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) were reduced. DEHP caused ROS production, oxidative stress and k-Ras upregulation, thereby activating the ERK and Akt pathways in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, TRH receptor (TRHr) level was elevated after the activation of the Akt pathway and was downregulated after the inhibition of the Akt pathway. However, TRHr was not modulated by the ERK pathway. Additionally, hepatic enzymes, including Ugt1a1, CYP2b1, Sult1e1, and Sult2b1, were significantly induced after DEHP exposure. Taken together, DEHP can perturb TH homeostasis and reduce TH levels. The activated Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and induced hepatic enzymes play vital roles in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP. PMID:28065941

  10. Di2-ethylhexyl phthalate disrupts thyroid hormone homeostasis through activating the Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and inducing hepatic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hanfeng; Ha, Mei; Yang, Min; Yue, Ping; Xie, Zhengyuan; Liu, Changjiang

    2017-01-09

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), as a widespread environmental pollutant and an endocrine disruptor, can disturb the homeostasis of thyroid hormones (THs). In order to elucidate roles of the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways and hepatic enzymes in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP, Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with DEHP by gavage for 30 consecutive days; Nthy-ori 3-1 cells were treated with DEHP with NAC, k-Ras siRNA or inhibitors (U0126 and wortmannin). Results showed that DEHP led to histopathologic changes in rat thyroid and liver, such as the decrease in thyroid follicular cavity diameter, hepatocyte edema. Triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) were reduced. DEHP caused ROS production, oxidative stress and k-Ras upregulation, thereby activating the ERK and Akt pathways in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, TRH receptor (TRHr) level was elevated after the activation of the Akt pathway and was downregulated after the inhibition of the Akt pathway. However, TRHr was not modulated by the ERK pathway. Additionally, hepatic enzymes, including Ugt1a1, CYP2b1, Sult1e1, and Sult2b1, were significantly induced after DEHP exposure. Taken together, DEHP can perturb TH homeostasis and reduce TH levels. The activated Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and induced hepatic enzymes play vital roles in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP.

  11. Effect of curcumin on hepatic antioxidant enzymes activities and gene expressions in rats intoxicated with aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    El-Bahr, S M

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight rats were examined in a 5-week experiment to investigate the effect of curcumin on gene expression and activities of hepatic antioxidant enzymes in rats intoxicated with aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 ). The rats were divided into four groups. Rats in 1-4 groups served as control, oral curcumin treated (15 mg/kg body weight), single i.p. dose of AFB1 (3 mg/kg body weight) and combination of single i.p. dose of AFB1 with oral curcumin treated, respectively. AFB1 Liver damage and oxidative stress were evident in untreated AFB1 -intoxicated rats as indicated by a significant elevation in hepatic transaminases, elevation in lipid peroxide biomarkers (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances; TBARS), reduction of reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration, reduction in the activities of antioxidant enzymes namely catalase (CAT), total superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and down-regulation of gene expression of these antioxidant enzymes compared to control. Liver sections of rats intoxicated with AFB1 showed a disrupted lobular architecture, scattered necrotic cells and biliary proliferation. Administration of curcumin with AFB1 resulted in amelioration of AFB1 -induced effects compared to untreated AFB1 -intoxicated rats via an up-regulation of antioxidant enzyme gene expression, activation of the expressed genes and increase in the availability of GSH. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Hepatic fatty acid oxidation enzyme activities are stimulated in rats fed the brown seaweed, Undaria pinnatifida (wakame).

    PubMed

    Murata, M; Ishihara, K; Saito, H

    1999-01-01

    The activities of hepatic enzymes involved in fatty acid synthesis and oxidation were compared in rats fed diets containing different proportions of dried powder of the brown seaweed, Undaria pinnatifida (wakame). Rats were fed diets containing 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2. 0, 5.0 and 10 g/100 g of dried wakame powder. Experimental diets were adjusted to provide consistent amounts of most nutrients, but mineral concentrations were not standardized. After the 21-d feeding period, serum and liver triacylglycerol levels in rats fed diets in which wakame constituted at least 2% were significantly lower than those in rats fed the control diet. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was significantly lower in rats fed the 5 and 10% wakame diets than in rats fed the control diet. In contrast, 10% wakame diet increased activities of enzymes involved in the beta-oxidation pathway including hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, acyl-CoA oxidase, enoyl-CoA hydratase and 2,4-dienoyl-CoA reductase. Some differences were detected in rats fed 5% wakame as well. These results suggest that alterations of the activities of enzymes involved in fatty acid metabolism in the liver are responsible for the serum triacylglycerol-lowering effect of dietary wakame. Thus, wakame may be useful as a food to prevent hyperlipidemia.

  13. Activity and mRNA Levels of Enzymes Involved in Hepatic Fatty Acid Synthesis in Rats Fed Naringenin.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Toru; Ide, Takashi

    2015-11-04

    We investigated the physiological activity of naringenin in affecting hepatic lipogenesis and serum and liver lipid levels in rats. Rats were fed diets containing 0, 1, or 2.5 g/kg naringenin for 15 d. Naringenin at a dietary level of 2.5 g/kg significantly decreased the activities and the mRNA levels of various lipogenic enzymes and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) mRNA level. The activities and the mRNA levels were also 9-22% and 12-38% lower, respectively, in rats fed a 1 g/kg naringenin diet than in the animals fed a naringenin-free diet, although the differences were not significant in many cases. Naringenin at 2.5 g/kg significantly lowered serum triacylglycerol, cholesterol, and phospholipid and hepatic triacylglycerol and cholesterol. This flavonoid at 1.0 g/kg also significantly lowered these parameters except for serum triacylglycerol. Naringenin levels in serum and liver dose-dependently increased, and hepatic concentrations reached levels that can affect various signaling pathways.

  14. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin-(1–7)/Mas axis activates Akt signaling to ameliorate hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xi; Yang, Fangyuan; Shi, Tingting; Yuan, Mingxia; Xin, Zhong; Xie, Rongrong; Li, Sen; Li, Hongbing; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2016-01-01

    The classical axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE)/Ang II/AT1, contributes to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the role of bypass axis of RAS (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang-(1–7)/Mas) in hepatic steatosis is still unclear. Here we showed that deletion of ACE2 aggravates liver steatosis, which is correlated with the increased expression of hepatic lipogenic genes and the decreased expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in the liver of ACE2 knockout (ACE2−/y) mice. Meanwhile, oxidative stress and inflammation were also aggravated in ACE2−/y mice. On the contrary, overexpression of ACE2 improved fatty liver in db/db mice, and the mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes were up-regulated. In vitro, Ang-(1–7)/ACE2 ameliorated hepatic steatosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in free fatty acid (FFA)-induced HepG2 cells, and what’s more, Akt inhibitors reduced ACE2-mediated lipid metabolism. Furthermore, ACE2-mediated Akt activation could be attenuated by blockade of ATP/P2 receptor/Calmodulin (CaM) pathway. These results indicated that Ang-(1–7)/ACE2/Mas axis may reduce liver lipid accumulation partly by regulating lipid-metabolizing genes through ATP/P2 receptor/CaM signaling pathway. Our findings support the potential role of ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas axis in prevention and treatment of hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:26883384

  15. Effect of Antiviral Therapy on Serum Activity of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Husic-Selimovic, Azra; Sofic, Amela; Huskic, Jasminko; Bulja, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Renin-angiotenzin system (RAS) is frequently activated in patients with chronic liver disease. Angiotenzin - II (AT-II), produced by angiotenzin converting enzyme (ACE), has many physiological effects, including an important role in liver fibrogenesis. Combined antiviral therapy with PEG-IFN and ribavirin besides its antiviral effect also leads to a reduction in liver parenchyma fibrosis. Aim of the study: Determining the value of ACE in serum of patients with chronic hepatitis C before and after combined antiviral therapy, as well as the value of ACE activities in sera of the control group. Materials and methods: We studied 50 patients treated at Gastroenterohepatology Department, in the time-period of four years. Value of ACE in serum was determined by Olympus AU 400 device, with application of kit “Infinity TN ACE Liquid Stable Reagent”. HCV RNA levels in sera were measured by real time PCR. HCV RNA test was performed with modular analysis of AMPLICOR and COBAS AMPLICOR HCV MONITOR test v2.0, which has proved infection and was used for quantification of the viruses and monitoring of the patients’ response to therapy. Liver histology was evaluated in accordance with the level of necroinflammation activity and stage of fibrosis. Results: Serum activities of ACE in chronic hepatitis C patients is statistically higher than the values in the control group (p=0.02). Antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients statistically decreases serum activities of ACE (p= 0.02) and indirectly affects fibrogenesis of the liver parenchyma. Correlation between ACE and ALT activity after the therapy was proved (0.3934). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the activity of ACE in serum is a good indirect parameter of the liver damage, and could be used as an indirect prognostic factor of the level of liver parenchyma damage. Serum activity of ACE can be used as a parameter for non-invasive assessment of intensity of liver damage. PMID:27147779

  16. Antidiabetic activity of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides F31 down-regulated hepatic glucose regulatory enzymes in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chun; Wu, Qingping; Zhang, Jumei; Xie, Yizhen; Cai, Wen; Tan, Jianbin

    2017-01-20

    Ganoderma lucidum (Lin Zhi) has been used to treat diabetes in Chinese folk for centuries. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GLPs) had hypoglycemic effects in diabetic mice. Our aim was to identify the main bioactives in GLPs and corresponding mechanism of action. Four polysaccharide-enriched fraction were isolated from GLPs and the antidiabetic activities were evaluated by type 2 diabetic mice. Fasting serum glucose (FSG), fasting serum insulin (FSI) and epididymal fat/BW ratio were measured at the end of the experiment. In liver, the mRNA levels of hepatic glucose regulatory enzymes were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and the protein levels of phospho-AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK)/AMPK were determined by western blotting test. In epididymal fat tissue, the mRNA and protein levels GLUT4, resistin, fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC1) were determined by qPCR and immuno-histochemistry. The structure of polysaccharide F31 was obtained from GPC, FTIR NMR and GC-MS spectroscopy, RESULTS: F31 significantly decreased FSG (P<0.05), FSI and epididymal fat/BW ratio (P<0.01). In liver, F31 decreased the mRNA levels of hepatic glucose regulatory enzymes, and up-regulated the ratio of phospho-AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK)/AMPK. In epididymal fat tissue, F31 increased the mRNA levels of GLUT4 but decreased fatty acid synthase (FAS), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC1) and resistin. Immuno-histochemistry results revealed F31 increased the protein levels of GLUT4 and decreased resistin. Data suggested that the main bioactives in GLPs was F31, which was determined to be a β-heteropolysaccharide with the weight-average molecular weight of 15.9kDa. The possible action mechanism of F31 may be associated with down-regulation of the hepatic glucose regulated enzyme mRNA levels via AMPK activation, improvement of insulin resistance and decrease of epididymal fat/BW ratio. These

  17. Physical properties, lipid composition and enzyme activities of hepatic subcellular membranes from chick embryo after ethanol treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Amate, M.C.; Marco, C.; Segovia, J.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Exposure of chick embryos to ethanol resulted in significant alterations to the lipid composition of various different hepatic subcellular membranes. A marked decrease in cholesterol levels and an increase in the phospholipid content of microsomes and mitochondria was observed. Ethanol also affected the fatty acid profiles, mainly by decreasing the percentage of oleic acid in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine in the mitochondria and phosphatidylethanolamine in the microsomes. In spite of these changes ethanol only induced alterations in the fluidity of the mitochondrial membranes, which showed a more rigid core, in contrast to the phospholipid-head region, which was not affected. In accordance with the changes observed in the physical state of the membrane, the enzymes involved in the microsomal electron-transport systems were not modified by ethanol, while cytochrome oxidase activity decreased by 50% compared to the activity in the mitochondria from control chick embryos.

  18. Effect of insecticides on vital activity, hepatic enzymes and red blood cell acetyl cholinesterase activity of rabbits in Makkah.

    PubMed

    Sawas, A H

    1998-05-01

    Developing animals and invertebrate are markedly more sensitive to acute toxicity through exposure to insecticides. Varieties of insecticides are used for hygienic control in Makkah holy places. The present study examines the acute effects of commonly used insecticides in Makkah area. Rosfin as an organophosphorus, Airlen as a pyrethroid and Sulvac as a carbamate derivative were tested for their effects on vital activities, hepatic transaminases, serum triglycerides and acetyl cholinesterase activity of rabbits. The insecticides were tested in same and double concentration used for insect control by Makkah's municipal authorities. Compressed air was used as a source of pressure for spraying wooden boxes designed for habitation of animals during the experiments. There were no significant changes in vital activities of rabbits in both concentrations. However, serum glutamate pyuvate transaminase (SGPT) and serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT) showed irregular changes (mild decrease or increase) in all groups, while triglyceride showed mild rise after six days exposure in case of double concentration. Acetyl cholinesterase showed mild increase in activity after five minutes incubation time, but there was unnoticed increase in activity after 15, 25, 35 and 45 minutes of incubation. In case of Airlen, the activity increased after five minutes of incubation and decreased thereafter. In conclusion, insecticides used in the holy places of Makkah area have no apparent effects on vital activity, acetyl cholinesterase activity and showed no significant effect on rabbit hepatic transaminases and serum triglyceride.

  19. Comparative toxicology of tetrachlorobiphenyls in mink and rats. I. Changes in hepatic enzyme activity and smooth endoplasmic reticulum volume

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, D.M.; Corey, R.D.; Helferich, W.G.; McFarland, J.M.; Lowenstine, L.J.; Moody, D.E.; Hammock, B.D.; Shull, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    Mink have been shown previously to be extraordinarily sensitive to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and related classes of halogenated hydrocarbons. This study explored several aspects of the acute response of mink to two purified tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB) congeners and compared their response with that of the rat, a less sensitive and more thoroughly studied species. Young female pastel mink and young female Sprague-Dawley rats received three daily intraperitoneal injections with equimolar doses of either 2,4,2',4'-TCB or 3,4,3',4'-TCB, and were sacrificed after 7 days. Two control groups were used for each species; one was allowed free access to food and the other was pair-fed to the 3,4,3',4'-TCB treatment group. Rats remained clinically normal, while mink treated with 3,4,3',4'-TCB developed severe anorexia, diarrhea, and melena. Both species had significant increases in hepatic cytochrome P-450 content and the characteristic shift in the spectral maxima from 450 to 448 nm in the 3,4,3',4'-TCB- but not in the 2,4,2',4'-TCB-treated animals. Rats but not mink had increased activities of several hepatic monooxygenases in response to both congeners while microsomal epoxide hydrolase was increased in rats after 2,4,2',4'-TCB and in mink after 3,4,3',4'-TCB. Significant increases in the relative volume of smooth endoplasmic reticulum within hepatocytes of 2,4,2',4'-TCB-treated rats but not mink were confirmed by ultrastructural morphometry. Accumulation of both congeners was greater in adipose tissue than in the liver of either species. In both species, concentrations in adipose tissue were much greater for 2,4,2',4'-TCB than for 3,4,3',4'-TCB. PCB toxicosis in mink, as in other species, appeared to be dependent on isomeric arrangement of chlorine substituents. However, unlike other species, the toxicosis was not associated with biochemical or morphological evidence of hepatic enzyme induction.

  20. Hepatic enzyme activity after combined administration of methylmercury, lead and cadmium in the pekin duck

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, S.A.; Bhatnagar, M.K. )

    1990-04-01

    In order to assess adequately the environmental impact of heavy metals it is important to consider that they may occur simultaneously in the environment, where they may interact to alter their individual toxicities on living systems. Metals such as mercury (Hg), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) can be found in all levels of the polluted ecosystem, and in animals inhabiting such areas. In the polluted aquatic environment waterfowl have been noted to accumulate high levels of these metals in their tissues. A major toxic manifestation of heavy metal exposure is the perturbation of a wide range of enzyme systems in virtually all subcellular compartments. With the exception of lead, little data is available on the effects of metals on avian enzyme systems. The present report describes the effects observed in vivo on acid phosphatase (AP), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and cytochrome c oxidase (cyt c ox) in the liver of pekin ducks exposed to combinations of methylmercury (MeHg), lead and cadmium.

  1. [Activity of the marker liver enzymes under the conditions of toxic hepatitis and alimentary deprivation of protein].

    PubMed

    Voloshchuk, O N; Kopyl'chuk, G P; Buchkovskaia, I M

    2014-01-01

    The activity of the sorbitoldehydrogenase (SDH), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in the blood serum of rats with acetaminophen-induced hepatitis under the conditions of alimentary deprivation of protein was studied. The animals were divided into 3 groups: 1--rats with acute acetaminophen-induced hepatitis, maintained on the full ration; 2--rats with acute acetaminophen-induced hepatitis, maintained under the conditions of alimentary deprivation of protein; 3--control. The activity of the sorbitol dehydrogenase in blood serum was determined by the kinetic method, activity of the alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase - photometrically. It is shown, that in animals with the model hepatitis the activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase in blood serum increases 20-fold, wherein statistical significance between animals with hepatitis maintained under the conditions of full ration and those of low-protein diet is not established. In the group of animals with acetaminophen-induced hepatitis the preservation on the control level of the alkaline phosphatase activity on the base of the increase of alanine aminotransferase by 2.2 times and ratio ALT/ALP>5 testifies about hepatocellular liver injury. In the group of animals with drug-induced hepatitis and alimentary deprivation of protein, the increase of the alkaline phosphatase and alanine aminotransferase activity is observed, herewith the ratio ALT/ALP ranges from 2 to 5 and testifies about mixed liver injury. The conclusion was made, that alimentary deprivation of protein is the critical factor for the development of the disturbances of functional and structural liver integrity, and the therapeutic approaches to the correction of the drug-induced liver injury should be different depending on the value of protein ration in the anamnesis, taking into account the different types of liver injury.

  2. Human urinary amylolytic enzymes in acute hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Franzini, C.; Moda, S.

    1965-01-01

    Using paper eletrophoresis two amylolytic enzymes in human urine were demonstrated. A main peak was shown in the gamma globulin zone in normal urine and a second minor peak, in contrast to earlier findings, in the beta globulin zone. The organic source of the minor peak is probably in the liver. Urines from cases of acute hepatitis were studied in the same way and showed that the electrophoretic beta peak was raised in acute hepatitis, also pointing to a possible origin in the liver. Further studies are required to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:5844206

  3. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of a gene encoding cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase into hamsters increases hepatic enzyme activity and reduces plasma total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Spady, D K; Cuthbert, J A; Willard, M N; Meidell, R S

    1995-01-01

    Clinical interventions that accelerate conversion of cholesterol to bile acids reduce circulating low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations. The initial and rate-limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway is catalyzed by hepatic cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase. To examine the effects of transient primary overexpression of this enzyme on sterol metabolism and lipoprotein transport, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus in which a cDNA encoding rat 7 alpha-hydroxylase is expressed from the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter (AdCMV7 alpha). Syrian hamsters administered AdCMV7 alpha intravenously accumulated transgene-specific mRNA in the liver and demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in hepatic microsomal 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity. The increased conversion of cholesterol to bile acids resulted in a compensatory increase in hepatic cholesterol synthesis. In addition, overexpression of 7 alpha-hydroxylase reduced the rate of LDL cholesterol entry into the plasma space and, in animals maintained on a Western-type diet, restored hepatic LDL receptor expression. As a consequence, plasma LDL concentrations fell by approximately 60% in animals maintained on control diet and by approximately 75% in animals consuming a Western-type diet. Plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were reduced to a lesser degree. These results demonstrate that transient upregulation of bile acid synthesis by direct transfer of a 7 alpha-hydroxylase gene favorably alters circulating lipoprotein profiles and suggest one potential molecular target for genetic strategies aimed at reducing cardiovascular risk. Images PMID:7635963

  4. Effects of dietary tannic acid on the growth, hepatic gene expression, and antioxidant enzyme activity in Brandt's voles (Microtus brandti).

    PubMed

    Ye, Man-Hong; Nan, Yan-Lei; Ding, Meng-Meng; Hu, Jun-Bang; Liu, Qian; Wei, Wan-Hong; Yang, Sheng-Mei

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the physiological and biochemical responses of Brandt's voles to the persistent presence of dietary tannic acid. The diet for animals in the experimental group was supplemented with 3% dietary tannic acid for 5weeks. The control group received a commercial lab chow. No significant differences were detected in body weight, organ (heart, kidney, and liver) weights, and organ parameters between animals from two groups. However, voles in the experimental group had significantly higher daily food intake, increased contents of proline and histidine in saliva and feces after protein hydrolysis, and elevated hepatic expression of transferrin than the control. Our results suggested the existence of adaptive strategies developed in Brandt's voles to overcome the adverse effects of dietary tannic acid. (1) Food consumption was increased to satisfy their nutritional demands. (2) The secretion of tannic-acid-binding salivary proteins was promoted. (3) The absorption of iron was enhanced. These alterations contributed to neutralize the negative effects of tannic acid and maintain body mass in animals supplemented with tannic acid. As the result of the consumption of tannic acid, hepatic expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase was significantly decreased, while the overall potential of the antioxidant system, characterized by increased hepatic enzymatic activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase, was enhanced. Our results also implied the involvement of tannic acid in the regulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in voles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dietary ɛ-Polylysine Decreased Serum and Liver Lipid Contents by Enhancing Fecal Lipid Excretion Irrespective of Increased Hepatic Fatty Acid Biosynthesis-Related Enzymes Activities in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hosomi, Ryota; Yamamoto, Daiki; Otsuka, Ren; Nishiyama, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Munehiro; Fukunaga, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    ɛ-Polylysine (EPL) is used as a natural preservative in food. However, few studies have been conducted to assess the beneficial functions of dietary EPL. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying the inhibition of neutral and acidic sterol absorption and hepatic enzyme activity-related fatty acid biosynthesis following EPL intake. EPL digest prepared using an in vitro digestion model had lower lipase activity and micellar lipid solubility and higher bile acid binding capacity than casein digest. Male Wistar rats were fed an AIN-93G diet containing 1% (wt/wt) EPL or l-lysine. After 4 weeks of feeding these diets, the marked decrease in serum and liver triacylglycerol contents by the EPL diet was partly attributed to increased fecal fatty acid excretion. The activities of hepatic acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, which are key enzymes of fatty acid biosynthesis, were enhanced in rats fed EPL diet. The increased fatty acid biosynthesis activity due to dietary EPL may be prevented by the enhancement of fecal fatty acid excretion. The hypocholesterolemic effect of EPL was mediated by increased fecal neutral and acidic sterol excretions due to the EPL digest suppressing micellar lipid solubility and high bile acid binding capacity. These results show that dietary EPL has beneficial effects that could help prevent lifestyle-related diseases such as hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:25866749

  6. SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED DECLINE IN HEPATIC PEROXISOMAL ENZYME ACTIVITIES CORRESPONDS WITH DIMINISHED LEVELS OF RETINOID X RECEPTOR ALPHA, BUT NOT PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR ALPHA1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Aging is associated with alterations in hepatic peroxisomal metabolism and susceptibility to hepatocarcinogenecity produced by agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa). Mechanisms involved in these effects are not well understood. Howev...

  7. SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED DECLINE IN HEPATIC PEROXISOMAL ENZYME ACTIVITIES CORRESPONDS WITH DIMINISHED LEVELS OF RETINOID X RECEPTOR ALPHA, BUT NOT PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR ALPHA1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Aging is associated with alterations in hepatic peroxisomal metabolism and susceptibility to hepatocarcinogenecity produced by agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa). Mechanisms involved in these effects are not well understood. Howev...

  8. Diet-induced alterations in hepatic progesterone (P4) catabolic enzyme activity and P4 clearance rate in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Lemley, C O; Vonnahme, K A; Tager, L R; Krause, K M; Wilson, M E

    2010-06-01

    Elevated rates of steroid clearance may lead to lower reproductive success in several mammalian species. Cytochrome P450 (EC 1.14.14.1) and aldo-keto reductases (AKR; EC 1.1.1.145-151) are involved in the first phase of steroid inactivation, before second phase conjugation and excretion of the steroid metabolite. The current objectives were to determine liver blood flow (LBF), hepatic enzyme activity, and metabolic clearance rate (MCR) of progesterone (P(4)) in dairy cows consuming isoenergetic and isonitrogenous diets formulated to cause divergent insulin secretion. Insulin concentrations increased by 22% in cows fed the high cornstarch diet, and both cytochrome P450 2C and cytochrome P450 3A activities were decreased (P<0.05) by approximately 50%, while AKR1C tended (P<0.10) to be lower in cows fed the high cornstarch diet. LBF was similar between the two diets (1891+/-91 l/h). MCR of P(4) tended (P<0.10) to be lower in cows fed the high cornstarch diet (25+/-5 l/hxBW(0.75)) versus the high fiber diet (40+/-6 l/hxBW(0.75)). The half-life of P(4) was increased (P<0.05) in cows fed the high cornstarch diet (73+/-10 min) versus the high fiber diet (24+/-10 min). In summary, cows with elevated insulin concentrations and lower enzyme activity showed a decrease in P(4) clearance without any changes in LBF. This dietary relationship with hepatic enzyme activity may explain some of the observed alterations in steroid profiles during the estrous cycle or gestation of the high producing dairy cow.

  9. Temperature modulates hepatic carbohydrate metabolic enzyme activity and gene expression in juvenile GIFT tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fed a carbohydrate-enriched diet.

    PubMed

    Qiang, J; He, J; Yang, H; Wang, H; Kpundeh, M D; Xu, P; Zhu, Z X

    2014-02-01

    The effects of rearing temperature on hepatic glucokinase (GK), glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity and gene expression were studied in GIFT (genetically improved farmed tilapia) tilapia fed a high carbohydrate diet containing 28% crude protein, 5% crude lipid and 40% wheat starch. Triplicate groups of fish (11.28 g initial body weight) were fed the diet for 45 days at 22 °C, 28 °C or 34 °C. At the end of the trial, final body weight of juvenile at 28 °C (59.12 g) was higher than that of the fish reared at 22 °C (27.13 g) and 34 °C (43.17 g). Feed intake, feed efficiency and protein efficiency ratio were also better at 28 °C. Liver glycogen levels were higher at 28 °C, while plasma glucose levels were higher in the 22 °C group. Significant (P<0.05) effects of water temperature on enzymes activities and gene expression were observed. Hepatic GK activity and mRNA level were higher at 28 °C than at 34 °C. Higher G6Pase and G6PD activity and gene expression were observed at 22 °C. Overall, the data show that juveniles reared at 28 °C exhibited enhanced liver glycolytic capacity. In contrast, hepatic gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis were increased by low temperature (22 °C).

  10. Methadone induces the expression of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes through the activation of pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor.

    PubMed

    Tolson, Antonia H; Li, Haishan; Eddington, Natalie D; Wang, Hongbing

    2009-09-01

    Methadone (MD) is the most established substance abuse pharmacotherapy of choice for the management of heroin dependence. To date, drug-drug interactions involving MD have been characterized asymmetrically among existing reports, which describe how other drugs affect the metabolic or pharmacokinetic profiles of MD; however, limited information is available regarding the potential for MD to influence similar fates of coadministered drugs. Moreover, little to no mechanistic evidence has been explored. Here, we show that MD induces hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) through the activation of pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of human hepatocyte cultures revealed that MD induces the mRNA expression of CYP2B6, CYP3A4, UGT1A1, and multidrug resistance 1 in a concentration-related manner, with the maximal induction of CYP2B6 challenging that of the induction by rifampicin. Furthermore, MD-mediated induction of CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 proteins was observed in Western blot analysis. In cell-based reporter assays, MD significantly increased human (h) PXR-mediated CYP2B6 reporter activities but exhibited minimal effect on hCAR activation as a result of the constitutive activity of hCAR in HepG2 cells. Further studies revealed that treatment with MD resulted in significant nuclear accumulation of adenovirus/enhanced yellow fluorescent protein tagged-hCAR in human hepatocytes, which has been regarded as the initial step of CAR activation. Additional analysis of the two enantiomers of MD, R-(-)-MD (active) and S-(+)-MD (inactive), indicates the lack of stereoselectivity pertaining to MD-mediated DME induction. Overall, our results show that MD induces the hepatic expression of multiple DMEs by activating PXR- and CAR-mediated pathways.

  11. Methadone Induces the Expression of Hepatic Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes through the Activation of Pregnane X Receptor and Constitutive Androstane Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tolson, Antonia H.; Li, Haishan; Eddington, Natalie D.; Wang, Hongbing

    2009-01-01

    Methadone (MD) is the most established substance abuse pharmacotherapy of choice for the management of heroin dependence. To date, drug-drug interactions involving MD have been characterized asymmetrically among existing reports, which describe how other drugs affect the metabolic or pharmacokinetic profiles of MD; however, limited information is available regarding the potential for MD to influence similar fates of coadministered drugs. Moreover, little to no mechanistic evidence has been explored. Here, we show that MD induces hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) through the activation of pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of human hepatocyte cultures revealed that MD induces the mRNA expression of CYP2B6, CYP3A4, UGT1A1, and multidrug resistance 1 in a concentration-related manner, with the maximal induction of CYP2B6 challenging that of the induction by rifampicin. Furthermore, MD-mediated induction of CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 proteins was observed in Western blot analysis. In cell-based reporter assays, MD significantly increased human (h) PXR-mediated CYP2B6 reporter activities but exhibited minimal effect on hCAR activation as a result of the constitutive activity of hCAR in HepG2 cells. Further studies revealed that treatment with MD resulted in significant nuclear accumulation of adenovirus/enhanced yellow fluorescent protein tagged-hCAR in human hepatocytes, which has been regarded as the initial step of CAR activation. Additional analysis of the two enantiomers of MD, R-(–)-MD (active) and S-(+)-MD (inactive), indicates the lack of stereoselectivity pertaining to MD-mediated DME induction. Overall, our results show that MD induces the hepatic expression of multiple DMEs by activating PXR- and CAR-mediated pathways. PMID:19520773

  12. Comparative hepatic activity of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes and concentrations of organohalogens and their hydroxylated analogues in captive Greenland sledge dogs (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Verreault, Jonathan; Maisonneuve, France; Dietz, Rune; Sonne, Christian; Letcher, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    A captive study was performed with Greenland sledge dogs (Canis familiaris) fed a naturally organohalogen-contaminated diet (Greenland minke whale [Balaenoptera acutorostrata] blubber; exposed group) or a control diet (pork fat; control group). The catalytic activity of major xenobiotic-metabolizing phase I and II hepatic microsomal enzymes was assessed. Relative to control dogs, ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity in exposed dogs was twofold higher (p = 0.001). Testosterone hydroxylation yielded 6beta- and 16beta-hydroxy (OH) testosterone and androstenedione, with higher rates of production (23-27%; p < or = 0.03) in the exposed individuals. In the exposed dogs, epoxide hydrolase (EH) activity was 31% higher (p = 0.02) relative to the control dogs, whereas uridine diphosphoglucuronosyl transferase (UDPGT) activity was not different (p = 0.62). When the exposed and control dogs were combined, the summed (sigma) plasma concentrations of OH-polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were predicted by plasma sigmaPCB concentrations and EROD activity (p < or = 0.04), whereas testosterone hydroxylase, EH, and UDPGT activities were not significant predictors of these concentrations. Consistent results were found for individual OH-PCB congeners and their theoretical precursor PCBs (e.g., 4-OH-CB-187 and CB-183, and 4-OH-CB-146 and CB-146) and for EROD activity. No association was found between sigmaOH-polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) and sigmaPBDE plasma concentrations, or between potential precursor-metabolite pairs, and the enzyme activities. The present results suggest that liver microsomal EROD activity and plasma PCB concentrations have a greater (e.g., relative to EH activity) predictive power for the occurrence of plasma OH-PCB residues in sledge dogs. These results also suggest that plasma OH-PBDEs likely are not products of cytochrome P450-mediated transformation but, rather, are accumulated via the diet.

  13. Chronic alcohol intake up-regulates hepatic expressions of carotenoid cleavage enzymes and peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptors in rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Excessive and chronic alcohol intake leads to a lower hepatic vitamin A status by interfering with vitamin A metabolism.Dietary provitamin A carotenoids can be converted into vitamin A mainly by carotenoid 15,15’-monooxygenase 1 (CMO1) and, to a lesser degree, carotenoid 9910’-monooxygenase 2 (CMO2)...

  14. The changes of serum testosterone level and hepatic microsome enzyme activity of crucian carp (Carassius carassius) exposed to a sublethal dosage of pentachlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Yin, Daqiang; Kong, Fanxiang

    2008-10-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP), which was reported to be a typical persistent organic pollutant and environmental endocrine disruptor, may cause threat to aquatic species. In this study, serum testosterone concentration, activity of liver microsome ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) and glutathione S-transferases (GST) of crucian carp (Carassius carassius) exposed to PCP for 7 and 15 d, respectively, were examined. The results showed that testosterone concentration was induced remarkably after 7 d (P<0.05), and the testosterone concentrations in 15 d treatment crucian carp were higher than those in 7 d treatment. It was found that there were significant effects on activities of EROD and GST after crucian carp were exposed to PCP for 7 and 15 d (P<0.05), compared to the controls. EROD and GST activities increased with increase in PCP concentration and also with increase in time on exposure. The results indicated that serum testosterone, EROD and GST were sensitive endpoints to PCP. PCP may have endocrine disrupting activities and may affect the reproductive success of this species. It is possible that the changes of hepatic microsome enzyme activities may result in alterations of serum testosterone levels in crucian carp.

  15. Dietary chia seed induced changes in hepatic transcription factors and their target lipogenic and oxidative enzyme activities in dyslipidaemic insulin-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andrea S; Oliva, Maria E; Ferreira, Maria R; Chicco, Adriana; Lombardo, Yolanda B

    2013-05-01

    The present study analyses the effect of dietary chia seed rich in n-3 α-linolenic acid on the mechanisms underlying dyslipidaemia and liver steatosis developed in rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD) for either 3 weeks or 5 months. The key hepatic enzyme activities such as fatty acid synthase (FAS), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH), carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) and fatty acid oxidase (FAO) involved in lipid metabolism and the protein mass levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) and PPARα were studied. (1) For 3 weeks, Wistar rats were fed either a SRD with 11 % of maize oil (MO) as dietary fat or a SRD in which chia seed replaced MO (SRD+Chia). (2) A second group of rats were fed a SRD for 3 months. Afterwards, half the rats continued with the SRD while for the other half, MO was replaced by chia for 2 months (SRD+Chia). In a control group, maize starch replaced sucrose. Liver TAG and the aforementioned parameters were analysed in all groups. The replacement of MO by chia in the SRD prevented (3 weeks) or improved/normalised (5 months) increases in dyslipidaemia, liver TAG, FAS, ACC and G-6-PDH activities, and increased FAO and CPT-1 activities. Protein levels of PPARα increased, and the increased mature form of SREBP-1 protein levels in the SRD was normalised by chia in both protocols (1 and 2). The present study provides new data regarding some key mechanisms related to the fate of hepatic fatty acid metabolism that seem to be involved in the effect of dietary chia seed in preventing and normalising/improving dyslipidaemia and liver steatosis in an insulin-resistant rat model.

  16. Dietary D-psicose, a C-3 epimer of D-fructose, suppresses the activity of hepatic lipogenic enzymes in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, T; Baba, Y; Hashiguchi, M; Takeshita, K; Izumori, K; Suzuki, H

    2001-01-01

    D-Psicose (D-ribo-2-hexulose), a C-3 epimer of D-fructose, is present in small quantities in commercial carbohydrate complexes or agricultural products. Wistar male rats were fed experimental diets which consisted of 5% D-psicose, cellulose, D-fructose or D-glucose for 28 days. Abdominal adipose tissue weight was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in rats fed the D-psicose diet than in rats fed a D-fructose and D-glucose diets, even though the four dietary groups were offered the same amount throughout the experimental period. Fatty acid synthase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities in the liver were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in rats fed the D-psicose diet than in rats fed the D-fructose and D-glucose diets. However, lipoprotein lipase activities in the heart, soleus muscle and perirenal adipose tissue were the same. These results suggest that a supplement of D-psicose in the diet suppresses hepatic lipogenic enzyme activities. The lower abdominal fat accumulation in rats fed a D-psicose diet might result from lower lipogenesis in the liver.

  17. The enzymes LSD1 and Set1A cooperate with the viral protein HBx to establish an active hepatitis B viral chromatin state

    PubMed Central

    Alarcon, Valentina; Hernández, Sergio; Rubio, Lorena; Alvarez, Francisca; Flores, Yvo; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V.; Kann, Michael; Villanueva, Rodrigo A.; Loyola, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    With about 350 million people chronically infected around the world hepatitis B is a major health problem. Template for progeny HBV synthesis is the viral genome, organized as a minichromosome (cccDNA) inside the hepatocyte nucleus. How viral cccDNA gene expression is regulated by its chromatin structure; more importantly, how the modulation of this structure impacts on viral gene expression remains elusive. Here, we found that the enzyme SetDB1 contributes to setting up a repressed cccDNA chromatin state. This repressive state is activated by the histone lysine demethylase-1 (LSD1). Consistently, inhibiting or reducing LSD1 levels led to repression of viral gene expression. This correlates with the transcriptionally repressive mark H3K9 methylation and reduction on the activating marks H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation on viral promoters. Investigating the importance of viral proteins we found that LSD1 recruitment to viral promoters was dependent on the viral transactivator protein HBx. Moreover, the histone methyltransferase Set1A and HBx are simultaneously bound to the core promoter, and Set1A expression correlates with cccDNA H3K4 methylation. Our results shed light on the mechanisms of HBV regulation mediated by the cccDNA chromatin structure, offering new therapeutic targets to develop drugs for the treatment of chronically infected HBV patients. PMID:27174370

  18. The enzymes LSD1 and Set1A cooperate with the viral protein HBx to establish an active hepatitis B viral chromatin state.

    PubMed

    Alarcon, Valentina; Hernández, Sergio; Rubio, Lorena; Alvarez, Francisca; Flores, Yvo; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V; Kann, Michael; Villanueva, Rodrigo A; Loyola, Alejandra

    2016-05-13

    With about 350 million people chronically infected around the world hepatitis B is a major health problem. Template for progeny HBV synthesis is the viral genome, organized as a minichromosome (cccDNA) inside the hepatocyte nucleus. How viral cccDNA gene expression is regulated by its chromatin structure; more importantly, how the modulation of this structure impacts on viral gene expression remains elusive. Here, we found that the enzyme SetDB1 contributes to setting up a repressed cccDNA chromatin state. This repressive state is activated by the histone lysine demethylase-1 (LSD1). Consistently, inhibiting or reducing LSD1 levels led to repression of viral gene expression. This correlates with the transcriptionally repressive mark H3K9 methylation and reduction on the activating marks H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation on viral promoters. Investigating the importance of viral proteins we found that LSD1 recruitment to viral promoters was dependent on the viral transactivator protein HBx. Moreover, the histone methyltransferase Set1A and HBx are simultaneously bound to the core promoter, and Set1A expression correlates with cccDNA H3K4 methylation. Our results shed light on the mechanisms of HBV regulation mediated by the cccDNA chromatin structure, offering new therapeutic targets to develop drugs for the treatment of chronically infected HBV patients.

  19. Nelumbo nucifera leaves protect hydrogen peroxide-induced hepatic damage via antioxidant enzymes and HO-1/Nrf2 activation.

    PubMed

    Je, Jae-Young; Lee, Da-Bin

    2015-06-01

    Naturally occurring phenolic compounds are widely found in plants. Here, the phenolic composition and hepatoprotective effect of the butanolic extract (BE) from Nelumbo nucifera leaves against H2O2-induced hepatic damage in cultured hepatocytes were investigated. BE showed high total phenol and flavonoid contents, and major phenolic compounds are quercetin, catechin, ferulic acid, rutin, and protocatechuic acid by HPLC analysis. BE effectively scavenged 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) cation radicals (IC50 values of 5.21 μg mL(-1) for DPPH and 6.22 μg mL(-1) for ABTS(+)) and showed strong reducing power. Pretreatment of BE prior to 650 μM H2O2 exposure markedly increased cell viability and suppressed H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and AAPH-induced cell membrane lipid peroxidation. In addition, BE up-regulated intracellular glutathione levels under normal and oxidative stress conditions. Notably, the hepatoprotective effect of BE was directly correlated with the increased expression of superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) by 0.62-fold, catalase (CAT) by 0.42-fold, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) by 2.4-fold. Pretreatment of BE also increased the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 by 8.1-fold indicating that increased SOD-1, CAT, and HO-1 expressions are Nrf2-mediated.

  20. Hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 enzyme activity in relation to in vitro metabolism/inhibition of polychlorinated biphenyls and testosterone in Baltic grey seal (Halichoerus grypus).

    PubMed

    Li, Hongxia; Boon, Jan P; Lewis, Wilma E; van den Berg, Martin; Nyman, Madeleine; Letcher, Robert J

    2003-03-01

    Among other factors, cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme activity determines polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) bioaccumulation, biotransformation, and toxicity in exposed species. We measured the oxidative metabolism in vitro of 12 PCB congeners, representing structural groups based on the number and position of the chlorine atoms, by the hepatic microsomes of one Baltic grey seal (Halichoerus grypus). Microsomal metabolism was observed for several PCBs with vicinal H atoms exclusively in the ortho and meta positions and without any ortho-Cl substituents (CB-15 [4,4'-Cl2] and CB-77 [3,3',4,4'-Cl4]), vicinal meta and para-H atoms (CB-52 [2,2',5,5'-Cl4], and -101 [2,2',4,5,5'-Cl5]) or with both characteristics in combination with either only one ortho-Cl (CB-26 [2,3',5-Cl3], CB-31 [2,4',5-Cl3]) or two ortho-Cl substituents (CB-44 [2,2',3,5'-Cl4]). To allocate PCB biotransformation to specific CYPs, the inhibitive effect of compounds with known CYP-specific inhibition properties was assessed on in vitro PCB metabolism and on regio- and stereospecific testosterone hydroxylase activities. Metabolic inhibition was considered relevant at concentrations < or = 1.0 microM because these inhibitors became decreasingly selective at higher concentrations. At < 1.0 microM, ellipticine (CYPIAI/2 inhibitor) selectively inhibited CB-15, -26, -31, and -77 metabolism, with no significant inhibition of CB-44, -52, and -101 metabolism. Inhibition of CB-52 and -101 metabolism by chloramphenicol (CYP2B inhibitor) started at 1.0 microM and maximized at about 100% at 10 microM. Ketoconazole (CYP3A inhibitor) appeared to selectively inhibit CB-26, -31, and -44 metabolism relative to CB-15, -77, and -52 at concentrations < or = 1.0 microM. Major testosterone metabolites formed in vitro were 2beta-(CYP3A), 6beta- (CYP3A, CYPIA), and 16beta- (CYP2B) hydroxytestosterone and androstenedione (CYP2B, CYP2C11). The CYP forms indicated are associated with the specific metabolism of testosterone in laboratory

  1. Mutagenic activation and detoxification of benzo[a]pyrene in vitro by hepatic cytochrome P450 1A1 and phase II enzymes in three meat-producing animals.

    PubMed

    Darwish, W; Ikenaka, Y; Eldaly, E; Ishizuka, M

    2010-01-01

    The mutagenic activation activity of hepatic microsomes from three meat-producing animals (cattle, deer and horses) was compared with those of rats as a reference species. In the Ames Salmonella typhimurium TA98 assay, the liver microsomes of all examined animals mutagenically activated benzo[a]pyrene, an ideal promutagens, in terms of production of histidine-independent revertant colonies. The microsomes of horses had the highest ability to produce revertant colonies of the examined animals under both low and high substrate concentrations. Inhibition of this mutagenic activity using alpha-naphthoflavone, anti-rat CYP1A1, CYP3A2 and CYP2E1 antibodies suggests that this activity was mainly because of CYP1A1 in these animals as well as in rats. The addition of co-factors for two phase II enzymes, microsomal UDP glucoronosyl transferase and cytosolic glutathione-S-transferase, reduced the production of the revertant colonies in a concentration-dependent manner. Interestingly, horses had the highest reduction rate among the examined animals, suggesting that phase II enzymes play a great role in producing a state of balance between the bioactivation and detoxification of xenobiotics in these meat-producing animals. This report is the first to investigate the mutagenic activation activity of the hepatic microsomes and the role of phase II enzymes against this activity in meat-producing animals.

  2. Photoperiodism and Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Orlando; Morel, Claudine

    1974-01-01

    Metabolic readjustments after a change from long days to short days appear, in Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, to be achieved through the operation of two main mechanisms: variation in enzyme capacity, and circadian rhythmicity. After a lag time, capacity in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and capacity in aspartate aminotransferase increase exponentially and appear to be allometrically linked during 50 to 60 short days; then a sudden fall takes place in the activity of the former. Malic enzyme and alanine aminotransferase behave differently. Thus, the operation of the two sections of the pathway (before and after the malate step) give rise to a continuously changing functional compartmentation in the pathway. Circadian rhythmicity, on the other hand, produces time compartmentation through phase shifts and variation in amplitude, independently for each enzyme. These characteristics suggest that the operation of a so-called biological clock would be involved. We propose the hypothesis that feedback regulation would be more accurate and efficient when applied to an already oscillating, clock-controlled enzyme system. PMID:16658749

  3. Hepatic porphyrin concentration and uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase activity in hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Brudieux, E; de Lédinghen, V; Moran, M J; Fontanellas, A; Oui, B; Trimoulet, P; Belleannée, G; Piton, A; Raymond, J M; Doutre, M S; Amouretti, M; de Verneuil, H; Couzigou, P

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a high prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT). The aim of this study was to assess hepatic porphyrin concentrations (HPC) and hepatic uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD) activity in HCV-infected patients free of PCT. Thirty-two HCV-infected patients (20 M, 12 F, mean age 51 years) and seven control patients (4 M, 3 F, mean age 59 years) free of liver disease, were studied. Knodell's score was determined on liver biopsy by two independent anatomopathologists. Measurement of HPC and hepatic UROD activity levels were carried out on liver biopsy. Relative to controls, HCV-infected patients had high HPC levels (mean +/- SD: 47 +/- 20 vs. 17 +/- 6 pmol/mg protein, P < 0.001) and low hepatic UROD activity levels (514 +/- 95 vs. 619 +/- 125 pmol Copro/h/mg protein, P < 0.05). HPC was not correlated with hepatic UROD activity and the increase was due to coproporphyrin accumulation. No correlation was observed between HPC or hepatic UROD activity values and HCV-RNA concentrations, Knodell's score, hepatic fibrosis, periportal necrosis, periportal inflammation or hepatic iron content in HCV-infected patients. Hepatocellular necrosis was significantly correlated with HPC value (P < 0.005). Hence, in HCV-infected patients, HPC is significantly increased and hepatic UROD activity is very slightly decreased as compared to controls. HPC values and UROD activity are not correlated with HCV-RNA concentrations, hepatic iron content and hepatic fibrosis. The small increase in HPC values in hepatitis C infection is linked with hepatic injury and not with a direct effect on hepatic UROD enzyme.

  4. Quantitative Characterization of Major Hepatic UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase Enzymes in Human Liver Microsomes: Comparison of Two Proteomic Methods and Correlation with Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Achour, Brahim; Dantonio, Alyssa; Niosi, Mark; Novak, Jonathan J; Fallon, John K; Barber, Jill; Smith, Philip C; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Goosen, Theunis C

    2017-10-01

    Quantitative characterization of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes is valuable in glucuronidation reaction phenotyping, predicting metabolic clearance and drug-drug interactions using extrapolation exercises based on pharmacokinetic modeling. Different quantitative proteomic workflows have been employed to quantify UGT enzymes in various systems, with reports indicating large variability in expression, which cannot be explained by interindividual variability alone. To evaluate the effect of methodological differences on end-point UGT abundance quantification, eight UGT enzymes were quantified in 24 matched liver microsomal samples by two laboratories using stable isotope-labeled (SIL) peptides or quantitative concatemer (QconCAT) standard, and measurements were assessed against catalytic activity in seven enzymes (n = 59). There was little agreement between individual abundance levels reported by the two methods; only UGT1A1 showed strong correlation [Spearman rank order correlation (Rs) = 0.73, P < 0.0001; R(2) = 0.30; n = 24]. SIL-based abundance measurements correlated well with enzyme activities, with correlations ranging from moderate for UGTs 1A6, 1A9, and 2B15 (Rs = 0.52-0.59, P < 0.0001; R(2) = 0.34-0.58; n = 59) to strong correlations for UGTs 1A1, 1A3, 1A4, and 2B7 (Rs = 0.79-0.90, P < 0.0001; R(2) = 0.69-0.79). QconCAT-based data revealed generally poor correlation with activity, whereas moderate correlations were shown for UGTs 1A1, 1A3, and 2B7. Spurious abundance-activity correlations were identified in the cases of UGT1A4/2B4 and UGT2B7/2B15, which could be explained by correlations of protein expression between these enzymes. Consistent correlation of UGT abundance with catalytic activity, demonstrated by the SIL-based dataset, suggests that quantitative proteomic data should be validated against catalytic activity whenever possible. In addition, metabolic reaction phenotyping exercises should consider spurious abundance-activity

  5. Hepatic Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs). No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been carried out through life stages in any species. RESULTS: Using full-genome arrays, the mRNA expression of all XMETs and their regulatory proteins was examined during fetal (gestation day (GD) 19), neonatal (postnatal day (PND) 7), prepubescent (PND32), middle age (12 months), and old age (18 and 24 months) in the C57BL/6J (C57) mouse liver and compared to adults. Fetal and neonatal life stages exhibited dramatic differences in XMET mRNA expression compared to the relatively minor effects of old age. The total number of XMET probe sets that differed from adults was 636, 500, 84, 5, 43, and 102 for GD19, PND7, PND32, 12 months, 18 months and 24 months, respectively. At all life stages except PND32, under-expressed genes outnumbered over-expressed genes. The altered XMETs included those in all of the major metabolic and transport phases including introduction of reactive or polar groups (Phase I), conjugation (Phase II) and excretion (Phase III). In the fetus and neonate, parallel increases in expression were noted in the dioxin receptor, Nrf2 components and their regulated genes while nuclear receptors and regulated genes were generally down-regulated. Suppression of male-specific XMETs w

  6. Evaluation of the marine alga Ulva rigida as a food supplement: effect of intake on intestinal, hepatic, and renal enzyme activities in rats.

    PubMed

    Taboada, Cristina; Millán, Rosendo; Míguez, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    The use of seaweeds as a food is more widespread in Eastern than in Western countries, although demand for these plants has increased in the West because their possible usefulness as dietary supplements. However, very little is known about the effects of regular consumption of algae. The aim of the present study was to determine the composition of Ulva rigida and to evaluate the effects of dietary supplementation of the diet with 10% alga for 4 weeks on dietary intake, growth, protein efficiency ratio, diet conversion ratio, and some organ weights in growing male rats. We also studied the effect of inclusion of the alga in the diet on intestinal, hepatic, and renal enzymatic activities. U. rigida was found to be a good source of protein and carbohydrates. Food intake was higher in the U. rigida group than in the control group, but ingestion of alga did not have any effect on the other trophic parameters. The intestinal disaccharidase and leucine aminopeptidase activities were lower in rats fed with alga than in control rats, but γ-glutamyl transpeptidase activity was higher in the kidneys of alga-fed rats than in control rats. U. rigida contains high amounts of protein, carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals and low amounts of lipids. Analysis of the amino acid composition revealed good-quality protein. The addition of alga to the diet inhibited disaccharidase activities, which suggested that alga consumption could be useful in some chronic disorders associated with pertubations of glucose homeostasis caused by carbohydrate absorption.

  7. Grapefruit and oroblanco enhance hepatic detoxification enzymes in rats: possible role in protection against chemical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hahn-Obercyger, Michal; Stark, Aliza H; Madar, Zecharia

    2005-03-09

    Citrus fruits are considered to be functional foods that promote good health. This study was carried out to assess the effect of oroblanco and grapefruit consumption on hepatic detoxification enzymes. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were provided with either regular drinking water (control) or experimental treatments of oroblanco juice, grapefruit juice, or a sugar mix for 6 weeks. After 1 week of treatment, half the animals in each group were injected with the procarcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine. Grapefruit juice significantly increased activity and expression of the hepatic phase I enzyme, cytochrome P450 CYP1A1, with a marked trend toward enhanced NAD(P)H:quinone reductase (QR) activity. Oroblanco juice significantly increased glutathione S-transferase phase II enzyme activity along with CYP1A1 expression and a notable trend toward increased activity of both CYP1A1 and QR. These results suggest that these citrus fruits are bifunctional inducers, modulating both phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes to enhance hepatic detoxification.

  8. Ameliorating effect of betanin, a natural chromoalkaloid by modulating hepatic carbohydrate metabolic enzyme activities and glycogen content in streptozotocin - nicotinamide induced experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Dhananjayan, Indumathi; Kathiroli, Sujithra; Subramani, Srinivasan; Veerasamy, Vinothkumar

    2017-04-01

    Betanin, a chromoalkaloid of beetroot, has shown significant biological effects of antioxidants, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic activities. So, we attempted to determine whether betanin (a natural pigment) would be protective against hyperglycemia in streptozotocin (STZ) - nicotinamide (NA) induced diabetic rats. Rats were injected with STZ (40mg/kgb.w.) 15 mins after the administration of NA (110mg/kgb.w.) by intraperitonially (i.p.) 30days for the induction of experimental diabetes mellitus. After 72h diabetic rats were treated with betanin orally at a doses of 10, 20 and 40mg/kg b.w., respectively in a dose dependent manner and glibenclamide (600μg/kgb.w.). The promising character of betanin against diabetic rats was evaluated by performing the various biochemical parameters and histomorphological changes in liver and pancreas. Among the three doses, 20mg/kgb.w. of betanin was able to positively regulate plasma glucose, insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and hemoglobin (Hb) levels by significantly increasing the activity of glycolytic enzyme (glucokinase and pyruvate kinase), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and significantly decreasing the activity of gluconeogenic enzymes (glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase) thereby increasing the glycogen content in the liver. We put forward that betanin could significantly restore the levels of carbohydrate metabolic key enzymes to near normal in diabetic rat. Immunohistochemical observation of pancreas revealed that betanin treated diabetic rats showed increased insulin immunoreactive β-cells, which confirmed the biochemical findings. Taken together, present study suggests that betanin modulates the carbohydrate metabolism and has beneficial effects in glucose homeostasis.

  9. Effect of caloric restriction and AMPK activation on hepatic nuclear receptor, biotransformation enzyme, and transporter expression in lean and obese mice.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Supriya R; Xu, Jialin; Donepudi, Ajay C; Wei, Wei; Slitt, Angela L

    2013-09-01

    Fatty liver alters liver transporter expression. Caloric restriction (CR), the recommended therapy to reverse fatty liver, increases Sirtuin1 deacetylase activity in liver. This study evaluated whether CR and CR mimetics reversed obesity-induced transporter expression in liver and hepatocytes. mRNA and protein expression was determined in adult lean (lean) and leptin-deficient obese (OB) mice fed ad libitum or placed on 40% (kCal) reduced diet. Hepatocytes were isolated from lean and OB mice, treated with AMP Kinase activators, and gene expression was determined. CR decreased Oatp1a1, Oatp1b2, and Abcb11 mRNA expression in lean, but not OB mice. CR increased Abcc2 mRNA OB livers, whereas protein expression increased in both genotypes. CR increased Abcc3 protein expression increased in OB livers. CR did not alter Abcc1, 4 and 5 mRNA expression in lean mice but decreased expression in livers of OB mice. CR increased Abcc4 protein in lean, but not OB mice. CR restriction reversed the expression of some, but not all transporters in livers of OB mice. Overall, these data indicate a potential for CR to restore some hepatic transporter changes in OB mice, but suggest a functional leptin axis is needed for reversal of expression for some transporters.

  10. Determination of lipolytic enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Kovacic, Filip

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a versatile human opportunistic pathogen that produces and secretes an arsenal of enzymes, proteins and small molecules many of which serve as virulence factors. Notably, about 40 % of P. aeruginosa genes code for proteins of unknown function, among them more than 80 encoding putative, but still unknown lipolytic enzymes. This group of hydrolases (EC 3.1.1) is known already for decades, but only recently, several of these enzymes have attracted attention as potential virulence factors. Reliable and reproducible enzymatic activity assays are crucial to determine their physiological function and particularly assess their contribution to pathogenicity. As a consequence of the unique biochemical properties of lipids resulting in the formation of micellar structures in water, the reproducible preparation of substrate emulsions is strongly dependent on the method used. Furthermore, the physicochemical properties of the respective substrate emulsion may drastically affect the activities of the tested lipolytic enzymes. Here, we describe common methods for the activity determination of lipase, esterase, phospholipase, and lysophospholipase. These methods cover lipolytic activity assays carried out in vitro, with cell extracts or separated subcellular compartments and with purified enzymes. We have attempted to describe standardized protocols, allowing the determination and comparison of enzymatic activities of lipolytic enzymes from different sources. These methods should also encourage the Pseudomonas community to address the wealth of still unexplored lipolytic enzymes encoded and produced by P. aeruginosa.

  11. Role of hepatitis B virus X repression of C/EBPbeta activity in the down-regulation of glutathione S-transferase A2 gene: implications in other phase II detoxifying enzyme expression.

    PubMed

    Cho, I J; Ki, S H; Brooks, C; Kim, S G

    2009-02-01

    1. A genome-wide in silico screening rendered the genes of phase II enzymes in the rat genome whose promoters contain the putative DNA elements interacting with CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) and NF-E2-related factor (Nrf2). The hepatitis B virus X (HBx) protein strongly modulates the transactivation and/or the repression of genes regulated by some bZIP transcription factors. 2. This study investigated the effects of HBx on the induction of phase II enzymes with the aim of elucidating the role of HBx interaction with C/EBPbeta or Nrf2 bZIP transcription factors in hepatocyte-derived cells. 3. Immunoblot and reporter gene analyses revealed that transfection of HBx interfered with the constitutive and inducible GSTA2 transactivation promoted by oltipraz (C/EBPbeta activator), but not that by tert-butylhydroquinone (t-BHQ, Nrf2 activator). Moreover, HBx transfection completely inhibited GSTA2 reporter gene activity induced by C/EBPbeta, but failed to inhibit that by Nrf2. 4. Gel shift assays identified that HBx inhibited the increase in C/EBPbeta-DNA complex formation by oltipraz, but not the increase in Nrf2-DNA complex by t-BHQ. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblot assays verified the direct interaction between HBx and C/EBPbeta. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed HBx inhibition of C/EBPbeta binding to its binding site in the GSTA2 gene promoter. HBx repressed the induction of other phase II enzymes including GSTP, UDP-glucuronyltransferase 1A, microsomal epoxide hydrolase, GSTM1, GSTM2, and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthase. 5. These results demonstrate that HBx inhibits the induction of phase II detoxifying enzymes, which is mediated by its interaction with C/EBPbeta, but not Nrf2, substantiating the specific role of HBx in phase II detoxifying capacity.

  12. Effect of Helicteres isora bark extract on blood glucose and hepatic enzymes in experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G; Murugesan, A G; Rajasekara Pandian, M

    2006-04-01

    The effect of oral administration of an aqueous extract of the bark of Helicteres isora was investigated on blood glucose and plasma antioxidant status in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. The study was also undertaken to evaluate the role of hepatic enzymes in experimental diabetes. Oral administration of a bark extract of Helicteres isora (100, 200 mg/kg) in STZ diabetic rats caused a significant increase in body weight, hepatic hexokinase activity and significant decrease in hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase, serum acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Based on these findings, we suggest that Helicteres isora possesses hypoglycemic and hepatoprotective activity and is able to ameliorate biochemical damage in STZ induced diabetic rats.

  13. Supplementation of corn dried distillers' grains plus solubles to gestating beef cows fed low-quality forage: II. Impacts on uterine blood flow, circulating estradiol-17β and progesterone, and hepatic steroid metabolizing enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, V C; Mordhorst, B R; Gaspers, J J; Bauer, M L; Swanson, K C; Lemley, C O; Vonnahme, K A

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of supplementing dried distillers' grains plus solubles (DDGS) during late gestation on uterine blood flow (BF), circulating steroid hormones and hepatic steroid metabolizing enzymes, and calf and placental weights. Multiparous beef cows were randomly divided into a control group (CON; = 15) consuming a diet containing 90% corn stover and 10% corn silage (DM basis) for ad libitum intake and a treatment group (SUP; = 12) consuming the same diet and DDGS (0.3% of BW). Corn silage inclusion was increased to 30% as gestation progressed to meet increasing caloric requirements. Ipsilateral and contralateral uterine BF and cross-sectional area (CSA) of each uterine artery were measured by Doppler ultrasonography on d 180, 216, and 246 of pregnancy. Contralateral BF and CSA increased ( < 0.01) as gestation advanced. Ipsilateral BF and CSA was affected by a treatment × day of gestation interaction ( < 0.05). A main effect of treatment ( = 0.02) and day ( < 0.01) was observed for total BF; BF increased over time and SUP cows had greater BF than CON cows. Circulating concentrations of both progesterone (P4) and estradiol-17β (E2) were affected by an interaction of treatment and day ( < 0.01). Concentrations of circulating E2 steadily increased throughout the study and were greater in CON cows than in SUP cows by d 242. Concentrations of P4 also increased over time; P4 of CON cows was greater than that of SUP cows by d 242. Uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) activity increased with advancing gestation ( < 0.01). There was greater UGT activity ( < 0.05) and a trend for greater CYP1A activity ( = 0.06) in SUP cows than in CON cows. Activity of cytochrome P450 3A was greater ( < 0.01) in SUP cows and decreased ( < 0.05) with advancing gestation. Supplementing DDGS to cows fed low-quality forage during late gestation increased uterine BF but decreased circulating E2 and P4

  14. Expression of hepatic antioxidant enzymes in non-obese type-2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Chang Seon; Oh, Soo Jin; Oh, Jung Min; Lee, Sang Yoon; Kwak, Hui Chan; Yun, Kang Uk; Lee, Ji-Yoon; Park, Song-Kyu; Kim, Bong-Hee; Ma, Jin Yeul; Kim, Sang Kyum

    2014-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus and its complications have been attributed in part to oxidative stress, against which antioxidant enzymes constitute a major protective mechanism. The present study was performed to investigate the effects of early stage type 2 diabetes in the absence of obesity and liver damage on hepatic antioxidant enzyme expression and oxidative stress using 9-week-old Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats. Hepatic total antioxidant capacity determined by total oxygen radical scavenging capacity and lipid peroxidation determined by malondialdehyde in plasma and liver were not significantly different between normal Wistar rats and GK rats. These results indicated that oxidative stress is not evident in these type 2 diabetic rats. Hepatic expression levels of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase-1, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and reductase, thioredoxin-1, mu- and pi-class glutathione S-transferase (GST), and the gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit, were not different between normal rats and GK rats. But, hepatic level and activity of alpha-class GST were decreased and peroxiredoxin-1 level was increased in GK rats, suggesting that upregulation of peroxiredoxin-1 compensates for downregulation of alpha-class GST. These results suggest that alpha-class GST and peroxiredoxin-1 in liver can be altered during the early stages of type 2 diabetes in the absence of obesity and severe oxidative stress.

  15. Chemoprotective activity of boldine: modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kubínová, R; Machala, M; Minksová, K; Neca, J; Suchý, V

    2001-03-01

    Possible chemoprotective effects of the naturally occurring alkaloid boldine, a major alkaloid of boldo (Peumus boldus Mol.) leaves and bark, including in vitro modulations of drug-metabolizing enzymes in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1 cell line and mouse hepatic microsomes, were investigated. Boldine manifested inhibition activity on hepatic microsomal CYP1A-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and CYP3A-dependent testosterone 6 beta-hydroxylase activities and stimulated glutathione S-transferase activity in Hepa-1 cells. In addition to the known antioxidant activity, boldine could decrease the metabolic activation of other xenobiotics including chemical mutagens.

  16. Hypoglycaemic activity of Coccinia indica and Momordica charantia in diabetic rats: depression of the hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and elevation of both liver and red-cell shunt enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Shibib, B A; Khan, L A; Rahman, R

    1993-01-01

    Coccinia indica leaves were extracted with 60% ethanol, solvents were evaporated and the residue was suspended in water. This suspension was administered orally at a dose of 200 mg/kg body wt. after 18 h of fasting to normal fed and streptozotocin-induced male diabetic rats (180-250 g). After 90 min the rats were killed, and blood-glucose, hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and red-cell G6PDH were assayed. Blood sugar was depressed by 23% (P < 0.01) and 27% (P < 0.001) in the normal fed and streptozotocin-diabetic rats respectively compared with controls which were given distilled water. Hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activities were depressed by 32% (P < 0.001) 30% (P < 0.05) respectively in the streptozotocin-diabetic rats, compared with 19% (P < 0.02) and 20% (P < 0.01) depression in the normal fed controls, whereas both the red-cell and hepatic G6PDH activities were found to be elevated by feeding the extract in the streptozotocin-diabetic and in the normal fed controls. Similar results were obtained with the 95%-ethanolic extract of Momordica charantia. Taken together, these results indicate that Coccinia indica and Momordica charantia extracts lowered blood glucose by depressing its synthesis, on the one hand through depression of the key gluconeogenic enzymes glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and on the other by enhancing glucose oxidation by the shunt pathway through activation of its principal enzyme G6PDH. PMID:8389127

  17. Effects of naturally occurring coumarins on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes inmice

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiner, Heather E. Xia, Xiaojun; Sonoda, Junichiro; Zhang, Jun; Pontius, Elizabeth; Abey, Jane; Evans, Ronald M.; Moore, David D.; DiGiovanni, John

    2008-10-15

    Cytochromes P450 (P450s) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute two important enzyme families involved in carcinogen metabolism. Generally, P450s play activation or detoxifying roles while GSTs act primarily as detoxifying enzymes. We previously demonstrated that oral administration of the linear furanocoumarins, isopimpinellin and imperatorin, modulated P450 and GST activities in various tissues of mice. The purpose of the present study was to compare a broader range of naturally occurring coumarins (simple coumarins, and furanocoumarins of the linear and angular type) for their abilities to modulate hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes when administered orally to mice. We now report that all of the different coumarins tested (coumarin, limettin, auraptene, angelicin, bergamottin, imperatorin and isopimpinellin) induced hepatic GST activities, whereas the linear furanocoumarins possessed the greatest abilities to induce hepatic P450 activities, in particular P450 2B and 3A. In both cases, this corresponded to an increase in protein expression of the enzymes. Induction of P4502B10, 3A11, and 2C9 by xenobiotics often is a result of activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and/or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Using a pregnane X receptor reporter system, our results demonstrated that isopimpinellin activated both PXR and its human ortholog SXR by recruiting coactivator SRC-1 in transfected cells. In CAR transfection assays, isopimpinellin counteracted the inhibitory effect of androstanol on full-length mCAR, a Gal4-mCAR ligand-binding domain fusion, and restored coactivator binding. Orally administered isopimpinellin induced hepatic mRNA expression of Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11, and GSTa in CAR(+/+) wild-type mice. In contrast, the induction of Cyp2b10 mRNA by isopimpinellin was attenuated in the CAR(-/-) mice, suggesting that isopimpinellin induces Cyp2b10 via the CAR receptor. Overall, the current data indicate that naturally occurring coumarins have

  18. Acute Liver Injury Induces Nucleocytoplasmic Redistribution of Hepatic Methionine Metabolism Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Miguel; Garrido, Francisco; Pérez-Miguelsanz, Juliana; Pacheco, María; Partearroyo, Teresa; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The discovery of methionine metabolism enzymes in the cell nucleus, together with their association with key nuclear processes, suggested a putative relationship between alterations in their subcellular distribution and disease. Results: Using the rat model of d-galactosamine intoxication, severe changes in hepatic steady-state mRNA levels were found; the largest decreases corresponded to enzymes exhibiting the highest expression in normal tissue. Cytoplasmic protein levels, activities, and metabolite concentrations suffered more moderate changes following a similar trend. Interestingly, galactosamine treatment induced hepatic nuclear accumulation of methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) α1 and S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase tetramers, their active assemblies. In fact, galactosamine-treated livers showed enhanced nuclear MAT activity. Acetaminophen (APAP) intoxication mimicked most galactosamine effects on hepatic MATα1, including accumulation of nuclear tetramers. H35 cells that overexpress tagged-MATα1 reproduced the subcellular distribution observed in liver, and the changes induced by galactosamine and APAP that were also observed upon glutathione depletion by buthionine sulfoximine. The H35 nuclear accumulation of tagged-MATα1 induced by these agents correlated with decreased glutathione reduced form/glutathione oxidized form ratios and was prevented by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and glutathione ethyl ester. However, the changes in epigenetic modifications associated with tagged-MATα1 nuclear accumulation were only prevented by NAC in galactosamine-treated cells. Innovation: Cytoplasmic and nuclear changes in proteins that regulate the methylation index follow opposite trends in acute liver injury, their nuclear accumulation showing potential as disease marker. Conclusion: Altogether these results demonstrate galactosamine- and APAP-induced nuclear accumulation of methionine metabolism enzymes as active oligomers and unveil the implication of

  19. Serum enzyme activities after cardioversion

    PubMed Central

    Mandecki, Tadeusz; Giec, Leszek; Kargul, Włodzimierz

    1970-01-01

    Serum aspartate aminotransferase (SGOT), alanine aminotransferase (SGPT), creatinine phosphokinase (CPK), and butyric acid dehydrogenase (BDH) were determined in 94 patients before, 1½ hours, and 24 hours after cardioversion. An increase in SGOT and CPK activity was observed 24 hours after cardioversion in the group of patients treated with two or more DC shocks. The importance of this enzyme activity increase is discussed. It originates in the skeletal muscles and probably has no clinical significance, as no other signs of myocardial damage were observed simultaneously in a large group of patients. PMID:5470040

  20. The angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril rescues mice from endotoxin-induced lethal hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Ge, Pu; Jiang, Rong; Yao, Xin; Li, Jing; Dai, Jie; Zhang, Li; Ye, Bin

    2017-02-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is classically regarded as a crucial regulator of circulatory homeostasis, but recent studies also revealed its pro-inflammatory roles. The beneficial effects of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) in severe inflammatory injury in the lung and heart have been previously reported, but its potential effects on lethal hepatitis were unknown. In this study, a mouse model with LPS/d-galactosamine (GalN)-induced fulminant hepatitis were used to test the protective potential of captopril, a representative ACEI. The results indicated that treatment with captopril significantly decreased the plasma level of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, alleviated the histopathological damage of the liver tissue and improve the survival rate of LPS/GalN-challenged mice. These effects were accompanied by reduced mRNA levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in the liver, and decreased protein level of TNF-α and IL-6 in the plasma. In addition, the activation of caspases 3, 8 and 9, and the presence of TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells, were also suppressed by captopril treatment. The above evidence suggested that the renin-angiotensin system might be involved in the development of LPS/GalN-induced fulminant hepatitis and ACEI might have potential value in lethal hepatitis.

  1. Catalase ameliorates hepatic fibrosis by inhibition of hepatic stellate cells activation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuwei; Qu, Ying; Xu, Mingyi; Wang, Xingpeng; Lu, Lungen

    2014-01-01

    Catalase, an endogenous antioxidant enzyme, is thought to have rescue effects on hepatic fibrosis. In this study, the regulation of catalase in CCl₄-induced hepatic fibrogenesis was investigated. Our results indicated that catalase expression was decreased upon CCl₄ treatment in a time-dependent manner, while the expression of several profibrosis and proangiogenic factors, including transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and angiopoietin 1 were significantly increased. To assess the role of catalase in hepatic fibrosis, catalase was overexpressed in HSC-T6 cells. This overexpression resulted in the inhibition of cell proliferation, migratory activity, and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) expression, key features that characterize activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC). Overexpression of catalase led to a decrease in the secretion of collagen type 1 and angiopoietin 1. These results indicate that loss of catalase activity is involved in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis caused by the activation of HSCs.

  2. Hepatitis B virus X protein regulates hepatic glucose homeostasis via activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye-Jun; Park, Young-Ho; Kim, Sun-Uk; Moon, Hyung-Bae; Park, Do Sim; Han, Ying-Hao; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, Dong-Seok; Song, In-Sung; Lee, Dae Ho; Kim, Minhye; Kim, Nam-Soon; Kim, Dae-Ghon; Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Sang-Keun; Kim, Yo Na; Kim, Su Sung; Choi, Cheol Soo; Kim, Young-Bum; Yu, Dae-Yeul

    2011-08-26

    Dysregulation of liver functions leads to insulin resistance causing type 2 diabetes mellitus and is often found in chronic liver diseases. However, the mechanisms of hepatic dysfunction leading to hepatic metabolic disorder are still poorly understood in chronic liver diseases. The current work investigated the role of hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in regulating glucose metabolism. We studied HBx-overexpressing (HBxTg) mice and HBxTg mice lacking inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Here we show that gene expressions of the key gluconeogenic enzymes were significantly increased in HepG2 cells expressing HBx (HepG2-HBx) and in non-tumor liver tissues of hepatitis B virus patients with high levels of HBx expression. In the liver of HBxTg mice, the expressions of gluconeogenic genes were also elevated, leading to hyperglycemia by increasing hepatic glucose production. However, this effect was insufficient to cause systemic insulin resistance. Importantly, the actions of HBx on hepatic glucose metabolism are thought to be mediated via iNOS signaling, as evidenced by the fact that deficiency of iNOS restored HBx-induced hyperglycemia by suppressing the gene expression of gluconeogenic enzymes. Treatment of HepG2-HBx cells with nitric oxide (NO) caused a significant increase in the expression of gluconeogenic genes, but JNK1 inhibition was completely normalized. Furthermore, hyperactivation of JNK1 in the liver of HBxTg mice was also suppressed in the absence of iNOS, indicating the critical role for JNK in the mutual regulation of HBx- and iNOS-mediated glucose metabolism. These findings establish a novel mechanism of HBx-driven hepatic metabolic disorder that is modulated by iNOS-mediated activation of JNK.

  3. Modulatory effects of Kaempferia parviflora extract on mouse hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mekjaruskul, Catheleeya; Jay, Michael; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn

    2012-06-14

    Kaempferia parviflora is a herbal plant, the extracts of which are commonly used as alternative medicines. It widely uses as aphrodisiac, anti-inflammation, anti-microbacterial, and anti-peptic ulcer. In order to obtain an effective utilization and safety of the herb, the influence of Kaempferia parviflora on hepatic CYP450 metabolizing enzymes including CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B, CYP2E1, and CYP3A was investigated. The impact of Kaempferia parviflora on CYP450 both in vitro and in vivo was examined by using ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylation, methoxyresorufin O-dealkylation, pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylation, p-nitrophenol hydroxylation, and erythromycin N-demethylation assays, respectively. In vitro studies using non-induced mouse hepatic microsomes in the presence or absence of Kaempferia parviflora extract showed that Kaempferia parviflora extract altered CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B, and CYP2E1 activities by non-competitive, mixed-competitive, competitive, and uncompetitive mechanisms, respectively. Among these enzymes, CYP1A2 was affected by Kaempferia parviflora based on the highest value of V(max) (15.276±0.206 nmol/min) and lowest of K(i) value (0.008±0.002 μg/ml). In addition, the plant extract also modulated CYP2B activity based on the low K(m) value (1.599±0.147 pmol). For in vivo studies, mice were orally treated with 250 mg/kg of Kaempferia parviflora extract for 7, 14, and 21 days. The results demonstrated that Kaempferia parviflora extract significantly induced CYP1A1, CYP1A2 enzyme activities following short-term treatment. CYP2B enzyme activities were markedly increased all Kaempferia parviflora extract treatment timepoints, whereas Kaempferia parviflora extract significantly enhanced CYP2E1 activity only after long-term treatment. However, Kaempferia parviflora extract did not affect the CYP3A enzyme activity. Kaempferia parviflora extract modulated several CYP450 enzyme activities, thus, its utilization with drugs or other herbs should raise concern for

  4. Pharmacological Intervention in Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation and Hepatic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Hans-Theo; Bartneck, Matthias; Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan; Nattermann, Jacob; Lammers, Twan; Tacke, Frank; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The activation and transdifferentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) into contractile, matrix-producing myofibroblasts (MFBs) are central events in hepatic fibrogenesis. These processes are driven by autocrine- and paracrine-acting soluble factors (i.e., cytokines and chemokines). Proof-of-concept studies of the last decades have shown that both the deactivation and removal of hepatic MFBs as well as antagonizing profibrogenic factors are in principle suitable to attenuate ongoing hepatic fibrosis. Although several drugs show potent antifibrotic activities in experimental models of hepatic fibrosis, there is presently no effective pharmaceutical intervention specifically approved for the treatment of liver fibrosis. Pharmaceutical interventions are generally hampered by insufficient supply of drugs to the diseased liver tissue and/or by adverse effects as a result of affecting non-target cells. Therefore, targeted delivery systems that bind specifically to receptors solely expressed on activated HSCs or transdifferentiated MFBs and delivery systems that can improve drug distribution to the liver in general are urgently needed. In this review, we summarize current strategies for targeted delivery of drugs to the liver and in particular to pro-fibrogenic liver cells. The applicability and efficacy of sequestering molecules, selective protein carriers, lipid-based drug vehicles, viral vectors, transcriptional targeting approaches, therapeutic liver- and HSC-specific nanoparticles, and miRNA-based strategies are discussed. Some of these delivery systems that had already been successfully tested in experimental animal models of ongoing hepatic fibrogenesis are expected to translate into clinically useful therapeutics specifically targeting HSCs. PMID:26941644

  5. Plasma metabolites, ions and thyroid hormones levels, and hepatic enzymes׳ activity in Caspian roach (Rutilus rutilus caspicus) exposed to waterborne manganese.

    PubMed

    Hoseini, Seyyed Morteza; Hedayati, Aliakbar; Ghelichpour, Melika

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the effect of waterborne manganese on plasma biochemical characteristics in fish, Caspian roach (Rutilus rutilus caspicus) was exposed to 0 (control), 60 (M60), 150 (M150) and 300 (M300) mg/L water manganese for 96h. Thereafter, plasma biochemical characteristics were studied. Plasma glucose level significantly increased in M60 and decreased in M150 and M300 groups, compared to the control. M300 had significantly lower hematocrit compared to the control. Albumin remained unchanged after manganese exposure, however, the manganese-exposed fish showed significant increase in plasma total protein levels. M150 and M300 showed significant increase in the plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels compared to the control and M60. M60 and M150 had significantly higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity compared to the control. The manganese-exposed groups had significantly higher alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity compared to the control. M150 and M300 had aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity significantly higher than those of the control and M60. M300 had significantly higher triiodothyronine (T3) levels than the other groups. All manganese-exposed fish had significantly higher thyroxin (T4) levels than the control. The plasma levels of chloride showed a significant decrease in the manganese-exposed fish, compared to the control. M150 and M300 had significantly lower sodium levels, compared to the control. M60 and M150 had significantly lower plasma calcium levels compared to the other groups. It is concluded that clinical chemistry along with thyroid hormones levels can be the useful tools to monitor manganese toxicity in fish. The possible mechanisms involving in the biochemical changes were discussed.

  6. Effect of peppermint oil on serum lipid peroxidation and hepatic enzymes after immobility stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Marjani, Abdoljalal; Rahmati, Reza; Mansourian, Azad Reza; Veghary, Gholamreza

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the influences of various doses of peppermint oil on the hepatic en-zymes, alanine transaminase, apartate tranaminase, alkaline phosphotase and gamma glutamyl transferase and the level of malondialdehyde in the serum of mice with and without immobility stress. The mice exposed to drink water, 0.9, 27 and 60 mg/kg peppermint oil from the days 1 to 5 for a period of 4 h before and after immobility stress. Serum MDA in-creased in treatment group II, III and IV after immobility stress. There was a significant decrease in ALT in treatment group III and IV after immobility stress. There were also significant decreases in ALP and GGT in treatment group IV af-ter immobility stress. This result may suggest that, MDA level is higher in immobilization stress group than in the un-immobilized animals in serum and this results show that enzyme activities decreased after immobilization stress.

  7. Effect of Peppermint Oil on Serum Lipid Peroxidation and Hepatic Enzymes after Immobility Stress in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marjani, Abdoljalal; Rahmati, Reza; Mansourian, Azad Reza; Veghary, Gholamreza

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the influences of various doses of peppermint oil on the hepatic en-zymes, alanine transaminase, apartate tranaminase, alkaline phosphotase and gamma glutamyl transferase and the level of malondialdehyde in the serum of mice with and without immobility stress. The mice exposed to drink water, 0.9, 27 and 60 mg/kg peppermint oil from the days 1 to 5 for a period of 4 h before and after immobility stress. Serum MDA in-creased in treatment group II, III and IV after immobility stress. There was a significant decrease in ALT in treatment group III and IV after immobility stress. There were also significant decreases in ALP and GGT in treatment group IV af-ter immobility stress. This result may suggest that, MDA level is higher in immobilization stress group than in the un-immobilized animals in serum and this results show that enzyme activities decreased after immobilization stress. PMID:22654997

  8. Activation of thiamin diphosphate in enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hübner, G; Tittmann, K; Killenberg-Jabs, M; Schäffner, J; Spinka, M; Neef, H; Kern, D; Kern, G; Schneider, G; Wikner, C; Ghisla, S

    1998-06-29

    Activation of the coenzyme ThDP was studied by measuring the kinetics of deprotonation at the C2 carbon of thiamin diphosphate in the enzymes pyruvate decarboxylase, transketolase, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, pyruvate oxidase, in site-specific mutant enzymes and in enzyme complexes containing coenzyme analogues by proton/deuterium exchange detected by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The respective deprotonation rate constant is above the catalytic constant in all enzymes investigated. The fast deprotonation requires the presence of an activator in pyruvate decarboxylase from yeast, showing the allosteric regulation of this enzyme to be accomplished by an increase in the C2-H dissociation rate of the enzyme-bound thiamin diphosphate. The data of the thiamin diphosphate analogues and of the mutant enzymes show the N1' atom and the 4'-NH2 group to be essential for the activation of the coenzyme and a conserved glutamate involved in the proton abstraction mechanism of the enzyme-bound thiamin diphosphate.

  9. Tissue-specific contaminant accumulation and associated effects on hepatic serum analytes and cytochrome P450 enzyme activities in hooded seals (Cystophora cristata) from the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

    PubMed

    Wolkers, Hans; Boily, France; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna; van Bavel, Bert; Hammill, Mike O; Primicerio, Raul

    2009-02-01

    The current study aims to assess contaminant levels and tissue burdens in hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) blubber, liver, and blood in association with cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes (CYP1A and -3A) and serum analytes (hepatic enzymes like alanine aminotransferase [ALT], aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase [AP], and gamma-glutamyltransferase [GGT], serum proteins, and creatine kinase). Contaminant accumulation levels and patterns of polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated pesticides, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) differed between tissues and seal groups, with the highest levels in liver. Pups showed higher liver contaminant levels, especially for PBDEs, than adults. These high levels might be associated with the ingestion of large amounts of contaminated milk and subsequent accumulation in the liver. Adult males and females mainly differed in PBDE levels, which were higher in females, possibly due to a sex-specific diet. The association between blubber contaminant burdens and the diagnostic enzymes ALT, GGT, and AP, and serum albumin, was inconclusive. In contrast, several CYP isoenzymes showed a clear positive relationship with the overall blubber contaminant burden, indicating enzyme induction following exposure to polyhalogenated hydrocarbons. Therefore, liver CYP isoenzymes may serve as a sensitive biomarker for long-term exposure to polyhalogenated hydrocarbons.

  10. Determining Enzyme Activity by Radial Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Bill D.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses advantages of radial diffusion assay in determining presence of enzyme and/or rough approximation of amount of enzyme activities. Procedures are included for the preparation of starch-agar plates, and the application and determination of enzyme. Techniques using plant materials (homogenates, tissues, ungerminated embryos, and seedlings)…

  11. Determining Enzyme Activity by Radial Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Bill D.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses advantages of radial diffusion assay in determining presence of enzyme and/or rough approximation of amount of enzyme activities. Procedures are included for the preparation of starch-agar plates, and the application and determination of enzyme. Techniques using plant materials (homogenates, tissues, ungerminated embryos, and seedlings)…

  12. The effects of fenvalerate on hepatic and cerebral xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in selenium and/or iodine deficient rats

    PubMed Central

    Caglayan, Aydan; Kocer-Gumusel, Belma; Erkekoglu, Pinar; Hincal, Filiz

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Particularly in developing countries, selenium and/or iodine deficiencies are encountered and use of pesticides in agriculture are not well-controlled. Fenvalerate is a pyrethroid insectide used in agriculture and has applications against a wide range of pests. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of fenvalerate on hepatic and cerebral xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities in the presence of iodine and/or selenium deficiency on a rat model. Materials and Methods: Iodine and/or selenium deficiency was induced by feeding three-week-old Wistar rats with a diet containing <0.005 mg selenium kg-1, and/or administering 1% sodium perchlorate in drinking water for 7 weeks. Test groups received fenvalerate (100 mg kg-1 BW IP) for the last 7 days. Hepatic and cerebral microsomal aniline hydroxylase (CYP2E1) and cytosolic glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities were determined. Besides, hepatic NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (P450R), ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD, CYP1A1/1A2) and penthoxyresorufin O-depenthylase (PROD, CYP2B1/2B2), activities were also measured. Results: Fenvalerate had a general inductive effect on the hepatic and cerebral xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities. Moreover, enzyme activities were also altered by iodine and/or selenium deficiency, but the effects seemed to be enzyme- and tissue-specific. Conclusion: The inductive effect of fenvalerate, particularly in high dose exposures, may change the metabolism of several xenobiotics, including drugs, as well as endogenous substrates. The effects may vary depending on the selenium and/or iodine status of individual. PMID:27872699

  13. Schisandra Chinensis Baillon regulates the gene expression of phase II antioxidant/detoxifying enzymes in hepatic damage induced rats

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Han I; Do, Gyeong-Min; Lee, Hye Min; Ok, Hyang Mok; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES This study investigated the antioxidant activities and hepatoprotective effects of Schisandra chinensis Baillon extract (SCE) against tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced oxidative hepatic damage in rats. MATERIALS/METHODS Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were pretreated with SCE (300, 600, and 1,200 mg/kg BW) or saline once daily for 14 consecutive days. On day 14, each animal, except those belonging to the normal control group, were injected with t-BHP (0.8 mmol/kg BW/i.p.), and all of the rats were sacrificed 16 h after t-BHP injection. RESULTS Although no significant differences in AST and ALT levels were observed among the TC and SCE groups, the high-dose SCE group showed a decreasing tendency compared to the TC group. However, erythrocyte SOD activity showed a significant increase in the low-dose SCE group compared with the TC group. On the other hand, no significant differences in hepatic total glutathione (GSH) level, glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were observed among the TC and SCE groups. Hepatic histopathological evaluation revealed that pretreatment with SCE resulted in reduced t-BHP-induced incidence of lesions, such as neutrophil infiltration, swelling of liver cells, and necrosis. In particular, treatment with a high dose of SCE resulted in induction of phase II antioxidant/detoxifying enzyme expression, such as glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC). CONCLUSIONS Based on these results, we conclude that SCE exerts protective effects against t-BHP induced oxidative hepatic damage through the reduction of neutrophil infiltration, swelling of liver cells, and necrosis. In addition, SCE regulates the gene expression of phase II antioxidant/detoxifying enzymes independent of hepatic antioxidant enzyme activity. PMID:24944771

  14. Differential regulation of hepatic enzymes by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and glucocorticoids

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.A.; Linder, M.W.; Fernandez, D.; Prough, R.A. )

    1991-03-15

    A putative glucocorticoid (GC) response element has been identified within the first intron of the P450IA1 gene and is apparently necessary for GC-dependent potentiation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) induction of P450IA1. In cultured rat hepatocytes, the synthetic GC, dexamethasone (DEX), potentiated PAH induction of both P450IA1 and glutathione S-transferase protein and mRNA. However, DEX caused a small decrease in PAH-dependent induction of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (QOR) subunit protein and mRNA in culture. The potentiation of 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) dependent induction of hepatic P450IA1, GST and QOR by low doses of DEX was evaluated in neonatal and adult rats. In neonates, MC induction was potentiated 2-, 1.5-, and 1.4-fold for P450IA1, GST, and QOR activities, respectively, by DEX. However, in adult rats, DEX potentiated MC induction of P450IA1 activity, but repressed MC induction of GST and QOR. Western immunoanalysis and Northern analysis indicated that the changes in these activities were associated with parallel changes in the levels of immunoreactive proteins and mRNA. Glucocorticoids may have an age-dependent influence on the induction of hepatic enzymes by PAH possibly involving other regulatory factors, in addition to Ah and GC receptors.

  15. Introduction to hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme induction in drug safety evaluation studies.

    PubMed

    Botts, Suzanne; Ennulat, Daniela; Francke-Carroll, Sabine; Graham, Mark; Maronpot, Robert R; Mohutsky, Michael

    2010-08-01

    The following three articles represent the output of a combined effort initiated by the Scientific Regulatory Policy Committee of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology to provide a unified review of current scientific practices and relevant literature and provide suggestions regarding the recognition, interpretation, and risk assessment of hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme (DME) induction studies. The core objective was to provide a review that the scientific community including pathologists, regulatory scientists, toxicologists, investigative scientists, and others would find valuable for managing, designing, and interpreting toxicity studies supporting regulatory filings. Three working groups composed of scientists from industry, academia, and regulatory agencies were convened to review the available literature on important aspects of the interpretation and risk assessment of hepatic microsomal DME enzyme induction in three publications. The three reviews are as follows: "Effects of Hepatic Drug Metabolizing Enzyme Induction on Clinical Pathology Parameters in Animals and Man," Toxicol Pathol "Hepatic Drug Metabolizing Enzyme Induction: Microscopic and Ultrastructural Appearance," Toxicol Pathol "Hepatic Drug Metabolizing Enzyme Induction and Implications for Preclinical and Clinical Risk Assessment," Toxicol Pathol The purpose of this introduction is not to summarize the articles but rather to frame the series and to provide a common mechanistic introduction.

  16. Hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in two species of benthic fish showing different prevalences of contaminant-associated liver neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, T.K.; Singh, S.V.; Awasthi, Y.C.; Varanasi, U. )

    1992-04-01

    English sole (Parophrys vetulus) and starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus) are closely related benthic fish which show substantial differences in prevalences of contaminant-associated hepatic neoplasms and putatively preneoplastic foci of cellular alteration when captured from estuaries containing a variety of organic chemical contaminants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Because PAH are strongly implicated as causative agents in the etiology of these lesions, several of the hepatic enzymes involved in activation and detoxication of PAH were studied in these two species. Hepatic aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH), epoxide hydrolase (EH), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities were measured in animals sampled from both contaminated and reference areas. English sole, the species showing higher prevalences of contaminant-associated hepatic lesions, had higher (1- to 2-fold) hepatic activities of AHH and lower activities of EH (0.8-fold) and GST (1.8-fold) than those of starry flounder, regardless of site of capture. These results are largely consistent with increased activation and decreased detoxication of PAH by English sole in comparison to starry flounder. Both laboratory and field data suggested that the observed species differences in enzyme activities were constitutive and not related to differential exposure to contaminants. There were also substantial differences between these species with respect to expression of GST isoenzymes, in that starry flounder expressed two highly anionic GST isoenzymes which did not correspond to any GST isoenzymes expressed in English sole liver; a previous study in an elasmobranch fish showed that an anionic GST was most active toward PAH oxides.

  17. Dietary lipid-induced changes in enzymes of hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    de Catalfo, Graciela E Hurtado; de Alaniz, María J T; Marra, Carlos A

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the effect of different dietary oils on the main hepatic enzymes involved in metabolism and their impact on oxidative stress status. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were fed for 60 d on the same basal diet plus different lipid sources from commercial oils: soybean (S), olive (O), coconut (C), and grape seed (G). After sacrifice, the liver lipid fatty acid composition, enzymatic and non-enzymatic components of the antioxidant defense system, and the activity of enzymes involved in lipid metabolism were determined. The concentration of Ca(2+) in plasma and liver homogenates was also measured. The diets produced significant changes in the total and polar lipid fatty acid compositions and alterations in key enzyme activities involved in lipid metabolism. The S and G groups showed significantly increased oxidative stress biomarkers. The enzymatic and non-enzymatic components of the antioxidant defense system were increased in the O and C groups. The highest levels of nitrite plus nitrate were observed in the S and G groups compared with the O and C groups in plasma and in liver homogenates. These were directly correlated with the Ca(2+) concentration. The most beneficial effects were obtained with olive oil. However, it is necessary to study in more detail appropriate mixtures of olive and soybean oils to provide an adequate balance between ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids. Different dietary oils modify the lipid composition of the plasma and liver, local and systemic antioxidant statuses, and the activity of the key enzymes of lipid metabolism. The interrelation between Ca(2+) and nitrite plus nitrate could be the causal factor underlying the observed changes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Enzyme Activity Experiments Using a Simple Spectrophotometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurlbut, Jeffrey A.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Experimental procedures for studying enzyme activity using a Spectronic 20 spectrophotometer are described. The experiments demonstrate the effect of pH, temperature, and inhibitors on enzyme activity and allow the determination of Km, Vmax, and Kcat. These procedures are designed for teaching large lower-level biochemistry classes. (MR)

  19. Enzyme Activity Experiments Using a Simple Spectrophotometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurlbut, Jeffrey A.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Experimental procedures for studying enzyme activity using a Spectronic 20 spectrophotometer are described. The experiments demonstrate the effect of pH, temperature, and inhibitors on enzyme activity and allow the determination of Km, Vmax, and Kcat. These procedures are designed for teaching large lower-level biochemistry classes. (MR)

  20. Transporter-Enzyme Interplay: Deconvoluting Effects of Hepatic Transporters and Enzymes on Drug Disposition Using Static and Dynamic Mechanistic Models.

    PubMed

    Varma, Manthena V; El-Kattan, Ayman F

    2016-07-01

    A large body of evidence suggests hepatic uptake transporters, organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs), are of high clinical relevance in determining the pharmacokinetics of substrate drugs, based on which recent regulatory guidances to industry recommend appropriate assessment of investigational drugs for the potential drug interactions. We recently proposed an extended clearance classification system (ECCS) framework in which the systemic clearance of class 1B and 3B drugs is likely determined by hepatic uptake. The ECCS framework therefore predicts the possibility of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) involving OATPs and the effects of genetic variants of SLCO1B1 early in the discovery and facilitates decision making in the candidate selection and progression. Although OATP-mediated uptake is often the rate-determining process in the hepatic clearance of substrate drugs, metabolic and/or biliary components also contribute to the overall hepatic disposition and, more importantly, to liver exposure. Clinical evidence suggests that alteration in biliary efflux transport or metabolic enzymes associated with genetic polymorphism leads to change in the pharmacodynamic response of statins, for which the pharmacological target resides in the liver. Perpetrator drugs may show inhibitory and/or induction effects on transporters and enzymes simultaneously. It is therefore important to adopt models that frame these multiple processes in a mechanistic sense for quantitative DDI predictions and to deconvolute the effects of individual processes on the plasma and hepatic exposure. In vitro data-informed mechanistic static and physiologically based pharmacokinetic models are proven useful in rationalizing and predicting transporter-mediated DDIs and the complex DDIs involving transporter-enzyme interplay. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  1. Enzymes and Enzyme Activity Encoded by Nonenveloped Viruses.

    PubMed

    Azad, Kimi; Banerjee, Manidipa; Johnson, John E

    2017-06-21

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that rely on host cell machineries for their replication and survival. Although viruses tend to make optimal use of the host cell protein repertoire, they need to encode essential enzymatic or effector functions that may not be available or accessible in the host cellular milieu. The enzymes encoded by nonenveloped viruses-a group of viruses that lack any lipid coating or envelope-play vital roles in all the stages of the viral life cycle. This review summarizes the structural, biochemical, and mechanistic information available for several classes of enzymes and autocatalytic activity encoded by nonenveloped viruses. Advances in research and development of antiviral inhibitors targeting specific viral enzymes are also highlighted. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Virology Volume 4 is September 29, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  2. (+)-Catechin attenuates activation of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Bragança de Moraes, Cristina Machado; Bitencourt, Shanna; de Mesquita, Fernanda Cristina; Mello, Denizar; de Oliveira, Leticia Paranhos; da Silva, Gabriela Viegas; Lorini, Vinicius; Caberlon, Eduardo; de Souza Basso, Bruno; Schmid, Julia; Ferreira, Gabriela Acevedo; de Oliveira, Jarbas Rodrigues

    2014-04-01

    (+)-Catechin is a type of catechin present in large amounts in açaí fruits and cocoa seeds. Besides its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, little is known about its effects in the liver, especially during hepatic fibrosis. We report here the effects of (+)-catechin on hepatic stellate cells. (+)-Catechin induced quiescent phenotype in GRX cells, along with an increase in lipid droplets. Proliferator-activated receptor γ mRNA expression was upregulated, whereas type I collagen mRNA expression was downregulated. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were not influenced by (+)-catechin, whereas the levels of interleukin 10 were significantly increased. The data provide evidence that (+)-catechin can reduce hepatic stellate cell activation.

  3. Sex difference in induction of hepatic CYP2B and CYP3A subfamily enzymes by nicardipine and nifedipine in rats.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yoshihiro; Sekimoto, Masashi; Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Degawa, Masakuni

    2004-04-01

    Male and female of F344 rats were treated per os with nicardipine (Nic) and nifedipine (Nif), and changes in the levels of mRNA and protein of hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes, CYP2B1, CYP2B2, CYP3A1, CYP3A2, CYP3A9, and CYP3A18 were examined. Furthermore, hepatic microsomal activities for pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (PROD) and nifedipine oxidation, which are mainly mediated by CYP2B and CYP3A subfamily enzymes, respectively, were measured. Analyses of RT-PCR and Western blotting revealed that Nic and Nif induced predominantly CYP3A and CYP2B enzymes, respectively. As for the gene activation of CYP2B enzymes, especially CYP2B1, Nif showed high capacity in both sexes of rats, whereas Nic did a definite capacity in the males but little in the females. Gene activations of CYP3A1, CYP3A2, and CYP3A18 by Nic occurred in both sexes of rats, although that of CYP3A9 did only in the male rats. Although gene activations of CYP3A1 and CYP3A2 by Nif were observed in both sexes of rats, a slight activation of the CYP3A9 gene occurred only in female rats, and the CYP3A18 gene activation, in neither male nor female rats. Thus, changes in levels of the mRNA or protein of CYP2B and CYP3A enzymes, especially CYP2B1 and CYP3A2, were closely correlated with those in hepatic PROD and nifedipine oxidation activities, respectively. The present findings demonstrate for the first time the sex difference in the Nic- and Nif-mediated induction of hepatic P450 enzymes in rats and further indicate that Nic and Nif show different specificities and sex dependencies in the induction of hepatic P450 enzymes.

  4. Regulation of hepatic lipase activity by sphingomyelin in plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Subbaiah, Papasani V

    2015-10-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) is an important enzyme in the clearance of triacylglycerol (TAG) from the circulation, and has been proposed to have pro-atherogenic as well as anti-atherogenic properties. It hydrolyzes both phospholipids and TAG of lipoproteins, and its activity is negatively correlated with HDL levels. Although it is known that HL acts preferentially on HDL lipids, the basis for this specificity is not known, since it does not require any specific apoprotein for activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin (SM), whose concentration is much higher in VLDL and LDL compared to HDL, is an inhibitor of HL, and that this could explain the lipoprotein specificity of the enzyme. The results presented show that the depletion of SM from normal lipoproteins activated the HL roughly in proportion to their SM content. SM depletion stimulated the hydrolysis of both phosphatidylcholine (PC) and TAG, although the PC hydrolysis was stimulated more. In the native lipoproteins, HL showed specificity for PC species containing polyunsaturated fatty acids at sn-2 position, and produced more unsaturated lyso PC species. The enzyme also showed preferential hydrolysis of certain TAG species over others. SM depletion affected the specificity of the enzyme towards PC and TAG species modestly. These results show that SM is a physiological inhibitor of HL activity in lipoproteins and that the specificity of the enzyme towards HDL is at least partly due to its low SM content. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Regulation of hepatic lipase activity by sphingomyelin in plasma lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peng; Subbaiah, Papasani V.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) is an important enzyme in the clearance of triacylglycerol (TAG) from the circulation, and has been proposed to have pro-atherogenic as well as anti-atherogenic properties. It hydrolyzes both phospholipids and TAG of lipoproteins, and its activity is negatively correlated with HDL levels. Although it is known that HL acts preferentially on HDL lipids, the basis for this specificity is not known, since it does not require any specific apoprotein for activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin (SM), whose concentration is much higher in VLDL and LDL compared to HDL, is an inhibitor of HL, and that this could explain the lipoprotein specificity of the enzyme. The results presented show that the depletion of SM from normal lipoproteins activated the HL roughly in proportion to their SM content. SM depletion stimulated the hydrolysis of both phosphatidylcholine (PC) and TAG, although the PC hydrolysis was stimulated more. In the native lipoproteins, HL showed specificity for PC species containing polyunsaturated fatty acids at sn-2 position, and produced more unsaturated lyso PC species. The enzyme also showed preferential hydrolysis of certain TAG species over others. SM depletion affected the specificity of the enzyme towards PC and TAG species modestly. These results show that SM is a physiological inhibitor of HL activity in lipoproteins and that the specificity of the enzyme towards HDL is at least partly due to its low SM content. PMID:26193433

  6. The Effects of Subacute Exposure of Peracetic Acid on Lipid Peroxidation and Hepatic Enzymes in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Marjani, Abdoljalal; Golalipour, Mohammad J.; Gharravi, Anneh M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study was undertaken to determine the effect of subacute exposure of peracetic acid on lipid peroxidation and hepatic enzymes in Wistar rats. Methods 48 male animals in Treatment Group I, II and III received 0.2%, 2% and 20% peracetic acid daily for 2 and 4 weeks. Results Serum malondialdehyde increased and Alanine Transaminase and Aspartate Transaminase decreased significantly in groups 2 and 3, compared to the control group. The malondialdehyde, Alanine Transaminase and Aspartate Transaminase with 0.2% and 2% doses of peracetic acid for 2 weeks do not lead to the alteration of malondialdehyde and enzyme activities. Conclusion This study demonstrated that the enhancement of malondialdehyde could provide an oxidative damage induced by disinfectant peroxidation at 20% and 2% doses at 2 and 4 weeks. The consumption of peroxidation with 20% for 2 weeks and 2% for 4 weeks can cause the increase of malondialdehyde and the decrease of enzyme activities, respectively. PMID:22043353

  7. [Herpes simplex hepatitis with macrophage activation syndrome in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Mihalcea-Danciu, M; Ellero, B; Gandoin, M; Harlay, M-L; Schneider, F; Bilbault, P

    2014-12-01

    Herpes simplex hepatitis is a rare cause of acute hepatitis in immunocompetent patients. The triad of fever, increase in liver enzymes and leucopenia is suggestive of herpes simplex hepatitis. Delayed diagnosis without antiviral therapy contributes significantly to an unfavorable outcome. We report a 50-year old immunocompetent male patient, who presented with acute severe hepatitis due to a reactivation of a herpes simplex infection with a complicated course including macrophage activation syndrome and severe coagulopathy. Outcome was finally favorable with early acyclovir therapy. Despite its relatively low occurrence rate, diagnosis of herpetic hepatitis should be discussed in immunocompetent patients with acute liver failure. The benefit of an early acyclovir treatment should lead clinicians to consider this uncommon diagnosis in unexplained cases of hepatitis and to test rapidly HSV DNA levels by PCR in plasma. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of Soil Samples of Enzyme Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, P. W.

    1977-01-01

    Described are nine enzyme essays for distinguishing soil samples. Colorimetric methods are used to compare enzyme levels in soils from different sites. Each soil tested had its own spectrum of activity. Attention is drawn to applications of this technique in forensic science and in studies of soil fertility. (Author/AJ)

  9. Characterization of Soil Samples of Enzyme Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, P. W.

    1977-01-01

    Described are nine enzyme essays for distinguishing soil samples. Colorimetric methods are used to compare enzyme levels in soils from different sites. Each soil tested had its own spectrum of activity. Attention is drawn to applications of this technique in forensic science and in studies of soil fertility. (Author/AJ)

  10. Citrus unshiu peel extract ameliorates hyperglycemia and hepatic steatosis by altering inflammation and hepatic glucose- and lipid-regulating enzymes in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Hae-Jin; Jung, Un Ju; Cho, Su-Jung; Jung, Hee-Kyung; Shim, Sangphil; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2013-02-01

    Insulin resistance in Type 2 diabetes leads to hepatic steatosis that can accompanied by progressive inflammation of the liver. Citrus unshiu peel is a rich source of citrus flavonoids that possess anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic and lipid-lowering effects. However, the ability of citrus unshiu peel ethanol extract (CPE) to improve hyperglycemia, adiposity and hepatic steatosis in Type 2 diabetes is unknown. Thus, we evaluated the effects of CPE on markers for glucose, lipid metabolism and inflammation in Type 2 diabetic mice. Male C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice were fed a normal diet with CPE (2 g/100 g diet) or rosiglitazone (0.001 g/100 g diet) for 6 weeks. Mice supplemented with the CPE showed a significant decrease in body weight gain, body fat mass and blood glucose level. The antihyperglycemic effect of CPE appeared to be partially mediated through the inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA expression and its activity and through the induction of insulin/glucagon secretion. CPE also ameliorated hepatic steatosis and hypertriglyceridemia via the inhibition of gene expression and activities of the lipogenic enzymes and the activation of fatty acid oxidation in the liver. These beneficial effects of CPE may be related to increased levels of anti-inflammatory adiponectin and interleukin (IL)-10, and decreased levels of pro-inflammatory markers (IL-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α) in the plasma or liver. Taken together, we suggest that CPE has the potential to improve both hyperglycemia and hepatic steatosis in Type 2 diabetes.

  11. [Serum gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity in children with chronic hepatitis B].

    PubMed

    Lebensztejn, Dariusz Marek; Skiba, Elzbieta; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria Elzbieta; Kaczmarski, Maciej

    2005-03-01

    THE AIM OF THE STUDY was evaluation of serum activity of chosen enzymes (ALT, AST, GGT and ALP) in assessment of fibrosis degree in children with chronic hepatitis B. We determined serum activity of liver enzymes in 47 children aged 4-16 with biopsy-verified chronic hepatitis B, prior to interferon alpha treatment. Fibrosis stage was assessed in a blinded fashion according to Batts and Ludwig. We defined advanced fibrosis as a score =3. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was used to calculate the power of the assays to detect advanced liver fibrosis (AccuROC, Canada). Serum GGT activity of 19 IU/I had a sensitivity of 50% and a specificity of 90% (AUC=0.7324, p=0.0391) to predict advanced fibrosis. All other enzymes did not allow a useful prediction. GGT is suitable serum marker to predict advanced liver fibrosis in children with chronic hepatitis B.

  12. Urinary D-glucaric acid and serum hepatic enzyme levels in chronic alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Tutor, J C; Alvarez-Prechous, A; Bernabeu, F; Pardiñas, M C; Paz, J M; Lareu, V

    1988-06-01

    Urinary D-glucaric acid (DGA) and the activities of gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and other hepatic enzymes in serum were determined in 33 noncirrhotic male alcoholics who had continued to consume alcohol until at least 24 h prior to the taking of samples. DGA excretion was significantly greater in them than in a group of 30 healthy controls (p less than 0.001), exceeding the upper reference level in 38% of the alcoholic cases (as compared with 88% for GGT). In the alcoholic patients, there was highly significant correlation between urinary DGA and serum GGT (r = 0.613, p less than 0.001), suggesting that in both cases the increased levels are due to enzyme induction. None of the biochemical variables studied were significantly correlated with estimated daily alcohol consumption. Urinary DGA levels fell off rapidly with abstinence, and in 31 alcoholic patients who had consumed no alcohol for 5 days, there was no statistically significant correlation between DGA excretion and serum GGT (r = 0.158, p congruent to 0.4).

  13. Visualization of enzyme activities inside earthworm pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Duyen; Razavi, Bahar S.

    2015-04-01

    In extremely dynamic microhabitats as bio-pores made by earthworm, the in situ enzyme activities are assumed as a footprint of complex biotic interactions. Our study focused on the effect of earthworm on the enzyme activities inside bio-pores and visualizing the differences between bio-pores and earthworm-free soil by zymography technique (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2013). For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in bio-pores. Lumbricus terrestris L. was placed into transparent box (15×20×15cm). After two weeks when bio-pore systems were formed by earthworms, we visualized in situ enzyme activities of five hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase, xylanase, leucine-aminopeptidase, and phosphatase. Zymography showed higher activity of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores comparing to bulk soil. However, the differences in activity of cellobiohydrolase and leucine aminopeptidase between bio-pore and bulk soil were less pronounced. This demonstrated an applicability of zymography approach to monitor and to distinguish the in situ activity of hydrolytic enzymes in soil biopores.

  14. How thiamine diphosphate is activated in enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kern, D; Kern, G; Neef, H; Tittmann, K; Killenberg-Jabs, M; Wikner, C; Schneider, G; Hübner, G

    1997-01-03

    The controversial question of how thiamine diphosphate, the biologically active form of vitamin B1, is activated in different enzymes has been addressed. Activation of the coenzyme was studied by measuring thermodynamics and kinetics of deprotonation at the carbon in the 2-position (C2) of thiamine diphosphate in the enzymes pyruvate decarboxylase and transketolase by use of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, proton/deuterium exchange, coenzyme analogs, and site-specific mutant enzymes. Interaction of a glutamate with the nitrogen in the 1'-position in the pyrimidine ring activated the 4'-amino group to act as an efficient proton acceptor for the C2 proton. The protein component accelerated the deprotonation of the C2 atom by several orders of magnitude, beyond the rate of the overall enzyme reaction. Therefore, the earlier proposed concerted mechanism or stabilization of a C2 carbanion can be excluded.

  15. Effects of PCBs on plasma enzymes, testosterone level, and hepatic xenobiotic metabolism in the grey partridge, perdix perdlx

    SciTech Connect

    Abiola, F. ); Lorgue, G.; Riviere, J.L. ); Benoit, E. ); Soyez, D. )

    1989-09-01

    The hepatic cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase (MO) system functions in oxidative biotransformation of a wide variety of both endogenous and exogenous (xenobiotic) compounds in many animal species. However, most of the previous studies were carried out with a narrow range of species and investigations on wild species are lacking. In this report, the authors describe the effects of a commercial mixture of PCBs (DP5) on the hepatic MO activities of the grey partridge (Perdix perdix). To more thoroughly investigate the inducing effects of DP5, they used two series of homologous substrates, alkylresorufins and alkoxycoumarins, and an endogenous compound, testosterone, which were shown in mammals to differentiate between different forms of cytochrome P-450. Furthermore, to more carefully assess the effects of DP5, they also measured the activity of two plasma marker enzymes, alanine transpeptidase (ALAT) and gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT), and the plasmatic concentration of testosterone.

  16. Normal Modes Expose Active Sites in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Glantz-Gashai, Yitav; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of active sites is an important tool in bioinformatics. Here we present an improved structure based technique to expose active sites that is based on large changes of solvent accessibility accompanying normal mode dynamics. The technique which detects EXPOsure of active SITes through normal modEs is named EXPOSITE. The technique is trained using a small 133 enzyme dataset and tested using a large 845 enzyme dataset, both with known active site residues. EXPOSITE is also tested in a benchmark protein ligand dataset (PLD) comprising 48 proteins with and without bound ligands. EXPOSITE is shown to successfully locate the active site in most instances, and is found to be more accurate than other structure-based techniques. Interestingly, in several instances, the active site does not correspond to the largest pocket. EXPOSITE is advantageous due to its high precision and paves the way for structure based prediction of active site in enzymes. PMID:28002427

  17. Changes in hepatic phase I and phase II biotransformation enzyme expression and glutathione levels following atrazine exposure in female rats.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Arthur D; Breckenridge, Charles B; Yi, Kun D; Sawhney Coder, Pragati; Wanders, Desiree; Judd, Robert L; Foradori, Chad D

    2017-10-05

    1. To determine the effects of repeated atrazine (ATR) treatment on hepatic phase I and II enzymes, adult female rats were treated with vehicle or 100 mg/kg of ATR for 1, 2, 3 or 4 days. Glutathione-s-transferases (GST) mRNA expression, protein levels (mu, pi, alpha, omega), and activity (cytosolic and microsomal), along with bioavailable glutathione (GSH) were assayed. 2. GST expression, concentrations and activity were increased, along with GSH levels, in animals treated with ATR for 3 and 4 days. 3. A subsequent study was performed with animals treated with vehicle, 6.5, 50 or 100 mg/kg/day for 4, 8 or 14 days. Expression of hepatic phase I CYP 450 enzymes was evaluated in conjugation with GST expression, protein and activity. Nineteen of the 45 CYP enzymes assayed displayed increased mRNA levels after eight days of treatment in animals treated with 50 or 100 mg/kg/day. After 14 days of treatment, all CYP expression levels returned to control levels except for CYP2B2, CYP2B3, CYP2C7, CYP2C23, CYP2E1, CYP3A9, CYP4A3 and CYP27A1, which remained elevated. 4. Results indicate that there may be a habituation or adaptation of liver phase I and phase II expression following repeated ATR treatment.

  18. Antimutagenic activity of oxidase enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Agabeili, R.A.

    1986-11-01

    By means of a cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal aberrations in plant cells (Welsh onion, wheat) it was found that the cofactors nicotinamide adenine phosphate (NAD), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), and riboflavin possess antimutagenic activity.

  19. Long-term effect of medium-chain triglyceride on hepatic enzymes catalyzing lipogenesis and cholesterogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Takase, S; Morimoto, A; Nakanishi, M; Muto, Y

    1977-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the long-term effect of dietary medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) as compared with that of corn oil feeding on lipid metabolism in rats. Both serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels in MCT-fed rats showed significant decrease during the experimental period of eight weeks, although liver cholesterol and triglyceride contents were not distinguishable between the two groups. Significant elevation of the activity of lipogenic enzymes, such as fatty acid synthetase (FAS) and malic enzyme (ME) of the liver, was observed in MCT-fed rats without any fat accumulation of the liver (fatty liver). The increase of lipogenic enzyme activity was accompanied by a significant reduction of essential fatty acids (EFA) such as 18:2 (omega6) and 20:4 (omega6) in total liver lipid. In contrast, hepatic beta-hydroxy-beta-methylglutaryl CoA(HMG-CoA) reductase activity was significantly decreased in MCT-fed rats, that would play an important role in achieving hypocholesterolemia. From these results obtained in a long-term experiment, it is concluded that exogenous MCT depresses the key enzyme catalyzing cholesterol synthesis with a concomitant elevation of lipogenic enzyme activity in the rat liver.

  20. Enzyme activity in dialkyl phosphate ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, M.F.; Dunn, J.; Li, L.-L.; Handley-Pendleton, J. M.; van der lelie, D.; Wishart, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    The activity of four metagenomic enzymes and an enzyme cloned from the straw mushroom, Volvariellavolvacea were studied in the following ionic liquids, 1,3-dimethylimidazolium dimethyl phosphate, [mmim][dmp], 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethyl phosphate, [emim][dmp], 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethyl phosphate, [emim][dep] and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, [emim][OAc]. Activity was determined by analyzing the hydrolysis of para-nitrobenzene carbohydrate derivatives. In general, the enzymes were most active in the dimethyl phosphate ionic liquids, followed by acetate. Generally speaking, activity decreased sharply for concentrations of [emim][dep] above 10% v/v, while the other ionic liquids showed less impact on activity up to 20% v/v.

  1. Purification and characterization of hepatic glutathione S-transferases of rhesus monkeys. A family of enzymes similar to the human hepatic glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed Central

    Hoesch, R M; Boyer, T D

    1988-01-01

    Thirteen forms of glutathione S-transferase were purified from the livers of female rhesus monkeys (Macaque mulatta). Most (74.7%) of the activity in the hepatic cytosol adhered well to the GSH affinity column and could be eluted only with the addition of GSH to the eluting buffer. The predominant isoenzymes (n = 5) in this 'high-affinity' fraction had alkaline pI values (greater than 9.0) and contained a subunit with an Mr value of 24,000. All of these isoenzymes had high organic peroxidase activity and, on the basis of amino acid analysis, substrate specificities and affinity for non-substrate ligands, appear to belong to the family of glutathione S-transferases that have been termed alpha [Mannervik, Alin, Guthenberg, Jensson, Tahir, Warholm & Jörnvall (1985) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 82, 7202-7206]. Also within the high-affinity fraction was an isoenzyme with an acidic (5.8) pI value. This acidic isoenzyme was composed of a unique subunit (Mr 23,000). The N-terminal sequence (ten residues) of this acidic enzyme was identical with that of a human form that is referred to as pi. The predominant form of enzyme in the 'low-affinity' (eluted from the GSH affinity column with an increase in buffer pH) fraction was a homodimer of a 26,000-Mr subunit. It had an alkaline pI (greater than 9.0) but it lacked organic peroxidase activity. The N-terminal sequence (ten residues) of this enzyme was identical with that of a human enzyme referred to as mu. The substrate specificities and affinity for non-substrate ligands of this monkey enzyme also were similar to those of the human enzyme. In conclusion, the liver cytosol of rhesus monkeys contains a number of glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes that are very similar to the human hepatic enzymes. Images Fig. 3. PMID:3390162

  2. Antidiabetic efficacy of citronellol, a citrus monoterpene by ameliorating the hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Subramani; Muruganathan, Udaiyar

    2016-04-25

    Diabetes mellitus is a clinically complex disease characterized by chronic hyperglycemia with metabolic disturbances. During diabetes, endogenous hepatic glucose production is increased as a result of impaired activities of the key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the antidiabetic efficacy of citronellol, a citrus monoterpene in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes mellitus was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (40 mg/kg b.w). STZ induced diabetic rats received citronellol orally at the doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg b.w for 30 days. In this study the levels of plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin (Hb), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), glycogen, and the activities of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes, liver and kidney markers were evaluated. Oral administration of citronellol (50 mg/kg) for 30 days dose dependently improved the levels of insulin, Hb and hepatic glycogen with significant decrease in glucose and HbA1C levels. The altered activities of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes, hepatic and kidney markers were restored to near normal. Citronellol supplement was found to be effective in preserving the normal histological appearance of hepatic cells and insulin-positive β-cells in STZ-rats. Our results suggest that administration of citronellol attenuates the hyperglycemia in the STZ-induced diabetic rats by ameliorating the key carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and could be developed as a functional and nutraceutical ingredient in combating diabetes mellitus.

  3. Central neural regulation by adrenergic nerves of the daily rhythm in hepatic tyrosine transaminase activity

    PubMed Central

    Black, Ira B.; Reis, Donald J.

    1971-01-01

    1. In adrenalectomized fasted rats transection of the spinal cord at C7-C8 or placement of bilateral electrolytic lesions in the lateral hypothalamus when performed in the morning interrupted the daily rhythm of hepatic tyrosine transaminase by elevating low (AM) enzyme activities to high (PM) levels; lesions placed in PM did not affect the late afternoon rise in enzyme activity. 2. Bilateral thalamic lesions had no affect on enzyme activity. 3. The activity of hepatic catechol-O-methyl transferase was unaffected by hypothalamic lesions. 4. The lesion-evoked rise of tyrosine transaminase activity was abolished by exogenously administered norepinephrine. 5. Cycloheximide blocked the rise of tyrosine transaminase activity caused by hypothalamic lesions. 6. The results suggest that rhythmic activity of sympathetic nerves governed by lateral hypothalamus contribute to regulation of the daily rhythm in tyrosine transaminase by regulating the release of norepinephrine peripherally; norepinephrine may block the daily rise of enzyme by interfering with protein synthesis, possibly of new enzyme, by competing with pyridoxal co-factor. 7. It is proposed that alternating activity of sympathetic-adrenergic and vagal-cholinergic nerves to liver, controlled by the C.N.S., contribute to rhythmic activity of hepatic tyrosine transaminase. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:4400586

  4. [Hepatic manifestation of a macrophage activation syndrome (MAS)].

    PubMed

    Nagel, Michael; Schwarting, Andreas; Straub, Beate K; Galle, Peter R; Zimmermann, Tim

    2017-04-04

    Background Elevated liver values are the most common pathological laboratory result in Germany. Frequent findings, especially in younger patients, are nutritive- or medicamentous- toxic reasons, viral or autoimmune hepatitis. A macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) may manifest like a viral infectious disease with fever, hepatosplenomegaly and pancytopenia and is associated with a high mortality. It is based on an enhanced activation of macrophages with increased cytokine release, leading to organ damage and multi-organ failure. In addition to genetic causes, MAS is commonly associated with infections and rheumatic diseases. We report the case of a 26-year-old female patient suffering from MAS as a rare cause of elevated liver enzymes. Methods Patient characteristics, laboratory values, liver histology, bone marrow and radiological imaging were documented and analyzed. Case Report After an ordinary upper airway infection with bronchitis, a rheumatic arthritis appeared and was treated with leflunomide und methotrexate. In the further course of the disease, the patient developed an acute hepatitis with fever, pancytopenia and massive hyperferritinemia. Immunohistochemistry of the liver biopsy revealed hemophagocytosis and activation of CD68-positive macrophages. In the radiological and histological diagnostics of the liver and bone marrow, an MAS was diagnosed as underlying disease of the acute hepatitis. Under therapy with prednisolone, the fever disappeared and transaminases and ferritin rapidly normalized. Conclusion Aside from the frequent causes of elevated liver values in younger patients, such as nutritive toxic, drug induced liver injury, viral or autoimmune hepatitis, especially in case of massive hyperferritinemia, a MAS should be considered as a rare cause of acute liver disease.

  5. Central Insulin Action Activates Kupffer Cells by Suppressing Hepatic Vagal Activation via the Nicotinic Alpha 7 Acetylcholine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kumi; Tanida, Mamoru; Nagata, Naoto; Inaba, Yuka; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito; Asahara, Shun-ichiro; Kido, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Toshinai, Koji; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Kaneko, Shuichi; Kasuga, Masato; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2016-03-15

    Central insulin action activates hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling, which suppresses the gene expression of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes. The vagus nerve plays an important role in this centrally mediated hepatic response; however, the precise mechanism underlying this brain-liver interaction is unclear. Here, we present our findings that the vagus nerve suppresses hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling via α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAchR) on Kupffer cells, and that central insulin action activates hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling by suppressing vagal activity. Indeed, central insulin-mediated hepatic IL-6/STAT3 activation and gluconeogenic gene suppression were impeded in mice with hepatic vagotomy, pharmacological cholinergic blockade, or α7-nAchR deficiency. In high-fat diet-induced obese and insulin-resistant mice, control of the vagus nerve by central insulin action was disturbed, inducing a persistent increase of inflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that dysregulation of the α7-nAchR-mediated control of Kupffer cells by central insulin action may affect the pathogenesis of chronic hepatic inflammation in obesity.

  6. Efficacy of azelaic acid on hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in high fat diet induced type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Muthulakshmi, Shanmugam; Saravanan, Ramalingam

    2013-06-01

    Azelaic acid (AzA), a C9 linear α,ω-dicarboxylic acid, is found in whole grains namely wheat, rye, barley, oat seeds and sorghum. The study was performed to investigate whether AzA exerts beneficial effect on hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in high fat diet (HFD) induced type 2 diabetic C57BL/6J mice. C57BL/6J mice were fed high fat diet for 10 weeks and subjected to intragastric administration of various doses (20 mg, 40 mg and 80 mg/kg BW) of AzA daily for the subsequent 5 weeks. Rosiglitazone (RSG) was used as reference drug. Body weight, food intake, plasma glucose, plasma insulin, blood haemoglobin (Hb), blood glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), liver glycolytic enzyme (hexokinase), hepatic shunt enzyme (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), gluconeogenic enzymes(glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase), liver glycogen, plasma and liver triglycerides were examined in mice fed with normal standard diet (NC), high fat diet (HFD), HFD with AzA (HFD + AzA) and HFD with rosiglitazone (HFD + RSG). Among the three doses, 80 mg/kg BW of AzA was able to positively regulate plasma glucose, insulin, blood HbA1c and haemoglobin levels by significantly increasing the activity of hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and significantly decreasing the activity of glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase thereby increasing the glycogen content in the liver. From this study, we put forward that AzA could significantly restore the levels of plasma glucose, insulin, HbA1c, Hb, liver glycogen and carbohydrate metabolic key enzymes to near normal in diabetic mice and hence, AzA may be useful as a biomaterial in the development of therapeutic agents against high fat diet induced T2DM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Activity assessment of microbial fibrinolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kotb, Essam

    2013-08-01

    Conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin inside blood vessels results in thrombosis, leading to myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases. In general, there are four therapy options: surgical operation, intake of antiplatelets, anticoagulants, or fibrinolytic enzymes. Microbial fibrinolytic enzymes have attracted much more attention than typical thrombolytic agents because of the expensive prices and the side effects of the latter. The fibrinolytic enzymes were successively discovered from different microorganisms, the most important among which is the genus Bacillus. Microbial fibrinolytic enzymes, especially those from food-grade microorganisms, have the potential to be developed as functional food additives and drugs to prevent or cure thrombosis and other related diseases. There are several assay methods for these enzymes; this may due to the insolubility of substrate, fibrin. Existing assay methods can be divided into three major groups. The first group consists of assay of fibrinolytic activity with natural proteins as substrates, e.g., fibrin plate methods. The second and third groups of assays are suitable for kinetic studies and are based on the determination of hydrolysis of synthetic peptide esters. This review will deal primarily with the microorganisms that have been reported in literature to produce fibrinolytic enzymes and the first review discussing the methods used to assay the fibrinolytic activity.

  8. Effect of Laser Irradiation on Enzyme Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Satoshi; Kashii, Masafumi; Kitano, Hiroshi; Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Doi, Masaaki; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Sasaki, Takatomo

    2005-11-01

    We previously developed a protein crystallization technique using a femtosecond laser and protein crystal processing and detaching techniques using a pulsed UV laser. In this study, we examine the effect of laser irradiation on protein integrity. After several kinds of laser were irradiated on part of a solution of glycerol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides, we measured the enzyme activity. Femtosecond and deep-UV laser irradiations have little influence on the whole enzyme activity, whereas the enzyme lost its activity upon high-power near-infrared laser irradiation at a wavelength of 1547 nm. These results suggest that suitable laser irradiation has no remarkable destructive influence on protein crystallization or crystal processing.

  9. Activities of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in rat placenta and liver in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fabian, Eric; Wang, Xinyi; Engel, Franziska; Li, Hequn; Landsiedel, Robert; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2016-06-01

    In order to assess whether the placental metabolism of xenobiotic compounds should be taken into consideration for physiologically-based toxicokinetic (PBTK) modelling, the activities of seven phase I and phase II enzymes have been quantified in the 18-day placenta of untreated Wistar rats. To determine their relative contribution, these activities were compared to those of untreated adult male rat liver, using commonly accepted assays. The enzymes comprised cytochrome P450 (CYP), flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), esterase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and glutathione S-transferase (GST). In contrast to liver, no activities were measurable for 7-ethylresorufin-O-dealkylase (CYP1A), 7-pentylresorufin-O-dealkylase (CYP2B), 7-benzylresorufin-O-dealkylase (CYP2B, 2C and 3 A), UGT1, UGT2 and GST in placenta, indicating that the placental activity of these enzymes was well below their hepatic activity. Low activities in placenta were determined for FMO (4%), and esterase (8%), whereas the activity of placental ADH and ALDH accounted for 35% and 40% of the hepatic activities, respectively. In support of the negligible placental CYP activity, testosterone and six model azole fungicides, which were readily metabolized by rat hepatic microsomes, failed to exhibit any metabolic turnover with rat placental microsomes. Hence, with the possible exception of ADH and ALDH, the activities of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in rat placenta are too low to warrant consideration in PBTK modelling.

  10. Influence of dietary macronutrients on induction of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes by Coleus forskohlii extract in mice.

    PubMed

    Yokotani, Kaori; Chiba, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Yoko; Nakanishi, Tomoko; Murata, Masatsune; Umegaki, Keizo

    2013-01-01

    From studies in mice, we have reported that Coleus forskohlii extract (CFE), a popular herbal weight-loss ingredient, markedly induced hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes, especially cytochrome P450 (CYP), and interacted with co-administered drugs. This study was designed to examine how the induction of drug metabolizing enzymes by CFE was influenced by different levels of macronutrients in the diet. Mice were fed a non-purified diet or semi-purified diet with and without CFE (0.3-0.5%) for 14-18 d, and changes in the ratio of liver weight to body weight, an indicator of hepatic CYP induction, and hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes were analyzed. The ratio of liver weight to body weight, content and activities of CYPs, and activity of glutathione S-transferase were higher in a semi-purified standard diet (AIN93G formula) group than in high sucrose (62.9%) and high fat (29.9%) diet groups. Different levels of protein (7%, 20%, and 33%) in the diets did not influence CFE-induced CYP induction or increase the ratio of liver weight to body weight. The effect of CFE on the ratio of liver weight to body weight was higher with a semi-purified diet than with a non-purified diet, and was similar between dietary administration and intragastric gavage when the CFE dose and the diet were the same. There was a positive correlation between CFE-induced CYP induction and the content of starch in the diets, suggesting that dietary starch potentiates CFE-induced CYP induction in mice. The mechanism of enhanced CYP induction remains unclear.

  11. Effect of the combined probiotics with aflatoxin B₁-degrading enzyme on aflatoxin detoxification, broiler production performance and hepatic enzyme gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Rui-yu; Chang, Juan; Yin, Qing-qiang; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu-rong; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Guo-qiang; Zheng, Qiu-hong

    2013-09-01

    In order to degrade aflatoxin B₁ (AFB₁), AFB₁-degrading microbes (probiotics) such as Lactobacillus casei, Bacillus subtilis and Pichia anomala, and the AFB₁-degrading enzyme from Aspergillus oryzae were selected and combined to make feed additive. Seventy-five 43-day-old male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly divided into 5 groups, 15 broilers for each group. The broilers were given with 5 kinds of diets such as the basal diet, 400 μg/kg AFB₁ supplement without feed additive, and 200, 400, 800 μg/kg AFB₁ supplement with 0.15% feed additive. The feeding experimental period was 30 d, which was used to determine production performance of broilers. In addition, serum, liver and chest muscle were selected for measuring AFB₁ residues, gene expressions, microscopic and antioxidant analyses. The results showed that adding 0.15% feed additive in broiler diets could significantly relieve the negative effect of AFB₁ on chicken's production performance and nutrient metabolic rates (P<0.05). It could also improve AFB₁ metabolism, hepatic cell structure, antioxidant activity, and many hepatic enzyme gene expressions involved in oxidoreductase, apoptosis, cell growth, immune system and metabolic process (P<0.05). It could be concluded that the feed additive was able to degrade AFB₁ and improve animal production.

  12. Exploratory Studies of (-)-Epicatechin, a Bioactive Compound of Phyllanthus niruri, on the Antioxidant Enzymes and Oxidative Stress Markers in D-galactosamine-induced Hepatitis in Rats: A Study with Reference to Clinical Prospective.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Bhasha; Shanmugam, Kondeti Ramudu; Ravi, Sahukari; Subbaiah, Ganjikunta Venkata; Ramakrishana, Chilakala; Mallikarjuna, Korivi; Reddy, Kesireddy Sathyavelu

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis is a health problem affecting millions of people worldwide and it is the major risk factor for liver cirrhosis. In India, many plants are used to treat hepatitis. But little is known about the effects of (-)-epicatechin a bioactive compound of Phyllanthus niruri (PN) in hepatitis rats. The present study was designed to explore the antioxidant property of (-)-epicatechin isolated from PN in D-Galactosamine (D-GalN) induced hepatitis rats. The rats are divided into five groups as per the experimental design. (-)-Epicatchin pretreatment was given to the hepatitis rats for 21 days and biochemical analysis was carried out. The hepatic antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST), reduced glutathione (GSH), and malondialdehyde (MDA) and serum markers aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), albumin, and bilirubin are estimated. All the antioxidant enzymes activities and albumin levels are depleted in hepatitic rats. Whereas GST, ALP, AST, ALT activities and MDA, and bilirubin levels are elevated in hepatitis rats, (-)-epicatechin pretreatment increased all the antioxidant enzymes and decreased the GST, ALP, AST, ALT, and MDA levels in hepatitis rats. However, histopatholoigic studies also proves that (-)-epicatechin pretreatment decreased the tissue damage in hepatitis condition. This is the first report on the antioxidant enzymes and hepatoprotective effect of (-)-epicatechin in hepatitis rats. From this study, we conclude that (-)-epicatechin treatment decreased the oxidative damage in hepatitis rats. The present study was carried out to know the impact of (-)-epicatechin on antioxidant enzymes activities in hepatitis rats. From this study, we found that the antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT, GPx, GR, GSH depleted in hepatitis rats and increased with (-)-epicatechin in hepatitis rats.MDA levels

  13. Exploratory Studies of (-)-Epicatechin, a Bioactive Compound of Phyllanthus niruri, on the Antioxidant Enzymes and Oxidative Stress Markers in D-galactosamine-induced Hepatitis in Rats: A Study with Reference to Clinical Prospective

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Bhasha; Shanmugam, Kondeti Ramudu; Ravi, Sahukari; Subbaiah, Ganjikunta Venkata; Ramakrishana, Chilakala; Mallikarjuna, Korivi; Reddy, Kesireddy Sathyavelu

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis is a health problem affecting millions of people worldwide and it is the major risk factor for liver cirrhosis. In India, many plants are used to treat hepatitis. But little is known about the effects of (-)-epicatechin a bioactive compound of Phyllanthus niruri (PN) in hepatitis rats. Objective: The present study was designed to explore the antioxidant property of (-)-epicatechin isolated from PN in D-Galactosamine (D-GalN) induced hepatitis rats. Materials and Methods: The rats are divided into five groups as per the experimental design. (-)-Epicatchin pretreatment was given to the hepatitis rats for 21 days and biochemical analysis was carried out. The hepatic antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST), reduced glutathione (GSH), and malondialdehyde (MDA) and serum markers aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), albumin, and bilirubin are estimated. Results: All the antioxidant enzymes activities and albumin levels are depleted in hepatitic rats. Whereas GST, ALP, AST, ALT activities and MDA, and bilirubin levels are elevated in hepatitis rats, (-)-epicatechin pretreatment increased all the antioxidant enzymes and decreased the GST, ALP, AST, ALT, and MDA levels in hepatitis rats. However, histopatholoigic studies also proves that (-)-epicatechin pretreatment decreased the tissue damage in hepatitis condition. This is the first report on the antioxidant enzymes and hepatoprotective effect of (-)-epicatechin in hepatitis rats. Conclusion: From this study, we conclude that (-)-epicatechin treatment decreased the oxidative damage in hepatitis rats. SUMMARY The present study was carried out to know the impact of (-)-epicatechin on antioxidant enzymes activities in hepatitis rats. From this study, we found that the antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT, GPx, GR, GSH depleted in

  14. Regulation of Hepatic Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes in Germ-Free Mice by Conventionalization and Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Felcy Pavithra; Cheng, Sunny Lihua; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known regarding the effect of intestinal microbiota modifiers, such as probiotics and conventionalization with exogenous bacteria, on host hepatic drug metabolism. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine the effect of these modifiers on the expression of various drug-metabolizing enzymes of the host liver. VSL3 is a probiotic that contains eight live strains of bacteria. Five groups of mice were used: 1) conventional mice (CV), 2) conventional mice treated with VSL3 in drinking water, 3) germ-free (GF) mice, 4) GF mice treated with VSL3, and 5) GF mice exposed to the conventional environment for 2 months. All mice were 3 months old at tissue collection. GF conditions markedly downregulated the cytochrome P450 (P450) 3a gene cluster, but upregulated the Cyp4a cluster, whereas conventionalization normalized their expression to conventional levels [reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and western blot]. Changes in the Cyp3a and 4a gene expression correlated with alterations in the pregnane X receptor and peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor α–DNA binding, respectively (chromatin immunoprecipitation–qPCR). VSL3 increased each bacterial component in the large intestinal content of the CV mice, and increased these bacteria even more in GF mice, likely due to less competition for growth in the GF environment. VSL3 given to conventional mice increased the mRNAs of Cyp4v3, alcohol dehydrogenase 1, and carboxyesterase 2a, but decreased the mRNAs of multiple phase II glutathione-S-transferases. VSL3 given to germ-free mice decreased the mRNAs of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases 1a9 and 2a3. In conclusion, conventionalization and VSL3 alter the expression of many drug-metabolizing enzyme s in the liver, suggesting the importance of considering “bacteria-drug” interactions for various adverse drug reactions in patients. PMID:26586378

  15. Halophilic enzyme activation induced by salts

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Gabriel; Laín, Ana; Tadeo, Xavier; López-Méndez, Blanca; Castaño, David; Millet, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Halophilic archea (halobacteriae) thrive in hypersaline environments, avoiding osmotic shock by increasing the ion concentration of their cytoplasm by up to 3–6 M. To remain folded and active, their constitutive proteins have evolved towards a biased amino acid composition. High salt concentration affects catalytic activity in an enzyme-dependent way and a unified molecular mechanism remains elusive. Here, we have investigated a DNA ligase from Haloferax volcanii (Hv LigN) to show that K+ triggers catalytic activity by preferentially stabilising a specific conformation in the reaction coordinate. Sodium ions, in turn, do not populate such isoform and the enzyme remains inactive in the presence of this co-solute. Our results show that the halophilic amino acid signature enhances the enzyme's thermodynamic stability, with an indirect effect on its catalytic activity. This model has been successfully applied to reengineer Hv LigN into an enzyme that is catalytically active in the presence of NaCl. PMID:22355525

  16. Evaluation of the synergistic effect of Allium sativum, Eugenia jambolana, Momordica charantia, Ocimum sanctum, and Psidium guajava on hepatic and intestinal drug metabolizing enzymes in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Devendra; Trivedi, Neerja; Dixit, Rakesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims/Background: This study was to investigated the synergistic effect of polyherbal formulations (PHF) of Allium sativum L., Eugenia jambolana Lam., Momordica charantia L., Ocimum sanctum Linn., and Psidium guajava L. in the inhibition/induction of hepatic and intestinal cytochrome P450 (CYPs) and Phase-II conjugated drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs). Consumption of these herbal remedy has been extensively documented for diabetes treatment in Ayurveda. Methodology: PHF of these five herbs was prepared, and different doses were orally administered to Sprague–Dawley rats of different groups except control group. Expression of mRNA and activity of DMEs were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and high performance liquid chromatography in isolated liver and intestine microsomes in PHF pretreated rats. Results: The activities of hepatic and intestinal Phase-II enzyme levels increased along with mRNA levels except CYP3A mRNA level. PHF administration increases the activity of hepatic and intestinal UDP-glucuronyltransferase and glutathione S-transferase in response to dose and time; however, the activity of hepatic sulfotransferase increased at higher doses. Conclusions: CYPs and Phase-II conjugated enzymes levels can be modulated in dose and time dependent manner. Observations suggest that polyherbal formulation might be a possible cause of herb-drug interaction, due to changes in pharmacokinetic of crucial CYPs and Phase-II substrate drug. PMID:27757267

  17. Hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1 mediates alcohol-induced regulation of bile acid enzyme genes expression via CREBH.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Dipanjan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Li, Tiangang; Misra, Jagannath; Kim, Don-Kyu; Kim, Jung Ran; Kwon, Joseph; Jeong, Won-Il; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Park, Tae-Sik; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Chiang, John Y L; Lee, Chul-Ho; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Bile acids concentration in liver is tightly regulated to prevent cell damage. Previous studies have demonstrated that deregulation of bile acid homeostasis can lead to cholestatic liver disease. Recently, we have shown that ER-bound transcription factor Crebh is a downstream effector of hepatic Cb1r signaling pathway. In this study, we have investigated the effect of alcohol exposure on hepatic bile acid homeostasis and elucidated the mediatory roles of Cb1r and Crebh in this process. We found that alcohol exposure or Cb1r-agonist 2-AG treatment increases hepatic bile acid synthesis and serum ALT, AST levels in vivo alongwith significant increase in Crebh gene expression and activation. Alcohol exposure activated Cb1r, Crebh, and perturbed bile acid homeostasis. Overexpression of Crebh increased the expression of key bile acid synthesis enzyme genes via direct binding of Crebh to their promoters, whereas Cb1r knockout and Crebh-knockdown mice were protected against alcohol-induced perturbation of bile acid homeostasis. Interestingly, insulin treatment protected against Cb1r-mediated Crebh-induced disruption of bile acid homeostasis. Furthermore, Crebh expression and activation was found to be markedly increased in insulin resistance conditions and Crebh knockdown in diabetic mice model (db/db) significantly reversed alcohol-induced disruption of bile acid homeostasis. Overall, our study demonstrates a novel regulatory mechanism of hepatic bile acid metabolism by alcohol via Cb1r-mediated activation of Crebh, and suggests that targeting Crebh can be of therapeutic potential in ameliorating alcohol-induced perturbation of bile acid homeostasis.

  18. FLUCONAZOLE-INDUCED HEPATIC CYTOCHROME P450 GENE EXPRESSION AND ENZYMATIC ACTIVITIES IN RATS AND MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was undertaken to examine the effects of the triazole antifungal agent fluconazole on the expression of hepatic cytochrome P450 (Cyp) genes and the activities of Cyp enzymes in male Sprague-Dawley rats and male CD-1 mice. Alkoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (AROD) methods w...

  19. Hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes belonging to the CYP2C subfamily from an Australian marsupial, the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Jones, Brett R; El-Merhibi, Adaweyah; Ngo, Suong N T; Stupans, Ieva; McKinnon, Ross A

    2008-09-01

    Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) are critically important in the oxidative metabolism of a diverse array of xenobiotics and endogenous substrates. We have previously reported that the obligate Eucalyptus feeder koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) exhibits a higher hepatic CYP2C activity as compared to non-Eucalyptus feeders human or rat, with stimulation of CYP2C activity by cineole. In the present study, we examine CYP2C expression by immunohistochemistry and describe the identification and cloning of koala CYP2Cs. Utilising anti-rat CYP2C6 antibody, the expression of CYP2C was found to be uniform across the hepatic sections, being consistent with that observed in human and rat. Two 1647 and 1638 bp koala liver CYP2C complete cDNAs, designated CYP2C47 and CYP2C48 respectively, were cloned by cDNA library screening. The koala CYP2C cDNAs encode a protein of 495 amino acids. Three additional partial CYP2C sequences were also identified from the koala, indicating the multiplicity of the CYP2C subfamily in this unique marsupial species. The results of this study demonstrate the presence of koala hepatic CYP2Cs that share several common features with other published CYP2Cs; however CYP2C47 and CYP2C48 contain four extra amino acid residues at the NH2-terminal, a transmembrane anchor which was reported being a fundamentally conserved structure core of all eukaryote CYP enzymes.

  20. An NMR Study of Enzyme Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterman, Keith E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as a model for studying enzyme activity with a basic spectrometer is presented. Included are background information, experimental procedures, and a discussion of probable results. Stressed is the value of the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in biochemistry. (CW)

  1. An NMR Study of Enzyme Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterman, Keith E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as a model for studying enzyme activity with a basic spectrometer is presented. Included are background information, experimental procedures, and a discussion of probable results. Stressed is the value of the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in biochemistry. (CW)

  2. Inflammation, hepatic enzymes and resistance training in individuals with metabolic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Levinger, I; Goodman, C; Peake, J; Garnham, A; Hare, D L; Jerums, G; Selig, S

    2009-03-01

    Increases in inflammatory markers, hepatic enzymes and physical inactivity are associated with the development of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). We examined whether inflammatory markers and hepatic enzymes are correlated with traditional risk factors for MetS and studied the effects of resistance training (RT) on these emerging risk factors in individuals with a high number of metabolic risk factors (HiMF, 2.9 +/- 0.8) and those with a low number of metabolic risk factors (LoMF, 0.5 +/- 0.5). Twenty-eight men and 27 women aged 50.8 +/- 6.5 years (mean +/- sd) participated in the study. Participants were randomized to four groups, HiMF training (HiMFT), HiMF control (HiMFC), LoMF training (LoMFT) and LoMF control (LoMFC). Before and after 10 weeks of RT [3 days/week, seven exercises, three sets with intensity gradually increased from 40-50% of one repetition maximum (1RM) to 75-85% of 1RM], blood samples were obtained for the measurement of pro-inflammatory cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). At baseline, HiMF had higher interleukin-6 (33.9%), CRP (57.1%), GGT (45.2%) and ALT (40.6%) levels, compared with LoMF (all P < 0.05). CRP, GGT and ALT correlated with the number of risk factors (r = 0.48, 0.51 and 0.57, respectively, all P < 0.01) and with other anthropometric and clinical measures (r range from 0.26 to 0.60, P < 0.05). RT did not significantly alter inflammatory markers or hepatic enzymes (all P > 0.05). HiMF was associated with increased inflammatory markers and hepatic enzyme concentrations. RT did not reduce inflammatory markers and hepatic enzymes in individuals with HiMF.

  3. Effect of Traumatic Brain Injury, Erythropoietin, and Anakinra on Hepatic Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters in an Experimental Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gail D; Peterson, Todd C; Vonder Haar, Cole; Farin, Fred M; Bammler, Theo K; MacDonald, James W; Kantor, Eric D; Hoane, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    In contrast to considerable data demonstrating a decrease in cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity in inflammation and infection, clinically, traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in an increase in CYP and UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of TBI alone and with treatment with erythropoietin (EPO) or anakinra on the gene expression of hepatic inflammatory proteins, drug-metabolizing enzymes, and transporters in a cortical contusion impact (CCI) injury model. Microarray-based transcriptional profiling was used to determine the effect on gene expression at 24 h, 72 h, and 7 days post-CCI. Plasma cytokine and liver protein concentrations of CYP2D4, CYP3A1, EPHX1, and UGT2B7 were determined. There was no effect of TBI, TBI + EPO, or TBI + anakinra on gene expression of the inflammatory factors shown to be associated with decreased expression of hepatic metabolic enzymes in models of infection and inflammation. IL-6 plasma concentrations were increased in TBI animals and decreased with EPO and anakinra treatment. There was no significant effect of TBI and/or anakinra on gene expression of enzymes or transporters known to be involved in drug disposition. TBI + EPO treatment decreased the gene expression of Cyp2d4 at 72 h with a corresponding decrease in CYP2D4 protein at 72 h and 7 days. CYP3A1 protein was decreased at 24 h. In conclusion, EPO treatment may result in a significant decrease in the metabolism of Cyp-metabolized drugs. In contrast to clinical TBI, there was not a significant effect of experimental TBI on CYP or UGT metabolic enzymes.

  4. Purification and characterization of mouse hepatic enzyme that converts selenomethionine to methylselenol by its alpha,gamma-elimination.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Tomofumi; Motobayashi, Shinji; Ueno, Hitoshi; Nakamuro, Katsuhiko

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to purify and characterize a mouse hepatic enzyme that directly generates CH3SeH from seleno-l-methionine (l-SeMet) by the alpha,gamma-elimination reaction. The l-SeMet alpha,gamma-elimination enzyme was ubiquitous in tissues from ICR mice and the activity was relatively high in the large intestine, brain, and muscle, as well as the liver. Aging and sex of the mice did not have any significant influence on the activity in the liver. The enzyme was purified from the mouse liver by ammonium sulfate precipitation and four kinds of column chromatography. These procedures yielded a homogeneous enzyme, which was purified approx 1000-fold relative to mouse liver extract. Overall recovery was approx 8%. The purified enzyme had a molecular mass of approx 160 kDa with four identical subunits. The Km value of the enzyme for the catalysis of l-SeMet was 15.5 mM, and the Vmax was 0.29 units/mg protein. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (pyridoxal-P) was required as a cofactor because the holoenzyme could be resolved to the apoenzyme by incubation with hydroxylamine and reconstituted by addition of pyridoxal-P. The enzyme showed the optimum activity at around pH 8.0 and the highest activity at 50 degrees C; it catalyzed the alpha,gamma-elimination reactions of several analogs such as d,l-homocysteine and l-homoserine in addition to l-SeMet. This enzyme also catalyzed the alpha,beta-elimination reaction of Se-methylseleno-l-cysteine. However, l-methionine was inert. Therefore, the purified enzyme was different from the bacterial l-methionine gamma-lyase that metabolizes l-SeMet to CH3SeH, in terms of the substrate specificity. These results were the first identification of a mammalian enzyme that specifically catalyzes the alpha,gamma-elimination reaction of l-SeMet and immediately converts it to CH3SeH, an important metabolite of Se.

  5. Can chronic maternal drug therapy alter the nursing infant's hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme pattern?

    PubMed

    Toddywalla, V S; Patel, S B; Betrabet, S S; Kulkarni, R D; Kombo, I; Saxena, B N

    1995-10-01

    This study was carried out to investigate whether minute quantities of maternal drugs ingested over an extended period of time by a breast-feeding infant can alter the activity pattern of the infant's hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme (HDME). The HDME activity patterns of 12 breast-fed infants whose mothers were not on drug therapy were compared with those of 11 infants whose mothers had been taking 30 micrograms levo-norgesterel daily for 90 to 195 days (oral contraceptives group) and of 10 infants whose mothers had been taking ethambutol and isoniazid daily since pregnancy (tuberculosis group). As 6 beta hydroxycortisol in urine is considered to be a good and acceptable reflector of HDME activity, it was estimated from the infants' urine using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. A comparison of the patterns between 90 days of age and 195 days of age of the infants in the control group and the two study groups indicated an increase from 36.6 ng/mL to 58.4 ng/mL at 195 days in the control group. An initial decrease from 36.6 ng/mL to 26.2 ng/mL was noted with commencement of maternal levo-norgesterel therapy, followed by a slow and steady rise to 47.8 ng/mL at 195 days of age, with a shift in the peak from 120 to 135 days of infants age in the oral contraceptive group. A suppressed pattern with decreased levels of 6 beta hydroxycortisol ranging from 19.3 ng/mL to 26.5 ng/mL at 195 days was found in the tuberculosis group. The data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) coupled with Duncan's Multiple range test. Both treatment group showed significant differences from the control group at the 0.050 level. The HDME plays an important role in determining the final outcome of any drug in humans, as it controls the metabolism of drugs. Hence, alterations in its activity caused by the transfer of maternal drugs over a prolonged period of time could pose a serious problem to nurslings when they require drugs for their own benefit.

  6. Concentration profiles near an activated enzyme.

    PubMed

    Park, Soohyung; Agmon, Noam

    2008-09-25

    When a resting enzyme is activated, substrate concentration profile evolves in its vicinity, ultimately tending to steady state. We use modern theories for many-body effects on diffusion-influenced reactions to derive approximate analytical expressions for the steady-state profile and the Laplace transform of the transient concentration profiles. These show excellent agreement with accurate many-particle Brownian-dynamics simulations for the Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The steady-state profile has a hyperbolic dependence on the distance of the substrate from the enzyme, albeit with a prefactor containing the complexity of the many-body effects. These are most conspicuous for the substrate concentration at the surface of the enzyme. It shows an interesting transition as a function of the enzyme turnover rate. When it is high, the contact concentration decays monotonically to steady state. However, for slow turnover it is nonmonotonic, showing a minimum due to reversible substrate binding, then a maximum due to diffusion of new substrate toward the enzyme, and finally decay to steady state. Under certain conditions one can obtain a good estimate for the critical value of the turnover rate constant at the transition.

  7. Effects of arecoline on hepatic cytochrome P450 activity and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Run-mei, Xiao; Jun-jun, Wang; Jing-ya, Chen; Li-juan, Sun; Yong, Chen

    2014-08-01

    Betel-quid use is associated with the risk of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the impact of arecoline on human hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in vitro and rat hepatic CYP enzymes, as well as the hepatic oxidative stress and liver injury of rats in vivo. The in vitro results indicated that arecoline hydrobromide (AH) has no significant effect on the activities of CYP2B, 2C9, 3A4, 1A2, 2E1 and 2D6 in human liver microsome (HLM). However, oral administration of AH at 4 and 20 mg/kg/d for seven consecutive days significantly increased the activities of rat hepatic CYP2B, 2E1, 2D, 3A, 2C and 1A2. In addition, AH at 100 mg/kg/d significantly increased the levels of ALT, AST and MDA, decreased the levels of SOD, CAT, GSH-Px and GSH, in rat liver. The in vivo induction of AH on rat hepatic CYP isoforms suggested that the high risk of metabolic interaction should be existed when the substrate drugs of the six kinds of CYP isoforms was administered in betel-quid use human. Furthermore, the in vivo results also suggested that AH-induced hepatoxicity should be associated with the induction of AH on rat hepatic CYP2E1 and 2B.

  8. SOLUBLE HEPATIC δ-AMINOLEVULINIC ACID SYNTHETASE: END-PRODUCT INHIBITION OF THE PARTIALLY PURIFIED ENZYME*

    PubMed Central

    Scholnick, Perry L.; Hammaker, Lydia E.; Marver, Harvey S.

    1969-01-01

    The present study confirms the existence of hepatic δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase in the cytosol of the liver, suggests that this enzyme may be in transit to the mitochondria, and defines some of the characteristics of the partially purified enzyme. The substrate and cofactor requirements are similar to those of mitochondrial δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase. Heme strongly inhibits the partially purified enzyme. A number of proteins that bind heme block this inhibition, which explains previous failures to demonstrate heme inhibition in crude systems. End-product inhibition of δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase in the mitochondria may play an important role in the regulation of heme biosynthesis in eukaryotic cells. PMID:5257968

  9. Coral calcium hydride prevents hepatic steatosis in high fat diet-induced obese rats: A potent mitochondrial nutrient and phase II enzyme inducer.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chen; Wang, Yongyao; Zhu, Erkang; Yan, Chunhong; Zhao, Lin; Wang, Xiaojie; Qiu, Yingfeng; Shen, Hui; Sun, Xuejun; Feng, Zhihui; Liu, Jiankang; Long, Jiangang

    2016-03-01

    Diet-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by profound lipid accumulation and associated with an inflammatory response, oxidative stress and hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that some mitochondrial nutrients effectively ameliorated high fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic steatosis and metabolic disorders. Molecular hydrogen in hydrogen-rich liquid or inhaling gas, which has been confirmed in scavenging reactive oxygen species and preventing mitochondrial decay, improved metabolic syndrome in patients and animal models. Coral calcium hydride (CCH) is a new solid molecular hydrogen carrier made of coral calcium. However, whether and how CCH impacts HFD-induced hepatic steatosis remains uninvestigated. In the present study, we applied CCH to a HFD-induced NAFLD rat model for 13 weeks. We found that CCH durably generated hydrogen in vivo and in vitro. CCH treatment significantly reduced body weight gain, improved glucose and lipid metabolism and attenuated hepatic steatosis in HFD-induced obese rats with no influence on food and water intake. Moreover, CCH effectively improved HFD-induced hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction, reduced oxidative stress, and activated phase II enzymes. Our results suggest that CCH is an efficient hydrogen-rich agent, which could prevent HFD-induced NAFLD via activating phase II enzymes and improving mitochondrial function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Naturalistic observation on the hepatic enzyme changes in patients treated with either risperidone or olanzapine alone.

    PubMed

    Pae, Chi-Un; Lim, Hyun-Kook; Kim, Tae-Suk; Kim, Jung-Jin; Lee, Chang-Uk; Lee, Soo-Jung; Lee, Chul; Paik, In-Ho

    2005-05-01

    This retrospective study aimed to compare differences in hepatic enzyme elevation during treatment with either risperidone or olanzapine alone in patients with psychotic disorders. The charts were reviewed for six hundred and sixty-seven (667) inpatients with psychotic disorders who were treated with either risperidone (n=289) or olanzapine (n=145) alone at a university-affiliated hospital between 1998 and 2002. Frequencies of elevation greater than the reference level in any enzyme among aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphotase (ALP) were higher in the olanzapine-treated group (26.9%) than in the risperidone-treated group (14.2%) [odds ratio (OR)=2.225, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.362-3.638, P=0.002]. Frequencies of elevation greater than the reference level in ALT were higher in the olanzapine-treated group than in the risperidone-treated group (OR=2.182, P=0.004), as were frequencies with two-fold (OR=3.064, P=0.017) and three-fold (OR=2.883, P=0.039) elevation. Recovery time was longer in the olanzapine-treated group than in the risperidone-treated group (P=0.0059), as was latency time (P=0.0044). These results suggest that there are potential differences in antipsychotic-associated hepatic enzyme alterations between risperidone and olanzapine treatment. Controlled, prospective studies should be conducted to identify the risk factors associated with an alteration in hepatic enzymes related to treatment with risperidone and olanzapine.

  11. The effect of bamboo extract on hepatic biotransforming enzymes – Findings from an obese–diabetic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Cheryl L.K.; Collier, Abby C.; Berry, Marla J.; Panee, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study Bamboo leaves are used as a component in traditional Chinese medicine for the anti-inflammatory function. Our previous studies have demonstrated that an ethanol/water extract from Phyllostachys edulis ameliorated obesity-associated chronic systemic inflammation in mice, and therefore relieving the symptoms of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this project was to further investigate the effects of this bamboo extract on hepatic biotransformation enzymes in both lean and obese mice, as an initial step in the toxicological evaluation of using this traditional medicine in obese/diabetic population. Materials and methods Male C57BL/6J mice were randomized to 4 groups and fed standard (10% kcal from fat) diet with or without bamboo extract supplementation at a dose of 10 gram per kilogram diet (n = 10 and n = 9, respectively), or high fat (45% kcal from fat) diet with or without bamboo extract (n = 8 and N = 7, respectively). The dietary treatment lasted for 6 months. Subsequently, the activities and expression of the major Phase I and II hepatic biotransformation enzymes were assessed in subcellular fractions from murine livers. Results Three groups of mice, lean bamboo extract-supplemented, obese/diabetic, and bamboo extract-supplemented obese/diabetic, showed greater activities of cytochromes P450 1a2 and 3a11 compared to control but no changes in the expression level of these proteins. For Phase II enzymes, bamboo extract supplementation in lean mice caused decreased glutathione-S-transferase activity (−12%) and greater uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase activity (+46%), but had no effect on sulfotransferase activity. Conversely, the obese/diabetic condition itself increased glutathione-S-transferase and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase activities, but decreased total sulfotransferase activity and sulfotransferase 2a1 expression. Conclusions Bamboo extract and obesity/diabetes show significant independent effects on hepatic bio

  12. Hepatic antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in response to pesticide methomyl and recovery pattern.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shun Long; Chen, Jia Zhang; Xu, Pao; Qu, Jian Hong; Fan, Li Min; Song, Chao; Qiu, Li Ping

    2014-04-01

    Hepatic antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) of Nile tilapia in response to pesticide methomyl and recovery pattern were researched by exposing tilapia to sub-lethal methomyl concentrations of 0, 0.2, 2, 20 and 200 μg/L for 30 days, and then transferred to methomyl-free water for 18 days. Hepatic SOD and CAT were measured at 10 min (day 0), 6, 12, 18, 24 and 30 days after starting the experiment and at 18 days after transferring to methomyl-free water. The results showed hepatic SOD and CAT activities in 2, 20 and 200 μg/L groups were affected significantly, however, that in 0.2 μg/L group didn't change significantly compared to control during 30-day exposure period. Thus it would appear the 0.2 μg/L methomyl might be considered the no observed adverse effect level. Recovery data showed that, for SOD, the effects produced by lower concentration of methomyl 2 μg/L were reversible but not at concentrations higher than 20 μg/L, however, for CAT, the effects produced by all the concentrations were reversible.

  13. Effects of tin-protoporphyrin administration on hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in the juvenile rat

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, D.L.; Becker, F.F.

    1988-01-01

    The heme analogue tin-protoporphyrin IX (SnP) is a potent inhibitor of microsomal heme oxygenase. Administration of SnP to neonatal rats can prevent hyperbilirubinemia by blocking the postnatal increase of heme oxygenase activity. Apparently innocuous at therapeutic doses, it is of potential clinical value for chemoprevention of neonatal jaundice. We found that when 50-g male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated daily with 50 mumol of SnP/kg sc for 6 days, hepatic microsomal cytochromes b5 and P-450 were significantly diminished. Cytochrome P-450 reductase, two P-450-dependent monooxygenases, aminopyrine demethylase and benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase, and catalase, a peroxisomal hemoprotein, were also significantly diminished. These results suggested that SnP might significantly affect the metabolism of other xenobiotics. This possibility was confirmed by the finding that hexobarbital-induced sleep lasted 4 times longer in SnP-treated rats than in controls. Inhibition of protein synthesis by SnP was ruled out as the cause of hemoprotein loss when administration of (/sup 3/H)leucine to SnP-treated and control rats demonstrated that proteins of the microsomal, cytosolic, and plasma membrane fractions of the livers from both groups incorporated similar levels of leucine. When /sup 55/FeCl/sub 3/ and (2-/sup 14/C)glycine were administered to measure heme synthesis, heme extract from the livers of SnP-treated rats contained 4 times more label from iron and glycine than did heme from control livers. Despite the apparent increased rate of heme synthesis in SnP-treated rats, each of the three cell fractions demonstrated a significant loss of heme but contained sizable amounts of SnP. These findings suggest that SnP causes a decrease of functional hemoprotein and partial loss of enzymic activity by displacing intracellular heme.

  14. Hepatic cytochrome P450s, phase II enzymes and nuclear receptors are downregulated in a Th2 environment during Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    PubMed

    Mimche, Sylvie M; Nyagode, Beatrice A; Merrell, Matthew D; Lee, Choon-Myung; Prasanphanich, Nina S; Cummings, Richard D; Morgan, Edward T

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation and infection downregulate the activity and expression of cytochrome P450s (P450s) and other drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) involved in hepatic drug clearance. Schistosoma mansoni infection was reported to cause a downregulation of hepatic P450-dependent activities in mouse liver, but little is known about the specific enzymes affected or whether phase II DMEs are also affected. Here we describe the effect of murine schistosomiasis on the expression of hepatic P450s, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (Cpr), phase II drug metabolizing enzymes, and nuclear receptors at 30 and 45 days postinfection (dpi). Although the hepatic expression of some of these genes was altered at 30 dpi, we observed substantial changes in the expression of the majority of P450 mRNAs and proteins measured, Cpr protein, as well as many of the UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and sulfotransferases at 45 dpi. S. mansoni infection also altered nuclear receptor expression, inducing mRNA levels at 30 dpi and depressing levels at 45 dpi. S. mansoni evoked a T helper 2 (Th2) inflammatory response at 45 dpi, as indicated by the induction of hepatic Th2 cytokine mRNAs [interleukins 4, 5, and 13], whereas the hepatic proinflammatory response was relatively weak. Thus, chronic schistosomiasis markedly and selectively alters the expression of multiple DMEs, which may be associated with Th2 cytokine release. This would represent a novel mechanism of DME regulation in disease states. These findings have important implications for drug testing in infected mice, whereas the relevance to humans with schistosomiasis needs to be determined.

  15. Protective potential of Averrhoa bilimbi fruits in ameliorating the hepatic key enzymes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Surya B; S, Mini

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is a mutifactorial disease which leads to several complications. Currently available drug regimens for management of diabetes have certain drawbacks. Need for safer and effective medicines from natural sources having potent antidiabetic activity. Averrhoa bilimbi Linn. (Oxalidaceae) is a medicinal plant and is reported to possess hypoglycemic activity. To investigate the antidiabetic potential of Averrhoa bilimbi fruit extract in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in male Sprague Dawley rats by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (40mg/kg body weight). The diabetic rats were treated orally with ethyl acetate fraction of A. bilimbi fruits (ABE) (25mg/kg body weight) and metformin (100mg/kg body weight) by intragastric intubation for 60days. After 60days, the rats were sacrificed; blood, liver and pancreas were collected. Several indices such as blood glucose, plasma insulin, toxicity markers and the activities of carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes were assayed. The phytochemicals present in the ABE was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. ABE significantly (p<0.05) reduced the level of blood glucose and hepatic toxicity markers and increased plasma insulin in diabetic rats. ABE modulated the activities of carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes, significantly increased the activities of hexokinase (59%) and pyruvate kinase (68%) and reduced the activities of glucose-6-phosphatase (32%) and fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase (20%). The histological studies of the pancreas also supported our findings. The results were compared with metformin, a standard oral hypoglycemic drug. GC-MS analysis of ABE revealed the presence of 11 chemical constituents in the extract. ABE exerts its antidiabetic effect by promoting glucose metabolism via glycolysis and inhibiting hepatic endogenous glucose production via gluconeogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Altered liver acini induced in diabetic rats by portal vein islet isografts resemble preneoplastic hepatic foci in their enzymic pattern.

    PubMed Central

    Dombrowski, F.; Filsinger, E.; Bannasch, P.; Pfeifer, U.

    1996-01-01

    As demonstrated previously, liver acini draining the blood from intraportally transplanted pancreatic islets in streptozotocin-diabetic rats are altered in various respects. The hepatocytes in these acini store glycogen and/or fat, and they show an increase in proliferation as well as in apoptotic activity. Thus, they are phenotypically similar to carcinogen-induced preneoplastic liver foci (glycogen-storing foci and sometimes also mixed cell foci). By means of catalytic enzyme histochemistry or immunohistochemistry, we investigated the activity of key enzymes of alternative pathways of carbohydrate metabolism and some additional marker enzymes (well known from studies on preneoplastic hepatic foci) in the altered liver acini surrounding the islet isografts. In addition, the expression of glucose transporter proteins 1 and 2 (GLUT-1 and GLUT-2) were investigated immunohistochemically. The activities of hexokinase, pyruvate kinase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were increased, whereas the activities of glycogen phosphorylase, adenylate cyclase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and membrane-bound adenosine triphosphatase were decreased in the altered liver acini. The expression of GLUT-2 was also decreased. GLUT-1 and glutathione S-transferase placental form were not expressed, and the activities of glycogen synthase and gamma-glutamyl-transferase remained unchanged. All changes of the enzyme activities were in line with the well known effects of insulin and resembled alterations characteristic of preneoplastic liver foci observed in different models of hepatocarcinogenesis. It remains to be clarified in long-term experiments whether or not these foci represent preneoplastic lesions and may proceed to neoplasia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8644865

  17. Chemomodulatory effect of Moringa oleifera, Lam, on hepatic carcinogen metabolising enzymes, antioxidant parameters and skin papillomagenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Bharali, Rupjyoti; Tabassum, Jawahira; Azad, Mohammed Rekibul Haque

    2003-01-01

    The modulatory effects of a hydro-alcoholic extract of drumsticks of Moringa oliefera Lam at doses of 125 mg/kg bodyweight and 250 mg/ kg body weight for 7 and 14 days, respectively, were investigated with reference to drug metabolising Phase I (Cytochrome b(5) and Cytochrome p(450) ) and Phase II (Glutathione-S- transferase) enzymes, anti-oxidant enzymes, glutathione content and lipid peroxidation in the liver of 6-8 week old female Swiss albino mice. Further, the chemopreventive efficacy of the extract was evaluated in a two stage model of 7,12 - dimethylbenz(a)anthracene induced skin papillomagenesis. Significant increase (p<0.05 to p<0.01) in the activities of hepatic cytochrome b(5), cytochrome p(450), catalase, glutathione peroxidase ( GPx ), glutathione reductase (GR), acid soluble sulfhydryl content (-SH ) and a significant decrease ( p<0.01 ) in the hepatic MDA level were observed at both dose levels of treatment when compared with the control values. Glutathione-S- transferase ( GST )activity was found to be significantly increased (p<0.01 ) only at the higher dose level. Butylated hydroxyanisol (BHA ) fed at a dose of 0.75% in the diet for 7 and 14 days (positive control ) caused a significant increase (p<0.05 to p<0.01) in the levels of hepatic phase I and phase II enzymes, anti- oxidant enzymes, glutathione content and a decrease in lipid peroxidation. The skin papillomagenesis studies demonstrated a significant decrease (p<0.05 ) in the percentage of mice with papillomas, average number of papillomas per mouse and papillomas per papilloma bearing mouse when the animals received a topical application of the extract at a dose of 5mg/ kg body weight in the peri-initiation phase 7 days before and 7 days after DMBA application, Group II ), promotional phase (from the day of croton oil application and continued till the end of the experiment, Group III ) and both peri and post initiation stages (from 7 days prior to DMBA application and continued till the

  18. [Current seroprevalence, vaccination and predictive value of liver enzymes for hepatitis B among refugees in Germany].

    PubMed

    Hampel, Annika; Solbach, Philipp; Cornberg, Markus; Schmidt, Reinhold E; Behrens, Georg M N; Jablonka, Alexandra

    2016-05-01

    Currently only vague estimates exist for the seroprevalence and vaccination status for viral hepatitis B (HBV) in refugees arriving in Germany during the current refugee crisis. To assess the prevalence of hepatitis B in refugees arriving in northern Germany in 2015. In a cross-sectional study in 793 patients from all age groups tests for serological markers of hepatitis B virus infection (HBsAg, anti-HBc) and liver enzymes (ALT, AST, bilirubin, γGT, alkaline phosphatase) were performed in August 2015 at six reception centers in northern Germany. In 258 patients anti-HBs antibodies were assessed additionally. Of the tested refugees, 76.7 % were male, the median age was 28.8 ± 11.4 years, and 7.8 % were children under the age of 18. The overall prevalence of HBsAg and total anti-HBc was 2.3 % and 14.0 % respectively (2.5 % and 14.5 % in men; 1.2 % and 13.5 % in women). Prevalence was highest in 35 to 49-year-old patients for HBsAg (3.1 %) and for refugees over 50 years for anti-HBc (38 %). No immunity to Hepatitis B was found in 62 %, 18.6 % had been vaccinated against Hepatitis B, while 50 % of children aged up to 15 years (n = 12) had been vaccinated. Positive predictive values of elevated AST and ALT for detection of HBsAg was 0 and 0.016, respectively. Only two patients with a positive HBsAg had elevated transaminases. This study showed a high prevalence of HBsAg in a German refugee sample in comparison to the general German population. Liver enzymes are not an appropriate tool for screening for hepatitis B virus infection.

  19. [Effects of Hg on soil enzyme activity].

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-Lu; Sun, Tie-Heng; He, Wen-Xiang; Chen, Su

    2007-03-01

    With simulation test, this paper studied the effects of Hg on the activities of urease, invertase and neutral phosphotase in four soils. The results showed that Hg inhibited soil urease and invertase activities markedly, but its inhibitory effect differed with test soils. There was a significant logarithmic correlation between the concentration of HgCl2 and the activities of these two enzymes (P < 0.05). In test soils, the ED50 of urease activity was 87.99, 5.47, 24.05 and 19.88 mg x kg(-1), and that of invertase activity was 76.68, 727.49, 236.52 and 316.59 mg x kg(-1), respectively. Urease was more sensitive than invertase to Hg contamination, while organic matter had a protective effect on soil enzymes. Soil neutral phosphatase was not sensitive to Hg contamination, except that it was significantly activated by Hg in the meadow brown soil applied with plenty of organic fertilizer.

  20. Comparison of Enzyme Immunoassays for Detection of Antibodies to Hepatitis D Virus in Serum

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Siu-Kei; Atienza, Ederlyn E.; Cook, Linda; Prince, Harry; Slev, Patricia; Lapé-Nixon, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Serology remains critical for diagnosing hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection, which affects 15 to 20 million people worldwide, but the literature on characterizing commercial enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) dates back to 15 years ago. We evaluated 2 commercial EIAs currently available for detecting anti-HDV antibodies. The DiaSorin assay demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity. Using a modified cutoff value, the Cusabio assay demonstrated a sensitivity of 81.3% and specificity of 90.9%. Our data show that recently developed EIAs are reliable for anti-HDV antibody detection. PMID:27280621

  1. Iodothyronine deiodinase enzyme activities in bone.

    PubMed

    Williams, Allan J; Robson, Helen; Kester, Monique H A; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M; Shalet, Stephen M; Visser, Theo J; Williams, Graham R

    2008-07-01

    Euthyroid status is essential for normal skeletal development and maintenance of the adult skeleton, but the mechanisms which control supply of thyroid hormone to bone cells are poorly understood. Thyroid hormones enter target cells via monocarboxylate transporter-8 (MCT8), which provides a functional link between thyroid hormone uptake and metabolism in the regulation of T3-action but has not been investigated in bone. Most circulating active thyroid hormone (T3) is derived from outer ring deiodination of thyroxine (T4) mediated by the type 1 deiodinase enzyme (D1). The D2 isozyme regulates intra-cellular T3 supply and determines saturation of the nuclear T3-receptor (TR), whereas a third enzyme (D3) inactivates T4 and T3 to prevent hormone availability and reduce TR-saturation. The aim of this study was to determine whether MCT8 is expressed in the skeleton and whether chondrocytes, osteoblasts and osteoclasts express functional deiodinases. Gene expression was analyzed by RT-PCR and D1, D2 and D3 function by sensitive and highly specific determination of enzyme activities. MCT8 mRNA was expressed in chondrocytes, osteoblasts and osteoclasts at all stages of cell differentiation. D1 activity was undetectable in all cell types, D2 activity was only present in mature osteoblasts whereas D3 activity was evident throughout chondrocyte, osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation in primary cell cultures. These data suggest that T3 availability especially during skeletal development may be limited by D3-mediated catabolism rather than by MCT8 mediated cellular uptake or D2-dependent T3 production.

  2. The trans-10,cis-12 isomer of conjugated linoleic acid reduces hepatic triacylglycerol content without affecting lipogenic enzymes in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Zabala, Amaia; Churruca, Itziar; Macarulla, M Teresa; Rodríguez, Víctor M; Fernández-Quintela, Alfredo; Martínez, J Alfredo; Portillo, María P

    2004-09-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) refers to the positional and geometric dienoic isomers of linoleic acid. The dietary intake of CLA has been associated with changes in lipid metabolism. The aim of the present work was to assess the effects of the two main isomers of CLA on sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1a and SREBP-1c mRNA levels, as well as on mRNA levels and the activities of several lipogenic enzymes in liver. For this purpose hamsters were fed an atherogenic diet supplemented with 5 g linoleic acid, cis-9,trans-11 or trans-10,cis-12 CLA/kg diet for 6 weeks. The trans-10,cis-12 isomer intake produced significantly greater liver weight, but also significantly decreased liver fat accumulation. No changes in mRNA levels of SREBP-1a, SREBP-1c and lipogenic enzymes, or in the activities of these enzymes, were observed. There was no effect of feeding cis-9,trans-11 CLA. These results suggest that increased fat accumulation in liver does not occur on the basis of liver enlargement produced by feeding the trans-10,cis-12 isomer of CLA in hamsters. The reduction in hepatic triacylglycerol content induced by this isomer was not attributable to changes in lipogenesis.

  3. The Action of Antidiabetic Plants of the Canadian James Bay Cree Traditional Pharmacopeia on Key Enzymes of Hepatic Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Nachar, Abir; Vallerand, Diane; Musallam, Lina; Lavoie, Louis; Arnason, John; Haddad, Pierre S.

    2013-01-01

    We determined the capacity of putative antidiabetic plants used by the Eastern James Bay Cree (Canada) to modulate key enzymes of gluconeogenesis and glycogen synthesis and key regulating kinases. Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and glycogen synthase (GS) activities were assessed in cultured hepatocytes treated with crude extracts of seventeen plant species. Phosphorylation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK), Akt, and Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) were probed by Western blot. Seven of the seventeen plant extracts significantly decreased G6Pase activity, Abies balsamea and Picea glauca, exerting an effect similar to insulin. This action involved both Akt and AMPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, several plant extracts activated GS, Larix laricina and A. balsamea, far exceeding the action of insulin. We also found a significant correlation between GS stimulation and GSK-3 phosphorylation induced by plant extract treatments. In summary, three Cree plants stand out for marked effects on hepatic glucose homeostasis. P. glauca affects glucose production whereas L. laricina rather acts on glucose storage. However, A. balsamea has the most promising profile, simultaneously and powerfully reducing G6Pase and stimulating GS. Our studies thus confirm that the reduction of hepatic glucose production likely contributes to the therapeutic potential of several antidiabetic Cree traditional medicines. PMID:23864882

  4. The action of antidiabetic plants of the canadian james bay cree traditional pharmacopeia on key enzymes of hepatic glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Nachar, Abir; Vallerand, Diane; Musallam, Lina; Lavoie, Louis; Badawi, Alaa; Arnason, John; Haddad, Pierre S

    2013-01-01

    We determined the capacity of putative antidiabetic plants used by the Eastern James Bay Cree (Canada) to modulate key enzymes of gluconeogenesis and glycogen synthesis and key regulating kinases. Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and glycogen synthase (GS) activities were assessed in cultured hepatocytes treated with crude extracts of seventeen plant species. Phosphorylation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK), Akt, and Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) were probed by Western blot. Seven of the seventeen plant extracts significantly decreased G6Pase activity, Abies balsamea and Picea glauca, exerting an effect similar to insulin. This action involved both Akt and AMPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, several plant extracts activated GS, Larix laricina and A. balsamea, far exceeding the action of insulin. We also found a significant correlation between GS stimulation and GSK-3 phosphorylation induced by plant extract treatments. In summary, three Cree plants stand out for marked effects on hepatic glucose homeostasis. P. glauca affects glucose production whereas L. laricina rather acts on glucose storage. However, A. balsamea has the most promising profile, simultaneously and powerfully reducing G6Pase and stimulating GS. Our studies thus confirm that the reduction of hepatic glucose production likely contributes to the therapeutic potential of several antidiabetic Cree traditional medicines.

  5. Hepatoprotective Activity of Vitex trifolia against Carbon Tetrachloride-induced Hepatic Damage.

    PubMed

    Manjunatha, B K; Vidya, S M

    2008-01-01

    Aqueous and ethanol extracts of leaf of Vitex trifolia was investigated for hepatoprotective activity against carbon tetrachloride induced liver damage. To assess the hepatoprotective activity of the extracts, various biochemical parameters viz., total bilirubin, total protein, alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase activities were determined. Results of the serum biochemical estimations revealed significant reduction in total bilirubin and serum marker enzymes and increase in total protein in the animals treated with ethanol and aqueous extracts. However significant rise in these serum enzymes and decrease in total protein level was noticed in CCl4 treated group indicating the hepatic damage. The hepatoprotective activity is also supported by histological studies of liver tissue. Histology of the liver tissue treated with ethanol and aqueous extracts showed normal hepatic architecture with few fatty lobules. Hence the present study revealed that Vitex trifolia could afford significant protection against CCl(4) induced hepatocellular injury.

  6. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... have liver damage because of it. What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  7. Effect of Pterocarpus santalinus bark, on blood glucose, serum lipids, plasma insulin and hepatic carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kondeti, Vinay Kumar; Badri, Kameswara Rao; Maddirala, Dilip Rajasekhar; Thur, Sampath Kumar Mekala; Fatima, Shaik Sameena; Kasetti, Ramesh Babu; Rao, Chippada Appa

    2010-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of bark of Pterocarpus santalinus, an ethnomedicinal plant, on blood glucose, plasma insulin, serum lipids and the activities of hepatic glucose metabolizing enzymes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were treated (acute/short-term and long-term) with ethyl acetate:methanol fractions of ethanolic extract of the bark of P. santalinus. Fasting blood glucose, HbA(1C), plasma insulin and protein were estimated before and after the treatment, along with hepatic glycogen, and activities of hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Further anti-hyperlipidemic activity was studied by measuring the levels of serum lipids and lipoproteins. Phytochemical analysis of active fraction showed the presence of flavonoids, glycosides and phenols. Biological testing of the active fraction demonstrated a significant antidiabetic activity by reducing the elevated blood glucose levels and glycosylated hemoglobin, improving hyperlipidemia and restoring the insulin levels in treated experimental induced diabetic rats. Further elucidation of mechanism of action showed improvement in the hepatic carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes after the treatment. Our present investigation suggests that active fraction of ethanolic extract of bark of P. santalinus decreases streptozotocin induced hyperglycemia by increasing glycolysis and decreasing gluconeogenesis. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Enzyme activity assay of glycoprotein enzymes based on a boronate affinity molecularly imprinted 96-well microplate.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhen

    2014-12-16

    Enzyme activity assay is an important method in clinical diagnostics. However, conventional enzyme activity assay suffers from apparent interference from the sample matrix. Herein, we present a new format of enzyme activity assay that can effectively eliminate the effects of the sample matrix. The key is a 96-well microplate modified with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) prepared according to a newly proposed method called boronate affinity-based oriented surface imprinting. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a glycoprotein enzyme that has been routinely used as an indicator for several diseases in clinical tests, was taken as a representative target enzyme. The prepared MIP exhibited strong affinity toward the template enzyme (with a dissociation constant of 10(-10) M) as well as superb tolerance for interference. Thus, the enzyme molecules in a complicated sample matrix could be specifically captured and cleaned up for enzyme activity assay, which eliminated the interference from the sample matrix. On the other hand, because the boronate affinity MIP could well retain the enzymatic activity of glycoprotein enzymes, the enzyme captured by the MIP was directly used for activity assay. Thus, additional assay time and possible enzyme or activity loss due to an enzyme release step required by other methods were avoided. Assay of ALP in human serum was successfully demonstrated, suggesting a promising prospect of the proposed method in real-world applications.

  9. Lycopene attenuated hepatic tumorigenesis via differential mechanisms depending on carotenoid cleavage enzyme in mice.

    PubMed

    Ip, Blanche C; Liu, Chun; Ausman, Lynne M; von Lintig, Johannes; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2014-12-01

    Obesity is associated with increased liver cancer risks and mortality. We recently showed that apo-10'-lycopenoic acid, a lycopene metabolite generated by beta-carotene-9',10'-oxygenase (BCO2), inhibited carcinogen-initiated, high-fat diet (HFD)-promoted liver inflammation, and hepatic tumorigenesis development. The present investigation examined the outstanding question of whether lycopene could suppress HFD-promoted hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression, and if BCO2 expression is important using BCO2-knockout (BCO2-KO) and wild-type male mice. Results showed that lycopene supplementation (100 mg/kg diet) for 24 weeks resulted in comparable accumulation of hepatic lycopene (19.4 vs. 18.2 nmol/g) and had similar effects on suppressing HFD-promoted HCC incidence (19% vs. 20%) and multiplicity (58% vs. 62%) in wild-type and BCO2-KO mice, respectively. Intriguingly, lycopene chemopreventive effects in wild-type mice were associated with reduced hepatic proinflammatory signaling (phosphorylation of NK-κB p65 and STAT3; IL6 protein) and inflammatory foci. In contrast, the protective effects of lycopene in BCO2-KO but not in wild-type mice were associated with reduced hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated unfolded protein response (ER(UPR)), through decreasing ER(UPR)-mediated protein kinase RNA-activated like kinase-eukaryotic initiation factor 2α activation, and inositol requiring 1α-X-box-binding protein 1 signaling. Lycopene supplementation in BCO2-KO mice suppressed oncogenic signals, including Met mRNA, β-catenin protein, and mTOR complex 1 activation, which was associated with increased hepatic microRNA (miR)-199a/b and miR214 levels. These results provided novel experimental evidence that dietary lycopene can prevent HFD-promoted HCC incidence and multiplicity in mice, and may elicit different mechanisms depending on BCO2 expression. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Identification of protons position in acid-base enzyme catalyzed reactions: the hepatitis C viral NS3 protease.

    PubMed

    Shokhen, Michael; Albeck, Amnon

    2004-05-01

    General acid-base catalysis is a key element of the catalytic activity of most enzymes. Therefore, any explicit molecular modeling of enzyme-catalyzed chemical reactions requires correct identification of protons location on the catalytic groups. In this work, we apply our quantum mechanical/self-consistent reaction field in virtual solvent [QM/SCRF(VS)] method for identification of the position of protons shared by the enzyme catalytic groups and the polar groups of the inhibitor in a covalent tetrahedral complex (TC) of the hepatitis C virus NS3 protease with a peptidyl alpha-ketoacid inhibitor. To identify the relevant protonation states, we have analyzed relative stabilities of R and S configurations of the TC that depend on the specific proton distribution over the polar groups and correlated it with experimental NMR and X-ray crystallography data, both at low and neutral pH ranges. The tentative assignment of the single resonance in the (13)C NMR spectrum of the hemiketal carbon at physiological pH to the S configuration of TC is confirmed. Both R and S configurations are equally stable at acidic pH in our modeling, in good agreement with the (13)C NMR observation. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Monovalent Cation Activation of the Radical SAM Enzyme Pyruvate Formate-Lyase Activating Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Shisler, Krista A; Hutcheson, Rachel U; Horitani, Masaki; Duschene, Kaitlin S; Crain, Adam V; Byer, Amanda S; Shepard, Eric M; Rasmussen, Ashley; Yang, Jian; Broderick, William E; Vey, Jessica L; Drennan, Catherine L; Hoffman, Brian M; Broderick, Joan B

    2017-08-30

    Pyruvate formate-lyase activating enzyme (PFL-AE) is a radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzyme that installs a catalytically essential glycyl radical on pyruvate formate-lyase. We show that PFL-AE binds a catalytically essential monovalent cation at its active site, yet another parallel with B12 enzymes, and we characterize this cation site by a combination of structural, biochemical, and spectroscopic approaches. Refinement of the PFL-AE crystal structure reveals Na(+) as the most likely ion present in the solved structures, and pulsed electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) demonstrates that the same cation site is occupied by (23)Na in the solution state of the as-isolated enzyme. A SAM carboxylate-oxygen is an M(+) ligand, and EPR and circular dichroism spectroscopies reveal that both the site occupancy and the identity of the cation perturb the electronic properties of the SAM-chelated iron-sulfur cluster. ENDOR studies of the PFL-AE/[(13)C-methyl]-SAM complex show that the target sulfonium positioning varies with the cation, while the observation of an isotropic hyperfine coupling to the cation by ENDOR measurements establishes its intimate, SAM-mediated interaction with the cluster. This monovalent cation site controls enzyme activity: (i) PFL-AE in the absence of any simple monovalent cations has little-no activity; and (ii) among monocations, going down Group 1 of the periodic table from Li(+) to Cs(+), PFL-AE activity sharply maximizes at K(+), with NH4(+) closely matching the efficacy of K(+). PFL-AE is thus a type I M(+)-activated enzyme whose M(+) controls reactivity by interactions with the cosubstrate, SAM, which is bound to the catalytic iron-sulfur cluster.

  12. High-Throughput Analysis of Enzyme Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoxin

    2007-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) techniques have been applied to many research fields nowadays. Robot microarray printing technique and automation microtiter handling technique allows HTS performing in both heterogeneous and homogeneous formats, with minimal sample required for each assay element. In this dissertation, new HTS techniques for enzyme activity analysis were developed. First, patterns of immobilized enzyme on nylon screen were detected by multiplexed capillary system. The imaging resolution is limited by the outer diameter of the capillaries. In order to get finer images, capillaries with smaller outer diameters can be used to form the imaging probe. Application of capillary electrophoresis allows separation of the product from the substrate in the reaction mixture, so that the product doesn't have to have different optical properties with the substrate. UV absorption detection allows almost universal detection for organic molecules. Thus, no modifications of either the substrate or the product molecules are necessary. This technique has the potential to be used in screening of local distribution variations of specific bio-molecules in a tissue or in screening of multiple immobilized catalysts. Another high-throughput screening technique is developed by directly monitoring the light intensity of the immobilized-catalyst surface using a scientific charge-coupled device (CCD). Briefly, the surface of enzyme microarray is focused onto a scientific CCD using an objective lens. By carefully choosing the detection wavelength, generation of product on an enzyme spot can be seen by the CCD. Analyzing the light intensity change over time on an enzyme spot can give information of reaction rate. The same microarray can be used for many times. Thus, high-throughput kinetic studies of hundreds of catalytic reactions are made possible. At last, we studied the fluorescence emission spectra of ADP and obtained the detection limits for ADP under three different

  13. Effect of stress on hepatic 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity and its influence on carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Altuna, María Eugenia; Lelli, Sandra Marcela; San Martín de Viale, Leonor C; Damasco, María Cristina

    2006-10-01

    Stress activates the synthesis and secretion of catecholamines and adrenal glucocorticoids, increasing their circulating levels. In vivo, hepatic 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD1) stimulates the shift of 11-dehydrocorticosterone to corticosterone, enhancing active glucocorticoids at tissue level. We studied the effect of 3 types of stress, 1 induced by bucogastric overload with 200 mmol/L HCl causing metabolic acidosis (HCl), the second induced by bucogastric overload with 0.45% NaCl (NaCl), and the third induced by simulated overload (cannula), on the kinetics of hepatic HSD1 of rats and their influence on the activity of the gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, glycemia, and glycogen deposition. Compared with unstressed controls, all types of stress significantly increased HSD1 activity (146% cannula, 130% NaCl, and 253% HCl), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity (51% cannula, 48% NaCl, and 86% HCl), and glycemia (29% cannula, 30% NaCl, and 41% HCl), but decreased hepatic glycogen (68% cannula, 68% NaCl, and 78% HCl). Owing to these results, we suggest the following events occur when stress is induced: an increase in hepatic HSD1 activity, augmented active glucocorticoid levels, increased gluconeogenesis, and glycemia. Also involved are the multiple events indirectly related to glucocorticoids, which lead to the depletion of hepatic glycogen deposits, thereby contributing to increased glycemia. This new approach shows that stress increments the activity of hepatic HSD1 and suggests that this enzyme could be involved in the development of the Metabolic Syndrome.

  14. Modulation of insulin degrading enzyme activity and liver cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, Olga; von Loeffelholz, Christian; Ilkavets, Iryna; Sticht, Carsten; Zhuk, Sergei; Murahovschi, Veronica; Lukowski, Sonja; Döcke, Stephanie; Kriebel, Jennifer; de las Heras Gala, Tonia; Malashicheva, Anna; Kostareva, Anna; Lock, Johan F; Stockmann, Martin; Grallert, Harald; Gretz, Norbert; Dooley, Steven; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Rudovich, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM), insulin therapy, and hyperinsulinemia are independent risk factors of liver cancer. Recently, the use of a novel inhibitor of insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) was proposed as a new therapeutic strategy in T2DM. However, IDE inhibition might stimulate liver cell proliferation via increased intracellular insulin concentration. The aim of this study was to characterize effects of inhibition of IDE activity in HepG2 hepatoma cells and to analyze liver specific expression of IDE in subjects with T2DM. HepG2 cells were treated with 10 nM insulin for 24 h with or without inhibition of IDE activity using IDE RNAi, and cell transcriptome and proliferation rate were analyzed. Human liver samples (n = 22) were used for the gene expression profiling by microarrays. In HepG2 cells, IDE knockdown changed expression of genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis pathways. Proliferation rate was lower in IDE knockdown cells than in controls. Microarray analysis revealed the decrease of hepatic IDE expression in subjects with T2DM accompanied by the downregulation of the p53-dependent genes FAS and CCNG2, but not by the upregulation of proliferation markers MKI67, MCM2 and PCNA. Similar results were found in the liver microarray dataset from GEO Profiles database. In conclusion, IDE expression is decreased in liver of subjects with T2DM which is accompanied by the dysregulation of p53 pathway. Prolonged use of IDE inhibitors for T2DM treatment should be carefully tested in animal studies regarding its potential effect on hepatic tumorigenesis.

  15. Modulation of insulin degrading enzyme activity and liver cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pivovarova, Olga; von Loeffelholz, Christian; Ilkavets, Iryna; Sticht, Carsten; Zhuk, Sergei; Murahovschi, Veronica; Lukowski, Sonja; Döcke, Stephanie; Kriebel, Jennifer; de las Heras Gala, Tonia; Malashicheva, Anna; Kostareva, Anna; Lock, Johan F; Stockmann, Martin; Grallert, Harald; Gretz, Norbert; Dooley, Steven; Pfeiffer, Andreas FH; Rudovich, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM), insulin therapy, and hyperinsulinemia are independent risk factors of liver cancer. Recently, the use of a novel inhibitor of insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) was proposed as a new therapeutic strategy in T2DM. However, IDE inhibition might stimulate liver cell proliferation via increased intracellular insulin concentration. The aim of this study was to characterize effects of inhibition of IDE activity in HepG2 hepatoma cells and to analyze liver specific expression of IDE in subjects with T2DM. HepG2 cells were treated with 10 nM insulin for 24 h with or without inhibition of IDE activity using IDE RNAi, and cell transcriptome and proliferation rate were analyzed. Human liver samples (n = 22) were used for the gene expression profiling by microarrays. In HepG2 cells, IDE knockdown changed expression of genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis pathways. Proliferation rate was lower in IDE knockdown cells than in controls. Microarray analysis revealed the decrease of hepatic IDE expression in subjects with T2DM accompanied by the downregulation of the p53-dependent genes FAS and CCNG2, but not by the upregulation of proliferation markers MKI67, MCM2 and PCNA. Similar results were found in the liver microarray dataset from GEO Profiles database. In conclusion, IDE expression is decreased in liver of subjects with T2DM which is accompanied by the dysregulation of p53 pathway. Prolonged use of IDE inhibitors for T2DM treatment should be carefully tested in animal studies regarding its potential effect on hepatic tumorigenesis. PMID:25945652

  16. Characterization of human hepatic and extrahepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes involved in the metabolism of classic cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Anna; Lichti, Cheryl F; Prather, Paul L; Zielinska, Agnieszka K; Bratton, Stacie M; Gallus-Zawada, Anna; Finel, Moshe; Miller, Grover P; Radomińska-Pandya, Anna; Moran, Jeffery H

    2009-07-01

    Tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the primary psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, is subject to cytochrome P450 oxidation and subsequent UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)-dependent glucuronidation. Many studies have shown that CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 are the primary enzymes responsible for these cytochrome P450-dependent oxidations, but little work has been done to characterize phase II metabolic pathways. In this study, we test the hypothesis that there are specific human UGTs responsible for classic cannabinoid metabolism. The activities of 12 human recombinant UGTs toward classic cannabinoids [cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD), (-)-Delta(8)-THC, (-)-Delta(9)-THC, (+/-)-11-hydroxy-Delta(9)-THC (THC-OH), and (-)-11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-THC (THC-COOH)] were evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and labeling assays. Despite activity by UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, and 2B7 toward CBN, CBD, THC-OH, and THC-COOH, only selected UGTs demonstrate sufficient activity for further characterization of steady-state kinetics. CBN was the most recognized substrate as evidenced by activities from hepatic UGT1A9 and extrahepatic UGT1A7, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10. These results may reflect the introduction of an aromatic ring to Delta(9)-THC, leading to favorable pi stacking with phenylalanines in the UGT active site. Likewise, oxidation of Delta(9)-THC to THC-OH results in UGT1A9 and UGT1A10 activity toward the cannabinoid. Further oxidation to THC-COOH surprisingly leads to a loss in metabolism by UGT1A9 and UGT1A10, while creating a substrate recognized by UGT1A1 and UGT1A3. The resulting glucuronide of THC-COOH is the main metabolite found in urine, and thus these hepatic enzymes play a critical role in the metabolic clearance of cannabinoids. Taken together, glucuronidation of cannabinoids depends on upstream processing including enzymes such as CYP2C9 and CYP3A4.

  17. Characterization of Human Hepatic and Extrahepatic UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase Enzymes Involved in the Metabolism of Classic Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Anna; Lichti, Cheryl F.; Prather, Paul L.; Zielinska, Agnieszka K.; Bratton, Stacie M.; Gallus-Zawada, Anna; Finel, Moshe; Miller, Grover P.; Radomińska-Pandya, Anna; Moran, Jeffery H.

    2009-01-01

    Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), the primary psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, is subject to cytochrome P450 oxidation and subsequent UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)-dependent glucuronidation. Many studies have shown that CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 are the primary enzymes responsible for these cytochrome P450-dependent oxidations, but little work has been done to characterize phase II metabolic pathways. In this study, we test the hypothesis that there are specific human UGTs responsible for classic cannabinoid metabolism. The activities of 12 human recombinant UGTs toward classic cannabinoids [cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD), (–)-Δ8-THC, (–)-Δ9-THC, (±)-11-hydroxy-Δ9-THC (THC-OH), and (–)-11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-THC (THC-COOH)] were evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and labeling assays. Despite activity by UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, and 2B7 toward CBN, CBD, THC-OH, and THC-COOH, only selected UGTs demonstrate sufficient activity for further characterization of steady-state kinetics. CBN was the most recognized substrate as evidenced by activities from hepatic UGT1A9 and extrahepatic UGT1A7, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10. These results may reflect the introduction of an aromatic ring to Δ9-THC, leading to favorable π stacking with phenylalanines in the UGT active site. Likewise, oxidation of Δ9-THC to THC-OH results in UGT1A9 and UGT1A10 activity toward the cannabinoid. Further oxidation to THC-COOH surprisingly leads to a loss in metabolism by UGT1A9 and UGT1A10, while creating a substrate recognized by UGT1A1 and UGT1A3. The resulting glucuronide of THC-COOH is the main metabolite found in urine, and thus these hepatic enzymes play a critical role in the metabolic clearance of cannabinoids. Taken together, glucuronidation of cannabinoids depends on upstream processing including enzymes such as CYP2C9 and CYP3A4. PMID:19339377

  18. Lymphocyte activation and hepatic cellular infiltration in immunocompetent mice infected by dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsuen-Chin; Lai, Show-Yun; Sung, Jui-Min; Lee, Shu-Hwae; Lin, Yu-Chin; Wang, Wei-Kung; Chen, Yee-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; King, Chwan-Chuen; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A

    2004-07-01

    Activation and expansion of dengue virus-specific T cells and abnormal liver functions in dengue patients have been documented. However, it remains to be determined whether T cells are involved in the pathogenic mechanism of dengue virus infection. In this study, immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice were employed to study dengue virus-induced T cell activation. Mice were inoculated with 10(8) PFU dengue virus serotype 2 strain 16681 by the intravenous route. Dengue viral core RNA was detected by RT-PCR in mouse serum, liver, spleen, and brain at different time points after infection. Splenic T cells were activated as evidenced by their expression of CD69 and O-glycosylated CD43 at as early as day 3 after infection. Splenic T cell expression of O-glycosylated CD43 and IFN-gamma production coordinately peaked at day 5. Coincided with the peak of splenic T cell activation was hepatic lymphocyte infiltration and elevation of liver enzymes. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the infiltrating CD8(+) T cell to CD4(+) T cell ratio was 5/3. After a second inoculation of dengue virus, hepatic T cell infiltration and liver enzyme levels increased sharply. The infiltrating hepatic CD8(+) T cell to CD4(+) T cell ratio increased to 5.8/1. A strong correlation was found between T cell activation and hepatic cellular infiltration in immunocompetent mice infected with dengue virus. The kinetics of liver enzyme elevation also correlated with that of T cell activation. These data suggest a relationship between T cell infiltration and elevation of liver enzymes.

  19. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Activity in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Mohammad Reza; Handjani, Farhad; Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Kalafi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Background. Alopecia areata (AA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the hair follicle. The exact pathogenesis of AA remains unknown, although recent studies support a T-cell mediated autoimmune process. On the other hand, some studies have proposed that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) may play a role in autoimmunity. Therefore, we assessed serum activity of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), a component of this system, in AA. Methods. ACE activity was measured in the sera of 19 patients with AA and 16 healthy control subjects. In addition, the relationship between severity and duration of the disease and ACE activity was evaluated. Results. Serum ACE activity was higher in the patient group (55.81 U/L) compared to the control group (46.41 U/L), but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.085). Also, there was no correlation between ACE activity and severity (P = 0.13) and duration of disease (P = 0.25) in the patient group. Conclusion. The increased serum ACE activity found in this study may demonstrate local involvement of the RAAS in the pathogenesis of AA. Assessment of ACE in a study with a larger sample size as well as in tissue samples is recommended in order to further evaluate the possible role of RAAS in AA. PMID:25349723

  20. CLOCK Regulates Circadian Rhythms of Hepatic Glycogen Synthesis through Transcriptional Activation of Gys2*

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Ryosuke; Oishi, Katsutaka; Ishida, Norio

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic glycogen content is important for glucose homeostasis and exhibits robust circadian rhythms that peak at the end of the active phase in mammals. The activities of the rate-limiting enzymes for glycogenesis and glycogenolysis also show circadian rhythms, and the balance between them forms the circadian rhythm of the hepatic glycogen content. However, no direct evidence has yet implicated the circadian clock in the regulation of glycogen metabolism at the molecular level. We show here that a Clock gene mutation damps the circadian rhythm of the hepatic glycogen content, as well as the circadian mRNA and protein expression of Gys2 (glycogen synthase 2), which is the rate-limiting enzyme of glycogenesis in the liver. Transient reporter assays revealed that CLOCK drives the transcriptional activation of Gys2 via two tandemly located E-boxes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of liver tissues revealed that CLOCK binds to these E-box elements in vivo, and real time reporter assays showed that these elements are sufficient for circadian Gys2 expression in vitro. Thus, CLOCK regulates the circadian rhythms of hepatic glycogen synthesis through transcriptional activation of Gys2. PMID:20430893

  1. Coleus forskohlii extract induces hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes in mice.

    PubMed

    Virgona, Nantiga; Yokotani, Kaori; Yamazaki, Yuko; Shimura, Fumio; Chiba, Tsuyoshi; Taki, Yuko; Yamada, Shizuo; Shinozuka, Kazumasa; Murata, Masatsune; Umegaki, Keizo

    2012-03-01

    Coleus forskohlii root extract (CFE) is popular for use as a weight loss dietary supplement. In this study, the influence of standardized CFE containing 10% active component forskolin on the hepatic drug metabolizing system was investigated to evaluate the safety through its drug interaction potential. Male ICR mice were fed AIN93G-based diets containing 0-5% CFE or 0.05% pure forskolin for 2-3 weeks. Intake of two different sources of 0.5% CFE significantly increased the relative liver weight, total content of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) and induced CYPs (especially 2B, 2C, 3A types) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities. CFE significantly increased mRNA expression of CYPs and GST with dose related responses. However, unlike the CFE, intake of 0.05% pure forskolin was found to be associated with only weak induction in CYP3A and GST activities with no significant increases in relative liver weight, total hepatic content or other CYPs activities. The inductions of CYPs and GST by CFE were observed at 1 week of feeding and rapidly recovered by discontinuation of CFE. These results indicated the induction potential of CFE on CYPs, and that this effect was predominantly due to other, as yet unidentified constituents, and not forskolin contained in CFE. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Liver Enzymes in Children with beta-Thalassemia Major: Correlation with Iron Overload and Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Khaled M.; Ibrahim, Ola M.; Kaddah, Ahmed M.; Boseila, Samia; Ismail, Leila Abu; Hamid, May M. Abdel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Beta Thalassemia is the most common chronic hemolytic anemia in Egypt (85.1%) with an estimated carrier rate of 9-10.2%. Injury to the liver, whether acute or chronic, eventually results in an increase in serum concentrations of Alanine transaminase (ALT) and Aspartate transaminase (AST). AIM: Evaluating the potentiating effect of iron overload & viral hepatitis infection on the liver enzymes. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty (80) thalassemia major patients were studied with respect to liver enzymes, ferritin, transferrin saturation, HBsAg, anti-HCV antibody and HCV-PCR for anti-HCV positive patients. RESULTS: Fifty % of the patients were anti-HCV positive and 55% of them were HCV-PCR positive. Patients with elevated ALT and AST levels had significantly higher mean serum ferritin than those with normal levels. Anti-HCV positive patients had higher mean serum ferritin, serum ALT, AST and GGT levels and higher age and duration of blood transfusion than the negative group. HCV-PCR positive patients had higher mean serum ferritin and serum ALT and also higher age and duration of blood transfusion than the negative group. CONCLUSION: Iron overload is a main leading cause of elevated liver enzymes, and presence of HCV infection is significantly related to the increased iron overload. PMID:27275237

  3. Exploration of the spontaneous fluctuating activity of single enzyme molecules.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Anne; Maarleveld, Timo R; Bruggeman, Frank J

    2013-09-02

    Single enzyme molecules display inevitable, stochastic fluctuations in their catalytic activity. In metabolism, for instance, the stochastic activity of individual enzymes is averaged out due to their high copy numbers per single cell. However, many processes inside cells rely on single enzyme activity, such as transcription, replication, translation, and histone modifications. Here we introduce the main theoretical concepts of stochastic single-enzyme activity starting from the Michaelis-Menten enzyme mechanism. Next, we discuss stochasticity of multi-substrate enzymes, of enzymes and receptors with multiple conformational states and finally, how fluctuations in receptor activity arise from fluctuations in signal concentration. This paper aims to introduce the exciting field of single-molecule enzyme kinetics and stochasticity to a wider audience of biochemists and systems biologists. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Contaminants in eggs of colonial waterbirds and hepatic cytochrome P450 enzyme levels in pipped tern embryos, Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Melancon, M.J.; Hoffman, D.J.; Henny, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    Eggs of Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri) collected in 1991 from nesting colonies on Crescent Island (Columbia River) and the Potholes Reservoir in south central Washington generally contained low residues of organochlorine pesticides and metabolites, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Hepatic cytochrome P450 enzyme activity in pipped embryos of Forster's terns from the two colonies seemed unaffected by contaminants. At Crescent Island, examination of 23 Forster's tern eggs with large embryos (19 viable [10 pipped] and four dead [two pipped]) revealed developmental abnormalities in two viable pipped embryos (missing maxilla and deformed pelvic girdle) and a viable prepipping embryos (shortened beak). Our limited sample sizes and number of compounds analyzed preclude us from determining whether or not the abnormalities are related to contaminants. No abnormalities were noted in 10 pipped eggs (nine viable and one dead at collection) of Forster's terns collected from the Potholes Reservoir colony. Eggs of Caspian terns (Sterna caspia) collected from Crescent Island in 1991 also contained generally low residues of contaminants, only one developmental abnormality was noted, and limited data indicated that cytochrome P450 enzyme activity apparently was unaffected by contaminants. Organochlorine contaminants were generally low in addled eggs of American white pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) collected from Crescent Island in 1994

  5. Contaminants in eggs of colonial waterbirds and hepatic cytochrome P450 enzyme levels in pipped tern embryos, Washington State.

    PubMed

    Blus, L J; Melancon, M J; Hoffman, D J; Henny, C J

    1998-10-01

    Eggs of Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri) collected in 1991 from nesting colonies on Crescent Island (Columbia River) and the Potholes Reservoir in south central Washington generally contained low residues of organochlorine pesticides and metabolites, 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Hepatic cytochrome P450 enzyme activity in pipped embryos of Forster's terns from the two colonies seemed unaffected by contaminants. At Crescent Island, examination of 23 Forster's tern eggs with large embryos (19 viable [10 pipped] and four dead [two pipped]) revealed developmental abnormalities in two viable pipped embryos (missing maxilla and deformed pelvic girdle) and a viable prepipping embryo (shortened beak). Our limited sample sizes and number of compounds analyzed preclude us from determining whether or not the abnormalities are related to contaminants. No abnormalities were noted in 10 pipped eggs (nine viable and one dead at collection) of Forster's terns collected from the Potholes Reservoir colony. Eggs of Caspian terns (Sterna caspia) collected from Crescent Island in 1991 also contained generally low residues of contaminants, only one developmental abnormality was noted, and limited data indicated that cytochrome P450 enzyme activity apparently was unaffected by contaminants. Organochlorine contaminants were generally low in addled eggs of American white pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) collected from Crescent Island in 1994.

  6. Myocardial aminoacyl-transfer-ribonucleic acid synthetase and aminoacyl-transferring enzyme activity

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, K.; Harris, P.

    1972-01-01

    The properties of cytoplasmic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and aminoacyl-transferring enzymes in the myocardium were examined and methods for the assay of the activity of these enzyme systems were developed. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase activity was measured from the rate of incorporation of 14C-labelled amino acid into aminoacyl-tRNA. Transferase activity was measured from the rate of incorporation of amino[14C]acyl-tRNA into protein in the presence of a standard preparation of hepatic ribosomes. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase activity is labile once the heart has been homogenized, whereas transferase activity is stable. The source of energy for synthetase activity is ATP; that for transferase is GTP. Transferase activity was inhibited by puromycin and stimulated by dithiothreitol, whereas synthetase activity was unaffected. PMID:5071178

  7. [Interrelation between the activity of hepatitis, liver fibrosis and immune status in children with chronic hepatitis B and C].

    PubMed

    Filimonov, P N; Gavrilova, N I; Ivanov, G Ia; Shkrupiĭ, V A

    2004-01-01

    The lesion of the liver in viral hepatitis was found to depend on the state of the immune system. Relationship between the content of lymphocyte subpopulations (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD20+) in the blood and immunoglobulins (IgG, IgM, IgA) with parameters of semi-quantitative evaluation of the activity of hepatitis and the stage of liver fibrosis in children with chronic virus hepatitis B, C, B + C was studied. The characteristic feature of all hepatitis was a decrease in the number of T lymphocytes CD4+ below the normal level and an increase in the content of B lymphocytes. The correlation between the morphological activity of hepatitis and the amount of T lymphocytes CD8+ was established only in chronic hepatitis B. In chronic hepatitis B and B + C the absolute amount of blood lymphocytes decreased with the increase of the age of the patients, but in chronic hepatitis B this was accompanied by the decrease of the morphological activity of hepatitis and in hepatitis B + C by its increase. The amount of lymphocytes CD4+ rose with the increase of liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B. In children with chronic hepatitis C and B + C the amount of blood lymphocytes was found to be unrelated to the morphological activity of hepatitis.

  8. Hepatic SATB1 induces paracrine activation of hepatic stellate cells and is upregulated by HBx

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jin; Tu, Wei; Han, Jian; He, Jiayi; Liu, Jingmei; Han, Ping; Wang, Yunwu; Li, Mengke; Liu, Mei; Liao, Jiazhi; Tian, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver diseases, but its involvement in hepatic fibrogenesis remains unclear. Special AT-rich binding protein 1 (SATB1) has been implicated in reprogramming chromatin organization and transcription profiles in many cancers and non-cancer-related conditions. We found that hepatic SATB1 expression was significantly up-regulated in fibrotic tissues from chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients and HBV transgenic (HBV-Tg) mouse model. Knockdown of SATB1 in the liver significantly alleviated CCl4-induced fibrosis in HBV-Tg mouse model. Moreover, we suggested HBV encoded x protein (HBx) induced SATB1 expression through activation of JNK and ERK pathways. Enforced expression of SATB1 in hepatocytes promoted the activation and proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) by secretion of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and platelet derived growth factor-A (PDGF-AA). Our findings demonstrated that HBx upregulated hepatic SATB1 which exerted pro-fibrotic effects by paracrine activation of stellate cells in HBV-related fibrosis. PMID:27883059

  9. Gene Expression Variability in Human Hepatic Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lun; Price, Elvin T.; Chang, Ching-Wei; Li, Yan; Huang, Ying; Guo, Li-Wu; Guo, Yongli; Kaput, Jim; Shi, Leming; Ning, Baitang

    2013-01-01

    Interindividual variability in the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (DMETs) in human liver may contribute to interindividual differences in drug efficacy and adverse reactions. Published studies that analyzed variability in the expression of DMET genes were limited by sample sizes and the number of genes profiled. We systematically analyzed the expression of 374 DMETs from a microarray data set consisting of gene expression profiles derived from 427 human liver samples. The standard deviation of interindividual expression for DMET genes was much higher than that for non-DMET genes. The 20 DMET genes with the largest variability in the expression provided examples of the interindividual variation. Gene expression data were also analyzed using network analysis methods, which delineates the similarities of biological functionalities and regulation mechanisms for these highly variable DMET genes. Expression variability of human hepatic DMET genes may affect drug-gene interactions and disease susceptibility, with concomitant clinical implications. PMID:23637747

  10. Effects of the Activation of Three Major Hepatic Akt Substrates on Glucose Metabolism in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Gota; Inoue, Ikuo; Suzuki, Tokuko; Sumita, Takashi; Inukai, Kouichi; Katayama, Shigehiro; Awata, Takuya; Yamada, Tetsuya; Asano, Tomoichiro; Katagiri, Hideki; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Shimada, Akira; Ono, Hiraku

    2017-08-01

    Insulin suppresses glucose output from the liver via Akt activation; however, which substrate of Akt plays the major role in transducing this effect is unclear. We tested the postnatal expression of Akt-unresponsive, constitutively active mutants of three major Akt substrates widely considered to regulate glucose metabolism [i.e., FoxO1, PGC1α, and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β)] using adenoviral gene delivery to the mouse liver. We performed physiological hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies using these mice under awake and nonrestrained conditions with blood sampling via an arterial catheter. Hepatic expression of constitutively active FoxO1 induced significant hepatic and systemic insulin resistance. However, neither the expression of constitutively active PGC1α nor that of GSK3β significantly changed insulin sensitivity. Simultaneous expression of all three mutants together induced no further insulin resistance compared with that of the FoxO1 mutant. The glycogen content in the liver was significantly reduced by constitutively active GSK3β expression. In cultured hepatocytes, constitutively active PGC1α induced markedly stronger transcriptional enhancement of gluconeogenic key enzymes than did constitutively active FoxO1. From these results, we conclude that FoxO1 has the most prominent role in transducing insulin's effect downstream from Akt to suppress hepatic glucose output, involving mechanisms independent of the transcriptional regulation of key gluconeogenic enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  11. [Hepatitis non-A, non-B: epidemiological significance in acute viral hepatitis and chronic active hepatitis of hepatological consultation].

    PubMed

    Jmelnitzky, A C; Basualdo, J A; Belloni, P O; Ponce de León, H H; García, C; Curciarello, J

    1987-01-01

    157 acute viral hepatitis and 60 chronic active ones have been analyzed focusing on NANB etiology. HAV was implicated in 36.3% of the hole acute viral hepatitis sample, HBV in 29.3%, and HNANBV was presumed as etiology in 31.2%, 5 patients (3.2%) had acute infection by HAV, on previous one by HBV, except for Epstein-Barr virus, no other test for viruses were determined (CMV, HSV, etc.). Male/female ratio was 1.4:1, 1.9:1, and 1.4:1 for HAV, HBV and HNANBV acute hepatitis respectively; HAV was the main etiology in the 0-9 age group (72.2%) although it only represents 11.5% of the sample; small occurrence of HAV hepatitis were found in patients over 40 (8.8%); HBV was clearly prevalent in patients over 50 (65.2%); the highest concentration of NANB etiology was found between 20-39 years old, but it was represented in all age-groups. Out of 49 NANB acute hepatitis, 12.2% had related transfusional antecedents, 12.2% belonged to health care worker group, and 4.1% had a close family NANB hepatitis contact; 71.5% had no reported antecedent. Viral source was presumably implicated in 75.0% of chronic active hepatitis, 25.0% attributable to HNANBV. Results seem not feasible to transfer to general population due to the facts that most patients were of specialized consult, and pediatric assistance is unusual to the authors practice.

  12. Effects of special blue fluorescent light on hepatic mixed-function oxidase activity in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.R.; Yeary, R.A.; Randall, G.

    1981-01-01

    Phototherapy has been widely used in the treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Recent reports, however, have indicated that fluorescent light may be toxic and mutagenic to mammalian cells. these findings suggest possible long-term side effects with the use of phototherapy. This study was undertaken to determine the effects of phototherapy on hepatic microsomal enzyme activity. The exposure of Sprague-Dawley and Gunn rats to special blue fluorescent light at an average irradiance of 1,200 microW/cm2 resulted in no significant changes in liver microsomal enzyme activity for aniline hydroxylase, p-nitroanisole-O-demethylase, ethylmorphine-N-demethylase, cytochrome c reductase or the quantity of cytochrome P-450. A significant decrease in aniline hydroxylase and p-nitroanisole-O-demethylase activity was observed when liver microsomes were exposed in vitro to special blue fluorescent light. Photoactivated bilirubin did not effect the activity of the mixed-function oxidase enzymes measured under the conditions of this study.

  13. Gene expression profiling and pathway network analysis of hepatic metabolic enzymes targeted by baicalein.

    PubMed

    Qin, Si; Chen, Jihua; Tanigawa, Shunsuke; Hou, De-Xing

    2012-03-06

    Baicalein is a flavone originally isolated from the roots of traditional Chinese medicinal herb, Scutellaria baicalensis, which has been proved as a promising chemopreventive compound for many chronic human diseases. The present study aimed to clarify the molecular mechanism targeted by baicalein. Gene expression profiling of HepG2 cells treated with baicalein was carried out, using the Affymetrix 42K oligonucleotide microarray in the present study. Microarray data analyzed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), further study performed by real time PCR, reporter gene assay, and Western blot. Among total 42K gene probes, baicalein treatment up-regulated the signals of 440 gene probes (1.04% of total gene probes) and down-regulated signals of 254 gene probes (0.6% of total gene probes) by ≥2-fold. These genes were categorized into 35 groups and hit for biological processes, molecular functions, and signaling pathways. The network and pathway analyses of these data further revealed that an Nrf2 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2)-mediated ARE (antioxidant response element) pathway is involved in baicalein-induced gene expression of hepatic metabolic enzymes. The representative enzymes involved in Nrf2/ARE pathway were further confirmed at mRNA level by real time PCR and at protein level by Western blot analysis. Moreover, the ARE-reporter gene assay demonstrated that baicalein stimulated Nrf2-mediated ARE transactivation. Our results provide a comprehensive data for understanding the hepatic metabolism, bioactive role and the molecular mechanisms of baicalein. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Licochalcone A regulates hepatic lipid metabolism through activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Quan, Hai Yan; Kim, Soo Jung; Kim, Do Yeon; Jo, Hee Kyung; Kim, Go Woon; Chung, Sung Hyun

    2013-04-01

    Licochalcone A (LA) is a major phenolic ingredient of Glycyrrhiza plant. Although multiple pharmacological activities of LA have been reported, effect on hepatic lipid metabolism is unknown yet. The present study showed LA to suppress the hepatic triglyceride accumulation in HepG2 cells and ICR mice fed on a high fat diet (HFD). LA inhibited lipogenesis via suppression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c) and its target enzymes (stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1, fatty acid synthase and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase) transcription. In addition, LA up-regulated gene expression of proteins such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and fatty acid transporter (FAT/CD36), which are responsible for lipolysis and fatty acid transport, respectively. These effects were mediated through activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and were abrogated when HepG2 cells were treated with an AMPK inhibitor, compound C. To explore how LA activates AMPK, oxygen consumption rate and ATP levels were measured in HepG2 cells. LA significantly inhibited the mitochondrial respiration and ATP levels, suggesting that LA activated AMPK indirectly. In animal study, LA (5 and 10mg/kg) was orally administered to six-week-old mice once a day for 3 weeks. In vitro results were likely to hold true in vivo experiment, as LA markedly lowered the triglyceride levels and activated AMPK signaling pathway in the liver of ICR mice fed on a HFD. In conclusion, the current study suggests that LA suppressed hepatic triglyceride accumulation through modulation of AMPK-SREBP signaling pathway and thus LA may be a potential therapeutic agent for treating fatty liver disease.

  15. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... clotting problems or chronic liver disease. previous continue Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Although hep A is a ... does — through direct contact with infected body fluids. Hepatitis B and C are even more easily passed in ...

  16. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A if they've been vaccinated against it. Hepatitis B Hepatitis B is a more serious infection. It may lead ... of which cause severe illness and even death. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is transmitted from person to person ...

  17. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... a problem with the liver itself What Is Hepatitis A? Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is contagious, usually spreading to others ... objects contaminated by feces (poop) containing HAV. The hepatitis A vaccine has helped to make the infection rare ...

  18. Glycyl radical activating enzymes: structure, mechanism, and substrate interactions.

    PubMed

    Shisler, Krista A; Broderick, Joan B

    2014-03-15

    The glycyl radical enzyme activating enzymes (GRE-AEs) are a group of enzymes that belong to the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) superfamily and utilize a [4Fe-4S] cluster and SAM to catalyze H-atom abstraction from their substrate proteins. GRE-AEs activate homodimeric proteins known as glycyl radical enzymes (GREs) through the production of a glycyl radical. After activation, these GREs catalyze diverse reactions through the production of their own substrate radicals. The GRE-AE pyruvate formate lyase activating enzyme (PFL-AE) is extensively characterized and has provided insights into the active site structure of radical SAM enzymes including GRE-AEs, illustrating the nature of the interactions with their corresponding substrate GREs and external electron donors. This review will highlight research on PFL-AE and will also discuss a few GREs and their respective activating enzymes.

  19. Barley sprout extracts reduce hepatic lipid accumulation in ethanol-fed mice by activating hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Ji; Hwang, Su Hyeon; Jia, Yaoyao; Seo, Woo-Duck; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2017-11-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption leads to hepatic lipid accumulation and alcoholic fatty liver disease. Previously, we demonstrated that barley sprout extract, which contains saponarin as an active compound, reduces hepatic steatosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of barley sprout extracts (BSE) on hepatic lipid accumulation in a mouse model of alcoholic fatty liver disease. Seven-week-old C57BL/6 mice were fed an alcohol-containing diet (5% ethanol) and a low or high dose of BSE (100 or 200mg/kg body weight, respectively) for 10days. The high dose of BSE significantly decreased hepatic lipid accumulation compared with the ethanol-only control group. In the second animal study, mice were fed an alcohol-containing diet for 10days, followed by a 45% high-fat diet with oral administration of BSE (100 or 200mg/day/kg body weight) for 4weeks. Mice in both BSE-fed groups showed reduced hepatic steatosis. In the livers of mice fed BSE, phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was increased, and expression of hepatic autophagy markers was elevated. In cultured hepatocytes, BSE (200μg/mL) increased the rate of fatty acid oxidation and reduced that of fatty acid synthesis. Taken together, these findings suggest that BSE promotes degradation of lipid droplets and subsequent activation of fat oxidation by activating AMPK in the liver, thus protecting against development of hepatic steatosis in alcohol-fed mice. Saponarin, a major flavonoid in BSE and an activator of AMPK, increased the activity of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, which suggests that the reduction in hepatic triglyceride levels was mediated by this component of BSE. In conclusion, BSE ameliorated hepatic steatosis in a mouse model of ethanol-induced fatty liver by activating AMPK, an effect possibly mediated by the saponarin component. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Temperature and the catalytic activity of enzymes: a fresh understanding.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Roy M; Danson, Michael J

    2013-09-02

    The discovery of an additional step in the progression of an enzyme from the active to inactive state under the influence of temperature has led to a better match with experimental data for all enzymes that follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and to an increased understanding of the process. The new model of the process, the Equilibrium Model, describes an additional mechanism by which temperature affects the activity of enzymes, with implications for ecological, metabolic, structural, and applied studies of enzymes.

  1. Induction of hepatic CYP3A enzymes by pregnancy-related hormones: studies in human hepatocytes and hepatic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Ioannis; Grepper, Susan; Unadkat, Jashvant D

    2013-02-01

    CYP3A activity is induced by approximately 2-fold during the third trimester of human pregnancy. Placental growth hormone (PGH), estrogens (primarily 17β-estradiol), cortisol, and progesterone have the potential to modulate CYP3A activity. Therefore, we determined whether the elevated plasma concentrations of these hormones during pregnancy induce hepatic CYP3A expression. We incubated sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes (SCHH) from premenopausal female donors (n = 2) with the physiologic (unbound, 1× total) and the 10× total third trimester hormone plasma concentrations (individually and in combination) and determined their effect on CYP3A activity and the transcripts of CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and the respective hormone receptors (growth hormone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, and estrogen receptor alpha). Of all the hormones, cortisol was the most potent inducer of CYP3A activity and CYP3A4, CYP3A5 mRNA expression. The combination of PGH/growth hormone and cortisol induced CYP3A activity and expression significantly more than did cortisol alone. When incubated with the unbound or total plasma concentration of all the hormones, CYP3A activity in SCHH was induced to an extent comparable to that observed in vivo during the third trimester. These hormones had only a modest effect on the mRNA expression of the hormone receptors. The pattern of induction observed in SCHH was reproduced in HepaRG cells but not in HuH7/HepG2 cells. SCHH or HepaRG cells could be used to determine the mechanistic basis of CYP3A induction during pregnancy and to predict the magnitude of induction likely to be observed during the first and second trimesters, when phenotyping studies to measure in vivo CYP3A activity are logistically difficult to perform.

  2. Influence of Piper betle on hepatic marker enzymes and tissue antioxidant status in D-galactosamine-induced hepatotoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Pushpavalli, Ganesan; Veeramani, Chinnadurai; Pugalendi, Kodukkur Viswanathan

    2008-01-01

    D-galactosamine is a well-established hepatotoxicant that induces a diffuse type of liver injury closely resembling human viral hepatitis. D-galactosamine by its property of generating free radicals causes severe damage to the membrane and affects almost all organs of the human body. The leaves of Piper betle L., a commonly used masticatory in Asian countries, possess several biological properties. Our aim is to investigate the in vivo antioxidant potential of P. betle leaf-extract against oxidative stress induced by D-galactosamine intoxication in male albino Wistar rats. Toxicity was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of D-galactosamine, 400 mg/kg body weight (BW) for 21 days. Rats were treated with P. betle extract (200 mg/kg BW) via intragastric intubations. We assessed the activities of liver marker enzymes (aspartate amino-transferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase) and levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), lipid hydroperoxides, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, vitamin C, vitamin E, and reduced glutathione. The extract significantly improved the status of antioxidants and decreased TBARS, hydroperoxides, and liver marker enzymes when compared with the D-galactosamine treated group, demonstrating its hepatoprotective and antioxidant properties.

  3. Influence of Piper betle on hepatic marker enzymes and tissue antioxidant status in ethanol-treated Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, R; Prakasam, A; Ramesh, B; Pugalendi, K V

    2002-01-01

    Piper betle L. is a commonly used masticatory in Asia. This study was carried out to investigate the hepatoprotective and antioxidant properties of P. betle, using ethanol intoxication as a model of hepatotoxic and oxidative damage. Ethanol-treated rats exhibited elevation of hepatic marker enzymes and disturbances in antioxidant defense when compared with normal rats. Oral administration of P. betle extract (100, 200, or 300 mg/kg body weight) for 30 days significantly (P <.05) decreased aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and lipid hydroperoxides in ethanol treated rats. The extract also improved the tissue antioxidant status by increasing the levels of nonenzymatic antioxidants (reduced glutathione, vitamin C, and vitamin E) and the activities of free radical-detoxifying enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in liver and kidney of ethanol-treated rats. The highest dose of P. betle extract (300 mg/kg body weight) was most effective. The results were comparable with the known hepatoprotective drug, silymarin. These results indicate that P. betle could afford a significant hepatoprotective and antioxidant effect.

  4. Activation of the hepatic endothelin-system in rats with biliary liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rothermund, L; Cho, J J; Leggewie, S; Schwarz, A; Bauer, C; Paul, M; Neumayer, H H; Schuppan, D; Hocher, B

    2000-11-01

    Circulating plasma endothelin-1 (ET-1) is elevated in liver cirrhosis, in a disease-stage-dependent manner. However, ET-1 exerts its effects mainly via paracrine and autocrine pathways. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to analyze the hepatic endothelin (ET) system in liver cirrhosis resulting from bile duct obstruction (BDO). Wistar rats were subjected for 6 weeks to either sham operation (control) or BDO. Thereafter, hepatic ET-1 concentrations were elevated 7.2-fold in BDO compared to control (p <0.001), whereas big ET-1 was unchanged. The density of both ET receptor subtypes was upregulated in BDO (ETA: 7.4-fold and ETB: 4.9-fold vs control, p < 0.001, respectively). The affinity of both receptor subtypes was significantly reduced in BDO. In conclusion, our data demonstrated for the first time that the hepatic ET system in liver cirrhosis is characterized by a simultaneous upregulation of both ET-1 tissue concentration as well as the density of hepatic ETA- and ETB-receptors, suggesting a synergistic activation of the hepatic ET system in rats with BDO. The increased ET-1 tissue concentration is not a result of an altered big ET-1 synthesis in biliary liver fibrosis, suggesting an increased activity of endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE) in liver cirrhosis.

  5. Enzyme and root activities in surface-flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ling; Wang, Yu-Bin; Zhao, Li-Na; Chen, Zhang-He

    2009-07-01

    Sixteen small-scale wetlands planted with four plant species were constructed for domestic wastewater purification. The objective of this study was to determine the correlations between contaminant removal and soil enzyme activity, root activity, and growth in the constructed wetlands. The results indicated that correlations between contaminant removal efficiency and enzyme activity varied depending on the contaminants. The removal efficiency of NH4+ was significantly correlated with both urease and protease activity in all wetlands, and the removal of total phosphorus and soluble reactive phosphorus was significantly correlated with phosphatase activity in most wetlands, while the removal of total nitrogen, NO3(-) , and chemical oxygen demand (COD) was significantly correlated with enzyme activity only in a few instances. Correlations between soil enzyme activity and root activity varied among species. Activities of all enzymes were significantly correlated with root activity in Vetiveria zizanioides and Phragmites australis wetlands, but not in Hymenocallis littoralis wetlands. Significant correlations between enzyme activity and root biomass and between enzyme activity and root growth were found mainly in Cyperus flabelliformis wetlands. Root activity was significantly correlated with removal efficiencies of all contaminants except NO3(-) and COD in V. zizanioides wetlands. Enzyme activities and root activity showed single-peak seasonal patterns. Activities of phosphatase, urease, and cellulase were significantly higher in the top layer of the substrate than in the deeper layers, and there were generally no significant differences between the deeper layers (deeper than 15 cm).

  6. Investigation of antiaromatase activity using hepatic microsomes of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Sassa-Deepaeng, Tanongsak; Chaisri, Wasana; Pikulkaew, Surachai; Okonogi, Siriporn

    2017-03-19

    Microsomal aromatase enzymes of humans and rats have been used in antiaromatase assays, but enzyme activity is species-specific. The current study extracted hepatic microsomes of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to investigate and compare the antiaromatase activity of chrysin, quercetin, and quercitrin. This activity was evaluated using a dibenzylfluorescein (DBF) assay. Results revealed that the age and body weight of Nile tilapia affected the yield of extracted microsomes. Extraction of hepatic microsomes of Nile tilapia was most effective when using a reaction medium with a pH of 8.0. A DBF assay using Nile tilapia microsomes revealed significant differences in levels of antiaromatase activity for chrysin, quercetin, and quercitrin. Chrysin was the most potent aromatase inhibitor, with an IC50 of 0.25 mg/mL. In addition, chrysin is an aromatase inhibitor that also inhibits the proliferation of cancer cells. Hepatic microsomes of Nile tilapia can be used to investigate and compare the antiaromatase activity of different compounds.

  7. Modulation of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 hepatic enzymes after oral administration of Chios mastic gum to male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Katsanou, Efrosini S; Kyriakopoulou, Katerina; Emmanouil, Christina; Fokialakis, Nikolas; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Machera, Kyriaki

    2014-01-01

    Chios mastic gum (CMG), a resin derived from Pistacia lentiscus var. chia, is known since ancient times for its pharmacological activities. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 enzymes are among the most involved in the biotransformation of chemicals and the metabolic activation of pro-carcinogens. Previous studies referring to the modulation of these enzymes by CMG have revealed findings of unclear biological and toxicological significance. For this purpose, the modulation of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 enzymes in the liver of male Wistar rats following oral administration of CMG extract (CMGE), at the levels of mRNA and CYP1A1 enzyme activity, was compared to respective enzyme modulation following oral administration of a well-known bioactive natural product, caffeine, as control compound known to involve hepatic enzymes in its metabolism. mRNA levels of Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 were measured by reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction and their relative quantification was calculated. CYP1A1 enzyme induction was measured through the activity of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD). The results indicated that administration of CMGE at the recommended pharmaceutical dose does not induce significant transcriptional modulation of Cyp1a1/2 and subsequent enzyme activity induction of CYP1A1 while effects of the same order of magnitude were observed in the same test system following the administration of caffeine at the mean daily consumed levels. The outcome of this study further confirms the lack of any toxicological or biological significance of the specific findings on liver following the administration of CMGE.

  8. The importance of myeloperoxidase enzyme activity in the pathogenesis of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Guven, F M K; Aydin, H; Yildiz, G; Engin, A; Celik, V K; Bakir, D; Deveci, K

    2013-03-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a disease with a severe course including acute viral haemorrhagic fever, ecchymosis, thrombocytopenia, hepatic function disorder and high mortality. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an enzyme located in neutrophil granulocytes and plays an important role in the destruction of phagocytosed micro-organisms. The aim of this study was to analyse MPO enzyme activity in CCHF cases compared with a control group. A total of 47 randomly selected CCHF patients admitted to the Department of Infectious Diseases of Cumhuriyet University Hospital in Sivas, Turkey, were studied, and as a control group, 41 age- and sex-matched individuals without any systemic disease were included in this study. MPO enzyme activity was measured in plasma and leukocytes for both groups by the ELISA method. MPO plasma and MPO leukocyte values were calculated as 57.62 ± 8.85 and 44.84 ± 9.71 in CCHF patients, and 0.79 ± 0.29 and 0.49 ± 0.11 in the controls, respectively. MPO enzyme activity was statistically significantly higher in patients with CCHF when compared to the control group. In conclusion, MPO enzyme activity is directly related to the activation of phagocytic leukocytes, and increases in both the plasma and leukocytes in CCHF patients. The increase of the MPO enzyme activity in leukocytes due to viral load leads to the destruction of the leukocyte. It is thought that MPO enzyme activity in plasma was higher in CCHF patients due to the destruction of leukocytes. MPO enzyme activity may be important in terms of the prognosis in patients with CCHF; however, more extensive studies are required on this subject.

  9. Observing Single Enzyme Molecules Interconvert between Activity States upon Heating

    PubMed Central

    Rojek, Marcin J.; Walt, David R.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that single enzyme molecules of β-galactosidase interconvert between different activity states upon exposure to short pulses of heat. We show that these changes in activity are the result of different enzyme conformations. Hundreds of single β-galactosidase molecules are trapped in femtoliter reaction chambers and the individual enzymes are subjected to short heating pulses. When heating pulses are introduced into the system, the enzyme molecules switch between different activity states. Furthermore, we observe that the changes in activity are random and do not correlate with the enzyme's original activity. This study demonstrates that different stable conformations play an important role in the static heterogeneity reported previously, resulting in distinct long-lived activity states of enzyme molecules in a population. PMID:24465972

  10. A Comparative Study for the Evaluation of Two Doses of Ellagic Acid on Hepatic Drug Metabolizing and Antioxidant Enzymes in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Gurbet; Semiz, Aslı; Karakurt, Serdar; Arslan, Sevki; Adali, Orhan; Sen, Alaattin

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate different doses of ellagic acid (EA) in vivo in rats for its potential to modulate hepatic phases I, II, and antioxidant enzymes. EA (10 or 30 mg/kg/day, intragastrically) was administered for 14 consecutive days, and activity, protein, and mRNA levels were determined. Although the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B and CYP2E enzyme activities were decreased significantly, the activities of all other enzymes were unchanged with the 10 mg/kg/day EA. In addition, western-blot and qRT-PCR results clearly corroborated the above enzyme expressions. On the other hand, while the NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities were increased significantly, CYP1A, 2B, 2C, 2E, and 19 enzyme activities were reduced significantly with 30 mg/kg/day EA. In addition, CYP2B, 2C6, 2E1, and 19 protein and mRNA levels were substantially decreased by the 30 mg/kg/day dose of EA, but the CYP1A protein, and mRNA levels were not changed. CYP3A enzyme activity, protein and mRNA levels were not altered by neither 10 nor 30 mg/kg/day ellagic acid. These results indicate that EA exerts a dose-dependent impact on the metabolism of chemical carcinogens and drugs by affecting the enzymes involved in xenobiotics activation/detoxification and antioxidant pathways. PMID:23971029

  11. Novel 2-oxoimidazolidine-4-carboxylic acid derivatives as Hepatitis C virus NS3-4A serine protease inhibitors: synthesis, activity, and X-ray crystal structure of an enzyme inhibitor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Arasappan, Ashok; Njoroge, F. George; Parekh, Tejal N.; Yang, Xiaozheng; Pichardo, John; Butkiewicz, Nancy; Prongay, Andrew; Yao, Nanhua; Girijavallabhan, Viyyoor

    2008-06-30

    Synthesis and HCV NS3 serine protease inhibitory activity of some novel 2-oxoimidazolidine-4-carboxylic acid derivatives are reported. Inhibitors derived from this new P2 core exhibited activity in the low {micro}M range. X-ray structure of an inhibitor, 15c bound to the protease is presented.

  12. Effects of Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes and plasma tolbutamide concentration in rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hsien-Tsung; Chang, Yi-Wei; Uramaru, Naoto; Watanabe, Yoko; Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lii, Chong-Kuei; Yeh, Teng-Kuang

    2012-06-26

    Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang (BT) is the dry powder derived from the aqueous extract of a mixture of 10 medicinal herbs. It is a traditional Chinese medicine being used for the treatment of various immune-related diseases. To investigate the effect of BT on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes and its effect on plasma concentrations of tolbutamide, a substrate of CYP2C, in rats. EXP 1: Thirty-two male Wistar rats were divided into four groups. Rats were fed a control diet and a control diet containing 1, 2.5 and 5% (w/w) of BT, respectively, for eight weeks. The activities of the major CYP and Phase II conjugating enzymes in rat liver microsomes as well as the antioxidant system in rat liver were assessed. Exp 2: Male Wistar rats were fed a control diet or a control diet containing 2.5% of BT, respectively, for eight weeks. A single 20-mg/kg oral dose of tolbutamide was then administered to each rat. Plasma samples were collected from each rat at 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8h after dosing. The concentrations of tolbutamide and glucose level in plasma were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer (HPLC/MS) and enzymatic method, respectively. Significant decrease in microsomal CYP2C-catalyzed diclofenac 4-hydroxylation in the liver of rats fed the BT diet was observed. Increased UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities were also observed in the liver of rats fed the diet containing 2.5 and 5% of BT. Immunoblot analyses also showed decreases of CYP2C11 proteins in the liver of BT fed rats. In addition, rats fed the 2.5% BT diet for eight weeks had no effects on the disposition of tolbutamide and reduction of glucose level in plasma after orally administered of tolbutamide. Rats fed the BT diet for eight weeks may decrease CYP2C enzyme activity and protein expression and increase Phase II conjugating enzyme activities in liver. However, BT may not affect the disposition and efficacy of tolbutamide. Crown Copyright © 2012

  13. Effect of selenium-containing compounds on hepatic chemoprotective enzymes in mice.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Wael M; Aboul-Fadl, Tarek; Lamb, John G; Roberts, Jeanette C; Franklin, Michael R

    2006-03-15

    Selenite and organoselenium compounds have been examined at supranutritional levels for their ability to influence the activity and mRNA levels of chemoprotective enzymes in the livers of selenium-sufficient mice and the changes compared to those elicited by oltipraz. Compounds investigated included novel selenocysteine prodrugs that have previously been evaluated for their ability to reduce the tumorigenicity of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) in mice. Following seven daily doses (i.g.), all compounds except 2-methylselenazolidine-4(R)-carboxylic acid (MSCA) increased thioredoxin reductase activity (43-92%) but only for 2-oxoselenazolidine-4(R)-carboxylic acid (OSCA) was there an accompanying increase in mRNA. No compound enhanced glutathione peroxidase activity, although sodium selenite significantly elevated the mRNA of this enzyme. Oltipraz was an efficacious inducer of both thioredoxin reductase and glutathione peroxidase mRNAs. Sodium selenite, selenazolidine-4(R)-carboxylic acid (SCA), and OSCA elevated NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase mRNA but only for OSCA was the elevation in mRNA accompanied by an increase in enzyme activity. L-Selenocystine significantly increased this activity without increasing mRNA levels. Sodium selenite, L-selenocystine, L-selenomethionine, and Se-methyl-L-selenocysteine all enhanced glutathione S-transferase activity. The increased activity with sodium selenite was accompanied by increases in mRNAs of Gst alpha, Gst mu and Gst pi classes, while for L-selenocystine and Se-methyl-L-selenocysteine, only an elevation in the mRNA for the Gst alpha class was observed. Gst alpha and Gst mu class mRNAs were elevated by OSCA without a significant elevation in enzyme activity. SCA and MSCA both elevated a Gst pi mRNA and MSCA elevated Gst mu in addition. By comparison, oltipraz only significantly elevated the mRNA of Gst mu, adding to the conclusion that across the entire study, no selenium compound appears to be acting

  14. Liver Allograft Its Use in Chronic Active Hepatitis With Macronodular Cirrhosis, Hepatitis B Surface Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Corman, Jarques L.; Putnam, Charles W.; Iwatsuki, Shunzaburo; Redeker, Allan G.; Porter, K. A.; Peters, Robert L.; Schröter, Gerhard; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    A patient suffering from chronic active hepatitis with macronodular cirrhosis, positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HB,Ag), was treated with an orthoiopic liver allograft. The HB, antigenemia, as measured with several precipltation tests and by complement fixation, became negative after transplantation and remained so for about 2½ months. During the interval, very low Iters of the antigen were detectable by, radioimmunoassay. At about three months after transplantation, she had an attack of acute hepatitis, at which time HB,Ag became detectable by all tests. She recovered, but progressive liver disease developed during the remaining 1½ years of her life. She died of disseminaled nocardiosis and candidiasis with deteriorating hepatic function. The homograft at autopsy, showed no evidence of rejection, but was the site of chronic active liver disease, although of a different pathologic pattern than that affecting her native liver. The differences in histology may reflect the influence of chronic Immunosuppression on the features of chronic active hepatitis. PMID:365134

  15. Antioxidant activity of white rice, brown rice and germinated brown rice (in vivo and in vitro) and the effects on lipid peroxidation and liver enzymes in hyperlipidaemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mohd Esa, Norhaizan; Abdul Kadir, Khairul-Kamilah; Amom, Zulkhairi; Azlan, Azrina

    2013-11-15

    Antioxidant activity of different rice extract and the effect on the levels of antioxidant enzyme activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), vitamin E, lipid peroxidation and liver enzymes in hyperlipidaemia rabbits were investigated. Germinated brown rice (GBR) has the highest antioxidant activity compared to white rice (WR) and brown rice (BR). All rice grains increased the activity of SOD and GPx. However, vitamin E levels increased only in the groups that received the BR and GBR diets. The reduction of lipid peroxidation levels and activity of hepatic enzymes (alanine transferase, ALT and aspartate transaminase, AST) were only significantly observed in the GBR group. In conclusion, GBR supplementation has the greatest impact on increasing antioxidant enzyme activity and vitamin E level and on reducing lipid peroxidation in hypercholesterolaemia rabbit, thereby preventing the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Furthermore, GBR diet can also reduce the level of hepatic enzymes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Phase I and II liver enzyme activities in juvenile alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) collected from three sites in the Kissimmee-Everglades drainage, Florida (USA).

    PubMed

    Gunderson, M P; Oberdörster, E; Guillette, L J

    2004-10-01

    We examined CYP1A (measured using hepatic EROD and MROD activities) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities in juvenile alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) collected from three sites with varying contamination in the Kissimmee-Everglades drainage in south Florida. We hypothesized that contaminants present in areas with intermediate or higher contaminant concentrations would alter hepatic enzyme activities in juvenile alligators from those sites when compared to hepatic enzyme activity in animals from the area with the least contamination. EROD activity was found to be higher in animals from the site with lower reported levels of contamination relative to those from the site with the highest reported contamination suggesting an inhibition of CYP1A expression or activity. No differences among animals from the three sites were observed for hepatic MROD and GST activities. A significant negative relationship between EROD, MROD, and GST activities and body size was exhibited in alligators from the site with the lowest contamination. No relationship between body size and hepatic enzyme activity was found in animals from the sites with intermediate and higher contamination, suggesting that contaminants present at these sites act to alter this relationship. No correlation was observed in this study between plasma steroid concentrations (estradiol-17 beta or testosterone) and hepatic EROD, MROD, or GST activities.

  17. Individual variation in hepatic aldehyde oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Al-Salmy, H S

    2001-04-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a molybdo-flavo enzyme expressed predominantly in the liver, lung, and kidney. AO plays a major role in oxidation of aldehydes, as well as oxidation of various N-heterocyclic compounds of pharmacological and toxicological importance including antiviral (famciclovir), antimalarial (quinine), antitumour (methotrexate), and nicotine. The aim of this study was to investigate cytosolic aldehyde oxidase activity in human liver. Cytosolic AO was characterised using both the metabolism of N-[(2-dimethylamino)ethyl] acridine-4-carboxamide (DACA) and benzaldehyde to form DACA-9(10H)-acridone (quantified by HPLC with fluorescence detection) and benzoic acid (quantified spectrophotometrically). Thirteen livers (10 female, 3 male) were examined. The intrinsic clearance (Vmax/Km) of DACA varied 18-fold (0.03-0.50 m/min/mg). Vmax ranged from 0.20-3.10 nmol/ min/mg, and Km ranged from 3.5-14.2 microM. In the same specimens, the intrinsic clearance for benzaldehyde varied 5-fold (0.40-1.8 ml/min/mg). Vmax ranged from 3.60-12.6 nmol/min/mg and Km ranged from 3.6-14.6 microM. Furthermore, there were no differences in AO activity between male and female human livers, nor was there any relationship to age of donor (range 29-73 years), smoking status, or disease status. In conclusion, our results showed that there are variations in AO activity in human liver. These variations in aldehyde oxidase activity might reflect individual variations or they might be due to AO stability during processing and storage.

  18. Coffee modulates transcription factor Nrf2 and highly increases the activity of antioxidant enzymes in rats.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Silvio J V; Ishimoto, Emília Y; Torres, Elizabeth A F S

    2014-01-08

    This study investigated the effect of a 28 day administration of coffee brew on the activity of antioxidant enzymes in rats. After this period of 2.0 mL/day dosages of this beverage, the activities of hepatic superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase increased 74.8, 59.4, and 135.2%, respectively, whereas the cytosolic level of Nrf2 increased 131.3%. At the same time, the total antioxidant capacity of the hepatic tissue increased 25.1%, improving the defensive status against oxidative stress. At the end of the experiment, the levels of biomarkers alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase remained equal to the control group, and no changes were observed in the hepatic histoarchiteture of the animals, suggesting that the liver tissue was not impaired by the exposure to coffee. The changes in enzyme activities and antioxidant capacity were statistically significant (p < 0.05), indicating that coffee could be considered an important alternative against oxidative stress and its correlated degenerative diseases.

  19. Lipoprotein electrostatic properties regulate hepatic lipase association and activity.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Jonathan G; Nguyen, Trang; Sparks, Daniel L

    2007-12-01

    The effect of lipoprotein electrostatic properties on the catalytic regulation of hepatic lipase (HL) was investigated. Enrichment of serum or very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) with oleic acid increased lipoprotein negative charge and stimulated lipid hydrolysis by HL. Similarly, enrichment of serum or isolated lipoproteins with the anionic phospholipids phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidic acid, or phosphatidylserine also increased lipoprotein negative charge and stimulated hydrolysis by HL. Anionic lipids had a small effect on phospholipid hydrolysis, but significantly stimulated triacylglyceride (TG) hydrolysis. High density lipoprotein (HDL) charge appears to have a specific effect on lipolysis. Enrichment of HDL with PI significantly stimulated VLDL-TG hydrolysis by HL. To determine whether HDL charge affects the association of HL with HDL and VLDL, HL-lipoprotein interactions were probed immunochemically. Under normal circumstances, HL associates with HDL particles, and only small amounts bind to VLDL. PI enrichment of HDL blocked the binding of HL with HDL. These data indicate that increasing the negative charge of HDL stimulates VLDL-TG hydrolysis by reducing the association of HL with HDL. Therefore, HDL controls the hydrolysis of VLDL by affecting the interlipoprotein association of HL. Lipoprotein electrostatic properties regulate lipase association and are an important regulator of the binding and activity of lipolytic enzymes.

  20. HCV core protein induces hepatic lipid accumulation by activating SREBP1 and PPAR{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kook Hwan; Hong, Sung Pyo; Kim, KyeongJin; Park, Min Jung; Kim, Kwang Jin; Cheong, JaeHun . E-mail: molecule85@pusan.ac.kr

    2007-04-20

    Hepatic steatosis is a common feature in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. HCV core protein plays an important role in the development of hepatic steatosis in HCV infection. Because SREBP1 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 1) and PPAR{gamma} (peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor {gamma}) are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism of hepatocyte, we sought to determine whether HCV core protein may impair the expression and activity of SREBP1 and PPAR{gamma}. In this study, it was demonstrated that HCV core protein increases the gene expression of SREBP1 not only in Chang liver, Huh7, and HepG2 cells transiently transfected with HCV core protein expression plasmid, but also in Chang liver-core stable cells. Furthermore, HCV core protein enhanced the transcriptional activity of SREBP1. In addition, HCV core protein elevated PPAR{gamma} transcriptional activity. However, HCV core protein had no effect on PPAR{gamma} gene expression. Finally, we showed that HCV core protein stimulates the genes expression of lipogenic enzyme and fatty acid uptake associated protein. Therefore, our finding provides a new insight into the mechanism of hepatic steatosis by HCV infection.

  1. New parameters controlling the effect of temperature on enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Daniel, R M; Danson, M J; Eisenthal, R; Lee, C K; Peterson, M E

    2007-12-01

    Arising from careful measurements of the thermal behaviour of enzymes, a new model, the Equilibrium Model, has been developed to explain more fully the effects of temperature on enzymes. The model describes the effect of temperature on enzyme activity in terms of a rapidly reversible active-inactive (but not denatured) transition, revealing an additional and reversible mechanism for enzyme activity loss in addition to irreversible thermal inactivation at high temperatures. Two new thermal parameters, T(eq) and DeltaH(eq), describe the active-inactive transition, and enable a complete description of the effect of temperature on enzyme activity. We describe here the Model and its fit to experimental data, methods for the determination of the Equilibrium Model parameters, and the implications of the Model for the environmental adaptation and evolution of enzymes, and for biotechnology.

  2. Apolipoprotein D Transgenic Mice Develop Hepatic Steatosis through Activation of PPARγ and Fatty Acid Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Labrie, Marilyne; Lalonde, Simon; Najyb, Ouafa; Thiery, Maxime; Daneault, Caroline; Des Rosiers, Chrisitne; Rassart, Eric; Mounier, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic mice (Tg) overexpressing human apolipoprotein D (H-apoD) in the brain are resistant to neurodegeneration. Despite the use of a neuron-specific promoter to generate the Tg mice, they expressed significant levels of H-apoD in both plasma and liver and they slowly develop hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. We show here that hepatic PPARγ expression in Tg mice is increased by 2-fold compared to wild type (WT) mice. Consequently, PPARγ target genes Plin2 and Cide A/C are overexpressed, leading to increased lipid droplets formation. Expression of the fatty acid transporter CD36, another PPARgamma target, is also increased in Tg mice associated with elevated fatty acid uptake as measured in primary hepatocytes. Elevated expression of AMPK in the liver of Tg leads to phosphorylation of acetyl CoA carboxylase, indicating a decreased activity of the enzyme. Fatty acid synthase expression is also induced but the hepatic lipogenesis measured in vivo is not significantly different between WT and Tg mice. In addition, expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1, the rate-limiting enzyme of beta-oxidation, is slightly upregulated. Finally, we show that overexpressing H-apoD in HepG2 cells in presence of arachidonic acid (AA), the main apoD ligand, increases the transcriptional activity of PPARγ. Supporting the role of apoD in AA transport, we observed enrichment in hepatic AA and a decrease in plasmatic AA concentration. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the hepatic steatosis observed in apoD Tg mice is a consequence of increased PPARγ transcriptional activity by AA leading to increased fatty acid uptake by the liver. PMID:26083030

  3. Virus-Specific mRNA Capping Enzyme Encoded by Hepatitis E Virus

    PubMed Central

    Magden, Julia; Takeda, Naokazu; Li, Tiancheng; Auvinen, Petri; Ahola, Tero; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Merits, Andres; Kääriäinen, Leevi

    2001-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), a positive-strand RNA virus, is an important causative agent of waterborne hepatitis. Expression of cDNA (encoding amino acids 1 to 979 of HEV nonstructural open reading frame 1) in insect cells resulted in synthesis of a 110-kDa protein (P110), a fraction of which was proteolytically processed to an 80-kDa protein. P110 was tightly bound to cytoplasmic membranes, from which it could be released by detergents. Immunopurified P110 catalyzed transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to GTP and GDP to yield m7GTP or m7GDP. GMP, GpppG, and GpppA were poor substrates for the P110 methyltransferase. There was no evidence for further methylation of m7GTP when it was used as a substrate for the methyltransferase. P110 was also a guanylyltransferase, which formed a covalent complex, P110-m7GMP, in the presence of AdoMet and GTP, because radioactivity from both [α-32P]GTP and [3H-methyl]AdoMet was found in the covalent guanylate complex. Since both methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase reactions are strictly virus specific, they should offer optimal targets for development of antiviral drugs. Cap analogs such as m7GTP, m7GDP, et2m7GMP, and m2et7GMP inhibited the methyltransferase reaction. HEV P110 capping enzyme has similar properties to the methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase of alphavirus nsP1, tobacco mosaic virus P126, brome mosaic virus replicase protein 1a, and bamboo mosaic virus (a potexvirus) nonstructural protein, indicating there is a common evolutionary origin of these distantly related plant and animal virus families. PMID:11413290

  4. Short communication: Regulation of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes by dietary glycerol in transition dairy cows.

    PubMed

    White, H M; Carvalho, E R; Koser, S L; Schmelz-Roberts, N S; Pezzanite, L M; Slabaugh, A C; Doane, P H; Donkin, S S

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional status and glucose precursors are known regulators of gluconeogenic gene expression. Glycerol can replace corn in diets fed to dairy cows and use of glycerol is linked to increased rumen propionate production. The effect of dietary glycerol on the regulation of gluconeogenic enzymes is unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of glycerol on expression of pyruvate carboxylase (PC), cytosolic and mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C and PEPCK-M), and glucose-6-phosphatase. Twenty-six multiparous Holstein cows were fed either a control diet or a diet where high-moisture corn was replaced by glycerol from -28 through +56 d relative to calving (DRTC). Liver tissue was collected via percutaneous liver biopsy at -28, -14, +1, +14, +28, and +56 DRTC for RNA analysis. Expression of PC mRNA increased 6-fold at +1 and 4-fold at +14 DRTC relative to precalving levels. Dietary glycerol did not alter expression of PC mRNA expression. Expression of PEPCK-C increased 2.5-fold at +14 and 3-fold at +28 DRTC compared with +1 DRTC. Overall, dietary glycerol increased PEPCK-C expression compared with that of cows fed control diets. The ratio of PC to PEPCK-C was increased 6.3-fold at +1 DRTC compared with precalving and tended to be decreased in cows fed glycerol. We detected no effect of diet or DRTC on PEPCK-M or glucose-6-phosphatase mRNA, and there were no interactions of dietary treatment and DRTC for any transcript measured. Substituting corn with glycerol increased the expression of PEPCK-C mRNA during transition to lactation and suggests that dietary energy source alters hepatic expression. The observed increase in PEPCK-C expression with glycerol feeding may indicate regulation of hepatic gene expression by changes in rumen propionate production.

  5. Angiotensin Receptor Blockade Recovers Hepatic UCP2 Expression and Aconitase and SDH Activities and Ameliorates Hepatic Oxidative Damage in Insulin Resistant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Montez, Priscilla; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Rodríguez, Rubén; Thorwald, Max A.; Viscarra, José A.; Lam, Lisa; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Nakano, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is commonly associated with elevated renin-angiotensin system, oxidative stress, and steatohepatitis with down-regulation of uncoupling proteins (UCPs). However, the mechanisms linking renin-angiotensin system, steatosis, and UCP2 to hepatic oxidative damage during insulin resistance are not described. To test the hypothesis that angiotensin receptor activation contributes to decreased hepatic UCP2 expression and aconitase activity and to increased oxidative damage after increased glucose intake in a model of MetS, lean and obese Long Evans rats (n = 10/group) were randomly assigned to the following groups: 1) untreated Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka (lean, strain control), 2) untreated Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) (MetS model), 3) OLETF + angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) (10 mg olmesartan/kg·d × 6 wk), 4) OLETF + high glucose (HG) (5% in drinking water × 6 wk), and 5) OLETF + ARB + HG (ARB/HG × 6 wk). HG increased body mass (37%), plasma triglycerides (TGs) (35%), plasma glycerol (87%), plasma free fatty acids (28%), and hepatic nitrotyrosine (74%). ARB treatment in HG decreased body mass (12%), plasma TG (15%), plasma glycerol (23%), plasma free fatty acids (14%), and hepatic TG content (42%), suggesting that angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1) activation and increased adiposity contribute to the development of obesity-related dyslipidemia. ARB in HG also decreased hepatic nitrotyrosine and increased hepatic UCP2 expression (59%) and aconitase activity (40%), as well as antioxidant enzyme activities (50-120%), suggesting that AT1 activation also contributes to protein oxidation, impaired lipid metabolism, and antioxidant metabolism in the liver. Thus, in addition to promoting obesity-related hypertension, AT1 activation may also impair lipid metabolism and antioxidant capacity, resulting in steatosis via decreased UCP2 and tricarboxylic acid cycle activity. PMID:23087176

  6. Angiotensin receptor blockade recovers hepatic UCP2 expression and aconitase and SDH activities and ameliorates hepatic oxidative damage in insulin resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Montez, Priscilla; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Rodríguez, Rubén; Thorwald, Max A; Viscarra, José A; Lam, Lisa; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Nakano, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Akira; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2012-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is commonly associated with elevated renin-angiotensin system, oxidative stress, and steatohepatitis with down-regulation of uncoupling proteins (UCPs). However, the mechanisms linking renin-angiotensin system, steatosis, and UCP2 to hepatic oxidative damage during insulin resistance are not described. To test the hypothesis that angiotensin receptor activation contributes to decreased hepatic UCP2 expression and aconitase activity and to increased oxidative damage after increased glucose intake in a model of MetS, lean and obese Long Evans rats (n = 10/group) were randomly assigned to the following groups: 1) untreated Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka (lean, strain control), 2) untreated Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) (MetS model), 3) OLETF + angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) (10 mg olmesartan/kg·d × 6 wk), 4) OLETF + high glucose (HG) (5% in drinking water × 6 wk), and 5) OLETF + ARB + HG (ARB/HG × 6 wk). HG increased body mass (37%), plasma triglycerides (TGs) (35%), plasma glycerol (87%), plasma free fatty acids (28%), and hepatic nitrotyrosine (74%). ARB treatment in HG decreased body mass (12%), plasma TG (15%), plasma glycerol (23%), plasma free fatty acids (14%), and hepatic TG content (42%), suggesting that angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1) activation and increased adiposity contribute to the development of obesity-related dyslipidemia. ARB in HG also decreased hepatic nitrotyrosine and increased hepatic UCP2 expression (59%) and aconitase activity (40%), as well as antioxidant enzyme activities (50-120%), suggesting that AT1 activation also contributes to protein oxidation, impaired lipid metabolism, and antioxidant metabolism in the liver. Thus, in addition to promoting obesity-related hypertension, AT1 activation may also impair lipid metabolism and antioxidant capacity, resulting in steatosis via decreased UCP2 and tricarboxylic acid cycle activity.

  7. Hepatic glycogen supercompensation activates AMP-activated protein kinase, impairs insulin signaling, and reduces glycogen deposition in the liver.

    PubMed

    Winnick, Jason J; An, Zhibo; Ramnanan, Christopher J; Smith, Marta; Irimia, Jose M; Neal, Doss W; Moore, Mary Courtney; Roach, Peter J; Cherrington, Alan D

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how increasing the hepatic glycogen content would affect the liver's ability to take up and metabolize glucose. During the first 4 h of the study, liver glycogen deposition was stimulated by intraportal fructose infusion in the presence of hyperglycemic-normoinsulinemia. This was followed by a 2-h hyperglycemic-normoinsulinemic control period, during which the fructose infusion was stopped, and a 2-h experimental period in which net hepatic glucose uptake (NHGU) and disposition (glycogen, lactate, and CO(2)) were measured in the absence of fructose but in the presence of a hyperglycemic-hyperinsulinemic challenge including portal vein glucose infusion. Fructose infusion increased net hepatic glycogen synthesis (0.7 ± 0.5 vs. 6.4 ± 0.4 mg/kg/min; P < 0.001), causing a large difference in hepatic glycogen content (62 ± 9 vs. 100 ± 3 mg/g; P < 0.001). Hepatic glycogen supercompensation (fructose infusion group) did not alter NHGU, but it reduced the percent of NHGU directed to glycogen (79 ± 4 vs. 55 ± 6; P < 0.01) and increased the percent directed to lactate (12 ± 3 vs. 29 ± 5; P = 0.01) and oxidation (9 ± 3 vs. 16 ± 3; P = NS). This change was associated with increased AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, diminished insulin signaling, and a shift in glycogenic enzyme activity toward a state discouraging glycogen accumulation. These data indicate that increases in hepatic glycogen can generate a state of hepatic insulin resistance, which is characterized by impaired glycogen synthesis despite preserved NHGU.

  8. Evaluation of a novel chemiluminescent microplate enzyme immunoassay for hepatitis B surface antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Song, Liu-Wei; Fang, Lin-Lin; Wu, Yong; Ge, Sheng-Xiang; Li, Hui; Yuan, Quan; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) is an important biomarker used in the diagnosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, but false-negative results are still reported in the detection of HBsAg using commercial assays. In this study, we evaluated the qualitative properties of a novel HBsAg chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) assay--WTultra. WHO standard sample dilution series and samples from low-level HBsAg carriers (<1 ng/mL) were used to evaluate the sensitivity of the WTultra assay. Boston Biomedica, Inc. (BBI) hepatitis B seroconversion panels were used to assess the ability of the WTultra assay to detect the window period. In addition, dilution series of 22 serum samples with different genotypes, serotypes and HBsAg mutations were used to assess the WTultra assay, and these were compared with other commercial assays. The lower detection limit of the WTultra assay was 0.012 IU/mL, and it showed a high sensitivity (97.52%, 95% CI, 94.95-99.00) in the detection of 282 low-level HBsAg carriers (<1 ng/mL). In samples with various HBV genotypes, serotypes and HBsAg mutations, the WTultra assay yielded 117 positive results in 132 samples, which was significantly higher than the results with the other four commercial assays (89, 83, 65 and 45, respectively, p<0.01). In the assays of mutant strains, the WTultra assay detected 82 positive results in 90 samples, which was significantly better than the results for the Hepanostika HBsAg Ultra (58 positive) and Architect (55 positive) (p<0.01) assays, which in turn were significantly better than the Murex V.3 (41 positive, p=0.026) and AxSYM V2 (29 positive, p<0.01) assays. However, in the detection of 42 samples of wild-type strains with various genotypes and serotypes, no significant differences were observed among the WTultra (35 positive), Architect (28 positive) and Hepanostika HBsAg Ultra (31 positive) assays. However, the WTultra assay detected significantly more samples than the Murex V.3 (24

  9. Spatial distribution of enzyme activities in the rhizosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Bahar S.; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere, the tiny zone of soil surrounding roots, certainly represents one of the most dynamic habitat and interfaces on Earth. Activities of enzymes produced by both plant roots and microbes are the primary biological drivers of organic matter decomposition and nutrient cycling. That is why there is an urgent need in spatially explicit methods for the determination of the rhizosphere extension and enzyme distribution. Recently, zymography as a new technique based on diffusion of enzymes through the 1 mm gel plate for analysis has been introduced (Spohn & Kuzyakov, 2013). We developed the zymography technique to visualize the enzyme activities with a higher spatial resolution. For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities as a function of distance from the root tip and the root surface in the soil. We visualized the two dimensional distribution of the activity of three enzymes: β-glucosidase, phosphatase and leucine amino peptidase in the rhizosphere of maize using fluorogenically labelled substrates. Spatial-resolution of fluorescent images was improved by direct application of a substrate saturated membrane to the soil-root system. The newly-developed direct zymography visualized heterogeneity of enzyme activities along the roots. The activity of all enzymes was the highest at the apical parts of individual roots. Across the roots, the enzyme activities were higher at immediate vicinity of the roots (1.5 mm) and gradually decreased towards the bulk soil. Spatial patterns of enzyme activities as a function of distance from the root surface were enzyme specific, with highest extension for phosphatase. We conclude that improved zymography is promising in situ technique to analyze, visualize and quantify spatial distribution of enzyme activities in the rhizosphere hotspots. References Spohn, M., Kuzyakov, Y., 2013. Phosphorus mineralization can be driven by microbial need for carbon. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 61: 69-75

  10. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    Eslam, M.; Khattab, M. A.; Harrison, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance are higher among people chronically infected with hepatitis C (CHC) when compared with the general population and people with other causes of chronic liver disease. Both insulin resistance and diabetes are associated with adverse outcomes across all stages of CHC, including the liver transplant population. CHC is also associated with the development of hepatic steatosis, a common histological feature present in approximately 55% (32–81%) of cases. There is a complex interrelationship between insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis and both are postulated to aggravate each other. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear factors involved in the regulation of glucose, lipid homeostasis, inflammatory response, cell differentiation, and cell cycle. The relationship between hepatitis C virus replication and PPARs has been the focus of recent study. Given the availability of potent agonists, PPARs may represent a novel pharmacological target in the treatment of CHC. PMID:22043232

  11. Effects of human diets of two different Japanese populations on cancer incidence in rat hepatic drug-metabolizing and antioxidant enzyme systems.

    PubMed

    Kanke, Y; Iitoi, Y; Iwasaki, M; Iwase, Y; Iwama, M; Kimira, M; Takahashi, T; Tsugane, S; Watanabe, S; Akabane, M

    1996-01-01

    Hepatic enzyme systems of drug metabolism and antioxidation were investigated in rats fed the complete human diets consumed in the two Japanese prefectures, Akita and Okinawa, where the incidence of cancers was quite different: Okinawa had the lowest and Akita the highest age-adjusted mortality rate. In rats fed the human diet consumed in Okinawa, hepatic glutathione S-transferase activity was higher and lipid peroxide content was lower than in rats fed the diet consumed in Akita. These data might indicate that the number and/or quantity of the dietary components attributed to the detoxification of carcinogens and the scavenging reactive carcinogen species was much higher in the foods consumed in the population having lower cancer mortality rate.

  12. [Autoimmune chronic active hepatitis: anatomoclinic's study of 50 patients].

    PubMed

    Hakem, D; Berrah, A; Berkane, S; Asselah, H; Aït-Younes, S; Asselah, F; Salah, S; Merriche, S; Abbadi, M C

    2005-11-01

    To analyse anatomoclinic and evolutive aspects of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) through 50 observations collected in two Internal Medicine departments in Algiers from 1998 to 2002 and to make a review of the literature. The study is prospective. The diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is established according to the recommendations of the score of the International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group (1991) or/and hepatitic damage confirmed by histology. Fifty patients were studied: (32 women-18 men) and the mean age was 38 years (17 to 73). Autoimmune extra-hepatitic manifestations were associated in 26%. The AIH type 1 has been noted in 58%. AIH were type 2 in only 6%. In 22% of the cases AIH were sero-negative and the others AIH represented 14% were classed as overlap-syndrome (5 cases of primary biliary cirrhosis and 2 cases of primary sclerosing cholangitis hepatitis overlap syndrome). The first liver biopsy tissue showed strong necrotic-inflammatory activity in 56% and cirrhosis was identified in 19 patients (38%). The treatment (azathioprine and corticosteroid) was prescribed in 37 patients (74%) in active chronic hepatitis or in compensed cirrhosis. 28% of the patients died (9-36 months) because cirrhosis's complications or because complications of hepatocarcinoma (3 cases). The diagnosis of AIH must be established early for each patient with chronic liver disease particularly is those are supposed as a crypto genetic hepatitis. The prognosis is compromised by delayed diagnosis and the mortality in middle following up is high.

  13. Eurythermalism and the temperature dependence of enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Charles K; Daniel, Roy M; Shepherd, Charis; Saul, David; Cary, S Craig; Danson, Michael J; Eisenthal, Robert; Peterson, Michelle E

    2007-06-01

    The "Equilibrium Model" has provided new tools for describing and investigating enzyme thermal adaptation. It has been shown that the effect of temperature on enzyme activity is not only governed by deltaG(double dagger)(cat) and deltaG(double dagger)(inact) but also by two new intrinsic parameters, deltaH(eq) and T(eq), which describe the enthalpy and midpoint, respectively, of a reversible equilibrium between active and inactive (but not denatured) forms of enzyme. Twenty-one enzymes from organisms with a wide range of growth temperatures were characterized using the Equilibrium Model. Statistical analysis indicates that T(eq) is a better predictor of growth temperature than enzyme stability (deltaG(double dagger)(inact)). As expected from the Equilibrium Model, deltaH(eq) correlates with catalytic temperature tolerance of enzymes and thus can be declared the first intrinsic and quantitative measure of enzyme eurythermalism. Other findings shed light on the evolution of psychrophilic and thermophilic enzymes. The findings suggest that the description of the Equilibrium Model of the effect of temperature on enzyme activity applies to all enzymes regardless of their temperature origins and that its associated parameters, deltaH(eq) and T(eq), are intrinsic and necessary parameters for characterizing the thermal properties of enzymes and their temperature adaptation and evolution.

  14. Therapeutic insulin and hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase activity in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Burchell, A; McGeechan, A; Hume, R

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase activity is low at birth, and in term infants rises rapidly to adult levels. In contrast, in most preterm infants, it remains low postnatally making them vulnerable to repeated hypoglycaemic episodes, resultant cerebral damage, or risk of sudden and unexpected death.
AIMS—To investigate the clinical features of preterm infants with low glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme activity to determine the influencing factors.
METHODS—Clinical data from 36 preterm infants were correlated by stepwise multiple regression analysis with Vmax of hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase as the dependent variable.
RESULTS—The most significant correlation was with the administration of insulin (units/kg/h postnatal life) with lesser effects of respiratory distress syndrome and dopamine administration. The Vmax changes reflected changes in the level of expression of the glucose-6-phosphatase protein.
CONCLUSION—In a variety of animal models, hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase levels have been shown to decrease in response to insulin, which also decreases transcription of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. The association of insulin administration with high levels of hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase activity and protein expression was therefore most unexpected. Results from model systems, or adults, must be extrapolated to the metabolism of preterm infants with caution.

 PMID:10794792

  15. Hepatic Enzyme Decline after Pediatric Blunt Trauma: A Tool for Timing Child Abuse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Amy L.; Lindberg, Daniel M.; Burke, Bonnie L.; Shults, Justine; Holmes, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Previous research in adult patients with blunt hepatic injuries has suggested a pattern of serum hepatic transaminase concentration decline. Evaluating this decline after pediatric blunt hepatic trauma could establish parameters for estimating the time of inflicted injuries. Deviation from a consistent transaminase resolution pattern…

  16. Hepatic Enzyme Decline after Pediatric Blunt Trauma: A Tool for Timing Child Abuse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Amy L.; Lindberg, Daniel M.; Burke, Bonnie L.; Shults, Justine; Holmes, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Previous research in adult patients with blunt hepatic injuries has suggested a pattern of serum hepatic transaminase concentration decline. Evaluating this decline after pediatric blunt hepatic trauma could establish parameters for estimating the time of inflicted injuries. Deviation from a consistent transaminase resolution pattern…

  17. Ultrasound in Enzyme Activation and Inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawson, Raymond; Gamage, Mala; Terefe, Netsanet Shiferaw; Knoerzer, Kai

    As discussed in previous chapters, most effects due to ultrasound arise from cavitation events, in particular, collapsing cavitation bubbles. These collapsing bubbles generate very high localized temperatures and pressure shockwaves along with micro-streaming that is associated with high shear forces. These effects can be used to accelerate the transport of substrates and reaction products to and from enzymes, and to enhance mass transfer in enzyme reactor systems, and thus improve efficiency. However, the high velocity streaming, together with the formation of hydroxy radicals and heat generation during collapsing of bubbles, may also potentially affect the biocatalyst stability, and this can be a limiting factor in combined ultrasound/enzymatic applications. Typically, enzymes can be readily denatured by slight changes in environmental conditions, including temperature, pressure, shear stress, pH and ionic strength.

  18. Cold-active enzymes studied by comparative molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Spiwok, Vojtech; Lipovová, Petra; Skálová, Tereza; Dusková, Jarmila; Dohnálek, Jan; Hasek, Jindrich; Russell, Nicholas J; Králová, Blanka

    2007-04-01

    Enzymes from cold-adapted species are significantly more active at low temperatures, even those close to zero Celsius, but the rationale of this adaptation is complex and relatively poorly understood. It is commonly stated that there is a relationship between the flexibility of an enzyme and its catalytic activity at low temperature. This paper gives the results of a study using molecular dynamics simulations performed for five pairs of enzymes, each pair comprising a cold-active enzyme plus its mesophilic or thermophilic counterpart. The enzyme pairs included alpha-amylase, citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, alkaline protease and xylanase. Numerous sites with elevated flexibility were observed in all enzymes; however, differences in flexibilities were not striking. Nevertheless, amino acid residues common in both enzymes of a pair (not present in insertions of a structure alignment) are generally more flexible in the cold-active enzymes. The further application of principle component analysis to the protein dynamics revealed that there are differences in the rate and/or extent of opening and closing of the active sites. The results indicate that protein dynamics play an important role in catalytic processes where structural rearrangements, such as those required for active site access by substrate, are involved. They also support the notion that cold adaptation may have evolved by selective changes in regions of enzyme structure rather than in global change to the whole protein.

  19. Microbial Enzyme Activity and Carbon Cycling in Grassland Soil Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, S. D.; Jastrow, J. D.

    2004-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes are necessary to degrade complex organic compounds present in soils. Using physical fractionation procedures, we tested whether old soil carbon is spatially isolated from degradative enzymes across a prairie restoration chronosequence in Illinois, USA. We found that carbon-degrading enzymes were abundant in all soil fractions, including macroaggregates, microaggregates, and the clay fraction, which contains carbon with a mean residence time of ~200 years. The activities of two cellulose-degrading enzymes and a chitin-degrading enzyme were 2-10 times greater in organic matter fractions than in bulk soil, consistent with the rapid turnover of these fractions. Polyphenol oxidase activity was 3 times greater in the clay fraction than in the bulk soil, despite very slow carbon turnover in this fraction. Changes in enzyme activity across the restoration chronosequence were small once adjusted for increases in soil carbon concentration, although polyphenol oxidase activity per unit carbon declined by 50% in native prairie versus cultivated soil. These results are consistent with a `two-pool' model of enzyme and carbon turnover in grassland soils. In light organic matter fractions, enzyme production and carbon turnover both occur rapidly. However, in mineral-dominated fractions, both enzymes and their carbon substrates are immobilized on mineral surfaces, leading to slow turnover. Soil carbon accumulation in the clay fraction and across the prairie restoration chronosequence probably reflects increasing physical isolation of enzymes and substrates on the molecular scale, rather than the micron to millimeter scale.

  20. Manganese enzymes with binuclear active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Dismukes, G.C.

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this article is twofold. First, to review the recent literature dealing with the mechanisms of catalysis by binuclear manganese enzymes. Second, to summarize and illustrate the general principles of catalysis which distinguish binuclear metalloenzymes from monometallic centers. This review covers primarily the published literature from 1991 up to May 1996. A summary of the major structurally characterized dimanganese enzymes is given. These perform various reaction types including several redox reactions, (de)hydrations, isomerizations, (de)phosphorylation, and phosphoryl transfer. 114 refs.

  1. A Simple and Accurate Method for Measuring Enzyme Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din-Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents methods commonly used for investigating enzyme activity using catalase and presents a new method for measuring catalase activity that is more reliable and accurate. Provides results that are readily reproduced and quantified. Can also be used for investigations of enzyme properties such as the effects of temperature, pH, inhibitors,…

  2. A Simple and Accurate Method for Measuring Enzyme Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din-Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents methods commonly used for investigating enzyme activity using catalase and presents a new method for measuring catalase activity that is more reliable and accurate. Provides results that are readily reproduced and quantified. Can also be used for investigations of enzyme properties such as the effects of temperature, pH, inhibitors,…

  3. JMJD3 aids in reprogramming of bone marrow progenitor cells to hepatic phenotype through epigenetic activation of hepatic transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Kochat, Veena; Equbal, Zaffar; Baligar, Prakash; Kumar, Vikash; Srivastava, Madhulika; Mukhopadhyay, Asok

    2017-01-01

    The strictly regulated unidirectional differentiation program in some somatic stem/progenitor cells has been found to be modified in the ectopic site (tissue) undergoing regeneration. In these cases, the lineage barrier is crossed by either heterotypic cell fusion or direct differentiation. Though studies have shown the role of coordinated genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in cellular development and differentiation, how the lineage fate of adult bone marrow progenitor cells (BMPCs) is reprogrammed during liver regeneration and whether this lineage switch is stably maintained are not clearly understood. In the present study, we wanted to decipher genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that involve in lineage reprogramming of BMPCs into hepatocyte-like cells. Here we report dynamic transcriptional change during cellular reprogramming of BMPCs to hepatocytes and dissect the epigenetic switch mechanism of BM cell-mediated liver regeneration after acute injury. Genome-wide gene expression analysis in BM-derived hepatocytes, isolated after 1 month and 5 months of transplantation, showed induction of hepatic transcriptional program and diminishing of donor signatures over the time. The transcriptional reprogramming of BM-derived cells was found to be the result of enrichment of activating marks (H3K4me3 and H3K9Ac) and loss of repressive marks (H3K27me3 and H3K9me3) at the promoters of hepatic transcription factors (HTFs). Further analyses showed that BMPCs possess bivalent histone marks (H3K4me3 and H3K27me3) at the promoters of crucial HTFs. H3K27 methylation dynamics at the HTFs was antagonistically regulated by EZH2 and JMJD3. Preliminary evidence suggests a role of JMJD3 in removal of H3K27me3 mark from promoters of HTFs, thus activating epigenetically poised hepatic genes in BMPCs prior to partial nuclear reprogramming. The importance of JMJD3 in reprogramming of BMPCs to hepatic phenotype was confirmed by inhibiting catalytic function of the enzyme using small molecule

  4. Effects of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors on Liver Fibrosis in HIV and Hepatitis C Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Reese, Lindsey J; Tider, Diane S; Stivala, Alicia C; Fishbein, Dawn A

    2012-01-01

    Background. Liver fibrosis is accelerated in HIV and hepatitis C coinfection, mediated by profibrotic effects of angiotensin. The objective of this study was to determine if angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is) attenuate liver fibrosis in coinfection. Methods. A retrospective review of 156 coinfected subjects was conducted to analyze the association between exposure to ACE-Is and liver fibrosis. Noninvasive indices of liver fibrosis (APRI, FIB-4, Forns indices) were compared between subjects who had taken ACE-Is and controls who had not taken them. Linear regression was used to evaluate ACE-I use as an independent predictor of fibrosis. Results. Subjects taking ACE-Is for three years were no different than controls on the APRI and the FIB-4 but had significantly higher scores than controls on the Forns index, indicating more advanced fibrosis. The use of ACE-Is for three years remained independently associated with an elevated Forns score when adjusted for age, race, and HIV viral load (P < 0.001). There were significant associations between all of the indices and significant fibrosis, as determined clinically and radiologically. Conclusions. There was not a protective association between angiotensin inhibition and liver fibrosis in coinfection. These noninvasive indices may be useful for ruling out significant fibrosis in coinfection.

  5. Activities of biotransformation enzymes in pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) and their modulation by in vivo administration of mebendazole and flubendazole.

    PubMed

    Savlík, M; Polácková, L; Szotáková, B; Lamka, J; Velík, J; Skálová, L

    2007-08-01

    Basal activities of certain pheasant hepatic and intestinal biotransformation enzymes and modulation of their activities by anthelmintics flubendazole (FLBZ) and mebendazole (MBZ) were investigated in subcellular fractions that were prepared from liver and small intestine of control and FLBZ or MBZ treated birds. Several oxidation, reduction and conjugation enzyme activities were assessed. In the liver, treatment of pheasants by FLBZ or MBZ caused very slight or no changes in monooxygenase activities and conjugation enzymes. More significative changes were detected in small intestine. Metyrapone and daunorubicin reductase activities were increased by both substances in the liver. This is the first evidence that certain benzimidazoles modulate reductases of carbonyl group. With respect to the relatively slight extent of the changes caused by FLBZ or MBZ we can assume that repeated administration of therapeutic doses of both FLBZ and MBZ has probably no serious influence on pheasant biotransformation enzyme system.

  6. Epigenetic regulation of hepatic stellate cell activation and liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    El Taghdouini, Adil; van Grunsven, Leo A

    2016-12-01

    Chronic liver injury to hepatocytes or cholangiocytes, when left unmanaged, leads to the development of liver fibrosis, a condition characterized by the excessive intrahepatic deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. Activated hepatic stellate cells constitute the predominant source of extracellular matrix in fibrotic livers and their transition from a quiescent state during fibrogenesis is associated with important alterations in their transcriptional and epigenetic landscape. Areas covered: We briefly describe the processes involved in hepatic stellate cell activation and discuss our current understanding of alterations in the epigenetic landscape, i.e DNA methylation, histone modifications and the functional role of non-coding RNAs that accompany this key event in the development of chronic liver disease. Expert commentary: Although great progress has been made, our understanding of the epigenetic regulation of hepatic stellate cell activation is limited and, thus far, insufficient to allow the development of epigenetic drugs that can selectively interrupt liver fibrosis.

  7. Enhancing Enzyme Activity and Immobilization in Nanostructured Inorganic-Enzyme Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lang, Xuye; Zhu, Lingling; Gao, Yingning; Wheeldon, Ian

    2017-09-12

    Understanding the chemical and physical interactions at the interface of protein surfaces and inorganic crystals has important implications in the advancement of immobilized enzyme catalysis. Recently, enzyme-inorganic hybrid complexes have been demonstrated as effective materials for enzyme immobilization. The precipitation of phosphate nanocrystals in the presence of enzymes creates enzyme-Cu3(PO4)2·3H2O particles with high surface-to-volume ratios, enhanced activity, and increased stability. Here, we begin to develop a mechanistic understanding of enzyme loading in such complexes. Using a series of enzymes including horseradish peroxidase (HRP), a thermostable alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhD), diaphorase, catalase, glucose oxidase (GOx), and the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA), we identified a correlation between particle synthesis temperature, overall enzyme charge, and enzyme loading. The model enzyme HRP has a high predicted pI of ∼7.5 and maintains an overall positive charge under the synthesis conditions, phosphate buffer pH 7.4. HRP loading in HRP-Cu3(PO4)2 complexes was enhanced by 4.2-fold when synthesis was carried out at 37 °C in comparison with synthesis at 4 °C. HRP loading was further enhanced with synthesis at pH 8.0, correlating with a decrease in overall enzyme charge. Proteins with lower predicted pI values and negative overall charge (AdhD, pI of 5.6; diaphorase, pI of 6.8; GOx, pI of 5.2; catalase, pI of 6.9; and, BSA, pI of 5.7) exhibited higher enzyme loadings with 4 °C synthesis, 2.7-, 2.6-, 2.5-, 1.8-, and 1.7-fold protein loading enhancements, respectively. Using HRP as a model system, we also demonstrate that activity increased concomitantly with enzyme loading, and that particle nanostructure was minimally affected by synthesis temperature. Combined, the results presented here demonstrate the control of enzyme loading in enzyme-inorganic particles opening up new possibilities in enzyme and multienzyme catalysis.

  8. Do differences in the activities of carbohydrate metabolism enzymes between Lake Whitefish ecotypes match predictions from transcriptomic studies?

    PubMed

    Dalziel, Anne C; Laporte, Martin; Guderley, Helga; Bernatchez, Louis

    2017-08-07

    Transcriptomic studies are facilitating the search for the molecular bases of adaptation in natural populations, but the impact of these differences in mRNA content on animal physiology are often unknown. One way to determine if molecular changes have the potential to influence animal physiology and performance is to test for correlated changes at higher levels of biological organization, including enzyme activity. Here, we measure the activities of carbohydrate metabolism enzymes to test if previously documented genetic and transcriptomic variation between 'dwarf' and 'normal' Lake Whitefish ecotypes are associated with corresponding changes in enzyme activity (measured as maximal rate, Vmax) in liver and skeletal muscle. We use laboratory-reared fish from the same populations as prior transcriptomic studies and find that white muscle mRNA content is a good predictor of glycolytic and glycogen metabolism enzyme activity, and dwarf whitefish have evolved higher activities than normal whitefish. However, the differences in hepatic mRNA content found between ecotypes in prior studies are not associated with comparable changes in enzyme activity. For example, dwarf whitefish have lower enzyme activities, but higher transcript abundances for two glycolytic enzymes compared to normal whitefish. Overall, we find that transcriptomic studies successfully highlight evolutionary variation in enzyme activities, but not always in the direction predicted, indicating that a variety of tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms contributed to the evolution of energy metabolism in Lake Whitefish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Multicentric evaluation of new commercial enzyme immunoassays for the detection of immunoglobulin M and total antibodies against hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed

    Arcangeletti, M C; Dussaix, E; Ferraglia, F; Roque-Afonso, A M; Graube, A; Chezzi, C

    2011-08-01

    A multicentric clinical study was conducted on representative sera from 1,738 European and U.S. subjects for the evaluation of new anti-hepatitis A virus enzyme immunoassays from Bio-Rad Laboratories. Comparison with reference DiaSorin S.p.A. tests confirmed the good performance of Bio-Rad assays (99.85% and 99.47% overall agreement in detecting total antibodies and IgM, respectively).

  10. Multicentric Evaluation of New Commercial Enzyme Immunoassays for the Detection of Immunoglobulin M and Total Antibodies against Hepatitis A Virus▿

    PubMed Central

    Arcangeletti, M. C.; Dussaix, E.; Ferraglia, F.; Roque-Afonso, A. M.; Graube, A.; Chezzi, C.

    2011-01-01

    A multicentric clinical study was conducted on representative sera from 1,738 European and U.S. subjects for the evaluation of new anti-hepatitis A virus enzyme immunoassays from Bio-Rad Laboratories. Comparison with reference DiaSorin S.p.A. tests confirmed the good performance of Bio-Rad assays (99.85% and 99.47% overall agreement in detecting total antibodies and IgM, respectively). PMID:21653739

  11. Hepatitis B virus replication in steroid-treated severe HBsAg-positive chronic active hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Davis, G L; Czaja, A J; Taswell, H F; Ludwig, J; Go, V L

    1985-02-01

    To determine the effect of corticosteroids on the replication of hepatitis B virus and to assess the relationship between virus replication and prognosis, the behavior of serum and tissue HBcAg was evaluated in 16 patients with severe HBsAg-positive chronic active hepatitis who were treated with prednisone and followed for up to 10 years (mean +/- SEM, 66 +/- 9 months). Hepatitis B virus replication was assessed in serum by a solid-phase radioimmunoassay of Dane particle-associated HBcAg and in liver tissue by indirect immunoperoxidase staining for HBcAg. Despite the presence of severe inflammatory activity, only low levels of hepatitis B virus replication were demonstrated. Mean serum HBcAg levels were low at accession and remained essentially unchanged or gradually decreased during corticosteroid therapy. Serum HBcAg appeared in only one patient in whom no virus replication was detected prior to therapy. HBeAg was frequently detected at low titers by radioimmunoassay when serum HBcAg was undetectable. Loss of HBcAg preceded loss of HBeAg by radioimmunoassay, and disappearance of both markers was a prerequisite for sustained histologic remission. In eight patients, inflammation was present despite absence of serum or tissue HBcAg; in three of these, disease activity continued after loss of HBeAg. We conclude that low levels of hepatitis B virus replication may be associated with severe inflammatory activity, and these levels are not increased by long-term corticosteroid therapy. Inflammation can continue despite loss of HBeAg and absence of detectable virus replication.

  12. Liver enzymes are associated with hepatic insulin resistance, insulin secretion, and glucagon concentration in healthy men and women.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Fabrice; Ducluzeau, Pierre-Henri; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Laville, Martine; Anderwald, Christian H; Konrad, Thomas; Mari, Andrea; Balkau, Beverley

    2011-06-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms to explain the association between risk of type 2 diabetes and elevated concentrations of γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and alanineaminotransferase (ALT) remain poorly characterized. We explored the association of liver enzymes with peripheral and hepatic insulin resistance, insulin secretion, insulin clearance, and glucagon concentration. We studied 1,309 nondiabetic individuals from the Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular disease (RISC) study; all had a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with assessment of insulin secretion and hepatic insulin extraction. The hepatic insulin resistance index was calculated in 393 individuals. In both men and women, plasma concentrations of GGT and ALT were inversely related with insulin sensitivity (M/I) (all P < 0.01). Likewise, the hepatic insulin resistance index was positively correlated with both GGT (r = 0.37, P < 0.0001, men; r = 0.36, P < 0.0001, women) and ALT (r = 0.25, P = 0.0005, men; r = 0.18, P = 0.01, women). These associations persisted in multivariable models. Increased GGT and ALT were significantly associated with higher insulin secretion rates and with both reduced endogenous clearance of insulin and hepatic insulin extraction during the OGTT (P = 0.0005 in men; P = 0.003 in women). Plasma fasting glucagon levels increased over ALT quartiles (men, quartile 4 vs. quartile 1 11.2 ± 5.1 vs. 9.3 ± 3.8 pmol/L, respectively, P = 0.0002; women, 9.0 ± 4.3 vs. 7.6 ± 3.1, P = 0.001). In healthy individuals, increased GGT and ALT were biomarkers of both systemic and hepatic insulin resistance with concomitant increased insulin secretion and decreased hepatic insulin clearance. The novel finding of a positive correlation between ALT and fasting glucagon level concentrations warrants confirmation in type 2 diabetes.

  13. Experiment K304: Studies of specific hepatic enzymes and liver constituents involved in the conversion of carbohydrates to lipids in rats exposed to prolonged space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, S.; Klein, H. P.; Lin, C. Y.; Volkmann, C.; Tigranyan, R. A.; Vetrova, E. G.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of space flight on the activities of 26 enzymes concerned with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in hepatic tissue taken from male Wistar rats are investigated. These activities were measured in the various hepatic cell compartments, i.e., cytosol, mitochondria and microsomes. In addition, the levels of glycogen, total lipids, phospholipids, triglycerides, cholesterol, cholesterol esters, and the fatty acid composition of the rat livers were also examined and quantified. A similar group of ground-based rats treated in an identical manner served as controls. Both flight and synchronous control rats were sacrificed at three time intervals: R+0, 7-11 hours after recovery; R+6, after 6 days; R+6(S), after 6 days (having undergone 2-5 hour periods of fixed stress in a "backupward" position on days 0, 3, 4, 5 and 6) and R+29, after 29 days post-flight. Although most of the enzyme activities and the amounts of liver constituents studied were unaffected by the period of weightlessness, some significant differences were observed.

  14. Experiment K304: Studies of specific hepatic enzymes and liver constituents involved in the conversion of carbohydrates to lipids in rats exposed to prolonged space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, S.; Klein, H. P.; Lin, C. Y.; Volkmann, C.; Tigranyan, R. A.; Vetrova, E. G.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of space flight on the activities of 26 enzymes concerned with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in hepatic tissue taken from male Wistar rats are investigated. These activities were measured in the various hepatic cell compartments, i.e., cytosol, mitochondria and microsomes. In addition, the levels of glycogen, total lipids, phospholipids, triglycerides, cholesterol, cholesterol esters, and the fatty acid composition of the rat livers were also examined and quantified. A similar group of ground-based rats treated in an identical manner served as controls. Both flight and synchronous control rats were sacrificed at three time intervals: R+0, 7-11 hours after recovery; R+6, after 6 days; R+6(S), after 6 days (having undergone 2-5 hour periods of fixed stress in a "backupward" position on days 0, 3, 4, 5 and 6) and R+29, after 29 days post-flight. Although most of the enzyme activities and the amounts of liver constituents studied were unaffected by the period of weightlessness, some significant differences were observed.

  15. Diffusional correlations among multiple active sites in a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-04-07

    Simulations of the enzymatic dynamics of a model enzyme containing multiple substrate binding sites indicate the existence of diffusional correlations in the chemical reactivity of the active sites. A coarse-grain, particle-based, mesoscopic description of the system, comprising the enzyme, the substrate, the product and solvent, is constructed to study these effects. The reactive and non-reactive dynamics is followed using a hybrid scheme that combines molecular dynamics for the enzyme, substrate and product molecules with multiparticle collision dynamics for the solvent. It is found that the reactivity of an individual active site in the multiple-active-site enzyme is reduced substantially, and this effect is analyzed and attributed to diffusive competition for the substrate among the different active sites in the enzyme.

  16. Gluconeogenic substrates and hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes in streptozotocin-diabetic rats: effect of mulberry (Morus indica L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Andallu, B; Varadacharyulu, N C

    2007-03-01

    Mulberry (Morus indica L.) leaves, the sole food of the silk worm, were evaluated for antidiabetic effects in streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats. Treatment with dried mulberry leaf powder at 25% of the diet for a period of 8 weeks was found to be remarkably beneficial to STZ-diabetic rats as evidenced by controlled hyperglycemia and glycosuria. In addition, mulberry leaves countered (reversed) the alterations in gluconeogenic substrates in STZ-diabetic rats as indicated by significant reduction in serum pyruvic and lactic acid levels, a significant increase in proteins and a significant decrease in free amino acid, urea, and creatinine levels in blood, and a decreased urinary excretion of urea and creatinine. Anomalies in the activities of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes associated with impaired glucose homeostasis in STZ-diabetic rats were ameliorated by feeding the mulberry leaf-supplemented diet, indicating that control over hyperglycemia and associated complications in the diabetic state by mulberry leaves is by way of regulation of gluconeogenesis. With respect to all the parameters, mulberry leaves were more effective than the oral hypoglycemic drug glibenclamide.

  17. Hepatic steroid inactivating enzymes, hepatic portal blood flow, and corpus luteum blood perfusion in lactating dairy cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In ruminants, a decrease in pregnancy rates may be due to decreased concentrations of progesterone (P4). It is important to note that both production from the corpus luteum and/or hepatic steroid inactivation impacts peripheral concentrations of P4. Cattle with an elevated dry matter intake have inc...

  18. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  19. Neuronal CCL2 is upregulated during hepatic encephalopathy and contributes to microglia activation and neurological decline

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute liver failure leads to systemic complications with one of the most dangerous being a decline in neurological function, termed hepatic encephalopathy. Neurological dysfunction is exacerbated by an increase of toxic metabolites in the brain that lead to neuroinflammation. Following various liver diseases, hepatic and circulating chemokines, such as chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), are elevated, though their effects on the brain following acute liver injury and subsequent hepatic encephalopathy are unknown. CCL2 is known to activate microglia in other neuropathies, leading to a proinflammatory response. However, the effects of CCL2 on microglia activation and the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy following acute liver injury remain to be determined. Methods Hepatic encephalopathy was induced in mice via injection of azoxymethane (AOM) in the presence or absence of INCB 3284 dimesylate (INCB), a chemokine receptor 2 inhibitor, or C 021 dihydrochloride (C021), a chemokine receptor 4 inhibitor. Mice were monitored for neurological decline and time to coma (loss of all reflexes) was recorded. Tissue was collected at coma and used for real-time PCR, immunoblots, ELISA, or immunostaining analyses to assess the activation of microglia and consequences on pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Results Following AOM administration, microglia activation was significantly increased in AOM-treated mice compared to controls. Concentrations of CCL2 in the liver, serum, and cortex were significantly elevated in AOM-treated mice compared to controls. Systemic administration of INCB or C021 reduced liver damage as assessed by serum liver enzyme biochemistry. Administration of INCB or C021 significantly improved the neurological outcomes of AOM-treated mice, reduced microglia activation, reduced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and alleviated AOM-induced cytokine upregulation. Conclusions These findings suggest that CCL2 is elevated systemically following acute liver injury

  20. Puerarin ameliorates hepatic steatosis by activating the PPARα and AMPK signaling pathways in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ok-Hwa; Kim, Sung-Bae; Mun, Su-Hyun; Seo, Yun-Soo; Hwang, Hyeong-Chil; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Ho-Seob; Kang, Dae-Gil; Kwon, Dong-Yeul

    2015-03-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and is the leading cause of chronic liver disease. Steatohepatitis plays a critical role in the process resulting in liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Puerarin is a herbal product widely used in Asia, and is believed to have therapeutic benefits for alleviating the symptoms of steatohepatitis. The present study was designed to investigate the effects and mechanisms of action of puerarin in reducing lipid accumulation in oleic acid (OA)-treated HepG2 cells. Hepatocytes were treated with OA with or without puerarin to observe lipid accumulation by Oil Red O staining. We also examined hepatic lipid contents (e.g., triacylglycerol and cholesterol) following treatment with puerarin. Western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to measure sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, fatty acid synthase (FAS), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) protein and mRNA expression, respectively. Our results revealed that puerarin suppressed OA-induced lipid accumulation, and reduced the triacylglycerol and cholesterol levels. Furthermore, puerarin decreased the expression levels of lipogenic enzymes, such as FAS and SREBPs, and increased the expression levels of PPARα, which are critical regulators of hepatic lipid metabolism through the AMPK signaling pathway. These results indicate that puerarin has the same ability to activate AMPK, and reduce SREBP-1 and FAS expression, thus inhibiting hepatic lipogenesis and increasing hepatic antioxidant activity. We found that puerarin exerted a regulatory effect on lipid accumulation by decreasing lipogenesis in hepatocytes. Therefore, puerarin extract may have therapeutic benefits in the treatment of fatty liver and lipid-related metabolic disorders.

  1. [Gallbladder motor activity in patients with virus hepatitis B].

    PubMed

    Mamos, Arkadiusz; Wichan, Paweł; Chojnacki, Jan; Grzegorczyk, Krzysztof

    2003-12-01

    In acute stage of virus hepatitis B patients often complain of dyspeptic discomfort. They may be a consequence of alimentary tract motor activity disorders including these of gallbladder. Routine ultrasonography in an early phase of virus hepatitis often reveals gallbladder wall thickening what may confirm the above thesis. Thus, a group of 15 patients in an acute phase of virus hepatitis B was subjected to examinations. Gallbladder motor activity was assessed by ultrasonographic method determining its total volume and ejection fraction and volume after test meal stimulus. First examination was performed in the first week since the appearance of yellowing of the walls, successive in 4 and 8 week of the disease. Obtained results were compared to the values obtained in the group of 25 healthy volunteers. It was found out that gallbladder volume was significantly decreased and ejection fraction increased in the acute phase of virus hepatitis B than in the controls. This may speak for gallbladder hyperreactivity in patients in the course of virus hepatitis B. These disorders decreased during two-month observation but even in the 8 week the investigated parameters differed from those found in the control group.

  2. Enzyme activities along a latitudinal transect in Western Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnecker, Jörg; Wild, Birgit; Eloy Alves, Ricardo J.; Gentsch, Norman; Gittel, Antje; Knoltsch, Anna; Lashchinskiy, Nikolay; Mikutta, Robert; Takriti, Mounir; Richter, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) and thus carbon and nutrient cycling in soils is mediated by the activity of extracellular enzymes. The specific activities of these enzymes and their ratios to each other represent the link between the composition of soil organic matter and the nutrient demand of the microbial community. Depending on the difference between microbial nutrient demand and substrate availability, extracellular enzymes can enhance or slow down different nutrient cycles in the soil. We investigated activities of six extracellular enzymes (cellobiohydrolase, leucine-amino-peptidase, N-acetylglucosaminidase, chitotriosidase, phosphatase and phenoloxidase) in the topsoil organic horizon, topsoil mineral horizon and subsoil horizon in seven ecosystems along a 1,500 km-long North-South transect in Western Siberia. The transect included sites in the southern tundra, northern taiga, middle taiga, southern taiga, forest-steppe (in forested patches as well as in adjacent meadows) and Steppe. We found that enzyme patterns varied stronger with soil depth than between ecosystems. Differences between horizons were mainly based on the increasing ratio of oxidative enzymes to hydrolytic enzymes. Differences between sites were more pronounced in topsoil than in subsoil mineral horizons, but did not reflect the north-south transect and the related gradients in temperature and precipitation. The observed differences between sites in topsoil horizons might therefore result from differences in vegetation rather than climatic factors. The decreasing variability in the enzyme pattern with depth might also indicate that the composition of soil organic matter becomes more similar with soil depth, most likely by an increasing proportion of microbial remains compared to plant derived constituents of SOM. This also indicates, that SOM becomes less divers the more it is processed by soil microorganisms. Our findings highlight the importance of soil depth on enzyme

  3. Stimulation of hepatic mitochondrial alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme by L-triiodothyronine. Characteristics of the response with specific nuclear thyroid hormone binding sites fully saturated.

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, J H; Silva, E; Schwartz, H L; Surks, M I

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were designed to analyze the relationship of a single i.v. dose of triiodothyronine (T3), the level of plasma and hepatic nuclear T3 attained, and the tissue response as reflected in increased activity of hepatic mitochondrial alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (alpha-GPD) and cytosol "malic enzyme" (ME). These studied were carried out in euthyroid rats by varying the dose of T3 injected and the time at which the animals were killed and the enzyme levels measured. The plasma T3 concentration was determined and the fraction of nuclear sites occupied at any time t was calculated from the known plasma:nuclear relationship. As a first step, the analysis was confined to the limiting situation in which all nuclear sites were effectively saturated. The following additional information was required and obtained: A proportional relationship between the half-neutralizing volume of a specific antiserum to malic enzyme and the activity of malic enzyme was established, thus confirming previous reports that the increase in enzyme activity induced by T3 is due to increased enzyme mass. The absolute refractory period immediately after i.v. injection of T3, during which no enzyme response could be detected, was determined. This was shown to be 13.4 h for alpha-GPD and 8.2 h for ME. Lastly, the t1/2 of the enzyme decay after pulse injection of T3 was measured. This was similar for both enzymes, 2.8+/-0.6 (SD) days for alpha-GPD and 2.7+/-0.6 (SD) days for ME. The results of these studies indicated that the extent of hepatic response appears limited by full occupancy of a set of intracellular receptor sites by T3 which is in rapid equilibrium with the plasma hormone pool. The kinetic properties of the receptors, as functionally defined in these studies, resemble those associated with the recently described specific nuclear T3 sites. These data per se are thus compatible with but do not prove a nuclear site of initiation of hormone effect. Thye do allow the development

  4. Hepatitis B virus e antigen induces activation of rat hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zan, Yanlu; Zhang, Yuxia; Tien, Po

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •HBeAg expression in HSCs induced production of ECM protein and liver fibrotic markers. •The activation and proliferation of HSCs were mediated by TGF-β. •HBeAg protein purified from cell medium directly activated HSCs. -- Abstract: Chronic hepatitis B virus infection is a major cause of hepatic fibrosis, leading to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) is an accessory protein of HBV, not required for viral replication but important for natural infection in vivo. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the major producers of excessive extracellular matrix during liver fibrogenesis. Therefore, we examined the influence of HBeAg on HSCs. The rat HSC line HSC-T6 was transfected with HBeAg plasmids, and expression of α-smooth muscle actin, collagen I, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β), and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR. The proliferation of HSCs was determined by MTS analysis. HBeAg transduction induced up-regulation of these fibrogenic genes and proliferation of HSCs. We found that HBeAg induced TGF-β secretion in HSCs, and the activation of HSCs was prevented by a neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody. Depletion and addition of HBeAg protein in conditioned medium from HSC-T6 cells transduced with HBeAg indicated that HBeAg directly induced the activation and proliferation of rat primary HSCs. Taken together, HBeAg induces the activation and proliferation of HSCs, mainly mediated by TGF-β, and HBeAg protein purified from cell medium can directly activate HSCs.

  5. Establishment of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system for determining soluble CD96 and its application in the measurement of sCD96 in patients with viral hepatitis B and hepatic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Gong, J; Zhu, C; Zhuang, R; Song, C; Li, Q; Xu, Z; Wei, Y; Yang, K; Yang, A; Chen, L; Jin, B

    2009-01-01

    CD96, previously named T cell activation increased late expression (Tactile), is a transmembrane molecule that functions as an activated receptor on natural killer cells. It is well known that many transmembrane molecules have soluble forms, which were either shed from the cell surface or spliced at mRNA level. In many cases, the levels of soluble forms in the circulation could be used as biomarkers of lymphocyte activation in bacterial or virus infection, tumour, transplantation and autoimmue disease. To investigate whether CD96 could be released into the sera and the possible biological fuction of soluble hCD96 (sCD96), we generated and characterized five clones of anti-hCD96 mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAb) and developed a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system based on two anti-hCD96 mAbs with different epitope specificities. Using this ELISA system, sCD96 in serum samples from 99 healthy individuals could be detected. Furthermore, we found that the level of sCD96 in serum samples from patients with chronic viral hepatitis B or classes B and C of hepatic cirrhosis classified using the Child–Pugh score was much higher (P < 0·001 versus healthy individuals; P = 0·006 versus healthy individuals respectively) than that from healthy individuals (0·98 ng/ml). Our study demonstrates for the first time that sCD96 existed in sera, and suggestes that sCD96 may be used as a serous marker for some diseases such as chronic viral hepatitis B infection or hepatic cirrhosis in classes B and C. The level of sCD96 in patients’ serum may have some relationship with a chronic inflammatory reaction. PMID:19040604

  6. Eucommia ulmoides Oliver Extract, Aucubin, and Geniposide Enhance Lysosomal Activity to Regulate ER Stress and Hepatic Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwa-Young; Lee, Geum-Hwa; Lee, Mi-Rin; Kim, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Nan-young; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Yong-Chul; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Eucommia ulmoides Oliver is a natural product widely used as a dietary supplement and medicinal plant. Here, we examined the potential regulatory effects of Eucommia ulmoides Oliver extracts (EUE) on hepatic dyslipidemia and its related mechanisms by in vitro and in vivo studies. EUE and its two active constituents, aucubin and geniposide, inhibited palmitate-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, reducing hepatic lipid accumulation through secretion of apolipoprotein B and associated triglycerides and cholesterol in human HepG2 hepatocytes. To determine how EUE diminishes the ER stress response, lysosomal and proteasomal protein degradation activities were analyzed. Although proteasomal activity was not affected, lysosomal enzyme activities including V-ATPase were significantly increased by EUE as well as aucubin and geniposide in HepG2 cells. Treatment with the V-ATPase inhibitor, bafilomycin, reversed the inhibition of ER stress, secretion of apolipoprotein B, and hepatic lipid accumulation induced by EUE or its component, aucubin or geniposide. In addition, EUE was determined to regulate hepatic dyslipidemia by enhancing lysosomal activity and to regulate ER stress in rats fed a high-fat diet. Together, these results suggest that EUE and its active components enhance lysosomal activity, resulting in decreased ER stress and hepatic dyslipidemia. PMID:24349058

  7. TREATABILITY STUDY BULLETIN: ENZYME-ACTIVATED CELLULOSE TECHNOLOGY - THORNECO, INC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Enzyme-Activated Cellulose Technology developed by Thorneco, Inc. uses cellulose placed into one or more cylindrical towers to remove metals and organic compounds from an aqueous solution. The cellulose is coated with a proprietary enzyme. Operating parameters that can affe...

  8. Polar bear hepatic cytochrome P450: Immunochemical quantitation, EROD/PROD activity and organochlorines

    SciTech Connect

    Letcher, R.J.; Norstrom, R.J. |

    1994-12-31

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are an ubiquitous mammal atop the arctic marine food chain and bioaccumulate lipophilic environmental contaminants. Antibodies prepared against purified rat liver cytochrome P450-1 Al, -1 A2, -2Bl and -3Al enzymes have been found to cross-react with structurally-related orthologues present in the hepatic microsomes of wild polar bears, immunochemically determined levels of P450-1 A and -2B proteins in polar bear liver relative to liver of untreated rats suggested enzyme induction, probably as a result of exposure to xenobiotic contaminants. Optical density quantitation of the most immunochemically responsive isozymes P450-I Al, -IA2 and -2Bi to polygonal rabbit anti-rat P450-IA/IA2 sera and -2BI antibodies in hepatic microsomes of 13 adult male polar bars from the Resolute Bay area of the Canadian Arctic is presented. Correlations with EROD and PROD catalytic activities and levels of organochlorines, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethene (p,p-DDE) and their methyl sulfone (MeSO2-) metabolites are made to determine if compound-specific enzyme induction linkages exist. Inter-species immunochemical quantitation of isozymic P450 cytochromes can serve as an indicator of exposure to biologically active contaminant.

  9. Photoreactivating enzyme activity in the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta

    SciTech Connect

    Woodhead, A.D.; Achey, P.M.

    1981-06-01

    There has been considerable speculation about the occurrence of photoreactivating enzyme in different organisms and about its biological purpose. We have developed a simple, sensitive assay for estimating pyrimidine dimers in DNA which is useful in making a rapid survey for the presence of the enzyme. Using this method, we have found photoreactivating enzyme activity in the tissues of the rat tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta. This parasite spends the majority of its life span in the bodies of its definitive or intermediate hosts, but a period is spent externally. We suggest that photoreactivating enzyme may be important in preserving the integrity of embryonic DNA during this free-living stage.

  10. Photoreactivating enzyme activity in the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta

    SciTech Connect

    Woodhead, A.D.; Achey, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    There has been considerable speculation about the occurrence of photoreactivating enzyme in different organisms and about its biologic purpose. We have developed a simple, sensitive assay for estimating pyrimidine dimers in DNA which is useful in making a rapid survey for the presence of the enzyme. Using this method, we have found photoreactivating enzyme activity in the tissues of the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta. This parasite spends the majority of its life span in the bodies of its definitive or intermediate hosts, but a period is spent externally. We suggest that photoreactivating enzyme may be important in perserving the integrity of embryonic DNA during this free-living stage.

  11. Enzyme activity control by responsive redoxpolymers.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Birgit; Warsinke, Axel; Katterle, Martin

    2007-06-05

    A new thermoresponsive poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAM)-ferrocene polymer was synthesized and characterized. PNIPAMFoxy bears additional oxirane groups which were used for attachment by a self-assembly process on a cysteamine-modified gold electrode to create a thin hydrophilic film. The new redox polymer enabled electrical communication between the cofactor pyrrolinoquinoline quinone (PQQ) of soluble glucose dehydrogenase (sGDH) and the electrode for sensitive detection of this enzyme as a prospective protein label. The temperature influence on the redox polymer/enzyme complex was investigated. An inverse temperature response behavior of surface bound PNIPAMFoxy compared to the soluble polymer was found and is discussed in detail. The highest efficiency of mediated electron transfer for the immobilized PNIPAMFoxy with sGDH was observed at 24 degrees C, which was twice as high as that of its soluble counterpart. A steady-state electrooxidation current densitiy of 4.5 microA.cm-2 was observed in the presence of 10 nM sGDH and 5 mM glucose. A detection limit of 0.5 nM of soluble PQQ-sGDH was obtained.

  12. Increasing the activity of immobilized enzymes with nanoparticle conjugation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shaowei; Cargill, Allison A; Medintz, Igor L; Claussen, Jonathan C

    2015-08-01

    The efficiency and selectivity of enzymatic catalysis is useful to a plethora of industrial and manufacturing processes. Many of these processes require the immobilization of enzymes onto surfaces, which has traditionally reduced enzyme activity. However, recent research has shown that the integration of nanoparticles into enzyme carrier schemes has maintained or even enhanced immobilized enzyme performance. The nanoparticle size and surface chemistry as well as the orientation and density of immobilized enzymes all contribute to the enhanced performance of enzyme-nanoparticle conjugates. These improvements are noted in specific nanoparticles including those comprising carbon (e.g., graphene and carbon nanotubes), metal/metal oxides and polymeric nanomaterials, as well as semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of malonate and p-chlorophenoxy acetic acid on hepatic succinic dehydrogenase activity of ageing lizards.

    PubMed

    Jena, B S; Patnaik, B K

    1990-01-01

    The degree of inhibition of hepatic succinic dehydrogenase activity by malonate, a competitive inhibitor, did not differ between young and middle-aged lizards. On the other hand, the same parameter increased significantly between middle-aged and old lizards. The percent inhibition of enzyme activity by p-chlorophenoxy acetic acid was also age-dependent, being higher in middle-aged and old than in young lizards.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and hepatic stellate cell activation.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, T; Schrum, L; Rippe, R; Xiong, S; Yee, H F; Motomura, K; Anania, F A; Willson, T M; Tsukamoto, H

    2000-11-17

    The present study examined the roles of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) in activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC), a pivotal event in liver fibrogenesis. RNase protection assay detected mRNA for PPARgamma1 but not that for the adipocyte-specific gamma2 isoform in HSC isolated from sham-operated rats, whereas the transcripts for neither isoforms were detectable in HSC from cholestatic liver fibrosis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction confirmed a 70% reduction in PPARgamma mRNA level in HSC from BDL. Nuclear extracts from BDL cells showed an expected diminution of binding to PPAR-responsive element, whereas NF-kappaB and AP-1 binding were increased. Treatment of cultured-activated HSC with ligands for PPARgamma (10 microm 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15dPGJ(2)); 0.1 approximately 10 microm BRL49653) inhibited DNA and collagen synthesis without affecting the cell viability. Suppression of HSC collagen by 15dPGJ(2) was abrogated 70% by the concomitant treatment with a PPARgamma antagonist (GW9662). HSC DNA and collagen synthesis were inhibited by WY14643 at the concentrations known to activate both PPARalpha and gamma (>100 microm) but not at those that only activate PPARalpha (<10 microm) or by a synthetic PPARalpha-selective agonist (GW9578). 15dPGJ(2) reduced alpha1(I) procollagen, smooth muscle alpha-actin, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 mRNA levels while inducing matrix metalloproteinase-3 and CD36. 15dPGJ(2) and BRL49653 inhibited alpha1(I) procollagen promoter activity. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (10 ng/ml) reduced PPARgamma mRNA, and this effect was prevented by the treatment with 15dPGJ(2). These results demonstrate that HSC activation is associated with the reductions in PPARgamma expression and PPAR-responsive element binding in vivo and is reversed by the treatment with PPARgamma ligands in vitro. These findings implicate diminished PPARgamma signaling in

  15. Metformin regulates hepatic lipid metabolism through activating AMP-activated protein kinase and inducing ATGL in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Lu; Wei, Hen-Wei; Chiu, Wen-Zan; Kang, Ching-Hui; Lin, Ting-Han; Hung, Chien-Ching; Chen, Ming-Chun; Shieh, Ming-Song; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Lee, Horng-Mo

    2011-12-05

    Although many clinical trials have showed that metformin improves non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which is a common liver disease associated with hepatic enzyme abnormalities, an animal model is required to investigate the effects of altered gene expression and post-translational processing (proteins) in mediating the observed responses. Laying hens appear to develop fatty livers, as in the case in human beings, when ingesting energy in excess of maintenance, and they can be used as an animal model for observing hepatic steatosis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether metformin could improve the non-alcoholic fatty liver of laying hens and to examine the possible mechanisms of lipid-lowering effects. Forty-eight Leghorn laying hens of Hy-Line variety W-36 - 44 weeks with 64.8% hen-day egg production - were randomly assigned into 4 treatments, each receiving 0, 10, 30, or 100mg of metformin with saline per kg body weight by daily wing vein injection. Results showed that, compared with the control, significant decreases existed in the laying rates; plasma triglyceride, cholesterol, and insulin levels; body weights; abdominal fat weights; hepatic lipid contents; and hepatic fatty acid synthase expression of layers receiving 30 or 100mg per kg body weight, whereas significant increases in their hepatic 5'adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, acyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylation, adipose triglyceride lipase, and carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 expression were observed. These data suggest that metformin could reduce lipid deposits in the liver and that the laying hen is a valuable animal model for studying hepatic steatosis.

  16. Function and biotechnology of extremophilic enzymes in low water activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes from extremophilic microorganisms usually catalyze chemical reactions in non-standard conditions. Such conditions promote aggregation, precipitation, and denaturation, reducing the activity of most non-extremophilic enzymes, frequently due to the absence of sufficient hydration. Some extremophilic enzymes maintain a tight hydration shell and remain active in solution even when liquid water is limiting, e.g. in the presence of high ionic concentrations, or at cold temperature when water is close to the freezing point. Extremophilic enzymes are able to compete for hydration via alterations especially to their surface through greater surface charges and increased molecular motion. These properties have enabled some extremophilic enzymes to function in the presence of non-aqueous organic solvents, with potential for design of useful catalysts. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of extremophilic enzymes functioning in high salinity and cold temperatures, focusing on their strategy for function at low water activity. We discuss how the understanding of extremophilic enzyme function is leading to the design of a new generation of enzyme catalysts and their applications to biotechnology. PMID:22480329

  17. Investigation of Antioxidant and Hepatoprotective Activity of Standardized Curcuma xanthorrhiza Rhizome in Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Hepatic Damaged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Devaraj, Sutha; Ismail, Sabariah; Ramanathan, Surash

    2014-01-01

    Curcuma xanthorrhiza (CX) has been used for centuries in traditional system of medicine to treat several diseases such as hepatitis, liver complaints, and diabetes. It has been consumed as food supplement and “jamu” as a remedy for hepatitis. Hence, CX was further explored for its potential as a functional food for liver related diseases. As such, initiative was taken to evaluate the antioxidant and hepatoprotective potential of CX rhizome. Antioxidant activity of the standardized CX fractions was determined using in vitro assays. Hepatoprotective assay was conducted against carbon tetrachloride- (CCl4-) induced hepatic damage in rats at doses of 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg of hexane fraction. Highest antioxidant activity was found in hexane fraction. In the case of hepatoprotective activity, CX hexane fraction showed significant improvement in terms of a biochemical liver function, antioxidative liver enzymes, and lipid peroxidation activity. Good recovery was observed in the treated hepatic tissues histologically. Hence, the results concluded that CX hexane fraction possessed prominent hepatoprotective activities which might be due to its in vitro antioxidant activity. These findings also support the use of CX as a functional food for hepatitis remedy in traditional medicinal system. PMID:25133223

  18. Sustained gastrointestinal activity of dendronized polymer-enzyme conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, Gregor; Grotzky, Andrea; Lukić, Ružica; Matoori, Simon; Luciani, Paola; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Baozhong; Walde, Peter; Schlüter, A. Dieter; Gauthier, Marc A.; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2013-07-01

    Methods to stabilize and retain enzyme activity in the gastrointestinal tract are investigated rarely because of the difficulty of protecting proteins from an environment that has evolved to promote their digestion. Preventing the degradation of enzymes under these conditions, however, is critical for the development of new protein-based oral therapies. Here we show that covalent conjugation to polymers can stabilize orally administered therapeutic enzymes at different locations in the gastrointestinal tract. Architecturally and functionally diverse polymers are used to protect enzymes sterically from inactivation and to promote interactions with mucin on the stomach wall. Using this approach the in vivo activity of enzymes can be sustained for several hours in the stomach and/or in the small intestine. These findings provide new insight and a firm basis for the development of new therapeutic and imaging strategies based on orally administered proteins using a simple and accessible technology.

  19. Fish oil at low dietary levels enhances physiological activity of sesamin to increase hepatic fatty acid oxidation in rats.

    PubMed

    Ide, Takashi

    2012-11-01

    We previously demonstrated that a diet containing fish oil at a level of 80 g/kg strongly stimulated the physiological activity of a sesame sesamin preparation containing sesamin and episesamin at equal amounts to increase hepatic fatty acid oxidation. This study was conducted to clarify whether fish oil at lower dietary levels enhances the physiological activity of sesamin to increase hepatic fatty acid oxidation. Rats were fed experimental diets supplemented with 0 or 2 g sesamin/kg, and containing 0, 15 or 30 g fish oil/kg for 15 days. Among rats fed sesamin-free diets, diets containing 15 and 30 g fish oil/kg slightly increased the activity of enzymes involved in hepatic fatty acid oxidation. Sesamin increased these values irrespective of the presence or absence of fish oil in diets; however, the extent of the increase of many parameters was much greater in rats given fish oil-containing diets than in those fed a fish oil-free diet. Diets simultaneously containing sesamin and fish oil increased the gene expression of various peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation enzymes in a synergistic manner; but they were ineffective in causing a synergistic increase in mRNA levels of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation enzymes. The extent of the synergistic increase in the activity of hepatic fatty acid oxidation enzymes and mRNA levels of the peroxisomal enzymes was indistinguishable between diets containing 15 and 30 g fish oil/kg and appeared comparable to that observed previously with a diet containing 80 g fish oil/kg.

  20. Feeding glycerol-enriched yeast culture improves lactation performance, energy status, and hepatic gluconeogenic enzyme expression of dairy cows during the transition period.

    PubMed

    Ye, G; Liu, J; Liu, Y; Chen, X; Liao, S F; Huang, D; Huang, K

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of feeding glycerol-enriched yeast culture (GY) on feed intake, lactation performance, blood metabolites, and expression of some key hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes in dairy cows during the transition period. Forty-four multiparous transition Holstein cows were blocked by parity, previous 305-d mature equivalent milk yield, and expected calving date and randomly allocated to 4 dietary treatments: Control (no additive), 2 L/d of GY (75.8 g/L glycerol and 15.3 g/L yeast), 150 g/d of glycerol (G; 0.998 g/g glycerol), and 1 L/d of yeast culture (Y; 31.1 g/L yeast). All additives were top-dressed and hand mixed into the upper one-third of the total mixed ration in the morning from -14 to +28 d relative to calving. Results indicated that the DMI, NE intake, change of BCS, and milk yields were not affected by the treatments ( > 0.05). Supplementation of GY or Y increased milk fat percentages, milk protein percentages, and milk protein yields relative to the Control or G group ( < 0.05). Cows fed GY or G had higher glucose levels and lower β-hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA) and NEFA levels in plasma than cows fed the Control ( < 0.05) and had lower NEFA levels than cows fed Y ( < 0.05). On 14 d postpartum, cows fed GY or G had higher enzyme activities, mRNA, and protein expression of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C; < 0.05); higher enzyme activities ( < 0.05) and a tendency toward higher mRNA expression ( < 0.10) of glycerol kinase (GK); and a tendency toward higher enzyme activities of pyruvate carboxylase (PC) in the liver ( < 0.10) when compared with cows fed Control or Y. The enzyme activities, mRNA, and protein expression of PEPCK-C, PC, and GK did not differ between cows fed GY and G ( > 0.10). In conclusion, dietary GY or Y supplementation increased the milk fat and protein content of the cows in early lactation and GY or G supplementation improved the energy status as indicated by greater plasma glucose and

  1. Activation volumes of enzymes adsorbed on silica particles.

    PubMed

    Schuabb, Vitor; Czeslik, Claus

    2014-12-30

    The immobilization of enzymes on carrier particles is useful in many biotechnological processes. In this way, enzymes can be separated from the reaction solution by filtering and can be reused in several cycles. On the other hand, there is a series of examples of free enzymes in solution that can be activated by the application of pressure. Thus, a potential loss of enzymatic activity upon immobilization on carrier particles might be compensated by pressure. In this study, we have determined the activation volumes of two enzymes, α-chymotrypsin (α-CT) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP), when they are adsorbed on silica particles and free in solution. The experiments have been carried out using fluorescence assays under pressures up to 2000 bar. In all cases, activation volumes were found to depend on the applied pressure, suggesting different compressions of the enzyme-substrate complex and the transition state. The volume profiles of free and adsorbed HRP are similar. For α-CT, larger activation volumes are found in the adsorbed state. However, up to about 500 bar, the enzymatic reaction of α-CT, which is adsorbed on silica particles, is characterized by a negative activation volume. This observation suggests that application of pressure might indeed be useful to enhance the activity of enzymes on carrier particles.

  2. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... transaminase enzyme levels Treatment There is no specific treatment for hepatitis A. You should rest when the symptoms are ... and have not had hepatitis A or the hepatitis A vaccine. Common reasons for getting one or both of these treatments include: You live with someone who has hepatitis ...

  3. Compounds from silicones alter enzyme activity in curing barnacle glue and model enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rittschof, Daniel; Orihuela, Beatriz; Harder, Tilmann; Stafslien, Shane; Chisholm, Bret; Dickinson, Gary H

    2011-02-17

    Attachment strength of fouling organisms on silicone coatings is low. We hypothesized that low attachment strength on silicones is, in part, due to the interaction of surface available components with natural glues. Components could alter curing of glues through bulk changes or specifically through altered enzyme activity. GC-MS analysis of silicone coatings showed surface-available siloxanes when the coatings were gently rubbed with a cotton swab for 15 seconds or given a 30 second rinse with methanol. Mixtures of compounds were found on 2 commercial and 8 model silicone coatings. The hypothesis that silicone components alter glue curing enzymes was tested with curing barnacle glue and with commercial enzymes. In our model, barnacle glue curing involves trypsin-like serine protease(s), which activate enzymes and structural proteins, and a transglutaminase which cross-links glue proteins. Transglutaminase activity was significantly altered upon exposure of curing glue from individual barnacles to silicone eluates. Activity of purified trypsin and, to a greater extent, transglutaminase was significantly altered by relevant concentrations of silicone polymer constituents. Surface-associated silicone compounds can disrupt glue curing and alter enzyme properties. Altered curing of natural glues has potential in fouling management.

  4. Compounds from Silicones Alter Enzyme Activity in Curing Barnacle Glue and Model Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Rittschof, Daniel; Orihuela, Beatriz; Harder, Tilmann; Stafslien, Shane; Chisholm, Bret; Dickinson, Gary H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Attachment strength of fouling organisms on silicone coatings is low. We hypothesized that low attachment strength on silicones is, in part, due to the interaction of surface available components with natural glues. Components could alter curing of glues through bulk changes or specifically through altered enzyme activity. Methodology/Principal Findings GC-MS analysis of silicone coatings showed surface-available siloxanes when the coatings were gently rubbed with a cotton swab for 15 seconds or given a 30 second rinse with methanol. Mixtures of compounds were found on 2 commercial and 8 model silicone coatings. The hypothesis that silicone components alter glue curing enzymes was tested with curing barnacle glue and with commercial enzymes. In our model, barnacle glue curing involves trypsin-like serine protease(s), which activate enzymes and structural proteins, and a transglutaminase which cross-links glue proteins. Transglutaminase activity was significantly altered upon exposure of curing glue from individual barnacles to silicone eluates. Activity of purified trypsin and, to a greater extent, transglutaminase was significantly altered by relevant concentrations of silicone polymer constituents. Conclusions/Significance Surface-associated silicone compounds can disrupt glue curing and alter enzyme properties. Altered curing of natural glues has potential in fouling management. PMID:21379573

  5. Effect of early feed restriction and enzyme supplementation on digestive enzyme activities in broilers.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, D F; Cruz, V C; Sartori, J R; Vicentini Paulino, M L M

    2004-09-01

    The effect of feed restriction and enzymatic supplementation on intestinal and pancreatic enzyme activities and weight gain was studied in broiler chickens. Quantitative feed restriction was applied to chickens from 7 to 14 d of age. An enzyme complex mainly consisting of protease and amylase was added to the chicken ration from hatching to the end of the experiment. Birds subjected to feed restriction whose diet was not supplemented showed an increase in sucrase, amylase, and lipase activities immediately after the restriction period. Amylase, lipase, and chymotrypsin activities were higher in chickens subjected to feed restriction and fed a supplemented diet than in those only subjected to feed restriction. Trypsin activity increased after feed restriction and after supplementation, but there was no interaction between these effects. Early feed restriction had no effect on enzyme activity in 42-d-old chickens. Chickens subjected to early restriction and fed the supplemented diet presented higher sucrase, maltase, and lipase activities than nonsupplemented ones (P < 0.05). There was no effect of early feed restriction or diet supplementation on weight gain to 42 d. Percentage weight gain from 14 to 42 d of age was equivalent in feed-restricted and ad libitum fed birds. Feed-restricted broilers fed a supplemented diet showed a higher percentage weight gain than nonsupplemented birds. We conclude that enzymatic supplementation potentiates the effect of feed restriction on digestive enzyme activity and on weight gain.

  6. ENZYMIC ACTIVITY IN FREEZE DRIED FOODS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    and bananas. Factors studied include, polyphenol oxidase , peroxidase, sucrase, alpha and beta amylase, pectinesterase and ascorbase activity as well...storage of freeze-dried and frozen peas at different moisture was studied. Lipase activity and production of free fatty acid was following during long term

  7. Effect of ketogenic diet on nucleotide hydrolysis and hepatic enzymes in blood serum of rats in a lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Vanessa Gass; de Paula Cognato, Giana; Müller, Alexandre Pastoris; Figueiró, Fabrício; Bonan, Carla Denise; Perry, Marcos L Santos; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2010-06-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is a high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet, used for treating refractory epilepsy in children. We have previously shown alterations in nucleotidase activities from the central nervous system and blood serum of rats submitted to different models of epilepsy. In this study we investigated the effect of KD on nucleotidase activities in the blood serum, as well if KD has any influence in the activity of liver enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase activities in Wistar rats submitted to the lithium-pilocarpine model of epilepsy. At 21 days of age, rats received an injection of lithium chloride and, 18-19 h later, they received an injection of pilocarpine hydrochloride for status epilepticus induction. The results reported herein show that seizures induced by lithium-pilocarpine elicit a significant increase in ATP hydrolysis and alkaline phosphatase activity, as well as a decrease in ADP hydrolysis and aspartate aminotransferase activity. The KD is a rigorous regimen that can be associated with hepatic damage, as shown herein by the elevated activities of liver enzymes and 5'-nucleotidase in blood serum. Further studies are necessary to investigate the mechanism of inhibition of lithium on nucleotidases in blood serum.

  8. Synergetic Effects of Nanoporous Support and Urea on Enzyme Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Chenghong; Shin, Yongsoon; Liu, Jun; Ackerman, Eric J.

    2007-02-01

    Here we report that synergetic effects of functionalized nanoporous support and urea on enzyme activity enhancement. Even in 8.0 M urea, the specific activity of GI entrapped in FMS was still higher than the highest specific activity of GI free in solution, indicating the strong tolerance of GI in FMS to the high concentration of urea.

  9. Investigation of enzyme activity by SERRS using poly-functionalised benzotriazole derivatives as enzyme substrates.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Andrew M; Stirling, Kirsten; Faulds, Karen; Moore, Barry D; Graham, Duncan

    2006-08-07

    New methods of measuring biologically relevant concentrations of enzymes are necessary to allow greater understanding of biological systems. We have previously shown that aryl azo benzotriazolyl alkyl esters can act as enzyme substrates, with the progress of the reaction being monitored using SERRS (see Nat. Biotechnol., 2004, 22, 1133, ref. ). This is a wholly novel analytical application of SERRS, and the low detection levels of the technique allow for an ultra-sensitive enzyme assay. Masked enzyme substrates are used that are invisible to SERRS until enzymatic hydrolysis. Turnover of the substrate by the enzyme leads to the release of the surface-seeking dye necessary for SERRS, and intense signals are produced. Here we report an improved synthesis of 2H-benzotriazolyl alkyl esters via nucleophilic substitution of a chloromethyl ester by benzotriazolyl azo dyes, giving up to a ten-fold increase on previously reported yields. Introduction of electron-withdrawing groups to the benzotriazole ring allows control over the SERRS properties of the compounds. This is of great significance in expanding the synthetic flexibility and subsequently the fundamental use of these compounds as ultra-sensitive and selective reporters of enzyme activity.

  10. Undiagnosed hepatitis C virus infection in hemodialysis patients: value of HCV RNA and liver enzyme levels.

    PubMed

    Caramelo, C; Bartolomé, J; Albalate, M; de Sequera, P; Navas, S; Bermejillo, T; Oliva, H; Marriott, E; Ortiz, A; Ruiz Tuñón, C; Casado, S; Carreño, V

    1996-12-01

    At present, routine screening for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is based on the detection of antiviral antibodies. Underdiagnosis of HCV infection by using HCV antibody tests, however, still occurs. Additional diagnostic means are provided by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The measurement of aminotransferase (ASAT and ALAT) has served as an auxiliary, less specific test. The present research aimed to design practical and low cost strategies to diminish underdiagnosis of HCV infection in dialysis patients. With this purpose in mind, we examined whether aminotransferases values in HCV antibody-negative patients could be related to undiagnosed HCV infection, by using HCV RNA testing by PCR as the gold standard. In 112 hemodialysis patients, we found 78 negative and 34 positive for HCV antibodies. A major finding was that 222 (28.2%) out of the 78 HCV antibodies-negative patients had positive HCV RNA by PCR. In repeated samples taken at six months follow-up from 19 out of these 22 patients, only one of them was positive for anti-HCV antibodies; moreover, a positive HCV RNA by PCR was confirmed in 13 (68.5%) of them. Within the HCV antibody-negative group, the mean values of ASAT, ALAT and gammaglutamiltransferase were higher (P < 0.001, P < 0.001 and P < 0.02, respectively) in the HCV PCR-positive versus the HCV PCR-negative patients. No significant differences were found in the liver enzyme values between the HCV antibody-negative, HCV RNA positive and the HCV antibody positive, HCV RNA positive individuals. Histological samples from two HCV RNA positive, HCV antibody-negative patients disclosed the presence of a mild liver disease. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates the critical importance of HCV RNA determination by PCR in hemodialysis patients who have no detectable circulating antibodies against the HCV. Furthermore, in conditions in which PCR technology is not readily available, we have established that the existence of a moderate increase of

  11. [Periapical odontogenic processes of inflammatory origin. Enzyme activity].

    PubMed

    García-Pola Vallejo, M J; Rodriguez Rossel, M E; López Arranz, J S; Valle Soto, M

    1991-04-01

    A histoenzymological study was carried out on 40 tissues specimens removed at biopsy and for surgical operations of the following lesions: 5 normal oral mucosa, 5 periapical granulomas, and 30 periapical inflammatory cysts. The purpose of this study was to study some possibly significant variations in levels o activities of oxidative enzymes, and hydrolaxes enzymes. In inflammatory cysts, enzymatic activities were similar to normal epithelium. There was high levels of acid phosphatase LDH and G6PDH activity in the central cells of apical granulomas and in the exfoliating epithelial cells of periapical inflammatory cysts. There were differency in the glycosaminoglicans activity on the different epitelial pattern.

  12. Enzyme:nanoparticle bioconjugates with two sequential enzymes: stoichiometry and activity of malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Keighron, Jacqueline D; Keating, Christine D

    2010-12-21

    We report the synthesis and characterization of bioconjugates in which the enzymes malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and/or citrate synthase (CS) were adsorbed to 30 nm diameter Au nanoparticles. Enzyme:Au stoichiometry and kinetic parameters (specific activity, k(cat), K(M), and activity per particle) were determined for MDH:Au, CS:Au, and three types of dual-activity MDH/CS:Au bioconjugates. For single-activity bioconjugates (MDH:Au and CS:Au), the number of enzyme molecules adsorbed per particle was dependent upon the enzyme concentration in solution, with multilayers forming at high enzyme:Au solution ratios. The specific activity of adsorbed enzyme increased with increasing number adsorbed per particle for CS:Au, but was less sensitive to stoichiometry for MDH:Au. Dual activity bioconjugates were prepared in three ways: (1) by adsorption of MDH followed by CS, (2) by adsorption of CS followed by MDH, and (3) by coadsorption of both enzymes from the same solution. The resulting bioconjugates differed substantially in the number of enzyme molecules adsorbed per particle, the specific activity of the adsorbed enzymes, and also the enzymatic activity per particle. Bioconjugates formed by adding CS to the Au nanoparticles before MDH was added exhibited higher specific activities for both enzymes than those formed by adding the enzymes in the reverse order. These bioconjugates also had 3-fold higher per-particle sequential activity for conversion of malate to citrate, despite substantially fewer copies of both enzymes present.

  13. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes.

    PubMed

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2008-08-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a catalytic triad of ser-his-asp (S-H-D) amino acid residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that in ACAT1, S456, H460, and D400 were essential for activity. In ACAT2, H438 was required for enzymatic activity. However, mutation of D378 destabilized the enzyme. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any S mutations of ACAT2 that abolished catalytic activity. Moreover, ACAT2 was insensitive to serine-modifying reagents, whereas ACAT1 was not. Further studies indicated that tyrosine residues may be important for ACAT activity. Mutational analysis showed that the tyrosine residue of the highly conserved FYXDWWN motif was important for ACAT activity. Furthermore, Y518 was necessary for ACAT1 activity, whereas the analogous residue in ACAT2, Y496, was not. The available data suggest that the amino acid requirement for ACAT activity may be different for the two ACAT isozymes.

  14. Inhibition of existing denitrification enzyme activity by chloramphenicol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, M.H.; Smith, R.L.; Macalady, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Chloramphenicol completely inhibited the activity of existing denitrification enzymes in acetylene-block incubations with (i) sediments from a nitrate-contaminated aquifer and (ii) a continuous culture of denitrifying groundwater bacteria. Control flasks with no antibiotic produced significant amounts of nitrous oxide in the same time period. Amendment with chloramphenicol after nitrous oxide production had begun resulted in a significant decrease in the rate of nitrous oxide production. Chloramphenicol also decreased (>50%) the activity of existing denitrification enzymes in pure cultures of Pseudomonas denitrificans that were harvested during log- phase growth and maintained for 2 weeks in a starvation medium lacking electron donor. Short-term time courses of nitrate consumption and nitrous oxide production in the presence of acetylene with P. denitrificans undergoing carbon starvation were performed under optimal conditions designed to mimic denitrification enzyme activity assays used with soils. Time courses were linear for both chloramphenicol and control flasks, and rate estimates for the two treatments were significantly different at the 95% confidence level. Complete or partial inhibition of existing enzyme activity is not consistent with the current understanding of the mode of action of chloramphenicol or current practice, in which the compound is frequently employed to inhibit de novo protein synthesis during the course of microbial activity assays. The results of this study demonstrate that chloramphenicol amendment can inhibit the activity of existing denitrification enzymes and suggest that caution is needed in the design and interpretation of denitrification activity assays in which chloramphenicol is used to prevent new protein synthesis.

  15. Ionizable side chains at catalytic active sites of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Liang, Jie; Eisenberg, Bob

    2012-05-01

    Catalytic active sites of enzymes of known structure can be well defined by a modern program of computational geometry. The CASTp program was used to define and measure the volume of the catalytic active sites of 573 enzymes in the Catalytic Site Atlas database. The active sites are identified as catalytic because the amino acids they contain are known to participate in the chemical reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Acid and base side chains are reliable markers of catalytic active sites. The catalytic active sites have 4 acid and 5 base side chains, in an average volume of 1,072 Å(3). The number density of acid side chains is 8.3 M (in chemical units); the number density of basic side chains is 10.6 M. The catalytic active site of these enzymes is an unusual electrostatic and steric environment in which side chains and reactants are crowded together in a mixture more like an ionic liquid than an ideal infinitely dilute solution. The electrostatics and crowding of reactants and side chains seems likely to be important for catalytic function. In three types of analogous ion channels, simulation of crowded charges accounts for the main properties of selectivity measured in a wide range of solutions and concentrations. It seems wise to use mathematics designed to study interacting complex fluids when making models of the catalytic active sites of enzymes.

  16. Hepatic Cytochrome P450 Activity, Abundance, and Expression Throughout Human Development.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Natalie C; Nandhikonda, Premchendar; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Ansong, Charles; Anderson, Lindsey N; Smith, Jordan N; Corley, Richard A; Wright, Aaron T

    2016-07-01

    Cytochrome P450s are oxidative metabolic enzymes that play critical roles in the biotransformation of endogenous compounds and xenobiotics. The expression and activity of P450 enzymes varies considerably throughout human development; the deficit in our understanding of these dynamics limits our ability to predict environmental and pharmaceutical exposure effects. In an effort to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the ontogeny of P450 enzymes, we employed a multi-omic characterization of P450 transcript expression, protein abundance, and functional activity. Modified mechanism-based inhibitors of P450s were used as chemical probes for isolating active P450 proteoforms in human hepatic microsomes with developmental stages ranging from early gestation to late adult. High-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to identify and quantify probe-labeled P450s, allowing for a functional profile of P450 ontogeny. Total protein abundance profiles and P450 rRNA was also measured, and our results reveal life-stage-dependent variability in P450 expression, abundance, and activity throughout human development and frequent discordant relationships between expression and activity. We have significantly expanded the knowledge of P450 ontogeny, particularly at the level of individual P450 activity. We anticipate that these results will be useful for enabling predictive therapeutic dosing, and for avoiding potentially adverse and harmful reactions during maturation from both therapeutic drugs and environmental xenobiotics. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. Hepatic Cytochrome P450 Activity, Abundance, and Expression Throughout Human Development

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Nandhikonda, Premchendar; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Ansong, Charles; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Smith, Jordan N.; Corley, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450s are oxidative metabolic enzymes that play critical roles in the biotransformation of endogenous compounds and xenobiotics. The expression and activity of P450 enzymes varies considerably throughout human development; the deficit in our understanding of these dynamics limits our ability to predict environmental and pharmaceutical exposure effects. In an effort to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the ontogeny of P450 enzymes, we employed a multi-omic characterization of P450 transcript expression, protein abundance, and functional activity. Modified mechanism-based inhibitors of P450s were used as chemical probes for isolating active P450 proteoforms in human hepatic microsomes with developmental stages ranging from early gestation to late adult. High-resolution liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry was used to identify and quantify probe-labeled P450s, allowing for a functional profile of P450 ontogeny. Total protein abundance profiles and P450 rRNA was also measured, and our results reveal life-stage–dependent variability in P450 expression, abundance, and activity throughout human development and frequent discordant relationships between expression and activity. We have significantly expanded the knowledge of P450 ontogeny, particularly at the level of individual P450 activity. We anticipate that these results will be useful for enabling predictive therapeutic dosing, and for avoiding potentially adverse and harmful reactions during maturation from both therapeutic drugs and environmental xenobiotics. PMID:27084891

  18. Hepatic and extrahepatic distribution of ornithine urea cycle enzymes in holocephalan elephant fish (Callorhinchus milii).

    PubMed

    Takagi, Wataru; Kajimura, Makiko; Bell, Justin D; Toop, Tes; Donald, John A; Hyodo, Susumu

    2012-04-01

    Cartilaginous fish comprise two subclasses, the Holocephali (chimaeras) and Elasmobranchii (sharks, skates and rays). Little is known about osmoregulatory mechanisms in holocephalan fishes except that they conduct urea-based osmoregulation, as in elasmobranchs. In the present study, we examined the ornithine urea cycle (OUC) enzymes that play a role in urea biosynthesis in the holocephalan elephant fish, Callorhinchus milii (cm). We obtained a single mRNA encoding carbamoyl phosphate synthetase III (cmCPSIII) and ornithine transcarbamylase (cmOTC), and two mRNAs encoding glutamine synthetases (cmGSs) and two arginases (cmARGs), respectively. The two cmGSs were structurally and functionally separated into two types: brain/liver/kidney-type cmGS1 and muscle-type cmGS2. Furthermore, two alternatively spliced transcripts with different sizes were found for cmgs1 gene. The longer transcript has a putative mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS) and was predominantly expressed in the liver and kidney. MTS was not found in the short form of cmGS1 and cmGS2. A high mRNA expression and enzyme activities were found in the liver and muscle. Furthermore, in various tissues examined, mRNA levels of all the enzymes except cmCPSIII were significantly increased after hatching. The data show that the liver is the important organ for urea biosynthesis in elephant fish, but, extrahepatic tissues such as the kidney and muscle may also contribute to the urea production. In addition to the role of the extrahepatic tissues and nitrogen metabolism, the molecular and functional characteristics of multiple isoforms of GSs and ARGs are discussed.

  19. Chimeric enzymes with improved cellulase activities

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Qi; Baker, John O; Himmel, Michael E

    2015-03-31

    Nucleic acid molecules encoding chimeric cellulase polypeptides that exhibit improved cellulase activities are disclosed herein. The chimeric cellulase polypeptides encoded by these nucleic acids and methods to produce the cellulases are also described, along with methods of using chimeric cellulases for the conversion of cellulose to sugars such as glucose.

  20. Enzyme activities in mitochondria isolated from ripening tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, D; Goodenough, P W; Weitzman, P D

    1986-09-01

    Mitochondria were isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) fruit at the mature green, orange-green and red stages and from fruit artificially suspended in their ripening stage. The specific activities of citrate synthase (EC 4.1.3.7), malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37), NAD-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.41) and NAD-linked malic enzyme (EC 1.1.1.38) were determined. The specific activities of all these enzymes fell during ipening, although the mitochondria were fully functional as demonstrated by the uptake of oxygen. The fall in activity of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase was accompanied by a similar fall in the activity of the cytosolic isoenzyme. Percoll-purified mitochondria isolated from mature green fruit remained intact for more than one week and at least one enzyme, citrate synthase, did not exhibit the fall in specific activity found in normal ripening fruit.

  1. Activity of selected hydrolytic enzymes in Allium sativum L. anthers.

    PubMed

    Winiarczyk, Krystyna; Gębura, Joanna

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine enzymatic activity in sterile Allium sativum anthers in the final stages of male gametophyte development (the stages of tetrads and free microspores). The analysed enzymes were shown to occur in the form of numerous isoforms. In the tetrad stage, esterase activity was predominant, which was manifested by the greater number of isoforms of the enzyme. In turn, in the microspore stage, higher numbers of isoforms of acid phosphatases and proteases were detected. The development of sterile pollen grains in garlic is associated with a high level of protease and acid phosphatase activity and lower level of esterase activities in the anther locule. Probably this is the first description of the enzymes activity (ACPH, EST, PRO) in the consecutives stages of cell wall formation which is considered to be one of the causes of male sterility in flowering plant.

  2. Interfacial activation-based molecular bioimprinting of lipolytic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Mingarro, I; Abad, C; Braco, L

    1995-01-01

    Interfacial activation-based molecular (bio)-imprinting (IAMI) has been developed to rationally improve the performance of lipolytic enzymes in nonaqueous environments. The strategy combinedly exploits (i) the known dramatic enhancement of the protein conformational rigidity in a water-restricted milieu and (ii) the reported conformational changes associated with the activation of these enzymes at lipid-water interfaces, which basically involves an increased substrate accessibility to the active site and/or an induction of a more competent catalytic machinery. Six model enzymes have been assayed in several model reactions in nonaqueous media. The results, rationalized in light of the present biochemical and structural knowledge, show that the IAMI approach represents a straightforward, versatile method to generate manageable, activated (kinetically trapped) forms of lipolytic enzymes, providing under optimal conditions nonaqueous rate enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude. It is also shown that imprintability of lipolytic enzymes depends not only on the nature of the enzyme but also on the "quality" of the interface used as the template. PMID:7724558

  3. Interfacial activation-based molecular bioimprinting of lipolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mingarro, I; Abad, C; Braco, L

    1995-04-11

    Interfacial activation-based molecular (bio)-imprinting (IAMI) has been developed to rationally improve the performance of lipolytic enzymes in nonaqueous environments. The strategy combinedly exploits (i) the known dramatic enhancement of the protein conformational rigidity in a water-restricted milieu and (ii) the reported conformational changes associated with the activation of these enzymes at lipid-water interfaces, which basically involves an increased substrate accessibility to the active site and/or an induction of a more competent catalytic machinery. Six model enzymes have been assayed in several model reactions in nonaqueous media. The results, rationalized in light of the present biochemical and structural knowledge, show that the IAMI approach represents a straightforward, versatile method to generate manageable, activated (kinetically trapped) forms of lipolytic enzymes, providing under optimal conditions nonaqueous rate enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude. It is also shown that imprintability of lipolytic enzymes depends not only on the nature of the enzyme but also on the "quality" of the interface used as the template.

  4. Prediction of CYP3A4 enzyme activity using haplotype tag SNPs in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Perera, MA; Thirumaran, RK; Cox, NJ; Hanauer, S; Das, S; Brimer-Cline, C; Lamba, V; Schuetz, EG; Ratain, MJ; Di Rienzo, A

    2009-01-01

    The CYP3A locus encodes hepatic enzymes that metabolize many clinically used drugs. However, there is marked interindividual variability in enzyme expression and clearance of drugs metabolized by these enzymes. We utilized comparative genomics and computational prediction of transcriptional factor binding sites to evaluate regions within CYP3A that were most likely to contribute to this variation. We then used a haplotype tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (htSNPs) approach to evaluate the entire locus with the fewest number of maximally informative SNPs. We investigated the association between these htSNPs and in vivo CYP3A enzyme activity using a single-point IV midazolam clearance assay. We found associations between the midazolam phenotype and age, diagnosis of hypertension and one htSNP (141689) located upstream of CYP3A4. 141689 lies near the xenobiotic responsive enhancer module (XREM) regulatory region of CYP3A4. Cell-based studies show increased transcriptional activation with the minor allele at 141689, in agreement with the in vivo association study findings. This study marks the first systematic evaluation of coding and noncoding variation that may contribute to CYP3A phenotypic variability. PMID:18825162

  5. Do Antioxidant Enzymes and Glutathione Play Roles in the Induction of Hepatic Oxidative Stress in Mice upon Subchronic Exposure to Mixtures of Dichloroacetate and Trichloroacetate?

    PubMed Central

    Hassoun, Ezdihar; Cearfoss, Jacquelyn

    2014-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA) are water chlorination byproducts, and their mixtures were previously found to induce additive to greater than additive effects on hepatic oxidative stress (OS) induction in mice after subchronic exposure. To investigate the roles of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione (GSH) in those effects, livers of B6C3F1 mice treated by gavage with 7.5, 15, or 30 mg DCA/kg/day, 12.5, 25, or 50 mg TCA/kg/day, and mixtures (Mix I, Mix II and Mix III) at DCA:TCA ratios corresponding to 7.5:12.5, 15:25 and 25:50 mg/kg/day, respectively, for 13 weeks. Livers were assayed for superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), as well as for GSH levels. In general, DCA suppressed SOD and GSH-Px activities and GSH levels but caused no changes in CAT activity; TCA increased SOD and CAT activities, suppressed GSH-Px activity, but did not change GSH levels; mixtures of DCA and TCA increased SOD and CAT activities and suppressed GSH-Px activity and GSH levels. In conclusion, antioxidant enzymes contribute to DCA-, TCA- and mixtures-induced OS, but not to changes from additive to greater than additive effects produced by different mixture compositions of the compounds. GSH on the hand may contribute to these changes. PMID:25530655

  6. Effect of Boswellia serrata supplementation on blood lipid, hepatic enzymes and fructosamine levels in type2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is an endocrine disorder that affects a large percentage of patients. High blood glucose causes fatty deposits in the liver which is likely to increase in SGOT and SGPT activities. Significant increase in SGOT/SGPT and low HDL levels is observed in patients with diabetes. Serum fructosamine concentration reflects the degree of blood glucose control in diabetic patients. This study was aimed to investigate the antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and hepatoprotective effects of supplementation of Boswellia serrata in type2 diabetic patients. Methods 60 type 2 diabetic patients from both sexes (30 males and 30 females) were dedicated to the control and intervention groups (30 subjects per group). Boswellia serrata gum resin in amount of 900 mg daily for 6 weeks were orally administered (as three 300 mg doses) in intervention group and the control group did not receive anything. Blood samples were taken at the beginning of the study and after 6 weeks. Blood levels of fructosamine, lipid profiles as well as hepatic enzyme in type 2 diabetic patients were measured. Results Treatment of diabetic patient with Boswellia serrata was caused to significant increase in blood HDL levels as well as a remarkable decrease in cholesterol, LDL, fructosamine (p < 0.05) SGPT and SGOT levels after 6 weeks (p < 0.01). In spite of reduction of serum triglyceride, VLDL levels in intervention group, we did not detect a significant difference after 6 weeks. Conclusion This study showed that Boswellia serrata supplementation can be beneficial in controlling blood parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, its use can be useful in patients with medicines. PMID:24495344

  7. Catalytically active nanomaterials: a promising candidate for artificial enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Youhui; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-04-15

    Natural enzymes, exquisite biocatalysts mediating every biological process in living organisms, are able to accelerate the rate of chemical reactions up to 10(19) times for specific substrates and reactions. However, the practical application of enzymes is often hampered by their intrinsic drawbacks, such as low operational stability, sensitivity of catalytic activity to environmental conditions, and high costs in preparation and purification. Therefore, the discovery and development of artificial enzymes is highly desired. Recently, the merging of nanotechnology with biology has ignited extensive research efforts for designing functional nanomaterials that exhibit various properties intrinsic to enzymes. As a promising candidate for artificial enzymes, catalytically active nanomaterials (nanozymes) show several advantages over natural enzymes, such as controlled synthesis in low cost, tunability in catalytic activities, as well as high stability against stringent conditions. In this Account, we focus on our recent progress in exploring and constructing such nanoparticulate artificial enzymes, including graphene oxide, graphene-hemin nanocomposites, carbon nanotubes, carbon nanodots, mesoporous silica-encapsulated gold nanoparticles, gold nanoclusters, and nanoceria. According to their structural characteristics, these enzyme mimics are categorized into three classes: carbon-, metal-, and metal-oxide-based nanomaterials. We aim to highlight the important role of catalytic nanomaterials in the fields of biomimetics. First, we provide a practical introduction to the identification of these nanozymes, the source of the enzyme-like activities, and the enhancement of activities via rational design and engineering. Then we briefly describe new or enhanced applications of certain nanozymes in biomedical diagnosis, environmental monitoring, and therapeutics. For instance, we have successfully used these biomimetic catalysts as colorimetric probes for the detection of

  8. Optimization to Low Temperature Activity in Psychrophilic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Struvay, Caroline; Feller, Georges

    2012-01-01

    Psychrophiles, i.e., organisms thriving permanently at near-zero temperatures, synthesize cold-active enzymes to sustain their cell cycle. These enzymes are already used in many biotechnological applications requiring high activity at mild temperatures or fast heat-inactivation rate. Most psychrophilic enzymes optimize a high activity at low temperature at the expense of substrate affinity, therefore reducing the free energy barrier of the transition state. Furthermore, a weak temperature dependence of activity ensures moderate reduction of the catalytic activity in the cold. In these naturally evolved enzymes, the optimization to low temperature activity is reached via destabilization of the structures bearing the active site or by destabilization of the whole molecule. This involves a reduction in the number and strength of all types of weak interactions or the disappearance of stability factors, resulting in improved dynamics of active site residues in the cold. Considering the subtle structural adjustments required for low temperature activity, directed evolution appears to be the most suitable methodology to engineer cold activity in biological catalysts. PMID:23109875

  9. Expression of hepatic drug-metabolizing cytochrome p450 enzymes and their intercorrelations: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Achour, Brahim; Barber, Jill; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2014-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 is a family of enzymes that catalyze reactions involved in the metabolism of drugs and other xenobiotics. These enzymes are therefore important in pharmacologic and toxicologic studies, and information on their abundances is of value in the process of scaling in vitro data to in vivo metabolic parameters. A meta-analysis was applied to data on the abundance of human hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes in Caucasian adult livers (50 studies). Despite variations in the methods used to measure the abundance of enzymes, agreement between the studies in 26 different laboratories was generally good. Nonetheless, some heterogeneity was detected (Higgins and Thompson heterogeneity test). More importantly, large interindividual variability was observed in the collated data. Positive correlations between the expression levels of some cytochrome P450 enzymes were found in the abundance data, including the following pairs: CYP3A4/CYP3A5*1/*3 (Rs = 0.70, P < 0.0001, n = 52), CYP3A4/CYP2C8 (Rs = 0.68, P < 0.0001, n = 134), CYP3A4/CYP2C9 (Rs = 0.55, P < 0.0001, n = 71), and CYP2C8/CYP2C9 (Rs = 0.55, P < 0.0001, n = 99). These correlations can be used to demonstrate common genetic transcriptional mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  10. Directed Evolution of Novel Enzyme Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-11

    We report here the directed evolution of the two valuable oxidases horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and laccase . We achieved functional expression of HRP...expressed the laccase from Myceliophthora themophila in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We employed directed evolution to improve catalysis as well as...expression level to a 170 fold higher total activity. Our evolved yeast mutant has the highest functional expression ever reported for laccase in a

  11. Effect of L-carnitine supplementation on xenobiotic-metabolizing hepatic enzymes exposed to methanol.

    PubMed

    Olszowy, Zofia; Plewka, Andrzej; Czech, Ewa; Nowicka, Joanna; Plewka, Danuta; Nowaczyk, Grazyna; Kamiński, Marcin

    2006-07-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of L-carnitine on hepatic cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases exposed to methanol. Male Spraque-Dawley rats were given methanol (1/4 LD50 and 1/2 LD50) together with L-carnitine (1g/kg body weight). The parameters of microsome electron transport chains I and II and the levels of CYP2E1, CYP2B1/2 and CYP1A2 were measured 8, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after exposure. L-carnitine did not affect cytochrome P450 but it significantly increased at 72 and 96 h NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. It stimulated cytochrome b5 at 48 and 96 h and NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase activity at 12, 72 and 96 h. Methanol, especially the lower dose, inhibited cytochrome P450 after 48 h, but the higher methanol dose inhibited NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase activity in this time. L-carnitine, combined with the lower dose of methanol, stimulated NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase after 48 h and cytochrome b5 and NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase over the whole period of observation. L-carnitine stimulated CYP2B1/2 but not CYP2E1 and CYP1A2. Methanol stimulated CYP2E1 at 24 h, but CYP1A2 at 96 h in the studied doses. CYP2B1/2 was induced by the lower dose of methanol at 24 h but by the higher one at 96 h. When given together, L-carnitine and methanol (1/2 LD50) significantly stimulated CYP2E1 up to 170% at 24 h and 145% at 96 h.

  12. Enzyme activation through the utilization of intrinsic dianion binding energy.

    PubMed

    Amyes, T L; Malabanan, M M; Zhai, X; Reyes, A C; Richard, J P

    2017-03-01

    We consider 'the proposition that the intrinsic binding energy that results from the noncovalent interaction of a specific substrate with the active site of the enzyme is considerably larger than is generally believed. An important part of this binding energy may be utilized to provide the driving force for catalysis, so that the observed binding energy represents only what is left over after this utilization' [Jencks,W.P. (1975) Adv. Enzymol. Relat. Areas. Mol. Biol. , , 219-410]. The large ~12 kcal/mol intrinsic substrate phosphodianion binding energy for reactions catalyzed by triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is divided into 4-6 kcal/mol binding energy that is expressed on the formation of the Michaelis complex in anchoring substrates to the respective enzyme, and 6-8 kcal/mol binding energy that is specifically expressed at the transition state in activating the respective enzymes for catalysis. A structure-based mechanism is described where the dianion binding energy drives a conformational change that activates these enzymes for catalysis. Phosphite dianion plays the active role of holding TIM in a high-energy closed active form, but acts as passive spectator in showing no effect on transition-state structure. The result of studies on mutant enzymes is presented, which support the proposal that the dianion-driven enzyme conformational change plays a role in enhancing the basicity of side chain of E167, the catalytic base, by clamping the base between a pair of hydrophobic side chains. The insight these results provide into the architecture of enzyme active sites and the development of strategies for the de novo design of protein catalysts is discussed.

  13. Distribution and activity of hydrogenase enzymes in subsurface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, R.; Nickel, J.; Glombitza, C.; Spivack, A. J.; D'Hondt, S. L.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2013-12-01

    Metabolically active microbial communities are present in a wide range of subsurface environments. Techniques like enumeration of microbial cells, activity measurements with radiotracer assays and the analysis of porewater constituents are currently being used to explore the subsurface biosphere, alongside with molecular biological analyses. However, many of these techniques reach their detection limits due to low microbial activity and abundance. Direct measurements of microbial turnover not just face issues of insufficient sensitivity, they only provide information about a single specific process rather than an overall microbial activity. Since hydrogenase enzymes are intracellular and ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, the enzyme activity represents a measure of total activity of the entire microbial community. A hydrogenase activity assay could quantify total metabolic activity without having to identify specific processes. This would be a major advantage in subsurface biosphere studies, where several metabolic processes can occur simultaneously. We quantified hydrogenase enzyme activity and distribution in sediment samples from different aquatic subsurface environments (Lake Van, Barents Sea, Equatorial Pacific and Gulf of Mexico) using a tritium-based assay. We found enzyme activity at all sites and depths. Volumetric hydrogenase activity did not show much variability between sites and sampling depths, whereas cell-specific activity ranged from 10-5 to 1 nmol H2 cell-1 d-1. Activity was lowest in sediment layers where nitrate was detected. Higher activity was associated with samples in which sulfate was the predominant electron acceptor. We found highest activity in samples from environments with >10 ppm methane in the pore water. The results show that cell-specific hydrogenase enzyme activity increases with decreasing energy yield of the electron acceptor used. It is not possible to convert volumetric or cell-specific hydrogenase activity into a

  14. Effect of Commiphora mukul gum resin on hepatic marker enzymes, lipid peroxidation and antioxidants status in pancreas and heart of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, B; Karuna, R; Sreenivasa, Reddy S; Haritha, K; Sai, Mangala D; Sasi, Bhusana Rao B; Saralakumari, D

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the antioxidant efficacy of Commiphora mukul (C. mukul) gum resin ethanolic extract in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. Methods The male Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into four groups of eight animals each: Control group (C), CM-treated control group (C+CMEE), Diabetic control group (D), CM- treated diabetic group (D+CMEE). Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of STZ (55 mg/kg/ bwt). After being confirmed the diabetic rats were treated with C. mukul gum resin ethanolic extract (CMEE) for 60 days. The biochemical estimations like antioxidant, oxidative stress marker enzymes and hepatic marker enzymes of tissues were performed. Results The diabetic rats showed increased level of enzymatic activities aspartate aminotransaminase (AST), alanine aminotransaminase (ALT) in liver and kidney and oxidative markers like lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein oxidation (PO) in pancreas and heart. Antioxidant enzyme activities were significantly decreased in the pancreas and heart compared to control group. Administration of CMEE (200 mg/kg bw) to diabetic rats for 60 days significantly reversed the above parameters towards normalcy. Conclusions In conclusion, our data indicate the preventive role of C. mukul against STZ-induced diabetic oxidative stress; hence this plant could be used as an adjuvant therapy for the prevention and/or management of diabetes and aggravated antioxidant status. PMID:23569867

  15. [Effects of starvation on digestive enzyme activities of Monopterus albus].

    PubMed

    Yang, Dai-qin; Chen, Fang; Ruan, Guo-liang; Hu, Cheng-wen; Cao, Sheng-huan

    2007-05-01

    Starvation is a major environmental stress, which has a broad effect on the physiology and ecology of aquatic animals. In this study, Monopterus albus was starved for 30 days at (20 +/- 0.5) degrees C, and the activities of protease, trypsin, amylase and lipase in its digestive organs were measured on the 0, 3rd, 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, and 30th day of starvation. The results showed that starvation had definite effects on the activities of all test enzymes. With the prolongation of starvation, the activities of test enzymes decreased, which was most significant when the fish was starved for 5-10 days. After 10 days of starvation, the decreasing trend of the enzyme activities became less obvious.

  16. [Activity of antioxidant enzymes in patients with liver cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Czeczot, Hanna; Scibior, Dorota; Skrzycki, Michał; Podsiad, Małgorzata

    2006-01-01

    The aim of our studies was the estimation of activities of antioxidant enzymes in patients with liver cirrhosis. We investigated activities of superoxide dismutases (CuZnSOD, MnSOD), catalase (CAT), selenium dependent GSH peroxidase (Se-GSH-Px), selenium independent GSH peroxidase (non-Se-GSH-Px), GSH-S-transferase (GST), GSH reductase (GSHR) and the level ofreduced gutathione (GSH) in cirrhotic and healthy liver tissues. The activities of CuZnSOD, MnSOD, CAT and GSH-dependent enzymes (except GSHR) were found to be lower in cirrhotic tissue compared to healthy liver. Those changes were associated with decrease of GSH level in cirrhotic tissue compared with control liver tissue. Our results show that antioxidant barrier in liver cirrhosis is impaired. It is associated with decrease of glutathione level and changes of activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, GSHPx, GST, GSHR) in liver cirrhosis compared with healthy liver.

  17. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... low because of routine testing of donated blood. Sexual transmission and transmission among family members through close contact ... associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses ... B Blood, needles, sexual 10% of older children develop chronic infection. 90% ...

  18. Fluorogenic Peptide Substrate for Quantification of Bacterial Enzyme Activities

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abdullah, Ismail H.; Bagramyan, Karine; Bilbao, Shiela; Qi, Meirigeng; Kalkum, Markus

    2017-01-01

    A novel peptide substrate (A G G P L G P P G P G G) was developed for quantifying the activities of bacterial enzymes using a highly sensitive Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) based assay. The peptide substrate was cleaved by collagenase class I, II, Liberase MTF C/T, collagenase NB1, and thermolysin/neutral protease, which was significantly enhanced in the presence of CaCl2. However, the activities of these enzymes were significantly decreased in the presence of ZnSO4 or ZnCl2. Collagenase I, II, Liberase MTF C/T, thermolysin/neutral protease share similar cleavage sites, L↓G and P↓G. However, collagenase NB1 cleaves the peptide substrate at G↓P and P↓L, in addition to P↓G. The enzyme activity is pH dependent, within a range of 6.8 to 7.5, but was significantly diminished at pH 8.0. Interestingly, the peptide substrate was not cleaved by endogenous pancreatic protease such as trypsin, chymotrypsin, and elastase. In conclusion, the novel peptide substrate is collagenase, thermolysin/neutral protease specific and can be applied to quantify enzyme activities from different microbes. Furthermore, the assay can be used for fine-tuning reaction mixtures of various agents to enhance the overall activity of a cocktail of multiple enzymes and achieve optimal organ/tissue digestion, while protecting the integrity of the target cells. PMID:28287171

  19. Characterization of aldehyde oxidase enzyme activity in cryopreserved human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hutzler, J Matthew; Yang, Young-Sun; Albaugh, Daniel; Fullenwider, Cody L; Schmenk, Jennifer; Fisher, Michael B

    2012-02-01

    Substrates of aldehyde oxidase (AO), for which human clinical pharmacokinetics are reported, were selected and evaluated in pooled mixed-gender cryopreserved human hepatocytes in an effort to quantitatively characterize AO activity. Estimated hepatic clearance (Cl(h)) for BIBX1382, carbazeran, O⁶-benzylguanine, zaleplon, and XK-469 using cryopreserved hepatocytes was 18, 17, 12, <4.3, and <4.3 ml · min⁻¹ · kg⁻¹, respectively. The observed metabolic clearance in cryopreserved hepatocytes was confirmed to be a result of AO-mediated metabolism via two approaches. Metabolite identification after incubations in the presence of H₂¹⁸O confirmed that the predominant oxidative metabolite was generated by AO, as expected isotope patterns in mass spectra were observed after analysis by high-resolution mass spectrometry. Second, clearance values were efficiently attenuated upon coincubation with hydralazine, an inhibitor of AO. The low exposure after oral doses of BIBX1382 and carbazeran (∼5% F) would have been fairly well predicted using simple hepatic extraction (f(h)) values derived from cryopreserved hepatocytes. In addition, the estimated hepatic clearance value for O⁶-benzylguanine was within ∼80% of the observed total clearance in humans after intravenous administration (15 ml · min⁻¹ · kg⁻¹), indicating a reasonable level of quantitative activity from this in vitro system. However, a 3.5-fold underprediction of total clearance was observed for zaleplon, despite the 5-oxo metabolite being clearly observed. These data taken together suggest that the use of cryopreserved hepatocytes may be a practical approach for assessing AO-mediated metabolism in discovery and potentially useful for predicting hepatic clearance of AO substrates.

  20. Cadmium effect on microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme activity in rat livers with respect to differences in age and sex

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, M.

    1982-04-01

    The effect of cadmium on the hepatic microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme system was investigated. Cadmium chloride caused the conversion of cytochrome P-450 to P-420 in rat liver microsomes. The destruction of cytochrome P-450 by cadmium caused the reduction of microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme activity and prolonged the pentobarbital sleeping time. There is a sex-related difference in the ability of cadmium to inhibit the hepatic drug metabolism in rats: male rats are more sensitive to cadmium than females. The effective period when cadmium prolonged their sleep depended upon the age of rats; older rats were more sensitive to cadmium than younger ones. The maximum increase of sleeping time depended upon the dose level of cadium, and the rate constant of the equations seems to depend upon the age of the animals.

  1. Patterns of functional enzyme activity in fungus farming ambrosia beetles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In wood-dwelling fungus-farming weevils, the so-called ambrosia beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae and Platypodinae), wood in the excavated tunnels is used as a medium for cultivating fungi by the combined action of digging larvae (which create more space for the fungi to grow) and of adults sowing and pruning the fungus. The beetles are obligately dependent on the fungus that provides essential vitamins, amino acids and sterols. However, to what extent microbial enzymes support fungus farming in ambrosia beetles is unknown. Here we measure (i) 13 plant cell-wall degrading enzymes in the fungus garden microbial consortium of the ambrosia beetle Xyleborinus saxesenii, including its primary fungal symbionts, in three compartments of laboratory maintained nests, at different time points after gallery foundation and (ii) four specific enzymes that may be either insect or microbially derived in X. saxesenii adult and larval individuals. Results We discovered that the activity of cellulases in ambrosia fungus gardens is relatively small compared to the activities of other cellulolytic enzymes. Enzyme activity in all compartments of the garden was mainly directed towards hemicellulose carbohydrates such as xylan, glucomannan and callose. Hemicellulolytic enzyme activity within the brood chamber increased with gallery age, whereas irrespective of the age of the gallery, the highest overall enzyme activity were detected in the gallery dump material expelled by the beetles. Interestingly endo-β-1,3(4)-glucanase activity capable of callose degradation was identified in whole-body extracts of both larvae and adult X. saxesenii, whereas endo-β-1,4-xylanase activity was exclusively detected in larvae. Conclusion Similar to closely related fungi associated with bark beetles in phloem, the microbial symbionts of ambrosia beetles hardly degrade cellulose. Instead, their enzyme activity is directed mainly towards comparatively more easily accessible hemicellulose

  2. Patterns of functional enzyme activity in fungus farming ambrosia beetles.

    PubMed

    De Fine Licht, Henrik H; Biedermann, Peter H W

    2012-06-06

    In wood-dwelling fungus-farming weevils, the so-called ambrosia beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae and Platypodinae), wood in the excavated tunnels is used as a medium for cultivating fungi by the combined action of digging larvae (which create more space for the fungi to grow) and of adults sowing and pruning the fungus. The beetles are obligately dependent on the fungus that provides essential vitamins, amino acids and sterols. However, to what extent microbial enzymes support fungus farming in ambrosia beetles is unknown. Here we measure (i) 13 plant cell-wall degrading enzymes in the fungus garden microbial consortium of the ambrosia beetle Xyleborinus saxesenii, including its primary fungal symbionts, in three compartments of laboratory maintained nests, at different time points after gallery foundation and (ii) four specific enzymes that may be either insect or microbially derived in X. saxesenii adult and larval individuals. We discovered that the activity of cellulases in ambrosia fungus gardens is relatively small compared to the activities of other cellulolytic enzymes. Enzyme activity in all compartments of the garden was mainly directed towards hemicellulose carbohydrates such as xylan, glucomannan and callose. Hemicellulolytic enzyme activity within the brood chamber increased with gallery age, whereas irrespective of the age of the gallery, the highest overall enzyme activity were detected in the gallery dump material expelled by the beetles. Interestingly endo-β-1,3(4)-glucanase activity capable of callose degradation was identified in whole-body extracts of both larvae and adult X. saxesenii, whereas endo-β-1,4-xylanase activity was exclusively detected in larvae. Similar to closely related fungi associated with bark beetles in phloem, the microbial symbionts of ambrosia beetles hardly degrade cellulose. Instead, their enzyme activity is directed mainly towards comparatively more easily accessible hemicellulose components of the ray

  3. [Dosing time based on molecular mechanism of biological clock of hepatic drug metabolic enzyme].

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Naoya

    2009-11-01

    The mammalian circadian pacemaker stays in the paired suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). Recent several studies reveal that the circadian rhythms of physiology and behavior are controlled by clock genes. In addition, the effectiveness and toxicity of many drugs vary depending on dosing time associated with 24-h rhythms of biochemical, physiological, and behavioral processes under the control of the circadian clock. Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic drug, and is mainly biotransformed and eliminated as nontoxic conjugates with glucuronic acid and sulfuric acid. Only a small portion of the dose is mainly bioactivated by CYP2E1 to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), a reactive toxic intermediate. For APAP overdose, glucuronidation and sulfation are saturated and the formation of NAPQI increases. However, the exact mechanisms underlying the chronotoxicity of APAP have not been clarified yet. In the present study, we have clarified that there was a significant dosing time-dependent difference in hepatotoxicity induced by APAP in mice. The mechanism may be related to the rhythmicity of CYP2E1 activity and GSH conjugation. In additon, we investigated whether the liver transcription factor hepatic nuclear factor-1alpha (HNF-1alpha) and clock genes undergoing astriking 24-h rhythm in mouse liver contribute to the 24-h regulation of CYP2E1 activity. A significant 24-h rhythmicity was demonstrated for CYP2E1 activity, protein levels and mRNA levels. HNF-1alpha and clock genes may contribute to produce the 24-h rhythm of CYP2E1 mRNA levels. Metabolism by CYP and GSH conjugation are common metabolic pathways for many drugs such as APAP. These findings support the concept that choosing the most appropriate time of day to administer the drugs associated with metabolic rhythmicity such as CYP and GSH conjugation may reduce hepatotoxicity in experimental and clinical situations. 24-h rhythm of CYP2E1 activity was controlled by HNF-1alpha and clock gene, in a

  4. The enzymes of the transsulfuration pathways: active-site characterizations.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Susan M; Lodha, Pratik H; Morneau, Dominique J K

    2011-11-01

    The diversity of reactions catalyzed by enzymes reliant on pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) demonstrates the catalytic versatility of this cofactor and the plasticity of the protein scaffolds of the major fold types of PLP-dependent enzymes. The enzymes of the transsulfuration (cystathionine γ-synthase and cystathionine β-lyase) and reverse transsulfuration (cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase) pathways interconvert l-cysteine and l-homocysteine, the immediate precursor of l-methionine, in plants/bacteria and yeast/animals, respectively. These enzymes provide a useful model system for investigation of the mechanisms of substrate and reaction specificity in PLP-dependent enzymes as they catalyze distinct side chain rearrangements of similar amino acid substrates. Exploration of the underlying factors that enable enzymes to control the substrate and reaction specificity of this cofactor will enable the engineering of these properties and the development of therapeutics and antimicrobial compounds. Recent studies probing the role of active-site residues, of the enzymes of the transsulfuration pathways, as determinants of substrate and reaction specificity are the subject of this review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pyridoxal Phosphate Enzymology. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Marked inhibition of hepatic cytochrome P450 activity in cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Irizar, A; Ioannides, C

    1998-04-03

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the expression of major xenobiotic-metabolising cytochrome P450 proteins, and of other enzyme systems, in hepatic and extrahepatic tissues of rabbits rendered atherosclerotic by the dietary administration of 1% cholesterol diets for 8 weeks. Individual cytochrome P450 proteins were monitored using diagnostic substrates and immunologically in Western blot analysis. The activity of all hepatic isoforms studied was depressed in the atherosclerotic animals; when, however, apoprotein levels were determined immunologically, no major differences were evident between the control and the atherosclerotic rabbits. In vitro studies indicated that neither cholesterol nor palm oil inhibited cytochrome P450 activity. The effects of cholesterol treatment leading to atherosclerosis on kidney, heart and lung cytochrome P450 activities were isoform- and tissue-specific; no change was evident in the heart activities, but in the lung and kidney cytochrome P450 activities were clearly modulated by the treatment with cholesterol. Apoprotein levels did not always parallel the changes in activities. Western blot analysis of aortic cytochromes P450 revealed that administration of cholesterol-rich diets enhanced CYP2B and CYP3A apoprotein levels. Cholesterol feeding to rabbits gave rise to a marked decrease in hepatic glutathione S-transferase activity but did not influence glutathione reductase or total glutathione levels. The same treatment had no effect on catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. It is concluded that treatment of rabbits with cholesterol-rich diets leading to atherosclerosis gives rise to profound changes in the expression of cytochrome P450 proteins in the liver and other tissues; possible mechanisms are discussed.

  6. Chemoproteomic profiling of host and pathogen enzymes active in cholera

    PubMed Central

    Hatzios, Stavroula K.; Hubbard, Troy; Sasabe, Jumpei; Munera, Diana; Clark, Lars; Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T.; Davis, Brigid M.; Weerapana, Eranthie; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2016-01-01

    Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) is a chemoproteomic tool for detecting active enzymes in complex biological systems. We used ABPP to identify secreted bacterial and host serine hydrolases that are active in animals infected with the cholera pathogen Vibrio cholerae. Four V. cholerae proteases were consistently active in infected rabbits, and one, VC0157 (renamed IvaP), was also active in human cholera stool. Inactivation of IvaP influenced the activity of other secreted V. cholerae and rabbit enzymes in vivo, while genetic disruption of all four proteases increased the abundance and binding of an intestinal lectin—intelectin—to V. cholerae in infected rabbits. Intelectin also bound to other enteric bacterial pathogens, suggesting it may constitute a previously unrecognized mechanism of bacterial surveillance in the intestine that is inhibited by pathogen-secreted proteases. Our work demonstrates the power of activity-based proteomics to reveal host-pathogen enzymatic dialogue in an animal model of infection. PMID:26900865

  7. Chemoproteomic profiling of host and pathogen enzymes active in cholera.

    PubMed

    Hatzios, Stavroula K; Abel, Sören; Martell, Julianne; Hubbard, Troy; Sasabe, Jumpei; Munera, Diana; Clark, Lars; Bachovchin, Daniel A; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T; Davis, Brigid M; Weerapana, Eranthie; Waldor, Matthew K

    2016-04-01

    Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) is a chemoproteomic tool for detecting active enzymes in complex biological systems. We used ABPP to identify secreted bacterial and host serine hydrolases that are active in animals infected with the cholera pathogen Vibrio cholerae. Four V. cholerae proteases were consistently active in infected rabbits, and one, VC0157 (renamed IvaP), was also active in human choleric stool. Inactivation of IvaP influenced the activity of other secreted V. cholerae and rabbit enzymes in vivo, and genetic disruption of all four proteases increased the abundance of intelectin, an intestinal lectin, and its binding to V. cholerae in infected rabbits. Intelectin also bound to other enteric bacterial pathogens, suggesting that it may constitute a previously unrecognized mechanism of bacterial surveillance in the intestine that is inhibited by pathogen-secreted proteases. Our work demonstrates the power of activity-based proteomics to reveal host-pathogen enzymatic dialog in an animal model of infection.

  8. O2 Activation by Non-Heme Iron Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Edward I; Goudarzi, Serra; Sutherlin, Kyle D

    2016-11-22

    The non-heme Fe enzymes are ubiquitous in nature and perform a wide range of functions involving O2 activation. These had been difficult to study relative to heme enzymes; however, spectroscopic methods that provide significant insight into the correlation of structure with function have now been developed. This Current Topics article summarizes both the molecular mechanism these enzymes use to control O2 activation in the presence of cosubstrates and the oxygen intermediates these reactions generate. Three types of O2 activation are observed. First, non-heme reactivity is shown to be different from heme chemistry where a low-spin Fe(III)-OOH non-heme intermediate directly reacts with substrate. Also, two subclasses of non-heme Fe enzymes generate high-spin Fe(IV)═O intermediates that provide both σ and π frontier molecular orbitals that can control selectivity. Finally, for several subclasses of non-heme Fe enzymes, binding of the substrate to the Fe(II) site leads to the one-electron reductive activation of O2 to an Fe(III)-superoxide capable of H atom abstraction and electrophilic attack.

  9. O2 Activation by Non-Heme Iron Enzymes

    DOE PAGES

    Solomon, Edward I.; Goudarzi, Serra; Sutherlin, Kyle D.

    2016-10-28

    The non-heme Fe enzymes are ubiquitous in nature and perform a wide range of functions involving O2 activation. These had been difficult to study relative to heme enzymes; however, spectroscopic methods have now been developed that provide significant insight into the correlation of structure with function. This Current Topics article summarizes both the molecular mechanism these enzymes use to control O2 activation in the presence of cosubstrates and the oxygen intermediates these reactions generate. Three types of O2 activation are observed. First, non-heme reactivity is shown to be different from heme chemistry where a low-spin FeIII-OOH non-heme intermediate directly reactsmore » with substrate. Also, two subclasses of non-heme Fe enzymes generate high-spin FeIV=O intermediates that provide both σ and π frontier molecular orbitals that can control selectivity. Lastly, for several subclasses of non-heme Fe enzymes, substrate binding to the FeII site leads to the one electron reductive activation of O2 to an FeIII-superoxide capable of H-atom abstraction and electrophilic attack.« less

  10. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  11. Evolutionary transitions in enzyme activity of ant fungus gardens.

    PubMed

    De Fine Licht, Henrik H; Schiøtt, Morten; Mueller, Ulrich G; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2010-07-01

    Fungus-growing (attine) ants and their fungal symbionts passed through several evolutionary transitions during their 50 million year old evolutionary history. The basal attine lineages often shifted between two main cultivar clades, whereas the derived higher-attine lineages maintained an association with a monophyletic clade of specialized symbionts. In conjunction with the transition to specialized symbionts, the ants advanced in colony size and social complexity. Here we provide a comparative study of the functional specialization in extracellular enzyme activities in fungus gardens across the attine phylogeny. We show that, relative to sister clades, gardens of higher-attine ants have enhanced activity of protein-digesting enzymes, whereas gardens of leaf-cutting ants also have increased activity of starch-digesting enzymes. However, the enzyme activities of lower-attine fungus gardens are targeted primarily toward partial degradation of plant cell walls, reflecting a plesiomorphic state of nondomesticated fungi. The enzyme profiles of the higher-attine and leaf-cutting gardens appear particularly suited to digest fresh plant materials and to access nutrients from live cells without major breakdown of cell walls. The adaptive significance of the lower-attine symbiont shifts remains unclear. One of these shifts was obligate, but digestive advantages remained ambiguous, whereas the other remained facultative despite providing greater digestive efficiency.

  12. Water modulation of stratum corneum chymotryptic enzyme activity and desquamation.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, A; Harding, C; Moore, A; Coan, P

    2001-09-01

    Exposure to a dry environment leads to depletion of water from the peripheral stratum corneum layers in a process dependent on the relative humidity (RH) and the intrinsic properties of the tissue. We hypothesized that by modulating the water content of the stratum corneum in the surface layers, RH effects the rate of desquamation by modulating the activity of the desquamatory enzymes, and specifically stratum corneum chymotryptic enzyme (SCCE). Using a novel air interface in vitro desquamatory model, we demonstrated RH-dependent corneocyte release with desquamatory rates decreasing below 80% RH. Application of 10% glycerol or a glycerol-containing moisturizing lotion further increased desquamation, even in humid conditions, demonstrating that water was the rate-limiting factor in the final stages of desquamation. Furthermore, even in humid conditions desquamation was sub-maximal. In situ stratum corneum SCCE activity showed a dependence on RH: activity was significantly higher at 100% than at 44% RH. Further increases in SCCE activity were induced by applying a 10% glycerol solution. Since SCCE, a water-requiring enzyme, must function in the water-depleted outer stratum corneum, we sought to determine whether this enzyme has a tolerance to lowered water activity. Using concentrated sucrose solutions to lower water activity, we analysed the activity of recombinant SCCE and compared it to that of trypsin and chymotrypsin. SCCE activity demonstrated a tolerance to water restriction, and this may be an adaptation to maintain enzyme activity even within the water-depleted stratum corneum intercellular space. Overall these findings support the concept that in the upper stratum corneum, RH modulates desquamation by its effect upon SCCE activity, and possibly other desquamatory hydrolases. In addition, SCCE may be adapted to function in the water-restricted stratum corneum intercellular space.

  13. Hydrophobic core flexibility modulates enzyme activity in HIV-1 protease

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.; Bolon, Daniel N. A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity. PMID:22295904

  14. Does diet influence salivary enzyme activities in elephant species?

    PubMed

    Boehlke, Carolin; Pötschke, Sandra; Behringer, Verena; Hannig, Christian; Zierau, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) and African elephants (Loxodonta africana) are herbivore generalists; however, Asian elephants might ingest a higher proportion of grasses than Africans. Although some studies have investigated nutrition-specific morphological adaptations of the two species, broader studies on salivary enzymes in both elephant species are lacking. This study focuses on the comparison of salivary enzymes activity profiles in the two elephant species; these enzymes are relevant for protective and digestive functions in humans. We aimed to determine whether salivary amylase (sAA), lysozyme (sLYS), and peroxidase (sPOD) activities have changed in a species-specific pattern during evolutionary separation of the elephant genera. Saliva samples of 14 Asian and eight African elephants were collected in three German zoos. Results show that sAA and sLYS are salivary components of both elephant species in an active conformation. In contrast, little to no sPOD activity was determined in any elephant sample. Furthermore, sAA activity was significantly higher in Asian compared with African elephants. sLYS and sPOD showed no species-specific differences. The time of food provision until sample collection affected only sAA activity. In summary, the results suggest several possible factors modulating the activity of the mammal-typical enzymes, such as sAA, sLYS, and sPOD, e.g., nutrition and sampling procedure, which have to be considered when analyzing differences in saliva composition of animal species.

  15. Hydrophobic Core Flexibility Modulates Enzyme Activity in HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Bolon, Daniel N.A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-09-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from the active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity.

  16. A DNA enzyme with N-glycosylase activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheppard, T. L.; Ordoukhanian, P.; Joyce, G. F.

    2000-01-01

    In vitro evolution was used to develop a DNA enzyme that catalyzes the site-specific depurination of DNA with a catalytic rate enhancement of about 10(6)-fold. The reaction involves hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond of a particular deoxyguanosine residue, leading to DNA strand scission at the apurinic site. The DNA enzyme contains 93 nucleotides and is structurally complex. It has an absolute requirement for a divalent metal cation and exhibits optimal activity at about pH 5. The mechanism of the reaction was confirmed by analysis of the cleavage products by using HPLC and mass spectrometry. The isolation and characterization of an N-glycosylase DNA enzyme demonstrates that single-stranded DNA, like RNA and proteins, can form a complex tertiary structure and catalyze a difficult biochemical transformation. This DNA enzyme provides a new approach for the site-specific cleavage of DNA molecules.

  17. A DNA enzyme with N-glycosylase activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheppard, T. L.; Ordoukhanian, P.; Joyce, G. F.

    2000-01-01

    In vitro evolution was used to develop a DNA enzyme that catalyzes the site-specific depurination of DNA with a catalytic rate enhancement of about 10(6)-fold. The reaction involves hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond of a particular deoxyguanosine residue, leading to DNA strand scission at the apurinic site. The DNA enzyme contains 93 nucleotides and is structurally complex. It has an absolute requirement for a divalent metal cation and exhibits optimal activity at about pH 5. The mechanism of the reaction was confirmed by analysis of the cleavage products by using HPLC and mass spectrometry. The isolation and characterization of an N-glycosylase DNA enzyme demonstrates that single-stranded DNA, like RNA and proteins, can form a complex tertiary structure and catalyze a difficult biochemical transformation. This DNA enzyme provides a new approach for the site-specific cleavage of DNA molecules.

  18. Inducible trehalase enzyme activity of Morchella conica Persoon mycelium.

    PubMed

    Czövek, Pálma; Király, I

    2011-03-01

    Morchella conica Pers. strains of the study were isolated from fruit bodies collected in ash-mixed forests. At first, the strains were cultured on potato dextrose agar (PDA), then on modified Murashige and Skoog (MS) solid agar media. A normal-growing strain was chosen for the trehalase induction experiments. During the trehalase induction treatment, mycelia were grown in liquid culture containing different concentrations of trehalose. After the induction period of trehalase enzymes, physiological state of the mycelium and the oxidative stress were monitored in the vegetative mycelia by measuring the change of the malondialdehyde content, superoxide dismutase enzyme activity, the fresh and dry weight. The examined Morchella conica strain utilized the trehalose properly. The rising amount of the trehalose triggered the increase of the mycelial trehalase enzyme activity. Our results clearly proved that both neutral and acidic trehalase isoenzyme activity of the Morchella conica mycelium are inducible and are playing important role in the utilization of external trehalose.

  19. De novo active sites for resurrected Precambrian enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Risso, Valeria A.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Candel, Adela M.; Krüger, Dennis M.; Pantoja-Uceda, David; Ortega-Muñoz, Mariano; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco; Gaucher, Eric A.; Kamerlin, Shina C. L.; Bruix, Marta; Gavira, Jose A.; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2017-01-01

    Protein engineering studies often suggest the emergence of completely new enzyme functionalities to be highly improbable. However, enzymes likely catalysed many different reactions already in the last universal common ancestor. Mechanisms for the emergence of completely new active sites must therefore either plausibly exist or at least have existed at the primordial protein stage. Here, we use resurrected Precambrian proteins as scaffolds for protein engineering and demonstrate that a new active site can be generated through a single hydrophobic-to-ionizable amino acid replacement that generates a partially buried group with perturbed physico-chemical properties. We provide experimental and computational evidence that conformational flexibility can assist the emergence and subsequent evolution of new active sites by improving substrate and transition-state binding, through the sampling of many potentially productive conformations. Our results suggest a mechanism for the emergence of primordial enzymes and highlight the potential of ancestral reconstruction as a tool for protein engineering. PMID:28719578

  20. De novo active sites for resurrected Precambrian enzymes.

    PubMed

    Risso, Valeria A; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Candel, Adela M; Krüger, Dennis M; Pantoja-Uceda, David; Ortega-Muñoz, Mariano; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco; Gaucher, Eric A; Kamerlin, Shina C L; Bruix, Marta; Gavira, Jose A; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2017-07-18

    Protein engineering studies often suggest the emergence of completely new enzyme functionalities to be highly improbable. However, enzymes likely catalysed many different reactions already in the last universal common ancestor. Mechanisms for the emergence of completely new active sites must therefore either plausibly exist or at least have existed at the primordial protein stage. Here, we use resurrected Precambrian proteins as scaffolds for protein engineering and demonstrate that a new active site can be generated through a single hydrophobic-to-ionizable amino acid replacement that generates a partially buried group with perturbed physico-chemical properties. We provide experimental and computational evidence that conformational flexibility can assist the emergence and subsequent evolution of new active sites by improving substrate and transition-state binding, through the sampling of many potentially productive conformations. Our results suggest a mechanism for the emergence of primordial enzymes and highlight the potential of ancestral reconstruction as a tool for protein engineering.

  1. De novo active sites for resurrected Precambrian enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risso, Valeria A.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Candel, Adela M.; Krüger, Dennis M.; Pantoja-Uceda, David; Ortega-Muñoz, Mariano; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco; Gaucher, Eric A.; Kamerlin, Shina C. L.; Bruix, Marta; Gavira, Jose A.; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2017-07-01

    Protein engineering studies often suggest the emergence of completely new enzyme functionalities to be highly improbable. However, enzymes likely catalysed many different reactions already in the last universal common ancestor. Mechanisms for the emergence of completely new active sites must therefore either plausibly exist or at least have existed at the primordial protein stage. Here, we use resurrected Precambrian proteins as scaffolds for protein engineering and demonstrate that a new active site can be generated through a single hydrophobic-to-ionizable amino acid replacement that generates a partially buried group with perturbed physico-chemical properties. We provide experimental and computational evidence that conformational flexibility can assist the emergence and subsequent evolution of new active sites by improving substrate and transition-state binding, through the sampling of many potentially productive conformations. Our results suggest a mechanism for the emergence of primordial enzymes and highlight the potential of ancestral reconstruction as a tool for protein engineering.

  2. A lard-rich high-fat diet increases hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in endotoxemic rats.

    PubMed

    Kai, Motoki; Miyoshi, Makoto; Fujiwara, Mayu; Nishiyama, Yuya; Inoue, Taketo; Maeshige, Noriaki; Hamada, Yasuhiro; Usami, Makoto

    2017-05-15

    Diets high in saturated fatty acids activate chronic inflammation. We previously reported that, in even acute inflammation caused by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), liver injury was exacerbated in rats fed a lard-rich diet. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are related to inflammation and are also key regulators of lipid metabolism. In this study, we examined effects of high-fat diet on liver injury and hepatic lipid metabolism during endotoxemia, measuring hepatic PPARs and other markers. Male Wistar rats were fed a high-fat diet (HFD, 60 kcal% fat) or control diet (CD, 10 kcal% fat) for 4 or 12 wk, injected with LPS and sacrificed at 0, 1.5, or 6 h. Analyses included plasma aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) levels, messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of hepatic PPARα and PPARγ, and mRNA levels of enzymes related to fatty acid oxidation and synthesis. Endotoxemic rats on HFD for 12 wk, but not 4 wk, had higher mRNA and protein levels for hepatic PPARs, than did those on CD (P < 0.01-0.05). Similarly, these rats had increased mRNA expression of hepatic fatty acid oxidation- and synthesis-related enzymes (P < 0.01-0.05). Rats injected with LPS had more severe liver injury, indicated by plasma AST/ALT, if on the HFD for 12 wk, compared with for 4 wk. Consumption of a lard-rich diet for 12 wk worsened liver injury and increased hepatic PPARα and PPARγ expression in endotoxemic rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Nigella sativa fixed and essential oils on antioxidant status, hepatic enzymes, and immunity in streptozotocin induced diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nigella sativa fixed (NSFO) and essential (NSEO) oils have been used to treat diabetes mellitus and its complications. Present study was undertaken to explore and validate these folkloric uses. Methods Sprague dawley rats having streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetes mellitus were used to assess the role of NSFO and NSEO in the management of diabetes complications. Parameters investigated were antioxidant potential, oxidative stress, and the immunity by in vivo experiments. Results The results indicated that STZ decreased the glutathione contents (25.72%), while NSFO and NSEO increased the trait significantly (P < 0.05). Experimental diets increased the tocopherol contents (P < 0.01) and enhanced the expression of hepatic enzymes (P < 0.01). Correlation matrix further indicated that antioxidant potential is positively associated (P < 0.05) responsible for the modulation of hepatic enzymes and the decrease of the nitric oxide production thus controlling the diabetes complications. Conclusions Overall, results of present study supported the traditional use of N. sativa and its derived products as a treatment for hyperglycemia and allied abnormalities. Moreover, N. sativa fixed and essential oils significantly ameliorate free radicals and improve antioxidant capacity thus reducing the risk of diabetic complications. PMID:24939518

  4. DEHP reduces thyroid hormones via interacting with hormone synthesis-related proteins, deiodinases, transthyretin, receptors, and hepatic enzymes in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changjiang; Zhao, Letian; Wei, Li; Li, Lianbing

    2015-08-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is used extensively in many personal care and consumer products, resulting in widespread nonoccupational human exposure through multiple routes and media. Limited studies suggest that exposure to DEHP may be associated with altered thyroid function, but detailed mechanisms are unclear. In order to elucidate potential mechanisms by which DEHP disturbs thyroid hormone homeostasis, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were dosed with DEHP by gavage at 0, 250, 500, and 750 mg/kg/day for 30 days and sacrificed within 24 h after the last dose. Gene expressions of thyroid hormone receptors, deiodinases, transthyretin, and hepatic enzymes were measured by RT-PCR; protein levels of transthyretin were also analyzed by Western blot. Results showed that DEHP caused histological changes in the thyroid and follicular epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia were observed. DEHP significantly reduced thyroid hormones (T3, T4) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) levels, whereas thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was not affected. After exposure to DEHP, biosynthesis of thyroid hormones was suppressed, and sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) levels were significantly reduced. Additionally, levels of deiodinases and transthyretin were also affected. TSH receptor (TSHr) level was downregulated, while TRH receptor (TRHr) level was upregulated. Metabolism of thyroid hormones was accelerated due to elevated gene expression of hepatic enzymes (UDPGTs and CYP2B1) by DEHP. Taken together, observed findings indicate that DEHP could reduce thyroid hormones through influencing biosynthesis, biotransformation, biotransport, receptor levels, and metabolism of thyroid hormones.

  5. Chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) juice modulates 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene induced hepatic but not mammary gland phase I and II enzymes in female rats.

    PubMed

    Szaefer, Hanna; Krajka-Kuźniak, Violetta; Ignatowicz, Ewa; Adamska, Teresa; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2011-03-01

    Chokeberry is a rich source of procyanidins known to have several types of biological activity including anticarcinogenic potential in experimental models. In this study we examined the effect of chokeberry juice on the hepatic and mammary gland carcinogen metabolizing enzyme expression altered by the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged with chokeberry juice (8 ml/kg b.w.) for 28 consecutive days. DMBA was administered i.p. on the 27th and the 28th days. Pretreatment with chokeberry juice reduced the activity of CYP1A1 and increased that of CYP2B involved in metabolic activation/detoxication of DMBA in rat liver, as well as expression and activity of phase II enzymes. Chokeberry juice had no effect on these parameters in the mammary gland and DMBA induced DNA damage in rat blood cells. These results together with our earlier observations indicate that metabolic alterations induced by chokeberry feeding are tissue specific and depend on the class of carcinogen. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Activation energy of extracellular enzymes in soils from different biomes.

    PubMed

    Steinweg, J Megan; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Frerichs, Joshua; Mayes, Melanie A

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme dynamics are being incorporated into soil carbon cycling models and accurate representation of enzyme kinetics is an important step in predicting belowground nutrient dynamics. A scarce number of studies have measured activation energy (Ea) in soils and fewer studies have measured Ea in arctic and tropical soils, or in subsurface soils. We determined the Ea for four typical lignocellulose degrading enzymes in the A and B horizons of seven soils covering six different soil orders. We also elucidated which soil properties predicted any measurable differences in Ea. β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, phenol oxidase and peroxidase activities were measured at five temperatures, 4, 21, 30, 40, and 60°C. Ea was calculated using the Arrhenius equation. β-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase Ea values for both A and B horizons in this study were similar to previously reported values, however we could not make a direct comparison for B horizon soils because of the lack of data. There was no consistent relationship between hydrolase enzyme Ea and the environmental variables we measured. Phenol oxidase was the only enzyme that had a consistent positive relationship between Ea and pH in both horizons. The Ea in the arctic and subarctic zones for peroxidase was lower than the hydrolases and phenol oxidase values, indicating peroxidase may be a rate limited enzyme in environments under warming conditions. By including these six soil types we have increased the number of soil oxidative enzyme Ea values reported in the literature by 50%. This study is a step towards better quantifying enzyme kinetics in different climate zones.

  7. Relative potency based on hepatic enzyme induction predicts immunosuppressive effects of a mixture of PCDDS/PCDFS and PCBS

    SciTech Connect

    Smialowicz, R.J.; DeVito, M.J. Williams, W.C.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    2008-03-15

    The toxic equivalency factor (TEF) approach was employed to compare immunotoxic potency of mixtures containing polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans and polychlorinated biphenyls relative to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), using the antibody response to sheep erythrocytes (SRBC). Mixture-1 (MIX-1) contained TCDD, 1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (PeCDD), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF), 1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (1-PeCDF), 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (4-PeCDF), and 1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9-octachlorodibenzofuran (OCDF). Mixture-2 (MIX-2) contained MIX-1 and the following PCBs, 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (IUPAC No. 77), 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (126), 3,3',4,4',5,5N-hexachlorobiphenyl (169), 2,3,3',4,4'-pentachlorobiphenyl (105), 2,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (118), and 2,3,3',4,4',5-hexachlorobiphenyl (156). The mixture compositions were based on relative chemical concentrations in food and human tissues. TCDD equivalents (TEQ) of the mixture were estimated using relative potency factors from hepatic enzyme induction in mice [DeVito, M.J., Diliberto, J.J., Ross, D.G., Menache, M.G., Birnbaum, L.S., 1997. Dose-response relationships for polyhalogenated dioxins and dibenzofurans following subchronic treatment in mice. I .CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 enzyme activity in liver, lung and skin. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 130, 197-208; DeVito, M.J., Menache, G., Diliberto, J.J., Ross, D.G., Birnbaum L.S., 2000. Dose-response relationships for induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 enzyme activity in liver, lung, and skin in female mice following subchronic exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 167, 157-172] Female mice received 0, 1.5, 15, 150 or 450 ng TCDD/kg/day or approximately 0, 1.5, 15, 150 or 450 ng TEQ/kg/day of MIX-1 or MIX-2 by gavage 5 days per week for 13 weeks. Mice were immunized 3 days after the last exposure and 4 days later, body, spleen, thymus, and liver weights were measured

  8. Regulation of eNOS enzyme activity by posttranslational modification.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Elke H; Dirsch, Verena M

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) employs multiple different cellular control mechanisms impinging on level and activity of the enzyme. This review aims at summarizing the current knowledge on the posttranslational modifications of eNOS, including acylation, nitrosylation, phosphorylation, acetylation, glycosylation and glutathionylation. Sites, mediators and impact on enzyme localization and activity of the single modifications will be discussed. Moreover, interdependence, cooperativity and competition between the different posttranslational modifications will be elaborated with special emphasis on the susceptibility of eNOS to metabolic cues.

  9. Synthesis of New Hydrazone Derivatives for MAO Enzymes Inhibitory Activity.

    PubMed

    Can, Nafiz Öncü; Osmaniye, Derya; Levent, Serkan; Sağlık, Begüm Nurpelin; İnci, Beril; Ilgın, Sinem; Özkay, Yusuf; Kaplancıklı, Zafer Asım

    2017-08-20

    In the present work, 14 new 1-substituted-2-phenylhydrazone derivatives were synthesized to evaluate their inhibitory activity against hMAO enzymes. The structures of the newly synthesized hydrazones 2a-2n were characterized by IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, HR-MS spectroscopic methods. The inhibitory activity of compounds 2a-2n against hMAO-A and hMAO-B enzymes was elucidated by using an in-vitro Amplex Red® reagent assay based on fluorometric methods. According to the activity studies, 2a and 2b were found to be the most active compounds against hMAO-A enzyme, with IC50 values of 0.342 µM and 0.028 µM, respectively. The most active compounds 2a-2b were evaluated by means of enzyme kinetics and docking studies. Moreover, these compounds were subjected to cytotoxicity and genotoxicity tests to establish their preliminary toxicological profiles and were found to be non-cytotoxic and non-genotoxic. Consequently, the findings of this study display the biological importance of compounds 2a, 2b as selective, irreversible and competitive inhibitors of hMAO-A. Docking studies revealed that there is a strong interaction between hMAO-A and the most active compound 2b.

  10. Antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs differentially affect PON1 enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Avcikurt, Ayla Solmaz; Sinan, Selma; Kockar, Feray

    2015-04-01

    Human serum paraoxonase (PON1, EC 3.1.8.1.) is a high-density lipid (HDL)-associated, calcium-dependent enzyme. In this study, the effects of Haloperidol, Fluoxetine hydrochloride, Diazepam and Acepromazine drugs used for the therapy of antidepressant and antipsychotic diseases, on paraoxonase enzyme activity was studied in in vitro inhibition studies on purified human serum PON1. PON1 enzyme was purified from human blood using two-step procedures, namely, ammonium sulfate precipitation and sepharose-4B-l-tyrosine-1-napthylamine hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The overall purification of human serum PON1 was obtained in a activity of 109.29 U/mL and this enzyme was purified 125-fold. The SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the enzyme indicates a single band with an apparent MW of 43 kDa. Inhibition studies indicated that haloperidol and fluoxetine hydrocloride were effective inhibitors on purified human serum PON1 activity with IC50 of 0.187 and 3.08 mM values, respectively. The kinetics of interaction of haloperidol and fluoxetine hydrocloride with the purified human serum PON1 indicated uncompetitive inhibiton pattern with Ki of 4.15 and 0.007 mM, respectively.

  11. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activity in avian semen.

    PubMed

    Partyka, Agnieszka; Lukaszewicz, Ewa; Niżański, Wojciech

    2012-10-01

    The present study compared the antioxidant system and lipid peroxidation in semen of two avian species: chicken and goose. The experiment was conducted on Greenleg Partridge roosters and White Koluda(®) ganders, each represented by 10 mature males. Malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were determined in sperm cells and seminal plasma. In gander spermatozoa, the amount of MDA was 10 times greater (P<0.01) than in rooster spermatozoa. Each of the investigated antioxidant enzymes had greater (P<0.01) activity in goose than chicken sperm. Catalase activity was detected in seminal plasma and spermatozoa from both studied species for the first time. In seminal plasma, the activity of GPx was two times greater (P<0.01) in the White Koluda(®) than in chickens, whereas SOD activity was less (P<0.01) than in chickens. This is the first study describing the presence of CAT in avian semen and the occurrence of indicator of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in geese. Data from the present study clearly show the species-specific differences in the activity of antioxidant defense and LPO. The greater amount of lipid peroxidation and greater activity of antioxidant enzymes in goose semen might suggest that spermatozoa were under greater oxidative stress and the enzymes were not utilized for the protection of functionally and structurally impaired cells. In turn, in fresh chicken semen a lesser activity of antioxidant enzymes accompanied with a lesser lipid peroxidation amount and good semen quality could indicate that fowl spermatozoa were under oxidative stress, but the enzymes were employed to protect and maintain sperm quality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of hepatic enzyme inducers on thyroxine (T4) catabolism in primary rat hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptor agonists such as phenobarbital (PB), 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), and 3-methylcholantrene (3-MC) decrease circulating thyroxine (T4) concentrations in rats. It is suspected that this decrease occurs through the induction of hepatic metabolizing en...

  13. Effects of hepatic enzyme inducers on thyroxine (T4) catabolism in primary rat hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptor agonists such as phenobarbital (PB), 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), and 3-methylcholantrene (3-MC) decrease circulating thyroxine (T4) concentrations in rats. It is suspected that this decrease occurs through the induction of hepatic metabolizing en...

  14. Chronic alcohol intake upregulates hepatic expression of carotenoid cleavage enzymes and PPAR in rats.

    PubMed

    Luvizotto, Renata A M; Nascimento, André F; Veeramachaneni, Sudipta; Liu, Chun; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2010-10-01

    Excessive and chronic alcohol intake leads to a lower hepatic vitamin A status by interfering with vitamin A metabolism. Dietary provitamin A carotenoids can be converted into vitamin A mainly by carotenoid 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 (CMO1) and, to a lesser degree, carotenoid 9'10'-monooxygenase 2 (CMO2). CMO1 has been shown to be regulated by several transcription factors, such as the PPAR, retinoid X receptor, and thyroid receptor (TR). The regulation of CMO2 has yet to be identified. The impact of chronic alcohol intake on hepatic expressions of CMO1 and CMO2 and their related transcription factors are unknown. In this study, Fischer 344 rats were pair-fed either a liquid ethanol Lieber-DeCarli diet (n = 10) or a control diet (n = 10) for 11 wk. Hepatic retinoid concentration and expressions of CMO1, CMO2, PPARγ, PPARα, and TRβ as well as plasma thyroid hormones levels were analyzed. We observed that administering alcohol decreased hepatic retinoid levels but increased mRNA concentrations of CMO1, CMO2, PPARγ, PPARα, and TRβ and upregulated protein levels of CMO2, PPARγ, and PPARα. There was a positive correlation of PPARγ with CMO1 (r = 0.89; P < 0.0001) and both PPARγ and PPARα with CMO2 (r = 0.72, P < 0.001 and r = 0.62, P < 0.01, respectively). Plasma thyroid hormone concentrations did not differ between the control rats and alcohol-fed rats. This study suggests that chronic alcohol intake significantly upregulates hepatic expression of CMO1 and, to a much lesser extent, CMO2. This process may be due to alcohol-induced PPARγ expression and lower vitamin A status in the liver.

  15. Activity of Krebs cycle enzymes in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Comim, Clarissa M; Hoepers, Andreza; Ventura, Letícia; Freiberger, Viviane; Dominguini, Diogo; Mina, Francielle; Mendonça, Bruna P; Scaini, Giselli; Vainzof, Mariz; Streck, Emílio L; Quevedo, João

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a degenerative disease of skeletal, respiratory, and cardiac muscles caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. More recently, brain involvement has been verified. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress may underlie the pathophysiology of DMD. In this study we evaluate Krebs cycle enzymes activity in the cerebral cortex, diaphragm, and quadriceps muscles of mdx mice. Cortex, diaphragm, and quadriceps tissues from male dystrophic mdx and control mice were used. We observed increased malate dehydrogenase activity in the cortex; increased malate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase activities in the diaphragm; and increased citrate synthase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase activities in the quadriceps of mdx mice. This study showed increased activity of Krebs cycle enzymes in cortex, quadriceps, and diaphragm in mdx mice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Modulatory effects of morin on hyperglycemia by attenuating the hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism and β-cell function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Vanitha, P; Uma, C; Suganya, N; Bhakkiyalakshmi, E; Suriyanarayanan, S; Gunasekaran, P; Sivasubramanian, S; Ramkumar, K M

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of morin on blood glucose, insulin level, hepatic glucose regulating enzyme activities and glycogen level in experimental diabetes. Diabetes mellitus was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (50 mg/kg b.w.). Five days after STZ injection, diabetic rats received morin (25 and 50 mg/kg b.w.) orally for 30 days. Glibenclamide was used as reference drug. Morin treatment significantly reduced the blood glucose and improved the serum insulin levels. Further, a dose-dependent reduction in glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase was observed along with the increase in liver hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities. Morin supplement were found to be effective in preserving the normal histological appearance of pancreatic islets as well as to preserve insulin-positive β-cells in STZ-rats. Therefore, these findings suggest that morin displays beneficial effects in the treatment of diabetes, mediated through the regulation of carbohydrate metabolic enzyme activities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Miltefosine Suppresses Hepatic Steatosis by Activating AMPK Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yaqin; Tong, Xing; Li, Kexue; Bai, Hui; Li, Xiaoyu; Ben, Jingjing; Zhang, Hanwen; Yang, Qing; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose It has been accepted that AMPK (Adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase) activation exhibits many beneficial effects on glucolipid metabolism. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) is an important lysophospholipid which can improve blood glucose levels in diabetic mice and attenuate inflammation by activating AMPK signal pathway in macrophages. Synthetic alkylphospholipids (ALPs), such as miltefosine, is used as an alternate of LPC for the clinical application. Here, we investigated whether miltefosine could have an impact on hepatic steatosis and related metabolic disorders. Experimental Approach Mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD) for 16 weeks to generate an obese model. Next, the obese mice were randomly divided into three groups: saline-treated and miltefosine-treated (2.5 or 5 mg/kg/d) groups. Miltefosine was intraperitoneally administrated into mice for additional 4 weeks plus HFD treatment. Key Results It was shown that miltefosine treatment could substantially improve glucose metabolism, prevented hepatic lipid accumulation, and inhibited liver inflammation in HFD-fed mice by activating AMPK signal pathway. In vitro, miltefosine stimulated AMPKα phosphorylation both in time and dose dependent manner and decreased lipid accumulation in liver cells. When a specific AMPK inhibitor compound C was used to treat mice, the antagonistic effects of miltefosine on HFD-induced mouse hyperlipidaemia and liver steatosis were abolished. Treatment with miltefosine also dramatically inhibited the HFD-induced liver inflammation in mice. Conclusions and Implications Here we demonstrated that miltefosine might be a new activator of AMPK signal pathway in vivo and in vitro and be useful for treatment of hepatic steatosis and related metabolic disorders. PMID:27681040

  18. Fluorogenic Substrates for Visualizing Acidic Organelle Enzyme Activities

    PubMed Central

    Harlan, Fiona Karen; Lusk, Jason Scott; Mohr, Breanna Michelle; Guzikowski, Anthony Peter; Batchelor, Robert Hardy; Jiang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic cytoplasmic organelles that are present in all nucleated mammalian cells and are involved in a variety of cellular processes including repair of the plasma membrane, defense against pathogens, cholesterol homeostasis, bone remodeling, metabolism, apoptosis and cell signaling. Defects in lysosomal enzyme activity have been associated with a variety of neurological diseases including Parkinson’s Disease, Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Fluorogenic lysosomal staining probes were synthesized for labeling lysosomes and other acidic organelles in a live-cell format and were shown to be capable of monitoring lysosomal metabolic activity. The new targeted substrates were prepared from fluorescent dyes having a low pKa value for optimum fluorescence at the lower physiological pH found in lysosomes. They were modified to contain targeting groups to direct their accumulation in lysosomes as well as enzyme-cleavable functions for monitoring specific enzyme activities using a live-cell staining format. Application to the staining of cells derived from blood and skin samples of patients with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy, Krabbe and Gaucher Diseases as well as healthy human fibroblast and leukocyte control cells exhibited localization to the lysosome when compared with known lysosomal stain LysoTracker® Red DND-99 as well as with anti-LAMP1 Antibody staining. When cell metabolism was inhibited with chloroquine, staining with an esterase substrate was reduced, demonstrating that the substrates can be used to measure cell metabolism. When applied to diseased cells, the intensity of staining was reflective of lysosomal enzyme levels found in diseased cells. Substrates specific to the enzyme deficiencies in Gaucher or Krabbe disease patient cell lines exhibited reduced staining compared to that in non-diseased cells. The new lysosome-targeted fluorogenic substrates should be useful for research, diagnostics and

  19. Effects of selenium dietary enhancement on hatchery-reared coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch (Walbaum), when compared with wild coho: hepatic enzymes and seawater adaptation evaluated.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Felton, S.P.; Landolt, M.L.; Grace, R.; Palmisano, A.N.

    1996-01-01

    Hatchery-reared coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch (Walbaum), were fed elevated levels of selenium (as Na2SeO3) to raise eviscerated body burdens to the level measured in wild counterparts. The goal was to find a dietary concentration that would achieve the desired effect without causing damage to growth and normal development. To measure some indices of health, the detoxifying enzymes chosen were hepatic glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD). Eviscerated body selenium (Se) concentration, GSH-Px and SOD levels were measured during and at the end of the 9 month freshwater feeding trial. Selenium retention and enzyme activity were also measured during 6 months’residence in sea water (SW). Selenium supplements were added to a commercial ration to give final concentrations of 1.1, 8.6, 11.1, 13.6 μg g-1 Se in the four respective diets. The results indicated that a dietary concentration of 8.6 μg g-1selenium was capable of inducing eviscerated body burdens similar to those found in wild fish. The elevated selenium levels persisted throughout the freshwater (FW) rearing phase, but declined when the fish were fed an unsupplemented ration upon SW entry. Superoxide dismutase levels did not increase above control levels. Glutathione peroxidase levels increased in fish fed the supplemented diets. GSH-Px activity declined in the higher supplemented dietary groups when all groups were reduced to the control group level of 1.1 μg g-1. Cumulative mortality in SW was 20% in fish fed either the 1.1 or the 8.6 μg g-1 Se diets. The 8.6 μg g-1 Se supplemented diets did produce healthy coho, comparable to their wild counterparts.

  20. Lipid deacylating enzymes in plants: old activities, new genes.

    PubMed

    Matos, Ana Rita; Pham-Thi, Anh-Thu

    2009-06-01

    Because lipids are major components of cellular membranes, their degradation under stress conditions compromises compartmentalization. However, in addition to having structural roles, membrane lipids are also implicated in signalling processes involving the activity of lipolytic enzymes. Phospholipases D and C, acting on the polar heads of phospholipids, have been relatively well characterized in plants. In contrast, knowledge of lipid deacylating enzymes remains limited. Lipid acyl hydrolases (LAH) are able to hydrolyse both fatty acid moieties of polar lipids. They differ from phospholipases A(1) or A(2) (PLA) acting on sn-1 or sn-2 positions of phospholipids, respectively, as well as from lipases which de-esterify triacylglycerols. The free polyunsaturated fatty acids generated by deacylating enzymes can be used in the biosynthesis of oxylipins and the lysophospholipids, provided by PLAs, are also bioactive molecules. In the four decades that have passed since the first description of LAH activities in plants some enzymes have been purified. In recent years, the widespread use of molecular approaches together with the attention paid to lipid signalling has contributed to a renewed interest in LAH and has led to the identification of different gene families and the characterization of new enzymes. Additionally, several proteins with putative lipase/esterase signatures have been identified. In the present paper we review currently available data on LAHs, PLAs, triacylglycerol lipases and other putative deacylating enzymes. The roles of lipid deacylating enzymes in plant growth, development and stress responses are discussed in the context of their involvement in membrane deterioration, lipid turnover and cellular signalling.

  1. Enzyme activities by indicator of quality in organic soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raigon Jiménez, Mo; Fita, Ana Delores; Rodriguez Burruezo, Adrián

    2016-04-01

    The analytical determination of biochemical parameters, as soil enzyme activities and those related to the microbial biomass is growing importance by biological indicator in soil science studies. The metabolic activity in soil is responsible of important processes such as mineralization and humification of organic matter. These biological reactions will affect other key processes involved with elements like carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus , and all transformations related in soil microbial biomass. The determination of biochemical parameters is useful in studies carried out on organic soil where microbial processes that are key to their conservation can be analyzed through parameters of the metabolic activity of these soils. The main objective of this work is to apply analytical methodologies of enzyme activities in soil collections of different physicochemical characteristics. There have been selective sampling of natural soils, organic farming soils, conventional farming soils and urban soils. The soils have been properly identified conserved at 4 ° C until analysis. The enzyme activities determinations have been: catalase, urease, cellulase, dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase, which bring together a representative group of biological transformations that occur in the soil environment. The results indicate that for natural and agronomic soil collections, the values of the enzymatic activities are within the ranges established for forestry and agricultural soils. Organic soils are generally higher level of enzymatic, regardless activity of the enzyme involved. Soil near an urban area, levels of activities have been significantly reduced. The vegetation cover applied to organic soils, results in greater enzymatic activity. So the quality of these soils, defined as the ability to maintain their biological productivity is increased with the use of cover crops, whether or spontaneous species. The practice of cover based on legumes could be used as an ideal choice

  2. Activity of cytochrome P450 1A2 in relation to hepatic iron accumulation in transfusion-dependent β-thalassaemia major patients.

    PubMed

    Shteyer, E; Nitzan, I; Godfarb, A; Hemed, N; Revel-Vilk, S

    2015-04-01

    Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) is a cytochrome enzyme with a pivotal role in hepatic drug metabolism. Data from CYP1A2((-/-)) mouse suggest that CYP1A2 plays a role in aspects of hepatic iron toxicity. The aim of this study was to assess the activity of CYP1A2 in relation to hepatic iron load in patients with transfusion-dependent β-thalassaemia major. The (13) C-methacetin continuous breath test was performed on 30 consecutive patients with transfusion-dependent β-thalassaemia major. CYP1A2 activity was measured by the rate at which the (13) C substrate is metabolized and exhaled expressed as percentage dose recovery (PDR) per hour. CYP1A2 activity was correlated with clinical and laboratory parameters and hepatic iron accumulation by T2* magnetic resonance imaging (T2*MRI). Cytochrome P450 1A2 activity in patients with transfusion-dependent β- thalassaemia major was positivity correlated with plasma ferritin levels. No correlation was found with age, duration and amount of red blood cell transfusion and type of iron chelation therapy. Low CYP1A2 activity was negatively associated with hepatic iron accumulation (T2*MRI ≤ 6.3 ms); adjusted odds ratio (OR; 95% CI) for hepatic iron accumulation in patients with low CYP1A2 activity was 0.047 (0.003-0.72; P = 0.021). Of the six patients with decreased activity of CYP1A2, five had no hepatic iron accumulation and one had mild hepatic iron accumulation by T2*MRI. Activity of CYP1A2 is associated with hepatic iron accumulation in patients with transfusion-depended β-thalassaemia major. Further studies are needed to assess the exact role of CYP1A2 in iron metabolism in human. © 2014 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  3. Hepatitis B antigen in hepatocytes of chronic active liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kawanishi, H

    1979-04-01

    To study the morphologic interrelation of hepatocytes with the replication of hepatitis B vius (HBV) and immunocompetent cells in chronic active liver disease(CALD), organ cultures were prepared from liver biopsy specimens. Replication of hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) appears to occur in the nucleus of the hepatocyte in close association with intranuclear electron-dense strands and sometimes intranucleolar matrixes (likely HBcAg genomes), and cytoplasmic maturation of the HBcAg takes place in the preautolytic condition of host hepatocytes. Immunocompetent cells became progressively autolyzed in the early period of cultures. No difference in progression of hepatocyte injury in tissues from normal subjects and from hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive and HBsAg-negative patients with CALD may suggest that intracellular synthesis of HBV alone is not cytopathic to host hepatocytes. This model is promising for the study of HBV replication and development, and also for testing the efficacy of new antiviral agents against the virus.

  4. Abalone Protein Hydrolysates: Preparation, Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme Inhibition and Cellular Antioxidant Activity.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo Yeon; Je, Jae-Young; Hwang, Joung-Youl; Ahn, Chang-Bum

    2015-09-01

    Abalone protein was hydrolyzed by enzymatic hydrolysis and the optimal enzyme/substrate (E/S) ratios were determined. Abalone protein hydrolysates (APH) produced by Protamex at E/S ratio of 1:100 showed angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitory activity with IC50 of 0.46 mg/mL, and APH obtained by Flavourzyme at E/S ratio of 1:100 possessed the oxygen radical absorbance capacity value of 457.6 μM trolox equivalent/mg sample. Flavourzyme abalone protein hydrolysates (FAPH) also exhibited H2O2 scavenging activity with IC50 of 0.48 mg/mL and Fe(2+) chelating activity with IC50 of 2.26 mg/mL as well as high reducing power. FAPH significantly (P<0.05) protected H2O2-induced hepatic cell damage in cultured hepatocytes, and the cell viability was restored to 90.27% in the presence of FAPH. FAPH exhibited 46.20% intracellular ROS scavenging activity and 57.89% lipid peroxidation inhibition activity in cultured hepatocytes. Overall, APH may be useful as an ingredient for functional foods.

  5. Abalone Protein Hydrolysates: Preparation, Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme Inhibition and Cellular Antioxidant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo Yeon; Je, Jae-Young; Hwang, Joung-Youl; Ahn, Chang-Bum

    2015-01-01

    Abalone protein was hydrolyzed by enzymatic hydrolysis and the optimal enzyme/substrate (E/S) ratios were determined. Abalone protein hydrolysates (APH) produced by Protamex at E/S ratio of 1:100 showed angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitory activity with IC50 of 0.46 mg/mL, and APH obtained by Flavourzyme at E/S ratio of 1:100 possessed the oxygen radical absorbance capacity value of 457.6 μM trolox equivalent/mg sample. Flavourzyme abalone protein hydrolysates (FAPH) also exhibited H2O2 scavenging activity with IC50 of 0.48 mg/mL and Fe2+ chelating activity with IC50 of 2.26 mg/mL as well as high reducing power. FAPH significantly (P<0.05) protected H2O2-induced hepatic cell damage in cultured hepatocytes, and the cell viability was restored to 90.27% in the presence of FAPH. FAPH exhibited 46.20% intracellular ROS scavenging activity and 57.89% lipid peroxidation inhibition activity in cultured hepatocytes. Overall, APH may be useful as an ingredient for functional foods. PMID:26451354

  6. Inhibition of converting enzyme activity by acute hypoxia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Stalcup, S A; Lipset, J S; Legant, P M; Leuenberger, P J; Mellins, R B

    1979-02-01

    We studied the effect of a change in oxygen tension on converting enzyme activity in anesthetized, paralyzed, catheterized dogs ventilated with room air, 100% O2, and hypoxic gas mixtures. Bradykinin was continuously infused into the femoral vein and simultaneous samples drawn from the pulmonary artery and left atrium; bradykinin was extracted into ethanol and measured by radioimmunoassay. Clearance of bradykinin by lung converting enzyme decreased from 96% at PaO2 levels above 95 Torr to 0% below 26 Torr. Inhibition of enzyme activity was rapid in onset (less than 2 min), closely correlated with PaO2 (r = 0.92, P less than 0.001), and reversible within 2 min after return to room air breathing. Converting enzyme activity of the systemic vascular bed was also inhibited by hypoxia; kininase I activity was unaffected by oxygen tension. Although arterial bradykinin concentrations in the range of 0.5 ng/ml produced hypotension in normoxic animals, elevations to 30 ng/ml had no hypotensive effect in hypoxic dogs. During acute hypoxia, venous bradykinin will pass through the lung unmetabolized, and local levels of angiotensin II and bradykinin will vary in vascular beds with different oxygen tensions, providing a finely-graded mechanism for blood flow regulation.

  7. Variation in Soil Enzyme Activities in a Temperate Agroforestry Watershed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Integration of agroforestry and grass buffers into row crop watersheds improves overall environmental quality, including soil quality. The objective of this study was to examine management and landscape effects on soil carbon, soil nitrogen, microbial diversity, enzyme activity, and DNA concentrati...

  8. Carbohydrate active enzymes revealed in Coptotermes formosanus transcriptome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A normalized cDNA library of Coptotermes formosanus was constructed using mixed RNA isolated from workers, soldiers, nymphs and alates of both sexes. Sequencing of this library generated 131,637 EST and 25,939 unigenes were assembled. Carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) revealed in this library we...

  9. [Interaction between CYP450 enzymes and metabolism of traditional Chinese medicine as well as enzyme activity assay].

    PubMed

    Lu, Tu-lin; Su, Lian-lin; Ji, De; Gu, Wei; Mao, Chun-qin

    2015-09-01

    Drugs are exogenous compounds for human bodies, and will be metabolized by many enzymes after administration. CYP450 enzyme, as a major metabolic enzyme, is an important phase I drug metabolizing enzyme. In human bodies, about 75% of drug metabolism is conducted by CYP450 enzymes, and CYP450 enzymes is the key factor for drug interactions between traditional Chinese medicine( TCM) -TCM, TCM-medicine and other drug combination. In order to make clear the interaction between metabolic enzymes and TCM metabolism, we generally chose the enzymatic activity as an evaluation index. That is to say, the enhancement or reduction of CYP450 enzyme activity was used to infer the inducing or inhibitory effect of active ingredients and extracts of traditional Chinese medicine on enzymes. At present, the common method for measuring metabolic enzyme activity is Cocktail probe drugs, and it is the key to select the suitable probe substrates. This is of great significance for study drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) process in organisms. The study focuses on the interaction between TCMs, active ingredients, herbal extracts, cocktail probe substrates as well as CYP450 enzymes, in order to guide future studies.

  10. Regulation of Human Hepatic Drug Transporter Activity and Expression by Diesel Exhaust Particle Extract

    PubMed Central

    Le Vee, Marc; Jouan, Elodie; Stieger, Bruno; Lecureur, Valérie; Fardel, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) are common environmental air pollutants primarily affecting the lung. DEPs or chemicals adsorbed on DEPs also exert extra-pulmonary effects, including alteration of hepatic drug detoxifying enzyme expression. The present study was designed to determine whether organic DEP extract (DEPe) may target hepatic drug transporters that contribute in a major way to drug detoxification. Using primary human hepatocytes and transporter-overexpressing cells, DEPe was first shown to strongly inhibit activities of the sinusoidal solute carrier (SLC) uptake transporters organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP) 1B1, 1B3 and 2B1 and of the canalicular ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux pump multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, with IC50 values ranging from approximately 1 to 20 μg/mL and relevant to environmental exposure situations. By contrast, 25 μg/mL DEPe failed to alter activities of the SLC transporter organic cation transporter (OCT) 1 and of the ABC efflux pumps P-glycoprotein and bile salt export pump (BSEP), whereas it only moderately inhibited those of sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide and of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Treatment by 25 μg/mL DEPe was next demonstrated to induce expression of BCRP at both mRNA and protein level in cultured human hepatic cells, whereas it concomitantly repressed mRNA expression of various transporters, including OATP1B3, OATP2B1, OCT1 and BSEP. Such changes in transporter expression were found to be highly correlated to those caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a reference activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway. This suggests that DEPe, which is enriched in known ligands of AhR like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alters drug transporter expression via activation of the AhR cascade. Taken together, these data established human hepatic transporters as targets of organic chemicals containing in DEPs, which may contribute to their

  11. Potential enzyme activities in cryoturbated organic matter of arctic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnecker, J.; Wild, B.; Rusalimova, O.; Mikutta, R.; Guggenberger, G.; Richter, A.

    2012-12-01

    An estimated 581 Gt organic carbon is stored in arctic soils that are affected by cryoturbtion, more than in today's atmosphere (450 Gt). The high amount of organic carbon is, amongst other factors, due to topsoil organic matter (OM) that has been subducted by freeze-thaw processes. This cryoturbated OM is usually hundreds to thousands of years old, while the chemical composition remains largely unaltered. It has therefore been suggested, that the retarded decomposition rates cannot be explained by unfavourable abiotic conditions in deeper soil layers alone. Since decomposition of soil organic material is dependent on extracellular enzymes, we measured potential and actual extracellular enzyme activities in organic topsoil, mineral subsoil and cryoturbated material from three different tundra sites, in Zackenberg (Greenland) and Cherskii (North-East Siberia). In addition we analysed the microbial community structure by PLFAs. Hydrolytic enzyme activities, calculated on a per gram dry mass basis, were higher in organic topsoil horizons than in cryoturbated horizons, which in turn were higher than in mineral horizons. When calculated on per gram carbon basis, the activity of the carbon acquiring enzyme exoglucanase was not significantly different between cryoturbated and topsoil organic horizons in any of the three sites. Oxidative enzymes, i.e. phenoloxidase and peroxidase, responsible for degradation of complex organic substances, showed higher activities in topsoil organic and cryoturbated horizons than in mineral horizons, when calculated per gram dry mass. Specific activities (per g C) however were highest in mineral horizons. We also measured actual cellulase activities (by inhibiting microbial uptake of products and without substrate addition): calculated per g C, the activities were up to ten times as high in organic topsoil compared to cryoturbated and mineral horizons, the latter not being significantly different. The total amount of PLFAs, as a proxy for

  12. Carotenoid-cleavage activities of crude enzymes from Pandanous amryllifolius.

    PubMed

    Ningrum, Andriati; Schreiner, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    Carotenoid degradation products, known as norisoprenoids, are aroma-impact compounds in several plants. Pandan wangi is a common name of the shrub Pandanus amaryllifolius. The genus name 'Pandanus' is derived from the Indonesian name of the tree, pandan. In Indonesia, the leaves from the plant are used for several purposes, e.g., as natural colorants and flavor, and as traditional treatments. The aim of this study was to determine the cleavage of β-carotene and β-apo-8'-carotenal by carotenoid-cleavage enzymes isolated from pandan leaves, to investigate dependencies of the enzymatic activities on temperature and pH, to determine the enzymatic reaction products by using Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrophotometry (HS-SPME GC/MS), and to investigate the influence of heat treatment and addition of crude enzyme on formation of norisoprenoids. Crude enzymes from pandan leaves showed higher activity against β-carotene than β-apo-8'-carotenal. The optimum temperature of crude enzymes was 70°, while the optimum pH value was 6. We identified β-ionone as the major volatile reaction product from the incubations of two different carotenoid substrates, β-carotene and β-apo-8'-carotenal. Several treatments, e.g., heat treatment and addition of crude enzymes in pandan leaves contributed to the norisoprenoid content. Our findings revealed that the crude enzymes from pandan leaves with carotenoid-cleavage activity might provide a potential application, especially for biocatalysis, in natural-flavor industry.

  13. Chronic administration of caderofloxacin, a new fluoroquinolone, increases hepatic CYP2E1 expression and activity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Miao, Ming-xing; Zhong, Ze-yu; Xu, Ping; Chen, Yang; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Caderofloxacin is a new fluoroquinolone that is under phase III clinical trials in China. Here we examined the effects of caderofloxacin on rat hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoforms as well as the potential of caderofloxacin interacting with co-administered drugs. Methods: Male rats were treated with caderofloxacin (9 mg/kg, ig) once or twice daily for 14 consecutive days. The effects of caderofloxacin on CYP3A, 2D6, 2C19, 1A2, 2E1 and 2C9 were evaluated using a “cocktail” of 6 probes (midazolam, dextromethorphan, omeprazole, theophylline, chlorzoxazone and diclofenac) injected on d 0 (prior to caderofloxacin exposure) and d 15 (after caderofloxacin exposure). Hepatic microsomes from the caderofloxacin-treated rats were used to assess CYP2E1 activity and chlorzoxazone metabolism. The expression of CYP2E1 mRNA and protein in hepatic microsomes was analyzed with RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Results: Fourteen-day administration of caderofloxacin significantly increased the activity of hepatic CYP2E1, leading to enhanced metabolism of chlorzoxazone. In vitro microsomal study confirmed that CYP2E1 was a major metabolic enzyme involved in chlorzoxazone metabolism, and the 14-d administration of caderofloxacin significantly increased the activity of CYP2E1 in hepatic microsomes, resulting in increased formation of 6-hydroxychlorzoxazone. Furthermore, the 14-d administration of caderofloxacin significantly increased the expression of CYP2E1 mRNA and protein in liver microsomes, which was consistent with the pharmacokinetic results. Conclusion: Fourteen-day administration of caderofloxacin can induce the expression and activity of hepatic CYP2E1 in rats. When caderofloxacin is administered, a potential drug-drug interaction mediated by CYP2E1 induction should be considered. PMID:26838075

  14. The Effects of Chloroquine-Resistant and Chloroquine-Sensitive Strains of Berghei on Rodent Hepatic Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-14

    Dipetolllonema M<’I:stomys 42.94 106 58.46 viteolle Schistosollloll mansoni S . I1\\I!lnsoni Fasciola hepatica matalensis Mi ce (SWiss) Mice (Swiss...infected with Fasciola hepatica (Table 4). This may be due to direct residence of the parasites in their host’s liver and severe injury of the liver...vitro drug- metabolizing activity of the hepatic mixed function oxidase system in rats infected experimentally with Fasciola hepatica

  15. Genetic inhibition of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity increases liver fat and alters global protein acetylationa

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Jenny D.Y.; Lawrence, Robert T.; Healy, Marin E.; Dominy, John E.; Liao, Jason A.; Breen, David S.; Byrne, Frances L.; Kenwood, Brandon M.; Lackner, Carolin; Okutsu, Saeko; Mas, Valeria R.; Caldwell, Stephen H.; Tomsig, Jose L.; Cooney, Gregory J.; Puigserver, Pere B.; Turner, Nigel; James, David E.; Villén, Judit; Hoehn, Kyle L.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid deposition in the liver is associated with metabolic disorders including fatty liver disease, type II diabetes, and hepatocellular cancer. The enzymes acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) and ACC2 are powerful regulators of hepatic fat storage; therefore, their inhibition is expected to prevent the development of fatty liver. In this study we generated liver-specific ACC1 and ACC2 double knockout (LDKO) mice to determine how the loss of ACC activity affects liver fat metabolism and whole-body physiology. Characterization of LDKO mice revealed unexpected phenotypes of increased hepatic triglyceride and decreased fat oxidation. We also observed that chronic ACC inhibition led to hyper-acetylation of proteins in the extra-mitochondrial space. In sum, these data reveal the existence of a compensatory pathway that protects hepatic fat stores when ACC enzymes are inhibited. Furthermore, we identified an important role for ACC enzymes in the regulation of protein acetylation in the extra-mitochondrial space. PMID:24944901

  16. Crystallographic identification of a noncompetitive inhibitor binding site on the hepatitis C virus NS5B RNA polymerase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Love, Robert A; Parge, Hans E; Yu, Xiu; Hickey, Michael J; Diehl, Wade; Gao, Jingjin; Wriggers, Hilary; Ekker, Anne; Wang, Liann; Thomson, James A; Dragovich, Peter S; Fuhrman, Shella A

    2003-07-01

    The virus-encoded nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and is absolutely required for replication of the virus. NS5B exhibits significant differences from cellular polymerases and therefore has become an attractive target for anti-HCV therapy. Using a high-throughput screen, we discovered a novel NS5B inhibitor that binds to the enzyme noncompetitively with respect to nucleotide substrates. Here we report the crystal structure of NS5B complexed with this small molecule inhibitor. Unexpectedly, the inhibitor is bound within a narrow cleft on the protein's surface in the "thumb" domain, about 30 A from the enzyme's catalytic center. The interaction between this inhibitor and NS5B occurs without dramatic changes to the structure of the protein, and sequence analysis suggests that the binding site is conserved across known HCV genotypes. Possible mechanisms of inhibition include perturbation of protein dynamics, interference with RNA binding, and disruption of enzyme oligomerization.

  17. The active site structure and mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    Arginine specific reagents showed irreversible inhibition of avian liver mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Potent protection against modification was elicited by CO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} in the presence of other substrates. Labeling of enzyme with (7-{sup 14}C) phenylglyoxal showed that 1 or 2 arginines are involved in CO{sub 2} binding and activation. Peptide map studies showed this active site arginine residues is located at position 289. Histidine specific reagents showed pseudo first order inhibition of avian mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity. The best protection against modification was elicited by IDP or IDP and Mn{sup +2}. One histidine residue is at or near the phosphoenolpyruvate binding site as demonstrated in the increased absorbance at 240 nm and proton relaxation rate studies. Circular dichroism studies reveal that enzyme structure was perturbed by diethylpyrocarbonate modification. Metal binding studies suggest that this enzyme has only one metal binding site. The putative binding sites from several GTP and phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes are observed in P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase from different species.

  18. Effects of humic acid-metal complexes on hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase, carnitine acetyltransferase and catalase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fungjou Lu; Youngshin Chen . Dept. of Biochemistry); Tienshang Huang . Dept. of Medicine)

    1994-03-01

    A significant increase in activities of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase and carnitine acetyltransferase was observed in male Balb/c mice intraperitoneally injected for 40 d with 0.125 mg/0.1 ml/d humic acid-metal complexes. Among these complexes, the humic acid-As complex was relatively effective, whereas humic acid-25 metal complex was more effective, and humic acid-26 metal complex was most effective. However, humic acid or metal mixtures, or metal such as As alone, was not effective. Humic acid-metal complexes also significantly decreased hepatic catalase activity. A marked decrease of 60-kDa polypeptide in liver cytoplasm was also observed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after the mice had been injected with the complexes. Morphological analysis of a histopathological biopsy of such treated mice revealed several changes in hepatocytes, including focal necrosis and cell infiltration, mild fatty changes, reactive nuclei, and hypertrophy. Humic acid-metal complexes affect activities of metabolic enzymes of fatty acids, and this results in accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and increase of the lipid peroxidation. The products of lipid peroxidation may be responsible for liver damage and possible carcinogenesis. Previous studies in this laboratory had shown that humic acid-metal complex altered the coagulation system and that humic acid, per se, caused vasculopathy. Therefore, humic acid-metal complexes may be main causal factors of not only so-called blackfoot disease, but also the liver cancer prevailing on the southwestern coast of Taiwan.

  19. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α Activation Induces Hepatic Steatosis, Suggesting an Adverse Effect

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fang; Wang, Qi; Xu, Chao; Cao, Mingfeng; Zhou, Xiaoming; Wang, Tingting; Yu, Chunxiao; Jing, Fei; Chen, Wenbin; Gao, Ling; Zhao, Jiajun

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by hepatic triglyceride accumulation, ranging from steatosis to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. NAFLD is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and is associated with metabolic syndrome. Antihyperlipidemic drugs are recommended as part of the treatment for NAFLD patients. Although fibrates activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), leading to the reduction of serum triglyceride levels, the effects of these drugs on NAFLD remain controversial. Clinical studies have reported that PPARα activation does not improve hepatic steatosis. In the present study, we focused on exploring the effect and mechanism of PPARα activation on hepatic triglyceride accumulation and hepatic steatosis. Male C57BL/6J mice, Pparα-null mice and HepG2 cells were treated with fenofibrate, one of the most commonly used fibrate drugs. Both low and high doses of fenofibrate were administered. Hepatic steatosis was detected through oil red O staining and electron microscopy. Notably, in fenofibrate-treated mice, the serum triglyceride levels were reduced and the hepatic triglyceride content was increased in a dose-dependent manner. Oil red O staining of liver sections demonstrated that fenofibrate-fed mice accumulated abundant neutral lipids. Fenofibrate also increased the intracellular triglyceride content in HepG2 cells. The expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c) and the key genes associated with lipogenesis were increased in fenofibrate-treated mouse livers and HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. However, the effect was strongly impaired in Pparα-null mice treated with fenofibrate. Fenofibrate treatment induced mature SREBP-1c expression via the direct binding of PPARα to the DR1 motif of the SREBP-1c gene. Taken together, these findings indicate the molecular mechanism by which PPARα activation increases liver triglyceride accumulation and suggest an adverse effect of

  20. Cytidine-5'-monophosphate-N-acetylneuraminic acid. Asialoglycoprotein sialic acid transferase activity in liver and serum of patients with juvenile hepatic cirrhosis and alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kuhlenschmidt, M S; Peters, S P; Pinkard, O D; Glew, R H; Sharp, H

    1976-04-08

    The molecular basis for the accumulation of a substance which displays the immunological reactivity of alpha-1-antitrypsin within vesicles of liver parenchymal cells of individuals with hepatic cirrhosis and serum alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency remains unclear. We recently reported that serum from a patient with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and hepatic cirrhosis was substantially deficient in sialyltransferease (EC 2.4.99.1) an enzyme which transfers sialic acid from cytidine 5'-monophosphate-N-acetylneuraminic acid to a variety of asialoglycoprotein acceptors. In the present report we have extended these studies to include serum from five additional patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and juvenile hepatic cirrhosis as well as a liver specimen obtained at autopsy of one of these patients. We find the sialytransferase activity in serum from six patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and hepatic cirrhosis to be 50% of healthy pediatric control values and 30% of pediatric patients with liver disease. However, serum from family members homozygous for alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency but without hepatic cirrhosis, and serum from patients with a variety of other kinds of liver disease, failed to exhibit the marked sialytransferase deficiency. Similar assays carried out on a homogenate of a liver sample from one patient with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and hepatic cirrhosis indicated that the deficiency of sialyltransferase activity was not demonstrable in liver. Furthermore, a comparative kinetic analysis of serum and liver sialytransferase in normal and afflicted individuals failed to detect differences in substrate affinities which might account for a decrease in functional sialyltransferase capacity in individuals with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and hepatic cirrhosis. These observations suggest that the serum sialyltransferase deficiency in such patients probably arises after chronic and extensive liver disease involving hepatic accumulation of

  1. Diminution of Hepatic Response to 7, 12-dimethylbenz(α)anthracene by Ethyl Acetate Fraction of Acacia catechu Willd. through Modulation of Xenobiotic and Anti-Oxidative Enzymes in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rakesh; Kaur, Rajbir; Singh, Amrit Pal; Arora, Saroj

    2014-01-01

    Background Liver is the primary metabolizing site of body and is prone to damage by exogenous as well as endogenous intoxicants. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as 7, 12- dimethylbenz(α)anthracene (DMBA) is an exogenous hepatotoxin, which is well known for modulating phase I, II and anti-oxidative enzymes of liver. Plants contain plethora of polyphenolic compounds which can reverse the damaging effect of various xenobiotics. The present study investigated protective role of the ethyl acetate fraction of Acacia catechu Willd. (EAF) against DMBA induced alteration in hepatic metabolizing and anti-oxidative enzymes in rats. Methodology and Principal Findings The rats were subjected to hepatic damage by treating with DMBA for 7 weeks on alternative days and treatment schedule was terminated at the end of 14 weeks. The rats were euthanized at the end of protocol and livers were homogenized. The liver homogenates were used to analyse phase I (NADPH-cytochrome P450 reducatse, NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase, cytochrome P420, cytochrome b5), phase II (glutathione-S-transferase, DT diaphorase and γ-Glutamyl transpeptidase) and antioxidative enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, guiacol peroxidase and lactate dehydrogenase). Furthermore, other oxidative stress parameters (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lipid hydroperoxides and conjugated dienes and reduced glutathione) and liver marker enzymes (serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase and alkaline phosphatase) were also studied. The DMBA induced significant changes in activity of hepatic enzymes that was reversed by treatment with three dose levels of EAF. Conclusion It is concluded that EAF affords hepato-protection against DMBA in rats through modulation of phase I, II and anti-oxidative enzymes. PMID:24587216

  2. Regulation of hepatic stellate cell proliferation and activation by glutamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Ghazwani, Mohammed; Liu, Ke; Huang, Yixian; Chang, Na; Fan, Jie; He, Fengtian; Li, Liying; Bu, Shizhong; Xie, Wen; Ma, Xiaochao; Li, Song

    2017-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins, which is mainly caused by accumulation of activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). The mechanisms of activation and proliferation of HSCs, two key events after liver damage, have been studied for many years. Here we report a novel pathway to control HSCs by regulating glutamine metabolism. We demonstrated that the proliferation of HSCs is critically dependent on glutamine that is used to generate α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and non-essential amino acid (NEAA). In addition, both culture- and in vivo-activated HSCs have increased glutamine utilization and increased expression of genes related to glutamine metabolism, including GLS (glutaminase), aspartate transaminase (GOT1) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GLUD1). Inhibition of these enzymes, as well as glutamine depletion, had a significant inhibitory effect on HSCs activation. In addition to providing energy expenditure, conversion of glutamine to proline is enhanced. The pool of free proline may also be increased via downregulation of POX expression. Hedgehog signaling plays an important role in the regulation of glutamine metabolism, as well as TGF-β1, c-Myc, and Ras signalings, via transcriptional upregulation and repression of key metabolic enzymes in this pathway. Finally, changes in glutamine metabolism were also found in mouse liver tissue following CCl4-induced acute injury. Glutamine metabolism plays an important role in regulating the proliferation and activation of HSCs. Strategies that are targeted at glutamine metabolism may represent a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  3. Hepatitis B virus activity in patients with anti-hepatitis C virus antibody positivity and hepatitis B antigen positivity.

    PubMed

    Haushofer, Alexander C; Hauer, René; Brunner, Harald; Köller, Ursula; Trubert-Exinger, Doris; Halbmayer, Walter Michael; Haas, Josef; Kessler, Harald H

    2002-12-01

    Co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HCV seems to be relatively frequent. There might be a mutual influence on replication activity of HBV and HCV. To determine the HBV activity in patients with serum HCV RNA and HBsAg positivity and in those with confirmed anti-HCV antibody and HBsAg positivity but serum HCV RNA negativity. A total of 1,200 anti-HCV antibody positive samples were investigated. Samples of HCV RNA and HBsAg positive patients were compared with those of confirmed anti-HCV and HBsAg positive but serum HCV RNA negative patients. HBV activity was tested with the quantitative Cobas Amplicor HBV Monitor Test (Roche Diagnostic Systems, Pleasanton, CA). Of all studied patients with chronic hepatitis C (serum HCV RNA positivity) only 1.0% were found to be HBsAg positive. In contrast, of all patients with confirmed anti-HCV positivity but serum HCV RNA negativity, 11.9% tested HBsAg positive. The median of HBV DNA levels of patients with serum HCV RNA positivity and HBeAg seroconversion (4.0 x 10(2) HBV DNA copies per ml) was found to be slightly lower than that of patients with serum HCV RNA negativity and HBeAg seroconversion (2.5 x 10(3) HBV DNA copies per ml; P>0.05). The median of HBV DNA levels of patients with serum HCV RNA positivity but without HBeAg seroconversion (1.1 x 10(4) HBV DNA copies per ml) was found to be significantly lower than that of patients with serum HCV RNA negativity but without HBeAg seroconversion (2.6 x 10(7) HBV DNA copies per ml; P<0.05). A mutual effect on HBV and HCV replication could be observed. The molecular assay for quantification of serum HBV DNA was found to be useful for the routine diagnostic laboratory.

  4. Strong Effects of a Shelfbreak Jet on Microbial Enzyme Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoarfrost, A.; Balmonte, J. P.; Ziervogel, K.; Ghobrial, S.; Gawarkiewicz, G.; Arnosti, C.

    2016-02-01

    The activities of extracellular enzymes are critical in initiating microbial cycling of organic carbon, yet the dynamics of heterotrophic enzyme activities in marine environments are still poorly understood. Variations at a given site in rates of activity and the spectrum of organic substrates hydrolyzed may depend upon environmental context. We measured the extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis of 13 high- and low-molecular-weight organic substrates in surface and bottom waters along a closely spaced 4-station transect at 71 W on the North Atlantic continental shelf, in the vicinity of the shelfbreak front. This transect intersects a robust upwelling cell that typically shows high biologic productivity, and is locatable by changes in T/S profiles and chl a concentrations along sharp spatial gradients. At the time of sampling, cold pool waters over the continental shelf were relatively cold, 3.5 Deg. C, compared to 12 Deg. C over the upper continental slope. Satellite thermal imagery indicated that shelf water extended offshore and interacted with a large crest of the Gulf Stream. The surface and bottom waters associated with the upwelling jet were characterized by enzyme activities a factor of 20 more rapid than closer inshore waters, and surface water chl a concentrations that were two to three times higher than the inshore waters. The spectrum of enzyme activities also differed markedly between surface and bottom waters both within the jet and at near-shore stations. Microbial extracellular enzymatic activities were strongly influenced by differences in their environmental context along the continental slope and shelfbreak front. Constraining the factors controlling heterotrophic activity across the diverse marine environment is an important step in understanding microbial controls on carbon cycling.

  5. Garlic Oil Attenuated Nitrosodiethylamine-Induced Hepatocarcinogenesis by Modulating the Metabolic Activation and Detoxification Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cui-Li; Zeng, Tao; Zhao, Xiu-Lan; Xie, Ke-Qin

    2013-01-01

    Nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) is a potent carcinogen widely existing in the environment. Our previous study has demonstrated that garlic oil (GO) could prevent NDEA-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in rats, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. It has been well documented that the metabolic activation may play important roles in NDEA-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Therefore, we designed the current study to explore the potential mechanisms by investigating the changes of hepatic phase Ⅰ enzymes (including cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYP) 2E1, CYP1A2 and CYP1A1) and phase Ⅱ enzymes (including glutathione S transferases (GSTs) and UDP- Glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs)) by using enzymatic methods, real-time PCR, and western blotting analysis. We found that NDEA treatment resulted in significant decreases of the activities of CYP2E1, CYP1A2, GST alpha, GST mu, UGTs and increases of the activities of CYP1A1 and GST pi. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein levels of CYP2E1, CYP1A2, GST alpha, GST mu and UGT1A6 in the liver of NDEA-treated rats were significantly decreased compared with those of the control group rats, while the mRNA and protein levels of CYP1A1 and GST pi were dramatically increased. Interestingly, all these adverse effects induced by NDEA were simultaneously and significantly suppressed by GO co-treatment. These data suggest that the protective effects of GO against NDEA-induced hepatocarcinogenesis might be, at least partially, attributed to the modulation of phase I and phase II enzymes. PMID:23494807

  6. Micropollutant degradation via extracted native enzymes from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Krah, Daniel; Ghattas, Ann-Kathrin; Wick, Arne; Bröder, Kathrin; Ternes, Thomas A

    2016-05-15

    A procedure was developed to assess the biodegradation of micropollutants in cell-free lysates produced from activated sludge of a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). This proof-of-principle provides the basis for further investigations of micropollutant biodegradation via native enzymes in a solution of reduced complexity, facilitating downstream protein analysis. Differently produced lysates, containing a variety of native enzymes, showed significant enzymatic activities of acid phosphatase, β-galactosidase and β-glucuronidase in conventional colorimetric enzyme assays, whereas heat-deactivated controls did not. To determine the enzymatic activity towards micropollutants, 20 compounds were spiked to the cell-free lysates under aerobic conditions and were monitored via LC-ESI-MS/MS. The micropollutants were selected to span a wide range of different biodegradabilities in conventional activated sludge treatment via distinct primary degradation reactions. Of the 20 spiked micropollutants, 18 could be degraded by intact sludge under assay conditions, while six showed reproducible degradation in the lysates compared to the heat-deactivated negative controls: acetaminophen, N-acetyl-sulfamethoxazole (acetyl-SMX), atenolol, bezafibrate, erythromycin and 10,11-dihydro-10-hydroxycarbamazepine (10-OH-CBZ). The primary biotransformation of the first four compounds can be attributed to amide hydrolysis. However, the observed biotransformations in the lysates were differently influenced by experimental parameters such as sludge pre-treatment and the addition of ammonium sulfate or peptidase inhibitors, suggesting that different hydrolase enzymes were involved in the primary degradation, among them possibly peptidases. Furthermore, the transformation of 10-OH-CBZ to 9-CA-ADIN was caused by a biologically-mediated oxidation, which indicates that in addition to hydrolases further enzyme classes (probably oxidoreductases) are present in the native lysates. Although the

  7. Viral hepatitis A, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    2011-08-01

    From 2000 to 2010, there were 214 incident diagnoses of acute hepatitis A among active component members of the U.S. Armed Forces; the crude overall incidence rate during the period was 1.37 per 100,000 person-years. Rates of incident diagnoses of acute hepatitis A were relatively low throughout the period and much lower than during the pre-vaccine era (1990-1996). There were disproportionate numbers of diagnoses of acute hepatitis A among service members born in countries endemic for the infection. The low rates of acute hepatitis A among U.S. military members overall reflect the widespread use of hepatitis A virus vaccine.

  8. Effects of dietary retinyl acetate on the promotion of hepatic enzyme-altered foci by polybrominated biphenyls in initiated rats.

    PubMed

    Rezabek, M S; Sleight, S D; Jensen, R K; Aust, S D

    1989-08-01

    Vitamin A inhibits the development of some chemically-induced tumours. Since polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) are hepatic tumour promoters and they affect vitamin A homeostasis in rats, we put forward the hypothesis that dietary levels of vitamin A would influence tumour promotion by PBBs. In the study described here, female Sprague-Dawley rats were initiated on day 1 by ip administration of diethylnitrosamine. On day 7 after initiation, the rats were fed a vitamin A-deficient basal diet that was supplemented with either 2000 IU (low-vitamin A) or 200,000 IU (high-vitamin A) retinyl acetate/kg feed. From day 30 after initiation until the end of the study the following PBBs were added to the diets: Firemaster BP-6 (10 ppm), 2,4,5,2',4',5'-hexabromobiphenyl (10 ppm) or 3,4,5,3',4',5'-hexabromobiphenyl (1 ppm). The control animals received low- or high-vitamin A diets containing no PBBs. On day 180, the rats were necropsied, sections of various tissues were stained for histopathological examination and an evaluation of hepatic enzyme-altered foci was performed. Numbers of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase-positive foci/cm3 liver and the mean volumes of these foci were lower in the high-vitamin A groups than those in the corresponding low-vitamin A groups, but these differences were not significant. The percentage of the liver volume occupied by foci was significantly greater in the low-vitamin A with 345-HBB group than in the corresponding high-vitamin A group. Thus, high dietary levels of vitamin A had some inhibitory effect on the promotion of hepatic-altered foci by 345-HBB in initiated rats.

  9. Microbial Community Structure and Enzyme Activities in Semiarid Agricultural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-Martinez, V. A.; Zobeck, T. M.; Gill, T. E.; Kennedy, A. C.

    2002-12-01

    The effect of agricultural management practices on the microbial community structure and enzyme activities of semiarid soils of different textures in the Southern High Plains of Texas were investigated. The soils (sandy clay loam, fine sandy loam and loam) were under continuous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) or in rotations with peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) or wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and had different water management (irrigated or dryland) and tillage (conservation or conventional). Microbial community structure was investigated using fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis by gas chromatography and enzyme activities, involved in C, N, P and S cycling of soils, were measured (mg product released per kg soil per h). The activities of b-glucosidase, b-glucosaminidase, alkaline phosphatase, and arylsulfatase were significantly (P<0.05) increased in soils under cotton rotated with sorghum or wheat, and due to conservation tillage in comparison to continuous cotton under conventional tillage. Principal component analysis showed FAME profiles of these soils separated distinctly along PC1 (20 %) and PC2 (13 %) due to their differences in soil texture and management. No significant differences were detected in FAME profiles due to management practices for the same soils in this sampling period. Enzyme activities provide early indications of the benefits in microbial populations and activities and soil organic matter under crop rotations and conservation tillage in comparison to the typical practices in semiarid regions of continuous cotton and conventional tillage.

  10. A generic rate law for surface-active enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Onder; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2013-09-02

    Many biochemical reactions are confined to interfaces, such as membranes or cell walls. Despite their importance, no canonical rate laws describing the kinetics of surface-active enzymes exist. Combining the approach chosen by Michaelis and Menten 100 years ago with concepts from surface chemical physics, we here present an approach to derive generic rate laws of enzymatic processes at surfaces. We illustrate this by a simple reversible conversion on a surface to stress key differences to the classical case in solution. The available area function, a concept from surface physics which enters the rate law, covers different models of adsorption and presents a unifying perspective on saturation effects and competition between enzymes. A remarkable implication is the direct dependence of the rate of a given enzyme on all other enzymatic species able to bind at the surface. The generic approach highlights general principles of the kinetics of surface-active enzymes and allows to build consistent mathematical models of more complex pathways involving reactions at interfaces.

  11. Functionally diverse biotin-dependent enzymes with oxaloacetate decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Lietzan, Adam D; St Maurice, Martin

    2014-02-15

    Biotin-dependent enzymes catalyze carboxylation, decarboxylation and transcarboxylation reactions that participate in the primary metabolism of a wide range of organisms. In all cases, the overall reaction proceeds via two half reactions that take place in physically distinct active sites. In the first half-reaction, a carboxyl group is transferred to the 1-N' of a covalently tethered biotin cofactor. The tethered carboxybiotin intermediate subsequently translocates to a second active site where the carboxyl group is either transferred to an acceptor substrate or, in some bacteria and archaea, is decarboxylated to biotin and CO2 in order to power the export of sodium ions from the cytoplasm. A homologous carboxyltransferase domain is found in three enzymes that catalyze diverse overall reactions: carbon fixation by pyruvate carboxylase, decarboxylation and sodium transport by the biotin-dependent oxaloacetate decarboxylase complex, and transcarboxylation by transcarboxylase from Propionibacterium shermanii. Over the past several years, structural data have emerged which have greatly advanced the mechanistic description of these enzymes. This review assembles a uniform description of the carboxyltransferase domain structure and catalytic mechanism from recent studies of pyruvate carboxylase, oxaloacetate decarboxylase and transcarboxylase, three enzymes that utilize an analogous carboxyltransferase domain to catalyze the biotin-dependent decarboxylation of oxaloacetate.

  12. RSPOs facilitated HSC activation and promoted hepatic fibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xinguang; Yi, Huixing; Wang, Linlin; Wu, Wanxin; Wu, Xiaojun; Yu, Linghua

    2016-01-01

    Roof plate-specific spondin (RSPO) proteins are potent Wnt pathway agonists and involve in a broad range of developmental and physiological processes. This study investigated the activities and mechanisms of RSPOs in liver fibrogenesis, especially in hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation. HSC activation was assessed by fibrosis biomarker (α-smooth muscle actin and Collagen-I), phenotypic change (accumulation of lipid droplets), and increased proliferation. Similarly, Wnt pathway activity was evaluated by the expression of nuclear β-catenin and T cell-specific transcription factors (TCF) activity. We found RSPOs were overexpressed in human fibrotic liver tissue and the expressions were correlated with liver fibrosis stages. In vitro studies showed RSPOs level increased during HSC activation, and stimuli with RSPOs enhanced Wnt pathway activity and promoted HSC activation subsequently. Furthermore, in vivo experiments demonstrated that the knockdown of RSPOs suppressed both Wnt pathway activity and HSC activation. Interestingly, the inhibitor of the Wnt signaling pathway Dickkopf1 impairs RSPOs effects on HSCs. Taken together, our results revealed that RSPOs facilitated HSC activation and promote liver fibrogenesis by enhancing the Wnt pathway. PMID:27572318

  13. Extracellular enzyme activity and biogeochemical cycling in restored prairies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, L.; Hernandez, D.; Schade, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Winter microbial activity in mid-latitude prairie ecosystems is thermally sensitive and significantly influenced by snow depth. Snow insulates the soil column facilitating microbial processing of complex organic substrates. Previous studies in forests and tundra ecosystems suggest patterns of substrate utilization and limitation are seasonal; above freezing, soil microbes access fresh litter inputs and sugar exudates from plant roots, while under frozen condition they recycle nutrients incorporated in microbial biomass. In order to liberate nutrients required for carbon degradation, soil microbes invest energy in the production of extracellular enzymes that cleave monomers from polymer bonds. The inverse relationship between relative enzyme abundance and substrate availability makes enzyme assays a useful proxy to assess changes in resources over time. Our objective in this study was to assess patterns in microbial biomass, nutrient availability, and extracellular enzyme activity in four snow exclosure sites over a seven-month period. Over the past three years, we have maintained a snow removal experiment on two restored prairies in central Minnesota. In each prairie, snow was continuously removed annually from two 4 x 4 m plots by shoveling after each snow event. Extractable C, N and P, and microbial C, N and P in soil samples were measured in samples collected from these snow removal plots, as well as in adjacent unmanipulated prairie control plots. Pools of C, N, and P were estimated using standard extraction protocols, and microbial pools were estimated using chloroform fumigation direct extraction (CFDE). We conducted fluorometric extracellular enzyme assays (EEA) to assess how the degradation potential of cellulose (cellobiohydrolase, CBH), protein (leucine aminopeptidase, LAP), and phosphate esters (phosphatase, PHOS) changed seasonally. Microbial C and N declined between October and June, while microbial P declined during the fall and winter, but increased

  14. Virocidal activity of Egyptian scorpion venoms against hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    El-Bitar, Alaa M H; Sarhan, Moustafa M H; Aoki, Chie; Takahara, Yusuke; Komoto, Mari; Deng, Lin; Moustafa, Mohsen A; Hotta, Hak

    2015-03-24

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major global health problem, causing chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Development of well-tolerated regimens with high cure rates and fewer side effects is still much needed. Recently, natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are attracting more attention as biological compounds and can be a good template to develop therapeutic agents, including antiviral agents against a variety of viruses. Various AMPs have been characterized from the venom of different venomous animals including scorpions. The possible antiviral activities of crude venoms obtained from five Egyptian scorpion species (Leiurus quinquestriatus, Androctonus amoreuxi, A. australis, A. bicolor and Scorpio maurus palmatus) were evaluated by a cell culture method using Huh7.5 cells and the J6/JFH1-P47 strain of HCV. Time-of-addition experiments and inactivation of enzymatic activities of the venoms were carried out to determine the characteristics of the anti-HCV activities. S. maurus palmatus and A. australis venoms showed anti-HCV activities, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC₅₀) being 6.3 ± 1.6 and 88.3 ± 5.8 μg/ml, respectively. S. maurus palmatus venom (30 μg/ml) impaired HCV infectivity in culture medium, but not inside the cells, through virocidal effect. The anti-HCV activity of this venom was not inhibited by a metalloprotease inhibitor or heating at 60°C. The antiviral activity was directed preferentially against HCV. S. maurus palmatus venom is considered as a good natural source for characterization and development of novel anti-HCV agents targeting the entry step. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing antiviral activities of Egyptian scorpion venoms against HCV, and may open a new approach towards discovering antiviral compounds derived from scorpion venoms.

  15. Hepatitis B virus X protein activates human hepatic stellate cells through upregulating TGFβ1.

    PubMed

    Chen, H-Y; Chen, Z-X; Huang, R-F; Lin, N; Wang, X-Z

    2014-10-27

    We investigated the effects of the hepatitis B virus X gene (HBV X) on the activation of human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and the possible mechanisms underlying the pathway. Recombinant plasmid pHBV-X-IRES2-EGFP was constructed and transfected into HL-7702 cells using a lipid-mediated method. Transfected cells were screened by G418, which detected stable expression of the X gene by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and Western blot analysis, and named L02/x. Cells not subjected to G418-selection were analyzed to confirm the transient expression of the X gene and named L02/48x. Subsequently, L02/x and L02/48x, together with non-HBx-expressing cells, were co-cultured with HSCs in a non-contact transwell system. After 36 h of co-culture, the proliferation and migration of HSCs was detected using different cell counting methods. Finally, the mRNA and protein levels of α-SMA, Col I, and TGFβ1 in HSCs were detected by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis showed that L02/x and L02/48x cells can express HBV X gene mRNA and protein. Additionally, HSCs co-cultured with L02/x or L02/48x cells showed significantly higher proliferation and migration levels than control groups. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis showed that the mRNA and protein expressions of α-SMA, Col I, and TGFβ1 in HSCs co-cultured with HBx-expressing liver cells were higher than those in control groups. HBx protein activated HSCs in vitro, leading to increased proliferation and migration of HSCs and upregulation of α-SMA and Col I. The TGFβ1 gene may be involved in this pathway.

  16. Hepatoprotective and antioxidant activities of Vernonia amygdalina on acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Iwalokun, B A; Efedede, B U; Alabi-Sofunde, J A; Oduala, T; Magbagbeola, O A; Akinwande, A I

    2006-01-01

    Vernonia amygdalina Del. (Family Compositae) is used in Nigerian folk medicine as a tonic and remedy against constipation, fever, high blood pressure, and many infectious diseases. We have evaluated the hepatoprotective and antioxidant effects of an aqueous extract of V. amygdalina leaves against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in mice in vivo. Activities of liver marker enzymes in serum (glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase, glutamate-pyruvate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, and alkaline phosphatase) and bilirubin levels were determined colorimetrically, while catalase activity, lipid peroxidation products, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), iron, and total protein concentrations were measured in liver homogenate. Acetaminophen challenge (300 mg/kg, i.p) for 7 days caused significant (P < .01) increases in the levels of bilirubin, liver enzymes, TBARS, and iron, while catalase activity and total protein level were reduced significantly (P < .01). Preadministration of V. amygdalina resulted in a dose-dependent (50-100 mg/kg) reversal of acetaminophen-induced alterations of all the liver function parameters by 51.9-84.9%. Suppression of acetaminophen-induced lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress by the extract was also dose-dependent (50-100 mg/kg). The results of this study suggest that V. amygdalina elicits hepatoprotectivity through antioxidant activity on acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage in mice.

  17. Activity of peroxisomal enzymes, and levels of polyamines in LPA-transgenic mice on two different diets

    PubMed Central

    Eliassen, Knut A; Brodal, Bjørn P; Svindland, Aud; Osmundsen, Harald; Rønning, Helle; Djurovic, Srdjan; Berg, Kåre

    2005-01-01

    Background In man, elevated levels of plasma lipoprotein (a)(Lp(a)) is a cardiovascular risk factor, and oxidized phospholipids are believed to play a role as modulators of inflammatory processes such as atherosclerosis. Polyamines are potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents. It was therefore of interest to examine polyamines and their metabolism in LPA transgenic mice. Concentration of the polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine as well as the activity of peroxisomal polyamine oxidase and two other peroxisomal enzymes, acyl-CoA oxidase and catalase were measured. The mice were fed either a standard diet or a diet high in fat and cholesterol (HFHC). Some of the mice in each feeding group were in addition given aminoguanidine (AG), a specific inhibitor of diamine oxidase, which catalyses degradation of putrescine, and also inhibits non-enzymatic glycosylation of protein which is implicated in the aetiology of atherosclerosis in diabetic patients. Non-transgenic mice were used as controls. Results Intestinal peroxisomal polyamine oxidase activity was significantly higher in LPA transgenic mice than in the non-transgenic mice, while intestinal peroxisomal catalase activity was significantly lower. Hepatic β-oxidation increased in Lp(a) transgenic mice fed the HFHC diet, but not in those on standard diet. Hepatic spermidine concentration was increased in all mice fed the HFHC diet compared to those fed a standard diet, while spermine concentration was decreased. With exception of the group fed only standard diet, transgenic mice showed a lower degree of hepatic steatosis than non-transgenic mice. AG had no significant effect on hepatic steatosis. Conclusion The present results indicate a connection between peroxisomal enzyme activity and the presence of the human LPA gene in the murine genome. The effect may be a result of changes in oxidative processes in lipid metabolism rather than resulting from a direct effect of the LPA construct on the peroximal

  18. Influence of environmental static electric field on antioxidant enzymes activities in hepatocytes of mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, S X; Xu, Y Q; Di, G Q; Jiang, J H; Xin, L; Wu, T Y

    2016-07-25

    With the increasing voltage of direct current transmission line, the intensity of the environmental static electric field has also increased. Thus, whether static electric fields cause biological injury is an important question. In this study, the effects of chronic exposure to environmental static electric fields on some antioxidant enzymes activities in the hepatocytes of mice were investigated. Male Institute of Cancer Research mice were exposed for 35 days to environmental static electric fields of different electric field intensities of 9.2-21.85 kV/m (experiment group I, EG-I), 2.3-15.4 kV/m (experiment group II, EG-II), and 0 kV/m (control group, CG). On days 7, 14, 21, and 35 of the exposure cycle, liver homogenates were obtained and the activities of antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase were determined, as well as the concentration of malonaldehyde. The results revealed a significant increase in superoxide dismutase activity in both EG-I and EG-II on the 7th (P < 0.05) and 35th days (P < 0.01) of the exposure cycle compared to that in the control group. However, the other test indices such as glutathione S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, and malonaldehyde showed only minimal changes during the exposure cycle. These results revealed a weak relationship between the exposure to environmental static electric fields and hepatic oxidative stress in living organisms.

  19. Effect of intratracheally instilled benzo(a)pyrene on the pulmonary and hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes in normal and vitamin A deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Dogra, S C; Khanduja, K L; Sharma, R R

    1985-03-01

    The effect of intratracheal instillation of different doses of benzo(a)pyrene (0.1, 1.0 and 2.0 mg) on the drug metabolizing enzymes of lung and liver was analysed in rats fed diet with or without vitamin A for 5-6 weeks. Benzo(a)pyrene exposure at 2.0 mg dose only elevated the level of cytochrome P-450 and b5, and activity of benzopyrene hydroxylase in liver, and extent of increase was similar in normal and vitamin A deficient groups. Contrary to this, pulmonary contents of cytochrome P-450 and b5, and benzopyrene hydroxylase activity increased over control values in both the groups even at lower doses of benzo(a)pyrene. Moreover, their values were higher in vitamin A deficient-treated groups compared to normal-treated controls. Increase in these parameters was greater in lung as compared to increase in liver. NADPH cytochrome C-reductase in lung and liver was not affected either by inducing vitamin A deficiency or exposing these rats further to benzo(a)pyrene. Uridine-diphospho-glucuronosyl-transferase (UDP-GT) activity in normal and vitamin A deficient groups was enhanced following exposure to benzo(a)pyrene both in lung and liver. However, activity of this enzyme remained impaired in vitamin A deficient groups, benzo(a)pyrene exposed or not exposed when compared to respective normal controls. Glutathione S-transferase activity remained unchanged following exposure to benzo(a)pyrene both in lung and liver. The apparent increase in hepatic glutathione S-transferase and decrease in pulmonary glutathione S-transferase activity in vitamin A deficiency was only due to vitamin A deficient status of rats with no further effect of benzo(a)pyrene.

  20. Human monoamine oxidase A gene determines levels of enzyme activity.

    PubMed Central

    Hotamisligil, G S; Breakefield, X O

    1991-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is a critical enzyme in the degradative deamination of biogenic amines throughout the body. Two biochemically distinct forms of the enzyme, A and B, are encoded in separate genes on the human X chromosome. In these studies we investigated the role of the structural gene for MAO-A in determining levels of activity in humans, as measured in cultured skin fibroblasts. The coding sequence of the mRNA for MAO-A was determined by first-strand cDNA synthesis, PCR amplification, and direct dideoxy sequencing. Two single-basepair substitutions were observed in cDNAs from cells with a 30-fold difference in activity levels. These two substitutions were in the third base of a triplet codon and hence did not affect the deduced amino acid sequence but did affect the presence or absence of restriction-enzyme sites for EcoRV and Fnu4HI, which could be elucidated on PCR fragments derived from genomic DNA or cDNAs. A third polymorphism for MspI in the noncoding region of the MAOA gene was also evaluated by Southern blot analysis using genomic DNA. Statistically significant associations were observed between the alleles for MAOA and levels of MAO activity in human male fibroblast lines. This association indicates that the MAOA gene itself is a major determinant of activity levels, apparently, in part, through noncoding, regulatory elements. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1678250

  1. Antioxidant enzyme activities in maize plants colonized with Piriformospora indica.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Yadav, Vikas; Tuteja, Narendra; Johri, Atul Kumar

    2009-03-01

    The bioprotection performance of Piriformospora indica against the root parasite Fusarium verticillioides was studied. We found that maize plants first grown with F. verticillioides and at day 10 inoculated with P. indica showed improvements in biomass, and root length and number as compared with plants grown with F. verticillioides alone. To validate our finding that inoculation with P. indica suppresses colonization by F. verticillioides, we performed PCR analyses using P. indica- and F. verticillioides-specific primers. Our results showed that inoculation with P. indica suppresses further colonization by F. verticillioides. We hypothesized that as the colonization by P. indica increases, the presence of/colonization by F. verticillioides decreases. In roots, catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were found to be higher in F. verticillioides-colonized plants than in non-colonized plants. Increased activity of antioxidant enzymes minimizes the chances of oxidative burst (excessive production of reactive oxygen species), and therefore F. verticillioides might be protected from the oxidative defence system during colonization. We also observed decreased antioxidant enzyme activities in plants first inoculated with F. verticillioides and at day 10 inoculated with P. indica as compared with plants inoculated with F. verticillioides alone. These decreased antioxidant enzyme activities due to the presence of P. indica help the plant to overcome the disease load of F. verticillioides. We propose that P. indica can be used as a bioprotection agent against the root parasite F. verticillioides.

  2. Ecto-enzyme activity of human erythrocyte adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Bielat, K; Tritsch, G L

    1989-04-11

    Adenosine deaminase is found primarily in the cytoplasm of many cell types. In the human erythrocyte, about 30 per cent of the total adenosine deaminase activity is membrane associated, and about two-thirds of this is inactivated by treatment of intact erythrocytes with the nonpenetrating reagent diazotized sulfanilic acid, without affecting lactate dehydrogenase, a soluble cytoplasmic enzyme. This indicates that within the cell membranes, the catalytic site of about two-thirds of the adenosine deaminase faces the external medium, i.e., ecto adenosine deaminase. Localization of adenosine deaminase activity at the cell membrane is demonstrated directly by electron microscopy by use of the substrate 6-Chloropurine ribonucleoside, which is dechlorinated by adenosine deaminase to produce Cl-, which is precipitated at its locus of formation by added Ag+, and the precipitated AgCl converted into the electron dense Ag0 upon exposure to light. From the Hydropathic Profile of the amino acid sequence of adenosine deaminase it is evident that there are two hydrophobic domains of sufficient length to span a biological membrane, and it is proposed that these domains could function to anchor the enzyme to the membrane. The importance of adenosine deaminase is indicated by the fatal immuno-deficiency which results from untreated genetic adenosine deaminase deficiency. It may be important to determine whether the amount of ecto adenosine deaminase activity is better suited to assess the clinical status of adenosine deaminase deficient patients that the currently used total cellular enzyme activity.

  3. Discriminative structural approaches for enzyme active-site prediction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Predicting enzyme active-sites in proteins is an important issue not only for protein sciences but also for a variety of practical applications such as drug design. Because enzyme reaction mechanisms are based on the local structures of enzyme active-sites, various template-based methods that compare local structures in proteins have been developed to date. In comparing such local sites, a simple measurement, RMSD, has been used so far. Results This paper introduces new machine learning algorithms that refine the similarity/deviation for comparison of local structures. The similarity/deviation is applied to two types of applications, single template analysis and multiple template analysis. In the single template analysis, a single template is used as a query to search proteins for active sites, whereas a protein structure is examined as a query to discover the possible active-sites using a set of templates in the multiple template analysis. Conclusions This paper experimentally illustrates that the machine learning algorithms effectively improve the similarity/deviation measurements for both the analyses. PMID:21342581

  4. Extracellular enzyme activity in a willow sewage treatment system.

    PubMed

    Brzezinska, Maria Swiontek; Lalke-Porczyk, Elżbieta; Kalwasińska, Agnieszka

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents the results of studies on the activity of extra-cellular enzymes in soil-willow vegetation filter soil which is used in the post-treatment of household sewage in an onsite wastewater treatment system located in central Poland. Wastewater is discharged from the detached house by gravity into the onsite wastewater treatment system. It flows through a connecting pipe into a single-chamber septic tank and is directed by the connecting pipe to a control well to be further channelled in the soil-willow filter by means of a subsurface leaching system. Soil samples for the studies were collected from two depths of 5 cm and 1 m from three plots: close to the wastewater inflow, at mid-length of the plot and close to its terminal part. Soil samples were collected from May to October 2009. The activity of the extra-cellular enzymes was assayed by the fluorometric method using 4-methylumbelliferyl and 7-amido-4-methylcoumarin substrate. The ranking of potential activity of the assayed enzymes was the same at 5 cm and 1 m soil depths, i.e. esterase > phosphmomoesterase > leucine-aminopeptidase > β-glucosidase > α-glucosidase. The highest values of enzymatic activity were recorded in the surface layer of the soil at the wastewater inflow and decreased with increasing distance from that point.

  5. Effect of standardized cranberry extract on the activity and expression of selected biotransformation enzymes in rat liver and intestine.

    PubMed

    Bártíková, Hana; Boušová, Iva; Jedličková, Pavla; Lněničková, Kateřina; Skálová, Lenka; Szotáková, Barbora

    2014-09-18

    The use of dietary supplements containing cranberry extract is a common way to prevent urinary tract infections. As consumption of these supplements containing a mixture of concentrated anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins has increased, interest in their possible interactions with drug-metabolizing enzymes has grown. In this in vivo study, rats were treated with a standardized cranberry extract (CystiCran®) obtained from Vaccinium macrocarpon in two dosage schemes (14 days, 0.5 mg of proanthocyanidins/kg/day; 1 day, 1.5 mg of proanthocyanidins/kg/day). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins contained in this extract on the activity and expression of intestinal and hepatic biotransformation enzymes: cytochrome P450 (CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B and CYP3A), carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT). Administration of cranberry extract led to moderate increases in the activities of hepatic CYP3A (by 34%), CYP1A1 (by 38%), UGT (by 40%), CBR1 (by 17%) and GST (by 13%), while activities of these enzymes in the small intestine were unchanged. No changes in the relative amounts of these proteins were found. Taken together, the interactions of cranberry extract with simultaneously administered drugs seem not to be serious.

  6. Enzyme-like activities of algal polysaccharide - cerium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongfeng; Sun, Jipeng; Du, Dehong; Ye, Shen; Wang, Changhong; Zhou, Xiaoling; Xue, Changhu

    2005-01-01

    Water-soluble algal polysaccharides (APS) (alginic acid, fucoidan and laminaran) possess many pharmacological activities. The results of this study showed that the APS-Ce4+ complexes have some enzyme-like activities. Fucoidan and its complex with Ce4+ have activities similar to those of SOD. The activities of laminaran, alginic acid and their complexes are not measurable. The APS do not show measurable activities in the digestion of plasmid DNA. In contrast, the APS - Ce4+ complexes show these measurable activities under the comparable condition when APS bind Ce4+ and form homogenous solutions. The laminaran - Ce4+ complex shows the most obvious activity in the digestion of plasmid DNA, pNPP and chloropy-rifos under neutral conditions.

  7. Decrease of serum Angiotensin converting enzyme levels upon telbivudine treatment for chronic hepatitis B virus infection and negative correlations between the enzyme levels and estimated glumerular filtration rates.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kung-Hao; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Hsu, Chao-Wei; Chang, Ming-Ling; Yeh, Chau-Ting

    2014-01-01

    During antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B, renal function impairment could be a critical concern when oral nucleot(s)ide analogues were used. Paradoxically, long-term telbivudine treatment was associated with an increase of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) through unknown mechanisms. We aimed to investigate changes in serum protein abundances associated with renal function in response to antiviral treatments. Primarily, a transcriptomic assay was performed to identify differentially expressed genes in peripheral blood cells caused by the telbivudine treatment. Two genes coding angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and complement factor H (CFH) were screened from 14 candidate renal function-related genes. ACE and CFH production were further investigated using enzyme-linked immunoassays. Verification studies showed no significant change of serum CFH levels, but there was a significant reduction of serum ACE levels by continuous telbivudine treatment for 330.00 ± 0.85 days (34 patients; paired t-test, P = 0.022). Serum HBV DNA and ALT levels also decreased (P = 0.008 and < 0.001, respectively). A significant increase in eGFR was found (33 patients, paired t-test, P = 0.002) at 708.64 ± 31.63 days. Patients' eGFRs were negatively correlated with serum ACE levels (r = -0.375, P = 0.002) but not with serum HBV DNA and ALT levels (P = 0.241 and 0.088 respectively). Significant decreases of the ACE levels were also observed upon entecavir treatment (20 patients; paired t-test, P = 0.020) at 412.88 ± 36.92 days. No significant correlation was found between serum ACE levels and eGFRs (r = -0.239, P = 0.138) in entecavir-treated patients. We discovered a consistent reduction of serum ACE levels by two oral antiviral monotherapies, entecavir and telbivudine. Serum ACE levels were negatively correlated with eGFRs in telbivudine treated patients.

  8. Activity-Based Screening of Metagenomic Libraries for Hydrogenase Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Adam, Nicole; Perner, Mirjam

    2017-01-01

    Here we outline how to identify hydrogenase enzymes from metagenomic libraries through an activity-based screening approach. A metagenomic fosmid library is constructed in E. coli and the fosmids are transferred into a hydrogenase deletion mutant of Shewanella oneidensis (ΔhyaB) via triparental mating. If a fosmid exhibits hydrogen uptake activity, S. oneidensis' phenotype is restored and hydrogenase activity is indicated by a color change of the medium from yellow to colorless. This new method enables screening of 48 metagenomic fosmid clones in parallel.

  9. Enantioselective effects of metalaxyl on soil enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Yue, Heng; Fang, Song; Zhang, Yizhi; Ning, Yang; Yu, Weisong; Kong, Fanyu; Qiu, Jun

    2016-12-01

    The enantioselective effects of the chiral pesticide metalaxyl on soil enzyme activity were investigated. Incubation experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of metalaxyl enantiomers at different concentrations on the activities of urease, invertase, and catalase as well as the type of activity change (activation vs. inhibition) at different times during incubation. The results indicated that the effects of metalaxyl on the activity of soil enzymes were not only related to the concentration of the enantiomers and soil incubation time, but also to the chiral configuration, suggesting the effects were enantioselective. A pattern of inhibition-recovery-slight stimulation was observed in urease activity of the soil samples treated with metalaxyl enantiomers, but the effects of (-) -R-metalaxyl were stronger than those of (+)-S-metalaxyl at the same concentration. Invertase activity in soil samples treated with metalaxyl enantiomers initially sharply decreased before finally returning to the normal level, and the effects of (+)-S-metalaxyl were stronger than those of (-) -R-metalaxyl at the same concentration. Metalaxyl enantiomers influenced catalase activity in a pattern of slight stimulation-inhibition-recovery, and the effects of (-) -R-metalaxyl were stronger than those of (+)-S-metalaxyl at the same concentration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Digestive enzymes activity in larvae of Cameraria ohridella (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae).

    PubMed

    Stygar, Dominika; Dolezych, Bogdan; Nakonieczny, Mirosław; Migula, Pawel; Michalczyk, Katarzyna; Zaak, Maria

    2010-10-01

    This article presents the activity of carbohydratases and proteases in the midgut of Cameraria ohridella larvae--an oligophagous pest whose preferred feeding is horse chestnuts leaves. Optimal media pH of the assayed enzymes were similar to those of other Lepidopterans. Relatively high amylase activity, as well as maltase and sucrase activities, indicates that starch and sucrose are the main digested saccharides. Trehalase activity was similar to that described in other Lepidopterans. Activities of glycosidases were significantly lower than those of disaccharidases what suggests that neither cellulose nor glycosides are important for C. ohridella. Trypsin is the main endoprotease of this pest. Like in other leaf-eaters carboxypeptidase activity was higher than that of aminopeptidase. The activity of the majority of examined enzymes increased in the following successive pest generations, which could be explained by the decreased nutritional value of older leaves. Probably this phenomenon in hydrolases activity in Cameraria is a nonspecific mechanism present at this stage of co-evolution of the horse chestnut and its pest.

  11. Functional Oil from Black Seed Differentially Inhibits Aldose-reductase and Ectonucleotidase Activities by Up-regulating Cellular Energy in Haloperidol-induced Hepatic Toxicity in Rat Liver.

    PubMed

    Kehinde, Akintunde Jacob

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the effect of rate-limiting enzymes involved in degradation of hepatic adenosine and intracellular sorbitol was investigated in rats exposed to haloperidol (HAL) and treated with functional oil (FO), containing principal active phytochemicals from black seed. Animals were divided into six groups (n=10): Distilled water, HAL 15 mg/kg, pre-administration/HAL 15 mg/kg, co-administration/HAL 15 mg/kg, post-administration/HAL 15 mg/kg, FO 150 mg/kg. The results of this study revealed that the activities of ectonucleotidase and aldose-reductase were significantly increased in HAL-treated rats when compared with the control (p < 0.05). However, differential treatments (pre, co and post) with FO depleted the activities of these enzymes compared with HAL-treated rats. Furthermore, therapeutic HAL administration increased the levels of key hepatic biomarkers (ALT, AST, and ALP) and malondialdehyde level with a concomitant decrease in functional hepatic cellular ATP. However, differential treatment with FO increases hepatic ATP and non-enzymatic antioxidant status, with a concomitant decrease in the levels of malondialdehyde and liver biomarkers. Therefore, results of this finding underlined the importance of aldose-reductase and econucleotidase activities in HAL induced toxicity and suggest some possible mechanisms of action by which FO prevent HAL-induced hepatic toxicity in rats.

  12. Effects of metronidazole on hepatic CYP3A4 activity.

    PubMed

    Haas, C E; Kaufman, D C; DiCenzo, R C

    2001-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of a short course of oral metronidazole, commonly used for bowel-preparation regimens, on hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 activity, as measured by the [14C N-methyl]-erythromycin breath test (ERMBT) in healthy volunteers. Prospective, nonrandomized, interventional study University-affiliated, community, teaching hospital. Five healthy male volunteers. Subjects underwent a baseline ERMBT in the morning before receiving three oral doses of metronidazole 500 mg administered at 3 P.M., 7 P.M., and 11 P.M. Repeat ERMBTs were performed at 24, 72, and 96 hours after the initial ERMBT. Changes in ERMBT values were compared with baseline results using Freidman's repeated-measures analysis of variance on ranks. The ERMBT values did not change significantly compared with baseline (p=0.82). Median (range) ERMBT values expressed as a percentage of baseline at 24, 72, and 96 hours were 110.3 (96.2-136.9), 101.3 (99.3-115.0), and 101.8 (95.5-116.3), respectively A short course of oral metronidazole does not result in a significant change in hepatic CYP3A4 activity as measured by the ERMBT.

  13. Activity of anandamide (AEA) metabolic enzymes in rat placental bed.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, B M; Battista, N; Correia-da-Silva, G; Rapino, C; Maccarrone, M; Teixeira, N A

    2014-11-01

    Endocannabinoids are endogenous lipid mediators, with anandamide (AEA) being the first member identified. It is now widely accepted that AEA influences early pregnancy events and its levels, which primarily depend on its synthesis by an N-acyl-phosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) and degradation by a fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), must be tightly regulated. Previous studies demonstrated that AEA levels require in situ regulation of these respective metabolic enzymes, and thus, any disturbance in AEA levels may impact maternal remodeling processes occurring during placental development. In this study, the activities of the AEA-metabolic enzymes that result in the establishment of proper local AEA levels during rat gestation were examined. Here, we demonstrate that during placentation NAPE-PLD and FAAH activities change in a temporal manner. Our findings suggest that NAPE-PLD and FAAH create the appropriate AEA levels required for tissue remodeling in the placental bed, a process essential to pregnancy maintenance.

  14. [Lysosomal enzyme activity in white blood cells in leukemias].

    PubMed

    Rybakova, L P; Kharchenko, M F

    1996-01-01

    Total enzyme activity of acidic hydrolases and total neutral proteinase were compared in the post-nuclear fraction of leukocytes from healthy subjects and leukemia patients. The levels of acidic phosphotase and neutral proteinase in lymphoid cells of healthy donors were 11 and 7 times lower than those in myeloid cells, respectively. Patients suffering chronic myeloid leukemia revealed enhanced levels of beta-glucuronidase and neutral proteinases whereas B-chronic lymphoid leukemia involved acidic hydrolase concentrations lower than normal. As chronic myeloid leukemia advanced, neutral proteinase activity dropped dramatically (2.5 times); an aggressive course of B-chronic lymphoid leukemia was accompanied by a 3-fold decrease in acidic hydrolase level. The results may be used as indirect evidence of differences in the role of lysosomal enzymes in the mechanism of protein processing involved in myeloid and lymphoid proliferative pathologies.

  15. Growth characteristics and enzyme activity in Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis isolates.

    PubMed

    Symonds, E Pearl; Trott, Darren J; Bird, Philip S; Mills, Paul

    2008-09-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a member of the phylum Chytridiomycota and the causative organism chytridiomycosis, a disease of amphibians associated with global population declines and mass mortality events. The organism targets keratin-forming epithelium in adult and larval amphibians, which suggests that keratinolytic activity may be required to infect amphibian hosts. To investigate this hypothesis, we tested 10 isolates of B. dendrobatidis for their ability to grow on a range of keratin-supplemented agars and measured keratolytic enzyme activity using a commercially available kit (bioMerieux API ZYM). The most dense and fastest growth of isolates were recorded on tryptone agar, followed by growth on frog skin agar and the slowest growth recorded on feather meal and boiled snake skin agar. Growth patterns were distinctive for each nutrient source. All 10 isolates were strongly positive for a range of proteolytic enzymes which may be keratinolytic, including trypsin and chymotrypsin. These findings support the predilection of B. dendrobatidis for amphibian skin.

  16. A DNA enzyme with Mg(2+)-Dependent RNA Phosphoesterase Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, Ronald R.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1995-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that DNA can act as an enzyme in the Pb(2+)-dependent cleavage of an RNA phosphoester. This is a facile reaction, with an uncatalyzed rate for a typical RNA phosphoester of approx. 10(exp -4)/ min in the presence of 1 mM Pb(OAc)2 at pH 7.0 and 23 C. The Mg(2+) - dependent reaction is more difficult, with an uncatalyzed rate of approx. 10(exp -7)/ min under comparable conditions. Mg(2+) - dependent cleavage has special relevance to biology because it is compatible with intracellular conditions. Using in vitro selection, we sought to develop a family of phosphoester-cleaving DNA enzymes that operate in the presence of various divalent metals, focusing particularly on the Mg(2+) - dependent reaction. Results: We generated a population of greater than 10(exp 13) DNAs containing 40 random nucleotides and carried out repeated rounds of selective amplification, enriching for molecules that cleave a target RNA phosphoester in the presence of 1 mM Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+) or Pb(2+). Examination of individual clones from the Mg(2+) lineage after the sixth round revealed a catalytic motif comprised of a three-stem junction.This motif was partially randomized and subjected to seven additional rounds of selective amplification, yielding catalysts with a rate of 0.01/ min. The optimized DNA catalyst was divided into separate substrate and enzyme domains and shown to have a similar level of activity under multiple turnover conditions. Conclusions: We have generated a Mg(2+) - dependent DNA enzyme that cleaves a target RNA phosphoester with a catalytic rate approx. 10(exp 5) - fold greater than that of the uncatalyzed reaction. This activity is compatible with intracellular conditions, raising the possibility that DNA enzymes might be made to operate in vivo.

  17. Effect of topical application of clotrimazole to rats on epidermal and hepatic monooxygenase activities and cytochrome P-450.

    PubMed

    Merk, H F; Khan, W A; Kuhn, C; Bickers, D R; Mukhtar, H

    1989-01-01

    Clotrimazole, an N-substituted imidazole, is a widely used topical agent for the treatment of superficial fungal infections. In this study, the effect of application of clotrimazole to the skin of neonatal rats on the induction response of the cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase system in epidermis and liver has been examined. A single topical application of clotrimazole (10 mg/100 g) to rats resulted in a 53% increase in hepatic cytochrome P-450 content. Clotrimazole treatment also resulted in significant induction of epidermal 7-ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase activity. Hepatic p-nitrophenol hydroxylase, an enzyme, catalyzed principally by the ethanol inducible cytochrome P-450 isozyme, was also significantly induced (58%) by topically applied clotrimazole. This enzyme activity was undetectable in epidermal microsomes. Further characterization of the cytochrome P-450 isozymes induced in liver by clotrimazole treatment was based on monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against purified rat liver cytochrome P-450 isozymes induced by phenobarbital (MAb 2-66-3) and ethanol (MAb 1-98-1). Hepatic microsomes prepared from clotrimazole-treated rats showed significant immunoreactivity on Western blot with both the MAbs whereas no reactivity occurred in epidermal microsomes. Our data indicate that topical application of clotrimazole to rats results in the induction of selected cytochrome P-450 isozyme(s) in liver and epidermis which may have implications for the therapeutic use of this compound.

  18. Sample storage for soil enzyme activity and bacterial community profiles.

    PubMed

    Wallenius, K; Rita, H; Simpanen, S; Mikkonen, A; Niemi, R M

    2010-04-01

    Storage of samples is often an unavoidable step in environmental data collection, since available analytical capacity seldom permits immediate processing of large sample sets needed for representative data. In microbiological soil studies, sample pretreatments may have a strong influence on measurement results, and thus careful consideration is required in the selection of storage conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the suitability of prolonged (up to 16 weeks) frozen or air-dried storage for divergent soil materials. The samples selected to this study were mineral soil (clay loam) from an agricultural field, humus from a pine forest and compost from a municipal sewage sludge composting field. The measured microbiological parameters included functional profiling with ten different hydrolysing enzyme activities determined by artificial fluorogenic substrates, and structural profiling with bacterial 16S rDNA community fingerprints by amplicon length heterogeneity analysis (LH-PCR). Storage of samples affected the observed fluorescence intensity of the enzyme assay's fluorophor standards dissolved in soil suspension. The impact was highly dependent on the soil matrix and storage method, making it important to use separate standardisation for each combination of matrix type, storage method and time. Freezing proved to be a better storage method than air-drying for all the matrices and enzyme activities studied. The effect of freezing on the enzyme activities was small (<20%) in clay loam and forest humus and moderate (generally 20-30%) in compost. The most dramatic decreases (>50%) in activity were observed in compost after air-drying. The bacterial LH-PCR community fingerprints were unaffected by frozen storage in all matrices. The effect of storage treatments was tested using a new statistical method based on showing similarity rather than difference of results.

  19. Modulatory effect of green tea extract on hepatic key enzymes of glucose metabolism in streptozotocin and high fat diet induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Ramalingam; Naresh, Rajendran; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanatham

    2013-05-15

    The study was undertaken to evaluate the antidiabetic effect of green tea extract on carbohydrate metabolic key enzymes in control and streptozotocin high fat diet -induced diabetic rats. The daily oral treatment of green tea extract (300 mg/kg body weight) to diabetic rats for 30 days resulted in a significant reduction in the levels of plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and increase in the levels of insulin and hemoglobin. The altered activities of the key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism such as hexokinase, pyruvate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase in liver of diabetic rats were significantly reverted to near normal levels by the administration of green tea extract. Further, green tea extract administration to diabetic rats improved muscle and hepatic glycogen content suggesting the antihyperglycemic potential of green tea extract in diabetic rats. The obtained results were compared with metformin, a standard oral hypoglycemic drug. Thus, this study indicates that the administration of green tea extract to diabetic rats resulted in alterations in the metabolism of glucose with subsequent reduction in plasma glucose levels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Developmental changes in hepatic fructose 2,6-bisphosphate content and phosphofructokinase-1 activity in the transition of chicks from embryonic to neonatal nutritional environment.

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, M J; Dickson, A J

    1987-01-01

    Within 2 days of hatching in chicks, there are parallel increases in hepatic fructose 2,6-bisphosphate content and phosphofructokinase-1 activity. The changes observed are a consequence of feeding on the carbohydrate-rich diet of neonatal life: lack of access to food after hatching prevents changes for either parameter. The results are discussed in relation to changes in the activities of hepatic lipogenic enzymes during the embryonic/neonatal transition of chicks and the role of insulin in co-ordination of developmental processes. PMID:2959273

  1. Controlling the enzymatic activity of a restriction enzyme by light.

    PubMed

    Schierling, Benno; Noël, Ann-Josée; Wende, Wolfgang; Hien, Le Thi; Volkov, Eugeny; Kubareva, Elena; Oretskaya, Tatiana; Kokkinidis, Michael; Römpp, Andreas; Spengler, Bernhard; Pingoud, Alfred

    2010-01-26

    For many applications it would be desirable to be able to control the activity of proteins by using an external signal. In the present study, we have explored the possibility of modulating the activity of a restriction enzyme with light. By cross-linking two suitably located cysteine residues with a bifunctional azobenzene derivative, which can adopt a cis- or trans-configuration when illuminated by UV or blue light, respectively, enzymatic activity can be controlled in a reversible manner. To determine which residues when cross-linked show the largest "photoswitch effect," i.e., difference in activity when illuminated with UV vs. blue light, > 30 variants of a single-chain version of the restriction endonuclease PvuII were produced, modified with azobenzene, and tested for DNA cleavage activity. In general, introducing single cross-links in the enzyme leads to only small effects, whereas with multiple cross-links and additional mutations larger effects are observed. Some of the modified variants, which carry the cross-links close to the catalytic center, can be modulated in their DNA cleavage activity by a factor of up to 16 by illumination with UV (azobenzene in cis) and blue light (azobenzene in trans), respectively. The change in activity is achieved in seconds, is fully reversible, and, in the case analyzed, is due to a change in V(max) rather than K(m).

  2. Aspergillus kawachii produces an acidic pectin releasing enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Contreras Esquivel, J C; Hours, R A; Voget, C E; Mignone, C F

    1999-01-01

    A pectin-releasing (protopectinase, PPase) activity was found in a culture filtrate of Aspergillus kawachii IFO 4308. PPase activity was highest in the pH range of 2.0-2.5 and it was highly stable at 50 degrees C (85% of residual activity was found after a 10-h incubation in citrate-phosphate buffer, pH 3.0). Among other different enzyme activities, which are usually involved in plant cell-wall degradation, only polygalacturonase activity was detected. This result suggests that the PPase activity could correspond to a particular kind of polygalacturonase. Pectin extraction from lemon peels carried out at 50 degrees C for 2 h (pH 3.5) gave yields of ethanol-precipitated pectin equivalent to 17.4% of the initial total solids contained in the peels. Thus, this enzyme activity would allow carrying out a pectin extraction process at lower reaction pHs and higher temperatures in comparison with similar reports using other PPases. These properties seem to be very interesting from the practical point of view.

  3. Exploring the sheep rumen microbiome for carbohydrate-active enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lucas Dantas; de Souza Lima, André Oliveira; Taketani, Rodrigo Gouvêa; Darias, Phillip; da Silva, Lília Raquel Fé; Romagnoli, Emiliana Manesco; Louvandini, Helder; Abdalla, Adibe Luiz; Mendes, Rodrigo

    2015-07-01

    The rumen is a complex ecosystem enriched for microorganisms able to degrade biomass during the animal's digestion process. The recovery of new enzymes from naturally evolved biomass-degrading microbial communities is a promising strategy to overcome the inefficient enzymatic plant destruction in industrial production of biofuels. In this context, this study aimed to describe the bacterial composition and functions in the sheep rumen microbiome, focusing on carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAE). Here, we used phylogenetic profiling analysis (inventory of 16S rRNA genes) combined with metagenomics to access the rumen microbiome of four sheep and explore its potential to identify fibrolytic enzymes. The bacterial community was dominated by Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, followed by Proteobacteria. As observed for other ruminants, Prevotella was the dominant genus in the microbiome, comprising more than 30 % of the total bacterial community. Multivariate analysis of the phylogenetic profiling data and chemical parameters showed a positive correlation between the abundance of Prevotellaceae (Bacteroidetes phylum) and organic matter degradability. A negative correlation was observed between Succinivibrionaceae (Proteobacteria phylum) and methane production. An average of 2 % of the shotgun metagenomic reads was assigned to putative CAE when considering nine protein databases. In addition, assembled contigs allowed recognition of 67 putative partial CAE (NCBI-Refseq) representing 12 glycosyl hydrolase families (Pfam database). Overall, we identified a total of 28 lignocellulases, 22 amylases and 9 other putative CAE, showing the sheep rumen microbiome as a promising source of new fibrolytic enzymes.

  4. In vivo enzyme activity in inborn errors of metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, G.N.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Halliday, D. )

    1990-08-01

    Low-dose continuous infusions of (2H5)phenylalanine, (1-13C)propionate, and (1-13C)leucine were used to quantitate phenylalanine hydroxylation in phenylketonuria (PKU, four subjects), propionate oxidation in methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA, four subjects), and propionic acidaemia (PA, four subjects) and leucine oxidation in maple syrup urine disease (MSUD, four subjects). In vivo enzyme activity in PKU, MMA, and PA subjects was similar to or in excess of that in adult controls (range of phenylalanine hydroxylation in PKU, 3.7 to 6.5 mumol/kg/h, control 3.2 to 7.9, n = 7; propionate oxidation in MMA, 15.2 to 64.8 mumol/kg/h, and in PA, 11.1 to 36.0, control 5.1 to 19.0, n = 5). By contrast, in vivo leucine oxidation was undetectable in three of the four MSUD subjects (less than 0.5 mumol/kg/h) and negligible in the remaining subject (2 mumol/kg/h, control 10.4 to 15.7, n = 6). These results suggest that significant substrate removal can be achieved in some inborn metabolic errors either through stimulation of residual enzyme activity in defective enzyme systems or by activation of alternate metabolic pathways. Both possibilities almost certainly depend on gross elevation of substrate concentrations. By contrast, only minimal in vivo oxidation of leucine appears possible in MSUD.

  5. Hepatic Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression Through the Life Stages of the Mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs). No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been ca...

  6. Hepatic Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression Through the Life Stages of the Mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs). No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been ca...

  7. Microsomal enzyme activity, glutathione S-transferase-placental form expression, cell proliferation, and vitamin A stores in livers of rats consuming Great Lakes salmon.

    PubMed

    Iverson, F; Mehta, R; Hierlihy, L; Gurofsky, S; Lok, E; Mueller, R; Bourbonnais, D H; Spear, P A

    1998-02-01

    Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed diets incorporating lyophilized chinook salmon obtained from Lake Ontario and Lake Huron. After 70 days, females were bred and the progeny (F1) were reared on the same fish-based diets as the adults (F0). After 78-133 days on the diets, males and females of both generations were sacrificed and hepatic microsomal enzyme activities determined, along with glutathione S-transferase-placental form (GSTP) expression and hepatic cellular proliferation. Hepatic P450 enzyme activities (MROD, EROD, PROD, BROD, and aminopyrine) were increased significantly by fish diets from both sources. Increases in hepatic enzyme activity were greatest for fish caught from Lake Ontario and reflected the total levels of organochlorine contaminants in the fish. GSTP and cell proliferation rates did not show any diet-related or dose-related changes. Vitamin A stores were analyzed as the concentration of liver retinyl palmitate. In rats receiving the highest TEQ dose (i.e., 20% Lake Ontario fish diet), vitamin A stores were significantly lower in F0 adults, F1 weanlings, and F1 adult females.

  8. The Flavone Luteolin Suppresses SREBP-2 Expression and Post-Translational Activation in Hepatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tsz Yan; Lin, Shu-mei; Leung, Lai K.

    2015-01-01

    High blood cholesterol has been associated with cardiovascular diseases. The enzyme HMG CoA reductase (HMGCR) is responsible for cholesterol synthesis, and inhibitors of this enzyme (statins) have been used clinically to control blood cholesterol. Sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) -2 is a key transcription factor in cholesterol metabolism, and HMGCR is a target gene of SREBP-2. Attenuating SREBP-2 activity could potentially minimize the expression of HMGCR. Luteolin is a flavone that is commonly detected in plant foods. In the present study, Luteolin suppressed the expression of SREBP-2 at concentrations as low as 1 μM in the hepatic cell lines WRL and HepG2. This flavone also prevented the nuclear translocation of SREBP-2. Post-translational processing of SREBP-2 protein was required for nuclear translocation. Luteolin partially blocked this activation route through increased AMP kinase (AMPK) activation. At the transcriptional level, the mRNA and protein expression of SREBP-2 were reduced through luteolin. A reporter gene assay also verified that the transcription of SREBF2 was weakened in response to this flavone. The reduced expression and protein processing of SREBP-2 resulted in decreased nuclear translocation. Thus, the transcription of HMGCR was also decreased after luteolin treatment. In summary, the results of the present study showed that luteolin modulates HMGCR transcription by decreasing the expression and nuclear translocation of SREBP-2. PMID:26302339

  9. Engineered N-acetylhexosamine-active enzymes in glycoscience.

    PubMed

    Slámová, Kristýna; Bojarová, Pavla

    2017-08-01

    In recent years, enzymes modifying N-acetylhexosamine substrates have emerged in numerous theoretical studies as well as practical applications from biology, biomedicine, and biotechnology. Advanced enzyme engineering techniques converted them into potent synthetic instruments affording a variety of valuable glycosides. This review presents the diversity of engineered enzymes active with N-acetylhexosamine carbohydrates: from popular glycoside hydrolases and glycosyltransferases to less known oxidases, epimerases, kinases, sulfotransferases, and acetylases. Though hydrolases in natura, engineered chitinases, β-N-acetylhexosaminidases, and endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidases were successfully employed in the synthesis of defined natural and derivatized chitooligomers and in the remodeling of N-glycosylation patterns of therapeutic antibodies. The genes of various N-acetylhexosaminyltransferases were cloned into metabolically engineered microorganisms for producing human milk oligosaccharides, Lewis X structures, and human-like glycoproteins. Moreover, mutant N-acetylhexosamine-active glycosyltransferases were applied, e.g., in the construction of glycomimetics and complex glycostructures, industrial production of low-lactose milk, and metabolic labeling of glycans. In the synthesis of biotechnologically important compounds, several innovative glycoengineered systems are presented for an efficient bioproduction of GlcNAc, UDP-GlcNAc, N-acetylneuraminic acid, and of defined glycosaminoglycans. The above examples demonstrate that engineering of N-acetylhexosamine-active enzymes was able to solve complex issues such as synthesis of tailored human-like glycoproteins or industrial-scale production of desired oligosaccharides. Due to the specific catalytic mechanism, mutagenesis of these catalysts was often realized through rational solutions. Specific N-acetylhexosamine glycosylation is crucial in biological, biomedical and biotechnological applications and a good

  10. Increased serum cortisol binding in chronic active hepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Orbach, O.; Schussler, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    A high serum cortisol concentration, apparently due to increased cortisol-binding globulin (CBG), was found in a patient (index case) with chronic active hepatitis (CAH). We therefore performed further studies to determine whether increased cortisol binding is generally associated with CAH. Serum samples were obtained from 15 hospitalized patients with long-term liver function test elevations but no evidence of cirrhosis, 15 normal subjects without a history of hepatitis, four healthy pregnant women, and 10 alcoholic patients with stigmata of cirrhosis. Serum cortisol binding was measured by an adaptation of a previously described charcoal uptake method. Thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) and sex hormone-binding globulin were determined by radioimmunoassays. Charcoal uptake of 125I cortisol from sera of normal subjects and additional patients with CAH revealed that increased serum cortisol binding by a saturable site, presumably CBG, was associated with CAH. Cortisol binding was significantly correlated with immunoassayable TBG, suggesting that in CAH, similar mechanisms may be responsible for increasing the serum concentrations of CBG and TBG.

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum localization and activity of maize auxin biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Seo, Hyesu; Park, Woong June; Hawes, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Auxin is a major growth hormone in plants and the first plant hormone to be discovered and studied. Active research over >60 years has shed light on many of the molecular mechanisms of its action including transport, perception, signal transduction, and a variety of biosynthetic pathways in various species, tissues, and developmental stages. The complexity and redundancy of the auxin biosynthetic network and enzymes involved raises the question of how such a system, producing such a potent agent as auxin, can be appropriately controlled at all. Here it is shown that maize auxin biosynthesis takes place in microsomal as well as cytosolic cellular fractions from maize seedlings. Most interestingly, a set of enzymes shown to be involved in auxin biosynthesis via their activity and/or mutant phenotypes and catalysing adjacent steps in YUCCA-dependent biosynthesis are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Positioning of auxin biosynthetic enzymes at the ER could be necessary to bring auxin biosynthesis in closer proximity to ER-localized factors for transport, conjugation, and signalling, and allow for an additional level of regulation by subcellular compartmentation of auxin action. Furthermore, it might provide a link to ethylene action and be a factor in hormonal cross-talk as all five ethylene receptors are ER localized.

  12. Extracellular enzyme activities and nutrient availability during artificial groundwater recharge.

    PubMed

    Kolehmainen, Reija E; Korpela, Jaana P; Münster, Uwe; Puhakka, Jaakko A; Tuovinen, Olli H

    2009-02-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) removal is the main objective of artificial groundwater recharge (AGR) for drinking water production and biodegradation plays a substantial role in this process. This study focused on the biodegradation of NOM and nutrient availability for microorganisms in AGR by the determination of extracellular enzyme activities (EEAs) and nutrient concentrations along a flow path in an AGR aquifer (Tuusula Water Works, Finland). Natural groundwater in the same area but outside the influence of recharge was used as a reference. Determination of the specific alpha-d-glucosidase (alpha-Glu), beta-d-glucosidase (beta-Glu), phosphomonoesterase (PME), leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and acetate esterase (AEST) activities by fluorogenic model substrates revealed major increases in the enzymatic hydrolysis rates in the aquifer within a 10m distance from the basin. The changes in the EEAs along the flow path occurred simultaneously with decreases in nutrient concentrations. The results support the assumption that the synthesis of extracellular enzymes in aquatic environments is up and down regulated by nutrient availability. The EEAs in the basin sediment and pore water samples (down to 10cm) were in the same order of magnitude as in the basin water, suggesting similar nutritional conditions. Phosphorus was likely to be the limiting nutrient at this particular AGR site. Furthermore, the extracellular enzymes functioned in a synergistic and cooperative way.

  13. Trace elements as an activator of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wołonciej, Marta; Milewska, Elżbieta; Roszkowska-Jakimiec, Wiesława

    2016-12-31

    Oxidative stress is a state of impaired balance between the formation of free radicals and antioxidant capacity of the body. It causes many defects of the body, e.g. lipid peroxidation, DNA and protein damage. In order to prevent the effects of oxidative stress, the organism has developed defence mechanisms. These mechanisms capture and inhibit the formation of free radicals and also chelate ion metals that catalyse free radical reactions. Trace elements are components of antioxidant enzymes involved in antioxidant mechanisms. Selenium, as a selenocysteine, is a component of the active site of glutathione peroxidase (GPx). The main function of GPx is neutralization of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic peroxide (LOOH). Furthermore, selenium is a structural part of a large group of selenoproteins that are necessary for proper functioning of the body. Manganese, copper and zinc are a part of the group of superoxide dismutase enzymes (MnSOD, Cu/ZnSOD), which catalyse the superoxide anion dismutation into hydrogen peroxide and oxygen. Formed hydrogen peroxide is decomposed into water and oxygen by catalase or glutathione peroxidase. An integral component of catalase (CAT) is iron ions. The concentration of these trace elements has a significant influence on the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and thus on defence against oxidative stress. Even a small change in the level of trace elements in the tissue causes a disturbance in their metabolism, leading to the occurrence of many diseases.

  14. Substrate-Competitive Activity-Based Profiling of Ester Prodrug Activating Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Majmudar, Jaimeen D; Davda, Dahvid; Ghanakota, Phani; Kim, Ki H; Carlson, Heather A; Showalter, Hollis D; Martin, Brent R; Amidon, Gordon L

    2015-09-08

    Understanding the mechanistic basis of prodrug delivery and activation is critical for establishing species-specific prodrug sensitivities necessary for evaluating preclinical animal models and potential drug-drug interactions. Despite significant adoption of prodrug methodologies for enhanced pharmacokinetics, functional annotation of prodrug activating enzymes is laborious and often unaddressed. Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) describes an emerging chemoproteomic approach to assay active site occupancy within a mechanistically similar enzyme class in native proteomes. The serine hydrolase enzyme family is broadly reactive with reporter-linked fluorophosphonates, which have shown to provide a mechanism-based covalent labeling strategy to assay the activation state and active site occupancy of cellular serine amidases, esterases, and thioesterases. Here we describe a modified ABPP approach using direct substrate competition to identify activating enzymes for an ethyl ester prodrug, the influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir. Substrate-competitive ABPP analysis identified carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) as an oseltamivir-activating enzyme in intestinal cell homogenates. Saturating concentrations of oseltamivir lead to a four-fold reduction in the observed rate constant for CES1 inactivation by fluorophosphonates. WWL50, a reported carbamate inhibitor of mouse CES1, blocked oseltamivir hydrolysis activity in human cell homogenates, confirming CES1 is the primary prodrug activating enzyme for oseltamivir in human liver and intestinal cell lines. The related carbamate inhibitor WWL79 inhibited mouse but not human CES1, providing a series of probes for analyzing prodrug activation mechanisms in different preclinical models. Overall, we present a substrate-competitive activity-based profiling approach for broadly surveying candidate prodrug hydrolyzing enzymes and outline the kinetic parameters for activating enzyme discovery, ester prodrug design, and

  15. Cysteine 904 Is Required for Maximal Insulin Degrading Enzyme Activity and Polyanion Activation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun Suk; Melikishvili, Manana; Fried, Michael G.; Juliano, Maria A.; Juliano, Luiz; Rodgers, David W.; Hersh, Louis B.

    2012-01-01

    Cysteine residues in insulin degrading enzyme have been reported as non-critical for its activity. We found that converting the twelve cysteine residues in rat insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) to serines resulted in a cysteine-free form of the enzyme with reduced activity and decreased activation by polyanions. Mutation of each cysteine residue individually revealed cysteine 904 as the key residue required for maximal activity and polyanion activation, although other cysteines affect polyanion binding to a lesser extent. Based on the structure of IDE, Asn 575 was identified as a potential hydrogen bond partner for Cys904 and mutation of this residue also reduced activity and decreased polyanion activation. The oligomerization state of IDE did not correlate with its activity, with the dimer being the predominant form in all the samples examined. These data suggest that there are several conformational states of the dimer that affect activity and polyanion activation. PMID:23077523

  16. Maternal chronic hepatitis B virus does not affect neonatal biotinidase activity.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, George D; Schulpis, Kleopatra H; Papakonstantinou, Evangelos; Papadakis, Miltiadis; Elefsiniotis, Ioannis; Papassotiriou, Ioannis; Antsaklis, Aris

    2008-03-01

    Biotinidase activity is closely related to liver function. To evaluate whether maternal chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection affects neonatal biotinidase activity. Twenty-three asymptomatic pregnant women with HBV (group A) and 28 healthy pregnant women (controls) in the delivery room and their newborns (cord blood) underwent laboratory examinations. Serological HBV and liver function tests were performed with standard techniques, while biotinidase activity was measured with an HPLC method. Serological HBV tests and HBV DNA showed chronic HBV (precore mutant G1896A) in group A, whereas anti-HBc and anti-HBe were detected in their neonates. Liver function chemistry was found normal in controls and both groups of newborns. Moderately increased transaminases were found in the infected mothers. Interestingly, albumin levels did not differ among the studied groups. Biotinidase activity in HBV mothers (5.76+/-0.6 nmol/min/mL) was significantly decreased (p<0.001) as compared to controls (8.43+/-0.65 nmol/min/mL). The enzyme activity did not differ among the neonates. Biotinidase activity inversely correlated with transaminases but not with albumin or with HBV-DNA levels. Decreased biotinidase activities were evaluated in mothers with HBV and normal in their neonates. Biotin supplementation in the diseased mothers may prevent possible symptoms due to biotin recycling impairment.

  17. St. John's Wort increases brain serotonin synthesis by inhibiting hepatic tryptophan 2, 3 dioxygenase activity and its gene expression in stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Bano, Samina; Ara, Iffat; Saboohi, Kausar; Moattar, Tariq; Chaoudhry, Bushra

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of herbal St. John's Wort (SJW) on transcriptional regulation of hepatic tryptophan 2, 3 - dioxygenase (TDO) enzyme activity and brain regional serotonin (5-HT) levels in rats exposed to forced swim test (FST). TDO mRNA expression was quantified using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain (RT-PCR) reaction and brain regional indoleamines were determined by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to fluorescence detector. Behavioral analysis shows significant reduction in immobility time in SJW (500mg/kg/ml) administered rats. It was found that pretreatment of SJW to rats did not prevent stress-induced elevation in plasma corticosterone levels however it increases serotonin synthesis by virtue of inhibiting hepatic TDO enzyme activity and its gene expression, ascertaining the notion that there exists an inverse relationship between hepatic TDO enzyme activity and brain 5-HT. The drug also decreases serotonin turnover in all the brain areas (hypothalamus, hippocampus amygdala) in stressed rats endorsing its monoamine oxidase inhibition property. Inhibition of TDO enzyme activity and its gene expression by the drug provides new insights for the development of therapeutic interventions for stress related mental illnesses.

  18. Immunomodulation of activated hepatic stellate cells by mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Parekkadan, Biju; Poll, Daan van; Megeed, Zaki; Kobayashi, Naoya; Tilles, Arno W.; Berthiaume, Francois; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2007-11-16

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been reported to prevent the development of liver fibrosis in a number of pre-clinical studies. Marked changes in liver histopathology and serological markers of liver function have been observed without a clear understanding of the therapeutic mechanism by which stem cells act. We sought to determine if MSCs could modulate the activity of resident liver cells, specifically hepatic stellate cells (SCs) by paracrine mechanisms using indirect cocultures. Indirect coculture of MSCs and activated SCs led to a significant decrease in collagen deposition and proliferation, while inducing apoptosis of activated SCs. The molecular mechanisms underlying the modulation of SC activity by MSCs were examined. IL-6 secretion from activated SCs induced IL-10 secretion from MSCs, suggesting a dynamic response of MSCs to the SCs in the microenvironment. Blockade of MSC-derived IL-10 and TNF-{alpha} abolished the inhibitory effects of MSCs on SC proliferation and collagen synthesis. In addition, release of HGF by MSCs was responsible for the marked induction of apoptosis in SCs as determined by antibody-neutralization studies. These findings demonstrate that MSCs can modulate the function of activated SCs via paracrine mechanisms provide a plausible explanation for the protective role of MSCs in liver inflammation and fibrosis, which may also be relevant to other models of tissue fibrosis.

  19. Impact of hyperlipidemia on plasma protein binding and hepatic drug transporter and metabolic enzyme regulation in a rat model of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Anger, Gregory J; Piquette-Miller, Micheline

    2010-07-01

    It is currently unknown whether gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a prevalent obstetrical complication, compounds the changes in drug disposition that occur naturally in pregnancy. Hyperlipidemia occurs in GDM. Using a rat model of GDM, we determined whether excess lipids compete with drugs for plasma protein binding. Because lipids activate nuclear receptors that regulate drug transporters and metabolic enzymes, we used proteome analysis to determine whether hyperlipidemia indirectly leads to the dysregulation of these proteins in the liver. GDM was induced on gestational day 6 (GD6) via streptozotocin injection. Controls received either vehicle alone or streptozotocin with subsequent insulin treatment. Liver and plasma were collected on GD20. Glyburide and saquinavir protein binding was determined by ultrafiltration, and an established solvent method was used for plasma delipidation. Proteomics analysis was performed by using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation methodology with membrane-enriched hepatic protein samples. Relative to controls, GDM rat plasma contained more cholesterol and triglycerides. Plasma protein binding of glyburide and saquinavir was decreased in GDM. Delipidation normalized protein binding in GDM plasma. Proteins linked to lipid metabolism were strongly affected in the GDM proteomics data set, with prohyperlipidemic and antihyperlipidemic changes observed, and formed networks that implicated several nuclear receptors. Up-regulation of drug transporters and metabolic enzymes was observed (e.g., multidrug resistance 1/2, CYP2A1, CYP2B9, and CYP2D3). In this study, GDM-induced hyperlipidemia decreased protein binding and was associated with drug transporter and metabolic enzyme up-regulation in the liver. Both of these findings could change drug disposition in affected pregnancies, compounding changes associated with pregnancy itself.

  20. Protoplast fusion enhances lignocellulolytic enzyme activities in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yu-xiao; Liu, Jia-jing; Liu, Yan; Cheng, Qi-yue; Yu, Qun; Chen, Xin; Ren, Xiao-dong

    2014-12-01

    Protoplast fusion was used to obtain a higher production of lignocellulolytic enzymes with protoplast fusion in Trichoderma reesei. The fusant strain T. reesei JL6 was obtained from protoplast fusion from T. reesei strains QM9414, MCG77, and Rut C-30. Filter paper activity of T. reesei JL6 increased by 18% compared with that of Rut C-30. β-Glucosidase, hemicellulase and pectinase activities of T. reesei JL6 were also higher. The former activity was 0.39 Uml(-1), while those of QM9414, MCG77, and Rut C-30 were 0.13, 0.11, and 0.16 Uml(-1), respectively. Pectinase and hemicellulase activities of JL6 were 5.4 and 15.6 Uml(-1), respectively, which were slightly higher than those of the parents. The effects of corn stover and wheat bran carbon sources on the cellulase production and growth curve of T. reesei JL6 were also investigated.

  1. Understanding drivers of peatland extracellular enzyme activity in the PEATcosm experiment: mixed evidence for enzymic latch hypothesis

    Treesearch

    Karl J. Romanowicz; Evan S. Kane; Lynette R. Potvin; Aleta L. Daniels; Randy Kolka; Erik A. Lilleskov

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Our objective was to assess the impacts of water table position and plant functional groups on peatland extracellular enzyme activity (EEA) framed within the context of the enzymic latch hypothesis. Methods. We utilized a full factorial experiment with 2 water table (WT) treatments (high and low) and 3 plant functional...

  2. Effects of cigarette smoke and dietary vitamin E levels on selected lung and hepatic biotransformation enzymes in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano, M.J.; Gairola, C.; Dorough, H.W.

    1985-01-01

    Young male C57BL mice were exposed nose-only to cigarette smoke 20 min/day for 8 weeks while maintained on diets containing 0, 5, and 100 ppm of vitamin E. Smoking had no effect on hepatic aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH), UDP-glucuronyltransferase, glutathione S-transferase, parathion desulfurase, or parathion esterase activity. Lung AHH activity was increased in all smoke-exposed mice, although the increase was significantly less in animals maintained on the vitamin E-free diet. All mice on the vitamin E-free diet showed reduced lung AHH activity and increased hepatic lipid peroxidation. No other biotransformations tested were significantly altered by varying vitamin E concentrations alone or in combination with cigarette smoke. For all vitamin E diets, both the smoke-exposed and sham-treated mice gained significantly less weight than the control animals. This effect was attributed to stress induced by restraint of the animals within the smoking apparatus. The results of these experiments show that both cigarette smoke and vitamin E-deficient diets may affect xenobiotic metabolism but that the combination does not appear to alter markedly their individual effects or to induce ones not previously observed.

  3. Kinetics of conjugation and oxidation of nitrobenzyl alcohols by rat hepatic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rickert, D E; deBethizy, J D; Glover, M R; Kedderis, G L

    1985-12-01

    Previous work has suggested that quantitative differences in the in vitro and in vivo metabolism of mononitrotoluene isomers are a result of differences in the hepatic conjugation and oxidation of the first metabolic intermediates, the mononitrobenzyl alcohols. We have determined the steady-state kinetic parameters, Vmax, Km and V/K, for the metabolism of the nitrobenzyl alcohols by rat hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase, glucuronyltransferase, and sulfotransferase. 3-Nitrobenzyl alcohol was the best substrate for cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase (Vmax = 1.48 nmoles/min/mg protein, V/K = 3.15 X 10(-3) nmoles/min/mg protein/microM, Km = 503 microM). Vmax and Km values for 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol were similar, but V/K was about 60% of that for 3-nitrobenzyl alcohol. 2-Nitrobenzyl alcohol was not metabolized by the alcohol dehydrogenase preparation used here, but it was metabolized to 2-nitrobenzoic acid by a rat liver mitochondrial preparation. 2-Nitrobenzyl alcohol was the best substrate for microsomal glucuronyltransferase (Vmax = 3.59 nmoles/min/mg protein, V/K = 11.28 X 10(-3) nmoles/min/mg protein/microM, Km = 373 microM). The Vmax for 3-nitrobenzyl alcohol was similar, but the V/K was about half and the Km was about twice that for 2-nitrobenzyl alcohol. The Vmax for 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol was about 40% and the V/K was about half that for 2-nitrobenzyl alcohol. The best substrate for cytosolic sulfotransferase was 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol (Vmax = 1.69 nmoles/min/mg protein, V/K = 37.21 X 10(-3) nmoles/min/mg protein/microM, Km = 48 microM). The Vmax values for the other two benzyl alcohols were similar, but the V/K and Km values were about 11 and 400%, respectively, of those for 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol. These data are in qualitative agreement with results obtained when the nitrobenzyl alcohols were incubated with isolated hepatocytes, but they do not allow quantitative modeling of the data from hepatocytes.

  4. Beneficial effect of carvone, a dietary monoterpene ameliorates hyperglycemia by regulating the key enzymes activities of carbohydrate metabolism in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Muruganathan, Udaiyar; Srinivasan, Subramani

    2016-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic/endocrine disorder characterized by inadequate control of carbohydrate metabolism and causes serious health issues. This study evaluates the effect of carvone, a novel monoterpene ketone, on carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the liver of normal and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (40mg/kg b.w). STZ intoxication led to a significant increase in the levels of plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and decrease in the levels of insulin and hemoglobin (Hb). The activities of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes, glycogen, enzymatic antioxidants in pancreas and hepatic markers content were also altered. The daily oral administration of carvone (50mg/kg b.w) to diabetic rats for 30days resulted a significant decline in the levels of plasma glucose, HbA1c and significant improve in the levels of Hb and insulin. The reversed activities of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes, enzymic antioxidants and hepatic marker enzymes in diabetic rats were renovated to near normal level by the administration of carvone. The obtained results were compared with glyclazide, a standard oral hypoglycemia drug. Histopathological analysis of liver and pancreas and immunohistochemistry of pancreas revealed that treatment with carvone reduced the STZ-induced damage to hepatic and β-cells of the pancreas. From our results, carvone regulates carbohydrate metabolism by ameliorating the key enzymes in the hepatic tissues of STZ-induced diabetic rats however further studies and safety studies are needed to validate the effects of carvone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. A fluorescently labeled dendronized polymer-enzyme conjugate carrying multiple copies of two different types of active enzymes.

    PubMed

    Grotzky, Andrea; Nauser, Thomas; Erdogan, Huriye; Schlüter, A Dieter; Walde, Peter

    2012-07-18

    A hybrid structure of a synthetic dendronized polymer, two different types of enzymes (superoxide dismutase and horseradish peroxidase), and a fluorescent dye (fluorescein) was synthesized. Thereby, a single polymer chain carried multiple copies of the two enzymes and the fluorescein. The entire attachment chemistry is based on UV/vis-quantifiable bis-aryl hydrazone bond formation that allows direct quantification of bound molecules: 60 superoxide dismutase, 120 horseradish peroxidase, and 20 fluorescein molecules on an average polymer chain of 2000 repeating units. To obtain other enzyme ratios the experimental conditions were altered accordingly. Moreover, it could be shown that both enzymes remained fully active and catalyzed a two-step cascade reaction.

  6. An Extended Polyanion Activation Surface in Insulin Degrading Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun Suk; Ozbil, Mehmet; Zhang, Tingting; Sheetz, Michael; Lee, David; Tran, Danny; Li, Sheng; Prabhakar, Rajeev; Hersh, Louis B.; Rodgers, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is believed to be the major enzyme that metabolizes insulin and has been implicated in the degradation of a number of other bioactive peptides, including amyloid beta peptide (Aβ), glucagon, amylin, and atrial natriuretic peptide. IDE is activated toward some substrates by both peptides and polyanions/anions, possibly representing an important control mechanism and a potential therapeutic target. A binding site for the polyanion ATP has previously been defined crystallographically, but mutagenesis studies suggest that other polyanion binding modes likely exist on the same extended surface that forms one wall of the substrate-binding chamber. Here we use a computational approach to define three potential ATP binding sites and mutagenesis and kinetic studies to confirm the relevance of these sites. Mutations were made at four positively charged residues (Arg 429, Arg 431, Arg 847, Lys 898) within the polyanion-binding region, converting them to polar or hydrophobic residues. We find that mutations in all three ATP binding sites strongly decrease the degree of activation by ATP and can lower basal activity and cooperativity. Computational analysis suggests conformational changes that result from polyanion binding as well as from mutating residues involved in polyanion binding. These findings indicate the presence of multiple polyanion binding modes and suggest the anion-binding surface plays an important conformational role in controlling IDE activity. PMID:26186535

  7. Development of a Highly Sensitive Bioluminescent Enzyme Immunoassay for Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigen Capable of Detecting Divergent Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Takehara, Shizuka; Takahashi, Masaharu

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are sometimes overlooked when using commercial kits to measure hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) due to their low sensitivities and reactivities to mutant strains of various genotypes. We developed an ultrasensitive bioluminescent enzyme immunoassay (BLEIA) for HBsAg using firefly luciferase, which is adaptable to a variety of HBsAg mutants, by combining four monoclonal antibodies with a polyclonal antibody against HBsAg. The measurement of seroconversion panels showed trace amounts of HBsAg during the early infection phase by the BLEIA because of its high sensitivity of 5 mIU/ml. The BLEIA detected HBsAg as early as did PCR in five of seven series and from 2.1 to 9.4 days earlier than commercial immunoassay methods. During the late infection phase, the BLEIA successfully detected HBsAg even 40 days after the disappearance of HBV DNA and the emergence of antibodies against HBsAg. The HBsAg BLEIA successfully detected all 13 recombinant HBsAg and 45 types of HBsAg mutants with various mutations within amino acids 90 to 164 in the S gene product. Some specimens had higher values determined by the BLEIA than those by a commercial chemiluminescent immunoassay; this suggests that such discrepancies were caused by the dissociation of preS1/preS2 peptides from the particle surface. With its highly sensitive detection of low-titer HBsAg, including various mutants, the HBsAg BLEIA is considered to be useful for the early diagnosis and prevention of HBV infection because of the shorter window of infection prior to detection, which facilitates early prediction of recurrence in HBV-infected individuals. PMID:23761660

  8. Association of interleukin-15-induced peripheral immune activation with hepatic stellate cell activation in persons coinfected with hepatitis C virus and HIV.

    PubMed

    Allison, Robert D; Katsounas, Antonios; Koziol, Deloris E; Kleiner, David E; Alter, Harvey J; Lempicki, Richard A; Wood, Brad; Yang, Jun; Fullmer, Brandie; Cortez, Karoll J; Polis, Michael A; Kottilil, Shyam

    2009-08-15

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) mediate hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver fibrosis, and increased HSC activation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV coinfection may be associated with accelerated fibrosis. We examined the level of HSC activation in HIV/HCV-coinfected and HCV-monoinfected subjects and its relationship to the level of activation and gene expression of peripheral immune cells in coinfected subjects. HSC activation levels positively correlated with peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immune activation and were associated with enhanced interleukin-15 (IL-15) gene expression, suggesting a pathogenic role for IL-15-driven immunomediated hepatic fibrosis. Future strategies that reduce immune activation and HSC activation may delay progression of liver fibrosis.

  9. The helicase activity associated with hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 3 (NS3).

    PubMed Central

    Tai, C L; Chi, W K; Chen, D S; Hwang, L H

    1996-01-01

    To assess the RNA helicase activity of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3), a polypeptide encompassing amino acids 1175 to 1657, which cover only the putative helicase domain, was expressed in Escherichia coli by a pET expression vector. The protein was purified to near homogeneity and assayed for RNA helicase activity in vitro with double-stranded RNA substrates prepared from a multiple cloning sequence and an HCV 5' nontranslated region (5'-NTR) or 3'-NTR. The enzyme acted successfully on substrates containing both 5' and 3' single-stranded regions (standard) or on substrates containing only the 3' single-stranded regions (3'/3') but failed to act on substrates containing only the 5' single-stranded regions (5'/5') or on substrates lacking the single-stranded regions (blunt). These results thus suggest 3' to 5' directionality for HCV RNA helicase activity. However, a 5'/5' substrate derived from the HCV 5'-NTR was also partially unwound by the enzyme, possibly because of unique properties inherent in the 5' single-stranded regions. Gel mobility shift analyses demonstrated that the HCV NS3 helicase could bind to either 5'- or 3'-tailed substrates but not to substrates lacking a single-stranded region, indicating that the polarity of the RNA strand to which the helicase bound was a more important enzymatic activity determinant. In addition to double-stranded RNA substrates, HCV NS3 helicase activity could displace both RNA and DNA oligonucleotides on a DNA template, suggesting that HCV NS3 too was disposed to DNA helicase activity. This study also demonstrated that RNA helicase activity was dramatically inhibited by the single-stranded polynucleotides. Taken altogether, our results indicate that the HCV NS3 helicase is unique among the RNA helicases characterized so far. PMID:8970970

  10. Hepatic overexpression of a constitutively active form of liver glycogen synthase improves glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ros, Susana; Zafra, Delia; Valles-Ortega, Jordi; García-Rocha, Mar; Forrow, Stephen; Domínguez, Jorge; Calbó, Joaquim; Guinovart, Joan J

    2010-11-26

    In this study, we tested the efficacy of increasing liver glycogen synthase to improve blood glucose homeostasis. The overexpression of wild-type liver glycogen synthase in rats had no effect on blood glucose homeostasis in either the fed or the fasted state. In contrast, the expression of a constitutively active mutant form of the enzyme caused a significant lowering of blood glucose in the former but not the latter state. Moreover, it markedly enhanced the clearance of blood glucose when fasted rats were challenged with a glucose load. Hepatic glycogen stores in rats overexpressing the activated mutant form of liver glycogen synthase were enhanced in the fed state and in response to an oral glucose load but showed a net decline during fasting. In order to test whether these effects were maintained during long term activation of liver glycogen synthase, we generated liver-specific transgenic mice expressing the constitutively active LGS form. These mice also showed an enhanced capacity to store glycogen in the fed state and an improved glucose tolerance when challenged with a glucose load. Thus, we conclude that the activation of liver glycogen synthase improves glucose tolerance in the fed state without compromising glycogenolysis in the postabsorptive state. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the activation of liver glycogen synthase may provide a potential strategy for improvement of glucose tolerance in the postprandial state.

  11. Effects of Sublethal Exposure to a Glyphosate-Based Herbicide Formulation on Metabolic Activities of Different Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzymes in Rats.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Karen; Najle, Roberto; Lifschitz, Adrián; Maté, María L; Lanusse, Carlos; Virkel, Guillermo L

    2014-07-01

    The activities of different xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in liver subcellular fractions from Wistar rats exposed to a glyphosate (GLP)-based herbicide (Roundup full II) were evaluated in this work. Exposure to the herbicide triggered protective mechanisms against oxidative stress (increased glutathione peroxidase activity and total glutathione levels). Liver microsomes from both male and female rats exposed to the herbicide had lower (45%-54%, P < 0.01) hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) levels compared to their respective control animals. In female rats, the hepatic 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (a general CYP-dependent enzyme activity) was 57% higher (P < 0.05) in herbicide-exposed compared to control animals. Conversely, this enzyme activity was 58% lower (P < 0.05) in male rats receiving the herbicide. Lower (P < 0.05) 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethlyase (EROD, CYP1A1/2 dependent) and oleandomycin triacetate (TAO) N-demethylase (CYP3A dependent) enzyme activities were observed in liver microsomes from exposed male rats. Conversely, in females receiving the herbicide, EROD increased (123%-168%, P < 0.05), whereas TAO N-demethylase did not change. A higher (158%-179%, P < 0.01) benzyloxyresorufin O-debenzylase (a CYP2B-dependent enzyme activity) activity was only observed in herbicide-exposed female rats. In herbicide-exposed rats, the hepatic S-oxidation of methimazole (flavin monooxygenase dependent) was 49% to 62% lower (P < 0.001), whereas the carbonyl reduction of menadione (a cytosolic carbonyl reductase-dependent activity) was higher (P < 0.05). Exposure to the herbicide had no effects on enzymatic activities dependent on carboxylesterases, glutathione transferases, and uridinediphospho-glucuronosyltransferases. This research demonstrated certain biochemical modifications after exposure to a GLP-based herbicide. Such modifications may affect the metabolic fate of different endobiotic and xenobiotic substances. The pharmacotoxicological significance of these

  12. Tissue enzyme activities in the loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta).

    PubMed

    Anderson, Eric T; Socha, Victoria L; Gardner, Jennifer; Byrd, Lynne; Manire, Charles A

    2013-03-01

    The loggerhead sea turtle, Caretta caretta, one of the seven species of threatened or endangered sea turtles worldwide, is one of the most commonly encountered marine turtles off the eastern coast of the United States and Gulf of Mexico. Although biochemical reference ranges have been evaluated for several species of sea turtles, tissue specificity of the commonly used plasma enzymes is lacking. This study evaluated the tissue specificity of eight enzymes, including amylase, lipase, creatine kinase (CK), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), in 30 tissues from five stranded loggerhead sea turtles with no evidence of infectious disease. Amylase and lipase showed the greatest tissue specificity, with activity found only in pancreatic samples. Creatine kinase had high levels present in skeletal and cardiac muscle, and moderate levels in central nervous system and gastrointestinal samples. Gamma-glutamyl transferase was found in kidney samples, but only in very low levels. Creatine kinase, ALP, AST, and LDH were found in all tissues evaluated and ALT was found in most, indicating low tissue specificity for these enzymes in the loggerhead.

  13. A Computational Methodology to Screen Activities of Enzyme Variants

    PubMed Central

    Hediger, Martin R.; De Vico, Luca; Svendsen, Allan; Besenmatter, Werner; Jensen, Jan H.

    2012-01-01

    We present a fast computational method to efficiently screen enzyme activity. In the presented method, the effect of mutations on the barrier height of an enzyme-catalysed reaction can be computed within 24 hours on roughly 10 processors. The methodology is based on the PM6 and MOZYME methods as implemented in MOPAC2009, and is tested on the first step of the amide hydrolysis reaction catalyzed by the Candida Antarctica lipase B (CalB) enzyme. The barrier heights are estimated using adiabatic mapping and shown to give barrier heights to within 3 kcal/mol of B3LYP/6-31G(d)//RHF/3-21G results for a small model system. Relatively strict convergence criteria (0.5 kcal/(molÅ)), long NDDO cutoff distances within the MOZYME method (15 Å) and single point evaluations using conventional PM6 are needed for reliable results. The generation of mutant structures and subsequent setup of the semiempirical calculations are automated so that the effect on barrier heights can be estimated for hundreds of mutants in a matter of weeks using high performance computing. PMID:23284627

  14. Intestinal Detoxification Limits the Activation of Hepatic Pregnane X Receptor by Lithocholic AcidS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Bryn M.; Milona, Alexandra; van Mil, Saskia; Clements, Peter; Holder, Julie; Boudjelal, Mohamed; Cairns, William; Parker, Malcolm; White, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The intestinal-derived secondary bile acid (BA) lithocholic acid (LCA) is hepatotoxic and is implicated in the pathogenesis of cholestatic diseases. LCA is an endogenous ligand of the xenobiotic nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR), but there is currently no consensus on the respective roles of hepatic and intestinal PXR in mediating protection against LCA in vivo. Under the conditions reported here, we show that mice lacking Pxr are resistant to LCA-mediated hepatotoxicity. This unexpected phenotype is found in association with enhanced urinary BA excretion and elevated basal expression of drug metabolism enzymes and the hepatic sulfate donor synthesis enzyme Papss2 in Pxr(−/−) mice. By subsequently comparing molecular responses to dietary and intraperitoneal administration of LCA, we made two other significant observations: 1) LCA feeding induces intestinal, but not hepatic, drug-metabolizing enzymes in a largely Pxr-independent manner; and 2) in contrast to LCA feeding, bypassing first-pass gut transit by intraperitoneal administration of LCA did induce hepatic detoxification machinery and in a Pxr-dependent manner. These data reconcile important discrepancies in the reported molecular responses to this BA and suggest that Pxr plays only a limited role in mediating responses to gut-derived LCA. Furthermore, the route of administration must be considered in the future planning and interpretation of experiments designed to assess hepatic responses to BAs, orally administered pharmaceuticals, and dietary toxins. PMID:19797606

  15. Activation of Variants of Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase by the Normal Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Bakay, Bohdan; Nyhan, William L.

    1972-01-01

    Deficient hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT; EC 2.4.2.8) enzymes from erythrocytes of patients with hyperuricemia and with the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome migrate 15% faster in polyacrylamide gel disc electrophoresis than the normal enzyme. A half-sister of two males with partial deficiency, who had 34% of normal HGPRT activity in her erythrocytes, yielded profiles containing two distinct zones of activity; one corresponded to the enzyme found in normal individuals and one to the variant of her half-brothers. However, in her profile her variant enzyme showed notably greater activity than that observed in her half-brothers. This increase was due to an activation of the variant by normal enzyme. Electrophoresis of mixtures of normal enzyme with partially deficient enzymes from patients with hyperuricemia and with the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome also led to activation of deficient HGPRT variants by normal enzymes. Deficient variants were also activated by normal enzyme on filtration through Sephadex G-25. Experiments in which deficient variant enzymes were activated with purified normal enzyme labeled with 125I indicated that deficient enzymes incorporate components of the normal enzyme. No such activation of deficient enzymes was ever obtained when mixtures of deficient and normal enzymes were put together in a test tube. Images PMID:4341698

  16. The slowed brain: cortical oscillatory activity in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Butz, Markus; May, Elisabeth S; Häussinger, Dieter; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2013-08-15

    Oscillatory activity of the human brain has received growing interest as a key mechanism of large-scale integration across different brain regions. Besides a crucial role of oscillatory activity in the emergence of other neurological and psychiatric diseases, recent evidence indicates a key role in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). This review summarizes the current knowledge on pathological alterations of oscillatory brain activity in association with liver dysfunction and HE in the context of spontaneous brain activity, motor symptoms, sensory processing, and attention. The existing literature demonstrates a prominent slowing of the frequency of oscillatory activity as shown for spontaneous brain activity at rest, with respect to deficits of motor behavior and motor symptoms, and in the context of visual attention processes. The observed slowing extends across different subsystems of the brain and has been confirmed across different frequency bands, providing evidence for ubiquitous changes of oscillatory activity in HE. For example, the frequency of cortico-muscular coherence in HE patients appears at the frequency of the mini-asterixis (⩽12Hz), while cirrhotics without overt signs of HE show coherence similar to healthy subjects, i.e. at 13-30Hz. Interestingly, the so-called critical flicker frequency (CFF) as a measure of the processing of an oscillating visual stimulus has emerged as a useful tool to quantify HE disease severity, correlating with behavioral and neurophysiological alterations. Moreover, the CFF reliably distinguishes patients with manifest HE from cirrhotics without any signs of HE and healthy controls using a cut-off frequency of 39Hz. In conclusion, oscillatory activity is globally slowed in HE in close association with HE symptoms and disease severity. Although the underlying causal mechanisms are not yet understood, these results indicate that pathological changes of oscillatory activity play an important role in the

  17. Global Profiling of Carbohydrate Active Enzymes in Human Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Mande, Sharmila S.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Carbohydrate Active enzyme (CAZyme) families, encoded by human gut microflora, play a crucial role in breakdown of complex dietary carbohydrates into components that can be absorbed by our intestinal epithelium. Since nutritional wellbeing of an individual is dependent on the nutrient harvesting capability of the gut microbiome, it is important to understand how CAZyme repertoire in the gut is influenced by factors like age, geography and food habits. Results This study reports a comprehensive in-silico analysis of CAZyme profiles in the gut microbiomes of 448 individuals belonging to different geographies, using similarity searches of the corresponding gut metagenomic contigs against the carbohydrate active enzymes database. The study identifies a core group of 89 CAZyme families that are present across 85% of the gut microbiomes. The study detects several geography/age-specific trends in gut CAZyme repertoires of the individuals. Notably, a group of CAZymes having a positive correlation with BMI has been identified. Further this group of BMI-associated CAZymes is observed to be specifically abundant in the Firmicutes phyla. One of the major findings from this study is identification of three distinct groups of individuals, referred to as 'CAZotypes', having similar CAZyme profiles. Distinct taxonomic drivers for these CAZotypes as well as the probable dietary basis for such trends have also been elucidated. The results of this study provide a global view of CAZyme profiles across individuals of various geographies and age-groups. These results re-iterate the need of a more precise understanding of the role of carbohydrate active enzymes in human nutrition. PMID:26544883