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Sample records for hepatic radionuclide angiography

  1. Diagnosis and screening of small hepatocellular carcinomas. Comparison of radionuclide imaging, ultrasound, computed tomography, hepatic angiography, and alpha 1-fetoprotein assay

    SciTech Connect

    Takashima, T.; Matsui, O.; Suzuki, M.; Ida, M.

    1982-12-01

    Twenty-nine small (less than 5 cm) hepatocellular carcinomas in 18 patients were examined by radionuclide imaging (RN), ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), hepatic angiography, and serum alpha 1-fetoprotein (AFP) assay. Sensitivity was 39% with RN, 50% with US, 56% with CT, and 94% with angiography, including infusion hepatic angiography (IHA). Lesions larger than 3 cm could be detected by all of these methods; those between 2 and 3 cm were generally shown by US and CT but not RN. IHA was essential for diagnosis of lesions less than 2 cm, which were otherwise difficult or impossible to detect except with angiography. As a screening method, AFP was best, followed by US and CT. The authors recommend using AFP and US to minimize expense and radiation exposure. In questionable cases, IHA should be performed.

  2. Diagnosis and screening of small hepatocellular carcinomas: comparison of radionuclide imaging, ultrasound, computed tomography, hepatic angiography, and. cap alpha. /sub 1/-fetoprotein assay

    SciTech Connect

    Takashima, T.; Matsui, O.; Suzuki, M.; Ida, M.

    1982-12-01

    Twenty-nine small (<5 cm) hepatocellular carcinomas in 18 patients were examined by radionuclide imaging (RN), ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), hepatic angiography, and serum ..cap alpha../sub 1/-fetoprotein (AFP) assay. Sensitivity was 39% with RN, 50% with US, 56% with CT, and 94% with angiography, including infusion hepatic angiography (IHA). Lesions larger than 3 cm could be detected by all of these methods; those between 2 and 3 cm were generally shown by US and CT but not RN. IHA was essential for diagnosis of lesions less than 2 cm, which were otherwise difficult or impossible to detect except with angiography. As a screening method, AFP was best, followed by US and CT. The authors recommend using AFP and US to minimize expense and radiation exposure. In questionable cases, IHA should be performed.

  3. Equilibrium radionuclide gated angiography in patients with tricuspid regurgitation

    SciTech Connect

    Handler, B.; Pavel, D.G.; Pietras, R.; Swiryn, S.; Byrom, E.; Lam, W.; Rosen, K.M.

    1983-01-15

    Equilibrium gated radionuclide angiography was performed in 2 control groups (15 patients with no organic heart disease and 24 patients with organic heart disease but without right- or left-sided valvular regurgitation) and in 9 patients with clinical tricuspid regurgitation. The regurgitant index, or ratio of left to right ventricular stroke counts, was significantly lower in patients with tricuspid regurgitation than in either control group. Time-activity variation over the liver was used to compute a hepatic expansion fraction which was significantly higher in patients with tricuspid regurgitation than in either control group. Fourier analysis of time-activity variation in each pixel was used to generate amplitude and phase images. Only pixels with values for amplitude at least 7% of the maximum in the image were retained in the final display. All patients with tricuspid regurgitation had greater than 100 pixels over the liver automatically retained by the computer. These pixels were of phase comparable to that of the right atrium and approximately 180 degrees out of phase with the right ventricle. In contrast, no patient with no organic heart disease and only 1 of 24 patients with organic heart disease had any pixels retained by the computer. In conclusion, patients with tricuspid regurgitation were characterized on equilibrium gated angiography by an abnormally low regurgitant index (7 of 9 patients) reflecting increased right ventricular stroke volume, increased hepatic expansion fraction (7 of 9 patients), and increased amplitude of count variation over the liver in phase with the right atrium (9 of 9 patients).

  4. Detection of radiation cardiomyopathy by gated radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, R.J.; Bar-Shlomo, B.Z.; Druck, M.N.; Herman, J.G.; Gilbert, B.W.; Perrault, D.J.; McLaughlin, P.R.

    1983-02-01

    Twenty-one asymptomatic adults underwent rest and exercise gated radionuclide angiography seven to 20 years after having received mediastinal radiation (2,000 to 7,600 rads) for Hodgkin's disease. None of these patients received cytotoxic chemotherapy. Twelve patients (57 percent) had abnormal left (less than 53 percent at rest and/or greater than 5 percent decrease at peak exercise) and/or right (less than 27 percent at rest and/or greater than 5 percent decrease at peak exercise) ventricular ejection fractions. Previous reports have described myocardial fibrosis occurring late after therapeutic mediastinal radiation; however, the incidence of this occurrence based on clinical follow-up has been low. Rest and exercise radionuclide angiography is a sensitive method for assessing systolic ventricular function and reveals a high prevalence of cardiomyopathy that can be linked to previous radiotherapy.

  5. External accumulation of radionuclide in hepatic hydrothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, R.J.; Johnston, G.S.

    1989-05-01

    Hepatic hydrothorax is a complication in approximately 5% of patients with cirrhosis. Ascites is almost always present and helps to suggest the correct diagnosis. However, when ascites is absent, radionuclide imaging has proven to be helpful in establishing that the pleural effusion originated from ascitic fluid. When pleural fluid is rapidly removed, such as by thoracostomy tube drainage, the radioisotope may accumulate outside the thorax and produce a negative scan of the chest. When the radionuclide scan is nondiagnostic and the pleural space is being rapidly drained, the pleural fluid collecting system should always be imaged before rejecting a diagnosis of hepatic hydrothorax.

  6. Types of diaphragmatic motion during hepatic angiography.

    PubMed

    Katsuda, T; Kuroda, C; Fujita, M

    1997-01-01

    To determine the types and causes of diaphragmatic motion during hepatic angiography, the authors used transarterial cut-film portography (TAP) to study movement of the diaphragm during breath-holding. Thirty-three TAP sequences were studied, and the patients' diaphragmatic motions were classified into four categories according to the distance their diaphragms moved. Results showed that the diaphragm was stationary in 33% of the TAP studies, while perpetual motion occurred in 15% of the studies, early-phase motion occurred in 12% and late-phase motion occurred in 40%. Ten sequences showed diaphragmatic motion of more than 10 mm, with eight sequences showing caudal motion and two showing cranial motion. This article discusses the cause of diaphragmatic motion during breath-holding for hepatic angiography and presents suggestions to reduce motion artifacts during the exam.

  7. Hepatic Artery Angiography and Embolization for Hemobilia Following Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, Tony; Travis, Simon; Ettles, Duncan; Dyet, John; Sedman, Peter; Wedgewood, Kevin; Royston, Christopher

    1999-01-15

    Purpose: The effectiveness of angiography and embolization in diagnosis and treatment were assessed in a cohort of patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods: Over a 6-year period 1513 laparoscopic cholecystectomies were carried out in our region. Nine of these patients (0.6%) developed significant upper gastrointestinal bleeding, 5-43 days after surgery. All underwent emergency celiac and selective right hepatic artery angiography. All were treated by coil embolization of the right hepatic artery proximal and distal to the bleeding point. Results: Pseudoaneurysms of the hepatic artery adjacent to cholecystectomy clips were demonstrated in all nine patients at selective right hepatic angiography. In three patients celiac axis angiography alone failed to demonstrate the pseudoaneurysm. Embolization controlled hemorrhage in all patients with no further bleeding and no further intervention. One patient developed a candidal liver abscess in the post-procedure period. All patients are alive and well at follow-up. Conclusion: Selective right hepatic angiography is vital in the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Embolization offers the advantage of minimally invasive treatment in unstable patients, does not disrupt recent biliary reconstruction, allows distal as well as proximal control of the hepatic artery, and is an effective treatment for this potentially life-threatening complication.

  8. Detection of a traumatic renal aterial venous fistula by radionuclide angiography (RNA)

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, J.C.; Weitzman, A.F.; Lee, V.W.; Grosso, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    A case of post-traumatic A-V fistula was detected by radionuclide angiography. A 40-yr-old male, with a stab wound in left upper quadrant of abdomen, had undergone exploratory laparotomy that disclosed lacerations of the stomach and proximal portions of small bowel and superior mesenteric artery. The patient continued to have quaiac-positive stools postoperatively. One week later a radionuclide sequential image of the abdomen using 8 mCi of Tc-99m sulfur colloid revealed an area of increased radionuclide concentration in the left midabdomen seen only during aterial phase and not visible on the subsequent static images. The findings were confirmed to be A-V fistula by angiogram and subsequently by renal surgery. The patient had an uneventful elective closure of the fistula. The cause of quaiac-positive stool was unexplained. Eight cases of renal A-V fistula have been well demonstrated by radionuclide angiography in the literature. The authors emphasized the radionuclide angiography is a suitable screening procedure for patients with suspected traumatic vascular injury, and contrast angiography should be used for the confirmation of diagnosis.

  9. Prognostic value and limitations of exercise radionuclide angiography in medically treated coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Taliercio, C.P.; Clements, I.P.; Zinsmeister, A.R.; Gibbons, R.J.

    1988-06-01

    We investigated whether exercise radionuclide angiography provides prognostic information in addition to that identified by resting left ventricular function and coronary anatomy in patients with medically treated coronary artery disease. Clinical follow-up (median, 21.7 months) was obtained in 424 medically treated patients who underwent exercise radionuclide angiography and coronary angiography. The mean age of the study population was 58 years, and 67% were men. Cardiac death occurred in 16 patients, nonfatal myocardial infarction in 16, and nonfatal out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in 1. Univariate analysis showed that multiple variables were associated with future cardiac events, including number of diseased vessels, exercise and rest radionuclide ejection fraction, history of myocardial infarction, exercise and rest left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic volume indices, peak exercise workload, age, abnormal resting electrocardiogram, and peak exercise ST-segment depression. Only three variables were independently associated with cardiac events on follow-up: number of diseased vessels, radionuclide ejection fraction at rest, and age. In patients with three-vessel disease and a resting radionuclide ejection fraction of more than 40%, a subgroup with higher risk could not be identified on the basis of exercise radionuclide response.

  10. Rest and exercise radionuclide angiography for diagnosis in chronic ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, R.J. )

    1991-09-01

    Rest and exercise radionuclide angiography is frequently employed for the diagnosis of chest pain syndromes. Its value and limitations in this regard have been well studied, but proper utilization of the technique requires an understanding of five critical concepts: (1) Radionuclide angiography is superior to treadmill exercise testing and probably equivalent to thallium scintigraphy, although the published series did not use current methods. (2) The true specificity of radionuclide angiography is about 80%, intermediate between the early optimistic estimates and the later pessimistic ones. (3) The peak exercise ejection fraction is the preferred test parameter for diagnosis, although exercise hemodynamics, symptoms, and electrocardiographic changes should also be considered. (4) Although radionuclide angiography is clearly helpful for noninvasive diagnosis, significant numbers of patients will continue to fall in an uncertain category. (5) The proper application of the technique requires recognition of its limitations and careful attention to technical details. When properly applied, this modality can make an important contribution to clinical decision making. 58 references.

  11. Hepatic tumor angiography: a subject review

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, V.P.

    1983-09-01

    The dual blood supply of the normal hepatic parenchyma and the single arterial supply of hepatic neoplasms are important factors in the interpretation of celiac and hepatic arteriograms. Depending on whether the hepatic artery, portal vein, or both are opacified, three types of hepatogram can occur: arterial, portal, or mixed. On the celiac arteriogram, the densely opacified hepatic parenchyma makes the less well opacified tumor appear relatively hypovascular; and conversely, on the hepatic arteriogram the nonopacified portal flow has a ''wash-out'' effect on the normal parenchyma so that the neoplasm remains hypervascular. Thus most hepatic neoplasms are hypervascular on the hepatic arteriogram, and conversion of a hypervascular tumor to a hypovascular one is indicative of its response to treatment.

  12. Superselective catheterization technique in hepatic angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, V.P.; Soo, C.S.; Carrasco, C.H.; Wallace, S.

    1983-10-01

    The techniques for superselective catheterization of hepatic artery are described. The catheters have five major configurations in various sizes: (1) simple curve, (2) reverse curve, (3) double curve, (4) modified double curve, and (5) hepatic and splenic curves. Since the celiac artery may be directed caudad, horizontally, or cephalad, the techniques vary accordingly. The basic approach of the system described is to tailor the catheter to fit the vascular anatomy. These various techniques have produced a 95% success rate in the hepatic artery catheterization of 1000 patients.

  13. Renal trauma: radiological studies - comparison of urography, computed tomography, angiography, and radionuclide studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, E.K.; Sullivan, J.; Frentz, G.

    1985-01-01

    Excretory urography, computed radionuclide urography, angiography, and both conventional and dynamic computed tomography (CT) were compared with regard to accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity in 388 patients with renal trauma. Used as the triage examination, urography established the absence of significant renal injury with an accuracy of 87%, obviating further evaluation. Dynamic CT proved to be the best methods of assessing parenchymal injuries, establishing the correct diagnosis in 129 out of 130 cases compared to 116/130 for conventional CT. Angiography was the procedure of choice for diagnosis and categorization of renal artery injuries, which were diagnosed correctly in all 43 cases. The choice between dynamic CT and angiography as the second examination rests upon careful evaluation of clinical and urographic findings for signs of renal artery injury which would mandate angiographic assessment.

  14. Glucagon-Induced Vasospasm of Hepatic Artery Branches During Visceral Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Dziedzic, T. Scott; Smith, Tony P.

    2008-07-15

    Glucagon is often used in radiology to decrease bowel motility for enhanced imaging, including visceral digital subtraction angiography. We present a case in which branch hepatic artery vasospasm followed the intravenous administration of glucagon during visceral angiography.

  15. Jugular venous reflux on magnetic resonance angiography and radionuclide venography

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Tomohisa; Okuchi, Sachi; Yamamoto, Akira; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Fujimoto, Koji; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship between the signal from retrograde venous flow on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and retrograde upward flow from the left brachiocephalic vein has not been explored. Purpose To reveal the frequency of jugular venous reflux using MRA and nuclear venography in patients being evaluated for cerebral volume and blood flow. Material and Methods A total of 229 patients with cognitive disturbance who had undergone brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on the same day to evaluate cerebral blood flow were evaluated. Jugular venous reflux was measured on MRA and nuclear venography, which was conducted just after injection of N-isopropyl-123I-p-iodoamphetamine for the SPECT study. Results MRA showed jugular reflux in seven patients on the right side, and in 22 on the left. Nuclear venography showed jugular reflux in six patients on the right side, and in 20 on the left. Conclusion Jugular venous reflux was observed mostly on the left side. Retrograde flow was observed on both MRA and nuclear venography in half of the cases, with the rest only on one of the modalities. PMID:27994882

  16. Hepatic perfusion abnormalities during CT angiography: Detection and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeny, P.C.; Marks, W.M.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-seven perfusion abnormalities were detected in 17 of 50 patients who underwent computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the liver. All but one of the perfusion abnormalities occurred in patients with primary or metastatic liver tumors. Perfusion abnormalities were lobar in nine cases, segmental in 11, and subsegmental in seven; 14 were hypoperfusion and 13 were hyperperfusion abnormalities. The causes for the abnormalities included nonperfusion of a replaced hepatic artery (n = 11), cirrhosis and nodular regeneration (n = 3), altered hepatic hemodynamics (e.g., siphoning, laminar flow) caused by tumor (n = 7), contrast media washout from a nonperfused vessel (n = 1), compression of adjacent hepatic parenchyma (n = 1), and unknown (n = 4). Differentiation of perfusion abnormalities from tumor usually can be made by comparing the morphology of the known tumor with the suspected perfusion abnormality, changes of each on delayed CTA scans, and review of initial angiograms and other imaging studies.

  17. Evaluation of Primary Pulmonary Vein Stenosis in Children: Comparison of Radionuclide Perfusion Lung Scan and Angiography.

    PubMed

    Drubach, Laura A; Jenkins, Kathy J; Stamoulis, Catherine; Palmer, Edwin L; Lee, Edward Y

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of radionuclide perfusion lung scanning in the evaluation of primary pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS) in pediatric patients by comparing it with angiography. We retrospectively identified pediatric patients with primary PVS who underwent both lung scanning and angiography. A cohort of 34 patients was evaluated. The presence of PVS in the right upper, right lower, left upper, and left lower pulmonary veins on angiograms was recorded. Two nuclear medicine physicians evaluated the lung scans for perfusion defects. Agreement between lung scan and angiographic findings was assessed with contingency tables. Sensitivity and specificity of lung scanning for accurate detection of PVS with angiographic findings as the reference standard were assessed by ROC analysis. Angiography depicted PVS in 90 of the total 136 pulmonary veins (66%). Lung scans correctly depicted 65 (72%) of the cases of PVS diagnosed with angiography. The sensitivity and specificity of lung scans were 76.0% and 88.9% for the right upper pulmonary vein, 70.6% and 94.1% for the right lower pulmonary vein, 77.3% and 58.3% for the left upper pulmonary vein, and 65.4% and 87.5% for the left lower pulmonary vein. Lung scan findings correlate with angiographic findings in the detection of primary PVS in pediatric patients. Perfusion lung scanning may have a role in angiographically diagnosed PVS by noninvasively showing relative perfusion at the tissue level.

  18. Long-term follow-up of patients with silent ischemia during exercise radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Breitenbuecher, A.P.; Pfisterer, M.; Hoffmann, A.; Burckhardt, D. )

    1990-04-01

    A retrospective 5 year follow-up study was performed in 140 patients with unequivocal ischemia during exercise radionuclide angiography (greater than or equal to 10% decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction or greater than or equal to 5% decrease in ejection fraction together with a distinct regional wall motion abnormality). In 84 patients (60%), ischemia during radionuclide angiography was silent (silent ischemia group), whereas 56 patients experienced angina during the test (symptomatic group). Work load and antianginal medication were similar in both groups. Critical cardiac events (unstable angina, myocardial infarction, cardiac death) occurred in 27% of patients in the silent ischemia group and 16% of those in the symptomatic group (p = NS); however, myocardial infarction or death was more frequent in patients with silent ischemia (22% versus 9%; p less than 0.05). If there was additional exercise-induced ST segment depression, the rate of critical events was further increased (p less than 0.05). The difference in critical cardiac events seemed to be influenced by the higher incidence of revascularization procedures in symptomatic patients, whereas medical therapy had no similar effect. Thus, these findings suggest that patients with documented severe ischemia should undergo left heart catheterization and revascularization irrespective of symptoms to improve their prognosis.

  19. Response of left ventricular ejection fraction to recovery from general anesthesia: measurement by gated radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Coriat, P.; Mundler, O.; Bousseau, D.; Fauchet, M.; Rous, A.C.; Echter, E.; Viars, P.

    1986-06-01

    To test the hypothesis that, after anesthesia for noncardiac surgical procedures, the increased cardiac work during recovery induces wall motion and ejection fraction (EF) abnormalities in patients with mild angina pectoris, gated radionuclide angiography was performed in patients undergoing simple cholecystectomy under narcotic-relaxant general anesthesia. The ejection fraction was determined during anesthesia at the end of surgery, and then determined 3 min and 3 hr after extubation. A new angiography was performed 24 hr later, and a myocardial scintigraphy (Thallium 201) was performed during infusion of the coronary vasodilator, dipyridamole. In the first part of the investigation, eight patients without coronary artery disease (CAD) (group 1) and 20 patients with mild angina (group 2) were studied. In the second part of the study, seven patients (group 3) with mild angina pectoris received an intravenous infusion of 0.4 microgram X kg-1 X min-1 of nitroglycerin started before surgery and gradually decreased 4 hr after extubation. In group 1, EF remained unchanged at recovery. In contrast in group 2, EF responded abnormally to recovery: EF decreased from 55% during anesthesia to 45% 3 min after extubation (P less than 0.001). Patients in group 3, who received intravenous nitroglycerin, showed no change of EF at recovery. This study demonstrates that recovery from general anesthesia causes abnormalities in left ventricular function in patients suffering from CAD. These abnormalities are prevented by prophylactic intravenous nitroglycerin.

  20. Increased left ventricular ejection fraction after a meal: potential source of error in performance of radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.M.; White, C.J.; Sobol, S.M.; Lull, R.J.

    1983-06-01

    The effect of a standardized meal on left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) was determined by equilibrium radionuclide angiography in 16 patients with stable congestive heart failure but without pulmonary or valvular heart disease. LVEF was determined in the fasting state and 15, 30, and 45 minutes after a meal. Patients with moderately depressed fasting LVEF (30 to 50%), Group I, had a mean increase of 6.9 +/- 2.9% (p less than 0.005) in the LVEF at 45 minutes after the meal. Patients with severely depressed fasting LVEF (less than 30%), Group II, had no change after the meal. It is concluded that significant increases in LVEF may occur after meals in patients with moderate but not severe left ventricular dysfunction. Equilibrium radionuclide angiography studies that are not standardized for patients' mealtimes may introduce an important unmeasured variable that will affect the validity of data in serial studies of left ventricular function.

  1. Non-invasive evaluation of the cardiac function in golden retriever dogs by radionuclide angiography.

    PubMed

    Devaux, J Y; Cabane, L; Esler, M; Flaouters, H; Duboc, D

    1993-01-01

    Golden Retriever dogs manifest an X-linked, Duchenne-like, muscular dystrophy with a characteristic lack of dystrophin. Histologic findings have demonstrated the cardiac involvement in these dogs to be a model for the cardiac insufficiency in human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The goal of this study was to assess the capability of radionuclide angiography (RNA) as an assessment tool to measure the ventricular dysfunction in these dogs. Three dogs, one normal and two with muscular dystrophy (MD), were studied by equilibrium gated blood pool. Red blood cells were labelled with 420 MBq of 99mTc. The three dogs lying on their left sides on the table, received no drugs and were not restrained in any manner. RNA left ejection fraction (EF) and echographic measurements of left ventricular fractional shortening (FS) were performed during the same session. EF values were 61%, 48%, 36% and FS values were 47%, 32%, 26%, respectively, for the control dog, the 6 month old MD dog and the 12 month old MD dog. This preliminary study demonstrates the potential usefulness of RNA for the non-invasive follow-up exams of specific therapy in a canine model of muscular dystrophy.

  2. [Reliability of venous blood gas analysis and radionuclide angiography in post-traumatic dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Scola, A; Scola, E

    2017-06-01

    The diagnosis "post-traumatic dystrophy" (PTD) was first defined with clinical and paraclinical criteria by Scola et al. in 2013. The objectivity and reliability of the paraclinical criteria (venous blood gas analysis [vBGA], radionuclide angiography [RNA]), and recommendations for therapy should be assessed in a prospective study. In five patients with clinical signs of post-traumatic nonbacterial inflammation of the hand, both diagnosis and a 3‑week hospital treatment were carried out in accordance with the publication mentioned above. The primary traumata (four fractures and one soft-tissue injury) were located in either the hand or the forearm. Unsuccessful outpatient treatment always led to hospital admission. One patient with severe osteopenia in the hand skeleton was treated with bisphosphonates for 6 months. All patients fulfilled the clinical and paraclinical criteria for the diagnosis of PTD. On admission, an elevated venous partial pressure of oxygen was found by vBGA in the affected hand (∆pO2 mean 22 ± 3 mm Hg) and a hyperperfusion due to arteriovenous shunts was measured using RNA (mean 75 ± 47%). The symptomatic treatment was extremely well tolerated; by the time of discharge, all patients achieved full functioning of the hand with minor loss of strength (venous ∆pO2 mean 5 ± 3 mm Hg). The osteopenia in the one patient treated with bisphosphonates showed recalcification after 6 months. The reliability of clinical and paraclinical criteria for PTD were confirmed. vBGA and RNA seem to be good parameters for confirming the diagnosis of PTD. "Rubor," a symptom traditionally interpreted as "hyperemia," contradicts the paraclinical findings and leads to the assumption that the cause of this post-traumatic syndrome is microvascular dysfunction.

  3. Comparison of biventricular ejection fractions using cadmium-zinc-telluride SPECT and planar equilibrium radionuclide angiography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chieh; Ko, Chi-Lun; Yen, Rouh-Fang; Lo, Mei-Fang; Huang, Yih-Hwen; Hsu, Pei-Ying; Wu, Yen-Wen; Cheng, Mei-Fang

    2016-06-01

    We compared biventricular ejection fractions (EFs) from gated blood-pool single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using a cadmium-zinc-telluride camera (CZT-SPECT) with planar equilibrium radionuclide angiography (ERNA) using a NaI gamma camera (NaI-planar). We also evaluated whether imaging time can be reduced without compromising image quality using the CZT camera. Forty-eight patients underwent NaI-planar and CZT-SPECT on the same day. CZT-SPECT datasets were re-projected at an LAO orientation similar to ERNA acquisition, forming CZT-repro planar datasets. The resulting biventricular volumetric measurements and EFs were compared. LVEF calculated from CZT-SPECT and CZT-repro correlated better with NaI-planar (r = 0.93 and 0.99, respectively) than RVEF (r = 0.76 and 0.82, respectively). Excellent intra-class correlation and low bias in intra-observer comparisons were observed for the biventricular EFs derived from three datasets. A wider limit of agreement in CZT-SPECT-derived LVEFs, lower correlation and significant bias for NaI-planar, and CZT-repro-derived RVEFs was found in the inter-observer analyses. Nonetheless, the imaging time can be reduced to 4 minutes without increasing variability in EFs using the CZT camera (P = NS). LVEFs calculated from CZT-SPECT and CZT-repro correlated well with NaI-planar. CZT camera may reduce imaging time while preserving image quality in the assessment of biventricular EFs.

  4. [Non-contrast-Enhanced MR angiography for selective evaluation of the hepatic portal vein].

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Sun, JiayU; Wang, Chenglong; Xia, Chuncao; Li, Changxian

    2011-08-01

    This study was aimed to compare and evaluate the diagnostic performance of non-contrast-enhanced MR angiography (NCE-MRA) with contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) in the anatomic assessment of hepatic portal vein. Thirty people, ten patients with hepatic cirrhosis without ascites and twenty normal physical examination donors as control group were included in the NCE-MRA and CE-MRA with the same 1.5T MR scanner. Anatomic angiographic images were reconstructed and their datasets available for analysis independently performed by two radiologists. Assessment of data quality of hepatic portal vein vessels was rated with a four-point scale. After consensus reading, a total 27 images (90%) scored more than 3 point were observed in NCE-MRA and 28 (93.3%) in CE-MRA, respectively. Segmental branch vessels were visualized on MR angiography in the majority of cases. Both NCE-MRA and CE-MRA correctly characterized the hepatic portal veins with grade 5 and without false positive cases. Only 4 false negatives with grade 6 were missed in NCE-MRA group. There were no statistically significant differences between NCE-MRA and CE-MRA for characterization of hepatic vasculature (P < 0.05). Kappa value was larger than 0.75 for both reviewers. A conclusion could be drawn that NCE-MRA is a non-invasive and effective method that provides a comprehensive assessment of the hepatic portal vein.

  5. [Non-contrast-enhanced MR angiography for selective visualization of the hepatic vein].

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Sun, Jia-Yu; Xia, Chun-Cao; Li, Chang-Xian

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of non-contrast-enhanced MR angiography (NCE-MRA) in the preoperative assessment of hepatic vein. Contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA)and NCE-MRA were performed on ten patients with hepatic cirrhosis and twelve potential living liver donors with the same 1. 5T MR scanner. The anatomic angiographic images were reconstructed and reviewed by two radiologists independently. The quality of the images of hepatic vein vessels was rated with a four point scale. After consensus reading, 19 NCE-MRA images (86.4%) and 20 CE-MRA images (90.9%) scored more than 3 point, respectively. The segmental branch vessels were visualized on MR angiography in the majority of cases. Both NCE-MRA and CE-MRA correctly characterized 20 out of 22 hepatic veins without false positive reporting. The NCE-MRA reported two false negative cases. There were no statistically significant differences between NCE-MRA and CE-MRA for the characterization of hepatic vasculature (P > 0.05). High consistency was achieved between the two reviewers, with Kappa values over 0.75. NCE-MRA is a non-invasive and effective method for the comprehensive assessment of hepatic vein.

  6. Assessment of single vessel coronary artery disease: results of exercise electrocardiography, thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging and radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Port, S.C.; Oshima, M.; Ray, G.; McNamee, P.; Schmidt, D.H.

    1985-07-01

    The sensitivity of the commonly used stress tests for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease was analyzed in 46 patients with significant occlusion (greater than or equal to 70% luminal diameter obstruction) of only one major coronary artery and no prior myocardial infarction. In all patients, thallium-201 perfusion imaging (both planar and seven-pinhole tomographic) and 12 lead electrocardiography were performed during the same graded treadmill exercise test and radionuclide angiography was performed during upright bicycle exercise. Exercise rate-pressure (double) product was 22,307 +/- 6,750 on the treadmill compared with 22,995 +/- 5,622 on the bicycle (p = NS). Exercise electrocardiograms were unequivocally abnormal in 24 patients (52%). Qualitative planar thallium images were abnormal in 42 patients (91%). Quantitative analysis of the tomographic thallium images were abnormal in 41 patients (89%). An exercise ejection fraction of less than 0.56 or a new wall motion abnormality was seen in 30 patients (65%). Results were similar for the right (n = 11) and left anterior descending (n = 28) coronary arteries while all tests but the planar thallium imaging showed a lower sensitivity for isolated circumflex artery disease (n = 7). The specificity of the tests was 72, 83, 89 and 72% for electrocardiography, planar thallium imaging, tomographic thallium imaging and radionuclide angiography, respectively. The results suggest that exercise thallium-201 perfusion imaging is the most sensitive noninvasive stress test for the diagnosis of single vessel coronary artery disease.

  7. Comparison of exercise radionuclide angiography with thallium SPECT imaging for detection of significant narrowing of the left circumflex coronary artery

    SciTech Connect

    Dilsizian, V.; Perrone-Filardi, P.; Cannon, R.O. 3d.; Freedman, N.M.; Bacharach, S.L.; Bonow, R.O. )

    1991-08-01

    Although quantitation of exercise thallium tomograms has enhanced the noninvasive diagnosis and localization of coronary artery disease, the detection of stenosis of the left circumflex coronary artery remains suboptimal. Because posterolateral regional wall motion during exercise is well assessed by radionuclide angiography, this study determined whether regional dysfunction of the posterolateral wall during exercise radionuclide angiography is more sensitive in identifying left circumflex disease than thallium perfusion abnormalities assessed by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). One hundred ten consecutive patients with CAD were studied, of whom 70 had a significant stenosis of the left circumflex coronary artery or a major obtuse marginal branch. Both regional function and segmental thallium activity of the posterolateral wall were assessed using visual and quantitative analysis. Left ventricular regional function was assessed objectively by dividing the left ventricular region of interest into 20 sectors; the 8 sectors corresponding to the posterolateral free wall were used to assess function in the left circumflex artery distribution. Similarly, using circumferential profile analysis of short-axis thallium tomograms, left ventricular myocardial activity was subdivided into 64 sectors; the 16 sectors corresponding to the posterolateral region were used to assess thallium perfusion abnormalities in the left circumflex artery territory. Qualitative posterolateral wall motion analysis detected 76% of patients with left circumflex coronary artery stenosis, with a specificity of 83%, compared with only 44% by qualitative thallium tomography (p less than 0.001) and a specificity of 92%.

  8. Radionuclide angiography: as diagnostic method for Wilms' tumor with direct extension into the heart.

    PubMed

    Avila Ramírez, E; Martínez Guerra, G

    1982-01-01

    Radioisotope angiography may be used as an initial study in Wilms' tumor. We report a patient who had a total nephrectomy but then had severe cardiovascular complications. These led to open heart surgery and removal of a tumor lodged in the right atrium. Radioisotope angiography, performed two weeks earlier, showed a "cold" image on the anterior wall of the right ventricle. This finding was later confirmed by other studies and finally at the time of a second operation. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the different methods employed in this case, to emphasize the risks attributed to each, and finally to suggest the use of non-invasive studies such as radioisotope angiography as a practical method of study in infancy.

  9. Celiac Axis, Common Hepatic and Hepatic Artery Variants as Evidenced on MDCT Angiography in South Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction With the increase in the hepatobiliary, pancreatic surgeries and liver transplantation, being aware of the anatomic variations of the celiac axis and the hepatic arteries is of paramount importance. Aim To illustrate the normal anatomy and variants of the celiac axis and the hepatic arteries with multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography in South Indian population and determine the potential variations in the celiac axis anatomy and the hepatic arteries, thus assisting the hepatobiliary surgeon and the interventional radiologist in avoiding iatrogenic injury to the arteries. Materials and Methods Two hundred patients undergoing abdominal CT angiography from July 2014 till July 2015 were retrospectively studied for hepatic arterial and celiac axis anatomical variation. The anatomic variations in our study were correlated with other studies. Results The celiac axis (CA) and the hepatic artery (HA) variations were analysed as per criteria laid by Song et al., and Michel. Out of 15 possible CA variations, 5 types of celiac artery variations were seen in 14 patients. A normal CA was seen in 179(89.5%) patients of the 200 patients. In the remaining 7 patients, the CA anatomy was classified as ambiguous since there was separate origin of the right and left hepatic arteries from the CA with absent common hepatic artery (CHA). The CHA originated normally from the celiac axis in 94% of the cases. Variation of CHA origin was seen in 5 patients. Normal HA anatomy was seen in 114 (57%) patients. Variation in HA anatomy was seen in 86 (43%) patients. Origin of the right hepatic artery (RHA) from the hepatic artery proper was seen in 182 (91%) patients and replaced origin of RHA from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was seen in 18 (9%) of the cases. Accessory RHA was seen in 7(3.5%) patients. The left hepatic artery (LHA) originated from the hepatic artery proper in 186 (93%) patients and replaced origin of LHA from the left gastric artery (LGA) was

  10. Hepatic metastases of hemangiopericytoma: contrast-enhanced MRI, contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and angiography findings

    PubMed Central

    Aliberti, Camillo; Benea, Giorgio; Kopf, Barbara; De Giorgi, Ugo

    2006-01-01

    Hemangiopericytoma is a rare and characteristically hypervascular tumour. We report a case of hepatic metastases of hemangiopericytoma for which there was correlative imaging by ultrasonography, ultrasonography with second-generation contrast agent (BR1), computed tomography, gadolinium-enhanced, Gd-BOPTA-enhanced and ferumoxides-enhanced magnetic resonance, and angiography. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case in which all these modalities were used in the diagnostic evaluation. PMID:16766270

  11. Angiography of Hepatic Vascular Malformations Associated with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Manabu Tate, Etuko; Nishii, Toshiaki; Watarai, Jiro; Shioya, Takanobu; White, Robert I.

    2003-04-15

    Purpose: To describe the angiographic features of hepatic involvement in hereditary hemorrhagictelangiectasia (HHT), particularly the presence of portovenous shunts. Methods: We reviewed the angiographic findings of seven patients with HHT. The patients comprised three women and four men with a mean age of 51 years. Results: Intrahepatictelangiectasias were found in all seven patients and shunts between three vascular channels were found in six of seven patients. In the four patients who had portovenous shunts combined with arterioportal shunts, the portovenous shunts were large. Three patients had noportovenous shunts. Two of these patients had arteriovenous shunts, and one had no shunt. The mean age (69 years) of the patients with portovenous shunts was older than those without portovenous shunts (26 years). Conclusions: Hepatic vascular lesions in HHT are varied, ranging from telangiectasias to large shunts between three vascular channels. In an advanced stage of involvement, large portovenous shunts are present.

  12. Radionuclide angiography in congenitally corrected transposition of the great vessels in an adult.

    PubMed

    Gal, R; Port, S C

    1987-01-01

    The case of a 34-yr-old man with congenitally corrected transposition of the great vessels is described. Both first-pass and equilibrium radionuclide angiographic data were acquired and demonstrate the value of both studies in delineating the ventricular inversion and the transposed great vessels that are characteristic of this disorder. In addition to the anatomic information, the ejection fractions of the venous and systemic ventricles at rest and during exercise, the lack of any left to right shunt, and the presence of systemic A-V valve insufficiency can all be obtained from the scintigraphic data.

  13. Evaluation of asymmetries of blood flow rate and of circulation time by intravenous radionuclide cerebral angiography in patients with ischemic completed stroke.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, A; Primavera, A; Gasparetto, B

    1984-12-01

    155 patients with ischemic completed stroke of varying severity and outcome have been evaluated by radionuclide cerebral angiography with analysis of regional time-activity curves. Two parameters have been evaluated: area under the upslope of the curve (Aup) reflecting regional blood flow rate and moment of the whole curve reflecting tracer circulation time (rABCT) Combination of these two methods ensured increased detection of perfusion asymmetries.

  14. Radionuclide angiography and blood pool imaging to assess skin ulcer healing prognosis in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Alazraki, N.; Lawrence, P.F.; Syverud, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Several non-invasive diagnostic techniques including segmental limb blood pressures, skin fluoresence, and photo plethysmography, have been evaluated as predictors of skin ulcer healing in patients with peripheral vascular disease, but none are widely used. Using 20mCi of Tc-99m phosphate compounds, four phase bone scans were obtained, including (1) radionuclide angiogram (2) blood pool image (3) 2 hour and 4-6 hour static images and (4) 24 hour static delayed images. The first two phases were used to assess vacularity to the region of distal extremity ulceration; the last two phases evaluated presence or absence of osteomyelitis. Studies were performed in 30 patients with non-healing ulcers of the lower extremities. Perfusion to the regions of ulceration on images was graded as normal, increased, or reduced with respect to the opposite (presumed normal) limb or some other normal reference area. Hypervascular response was interpreted as good prognosis for healing unless osteomyelitis was present. Clinicians followed patients for 14 days to assess limb healing with optimum care. If there was no improvement, angiography and/or surgery (reconstructive surgery, sympathectomy, or amputation) was done. Results showed: sensitivity for predicting ulcer healing was 94%, specificity 89%. Patients who failed to heal their ulcers showed reduced perfusion, no hypervascular response, or osteomyelitis. Microcirculatory adequacy for ulcer healing appear predictable by this technique.

  15. Reproducibility of ejection-fraction determinations by equilibrium radionuclide angiography in response to supine bicycle exercise: concise communication.

    PubMed

    Pfisterer, M E; Battler, A; Swanson, S M; Slutsky, R; Froelicher, V; Ashburn, W L

    1979-06-01

    Sixteen patients with stable, chronic coronary artery disease were studied twice within and average of 15 days to evaluate the reproducibility of ejection fraction (EF) determined by equilibrium radionuclide angiography (EQ) at rest, during supine bicycle exercise (ex), and in the recovery period (rec). Following injection of 20--25 mCi of Tc-99m-tagged human serum albumin, data were analyzed for 2-min periods at rest, during several stages of exercise (submax, max), and during recovery (rec1 = minutes 2 + 3, rec2 = minutes 9 + 10). Each patient reached similar (heart rate) X (blood pressure) products in the two studies: 21280 +/- 5200 compared with 20390 +/- 4140 mmHg/min. Mean EFs for the first and second studies were: at rest (53.0 +/- 10.8)%, 52.5 +/- 10.4)% (r = 0.95; submax ex (51.4 +/- 12.0)%, (52.1 +/- 12.8)%, (r = 0.91); max ex (50.6 +/- 12.6)%, (51.6 +/- 12.9)% (r = 0.97); rec1 (62.7 +/- 11.6)%, (62.4 +/- 12.2)% (r = 0.95); rec2 (55.5 %/- 10.8)%, (57.2 +/- 11.7)% (r = 0.91). In stable patients, the reproducibility of EF determined by EQ is excellent during rest, supine bicycle exercise, and recovery from exercise.

  16. Induced renal artery stenosis in rabbits: magnetic resonance imaging, angiography, and radionuclide determination of blood volume and blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, D.G.; Tobin, M.; LeVeen, R.; Tomaczewski, J.; Alavi, A.; Staum, M.; Kundel, H.

    1988-03-01

    To investigate the ability of MRI to detect alterations due to renal ischemia, a rabbit renal artery stenosis (RAS) model was developed. Seven rabbits had RAS induced by surgically encircling the artery with a polyethylene band which had a lumen of 1 mm, 1 to 2 weeks prior to imaging. The stenosis was confirmed by angiography, and the rabbits were then imaged in a 1.4 T research MRI unit. T1 was calculated using four inversion recovery sequences with different inversion times. Renal blood flow, using /sup 113/Sn-microspheres, and regional water content by drying were then measured. The average T1 of the inner medulla was shorter for the ischemia (1574 msec) than for the contralateral kidney (1849 msec), while no change ws noted in the cortex. Ischemic kidneys had less distinct outer medullary zones on IR images with TI = 600 msec than did contralateral or control kidneys. Blood flow to both the cortex and medulla were markedly reduced in ischemic kidneys compared with contralateral kidneys (119.5 vs. 391 ml/min/100 gm for cortex and 19.8 vs. 50.8 ml/min/100 gm for medulla). Renal water and blood content were less affected. Our rabbit model of renal artery stenosis with MRI, radionuclide, and angiographic correlation has the potential to increase our understanding of MR imaging of the rabbit kidney.

  17. Radionuclide angiography and endomyocardial biopsy in the assessment of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Druck, M N; Gulenchyn, K Y; Evans, W K; Gotlieb, A; Srigley, J R; Bar-Shlomo, B Z; Feiglin, D H; McEwan, P; Silver, M D; Millband, L

    1984-04-15

    Thirty-eight patients with a mean age of 53.2 years (19 to 75 years of age), who were receiving doxorubicin (D) for malignant disease, were studied in order to determine the relationship between functional and morphologic myocardial changes at different dose levels. Serial patient evaluations included physical examination, chest x-ray, electrocardiogram (ECG), endomyocardial biopsy (EMB), and rest-exercise gated nuclear angiography (GNA), at doses of D ranging from 144 to 954 mg/m2 (mean, 426 mg/m2). Physical examination, chest x-ray, and ECG proved to be insensitive predictors of D cardiotoxicity. Correlation of GNA and EMB in 31 patient evaluations, exclusive of known heart disease, did not reveal any false-positive angiograms, and all abnormal GNAs were associated with abnormal biopsies. Use of stress GNA uncovered six abnormal ventricles which could have been missed with a rest GNA alone. It has been suggested that: (1) GNA is a reliable monitor of D therapy; (2) an exercise study should be performed when the rest ejection fraction is normal, but is unnecessary when the rest EF is abnormal; (3) all patients with a resting ejection fraction of less than 45%, exclusive of other cardiac disease, should have D discontinued; and (4) endomyocardial biopsy is useful in assessing D cardiotoxicity in patients with other possible causes of an abnormal GNA.

  18. System identification and compartmental analysis of left heart by first-pass radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, E.C.

    1985-05-01

    This project was undertaken to develop a rigorous method to quantitate valvular regurgitation and other hemodynamic parameters and to evaluate its clinical applicability. First-pass pulmonary time-activity curves were used as system input functions and left ventricular curves as output functions of differential equations describing both 1 and 2 compartment systems. The 2 models were applied in 34 patients (PTS): 16 with mitral regurgitation and 18 without regurgitation. The one and 2 compartment models gave similar forward ejection fraction values (r=.89 with similar means). The 2 compartment model yielded RF of 6 +- 8% in PTS without regurgitation vs. 39 +- 22% in PTS with regurgitation (p<.01). RF correlated well with the severity of regurgitation by contrast angiography. These identification methods provide a new approach to the determination of regurgitant fraction and other hemodynamic parameters, yielding results that correlate well with other clinical and angiographic findings and that also supplement and extend the results of gated cardiac imaging. The 1 and 2 compartment models yield complimentary results.

  19. Impact of Multislice CT Angiography on Planning of Radiological Catheter Placement for Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sone, Miyuki Kato, Kenichi; Hirose, Atsuo; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Tomabechi, Makiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Hanari, Takao

    2008-01-15

    The objective of this study was to assess prospectively the role of multislice CT angiography (MSCTA) on planning of radiological catheter placement for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC). Forty-six patients with malignant liver tumors planned for HAIC were included. In each patient, both MSCTA and intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were performed, except one patient who did not undergo DSA. Comparison of MSCTA and DSA images was performed for the remaining 45 patients. Detectability of anatomical variants of the hepatic artery, course of the celiac trunk, visualization scores of arterial branches and interobserver agreement, presence of arterial stenosis, and technical outcome were evaluated. Anatomical variations of the hepatic artery were detected in 19 of 45 patients (42%) on both modalities. The course of the celiac trunk was different in 12 patients. The visualization scores of celiac arterial branches on MSCTA/DSA were 3.0 {+-} 0/2.9 {+-} 0.2 in the celiac trunk, 3.0 {+-} 0/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the common hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.2/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the proper hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.3/2.9 {+-} 0.4 in the right hepatic artery, 2.8 {+-} 0.4/2.9 {+-} 0.4 in the left hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.2/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the gastroduodenal artery, 2.1 {+-} 0.8/2.2 {+-} 0.9 in the right gastric artery, and 2.7 {+-} 0.8/2.6 {+-} 0.8 in the left gastric artery. No statistically significant differences exist between the two modalities. Interobserver agreement for MSCTA was equivalent to that for DSA. Two patients showed stenosis of the celiac trunk on both modalities. Based on these imaging findings, technical success was accomplished in all patients. In conclusion, MSCTA is accurate in assessing arterial anatomy and abnormalities. MSCTA can provide adequate information for planning of radiological catheter placement for HAIC.

  20. Impact of multislice CT angiography on planning of radiological catheter placement for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sone, Miyuki; Kato, Kenichi; Hirose, Atsuo; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Tomabechi, Makiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Hanari, Takao

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess prospectively the role of multislice CT angiography (MSCTA) on planning of radiological catheter placement for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC). Forty-six patients with malignant liver tumors planned for HAIC were included. In each patient, both MSCTA and intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were performed, except one patient who did not undergo DSA. Comparison of MSCTA and DSA images was performed for the remaining 45 patients. Detectability of anatomical variants of the hepatic artery, course of the celiac trunk, visualization scores of arterial branches and interobserver agreement, presence of arterial stenosis, and technical outcome were evaluated. Anatomical variations of the hepatic artery were detected in 19 of 45 patients (42%) on both modalities. The course of the celiac trunk was different in 12 patients. The visualization scores of celiac arterial branches on MSCTA/DSA were 3.0 +/- 0/2.9 +/- 0.2 in the celiac trunk, 3.0 +/- 0/2.9 +/- 0.3 in the common hepatic artery, 2.9 +/- 0.2/2.9 +/- 0.3 in the proper hepatic artery, 2.9 +/- 0.3/2.9 +/- 0.4 in the right hepatic artery, 2.8 +/- 0.4/2.9 +/- 0.4 in the left hepatic artery, 2.9 +/- 0.2/2.9 +/- 0.3 in the gastroduodenal artery, 2.1 +/- 0.8/2.2 +/- 0.9 in the right gastric artery, and 2.7 +/- 0.8/2.6 +/- 0.8 in the left gastric artery. No statistically significant differences exist between the two modalities. Interobserver agreement for MSCTA was equivalent to that for DSA. Two patients showed stenosis of the celiac trunk on both modalities. Based on these imaging findings, technical success was accomplished in all patients. In conclusion, MSCTA is accurate in assessing arterial anatomy and abnormalities. MSCTA can provide adequate information for planning of radiological catheter placement for HAIC.

  1. Preoperative dual-phase 3D CT angiography assessment of the right hepatic artery before gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Keishi; Sakuramoto, Shinichi; Mieno, Hiroaki; Shibata, Tomotaka; Nemoto, Masayuki; Katada, Natsuya; Kikuchi, Shiro; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2014-10-01

    In the current study, we evaluated the efficacy of dual-phase three-dimensional (3D) CT angiography (CTA) in the assessment of the vascular anatomy, especially the right hepatic artery (RHA), before gastrectomy. The study initially included 714 consecutive patients being treated for gastric cancer. A dual-phase contrast-enhanced CT scan using 32-multi detector-row CT was performed for all patients. Among the 714 patients, 3D CTA clearly identified anomalies with the RHA arising from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) in 49 cases (6.9 %). In Michels' classification type IX, the common hepatic artery (CHA) originates only from the SMA. Such cases exhibit defective anatomy for the CHA in conjunction with the celiac-splenic artery system, resulting in direct exposure of the portal vein beneath the #8a lymph node station, which was retrospectively confirmed by video in laparoscopic gastrectomy cases. Fused images of both 3D angiography and venography were obtained, and could have predicted the risk preoperatively, and the surgical finding confirmed its usefulness. Preoperative evaluations using 3D CTA can provide more accurate information about the vessel anatomy. The fused images from 3D CTA have the potential to reduce the intraoperative risks for injuries to critical vessel, such as the portal vein, during gastrectomy.

  2. Serial measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction by radionuclide angiography early and late after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Schelbert, H R; Henning, H; Ashburn, W L; Verba, J W; Karliner, J S; O'Rourke, R A

    1976-10-01

    The left ventricular ejection fraction was determined serially with radioisotope angiography in 63 patients with acute myocardial infarction. After the peripheral injection of a bolus of technetium-99m, precordial radioactivity was recorded with a gamma scintillation camera and the ejection fraction calculated from the high frequency left ventricular time-activity curve. Since this technique requires no assumptions with respect to left ventricular geometry, it is particularly useful in patients with segmental left ventricular dysfunction. Serial measurements during the first 5 days after hospital admission were made in 50 patients, 30 of whom were studied during the subsequent 2 to 39 months (mean 19.9 months). Late follow-up serial studies were also performed in an additional 13 patients who had only one measurement of the left ventricular ejection fraction during the early postinfarction period. Early after infarction, the left ventricular ejection fraction was normal (more than 0.52) in only 15 of the 63 patients, and averaged 0.52 +/- 0.05 (standard deviation) in the 27 patients with an uncomplicated infarct. The ejection fraction was reduced in 24 patients with mild to moderate left ventricular failure (0.40 +/- 0.05, P less than 0.0001) and in the 12 patients with overt pulmonary edema (0.33 +/- 0.07, P less than 0.0001). In 35 patients the ejection fraction correlated with the mean pulmonary arterial wedge pressure (r = 0.72). In 15 patients with normal left ventricular wall motion by heart motion videotracking, the ejection fraction was significantly higher (0.53 +/- 0.08) than in the 26 patients with regional left ventricular dysfunction (0.41 +/- 0.10, P less than 0.0001). During the early postinfarction period, the left ventricular ejection fraction improved in 55 percent of patients and remained unchanged or decreased in 45 percent. A further increase in the ejection fraction was noted in 61 percent of patients during the late follow-up period. Patients

  3. Estimation of brain perfusion using Va value as initial distribution volume in radionuclide angiography with technetium-99m HMPAO

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamoto, M.; Ikegami, T.

    1994-05-01

    Matsuda reported a non-invasive, simple method for the quantitative measurements of brain perfusion using radionuclide angiography with Tc-99m. HMPAO and showed graphical analysis of the ratio of brain activity to aortic arch activity gave two parameters, which are the slope of the fitted line (Ku:unidirectional influx constant) and its intercept with the yards (Vn:initial volume of distribution). Brain perfusion index (BPI),which is a connected Ku value, showed good correlation with cerebral blood flow determined with Xe-133 SPECT. The aim of our study is to elucidate the clinical significance of another parameter, Vn value, determined inpatients with cerebral vessel disease. Eighty-nine cases were studied and classified into three groups on the basis of clinical history and images of CT and/or MR: Group A, normal, 36 cases; Group B, infarction, 44 cases; Group C, subarachnoid hemorrhage, 9 cases. The average age of each group were not different statistically (63.3, 67.4 and 59.8, respectively). The average BPI values for group B and C were significantly lower than that of group A(7.7, 6. 8 and 9.5, respectively ). On the other hand, Vn for group C(0.23) was significantly lower than that for group A(0.45); however that for group B(0.49) was not. These findings indicate that cerebral blood flow in both infarction and subarachnoid hemorrhage decrease but their circumstances near vessels differ from the aspect of initial volume of tracer distribution. This might help to understand or diagnose cerebral vessel diseases.

  4. Left ventricular volumes during exercise in normal subjects and patients with dilated cardiomyopathy assessed by first-pass radionuclide angiography.

    PubMed

    Tomai, F; Ciavolella, M; Crea, F; Gaspardone, A; Versaci, F; Giannitti, C; Scali, D; Chiariello, L; Gioffrè, P A

    1993-11-15

    During isotonic exercise, left ventricular (LV) suction and the Frank-Starling law of the heart may have important roles in the enhancement of early LV diastolic filling and in the increase of myocardial contractility, respectively. It remains controversial whether these mechanisms operate in normal subjects or patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Ten healthy subjects and 10 patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy who underwent maximal upright bicycle exercise testing were studied. First-pass radionuclide angiography was performed at both rest and peak exercise using a multicrystal gamma camera. In normal subjects, LV end-systolic volume at peak exercise was smaller than during baseline (17 +/- 7 vs 30 +/- 15 ml/m2; p < 0.05), whereas rapid filling volume was greater (52 +/- 16 vs 38 +/- 8 ml/m2; p < 0.01). In patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, both end-systolic (108 +/- 34 to 123 +/- 53 ml/m2; p = NS) and rapid filling (24 +/- 6 to 28 +/- 9 ml/m2; p = NS) volumes did not change from rest to peak exercise. A significant correlation was found between the changes in end-systolic volume at peak exercise and in peak rapid filling rate in normal subjects (r = 0.6; p < 0.05), but not in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (r = 0.3; p = NS). In normal subjects, end-diastolic volume at peak exercise was similar to that during baseline (78 +/- 14 and 85 +/- 15 ml/m2, respectively; p = NS), whereas in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, it was greater (164 +/- 50 vs 146 +/- 33 ml/m2; p < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Peak exercise left ventricular performance in normal subjects and in athletes assessed by first-pass radionuclide angiography.

    PubMed

    Tomai, F; Ciavolella, M; Gaspardone, A; De Fazio, A; Basso, E G; Giannitti, C; Scali, D; Versaci, F; Crea, F; Gioffrè, P A

    1992-08-15

    The role of Frank-Starling law of the heart in determining the increase in cardiac output during exercise in humans is still controversial (e.g., the mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of left ventricular [LV] filling during the shortened diastolic interval). Ten weight lifters, 12 swimmers and 12 sedentary subjects who underwent maximal upright bicycle exercise testing were studied. First-pass radionuclide angiography was performed both at rest and at peak exercise using a multicrystal gamma camera. Compared with resting values, heart rate and cardiac index at peak exercise increased by 101 +/- 16 beats/min (p less than 0.001) and 6.7 +/- 2.8 liters/min/m2 (p less than 0.001) in weight lifters, by 96 +/- 9 beats/min (p less than 0.001) and 9.5 +/- 2 liters/min/m2 (p less than 0.001) in swimmers, and by 103 +/- 9 beats/min (p less than 0.001) and 7.3 +/- 1.8 liters/min/m2 (p less than 0.001) in sedentary subjects. Stroke volume increased by 20.5 +/- 9.8 ml/m2 (p less than 0.001) in swimmers only. End-diastolic volume at peak exercise did not change in weight lifters and in swimmers; it decreased by 8.2 +/- 8.6 ml/m2 (p less than 0.01) in sedentary subjects. A significant correlation was found between the decrease in end-systolic volume and the increase in peak rapid filling rate at peak exercise in all 3 groups (r = 0.65, p less than 0.05 in weight lifters; r = 0.59, p less than 0.05 in swimmers; r = 0.67, p less than 0.05 in sedentary subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Assessment of early ventricular systole by first pass radionuclide angiography: useful method for detection of left ventricular dysfunction at rest in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Slutsky, R; Gordon, D; Karliner, J; Battler, A; Walaski, S; Verba, J; Pfisterer, M; Peterson, K; Ashburn, W

    1979-09-01

    To identify abnormal left ventricular function without exercise stress in patients with coronary artery disease first-pass radionuclide angiograms were analyzed in 32 normal subjects (Group I); 31 patients with coronary disease and normal contrast ventriculograms (Group II); and 17 patients with coronary disease and depressed left ventricular function (Group III). Total ejection fraction (EF) was computed with standard angiographic methods and from each time-activity curve. During the first third of systole, ejection fraction was determined manually by averaging three to five beats and the value compared with that obtained with contrast ventriculography: (Formula: see text). Both total radionuclide ejection fraction (r = 0.95) and first-third ejection fraction (r = 0.91) correlated well with angiography. Intraobserver and interobserver variation was small, averaging 0.02 +/- 0.02 (range 0 to 0.05). The radionuclide first-third ejection fraction was 0.25 or greater in normal subjects and less than 0.25 in 29 of 31 patients (94 percent) in Group II and in all patients in Group III. It is concluded that the first-third ejection fraction obtained with first pass angiography identifies subtle abnormalities of left ventricular function at rest in more than 90 percent of patients with coronary disease that may not be recognized by total ejection fraction alone.

  7. Value of non-contrast sequences in magnetic resonance angiography of hepatic arterial vasculature.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Vivek B; Gilbert, John W; Krishnamoorthy, Saravanan; Cornfeld, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate value of adding non-contrast MR angiographic sequence (In-Flow Inversion Recovery [IFIR]) to standard fat-suppressed T1-weighted postcontrast sequence (3D spoiled gradient echo [3D-GRE]) for evaluating hepatic arterial anatomy. Retrospective evaluation of 30 consecutive patients undergoing multiphase liver MRI. Individual vessels for IFIR/3D-GRE sequences were evaluated by two blinded readers using a four-point scale. Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for vessel conspicuity between IFIR/3D-GRE sequences. IFIR alone diagnostically imaged 8.1% of vessels, 3D-GRE alone 25.8%, 55.8% by both 3D-GRE/IFIR, and 10.3% of vessels by neither. Two patients with variant vascular anatomy were visualized with both sequences. Addition of IFIR to 3D-GRE resulted in statistically significant increase in arterial visualization (p<0.001), 10% relative increase in identified vessels, and 3-5 mi increase in acquisition time for total scan time of 30-35 min. IFIR may be a useful adjunct to 3D-GRE in hepatic angiography without adding considerably to scan time. 10% more hepatic arteries were seen when combining information from IFIR/3D-GRE vs. 3D-GRE alone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography Versus Radionuclide Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Patients With Chest Pain Admitted to Telemetry: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Levsky, Jeffrey M; Spevack, Daniel M; Travin, Mark I; Menegus, Mark A; Huang, Paul W; Clark, Elana T; Kim, Choo-Won; Hirschhorn, Esther; Freeman, Katherine D; Tobin, Jonathan N; Haramati, Linda B

    2015-08-04

    The role of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in the management of symptomatic patients suspected of having coronary artery disease is expanding. However, prospective intermediate-term outcomes are lacking. To compare CCTA with conventional noninvasive testing. Randomized, controlled comparative effectiveness trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00705458). Telemetry-monitored wards of an inner-city medical center. 400 patients with acute chest pain (mean age, 57 years); 63% women; 54% Hispanic and 37% African-American; and low socioeconomic status. CCTA or radionuclide stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). The primary outcome was cardiac catheterization not leading to revascularization within 1 year. Secondary outcomes included length of stay, resource utilization, and patient experience. Safety outcomes included death, major cardiovascular events, and radiation exposure. Thirty (15%) patients who had CCTA and 32 (16%) who had MPI underwent cardiac catheterization within 1 year. Fifteen (7.5%) and 20 (10%) of these patients, respectively, did not undergo revascularization (difference, -2.5 percentage points [95% CI, -8.6 to 3.5 percentage points]; hazard ratio, 0.77 [CI, 0.40 to 1.49]; P = 0.44). Median length of stay was 28.9 hours for the CCTA group and 30.4 hours for the MPI group (P = 0.057). Median follow-up was 40.4 months. For the CCTA and MPI groups, the incidence of death (0.5% versus 3%; P = 0.12), nonfatal cardiovascular events (4.5% versus 4.5%), rehospitalization (43% versus 49%), emergency department visit (63% versus 58%), and outpatient cardiology visit (23% versus 21%) did not differ. Long-term, all-cause radiation exposure was lower for the CCTA group (24 versus 29 mSv; P < 0.001). More patients in the CCTA group graded their experience favorably (P = 0.001) and would undergo the examination again (P = 0.003). This was a single-site study, and the primary outcome depended on clinical management decisions. The CCTA and MPI groups did

  9. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the celiac trunk and hepatic arterial system: normal anatomy and main variants *

    PubMed Central

    Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; de Mello Júnior, Carlos Fernando; Franca, Henrique Almeida; Duarte, Cláudia Martina Araújo; Borges, Rafael Farias; de Magalhães, Ana Guardiana Ximenes

    2016-01-01

    Although digital angiography remains as the gold standard for imaging the celiac arterial trunk and hepatic arteries, multidetector computed tomography in association with digital images processing by software resources represents a useful tool particularly attractive for its non invasiveness. Knowledge of normal anatomy as well as of its variations is helpful in images interpretation and to address surgical planning on a case-by-case basis. The present essay illustrates several types of anatomical variations of celiac trunk, hepatic artery and its main branches, by means of digitally reconstructed computed tomography images, correlating their prevalence in the population with surgical implications. PMID:26929461

  10. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the celiac trunk and hepatic arterial system: normal anatomy and main variants.

    PubMed

    Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; de Mello Júnior, Carlos Fernando; Franca, Henrique Almeida; Duarte, Cláudia Martina Araújo; Borges, Rafael Farias; de Magalhães, Ana Guardiana Ximenes

    2016-01-01

    Although digital angiography remains as the gold standard for imaging the celiac arterial trunk and hepatic arteries, multidetector computed tomography in association with digital images processing by software resources represents a useful tool particularly attractive for its non invasiveness. Knowledge of normal anatomy as well as of its variations is helpful in images interpretation and to address surgical planning on a case-by-case basis. The present essay illustrates several types of anatomical variations of celiac trunk, hepatic artery and its main branches, by means of digitally reconstructed computed tomography images, correlating their prevalence in the population with surgical implications.

  11. Implications of Discordant Findings Between Hepatic Angiography and Cross-Sectional Imaging in Transplant Candidates With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Young, Kellie; Fidelman, Nicholas; Yao, Francis Y.; Hills, Nancy K.; Kohi, Maureen P.; Kolli, K. Pallav; Taylor, Andrew G.; Kerlan, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether the detection of discordant numbers of hypervascular foci at hepatic angiography versus contrast-enhanced (CE) cross-sectional imaging [computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] is associated with adverse clinical outcomes in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who are listed for liver transplantation. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 218 consecutive patients with HCC who were listed for a liver transplant and who underwent transarterial chemoembolization at our institution between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2010. Patients were grouped into 3 categories: (1) the number of nodules at CT/MRI was concordant with the number of hypervascular foci detected at angiography (n = 136), (2) the number of nodules at CT/MRI was greater than the number of hypervascular foci at angiography (n = 45), and (3) the number of nodules at CT/MRI was fewer than the number of hypervascular foci at angiography (n = 37). The study outcomes were liver transplantation and tumor recurrence after transplantation. The detection of at least 3 more hypervascular foci at angiography versus the number of HCC nodules on CT/MRI was associated with a significantly lower rate of transplantation [multivariate subhazard ratio (SHR), 0.39; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.17–0.92]. The detection of fewer hypervascular foci at angiography versus the number of HCC nodules on CT/MRI was associated with a significantly higher rate of tumor recurrence after transplantation (multivariate SHR, 3.49; 95% CI, 1.27–9.56). In conclusion, liver transplant candidates with HCC who demonstrate discordant findings between angiography and CE CT or MRI may be at a higher risk for dropout from the transplant list and for tumor recurrence after transplantation. PMID:25678220

  12. Evaluation of left ventricular function by radionuclide angiography during exercise in normal subjects and in patients with chronic coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Iskandrian, A S; Hakki, A H; DePace, N L; Manno, B; Segal, B L

    1983-06-01

    Radionuclide angiography permits evaluation of left ventricular performance during exercise. There are several factors that may affect the results in normal subjects and in patients with chronic coronary heart disease. Important among these are the selection criteria: age, sex, level of exercise, exercise end points, ejection fraction at rest and effects of pharmacologic agents. An abnormal ejection fraction response to exercise is not a specific marker for coronary heart disease but may be encountered in other cardiac diseases. In addition to the diagnostic considerations, important prognostic data can be obtained. Further studies are needed to determine the prognostic implications of anatomic findings versus the functional abnormalities induced by exercise in patients with coronary artery disease.

  13. Indirect Radionuclide Coronary Angiography to Evaluate Gradients of Myocardial Blood Flow and Flow Reserve Through Coronary Stenosis Using N-13 Ammonia PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Sik; Cho, Sang-Geon; Kim, Ju Han; Bom, Hee-Seung

    2013-08-01

    Although quantitative evaluation of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) has been perceived as an attractive advantage of positron emission tomography (PET) over other cardiac imaging technologies, application of the information to specific coronary lesions is a difficult task for nuclear cardiologists. We hypothesized that changes in MBF and MFR over a coronary lesion could be identified by use of a hybrid technology of CT coronary angiography (CTCA) and N-13 ammonia PET. To evaluate this hypothesis, we measured the gradient of MBF and MFR through coronary stenosis in seven patients (M:F=3:4, median age 56 years) with coronary artery disease who underwent N-13 ammonia PET, CTCA, and interventional coronary angiography. Two patients had proximal left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery disease and five patients had mid to distal LAD disease. Mean global stress and rest MBF were 2.62±0.58 and 1.03±0.19 ml/min/g, respectively. Mean global MFR was 2.6±0.73. Regional stress and rest MBF in the LAD territory were 2.36±0.75 and 0.96±0.21 ml/min/g, respectively. Regional MFR in the LAD territory was 2.55±0.83 ml/min/g. Stress MBF changed dramatically according to the location of coronary stenosis. It dropped acutely in proximal lesions, whereas it diminished gradually in mid to distal lesions. In conclusion, by use of a hybrid technology of CTCA and PET, it was feasible to make a direct correlation of coronary lesions with the gradient of MFR and CFR through coronary stenosis, which indicated the severity of the coronary lesion. We named this technique indirect radionuclide coronary angiography.

  14. Uncommon scintigraphic findings of multiple hepatic hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    el-Desouki, M.; Joharjy, I.A.; al-Muzrakchi, A.M.; Bashi, S.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Tc-99m labeled red blood cell scintigraphy is a valuable, noninvasive technique for differentiating hepatic hemangioma from other lesions by demonstrating a 'perfusion blood pool mismatch.' The characteristic finding on dynamic CT scan of peripheral and subsequent central enhancement is not usually seen on Tc-99m RBC angiography, probably due to rapid mixing and dilution of the radionuclide and low resolution of the gamma camera. A case of multiple hepatic hemangioma is presented in which Tc-99m RBC dynamic angiography demonstrated peripheral enhancement with subsequent central filling. In addition, delayed static images showed more hepatic lesions.

  15. Angiography and the gastrointestinal bleeder

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, S.

    1982-05-01

    The role of angiography in the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage is discussed. Three categories of gastrointestinal bleeding are considered: upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastroesophageal varices, upper gastrointestinal bleeding of arterial or capillary origin, and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The advantages and disadvantages of angiography are compared with those of radionuclide scanning and endoscopy or colonoscopy. It is anticipated that, as radionuclide scans are more widely employed, angiography will eventually be performed only in those patients with positive scans.

  16. Anatomical variation of celiac axis, superior mesenteric artery, and hepatic artery: Evaluation with multidetector computed tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Farghadani, Maryam; Momeni, Mohammad; Hekmatnia, Ali; Momeni, Fateme; Baradaran Mahdavi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The celiac axis, superior mesenteric artery (SMA), and hepatic artery are the most important branches of abdominal aorta due to their vascularization field. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of different anatomical variation of celiac axis, SMA, hepatic artery, and its branches with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography of upper abdomen arteries. Materials and Methods: MDCT of 607 kidney donor and traumatic patients that referred to MDCT unit at Al Zahra Hospital in Isfahan from 2012 to 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. We excluded patients with history of abdominal vascular surgery and hepatic or pancreatic surgery. Computed tomography images of the patient were obtained with 64-row MDCT scanner and anatomical variations were analyzed. Results: Three hundred and eighty-eight (63.9%) of the 607 patients had classic arterial anatomy and 219 (36.1%) patients had variant types. The most common type of variation was the origin of the right hepatic artery (RHA) from SMA (9.6%), and the next common variation was the origin of the left hepatic artery (LHA) from the left gastric artery (6.9%). Variations in the origin of the common hepatic artery (CHA) were seen in 16 (2.6%) patients. Buhler arc was identified in two patients. The RHA originated from the celiac axis in 11 (1.8%) patients and from the aorta in 8 (1.3%) patients. Trifurcation of CHA into gastroduodenal artery, RHA, and LHA was detected in 11 (1.8%) patients. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that anatomical variation occurs in a high percentage of patients. Detection of these variations can guide surgical and radiological interventional planning.

  17. Influence of different background and left-ventricular assignments on the ejection fraction in equilibrium radionuclide angiography.

    PubMed

    Slutsky, R; Pfisterer, M; Verba, J; Battler, A; Ashburn, W

    1980-06-01

    Seventy-six patients were studied within one week of contrast ventriculography to assess the influence of differing background assignments on ejection fractions derived from gated equilibrium radionuclide anigograms. "Fixed" and "variable" left-ventricular regions on interest and five different backgrounds were used. Inter- and intra-observer variability were determined, and 15 patients underwent a second study 2 weeks later. Variable left-ventricular regions of interest produced higher ejection fractions than fixed ones. A computer-assigned background or a ring drawn manually around the left ventricle correlated best with contrast ventriculography, giving greater serial and inter- and intra-observer variability. Automated background assignments reduced variability and increased reproducibility, though not always associated with the best correlation with contrast ventriculography. Thus a variety of left-ventricular and background regions of interest gives excellent reproducibility and accuracy.

  18. Quantitative radionuclide angiography in assessment of hemodynamic changes during upright exercise: observations in normal subjects, patient with coronary artery disease and patients with aortic regurgitation

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Hakki, A.H.; Kane, S.A.; Segal, B.L.

    1981-08-01

    Quantitative radionuclide angiography was used to evaluate hemodynamic changes in three subject groups during symptom-limited upright exercise. The 12 normal subjects had significant increases in heart rate, stroke volume, left ventricular ejection fraction and cardiac output during exercise; changes in end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were not significant. In the 24 patients with coronary artery disease there were significant increases in heart rate and cardiac output during exercise, but insignificant changes in end-diastolic, end-systolic and stroke volumes and ejection fraction. The change in diastolic volume in these patients was determined by the extent of coronary artery disease, propranolol therapy, end point of exercise and presence of collateral vessels. Furthermore, patients with previous myocardial infarction had a lower ejection fraction and higher end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes during exercise than those without myocardial infarction. In the 12 patients with chronic aortic regurgitation of moderate to severe degree, there was a decrease in the end-diastolic volume during exercise. This response was distinctly different from that of the normal subjects or the patients with coronary artery disease. All three groups had a significant decrease in pulmonary transit time during exercise. It is concluded that changes in cardiac output in normal subjects during upright exercise are related to augmentation of stroke volume and tachycardia, whereas in patients with coronary artery disease they are related mainly to tachycardia.

  19. Effects of resting ischemia assessed by thallium scintigraphy on QRS scoring system for estimating left ventricular function quantified by radionuclide angiography in acute myocardial infarction patients.

    PubMed

    DePace, N L; Hakki, A H; Iskandrian, A S

    1984-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether resting ischemia limits the usefulness of the QRS scoring system in predicting left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) in patients with acute infarction. We studied 48 patients after acute infarction by means of 12-lead ECG, thallium-201 scintigraphy, and radionuclide angiography. The thallium-201 scintigrams showed fixed defects in 25 patients, perfusion defects with partial or complete redistribution in the delayed images in 19 patients, and normal images in the remaining four patients. In the 48 patients there was a significant correlation between the QRS score and LVEF (r = -0.67; p less than 0.001). Patients with fixed defects showed a better correlation than patients with resting ischemia (r = -0.77 vs r = -0.60). A QRS score of 3 or less was used to separate patients with LVEF of 40% or greater from those with lower LVEF in patients with fixed defects (p = 0.0005), but this cutoff did not categorize patients with resting ischemia as to LVEF. Thus the presence of rest ischemia in patients with acute infarction may affect the correlation between QRS score and LVEF.

  20. Relation between coronary anatomy and serial changes in left ventricular function on exercise: a study using first pass radionuclide angiography with gold-195m.

    PubMed Central

    Caplin, J L; Dymond, D S; O'Keefe, J C; Flatman, W D; Dyke, L; Banim, S O; Spurrell, R A

    1986-01-01

    Serial changes in left ventricular function on exercise were assessed by first pass radionuclide angiography with gold-195m (half life 30.5 s) in 25 men with known coronary anatomy. In the seven patients with three vessel disease, abnormalities of global left ventricular function and regional wall motion occurred earlier during exercise, were of greater extent at peak exercise, and persisted longer after exercise than in the 11 patients with one and two vessel disease or the seven with normal coronary arteries. Although there were significant differences between the groups in absolute change in ejection fraction and the rate of change in ejection fraction related to exercise duration and heart rate, a considerable overlap of values between groups precluded the accurate prediction of coronary anatomy in individuals. These data suggest that the amount of myocardium at risk from ischaemia in some patients with one and two vessel disease may resemble that in patients with three vessel disease. This study shows that an anatomical classification based solely on the number of diseased vessels will not predict the extent of the impairment of left ventricular function on exercise. Images Fig. 2 PMID:3942646

  1. Effect of diltiazem on myocardial infarct size estimated by enzyme release, serial thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography and radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zannad, F.; Amor, M.; Karcher, G.; Maurin, P.; Ethevenot, G.; Sebag, C.; Bertrand, A.; Pernot, C.; Gilgenkrantz, J.M.

    1988-06-01

    Diltiazem is a calcium antagonist with demonstrated experimental cardioprotective effects. Its effects on myocardial infarct size were studied in 34 patients admitted within 6 hours after the first symptoms of acute myocardial infarction. These patients were randomized, double-blind to placebo or diltiazem (10-mg intravenous bolus followed by 15 mg/hr intravenous infusion during 72 hours, followed by 4 X 60 mg during 21 days). Myocardial infarct size was assessed by plasma creatine kinase and creatine kinase-MB indexes, perfusion defect scores using single-photon emission computed tomography with thallium-201 and left ventricular ejection fraction measured by radionuclide angiography. Tomographic and angiographic scanning was performed serially before randomization, after 48 hours and 21 days later. Groups were comparable in terms of age, sex, inclusion time and baseline infarct location and size. Results showed no difference in creatine kinase and creatine kinase-MB data between controls and treated patients, a significant decrease in the perfusion defect scores in the diltiazem group (+0.1 +/- 3.0 placebo vs -2.2 +/- 1.9 diltiazem, p less than 0.02) and a better ejection fraction recovery in the diltiazem group (-4.2 +/- 7.4 placebo vs +7.7 +/- 11.2 diltiazem, p less than 0.05). Myocardial infarct size estimates from perfusion defect scores and enzyme data were closely correlated. These preliminary results suggest that diltiazem may reduce ischemic injury in acute myocardial infarction.

  2. Use of multivariate analysis to improve the accuracy of radionuclide angiography with stress in detecting coronary artery disease in men

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, P.S.; Bible, M.; Ellestad, M.H.; Berge, R.; Johnson, K.; Hayes, M.

    1983-01-01

    A multivariate analysis (MVA) system was derived retrospectively from a population of 76 males with coronary artery disease and 18 control subjects. Posterior probabilities were then derived from such a system prospectively in a new male population of 11 subjects with normal coronary arteries and hemodynamics and 63 patients with coronary artery disease. The sensitivity was 84% compared to that for change in ejection fraction (delta EF) greater than or equal to 5 criterion of 71% (p less than 0.01), the specificity was 91% compared to 73% for the delta EF greater than or equal to 5 criterion (p greater than 0.05), and the correct classification rate was 85% compared to 72% for the delta EF greater than or equal to 5 criterion (p less than 0.01). The significant variables were: change in EF with exercise, percent maximal heart rate, change in end-diastolic volume (delta EDV) with exercise, change in R wave, and exercise duration. Application of the multivariate approach to radionuclide imaging with stress, including both exercise and nuclear parameters, significantly improved the diagnostic accuracy of the test and allowed for a probability statement concerning the likelihood of disease.

  3. Radionuclide Ventriculography or Radionuclide Angiography (MUGA Scan)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Heart Attack Treatment of a Heart Attack Life After a Heart Attack Heart Failure About Heart Failure ... Non-invasive - Invasive • Treatment of a Heart Attack • Life After a Heart Attack • Heart Attack Tools & Resources • Support ...

  4. Interventricular delay measurement using equilibrium radionuclide angiography before resynchronization therapy should be performed outside the area of segmental wall motion abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Courtehoux, Maxime; Zannad, Noura; Fauchier, Laurent; Babuty, Dominique; Eder, Veronique

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate that only mechanical dyssynchrony outside the area of segmental wall motion abnormalities (WMA) can be reduced by cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Included in the study were 28 consecutive patients with nonischaemic cardiomyopathy selected for CRT. Equilibrium radionuclide angiography (ERNA) was carried out before and after implantation of a multisite pacemaker. Patients were separated into two groups depending on the presence or absence of segmental WMA. A reduction in QRS duration was observed in all patients after CRT. The interventricular delay (IVD) decreased significantly after CRT only in patients without WMA (homogeneous contraction, HG group; IVD 44 ± 11.4° vs. 17 ± 3.1°, p = 0.04). In contrast, no significant decrease was observed in patients with WMA (WMA group; IVD 51 ± 6° vs. 38 ± 6°, p NS). However, when dyssynchrony was considered outside the WMA area, a significant reduction in IVD was obtained, in the same range as in the HG group (IVD 32 ± 3° vs. 19 ± 3°, p = 0.04). In 9 of 15 patients (60%) with a reduction in IVD after CRT, the left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) increased by about +10%. In contrast, in 13 of 13 patients (100%) with no reduction in IVD, no modification of LVEF was obtained. In the presence of segmental WMA without significant delays outside the WMA area, no reduction in IVD was observed and LVEF did not increase (IVD 34 ± 5° before CRT vs. 37 ± 7° after CRT; LVEF 19 ± 4% before CRT vs. 22 ± 3% after CRT, p NS). ERNA can be used to predict good mechanical resychronization (decrease in IVD) in patients after pacing. IVD has to be determined excluding the area of WMA in order to select patients who will show an increase in their left ventricle function after CRT.

  5. Cerebral angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Carotid angiogram; Cervicocerebral catheter-based angiography; Intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography; IADSA ... with the dye are seen. This is called digital subtraction angiography (DSA). After the x-rays are ...

  6. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for the preoperative evaluation of hepatic vascular anatomy in living liver donors: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xuetao; Wang, Hong; Ma, Qiaozhi; Wu, Chunnan; Ma, Lin

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) when used in the preoperative evaluation of hepatic vascular anatomy in living liver donors. A computer-assisted literature searching of EMBASE, PubMed (MEDLINE), and the Cochrane library databases was conducted to identify potentially relevant articles which primarily examined the utility of contrast-enhanced MRA in the preoperative evaluation of hepatic vascular anatomy in living liver donors. We used the Q statistic of chi-squared value test and inconsistency index (I-squared, I(2)) to estimate the heterogeneity of the data extracted from all selected studies. Meta-Disc software (version 1.4) (ftp://ftp.hrc.es/pub/programas/metadisc/Metadisc_update.htm) was used to perform our analysis. Eight studies were included in the present meta-analysis. A total of 289 living liver donor candidates and 198 patients who underwent liver harvesting were included in the present study. The pooled sensitivities of hepatic artery (HA), portal vein (PV), and hepatic vein (HV) in this meta-analysis were 0.84, 0.97, and 0.94, respectively. The pooled specificities of HA, PV, and HV were 1.00, 1.00, and 1.00, respectively. The pooled diagnostic odds ratios of HA, PV, and HV were 127.28, 302.80, and 256.59, respectively. The area under the summary receiver-operating characteristic curves of HA, PV, and HV were 0.9917, 0.9960, and 0.9813, respectively. The high sensitivity and specificity demonstrated in this meta-analysis suggest that contrast-enhanced MRA was a promising test for the preoperative evaluation of hepatic vascular anatomy in living liver donors. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Video instrumentation for radionuclide angiocardiography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriss, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Two types of videoscintiscopes for performing radioisotopic angiocardiography with a scintillation camera are described, and use of these instruments in performing clinical studies is illustrated. Radionuclide angiocardiography is a simple, quick and accurate procedure recommended as a screening test for patients with a variety of congenital and acquired cardiovascular lesions. When performed in conjunction with coronary arterial catheterization, dynamic radionuclide angiography may provide useful information about regional myocardial perfusion. Quantitative capabilities greatly enhance the potential of this diagnostic tool.

  8. Radionuclide Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalutsky, M. R.

    Radionuclide therapy utilizes unsealed sources of radionuclides as a treatment for cancer or other pathological conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Radionuclides that decay by the emission of β and α particles, as well as those that emit Auger electrons, have been used for this purpose. In this chapter, radiochemical aspects of radionuclide therapy, including criteria for radionuclide selection, radionuclide production, radiolabeling chemistry, and radiation dosimetry are discussed.

  9. Anatomical variations of the celiac trunk and hepatic arterial system: an analysis using multidetector computed tomography angiography*

    PubMed Central

    Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; Franca, Henrique Almeida; de Mello Júnior, Carlos Fernando; Silva Neto, Eulâmpio José; Negromonte, Gustavo Ramalho Pessoa; Duarte, Cláudia Martina Araújo; Cavalcanti Neto, Bartolomeu Fragoso; Farias, Rebeca Danielly da Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the prevalence of anatomical variations of celiac arterial trunk (CAT) branches and hepatic arterial system (HAS), as well as the CAT diameter, length and distance to the superior mesenteric artery. Materials and Methods Retrospective, cross-sectional and predominantly descriptive study based on the analysis of multidetector computed tomography images of 60 patients. Results The celiac trunk anatomy was normal in 90% of cases. Hepatosplenic trunk was found in 8.3% of patients, and hepatogastric trunk in 1.7%. Variation of the HAS was observed in 21.7% of cases, including anomalous location of the right hepatic artery in 8.3% of cases, and of the left hepatic artery, in 5%. Also, cases of joint relocation of right and left hepatic arteries, and trifurcation of the proper hepatic artery were observed, respectively, in 3 (5%) and 2 (3.3%) patients. Mean length and caliber of the CAT were 2.3 cm and 0.8 cm, respectively. Mean distance between CAT and superior mesenteric artery was 1.2 cm (standard deviation = 4.08). A significant correlation was observed between CAT diameter and length, and CAT diameter and distance to superior mesenteric artery. Conclusion The pattern of CAT variations and diameter corroborate the majority of the literature data. However, this does not happen in relation to the HAS. PMID:26811552

  10. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... have liver damage because of it. What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  11. Prevalence and Genotypes of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Patients Underwent Coronary Angiography and Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Mazandaran Heart Center, Sari, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Tahoora; Ziabakhsh-Tabary, Shervin; Ghaemiyan, Ali; Haghshenas, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major global health problem in the worldwide that associated with significant morbidity and mortality in cardiac surgery. The available data on HBV distribution and genotyping of HBV are very heterogeneous. Therefore in this study, we tried to indicate the prevalence of HBV infections in cardiac catheterization patients referred to health centers in the north of Iran and identified the HBV genotypes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we studied 2650 patients who underwent selective coronary artery angiography and coronary artery bypass grafting in Mazandaran heart center, Sari, Iran from 2011 to 2013. All serum samples were examined to detect HBsAg by ELISA test. HBV-DNA was extracted from HBsAg positive samples using Mini Elute Kit from Qiagen and determined the genotypes of HBV by PCR using the Master Mix kit with Taq-DNA polymerase enzyme and with type of specific primers. All samples were examined in the virology laboratory of Sari Medical School. Results: The mean age of patients was 59.7±10.9 (range, 20 to 81) year that 1590 (60%) patients were male and 1060 (40%) were female. Seventeen cases (0.08 %) were found with hepatitis B virus infection, and the highest rates of infection were reported among those aged 40–60 years old in this study. We found genotype D the predominant type in this study. Conclusion: This study indicates that the prevalence of HBV endemicity in the north of Iran is low and genotype D is the only genotype in patients infected with HBV. PMID:25568563

  12. Radionuclide trap

    DOEpatents

    McGuire, Joseph C.

    1978-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition.

  13. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... clotting problems or chronic liver disease. previous continue Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Although hep A is a ... does — through direct contact with infected body fluids. Hepatitis B and C are even more easily passed in ...

  14. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A if they've been vaccinated against it. Hepatitis B Hepatitis B is a more serious infection. It may lead ... of which cause severe illness and even death. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is transmitted from person to person ...

  15. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... a problem with the liver itself What Is Hepatitis A? Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is contagious, usually spreading to others ... objects contaminated by feces (poop) containing HAV. The hepatitis A vaccine has helped to make the infection rare ...

  16. Catheter Angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical conditions. Angiography uses one of three imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection ... the extent and severity of the effects of coronary artery disease and plan for a surgical operation, such as ...

  17. Pulmonary angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pulmonary arteriography; Pulmonary angiogram; Angiogram of the lungs Images Pulmonary arteries References Jackson JE, Meaney JFM. Angiography. ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  18. Radionuclide Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösch, F.; Knapp, F. F. (Russ)

    Radionuclide generator systems continue to play a key role in providing both diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides for various applications in nuclear medicine, oncology, and interventional cardiology. Although many parent/daughter pairs have been evaluated as radionuclide generator systems, there are a relatively small number of generators, which are currently in routine clinical and research use. Essentially every conceivable approach has been used for parent/separation strategies, including sublimation, thermochromatographic separation, solvent extraction, and adsorptive column chromatography. The most widely used radionuclide generator for clinical applications is the 99Mo/99mTc generator system, but recent years have seen an enormous increase in the use of generators to provide therapeutic radionuclides, which has paralleled the development of complementary technologies for targeting agents for therapy and in the general increased interest in the use of unsealed therapeutic radioactive sources. More recently, use of the 68Ge/68Ga generator is showing great potential as a source of positron-emitting 68Ga for positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging. Key advantages for the use of radionuclide generators include reasonable costs, the convenience of obtaining the desired daughter radionuclide on demand, and availability of the daughter radionuclide in high specific activity, no-carrier added form.

  19. Radionuclide cisternogram

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. A radionuclide cisternogram is a nuclear scan test. It is used to diagnose problems ... damage. The amount of radiation used during the nuclear scan is very small. Almost all of the ...

  20. Pediatric body MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Muthupillai, Raja; Chung, Taylor

    2009-02-01

    Vascular pathology in children is commonplace and involves every organ system; however, the powerful, noninvasive, and rapid three-dimensional imaging capability offered by MR angiography is underutilized in children. The success of pediatric MR angiography depends on modifying the MR angiography on the basis of patient size, hemodynamic status, and clinical indications in children, and requires an adequate understanding of pediatric-specific hardware, software, and equipment requirements. This article provides an overview of general pediatric MR angiography techniques, common indications for body MR angiography in children, and the complementary role of MR angiography to other vascular imaging modalities in children, including CT angiography, Doppler ultrasound, and catheter angiography.

  1. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... low because of routine testing of donated blood. Sexual transmission and transmission among family members through close contact ... associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses ... B Blood, needles, sexual 10% of older children develop chronic infection. 90% ...

  2. Angiography of Liver Transplantation Patients 1

    PubMed Central

    Zajko, Albert B.; Bron, Klaus M.; Starzl, Thomas E.; Van Thiel, David H.; Gartner, J. Carlton; Iwatsuki, Shunzaburo; Shaw, Byers W.; Zitelli, Basil J.; Malatack, J. Jeffrey; Urbach, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    Over 45 months, 119 angiographic examinations were performed in 95 patients prior to liver transplantation, and 53 examinations in 44 patients after transplantation. Transplantation feasibility was influenced by patency of the portal vein and inferior vena cava. Selective arterial portography, wedged hepatic venography, and transhepatic portography were used to assess the portal vein if sonography or computed tomography was inconclusive. Major indications for angiography after transplantation included early liver failure, sepsis, unexplained elevation of liver enzyme levels, and delayed bile leakage, all of which may be due to hepatic artery thrombosis. Other indications included gastrointestinal tract bleeding, hemobilia, and evaluation of portal vein patency in patients with chronic rejection who were being considered for retransplantation. Normal radiographic features of hepatic artery and portal vein reconstruction are demonstrated. Complications diagnosed using results of angiography included hepatic artery or portal vein stenoses and thromboses and pancreaticoduodenal aneurysms. Intrahepatic arterial narrowing, attenuation, slow flow, and poor filling were seen in five patients with rejection PMID:3901102

  3. Hepatic hemangioma: atypical appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Mikulis, D.J.; Costello, P.; Clouse, M.E.

    1985-07-01

    Recent reports indicate that computed tomography (CT) after bolus injection of contrast material is diagnostically specific for hemangioma, replacing the need for angiography in a high percentage of patients. The authors report a unique hepatic hemangioma that showed early diffuse intense opacification by angiography and contrast-enhanced CT.

  4. Radionuclide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Sorg, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed new and revised regulations on radionuclide contaminants in drinking water in June 1991. During the 1980's, the Drinking Water Research Division, USEPA conducted a research program to evaluate various technologies to remove radium, uranium and radon from drinking water. The research consisted of laboratory and field studies conducted by USEPA, universities and consultants. The paper summarizes the results of the most significant projects completed. General information is also presented on the general chemistry of the three radionuclides. The information presented indicates that the most practical treatment methods for radium are ion exchange and lime-soda softening and reverse osmosis. The methods tested for radon are aeration and granular activated carbon and the methods for uranium are anion exchange and reverse osmosis.

  5. Radionuclide imaging of the urinary tract

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1985-11-01

    This article describes the role of nuclear medicine in the evaluation of the genitourinary tract. The technical aspects of radionuclide imaging (radiopharmaceuticals, radiation dosimetry, instrumentation, and method) are briefly presented, and each of the indications for renal scintigraphy--including the evaluation of differential renal function, hypertension, obstruction, renal transplants, masses, trauma, congenital anomalies, vesicoureteral reflux, and infection--are discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide imaging with respect to alternative radiographic examinations (such as intravenous urography, ultrasonography, CT, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging) are emphasized wherever applicable. 136 references.

  6. Radionuclide imaging of the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Velchik, M G

    1985-11-01

    This article describes the role of nuclear medicine in the evaluation of the genitourinary tract. The technical aspects of radionuclide imaging (radiopharmaceuticals, radiation dosimetry, instrumentation, and method) are briefly presented, and each of the indications for renal scintigraphy--including the evaluation of differential renal function, hypertension, obstruction, renal transplants, masses, trauma, congenital anomalies, vesicoureteral reflux, and infection--are discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide imaging with respect to alternative radiographic examinations (such as intravenous urography, ultrasonography, CT, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging) are emphasized wherever applicable.

  7. Radionuclide salivary gland imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mishkin, F.S.

    1981-10-01

    Salivary gland imaging with 99mTc as pertechnetate provides functional information concerning trapping and excretion of the parotid and submandibular glands. Anatomic information gained often adds little to clinical evaluation. On the other hand, functional information may detect subclinical involvement, which correlates well with biopsy of the minor labial salivary glands. Salivary gland abnormalities in systemic disease such as sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, and other collagenvascular disorders may be detected before they result in the clinical manifestaions of Sjoegren's syndrome. Such glands, after initially demonstrating increased trapping in the acute phase, tend to have decreased trapping and failure to discharge pertechnetate in response to an appropriate physiologic stimulus. Increased uptake of gallium-67 citrate often accompanies these findings. Inflammatory parotitis can be suspected when increased perfusion is evident on radionuclide angiography with any agent. The ability of the salivary gland image to detect and categorize mass lesions, which result in focal areas of diminished activity such as tumors, cysts, and most other masses, is disappointing, while its ability to detect and categorize Warthin's tumor, which concentrates pertechnetate, is much more valuable, although not specific.

  8. Radionuclide Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Hess, Søren; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2017-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays an integral role in the diagnostic workup of suspected pulmonary embolism, and several modalities have been employed over the years. In recent years, the choice has been narrowed to either computer tomographic or radionuclide based methods, i.e. computer tomographic angiography (CTA) and ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy (V/Q-scan). Both methods display advantages and shortcomings, and while we provide some insights into CTA and alternative methods, the paper's main focus is a review of the V/Q-scan. We discuss basic considerations, interpretation criteria, clinical value, and controversies of conventional planar lung scintigraphy as well as the more contemporary 3-dimensional imaging technique of single photon emission tomography (SPECT) with or without CT.

  9. CT angiography - chest

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - thorax; CTA - lungs; Pulmonary embolism - CTA chest; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - CTA chest; Venous thromboembolism - CTA lung; Blood clot - CTA lung; Embolus - CTA lung; CT ...

  10. Natural Radionuclides in Ground Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Stanley N.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the natural trace radionuclides in ground water. Indicates the geologic origin of these radionuclides. Discusses the importance of these radionuclides. Suggests future uses of a number of additional radionuclides. (CW)

  11. Natural Radionuclides in Ground Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Stanley N.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the natural trace radionuclides in ground water. Indicates the geologic origin of these radionuclides. Discusses the importance of these radionuclides. Suggests future uses of a number of additional radionuclides. (CW)

  12. Radionuclide deposition control

    DOEpatents

    Brehm, William F.; McGuire, Joseph C.

    1980-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition.

  13. Indocyanine green video angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frambach, Donald A.

    1994-06-01

    Over the last two years, ophthalmologists have begun to use indocyanine green angiography as a supplement to fluorescein angiography. Unlike fluorescein, indocyanine green absorbs near infrared and emits slightly longer infrared light. Therefore, indocyanine green angiography images structures deeper in the retina and through blood, pigment, and turbid serous fluid that accumulates in a number of diseases. In addition, indocyanine green shows very different properties of dye leakage than does fluorescein and this can be used to identify certain abnormal blood vessels that grow beneath the retinas of patients with macular degeneration. Finally, indocyanine green fluoresces only 4% as efficiently as fluorescein which has presented a major technical problem until highly amplified video systems have become available to ophthalmologists. We have used a scanning laser ophthalmoscope to perform video indocyanine green angiography at the Doheny Eye Institute since November, 1991. In this paper, I will present several clinical cases that demonstrate the clinical usefulness of indocyanine green angiography.

  14. Detection of gastrointestinal bleeding by radionuclide scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.; Luna, E.; Kingsley, S.; Prince, M.; Herrera, N.

    1984-01-01

    Scanning with Technetium /sup 99m/ labeled autologous red blood cells was performed in 59 patients with clinical suspicion of acute and/or intermittent, chronic gastrointestinal bleeding. In 36 patients (61%), a definite site of bleeding could be demonstrated. A strong correlation with other modalities such as upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy, contrast angiography, and surgical exploration was found. Overall sensitivity of the procedure was 91%; specificity 100% and accuracy 93.3%. It is suggested that radionuclide scintigraphy provides a completely noninvasive, simple, and sensitive procedure which may be routinely used for the detection and localization of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  15. Radionuclide demonstration of intrapulmonary shunting in cirrhosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, E.R.; Thrall, J.H.; Dantzker, D.R.

    1983-05-01

    The association of hepatic cirrhosis and severe arterial hypoxemia has been well described. Although alterations in ventilatory function may partially account for the hypoxemia, the principal mechanism is thought to be a microangiopathic change in the pulmonary arteriovenous shunting with resultant systemic desaturation. Whole-body radionuclide scans with technetium-99m macroaggrregated albumin (/sup 99m/Tc MAA) labeling have been diagnostic of right-to-left shunting by their demonstration of tracer accumulation within the extrapulmonary circulation. A case of severe pulmonary arteriovenous shunting in an alcoholic patient in whom hepatic disease had not been of apparent clinical significance before radionuclide scanning is reported. He did not have cutaneous angiomata as have all other patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and hypoxemia.

  16. Radionuclide demonstration of intrapulmonary shunting in cirrhosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, E.R.; Thrall, J.H.; Dantzker, D.R.

    1983-05-01

    The association of hepatic cirrhosis and severe arterial hypoxemia has been well described. Although alterations in ventilatory function may partially account for the hypoxemia, the principal mechanism is thought to be a microangiopathic change in the pulmonary vasculature resulting in intrapulmonary arteriovenous shunting with resultant systemic desaturation. Whole-body radionuclide scans with technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin labeling have been diagnostic of right-to-left shunting by their demonstration of tracer accumulation within the extrapulmonary circulation. A case of severe pulmonary arteriovenous shunting in an alcoholic patient in whom hepatic disease had not been of apparent clinical significance before radionuclide scanning is reported. He did not have cuntaeous angiomata as have all other patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and hypoxemia.

  17. CT Angiography (CTA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical conditions. Angiography uses one of three imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection ... the extent and severity of the effects of coronary artery disease and plan for a surgical operation, such as ...

  18. Radionuclide bone imaging and densitometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mettler, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections. Some of the titles are: Radionuclides and the Normal Bone Scan; The Radionuclide Bone Scan in Malignant Disease; Pediatric Applications of Radionuclide Bone Imaging; The Radionuclide Bone Scan in Arthritis and Metabolic and Miscellaneous Disorders; and Soft Tissue Activity on the Radionuclide Bone Scan.

  19. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Güven, Koray; Acunaş, Bülent

    2004-10-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography has provided excellent opportunities for advancement of computed tomography (CT) technology and clinical applications. It has a wide range of applications in the abdomen including vascular pathologies either occlusive or aneurysmal; enables the radiologist to produce vascular mapping that clearly show tumor invasion of vasculature and the relationship of vessels to mass lesions. MDCTA can be used in preoperative planning for hepatic resection, preoperative evaluation and planning for liver transplantation. MDCTA can also provide extremely valuable information in the evaluation of ischemic bowel disease, active Crohn disease, the extent and location of collateral vessels in cirrhosis.

  20. Radionuclide removal by apatite

    SciTech Connect

    Rigali, Mark J.; Brady, Patrick V.; Moore, Robert C.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a growing body of research supports widespread future reliance on apatite for radioactive waste cleanup. Apatite is a multi-functional radionuclide sorbent that lowers dissolved radionuclide concentrations by surface sorption, ion exchange, surface precipitation, and by providing phosphate to precipitate low-solubility radionuclide-containing minerals. Natural apatites are rich in trace elements, and apatite’s stability in the geologic record suggest that radionuclides incorporated into apatite, whether in a permeable reactive barrier or a waste form, are likely to remain isolated from the biosphere for long periods of time. Here we outline the mineralogic and surface origins of apatite-radionuclide reactivity and show how apatites might be used to environmental advantage in the future.

  1. Radionuclide removal by apatite

    DOE PAGES

    Rigali, Mark J.; Brady, Patrick V.; Moore, Robert C.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a growing body of research supports widespread future reliance on apatite for radioactive waste cleanup. Apatite is a multi-functional radionuclide sorbent that lowers dissolved radionuclide concentrations by surface sorption, ion exchange, surface precipitation, and by providing phosphate to precipitate low-solubility radionuclide-containing minerals. Natural apatites are rich in trace elements, and apatite’s stability in the geologic record suggest that radionuclides incorporated into apatite, whether in a permeable reactive barrier or a waste form, are likely to remain isolated from the biosphere for long periods of time. Here we outline the mineralogic and surface origins of apatite-radionuclide reactivity andmore » show how apatites might be used to environmental advantage in the future.« less

  2. Radionuclides in US coals

    SciTech Connect

    Bisselle, C. A.; Brown, R. D.

    1984-03-01

    The current state of knowledge with respect to radionuclide concentrations in US coals is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the levels of uranium in coal (and lignite) which are considered to represent a concern resulting from coal combustion; areas of the US where such levels have been found; and possible origins of high radionuclide levels in coal. The report reviews relevant studies and presents new data derived from a computerized search of radionuclide content in about 4000 coal samples collected throughout the coterminous US. 103 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  3. Three-dimensional spiral CT angiography in pancreatic surgical planning using non-tailored protocols: comparison with conventional angiography.

    PubMed

    Blomley, M J; Albrecht, T; Williamson, R C; Allison, D J

    1998-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate three-dimensional spiral computed tomography (3DCT) as an adjunct to routine pancreatic CT scanning, with particular regard to the identification of surgically important hepatic arterial anomalies, correlated with conventional visceral angiography. 32 patients underwent spiral CT scans prior to pancreatic surgery using established protocols. Oral contrast medium was used throughout. 150 ml of intravenous contrast medium was given at 3 ml s-1 with a 24 s spiral CT sequence starting 35 s after the start of infusion. Two protocols were employed, both with a pitch of 1:3 mm table feed/collimation (n = 17) and 5 mm table feed/collimation (n = 15). Overlapping (1 mm minimum) axial reformats were reconstructed. 3DCT shaded-surface displays of the visceral arteries were assessed for visceral arterial anomalies. Visceral angiography (n = 23) was independently correlated. Satisfactory 3D angiograms were performed in all but one patient, in whom the coeliac axis was missed. (i) 3 mm protocol: 3DCT (n = 17) showed three anomalous right hepatic arteries (ARHA), one trifurcation anomaly and one splenic artery with an aortic origin. Angiography (n = 11) confirmed these findings, although one patient with an ARHA did not have angiography. A left gastric arterial supply to the left liver was not detected. (ii) 5 mm protocol: 3DCT (n = 15) showed two cases of ARHA. While confirming these findings, angiography (n = 12) showed a third case of ARHA, in which the coeliac and superior mesenteric artery had very close origins. A left gastric supply to the left liver was also missed. It is concluded that satisfactory 3DCT is possible without changing existing scanning protocols, although narrow sections are required for the confident assessment of right hepatic arterial anomalies, and any left hepatic supply via the left gastric artery was poorly assessed in this series.

  4. Radionuclides in Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, E. D.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is a radionuclide imaging technique, including the gamma camera, image analysis computer, radiopharmaceuticals, and positron emission tomography. Several pictures showing the use of this technique are presented. (YP)

  5. Radionuclides in Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, E. D.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is a radionuclide imaging technique, including the gamma camera, image analysis computer, radiopharmaceuticals, and positron emission tomography. Several pictures showing the use of this technique are presented. (YP)

  6. Gallbladder radionuclide scan

    MedlinePlus

    Radionuclide - gallbladder; Gallbladder scan; Biliary scan; Cholescintigraphy; HIDA; Hepatobiliary nuclear imaging scan ... It will then flow with bile into the gallbladder and then the duodenum or small intestine. For ...

  7. Method and apparatus for separating radionuclides from non-radionuclides

    DOEpatents

    Harp, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    In an apparatus for separating radionuclides from non-radionuclides in a mixture of nuclear waste, a vessel is provided wherein the mixture is heated to a temperature greater than the temperature of vaporization for the non-radionuclides but less than the temperature of vaporization for the radionuclides. Consequently the non-radionuclides are vaporized while the non-radionuclides remain the solid or liquid state. The non-radionuclide vapors are withdrawn from the vessel and condensed to produce a flow of condensate. When this flow decreases the heat is reduced to prevent temperature spikes which might otherwise vaporize the radionuclides. The vessel is removed and capped with the radioactive components of the apparatus and multiple batches of the radionuclide residue disposed therein. Thus the vessel ultimately provides a burial vehicle for all of the radioactive components of the process.

  8. The interval ejection fraction: a cineangiographic and radionuclide study

    SciTech Connect

    Kemper, A.J.; Bianco, J.A.; Shulman, R.M.; Folland, E.D.; Parisi, A.F.; Tow, D.E.

    1982-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of the first-third ejection fraction (1/3 EF) for detecting patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), resting contrast ventriculography and first-pass radionuclide angiography with a high-count-rate, multicrystal camera system were performed in 47 subjects: 22 normal controls and 25 patients with clinically stable angina pectoris and severe CAD without and with resting wall motion abnormalities. By contrast angiography, only group 3 had depressed global EF or 1/3 EF compared with control. Whereas 11 of 25 CAD patients had global EF outside the normal range, only two of 25 had depressed 1/3 EF. Both had left ventricular asynergy and a depressed global EF. Studies performed using first-pass radionuclide angiography revealed similar results. A wide range of 1/3 EF values was found in normal subjects by both techniques. Thus, the ejection fraction during the first third of systole at rest is of limited value for detecting patients with CAD.

  9. Initial Radionuclide Inventories

    SciTech Connect

    H. Miller

    2004-09-19

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement, currently identified as

  10. Radionuclide studies in impotence

    SciTech Connect

    Hilson, A.J.; Lewis, C.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Impotence may be of physiological origin with causes including vascular or neurological pathology. Alternatively, it may be of psychogenic origin. Clinicians can distinguish between psychological and organic impotence by observing nocturnal penile tumescence. Non-radionuclide investigations for organic impotence include penile plethysmography or pulse Doppler analysis for arterial supply, cavernosometry for venous drainage, and biothesiometry or evoked potentials for neurological pathology. Radionuclide studies are primarily based on the use of technetium 99m-pertechnetate, 99mTc-red blood cells, or xenon 133 to study the blood flow, with or without pharmacological intervention, commonly papaverine. 26 references.

  11. Pediatric digital subtraction angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, G.M.; Wesenberg, R.L.; Mueller, D.L.; Reid, R.H.

    1984-12-01

    Experience with intravenous digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in infants and children is limited, although its relative rate of performance, low complication rate, and diagnostic accuracy indicate great potential. The authors performed 87 DSA examinations (74 patients) and obtained sufficient detail to facilitate diagnosis in most cases. The major problems of patient movement and overlapping vessels can be minimized by judicious use of sedation and strict attention to technique. Exposure of patients to radiation has not been a limiting factor since our system uses low exposure factors. Our results demonstrate that DSA has wide applicability to many organ systems and is especially useful in intracranial disease and for preoperative evaluation of neoplasms.

  12. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Simon S.; Jia, Yali; Zhang, Miao; Su, Johnny P.; Liu, Gangjun; Hwang, Thomas S.; Bailey, Steven T.; Huang, David

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a noninvasive approach that can visualize blood vessels down to the capillary level. With the advent of high-speed OCT and efficient algorithms, practical OCTA of ocular circulation is now available to ophthalmologists. Clinical investigations that used OCTA have increased exponentially in the past few years. This review will cover the history of OCTA and survey its most important clinical applications. The salient problems in the interpretation and analysis of OCTA are described, and recent advances are highlighted. PMID:27409483

  13. Fluorescent blood cell angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-nun, Joshua; Constable, Ian J.

    1994-06-01

    Fluorescein angiography is currently the main method for evaluation of the retinal vascular patency. Ashton noted that capillary patency to the small fluorescein molecule may differ from that of the larger red blood cells. He concluded that fluorescein angiography is not able to demonstrate a developing stenosis, that might be the precipitating cause of a later capillary closure in various microvasculopathies. Sarelius et al have shown, in hamster cheek pouch and cremaster muscle, that fluorescently labeled erythrocytes in known concentrations can be used for the direct measurement of capillary flow parameters. The only assumption that this method relies on, is that the labeled cells are rheologically normal and therefore reflect the behavior of the total cell population. We have developed a new method for an in-vivo, real-time demonstration of the blood cell flow in the retinal capillary net. Based on the assumption presented by Sarelius et al, measurement and analysis of the retinal capillary blood cell flow is also possible from the results achieved by the new method.

  14. Digital subtraction angiography of the pulmonary arteries for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, J.W.; Verhoeven, L.A.J.; Kersbergen, J.J.; Overtoom, T.T.C.

    1983-06-01

    A comparative study of radionuclide scanning (perfusion studies in all 18 patients and ventilation studies in 9) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was performed in 18 patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism. In 17 patients good visualization of the arteries was obtained with DSA; 10 of these patients had no pre-existing lung disease, and 7 had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The information provided by DSA in this small group was equal to or better than that of scintigraphy, especially in patients with COPD, and the reliability of DSA was superior to that of the radionuclide scintigraphy. Methods for preventing motion artifacts with DSA are also described.

  15. Computed tomography in hepatic trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, K.L. Jr.; Federle, M.P.

    1983-08-01

    Twenty-five patients with hepatic injury from blunt upper abdominal trauma were examined by computed tomography (CT). The spectrum of CT findings was recorded, and the size of the hepatic laceration and the associated hemoperitoneum were correlated with the mode of therapy used in each case (operative vs nonoperative). While the need for surgery correlated roughly with the size of the hepatic laceration, the size of the associated hemoperitoneum was an important modifying factor. Fifteen patients with hepatic lacerations but little or no hemoperitoneum were managed nonoperatively. CT seems to have significant advantages over hepatic scintigraphy, angiography, and diagnostic peritoneal lavage. By combining inforamtion on the clinical state of the patient and CT findings, therapy of hepatic injury can be individualized and the incidence of nontherapeutic laparotomies decreased.

  16. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  17. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    R. Schreiner

    2001-06-27

    The purpose of this work is to develop the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, as directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a). This abstraction is the conceptual model that will be used to determine the rate of release of radionuclides from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ) in the total system performance assessment-license application (TSPA-LA). In particular, this model will be used to quantify the time-dependent radionuclide releases from a failed waste package (WP) and their subsequent transport through the EBS to the emplacement drift wall/UZ interface. The development of this conceptual model will allow Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department to provide a more detailed and complete EBS flow and transport abstraction. The results from this conceptual model will allow PA0 to address portions of the key technical issues (KTIs) presented in three NRC Issue Resolution Status Reports (IRSRs): (1) the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (ENFE), Revision 2 (NRC 1999a), (2) the Container Life and Source Term (CLST), Revision 2 (NRC 1999b), and (3) the Thermal Effects on Flow (TEF), Revision 1 (NRC 1998). The conceptual model for flow and transport in the EBS will be referred to as the ''EBS RT Abstraction'' in this analysis/modeling report (AMR). The scope of this abstraction and report is limited to flow and transport processes. More specifically, this AMR does not discuss elements of the TSPA-SR and TSPA-LA that relate to the EBS but are discussed in other AMRs. These elements include corrosion processes, radionuclide solubility limits, waste form dissolution rates and concentrations of colloidal particles that are generally represented as boundary conditions or input parameters for the EBS RT Abstraction. In effect, this AMR provides the algorithms for transporting radionuclides using the flow geometry and radionuclide concentrations determined by other

  18. Optical projection angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Riwei; Wang, Mingyi; Zhang, Fuli; Han, Dingan; Wang, Ruikang K.; Yang, Guojian; Zeng, Yaguang

    2016-11-01

    We propose the optical projection angiography (OPA) based on lateral dynamic scattering light for visualizing a three-dimensional (3D) blood-flow network. In OPA, a pulsed laser source illuminates a live biological sample for eliminating digital camera integration effects. The 2D flow image can be obtained by separating the dynamic and static scattering light signal of each camera pixel in the frequency domain. Flow images at a different angle are combined to reconstruct the 3D volume of the sample to realize OPA. Moreover, as our experiment retains the bright-field optical projection tomography (OPT) setup, the OPA image for the circulatory system and the OPT image for the skeletal structure can simultaneously be reconstructed. The experimental results can potentially be applied in physiological development studies.

  19. Optical coherence angiography

    PubMed Central

    Wylęgała, Adam; Teper, Sławomir; Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Wylęgała, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Retinal vascular diseases are one of the most common causes of blindness in the developed world. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography (OCT-A) is a new noninvasive method that uses several algorithms to detect blood movement. This enables the creation of high-resolution vascular images with contrast depicting motionless tissue. Methods: This review presents the results of articles relevant to age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy (DR), and OCT-A. The OCT-A technique can successfully be used in the diagnosis of neovascularization, retinal vein occlusion (RVO) and retinal artery occlusion (RAO), vessel abnormalities and even anterior segment neovascularization. OCT-A can also be applied to compute data such as vessel density, and flow index in both superficial and deep plexuses. Results: Many studies have compared fluorescein angiography with OCT-A. Other studies have reported differences in vascular density in AMD patients and have compared them with people having healthy eyes. Although OCT-A offers rapid picture acquisition, high repeatability and resolution, it also has many drawbacks. The most common are: motion artifacts, projections from overlying vessels and limited field of view. An interesting new application is the possibility to assess changes during antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy. Another function of OCT-A is the possible application in the study of choriocapillaries in many fields of ocular pathology. Conclusion: OCT-A is a new promising method that allows the visualization of the retinal vascular network and the counting of blood flow parameters. This technique provides reliable images useful in clinical routines. PMID:27741104

  20. From the RSNA refresher courses: CT angiography: clinical applications in the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Fishman, E K

    2001-10-01

    The development of spiral computed tomography (CT) and subsequently multidetector CT has provided unparalleled opportunities for advancement of CT technology and clinical applications. One of the most influential developments has been CT angiography, which is the use of thin-section CT combined with postprocessing of imaging data by using a variety of three-dimensional reconstruction techniques to produce vascular maps that equal or exceed those provided by classic angiography in many applications. In the evaluation of pancreatic disease, the use of multidetector CT angiography enables the radiologist to produce vascular maps that clearly show tumor invasion of vasculature and the relationship of vessels to pancreatic masses. Anatomic areas for which the three-dimensional display is especially helpful include the confluence of the portal vein and the superior mesenteric vein and the more distal portions of the portal vein. Preliminary studies indicate that CT angiography may prove beneficial in the evaluation of ischemic bowel and active Crohn disease. CT angiography has proved extremely valuable for applications such as preoperative planning for hepatic resection, preoperative evaluation and planning for liver transplantation, pretreatment planning for patients considered for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, and pretreatment evaluation of portal vein patency for a variety of reasons. CT angiography can also provide supplemental information in patients with cirrhosis, upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding due to varices, or primary extrahepatic neoplasms.

  1. Osteoid osteoma: radionuclide diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Helms, C.A.; Hattner, R.S.; Vogler, J.B.

    1984-06-01

    The double-density sign, seen on radionuclide bone scans, is described for diagnosing osteoid osteomas and for localizing the nidus. Its use in differentiating the nidus of an osteoid osteoma from osteomyelitis is also described. The utility of computed tomography in localization of the nidus is also illustrated. The double-density sign was helpful in diagnosing seven cases of surgically confirmed osteoid osteoma.

  2. CT angiography - head and neck

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007677.htm CT angiography - head and neck To use the sharing features on this page, ... create pictures of the blood vessels in the head and neck. How the Test is Performed You will be ...

  3. CT angiography - abdomen and pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - abdomen and pelvis; CTA - abdomen and pelvis; Renal artery - CTA; Aortic - CTA; Mesenteric CTA ... belly or pelvis Masses and tumors in the abdomen or pelvis, including cancer, when needed to help ...

  4. Technical aspects of CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Kuszyk, B S; Fishman, E K

    1998-10-01

    The basic tasks of spiral CT acquisition, image processing, and image display are the foundations underlying CT angiography regardless of the anatomic region of interest. Volume rendering is a rapidly emerging image processing technique for creating three-dimensional (3D) images from CT datasets, which has important advantages over other 3D rendering techniques including maximum intensity projection and surface rendering. This articles reviews the techniques that are commonly used in CT angiography and key considerations for optimization.

  5. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A Hepatitis A Hepatitis A is a contagious viral infection that can easily affect children and adults. It is one of the most common types of hepatitis virus. Often when you hear about hepatitis A ...

  6. CT Angiography after 20 Years

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Leipsic, Jonathon; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Fleischmann, Dominik; Napel, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Through a marriage of spiral computed tomography (CT) and graphical volumetric image processing, CT angiography was born 20 years ago. Fueled by a series of technical innovations in CT and image processing, over the next 5–15 years, CT angiography toppled conventional angiography, the undisputed diagnostic reference standard for vascular disease for the prior 70 years, as the preferred modality for the diagnosis and characterization of most cardiovascular abnormalities. This review recounts the evolution of CT angiography from its development and early challenges to a maturing modality that has provided unique insights into cardiovascular disease characterization and management. Selected clinical challenges, which include acute aortic syndromes, peripheral vascular disease, aortic stent-graft and transcatheter aortic valve assessment, and coronary artery disease, are presented as contrasting examples of how CT angiography is changing our approach to cardiovascular disease diagnosis and management. Finally, the recently introduced capabilities for multispectral imaging, tissue perfusion imaging, and radiation dose reduction through iterative reconstruction are explored with consideration toward the continued refinement and advancement of CT angiography. PMID:24848958

  7. Three-phase radionuclide bone scanning in evaluation of local radiation injury. A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Mettler, F.A. Jr.; Monsein, L.; Davis, M.; Rosenberg, R.; Kelsey, C.; Listrom, M.

    1987-10-01

    The management of local radiation injuries is influenced by the degree of vascular compromise within the skin and underlying tissues. Other authors have used thermography and angiography in assessing the blood flow to radiation damaged tissues. This report describes the use of radionuclide imaging in the evaluation of a patient who developed necrosis of his distal digits following a radiation accident. In addition to determining the vascular status of the hands, imaging helped indicate an appropriate level for amputation.

  8. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers

  9. Osteopetrosis: Radiological & Radionuclide Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sit, Cherry; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Fogelman, Ignac; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare inherited bone disease where bones harden and become abnormally dense. While the diagnosis is clinical, it also greatly relies on appearance of the skeleton radiographically. X-ray, radionuclide bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging have been reported to identify characteristics of osteopetrosis. We present an interesting case of a 59-year-old man with a history of bilateral hip fractures. He underwent 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate whole body scan supplemented with single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography of spine, which showed increased uptake in the humeri, tibiae and femora, which were in keeping with osteopetrosis. PMID:25589808

  10. Magnetic resonance angiography vs. angiography in tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Rao, Uppalapati Venkateswara; Vanajakshamma, Velam; Rajasekhar, Durgaprasad; Lakshmi, Amancharla Yadagiri; Reddy, Reddivari Niranjan

    2013-08-01

    : To determine whether gadolinium-enhanced three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography can provide a noninvasive alternative to diagnostic catheterization for evaluation of pulmonary artery anatomy in tetralogy of Fallot. Thirty-five consecutive patients with tetralogy of Fallot, who attended the cardiology outpatient department between January 2008 and December 2009, were included in the study. There were 21 males and 14 females, with a mean age of 9 ± 4.15 years (range, 3-21 years). Thirty-two patients had tetralogy of Fallot with varying severities of valvular and infundibular stenosis. Three patients had tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia. All patients underwent both cardiac catheterization with X-ray angiography and 3-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography within one month. Measurements of right and left pulmonary arteries and aortopulmonary collaterals were equal by both methods. There was a good correlation between magnetic resonance angiography and catheterization measurements of branch pulmonary arteries. Gadolinium-enhanced three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography can be used as a reliable noninvasive alternative to X-ray cineangiography for delineation of pulmonary arterial anatomy in sick infants and young children, obviating the need for catheterization.

  11. Interval ejection fraction: a cineangiographic and radionuclide study

    SciTech Connect

    Kemper, A.J.; Bianco, J.A.; Shulman, R.M.; Folland, E.D.; Paris, A.F.; Tow, D.E.

    1982-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of the first-third ejection fraction (1/3 EF) for detecting patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), resting contrast ventriculography and first-pass radionuclide angiography with a high-count-rate, multicrystal camera system were performed in 47 subjects: 22 normal controls (group 1) and 25 patients with clinically stable angina pectoris and severe CAD (mean 2.3 vessels) without (group 2, n = 12) and with (group 3, n = 13) resting wall motion abnormalities. By contrast angiography, only group 3 had depressed global EF or 1/3 EF compared with control (global EF: group 1, 0.71 = 0.09; group 2, 0.67 = 0.09 (NS); group 3, 0.49 = 0.05 (p < 0.01 vs groups 1 and 2); 1/3 EF: group 1, 0.29 = 0.06; group 2, 0.28 = 0.05 (NS); group 3, 0.22 = 0.05 (p < 0.01 vs groups 1 and 2)). Whereas 11 of 25 CAD patients had global EF outside the normal range, only two of 25 had depressed 1/3 EF. Both had left ventricular asynergy and a depressed global EF. Studies performed using first-pass radionuclide angiography revealed similar results, i.e., only four of 25 CAD patients, all with left ventricular asynergy and depressed global EF, had depressed 1/3 EF values. A wide range of 1/3 EF values was found in normal subjects by both techniques. Thus, the ejection fraction during the first third of systole at rest is of limited value for detecting patients with CAD.

  12. Targeted radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lawrence E.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Meredith, Ruby F.

    2008-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) seeks molecular and functional targets within patient tumor sites. A number of agents have been constructed and labeled with beta, alpha, and Auger emitters. Radionuclide carriers spanning a broad range of sizes; e.g., antibodies, liposomes, and constructs such as nanoparticles have been used in these studies. Uptake, in percent-injected dose per gram of malignant tissue, is used to evaluate the specificity of the targeting vehicle. Lymphoma (B-cell) has been the primary clinical application. Extension to solid tumors will require raising the macroscopic absorbed dose by several-fold over values found in present technology. Methods that may effect such changes include multistep targeting, simultaneous chemotherapy, and external sequestration of the agent. Toxicity has primarily involved red marrow so that marrow replacement can also be used to enhance future TRT treatments. Correlation of toxicities and treatment efficiency has been limited by relatively poor absorbed dose estimates partly because of using standard (phantom) organ sizes. These associations will be improved in the future by obtaining patient-specific organ size and activity data with hybrid SPECT∕CT and PET∕CT scanners. PMID:18697529

  13. Radionuclides in nephrology

    SciTech Connect

    Lausanne, A.B.D.

    1987-01-01

    In 47 expert contributions, this volume provides a summary of the latest research on radionuclides in nephro-urology together with current and new clinical applications especially in renovascular hypertension, kidney transplantation, and metabolic and urological diseases. In addition, attention is given to aspects of basic renal physiology and function and possible applications of nuclear magnetic resonance and spectroscopy in nephro-urology. New testing procedures which promise to improve diagnosis, and new radiopharmaceuticals are described. The reports are divided into eight sections, the first of which features studies on the renin-angiotensin system, cisplatin, atrial natriuretic factor and determining plasma oxalate. Four papers describe a number of new radiopharmaceuticals which have the potential to replace hippuran. In the third section, radionuclide methods for the measurement of renal function parameters are discussed. The book then focuses on the potential role of captopril in the improved diagnosis of renovascular hypertension. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance and spectroscopy are demonstrated in the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis, kidney assessment after lithotripsy, kidney evaluation prior to transplantation, and in monitoring renal ischemia during hypotension.

  14. Reactor-Produced Medical Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Mausner, Leonard; Garland, Marc A

    2011-01-01

    The therapeutic use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine, oncology and cardiology is the most rapidly growing use of medical radionuclides. Since most therapeutic radionuclides are neutron rich and decay by beta emission, they are reactor-produced. This chapter deals mainly with production approaches with neutrons. Neutron interactions with matter, neutron transmission and activation rates, and neutron spectra of nuclear reactors are discussed in some detail. Further, a short discussion of the neutron-energy dependence of cross sections, reaction rates in thermal reactors, cross section measurements and flux monitoring, and general equations governing the reactor production of radionuclides are presented. Finally, the chapter is concluded by providing a number of examples encompassing the various possible reaction routes for production of a number of medical radionuclides in a reactor.

  15. Complications of renal transplantation: evaluation with US and radionuclide imaging.

    PubMed

    Brown, E D; Chen, M Y; Wolfman, N T; Ott, D J; Watson, N E

    2000-01-01

    Following renal transplantation, patients are often evaluated with ultrasonography (US) or radionuclide imaging to assess renal function and the presence of possible complications. Both modalities are inexpensive, noninvasive, and nonnephrotoxic. A basic understanding of the surgical techniques commonly used for renal transplantation is useful when imaging these patients in order to recognize complications and to direct further imaging or intervention. The most frequent complications of renal transplantation include perinephric fluid collections; decreased renal function; and abnormalities of the vasculature, collecting system, and renal parenchyma. Perinephric fluid collections are common following transplantation, and their clinical significance depends on the type, location, size, and growth of the fluid collection, features that are well-evaluated with US. Causes of diminished renal function include acute tubular necrosis, rejection, and toxicity from medications. Radionuclide imaging is the most useful modality for assessing renal function. Vascular complications of transplantation include occlusion or stenosis of the arterial or venous supply, arteriovenous fistulas, and pseudoaneurysms. Although the standard for evaluating these vascular complications is angiography, US is an excellent noninvasive method for screening. Other transplant complications such as abnormalities of the collecting system and renal parenchyma are well-evaluated with both radionuclide imaging and US.

  16. Evolution of digital angiography systems.

    PubMed

    Brigida, Raffaela; Misciasci, Teresa; Martarelli, Fabiola; Gangitano, Guido; Ottaviani, Pierfrancesco; Rollo, Massimo; Marano, Pasquale

    2003-01-01

    The innovations introduced by digital subtraction angiography in digital radiography are briefly illustrated with the description of its components and functioning. The pros and cons of digital subtraction angiography are analyzed in light of present and future imaging technologies. In particular, among advantages there are: automatic exposure, digital image subtraction, digital post-processing, high number of images per second, possible changes in density and contrast. Among disadvantages there are: small round field of view, geometric distortion at the image periphery, high sensitivity to patient movements, not very high spatial resolution. At present, flat panel detectors represent the most suitable substitutes for digital subtraction angiography, with the introduction of novel solutions for those artifacts which for years have hindered its diagnostic validity. The concept of temporal artifact, reset light and possible future evolutions of this technology that may afford both diagnostic and protectionist advantages, are analyzed.

  17. Testicular torsion and epididymitis demonstrated by radionuclide angiograms and static imaging.

    PubMed

    Hankins, A J

    1979-10-01

    Radionuclide testicular angiography and static images were performed using technetium 99m sodium pertechnetate in an effort to differentiate between testicular torsion and acute epididymitis in 12 patients. The diagnosis of testicular torsion was made in four cases that were confirmed at surgery. Acute epididymitis or acute epididymo-orchitis was diagnosed six times. These patients were treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics leading to a subsidence of their clinical symptomatology during therapy with no sequelae. The radionuclide angiogram and static image changes of chronic epididymitis are also discussed.Radionuclide testicular angiograms and static images can be significant benefits in addition to the clinical and physical findings to distinguish between testicular torsion and acute and chronic epididymitis.

  18. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. ...

  19. Endovascular treatment of primary hepatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Popiel, M; Gulie, L; Turculeţ, C; Beuran, M

    2008-01-01

    First transcatheter embolization of hepatic artery has been materializing in 1974, in France, for unresectable hepatic tumours. Then, this treatment has become use enough in many countries, especially in Japan, where primary hepatic tumours are very frequent. In this article, we present procedures of interventional endovascular treatment for primary hepatic tumours: chemoembolization, intra–arterial chemotherapy. The study comprises patients with primary hepatic tumours investigated by hepatic–ultrasound and contrast–enhanced CT or MRI. DSA–hepatic angiography is very important to verify the accessory hepatic supply. It has been performed selective catheterization of right/left hepatic branches followed by cytostatics injection. Most of the patients have benefit by hepatic chemoembolization (cytostatics, Lipiodol and embolic materials). The selective intra–arterial chemotherapy (cytostatics without Lipiodol) was performing in cases with contraindications for Lipiodol or embolic materials injection (cirrhosis–Child C, thrombosis of portal vein, hepatic insufficiency). For treatment of primary hepatic tumours we use 5–F–Uracil, Farmarubicin and Mytomicin C. Less numbers of the reservoirs were placed because financial causes. Chemoembolization was better than procedures without Lipiodol or embolic materials. Lipiodol reached in tumoural tissue and the distribution of Lipiodol harmonises with degree of vascularisation. After the chemoembolization procedure, the diameter of tumours decreased gradually depending on the size of tumour. Effective alternative for unresectable primary hepatic tumours (big size, hepatic dysfunction, and other surgical risk factors) is endovascular interventional treatment. PMID:20108517

  20. APT radionuclide production experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Gavron, A.; King, J.D.

    1994-07-02

    Tritium ({sup 3}H, a heavy isotope of hydrogen) is produced by low energy neutron-induced reactions on various elements. One such reaction is n+{sup 3}He {yields}>{sup 3}H+{sup 1}H in which {sup 3}He is transmuted to tritium. Another reaction, which has been used in reactor production of tritium, is the n+{sup 6}Li {yields}> {sup 3}H+{sup 4}He reaction. Accelerator Production of Tritium relies on a high-energy proton beam to produce these neutrons using the spallation reaction, in which high-energy proton beam to produce these neutrons using the spallation reaction, in which high-energy protons reacting with a heavy nucleus produce a shower of low-energy neutrons and a lower-mass residual nucleus. It is important to quantify the residual radionuclides produced in the spallation target for two reasons. From an engineering point of view, one must understand short-lived isotopes that may contribute to decay heat. From a safety viewpoint, one must understand what nuclei and decay gammas are produced in order to design adequate shielding, to estimate ultimate waste disposal problems, and to predict possible effects due to accidental dispersion during operation. The authors have performed an experiment to measure the production of radioisotopes in stopping-length W and Pb targets irradiated by a 800 MeV proton beam, and are comparing the results to values obtained from calculations using LAHET and MCNP. The experiment was designed to pay particular attention to the short half-life radionuclides, which have not been previously measured. In the following, they present details of the experiment, explain how they analyzed the data and obtain the results, how they perform the calculations, and finally, how the experimental data agree with the calculations.

  1. Radionuclide therapy for arthritic knees

    SciTech Connect

    Doepel, L.K.

    1985-02-08

    A new radionuclide therapeutic approach for rheumatoid arthritis of the knee is described. This therapy combines a short-lived radionuclide with a carrier whose physical and chemical characteristics aid retention of the radioactive particles within the joint. Joining a radionuclide to a particulate carrier had not been explored previously as a potential method for inhibiting radiation leakage. The treatment couples the rare earth element dysprosium 165 to ferric hydroxide in macroaggregate form (size range: 3 to 10 ..mu..m). After the relatively inert iron complex penetrates the synovium, it causes cell death. Macrophages and phagocytes clear away the cellular debris, essentially eliminating the synovium.

  2. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  3. Mechanical aspects of CO₂ angiography.

    PubMed

    Corazza, Ivan; Rossi, Pier Luca; Feliciani, Giacomo; Pisani, Luca; Zannoli, Sebastiano; Zannoli, Romano

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to clarify some physical-mechanical aspects involved in the carbon dioxide angiography procedure (CO₂ angiography), with a particular attention to a possible damage of the vascular wall. CO₂ angiography is widely used on patients with iodine intolerance. The injection of a gaseous element, in most cases manually performed, requires a long training period. Automatic systems allow better control of the injection and the study of the mechanical behaviour of the gas. CO₂ injections have been studied by using manual and automatic systems. Pressures, flows and jet shapes have been monitored by using a cardiovascular mock. Photographic images of liquid and gaseous jet have been recorded in different conditions, and the vascular pressure rises during injection have been monitored. The shape of the liquid jet during the catheter washing phase is straight in the catheter direction and there is no jet during gas injection. Gas bubbles are suddenly formed at the catheter's hole and move upwards: buoyancy is the only governing phenomenon and no bubbles fragmentation is detected. The pressure rise in the vessel depends on the injection pressure and volume and in some cases of manual injection it may double the basal vascular pressure values. CO₂ angiography is a powerful and safe procedure which diffusion will certainly increase, although some aspects related to gas injection and chamber filling are not jet well known. The use of an automatic system permits better results, shorter training period and limitation of vascular wall damage risk.

  4. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect

    Bovaird, Chase C.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2011-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. The information present in the report provides data that (1) measures the effect of concrete wasteform properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and (2) quantifies the rate of carbonation of concrete materials in a simulated vadose zone repository.

  5. Radionuclide imaging of osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Palestro, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Radionuclide procedures frequently are performed as part of the diagnostic workup of osteomyelitis. Bone scintigraphy accurately diagnoses osteomyelitis in bones not affected by underlying conditions. Degenerative joint disease, fracture, and orthopedic hardware decrease the specificity of the bone scan, making it less useful in these situations. Gallium-67 scintigraphy was often used as an adjunct to bone scintigraphy for diagnosing osteomyelitis. However, now it is used primarily for spinal infections when (18)F-FDG imaging cannot be performed. Except for the spine, in vitro-labeled leukocyte imaging is the nuclear medicine test of choice for diagnosing complicating osteomyelitis. Leukocytes accumulate in bone marrow as well as in infection. Performing complementary bone marrow imaging with (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid facilitates the differentiation between osteomyelitis and normal marrow and improves test overall accuracy. Antigranulocyte antibodies and antibody fragments, such as (99m)Tc-besilesomab and (99m)Tc-sulesomab, were developed to eliminate the disadvantages associated with in vitro-labeled leukocytes. These agents, however, have their own shortcomings and are not widely available. As biotin is used as a growth factor by certain bacteria, (111)In-biotin is useful to diagnose spinal infections. Radiolabeled synthetic fragments of ubiquicidin, a naturally occurring human antimicrobial peptide that targets bacteria, can differentiate infection from sterile inflammation and may be useful to monitor response to treatment. (18)F-FDG is extremely useful in the diagnostic workup of osteomyelitis. Sensitivity in excess of 95% and specificity ranging from 75%-99% have been reported. (18)F-FDG is the radionuclide test of choice for spinal infection. The test is sensitive, with a high negative predictive value, and reliably differentiates degenerative from infectious vertebral body end-plate abnormalities. Data on the accuracy of (18)F-FDG for diagnosing diabetic pedal

  6. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    SciTech Connect

    J. Houseworth

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water. The invert is the structure constructed in a drift to provide the floor of the

  7. Simultaneous technetium-99m MIBI angiography and myocardial perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Baillet, G.Y.; Mena, I.G.; Kuperus, J.H.; Robertson, J.M.; French, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Resting first-pass radionuclide angiography (FPRNA) was performed with the myocardial perfusion agent technetium-99m MIBI. In 27 patients, it was compared with technetium-99m diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid FPRNA. A significant correlation was present in left (r = 0.93, p less than 0.001) as well as right (r = 0.92, p less than 0.001) ventricular ejection fraction measured with both radiopharmaceuticals. In 13 patients, MIBI derived segmental wall motion was compared with contrast ventriculography. A high correlation was present (p less than 0.001), and qualitative agreement was found in 38/52 segments. In 19 patients with myocardial infarction a significant correlation was present between MIBI segmental wall motion and perfusion scores (p less than 0.001). In ten patients with a history of myocardial infarction, 18 myocardial segments demonstrated diseased coronary vessels and impaired wall motion at contrast angiography. These segments were all identified by the MIBI wall motion and perfusion study. We conclude that MIBI is a promising agent for simultaneous evaluation of cardiac function and myocardial perfusion at rest.

  8. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q; Weng, J; Wang, J

    2007-11-15

    Studies of radionuclides in the environment have entered a new era with the renaissance of nuclear energy and associated fuel reprocessing, geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes, and concerns about national security with respect to nuclear non-proliferation. This work presents an overview of anthropogenic radionuclide contamination in the environment, as well as the salient geochemical behavior of important radionuclides. We first discuss the following major anthropogenic sources and current development that contribute to the radionuclide contamination of the environment: (1) nuclear weapons program; (2) nuclear weapons testing; (3) nuclear power plants; (4) commercial fuel reprocessing; (5) geological repository of high-level nuclear wastes, and (6) nuclear accidents. Then, we summarize the geochemical behavior for radionuclides {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and {sup 237}Np, because of their complex geochemical behavior, long half-lives, and presumably high mobility in the environment. Biogeochemical cycling and environment risk assessment must take into account speciation of these redox-sensitive radionuclides.

  9. Angiography of nonneoplastic retroperitoneal masses

    SciTech Connect

    Lois, J.F.; Levin, D.C.; Hooshmand, I.

    1982-01-01

    Although noninvasive imaging modalities can be used to initially detect retroperitoneal masses, angiography is still desirable for several reasons in those cases in which surgery is contemplated. The latter can forewarn the surgeon as to possible hemorrhagic complications in highly vascular lesions. In some cases it can predict the malignant potential of the lesion. Finally, since these masses may derive blood supply from multiple sources, a vascular ''road map'' is provided to the surgeon. The angiographic findings of malignant retroperitoneal tumors are well known, but very little has been published dealing with benign nonneoplastic retroperitoneal masses. We have performed angiography in 11 surgically proven nonneoplastic retroperitoneal masses (9 inflammatory lesions, 2 hematomas). Major arterial or renal displacement occurred in 10. The 2 hematomas and 3 inflammatory lesions were totally avascular; 6 of the 9 inflammatory lesions revealed fine neovascularity and 5 of these 6 had an associated capillary blush. Sources of vascular supply included the lumbar, renal capsular, superior mesenteric, and gastroduodenal arteries. Although angiography is helpful in preoperative evaluation of retroperitoneal masses for the aforementioned reasons, it may be difficult or impossible to differentiate benign from malignant lesions based on the angiographic findings alone.

  10. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor may want you to get the hepatitis B vaccine (and maybe the hepatitis A vaccine, too), if you don't already have these viruses. If you have hepatitis C, you are more likely to catch hepatitis A or hepatitis B, which would cause more damage to your liver. ...

  11. Radionuclide detection devices and associated methods

    DOEpatents

    Mann, Nicholas R [Rigby, ID; Lister, Tedd E [Idaho Falls, ID; Tranter, Troy J [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-03-08

    Radionuclide detection devices comprise a fluid cell comprising a flow channel for a fluid stream. A radionuclide collector is positioned within the flow channel and configured to concentrate one or more radionuclides from the fluid stream onto at least a portion of the radionuclide collector. A scintillator for generating scintillation pulses responsive to an occurrence of a decay event is positioned proximate at least a portion of the radionuclide collector and adjacent to a detection system for detecting the scintillation pulses. Methods of selectively detecting a radionuclide are also provided.

  12. Inverse problem in radionuclide transport

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.

    1988-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste must comply with the performance objectives set forth in 10 CFR 61 for low-level waste (LLW) and 10 CFR 60 for high-level waste (HLW). To determine probable compliance, the proposed disposal system can be modeled to predict its performance. One of the difficulties encountered in such a study is modeling the migration of radionuclides through a complex geologic medium for the long term. Although many radionuclide transport models exist in the literature, the accuracy of the model prediction is highly dependent on the model parameters used. The problem of using known parameters in a radionuclide transport model to predict radionuclide concentrations is a direct problem (DP); whereas the reverse of DP, i.e., the parameter identification problem of determining model parameters from known radionuclide concentrations, is called the inverse problem (IP). In this study, a procedure to solve IP is tested, using the regression technique. Several nonlinear regression programs are examined, and the best one is recommended. 13 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  14. Radionuclide injury to the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Dagle, G E; Sanders, C L

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide injury to the lung has been studied in rats, hamsters, dogs, mice and baboons. Exposure of the lung to high dose levels of radionuclides produces a spectrum of progressively more severe functional and morphological changes, ranging from radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis to lung tumors. These changes are somewhat similar for different species. Their severity can be related to the absorbed radiation dose (measured in rads) produced by alpha, beta or gamma radiation emanating from various deposited radionuclides. The chemicophysical forms of radionuclides and spatial-temporal factors are also important variables. As with other forms of injury to the lung, repair attempts are highlighted by fibrosis and proliferation of pulmonary epithelium. Lung tumors are the principal late effect observed in experimental animals following pulmonary deposition of radionuclides at dose levels that do not result in early deaths from radiation pneumonitis or fibrosis. The predominant lung tumors described have been of epithelial origin and have been classified, in decreasing frequency of occurrence, as adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, epidermoid carcinomas and combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma. Mesothelioma and fibrosarcoma have been observed in rats, but less commonly in other species. Hemangiosarcomas were frequency observed in dogs exposed to beta-gamma emitters, and occasionally in rats exposed to alpha emitters. These morphologic changes in the lungs of experimental animals were reviewed and issues relevant to the prediction of human hazards discussed. PMID:6376095

  15. Technical principles of MR angiography methods.

    PubMed

    Ivancevic, Marko K; Geerts, Liesbeth; Weadock, William J; Chenevert, Thomas L

    2009-02-01

    Magnetic resonance provides a wide variety of possibilities for arterial and venous blood vessel imaging in all vascular territories. This article provides a brief review of the technical principles of MR angiography. The first section is dedicated to non-contrast-enhanced angiography techniques and includes several distinct approaches: time-of-flight, phase contrast, triggered angiography non-contrast-enhanced, and balanced steady-state free precession. The second section relates to the contrast-enhanced and time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography methods. The latest technical developments in MR imaging hardware, sequences and software, coil technology, and reconstruction capability allow dynamic MR angiography performance similar to CT angiography, without risks of iodine contrast agent and ionizing radiation exposure.

  16. Radiation dose measurements in coronary CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Sabarudin, Akmal; Sun, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography is associated with high radiation dose and this has raised serious concerns in the literature. Awareness of various parameters for dose estimates and measurements of coronary CT angiography plays an important role in increasing our understanding of the radiation exposure to patients, thus, contributing to the implementation of dose-saving strategies. This article provides an overview of the radiation dose quantity and its measurement during coronary CT angiography procedures. PMID:24392190

  17. Radionuclide Therapy for Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Cives, Mauro; Strosberg, Jonathan

    2017-02-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a form of systemic radiotherapy that allows targeted delivery of radionuclides to tumor cells expressing high levels of somatostatin receptors. The two radiopeptides most commonly used for PRRT, (90)Y-DOTATOC and (177)Lu-DOTATATE, have been successfully employed for more than a decade for the treatment of advanced neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Recently, the phase III, randomized NETTER-1 trial has compared (177)Lu-DOTATATE versus high-dose octreotide LAR in patients with progressive, metastatic midgut NETs, demonstrating exceptional tolerability and efficacy. This review summarizes recent developments in the field of radionuclide therapy for gastroenteropancreatic and lung NETs and considers possible strategies to further enhance its clinical efficacy.

  18. Radionuclide Therapy of Bone Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Manfred; Kampen, Willm U.

    2012-01-01

    The skeleton is a potential metastatic target of many malignant tumors. Up to 85% of prostate and breast cancer patients may develop bone metastases causing severe pain syndromes in many of them. In patients suffering from multilocular, mainly osteoblastic lesions and pain syndrome, radionuclide therapy is recommended for pain palliation. Low-energy beta-emitting radionuclides (153samarium-ethylenediaminetetrameth-ylenephosphonate (EDTMP) and 89strontium) deliver high radiation doses to bone metastases and micrometastases in the bone marrow, but only negligible doses to the hematopoietic marrow. The response rate regarding pain syndrome is about 75%; about 25% of the patients may even become pain free. The therapy is repeatable, depending on cell counts. Concomitant treatment with modern bisphosphonates does not interfere with the treatment effects. Clinical trials using a new, not yet approved nuclide (223Radium) and/or combinations of chemotherapy and radionuclides are aiming at a more curative approach. PMID:22740795

  19. 100 years of radionuclide metrology.

    PubMed

    Judge, S M; Arnold, D; Chauvenet, B; Collé, R; De Felice, P; García-Toraño, E; Wätjen, U

    2014-05-01

    The discipline of radionuclide metrology at national standards institutes started in 1913 with the certification by Curie, Rutherford and Meyer of the first primary standards of radium. In early years, radium was a valuable commodity and the aim of the standards was largely to facilitate trade. The focus later changed to providing standards for the new wide range of radionuclides, so that radioactivity could be used for healthcare and industrial applications while minimising the risk to patients, workers and the environment. National measurement institutes responded to the changing demands by developing new techniques for realising primary standards of radioactivity. Looking ahead, there are likely to be demands for standards for new radionuclides used in nuclear medicine, an expansion of the scope of the field into quantitative imaging to facilitate accurate patient dosimetry for nuclear medicine, and an increasing need for accurate standards for radioactive waste management and nuclear forensics.

  20. Bioremediation of radionuclides: emerging technologies.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Singh, Sompal; Singh, Om V

    2007-01-01

    A large quantity of radioactive waste is being generated as the byproduct of atomic energy and related programs worldwide. There are multiple radioactive waste dumping sites, that, if exposed to the general population, may cause serious life-threatening disorders. Currently, no efficient technology is available that can store the radioactive wastes with adequate safety. Therefore, bioremediation of radionuclides/radioactive waste is an unavoidable necessity that has been tried using biotransformation, bioaccumulation, biosorption, biostimulation, and bioaugmentaion, with limited success. Genetic engineering has been implemented to develop an organism that can effectively detoxify radionuclides along with other organic pollutants present as co-contaminants in the radioactive waste sites. However, the lack of system-wide information regarding factors regulating growth and metabolism of microbial communities can be conquered by newly seeded "-omics"-based technologies, viz. transcriptomics and proteomics. Studies combining functional transcriptomics and proteomics would create a system-wide approach studying the microbial metabolism in radionuclides detoxification.

  1. Radionuclides in Chesapeake Bay sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cressy, P. J., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Natural and manmade gamma-ray emitting radionuclides were measured in Chesapeake Bay sediments taken near the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant site. Samples represented several water depths, at six locations, for five dates encompassing a complete seasonal cycle. Radionuclide contents of dry sediments ranged as follows: Tl-208, 40 to 400 pCi/kg; Bi-214, 200 to 800 pCi/kg; K, 0.04 to 2.1 percent; Cs-137 5 to 1900 pCi/kg; Ru106, 40 to 1000 pCikg Co60, 1 to 27 pCi/kg. In general, radionuclide contents were positively correlated with each other and negatively correlated with sediment grain size.

  2. The second insight: Radionuclide diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentle, Brian C.; Hooper, Richard

    Nuclear medicine has been defined as the use of radionuclides (unsealed sources of radiation) in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. It is a predominantly diagnostic speciality. Of the two aspects of disease, disordered structure and disordered function, nuclear medicine or radionuclide diagnosis has been unique in consistently providing information about disordered function. The method has applications both in life ( in vivo examinations, often involving imaging radionuclide distributions in the body) and in the test-tube ( in vivo). The tracer principle has allowed insights in respect of both patient care and research across a broad spectrum of diseases. Although nuclear medicine is a specialty which continues to evolve, it already has an established role in health care, predicated on its ability to study function.

  3. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis C Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Hepatitis C is a viral infection that causes liver inflammation, sometimes leading to serious liver damage. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) spreads through contaminated ...

  4. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... receive the hepatitis B vaccine. Since then, the rate of new hepatitis B infections has gone down ... 1 Asian Americans and African Americans have higher rates of chronic hepatitis B. 2 Many people in ...

  5. Radionuclide Imaging of Cardiovascular Infection.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Fozia Zahir; James, Jackie; Memmott, Matthew J; Arumugam, Parthiban

    2016-02-01

    Owing to expanding clinical indications, cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) are being increasingly used. Despite improved surgical techniques and the use of prophylactic antimicrobial therapy, the rate of CIED-related infection is also increasing. Infection is a potentially serious complication, with clinical manifestations ranging from surgical site infection and local symptoms in the region of the generator pocket to fulminant endocarditis. The utility of radionuclide imaging as a stand-alone noninvasive diagnostic imaging test in patients with suspected endocarditis has been less frequently examined. This article summarizes the recent advances in radionuclide imaging for evaluation of patients with suspected cardiovascular infections.

  6. Radionuclide labeled lymphocytes for therapeutic use

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Fawwaz, Rashid A.; Richards, Powell

    1985-01-01

    Lymphocytes labelled with .beta.-emitting radionuclides are therapeutically useful, particularly for lymphoid ablation. They are prepared by incubation of the lymphocytes with the selected radionuclide-oxine complex.

  7. Conditions and processes affecting radionuclide transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Neymark, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of unsaturated-zone transport is based on laboratory and field-scale experiments. Fractures provide advective transport pathways. Sorption and matrix diffusion may contribute to retardation of radionuclides. Conversely, sorption onto mobile colloids may enhance radionuclide transport.

  8. Radionuclide labeled lymphocytes for therapeutic use

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Richards, P.

    1983-05-03

    Lymphocytes labelled with ..beta..-emitting radionuclides are therapeutically useful, particularly for lymphoid ablation. They are prepared by incubation of the lymphocytes with the selected radionuclide-oxine complex.

  9. Radionuclide Sensors for Subsurface Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy DeVol

    2006-06-30

    Contamination of the subsurface by radionuclides is a persistent and vexing problem for the Department of Energy. These radionuclides must be measured in field studies and monitoed in the long term when they cannot be removed. However, no radionuclide sensors existed for groundwater monitoring prior to this team's research under the EMSP program Detection of a and b decays from radionuclides in water is difficult due to their short ranges in condensed media.

  10. Measurement of radionuclides in waste packages

    DOEpatents

    Brodzinski, R.L.; Perkins, R.W.; Rieck, H.G.; Wogman, N.A.

    1984-09-12

    A method is described for non-destructively assaying the radionuclide content of solid waste in a sealed container by analysis of the waste's gamma-ray spectrum and neutron emissions. Some radionuclides are measured by characteristic photopeaks in the gamma-ray spectrum; transuranic nuclides are measured by neutron emission rate; other radionuclides are measured by correlation with those already measured.

  11. TECHNOLOGIES FOR RADON AND RADIONUCLIDE REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper provides a summary of the technologies that are currently being used to remove radionuclides from drinking water. The radionuclides that are featured are the radionuclides currently regulated by EPA; radium, radon and uranium. Tehnologies effective for removal of eac...

  12. [Role of Radionuclide Technologies in Medicine].

    PubMed

    Chernyaev, A P; Belousov, A V; Varzar, S M; Borchegovskaya, P Y; Nikolaeva, A A; Krusanov, G A

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes the role of radionuclide technologies among the nuclear-physical methods used in medicine. The condition and prospects of the development of nuclear technology with use of radionuclides in medicine, and in particular, the method of brachytherapy are analyzed. The analysis of the current state of applying radionuclide facilities in medicine is provided.

  13. Measurement of radionuclides in waste packages

    DOEpatents

    Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Perkins, Richard W.; Rieck, Henry G.; Wogman, Ned A.

    1986-01-01

    A method is described for non-destructively assaying the radionuclide content of solid waste in a sealed container by analysis of the waste's gamma-ray spectrum and neutron emissions. Some radionuclides are measured by characteristic photopeaks in the gamma-ray spectrum; transuranic nuclides are measured by neutron emission rate; other radionuclides are measured by correlation with those already measured.

  14. Digital subtraction angiography in children

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M.L.; Singleton, E.B.; Egan, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary results with digital subtraction angiography in infants and children have shown this to be an excellent screening procedure and often diagnostic. The examination can be performed satisfactorily on outpatients. Sixty patients have undergone this examination for evaluation of suspected abnormalities of the aortic arch and its branches, intracranial arteries, pulmonary arteries, abdominal aorta and its branches, and peripheral vessels. Adequate sedation is mandatory to prevent motion artifacts. While the literature reports increasing use of central venous catheters for delivery of contrast material, the use of short catheters placed in an antecubital vein is satisfactory for the pediatric patient. Techniques of the procedures are described along with seven appropriate case examples.

  15. Tumor Immunotargeting Using Innovative Radionuclides

    PubMed Central

    Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Rousseau, Caroline; Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Mathieu, Cédric; Guérard, François; Frampas, Eric; Carlier, Thomas; Chouin, Nicolas; Haddad, Ferid; Chatal, Jean-François; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Chérel, Michel; Barbet, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews some aspects and recent developments in the use of antibodies to target radionuclides for tumor imaging and therapy. While radiolabeled antibodies have been considered for many years in this context, only a few have reached the level of routine clinical use. However, alternative radionuclides, with more appropriate physical properties, such as lutetium-177 or copper-67, as well as alpha-emitting radionuclides, including astatine-211, bismuth-213, actinium-225, and others are currently reviving hopes in cancer treatments, both in hematological diseases and solid tumors. At the same time, PET imaging, with short-lived radionuclides, such as gallium-68, fluorine-18 or copper-64, or long half-life ones, particularly iodine-124 and zirconium-89 now offers new perspectives in immuno-specific phenotype tumor imaging. New antibody analogues and pretargeting strategies have also considerably improved the performances of tumor immunotargeting and completely renewed the interest in these approaches for imaging and therapy by providing theranostics, companion diagnostics and news tools to make personalized medicine a reality. PMID:25679452

  16. Radionuclide evaluation in childhood injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.R.; Starshak, R.J.; Hubbard, A.M.

    1983-07-01

    Radionuclide techniques serve an important role in evaluating childhood injuries. Frequently, they can be employed as the initial and definitive examination. At times they represent the only modality that will detect specific injuries such as the skeletal system. Familiarity with the advantages and limitations of tracer techniques will insure appropriate management of childhood injuries.

  17. Natural radionuclide accumulation by raindrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Anatoly; Martin, Inacio; Shkevov, Rumen; Alves, Mauro

    2016-07-01

    The laboratory of environmental radiation of ITA (São José dos Campos, 23°11'11″S, 45°52'43″W, 650 MAMSL) performs simultaneous monitoring of a natural radiation background and meteorological parameters. A time resolution of up to 1 minute allows a detailed comparison of changes in meteorological parameters with those of a concentration of ambient radon progenies in the atmosphere. Results of a study of variation of a fallout of radon progenies ^{214}Pb and ^{214}Bi concomitanting rainfalls are present. The radionuclide fallout rate is reconstructed from the observed gamma rate through a simulation of the first kind Volterra integral equation with difference kernel, determined by ratio of precipitating rates of 214Pb and 214Bi and their decay half times. An original straightforward step-by-step procedure was used for the numerical solution of the equation. The radionuclide concentration in the rainwater is calculated as a ratio of the reconstructed fallout to the measured rainfall. It was observed that the radionuclide fallout rate increases as the rainfall one in approximately power 0.6, i.e. the same as the mean raindrop volume. The concentration thereafter decreases as the rainfall rate in power 0.4. A numerical simulation of the process of accumulation of the radionuclides during diffusion and coalescence drop growth and aerosol scavenging during a passage from a cloud to the ground was performed. The results of the simulations agree with the experimental data.

  18. (Biogeochemical pathways at artificial radionuclides)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, F.O.

    1989-06-26

    Many of the present computer codes used to assist management decisions on hazardous waste management issues have not been verified or tested and, in many instances, are operated by individuals lacking specific expertise about the overall behavior of radionuclides in the environment. BIOMOVS is an international effort to test such codes. SCOPE-RADPATH has been organized to address the data needs for reliable environmental assessment of radionuclides and the data required for code testing. Concern was expressed at both meetings that computer codes are being inadvertently used as a substitute for scientific expertise and are obscuring rather than identifying needs for further research. Efforts to alleviate this situation are apparent among the scientific community funded by the Commission of the European Communities and the Nordic Liason Committee for Atomic Energy. Attempts are also being made to transfer information about the environmental behavior of radionuclides to other types of trace contaminants in the biosphere, using radionuclides as quantitative tracers of major biospheric transport processes. Of particular importance is the assessment of the transfer of radioactive contaminants from watersheds into surface waters and subsequent bioaccumulation into aquatic food chains as well as the long-term remobilization of contaminants initially immobilized in sediment.

  19. Modeling Radionuclide Transport in Clays

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Liange; Li, Lianchong; Rutqvist, Jonny; Liu, Hui -Hai; Birkholzer, Jens

    2012-05-01

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated or plastic clays (Tsang and Hudson, 2010). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. During the lifespan of a clay repository, the repository performance is affected by complex thermal, hydrogeological, mechanical, chemical (THMC) processes, such as heat release due to radionuclide decay, multiphase flow, formation of damage zones, radionuclide transport, waste dissolution, and chemical reactions. All these processes are related to each other. An in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is critical for the performance assessment (PA) of the repository. These coupled processes may affect radionuclide transport by changing transport paths (e.g., formation and evolution of excavation damaged zone (EDZ)) and altering flow, mineral, and mechanical properties that are related to radionuclide transport. While radionuclide transport in clay formation has been studied using laboratory tests (e,g, Appelo et al. 2010, Garcia-Gutierrez et al., 2008, Maes et al., 2008), short-term field

  20. OCT Angiography Compared to Fluorescein and Indocyanine Green Angiography in Chronic Central Serous Chorioretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Teussink, Michel M; Breukink, Myrte B; van Grinsven, Mark J J P; Hoyng, Carel B; Klevering, B Jeroen; Boon, Camiel J F; de Jong, Eiko K; Theelen, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Abnormal choroidal blood flow is considered important in the pathogenesis of chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography can image ocular blood cell flow and could thus provide novel insights in disease mechanisms of CSC. We evaluated depth-resolved flow in chronic CSC by OCT angiography compared to fluorescein angiography (FA) and indocyanine green angiography (ICGA). Eighteen eyes with chronic CSC, and six healthy controls, were included. Two human observers annotated areas of staining, hypofluorescence, and hotspots on FA and ICGA, and areas of abnormal flow on OCT angiography. Interobserver agreement in annotating OCT angiography and FA/ICGA was measured by Jaccard indices (JIs). We assessed colocation of flow abnormalities and subretinal fluid visible on OCT, and the distance between hotspots on ICGA from flow abnormalities. Abnormal areas were most frequently annotated in late-phase ICGA and choriocapillary OCT angiography, with moderately high (median JI, 0.74) and moderate (median JI, 0.52) interobserver agreement, respectively. Abnormalities on late-phase ICGA and FA colocated with those on OCT angiography. Aberrant choriocapillary OCT angiography presented as foci of reduced flow surrounded by hyperperfused areas. Hotspots on ICGA were located near hypoperfused spots on OCT angiography (mean distance, 168 μm). Areas with current or former subretinal fluid were colocated with flow abnormalities. On OCT angiography, chronic CSC showed irregular choriocapillary flow patterns, corresponding to ICGA abnormalities. These results suggest focal choriocapillary ischemia with surrounding hyperperfusion that may lead to subretinal fluid leakage.

  1. Indocyanine green fluorescence angiography of the choroid.

    PubMed Central

    Craandijk, A; Van Beek, C A

    1976-01-01

    Indocyanine green fluorescence (ICG) angiography of the choroid gives better visualization of the choroidal vessels than does fluorescein angiography. We found that the detachment of the pigment epithelium seems bigger on ICG than on fluorescein angiograms, and pigmented lesions are more clearly delineated. Images PMID:952809

  2. [Three-dimensional reconstruction and image fusion between liver focal lesions and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography].

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Liang, Bi-Ling; Zhang, Rong; Xu, Xiao-Mao; Ren, Jun-Jie; Ye, Rui-Xin; Zhong, Jing-Lian

    2006-07-01

    Identifying the correlation of focal lesions to the liver vessel system is a key factor in selecting treatment patterns for focal hepatic diseases. This study was to evaluate the feasibility of 3-dimensional reconstruction and the fusion image between the 3-dimensional dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (3D DCE MRA) and the focal hepatic lesions, and further, explore the clinical application of this method. 3D DCE-MRA and conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. The angiography and focal hepatic lesions were reconstructed with maximum intensity projection (MIP) and surface shaded display (SSD), and then fused together. Of the 25 cases with evaluable images, 2 were hemangioma, 3 were focal nodular hyperplasia, 1 was hepatocellular adenoma, 2 were macroregenerative nodule, 2 were hepatobiliary cystadenocarcinoma, and 17 were hepatocellular carcinoma; 21 were confirmed by operation resection, and 4 received digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The anatomic relationship between the lesions and the vessels were well shown. Of the 27 cases, 5 showed normal vessel branching, 6 showed feeding arteries from the hepatic artery, 11 showed compressed and shifted trunks of the vessels, 6 showed tumor invaded vessels, and 11 showed the tumor embolism in the portal vein or the inferior vena cave; 9 also showed MRI signs of portal hypertension. MIP was prior to SSD in demonstrating small branches of the hepatic vessels. The 3-dimensional reconstruction and fusion images between 3D DCE-MRA and the focal hepatic lesions by using MIP and SSD can easily display the anatomic relationship between the focal hepatic lesions and the hepatic vessels, and thus can help the surgeons to localize lesions, minimize operating time and decide the extent of surgical resection.

  3. Identification of CSF fistulas by radionuclide counting

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Y.; Kunishio, K.; Sunami, N.; Yamamoto, Y.; Satoh, T.; Suga, M.; Asari, S. )

    1990-07-01

    A radionuclide counting method, performed with the patient prone and the neck flexed, was used successfully to diagnose CSF rhinorrhea in two patients. A normal radionuclide ratio (radionuclide counts in pledget/radionuclide counts in 1-ml blood sample) was obtained in 11 normal control subjects. Significance was determined to be a ratio greater than 0.37. Use of radionuclide counting method of determining CSF rhinorrhea is recommended when other methods have failed to locate a site of leakage or when posttraumatic meningitis suggests subclinical CSF rhinorrhea.

  4. Relaxation response in femoral angiography.

    PubMed

    Mandle, C L; Domar, A D; Harrington, D P; Leserman, J; Bozadjian, E M; Friedman, R; Benson, H

    1990-03-01

    Immediately before they underwent femoral angiography, 45 patients were given one of three types of audiotapes: a relaxation response tape recorded for this study, a tape of contemporary instrumental music, or a blank tape. All patients were instructed to listen to their audiotape during the entire angiographic procedure. Each audiotape was played through earphones. Radiologists were not told the group assignment or tape contents. The patients given the audiotape with instructions to elicit the relaxation response (n = 15) experienced significantly less anxiety (P less than .05) and pain (P less than .001) during the procedure, were observed by radiology nurses to exhibit significantly less pain (P less than .001) and anxiety (P less than .001), and requested significantly less fentanyl citrate (P less than .01) and diazepam (P less than .01) than patients given either the music (n = 14) or the blank (n = 16) control audiotapes. Elicitation of the relaxation response is a simple, inexpensive, efficacious, and practical method to reduce pain, anxiety, and medication during femoral angiography and may be useful in other invasive procedures.

  5. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the liver), liver cancer, and even death.Hepatitis A can cause varying symptoms, but most often causes fever, tiredness, ... important? The hepatitis B vaccine prevents infection with hepatitis B virus, which causes liver cancer. The hepatitis B virus is 100 ...

  6. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... transaminase enzyme levels Treatment There is no specific treatment for hepatitis A. You should rest when the symptoms are ... and have not had hepatitis A or the hepatitis A vaccine. Common reasons for getting one or both of these treatments include: You live with someone who has hepatitis ...

  7. Radionuclide synovectomy - essentials for rheumatologists.

    PubMed

    Chojnowski, Marek M; Felis-Giemza, Anna; Kobylecka, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide synovectomy is a minimally invasive method of treating persistent joint inflammation. It involves intra-articular injection of radioactive colloids which induce necrosis and fibrosis of hypertrophic synovial membrane. The most common indication for radiosynovectomy is rheumatoid arthritis, although patients with seronegative spondyloarthropathies, unclassified arthritis, haemophilic arthropathy and other less common arthropathies can also benefit from this method. Radiosynovectomy is safe, well tolerated and efficacious. About 70-80% of patients respond well to the therapy. However, the therapeutic effects are considerably worse in patients with co-existent osteoarthritis and advanced joint degeneration. Despite its advantages, radionuclide synovectomy is not performed as often as it could be, so greater knowledge and understanding of this method are needed. The authors present the most important facts about radiosynovectomy that may help rheumatologists in their daily clinical practice.

  8. Chernobyl radionuclide distribution and migration.

    PubMed

    Izrael, Yury A

    2007-11-01

    The accident at Unit No. 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on 26 April 1986 presented severe challenges in radiation protection. Early activity measurements defined the contaminated areas in order to determine what persons should be evacuated on the basis of the exposure limit at that time of 100 mSv (10 rem) for accidents. The immediate definition of these areas was accomplished with specially equipped aircraft capable of measuring external gamma-exposure rate and radionuclide spectra. Over time, maps of 137Cs contamination (the most important long-lived radionuclide) have become more and more sophisticated and have been used for further determinations of the control of the consequences of the accident. About 70% of the total release of 137Cs was deposited in Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine; but there was also widespread deposition throughout the countries of Western Europe. Two atlases of contamination throughout Europe were prepared, and the Russian atlas included data on other radionuclides and on external gamma-exposure rates. The radiocesiums behaved as volatile radionuclides because of the volatility of cesium. In contrast to the typical pattern after nuclear weapons tests, 90Sr behaved only as a refractory element, as its volatile precursors krypton and rubidium had already decayed within the reactor. Nearly all of the refractory elements (strontium, plutonium, etc.) released by the accident were confined to the 30-km zone around the reactor. A proposal is made to develop a more complete atlas of 137Cs deposition from the accident that would include the entire Northern Hemisphere. Water was not an important vector of exposure to human beings following the accident.

  9. Natural chelates for radionuclide decorporation

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, E.T.

    1983-08-25

    This invention relates to the method and resulting chelates of desorbing a radionuclide selected from thorium, uranium, and plutonium containing cultures in a bioavailable form involving pseudomonas or other microorganisms. A preferred microorganism is Pseudomonas aeruginosa which forms multiple chelates with thorium in the range of molecular weight 1000 to 1000 and also forms chelates with uranium of molecular weight in the area of 100 to 1000 and 1000 to 2000.

  10. "Geyser" leakage on fluorescein angiography.

    PubMed

    Levy, Jaime; Fagan, Xavier J; Lifshitz, Tova; Schneck, Marina

    2013-11-22

    An 82-year-old patient with diabetes was followed up due to moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema in the right eye. Visual acuity was 6/36. Focal macular laser was conducted (A). Three years later, the patient presented with blurry vision in the right eye. Visual acuity was 3/60. Vitreous hemorrhage was observed (B), and neovascularization of the disc was suspected (C). Fluorescein angiography (D, mid venous phase; E-F, recirculation phase) confirmed neovascularization of the disc and depicted a striking vertical leakage. Panretinal photocoagulation was started. Possible explanations for the "geyser" leakage may be either a partial posterior vitreous detachment allowing the fluorescein to track upwards but not elsewhere or a pocket of syneretic vitreous allowing the fluorescein passage in which to diffuse, much like the passage the blood would have taken.

  11. Radionuclide behavior in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Tveten, U. )

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of the following task: Review for quality and consistency the available data on measurements of initial ground contamination of Chernobyl radionuclides in various parts of Norway and subsequent concentrations of these radionuclides in various environmental media as functions of time. Utilize the data obtained to verify the existing models, or to improve them, for describing radionuclide behavior in the environment. Some of the processes standard were: migration into soil; weathering; resuspension; food-chain contamination; and loss or reconcentration by run-off. The task performed within this contract has been to use post-Chernobyl data from Norway to verify or find areas for possible improvement in the chronic exposure pathway models utilized in MACCS. Work has consisted mainly of collecting and evaluating post-Chernobyl information from Norway or other countries when relevant; but has also included experimental work performed specifically for the current task. In most connections the data available show the models and data in MACCS to be appropriate. A few areas where the data indicate that the MACCS approach is faulty or inadequate are, however, pointed out in the report. These should be examined carefully, and appropriate modifications should eventually be made. 14 refs., 12 figs., 22 tabs.

  12. Radionuclide daughter inventory generator code: DIG

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, D.E.; Sharp, R.D.

    1985-09-01

    The Daughter Inventory Generator (DIG) code accepts a tabulation of radionuclide initially present in a waste stream, specified as amounts present either by mass or by activity, and produces a tabulation of radionuclides present after a user-specified elapsed time. This resultant radionuclide inventory characterizes wastes that have undergone daughter ingrowth during subsequent processes, such as leaching and transport, and includes daughter radionuclides that should be considered in these subsequent processes or for inclusion in a pollutant source term. Output of the DIG code also summarizes radionuclide decay constants. The DIG code was developed specifically to assist the user of the PRESTO-II methodology and code in preparing data sets and accounting for possible daughter ingrowth in wastes buried in shallow-land disposal areas. The DIG code is also useful in preparing data sets for the PRESTO-EPA code. Daughter ingrowth in buried radionuclides and in radionuclides that have been leached from the wastes and are undergoing hydrologic transport are considered, and the quantities of daughter radionuclide are calculated. Radionuclide decay constants generated by DIG and included in the DIG output are required in the PRESTO-II code input data set. The DIG accesses some subroutines written for use with the CRRIS system and accesses files containing radionuclide data compiled by D.C. Kocher. 11 refs.

  13. Digital subtraction angiography of the heart and lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Moodie, D.S.; Yiannikas, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Physical Principles of Cardiac Digital Subtraction Angiography, The Use of Intravenous Digital Subtraction Angiography in Evaluating Patients with Complex Congenital Heart Disease, Exercise Intravenous Digital Subtraction Angiograpny, Cardiomyopathic and Cardiac Neoplastic Disease, Digital Subtraction Angiography in the Catheterization Laboratory, and Cardiac Digital Subtraction Angiography - Future Directions.

  14. Renal angiography with iohexol and metrizoate

    SciTech Connect

    Toernquist, C.; Holtaes, S.

    1984-02-01

    The nephrotoxicity of the ionic contrast medium metrizoate was compared with that of nonionic iohexol when used for renal angiography. Fifteen patients who underwent renal angiography with metrizoate and 15 with iohexol were studied. Serum creatinine level, Cr-51-EDTA clearance, and urine albumin level were recorded before and after angiography. Metrizoate affected renal function, as indicated both by a transient decrease in glomerular filtration rate and by a transient albuminuria. Renal function was unaffected by iohexol. Furthermore, iohexol produced less subjective discomfort than metrizoate. There appeared to be no difference in the quality of the angiograms obtained with the two media.

  15. An Unusual Case of Hepatic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Frena, Antonio; Zanetti, Gianfranco; Gozzetti, Giuseppe

    1991-01-01

    A case is reported of a large hepatic tumor in a patient aged 71. Preoperative diagnostic techniques, including echography, CT and angiography, did not provide sufficient criteria for a precise diagnosis. The mass was removed with an extended right hepatectomy with no particular physiopathological consequences. Histological analysis revealed that this was a metastasis from a melonoma of the choroid, operated on 17 years previously. PMID:1859802

  16. Methods of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    DOEpatents

    Bray, Lane A.; Ryan, Jack L.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a method of obtaining a radionuclide product selected from the group consisting of .sup.223 Ra and .sup.225 Ac, from a radionuclide "cow" of .sup.227 Ac or .sup.229 Th respectively. The method comprises the steps of a) permitting ingrowth of at least one radionuclide daughter from said radionuclide "cow" forming an ingrown mixture; b) insuring that the ingrown mixture is a nitric acid ingrown mixture; c) passing the nitric acid ingrown mixture through a first nitrate form ion exchange column which permits separating the "cow" from at least one radionuclide daughter; d) insuring that the at least one radionuclide daughter contains the radionuclide product; e) passing the at least one radionuclide daughter through a second ion exchange column and separating the at least one radionuclide daughter from the radionuclide product and f) recycling the at least one radionuclide daughter by adding it to the "cow". In one embodiment the radionuclide "cow" is the .sup.227 Ac, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.227 Th and the product radionuclide is the .sup.223 Ra and the first nitrate form ion exchange column passes the .sup.227 Ac and retains the .sup.227 Th. In another embodiment the radionuclide "cow"is the .sup.229 Th, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.225 Ra and said product radionuclide is the .sup.225 Ac and the .sup.225 Ac and nitrate form ion exchange column retains the .sup.229 Th and passes the .sup.225 Ra/Ac.

  17. Methods of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    DOEpatents

    Bray, L.A.; Ryan, J.L.

    1998-09-15

    The present invention is a method of obtaining a radionuclide product selected from the group consisting of {sup 223}Ra and {sup 225}Ac, from a radionuclide ``cow`` of {sup 227}Ac or {sup 229}Th respectively. The method comprises the steps of (a) permitting ingrowth of at least one radionuclide daughter from said radionuclide ``cow`` forming an ingrown mixture; (b) insuring that the ingrown mixture is a nitric acid ingrown mixture; (c) passing the nitric acid ingrown mixture through a first nitrate form ion exchange column which permits separating the ``cow`` from at least one radionuclide daughter; (d) insuring that the at least one radionuclide daughter contains the radionuclide product; (e) passing the at least one radionuclide daughter through a second ion exchange column and separating the at least one radionuclide daughter from the radionuclide product and (f) recycling the at least one radionuclide daughter by adding it to the ``cow``. In one embodiment the radionuclide ``cow`` is the {sup 227}Ac, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a {sup 227}Th and the product radionuclide is the {sup 223}Ra and the first nitrate form ion exchange column passes the {sup 227}Ac and retains the {sup 227}Th. In another embodiment the radionuclide ``cow`` is the {sup 229}Th, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a {sup 225}Ra and said product radionuclide is the {sup 225}Ac and the {sup 225}Ac and nitrate form ion exchange column retains the {sup 229}Th and passes the {sup 225}Ra/Ac. 8 figs.

  18. Radionuclide angiography in evaluation of left ventricular function following aortic valve replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Santinga, J.T.; Kirsh, M.M.; Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.; Pitt, B.

    1981-05-01

    Congestive heart failure in patients surviving aortic valve replacement has been associated with a high late mortality. To determine whether myocardial dysfunction in these patients occurred preoperatively, perioperatively, or during the early postoperative period, 19 consecutive patients undergoing aortic valve replacement using cardioplegia and hypothermia were studied by multiple-gated cardiac blood pool imaging. The resting ejection fractions for 8 patients with aortic stenosis did not show significant changes following operation. The 11 patients with aortic insufficiency has resting preoperative values of 58 +/- 15%, which fell to 38 +/- 18% immediately postoperatively (p less than 0.01), with the late values being 51 +/- 16%. Eight of 18 patients (44%) showed deterioration of regional wall motion immediately after operation, which persisted in 3 during the late evaluation. The occurrence of new perioperative regional wall motion abnormalities and persistent perioperative depression in left ventricular function in some patients suggest the need for further improvement in myocardial protection during cardiopulmonary bypass for aortic valve replacement.

  19. Microbial Transformations of Actinides and Other Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Francis,A.J.; Dodge, C. J.

    2009-01-07

    Microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of the actinides and other radionuclides released from nuclear fuel cycle and from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can alter the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution in the environment and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of radionuclides is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect non-enzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of radionuclides have been extensively investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes and biochemical mechanisms which affect the stability and mobility of radionuclides. The mechanisms of microbial transformations of the major and minor actinides U, Pu, Cm, Am, Np, the fission products and other radionuclides such as Ra, Tc, I, Cs, Sr, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of electron donors and acceptors are reviewed.

  20. Chemical speciation of radionuclides migrating in groundwaters

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, D.; Schilk, A.; Abel, K.; Lepel, E.; Thomas, C.; Pratt, S.; Cooper, E.; Hartwig, P.; Killey, R.

    1994-04-01

    In order to more accurately predict the rates and mechanisms of radionuclide migration from low-level waste disposal facilities via groundwater transport, ongoing studies are being conducted at field sites at Chalk River Laboratories to identify and characterize the chemical speciation of mobile, long-lived radionuclides migrating in groundwaters. Large-volume water sampling techniques are being utilized to separate and concentrate radionuclides into particular, cationic, anionic, and nonionic chemical forms. Most radionuclides are migrating as soluble, anionic species that appear to be predominantly organoradionuclide complexes. Laboratory studies utilizing anion exchange chromatography have separated several anionically complexed radionuclides, e.g., {sup 60}Co and {sup 106}Ru, into a number of specific compounds or groups of compounds. Further identification of the anionic organoradionuclide complexes is planned utilizing high resolution mass spectrometry. Large-volume ultra-filtration experiments are characterizing the particulate forms of radionuclides being transported in these groundwaters.

  1. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gudkov, Sergey V.; Shilyagina, Natalya Yu.; Vodeneev, Vladimir A.; Zvyagin, Andrei V.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed. PMID:26729091

  2. Method of making colloid labeled with radionuclide

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, Robert W.; Hines, John J.

    1991-01-01

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints.

  3. Colloid labelled with radionuclide and method

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, Robert W.; Hines, John J.

    1990-01-01

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints.

  4. DKPRO: A radionuclide decay and reprocessing code

    SciTech Connect

    Wootan, D.; Schmittroth, F.A.

    1997-07-14

    The DKPRO code solves the general problem of modeling complex nuclear wastes streams using ORIGEN2 radionuclide production files. There is a continuing need for estimates of Hanford radionuclides. Physical measurements are one basis; calculational estimates, the approach represented here, are another. Given a known nuclear fuel history, it is relatively straightforward to calculate radionuclide inventories with codes such as the widely-used Oak Ridge National Laboratory code ORIGEN2.

  5. Colloid labelled with radionuclide and method

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, R.W.; Hines, J.J.

    1990-11-13

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints. No Drawings

  6. Whole body postmortem magnetic resonance angiography.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Thomas D; Hatch, Gary M; Ebert, Lars C; Flach, Patricia M; Ross, Steffen; Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Thali, Michael J

    2012-05-01

      Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging have become important elements of forensic radiology. Whereas the feasibility and potential of CT angiography have long been explored, postmortem MR angiography (PMMRA) has so far been neglected. We tested the feasibility of PMMRA on four adult human cadavers. Technical quality of PMMRA was assessed relative to postmortem CT angiography (PMCTA), separately for each body region. Intra-aortic contrast volumes were calculated on PMCTA and PMMRA with segmentation software. The results showed that technical quality of PMMRA images was equal to PMCTA in 4/4 cases for the head, the heart, and the chest, and in 3/4 cases for the abdomen, and the pelvis. There was a mean decrease in intra-aortic contrast volume from PMCTA to PMMRA of 46%. PMMRA is technically feasible and allows combining the soft tissue detail provided by MR and the information afforded by angiography. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  7. Low-cost portable fluorescein angiography.

    PubMed

    Maude, Richard J; Plewes, Katherine; Dimock, Joss; Dondorp, Arjen M

    2011-09-01

    Fundus fluorescein angiography has great potential as a unique non-invasive tool to investigate in vivo the microvascular pathogenesis of a wide variety of diseases affecting the central nervous system. However, because it requires a bulky and expensive tabletop retinal camera, it is normally limited to cooperative and alert seated patients in well-resourced settings. Recently completed and ongoing studies of the pathogenesis of severe malaria are using fluorescein angiography to examine in detail the postulated central role of microvascular obstruction. We describe a novel method of fluorescein angiography with a portable retinal camera that can be adapted at very low cost for use in sick patients at the bedside. This method greatly expands the scope of potential studies utilising fluorescein angiography.

  8. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... them. Causes This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference ... inflammation, or hepatitis, may occur along with other autoimmune diseases. These include: Graves disease Inflammatory bowel disease Rheumatoid ...

  9. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000279.htm Hepatitis B To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis B is irritation and swelling (inflammation) of the ...

  10. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources Business Congressional Affairs Jobs Benefits Booklet Data & Statistics National ... with hepatitis B need to be on treatment. Choosing the right time for hepatitis B treatment is ...

  11. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... washed in untreated water Putting into your mouth a finger or object that came into contact with ...

  12. Digital Subtraction Angiography In Peripheral Vascular Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieghorst, Michael F.; Crummy, Andrew B.; Lieberman, Robert P.; Turnipseed, William D.; Detmer, Donald E.; Berkoff, Herbert A.

    1981-11-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) has considerable utility in the evaluation of peripheral vascular disease. It is useful in screening selected patients for vascular disease and its relative ease of performance and good patient tolerance make it ideal for serial examinations of post operative patients. When used in conjunction with intra arterial injections, the technique may show "run-off" vessels which were not demonstrated by standard angiography. This paper presents our experience using DSA to image peripheral vascular problems.

  13. Therapy for incorporated radionuclides: scope and need

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, V.H.

    1981-03-01

    In the United States the recent termination of funding for research on therapy for incorporated radionuclides has virtually halted progress on improved or new agents and procedures for removing radioactivity from the body. Research was eliminated, but is still needed on new removal agents, improved delivery system, in vitro test systems, and the toxicology of treatments. For many radionuclides, no adequate therapy exists. The relationship between radionuclide removal and reduction in cancer risk is still unanswered. Without proper research support, needed improvements in the treatment for incorporated radionuclides in the US are uncertain.

  14. Ion binding compounds, radionuclide complexes, methods of making radionuclide complexes, methods of extracting radionuclides, and methods of delivering radionuclides to target locations

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xiaoyuan; Wai, Chien M.; Fisher, Darrell R.

    2000-01-01

    The invention pertains to compounds for binding lanthanide ions and actinide ions. The invention further pertains to compounds for binding radionuclides, and to methods of making radionuclide complexes. Also, the invention pertains to methods of extracting radionuclides. Additionally, the invention pertains to methods of delivering radionuclides to target locations. In one aspect, the invention includes a compound comprising: a) a calix[n]arene group, wherein n is an integer greater than 3, the calix[n]arene group comprising an upper rim and a lower rim; b) at least one ionizable group attached to the lower rim; and c) an ion selected from the group consisting of lanthanide and actinide elements bound to the ionizable group. In another aspect, the invention includes a method of extracting a radionuclide, comprising: a) providing a sample comprising a radionuclide; b) providing a calix[n]arene compound in contact with the sample, wherein n is an integer greater than 3; and c) extracting radionuclide from the sample into the calix[n]arene compound. In yet another aspect, the invention includes a method of delivering a radionuclide to a target location, comprising: a) providing a calix[n]arene compound, wherein n is an integer greater than 3, the calix[n]arene compound comprising at least one ionizable group; b) providing a radionuclide bound to the calix[n]arene compound; and c) providing an antibody attached to the calix[n]arene compound, the antibody being specific for a material found at the target location.

  15. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis C, is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with ... childbirth. Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. If ...

  16. CT angiography ofthe carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Prokop, M; Waaijer, A; Kreuzer, S

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of multislice scanning has made CT angiography (CTA) a serious competitor to MR angiography (MRA) as a second line method for the evaluation of the carotid arteries. For optimum display of the morphology of stenoses, it is necessary to apply the thinnest possible section collimation (ideally [symbol: see text] 1.25mm). While the scan range is limited for single slice CTA, it is possible to cover the whole supraaortic circulation from the aortic arch to the intracranial vessels using multislice scanning. Timing of contrast injection is important, however, the injection technique for carotid CTA is more forgiving than for other body regions. Image evaluation is mainly based on axial sections and curved planar reformations (CPR). Other techniques only serve as an adjunct to better be able to demonstrate the findings. Most potential pitfalls can be avoided by using the appropriate technique. CTA has been shown to have a pooled sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 98% for the detection of >70% stenoses, even if only older single-slice techniques are used. Differentiation between lipid, fibrous and calcified plaques may be possible, especially with multislice scanning. Multislice CTA can in addition detect tandem stenoses in the region of the carotid origin from the aorta, the carotid siphon, and the intracranial portion of the carotids. CT is able to provide a comprehensive evaluation of patients with acute stroke by using a combined approach of pre-contrast CT to detect hemorrhage and manifest infarction, CT brain perfusion measurements to differentiate between penumbra and infarct and CTA to detect the occluded vessel as well as potential concomitant carotid abnormalities. In summary, carotid CTA has come of age and can be used to quantify stenoses more precisely than ultrasound, to detect tandem stenoses and for the workup of acute stroke patients. The learning objectives include learning how to chose acquisition parameters for carotid CTA, how to

  17. Radionuclide therapy of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Carrasquillo, Jorge A; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Chen, Clara C

    2012-10-01

    Adrenal tumors arising from chromaffin cells will often accumulate radiolabeled metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and thus are amenable to therapy with I-131 MIBG. More recently, therapy studies have targeted the somatostatin receptors using Lu-177 or Y-90 radiolabeled somatostatin analogs. Because pheochromocytoma (PHEO)/paraganglioma (PGL) and neuroblastoma (NB), which often arise from the adrenals, express these receptors, clinical trials have been performed with these reagents. We will review the experience using radionuclide therapy for targeting PHEO/PGL and NBs. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [Radionuclide therapy for neuroendocrine tumours].

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Jann; Oturai, Peter; Højgaard, Liselotte; Knigge, Ulrich; Hansen, Carsten Palnaes; Martiný, Lars; Rasmussen, Palle; Kjaer, Andreas

    2010-10-25

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using somatostatin analogues labelled with beta-emitting isotopes can be given to patients with metastasized or inoperable neuroendocrine tumours provided these have increased uptake on octreotide scintigraphy. This is a brief review of the treatment principle, indications and contraindications and practices with (177)Lu-DOTATATE treatment used at Rigshospitalet. Side effects are generally mild and reversible. Severe long-term side effects are rare. The majority of patients will experience increased quality of life and partial tumour reduction or stabilization for a period of time. However, up to 20% will experience no treatment effect.

  19. Comparison of CT angiography and digital subtraction angiography in the diagnosis of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Miabi, Zinat; Pourfathi, Hojjat; Midia, Mehran; Midia, Ramin; Parvizi, Rezayat

    2011-01-01

    There are several methods for the diagnosis and evaluation of coarctation of the aorta. Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) is the standard detection method, though it entails complications and side-effects. The aim of the present study was to compare Computed Tomography (CT) angiography with DSA for diagnosing aortic coarctation. We performed a cross-sectional study of 15 patients (11 males and four females aged between two and 30 years) referred to Tabriz Shahid Madani Hospital and Imaging Center between August 2005 and February 2006 with suspected aortic coarctation. All patients were subjected to DSA and CT angiography for diagnosis of aortic coarctation. The mean age of the patients was 14.6 years; 11 were male (74.4%) and four (26.6%) were female. The DSA and CT angiography results were comparable in all patients in terms of diagnosis and the detection of complications, particularly cardiovascular complications. However, CT angiography was less time-consuming to perform than DSA (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, CT angiography, comparableto DSA, diagnosed coarctation of aorta in all the patients. However, CT angiography is a non-invasive, cost effective procedure that takes significantly less time to carry out than DSA. Therefore, CT angiography is recommended as an appropriate method for diagnosing the coarctation of aorta.

  20. MD CT Angiography and MR Angiography of Nonatherosclerotic Renal Artery Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Flors, Lucia; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos; Ahmad, Ehab Ali; Norton, Patrick T.; Turba, Ulku C.; Bozlar, Ugur; Hagspiel, Klaus D.

    2011-12-15

    We reviewed the computed tomographic and magnetic resonance angiographic appearances of the various nonatherosclerotic renal artery pathologies. Rapid progress in cross-sectional techniques has allowed computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography to replace digital subtraction angiography in most circumstances. When state-of-the-art equipment and optimized protocols are used, diagnosing a wide range of nonatherosclerotic pathologies is possible.

  1. Hysterosalpingo-radionuclide scintigraphy (HERS)

    SciTech Connect

    Iturralde, M.; Venter, P.F.

    1981-10-01

    A radionuclide procedure, hysterosalpingo-radionuclide scintigraphy (HERS), was designed to evaluate the migration of a particulate radioactive tracer from the vagina to the peritoneal cavity and ovaries as well as to image and functionally outline the patency of the pathways between these two extremes of the female reproductive system. Technetium-99m human albumin microspheres (99mTc-HAM) were deposited in the posterior fornices of patients who were divided into two specific groups. Group I consisted of patients who were to undergo different elective gynecologic operations, in which besides obtaining sequential images, radioactivity levels were measured in the removed organs and tissues. Group II consisted of patients referred by the Infertility Clinic for evaluation of their reproductive system pathways patency. In this latter group, HERS was compared with contrast hysterosalpingography (HSG) and peritoneoscopy (PCP). The results obtained from measurements of radioactivity levels on the removed surgical specimens and comparison with other conventional gynecologic diagnostic procedures provide accurate evidence of the migration of 99mTc-HAM from the vagina, through the uterus and tubes, to the peritoneal cavity and ovaries, and show that HERS is a simple noninvasive method for functionally imaging and assessing the patency of the female reproductive system pathways.

  2. Radionuclide imaging in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Wolf-Dieter

    2014-11-01

    Ischemic stroke is caused by interruption or significant impairment of blood supply to the brain, which leads to a cascade of metabolic and molecular alterations resulting in functional disturbance and morphologic damage. The changes in regional cerebral blood flow and regional metabolism can be assessed by radionuclide imaging, especially SPECT and PET. SPECT and PET have broadened our understanding of flow and metabolic thresholds critical for maintenance of brain function and morphology: PET was essential in the transfer of the concept of the penumbra to clinical stroke and thereby had a great impact on developing treatment strategies. Receptor ligands can be applied as early markers of irreversible neuronal damage and can predict the size of the final infarcts, which is important for decisions on invasive therapy in large ("malignant") infarction. With SPECT and PET, the reserve capacity of the blood supply can be tested in obstructive arteriosclerosis, which is essential for planning interventions. The effect of a stroke on surrounding and contralateral primarily unaffected tissue can be investigated, helping to understand symptoms caused by disturbance in functional networks. Activation studies are useful to demonstrate alternative pathways to compensate for lesions and to test the effect of rehabilitative therapy. Radioisotope studies help to detect neuroinflammation and its effect on extension of tissue damage. Despite the limitations of broad clinical application of radionuclide imaging, this technology has a great impact on research in cerebrovascular diseases and still has various applications in the management of stroke. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  3. Radionuclide transit in esophageal varices

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.H.; Wang, S.J.; Wu, L.C.; Liu, R.S.; Tsai, Y.T.; Chiang, T.T.

    1985-05-01

    This study assessed esophageal motility in patients with esophageal varices by radionuclide transit studies. Data were acquired in list mode after an oral dose of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid in 10 ml of water in the supine position above a low-energy all-purpose collimator of a gamma camera. The condensed image (CI) superimposed with a centroid curve was also produced in each case. Twenty-five normal subjects (N) and 32 patients (pts) with esophageal varices by endoscopy (large varices in Grades IV and V in 8 and small varices in Grade III or less in 24) were studied. TMTT, RTT, RF, and RI were all significantly increased in pts as compared to N. Especially, the transit time for the middle third (6.7 +- 2.6 sec vs 3.5 +- 0.9 sec in N, rho < 0.005) had the optimal sensitivy and specificity of 88% each at the cutoff value of 4.2 sec as determined by ROC analysis. In summary, radionuclide transit disorders occur in the majority of pts with esopageal varices. The middle RTT and CI are both optimal in sensitivity and specificity for detecting the abnormalities.

  4. Follow-up of true visceral artery aneurysm after coil embolization by three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography

    PubMed Central

    Koganemaru, Masamichi; Abe, Toshi; Nonoshita, Masaaki; Iwamoto, Ryoji; Kusumoto, Masashi; Kuhara, Asako; Kugiyama, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the outcomes of coil embolization of true visceral artery aneurysms by three-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) angiography. MATERIALS AND METHODS We used three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography, which included source images, to evaluate 23 patients (mean age, 60 years; range, 28–83 years) with true visceral artery aneurysms (splenic, n=15; hepatic, n=2; gastroduodenal, n=2; celiac, n=2; pancreaticoduodenal, n=1; gastroepiploic, n=1) who underwent coil embolization. Angiographic aneurysmal occlusion was revealed in all cases. Follow-up MR angiography was conducted with either a 1.5 or 3 Tesla system 3–25 months (mean, 18 months) after embolization. MR angiography was evaluated for aneurysmal occlusion, hemodynamic status, and complications. RESULTS Complete aneurysmal occlusion was determined in 22 patients (96%) on follow-up MR angiography (mean follow-up period, 18 months). Neck recanalization, which was observed at nine and 20 months after embolization, was confirmed in one of eight patients (13%) using a neck preservation technique. In this patient, a small neck recanalization covered by a coil mass was demonstrated. The complete hemodynamic status after embolization was determined in 21 patients (91%); the visualization of several collateral vessels, such as short gastric arteries, after parent artery occlusion was poor compared with that seen on digital subtraction angiography in the remaining two patients (9%). An asymptomatic localized splenic infarction was confirmed in one patient (4%). CONCLUSION Our study presents the follow-up results from three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography, which confirmed neck recanalization, the approximate hemodynamic status, and complications. This effective and less invasive method may be suitable for serial follow-up after coil embolization of true visceral aneurysms. PMID:24356294

  5. Follow-up of true visceral artery aneurysm after coil embolization by three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Koganemaru, Masamichi; Abe, Toshi; Nonoshita, Masaaki; Iwamoto, Ryoji; Kusumoto, Masashi; Kuhara, Asako; Kugiyama, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the outcomes of coil embolization of true visceral artery aneurysms by three-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) angiography. We used three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography, which included source images, to evaluate 23 patients (mean age, 60 years; range, 28-83 years) with true visceral artery aneurysms (splenic, n=15; hepatic, n=2; gastroduodenal, n=2; celiac, n=2; pancreaticoduodenal, n=1; gastroepiploic, n=1) who underwent coil embolization. Angiographic aneurysmal occlusion was revealed in all cases. Follow-up MR angiography was conducted with either a 1.5 or 3 Tesla system 3-25 months (mean, 18 months) after embolization. MR angiography was evaluated for aneurysmal occlusion, hemodynamic status, and complications. Complete aneurysmal occlusion was determined in 22 patients (96%) on follow-up MR angiography (mean follow-up period, 18 months). Neck recanalization, which was observed at nine and 20 months after embolization, was confirmed in one of eight patients (13%) using a neck preservation technique. In this patient, a small neck recanalization covered by a coil mass was demonstrated. The complete hemodynamic status after embolization was determined in 21 patients (91%); the visualization of several collateral vessels, such as short gastric arteries, after parent artery occlusion was poor compared with that seen on digital subtraction angiography in the remaining two patients (9%). An asymptomatic localized splenic infarction was confirmed in one patient (4%). Our study presents the follow-up results from three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography, which confirmed neck recanalization, the approximate hemodynamic status, and complications. This effective and less invasive method may be suitable for serial follow-up after coil embolization of true visceral aneurysms.

  6. Modeling Radionuclide Decay Chain Migration Using HYDROGEOCHEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T. C.; Tsai, C. H.; Lai, K. H.; Chen, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear technology has been employed for energy production for several decades. Although people receive many benefits from nuclear energy, there are inevitably environmental pollutions as well as human health threats posed by the radioactive materials releases from nuclear waste disposed in geological repositories or accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear facilities. Theoretical studies have been undertaken to understand the transport of radionuclides in subsurface environments because that the radionuclide transport in groundwater is one of the main pathway in exposure scenarios for the intake of radionuclides. The radionuclide transport in groundwater can be predicted using analytical solution as well as numerical models. In this study, we simulate the transport of the radionuclide decay chain using HYDROGEOCHEM. The simulated results are verified against the analytical solution available in the literature. Excellent agreements between the numerical simulation and the analytical are observed for a wide spectrum of concentration. HYDROGECHEM is a useful tool assessing the ecological and environmental impact of the accidental radionuclide releases such as the Fukushima nuclear disaster where multiple radionuclides leaked through the reactor, subsequently contaminating the local groundwater and ocean seawater in the vicinity of the nuclear plant.

  7. Microbial detoxification of metals and radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, J R; Lovley, D R

    2001-06-01

    Microorganisms have important roles in the biogeochemical cycling of toxic metals and radionuclides. Recent advances have been made in understanding metal-microbe interactions and new applications of these processes to the detoxification of metal and radionuclide contamination have been developed.

  8. Comparison of transplenic multidetector CT portography to multidetector CT-angiography in normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Echandi, Rita L; Morandi, Federica; Daniel, William T; Paquette, Janet L; Daniel, Gregory B

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated transplenic injection of iodinated contrast medium for computed tomography (CT) assessment of the portal vasculature. Specific aims were to: (1) establish a protocol for transplenic transplenic CT portography using a 40-row multidetector scanner; (2) compare transplenic CT portography to dual-phase CT angiography in terms of image quality, opacification of the portal system, and contrast enhancement of the portal vasculature and liver; (3) compare personnel exposure during transplenic CT portography and transplenic portal scintigraphy. Seven juvenile dogs underwent transplenic portal scintigraphy, CT angiography, and transplenic CT portography. Transplenic portal scintigraphy and CT angiography were performed using previously established protocols. For transplenic CT portography, a 20- or 22 gauge needle attached to an extension set was placed into the splenic parenchyma using CT guidance. Iodinated contrast medium (175 mg I/ml) was administered, and CT acquisition was started at the time of the injection. Transplenic CT portography was simple, rapid and provided more intense enhancement of the splenic and portal veins, with a lower contrast medium dose (median dose: 525 mg I for transplenic CT portography, 7700 mg I for CT angiography), but caused inconsistent intrahepatic portal branches and parenchymal opacification due to streamlining and streak artifacts. Despite significantly lower attenuation values in the portal vein, CT angiography provided sufficient enhancement for vessel identification and more consistent parenchymal hepatic enhancement. Personnel radiation exposure rate was higher during transplenic CT portography (0.0725 mSv/min) compared with transplenic portal scintigraphy (0.000125 mSv/min). As transplenic CT portography requires an average injection time of 1 min per study; over 650 [corrected] studies must be performed before reaching the maximum permissible whole body dose of 0.05 [corrected] Sv.

  9. Radionuclide Releases During Normal Operations for Ventilated Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Blunt, B.

    2001-09-24

    This calculation estimates the design emissions of radionuclides from Ventilated Tanks used by various facilities. The calculation includes emissions due to processing and storage of radionuclide material.

  10. Detecting low levels of radionuclides in fluids

    DOEpatents

    Patch, Keith D.; Morgan, Dean T.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting low levels of one or more radionuclides in a fluid sample uses a substrate that includes an ion exchange resin or other sorbent material to collect the radionuclides. A collecting apparatus includes a collecting chamber that exposes the substrate to a measured amount of the fluid sample such that radionuclides in the fluid sample are collected by the ion exchange resin. A drying apparatus, which can include a drying chamber, then dries the substrate. A measuring apparatus measures emissions from radionuclides collected on the substrate. The substrate is positioned in a measuring chamber proximate to a detector, which provides a signal in response to emissions from the radionuclides. Other analysis methods can be used to detect non-radioactive analytes, which can be collected with other types of sorbent materials.

  11. Sensors and Automated Analyzers for Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.

    2003-03-27

    The production of nuclear weapons materials has generated large quantities of nuclear waste and significant environmental contamination. We have developed new, rapid, automated methods for determination of radionuclides using sequential injection methodologies to automate extraction chromatographic separations, with on-line flow-through scintillation counting for real time detection. This work has progressed in two main areas: radionuclide sensors for water monitoring and automated radiochemical analyzers for monitoring nuclear waste processing operations. Radionuclide sensors have been developed that collect and concentrate radionuclides in preconcentrating minicolumns with dual functionality: chemical selectivity for radionuclide capture and scintillation for signal output. These sensors can detect pertechnetate to below regulatory levels and have been engineered into a prototype for field testing. A fully automated process monitor has been developed for total technetium in nuclear waste streams. This instrument performs sample acidification, speciation adjustment, separation and detection in fifteen minutes or less.

  12. Hepatitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  13. Noninvasive assessment of right ventricular function: will there be resurgence in radionuclide imaging techniques?

    PubMed

    Ramani, Gautam V; Gurm, Gagandeep; Dilsizian, Vasken; Park, Myung H

    2010-03-01

    Right ventricular (RV) function is increasingly being recognized as an important prognostic marker in multiple cardiopulmonary disease states, including congestive heart failure, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Accurate and reproducible measures of RV function, although technically challenging, are highly relevant in the clinical setting. Radionuclide techniques (eg, first-pass radionuclide angiography for quantifying RV systolic function) were developed nearly 40 years ago. More recently, MRI and transthoracic echocardiography have become the diagnostic imaging techniques of choice for the noninvasive evaluation of RV function. However, developments in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), and hybrid SPECT/CT and PET/CT systems have greatly improved the image quality and contrast resolution of radionuclide imaging of the heart, allowing for coregistered physiologic and anatomical information of the right ventricle in three dimensions. These improvements in cardiac imaging provide new opportunities for assessing RV myocardial perfusion, function, and anatomy in the same setting. Such imaging approaches may in the future provide assistance with proactive disease management, including early diagnosis of impending RV dysfunction in high-risk patients and for guiding decisions to initiate and/or modify treatments.

  14. Complications with Outpatient Angiography and Interventional Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Noel; Chi, Ka-Kit; Ajaka, Joe; McKay, Lesa; O'Neill, Diane; Wong, Kai Ping

    2002-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively identify the complications, and rates of complication, in outpatient angiography and interventional procedures. Methods: There were 1050 consecutive patients, 646 men and 404 women, aged 17-89 years, with a total of 1239 procedures studied in a 2-year period, 1997 to 1999. Results: There were 560 cases of aorto-femoral angiography,resulting in 124 complications (22%), with pain or hematoma in 110.There were 206 cases of neck and cerebral angiography, resulting in 51 complications (25%), with pain and hematoma in 34, transient ischemic attack in 2 and cerebrovascular accident in 1. There were 197 interfentional procedures, with 177 being balloon dilatations, resulting in 68 complications (35%), with 2 having hematomas and 1 having hematoma/abscess requiring active treatment. There were 276 cases having various 'other' procedures (e.g., renal angiography),resulting in 65 complications (24%), with pain and hematoma in 61. No procedure-related death occurred. Eighteen cases (1.5%) had significant complications, with contrast allergy in eight. Conclusion: Outpatient angiography and intervention are relatively safe, with low significant complication rates.

  15. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    SciTech Connect

    P.R. Dixon

    2004-02-17

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document two models for drift-scale radionuclide transport. This has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC) 2002 [160819]), which includes planning documents for the technical work scope, content, and management of this Model Report in Section 1.15, Work Package AUZM11, ''Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport.'' The technical work scope for this Model Report calls for development of a process-level model and an abstraction model representing diffusive release from the invert to the rocks, partitioned between fracture and matrix, as compared to the fracture-release approach used in the Site Recommendation. The invert is the structure constructed in a drift to provide the floor of that drift. The plan for validation of the models documented in this Model Report is given in Section I-5 of Attachment I in BSC (2002 [160819]). Note that the model validation presented in Section 7 deviates from the technical work plan (BSC 2002 [160819], Section I-5) in that an independent technical review specifically for model validation has not been conducted, nor publication in a peer-reviewed journal. Model validation presented in Section 7 is based on corroboration with alternative mathematical models, which is also called out by the technical work plan (BSC 2002 [160819], Section I-5), and is sufficient based on the requirements of AP-SIII.10Q for model validation. See Section 7 for additional discussion. The phenomenon of flow and transport in the vicinity of the waste emplacement drift are evaluated in this model report under ambient thermal, chemical, and mechanical conditions. This includes the effects of water diversion around an emplacement drift and the flow and transport behavior expected in a fractured rock below the drift. The reason for a separate assessment of drift-scale transport is that the effects of waste emplacement drifts on flow

  16. Computational methods in radionuclide dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardiès, M.; Myers, M. J.

    1996-10-01

    The various approaches in radionuclide dosimetry depend on the size and spatial relation of the sources and targets considered in conjunction with the emission range of the radionuclide used. We present some of the frequently reported computational techniques on the basis of the source/target size. For whole organs, or for sources or targets bigger than some centimetres, the acknowledged standard was introduced 30 years ago by the MIRD committee and is still being updated. That approach, based on the absorbed fraction concept, is mainly used for radioprotection purposes but has been updated to take into account the dosimetric challenge raised by therapeutic use of vectored radiopharmaceuticals. At this level, the most important computational effort is in the field of photon dosimetry. On the millimetre scale, photons can often be disregarded, and or electron dosimetry is generally reported. Heterogeneities at this level are mainly above the cell level, involving groups of cell or a part of an organ. The dose distribution pattern is often calculated by generalizing a point source dose distribution, but direct calculation by Monte Carlo techniques is also frequently reported because it allows media of inhomogeneous density to be considered. At the cell level, and electron (low-range or Auger) are the predominant emissions examined. Heterogeneities in the dose distribution are taken into account, mainly to determine the mean dose at the nucleus. At the DNA level, Auger electrons or -particles are considered from a microdosimetric point of view. These studies are often connected with radiobiological experiments on radionuclide toxicity.

  17. Cosmogenic radionuclides in stone meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cressy, P. J., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This document presents the techniques and compilation of results of cosmogenic Al-26 measurements at Goddard Space Flight Center on 91 samples of 76 stone meteorites. Short-lived radionuclides, including Na-22, Sc-46, Mn-54, and Co-60, were measured in 13 of these meteorites. About one-third of these data has not previously been published. The results are discussed briefly in terms of (1) depletion of Al-26 and natural potassium due to weathering, (2) possible exposure of several chondrites to an unusually high cosmic-ray flux, (3) comparison of Al-26, Na-22, Sc-46, and Mn5-54 in chondrites with the spallation Ne-22/Ne-21 ratio as a shielding indicator, and (4) comparison of (Al-26)-(Ne-22)/Ne-21 data for achondrite classes with the chondrite trend.

  18. Radionuclides in surface and groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, Kate M.

    2009-01-01

    Unique among all the contaminants that adversely affect surface and water quality, radioactive compounds pose a double threat from both toxicity and damaging radiation. The extreme energy potential of many of these materials makes them both useful and toxic. The unique properties of radioactive materials make them invaluable for medical, weapons, and energy applications. However, mining, production, use, and disposal of these compounds provide potential pathways for their release into the environment, posing a risk to both humans and wildlife. This chapter discusses the sources, uses, and regulation of radioactive compounds in the United States, biogeochemical processes that control mobility in the environment, examples of radionuclide contamination, and current work related to contaminated site remediation.

  19. Transverse section radionuclide scanning system

    DOEpatents

    Kuhl, David E.; Edwards, Roy Q.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a transverse section radionuclide scanning system for high-sensitivity quantification of brain radioactivity in cross-section picture format in order to permit accurate assessment of regional brain function localized in three-dimensions. High sensitivity crucially depends on overcoming the heretofore known raster type scanning, which requires back and forth detector movement involving dead-time or partial enclosure of the scan field. Accordingly, this invention provides a detector array having no back and forth movement by interlaced detectors that enclose the scan field and rotate as an integral unit around one axis of rotation in a slip ring that continuously transmits the detector data by means of laser emitting diodes, with the advantages that increased amounts of data can be continuously collected, processed and displayed with increased sensitivity according to a suitable computer program.

  20. Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs and symptoms of hepatitis C virus infection? Hepatitis C virus infection causes signs and symptoms similar to those of hepatitis B virus infection. It also can cause no symptoms. Unlike hepatitis B virus infection, most ...

  1. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table ... from all walks of life are affected by hepatitis, especially hepatitis C, the most common form of ...

  2. Illicit Trafficking of Natural Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Steinhaeusler; Lyudmila, Zaitseva

    2008-08-07

    Natural radionuclides have been subject to trafficking worldwide, involving natural uranium ore (U 238), processed uranium (yellow cake), low enriched uranium (<20% U 235) or highly enriched uranium (>20% U 235), radium (Ra 226), polonium (Po 210), and natural thorium ore (Th 232). An important prerequisite to successful illicit trafficking activities is access to a suitable logistical infrastructure enabling an undercover shipment of radioactive materials and, in case of trafficking natural uranium or thorium ore, capable of transporting large volumes of material. Covert en route diversion of an authorised uranium transport, together with covert diversion of uranium concentrate from an operating or closed uranium mines or mills, are subject of case studies. Such cases, involving Israel, Iran, Pakistan and Libya, have been analyzed in terms of international actors involved and methods deployed. Using international incident data contained in the Database on Nuclear Smuggling, Theft and Orphan Radiation Sources (DSTO) and international experience gained from the fight against drug trafficking, a generic Trafficking Pathway Model (TPM) is developed for trafficking of natural radionuclides. The TPM covers the complete trafficking cycle, ranging from material diversion, covert material transport, material concealment, and all associated operational procedures. The model subdivides the trafficking cycle into five phases: (1) Material diversion by insider(s) or initiation by outsider(s); (2) Covert transport; (3) Material brokerage; (4) Material sale; (5) Material delivery. An Action Plan is recommended, addressing the strengthening of the national infrastructure for material protection and accounting, development of higher standards of good governance, and needs for improving the control system deployed by customs, border guards and security forces.

  3. Illicit Trafficking of Natural Radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Steinhäusler; Lyudmila, Zaitseva

    2008-08-01

    Natural radionuclides have been subject to trafficking worldwide, involving natural uranium ore (U 238), processed uranium (yellow cake), low enriched uranium (<20% U 235) or highly enriched uranium (>20% U 235), radium (Ra 226), polonium (Po 210), and natural thorium ore (Th 232). An important prerequisite to successful illicit trafficking activities is access to a suitable logistical infrastructure enabling an undercover shipment of radioactive materials and, in case of trafficking natural uranium or thorium ore, capable of transporting large volumes of material. Covert en route diversion of an authorised uranium transport, together with covert diversion of uranium concentrate from an operating or closed uranium mines or mills, are subject of case studies. Such cases, involving Israel, Iran, Pakistan and Libya, have been analyzed in terms of international actors involved and methods deployed. Using international incident data contained in the Database on Nuclear Smuggling, Theft and Orphan Radiation Sources (DSTO) and international experience gained from the fight against drug trafficking, a generic Trafficking Pathway Model (TPM) is developed for trafficking of natural radionuclides. The TPM covers the complete trafficking cycle, ranging from material diversion, covert material transport, material concealment, and all associated operational procedures. The model subdivides the trafficking cycle into five phases: (1) Material diversion by insider(s) or initiation by outsider(s); (2) Covert transport; (3) Material brokerage; (4) Material sale; (5) Material delivery. An Action Plan is recommended, addressing the strengthening of the national infrastructure for material protection and accounting, development of higher standards of good governance, and needs for improving the control system deployed by customs, border guards and security forces.

  4. Indirect coronary angiography: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Wolffgram, T; Krieter, A; Berger, H; Detter, C; Schurr, M O; Braun, M; Schneider, U

    2002-01-01

    The diagnostic method of choice to proof coronary artery disease and to localize stenoses and to judge the stage of the disease is coronary angiography. A new angiographic technique invented by. Wolffgram and Krieter that works without cannulation of the coronary arteries could simplify the interventional procedure. In addition, a technique like this could be used for angiography after CABG surgery directly on the table for quality assurance reasons. This angiography could be performed by the cardiac surgeon without necessarily involving a cardiologist. A feasibility study was successfully done in a cooperation of the Departments. for Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery, Munich University, Steinbeis Transfer Centre for rHealthcare Technologies, Tuebingen and Fraunhofer Technology Development Group (TEG), Stuttgart.

  5. Full-field optical micro-angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingyi; Zeng, Yaguang; Liang, Xianjun; Lu, Xuanlong; Feng, Guanping; Han, Dingan; Yang, Guojian

    2014-02-01

    We present a detailed description of full-field optical micro-angiography on the basis of frequency-domain laser speckle imaging with intensity fluctuation modulation (LSI-IFM). The imaging approach works based on the instantaneous local intensity fluctuation realized via the combination of short exposure and low sampling rate of a camera and appropriate magnification of a microscope. In vivo experiments on mouse ear verify the theoretical description we made for the imaging mechanism and demonstrate the ability of LSI-IFM as optical micro-angiography. By introducing a fundus camera into LSI-IFM system, our approach has a potential application in label-free retina optical micro-angiography.

  6. Hepatitis C Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hepatitis C Antibody; Anti-HCV; HCV-PCR; HCV-RNA; Hepatitis C Viral Load Formal name: Viral Hepatitis C Antibody Screen; Viral Hepatitis C RNA by PCR; Hepatitis C Virus Genotype Related tests: ...

  7. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chapter 3 - Hepatitis A Chapter 3 - Hepatitis C Hepatitis B Francisco Averhoff INFECTIOUS AGENT Hepatitis B is ... their exposures. Map 3-04. Prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus infection among adults PDF Version (printable) ...

  8. Radionuclides: Accumulation and Transport in Plants.

    PubMed

    Gupta, D K; Chatterjee, S; Datta, S; Voronina, A V; Walther, C

    Application of radioactive elements or radionuclides for anthropogenic use is a widespread phenomenon nowadays. Radionuclides undergo radioactive decays releasing ionizing radiation like gamma ray(s) and/or alpha or beta particles that can displace electrons in the living matter (like in DNA) and disturb its function. Radionuclides are highly hazardous pollutants of considerable impact on the environment, food chain and human health. Cleaning up of the contaminated environment through plants is a promising technology where the rhizosphere may play an important role. Plants belonging to the families of Brassicaceae, Papilionaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Poaceae, and Asteraceae are most important in this respect and offer the largest potential for heavy metal phytoremediation. Plants like Lactuca sativa L., Silybum marianum Gaertn., Centaurea cyanus L., Carthamus tinctorius L., Helianthus annuus and H. tuberosus are also important plants for heavy metal phytoremediation. However, transfer factors (TF) of radionuclide from soil/water to plant ([Radionuclide]plant/[Radionuclide]soil) vary widely in different plants. Rhizosphere, rhizobacteria and varied metal transporters like NRAMP, ZIP families CDF, ATPases (HMAs) family like P1B-ATPases, are involved in the radio-phytoremediation processes. This review will discuss recent advancements and potential application of plants for radionuclide removal from the environment.

  9. Analysis of coronary angiography related psychophysiological responses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coronary angiography is an important tool in diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. However, it is the administration is relatively stressful and emotionally traumatic for the subjects. The aim of this study is to evaluate psychophysiological responses induced by the coronary angiography instead of subjective methods such as a questionnaire. We have also evaluated the influence of the tranquilizer on the psychophysiological responses. Methods Electrocardiography (ECG), Blood Volume Pulse (BVP), and Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) of 34 patients who underwent coronary angiography operation were recorded. Recordings were done at three phases: "1 hour before," "during," and "1 hour after" the coronary angiography test. Total of 5 features obtained from the physiological signals were compared across these three phases. Sixteen of the patients were administered 5 mg of a tranquilizer (Diazepam) before the operation and remaining 18 were not. Results Our results indicate that there is a strong correlation between features (LF/HF, Bk, DN1/DN2, skin conductance level and seg_mean) in terms of reflecting psychophysiological responses. However only DN1/DN2 feature has statistically significant differences between angiography phases (for diazepam: p = 0.0201, for non_diazepam p = 0.0224). We also note that there are statistically significant differences between the diazepam and non-diazepam groups for seg_mean features in "before", "during" and "after" phases (p = 0.0156, 0.0282, and 0.0443, respectively). Conclusions The most intense sympathetic activity is observed in the "during" angiography phase for both of the groups. The obtained features can be used in some clinical studies where generation of the customized/individual diagnoses styles and quantitative evaluation of psychophysiological responses is necessary. PMID:21834993

  10. The Usefulness of Three-Dimensional Angiography with a Flat Panel Detector of Direct Conversion Type in a Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization Procedure for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kakeda, Shingo Korogi, Yukunori; Hatakeyama, Yoshihisa; Ohnari, Norihiro; Oda, Nobuhiro; Nishino, Kazuyoshi; Miyamoto, Wataru

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of a three-dimensional (3D) angiography system using a flat panel detector of direct conversion type in treatments with subsegmental transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). Thirty-six consecutive patients who underwent hepatic angiography were prospectively examined. First, two radiologists evaluated the degree of visualization of the peripheral branches of the hepatic arteries on 3D digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Then the radiologists evaluated the visualization of tumor staining and feeding arteries in 25 patients (30 HCCs) who underwent subsegmental TACE. The two radiologists who performed the TACE assessed whether the additional information provided by 3D DSA was useful for treatments. In 34 (94.4%) of 36 patients, the subsegmental branches of the hepatic arteries were sufficiently visualized. The feeding arteries of HCCs were sufficiently visualized in 28 (93%) of 30 HCCs, whereas tumor stains were sufficiently visualized in 18 (60%). Maximum intensity projection images were significantly superior to volume recording images for visualization of the tumor staining and feeding arteries of HCCs. In 27 (90%) of 30 HCCs, 3D DSA provided additional useful information for subsegmental TACE. The high-quality 3D DSA with flat panel detector angiography system provided a precise vascular road map, which was useful for performing subsegmental TACE .of HCCs.

  11. The usefulness of three-dimensional angiography with a flat panel detector of direct conversion type in a transcatheter arterial chemoembolization procedure for hepatocellular carcinoma: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Kakeda, Shingo; Korogi, Yukunori; Hatakeyama, Yoshihisa; Ohnari, Norihiro; Oda, Nobuhiro; Nishino, Kazuyoshi; Miyamoto, Wataru

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of a three-dimensional (3D) angiography system using a flat panel detector of direct conversion type in treatments with subsegmental transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). Thirty-six consecutive patients who underwent hepatic angiography were prospectively examined. First, two radiologists evaluated the degree of visualization of the peripheral branches of the hepatic arteries on 3D digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Then the radiologists evaluated the visualization of tumor staining and feeding arteries in 25 patients (30 HCCs) who underwent subsegmental TACE. The two radiologists who performed the TACE assessed whether the additional information provided by 3D DSA was useful for treatments. In 34 (94.4%) of 36 patients, the subsegmental branches of the hepatic arteries were sufficiently visualized. The feeding arteries of HCCs were sufficiently visualized in 28 (93%) of 30 HCCs, whereas tumor stains were sufficiently visualized in 18 (60%). Maximum intensity projection images were significantly superior to volume recording images for visualization of the tumor staining and feeding arteries of HCCs. In 27 (90%) of 30 HCCs, 3D DSA provided additional useful information for subsegmental TACE. The high-quality 3D DSA with flat panel detector angiography system provided a precise vascular road map, which was useful for performing subsegmental TACE of HCCs.

  12. Acute Ischemic Stroke: Infarct Core Estimation on CT Angiography Source Images Depends on CT Angiography Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Pulli, Benjamin; Schaefer, Pamela W.; Hakimelahi, Reza; Chaudhry, Zeshan A.; Lev, Michael H.; Hirsch, Joshua A.; González, R. Gilberto

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test whether the relationship between acute ischemic infarct size on concurrent computed tomographic (CT) angiography source images and diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance images is dependent on the parameters of CT angiography acquisition protocols. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study had institutional review board approval, and all records were HIPAA compliant. Data in 100 patients with anterior-circulation acute ischemic stroke and large vessel occlusion who underwent concurrent CT angiography and DW imaging within 9 hours of symptom onset were analyzed. Measured areas of hyperintensity at acute DW imaging were used as the standard of reference for infarct size. Information regarding lesion volumes and CT angiography protocol parameters was collected for each patient. For analysis, patients were divided into two groups on the basis of CT angiography protocol differences (patients in group 1 were imaged with the older, slower protocol). Intermethod agreement for infarct size was evaluated by using the Wilcoxon signed rank test, as well as by using Spearman correlation and Bland-Altman analysis. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of marked (≥20%) overestimation of infarct size on CT angiography source images. Results: In group 1 (n = 35), median hypoattenuation volumes on CT angiography source images were slightly underestimated compared with DW imaging hyperintensity volumes (33.0 vs 41.6 mL, P = .01; ratio = 0.83), with high correlation (ρ = 0.91). In group 2 (n = 65), median volume on CT angiography source images was much larger than that on DW images (94.8 vs 17.8 mL, P < .0001; ratio = 3.5), with poor correlation (ρ = 0.49). This overestimation on CT angiography source images would have inappropriately excluded from reperfusion therapy 44.4% or 90.3% of patients eligible according to DW imaging criteria on the basis of a 100-mL absolute threshold or a 20% or greater mismatch threshold, respectively

  13. Digital subtraction angiography of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Gattoni, F; Avogadro, A; Baldini, U; Pozzato, C; Bonfanti, M T; Gandini, D; Franch, L; Uslenghi, C

    1988-09-01

    Intravenous and intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was performed in 88 patients: 34 with tumours, 10 with renal trauma, 26 with suspected renovascular hypertension, 6 with vascular impression on the renal pelvis, 8 with nephrolithiasis and 4 with sonographically abnormal kidneys. Venous and arterial DSA always gave diagnostically useful images. Intravenous DSA is valuable in patients with suspected renovascular hypertension or after vascular surgery, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and transcatheter embolisation. Arterial DSA is preferable to venous DSA in other clinical situations, particularly in the evaluation of renal tumours, and may be recommended in preference to conventional angiography.

  14. Digital subtraction angiography of the thoracic aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, L.B.; Buonocore, E.; Modic, M.T.; Meaney, T.F.

    1984-02-01

    Forty-three patients with acquired and congenital abnormalities of the thoracic aorta were studied using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) after an intravenous bolus injection of 40 ml of contrast material. Abnormalities studied included coarctation, pseudocoarctation, Marfan syndrome, cervical aorta, double aortic arch, aneurysm, dissection, and tumor. Twenty-four patients also had conventional angiography. DSA was accurate in 95% of cases; in the other 5%, involving patients with acute type I dissection, the coronary arteries could not be seen. The authors concluded that in 92% of their patients, DSA could have replaced the standard aortogram.

  15. Fluorescein and Indocyanine Green Angiography for Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Herbort, Carl P

    2009-01-01

    In recent years enormous progress has been achieved in investigational procedures for uveitis. Imaging is one such example with the advent of new methods such as indocyanine green angiography, ultrasound biomicroscopy and optical coherence tomography to cite only the most important. This tremendous increase in precision and accuracy in the assessment of the level and degree of inflammation and its monitoring comes in parallel with the development of extremely potent and efficacious therapies. In view of these developments, our whole attitude in the appraisal and investigation of the uveitis patient has to be adapted and correctly reoriented integrating the recent developments and this is no different for ocular angiography. PMID:20404985

  16. Iodide Mumps Complicating Coronary and Carotid Angiography.

    PubMed

    Elder, Alexander M M; Ng, Martin K C

    2017-02-01

    We report a case of asceptic sialadenitis that occurred in a patient with end-stage renal failure following administration of iodinated contrast for coronary and carotid angiography. This is a rare but important complication of iodinated contrast. Early diagnosis of iodide mumps following angiography avoids unnecessary investigations and treatment. In this case the patient underwent haemodialysis with subsequent complete resolution of the sialadenitis, a treatment that has previously not been reported for this condition. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Gastrointestinal bleeding and obstructive jaundice: Think of hepatic artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Vultaggio, Fabrice; Morère, Pierre-Henri; Constantin, Christophe; Christodoulou, Michel; Roulin, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Hemobilia is an uncommon and potential life-threatening condition mainly due to hepato-biliary tree traumatic or iatrogenic injuries. Spontaneously ruptured aneurysm of the hepatic artery is seldom described. We report the case of an 89-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain, jaundice and gastrointestinal bleeding, whose ultrasound and computed tomography revealed a non-traumatic, spontaneous aneurysm of the right hepatic artery. The oeso-gastro-duodenoscopy and colonoscopy did not reveal any bleeding at the ampulla of Vater, nor anywhere else. Selective angiography confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic artery aneurysm and revealed a full hepatic artery originating from the superior mesenteric artery. The patient was successfully treated by selective embolization of microcoils. We discuss the etiologies of hemobilia and its treatment with selective embolization, which remains favored over surgical treatment. Although aneurysm of the hepatic artery is rare, especially without trauma, a high index of suspicion is needed in order to ensure appropriate treatment. PMID:27358680

  18. 2009 LANL radionuclide air emissions report

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehne, David P.

    2010-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2009. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  19. 2010 LANL radionuclide air emissions report /

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehne, David P.

    2011-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2010. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  20. 2008 LANL radionuclide air emissions report

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehne, David P.

    2009-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2008. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  1. Gastroesophageal reflux in children: radionuclide gastroesophagography

    SciTech Connect

    Blumhagen, J.D.; Rudd, T.G.; Christie, D.L.

    1980-11-01

    Sixty-five symptomatic infants and children underwent radionuclide gastroesophagography, acid reflux testing, and barium esophagography with water-siphon testing to evaluate the clinical efficacy of the scintigraphic technique in detecting gastroesophageal reflux. After ingesting /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid in fruit juice, patients rested beneath the gamma camera for 30 to 60 min while esophageal activity was monitored continuously. By using the acid reflux test as a standard of comparison, the senstivity of radionuclide gastroesophagography was 75%. Because of its physiologic nature, low radiation exposure, and convenience, radionuclide gastroesophagography warrants further evaluation as a screening test for gastroesophageal reflux.

  2. Clinical applications of computed tomography angiography in neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Dross, Peter; Fisher, Brandon

    2005-06-01

    Recent technical advances in multidetector computed tomography angiography (CTA) now allow for the noninvasive evaluation of the neurovascular tree. In the evaluation of intracranial aneurysms, stroke imaging, and other vascular abnormalities, CTA compares favorably with conventional angiography. Several illustrative case reports are presented and the advantages of CTA over conventional angiography are discussed.

  3. Comparative analysis of fluorescent angiography, computed tomographic angiography and magnetic resonance angiography for planning autologous breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Michael P.; Hunter-Smith, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The high incidence of breast cancer and growing number of breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy has led to breast reconstruction becoming an important part of holistic treatment for these patients. In planning autologous reconstructions, preoperative assessment of donor site microvascular anatomy with advanced imaging modalities has assisted in the appropriate selection of flap donor site, individual perforators, and lead to an overall improvement in flap outcomes. In this review, we compare the accuracy of fluorescent angiography, computed tomographic angiography (CTA), and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and their impact on clinical outcomes. Methods A review of the published English literature dating from 1950 to 2015 using databases, such as PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, and EMBASE was undertaken. Results Fluorescent angiography is technically limited by its inability to evaluate deep-lying perforators and hence, it has a minimal role in the preoperative setting. However, it may be useful intraoperatively in evaluating microvascular anastomotic patency and the mastectomy skin perfusion. CTA is currently widely considered the standard, due to its high accuracy and reliability. Multiple studies have demonstrated its ability to improve clinical outcomes, such as operative length and flap complications. However, concerns surrounding exposure to radiation and nephrotoxic contrast agents exist. MRA has been explored, however despite recent advances, the image quality of MRA is considered inferior to CTA. Conclusions Preoperative imaging is an essential component in planning autologous breast reconstruction. Fluorescent angiography presents minimal role as a preoperative imaging modality, but may be a useful intraoperative adjunct to assess the anastomosis and the mastectomy skin perfusion. Currently, CTA is the gold standard preoperatively. MRA has a role, particularly for women of younger age, iodine allergy, and renal impairment. PMID

  4. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation of the liver.” This inflammation can be caused by a wide variety of toxins, drugs, and metabolic diseases, as well as infection. There are at least 5 hepatitis viruses. Hepatitis A is contracted when a child eats food or drinks water that is contaminated with the virus or has ...

  5. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... MW, Sheffield JS. Prevention and management of viral hepatitis in pregnancy. Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America . 2014;41(4):573–592. [4] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chapter 9: Hepatitis A. In Hamborsky J, Kroger A, Wolfe S, eds. ...

  6. Radiologic Damage Control: Evaluation of a Combined CT and Angiography Suite with a Pivoting Table

    SciTech Connect

    Kos, Xavier; Fanchamps, Jean-Marc; Trotteur, Genevieve; Dondelinger, Robert F.

    1999-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively the integrated diagnostic and therapeutic management of severely polytraumatized patients using a combined computed tomography (CT) and angiography suite with a single pivoting table. Methods: Eleven patients, aged 16-74 years (median 30 years), were managed with spiral CT and angiography without patient transfer. Four patients were unstable, seven had received blood transfusions (2-18 units) and six were intubated. In 10 patients in whom active bleeding was demonstrated (splenic 5, hepatic 2, renal 2, left inferior epigastric artery 1), hemostatic embolization was obtained. Results: Total procedure time did not exceed 80 min. Immediate hemostasis was achieved in all patients. Recurrent bleeding from the liver required additional embolization in one patient. Median length of stay in the intensive care unit was 4 days and median hospital stay was 27 days. All patients survived without significant sequelae. Conclusion: The use of a combined CT-angiography suite enables rapid diagnostic investigation and hemostatic embolization in actively bleeding trauma patients.

  7. System and method for assaying a radionuclide

    DOEpatents

    Cadieux, James R; King, III, George S; Fugate, Glenn A

    2014-12-23

    A system for assaying a radionuclide includes a liquid scintillation detector, an analyzer connected to the liquid scintillation detector, and a delay circuit connected to the analyzer. A gamma detector and a multi-channel analyzer are connected to the delay circuit and the gamma detector. The multi-channel analyzer produces a signal reflective of the radionuclide in the sample. A method for assaying a radionuclide includes selecting a sample, detecting alpha or beta emissions from the sample with a liquid scintillation detector, producing a first signal reflective of the alpha or beta emissions, and delaying the first signal a predetermined time. The method further includes detecting gamma emissions from the sample, producing a second signal reflective of the gamma emissions, and combining the delayed first signal with the second signal to produce a third signal reflective of the radionuclide.

  8. Dosimetry and Case Studies for Selected Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne

    2009-01-01

    This is a comprehensive review and analysis of biokinetic and dosimetric information for those radionuclides most likely to be involved in accidental exposures to workers or members of the public or used in radiological terrorism.

  9. Natural radionuclides in Hanford site ground waters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.R.; Laul, J.C.; Johnson, V.G.

    1987-10-01

    Uranium, Th, Ra, Rn, Pb and Po radionuclide concentrations in ground waters from the Hanford Site indicate that U, Th, and Ra are highly sorbed. Relative to Rn, these radionuclides are low by factors of 10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -6/. Uranium sorption is likely due to its reduction from the +6 state, where it is introduced via surface waters, to the +4 state found in the confined aquifers. The distribution of radionuclides is very similar in all of the confined aquifers and significantly different from the distribution observed in the unconfined and surface waters. Barium correlates well with Ra over three orders of magnitude, indicating that stable element analogs may be useful for inferring the behavior of radioactive waste radionuclides in this candidate geologic repository. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Radionuclide carriers for targeting of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sofou, Stavroula

    2008-01-01

    This review describes strategies for the delivery of therapeutic radionuclides to tumor sites. Therapeutic approaches are summarized in terms of tumor location in the body, and tumor morphology. These determine the radionuclides of choice for suggested targeting ligands, and the type of delivery carriers. This review is not exhaustive in examples of radionuclide carriers for targeted cancer therapy. Our purpose is two-fold: to give an integrated picture of the general strategies and molecular constructs currently explored for the delivery of therapeutic radionuclides, and to identify challenges that need to be addressed. Internal radiotherapies for targeting of cancer are at a very exciting and creative stage. It is expected that the current emphasis on multidisciplinary approaches for exploring such therapeutic directions should enable internal radiotherapy to reach its full potential. PMID:18686778

  11. Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Principles and Applications.

    PubMed

    Dyke, Lara M

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Principles and Applications. Carr J. C., Carroll T. J., Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg/New York, 2012. 412 pp. Price $179.00. ISBN 978-1-4419-1685-3 (hardcover). © 2013 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. Clinical applications of magnetic resonance angiography.

    PubMed

    Glazer, M; McCormack, J; Dross, P

    1992-08-01

    Recent technical advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now allow for the noninvasive study of blood flow in vessels, or magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). We describe several case reports involving the use of MRA and discuss its advantages in evaluating patients for carotid artery stenosis, intracerebral aneurysms, and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs).

  13. Unexpected Angiography Findings and Effects on Management

    PubMed Central

    Neill, Matthew; Charles, Hearns W; Gross, Jonathan S; Farquharson, Sean; Deipolyi, Amy R

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in noninvasive imaging with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, conventional angiography still contributes to the diagnostic workup of oncologic and other diseases. Arteriography can reveal tumors not evident on cross-sectional imaging, in addition to defining aberrant or unexpected arterial supply to targeted lesions. This additional and potentially unanticipated information can alter management decisions during interventional procedures. PMID:27688932

  14. Livermore Accelerator Source for Radionuclide Science (LASRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Scott; Bleuel, Darren; Johnson, Micah; Rusnak, Brian; Soltz, Ron; Tonchev, Anton

    2016-05-05

    The Livermore Accelerator Source for Radionuclide Science (LASRS) will generate intense photon and neutron beams to address important gaps in the study of radionuclide science that directly impact Stockpile Stewardship, Nuclear Forensics, and Nuclear Material Detection. The co-location of MeV-scale neutral and photon sources with radiochemical analytics provides a unique facility to meet current and future challenges in nuclear security and nuclear science.

  15. Alchemy with short-lived radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, F.F.; Finn, R.D.; Gilson, A.J.

    1981-04-01

    A variety of short-lived radionuclides are produced and subsequently incorporated into radiopharmaceutical compounds in the radionuclide production program currently being conducted at the Cyclotron Facility of Mount Sinai Medical Center. The recovery of high specific activity oxygen-15 labelled water prepared by means of an inexpensive system operating in conjunction with an on-line radiogas target routinely utilized for oxygen-15 labelled carbon dioxide studies is currently receiving particular attention.

  16. Coronary CT angiography with prospective ECG-triggering: an effective alternative to invasive coronary angiography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Despite the tremendous contributions of coronary CT angiography to coronary artery disease, radiation dose associated with coronary CT angiography has raised serious concerns in the literature, as the risk of developing radiation-induced malignancy is not negligible. Various dose-saving strategies have been implemented, with some of the strategies resulting in significant dose reduction. Of these strategies, prospective ECG-triggering is one of the most effective techniques with resultant effective radiation dose similar to or even lower than that of invasive coronary angiography. Prospective ECG-triggered coronary CT angiography has been reported to have high diagnostic accuracy in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease with image quality comparable to that of retrospective ECG-gating, but with significantly reduced radiation dose. Successful performance of prospective ECG-triggering is determined by strict exclusion criteria and careful patient preparation. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the diagnostic applications of coronary CT angiography with prospective ECG-triggering with focus on radiation dose reduction. Radiation dose measurements are discussed with aim of allowing accurate dose estimation. Diagnostic value of prospective ECG-triggered coronary CT angiography in patients with different heart rate is discussed. Finally, current status and future directions are highlighted. PMID:24282694

  17. Comparison of CT scanning and radionuclide imaging in liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.L.; Esposito, F.S.

    1980-01-01

    Early experience with body CT suggested its usefulness in many diagnostic problems; jaundice, renal and pancreatic masses, and in the evaluation of relatively inaccessible parts of the body, such as the retroperitineum, mediastinum, and pelvis. Investigation of hepatic disease by CT was not unexpectedly compared to radionuclide liver scanning, the major preexisting modality for imaging the liver. In the evaluation of the jaundiced patient, CT rapidly assumed a major role, providing more specific information about the liver than the RN liver scan, as well as demonstrating adjacent organs. CT differentiate obstructive from non-obstructive jaundice. With respect to mass lesions of the liver, the RN liver scan is more sensitive than CT but less specific. The abnormalities on an isotope image of the liver consist of normal variants in configuration, extrinsic compression by adjacent structures, cysts, hemangiomata, abscesses, and neoplasms. These suspected lesions may then be better delineated by the CT image, and a more precise diagnosis made. The physiologic information provided by the RN liver scan is an added facet which is helpful in the patient with diffuse hepatic disease. The CT image will be normal in many of these patients, however, hemochromatosis and fatty infiltration lend themselves especially to density evaluation by CT. The evaluation of lymphoma is more thorough with CT. Structures other than the liver, such as lymph nodes, are visualized. Gallium, however, provides additional isotopic information in patients with lymphoma, and in addition, is known to be useful in the investigation of a febrile patient with an abscess. Newer isotopic agents expand hepatic imaging in other directions, visualizing the biliary tree and evaluating the jaundiced patient.

  18. Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Linnea

    2013-05-01

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are produced, handled, store d, and potentially emitted . These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989a). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2012, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]) . These minor sources include d about 140 stack sources and no diffuse sources . T here were no unplanned airborne radionuclide emissions from Berkeley Lab operations . Emissions from minor sources were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building- specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA -approved computer code s, CAP88-PC and COMPLY , to calculate doses to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) at any offsite point where there is a residence, school, business, or office. Because radionuclides are used at three noncontiguous locations (the main site, Berkeley West Bio center, and Joint BioEnergy Institute), three different MEIs were identified.

  19. Radionuclides in an underground environment

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.L.

    1996-08-01

    In the 100 years since Becquerel recognized radioactivity, mankind has been very successful in producing large amounts of radioactive materials. We have been less successful in reaching a consensus on how to dispose of the billions of curies of fission products and transuranics resulting from nuclear weapons testing, electrical power generation, medical research, and a variety of other human endeavors. Many countries, including the United States, favor underground burial as a means of disposing of radioactive wastes. There are, however, serious questions about how such buried wastes may behave in the underground environment and particularly how they might eventually contaminate water, air and soil resources on which we are dependent. This paper describes research done in the United States in the state of Nevada on the behavior of radioactive materials placed underground. During the last thirty years, a series of ``experiments`` conducted for other purposes (testing of nuclear weapons) have resulted in a wide variety of fission products and actinides being injected in rock strata both above and below the water table. Variables which seem to control the movement of these radionuclides include the physical form (occlusion versus surface deposition), the chemical oxidation state, sorption by mineral phases of the host rock, and the hydrologic properties of the medium. The information gained from these studies should be relevant to planning for remediation of nuclear facilities elsewhere in the world and for long-term storage of nuclear wastes.

  20. Radionuclide evaluation of lung trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Lull, R.J.; Tatum, J.L.; Sugerman, H.J.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Boll, D.A.; Kaplan, K.A.

    1983-07-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging procedures can play a significant role in evaluating the pulmonary complications that are seen in trauma patients. A quantitative method for measuring increased pulmonary capillary permeability that uses Tc-99m HSA allows early diagnosis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and accurately differentiates this condition from pneumonia or cardiogenic pulmonary edema. This technique may be of great value in following the response to therapy. The use of 133Xe to diagnose inhalation injury remains an important diagnostic tool, particularly at hospitals with specialized burn units. Regional decreases in ventilation-perfusion images reliably localize aspirated foreign bodies. Radionuclide techniques that are used to demonstrate gastropulmonary aspiration remain controversial and require further clinical evaluation. Pulmonary perfusion imaging, although nonspecific, may provide the earliest clue for correct diagnosis of fat embolism, air embolism, contusion, or laceration. Furthermore, the possibility of perfusion abnormality due to these uncommon conditions must be remembered whenever trauma patients are evaluated for pulmonary thromboembolism with scintigraphy. Occasionally, liver or spleen scintigraphy may be the most appropriate procedure when penetrating chest trauma also involves these subdiaphragmatic organs.

  1. Radionuclide scintigraphy of bacterial nephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, J.J.; Weiss, S.C.; Shkolnik, A.; Yogev, R.; Firlit, C.; Traisman, E.S.

    1984-01-01

    Pyelonephritis is a leading cause of renal failure and is expected to cost as much as three billion dollars in 1984. The diagnosis of urinary tract infection is usually not difficult. However, localization of the infection within the renal parenchyma as opposed to the collecting system is much more difficult. Flank pain, fever, bacteiuria and evidence of parenchymal involvement by intravenous urography may be absent or unrecognized particularly in the infant. Ultrasound and Nuclear Medicine are advocated as better methods to define parenchymal involvement. Such definition is important in the consideration of treatment since parenchymal involvement of the kidney carries a much more ominous potential outcome than infection restricted to within the collecting system. 38 children with a clinical diagnosis of urinary tract infection were studied. 26 of the patients demonstrated abnormal renal parenchymal findings with Gallium-67 Citrate or Tc-99m Glucoheptonate scintigraphy. Intravenous urography was notably ineffective with only 5 of the 20 interpreted as abnormal due to parenchymal disease or decreased function. 11 were entirely normal while only 5 demonstrated scars or hydronephrosis. Only 10 of 17 patients demonstrated intranvesicoureteral reflux on x-ray or nuclear cystography. Ultrasound depicted 6 of 20 patients as having parenchymal abnormalities. Seven were normal. Nonspecific findings such as dilitation of the renal pelvis or renal enlargement was noted in 11 of the 20 patients. Radionuclide Scintigraphy is the most efficacious modality to detect since acute bacterial nephritis.

  2. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  3. Marked reduction of effective radiation dose in patients undergoing CT coronary angiography using prospective ECG gating.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Anthony; Learner, Ruth; Eggleton, Simon; Lambros, John; Friedman, Daniel

    2011-08-01

    Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is a rapidly evolving technology which can characterise and image sub clinical atherosclerotic plaque and visualise anatomy and quantitate stenosis. Concern about radiation exposure has limited the uptake of this technology. The aim of this study was to review the radiation dose data in 2298 consecutive patients referred to a single centre in an Australian outpatient setting over 27 months using all available radiation dose reduction strategies. Prospective ECG gating ("step and shoot") was used preferentially in 2025 patients with a mean effective dose of 3.39 ± 1.84 mSv (range 0.86-12.6 mSv). For clinical reasons only 273 patients required retrospective ECG gating, mean dose 19.21 ± 5.58 mSv (range 2.4-34.9 mSv) resulting in an 85.7% reduction in dose for the majority of patients with the low dose technique. In conclusion, most patients referred for routine CCTA can be studied with a radiation dose comparable to invasive X-ray angiography and less than radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging. Copyright © 2011 Australasian Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Angiography, scintigraphy, intraosseous pressure, and histologic findings in high-risk osteonecrotic femoral heads with negative magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Koo, K H; Kim, R; Cho, S H; Song, H R; Lee, G; Ko, G H

    1994-11-01

    One hundred twenty-six hips of 68 patients who were suspected of having osteonecrosis or being at risk for osteonecrosis were studied with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Abnormal patterns on MR imaging characteristic of osteonecrosis were observed in 98 hips. The remaining 28 hips (22 patients) with negative MR images underwent superselective angiography of the medial femoral circumflex artery. Angiography showed interruption of the superior retinacular arteries in 13 hips (12 patients), including 6 of 7 symptomatic hips. Bone scans were performed on 8 of 13 hips angiographically positive for osteonecrosis. Decrease of radionuclide uptake (cold lesions) was observed in all 8 of these femoral heads. Thirteen femoral heads with interruption of superior retinacular arteries underwent intraosseous pressure measurement and core biopsy. Intraosseous pressure was elevated in 11 hips. The results of histologic study showed evidence of early necrosis in 10 femoral heads. This study indicates that there are a considerable number of femoral heads at high risk, even when they have negative MR images. They do, however, show positive findings on angiography, scintigraphy (cold lesions), intraosseous pressure measurement, and histologic study.

  5. [Recent progress in radionuclide therapy].

    PubMed

    Kasagi, K; Iwata, M; Misaki, T; Konishi, J; Sakahara, H

    2000-11-01

    Therapeutic use of radionuclides includes 131I for thyroid cancer and hyperthyroid Graves' disease, 89SrCl3 for metastatic bone tumors, 131I-MIBG for malignant pheochromocytoma and neuroblastoma, and radioimmunotherapies. 131I is concentrated in 60-70% of metastases from differentiated thyroid cancer following total thyroidectomy. Radioiodine uptake in metastatic lesions is greater in younger patients than in older ones. Hypothyroidism is often mild or even absent in patients with a large amount of tumor tissue, indicating that thyroid hormones produced by highly differentiated tumors compensate partially or even completely for hypothyroidism following total thyroidectomy. Adequate uptake of 131I has been reported to be associated with significant reduction in the size and number of metastases, and with lower recurrence and higher survival rates. Other favorable factors for longer survival are younger age, well-differentiated histological type, small disease extent, and early discovery of metastases. Older patients with extensive metastases and/or bulky tumor masses in the bone have a poor prognosis. Therefore, it is important to discover metastases as early as possible, when patients are still young. Long-term follow-up with periodic thyroglobulin measurements and imaging studies is strongly recommended. In Japan, 131I treatment for Graves' disease is performed only in selected patients in whom antithyroid drugs cannot be used because of side effects or not effective, considering the high prevalence of permanent hypothyroidism. 89SrCl3 is useful for reducing pain due to bone metastases of malignant tumors. 131I-MIBG therapy is effective for improvement of QOL in some patients with metastatic malignant pheochromocytoma. Radioimmuno-therapy using anti-CD20 has been used successfully in clinical application in patients with malignant B cell lymphoma.

  6. Radionuclide imaging in drug development.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Alan C; Frier, Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    Radioactive tracers have made an immense contribution to the understanding of human physiology and pathology. At the start of the 21st century nuclear imaging has emerged as the main metabolic imaging modality which is of growing importance in drug development and clinical pharmacology. Using techniques adapted from those undertaken in clinical radiopharmacy and nuclear medicine facilities drug molecules and carrier systems may be radiolabelled and their release, biodistribution and uptake may be visualized in human subjects. Imaging studies are capable of locating the uptake of specific receptors in the brain, the site of disintegration of a tablet in the GI tract, the penetration of a nebulized solution into the lung and the residence time of an eye drop on the cornea. The technology uses suitable gamma emitting radionuclides such as 99mTc, 111In, 123I and 153Sm, which may be imaged with a gamma camera or positron emitters such as 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F for positron emission tomography (PET). Positron emitters are more appropriate for the direct labeling of drug molecules rather than metals such a 99mTc or 111In. A particular asset of these techniques is that the in vivo distribution and kinetics of a radiolabelled pharmaceutical formulation may be quantified. In this way correlation between the observed pharmacological effects and the precise site of delivery may be made. A powerful feature of nuclear molecular imaging is the evaluation of drug delivery systems in patient groups for whom the treatment is intended. Such studies not only provide data on the nature and characteristics of a product, such as reliability and reproducibility, but can demonstrate proof of principle for the new generation of targeted therapeutics. Imaging data are increasingly being used in product registration dossiers for submission to Regulatory Authorities.

  7. Patients with Life-Threatening Arterial Renal Hemorrhage: CT Angiography and Catheter Angiography with Subsequent Superselective Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M. Stampfl, U.; Bellemann, N.; Ramsauer, S.; Loenard, B. M.; Haferkamp, A.; Hallscheidt, P.; Richter, G. M.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical and clinical success of superselective embolization in patients with life-threatening arterial renal hemorrhage undergoing preinterventional CT angiography. Forty-three patients with clinical signs of life-threatening arterial renal hemorrhage underwent CT angiography and catheter angiography. Superselective embolization was indicated in the case of a positive catheter angiography. Primary study goals were technical and clinical success of superselective embolization. Secondary study goals were CT angiographic and catheter angiographic image findings and clinical follow-up. The mean time interval between CT angiography and catheter angiography was 8.3 {+-} 10.3 h (range, 0.2-34.1 h). Arterial renal hemorrhage was identified with CT angiography in 42 of 43 patients (98%) and catheter angiography in 39 of 43 patients (91%) (overview angiography in 4 of 43 patients [9%], selective angiography in 16 of 43 patients [37%], and superselective angiography in 39 of 43 patients [91%]). Superselective embolization was performed in 39 of 43 patients (91%) and technically successful in 37 of 39 patients (95%). Therefore, coil embolization was performed in 13 of 37 patients (35%), liquid embolization in 9 of 37 patients (24%), particulate embolization in 1 of 37 patients (3%), and a combination in 14 of 37 patients (38%). Clinical failure occurred in 8 of 39 patients (21%) and procedure-related complications in 2 of 39 patients (5%). The 30-day mortality rate was 3%. Hemoglobin decreased significantly prior to intervention (P < 0.001) and increased significantly after intervention (P < 0.005). In conclusion, superselective embolization is effective, reliable, and safe in patients with life-threatening arterial renal hemorrhage. In contrast to overview and selective angiography, only superselective angiography allows reliable detection of arterial renal hemorrhage. Preinterventional CT angiography is excellent for detection

  8. Radionuclide measurement of right ventricular function in atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect and complete transposition of the great arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.J.; Shubao, C.; Clarke, S.E.; Fogelman, I.; Maisey, M.N.; Tynan, M.

    1986-05-01

    Right ventricular (RV) function was assessed in 80 patients with congenital heart disease by first-pass and gated equilibrium radionuclide angiography. In 30 patients with a ventricular septal defect (VSD) the mean RV ejection fraction (+/- standard deviation) was 64 +/- 7%. In 30 patients with a secundum atrial septal defect it was 61 +/- 9% and in 20 patients with surgically corrected complete transposition of the great arteries it was 49 +/- 13%. These values are in close agreement with values established with cineangiography for similar groups of patients. The mean ejection fraction in the group with transposition of the great arteries was significantly less than in the group with VSD (p less than 0.001). Phase analysis of the equilibrium studies showed that there was delayed RV contraction in many patients in the absence of conduction abnormalities. This delay was significantly greater in patients with atrial septal defect than in those with VSD (p less than 0.05). There was a strong correlation between size of left-to-right shunt and phase delay in patients with VSD (r = -0.72). Thus, first-pass gated radionuclide angiography provides a valid measurement of RV ejection fraction, and delayed RV contraction on phase analysis may be a sensitive index of early RV dysfunction.

  9. Hepatic ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood or oxygen, causing injury to liver cells. Causes Low blood pressure from any condition can lead to hepatic ischemia. ... liver's blood vessels Treatment Treatment depends on the cause. Low blood pressure and blood clots must be treated right away. ...

  10. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... a mother who had hepatitis C Received a tattoo or acupuncture with needles that were not disinfected ... is very low with practitioners who have a tattoo license or permit or an acupuncture license) Received ...

  11. Autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Heneghan, Michael A; Yeoman, Andrew D; Verma, Sumita; Smith, Alastair D; Longhi, Maria Serena

    2013-10-26

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a disease of the hepatic parenchyma that can present in acute or chronic forms. In common with many autoimmune diseases, autoimmune hepatitis is associated with non-organ-specific antibodies in the context of hepatic autoimmunity. This dichotomy has made definition of a unifying hypothesis in the pathophysiology of the disease difficult, although data from the past 8 years have drawn attention to the role of regulatory T cells. Several triggers have been identified, and the disease arises in genetically susceptible individuals. Clinical and biochemical remission is achievable in up to 85% of cases. For the remaining patients, alternative immunosuppression strategies are an option. Liver transplantation provides an excellent outcome for patients with acute liver failure or complications of end-stage liver disease, including hepatocellular carcinoma. Variant or overlapping syndromes are worthy of consideration when unexpected disease features arise.

  12. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the same symptoms as those of other liver diseases or metabolic disorders. Blood tests. A blood test involves drawing ... the same symptoms as those of other liver diseases or metabolic disorders. Treatment for autoimmune hepatitis includes medication to ...

  13. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain function in people with advanced liver disease. When ... travel through your body until they reach your brain, causing mental and physical symptoms of HE. Hepatic ...

  14. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Health e Vet Prescriptions Refills Crisis Prevention Mental Health PTSD Public Health Veterans Access, Choice & Accountability Act ... and Complementary Therapies Diet and Nutrition Managing Pain Mental Health Sex and Sexuality (for Hepatitis C) Success Stories ...

  15. Alcoholic Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... alcoholic hepatitis include: Fluid accumulation in your abdomen (ascites) Confusion and behavior changes due to a buildup ... is life-threatening and requires immediate medical care. Ascites. Fluid that accumulates in the abdomen might become ...

  16. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... bowel movements Loss of appetite Low-grade fever Dark urine Joint pain Yellowing of the skin and ... person ingests even tiny amounts of contaminated fecal matter. The hepatitis A virus infects liver cells and ...

  17. Scintigraphy in evaluation of the hypoplastic right hepatic lobe: a rare variant.

    PubMed Central

    Suneja, S. K.; Teal, J. S.

    1989-01-01

    A rare variant of right hepatic lobe hypoplasia associated with high gallbladder position in the right upper abdomen is described. Pain is frequent and may be due to cholelithiasis. It is important to recognize this variant because an associated hypertrophic left hepatic lobe can clinically masquerade as an abdominal mass. Radionuclide studies and abdominal computerized tomography are useful in defining the hypertrophied left hepatic lobe and ectopic gallbladder. The duodenum and hepatic flexure are positioned high due to space left by the hypoplastic right lobe. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2733056

  18. Preparation of Radiopharmaceuticals Labeled with Metal Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    2012-02-16

    The overall goal of this project was to develop methods for the production of metal-based radionuclides, to develop metal-based radiopharmaceuticals and in a limited number of cases, to translate these agents to the clinical situation. Initial work concentrated on the application of the radionuclides of Cu, Cu-60, Cu-61 and Cu-64, as well as application of Ga-68 radiopharmaceuticals. Initially Cu-64 was produced at the Missouri University Research Reactor and experiments carried out at Washington University. A limited number of studies were carried out utilizing Cu-62, a generator produced radionuclide produced by Mallinckrodt Inc. (now Covidien). In these studies, copper-62-labeled pyruvaldehyde Bis(N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazonato)-copper(II) was studied as an agent for cerebral myocardial perfusion. A remote system for the production of this radiopharmaceutical was developed and a limited number of patient studies carried out with this agent. Various other copper radiopharmaceuticals were investigated, these included copper labeled blood imaging agents as well as Cu-64 labeled antibodies. Cu-64 labeled antibodies targeting colon cancer were translated to the human situation. Cu-64 was also used to label peptides (Cu-64 octriatide) and this is one of the first applications of a peptide radiolabeled with a positron emitting metal radionuclide. Investigations were then pursued on the preparation of the copper radionuclides on a small biomedical cyclotron. A system for the production of high specific activity Cu-64 was developed and initially the Cu-64 was utilized to study the hypoxic imaging agent Cu-64 ATSM. Utilizing the same target system, other positron emitting metal radionuclides were produced, these were Y-86 and Ga-66. Radiopharmaceuticals were labeled utilizing both of these radionuclides. Many studies were carried out in animal models on the uptake of Cu-ATSM in hypoxic tissue. The hypothesis is that Cu-ATSM retention in vivo is dependent upon the

  19. Differentiation of jaundice in infancy: an application of radionuclide biliary studies

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, G.S.; Rosenbaum, R.C.; Hill, J.L.; Diaconis, J.N.

    1985-12-01

    Atresia and hypoplasia of the bile ducts are the most common congenital biliary anomalies of clinical importance. Surgical correction can help about 10% of these infants. However, surgery should be performed within the first month of life to avoid irreversible liver parenchymal changes. It is difficult to separate the surgical condition, biliary atresia, from conditions in which the trauma of laparotomy should be avoided, such as neonatal hepatitis and other clinically indistinguishable causes of obstructive jaundice. Radionuclide imaging with the /sup 99m/Tc-labeled N-substituted iminodiacetic acids (HIDA, PIDIDA, DISIDA, etc) have been helpful in the differential diagnosis of biliary atresia.

  20. Gadofosveset-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    PubMed Central

    Goyen, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    Gadofosveset (Vasovist®, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin/Germany) is the first intravascular contrast agent approved for use with magnetic resonance angiography in the European Union, Switzerland, Turkey, Canada, and Australia. Gadofosveset reversibly binds to albumin providing extended intravascular enhancement compared wth existing extracellular magnetic resonance contrast agents. Prior to approval, gadofosveset underwent extensive testing to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the drug; the clinical trials show that gadofosveset-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is safe and well tolerated in patients with vascular disease and effective for the detection of vascular stenosis and aneurysms gadofosveset has the potential to open new horizons in diagnostic MRA by increasing the spatial resolution and the robustness of MRA examinations and facilitating the examination of multiple vascular beds. PMID:18629367

  1. Prognostic utility of coronary computed tomographic angiography

    PubMed Central

    Otaki, Yuka; Berman, Daniel S.; Min, James K.

    2013-01-01

    Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) employing CT scanners of 64-detector rows or greater represents a noninvasive method that enables accurate detection and exclusion of anatomically obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), providing excellent diagnostic information when compared to invasive angiography. There are numerous potential advantages of CCTA beyond simply luminal stenosis assessment including quantification of atherosclerotic plaque volume as well as assessment of plaque composition, extent, location and distribution. In recent years, an array of studies has evaluated the prognostic utility of CCTA findings of CAD for the prediction of major adverse cardiac events, all-cause death and plaque instability. This prognostic information enhances risk stratification and, if properly acted upon, may improve medical therapy and/or behavioral changes that may enhance event-free survival. The goal of the present article is to summarize the current status of the prognostic utility of CCTA findings of CAD. PMID:23809386

  2. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2010-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how waste form performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of waste form aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of waste form aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the waste forms come in contact with groundwater. The information presented in the report provides data that 1) quantify radionuclide retention within concrete waste form materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG); 2) measure the effect of concrete waste form properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and 3) quantify the stability of uranium-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  3. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms - FY13

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Michelle MV; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Lapierre, Robert; Dage, Denomy C.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2013-10-15

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  4. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Linnea

    2012-06-04

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are produced, handled, stored, and potentially emitted. These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H. Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2011, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.01 mSv/yr]). These minor sources included about 90 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned airborne radionuclide emissions from Berkeley lab operations. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer codes, CAP88-PC and COMPLY, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI).

  5. Idaho radionuclide exposure study: Literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.G.; Freeman, H.D.; Hartley, J.N.

    1987-10-01

    Phosphate ores contain elevated levels of natural radioactivity, some of which is released to the environment during processing or use of solid byproducts. The effect of radionuclides from Idaho phosphate processing operations on the local communities has been the subject of much research and study. The literature is reviewed in this report. Two primary radionuclide pathways to the environment have been studied in detail: (1) airborne release of volatile radionuclides, primarily /sup 210/Po, from calciner stacks at the two elemental phosphorus plants; and (2) use of byproduct slag as an aggregate for construction in Soda Springs and Pocatello. Despite the research, there is still no clear understanding of the population dose from radionuclide emissions, effluents, and solid wastes from phosphate processing plants. Two other potential radionuclide pathways to the environment have been identified: radon exhalation from phosphogypsum and ore piles and contamination of surface and ground waters. Recommendations on further study needed to develop a data base for a complete risk assssment are given in the report.

  6. Radionuclide Mobility at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q; Smith, D; Rose, T; Glascoe, L; Steefel, C; Zavarin, M

    2003-11-13

    Underground nuclear tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are characterized by abundant fission product and actinide source terms. Included are {sup 99}Tc and other soluble radionuclides ({sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 85}Kr, and {sup 129}I), which are presumably mobile in groundwater and potentially toxic to down-gradient receptors. NTS provides the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with an analog of the release of these radionuclides from a nuclear waste repository in the absence of engineered barriers. The investigation described in this report synthesizes a substantial body of data collected on the identity and distribution of soluble radionuclides at field scales over distances of hundreds of meters, for durations up to 40 years, and under hydrogeologic conditions very similar to the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain. This body of data is complemented by laboratory transport studies and a synthesis of recent modeling investigations from the NTS, with an emphasis on the ongoing Yucca Mountain Program (YMP) efforts. Overall, understanding the controls of radionuclide mobility associated with these nuclear tests will provide insight into the repository's future performance as well as bounds and calibrations for the numerical predictions of long-term radionuclide releases and migration.

  7. Fast analysis of radionuclide decay chain migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. S.; Liang, C. P.; Liu, C. W.; Li, L.

    2014-12-01

    A novel tool for rapidly predicting the long-term plume behavior of an arbitrary length radionuclide decay chain is presented in this study. This fast tool is achieved based on generalized analytical solutions in compact format derived for a set of two-dimensional advection-dispersion equations coupled with sequential first-order decay reactions in groundwater system. The performance of the developed tool is evaluated by a numerical model using a Laplace transform finite difference scheme. The results of performance evaluation indicate that the developed model is robust and accurate. The developed model is then used to fast understand the transport behavior of a four-member radionuclide decay chain. Results show that the plume extents and concentration levels of any target radionuclide are very sensitive to longitudinal, transverse dispersion, decay rate constant and retardation factor. The developed model are useful tools for rapidly assessing the ecological and environmental impact of the accidental radionuclide releases such as the Fukushima nuclear disaster where multiple radionuclides leaked through the reactor, subsequently contaminating the local groundwater and ocean seawater in the vicinity of the nuclear plant.

  8. Hepatitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... people at risk for contracting hepatitis. But frequent hand washing and good hygiene practices can reduce this risk. ... After Having Hepatitis B? Hepatitis B (HBV) Hepatitis Hand Washing Blood Transfusions Body Piercing Tattoos Contact Us Print ...

  9. Hepatitis A Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Hepatitis A Testing Share this page: Was this page ... HAV-Ab total; Anti-HAV Formal name: Viral Hepatitis A Antibody Related tests: Hepatitis B Testing ; Hepatitis ...

  10. Hepatitis B Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... worldwide 2 Billion People have been infected with Hepatitis B Worldwide The Hepatitis B Foundation is working ... of people living with hepatitis B. Learn About Hepatitis B in 11 Other Languages . Resource Video See ...

  11. Hepatitis A - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hepatitis A Vaccine: What You Need to Know - English Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) -- Hepatitis A Vaccine: What ... Hepatitis A Vaccine: What You Need to Know - English Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) -- Hepatitis A Vaccine: What ...

  12. 5-F catheter in cerebral angiography

    SciTech Connect

    O'Reilly, G.V.; Naheedy, M.H.; Colucci, V.M.; Hammerschlag, S.B.

    1981-11-01

    Although the 5-F catheter is reputed to cause less vascular trauma than larger catheters, subintimal injections of contrast material have occurred following intimal damage by the catheter tip. Microscopic studies of the tips of two widely used 5-F polyethylene catheters have revealed a difference in configuration resulting in one of the catheters becoming markedly damaged during angiography. The authors make recommendations for finishing and protecting the catheter tip.

  13. [Clinical applications of computed tomography coronary angiography].

    PubMed

    Bastarrika, G; Schoepf, U J

    2009-01-01

    The clinical applications of computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) are constantly evolving. Initially employed to quantify coronary artery calcification, multidetector CT also makes it possible to evaluate the anatomy and anatomical variations of coronary circulation, rule out coronary disease, and follow up surgical and percutaneous revascularization procedures. Moreover, CTCA may potentially be useful to quantify ventricular function, characterize non-calcified atherosclerotic plaques, and analyze myocardial perfusion and viability, providing anatomical, morphological, and functional information in patients with suspected ischemic heart disease.

  14. [Angiography and interventional radiology of the kidney].

    PubMed

    Hansmann, J; Richter, G M; Hallscheidt, P; Düx, M; Nöldge, G; Kauffmann, G W

    1999-05-01

    For imaging of renal pathology a broad spectrum of radiologic diagnostic procedures are available which are, sometimes and particularly more recently, competing among each other in their diagnostic yield and relevance. For tumorous lesions ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are performed predominantly. Angiography is no longer required with the exception of highly selected cases and in some specific preoperative workup requirements. Until recently, catheter based digital subtraction angiography has been considered as gold standard. However, non-invasive techniques such as CT-angiography and MR-angiography are evolving parallel to their quantum leap of resolutions and readiness to use. Nevertheless, well accepted criteria for quality assessement of these new modalities are still lacking. More comparison studies are urgently warranted. Despite the availability of ultrashort pulse sequences applying the T1 relaxation reduction effect of gadolinium enhanced MR techniques overestimation of renal artery stenosis still poses a substantial problem. Renal intervention implies a variety of procedures such as plain angioplasty, stent placement, embolization of traumatic and both benign and malignant tumors. These methods have emerged over the last two decades from a more experimental nature to a fully accepted treatment option. When renal artery angioplasty is embedded in an aggressive approach including stenting as an adjunct for more complex cases, renal ostial lesions and a well organized follow-up regimen its therapeutic potential for treatment of renal insufficiency, malignant hypertension, for organ preservation bears a very high potential. Provided adequat periinterventional drug regimen restenosis rates may be as low as 10%. In highly selected cases capillary embolization might be used as an alternative to nephrectomy with a similar clinical outcome. Particularly the development of superselective small caliber embolization catheters

  15. OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY IN GEOGRAPHIC ATROPHY.

    PubMed

    Sacconi, Riccardo; Corbelli, Eleonora; Carnevali, Adriano; Querques, Lea; Bandello, Francesco; Querques, Giuseppe

    2017-10-06

    To analyze choriocapillaris (CC) vessel density (VD) around geographic atrophy (GA) secondary to non-neovascular dry age-related macular degeneration using optical coherence tomography angiography. We compared CC VD surrounding GA margin (500 μm radius) with control CC (outside GA margin) in a consecutive series of GA patients presenting between August 2016 and February 2017 at the Medical Retina and Imaging Unit of University Vita-Salute, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele in Milan. Images were obtained through thresholding and binarization. We also compared the CC VD in a sample area of 500 μm × 500 μm surrounding GA margin rated as hyperautofluorescent on fundus autofluorescence to a similar area rated as isoautofluorescent. Fifty eyes of 29 patients (19 women and 10 men; mean age 77 ± 6 years) with mean GA area of 9.43 ± 5.08 mm and mean subfoveal choroidal thickness of 164 ± 73 μm were included. Choriocapillaris VD surrounding GA margin as detected by optical coherence tomography angiography revealed a significant impairment compared with control CC outside GA margin (0.317 ± 0.083 vs. 0.461 ± 0.054, P < 0.001), which was even greater in patients with foveal involvement (P = 0.013). Furthermore, mean VD in hyperautofluorescent areas was significantly lower compared with isoautofluorescent areas (0.242 ± 0.112 vs. 0.327 ± 0.130, P = 0.001). A positive correlation was disclosed between VD surrounding GA margin and subfoveal choroidal thickness (r = 0.332, P = 0.019). Optical coherence tomography angiography discloses CC impairment surrounding GA margin. Such CC impairment at GA margin seems to precede retinal pigment epithelium alterations at fundus autofluorescence. Optical coherence tomography angiography could be a new valuable tool for detecting CC alterations and to evaluate potential therapeutic responses in clinical studies.

  16. Cardiac CT Angiography in Congestive Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Levine, Avi; Hecht, Harvey S

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac CT angiography has become an important tool for the diagnosis and treatment of congestive heart failure. Differentiation of ischemic from nonischemic cardiomyopathy; evaluation of myocardial perfusion; characterization of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia; and delineation of congenital heart defects and valvular abnormalities are the primary diagnostic applications. Therapeutic use includes visualization of the coronary venous anatomy for optimal implementation of cardiac resynchronization therapy and evaluation of left ventricular assist devices and transplant vasculopathy.

  17. Indocyanine green angiography features of malattia leventinese

    PubMed Central

    Souied, E H; Leveziel, N; Querques, G; Darmon, J; Coscas, G; Soubrane, G

    2006-01-01

    Background/aim Malattia leventinese (ML) is an inherited macular degeneration characterised by the presence of small radial drusen. Despite extensive descriptions of this study of the fundus, angiographic features of ML have been inadequately described. The aim is to describe the indocyanine green angiography (ICG) features observed in ML. Methods 10 eyes from five consecutive ML patients (aged 27–44 years) were prospectively included. A complete ophthalmological examination including colour fundus photographs, autofluorescence, fluorescein angiography (FA), and ICG was performed. Results ICG differentiated two types of drusen. Large round aggregated drusen were consistently hypofluorescent in the early phases and presented as hyperfluorescent spots surrounded by halos of hypofluorescence in the late phases. Conversely, small radial drusen were mostly hyperfluorescent in the early phases with decreased fluorescence in the late phases of the ICG sequence. FA also showed differences in staining between the two types of drusen. Conclusions ICG angiography revealed marked differences between the large round and small radial drusen observed in ML. The large central drusen presented with an unusual pustuliform feature on the late phases of the ICG sequence. This distinct feature may be useful in the diagnosis of late stage disease when drusen consolidation could obscure the radial drusen. PMID:16488948

  18. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chalam, K. V.; Sambhav, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a new, non-invasive imaging system that generates volumetric data of retinal and choroidal layers. It has the ability to show both structural and blood flow information. Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm (a vital component of OCTA software) helps to decrease the signal to noise ratio of flow detection thus enhancing visualization of retinal vasculature using motion contrast. Published studies describe potential efficacy for OCTA in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vascular occlusions and sickle cell disease. OCTA provides a detailed view of the retinal vasculature, which allows accurate delineation of microvascular abnormalities in diabetic eyes and vascular occlusions. It helps quantify vascular compromise depending upon the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA can also elucidate the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in wet AMD. In this paper, we review the knowledge, available in English language publications regarding OCTA, and compare it with the conventional angiographic standard, fluorescein angiography (FA). Finally, we summarize its potential applications to retinal vascular diseases. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTA's utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer a non-invasive option of visualizing the retinal vasculature, enabling us to decrease morbidity through early detection and intervention in retinal diseases. PMID:27195091

  19. Hepatitis A through E (Viral Hepatitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the treatment of chronic hepatitis B include alpha interferon and peginterferon, which slow the replication of the ... Chronic hepatitis D is usually treated with pegylated interferon, although other potential treatments are under study. Hepatitis ...

  20. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will test your blood. You ...

  1. Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm; a rare complication of amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Khan, Anam; Pal, Khawaja Muhammad Inam; Khan, Hussain Ijaz

    2011-08-01

    Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm (HAP) is an infrequently encountered entity, usually seen secondary to blunt or penetrating trauma. The clinical presentation is often due to complications such as intrahepatic or intraperitoneal bleeding as a result of rupture of the pseudoaneurysm. Diagnosis is frequently delayed and made by splanchnic angiography. HAP associated with a liver abscess, has very rarely been described in the literature. We report the case of a 50-year-old man with amoebic liver abscess and right hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm which was suspected on high resolution contrast-enhanced abdominal computer tomography (CT). The lesion was confirmed by arteriography and treated prophylactically with transcatheteter embolization.

  2. Endovascular management of hepatic hemorrhage and subcapsular hematoma in HELLP syndrome.

    PubMed

    Das, Chandan Jyoti; Srivastava, Deep Narayan; Debnath, Jyotindu; Ramchandran, Vijay; Pal, Sujoy; Sahni, Peush

    2007-01-01

    Spontaneous intrahepatic hemorrhage with or without subcapsular extension is a rare and grave complication of pregnancy. We present a 22-year-old lady in whom liver rupture was noted on emergency caesarian section and later confirmed on contrast-enhanced CT scan. She gradually recovered following selective hepatic angiography and embolization.

  3. Development of the osmium-191 yields iridium-191m radionuclide generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treves, S.; Packard, A. B.

    1985-04-01

    The use of Ir-191m in radionuclide angiography has been the subject of increasing interest in recent years. The Os-191-Ir-191m generator that has been used for these studies suffers, however, from Ir-191m yield (10%/ml) and higher than desirable Os-191 breakthrough (5 x 10 to the -3%). Ir generator has been developed that has higher yield (25 to 30%/ml) and lower breakthrough ( x 10 to the -4 power %) when eluted with an eluent (0.001 M oxalic acid/0.9% saline that does not require buffering prior to injection. Studies within the last year have shown the eluate of this generator to be nontoxic at up to 100 times the expected human dose and work is in progress to obtain approval for human use of this system. While a significant improvement over past generator designs, the yield of this generator is still modest and the evaluation of new osmium complexes for use on the generator has continued. Clinical studies involving the use of Ir-191m for first pass angiography in adults and children have continued.

  4. Diagnosis of arterial injuries caused by penetrating trauma to the neck: comparison of helical CT angiography and conventional angiography.

    PubMed

    Múnera, F; Soto, J A; Palacio, D; Velez, S M; Medina, E

    2000-08-01

    To determine the sensitivity and specificity of helical computed tomographic (CT) angiography in the diagnosis of carotid and vertebral arterial injuries caused by penetrating neck trauma. A prospective study was conducted during 24 months in 60 patients with penetrating neck trauma who were referred for conventional angiography owing to clinical suspicion of arterial injury. In the patient population, 146 arteries (77 carotid, 69 vertebral) were studied by means of conventional angiography. In all patients, conventional angiography and helical CT angiography were completed within 6 hours. Two radiologists interpreted helical CT angiographic studies by means of consensus. Conventional angiography was the standard of reference for determining the sensitivity and specificity of helical CT angiography. Conventional angiograms showed arterial injuries in 10 (17%) of 60 patients. Conventional angiographic findings were arterial occlusion (n = 4), arteriovenous fistula (n = 2), pseudoaneurysm (n = 3), pseudoaneurysm with arteriovenous fistula (n = 1), and normal arteries (n = 136). Nine of 10 arterial injuries and all normal arteries were depicted adequately at helical CT angiography. Sensitivity of helical CT angiography was 90%, specificity was 100%, positive predictive value was 100%, and negative predictive value was 98%. The sensitivity and specificity of helical CT angiography are high for detection of major carotid and vertebral arterial injuries resulting from penetrating trauma.

  5. Multislice computerized tomography angiography in the evaluation of intracranial aneurysms: a comparison with intraarterial digital subtraction angiography.

    PubMed

    Wintermark, Max; Uske, Antoine; Chalaron, Marc; Regli, Luca; Maeder, Philippe; Meuli, Reto; Schnyder, Pierre; Binaghi, Stefano

    2003-04-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of computerized tomography (CT) angiography performed with the aid of multislice technology (MSCT angiography) in the investigation of intracranial aneurysms, by comparing this method with intraarterial digital subtraction (IADS) angiography. Fifty consecutive adult patients, who successively underwent MSCT angiography (four rows) and IADS angiography of intracranial vessels, were prospectively identified. The MSCT angiography studies consisted of 1.25-mm slices, with 0.8-mm reconstruction intervals, a pitch of 0.75, and timing determined by a test bolus. Two neuroradiologists, who were blinded to the initial interpretation of the MSCT angiograms as well as to those of the IADS angiograms, independently reviewed the MSCT angiograms for the detection and characterization of intracranial aneurysms. Forty-nine intracranial aneurysms were identified in 40 patients; 33 of these lesions were responsible for subarachnoid hemorrhage. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MSCT angiography in the detection of intracranial aneurysms were 94.8, 95.2, and 94.9%, respectively, on a per-aneurysm basis and 99, 95.2, and 98.3%, respectively, on a per-patient basis. Interobserver agreement was 98%. There was an excellent correlation between aneurysm size assessed using MSCT angiography and that determined by IADS angiography (slope = 0.916, r = 0.877, p < 0.001); however, 2 mm stood as the cutoff size below which the sensitivity of MSCT angiography was statistically lower. That method displayed great accuracy in characterizing the morphological characteristics of the aneurysm. Multislice CT angiography is an accurate and robust noninvasive screening test for intracranial aneurysms. It performs better than that reported for single-slice CT angiography. Introduction of eight- and especially 16-row MSCT angiography will provide further progression through thinner slices, a lower pitch, and a purely arterial phase.

  6. 2014 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehne, David Patrick

    2015-07-21

    This report describes the emissions of airborne radionuclides from operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2014, and the resulting off-site dose from these emissions. This document fulfills the requirements established by the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H – Emissions of Radionuclides other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities, commonly referred to as the Radionuclide NESHAP or Rad-NESHAP. Compliance with this regulation and preparation of this document is the responsibility of LANL’s RadNESHAP compliance program, which is part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 6.

  7. Diffusion of Radionuclides in Concrete and Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Parker, Kent E.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Clayton, Libby N.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2012-04-25

    One of the methods being considered for safely disposing of Category 3 low-level radioactive wastes is to encase the waste in concrete. Such concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and would act as an intrusion barrier. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The mobilized radionuclides may escape from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and move into the surrounding subsurface environment. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the ability of the surrounding soil to retard radionuclide migration. The objective of our study was to measure the diffusivity of Re, Tc and I in concrete containment and the surrounding vadose zone soil. Effects of carbonation, presence of metallic iron, and fracturing of concrete and the varying moisture contents in soil on the diffusivities of Tc and I were evaluated.

  8. Therapeutic radionuclides: Making the right choice

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1996-08-01

    Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in nuclear medicine therapeutic procedures. Using unsealed sources for therapy is not a new concept; it has been around since the beginnings of nuclear medicine. Treatment of thyroid disorders with radioiodine is a classic example. The availability of radionuclides with suitable therapeutic properties for specific applications, as well as methods for their selective targeting to diseased tissue have, however, remained the main obstacles for therapy to assume a more widespread role in nuclear medicine. Nonetheless, a number of new techniques that have recently emerged, (e.g., tumor therapy with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, treatment of metastatic bone pain, etc.) appear to have provided a substantial impetus to research on production of new therapeutic radionuclides. Although there are a number of new therapeutic approaches requiring specific radionuclides, only selected broad areas will be used as examples in this article.

  9. Radionuclide migration as a function of mineralogy

    SciTech Connect

    Triay, I.R.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.

    1991-02-01

    The migration of radionuclides is studied as a function of mineralogy utilizing batch sorption and column experiments. The transport behavior of alkaline, alkaline-earth, and transition metals, and actinide species is studied in pure mineral separates. The solid phases utilized for these investigations are silicates, alumino-silicates, carbonates, and metal oxides and oxyhydroxides. The results of this effort are utilized to aid in the elucidation of the dominant chemical mechanisms of radionuclide migration, the prediction of radionuclide transport in conditions similar to those expected at the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and the identification of materials that act as natural geological barriers or that can be utilized as strong sorbers in engineered barriers. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-particle emitting radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, M R; Pozzi, O R

    2004-12-01

    An important consideration in the development of effective strategies for radioimmunotherapy is the nature of the radiation emitted by the radionuclide. Radionuclides decaying by the emission of alpha-particles offer the possibility of matching the cell specific reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with radiation with a range of only a few cell diameters. Furthermore, alpha-particles have important biological advantages compared with external beam radiation and beta-particles including a higher biological effectiveness, which is nearly independent of oxygen concentration, dose rate and cell cycle position. In this review, the clinical settings most likely to benefit from alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy will be discussed. The current status of preclinical and clinical research with antibodies labeled with 3 promising alpha-particle emitting radionuclides - (213)Bi, (225)Ac, and (211)At - also will be summarized.

  11. EPA perspective on radionuclide aerosol sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Karhnak, J.M.

    1995-02-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is concerned with radionuclide aerosol sampling primarily at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities in order to insure compliance with national air emission standards, known as NESHAPs. Sampling procedures are specified in {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides other than Radon from Department of Energy Sites{close_quotes} (Subpart H). Subpart H also allows alternate procedures to be used if they meet certain requirements. This paper discusses some of the mission differences between EPA and Doe and how these differences are reflected in decisions that are made. It then describes how the EPA develops standards, considers alternate sampling procedures, and lists suggestions to speed up the review and acceptance process for alternate procedures. The paper concludes with a discussion of the process for delegation of Radionuclide NESHAPs responsibilities to the States, and responsibilities that could be retained by EPA.

  12. Folate-receptor-targeted radionuclide imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Ke, Chun-Yen; Mathias, Carla J; Green, Mark A

    2004-04-29

    The cell-membrane folate receptor is a potential molecular target for tumor-selective drug delivery, including delivery of radiolabeled folate-chelate conjugates for diagnostic imaging. This review surveys the growing literature on tumor imaging with radionuclide agents targeted to the folate receptor. Successful folate-receptor targeting has been reported, both in vitro and in vivo, using a variety of radionuclides that are suitable for clinical diagnostic imaging (67Ga, 111In, 99mTc, 66Ga, and 64Cu). While none of these agents has, to date, been demonstrated to have clinical efficacy as a diagnostic tool, existing data indicates that it is feasible to noninvasively assess (at least qualitatively) tissue folate receptor levels by external radionuclide imaging.

  13. Therapeutic Radionuclides: Biophysical and Radiobiologic Principles

    PubMed Central

    Kassis, Amin I.

    2008-01-01

    Although the general radiobiologic principles underlying external beam therapy and radionuclide therapy are the same, there are significant differences in the biophysical and radiobiologic effects from the two types of radiation. In addition to the emission of particulate radiation, targeted radionuclide therapy is characterized by (i) extended exposures and, usually, declining dose rates; (ii) nonuniformities in the distribution of radioactivity and, thus, absorbed dose; and (iii) particles of varying ionization density and, hence, quality. This chapter explores the special features that distinguish the biologic effects consequent to the traversal of charged particles through mammalian cells. It also highlights what has been learned when these radionuclides and radiotargeting pharmaceuticals are used to treat cancers. PMID:18662557

  14. Diagnostic yield and accuracy of CT angiography, MR angiography, and digital subtraction angiography for detection of macrovascular causes of intracerebral haemorrhage: prospective, multicentre cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Velthuis, Birgitta K; Rinkel, Gabriël J E; Algra, Ale; de Kort, Gérard A P; Witkamp, Theo D; de Ridder, Johanna C M; van Nieuwenhuizen, Koen M; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Schonewille, Wouter J; de Kort, Paul L M; Dippel, Diederik W; Raaymakers, Theodora W M; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Wermer, Marieke J H; Kerkhoff, Henk; Jellema, Korné; Bronner, Irene M; Remmers, Michel J M; Bienfait, Henri Paul; Witjes, Ron J G M; Greving, Jacoba P; Klijn, Catharina J M

    2015-01-01

    Study question What are the diagnostic yield and accuracy of early computed tomography (CT) angiography followed by magnetic resonance imaging/angiography (MRI/MRA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in patients with non-traumatic intracerebral haemorrhage? Methods This prospective diagnostic study enrolled 298 adults (18-70 years) treated in 22 hospitals in the Netherlands over six years. CT angiography was performed within seven days of haemorrhage. If the result was negative, MRI/MRA was performed four to eight weeks later. DSA was performed when the CT angiography or MRI/MRA results were inconclusive or negative. The main outcome was a macrovascular cause, including arteriovenous malformation, aneurysm, dural arteriovenous fistula, and cavernoma. Three blinded neuroradiologists independently evaluated the images for macrovascular causes of haemorrhage. The reference standard was the best available evidence from all findings during one year’s follow-up. Study answer and limitations A macrovascular cause was identified in 69 patients (23%). 291 patients (98%) underwent CT angiography; 214 with a negative result underwent additional MRI/MRA and 97 with a negative result for both CT angiography and MRI/MRA underwent DSA. Early CT angiography detected 51 macrovascular causes (yield 17%, 95% confidence interval 13% to 22%). CT angiography with MRI/MRA identified two additional macrovascular causes (18%, 14% to 23%) and these modalities combined with DSA another 15 (23%, 18% to 28%). This last extensive strategy failed to detect a cavernoma, which was identified on MRI during follow-up (reference strategy). The positive predictive value of CT angiography was 72% (60% to 82%), of additional MRI/MRA was 35% (14% to 62%), and of additional DSA was 100% (75% to 100%). None of the patients experienced complications with CT angiography or MRI/MRA; 0.6% of patients who underwent DSA experienced permanent sequelae. Not all patients with negative CT angiography and

  15. Radionuclide imaging of acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Worsley, Daniel F; Alavi, Abass

    2003-10-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a potentially fatal condition for which treatment is highly effective. The diagnosis of PE can be challenging and often requires diagnostic imaging. For many years, chest radiographs and ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy have been the primary imaging modalities used in the evaluation of patients with suspected acute PE. The combination of clinical assessment, plus results of V/Q scintigraphy and a noninvasive venous study of the lower extremities can provide clinicians with the information needed to direct treatment in the majority of patients with suspected PE. More recently, advances in computerized tomography (CT) angiography have allowed for the direct visualization of PE, and this technique has emerged as an important diagnostic test in the evaluation of patients with suspected PE. Proponents suggest that CT angiography should be used as the first line imaging test in patients with suspected PE. Others suggest that V/Q scanning should remain as the first line diagnostic imaging test and that CT angiography should be used in patient's in whom the diagnosis remains uncertain. The combination of CT angiography and CT venography has the potential to provide a single comprehensive study of patients with suspected venous thromboembolism.

  16. Planar and SPECT Tc-99m red blood cell imaging in hepatic cavernous hemangiomas and other hepatic lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Intenzo, C.; Kim, S.; Madsen, M.; Desai, A.; Park, C.

    1988-04-01

    The utility of Tc-99m RBC imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic cavernous hemangiomas has been established. Of the 25 patients with various focal hepatic lesions evaluated, 16 were diagnosed as having hemangiomas: eight proven by surgery, two proven by angiography, and six proven by maintaining a stable clinical course ranging from 6 to 12 months with normal follow-up liver function tests. Although fourteen of these were detected by planar imaging, two were detected by SPECT only. Two patients with large hemangiomas had false-negative scans, whereas the remaining seven patients had other liver lesions.

  17. Data Authentication Demonstration for Radionuclide Stations

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Mark; Herrington, Pres; Miley, Harry; Ellis, J. Edward; McKinnon, David; St. Pierre, Devon

    1999-08-03

    Data authentication is required for certification of sensor stations in the International Monitoring System (IMS). Authentication capability has been previously demonstrated for continuous waveform stations (seismic and infrasound). This paper addresses data surety for the radionuclide stations in the IMS, in particular the Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) system developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Radionuclide stations communicate data by electronic mail using formats defined in IMS 1.0, Formats and Protocols for Messages. An open message authentication standard exists, called S/MIME (Secure/Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions), which has been proposed for use with all IMS radionuclide station message communications. This standard specifies adding a digital signature and public key certificate as a MIME attachment to the e-mail message. It is advantageous because it allows authentication to be added to all IMS 1.0 messages in a standard format and is commercially supported in e-mail software. For command and control, the RASA system uses a networked Graphical User Interface (GUI) based upon Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) communications, which requires special authentication procedures. The authors have modified the RASA system to meet CTBTO authentication guidelines, using a FORTEZZA card for authentication functions. They demonstrated signing radionuclide data messages at the RASA, then sending, receiving, and verifying the messages at a data center. They demonstrated authenticating command messages and responses from the data center GUI to the RASA. Also, the particular authentication system command to change the private/public key pair and retrieve the new public key was demonstrated. This work shows that data surety meeting IMS guidelines may be immediately applied to IMS radionuclide systems.

  18. Peptide-Targeted Radionuclide Therapy for Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yubin; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    Melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1-R) and melanin are two attractive melanoma-specific targets for peptide-targeted radionuclide therapy for melanoma. Radiolabeled peptides targeting MC1-R/melanin can selectively and specifically target cytotoxic radiation generated from therapeutic radionuclides to melanoma cells for cell killing, while sparing the normal tissues and organs. This review highlights the recent advances of peptide-targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma targeting MC1R and melanin. The promising therapeutic efficacies of 188Re-(Arg11)CCMSH (188Re-[Cys3,4,10, d-Phe7, Arg11]-α-MSH3-13), 177Lu- and 212Pb-labeled DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-[ReO-(Cys3,4,10, d-Phe7, Arg11)]-α-MSH3-13) and 188Re-HYNIC-4B4 (188Re-hydrazinonicotinamide-Tyr-Glu-Arg-Lys-Phe-Trp-His-Gly-Arg-His) in preclinical melanoma-bearing models demonstrate an optimistic outlook for peptide-targeted radionuclide therapy for melanoma. Peptide-targeted radionuclide therapy for melanoma will likely contribute in an adjuvant setting, once the primary tumor has been surgically removed, to treat metastatic deposits and for treatment of end-stage disease. The lack of effective treatments for metastatic melanoma and end stage disease underscores the necessity to develop and implement new treatment strategies, such as peptide-targeted radionuclide therapy. PMID:18387816

  19. Comparison between indocyanine green angiography and fluorescein angiography in normal cats.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Miri; Maehara, Seiya; Ito, Yosuke; Yamashita, Kazuto; Kubo, Akira; Nakade, Tetsuya

    2017-07-01

    To study a new approach to indocyanine green (ICG) angiography for contrasting the ocular fundus in cats. Six healthy laboratory cats. Fluorescein (FLUO) and ICG angiography were performed using an infrared-sensitive charged coupled device-equipped fundus camera on sedated cats. At 12.3 ± 3.4 s after ICG administration, the choroidal arteries could be seen extending radially from the optic disk. The choroidal veins became apparent at 16.2 ± 4.1 s alongside the choroidal arteries. Gradual fading of the choroidal vessels began 5.8 ± 1.5 min postdye administration and diffuse fluorescence of the fundus appeared. Diffuse fluorescence of the optic disk faded at about 18.8 ± 2.9 min. Mean arterial blood pressure at 1 and 3 min after ICG administration showed no significant change when compared to pre-administration (P > 0.05). However, 5 min (P = 0.054) and 10 min (P < 0.05) postadministration, a significant drop in blood pressure occurred. The time lapse between FLUO administration and its appearance in the ocular fundus was 15.7 ± 3.8 s. Retinal veins became apparent at 22.0 ± 3.6 s alongside retinal arteries. At 31.2 ± 4.1 s, full venous fluorescence was visualized throughout the entire fundus. While FLUO angiography shows only the retinal vessels, ICG angiography enabled visualization of the choroidal vasculature. ICG angiography provides clear resolution while remaining reliable and simple; thus, a combination of ICG and FLUO angiography shows promise as a diagnostic aid for clinical evaluation of various chorioretinal diseases in cats. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  20. The Watchboy Radionuclide Detector Deployment and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dazeley, S.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N.

    2014-09-30

    The Watchboy detector was designed to measure the rate of radionuclide production in water created via muon spallation. The three primary nuclei of interest, 11Li, 8He and 9Li, can mimic an antineutrino induced inverse beta decay, producing a high energy beta particle in coincidence with a neutron. Their signature in Watchboy would be the passage of a muon through the target, followed some time later, characterized by the decay time of the radionuclide, by a beta and a neutron emitted in coincidence.

  1. On the lognormality of radionuclide deposition.

    PubMed

    Grubich, Andry

    2015-05-01

    The influence of the variation of soil density and the uncertainty of activity measurements on the statistical distribution of radionuclide concentrations on a site is considered. It is demonstrated that the influence of these factors adequately explains the observed deviation of radionuclide empirical probability distribution functions (empirical PDFs) from lognormal. In all probability lognormality of activity density distributions is the consequence of the atmospheric fallout process, as observed for deposition from Chernobyl and Fukushima. The results obtained are in no way specific to radioactive contaminants, and are consequently applicable for depositions of non-radioactive pollutants as well. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Microbiological Transformations of Radionuclides in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Matthew J.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2010-01-04

    Microorganisms are ubiquitous in subsurface environments although their populations sizes and metabolic activities can vary considerably depending on energy and nutrient inputs. As a result of their metabolic activities and the chemical properties of their cell surfaces and the exopolymers they produce, microorganisms can directly or indirectly facilitate the biotransformation of radionuclides, thus altering their solubility and overall fate and transport in the environment. Although biosorption to cell surfaces and exopolymers can be an important factor modifying the solubility of some radionuclides under specific conditions, oxidation state is often considered the single most important factor controlling their speciation and, therefore, environmental behavior.

  3. Laboratory studies of radionuclide migration in tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Rundberg, R.S.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.; Thompson, J.L.; Triay, I.R.

    1989-10-01

    The movement of selected radionuclides has been observed in crushed tuff, intact tuff, and fractured tuff columns. Retardation factors and dispersivities were determined from the elution profiles. Retardation factors have been compared with those predicted on the basis of batch sorption studies. This comparison forms a basis for either validating distribution coefficients or providing evidence of speciation, including colloid formation. Dispersivities measured as a function of velocity provide a means of determining the effect of sorption kinetics or mass transfer on radionuclide migration. Dispersion is also being studied in the context of scaling symmetry to develop a basis for extrapolating from the laboratory scale to the field. 21 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Pedal angiography in peripheral arterial occlusive disease: first-pass i.v. contrast-enhanced MR angiography with blood pool contrast medium versus intraarterial digital subtraction angiography.

    PubMed

    Kos, Sebastian; Reisinger, Clemens; Aschwanden, Markus; Bongartz, Georg M; Jacob, Augustinus L; Bilecen, Deniz

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate first-pass i.v. gadofosveset-enhanced MR angiography in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease for visualization of the pedal arteries and stenosis or occlusion of those arteries with intraarterial digital subtraction angiography as the reference standard. Twenty patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (nine women, 11 men; age-range 58-83 years) were prospectively enrolled. Gadofosveset first-pass contrast-enhanced MR angiography was performed with a 1.5-T system, a dedicated foot coil, and cuff compression to the calf. Arterial segments were assessed for degree of arterial stenosis, arterial visibility, diagnostic utility, and venous contamination. Detection of vessel stenosis or occlusion was evaluated in comparison with findings at digital subtraction angiography. The unpaired Student's t test was used to test arterial visibility with the two techniques. First-pass MR angiography with gadofosveset had good diagnostic utility in 83.9% of all segments and no venous contamination in 96.8% of all segments. There was no difference between the performance of intraarterial digital subtraction angiography and that of i.v. contrast-enhanced MR angiography in arterial visibility overall (p = 0.245) or in subgroup analysis of surgical arterial bypass targets (p = 0.202). The overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of i.v. gadofosveset-enhanced MR angiography for characterization of clinically significant stenosis and occlusion were 91.4%, 96.1%, and 93.9%. In the subgroup analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 85.5%, 96.5%, and 92.1%. Gadofosveset-enhanced MR angiography of the pedal arteries in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease has arterial visibility equal to that of digital subtraction angiography and facilitates depiction of clinically significant stenosis and occlusion.

  5. Videodensitometric ejection fraction from intravenous digital subtraction right ventriculograms: correlation with first pass radionuclide ejection fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Detrano, R.; MacIntyre, W.; Salcedo, E.E.; O'Donnell, J.; Underwood, D.A.; Simpfendorfer, C.; Go, R.T.; Butters, K.; Withrow, S.

    1985-06-01

    Thirty-one consecutive patients undergoing intravenous blurred mask digital subtraction right ventriculography were submitted to first pass radionuclide angiography. Second order mask resubtraction of end-diastolic and end-systolic right ventricular digital image frames was executed using preinjection end-diastolic and end-systolic frames to rid the digital subtraction images of mis-registration artifact. End-diastolic and end-systolic perimeters were drawn manually by two independent observers with a light pen. Ejection fractions calculated from the integrated videodensitometric counts within these perimeters correlated well with those derived from the first pass radionuclide right ventriculogram (r = 0.84) and the interobserver correlation was acceptable (r = 0.91). Interobserver differences occurred more frequently in patients with atrial fibrillation and in those whose tricuspid valve planes were difficult to discern on the digital subtraction right ventriculograms. These results suggest that videodensitometric analysis of digital subtraction right ventriculograms is an accurate method of determining right ventricular ejection fraction and may find wide clinical applicability.

  6. Relationship of radionuclide indexes of cardiac function during interventions: volume loading, afterload stress, exercise, and pacing

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.A.

    1983-04-01

    We compared three radionuclide index of cardiac function: 1) the ejection fraction (EF), 2) the mean ejection rate (ER), and 3) the mean velocity of circumferential fiber shortening (MVCF) during volume loading, phenylephrine hydrochloride stress, exercise, and atrial pacing. All behaved in a similar (linear) fashion, allowing appropriate hemodynamic conclusions to be drawn using either index. During atrial pacing, the ejection fraction declined when velocity indexes increased, suggesting that the ejection fraction may not be a suitable index to characterize alterations in inotropic state during rapid alterations in heart rate, particular in the absence of angina pectoris. This may result from the reductions in cardiac volume for the duration of pacing, where the velocity index is preserved. In most circumstances excluding atrial pacing, ejection fraction during interventions is an adequate index of the change of myocardial contractile state. Overall, radionuclide angiography is an excellent technique to characterize acute hemodynamic interventions, with ejection fraction, in general, the simplest and most reliable of cardiac indexes during stress interventions.

  7. The Use of Fluorescein Angiography to Study Oxygen Toxicity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-02-28

    NAVAL RESEA DICAL ÄTORY SUBMARINE BASE, GROTON, CONN. REPORT NUMBER 833 THE USE OF FLUORESCEIN ANGIOGRAPHY TO STUDY OXYGEN TOXICITY by...distribution unlimited PROBLEM To test whether fluorescein angiography can be used as a technique for monitoring an individual’s response to... Angiography to Study Oxygen Toxicity* Reprinted from Annals of Ophthalmology, Volume 9, Number 8, August 1977. Copyright 1977 by Annals of

  8. Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Our Accomplishments Annual Reports Our Videos What Is Hepatitis B? What Is Hepatitis B? The ABCs of Viral Hepatitis Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B Hepatitis Delta Coinfection Hepatitis C Coinfection HIV/AIDS ...

  9. Radionuclide Therapies in Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kendi, A Tuba; Moncayo, Valeria M; Nye, Jonathon A; Galt, James R; Halkar, Raghuveer; Schuster, David M

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances and applications of radionuclide therapy. Individualized precision medicine, new treatments, and the evolving role of radionuclide therapy are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of Radionuclides in the Savannah River Site Environment Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.

    1999-01-26

    This document summarizes the impact of radionuclide releases from Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities from 1954 through 1996. The radionuclides reported here are those whose release resulted in the highest dose to people living near SRS.

  11. Non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography: techniques and applications.

    PubMed

    Blankholm, Anne Dorte; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography has gained renewed interest since the discovery of the association between gadolinium-based contrast agents and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. The following article is an overview of the different magnetic resonance angiography sequences, the technical possibilities and new developments. Clinical options and recent advancements will be highlighted, and recommendations for non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography techniques in different anatomical regions will be given. Furthermore, the authors seek to predict the future of non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography, with special focus on patients at risk.

  12. Hepatitis E.

    PubMed

    Kamar, Nassim; Bendall, Richard; Legrand-Abravanel, Florence; Xia, Ning-Shao; Ijaz, Samreen; Izopet, Jacques; Dalton, Harry R

    2012-06-30

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) was discovered during the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan in the 1980s, after an outbreak of unexplained hepatitis at a military camp. A pooled faecal extract from affected soldiers was ingested by a member of the research team. He became sick, and the new virus (named HEV), was detected in his stool by electron microscopy. Subsequently, endemic HEV has been identified in many resource-poor countries. Globally, HEV is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis. The virus was not initially thought to occur in developed countries, but recent reports have shown this notion to be mistaken. The aim of this Seminar is to describe recent discoveries regarding HEV, and how they have changed our understanding of its effect on human health worldwide. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Noninvasive detection of vertebral artery stenosis: a comparison of contrast-enhanced MR angiography, CT angiography, and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sofia; Rich, Philip; Clifton, Andrew; Markus, Hugh S

    2009-11-01

    Vertebral stenosis is associated with a high risk of recurrent stroke, but noninvasive imaging techniques to identify it have lacked sensitivity. Contrast-enhanced MR angiography and CT angiography have been recently developed and appear to have better sensitivity. However, no prospective studies have compared both of these techniques with ultrasound against the gold standard of intra-arterial angiography in the same group of patients. Forty-six patients were prospectively recruited in whom intra-arterial angiography was being performed. Contrast-enhanced MR angiography, CT angiography, and duplex ultrasound were also performed. Angiographic images were analyzed blinded to patient identity by 2 experienced neuroradiologists. Contrast-enhanced MR angiography had the highest sensitivity and specificity (Radiologist 1, 0.83 and 0.91, respectively; Radiologist 2, 0.89 and 0.87) for detecting >or=50% stenosis. CT angiography had good sensitivity (Radiologist 1, 0.68; Radiologist 2, 0.58) and excellent specificity (Radiologist 1, 0.92; Radiologist 2, 0.93), whereas duplex had low sensitivity (0.44) but excellent specificity (0.95). For vertebral origin stenosis >or=50%, sensitivities were similar for contrast-enhanced MR angiography (Radiologist 1, 0.91; Radiologist 2, 0.82) but relatively higher for CT angiography (Radiologist 1, 0.82; Radiologist 2, 0.82) and duplex (0.67). Contrast-enhanced MR angiography is the most sensitive noninvasive technique to detect vertebral artery stenosis and also has high specificity. CT angiography has good sensitivity and high specificity. In contrast, ultrasound has low sensitivity and will miss many vertebral stenoses.

  14. Radionuclide angiographic evaluation of left ventricular performance at rest and during exercise in patients with aortic regurgitation

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Heo, J.

    1986-06-01

    Radionuclide angiographic evaluation of LV performance at rest and during exercise in patients with AR have shown that an abnormal EF response to exercise may be observed in asymptomatic patients with normal resting LV function. The EF response to exercise has been correlated with a number of clinical and exercise measurements; important among these are the slope of the systolic pressure-to-end-systolic volume, end-systolic volume, cardiac index, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and wall stress. The changes in the regurgitant fraction, EF, and LV volume have shown considerable individual variability; they have also allowed a better understanding of the circulatory responses during exercise. Radionuclide angiography provides a reliable and reproducible method of measuring the rest LVEF that is important in the timing and the outcome of valve replacement. The value of the EF response to exercise in patient management is not yet clear; it is possible that other radionuclide-derived measurements at rest or during exercise, such as the systolic pressure-to-end-systolic volume relationship, and the end-systolic volume may provide complementary information to that provided by the EF.

  15. 21 CFR 892.5750 - Radionuclide radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radionuclide radiation therapy system. 892.5750... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5750 Radionuclide radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A radionuclide radiation therapy system is a device intended to permit...

  16. 21 CFR 892.5700 - Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system. 892.5700 Section 892.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... radionuclide applicator system. (a) Identification. A remote controlled radionuclide applicator system is...

  17. 21 CFR 892.5700 - Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system. 892.5700 Section 892.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... radionuclide applicator system. (a) Identification. A remote controlled radionuclide applicator system is...

  18. 21 CFR 892.5700 - Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system. 892.5700 Section 892.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... radionuclide applicator system. (a) Identification. A remote controlled radionuclide applicator system is...

  19. 21 CFR 892.5700 - Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system. 892.5700 Section 892.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... radionuclide applicator system. (a) Identification. A remote controlled radionuclide applicator system is...

  20. Analysis of enlarged images using time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography, computed tomography, and conventional angiography.

    PubMed

    Heo, Yeong-Cheol; Lee, Hae-Kag; Yang, Han-Jun; Cho, Jae-Hwan

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to assess the accuracy of time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography, computed tomography, and conventional angiography in depicting the actual length of the blood vessels. Three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography and computed tomography angiography were performed using a flow phantom model that was 2.11 mm in diameter and had a total area of 0.26 cm(2). After this, volume rendering technique and the maximum intensity projection method as well as two-dimensional digital subtraction angiography and three-dimensional rotational angiography based on conventional angiography were conducted. For three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography, 8 channel sensitivity encoding (SENSE) head coil for the 3.0 Tesla equipment was used. Fluid was added to the normal saline solution at various rates, such as 11.4, 20.0, 31.4, 40.0, 51.5, 60.0, 71.5, 80.1, 91.5, and 100.1 cm/s using an automatic contrast media injector. Each image was thoroughly examined. After reconstructing the image using the maximum intensity projection method, the length of the conduit in the center of the coronal plane was measured 30 times. After performing computed tomography angiography with the 64-channel CT scanner and 16-channel CT scanner, the images were sent to TeraRecon. Then, the length of the conduit in the center of the coronal plane of each image was measured 30 times after reconstructing the images using volume rendering and maximum intensity projection techniques. For conventional angiography, three-dimensional rotational angiography and two-dimensional digital subtraction angiography were used. Images obtained by three-dimensional rotational angiography were reconstructed and enhanced by 33, 50, and 100 % in the 128 Matrix and the 256 Matrix, respectively on the Xtra Vision workstation. The maximum intensity projection was used for the reconstruction, and the length of the conduit was measured 30 times in the center of the coronal

  1. Distribution of radionuclides in Dardanelle Reservoir sediments.

    PubMed

    Forgy, J R; Epperson, C E; Swindle, D L

    1984-02-01

    Natural and reactor-discharged gamma-ray emitting radionuclides were measured in Dardanelle Reservoir surface sediments taken near the Arkansas Nuclear One Power Plant site. Samples represented several water depths and particle sizes, at 33 locations, in a field survey conducted in early September 1980. Radionuclide contents of dry sediments ranged as follows: natural radioactivity (40K as well as uranium and thorium decay products) 661-1210 Bq/kg; and reactor discharged radioactivity (137Cs, 134Cs, 60Co,, 58Co, 54Mn), no detectable activity to 237 Bq/kg. In general, radionuclide contents were positively correlated with decreasing sediment particle size. The average external whole-body and skin doses from all measurable reactor-discharged radionuclides were calculated according to the mathematical formula for determining external dose from sediment given by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Inside the discharge embayment near the reactor discharge canal, the doses were 1.7 X 10(-3) mSv/yr to the whole body and 2.0 X 10(-3) mSv/yr to the skin. Outside this area, the doses were 0.15 X 10(-3) and 0.18 X 10(-3) mSv/yr to the whole body and skin, respectively.

  2. Understanding Radionuclide Interactions with Layered Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Layered materials play an important role in nuclear waste management and environmental cleanup. Better understanding of radionuclide interactions with those materials is critical for engineering high-performance materials for various applications. This presentation will provide an overview on radionuclide interactions with two general categories of layered materials - cationic clays and anionic clays - from a perspective of nanopore confinement. Nanopores are widely present in layered materials, either as the interlayers or as inter-particle space. Nanopore confinement can significantly modify chemical reactions in those materials. This effect may cause the preferential enrichment of radionuclides in nanopores and therefore directly impact the mobility of the radionuclides. This effect also implies that conventional sorption measurements using disaggregated samples may not represent chemical conditions in actual systems. The control of material structures on ion exchange, surface complexation, and diffusion in layered materials will be systematically examined, and the related modeling approaches will be discussed. This work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories, which is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the DOE under contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  3. REMOVAL OF RADIONUCLIDES BY ELECTROKINETIC SOIL PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrokinetics promises to be an innovative treatment process for in-situ treatment of soils and groundwater contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides. Electrokinetics refers to the movement of ionic liquids and charged particles relative to one another under the action ...

  4. REMOVAL OF RADIONUCLIDES BY ELECTROKINETIC SOIL PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrokinetics promises to be an innovative treatment process for in-situ treatment of soils and groundwater contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides. Electrokinetics refers to the movement of ionic liquids and charged particles relative to one another under the action ...

  5. RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT MODELS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    S. Magnuson

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) radionuclide transport model, which evaluates, by means of three-dimensional numerical models, the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the UZ, under ambient conditions, from the repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  6. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers: radionuclide transport modeling for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Y.; Yabusaki, S.B.; Kincaid, C.T.; Skaggs, R.L.; Walters, W.H.

    1982-12-01

    SERATRA, a transient, two-dimensional (laterally-averaged) computer model of sediment-contaminant transport in rivers, satisfactorily resolved the distribution of sediment and radionuclide concentrations in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system in New York. By modeling the physical processes of advection, diffusion, erosion, deposition, and bed armoring, SERATRA routed three sediment size fractions, including cohesive soils, to simulate three dynamic flow events. In conjunction with the sediment transport, SERATRA computed radionuclide levels in dissolved, suspended sediment, and bed sediment forms for four radionuclides (/sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu, and /sup 3/H). By accounting for time-dependent sediment-radionuclide interaction in the water column and bed, SERATA is a physically explicit model of radionuclide fate and migration. Sediment and radionuclide concentrations calculated by SERATA in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system are in reasonable agreement with measured values. SERATRA is in the field performance phase of an extensive testing program designed to establish the utility of the model as a site assessment tool. The model handles not only radionuclides but other contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals and other toxic chemicals. Now that the model has been applied to four field sites, including the latest study of the Cattaraugus Creek stream system, it is recommended that a final model be validated through comparison of predicted results with field data from a carefully controlled tracer test at a field site. It is also recommended that a detailed laboratory flume be tested to study cohesive sediment transport, deposition, and erosion characteristics. The lack of current understanding of these characteristics is one of the weakest areas hindering the accurate assessment of the migration of radionuclides sorbed by fine sediments of silt and clay.

  7. Radionuclides in radiation-induced bystander effect; may it share in radionuclide therapy?

    PubMed

    Widel, M

    2017-01-01

    For many years in radiobiology and radiotherapy predominated the conviction that cellular DNA is the main target for ionizing radiation, however, the view has changed in the past 20 years. Nowadays, it is assumed that not only directed (targeted) radiation effect, but also an indirect (non-targeted) effect may contribute to the result of radiation treatment. Non-targeted effect is relatively well recognized after external beam irradiation in vitro and in vivo, and comprises such phenomena like radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), genomic instability, adaptive response and abscopal (out of field) effect. These stress-induced and molecular signaling mediated phenomena appear in non-targeted cells as variety responses resembling that observed in directly hit cells. Bystander effects can be both detrimental and beneficial in dependence on dose, dose-rate, cell type, genetic status and experimental condition. Less is known about radionuclide-induced non-targeted effects in radionuclide therapy, although, based on characteristics of the radionuclide radiation, on experiments in vitro utilizing classical and 3-D cell cultures, and preclinical study on animals it seems obvious that exposure to radionuclide is accompanied by various bystander effects, mostly damaging, less often protective. This review summarizes existing data on radionuclide induced bystander effects comprising radionuclides emitting beta- and alpha-particles and Auger electrons used in tumor radiotherapy and diagnostics. So far, separation of the direct effect of radionuclide decay from crossfire and bystander effects in clinical targeted radionuclide therapy is impossible because of the lack of methods to assess whether, and to what extent bystander effect is involved in human organism. Considerations on this topic are also included.

  8. Safety and efficacy of dual-axis rotational coronary angiography vs. standard coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Klein, Andrew J; Garcia, Joel A; Hudson, Paul A; Kim, Michael S; Messenger, John C; Casserly, Ivan P; Wink, Onno; Hattler, Brack; Tsai, Thomas T; Chen, S Y James; Hansgen, Adam; Carroll, John D

    2011-05-01

    To determine the safety and efficacy of dual-axis rotational coronary angiography (DARCA) by directly comparing it to standard coronary angiography (SA). Standard coronary angiography (SA) requires numerous fixed static images of the coronary tree and has multiple well-documented limitations. Dual-axis rotational coronary angiography (DARCA) is a new rotational acquisition technique that entails simultaneous LAO/RAO and cranial/caudal gantry movement. This technological advancement obtains numerous unique images of the left or right coronary tree with a single coronary injection. We sought to assess the safety and efficacy of DARCA as well as determine DARCA's adequacy for CAD screening and assessment. Thirty patients underwent SA following by DARCA. Contrast volume, radiation dose (DAP) and procedural time were recorded for each method to assess safety. For DARCA acquisitions, blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), symptoms and any arrhythmias were recorded. All angiograms were reviewed for CAD screening adequacy by two independent invasive cardiologists. Compared to SA, use of DARCA was associated with a 51% reduction in contrast, 35% less radiation exposure, and 18% shorter procedural time. Both independent reviewers noted DARCA to be at least equivalent to SA with respect to the ability to screen for CAD. DARCA represents a new angiographic technique which is equivalent in terms of image quality and is associated with less contrast use, radiation exposure, and procedural time than SA. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Does CT Angiography Matter for Patients with Cervical Spine Injuries?

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, John C; Emery, Sanford E; France, John C; Daffner, Scott D

    2014-06-04

    Cervical injury can be associated with vertebral artery injury. This study was performed to determine the impact of computed tomography (CT) angiography of the head and neck on planning treatment of cervical spine fracture, if these tests were ordered appropriately, and to estimate cost and associated exposure to radiation and contrast medium. This retrospective review included all patients who underwent CT of the cervical spine and CT angiography of the head and neck from January 2010 to August 2011 at one institution. Patients were divided into those with and those without cervical spine fracture seen on CT of the cervical spine. We determined if the CT angiography of the head and neck was positive for vascular injury in the patients with a cervical fracture. Vascular injury treatment and alterations in surgical fracture treatment due to positive CT angiography of the head and neck were recorded. A scan was deemed appropriate if it had been ordered per established institutional protocol. Of the 381 patients who underwent CT angiography of the head and neck, 126 had a cervical injury. Sixteen of the CT angiography studies were appropriately ordered for non-spinal indications, and twenty-three were inappropriately ordered. The CT angiography was positive for one patient for whom the imaging was off protocol and one for whom the indication was non-spinal. Nineteen patients had positive CT angiography of the head and neck; no patient underwent surgical intervention for a vascular lesion. Eleven patients underwent surgical intervention for a cervical fracture; the operative plan was changed because of vascular injury in one case. The CT angiography was positive for eleven of forty-eight patients who had sustained a C2 fracture; this group accounted for eleven of the nineteen positive CT angiography studies. Noncontiguous injuries occurred in nineteen patients; three had positive CT angiography of the head and neck. The approximate charge for the CT angiography was

  10. Scientific Analysis Cover Sheet for Radionuclide Screening

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ragan

    2002-08-09

    The waste forms under consideration for disposal in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain contain scores of radionuclides (Attachments V and VI). It would be impractical and highly inefficient to model all of these radionuclides in a total system performance assessment (TSPA). Thus, the purpose of this radionuclide screening analysis is to remove from further consideration (screen out) radionuclides that are unlikely to significantly contribute to radiation dose to the public from the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The remaining nuclides (those screened in) are recommended for consideration in TSPA modeling for license application. This analysis also covers radionuclides that are not screened in based on dose, but need to be included in TSPA modeling for other reasons. For example, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations require consideration of the combined activity of Ra-226 and Ra-228 in groundwater (40 CFR 197.30, 10 CFR 63.331). Also, Cm-245, Pu-241, and U-235 decay indirectly to potentially important radionuclides, and are not identified by the screening analysis as important. The radionuclide screening analysis separately considers two different postclosure time periods: the 10,000-y regulatory period for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain and the period after 10,000 y up to 1 million y after emplacement. The incremental effect of extending the screening for the regulatory period to 20,000 y is also addressed. Four release scenarios are considered: (1) the nominal scenario, which entails long-term degradation of disposal containers and waste forms, (2) a human-intrusion scenario, (3) an intrusive igneous event, and (4) an eruptive igneous event. Because the first three scenarios require groundwater transport, they are called groundwater scenarios below. The screening analysis considers the following waste forms: spent boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel, spent

  11. Discordance between CT and angiography in the PIOPED II study.

    PubMed

    Wittram, Conrad; Waltman, Arthur C; Shepard, Jo-Anne O; Halpern, Elkan; Goodman, Lawrence R

    2007-09-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the causes of discordant computed tomographic (CT)-angiographic readings from the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis, or PIOPED, II study. Institutional review board approval was obtained for this HIPAA-compliant study. Of 1036 patients suspected of having pulmonary embolism who were examined with CT, 226 underwent angiography; 206 patients had concordant results and 20 had discordant results according to two independent readers. Of these 20 patients, 10 were men and 10 were women (mean age, 49 years). Among the 20 studies with discordant results, central readers identified seven cases as negative and 13 as positive for pulmonary embolism at CT; these findings were reversed at angiography. Side-by-side comparisons of discordant studies were performed in consensus. The time between CT and angiography and all locations of pulmonary embolism vascular territory were recorded. The McNemar binomial test was used. One patient had false-positive findings at angiography, 13 patients had false-negative findings at angiography, and two patients had false-negative findings at CT. Four patients had true-negative findings at CT; however, findings were positive for thrombus at angiography. The sensitivity for the detection of pulmonary embolism was 87% for CT and 32% for angiography (P=.007). The largest missed thrombus at angiography was subsegmental in eight patients, segmental in two patients, and lobar in three patients; at CT it was subsegmental in two patients. The mean time between CT and angiography was 40 hours+/-21 (standard deviation) (range, 10-97 hours). In the interval between CT and angiography, thrombi can remain the same, resolve, develop, or result from angiography. Copyright (c) RSNA, 2007.

  12. Syringe calibration factors for the NPL Secondary Standard Radionuclide Calibrator for selected medical radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Tyler, D K; Woods, M J

    2003-01-01

    Before a radiopharmaceutical is administered to a patient, its activity needs to be accurately assayed. This is normally done via a radionuclide calibrator, using a glass vial as the calibration device. The radionuclide is then transferred to a syringe and it is now becoming common practice to re-measure the syringe and use this value as the activity administered to the patient. Due to elemental composition and geometrical differences, etc. between the glass vial and the syringe, the calibration factors are different for the two containers and this can lead to an incorrect activity being given to the patient unless a correction is applied for these differences. To reduce the uncertainty on syringe measurements, syringe calibration factors and volume correction factors for the NPL Secondary Standard Radionuclide Calibrator have been derived by NPL for several medically important radionuclides. It was found that the differences between the calibration factors for the syringes and glass vials depend on the energies of the photon emissions from the decay of the radionuclides; the lower the energy, the greater the difference. As expected, large differences were observed for 125I (70%) and only small differences for 131I. However, for radionuclides such as 99mTc and 67Ga, differences of up to 30% have been observed. This work has shown the need for the use of specifically derived syringe calibration factors as well as highlighting the complexity of the problem with regard to syringe types, procurement, etc.

  13. 2006 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report

    SciTech Connect

    David P. Fuehne

    2007-06-30

    This report describes the impacts from emissions of radionuclides at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2006. This report fulfills the requirements established by the Radionuclide National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Rad-NESHAP). This report is prepared by LANL's Rad-NESHAP compliance team, part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to an off-site member of the public was calculated using procedures specified by the EPA and described in this report. LANL's EDE was 0.47 mrem for 2006. The annual limit established by the EPA is 10 mrem per year. During calendar year 2006, LANL continuously monitored radionuclide emissions at 28 release points, or stacks. The Laboratory estimates emissions from an additional 58 release points using radionuclide usage source terms. Also, LANL uses a network of air samplers around the Laboratory perimeter to monitor ambient airborne levels of radionuclides. To provide data for dispersion modeling and dose assessment, LANL maintains and operates meteorological monitoring systems. From these measurement systems, a comprehensive evaluation is conducted to calculate the EDE for the Laboratory. The EDE is evaluated as any member of the public at any off-site location where there is a residence, school, business, or office. In 2006, this location was the Los Alamos Airport Terminal. The majority of this dose is due to ambient air sampling of plutonium emitted from 2006 clean-up activities at an environmental restoration site (73-002-99; ash pile). Doses reported to the EPA for the past 10 years are shown in Table E1.

  14. Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, K.K.; Acharya, S.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Antibodies, specifically monoclonal antibodies, are potentially very useful and powerful carriers of therapeutic agents to target tissues and diagnostic agents. The loading or charging of antibodies with agents, especially radiotracers, is reviewed here. The choice of radioisotope for immunodetection and/or immunotherapy is based on its availability, half-life, nature of the radiation emitted, and the metabolic pathways of the radionuclide in the body. Most important of all are the derivatization techniques available for labeling the antibody with the given radionuclide. Isotopes of iodine and divalent metal ions are the most commonly used radionuclides. Antibodies labeled with iodine at tyrosine residues are metabolized rapidly in vivo. This leads to the incorporation of metabolized radioactive iodine into various tissues, mainly the thyroid gland and stomach, and to the accumulation of high levels of circulating iodine in the blood, which masks tumor uptake considerably. To overcome these limitations, the use of iodohippurate as an iodine-anchoring molecule to the protein should be considered. When divalent or multivalent metal ions are used as the preferred radionuclide, bifunctional chelating reagents such as EDTA or DTPA are first coupled to the protein or antibody. These chelating molecules are attached to the protein by formation of an isopeptide linkage between the carboxylate of the chelating reagent and the amino group of the protein. Several procedures are available to generate the isopeptide linkage. When the anchoring of the chelating agent through isopeptide linkage results in the inactivation of the antibody, periodate oxidation of the carbohydrate moiety of the antibody, followed by reductive coupling of chelator, could be considered as an alternative. There is still a need for better, simpler, and more direct methods for labeling antibodies with radionuclides. 78 references.

  15. [A case of hepatic artery aneurysm that had formed asymptomatically and penetrated into the duodenum].

    PubMed

    Hatogai, Ken; Nakazawa, Atsushi; Takita, Maiko; Kishino, Ryouhei; Seki, Eri; Iwasaki, Eisuke; Izumiya, Motoko; Maeda, Norio; Motegi, Katsuhiko; Mukai, Kiyoshi; Tsukada, Nobuhiro

    2012-02-01

    A 41-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with gastrointestinal bleeding. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a submucosal protrusion with erosion in the duodenal bulb which was thought to be the bleeding source. Dynamic CT scan, ultrasonography and angiography of the abdomen revealed a hepatic artery aneurysm and a dilated celiac artery that dissected from its origin. Although we considered percutaneous transcatheter arterial embolization with metallic coils, we chose surgical resection and vascular reconstruction to prevent hepatic ischemia resulting from interruption of collateral circulation. On the 8(th) day, hepatic artery aneurysmectomy and revascularization with a great saphenous vein was carried out without any severe complication. The pathological specimen demonstrated segmental arterial mediolysis.

  16. Computed Tomographic Angiography of the Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Neil J

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) angiography (CTA) has become the preferred imaging test of choice for various aortic conditions because of its excellent spatial resolution, rapid image acquisition, and its wide availability. CTA provides a robust tool for planning aortic interventions and diagnosing acute and chronic vascular diseases in the abdomen. CTA is the standard for imaging aneurysms before intervention and evaluating the aorta in the acute setting to assess traumatic injury, dissection, and aneurysm rupture. Knowledge of the imaging features of these disease processes, inflammatory vasculitides, and occlusive atherosclerotic disease is essential for guiding surgical and medical management of patients.

  17. Autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Strassburg, Christian P

    2010-10-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the liver with a dismal prognosis when left untreated. Key for the improvement of prognosis is a timely diagnosis before cirrhosis has developed. This is reached by the exclusion of other causes of hepatitis, elevated immunoglobulin G, autoantibody profile and histological assessment. Treatment achieves remission rates in 80% of individuals and consists of immunosuppression with corticosteroids and azathioprine. A recent randomised controlled multicenter trial has added budesonide to the effective treatment options in non-cirrhotic patients and leads to a reduction of unwanted steroid side effects. Autoimmune hepatitis is an autoimmune disease of unknown aetiology. Association studies of major histocompatibility complex and other genes demonstrate an influence of immunogenetics. However, apart from the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1, in which 10% of patients suffer from an autoantibody-positive autoimmune hepatitis linked to mutations of the autoimmune regulator gene, there is no clear evidence for a hereditary aetiology of this disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Utilization of cardiac computed tomography angiography and outpatient invasive coronary angiography in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Roifman, Idan; Rezai, Mohammad R; Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Chow, Benjamin J W; Wright, Graham A; Tu, Jack V

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA) has emerged as a non-invasive method of diagnosing coronary artery disease. The extent of utilization and uptake of this technology since initiation of its funding by the government of Ontario is unknown. The aim of our study was to examine coronary CTA utilization and the rates of elective invasive coronary angiography and revascularization before and after funding initiation. We studied all coronary CTAs performed on adults in Ontario after initiation of funding. We also used an interrupted time series analysis to compare the average monthly rates of invasive angiography and revascularization before and after initiation of funding. There was an initial steep increase in age-and sex-standardized rates of coronary CTA from 5.0 to 11.4/100,000 over the first two quarters after funding initiation. Afterwards, there was a gradual increase in utilization from 11.4 to 17.1/100,000 over two subsequent calendar years. There was a significant reduction in both the mean monthly outpatient invasive coronary angiography (from 20.7 to 19.9 per 100,000 (p = 0.0004)) and revascularization (from 4.9 to 4.4 per 100,000 (p < 0.0001)) rates in the three years following introduction of the coronary CTA billing code as compared to the three prior to its introduction. Since the introduction of coronary CTA funding in Ontario, there has been a steady and controlled increase in its utilization. The increasing use of coronary CTA was associated with a reduction in both the rates of invasive angiography and revascularization. Copyright © 2015 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A case of ruptured segmental arterial mediolysis of the hepatic artery: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Tomonaga, Tetsuo; Eguchi, Susumu; Hidaka, Masaaki; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Soyama, Akihiko; Muraoka, Izumi; Mizutani, Akimasa; Fukui, Hiroshi; Kanematsu, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    This article reports a patient with intra-abdominal hemorrhage secondary to a rare vascular disease, segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM). The patient was a 68-year-old male who presented with chilling and severe abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography results suggested the presence of an intra-abdominal hemorrhage. Although visceral angiography illustrated multiple aneurysms in the branches of the hepatic artery, active bleeding was not evident. Conservative therapy including transfusion was performed, and re-angiography revealed the disappearance of multiple hepatic arterial aneurysms 8 months later. This is the first case of intra-abdominal hemorrhage related to SAM of the hepatic artery in which natural history of SAM was seen.

  20. Hemodialysis fistula occlusion: demonstration with 64-slice CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Edward G; Johnson, Pamela T; Fishman, Elliot K

    2006-01-01

    The speed and resolution of 64-slice CT have resulted in new applications for CT angiography (CTA) owing to rapid data acquisition during the arterial phase, improved visualization of small vessels, and lengthened anatomic coverage. Extremity CT angiography is one such region. This case report shows the utility of multislice CTA for the evaluation of hemodialysis graft dysfunction.

  1. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography findings in retinal arterial macroaneurysms.

    PubMed

    Alnawaiseh, Maged; Schubert, Friederike; Nelis, Pieter; Wirths, Gabriele; Rosentreter, André; Eter, Nicole

    2016-07-22

    Optical coherence tomography angiography is a novel imaging technique that allows dyeless in vivo visualization of the retinal and choroidal vasculature. The purpose of this study was to describe optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography findings in patients with retinal arterial macroaneurysms (RAMs). Three eyes of three patients with RAMs were retrospectively included. Fundus photography, OCT, fluorescein angiography (FA), and OCT angiography were performed. The entire imaging data was analyzed in detail. OCT angiography could detect the RAMs noninvasively without dye injection. By simultaneously observing the OCT scans, it was possible to determine the depth of the RAMs in the retina, to detect the exact localization in relation to the main vessel, and to determine the level of blood flow in the RAMs. OCT angiography can clearly visualize RAMs without use of a dye. It also allows layer-specific observation of blood flow in each layer of the RAM. OCT angiography provides additional dynamic information on RAMs, which is not obtained with FA and facilitates a better understanding of its morphology and activity. This information in combination with ICG and fluorescein angiography can help to optimize direct laser treatment.

  2. Uptake by plants of radionuclides from FUSRAP waste materials

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    Radionuclides from FUSRAP wastes potentially may be taken up by plants during remedial action activities and permanent near-surface burial of contaminated materials. In order to better understand the propensity of radionuclides to accumulate in plant tissue, soil and plant factors influencing the uptake and accumulation of radionuclides by plants are reviewed. In addition, data describing the uptake of the principal radionuclides present in FUSRAP wastes (uranium-238, thorium-230, radium-226, lead-210, and polonium-210) are summarized. All five radionuclides can accumulate in plant root tissue to some extent, and there is potential for the translocation and accumulation of these radionuclides in plant shoot tissue. Of these five radionuclides, radium-226 appears to have the greatest potential for translocation and accumulation in plant shoot tissue. 28 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  3. National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series

    SciTech Connect

    Rudin, M.J.; Garcia, R.S.

    1992-02-01

    This volume serves as an introduction to the National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series. This report includes discussions of radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha-emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than five years). Each report includes information regarding radiological and chemical characteristics of specific radionuclides. Information is also included discussing waste streams and waste forms that may contain each radionuclide, and radionuclide behavior in the environment and in the human body. Not all radionuclides commonly found at low-level radioactive waste sites are included in this report. The discussion in this volume explains the rationale of the radionuclide selection process.

  4. Non-contrast-enhanced MR angiography in the diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) compared with digital subtraction angiography (DSA): Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Li, Ceng; Zeng, Mengsu; Lu, Xin; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Jiali; Sami, Muhammad Umair; Xu, Kai

    2017-02-01

    Non-CE MRA techniques (true steady-state free-precession, SSFP) have been used effectively for the selective visualization of the portal venous system and inferior vena cava. Budd-Chiari Syndrome (BCS) encompasses a number of conditions that cause the obstruction of the hepatic outflow tract from the small hepatic veins to the junction of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and right atrium. The purpose of this study was to diagnose BCS with IVC obstruction using respiratory triggered three-dimensional (3D) true SSFP with T-SLIP and compare to digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The image acquisition of 3D true SSFP scans was successfully performed in 108 patients (≧2 score). The mean and SDs of the relative SNR and CNR were 55.96±2.32 and 30.72±1.56, respectively. Intergroup agreement for the detection of the 4 types (membranous obstruction, segmental occlusion, and membranous obstruction with a hole and segmental stenosis) of BCS with IVC obstruction was excellent between the Time-SLIP and the DSA. In conclusion, Time-SLIP for the detection of IVC obstruction BCS does not require the use of contrast. This procedure can achieve a high success rate, high accuracy rate and fine image quality for the diagnosis of IVC obstruction BCS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Image Artifacts in Optical Coherence Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Spaide, Richard F.; Fujimoto, James G.; Waheed, Nadia K.

    2016-01-01

    To describe image artifacts of optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) and their underlying causative mechanisms. To establish a common vocabulary for the artifacts observed. Methods The methods by which OCTA images are acquired, generated and displayed are reviewed as are the mechanisms by which each or all of these methods can produce extraneous image information. A common set of terminology is proposed and used. Results OCTA uses motion contrast to image blood flow and thereby images the vasculature without the need for a contrast agent. Artifacts are very common and can arise from the OCT image acquisition, intrinsic characteristics of the eye, eye motion, or image processing and display strategies. OCT image acquisition for angiography takes more time than simple structural scans and necessitates trade-offs in flow resolution, scan quality, and speed. An important set of artifacts are projection artifacts in which images of blood vessels appear at erroneous locations. Image processing used for OCTA can alter vascular appearance through segmentation defects and because of image display strategies can give false impressions of the density and location of vessels. Eye motion leads to discontinuities in displayed data. OCTA artifacts can be detected by interactive evaluation of the images. Conclusions Image artifacts are common, and can lead to incorrect interpretations of OCTA images. Because of the quantity of data available and the potential for artifacts, physician interaction in viewing the image data will be required, much like what happens in modern radiology practice. PMID:26428607

  6. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and Tmax, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  7. Angiography with a multifunctional line scanning ophthalmoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Patel, Ankit H.; Vazquez, Vanessa; Husain, Deeba

    2012-02-01

    A multifunctional line scanning ophthalmoscope (mLSO) was designed, constructed, and tested on human subjects. The mLSO could sequentially acquire wide-field, confocal, near-infrared reflectance, fluorescein angiography (FA), and indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) retinal images. The system also included a retinal tracker (RT) and a photodynamic therapy laser treatment port. The mLSO was tested in a pilot clinical study on human subjects with and without retinal disease. The instrument exhibited robust retinal tracking and high-contrast line scanning imaging. The FA and ICGA angiograms showed a similar appearance of hyper- and hypo-pigmented disease features and a nearly equivalent resolution of fine capillaries compared to a commercial flood-illumination fundus imager. An mLSO-based platform will enable researchers and clinicians to image human and animal eyes with a variety of modalities and deliver therapeutic beams from a single automated interface. This approach has the potential to improve patient comfort and reduce imaging session times, allowing clinicians to better diagnose, plan, and conduct patient procedures with improved outcomes.

  8. Coronary CT angiography: Beyond morphological stenosis analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhonghua

    2013-12-26

    Rapid technological developments in computed tomography (CT) imaging technique have made coronary CT angiography an attractive imaging tool in the detection of coronary artery disease. Despite visualization of excellent anatomical details of the coronary lumen changes, coronary CT angiography does not provide hemodynamic changes caused by presence of plaques. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a widely used method in the mechanical engineering field to solve complex problems through analysing fluid flow, heat transfer and associated phenomena by using computer simulations. In recent years, CFD is increasingly used in biomedical research due to high performance hardware and software. CFD techniques have been used to study cardiovascular hemodynamics through simulation tools to assist in predicting the behaviour of circulatory blood flow inside the human body. Blood flow plays a key role in the localization and progression of coronary artery disease. CFD simulation based on 3D luminal reconstructions can be used to analyse the local flow fields and flow profiling due to changes of vascular geometry, thus, identifying risk factors for development of coronary artery disease. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the coronary CT-derived CFD applications in coronary artery disease.

  9. Optical coherence tomography based angiography [Invited

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2017-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based angiography (OCTA) provides in vivo, three-dimensional vascular information by the use of flowing red blood cells as intrinsic contrast agents, enabling the visualization of functional vessel networks within microcirculatory tissue beds non-invasively, without a need of dye injection. Because of these attributes, OCTA has been rapidly translated to clinical ophthalmology within a short period of time in the development. Various OCTA algorithms have been developed to detect the functional micro-vasculatures in vivo by utilizing different components of OCT signals, including phase-signal-based OCTA, intensity-signal-based OCTA and complex-signal-based OCTA. All these algorithms have shown, in one way or another, their clinical values in revealing micro-vasculatures in biological tissues in vivo, identifying abnormal vascular networks or vessel impairment zones in retinal and skin pathologies, detecting vessel patterns and angiogenesis in eyes with age-related macular degeneration and in skin and brain with tumors, and monitoring responses to hypoxia in the brain tissue. The purpose of this paper is to provide a technical oriented overview of the OCTA developments and their potential pre-clinical and clinical applications, and to shed some lights on its future perspectives. Because of its clinical translation to ophthalmology, this review intentionally places a slightly more weight on ophthalmic OCT angiography. PMID:28271003

  10. INDOCYANINE GREEN ANGIOGRAPHY OF PACHYCHOROID PIGMENT EPITHELIOPATHY.

    PubMed

    Ersoz, M Giray; Arf, Serra; Hocaoglu, Mumin; Sayman Muslubas, Isil; Karacorlu, Murat

    2017-07-18

    To compare choroidal hyperpermeability and vessel density between eyes with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC), those with pachychoroid pigment epitheliopathy (PPE) and those with uncomplicated pachychoroid (UCP). We retrospectively reviewed indocyanine green angiography images of 60 patients with unilateral active CSC who had PPE (36 eyes) or UCP (24 eyes) in their fellow eyes. We used color thresholding of indocyanine green angiography images to determine choroidal vessel density. The mean choroidal thickness of eyes with CSC was greater than that of eyes with PPE or UCP, but this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.46). There was no significant difference between the PPE (92%) and CSC (93%) groups regarding choroidal hyperpermeability (P = 0.76), but both of these groups had higher choroidal permeability than the UCP group (50%) (both P < 0.001). In 30 (90%) of 33 eyes with PPE who had choroidal hyperpermeability, retinal pigment epithelium alterations were in the region of hyperpermeability. Choroidal vessel density did not differ between the PPE and UCP groups (P = 0.57). Pachychoroid pigment epitheliopathy is forme fruste of CSC. There is no difference between complicated and UCP regarding subfoveal choroidal thickness and choroidal vessel density. The main difference between these groups is choroidal hyperpermeability.

  11. Indocyanine green angiography in posterior uveitis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rupesh V; Biswas, Jyotirmay; Gunasekaran, Dinesh

    2013-04-01

    Literature review for indocyanine green angiography and evaluate the role of indocyanine green angiogram (ICGA) in patients with posterior uveitis seen at a tertiary referral eye care centre. Detailed review of the literature on ICGA was performed. Retrospective review of medical records of patients with posterior uveitis and dual fundus and ICGA was done after institutional board approval. Eighteen patients (26 eyes) had serpiginous choroiditis out of which 12 patients had active choroiditis and six patients had healed choroiditis, six patients (12 eyes) had ampiginous choroiditis, six patients (12 eyes) had acute multifocal posterior placoid pigment epitheliopathy, eight patients (10 eyes) had multifocal choroiditis, four patients (eight eyes) had presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome, four patients (eight eyes) had presumed tuberculous choroiditis, two patients (four eyes) had multiple evanescent white dot syndrome and two patients (four eyes) had Vogt Koyanagi Harada (VKH) syndrome. The most characteristic feature noted on ICGA was the presence of different patterns of hypofluorescent dark spots, which were present at different stages of the angiogram. ICGA provides the clinician with a powerful adjunctive tool in choroidal inflammatory disorders. It is not meant to replace already proven modalities such as the fluorescein angiography, but it can provide additional information that is useful in establishing a more definitive diagnosis in inflammatory chorioretinal diseases associated with multiple spots. It still needs to be determined if ICGA can prove to be a follow up parameter to evaluate disease progression.

  12. Indocyanine green angiography in posterior uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rupesh V; Biswas, Jyotirmay; Gunasekaran, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Literature review for indocyanine green angiography and evaluate the role of indocyanine green angiogram (ICGA) in patients with posterior uveitis seen at a tertiary referral eye care centre. Detailed review of the literature on ICGA was performed. Retrospective review of medical records of patients with posterior uveitis and dual fundus and ICGA was done after institutional board approval. Eighteen patients (26 eyes) had serpiginous choroiditis out of which 12 patients had active choroiditis and six patients had healed choroiditis, six patients (12 eyes) had ampiginous choroiditis, six patients (12 eyes) had acute multifocal posterior placoid pigment epitheliopathy, eight patients (10 eyes) had multifocal choroiditis, four patients (eight eyes) had presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome, four patients (eight eyes) had presumed tuberculous choroiditis, two patients (four eyes) had multiple evanescent white dot syndrome and two patients (four eyes) had Vogt Koyanagi Harada (VKH) syndrome. The most characteristic feature noted on ICGA was the presence of different patterns of hypofluorescent dark spots, which were present at different stages of the angiogram. ICGA provides the clinician with a powerful adjunctive tool in choroidal inflammatory disorders. It is not meant to replace already proven modalities such as the fluorescein angiography, but it can provide additional information that is useful in establishing a more definitive diagnosis in inflammatory chorioretinal diseases associated with multiple spots. It still needs to be determined if ICGA can prove to be a follow up parameter to evaluate disease progression. PMID:23685486

  13. Intraoperative Fluorescence Vascular Angiography: During Tibial Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Diana; Bharara, Manish; Armstrong, David G; Mills, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Preventing amputations in persons with lower extremity complications of diabetes is a complex endeavor, particularly in those with concomitant ischemia and tissue loss. Fluorescence angiography (Novadaq SPY system) may provide a tool for objective evaluations of tissue viability in the diabetic foot, which is an important indicator of the ability of the diabetic ulcer to heal adequately. The SPY system uses a low-power laser coupled with a charge-coupled device camera and indocyanine green (ICG) to sequence perfusion at the surface of the skin. We present an illustrated example of the potential utility of ICG fluorescence angiography (ICGFA) before and after vascular intervention in a high-risk limb. ICGFA appeared to reveal demarcation between viable and nonviable tissue and real-time perfusion, specifically capillary fill. ICGFA clarified the extent of necessary debridement and provided an immediate indication of improvement in regional perfusion status following revascularization. Future studies involving ICGFA may include pre- and postdebridement and closure perfusion, comparison of tissue perfusion pre- and post-endovascular therapy, and lower extremity flap viability. Future works will also address the consistency of results with ICGFA by analyzing a larger cohort of patients being treated by our unit. PMID:22401340

  14. Computed tomography imaging and angiography - principles.

    PubMed

    Kamalian, Shervin; Lev, Michael H; Gupta, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of patients with diverse neurologic disorders was forever changed in the summer of 1973, when the first commercial computed tomography (CT) scanners were introduced. Until then, the detection and characterization of intracranial or spinal lesions could only be inferred by limited spatial resolution radioisotope scans, or by the patterns of tissue and vascular displacement on invasive pneumoencaphalography and direct carotid puncture catheter arteriography. Even the earliest-generation CT scanners - which required tens of minutes for the acquisition and reconstruction of low-resolution images (128×128 matrix) - could, based on density, noninvasively distinguish infarct, hemorrhage, and other mass lesions with unprecedented accuracy. Iodinated, intravenous contrast added further sensitivity and specificity in regions of blood-brain barrier breakdown. The advent of rapid multidetector row CT scanning in the early 1990s created renewed enthusiasm for CT, with CT angiography largely replacing direct catheter angiography. More recently, iterative reconstruction postprocessing techniques have made possible high spatial resolution, reduced noise, very low radiation dose CT scanning. The speed, spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and low radiation dose capability of present-day scanners have also facilitated dual-energy imaging which, like magnetic resonance imaging, for the first time, has allowed tissue-specific CT imaging characterization of intracranial pathology.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Angiography of the Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Takehara, Yasuo; Yamashita, Shuhei; Sakahara, Harumi; Masui, Takayuki; Isoda, Haruo

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is capable of imaging arteries in the half to whole body by a single acquisition without a nephrotoxic contrast medium, and acquired images can be reconstructed into a specific cross-sectional view in an arbitrary directions. MRA is applicable for vessels non-reachable by a catheter approach, and collateral vessels can be fully visualized. Since MRA is minimally-invasive with no exposure to ionized radiation, it can be repeatedly applied for follow-up. However, there are also disadvantages: the temporal and spatial resolutions are inferior to those of X-ray angiography, and, at present, it cannot be used as a guide for intervention. Moreover, gadolinium administrations may cause NSF in patients who have lost renal function, as a new risk. Accordingly, strict consideration is required for an indication of its application. Development of non-contrast MRA and evaluation of the wall itself may draw more attention in the future. Plaque imaging is being routinely performed nowadays, and the measurement of vascular wall shear stress, which has a close association with arteriosclerosis, may become possible by utilizing the time-resolved phase-contrast method capable of measuring the time-resolved velocity vectors of blood flow throughout the body. (*English Translation of J Jpn Coll Angiol, 2009, 49: 503-516.) PMID:23555465

  16. Hepatitis A Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Twinrix® (as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... Why get vaccinated against hepatitis A?Hepatitis A is a serious liver disease. It is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). HAV is spread from ...

  17. Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography for Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Paul D.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Fowler, Sarah E.; Goodman, Lawrence R.; Gottschalk, Alexander; Hales, Charles A.; Hull, Russell D.; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Leeper, Kenneth V.; Naidich, David P.; Sak, Daniel J.; Sostman, H. Dirk; Tapson, Victor F.; Weg, John G.; Woodard, Pamela K.

    2011-01-01

    Background The accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography and magnetic resonance venography for diagnosing pulmonary embolism has not been determined conclusively. Objective To investigate performance characteristics of magnetic resonance angiography, with or without magnetic resonance venography, for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Design Prospective, multicenter study from 10 April 2006 to 30 September 2008. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT00241826) Setting 7 hospitals and their emergency services. Patients 371 adults with diagnosed or excluded pulmonary embolism. Measurements Sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios were measured by comparing independently read magnetic resonance imaging with the reference standard for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Reference standard diagnosis or exclusion was made by using various tests, including computed tomographic angiography and venography, ventilation–perfusion lung scan, venous ultra-sonography, D-dimer assay, and clinical assessment. Results Magnetic resonance angiography, averaged across centers, was technically inadequate in 25% of patients (92 of 371). The proportion of technically inadequate images ranged from 11% to 52% at various centers. Including patients with technically inadequate images, magnetic resonance angiography identified 57% (59 of 104) with pulmonary embolism. Technically adequate magnetic resonance angiography had a sensitivity of 78% and a specificity of 99%. Technically adequate magnetic resonance angiography and venography had a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 96%, but 52% of patients (194 of 370) had technically inadequate results. Limitation A high proportion of patients with suspected embolism was not eligible or declined to participate. Conclusion Magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography should be considered only at centers that routinely perform it well and only for patients for whom standard tests are contraindicated. Magnetic

  18. Computed tomography angiography of situs inversus, portosystemic shunt and multiple vena cava anomalies in a dog.

    PubMed

    Oui, Heejin; Kim, Jisun; Bae, Yeonho; Oh, Juyeon; Park, Seungjo; Lee, Gahyun; Jeon, Sunghoon; Choi, Jihye

    2013-11-01

    A 5-year-old Shih Tzu was presented with intermittent vomiting and anorexia. Microhepatica and reversed position of the abdominal organs were observed on radiography. Ultrasonographically, portosystemic shunt (PSS) was tentatively diagnosed. Computed tomography (CT) revealed that the distended portal vein drained into the left hepatic vein. The caudal vena cava (CdVC) split postrenally and converged at the renal level. Cranial to this, the azygos continuation of the CdVC was confirmed. In the thorax, a persistent left cranial vena cava (CrVC) was found along with right CrVC. This is the first report of a dog with persistent left CrVC and multiple abdominal malformations. CT angiography was useful in evaluating the characteristics of each vascular anomaly and determining the required surgical correction in this complex case.

  19. Computed Tomography Angiography of Situs Inversus, Portosystemic Shunt and Multiple Vena Cava Anomalies in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    OUI, Heejin; KIM, Jisun; BAE, Yeonho; OH, Juyeon; PARK, Seungjo; LEE, Gahyun; JEON, Sunghoon; CHOI, Jihye

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 5-year-old Shih Tzu was presented with intermittent vomiting and anorexia. Microhepatica and reversed position of the abdominal organs were observed on radiography. Ultrasonographically, portosystemic shunt (PSS) was tentatively diagnosed. Computed tomography (CT) revealed that the distended portal vein drained into the left hepatic vein. The caudal vena cava (CdVC) split postrenally and converged at the renal level. Cranial to this, the azygos continuation of the CdVC was confirmed. In the thorax, a persistent left cranial vena cava (CrVC) was found along with right CrVC. This is the first report of a dog with persistent left CrVC and multiple abdominal malformations. CT angiography was useful in evaluating the characteristics of each vascular anomaly and determining the required surgical correction in this complex case. PMID:23842117

  20. Hemodynamic indexes derived from computed tomography angiography to predict pulmonary embolism related mortality.

    PubMed

    John, Gregor; Marti, Christophe; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Perrier, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) induces an acute increase in the right ventricle afterload that can lead to right-ventricular dysfunction (RVD) and eventually to circulatory collapse. Hemodynamic status and presence of RVD are important determinants of adverse outcomes in acute PE. Technologic progress allows computed tomography angiography (CTA) to give more information than accurate diagnosis of PE. It may also provide an insight into hemodynamics and right-ventricular function. Proximal localization of emboli, reflux of contrast medium to the hepatic veins, and right-to-left short-axis ventricular diameter ratio seem to be the most relevant CTA predictors of 30-day mortality. These elements require little postprocessing time, an advantage in the emergency room. We herein review the prognostic value of RVD and other CTA mortality predictors for patients with acute PE.

  1. Transfer of fallout radionuclides derived from Fukushima NPP accident: 1 year study on transfer of radionuclides through hydrological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onda, Yuichi; Kato, Hiroaki; Patin, Jeremy; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Tsujimura, Maki; Wakahara, Taeko; Fukushima, Takehiko

    2013-04-01

    Previous experiences such as Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident have confirmed that fallout radionuclides on the ground surface migrate through natural environment including soils and rivers. Therefore, in order to estimate future changes in radionuclide deposition, migration process of radionuclides in forests, soils, ground water, rivers should be monitored. However, such comprehensive studies on migration through forests, soils, ground water and rivers have not been conducted so far. Here, we present the following comprehensive investigation was conducted to confirm migration of radionuclides through natural environment including soils and rivers. 1)Study on depth distribution of radiocaesium in soils within forests, fields, and grassland 2)Confirmation of radionuclide distribution and investigation on migration in forests 3)Study on radionuclide migration due to soil erosion under different land use 4)Measurement of radionuclides entrained from natural environment including forests and soils 5)Investigation on radionuclide migration through soil water, ground water, stream water, spring water under different land use 6)Study on paddy-to-river transfer of radionuclides through suspended sediments 7)Study on river-to-ocean transfer of radionuclides via suspended sediments 8)Confirmation of radionuclide deposition in ponds and reservoirs

  2. Ultrasonographic Visualization of Accessory Hepatic Veins and Their Lesions in Budd-Chiari Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shi-Feng; Gai, Yong-Hao; Ma, Shuang; Liang, Bo; Wang, Guang-Chuan; Liu, Qing-Wei

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ultrasonographic features of accessory hepatic veins (AHVs) and their lesions in Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). Three hundred patients with BCS were examined by ultrasonography with multifrequency (3-6 MHz) convex transducers. Sonography was performed 1 to 2 wk before digital subtraction angiography and computed tomography angiography or magnetic resonance imaging. Using sonograms, we evaluated the number, course, diameter, orifice, lesions and hemodynamics of patent and obstructed AHVs. Ultrasonography was superior to digital subtraction angiography, computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance imaging in revealing AHV lesions and hemodynamics. Dilated AHVs were detected in 227 patients. There were 239 caudate lobe veins in 167 patients and 168 inferior right hepatic veins in 151 patients. Both caudate lobe veins and inferior right hepatic veins were found in 91 of the 227 patients. The inlets to AHVs were located mainly on the right lateral or right anterior wall of the inferior vena cava, and the remnant, on the left lateral wall. AHV lesions comprised mainly septal obstruction and segmental stenosis. The hemodynamics of AHVs varied with the condition of inferior vena cava and AHVs. Ultrasonic examination can reveal AHVs and their lesions in patients with BCS and is helpful in choosing and planning therapeutic approaches.

  3. Coronary computed tomographic angiography: current role in the diagnosis and management of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Andrew W; Kantor, Birgit; Gerber, Thomas C

    2009-06-01

    Advances in computed tomography (CT) technology allow images to be obtained with high spatial and temporal resolution. These features now permit noninvasive coronary CT angiography (CCTA). Many studies addressing proof of concept, feasibility, and clinical robustness have been published since CCTA was first described. More recently, the scientific evaluation of CCTA has rightly focused less on technical aspects and more on multicenter trials of the diagnostic value of CCTA and on head-to-head comparisons with other noninvasive modalities for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD), such as stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with radionuclides. Recent peer-reviewed publications that compare CCTA to invasive, selective coronary angiography (SCA) or MPI, or that address radiation protection issues related to CCTA, were reviewed and summarized. Overall, there is high agreement between CCTA and both SCA and MPI for the presence of CAD. However, CCTA can over- or underestimate the severity of CAD compared to SCA as a reference standard. Initial studies that compared CCTA to MPI found their accuracies for determining the presence of high-grade luminal obstructions comparable. Limitations of CCTA include inability to reliably assess the coronary artery lumen dimensions in patients with large amounts of coronary artery calcium, artifacts caused by coronary and respiratory motion, and the need for ionizing radiation and intravenous administration of iodinated contrast material. Various dose reduction methods for CCTA now exist that may substantially lower patient dose to levels less than those of SCA or MPI. Although current expert consensus does not call for CCTA to be a first-line test for CAD, particularly for screening in asymptomatic individuals, current data suggest a promising role in the evaluation of symptomatic patients for possible CAD.

  4. Radionuclide Sensors and Systems for Environmental Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Egorov, Oleg; Burge, Scott R.

    2009-05-18

    We have developed automated sensor and monitoring devices for trace radionuclides in water, using preconcentrating columns and radiometric detection. The preconcentrating minicolumn sensor concept combines selective capture and detection in a single functional unit. We have demonstrated quantification of radionuclides such as technetium-99 to levels below drinking water standards in an equilibration-based process that produces steady state signals, signal proportional to concentration, and easy re-equilibration to new concentration levels. Alternatively, monitors can be developed with separate separation and detection units that are fluidically linked. We have demonstrated detection of strontium-90 to levels below drinking water standards by this approach. We are developing autonomous systems for at-site monitoring on the Hanford Site in Washington State.

  5. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, S.M. Finn, R.D.

    1992-08-04

    This report describes the author's continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program has 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry /Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section under the DOE grant during the 1989--1992 grant period, will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections of the DOE grant during the 1992--1995 grant period. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

  6. Methods and systems for detection of radionuclides

    DOEpatents

    Coates, Jr., John T.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2010-05-25

    Disclosed are materials and systems useful in determining the existence of radionuclides in an aqueous sample. The materials provide the dual function of both extraction and scintillation to the systems. The systems can be both portable and simple to use, and as such can beneficially be utilized to determine presence and optionally concentration of radionuclide contamination in an aqueous sample at any desired location and according to a relatively simple process without the necessity of complicated sample handling techniques. The disclosed systems include a one-step process, providing simultaneous extraction and detection capability, and a two-step process, providing a first extraction step that can be carried out in a remote field location, followed by a second detection step that can be carried out in a different location.

  7. [Radionuclide therapy for bone metastases: new opportunities].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V V; Kochetova, T Yu; Voloznev, L V

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of patients with multiple bone metastases accompanied by pain syndrome is a complicated clinical task. Radionuclide therapy is one of its solutions, which is used to achieve long reduction of pain syndrome and significant improvement the quality of patients' life. However mechanism of action of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals suggests not only pain control but antitumor effect as well. In early clinical studies of safety and efficacy of the most common bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in single administration there were not any preferences in overall survival but individual clinical cases with extraordinary tumor regression after radionuclide therapy were reported. Repeated bone targeted therapy and combination with other treatment modalities can help to gain statistical significant increase in overall survival of patients.

  8. Radionuclide synovectomy – essentials for rheumatologists

    PubMed Central

    Felis-Giemza, Anna; Kobylecka, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide synovectomy is a minimally invasive method of treating persistent joint inflammation. It involves intra-articular injection of radioactive colloids which induce necrosis and fibrosis of hypertrophic synovial membrane. The most common indication for radiosynovectomy is rheumatoid arthritis, although patients with seronegative spondyloarthropathies, unclassified arthritis, haemophilic arthropathy and other less common arthropathies can also benefit from this method. Radiosynovectomy is safe, well tolerated and efficacious. About 70–80% of patients respond well to the therapy. However, the therapeutic effects are considerably worse in patients with co-existent osteoarthritis and advanced joint degeneration. Despite its advantages, radionuclide synovectomy is not performed as often as it could be, so greater knowledge and understanding of this method are needed. The authors present the most important facts about radiosynovectomy that may help rheumatologists in their daily clinical practice. PMID:27504020

  9. Cadastral valuation of lands polluted with radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, O. A.; Tsvetnov, E. V.; Shcheglov, A. I.; Romashkina, A. D.; Ermiyaev, Ya. R.

    2016-11-01

    The major method to correct the cadastral value of land for contamination with radionuclides is to reduce it by the sum of expenses necessary for land remediation and for special measures ensuring the obtaining of agricultural and forestry products satisfying safety norms. Lands contaminated with radionuclides and used in agriculture and forestry are often removed from the system of land taxation. In this case, their cadastral value becomes an excessive element of the state cadaster of real estate. An approach toward cadastral valuation of such lands suggested by the authors assumes the creation of a system of compensation payments as the main source of financing of land rehabilitation and soil conservation measures. An original system of calculation of such payments has been tested for radioactively contaminated lands in Plavsk district of Tula oblast. It is argued that compensation payments for radioactively contaminated agrocenoses should be higher than those for natural cenoses.

  10. Decline of radionuclides in Columbia River biota

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, C.E.; Watson, D.G.; Scott, A.J.; Gurtisen, J.M.

    1980-03-01

    In January 1971, the last of nine plutonium production reactors using direct discharge of once-through cooling waters into the Columbia River was closed. Sampling was initiated at three stations on the Columbia River to document the decline of the radionuclide body burdens in the biota of the Columbia River ecosystem. The data show that in a river-reservoir complex, the measurable body burden of fission-produced radionuclides decreased to essentially undetectable levels within 18 to 24 mo after cessation of discharge of once-through cooling water into the river. On the basis of data from the free-flowing station, we believe that this decrease would be even more rapid in an unimpounded river.

  11. Advances in radionuclide imaging of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Kouranos, V; Wells, A U; Sharma, R; Underwood, S R; Wechalekar, K

    2015-09-01

    Radionuclide imaging for the diagnosis and monitoring of cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis has advanced significantly in recent years. This article is based on published clinical guidelines, literature review and our collective clinical experience. Gallium-67 scintigraphy is among the diagnostic criteria for cardiac involvement in systemic sarcoidosis, and it is strongly associated with response to treatment. However, fluorine-18, 2-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is now preferred both for diagnosis and for assessing prognosis. Most data are from small observational studies that are potentially biased. Quantitative imaging to assess changes in disease activity in response to treatment may lead to FDG-PET having an important routine role in managing cardiac sarcoidosis. Larger prospective studies are required, particularly to assess the effectiveness of radionuclide imaging in improving clinical management and outcome. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Preventing hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A is inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus. You can take several steps to ... reduce your risk of spreading or catching the hepatitis A virus: Always wash your hands thoroughly after ...

  13. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Chapter 3 - Helminths, Soil-Transmitted Chapter 3 - Hepatitis B Hepatitis A ... Dec 20;2(6):227–30. Chapter 3 - Helminths, Soil-Transmitted Chapter 3 - Hepatitis B File Formats ...

  14. Hepatitis Risk Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Hepatitis Risk Assessment Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Viral Hepatitis. Are you at risk? Take this 5 minute Hepatitis Risk Assessment developed ...

  15. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  16. HIV and Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Hepatitis C (Last updated 8/31/2016; last reviewed ... the medicines for any side effects. What is hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a liver disease caused ...

  17. HIV and Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Hepatitis B (Last updated 8/31/2016; last reviewed ... should be treated for both diseases. What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a liver disease caused ...

  18. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Linnea

    2009-05-21

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2008, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources include more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2008 is 5.2 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (5.2 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2008.

  19. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Linnea; Wahl, Linnea

    2008-06-13

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). The EPA regulates radionuclide emissions that may be released from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or that may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2007, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor stack or building emissions sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]), there were no diffuse emissions, and there were no unplanned emissions. Emissions from minor sources either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities received for use or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, Version 3.0, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2007 is 1.2 x 10{sup -2} mrem/yr (1.2 x 10{sup -4} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) EPA dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 3.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (3.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2007.

  20. Radionuclide bone scintigraphy in pediatric orthopedics

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, J.J.

    1986-12-01

    Radionuclide bone scintigraphy is highly sensitive and specific for diagnosing the musculoskeletal disorders of childhood. Conditions such as neonatal osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, diskitis of childhood, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, the osteochondroses, the toddler's fracture, sports injuries, spondylolysis, myositis ossificians, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy are readily defined. High-quality state-of-the-art scintigraphy is essential in infants and young children. 64 references.

  1. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Linnea

    2010-06-01

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40CFR61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2009, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources included more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2009 is 7.0 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (7.0 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.5 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.5 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2009.

  2. Radionuclide transfer from feed to camel milk.

    PubMed

    Al-Masri, M S; Al-Hamwi, A; Amin, Y; Safieh, M B; Zarkawi, M; Soukouti, A; Dayyoub, R; Voigt, G; Fesenko, S

    2014-06-01

    The transfer of (137)Cs, (85)Sr, (131)I, (210)Po, (210)Pb and (238)U from feed to camel's milk was investigated in a pilot experiment with three lactating camels. For a period of 60 days, the animals were fed on spiked feed containing the studied radionuclides. They were subsequently returned to a contamination-free diet and monitored for another 90 days. The activity concentrations of (137)Cs, (85)Sr and (131)I in milk decreased with time and reached background levels after 20 days. Equilibrium transfer coefficients and biological half-lives were estimated and transfer coefficients were calculated as (8.1 ± 3.6) × 10(-4), (4.4 ± 1.6) × 10(-2), (7.8 ± 3.9) × 10(-4), (2.7 ± 3.5) × 10(-4), (1.8 ± 1.5) × 10(-4) and (7.0 ± 3.6) × 10(-3) d L(-1) for (85)Sr, (131)I, (137)Cs, (210)Po, (210)Pb and (238)U, respectively. The biological half-lives were estimated to be 6.4, 4.2, 8.9, and 53.3 days for (85)Sr, (131)I, (137)Cs, and (238)U, respectively. Estimates of the half-lives were based on a one component model: it was found that the half-life values measured for artificial radionuclides were slightly shorter than those for natural radionuclides. The data obtained in the study are the first published experimental data on radionuclide transfer to camel milk.

  3. Breast-Dedicated Radionuclide Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Hsu, David F C; Freese, David L; Levin, Craig S

    2016-02-01

    Breast-dedicated radionuclide imaging systems show promise for increasing clinical sensitivity for breast cancer while minimizing patient dose and cost. We present several breast-dedicated coincidence-photon and single-photon camera designs that have been described in the literature and examine their intrinsic performance, clinical relevance, and impact. Recent tracer development is mentioned, results from recent clinical tests are summarized, and potential areas for improvement are highlighted.

  4. Radionuclide therapy in neuroendocrine tumours: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gulenchyn, K Y; Yao, X; Asa, S L; Singh, S; Law, C

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the effects of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals in patients with different types of advanced neuroendocrine tumour (NETs). A literature search was carried out in MEDLINE and EMBASE from January 1998 to November 2010. The Cochrane Library (to Issue 10, 2010) and the Standards and Guidelines Evidence Inventory of Cancer Guidelines, including over 1100 English-language cancer guidelines from January 2003 to June 2010, were also checked. No existing systematic reviews or clinical practice guidelines based on a systematic review or randomised controlled trials focusing on this topic were found. Twenty-four fully published articles were abstracted and summarised: 16 articles focused on five peptide receptor radionuclide therapy ((111)In-DTPAOC, (90)Y-DOTALAN, (90)Y-DOTATOC, (90)Y-DOTATATE, and (177)Lu-DOTATATE) and eight focused on (131)I-MIBG treatment. Limited evidence from a historical comparison of studies in one centre supported that (177)Lu-DOTATATE might be associated with greater clinical outcomes compared with (90)Y-DOTATOC or (111)In-DTPAOC. The severe toxicities for (177)Lu-DOTATATE included hepatic insufficiency in 0.6%, myelodysplastic syndrome in 0.8% and renal insufficiency in 0.4% of patients in this study. Insufficient evidence suggested efficacy of (131)I-MIBG in adult NET patients, but the overall tumour response rate from (131)I-MIBG was 27-75% for malignant neuroblastoma, paraganglioma or pheochromocytoma. Haematological toxicities were the main severe side-effects after (131)I-MIBG and 4% of patients developed secondary malignancies in one study. To date, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy seems to be an acceptable option and is relatively safe in adult advanced NET patients with receptor uptake positive on scintigraphy, but patients' renal function must be monitored. (131)I-MIBG may be effective for malignant neuroblastoma, paraganglioma or pheochromocytoma, but its side-effects need to be

  5. Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Sharara, A I; Hunt, C M; Hamilton, J D

    1996-10-15

    To review the virology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, natural history, clinical manifestations, and current treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The MEDLINE database (1966 to 1996) was searched for English-language articles and abstracts on HCV and non-A, non-B hepatitis. Papers cited in relevant primary articles were also reviewed. More than 500 original and review articles were evaluated, and the most relevant were selected. Data were extracted and reviewed by all authors. In most patients, HCV infection results in chronic hepatitis. The disease is insidious and subclinical but may progress over decades into end-stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma, which makes HCV cirrhosis a leading indication for orthotopic liver transplantation. Current diagnostic methods are highly sensitive and specific, and quantitative assessment of viral load may help to predict and monitor response to treatment. The only available therapeutic option is interferon, and this agent is effective in only a small subset of patients. Infection with HCV is a significant public health problem that has important clinical and financial consequences. The tailoring of specific therapy according to viral load or genotype, better patient selection, and use of combination drug regimens may improve the chance of viral clearance and sustained biochemical and histologic response. Further understanding of the basic virology of HCV and the exact mechanisms of viral persistence and tissue injury is needed to help define future therapeutic and preventive strategies.

  6. [Hepatitis E].

    PubMed

    Scotto, Gaetano; Bulla, Fabio; Campanale, Francesca; Tartaglia, Alessandra; Fazio, Vincenzina

    2013-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) represents the main aetiological agent of enteric non-A hepatitis and is the only member of a new virus, Hepevirus, belonging to the family of Hepeviridae. HEV is the single most important cause of acute clinical hepatitis among adults in many areas of the developing world, specifically the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia, the Middle East and North Africa, where it is a common cause of sporadic and epidemic waterborne outbreaks and results in a high rate of morbidity and death, especially in pregnant women. Once thought of as an infection confined to developing countries, it is now recognized as a geographically widely distributed disease. In low-endemic regions (Western countries), sporadic cases of locally-acquired HEV infection are reported, acquired possibly through zoonotic transmission from pigs, wild boars or deer. In persons with pre-existing chronic liver disease, HEV superinfection can present as acute-on-chronic liver disease. In European countries, chronic infection, which may progress to liver cirrhosis, has been reported among immunosuppressed persons. Two testing vaccines proved to be highly effective in preventing the disease; these vaccines should be of particular use in groups that are at high risk of HEV infection.

  7. Adult Living with Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Viral Hepatitis Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B Hepatitis Delta Coinfection Hepatitis C Coinfection HIV/AIDS Coinfection Prevention & ... Institute Education & Training Hep B United Coalition Hepatitis Delta Connect 2017 International HBV Meeting National Patient Advocacy ...

  8. Concrete Property and Radionuclide Migration Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Powers, Laura; Parker, Kent E.; Clayton, Libby N.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2008-10-01

    The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the DOE Complex. Part of theses services includes safe disposal of LLW and MLLW at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG) in accordance with the requirements listed in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, a Performance Assessment (PA) analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires that continuing data collection be conducted to enhance confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied upon to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the Order. One critical assumption is that concrete will frequently be used as waste form or container material to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Data was collected to (1) quantify radionuclide migration through concrete materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the LLBG, (2) measure the properties of the concrete materials, especially those likely to influence radionuclide migration, and (3) quantify the stability of U-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  9. UPTAKE OF RADIONUCLIDE METALS BY SPME FIBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M; S Crump, S; Robert02 Ray, R; Keisha Martin, K; Donna Beals, D

    2006-08-28

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Laboratory currently does not have on site facilities for handling radioactive evidentiary materials and there are no established FBI methods or procedures for decontaminating high explosive (HE) and fire debris (FD) evidence while maintaining evidentiary value. One experimental method for the isolation of HE and FD residue involves using solid phase microextraction or SPME fibers to remove residue of interest. Due to their high affinity for organics, SPME fibers should have little affinity for most metals. However, no studies have measured the affinity of radionuclides for SPME fibers. The focus of this research was to examine the affinity of dissolved radionuclide ({sup 239/240}Pu, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 85}Sr, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co and {sup 226}Ra) and stable radionuclide surrogate metals (Sr, Co, Ir, Re, Ni, Ba, Cs, Nb, Zr, Ru, and Nd) for SPME fibers at the exposure conditions that favor the uptake of HE and FD residues. Our results from radiochemical and mass spectrometric analyses indicate these metals have little measurable affinity for these SPME fibers during conditions that are conducive to HE and FD residue uptake with subsequent analysis by liquid or gas phase chromatography with mass spectrometric detection.

  10. Radionuclides in the evaluation of urinary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Scharf, S.C.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1982-07-01

    Radionuclide renography and renal scanning techniques are ideally suited to the initial and follow-up evaluation of patients with obstructive uropathy. While other modalities are superior in their ability to provide anatomic information, the radionuclide study yields functional information for each kidney without the necessity to resort to invasive studies. In addition, the Nuclear Medicine study is well suited to the evaluation of obstruction where serial studies often are required because of a lower radiation burden compared to urography. This lower radiation dose is especially important in obstruction because of the recurrent nature of several kinds of obstructive uropathy and because of the high incidence in the pediatric age group. The ability to control urine flow rate during the procedure through dehydration or administration of diuretics is an additional benefit. Increasing availability of computerization of nuclear medicine procedures as well as interest in studies employing physiologic intervention (including the diuresis renogram) have assured an important place for radionuclide studies in the evaluation of patients with urinary obstruction.

  11. Targeted radionuclide therapies for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Shah, M; Da Silva, R; Gravekamp, C; Libutti, S K; Abraham, T; Dadachova, E

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic malignancies, the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths, have an aggressive behavior with poor prognosis, resulting in a 5-year survival rate of only 4%. It is typically a silent malignancy until patients develop metastatic disease. Targeted radionuclide therapies of cancer such as radiolabeled peptides, which bind to the receptors overexpressed by cancer cells and radiolabeled antibodies to tumor-specific antigens provide a viable alternative to chemotherapy and external beam radiation of metastatic cancers. Multiple clinical trials of targeted radionuclide therapy of pancreatic cancer have been performed in the last decade and demonstrated safety and potential efficacy of radionuclide therapy for treatment of this formidable disease. Although a lot of progress has been made in treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors with radiolabeled (90)Y and (177)Lu somatostatin peptide analogs, pancreatic adenocarcinomas remain a major challenge. Novel approaches such as peptides and antibodies radiolabeled with alpha emitters, pre-targeting, bispecific antibodies and biological therapy based on the radioactive tumorlytic bacteria might offer a potential breakthrough in treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

  12. [Biosorption of Radionuclide Uranium by Deinococcus radiodurans].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Dong, Fa-qin; Dai, Qun-wei; Liu, Ming-xue; Nie, Xiao-qin; Zhang, Dong; Ma, Jia-lin; Zhou, Xian

    2015-04-01

    As a biological adsorbent, Living Deinococcus radiodurans was used for removing radionuclide uranium in the aqueous solution. The effect factors on biosorption of radionuclide uranium were researched in the present paper, including solution pH values and initial uranium concentration. Meanwhile, the biosorption mechanism was researched by the method of FTIR and SEM/EDS. The results show that the optimum conditions for biosorption are as follows: pH = 5, co = 100 mg · L(-1) and the maximum biosorption capacity is up to 240 mgU · g(-1). According to the SEM results and EDXS analysis, it is indicated that the cell surface is attached by lots of sheet uranium crystals, and the main biosorpiton way of uranium is the ion exchange or surface complexation. Comparing FTIR spectra and FTIR fitting spectra before and after biosorption, we can find that the whole spectra has a certain change, particularly active groups (such as amide groups of the protein, hydroxy, carboxyl and phosphate group) are involved in the biosorption process. Then, there is a new peak at 906 cm(-1) and it is a stretching vibration peak of UO2(2+). Obviously, it is possible that as an anti radiation microorganism, Deinococcus radiodurans could be used for removing radionuclide uranium in radiation environment.

  13. Fungi and ionizing radiation from radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Dighton, John; Tugay, Tatyana; Zhdanova, Nelli

    2008-04-01

    Radionuclides in the environment are one of the major concerns to human health and ecotoxicology. The explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant renewed interest in the role played by fungi in mediating radionuclide movement in ecosystems. As a result of these studies, our knowledge of the importance of fungi, especially in their mycorrhizal habit, in long-term accumulation of radionuclides, transfer up the food chain and regulation of accumulation by their host plants was increased. Micro-fungi have been found to be highly resilient to exposure to ionizing radiation, with fungi having been isolated from within and around the Chernobyl plant. Radioresistance of some fungal species has been linked to the presence of melanin, which has been shown to have emerging properties of acting as an energy transporter for metabolism and has been implicated in enhancing hyphal growth and directed growth of sensitized hyphae towards sources of radiation. Using this recently acquired knowledge, we may be in a better position to suggest the use of fungi in bioremediation of radioactively contaminated sites and cleanup of industrial effluent.

  14. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: an imaging review comparing MR pulmonary angiography and perfusion with multidetector CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira, F P; Lima, C M A O; Coutinho, A C; Parente, D B; Bittencourt, L K; Bessa, L G P; Domingues, R C; Marchiori, E

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease that leads to substantial morbidity and eventual death. Pulmonary multidetector CT angiography (MDCTA), pulmonary MR angiography (MRA) and MR-derived pulmonary perfusion (MRPP) imaging are non-invasive imaging techniques for the differential diagnosis of PH. MDCTA is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, one of the most common causes of PH. MRA and MRPP are promising techniques that do not require the use of ionising radiation or iodinated contrast material, and can be useful for patients for whom such material cannot be used. This review compares the imaging aspects of pulmonary MRA and 64-row MDCTA in patients with chronic thromboembolic or idiopathic PH. PMID:22932061

  15. Fluorescein Angiography Versus Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Macular Telangiectasia Type I Treated With Bevacizumab Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yannuzzi, Nicolas A; Gregori, Ninel Z; Roisman, Luiz; Gupta, Nisha; Goldhagen, Brian E; Goldhardt, Raquel

    2017-03-01

    This is a report of microvascular changes seen on fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) in a 47-year-old man with macular telangiectasia Type 1 (MacTel1) after a 7-year bevacizumab (Avastin; Genentech, South San Francisco, CA) treatment course. OCTA allowed for clear visualization of most telangiectasias and aneurysms in the deep capillary plexus, with only few microvascular dilatations in the superficial plexus. In addition, areas of capillary dropout in the superficial and deep vascular plexa located near telangiectasias were documented on OCTA. Serial FA demonstrated reduced number of aneurysms and telangiectasias at the 7-year mark compared to baseline. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2017;48:263-266.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: an imaging review comparing MR pulmonary angiography and perfusion with multidetector CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, F P; Lima, C M A O; Coutinho, A C; Parente, D B; Bittencourt, L K; Bessa, L G P; Domingues, R C; Marchiori, E

    2012-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease that leads to substantial morbidity and eventual death. Pulmonary multidetector CT angiography (MDCTA), pulmonary MR angiography (MRA) and MR-derived pulmonary perfusion (MRPP) imaging are non-invasive imaging techniques for the differential diagnosis of PH. MDCTA is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, one of the most common causes of PH. MRA and MRPP are promising techniques that do not require the use of ionising radiation or iodinated contrast material, and can be useful for patients for whom such material cannot be used. This review compares the imaging aspects of pulmonary MRA and 64-row MDCTA in patients with chronic thromboembolic or idiopathic PH.

  17. Mathematical Simulation of Sediment and Radionuclide Transport in Surface Waters

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    1981-04-01

    The study objective of "The Mathematical Simulation of Sediment and Radionuclide Transport in Surface Waters" is to synthesize and test radionuclide transport models capable of realistically assessing radionuclide transport in various types of surface water bodies by including the sediment-radionuclide interactions. These interactions include radionuclide adsorption by sediment; desorption from sediment into water; and transport, deposition, and resuspension of sorbed radionuclides controlled by the sediment movements. During FY-1979, the modification of sediment and contaminant (radionuclide) transport model, FETRA, was completed to make it applicable to coastal waters. The model is an unsteady, two-dimensional (longitudinal and lateral) model that consists of three submodels (for sediment, dissolved-contaminant, and particulate-contaminant transport), coupled to include the sediment-contaminant interactions. In estuaries, flow phenomena and consequent sediment and radionuclide migration are often three-dimensional in nature mainly because of nonuniform channel cross-sections, salinity intrusion, and lateral-flow circulation. Thus, an unsteady, three-dimensional radionuclide transport model for estuaries is also being synthesized by combining and modifying a PNL unsteady hydrothermal model and FETRA. These two radionuclide transport models for coastal waters and estuaries will be applied to actual sites to examine the validity of the codes.

  18. Fukushima's forgotten radionuclides: a review of the understudied radioactive emissions.

    PubMed

    Steinhauser, Georg

    2014-05-06

    In environmental monitoring campaigns for anthropogenic radionuclides released in the course of the Fukushima nuclear accident (2011), most focus had been on gamma-emitting radionuclides. More than 99% of the released activity was due to radionuclides of the elements Kr, Te, I, Xe, and Cs. However, little work had been done on the monitoring of radionuclides other than (131)I, (132)Te, (134)Cs, (136)Cs, and (137)Cs. Radionuclides such as those of less volatile elements (e.g., (89)Sr, (90)Sr, (103)Ru, (106)Ru, plutonium), pure beta-emitters ((3)H, (14)C, (35)S), gaseous radionuclides ((85)Kr, (133)Xe, (135)Xe) or radionuclides with very long half-lives (e.g., (36)Cl, (99)Tc, (129)I, some actinides such as (236)U) have been understudied by comparison. In this review, we summarize previous monitoring work on these "orphan" radionuclides in various environmental media and outline further challenges for future monitoring campaigns. Some of the understudied radionuclides are of radiological concern, others are promising tracers for environmental, geochemical processes such as oceanic mixing. Unfortunately, the shorter-lived nuclides of radioxenon, (103)Ru, (89)Sr and (35)S will no longer exhibit detectable activities in the environment. Activity concentrations of other radionuclides such as tritium, (14)C, or (85)Kr will become blurred in the significant background of previous releases (nuclear explosions and previous accidents). Isotope ratios such as (240)Pu/(239)Pu will allow for the identification of Fukushima plutonium despite the plutonium background.

  19. The potential for neurovascular intravenous angiography using K-edge digital subtraction angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schültke, E.; Fiedler, S.; Kelly, M.; Griebel, R.; Juurlink, B.; LeDuc, G.; Estève, F.; Le Bas, J.-F.; Renier, M.; Nemoz, C.; Meguro, K.

    2005-08-01

    Background: Catheterization of small-caliber blood vessels in the central nervous system can be extremely challenging. Alternatively, intravenous (i.v.) administration of contrast agent is minimally invasive and therefore carries a much lower risk for the patient. With conventional X-ray equipment, volumes of contrast agent that could be safely administered to the patient do not allow acquisition of high-quality images after i.v. injection, because the contrast bolus is extremely diluted by passage through the heart. However, synchrotron-based digital K-edge subtraction angiography does allow acquisition of high-quality images after i.v. administration of relatively small doses of contrast agent. Materials and methods: Eight adult male New Zealand rabbits were used for our experiments. Animals were submitted to both angiography with conventional X-ray equipment and synchrotron-based digital subtraction angiography. Results: With conventional X-ray equipment, no contrast was seen in either cerebral or spinal blood vessels after i.v. injection of iodinated contrast agent. However, using K-edge digital subtraction angiography, as little as 1 ml iodinated contrast agent, when administered as i.v. bolus, yielded images of small-caliber blood vessels in the central nervous system (both brain and spinal cord). Conclusions: If it would be possible to image blood vessels of the same diameter in the central nervous system of human patients, the synchrotron-based technique could yield high-quality images at a significantly lower risk for the patient than conventional X-ray imaging. Images could be acquired where catheterization of feeding blood vessels has proven impossible.

  20. Type 1 Choroidal Neovascularization Lesion Size: Indocyanine Green Angiography Versus Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Eliana; Miere, Alexandra; Querques, Giuseppe; Capuano, Vittorio; Jung, Camille; Souied, Eric H

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the size of type 1 choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in neovascular AMD by optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) and to compare with indocyanine green angiography (ICGA). Patients diagnosed type 1 CNV underwent multimodal imaging by fluorescein angiography (FA), ICGA, spectral-domain (SD)-OCT, and OCTA. Lesion size was measured both on OCTA at the choriocapillaris level with "select area" and "vessel area" functions, incorporated in AngioVue software and on ICGA at intermediate and late phases, by two masked independent readers. Nineteen eyes of 17 patients (mean age 80.6 ± 8.36) were included in the analysis. Mean visual acuity was 0.2 logMAR. All OCTA revealed a high flow neovascular network in the choriocapillaris segmentation. On OCTA, interclass correlation between readers 1 and 2 was 0.96 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.94-0.99) for select area and 0.97 (95% CI 0.96-0.99) for vessel area. The difference between lesion size in OCTA versus ICGA was detected in all eyes and it was statistically significant for both readers (P < 0.05). Optical coherence tomography angiography provides both quantitative and qualitative information on type 1 CNV and appears as a new reproducible way to evaluate CNV area and vessels area. Type 1 CNV lesion size in the choriocapillaris segmentation of OCTA and ICGA intermediate and late phases revealed that the OCTA size is significantly smaller than the ICGA size. This supports the idea that OCTA could be considered for evaluation of the neovascular lesion and for evaluation of therapeutic responses.

  1. Intra-arterial digital subtraction angiogrpahy: comparison with conventional hepatic arteriography

    SciTech Connect

    Flannigan, B.D.; Gomes, A.S.; Stambuk, E.C.; Lois, J.F.; Pais, S.O.

    1983-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA), 28 patients with a variety of hepatic lesions underwent intra-arterial DSA immediately following conventional celiac or hepatic arteriography. Thirty-one studies were obtained and the results of DSA were compared with the conventional arteriograms. DSA showed good visualization of the arteries in the early arterial phase of the examination. The late arterial phase was better evaluated on conventional arteriograms due to the decreased spatial resolution of DSA. Arterial DSA was most useful in the evaluation of the parenchyma of the liver; the use of remasking techniques allowed improved visualization of hepatic lesions, particularly in the left lobe of the liver. It is concluded that arterial DSA is useful in hepatic imaging and may supplant conventional hepatic arteriography as the technology improves.

  2. Visual-Functional Mismatch Between Coronary Angiography, Fractional Flow Reserve, and Quantitative Coronary Angiography.

    PubMed

    Safi, Morteza; Eslami, Vahid; Namazi, Mohammad Hasan; Vakili, Hossain; Saadat, Habib; Alipourparsa, Saeid; Adibi, Ali; Movahed, Mohammad Reza

    2016-12-01

    Anatomical and functional mismatches are not uncommon in the assessment of coronary lesions. The aim of this study was to identify clinical and lesion-specific factors affecting angiographic, anatomical, and functional mismatch in intermediate coronary lesions. In patients who underwent coronary angiography for clinical reasons, fractional flow reserve (FFR), and quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) analyses for intermediate stenotic lesions were performed simultaneously. Mismatches between the measured values were analyzed. A total of 95 intermediate lesions were assessed simultaneously by visual angiography, FFR, and QCA. The visual-FFR mismatch was found in 40% of the lesions while reverse visual-FFR mismatch was determined in nearly 14% of the lesions. Mismatch and reverse mismatch between FFR and QCA parameters were observed in 10 and 23% of the lesions. FFR value was significant in 32% of the lesions while visually significant stenosis was shown in 61% of the lesions. Among the visual-FFR reverse mismatch group, the prevalence of culprit lesions within the left anterior descending (LAD) was significantly higher than other vessels (p value < 0.02). There were high frequencies of angiographic, QCA, and functional mismatches in analyses of intermediate coronary lesions. LAD lesions showed the highest mismatch. Angiographic or QCA estimation of lesion severity has consistently resulted in inappropriate stenting of functionally nonsignificant lesions or undertreatment of significant lesions based on FFR.

  3. Patient radiation dose from computed tomography angiography and digital subtraction angiography of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netwong, Y.; Krisanachinda, A.

    2016-03-01

    The 64-row multidetector computed tomography angiography (64-MDCTA) provides vascular image quality of the brain similar to digital subtraction angiography (DSA), but the effective dose of CTA is lower than DSA studied in phantom. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effective dose from 64-MDCTA and DSA. Effective dose (according to ICRP 103) from 64-MDCTA and DSA flat panel detector for cerebral vessels examination of the brain using standard protocols as recommended by the manufacturer was calculated for 30 cases of MDCTA (15 male and 15 female).The mean patient age was 49.5 (23-89) yrs. 30 cases of DSA (14 male and 16 female), the mean patient age was 46.8 (21-81) yrs. For CTA, the mean effective dose was 3.7 (2.82- 5.19) mSv. For DSA, the mean effective dose was 5.78 (3.3-10.06) mSv. The effective dose of CTA depends on the scanning protocol and scan length. Low tube current can reduce patient dose whereas the number of exposures and number of series in 3D rotational angiography (3D RA) resulted in increasing effective dose in DSA patients.

  4. Fluorescein angiography basic science and engineering.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, D R

    1986-12-01

    Fluorescein angiography is an application of the physical phenomenon of fluorescence, which is phosphorescence in which the quantum mechanical decay curve is so rapid that it appears instantaneous, and it consequently has no afterglow. Sodium fluorescein is excited by light energy between 465 and 490 nm, and it decays into a lower state emitting light energy between 520 and 530 nm as fluorescent radiation. The free electrons available for excitation are reduced by chemical bonding between the fluorescein dye and plasma proteins to which up to 80% of the dye is bound in the bloodstream, thus reducing overall fluorescence. Optimalization of the observed and recorded fluorescence is afforded by providing exciter and barrier filters with as little overlap as possible to reduce or eliminate contrast reducing pseudofluorescence.

  5. Indications for angiography in blunt thoracic trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Barcia, T.C.; Livoni, J.P.

    1983-04-01

    The clinical charts and radiographs of 113 patients who underwent aortography for suspected blunt injury to the aorta and brachiocephalic vessels were reviewed to identify the most useful indications for angiography. Eight previously described clinical criteria and 14 previously described radiographic criteria were evaluated in each of these patients, 27 of whom had either an aortic or brachiocephalic injury. Contrary to previous reports, our data indicate that no single clinical or radiographic sign is highly specific for vascular injury. An abnormal aortic outline and mediastinal widening remain the most sensitive criteria, although these were also present in a large number of patients without vascular injury. Displaced paraspinous lines and nasogastric tubes are also useful signs.

  6. Digital subtraction angiography in extremity trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, P.C.; Jeffrey, R.B. Jr.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1984-10-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) may have considerable impact on the work-up of patients who have suffered trauma. The angiographic evaluation of vascular injuries can be accomplished rapidly and with minimal catheter use and manipulation, which is particularly important for those critically ill patients who have significant immobility because of multiple fractures. The authors retrospectively reviewed the digital subtraction angiograms in 50 consecutive cases of extremity trauma. The quality of the images in 44 of these permitted a confident diagnosis, the accuracy of which was confirmed by surgical or clinical follow-up. DSA reduces the time required to perform the procedure, the amount of contrast material injected, patient discomfort, and film cost. Its major disadvantage is the limited field size of the image intensifier.

  7. Coronary CT angiography with low radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Zhang, Zhaoqi

    2010-02-01

    With the introduction of 64-slice CT and dual-source CT technology, coronary CT angiography(CCTA) has emerged as a useful diagnostic imaging modality for the noninvasive assessment of coronary heart disease. Recently, the risks associated with ionizing radiation on CT have raised serious concerns.The main concern of exposure to ionizing radiation is the potential risk of cancer. CCTA involves much higher radiation dose with the advances in the spatial and temporal resolution of cardiac CT. Currently,various dose-saving algorithms, such as ECG (electrocardiography)-based dose modulation, reduced tube voltage, and prospective ECG gating, high-pitch helical scanning are available to lower radiation exposure during cardiac CT. Therefore, careful selection of CT scanning protocols is needed to keep the radiation exposure 'as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)'. In this review we will discuss the radiation dose safety issues, the measurement of radiation dose and current use of dose-saving techniques in CCTA.

  8. Coronary CT angiography: current status and continuing challenges

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Z; Choo, G H; Ng, K H

    2012-01-01

    Coronary CT angiography has been increasingly used in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease owing to rapid technological developments, which are reflected in the improved spatial and temporal resolution of the images. High diagnostic accuracy has been achieved with multislice CT scanners (64 slice and higher), and in selected patients coronary CT angiography is regarded as a reliable alternative to invasive coronary angiography. With high-quality coronary CT imaging increasingly being performed, patients can benefit from an imaging modality that provides a rapid and accurate diagnosis while avoiding an invasive procedure. Despite the tremendous contributions of coronary CT angiography to cardiac imaging, study results reported in the literature should be interpreted with caution as there are some limitations existing within the study design or related to patient risk factors. In addition, some attention must be given to the potential health risks associated with the ionising radiation received during cardiac CT examinations. Radiation dose associated with coronary CT angiography has raised serious concerns in the literature, as the risk of developing malignancy is not negligible. Various dose-saving strategies have been implemented, with some of the strategies resulting in significant dose reduction. The aim of this review is to present an overview of the role of coronary CT angiography on cardiac imaging, with focus on coronary artery disease in terms of the diagnostic and prognostic value of coronary CT angiography. Various approaches for dose reduction commonly recommended in the literature are discussed. Limitations of coronary CT angiography are identified. Finally, future directions and challenges with the use of coronary CT angiography are highlighted. PMID:22253353

  9. Accuracy of distance measurements in biplane angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toennies, Klaus D.; Oishi, Satoru; Koster, David; Schroth, Gerhard

    1997-05-01

    Distance measurements of the vascular system of the brain can be derived from biplanar digital subtraction angiography (2p-DSA). The measurements are used for planning of minimal invasive surgical procedures. Our 90 degree-fixed-angle G- ring angiography system has the potential of acquiring pairs of such images with high geometric accuracy. The sizes of vessels and aneurysms are estimated applying a fast and accurate extraction method in order to select an appropriate surgical strategy. Distance computation from 2p-DSA is carried out in three steps. First, the boundary of the structure to be measured is detected based on zero-crossings and closeness to user-specified end points. Subsequently, the 3D location of the center of the structure is computed from the centers of gravity of its two projections. This location is used to reverse the magnification factor caused by the cone-shaped projection of the x-rays. Since exact measurements of possibly very small structures are crucial to the usefulness in surgical planning, we identified mechanical and computational influences on the geometry which may have an impact on the measurement accuracy. A study with phantoms is presented distinguishing between the different effects and enabling the computation of an optimal overall exactness. Comparing this optimum with results of distance measurements on phantoms whose exact size and shape is known, we found, that the measurement error for structures of size of 20 mm was less than 0.05 mm on average and 0.50 mm at maximum. The maximum achievable accuracy of 0.15 mm was in most cases exceeded by less than 0.15 mm. This accuracy surpasses by far the requirements for the above mentioned surgery application. The mechanic accuracy of the fixed-angle biplanar system meets the requirements for computing a 3D reconstruction of the small vessels of the brain. It also indicates, that simple measurements will be possible on systems being less accurate.

  10. [Myocardial perfusion imaging by digital subtraction angiography].

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, H; Ishikawa, K; Ogai, T; Katori, R

    1986-03-01

    Several methods of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were compared to determine which could better visualize regional myocardial perfusion using coronary angiography in seven patients with myocardial infarction, two with angina pectoris and five with normal coronary arteries. Satisfactory DSA was judged to be achieved if the shape of the heart on the mask film was identical to that on the live film and if both films were exactly superimposed. To obtain an identical mask film in the shape of each live film, both films were selected from the following three phases of the cardiac cycle; at the R wave of the electrocardiogram, 100 msec before the R wave, and 200 msec before the R wave. The last two were superior for obtaining mask and live films which were similar in shape, because the cardiac motion in these phases was relatively small. Using these mask and live films, DSA was performed either with the continuous image mode (CI mode) or the time interval difference mode (TID mode). The overall perfusion of contrast medium through the artery to the vein was adequately visualized using the CI mode. Passage of contrast medium through the artery, capillary and vein was visualized at each phase using TID mode. Subtracted images were displayed and photographed, and the density of the contrast medium was adequate to display contour lines as in a relief map. Using this DSA, it was found that regional perfusion of the contrast medium was not always uniform in normal subjects, depending on the typography of the coronary artery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. CT angiography in the abdomen: a pictorial review and update.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peter S; Platt, Joel F

    2014-02-01

    The development of multidetector CT technology and helical scanning techniques has revolutionized the use of CT for primary diagnostic evaluation of the abdominal vasculature, particularly the arterial system. CT angiography has numerous benefits relative to conventional catheter angiography, and has largely replaced catheter-based techniques in many clinical algorithms. This pictorial review and update will cover important technical principles related to modern CT angiography (including contrast delivery and dose considerations), discuss relevant anatomy and variants, and illustrate numerous arterial conditions related to the abdominal aorta and branch vessels.

  12. Optical coherence tomography angiography and indocyanine green angiography for corneal vascularisation.

    PubMed

    Ang, Marcus; Cai, Yijun; MacPhee, Becky; Sim, Dawn A; Keane, Pearse A; Sng, Chelvin C A; Egan, Catherine A; Tufail, Adnan; Larkin, Daniel F; Wilkins, Mark R

    2016-11-01

    To describe an optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) system adapted for anterior segment imaging, compared with indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) in eyes with corneal vascularisation. Retrospective study of subjects with corneal vascularisation secondary to microbial keratitis who had OCTA scans performed using a commercially available split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation algorithm angiography system (AngioVue; Optovue Inc., Fremont, California, USA) and ICGA images (Spectralis; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany). The agreement between OCTA and ICGA techniques in terms of area of vascularisation measured, using Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement (LOA). We compared the area of corneal vascularisation in 64 scan images (eight eyes, four scans for each angiography technique). In our series, the overall mean area of vascularisation from the ICGA scans was 0.49±0.34 mm(2) and OCTA scans was 0.51±0.36 mm(2). We obtained substantial repeatability in terms of image quality score (κ=0.80) for all OCTA scans. The agreement between OCTA and ICGA scans was good, although ICGA measured a smaller area compared with the OCTA with a mean difference of -0.03 mm(2) (95% CI -0.07 to 0.01). The LOA ranged from a lower limit of -0.27 (95% CI -0.34 to -0.19) to an upper limit of 0.20 (95% CI 0.13 to 0.28, p=0.127). We found that rapid, non-contact OCTA adapted for the cornea was comparable with ICGA for measurement of the area of corneal vascularisation in this pilot clinical study. Further prospective studies are required to confirm if this relatively new imaging technique may be further developed to replace invasive angiography techniques for the anterior segment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Assessment of left ventricular ejection fraction by radionuclide angiography. Comparison to echocardiography and serial measurements in patients with myocardial infarction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schelbert, H. R.; Henning, H.; Orourke, R. A.; Ashburn, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements of the left ventricular ejection fraction were compared in patients with previous myocardial infarctions. Left ventricular ejection fraction was measured by the radioisotopic method serially in patients early after an acute myocardial infarction and during the convalescence period. Ultrasound recordings were obtained utilizing a commercially available ultrasonoscope and a 1/9 cm transducer focused at 10 cm with a repetition rate of 1000 impulses per second. All recordings were made on a visicorder oscillography.

  14. Assessment of left ventricular ejection fraction by radionuclide angiography. Comparison to echocardiography and serial measurements in patients with myocardial infarction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schelbert, H. R.; Henning, H.; Orourke, R. A.; Ashburn, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements of the left ventricular ejection fraction were compared in patients with previous myocardial infarctions. Left ventricular ejection fraction was measured by the radioisotopic method serially in patients early after an acute myocardial infarction and during the convalescence period. Ultrasound recordings were obtained utilizing a commercially available ultrasonoscope and a 1/9 cm transducer focused at 10 cm with a repetition rate of 1000 impulses per second. All recordings were made on a visicorder oscillography.

  15. Technetium-99m NGA functional hepatic imaging: preliminary clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Stadalnik, R.C.; Vera, D.R.; Woodle, E.S.; Trudeau, W.L.; Porter, B.A.; Ward, R.E.; Krohn, K.A.; O'Grady, L.F.

    1985-11-01

    Technetium-99m galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin ( (Tc)NGA) is a radiolabeled ligand to hepatic binding protein, a receptor which resides at the plasma membrane of hepatocytes. This receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical and its kinetic model provide a noninvasive method for the assessment of liver function. Eighteen patients were studied: seven with hepatoma, eight with liver metastases, four with cirrhosis, and one patient with acute fulminant non-A, non-B hepatitis. Technetium-99m NGA liver imaging provided anatomic information of diagnostic quality comparable to that obtained with other routine imaging modalities, including computed tomography, angiography, ultrasound, and (Tc)sulfur colloid scintigraphy. Kinetic modeling of dynamic (Tc)NGA data produced estimates of standardized hepatic blood flow, Q (hepatic blood flow divided by total blood volume), and hepatic binding protein concentration, (HBP). Significant rank correlation was obtained between (HBP) estimates and CTC scores. This correlation supports the hypothesis that (HBP) is a measure of functional hepatocyte mass. The combination of decreased Q and markedly reduced (HBP) may have prognostic significance; all three patients with this combination died of hepatic failure within 6 wk of imaging.

  16. Selected radionuclides important to low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low level radioactive waste (LLW) management facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the environment. Extensive surveys of available literature provided information for this report. Certain radionuclides may contribute significantly to the dose estimated during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. Among these are the radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than 5 years). This report discusses these radionuclides and other radionuclides that may be significant during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. This report not only includes essential information on each radionuclide, but also incorporates waste and disposal information on the radionuclide, and behavior of the radionuclide in the environment and in the human body. Radionuclides addressed in this document include technetium-99, carbon-14, iodine-129, tritium, cesium-137, strontium-90, nickel-59, plutonium-241, nickel-63, niobium-94, cobalt-60, curium -42, americium-241, uranium-238, and neptunium-237.

  17. Radionuclide and radiation protection data handbook 2nd edition (2002).

    PubMed

    Delacroix, D; Guerre, J P; Leblanc, P; Hickman, C

    2002-01-01

    This handbook is a reference source of radionuclide and radiation protection information. Its purpose is to provide users of radionuclides in medicine, research and industry with consolidated and appropriate information and data to handle and transport radioactive substances safely. It is mainly intended for users in low and intermediate activity laboratories. Individual data sheets are provided for a wide range of commonly used radionuclides (144 in total). These radionuclides are classified into five different groups as a function of risk level, represented by colours red, orange, yellow, green and blue, in descending order of risk.

  18. Transuranic radionuclides dispersed into the aquatic environment, a bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Noshkin, V.E.; Stoker, A.C.; Wong, Kai M.

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this project was to compile a bibliography of references containing environmental transuranic radionuclide data. Our intent was to identify those parameters affecting transuranic radionuclide transport that may be generic and those that may be dependent on chemical form and/or environmental conditions (i.e., site specific) in terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric environments An understanding of the unique characteristics and similarities between source terms and environmental conditions relative to transuranic radionuclide transport and cycling will provide the ability to assess and predict the long term impact on man and the environment. An additional goal of our literature review, was to extract the ranges of environmental transuranic radionuclide data from the identified references for inclusion in a data base. Related to source term, these ranges of data can be used to calculate the dose to man from the radionuclides, and to perform uncertainty analyses on these dose assessments. On the basis of our reviews, we have arbitrarily outlined five general source terms. These are fallout, fuel cycle waste, accidents, disposal sites and resuspension. Resuspension of the transuranic radionuclides is a unique source term, in that the radionuclides can originate from any of the other source terms. If these transuranic radionuclides become resuspended into the air, they then become important as a source of inhaled radionuclides.

  19. Mathematical simulation of sediment and radionuclide transport in estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Y.; Trent, D.S.

    1982-11-01

    The finite element model LFESCOT (Flow, Energy, Salinity, Sediment and Contaminant Transport Model) was synthesized under this study to simulate radionuclide transport in estuaries to obtain accurate radionuclide distributions which are affected by these factors: time variance, three-dimensional flow, temperature, salinity, and sediments. Because sediment transport and radionuclide adsorption/desorption depend strongly on sizes or types of sediments, FLESCOT simulates sediment and a sediment-sorbed radionuclide for the total of three sediment-size fractions (or sediment types) of both cohesive and noncohesive sediments. It also calculates changes of estuarine bed conditions, including bed elevation changes due to sediment erosion/deposition, and three-dimensional distributions of three bed sediment sizes and sediment-sorbed radionuclides within the bed. Although the model was synthesized for radionuclide transport, it is general enough to also handle other contaminants such as heavy metals, pesticides, or toxic chemicals. The model was checked for its capability for flow, water surface elevation change, salinity, sediment and radionuclide transport under various simple conditions first, confirming the general validity of the model's computational schemes. These tests also revealed that FLESCOT can use large aspect ratios of computational cells, which are necessary in handling long estuarine study areas. After these simple tests, FLESCOT was applied to the Hudson River estuary between Chelsea and the mouth of the river to examine how well the model can predict radionuclide transport through simulating tidally influenced three-dimensional flow, salinity, sediment and radionuclide movements with their interactions.

  20. Transuranic radionuclides from resuspension in the environment, a bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, A.C.; Shinn, J.H.; Noshkin, V.E.

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this project was to compile a bibliography of references containing environmental transuranic radionuclide data. Our intent was to identify those parameters affecting transuranic radionuclide transport that may be generic and those that may be dependent on chemical form and/or environmental conditions. An understanding of the unique characteristics and similarities between source terms and environmental conditions relative to transuranic radionuclide transport and cycling will provide the ability to assess and predict the long term impact on man and the environment. An additional goal of our literature review, was to extract the ranges of environmental transuranic radionuclide data from the identified references for inclusion in a data base. Related to source term, these ranges of data can be used to calculate the dose to man from the radionuclides, and to perform uncertainty analyses on these dose assessments. On the basis of our reviews, we have arbitrarily outlined five general source terms. These are fallout, fuel cycle waste, accidents, disposal sites and resuspension. Resuspension of the transuranic radionuclides is an unique source term, in that the radionuclides can originate from any of the other source terms. If these transuranic radionuclides become resuspended into the air, they then become important as a source of inhaled radionuclides. This bibliography is a compilation of the references containing studies of plutonium and americium in the environment as a result of resuspension.

  1. Coronary MR angiography revealed: how to optimize image quality.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Masaki; Sakuma, Hajime

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the coronary arteries has been challenging, owing to the small size of the vessels and the complex motion caused by cardiac contraction and respiration. Free-breathing, whole-heart coronary MR angiography has emerged as a method that can provide visualization of the entire coronary arterial tree within a single 3-dimensional acquisition. Although coronary MR angiography is noninvasive and without radiation exposure, acquisition of high-quality coronary images is operator dependent and is generally more difficult than computed tomographic angiography. This article explains how to optimize acquisition of coronary MR angiography for reliable assessment of coronary artery disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Aortic valve laceration following coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Roy, James; Manganas, Con; Youssef, George; Rees, David

    2016-11-01

    Valve complications following coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary interventions are rare. We report a case of an aortic valve laceration following cardiac catheterization and percutaneous coronary intervention, which required surgical valve replacement. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Digital subtraction angiography for preoperative evaluation of extremity tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Paushter, D.M.; Borkowski, G.R.; Buonocore, E.; Belhobek, G.H.; Marks, K.E.

    1983-07-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the role of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in the surgical planning of musculoskeletal neoplasms. Thirteen patients with primary bone and soft-tissue tumors were examined by CT and DSA. Three patients also had conventional angiography. DSA yielded surgically useful information in 10 patients, comparable to that expected from conventional angiography. DSA was most helpful in demonstrating the presence or absence of major vessel involvement by tumor when this could not be ascertained definitely on CT. Demonstration of mass extent by CT was accurate in 11 patients. Results of this study suggest that the combination of CT and DSA is useful in the preoperative evaluation of selected extremity tumors and should diminish the need for conventional angiography.

  4. Intra-Operative Indocyanine Green Angiography of the Parathyroid Gland.

    PubMed

    Vidal Fortuny, Jordi; Karenovics, Wolfram; Triponez, Frederic; Sadowski, Samira M

    2016-10-01

    Major complications of thyroid and parathyroid surgery are recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries and definitive hypoparathyroidism. The use of intra-operative Indocyanine Green Angiography for confirmation of vascular status of the parathyroid gland is reported here.

  5. Indocyanine green angiography findings in acute retinal necrosis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bissig, A; Balaskas, K; Vaudaux, J D; Guex-Crosier, Y

    2011-04-01

    Acute retinal necrosis syndrome is clinically defined by the presence of peripheral necrotizing retinitis associated with severe occlusive vasculitis caused primarily by herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus. Previously considered as an exclusively retinal pathology, choroidal involvement, as demonstrated by indocyanine green angiography, has not been extensively studied. Indocyanine green angiography was performed in 4 patients with ARN. Observed angiographic patterns included: 1. a characteristic triangular area of hypo-perfusion, 2. hypofluorescent lobular patches and areas of fuzzy choroidal vascular hyperfluorescence, and 3. isolated hypofluorescent lobular patches of the contralateral eye. Marked choroidal hypo-perfusion on indocyanine green angiography was associated with extensive retinal ischemia. Treatment included a combination of antiviral agents and corticosteroids complemented by prophylactic acetylsalicylate. Indocyanine green angiography may provide important information regarding choroidal vascular involvement in ARN. It may also permit the timely identification of sub-clinical contralateral eye involvement. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Cine photography and video recording of anterior segment fluorescein angiography.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, R J; Ford, S M

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of apparatus and technique for carrying out cine photography and video recording of anterior segment fluorescein angiography. We found cine best for single-frame analysis and video tape recording less expensive. Images PMID:708682

  7. Hepatitis B (HBV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hepatitis B (HBV) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hepatitis B (HBV) A A A What's in this article? ... poisons). There are several different types of hepatitis . Hepatitis B is a type that can move from one ...

  8. The terminology of hepatitis*

    PubMed Central

    1973-01-01

    It is proposed that the diseases formerly known as “infectious hepatitis” and “serum hepatitis” be referred to as viral hepatitis type A and viral hepatitis type B, respectively. It is further recommended that the “Australia” antigen be referred to as hepatitis B antigen (HB Ag) and the corresponding antibody as hepatitis B antibody (HB Ab). PMID:4544683

  9. Hepatic osteodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gatta, Angelo; Verardo, Alberto; Di Pascoli, Marco; Giannini, Sandro; Bolognesi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Metabolic disturbances of bone are frequent in patients with chronic liver disease. The prevalence of osteoporosis among patients with advanced chronic liver disease is reported between 12% and 55%; it is higher in primary biliary cirrhosis. All patients with advanced liver disease should be screened for osteoporosis with a densitometry, especially if the etiology is cholestatic and in the presence of other risk factors. Clinical relevance of hepatic osteodystrophy increases after liver transplantation. After liver transplant, a rapid loss of bone mineral density can be detected in the first 6 months, followed by stabilization and slight improvement of the values. At the time of transplantation, bone density values are very important prognostic factors. Therapy of hepatic osteodystrophy is based primarily on the control of risk factors: cessation of tobacco and alcohol assumption, reduction of caffeine ingestion, exercise, supplementation of calcium and vitamin D, limitation of drugs such as loop diuretics, corticosteroids, cholestyramine. Bisphosphonates have been proposed for the therapy of osteoporosis in patients with liver disease, particularly after liver transplantation. The possible side effects of oral administration of bisphosphonates, such as the occurrence of esophageal ulcerations, are of particular concern in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension, due to the risk of gastrointestinal hemorrhage from ruptured esophageal varices, although this risk is probably overestimated. PMID:25568651

  10. Visualizing plumes of heavy metals and radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigiobbe, V.; Liu, T.; Bryant, S. L.; Hesse, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The understanding of the transport behaviors in porous media resides on the ability to reproduce fundamental phenomena in a lab setting. Experiments with quasi 2D tanks filled with beads are performed to study physical phenomena induced by chemical and fluid dynamic processes. When an alkaline solution containing heavy metals or radionuclides invades a low pH region, mixing due to longitudinal dispersion induces destabilization of the front forming a fast travelling pulse [1]. When the two fluids travel in parallel, instead, mixing induced by transverse dispersion creates a continuous leakage from the alkaline region into the acidic one forming a fast travelling plume [2] (Figure 1). Impact of these phenomena are on aquifers upon leaking of alkaline fluids, rich in heavy metals and radionuclides, from waste storage sites. Here, we report the results from a study where experiments with a quasi 2D tank are performed to analyze the effect of transverse mixing on strontium (Sr2+) transport. To visualize the leaking plume, a fluorescent dye (Fura-2) is added the acidic solution, which has been widely used in biomedical applications [3]. It is the aim of this work to optimize its application under the conditions relevant to this work. Spectrometric measurements of absorption and fluorescence show sensitivity of the dye to the presence of Sr2+ throughout a broad range of pH and Sr2+ concentration (Figure 2). In the absence of Sr2+, no significant absorption and fluorescence was measured, but as Sr2+ was added the relevant peaks increase significantly and sample dilution of tenfold was required to remain within the measuring threshold. These results show a strong sensitivity of the dye to the cation opening the opportunity to use Fura-2 as a tool to visualize heavy metals and radionuclides plumes. References[1] Prigiobbe et al. (2012) GRL 39, L18401. [2] Prigiobbe and Hesse (2015) in preparation. [3] Xu-Friedman and Regehr (2000) J. Neurosci. 20(12) 4414-4422.

  11. Digital subtraction angiography in pediatric cerebrovascular occlusive disease

    SciTech Connect

    Faerber, E.N.; Griska, L.A.B.; Swartz, J.D.; Capitanio, M.A.; Popky, G.L.

    1984-08-01

    While conventional angiography has been used to demonstrate cerebrovascular occlusive disease in the past, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is capable of showing progressive vascular involvement with ease, simplicity, and extremely low morbidity, making it particularly well suited for children and outpatients either alone or coordinated with computed tomography. The authors discuss the usefulness and advantages of DSA as demonstrated in 7 infants and children with hemiplegia, 4 of whom had sickle-cell disease.

  12. Method of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    DOEpatents

    Bray, Lane A.; Ryan, Jack L.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a method of removing an impurity of plutonium, lead or a combination thereof from a mixture of radionuclides that contains the impurity and at least one parent radionuclide. The method has the steps of (a) insuring that the mixture is a hydrochloric acid mixture; (b) oxidizing the acidic mixture and specifically oxidizing the impurity to its highest oxidation state; and (c) passing the oxidized mixture through a chloride form anion exchange column whereupon the oxidized impurity absorbs to the chloride form anion exchange column and the 22.sup.9 Th or 2.sup.27 Ac "cow" radionuclide passes through the chloride form anion exchange column. The plutonium is removed for the purpose of obtaining other alpha emitting radionuclides in a highly purified form suitable for medical therapy. In addition to plutonium; lead, iron, cobalt, copper, uranium, and other metallic cations that form chloride anionic complexes that may be present in the mixture; are removed from the mixture on the chloride form anion exchange column.

  13. Method of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    DOEpatents

    Bray, L.A.; Ryan, J.L.

    1999-03-23

    The present invention is a method of removing an impurity of plutonium, lead or a combination thereof from a mixture of radionuclides that contains the impurity and at least one parent radionuclide. The method has the steps of (a) insuring that the mixture is a hydrochloric acid mixture; (b) oxidizing the acidic mixture and specifically oxidizing the impurity to its highest oxidation state; and (c) passing the oxidized mixture through a chloride form anion exchange column whereupon the oxidized impurity absorbs to the chloride form anion exchange column and the {sup 229}Th or {sup 227}Ac ``cow`` radionuclide passes through the chloride form anion exchange column. The plutonium is removed for the purpose of obtaining other alpha emitting radionuclides in a highly purified form suitable for medical therapy. In addition to plutonium, lead, iron, cobalt, copper, uranium, and other metallic cations that form chloride anionic complexes that may be present in the mixture are removed from the mixture on the chloride form anion exchange column. 8 figs.

  14. Selective laser ionisation of radionuclide 63Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, G. O.; D'yachkov, A. B.; Gorkunov, A. A.; Labozin, A. V.; Mironov, S. M.; Firsov, V. A.; Panchenko, V. Ya.

    2017-02-01

    We report a search for a scheme of selective laser stepwise ionisation of radionuclide 63Ni by radiation of a dye laser pumped by a copper vapour laser. A three-stage scheme is found with ionisation through an autoionising state (AIS): 3d 84s2 3F4(E = 0) → 3d 94p 1Fo3(31030.99 cm-1) → 3d 94d 2[7/2]4(49322.56 cm-1) → AIS(67707.61 cm-1) which, by employing saturated radiation intensities provides the ionisation selectivity of above 1200 for 63Ni.

  15. [Radionuclides for metastatic bone pain palliation].

    PubMed

    Lass, Piotr

    2002-10-01

    The paper overviews the role of systemic radionuclide therapy in patients with disseminated bone metastases. Most patients with bone metastases experience painful symptoms. Systemic radioisotope therapy is an alternative to traditional hemibody radiation in cases of multiple, diffuse metastases. Usually given as a single i.v. slow infusion it provides a pain relief beginning in one to three weeks, with a mean duration up to several months, depending on the kind of radioisotope applied. The paper overviews the role of unsealed source therapy with these bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in palliating pain, improving quality of life, indications, contraindications and complications of this therapy are discussed, as well as cost-benefit aspects.

  16. Natural contamination in radionuclide detection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wogman, N.A.

    1980-10-01

    Through the use of low-level gamma-ray spectrometry, clean material for construction of radionuclide detection systems has been identified. In general aluminum contains high quantities of /sup 232/Th and /sup 238/U with minimal quantities of /sup 40/K. Stainless steels contain /sup 60/Co. The radioactive contents of foams, cements, and light reflective materials are quite variable. Molecular sieve materials used in germanium spectrometers contain from 4-9 dpm/g. Only through a judicious choice of materials can a spectrometer with the lowest achievable background be assembled.

  17. Measurement of radionuclides in waste packages

    SciTech Connect

    Brodzinski, R.L.; Perkins, R.W.; Rieck, H.G.; Wogman, N.A.

    1986-10-14

    A method is described for non-destructively assaying the radionuclide content of solid waste in a sealed container comprising: (a) determining the type of reactor responsible for the generation of the waste; (b) determining the degree of fuel enrichment of the reactor; (c) determining the decay time of the waste since exposure in the reactor; (d) measuring the gamma-ray spectrum of the waste; (e) determining the matrix density of the waste from ratios of photopeak pairs from individual radioisotopes in the gamma-ray spectrum; (f) measuring the total neutron flux and the coincidence neutron flux of the waste; and (g) determining neutron multiplicity from the coincidence neutron flux.

  18. Radionuclides in the Great Lakes basin.

    PubMed Central

    Ahier, B A; Tracy, B L

    1995-01-01

    The Great Lakes basin is of radiologic interest due to the large population within its boundaries that may be exposed to various sources of ionizing radiation. Specific radionuclides of interest in the basin arising from natural and artificial sources include 3H, 14C, 90Sr, 129I, 131I, 137Cs, 222Rn, 226Ra, 235U, 238U, 239Pu, and 241Am. The greatest contribution to total radiation exposure is the natural background radiation that provides an average dose of about 2.6 mSv/year to all basin residents. Global fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests conducted before 1963 has resulted in the largest input of anthropogenic radioactivity into the lakes. Of increasing importance is the radionuclide input from the various components of the nuclear fuel cycle. Although the dose from these activities is currently very low, it is expected to increase if there is continued growth of the nuclear industry. In spite of strict regulations on design and operation of nuclear power facilities, the potential exists for a serious accident as a result of the large inventories of radionuclides contained in the reactor cores; however, these risks are several orders of magnitude less than the risks from other natural and man-made hazards. An area of major priority over the next few decades will be the management of the substantial amounts of radioactive waste generated by nuclear fuel cycle activities. Based on derived risk coefficients, the theoretical incidence of fatal and weighted nonfatal cancers and hereditary defects in the basin's population, attributable to 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation, is conservatively estimated to be of the order of 3.4 x 10(5) cases. The total number of attributable health effects to the year 2050 from fallout radionuclides in the Great Lakes basin is of the order of 5.0 x 10(3). In contrast, estimates of attributable health effects from 50 years of exposure to current nuclear fuel cycle effluent in the basin are of the order of 2

  19. Radionuclide partitioning across great lakes natural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platford, R. F.; Joshi, S. R.

    1989-11-01

    Several water and surface microlayer samples from Lake St. Clair, the Niagara River, and the North Shore of Lake Ontario collected during 1983 1986 have been assayed for a variety of radionuclides. In addition, the foam accumulating in the pool just below Niagara Falls was also analyzed and found to be the most efficient aqueous phase collector of137Cs,210Pb, and226Ra. The order of radioisotope specific activities from highest to lowest is: Lake Ontario sediment, Niagara River suspended solids, Niagara River foam, surface microlayer water, and subsurface water. Radiological dose rates to the sediments from137Cs,226Ra, and228Th total about 5 mGy/y.

  20. Preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with metal radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1992-06-01

    We recently developed a useful zinc-62/copper-62 generator and are presently evaluating copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals for clinical studies. While developing these copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals, in collaboration with the University of Missouri Research Reactor, Columbia we have also explored copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals. The PET images we obtained with copper-64 tracers were of such high quality that we have developed and evaluated copper-64 labeled antibodies for PET imaging. The major research activities described herein include: the development and assessment of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals; the development and evaluation of a new zinc-62/copper-62 generator and the assessment of copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals; mechanistic studies on proteins labeled with metal radionuclides.

  1. Radionuclides at Descartes in the central highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Throium, uranium, potassium, aluminium-26, and sodium-22 were measured by nondestructive gamma ray spectrometry in six soil and two rock samples gathered by Apollo 16 in the lunar central highlands. The soil samples probably include both major geologic formations in the vicinity, the Cayley and Descartes Formations, although it is possible that the Descartes Formation is not represented. The rock samples have low concentrations of primordial radionuclides. The Al concentrations were lower than could be expected from the high abundance of alumina in the Apollo 16 soils reported earlier, but this could be due to lower concentrations of target elements in these soils, sampling depth variations, or regolithic mixing (exposure age variations).

  2. Research remote laser methods for radionuclides monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kascheev, S. V.; Elizarov, Valentin V.; Grishkanich, Alexander S.; Bespalov, V. G.; Vasil'ev, Sergey K.; Zhevlakov, A. P.

    2014-05-01

    Laser sensing can serve as a highly effective method of searching and monitoring of radioactive contamination. The first method is essence consists in definition the Sr90 and Сs137 concentration by excitation and registration of fluorescence at wavelength of λ = 0.347÷7.0 μm at laser sounding. The second method experiments were carried out under the Raman-scattering circuit. Preliminary results of investigation show the real possibility to register of leakage of a radionuclide with concentration at level of 108÷109 сm-3 on a safe distance from the infected object.

  3. Sustainable production of orphan radionuclides at Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Nickles, R J; Avila-Rodriguez, M A; Nye, J A; Houser, E N; Selwyn, R G; Schueller, M J; Christian, B T; Jensen, M

    2008-06-01

    Over a hundred proton-induced reactions have been studied at the University of Wisconsin Medical Physics department since the installation of the first CTI RDS 112 in 1985. The focus has been to measure thick target yields at 11 MeV, in an effort to concentrate on the practical production of positron emitting radionuclides that have favorable decay characteristics, high yields and the potential for labeling pivotal biological tracers. This review covers our recent advances to scale-up the production of the heavy halogens and transition metals as feed-stock for non-conventional PET tracers that are currently attracting increased attention in oncology.

  4. Radionuclide evaluation of nonmalignant bone disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Winzelberg, G.G.

    1983-02-01

    Recent advances in nuclear imaging have improved the noninvasive evaluation of patients with nonmalignant bone disorders. When bone scanning agents are combined with bone marrow scanning agents and gallium-67 scintigraphy, a more accurate diagnosis can be obtained. By selecting the appropriate imaging sequence, it is often possible to distinguish cellulitis from underlying osteomyelitis. In patients with total hip replacements, it may be possible to separate postsurgical changes from prosthetic loosening or infection. Stress fractures in joggers may be detected by radionuclide bone scintigraphy before radiographs become abnormal. These nuclear imaging procedures can be done in most hospitals.

  5. Critical review: Radionuclide transport, sediment transport, and water quality mathematical modeling; and radionuclide adsorption/desorption mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Y.; Serne, R.J.; Arnold, E.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Thompson, F.L.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the results of a detailed literature review of radionuclide transport models applicable to rivers, estuaries, coastal waters, the Great Lakes, and impoundments. Some representatives sediment transport and water quality models were also reviewed to evaluate if they can be readily adapted to radionuclide transport modeling. The review showed that most available transport models were developed for dissolved radionuclide in rivers. These models include the mechanisms of advection, dispersion, and radionuclide decay. Since the models do not include sediment and radionuclide interactions, they are best suited for simulating short-term radionuclide migration where: (1) radionuclides have small distribution coefficients; (2) sediment concentrations in receiving water bodies are very low. Only 5 of the reviewed models include full sediment and radionuclide interactions: CHMSED developed by Fields; FETRA SERATRA, and TODAM developed by Onishi et al, and a model developed by Shull and Gloyna. The 5 models are applicable to cases where: (1) the distribution coefficient is large; (2) sediment concentrations are high; or (3) long-term migration and accumulation are under consideration. The report also discusses radionuclide absorption/desorption distribution ratios and addresses adsorption/desorption mechanisms and their controlling processes for 25 elements under surface water conditions. These elements are: Am, Sb, C, Ce, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, I, Fe, Mn, Np, P, Pu, Pm, Ra, Ru, Sr, Tc, Th, {sup 3}H, U, Zn and Zr.

  6. Relationships between coronary angiography, mood, anxiety and insomnia.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Pınar Guzel; Selvi, Yavuz; Boysan, Murat; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Akdağ, Serkan; Ozturk, Fatih

    2015-08-30

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the anxiety, depression and insomnia levels in the pre- and post-coronary angiography in patients undergoing elective coronary angiography due to suspected coronary artery disease. This prospective cross-sectional study consisted of 120 patients consecutively underwent coronary angiogram (CAG) between January and August 2014 in Departments of Cardiology. The mean age was 57.49 (SD±9.73), and 58.3% of the sample were women. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Profile of Mood States Scale, Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Insomnia Severity Index were used. Patients were subsumed under 2 groups as normal and critical according to the presence or the absence of visually severe stenosis in at least one coronary artery. Subjects with significant stenosis had greater mean scores on depression-dejection and anger-hostility sub-scales of the POMS in the post-angiography than pre-angiography scores. We found that older age and having a physical illness significantly contributed to the risk of having significant stenosis in coronary vasculature. Subjects with severe coronary artery stenosis scored higher on depression-dejection and anger-hostility sub-scales at the post-angiography time period relative to pre-angiography scores. Trait and state anxiety levels were found to be moderate higher in both groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. CT angiography of intracranial aneurysms: a focus on postprocessing.

    PubMed

    Tomandl, Bernd F; Köstner, Niels C; Schempershofe, Miriam; Huk, Walter J; Strauss, Christian; Anker, Lars; Hastreiter, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) angiography is a well-known tool for detection of intracranial aneurysms and the planning of therapeutic intervention. Despite a wealth of existing studies and an increase in image quality due to use of multisection CT and increasingly sophisticated postprocessing tools such as direct volume rendering, CT angiography has still not replaced digital subtraction angiography as the standard of reference for detection of intracranial aneurysms. One reason may be that CT angiography is still not a uniformly standardized method, particularly with regard to image postprocessing. Several methods for two- and three-dimensional visualization can be used: multiplanar reformation, maximum intensity projection, shaded surface display, and direct volume rendering. Pitfalls of CT angiography include lack of visibility of small arteries, difficulty differentiating the infundibular dilatation at the origin of an artery from an aneurysm, the kissing vessel artifact, demonstration of venous structures that can simulate aneurysms, inability to identify thrombosis and calcification on three-dimensional images, and beam hardening artifacts produced by aneurysm clips. Finally, an algorithm for the safe and useful application of CT angiography in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage has been developed, which takes into account the varying quality of equipment and software at different imaging centers. Copyright RSNA, 2004

  8. Aqueous Angiography with Fluorescein and Indocyanine Green in Bovine Eyes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Alex S; Saraswathy, Sindhu; Dastiridou, Anna; Begian, Alan; Legaspi, Hanz; Mohindroo, Chirayu; Tan, James C H; Francis, Brian A; Caprioli, Joseph; Hinton, David R; Weinreb, Robert N

    2016-11-01

    We characterize aqueous angiography as a real-time aqueous humor outflow imaging (AHO) modality in cow eyes with two tracers of different molecular characteristics. Cow enucleated eyes (n = 31) were obtained and perfused with balanced salt solution via a Lewicky AC maintainer through a 1-mm side-port. Fluorescein (2.5%) or indocyanine green (ICG; 0.4%) were introduced intracamerally at 10 mm Hg individually or sequentially. With an angiographer, infrared and fluorescent images were acquired. Concurrent anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) was performed, and fixable fluorescent dextrans were introduced into the eye for histologic analysis of angiographically positive and negative areas. Aqueous angiography in cow eyes with fluorescein and ICG yielded high-quality images with segmental patterns. Over time, ICG maintained a better intraluminal presence. Angiographically positive, but not negative, areas demonstrated intrascleral lumens with anterior segment OCT. Aqueous angiography with fluorescent dextrans led to their trapping in AHO pathways. Sequential aqueous angiography with ICG followed by fluorescein in cow eyes demonstrated similar patterns. Aqueous angiography in model cow eyes demonstrated segmental angiographic outflow patterns with either fluorescein or ICG as a tracer. Further characterization of segmental AHO with aqueous angiography may allow for intelligent placement of trabecular bypass minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries for improved surgical results.

  9. Aqueous Angiography with Fluorescein and Indocyanine Green in Bovine Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Alex S.; Saraswathy, Sindhu; Dastiridou, Anna; Begian, Alan; Legaspi, Hanz; Mohindroo, Chirayu; Tan, James C. H.; Francis, Brian A.; Caprioli, Joseph; Hinton, David R.; Weinreb, Robert N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We characterize aqueous angiography as a real-time aqueous humor outflow imaging (AHO) modality in cow eyes with two tracers of different molecular characteristics. Methods Cow enucleated eyes (n = 31) were obtained and perfused with balanced salt solution via a Lewicky AC maintainer through a 1-mm side-port. Fluorescein (2.5%) or indocyanine green (ICG; 0.4%) were introduced intracamerally at 10 mm Hg individually or sequentially. With an angiographer, infrared and fluorescent images were acquired. Concurrent anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) was performed, and fixable fluorescent dextrans were introduced into the eye for histologic analysis of angiographically positive and negative areas. Results Aqueous angiography in cow eyes with fluorescein and ICG yielded high-quality images with segmental patterns. Over time, ICG maintained a better intraluminal presence. Angiographically positive, but not negative, areas demonstrated intrascleral lumens with anterior segment OCT. Aqueous angiography with fluorescent dextrans led to their trapping in AHO pathways. Sequential aqueous angiography with ICG followed by fluorescein in cow eyes demonstrated similar patterns. Conclusions Aqueous angiography in model cow eyes demonstrated segmental angiographic outflow patterns with either fluorescein or ICG as a tracer. Translational Relevance Further characterization of segmental AHO with aqueous angiography may allow for intelligent placement of trabecular bypass minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries for improved surgical results. PMID:27847692

  10. Contrast agent choice for intravenous coronary angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, H. D.; Siddons, D. P.

    1990-05-01

    The screening of the general population for coronary artery disease would be practical if a method existed for visualizing the extent of occlusion after an intravenous injection of contrast agent. Measurements performed with monochromatic synchrotron radiation X-rays and an iodine-containing contrast agent at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory have shown that such an intravenous angiography procedure would be possible with an adequately intense monochromatic X-ray source. Because of the size and cost of synchrotron radiation facilities it would be desirable to make the most efficient use of the intensity available, while reducing as much as possible the radiation dose experienced by the patient. By choosing contrast agents containing elements with a higher atomic number than iodine, it is possible to both improve the image quality and reduce the patient radiation dose, while using the same synchrotron radiation source. By using Si monochromator crystals with a small mosaic spread, it is possible to increase the X-ray flux available for imaging by over an order of magnitude, without any changes in the storage ring or wiggler magnet. The most critical imaging task for intravenous coronary angiography utilizing synchrotron radiation X-rays is visualizing a coronary artery through the left ventricle or aorta which also contain contrast agent. Calculations have been made of the signal to noise ratio expected for this imaging task for various contrast agents with atomic numbers between that of iodine and bismuth. The X-ray energy spectrum of the X-17 superconduction wiggler beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been used for these calculations. Both perfect Si crystals and Si crystals with a small mosaic spread are considered as monochromators. Contrast agents containing Gd or Yb seem to have about the optimal calculated signal to noise ratio. Gd-DTPA is already approved for use as a contrast agent for

  11. Hepatic regenerating nodules in hereditary tyrosinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Day, D.L.; Letourneau, J.G.; Allan, B.T.; Sharp, H.L.; Ascher, N.; Dehner, L.P.; Thompson, W.M.

    1987-08-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia is an autosomal recessive, enzymatic disorder that results in micro- and macronodular cirrhosis in early childhood. Hepatocellular carcinoma occurs in approximately one-third of affected children. We evaluated the imaging studies performed in five children with this disorder. Pathologic examination of all five of the livers revealed cirrhosis and multiple regenerating nodules; hepatocellular carcinoma was present in two of the five livers. All five patients had high-attenuation or high- and low-attenuation foci within the liver. These high-attenuation foci were not apparent as focal lesions in three of four hepatic sonograms or in one of two hepatic nuclear scans. Angiography showed tumor vascularity in one patient with a focal hepatocellular carcinoma, but was indeterminate in a second patient with severe cirrhosis and multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma. Children with cirrhosis due to tyrosinemia may develop regenerating nodules that appear as high-attenuation hepatic foci on CT scans. It is difficult to differentiate regenerating nodules from multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma in these patients.

  12. The effect of gravel size fraction on the distribution coefficients of selected radionuclides radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Last, George V.; Glossbrenner, Ellwood T.

    2009-06-26

    This manuscript addresses the consequences of the common practice of assuming that the gravel fraction of sediments does not participate in sorption reactions and thus sorption quantified by the distribution coefficient (Kd) construct can be estimated from laboratory tests on < 2mm fraction of sediments. As shown within the use of this common assumption can lead to inaccurate estimates of the mobility and sorption capacity of key radionuclides (Tc, U, and Np) at the Hanford Site where gravel dominates the lower Hanford formation and upper Ringold Formation. Batch sorption and column experiments showed that the distribution coefficient measured using only < 2mm fraction were not in agreement with those obtained from the bulk sediments depending on the radionuclide. The least reactive radionuclide, Tc showed the lowest effects from the presence of gravel. However, differences between measured Kds using < 2mm fractions of the sediment and the Kds measured on the bulk sediment were significant for strongly reactive radionuclides such as Np, especially on the sediment with gravel fractions that contained highly reactive sites. Highly reactive sites in the gravel fraction were attributed to the presence of Fe oxides coatings and/or reactive fracture faces on the gravel surfaces. Gravel correction factors that use the sum of the Kd,<2 mm and Kd,>2 mm values to estimate the Kd for the bulk sediment were found to best describe Kds for radionuclides on the bulk sediment. However, more detailed characterization of gravel surfaces should be also conducted to identify those gravels with higher reactive sorbents, if present. Gravel correction factors should be considered to predict precisely the sorption capacity of bulk sediments that contain more than 10% gravel and to estimate the mobility of contaminants in subsurface environments.

  13. 4D CT angiography more closely defines intracranial thrombus burden than single-phase CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Frölich, A M J; Schrader, D; Klotz, E; Schramm, R; Wasser, K; Knauth, M; Schramm, P

    2013-10-01

    In patients with acute stroke, the location and extent of intravascular thrombi correlate with clinical and imaging outcomes and have been used to predict the success of intravenous thrombolysis. We hypothesized that 4D-CTA reconstructed from whole-brain CTP more closely outlines intracranial thrombi than conventional single-phase CTA. Sixty-seven patients with anterior circulation occlusion were retrospectively analyzed. For 4D-CTA, temporal maximum intensity projections were calculated that combine all 30 spiral scans of the CTP examination through temporal fusion. Thrombus extent was assessed by a semi-quantitative clot burden score (0-10; in which 0 = complete unilateral anterior circulation occlusion and 10 = patent vasculature). In patients with sufficient collateral flow, the length of the filling defect and corresponding hyperdense middle cerebral artery sign on NCCT were measured. Clot burden on temporal maximum intensity projection (median clot burden score, 7.0; interquartile range, 5.1-8.0) was significantly lower than on single-phase CT angiography (median, 6.0; interquartile range, 4.5-7.0; P < .0001). The length of the hyperdense middle cerebral artery sign (14.30 ± 5.93 mm) showed excellent correlation with the filling defect in the middle cerebral artery on temporal maximum intensity projection (13.40 ± 6.40 mm); this filling defect was larger on single-phase CT angiography (18.08 ± 6.54 mm; P = .043). As the result of an increased sensitivity for collateral flow, 4D-CTA temporal maximum intensity projection more closely outlines intracranial thrombi than conventional single-phase CT angiography. Our findings can be helpful when planning acute neurointervention. Further research is necessary to validate our data and assess the use of 4D-CTA in predicting response to different recanalization strategies.

  14. Imaging Foveal Microvasculature: Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Versus Adaptive Optics Scanning Light Ophthalmoscope Fluorescein Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Shelley; Krawitz, Brian; Efstathiadis, Eleni; Geyman, Lawrence; Weitz, Rishard; Chui, Toco Y. P.; Carroll, Joseph; Dubra, Alfredo; Rosen, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the use of optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) and adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope fluorescein angiography (AOSLO FA) for characterizing the foveal microvasculature in healthy and vasculopathic eyes. Methods Four healthy controls and 11 vasculopathic patients (4 diabetic retinopathy, 4 retinal vein occlusion, and 3 sickle cell retinopathy) were imaged with OCTA and AOSLO FA. Foveal perfusion maps were semiautomatically skeletonized for quantitative analysis, which included foveal avascular zone (FAZ) metrics (area, perimeter, acircularity index) and vessel density in three concentric annular regions of interest. On each set of OCTA and AOSLO FA images, matching vessel segments were used for lumen diameter measurement. Qualitative image comparisons were performed by visual identification of microaneurysms, vessel loops, leakage, and vessel segments. Results Adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope FA and OCTA showed no statistically significant differences in FAZ perimeter, acircularity index, and vessel densities. Foveal avascular zone area, however, showed a small but statistically significant difference of 1.8% (P = 0.004). Lumen diameter was significantly larger on OCTA (mean difference 5.7 μm, P < 0.001). Microaneurysms, fine structure of vessel loops, leakage, and some vessel segments were visible on AOSLO FA but not OCTA, while blood vessels obscured by leakage were visible only on OCTA. Conclusions Optical coherence tomography angiography is comparable to AOSLO FA at imaging the foveal microvasculature except for differences in FAZ area, lumen diameter, and some qualitative features. These results, together with its ease of use, short acquisition time, and avoidance of potentially phototoxic blue light, support OCTA as a tool for monitoring ocular pathology and detecting early disease. PMID:27409463

  15. Intra-arterial CT angiography visualization of arterial supply to inferior vena cava tumor thrombus prior to radioembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Roche, Glen; Teo, Terence K B; Tan, Andrew E H; Irani, Farah G

    2012-01-01

    Unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma has a high frequency of vascular invasion and arterial parasitization. Trans-arterial radioembolization using yttrium-90 (Y90) microspheres is a possible treatment option. Paramount to its success is the meticulous angiographic interrogation of tumor feeding arteries and extra-hepatic supply. We describe a patient with tumor invasion of the inferior vena cava with arterial supply from the right inferior phrenic artery, which was exquisitely visualized using intra-arterial computed tomographic angiography (IACTA) during the planning technetium-99m macro aggregated albumin phase. This technique was useful in planning which artery to administer Y90 microspheres into for maximal brachytherapy. Although patient outcome was poor due to significant arterio-portal shunting, we believe that IACTA is a useful adjunct to conventional digital subtraction angiography in planning radioembolization therapy.

  16. Correlation between magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) in ectatic coronary vessels.

    PubMed

    Mavrogeni, Sophie I; Manginas, Athanassios; Papadakis, Emmanouil; Foussas, Stefanos; Douskou, Marouso; Baras, Panagiotis; Seimenis, Ioannis; Cokkinos, Dennis V

    2004-01-01

    Coronary artery ectasia (CAE) is defined as a dilatation of an arterial segment to a diameter at least 1.5 times that of the adjacent normal artery. The correct follow-up of ectatic vessels is hampered by the need for repeat angiograms. In this work we compared quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) measurements of the diameter of the proximal most ectatic part of coronary vessels, with corresponding measurements obtained by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) using both gradient echo and turbo spin echo imaging sequences. Fifteen patients (14 male), aged 45-65 years, with known CAE were prospectively studied. Two electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered pulse sequences were implemented for coronary magnetic resonance angiography. The first was a three-dimensional (3D), segmented, k-space gradient-echo sequence, employing a T2-weighted preparation prepulse and a frequency-selective, fat-saturation prepulse to enhance "white blood" (WB) contrast of the coronary arteries. The second sequence was an M2D dual Inversion Recovery (IR) Turbo Spin-Echo with a linear k-space acquisition scheme, providing "black-blood" (BB) contrast of the coronaries. All scans were carried out with the patient free breathing using a 2D, real-time Navigator beam, for respiratory motion tracking and gating. All patients underwent QCA, and the diameter of the proximal most ectatic part of each vessel was measured and compared with "white-blood" and "black-blood" MRA measurements. The average length of continuously visualized LM, LAD, LCx, and RCA by MRA was 2.5 +/- 0.3, 5.8 +/- 0.8, 3.9 +/- 1.0, and 7.2 +/- 1.2 cm, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between diameter measurements of the proximal most ectatic part of each vessel, obtained with WB and BB sequences. There was a close correlation between MRA and QCA measurements (r = 0.87, p < 0.001). Bland-Altman analysis showed no systematic differences between the examined methods, over the whole range of vessel

  17. Unusual Congenital Aortic Anomaly with Rare Common Celiamesenteric Trunk Variation: MR Angiography and Digital Substraction Angiography Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Tosun, Ozgur Sanlidilek, Umman; Cetin, Huseyin; Ozdemir, Ozcan; Kurt, Aydin; Sakarya, Mehmet Emin; Tas, Ismet

    2007-09-15

    Magnetic resonance angiography and digital substraction angiography (DSA) findings in a case with a rare congenital thoracoabdominal aortic hypoplasia and common celiamesenteric trunk variation with occlusion of infrarenal abdominal aorta are described here. To our knowledge, this aortic anomaly has not been previously described in the English literature. DSA is the optimum imaging modality for determination of aortic hypoplasia, associated vascular malformations, collateral vessels, and direction of flow within vessels.

  18. Detection of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma: Comparison of multi-detector CT with digital subtraction angiography and Lipiodol CT

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiao-Hua; Guan, Yong-Song; Zhou, Xiang-Ping; Huang, Juan; Sun, Long; Li, Xiao; Liu, Yuan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of biphasic multi-detector row helical computed tomography (MDCT), digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and Lipiodol computed tomography (CT) in detection of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with nodular HCC underwent biphasic MDCT examination: hepatic arterial phase (HAP) 25 s and portal venous phase (PVP) 70 s after injection of the contrast medium (1.5 mL/kg). They also underwent hepatic angiography and intra-arterial infusion of iodized oil. Lipiodol CT was performed 3-4 wk after infusion. MDCT images were compared with DSA and Lipiodol CT images for detection of hepatic nodules. RESULTS: The three imaging techniques had the same sensitivity in detecting nodules >20 mm in diameter. There was no significant difference in the sensitivity among HAP-MDCT, Lipiodol CT and DSA for nodules of 10-20 mm in diameter. For the nodules <10 mm in diameter, HAP-MDCT identified 47, Lipiodol CT detected 27 (χ2 = 11.3, P = 0.005<0.01, HAP-MDCT vs Lipiodol CT) and DSA detected 16 (χ2 = 9.09, P = 0.005<0.01 vs Lipiodol CT and χ2 = 29.03, P = 0.005<0.01vs HAP-MDCT). However, six nodules <10 mm in diameter were detected only by Lipiodol CT. CONCLUSION: MDCT and Lipiodol CT are two complementary modalities. At present, MDCT does not obviate the need for DSA and subsequent Lipiodol CT as a preoperative examination for HCC. PMID:15633215

  19. Traces of natural radionuclides in animal food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merli, Isabella Desan; da Silveira, Marcilei A. Guazzelli; Medina, Nilberto H.

    2014-11-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials are present everywhere, e.g., in soil, air, housing materials, food, etc. Therefore, human beings and animals receive internal exposure from radioactive elements inside their bodies through breathing and alimentation. Gamma radiation has enough energy to remove an electron from the atom and compromise the rearrangement of electrons in the search for a more stable configuration which can disturb molecule chemical bonding. Food ingestion is one of the most common forms of radioisotopes absorption. The goal of this work is the measurement of natural gamma radiation rates from natural radioisotopes present in animal food. To determine the concentration of natural radionuclides present in animal food gamma-ray spectrometry was applied. We have prepared animal food samples for poultry, fish, dogs, cats and cattle. The two highest total ingestion effective doses observed refers to a sample of mineral salt cattle, 95.3(15) μSv/year, rabbit chow, with a value of 48(5) μSv/year, and cattle mineral salt, with a value of 69(7) μSv/year, while the annual total dose value from terrestrial intake radionuclide is of the order of 290 μSv/year.

  20. Patient-specific internal radionuclide dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Tsougos, Ioannis; Loudos, George; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Theodorou, Kiki; Kappas, Constantin

    2010-02-01

    The development of patient-specific treatment planning systems is of outmost importance in the development of radionuclide dosimetry, taking into account that quantitative three-dimensional nuclear medical imaging can be used in this regard. At present, the established method for dosimetry is based on the measurement of the biokinetics by serial gamma-camera scans, followed by calculations of the administered activity and the residence times, resulting in the radiation-absorbed doses of critical organs. However, the quantification of the activity in different organs from planar data is hampered by inaccurate attenuation and scatter correction as well as because of background and organ overlay. In contrast, dosimetry based on quantitative three-dimensional data can be more accurate and allows an individualized approach, provided that all effects that degrade the quantitative content of the images have been corrected for. In addition, inhomogeneous organ accumulation of the radionuclide can be detected and possibly taken into account. The aim of this work is to provide adequate information on internal emitter dosimetry and a state-of-the-art review of the current methodology and future trends.