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Sample records for hepatic tumors ct

  1. Lipiodol enhanced CT scanning of malignant hepatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Eurvilaichit, C

    2000-04-01

    From August 1984 to March 1991, 41 patients with malignant liver tumors, 30 males and 11 females, aged 30-75 years were treated at Ramathibodi Hospital with injection of mitomycin-C lipiodol emulsion into the tumor via the feeding artery followed by embolization of the feeding artery with gelfoam particles. The patients comprised 30 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma, 4 cases of cholangiocarcinoma and 7 cases of metastatic tumors of which one was from CA stomach, three were from CA breast, and three from CA colon. The vascularity of the tumor was assessed in angiogram obtained prior to treatment and retention pattern of lipiodol in the tumor was evaluated in lipiodol-enhanced CT scan images taken 2-4 weeks following therapy. The results showed that lipiodol CT scan images exhibited four patterns of lipiodol retention in the tumor appearing as opacity as follows (1) homogenous (2) heterogeneous (3) ring-like and (4) none. Lipiodol retention pattern appeared to be somewhat related to vascularity of the tumor. Most of the hypervascular tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma had homogeneous lipiodol accumulation pattern if the tumor size was less than 5 cm. Metastatic tumors and cholangiocarcinoma showed heterogeneous or ring-like pattern of lipiodol accumulation because they were relatively hypovascular. Hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma may exhibit heterogeneous or ring-like pattern if they are larger than 5 cms, and have multiple feeding arteries, necrosis or AV shunting. Hepatocellular carcinoma with AV shunting may not show any lipiodol accumulation at all.

  2. Effects of monoterpenes and mevinolin on murine colon tumor CT-26 in vitro and its hepatic "metastases" in vivo.

    PubMed

    Broitman, S A; Wilkinson, J; Cerda, S; Branch, S K

    1996-01-01

    Tumors derived from the colonic epithelium exhibit cholesterol metabolism which is clearly different from that in fibroblasts, hepatocytes, adrenals, and ovaries. In hepatocytes and fibroblasts MEV inhibition of the rate limiting step in cholesterol synthesis HMG Co A reductase can be overcome by the uptake of LDL. Colon cancer cells however do not overcome MEV inhibition by LDL uptake but rather exhibit further growth suppression Mevinolin (Mevacor), a drug used to lower serum cholesterol levels has the advantage of accumulating in the liver to approximately 95% with the first pass. A small but variable percentage of non-sterol precursors may escape inhibition and be utilized for other pathways in the isoprenylation of certain proteins, among them members of the ras family. Mutated ras, an oncogene, is found in 40-50% of colon tumors and the expression of a functional gene product is dependent on isoprenylation for anchorage to the tumor cell membrane. d-Limonene, a relatively non-toxic monoterpene found in orange skin oil, selectively inhibits isoprenylation and also accumulates to some extent in the liver. It was hypothesized that the differences in mevalonate metabolism between hepatocytes and colon tumor cells could provide a chemotherapeutic advantage in which MEV and/or d-limonene could effectively inhibit cholesterol synthesis and post-translational modification of proteins with non-sterol cholesterol precursors in colon tumor derived hepatic metastases and thus inhibit their growth. Since each drug affects aspects of mevalonate synthesis at different points, the effects of the combination of their agents on inhibiting tumor metastases was investigated to ascertain if these could be additive. In tissue culture, MEV and d-limonene significantly inhibited the growth of CT-26, a murine transplantable colon tumor. Cholesterol synthesis assessed in these cells indicated that in lipid deficient media the following additions-25-hydroxycholesterol, and LDL

  3. Intraarterial Chemotherapy or Chemoembolization for Locally Advanced and/or Recurrent Hepatic Tumors: Evaluation of the Feeding Artery with an Interventional CT System

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Toshinori; Korogi, Yukunori; Ono, Ken; Maruoka, Kousei; Harada, Kazunori; Aridomi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Mutsumasa

    2001-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of an interventional CT system for intraarterial chemotherapy or chemoembolization for locally advanced and/or recurrent hepatic tumors.Methods: Thirty-eight patients with locally advanced or recurrent hepatic tumors underwent 73 intraarterial contrast-enhanced CT (IA-CECT) examinations immediately before chemotherapy or chemoembolization. The degree of tumor vascularity on angiography and enhancement on IA-CECT was classified into three grades: no, mild, or marked vascularity. The IA-CECT grades were compared with the angiographic grades.Results: Twenty-nine (69%) of 42 examinations that were interpreted as having no or mild vascularity on angiography were classified as marked enhancement on IA-CECT. Based on IA-CECT findings, the position of the catheter was changed in 14 (19%) of 73 CT examinations. The reasons for the reposition were as follows: weak or no enhancement of the tumor (n = 11) or strong enhancement of the gallbladder wall (n = 3). The treatment strategy was changed in three patients (8%). No major complications relating to the interventional procedures were observed.Conclusions: IA-CECT is a reliable method when evaluating the perfusion of the tumor and adjacent normal tissues. The interventional CT system is useful for performing safe and effective intraarterial chemotherapy or chemoembolization in patients with locally advanced and/or recurrent hepatic tumors.

  4. Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinbo; Hu, Zhijian; Wu, Junwei; Bai, Lishan; Chai, Xinqun

    2011-11-19

    Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor is rare and poses a challenge for diagnosis and management. We presented a case of primary hepatic carcinoid tumor in a 53-year-old female with a complaint of right upper abdominal pain. Computer tomography scans revealed a hypervascular mass in segment 4 of the liver. An ultrasonography-guided biopsy showed a carcinoid tumor. No other lesions were found by the radiological investigations. Surgery resection was performed and histopathological examination revealed a primary hepatic carcinoid tumor. Three years later, recurrence was found and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization was performed. After transcatheter arterial chemoembolization, the patient has been free of symptom and had no radiological disease progression for over 6 months. Surgical resection combination with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization is effective to offer excellent palliation.

  5. Hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Da; Wang, Jianmin; Tian, Yuepeng; Li, Qiuguo; Yan, Haixiong; Wang, Biao; Xiong, Li; Li, Qinglong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rational: Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm which expresses both myogenic and melanocytic markers. PEComas are found in a variety locations in the body, but up to now only approximately 30 cases about hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor are reported in English language worldwide. Patient concerns: A 32-year-old woman was admitted in our hospital with intermittent right upper quadrant pain for 1 month and recent (1 day) progressive deterioration. Diagnoses: Based on the results of the laboratory examinations and the findings of the computed tomography, the diagnosis of hepatic hamartoma or the hepatocecullar carcinoma with hemorrhage was made. Interventions: The patient underwent a segmentectomy of the liver, and the finally diagnosis of hepatic PEComa was made with immunohistochemical confirmation with HMB-45 and SMA. Outcomes: There is no clinical or radiographic evidence of recurrence 9 months after surgery. Lessons: This kind of tumor is extremely rare and the natural history of PEComa is uncertain, as the treatment protocol for hepatic PEComa has not reached a consensus. But the main treatment of the disease may be surgical resection. Only after long term follow-up can we know whether the tumor is benign or malignant. It appears that longer clinical follow-up is necessary in all patients with hepatic PEComas. PMID:28002331

  6. [Hepatic tumors and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Rio, E; Mornex, F; Peiffert, D; Huertas, A

    2016-09-01

    Recent technological developments led to develop the concept of focused liver radiation therapy. We must distinguish primary and secondary tumors as the indications are restricted and must be discussed as an alternative to surgical or medical treatments. For hepatocellular carcinoma 5 to 10cm (or more), a conformational radiation with or without intensity modulation is performed. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being evaluated and is increasingly proposed as an alternative to radiofrequency ablative treatment for primary or secondary tumors (typically less than 5cm). Tumor (and liver) movements induced by respiratory motions must be taken into account. Strict dosimetric criteria must be met with particular attention to the dose-volume histograms to liver and the hollow organs, including cases of SBRT.

  7. CT of hepatic schistosomiasis mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Fataar, S.; Bassiony, H.; Satyanath, S.; Rudwan, M.A.; Khaffaji, S.; El Magdy, W.; Al-Ansari, A.G.; Hanna, R.

    1985-07-01

    Schistosomal periportal fibrosis produced a typical pattern on computed tomography in five patients. Low-density periportal tissue, present throughout the liver, enhanced strongly after the administration of contrast medium. While rounded in cross section, the thickened periportal tissue produced linear and branching patterns when imaged in longitudinal section. In all cases, the sonographic features were typical of schistosomal periportal fibrosis. A lack of awareness of the distinctive features of periportal fibrosis may result in a mistaken diagnosis of hepatic metastases.

  8. Uncommon hepatic tumors: iconographic essay - Part 2.

    PubMed

    Pedrassa, Bruno Cheregati; da Rocha, Eduardo Lima; Kierzenbaum, Marcelo Longo; Bormann, Renata Lilian; Francisc, Viviane Vieira; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    In cases where typical aspects are shown, the diagnosis of most frequent hepatic lesions can be made with some safety by means of several imaging methods; on the other hand, uncommon lesions generally represent a diagnostic challenge for the radiologist. In the present second part of the study, the authors describe four rare hepatic lesions, as follows: primary hepatic lymphoma, myofibroblastic tumor, primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumor and desmoplastic small round cell tumor, approaching their main characteristics and imaging findings with emphasis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round cell tumors: CT and FDG-PET/CT findings with histopathological association.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingjing; Wu, Zengjie; Sun, Binbin; Li, Dacheng; Wang, Zhenguang; Liu, Fangjun; Hua, Hui

    2016-05-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumors (DSRCTs) are rare and aggressive malignant tumors. The aim of the present study was to analyze computed tomography (CT) and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/CT imaging features of intra-abdominal desmoplastic DSRCT, and investigate the association of these features with histopathological results. The present study was a retrospective investigation of 4 patients with DSRCT. All patients underwent CT and dynamic CT, and 1 additionally underwent FDG-PET/CT scanning. Following a tumor resection, routine hematoxylin and eosin staining, and immunostaining, were performed and evaluated. Multiple large abdominopelvic masses were identified in all 4 patients; however, no indications of their site of origin were demonstrated. CT revealed soft-tissue masses with patchy foci of hypodense lesions. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed slightly or moderately heterogeneous enhancement of the lesions. Other observations from these patients included calcification (n=2), peritoneal seeding (n=3), hepatic metastasis (n=3), retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy (n=3) and ascites (n=2). FDG-PET/CT revealed multiple nodular increased FDG uptake in the abdominopelvic masses, and in the liver and peritoneum in 1 case. Intra-abdominal DSRCT demonstrated significant diagnostic characteristics on plain and contrast-enhanced CT. Multiple, bulky soft-tissue masses inside the peritoneal cavity, particularly in male adolescents and young adults, should be considered as potential cases of DSRCT. FDG-PET/CT techniques may be utilized to aid the staging of tumors.

  10. A rare case of a primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are well-differentiated low grade malignant neoplasms. Their pathogenesis is thought to be secondary to the unrestricted proliferation of neuroendocrine cells. They most commonly arise in the bronchopulmonary or gastrointestinal tract but can originate from almost any organ. While the liver is a common site of metastases, primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumors are an exceedingly rare pathology, of which fewer than 100 cases have been described in world literature. Thus, there exists a paucity of data regarding the clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of this disease. We present a case of a 35-year-old patient who presented to our facility for evaluation of a cough and cervical lymphadenopathy. Two biopsies of the lymph nodes were negative, however on workup for an occult malignancy a hypodense heterogeneous hypervascular lesion measuring 3.7 cm × 2.7 cm in segment IVb of the liver was noted on computer tomography (CT) scan. The levels of laboratory studies such as liver enzymes, alkaline phospatase, chromogranin A, 24-hour 5 hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and tumor markers including alpha fetoprotein were not elevated. An MRI confirmed the mass, and the patient underwent CT guided biopsy of the hepatic lesion. Staining from the biopsy resulted in cells reactive for synaptophysin, chromogranin, anti-Cytokeratin (CAM 5.2), MOC31, CD 56 and mucin glycoprotein (MUC) confirming a nonsecretory neuroendocrine tumor. Patient underwent octreotide scan, PET scan, CT chest, MRI head along with EUS, EGD and colonoscopy to evaluate for a primary source, however, none was found. The well localized presentation without extensive hepatic invasion made the patient a candidate for surgical resection which was successfully performed. The patient remains disease free over 36 months after initial presentation. Primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumors are an exceedingly rare entity whose variable presentation necessitates provider familiarity with this

  11. [Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma: a rare hepatic tumor].

    PubMed

    Botella, M T; Cabrera, T; Sebastián, J J; Navarro, M J; Alvarez, R; Uribarrena, R

    1995-10-01

    We present a case of epithelioid hemangioendothelioma of the liver (EHL). The imaging techniques did not permit the diagnosis. A liver biopsy was done under laparoscopy. One year later, the patient remains without symptoms in spite of the presence of lung metastases and the therapeutic abstention. The most outstanding aspects of this rare hepatic tumor are discussed.

  12. Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor with Poor Outcome.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Om; Ayub, Adil; Naeem, Buria; Najam, Sehrish; Ahmed, Zubair; Jafri, Wasim; Hamid, Saeed

    2016-03-01

    Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor (PHCT) represents an extremely rare clinical entity with only a few cases reported to date. These tumors are rarely associated with metastasis and surgical resection is usually curative. Herein, we report two cases of PHCT associated with poor outcomes due to late diagnosis. Both cases presented late with non-specific symptoms. One patient presented after a 2-week history of symptoms and the second case had a longstanding two years symptomatic interval during which he remained undiagnosed and not properly worked up. Both these cases were diagnosed with hepatic carcinoid tumor, which originates from neuroendocrine cells. Case 1 opted for palliative care and expired in one month’s time. Surgical resection was advised to the second case, but he left against medical advice.

  13. Multidetector CT of hepatic artery pathologies.

    PubMed

    Karaosmanoglu, D; Erol, B; Karcaaltincaba, M

    2012-01-01

    The hepatic artery can be involved by a variety of pathology and diseases.Today MDCT enables high quality imaging of the hepatic artery using axial, MIP and volume rendered images. We illustrate MDCT findings of anatomical variations, aneurysm, dilatation, dissection, arteriovenous fistula, thrombosis and stenosis. Aneurysms can be saccular, fusiform and multiple and may develop due to atherosclerosis, vasculitis, trauma and biopsy. Dilatation of hepatic artery can be seen in portal hypertension, Osler-Weber-Rendu disease and hemangiomatosis. Hepatic artery can be occluded after trauma and transplantation. Dissection develops due to atherosclerosis, Marfan and Ehler Danlos syndromes and during pregnancy. Arteriovenous fistula can be congenital and acquired. We conclude that various hepatic artery pathologies can be confidently diagnosed by MDCT.

  14. Uncommon hepatic tumors: iconographic essay - Part 1*

    PubMed Central

    Pedrassa, Bruno Cheregati; da Rocha, Eduardo Lima; Kierszenbaum, Marcelo Longo; Bormann, Renata Lilian; Torres, Lucas Rios; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Most malignant liver tumors are represented by hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma; however a variety of other uncommon hepatic lesions might also be found. Common lesions such as hemangioma, focal nodular hyperplasia and metastases are well known and have already been extensively documented in the literature. The diagnosis of typical hepatic lesions may be done with some reliability by means of several imaging methods; on the other hand, uncommon lesions normally represent a diagnostic challenge for the radiologist. In this first part of the study, the authors will approach five uncommon liver tumors - angiosarcoma, angiomyolipoma, cystadenoma/biliary carcinoma, epithelioid hemangioendothelioma, and fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma -, describing their main characteristics and image findings with focus on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25741106

  15. Uncommon hepatic tumors: iconographic essay - Part 1.

    PubMed

    Pedrassa, Bruno Cheregati; da Rocha, Eduardo Lima; Kierszenbaum, Marcelo Longo; Bormann, Renata Lilian; Torres, Lucas Rios; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Most malignant liver tumors are represented by hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma; however a variety of other uncommon hepatic lesions might also be found. Common lesions such as hemangioma, focal nodular hyperplasia and metastases are well known and have already been extensively documented in the literature. The diagnosis of typical hepatic lesions may be done with some reliability by means of several imaging methods; on the other hand, uncommon lesions normally represent a diagnostic challenge for the radiologist. In this first part of the study, the authors will approach five uncommon liver tumors - angiosarcoma, angiomyolipoma, cystadenoma/biliary carcinoma, epithelioid hemangioendothelioma, and fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma -, describing their main characteristics and image findings with focus on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

  16. Hepatic perfusion abnormalities during CT angiography: Detection and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeny, P.C.; Marks, W.M.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-seven perfusion abnormalities were detected in 17 of 50 patients who underwent computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the liver. All but one of the perfusion abnormalities occurred in patients with primary or metastatic liver tumors. Perfusion abnormalities were lobar in nine cases, segmental in 11, and subsegmental in seven; 14 were hypoperfusion and 13 were hyperperfusion abnormalities. The causes for the abnormalities included nonperfusion of a replaced hepatic artery (n = 11), cirrhosis and nodular regeneration (n = 3), altered hepatic hemodynamics (e.g., siphoning, laminar flow) caused by tumor (n = 7), contrast media washout from a nonperfused vessel (n = 1), compression of adjacent hepatic parenchyma (n = 1), and unknown (n = 4). Differentiation of perfusion abnormalities from tumor usually can be made by comparing the morphology of the known tumor with the suspected perfusion abnormality, changes of each on delayed CTA scans, and review of initial angiograms and other imaging studies.

  17. Askin tumor: CT and FDG-PET/CT imaging findings and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Xia, Tingting; Guan, Yubao; Chen, Yongxin; Li, Jingxu

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the imaging findings of Askin tumors on computed tomography (CT) and fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET/CT).Seventeen cases of Askin tumors confirmed by histopathology were retrospectively analyzed in terms of CT (17 cases) and FDG-PET/CT data (6 cases).Fifteen of the tumors were located in the chest wall and the other 2 were in the anterior middle mediastinum. Of the 15 chest wall cases, 13 demonstrated irregular, heterogeneous soft tissue masses with cystic degeneration and necrosis, and 2 demonstrated homogeneous soft tissue masses on unenhanced CT scans. Two mediastinal tumors demonstrated the irregular, heterogeneous soft tissue masses. Calcifications were found in 2 tumors. The tumors demonstrated heterogeneously enhancement in 16 cases and homogeneous enhancement in 1 case on contrast-enhanced scans. FDG-PET/CT images revealed increased metabolic activity in all 6 cases undergone FDG-PET/CT scan, and the lesion SUVmax ranged from 4.0 to 18.6. At initial diagnosis, CT and FDG-PET/CT scans revealed rib destruction in 9 cases, pleural effusion in 9 cases, and lung metastasis in 1 case. At follow-up, 12 cases showed recurrence and/or metastases, 4 cases showed improvement or remained stable, and 1 was lost to follow-up.In summary, CT and FDG-PET/CT images of Askin tumors showed heterogeneous soft tissue masses in the chest wall and the mediastinum, accompanied by rib destruction, pleural effusion, and increased FDG uptake. CT and FDG-PET/CT imaging play important roles in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with Askin tumors.

  18. Automated 3D vascular segmentation in CT hepatic venography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetita, Catalin; Lucidarme, Olivier; Preteux, Francoise

    2005-08-01

    In the framework of preoperative evaluation of the hepatic venous anatomy in living-donor liver transplantation or oncologic rejections, this paper proposes an automated approach for the 3D segmentation of the liver vascular structure from 3D CT hepatic venography data. The developed segmentation approach takes into account the specificities of anatomical structures in terms of spatial location, connectivity and morphometric properties. It implements basic and advanced morphological operators (closing, geodesic dilation, gray-level reconstruction, sup-constrained connection cost) in mono- and multi-resolution filtering schemes in order to achieve an automated 3D reconstruction of the opacified hepatic vessels. A thorough investigation of the venous anatomy including morphometric parameter estimation is then possible via computer-vision 3D rendering, interaction and navigation capabilities.

  19. Primary Neuroendocrine Tumor of the Left Hepatic Duct: A Case Report with Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bhandarwar, Ajay H.; Shaikh, Taher A.; Borisa, Ashok D.; Palep, Jaydeep H.; Patil, Arun S.; Manke, Aditya A.

    2012-01-01

    Primary Biliary Tract Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are extremely rare tumors with only 77 cases been reported in the literature till now. We describe a case of a left hepatic duct NET and review the literature for this rare malignancy. To the best of our knowledge the present case is the first reported case of a left hepatic duct NET in the literature. In spite of availability of advanced diagnostic tools like Computerized Tomography (CT) Scan and Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio Pancreaticography (ERCP) a definitive diagnosis of these tumors is possible only after an accurate histopathologic diagnosis of operative specimens with immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Though surgical excision remains the gold standard treatment for such tumors, patients with unresectable tumors have good survival with newer biologic agents like Octreotride. PMID:23213596

  20. Pattern of Retained Contrast on Immediate Postprocedure Computed tomography (CT) After Particle Embolization of Liver Tumors Predicts Subsequent Treatment Response

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaodong Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Jia Xiaoyu Gonen, Mithat; Brown, Karen T. Sofocleous, Constantinos T. Getrajdman, George I. Brody, Lynn A. Thornton, Raymond H. Maybody, Majid Covey, Ann M. Siegelbaum, Robert H. Alago, William Solomon, Stephen B.

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo determine if the pattern of retained contrast on immediate postprocedure computed tomography (CT) after particle embolization of hepatic tumors predicts modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST) response.Materials and MethodsThis study was approved by the Institutional Review Board with a waiver of authorization. One hundred four liver tumors were embolized with spherical embolic agents (Embospheres, Bead Block, LC Bead) and polyvinyl alcohol. Noncontrast CT was performed immediately after embolization to assess contrast retention in the targeted tumors, and treatment response was assessed by mRECIST criteria on follow-up CT (average time 9.0 {+-} 7.7 weeks after embolization). Tumor contrast retention (TCR) was determined based on change in Hounsfield units (HUs) of the index tumors between the preprocedure and immediate postprocedure scans; vascular contrast retention (VCR) was rated; and defects in contrast retention (DCR) were also documented. The morphology of residual enhancing tumor on follow-up CT was described as partial, circumferential, or total. Association between TCR variables and tumor response were assessed using multivariate logistic regression.ResultsOf 104 hepatic tumors, 51 (49 %) tumors had complete response (CR) by mRECIST criteria; 23 (22.1 %) had partial response (PR); 21 (20.2 %) had stable disease (SD); and 9 (8.7 %) had progressive disease (PD). By multivariate analysis, TCR, VCR, and tumor size are independent predictors of CR (p = 0.02, 0.05, and 0.005 respectively). In 75 tumors, DCR was found to be an independent predictor of failure to achieve complete response (p < 0.0001) by imaging criteria.ConclusionTCR, VCR, and DCR on immediate posttreatment CT are independent predictors of CR by mRECIST criteria.

  1. Hepatic Abscess After Yttrium-90 Radioembolization for Islet-Cell Tumor Hepatic Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, Neil B.; Mulcahy, Mary F.; Lewandowski, Robert J.; Salem, Riad; Ryu, Robert K.

    2010-06-15

    Infectious complications after yttrium-90 (y-90) radioembolization of hepatic tumors are rare. Most reports describe hepatic abscesses as complications of other locoregional therapies, such as transcatheter arterial embolization or chemoembolization. These usually occur in patients with a history of biliary intervention and present several weeks after treatment. We report a case of hepatic abscess formed immediately after y-90 radioembolization of a hepatic metastasis in a patient who had no history of previous biliary instrumentation.

  2. Hepatic Fibrosis: Evaluation with Semiquantitative Contrast-enhanced CT

    PubMed Central

    Varenika, Vanja; Fu, Yanjun; Maher, Jacquelyn J.; Gao, Dongwei; Kakar, Sanjay; Cabarrus, Miguel C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using contrast material–enhanced computed tomographic (CT) measurements of hepatic fractional extracellular space (fECS) and macromolecular contrast material (MMCM) uptake to measure severity of liver fibrosis. Materials and Methods: All procedures were approved by and executed in accordance with University of California, San Francisco, institutional animal care and use committee regulations. Twenty-one rats that received intragastric CCl4 for 0–12 weeks were imaged with respiratory-gated micro-CT by using both a conventional contrast material and a novel iodinated MMCM. Histopathologic hepatic fibrosis was graded qualitatively by using the Ishak fibrosis score and quantitatively by using morphometry of the fibrosis area. Hepatic fECS and MMCM uptake were calculated for each examination and correlated with histopathologic findings by using uni- and multivariate linear regressions. Results: Ishak fibrosis scores ranged from a baseline of 0 in untreated animals to a maximum of 5. Histopathologic liver fibrosis area increased from 0.46% to 3.5% over the same interval. Strong correlations were seen between conventional contrast-enhanced CT measurements of fECS and both the Ishak fibrosis scores (R2 = 0.751, P < .001) and the fibrosis area (R2 = 0.801, P < .001). Strong negative correlations were observed between uptake of MMCM in the liver and Ishak fibrosis scores (R2 = 0.827, P < .001), as well as between uptake of MMCM in the liver and fibrosis area (R2 = 0.643, P = .001). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed a trend toward independence for fECS and MMCM uptake in the prediction of Ishak fibrosis scores, with an R2 value of 0.86 (P = .081 and P = .033, respectively). Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced CT measurements of fECS and MMCM uptake are individually capable of being used to estimate the degree of early hepatic fibrosis in a rat model. © RSNA, 2012 Supplemental material: http

  3. Diffuse Infantile Hepatic Hemangioendothelioma With Early Central Enhancement in an Adult: A Case Report of CT and MRI Findings.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Dong, Hui; Zuo, Changjing; He, Tianlin

    2015-12-01

    Infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma (IHH) is the most common vascular tumor of the liver in infancy. Adult with IHH is extremely rare. We presented a diffuse IHH in an adult patient with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings.A 39-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of a 2-year history of abnormal liver function tests and a 7-day history of jaundice. Physical examination revealed enlarged liver. Unenhanced abdominal CT showed enlargement of the liver with diffuse hypodensity. Enhanced CT on the arterial phase revealed multiple centrally enhanced lesions diffusely involved the enlarged liver. The enhanced areas of the lesions became larger on the portal phase and all the lesions became homogeneous enhanced on the delayed phase. These lesions showed heterogeneously hyperintense on T2-weighted image, hypointense on T1-weighted image, and early centrally enhanced on dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MRI, with complete tumor enhancement after 180 s. The patient underwent orthotopic liver transplantation. IHH type 2 was confirmed by pathology. The patient died of tumor recurrence in the liver 4 months after transplantation.Unlike the previously described imaging appearances of IHH, this case showed diffuse nodules with early central enhancement on CT and MRI. Considering the importance of the ability to differentiate IHH from other hepatic tumors, radiologists should be aware of these imaging appearances to establish knowledge of the entire spectrum of IHH.

  4. Effectiveness of quantitative MAA SPECT/CT for the definition of vascularized hepatic volume and dosimetric approach: phantom validation and clinical preliminary results in patients with complex hepatic vascularization treated with yttrium-90-labeled microspheres.

    PubMed

    Garin, Etienne; Lenoir, Laurence; Rolland, Yan; Laffont, Sophie; Pracht, Marc; Mesbah, Habiba; Porée, Philippe; Ardisson, Valérie; Bourguet, Patrick; Clement, Bruno; Boucher, Eveline

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the use of quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) analysis for vascularized volume measurements in the use of the yttrium-90-radiolabeled microspheres (TheraSphere). A phantom study was conducted for the validation of SPECT/CT volume measurement. SPECT/CT quantitative analysis was used for the measurement of the volume of distribution of the albumin macroaggregates (MAA; i.e., the vascularized volume) in the liver and the tumor, and the total activity contained in the liver and the tumor in four consecutive patients presenting with a complex liver vascularization referred for a treatment with TheraSphere. SPECT/CT volume measurement proved to be accurate (mean error <7%) and reproducible (interobserver concordance 0.99). For eight treatments, in cases of complex hepatic vascularization, the hepatic volumes based on angiography and CT led to a relative overestimation or underestimation of the vascularized hepatic volume by 43.2 ± 32.7% (5-87%) compared with SPECT/CT analyses. The vascularized liver volume taken into account calculated from SPECT/CT data, instead of angiography and CT data, results in modifying the activity injected for three treatments of eight. Moreover, quantitative analysis of SPECT/CT allows us to calculate the absorbed dose in the tumor and in the healthy liver, leading to doubling of the injected activity for one treatment of eight. MAA SPECT/CT is accurate for volume measurements. It provides a valuable contribution to the therapeutic planning of patients presenting with complex hepatic vascularization, in particular for calculating the vascularized liver volume, the activity to be injected and the absorbed doses. Studies should be conducted to assess the role of quantitative MAA/SPECT CT in therapeutic planning.

  5. Hepatic abscess secondary to a fishbone penetrating the gastric wall: CT demonstration.

    PubMed

    Masunaga, S; Abe, M; Imura, T; Asano, M; Minami, S; Fujisawa, I

    1991-01-01

    Preoperative diagnosis of hepatic abscess due to foreign bodies penetrating the gastrointestinal tract is uncommon with conventional imaging methods. This report describes and illustrates a case of hepatic abscess secondary to a fishbone penetrating the gastric antrum wall which was diagnosed preoperatively by CT and confirmed at surgery. The value of CT in the preoperative diagnosis of cases of this kind is emphasized.

  6. Assessment of lung tumor response by perfusion CT.

    PubMed

    Coche, E

    2013-01-01

    Perfusion CT permits evaluation of lung cancer angiogenesis and response to therapy by demonstrating alterations in lung tumor vascularity. It is advocated that perfusion CT performed shortly after initiating therapy may provide a better evaluation of physiological changes rather than the conventional size assessment obtained with RECIST. The radiation dose,the volume of contrast medium delivered to the patient and the reproducibility of blood flow parameters remain an issue for this type of investigation.

  7. CT and MR findings of Krukenberg tumors: Comparison with primary ovarian tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seung Hyup; Kim, Won Hong; Park, Kyung Joo

    1996-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the CT and MR findings of Krukenberg tumors and to compare them with those of primary ovarian tumors. This study included 20 patients with Krukenberg tumors and 65 patients with various primary ovarian tumors. CT/MR/both imaging studies were available in 15/1/4 patients with Krukenberg tumor and 31/10/24 patients with primary ovarian tumors, respectively. Imaging findings of the tumors were categorized into three subgroups: a solid mass with intratumoral cysts, a solid mass without intratumoral cysts, and a predominantly cystic mass. Among 32 Krukenberg tumors (bilateral in 12 patients), 22 were solid masses with intratumoral cysts, in 14 of which the wall of the intratumoral cysts showed apparently strong contrast enhancement on CT and/or MRI. Six Krukenberg tumors were solid masses without intratumoral cysts, and four were predominantly cystic masses. Imaging findings of 88 primary ovarian tumors (bilateral in 23 patients) were 5 solid masses with intratumoral cysts, 27 solid masses without intratumoral cysts, and 56 predominantly cystic masses. None of the five primary ovarian tumors with solid mass with intratumoral cysts demonstrated apparently strong contrast enhancement of the cyst wall. Krukenberg tumor should be suspected when one sees solid ovarian tumors containing well demarcated intratumoral cystic lesions, especially if the walls of those cysts demonstrate apparently strong contrast enhancement. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Cone beam CT tumor vasculature dynamic study (Murine model)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong; Ning, Ruola; Conover, David; Ricardo, Betancourt; Liu, Shaohua

    2008-03-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is the process by which new blood vessels are formed from the existing vessels in a tumor to promote tumor growth. Tumor angiogenesis has important implications in the diagnosis and treatment of various solid tumors. Flat panel detector based cone beam CT opens up a new way for detection of tumors, and tumor angiogenesis associated with functional CBCT has the potential to provide more information than traditional functional CT due to more overall coverage during the same scanning period and the reconstruction being isotropic resulting in a more accurate 3D volume intensity measurement. A functional study was conducted by using CBCT to determine the degree of the enhancement within the tumor after injecting the contrast agent intravenously. For typical doses of contrast material, the amount of enhancement is proportional to the concentration of this material within the region of interest. A series of images obtained at one location over time allows generation of time-attenuation data from which a number of semi-quantitative parameters, such as enhancement rate, can be determined. An in vivo mice study with and without mammo tumor was conducted on our prototype CBCT system, and half scan scheme is used to determine the time-intensity curve within the VOI of the mouse. The CBCT has an x-ray tube, a gantry with slip ring technology, and a 40×30 cm Varian Paxscan 4030CB real time FPD.

  9. Inflammatory angiomyolipoma of the liver: a rare hepatic tumor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Angiomyolipoma (AML) is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm of the tumor, composed of a varying heterogeneous mixture of three tissue components: blood vessels, smooth muscle and adipose cells. Hepatic AML may demonstrate a marked histological diversity. We herein present one case of hepatic AML exhibiting prominent inflammatory cells in the background, which happened in a 61-year-old Chinese female patient, without signs of tuberous sclerosis. Histologically, the striking feature was the infiltration of numerous inflammatory cells in the background, including small lymphocytes, plasma cells, and eosnophils. The tumor cells were spindled and histiocytoid in shape, with slightly eosinophilic cytoplasm, and arranged along the vessels or scattered among the inflammatory background. Sinusoid structure was obviously seen in the tumor. Mature adipocytes and thick-walled blood vessels were focally observed at the boundaries between the tumor and surrounding liver tissues. The tumor cells were positive immunostaining for HMB-45, Melan-A, and smooth muscle actin. The inflammatory AML should be distinguished from other tumors with inflammatory background such as inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor and follicular dendritic cell tumor and deserves wider recognition for its occurrence as a primary hepatic tumor. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1828633072762370 PMID:22978636

  10. Percutaneous biliary drainage catheter insertion in patients with extensive hepatic metastatic tumor burden

    PubMed Central

    Langman, Eun L.; Suhocki, Paul V.; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Morse, Michael A.; Burbridge, Rebecca A.; Smith, Tony P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with metastatic disease of the liver can have hyperbilirubinemia due to a number of reasons, including biliary obstruction. The purpose of this study was to analyze patient outcomes after percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) catheter insertion in patients with extensive hepatic metastatic tumor burden. Methods Out of 746 PBD insertions, 44 patients (24 males, 20 females, mean age 57.4 years, range, 34–80 years) had metastatic malignancy with a hepatic tumor burden of greater than 20% parenchymal volume based on pre-procedure computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Laboratory data before and after PBD insertion were compared. Survival and outcomes analysis performed. A subanalysis was performed on patients with CT-demonstrated catheter traversal of tumoral tissue. Results A PBD catheter was successfully inserted in all patients. The mean serum bilirubin level decreased significantly from 10.9±6.4 mg/dL immediately prior to PBD insertion to 7.1±5.6 mg/dL (P<0.001) within one month post PBD insertion. Four patients (11%) demonstrated normalization of bilirubin levels to less than 1.6 mg/dL. Of the 14 patients with a post-procedure CT or MRI, the PBD catheter traversed a tumor in 11 (79%). One of these patients required a transfusion after the procedure and one had recurrent catheter exchanges due to pericatheter leakage. The 30-day overall survival was 41% with a median survival of 19 days. The percentage decrease in serum bilirubin after PBD insertion and pre-procedure international normalized ratio (INR) were correlated with improved survival (OR =3.7, P=0.010 and OR =4.9, P=0.028 respectively). The PBD-associated major complication rate was 16%. Conclusions In patients with hyperbilirubinemia and extensive hepatic metastatic disease burden, survival was dismal after PBD catheter insertion. Serum bilirubin level normalization occurred rarely. PMID:28078111

  11. Cardiac calcified amorphous tumors: CT and MRI findings

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Ravza; Demir, Ali Aslan; Önür, İmran; Yılbazbayhan, Dilek; Dursun, Memduh

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of cardiac calcified amorphous tumors (CATs). METHODS CT and MRI findings of cardiac CATs in 12 patients were included. We retrospectively examined patient demographics, location, size, shape configuration, imaging features, calcification distribution of tumors, and accompanying medical problems. RESULTS There was a female predominance (75%), with a mean age at presentation of 65 years. Patients were mostly asymptomatic on presentation (58.3%). The left ventricle of the heart was mostly involved (91%). CT findings of CATs were classified as partial calcification with a hypodense mass in four patients or a diffuse calcified form in eight. Calcification was predominant with large foci appearance as in partially calcified masses. On T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images, CATs appeared hypointense and showed no contrast enhancement. CONCLUSION The shape and configuration of cardiac CATs are variable with a narrow spectrum of CT and MRI findings, but large foci in a partially calcified mass or diffuse calcification of a mass on CT is very important in the diagnosis of cardiac CATs. Masses show a low signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images with no contrast enhancement on MRI. PMID:27705878

  12. CT Features of Colorectal Schwannomas: Differentiation from Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji Hee; Kim, Se Hyung; Kim, Young Hoon; Rha, Sung Eun; Hur, Bo Yun; Han, Joon Koo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To find differential CT features of colorectal schwannomas from gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Materials and Methods CT features of 13 pathologically proven colorectal schwannomas and 21 GISTs were retrospectively reviewed. The following CT items were analyzed: size, longitudinal and transverse location, shape, margin, homogeneity, necrosis, surface ulceration, calcification, degree of attenuation, the presence of enlarged lymph node (LN), and metastasis. Among the features, significant variables were evaluated using univariate statistical tests. The optimal cut-off point of tumor size was obtained by ROC analysis. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to find the most independent CT variables. Results Small size, non-rectum location, smooth margin, homogeneous high attenuation without necrosis, and the presence of enlarged LNs were found to be significant variables to differentiate schwannomas from GISTs (P<0.05). The optimized cut-off point for tumor size in distinguishing GISTs from schwannomas was 3.9 cm (AUC = 0.808, sensitivity = 66.7%, specificity = 92.3%, P<0.0001). Binary regression analysis revealed that only non-rectum location remained independent predictor for schwannomas differentiated from GISTs (odds ratio = 31.667, P = 0.001). Conclusion Colorectal schwannomas usually located in non-rectum and appear as small subepithelial nodules showing homogeneous high attenuation and smooth margin. Schwannomas exclusively accompany with enlarged LNs. PMID:28005903

  13. CT-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of pulmonary malignant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Wei-Chun; Lee, Yee-Fan; Chen, Yi-Chang; Chien, Ning; Huang, Yu-Sen; Tseng, Yao-Hui; Lee, Jang-Ming; Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Chen, Jin-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Background Microwave ablation (MWA) of lung tumors is a new approach for local tumor control. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the preliminary results of safety and efficacy of MWA with a dynamic frequency range (902–928 MHz) and power (10–32 W) for local tumor control of thoracic malignancies. Methods From December 1, 2013 to February 1, 2016, there were total 32 lung tumors among 15 patients (7 men, 8 women, age range 43–82 years, mean 57.8±11.1 years of age) receiving MWA of thoracic neoplasms, including lung adenocarcinoma (n=5), metastatic colorectal cancer (n=7), invasive thymoma (n=1), metastatic uterine leiomyosarcoma (n=1), and metastatic ampullary carcinoma (n=1). Mean tumor size was 13.5 mm (range, 3.0–32.0 mm). The mean sequential ablation during each MWA was 2.3±1.1 times (range, 1–5 times). The outcomes of ablation were evaluated by follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans and the complications were assessed by medical records and CT scan after ablation. Results The mean follow-up interval of each tumor was 446.8 days (range, 196–902 days). Local tumor recurrence was found in 5 of the 32 tumors resulting in a local control rate 84.4%. No MWA-related mortality was noted. After MWA, the incidence of pneumothorax was 37.5% (12/32). Only one patient with pneumothorax required air evacuation. Third-degree skin burn adjacent to the entry site occurred in one patient and required debridement and closure with flap. Conclusions After appropriate patient selection, MWA with a dynamic frequency range (902–928 MHz) and power (10–32 W) is an effective and safe procedure for local tumor control of recurrent and metastatic lung tumors. PMID:28066666

  14. Impact of multislice CT angiography on planning of radiological catheter placement for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sone, Miyuki; Kato, Kenichi; Hirose, Atsuo; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Tomabechi, Makiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Hanari, Takao

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess prospectively the role of multislice CT angiography (MSCTA) on planning of radiological catheter placement for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC). Forty-six patients with malignant liver tumors planned for HAIC were included. In each patient, both MSCTA and intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were performed, except one patient who did not undergo DSA. Comparison of MSCTA and DSA images was performed for the remaining 45 patients. Detectability of anatomical variants of the hepatic artery, course of the celiac trunk, visualization scores of arterial branches and interobserver agreement, presence of arterial stenosis, and technical outcome were evaluated. Anatomical variations of the hepatic artery were detected in 19 of 45 patients (42%) on both modalities. The course of the celiac trunk was different in 12 patients. The visualization scores of celiac arterial branches on MSCTA/DSA were 3.0 +/- 0/2.9 +/- 0.2 in the celiac trunk, 3.0 +/- 0/2.9 +/- 0.3 in the common hepatic artery, 2.9 +/- 0.2/2.9 +/- 0.3 in the proper hepatic artery, 2.9 +/- 0.3/2.9 +/- 0.4 in the right hepatic artery, 2.8 +/- 0.4/2.9 +/- 0.4 in the left hepatic artery, 2.9 +/- 0.2/2.9 +/- 0.3 in the gastroduodenal artery, 2.1 +/- 0.8/2.2 +/- 0.9 in the right gastric artery, and 2.7 +/- 0.8/2.6 +/- 0.8 in the left gastric artery. No statistically significant differences exist between the two modalities. Interobserver agreement for MSCTA was equivalent to that for DSA. Two patients showed stenosis of the celiac trunk on both modalities. Based on these imaging findings, technical success was accomplished in all patients. In conclusion, MSCTA is accurate in assessing arterial anatomy and abnormalities. MSCTA can provide adequate information for planning of radiological catheter placement for HAIC.

  15. Impact of Multislice CT Angiography on Planning of Radiological Catheter Placement for Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sone, Miyuki Kato, Kenichi; Hirose, Atsuo; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Tomabechi, Makiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Hanari, Takao

    2008-01-15

    The objective of this study was to assess prospectively the role of multislice CT angiography (MSCTA) on planning of radiological catheter placement for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC). Forty-six patients with malignant liver tumors planned for HAIC were included. In each patient, both MSCTA and intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were performed, except one patient who did not undergo DSA. Comparison of MSCTA and DSA images was performed for the remaining 45 patients. Detectability of anatomical variants of the hepatic artery, course of the celiac trunk, visualization scores of arterial branches and interobserver agreement, presence of arterial stenosis, and technical outcome were evaluated. Anatomical variations of the hepatic artery were detected in 19 of 45 patients (42%) on both modalities. The course of the celiac trunk was different in 12 patients. The visualization scores of celiac arterial branches on MSCTA/DSA were 3.0 {+-} 0/2.9 {+-} 0.2 in the celiac trunk, 3.0 {+-} 0/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the common hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.2/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the proper hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.3/2.9 {+-} 0.4 in the right hepatic artery, 2.8 {+-} 0.4/2.9 {+-} 0.4 in the left hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.2/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the gastroduodenal artery, 2.1 {+-} 0.8/2.2 {+-} 0.9 in the right gastric artery, and 2.7 {+-} 0.8/2.6 {+-} 0.8 in the left gastric artery. No statistically significant differences exist between the two modalities. Interobserver agreement for MSCTA was equivalent to that for DSA. Two patients showed stenosis of the celiac trunk on both modalities. Based on these imaging findings, technical success was accomplished in all patients. In conclusion, MSCTA is accurate in assessing arterial anatomy and abnormalities. MSCTA can provide adequate information for planning of radiological catheter placement for HAIC.

  16. [Metrizamide CT cisternography in skull base tumors (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tsuyumu, M; Fujiwara, K; Yamaguchi, T; Hiratsuka, H; Inaba, Y

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-three cases suspected of skull base tumors were examined by CT cisternography (CTC) with CT scanner (EMI 1010) from April, 1977 to March, 1978. The lesions in 20 cases were diagnosed as positive and confirmed by operation and/or autopsies. These include five acoustic neurinomas, six pituitary adenomas, two craniopharyngiomas, two skull base meningiomas, one arachnoid cyst and miscellaneous tumors. Isotonic Metrizamide solution four of 2-10 ml was injected via lumbar route. Patients were kept in 30 degrees Trendelenburg position for 60 minutes until the first scanning. Scannings were obtained 1, 3, 6, 24 and in some cases 48 hours after lumbar injection. No side effects except for headache, nausea, vomiting occurred. There were no convulsions. In diagnosing cerebellopontine angle tumors, the indirect signs such as asymmetrical ambient cisterns are of importance, when combined with direct signs, i.e. a shadow defect. Parasellar tumors are usually difficult to diagnose with conventional CT due to streak artifact caused by adjacent bony structure. In CTC the extrasellar extension of pituitary tumors were clearly visible. The size, shape, dimensions and the relationship to the adjacent structures of the craniopharyngiomas were easily demonstrated with CTC especially when a coronal view was added. In arachnoid cyst, CTC demonstrated the delayed turnover of Metrizamide between the cyst cavity and the adjacent subarachnoid space. In conclusion, CTC is an useful neuroradiological diagnostic adjunct because of minimal bony streak artifact and high spatial resolution. It would be expected that small tumors of even 2-3 mm in diameter might be diagnosed, from the fact that the middle cerebral artery in the suprasellar cistern is clearly visible as a shadow defect.

  17. Primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumor: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jeong Eun; Kim, Byung Seok; Lee, Chang Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    Primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumors (PHNETs) are extremely rare and difficult to distinguish from other liver tumors, such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cholangiocarcinoma, based on medical imaging findings. A 70-year-old man was referred for evaluation of liver mass incidentally discovered on abdominal computed tomography. The characteristic finding from dynamic liver magnetic resonance imaging led to a diagnosis of HCC. The patient underwent right hepatectomy. Histopathological and immunohistochemical examination revealed grade 2 neuroendocrine tumor. The postoperative 24-h urinary excretion of 5-hydroxy-indolacetic acid was within the normal range. Further imaging investigations were performed. No other lesions were found making probable the diagnosis of PHNET. This case shows that the diagnosis of PHNET is a medical challenge, requiring differentiation of PHNETs other hepatic masses and exclusion of occult primary neuroendocrine tumors. The diagnosis of PHNET can be ascertained after long term follow-up to exclude another primary origin. PMID:27574614

  18. Clinical applications of choline PET/CT in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, Elisabetta; Lazzeri, Patrizia; Milano, Amalia; Gaeta, Maria Chiara; Ciarmiello, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas and metastatic tumors are the most common forms of brain tumors. From a clinical perspective, neuroimaging plays a significant role, in diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up. To date MRI is considered the current clinical gold standard for imaging, however, despite providing superior structural detail it features poor specificity in identifying viable tumors in brain treated with surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. In the last years functional neuroimaging has become largely widespread thanks to the use of molecular tracers employed in cellular metabolism which has significantly improved the management of patients with brain tumors, especially in the post-treatment phase. Despite the considerable progress of molecular imaging in oncology its use in the diagnosis of brain tumors is still limited by a few wellknown technical problems. Because 18F-FDG, the most common radiotracer used in oncology, is avidly accumulated by normal cortex, the low tumor/background signal ratio makes it difficult to distinguish the tumor from normal surrounding tissues. By contrast, radiotracers with higher specificity for the tumor are labeled with a short half-life isotopes which restricts their use to those centers equipped with a cyclotron and radiopharmacy facility. 11C-choline has been reported as a suitable tracer for neuroimaging application. The recent availability of choline labeled with a long half-life radioisotope as 18F increases the possibility of studying this tracer's potential role in the staging of brain tumors. The present review focuses on the possible clinical applications of PET/CT with choline tracers in malignant brain tumors and brain metastases, with a special focus on malignant gliomas.

  19. Hepatic perfusion abnormalities during treatment with hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy: Value of CT arteriography using an implantable port system

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Hiroshi; Kimura, Motomasa; Kamura, Takeshi; Miura, Tsutomu

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate CT arteriography (CTA) using an implantable port system in the detection of perfusion abnormalities occurring during hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC). In 51 patients with unresectable primary and metastatic liver tumors, who had implanted port systems for HAIC, CTA examinations through the infusion pump were performed. When perfusion abnormalities were found, selective angiography and/or digital subtraction angiography using the implantable port system were performed to determine the etiology. Forty-nine perfusion abnormalities were detected in 32 patients. Intrahepatic hypoperfusion was found in 24 cases. Of 11 patients in whom correction of the hypoperfusion was attempted, it was successful in 10. Of 13 patients in whom correction was not attempted, 6 patients showed progressive disease in nonperfused areas. Intrahepatic hyperperfusion was found in 14 cases, which showed no subsequent complication. Extrahepatic perfusion was found in 11 cases. We consider CTA to be useful in detecting perfusion abnormalities that may compromise HAIC. 22 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Image fusion for visualization of hepatic vasculature and tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Jin-Shin; Chen, Shiuh-Yung J.; Sudakoff, Gary S.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Dachman, Abraham H.

    1995-05-01

    We have developed segmentation and simultaneous display techniques to facilitate the visualization of the three-dimensional spatial relationships between organ structures and organ vasculature. We concentrate on the visualization of the liver based on spiral computed tomography images. Surface-based 3-D rendering and maximal intensity projection algorithms are used for data visualization. To extract the liver in the serial of images accurately and efficiently, we have developed a user-friendly interactive program with a deformable-model segmentation. Surface rendering techniques are used to visualize the extracted structures, adjacent contours are aligned and fitted with a Bezier surface to yield a smooth surface. Visualization of the vascular structures, portal and hepatic veins, is achieved by applying a MIP technique to the extracted liver volume. To integrate the extracted structures they are surface-rendered and their MIP images are aligned and a color table is designed for simultaneous display of the combined liver/tumor and vasculature images. By combining the 3-D surface rendering and MIP techniques, portal veins, hepatic veins, and hepatic tumor can be inspected simultaneously and their spatial relationships can be more easily perceived. The proposed technique will be useful for visualization of both hepatic neoplasm and vasculature in surgical planning for tumor resection or living-donor liver transplantation.

  1. Non-Rigid Registration of Liver CT Images for CT-Guided Ablation of Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Niessen, Wiro; Moelker, Adriaan; Walsum, Theo van

    2016-01-01

    CT-guided percutaneous ablation for liver cancer treatment is a relevant technique for patients not eligible for surgery and with tumors that are inconspicuous on US imaging. The lack of real-time imaging and the use of a limited amount of CT contrast agent make targeting the tumor with the needle challenging. In this study, we evaluate a registration framework that allows the integration of diagnostic pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images and intra-operative non-contrast enhanced CT images to improve image guidance in the intervention. The liver and tumor are segmented in the pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images. Next, the contrast enhanced image is registered to the intra-operative CT images in a two-stage approach. First, the contrast-enhanced diagnostic image is non-rigidly registered to a non-contrast enhanced image that is conventionally acquired at the start of the intervention. In case the initial registration is not sufficiently accurate, a refinement step is applied using non-rigid registration method with a local rigidity term. In the second stage, the intra-operative CT-images that are used to check the needle position, which often consist of only a few slices, are registered rigidly to the intra-operative image that was acquired at the start of the intervention. Subsequently, the diagnostic image is registered to the current intra-operative image, using both transformations, this allows the visualization of the tumor region extracted from pre-operative data in the intra-operative CT images containing needle. The method is evaluated on imaging data of 19 patients at the Erasmus MC. Quantitative evaluation is performed using the Dice metric, mean surface distance of the liver border and corresponding landmarks in the diagnostic and the intra-operative images. The registration of the diagnostic CT image to the initial intra-operative CT image did not require a refinement step in 13 cases. For those cases, the resulting registration had a Dice

  2. Non-Rigid Registration of Liver CT Images for CT-Guided Ablation of Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Niessen, Wiro; Moelker, Adriaan; van Walsum, Theo

    2016-01-01

    CT-guided percutaneous ablation for liver cancer treatment is a relevant technique for patients not eligible for surgery and with tumors that are inconspicuous on US imaging. The lack of real-time imaging and the use of a limited amount of CT contrast agent make targeting the tumor with the needle challenging. In this study, we evaluate a registration framework that allows the integration of diagnostic pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images and intra-operative non-contrast enhanced CT images to improve image guidance in the intervention. The liver and tumor are segmented in the pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images. Next, the contrast enhanced image is registered to the intra-operative CT images in a two-stage approach. First, the contrast-enhanced diagnostic image is non-rigidly registered to a non-contrast enhanced image that is conventionally acquired at the start of the intervention. In case the initial registration is not sufficiently accurate, a refinement step is applied using non-rigid registration method with a local rigidity term. In the second stage, the intra-operative CT-images that are used to check the needle position, which often consist of only a few slices, are registered rigidly to the intra-operative image that was acquired at the start of the intervention. Subsequently, the diagnostic image is registered to the current intra-operative image, using both transformations, this allows the visualization of the tumor region extracted from pre-operative data in the intra-operative CT images containing needle. The method is evaluated on imaging data of 19 patients at the Erasmus MC. Quantitative evaluation is performed using the Dice metric, mean surface distance of the liver border and corresponding landmarks in the diagnostic and the intra-operative images. The registration of the diagnostic CT image to the initial intra-operative CT image did not require a refinement step in 13 cases. For those cases, the resulting registration had a Dice

  3. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  4. MRI-guided laser ablation of neuroendocrine tumor hepatic metastases

    PubMed Central

    Perälä, Jukka; Klemola, Rauli; Kallio, Raija; Li, Chengli; Vihriälä, Ilkka; Salmela, Pasi I; Tervonen, Osmo

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) represent a therapeutically challenging and heterogeneous group of malignancies occurring throughout the body, but mainly in the gastrointestinal system. Purpose To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided laser ablation of NET liver metastases and assess its role within the current treatment options and methods. Material and Methods Two patients with NET tumor hepatic metastases were treated with MRI-guided interstitial laser ablation (LITT). Three tumors were treated. Clinical follow-up time was 10 years. Results Both patients were successfully treated. There were no local recurrences at the ablation site during the follow-up. Both patients had survived at 10-year follow-up. One patient is disease-free. Conclusion MRI-guided laser ablation can be used to treat NET tumor liver metastases but combination therapy and a rigorous follow-up schedule are recommended. PMID:24778794

  5. Bone Windows for Distinguishing Malignant from Benign Primary Bone Tumors on FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Costelloe, Colleen M; Chuang, Hubert H; Chasen, Beth A; Pan, Tinsu; Fox, Patricia S; Bassett, Roland L; Madewell, John E

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The default window setting on PET/CT workstations is soft tissue. This study investigates whether bone windowing and hybrid FDG PET/CT can help differentiate between malignant and benign primary bone tumors. Materials and methods. A database review included 98 patients with malignant (n=64) or benign primary bone (n=34) tumors. The reference standard was biopsy for malignancies and biopsy or >1 year imaging follow-up of benign tumors. Three radiologists and/or nuclear medicine physicians blinded to diagnosis and other imaging viewed the lesions on CT with bone windows (CT-BW) without and then with PET (PET/CT-BW), and separate PET-only images for malignancy or benignity. Three weeks later the tumors were viewed on CT with soft tissue windows (CT-STW) without and then with PET (PET/CT-STW). Results. Mean sensitivity and specificity for identifying malignancies included: CT-BW: 96%, 90%; CT-STW: 90%, 90%; PET/CT-BW: 95%, 85%, PET/CT-STW: 95%, 86% and PET-only: 96%, 75%, respectively. CT-BW demonstrated higher specificity than PET-only and PET/CT-BW (p=0.0005 and p=0.0103, respectively) and trended toward higher sensitivity than CT-STW (p=0.0759). Malignant primary bone tumors were more avid than benign lesions overall (p<0.0001) but the avidity of benign aggressive lesions (giant cell tumors and Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis) trended higher than the malignancies (p=0.08). Conclusion. Bone windows provided high specificity for distinguishing between malignant and benign primary bone tumors and are recommended when viewing FDG PET/CT.

  6. Hepatic Arterial Chemoembolization Using Drug-Eluting Beads in Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumor Metastatic to the Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, Shantanu K.; Friese, Jeremy L.; Sadow, Cheryl A.; Ayyagari, Rajasekhara; Binkert, Christoph A.; Schenker, Matthew P.; Kulke, Matthew; Baum, Richard

    2011-06-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate short (<3 months) and intermediate-term (>3 months) follow-up in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumor to the liver who underwent hepatic arterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting beads at a single institution. Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained for this retrospective review. All patients who were treated with 100-300 or 300-500 {mu}m drug-eluting LC Beads (Biocompatibles, UK) preloaded with doxorubicin (range, 50-100 mg) for GI neuroendocrine tumor metastatic to the liver from June 2004 to June 2009 were included. CT and MRI were evaluated for progression using Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) or European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) criteria. Short-term (<3 months) and intermediate-term (>3 months) imaging response was determined and Kaplan-Meier survival curves were plotted. Results: Thirty-eight drug-eluting bead chemoembolization procedures were performed on 32 hepatic lobes, comprising 21 treatment cycles in 18 patients. All procedures were technically successful with two major complications (biliary injuries). At short-term follow-up (<3 months), 22 of 38 (58%) procedures and 10 of 21 (48%) treatment cycles produced an objective response (OR) with the remainder having stable disease (SD). At intermediate-term follow-up (mean, 445 days; range, 163-1247), 17 of 26 (65%) procedures and 8 of 14 (57%) treatment cycles produced an OR. Probability of progressing was approximately 52% at 1 year with a median time to progression of 419 days. Conclusions: Drug-eluting bead chemoembolization is a reasonable alternative to hepatic arterial embolization and chemoembolization for the treatment of metastatic neuroendocrine tumor to the liver.

  7. MRI characterization of 124 CT-indeterminate focal hepatic lesions: evaluation of clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Leyendecker, John R.; Menias, Christine O.; Oliveira, Erica P.; Narra, Vamsidhar R.; Chapman, William C.; Hassanien, Moataz H.; Elsharkawy, Mohamed S.; Brown, Jeffrey J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the diagnostic yield of MRI performed for characterization of focal hepatic lesions that are interpreted as indeterminate on CT. Patients and methods. In a retrospective investigation, 124 indeterminate focal hepatic lesions in 96 patients were identified on CT examinations over 5 years from 1997 to 2001. All patients had MRI performed for the liver within 6 weeks of their CT examination. CT and MR images were reviewed independently by two separate groups of two radiologists. The value of MRI in characterizing these lesions was assessed. Diagnoses were confirmed based on histology, characteristic imaging features, and clinical follow-up. Results. MRI definitely characterized 73 lesions (58%) that were indeterminate on CT. MRI was accurate in 72/73 of these lesions. MRI could not definitely characterize 51 lesions (42%). Ten lesions were not visualized on MRI, and follow-up imaging confirmed that no lesion was present in eight of these cases (pseudolesions). Conclusion. MRI is valuable for the characterization of indeterminate focal hepatic lesions detected on CT. PMID:18333224

  8. Additional value of hybrid SPECT/CT systems in neuroendocrine tumors, adrenal tumors, pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Wong, K K; Chondrogiannis, S; Fuster, D; Ruiz, C; Marzola, M C; Giammarile, F; Colletti, P M; Rubello, D

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the potential advantages of SPECT/CT hybrid imaging in the management of neuroendocrine tumors, adrenal tumors, pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas. From the collected data, the superiority of fused images was observed as providing both functional/molecular and morphological imaging compared to planar imaging. This provided an improvement in diagnostic imaging, with significant advantages as regards: (1) precise locating of the lesions; (2) an improvement in characterization of the findings, resulting higher specificity, improved sensitivity, and overall greater accuracy, (3) additional anatomical information derived from the CT component; (4) CT-based attenuation correction and potential for volumetric dosimetry calculations, and (5) improvement on the impact on patient management (e.g. in better defining treatment plans, in shortening surgical operating times). It can be concluded that SPECT/CT hybrid imaging provides the nuclear medicine physician with a powerful imaging modality in comparison to planar imaging, providing essential information about the location of lesions, and high quality homogeneous images.

  9. Anatomy of hepatic arteriolo-portal venular shunts evaluated by 3D micro-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Kline, Timothy L; Knudsen, Bruce E; Anderson, Jill L; Vercnocke, Andrew J; Jorgensen, Steven M; Ritman, Erik L

    2014-06-01

    The liver differs from other organs in that two vascular systems deliver its blood - the hepatic artery and the portal vein. However, how the two systems interact is not fully understood. We therefore studied the microvascular geometry of rat liver hepatic artery and portal vein injected with the contrast polymer Microfil(®). Intact isolated rat livers were imaged by micro-CT and anatomic evidence for hepatic arteriolo-portal venular shunts occurring between hepatic artery and portal vein branches was found. Simulations were performed to rule out the possibility of the observed shunts being artifacts resulting from image blurring. In addition, in the case of specimens where only the portal vein was injected, only the portal vein was opacified, whereas in hepatic artery injections, both the hepatic artery and portal vein were opacified. We conclude that mixing of the hepatic artery and portal vein blood can occur proximal to the sinusoidal level, and that the hepatic arteriolo-portal venular shunts may function as a one-way valve-like mechanism, allowing flow only from the hepatic artery to the portal vein (and not the other way around).

  10. Reproducibility and variability of very low dose hepatic perfusion CT in metastatic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Topcuoğlu, Osman Melih; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay; Akata, Deniz; Özmen, Mustafa Nasuh

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to determine the intra- and interobserver agreement on the software analysis of very low dose hepatic perfusion CT (pCT). METHODS A total of 53 pCT examinations were obtained from 21 patients (16 men, 5 women; mean age, 60.4 years) with proven liver metastasis from various primary cancers. The pCT examinations were analyzed by two readers independently and perfusion parameters were noted for whole liver, whole metastasis, metastasis wall, and normal-looking liver (liver tissue without metastasis) in regions of interest (ROIs). Readers repeated the analysis after an interval of one month. Intra- and interobserver agreements were assessed with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and Bland-Altman statistics. RESULTS The mean ICCs of all ROIs between readers were 0.91, 0.93, 0.86, 0.45, 0.53, and 0.66 for blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), permeability, arterial liver perfusion (ALP), portal venous perfusion (PVP) and hepatic perfusion index (HPI), respectively. The mean ICCs of all ROIs between readings were 0.86, 0.91, 0.81, 0.53, 0.56, and 0.71 for BF, BV, permeability, ALP, PVP, and HPI, respectively. There was greater agreement on the parameters measured for the whole metastasis than on the parameters measured for the metastasis wall. The effective dose of all perfusion CT studies was 2.9 mSv. CONCLUSION There is greater intra- and interobserver agreement for BF and BV than for permeability, ALP, PVP, and HPI at very low dose hepatic pCT. Permeability, ALP, PVP, and HPI parameters cannot be used in clinical practice for hepatic pCT with an effective dose of 2.9 mSv. PMID:27759566

  11. Primary hepatic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor successfully treated with combination therapy: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hae Il; Lee, Hyoung Uk; Ahn, Tae Sung; Lee, Jong Eun; Lee, Hyun Yong; Cho, Hyon Doek; Lee, Sang Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Primary malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) in a young female patient, not associated with neurofibromatosis type-I is extremely rare in the liver. A 33-year-old female was admitted with a right flank pain for a weak. The CT scan showed 12.5-cm-sized mass located at the right hepatic lobe. At laparotomy, about 20.0-cm-sized mass was on the right hepatic lobe with attachment to right diaphragmatic pleura. Right hepatic lobe and adherent part of diaphragmatic pleura were resected. On histology and immunohistochemistry, it was diagnosed MPNST. Adjuvant radiotherapy for the right diaphragmatic pleura and adjuvant chemotherapy with adriamycin, ifosfamide and cisplatin were sequentially performed. The prognosis of MPNST is generally poor and it is associated with a highly aggressive course of recurrence, metastases, and death. Our case is probably a first report about combination therapy. PMID:27904856

  12. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Showing Intense Tracer Uptake on PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Noto, Benjamin; Weckesser, Matthias; Buerke, Boris; Pixberg, Michaela; Avramovic, Nemanja

    2017-03-01

    A 70-year-old man with suspected prostate cancer was referred for Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT (short PSMA PET/CT) for staging of tumor extent. Apart from vivid tracer uptake in the prostate gland and osseous metastasis, PSMA PET/CT revealed a large soft tissue mass with calcifications in the left upper abdomen showing intense tracer uptake. Histologic examination revealed the mass to be a gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

  13. Localization of islet cell tumors by dynamic CT: comparison with plain CT, arteriography, sonography, and venous sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Krudy, A.G.; Doppman, J.L.; Jensen, R.T.; Norton, J.A.; Collen, M.J.; Shawker, T.H.; Gardner, J.D.; McArthur, K.; Gorden, P.

    1984-09-01

    Ten patients with suspected islet cell tumors (seven with possible gastrinomas, three with insulinomas) underwent diagnostic evaluation with dynamic CT scanning, routine CT scanning, angiography, and sonography. Venous sampling was also performed in selected instances. Nine sites of gastrinoma and three insulinomas were confirmed surgically in eight patients. Two patients had negative surgical explorations. Routine CT demonstrated five of the nine gastrinomas and one of two insulinomas. Angiography was positive in six of nine gastrinomas and all three insulinomas. Sonography showed only two of the nine gastrinomas and two of the three insulinomas. Dynamic CT scanning demonstrated three additional lesions (two gastrinomas, on insulinoma) not visible on routine CT scanning. Although most of these lesions were visible arteriographically, dynamic CT scans at the appropriate level localized the pathology in the transverse plane and greatly aided in surgical resection of these lesions.

  14. Follow-up of Wilms tumor: comparison of CT with other imaging procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Brasch, R.C.; Randel, S.B.; Gould, R.G.

    1981-11-01

    In a retrospective review, computed tomography (CT) was compared to a ''routine'' combination of other diagnostic imaging procedures used for follow-up evaluations of 13 children being treated for Wilms tumor. The examined variables were diagnostic accuracy, expense, and duration of examination. Results from 13 patients indicated that CT most accurately answers diagnostic queries pertinent to follow-up evaluation of Wilms tumors: the presence and extent of bilateral renal tumors, local recurrence, contralateral renal hypertrophy, and metastasis to liver or lungs. For diagnosing pulmonary metastases, CT was superior to conventional chest radiography both in sensitivity (4/4 vs. 2/4) and specificity (9/9 vs. 6/9). In depiction of liver metastases, CT (3/3) was superior to liver scintigraphy (2/3). The extent of bilateral Wilms tumors was better defined by CT than by urography. In no instances were the alternative diagnostic imaging studies found to be more accurate than CT for the detection of recurrent tumor. Average cost for a CT examination ($344) is considerably less than the cost for a routine combination of the other imaging studies ($594). Examination time and diagnostic radiation doses are also reduced using CT. Pending larger comparison studies, CT is recommended as the primary diagnostic method for follow-up evaluation of patients with Wilms tumor.

  15. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Hepatic Arteriography in Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Performance Depicting Tumors and Tumor Feeders

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, In Joon; Chung, Jin Wook Yin, Yong Hu; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Kim, Young Il; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to analyze retrospectively the performance of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) hepatic arteriography in depicting tumors and their feeders and to investigate the related determining factors in chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).MethodsEighty-six patients with 142 tumors satisfying the imaging diagnosis criteria of HCC were included in this study. The performance of CBCT hepatic arteriography for chemoembolization per tumor and per patient was evaluated using maximum intensity projection images alone (MIP analysis) or MIP combined with multiplanar reformation images (MIP + MPR analysis) regarding the following three aspects: tumor depiction, confidence of tumor feeder detection, and trackability of tumor feeders. Tumor size, tumor enhancement, tumor location, number of feeders, diaphragmatic motion, portal vein enhancement, and hepatic artery to parenchyma enhancement ratio were regarded as potential determining factors.ResultsTumors were depicted in 125 (88.0 %) and 142 tumors (100 %) on MIP and MIP + MPR analysis, respectively. Imaging performances on MIP and MIP + MPR analysis were good enough to perform subsegmental chemoembolization without additional angiographic investigation in 88 (62.0 %) and 128 tumors (90.1 %) on per-tumor basis and in 43 (50 %) and 73 (84.9 %) on per-patient basis, respectively. Significant determining factors for performance in MIP + MPR analysis on per tumor basis were tumor size (p = 0.030), tumor enhancement (0.005), tumor location (p = 0.001), and diaphragmatic motion (p < 0.001).ConclusionsCBCT hepatic arteriography provided sufficient information for subsegmental chemoembolization by depicting tumors and their feeders in the vast majority of patients. Combined analysis of MIP and MPR images was essential to enhance the performance of CBCT hepatic arteriography.

  16. Evaluation of Intrahepatic Perfusion on Fusion Imaging Using a Combined CT/SPECT System: Influence of Anatomic Variations on Hemodynamic Modification Before Installation of Implantable Port Systems for Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Takamori, Hiroshi; Chikamoto, Akira; Kanemitsu, Keiichirou; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2007-06-15

    Background. In some patients with hepatic tumors, anatomic variations in the hepatic arteries may require hemodynamic modification to render effective hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy delivered via implantable port systems. We used a combined CT/SPECT system to obtain fused images of the intrahepatic perfusion patterns in patients with such anatomic variations and assessed their effects on the treatment response of hepatic tumors. Methods. Using a combined SPECT/CT system, we obtained fused images in 110 patients with malignant liver tumors (n = 75) or liver metastasis from unresectable pancreatic cancer (n = 35). Patients with anatomic hepatic arteries variations underwent hemodynamic modification before the placement of implantable port systems for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy. We evaluated their intrahepatic perfusion patterns and the initial treatment response of their liver tumors. The perfusion patterns on the fused images were classified as homogeneous, local hypoperfusion, and/or perfusion defect. Using the WHO criteria of complete response (CR), partial response (PR), no change (NC), and progressive disease (PD), we evaluated the patients' tumor responses after 3 months on multislice helical CT scans. The treatment was regarded as effective in patients who achieved a complete response or partial response. Results. Anatomic hepatic artery variations were present in 15 of the 110 patients (13.6%); 5 manifested replacement of the left hepatic artery (LHA), 8 of the right hepatic artery (RHA), and 1 each had replacement of the RHA and LHA, and replacement of the LHA plus an accessory RHA. In 13 of these 15 patients (87%), occlusion with metallic coils was successful. On fusion imaging, the perfusion patterns were recorded as homogeneous in 6 patients (43%), as hypoperfusion in 7 (50%), and 1 patient had a perfusion defect (7.1%) in the embolized arterial region. Of the 8 patients with RHA replacement, 4 manifested a homogeneous distribution and

  17. Classification of hypervascular liver lesions based on hepatic artery and portal vein blood supply coefficients calculated from triphasic CT scans.

    PubMed

    Boas, F Edward; Kamaya, Aya; Do, Bao; Desser, Terry S; Beaulieu, Christopher F; Vasanawala, Shreyas S; Hwang, Gloria L; Sze, Daniel Y

    2015-04-01

    Perfusion CT of the liver typically involves scanning the liver at least 20 times, resulting in a large radiation dose. We developed and validated a simplified model of tumor blood supply that can be applied to standard triphasic scans and evaluated whether this can be used to distinguish benign and malignant liver lesions. Triphasic CTs of 46 malignant and 32 benign liver lesions were analyzed. For each phase, regions of interest were drawn in the arterially enhancing portion of each lesion, as well as the background liver, aorta, and portal vein. Hepatic artery and portal vein blood supply coefficients for each lesion were then calculated by expressing the enhancement curve of the lesion as a linear combination of the enhancement curves of the aorta and portal vein. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and hypervascular metastases, on average, both had increased hepatic artery coefficients compared to the background liver. Compared to HCC, benign lesions, on average, had either a greater hepatic artery coefficient (hemangioma) or a greater portal vein coefficient (focal nodular hyperplasia or transient hepatic attenuation difference). Hypervascularity with washout is a key diagnostic criterion for HCC, but it had a sensitivity of 72 % and specificity of 81 % for diagnosing malignancy in our diverse set of liver lesions. The sensitivity for malignancy was increased to 89 % by including enhancing lesions that were hypodense on all phases. The specificity for malignancy was increased to 97 % (p = 0.039) by also examining hepatic artery and portal vein blood supply coefficients, while maintaining a sensitivity of 76 %.

  18. Diagnostic performance of Contrast-enhanced CT in Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids-induced Hepatic Sinusoidal Obstructive Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Xuefeng; Ye, Jin; Rong, Xinxin; Lu, Zhiwen; Li, Xin; Wang, Yong; Yang, Ling; Xu, Keshu; Song, Yuhu; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (HSOS) can be caused by pyrrolizidine alkaloids(PAs)-containing herbals. Since PAs exposure is obscure and clinical presentation of HSOS is unspecific, it is challenge to establish the diagnosis of PAs-induced HSOS. Gynura segetum is one of the most wide-use herbals containing PAs. The aim of our study is to describe the features of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) in gynura segetum-induced HSOS, and then determine diagnostic performance of radiological signs. We retrospectively analyzed medical records and CT images of HSOS patients (71 cases) and the controls (222 cases) enrolled from January 1, 2008, to Oct 31, 2015. The common findings of contrast CT in PAs-induced HSOS included: ascites (100%), hepatomegaly (78.87%), gallbladder wall thickening (86.96%), pleural effusion (70.42%), hepatic vein narrowing (87.32%), patchy liver enhancement (92.96%), and heterogeneous hypoattenuation (100%); of these signs, patchy enhancement and heterogeneous hypoattenuation were valuable features. Then, the result of diagnostic performance demonstrated that contrast CT possessed better performance in diagnosing PAs-induced HSOS compared with various parameters of Seattle criteria. In conclusion, the patients with PAs-induced HSOS display distinct radiologic features at CT-scan, which reveals that contrast-enhanced CT provides an effective noninvasive method for diagnosing PAs-induced HSOS. PMID:27897243

  19. Primary Hepatic Osteosarcoma: A Rare Cause of Primary Liver Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Tamang, Tsering Gyalpo Lama; Shuster, Marina; Chandra, Abhinav B.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Extraosseous osteosarcomas are rare, accounting for approximately 4% of all osteosarcomas. A literature review yields very few cases of osteosarcoma primarily arising from the hepatic parenchyma. CASE REPORT This report describes a case of a man in his 50s with a history of hepatitis C and cirrhosis who presented with 5 days of progressive right upper quadrant pain. Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen and pelvis demonstrated a 4.4 cm × 4.8 cm × 4.8 cm right hepatic lobe mass with a large area of necrosis and peripheral enhancement. The subsequent liver biopsy showed few cores of tumor composed of fibroblastic malignant cells producing lace-like osteoid matrix. Osteosarcomatous foci in other parts of the body were excluded by performing extensive physical examination, radiologic imaging, and biopsy. Hence, a primary osteosarcoma was diagnosed. The patient underwent portal vein embolization in preparation for a surgical resection of the right liver lobe. He was admitted six weeks after the embolization for dyspnea and abdominal distension and expired due to abdominal hematoma and pulmonary embolism. CONCLUSION Based on the rarity, lack of consensus in treatment, and dismal prognosis, extraosseous osteosarcoma should be considered a separate entity from osseous osteosarcoma. More data and research are needed in this rare and understudied malignancy. PMID:27081321

  20. Hepatic arterial embolization in patients with neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Liver metastases occur in 46-93% of patients with neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs). Presence and extension of liver metastases are considered important prognostic factors, as they may significantly impair the patient’s quality of life, because of either tumor bulk or hormonal hypersecretion. Therapies for NEN liver metastases include surgical resection, liver transplantation, chemotherapy and biotherapy. Surgery is the gold standard for curative therapy, but in most of NEN patients with liver metastases, when surgery can not be applied, minimally invasive therapeutic approaches are adopted. They include trans-arterial embolization (TAE), trans-arterial chemoembolization (TACE), radiofrequency thermal ablation and new emerging techniques. TAE is based on selective infusion of particles in the branch of the hepatic artery supplying the tumor lesions. The goal of TAE is to occlude tumor blood vessels resulting in ischemia and necrosis. Many reports have shown that TAE can reduce tumor size and hormone output, resulting in palliation of symptoms without the use of cytotoxic drugs, resulting in better tolerability. This review will focus on TAE performance and safety in NEN patients with liver metastases. PMID:24887262

  1. Changes in Hepatic Blood Flow During Transcatheter Arterial Infusion with Heated Saline in Hepatic VX2 Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Wei; Li Jing; Wu Zhiqun; Zhou Changxi; Liu Xi; Wan Yi; Duan Yunyou

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. This study evaluates the influence of transcatheter arterial infusion with heated saline on hepatic arterial and portal venous blood flows to tumor and normal hepatic tissues in a rabbit VX2 tumor model. Methods. All animal experiments were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Twenty rabbits with VX2 liver tumors were divided into the following two groups: (a) the treated group (n = 10), which received a 60 mL transarterial injection of 60 Degree-Sign C saline via the hepatic artery; (b) the control group (n = 10), which received a 60 mL injection of 37 Degree-Sign C saline via the hepatic artery. Using ultrasonography, the blood flows in both the portal vein and hepatic artery were measured, and the changes in the hemodynamic indices were recorded before and immediately after the injection. The changes in the tumor and normal liver tissues of the two groups were histopathologically examined by hematoxylin and eosin staining after the injection. Results. After the transcatheter arterial heated infusion, there was a decrease in the hepatic arterial blood flow to the tumor tissue, a significant decrease in the hepatic artery mean velocity (P < 0.05), and a significant increase in the resistance index (P < 0.05). On hematoxylin and eosin staining, there were no obvious signs of tissue destruction in the normal liver tissue or the tumor tissue after heated perfusion, and coagulated blood plasma was observed in the cavities of intratumoral blood vessels in the treated group. Conclusions. The changes in tumor blood flow in the rabbit VX2 tumor model were presumably caused by microthrombi in the tumor vessels, and the portal vein likely mediated the heat loss in normal liver tissue during the transarterial heated infusion.

  2. Atlas of hepatic tumors and focal lesions: Arteriographic and tomographic diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, O.; Schwartz, S.I.

    1984-01-01

    This book describes the diagnosis of liver tumors. Topics considered include general considerations, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatoblastoma, cholangiocarcinoma, mesenchyomoma, sarcoma, hemangioma, hepatic cell adenoma, focal nodular hyperlasia (FNH), hamartoma, echinococcus cyst, abscess, AV fistula, hepatic artery aneurysm, metastatic carcinoma-colon, metastatic cholangiocarcinoma, metastatic melanoma, metastatic merkel cell and extrahepatic tumor.

  3. Improving abdomen tumor low-dose CT images using a fast dictionary learning based processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shi, Luyao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis; Toumoulin, Christine

    2013-08-01

    In abdomen computed tomography (CT), repeated radiation exposures are often inevitable for cancer patients who receive surgery or radiotherapy guided by CT images. Low-dose scans should thus be considered in order to avoid the harm of accumulative x-ray radiation. This work is aimed at improving abdomen tumor CT images from low-dose scans by using a fast dictionary learning (DL) based processing. Stemming from sparse representation theory, the proposed patch-based DL approach allows effective suppression of both mottled noise and streak artifacts. The experiments carried out on clinical data show that the proposed method brings encouraging improvements in abdomen low-dose CT images with tumors.

  4. SU-E-J-267: Change in Mean CT Intensity of Lung Tumors During Radiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Mahon, R; Tennyson, N; Weiss, E; Hugo, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate CT intensity change of lung tumors during radiation therapy. Methods: Repeated 4D CT images were acquired on a CT simulator during the course of therapy for 27 lung cancer patients on IRB approved protocols. All subjects received definitive radiation treatment ± chemotherapy. CT scans were completed prior to treatment, and 2–7 times during the treatment course. Primary tumor was delineated by an experienced Radiation Oncologist. Contours were thresholded between −100 HU and 200 HU to remove airways and bone. Correlations between the change in the mean tumor intensity and initial tumor intensity, SUVmax, and tumor volume change rate were investigated. Reproducibility was assessed by evaluating the variation in mean intensity over all phases in 4DCT, for a subgroup of 19 subjects. Results: Reproducibility of tumor intensity between phases as characterized by the root mean square of standard deviation across 19 subjects was 1.8 HU. Subjects had a mean initial tumor intensity of 16.5 ± 11.6 HU and an overall reduction in HU by 10.3 ± 8.5 HU. Evaluation of the changes in tumor intensity during treatment showed a decrease of 0.3 ± 0.3 HU/day for all subjects, except three. No significant correlation was found between change in HU/day and initial HU intensity (p=0.53), initial PET SUVmax (p=0.69), or initial tumor volume (p=0.70). The rate of tumor volume change was weakly correlated (R{sup 2}=0.05) with HU change (p=0.01). Conclusion: Most lung cancer subjects showed a marked trend of decreasing mean tumor CT intensity throughout radiotherapy, including early in the treatment course. Change in HU/day is not correlated with other potential early predictors for response, such as SUV and tumor volume change. This Result supports future studies to evaluate change in tumor intensity on CT as an early predictor of response.

  5. PET-CT Fusion in Radiation Management of Patients with Anorectal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Cynthia; Koshy, Mary; Staley, Charles; Esiashvili, Natia; Ghavidel, Sharam; Fowler, Zach; Fox, Tim; Esteves, Fabio; Landry, Jerome Godette, Karen

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To compare computed tomography (CT) with positron emission tomography-CT (PET-CT) scans with respect to anorectal tumor volumes, correlation in overlap, and influence on radiation treatment fields and patient care. Patients and Methods: From March to November 2003, 20 patients with rectal cancer and 3 patients with anal cancer were treated with preoperative or definitive chemoradiation, respectively. Computed tomography simulation data generated a CT gross tumor volume (CT-GTV) and CT planning target volume (CT-PTV) and {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose PET (FDG-PET) created a PET-GTV and PET-PTV. The PET-CT and CT images were fused using manual coregistration. Patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal therapy to traditional doses. The PET, CT, and overlap volumes (OVs) were measured in cubic centimeters. Results: Mean PET-GTV was smaller than the mean CT-GTV (91.7 vs. 99.6 cm{sup 3}). The mean OV was 46.7%. As tumor volume increased, PET and CT OV correlated significantly (p < 0.001). In 17% of patients PET-CT altered the PTV, and in 26% it changed the radiation treatment plan. For 25% of patients with rectal cancer, PET detected distant metastases and changed overall management. Ten rectal cancer patients underwent surgery. When the pretreatment PET standardized uptake value was >10 and the posttreatment PET standardized uptake value was <6, 100% achieved pathologic downstaging (p = 0.047). Conclusions: Variation in volume was significant, with 17% and 26% of patients requiring a change in treatment fields and patient management, respectively. Positron emission tomography can change the management for anorectal tumors by early detection of metastatic disease or disease outside standard radiation fields.

  6. Fully automatic anatomical, pathological, and functional segmentation from CT scans for hepatic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Luc; Delingette, Herve; Malandain, Gregoire; Montagnat, Johan; Ayache, Nicholas; Clement, Jean-Marie; Koehl, Christophe; Dourthe, Olivier; Mutter, Didier; Marescaux, Jacques

    2000-06-01

    To facilitate hepatic surgical planning, we have developed a new system for the automatic 3D delineation of anatomical and pathological hepatic structures from a spiral CT scan. This system also extracts functional information useful for surgery planning, such as portal vein labeling and anatomical segment delineation following the conventional Couinaud definition. From a 2 mm thick enhanced spiral CT scan, a first stage automatically delineates the skin, bones, lungs and kidneys, by combining the use of thresholding, mathematical morphological methods and distance maps. Next, a reference 3D model is immerged in the image and automatically deformed to the liver contour. Then an automatic Gaussians fitting on the imaging histogram allows to threshold the intensities of parenchyma, vessels and lesions. The next stage improves this first classification by an original topological and geometrical analysis, providing an automatic and precise delineation of lesions and veins. Finally, a topological and geometrical analysis based on medical knowledge provides the hepatic functional information invisible in medical imaging: portal vein labeling and hepatic anatomical segments. Clinical validation performed on more than 30 patients shows that this method allows a delineation of anatomical structures, often more sensitive and more specific than manual delineation by a radiologist.

  7. Imaging Features of Radiofrequency Ablation with Heat-Deployed Liposomal Doxorubicin in Hepatic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Cheng William Chow, Lucy; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Lencioni, Riccardo; Libutti, Steven K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2016-03-15

    IntroductionThe imaging features of unresectable hepatic malignancies in patients who underwent radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in combination with lyso-thermosensitive liposomal doxorubicin (LTLD) were determined.Materials and MethodsA phase I dose escalation study combining RFA with LTLD was performed with peri- and post- procedural CT and MRI. Imaging features were analyzed and measured in terms of ablative zone size and surrounding penumbra size. The dynamic imaging appearance was described qualitatively immediately following the procedure and at 1-month follow-up. The control group receiving liver RFA without LTLD was compared to the study group in terms of imaging features and post-ablative zone size dynamics at follow-up.ResultsPost-treatment scans of hepatic lesions treated with RFA and LTLD have distinctive imaging characteristics when compared to those treated with RFA alone. The addition of LTLD resulted in a regular or smooth enhancing rim on T1W MRI which often correlated with increased attenuation on CT. The LTLD-treated ablation zones were stable or enlarged at follow-up four weeks later in 69 % of study subjects as opposed to conventional RFA where the ablation zone underwent involution compared to imaging acquired immediately after the procedure.ConclusionThe imaging features following RFA with LTLD were different from those after standard RFA and can mimic residual or recurrent tumor. Knowledge of the subtle findings between the two groups can help avoid misinterpretation and proper identification of treatment failure in this setting. Increased size of the LTLD-treated ablation zone after RFA suggests the ongoing drug-induced biological effects.

  8. Deriving the Intrahepatic Arteriovenous Shunt Rate from CT Images and Biochemical Data Instead of from Arterial Perfusion Scintigraphy in Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, Toshiro Seki, Hiroshi; Shiina, Makoto

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate a method for predicting the intrahepatic arteriovenous shunt rate from computed tomography (CT) images and biochemical data, instead of from arterial perfusion scintigraphy, because adverse exacerbated systemic effects may be induced in cases where a high shunt rate exists. CT and arterial perfusion scintigraphy were performed in patients with liver metastases from gastric or colorectal cancer. Biochemical data and tumor marker levels of 33 enrolled patients were measured. The results were statistically verified by multiple regression analysis. The total metastatic hepatic tumor volume (V{sub metastasized}), residual hepatic parenchyma volume (V{sub residual}; calculated from CT images), and biochemical data were treated as independent variables; the intrahepatic arteriovenous (IHAV) shunt rate (calculated from scintigraphy) was treated as a dependent variable. The IHAV shunt rate was 15.1 {+-} 11.9%. Based on the correlation matrixes, the best correlation coefficient of 0.84 was established between the IHAV shunt rate and V{sub metastasized} (p < 0.01). In the multiple regression analysis with the IHAV shunt rate as the dependent variable, the coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) was 0.75, which was significant at the 0.1% level with two significant independent variables (V{sub metastasized} and V{sub residual}). The standardized regression coefficients ({beta}) of V{sub metastasized} and V{sub residual} were significant at the 0.1 and 5% levels, respectively. Based on this result, we can obtain a predicted value of IHAV shunt rate (p < 0.001) using CT images. When a high shunt rate was predicted, beneficial and consistent clinical monitoring can be initiated in, for example, hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy.

  9. Pancreatic Cancer Tumor Size on CT Scan Versus Pathologic Specimen: Implications for Radiation Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Arvold, Nils D.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Mamon, Harvey J.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic cancer primary tumor size measurements are often discordant between computed tomography (CT) and pathologic specimen after resection. Dimensions of the primary tumor are increasingly relevant in an era of highly conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 97 consecutive patients with resected pancreatic cancer at two Boston hospitals. All patients had CT scans before surgical resection. Primary endpoints were maximum dimension (in millimeters) of the primary tumor in any direction as reported by the radiologist on CT and by the pathologist for the resected gross fresh specimen. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) findings were analyzed if available. Results: Of the patients, 87 (90%) had preoperative CT scans available for review and 46 (47%) had EUS. Among proximal tumors (n = 69), 40 (58%) had pathologic duodenal invasion, which was seen on CT in only 3 cases. The pathologic tumor size was a median of 7 mm larger compared with CT size for the same patient (range, -15 to 43 mm; p < 0.0001), with 73 patients (84%) having a primary tumor larger on pathology than CT. Endoscopic ultrasound was somewhat more accurate, with pathologic tumor size being a median of only 5 mm larger compared with EUS size (range, -15 to 35 mm; p = 0.0003). Conclusions: Computed tomography scans significantly under-represent pancreatic cancer tumor size compared with pathologic specimens in resectable cases. We propose a clinical target volume expansion formula for the primary tumor based on our data. The high rate of pathologic duodenal invasion suggests a risk of duodenal undercoverage with highly conformal radiotherapy.

  10. Utility of Electrocardiography (ECG)-Gated Computed Tomography (CT) for Preoperative Evaluations of Thymic Epithelial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Hara, Masaki; Nakagawa, Motoo; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Preoperative evaluation of invasion to the adjacent organs is important for the thymic epithelial tumors on CT. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the utility of electrocardiography (ECG)-gated CT for assessing thymic epithelial tumors with regard to the motion artifacts produced and the preoperative diagnostic accuracy of the technique. Material/Methods Forty thymic epithelial tumors (36 thymomas and 4 thymic carcinomas) were examined with ECG-gated contrast-enhanced CT using a dual source scanner. The scan delay after the contrast media injection was 30 s for the non-ECG-gated CT and 100 s for the ECG-gated CT. Two radiologists blindly evaluated both the non-ECG-gated and ECG-gated CT images for motion artifacts and determined whether the tumors had invaded adjacent structures (mediastinal fat, superior vena cava, brachiocephalic veins, aorta, pulmonary artery, pericardium, or lungs) on each image. Motion artifacts were evaluated using a 3-grade scale. Surgical and pathological findings were used as a reference standard for tumor invasion. Results Motion artifacts were significantly reduced for all structures by ECG gating (p=0.0089 for the lungs and p<0.0001 for the other structures). Non-ECG-gated CT and ECG-gated CT demonstrated 79% and 95% accuracy, respectively, during assessments of pericardial invasion (p=0.03). Conclusions ECG-gated CT reduced the severity of motion artifacts and might be useful for preoperative assessment whether thymic epithelial tumors have invaded adjacent structures. PMID:27920842

  11. Comparison of CT and MRI brain tumor imaging using a canine glioma model.

    PubMed

    Whelan, H T; Clanton, J A; Wilson, R E; Tulipan, N B

    1988-01-01

    A canine gliosarcoma model was used to study the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium contrast enhancement in defining the histologic margins of brain tumors. The effectiveness of this technique was compared to conventional computed tomography (CT) using iodinated contrast enhancement. Cultured canine gliosarcoma cells were injected into the left hemisphere of adult mongrel dogs. The dogs developed brain tumors and progressive clinical signs. Serial MRI with and without gadolinium diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid was compared to serial CT with and without sodium iothalamate obtained on the same days. After the final scans, animals were sacrificed; the brains were removed and processed for routine histopathologic study. All tumors were visualized with contrast-enhanced MRI which proved most sensitive. Gadolinium di-ethylene triamine penta-acetic acid caused bright enhancement of tumors in a distribution that consistently corresponded to areas of pathologically proved tumor infiltration. Gross and microscopic autopsy findings correlated better with MRI than with CT which tended to produce poorer resolution and underrepresent the size of viable tumor. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI is more accurate than unenhanced MRI, unenhanced CT, or enhanced CT in defining the histologic margins of tumors.

  12. Segmentation of hepatic artery in multi-phase liver CT using directional dilation and connectivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Schnurr, Alena-Kathrin; Zidowitz, Stephan; Georgii, Joachim; Zhao, Yue; Razavi, Mohammad; Schwier, Michael; Hahn, Horst K.; Hansen, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Segmentation of hepatic arteries in multi-phase computed tomography (CT) images is indispensable in liver surgery planning. During image acquisition, the hepatic artery is enhanced by the injection of contrast agent. The enhanced signals are often not stably acquired due to non-optimal contrast timing. Other vascular structure, such as hepatic vein or portal vein, can be enhanced as well in the arterial phase, which can adversely affect the segmentation results. Furthermore, the arteries might suffer from partial volume effects due to their small diameter. To overcome these difficulties, we propose a framework for robust hepatic artery segmentation requiring a minimal amount of user interaction. First, an efficient multi-scale Hessian-based vesselness filter is applied on the artery phase CT image, aiming to enhance vessel structures with specified diameter range. Second, the vesselness response is processed using a Bayesian classifier to identify the most probable vessel structures. Considering the vesselness filter normally performs not ideally on the vessel bifurcations or the segments corrupted by noise, two vessel-reconnection techniques are proposed. The first technique uses a directional morphological operator to dilate vessel segments along their centerline directions, attempting to fill the gap between broken vascular segments. The second technique analyzes the connectivity of vessel segments and reconnects disconnected segments and branches. Finally, a 3D vessel tree is reconstructed. The algorithm has been evaluated using 18 CT images of the liver. To quantitatively measure the similarities between segmented and reference vessel trees, the skeleton coverage and mean symmetric distance are calculated to quantify the agreement between reference and segmented vessel skeletons, resulting in an average of 0:55+/-0:27 and 12:7+/-7:9 mm (mean standard deviation), respectively.

  13. Metastatic cervical adenopathy from tumors of unknown origin: the role of CT

    SciTech Connect

    Muraki, A.S.; Mancuso, A.A.; Harnsberger, H.R.

    1984-09-01

    A prospective CT study of seventeen patients with metastatic cervical adenopathy from tumors at an unknown primary site, believed most likely to be in the upper aerodigestive tract, was performed. CT suggested a primary site in ten cases, of which four were confirmed by surgery or biopsy. In four cases, CT did not identify a suspicious site and no primary site was identified during triple endoscopy, sometimes with blind biopsies. CT was able to suggest correct causes other than carcinoma in three cases and gave useful information about the extent of nodal disease. CT should be used as part of the routine evaluation of patients with this clinical problem. A diagnostic algorithm is suggested in which CT is integrated with modern endoscopic and aspiration cytologic techniques.

  14. Automatic co-segmentation of lung tumor based on random forest in PET-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xueqing; Xiang, Dehui; Zhang, Bin; Zhu, Weifang; Shi, Fei; Chen, Xinjian

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a fully automatic method is proposed to segment the lung tumor in clinical 3D PET-CT images. The proposed method effectively combines PET and CT information to make full use of the high contrast of PET images and superior spatial resolution of CT images. Our approach consists of three main parts: (1) initial segmentation, in which spines are removed in CT images and initial connected regions achieved by thresholding based segmentation in PET images; (2) coarse segmentation, in which monotonic downhill function is applied to rule out structures which have similar standardized uptake values (SUV) to the lung tumor but do not satisfy a monotonic property in PET images; (3) fine segmentation, random forests method is applied to accurately segment the lung tumor by extracting effective features from PET and CT images simultaneously. We validated our algorithm on a dataset which consists of 24 3D PET-CT images from different patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The average TPVF, FPVF and accuracy rate (ACC) were 83.65%, 0.05% and 99.93%, respectively. The correlation analysis shows our segmented lung tumor volumes has strong correlation ( average 0.985) with the ground truth 1 and ground truth 2 labeled by a clinical expert.

  15. Optimal Co-segmentation of Tumor in PET-CT Images with Context Information

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qi; Bai, Junjie; Han, Dongfeng; Bhatia, Sudershan; Sun, Wenqing; Rockey, William; Bayouth, John E.; Buatti, John M.

    2014-01-01

    PET-CT images have been widely used in clinical practice for radiotherapy treatment planning of the radiotherapy. Many existing segmentation approaches only work for a single imaging modality, which suffer from the low spatial resolution in PET or low contrast in CT. In this work we propose a novel method for the co-segmentation of the tumor in both PET and CT images, which makes use of advantages from each modality: the functionality information from PET and the anatomical structure information from CT. The approach formulates the segmentation problem as a minimization problem of a Markov Random Field (MRF) model, which encodes the information from both modalities. The optimization is solved using a graph-cut based method. Two sub-graphs are constructed for the segmentation of the PET and the CT images, respectively. To achieve consistent results in two modalities, an adaptive context cost is enforced by adding context arcs between the two subgraphs. An optimal solution can be obtained by solving a single maximum flow problem, which leads to simultaneous segmentation of the tumor volumes in both modalities. The proposed algorithm was validated in robust delineation of lung tumors on 23 PET-CT datasets and two head-and-neck cancer subjects. Both qualitative and quantitative results show significant improvement compared to the graph cut methods solely using PET or CT. PMID:23693127

  16. Artifacts in Conventional Computed Tomography (CT) and Free Breathing Four-Dimensional CT Induce Uncertainty in Gross Tumor Volume Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Fredberg Persson, Gitte; Nygaard, Ditte Eklund; Munch af Rosenschoeld, Per; Richter Vogelius, Ivan; Josipovic, Mirjana; Specht, Lena; Korreman, Stine Sofia

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Artifacts impacting the imaged tumor volume can be seen in conventional three-dimensional CT (3DCT) scans for planning of lung cancer radiotherapy but can be reduced with the use of respiration-correlated imaging, i.e., 4DCT or breathhold CT (BHCT) scans. The aim of this study was to compare delineated gross tumor volume (GTV) sizes in 3DCT, 4DCT, and BHCT scans of patients with lung tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 36 patients with 46 tumors referred for stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumors were included. All patients underwent positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, 4DCT, and BHCT scans. GTVs in all CT scans of individual patients were delineated during one session by a single physician to minimize systematic delineation uncertainty. The GTV size from the BHCT was considered the closest to true tumor volume and was chosen as the reference. The reference GTV size was compared to GTV sizes in 3DCT, at midventilation (MidV), at end-inspiration (Insp), and at end-expiration (Exp) bins from the 4DCT scan. Results: The median BHCT GTV size was 4.9 cm{sup 3} (0.1-53.3 cm{sup 3}). Median deviation between 3DCT and BHCT GTV size was 0.3 cm{sup 3} (-3.3 to 30.0 cm{sup 3}), between MidV and BHCT size was 0.2 cm{sup 3} (-5.7 to 19.7 cm{sup 3}), between Insp and BHCT size was 0.3 cm{sup 3} (-4.7 to 24.8 cm{sup 3}), and between Exp and BHCT size was 0.3 cm{sup 3} (-4.8 to 25.5 cm{sup 3}). The 3DCT, MidV, Insp, and Exp median GTV sizes were all significantly larger than the BHCT median GTV size. Conclusions: In the present study, the choice of CT method significantly influenced the delineated GTV size, on average, leading to an increase in GTV size compared to the reference BHCT. The uncertainty caused by artifacts is estimated to be in the same magnitude as delineation uncertainty and should be considered in the design of margins for radiotherapy.

  17. Automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images using fuzzy Markov random field model.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yu; Feng, Yuanming; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Ning; Lin, Wang; Sa, Yu; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and CT images provides complementary functional and anatomical information of human tissues and it has been used for better tumor volume definition of lung cancer. This paper proposed a robust method for automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images. The new method is based on fuzzy Markov random field (MRF) model. The combination of PET and CT image information is achieved by using a proper joint posterior probability distribution of observed features in the fuzzy MRF model which performs better than the commonly used Gaussian joint distribution. In this study, the PET and CT simulation images of 7 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were used to evaluate the proposed method. Tumor segmentations with the proposed method and manual method by an experienced radiation oncologist on the fused images were performed, respectively. Segmentation results obtained with the two methods were similar and Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC) was 0.85 ± 0.013. It has been shown that effective and automatic segmentations can be achieved with this method for lung tumors which locate near other organs with similar intensities in PET and CT images, such as when the tumors extend into chest wall or mediastinum.

  18. Automatic Lung Tumor Segmentation on PET/CT Images Using Fuzzy Markov Random Field Model

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu; Feng, Yuanming; Sun, Jian; Lin, Wang; Sa, Yu; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and CT images provides complementary functional and anatomical information of human tissues and it has been used for better tumor volume definition of lung cancer. This paper proposed a robust method for automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images. The new method is based on fuzzy Markov random field (MRF) model. The combination of PET and CT image information is achieved by using a proper joint posterior probability distribution of observed features in the fuzzy MRF model which performs better than the commonly used Gaussian joint distribution. In this study, the PET and CT simulation images of 7 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were used to evaluate the proposed method. Tumor segmentations with the proposed method and manual method by an experienced radiation oncologist on the fused images were performed, respectively. Segmentation results obtained with the two methods were similar and Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC) was 0.85 ± 0.013. It has been shown that effective and automatic segmentations can be achieved with this method for lung tumors which locate near other organs with similar intensities in PET and CT images, such as when the tumors extend into chest wall or mediastinum. PMID:24987451

  19. [Radiological diagnosis of hepatic tumors. Part II: Identification and differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Layer, G; Delorme, S

    2007-10-01

    Focal hepatic lesions occur in 5% of the population. The clarification of such common occurrences is of major significance because oncological diseases play an important role with respect to morbidity and mortality of the population. The first part of this review article dealt with the most important aspects of classification, epidemiology and pathology of hepatic tumors for radiologists and the current technical situation with regards to the diagnostic procedure. This second part of the review deals with the significance of radiological procedures for identification and differential diagnosis of hepatic tumors.

  20. The effect of housing temperature on the growth of CT26 tumor expressing fluorescent protein EGFP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuzhakova, Diana V.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Lapkina, Irina V.; Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O.; Lukyanov, Sergey A.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2016-04-01

    To date, the effect of housing temperature on tumor development in the immunocompetent mice has been studied on poorly immunogenic cancer models. Standard housing temperature 20-26°C was shown to cause chronic metabolic cold stress and promote tumor progression via suppression of the antitumor immune response, whereas a thermoneutral temperature 30-31°C was more preferable for normal metabolism of mice and inhibited tumor growth. Our work represents the first attempt to discover the potential effect of housing temperature on the development of highly immunogenic tumor. EGFP-expressing murine colon carcinoma CT26 generated in Balb/c mice was used as a tumor model. No statistically significant differences were shown in tumor incidences and growth rates at 20°C, 25°C and 30°C for non-modified CT26. Maintaining mice challenged with CT26-EGFP cells at 30°C led to complete inhibition of tumor development. In summary, we demonstrated that the housing temperature is important for the regulation of growth of highly immunogenic tumors in mice through antitumor immunity.

  1. Expression of steroid hormone receptors in benign hepatic tumors. An immunocytochemical study.

    PubMed

    Masood, S; West, A B; Barwick, K W

    1992-12-01

    Many hepatic adenomas have been demonstrated to have a clear relationship with oral contraceptive use, and it is presumed that there may be hormone receptors within the cytoplasm or nucleus of adenoma cells that mediate tumor growth in response to hormonal stimulation. Only a small number of examples of benign hepatic tumors have been analyzed for the presence of estrogen and progesterone receptors, and there has been a lack of consensus with regard to the findings. All previous studies have determined receptor levels by biochemical methods. In a retrospective study, we employed specific monoclonal antibodies against estrogen and progesterone receptors in 10 benign paraffin-embedded hepatic lesions: five examples of hepatic adenoma and five examples of focal nodular hyperplasia. All patients were female, except for one male with adenoma and one male with focal nodular hyperplasia. No patient had received tamoxifen citrate or any other form of hormonal therapy for their hepatic lesion. Positive controls included benign and malignant breast tissue. No positive staining was seen in hepatic adenoma, focal nodular hyperplasia, or normal adjacent liver parenchyma. Intense positive staining was seen in all positive control tissues. This negative result with the use of specific monoclonal antibodies in an established immunohistochemical method for analysis of estrogen and progesterone receptors does not exclude the presence of these receptors in benign hepatic lesions, but does suggest that, if present, they occur in much smaller amounts than in benign and malignant breast tissue. The presence of hormone receptors in benign hepatic tumors deserves further study.

  2. Micro-CT molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis using a magnetite nano-cluster probe.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Li, Jing; Zhang, Chunfu; Xu, Lisa X

    2013-06-01

    Due to its high resolution, micro-CT is desirable for molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis. However, the sensitivity of micro-CT to contrast agents is relatively low. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop high micro-CT sensitive molecular imaging probes for direct visualization and dynamic monitoring of tumor angiogenesis. To this end, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides conjugated magnetite nano clusters (RGD-MNCs) were developed by assembling individual magnetite nano particles into clusters with amphiphilic (maleimide) methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic acid) ((Mal)mPEG-PLA) copolymer and subsequently encoding RGD peptides onto the clusters for specific targeting alpha(v)beta3 integrin. The hydrodynamic size of RGD-MNCs was about 85 nm. To test its specificity, alpha(v)beta3 positive cells (H1299) were incubated with magnetite nano clusters (MNCs), RGD-MNCs or RGD-MNCs competition with free RGD peptides. Prussian Blue staining and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) measurements indicated that the cell uptake of RGD-MNCs was significantly more than that of MNCs, which could be inhibited by free RGD peptides. For detection of tumor angiogenesis, mice bearing H1299 tumors were injected intravenously with RGD-MNCs at the dose of 400 micro mol Fe/kg. Tumor angiogenic hot spots as well as individual angiogenic vessels could be clearly manifested by micro-CT imaging 12 h post injection, which was dynamically monitored with the extension of probe circulation time. Subsequent histological studies of tumor tissues verified that RGD-MNCs registered tumor angiogenic vessels. Our study demonstrated that RGD-MNC probes fabricated in this study could be used to effectively target alpha(v)beta3 integrin. Using high resolution micro-CT in combination with the probes, tumor angiogenesis could be studied dynamically.

  3. Resolution of Hepatic Encephalopathy Following Hepatic Artery Embolization in a Patient with Well-Differentiated Neuroendocrine Tumor Metastatic to the Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Erinjeri, Joseph P. Deodhar, Ajita; Thornton, Raymond H.; Allen, Peter J.; Getrajdman, George I.; Brown, Karen T.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Reidy, Diane L.

    2010-06-15

    Hepatic encephalopathy is considered a contraindication to hepatic artery embolization. We describe a patient with a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor metastatic to the liver with refractory hepatic encephalopathy and normal liver function tests. The encephalopathy was refractory to standard medical therapy with lactulose. The patient's mental status returned to baseline after three hepatic artery embolization procedures. Arteriography and ultrasound imaging before and after embolization suggest that the encephalopathy was due to arterioportal shunting causing hepatofugal portal venous flow and portosystemic shunting. In patients with a primary or metastatic well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor whose refractory hepatic encephalopathy is due to portosystemic shunting (rather than global hepatic dysfunction secondary to tumor burden), hepatic artery embolization can be performed safely and effectively.

  4. Primary Hepatic Neuroendocrine Tumor with Unusual Thyroid Follicular-Like Morphologic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohd Elmugtaba; Abadeer, Kerolos; Zhai, Qihui (Jim)

    2017-01-01

    We describe a primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumor of a 57-year-old Thai woman who presented in 2004 with a suspicious mass in the left hepatic lobe. She underwent left hepatectomy for the 10.5-cm mass, called intermediate grade neuroendocrine carcinoma of unknown origin, likely metastatic. The tumor recurred in 2007, then called recurrent primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumor (PHNET), and the patient underwent liver transplant. Because of similarity between the neuroendocrine tumor and a thyroid tumor—specifically, follicular-like characteristics—immunohistochemical stains for thyroglobulin, TTF1, and calcitonin were performed. However, all were negative. All imaging studies revealed no evidence of a primary lesion other than the liver mass. In 2008, the patient's liver transplant failed because of ischemic cholangiopathy, and she underwent a second liver transplant. Seven years later, in 2015, she presented with metastatic neuroendocrine tumor of intermediate grade to the lung, consistent with metastatic PHNET. She underwent left upper-lobe wedge resection to remove the tumor. The patient is alive with no evidence of disease at 13 years after initial diagnosis. This rare variant of PHNET had thyroid-like morphologic characteristics but there is no evidence of primary thyroid tumor or thyroid markers in the primary and recurrent hepatic tumors and lung metastasis. PMID:28316853

  5. Investigation of 1377C/T polymorphism of the Toll-like receptor 3 among patients with chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Goktas, Emine Firat; Bulut, Cemal; Goktas, Mustafa Tugrul; Ozer, Erdem Kamil; Karaca, Ragip Ozgur; Kinikli, Sami; Demiroz, Ali Pekcan; Bozkurt, Atilla

    2016-07-01

    The immunopathogenesis of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) has not been clarified yet. Toll-like receptors (TLR) are a receptor family that initiates immunity with exogenous-endogenous ligands and plays a role in the pathogenesis of infections. In this study, we aimed to investigate the frequency of TLR 3 1377C/T (rs3775290) polymorphism and its role in patients with CHB. We included 50 healthy individuals as control group and 73 active and 43 inactive hepatitis B patients. All DNA samples were isolated from blood samples. For the detection of TLR 3 1377C/T single-nucleotide polymorphism, restriction fragment length polymorphism was used. A statistically significant difference was determined in Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA levels of CHB patients with the CC, CT, and TT genotypes (p = 0.013). The highest levels of HBV DNA were detected in individuals with TT genotypes. Additionally, the frequency of CC genotype was higher in the active CHB patients compared with that of the inactive CHB patients (p = 0.044). No statistically significant difference in TLR 3 1377C/T polymorphism was detected between healthy controls and the hepatitis B patients (p = 0.342). In conclusion, HBV DNA level was higher in the individuals with TT genotype, and CC genotype was more frequent in the active CHB patients. These results suggest a possible association between CHB and TLR 3 gene (1377C/T) polymorphism.

  6. Hepatic Tumor Metastases Cause Enhanced PEGylated Liposome Uptake by Kupffer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ukawa, Masami; Fujiwara, Yukako; Ando, Hidenori; Shimizu, Taro; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Kupffer cells in livers bearing tumor metastases were found to have promoted tumor invasion and exacerbated the metastasis. This implies that the function of Kupffer cells might differ between animals bearing hepatic metastases and those that are healthy. Kupffer cells are considered responsible for the accumulation of liposomes in the liver. In this study, we hypothesized that the alteration in the function of Kupffer cells by hepatic metastasis would also affect the biodistribution of liposomes following intravenous administration. The hepatic accumulation and the blood concentration of PEGylated liposomes were compared between healthy mice and tumor-bearing mice. We noted that hepatic accumulation and elimination from the blood were significantly accelerated in tumor-bearing mice, indicating that our hypothesis was correct. In the tumor-bearing mice, the proportion of Kupffer cells taking up liposomes was significantly increased. Intravenous injection of oxaliplatin (l-OHP) containing PEGylated liposomes decreased the fraction of Kupffer cells, but this administration caused no injury to the hepatocytes. These results suggest that PEGylated liposomes containing l-OHP may have the potential to treat metastatic hepatic cancer-not only via the direct killing of the cancer cells but also via a reduction in tumor-supportive Kupffer cells.

  7. Automated localization and segmentation of lung tumor from PET-CT thorax volumes based on image feature analysis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hui; Wang, Xiuying; Feng, Dagan

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography - computed tomography (PET-CT) plays an essential role in early tumor detection, diagnosis, staging and treatment. Automated and more accurate lung tumor detection and delineation from PET-CT is challenging. In this paper, on the basis of quantitative analysis of contrast feature of PET volume in SUV (standardized uptake value), our method firstly automatically localized the lung tumor. Then based on analysing the surrounding CT features of the initial tumor definition, our decision strategy determines the tumor segmentation from CT or from PET. The algorithm has been validated on 20 PET-CT studies involving non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Experimental results demonstrated that our method was able to segment the tumor when adjacent to mediastinum or chest wall, and the algorithm outperformed the other five lung segmentation methods in terms of overlapping measure.

  8. Hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa): a case report with a review of literatures

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hyun-Jin; Kang, Dong Wook; Kim, Joo Heon; Han, Hyun Young; Lee, Min Koo

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) are very rare. We report a primary hepatic PEComa with a review of the literature. A 56-year-old women presented with a nodular mass detected during the management of chronic renal failure and chronic hepatitis C. Diagnostic imaging studies suggested a nodular hepatocellular carcinoma in segment 5 of the liver. The patient underwent partial hepatectomy. A brown-colored expansile mass measuring 3.2×3.0 cm was relatively demarcated from the surrounding liver parenchyma. The tumor was mainly composed of epithelioid cells that were arranged in a trabecular growth pattern. Adipose tissue and thick-walled blood vessels were minimally identified. A small amount of extramedullary hematopoiesis was observed in the sinusoidal spaces between tumor cells. Tumor cells were diffusely immunoreactive for human melanoma black 45 (HMB45) and Melan A, focally immunoreactive for smooth muscle actin, but not for hepatocyte specific antigen (HSA). PMID:28288506

  9. Hepatic trauma: CT findings and considerations based on our experience in emergency diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Romano, Luigia; Giovine, Sabrina; Guidi, Guido; Tortora, Giovanni; Cinque, Teresa; Romano, Stefania

    2004-04-01

    Abdominal blunt trauma represents the main cause of death in people of age less than 40 years; the liver injury occurs frequently, with an incidence varying from 3 to 10%. Isolated hepatic lesions are rare and in 77-90% of cases, lesions of other organs and viscera are involved. Right hepatic lobe is a frequent site of injury, because it is the more voluminous portion of liver parenchyma; posterior superior hepatic segments are proximal to fixed anatomical structures such as ribs and spine that may have an important role in determining of the lesion. The coronal ligaments' insertion in this parenchymal region augments the effect of acceleration-deceleration mechanism. Associated lesions usually are homolateral costal fractures, laceration or contusion of the inferior right pulmonary lobe, haemothorax, pneumothorax, renal and/or adrenal lesions. Traumatic lesions of left hepatic lobe are rare and usually associated with direct impact on the superior abdomen, such as in car-crash when the wheel causes a compressive effect on thorax and abdomen. Associated lesions to left hepatic lobe injuries correlated to this mechanism are: sternal fractures, pancreatic, myocardial, gastrointestinal tract injuries. Lesions of the caudal lobe are extremely rare, usually not isolated and noted with other large parenchymal lesions. The Institution of Specialized Trauma Centers and the technical progress in imaging methodology developed in the last years a great reduction of mortality. New diagnostic methodologies allow a reduction of negatives laparotomies and allow the possibility of conservative treatment of numerous traumatic lesions; however, therapy depends from imaging findings and clinical conditions of the patient. Computed tomography (CT) certainly presents a large impact on diagnosis and management of patients with lesions from blunt abdominal traumas. It is important to establish a prognostic criteria allowing decisions for conservative or surgical treatment; CT findings

  10. Autoradiographic and histopathological studies of boric acid-mediated BNCT in hepatic VX2 tumor-bearing rabbits: Specific boron retention and damage in tumor and tumor vessels.

    PubMed

    Yang, C H; Lin, Y T; Hung, Y H; Liao, J W; Peir, J J; Liu, H M; Lin, Y L; Liu, Y M; Chen, Y W; Chuang, K S; Chou, F I

    2015-12-01

    Hepatoma is a malignant tumor that responds poorly to conventional therapies. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) may provide a better way for hepatoma therapy. In this research, (10)B-enriched boric acid (BA, 99% (10)B) was used as the boron drug. A multifocal hepatic VX2 tumor-bearing rabbit model was used to study the mechanisms of BA-mediated BNCT. Autoradiography demonstrated that BA was selectively targeted to tumors and tumor vessels. Histopathological examination revealed the radiation damage to tumor-bearing liver was concentrated in the tumor regions during BNCT treatment. The selective killing of tumor cells and the destruction of the blood vessels in tumor masses may be responsible for the success of BA-mediated BNCT for liver tumors.

  11. Tungsten oxide nanorods: an efficient nanoplatform for tumor CT imaging and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiguo; Kong, Bin; Yu, Chao; Shi, Xiangyang; Wang, Mingwei; Liu, Wei; Sun, Yanan; Zhang, Yingjian; Yang, Hong; Yang, Shiping

    2014-01-13

    We report here a facile thermal decomposition approach to creating tungsten oxide nanorods (WO2.9 NRs) with a length of 13.1 ± 3.6 nm and a diameter of 4.4 ± 1.5 nm for tumor theranostic applications. The formed WO2.9 NRs were modified with methoxypoly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) carboxyl acid via ligand exchange to have good water dispersability and biocompatibility. With the high photothermal conversion efficiency irradiated by a 980 nm laser and the better X-ray attenuation property than clinically used computed tomography (CT) contrast agent Iohexol, the formed PEGylated WO2.9 NRs are able to inhibit the growth of the model cancer cells in vitro and the corresponding tumor model in vivo, and enable effective CT imaging of the tumor model in vivo. Our "killing two birds with one stone" strategy could be extended for fabricating other nanoplatforms for efficient tumor theranostic applications.

  12. CtIP, a candidate tumor susceptibility gene is a team player with luminaries.

    PubMed

    Chinnadurai, G

    2006-01-01

    CtIP is a nuclear protein conserved among vertebrates that was discovered as a cofactor of the transcriptional corepressor CtBP. CtIP also interacts with the tumor suppressors such as BRCA1 and the pRb family members through binding sites that are frequently mutated in human cancers. CtIP is a target for BRCA1-dependent phosphorylation by the ATM kinase induced by DNA double strand breakage. CtIP plays a role in DNA-damage-induced cell cycle checkpoint control at the G2/M transition. Homozygous inactivation of the Ctip gene causes very early embryonic lethality during mouse development. The Ctip(-/-) embryo cells are arrested in G1 and do not enter S phase. Depletion of Ctip in established mouse embryo fibroblasts arrests cells in G1 and results in an accumulation of hypophosphorylated Rb and the Cdk inhibitor p21, suggesting that CtIP is also a critical regulator of G1/S transition of the cell cycle. The Ctip gene contains a mononucleotide (A9) repeat and one of the alleles is mutated at a high frequency in colon cancers with microsatellite instability. The Ctip(+/-) mice develop multiple types of tumors suggesting that haploid insufficiency of Ctip leads to tumorigenesis. Among the various tumor types observed in Ctip(+/-) heterozygous mice, large lymphomas are prevalent. Recent studies raise the possibility that Ctip may itself be a tumor susceptibility gene and suggest that it might be important for the activities of tumor suppressors BRCA1, pRb family proteins and Ikaros family members.

  13. A chance-constrained programming level set method for longitudinal segmentation of lung tumors in CT.

    PubMed

    Rouchdy, Youssef; Bloch, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel stochastic level set method for the longitudinal tracking of lung tumors in computed tomography (CT). The proposed model addresses the limitations of registration based and segmentation based methods for longitudinal tumor tracking. It combines the advantages of each approach using a new probabilistic framework, namely Chance-Constrained Programming (CCP). Lung tumors can shrink or grow over time, which can be reflected in large changes of shape, appearance and volume in CT images. Traditional level set methods with a priori knowledge about shape are not suitable since the tumors are undergoing random and large changes in shape. Our CCP level set model allows to introduce a flexible prior to track structures with a highly variable shape by permitting a constraint violation of the prior up to a specified probability level. The chance constraints are computed from two given points by the user or from segmented tumors from a reference image. The reference image can be one of the images studied or an external template. We present a numerical scheme to approximate the solution of the proposed model and apply it to track lung tumors in CT. Finally, we compare our approach with a Bayesian level set. The CCP level set model gives the best results: it is more coherent with the manual segmentation.

  14. Hepatic Arterial Embolization with Doxorubicin-Loaded Superabsorbent Polymer Microspheres in a Rabbit Liver Tumor Model

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sanjay Wright, Kenneth C.; Ensor, Joe; Van Pelt, Carolyn S.; Dixon, Katherine A.; Kundra, Vikas

    2011-10-15

    Objectives: The pharmacokinetic profile after hepatic arterial embolization with superabsorbent microspheres (QuadraSpheres) loaded with doxorubicin was studied. Methods: Rabbits with hepatic VX2 tumors were treated with intra-arterial administration of QuadraSpheres loaded with doxorubicin, or transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) using doxorubicin, Lipiodol and Embospheres, or hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) of doxorubicin. Tumor specimens were evaluated by fluorescence microscopy, and plasma and tumor concentrations of doxorubicin were measured. Results: The peak plasma concentration of doxorubicin was lower in the QuadraSphere group (309.9 ng/ml) than in the HAI (673.4 ng/ml) or TACE (360.5 ng/ml) groups, suggesting higher tumor retention in the QuadraSphere group. Intratumoral doxorubicin levels declined to negligible levels at 1 and 3 days after treatment, respectively, in the HAI and TACE groups. In the QuadraSphere groups, intratumoral doxorubicin level declined after day 1, but was still detectable at 14 days after treatment and was higher than that in the other groups at 1, 3, and 7 days. Intratumoral doxorubicin fluorescence was detected at all time points in the QuadraSphere group, but only at 1 day after treatment in the TACE group. Conclusions: Hepatic arterial administration of doxorubicin-loaded QuadraSpheres enables the sustained release of doxorubicin to hepatic tumors.

  15. CT-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation in Patients with Hepatic Metastases from Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobs, Tobias F. Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Schrader, Angelika; Stemmler, Hans Joachim; Trumm, Christoph; Lubienski, Andreas; Murthy, Ravi; Helmberger, Thomas K.; Reiser, Maximilian F.

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate technical success, technique effectiveness, and survival following radiofrequency ablation for breast cancer liver metastases and to determine prognostic factors. Forty-three patients with 111 breast cancer liver metastases underwent CT-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Technical success and technique effectiveness was evaluated by performing serial CT scans. We assessed the prognostic value of hormone receptor status, overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and presence of extrahepatic tumor spread. Survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Technical success was achieved in 107 metastases (96%). Primary technique effectiveness was 96%. During follow-up local tumor progression was observed in 15 metastases, representing a secondary technique effectiveness of 86.5%. The overall time to progression to the liver was 10.5 months. The estimated overall median survival was 58.6 months. There was no significant difference in terms of survival probability with respect to hormone receptor status, HER2 overexpression, and presence of isolated bone metastases. Survival was significantly lower among patients with extrahepatic disease, with the exception of skeletal metastases. We conclude that CT-guided RF ablation of liver metastases from breast cancer can be performed with a high degree of technical success and technique effectiveness, providing promising survival rates in patients with no visceral extrahepatic disease. Solitary bone metastases did not negatively affect survival probability after RF ablation.

  16. CT-guided radiofrequency ablation in patients with hepatic metastases from breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Tobias F; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Schrader, Angelika; Stemmler, Hans Joachim; Trumm, Christoph; Lubienski, Andreas; Murthy, Ravi; Helmberger, Thomas K; Reiser, Maximilian F

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate technical success, technique effectiveness, and survival following radiofrequency ablation for breast cancer liver metastases and to determine prognostic factors. Forty-three patients with 111 breast cancer liver metastases underwent CT-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Technical success and technique effectiveness was evaluated by performing serial CT scans. We assessed the prognostic value of hormone receptor status, overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and presence of extrahepatic tumor spread. Survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Technical success was achieved in 107 metastases (96%). Primary technique effectiveness was 96%. During follow-up local tumor progression was observed in 15 metastases, representing a secondary technique effectiveness of 86.5%. The overall time to progression to the liver was 10.5 months. The estimated overall median survival was 58.6 months. There was no significant difference in terms of survival probability with respect to hormone receptor status, HER2 overexpression, and presence of isolated bone metastases. Survival was significantly lower among patients with extrahepatic disease, with the exception of skeletal metastases. We conclude that CT-guided RF ablation of liver metastases from breast cancer can be performed with a high degree of technical success and technique effectiveness, providing promising survival rates in patients with no visceral extrahepatic disease. Solitary bone metastases did not negatively affect survival probability after RF ablation.

  17. Anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activities of an exopolysaccharide from Rhizopus nigricans on CT26 tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Cao, Jianfeng; Chen, Guochuang; Xu, Yanghui; Lu, Jingbo; Fang, Fang; Chen, Kaoshan

    2016-07-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activities of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) from Rhizopus nigricans. Our results showed EPS could significantly inhibit the tumor growth and increase the immune organs index of CT26 tumor-bearing mice. EPS treatment increased the productions of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in serum. The increase of percentage of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells among total spleen T lymphocyte was also observed. Furthermore, EPS remarkably stimulate spleen lymphocytes proliferation in the absence or presence of mitogens. In addition, we found that EPS had synergistic effect with chemotherapy and improved immunosuppressive effect induced by 5-Fu. In summary, these findings indicated that the antitumor effects of EPS might be partly due to immune function activation and it might have potential to be used in the treatment for colorectal cancer.

  18. Automated segmentation of middle hepatic vein in non-contrast x-ray CT images based on an atlas-driven approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Teruhiko; Zhou, Xiangrong; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kondo, Hiroshi; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2008-03-01

    In order to support the diagnosis of hepatic diseases, understanding the anatomical structures of hepatic lobes and hepatic vessels is necessary. Although viewing and understanding the hepatic vessels in contrast media-enhanced CT images is easy, the observation of the hepatic vessels in non-contrast X-ray CT images that are widely used for the screening purpose is difficult. We are developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to support the liver diagnosis based on non-contrast X-ray CT images. This paper proposes a new approach to segment the middle hepatic vein (MHV), a key structure (landmark) for separating the liver region into left and right lobes. Extraction and classification of hepatic vessels are difficult in non-contrast X-ray CT images because the contrast between hepatic vessels and other liver tissues is low. Our approach uses an atlas-driven method by the following three stages. (1) Construction of liver atlases of left and right hepatic lobes using a learning datasets. (2) Fully-automated enhancement and extraction of hepatic vessels in liver regions. (3) Extraction of MHV based on the results of (1) and (2). The proposed approach was applied to 22 normal liver cases of non-contrast X-ray CT images. The preliminary results show that the proposed approach achieves the success in 14 cases for MHV extraction.

  19. A huge malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with hepatic metastasis arising from retroperitoneal ganglioneuroma.

    PubMed

    Meng, Z H; Yang, Y S; Cheng, K L; Chen, G Q; Wang, L P; Li, W

    2013-01-01

    Ganglioneuromas (GNs) are the rarest and most benign of the neuroblastic tumors. We experienced a case of huge retroperitoneal GN which differentiated into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) with hepatic metastasis. The tumor was located in the upper right quarter of the abdomen and pressed the right lobe of the liver, which was initially misdiagnosed as a liver carcinoma. The tumor shared blood supply with the right liver lob and had rich blood supplies from the abdominal aorta, renal artery and hepatic artery. It was also associated with skin pigment and recurrence shortly following resection. Our finding demonstrated that MPNST is a potent invasive malignant tumor and metastasis earlier with very poor prognosis.

  20. CT and MRI Findings in a Rare Case of Renal Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Akkaya, Zehra; Peker, Elif; Gulpinar, Basak; Karadag, Hale; Erden, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Primary renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor/extraskeletal Ewing’s sarcoma (PNET/EES) is a very rare renal tumor. Case Report We report a case of primary renal PNET/EES of the kidney in an adult patient and describe its computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings, including diffusion weighted images along with a review of the current medical literature. Conclusions Although very rare, a relatively large renal mass which shows very infiltrative growth pattern on CT and MR imaging and striking diffusion restriction should raise the suspicion of a renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor, in a young adult. PMID:27635170

  1. Endolymphatic Sac Tumor Showing Increased Activity on 68Ga DOTATATE PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Sadowski, Samira M; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2016-10-01

    Endolymphatic sac tumors (ELSTs) are rare tumors arising from the epithelium of the endolymphatic sac and duct that can be either sporadic or associated with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. We report a case of a VHL patient with histologically proven residual ELST who underwent Ga DOTATATE PET/CT showing increased activity (SUVmax, 6.29) by the ELST. The presented case of a VHL-associated ELST with increased Ga DOTATATE uptake indicates cell-surface expression of somatostatin receptors by this tumor, suggesting the potential application of somatostatin receptor imaging using Ga DOTA-conjugated peptides in the workup and management of these patients.

  2. Angiogenesis dependent characteristics of tumor observed on rabbit VX2 hepatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate angiogenesis dependent characteristics of carcinoma proliferation, metastasis and to found if there is tumor vascularity architecture defect. Methods: 36 rabbits were random divided into 2 groups: Experimental group: 18 rabbits liver were implanted with VX2 tumor by surgery operation; Control group: 18 experimental rabbits performed the same surgery operation without tumor implantation, the course of tumor growth and blood vessel invasion was observed by autopsy. One slide was used for hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, one slide was used for elastic fiber staining by Victoria blue and Ponceau’s histochemical staining, and one slide was used for vascular endothelial cell immunohistochemical staining with biotinylated-ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I); all three slides were observed under an optical microscopic. One additional slide was systematically observed by electron microscopy. SPSS 19.0 software was used for the statistical analyses of the data. Results: The tumor grew acceleration after tumor angiogenesis, volume of original tumors was correlated with vascular caliber. The central tumor found necrosis without enough blood supply while tumor grew rapidly after tumor angiogenesis. The tumor infiltrated into liver blood sinus, blood vessels in hepatic interstitial tissue, the liver capsular vein and important organs metastasis such as lungs, kidneys, abdominal cavity caused rabbits died. The average vascular density count of 18 experimental rabbits under 400 times light microscope were 43.17 ± 8.68/vessels/High Power Field; Tumor vascular diameter all within 200 μm. Vascular elastic fiber staining presented tumor blood vessels internal, external elastic plate intact, vascular endothelial cells organelles of tumor were integrity without endothelial cells architecture defect found by pathologic observation. Conclusion: Proliferation and metastasis of rabbit VX2 hepatic carcinoma was correlated with tumor angiogenesis and no tumor

  3. [Techniques of thermal ablation in primary hepatic carcinoma and metastatic tumors of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Rudzki, Sławomir; Jamroz, Adam

    2004-01-01

    Liver metastases develop in 30-50 per cent of patients with colorectal cancer. Without treatment, the median survival is approximately 7 months. Recent results from multiple investigations indicate that several minimally invasive treatment techniques are very effective for treating primary and secondary malignant hepatic tumors and they may replace surgical resection in the near future. Thermal ablation techniques for the treatment of primary and secondary malignant hepatic tumors include both freezing (cryoablation) and heating (microwave, laser, and high-intensity focused ultrasound) are characterized in this article.

  4. CT Imaging Findings after Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Olga R.; Thornton, Eavan; Mendiratta-Lala, Mishal; Mahadevan, Anand; Raptopoulos, Vassilious; Brook, Alexander; Najarian, Robert; Sheiman, Robert; Siewert, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To study radiological response to stereotactic radiotherapy for focal liver tumors. Materials and Methods. In this IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant study CTs of 68 consecutive patients who underwent stereotactic radiotherapy for liver tumors between 01/2006 and 01/2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Two independent reviewers evaluated lesion volume and enhancement pattern of the lesion and of juxtaposed liver parenchyma. Results. 36 subjects with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 25 with liver metastases, and seven with cholangiocarcinoma (CCC) were included in study. Mean follow-up time was 5.6 ± 7.1 months for HCC, 6.4 ± 5.1 months for metastases, and 10.1 ± 4.8 months for the CCC. Complete response was seen in 4/36 (11.1%) HCCs and 1/25 (4%) metastases. Partial response (>30% decrease in long diameter) was seen in 25/36 (69%) HCCs, 14/25 (58%) metastases, and 7/7 (100%) of CCCs. Partial response followed by local recurrence (>20% increase in long diameter from nadir) occurred in 2/36 (6%) HCCs and 4/25 (17%) metastases. Liver parenchyma adjacent to the lesion demonstrated a prominent halo of delayed enhancement in 27/36 (78%) of HCCs, 19/21 (91%) of metastases, and 7/7 (100%) of CCCs. Conclusion. Sustainable radiological partial response to stereotactic radiotherapy is most frequent outcome seen in liver lesions. Prominent halo of delayed enhancement of the adjacent liver is frequent finding. PMID:26221135

  5. Uncertainty analysis of quantitative imaging features extracted from contrast-enhanced CT in lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinzhong; Zhang, Lifei; Fave, Xenia J.; Fried, David V.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Ng, Chaan S.; Court, Laurence E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the uncertainty of quantitative imaging features extracted from contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans of lung cancer patients in terms of the dependency on the time after contrast injection and the feature reproducibility between scans. Methods Eight patients underwent contrast-enhanced CT scans of lung tumors on two sessions 2–7 days apart. Each session included 6 CT scans of the same anatomy taken every 15 seconds, starting 50 seconds after contrast injection. Image features based on intensity histogram, co-occurrence matrix, neighborhood gray-tone difference matrix, run-length matrix, and geometric shape were extracted from the tumor for each scan. Spearman’s correlation was used to examine the dependency of features on the time after contrast injection, with values over 0.50 considered time-dependent. Concordance correlation coefficients were calculated to examine the reproducibility of each feature between times of scans after contrast injection and between scanning sessions, with values greater than 0.90 considered reproducible. Results The features were found to have little dependency on the time between the contrast injection and the CT scan. Most features were reproducible between times of scans after contrast injection and between scanning sessions. Some features were more reproducible when they were extracted from a CT scan performed at a longer time after contrast injection. Conclusion The quantitative imaging features tested here are mostly reproducible and show little dependency on the time after contrast injection. PMID:26745258

  6. SU-E-J-275: Review - Computerized PET/CT Image Analysis in the Evaluation of Tumor Response to Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W; Wang, J; Zhang, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To review the literature in using computerized PET/CT image analysis for the evaluation of tumor response to therapy. Methods: We reviewed and summarized more than 100 papers that used computerized image analysis techniques for the evaluation of tumor response with PET/CT. This review mainly covered four aspects: image registration, tumor segmentation, image feature extraction, and response evaluation. Results: Although rigid image registration is straightforward, it has been shown to achieve good alignment between baseline and evaluation scans. Deformable image registration has been shown to improve the alignment when complex deformable distortions occur due to tumor shrinkage, weight loss or gain, and motion. Many semi-automatic tumor segmentation methods have been developed on PET. A comparative study revealed benefits of high levels of user interaction with simultaneous visualization of CT images and PET gradients. On CT, semi-automatic methods have been developed for only tumors that show marked difference in CT attenuation between the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues. Quite a few multi-modality segmentation methods have been shown to improve accuracy compared to single-modality algorithms. Advanced PET image features considering spatial information, such as tumor volume, tumor shape, total glycolytic volume, histogram distance, and texture features have been found more informative than the traditional SUVmax for the prediction of tumor response. Advanced CT features, including volumetric, attenuation, morphologic, structure, and texture descriptors, have also been found advantage over the traditional RECIST and WHO criteria in certain tumor types. Predictive models based on machine learning technique have been constructed for correlating selected image features to response. These models showed improved performance compared to current methods using cutoff value of a single measurement for tumor response. Conclusion: This review showed that

  7. Automated detection of lung tumors in PET/CT images using active contour filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramoto, Atsushi; Adachi, Hayato; Tsujimoto, Masakazu; Fujita, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Katsuaki; Yamamuro, Osamu; Tamaki, Tsuneo; Nishio, Masami; Kobayashi, Toshiki

    2015-03-01

    In a previous study, we developed a hybrid tumor detection method that used both computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) images. However, similar to existing computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes, it was difficult to detect low-contrast lesions that touch to the normal organs such as the chest wall or blood vessels in the lung. In the current study, we proposed a novel lung tumor detection method that uses active contour filters to detect the nodules deemed "difficult" in previous CAD schemes. The proposed scheme detects lung tumors using both CT and PET images. As for the detection in CT images, the massive region was first enhanced using an active contour filter (ACF), which is a type of contrast enhancement filter that has a deformable kernel shape. The kernel shape involves closed curves that are connected by several nodes that move iteratively in order to enclose the massive region. The final output of ACF is the difference between the maximum pixel value on the deformable kernel, and pixel value on the center of the filter kernel. Subsequently, the PET images were binarized to detect the regions of increased uptake. The results were integrated, followed by the false positive reduction using 21 characteristic features and three support vector machines. In the experiment, we evaluated the proposed method using 100 PET/CT images. More than half of nodules missed using previous methods were accurately detected. The results indicate that our method may be useful for the detection of lung tumors using PET/CT images.

  8. Hepatic resection or transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ninggang; Wei, Xiaodong; Zhang, Dongzhi; Chai, Wenxiao; Che, Ming; Wang, Jiangye; Du, Binbin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The role of hepatic resection in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with accompanying portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) remains controversial. This study aimed to evaluate the surgical outcomes of hepatic resection compared with those of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in HCC patients. A retrospective study was conducted using the medical records of 230 HCC patients with portal vein invasion who underwent hepatic resection (96 patients) or TACE (134 patients). The baseline characteristics, tumor characteristics, clinicopathological parameters, and overall survival rates were compared between the 2 groups. The baseline and tumor characteristics were comparable between the hepatic resection and TACE groups. The overall complication rate was 35.4% in the hepatic resection group, which was significantly lower than that in the TACE group (73.0%, P <0.001). However, the serious complication rate (grade ≥3) in the hepatic resection group was 13.5%, which was significantly higher than that in the TACE group (P = 0.003). The cumulative overall survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years in the hepatic resection group were 86.5%, 60.4%, and 33.3%, respectively. These rates were much higher than those in the TACE group (1-year: 77.6%; 3-year: 47.8%; and 5-year: 20.9%; P = 0.021). The long-term survival was notably better in the patients with types I and II PVTT than in the patients with types III and IV PVTT (P <0.05). The univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that types III and IV PVTT and TACE may have contributed to the poor overall survival following surgery. In HCC patients with PVTT and compensated liver function, hepatic resection is a safe and effective surgical protocol, particularly for patients with type I or II PVTT. PMID:27367992

  9. CT and angiography of primary extradural juxtasellar tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, T.; Ganti, S.R.; Mawad, M.E.; Hilal, S.K.

    1985-09-01

    The computed tomographic and angiographic features of 15 histologically proven primary extradural juxtasellar tumors were retrospectively reviewed. Five chordomas were characterized by prominent bone erosion and a significant posterior fossa component. Four trigeminal nerve neuromas each demonstrated bone erosion centered about Meckel's cave and moderate to marked contrast enhancement. Two cavernous sinus meningiomas revealed moderate contrast enhancement, expansion of the cavernous sinus, and moderate angiographic stain. Two cavernous hemangiomas of the cavernous sinus were intensely enhancing and demonstrated angiographic stain. Opacification of the sphenoid sinus with prominent bone destruction and lack of contrast enhancement was characteristic of a sphenoid sinus mucocele. The dural reflection could be directly visualized or indirectly inferred in each case.

  10. Comparison of DCE-CT models for quantitative evaluation of Ktrans in larynx tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosterbroek, J.; Bennink, E.; Philippens, M. E. P.; Raaijmakers, C. P. J.; Viergever, M. A.; de Jong, H. W. A. M.

    2015-05-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) can be used to estimate blood perfusion and vessel permeability in tumors. Tumor induced angiogenesis is generally associated with disorganized microvasculature with increased permeability or leakage. Estimated vascular leakage (Ktrans) values and their reliability greatly depend on the perfusion model used. To identify the preferred model for larynx tumor analysis, several perfusion models frequently used for estimating permeability were compared in this study. DCE-CT scans were acquired for 16 larynx cancer patients. Larynx tumors were delineated based on whole-mount histopathology after laryngectomy. DCE-CT data within these delineated volumes were analyzed using the Patlak and Logan plots, the Extended Tofts Model (ETM), the Adiabatic Approximation to the Tissue Homogeneity model (AATH) and a variant of AATH with fixed transit time (AATHFT). Akaike’s Information Criterion (AIC) was used to identify the best fitting model. Ktrans values from all models were compared with this best fitting model. Correlation strength was tested with two-tailed Spearman’s rank correlation and further examined using Bland-Altman plots. AATHFT was found to be the best fitting model. The overall median of individual patient medians Ktrans estimates were 14.3, 15.1, 16.1, 2.6 and 22.5 mL/100 g min  -  1 for AATH, AATHFT, ETM, Patlak and Logan, respectively. Ktrans estimates for all models except Patlak were strongly correlated (P  <  0.001). Bland-Altman plots show large biases but no significant deviating trend for any model other than Patlak. AATHFT was found to be the preferred model among those tested for estimation of Ktrans in larynx tumors.

  11. CT Features and Pathological Correlation of Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of the Kidney.

    PubMed

    Dong, Junqiang; Xing, Jingjing; Limbu, Hangsha Hang; Yue, Songwei; Su, Lei; Zhang, Dandan; Gao, Jianbo

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the computed tomography (CT) findings of primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of the kidney and correlate them pathologically. Ten cases of pathologically confirmed renal PNET were collected and retrospectively reviewed. The CT features that were analyzed include tumor size, shape, margins, density, nature of enhancement, presence of thrombosis, and metastasis, etc. These parameters were correlated with pathological findings and combined with literature review. The median age of the patients was 30 years. CT images showed solitary, large, ill-defined, irregular, or lobulated heterogeneous mass. Invasive growth toward the renal cortex and pelvis with renal cortical interruptions were seen in eight cases with one case exhibiting invasion that extended beyond the renal capsule with soft tissue seen in the perirenal fat pace. The tumors were confined to the kidney contour with enlargement of kidney in six of the cases. Cystic changes with mural nodules were detected in three cases. Eight cases showed persistent moderate enhancement during the nephrographic phase. Irregular septum-like structures were seen in four cases. Thrombosis was detected in eight cases. Lymph node metastasis was detected in eight cases with bilateral lung metastasis in two and bone metastasis in one. Renal PNET is a rare highly aggressive disease affecting younger people. It should be considered as a strong differential when well confined, yet large tumors that cause enlargement of the kidney are seen and also when tumors expressing cystic changes along with mural nodules are seen. Although renal PNET has certain other characteristic CT features, pathological and immunohistochemistry report must also be sought for definitive diagnosis.

  12. Selective Internal Radiotherapy (SIRT) of Hepatic Tumors: How to Deal with the Cystic Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Theysohn, Jens M.; Mueller, Stefan; Schlaak, Joerg F.; Ertle, Judith; Schlosser, Thomas W.; Bockisch, Andreas; Lauenstein, Thomas C.

    2013-08-01

    PurposeSelective internal radiotherapy (SIRT) with the beta emitter yttrium-90 (Y90) is a rapidly developing therapy option for unresectable liver malignancies. Nontarget irradiation of the gallbladder is a complication of SIRT. Thus, we aimed to assess different strategies to avoid infusion of Y90 into the cystic artery (CA).MethodsAfter hepatic digital subtraction angiography and administration of technetium-99m-labeled human serum albumin ({sup 99}mTc-HSA), 295 patients with primary or secondary liver tumors underwent single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). Different measures were taken before repeated Y90 mapping and SIRT to avoid unintended influx into the CA where necessary. Clinical symptoms, including pain, fever, or a positive Murphy sign, were assessed during patient follow-up.ResultsA significant {sup 99}mTc-HSA accumulation in the gallbladder wall (higher {sup 99}mTc-HSA uptake than in normal liver tissue) was seen in 20 patients. The following measures were taken to avoid unintended influx into the CA: temporary/permanent occlusion of the CA with gelfoam (n = 5)/microcoil (n = 1), induction of vasospasm with a microwire (n = 4), or altering catheter position (n = 10). Clinical signs of cholecystitis were observed in only one patient after temporary CA occlusion with gelfoam and were successfully treated by antibiotics. Cholecystectomy was not required for any patient.ConclusionIt is important to identify possible nontarget irradiation of the gallbladder. The risk for radiation-induced cholecystitis can be easily minimized by temporary or permanent CA embolization, vasospasm induction, or altering the catheter position.

  13. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha directly stimulates the overproduction of hepatic apolipoprotein B100-containing VLDL via impairment of hepatic insulin signaling.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin resistant states are commonly associated with both increased circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-a) and hepatic overproduction of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). In the present study, we examined the potential mechanistic link between TNF-a and hepatic overproduction of ap...

  14. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  15. Three polymorphisms of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and hepatitis B virus related hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qi; Fu, BiQi; Chen, Ping; Liu, Zhong Zhong; Wang, Wei; Ye, QiFa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: To assess the association between tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) G308A, G238A and C863T polymorphisms and hepatitis B virus related hepatocellular carcinoma (HBV-HCC) susceptibility. Methods: We interrogated the databases of Pubmed, Sciencedirect and Viley online library up to March 8, 2016. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) were calculated in a fixed-effects model or a random-effects model when appropriate. Results: In total, 12 case–control studies which containing 1580 HBV-HCC cases, 2033 HBV carrier controls, 395 HBV spontaneously recovered (SR) controls and 1116 healthy controls were included. Compared with GG genotype, the genotypes GA/AA of G308A were associated with a significantly increased HBV-HCC risk when the controls were all healthy individuals (AA vs. GG, OR 2.483, 95%CI 1.243 to 4.959; GA vs. GG, OR 1.383, 95%CI 1.028 to 1.860; GA/AA vs. GG, OR 1.381, 95%CI 1.048 to 1.820). Meanwhile, only the AA vs. GG model of G238A and HBV-HCC showed a statistic significance when the controls were healthy individuals (OR 4.776, 95%CI 1.280 to 17.819). CT genotype of TNF-α C863T could increase HBV-HCC risk whenever the controls were healthy individuals, HBV carriers or HBV recovers. Conclusion: This meta-analysis shows that AA genotype in TNF-α G308A and TNF-α G238A and CT genotype in TNF-α C863T may increase HBV-HCC risk. Therefore, HBV infection seemed to be a more important factor for tumorigenesis of HCC than genetic predisposition in G308A of TNF-α, and interaction between TNF-α C863T polymorphisms and HBV infection might be associated with increased HCC risk. PMID:27977601

  16. Anorectal giant condyloma acuminatum (Buschke-Loewenstein tumor): CT and radiographic manifestations

    SciTech Connect

    Balthazar, E.J.; Streiter, M.; Megibow, A.J.

    1984-03-01

    Giant condyloma acuminatum (Buschke-Loewenstein tumor) is an unusual variety of venereal wart characterized by a large size, cauliflower-like appearance, and locally invasive nature. CT examination of two patients with anorectal giant condylomata revealed the papillomatous and invasive nature of the lesion and the extent of tumor; there was infiltration of the subcutaneous tissue, perirectal fascial planes, and luminal narrowing with marked thickening of the rectal wall. The pathologic specimens showed benign histologic finding in one case and a mixed pattern with areas of malignant degeneration in the other. CT accurately demonstrated the exact location and extent of the lesions. The presence of malignant degeneration in this inherently invasive lesion can be established only on histologic examination.

  17. Evaluation of anterior mediastinal solid tumors by CT perfusion: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Bakan, Selim; Kandemirli, Sedat Giray; Dikici, Atilla Süleyman; Erşen, Ezel; Yıldırım, Onur; Samancı, Cesur; Batur, Şebnem; Olgun, Deniz Çebi; Kantarcı, Fatih; Akman, Canan

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to assess the role of computed tomography (CT) perfusion in differentiation of thymoma from thymic hyperplasia, lymphoma, thymic carcinoma, and lung cancer invading anterior mediastinum. METHODS In this study, 25 patients with an anterior mediastinal lesion underwent CT perfusion imaging from January 2015 to February 2016. Diagnoses included thymoma (n=7), thymic hyperplasia (n=8), lymphoma (n=4), thymic carcinoma (n=3), and invasive lung cancer (n=3). Lymphoma, thymic carcinoma, and lung cancer were grouped as malignant tumors for statistical analysis. Values for blood flow, blood volume, and permeability surface were measured in CT perfusion. RESULTS Blood flow and blood volume values were higher in thymoma in comparison to thymic hyperplasia; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Blood volume values were significantly higher in thymoma (mean, 11.4 mL/100 mL; range, 5.2–20.2 mL/100 mL) compared with lymphoma (mean, 5.3 mL/100 mL; range, 2.5–7.2 mL/100 mL) (P = 0.023). Blood flow and blood volume values were significantly higher in thymoma compared with non-thymoma malignant tumors (P = 0.025). CONCLUSION CT perfusion is helpful in differentiating thymoma from non-thymoma malignancies including lymphoma, thymic carcinoma, and invasive lung cancer involving the anterior mediastinum. PMID:27924778

  18. Graph cut based co-segmentation of lung tumor in PET-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Wei; Xiang, Dehui; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Xinjian

    2015-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of pulmonary tumor is important for clinicians to make appropriate diagnosis and treatment. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Computed Tomography (CT) are two commonly used imaging technologies for image-guided radiation therapy. In this study, we present a graph-based method to integrate the two modalities to segment the tumor simultaneously on PET and CT images. The co-segmentation problem is formulated as an energy minimization problem. Two weighted sub-graphs are constructed for PET and CT. The characteristic information of the two modalities is encoded on the edges of the graph. A context cost is enforced by adding context arcs to achieve consistent results between the two modalities. An optimal solution can be achieved by solving a maximum flow problem. The proposed segmentation method was validated on 18 sets of PET-CT images from different patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The quantitative results show significant improvement of our method with a mean DSC value 0.82.

  19. Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumor G1 with a Solitary Hepatic Metastatic Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Kohei; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimada, Seitarou; Ando, Takayuki; Hosokawa, Ayumu; Matsui, Koshi; Imura, Joji; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2017-01-01

    Rectal neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is a relatively rare tumor. NET is classified as G1, G2, or G3 according to the degree of mitosis or Ki-67 proliferation index, which reflect the malignant potential of the tumor, such as metastasis. Advanced cases with metastasis are indicated for chemotherapy treatment. However, the efficacy of chemotherapy is limited. Therefore, resection is considered, even in metastatic cases, if complete resection is possible. We herein report a case of small rectal NET discovered with hepatic metastasis classified as G1. The patient showed good progress with no recurrence after undergoing hepatectomy and endoscopic resection of rectal NET. PMID:28154272

  20. Microvascular Perfusion Changes following Transarterial Hepatic Tumor Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carmen Gacchina; Sharma, Karun V.; Levy, Elliot B.; Woods, David L.; Morris, Aaron H.; Bacher, John D.; Lewis, Andrew L.; Wood, Bradford J.; Dreher, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To quantify changes in tumor microvascular (< 1 mm) perfusion relative to commonly used angiographic endpoints. Materials and Methods Rabbit Vx2 liver tumors were embolized with 100–300-µm LC Bead particles to endpoints of substasis or complete stasis (controls were not embolized). Microvascular perfusion was evaluated by delivering two different fluorophore-conjugated perfusion markers (ie, lectins) through the catheter before embolization and 5 min after reaching the desired angiographic endpoint. Tumor microvasculature was labeled with an anti-CD31 antibody and analyzed with fluorescence microscopy for perfusion marker overlap/mismatch. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and post hoc test (n = 3–5 per group; 18 total). Results Mean microvascular density was 70 vessels/mm2 ± 17 (standard error of the mean), and 81% ± 1 of microvasculature (ie, CD31+ structures) was functionally perfused within viable Vx2 tumor regions. Embolization to the extent of substasis eliminated perfusion in 37% ± 9 of perfused microvessels (P > .05 vs baseline), whereas embolization to the extent of angiographic stasis eliminated perfusion in 56% ± 8 of perfused microvessels. Persistent microvascular perfusion following embolization was predominantly found in the tumor periphery, adjacent to normal tissue. Newly perfused microvasculature was evident following embolization to substasis but not when embolization was performed to complete angiographic stasis. Conclusions Nearly half of tumor microvasculature remained patent despite embolization to complete angiographic stasis. The observed preservation of tumor microvasculature perfusion with angiographic endpoints of substasis and stasis may have implications for tumor response to embolotherapy. PMID:26321051

  1. Carbon nanotube based respiratory gated micro-CT imaging of a murine model of lung tumors with optical imaging correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burk, Laurel M.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Heathcote, Samuel; Wang, Ko-han; Kim, William Y.; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2011-03-01

    Current optical imaging techniques can successfully measure tumor load in murine models of lung carcinoma but lack structural detail. We demonstrate that respiratory gated micro-CT imaging of such models gives information about structure and correlates with tumor load measurements by optical methods. Four mice with multifocal, Kras-induced tumors expressing firefly luciferase were imaged against four controls using both optical imaging and respiratory gated micro-CT. CT images of anesthetized animals were acquired with a custom CNT-based system using 30 ms x-ray pulses during peak inspiration; respiration motion was tracked with a pressure sensor beneath each animal's abdomen. Optical imaging based on the Luc+ signal correlating with tumor load was performed on a Xenogen IVIS Kinetix. Micro-CT images were post-processed using Osirix, measuring lung volume with region growing. Diameters of the largest three tumors were measured. Relationships between tumor size, lung volumes, and optical signal were compared. CT images and optical signals were obtained for all animals at two time points. In all lobes of the Kras+ mice in all images, tumors were visible; the smallest to be readily identified measured approximately 300 microns diameter. CT-derived tumor volumes and optical signals related linearly, with r=0.94 for all animals. When derived for only tumor bearing animals, r=0.3. The trend of each individual animal's optical signal tracked correctly based on the CT volumes. Interestingly, lung volumes also correlated positively with optical imaging data and tumor volume burden, suggesting active remodeling.

  2. Hepatic cavernous hemangioma: diagnosis with /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red cells and single-photon emission CT

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, R.I.; Friedman, A.C.; Maurer, A.H.; Radecki, P.D.; Caroline, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    During the performance of high-resolution real-time abdominal sonography, small echogenic hepatic masses are frequently discovered. A second imaging test to confirm the suspected diagnosis of hemangioma is often required. Planar labeled red-cell imaging will often not detect hemangiomas smaller than 3 cm. We studied 14 patients with labeled red-cell scintigraphy and single-photon emission CT (SPECT). Six hemangiomas were diagnosed by SPECT that would have been missed by planar imaging alone. All six were smaller than 2.5 cm. With the addition of SPECT, labeled red-cell scintigraphy has specificity and sensitivity that make it at least as reliable as dynamic CT for the noninvasive diagnosis of hepatic cavernous hemangioma.

  3. SU-E-I-58: Detecting Tumors with Extremely Low Contrast in CT Images

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, K; Gou, S; Kupelian, P; Steiberg, M; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumors such as the prostate focal lesions and the brain metastases have extremely low CT contrast and MRI is usually used for target delineation. The target contours are propagated to the CT for treatment planning and patient positioning. We have employed an advanced denoising method eliminating the noise and allow magnification of subtle contrast of these focal lesions on CT. Methods: Five prostate and two brain metastasis patients with MRI T2, diffusion or dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) images confirmed focal lesions were included. One brain patients had 5 metastases. A block matching 3D (BM3D) algorithm was adapted to reduce the noise of kVCT images used for treatment planning. The gray-level range of the resultant images was narrowed to magnify the tumor-normal tissue contrast. Results: For the prostate patients, denoised kVCT images showed focal regions at 5, 8,11-1, 2, and 8–10 oclock for the 5 patients, this is highly consistent to the radiologist confirmed focal lesions based on MRI at 5, 7, 11-1, 2 and 8–10 oclock in the axial plane. These CT focal regions matched well with the MRI focal lesions in the cranio-caudal position. The average increase in density compared to background prostate glands was 0.86%, which corresponds to ∼50% increase in cellularity and is lower than the average CT noise level of 2.4%. For the brain patients, denoised kVCT showed 5/6 metastases. The high CT-density region of a metastasis is 2-mm off from its corresponding elevated MRI perfusion center. Overall the detecting sensitivity was 91%. Conclusion: It has been preliminarily demonstrated that the higher tumor cellularity can be detected using kVCT. The low contrast-to-noise information requires advanced denoising to reveal. The finding is significant to radiotherapy by providing an additional tool to locate focal lesions for confirming MRI-CT registration and providing a highly accessible outcome assessment tool.

  4. The effect of diet on tumor necrosis factor stimulation of hepatic lipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Feingold, K.R.; Soued, M.; Serio, M.K.; Adi, S.; Moser, A.H.; Grunfeld, C. )

    1990-06-01

    In this study, we determined the effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) on serum lipid levels and hepatic lipid synthesis in animals whose diets and feeding conditions were varied to induce changes in baseline serum lipid levels and/or rates of hepatic lipid synthesis. In animals studied at both the nadir and peak of the diurnal cycle of hepatic lipid synthesis, TNF acutely increases serum triglyceride levels, stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis, and increases the quantity of newly synthesized fatty acids found in the serum. Similarly, in animals ingesting either high-sucrose or cholesterol-enriched diets, TNF induces the characteristic rapid increase in serum triglyceride levels, hepatic fatty acid synthesis, and quantity of labeled fatty acids in the serum. In animals fed a diet high in triglycerides, using either corn oil or lard, TNF stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increases the quantity of newly synthesized fatty acids in the serum, but serum triglyceride levels do not change. However, TNF inhibits gastric emptying, which results in a marked decrease in fat absorption in TNF-treated animals. It is likely that a decrease in the dietary contribution to serum triglyceride levels during high-triglyceride feeding counterbalances the increased hepatic contribution induced by TNF treatment. In animals fasted before TNF administration there was no acute change in either serum lipid levels, hepatic fatty acid synthesis, or the quantity of labeled fatty acids in the serum. Thus, TNF stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increases serum triglyceride levels under many diverse dietary conditions, suggesting that there is a strong linkage between the immune system and lipid metabolism that is independent of most dietary manipulations and may be of fundamental importance in the body's response to infection.

  5. Texture Analysis of Preoperative CT Images for Prediction of Postoperative Hepatic Insufficiency: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Amber L; Adams, Lauryn B; Allen, Peter J; D’Angelica, Michael I; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Fong, Yuman; Kingham, T Peter; Leung, Universe; Miga, Michael I; Parada, E Patricia; Jarnagin, William R; Do, Richard K G

    2015-01-01

    Background Texture analysis is a promising method of analyzing imaging data to potentially enhance diagnostic capability. This approach involves automated measurement of pixel intensity variation that may offer further insight into disease progression than standard imaging techniques alone. We postulate that postoperative liver insufficiency, a major source of morbidity and mortality, correlates with preoperative heterogeneous parenchymal enhancement that can be quantified with texture analysis of cross-sectional imaging. Study Design A retrospective case-matched study (waiver of informed consent and HIPAA authorization, approved by the institutional review board) was performed comparing patients who underwent major hepatic resection and developed liver insufficiency (n=12) to a matched group of patients with no postoperative liver insufficiency (n=24) by procedure, remnant volume, and year of procedure. Texture analysis (with gray-level co-occurrence matrices) was used to quantify the heterogeneity of liver parenchyma on preoperative computed tomography (CT) scans. Statistical significance was evaluated using Wilcoxon’s signed rank and Pearson’s chi-squared tests. Results No statistically significant differences were found between study groups for preoperative patient demographics and clinical characteristics, with the exception of gender (p<0.05). Two texture features differed significantly between the groups: correlation (linear dependency of gray levels on neighboring pixels) and entropy (randomness of brightness variation) (p<0.05). Conclusions In this preliminary study, the texture of liver parenchyma on preoperative CT, was significantly more varied, less symmetric, and less homogeneous in patients with postoperative liver insufficiency; thus texture analysis has the potential to provide an additional means of preoperative risk stratification. PMID:25537305

  6. CAR-T cell therapy in gastrointestinal tumors and hepatic carcinoma: From bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Zimu; Peng, Meiyu; Fu, Shuyu; Xue, Zhenyi; Zhang, Rongxin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a genetically engineered receptor that combines a scFv domain, which specifically recognizes the tumor-specific antigen, with T cell activation domains. CAR-T cell therapies have demonstrated tremendous efficacy against hematologic malignancies in many clinical trials. Recent studies have extended these efforts to the treatment of solid tumors. However, the outcomes of CAR-T cell therapy for solid tumors are not as remarkable as the outcomes have been for hematologic malignancies. A series of hurdles has arisen with respect to CAR-T cell-based immunotherapy, which needs to be overcome to target solid tumors. The major challenge for CAR-T cell therapy in solid tumors is the selection of the appropriate specific antigen to demarcate the tumor from normal tissue. In this review, we discuss the application of CAR-T cells to gastrointestinal and hepatic carcinomas in preclinical and clinical research. Furthermore, we analyze the usefulness of several specific markers in the study of gastrointestinal tumors and hepatic carcinoma. PMID:28123893

  7. CAR-T cell therapy in gastrointestinal tumors and hepatic carcinoma: From bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Zimu; Peng, Meiyu; Fu, Shuyu; Xue, Zhenyi; Zhang, Rongxin

    2016-01-01

    The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a genetically engineered receptor that combines a scFv domain, which specifically recognizes the tumor-specific antigen, with T cell activation domains. CAR-T cell therapies have demonstrated tremendous efficacy against hematologic malignancies in many clinical trials. Recent studies have extended these efforts to the treatment of solid tumors. However, the outcomes of CAR-T cell therapy for solid tumors are not as remarkable as the outcomes have been for hematologic malignancies. A series of hurdles has arisen with respect to CAR-T cell-based immunotherapy, which needs to be overcome to target solid tumors. The major challenge for CAR-T cell therapy in solid tumors is the selection of the appropriate specific antigen to demarcate the tumor from normal tissue. In this review, we discuss the application of CAR-T cells to gastrointestinal and hepatic carcinomas in preclinical and clinical research. Furthermore, we analyze the usefulness of several specific markers in the study of gastrointestinal tumors and hepatic carcinoma.

  8. Soy protein isolate inhibits hepatic tumor promotion in mice fed a high-fat liquid diet.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Kelly E; Pulliam, Casey F; Pedersen, Kim B; Hennings, Leah; Ronis, Martin Jj

    2017-03-01

    Alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases are risk factors for development of hepatocellular carcinoma, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. On the other hand, ingestion of soy-containing diets may oppose the development of certain cancers. We previously reported that replacing casein with a soy protein isolate reduced tumor promotion in the livers of mice with alcoholic liver disease after feeding a high fat ethanol liquid diet following initiation with diethylnitrosamine. Feeding soy protein isolate inhibited processes that may contribute to tumor promotion including inflammation, sphingolipid signaling, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We have extended these studies to characterize liver tumor promotion in a model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease produced by chronic feeding of high-fat liquid diets in the absence of ethanol. Mice treated with diethylnitrosamine on postnatal day 14 were fed a high-fat liquid diet made with casein or SPI as the sole protein source for 16 weeks in adulthood. Relative to mice fed normal chow, a high fat/casein diet led to increased tumor promotion, hepatocyte proliferation, steatosis, and inflammation. Replacing casein with soy protein isolate counteracted these effects. The high fat diets also resulted in a general increase in transcripts for Wnt/β-catenin pathway components, which may be an important mechanism, whereby hepatic tumorigenesis is promoted. However, soy protein isolate did not block Wnt signaling in this nonalcoholic fatty liver disease model. We conclude that replacing casein with soy protein isolate blocks development of steatosis, inflammation, and tumor promotion in diethylnitrosamine-treated mice fed high fat diets. Impact statement The impact of dietary components on cancer is a topic of great interest for both the general public and the scientific community. Liver cancer is currently the second leading form of cancer deaths worldwide. Our study has addressed the effect of the protein

  9. In vivo assessment of intratumoral aspirin injection to treat hepatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Saad-Hossne, Rogério; Teixeira, Fábio Vieira; Denadai, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study the antineoplastic efficacy of 10% aspirin intralesional injection on VX2 hepatic tumors in a rabbit model. METHODS: Thirty-two male rabbits (age: 6-9 wk; body weight: 1700-2500 g) were inoculated with VX2 hepatic tumor cells (104 cells/rabbit) via supra-umbilical median laparotomy. On day 4 post-implantation, when the tumors were about 1 cm in diameter, the rabbits were randomly divided into the following groups (n = 8 each group) to assess early (24 h) and late (7 d) antineoplastic effects of intratumoral injection of 10% bicarbonate aspirin solution (experimental groups) in comparison to intratumoral injection of physiological saline solution (control groups): group 1, 24 h control; group 2, 24 h experimental; group 3, 7 d control; group 4, 7 d experimental. The serum biochemistry profile (measurements of glycemia, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase) and body weight measurements were obtained for all animals at the following time points: D0, before tumor implant; D4, day of treatment; D5, day of sacrifice for groups 1 and 2; D11, day of sacrifice for groups 3 and 4. Gross assessments of the abdominal and thoracic cavities were carried out upon sacrifice. The resected liver tissues, including hepatic tumors, were qualitatively (general morphology, signs of necrosis) and quantitatively (tumor area) assessed by histopathological analysis. RESULTS: Gross examination showed no alterations, besides the left hepatic lobe tumors, had occurred in the thoracic and abdominal cavities of any animal at any time point evaluated. However, the features of the tumor foci were distinctive between the groups. Compared to the control groups, which showed normal unabated tumor progression, the aspirin-treated groups showed imprecise but limited tumor boundaries and a general red-white coloration (indicating hemorrhaging) at 24 h post-treatment, and development of yellow-white areas of a cicatricial

  10. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Teens > Hepatitis Print A A A ... to a liver condition called hepatitis . What Is Hepatitis? The liver is one of the body's powerhouses. ...

  11. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... an important digestive liquid called bile . What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  12. Tungsten Oxide Nanorods: An Efficient Nanoplatform for Tumor CT Imaging and Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiguo; Kong, Bin; Yu, Chao; Shi, Xiangyang; Wang, Mingwei; Liu, Wei; Sun, Yanan; Zhang, Yingjian; Yang, Hong; Yang, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    We report here a facile thermal decomposition approach to creating tungsten oxide nanorods (WO2.9 NRs) with a length of 13.1 ± 3.6 nm and a diameter of 4.4 ± 1.5 nm for tumor theranostic applications. The formed WO2.9 NRs were modified with methoxypoly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) carboxyl acid via ligand exchange to have good water dispersability and biocompatibility. With the high photothermal conversion efficiency irradiated by a 980 nm laser and the better X-ray attenuation property than clinically used computed tomography (CT) contrast agent Iohexol, the formed PEGylated WO2.9 NRs are able to inhibit the growth of the model cancer cells in vitro and the corresponding tumor model in vivo, and enable effective CT imaging of the tumor model in vivo. Our “killing two birds with one stone” strategy could be extended for fabricating other nanoplatforms for efficient tumor theranostic applications. PMID:24413483

  13. Computerized segmentation of liver in hepatic CT and MRI by means of level-set geodesic active contouring.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenji; Huynh, Hieu Trung; Liu, Yipeng; Calabrese, Dominic; Zhou, Karen; Oto, Aytekin; Hori, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    Computerized liver volumetry has been studied, because the current "gold-standard" manual volumetry is subjective and very time-consuming. Liver volumetry is done in either CT or MRI. A number of researchers have developed computerized liver segmentation in CT, but there are fewer studies on ones for MRI. Our purpose in this study was to develop a general framework for liver segmentation in both CT and MRI. Our scheme consisted of 1) an anisotropic diffusion filter to reduce noise while preserving liver structures, 2) a scale-specific gradient magnitude filter to enhance liver boundaries, 3) a fast-marching algorithm to roughly determine liver boundaries, and 4) a geodesic-active-contour model coupled with a level-set algorithm to refine the initial boundaries. Our CT database contained hepatic CT scans of 18 liver donors obtained under a liver transplant protocol. Our MRI database contains 23 patients with 1.5T MRI scanners. To establish "gold-standard" liver volumes, radiologists manually traced the contour of the liver on each CT or MR slice. We compared our computer volumetry with "gold-standard" manual volumetry. Computer volumetry in CT and MRI reached excellent agreement with manual volumetry (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.94 and 0.98, respectively). Average user time for computer volumetry in CT and MRI was 0.57 ± 0.06 and 1.0 ± 0.13 min. per case, respectively, whereas those for manual volumetry were 39.4 ± 5.5 and 24.0 ± 4.4 min. per case, respectively, with statistically significant difference (p < .05). Our computerized liver segmentation framework provides an efficient and accurate way of measuring liver volumes in both CT and MRI.

  14. SU-E-QI-20: A Review of Advanced PET and CT Image Features for the Evaluation of Tumor Response

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To review the literature in using quantitative PET and CT image features for the evaluation of tumor response. Methods: We reviewed and summarized more than fifty papers that use advanced, quantitative PET/CT image features for the evaluation of tumor response. We also discussed future works on extracting disease-specific features, combining multiple and complementary features in response modeling, delineating tumor in multimodality images, and exploring biological explanations of these advanced features. Results: Advanced PET image features considering spatial information, such as tumor volume, tumor shape, total glycolytic volume, histogram distance, and texture features (characterizing spatial distribution of FDG uptake) have been found more informative than the traditional SUVmax for the prediction of tumor response. Advanced CT features, including volumetric, attenuation, morphologic, structure, and texture descriptors, have also been found advantage over the traditional RECIST and WHO criteria in certain tumor types. Conclusions: Advanced, quantitative FDG PET/CT image features have been shown promising for the evaluation of tumor response. With the emerging multi-modality imaging performed at multiple time points for each patient, it becomes more important to analyze the serial images quantitatively, select and combine both complementary and contradictory information from various sources, for accurate and personalized evaluation of tumor response to therapy.

  15. EBV-associated hepatic smooth muscle tumor of uncertain biologic behavior after heart transplantation in a pediatric patient: case report

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Chintalapati, Suneetha; Dietz, Robin; Raza, Adnan S.; Wang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-associated smooth muscle tumor (EBV-SMT) is a rare neoplasm recognized in immunocompromised patients. There are less than 30 cases of EBV-SMT reported in pediatric population following solid organ transplantation. Herein, we report a case of an 8-year-old female who was incidentally noted to have multiple lesions in the liver 8 years after heart transplantation. The tumor was composed of a cellular proliferation of spindle-shaped cells with low mitotic activity. The diagnosis of EBV-SMT was confirmed by in situ hybridization for EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) transcripts. Multiple additional lesions were detected by whole body positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan 4 months after the initial finding of the hepatic lesions. Immunosuppression was switched to a mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor. We conclude that EBV-SMT should be included in the differential diagnoses in post-transplantation patients and further investigations should be performed to evaluate additional lesions. PMID:28280632

  16. CT Pelvis in Children; Should We Routinely Scan Pelvis for Wilms Tumor and Hepatoblastoma? Implications for Imaging Protocol Development.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Waseem; McHugh, Kieran; Aslam, Mubashir; Sajjad, Zafar; Abid, Waqas; Youssef, Talaat; Ali, Arif; Fadoo, Zahra

    2015-10-01

    Wilms tumor and hepatoblastoma are the most common intra-abdominal solid organ childhood tumors. CT examination is one of the routinely performed procedures in hospitals for children with these tumors inspite of high radiation exposure associated with CT scans. Sixty patients (Wilms tumor = 45, hepatoblastoma = 16) were evaluated retrospectively. Higher proportion (44.4%) of metastatic disease was identified at presentation in the Wilms tumor subset as compared to hepatoblastoma (6.3%) [p=0.006]. Metastatic disease was noted in 6 patients having Wilms tumor on follow-up while it was also low in hepatoblastoma which was noted in only 2 patients (p > 0.05). No significant difference was identified in pelvic extension of disease at presentation in both studied population (p > 0.05). Pelvic metastasis was noted in 1 patient only with Wilms tumor on follow-up while no pelvic metastasis was seen in the hepatoblastoma patients (p-value > 0.05).

  17. Polydopamine-coated gold nanostars for CT imaging and enhanced photothermal therapy of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Du; Shi, Xiangyang; Jin, Dayong

    2016-12-01

    The advancement of biocompatible nanoplatforms with dual functionalities of diagnosis and therapeutics is strongly demanded in biomedicine in recent years. In this work, we report the synthesis and characterization of polydopamine (pD)-coated gold nanostars (Au NSs) for computed tomography (CT) imaging and enhanced photothermal therapy (PTT) of tumors. Au NSs were firstly formed via a seed-mediated growth method and then stabilized with thiolated polyethyleneimine (PEI-SH), followed by deposition of pD on their surface. The formed pD-coated Au NSs (Au-PEI@pD NSs) were well characterized. We show that the Au-PEI@pD NSs are able to convert the absorbed near-infrared laser light into heat, and have strong X-ray attenuation property. Due to the co-existence of Au NSs and the pD, the light to heat conversion efficiency of the NSs can be significantly enhanced. These very interesting properties allow their uses as a powerful theranostic nanoplatform for efficient CT imaging and enhanced phtotothermal therapy of cancer cells in vitro and the xenografted tumor model in vivo. With the easy functionalization nature enabled by the coated pD shell, the developed pD-coated Au NSs may be developed as a versatile nanoplatform for targeted CT imaging and PTT of different types of cancer.

  18. SU-F-207-06: CT-Based Assessment of Tumor Volume in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Qayyum, F; Armato, S; Straus, C; Husain, A; Vigneswaran, W; Kindler, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the potential utility of computed tomography (CT) scans in the assessment of physical tumor bulk in malignant pleural mesothelioma patients. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma were used for this study. A CT scan was acquired for each patient prior to surgical resection of the tumor (median time between scan and surgery: 27 days). After surgery, the ex-vivo tumor volume was measured by a pathologist using a water displacement method. Separately, a radiologist identified and outlined the tumor boundary on each CT section that demonstrated tumor. These outlines then were analyzed to determine the total volume of disease present, the number of sections with outlines, and the mean volume of disease per outlined section. Subsets of the initial patient cohort were defined based on these parameters, i.e. cases with at least 30 sections of disease with a mean disease volume of at least 3mL per section. For each subset, the R- squared correlation between CT-based tumor volume and physical ex-vivo tumor volume was calculated. Results: The full cohort of 28 patients yielded a modest correlation between CT-based tumor volume and the ex-vivo tumor volume with an R-squared value of 0.66. In general, as the mean tumor volume per section increased, the correlation of CT-based volume with the physical tumor volume improved substantially. For example, when cases with at least 40 CT sections presenting a mean of at least 2mL of disease per section were evaluated (n=20) the R-squared correlation increased to 0.79. Conclusion: While image-based volumetry for mesothelioma may not generally capture physical tumor volume as accurately as one might expect, there exists a set of conditions in which CT-based volume is highly correlated with the physical tumor volume. SGA receives royalties and licensing fees through the University of Chicago for computer-aided diagnosis technology.

  19. [Role of PET-CT in the follow-up of treated tumors of the head and neck].

    PubMed

    Mabille, L

    2008-01-01

    F-18 FDG PET-CT is a well established medical imaging technique used routinely for the follow-up of treated head and neck tumors. Currently, PET-CT is performed 4 months after the end of therapy to assess its efficacy. More recently it has been suggested that this delay could be reduced to one month with major therapeutic implications. During follow-up, PET-CT could improve sensitivity and specificity compared to other imaging techniques. Moreover, since PET-CT is a "whole body technique", it allows restaging in a single procedure.

  20. Topology polymorphism graph for lung tumor segmentation in PET-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hui; Wang, Xiuying; Zhou, Jianlong; Eberl, Stefan; Yin, Yong; Feng, Dagan; Fulham, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Accurate lung tumor segmentation is problematic when the tumor boundary or edge, which reflects the advancing edge of the tumor, is difficult to discern on chest CT or PET. We propose a ‘topo-poly’ graph model to improve identification of the tumor extent. Our model incorporates an intensity graph and a topology graph. The intensity graph provides the joint PET-CT foreground similarity to differentiate the tumor from surrounding tissues. The topology graph is defined on the basis of contour tree to reflect the inclusion and exclusion relationship of regions. By taking into account different topology relations, the edges in our model exhibit topological polymorphism. These polymorphic edges in turn affect the energy cost when crossing different topology regions under a random walk framework, and hence contribute to appropriate tumor delineation. We validated our method on 40 patients with non-small cell lung cancer where the tumors were manually delineated by a clinical expert. The studies were separated into an ‘isolated’ group (n = 20) where the lung tumor was located in the lung parenchyma and away from associated structures / tissues in the thorax and a ‘complex’ group (n = 20) where the tumor abutted / involved a variety of adjacent structures and had heterogeneous FDG uptake. The methods were validated using Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC) to measure the spatial volume overlap and Hausdorff distance (HD) to compare shape similarity calculated as the maximum surface distance between the segmentation results and the manual delineations. Our method achieved an average DSC of 0.881  ±  0.046 and HD of 5.311  ±  3.022 mm for the isolated cases and DSC of 0.870  ±  0.038 and HD of 9.370  ±  3.169 mm for the complex cases. Student’s t-test showed that our model outperformed the other methods (p-values <0.05).

  1. [Periinterventional cone-beam-CT: application at transarterial chemoembolization of liver tumors].

    PubMed

    Adamus, R; Uder, M; Wilhelm, M; Loose, R W

    2011-07-01

    Periinterventional Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) today is a valuable tool in complex radiological interventions. Only little experience exists about CBCT in transarterial chemoembolisations (TACE) of liver tumors. 25 patients underwent periinterventional CBCT. We used a C-arc DSA with 30 × 40 cm flat panel detector. Image data with axial, coronal and 3D-reconstruction were acquired by 217° rotation in 8 seconds. In all 25 cases CBCT had an influence on the TACE regarding the decision which vessels to catheterize, the amount of retention of the embolisation agent or an abort because of insufficient vascularisation. In comparison with DSA alone, CBCT allows a better visualisation of tumour vessels, simplifies selective catheterisation, the decision whether an embolisation is possible and enables a good visualisation of Lipiodol retention. Hence, CBCT is a helpful periinterventional tool but cannot substitute CT and MRI in follow up.

  2. [Using CT to diagnose brain tumors at the Point G Hospital in Mali].

    PubMed

    Keita, A D; Kane, M; Guinto, C O; Landoure, G; Traore, S; Karembe, M; Toure, M; Diallo, A K; Fongoro, S; Sidibe, S; Traore, M; Traore, I

    2007-01-01

    The authors report 27 cases of cerebral tumours in 22 men and 5 women age 1 to 81. Clinical symptoms were dominated by cranial hypertension (59.3%), focal motor impairment involving cranial nerves (51.9%.) and seizures due to epilepsy (44.4%). The main tumors detected with CT scan include glyoma (.5 cases), craniopharyngioma (3 cases), adenoma (3 cases), medulloblastoma (3 cases), and metastasis (3 cases). The supra tentoriel was predominant (76.9%). Neurosurgery was performed in 6 patients and 21 cases received medical treatment. We fund 13 cases of death. In conclasion, cerebral tumours are very severe pathologies because of the high mortality associated with. CT scan has contributed to diagnose the lesions, show their topography and to determinte the histological nature. Neurosurgery is necessary for the treatment of these lesions.

  3. Random Walk and Graph Cut for Co-Segmentation of Lung Tumor on PET-CT Images.

    PubMed

    Ju, Wei; Xiang, Dehui; Xiang, Deihui; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Lirong; Kopriva, Ivica; Chen, Xinjian

    2015-12-01

    Accurate lung tumor delineation plays an important role in radiotherapy treatment planning. Since the lung tumor has poor boundary in positron emission tomography (PET) images and low contrast in computed tomography (CT) images, segmentation of tumor in the PET and CT images is a challenging task. In this paper, we effectively integrate the two modalities by making fully use of the superior contrast of PET images and superior spatial resolution of CT images. Random walk and graph cut method is integrated to solve the segmentation problem, in which random walk is utilized as an initialization tool to provide object seeds for graph cut segmentation on the PET and CT images. The co-segmentation problem is formulated as an energy minimization problem which is solved by max-flow/min-cut method. A graph, including two sub-graphs and a special link, is constructed, in which one sub-graph is for the PET and another is for CT, and the special link encodes a context term which penalizes the difference of the tumor segmentation on the two modalities. To fully utilize the characteristics of PET and CT images, a novel energy representation is devised. For the PET, a downhill cost and a 3D derivative cost are proposed. For the CT, a shape penalty cost is integrated into the energy function which helps to constrain the tumor region during the segmentation. We validate our algorithm on a data set which consists of 18 PET-CT images. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method is superior to the graph cut method solely using the PET or CT is more accurate compared with the random walk method, random walk co-segmentation method, and non-improved graph cut method.

  4. Anti-Gr-1 antibody depletion fails to eliminate hepatic myeloid-derived suppressor cells in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chi; Kapanadze, Tamar; Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Manns, Michael P; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies show that the liver is a preferred organ for the accumulation of MDSC. In this study, we examined the effect of systemic RB6-8C5 treatment on hepatic MDSC in tumor-bearing mice. EL4 tumor-bearing mice were injected i.p. with RB6-8C5, and hepatic, splenic, and blood MDSCs were analyzed by flow cytometry. Unexpectedly, hepatic MDSC remained in the liver, although RB6-8C5 completely eliminated them from the spleen and peripheral blood 24 h after treatment. Secondary antibody staining confirmed the presence of RB6-8C5-bound MDSC in the liver of mice with s.c. tumors. Similar observations were made in two other (colon and melanoma) tumor models. Whereas RB6-8C5 injection induced cell death of hepatic MDSC, as shown by Annexin V/7-AAD staining, these cells were replaced immediately, leading to a constant, increased frequency of hepatic MDSC. Adoptively transferred MDSC migrated preferentially to the liver after RB6-8C5 treatment, suggesting that hepatic MDSCs are reconstituted rapidly after depletion. Finally, hepatic MDSC remained immunosuppressive despite RB6-8C5 injection. Our study demonstrates that RB6-8C5 is not suitable for depletion of hepatic MDSCs and analysis of their function.

  5. Automated segmentation of murine lung tumors in x-ray micro-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swee, Joshua K. Y.; Sheridan, Clare; de Bruin, Elza; Downward, Julian; Lassailly, Francois; Pizarro, Luis

    2014-03-01

    Recent years have seen micro-CT emerge as a means of providing imaging analysis in pre-clinical study, with in-vivo micro-CT having been shown to be particularly applicable to the examination of murine lung tumors. Despite this, existing studies have involved substantial human intervention during the image analysis process, with the use of fully-automated aids found to be almost non-existent. We present a new approach to automate the segmentation of murine lung tumors designed specifically for in-vivo micro-CT-based pre-clinical lung cancer studies that addresses the specific requirements of such study, as well as the limitations human-centric segmentation approaches experience when applied to such micro-CT data. Our approach consists of three distinct stages, and begins by utilizing edge enhancing and vessel enhancing non-linear anisotropic diffusion filters to extract anatomy masks (lung/vessel structure) in a pre-processing stage. Initial candidate detection is then performed through ROI reduction utilizing obtained masks and a two-step automated segmentation approach that aims to extract all disconnected objects within the ROI, and consists of Otsu thresholding, mathematical morphology and marker-driven watershed. False positive reduction is finally performed on initial candidates through random-forest-driven classification using the shape, intensity, and spatial features of candidates. We provide validation of our approach using data from an associated lung cancer study, showing favorable results both in terms of detection (sensitivity=86%, specificity=89%) and structural recovery (Dice Similarity=0.88) when compared against manual specialist annotation.

  6. Hepatic falciform ligament Tc-99m-macroaggregated albumin activity on SPECT/CT prior to Yttrium-90 microsphere radioembolization: prophylactic measures to prevent non-target microsphere localization via patent hepatic falciform arteries.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yung Hsiang; Tan, Andrew E H; Khoo, Li Ser; Lo, Richard H G; Chow, Pierce K H; Goh, Anthony S W

    2011-06-01

    Yttrium-90 (Y-90) selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) is increasingly used to treat inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma. We describe two patients where hepatic falciform ligament Technetium-99m-macroaggregated albumin (Tc-99m-MAA) activity was identified on single photon emission computed tomography with integrated low-dose CT (SPECT/CT) scan during pre-therapy planning, and the steps taken to prevent radiation dermatitis. The first patient underwent prophylactic coil embolization of the patent hepatic falciform artery; the second patient underwent super-selective infusion of Y-90 resin microspheres to avoid the patent hepatic falciform artery. The incidence of falciform ligament Tc-99m-MAA activity detected on SPECT/CT at our institution is 10%. Tc-99m-MAA SPECT/CT scan provides valuable diagnostic information for treatment planning prior to Y-90 SIRT.

  7. Donor-Derived Hepatic Neuroendocrine Tumor: Pause Before Proceeding With Liver Retransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azzawi, Yasir; Stein, Lance L.; Shrestha, Roshan; Bhasin, Devina; Citron, Steven J.; Rubin, Raymond A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are rare but the age-adjusted incidence in the United States has increased, possibly due to improved radiographic and endoscopic detection. In advanced NET, hepatic metastases are common. Orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) is currently considered an acceptable therapy for selected patients with limited hepatic disease or liver metastases where complete resection is thought to have curative intent. The development of NET of donor origin is very uncommon after organ transplant, and it is unclear if the same treatment strategies applied to hepatic NET would also be efficacious after OLT. Here, we describe a unique case of an OLT recipient with a donor-derived NET that was treated with redo OLT as the primary therapy. The donor-derived NET recurred in the recipient's second liver allograft suggesting an extrahepatic reservoir. This case describes the natural history of such a rare event. Here, we highlight the treatment options for hepatic NET and challenge the role of OLT for a donor-derived hepatic NET. PMID:27830182

  8. Dynamic magnetic resonance monitoring of interstitial laser photocoagulation of hepatic metastases from a colorectal tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Hugh R.; Paley, Martyn; Buonaccorsi, Giovanni A.; Clemence, Matthew; Friedman, Emma P.; Allen, Clare; Hall-Craggs, Margret A.; Lees, William R.; Bown, Stephen G.

    1994-12-01

    Interstitial laser photocoagulation (ILP) is becoming an established treatment for hepatic metastases. Per-procedural ultrasound does not accurately define the tissue coagulated and dynamic computed tomography, while an accurate form of assessment, must be delayed until 24 hours after therapy; it too is, therefore, no use for per-procedural confirmation of total tumor ablation. By virtue of its good contrast, spatial and temporal resolution and the fact that T1 weighted images are temperature sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is, theoretically, applicable to the per-procedural guidance of ILP. Our ex vivo porcine, and in vivo rat liver experiments showed good imaging-pathological agreement. We have treated with ILP two patients suffering from hepatic metastases using MRI guidance. Four to eight 400 micrometers optical fibers were passed through the lesion down Teflon sheaths under local anaesthetic and intravenous sedation using ultrasound guidance. Sets of 400 second laser burns at 1.5 - 2.0 W per fiber were then performed, with a 1 cm fiber withdrawal between each set, until the entire tumor had been coagulated. Therapy was monitored with dynamic MRI using a T1 weighted FLASH sequence. MRI showed an enlarging bright rimmed low signal area which correlated with the region of devascularization seen on enhanced helical computed tomography at 24 hours. MRI can monitor ILP of hepatic metastases and confirm tumor ablation at the time of treatment.

  9. Repeatability of quantitative FDG-PET/CT and contrast enhanced CT in recurrent ovarian carcinoma: test retest measurements for tumor FDG uptake, diameter and volume

    PubMed Central

    Rockall, Andrea G.; Avril, Norbert; Lam, Raymond; Iannone, Robert; Mozley, P. David; Parkinson, Christine; Bergstrom, Donald; Sala, Evis; Sarker, Shah-Jalal; McNeish, Iain A.; Brenton, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Repeatability of baseline FDG-PET/CT measurements has not been tested in ovarian cancer. This dual-center, prospective study assessed variation in tumor FDG uptake, tumor diameter (TD) and tumor volume (TV) from sequential FDG-PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) in patients with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. Methods Patients underwent two pre-treatment baseline FDG-PET/CT (n=21) and CECT (n=20) at 2 clinical sites with different PET/CT instruments. Patients were included if they had at least one target lesion (TL) in the abdomen with an SUV maximum (SUVmax) of ≥2.5 and a long axis diameter of ≥15mm. Two independent reading methods were used to evaluate repeatability of TD and SUV uptake: on site and at an imaging clinical research organization (CRO). TV reads were only performed by CRO. In each reading set, TLs were independently measured on sequential imaging. Results Median time between FDG-PET/CT was 2 days (range 1-7). For site reads, concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) for SUVmean, SUVmax and TD were 0.95, 0.94 and 0.99 respectively. Repeatability coefficients were 16.3%, 17.3% and 8.8% for SUVmean, SUVmax and TD respectively. Similar results were observed for CRO reads. TV CCC was 0.99 with a repeatability coefficient of 28.1%. Conclusions There was excellent test/retest repeatability for FDG-PET/CT quantitative measurements across two sites and two independent reading methods. Cut-off values for determining change in SUVmean, SUVmax and TV establish limits to determine metabolic and/or volumetric response to treatment in platinum-sensitive relapsed ovarian cancer. PMID:24573555

  10. Using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging for the investigation of nude mouse hepatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qiang; Li, Dongyue; Zhang, Lu; Luo, Shuqian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the noninvasive imaging of hepatic tumors without contrast agents. Both normal tissues and tumor tissues can be detected, and tumor tissues in different stages can be classified quantitatively. We implanted BEL-7402 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells into the livers of nude mice and then imaged the livers using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging (ILPCI). The projection images' texture feature based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and dual-tree complex wavelet transforms (DTCWT) were extracted to discriminate normal tissues and tumor tissues. Different stages of hepatic tumors were classified using support vector machines (SVM). Images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 6 days after inoculation with cancer cells show diffuse distribution of the tumor tissue, but images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 9, 12, or 15 days after inoculation with cancer cells show necrotic lumps in the tumor tissue. The results of the principal component analysis (PCA) of the texture features based on GLCM of normal regions were positive, but those of tumor regions were negative. The results of PCA of the texture features based on DTCWT of normal regions were greater than those of tumor regions. The values of the texture features in low-frequency coefficient images increased monotonically with the growth of the tumors. Different stages of liver tumors can be classified using SVM, and the accuracy is 83.33%. Noninvasive and micron-scale imaging can be achieved by X-ray ILPCI. We can observe hepatic tumors and small vessels from the phase-contrast images. This new imaging approach for hepatic cancer is effective and has potential use in the early detection and classification of hepatic tumors.

  11. [Gastro-intestinal neuroectodermal tumor (GNET): A case report of a small intestine tumor with hepatic metastases].

    PubMed

    Kervarrec, Thibault; Lecointre, Claire; Kerdraon, Rémy; Bens, Guido; Piquard, Arnaud; Michenet, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    The gastro-intestinal neuroectodermal tumor (GNET) is a rare sarcoma of the digestive tract, which was recently recognised. The knowledge of the morphological, immunohistochemical and molecular diagnostic criteria is necessary to not mistake it for the metastasis of a melanoma or for another sarcoma of the digestive tract as the gastro-intestinal clear cells sarcoma or the malignant peripheral nervous system tumor (MPNST). We report the case of a 41-year-old patient with a GNET of the small intestine with hepatic metastasis. The histological examination showed a diffuse proliferation of epithelioid cells, which only express PS100. The presence EWSR1-ATF1 gene fusions with any melanocytic differentiation leads to the diagnosis of GNET.

  12. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... clotting problems or chronic liver disease. previous continue Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Although hep A is a ... does — through direct contact with infected body fluids. Hepatitis B and C are even more easily passed in ...

  13. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A if they've been vaccinated against it. Hepatitis B Hepatitis B is a more serious infection. It may lead ... of which cause severe illness and even death. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is transmitted from person to person ...

  14. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Hepatitis Page Content Article Body Hepatitis means “inflammation of ... it has been associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses Type Transmission Prognosis A Fecal-oral (stool ...

  15. Stereotactic radiosurgery for intradural spine tumors using cone-beam CT image guidance.

    PubMed

    Monserrate, Andrés; Zussman, Benjamin; Ozpinar, Alp; Niranjan, Ajay; Flickinger, John C; Gerszten, Peter C

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance technology has been widely adopted for spine radiosurgery delivery. There is relatively little experience with spine radiosurgery for intradural tumors using CBCT image guidance. This study prospectively evaluated a series of intradural spine tumors treated with radiosurgery. Patient setup accuracy for spine radiosurgery delivery using CBCT image guidance for intradural spine tumors was determined. METHODS Eighty-two patients with intradural tumors were treated and prospectively evaluated. The positioning deviations of the spine radiosurgery treatments in patients were recorded. Radiosurgery was delivered using a linear accelerator with a beam modulator and CBCT image guidance combined with a robotic couch that allows positioning correction in 3 translational and 3 rotational directions. To measure patient movement, 3 quality assurance CBCTs were performed and recorded in 30 patients: before, halfway, and after the radiosurgery treatment. The positioning data and fused images of planning CT and CBCT from the treatments were analyzed to determine intrafraction patient movements. From each of 3 CBCTs, 3 translational and 3 rotational coordinates were obtained. RESULTS The radiosurgery procedure was successfully completed for all patients. Lesion locations included cervical (22), thoracic (17), lumbar (38), and sacral (5). Tumor histologies included schwannoma (27), neurofibromas (18), meningioma (16), hemangioblastoma (8), and ependymoma (5). The mean prescription dose was 17 Gy (range 12-27 Gy) delivered in 1-3 fractions. At the halfway point of the radiation, the translational variations and standard deviations were 0.4 ± 0.5, 0.5 ± 0.8, and 0.4 ± 0.5 mm in the lateral (x), longitudinal (y), and anteroposterior (z) directions, respectively. Similarly, the variations immediately after treatment were 0.5 ± 0.4, 0.5 ± 0.6, and 0.6 ± 0.5 mm along x, y, and z directions, respectively. The mean rotational angles were 0

  16. Correlation between CT Perfusion Parameters and Microvessel Density and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xifu; Bai, Renju; Li, Yajun; Zhao, Jinkun

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the correlation between computed tomography (CT) perfusion parameters and markers of angiogenesis in adrenal adenomas and non-adenomas to determine if perfusion CT can be used to distinguish between them. Thirty-four patients with pathologically-confirmed adrenal tumors (17 adenomas, 17 non-adenomas) received CT perfusion imaging before surgery. CT perfusion parameters (blood flow [BF], blood volume [BV], mean transit time [MTT], and permeability surface area product [PS]) were calculated. Tumor tissue sections were examined with immunohistochemical methods for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and microvessel density (MVD). The mean age of the 34 patients was 43 years. The median BV was significantly higher in adenomas than in non-adenomas [12.3 ml/100 g, inter-quartile range (IQR): 10.4 to 16.5 ml/100 g vs. 8.8 ml/100 g, IQR: 3.3 to 9.4 ml/100 g, p = 0.001]. Differences in BF, MTT, and PS parameter values between adenomas and non-adenomas were not significant (p>0.05). The mean MVD was significantly higher in adenomas compared to non-adenomas (98.5±28.5 vs. 53.5±27.0, p<0.0001). Adenomas also expressed significantly higher median VEGF than non-adenomas (65%, IQR: 50 to 79% vs. 45%, IQR: 35 to 67%, p = 0.02). A moderately strong correlation between BF and VEGF (r = 0.53, p = 0.03) and between BV and MVD among adenomas (r = 0.57, p = 0.02) exist. Morphology, MVD, and VEGF expression in adenomas differ significantly from non-adenomas. Of the CT perfusion parameters examined, both BF and BV correlate with MVD, but only BF correlates with VEGF, and only in adenomas. The significant difference in BV suggests that BV may be used to differentiate adenomas from non-adenomas. However, the small difference in BV shows that it may only be possible to use BV to identify adenomas vs. non-adenomas at extreme BV values. PMID:24260316

  17. Calculating tumor trajectory and dose-of-the-day using cone-beam CT projections

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Bernard L. Westerly, David; Miften, Moyed

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection images provide anatomical data in real-time over several respiratory cycles, forming a comprehensive picture of tumor movement. The authors developed and validated a method which uses these projections to determine the trajectory of and dose to highly mobile tumors during each fraction of treatment. Methods: CBCT images of a respiration phantom were acquired, the trajectory of which mimicked a lung tumor with high amplitude (up to 2.5 cm) and hysteresis. A template-matching algorithm was used to identify the location of a steel BB in each CBCT projection, and a Gaussian probability density function for the absolute BB position was calculated which best fit the observed trajectory of the BB in the imager geometry. Two modifications of the trajectory reconstruction were investigated: first, using respiratory phase information to refine the trajectory estimation (Phase), and second, using the Monte Carlo (MC) method to sample the estimated Gaussian tumor position distribution. The accuracies of the proposed methods were evaluated by comparing the known and calculated BB trajectories in phantom-simulated clinical scenarios using abdominal tumor volumes. Results: With all methods, the mean position of the BB was determined with accuracy better than 0.1 mm, and root-mean-square trajectory errors averaged 3.8% ± 1.1% of the marker amplitude. Dosimetric calculations using Phase methods were more accurate, with mean absolute error less than 0.5%, and with error less than 1% in the highest-noise trajectory. MC-based trajectories prevent the overestimation of dose, but when viewed in an absolute sense, add a small amount of dosimetric error (<0.1%). Conclusions: Marker trajectory and target dose-of-the-day were accurately calculated using CBCT projections. This technique provides a method to evaluate highly mobile tumors using ordinary CBCT data, and could facilitate better strategies to mitigate or compensate for motion during

  18. Tumor specific mutations in TERT promoter and CTNNB1 gene in hepatitis B and hepatitis C related hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pezzuto, Francesca; Izzo, Francesco; Buonaguro, Luigi; Annunziata, Clorinda; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Botti, Gerardo; Buonaguro, Franco M.; Tornesello, Maria Lina

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent somatic mutations in the promoter region of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene and in the exon 3 of CTNNB1 gene have been recognized as common events in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with variable frequencies depending on etiology and geographical region. We have analyzed TERT promoter and CTNNB1 gene mutations in 122 cases of hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) related HCCs, in 7 cases of cholangiocarcinoma (CC) and hepatocholangiocarcinoma (HCC-CC) as well as in autologous cirrhotic tissues. Overall, 50.4% and 26% of HCC as well as 14.3% and none of CC and HCC-CC were mutated in TERT promoter and in CTNNB1 exon 3, respectively. TERT and CTNNB1 mutations were found more frequently in HCV related (53.6% and 26.4%, respectively) than HBV related (41.7% and 16.7%, respectively) HCCs and coexisted in 57.6% of CTNNB1 mutated tumors. Mutations in TERT and CTNNB1 were not associated with the functional promoter polymorphism rs2853669. No mutations were detected in the 129 non-HCC cirrhotic tissues. In conclusion, mutations in TERT promoter and in CTNNB1 gene represent specific cancer signatures in the pathogenesis of viral related HCC and could be promising early biomarkers as well as targets for tailored therapies. PMID:27276713

  19. Accurate tracking of tumor volume change during radiotherapy by CT-CBCT registration with intensity correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seyoun; Robinson, Adam; Quon, Harry; Kiess, Ana P.; Shen, Colette; Wong, John; Plishker, William; Shekhar, Raj; Lee, Junghoon

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a CT-CBCT registration method to accurately predict the tumor volume change based on daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs) during radiotherapy. CBCT is commonly used to reduce patient setup error during radiotherapy, but its poor image quality impedes accurate monitoring of anatomical changes. Although physician's contours drawn on the planning CT can be automatically propagated to daily CBCTs by deformable image registration (DIR), artifacts in CBCT often cause undesirable errors. To improve the accuracy of the registration-based segmentation, we developed a DIR method that iteratively corrects CBCT intensities by local histogram matching. Three popular DIR algorithms (B-spline, demons, and optical flow) with the intensity correction were implemented on a graphics processing unit for efficient computation. We evaluated their performances on six head and neck (HN) cancer cases. For each case, four trained scientists manually contoured the nodal gross tumor volume (GTV) on the planning CT and every other fraction CBCTs to which the propagated GTV contours by DIR were compared. The performance was also compared with commercial image registration software based on conventional mutual information (MI), VelocityAI (Varian Medical Systems Inc.). The volume differences (mean±std in cc) between the average of the manual segmentations and automatic segmentations are 3.70+/-2.30 (B-spline), 1.25+/-1.78 (demons), 0.93+/-1.14 (optical flow), and 4.39+/-3.86 (VelocityAI). The proposed method significantly reduced the estimation error by 9% (B-spline), 38% (demons), and 51% (optical flow) over the results using VelocityAI. Although demonstrated only on HN nodal GTVs, the results imply that the proposed method can produce improved segmentation of other critical structures over conventional methods.

  20. Technetium-99m-labelled red blood cell imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic haemangiomas: the role of SPECT/CT with a hybrid camera.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, Orazio; Danieli, Roberta; Manni, Carlo; Capoccetti, Francesca; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2004-07-01

    Delayed liver single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) after (99m)Tc red blood cell (RBC) labelling is helpful in detecting hepatic haemangiomas; however, diagnosis can be difficult when lesions are situated adjacent to structures like the inferior vena cava, the heart or hepatic vessels, where blood activity persists. The aims of this study were to evaluate the usefulness of RBC SPECT and transmission computed tomography (RBC SPECT/CT) performed simultaneously with a hybrid imaging system for correct characterisation of hepatic lesions in patients with suspected haemangioma, and to assess the additional value of fused images compared with SPECT alone. Twelve patients with 24 liver lesions were studied. The acquisitions of both anatomical (CT) and functional (SPECT) data were performed during a single session. SPECT images were first interpreted alone and then re-evaluated after adding the transmission anatomical maps. Image fusion was successful in all patients, with perfect correspondence between SPECT and CT data, allowing the precise anatomical localisation of sites of increased blood pool activity. SPECT/CT had a significant impact on results in four patients (33.3%) with four lesions defined as indeterminate on SPECT images, accurately characterising the hot spot foci located near vascular structures. In conclusion, RBC SPECT/CT imaging using this hybrid SPECT/CT system is feasible and useful in the identification or exclusion of suspected hepatic haemangiomas located near regions with high vascular activity.

  1. Size effect of Au/PAMAM contrast agent on CT imaging of reticuloendothelial system and tumor tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Jian; Liu, Ransheng; Zhang, Aixu; Yuan, Zhiyong

    2016-09-01

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM)-entrapped Au nanoparticles were synthesized with distinct sizes to figure out the size effect of Au-based contrast agent on CT imaging of passively targeted tissues. Au/PAMAM nanoparticles were first synthesized with narrow distribution of particles size of 22.2 ± 3.1, 54.2 ± 3.7, and 104.9 ± 4.7 nm in diameters. Size effect leads no significant difference on X-ray attenuation when Au/PAMAM was ≤0.05 mol/L. For CT imaging of a tumor model, small Au/PAMAM were more easily internalized via endocytosis in the liver, leading to more obviously enhanced contrast. Similarly, contrast agents with small sizes were more effective in tumor imaging because of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Overall, the particle size of Au/PAMAM heavily affected the efficiency of CT enhancement in imaging RES and tumors.

  2. Hepatic tumor ablation with clustered microwave antennae: the US Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Iannitti, David A.; Martin, Robert C.G.; Simon, Caroline J.; Hope, William W.; Newcomb, William L.; McMasters, Kelly M.; Dupuy, Damian

    2007-01-01

    Background: Thermal ablation techniques have become important treatment options for patients with unresectable hepatic malignancies. Microwave ablation (MWA) is a new thermal ablative technique that uses electromagnetic energy to produce coagulation necrosis. We report outcomes from the first clinical trial in the United States using MWA and a 915 MHz generator. Patients and methods: Patients with unresectable primary or metastatic liver cancer were enrolled in a multi-institutional trial from March 2004 through May 2006. Demographic information, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes were documented. Results: Eighty-seven patients underwent 94 ablation procedures for 224 hepatic tumors. Forty-two ablations (45%) were performed open, 7 (7%) laparoscopically, and 45 (48%) percutaneously. The average tumor size was 3.6 cm (range 0.5–9.0 cm). Single antenna ablation volumes were 10.0 ml (range 7.8–14.0 ml), and clustered antennae ablation volumes were 50.5 ml (range 21.1–146.5 ml). Outcome variables were measured with a mean follow-up of 19 months. Local recurrence at the ablation site occurred in 6 (2.7%) tumors, and regional recurrence occurred in 37 (43%) patients. With a mean follow-up of 19 months, 41 (47%) patients were alive with no evidence of disease. There were no procedure-related deaths. The overall mortality rate was 2.3%. Conclusions: Microwave ablation is a safe and effective technology for hepatic tumor ablation. In our study, clustered antennae resulted in larger ablation volumes. Further studies with histological confirmation are needed to verify clinical results. PMID:18333126

  3. Generation of a murine hepatic angiosarcoma cell line and reproducible mouse tumor model.

    PubMed

    Rothweiler, Sonja; Dill, Michael T; Terracciano, Luigi; Makowska, Zuzanna; Quagliata, Luca; Hlushchuk, Ruslan; Djonov, Valentin; Heim, Markus H; Semela, David

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic angiosarcoma (AS) is a rare and highly aggressive tumor of endothelial origin with dismal prognosis. Studies of the molecular biology of AS and treatment options are limited as animal models are rare. We have previously shown that inducible knockout of Notch1 in mice leads to spontaneous formation of hepatic AS. The aims of this study were to: (1) establish and characterize a cell line derived from this murine AS, (2) identify molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets, and (3) generate a tumor transplantation model. AS cells retained specific endothelial properties such as tube formation activity, as well as expression of CD31 and Von Willebrand factor. However, electron microscopy analysis revealed signs of dedifferentiation with loss of fenestrae and loss of contact inhibition. Microarray and pathway analysis showed substantial changes in gene expression and revealed activation of the Myc pathway. Exposing the AS cells to sorafenib reduced migration, filopodia dynamics, and cell proliferation but did not induce apoptosis. In addition, sorafenib suppressed ERK phosphorylation and expression of cyclin D2. Injection of AS cells into NOD/SCID mice resulted in formation of undifferentiated tumors, confirming the tumorigenic potential of these cells. In summary, we established and characterized a murine model of spontaneous AS formation and hepatic AS cell lines as a useful in vitro tool. Our data demonstrate antitumor activity of sorafenib in AS cells with potent inhibition of migration, filopodia formation, and cell proliferation, supporting further evaluation of sorafenib as a novel treatment strategy. In addition, AS cell transplantation provides a subcutaneous tumor model useful for in vivo preclinical drug testing.

  4. [Evaluation of reserved hepatic function in patients with hepatobiliary tumor by 99mTc-GSA: effect of hyperbilirubinemia and usefulness of regional reserved hepatic functional imaging].

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Ishikawa, N; Takeda, T; Sato, M; Fukunaga, K; Todoroki, T; Okumura, T; Hatakeyama, R; Itai, Y

    1996-02-01

    The evaluation of the reserved hepatic function was performed by 99mTc-galactosyl serum albumin (99mTc-GSA) in seventy patients with hepatobiliary tumor. The dynamic study was performed to evaluate global reserved hepatic function following the intravenous bolus injection of 99mTc-GSA, and the hepatic single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was obtained to assess the regional reserved hepatic function. The functional hepatic index (LHL15) was derived from liver time-activity data, and it was compared with serum total-bilirubin level, serum albumin level and plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green (ICG15). In the patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, LHL15 value agreed well with ICG15 value, serum total-bilirubin level, and serum albumin level. Moderate or severe hepatic dysfunction was observed at 65.4% of these patients. In the patients with cholangiocellular carcinoma, a discrepancy of LHL15 value and ICG15 value was observed. Increment of the ICG15 value was correlated with that of the serum total-bilirubin level, whereas the correlations was not observed between the LHL15 value and the serum total-bilirubin level. These results indicate that 99mTc-GSA scintigraphy can evaluate the reserved hepatic function without the embellishment of jaundice. This method is useful for assessing the global and regional reserved hepatic function.

  5. Assessment of intratumor hypoxia by integrated 18F-FDG PET / perfusion CT in a liver tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Stewart, Errol; Desjardins, Lise; Hadway, Jennifer; Morrison, Laura; Crukley, Cathie

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Hypoxia in solid tumors occurs when metabolic demands in tumor cells surpass the delivery of oxygenated blood. We hypothesize that the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) metabolism and tumor blood flow mismatch would correlate with tumor hypoxia. Methods Liver perfusion computed tomography (CT) and 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) imaging were performed in twelve rabbit livers implanted with VX2 carcinoma. Under CT guidance, a fiber optic probe was inserted into the tumor to measure the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2). Tumor blood flow (BF) and standardized uptake value (SUV) were measured to calculate flow-metabolism ratio (FMR). Tumor hypoxia was further identified using pimonidazole immunohistochemical staining. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the correlation between the imaging parameters and pO2 and pimonidazole staining. Results Weak correlations were found between blood volume (BV) and pO2 level (r = 0.425, P = 0.004), SUV and pO2 (r = -0.394, P = 0.007), FMR and pimonidazole staining score (r = -0.388, P = 0.031). However, there was stronger correlation between tumor FMR and pO2 level (r = 0.557, P < 0.001). Conclusions FMR correlated with tumor oxygenation and pimonidazole staining suggesting it may be a potential hypoxic imaging marker in liver tumor. PMID:28264009

  6. Variations in tumor size and position due to irregular breathing in 4D-CT: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Sarker, Joyatee; Chu, Alan; Mui, Kit; Wolfgang, John A.; Hirsch, Ariel E.; Chen, George T. Y.; Sharp, Gregory C.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To estimate the position and volume errors in 4D-CT caused by irregular breathing. Methods: A virtual 4D-CT scanner was designed to reproduce axial mode scans with retrospective resorting. This virtual scanner creates an artificial spherical tumor based on the specifications of the user, and recreates images that might be produced by a 4D-CT scanner using a patient breathing waveform. 155 respiratory waveforms of patients were used to test the variability of 4D-CT scans. Each breathing waveform was normalized and scaled to 1, 2, and 3 cm peak-to-peak motion, and artificial tumors with 2 and 4 cm radius were simulated for each scaled waveform. The center of mass and volume of resorted 4D-CT images were calculated and compared to the expected values of center of mass and volume for the artificial tumor. Intrasubject variability was investigated by running the virtual scanner over different subintervals of each patient's breathing waveform. Results: The average error in the center of mass location of an artificial tumor was less than 2 mm standard deviation for 2 cm motion. The corresponding average error in volume was less than 4%. In the worst-case scenarios, a center of mass error of 1.0 cm standard deviation and volume errors of 30%-60% at inhale were found. Systematic errors were observed in a subset of patients due to irregular breathing, and these errors were more pronounced when the tumor volume is smaller. Conclusions: Irregular breathing during 4D-CT simulation causes systematic errors in volume and center of mass measurements. These errors are small but depend on the tumor size, motion amplitude, and degree of breathing irregularity.

  7. Assessment of hepatic VX2 tumors with combined percutaneous transhepatic lymphosonography and contrast-enhanced ultrasonographic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cun; Liang, Ping; Wang, Yang; Zhou, Pei; Li, Xin; Han, Zhi-Yu; Liu, Shao-Ping

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of percutaneous transhepatic lymphosonography (PTL) as a novel method for the detection of tumor lymphangiogenesis in hepatic VX2 of rabbits and to evaluate combined PTL and routine contrast-enhanced ultrasonographic imaging for the diagnosis of liver cancer. METHODS: Ten rabbits with VX2 tumor were included in this study. SonoVue (0.1 mL/kg) was injected into each rabbit via an ear vein for contrast-enhanced ultrasonographic imaging, and 0.5 mL SonoVue was injected into the normal liver parenchyma near the VX2 tumor for PTL. Images and/or movie clips were stored for further analysis. RESULTS: Ultrasonographic imaging showed VX2 tumors ranging 5-19 mm in the liver of rabbits. The VX2 tumor was hyperechoic and hypoechoic to liver parenchyma at the early and later phase, respectively. The hepatic lymph vessels were visualized immediately after injection of contrast medium and continuously visualized with SonoVue® during PTL. The boundaries of VX2 tumors were hyperechoic to liver parenchyma and the tumors. There was a significant difference in the values for the boundaries of VX2 tumors after injection compared with the liver normal parenchyma and the tumor parenchyma during PTL. CONCLUSION: PTL is a novel method for the detection of tumor lymphangiogenesis in hepatic VX2 of rabbits. Combined PTL and contrast-enhanced ultrasonographic imaging can improve the diagnosis of liver cancer. PMID:18609718

  8. Improving abdomen tumor low-dose CT images using dictionary learning based patch processing and unsharp filtering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Yu, Fei; Luo, Limin; Toumoulin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Reducing patient radiation dose, while maintaining a high-quality image, is a major challenge in Computed Tomography (CT). The purpose of this work is to improve abdomen tumor low-dose CT (LDCT) image quality by using a two-step strategy: a first patch-wise non linear processing is first applied to suppress the noise and artifacts, that is based on a sparsity prior in term of a learned dictionary, then an unsharp filtering aiming to enhance the contrast of tissues and compensate the contrast loss caused by the DL processing. Preliminary results show that the proposed method is effective in suppressing mottled noise as well as improving tumor detectability.

  9. Safety and Efficacy of 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT for Diagnosis, Staging, and Treatment Management of Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Deppen, Stephen A.; Liu, Eric; Blume, Jeffrey D.; Clanton, Jeffrey; Shi, Chanjuan; Jones-Jackson, Laurie B.; Lakhani, Vipul; Baum, Richard P.; Berlin, Jordan; Smith, Gary T.; Graham, Michael; Sandler, Martin P.; Delbeke, Dominique; Walker, Ronald C.

    2017-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate safety and efficacy of 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT compared with 111In-pentetreotide imaging for diagnosis, staging, and restaging of pulmonary and gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Methods 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT and 111In-pentetreotide scans were obtained for 78 of 97 consecutively enrolled patients with known or suspected pulmonary or gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Safety and toxicity were measured by comparing vital signs, serum chemistry values, or acquisition-related medical complications before and after 68Ga-DOTATATE injection. Added value was determined by changes in treatment plan when 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT results were added to all prior imaging, including 111In-pentetreotide. Interobserver reproducibility of 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT scan interpretation was measured between blinded and nonblinded interpreters. Results 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT and 111In-pentetreotide scans were significantly different in impact on treatment (P < 0.001). 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT combined with CT or liver MRI changed care in 28 of 78 (36%) patients. Interobserver agreement between blinded and nonblinded interpreters was high. No participant had a trial-related event requiring treatment. Mild, transient events were tachycardia in 1, alanine transaminase elevation in 1, and hyperglycemia in 2 participants. No clinically significant arrhythmias occurred. 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT correctly identified 3 patients for peptide-receptor radiotherapy incorrectly classified by 111In-pentetreotide. Conclusion 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT was equivalent or superior to 111In-pentetreotide imaging in all 78 patients. No adverse events requiring treatment were observed. 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT changed treatment in 36% of participants. Given the lack of significant toxicity, lower radiation exposure, and improved accuracy compared with 111In-pentetreotide, 68Ga-DOTATATE imaging should be used instead of 111In-pentetreotide imaging where available. PMID:26769865

  10. Flat-Panel Cone-Beam Ct-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Very Small (≤1.5 cm) Liver Tumors: Technical Note on a Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi Buy, Xavier Alberti, Nicolas Fonck, Mariane; Grasso, Rosario Francesco; Palussière, Jean

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThe aim of the present study was to investigate the technical feasibility of flat-panel cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of very small (<1.5 cm) liver tumors.Materials and MethodsPatients included were candidates for hepatic percutaneous RFA as they had single biopsy-proven hepatic tumors sized ≤1.5 cm and poorly defined on ultrasonography. Following apnea induction, unenhanced CBCT scans were acquired and used to deploy the RF electrode with the aid of a virtual navigation system. If the tumor was not clearly identified on the unenhanced CBCT scan, a right retrograde arterial femoral access was established to carry out hepatic angiography and localize the tumor. Patients’ lesions and procedural variables were recorded and analyzed.ResultsThree patients (2 male and 1 female), aged 68, 76, and 87 years were included; 3 lesions (2 hepato-cellular carcinoma and 1 metastasis from colorectal cancer) were treated. One patient required hepatic angiography. Cycles of apnea used to acquire CBCT images and to deploy the electrode lasted <120 s. Mean fluoroscopic time needed to deploy the electrode was 36.6 ± 5.7 min. Mean overall procedural time was 66.0 ± 22.9 min. No peri- or post-procedural complications were noted. No cases of incomplete ablation were noted at 1-month follow-up.ConclusionPercutaneous CBCT-guided liver RFA with or without arterial hepatic angiography is technically feasible.

  11. Assessment of contrast enhanced respiration managed cone-beam CT for image guided radiotherapy of intrahepatic tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Nikolaj K. G.; Stewart, Errol; Lock, Michael; Fisher, Barbara; Kozak, Roman; Chen, Jeff; Lee, Ting-Yim; Wong, Eugene

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Contrast enhancement and respiration management are widely used during image acquisition for radiotherapy treatment planning of liver tumors along with respiration management at the treatment unit. However, neither respiration management nor intravenous contrast is commonly used during cone-beam CT (CBCT) image acquisition for alignment prior to radiotherapy. In this study, the authors investigate the potential gains of injecting an iodinated contrast agent in combination with respiration management during CBCT acquisition for liver tumor radiotherapy. Methods: Five rabbits with implanted liver tumors were subjected to CBCT with and without motion management and contrast injection. The acquired CBCT images were registered to the planning CT to determine alignment accuracy and dosimetric impact. The authors developed a simulation tool for simulating contrast-enhanced CBCT images from dynamic contrast enhanced CT imaging (DCE-CT) to determine optimal contrast injection protocols. The tool was validated against contrast-enhanced CBCT of the rabbit subjects and was used for five human patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma. Results: In the rabbit experiment, when neither motion management nor contrast was used, tumor centroid misalignment between planning image and CBCT was 9.2 mm. This was reduced to 2.8 mm when both techniques were employed. Tumors were not visualized in clinical CBCT images of human subjects. Simulated contrast-enhanced CBCT was found to improve tumor contrast in all subjects. Different patients were found to require different contrast injections to maximize tumor contrast. Conclusions: Based on the authors’ animal study, respiration managed contrast enhanced CBCT improves IGRT significantly. Contrast enhanced CBCT benefits from patient specific tracer kinetics determined from DCE-CT.

  12. Artificial pleural effusion in percutaneous microwave ablation of hepatic tumors near the diaphragm under the guidance of ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Sun, Yao; Cong, Lin; Jing, Xuehong; Yu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of artificial pleural effusion in percutaneous microwave ablation of hepatic tumors near the diaphragm under ultrasound guidance. Methods: For localization and navigation of tumors near the dome of the diaphragm by ultrasound during microwave ablation in 14 tumors of 11 cases, artificial pleural effusion was performed in the volume of 1000~1500 ml of Normal saline or 5% Glucose injection solution via the right thoracic cavity. The tumor marker, AFP was monitored before and after operation in 6 times in a period of 2 years. We analyzed the successful rate and effectiveness of artificial pleural effusion. Results: The successful rate of artificial pleural effusion was 100% without complications. Artificial hydrothorax on the right eliminated the interference of intrapulmonary gas to the visualization of hepatic tumors near the diaphragm on ultrasound. In the follow-up of 2 years, the ablation rate reached to 92.9% with no serious complications. The AFP value before operation was in significant statistical difference with the others after operation (P = 0.000). Conclusions: Artificial pleural effusion aids the visualization of hepatic tumors near the diaphragm on ultrasound. A good therapeutic effectiveness can be reached in percutaneous microwave ablation of tumors in the hepatic dome under the guidance of ultrasound. PMID:26629218

  13. Defining vascular signatures of malignant hepatic masses: role of MDCT with 3D rendering.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sameer; Johnson, Pamela T; Fishman, Elliot K

    2013-08-01

    Malignant hepatic masses, both primary and metastatic lesions, have characteristic CT appearances and enhancement patterns. Owing to advances in CT resolution, high-quality vascular maps can be generated with 3D rendering tools to aid hepatic mass evaluation. These renderings enable identification of neovascularity, which is critical for distinguishing malignant from benign lesions, and facilitate identification of small hyperenhancing malignant hepatic tumors. In this review, CT features of malignant hepatic masses are discussed in conjunction with a demonstration of the role for 3D vascular mapping.

  14. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha impairs hepatic insulin signaling and stimulates the overproduction of hepatic apolipoprotein B100-containing very low density lipoproteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanisms underlying hepatic overproduction of apolipoprotein B (apoB) 100-containing very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) in insulin resistance induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-a were investigated. In the present study, we examined the potential role of TNF-a in insulin signaling and lipopro...

  15. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha impairs hepatic insulin signaling and stumlates the overproduction of hepatic apolipoprotein B100-containing very low density lipoproteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanisms underlying hepatic overproduction of apolipoprotein B (apoB) 100-containing very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) in insulin resistance induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-a were investigated. In the present study, we examined the potential role of TNF-a in insulin signaling and lipopro...

  16. Integrated imaging of hepatic tumors in childhood. Part II. Benign lesions (congenital, reparative, and inflammatory)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Greenspan, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have encountered benign liver masses as frequently as malignant lesions in children with hepatomegaly. Lesions studied included abscesses, cavernous hemangioma/hemangioendothelioma, adenoma of glycogen storage disease, choledochal cysts, focal nodular hyperplasia, cystic hepatoblastoma, and hamartoma. An intergrated imaging protocol involving ultrasound, computed tomography, and scintigraphy proved to be more helpful than any one modality in establishing the benign or malignant nature of a hepatic neoplasm and the type of tumor, which is of particular importance when surgical exploration and/or biopsy is contraindicated.

  17. A black adrenal adenoma difficult to be differentiated from a malignant adrenal tumor by CT, MRI, scintigraphy and FDG PET/CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Nakajo, Masatoyo; Nakajo, Masayuki; Kajiya, Yoriko; Tani, Atsushi; Tsuruta, Masashi; Sugita, Satoshi; Fushitani, Shunsaku; Umekita, Yoshihisa

    2011-12-01

    Black adrenal adenoma (BAA) is an adrenal adenoma which contains lipofuscin and has a black or brown appearance. Preoperative diagnosis of BAA is difficult because it is diagnosed by pathologic findings. We report a case of an incidentally discovered non-hyperfunctioning BAA in the left adrenal gland of a 58-year-old man. It showed an oval lipid-poor mass, 3 cm × 2 cm in size on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), no avid uptake of (131)I-norcholesterol and (123)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) on scintigraphy, and intense avid uptake of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) on positron emission tomography-CT (PET/CT). FDG PET/CT showed that it was a hypermetabolic lesion, more intense than the activity of the liver, and the maximum standardized uptake value was 5.6 on 1-h early imaging and 8.3 on 2-h delayed imaging, suggesting a malignant tumor. BAA is a clinically rare benign adrenal adenoma, but it should be kept in mind that BAA may exhibit false-positive results for malignancy or inconclusive results for benignity with modern imaging modalities including CT, MRI, adrenal scintigraphy with radiolabelled cholesterol and radiolabelled MIBG, and FDG-PET like this case.

  18. Genomic Profiling Reveals an Alternate Mechanism for Hepatic Tumor Promotion by Perfluorooctanoic Acid in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Tilton, Susan C.; Orner, Gayle A.; Benninghoff, Abby D.; Carpenter, Hillary M.; Hendricks, Jerry D.; Pereira, Cliff B.; Williams, David E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a potent hepatocarcinogen and peroxisome proliferator (PP) in rodents. Humans are not susceptible to peroxisome proliferation and are considered refractory to carcinogenesis by PPs. Previous studies with rainbow trout indicate they are also insensitive to peroxisome proliferation by the PP dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), but are still susceptible to enhanced hepatocarcinogenesis after chronic exposure. Objectives In this study, we used trout as a unique in vivo tumor model to study the potential for PFOA carcinogenesis in the absence of peroxisome proliferation compared with the structurally diverse PPs clofibrate (CLOF) and DHEA. Mechanisms of carcinogenesis were identified from hepatic gene expression profiles phenotypically anchored to tumor outcome. Methods We fed aflatoxin B1 or sham-initiated animals 200–1,800 ppm PFOA in the diet for 30 weeks for tumor analysis. We subsequently examined gene expression by cDNA array in animals fed PFOA, DHEA, CLOF, or 5 ppm 17β-estradiol (E2, a known tumor promoter) in the diet for 14 days. Results PFOA (1,800 ppm or 50 mg/kg/day) and DHEA treatments resulted in enhanced liver tumor incidence and multiplicity (p < 0.0001), whereas CLOF showed no effect. Carcinogenesis was independent of peroxisome proliferation, measured by lack of peroxisomal β-oxidation and catalase activity. Alternately, both tumor promoters, PFOA and DHEA, resulted in estrogenic gene signatures with strong correlation to E2 by Pearson correlation (R = 0.81 and 0.78, respectively), whereas CLOF regulated no genes in common with E2. Conclusions These data suggest that the tumor-promoting activities of PFOA in trout are due to novel mechanisms involving estrogenic signaling and are independent of peroxisome proliferation. PMID:18709148

  19. Paraneoplastic pemphigus as a first sign of metastatic retroperitoneal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor: (18)F-FDG PET/CT findings.

    PubMed

    Dhull, V S; Passah, A; Rana, N; Arora, S; Mallick, S; Kumar, R

    2016-01-01

    A 30-year-old female presented with a 3-month history of erosive stomatitis and bullous lesions, along with recurrent episodes of abdominal pain. She was found to have a retroperitoneal lump in left lumbar region. Skin biopsy revealed bullous disorder. CT guided biopsy of the retroperitoneal mass was suggestive of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT). She was started on oral steroids and supportive care, and surgery was being planned when she developed respiratory failure. CT chest revealed vertebral metastases. PET/CT for whole body work up revealed a left para-aortic mass along with multiple skeletal metastases. The patient was kept on conservative management. After 3 months, the patient has shown clinical improvement, and an exploratory laparotomy is now being planned for the excision of the tumor, followed by chemotherapy. This case of retroperitoneal IMT is rare in terms of skeletal metastases with paraneoplastic pemphigus.

  20. Evaluating dynamic contrast-enhanced and photoacoustic CT to assess intra-tumor heterogeneity in xenograft mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Liu, Bo; Cao, Minsong; Reinecke, Dan; Dzemidzic, Mario; Liang, Yun; Kruger, Robert

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate photoacoustic CT spectroscopy (PCT-S) and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (DCE-CT) ability to measure parameters - oxygen saturation and vascular physiology - associated with the intra-tumor oxygenation status. Material and Methods: Breast (VEGF165 enhance MCF-7) and ovarian (SKOV3x) cancer cells were implanted into the fat pads and flanks of immune deficient mice and allowed to grow to a diameter of 8-15 mm. CT was used to determine physiological parameters by acquiring a sequence of scans over a 10 minute period after an i.v. injection of a radio-opaque contrast agent (Isovue). These time-dependent contrast-enhanced curves were fit to a two-compartmental model determining tumor perfusion, fractional plasma volume, permeability-surface area produce, and fractional interstitial volume on a voxel-by-voxel basis. After which, the tumors were imaged using photoacoustic CT (Optosonics, Inc., Indianapolis, IN 46202). The near infrared spectra (700-910 nm) within the vasculature was fit to linear combination of measured oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin blood samples to obtain oxygen saturation levels (SaO II). Results: The PCT-S scanner was first calibrated using different samples of oxygenated blood, from which a statistical error ranging from 2.5-6.5% was measured and a plot of the hemoglobin dissociation curve was consistent with empirical formula. In vivo determination of tumor vasculature SaO II levels were measurably tracked, and spatially correlated to the periphery of the tumor. Tumor depend variations in SaO II - 0.32 (ovarian) and 0.60 (breast) - and in vascular physiology - perfusion, 1.03 and 0.063 mL/min/mL, and fractional plasma volume, 0.20 and 0.07 - were observed. Conclusion: Combined, PCT-S and CED-CT has the potential to measure intra-tumor levels of tumor oxygen saturation and vascular physiology, key parameters associated with hypoxia.

  1. Temporal change analysis for improved tumor detection in dedicated CT breast imaging using affine and free-form deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Joyoni; O'Connor, J. Michael; Chen, Yu; Glick, Stephen J.

    2008-03-01

    Preliminary evidence has suggested that computerized tomographic (CT) imaging of the breast using a cone-beam, flat-panel detector system dedicated solely to breast imaging has potential for improving detection and diagnosis of early-stage breast cancer. Hypothetically, a powerful mechanism for assisting in early stage breast cancer detection from annual screening breast CT studies would be to examine temporal changes in the breast from year-to-year. We hypothesize that 3D image registration could be used to automatically register breast CT volumes scanned at different times (e.g., yearly screening exams). This would allow radiologists to quickly visualize small changes in the breast that have developed during the period since the last screening CT scan, and use this information to improve the diagnostic accuracy of early-stage breast cancer detection. To test our hypothesis, fresh mastectomy specimens were imaged with a flat-panel CT system at different time points, after moving the specimen to emulate the re-positioning motion of the breast between yearly screening exams. Synthetic tumors were then digitally inserted into the second CT scan at a clinically realistic location (to emulate tumor growth from year-to-year). An affine and a spline-based 3D image registration algorithm was implemented and applied to the CT reconstructions of the specimens acquired at different times. Subtraction of registered image volumes was then performed to better analyze temporal change. Results from this study suggests that temporal change analysis in 3D breast CT can potentially be a powerful tool in improving the visualization of small lesion growth.

  2. Targeting xCT, a cystine-glutamate transporter induces apoptosis and tumor regression for KSHV/HIV-associated lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiological agent of primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), which represents a rapidly progressing malignancy arising in HIV-infected patients. Conventional chemotherapy for PEL treatment induces unwanted toxicity and is ineffective — PEL continues to portend nearly 100% mortality within a period of months, which requires novel therapeutic strategies. The amino acid transporter, xCT, is essential for the uptake of cystine required for intracellular glutathione (GSH) synthesis and for maintaining the intracellular redox balance. Inhibition of xCT induces growth arrest in a variety of cancer cells, although its role in virus-associated malignancies including PEL remains unclear. In the current study, we identify that xCT is expressed on the surface of patient-derived KSHV+ PEL cells, and targeting xCT induces caspase-dependent cell apoptosis. Further experiments demonstrate the underlying mechanisms including host and viral factors: reducing intracellular GSH while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS), repressing cell-proliferation-related signaling, and inducing viral lytic genes. Using an immune-deficient xenograft model, we demonstrate that an xCT selective inhibitor, Sulfasalazine (SASP), prevents PEL tumor progression in vivo. Together, our data provide innovative and mechanistic insights into the role of xCT in PEL pathogenesis, and the framework for xCT-focused therapies for AIDS-related lymphoma in future. PMID:24708874

  3. Bitargeted microemulsions based on coix seed ingredients for enhanced hepatic tumor delivery and synergistic therapy.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ding; Sun, Wenjie; Liu, Mingjian; Liu, Yuping; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Yan

    2016-04-30

    A hepatic tumor bitargeted microemulsions drug delivery system using coix seed oil and coix seed polysaccharide (CP) acting as anticancer components, as well as functional excipients, was developed for enhanced tumor-specific accumulation by CP-mediated enhancement on passive tumor targeting and modification of galactose stearate (tumor-targeted ligand). In the physicochemical characteristics studies, galactose stearate-modified coix seed multicomponent microemulsions containing 30% CP (w%) (Gal-C-MEs) had a well-defined spherical shape with a small size (47.63 ± 1.41 nm), a narrow polydispersity index (PDI, 0.101 ± 0.002), and a nearly neutral surface charge (-4.37 ± 1.76 mV). The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of Gal-C-MEs against HepG2 cells was 70.2 μg/mL, which decreased by 1.8-fold in comparison with that of coix seed multicomponent microemulsions (C-MEs). The fluorescence intensity of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-loaded Gal-C-MEs (FITC-Gal-C-MEs) internalized by HepG2 cells was 1.8-fold higher than that of FITC-loaded C-MEs (FIT C-C-MEs), but the cellular uptake of the latter became reduce by 1.6-fold when the weight ratio of CP decreased up to 10%. In the cell apoptosis studies, C-MEs (containing 30% CP) did not show a significant difference with Gal-C-MEs, but exhibited 3.3-fold and 1.5-fold increase relative to C-MEs containing 10% CP and 20% CP, respectively. In the in vivo tumor targeting studies, Cy5-loaded Gal-C-MEs (Cy5-Gal-C-MEs), notably distributed in the tumor sites and still found even at 48 h post-administration, displayed the strongest capability of tumor tissue accumulation and retention among all the test groups. Most importantly, Gal-C-MEs had stronger inhibition of tumor growth, prolonged survival time and more effectively tumor cell apoptosis induction in comparison with C-MEs containing different amounts of CP, which further confirmed that a certain amount of CP and tumor-targeted ligand were of great importance to

  4. Ectopic ACTH and CRH co-secreting tumor localized by 68Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Bagci, Ulas; Sadowski, Samira M.; Patronas, Nicholas J.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) co-secreting tumors causing Cushing syndrome (CS) is challenging, since these tumors are rare and their diagnosis is frequently confused with Cushing disease (CD), due to the effect of CRH on the pituitary. We report a case of a 21-year-old male who was referred to our institution with persistent hypercortisolemia and CS after undergoing unnecessary transsphenoidal surgery (TSS). 68Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT revealed increased tracer uptake in the thymus which was histologically proved to be neuroendocrine tumor (NET) staining positive for ACTH and CRH. Imaging with 18F-FDG PET/CT was not diagnostic. PMID:26018709

  5. Ectopic ACTH and CRH Co-secreting Tumor Localized by 68Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Bagci, Ulas; Sadowski, Samira M; Patronas, Nicholas J; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-07-01

    Diagnosis of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) co-secreting tumors causing Cushing syndrome (CS) is challenging because these tumors are rare and their diagnosis is frequently confused with Cushing disease (CD), caused by the effect of CRH on the pituitary. We report a case of a 21-year-old male patient who was referred to our institution with persistent hypercortisolemia and CS after undergoing unnecessary transsphenoidal surgery (TSS). ⁶⁸Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT revealed increased tracer uptake in the thymus, which was histologically proven to be a neuroendocrine tumor (NET) that stained positive for ACTH and CRH. Imaging with ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT was not diagnostic.

  6. Automated detection and delineation of lung tumors in PET-CT volumes using a lung atlas and iterative mean-SUV threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballangan, Cherry; Wang, Xiuying; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2009-02-01

    Automated segmentation for the delineation of lung tumors with PET-CT is a challenging task. In PET images, primary lung tumors can have varying degrees of tracer uptake, which sometimes does not differ markedly from normal adjacent structures such as the mediastinum, heart and liver. In addition, separation of tumor from adjacent soft tissues and bone in the chest wall is problematic due to limited resolution. For CT, the tumor soft tissue density can be similar to that in the blood vessels and the chest wall; and although CT provides better boundary definition, exact tumor delineation is also difficult when the tumor density is similar to adjacent structures. We propose an innovative automated adaptive method to delineate lung tumors in PET-CT images in conjunction with a lung atlas in which an iterative mean-SUV (Standardized Uptake Value) threshold is used to gradually define the tumor region in PET. Tumor delineation in the CT data is performed using region growing and seeds obtained autonomously from the PET tumor regions. We evaluated our approach in 13 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and found it could delineate tumors of different size, shape and location, even when when the NSCLC involved the chest wall.

  7. Percutaneous CT-Guided Ablation in the Hepatic Dome: Artificially Induced Pneumothorax for Safe Transpleural Access

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Leonardo Guedes Moreira; Rochal, Rafael Dahmer; Rahal, Antônio; Garcia, Rodrigo Gobbo

    2015-01-01

    Ablative therapies have become a great alternative to surgical treatment of hepatic nodules. Some technical difficulties may negatively influence the effectiveness of this therapy, such as lesions located near the diaphragm. The transthoracic approach is commonly used to access these lesions. However, it is associated with an increased risk of complications, such as pneumothorax, hemothorax, alveolar bleeding, and others. We report a case of a radiofrequency ablation of a lesion in the hepatic dome, where an artificially induced pneumothorax was performed to guarantee a safe and effective access. The air was easily injected by a spinal needle and later aspirated by a single-lumen catheter. Induced pneumothorax shoud be considered in ablation of hepatic dome lesions, mainly when the transhepatic access is not appropriate. PMID:26713179

  8. Exploring Variability in CT Characterization of Tumors: A Preliminary Phantom Study1

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Binsheng; Tan, Yongqiang; Tsai, Wei Yann; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Lu, Lin

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To explore the effects of computed tomography (CT) slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm on quantification of image features to characterize tumors using a chest phantom. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-two phantom lesions of known sizes (10 and 20 mm), shapes (spherical, elliptical, lobulated, and spiculated), and densities [-630, -10, and +100 Hounsfield Unit (HU)] were inserted into an anthropomorphic thorax phantom and scanned three times with relocations. The raw data were reconstructed using six imaging settings, i.e., a combination of three slice thicknesses of 1.25, 2.5, and 5 mm and two reconstruction kernels of lung and standard. Lesions were segmented and 14 image features representing lesion size, shape, and texture were calculated. Differences in the measured image features due to slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm were compared using linear regression method by adjusting three confounding variables (size, density, and shape). RESULTS: All 14 features were significantly different between 1.25 and 5 mm slice images. The 1.25 and 2.5 mm slice thicknesses were better than 5 mm for volume, density mean, density SD gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) energy and homogeneity. As for the reconstruction algorithm, there was no significant difference in uni-dimension, volume, shape index 9, and compactness. Lung reconstruction was better for density mean, whereas standard reconstruction was better for density SD. CONCLUSIONS: CT slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm can significantly affect the quantification of image features. Thinner (1.25 and 2.5 mm) and thicker (5 mm) slice images should not be used interchangeably. Sharper and smoother reconstructions significantly affect the density-based features. PMID:24772211

  9. Comparison of manual vs. automated multimodality (CT-MRI) image registration for brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Abhirup; Santiago, Roberto J.; Smith, Ryan; Kassaee, Alireza . E-mail: Kassaee@xrt.upenn.edu

    2005-03-31

    Computed tomgoraphy-magnetic resonance imaging (CT-MRI) registrations are routinely used for target-volume delineation of brain tumors. We clinically use 2 software packages based on manual operation and 1 automated package with 2 different algorithms: chamfer matching using bony structures, and mutual information using intensity patterns. In all registration algorithms, a minimum of 3 pairs of identical anatomical and preferably noncoplanar landmarks is used on each of the 2 image sets. In manual registration, the program registers these points and links the image sets using a 3-dimensional (3D) transformation. In automated registration, the 3 landmarks are used as an initial starting point and further processing is done to complete the registration. Using our registration packages, registration of CT and MRI was performed on 10 patients. We scored the results of each registration set based on the amount of time spent, the accuracy reported by the software, and a final evaluation. We evaluated each software program by measuring the residual error between 'matched' points on the right and left globes and the posterior fossa for fused image slices. In general, manual registration showed higher misalignment between corresponding points compared to automated registration using intensity matching. This error had no directional dependence and was, most of the time, larger for a larger structure in both registration techniques. Automated algorithm based on intensity matching also gave the best results in terms of registration accuracy, irrespective of whether or not the initial landmarks were chosen carefully, when compared to that done using bone matching algorithm. Intensity-matching algorithm required the least amount of user-time and provided better accuracy.

  10. Frequency of interleukin 28B rs12979860 C>T variants in Filipino patients chronically infected with hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Baclig, Michael O; Reyes, Karen G; Mapua, Cynthia A; Gopez-Cervantes, Juliet; Natividad, Filipinas F

    2015-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the most prevalent viral infections worldwide. Nearly 400 million individuals are chronic carriers of HBV. The aim of the present study was to determine the frequency of human interleukin 28B (IL28B) variants among treatment naive Filipino patients clinically diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), and to compare the IL28B frequency distribution with various ethnic populations. Fifty-seven CHB patients and 43 normal controls were enrolled in this study. Real-time PCR was performed using the TaqMan genotyping assay for IL28B rs12979860. The allelic frequencies among normal controls were 0.94 and 0.06 for the IL28B rs12979860 C and T alleles, respectively. Eighty-eight percent were identified as homozygous for the IL28B C/C genotype and 12% were identified as heterozygous for the IL28B C/T genotype. Among CHB patients, the allelic frequencies were 0.90 for the IL28B C allele and 0.10 for the IL28B T allele. No IL28B T/T genotype was observed between the two groups. No significant difference in the distribution of IL28B genotypes was observed between normal controls and CHB patients. Allelic frequencies of IL28B among Filipinos were similar with other Asian populations but significantly different from Caucasians. The frequency of rs12979860 C>T variants among Filipino CHB patients has not yet been reported. These data provided new insight into the geographical frequency distribution of IL28B variants. Further studies are needed to determine the possible association between IL28B variants and response to pegylated-interferon-α plus ribavirin combination therapy among Filipino patients chronically infected with HBV.

  11. Radiological prediction of tumor invasiveness of lung adenocarcinoma on thin-section CT

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, Masahiro; Johkoh, Takeshi; Noguchi, Masayuki; Morii, Eiichi; Shintani, Yasushi; Okumura, Meinoshin; Hata, Akinori; Fujiwara, Maki; Honda, Osamu; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate thin-section computed tomography (CT) (TSCT) features that differentiate adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS), minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA), and invasive adenocarcinoma (IVA), and to determine the size of solid portion on CT that correlates to pathological invasive components. Forty-eight patients were included. Nodules were classified into ground-glass nodule (GGN), part-solid, solid, and heterogeneous. Visual density of GGNs was subjectively evaluated using reference standard images: faint GGN (Ga), <−700 Hounsfield unit (HU); intermediate GGN (Gb), from −700 to −400 HU; dense GGN (Gc), >−400 HU; and mixed (Ga + Gb, Ga + Gc, and Gb + Gc). The evaluated TSCT findings included margin of nodule, distribution of solid portion, distribution of air bronchiologram, and pleural indentation. The longest diameters of the solid portion and the entire tumor were measured. Invasive diameters were measured in pathological specimens. Twenty-two AISs (16 GGNs [7 Ga, 5 Gb, 2 Gc, 1 Ga + Gc, 1 Gb + Gc], 4 part-solids, and 2 heterogeneous), 6 MIAs (1 GGN [Gb + Gc], 3 part-solids, and 2 solids), and 20 IVAs (1 GGN [Gb], 3 part-solids, and 16 solid) were found. The longest diameter (mean ± standard deviation) of the solid portion and total tumor were 9.7 ± 9.7 and 18.9 ± 5.6 mm, respectively. Significant differences in TSCT findings between AIS and IVA were margin of nodule (Pearson chi-squared test, P = 0.004), distribution of air bronchiologram (P = 0.0148), and pleural indentation (P = 0.0067). A solid portion >5.3 mm on TSCT indicated MIA or IVA, and >7.3 mm indicated IVA (receiver operating characteristic analysis, P < 0.0001). Irregular margin, air bronchiologram with disruption and/or irregular dilatation, and pleural indentation may distinguish IVA from AIS. A 5.3 to 7.3 mm solid portion on TSCT indicates MIA/IVA, and a solid portion >7.3 mm on TSCT indicates IVA. PMID:28296757

  12. Histopathological characteristics of glutamine synthetase-positive hepatic tumor lesions in a mouse model of spontaneous metabolic syndrome (TSOD mouse)

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Nishida, Takeshi; Baba, Hayato; Hatta, Hideki; Imura, Johji; Sutoh, Mitsuko; Toyohara, Syunji; Hokao, Ryoji; Watanabe, Syunsuke; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Uehara, Hisanori; Tsuneyama, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that Tsumura-Suzuki obese diabetic (TSOD) mice, a polygenic model of spontaneous type 2 diabetes, is a valuable model of hepatic carcinogenesis via non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). One of the characteristics of tumors in these mice is the diffuse expression of glutamine synthetase (GS), which is a diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we performed detailed histopathological examinations and found that GS expression was diffusely positive in >70% of the hepatic tumors from 15-month-old male TSOD mice. Translocation of β-catenin into nuclei with enhanced membranous expression also occurred in GS-positive tumors. Small lesions (<1 mm) in GS-positive cases exhibited dysplastic nodules, with severe nuclear atypia, whereas large lesions (>3 mm) bore the characteristics of human HCC, exhibiting nuclear and structural atypia with invasive growth. By contrast, the majority of GS-negative tumors were hepatocellular adenomas with advanced fatty change and low nuclear grade. In GS-negative tumors, loss of liver fatty acid-binding protein expression was observed. These results suggest that the histological characteristics of GS-positive hepatic tumors in TSOD mice resemble human HCC; thus, this model may be a useful tool in translational research targeting the NAFLD/NASH-HCC sequence. PMID:27446562

  13. Histopathological characteristics of glutamine synthetase-positive hepatic tumor lesions in a mouse model of spontaneous metabolic syndrome (TSOD mouse).

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Nishida, Takeshi; Baba, Hayato; Hatta, Hideki; Imura, Johji; Sutoh, Mitsuko; Toyohara, Syunji; Hokao, Ryoji; Watanabe, Syunsuke; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Uehara, Hisanori; Tsuneyama, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported that Tsumura-Suzuki obese diabetic (TSOD) mice, a polygenic model of spontaneous type 2 diabetes, is a valuable model of hepatic carcinogenesis via non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). One of the characteristics of tumors in these mice is the diffuse expression of glutamine synthetase (GS), which is a diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we performed detailed histopathological examinations and found that GS expression was diffusely positive in >70% of the hepatic tumors from 15-month-old male TSOD mice. Translocation of β-catenin into nuclei with enhanced membranous expression also occurred in GS-positive tumors. Small lesions (<1 mm) in GS-positive cases exhibited dysplastic nodules, with severe nuclear atypia, whereas large lesions (>3 mm) bore the characteristics of human HCC, exhibiting nuclear and structural atypia with invasive growth. By contrast, the majority of GS-negative tumors were hepatocellular adenomas with advanced fatty change and low nuclear grade. In GS-negative tumors, loss of liver fatty acid-binding protein expression was observed. These results suggest that the histological characteristics of GS-positive hepatic tumors in TSOD mice resemble human HCC; thus, this model may be a useful tool in translational research targeting the NAFLD/NASH-HCC sequence.

  14. Vasculature segmentation for radio frequency ablation of non-resectable hepatic tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemler, Paul F.; McCreedy, Evan S.; Cheng, Ruida; Wood, Brad; McAuliffe, Matthew J.

    2006-03-01

    In Radio Frequency Ablation (RFA) procedures, hepatic tumor tissue is heated to a temperature where necrosis is insured. Unfortunately, recent results suggest that heating tumor tissue to necrosis is complicated because nearby major blood vessels provide a cooling effect. Therefore, it is fundamentally important for physicians to perform a careful analysis of the spatial relationship of diseased tissue to larger liver blood vessels. The liver contains many of these large vessels, which affect the RFA ablation shape and size. There are many sophisticated vasculature detection and segmentation techniques reported in the literature that identify continuous vessels as the diameter changes size and it transgresses through many bifurcation levels. However, the larger blood vessels near the treatment area are the only vessels required for proper RFA treatment plan formulation and analysis. With physician guidance and interaction, our system can segment those vessels which are most likely to affect the RFA ablations. We have found that our system provides the physician with therapeutic, geometric and spatial information necessary to accurately plan treatment of tumors near large blood vessels. The segmented liver vessels near the treatment region are also necessary for computing isolevel heating profiles used to evaluate different proposed treatment configurations.

  15. Serum alpha-fetoprotein subfractions identified by Ricinus communis agglutinin I in hepatic malignancies, yolk sac tumor, benign hepatic diseases, and fetal stage.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, T; Takahashi, Y

    1989-01-01

    Using Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA-I) affinity crossed-line immunoelectrophoresis, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) subfractions were studied in sera from patients with primary hepatic cancer (PHC), hepatic metastasis of gastric cancer (HMGC), yolk sac tumor (YST), acute or chronic hepatitis or hepatic cirrhosis. Fetal AFP subfractions were also examined in amniotic fluids or in culture fluids of fetal tissues. RCA-I non-reactive subfraction was commonly found in PHC, HMGC, YST, benign hepatic diseases, and fetal stage. RCA-I weakly reactive (WR) or strongly reactive (SR) subfraction was noted only in malignant diseases. RCA-I has a specific affinity to terminal galactose in oligosaccharide, and the presence of sialic acid on galactose residue(s) inhibits the affinity with RCA-I. Therefore, common AFP subfraction non-reactive with RCA-I was assumed to be galactosialyl form, while RCA-I WR and SR subfractions found only in malignancies were monogalactosyl and digalactosyl, respectively. Clinically this approach to detect the RCA-I WR or SR subfraction facilitates a differential diagnosis of AFP-producing malignancies and benign conditions.

  16. Tumor-induced CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells exacerbate immune-mediated hepatitis in mice in a CD40-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kapanadze, Tamar; Medina-Echeverz, José; Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Weiss, Jonathan M; Wiltrout, Robert H; Kapoor, Veena; Hawk, Nga; Terabe, Masaki; Berzofsky, Jay A; Manns, Michael P; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2015-04-01

    Immunosuppressive CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulate in the livers of tumor-bearing (TB) mice. We studied hepatic MDSCs in two murine models of immune-mediated hepatitis. Unexpectedly, treatment of TB mice with Concanavalin A (Con A) or α-galactosylceramide resulted in increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) serum levels in comparison to tumor-free mice. Adoptive transfer of hepatic MDSCs into naïve mice exacerbated Con A induced liver damage. Hepatic CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) cells revealed a polarized proinflammatory gene signature after Con A treatment. An IFN-γ-dependent upregulation of CD40 on hepatic CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) cells along with an upregulation of CD80, CD86, and CD1d after Con A treatment was observed. Con A treatment resulted in a loss of suppressor function by tumor-induced CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) MDSCs as well as enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated hepatotoxicity. CD40 knockdown in hepatic MDSCs led to increased arginase activity upon Con A treatment and lower ALT/AST serum levels. Finally, blockade of arginase activity in Cd40(-/-) tumor-induced myeloid cells resulted in exacerbation of hepatitis and increased ROS production in vivo. Our findings indicate that in a setting of acute hepatitis, tumor-induced hepatic MDSCs act as proinflammatory immune effector cells capable of killing hepatocytes in a CD40-dependent manner.

  17. Multimodality therapy for a case of neuroendocrine tumor in the hilum with multiple hepatic metastases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Huang, Zhen; Zhang, Yefan

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a male mid-aged patient with a rare neuroendocrine tumor in hepatic hilum who finally received surgical treatment after multidisciplinary treatment (MDT). After the condition was confirmed, the patient received sandostatin treatment based on MDT consultations and his family’s willingness due to the high surgical risk. One year later, follow-up examinations showed “stable disease” (SD), and sandostatin was withdrawn due to economic consideration. One year after drug withdrawal, liver metastases were found. Sutent treatment was then applied after a second MDT consultation. Four months later, further examinations showed a partial response (PR). Finally, the patient received surgical treatment in the department of surgery. PMID:28138646

  18. Optimizing a head-tracked stereo display system to guide hepatic tumor ablation.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Henry; State, Andrei; Yang, Hua; Peck, Tabitha; Lee, Sang Woo; Rosenthal, Michael; Bulysheva, Anna; Burke, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Radio frequency ablation is a minimally invasive intervention that introduces -- under 2D ultrasound guidance and via a needle-like probe -- high-frequency electrical current into non-resectable hepatic tumors. These recur mostly on the periphery, indicating errors in probe placement. Hypothesizing that a contextually correct 3D display will aid targeting and decrease recurrence, we have developed a prototype guidance system based on a head-tracked 3D display and motion-tracked instruments. We describe our reasoning and our experience in selecting components for, designing and constructing the 3D display. Initial candidates were an augmented reality see-through head-mounted display and a virtual reality "fish tank" system. We describe the system requirements and explain how we arrived at the final decision. We show the operational guidance system in use on phantoms and animals.

  19. A pilot study of the prognostic significance of metabolic tumor size measurements in PET/CT imaging of lymphomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallergi, Maria; Botsivali, Maria; Politis, Nikolaos; Menychtas, Dimitrios; Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Chatziioannou, Sofia

    2015-03-01

    This study explores changes in metabolic tumor volume, metabolic tumor diameter, and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), for earlier and more accurate identification of lymphomas' response to treatment using 18F- FDG PET/CT. Pre- and post-treatment PET/CT studies of 20 patients with Hodgkin disease (HL) and 7 patients with non- Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) were retrospectively selected for this study. The diameter and volume of the metabolic tumor was determined by an in-house developed adaptive local thresholding technique based on a 50% threshold of the maximum pixel value within a region. Statistical analysis aimed at exploring associations between metabolic size measurements and SUVmax and the ability of the three biomarkers to predict the patients' response to treatment as defined by the four classes in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) guidelines. Results indicated moderate correlations between % change in metabolic tumor volume and % change in metabolic tumor maximum diameter (R=0.51) and between % change in maximum diameter and % change in SUVmax (R=0.52). The correlation between % change in tumor volume and % change in SUVmax was weak (R=0.24). The % change in metabolic tumor size, either volume or diameter, was a "very strong" predictor of response to treatment (R=0.89), stronger than SUVmax (R=0.63). In conclusion, metabolic tumor volume could have important prognostic value, possibly higher than maximum metabolic diameter or SUVmax that are currently the standard of practice. Volume measurements, however, should be based on robust and standardized segmentation methodologies to avoid variability. In addition, SUV-peak or lean body mass corrected SUV-peak may be a better PET biomarker than SUVmax when SUV-volume combinations are considered.

  20. Graphics processing unit-accelerated non-rigid registration of MR images to CT images during CT-guided percutaneous liver tumor ablations

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Junichi; Plishker, William; Torabi, Meysam; Olubiyi, Olutayo I; Zaki, George; Tatli, Servet; Silverman, Stuart G.; Shekhar, Raj; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Accuracy and speed are essential for the intraprocedural nonrigid MR-to-CT image registration in the assessment of tumor margins during CT-guided liver tumor ablations. While both accuracy and speed can be improved by limiting the registration to a region of interest (ROI), manual contouring of the ROI prolongs the registration process substantially. To achieve accurate and fast registration without the use of an ROI, we combined a nonrigid registration technique based on volume subdivision with hardware acceleration using a graphical processing unit (GPU). We compared the registration accuracy and processing time of GPU-accelerated volume subdivision-based nonrigid registration technique to the conventional nonrigid B-spline registration technique. Materials and Methods Fourteen image data sets of preprocedural MR and intraprocedural CT images for percutaneous CT-guided liver tumor ablations were obtained. Each set of images was registered using the GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique and the B-spline technique. Manual contouring of ROI was used only for the B-spline technique. Registration accuracies (Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) and 95% Hausdorff Distance (HD)), and total processing time including contouring of ROIs and computation were compared using a paired Student’s t-test. Results Accuracy of the GPU-accelerated registrations and B-spline registrations, respectively were 88.3 ± 3.7% vs 89.3 ± 4.9% (p = 0.41) for DSC and 13.1 ± 5.2 mm vs 11.4 ± 6.3 mm (p = 0.15) for HD. Total processing time of the GPU-accelerated registration and B-spline registration techniques was 88 ± 14 s vs 557 ± 116 s (p < 0.000000002), respectively; there was no significant difference in computation time despite the difference in the complexity of the algorithms (p = 0.71). Conclusion The GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique was as accurate as the B-spline technique and required significantly less processing time. The GPU

  1. Monitoring glioma growth and tumor necrosis with the U-SPECT-II/CT scanner by targeting integrin αvβ3.

    PubMed

    Shao, Guoqiang; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shuang

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) as an imaging tool to monitor α(v)β(3) expression and tumor necrosis. The animal model was established by subcutaneous injection of 5 × 10(6) U87MG cells into the shoulder flank of each mouse. Imaging was performed using the U-SPECT-II/CT scanner (Milabs, Utrecht, the Netherlands). Tumor volumes were determined, and the tumor uptake of (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) was calculated on the basis of SPECT/CT and compared to that from biodistribution. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine CD31 and α(v)β(3) expression levels. We found that the tumor detection limit was ≈ 0.5 mm(3) by (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) SPECT/CT. The tumor uptake of (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) from SPECT/CT was almost identical to that from biodistribution. The α(v)β(3) was expressed mainly on blood vessels for the tumors of 0.2 to 0.5 cm(3). In larger tumors, tumor α(v)β(3) expression increased due to more contribution from glioma cells. When tumors were > 0.5 cm(3), the %ID/cm(3) uptake of (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) decreased because of necrosis. The overall relationship between the tumor size and %ID of (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) was modeled as a quadratic polynomial fitting curve, with R(2) being > .95. (99m)Tc-3P-RGD(2) SPECT/CT is excellent for monitoring α(v)β(3) expression and tumor necrosis during tumor growth and may become a screening tool for patient selection before anti-α(v)β(3) therapy.

  2. Hepatocellular carcinoma mouse models: Hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocarcinogenesis and haploinsufficient tumor suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yuan-Chi; Shen, Zhao-Qing; Kao, Cheng-Heng; Tsai, Ting-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial and multistage pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has fascinated a wide spectrum of scientists for decades. While a number of major risk factors have been identified, their mechanistic roles in hepatocarcinogenesis still need to be elucidated. Many tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) have been identified as being involved in HCC. These TSGs can be classified into two groups depending on the situation with respect to allelic mutation/loss in the tumors: the recessive TSGs with two required mutated alleles and the haploinsufficient TSGs with one required mutated allele. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the most important risk factors associated with HCC. Although mice cannot be infected with HBV due to the narrow host range of HBV and the lack of a proper receptor, one advantage of mouse models for HBV/HCC research is the numerous and powerful genetic tools that help investigate the phenotypic effects of viral proteins and allow the dissection of the dose-dependent action of TSGs. Here, we mainly focus on the application of mouse models in relation to HBV-associated HCC and on TSGs that act either in a recessive or in a haploinsufficient manner. Discoveries obtained using mouse models will have a great impact on HCC translational medicine. PMID:26755878

  3. [Relief effect of CT-guided (125)I seed implantation on patients with spinal and paraspinal osteolytic metastatic tumors].

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Li, F S; Wang, L; Du, Z G; Xu, S N

    2017-03-23

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of computed tomography (CT)-guided (125)I seed implantation in the treatment of patients with spinal and/or paraspinal osteolytic metastatic tumors. Methods: The radiation dose distribution was planned for 27 patients with 35 spinal and paraspinal osteolytic metastatic tumors by a treatment planning system (TPS). CT-guided (125)I seed implantation was carried out in the patients, and the quality of treatment was evaluated based on CT-imaging follow-up. Results: All the 27 patients underwent CT-guided (125)I seed implantation successfully. 12 to 50 (125)I seeds were injected into each spinal or paraspinal metastatic tumor, 39.15 on average, and the specific radioactive activity of the particles ranged from 0.60 to 0.80 mCi, 0.73 mCi on average. The minimal percentage of the dose received by 90% of the target volume (D(90)) of the spinal and paraspinal metastatic tumors ranged from 90 to 165 Gy, 115.03 Gy on average. Among the 27 patients, 21 (77.8%) had partial remission (PR) and 6(22.2%)had stable disease (SD). The Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) scores before implantation and at postoperative 3 and 6 months were 7.81±0.74, 2.04±1.10 and 1.81±0.79, respectively, (P<0.05). The assessment of pain intensity before (125)I seed implantation and at 3 postoperative months showed obvious improvements in the patients evaluated according to the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale: 12 (44.4%) patients with ASIA grade C were changed to grade D, 3 (11.1%) from grade C to grade E, 8 (29.6%) from grade D to grade E, 3 (11.1%) with a stable grade D, and 1 (3.7%)with a stablegrade C. The Karnovsky performance scale (KPS) scores before treatment and at 3 months and 6 months postoperatively were 66.30±6.88, 85.93±9.31 and 87.91±8.56, respectively (P<0.05). Their local control rate (LCR) at 3 months, 6 months and 1 year postoperatively were 100%, 92.6% and 51.9%, respectively, and the overall survival rates(OSR) were

  4. Ultrastable polyethyleneimine-stabilized gold nanoparticles modified with polyethylene glycol for blood pool, lymph node and tumor CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongxing; Wen, Shihui; Zhao, Lingzhou; Li, Du; Liu, Changcun; Jiang, Wenbin; Gao, Xiang; Gu, Wentao; Ma, Nan; Zhao, Jinhua; Shi, Xiangyang; Zhao, Qinghua

    2016-03-01

    Development of new long-circulating contrast agents for computed tomography (CT) imaging of different biological systems still remains a great challenge. Here, we report the design and synthesis of branched polyethyleneimine (PEI)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au PSNPs) modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for blood pool, lymph node, and tumor CT imaging. In this study, thiolated PEI was first synthesized and used as a stabilizing agent to form AuNPs. The formed Au PSNPs were then grafted with PEG monomethyl ether via PEI amine-enabled conjugation chemistry, followed by acetylation of the remaining PEI surface amines. The formed PEGylated Au PSNPs were characterized via different methods. We show that the PEGylated Au PSNPs with an Au core size of 5.1 nm have a relatively long half-decay time (7.8 h), and display a better X-ray attenuation property than conventionally used iodine-based CT contrast agents (e.g., Omnipaque), and are hemocompatible and cytocompatible in a given concentration range. These properties of the Au PSNPs afford their uses as a contrast agent for effective CT imaging of the blood pool and major organs of rats, lymph node of rabbits, and the xenografted tumor model of mice. Importantly, the PEGylated Au PSNPs could be excreted out of the body with time and also showed excellent in vivo stability. These findings suggest that the formed PEGylated Au PSNPs may be used as a promising contrast agent for CT imaging of different biological systems.Development of new long-circulating contrast agents for computed tomography (CT) imaging of different biological systems still remains a great challenge. Here, we report the design and synthesis of branched polyethyleneimine (PEI)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au PSNPs) modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for blood pool, lymph node, and tumor CT imaging. In this study, thiolated PEI was first synthesized and used as a stabilizing agent to form AuNPs. The formed Au PSNPs were then grafted with PEG

  5. Enhanced Ablation of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound with Microbubbles: An Experimental Study on Rabbit Hepatic VX2 Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    He Wei; Wang Wei Zhou Ping; Wang, Yixiang J.; Zhou Peng; Li Ruizhen; Wang Jinsheng; Ahuja, Anil T.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess the enhanced effect of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation with microbubbles on rabbit hepatic VX2 tumors and to compare the detection sensitivity of CEUS and CECT to determine the residual viable tissue after ablation of HIFU. Methods: Forty rabbits with hepatic VX2 tumors were randomly separated into two groups (20 animals per group) before HIFU ablation. A bolus of 0.2 mL of saline or a microbubble-based ultrasound (US) contrast agent was injected intravenously to group I rabbits and group II rabbits, respectively. The HIFU ablation procedure was started 15 s after the injection. Tumors were examined with grayscale contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) immediately before and after HIFU ablation. Histopathologic assessment was performed immediately after treatment imaging. Results: Before ablation, intense contrast enhancement during arterial phase was observed at the whole tumors or the periphery of the tumors by CEUS and CECT. Lower HIFU energy was used in group II than in group I (P < 0.001). Histopathologic assessment revealed local residual viable tumor tissues due to incomplete ablation in 47.4% (9/19) of tumors in group I and 10% (2/20) of tumors in group II (P < 0.05). The concordance rate of CEUS (90.9%) with histopathology on residual tumor detection was higher than that of CECT (27.3%, P < 0.05). Conclusions: Introduction of the microbubble agent enhances HIFU therapeutic efficacy. CEUS proves to have high sensitivity in assessment of residual viable rabbit VX2 tumor after HIFU.

  6. Comparison of Fusion Imaging Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Intra-arterial CT: Assessment of Drug Distribution by an Implantable Port System in Patients Undergoing Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Kusunoki, Shinichiroh; Nakaura, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Takamori, Hiroshi; Chikamoto, Akira; Kanemitsu, Keiichiro

    2006-06-15

    Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy is effective for treating primary and metastatic carcinoma of the liver. We compared the perfusion patterns of HAI chemotherapy on intra-arterial port-catheter computed tomography (iapc-CT) and fused images obtained with a combined single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) system. We studied 28 patients with primary or metastatic carcinoma of the liver who bore an implantable HAI port system. All underwent abdominal SPECT using Tc-99m-MAA (185 Mbq); the injection rate was 1 mL/min, identical to the chemotherapy infusion rate, and 0.5 mL/sec for iapc-CT. Delivery was through an implantable port. We compared the intrahepatic perfusion (IHP) and extrahepatic perfusion (EHP) patterns of HAI chemotherapy on iapc-CT images and fused images obtained with a combined SPECT/CT system. In 23 of 28 patients (82%), IHP patterns on iapc-CT images and fused images were identical. In 5 of the 28 patients (18%), IHP on fusion images was different from IHP on iapc-CT images. EHP was seen on fused images in 12 of the 28 patients (43%) and on iapc-CT images in 8 patients (29%). In 17 patients (61%), upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastroduodenal mucosal lesions. EHP was revealed on fused images in 10 of these patients; 9 of them manifested gastroduodenal toxicity at the time of subsequent HAI chemotherapy. Fusion imaging using the combined SPECT/CT system reflects the actual distribution of the infused anticancer agent. This information is valuable not only for monitoring adequate drug distribution but also for avoiding potential extrahepatic complications.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of PEGylated polyethylenimine-entrapped gold nanoparticles for blood pool and tumor CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Benqing; Zheng, Linfeng; Peng, Chen; Li, Du; Li, Jingchao; Wen, Shihui; Shen, Mingwu; Zhang, Guixiang; Shi, Xiangyang

    2014-10-08

    The synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) entrapped within polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified polyethylenimine (PEI) for blood pool and tumor computed tomography (CT) imaging are reported. In this approach, partially PEGylated PEI was used as a template for AuNP synthesis, followed by acetylating the PEI remaining surface amines. The synthesized PEGylated PEI-entrapped AuNPs (Au PENPs) were characterized via different methods. Our results reveal that the synthesized Au PENPs can be tuned to have an Au core size in a range of 1.9-4.6 nm and to be water-soluble, stable, and noncytotoxic in a studied concentration range. With a demonstrated better X-ray attenuation property than that of clinically used iodinated small molecular contrast agent (e.g., Omnipaque) and the prolonged half-decay time (11.2 h in rat) confirmed by pharmacokinetics studies, the developed PEGylated Au PENPs enabled efficient and enhanced blood pool CT imaging with imaging time up to 75 min. Likewise, thanks to the enhanced permeability and retention effect, the PEGylated Au PENPs were also able to be used as a contrast agent for effective CT imaging of a tumor model. With the proven organ biocompatibility by histological studies, the designed PEGylated Au PENPs may hold great promise to be used as contrast agents for CT imaging of a variety of biological systems. The significance of this study is that rather than the use of dendrimers as templates, cost-effective branched polymers (e.g., PEI) can be used as templates to generate functionalized AuNPs for CT imaging applications.

  8. Tumor Tracking Method Based on a Deformable 4D CT Breathing Motion Model Driven by an External Surface Surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Fassi, Aurora; Schaerer, Joël; Fernandes, Mathieu; Riboldi, Marco; Sarrut, David; Baroni, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a tumor tracking method based on a surrogate-driven motion model, which provides noninvasive dynamic localization of extracranial targets for the compensation of respiration-induced intrafraction motion in high-precision radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The proposed approach is based on a patient-specific breathing motion model, derived a priori from 4-dimensional planning computed tomography (CT) images. Model parameters (respiratory baseline, amplitude, and phase) are retrieved and updated at each treatment fraction according to in-room radiography acquisition and optical surface imaging. The baseline parameter is adapted to the interfraction variations obtained from the daily cone beam (CB) CT scan. The respiratory amplitude and phase are extracted from an external breathing surrogate, estimated from the displacement of the patient thoracoabdominal surface, acquired with a noninvasive surface imaging device. The developed method was tested on a database of 7 lung cancer patients, including the synchronized information on internal and external respiratory motion during a CBCT scan. Results: About 30 seconds of simultaneous acquisition of CBCT and optical surface images were analyzed for each patient. The tumor trajectories identified in CBCT projections were used as reference and compared with the target trajectories estimated from surface displacement with the a priori motion model. The resulting absolute differences between the reference and estimated tumor motion along the 2 image dimensions ranged between 0.7 and 2.4 mm; the measured phase shifts did not exceed 7% of the breathing cycle length. Conclusions: We investigated a tumor tracking method that integrates breathing motion information provided by the 4-dimensional planning CT with surface imaging at the time of treatment, representing an alternative approach to point-based external–internal correlation models. Although an in-room radiograph-based assessment of the

  9. Contribution of 18-FDG PET/CT to brown tumor detection in a patient with primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Gahier Penhoat, Mélanie; Drui, Delphine; Ansquer, Catherine; Mirallie, Eric; Maugars, Yves; Guillot, Pascale

    2017-03-01

    We report the case of a patient who presented with multiple brown tumors as the inaugural manifestation of primary hyperparathyroidism. Tc-99m hexakis methoxyisobutylisonitrile (99mTc-MIBI) scintigraphy demonstrated increased radiotracer uptake by the bone lesions. The patient was a 65-year-old male who sought advice for a swelling on his right shin. An osteolytic lesion was visible on the radiograph. A bone biopsy showed a benign tumor containing abundant osteoclastic cells. Laboratory abnormalities included hypercalcemia (3.63mmol/L with 1.91mmol/L ionized calcium), hypophosphatemia (0.38mmol/L), and parathyroid hormone elevation (880.8pg/mL; N: 10-70). Serum 25-OH Vitamin D level was lower than 4ng/mL (N: 30-60). An 18-FDG PET/CT scan identified numerous high-uptake bone lesions. By 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy, a large high-uptake mass was seen in the left parathyroid gland, as well as high-uptake lesions throughout the skeleton, which were less numerous than those seen by 18-FDG PET/CT. Ultrasonography of the neck visualized a mass consistent with an adenoma in the left parathyroid gland. Brown tumors are bone lesions whose diagnosis should be considered in patients with clinical and laboratory evidence of hyperparathyroidism, once a malignant disease is ruled out. Our case report suggests that 18-FDG PET/CT may be more sensitive than whole-body 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy in detecting brown tumors.

  10. [Effect of lipiodol emulsion and local hyperthermia on hepatic tissue blood flow in rabbits with VX-2 liver tumor].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Tada, I; Okada, K; Kim, Y I; Kobayashi, M

    1988-08-01

    The effect of intra-arterial infusion of lipiodol-emulsion and local hyperthermia on tissue blood flow was examined in experimental hepatic tumor and normal liver of rabbits. VX-2 tumor was implanted in liver of rabbit. The tissue blood flow was estimated by hydrogen gas clearance method when the tumor grew to about 2 cm. Tissue blood flow in tumor (64.5 ml/min/100 g) was significantly less than in normal liver (90.8 ml/min/100 g) (p less than 0.005). The intra-arterial infusion of lipiodol-emulsion did not alter the flow in either tissue. However, the addition of hyperthermia induced a substantial rise of tissue blood flow in normal liver (35% increase, from 93.8 to 127 ml/min/100 g) when compared with in VX-2 tumor (8.9% increase, from 65.1 to 71.8 ml/min/100 g). These were accompanied by a selective heating of liver tumor; the tumor temperature rose to 43 degrees C, although that of normal liver remained at 38 degrees C. Our results suggested that a specific temperature rise of liver tumor after infusion of lipiodol-emulsion and local heating might be related to a different response of microcirculation in tumor and normal liver to the hyperthermia.

  11. CT features of nonfunctioning islet cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Eelkema, E.A.; Stephens, D.H.; Ward, E.M.; Sheedy, P.F. II

    1984-11-01

    To determine the computed tomographic (CT) characteristics of nonfunctioning islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas, the CT scans of 27 patients with that disease were reviewed. The pancreatic tumor was identified as a mass in 26 patients (96%) Of the 25 tumors evaluated with contrast enhancement, 20 became partially diffusely hyperdense relative to nearby normal pancreatic tissue. Hepatic metastases were identified in 15 patients (56%), regional lymphadenopathy in 10 (37%), atrophy of the gland proximal to the tumor in six (22%), dilatation of the biliary ducts in five (19%), and dilatation of the pancreatic duct in four (15%). The CT appearances of the nonfunctioning islet cell tumors were compared with those of 100 ordinary (ductal) pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Although the two types of tumors were sometimes indistinguishable, features found to be more characteristic of islet cell carcinoma included a pancreatic mass of unusually large size, calcification within the tumor, and contrast enhancement of either the primary tumor or hepatic metastases. Involvement of the celiac axis or proximal superior mesenteric artery was limited to ductal carcinoma.

  12. SU-E-I-84: Accuracy Comparison of Multi-Modality Image-Based Volumes of Rodent Solid Tumors Using In-Air Micro-CT Image Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y; Fullerton, G; Goins, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Tumor volume is considered as a better predictor for therapy response monitoring and tumor staging over Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) or World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. In this study, the accuracy of subcutaneous rodent tumor volumes using preclinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and ultrasound (US) equipment and with an external caliper was compared using in-air micro-CT image volume of excised tumors determined as reference tumor volume in our prior study. Methods: MR, US and micro-CT images of subcutaneous SCC4 head and neck tumor xenografts were acquired 4, 6, 9, 11 and 13 days after tumor cell inoculation. Before MR and US scans, caliper measurements were made. After tumors were excised, in-air micro-CT imaging and ex vivo caliper measurements were performed. Tumor volumes were calculated using formula V = (π/6)*a*b*c where a, b and c are the maximum diameters in three perpendicular dimensions determined by the three image modalities and caliper, and compared with reference tumor volume by linear regression analysis as well as Bland-Altman plots. A one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) test was also performed to compare volumes among caliper measurements. Results: The correlation coefficients (R2) of the regression lines for tumor volumes measured by the three imaging modalities and caliper were 0.9939, 0.9669, 0.9806, 0.9274, 0.9619 and 0.9819 for MRI, US and micro-CT, caliperbeforeMRI, caliperbeforeUS and ex vivo caliper respectively. In Bland-Altman plots, the average of tumor volume difference from reference tumor volume (bias) was significant for caliper and micro- CT, but not for MRI and US. Comparison of caliper measurements showed a significant difference (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Using the in-air micro-CT image volume, tumor volume measured by MRI was the most accurate among the three imaging modalities. In vivo caliper volume measurements showed unreliability while ex

  13. Histogram Analysis of CT Perfusion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma for Predicting Response to Transarterial Radioembolization: Value of Tumor Heterogeneity Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Reiner, Caecilia S. Gordic, Sonja; Puippe, Gilbert; Morsbach, Fabian; Wurnig, Moritz; Schaefer, Niklaus; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Pfammatter, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2016-03-15

    PurposeTo evaluate in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), whether assessment of tumor heterogeneity by histogram analysis of computed tomography (CT) perfusion helps predicting response to transarterial radioembolization (TARE).Materials and MethodsSixteen patients (15 male; mean age 65 years; age range 47–80 years) with HCC underwent CT liver perfusion for treatment planning prior to TARE with Yttrium-90 microspheres. Arterial perfusion (AP) derived from CT perfusion was measured in the entire tumor volume, and heterogeneity was analyzed voxel-wise by histogram analysis. Response to TARE was evaluated on follow-up imaging (median follow-up, 129 days) based on modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST). Results of histogram analysis and mean AP values of the tumor were compared between responders and non-responders. Receiver operating characteristics were calculated to determine the parameters’ ability to discriminate responders from non-responders.ResultsAccording to mRECIST, 8 patients (50 %) were responders and 8 (50 %) non-responders. Comparing responders and non-responders, the 50th and 75th percentile of AP derived from histogram analysis was significantly different [AP 43.8/54.3 vs. 27.6/34.3 mL min{sup −1} 100 mL{sup −1}); p < 0.05], while the mean AP of HCCs (43.5 vs. 27.9 mL min{sup −1} 100 mL{sup −1}; p > 0.05) was not. Further heterogeneity parameters from histogram analysis (skewness, coefficient of variation, and 25th percentile) did not differ between responders and non-responders (p > 0.05). If the cut-off for the 75th percentile was set to an AP of 37.5 mL min{sup −1} 100 mL{sup −1}, therapy response could be predicted with a sensitivity of 88 % (7/8) and specificity of 75 % (6/8).ConclusionVoxel-wise histogram analysis of pretreatment CT perfusion indicating tumor heterogeneity of HCC improves the pretreatment prediction of response to TARE.

  14. Treatment of hepatic tumors by thermal versus mechanical effects of pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Song; Zhou, Ping; He, Wei; Liao, Manqiong; Chen, Lili; Ma, C.-M.

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to comparatively assess the thermal versus mechanical effects of pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment on hepatic tumors in vivo. Forty-five rabbits with hepatic VX2 tumors were randomly separated into three groups (15 animals per group) before HIFU ablation. The total HIFU energy (in situ) of 1250 J was used for each tumor for three groups. In groups I and II, animals were treated with 1 MHz pulsed ultrasound at 1 Hz pulsed repetition frequency (PRF), 0.5 duty cycle (0.5 s on and 0.5 s off) and10 s duration for one spot sonication. For group II, in addition to HIFU treatment, microbubbles (SonoVue, Bracco, Milan, Italy) were injected via vein before sonication acting as a synergist. In group III, animals were treated with 1 MHz pulsed ultrasound at 10 Hz PRF, 0.1 duty cycle (0.1 s on and 0.9 s off) and 10 s duration for one sonication. The total treatment spots were calculated according to the tumor volume. Tumors were examined with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) immediately prior to and post HIFU treatment. Histopathologic assessment was performed 3 h after treatment. Our study showed that all animals tolerated the HIFU treatment well. Our data showed that mechanical HIFU could lead to controlled injury in rabbit hepatic tumors with different histological changes in comparison to thermal HIFU with or without microbubbles.

  15. Down-regulation of the cancer/testis antigen 45 (CT45) is associated with altered tumor cell morphology, adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to their restricted expression in male germ cells and certain tumors, cancer/testis (CT) antigens are regarded as promising targets for tumor therapy. CT45 is a recently identified nuclear CT antigen that was associated with a severe disease score in Hodgkin’s lymphoma and poor prognosis in multiple myeloma. As for many CT antigens, the biological function of CT45 in developing germ cells and in tumor cells is largely unknown. Methods CT45 expression was down-regulated in CT45-positive Hodgkin’s lymphoma (L428), fibrosarcoma (HT1080) and myeloma (U266B1) cells using RNA interference. An efficient CT45 knock-down was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining and/or Western blotting. These cellular systems allowed us to analyze the impact of CT45 down-regulation on proliferation, cell cycle progression, morphology, adhesion, migration and invasive capacity of tumor cells. Results Reduced levels of CT45 did not coincide with changes in cell cycle progression or proliferation. However, we observed alterations in cell adherence, morphology and migration/invasion after CT45 down-regulation. Significant changes in the distribution of cytoskeleton-associated proteins were detected by confocal imaging. Changes in cell adherence were recorded in real-time using the xCelligence system with control and siRNA-treated cells. Altered migratory and invasive capacity of CT45 siRNA-treated cells were visualized in 3D migration and invasion assays. Moreover, we found that CT45 down-regulation altered the level of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein syncrip (hnRNP-Q1) which is known to be involved in the control of focal adhesion formation and cell motility. Conclusions Providing first evidence of a cell biological function of CT45, we suggest that this cancer/testis antigen is involved in the modulation of cell morphology, cell adherence and cell motility. Enhanced motility and/or invasiveness of CT45-positive cells could contribute to the more severe

  16. A hybrid approach for fusing 4D-MRI temporal information with 3D-CT for the study of lung and lung tumor motion

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y. X.; Van Reeth, E.; Poh, C. L.; Teo, S.-K.; Tan, C. H.; Tham, I. W. K.

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Accurate visualization of lung motion is important in many clinical applications, such as radiotherapy of lung cancer. Advancement in imaging modalities [e.g., computed tomography (CT) and MRI] has allowed dynamic imaging of lung and lung tumor motion. However, each imaging modality has its advantages and disadvantages. The study presented in this paper aims at generating synthetic 4D-CT dataset for lung cancer patients by combining both continuous three-dimensional (3D) motion captured by 4D-MRI and the high spatial resolution captured by CT using the authors’ proposed approach. Methods: A novel hybrid approach based on deformable image registration (DIR) and finite element method simulation was developed to fuse a static 3D-CT volume (acquired under breath-hold) and the 3D motion information extracted from 4D-MRI dataset, creating a synthetic 4D-CT dataset. Results: The study focuses on imaging of lung and lung tumor. Comparing the synthetic 4D-CT dataset with the acquired 4D-CT dataset of six lung cancer patients based on 420 landmarks, accurate results (average error <2 mm) were achieved using the authors’ proposed approach. Their hybrid approach achieved a 40% error reduction (based on landmarks assessment) over using only DIR techniques. Conclusions: The synthetic 4D-CT dataset generated has high spatial resolution, has excellent lung details, and is able to show movement of lung and lung tumor over multiple breathing cycles.

  17. Observer Performance in the Detection and Classification of Malignant Hepatic Nodules and Masses with CT Image-Space Denoising and Iterative Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lifeng; Li, Zhoubo; Manduca, Armando; Blezek, Daniel J.; Hough, David M.; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K.; Brickner, Gregory C.; Cernigliaro, Joseph C.; Hara, Amy K.; Fidler, Jeff L.; Lake, David S.; Shiung, Maria; Lewis, David; Leng, Shuai; Augustine, Kurt E.; Carter, Rickey E.; Holmes, David R.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if lower-dose computed tomographic (CT) scans obtained with adaptive image-based noise reduction (adaptive nonlocal means [ANLM]) or iterative reconstruction (sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction [SAFIRE]) result in reduced observer performance in the detection of malignant hepatic nodules and masses compared with routine-dose scans obtained with filtered back projection (FBP). Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board and was compliant with HIPAA. Informed consent was obtained from patients for the retrospective use of medical records for research purposes. CT projection data from 33 abdominal and 27 liver or pancreas CT examinations were collected (median volume CT dose index, 13.8 and 24.0 mGy, respectively). Hepatic malignancy was defined by progression or regression or with histopathologic findings. Lower-dose data were created by using a validated noise insertion method (10.4 mGy for abdominal CT and 14.6 mGy for liver or pancreas CT) and images reconstructed with FBP, ANLM, and SAFIRE. Four readers evaluated routine-dose FBP images and all lower-dose images, circumscribing liver lesions and selecting diagnosis. The jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic figure of merit (FOM) was calculated on a per–malignant nodule or per-mass basis. Noninferiority was defined by the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval (CI) of the difference between lower-dose and routine-dose FOMs being less than −0.10. Results Twenty-nine patients had 62 malignant hepatic nodules and masses. Estimated FOM differences between lower-dose FBP and lower-dose ANLM versus routine-dose FBP were noninferior (difference: −0.041 [95% CI: −0.090, 0.009] and −0.003 [95% CI: −0.052, 0.047], respectively). In patients with dedicated liver scans, lower-dose ANLM images were noninferior (difference: +0.015 [95% CI: −0.077, 0.106]), whereas lower-dose FBP images were not (difference −0.049 [95% CI:

  18. The Long-term Benefit of Liver Transplantation for Hepatic Metastases from Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Mazzaferro, V; Sposito, C; Coppa, J; Miceli, R; Bhoori, S; Bongini, M; Camerini, T; Milione, M; Regalia, E; Spreafico, C; Gangeri, L; Buzzoni, R; de Braud, F G; De Feo, T; Mariani, L

    2016-05-01

    Selection criteria and benefit of liver transplantation for hepatic metastases from neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) remains uncertain. Eighty-eight consecutive patients with metastatic NETs eligible for liver transplantation according to Milan-NET criteria were offered transplant (n.42) vs. non-transplant options (n.46) depending on list dynamics, patient disposition and age. Tumor burden between groups did not differ. Transplant patients were younger (40.5 vs. 55.5 years; p<0.001). Long-term outcomes were compared after matching between groups made on multiple Cox models adjusted for propensity score built on logistic models. Survival-benefit was the difference in mean survival between transplant vs. non-transplant options. No patients were lost or died without recurrence. Median follow-up was 122 months. Transplant group showed significant advantage over non-transplant strategies at 5 and 10-yrs in survival (97.2% and 88.8% vs. 50.9% and 22.4% respectively; p<0.001) and time-to-progression (13.1% and 13.1% vs. 83.5% and 89%; p<0.001). After adjustment for propensity score, survival advantage of transplant group was significant (HR=7.4; 95%CI: 2.4-23.0; p=0.001). Adjusted transplant-related survival-benefit was 6.82 months (95%CI: 1.10-12.54; p=0.019) and 38.43 months (95%CI: 21.41-55.45; p<0.001) at 5 and 10-yrs respectively. Liver transplantation for metastatic NETs under restrictive criteria provides excellent long-term outcome. Transplant-related survival-benefit increases over time and maximizes after 10 yrs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Imaging Intratumoral Nanoparticle Uptake after Combining Nanoembolization with Various Ablative Therapies in Hepatic VX2 Rabbit Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Alda L; Melancon, Marites P.; Abdelsalam, Mohamed; Figueira, Tomas Appleton; Dixon, Katherine; McWatters, Amanda; Zhou, Min; Huang, Qian; Mawlawi, Osama; Dunner, Kenneth; Li, Chun; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Combining image-guided therapy techniques for the treatment of liver cancers is a strategy that is being used to improve local tumor control rates. Here, we evaluate the intratumoral uptake of nanoparticles used in combination with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), irreversible electroporation (IRE), or laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). Eight rabbits with VX2 tumor in the liver underwent one of four treatments: (i) nanoembolization (NE) with radiolabeled, hollow gold nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin (64Cu-PEG-HAuNS-DOX); (ii) NE+RFA; (iii) NE+IRE; (iv) NE+LITT. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging was obtained 1-hr or 18-hrs after intervention. Tissue samples were collected for autoradiography and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. PET/CT imaging at 1-hr showed focal deposition of oil and nanoparticles in the tumor only after NE+RFA but at 18-hrs, all animals had focal accumulation of oil and nanoparticles in the tumor region. Autoradiograph analysis demonstrated nanoparticle deposition in the tumor and in the ablated tissues adjacent to the tumor when NE was combined with ablation. TEM results showed the intracellular uptake of nanoparticles in tumor only after NE+IRE. Nanoparticles demonstrated a structural change, suggesting direct interaction, potentially leading to drug release, only after NE+LITT. The findings demonstrate that a combined NE and ablation treatment technique for liver tumors is feasible, resulting in deposition of nanoparticles in and around the tumor. Depending on the ablative energy applied, different effects are seen on nanoparticle localization and structure. These effects should be considered when designing nanoparticles for use in combination with ablation technologies. PMID:27305763

  20. Tumor and normal tissue motion in the thorax during respiration: Analysis of volumetric and positional variations using 4D CT

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Elisabeth . E-mail: eweiss@mcvh-vcu.edu; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Dill, S. Vaughn; Keall, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate temporospatial variations of tumor and normal tissue during respiration in lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: In 14 patients, gross tumor volume (GTV) and normal tissue structures were manually contoured on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans. Structures were evaluated for volume changes, centroid (center of mass) motion, and phase dependence of variations relative to inspiration. Only volumetrically complete structures were used for analysis (lung in 2, heart in 8, all other structures in >10 patients). Results: During respiration, the magnitude of contoured volumes varied up to 62.5% for GTVs, 25.5% for lungs, and 12.6% for hearts. The range of maximum three-dimensional centroid movement for individual patients was 1.3-24.0 mm for GTV, 2.4-7.9 mm for heart, 5.2-12.0 mm for lungs, 0.3-5.5 mm for skin markers, 2.9-10.0 mm for trachea, and 6.6-21.7 mm for diaphragm. During respiration, the centroid positions of normal structures varied relative to the centroid position of the respective GTV by 1.5-8.1 mm for heart, 2.9-9.3 mm for lungs, 1.2-9.2 mm for skin markers, 0.9-7.1 mm for trachea, and 2.7-16.4 mm for diaphragm. Conclusion: Using 4D-CT, volumetric changes, positional alterations as well as changes in the position of contoured structures relative to the GTV were observed with large variations between individual patients. Although the interpretation of 4D-CT data has considerable uncertainty because of 4D-CT artifacts, observer variations, and the limited acquisition time, the findings might have a significant impact on treatment planning.

  1. Slip-ring and conventional dynamic hepatic CT: contrast material and timing considerations.

    PubMed

    Berland, L L

    1995-04-01

    advantages have come with new challenges, which can be overcome by knowing underlying principles and by attending to detail. Although we have learned much over the past 15 years about proper performance of abdominal CT examinations, we have much yet to learn about the effects of such examinations on the improved health of our patients and on the economic costs to society of providing this form of health care. Opinions on techniques have converged recently, as summarized herein. Therefore, we hope that some centers will now redirect their CT research toward the profoundly difficult, timely, and important issues of examination appropriateness, the value of quality improvement programs, clinical outcomes, and cost-effectiveness.

  2. Simulation of dosimetric consequences of 4D-CT-based motion margin estimation for proton radiotherapy using patient tumor motion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koybasi, Ozhan; Mishra, Pankaj; St. James, Sara; Lewis, John H.; Seco, Joao

    2014-02-01

    For the radiation treatment of lung cancer patients, four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) is a common practice used clinically to image tumor motion and subsequently determine the internal target volume (ITV) from the maximum intensity projection (MIP) images. ITV, which is derived from short pre-treatment 4D-CT scan (<6 s per couch position), may not adequately cover the extent of tumor motion during the treatment, particularly for patients that exhibit a large respiratory variability. Inaccurate tumor localization may result in under-dosage of the tumor or over-dosage of the surrounding tissues. The purpose of this study is therefore to assess the degree of tumor under-dosage in case of regular and irregular breathing for proton radiotherapy using ITV-based treatment planning. We place a spherical lesion into a modified XCAT phantom that is also capable of producing 4D images based on irregular breathing, and move the tumor according to real tumor motion data, which is acquired over multiple days by tracking gold fiducial markers implanted into the lung tumors of patients. We derive ITVs by taking the union of all tumor positions during 6 s of tumor motion in the phantom using the first day patient tumor tracking data. This is equivalent to ITVs generated clinically from cine-mode 4D-CT MIP images. The treatment plans created for different ITVs are then implemented on dynamic phantoms with tumor motion governed by real tumor tracking data from consecutive days. By comparing gross tumor volume dose distribution on days of ‘treatment’ with the ITV dose distribution, we evaluate the deviation of the actually delivered dose from the predicted dose. Our results have shown that the proton treatment planning on ITV derived from pre-treatment cine-mode 4D-CT can result in under-dosage (dose covering 95% of volume) of the tumor by up to 25.7% over 3 min of treatment for the patient with irregular respiratory motion. Tumor under-dosage is less significant for

  3. Percutaneous CT-Guided Cryoablation as an Alternative Treatment for an Extensive Pelvic Bone Giant Cell Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Panizza, Pedro Sergio Brito; Albuquerque Cavalcanti, Conrado Furtado de; Yamaguchi, Nise Hitomi; Leite, Claudia Costa; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Menezes, Marcos Roberto de

    2016-02-15

    A giant cell tumor (GCT) is an intermediate grade, locally aggressive neoplasia. Despite advances in surgical and clinical treatments, cases located on the spine and pelvic bones remain a significant challenge. Failure of clinical treatment with denosumab and patient refusal of surgical procedures (hemipelvectomy) led to the use of cryoablation. We report the use of percutaneous CT-guided cryoablation as an alternative treatment, shown to be a minimally invasive, safe, and effective option for a GCT with extensive involvement of the pelvic bones and allowed structural and functional preservation of the involved bones.

  4. Cervical neuroblastoma in eleven infants--a tumor with favorable prognosis. Clinical and radiologic (US, CT, MRI) findings.

    PubMed

    Abramson, S J; Berdon, W E; Ruzal-Shapiro, C; Stolar, C; Garvin, J

    1993-01-01

    Cervical neuroblastoma, a disease primarily of infants, has a favorable prognosis. Eleven patients are reported. Clinical presentations (other than mass) included stridor and swallowing problems. Masses when felt were commonly mistaken for infectious adenitis. Imaging studies (US, CT, MRI) showed solid masses with vascular displacement and narrowing; intraspinal extension was absent though extension into the adjacent sites of mediastinum and skull occurred. Horner syndrome was seen in five patients with accompanying heterochromia iridis in one. Five tumors had calcification. A high index of suspicion will lead to biopsy and less delay in diagnosis once a mass is felt or imaged.

  5. The role of FDG PET/CT in evaluation of mediastinal masses and neurogenic tumors of chest wall

    PubMed Central

    Tatci, Ebru; Ozmen, Ozlem; Dadali, Yeliz; Biner, Inci Uslu; Gokcek, Atila; Demirag, Funda; Incekara, Funda; Arslan, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the efficiency of FDG PET/CT for the differentiation of malignant from benign mediastinal masses and neurogenic tumors of chest-wall. Methods: The 88 patients with chest wall-mediastinal masses who underwent examination before operation were retrospectively reviewed. Size, CT density (HU mean) and SUVmax of mediastinal and chest wall lesions were determined. Statistical differences of these parameters were compared between groups by Mann-Whitney U test. Receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis with respect to SUVmax was performed to determine the best cutoff value for differentiating benign from malignant masses. Results: The overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of PET/CT in detection of malignancy were 90%, 55.17%, 67%, 50.94% and 91.43%, respectively. The SUVmax, HU mean and size were higher in malignant cases (P < 0.05). To distinguish benign and malignant lesions, the cut off value of SUVmax was 4.67. The lesion SUVmax was significantly associated with the lesion size and lesion HU mean values (P < 0.05). The value of SUVmax and HU mean were higher in solid benign lesions than those of cystic benign lesions (P < 0.05). The lesion size was higher in cystic lesions (P = 0.000). The mean SUVmax was significantly higher in invasive thymomas than those of non-invasive forms (P = 0.029). Conclusion: FDG PET/CT may be complementary to conventional imaging methods for the evaluation of mediastinal and chest wall masses. PET/CT may reduce unnecessary invasive investigations for diagnosis in patients with nonavid or low avid FDG lesions. However confirmatory tissue sampling is required to confirm PET positive findings for the definite diagnosis. PMID:26379916

  6. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced by hepatitis B virus core mediating the immune response for hepatitis B viral clearance in mice model.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Horng-Tay; Tsai, Hwei-Fang; Chyuan, I-Tsu; Liao, Hsiu-Jung; Chen, Chun-Jen; Chen, Pei-Jer; Hsu, Ping-Ning

    2014-01-01

    Persistent hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection results in chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). An efficient control of virus infections requires the coordinated actions of both innate and adaptive immune responses. In order to define the role of innate immunity effectors against HBV, viral clearance was studied in a panel of immunodeficient mouse strains by the hydrodynamic injection approach. Our results demonstrate that HBV viral clearance is not changed in IFN-α/β receptor (IFNAR), RIG-I, MDA5, MYD88, NLRP3, ASC, and IL-1R knock-out mice, indicating that these innate immunity effectors are not required for HBV clearance. In contrast, HBV persists in the absence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) or in mice treated with the soluble TNF receptor blocker, Etanercept. In these mice, there was an increase in PD-1-expressing CD8+ T-cells and an increase of serum HBV DNA, HBV core, and surface antigen expression as well as viral replication within the liver. Furthermore, the induction of TNF-α in clearing HBV is dependent on the HBV core, and TNF blockage eliminated HBV core-induced viral clearance effects. Finally, the intra-hepatic leukocytes (IHLs), but not the hepatocytes, are the cell source responsible for TNF-α production induced by HBcAg. These results provide evidences for TNF-α mediated innate immune mechanisms in HBV clearance and explain the mechanism of HBV reactivation during therapy with TNF blockage agents.

  7. Clinical implications of defining the gross tumor volume with combination of CT and {sup 18}FDG-positron emission tomography in non-small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Grills, Inga S. . E-mail: igrills@beaumont.edu; Yan Di; Black, Quinten C.; Wong, Ching-Yee O.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Kestin, Larry L.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To compare the planning target volume (PTV) definitions for computed tomography (CT) vs. positron emission tomography (PET) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: A total of 21 patients with NSCLC underwent three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning. All underwent a staging F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-position emission tomography ({sup 18}FDG-PET) scan and underwent treatment simulation using CT plus a separate planning {sup 18}FDG-PET scan. Three sets of target volumes were defined: Set 1, CT volumes (CT tumor + staging PET nodal disease); Set 2, PET volumes (planning PET tumor {l_brace}gross tumor volume (GTV) = [(0.3069 x mean standardized uptake value) + 0.5853]){r_brace}; Set 3, composite CT-PET volumes (fused CT-PET tumor). Sets 1 and 2 were compared using a matching index. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans were created using the Set 1 (CT) volumes; and coverage of the Set 3 (composite) volumes was evaluated. Separate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans were designed for the Set 3 volumes. Results: For the primary tumor GTV, the Set 1 (CT) volume was larger than the Set 2 (PET) volume in 48%, smaller in 33%, and equal in 19%. The mean matching index was 0.65 (35% CT-PET mismatch). Although quantitatively similar, the volumes differed qualitatively. The Set 3 (composite) volume was larger than either CT or PET alone in 62%, smaller in 24%, and equal in 14%. The dose-volume histogram parameters did not differ among the plans for Set 1 (CT) vs. Set 3 (composite) volumes. Small portions of the Set 3 PTV were significantly underdosed in 40% of cases using the CT-only plan. Conclusion: Computed tomography and PET are complementary and should be obtained in the treatment position and fused to define the GTV for NSCLC. Although the quantitative absolute target volume is sometimes similar, the qualitative target locations can be substantially different, leading to underdosage of the target when planning is

  8. Confounding of the association between radiation exposure from CT scans and risk of leukemia and brain tumors by cancer susceptibility syndromes.

    PubMed

    Meulepas, Johanna M; Ronckers, Cécile M; Merks, Johannes; Weijerman, Michel E; Lubin, Jay H; Hauptmann, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies linking radiation exposure from pediatric computed tomography (CT) to increased risks of leukemia and brain tumors lacked data to control for cancer susceptibility syndromes (CSS). These syndromes might be confounders because they are associated with an increased cancer risk and may increase the likelihood of pediatric CT scans. We identify CSS predisposing to leukemia and brain tumors through a systematic literature search and summarize prevalence and risk. Since empirical evidence is lacking in published literature on patterns of CT use for most types of CSS, we estimate confounding bias of relative risks (RR) for categories of radiation exposure based on expert opinion about patterns of CT scans among CSS patients. We estimate that radiation-related RRs for leukemia are not meaningfully confounded by Down syndrome, Noonan syndrome and other CSS. Moreover, tuberous sclerosis complex, von Hippel-Lindau disease, neurofibromatosis type 1 and other CSS do not meaningfully confound RRs for brain tumors. Empirical data on the use of CT scans among CSS patients is urgently needed. Our assessment indicates that associations with radiation exposure from pediatric CT scans and leukemia or brain tumors reported in previous studies are unlikely to be substantially confounded by unmeasured CSS.

  9. New orally active DNA minor groove binding small molecule CT-1 acts against breast cancer by targeting tumor DNA damage leading to p53-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Saini, Karan Singh; Hamidullah; Ashraf, Raghib; Mandalapu, Dhanaraju; Das, Sharmistha; Siddiqui, Mohd Quadir; Dwivedi, Sonam; Sarkar, Jayanta; Sharma, Vishnu Lal; Konwar, Rituraj

    2017-04-01

    Targeting tumor DNA damage and p53 pathway is a clinically established strategy in the development of cancer chemotherapeutics. Majority of anti-cancer drugs are delivered through parenteral route for reasons like severe toxicity, lack of stability, and poor enteral absorption. Current DNA targeting drugs in clinical like anthracycline suffers from major drawbacks like cardiotoxicity. Here, we report identification of a new orally active small molecule curcumin-triazole conjugate (CT-1) with significant anti-breast cancer activity in vitro and in vivo. CT-1 selectively and significantly inhibits viability of breast cancer cell lines; retards cells cycle progression at S phase and induce mitochondrial-mediated cell apoptosis. CT-1 selectively binds to minor groove of DNA and induces DNA damage leading to increase in p53 along with decrease in its ubiquitination. Inhibition of p53 with pharmacological inhibitor as well as siRNA revealed the necessity of p53 in CT-1-mediated anti-cancer effects in breast cancer cells. Studies using several other intact p53 and deficient p53 cancer cell lines further confirmed necessity of p53 in CT-1-mediated anti-cancer response. Pharmacological inhibition of pan-caspase showed CT-1 induces caspase-dependent cell death in breast cancer cells. Most interestingly, oral administration of CT-1 induces significant inhibition of tumor growth in LA-7 syngeneic orthotropic rat mammary tumor model. CT-1 treated mammary tumor shows enhancement in DNA damage, p53 upregulation, and apoptosis. Collectively, CT-1 exhibits potent anti-cancer effect both in vitro and in vivo and could serve as a safe orally active lead for anti-cancer drug development. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. In vivo characterization of tumor vasculature using iodine and gold nanoparticles and dual energy micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Darin P.; Ghaghada, Ketan; Moding, Everett J.; Kirsch, David G.; Badea, Cristian T.

    2013-03-01

    Tumor blood volume and vascular permeability are well established indicators of tumor angiogenesis and important predictors in cancer diagnosis, planning and treatment. In this work, we establish a novel preclinical imaging protocol which allows quantitative measurement of both metrics simultaneously. First, gold nanoparticles are injected and allowed to extravasate into the tumor, and then liposomal iodine nanoparticles are injected. Combining a previously optimized dual energy micro-CT scan using high-flux polychromatic x-ray sources (energies: 40 kVp, 80 kVp) with a novel post-reconstruction spectral filtration scheme, we are able to decompose the results into 3D iodine and gold maps, allowing simultaneous measurement of extravasated gold and intravascular iodine concentrations. Using a digital resolution phantom, the mean limits of detectability (mean CNR = 5) for each element are determined to be 2.3 mg mL-1 (18 mM) for iodine and 1.0 mg mL-1 (5.1 mM) for gold, well within the observed in vivo concentrations of each element (I: 0-24 mg mL-1, Au: 0-9 mg mL-1) and a factor of 10 improvement over the limits without post-reconstruction spectral filtration. Using a calibration phantom, these limits are validated and an optimal sensitivity matrix for performing decomposition using our micro-CT system is derived. Finally, using a primary mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma, we demonstrate the in vivo application of the protocol to measure fractional blood volume and vascular permeability over the course of five days of active tumor growth.

  11. FUSE Binding Protein 1 Facilitates Persistent Hepatitis C Virus Replication in Hepatoma Cells by Regulating Tumor Suppressor p53

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Updesh; Pandey, Ashutosh K.; Liu, Zhihe; Kumar, Sushil; Neiditch, Matthew B.; Klein, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of chronic hepatitis C (CHC), liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Immunohistochemistry of archived HCC tumors showed abundant FBP1 expression in HCC tumors with the CHC background. Oncomine data analysis of normal versus HCC tumors with the CHC background indicated a 4-fold increase in FBP1 expression with a concomitant 2.5-fold decrease in the expression of p53. We found that FBP1 promotes HCV replication by inhibiting p53 and regulating BCCIP and TCTP, which are positive and negative regulators of p53, respectively. The severe inhibition of HCV replication in FBP1-knockdown Huh7.5 cells was restored to a normal level by downregulation of either p53 or BCCIP. Although p53 in Huh7.5 cells is transcriptionally inactive as a result of Y220C mutation, we found that the activation and DNA binding ability of Y220C p53 were strongly suppressed by FBP1 but significantly activated upon knockdown of FBP1. Transient expression of FBP1 in FBP1 knockdown cells fully restored the control phenotype in which the DNA binding ability of p53 was strongly suppressed. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we found no significant difference in in vitro target DNA binding affinity of recombinant wild-type p53 and its Y220C mutant p53. However, in the presence of recombinant FBP1, the DNA binding ability of p53 is strongly inhibited. We confirmed that FBP1 downregulates BCCIP, p21, and p53 and upregulates TCTP under radiation-induced stress. Since FBP1 is overexpressed in most HCC tumors with an HCV background, it may have a role in promoting persistent virus infection and tumorigenesis. IMPORTANCE It is our novel finding that FUSE binding protein 1 (FBP1) strongly inhibits the function of tumor suppressor p53 and is an essential host cell factor required for HCV replication. Oncomine data analysis of a large number of samples has revealed that overexpression of

  12. TU-F-17A-05: Calculating Tumor Trajectory and Dose-Of-The-Day for Highly Mobile Tumors Using Cone-Beam CT Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B; Miften, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection images provide anatomical data in real-time over several respiratory cycles, forming a comprehensive picture of tumor movement. We developed a method using these projections to determine the trajectory and dose of highly mobile tumors during each fraction of treatment. Methods: CBCT images of a respiration phantom were acquired, where the trajectory mimicked a lung tumor with high amplitude (2.4 cm) and hysteresis. A template-matching algorithm was used to identify the location of a steel BB in each projection. A Gaussian probability density function for tumor position was calculated which best fit the observed trajectory of the BB in the imager geometry. Two methods to improve the accuracy of tumor track reconstruction were investigated: first, using respiratory phase information to refine the trajectory estimation, and second, using the Monte Carlo method to sample the estimated Gaussian tumor position distribution. 15 clinically-drawn abdominal/lung CTV volumes were used to evaluate the accuracy of the proposed methods by comparing the known and calculated BB trajectories. Results: With all methods, the mean position of the BB was determined with accuracy better than 0.1 mm, and root-mean-square (RMS) trajectory errors were lower than 5% of marker amplitude. Use of respiratory phase information decreased RMS errors by 30%, and decreased the fraction of large errors (>3 mm) by half. Mean dose to the clinical volumes was calculated with an average error of 0.1% and average absolute error of 0.3%. Dosimetric parameters D90/D95 were determined within 0.5% of maximum dose. Monte-Carlo sampling increased RMS trajectory and dosimetric errors slightly, but prevented over-estimation of dose in trajectories with high noise. Conclusions: Tumor trajectory and dose-of-the-day were accurately calculated using CBCT projections. This technique provides a widely-available method to evaluate highly-mobile tumors, and could facilitate better

  13. 18F-fluorothymidine PET/CT as an early predictor of tumor response to treatment with cetuximab in human lung cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoshi; Zhao, Songji; Kuge, Yuji; Zhao, Yan; Nishijima, Ken-Ichi; Hatano, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Yasushi; Kinoshita, Ichiro; Tamaki, Nagara; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi

    2011-09-01

    We investigated whether 18F-fluorothymidine-positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FLT-PET/CT) is useful for the evaluation of the very early response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody cetuximab therapy in human lung cancer xenografts. A human tumor xenograft model was established with a human non-small cell lung cancer cell line. The mice were randomly assigned to four groups: tumor growth follow-up, ex vivo study, PET/CT imaging and non-treated control. Mice were administered saline as control or cetuximab on day 1. An immunohistochemical study with Ki-67 was performed. Tumor volume treated with cetuximab was kept significantly smaller than control after day 8, although there was no difference on day 3. On day 3, 18F-FLT distribution was higher in the tumor than in other tissues, and was significantly decreased by treatment with cetuximab. On PET/CT imaging, 18F-FLT distribution in the tumor was clearly visualized, and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) was significantly decreased after treatment with cetuximab (p<0.01). Ki-67 expression was also significantly decreased on day 3 (p=0.01). These results suggest that 18F-FLT-PET/CT can be a useful predictor to determine the response to molecular targeted drugs such as cetuximab at an earlier time point than the change of tumor size.

  14. Towards respiration management in radiation treatment of lung tumors: transferring regions of interest from planning CT to kilovoltage X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Ataer-Cansizoglu, Esra; Bas, Erhan; Yousuf, M; You, Sheng; D'Souza, Warren D; Erdogmus, Deniz

    2010-01-01

    Tracking of lung tumors is imperative for improved radiotherapy treatment. However, the motion of the thoracic organs makes it a complicated task. 4D CT images acquired prior to treatment provide valuable information regarding the motion of organs and tumor, since it is manually annotated. In order to track tumors using treatment-day X-ray images (kV images), we need to find the correspondence with CT images so that projection of tumor region of interest will provide a good estimate about the position of the tumor on the X-ray image. In this study, we propose a method to estimate the alignment and respiration phase corresponding to X-ray images using 4D CT data. Our approach generates Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (DRRs) using bilateral filter smoothing and computes rigid registration with kV images since the position and orientation of patient might differ between CT and treatment-day image acquisition processes. Instead of using landmark points, our registration method makes use of Kernel Density Estimation over the edges that are not affected much by respiration. To estimate the phase of X-ray, we apply template matching techniques between the lung regions of X-ray and registered DRRs. Our approach gives accurate results for rigid registration and provides a starting point to track tumors using the X-ray images during the treatment.

  15. Evaluation of tumor localization in respiration motion-corrected cone-beam CT: Prospective study in lung

    SciTech Connect

    Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Kincaid, Russell; Hertanto, Agung; Hu, Yu-Chi; Pham, Hai; Yorke, Ellen; Zhang, Qinghui; Mageras, Gig S.; Rimner, Andreas

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Target localization accuracy of cone-beam CT (CBCT) images used in radiation treatment of respiratory disease sites is affected by motion artifacts (blurring and streaking). The authors have previously reported on a method of respiratory motion correction in thoracic CBCT at end expiration (EE). The previous retrospective study was limited to examination of reducing motion artifacts in a small number of patient cases. They report here on a prospective study in a larger group of lung cancer patients to evaluate respiratory motion-corrected (RMC)-CBCT ability to improve lung tumor localization accuracy and reduce motion artifacts in Linac-mounted CBCT images. A second study goal examines whether the motion correction derived from a respiration-correlated CT (RCCT) at simulation yields similar tumor localization accuracy at treatment. Methods: In an IRB-approved study, 19 lung cancer patients (22 tumors) received a RCCT at simulation, and on one treatment day received a RCCT, a respiratory-gated CBCT at end expiration, and a 1-min CBCT. A respiration monitor of abdominal displacement was used during all scans. In addition to a CBCT reconstruction without motion correction, the motion correction method was applied to the same 1-min scan. Projection images were sorted into ten bins based on abdominal displacement, and each bin was reconstructed to produce ten intermediate CBCT images. Each intermediate CBCT was deformed to the end expiration state using a motion model derived from RCCT. The deformed intermediate CBCT images were then added to produce a final RMC-CBCT. In order to evaluate the second study goal, the CBCT was corrected in two ways, one using a model derived from the RCCT at simulation [RMC-CBCT(sim)], the other from the RCCT at treatment [RMC-CBCT(tx)]. Image evaluation compared uncorrected CBCT, RMC-CBCT(sim), and RMC-CBCT(tx). The gated CBCT at end expiration served as the criterion standard for comparison. Using automatic rigid image

  16. Bilateral glomus tumor treated with PET-CT based conformal radiotherapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yuksel, Oznur; Topkan, Erkan; Pehlivan, Berrin

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Glomus tumors are benign, slow growing tumors originating from paraganglionic tissue, mostly located at the carotid bifurcation, jugular foramen, cervical portion vagus nerve, and middle ear cavity. Radiotherapy is treatment of choice for patients with intracranial extension, and patients with bilateral and multiple tumors, or patients who are inoperable. Case presentation We present a 53-year-old female patient with a glomus tumor treated with positron emission tomography computed tomography planning and 3D conformal radiotherapy, and the patient has remained free of disease progression 2 years after. Conclusion It is suggested that radiotherapy is a good treatment modality in patients with glomus tumor, and metabolic imaging and treatment planning with positron emission tomography computed tomography is superior to other imaging modalities. PMID:19918426

  17. SU-E-J-190: Characterization of Radiation Induced CT Number Changes in Tumor and Normal Lung During Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C; Liu, F; Tai, A; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To measure CT number (CTN) changes in tumor and normal lung as a function of radiation therapy (RT) dose during the course of RT delivery for lung cancer using daily IGRT CT images and single respiration phase CT images. Methods: 4D CT acquired during planning simulation and daily 3D CT acquired during daily IGRT for 10 lung cancer cases randomly selected in terms of age, caner type and stage, were analyzed using an in-house developed software tool. All patients were treated in 2 Gy fractions to primary tumors and involved nodal regions. Regions enclosed by a series of isodose surfaces in normal lung were delineated. The obtained contours along with target contours (GTVs) were populated to each singlephase planning CT and daily CT. CTN in term of Hounsfield Unit (HU) of each voxel in these delineated regions were collectively analyzed using histogram, mean, mode and linear correlation. Results: Respiration induced normal lung CTN change, as analyzed from single-phase planning CTs, ranged from 9 to 23 (±2) HU for the patients studied. Normal lung CTN change was as large as 50 (±12) HU over the entire treatment course, was dose and patient dependent and was measurable with dose changes as low as 1.5 Gy. For patients with obvious tumor volume regression, CTN within the GTV drops monotonically as much as 10 (±1) HU during the early fractions with a total dose of 20 Gy delivered. The GTV and CTN reductions are significantly correlated with correlation coefficient >0.95. Conclusion: Significant RT dose induced CTN changes in lung tissue and tumor region can be observed during even the early phase of RT delivery, and may potentially be used for early prediction of radiation response. Single respiration phase CT images have dramatically reduced statistical noise in ROIs, making daily dose response evaluation possible.

  18. Combined Evaluation of AFP, CA15-3, CA125, CA19-9, and CEA Tumor Markers in Patients with Hepatitis B and C

    PubMed Central

    ASSMAR, Mehdi; YEGANEH, Sara; MANSOURGHANAEI, Fariborz; AMIRMOZAFARI, Nour

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the role of tumor markers AFP, CA15-3, CA125, CA19-9 and CEA in patients with hepatitis B and C. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed from Oct 2012 to Oct 2014. Serum samples of 129 patients with hepatitis B and C referred to Guilan Liver and Digestive Disease Research Center in Rasht, Iran were collected and checked for the existence of the listed tumor markers by ELISA. Results: No increase in serum levels of tumor marker CA19-9, CEA and CA15-3 were seen in patients with hepatitis (P>0.05). In patients with hepatitis B, increase in CA125 were observed (P=0.03). In hepatitis C patients, there was an increase in AFP levels (P=0.03). Conclusion: The levels of AFP and CA125 markers were high in hepatitis C and hepatitis B, respectively. However, the increased levels were not seen is malignancy. Due to the small sample size, further study is necessary to find the reasons of the increase. PMID:28053931

  19. Oncocytic carcinoid tumor of the lung with intense F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT).

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Yuki; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Rieko; Hosokawa, Kohei; Kajihara, Makoto; Shimizu, Teruhiko; Takahashi, Tadaaki; Sakai, Shinya; Sawada, Shigeki; Yamashita, Motohiro; Ohtani, Haruhiko

    2013-10-01

    The present report describes a case of typical carcinoid tumor with intense fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake. The most of tumor cells were characterized by eosinophilic cytoplasm resulting from accumulation of mitochondria, which was called an oncocytic carcinoid tumor. Glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT-1) was expressed in a membranous pattern in the oncocytic component. Oncocytic carcinoid tumors could show intense FDG uptake due to the numerous intracellular mitochondria and the membranous overexpression of GLUT-1. Thus, it could be a potential pitfall of interpreting FDG-PET/CT image.

  20. Impact of (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging in therapeutic decisions for malignant solitary fibrous tumor of the pelvis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jinchun; Jones, Robin L; Lewis, David H; Eary, Janet F

    2013-06-01

    The decision to give neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with localized high-risk soft tissue sarcoma is often based on tumor grade evaluated from biopsies, but biopsies can have the inherent issue of sampling bias. Incorporation of SUVmax and heterogeneity assessed by F-FDG PET/CT could be other crucial components in the effort to tailor treatment to an individual patient, providing valuable parameters to guide the selection of the most appropriate management schedule for an individual. We present 1 representative case describing how FDG PET/CT can assist in clinical management decisions for treatment of malignant solitary fibrous tumor of the pelvis.

  1. Hepatic arterial administration of sorafenib and iodized oil effectively attenuates tumor growth and intrahepatic metastasis in rabbit VX2 hepatocellular carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Liu, Feng-Yong; Fu, Jin-Xin; Duan, Feng; Fan, Qing-Sheng; Wang, Mao-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the therapeutic effect of the hepatic arterial administration of sorafenib in rabbit VX-2 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model. Methods: Rabbit VX-2 HCC models were established via implanting VX-2 tumors into the livers, and randomly divided into four groups, respectively treated with (1) The hepatic arterial administration of iodized oil alone (TACE-i), (2) The hepatic arterial administration of iodized oil and pharmorubicin (TACE-ip), (3) The hepatic arterial administration of iodized and cis-DDP (TACE-ic), (4) The hepatic arterial administration of iodized and sorafenib (TACE-is). The growth rate and intrahepatic metastasis of implanted VX-2 tumor in each rabbit were measured. Microvessel density (MVD) in the adjacent tissues of implanted VX-2 tumor were estimated by detecting the expression of CD34 and VEGF level in tumor adjacent tissues were also examined by Immunohistochemistry. Results: Compared with other groups, TACE-is treatment group presented a better effect on inhibiting tumor growth rate and intrahepatic metastasis in rabbit VX-2 HCC model. The angiogenesis (assessed by MVD) in the adjacent tissues were suppressed more dramatically in TACE-is treated group. Moreover, TACE-is treatment did not significantly increase the levels of alanine transaminase and creatinine compared to the group with TACE-i treatment. Conclusion: The hepatic arterial administration of sorafenib and iodized oil (TACE-is) effectively attenuates tumor growth and intrahepatic metastasis in rabbit VX-2 HCC model without obvious hepatic and renal toxicity. One of the related mechanisms may be due to the inhibition of angiogenesis in the adjacent tissues. Our data indicated that TACE-is may be a secure and effective treatment for HCC. PMID:25550815

  2. Real-Time US-CT/MRI Image Fusion for Guidance of Thermal Ablation of Liver Tumors Undetectable with US: Results in 295 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Mauri, Giovanni Cova, Luca; Beni, Stefano De; Ierace, Tiziana Tondolo, Tania Cerri, Anna; Goldberg, S. Nahum; Solbiati, Luigi

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess feasibility of US-CT/MRI fusion-guided ablation in liver tumors undetectable with US.MethodsFrom 2002 to 2012, 295 tumors (162 HCCs and 133 metastases; mean diameter 1.3 ± 0.6 cm, range 0.5–2.5 cm) detectable on contrast-enhanced CT/MRI, but completely undetectable with unenhanced US and either totally undetectable or incompletely conspicuous with contrast-enhanced US (CEUS), were treated in 215 sessions using either internally cooled radiofrequency or microwave with standard ablation protocols, guided by an image fusion system (Virtual Navigation System, Esaote S.p.A., Genova, Italy) that combines US with CT/ MRI images. Correct targeting and successful ablation of tumor were verified after 24 hours with CT or MRI.ResultsA total of 282 of 295 (95.6 %) tumors were correctly targeted with successful ablation achieved in 266 of 295 (90.2 %). Sixteen of 295 (5.4 %) tumors were correctly targeted, but unsuccessfully ablated, and 13 of 295 (4.4 %) tumors were unsuccessfully ablated due to inaccurate targeting. There were no perioperative deaths. Major complications were observed in 2 of the 215 treatments sessions (0.9 %).ConclusionsReal-time virtual navigation system with US-CT/MRI fusion imaging is precise for targeting and achieving successful ablation of target tumors undetectable with US alone. Therefore, a larger population could benefit from ultrasound guided ablation procedures.

  3. In Vivo Diagnostic Imaging Using Micro-CT: Sequential and Comparative Evaluation of Rodent Models for Hepatic/Brain Ischemia and Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hayasaka, Naoto; Nagai, Nobuo; Kawao, Naoyuki; Niwa, Atsuko; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Mori, Yuki; Shigeta, Hiroshi; Kashiwagi, Nobuo; Miyazawa, Masaaki; Satou, Takao; Higashino, Hideaki; Matsuo, Osamu; Murakami, Takamichi

    2012-01-01

    Background There is an increasing need for animal disease models for pathophysiological research and efficient drug screening. However, one of the technical barriers to the effective use of the models is the difficulty of non-invasive and sequential monitoring of the same animals. Micro-CT is a powerful tool for serial diagnostic imaging of animal models. However, soft tissue contrast resolution, particularly in the brain, is insufficient for detailed analysis, unlike the current applications of CT in the clinical arena. We address the soft tissue contrast resolution issue in this report. Methodology We performed contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) on mouse models of experimental cerebral infarction and hepatic ischemia. Pathological changes in each lesion were quantified for two weeks by measuring the lesion volume or the ratio of high attenuation area (%HAA), indicative of increased vascular permeability. We also compared brain images of stroke rats and ischemic mice acquired with micro-CT to those acquired with 11.7-T micro-MRI. Histopathological analysis was performed to confirm the diagnosis by CECT. Principal Findings In the models of cerebral infarction, vascular permeability was increased from three days through one week after surgical initiation, which was also confirmed by Evans blue dye leakage. Measurement of volume and %HAA of the liver lesions demonstrated differences in the recovery process between mice with distinct genetic backgrounds. Comparison of CT and MR images acquired from the same stroke rats or ischemic mice indicated that accuracy of volumetric measurement, as well as spatial and contrast resolutions of CT images, was comparable to that obtained with MRI. The imaging results were also consistent with the histological data. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the CECT scanning method is useful in rodents for both quantitative and qualitative evaluations of pathologic lesions in tissues/organs including the brain, and is also suitable for

  4. Comparative effects of CT imaging measurement on RECIST endpoints and tumor growth kinetics modeling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Claire H.; Bies, Robert R.; Wang, Yaning; Sharma, Manish R.; Karovic, Sanja; Werk, Lynn; Edelman, Martin J.; Miller, Antonius A.; Vokes, Everett E.; Oto, Aytek; Ratain, Mark J.; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Maitland, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative assessments of tumor burden and modeling of longitudinal growth could improve phase 2 oncology trials. To identify obstacles to wider use of quantitative measures we obtained recorded linear tumor measurements from 3 published lung cancer trials. Model-based parameters of tumor burden change were estimated and compared with similarly sized samples from separate trials. Time-to-tumor-growth (TTG) was computed from measurements recorded on case report forms and a second radiologist blinded to the form data. RECIST-based progression-free survival (PFS) measures were perfectly concordant between the original forms data and the blinded radiologist re-evaluation (intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 1), but these routine inter-rater differences in the identification and measurement of target lesions were associated with an average 18 week delay (range −20 – 55 weeks) in TTG (ICC = 0.32). To exploit computational metrics for improving statistical power in small clinical trials will require increased precision of tumor burden assessments. PMID:26790562

  5. Active-target T1-weighted MR Imaging of Tiny Hepatic Tumor via RGD Modified Ultra-small Fe3O4 Nanoprobes

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhengyang; Song, Lina; Zang, Fengchao; Song, Jiacheng; Zhang, Wei; Yan, Changzhi; Xie, Jun; Ma, Zhanlong; Ma, Ming; Teng, Gaojun; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Developing ultrasensitive contrast agents for the early detection of malignant tumors in liver is highly demanded. Constructing hepatic tumors specific targeting probes could provide more sensitive imaging information but still faces great challenges. Here we report a novel approach for the synthesis of ultra-small Fe3O4 nanoparticles conjugated with c(RGDyK) and their applications as active-target T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent (T1-Fe3O4) for imaging tiny hepatic tumors in vivo. RGD-modified T1-Fe3O4 nanoprobes exhibited high r1 of 7.74 mM-1s-1 and ultralow r2/r1 of 2.8 at 3 T, reflecting their excellent T1 contrast effect at clinically relevant magnetic field. High targeting specificity together with favorable biocompatibility and strong ability to resist against non-specific uptake were evaluated through in vitro studies. Owing to the outstanding properties of tumor angiogenesis targeting with little phagocytosis in liver parenchyma, hepatic tumor as small as 2.2 mm was successfully detected via the T1 contrast enhancement of RGD-modified T1-Fe3O4. It is emphasized that this is the first report on active-target T1 imaging of hepatic tumors, which could not only significantly improve diagnostic sensitivity, but also provide post therapeutic assessments for patients with liver cancer. PMID:27570550

  6. Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis as only pathological finding at FDG-PET/CT in case of tumor marker elevation in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Grande, Maria Luz Dominguez; Rayo, Juan Ignacio; Serrano, Justo; Infante, Jose Rafael; Garcia, Lucia; Duran, Carmen; Gomez-Caminero, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis is an infrequent disease and although its treatment is palliative, earlier diagnosis will lead to prolonged survival and improve functional outcome. Whole-body FDG-PET allows the entire spinal cord to be examined noninvasively, so close attention should be paid to the spinal canal, since these lesions can easily be mistaken for physiologic uptake, sometimes there is no clinical suspicion and may occur without concurrent active cancer. We present a female patient with a history of carcinoma of the breast, who presented an elevation of serum tumor marker CA 15-3. An FDG-PET/CT study only revealed multiple abnormal uptake at the vertebral foramen at thoracic and lumbosacral regions suggesting leptomeningeal metastases that were confirmed by MRI and cerebrospinal fluid cytology.

  7. Very low-dose adult whole-body tumor imaging with F-18 FDG PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Naveed, Muhammad; McGrath, Mary; Lisi, Michele; Lavalley, Cathy; Feiglin, David

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if effective radiation dose due to PET component in adult whole-body tumor imaging with time-of-flight F-18 FDG PET/CT could be significantly reduced. We retrospectively analyzed data for 10 patients with the body mass index ranging from 25 to 50. We simulated F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose via reconstruction of simulated shorter acquisition time per bed position scans from the acquired list data. F-18 FDG whole-body scans were reconstructed using time-of-flight OSEM algorithm and advanced system modeling. Two groups of images were obtained: group A with a standard dose of F-18 FDG and standard reconstruction parameters and group B with simulated 25% dose and modified reconstruction parameters, respectively. Three nuclear medicine physicians blinded to the simulated activity independently reviewed the images and compared diagnostic quality of images. Based on the input from the physicians, we selected optimal modified reconstruction parameters for group B. In so obtained images, all the lesions observed in the group A were visible in the group B. The tumor SUV values were different in the group A, as compared to group B, respectively. However, no significant differences were reported in the final interpretation of the images from A and B groups. In conclusion, for a small number of patients, we have demonstrated that F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose, accompanied by appropriate modification of the reconstruction parameters provided adequate diagnostic quality of PET images acquired on time-of-flight PET/CT.

  8. Ablation of hepatic malignant tumors with irreversible electroporation: A systematic review and meta-analysis of outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Guo; Zhao, Qiyu; Chen, Fen; Jiang, Tian’an; Wang, Weilin

    2017-01-01

    Background Irreversible electroporation (IRE) ablation is a new technique that is used to eliminate malignant tumors through nonthermal approaches. Objective The purpose of this review was to evaluate the efficiency of IRE for hepatic malignant tumors. Methods A systematic search was performed from PubMed, Embase, Web of science, Scopus and other potential literatures from references in relevant articles July 26th, 2016. Overall estimates of pooled standard mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for the changes of the pre- and post-IRE longest diameter, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and serum total bilirubin levels. Sensitivity analysis and publication bias and were performed after the pooled analysis, and the quality of the included literatures was appraised using Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Results We finally included 300 patients (mean age: 51 to 66.6 years; male: 182; female: 118) from 9 studies of hepatic malignant tumors. The meta-analysis showed that comparing with the initial values, the longest diameter of the tumors was significantly decreased at the last follow-up months after IRE. Furthermore, the ALP, AST and total bilirubin levels were increased at 1 day after IRE while returned to baseline at the last follow-up month. No risk of publication bias was found, and all literatures were assessed good quality according to NOS. Conclusions The pooled data indicated that IRE could be a minimal invasive and effective approach for patients who had preoperative poor liver function or those whose masses were in refractory locations where surgical resection was unsuitable. PMID:28009979

  9. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS - ECTOPIC SPLEEN MIMICKING HEPATIC TUMOR WITH INTRA-ABDOMINAL METASTASES INVESTIGATED VIA TRIPLE-PHASE HELICAL COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN A DOG.

    PubMed

    Kutara, Kenji; Konno, Toshiaki; Kondo, Hirotaka; Aoki, Kotoyo; Yamazoe, Hinako; Matsunaga, Satoru

    2016-07-05

    A 10-year-old castrated male miniature dachshund was presented with an abdominal mass. The dog had a history of splenectomy. Triple-phase helical computed tomography was utilized, revealing a hepatic mass and multiple intra-abdominal solid masses. In triple-phase helical computed tomography the images, hepatic mass and two of four intra-abdominal masses were heterogenous in all phases. Therefore, we diagnosed a malignant hepatic tumor and presumed intra-abdominal metastases. The masses were surgically removed and were histologically composed of normal spleen tissues, findings which were consistent with ectopic spleen.

  10. TU-C-12A-11: Comparisons Between Cu-ATSM PET and DCE-CT Kinetic Parameters in Canine Sinonasal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    La Fontaine, M; Bradshaw, T; Kubicek, L; Forrest, L; Jeraj, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Regions of poor perfusion within tumors may be associated with higher hypoxic levels. This study aimed to test this hypothesis by comparing measurements of hypoxia from Cu-ATSM PET to vasculature kinetic parameters from DCE-CT kinetic analysis. Methods: Ten canine patients with sinonasal tumors received one Cu-ATSM PET/CT scan and three DCE-CT scans prior to treatment. Cu-ATSM PET/CT and DCE-CT scans were registered and resampled to matching voxel dimensions. Kinetic analysis was performed on DCE-CT scans and for each patient, the resulting kinetic parameter values from the three DCE-CT scans were averaged together. Cu-ATSM SUVs were spatially correlated (r{sub spatial}) on a voxel-to-voxel basis against the following DCE-CT kinetic parameters: transit time (t{sub 1}), blood flow (F), vasculature fraction (v{sub 1}), and permeability (PS). In addition, whole-tumor comparisons were performed by correlating (r{sub ROI}) the mean Cu-ATSM SUV (SUV{sub mean}) with median kinetic parameter values. Results: The spatial correlations (r{sub spatial}) were poor and ranged from -0.04 to 0.21 for all kinetic parameters. These low spatial correlations may be due to high variability in the DCE-CT kinetic parameter voxel values between scans. In our hypothesis, t{sub 1} was expected to have a positive correlation, while F was expected to have a negative correlation to hypoxia. However, in wholetumor analysis the opposite was found for both t{sub 1} (r{sub ROI} = -0.25) and F (r{sub ROI} = 0.56). PS and v{sub 1} may depict angiogenic responses to hypoxia and found positive correlations to Cu-ATSM SUV for PS (r{sub ROI} = 0.41), and v{sub 1} (r{sub ROI} = 0.57). Conclusion: Low spatial correlations were found between Cu-ATSM uptake and DCE-CT vasculature parameters, implying that poor perfusion is not associated with higher hypoxic regions. Across patients, the most hypoxic tumors tended to have higher blood flow values, which is contrary to our initial hypothesis. Funding

  11. Effect of Sipjeondaebo-tang on cancer-induced anorexia and cachexia in CT-26 tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn Kyung; Jung, Ki Yong; Woo, Sang-Mi; Yun, Yee Jin; Jun, Chan-Yong; Park, Jong Hyeong; Shin, Yong Cheol; Cho, Sung-Gook; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-associated anorexia and cachexia are a multifactorial condition described by a loss of body weight and muscle with anorexia, asthenia, and anemia. Moreover, they correlate with a high mortality rate, poor response to chemotherapy, poor performance status, and poor quality of life. Cancer cachexia is regulated by proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF- α). In addition, glucagon like peptide-1 (GIP-1), peptide YY (PYY), ghrelin, and leptin plays a crucial role in food intake. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effects of one of the traditional herbal medicines, Sipjeondaebo-tang (Juzen-taiho-to in Japanese; SJDBT), on cancer anorexia and cachexia in a fundamental mouse cancer anorexia/cachexia model, CT-26 tumor-bearing mice. SJDBT was more significantly effective in a treatment model where it was treated after anorexia and cachexia than in a prevention model where it was treated before anorexia and cachexia on the basis of parameters such as weights of muscles and whole body and food intakes. Moreover, SJDBT inhibited a production of IL-6, MCP-1, PYY, and GLP-1 and ameliorated cancer-induced anemia. Therefore, our in vivo studies provide evidence on the role of SJDBT in cancer-associated anorexia and cachexia, thereby suggesting that SJDBT may be useful for treating cancer-associated anorexia and cachexia.

  12. (18) F-FDG PET/CT vs. human papillomavirus, p16 and Epstein-Barr virus detection in cervical metastatic lymph nodes for identifying primary tumors.

    PubMed

    Cheol Park, Gi; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Cho, Kyung-Ja; Seung Kim, Jae; Hyeon Jin, Mi; Choi, Seung-Ho; Yuhl Nam, Soon; Yoon Kim, Sang

    2017-03-15

    Squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary of the head and neck (SCCUP) is a heterogeneous disease entity that requires careful examination to locate the occult primary. We examined the diagnostic value of expression of biomarkers, such as human papillomavirus (HPV), p16 and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), in metastatic lymph nodes vs. (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18) F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). We prospectively enrolled 54 consecutive SCCUP patients who received HPV, p16 and EBV analyses of lymph node fine-needle aspirates and (18) F-FDG PET/CT scans and subsequently underwent examinations and biopsies under general anesthesia to detect primary tumors. The diagnostic performance of the biomarkers and (18) F-FDG PET/CT were compared by using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analyses with histopathological results for identification of primary tumors. Primary tumors were identified in 28 (51.9%) of 54 patients: the palatine tonsil in 24, base of the tongue in 1, nasopharynx in 2, and hypopharynx in 1. The sensitivity of p16 (85.7%) and accuracy of HPV (85.2%) were higher than those (42.9% and 68.5%) of (18) F-FDG PET/CT (p < 0.05). The area under the ROC curve of HPV was higher than that of (18) F-FDG PET/CT (0.857 vs. 0.666, p = 0.007). The disease-free survival rates were higher in the patients with primary tumor detection or p16 nodal immunopositivity than in the other patients (p < 0.05). The results showed that HPV and p16 detection in metastatic lymph nodes can help locate hidden primary tumors, guide definitive treatment and predict patient survival.

  13. Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Cancer Stem Cell-Like Signatures in Cell Culture and Murine Tumor Xenografts▿

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Naushad; Allam, Heba; May, Randal; Sureban, Sripathi M.; Bronze, Michael S.; Bader, Ted; Umar, Shahid; Anant, Srikant; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a prominent risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Similar to most solid tumors, HCCs are believed to contain poorly differentiated cancer stem cell-like cells (CSCs) that initiate tumorigenesis and confer resistance to chemotherapy. In these studies, we demonstrate that the expression of an HCV subgenomic replicon in cultured cells results in the acquisition of CSC traits. These traits include enhanced expression of doublecortin and CaM kinase-like-1 (DCAMKL-1), Lgr5, CD133, α-fetoprotein, cytokeratin-19 (CK19), Lin28, and c-Myc. Conversely, curing of the replicon from these cells results in diminished expression of these factors. The putative stem cell marker DCAMKL-1 is also elevated in response to the overexpression of a cassette of pluripotency factors. The DCAMKL-1-positive cells isolated from hepatoma cell lines by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) form spheroids in Matrigel. The HCV RNA abundance and NS5B levels are significantly reduced by the small interfering RNA (siRNA)-led depletion of DCAMKL-1. We further demonstrate that HCV replicon-expressing cells initiate distinct tumor phenotypes compared to the tumors initiated by parent cells lacking the replicon. This HCV-induced phenotype is characterized by high-level expression/coexpression of DCAMKL-1, CK19, α-fetoprotein, and active c-Src. The results obtained by the analysis of liver tissues from HCV-positive patients and liver tissue microarrays reiterate these observations. In conclusion, chronic HCV infection appears to predispose cells toward the path of acquiring cancer stem cell-like traits by inducing DCAMKL-1 and hepatic progenitor and stem cell-related factors. DCAMKL-1 also represents a novel cellular target for combating HCV-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:21937640

  14. Multiple Tumors Located in the Same Section Are Associated with Better Outcomes After Hepatic Resection for HCC Patients Meeting the Milan Criteria.

    PubMed

    Lv, Tao; Jiang, Li; Yan, Lunan; Yang, Jiayin; Li, Bo; Wen, Tianfu; Zeng, Yong; Wang, Wentao; Xu, Mingqing

    2015-12-01

    The impact of the tumor location on the outcome after hepatic resection (HR) in multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to compare the short- and long-term outcomes of HR patients with multifocal tumors meeting the Milan criteria and tumors located in the same or different sections. A total of 219 consecutive HR patients with multifocal tumors meeting the Milan criteria were divided into group SS (n = 97; same section) and group DS (n = 122; different sections) according to their anatomical location (Couinaud's segmentation). The prognostic predictors were evaluated, and a subgroup analysis was performed. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates were significantly higher in group SS than group DS. The subgroup analysis showed that patients with two tumors in the same section and patients undergoing en bloc resection had better OS and RFS. A multivariate analysis revealed that tumors located in different sections and macrovascular invasion were independent predictors of poor prognosis. In HCC patients with multifocal tumors meeting the Milan criteria, tumors located in the same hepatic section may lead to better long-term survival and lower HCC recurrence rates than tumors in different sections after HR.

  15. Bovine hepatic and adipose retinol-binding protein gene expression and relationship with tumor necrosis factor-α.

    PubMed

    Rezamand, P; Watts, J S; Hunt, K M; Bradford, B J; Mamedova, L K; Morey, S D

    2012-12-01

    Retinol-binding protein (RBP) is the main transport system for retinol in circulation, is a relatively small protein with one binding site for retinol in the all-trans form, and is bound to transthyretin. The objectives of this study were to characterize the temporal pattern of bovine hepatic mRNA expression of RBP during the periparturient period and to determine if a relationship exists between the expression of RBP and that of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in dairy cows. In experiment 1, we assessed hepatic mRNA expression of RBP during the periparturient period. Liver tissues were sampled from periparturient dairy cows (n=9) at -21, -4, +1, +7, and +21 relative to parturition and frozen in liquid N(2). Total RNA was extracted from each tissue sample and cDNA was generated. Gene expressions of RBP and β-actin (as a housekeeping gene) were measured as relative quantity using reverse transcription-PCR. Data were analyzed using cycle threshold values, adjusted to β-actin, and significance was determined at P<0.05. Serum samples (-21, -4, +1, +7, and +21 relative to parturition) were analyzed for retinol concentration using a standard HPLC-based method. Cows had variable expression of hepatic RBP and serum retinol over the transition period, with a decline near parturition and a rebound toward prepartum levels later in lactation. In experiment 2, liver and visceral (intestinal) adipose tissues were sampled from dairy cows (n=28) at slaughter. Expression of RBP and TNF-α was detected in all samples and variations among cows were highly significant for both genes. Across tissues, expression of RBP was positively correlated with that of TNF-α (r=0.60). Within adipose tissue, expression of RBP and TNF-α was weakly correlated (r=0.23), whereas in hepatic tissue, expression was strongly correlated (r=0.62). In experiment 3, late-lactation dairy Holstein cows were blocked by parity and feed intake, and randomly assigned to control, recombinant bovine (rb

  16. Analysis of the variability among radiation oncologists in delineation of the postsurgical tumor bed based on 4D-CT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Li, Jianbin; Xing, Jun; Xu, Min; Shao, Qian; Fan, Tingyong; Guo, Bing; Liu, Shanshan

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigated interobserver and intraobserver variability in radiation oncologists' definition of the tumor bed (TB) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Results The TB volume, CVS and number of surgical clips were not significantly related to intraobserver variability. Moreover, no correlation was noted between CT slice thickness and interobserver variability (Δinter, DSCinter) in TB delineation, and no significant difference was noted among the three groups. The TB volume was negatively correlated with Δinter. DSCinter improved significantly with increased TB volume and decreased Δinter. DSCinter also increased significantly in patients with a CVS of 3 to 5 compared with patients with a CVS of 1 to 2. DSCinter was thus positively correlated with the CVS, with a correlation coefficient of 0.451. The use of 7 to 9 surgical clips neither decreased Δinter nor increased DSCinter. Materials and Methods Five or more surgical clips were placed at the TB during lumpectomy. The TB was delineated on the end expiration scan. The data were stratified based on the cavity visualization score (CVS), CT slice thickness and surgical clip number. The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and inter(intra)observer variability (Δinter and Δintra) in different groups were evaluated and compared. Conclusions Inter(intra)observer variability in TB delineation was decreased for breast cancer patients implanted with 5 or more surgical clips in the cohort with a higher CVS and a larger TB. The use of more than 6 surgical clips did not significantly improve TB delineation, so 5 to 6 surgical clips are likely adequate to delineate the TB. PMID:27655639

  17. Comparison of CT- and FDG-PET-defined gross tumor volume in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Paulino, Arnold C. . E-mail: apaulino@tmh.tmc.edu; Koshy, Mary; Howell, Rebecca; Schuster, David; Davis, Lawrence W.

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the gross tumor volume (GTV) identified on CT to that obtained from fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and determine the differences in volume and dose coverage of the PET-GTV when the CT-GTV is used for radiotherapy planning. Methods and Materials: A total of 40 patients with intact squamous cell carcinoma arising in the head-and-neck region underwent intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) at one department. All patients underwent CT simulation for treatment planning followed by PET-CT in the treatment position. CT simulation images were fused to the CT component of the PET-CT images. The GTV using the CT simulation images was contoured (CT-GTV), as was the GTV based on the PET scan (PET-GTV). The IMRT plans were obtained using the CT-GTV. Results: The PET-GTV was smaller, the same size, and larger than the CT-GTV in 30 (75%), 3 (8%), and 7 (18%) cases respectively. The median PET-GTV and CT-GTV volume was 20.3 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.2-294) and 37.2 cm{sup 3} (range, 2-456), respectively. The volume of PET-GTV receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose was 100% in 20 (50%), 95-99% in 10 (25%), 90-94% in 3 (8%), 85-89% in 1 (3%), 80-84% in 2 (5%), 75-79% in 1 (3%), and <75% in 3 (8%) cases. The minimal dose received by 95% of the PET-GTV was {>=}100% in 19 (48%), 95-99% in 11 (28%), 90-94% in 5 (13%), 85-89% in 2 (5%), and <75% in 3 (8%) cases. Conclusion: The PET-GTV was larger than the CT-GTV in 18% of cases. In approximately 25% of patients with intact head-and-neck cancer treated using IMRT, the volume of PET-GTV receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose and minimal dose received by 95% of the PET-GTV were less than optimal.

  18. Treatment Planning and Volumetric Response Assessment for Yttrium-90 Radioembolization: Semiautomated Determination of Liver Volume and Volume of Tumor Necrosis in Patients with Hepatic Malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Monsky, Wayne L.; Garza, Armando S.; Kim, Isaac; Loh, Shaun; Lin, Tzu-Chun; Li Chinshang; Fisher, Jerron; Sandhu, Parmbir; Sidhar, Vishal; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Lin, Frank; Deutsch, Larry-Stuart; Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to demonstrate intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility for novel semiautomated measurements of hepatic volume used for Yttrium-90 dose calculations as well as whole-liver and necrotic-liver (hypodense/nonenhancing) tumor volume after radioembolization. The secondary aim was to provide initial comparisons of tumor volumetric measurements with linear measurements, as defined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, and survival outcomes. Methods: Between 2006 and 2009, 23 consecutive radioembolization procedures were performed for 14 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 cases of hepatic metastases. Baseline and follow-up computed tomography obtained 1 month after treatment were retrospectively analyzed. Three observers measured liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volumes twice using semiautomated software. Results: Good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility was demonstrated (intraclass correlation [ICC] > 0.9) for tumor and liver volumes. Semiautomated measurements of liver volumes were statistically similar to those obtained with manual tracing (ICC = 0.868), but they required significantly less time to perform (p < 0.0001, ICC = 0.088). There was a positive association between change in linear tumor measurements and whole-tumor volume (p < 0.0001). However, linear measurements did not correlate with volume of necrosis (p > 0.05). Dose, change in tumor diameters, tumor volume, and necrotic volume did not correlate with survival (p > 0.05 in all instances). However, Kaplan-Meier curves suggest that a >10% increase in necrotic volume correlated with survival (p = 0.0472). Conclusion: Semiautomated volumetric analysis of liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volume can be performed with good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility. In this small retrospective study, measurements of tumor necrosis were suggested to correlate with survival.

  19. PET/CT imaging of neuroendocrine tumors with 68Gallium-labeled somatostatin analogues: An overview and single institutional experience from India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Punit; Singh, Harmandeep; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare neoplasms characterized by overexpression of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs). Functional imaging plays a crucial role in management of NETs. Recently, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 68Gallium (68Ga)-labeled somatostatin analogues has shown excellent results for imaging of NETs and better results than conventional SSTR scintigraphy. In this review we have discussed the utility of 68Ga-labeled somatostatin analogue PET/CT in NETs for various established and potential indications. In addition we have also shared our own experience from a tertiary care center in India. PMID:24591775

  20. Impact of PET - CT motion correction in minimizing the gross tumor volume in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Masoomi, Michael A; McLean, Anne H; Bouchareb, Yassine; Ryder, Will; Robinson, Andy

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the impact of respiratory motion on localization, and quantification of lung lesions for the Gross Tumor Volume utilizing a fully automated Auto3Dreg program and dynamic NURBS-based cardiac-torso digitized phantom (NCAT). Methods: Respiratory motion may result in more than 30% underestimation of the SUV values of lung, liver and kidney tumor lesions. The motion correction technique adopted in this study was an image-based motion correction approach using, a voxel-intensity-based and a multi-resolution multi-optimization (MRMO) algorithm. The NCAT phantom was used to generate CT attenuation maps and activity distribution volumes for the lung regions. All the generated frames were co-registered to a reference frame using a time efficient scheme. Quantitative assessment including Region of Interest (ROI), image fidelity and image correlation techniques, as well as semi-quantitative line profile analysis and qualitatively overlaying non-motion and motion corrected image frames were performed. Results: The largest motion was observed in the Z-direction. The greatest translation was for the frame 3, end inspiration, and the smallest for the frame 5 which was closet frame to the reference frame at 67% expiration. Visual assessment of the lesion sizes, 20-60mm at 3 different locations, apex, mid and base of lung showed noticeable improvement for all the foci and their locations. The maximum improvements for the image fidelity were from 0.395 to 0.930 within the lesion volume of interest. The greatest improvement in activity concentration underestimation was 7.7% below the true activity for the 20 mm lesion in comparison to 34.4% below, prior to correction. The discrepancies in activity underestimation were reduced with increasing the lesion sizes. Overlaying activity distribution on the attenuation map showed improved localization of the PET metabolic information to the anatomical CT images. Conclusion: The respiratory motion correction for the

  1. Beam-specific planning target volumes incorporating 4D CT for pencil beam scanning proton therapy of thoracic tumors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liyong; Kang, Minglei; Huang, Sheng; Mayer, Rulon; Thomas, Andrew; Solberg, Timothy D; McDonough, James E; Simone, Charles B

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether organ sparing and target coverage can be simultaneously maintained for pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment of thoracic tumors in the presence of motion, stopping power uncertainties, and patient setup variations. Ten consecutive patients that were previously treated with proton therapy to 66.6/1.8 Gy (RBE) using double scattering (DS) were replanned with PBS. Minimum and maximum intensity images from 4D CT were used to introduce flexible smearing in the determination of the beam specific PTV (BSPTV). Datasets from eight 4D CT phases, using ± 3% uncertainty in stopping power and ± 3 mm uncertainty in patient setup in each direction, were used to create 8 × 12 × 10 = 960 PBS plans for the evaluation of 10 patients. Plans were normalized to provide identical coverage between DS and PBS. The average lung V20, V5, and mean doses were reduced from 29.0%, 35.0%, and 16.4 Gy with DS to 24.6%, 30.6%, and 14.1 Gy with PBS, respectively. The average heart V30 and V45 were reduced from 10.4% and 7.5% in DS to 8.1% and 5.4% for PBS, respectively. Furthermore, the maximum spinal cord, esophagus, and heart doses were decreased from 37.1 Gy, 71.7 Gy, and 69.2 Gy with DS to 31.3 Gy, 67.9 Gy, and 64.6 Gy with PBS. The conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and global maximal dose were improved from 3.2, 0.08, 77.4 Gy with DS to 2.8, 0.04, and 72.1 Gy with PBS. All differences are statistically significant, with p-values <0.05, with the exception of the heart V45 (p = 0.146). PBS with BSPTV achieves better organ sparing and improves target coverage using a repainting method for the treatment of thoracic tumors. Incorporating motion-related uncertainties is essential.

  2. Beam-specific planning target volumes incorporating 4D CT for pencil beam scanning proton therapy of thoracic tumors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liyong; Kang, Minglei; Huang, Sheng; Mayer, Rulon; Thomas, Andrew; Solberg, Timothy D; McDonough, James E; Simone, Charles B

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether organ sparing and target coverage can be simultaneously maintained for pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment of thoracic tumors in the presence of motion, stopping power uncertainties, and patient setup variations. Ten consecutive patients that were previously treated with proton therapy to 66.6/1.8 Gy (RBE) using double scattering (DS) were replanned with PBS. Minimum and maximum intensity images from 4D CT were used to introduce flexible smearing in the determination of the beam specific PTV (BSPTV). Datasets from eight 4D CT phases, using ±3% uncertainty in stopping power and ±3 mm uncertainty in patient setup in each direction, were used to create 8×12×10=960 PBS plans for the evaluation of 10 patients. Plans were normalized to provide identical coverage between DS and PBS. The average lung V20, V5, and mean doses were reduced from 29.0%, 35.0%, and 16.4 Gy with DS to 24.6%, 30.6%, and 14.1 Gy with PBS, respectively. The average heart V30 and V45 were reduced from 10.4% and 7.5% in DS to 8.1% and 5.4% for PBS, respectively. Furthermore, the maximum spinal cord, esophagus, and heart doses were decreased from 37.1 Gy, 71.7 Gy, and 69.2 Gy with DS to 31.3 Gy, 67.9 Gy, and 64.6 Gy with PBS. The conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and global maximal dose were improved from 3.2, 0.08, 77.4 Gy with DS to 2.8, 0.04, and 72.1 Gy with PBS. All differences are statistically significant, with p-values <0.05, with the exception of the heart V45 (p=0.146). PBS with BSPTV achieves better organ sparing and improves target coverage using a repainting method for the treatment of thoracic tumors. Incorporating motion-related uncertainties is essential. PACS number: 87.55.D.

  3. PET/CT Based In Vivo Evaluation of 64Cu Labelled Nanodiscs in Tumor Bearing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huda, Pie; Binderup, Tina; Pedersen, Martin Cramer; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Elema, Dennis Ringkjøbing; Kjær, Andreas; Jensen, Mikael; Arleth, Lise

    2015-01-01

    64Cu radiolabelled nanodiscs based on the 11 α-helix MSP1E3D1 protein and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine lipids were, for the first time, followed in vivo by positron emission tomography for evaluating the biodistribution of nanodiscs. A cancer tumor bearing mouse model was used for the investigations, and it was found that the approximately 13 nm nanodiscs, due to their size, permeate deeply into cancer tissue. This makes them promising candidates for both drug delivery purposes and as advanced imaging agents. For the radiolabelling, a simple approach for 64Cu radiolabelling of proteins via a chelating agent, DOTA, was developed. The reaction was performed at sufficiently mild conditions to be compatible with labelling of the protein part of a lipid-protein particle while fully conserving the particle structure including the amphipathic protein fold. PMID:26132074

  4. Is There an Additional Value of {sup 11}C-Choline PET-CT to T2-weighted MRI Images in the Localization of Intraprostatic Tumor Nodules?

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bergh, Laura; Koole, Michel; Isebaert, Sofie; Joniau, Steven; Deroose, Christophe M.; Oyen, Raymond; Lerut, Evelyne; Budiharto, Tom; Mottaghy, Felix; Bormans, Guy; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Haustermans, Karin

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the additional value of {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) to T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for localization of intraprostatic tumor nodules. Methods and Materials: Forty-nine prostate cancer patients underwent T2w MRI and {sup 11}C-choline PET-CT before radical prostatectomy and extended lymphadenectomy. Tumor regions were outlined on the whole-mount histopathology sections and on the T2w MR images. Tumor localization was recorded in the basal, middle, and apical part of the prostate by means of an octant grid. To analyze {sup 11}C-choline PET-CT images, the same grid was used to calculate the standardized uptake values (SUV) per octant, after rigid registration with the T2w MR images for anatomic reference. Results: In total, 1,176 octants were analyzed. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of T2w MRI were 33.5%, 94.6%, and 70.2%, respectively. For {sup 11}C-choline PET-CT, the mean SUV{sub max} of malignant octants was significantly higher than the mean SUV{sub max} of benign octants (3.69 {+-} 1.29 vs. 3.06 {+-} 0.97, p < 0.0001) which was also true for mean SUV{sub mean} values (2.39 {+-} 0.77 vs. 1.94 {+-} 0.61, p < 0.0001). A positive correlation was observed between SUV{sub mean} and absolute tumor volume (Spearman r = 0.3003, p = 0.0362). No correlation was found between SUVs and prostate-specific antigen, T-stage or Gleason score. The highest accuracy (61.1%) was obtained with a SUV{sub max} cutoff of 2.70, resulting in a sensitivity of 77.4% and a specificity of 44.9%. When both modalities were combined (PET-CT or MRI positive), sensitivity levels increased as a function of SUV{sub max} but at the cost of specificity. When only considering suspect octants on {sup 11}C-choline PET-CT (SUV{sub max} {>=} 2.70) and T2w MRI, 84.7% of these segments were in agreement with the gold standard, compared with 80.5% for T2w MRI alone. Conclusions: The additional value of {sup

  5. In-vivo Comparison of 18F-FLT uptake, CT Number, Tumor Volume in Evaluation of Repopulation during Radiotherapy for Lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Yu, Jinming; Li, Chengming; Sun, Xindong; Meng, Xue

    2017-01-01

    Accelerated repopulation has been observed in various tumors. This study was aimed to evaluate the potential of 3′-deoxy-3′-18F-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT) uptake and Computed Tomography Number (CTN) in monitoring tumor responses to radiotherapy compared with tumor volume (TV) changes. Tumor bearing nude mice were assigned to either irradiated daily or every second day group and then randomized to 6 sub-groups to receive 0Gy, 6Gy, 12Gy, 18Gy, 24Gy, 36Gy irradiation, respectively. TV was measured every 3 days. 18F-FLT micro-PET/CT scans were performed after irradiation being completed. Tumor sections were stained to calculate the immunohistochemical (Ki-67) labeling index (LI). Comparison analysis between FLT uptake parameters, CTNs, VTs and Ki-67 LI results were conducted to determine the correlation. Ki-67 LI increased significantly after 6 times of irradiation at irradiated daily group and after 3 times at irradiated every second day group, suggesting accelerated repopulation. No shrinkage of TV was noticed at two groups during irradiation delivery. Both 18F-FLT uptake and CTN increased significantly after irradiation of 12Gy/6f/6d and 6Gy/3f/6d. Comparison analysis found a significant relationship between Ki-67 LI and 18F-FLT uptake parameters as well as CTN. Both 18F-FLT PET and CT have the potential to reflect the tumor proliferative response during radiation delivery. PMID:28387306

  6. Whole-body MRI including diffusion-weighted MRI compared with 5-HTP PET/CT in the detection of neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Carlbom, Lina; Caballero-Corbalán, José; Granberg, Dan; Sörensen, Jens; Eriksson, Barbro; Ahlström, Håkan

    2017-01-01

    Aim We wanted to explore if whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including diffusion-weighted (DW) and liver-specific contrast agent-enhanced imaging could be valuable in lesion detection of neuroendocrine tumors (NET). [11C]-5-Hydroxytryptophan positron emission tomography/computed tomography (5-HTP PET/CT) was used for comparison. Materials and methods Twenty-one patients with NET were investigated with whole-body MRI, including DW imaging (DWI) and contrast-enhanced imaging of the liver, and whole-body 5-HTP PET/CT. Seven additional patients underwent upper abdomen MRI including DWI, liver-specific contrast agent-enhanced imaging, and 5-HTP PET/CT. Results There was a patient-based concordance of 61% and a lesion-based concordance of 53% between the modalities. MRI showed good concordance with PET in detecting bone metastases but was less sensitive in detecting metastases in mediastinal lymph nodes. MRI detected more liver metastases than 5-HTP PET/CT. Conclusion Whole-body MRI with DWI did not detect all NET lesions found with whole-body 5-HTP PET/CT. Our findings indicate that MRI of the liver including liver-specific contrast agent-enhanced imaging and DWI could be a useful complement to whole-body 5-HTP PET/CT. PMID:27894208

  7. Tumor necrosis factor-α antagonist therapy for concomitant rheumatoid arthritis and hepatitis C virus infection: a case series study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ko-Ming; Cheng, Tien-Tsai; Lin, Jing-Chi; Chen, Chung-Jen

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate treatment response and hepatic safety of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy among patients with concomitant rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We reviewed the charts of 101 consecutive RA patients who were eligible for anti-TNF-α therapy in the Chiayi Branch of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Group A patients were sero-positive for anti-HCV antibodies and had HCV RNA but were negative for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Group B (the control group) patients were sero-negative for both anti-HCV antibodies and HBsAg. Response to anti-TNF-α treatment was assessed by calculating disease activity score at 28 joints (DAS28) at baseline and 5, 8, and 11 months after the start of TNF-α antagonist therapy. Percentage change in DAS28 from baseline to month 5 was 21.36 ± 8.01 % in group A and 26.98 ± 10.43 % in group B (p = 0.011). However, there was no obvious difference in treatment response between groups at other time points. Anti-TNF-α therapy was discontinued within 1 year of starting treatment in two subjects in group A and 4 in group B. Response to anti-TNF-α was better in group B than in group A at 5 months, but there was no substantial difference in response at the 1-year evaluation. Although the study sample was small, our results suggest that the safety of anti-TNF-α therapy is similar in RA patients with and without concomitant HCV infection.

  8. Outcome Prediction After Surgery and Chemoradiation of Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Oral Cavity, Oropharynx, and Hypopharynx: Use of Baseline Perfusion CT Microcirculatory Parameters vs. Tumor Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Bisdas, Sotirios; Nguyen, Shaun A.; Anand, Sharma K.; Glavina, Gordana; Day, Terry; Rumboldt, Zoran

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To assess whether pretreatment perfusion computed tomography (PCT) may predict outcome in chemoradiated patients with oral cavity, oropharynx, and hypopharynx squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) after surgical excision. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients with SCCA were examined before treatment. The primary site was oral cavity in 6, oropharynx in 7, and hypopharynx in 8 patients; there were 11 T2, 6 T3, and 4 T4 tumors. PCT was performed at the level of largest tumor diameter based on standard neck CT. The data were processed to obtain blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), and permeability surface area product (PS). Regions of interest were free-hand positioned on the lesions to obtain PCT measurements. Tumor volume was also calculated. Follow-up was performed with positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and endoscopy. Pearson correlation coefficient was used for comparison between the subgroups. A regression model was constructed to predict recurrence based on the following predictors: age, gender, tumor (T) and nodal (N) stage, tumor volume, and PCT parameters. Results: BF{sub mean}, BF{sub max}, BV{sub mean}, BV{sub max}, MTT{sub mean}, PS{sub mean}, and PS{sub max} were significantly different between patients with and without tumor recurrence (0.0001, p < 0.04). T stage, tumor volume, N stage, BF{sub max}, BV{sub max}, MTT{sub mean}, and radiation dose (p < 0.001) were independent predictors for recurrence. Cox proportional hazards model for tumor recurrence revealed significantly increased risk with high tumor volume (p = 0.00001, relative risk [RR] 7.4), low PS{sub mean} (p = 0.0001, RR 14.3), and low BF{sub max} (p = 0.002, RR 5.9). Conclusions: Our data suggest that PCT parameters have a prognostic role in patients with SCCA.

  9. Lack of association between interleukin 28B gene polymorphisms (rs8099917G/T, rs12979860 C/T) and susceptibility to chronic hepatitis C virus infection, Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Karkhane, Maryam; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Saeedi Niasar, Mahsa; Sarbazi, Mohamad Reza; Sharifian, Afsaneh; Alizadeh, Afshin Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Chronic Hepatitis C infection is a critical health problem worldwide, which caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV). Interleukin 28B (IL28B) is a determinant factor in disease progression and also susceptibility to chronic HCV infection. Background: The most significant aim of this study is to analyze the association between IL28B gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to chronic HCV infection in Iranian population. Methods: This study follows a case- control study design, in which, 288 patients with chronic hepatitis C and 250 healthy individuals were genotyped for IL28B polymorphisms (rs12979860 C/T and rs8099917 G/T). Studied population collected from Taleghani Haospital, Tehran. Genotyping of IL28B gene polymorphisms were performed using PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. 10 percent of the studied population was sequenced to validate the results. Results: rs8099917 G/T and rs12979860 C/T were differently distributed in hepatitis C patients and healthy controls in the female gender. TT, TG and GG genotypes distribution in the female gender were 56.7%, 39.8% and 4.5% in cases and 67%, 31.6% and 1.4% in controls (p=0.54). Also CC, CT and TT genotypes distribution were 31.8%, 61.4% and 6.8% in cases and 51.7%, 44.9% and 3.4% in controls (p=0.2). However, there was no significant difference in the allelic frequency and genotype distribution of rs12979860 C/T and rs8099917 T/G in both HCV patients with genotype 1a and 3a. Conclusion: It seems that rs8099917 G/T polymorphism plays a significant role in susceptibility to chronic HCV infection in Iranian population. On the other hand, no association was found between rs12979860 C/T polymorphisms and chronic hepatitis C. PMID:28224025

  10. Enhanced Antitumor Effect of Tirapazamine Delivered Intraperitoneally to VX2 Liver Tumor-Bearing Rabbits Subjected to Transarterial Hepatic Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Sonoda, Akinaga Nitta, Norihisa Ohta, Shinich Nitta-Seko, Ayumi Nagatani, Yukihiro Takahashi, Masashi Murata, Kiyoshi

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: We evaluated the effects of the combination of Tirapazamine (TPZ), activated preferentially under hypoxic conditions, and gelatin microspheres (GMS) on the tumor growth ratio in rabbits. Methods: We assigned 20 liver tumor-bearing Japanese white rabbits to 4 equal groups. Group 1 received 1 ml of saline intra-arterially (i.a.) and 20 ml of saline intraperitoneally (i.p.; saline group). Group 2 was injected with GMS i.a. and 20 ml saline i.p. (GMS group). Group 3 received 1 ml of saline i.a. and 300 mg/m{sup 2} of TPZ i.p. (TPZ group), and group 4 was treated with GMS i.a. and 300 mg/m{sup 2} of TPZ i.p. (GMS + TPZ group). The infusion of GMS was stopped when the blood flow stagnated. Before and 7 days after treatment, the liver tumor volumes were measured as the total number of pixels on 0.3Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Results: The tumor growth ratio (mean {+-} standard deviation) of the saline, GMS, TPZ, and GMS + TPZ groups was 519.15 {+-} 93.78, 279.24 {+-} 91.83, 369.78 {+-} 95.73, and 119.87 {+-} 17.62, respectively. The difference between the GMS + TPZ group and the other groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our results show that the combination of TPZ i.p. and GMS i.a. enhanced the antitumor effect of TPZ. This procedure may represent a new alternative treatment for patients with hepatic cell carcinoma.

  11. Variability of Gross Tumor Volume Delineation in Head-and-Neck Cancer Using PET/CT Fusion, Part II: The Impact of a Contouring Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Berson, Anthony M. Stein, Nicholas F.; Riegel, Adam C.; Destian, Sylvie; Ng, Tracy; Tena, Lawrence B.; Mitnick, Robin J.; Heiba, Sherif

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a gross tumor volume (GTV) contouring protocol on interobserver variability between 4 physicians in positron emission therapy/computed tomography (PET/CT) treatment planning of head-and-neck cancer. A GTV contouring protocol for PET/CT treatment planning was developed utilizing 4 stages: Preliminary contouring on CT alone, determination of appropriate PET windowing, accurate image registration, and modification of CT contouring with correctly formatted PET/CT display and rules for modality disagreement. Two neuroradiologists and 2 radiation oncologists (designated as A, B, C, and D, respectively) were given a tutorial of PET/CT coregistered imaging individualized to their skill level, which included a step-by-step explanation of the protocol with clinical examples. Opportunities for questions and hands-on practice were given. The physicians were asked to re-contour 16 head-and-neck patients from Part I on PET/CT fusion imaging. Differences in volume magnitude were analyzed for statistical significance by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired t-tests ({alpha} < 0.05). Volume overlap was analyzed for statistical significance using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests ({alpha} < 0.05). Volume overlap increased significantly from Part I to Part II (p < 0.05). One previously significant difference between physicians disappeared with the protocol in place. The mean fusion volume of Physician C, however, remained significantly larger than that of Physician D (p < 0.01). This result is unchanged from Part I. The multidisciplinary contouring protocol significantly improved the coincidence of GTVs contoured by multiple physicians. The magnitudes of the volumes showed marginal improvement in consistency. Developing an institutional contouring protocol for PET/CT treatment planning is highly recommended to reduce interobserver variability.

  12. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-06: Y90 PET/CT for the Instantaneous Determination of Both Target and Non-Target Absorbed Doses Following Hepatic Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Pasciak, A; Kao, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose The process of converting Yttrium-90 (Y90) PET/CT images into 3D absorbed dose maps will be explained. The simple methods presented will allow the medical physicst to analyze Y90 PET images following radioembolization and determine the absorbed dose to tumor, normal liver parenchyma and other areas of interest, without application of Monte-Carlo radiation transport or dose-point-kernel (DPK) convolution. Methods Absorbed dose can be computed from Y90 PET/CT images based on the premise that radioembolization is a permanent implant with a constant relative activity distribution after infusion. Many Y90 PET/CT publications have used DPK convolution to obtain 3D absorbed dose maps. However, this method requires specialized software limiting clinical utility. The Local Deposition method, an alternative to DPK convolution, can be used to obtain absorbed dose and requires no additional computer processing. Pixel values from regions of interest drawn on Y90 PET/CT images can be converted to absorbed dose (Gy) by multiplication with a scalar constant. Results There is evidence that suggests the Local Deposition method may actually be more accurate than DPK convolution and it has been successfully used in a recent Y90 PET/CT publication. We have analytically compared dose-volume-histograms (DVH) for phantom hot-spheres to determine the difference between the DPK and Local Deposition methods, as a function of PET scanner point-spread-function for Y90. We have found that for PET/CT systems with a FWHM greater than 3.0 mm when imaging Y90, the Local Deposition Method provides a more accurate representation of DVH, regardless of target size than DPK convolution. Conclusion Using the Local Deposition Method, post-radioembolization Y90 PET/CT images can be transformed into 3D absorbed dose maps of the liver. An interventional radiologist or a Medical Physicist can perform this transformation in a clinical setting, allowing for rapid prediction of treatment efficacy by

  13. Deep-inspiration breath-hold kilovoltage cone-beam CT for setup of stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung tumors: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Dennis M; Ding, George X; Coffey, Charles W; Kirby, Wyndee; Hallahan, Dennis E; Malcolm, Arnold; Lu, Bo

    2007-04-01

    We report our initial experience with deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) cone-beam CT (CBCT) on the treatment table, using the kilovoltage imager integrated into our linear accelerator, for setting up patients for DIBH stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Nine patients with non-small cell lung cancer (seven stage I), were given 60Gy in three fractions. All nine patients could perform a DIBH for 35s. For each patient we used a diagnostic reference CT volume image acquired during a DIBH to design an SBRT plan consisting of 7-10 noncoplanar conformal beams. Four patients were setup by registering DIBH kilovoltage projection radiographs or megavoltage portal images on the treatment table to digitally reconstructed radiographs from the reference CT. Each of the last 14 fractions out of a total of 27 was setup by acquiring a CBCT volume image on the treatment table in three breath-holds. The CBCT and reference CT volume images were directly registered and the shift was calculated from the registration. The CBCT volume images contained excellent detail on soft tissue and bony anatomy for matching to the reference CT. Most importantly, the tumor was always clearly visible in the CBCT images, even when it was difficult or impossible to see in the radiographs or portal images. The accuracy of the CBCT method was confirmed by DIBH megavoltage portal imaging and each treatment beam was delivered during a DIBH. CBCT acquisition typically required five more minutes than radiograph acquisition but the overall setup time was often shorter using CBCT because repeat imaging was minimized. We conclude that for setting up SBRT treatments of lung tumors, DIBH CBCT is feasible, fast and may result in less variation among observers than using bony anatomy in orthogonal radiographs.

  14. Kidney Tumor in a von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) Patient With Intensely Increased Activity on 68Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Sadowski, Samira M; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2016-12-01

    Renal and pancreatic cysts and tumors are the most common visceral manifestations of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease, a heritable multisystem cancer syndrome characterized by development of a variety of malignant and benign tumors. We report a case of a VHL patient with multiple renal cystic and complex cystic/solid lesions. The patient underwent Ga-DOTA-TATE-PET/CT showing intensely increased activity by a solid lesion which demonstrated enhancement on both CT and MRI scans, raising high suspicion for malignancy. The presented case indicates application of SSTR-imaging using Ga-DOTA-conjugated peptides in VHL-patients and emphasizes the need for cautious interpretation of renal parenchyma Ga-DOTATATE activity.

  15. Detection of metastatic liver tumor in multi-phase CT images by using a spherical gray-level differentiation searching filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuejun; Furukawa, Takahiro; Zhou, Xiangrong; Hara, Takeshi; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2011-03-01

    To detect the metastatic liver tumor on CT scans, two liver edge maps on unenhanced and portal venous phase images are firstly extracted and registered using phase-only correlation (POC) method, by which rotation and shift parameters are detected on two log-polar transformed power spectrum images. Then the liver gray map is obtained on non-contrast phase images by calculating the gray value within the region of edge map. The initial tumors are derived from the subtraction of edge and gray maps as well as referring to the score from the spherical gray-level differentiation searching (SGDS) filter. Finally the FPs are eliminated by shape and texture features. 12 normal cases and 25 cases with 44 metastatic liver tumors are used to test the performance of our algorithm, 86.7% of TPs are successfully extracted by our CAD system with 2.5 FPs per case. The result demonstrates that the POC is a robust method for the liver registration, and our proposed SGDS filter is effective to detect spherical shape tumor on CT images. It is expected that our CAD system could useful for quantitative assessment of metastatic liver tumor in clinical practice.

  16. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-induced Protein 8-like 2 (TIPE2) is associated with immune phases of patients with chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yu-Chen; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Na; Sun, Yan-Yan; Wang, Kai

    2017-02-24

    Tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8-like 2 (TIPE2) is a newly negative immune regulator but its role in different immune phases of patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is unknown. We determined the mRNA levels of TIPE2, interleukin-6, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factors-α and interferon-γ in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 205 naïve treated CHB patients and 15 healthy controls by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. Intrahepatic TIPE2 protein was also determined using immunohistochemistry staining. The TIPE2 mRNA level in CHB patients was significantly higher than that in healthy controls. Moreover, the TIPE2 mRNA level in immune clearance (IC) phases was significantly higher than that in immune tolerance (IT) phase; whereas TIPE2 mRNA in HBeAg negative hepatitis (ENH) was obviously higher than low replication (LR) phase. Furthermore, the optional cut off values of 2.02 and 1.59 for TIPE2 mRNA level have strong power in identifying IC and ENH from IT and LR. In addition, intrahepatic TIPE2 protein was predominantly located in hepatocyte plasma and correlated with hepatic inflammatory and fibrosis. Multivariate analysis showed tumor necrosis factors-α, interferon-γ and HBV DNA load were independently correlated with TIPE2 level. In conclusion, TIPE2 might be associated to the immune clearance of patients with chronic hepatitis B.

  17. Efficient Delivery of DOX to Nuclei of Hepatic Carcinoma Cells in the Subcutaneous Tumor Model Using pH-Sensitive Pullulan-DOX Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Li, Huanan; Cui, Yani; Sui, Junhui; Bian, Shaoquan; Sun, Yong; Liang, Jie; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-07-29

    A series of pullulan-doxorubicin conjugates (Pu-DOXs) were investigated for effectively delivering DOX to nuclei of hepatic carcinoma cells in subcutaneous tumor model. These Pu-DOXs were prepared by conjugating DOX onto pullulan molecule via pH-responsive hydrazone bond using spacers with different alkane chain length. The highest drug loading content of Pu-DOXs went up to nearly 50%, and the diameter of Pu-DOX nanoparticles ranged from 50 to 170 nm, as measured by DLS and TEM. These Pu-DOX nanoparticles could rapidly release DOX in the acidic environment at pH = 5.0 while being kept relatively stable in neural conditions. The in vitro cell coculture experiments revealed that these Pu-DOX nanoparticles were selectively internalized by hepatic carcinoma cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis via asialoglycoprotein receptor on the hepatic carcinoma cell surface. DOX was rapidly released from Pu-DOX nanoparticles in acidic endosome/lysosome, diffused into cell nuclei due to its strong affinity to nucleic acid, inhibited the cell proliferation, and accelerated the cell apoptosis. In the nude mice subcutaneous hepatic carcinoma model, Pu-DOX nanoparticles efficiently accumulated in the tumor site through the enhanced permeation and retention effect. Then DOX was specifically internalized by hepatic carcinoma cells and rapidly diffused into the nuclei of cells. Compared with the control group in in vivo experiments, these Pu-DOX nanoparticles effectively inhibited solid tumor growth, prolonging the lifetime of the experimental animal. These pH sensitive nanoparticles might provide an important clinical implication for targeted hepatic carcinoma therapy with high efficiency and low systematic toxicity.

  18. Interleukin-28B rs12979860C/T and rs8099917T/G contribute to spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus in Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming-Hua; Li, Yu; Xiao, Dong-Dong; Shi, Ke-Qing; Fan, Yu-Chen; Chen, Li-Li; Liu, Wen-Yue; Luo, Ying-Wan; Chen, Yong-Ping

    2013-04-15

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms rs12979860C/T and rs8099917T/G around interleukin-28B (IL28B) locus have been extensively investigated in their association with hepatitis C virus (HCV) spontaneous clearance. However, with the variable and even inconsistent results, it is necessary to conduct a meta-analysis. A literature search was conducted to seek articles about genetic variation of IL28B and spontaneous clearance of HCV. Odds ratio with 95% confidential interval were calculated to estimate their relationship. Furthermore, meta-regression analysis was performed to search for potential affective factors. A total of 8 studies including 2460 patients with chronic HCV infection and 1052 individuals with spontaneous HCV clearance met inclusion criteria, in which seven studies describing rs12979860 and three studies describing rs8099917. Analysis performed in Caucasian populations indicated that rs12979860CC and rs8099917TT contributed to HCV spontaneous clearance in both dominant model (CC vs. CT+TT, P<1×10(-4); TT vs. TG+GG, P<10(-4), respectively) and co-dominant model (CC vs. CT, P<1×10(-4), CC vs. TT, P<1×10(-4); TT vs. TG, P<10(-4), TT vs. GG, P=0.012, respectively). Meta-regression analysis suggested that male proportion (P=1×10(-5)) and mean age (P=1×10(-3)) might weaken the effect of rs12979860CC, but HCV genotype 1/4 (P=4×10(-4)) might contribute to it. IL28B rs12979860CC and rs8099917TT genotypes contribute to spontaneous HCV clearance in Caucasians.

  19. Activated hepatic stellate cells play pivotal roles in hepatocellular carcinoma cell chemoresistance and migration in multicellular tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yeonhwa; Kim, Se-hyuk; Kim, Kang Mo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Joon; Seo, Haeng Ran

    2016-01-01

    Most Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are resistant to conventional chemotherapeutic agents and remain an unmet medical need. Recently, multiple studies on the crosstalk between HCC and their tumor microenvironment have been conducted to overcome chemoresistance in HCC. In this study, we formed multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) to elucidate the mechanisms of environment-mediated chemoresistance in HCC. We observed that hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in MCTS significantly increased the compactness of spheroids and exhibited strong resistance to sorafenib and cisplatin relative to other types of stromal cells. Increased collagen 1A1 (COL1A1) expression was apparent in activated HSCs but not in fibroblasts or vascular endothelial cells in MCTS. Additionally, COL1A1 deficiency, which was increased by co-culture with HSCs, decreased the cell-cell interactions and thereby increased the therapeutic efficacy of anticancer therapies in MCTS. Furthermore, losartan, which can inhibit collagen I synthesis, attenuated the compactness of spheroids and increased the therapeutic efficacy of anticancer therapies in MCTS. Meanwhile, activated HSCs facilitated HCC migration by upregulating matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) in MCTS. Collectively, crosstalk between HCC cells and HSCs promoted HCC chemoresistance and migration by increasing the expression of COL1A1 and MMP9 in MCTS. Hence, targeting HSCs might represent a promising therapeutic strategy for liver cancer therapy. PMID:27853186

  20. Giant Cell Tumor with Secondary Aneurysmal Bone Cyst Shows Heterogeneous Metabolic Pattern on (18)F-FDG PET/CT: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Jeong; Kwon, Seong Young; Cho, Sang-Geon; Kim, Jahae; Song, Ho-Chun; Kim, Sung Sun; Yoon, Yeon Hong; Park, Jin Gyoon

    2016-12-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a generally benign bone tumor accounting for approximately 5 % of all primary bone neoplasms. Cystic components in GCTs that indicate secondary aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are reported in 14 % of GCTs. Although both of them have been described separately in previous reports that may show considerable fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake despite their benign nature, the findings of GCT with secondary ABC on (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) have not been well-known. We report a case of GCT with secondary ABC in a 26-year-old woman. (18)F-FDG PET/CT revealed a heterogeneous hypermetabolic lesion in the left proximal femur with the maximum standardized uptake value of 4.7. The solid components of the tumor showed higher FDG uptake than the cystic components. These observations suggest that the ABC components in GCTs show heterogeneous metabolic patterns on (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

  1. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation: Long-term survival analysis of 71 patients with inoperable malignant hepatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Niessen, C.; Thumann, S.; Beyer, L.; Pregler, B.; Kramer, J.; Lang, S.; Teufel, A.; Jung, E. M.; Stroszczynski, C.; Wiggermann, P.

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this retrospective analysis was to evaluate the survival times after percutaneous irreversible electroporation (IRE) in inoperable liver tumors not amenable to thermal ablation. 71 patients (14 females, 57 males, median age 63.5 ± 10.8 years) with 103 liver tumors were treated in 83 interventions using IRE (NanoKnife® system). The median tumor short-axis diameter was 1.9 cm (minimum 0.4 cm, maximum 4.5 cm). 35 patients had primary liver tumors and 36 patients had liver metastases. The Kaplan-Meier method was employed to calculate the survival rates, and the different groups were compared using multivariate log-rank and Wilcoxon tests. The overall median survival time was 26.3 months; the median survival of patients with primary land secondary liver cancer did not significantly differ (26.8 vs. 19.9 months; p = 0.41). Patients with a tumor diameter >3 cm (p < 0.001) or more than 2 lesions (p < 0.005) died significantly earlier than patients with smaller or fewer tumors. Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and Child-Pugh class B or C cirrhosis died significantly earlier than patients with Child-Pugh class A (p < 0.05). Patients with very early stage HCC survived significantly longer than patients with early stage HCC with a median survival of 22.3 vs. 13.7 months (p < 0.05). PMID:28266600

  2. Transcatheter arterial embolization with trisacryl gelatin microspheres (Embosphere®) leads to life-threatening tumor lysis syndrome in a rectal carcinoid patient with hepatic metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yuan-Hao; Tsai, Ming-Tsun; Kuo, Chen-Yu; Liu, Wen-Sheng; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Yeh, Yi-Chen; Li, Chung-Pin; Chen, Jinn-Yang; Chao, Yee

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal carcinoids appears to be increasing, and the rectum is the third most common location. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with trisacryl gelatin microspheres (Embosphere®) has been reported as an effective method for hepatic metastases of rectal carcinoids. Complications are uncommon and usually of minor consequence. We report an unusual case of a 34-year-old man with tumor lysis syndrome following TAE with Embosphere® in a patient with multiple hepatic metastases of a rectal carcinoid. Early detection and effective treatment are essential for this rare but potentially catastrophic complication. PMID:23986828

  3. CT-angiographic demonstration of hepatic collateral pathways due to superior vena cava obstruction in Behçet disease.

    PubMed

    Temizöz, Osman; Genchellac, Hakan; Yekeler, Ensar; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Unlü, Ercüment; Ozdemir, Hüseyin

    2010-12-01

    Behçet disease (BD) is a chronic multisystemic inflammatory disorder, mainly characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers, skin lesions, and uveitis. Large vein thrombosis in BD is unusual; when present, it is most frequently seen in the inferior or superior vena cava (SVC). The authors describe an unusual hepatic pseudolesion caused by abnormal focal enhancement through collateral pathways to the liver in two BD patients with SVC occlusion on three-dimensional multi-detector computed tomography, using volume rendering and maximum intensity projection techniques. BD should be suspected in patients presenting a focal increased hepatic enhancement area with collaterals caused by occlusion of the SVC without evidence of a hypercoagulable state or malignant mediastinal or thoracic venous inlet obstruction.

  4. Hepatitis C virus infection triggers a tumor-like glutamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lévy, Pierre L; Duponchel, Sarah; Eischeid, Hannah; Molle, Jennifer; Michelet, Maud; Diserens, Gaëlle; Vermathen, Martina; Vermathen, Peter; Dufour, Jean-Francois; Dienes, Hans-Peter; Steffen, Hans-Michael; Odenthal, Margarete; Zoulim, Fabien; Bartosch, Birke

    2017-03-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the main causes of hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the molecular mechanisms linking the infection to cancer development remain poorly understood. Here we used HCV-infected cells and liver biopsies to study how HCV modulates the glutaminolysis pathway, which is known to play an important role in cellular energetics, stress defense, and neoplastic transformation. Transcript levels of glutaminolytic factors were quantified in Huh7.5 cells or primary human hepatocytes infected with the Japanese fulminant hepatitis 1 HCV strain as well as in biopsies of chronic HCV patients. Nutrient deprivation, biochemical analysis, and metabolite quantification were performed with HCV-infected Huh7.5 cells. Furthermore, short hairpin RNA vectors and small molecule inhibitors were used to investigate the dependence of HCV replication on metabolic changes. We show that HCV modulates the transcript levels of key enzymes of glutamine metabolism in vitro and in liver biopsies of chronic HCV patients. Consistently, HCV infection increases glutamine use and dependence. We finally show that inhibiting glutamine metabolism attenuates HCV infection and the oxidative stress associated with HCV infection.

  5. SU-E-I-100: Heterogeneity Studying for Primary and Lymphoma Tumors by Using Multi-Scale Image Texture Analysis with PET-CT Images

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dengwang; Wang, Qinfen; Li, H; Chen, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is studying tumor heterogeneity of the primary and lymphoma by using multi-scale texture analysis with PET-CT images, where the tumor heterogeneity is expressed by texture features. Methods: Datasets were collected from 12 lung cancer patients, and both of primary and lymphoma tumors were detected with all these patients. All patients underwent whole-body 18F-FDG PET/CT scan before treatment.The regions of interest (ROI) of primary and lymphoma tumor were contoured by experienced clinical doctors. Then the ROI of primary and lymphoma tumor is extracted automatically by using Matlab software. According to the geometry size of contour structure, the images of tumor are decomposed by multi-scale method.Wavelet transform was performed on ROI structures within images by L layers sampling, and then wavelet sub-bands which have the same size of the original image are obtained. The number of sub-bands is 3L+1.The gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) is calculated within different sub-bands, thenenergy, inertia, correlation and gray in-homogeneity were extracted from GLCM.Finally, heterogeneity statistical analysis was studied for primary and lymphoma tumor using the texture features. Results: Energy, inertia, correlation and gray in-homogeneity are calculated with our experiments for heterogeneity statistical analysis.Energy for primary and lymphomatumor is equal with the same patient, while gray in-homogeneity and inertia of primaryare 2.59595±0.00855, 0.6439±0.0007 respectively. Gray in-homogeneity and inertia of lymphoma are 2.60115±0.00635, 0.64435±0.00055 respectively. The experiments showed that the volume of lymphoma is smaller than primary tumor, but thegray in-homogeneity and inertia were higher than primary tumor with the same patient, and the correlation with lymphoma tumors is zero, while the correlation with primary tumor isslightly strong. Conclusion: This studying showed that there were effective heterogeneity

  6. Hepatic Resection as a Safe and Effective Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Involving a Single Large Tumor, Multiple Tumors, or Macrovascular Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jian-Hong; Rodríguez, A. Chapin; Ke, Yang; Wang, Yan-Yan; Wang, Lin; Li, Le-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This systematic review examined whether the available evidence justifies using hepatic resection (HR) during later stages of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which contravenes treatment guidelines but is current practice at many medical centers. Official guidelines and retrospective studies recommend different roles for HR for patients with large/multinodular HCC or with HCC involving macrovascular invasion (MVI). Several databases were systematically searched for studies examining the safety and efficacy of HR for treating HCC involving a single large tumor (>5 cm) or multiple tumors, or for treating HCC involving MVI. We identified 50 studies involving 14 808 patients that investigated the use of HR to treat large/multinodular HCC, and 24 studies with 4389 patients that investigated HR to treat HCC with MVI. Median in-hospital mortality for patients with either type of HCC was significantly lower in Asian studies (2.7%) than in non-Asian studies (7.3%, P < 0.001). Median overall survival (OS) was significantly higher for all Asian patients with large/multinodular HCC than for all non-Asian patients at both 1 year (81% vs 65%, P < 0.001) and 5 years (42% vs 32%, P < 0.001). Similar results were obtained for median disease-free survival at 1 year (61% vs 50%, P < 0.001) and 5 years (26% vs 24%, P < 0.001). However, median OS was similar for Asian and non-Asian patients with HCC involving MVI at 1 year (50% vs 52%, P = 0.45) and 5 years (18% vs 14%, P = 0.94). There was an upward trend in 5-year OS in patients with either type of HCC. HR is reasonably safe and effective at treating large/multinodular HCC and HCC with MVI. The available evidence argues for expanding the indications for HR in official treatment guidelines. PMID:25621684

  7. CT-Based Evaluation of Tumor Volume After Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy of Locally Advanced Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity: Comparison with Clinical Remission Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rohde, Stefan Turowski, Bernd; Berkefeld, Joachim; Kovacs, Adorjan F.

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. To assess the volume of locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity and the oropharynx before and after intra-arterial (i.a.) chemotherapy by means of computed tomography and to compare these data with clinically determined treatment response of the same patient population. Methods. Eighty-eight patients with histologically proven, advanced carcinoma of the oral cavity and/or the oropharynx (local tumor stages T3/4) received neoadjuvant i.a. chemotherapy with cisplatin as part of a multimodal therapeutic regimen, comprising (1) local chemotherapy, (2) surgery, and (3) combined radio-chemotherapy. Three weeks after the intervention, residual disease was evaluated radiologically by measurement of the tumor volume and clinically by inspection and palpation of the primary tumor according to WHO criteria. Results. Comparison of treatment response according to radiological and clinical criteria respectively revealed complete remission in 5% vs. 8% (p < 0.05), partial remission in 30% vs. 31%, stable disease in 61% vs. 58%, and tumor progression in 5% vs. 2%. Conclusion. Radiological volumetry and clinical evaluation found comparable response rates after local chemotherapy. However, in patients with good response after local treatment, volumetric measurement with CT may help to distinguish between partial and complete remission. Thus, radiological tumor volumetry provides precise and differentiated information about tumor response and should be used as an additional tool in treatment monitoring after local chemotherapy.

  8. Quantification of Local Tumor Response to Fractionated Radiation Therapy for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Using Weekly {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Harald; Goda, Jayant Sastri; Vines, Douglass C.; Lockwood, Gina M.Math.; Tsang, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To quantify, in a feasibility study, metabolic and volumetric response to fractionated radiation therapy (RT) using weekly {sup 18}F fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for 10 non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients, and to correlate them to clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with chemotherapy-refractory NHL planned for radical RT were prospectively entered into a research study. PET/computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired before RT, and repeated weekly during the 3- to 4-week course of RT, and at 1 and 3 months after therapy. Gross tumor volumes were contoured on CT scans and the corresponding maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) determined in the coregistered PET images. The clinical outcomes of interest were local tumor response at 3 months post-RT and local tumor status at last follow-up or time of death. Results: {sup 18}F fluoro-deoxyglucose uptake from inflammation was rarely observed. The responses showed a large variability between patients. SUV{sub max} decreased consistently with a median of -2.1% per Gy (range, -3.3 to -0.7) and the median of the volumetric response was -2.2% per Gy (range, -2.8 to +0.5). Initial SUV{sub max} was not correlated with local control, whereas smaller initial tumor volume was, with smaller tumors more likely to achieve local control. The responses after treatment were also correlated to local control, but not the responses during treatment. Conclusions: Radiation does not confound the FDG uptake in the NHL tumor and normal tissues. Only smaller initial tumor volume and metabolic and volumetric response after completion of radiation therapy significantly correlated with eventual local control.

  9. Deletion of tumor progression locus 2 attenuates alcohol induced hepatic inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) involves the interaction of several inflammatory signaling pathways. Tumor progression locus 2 (TPL2), also known as Cancer Osaka Thyroid (COT) and MAP3K8, is a serine threonine kinase that functions as a critical regulator of inflammator...

  10. WE-AB-BRA-04: Evaluation of the Tumor Registration Error in Biopsy Procedures Performed Under Real Time PET/CT Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Fanchon, L; Apte, A; Dzyubak, O; Mageras, G; Yorke, E; Solomon, S; Kirov, A; Visvikis, D; Hatt, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: PET/CT guidance is used for biopsies of metabolically active lesions, which are not well seen on CT alone or to target the metabolically active tissue in tumor ablations. It has also been shown that PET/CT guided biopsies provide an opportunity to verify the location of the lesion border at the place of needle insertion. However the error in needle placement with respect to the metabolically active region may be affected by motion between the PET/CT scan performed at the start of the procedure and the CT scan performed with the needle in place and this error has not been previously quantified. Methods: Specimens from 31 PET/CT guided biopsies were investigated and correlated to the intraoperative PET scan under an IRB approved HIPAA compliant protocol. For 4 of the cases in which larger motion was suspected a second PET scan was obtained with the needle in place. The CT and the PET images obtained before and after the needle insertion were used to calculate the displacement of the voxels along the needle path. CTpost was registered to CTpre using a free form deformable registration and then fused with PETpre. The shifts between the PET image contours (42% of SUVmax) for PETpre and PETpost were obtained at the needle position. Results: For these extreme cases the displacement of the CT voxels along the needle path ranged from 2.9 to 8 mm with a mean of 5 mm. The shift of the PET image segmentation contours (42% of SUVmax) at the needle position ranged from 2.3 to 7 mm between the two scans. Conclusion: Evaluation of the mis-registration between the CT with the needle in place and the pre-biopsy PET can be obtained using deformable registration of the respective CT scans and can be used to indicate the need of a second PET in real-time. This work is supported in part by a grant from Biospace Lab, S.A.

  11. Galactosylated chitosan-grafted multiwall carbon nanotubes for pH-dependent sustained release and hepatic tumor-targeted delivery of doxorubicin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaole; Rui, Yao; Fan, Yuchao; Chen, Haiyan; Ma, Ning; Wu, Zhenghong

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are well known for their distinctive drug-loading ability that is mainly due to their large surface area, which permits covalent attachment of various target ligands or drug molecules by π-π stacking, allowing them to act as potential tumor-targeting carriers. Herein, we describe the development of galactosylated chitosan-graftedoxidized CNTs (O-CNTs-LCH) for pH-dependent sustained release and hepatic tumor-targeted delivery of doxorubicin (DOX). The in vitro release behavior in aqueous release media of different pH values (5.5, 6.5 and 7.4) verified the pH-dependent sustained release of DOX from O-CNTs-LCH-DOX. Moreover, these nanocarriers exhibited significant in vitro tumor-targeting properties, with a higher cellular uptake efficiency than that of free DOX in HepG2 cells. In addition, the good biocompatibility and low toxicity of O-CNTs-LCH-DOX was demonstrated by evaluating HepG2 cytotoxicity, vascular irritation and the maximum tolerated dose. Moreover, after intravenous administration in mice bearing the H22 tumor, O-CNTs-LCH-DOX showed higher antitumor activity and stronger fluorescent intensity in tumor tissue compared to free DOX. These results indicated the selective hepatic tumor targeting and the therapeutic effect of those nanocarriers.

  12. Quantitative Measurements of Enhancement on Preprocedure Triphasic CT Can Predict Response of Colorectal Liver Metastases to Radioembolization

    PubMed Central

    Boas, F. Edward; Brody, Lynn A.; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Yarmohammadi, Hooman; Shady, Waleed; Kishore, Sirish; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Colorectal liver metastases (CLM) have a variable response to radioembolization. This may be due at least partly to differences in tumor arterial perfusion. The present study examines whether quantitative measurements of enhancement on preprocedure triphasic CT can be used to predict the response of CLM to radioembolization. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients with CLM treated with radioembolization who underwent pretreatment PET/CT and triphasic CT examinations and posttreatment PET/CT examinations. A total of 31 consecutive patients with 60 target tumors were included in the present study. For each tumor, we calculated the hepatic artery coefficient (HAC), portal vein coefficient (PVC), and arterial enhancement fraction (AEF) based on enhancement measurements on pretreatment triphasic CT. HAC and PVC are estimates of the hepatic artery and portal vein blood supply. AEF, which is the arterial phase enhancement divided by the portal phase enhancement, provides an estimate of the hepatic artery blood supply as a fraction of the total blood supply. For each tumor, the metabolic response to radioembolization was based on findings from the initial follow-up PET/CT scan obtained at 4–8 weeks after treatment. Results A total of 55% of CLM had a complete or partial metabolic response. Arterial phase enhancement, the HAC, and the PVC did not predict which tumors responded to radioembolization. However, the AEF was statistically significantly greater in tumors with a complete or partial metabolic response than in tumors with no metabolic response (i.e., those with stable disease or disease progression) (p = 0.038). An AEF of less than 0.4 was associated with a 40% response rate, whereas an AEF greater than 0.75 was associated with a 78% response rate. Conclusion Response to radioembolization can be predicted using the AEF calculated from the preprocedure triphasic CT. PMID:27248430

  13. Visualization of microvascular proliferation as a tumor infiltration structure in rat glioma specimens using the diffraction-enhanced imaging in-plane CT technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Seung-Jun; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Huo, Qingkai; Ando, Masami; Choi, Gi-Hwan; Kim, Hong-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hong; Jeong, Eun-Ju; Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2012-03-01

    In order to study potent microenvironments of malignant gliomas with a high- resolution x-ray imaging technique, an injection orthotopic glioma model was made using the Sprague-Dawley rat. Total brain tissue, taken out as an ex vivo model, was examined with diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) computed tomography (CT) acquired with a 35 keV monochromatic x-ray. In the convolution-reconstructed 2D/3D images with a spatial resolution of 12.5 × 12.5 × 25 µm, distinction among necrosis, typical ring-shaped viable tumors, edemas and healthy tissues was clearly observed near the frontal lobe in front of the rat's caudate nucleus. Multiple microvascular proliferations (MVPs) were observed surrounding peritumoral edemas as a tumor infiltration structure. Typical dimensions of tubular MVPs were 130 (diameter) ×250 (length) µm with a partial sprout structure revealed in the 3D reconstructed image. Hyperplasia of cells around vessel walls was revealed with tumor cell infiltration along the perivascular space in microscopic observations of mild MVP during histological analysis. In conclusion, DEI-CT is capable of imaging potent tumor-infiltrating MVP structures surrounding high-grade gliomas.

  14. Comparison of Two Techniques for Radio-frequency Hepatic Tumor Ablation through Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosturski, N.; Margenov, S.; Vutov, Y.

    2011-11-01

    We simulate the thermal and electrical processes, involved in the radio-frequency ablation procedure. In this study, we take into account the observed fact, that the electrical conductivity of the hepatic tissue varies during the procedure. With the increase of the tissue temperature to a certain level, a sudden drop of the electrical conductivity is observed. This variation was neglected in some previous studies. The mathematical model consists of two parts—electrical and thermal. The energy from the applied AC voltage is determined first, by solving the Laplace equation to find the potential distribution. After that, the electric field intensity and the current density are directly calculated. Finally, the heat transfer equation is solved to determine the temperature distribution. Heat loss due to blood perfusion is also accounted for. The simulations were performed on the IBM Blue Gene/P massively parallel computer.

  15. Tropism between hepatic and pulmonary metastases in colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hyun; Choi, So-Jung; Park, Joon Suk; Lee, Jinseon; Cho, Yong Beom; Kang, Min-Woong; Lee, Woo Yong; Choi, Yong Soo; Kim, Hong Kwan; Han, Joungho; Chun, Ho-Kyung; Kim, Jhingook

    2012-08-01

    In metastatic colorectal cancers, tumor cells are disseminated prior to surgical resection of the primary tumor but remain dormant until proper colonization mechanisms are activated. To identify the colonization mechanisms of the metastatic tumors, we conducted a pairwise comparison between primary colorectal cancers and metastatic tumors (n=12 pairs), including six hepatic pairs and six pulmonary pairs. The mRNA levels of 224 genes previously reported to be associated with metastasis, cytokines and angiogenesis were quantitatively determined by PCR arrays. Among them, 27 genes were duplicated or triplicated to show consistent expression. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the Ct values of metastasis-related genes revealed that liver metastases were indistinguishable from primary colorectal cancers (n=5/6), whereas lung metastases were highly diversified from one another and from the primary tumors (n=6/6). Cytokines and receptor gene expression array data also confirmed the divergence of pulmonary metastases from primary colorectal cancers (n=6/6). Heat map analyses of ΔCt values of the metastasis-related genes identified a 17-gene tropism signature that was sufficient not only to distinguish liver and the lung metastases, but also reconstituted the clustering of primary tumors with the hepatic metastases (n=17/18). In this pilot experiment, pulmonary metastases were significantly diverged from hepatic metastases that were indistinguishable from primary colorectal cancers. Further genomic and clinical studies are in progress to evaluate the potential of the tropism signature as a therapeutic target to inhibit the colonization of metastatic colorectal cancers.

  16. Prognosis estimation under the light of metabolic tumor parameters on initial FDG-PET/CT in patients with primary extranodal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Okuyucu, Kursat; Ozaydın, Sukru; Alagoz, Engin; Ozgur, Gokhan; Oysul, Fahrettin Guven; Ozmen, Ozlem; Tuncel, Murat; Ozturk, Mustafa; Arslan, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas arising from the tissues other than primary lymphatic organs are named primary extranodal lymphoma. Most of the studies evaluated metabolic tumor parameters in different organs and histopathologic variants of this disease generally for treatment response. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of metabolic tumor parameters derived from initial FDG-PET/CT in patients with a medley of primary extranodal lymphoma in this study. Patients and methods There were 67 patients with primary extranodal lymphoma for whom FDG-PET/CT was requested for primary staging. Quantitative PET/CT parameters: maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), average standardized uptake value (SUVmean), metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were used to estimate disease-free survival and overall survival. Results SUVmean, MTV and TLG were found statistically significant after multivariate analysis. SUVmean remained significant after ROC curve analysis. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated as 88% and 64%, respectively, when the cut-off value of SUVmean was chosen as 5.15. After the investigation of primary presentation sites and histo-pathological variants according to recurrence, there is no difference amongst the variants. Primary site of extranodal lymphomas however, is statistically important (p = 0.014). Testis and central nervous system lymphomas have higher recurrence rate (62.5%, 73%, respectively). Conclusions High SUVmean, MTV and TLG values obtained from primary staging FDG-PET/CT are potential risk factors for both disease-free survival and overall survival in primary extranodal lymphoma. SUVmean is the most significant one amongst them for estimating recurrence/metastasis. PMID:27904443

  17. Site specific discrete PEGylation of (124)I-labeled mCC49 Fab' fragments improves tumor MicroPET/CT imaging in mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haiming; Carlton, Michelle M; Povoski, Stephen P; Milum, Keisha; Kumar, Krishan; Kothandaraman, Shankaran; Hinkle, George H; Colcher, David; Brody, Rich; Davis, Paul D; Pokora, Alex; Phelps, Mitchell; Martin, Edward W; Tweedle, Michael F

    2013-11-20

    The tumor-associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) antigen is highly overexpressed in various human adenocarcinomas and anti-TAG-72 monoclonal antibodies, and fragments are therefore useful as pharmaceutical targeting vectors. In this study, we investigated the effects of site-specific PEGylation with MW 2-4 kDa discrete, branched PEGylation reagents on mCC49 Fab' (MW 50 kDa) via in vitro TAG72 binding, and in vivo blood clearance kinetics, biodistribution, and mouse tumor microPET/CT imaging. mCC49Fab' (Fab'-NEM) was conjugated at a hinge region cysteine with maleimide-dPEG 12-(dPEG24COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-A), maleimide-dPEG12-(dPEG12COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-B), or maleimide-dPEG12-(m-dPEG24)3 (Mal-dPEG-C), and then radiolabeled with iodine-124 ((124)I) in vitro radioligand binding assays and in vivo studies used TAG-72 expressing LS174T human colon carcinoma cells and xenograft mouse tumors. Conjugation of mCC49Fab' with Mal-dPEG-A (Fab'-A) reduced the binding affinity of the non PEGylated Fab' by 30%; however, in vivo, Fab'-A significantly lengthened the blood retention vs Fab'-NEM (47.5 vs 28.1%/ID at 1 h, 25.1 vs 8.4%/ID at 5 h, p < 0.01), showed excellent tumor to background, better microPET/CT images due to higher tumor accumulation, and increased tumor concentration in excised tissues at 72 h by 130% (5.09 ± 0.83 vs 3.83 ± 1.50%ID/g, p < 0.05). Despite the strong similarity of the three PEGylation reagents, PEGylation with Mal-dPEG-B or -C reduced the in vitro binding affinity of Fab'-NEM by 70%, blood retention, microPET/CT imaging tumor signal intensity, and residual 72 h tumor concentration by 49% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.97 ± 0.29%ID/g, p < 0.05) and 63% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.42 ± 0.35%ID/g, p < 0.05), respectively. We conclude that remarkably subtle changes in the structure of the PEGylation reagent can create significantly altered biologic behavior. Further study is warranted of conjugates of the triple branched, negatively charged Mal-dPEG-A.

  18. Site Specific Discrete PEGylation of 124I-Labeled mCC49 Fab′ Fragments Improves Tumor MicroPET/CT Imaging in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Haiming; Carlton, Michelle M.; Povoski, Stephen P.; Milum, Keisha; Kumar, Krishan; Kothandaraman, Shankaran; Hinkle, George H.; Colcher, David; Brody, Rich; Davis, Paul D.; Pokora, Alex; Phelps, Mitchell; Martin, Edward W.; Tweedle, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    The tumor-associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) antigen is highly overexpressed in various human adenocarcinomas and anti-TAG-72 monoclonal antibodies, and fragments are therefore useful as pharmaceutical targeting vectors. In this study, we investigated the effects of site-specific PEGylation with MW 2–4 kDa discrete, branched PEGylation reagents on mCC49 Fab′ (MW 50 kDa) via in vitro TAG72 binding, and in vivo blood clearance kinetics, biodistribution, and mouse tumor microPET/CT imaging. mCC49Fab′ (Fab′-NEM) was conjugated at a hinge region cysteine with maleimide-dPEG12-(dPEG24COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-A), maleimide-dPEG12-(dPEG12COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-B), or maleimide-dPEG12-(m-dPEG24)3 (Mal-dPEG-C), and then radiolabeled with iodine-124 (124I) in vitro radioligand binding assays and in vivo studies used TAG-72 expressing LS174T human colon carcinoma cells and xenograft mouse tumors. Conjugation of mCC49Fab′ with Mal-dPEG-A (Fab′-A) reduced the binding affinity of the non PEGylated Fab′ by 30%; however, in vivo, Fab′-A significantly lengthened the blood retention vs Fab′-NEM (47.5 vs 28.1%/ID at 1 h, 25.1 vs 8.4%/ID at 5 h, p < 0.01), showed excellent tumor to background, better microPET/CT images due to higher tumor accumulation, and increased tumor concentration in excised tissues at 72 h by 130% (5.09 ± 0.83 vs 3.83 ± 1.50%ID/g, p < 0.05). Despite the strong similarity of the three PEGylation reagents, PEGylation with Mal-dPEG-B or -C reduced the in vitro binding affinity of Fab′-NEM by 70%, blood retention, microPET/CT imaging tumor signal intensity, and residual 72 h tumor concentration by 49% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.97 ± 0.29%ID/g, p < 0.05) and 63% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.42 ± 0.35%ID/g, p < 0.05), respectively. We conclude that remarkably subtle changes in the structure of the PEGylation reagent can create significantly altered biologic behavior. Further study is warranted of conjugates of the triple branched, negatively charged Mal-dPEG-A. PMID

  19. Arsenic trioxide treatment of rabbit liver VX-2 carcinoma via hepatic arterial cannulation-induced apoptosis and decreased levels of survivin in the tumor tissue

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Gong, Jian; Jiang, Xuyuan; Shao, Haibo

    2013-01-01

    Aim To investigate the role of tumor apoptosis-inhibitory protein survivin in arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis in VX-2 carcinoma in the rabbit liver by means of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization. Methods Sixteen rabbits with 32 implanted hepatic VX-2 tumors were randomly divided into two groups. The experimental group received 2 mg of arsenic trioxide and 1 mL of ultra-fluid lipiodol co-injected via hepatic arterial cannulation and the control group received only 1 mL of lipiodol. Animals were sacrificed 3 weeks after trans-catheterial arterial chemoembolization. Tumor tissue and tumor-peripheral tissue were collected for analysis. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end-labeling staining was used to assess tumor cells apoptosis. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the presence of survivin protein. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the expression of survivin gene. Results The number of apoptotic cells significantly increased in the tumor tissue (5.20 ± 0.60%) compared to tumor-peripheral tissue (1.29 ± 0.42%) of the arsenic trioxide-treated group. Survivin expression levels in the tumor tissue were significantly reduced in arsenic trioxide-treated group (7.68 ± 0.65) compared to the control group (35.30 ± 4.63). Conclusion Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization with arsenic trioxide induced apoptosis of VX-2 carcinoma, in which tumor apoptosis-inhibitory protein survivin may have played a role. PMID:23444241

  20. [Dosimetry verification of radioactive seed implantation with 3D printing template and CT guidance for paravertebral/retroperitoneal malignant tumor].

    PubMed

    Ji, Z; Jiang, Y L; Guo, F X; Peng, R; Sun, H T; Fan, J H; Wang, J J

    2017-04-04

    Objective: To compare the dose distributions of postoperative plans with preoperative plans for seeds implantations of paravertebral/retroperitoneal tumors assisted by 3D printing guide template and CT guidance, explore the effects of the technology for seeds implantations in dosimetry level and provide data support for the optimization and standardization in seeds implantation. Methods: Between December 2015 and July 2016, a total of 10 patients with paravertebral/retroperitoneal tumors (12 lesions) received 3D printing template assist radioactive seeds implantations in department of radiation oncology of Peking University Third Hospital, and included in the study. The diseases included cervical cancer, kidney cancer, abdominal stromal tumor, leiomyosarcoma of kidney, esophageal cancer and carcinoma of ureter. The prescribed doses was 110-150 Gy. All patients received preoperative planning design, individual template design and production, and the dose distribution of postoperative plan was compared with preoperative plan. Dose parameters including D(90), MPD, V(100), V(150,)conformal index(CI), EI of target volume and D(2cc) of organs at risk (spinal cord, aorta, kidney). Statistical software was SPSS 19.0 and statistical method was non-parameters Wilcoxon symbols test. Results: A total of 10 3D printing templates were designed and produced which were including 12 treatment areas.The mean D(90) of postoperative target area (GTV) was 131.1 (97.8-167.4 Gy) Gy. The actual seeds number of post operation increased by 3 to 12 in 5 cases (42.0%). The needle was well distributed. For postoperative plans, the mean D(90,)MPD, V(100,)V(150) was 131.1 Gy, 69.3 Gy, 90.2% and 65.2%, respectively, and which was 140.2 Gy, 65.6 Gy, 91.7% and 26.8%, respectively, in preoperative plans. This meant that the actual dose of target volume was slightly lower than preplanned dose, and the high dose area of target volume was larger than preplanned range, but there was no statistical

  1. Diffuse Hepatic and Spleen Uptake of Tc-99m MDP on Bone Scintigraphy Resembling Liver-Spleen Scintigraphy in a Patient of Plasma Cell Tumor.

    PubMed

    Ravanbod, Mohammad Reza; Nemati, Reza; Javadi, Hamid; Nabipour, Iraj; Assadi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    The present case demonstrates a diffuse intense hepatic and, to a lesser degree, spleen, Tc-99m MDP uptake on a routine bone scintigraphy resembling liver-spleen imaging. A 49-year-old female with a history of anaplastic plasma cell tumor and suffering from bone pain was referred for bone scintigraphy to evaluate possible bone metastases. The bone scintigraphy showed diffuse hepatic and spleen uptake of Tc-99m MDP resembling liver-spleen imaging. Furthermore, bone uptake of Tc-99m MDP was significantly diminished and there were no abnormal foci throughout the skeleton. The bone scintigraphy of the present case of an anaplastic plasma cell tumor suggests the possible presence of amyloidosis.

  2. A quantitative evaluation of diffusion-weighted MR imaging of focal hepatic lesions by using an optimal b-value for differentiation of malignant and benign tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Im, In-Chul; Kang, Su-Man; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Kim, Kwang

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine an optimized b-value for the characterization of focal hepatic lesions (malignant and benign tumors) and to perform a quantitative analysis of the results. To achieve this, we obtained diffusion-weighted images (DWIs) from 30 focal hepatic disease patients (liver metastasis: 20 patients, and liver hemangioma: 10 patients) by using a 1.5 T MR system and varying the b-value from 0 through 200. The experimental results revealed that at a b-value of 50, the DWIs of the lesions showed high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs; SN R liver_meta . = 229.83 ± 19.08, SNR liver_hema . = 241.66 ± 29.02), high contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs; CN R liver_meta . = 39.66 ± 3.87, C N R liver_hema . = 142.55 ± 12.97) and low signal intensities of the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs; ADC liver_meta . = 1.40 × 10-3 ± 0.29, ADC liver_hema . = 2.55 × 10-3 ± 0.92). The focal hepatic lesions were clearly depicted, with DW images and ADC maps corresponding well. Thus, we could present an optimized b-value ( b = 50) for the characterization of focal hepatic lesions. Additionally, the ADC values of liver lesions were found to be useful in differentiating benign from malignant tumors.

  3. Au Nanocage Functionalized with Ultra-small Fe3O4 Nanoparticles for Targeting T1–T2Dual MRI and CT Imaging of Tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guannan; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Xuanjun; Mei, Xifan

    2016-06-01

    Diagnostic approaches based on multimodal imaging of clinical noninvasive imaging (eg. MRI/CT scanner) are highly developed in recent years for accurate selection of the therapeutic regimens in critical diseases. Therefore, it is highly demanded in the development of appropriate all-in-one multimodal contrast agents (MCAs) for the MRI/CT multimodal imaging. Here a novel ideal MCAs (F-AuNC@Fe3O4) were engineered by assemble Au nanocages (Au NC) and ultra-small iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4) for simultaneous T1–T2dual MRI and CT contrast imaging. In this system, the Au nanocages offer facile thiol modification and strong X-ray attenuation property for CT imaging. The ultra-small Fe3O4 nanoparticles, as excellent contrast agent, is able to provide great enhanced signal of T1- and T2-weighted MRI (r1 = 6.263 mM‑1 s‑1, r2 = 28.117 mM‑1 s‑1) due to their ultra-refined size. After functionalization, the present MCAs nanoparticles exhibited small average size, low aggregation and excellent biocompatible. In vitro and In vivo studies revealed that the MCAs show long-term circulation time, renal clearance properties and outstanding capability of selective accumulation in tumor tissues for simultaneous CT imaging and T1- and T2-weighted MRI. Taken together, these results show that as-prepared MCAs are excellent candidates as MRI/CT multimodal imaging contrast agents.

  4. Au Nanocage Functionalized with Ultra-small Fe3O4 Nanoparticles for Targeting T1–T2Dual MRI and CT Imaging of Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guannan; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Xuanjun; Mei, Xifan

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic approaches based on multimodal imaging of clinical noninvasive imaging (eg. MRI/CT scanner) are highly developed in recent years for accurate selection of the therapeutic regimens in critical diseases. Therefore, it is highly demanded in the development of appropriate all-in-one multimodal contrast agents (MCAs) for the MRI/CT multimodal imaging. Here a novel ideal MCAs (F-AuNC@Fe3O4) were engineered by assemble Au nanocages (Au NC) and ultra-small iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4) for simultaneous T1–T2dual MRI and CT contrast imaging. In this system, the Au nanocages offer facile thiol modification and strong X-ray attenuation property for CT imaging. The ultra-small Fe3O4 nanoparticles, as excellent contrast agent, is able to provide great enhanced signal of T1- and T2-weighted MRI (r1 = 6.263 mM−1 s−1, r2 = 28.117 mM−1 s−1) due to their ultra-refined size. After functionalization, the present MCAs nanoparticles exhibited small average size, low aggregation and excellent biocompatible. In vitro and In vivo studies revealed that the MCAs show long-term circulation time, renal clearance properties and outstanding capability of selective accumulation in tumor tissues for simultaneous CT imaging and T1- and T2-weighted MRI. Taken together, these results show that as-prepared MCAs are excellent candidates as MRI/CT multimodal imaging contrast agents. PMID:27312564

  5. Use of C-Arm Cone Beam CT During Hepatic Radioembolization: Protocol Optimization for Extrahepatic Shunting and Parenchymal Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Hoven, Andor F. van den Prince, Jip F.; Keizer, Bart de; Vonken, Evert-Jan P. A.; Bruijnen, Rutger C. G.; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den

    2016-01-15

    PurposeTo optimize a C-arm computed tomography (CT) protocol for radioembolization (RE), specifically for extrahepatic shunting and parenchymal enhancement.Materials and MethodsA prospective development study was performed per IDEAL recommendations. A literature-based protocol was applied in patients with unresectable and chemorefractory liver malignancies undergoing an angiography before radioembolization. Contrast and scan settings were adjusted stepwise and repeatedly reviewed in a consensus meeting. Afterwards, two independent raters analyzed all scans. A third rater evaluated the SPECT/CT scans as a reference standard for extrahepatic shunting and lack of target segment perfusion.ResultsFifty scans were obtained in 29 procedures. The first protocol, using a 6 s delay and 10 s scan, showed insufficient parenchymal enhancement. In the second protocol, the delay was determined by timing parenchymal enhancement on DSA power injection (median 8 s, range 4–10 s): enhancement improved, but breathing artifacts increased (from 0 to 27 %). Since the third protocol with a 5 s scan decremented subjective image quality, the second protocol was deemed optimal. Median CNR (range) was 1.7 (0.6–3.2), 2.2 (−1.4–4.0), and 2.1 (−0.3–3.0) for protocol 1, 2, and 3 (p = 0.80). Delineation of perfused segments was possible in 57, 73, and 44 % of scans (p = 0.13). In all C-arm CTs combined, the negative predictive value was 95 % for extrahepatic shunting and 83 % for lack of target segment perfusion.ConclusionAn optimized C-arm CT protocol was developed that can be used to detect extrahepatic shunts and non-perfusion of target segments during RE.

  6. Effect of different segmentation algorithms on metabolic tumor volume measured on 18F-FDG PET/CT of cervical primary squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weina; Yu, Shupeng; Ma, Ying; Liu, Changping

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose It is known that fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography (CT) segmentation algorithms have an impact on the metabolic tumor volume (MTV). This leads to some uncertainties in PET/CT guidance of tumor radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of segmentation algorithms on the PET/CT-based MTV and their correlations with the gross tumor volumes (GTVs) of cervical primary squamous cell carcinoma. Materials and methods Fifty-five patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ia∼IIb and histologically proven cervical squamous cell carcinoma were enrolled. A fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT scan was performed before definitive surgery. GTV was measured on surgical specimens. MTVs were estimated on PET/CT scans using different segmentation algorithms, including a fixed percentage of the maximum standardized uptake value (20∼60% SUVmax) threshold and iterative adaptive algorithm. We divided all patients into four different groups according to the SUVmax within target volume. The comparisons of absolute values and percentage differences between MTVs by segmentation and GTV were performed in different SUVmax subgroups. The optimal threshold percentage was determined from MTV20%∼MTV60%, and was correlated with SUVmax. The correlation of MTViterative adaptive with GTV was also investigated. Results MTV50% and MTV60% were similar to GTV in the SUVmax up to 5 (P>0.05). MTV30%∼MTV60% were similar to GTV (P>0.05) in the 50.05) in the 100.05) in the SUVmax of at least 15 group. MTViterative adaptive was similar to GTV in both total and different SUVmax groups (P>0.05). Significant differences were observed among the fixed percentage method and the optimal threshold percentage was inversely correlated with SUVmax. The iterative adaptive segmentation algorithm led

  7. Lack of anti-tumor activity by anti-VEGF treatments in hepatic hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minsu; Choi, Jin-Young; Lim, Joon Seok; Park, Mi-Suk; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Kim, Honsoul

    2016-04-01

    Recently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents have been described in the literature as a valid treatment option for symptomatic liver hemangiomas, but only limited evidence supports this notion. The purpose of this study was to elucidate whether or not the administration of anti-VEGF agents can reliably achieve a size reduction in liver hemangiomas. We examined patients with incidental hemangiomas who received anti-angiogenic agents for the treatment of other malignancies. Our study population consisted of 17 colorectal cancer patients and one lung cancer patient carrying 21 hemangiomas who received bevacizumab, and seven renal cell carcinoma patients carrying nine hepatic hemangiomas who received sunitinib. We have measured the liver hemangioma volume on both the pre-treatment and post-treatment computed tomography images and then calculated the volume alteration rates. No statistically significant difference (P = 0.365) in the volume of the liver hemangiomas was observed before (1.1-168.8 cm(3); mean ± SD 19.8 ± 39.7 cm(3)) or after (1.2-163.6 cm(3); 19.3 ± 38.0 cm(3)) bevacizumab treatment. The volume reduction rate ranged from -35.0 to 11.2 % (mean ± SD -1.3 ± 10.8 %). The sunitinib treatment group also showed no statistically significant difference (P = 0.889) in hemangioma volume before (1.2-6.5 cm(3); 3.0 ± 1.8 cm(3)) or after (1.2-6.0 cm(3); 3.0-1.7 cm(3)) treatment. The volume reduction rate ranged from -13.3 to 7.7 % (median: mean ± SD -2.5 ± 6.6 %). We did not observe liver hemangioma shrinkage after bevacizumab or sunitinib treatment. Our data do not support the application of anti-VEGF agents for the treatment of hepatic hemangiomas.

  8. Brain metastases detectability of routine whole body (18)F-FDG PET and low dose CT scanning in 2502 asymptomatic patients with solid extracranial tumors.

    PubMed

    Bochev, Pavel; Klisarova, Aneliya; Kaprelyan, Ara; Chaushev, Borislav; Dancheva, Zhivka

    2012-01-01

    As fluorine-18-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( (18)F-FDG PET/CT) is gaining wider availability, more and more patients with malignancies undergo whole body PET/CT, mostly to assess tumor spread in the rest of the body, but not in the brain. Brain is a common site of metastatic spread in patients with solid extracranial tumors. Gold standard in the diagnosis of brain metastases remains magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However MRI is not routinely indicated and is not available for all cancer patients. Fluorine-18-FDG PET is considered as having poor sensitivity in detecting brain metastases, but this may not be true for PET/CT. The aim of our study was to assess the value of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of brain metastases found by whole body scan including the brain, in patients with solid extracranial neoplasms. A total of 2502 patients with solid extracranial neoplasms were studied. All patients underwent a routine whole body (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan with the whole brain included in the scanned field. Patients with known or suspected brain metastases were preliminary excluded from the study. Hypermetabolic and ring-like brain lesions on the PET scan were considered as metastases. Lesions with CT characteristics of brain metastases were regarded as such irrespective of their metabolic pattern. Lesions in doubt were verified by MRI during first testing or on follow-up or by operation. Our results showed that brain lesions, indicative of and verified to be metastases were detected in 25 out of the 2502 patients (1%), with lung cancer being the most common primary. Twenty three out of these 25 patients had no neurological symptoms by the time of the scan. The detection rate of brain metastases was relatively low, but information was obtained with a minimum increase of radiation burden. In conclusion, whole body (18)F-FDG PET/CT detected brain metastases in 1% of the patients if brain was included in the scanned field. Brain

  9. Omega-3 fatty acids decreases oxidative stress, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-1 beta in hyperthyroidism-induced hepatic dysfunction rat model.

    PubMed

    Gomaa, Asmaa M S; Abd El-Aziz, Ebtihal A

    2016-12-01

    Hyperthyroidism is associated with abnormalities of the liver. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially their long-chain forms: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have beneficial health effects. The objectives of the present study were to assess hyperthyroidism-induced hepatic dysfunction in adult male rats and to evaluate the ameliorative effects of omega-3 on hyperthyroidism-induced hepatic dysfunction and the underlying mechanisms. Twenty four adult male rats were randomly divided into three equal groups; control group which received water for 6 weeks, hyperthyroid group which received L-thyroxine orally for 6 weeks and hyperthyroid omega-3 treated group which received L-thyroxine for 2 weeks and then co-treated with L-thyroxine and omega-3 oral compound containing 18% of EPA and 12% of DHA for 4 weeks. Hyperthyroid omega-3 treated group showed significantly increased final body weight and body weight gain, decreased liver weight to body weight ratio, decreased serum triiodo-l-thyronine level, increased serum thyroid stimulating hormone level, decreased serum levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, increased hepatic levels of total antioxidant capacity and decreased hepatic levels of total peroxide and interleukin-1 beta when compared with the hyperthyroid group. Furthermore, histopathological studies revealed also marked improvement. We concluded that omega-3 had encouraging therapeutic effects against hyperthyroidism-induced hepatic dysfunction attributable to more than one mechanism: antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects.

  10. Protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) functions as a critical regulator in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced hepatic insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongye; Huang, Xiuqing; Jiao, Juan; Zhang, Hangxiang; Liu, Jin; Qin, Weiwei; Meng, Xiangyu; Shen, Tao; Lin, Yajun; Chu, Jiaojiao; Li, Jian

    2015-12-15

    Protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) was shown to participate in multiple cellular processes, including DNA damage response, cell cycle and embryo development. Recent studies demonstrated a looming role of PP4 in glucose metabolism. However, whether PP4 is involved in hepatic insulin resistance remains poorly understood. The objective of this study was to estimate the role of PP4 in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced hepatic insulin resistance. db/db mice and TNF-α-treated C57BL/6J mice were used as hepatic insulin resistance animal models. In vitro models were established in both HepG2 cells and primary hepatocytes by TNF-α treatment. We found that increased expression and activity of PP4 occurred in the livers of db/db mice and TNF-α-induced hepatic insulin resistance both in vitro and in vivo. Actually, PP4 silencing and suppression of PP4 activity ameliorated TNF-α-induced hepatic insulin resistance, whereas over-expression of PP4 caused insulin resistance. We then further investigated the prodiabetic mechanism of PP4 in TNF-α-induced insulin resistance. We found that PP4 formed a complex with IRS-1 to promote phosphorylation of IRS-1 on serine 307 via JNK activation and reduce the expression of IRS-1. Thus, PP4 is an important regulator in inflammatory related insulin resistance.

  11. Preoperative Prediction of Cervical Lymph Node Metastasis Using Primary Tumor SUVmax on 18F-FDG PET/CT in Patients with Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji-hoon; Kim, Choon-Young; Son, Seung Hyun; Kim, Do-Hoon; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang-Woo; Lee, Jaetae; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the current study was to evaluate the value of preoperative 18F-FDG (FDG) PET/CT in predicting cervical lymph node (LN) metastasis in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Methods One hundred and ninety-three newly diagnosed PTC patients (M: F = 25:168, age = 46.8 ± 12.2) who had undergone pretreatment FDG PET/CT and had neck node dissection were included in this study. The FDG avidity of the primary tumor and the SUVmax of the primary tumor (pSUVmax) were analyzed for prediction of LN metastasis. Detectability by ultrasonography (US) and FDG PET/CT for cervical LN metastasis were also assessed and compared with the pSUVmax. Results The FDG avidity of the primary tumor was identified in 118 patients (FDG avid group: 61.0%, M: F = 16:102, age 47.0 ± 12.7 years) and pSUVmax ranged from 1.3 to 35.6 (median 4.6) in the FDG avid group. The tumor size in the FDG avid group was bigger and there was a higher incidence of LN metastasis compared to the FDG non-avid group (0.93 vs. 0.59 cm, p <0.001 and 49.2 vs. 33.3%, p <0.05). In the FDG avid group, patients with LN metastasis had higher pSUVmax than patients without LN metastasis (8.7 ± 8.3 vs. 5.7 ± 5.1, p <0.001). The incidence of central LN metastasis in patients with a pSUVmax >4.6 was 54%; however, the detectability of central LN metastasis by US and FDG PET/CT were 10.3% and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusion A high FDG avidity of the primary tumor was related to LN metastasis in PTC patients. Therefore, patients with a high pSUVmax should be cautiously assessed for LN metastasis and might need a more comprehensive surgical approach. PMID:26636824

  12. The LATS2 tumor suppressor inhibits SREBP and suppresses hepatic cholesterol accumulation.

    PubMed

    Aylon, Yael; Gershoni, Anat; Rotkopf, Ron; Biton, Inbal E; Porat, Ziv; Koh, Anna P; Sun, Xiaochen; Lee, Youngmin; Fiel, Maria-Isabel; Hoshida, Yujin; Friedman, Scott L; Johnson, Randy L; Oren, Moshe

    2016-04-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is a major regulator of organ size. In the liver, Hippo pathway deregulation promotes hyperplasia and hepatocellular carcinoma primarily through hyperactivation of its downstream effector, YAP. The LATS2 tumor suppressor is a core member of the Hippo pathway. A screen for LATS2-interacting proteins in liver-derived cells identified the transcription factor SREBP2, master regulator of cholesterol homeostasis. LATS2 down-regulation caused SREBP activation and accumulation of excessive cholesterol. Likewise, mice harboring liver-specific Lats2 conditional knockout (Lats2-CKO) displayed constitutive SREBP activation and overexpressed SREBP target genes and developed spontaneous fatty liver disease. Interestingly, the impact of LATS2 depletion on SREBP-mediated transcription was clearly distinct from that of YAP overexpression. When challenged with excess dietary cholesterol, Lats2-CKO mice manifested more severe liver damage than wild-type mice. Surprisingly, apoptosis, inflammation, and fibrosis were actually attenuated relative to wild-type mice, in association with impaired p53 activation. Subsequently, Lats2-CKO mice failed to recover effectively from cholesterol-induced damage upon return to a normal diet. Additionally, decreased LATS2 mRNA in association with increased SREBP target gene expression was observed in a subset of human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease cases. Together, these findings further highlight the tight links between tumor suppressors and metabolic homeostasis.

  13. The LATS2 tumor suppressor inhibits SREBP and suppresses hepatic cholesterol accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Aylon, Yael; Gershoni, Anat; Rotkopf, Ron; Biton, Inbal E.; Porat, Ziv; Koh, Anna P.; Sun, Xiaochen; Lee, Youngmin; Fiel, Maria-Isabel; Hoshida, Yujin; Friedman, Scott L.; Johnson, Randy L.; Oren, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is a major regulator of organ size. In the liver, Hippo pathway deregulation promotes hyperplasia and hepatocellular carcinoma primarily through hyperactivation of its downstream effector, YAP. The LATS2 tumor suppressor is a core member of the Hippo pathway. A screen for LATS2-interacting proteins in liver-derived cells identified the transcription factor SREBP2, master regulator of cholesterol homeostasis. LATS2 down-regulation caused SREBP activation and accumulation of excessive cholesterol. Likewise, mice harboring liver-specific Lats2 conditional knockout (Lats2-CKO) displayed constitutive SREBP activation and overexpressed SREBP target genes and developed spontaneous fatty liver disease. Interestingly, the impact of LATS2 depletion on SREBP-mediated transcription was clearly distinct from that of YAP overexpression. When challenged with excess dietary cholesterol, Lats2-CKO mice manifested more severe liver damage than wild-type mice. Surprisingly, apoptosis, inflammation, and fibrosis were actually attenuated relative to wild-type mice, in association with impaired p53 activation. Subsequently, Lats2-CKO mice failed to recover effectively from cholesterol-induced damage upon return to a normal diet. Additionally, decreased LATS2 mRNA in association with increased SREBP target gene expression was observed in a subset of human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease cases. Together, these findings further highlight the tight links between tumor suppressors and metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27013235

  14. From the RSNA refresher courses: CT angiography: clinical applications in the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Fishman, E K

    2001-10-01

    The development of spiral computed tomography (CT) and subsequently multidetector CT has provided unparalleled opportunities for advancement of CT technology and clinical applications. One of the most influential developments has been CT angiography, which is the use of thin-section CT combined with postprocessing of imaging data by using a variety of three-dimensional reconstruction techniques to produce vascular maps that equal or exceed those provided by classic angiography in many applications. In the evaluation of pancreatic disease, the use of multidetector CT angiography enables the radiologist to produce vascular maps that clearly show tumor invasion of vasculature and the relationship of vessels to pancreatic masses. Anatomic areas for which the three-dimensional display is especially helpful include the confluence of the portal vein and the superior mesenteric vein and the more distal portions of the portal vein. Preliminary studies indicate that CT angiography may prove beneficial in the evaluation of ischemic bowel and active Crohn disease. CT angiography has proved extremely valuable for applications such as preoperative planning for hepatic resection, preoperative evaluation and planning for liver transplantation, pretreatment planning for patients considered for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, and pretreatment evaluation of portal vein patency for a variety of reasons. CT angiography can also provide supplemental information in patients with cirrhosis, upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding due to varices, or primary extrahepatic neoplasms.

  15. [Detection of second tumors in 11C-choline PET/CT studies performed due to biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    García, J R; Ponce, A; Canales, M; Ayuso, J; Moragas, M; Soler, M

    2014-01-01

    Early localization of biochemical recurrence in patients after radical treatment of prostate cancer is a widely accepted clinical indication of (11)C-choline PET/CT. Its widespread clinical use has prompted the depiction of incidentalomas, unusual sites of metastatic lesions, as well as false positive and negative cases. Over the last 6 years, a total of 454 (11)C-choline PET/CT studies have been performed in our institution to locate biochemical recurrence of patients with prostate cancer. With these studies, a second neoplasm has been found in 7 patients (1.54%): 3 lung, 2 colorectal, 1 esophagus and 1 esophageal junction, respectively. Although the clinical usefulness of this technique for detecting cancer lesions other than prostate origin is known for those patients who undergo this technique in the accepted indication, the diagnosis of a second tumor has a significant impact on their therapeutic management.

  16. 18F-FMISO PET/CT Visualization of Tumor Hypoxia in Patients with Chordoma of the Mobile and Sacrococcygeal Spine

    PubMed Central

    Cheney, Matthew D.; Chen, Yen-Lin; Lim, Ruth; Winrich, Barbara K.; Grosu, Anca L.; Trofimov, Alexei V.; Depauw, Nicolas; Shih, Helen A.; Schwab, Joseph H.; Hornicek, Francis J.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Local recurrence (LR) rates in chordoma patients following surgery ± radiation therapy (RT) or definitive RT are high. Tumor hypoxia is associated with radioresistance and LR. In this prospective study, [18F]-FMISO-PET/CT detected hypoxic tumor sub-volumes in 60% of patients with chordoma of the mobile and sacrococcygeal spine, the majority of which were sufficiently large to allow an RT boost. Further study of hypoxia-directed, dose-escalated RT, particularly in patients at high risk for LR, is warranted. Purpose/Objectives Local recurrence (LR) rates in chordoma patients following surgery ± radiation therapy (RT) or definitive RT are high. Tumor hypoxia is associated with radioresistance and LR. [18F] fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FMISO-PET/CT) can visualize skull base chordoma hypoxic sub-volumes (HSV) and feasibility of hypoxia-directed RT dose-escalation has been demonstrated in head and neck cancer. This study investigates FMISO-PET/CT detection of targetable HSVs in chordoma of the mobile or sacrococcygeal spine. Methods and Materials A prospective, pilot study of 20 patients with primary or locally recurrent chordoma of the mobile or sacrococcygeal spine treated with proton or combined proton/photon RT ± surgery was completed. FMISO-PET/CT was performed prior to RT and after 19.8-34.2 GyRBE (relative biologic effectiveness). Gross tumor volumes (GTV) were delineated and HSVs defined including voxels with standardized uptake values ≥ 1.4 times the muscle mean. Clinical characteristics and treatments received were compared between patients with and without HSVs. Results FMISO-PET/CT detected HSVs in 12 (60%; 12/20) patients. Baseline and interval HSV spatial concordance varied (0-94%). Eight HSVs were sufficiently large (≥ 5cc) to potentially allow an intensity modulated proton therapy boost. Patients with HSVs had significantly larger GTVs (median =410.0 cc vs. 63.4 cc; p=0.02) and were significantly more

  17. Optical Imaging of Mesenchymal Epithelial Transition Factor (MET) for Enhanced Detection and Characterization of Primary and Metastatic Hepatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, Shadi A.; Heidari, Pedram; Kim, Sun A.; Ogino, Shuji; Mahmood, Umar

    2016-01-01

    specific and can be blocked when co-injected with unlabeled peptide; for instance the epifluorescence TBR is reduced from 13.5 ± 1.2 to 1.7 ± 0.3 (p < 0.05) in HT-29 and from 5.3 ± 0.8 to 1.4 ± 0.2 (p < 0.05) in Huh-7 xenografts after co-injection with unlabeled peptides. Biodistribution studies showed predominantly renal clearance of the probe. Conclusion: Optical imaging of MET resulted in high TBR in animal models of primary and metastatic hepatic tumors suggesting its utility for procedural guidance. PMID:27698938

  18. Survival outcomes of hepatic resection compared with transarterial chemoembolization or sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Min; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Lee, Yoo Jin; Choi, Wang Yong; Choi, Sei Myong; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok; Kang, Koo Jeong; Kim, Young Hwan; Chauhan, Anil Kumar; Park, Soo Young; Tak, Won Young; Kweon, Young Oh; Kim, Byung Seok; Lee, Chang Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Treating hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) remains controversial. We compared the outcomes of hepatic resection (HR), transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), and sorafenib therapy as treatments for HCC with PVTT. Methods: Patients diagnosed as HCC with PVTT between January 2000 and December 2011 who received treatment with sorafenib, HR, or TACE were included. Patients with main PVTT, superior mesenteric vein tumor thrombosis, or Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) class C were excluded. The records of 172 patients were analyzed retrospectively. HR, TACE, and sorafenib treatment were performed is 40, 80, and 52 patients respectively. PVTT was classified as either involving the segmental branch (type I) or extending to involve the right or left portal vein (type II). Results: The median survival time was significantly longer in the HR group (19.9 months) than in the TACE and sorafenib groups (6.6 and 6.2 months, respectively; both p<0.001), and did not differ significantly between the latter two groups (p=0.698). Among patients with CTP class A, type I PVTT or unilobar-involved HCC, the median survival time was longer in the HR group than in the TACE and sorafenib groups (p=0.006). In univariate analyses, the initial treatment method, tumor size, PVTT type, involved lobe, CTP class, and presence of cirrhosis or ascites were correlated with overall survival. The significant prognostic factors for overall survival in Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis were initial treatment method (HR vs. TACE: hazard ratio=1.750, p=0.036; HR vs. sorafenib: hazard ratio=2.262, p=0.006), involved lobe (hazard ratio=1.705, p=0.008), PVTT type (hazard ratio=1.617, p=0.013), and CTP class (hazard ratio=1.712, p=0.012). Conclusions: Compared with TACE or sorafenib, HR may prolong the survival of patients with HCC in cases of CTP class A, type I PVTT or unilobar-involved HCC. PMID:27044767

  19. Percutaneous electrochemotherapy in the treatment of portal vein tumor thrombosis at hepatic hilum in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhosis: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Tarantino, Luciano; Busto, Giuseppina; Nasto, Aurelio; Fristachi, Raffaele; Cacace, Luigi; Talamo, Maria; Accardo, Catello; Bortone, Sara; Gallo, Paolo; Tarantino, Paolo; Nasto, Riccardo Aurelio; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Ambrosino, Pasquale

    2017-01-01

    AIM To treated with electrochemotherapy (ECT) a prospective case series of patients with liver cirrhosis and Vp3-Vp4- portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), in order to evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of this new non thermal ablative technique in those patients. METHODS Six patients (5 males and 1 female), aged 61-85 years (mean age, 70 years), four in Child-Pugh A and two in Child-Pugh B class, entered our study series. All patients were studied with three-phase computed tomography (CT), contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy of the thrombus before ECT. All patients underwent ECT treatment (Cliniporator Vitae®, IGEA SpA, Carpi, Modena, Italy) of Vp3-Vp4 PVTT in a single session. At the end of the procedure a post-treatment biopsy of the thrombus was performed. Scheduled follow-up in all patients entailed: CEUS within 24 h after treatment; triphasic contrast-enhanced CT and CEUS at 3 mo after treatment and every six months thereafter. RESULTS Post-treatment CEUS showed complete absence of enhancement of the treated thrombus in all cases. Post-treatment biopsy showed apoptosis and necrosis of tumor cells in all cases. The follow-up ranged from 9 to 20 mo (median, 14 mo). In 2 patients, the follow-up CT and CEUS demonstrated complete patency of the treated portal vein. Other 3 patients showed a persistent avascular non-tumoral shrinked thrombus at CEUS and CT during follow-up. No local recurrence was observed at follow-up CT and CEUS in 5/6 patients. One patient was lost to follow-up because of death from gastrointestinal hemorrage 5 wk after ECT. CONCLUSION In patients with cirrhosis, ECT seems effective and safe for curative treatment of Vp3-Vp4 PVTT from HCC. PMID:28223736

  20. The Effect of Dietary Glycine on the Hepatic Tumor Promoting Activity of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bunaciu, Rodica Petruta; Tharappel, Job C.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Korwel, Izabela; Robertson, Larry W.; Srinivasan, Cidambi; Spear, Brett T.; Glauert, Howard P.

    2007-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitious lipophilic environmental pollutants. Some of the PCB congeners and mixtures of congeners have tumor promoting activity in rat liver. The mechanism of their activity is not fully understood and is likely to be multifactorial. The aim of this study was to investigate if the resident liver macrophages, Kupffer cells, are important in the promoting activity of PCBs. The hypothesis of this study was that the inhibition of Kupffer cell activity would inhibit hepatic tumor promotion by PCBs in rats. To test our hypothesis, we studied the effects of Kupffer cell inhibition by dietary glycine (an inhibitor of Kupffer cell secretory activity) in a rat two-stage hepatocarcinogenesis model using 2,2’,4,4’,5,5’-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB-153, a non-dioxin-like PCB) or 3,3’,4,4’-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB-77, a dioxin-like PCB) as promoters. Diethylnitrosamine (DEN, 150 mg/kg) was administered to female Sprague Dawley rats, which were then placed on an unrefined diet containing 5% glycine (or casein as nitrogen control) starting two weeks after DEN administration. On the third day after starting the diets, rats received PCB-77 (300 μmol/kg), PCB-153 (300 μmol/kg), or corn oil by i.p. injection. The rats received a total of 4 PCB injections, administered every 14 days. The rats were euthanized on the 10th day after the last PCB injection, and the formation of altered hepatic foci expressing placental glutathione S-transferase (PGST) and the rate of DNA synthesis in these foci and in the normal liver tissue were determined. Glycine did not significantly affect foci number or volume. PCB-153 did not significantly increase the focal volume, but increased the number of foci per liver, but only in the rats not fed glycine; PCB-77 increased both the foci number and their volume in both glycine-fed and control rats. Glycine did not alter the PCB content of the liver, but did increase the activity of 7-benzyloxyresorufin O

  1. A new magnetic nanocapsule containing 5-fluorouracil: in vivo drug release, anti-tumor, and pro-apoptotic effects on CT26 cells allograft model.

    PubMed

    Shakeri-Zadeh, Ali; Shiran, Mohammad-Bagher; Khoee, Sepideh; Sharifi, Ali Mohammad; Ghaznavi, Habib; Khoei, Samideh

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to create an optimized method for preparation of 5-fluorouracil-loaded magnetic poly lactic-co-glycolic acid nanocapsules and to investigate its potential as multifunctional carriers to deliver therapeutic agents for tumor-targeted therapies. The in vitro release of the newly synthesized 5-fluorouracil-loaded poly lactic-co-glycolic acid magnetic nanocapsules was investigated in phosphate-buffered saline medium using the dialysis method. In vivo release studies of the magnetic nanocapsules were performed in rabbits. Finally, the targeting properties, anti-tumor, and pro-apoptotic effects of this new magnetic nanocapsule on CT26 cells allograft model were studied. The effective diameter of nanocapsules was 67.2 nm. In vivo release investigations showed that 5-fluorouracil has a sustained release profile, prolonged lifetime in the rabbit plasma, and increased tissue appetency when loaded into the magnetic nanocapsule. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed that the magnetic nanocapsules were successfully targeted to the tumor. Additionally, the anti-tumor studies revealed that the targeted therapy with magnetic nanocapsules containing 5-fluorouracil effectively inhibits the growth of tumors compared with 5-fluorouracil alone (P < 0.01). The present study demonstrates that this new magnetic nanocapsule can be considered a new nanotechnology-based cancer chemotherapy agent in vivo.

  2. Automated Voxel-Based Analysis of Volumetric Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT Data Improves Measurement of Serial Changes in Tumor Vascular Biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Coolens, Catherine; Driscoll, Brandon; Chung, Caroline; Shek, Tina; Gorjizadeh, Alborz; Ménard, Cynthia; Jaffray, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Development of perfusion imaging as a biomarker requires more robust methodologies for quantification of tumor physiology that allow assessment of volumetric tumor heterogeneity over time. This study proposes a parametric method for automatically analyzing perfused tissue from volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) computed tomography (CT) scans and assesses whether this 4-dimensional (4D) DCE approach is more robust and accurate than conventional, region-of-interest (ROI)-based CT methods in quantifying tumor perfusion with preliminary evaluation in metastatic brain cancer. Methods and Materials: Functional parameter reproducibility and analysis of sensitivity to imaging resolution and arterial input function were evaluated in image sets acquired from a 320-slice CT with a controlled flow phantom and patients with brain metastases, whose treatments were planned for stereotactic radiation surgery and who consented to a research ethics board-approved prospective imaging biomarker study. A voxel-based temporal dynamic analysis (TDA) methodology was used at baseline, at day 7, and at day 20 after treatment. The ability to detect changes in kinetic parameter maps in clinical data sets was investigated for both 4D TDA and conventional 2D ROI-based analysis methods. Results: A total of 7 brain metastases in 3 patients were evaluated over the 3 time points. The 4D TDA method showed improved spatial efficacy and accuracy of perfusion parameters compared to ROI-based DCE analysis (P<.005), with a reproducibility error of less than 2% when tested with DCE phantom data. Clinically, changes in transfer constant from the blood plasma into the extracellular extravascular space (K{sub trans}) were seen when using TDA, with substantially smaller errors than the 2D method on both day 7 post radiation surgery (±13%; P<.05) and by day 20 (±12%; P<.04). Standard methods showed a decrease in K{sub trans} but with large uncertainty (111.6 ± 150.5) %. Conclusions

  3. Experimental validation of heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on respiratory-averaged CT images in stereotactic body radiotherapy for moving tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Miyabe, Yuki; Matsuo, Yukinori; Kamomae, Takeshi; Nakata, Manabu; Yano, Shinsuke; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to experimentally assess the validity of heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on respiratory-averaged computed tomography (RACT) images in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for moving tumors. Four-dimensional computed tomography (CT) data were acquired while a dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a solitary target moved. Motion pattern was based on cos (t) with a constant respiration period of 4.0 sec along the longitudinal axis of the CT couch. The extent of motion (A{sub 1}) was set in the range of 0.0-12.0 mm at 3.0-mm intervals. Treatment planning with the heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription was designed on RACT images. A new commercially available Monte Carlo algorithm of well-commissioned 6-MV photon beam was used for dose calculation. Dosimetric effects of intrafractional tumor motion were then investigated experimentally under the same conditions as 4D CT simulation using the dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom, films, and an ionization chamber. The passing rate of {gamma} index was 98.18%, with the criteria of 3 mm/3%. The dose error between the planned and the measured isocenter dose in moving condition was within {+-} 0.7%. From the dose area histograms on the film, the mean {+-} standard deviation of the dose covering 100% of the cross section of the target was 102.32 {+-} 1.20% (range, 100.59-103.49%). By contrast, the irradiated areas receiving more than 95% dose for A{sub 1} = 12 mm were 1.46 and 1.33 times larger than those for A{sub 1} = 0 mm in the coronal and sagittal planes, respectively. This phantom study demonstrated that the cross section of the target received 100% dose under moving conditions in both the coronal and sagittal planes, suggesting that the heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on RACT images is acceptable in SBRT for moving tumors.

  4. PSMA Expression in Tumor Neovasculature Endothelial Cells of Follicular Thyroid Adenoma as Identified by Molecular Imaging Using 68Ga-PSMA Ligand PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Derlin, Thorsten; Kreipe, Hans-Heinrich; Schumacher, Udo; Soudah, Bisharah

    2017-03-01

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is expressed by both prostate cancer and other neoplasms. We report the case of a 65-year-old man with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer who underwent Ga-PSMA ligand PET/CT for restaging of disease. Ga-PSMA ligand accumulation was noted in a thyroid lesion, suspicious for thyroid malignancy on complementary ultrasound. Subsequent resection and histopathological analysis showed follicular thyroid adenoma with PSMA expression in tumor neovasculature endothelial cells, but not in thyroid epithelial cells. It is important to be aware that both malignant and benign thyroid neoplasms may show PSMA expression to avoid misinterpretation.

  5. Commissioning and clinical implementation of a sliding gantry CT scanner installed in an existing treatment room and early clinical experience for precise tumor localization.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chee-Wai; Wong, James; Grimm, Lisa; Chow, Michael; Uematsu, Minoru; Fung, Albert

    2003-06-01

    The primary objective of the present study is to demonstrate that a unique computed tomography (CT)-linear accelerator combination can be used to reduce uncertainties caused by organ motion and setup inaccuracy. The acceptance, commissioning, and clinical implementation of a sliding gantry CT scanner installed in an existing linear accelerator room are reported in this paper. A Siemens CT scanner was installed directly opposite to an existing accelerator. The scanner is movable on a pair of horizontal rails mounted parallel to the longitudinal axis of the treatment couch replaced with a carbon fiber tabletop. Acceptance and commissioning of the CT scanner were verified with phantom studies. For clinical implementation, quality assurance (QA) procedures have been instituted to ensure the integrity of the CT gantry axis alignment and the accuracy of its movement using a phantom designed in house. A clinical example employing the CT-Linac combination to correct the isocenter positioning caused by organ motion and setup inaccuracy was presented for a prostate irradiation. Dose calculations were performed to study the effects on tumor coverage without the adjustments of the isocenter. A summary of the isocenter adjustments for the first 30 patients is also presented. The geometric accuracy of the CT scanner is < or =1 mm. An isocenter deviation of > or =2 mm from the original plan can be detected. For the clinical example of a prostate patient, the average movement of the prostate gland was found to be approximately 3mm in the anterior-posterior (AP/PA) direction and 5 mm in the cephalic-caudal direction. Variations in the isocenter position may result in underdosage of the PTV if correction is not made for the change in the isocenter position. Our experience with the first 30 patients indicates that while the left-right adjustment of the isocenter is minimal, in the AP/PA direction, about 33% of treatments required an adjustment of 3-5 mm, and about 18% required a 5

  6. A Phase II Comparative Study of Gross Tumor Volume Definition With or Without PET/CT Fusion in Dosimetric Planning for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Primary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Jeffrey; Bae, Kyounghwa; Choi, Noah; Forster, Ken; Siegel, Barry A.; Brunetti, Jacqueline; Purdy, James; Faria, Sergio; Vu, Toni; Thorstad, Wade; Choy, Hak

    2012-01-01

    Background: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515 is a Phase II prospective trial designed to quantify the impact of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) compared with CT alone on radiation treatment plans (RTPs) and to determine the rate of elective nodal failure for PET/CT-derived volumes. Methods: Each enrolled patient underwent definitive radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer ({>=}60 Gy) and had two RTP datasets generated: gross tumor volume (GTV) derived with CT alone and with PET/CT. Patients received treatment using the PET/CT-derived plan. The primary end point, the impact of PET/CT fusion on treatment plans was measured by differences of the following variables for each patient: GTV, number of involved nodes, nodal station, mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung exceeding 20 Gy (V20), and mean esophageal dose (MED). Regional failure rate was a secondary end point. The nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used with Bonferroni adjustment for an overall significance level of 0.05. Results: RTOG 0515 accrued 52 patients, 47 of whom are evaluable. The follow-up time for all patients is 12.9 months (2.7-22.2). Tumor staging was as follows: II = 6%; IIIA = 40%; and IIIB = 54%. The GTV was statistically significantly smaller for PET/CT-derived volumes (98.7 vs. 86.2 mL; p < 0.0001). MLDs for PET/CT plans were slightly lower (19 vs. 17.8 Gy; p = 0.06). There was no significant difference in the number of involved nodes (2.1 vs. 2.4), V20 (32% vs. 30.8%), or MED (28.7 vs. 27.1 Gy). Nodal contours were altered by PET/CT for 51% of patients. One patient (2%) has developed an elective nodal failure. Conclusions: PET/CT-derived tumor volumes were smaller than those derived by CT alone. PET/CT changed nodal GTV contours in 51% of patients. The elective nodal failure rate for GTVs derived by PET/CT is quite low, supporting the RTOG standard of limiting the target volume to the primary tumor and involved nodes.

  7. Impact of Reconstruction Algorithms on CT Radiomic Features of Pulmonary Tumors: Analysis of Intra- and Inter-Reader Variability and Inter-Reconstruction Algorithm Variability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyungjin; Park, Chang Min; Lee, Myunghee; Park, Sang Joon; Song, Yong Sub; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Hwang, Eui Jin; Goo, Jin Mo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the impact of reconstruction algorithms on CT radiomic features of pulmonary tumors and to reveal and compare the intra- and inter-reader and inter-reconstruction algorithm variability of each feature. Methods Forty-two patients (M:F = 19:23; mean age, 60.43±10.56 years) with 42 pulmonary tumors (22.56±8.51mm) underwent contrast-enhanced CT scans, which were reconstructed with filtered back projection and commercial iterative reconstruction algorithm (level 3 and 5). Two readers independently segmented the whole tumor volume. Fifteen radiomic features were extracted and compared among reconstruction algorithms. Intra- and inter-reader variability and inter-reconstruction algorithm variability were calculated using coefficients of variation (CVs) and then compared. Results Among the 15 features, 5 first-order tumor intensity features and 4 gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM)-based features showed significant differences (p<0.05) among reconstruction algorithms. As for the variability, effective diameter, sphericity, entropy, and GLCM entropy were the most robust features (CV≤5%). Inter-reader variability was larger than intra-reader or inter-reconstruction algorithm variability in 9 features. However, for entropy, homogeneity, and 4 GLCM-based features, inter-reconstruction algorithm variability was significantly greater than inter-reader variability (p<0.013). Conclusions Most of the radiomic features were significantly affected by the reconstruction algorithms. Inter-reconstruction algorithm variability was greater than inter-reader variability for entropy, homogeneity, and GLCM-based features. PMID:27741289

  8. Impact of 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT on the Management of Neuroendocrine Tumors: The Referring Physician’s Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Ken; Czernin, Johannes; Wolin, Edward M.; Gupta, Pawan; Barrio, Martin; Gutierrez, Antonio; Schiepers, Christiaan; Mosessian, Sherly; Phelps, Michael E.; Allen-Auerbach, Martin S.

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor imaging with 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT (DOTATATE) is increasingly used for managing patients with neuroendocrine tumors. The objective of this study was to determine referring physicians’ perspectives on the impact of DOTATATE on the management of neuroendocrine tumors. Methods A set of 2 questionnaires (pre-PET and post-PET) was sent to the referring physicians of 100 consecutive patients with known or suspected neuroendocrine tumors, who were evaluated with DOTATATE. Questionnaires on 88 patients were returned (response rate, 88%). Referring physicians categorized the DOTATATE findings on the basis of the written PET reports as negative, positive, or equivocal for disease. The likelihood for metastatic disease was scored as low, moderate, or high. The intended management before and changes as a consequence of the PET study were indicated. Results The indications for PET/CT were initial and subsequent treatment strategy assessments in 14% and 86% of patients, respectively. Referring physicians reported that DOTATATE led to a change in suspicion for metastatic disease in 21 patients (24%; increased and decreased suspicion in 9 [10%] and 12 [14%] patients, respectively). Intended management changes were reported in 53 of 88 (60%) patients. Twenty patients (23%) scheduled to undergo chemotherapy were switched to treatments without chemotherapy, and 6 (7%) were switched from watch-and-wait to other treatment strategies. Conversely, 5 patients (6%) were switched from their initial treatment strategy to watch-and-wait. Conclusion This survey of referring physicians demonstrates a substantial impact of DOTATATE on the intended management of patients with neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:25500825

  9. Human Dosimetry and Preliminary Tumor Distribution of (superscript)18F-Fluoropaclitaxel in Healthy Volunteers and Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Patients Using PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kurdziel, K.A.; Logan, J.; Kurdziel, K.A.; Kalen, J.D.; Hirsch, J.I.; Wilson, J.D.; Bear, H.D.; Logan, J.; McCumisky, J.; Moorman-Sykes, K.; Adler, S.; Choyke, P.L.

    2011-08-17

    {sup 18}F-fluoropaclitaxel is a radiolabeled form of paclitaxel, a widely used chemotherapy agent. Preclinical data suggest that {sup 18}F-fluoropaclitaxel may be a reasonable surrogate for measuring the uptake of paclitaxel. As a substrate of P-glycoprotein, a drug efflux pump associated with multidrug resistance, {sup 18}F-fluoropaclitaxel may also be useful in identifying multidrug resistance and predicting tumor response for drugs other than paclitaxel. After informed consent was obtained, 3 healthy volunteers and 3 patients with untreated breast cancer (neoadjuvant chemotherapy candidates, tumor size > 2 cm) received an intravenous infusion of {sup 18}F-fluoropaclitaxel and then underwent PET/CT. Healthy volunteers underwent serial whole-body imaging over an approximately 3-h interval, and organ {sup 18}F residence times were determined from the time-activity curves uncorrected for decay to determine dosimetry. Radiation dose estimates were calculated using OLINDA/EXM software. For breast cancer patients, dynamic imaging of the primary tumor was performed for 60 min, followed by static whole-body scans at 1 and 2 h after injection. Dosimetry calculations showed that the gallbladder received the highest dose (229.50 {mu}Gy/MBq [0.849 rad/mCi]), followed by the small and large intestines (161.26 {mu}Gy/MBq [0.597 rad/mCi] and 184.59 {mu}Gy/MBq [0.683 rad/mCi]). The resultant effective dose was 28.79 {mu}Gy/MBq (0.107 rem/mCi). At approximately 1 h after injection, an average of 42% of the decay-corrected activity was in the gastrointestinal system, with a mean of 0.01% in the tumor. All 3 breast cancer patients showed retention of {sup 18}F-fluoropaclitaxel and ultimately demonstrated a complete pathologic response (no invasive cancer in the breast or axillary nodes) to chemotherapy that included a taxane (either paclitaxel or docetaxel) at surgical resection. The tumor-to-background ratio increased with time to a maximum of 7.7 at 20 min. This study

  10. Computationally efficient particle release map determination for direct tumor-targeting in a representative hepatic artery system.

    PubMed

    Childress, E M; Kleinstreuer, C

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of a novel direct tumor-targeting technique requires a computer modeling stage to generate particle release maps (PRMs) which allow for optimal catheter positioning and selection of best injection intervals for drug-particles. This simulation task for a patient-specific PRM may require excessive computational resources and a relatively long turn-around time for a fully transient analysis. Hence, steady-state conditions were sought which generates PRMs equivalent to the pulsatile arterial flow environment. Fluid-particle transport in a representative hepatic artery system was simulated under fully transient and steady-state flow conditions and their corresponding PRMs were analyzed and compared. Comparisons of the transient PRMs from ten equal intervals of the cardiac pulse revealed that the diastolic phase produced relatively constant PRMs due to its semisteady flow conditions. Furthermore, steady-state PRMs, which best matched the transient particle release maps, were found for each interval and over the entire cardiac pulse. From these comparisons, the flow rate and outlet pressure differences proved to be important parameters for estimating the PRMs. The computational times of the fully transient and steady simulations differed greatly, i.e., about 10 days versus 0.5 to 1 h, respectively. The time-averaged scenario may provide the best steady conditions for estimating the transient particle release maps. However, given the considerable changes in the PRMs due to the accelerating and decelerating phases of the cardiac cycle, it may be better to model several steady scenarios, which encompass the wide range of flows and pressures experienced by the arterial system in order to observe how the PRMs may change throughout the pulse. While adding more computation time, this method is still significantly faster than running the full transient case. Finally, while the best steady PRMs provide a qualitative guide for best catheter placement, the final

  11. Apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha in rat hepatocyte cell lines expressing hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Guilhot, S.; Miller, T.; Cornman, G.; Isom, H. C.

    1996-01-01

    Three well differentiated SV40-immortalized rat hepatocyte cell lines, CWSV1, CWSV2, and CWSV14, and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)-producing cell lines derived from them were examined for sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. CWSV1, CWSV2, and CWSV14 cells were co-transfected with a DNA construct containing a dimer of the HBV genome and the neo gene and selected in G418 to generate stable cell lines. Characterization of these cell lines indicated that they contain integrated HBV DNA, contain low molecular weight HBV DNA compatible with the presence of HBV replication intermediates, express HBV transcripts, and produce HBV proteins. The viability of CWSV1, CWSV2, and CWSV2 cells was not significantly altered when they were treated with TNF-alpha at concentrations as high as 20,000 U/ml. The HBV-expressing CWSV1 cell line, SV1di36, and the HBV-expressing CWSV14 cell line, SV14di208, were also not killed when treated with TNF-alpha. However, the HBV-expressing CWSV2 cell line, SV2di366, was extensively killed when treated with TNF-alpha at concentrations ranging from 200 to 20,000 U/ml. Analysis of several different HBV-producing CWSV2 cell lines indicated that TNF-alpha killing depended upon the level of HBV expression. The TNF-alpha-induced cell killing in high HBV-producing CWSV2 cell lines was accompanied by the presence of an oligonucleosomal DNA ladder characteristic of apoptosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:8774135

  12. Core samples for radiomics features that are insensitive to tumor segmentation: method and pilot study using CT images of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Echegaray, Sebastian; Gevaert, Olivier; Shah, Rajesh; Kamaya, Aya; Louie, John; Kothary, Nishita; Napel, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The purpose of this study is to investigate the utility of obtaining “core samples” of regions in CT volume scans for extraction of radiomic features. We asked four readers to outline tumors in three representative slices from each phase of multiphasic liver CT images taken from 29 patients (1128 segmentations) with hepatocellular carcinoma. Core samples were obtained by automatically tracing the maximal circle inscribed in the outlines. Image features describing the intensity, texture, shape, and margin were used to describe the segmented lesion. We calculated the intraclass correlation between the features extracted from the readers’ segmentations and their core samples to characterize robustness to segmentation between readers, and between human-based segmentation and core sampling. We conclude that despite the high interreader variability in manually delineating the tumor (average overlap of 43% across all readers), certain features such as intensity and texture features are robust to segmentation. More importantly, this same subset of features can be obtained from the core samples, providing as much information as detailed segmentation while being simpler and faster to obtain. PMID:26587549

  13. Core samples for radiomics features that are insensitive to tumor segmentation: method and pilot study using CT images of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Echegaray, Sebastian; Gevaert, Olivier; Shah, Rajesh; Kamaya, Aya; Louie, John; Kothary, Nishita; Napel, Sandy

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the utility of obtaining "core samples" of regions in CT volume scans for extraction of radiomic features. We asked four readers to outline tumors in three representative slices from each phase of multiphasic liver CT images taken from 29 patients (1128 segmentations) with hepatocellular carcinoma. Core samples were obtained by automatically tracing the maximal circle inscribed in the outlines. Image features describing the intensity, texture, shape, and margin were used to describe the segmented lesion. We calculated the intraclass correlation between the features extracted from the readers' segmentations and their core samples to characterize robustness to segmentation between readers, and between human-based segmentation and core sampling. We conclude that despite the high interreader variability in manually delineating the tumor (average overlap of 43% across all readers), certain features such as intensity and texture features are robust to segmentation. More importantly, this same subset of features can be obtained from the core samples, providing as much information as detailed segmentation while being simpler and faster to obtain.

  14. Paternal B Vitamin Intake Is a Determinant of Growth, Hepatic Lipid Metabolism and Intestinal Tumor Volume in Female Apc1638N Mouse Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Sabet, Julia A.; Park, Lara K.; Iyer, Lakshmanan K.; Tai, Albert K.; Koh, Gar Yee; Pfalzer, Anna C.; Parnell, Laurence D.; Mason, Joel B.; Liu, Zhenhua; Byun, Alexander J.; Crott, Jimmy W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The importance of maternal nutrition to offspring health and risk of disease is well established. Emerging evidence suggests paternal diet may affect offspring health as well. Objective In the current study we sought to determine whether modulating pre-conception paternal B vitamin intake alters intestinal tumor formation in offspring. Additionally, we sought to identify potential mechanisms for the observed weight differential among offspring by profiling hepatic gene expression and lipid content. Methods Male Apc1638N mice (prone to intestinal tumor formation) were fed diets containing replete (control, CTRL), mildly deficient (DEF), or supplemental (SUPP) quantities of vitamins B2, B6, B12, and folate for 8 weeks before mating with control-fed wild type females. Wild type offspring were euthanized at weaning and hepatic gene expression profiled. Apc1638N offspring were fed a replete diet and euthanized at 28 weeks of age to assess tumor burden. Results No differences in intestinal tumor incidence or burden were found between male Apc1638N offspring of different paternal diet groups. Although in female Apc1638N offspring there were no differences in tumor incidence or multiplicity, a stepwise increase in tumor volume with increasing paternal B vitamin intake was observed. Interestingly, female offspring of SUPP and DEF fathers had a significantly lower body weight than those of CTRL fed fathers. Moreover, hepatic trigylcerides and cholesterol were elevated 3-fold in adult female offspring of SUPP fathers. Weanling offspring of the same fathers displayed altered expression of several key lipid-metabolism genes. Hundreds of differentially methylated regions were identified in the paternal sperm in response to DEF and SUPP diets. Aside from a few genes including Igf2, there was a striking lack of overlap between these genes differentially methylated in sperm and differentially expressed in offspring. Conclusions In this animal model, modulation of

  15. Comparison of {sup 18}F-Fluorothymidine and {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT in Delineating Gross Tumor Volume by Optimal Threshold in Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Thoracic Esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    Han Dali; Yu Jinming; Yu Yonghua; Zhang Guifang; Zhong Xiaojun; Lu Jie; Yin Yong; Fu Zheng; Mu Dianbin; Zhang Baijiang; He Wei; Huo Zhijun; Liu Xijun; Kong Lei; Zhao Shuqiang; Sun Xiangyu

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the optimal method of using {sup 18}F-fluorothymidine (FLT) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) simulation to delineate the gross tumor volume (GTV) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma verified by pathologic examination and compare the results with those using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT. Methods and Materials: A total of 22 patients were enrolled and underwent both FLT and FDG PET/CT. The GTVs with biologic information were delineated using seven different methods in FLT PET/CT and three different methods in FDG PET/CT. The results were compared with the pathologic gross tumor length, and the optimal threshold was obtained. Next, we compared the simulation plans using the optimal threshold of FLT and FDG PET/CT. The radiation dose was prescribed as 60 Gy in 30 fractions with a precise radiotherapy technique. Results: The mean +- standard deviation pathologic gross tumor length was 4.94 +- 2.21 cm. On FLT PET/CT, the length of the standardized uptake value 1.4 was 4.91 +- 2.43 cm. On FDG PET/CT, the length of the standardized uptake value 2.5 was 5.10 +- 2.18 cm, both of which seemed more approximate to the pathologic gross tumor length. The differences in the bilateral lung volume receiving >=20 Gy, heart volume receiving >=40 Gy, and the maximal dose received by spinal cord between FLT and FDG were not significant. However, the values for mean lung dose, bilateral lung volume receiving >=5, >=10, >=30, >=40, and >=50 Gy, mean heart dose, and heart volume receiving >=30 Gy using FLT PET/CT-based planning were significant lower than those using FDG PET/CT. Conclusion: A standardized uptake value cutoff of 1.4 on FLT PET/CT and one of 2.5 on FDG PET/CT provided the closest estimation of GTV length. Finally, FLT PET/CT-based treatment planning provided potential benefits to the lungs and heart.

  16. Basal Autophagy and Feedback Activation of Akt Are Associated with Resistance to Metformin-Induced Inhibition of Hepatic Tumor Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Peng, Yuan-Fei; Ni, Hong-Min; Li, Yuan; Shi, Ying-Hong; Ding, Wen-Xing; Fan, Jia

    2015-01-01

    While accumulating evidence has shown that the use of the diabetic drug metformin may be beneficial against various tumors in some epidemiological studies, a few studies failed to show the same beneficial effects. The molecular and cellular mechanisms for these conflicting observations are not clear. In this study, we compared the inhibitory effects of cell growth by metformin on several hepatic tumor cell lines: SMMC-7721, HCC-97L, HCC-LM3 and HepG2. While metformin inhibited cell growth in all these cells, we found that SMMC-7721, HCC-97L and HCC-LM3 cells were more resistant than HepG2 cells. Mechanistically, we found that metformin inhibited mTOR in all these hepatic tumor cells. However, SMMC-7721 cells had higher levels of basal autophagy and mTORC2-mediated feedback activation of Akt than HepG2 cells, which may render SMMC-7721 cells to be more resistant to metformin-induced inhibition of cell growth. Similarly, HCC-97L and HCC-LM3 cells also had higher feedback activation of AKT than HepG2 cells, which may also account for their resistance to metformin-induced inhibition of cell growth. Therefore, the various basal autophagy and mTOR activity in different cancer cells may contribute to the controversial findings on the use of metformin in inhibition of cancers in humans.

  17. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by or linked with viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Most anal cancers (human papillomavirus) Some throat ...

  18. WE-E-17A-05: Complementary Prognostic Value of CT and 18F-FDG PET Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Tumor Heterogeneity Features Quantified Through Texture Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Desseroit, M; Cheze Le Rest, C; Tixier, F; Majdoub, M; Visvikis, D; Hatt, M; Guillevin, R; Perdrisot, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that CT or 18F-FDG PET intratumor heterogeneity features computed using texture analysis may have prognostic value in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC), but have been mostly investigated separately. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential added value with respect to prognosis regarding the combination of non-enhanced CT and 18F-FDG PET heterogeneity textural features on primary NSCLC tumors. Methods: One hundred patients with non-metastatic NSCLC (stage I–III), treated with surgery and/or (chemo)radiotherapy, that underwent staging 18F-FDG PET/CT images, were retrospectively included. Morphological tumor volumes were semi-automatically delineated on non-enhanced CT using 3D SlicerTM. Metabolically active tumor volumes (MATV) were automatically delineated on PET using the Fuzzy Locally Adaptive Bayesian (FLAB) method. Intratumoral tissue density and FDG uptake heterogeneities were quantified using texture parameters calculated from co-occurrence, difference, and run-length matrices. In addition to these textural features, first order histogram-derived metrics were computed on the whole morphological CT tumor volume, as well as on sub-volumes corresponding to fine, medium or coarse textures determined through various levels of LoG-filtering. Association with survival regarding all extracted features was assessed using Cox regression for both univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: Several PET and CT heterogeneity features were prognostic factors of overall survival in the univariate analysis. CT histogram-derived kurtosis and uniformity, as well as Low Grey-level High Run Emphasis (LGHRE), and PET local entropy were independent prognostic factors. Combined with stage and MATV, they led to a powerful prognostic model (p<0.0001), with median survival of 49 vs. 12.6 months and a hazard ratio of 3.5. Conclusion: Intratumoral heterogeneity quantified through textural features extracted from both CT and FDG PET

  19. Stat3 is a candidate epigenetic biomarker of perinatal Bisphenol A exposure associated with murine hepatic tumors with implications for human health

    PubMed Central

    Weinhouse, Caren; Bergin, Ingrid L.; Harris, Craig; Dolinoy, Dana C.

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) that has been implicated as a potential carcinogen and epigenotoxicant. We have previously reported dose-dependent incidence of hepatic tumors in 10-month-old isogenic mice perinatally exposed to BPA. Here, we evaluated DNA methylation at 3 candidate genes (Esr1, Il-6st, and Stat3) in liver tissue of BPA-exposed mice euthanized at 2 time points: post-natal day 22 (PND22; n = 147) or 10-months of age (n = 78, including n = 18 with hepatic tumors). Additionally, DNA methylation profiles were analyzed at human homologs of murine candidate genes in human fetal liver samples (n = 50) with known liver tissue BPA levels. Candidate genes were chosen based on reported expression changes in both rodent and human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Regions for bisulfite sequencing were chosen by mining whole genome next generation sequencing methylation datasets of both mice and human liver samples with known perinatal BPA exposures. One of 3 candidate genes, Stat3, displayed dose-dependent DNA methylation changes in both 10-month mice with liver tumors as compared to those without liver tumors and 3-week sibling mice from the same exposure study, implicating Stat3 as a potential epigenetic biomarker of both early life BPA exposure and adult disease in mice. DNA methylation profiles within STAT3 varied with liver tissue BPA level in human fetal liver samples as well, suggesting STAT3 may be a translationally relevant candidate biomarker. These data implicate Stat3 as a potential early life biomarker of adult murine liver tumor risk following early BPA exposure with early evidence of relevance to human health. PMID:26542749

  20. High total metabolic tumor volume in PET/CT predicts worse prognosis in diffuse large B cell lymphoma patients with bone marrow involvement in rituximab era.

    PubMed

    Song, Moo-Kon; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Lee, Gyeong-Won; Lim, Sung-Nam; Shin, Seunghyeon; Pak, Kyoung June; Kwon, Seong Young; Shim, Hye Kyung; Choi, Bong-Hoi; Kim, In-Suk; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Geun; Oh, So-Yeon

    2016-03-01

    Bone marrow involvement (BMI) in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) was naively regarded as an adverse clinical factor. However, it has been unknown which factor would separate clinical outcomes in DLBCL patients with BMI. Recently, metabolic tumor volume (MTV) on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was suggested to predict prognosis in several lymphoma types. Therefore, we investigated whether MTV would separate the outcomes in DLBCL patients with BMI. MTV on PET/CT was defined as an initial tumor burden as target lesion ≥ standard uptake value, 2.5 in 107 patients with BMI. Intramedullary (IM) MTV was defined as extent of BMI and total MTV was as whole tumor burden. 260.5 cm(3) and 601.2 cm(3) were ideal cut-off values for dividing high and low MTV status in the IM and total lymphoma lesions in Receiver Operating Curve analysis. High risk NCCN-IPI (p<0.001, p<0.001), bulky disease (p=0.011, p=0.005), concordant subtype (p=0.025, p=0.029), high IM MTV status (p<0.001, p<0.001), high total MTV status (p<0.001, p<0.001), and ≥ 2CAs in BM (p=0.037, p=0.033) were significantly associated with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) than other groups. In multivariate analysis, high risk NCCN-IPI (PFS, p=0.006; OS, p=0.013), concordant subtype (PFS, p=0.005; OS, p=0.007), and high total MTV status (PFS, p<0.001; OS, p<0.001) had independent clinical impacts. MTV had prognostic significances for survivals in DLBCL with BMI.

  1. P11: 18FDG-PET/CT for early prediction of response to first line platinum chemotherapy in advanced thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Giovannella; Ottaviano, Margaret; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Segreto, Sabrina; Tucci, Irene; Damiano, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the value of the metabolic tumor response assessed with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), compared with clinicobiological markers, to predict the response disease to first line platinum based chemotherapy in advanced thymic epithelial tumors (TETs). Methods Twenty patients with diagnosis of TET and stage of disease III and IV sec, Masaoka-Koga, were retrospectively included in this monocentric study. Different pre-treatment clinical, biological and pathological parameters, including histotype sec, WHO 2004 and stage of disease sec, Masaoka-Koga were assessed. Tumor glucose metabolism at baseline and its change after the first line platinum based chemotherapy (from 4 to 6 cycles) were assessed using FDG-PET, moreover the response disease was assessed using total body CT scan for the evaluation of RECIST criteria 1.1. Results Twelve patients had an objective response to the first line platinum based chemotherapy according RECIST criteria 1.1 and all of them started with a SUVmax at baseline major than 5, indeed the other eight patients, non-responders to chemotherapy, had a SUVmax at baseline minor than 5. Conclusions It is important to define the chemosensitivity of advanced TETs early. Combining bio-pathological parameters with the metabolism at baseline assessed with FDG-PET can help the physician to early predict the probability of obtaining a disease response to first line platinum based chemotherapy. The SUVmax cut off of 5 at 18FDG-PET/CT performed at baseline treatment might be a new parameter for choosing the most powerful first line of chemotherapy. Given these results, further prospective studies are needed to establish a new first line therapy in advanced TETs with a low SUVmax at baseline, non-responders to conventional chemotherapy.

  2. Hepatic hemangioma: atypical appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Mikulis, D.J.; Costello, P.; Clouse, M.E.

    1985-07-01

    Recent reports indicate that computed tomography (CT) after bolus injection of contrast material is diagnostically specific for hemangioma, replacing the need for angiography in a high percentage of patients. The authors report a unique hepatic hemangioma that showed early diffuse intense opacification by angiography and contrast-enhanced CT.

  3. Molecular imaging of late somatostatin receptor-positive metastases of renal cell carcinoma in the pancreas by 68Ga DOTATOC PET/CT: a rare differential diagnosis to multiple primary pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Peter, Luisa; Sänger, Jörg; Hommann, Merten; Baum, Richard Paul; Kaemmerer, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Ga somatostatin receptor PET/CT, currently the most sensitive imaging modality for well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors, is based on the molecular imaging of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) that are expressed in different tumor entities such as neuroendocrine neoplasms, lymphomas, meningiomas, or renal cell cancer (RCC). Most neuroendocrine neoplasms show a high expression of SSTR subtypes 2A and 5, whereas the overexpression of SSTR2A in RCC is mainly seen in peritumoral vessels. Here we report a case with strongly SSTR-positive pancreatic lesions detected by Ga DOTATOC PET/CT, which histologically turned out to be ultralate metastases of a RCC.

  4. SU-E-J-79: Internal Tumor Volume Motion and Volume Size Assessment Using 4D CT Lung Data

    SciTech Connect

    Jurkovic, I; Stathakis, S; Li, Y; Patel, A; Vincent, J; Papanikolaou, N; Mavroidis, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess internal tumor volume change through breathing cycle and associated tumor motion using the 4DCT data. Methods: Respiration induced volume change through breathing cycle and associated motion was analyzed for nine patients that were scanned during the different respiratory phases. The examined datasets were the maximum and average intensity projections (MIP and AIP) and the 10 phases of the respiratory cycle. The internal target volume (ITV) was delineated on each of the phases and the planning target volume (PTV) was then created by adding setup margins to the ITV. Tumor motion through the phases was assessed using the acquired 4DCT dataset, which was then used to determine if the margins used for the ITV creation successfully encompassed the tumor in three dimensions. Results: Results showed that GTV motion along the superior inferior axes was the largest in all the cases independent of the tumor location and/or size or the use of abdomen compression. The extent of the tumor motion was found to be connected with the size of the GTV. The smallest GTVs exhibited largest motion vector independent of the tumor location. The motion vector size varied through the phases depending on the tumor size and location and it was smallest for phases 20 and 30. The smaller the volume of the delineated GTV, the greater its volume difference through the different respiratory phases was. The average GTV volume change was largest for the phases 60 and 70. Conclusion: Even if GTV is delineated using both AIP and MIP datasets, its motion extent will exceed the used margins especially for the very small GTV volumes. When the GTV size is less than 10 cc it is recommended to use fusion of the GTVs through all the phases to create the planning ITV.

  5. TU-G-BRA-05: Predicting Volume Change of the Tumor and Critical Structures Throughout Radiation Therapy by CT-CBCT Registration with Local Intensity Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S; Robinson, A; Kiess, A; Quon, H; Wong, J; Lee, J; Plishker, W; Shekhar, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop an accurate and effective technique to predict and monitor volume changes of the tumor and organs at risk (OARs) from daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs). Methods: While CBCT is typically used to minimize the patient setup error, its poor image quality impedes accurate monitoring of daily anatomical changes in radiotherapy. Reconstruction artifacts in CBCT often cause undesirable errors in registration-based contour propagation from the planning CT, a conventional way to estimate anatomical changes. To improve the registration and segmentation accuracy, we developed a new deformable image registration (DIR) that iteratively corrects CBCT intensities using slice-based histogram matching during the registration process. Three popular DIR algorithms (hierarchical B-spline, demons, optical flow) augmented by the intensity correction were implemented on a graphics processing unit for efficient computation, and their performances were evaluated on six head and neck (HN) cancer cases. Four trained scientists manually contoured nodal gross tumor volume (GTV) on the planning CT and every other fraction CBCTs for each case, to which the propagated GTV contours by DIR were compared. The performance was also compared with commercial software, VelocityAI (Varian Medical Systems Inc.). Results: Manual contouring showed significant variations, [-76, +141]% from the mean of all four sets of contours. The volume differences (mean±std in cc) between the average manual segmentation and four automatic segmentations are 3.70±2.30(B-spline), 1.25±1.78(demons), 0.93±1.14(optical flow), and 4.39±3.86 (VelocityAI). In comparison to the average volume of the manual segmentations, the proposed approach significantly reduced the estimation error by 9%(B-spline), 38%(demons), and 51%(optical flow) over the conventional mutual information based method (VelocityAI). Conclusion: The proposed CT-CBCT registration with local CBCT intensity correction

  6. Kinematic modeling and its implication in longitudinal chemotherapy study of tumor physiology: ovarian xenograft mouse model and contrast-enhanced dynamic CT (Honorable Mention Poster Award)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Liang, Yun; Hutchins, Gary D.

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that dynamic CT provides the necessary sensitivity to quantify tumor physiology and differences in chemotherapeutic response. A compartmental mouse model utilizing measured contrast-enhanced dynamic CT scans is used to simulate systematic and statistical errors associated with tumor physiology: perfusion, permeability (PS), fractional plasma volume (fp), and fractional interstitial volume. The solute utilized is a small molecular weight radio-opaque contrast agent (isovue). For such an intravascular-interstitial medium, the kinematics simplifies to a two compartmental diffusive dominated set of coupled differential equations. Each combination of physiological parameters is repeatedly simulated fifteen times from which statistical errors calculated. The fractional change relative to the true value (systematic error) and standard deviation (statistical error) are plotted as a function of PS, fp, scanner temporal resolution and noise, and contrast media injection rates. By extrapolating from experimental data found in literature, a relative change in PS and fp of approximately 40% is required. Thus, the longitudinal response of two chemotherapeutic drugs under investigation - proteasome and IMPDH inhibitors - are hypothesized to induce different physiological responses. The first set of simulations varies PS from 0.05 to 0.40 mL/min/mL and fp from 0.01 to 0.07 mL/mL while holding all other physiological parameters constant. Errors in PS remain below 3% while statistical errors for fp increase significantly as the volume decreases toward 1-2%: errors remain less than 6% for fp>0.03 while increasing to above 15% for fp<0.02. The second set of simulations are performed quantifying the relationship between scanner temporal resolution and contrast media injection rate for various tumor permeabilities. For the majority of cases, the errors remain below 5%. As PS approaches perfusion, a total error less than 6% can be maintained

  7. Thoracic spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Narrowing of the spine ( spinal stenosis ) Scoliosis Tumor Risks Risks of CT scans include: Exposure to radiation ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  8. Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response and represses transplanted H22 hepatic ascitic tumor cell growth: Involvement of NF-κB signaling activation in CD4 + T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Tianming; Wang, Chaoyuan; Su, Hanwen; Xiang, Meixian

    2013-06-15

    Gastrodia elata Blume (G. elata) is a famous restorative food in East Asia. It can be used as an auxiliary reagent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment. Previous studies unveiled that G. elata exhibited immunomodulatory activities. To explore the active ingredients contributing to its immunomodulatory activities, gastrodin, vanillin, and parishin B were purified from G. elata and their anti-HCC effects were assessed in vivo. Among these compounds, only gastrodin was capable of repressing transplanted H22 ascitic hepatic tumor cell growth in vivo with low toxicity. Further investigations were designed to explore the effects of gastrodin on the immune system of tumor-bearing mice and potential molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. Our data showed that gastrodin ameliorated tumor cell transplantation-induced activation of endogenous pro-apoptotic pathway in CD4 + T cells and abnormalities in serum cytokine profiles in host animals. These events enhanced cytotoxic activities of natural killer and CD8 + T cells against H22 hepatic cancer cells. Gastrodin administration specifically upregulated mRNA levels of several nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) responsive genes in CD4 + T cells but not in CD8 + T cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that gastrodin increased the association of NF-κB p65 subunit to the promoter regions of IL-2 and Bcl-2 encoding genes in CD4 + T cells. Our investigations demonstrated that gastrodin is the main active ingredient contributing to the anticancer immunomodulatory properties of G. elata. Promoting NF-κB-mediated gene transcription in CD4 + T cells is implicated in its immunomodulatory activity. - Highlights: • Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response. • Gastrodin represses tumor transplantation-induced CD4 + T cell apoptosis. • Gastrodin activates NF-κB activity in CD4 + T cells.

  9. Maternal protein restriction induces alterations in hepatic tumor necrosis factor-α/CYP7A1 signaling and disorders regulation of cholesterol metabolism in the adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaomei; Qi, Ying; Tian, Baoling; Chen, Dong; Gao, Hong; Xi, Chunyan; Xing, Yanlin; Yuan, Zhengwei

    2014-07-01

    It is well recognized that adverse events in utero impair fetal development and lead to the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome in adulthood. To investigate the mechanisms linking impaired fetal growth to increased cholesterol, an important clinical risk factor characterizing the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, we examined the impact of maternal undernutrition on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)/c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway and the cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) expression in the livers of the offspring with a protein restriction model. The male offspring with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) caused by the isocaloric low-protein diet showed decreased liver weight at birth and augmented circulation and hepatic cholesterol levels at 40 weeks of age. Maternal undernutrition significantly upregulated cytokine TNF-α expression and JNK phospholytion levels in the livers from fetal age to adulthood. Elevated JNK phospholytion could be linked to downregulated hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α and CYP7A1 expression, subsequently led to higher hepatic cholesterol. This work demonstrated that intrauterine malnutrition-induced IUGR might result in intrinsic disorder in hepatic TNF-α/CYP7A1 signaling, and contribute to the development of hypercholesterolemia in later life.

  10. Multimodal Imaging of Nanocomposite Microspheres for Transcatheter Intra-Arterial Drug Delivery to Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Li, Weiguo; Chen, Jeane; Zhang, Zhuoli; Green, Richard M.; Huang, Sui; Larson, Andrew C.

    2016-01-01

    A modern multi-functional drug carrier is critically needed to improve the efficacy of image-guided catheter-directed approaches for the treatment of hepatic malignancies. For this purpose, a nanocomposite microsphere platform was developed for selective intra-arterial transcatheter drug delivery to liver tumors. In our study, continuous microfluidic methods were used to fabricate drug-loaded multimodal MRI/CT visible microspheres that included both gold nanorods and magnetic clusters. The resulting hydrophilic, deformable, and non-aggregated microspheres were mono-disperse and roughly 25 um in size. Sustained drug release and strong MRI T2 and CT contrast effects were achieved with the embedded magnetic nano-clusters and radiopaque gold nanorods. The microspheres were successfully infused through catheters selectively placed within the hepatic artery in rodent models and subsequent distribution in the targeted liver tissues and hepatic tumors confirmed with MRI and CT imaging. These multimodal nanocomposite drug carriers should be ideal for selective intra-arterial catheter-directed administration to liver tumors while permitting MRI/CT visualization for patient-specific confirmation of tumor-targeted delivery. PMID:27405824

  11. Multimodal Imaging of Nanocomposite Microspheres for Transcatheter Intra-Arterial Drug Delivery to Liver Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Li, Weiguo; Chen, Jeane; Zhang, Zhuoli; Green, Richard M.; Huang, Sui; Larson, Andrew C.

    2016-07-01

    A modern multi-functional drug carrier is critically needed to improve the efficacy of image-guided catheter-directed approaches for the treatment of hepatic malignancies. For this purpose, a nanocomposite microsphere platform was developed for selective intra-arterial transcatheter drug delivery to liver tumors. In our study, continuous microfluidic methods were used to fabricate drug-loaded multimodal MRI/CT visible microspheres that included both gold nanorods and magnetic clusters. The resulting hydrophilic, deformable, and non-aggregated microspheres were mono-disperse and roughly 25 um in size. Sustained drug release and strong MRI T2 and CT contrast effects were achieved with the embedded magnetic nano-clusters and radiopaque gold nanorods. The microspheres were successfully infused through catheters selectively placed within the hepatic artery in rodent models and subsequent distribution in the targeted liver tissues and hepatic tumors confirmed with MRI and CT imaging. These multimodal nanocomposite drug carriers should be ideal for selective intra-arterial catheter-directed administration to liver tumors while permitting MRI/CT visualization for patient-specific confirmation of tumor-targeted delivery.

  12. Multimodal Imaging of Nanocomposite Microspheres for Transcatheter Intra-Arterial Drug Delivery to Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Li, Weiguo; Chen, Jeane; Zhang, Zhuoli; Green, Richard M; Huang, Sui; Larson, Andrew C

    2016-07-13

    A modern multi-functional drug carrier is critically needed to improve the efficacy of image-guided catheter-directed approaches for the treatment of hepatic malignancies. For this purpose, a nanocomposite microsphere platform was developed for selective intra-arterial transcatheter drug delivery to liver tumors. In our study, continuous microfluidic methods were used to fabricate drug-loaded multimodal MRI/CT visible microspheres that included both gold nanorods and magnetic clusters. The resulting hydrophilic, deformable, and non-aggregated microspheres were mono-disperse and roughly 25 um in size. Sustained drug release and strong MRI T2 and CT contrast effects were achieved with the embedded magnetic nano-clusters and radiopaque gold nanorods. The microspheres were successfully infused through catheters selectively placed within the hepatic artery in rodent models and subsequent distribution in the targeted liver tissues and hepatic tumors confirmed with MRI and CT imaging. These multimodal nanocomposite drug carriers should be ideal for selective intra-arterial catheter-directed administration to liver tumors while permitting MRI/CT visualization for patient-specific confirmation of tumor-targeted delivery.

  13. Uncertainties in planned dose due to the limited voxel size of the planning CT when treating lung tumors with proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    España, Samuel; Paganetti, Harald

    2011-07-01

    Dose calculation for lung tumors can be challenging due to the low density and the fine structure of the geometry. The latter is not fully considered in the CT image resolution used in treatment planning causing the prediction of a more homogeneous tissue distribution. In proton therapy, this could result in predicting an unrealistically sharp distal dose falloff, i.e. an underestimation of the distal dose falloff degradation. The goal of this work was the quantification of such effects. Two computational phantoms resembling a two-dimensional heterogeneous random lung geometry and a swine lung were considered applying a variety of voxel sizes for dose calculation. Monte Carlo simulations were used to compare the dose distributions predicted with the voxel size typically used for the treatment planning procedure with those expected to be delivered using the finest resolution. The results show, for example, distal falloff position differences of up to 4 mm between planned and expected dose at the 90% level for the heterogeneous random lung (assuming treatment plan on a 2 × 2 × 2.5 mm3 grid). For the swine lung, differences of up to 38 mm were seen when airways are present in the beam path when the treatment plan was done on a 0.8 × 0.8 × 2.4 mm3 grid. The two-dimensional heterogeneous random lung phantom apparently does not describe the impact of the geometry adequately because of the lack of heterogeneities in the axial direction. The differences observed in the swine lung between planned and expected dose are presumably due to the poor axial resolution of the CT images used in clinical routine. In conclusion, when assigning margins for treatment planning for lung cancer, proton range uncertainties due to the heterogeneous lung geometry and CT image resolution need to be considered.

  14. Dynamic contrast-enhanced x-ray CT measurement of cerebral blood volume in a rabbit tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenic, Aleksa; Lee, Ting-Yim; Craen, Rosemary A.; Gelb, Adrian W.

    1998-07-01

    Cerebral blood volume (CBV) is a major determinant of intracranial pressure (ICP). Hyperventilation is commonly employed to reduce raised ICP (e.g. in brain tumour patients) presumably through its effect on CBV. With the advent of slip- ring CT scanners, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging allows for the measurement of CBV with high spatial resolution. Using a two-compartment model to characterize the distribution of X- ray contrast agent in the brain, we have developed a non- equilibrium CT method to measure CBV in normal and pathological regions. We used our method to investigate the effect of hyperventilation on CBV during propofol anaesthesia in rabbits with implanted brain tumours. Eight New Zealand White rabbits with implanted VX2 carcinoma brain tumours were studied. For each rabbit, regional CBV measurements were initially made at normocapnia (PaCO2 40 mmHg) and then at hyperventilation (PaCO2 25 mmHg) during propofol anaesthesia. The head was positioned such that a coronal image through the brain incorporated a significant cross-section of the brain tumour as well as a radial artery in a forelimb. Images at the rate of 1 per second were acquired for 2 minutes as Omnipaque 300 (1.5 ml/kg rabbit weight) was injected via a peripheral vein. In these CT images, regions of interest in the brain tissue (e.g. tumour, contra-lateral normal, and peri-tumoural) and the radial artery were drawn. For each region, the mean CT number in pre-contrast images was subtracted from the mean CT number in post-contrast images to produce either the tissue contrast concentration curve, or the arterial contrast concentration curve. Using our non- equilibrium analysis method based on a two-compartment model, regional CBV values were determined from the measured contrast concentration curves. From our study, the mean CBV values [+/- SD] in the tumour, peri-tumoural, and contra-lateral normal regions during normocapnia were: 5.47 plus or minus 1.97, 3.28 plus or minus 1.01, and 1

  15. High expression of AKR1B10 predicts low risk of early tumor recurrence in patients with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Yan; Qi, Lu-Nan; Zhong, Jian-Hong; Qin, Hong-Gui; Ye, Jia-Zhou; Lu, Shi-Dong; Ma, Liang; Xiang, Bang-De; Li, Le-Qun; You, Xue-Mei

    2017-01-01

    To clarify the relationship between aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 (AKR1B10) expression and early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence, this study detected AKR1B10 expression in tumor and adjacent non-tumor tissues from 110 patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related HCC underwent liver resection and analyzed its correlations with clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of these patients. Detected by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, AKR1B10 mRNA expression showed significantly higher in HCC tissues than in adjacent non-tumor tissues, with a low level in normal liver tissues. Similar results was confirmed at the protein level using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. High AKR1B10 expression was negatively correlated with serum alpha-fetoprotein level and positively correlated with HBV-DNA level. Patients with high AKR1B10 expression had significantly higher disease-free survival than those with low expression within 2 years after liver resection. Multivariate analysis also confirmed high AKR1B10 expression to be a predictor of low risk of early HCC recurrence. In addition, high AKR1B10 expression was found to be a favorable factor of overall survival. These results suggest that AKR1B10 is involved in HBV-related hepatocarcinogenesis, but its high expression could predict low risk of early tumor recurrence in patients with HBV-related HCC after liver resection. PMID:28181486

  16. Hyaline globules and papillary fragments in cytologic smears from two intra-abdominal tumors (ovarian and hepatic) in female patients: A diagnostic pitfall with histologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Machado, Isidro; López-Soto, María Victoria; Pérez-López, Albadio Samir; Domínguez-Álvarez, Carlos; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    Hyaline globules and papillary fragments in cytologic samples from two intra-abdominal tumors in young females are presented including the cytological features and the correlation with the histopathologic and immunohistochemical findings. In the first case a cytologic study from an ovarian mass showed papillary structures and isolated tumor cells with epithelioid morphology, irregular reniform-like nuclear contour, pale or vacuolated cytoplasm, abundant hyaline globules and occasional glomeruloid structures resembling Schiller-Duval bodies. Yolk sac tumor (YST) was the diagnosis on the histological slides. Tumor cells showed positivity for cytokeratin (AE1/AE3), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and Sal-like protein 4 (SALL4). In case number two the cytologic study from a liver metastasis displayed papillary and rosette-like clusters composed of uniform and bland cells showing occasional long cytoplasmic tails, hyaline globules and nuclear grooves. A diagnosis of hepatic metastasis from solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas (SPNP) was rendered from the histology. Tumor cells revealed immunoreactivity for cytokeratin (AE1/AE3), Vimentin, Galectin-1 (GAL-1), Neuron specific-enolase, CD10, progesterone and β-catenin (nuclear stain). Regarding differential diagnosis, in the patient with the ovarian mass an ovarian clear cell carcinoma was considered, as well as other germ cell tumors or metastatic carcinoma, while in the patient with a liver metastasis a neuroendocrine carcinoma was taken into account. YST and SPNP share some cytological findings, including hyaline globules, papillary structures, clear cells and intercellular eosinophilic basement membrane deposits. Thus, a detailed study and careful interpretation of the cytological, histological and immunohistochemical findings may be worthwhile to avoid a potential misdiagnosis, particularly in the cytologic specimens of the ovarian and/or intra-abdominal mass, when involving young

  17. Tumor Heterogeneity in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-Positive Advanced Gastric Cancer Assessed by CT Texture Analysis: Association with Survival after Trastuzumab Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sung Hyun; Lee, Yoon Jin; Park, Jihoon; Kim, Jin Won; Lee, Hye Seung; Kim, Bohyoung

    2016-01-01

    Background Image texture analysis is a noninvasive technique for quantifying intratumoral heterogeneity, with derived texture features reported to be closely related to the treatment outcome of tumors. Gastric cancer is one of the most common tumors and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although trastuzumab is associated with a survival gain among patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive advanced gastric cancer, optimal patient selection is challenging. The purpose of this study was to determine whether CT texture features of HER2-positive gastric cancer were related to the survival rate after trastuzumab treatment. Methods and Findings Patients diagnosed with HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer from February 2007 to August 2014 were retrospectively selected. Using in-house built software, histogram features (kurtosis and skewness) and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) features (angular second moment [ASM], contrast, entropy, variance, and correlation) were derived from the CT images of HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer in 26 patients. All the patients were followed up for more than 6 months, with no confirmed deaths. The patients were dichotomized into a good and poor survival group based on cutoff points of overall survival of 12 months. A receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was performed to test the ability of each texture parameter to identify the good survival group. Kaplan–Meier curves for patients above and below each threshold were constructed. Using a threshold of >265.8480 for contrast, >488.3150 for variance, and ≤0.1319×10−3. for correlation, all of the area under the ROC curves showed fair accuracy (>0.7). Kaplan–Meier analysis showed statistically significant survival difference between two groups according to optimal cutoff values of contrast, variance, correlation and ASM. However, as this study had a small number of patients, a further study with a larger

  18. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Hepatitis B » Hepatitis B Entire Lesson Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Hepatitis B Entire Lesson for Veterans and the Public ...

  19. Efficacy of 68Ga-DOTATOC Positron Emission Tomography (PET) CT in Children and Young Adults With Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Acoustic Schwannoma; Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Ependymoblastoma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Medulloepithelioma; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Meningeal Melanocytoma; Newly Diagnosed Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Recurrent Childhood Gliosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood

  20. Diffuse Infantile Hepatic Hemangioendothelioma With Early Central Enhancement in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Aisheng; Dong, Hui; Zuo, Changjing; He, Tianlin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma (IHH) is the most common vascular tumor of the liver in infancy. Adult with IHH is extremely rare. We presented a diffuse IHH in an adult patient with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings. A 39-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of a 2-year history of abnormal liver function tests and a 7-day history of jaundice. Physical examination revealed enlarged liver. Unenhanced abdominal CT showed enlargement of the liver with diffuse hypodensity. Enhanced CT on the arterial phase revealed multiple centrally enhanced lesions diffusely involved the enlarged liver. The enhanced areas of the lesions became larger on the portal phase and all the lesions became homogeneous enhanced on the delayed phase. These lesions showed heterogeneously hyperintense on T2-weighted image, hypointense on T1-weighted image, and early centrally enhanced on dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MRI, with complete tumor enhancement after 180 s. The patient underwent orthotopic liver transplantation. IHH type 2 was confirmed by pathology. The patient died of tumor recurrence in the liver 4 months after transplantation. Unlike the previously described imaging appearances of IHH, this case showed diffuse nodules with early central enhancement on CT and MRI. Considering the importance of the ability to differentiate IHH from other hepatic tumors, radiologists should be aware of these imaging appearances to establish knowledge of the entire spectrum of IHH. PMID:26705232

  1. TU-AB-303-04: Characterizing CT-Derived Mass Change of Non-Tumor Pathology During Lung Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, C; Weiss, E; Jan, N; Hugo, G; Christensen, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Atelectasis and other commonly-observed non-tumor lung pathologies (NTPs) can change during thoracic radiotherapy altering normal anatomy and inducing large changes in tumor position. However, the characteristics of these changes are not well understood. This study investigates longitudinal NTP tissue mass change during radiotherapy. Methods: Delineation of corresponding atelectatic regions before and after re-aeration is challenging since it is difficult to detect atelectatic-region boundaries after re-aeration. Therefore, individual lobes were delineated and analyzed instead. A radiation oncologist contoured the tumor and individual lobes in the planning and mid-treatment CTs for 7 patients. Each lobe was eroded by 2–4 voxels, which was found to reduce effects of inadvertent chest wall in the lobe delineation but still preserve the mean density of the lobe. The mass of each lobe was calculated after removing the tumor region. The uninvolved lobes were used as controls. Results: Mean mass change for contralateral, ipsilateral without NTP, and NTP lobes were +2.1 (18.0) %, −9.4 (18.2) %, and −13.4 (40.1) %, respectively. For NTP lobes, the degree and direction of change depended on atelectasis resolution type (full or partial), with mean mass change for full resolution of −43.1 (16.2) % and +4.5 (40.1) % for partial. The standard deviation for NTP lobes is likely higher due to actual changes in mass as well as increased delineation variability in the presence of tumor and lung consolidation. Median mean density change was −46.4% for NTP lobes, showing significant difference from contralateral (p=8.2×10−{sup 4}) and NTP-free ipsilateral lobes (p=0.006). Conclusion: No noticeable mass change occurred for pathology-free lobes. As NTP fully resolved, mass of the lobe decreased. One possible explanation is that the release of retained fluid and infiltrate commonly associated with NTP accounts for the reduced mass. This work was supported by the

  2. Characterization of metastatic tumor antigen 1 and its interaction with hepatitis B virus X protein in NF-κB signaling and tumor progression in a woodchuck hepatocellular carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yung-Tsung; Liu, Chun-Jen; Su, Tung-Hung; Cheng, Huei-Ru; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Lin, Hsiu-Lin; Wang, Chih-Chiang; Kao, Jia-Horng; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Wu, Hui-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The metastatic tumor antigen 1 (MTA1) protein is associated with tumor invasiveness and poor prognosis in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), particularly in those with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related HCC. Chronically woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV)-infected woodchuck is an ideal animal model for studying the pathogenesis of HBV-associated liver diseases, including HCC. To investigate the roles of MTA1 in HBV-associated hepatocarcinogenesis in the woodchuck model, we cloned the woodchuck MTA1 (wk-MTA1) complementary (c)DNA and characterized its molecular functions. The sequence and organization of the wk-MTA1 protein were highly conserved among different species. Similar to its expression in human HCC, wk-MTA1 was upregulated in woodchuck HCC, as determined at RNA and protein levels. Furthermore, an MTA1-spliced variant, wk-MTA1dE4, was overexpressed in woodchuck HCC, and it was attributed to approximately 50% of the total transcripts. The percentage of wk-MTA1dE4-overexpressed woodchuck HCCs was higher than that of the total wk-MTA1-overexpressed HCCs (77.8% vs 61.1%) and wk-MTA1dE4 may represent a more sensitive marker than the total wk-MTA1 in woodchuck HCC. We overexpressed or knocked down wk-MTA1 in a woodchuck HCC cell line and demonstrated that wk-MTA1 could interact with the WHV X protein (WHx) and play indispensable roles in WHx-mediated NF-κB activation and tumor cell migration- and invasion-promoting activities. In conclusion, our results support the hypothesis that woodchuck HCC recapitulates HBV-associated HCC with respect to the molecular characteristics of MTA1 and provides new clues for conducting mechanistic studies of MTA1 in HBV-associated hepatocarcinogenesis, including the possible clinical significance of wk-MTA1dE4. PMID:27323415

  3. Association between two common polymorphisms (single nucleotide polymorphism -250G/A and -514C/T) of the hepatic lipase gene and coronary artery disease in type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh, Ghorban; Ghaffari, Mohammad-Ali; Bazyar, Mohammad; Kheirollah, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Variations in the hepatic lipase (HL) gene are the potential candidate for coronary artery disease (CAD) especially in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in diverse populations. We assessed the association of -514C/T and -250G/A polymorphisms in HL (LIPC) gene with CAD risk in Iranian population with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 322 type 2 diabetic patients, 166 patients with normal angiograms as controls and 156 patients those identified with CAD undergoing their first coronary angiography as CAD cases. Genotyping of -514C/T and -250G/A polymorphisms in the promoter of the LIPC gene were studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Results: Genotype distributions in CAD cases (73.7%, 20.5%, and 5.8% for −250G/A) and (62.2%, 32.7%, and 5.1% for -514C/T) were significantly different from those in controls (60.8%, 37.4%, and 1.8% for -250G/A) and (51.2%, 48.2%, and 0.6% for -514C/T). CAD cases had lower A-allele frequency than controls (0.131 vs. 0.196, P = 0.028). The odds ratio for the presence of -250 (GG + GA) genotype and A allele in CAD cases were 2.206 (95% confidence interval [CI] =1.33–3.65, P = 0.002) and 1.609 (95% CI = 1.051 −2.463, P = 0.029) respectively. Haplotype analysis demonstrated a significant association between especially LIPC double mutant (−250 A/-514 T) haplotype and presence of CAD. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that -250 G/A polymorphism rather than -514 C/T polymorphism of LIPC gene is more associated with the increased risk of CAD particularly in women with T2DM. PMID:27014654

  4. First application of liquid-metal-jet sources for small-animal imaging: High-resolution CT and phase-contrast tumor demarcation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, Daniel H.; Lundstroem, Ulf; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Small-animal studies require images with high spatial resolution and high contrast due to the small scale of the structures. X-ray imaging systems for small animals are often limited by the microfocus source. Here, the authors investigate the applicability of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for such high-resolution small-animal imaging, both in tomography based on absorption and in soft-tissue tumor imaging based on in-line phase contrast. Methods: The experimental arrangement consists of a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source, the small-animal object on a rotating stage, and an imaging detector. The source-to-object and object-to-detector distances are adjusted for the preferred contrast mechanism. Two different liquid-metal-jet sources are used, one circulating a Ga/In/Sn alloy and the other an In/Ga alloy for higher penetration through thick tissue. Both sources are operated at 40-50 W electron-beam power with {approx}7 {mu}m x-ray spots, providing high spatial resolution in absorption imaging and high spatial coherence for the phase-contrast imaging. Results: High-resolution absorption imaging is demonstrated on mice with CT, showing 50 {mu}m bone details in the reconstructed slices. High-resolution phase-contrast soft-tissue imaging shows clear demarcation of mm-sized tumors at much lower dose than is required in absorption. Conclusions: This is the first application of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for whole-body small-animal x-ray imaging. In absorption, the method allows high-resolution tomographic skeletal imaging with potential for significantly shorter exposure times due to the power scalability of liquid-metal-jet sources. In phase contrast, the authors use a simple in-line arrangement to show distinct tumor demarcation of few-mm-sized tumors. This is, to their knowledge, the first small-animal tumor visualization with a laboratory phase-contrast system.

  5. Nuclear Expression of Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Is Associated with Recurrence of Early-Stage Hepatocellular Carcinomas: Role of Viral Protein in Tumor Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jing; Jung, Hae Yoen; Lee, Kyu Ho; Yi, Nam-Joon; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Jang, Ja-June; Lee, Kyoung-Bun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) plays well-known roles in tumorigenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in infected patients. However, HBV-associated protein status in tumor tissues and the relevance to tumor behavior has not been reported. Our study aimed to examine the expression of HBV-associated proteins in HCC and adjacent nontumorous tissue and their clinicopathologic implication in HCC patients. Methods: HBV surface antigen (HBsAg), HBV core antigen (HBcAg), and HBV X protein (HBx) were assessed in 328 HBV-associated HCCs and in 155 matched nontumorous tissues by immunohistochemistry staining. Results: The positive rates of HBsAg and cytoplasmic HBx staining in tumor tissue were lower than those in nontumorous tissue (7.3% vs. 57.4%, p < .001; 43.4% vs. 81.3%, p < .001). Conversely, nuclear HBx was detected more frequently in tumors than in nontumorous tissue (52.1% vs. 30.3%, p < .001). HCCs expressing HBsAg, HBcAg, or cytoplasmic HBx had smaller size; lower Edmondson-Steiner (ES) nuclear grade, pT stage, and serum alpha-fetoprotein, and less angioinvasion than HCCs not expressing HBV-associated proteins. Exceptionally, nuclear HBx-positive HCCs showed higher ES nuclear grade and more frequent large-vessel invasion than did nuclear HBx-negative HCCs. In survival analysis, only nuclear HBx-positive HCCs had shorter disease-free survival than nuclear HBx-negative HCCs in pT1 and ES nuclear grade 1–2 HCC subgroup (median, 126 months vs. 35 months; p = .015). Conclusions: Our data confirmed that expression of normal HBV-associated proteins generally decreases in tumor cells in comparison to nontumorous hepatocytes, with the exception of nuclear HBx, which suggests that nuclear HBx plays a role in recurrence of well-differentiated and early-stage HCCs. PMID:27086597

  6. Tumor-promoting/progressing role of additional chromosome instability in hepatic carcinogenesis in Sgo1 (Shugoshin 1) haploinsufficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hiroshi Y.; Zhang, Yuting; Reddy, Arun; Mohammed, Altaf; Lightfoot, Stan; Dai, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A major etiological risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is infection by Hepatitis viruses, especially hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus. Hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus do not cause aggressive activation of an oncogenic pathway, but they transactivate a broad array of genes, cause chronic inflammation, and, through interference with mitotic processes, lead to mitotic error-induced chromosome instability (ME-CIN). However, how ME-CIN is involved in the development of HCC remains unclear. Delineating the effect of ME-CIN on HCC development should help in identifying measures to combat HCC. In this study, we used ME-CIN model mice haploinsufficient in Shugoshin 1 (Sgo1−/+) to assess the role of ME-CIN in HCC development. Treatment with the carcinogen azoxymethane caused Sgo1−/+ ME-CIN model mice to develop HCCs within 6 months, whereas control mice developed no HCC (P < 0.003). The HCC development was associated with expression of early HCC markers (glutamine synthetase, glypican 3, heat shock protein 70, and the serum marker alpha fetoprotein), although without fibrosis. ME-CIN preceded the expression of HCC markers, suggesting that ME-CIN is an important early event in HCC development. In 12-month-old untreated Sgo1 mice, persistent DNA damage, altered gene expression, and spontaneous HCCs were observed. Sgo1 protein accumulated in response to DNA damage in vitro. Overall, Sgo1−/+-mediated ME-CIN strongly promoted/progressed development of HCC in the presence of an initiator carcinogen, and it had a mild initiator effect by itself. Use of the ME-CIN model mice should help in identifying drugs to counteract the effects of ME-CIN and should accelerate anti-HCC drug development. PMID:25740822

  7. Beneficial effects of post-transfusional hepatitis in acute myelogenous leukemia may be mediated by lipopolysaccharides, tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma.

    PubMed

    Treon, S P; Broitman, S A

    1992-10-01

    Post-transfusional hepatitis is often a complication in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in whom survival is paradoxically prolonged. The etiology is unknown. In previous studies, we showed that impaired hepatic endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) clearance in patients with acute viral hepatitis A, B, or C versus controls results in endotoxemia and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) release. TNF-alpha mediates anti-proliferative and differentiating effects in AML cell lines. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) released in acute viral hepatitis, acts in synergy with TNF-alpha. HL60, KG1, and U937 AML cells treated 3, 6, and 9 days with physiologically attainable TNF-alpha (10 U/ml), IFN-gamma (100 U/ml) and LPS (10 ng/ml) levels, have significantly diminished viability and cell growth versus controls. Treatment of HL60 AML cells with LPS/TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma also resulted in significantly increased monocytic pathway differentiation not seen with KG1 or U937 AML cells. HL60 AML cells treated with TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma for 6 days released endogenous TNF-alpha (1.57 U/10(6) cells) upon LPS stimulation compared to less than 0.01 U/10(6) cells in non-LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma-treated cells or untreated cells (p less than 0.0001). Untreated HL60 AML cells co-cultured with HL60 cells pretreated for 6 days with TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma and then subjected to LPS stimulation had significantly diminished cell growth compared to controls (p less than 0.0001). This effect could be reversed with anti-TNF-alpha antibody, supporting the concept that endogenous TNF-alpha release by LPS/TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma treated HL60 AML cells may act by paracrine means to suppress growth of other AML cells. The beneficial effects of post-transfusional hepatitis in AML patients may be mediated via LPS/TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma-induced AML cell growth suppression and/or terminal differentiation in which AML cells participate by releasing TNF-alpha after being acted upon by LPS

  8. CT Enterography

    MedlinePlus

    ... obstructions and Crohn’s disease. CT scanning is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. CT enterography is better able ... the benefits vs. risks? Benefits CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. A major advantage of CT ...

  9. Phase 1 Study of Pazopanib in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors and Hepatic Dysfunction: A National Cancer Institute Organ Dysfunction Working Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Stephen I; Chung, Vincent; Synold, Timothy; Longmate, Jeffrey; Suttle, A Benjamin; Ottesen, Lone H; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Kummar, Shivaani; Harvey, R Donald; Hamilton, Anne; O’Neil, Bert; Sarantopoulos, John; LoRusso, Patricia; Rudek, Michelle A; Dowlati, Afshin; Mulkerin, Daniel; Belani, Chandra P.; Gandhi, Leena; Lau, Cecilia; Ivy, S. Percy; Newman, Edward M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Pazopanib is a potent, multi-targeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor; however, there is limited information regarding the effects of liver function on pazopanib metabolism and pharmacokinetics (PK). The objective of this study was to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and PK profile of pazopanib in patients with varying degrees of hepatic dysfunction. Experimental Design Patients with any solid tumors or lymphoma were stratified into four groups based on the degree of hepatic dysfunction according to the National Cancer Institute Organ Dysfunction Working Group (NCI ODWG) criteria. Pazopanib was given orally once a day on a 21-day cycle. A modified 3+3 design was used. Results Ninety eight patients were enrolled. Patients in the mild group tolerated 800 mg per day. The moderate and severe groups tolerated 200 mg per day. Pharmacokinetic data in the mild group were similar to the data in the normal group. Comparison of the median Cmax and AUC(0–24) in the moderate or severe groups at 200 mg per day to the values in the normal and mild groups at 800 mg per day indicated less than dose-proportional systemic exposures in patients with moderate and severe hepatic impairment. This suggests that the lower MTD in the moderate and severe group is not due to a decrease in drug clearance or alteration in the proportion of metabolites. Conclusions In patients with mild liver dysfunction, pazopanib is well tolerated at the FDA-approved dose of 800 mg per day. Patients with moderate and severe liver dysfunction tolerated 200 mg per day. PMID:23653147

  10. SU-C-BRE-05: PTV Margin Determination Based On Tumor Radiobiological Characteristics and Geometric Uncertainties Derived From Daily Cone- Beam CT Images

    SciTech Connect

    Selvaraj, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To determine required PTV margins for ≤1% loss in mean population TCP using systematic (Σ) and random (σ) errors calculated from daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) images of head and neck patients. Methods: Daily CBCT images were acquired for 50 head and neck patients. The CBCT image sets acquired at each fraction were registered with planning CT to obtain positional errors for each patient for each fraction. Systematic and random errors were calculated from data collected for 50 patients as described in IPEM On Target report. CTV delineation uncertainty of 2mm is added quadratically to systematic error. Assuming a spherical target volume, the dose in each voxel of target volume is summed for each fraction in the treatment by shifting the dose grid to calculate mean population TCP inclusive of geometric uncertainties using a Monte Carlo method. These simulations were repeated for the set of Σ and σ in each axis for different PTV margins and drop in TCP for each margin are obtained. In order to study the effect of dose-response curve on PTV margins, two different σα of 0.048 Gy-1 and 0.218 Gy-1 representing steep and shallow dose-response curves are studied. Σ were 2.5, 2.5, 2.1 mm and σ were 0.3, 0.3 0.2 mm respectively in x, y and z axis respectively. Results: PTV margins based on tumor radiobiological characteristics are 4.8, 4.8 and 4 mm in x, y and z axis assuming 25 treatment fractions for σα 0.048 Gy-1 (steep) and 4.2,4.2 and 2.2 for σα of 0.218 Gy-1 (shallow). While the TCP-based margins did not differ much in x and y axis, it is considerably smaller in z axis for shallow DRC. Conclusion: TCP based margins are substantially smaller than physical dose-based margin recipes. This study also demonstrates the importance of considering tumor radiobiological characteristics while deriving margins.

  11. Three-Dimensional Ground Glass Opacity Ratio in CT Images Can Predict Tumor Invasiveness of Stage IA Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Woo Sik; Hong, Sae Rom; Lee, Jin Gu; Lee, Jae Seok; Jung, Hee Suk; Kim, Dae Joon; Chung, Kyung Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the relationship between various parameters, including volumetric parameters, and tumor invasiveness according to the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) classification. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 99 patients with completely resected stage IA lung adenocarcinoma. The correlation between several parameters [one-dimensional ground glass opacity (1D GGO) ratio, two-dimensional (2D) GGO ratio, three-dimensional (3D) GGO ratio, 1D solid size, 2D solid size, and 3D solid size] and tumor invasiveness according to IASLC/ATS/ERS classification was investigated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Adenocarcinoma in situ and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma were referred to as noninvasive adenocarcinoma. Results The areas under the curve (AUC) to predict invasive adenocarcinoma for the 1D, 2D, and 3D GGO ratios were 0.962, 0.967, and 0.971, respectively. The optimal cut-off values for the 1D, 2D, and 3D GGO ratios were 38%, 62%, and 74%, respectively. The AUC values for 1D, 2D, and 3D solid sizes to predict invasive adenocarcinoma were 0.933, 0.944, and 0.903, respectively. The optimal cut-off values for 1D, 2D, and 3D solid sizes were 1.2 cm, 1.5 cm2, and 0.7 cm3, respectively. The difference in the ROC curves for 3D GGO ratio and 3D solid size was significant (p=0.01). Conclusion Computed tomography image-related parameters based on GGO were well correlated with and predictive of invasiveness according to IASLC/ATS/ERS classification. 3D GGO ratio was more strongly correlated with pathologic invasiveness than 3D solid size. PMID:27401643

  12. CT-guided 125I seed implantation for inoperable retroperitoneal sarcoma: A technique for delivery of local tumor brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Biao; Guo, Wen-Hao; Lan, Ting; Yuan, Fang; Liu, Guan-Jian; Zan, Rui-Yu; You, Xin; Tan, Qiao-Yue; Liao, Zheng-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Radical surgery is currently the first treatment of choice for retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma (RSTS). However, the prognosis of RSTS remains poor due to ineffective local control and a high incidence of metastasis after surgical resection. Brachytherapy has been shown to safely provide local radiotherapy for numerous types of cancer when used alone or in combination with surgical resection, but has not been well characterized in the management of RSTS. The aim of this study was to evaluate CT-guided 125I seed implantation for local control and pain relief in the treatment of inoperable RSTS. A total of 23 patients with RSTS were treated with 125I implantation. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Other endpoints were evaluated via computed tomography scan or phone call/e-mail records. The occurrence of complications was assessed preoperatively (baseline) and during postoperatively follow-up or until patient succumbed. All patients were successfully treated with 125I implantation. A mean number of 70.87 radioactive seeds were applied in each patient. During the follow-up, two patients were unaccounted for, local recurrence occurred in three patients, five succumbed and complications were observed in sixteen. The patient's VAS score changed from 7.4 preoperatively to 7.6, 2.3, 2.0, 1.2, 1.5, 1.4 and 2.5 at 24 h, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after the procedure, respectively. Good local control and significant pain relief after 125I seed implantation was observed in patients with inoperable RSTS. Thus, the present results suggest that this method could be an effective treatment option for patients with inoperable RSTS. PMID:28101168

  13. Granular cell tumor as an unusual cause of obstruction at the hepatic hilum: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Lochan, Rajiv; Balupuri, Shlokarth; Bennett, Mark K; Manas, Derek M

    2006-01-01

    A diagnosis of malignancy is reasonably assumed when a lesion is found at the hilum or bile ducts in a patient with jaundice who has never undergone biliary surgery. Although benign tumors occasionally develop in this location, preoperative recognition is difficult and most are treated as malignant lesions. We illustrate this clinical scenario in this case report of a granular cell tumor (GCT) that developed at the biliary bifurcation, necessitating right hemi-hepatectomy with extrahepatic biliary tree excision. We describe the clinical presentation, imaging findings, treatment, and histological findings of this tumor. Although rare, a GCT can develop at the hilum and mimic a malignant lesion such as cholangiocarcinoma (CC) radiologically. To our knowledge, this is the fourth report of a GCT at the hilum of the liver. However, the possibility of this tumor should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a lesion in this location.

  14. Early prediction of histopathological response of rectal tumors after one week of preoperative radiochemotherapy using 18 F-FDG PET-CT imaging. A prospective clinical study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) is standard in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Initial data suggest that the tumor’s metabolic response, i.e. reduction of its 18 F-FDG uptake compared with the baseline, observed after two weeks of RCT, may correlate with histopathological response. This prospective study evaluated the ability of a very early metabolic response, seen after only one week of RCT, to predict the histopathological response to treatment. Methods Twenty patients with LARC who received standard RCT regimen followed by radical surgery participated in this study. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUV-MAX), measured by PET-CT imaging at baseline and on day 8 of RCT, and the changes in FDG uptake (ΔSUV-MAX), were compared with the histopathological response at surgery. Response was classified by tumor regression grade (TRG) and by achievement of pathological complete response (pCR). Results Absolute SUV-MAX values at both time points did not correlate with histopathological response. However, patients with pCR had a larger drop in SUV-MAX after one week of RCT (median: -35.31% vs −18.42%, p = 0.046). In contrast, TRG did not correlate with ΔSUV-MAX. The changes in FGD-uptake predicted accurately the achievement of pCR: only patients with a decrease of more than 32% in SUV-MAX had pCR while none of those whose tumors did not show any decrease in SUV-MAX had pCR. Conclusions A decrease in ΔSUV-MAX after only one week of RCT for LARC may be able to predict the achievement of pCR in the post-RCT surgical specimen. Validation in a larger independent cohort is planned. PMID:22853868

  15. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A Hepatitis A Hepatitis A is a contagious viral infection that can easily affect children and adults. It is one of the most common types of hepatitis virus. Often when you hear about hepatitis A ...

  16. Development and preclinical studies of (64)Cu-NOTA-pertuzumab F(ab')2 for imaging changes in tumor HER2 expression associated with response to trastuzumab by PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Lam, Karen; Chan, Conrad; Reilly, Raymond M

    2017-01-01

    We previously reported that microSPECT/CT imaging with (111)In-labeled pertuzumab detected decreased HER2 expression in human breast cancer (BC) xenografts in athymic mice associated with response to treatment with trastuzumab (Herceptin). Our aim was to extend these results to PET/CT by constructing F(ab')2 of pertuzumab modified with NOTA chelators for complexing (64)Cu. The effect of the administered mass (5-200 µg) of (64)Cu-NOTA-pertuzumab F(ab')2 was studied in NOD/SCID mice engrafted with HER2-positive SK-OV-3 human ovarian cancer xenografts. Biodistribution studies were performed in non-tumor bearing Balb/c mice to predict radiation doses to normal organs in humans. Serial PET/CT imaging was conducted on mice engrafted with HER2-positive and trastuzumab-sensitive BT-474 or trastuzumab-insensitive SK-OV-3 xenografted mice treated with weekly doses of trastuzumab. There were no significant effects of the administered mass of (64)Cu-NOTA-pertuzumab F(ab')2 on tumor or normal tissue uptake. The predicted total body dose in humans was 0.015 mSv/MBq, a 3.3-fold reduction compared to (111)In-labeled pertuzumab. MicroPET/CT images revealed specific tumor uptake of (64)Cu-NOTA-pertuzumab F(ab')2 at 24 or 48 h post-injection in mice with SK-OV-3 tumors. Image analysis of mice treated with trastuzumab showed 2-fold reduced uptake of (64)Cu-NOTA-pertuzumab F(ab')2 in BT-474 tumors after 1 week of trastuzumab normalized to baseline, and 1.9-fold increased uptake in SK-OV-3 tumors after 3 weeks of trastuzumab, consistent with tumor response and resistance, respectively. We conclude that PET/CT imaging with (64)Cu-NOTA-pertuzumab F(ab')2 detected changes in HER2 expression in response to trastuzumab while delivering a lower total body radiation dose compared to (111)In-labeled pertuzumab.

  17. The Role of Three-Dimensional Multidetector CT Gastrography in the Preoperative Imaging of Stomach Cancer: Emphasis on Detection and Localization of the Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Woong; Heo, Suk Hee; Lim, Hyo Soon; Lim, Nam Yeol; Park, Young Kyu; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2015-01-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) gastrography has been regarded as a promising technique for the preoperative imaging of gastric cancer. It has the ability to produce various three-dimensional (3D) images. Because 3D reconstruction images are more effective and intuitive for recognizing abnormal changes in the gastric folds and subtle mucosal nodularity than two-dimensional images, 3D MDCT gastrography can enhance the detection rate of early gastric cancer, which, in turn, contributes to the improvement of the accuracy of preoperative tumor (T) staging. In addition, shaded surface display and tissue transition projection images provide a global view of the stomach, with the exact location of gastric cancer, which may replace the need for barium studies. In this article, we discuss technical factors in producing high-quality MDCT gastrographic images and present cases demonstrating the usefulness of MDCT gastrography for the detection and T staging of gastric cancer while emphasizing the significance of preoperative localization of gastric cancer in terms of surgical margin. PMID:25598676

  18. A Study of CD45RA+ Depleted Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors and Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-30

    Ewing Sarcoma; Gastrointestinal Tumor; Germ Cell Tumor; Hepatic Tumor; Lymphoma; Wilms Tumor; Rhabdoid Tumor; Clear Cell Carcinoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Melanoma; Neuroblastoma; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Non-rhabdomyosarcoma

  19. EGFR mutations are associated with higher incidence of distant metastases and smaller tumor size in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer based on PET/CT scan.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jian; Chen, Min; Xiao, Nanjie; Li, Lu; Zhang, Yue; Li, Qinyang; Yang, Mi; Liu, Laiyu; Chen, Longhua

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to explore the correlation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation with tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who underwent positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scan. Patients diagnosed with NSCLC who underwent EGFR mutation status testing and PET/CT or PET/CT plus brain magnetic resonance imaging scan at initial diagnosis in Nanfang Hospital between July 2010 and June 2014 were consecutively enrolled. The correlation of EGFR mutation status with TNM stage and distant metastasis organs including brain, bone, liver, pleural, adrenals and contralateral lobe of lung were analyzed. A total of 401 patients were enrolled. Tumor size in EGFR mutation group was significantly smaller than the wild-type group (P < 0.001). Further, patients with EGFR mutations were demonstrated significantly more frequent in patients with distant metastasis than non-metastasis (45.7 vs 32.2 %, P = 0.007). The rates of bone (32.2 vs 22.8 %, P = 0.007) and brain (16.3 vs 9.4 %, P = 0.008) metastasis were significantly higher in EGFR mutation group than the wild-type group. In the subgroup of 199 metastatic NSCLC patients, patients with EGFR mutation were significantly associated with a smaller tumor size (P = 0.013) and earlier N stage (P = 0.033). Of note, compared with the EGFR wild-type group, patients had a higher likelihood of developing brain plus bone metastases at initial diagnosis of EGFR mutation group (20.9 vs 7.5 %, P = 0.018). Taken together, we identify that EGFR mutations might associate with more aggressive tumor progression than the wild types in NSCLC. In addition, patients with tumor having EGFR mutation had a smaller tumor size than without mutation.

  20. Facial Paralysis Secondary to Extensive Perineural Spread of Adenocarcinoma of the Parotid Gland Identified by PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Achong, Dwight M; Zloty, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Brain MRI in an 82-year-old man with presumed Bell's palsy revealed a clinically unsuspected right parotid gland mass but no other acute findings. Biopsy revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Staging F-FDG PET/CT revealed an FDG-avid parotid mass, abnormal FDG uptake along the course of the facial nerve from mass to skull base, and multiple FDG-avid right level II neck lymph nodes and hepatic metastases. The PET/CT findings and prolonged clinical course suggest that diffuse perineural spread of tumor from a smoldering parotid neoplasm, and not idiopathic Bell's palsy, was responsible for the patient's facial paralysis.

  1. Asparagus polysaccharide and gum with hepatic artery embolization induces tumor growth and inhibits angiogenesis in an orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Weng, Ling-Ling; Xiang, Jian-Feng; Lin, Jin-Bo; Yi, Shang-Hui; Yang, Li-Tao; Li, Yi-Sheng; Zeng, Hao-Tao; Lin, Sheng-Ming; Xin, Dong-Wei; Zhao, Hai-Liang; Qiu, Shu-Qi; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Min-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Liver cancer is one of leading digestive malignancies with high morbidity and mortality. There is an urgent need for the development of novel therapies for this deadly disease. It has been proven that asparagus polysaccharide, one of the most active derivates from the traditional medicine asparagus, possesses notable antitumor properties. However, little is known about the efficacy of asparagus polysaccharide as an adjuvant for liver cancer chemotherapy. Herein, we reported that asparagus polysaccharide and its embolic agent form, asparagus gum, significantly inhibited liver tumor growth with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) therapy in an orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumor model, while significantly inhibiting angiogenesis and promoting tumor cell apoptosis. Moreover, asparagine gelatinous possessed immunomodulatory functions and showed little toxicity to the host. These results highlight the chemotherapeutic potential of asparagus polysaccharide and warrant a future focus on development as novel chemotherapeutic agent for liver cancer TACE therapy.

  2. (18)F-FLT and (18)F-FDG PET-CT imaging in the evaluation of early therapeutic effects of chemotherapy on Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weina; Yu, Shupeng; Xin, Jun; Guo, Qiyong

    2016-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the early therapeutic effects of chemotherapy on Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats via F-18-fluoro-3'-deoxy-3'-L-fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT) and F-18-fluoro-deoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) imaging. Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats were subjected to (18)F-FLT and (18)F-FDG PET-CT imaging prior to and 24 and 48 h after epirubicin chemotherapy. (18)F-FLT and (18)F-FDG uptake [tumor/muscle (T/M)], the percentage of injected dose per gram (% ID/g), and the Ki-67 labeling index (LI-Ki-67) were quantitatively determined for each rat prior to and following epirubicin chemotherapy. The correlation between % ID/g and tumor LI-Ki-67 was analyzed. Both (18)F-FLT and (18)F-FDG tumor uptake decreased significantly at 24 and 48 h after chemotherapy (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively). LI-Ki-67 also significantly reduced 24 and 48 h after chemotherapy (P<0.001). Furthermore, (18)F-FLT and (18)F-FDG T/M tumor uptake correlated positively with LI-Ki-67 before and after chemotherapy (r=0.842 and 0.813, respectively). During the early post-chemotherapy stage, (18)F-FLT and (18)F-FDG uptake in Walker 256 tumors reduced significantly, which correlated positively with the tumor cell proliferative activity.

  3. 18F-FLT and 18F-FDG PET-CT imaging in the evaluation of early therapeutic effects of chemotherapy on Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weina; Yu, Shupeng; Xin, Jun; Guo, Qiyong

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the early therapeutic effects of chemotherapy on Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats via F-18-fluoro-3′-deoxy-3′-L-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT) and F-18-fluoro-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) imaging. Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats were subjected to 18F-FLT and 18F-FDG PET-CT imaging prior to and 24 and 48 h after epirubicin chemotherapy. 18F-FLT and 18F-FDG uptake [tumor/muscle (T/M)], the percentage of injected dose per gram (% ID/g), and the Ki-67 labeling index (LI-Ki-67) were quantitatively determined for each rat prior to and following epirubicin chemotherapy. The correlation between % ID/g and tumor LI-Ki-67 was analyzed. Both 18F-FLT and 18F-FDG tumor uptake decreased significantly at 24 and 48 h after chemotherapy (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively). LI-Ki-67 also significantly reduced 24 and 48 h after chemotherapy (P<0.001). Furthermore, 18F-FLT and 18F-FDG T/M tumor uptake correlated positively with LI-Ki-67 before and after chemotherapy (r=0.842 and 0.813, respectively). During the early post-chemotherapy stage, 18F-FLT and 18F-FDG uptake in Walker 256 tumors reduced significantly, which correlated positively with the tumor cell proliferative activity. PMID:28101193

  4. The role of 99mTc(V)-DMSA scan as compared to 99mTc-MDP and CT scans in imaging the primary tumor and metastases of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Zissimopoulos, Athanassios; Zanglis, Antonios; Andreopoulos, Dimitrios; Baziotis, Nikolaos

    2005-01-01

    The oncophilic complex of technetium-99m labeled pentavalent dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc(V)-DMSA) has been successfully used for the detection of primary and metastatic medullary thyroid cancer and for imaging various soft tissue tumors like lung, brain and prostate cancer. In this article, the role of 99mTc(V)-DMSA in the diagnosis of the primary tumor and metastases of osteosarcoma patients as compared to the 99mTc-MDP scan and the CT scan was studied. Twenty-eight patients with bone disease were referred to the Nuclear Medicine Department of Saint Savas Oncology Hospital in Athens from the Orthopedics Department of the same Hospital. From them, 18 (Group A) had osteosarcoma, 7 (Group B) osteomyelitis and 3 (Group C) bone fractures. The final diagnosis was made after fine needle aspiration biopsy. All patients were subjected to the 99mTc(V)-DMSA scan, the standard bone scan (99mTc-MDP) and CT scan. Group A patients showed a selective uptake of 99mTc(V)-DMSA in the primary tumor region. No abnormal 99mTc(V)-DMSA uptake was observed in the patients of Groups B and C. The 99mTc(V)-DMSA scan was found to be superior to the 99mTc-MDP and the CT scans in identifying metastases of osteosarcoma. Sensitivity was 100%, 86% and 98% respectively.

  5. Tumor progression locus 2 ablation suppressed hepatocellular carcinoma development by inhibiting hepatic inflammation and steatosis in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Tumor progression locus 2 (TPL2), a serine threonine kinase, functions as a critical regulator of inflammatory pathways and mediates oncogenic events. The potential role of Tpl2 in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development remains unkn...

  6. Automated liver segmentation for whole-body low-contrast CT images from PET-CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuying; Li, Changyang; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2009-01-01

    Accurate objective automated liver segmentation in PET-CT studies is important to improve the identification and localization of hepatic tumor. However, this segmentation is an extremely challenging task from the low-contrast CT images captured from PET-CT scanners because of the intensity similarity between liver and adjacent loops of bowel, stomach and muscle. In this paper, we propose a novel automated three-stage liver segmentation technique for PET-CT whole body studies, where: 1) the starting liver slice is automatically localized based on the liver - lung relations; 2) the "masking" slice containing the biggest liver section is localized using the ratio of liver ROI size to the right half of abdomen ROI size; 3) the liver segmented from the "masking" slice forms the initial estimation or mask for the automated liver segmentation. Our experimental results from clinical PET-CT studies show that this method can automatically segment the liver for a range of different patients, with consistent objective selection criteria and reproducible accurate results.

  7. [Role of 18FDG-PET/CT in the management and gross tumor volume definition for radiotherapy of head and neck cancer; single institution experiences based on long-term follow-up].

    PubMed

    Hideghéty, Katalin; Cserháti, Adrienne; Besenyi, Zsuzsanna; Zag, Levente; Gaál, Szilvia; Együd, Zsófia; Mózes, Petra; Szántó, Erika; Csenki, Melinda; Rusz, Orsolya; Varga, Zoltán; Dobi, Ágnes; Maráz, Anikó; Pávics, László; Lengyel, Zsolt

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of our work is evaluation of the impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on the complex management of locoregionally advanced (T3-4N1-3) head and neck squamous cell cancer (LAHNSC), and on the target definition for 3D conformal (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). 18FDG-PET/CT were performed on 185 patients with LAHNSC prior to radiotherapy/chemoradiation in the treatment position between 2006 and 2011. Prior to it 91 patients received induction chemotherapy (in 20 cases of these, baseline PET/CT was also available). The independently delineated CT-based gross tumor volume (GTVct) and PET/CT based ones (GTVpet) were compared. Impact of PET/CT on the treatment strategy, on tumor response evaluation to ICT, on GTV definition furthermore on overall and disease-specific survival (OS, DSS) was analysed. PET/CT revealed 10 head and neck, 2 lung cancers for 15 patients with carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) while 3 remained unknown. Second tumors were detected in 8 (4.4%), distant metastasis in 15 (8.2%) cases. The difference between GTVct and GTVpet was significant (p=0.001). In 16 patients (14%) the GTVpet were larger than GTVct due to multifocal manifestations in the laryngo-pharyngeal regions (4 cases) or lymph node metastases (12 cases). In the majority of the cases (82 pts, 72%) PET/CT-based conturing resulted in remarkable decrease in the volume (15-20%: 4 cases, 20-50%: 46 cases, >50%: 32 cases). On the basis of the initial and post-ICT PET/CT comparison in 15/20 patients more than 50% volume reduction and in 6/20 cases complete response were achieved. After an average of 6.4 years of follow-up the OS (median: 18.3±2.6 months) and DSS (median: 25.0±4.0 months) exhibited close correlation (p=0.0001) to the GTVpet. In cases with GTVpet <10 cm3 prior to RT, DSS did not reach the median, the mean is 82.1±6.1 months, while in cases with GTVpet 10-40 cm3 the median of the DSS was 28.8±4.9 months (HR = 3.57; 95% CI: 1.5-8.3), and in those with GTVpet >40

  8. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... Châu và vùng Thái Bình Dương Hepatitis C Hepatitis C What is hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a viral infection that ... can cure most cases of hepatitis C. Acute hepatitis C Acute hepatitis C is a short-term ...

  9. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Châu và vùng Thái Bình Dương Hepatitis C Hepatitis A What is hepatitis A? Hepatitis A is a viral infection that ... spreading hepatitis A to others . How common is hepatitis A? In the United States, hepatitis A has ...

  10. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Châu và vùng Thái Bình Dương Hepatitis C Hepatitis B What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a viral infection that ... to prevent spreading hepatitis B to others . Acute hepatitis B Acute hepatitis B is a short-term ...

  11. Synchronous occurrence of a hepatic myelolipoma and two hepatocellular carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shao-Yan; Xie, Hai-Yang; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shu-Sen; Wang, Wei-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Myelolipoma is a rare tumor composed of fat and bone marrow components, most of which are located in the adrenal gland. Myelolipoma in the liver is extremely rare. To date, only 10 cases have been reported in the English-language medical literature. In one of these cases, the hepatic myelolipoma was found within a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In the present study, we report the first case of the synchronous occurrence of hepatic myelolipoma and HCCs in different liver sections of one patient, a 26-year-old female who was admitted to our hospital because of a 4-d history of upper abdominal pain. The unenhanced computed tomography (CT) images showed a well-defined low-density mass with adipose components in the right liver lobe, 4.2 cm × 4.1 cm in size. Two inhomogeneous low-density masses were found in the left liver lobe, 8.6 cm × 7.7 cm and 2.6 cm × 2.6 cm in size. The masses in both the right and left liver lobes were heterogeneously enhanced in the contrast-enhanced CT images. Based on the results of the imaging examination, the mass in the right liver lobe was preliminarily considered to be a hamartoma, and the two masses in the left liver were preliminarily considered to be HCCs. We performed a right hepatectomy, a left hepatic lobectomy, and a cholecystectomy. Microscopic and immunohistochemical results revealed that the tumor in the right liver lobe was a hepatic myelolipoma, and that the two tumors in the left liver lobe were HCCs. PMID:27920487

  12. RIP-1/c-FLIPL Induce Hepatic Cancer Cell Apoptosis Through Regulating Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL)

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jichun; Yu, Xiao; Wang, Changfa; Yu, Can; Li, Zhiqiang; Nie, Wanpin; Xu, Xundi; Miao, Xiongying; Jin, Xiaoxin

    2017-01-01

    Background Almost all hepatic cancer cells have resistance to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis. c-FLIPL and RIP-1 are apoptotic negative regulatory factors. This study investigated the role of c-FLIPL and RIP-1 in hepatic cancer cell resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Material/Methods HepG2 cells were treated by TRAIL, RIP-1 siRNA, and/or BY11-7082. Cell viability was detected by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was tested by flow cytometry. DISC component proteins, RIP-1, and p-p65 were measured by Western blot. Caspase-8 and caspase-3 were determined by spectrophotometry. Results Single TRAIL treatment showed no significant impact on cell proliferation and apoptosis. HepG2 cells expressed high levels of RIP1 and c-FLIPL, while a high concentration of TRAIL upregulated RIP-1 and c-FLIPL expression but not DR4 and DR5. Single TRAIL treatment did not obviously activate caspase-8 and caspase-3. RIP-1 or c-FLIPL siRNA markedly induced cell apoptosis and enhanced caspase-8 and caspase-3 activities. Combined transfection obviously increased apoptotic cells. TRAIL markedly upregulated RIP-1 expression and enhanced p-p65 protein. Downregulating RIP-1 and/or BAY11-7082 significantly reduced NF-κB transcriptional activity, blocked cells in G0/G1 phase, weakened proliferation, elevated caspase-8 and caspase-3 activities, and promoted cell apoptosis. Conclusions TRAIL can enhance RIP1 and c-FLIPL expression in HepG2 cells. High expression of RIP1 and c-FLIPL is an important reason for TRAIL resistance. Downregulation of RIP1 and c-FLIPL can relieve caspase-8 suppression, activate caspase-3, and promote cell apoptosis. TRAIL mediates apoptosis resistance through upregulating RIP-1 expression, enhancing NF-κB transcriptional activity, and weakening caspase activity. PMID:28270653

  13. TU-G-BRA-07: Characterization of Tumor Proliferation During Successive Cycles of Anti-Angiogenic Therapy Using [F-18]FLT PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpelli, M; Perlman, S; Harmon, S; Perk, T; Scully, P; Bruce, J; Liu, G; Jeraj, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Studies have shown cessation of anti-angiogenic treatment during the first cycle of therapy resulted in rebound of tumor proliferation (flare). This study characterized proliferation dynamics during the first and third cycle of anti-angiogenic treatment using [F-18]FLT PET. Methods: Thirteen patients with various solid cancers were treated with Axitinib (Pfizer, Inc) at a dose of 5mg orally, twice daily, on contiguous three-week cycles with intermittent dosing (two-weeks-on/one-week-off). All patients received three FLT PET/CT scans during cycle 1 (C1): at baseline (C1D0), peak Axitinib concentration (C1D14), and the end of washout (C1D21). Ten patients received up to an additional three scans at corresponding time points during cycle 3 (C3). Lesions were identified by a nuclear medicine physician and manually contoured. Tumor burden was quantified using standard SUV metrics. Correlations between imaging metrics across C1 and C3 were calculated using the Spearman correlation. Results: At C1 peak drug concentration 11/13 patients had decreases in SUVtotal, with median decrease of 50% (change from C1D0 to C1D14). At C3 peak drug concentration 7/7 patients had decreases in SUVtotal, with median decrease of 20% (C3D0 to C3D14). Proliferative flare during C1 washout (>20% increase from C1D14 to C1D21) occurred in 9/13 patients, with median SUVtotal increase of 190%. Flare was also seen in C3 for 5/5 patients, with median SUVtotal increase of 70% (change from C3D14 to C3D21). Correlations were found between changes in imaging metrics across C1 and C3, notably the change in SUVtotal from C1D0 to C1D21 and the change in SUVtotal from C1D0 to C3D0 (ρ = 0.80). Conclusion: Measurements of SUVtotal showed that both patient response to treatment and flare were evident in both cycles of treatment. Correlation between changes in SUVtotal across C1 and C3 suggest early time points could be used to characterize patient response in later cycles. Research funded in part by

  14. A case of liver hemangioma with markedly reduced tumor size after metformin treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ono, Minoru; Sawada, Koji; Okumura, Toshikatsu

    2017-02-01

    A 52-year-old man with a 9-year history of hepatic hemangioma was treated with the anti-diabetic drug metformin, resulting in complete remission of the tumor. In 2006, a hemangioma with diameter of 20 × 25 mm was detected incidentally in the liver. The results of imaging studies including ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were all compatible with that of hepatic hemangioma. The patient consequently underwent imaging annually from 2006 to 2015. The tumor size increased slightly, to 30 × 35 mm in 2012; however, the general tumor characteristics in imaging were not changed. Beginning May 2012, metformin (750 mg/day) was administered because of an increase in blood sugar and hemoglobin A1c levels. After the start of metformin treatment, the tumor size on US gradually decreased. Finally, in October 2015, the tumor was no longer detected. Dynamic CT study also demonstrated markedly reduced tumor size, with a decrease of 2-3 mm in diameter. These results indicate that metformin treatment strongly suppressed cell proliferation in liver hemangioma. The anti-angiogenic effect of metformin was indicated as a possible cause of the reduction in tumor size.

  15. Sequential PET/CT with [18F]-FDG Predicts Pathological Tumor Response to Preoperative Short Course Radiotherapy with Delayed Surgery in Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Using Logistic Regression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pecori, Biagio; Lastoria, Secondo; Caracò, Corradina; Celentani, Marco; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Avallone, Antonio; Rega, Daniela; De Palma, Giampaolo; Mormile, Maria; Budillon, Alfredo; Muto, Paolo; Bianco, Francesco; Aloj, Luigi; Petrillo, Antonella; Delrio, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that FDG PET/CT may predict pathological response in patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Aim of the current study is evaluate if pathological response can be similarly predicted in LARC patients after short course radiation therapy alone. Methods: Thirty-three patients with cT2-3, N0-2, M0 rectal adenocarcinoma treated with hypo fractionated short course neoadjuvant RT (5x5 Gy) with delayed surgery (SCRTDS) were prospectively studied. All patients underwent 3 PET/CT studies at baseline, 10 days from RT end (early), and 53 days from RT end (delayed). Maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax), mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) of the primary tumor were measured and recorded at each PET/CT study. We use logistic regression analysis to aggregate different measures of metabolic response to predict the pathological response in the course of SCRTDS. Results: We provide straightforward formulas to classify response and estimate the probability of being a major responder (TRG1-2) or a complete responder (TRG1) for each individual. The formulas are based on the level of TLG at the early PET and on the overall proportional reduction of TLG between baseline and delayed PET studies. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that in the course of SCRTDS it is possible to estimate the probabilities of pathological tumor responses on the basis of PET/CT with FDG. Our formulas make it possible to assess the risks associated to LARC borne by a patient in the course of SCRTDS. These risk assessments can be balanced against other health risks associated with further treatments and can therefore be used to make informed therapy adjustments during SCRTDS. PMID:28060889

  16. F-18 FDG PET/CT and Tc-99m sulfur colloid SPECT imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of a case of dual solitary fibrous tumors of the retroperitoneum and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Javad; Subhawong, Andrea; Durand, Daniel James

    2012-03-01

    Although FDG PET is increasingly used for the staging of many types of sarcoma, little has been written regarding the FDG PET imaging characteristics of solitary fibrous tumor. We report a patient undergoing FDG PET/CT surveillance for squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue who was incidentally found to have two soft tissue masses in the retroperitoneum and pancreatic tail. Due to their low degree of FDG avidity, they were followed conservatively for approximately one year as they gradually increased in size. Technetium-99m sulfur colloid SPECT helped confirm that the pancreatic tail mass was not a splenule, after which both lesions were surgically resected and found to be extrathoracic solitary fibrous tumors without malignant features. These findings suggest that, as with other low-grade sarcomas, benign extrathoracic solitary fibrous tumors exhibit relatively little glycolytic metabolism in vivo.

  17. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » For Veterans and the Public Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... the Public Veterans and Public Home How is Hepatitis C Treated? Find the facts about the newest ...

  18. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cholangitis Wilson Disease Liver Disease A-Z Autoimmune Hepatitis What is autoimmune hepatitis? Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic—or long lasting— ... bacteria, viruses, toxins, and medications. What causes autoimmune hepatitis? A combination of autoimmunity, environmental triggers, and a ...

  19. Semi-Quantitative Calculations of Primary Tumor Metabolic Activity Using F-18 FDG PET/CT as a Predictor of Survival in 92 Patients With High-Grade Bone or Soft Tissue Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Fuglo, Hanna Maria; Rasmussen, Sine Hvid; Petersen, Michael Mork; Loft, Annika

    2015-07-01

    To assess the prognostic value of primary tumor metabolic activity in patients with high-grade bone sarcomas (BS) or soft tissue sarcomas (STS) using F-18 FDG PET/CT. A single-site, retrospective study including 92 patients with high-grade BS or STS. Pretreatment F-18 FDG PET/CT scan was performed. Clinical data were registered. Accuracy of maximum standardized uptake value of primary tumor (SUVmax) and tumor-to-background (T/B) uptake ratio as prognostic variables and identification of cut-off values to group patients were determined. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and log-rank test were used to compare survival distributions. Prognostic variables were assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Forty-one of 92 patients died during follow-up (45%). Average survival was 6.5 years (95% CI 5.8-7.3 years) and probability of 5-year survival was 52%. Accuracy of SUVmax and T/B uptake ratio as prognostic variables in all patients and during subgroup analysis of patients with STS was significant. No significant results for AUCs were registered in patients with BS. Surgery was independently prognostic for survival throughout multivariate regression analysis of all patients (P = 0.001, HR 3.84) and subgroup analysis (BS: P = 0.02, HR 11.62; STS: P = 0.005, HR 4.13). SUVmax was significant as prognostic variable in all patients (P = 0.02, HR 3.66) and in patients with STS (P = 0.007, HR 3.75). No significant results were demonstrated for T/B uptake ratio. Estimation of primary tumor metabolic activity with pretherapeutic SUVmax using F-18 FDG PET/CT demonstrates independent properties beyond histologic grading for prediction of survival in patients with high-grade STS, but not with high-grade BS.

  20. Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Supplied Exclusively by the Hepatic Falciform Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Gyoung Min; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Chung, Jin Wook; Lee, In Joon; Kim, Han Myun; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe imaging appearances of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) supplied exclusively by the hepatic falciform artery (HFA) and safety of chemoembolization via the HFA. Methods: During the past 6 years, we have performed chemoembolization for the treatment of 12 patients with HCCs supplied exclusively by the HFA. Computed tomography (CT) scans, digital subtraction angiograms, and medical records were retrospectively reviewed by consensus. Results: Tumors were located in Couinaud segments IV (n = 7) and III (n = 5) and in subcapsular areas around the falciform ligaments. Tumor size ranged from 1.0 to 1.8 cm (mean, 1.3 cm; median, 1.3 cm). HFAs originated from A4 (n = 7), A3 (n = 4), and the left hepatic artery near the umbilical point (n = 1). All tumors were supplied exclusively by the HFA. Prophylactic embolization of the distal HFA before chemoembolization was performed using gelatin sponge particles in only one patient, and selective chemoembolization via the HFA was achieved in all patients. One patient suffered from a skin rash after chemoembolization and recovered after conservative management. Individual responses of tumors supplied exclusively by the HFA were complete response (n = 8), partial response (n = 1), and stable disease (n = 2) at the first follow-up enhanced CT scan. Conclusions: The HFA can supply HCC located in subcapsular areas around the falciform ligament, and the tumors can be safely chemoembolized without significant complications.

  1. Posterior Fossa Tumors.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Lara A; Young Poussaint, Tina

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric brain tumors are the leading cause of death from solid tumors in childhood. The most common posterior fossa tumors in children are medulloblastoma, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor, cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma, ependymoma, and brainstem glioma. Location, and imaging findings on computed tomography (CT) and conventional MR (cMR) imaging may provide important clues to the most likely diagnosis. Moreover, information obtained from advanced MR imaging techniques increase diagnostic confidence and help distinguish between different histologic tumor types. Here we discuss the most common posterior fossa tumors in children, including typical imaging findings on CT, cMR imaging, and advanced MR imaging studies.

  2. SU-E-J-123: Assessing Segmentation Accuracy of Internal Volumes and Sub-Volumes in 4D PET/CT of Lung Tumors Using a Novel 3D Printed Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Soultan, D; Murphy, J; James, C; Hoh, C; Moiseenko, V; Cervino, L; Gill, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of internal target volume (ITV) segmentation of lung tumors for treatment planning of simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) radiotherapy as seen in 4D PET/CT images, using a novel 3D-printed phantom. Methods: The insert mimics high PET tracer uptake in the core and 50% uptake in the periphery, by using a porous design at the periphery. A lung phantom with the insert was placed on a programmable moving platform. Seven breathing waveforms of ideal and patient-specific respiratory motion patterns were fed to the platform, and 4D PET/CT scans were acquired of each of them. CT images were binned into 10 phases, and PET images were binned into 5 phases following the clinical protocol. Two scenarios were investigated for segmentation: a gate 30–70 window, and no gating. The radiation oncologist contoured the outer ITV of the porous insert with on CT images, while the internal void volume with 100% uptake was contoured on PET images for being indistinguishable from the outer volume in CT images. Segmented ITVs were compared to the expected volumes based on known target size and motion. Results: 3 ideal breathing patterns, 2 regular-breathing patient waveforms, and 2 irregular-breathing patient waveforms were used for this study. 18F-FDG was used as the PET tracer. The segmented ITVs from CT closely matched the expected motion for both no gating and gate 30–70 window, with disagreement of contoured ITV with respect to the expected volume not exceeding 13%. PET contours were seen to overestimate volumes in all the cases, up to more than 40%. Conclusion: 4DPET images of a novel 3D printed phantom designed to mimic different uptake values were obtained. 4DPET contours overestimated ITV volumes in all cases, while 4DCT contours matched expected ITV volume values. Investigation of the cause and effects of the discrepancies is undergoing.

  3. A novel 3D graph cut based co-segmentation of lung tumor on PET-CT images with Gaussian mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kai; Chen, Xinjian; Shi, Fei; Zhu, Weifang; Zhang, Bin; Xiang, Dehui

    2016-03-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Computed Tomography (CT) have been widely used in clinical practice for radiation therapy. Most existing methods only used one image modality, either PET or CT, which suffers from the low spatial resolution in PET or low contrast in CT. In this paper, a novel 3D graph cut method is proposed, which integrated Gaussian Mixture Models (GMMs) into the graph cut method. We also employed the random walk method as an initialization step to provide object seeds for the improvement of the graph cut based segmentation on PET and CT images. The constructed graph consists of two sub-graphs and a special link between the sub-graphs which penalize the difference segmentation between the two modalities. Finally, the segmentation problem is solved by the max-flow/min-cut method. The proposed method was tested on 20 patients' PET-CT images, and the experimental results demonstrated the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  4. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  5. MR-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) on Pediatric Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-27

    Relapsed Pediatric Solid Tumors; Refractory Pediatric Solid Tumors; Tumors Located in Bone or Soft Tissue in Close Proximity to Bone; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Ewing Sarcoma; Osteosarcoma; Neuroblastoma; Wilms Tumor; Hepatic Tumor; Germ Cell Tumor

  6. Hepatic regenerating nodules in hereditary tyrosinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Day, D.L.; Letourneau, J.G.; Allan, B.T.; Sharp, H.L.; Ascher, N.; Dehner, L.P.; Thompson, W.M.

    1987-08-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia is an autosomal recessive, enzymatic disorder that results in micro- and macronodular cirrhosis in early childhood. Hepatocellular carcinoma occurs in approximately one-third of affected children. We evaluated the imaging studies performed in five children with this disorder. Pathologic examination of all five of the livers revealed cirrhosis and multiple regenerating nodules; hepatocellular carcinoma was present in two of the five livers. All five patients had high-attenuation or high- and low-attenuation foci within the liver. These high-attenuation foci were not apparent as focal lesions in three of four hepatic sonograms or in one of two hepatic nuclear scans. Angiography showed tumor vascularity in one patient with a focal hepatocellular carcinoma, but was indeterminate in a second patient with severe cirrhosis and multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma. Children with cirrhosis due to tyrosinemia may develop regenerating nodules that appear as high-attenuation hepatic foci on CT scans. It is difficult to differentiate regenerating nodules from multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma in these patients.

  7. [A patient with thyroid cancer evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors during treatment for breast cancer recurrence in hepatic and cervical lymph nodes].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Keiko; Enomoto, Takumo; Oshida, Sayuri; Habiro, Takeyoshi; Hatate, Kazuhiko; Sengoku, Norihiko; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2013-11-01

    We describe a case of a 69-year-old woman who underwent left breast-preserving surgery and axillary dissection for left-sided breast cancer at 60 years of age. The histopathological diagnosis was papillotubular carcinoma, luminal A (pathological T1N0M0).In the eighth year after surgery, computed tomography (CT) revealed recurrence in the liver and cervical lymph node metastasis. The patient did not respond to 3 months of treatment with letrozole (progressive disease [PD]). Six courses of chemotherapy with epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (EC) were administered. Subsequently, the attending physician was replaced while the patient was receiving paclitaxel( PTX).After 4 courses of treatment with PTX, the liver metastasis disappeared (complete response [CR]).However, the cervical lymph nodes did not shrink (PD).The cytological diagnosis was papillary thyroid cancer with associated cervical lymph node metastasis. Total thyroidectomy and D3b cervical lymph node dissection were performed. The pathological diagnosis was pEx0T1bN1Mx, pStage IVA disease. Replacement of the attending physician is a critical turning point for patients. During chemotherapy or hormone therapy for breast cancer, each organ should be evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST).In the case of our patient, thyroid cancer was diagnosed according to RECIST. Cancer specialists should bear in mind that the treatment policy may change dramatically depending on the results of RECIST assessment.

  8. Perfusion CT and US of colorectal cancer liver metastases: a correlative study of two dynamic imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Meijerink, Martijn R; van Waesberghe, Jan Hein T M; van Schaik, Cors; Boven, Epie; van der Veldt, Astrid A M; van den Tol, Petrousjka; Meijer, Sybren; van Kuijk, Cornelis

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between dynamic-contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and first-pass dynamic-contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) of normal appearing liver parenchyma and of colorectal cancer liver metastases. Thirty patients with hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer underwent DCE-CT and DCE-US. To obtain DCE-US reproducibility measurements, double contrast-passages (2 × 2.4 mL SonoVue intravenous) were acquired. From several DCE-US-derived perfusion indices, the slope-value scored best with a reproducibility concordance correlation coefficient ranging from 0.75-0.93 and overall highest correlation to DCE-CT-derived variables (r = 0.52 to 0.73). The DCE-US-based tumor-to-liver perfusion gradient also showed a low test-retest variability and moderately correlated to DCE-CT (concordance correlation coefficient 0.87-0.92; r = 0.57 to 0.59). To conclude, DCE-US-based slope-value and tumor-to-liver perfusion gradient correlate best with DCE-CT perfusion values. However, both techniques cannot be used interchangeably. DCE-US should be restricted for studies in which a considerable change in perfusion is expected and for patients with a relatively high tumor blood flow at baseline.

  9. Role and pitfalls of hepatic helical multi-phase CT scanning in differential diagnosis of small hemangioma and small hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fu-Hua; Zeng, Meng-Su; Zhou, Kang-Rong

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To compare and analyze the contrast enhancement appearance of small hemangioma (SHHE) and small hepatocellular carcinoma (SHCC) with helical multi-phase CT scanning so as to determine their roles and pitfalls in the differential diagnosis of SHHE and SHCC. METHODS: The pre and postcontrast CT scanning of the liver in 73 cases (38 SHHE, 35 SHCC) were carried out. The first phase scan of the entire liver began at 30s after the injection of contrast medium, the second and third phases began at 70s, and 4 min respectively. The contrast enhancement patterns and characteristics of all lesions were observed and compared. RESULTS: In SHHE, 64.29% (27/42) had typical manifestations in two-phase dynamic scanning, such as peripheral dramatic high-density enhancement of the lesions with progressive opacification from the periphery toward the center, 30.95% (13/42) were hyperdense in both phases and 4.76% (2/42) were hypodense in both phases. In the third phase scanning, 96.67% (28/30) of SHHE were hyperdense and isodense. In SHCC 59.52% (25/42) presented typical appearances, such as hyperdense in the first phase and hypodense in the second phase, 23.81% (10/42) were hyperdense in the first phase and isodense in the second phase with 4.76% (2/42) of hypodense in both phases. In the third phase scanning, 85.71% (24/28) of SHCC were hypodense. CONCLUSION: According to the contrast enhancement patterns of SHHE and SHCC in the two-phase or multi-phase scanning by helical CT, diagnosis can be established in the majority of lesions, while some atypical cases needed MRI for further investigation. PMID:11819317

  10. Role and pitfalls of hepatic helical multi-phase CT scanning in differential diagnosis of small hemangioma and small hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fu-Hua; Zeng, Meng-Su; Zhou, Kang-Rong

    1998-08-01

    AIM:To compare and analyze the contrast enhancement appearance of small hemangioma (SHHE) and small hepatocellular carcinoma (SHCC) with helical multi-phase CT scanning so as to determine their roles and pitfalls in the differential diagnosis of SHHE and SHCC.METHODS:The pre and postcontrast CT scanning of the liver in 73 cases (38 SHHE, 35 SHCC) were carried out. The first phase scan of the entire liver began at 30s after the injection of contrast medium, the second and third phases began at 70s, and 4min respectively. The contrast enhancement patterns and characteristics of all lesions were observed and compared.RESULTS In SHHE, 64.29% (27/42) had typical manifestations in two-phase dynamic scanning, such as peripheral dramatic high-density enhancement of the lesions with progressive opacification from the periphery toward the center, 30.95% (13/42) were hyperdense in both phases and 4.76% (2/42) were hypodense in both phases. In the third phase scanning, 96.67% (28/30) of SHHE were hyperdense and isodense.In SHCC 59.52% (25/42) presented typical appearances, such as hyperdense in the first phase and hypodense in the second phase, 23.81% (10/42) were hyperdense in the first phase and isodense in the second phase with 4.76% (2/42) of hypodense in both phases. In the third phase scanning, 85.71% (24/28) of SHCC were hypodense.CONCLUSION:According to the contrast enhancement patterns of SHHE and SHCC in the two-phase or multi-phase scanning by helical CT, diagnosis can be established in the majority of lesions, while some atypical cases needed MRI for further investigation.

  11. Specific CT 3D rendering of the treatment zone after Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) in a pig liver model: the “Chebyshev Center Concept” to define the maximum treatable tumor size

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Size and shape of the treatment zone after Irreversible electroporation (IRE) can be difficult to depict due to the use of multiple applicators with complex spatial configuration. Exact geometrical definition of the treatment zone, however, is mandatory for acute treatment control since incomplete tumor coverage results in limited oncological outcome. In this study, the “Chebyshev Center Concept” was introduced for CT 3d rendering to assess size and position of the maximum treatable tumor at a specific safety margin. Methods In seven pig livers, three different IRE protocols were applied to create treatment zones of different size and shape: Protocol 1 (n = 5 IREs), Protocol 2 (n = 5 IREs), and Protocol 3 (n = 5 IREs). Contrast-enhanced CT was used to assess the treatment zones. Technique A consisted of a semi-automated software prototype for CT 3d rendering with the “Chebyshev Center Concept” implemented (the “Chebyshev Center” is the center of the largest inscribed sphere within the treatment zone) with automated definition of parameters for size, shape and position. Technique B consisted of standard CT 3d analysis with manual definition of the same parameters but position. Results For Protocol 1 and 2, short diameter of the treatment zone and diameter of the largest inscribed sphere within the treatment zone were not significantly different between Technique A and B. For Protocol 3, short diameter of the treatment zone and diameter of the largest inscribed sphere within the treatment zone were significantly smaller for Technique A compared with Technique B (41.1 ± 13.1 mm versus 53.8 ± 1.1 mm and 39.0 ± 8.4 mm versus 53.8 ± 1.1 mm; p < 0.05 and p < 0.01). For Protocol 1, 2 and 3, sphericity of the treatment zone was significantly larger for Technique A compared with B. Conclusions Regarding size and shape of the treatment zone after IRE, CT 3d rendering with the “Chebyshev Center Concept” implemented provides

  12. Right Atrial Mass in a Patient With HIV and Hepatitis B: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Umer; khan, Masroor; Anderson, Timithy

    2013-01-01

    A 41-year-old man presented to the emergency room for evaluation of substernal chest pain, shortness of breath and generalized failure to thrive. Patient had history of hepatitis B and HIV. During recent evaluation of hepatic mass, patient was found to have hepatocellular carcinoma on biopsy. Patient had no history of cirrhosis of the liver in the past. On Echocardiogram patient was noted to have a large mass filling the right atrial cavity. CT scan of abdomen, pelvis and chest showed a diffusely enlarged heterogeneously enhancing liver consistent with large hepatoma, with portal venous and hepatic vein thrombosis. Tumor thrombus extended through the hepatic veins and upper inferior vena cava into the right atrium. There was 6 cm greatest diameter enhancing mass in the right atrium. Patient had primary hepatocellular carcinoma with extensive invasion into vascular structures. His prognosis was poor and patient opted for palliative care only. In conclusion, patients with co-infection of HIV and Hepatitis B are at risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma with extension into the right atrium and physicians managing these patients should have high suspicion of right atrial involvement with tumor extension and low threshold to order a screening echocardiogram.

  13. Collision tumor of hepatocellular carcinoma and neuroendocrine carcinoma involving the liver: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Choi, Gyu Ho; Ann, Sun Young; Lee, Soon Il; Kim, Suk Bae; Song, Il Han

    2016-11-07

    Primary hepatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) with concurrent occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) of the liver is very rare. Only 8 cases have been reported in the literature. Concurrent occurrence of HCC and NEC in the liver is classified as combined type or collision type by histological distributional patterns; only 2 cases have been reported. Herein, we report a case of collision type concurrent occurrence of HCC and NEC, in which primary hepatic NEC was in only a small portion of the nodule, which is different from the 2 previously reported cases. A 72-year-old male with chronic hepatitis C was admitted to our hospital for a hepatic mass detected by liver computed tomography (CT) at another clinic. Because the nodule was in hepatic segment 3 and had proper radiologic findings for diagnosis of HCC, including enhancement in the arterial phase and wash-out in the portal and delay phases, the patient was treated with laparoscopic left lateral sectionectomy. The pathology demonstrated that the nodule was 2.5 cm and was moderately differentiated HCC. However, a 3 mm-sized focal neuroendocrine carcinoma was also detected on the capsule of the nodule. The tumor was concluded to be a collision type with HCC and primary hepatic NEC. After the surgery, for follow-up, the patient underwent a liver CT every 3 mo. Five multiple nodules were found in the right hepatic lobe on the follow-up liver CT 6 mo post-operatively. As the features of the nodules in the liver CT and MRI were different from that of HCC, a liver biopsy was performed. Intrahepatic recurrent NEC was proven after the liver biopsy, which showed the same pathologic features with the specimen obtained 6 mo ago. Palliative chemotherapy with a combination of etoposide and cisplatin has been administered for 4 months, showing partial response.

  14. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  15. MIB-1 Index-Stratified Assessment of Dual-Tracer PET/CT with (68)Ga-DOTATATE and (18)F-FDG and Multimodality Anatomic Imaging in Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors of Unknown Primary in a PRRT Workup Setting.

    PubMed

    Sampathirao, Nikita; Basu, Sandip

    2017-03-01

    Our aim was to comparatively assess dual-tracer PET/CT ((68)Ga-DOTATATE and (18)F-FDG) and multimodality anatomic imaging in studying metastatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) of unknown primary (CUP-NETs) scheduled for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy for divergence of tracer uptake on dual-tracer PET/CT, detection of primary, and overall lesion detection vis-a-vis tumor proliferation index (MIB-1/Ki-67). Methods: Fifty-one patients with CUP-NETs (25 men, 26 women; age, 22-74 y), histopathologically proven and thoroughly investigated with conventional imaging modalities (ultrasonography, CT/contrast-enhanced CT, MRI, and endoscopic ultrasound, wherever applicable), were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were primarily referred for deciding on feasibility of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (except 2 patients), and all had undergone (68)Ga-DOTATATE and (18)F-FDG PET/CT as part of pretreatment workup. The sites of metastases included liver, lung/mediastinum, skeleton, abdominal nodes, and other soft-tissue sites. Patients were divided into 5 groups on the basis of MIB-1/Ki-67 index on a 5-point scale: group I (1%-5%) (n = 35), group II (6%-10%) (n = 8), group III (11%-15%) (n = 4), group IV (16%-20%) (n = 2), and group V (>20%) (n = 2). Semiquantitative analysis of tracer uptake was undertaken by SUVmax of metastatic lesions and the primary (when detected). The SUVmax values were studied over increasing MIB-1/Ki-67 index. The detection sensitivity of (68)Ga-DOTATATE for primary and metastatic lesions was assessed and compared with other imaging modalities including (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Results: Unknown primary was detected on (68)Ga-DOTATATE in 31 of 51 patients, resulting in sensitivity of 60.78% whereas overall lesion detection sensitivity was 96.87%. The overall lesion detection sensitivities (individual groupwise from group I to group V) were 97.75%, 87.5%, 100%, 100%, and 66.67%, respectively. As MIB-1/Ki-67 index increased, (68)Ga-DOTATATE uptake

  16. Tumor Necrosis Factor-Like Weak Inducer of Apoptosis Promotes Hepatic Stellate Cells Migration via Canonical NF-κB/MMP9 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Aixiu; Wang, Chen; Cao, Yu; Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Mingming; Su, Min; Zou, Xiaoping; Xu, Guifang; Zhuge, Yuzheng

    2016-01-01

    In the liver, the signal and function of tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) have mainly been assessed in association with liver regeneration. However, the effects of TWEAK on liver fibrosis have not been fully elucidated. To investigate the effects of TWEAK on human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and to explore the relevant potential mechanisms, human HSCs line—LX-2 were cultured with TWEAK. Cell migration was detected by transwell assay; cell viability was evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8; the expression of MMP1, MMP2, MMP3, MMP7, MMP8, MMP9, MMP10, MMP11, MMP12, MMP13 gene was identified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting; the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was tested by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay; small interfering RNA transfection was applied for depletion of MMP9 and p65. The result of transwell assay revealed that TWEAK promoted LX-2 migration. Subsequently, our data testified that the expression and activity of MMP9 was induced by TWEAK in LX-2 cells, which enhanced the migration. Furthermore, our findings showed that TWEAK upregulated the phosphorylation of IκBα and p65 protein to increase MMP9 expression in LX-2 cells. Meanwhile, the alpha-smooth muscle actin, vimentin and desmin expression were upregulated following TWEAK treatment. The results in the present study revealed that TWEAK promotes HSCs migration via canonical NF-κB/MMP9 pathway, which possibly provides a molecular basis targeting TWEAK for the therapy of liver fibrosis. PMID:27907201

  17. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor may want you to get the hepatitis B vaccine (and maybe the hepatitis A vaccine, too), if you don't already have these viruses. If you have hepatitis C, you are more likely to catch hepatitis A or hepatitis B, which would cause more damage to your liver. ...

  18. Computed tomography of Krukenberg tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, K.C.; Gold, B.M.

    1985-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of three patients with Kurkenberg tumor was reviewed retrospectively. CT showed large, lobulated, multicystic masses with soft-tissue components, indistinguishable from primary ovarian carcinoma. Much has been written about metastatic ovarian tumor, but this is the first report in the radiologic literature about their CT features. The authors emphasize the importance of recognizing the ovary as a frequent site of metastases and the proper approach to this problem. In patients with a history of colon or gastric carcinoma, the mixed cystic and solid ovarian mass on CT should be regarded as metastatic tumor until proven otherwise. A careful search for gastrointestinal tract signs or symptoms should be done in any patient with a pelvic tumor. When CT is done for evaluation of ovarian tumor, the stomach and colon should be carefully evaluated, and the ovaries routinely examined in the preoperative CT staging of gastric or colon carcinoma.

  19. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis C Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Hepatitis C is a viral infection that causes liver inflammation, sometimes leading to serious liver damage. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) spreads through contaminated ...

  20. Toxic Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Toxic hepatitis is an inflammation of your liver in reaction to certain substances to which you're exposed. Toxic hepatitis can be caused by alcohol, chemicals, drugs or ...

  1. Breath-hold and free-breathing F-18-FDG-PET/CT in malignant melanoma—detection of additional tumoral foci and effects on quantitative parameters

    PubMed Central

    Bärwolf, Robert; Zirnsak, Mariana; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract During PET/CT acquisition, respiratory motion generates artifacts in the form of breath-related blurring, which may impair lesion detectability and diagnostic accuracy. This observational study was undertaken to verify whether breath-hold F-18-FDG-PET/CT (bhPET) detects additional foci compared to free-breathing PET/CT (fbPET) in cases of malignant melanoma, and to assess the impact of breath-holding on standard uptake values (SUV) and metabolic isocontoured volume (mVic40). Thirty-four patients with melanoma were examined. BhPET and fbPET findings of 117 lesions were compared and correlated with standard contrast-enhanced (ce) CT and MRI for lesion verification. Quantitative parameters (SUVmax, SUVmean, and mVic40) were assessed for both methods and evaluated by linear regression and Spearman correlation. The impact of lesion size and time interval between investigations was analyzed. In 1 patient, a CT-confirmed liver metastasis was seen only on bhPET but not on fbPET. At bhPET, SUVmax, and SUVmean proved significantly higher and mVic40 significantly lower than at fbPET. The positive effect on SUVmax and SUVmean was more pronounced in smaller lesions, whereas the time interval between bhPET and fbPET did not influence SUV or mVic40. In our patient cohort, bhPET yielded significantly higher SUV and provided improved volumetric lesion definition, particularly of smaller lesions. Also one additional liver lesion was identified. Breath-hold PET/CT is technically feasible, and may become clinically useful when fine quantitative evaluations are needed. PMID:28079829

  2. Hepatic glucose utilization in hepatic steatosis and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Keramida, Georgia; Hunter, James; Peters, Adrien Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. Whether hepatic glucose utilization rate (glucose phosphorylation rate; MRglu) is increased in steatosis and/or obesity is uncertain. Our aim was to determine the separate relationships of steatosis and obesity with MRglu. Sixty patients referred for routine PET/CT had dynamic PET imaging over the abdomen for 30 min post-injection of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), followed by Patlak–Rutland graphical analysis of the liver using abdominal aorta for arterial input signal. The plot gradient was divided by the intercept to give hepatic FDG clearance normalized to hepatic FDG distribution volume (ml/min per 100 ml) and multiplied by blood glucose to give hepatic MRglu (μmol/min per 100 ml). Hepatic steatosis was defined as CT density of ≤40 HU measured from the 60 min whole body routine PET/CT and obesity as body mass index of ≥30 kg/m2. Hepatic MRglu was higher in patients with steatosis (3.3±1.3 μmol/min per 100 ml) than those without (1.7±1.2 μmol/min per 100 ml; P<0.001) but there was no significant difference between obese (2.5±1.6 μmol/min per 100 ml) and non-obese patients (2.1±1.3 μmol/min per 100 ml). MRglu was increased in obese patients only if they had steatosis. Non-obese patients with steatosis still had increased MRglu. There was no association between MRglu and chemotherapy history. We conclude that MRglu is increased in hepatic steatosis probably through insulin resistance, hyperinsulinaemia and up-regulation of hepatic hexokinase, irrespective of obesity. PMID:27653524

  3. CD4+CD25+CD127low Regulatory T Cells Play Predominant Anti-Tumor Suppressive Role in Hepatitis B Virus-Associated Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shreya; Khosla, Ritu; David, Paul; Rastogi, Archana; Vyas, Ashish; Singh, Dileep; Bhardwaj, Ankit; Sahney, Amrish; Maiwall, Rakhi; Sarin, Shiv Kumar; Trehanpati, Nirupma

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide and hepatitis B is one of the commonest causes. T regulatory cells (Tregs) are strong immunomodulators and are likely to play a major role in HCC development. HBV infection is reported to induce expansion of Tregs. We investigated the CD4+CD25+CD127−veFoxP3+ Tregs in HBV-related HCC as compared to non-HBV-HCC. Patients and Methods: Whole blood immunophenotyping was analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry in patients with HBV-related HCC (HBV-HCC, n = 17), non-HBV-HCC (n = 22; NASH = 16, alcohol-related = 6), and chronic hepatitis B infection (CHBV; n = 10). Tregs functionality was checked by in vitro suppression assays using CD4+ CD25+ CD127low Tregs. Levels of serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), expression of FoxP3, IL-10, PD1, TGF-β, and Notch in Tregs, and liver explants were analyzed by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative RT-PCR. Results: CD4+CD25+hi and Foxp3 expression in CD4+CD25+hiCD127low was significantly increased (P = 0.04, P = 0.007) in HBVHCC compared to non-HBVHCC and CHBV patients. HBVHCC also showed high IL-10 and TGF-β secreting CD4 + CD25 + hiTregs. The PD1 expression in CD4 + CD25+hi was significantly decreased in the HBVHCC than non-HBVHCC. In HBVHCC, AFP levels were significantly high (median 941, range 2–727940) than non-HBVHCC (median 13.5, range 2–18,900). In HBVHCC, patients with high AFP (range; 3982–727940 ng/ml) showed positive correlation with Foxp3 expression in CD4+CD25+hi CD127low (r = 0.857, P = 0.014). Reduced PD1 expression in HBVHCC also had negative correlation with FOXP3 in CD4+CD25+hi CD127low (r = −0.78, P = 0.04). However, AFP levels in non-HBVHCC showed negative correlation with (R = −0.67, P = 0.005) with CD4+CD25+hi Tregs. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that CD4+ CD25+hi Tregs from HBVHCC patients have decreased expression of PD1

  4. Prognostication and response assessment in liver and pancreatic tumors: The new imaging

    PubMed Central

    De Robertis, Riccardo; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; Demozzi, Emanuele; Puntel, Gino; Ortolani, Silvia; Cingarlini, Sara; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bassi, Claudio; Pederzoli, Paolo; D’Onofrio, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and perfusion computed tomography (CT) are technical improvements of morphologic imaging that can evaluate functional properties of hepato-bilio-pancreatic tumors during conventional MRI or CT examinations. Nevertheless, the term “functional imaging” is commonly used to describe molecular imaging techniques, as positron emission tomography (PET) CT/MRI, which still represent the most widely used methods for the evaluation of functional properties of solid neoplasms; unlike PET or single photon emission computed tomography, functional imaging techniques applied to conventional MRI/CT examinations do not require the administration of radiolabeled drugs or specific equipments. Moreover, DWI and DCE-MRI can be performed during the same session, thus providing a comprehensive “one-step” morphological and functional evaluation of hepato-bilio-pancreatic tumors. Literature data reveal that functional imaging techniques could be proposed for the evaluation of these tumors before treatment, given that they may improve staging and predict prognosis or clinical outcome. Microscopic changes within neoplastic tissues induced by treatments can be detected and quantified with functional imaging, therefore these techniques could be used also for post-treatment assessment, even at an early stage. The aim of this editorial is to describe possible applications of new functional imaging techniques apart from molecular imaging to hepatic and pancreatic tumors through a review of up-to-date literature data, with a particular emphasis on pathological correlations, prognostic stratification and post-treatment monitoring. PMID:26078555

  5. Fulminant herpes hepatitis mimicking hepatic abscesses.

    PubMed

    Wolfsen, H C; Bolen, J W; Bowen, J L; Fenster, L F

    1993-01-01

    Fulminant hepatitis due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) in adults is a rare and deadly disease. We describe a 23-year-old woman with a 20-year history of Crohn's disease (CD) who was hospitalized with an acute febrile illness and diarrhea. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen demonstrated an intramural sigmoid colon abscess and multiple abscesses in the liver. Despite high-dose parenteral corticosteroids and broad-spectrum antibiotics, the patient remained acutely ill, with high fever and markedly elevated serum transaminase levels, but no jaundice. Sigmoid resection and wedge liver biopsy were performed at laparotomy. Histologic examination documented HSV-type intranuclear inclusions and inflammation with necrosis in both the sigmoid colon and liver specimens. The patient subsequently died despite parenteral acyclovir treatment. Although rare, fulminant hepatitis due to HSV simplex virus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with severe hepatitis. Of special note, the necrotizing liver lesions may be mistaken for pyogenic abscesses on CT scan.

  6. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas--evaluation with multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Edward G; Georgiades, Christos S; Horton, Karen H; Lillemoe, Keith D; Fishman, Elliot K

    2005-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas is a rare cystic pancreatic tumor. In this case report we provide the imaging perspective of the lesion including the role of multidetector CT (MDCT) and CT angiography and 3D imaging.

  7. Reversible Human TGF-β Signal Shifting between Tumor Suppression and Fibro-Carcinogenesis: Implications of Smad Phospho-Isoforms for Hepatic Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transitions.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Katsunori; Murata, Miki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2016-01-12

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) are observed during both physiological liver wound healing and the pathological fibrotic/carcinogenic (fibro-carcinogenetic) process. TGF-β and pro-inflammatory cytokine are considered to be the major factors accelerating liver fibrosis and promoting liver carcinogenesis. Smads, consisting of intermediate linker regions connecting Mad homology domains, act as the intracellular mediators of the TGF-β signal transduction pathway. As the TGF-β receptors, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase, differentially phosphorylate Smad2/3, we have generated numerous antibodies against linker (L) and C-terminal (C) phosphorylation sites in Smad2/3 and identified four types of phosphorylated forms: cytostatic COOH-terminally-phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3C), mitogenic pSmad3L (Ser-213) signaling, fibrogenic pSmad2L (Ser-245/250/255)/C signaling and migratory pSmad2/3L (Thr-220/179)/C signaling. After acute liver injury, TGF-β upregulates pSmad3C signaling and terminates pSmad3L (Ser-213)-mediated hepatocyte proliferation. TGF-β and pro-inflammatory cytokines cooperatively enhance collagen synthesis by upregulating pSmad2L (Thr-220)/C and pSmad3L (Thr-179)/C pathways in activated hepatic stellate cells. During chronic liver injuries, hepatocytes persistently affected by TGF-β and pro-inflammatory cytokines eventually become pre-neoplastic hepatocytes. Both myofibroblasts and pre-neoplastic hepatocyte exhibit the same carcinogenic (mitogenic) pSmad3L (Ser-213) and fibrogenic pSmad2L (Ser-245/250/255)/C signaling, with acquisition of fibro-carcinogenic properties and increasing risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Firstly, we review phospho-Smad-isoform signalings in epithelial and mesenchymal cells in physiological and pathological conditions and then consider Smad linker phosphorylation as a potential target for pathological EMT during human fibro-carcinogenesis, because human

  8. Hepatitis B and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems : Hepatitis B Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis B What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. This condition ... our related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis C . Hepatitis B and HIV About 10% of people living ...

  9. Adrenal cortex dysfunction: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Huebener, K.H.; Treugut, H.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of the adrenal gland was studied in 302 patients with possible endocrinologic disease and 107 patients undergoing CT for nonendocrinologic reasons. Measurements of adrenal size were also made in 100 adults with no known adrenal pathology. CT proved to be a sensitive diagnostic tool in combination with clinical studies. When blood hormone levels are increased, CT can differentiate among homogeneous organic hyperplasia, nodular hyperplasia, benign adenoma, and malignant cortical adenoma. When blood hormone levels are decreased, CT can demonstrate hypoplasia or metastatic tumorous destruction. Calcifications can be demonstrated earlier than on plain radiographs. When hormone elimination is increased, the morphologic substrate can be identified; tumorous changes can be localized and infiltration of surrounding organs recognized.

  10. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... transaminase enzyme levels Treatment There is no specific treatment for hepatitis A. You should rest when the symptoms are ... and have not had hepatitis A or the hepatitis A vaccine. Common reasons for getting one or both of these treatments include: You live with someone who has hepatitis ...

  11. Combined 18F-FDG and 11C-Methionine PET/CT scans in a case of metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    D’souza, Maria M.; Sharma, Rajnish; Jaimini, Abhinav; Saw, Sanjiv Kumar; Singh, Dinesh; Mondal, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    A 37-year-old male who underwent a central hepatectomy of the liver for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was referred for an 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) study to rule out tumor recurrence or metastases. The scan showed a recurrent hepatic mass at the operative site, along with low-grade uptake in bilateral pulmonary metastases, mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes, and few skeletal sites. A non-FDG avid intracranial extradural mass was visualized in the right frontal lobe. The 11C-methionine PET/CT scan performed subsequently revealed a larger area of involvement at the primary site, along with widespread metastases to the lungs, mediastinal, hilar, and abdominal lymph nodes, and multiple skeletal sites. Further, dural metastasis with high tracer uptake was noted in the frontal region. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case documented in the literature, wherein 11C-methionine PET/CT played a significant role in delineating the widespread dissemination, including the extremely rare dural involvement in a case of HCC. This report highlights the potential value of 11C-methionine PET/CT in assessing the hepatic and extrahepatic tumor burden in cases of HCC, especially in clinically unexpected locations. PMID:25210286

  12. Combination Therapy of Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization and Arterial Administration of Antiangiogenesis on VX2 Liver Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Gang; Zhao DenglLing; Li Guangchao; Yu Hui; Teng Gaojun

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the antitumorigenic efficiency of Endostar (an antiangiogenic agent) arterially administrated combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) on liver tumor, and validation of perfusion CT for quantitative measurements of the results.Experimental DesignThirty rabbits bearing VX2 liver tumors were randomly and equally distributed into three groups. One of the following treatment protocols was performed in each group: 1) group 1 was treated with TACE and simultaneously arterially administrated Endostar; 2) group 2 with TACE alone, and 3) a control group that had saline injected through hepatic artery. Routine CT scan was performed before treatment, and perfusion CT imaging was performed 2 weeks after treatment. Immunohistochemical biomarkers of microvascular density (MVD) and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were measured for assessments of angiogenesis. Results: We observed a statistically significant reduction from the control in the volume, growth rate, and size of the tumor 2 weeks after treatment with both TACE plus Endostar and with TACE alone (P < 0.01). Although there was no statistically significant difference in tumor size between the group with TACE plus Endostar and the group with TACE alone (P > 0.05), MVD and VEGF were significantly less expressed in the TACE plus Endostar group than both groups with TACE alone and the control group (P < 0.01). Blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), and permeability-surface area products (PS) in the group with TACE plus Endostar on perfusion CT were significantly higher than other two groups (P < 0.05), which were positively correlated with the MVD and VEGF values (P < 0.05). Conclusions: TACE with arterial administration of Endostar simultaneously significantly inhibited the angiogenesis biomarkers associated with TACE in a rabbit model bearing VX2 liver tumor, which indicates that the combined treatment protocol may have potential

  13. A Novel Assessment of Various Bio-Imaging Methods for Lung Tumor Detection and Treatment by using 4-D and 2-D CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Judice A., Antony; Geetha, Dr. K. Parimala

    2013-01-01

    Lung Cancer is known as one of the most difficult cancer to cure, and the number of deaths that it causes generally increasing. A detection of the Lung Cancer in its early stage can be helpful for Medical treatment to limit the danger, but it is a challenging problem due to Cancer cell structure. Interpretation of Medical image is often difficult and time consuming, even for the experienced Physicians. The aid of image analysis Based on machine learning can make this process easier. This paper describes fully Automatic Decision Support system for Lung Cancer diagnostic from CT Lung images. Most traditional medical diagnosis systems are founded on huge quantity of training data and takes long processing time. However, on the occasion that very little volume of data is available, the traditional diagnosis systems derive defects such as larger error, Time complexity. Focused on the solution to this problem, a Medical Diagnosis System based on Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is presented. In this paper we describe a pre-processing stage involving some Noise removal techniques help to solve this problem, we preprocess an images (by Mean Error Square Filtering and Histogram analysis)obtained after scanning the Lung CT images. Secondly separate the lung areas from an image by a segmentation process (by Thresholding and region growing techniques). Finally we developed HMM for the classification of Cancer Nodule. Results are checked for 2D and 4D CT images. This automation process reduces the time complexity and increases the diagnosis confidence. PMID:23847454

  14. Equivalent dose rate at 1m of patients with known or suspected neuroendocrine tumor exiting a nuclear medicine department after (68)Ga-DOTATOC, (18)F-FDOPA or (18)F-FDG PET/CT, or (111)In-pentetreotide or (123)I-mIBG SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Zhang-Yin, Jules; Dirand, Anne-Sophie; Sasanelli, Myriam; Corrégé, Gwenaelle; Peudon, Aude; Kiffel, Thierry; Nataf, Valérie; Clerc, Jérôme; Montravers, Françoise; Talbot, Jean-Noël

    2017-02-16

    (123)I-mIBG and (111)In-pentetrotide SPECT have been used for functional imaging of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) for the last two decades. More recently, PET/CT imaging with (18)F-FDG, (18)F-FDOPA and (68)Ga somatostatin-receptor ligands in NETs has been expanding. No direct measurements of the dose rate from NET patients exiting the nuclear medicine department could be found in the literature after PET/CT with (18)F-FDOPA or (68)Ga-DOTATOC, a somatostatin analogue. Methods: We measured the dose rates from NET patients undergoing PET/CT or SPECT/CT in our centers. A total of 103 paired measurements of equivalent dose rate at 1m of the patient (EDR-1m) were performed in 98 patients on leaving the department. The detector was facing the sternum or the urinary bladder, at a distance of 1 meter from and right in front of the patient. The practice for exiting the department differed according to whether the patient was referred to PET/CT or to SPECT/CT. PET/CT patients were discharged after imaging. Results: The median administered activity was 122 MBq in 53 (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CTs, 198 MBq in 15 (18)F-FDOPA PET/CTs and 176 MBq in 13 (18)F-FDG PET/CTs. The corresponding median EDR-1m (in µSv/h) were 4.8, 9.5 and 8.8 respectively facing the sternum, and 5.1, 10.1 and 9.5 respectively facing the bladder. SPECT/CT patients left the department earlier, just after radiopharmaceutical injection. The median administered activity was 170 MBq in 12 (111)In-pentetreotide SPECT/CTs and 186 MBq in 10 (123)I-mIBG SPECT/CTs. The corresponding median EDR-1m (in µSv/h) were 9.4, and 4.9 respectively at the level of the sternum, and 9.3 and 4.7 respectively at the level of the bladder. The EDR-1m was <20 µSv/h in all patients. Thus when exiting the nuclear medicine department, the NET patients injected with (68)Ga-DOTATOC or (123)I mIBG emitted an average EDR-1m roughly half of that of patients injected with other radiopharmaceuticals. This is a complementary argument for replacing

  15. Endovascular treatment of primary hepatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Popiel, M; Gulie, L; Turculeţ, C; Beuran, M

    2008-01-01

    First transcatheter embolization of hepatic artery has been materializing in 1974, in France, for unresectable hepatic tumours. Then, this treatment has become use enough in many countries, especially in Japan, where primary hepatic tumours are very frequent. In this article, we present procedures of interventional endovascular treatment for primary hepatic tumours: chemoembolization, intra–arterial chemotherapy. The study comprises patients with primary hepatic tumours investigated by hepatic–ultrasound and contrast–enhanced CT or MRI. DSA–hepatic angiography is very important to verify the accessory hepatic supply. It has been performed selective catheterization of right/left hepatic branches followed by cytostatics injection. Most of the patients have benefit by hepatic chemoembolization (cytostatics, Lipiodol and embolic materials). The selective intra–arterial chemotherapy (cytostatics without Lipiodol) was performing in cases with contraindications for Lipiodol or embolic materials injection (cirrhosis–Child C, thrombosis of portal vein, hepatic insufficiency). For treatment of primary hepatic tumours we use 5–F–Uracil, Farmarubicin and Mytomicin C. Less numbers of the reservoirs were placed because financial causes. Chemoembolization was better than procedures without Lipiodol or embolic materials. Lipiodol reached in tumoural tissue and the distribution of Lipiodol harmonises with degree of vascularisation. After the chemoembolization procedure, the diameter of tumours decreased gradually depending on the size of tumour. Effective alternative for unresectable primary hepatic tumours (big size, hepatic dysfunction, and other surgical risk factors) is endovascular interventional treatment. PMID:20108517

  16. Enrichment of maternal diet with conjugated linoleic acids influences desaturases activity and fatty acids profile in livers and hepatic microsomes of the offspring with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Białek, Agnieszka; Stawarska, Agnieszka; Tokarz, Andrzej; Czuba, Katarzyna; Konarska, Anna; Mazurkiewicz, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of diet supplementation of pregnant and breast-feeding female Sprague-Dawley rats with conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) on the Δ6- and Δ5-desaturase activity in hepatic microsomes as well as on fatty acids profile and lipids peroxidation in liver and hepatic microsomes of the progeny with chemically induced mammary tumors. Rats were divided into two groups with different diet supplementation (vegetable oil (which did not contain CLA) or CLA). Their female offspring was divided within these groups into two subgroups: (1)--fed the same diet as mothers (K1 - oil, 01 - CLA), and (2)--fed the standard fodder (K2, O2). At 50th day of life, the progeny obtained carcinogenic agent (7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene). Higher supply of CLA in diet of mothers resulted in lower susceptibility to chemically induced mammary tumors in their offspring (p = 0.0322). It also influenced the fatty acids profile in livers and in hepatic microsomes, especially polyunsaturated n3 and n6 fatty acids. CLA inhibited the activity of the desaturases, which confirmed that CLA can reduce the level of arachidonic acid directly, reducing linoleic acid content in membranes, or indirectly, through the regulation of its metabolism. We were unable to confirm or deny the antioxidative properties of CLA. Our results indicate that the higher supply of CLA in mothers' diet during pregnancy and breastfeeding causes their incorporation into tissues of children, changes the efficiency of fatty acids metabolism and exerts health-promoting effect in their adult life reducing the breast cancer risk.

  17. Intermittent Hepatic Inflow Occlusion During Partial Hepatectomy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Does Not Shorten Overall Survival or Increase the Likelihood of Tumor Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiwei; Tang, Wei; Hernandez-Alejandro, Roberto; Bertens, Kimberly A.; Wu, Hong; Liao, Mingheng; Li, Jiaxin; Zeng, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aim: To investigate whether the long-term outcomes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was adversely impacted by intermittent hepatic inflow occlusion (HIO) during hepatic resection. Methods: 1549 HCC patients who underwent hepatic resection between 1998 and 2008 were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Intermittent HIO was performed in 931 patients (HIO group); of which 712 patients had a Pringle maneuver as the mechanism for occlusion (PM group), and 219 patients had selective hemi-hepatic occlusion (SO group). There were 618 patients that underwent partial hepatectomy without occlusion (occlusion-free, OF group). Results: The 1-, 3-, and 5- year overall survival (OS) rates were 79%, 59%, and 42% in the HIO group, and 83%, 53%, and 35% in the OF group, respectively. The corresponding recurrence free survival (RFS) rates were 68%, 39%, and 22% in the HIO group, and 74%, 41%, and 18% in the OF group, respectively. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in OS or RFS (P = 0.325 and P = 0.416). Subgroup analysis showed patients with blood loss over 3000 mL and those requiring transfusion suffered significantly shorter OS and RFS. Blood loss over 3000 mL and blood transfusion were independent risk factors to OS and RFS. Conclusions: The application of intermittent HIO (PM and SO) during hepatic resection did not adversely impact either OS or RFS in patients with HCC. Intermittent HIO is still a valuable tool in hepatic resection, because high intraoperative blood loss resulting in transfusion is associated with a reduction in both OS and RFS. PMID:25526466

  18. 18F-FDG PET/CT for Monitoring the Response of Breast Cancer to miR-143-Based Therapeutics by Targeting Tumor Glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Ying; Zhang, Ling-fei; Guo, Rui; Liang, Sheng; Zhang, Min; Shi, Shuo; Shang-Guan, Cheng-fang; Liu, Mo-fang; Li, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Increased glucose utilization is a hallmark of cancer, and tumor metabolism is emerging as anticancer target for therapeutic intervention. Triple-negative breast cancers TNBC are highly glycolytic and show poor clinical outcomes. We previously identified hexokinase 2, the major glycolytic enzyme, as a target gene of miR-143 in TNBC. Here, we developed a therapeutic formulation using cholesterol-modified miR-143 agomir encapsulated in a neutral lipid-based delivery agent that blocked tumor growth and glucose metabolism in TNBC tumor-bearing mice when administered systemically. The antioncogenic effects were accompanied by a reduction in the direct target hexokinase 2 and [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake based on positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Treatment with miR-143 formulation has minimal toxic effects and mice tolerated it well. Thus, we demonstrated that miR-143 is a robust inhibitor of the Warburg effect and an effective therapeutic target for TNBC. In addition, 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography can be used to specifically monitor the response of TNBC to miR-143-based therapeutics by targeting tumor glycolysis. PMID:27574783

  19. (18)F-FDG PET/CT for Monitoring the Response of Breast Cancer to miR-143-Based Therapeutics by Targeting Tumor Glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ying; Zhang, Ling-Fei; Guo, Rui; Liang, Sheng; Zhang, Min; Shi, Shuo; Shang-Guan, Cheng-Fang; Liu, Mo-Fang; Li, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Increased glucose utilization is a hallmark of cancer, and tumor metabolism is emerging as anticancer target for therapeutic intervention. Triple-negative breast cancers TNBC are highly glycolytic and show poor clinical outcomes. We previously identified hexokinase 2, the major glycolytic enzyme, as a target gene of miR-143 in TNBC. Here, we developed a therapeutic formulation using cholesterol-modified miR-143 agomir encapsulated in a neutral lipid-based delivery agent that blocked tumor growth and glucose metabolism in TNBC tumor-bearing mice when administered systemically. The antioncogenic effects were accompanied by a reduction in the direct target hexokinase 2 and [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake based on positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Treatment with miR-143 formulation has minimal toxic effects and mice tolerated it well. Thus, we demonstrated that miR-143 is a robust inhibitor of the Warburg effect and an effective therapeutic target for TNBC. In addition, (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography can be used to specifically monitor the response of TNBC to miR-143-based therapeutics by targeting tumor glycolysis.

  20. (18)F-FDG PET/CT for Monitoring the Response of Breast Cancer to miR-143-Based Therapeutics by Targeting Tumor Glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ying; Zhang, Ling-Fei; Guo, Rui; Liang, Sheng; Zhang, Min; Shi, Shuo; Shang-Guan, Cheng-Fang; Liu, Mo-Fang; Li, Biao

    2016-08-30

    Increased glucose utilization is a hallmark of cancer, and tumor metabolism is emerging as anticancer target for therapeutic intervention. Triple-negative breast cancers TNBC are highly glycolytic and show poor clinical outcomes. We previously identified hexokinase 2, the major glycolytic enzyme, as a target gene of miR-143 in TNBC. Here, we developed a therapeutic formulation using cholesterol-modified miR-143 agomir encapsulated in a neutral lipid-based delivery agent that blocked tumor growth and glucose metabolism in TNBC tumor-bearing mice when administered systemically. The antioncogenic effects were accompanied by a reduction in the direct target hexokinase 2 and [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake based on positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Treatment with miR-143 formulation has minimal toxic effects and mice tolerated it well. Thus, we demonstrated that miR-143 is a robust inhibitor of the Warburg effect and an effective therapeutic target for TNBC. In addition, (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography can be used to specifically monitor the response of TNBC to miR-143-based therapeutics by targeting tumor glycolysis.

  1. Possible Misinterpretation of Demarcated Solid Patterns of Radiation Fibrosis on CT Scans as Tumor Recurrence in Patients Receiving Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Atsuya; Kunieda, Etsuo Takeda, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Michio; Sanuki, Naoko; Fujii, Hirofumi; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kubo, Atsushi M.D.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze opacity changes near primary lung cancer tumors irradiated by using hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) to determine the presence or absence of tumor recurrence. Methods and Materials: After review-board approval for a retrospective study, we examined data from 50 patients treated with curative intent for proven or highly suspected localized peripheral-lung cancer and followed up for at least 12 months. All patients had received 50 Gy in five fractions (80% isodose) and were followed up monthly with chest X-ray until clinical and X-ray findings stabilized. Follow-up computed tomography scans were performed 1 and 3 months after HSRT and thereafter at 3-month intervals during the first 2 years. Results: Median follow-up was 30.4 months (range, 12.0-73.8 months). Abnormal opacities that were suspicious for recurrent tumor appeared in 20 patients at a median of 20.7 months (range, 5.9-61.4 months). Only 3 patients were finally found to have recurrence; 14 were recurrence free but were suspected to have fibrosis, and findings for the other 3 patients were considered equivocal because of a short follow-up period ({<=}6 months). Conclusion: Radiation fibrosis, which may occur 1 year or longer after completion of HSRT, is difficult to distinguish from tumor recurrence. Even when opacities increase on follow-up radiologic scans, recurrence cannot be diagnosed conclusively based on image findings; biopsy occasionally is warranted.

  2. Radiofrequency Ablation Assisted by Real-Time Virtual Sonography and CT for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Undetectable by Conventional Sonography

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, Motoki Sato, Morio; Sahara, Shinya; Takasaka, Isao; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Tanihata, Hirohiko; Kimura, Masashi; Takeuchi, Nozomu

    2009-01-15

    Real-time virtual sonography (RVS) is a diagnostic imaging support system, which provides the same cross-sectional multiplanar reconstruction images as ultrasound images on the same monitor screen in real time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiofrequency ablation (RFA) assisted by RVS and CT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) undetectable with conventional sonography. Subjects were 20 patients with 20 HCC nodules not detected by conventional sonography but detectable by CT or MRI. All patients had hepatitis C-induced liver cirrhosis; there were 13 males and 7 females aged 55-81 years (mean, 69.3 years). RFA was performed in the CT room, and the tumor was punctured with the assistance of RVS. CT was performed immediately after puncture, and ablation was performed after confirming that the needle had been inserted into the tumor precisely. The mean number of punctures and success rates of the first puncture were evaluated. Treatment effects were evaluated with dynamic CT every 3 months after RFA. RFA was technically feasible and local tumor control was achieved in all patients. The mean number of punctures was 1.1, and the success rate of the first puncture was 90.0%. This method enabled safe ablation without complications. The mean follow-up period was 13.5 month (range, 9-18 months). No local recurrence was observed at the follow-up points. In conclusion, RFA assisted by RVS and CT is a safe and efficacious method of treatment for HCC undetectable by conventional sonography.

  3. LNA aptamer based multi-modal, Fe3O4-saturated lactoferrin (Fe3O4-bLf) nanocarriers for triple positive (EpCAM, CD133, CD44) colon tumor targeting and NIR, MRI and CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-12-01

    , survivin splice variant (survivin 2B) and other anti-apoptotic proteins Bad, Bcl-2 and XIAP. Apart from the promising anti-cancer efficacy and the exceptional tumor targeting ability observed by multimodal imaging using near-infrared (NIR) imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computerized tomographic (CT) techniques, these NCs also maintained the immunomodulatory benefits of bLf as they were able to increase the RBC, hemoglobin, iron calcium and zinc levels in mice.

  4. MR and CT appearance of cardiac hemangioma

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, J.L.; Kessler, R.M.; Raizada, V.; Williamson, M.R.

    1996-05-01

    We present a case of cardiac hemangioma in a symptomatic patient. MR and CT each have specific characteristics that should make one consider including or excluding this in the differential diagnosis of a cardiac tumor. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Dynamic multidetector computed tomography findings of hepatocellular carcinoma of hepatitis B virus-positive and -negative patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to retrospectively investigate and compare multidetector computed tomography findings of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-positive and -negative patients. Methods Triphasic (arterial, portal venous, and delayed phases) dynamic multidetector computed tomography (CT) was performed in 83 patients with HCC, 48 of whom were HBV-positive. The diagnosis of HCC was established with typical CT imaging findings (68 patients) or histopathological evaluation (15 patients). Distribution of solitary, multiple, and diffuse HCC, portal/hepatic vein thrombosis, metastasis, and patients with high alpha-fetoprotein levels in the HBV-positive and -negative groups were compared using the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test. Lesion size, alpha-fetoprotein levels, arterial, portal, delayed enhancement, and washout of lesions were compared using the Student’s t-test. Results Hypervascular tumors were observed in 72 (87%) patients, and hypovascular tumors were found in 11 (13%) patients. The mean alpha-fetoprotein value of HBV-positive patients with HCC was significantly higher than the mean alpha-fetoprotein value of HBV-negative patients (P < 0.05). Portal/hepatic vein thrombosis and metastasis were more frequently observed in HBV-positive patients (P < 0.05). The frequencies of solitary, multiple, and diffuse lesions in HBV-positive and -negative patients were not significantly different (P > 0.05). The mean diameters, arterial, portal, and delayed phase attenuations, and washout of HCC were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Conclusions Multidetector CT imaging findings of HCC in HBV-positive and -negative patients are alike. Portal/hepatic vein thrombosis and metastasis are more frequently observed in HBV-positive patients. Alpha-fetoprotein levels are higher in HBV-positive patients. PMID:25608603

  6. Hepatitis C: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » Hepatitis C » Hepatitis C Treatment Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Hepatitis C Treatment for Veterans and the Public Treatment ...

  7. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... washed in untreated water Putting into your mouth a finger or object that came into contact with ...

  8. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... commonly used with viral hepatitis and related conditions. Web Resources American Liver Foundation A national nonprofit organization ... other liver diseases through research, education, and advocacy. Web site features a database directory of hepatitis clinical ...

  9. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000279.htm Hepatitis B To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis B is irritation and swelling (inflammation) of the ...

  10. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Lupoid hepatitis; Chronic acute liver disease ... This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy body tissue and harmful, outside ...

  11. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... times more infectious than HIV. Which adults need hepatitis B vaccine? Any sexually active adult who is not in ... share needles, syringes, or other drug-injection equipment. Hepatitis B vaccine is available alone or in a combination with ...

  12. Pleural and Pulmonary Staining at Inferior Phrenic Arteriography Mimicking a Tumor Staining of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Deok Hee; Hwang, Jae Cheol; Lim, Soo Mee; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Sung, Kyu-Bo; Song, Ho-Young

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To describe the findings of pleural and pulmonary staining of the inferior phrenic artery, which can be confused with tumor staining during transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) of hepatoma.Methods: Fifteen patients who showed pleural and pulmonary staining without relationship to hepatic masses at inferior phrenic arteriography were enrolled. The staining was noted at initial TACE (n = 8), at successive TACE (n = 5), and after hepatic surgery (n = 2). The angiographic pattern, the presence of pleural change on computed tomography (CT), and clinical history were evaluated.Results: Draining pulmonary veins were seen in all cases. The lower margin of the staining corresponded to the lower margin of the pleura in 10 patients. CT showed pleural and/or pulmonary abnormalities in all cases. After embolization of the inferior phrenic artery, the accumulation of iodized oil in the lung was noted.Conclusion: Understanding the CT and angiographic findings of pleural and pulmonary staining during TACE may help differentiate benign staining from tumor staining.

  13. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis C, is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with ... childbirth. Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. If ...

  14. PET/CT in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama

    2008-11-15

    PET/CT is an effective tool for the diagnosis, staging and restaging of cancer patients. It combines the complementary information of functional PET images and anatomical CT images in one imaging session. Conventional stand-alone PET has been replaced by PET/CT for improved patient comfort, patient throughput, and most importantly the proven clinical outcome of PET/CT over that of PET and that of separate PET and CT. There are over two thousand PET/CT scanners installed worldwide since 2001. Oncology is the main application for PET/CT. Fluorine-18 deoxyglucose is the choice of radiopha