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Sample records for hepatitis a

  1. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... washed in untreated water Putting into your mouth a finger or object that came into contact with ...

  2. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations ​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Español Hepatitis A Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is hepatitis A? Hepatitis * A is a virus , or infection, ...

  3. Hepatitis A Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Hepatitis A Testing Share this page: Was this page ... HAV-Ab total; Anti-HAV Formal name: Viral Hepatitis A Antibody Related tests: Hepatitis B Testing ; Hepatitis ...

  4. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... an important digestive liquid called bile . What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  5. Hepatitis A - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... hepatitis A. Children can get hepatitis A at day care center from other children or from child care ... treatment with immunoglobulin therapy. If your child attends day care: Make sure the children and staff at the ...

  6. Hepatic encephalopathy: a review.

    PubMed

    Lizardi-Cervera, Javier; Almeda, Paloma; Guevara, Luis; Uribe, Misael

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complication that presents in as many as 28% of patients with cirrhosis, and reported up to ten years after the diagnosis of cirrhosis. Commonly, it is observed in patients with severe hepatic failure and is characterized by neuropsychiatric manifestations that can range in severity from a mild alteration in mental state to a coma; additionally, some neuromuscular symptoms can be observed. This complication of either acute or chronic hepatic disease is the result of a diminished hepatic reservoir and inability to detoxify some toxins that originate in the bowel. Today, the role of astrocytes, specifically the Alzheimer type II cells, is known to be very important in the pathogenesis of the hepatic encephalopathy, and will be reviewed later. In conclusion, the objectives of this review are: To understand the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy, To recognize the precipitating factors, as well as preventive measures for the development of the hepatic encephalopathy, To describe the new classification of hepatic encephalopathy and its clinical implications, To recognize the clinical manifestations and stages of the disease, To understand the main diagnostic tests used to detect the hepatic encephalopathy, To describe the main therapeutic treatments of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:15115963

  7. Combination hepatitis a-hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, A J; Balfour, J A

    1997-09-01

    The adult formulation of this combination hepatitis A-hepatitis B vaccine contains 720 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay units (EU) of formalin-inactivated hepatitis A virus strain HM175 and 20mug of recombinant DNA yeast-derived hepatitis B surface antigen adsorbed onto aluminium salts in 1ml for injection. The paediatric formulation contains half this dosage in 0.5ml for injection. The combination vaccine has been shown to be highly immunogenic in healthy young adults after the full dosage schedule of 3 doses at 0, 1 and 6 months. Trials in older adults and children indicate that immunogenicity is adequate in these groups also. The immunogenicity of the combination vaccine appears to be similar to that of hepatitis A vaccine and hepatitis B vaccine administered separately. Possible advantages for the combination vaccine recipient include fewer injections and lower costs. Local adverse reactions such as soreness at the injection site, redness and swelling occur often with the first dose of the series, but the incidence falls with subsequent doses. Local reactions are usually mild and transient, and reported systemic reactions (fatigue, headache) are thought not to have a causal link with the vaccine. PMID:18020513

  8. Hepatitis A FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... 185°F (85°C), kill the virus, although freezing temperatures do not. Symptoms Does Hepatitis A cause ... food, such as drinking beverages (with or without ice) of unknown purity, eating uncooked shellfish, and eating ...

  9. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses Type Transmission Prognosis A Fecal-oral (stool to ... risk for severe disease. Others A variety of viruses can affect the liver Signs and Symptoms Hepatitis ...

  10. Feature Hepatitis: The Dangers of Hepatitis: What you should know from A to E

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis The Dangers of Hepatitis: What you should know from A to E ... drugs. In some cases, hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Hepatitis: Acute or Chronic? Acute hepatitis is the initial ...

  11. Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond

    MedlinePlus

    Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is inflammation of the liver caused ...

  12. [Vaccination against hepatitis A].

    PubMed

    Balli, F; Di Biase, A R; Viola, L

    1996-01-01

    The epidemiology of hepatitis A, a disease endemic in various countries, is in a state of continuous change. Adults are more exposed to infection and considering the frequent absence of immunity, in contrast to children in whom the disease is almost always asymptomatic, the disease is often serious and prolonged with a mortality of up to 2.5%. The mode of transmission of HAV is predominantly the fecal-oral route; the virus is isolated during the prodromic period of the disease from the feces, blood, bile and seminal fluid. The virus can also be found in saliva (OMS '95); in addition it may also be transmitted by the maternal-fetal route. The HAV infects cells in vitro but does not cause a direct cytopathic effect. At the beginning of the acute phase of the disease the production of anti-HAV antibodies is of the IgM type followed later by IgG. Some studies have shown a potential role of cellular immunity in clearance of the virus from the hepatocytes and in the pathogenesis of the infection of HAV. The efficacy of immunoglobulin serum in the prevention of hepatitis A has been demonstrated since 1944. As regards active immunity two types of vaccinations have been prepared. One with live attenuated HAV carried by either bacteria or virus. The other, killed inactivated HAV, HAV capsule, antigenic subunit, synthetic peptides, anti-idiotypes or virosomes. The recent literature describe the vaccine produced by Merck Sharp & Dohme and by Smith Kline Beecham (SKB); both vaccines are made from HAV, grown in vitro, inactivated with formalin and adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide. The protection of the vaccine begins 14 days after administration and lasts from one month to one year. Numerous studies have been conducted which have shown that the vaccine is effective when given in 2 doses and confers protection against HAV for at least one year. The results have shown that the vaccination causes seroconversion in approximately 100% of subjects, and does not cause serious side

  13. [Vaccination against hepatitis A].

    PubMed

    Balli, F; Di Biase, A R; Viola, L

    1996-01-01

    The epidemiology of hepatitis A, a disease endemic in various countries, is in a state of continuous change. Adults are more exposed to infection and considering the frequent absence of immunity, in contrast to children in whom the disease is almost always asymptomatic, the disease is often serious and prolonged with a mortality of up to 2.5%. The mode of transmission of HAV is predominantly the fecal-oral route; the virus is isolated during the prodromic period of the disease from the feces, blood, bile and seminal fluid. The virus can also be found in saliva (OMS '95); in addition it may also be transmitted by the maternal-fetal route. The HAV infects cells in vitro but does not cause a direct cytopathic effect. At the beginning of the acute phase of the disease the production of anti-HAV antibodies is of the IgM type followed later by IgG. Some studies have shown a potential role of cellular immunity in clearance of the virus from the hepatocytes and in the pathogenesis of the infection of HAV. The efficacy of immunoglobulin serum in the prevention of hepatitis A has been demonstrated since 1944. As regards active immunity two types of vaccinations have been prepared. One with live attenuated HAV carried by either bacteria or virus. The other, killed inactivated HAV, HAV capsule, antigenic subunit, synthetic peptides, anti-idiotypes or virosomes. The recent literature describe the vaccine produced by Merck Sharp & Dohme and by Smith Kline Beecham (SKB); both vaccines are made from HAV, grown in vitro, inactivated with formalin and adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide. The protection of the vaccine begins 14 days after administration and lasts from one month to one year. Numerous studies have been conducted which have shown that the vaccine is effective when given in 2 doses and confers protection against HAV for at least one year. The results have shown that the vaccination causes seroconversion in approximately 100% of subjects, and does not cause serious side

  14. Hepatitis A: Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... are poor sanitary conditions or where good personal hygiene is not observed. Most hepatitis A viral infections ... person who doesn’t wash his or her hands after using the bathroom and then handles food ...

  15. Hepatitis D Virus: A Call to Screening

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis D virus causes an aggressive viral hepatitis with a virulent course of progression to cirrhosis and hepatic decompensation. It relies on hepatitis B coinfection for its pathogenesis and propagation. Hepatitis D virus had become the forgotten virus, with reduced public awareness, medical interest, and research support. Recently, there has been a resurgence of awareness and interest in hepatitis D, with improvements in diagnostic testing and establishment of international collaborative efforts to improve therapy. This article provides a framework to understand the impetus for increased screening as well as to identify key issues toward which collaborative efforts can be directed. PMID:27540336

  16. Hepatitis A infection during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Shahnaz A.; Koren, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    Question Many of my patients are from Southeast Asia, where hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is quite common. What precautions can I suggest my pregnant patients take before traveling to these areas and what is the risk of contracting HAV during pregnancy? Answer Hepatitis A virus is a water-borne pathogen transmitted by the fecal-oral route. To reduce the risk of contracting HAV while traveling to endemic areas, it is important to maintain hygienic practices such as hand washing with safe water, particularly before handling food, avoiding drinking water or using ice cubes of unknown purity, and avoiding eating unpeeled fruits and vegetables. An HAV vaccine is available and can be administered before traveling to endemic countries. Hepatitis A virus infection has a largely favourable expected outcome even during pregnancy. Infection occurring in the second or third trimester has been reported to be associated with preterm labour. PMID:26881283

  17. Hepatitis C: a current perspective.

    PubMed

    Farrell, G C

    1995-03-01

    This article covers several dilemmas posed by hepatitis C for the family physician. It is proposed that patients with known risk factors, such as injecting drug use or blood transfusion, be treated for an anti HCV. The problems of counselling the patient with an incidental positive anti HCV test are discussed; at present, the history of risk factors and liver test results are the most important aspects as there is no gold standard for hepatitis C diagnosis. Family and sexual transmission of HCV are rare; only mothers with extremely high levels of HCV viraemia are likely to transmit HCV to their offspring. Decisions about interferon treatment for hepatitis C require consideration of the natural history of this disease, the chances of a long-term response to treatment, and the adverse affects of interferon. Screening for hepatocellular carcinoma is proposed for patients who already have cirrhosis. PMID:7717894

  18. Hepatitis A: Old and New

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, Jennifer A.

    2001-01-01

    The hepatitis A virus (HAV), a picornavirus, is a common cause of hepatitis worldwide. Spread of infection is generally person to person or by oral intake after fecal contamination of skin or mucous membranes; less commonly, there is fecal contamination of food or water. Hepatitis A is endemic in developing countries, and most residents are exposed in childhood. In contrast, the adult population in developed countries demonstrates falling rates of exposure with improvements in hygiene and sanitation. The export of food that cannot be sterilized, from countries of high endemicity to areas with low rates of infection, is a potentially important source of infection. After ingestion and uptake from the gastrointestinal tract, the virus replicates in the liver and is excreted into the bile. Cellular immune responses to the virus lead to destruction of infected hepatocytes with consequent development of symptoms and signs of disease. Humoral immune responses are the basis for diagnostic serologic assays. Acute HAV infection is clinically indistinguishable from other causes of acute viral hepatitis. In young children the disease is often asymptomatic, whereas in older children and adults there may be a range of clinical manifestations from mild, anicteric infection to fulminant hepatic failure. Clinical variants include prolonged, relapsing, and cholestatic forms. Management of the acute illness is supportive, and complete recovery without sequelae is the usual outcome. Research efforts during World War II led to the development of passive immunoprophylaxis. Pooled immune serum globulin is efficacious in the prevention and attenuation of disease in exposed individuals. More recently, active immunoprophylaxis by vaccination has been accomplished. Future eradication of this disease can now be contemplated. PMID:11148002

  19. Bivalent inactivated hepatitis A and recombinant hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Beran, Jiri

    2007-12-01

    Hepatitis A and B remain serious global public health problems. Monovalent vaccines against hepatitis A and B have been available for many years. Since 1996, licenses have been gradually introduced for different formulations and immunization schedules of the first combined vaccines against both diseases. Twinrix Adult (with conventional and accelerated schedules) is available for the immunization of individuals aged 16 years or older in Europe and 18 years or older the USA. Twinrix Pediatric, with its three-dose schedule, and AmBirix, with its two-dose schedule, are licensed in Europe for ages 1-15 years. These vaccines offer a single injection for satisfactory protection against hepatitis A and B and an excellent safety and reactogenicity profile in comparison with monovalent vaccines. This article focuses on immunogenicity of the vaccines and proposes expert opinion and future directions in this field.

  20. Chronic urticaria following acute hepatitis A.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Paul M; Kevat, Dev A S; McCarthy, James S; Woods, Marion L

    2012-09-18

    Urticaria has a documented association with the prodromal phases of hepatitis A, B and, although still contentious, likely hepatitis C. Despite the documented association there are few actual reported cases of urticaria occurring with hepatitis A infection and in all of the cases reported so far the urticaria preceded the diagnosis of hepatitis A and was acute rather than chronic. We describe a case of urticaria occurring following acute infection with hepatitis A, which persisted beyond 6 weeks and therefore was by definition chronic. Although chronic urticaria has been reported to be associated with other forms of viral hepatitis, to the best of our knowledge this has not been reported previously with hepatitis A.

  1. Experience with hepatitis A and B vaccines.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jeffrey P

    2005-10-01

    The lengthy history of efforts to understand the pathogenesis and means of preventing and controlling both hepatitis A and B is noteworthy for many exceptional scientific achievements. Among these are the development of vaccines to prevent the spread of infection through induction of active immunity to hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). The first plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine was licensed in the United States in 1981 and was replaced by recombinant hepatitis B vaccines in 1986 and 1989. Vaccines to prevent HAV infection were licensed in the United States in 1995 and 1996. Subsequently, combination vaccines that included both hepatitis A and B vaccine components, or the hepatitis B component in combination with other commonly administered vaccines, were licensed in the United States. Despite significant reductions in hepatitis-related morbidity and mortality that have resulted from widespread use of these vaccines, vaccine-preventable morbidity and mortality still occur. The purposes of this article are to review clinical trial and other experience with hepatitis A and B vaccines in healthy individuals as well as in those with chronic liver disease, infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, or requiring hemodialysis; describe the impact that these vaccines and national recommendations for vaccination have had on reducing the incidence of HAV and HBV infection; and recommend expansion of these recommendations to include universal vaccination of adults as a means of further reducing the burden of viral hepatitis.

  2. Recurrent paratyphoid fever A co-infected with hepatitis A reactivated chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanling; Xiong, Yujiao; Huang, Wenxiang; Jia, Bei

    2014-05-12

    We report here a case of recurrent paratyphoid fever A with hepatitis A co-infection in a patient with chronic hepatitis B. A 26-year-old male patient, who was a hepatitis B virus carrier, was co-infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A and hepatitis A virus. The recurrence of the paratyphoid fever may be ascribed to the coexistence of hepatitis B, a course of ceftriaxone plus levofloxacin that was too short and the insensitivity of paratyphoid fever A to levofloxacin. We find that an adequate course and dose of ceftriaxone is a better strategy for treating paratyphoid fever. Furthermore, the co-infection of paratyphoid fever with hepatitis A may stimulate cellular immunity and break immunotolerance. Thus, the administration of the anti-viral agent entecavir may greatly improve the prognosis of this patient with chronic hepatitis B, and the episodes of paratyphoid fever and hepatitis A infection prompt the use of timely antiviral therapy.

  3. Does chronic hepatitis B infection affect the clinical course of acute hepatitis A?

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Rin; Moh, In Ho; Jung, Sung Won; Kim, Jin Bae; Park, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyoung Su; Jang, Myung Kuk; Lee, Myung Seok

    2013-01-01

    The impact of chronic hepatitis B on the clinical outcome of acute hepatitis A remains controversial. The aim of present study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of acute hepatitis A in cases with underlying chronic hepatitis B compared to cases of acute hepatitis A alone. Data on 758 patients with acute hepatitis A admitted at two university-affiliated hospitals were reviewed. Patients were classified into three groups: group A, patients with both acute hepatitis A and underlying chronic hepatitis B (n = 27); group B, patients infected by acute hepatitis A alone whose sexes and ages were matched with patients in group A (n  = 54); and group C, patients with acute hepatitis A alone (n = 731). None of the demographic features of group A were significantly different from those of group B or C, except for the proportion of males and body weight, which differed from group C. When comparing to group B, clinical symptoms were more frequent, and higher total bilirubin and lower albumin levels were observed in group A. When comparing to group C, the albumin levels were lower in group A. There were no differences in the duration of hospital stay, occurrence of acute kidney injury, acute liver failure, prolonged cholestasis, or relapsing hepatitis. This study revealed that clinical symptoms and laboratory findings were less favorable for patients with acute hepatitis A and chronic hepatitis B compared to those with acute hepatitis A alone. However, there were no differences in fatal outcomes or serious complications.

  4. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A antibody test; Hepatitis B antibody test; Hepatitis C antibody test; Hepatitis D antibody test ... or past infection, or immunity to hepatitis A Hepatitis B tests: Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), you have ...

  5. Hepatitis C and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems : Hepatitis C Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis C What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. This condition ... our related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B . Hepatitis C and HIV About 25% of people living ...

  6. Hepatitis B and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems : Hepatitis B Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis B What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. This condition ... our related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis C . Hepatitis B and HIV About 10% of people living ...

  7. Hepatitis B as a Sexually Transmitted Disease

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Brian A.P.

    1992-01-01

    Hepatitis B is a serious, common, viral, sexually transmitted disease. It is unique among the sexually transmitted diseases in that a safe, effective, proven vaccine is available. Increased recognition of hepatitis B as an important STD, appropriate counseling, and wise use of vaccination may well reduce the prevalence of this disease. PMID:21221349

  8. Hepatic sarcoidosis: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Ennaifer, Rym; Ayadi, Shema; Romdhane, Hayfa; Cheikh, Myriam; Nejma, Houda Ben; Bougassas, Wassila; Hadj, Najet Bel

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic non caseous granulomas disease. Liver is a common location but usually asymptomatic. Evidence based guidelines for this location treatment is lacking and the effect of corticosteroids may be inadequate. The aim of our study was to describe the clinical, biochemical, radiological and therapeutic features of seven patients with systemic sarcoidosis and liver involvement. A retrospective and descriptive monocentric study, over 3 years, including seven patients with systemic sarcoidosis and liver involvement. We included 5 women and 2 men with an average age of 43 years. Hepatic localization revealed sarcoidosis in 5 cases. Hepatomegaly was observed in all patients as well as abnormal serum liver function test reflected by anicteric cholestasis. Liver biopsy, showed in all granulomatous lesions consistent with sarcoidosis and severe fibrosis in 2 cases. Extra-hepatic manifestations were present in all patients represented mainly by pulmonary location. All patients were treated, five by corticosteroid and two with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Complete response was observed in one case, partial response in another case and corticosteroid refractoriness in one case. In two cases, corticosteroid therapy was introduced for less than 1 month, not allowing assessment of response. Antimalarials in combination with UDCA were used successfully in a patient with steroid-resistant liver disease. Liver involvement can reveal systemic sarcoidois. Given the risk of progression to severe liver disease, it must be screened in all patients with systemic sarcoidosis. Treatment is not systematic, and still based on corticosteroid therapy. In the absence of prospective randomized controlled trials, the efficacy of UDCA need to be proven. PMID:27795804

  9. Fulminant hepatic failure from hepatitis E in a non-pregnant female traveller.

    PubMed

    Chris, Robert B; Keystone, Jay S

    2016-04-01

    A non-pregnant Canadian woman returning from India presented with a 1-week history of jaundice and malaise. Subsequently, she developed fulminant hepatic failure caused by hepatitis E virus (HEV). HEV can cause fulminant hepatic failure, most commonly in pregnant women and those with chronic liver disease; however, all travellers are at risk.

  10. Autoimmune hepatitis or hepatic involvement in SLE?--A case report.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Y; Maebo, A; Yamade, W; Yamamoto, T; Amuro, Y; Hada, T; Higashino, K

    1987-04-01

    We report a patient with autoimmune hepatitis, who simultaneously satisfied the 1982 revised ARA criteria for systemic lupus erythematous and emphasize the difficulty in differentiating these two diseases. In addition, current concepts of a possible immunological distinction between autoimmune hepatitis and hepatic involvement in SLE are reviewed. PMID:3596158

  11. Fulminant hepatic failure after intravenous injection of sublingual buprenorphine in a patient with hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    French, Janine; Mujumdar, Avik; Angus, Peter; Gow, Paul

    2015-08-01

    A 20-year-old indigenous Australian male was admitted to the intensive care unit with fulminant hepatic failure secondary to intravenous use of buprenorphine, which had been prescribed sublingually for opioid dependence. Intravenous buprenorphine-induced hepatitis is well recognized, however, life-threatening fulminant hepatic failure has not previously been reported.

  12. Hepatitis A Vaccine: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... A is common, • are a man who has sex with other men, • use illegal drugs, • have a chronic liver disease such as hepatitis B or hepatitis C, • are being treated with clotting-factor concentrates, • work with hepatitis A-infected animals or in a hepatitis A research laboratory, or • ...

  13. Scarlet Fever and hepatitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gidaris, D; Zafeiriou, D; Mavridis, P; Gombakis, N

    2008-07-01

    Scarlet fever is a streptococcal infection with a good prognosis. Complications are well described. Hepatitis is a rare complication. We describe a 6-year old boy with scarlet fever, jaundice and elevated liver transaminases.

  14. Combined hepatitis A and B vaccine: providing a bright future for preventing hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Hewlett, Alex T

    2009-09-01

    The first combined hepatitis A and B vaccine has been available in the United States since 2001. The vaccine provides protection against viral hepatitis with rapid seroprotection and lasting immunogenicity. This review outlines the product's components, clinical efficacy and opportunities for use in special circumstances. The vaccine has a good safety profile and has good tolerability. The combined hepatitis A and B vaccine is a well studied vaccine that provides rapid seroconversion with a good safety profile.

  15. Hepatitis E: A disease of reemerging importance.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Siddharth; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-08-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis worldwide. Originally considered to be restricted to humans, it is now clear that HEV and HEV-like viruses have several animal reservoirs with complex ecology and genetic diversity, as exemplified by the recent discovery of HEV in dromedaries, a previously underestimated reservoir of zoonotic viruses prior to the emergence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus. Zoonotic foodborne transmission from pigs and feral animals such as wild boar is of increasing importance in the rapidly industrializing countries of the Asia Pacific region. Such zoonotic hepatitis E infection has particular relevance to the increasing population living with immunosuppression, due to the risk of chronic hepatitis E in these patients. Fortunately, major strides have been made recently in the management of chronic hepatitis E patients. Furthermore, an effective vaccine is also available that promises better control of hepatitis E burden in the near future. This review highlights these major recent developments in the epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of hepatitis E.

  16. Hepatitis E: A disease of reemerging importance.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Siddharth; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-08-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis worldwide. Originally considered to be restricted to humans, it is now clear that HEV and HEV-like viruses have several animal reservoirs with complex ecology and genetic diversity, as exemplified by the recent discovery of HEV in dromedaries, a previously underestimated reservoir of zoonotic viruses prior to the emergence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus. Zoonotic foodborne transmission from pigs and feral animals such as wild boar is of increasing importance in the rapidly industrializing countries of the Asia Pacific region. Such zoonotic hepatitis E infection has particular relevance to the increasing population living with immunosuppression, due to the risk of chronic hepatitis E in these patients. Fortunately, major strides have been made recently in the management of chronic hepatitis E patients. Furthermore, an effective vaccine is also available that promises better control of hepatitis E burden in the near future. This review highlights these major recent developments in the epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of hepatitis E. PMID:25773541

  17. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  18. Mincle Signaling Promotes Con A Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Greco, Stephanie H; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Kalabin, Aleksandr; Whiteman, Clint; Rokosh, Rae; Ravirala, Sushma; Ochi, Atsuo; Gutierrez, Johana; Salyana, Muhammad Atif; Mani, Vishnu R; Nagaraj, Savitha V; Deutsch, Michael; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Hundeyin, Mautin; Nikifrov, Yuriy; Tejada, Karla; Gelb, Bruce E; Katz, Steven C; Miller, George

    2016-10-01

    Con A hepatitis is regarded as a T cell-mediated model of acute liver injury. Mincle is a C-type lectin receptor that is critical in the immune response to mycobacteria and fungi but does not have a well-defined role in preclinical models of non-pathogen-mediated inflammation. Because Mincle can ligate the cell death ligand SAP130, we postulated that Mincle signaling drives intrahepatic inflammation and liver injury in Con A hepatitis. Acute liver injury was assessed in the murine Con A hepatitis model using C57BL/6, Mincle(-/-), and Dectin-1(-/-) mice. The role of C/EBPβ and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) signaling was assessed using selective inhibitors. We found that Mincle was highly expressed in hepatic innate inflammatory cells and endothelial cells in both mice and humans. Furthermore, sterile Mincle ligands and Mincle signaling intermediates were increased in the murine liver in Con A hepatitis. Most significantly, Mincle deletion or blockade protected against Con A hepatitis, whereas Mincle ligation exacerbated disease. Bone marrow chimeric and adoptive transfer experiments suggested that Mincle signaling in infiltrating myeloid cells dictates disease phenotype. Conversely, signaling via other C-type lectin receptors did not alter disease course. Mechanistically, we found that Mincle blockade decreased the NF-κβ-related signaling intermediates C/EBPβ and HIF-1α, both of which are necessary in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses. Accordingly, Mincle deletion lowered production of nitrites in Con A hepatitis and inhibition of both C/EBPβ and HIF-1α reduced the severity of liver disease. Our work implicates a novel innate immune driver of Con A hepatitis and, more broadly, suggests a potential role for Mincle in diseases governed by sterile inflammation. PMID:27559045

  19. Mincle Signaling Promotes Con A Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Greco, Stephanie H; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Kalabin, Aleksandr; Whiteman, Clint; Rokosh, Rae; Ravirala, Sushma; Ochi, Atsuo; Gutierrez, Johana; Salyana, Muhammad Atif; Mani, Vishnu R; Nagaraj, Savitha V; Deutsch, Michael; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Hundeyin, Mautin; Nikifrov, Yuriy; Tejada, Karla; Gelb, Bruce E; Katz, Steven C; Miller, George

    2016-10-01

    Con A hepatitis is regarded as a T cell-mediated model of acute liver injury. Mincle is a C-type lectin receptor that is critical in the immune response to mycobacteria and fungi but does not have a well-defined role in preclinical models of non-pathogen-mediated inflammation. Because Mincle can ligate the cell death ligand SAP130, we postulated that Mincle signaling drives intrahepatic inflammation and liver injury in Con A hepatitis. Acute liver injury was assessed in the murine Con A hepatitis model using C57BL/6, Mincle(-/-), and Dectin-1(-/-) mice. The role of C/EBPβ and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) signaling was assessed using selective inhibitors. We found that Mincle was highly expressed in hepatic innate inflammatory cells and endothelial cells in both mice and humans. Furthermore, sterile Mincle ligands and Mincle signaling intermediates were increased in the murine liver in Con A hepatitis. Most significantly, Mincle deletion or blockade protected against Con A hepatitis, whereas Mincle ligation exacerbated disease. Bone marrow chimeric and adoptive transfer experiments suggested that Mincle signaling in infiltrating myeloid cells dictates disease phenotype. Conversely, signaling via other C-type lectin receptors did not alter disease course. Mechanistically, we found that Mincle blockade decreased the NF-κβ-related signaling intermediates C/EBPβ and HIF-1α, both of which are necessary in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses. Accordingly, Mincle deletion lowered production of nitrites in Con A hepatitis and inhibition of both C/EBPβ and HIF-1α reduced the severity of liver disease. Our work implicates a novel innate immune driver of Con A hepatitis and, more broadly, suggests a potential role for Mincle in diseases governed by sterile inflammation.

  20. Establishing a viral hepatitis prevention and control program: Florida's experience.

    PubMed

    Baldy, Linda M; Urbas, Cheryl; Harris, Jennie L; Jones, T Stephen; Reichert, Philip E

    2007-01-01

    In 1999, the Florida State Legislature established and funded the statewide Hepatitis Prevention Program (HPP) to address growing concern about hepatitis C virus (HCV) and its potential public health burden. HPP supports county health departments' (CHDs') provision of viral hepatitis prevention services to at-risk adults through free hepatitis A and B vaccine in most CHDs and hepatitis serologic testing and statewide viral hepatitis-related education, consultation, and referral services. Some CHDs are directly funded by HPP. In 2001-2005, HPP support helped CHDs provide 59,228 hepatitis A and 74,039 hepatitis B vaccinations statewide. In 2005, HPP supported almost 17,000 hepatitis B and C tests. From January to June 2005, 1,603 positive HCV tests were reported, a 9.5% seropositivity rate. With $24 million from the Florida State Legislature through 2006, HPP has helped CHDs statewide provide substantial viral hepatitis prevention services to at-risk adults. PMID:17542449

  1. Hepatic Echinococcal Cysts: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Pakala, Tina; Molina, Marco; Wu, George Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a widely endemic helminthic disease caused by infection with metacestodes (larval stage) of the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm. E. granulosus are common parasites in certain parts of the world, and are present on every continent with the exception of Antarctica. As a result, a large number of people are affected by CE. The increased emigration of populations from endemic areas where prevalence rates are as high as 5–10% and the relatively quiescent clinical course of CE pose challenges for accurate and timely diagnoses. Upon infection with CE, cyst formation mainly occurs in the liver (70%). Diagnosis involves serum serologic testing for antibodies against hydatid antigens, but preferably with imaging by ultrasound or CT/MRI. Treatment methods include chemotherapy with benzimidazole carbamates and/or surgical approaches, including percutaneous aspiration injection and reaspiration. The success of these methods is influenced by the stage and location of hepatic cysts. However, CE can be clinically silent, and has a high risk for recurrence. It is important to consider the echinococcal parasite in the differential diagnosis of liver cystic lesions, especially in patients of foreign origin, and to perform appropriate long-term follow-ups. The aim of this review is to highlight the epidemiology, natural history, diagnostic methods, and treatment of liver disease caused by E. granulosus. PMID:27047771

  2. Hepatic Echinococcal Cysts: A Review.

    PubMed

    Pakala, Tina; Molina, Marco; Wu, George Y

    2016-03-28

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a widely endemic helminthic disease caused by infection with metacestodes (larval stage) of the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm. E. granulosus are common parasites in certain parts of the world, and are present on every continent with the exception of Antarctica. As a result, a large number of people are affected by CE. The increased emigration of populations from endemic areas where prevalence rates are as high as 5-10% and the relatively quiescent clinical course of CE pose challenges for accurate and timely diagnoses. Upon infection with CE, cyst formation mainly occurs in the liver (70%). Diagnosis involves serum serologic testing for antibodies against hydatid antigens, but preferably with imaging by ultrasound or CT/MRI. Treatment methods include chemotherapy with benzimidazole carbamates and/or surgical approaches, including percutaneous aspiration injection and reaspiration. The success of these methods is influenced by the stage and location of hepatic cysts. However, CE can be clinically silent, and has a high risk for recurrence. It is important to consider the echinococcal parasite in the differential diagnosis of liver cystic lesions, especially in patients of foreign origin, and to perform appropriate long-term follow-ups. The aim of this review is to highlight the epidemiology, natural history, diagnostic methods, and treatment of liver disease caused by E. granulosus. PMID:27047771

  3. [Viral hepatitis: from A to G viruses].

    PubMed

    Figueroa Barrios R, R

    1996-01-01

    Great advances has been achieved in the last 10 years in the study of acute and chronic viral hepatitis. The enigma of non-A non-B viral hepatitis was disclosed when C virus was identified and later when E virus was isolated. New viruses has been searched to explain non-A to non-E viral hepatitis, being reported recently G virus. Epidemiology and clinical aspects has been reviewed identifying unusual clinical forms: choletasic and relapsing hepatitis in HAV infection; escape mutants B virus hepatitis in HVB infection; and the silent evolution to chronicity in more than 70% of cases in HVC infection. Diagnostic techniques has been developed to asses serum antibodies and the virus itself. It is important to quantitate the viral particles in the serum before treatment. PCR technique has been used with good results. A and E virus do not remain in the host and permanent inmunity is obtained after infection is resolved. 10% of B and 80% of C viral hepatitis goes to chronicity. So far, the only drug used to treat chronic viral B, D and C hepatitis is interferon alfa, obtaining good response en 40%. Combinations with Rivabirin and increasing the dose, frequency and duration of interferon treatment are in study. lt is a recomendation to treat acute HCV infection with Interferon alfa to prevent chronicity. Vaccines against A and B virus are used, being included in childhood vaccination programs. No HVC vaccine has developed probably to constant virus mutancy. New chalenges are present in this field and in the identification of new hepatitis viruses. PMID:12165788

  4. Hepatitis C and Incarceration

    MedlinePlus

    HEPATITIS C & INCARCERATION What is hepatitis? “Hepatitis” means inflammation or swelling of the liver. The liver is an important ... viral hepatitis: Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. They are all different from each other and ...

  5. Viral hepatitis: a sexually transmitted disease?

    PubMed

    Buzby, M

    1996-03-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are often discussed in the context of herpes, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and AIDS. Viral hepatitis, specifically hepatitis B, is also an STD often omitted from these discussions. The incidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is variable throughout the world. In North America, the highest incidence occurs in patients who are between the ages of 15 and 25 years. Safe and effective vaccines are available to prevent HBV infection, which has an associated increased risk of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma in the carrier state. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a newly identified hepatotrophic virus that may also be sexually transmitted. There are no vaccines for the prevention of HCV infection and the majority of those who are infected become chronic carriers with chronic liver disease. Discussions focused on the prevention of STDs must include counseling for the prevention of HBV and HCV. PMID:8788658

  6. Viral hepatitis in the Arctic. A review from a Circumpolar Workshop on Viral hepatitis, ICCH13.

    PubMed

    Tulisov, Andrei; McMahon, Brian J; Koch, Anders; Minuk, Gerald; Chulanov, Vladimir; Bruce, Michael G; Uhanova, Julia; Børresen, Malene; Williams, James; Osiowy, Carla; Gelvan, Allan; Alexeeva, Marfa; Larke, Bryce; Watt, Kymberly

    2007-01-01

    This article is a review of the viral hepatitis workshop, held during the 13th International Congress of the Circumpolar Health consists of a review of data on viral hepatitis in the Arctic territories of four countries: Canada, Greenland, Russia and United States (Alaska). The main purpose of the workshop was to exchange knowledge on viral hepatitis in the Arctic and identify further needs for collaborative hepatitis research, which is planned to be implemented through the established Viral Hepatitis Working Group in the Arctic. The review is based on the available published research results, surveillance data and professional opinions of the authors. The information is presented by Arctic country. Viral hepatitis constitutes an important problem among Aboriginal peoples of the Arctic; the incidence of most types of viral hepatitis is higher among indigenous populations than in the general public. However, due to differences in the available information from each of the four Arctic countries, it is difficult to compare differences in types of disease in them. The main areas for future research are: HBV genotypes distribution, relations between different types of HBV, HCV and disease outcomes, HBV mutation rate and specific substitutions in the HBV genome over time in the Arctic, and occurrence of active liver disease in HBsAg carriers living in the Arctic, as well as further research in viral hepatitis A, C, D and E. PMID:17929632

  7. Hepatitis E: A newcomer to the hepatitis alphabet – Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Karl; Poirier, Louise; Varin, Sylvain; Beliveau, Claire; Laverdière, Michel

    1995-01-01

    The first Canadian case of hepatitis E is described in a patient who travelled to Asia for a six-month period and spent most of his time in India. Hepatitis E shares some similarities with hepatitis A, notably the mode of transmission and the absence of chronic course. However, a few important differences have been noted, including a higher mortality rate and a high fatality rate in pregnant women. Hepatitis E is very common in developing countries and should be suspected more often in individuals with gastrointestinal complaints returning from endemic areas. PMID:22514379

  8. Reassessing immune control of hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher M; Feng, Zongdi; Lemon, Stanley M

    2015-04-01

    There is renewed interest in hepatitis A virus (HAV) pathogenesis and immunity after 2-3 decades of limited progress. From a public health perspective, the average age at infection has increased in developing countries, resulting in more severe hepatitis that is poorly understood mechanistically. More fundamentally, there is interest in comparing immunity to HAV and hepatitis C virus (HCV): small, positive-strand RNA viruses with very different infection outcomes. Here, we review evidence that circulating HAV virions are cloaked in membranes, with consequences for induction of innate immunity and antibody-mediated neutralization. We also consider the contribution of CD4+ helper versus CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to antiviral immunity and liver injury, and present a model of non-cytotoxic immune control of HAV infection.

  9. Hepatitis A vaccine - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC Hepatitis A Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/ ... statements/hep-a.html CDC review information for Hepatitis A VIS: Page last reviewed: July 20, 2016 ...

  10. A case of acute hepatitis B in a chronic hepatitis C patient after daclatasvir and asunaprevir combination therapy: hepatitis B virus reactivation or acute self-limited hepatitis?

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Ishizu, Yoji; Kuzuya, Teiji; Honda, Takashi; Nishimura, Daisaku; Goto, Hidemi; Hirooka, Yoshiki

    2016-08-01

    Reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive patients treated with cytotoxic chemotherapy is well known. HBV reactivation in patients with HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection caused by direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy has also recently been reported. We report a case of acute hepatitis B in a patient with HCV infection after DAA therapy. An 83-year-old woman was referred for chronic hepatitis C. She was infected with HCV genotype 1b and negative for HBsAg at baseline. She received daclatasvir and asunaprevir therapy, and HCV became negative at 4 weeks and remained negative until 6 months after the end of DAA therapy. Acute hepatitis B developed 5 months after ending DAA therapy. Genome sequencing revealed the subgenotype as B1, and the serological subtype as adr. T118 K mutation at the S region as an immune escape mutant was identified. These virologic features led to HBV reactivation. The presence of hepatitis B core antibody or HBs antibody was not determined before DAA therapy, so prior HBV infection status was unclear. This case is speculated to represent HBV reactivation in a patient with previously resolved HBV induced by DAA therapy, based on virologic analysis and clinical status. The risk might be very low, but DAA therapy can cause HBV reactivation in chronic hepatitis C patients with prior HBV infection. When acute hepatitis emerges in patients who have received DAA therapy for HCV, HBV reactivation should be considered to allow early initiation of anti-HBV therapy. PMID:27329484

  11. Extensive hepatic necrosis in a premature infant.

    PubMed

    Bemmel, L A; Hack, W W; Seldenrijk, C A; Kneepkens, C M

    1992-02-01

    A fatal case of fulminant hepatic failure that occurred in the neonatal period is reported in a premature infant born after 27 4/7-weeks' gestation. Immediately after birth the infant had severe hypoxia and hypotension resulting from birth asphyxia, hypovolemic shock, and septicemia. At autopsy, histological appearance of the liver showed virtually total hepatocellular necrosis without features of fibrosis. Although the exact cause of hepatocellular injury cannot be fully ascertained, it is assumed that hypoxia and hypotension must have been the predominant factors leading to massive hepatic necrosis.

  12. Operating on a patient with hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Asthana, Sonal; Kneteman, Norman

    2009-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects more than 250 000 Canadians, many of whom are at increased risk of perioperative complications with surgery and all of whom represent an important risk for the entire surgical care team. The virus likely remains undiagnosed in one-third, while others have a limited understanding of the implications of the disease. All face an increased risk of liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. We review hepatitis C infection, including the challenges presented in operating on a patient with HCV infection and the inherent risks for the care team. PMID:19680522

  13. Spontaneous Hepatic Infarction in a Patient with Gallbladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Min; Joung, Hannah; Heo, Jung Won; Woo, Seo Kyung; Woo, In Sook; Jung, Yun Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic infarction is known as a rare disease entity in nontransplant patients. Although a few cases of hepatic infarction have been reported to be linked with invasive procedures, trauma, and hypercoagulability, a case of spontaneous hepatic infarction in a nontransplanted patient has hardly ever been reported. However, many clinical situations of patients with cancer, in particular biliary cancer, can predispose nontransplant patients to hepatic infarction. Besides, the clinical outcome of hepatic infarction in patients with cancer can be worse than in patients with other etiologies. As for treatment, anticoagulation treatment is usually recommended. However, because of its multifactorial etiology and combined complications, treatment of hepatic infarction is difficult and not simple. Herein, we report a case of fatal hepatic infarction that occurred spontaneously during the course of treatment in a patient with gallbladder cancer. Hepatic infarction should be considered as a possible fatal complication in patients during treatment of biliary malignancies. PMID:27462232

  14. Hepatitis C virus: A global view.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Amal Ahmed; Elbedewy, Tamer A; El-Serafy, Magdy; El-Toukhy, Naglaa; Ahmed, Wesam; Ali El Din, Zaniab

    2015-11-18

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global challenge; 130-175 million are chronically infected. Over 350000 die each year from HCV. Chronic HCV is the primary cause of cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and end-stage liver disease. Management of chronic HCV is aimed at preventing cirrhosis, reducing the risk of HCC, and treating extra hepatic complications. New treatments for chronic HCV has been devoted based on direct-acting antivirals, as pegylated interferon (peginterferon) is responsible for many side effects and limits treatment access. Sofosbuvir is the first compound to enter the market with Peginterferon-free combination regimens. PMID:26609344

  15. Hepatitis E and hepatitis C virus infections among French soldiers with non-A, non-B hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Coursaget, P; Krawczynski, K; Buisson, Y; Nizou, C; Molinié, C

    1993-02-01

    Serologic markers of HCV and HEV were investigated in 74 French soldiers with non-A, non-B hepatitis and in 18 patients involved in an outbreak of non-A,non-B hepatitis in Algeria. Moreover, anti-HCV antibodies were detected in 13 patients with non-A,non-B hepatitis of parenteral origin. HEV antibodies were investigated in 61-65% of patients involved in the 2 enterically transmitted outbreaks of non-A,non-B hepatitis observed in Algeria and Chad. The third cluster of non-A,non-B hepatitis observed in French soldiers serving in French Guyana is more likely to be attributed to malaria prophylactic treatment with Amodiaquine than to a viral origin. HCV infection was observed in 93% of acute or chronic cases associated with blood transfusion or parenteral drug abuse. Among acute cases, none of the soldiers who contracted the disease in Africa or in French Guyana was found to be anti-HCV positive compared to 78% of those who contracted the disease in France. HCV infections resulted in chronic hepatitis in 61% of cases.

  16. Primary extraskeletal hepatic osteosarcoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Ravinder S; Johnson, Todd O; Kitchell, Barbara E

    2003-02-01

    A 13-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat with an abdominal mass was evaluated; radiography revealed a radiopaque mass in the cranioventral region of the abdomen. A celiotomy was performed, and the mass was identified histologically as a hepatic osteosarcoma. Complete remission of the tumor was accomplished after partial hepatectomy and adjuvant treatment with carboplatin. PMID:12564597

  17. Successful treatment of activated occult hepatitis B in a non-responder chronic hepatitis C patient

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We reported a 23 years old male with chronic hepatitis C virus infection, discontinued from pegylated interferon/ribavirin combination therapy due to a lack of early virological response. He has developed activation of occult hepatitis B virus that was successfully treated by a one year of lamivudine therapy. PMID:22078891

  18. Review of Non-A and Non-B Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is responsible for most cases of parenterally transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis; it is also a cause of sporadic acute hepatitis. Hepatitis C viral infection becomes chronic in 50% of cases; 25% of these patients will develop cirrhosis. Therapy with interferon results in approximately 25% response rates (after subtraction of relapse rates), and probably the same reduction in morbidity of cirrhosis.

  19. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis B?Hepatitis B is a serious infection that affects the liver. It is caused by the hepatitis B virus. ...

  20. Hepatic trematodiasis in a Ganges River dolphin.

    PubMed

    Migaki, G; Lagios, M D; Herald, E S; Dempster, R P

    1979-11-01

    Hepatic trematodiasis caused by Cyclorchis campula was diagnosed in a juvenile Ganges River dolphin that had been in captivity at an aquarium for approximately 1 year. Histopathologic findings were severe chronic suppurative cholangitis, hyperplasia of the bile duct epithelium, and periductal fibrosis associated with fluke infection of the large bile ducts. PMID:521375

  1. Controlling post-transfusion hepatitis: a proposal to publicize hepatitis rates of transfusion facilities.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, S N; Sapolsky, H M

    1979-01-01

    A federal requirement that donor blood be labelled as either "paid" or "volunteer" took effect on May 15, 1978. A major rationale for requiring such labelling is that physicians, now that they can distinguish between categories of blood, will fear liability for post-transfusion hepatitis resulting from the use of paid blood. Thus, supporters of the labelling requirement hope that it will deter the use of high-risk commercial blood. Some paid blood, however, is not commercial blood and in fact may be safer than volunteer blood. The labelling strategy for hepatitis control, therefore, has negative as well as positive attributes. This Article considers the efficacy of blood labelling as a hepatitis control measure and proposes an alternative strategy--the periodic publicizing of hepatitis rates of facilities that perform transfusions--that, if practiced responsibly, could significantly decrease hepatitis transmission rates.

  2. Hypoxic Hepatitis: A Review and Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Waseem, Najeff; Chen, Po-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypoxic hepatitis (HH), also known as ischemic hepatitis or shock liver, is characterized by a massive, rapid rise in serum aminotransferases resulting from reduced oxygen delivery to the liver. The most common predisposing condition is cardiac failure, followed by circulatory failure as occurs in septic shock and respiratory failure. HH does, however, occur in the absence of a documented hypotensive event or shock state in 50% of patients. In intensive care units, the incidence of HH is near 2.5%, but has been reported as high as 10% in some studies. The pathophysiology is multifactorial, but often involves hepatic congestion from right heart failure along with reduced hepatic blood flow, total body hypoxemia, reduced oxygen uptake by hepatocytes or reperfusion injury following ischemia. The diagnosis is primarily clinical, and typically does not require liver biopsy. The definitive treatment of HH involves correction of the underlying disease state, but successful management includes monitoring for the potential complications such as hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, hyperammonemia and hepatopulmonary syndrome. Prognosis of HH remains poor, especially for cases in which there was a delay in diagnosis. The in-hospital mortality rate is >50%, and the most frequent cause of death is the predisposing condition and not the liver injury itself. PMID:27777895

  3. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Public Home » Hepatitis C » Treatment Decisions Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... can I find out about participating in a hepatitis C clinical trial? Many trials are being conducted ...

  4. Hepatitis C: Sex and Sexuality

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Hepatitis » Sex and Sexuality: Entire Lesson Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... hepatitis C virus through sex. Can you pass hepatitis C to a sex partner? Yes, but it ...

  5. Vasculitis as a Presenting Manifestation of Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harpreet; Sukhija, Gagandeep; Kaur, Parminder; Govil, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus is responsible for causing hepatic complications like acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma along with some uncommon immune mediated extrahepatic manifestations. Vasculitis remains an uncommon extrahepatic complication of hepatitis B virus infection. Herein we report a case of hepatitis B infection that presented with leucocytoclastic vasculitis as an initial manifestation and managed successfully with entacavir therapy. PMID:27042512

  6. A fish bone-related hepatic abscess

    PubMed Central

    Jarry, Julien; Nguyen, Vien; Stoltz, Adeline; Imperato, Marc; Michel, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    We report an unusual case of pyogenic, hepatic abscess caused by fish bone penetration of the duodenum in a 68-year-old woman. The fish bone had migrated into the liver through the duodenal wall. The patient was initially admitted to our emergency room with abdominal pain, fever, and asthenia. A contrastenhanced abdominal coputed tomography (CT) scan showed a hepatic abscess in relation with a straight, foreign body, which had entered through the duodenal wall. Surgery was necessary to remove the foreign body, which was identified as a fish bone. The patient's recovery was uneventful and she was discharged on postoperative day 10. This case is discussed together with the data collected by a medline-based extensive review of the literature. PMID:24765356

  7. Right Hepatic Artery: A Cadaver Investigation and Its Clinical Significance.

    PubMed

    Dandekar, Usha; Dandekar, Kundankumar; Chavan, Sushama

    2015-01-01

    The right hepatic artery is an end artery and contributes sole arterial supply to right lobe of the liver. Misinterpretation of normal anatomy and anatomical variations of the right hepatic artery contribute to the major intraoperative mishaps and complications in hepatobiliary surgery. The frequency of inadvertent or iatrogenic hepatobiliary vascular injury rises with the event of an aberrant anatomy. This descriptive study was carried out to document the normal anatomy and different variations of right hepatic artery to contribute to existing knowledge of right hepatic artery to improve surgical safety. This study conducted on 60 cadavers revealed aberrant replaced right hepatic artery in 18.3% and aberrant accessory right hepatic artery in 3.4%. Considering the course, the right hepatic artery ran outside Calot's triangle in 5% of cases and caterpillar hump right hepatic artery was seen in 13.3% of cases. The right hepatic artery (normal and aberrant) crossed anteriorly to the common hepatic duct in 8.3% and posteriorly to it in 71.6%. It has posterior relations with the common bile duct in 16.7% while in 3.4% it did not cross the common hepatic duct or common bile duct. The knowledge of such anomalies is important since their awareness will decrease morbidity and help to keep away from a number of surgical complications. PMID:26788371

  8. [Surgical treatment of a solitary hepatic abscess].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, V V; Tishchenko, A M; Gusak, I V; Maloshtan, A A; Skoryĭ, D I; Smachilo, R M

    2013-06-01

    Retrospective analysis of the treatment results of 120 patients, suffering solitary hepatic abscess (SHA), was conducted. The sanation methods, in accordance to technology, the treatment impact intensity and aggressiveness, may be divided on three lines: aspirational, draining and resectional. The method of sanation is selected on the background of morphological peculiarities of abscess--its sizes, by presence of sequesters, divisioning septs, dense rigid capsule, grade of periprocess. Surgical access is determined by the abscess localization, the patient's state severity, instrumental equipment of the clinic. Differentiated approach, taking into account genesis, sizes, localization and stage of its formation, constitutes a background of successful treatment of SHA. In totally formatted acute SHA, as a rule, the methods of choice are aspirational and aspiration-draining methods of sanation under ultrasonographic control or laparoscopy. In the presence of chronic SHA or suppurated parasitic hepatic cyst it is mandatory to select the resectional methods.

  9. Chronic Hepatitis D; at a Standstill?

    PubMed

    Rizzetto, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis D (CHD) is a severe liver disease with worldwide distribution caused by the hepatitis D virus (HDV). Therapy of CHD is at a standstill. It still relies on interferon (IFN), introduced empirically in the 1980s; results are limited. With the peghilated IFNs that are now in use, only 25% of CHD reach a sustained viral response, that is, clear the HDV-RNA 6 months after stopping therapy. However, HDV remains infectious and ready to reactivate at very low titers undetectable by current assays, if the HBsAg persists in serum; relapses of hepatitis D post-therapy are frequent and further diminish the therapeutic response. The major obstacle to CHD therapy is the minimalist nature of the HDV. It does not encode for any enzymatic function but is replicated by host RNA polymerases deceived to recognize the viral RNA as it were a cellular DNA; therefore, it has no replicative machinery of its own to be targeted by antivirals. The only help required from hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the HBsAg coat to attach to hepatocytes and assembly in the virion; HBV antivirals that decrease HBV-DNA but leave HBsAg unaffected are of no avail in CHD. Novel therapeutic strategies are under evaluation. Myrcludex B, a peptidic inhibitor of HBV entry, was used with some success in vitro in the mouse to block the Na+-tauro chocolate cotransporting polypeptide and prevent entry of the HD virion into hepatocytes. The nuclei acid polymer REP-2139 was shown to distinctly diminish serum HBsAg and HDV-RNA by blocking HBsAg entry and inhibiting its intracellular synthesis. Prenylation of the large HD-antigen is critical for its interaction with the HBsAg in the assembly of the virion. A proof of concept study in humans has shown that the prenylation inhibitor lonafarnib reduced HDV-viremia. PMID:27170382

  10. Establishment of a hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension model by hepatic arterial perfusion with 80% alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; He, Fu-Liang; Liu, Fu-Quan; Yue, Zhen-Dong; Zhao, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the feasibility and safety of establishing a porcine hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension model by hepatic arterial perfusion with 80% alcohol. METHODS: Twenty-one healthy Guizhou miniature pigs were randomly divided into three experimental groups and three control groups. The pigs in the three experimental groups were subjected to hepatic arterial perfusion with 7, 12 and 17 mL of 80% alcohol, respectively, while those in the three control groups underwent hepatic arterial perfusion with 7, 12 and 17 mL of saline, respectively. Hepatic arteriography and direct portal phlebography were performed on all animals before and after perfusion, and the portal venous pressure and diameter were measured before perfusion, immediately after perfusion, and at 2, 4 and 6 wk after perfusion. The following procedures were performed at different time points: routine blood sampling, blood biochemistry, blood coagulation and blood ammonia tests before surgery, and at 2, 4 and 6 wk after surgery; hepatic biopsy before surgery, within 6 h after surgery, and at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 wk after surgery; abdominal enhanced computed tomography examination before surgery and at 6 wk after surgery; autopsy and multi-point sampling of various liver lobes for histological examination at 6 wk after surgery. RESULTS: In experimental group 1, different degrees of hepatic fibrosis were observed, and one pig developed hepatic cirrhosis. In experimental group 2, there were cases of hepatic cirrhosis, different degrees of increased portal venous pressure, and intrahepatic portal venous bypass, but neither extrahepatic portal-systemic bypass circulation nor death occurred. In experimental group 3, two animals died and three animals developed hepatic cirrhosis, and different degrees of increased portal venous pressure and intrahepatic portal venous bypass were also observed, but there was no extrahepatic portal-systemic bypass circulation. CONCLUSION: It is feasible to establish an

  11. A rat model for hepatitis E virus

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Niraj; Verbeken, Erik; Ramaekers, Kaat; Dallmeier, Kai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the prime causes of acute viral hepatitis, and chronic hepatitis E is increasingly recognized as an important problem in the transplant setting. Nevertheless, the fundamental understanding of the biology of HEV replication is limited and there are few therapeutic options. The development of such therapies is partially hindered by the lack of a robust and convenient animal model. We propose the infection of athymic nude rats with the rat HEV strain LA-B350 as such a model. A cDNA clone, pLA-B350, was constructed and the infectivity of its capped RNA transcripts was confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a subgenomic replicon, pLA-B350/luc, was constructed and validated for in vitro antiviral studies. Interestingly, rat HEV proved to be less sensitive to the antiviral activity of α-interferon, ribavirin and mycophenolic acid than genotype 3 HEV (a strain that infects humans). As a proof-of-concept, part of the C-terminal polymerase sequence of pLA-B350/luc was swapped with its genotype 3 HEV counterpart: the resulting chimeric replicon replicated with comparable efficiency as the wild-type construct, confirming that LA-B350 strain is amenable to humanization (replacement of certain sequences or motifs by their counterparts from human HEV strains). Finally, ribavirin effectively inhibited LA-B350 replication in athymic nude rats, confirming the suitability of the rat model for antiviral studies. PMID:27483350

  12. A brief history of hepatitis milestones.

    PubMed

    Trepo, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Hepatitis has been a major plague of mankind. The history of the discovery of causative viruses is one of the most fascinating scientific adventures of this half century. Individualization of several types of hepatitis only emerged after world war two. Their identification has been associated with milestones which revolutionized medicine and public health. The discovery of HBV brought the first ever vaccine not prepared by tissue culture but initially directly from plasma and soon the first vaccine produced by genetic engineering. HBV vaccine proved to be the first "anti-cancer" vaccine by preventing hepatocellular carcinoma and practically eradicating it from childhood in Taiwan. Successful vaccines became also available for HAV and more recently HEV. The discovery of HCV in 1989 opened a new era since it was the first virus was identified by a direct molecular approach. Two billion people are infected with HBV and 350 million are chronic carriers of the virus. The extraordinary effectiveness of HBV vaccination was best illustrated in Taiwan and Singapore where in less than 2 decades HBs Ag carriers dropped from 9,1% to 2,7% and HCC from 27% to 17%. Successful development of nucleos(t)ides analogs make it now possible to fully control disease progression with a daily pill long term therapy. The progress in HCV therapy has been even more spectacular and successful treatment jumped from 6 % with interferon alone in 1986 to more than 80% in 2013 with triple combination therapies. Remarkably chronic hepatitis C is the only chronic disease which is curable. It will be soon possible to eradicate HCV infection with, an all oral, daily single pill (containing several molecules) for 3 to 6 months which will cure over 90% of patients. This unprecedented therapeutic victory benefiting hundred millions of people matches the triumphs over small pox, polio and tuberculosis. The next 10 years should undoubtedly witness cure or full control over all forms of acute and chronic

  13. Hepatitis A - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Burmese (myanmasa) Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Farsi (فارسی) Hmong (Hmoob) Khmer (Khmer) Russian (Русский) Somali ( ... Action Coalition; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Farsi (فارسی) Hepatitis A Vaccine English (Farsi) واکسن هپاتیت ...

  14. Hepatitis E: a complex and global disease

    PubMed Central

    Pelosi, E; Clarke, I

    2008-01-01

    Thirty years after its discovery, the hepatitis E virus (HEV) continues to represent a major public health problem in developing countries. In developed countries, it has emerged as a significant cause of non-travel-associated acute hepatitis. HEV infects a wide range of mammalian species and a key reservoir worldwide appears to be swine. Genomic sequence similarity between some human HEV genotypes and swine HEV strains has been identified and we know that humans can acquire HEV infection from animals. Although for the most part the clinical course of HEV infection is asymptomatic or mild, significant risk of serious disease exists in pregnant women and those with chronic liver disease. In addition, there are data on the threat of chronic infections in immunocompromised patients. Beyond management of exposure by public health measures, recent data support that active immunisation can prevent hepatitis E, highlighting the need for vaccination programmes. Here we review the current knowledge on HEV, its epidemiology, and the management and prevention of human disease. PMID:22460217

  15. Hepatitis E: a complex and global disease.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, E; Clarke, I

    2008-01-01

    Thirty years after its discovery, the hepatitis E virus (HEV) continues to represent a major public health problem in developing countries. In developed countries, it has emerged as a significant cause of non-travel-associated acute hepatitis. HEV infects a wide range of mammalian species and a key reservoir worldwide appears to be swine. Genomic sequence similarity between some human HEV genotypes and swine HEV strains has been identified and we know that humans can acquire HEV infection from animals. Although for the most part the clinical course of HEV infection is asymptomatic or mild, significant risk of serious disease exists in pregnant women and those with chronic liver disease. In addition, there are data on the threat of chronic infections in immunocompromised patients. Beyond management of exposure by public health measures, recent data support that active immunisation can prevent hepatitis E, highlighting the need for vaccination programmes. Here we review the current knowledge on HEV, its epidemiology, and the management and prevention of human disease. PMID:22460217

  16. Review: Occult hepatitis C virus infection: still remains a controversy.

    PubMed

    Vidimliski, Pavlina Dzekova; Nikolov, Igor; Geshkovska, Nadica Matevska; Dimovski, Aleksandar; Rostaing, Lionel; Sikole, Aleksandar

    2014-09-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by the presence of HCV RNA in the liver cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the patients whose serum samples test negative for HCV RNA, with or without presence of HCV antibodies. The present study reviews the existing literature on the persistence of occult hepatitis C virus infection, with description of the clinical characteristics and methods for identification of occult hepatitis C. Occult hepatitis C virus infection was detected in patients with abnormal results of liver function tests of unknown origin, with HCV antibodies and HCV RNA negativity in serum, and also in patients with spontaneous or treatment-induced recovery from hepatitis C. The viral replication in the liver cells and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cells was present in all clinical presentations of occult hepatitis C. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells represent an extra-hepatic site of HCV replication. The reason why HCV RNA was not detectable in the serum of patients with occult hepatitis C, could be the low number of circulating viral particles not detectable by the diagnostic tests with low sensitivity. It is uncertain whether occult hepatitis C is a different clinical entity or just a form of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Data accumulated over the last decade demonstrated that an effective approach to the diagnosis of HCV infection would be the implementation of more sensitive HCV RNA diagnostic assays, and also, examination of the presence of viral particles in the cells of the immune system.

  17. Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy Combined with Venous Embolization in a Patient with Hepatic Metastases with an Arteriovenous Shunt

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiofuku, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Sakaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kiyosei; Inoue, Masayoshi; Sueyoshi, Satoru; Shinnkai, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2009-07-15

    We describe herein a patient who had hepatic metastases with an arteriovenous shunt and was treated by hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy. The arteriovenous shunt was diagnosed by {sup 99m}Tc-macroaggregated albumin scintigraphy and hepatic venous embolization was performed to reduce shunt flow.

  18. Hepatic Shock Differential Diagnosis and Risk Factors: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Safari, Saeid; Rahmani, Farzad; Nejabatian, Arezu; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2015-01-01

    Context: Liver as an important organ has a vital role in physiological processes in the body. Different causes can disrupt normal function of liver. Factors such as hypo-perfusion, hypoxemia, infections and some others can cause hepatic injury and hepatic shock. Evidence Acquisition: Published research resources from 2002 to May 2015 in some databases (PubMed, Scopus, Index Copernicus, DOAJ, EBSCO-CINAHL, Science direct, Cochrane library and Google scholar and Iranian search database like SID and Iranmedex) were investigated for the present study. Results: Different causes can lead to hepatic shock. Most of these causes can be prevented by early resuscitation and treatment of underlying factors. Conclusions: Hepatic shock is detected in ill patients, especially those with hemodynamic disorders. It can be prevented by early treatment of underlying disease. There is no definite treatment for hepatic shock and should be managed conservatively. Hepatic shock in patients can increase the mortality rate. PMID:26587034

  19. A plant-derived edible vaccine against hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, J; Modelska, A; Figlerowicz, M; Pniewski, T; Letellier, M; Lisowa, O; Yusibov, V; Koprowski, H; Plucienniczak, A; Legocki, A B

    1999-10-01

    The infectious hepatitis B virus represents 42 nm spherical double-shelled particles. However, analysis of blood from hepatitis B virus carriers revealed the presence of smaller 22 nm particles consisting of a viral envelope surface protein. These particles are highly immunogenic and have been used in the design of hepatitis B virus vaccine produced in yeast. Upon expression in yeast, these proteins form virus-like particles that are used for parenteral immunization. Therefore, the DNA fragment encoding hepatitis B virus surface antigen was introduced into Agrobacterium tumerifacience LBA4404 and used to obtain transgenic lupin (Lupinus luteus L.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cv. Burpee Bibb expressing envelope surface protein. Mice that were fed the transgenic lupin tissue developed significant levels of hepatitis B virus-specific antibodies. Human volunteers, fed with transgenic lettuce plants expressing hepatitis B virus surface antigen, developed specific serum-IgG response to plant produced protein.

  20. A Case of Typhoid Fever with Hepatic Granulomas and Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Narechania, Shraddha; Duran, Marc; Karivedu, Vidhya; Gopalakrishna, K. V.

    2015-01-01

    The common histopathologic hepatic manifestations in patients infected with Salmonella include cloudy swelling and balloon degeneration with vacuolation of the hepatocytes and steatosis. Hepatic granulomas are a very rare finding, so far reported in very few cases. We report a 64-year-old patient with Salmonella enteritis who was found to have multiple 1.4 to 1.6 cm hypoechoic liver masses on ultrasound of the abdomen which on biopsy revealed hepatic granulomas. This case highlights the importance of keeping the differential diagnosis of Salmonella typhi (S. typhi) in mind in a patient with hepatic granulomas. PMID:25699196

  1. Hepatitis E: review of a disease endemic in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, F; Atiq, M; Ejaz, S; Hameed, S

    2001-04-01

    Hepatitis E is enterically transmitted causing a self-limiting illness similar to hepatitis A. However, unlike hepatitis A, immunity to hepatitis E is not life long, hepatitis E is a disease of developing nations with improper sewage disposal and unclean water supplies. It is thought to be the most common cause of acute sporadic hepatitis in Pakistan, where it has also caused major epidemics. Hepatitis E causes a mild self-limiting illness with no long-term sequelae. However, it is especially severe in pregnant females in the second and third trimesters, in whom it results in a high mortality rate (up to 20%) and an increased incidence of stillbirths. Diagnosis depends on clinical findings and elevated hepatic enzymes. Protection from this disease in endemic areas lies mainly in prevention, as the vaccine for hepatitis E is still in the experimental stage. Provision of clean drinking water, hand washing before eating and proper disposal of sewage has been shown to decrease the incidence of this disease. PMID:11759503

  2. Poor Outcomes in Hepatic Amyloidosis: A Report of 2 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kertowidjojo, Elizabeth; Zhang, Yue; Patel, Pruthvi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic amyloidosis is a rare disease entity that results from insoluble amyloid protein deposition in the liver. The disease often presents with vague, nonspecific clinical features. Currently, there is little literature describing treatment outcomes for biopsy-proven hepatic amyloidosis and current treatment guidelines recommend that patients enroll in a clinical trial due to insufficient evidence to suggest an optimal treatment regimen. Here, we present two cases of hepatic amyloidosis at an academic medical center and describe their presentation, treatment, and outcomes. These cases highlight the poor outcomes and difficult management of hepatic amyloidosis. Further understanding and investigation of this rare disease are warranted. PMID:27774327

  3. A Case of Primary Hepatic Lymphoma and Related Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yonghua; Jiang, Jinhong; Wu, Qinli; Zhang, Qiaolei; Xu, Yehui; Qu, Zhigang; Ma, Guangli; Wang, Xiaoqiu; Wang, Xiaoli; Jin, Weimei; Fang, Bingmu

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Primary hepatic lymphoma is a rare disease. And the clinical manifestations of this disease are nonspecific. The objective of this paper is to improve clinicians' understanding of this disease. Methods. We analyzed the clinical characteristics of a case of primary hepatic lymphoma in association with hepatitis B virus infection and reviewed the literature. Conclusion. The clinical manifestations of primary hepatic lymphoma are nonspecific. And it is easily misdiagnosed. Postoperative radiotherapy of patients with early stage was previously speculated to achieve favorable improvement. The application of targeted therapeutic drugs, chemotherapy, or combined local radiotherapy has become the first-line treatment strategy. PMID:27403354

  4. Water Borne Hepatitis A and Hepatitis E in Malwa Region of Punjab, India

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Deepak; Jindal, Neerja; Shukla, Ravinder K; Bansal, Renu

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Hepatitis-A virus infection (HAV) and Hepatitis E virus infection (HEV) are faecally contaminated water borne infection of great public interest in developing countries. HAV has a world-wide /dablestribution and affects infant and young children in developing countries and its epidemics are not very common. HEV is restricted to tropical countries and affects older children and young adults and its epidemics are common. Studies suggested that HEV is etiologically responsible for 10%–95% of admitted cases of hepatitis. Exposure rates over a period of time are different in different parts of the country and in different socio-economic groups. Aim of the study 1. To study the prevalence of HAV and HEV in the outbreak of hepatitis in certain areas of Malwa region of Punjab, India. 2. To determine the age specific prevalence rates of HAV and HEV. 3. To determine any change in the epidemiology of these infections. Material and Methods: This study was conducted in the Department of Microbiology in GGMC and Hospital Faridkot, A leading Tertiary care hospital and the major referral centre of malwa region of Punjab,India. Collection and Serological Tests: 1.Venous blood samples of patients of acute hepatitis were taken. 2.Relavent information regarding their Age, Sex Education, Socio-economic status, personal and community hygiene were recorded. All of the sera were screened for IgM Antibody to HEV and HAV using IgM capture ELISA Kit (ASIA-LION Biotechnology for HEV and GENERAL BIOLOGICAL CORPORATION for HAV ) in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Result and Conclusion : 1.The outbreak was due to hepatitis A &E virus(HEV predominating resulting from fecal contamination of drinking water). 2.Hepatitis E is more widely prevalent 3.There is a change in the epidemiology of HAV so,more cases are seen in age group of more than 20 years. PMID:24298465

  5. Versican: a novel modulator of hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bukong, Terence N; Maurice, Sean B; Chahal, Barinder; Schaeffer, David F; Winwood, Paul J

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the deposition and turnover of proteoglycans in liver fibrosis, despite their abundance in the extracellular matrix. Versican plays diverse roles in modulating cell behavior in other fibroproliferative diseases, but remains poorly described in the liver. Hepatic fibrosis was induced by carbon tetrachloride treatment of C57BL/6 mice over 4 weeks followed by recovery over a 28-day period. Primary mouse hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were activated in culture and versican was transiently knocked down in human (LX2) and mouse HSCs. Expression of versican, A Disintegrin-like and Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin-1 motifs (ADAMTS)-1, -4, -5, -8, -9, -15, and -20, and markers of fibrogenesis were studied using immunohistochemistry, real-time quantitative PCR, and western blotting. Immunohistochemistry showed increased expression of versican in cirrhotic human livers and the mouse model of fibrosis. Carbon tetrachloride treatment led to significant increases in versican expression and the proteoglycanases ADAMTS-5, -9, -15, and -20, alongside TNF-α, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), collagen-1, and TGF-β expression. During recovery, expression of many of these genes returned to control levels. However, expression of ADAMTS-5, -8, -9, and -15 showed delayed increases in expression at 28 days of recovery, which corresponded with decreases in versican V0 and V1 cleavage products (G1-DPEAAE(1401) and G1-DPEAAE(441)). Activation of primary HSCs in vitro significantly increased versican, α-SMA, and collagen-1 expression. Transient knockdown of versican in HSCs led to decreases in markers of fibrogenesis and reduced cell proliferation, without inducing apoptosis. Versican expression increases during HSC activation and liver fibrosis, and proteolytic processing occurs during the resolution of fibrosis. Knockdown studies in vitro suggest a possible role of versican in modulating hepatic fibrogenesis. PMID:26752747

  6. Chronic hepatitis: a retrospective study in 34 dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Fuentealba, C; Guest, S; Haywood, S; Horney, B

    1997-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize the histological changes observed in 34 accessioned cases of canine chronic hepatitis and to correlate these changes with the clinical pathological data. Cases of chronic hepatitis were subdivided into 6 categories: chronic active hepatitis (10/34), chronic persistent hepatitis (7/32), chronic cholestatic hepatitis (6/34), fibrosing hepatitis with cirrhosis (3/34), chronic cholangiohepatitis (3/34), and miscellaneous secondary hepatitis (5/34). Iron accumulation was a consistent finding in all livers examined. Although all cases of chronic hepatitis had elevated liver enzymes, no correlation was detected between biochemical parameters and the severity of morphologic changes. Similarly, no correlation was detected between rhodanine staining for copper and morphologic or biochemical indicators of cholestasis. However, presence of copper correlated well with reticulo-fibrosis (r = 0.8) and bile duct hyperplasia, suggesting that changes in the hemodynamics of the hepatic acini due to fibrosis could influence storage of copper. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:9187802

  7. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

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  8. Hepatitis C and immigration: a multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Scotto, Gaetano; Armignacco, Orlando; Starnini, Giulio; Francavilla, Ruggiero; Foti, Giuseppe; Portelli, Vincenzo; Mazzeo, Maurizio; Minerva, Nicola; Carretta, Vito; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Fazio, Vincenzina

    2016-09-01

    This retrospective multicentre study aims to evaluate the clinical and epidemiological features of HCV infection in a cohort of immigrants in Italy. Tests were carried out on 194 HCV positive subjects, who represented 5.7% of the participants at baseline screening: the virological (viral load, genotype) and biochemical appearance of their infection was determined, and the disease was staged by histological examination in the patients who had indicated their willingness. Standard therapy (peg-interferon + ribavirin) was implemented in patients who agreed to undergo treatment. The majority of immigrants were of East-European origin (48.4%), females were globally slightly predominant and the average age was 41.4 years. Of the 194 patients, 119 (63.1%) proved to be viraemic: genotype 1 was the most frequent, followed by genotype 4, the latter mainly in African patients. The histological staging of liver disease conducted in 25 patients showed mild hepatitis in 13 subjects, moderate/severe hepatitis in eight subjects and cirrhosis in four. Although 45 out of 119 patients (37.8%) with determinable HCV RNA agreed to undergo treatment, 11 of them independently stopped taking medication before the course of therapy was completed, without any significant side effects. At the sixth month of follow-up, the overall sustained virological response (SVR) was shown by 22/45 patients (48.8%). In our study, migrant populations had higher rates of HCV-related chronic hepatitis than the indigenous population; in some cases the infections were contracted in the country of origin, but in others the infection took place in Italy. The most commonly represented genotype, besides 1, was 4, especially among Africans. The therapeutic management of immigrants proved to be very difficult, mostly but not exclusively because of social factors.

  9. Hepatitis C and immigration: a multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Scotto, Gaetano; Armignacco, Orlando; Starnini, Giulio; Francavilla, Ruggiero; Foti, Giuseppe; Portelli, Vincenzo; Mazzeo, Maurizio; Minerva, Nicola; Carretta, Vito; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Fazio, Vincenzina

    2016-09-01

    This retrospective multicentre study aims to evaluate the clinical and epidemiological features of HCV infection in a cohort of immigrants in Italy. Tests were carried out on 194 HCV positive subjects, who represented 5.7% of the participants at baseline screening: the virological (viral load, genotype) and biochemical appearance of their infection was determined, and the disease was staged by histological examination in the patients who had indicated their willingness. Standard therapy (peg-interferon + ribavirin) was implemented in patients who agreed to undergo treatment. The majority of immigrants were of East-European origin (48.4%), females were globally slightly predominant and the average age was 41.4 years. Of the 194 patients, 119 (63.1%) proved to be viraemic: genotype 1 was the most frequent, followed by genotype 4, the latter mainly in African patients. The histological staging of liver disease conducted in 25 patients showed mild hepatitis in 13 subjects, moderate/severe hepatitis in eight subjects and cirrhosis in four. Although 45 out of 119 patients (37.8%) with determinable HCV RNA agreed to undergo treatment, 11 of them independently stopped taking medication before the course of therapy was completed, without any significant side effects. At the sixth month of follow-up, the overall sustained virological response (SVR) was shown by 22/45 patients (48.8%). In our study, migrant populations had higher rates of HCV-related chronic hepatitis than the indigenous population; in some cases the infections were contracted in the country of origin, but in others the infection took place in Italy. The most commonly represented genotype, besides 1, was 4, especially among Africans. The therapeutic management of immigrants proved to be very difficult, mostly but not exclusively because of social factors. PMID:27668901

  10. Primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    MORISHITA, ASAHIRO; YONEYAMA, HIROHITO; NOMURA, TAKAKO; SAKAMOTO, TEPPEI; FUJITA, KOJI; TANI, JOJI; MIYOSHI, HISAAKI; HABA, REIJI; MASAKI, TSUTOMU

    2016-01-01

    We herein present a case of an 87-year-old patient with multiple liver tumors identified on abdominal ultrasound. The assessment performed on admission included physical examination, computed tomography (CT) during hepatic angiography and CT during arterial portography. The examination revealed contrast enhancement of a proportion of the liver tumors (20 mm maximum diameter) during the arterial phase and mild contrast washout of those tumors during the delayed phase. On contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid, certain liver tumors exhibited contrast enhancement during the early phase and contrast washout during the hepatocyte phase in both lobes. By contrast, no lesions were identified during positron emission tomography imaging of the liver. A liver biopsy was performed and immunohistochemical staining revealed enhanced expression of cytokeratin AE1/AE3, synaptophysin, chromogranin A and CD56 and no expression of hepatocyte antigen or CΚ7. The mindbomb E3 ubiquitin protein ligase-1 index was ~2% in most of the tumor. The liver tumors were finally diagnosed as multiple intrahepatic metastases from a primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumor (PHNET). The patient underwent transarterial chemoembolisation with a combination of miriplatin (84 mg) mixed with gelatin sponge particles and lipiodol. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of PHNET in an patient aged >85 years. PMID:27284429

  11. Primary hepatic sarcomatoid carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LENG, QIANYING; XIANG, XI; TANG, YUANJIAO; YANG, YUJIA; QIU, LI

    2015-01-01

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma (SC) is a malignant tumor type of unclear pathogenesis, which rarely occurs in the liver. The present study reports the case of a 60-year-old woman who presented with multiple masses in her liver, with no fever, abdominal pain or jaundice. Serological markers for hepatitis B and C virus were negative, as was the test for α fetoprotein. Abdominal enhanced magnetic resonance imaging examination confirmed multiple lesions in the liver, and liquefactive necrosis was observed. The patient underwent a right hepatectomy, in addition to a cholecystectomy. Cytokeratin 8 (CK8), cluster of differentiation 117, pancytokeratin and vimentin were positively detected using immunohistochemistry, and thus the diagnosis of primary hepatic SC (PHSC) was established. During the follow-up period, characteristic imaging manifestations of tumor recurrence were detected, including peripheral enhancement, central necrosis, variable enhancement, venous invasion and intrahepatic metastasis. The immunohistochemical detection of CK, epithelial membrane antigen and vimentin, with CK8 as a critical indicator, may be useful for the diagnosis of PHSC. The preferred treatment for PHSC is surgical resection and the prognosis is poor. PMID:26622454

  12. Collapsing glomerulopathy associated with hepatitis B infection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Mantan, M.; Grover, R.; Kaur, S.; Batra, V.

    2016-01-01

    Collapsing glomerulopathy has been classified as a variant of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. It is associated with infections, inflammations, and certain medications. While its association with human immunodeficiency virus has been well established its occurrence with hepatitis B has not been reported. We present here a case of collapsing glomerulopathy in a child with hepatitis B infection. PMID:27512304

  13. STUDIES OF A MYXOVIRUS RECOVERED FROM PATIENTS WITH INFECTIOUS HEPATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Liebhaber, Harvey; Krugman, Saul; McGregor, Dorothy; Giles, Joan P.

    1965-01-01

    A virus has been isolated from the serum and urine of patients with infectious hepatitis. This virus is a member of the parinfluenza group. It is serologically distinct from the known members of the group, but apparently is antigenically related to the simian type-2 parainfluenza viruses. A causal relationship between WB virus and infectious hepatitis has not been established. PMID:4285254

  14. Extra-hepatic manifestations associated with hepatitis E virus infection: a comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bazerbachi, Fateh; Haffar, Samir; Garg, Sushil K; Lake, John R

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a significant public health problem that afflicts almost 20 million individuals annually and causes acute liver injury in 3.5 million, with approximately 56 000 deaths. As with other viral hepatitides, extra-hepatic manifestations could represent an important aspect of this infection. The spectrum of these manifestations is still emerging. Acute pancreatitis and neurological, musculoskeletal, hematological, renal, and other immune-mediated manifestations have been described. The aim of this article is to comprehensively review the published literature of extra-hepatic manifestations associated with HEV infection. Data sources: We searched the PubMed database using the MeSH term “hepatitis E” and each of the extra-hepatic manifestations associated with HEV infection. No language or date restrictions were set in these searches. Searches retrieving articles with non-A, non-B hepatitis were excluded. Additional articles were identified through the reference lists of included articles. Results: Several extra-hepatic manifestations associated with HEV infection have been published. The temporal association between some extra-hepatic manifestations and HEV infection and the exclusion of other possible etiologies suggests that HEV infection could have caused some of them. According to the available data, HEV infection appears to be strongly associated with acute pancreatitis, neurological disorders (with primarily dominant peripheral nerve involvement, most commonly manifested as Guillain-Barré syndrome, followed by neuralgic amyotrophy), hematological diseases (hemolytic anemia due to glucose phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, and severe thrombocytopenia), glomerulonephritis, and mixed cryoglobulinemia. More data are needed to clarify whether an association exists with musculoskeletal or other immune-mediated manifestations. Conclusions: HEV infection should be considered in patients with acute pancreatitis

  15. Adenovirus hepatitis in a boa constrictor (Boa constrictor).

    PubMed

    Ramis, A; Fernández-Bellon, H; Majó, N; Martínez-Silvestre, A; Latimer, K; Campagnoli, R

    2000-11-01

    A boa constrictor was submitted for postmortem evaluation. At necropsy, there were no substantial lesions except in the liver. Light microscopy revealed severe multifocal to coalescing coagulative necrotic hepatitis, with basophilic and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions in hepatocytes within the necrotic foci. The histopathological findings suggested a viral hepatitis. An adenoviral infection was diagnosed by means of transmission electronic microscopy and in situ hybridization techniques.

  16. [Vaccination against hepatitis A among occupational risk groups].

    PubMed

    Mukomolov, S L; Levakova, I A

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to evaluate vaccine prevention of hepatitis A in occupational risk groups in Russian Federation over 2011-2013. Epidemiologic analysis method was used. Data array for the analysis included information about 1,162,619 individuals vaccinated against hepatitis A throughout the country. Findings are that during the studied period a total of 470,278 adults over 18 years were vaccinated (i.e., 0,4% of all population of this age). Among occupational risk groups subjected to anti-hepatitis A vaccination within immunization calendar on epidemic indications, major (29%) share was presented by catering enterprises workers and individuals engaged into food trade and supply. Other occupational risk groups (workers maintaining water supply systems and sewerage system, medical staff, preschool institution teachers, etc) demonstrated significantly lower levels of being vaccinated. Vaccination against hepatitis Ain occupational risk groups should be in a focus of prophylactic measures, as will help to control over hepatitis A spread.

  17. [Vaccination against hepatitis A among occupational risk groups].

    PubMed

    Mukomolov, S L; Levakova, I A

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to evaluate vaccine prevention of hepatitis A in occupational risk groups in Russian Federation over 2011-2013. Epidemiologic analysis method was used. Data array for the analysis included information about 1,162,619 individuals vaccinated against hepatitis A throughout the country. Findings are that during the studied period a total of 470,278 adults over 18 years were vaccinated (i.e., 0,4% of all population of this age). Among occupational risk groups subjected to anti-hepatitis A vaccination within immunization calendar on epidemic indications, major (29%) share was presented by catering enterprises workers and individuals engaged into food trade and supply. Other occupational risk groups (workers maintaining water supply systems and sewerage system, medical staff, preschool institution teachers, etc) demonstrated significantly lower levels of being vaccinated. Vaccination against hepatitis Ain occupational risk groups should be in a focus of prophylactic measures, as will help to control over hepatitis A spread. PMID:25881392

  18. Hepatitis C FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis C FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  19. Hepatitis B FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis B FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  20. [Increased epidemic incidence of hepatitis B in a district hospital].

    PubMed

    Jakob, A; Mönch, E

    1978-01-15

    It is reported on an epidemic of hepatitis B of 29 patients in a district hospital. Due to diagnostic errors in importation and a more frequent appearance of diseases of hepatitis B in the surgical department and the 2nd medical department, in which above all diabetics are treated, took place. The average age of the patients was 55 years. In all patients the clinical course was to be regarded as severe. 4 of 29 patients died. In all patients the hepatitis B disease showed a pronounced jaundice with high transaminases, particularly the SGOT and LAP were clearly increased. Also the duration of the presence was longer than in hepatitis A as well as the transition into chronic hepatitis was more frequent. By diagnostic information of the physicians and the other medical staff as well as improved measures of desinfection the epidemic could be restricted.

  1. A Single Lineage of Hepatitis E Virus Causes both Outbreaks and Sporadic Hepatitis in Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Elduma, Adel Hussein; Zein, Mai Mohammed Adam; Karlsson, Marie; Elkhidir, Isam M.E.; Norder, Heléne

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have reported sporadic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections during non-outbreak periods in Africa. In this study, the prevalence of HEV infection in Sudan was investigated in 432 patients with acute hepatitis from 12 localities in North Kordofan, and from 152 patients involved in smaller outbreaks of hepatitis in the neighbouring Darfur. HEV infection was diagnosed in 147 (25%) patients: 98 from Kordofan and 49 from Darfur. The mortality was 10%; six of the patients who died from the infection were pregnant women. HEV RNA was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in 38 (26%) patients: 22 from Kordofan and 16 from Darfur. Partial open reading frame (ORF) 1 and ORF2 were sequenced from HEV from nine and three patients, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the Sudanese strains belonged to genotype 1 (HEV1), and confirmed the segregation of African HEV1 strains into one branch divergent from Asian HEV1. It also revealed that the Sudanese strains from this study and from an outbreak in 2004 formed a separate clade with a common ancestor, distinct from strains from the neighbouring Chad and Egypt. This HEV strain has thus spread in a large area of Sudan, where it has caused both sporadic hepatitis E and outbreaks from at least 2004 and onwards. These data demonstrate that hepatitis E is a constant, on-going public health problem in Sudan and that there is a need for hepatitis E surveillance, outbreak preparedness, and general improvements of the sanitation in these remote areas of the country. PMID:27782061

  2. Hepatitis A and B vaccination and public health.

    PubMed

    Hollinger, F Blaine; Bell, B; Levy-Bruhl, D; Shouval, D; Wiersma, S; Van Damme, P

    2007-11-01

    The introduction and implementation of hepatitis B vaccination programmes in areas of high endemicity has been very stressful. However, this initial accomplishment has led to the reassessment of priorities in some countries which could undermine these early successes. Work still remains to be done to support and implement interventions that will bring us closer to the WHO goal and to the control of hepatitis B in the community at large. Hepatitis A vaccine strategy for immunizing toddlers is shifting to those countries with intermediate endemicity where increasing morbidity in adults is being observed. Accumulating evidence indicates that such programmes can result in impressive reductions in the incidence of hepatitis A by herd immunity. Monitoring of these populations to determine durability of protection will be important to avoid shifting the infection to the older age population, when symptoms are more likely to occur. National policies need to consider hepatitis A vaccination in the context of other public health priorities.

  3. Hepatic PEComa: a potential pitfall in the evaluation of hepatic neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Hadi Mohammad; Katz, Steven C; Libbey, N Peter; Somasundar, Ponnandai S

    2014-01-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumour (PEComa) of the liver is very uncommon and may be overlooked in the clinical and histological differential diagnosis of a liver tumour. We report the case of an incidentally discovered liver mass suspicious for hepatocellular carcinoma, which on biopsy was suggestive of a pseudocyst but after resection was found to be hepatic PEComa with some of the usual characteristics of this neoplasm as well as several less familiar features. We have also reviewed cases of hepatic PEComa from the literature in order to provide insight into recognising possible PEComa preoperatively and assessing its risk of malignancy after diagnosis. PMID:24907216

  4. Cytomegalic hepatitis in a patient receiving omalizumab.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, R; Valente, C; Ferreira, E; Serra, J E; da Cunha, J Saraiva

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is a double stranded DNA virus that can be present in nearly all organs and body fluids. The primary infection is usually asymptomatic in the immunocompetent host and it is common among adolescents and young adults. The symptomatic form appears, in the majority of cases, as a mononucleosis syndrome with full recovery without specific treatment. We report a case of a 25 years old woman who presented with hepatitis due to CMV infection and history of omalizumab administration one month earlier. This recombinant monoclonal antibody is used to control refractory asthma and chronic spontaneous urticarial as it inhibits human IgE. Despite that, the long course of the disease lead us to initiate treatment with valganciclovir. The improvement after that was rapid and complete. PMID:27583207

  5. Seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus in Mumbai, and immunogenicity and safety of hepatitis A vaccine.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, P S; Shah, S S; Alvares, J F; Kher, A; Shankaran; Kandoth, P W; Sheth, P N; Kamath, H; Kamath, A; Koppikar, G V; Kalro, R H

    1998-01-01

    Prevention of hepatitis A virus (HAV) can be achieved through improved hygiene and living conditions, access to clean drinking water, and passive and active immunization. The present study assessed the age-related seroprevalence of HAV in Mumbai, India, in 1995-96 and the immunogenicity and safety of a newly developed inactivated HAV vaccine. 670 children and adults were recruited from 2 sites: a private hospital serving a predominantly middle- and upper-class population and a public hospital with low-income patients. Overall, 523 subjects (78%) were positive for anti-HAV. This rate was higher among low-income patients (85.3%) than those of higher socioeconomic status (64.5%). 38% of children under 5 years of age and 80% of those 11-15 years old were seropositive. 107 patients seronegative for anti-HAV were offered the vaccine. Anti-HAV antibody appeared 1 month after the first injection in 92.4% of vaccine recipients and 1 month after the second injection in 99%. Side effects were mild and self-limited. These findings confirm both the safety and the immunogenicity of the inactivated hepatitis A vaccine in high endemicity areas. However, universal immunization remains too costly in India. Further epidemiologic studies are needed to identify specific risk groups and regions that should be targeted for hepatitis A vaccine.

  6. [Acute myelitis related to hepatitis A after travel to Senegal].

    PubMed

    Ficko, C; Imbert, P; Mechaï, F; Barruet, R; Nicand, E; Rapp, C

    2010-02-01

    Neurological complications are rare following hepatitis A. Acute myelitis is even more uncommon. The purpose of this report is to describe a case of acute myelitis related to hepatitis A virus (HAV) in a 43-year-old-woman returning from Senegal. Diagnosis of myelitis was confirmed by spinal MRI and detection of anti-HAV Ig M antibodies in serum. The patient made a spontaneous clinical recovery in one month. Spinal MRI findings were normal at three months. Hepatitis A should be considered in the diagnostic approach to acute myelitis in returning travelers and patients living in highly endemic countries where prophylactic vaccination is unavailable.

  7. Current Concepts of Viral Hepatitis and A Peek into the Future 1

    PubMed Central

    Koff, Raymond S.

    1974-01-01

    New information has prompted revision of the conceptual framework for considering the epidemiology and virology of viral hepatitis. The means are now at hand to identify infections due to either Hepatitis A or B, as well as to implicate other etiologic agents in hepatitis. Immunologic evidence of variation in the antigens associated with Hepatitis B, and possibly in Hepatitis A, may explain some well known epidemiologic phenomena and has important implications in immune serum globulin prophylaxis. The ambiguous relationship of antigenemia and viremia in Hepatitis B is explored in relation to the hepatitis hazard of blood products, to trials of immune serum globulin, and to the potential role of the carrier-health worker in hepatitis transmission. The emerging concept of non-parenteral transmission of Hepatitis B is reviewed and future developments in the production of hepatitis vaccines and in experimental viral hepatitis in non-human primates is briefly discussed. PMID:4376306

  8. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 507 Hepatitis C WHAT IS HEPATITIS C? HOW IS IT DIAGNOSED? ... treatment may be less likely to work. Hep C treatment is less effective for coinfected people. Cure ...

  9. Efficiency of the incorporation of the hepatitis A vaccine as a combined A+B vaccine to the hepatitis B vaccination programme of preadolescents in schools.

    PubMed

    Navas, E; Salleras, L; Gisbert, R; Dominguez, A; Bruguera, M; Rodríguez, G; Galí, N; Prat, A

    2005-03-18

    In 1998, the Department of Health of Catalonia (Spain) began universal vaccination of preadolescents against hepatitis A by replacing the simple hepatitis B vaccine with a combined hepatitis A+B vaccine. Economic analyses were made of the two alternative strategies: to continue with the simple hepatitis B vaccination or to replace the simple vaccine with a combined hepatitis A+B vaccine. The analysis was made from the societal perspective and the time horizon considered was 25 years. In the base case, (estimated annual hepatitis A incidence of 15 per 100,000 and incremental price of the hepatitis A+B vaccine over the simple hepatitis B vaccine of 1.98) the net present value of the programme was positive (+533,708) and the benefit-cost ratio was 2.58. If the estimated disease incidence were reduced by half, the programme would still be efficient.

  10. Secondary Syphilis With Hepatitis and Nephrotic Syndrome: A Rare Concurrence

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Jasbir; Bajantri, Bharat; Nayudu, Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis, a chronic multisystem disease, is caused by a spirochete, Treponema pallidum. Clinical presentation may expand to several stages including primary, secondary and latent syphilis, which may present as early or late syphilis. Nephrotic syndrome and acute hepatitis are well-known complications of secondary syphilis. To the best of our knowledge, secondary syphilis with coexisting renal and hepatic complications has rarely been reported. Here we present a rare case of concurrent nephrotic syndrome and acute hepatitis in a patient with secondary syphilis. PMID:27298666

  11. Adverse events after hepatitis A B combination vaccine.

    PubMed

    Woo, Emily Jane; Miller, Nancy B; Ball, Robert

    2006-03-24

    In May 2001, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Hepatitis A Inactivated and Hepatitis B Recombinant Vaccine (HEPAB) for immunization of adults. From May 2001 to September 2003, the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) received 305 reports of adverse events after HEPAB. Many events were similar to those reported after the monovalent hepatitis A and B vaccines. Non-serious events included constitutional symptoms and local reactions. Serious events included neurologic, hepatobiliary, and dermatologic conditions, and detailed medical and epidemiological review did not suggest a clear pattern of evidence supporting a causal relationship with the vaccine, except for injection site reactions and some allergic reactions.

  12. Secondary Syphilis With Hepatitis and Nephrotic Syndrome: A Rare Concurrence.

    PubMed

    Makker, Jasbir; Bajantri, Bharat; Nayudu, Suresh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Syphilis, a chronic multisystem disease, is caused by a spirochete, Treponema pallidum. Clinical presentation may expand to several stages including primary, secondary and latent syphilis, which may present as early or late syphilis. Nephrotic syndrome and acute hepatitis are well-known complications of secondary syphilis. To the best of our knowledge, secondary syphilis with coexisting renal and hepatic complications has rarely been reported. Here we present a rare case of concurrent nephrotic syndrome and acute hepatitis in a patient with secondary syphilis. PMID:27298666

  13. A Dog Model for Acetaminophen-Induced Fulminant Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    FRANCAVILLA, A.; MAKOWKA, L.; POLIMENO, L.; BARONE, M.; DEMETRIS, J.; PRELICH, J.; Van THIEL, D. H.; STARZL, T. E.

    2010-01-01

    The development of a large animal model of fulminant hepatic failure produced with acetaminophen that should be useful in the development and evaluation of potential medical therapies for the important clinical problem of fulminant hepatic failure is described. Acetaminophen in dimethyl sulfoxide (600 mg/ml) given as three subcutaneous injections, with the first dose (750 mg/kg body wt) being given at noon, the second dose (200 mg/kg body wt) being given 9 h later, and the third dose (200 mg/kg body wt) being given 24 h after the initial dose consistently produces fulminant hepatic failure in dogs. The dimethyl sulfoxide vehicle, injected intramuscularly, does not influence either animal survival or hepatic function in control-treated dogs. No deaths occur within the first 36 h. By 72 h after initial drug administration, the mortality is 90%. Histopathological and biochemical investigations demonstrate a high degree of hepatocellular necrosis in nonsurviving animals without appreciable damage to the kidneys, lungs, or heart. The drug schedule and preparation outlined avoids the administration of large volumes of vehicle and results in prolonged high levels of acetaminophen in the blood sufficient to induce severe hepatic injury. Ranitidine (120 mg/kg body wt i.m.) given 30 min before each acetaminophen dose significantly reduces the mortality and hepatic necrosis produced using this model. This model satisfies all criteria established by Miller et al. for the production of a suitable large animal model of fulminant acute hepatic failure. PMID:2910762

  14. Prevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C infection in Libya: results from a national population based survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Libya is one of the largest countries in Africa and has the longest coast in the Mediterranean basin facing southern Europe. High rates of prevalence of viral hepatitis have been observed in various regions in Africa, but the prevalence in Libya is not well documented. We report on a large-scale nationwide study that evaluated the epidemiology of hepatitis B and hepatitis C in Libya and assessed the risk factors involved. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in 2008 on 65,761 individuals all over Libya. The country was divided into 12 regions according to the population density and sampling within each region was carried out under the supervision of the National Centre for Prevention of Infectious Diseases. Serum samples were collected from both males and females of all ages in both urban and rural areas and tested for HBsAg for hepatitis B and anti-HCV antibody for hepatitis C. Prevalence rates were determined in regions and in different groups and correlated with different demographic and risk factors involved in the spread of these viruses. Results The prevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses varied regionally across the country. The overall prevalence of hepatitis B was 2.2% (95% CI 2.1%-2.3%) and was higher among males than females (1.4:1.0). Hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence was 1.2% (95% CI 1.1-1.3) and it increased gradually after the age of 30 years (0.7-0.9% for < 30 years; 3.6% for ≥ 60 years). Prevalence of HBsAg was 0.8-0.9% below the age of 10 years, and higher but similar in older age groups (2.3-2.7%). There was an association between literacy and prevalence of hepatitis, particularly for HCV. Hospital admission, surgical operation, blood transfusion, and intravenous drug use were the main risk factors, and they were associated independently with a higher prevalence rate of viral hepatitis. Conclusions Libya may be considered an area of low-intermediate endemicity for hepatitis B virus infection, with lower

  15. Vaccination Against Hepatitis A for Hemophilic Patients: Is It Necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Jamal; Ziaee, Masood; Farsad, Seyed Ali; Fereydooni, Mohammad; Anani Sarab, Gholamreza; Rezvani Khorashad, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemophilic patients require long-life intravenous infusion of factor concentrates to treat bleedings. This could increase the risk of transmission of blood-borne infections like hepatitis C. Objectives The current study was aimed at investigating the immunity status against hepatitis A in hemophilic patients in south Khorasan and evaluating the necessity of hepatitis A vaccination for this population. Patients and Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted between 2014 and 2015 on all hemophilic patients of south Khorasan province, Iran (n = 108) for anti-HAV total, anti- HCV, HBs-Ag, anti-HIV, and anti-HTLV-I /II. Note that no one had already received a hepatitis A vaccine. Results As our results show, 77.8% of the participants (59% under 20 and 88.4% above 20 years old) were seropositive for anti-HAV total; 20.4% and 2.8% (three patients) of the cases were anti-HCV positive and anti-HTLV-1 positive, respectively, while none of the subjects were HBS-Ag or HIV-Ab positive. Seventeen of the patients (15.75%) showed a co-infection of HAV with HCV, and five HCV-infected patients (22.73%) had no immunity against hepatitis A. There was a significant relationship between age, rural life, and anti-HAV positive state in our patients (P < 0.001). No significant relationship between positive anti-HAV status and sex (P = 0.16), severity of hemophilia (P = 0.23), and infection with HIV, HCV, HTLV-1, and hepatitis B (P > 0.05) was detected. Conclusions More than 40% of the hemophilic patients under 20 years of age in the present study had no immunity against hepatitis A, and 23% of hepatitis C patients had not had a hepatitis A co-infection yet. Since hepatitis A can show a fulminant course in hepatitis C patients, vaccination against hepatitis A seems necessary in hemophilic patients in the region. PMID:27257430

  16. Hepatitis E virus as a Cause of Acute Hepatitis in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Tholen, Aletta T. R.; Schinkel, Janke; Molenkamp, Richard; Ang, C. Wim

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies indicate that 27% of Dutch blood donors have evidence of past infection with HEV. However, the low number of diagnosed HEV infections indicates either an asymptomatic course or under diagnosis. Objectives We investigated whether HEV is a cause of acute hepatitis in Dutch patients and which diagnostic modality (serology or PCR) should be used for optimal detection. Study design Serum samples were retrospectively selected from non-severely immuno-compromised patients from a university hospital population, suspected of having an infectious hepatitis. Criteria were: elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT> 34 U/l) and request for antibody testing for CMV, EBV or Hepatitis A (HAV). Results All samples were tested for HEV using ELISA and PCR. Ninety patients/sera were tested, of which 22% were HEV IgG positive. Only one serum was IgM positive. HEV PCR was positive in two patients: one patient was both HEV IgM and IgG positive, the other patient was only IgG positive. Both HEV RNA positive samples belonged to genotype 3. Evidence of recent infection with CMV, EBV and HAV was found in 13%, 10% and 3% respectively. Conclusions Although our study is limited by small numbers, we conclude that HEV is a cause of acute hepatitis in hospital associated patients in The Netherlands. Moreover, in our study population the prevalence of acute HAV (3%) was almost similar to acute HEV (2%). We propose to incorporate HEV testing in panels for acute infectious hepatitis. Negative results obtained for HEV IgM in a HEV PCR positive patient, indicates that antibody testing alone may not be sufficient and argues for PCR as a primary diagnostic tool in hospital associated patients. The high percentage of HEV IgG seropositivity confirms earlier epidemiological studies. PMID:26840767

  17. A case of acute hepatitis following mad honey ingestion.

    PubMed

    Sari Dogan, Fatma; Ozaydin, Vehbi; Incealtin, Onur; Guneysel, Ozlem; Demireller, Merve

    2015-12-01

    Acute hepatitis is characterized by liver inflammation and liver cell necrosis. The most frequently observed underlying cause thereof is viruses, but various other causes, such as alcohol, medication, or toxins may also lead thereto. In this paper, a case of acute hepatitis presenting with bradycardia, hypotension, and a prominent increase in liver enzymes following mad honey ingestion is discussed. Since there are only few cases of acute hepatitis following mad honey ingestion in the literature, we want to present this subject matter. PMID:27239626

  18. [A case of hepatic sarcoidosis presenting with cirrhotic symptoms].

    PubMed

    Kaji, Kiichiro; Ogino, Hidero; Hirai, Satoshi; Shimatani, Akiyoshi; Horita, Yosuke; Matsuda, Kouichiro; Hiramatsu, Katsushi; Matsuda, Mitsuru; Shimizu, Koichi; Nakanishi, Yuko; Noda, Yatsugi

    2014-03-01

    A man in 40s with skin sarcoidosis presented with signs and symptoms of liver injury and thrombocytopenia. Enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed cholecystolithiasis, hepatic deformation, and giant splenomegaly. Gastrointestinal endoscopy showed esophageal varices. Cholecystectomy, splenectomy, and wedge biopsy of the liver were performed. Histopathology of the liver revealed many granulomas and severe periportal fibrosis without lobular reconstruction. These findings were compatible with hepatic sarcoidosis, but not liver cirrhosis. Here we report a rare case of hepatic sarcoidosis presenting with cirrhotic symptoms.

  19. Comparison of effects of hepatitis E or A viral superinfection in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Weimin; Xie, Junqiang; Zhao, Zhixin; Xie, Dongying; Gao, Zhiliang

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare the demographics, liver function, and prognosis of Chinese patients infected with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and superinfected with hepatitis E virus (HEV) or hepatitis A virus (HAV). Patients and methods Among 188 patients with CHB, 136 with HEV superinfection and 52 with HAV superinfection were treated at our hospital between March 1999 and October 2007 for clinical features suggestive of acute hepatitis. The patients’ age, sex, incidence of liver failure, and mortality were recorded. The tested biochemical indices and markers of liver function included serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total bilirubin (TBil), prothrombin activity (PTA), and the serum levels of HBeAg, HBeAb, and HBV DNA. Results There were significant differences between the age and sex distributions of the two groups (P < 0.05). More patients in the CHB + HEV group had complications (94.9 vs. 61.5%, P < 0.001), and hepatic failure (39.7 vs. 11.5%, P = 0.002). Additionally, the mortality among the CHB + HEV group was significantly higher (33.8 vs. 1.9%, P < 0.001). Conclusions The comparison of clinical outcomes revealed that patients with HBV + HEV had more advanced baseline liver disease and a poorer prognosis than those with HBV + HAV. Because there is no vaccine against HEV, patients with CHB should take appropriate precautions against superinfection with HEV, such as consumption of boiled water and well-cooked food, in regions where it is endemic. PMID:21063485

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY THE MERGING PATHOGEN HEPATITIS E IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Like the hepatitis A virus, it is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and can cause short-term, acute hepatitis. In addition, hepatitis E has been found to cause a signific...

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY THE EMERGING PATHOGEN HEPATITIS E IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Like the hepatitis A virus, it is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and can cause short-term, acute hepatitis. In addition, hepatitis E has been found to cause a signific...

  2. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations ​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Autoimmune Hepatitis Page Content On this page: What is autoimmune ... Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is autoimmune hepatitis? Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic—or long lasting— ...

  3. Inorganic Nanoparticle as a Carrier for Hepatitis B Viral Capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekhtyar, Yu.; Romanova, M.; Kachanovska, A.; Skrastiņa, D.; Reinhofa, R.; Pumpens, P.; Patmalnieks, A.

    Virus like particles (VLP) are used to transport immune response-modulating agents to target cells to treat them. In order to deliver a high concentration of VLP to the cell, a number of VLP can be attached to a nanoparticle to be used as a nanolorry. In this study, SiO2 nanoparticles were attached to Hepatitis B VLP. Spectrophotometry measurements, electron, and fluorescent microscopy evidence showed that the SiO2 - Hepatitis B VLP complexes were formed.

  4. Changing travel-related global epidemiology of hepatitis A.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Robert

    2005-10-01

    Hepatitis A is highly endemic in many emerging cultures. Despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines and some improvements in sanitation in developing countries, hepatitis A remains a significant cause of morbidity for nonimmune travelers visiting such destinations. All are at risk, including short-term vacationers or business travelers who stay in deluxe accommodations. This may have considerable implications on public health. Hepatitis A vaccination programs for travelers have not proven to be effective, since many visitors to destinations at risk (e.g., Mexico) fail to consult health professionals prior to departure. Because 50% of the US population has an anticipated lifetime risk for exposure, universal immunization against hepatitis A should be considered.

  5. [Vaccines against hepatitis A and B in Chile].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, M Teresa

    2009-06-01

    The mode of transmission and epidemiological approach for hepatitis A and B are different. However, both are preventable with vaccines whose efficacy and long lasting protection has been demonstrated. This review describes the secular tendency of both infections in Chile, their risk factors that have contributed to their persistence in the country and the interventions that have been carried out to reduce the disease burden. Although the vaccine for hepatitis B was incorporated to the immunization program in 2005, the vaccine for hepatitis A persists in the list of interventions that must be assumed with priority by the Ministry of Health. If Chilean health authorities pretend to reach the enteric disease indicators of developed countries, they must accelerate the epidemiological transition towards the elimination of hepatitis A.

  6. Viral hepatitis A, B, and C: grown-up issues.

    PubMed

    Sharapov, Umid M; Hu, Dale J

    2010-08-01

    Viral hepatitis is a major global health problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although there are five major and distinct human hepatitis viruses characterized to date--referred to as hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E, respectively--only hepatitis A, B, and C are epidemiologically and clinically relevant for adolescents in North America. The clinical presentation of acute infection with each of these viruses is similar; thus, diagnosis depends on the use of specific serologic markers and viral nucleic acids. This review provides data on the epidemiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of each of these three viral infections, along with points that are important or unique to adolescent patients.

  7. Development and characterization of a new human hepatic cell line.

    PubMed

    Ramboer, Eva; De Craene, Bram; De Kock, Joey; Berx, Geert; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    The increasing demand and hampered use of primary human hepatocytes for research purposes have urged scientists to search for alternative cell sources, such as immortalized hepatic cell lines. The aim of this study was to develop a human hepatic cell line using the combined overexpression of TERT and the cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and mutant isoform CDK4R24C. Following transduction of adult human primary hepatocytes with the selected immortalization genes, cell growth was triggered and a cell line was established. When cultured under appropriate conditions, the cell line expressed several hepatocytic markers and liver-enriched transcription factors at the transcriptional and/or translational level, secreted liver-specific proteins and showed glycogen deposition. These results suggest that the immortalization strategy applied to primary human hepatocytes could generate a novel hepatic cell line that seems to retain some key hepatic characteristics. PMID:26869867

  8. Development and characterization of a new human hepatic cell line

    PubMed Central

    Ramboer, Eva; De Craene, Bram; De Kock, Joey; Berx, Geert; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    The increasing demand and hampered use of primary human hepatocytes for research purposes have urged scientists to search for alternative cell sources, such as immortalized hepatic cell lines. The aim of this study was to develop a human hepatic cell line using the combined overexpression of TERT and the cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and mutant isoform CDK4R24C. Following transduction of adult human primary hepatocytes with the selected immortalization genes, cell growth was triggered and a cell line was established. When cultured under appropriate conditions, the cell line expressed several hepatocytic markers and liver-enriched transcription factors at the transcriptional and/or translational level, secreted liver-specific proteins and showed glycogen deposition. These results suggest that the immortalization strategy applied to primary human hepatocytes could generate a novel hepatic cell line that seems to retain some key hepatic characteristics. PMID:26869867

  9. Spontaneous rupture: a rare complication of hepatic hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    De Beul, P; Roels, P; Heirwegh, G; Janssen, A; Claikens, B

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic lesions are one of the possible visceral causes of spontaneous hemoperitoneum. Hepatic hemangiomas are congenital vascular malformations and are the most common benign tumours of the liver. Most cases are asymptomatic. Although they seldom rupture, it is important to diagnose them as their global mortality rate is high. An accurate diagnosis of a hemangioma as cause of a hemoperitoneum would result in correct clinical decision making and treatment. PMID:25597208

  10. Hepatitis A virus detection in food: current and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, G; Bosch, A; Pintó, R M

    2007-07-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is responsible for around half of the total number of hepatitis infections diagnosed worldwide. HAV infection is mainly propagated via the faecal-oral route and as a consequence of globalisation, transnational outbreaks of foodborne infections are reported with increasing frequency. Molecular procedures are now available and should be employed for the direct surveillance of HAV in food and environmental samples.

  11. Planning and execution of a successful hepatitis B immunization program.

    PubMed

    Hurley, J L; Turner, H S; Butler, K M

    2001-01-01

    Today's college students occupy a "window" between older adults, whose need for hepatitis B vaccination is minimal, and younger people who receive the vaccine as part of their childhood immunization series. However, because of the high-risk activities that are often part of student behavior, college students are among the individuals who are at the highest risk for this disease; 75% of all reported hepatitis B cases occur in persons between the ages of 15 and 39 years. It is therefore imperative that college health professionals take seriously their responsibility to educate students about issues related to hepatitis B and make available programs that enable the students to receive immunizations. This article briefly describes a successful hepatitis B education and immunization program at an institution that has no mandatory prematriculation immunization requirements.

  12. Hepatitis A: Epidemiology and prevention in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Franco, Elisabetta; Meleleo, Cristina; Serino, Laura; Sorbara, Debora; Zaratti, Laura

    2012-03-27

    Hepatitis A is the most common form of acute viral hepatitis in the world. Major geographical differences in endemicity of hepatitis A are closely related to hygienic and sanitary conditions and other indicators of the level of socioeconomic development. The anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) seroprevalence rate is presently decreasing in many parts of the world, but in less developed regions and in several developing countries, HAV infection is still very common in the first years of life and seroprevalence rates approach 100%. In areas of intermediate endemicity, the delay in the exposure to the virus has generated a huge number of susceptible adolescents and adults and significantly increased the average age at infection. As the severity of disease increases with age, this has led to outbreaks of hepatitis A. Several factors contribute to the decline of the infection rate, including rising socioeconomic levels, increased access to clean water and the availability of a hepatitis A vaccine that was developed in the 1990s. For populations with a high proportion of susceptible adults, implementing vaccination programs may be considered. In this report, we review available epidemiological data and implementation of vaccination strategies, particularly focusing on developing countries.

  13. AIDS and hepatitis: a problem for the dental team.

    PubMed

    Reichart, P A

    1994-02-01

    The different types of viral hepatitis are briefly reviewed in relation to transmission during dental treatment, hepatitis B remaining the greatest threat to the dental team which is not immunised. The significance of hepatitis C for the dental profession is as yet undetermined. Transmission of HIV in the dental practice may occur from patient to dentist, from patient to patient and from dentist to patient. Epidemiological data show that none of these routes seems to be common. To date only five patients have been infected with HIV in a dental practice, the mode of transmission of which is unknown. In order to minimise the risk the dental profession is advised to strongly adhere to the recommendations for preventing HIV and hepatitis virus infection in health-care settings. Between patients all dental instruments should be submitted to sterilisation such as steam autoclaving. PMID:8021033

  14. Hepatitis E as a cause of acute jaundice syndrome in northern Uganda, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Gerbi, Gemechu B; Williams, Roxanne; Bakamutumaho, Barnabas; Liu, Stephen; Downing, Robert; Drobeniuc, Jan; Kamili, Saleem; Xu, Fujie; Holmberg, Scott D; Teshale, Eyasu H

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a common cause of acute viral hepatitis in developing countries; however, its contribution to acute jaundice syndrome is not well-described. A large outbreak of hepatitis E occurred in northern Uganda from 2007 to 2009. In response to this outbreak, acute jaundice syndrome surveillance was established in 10 district healthcare facilities to determine the proportion of cases attributable to hepatitis E. Of 347 acute jaundice syndrome cases reported, the majority (42%) had hepatitis E followed by hepatitis B (14%), malaria (10%), hepatitis C (5%), and other/unknown (29%). Of hepatitis E cases, 72% occurred in Kaboong district, and 68% of these cases occurred between May and August of 2011. Residence in Kaabong district was independently associated with hepatitis E (adjusted odds ratio = 13; 95% confidence interval = 7-24). The findings from this surveillance show that an outbreak and sporadic transmission of hepatitis E occur in northern Uganda.

  15. Hepatitis E as a cause of acute jaundice syndrome in northern Uganda, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Gerbi, Gemechu B; Williams, Roxanne; Bakamutumaho, Barnabas; Liu, Stephen; Downing, Robert; Drobeniuc, Jan; Kamili, Saleem; Xu, Fujie; Holmberg, Scott D; Teshale, Eyasu H

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a common cause of acute viral hepatitis in developing countries; however, its contribution to acute jaundice syndrome is not well-described. A large outbreak of hepatitis E occurred in northern Uganda from 2007 to 2009. In response to this outbreak, acute jaundice syndrome surveillance was established in 10 district healthcare facilities to determine the proportion of cases attributable to hepatitis E. Of 347 acute jaundice syndrome cases reported, the majority (42%) had hepatitis E followed by hepatitis B (14%), malaria (10%), hepatitis C (5%), and other/unknown (29%). Of hepatitis E cases, 72% occurred in Kaboong district, and 68% of these cases occurred between May and August of 2011. Residence in Kaabong district was independently associated with hepatitis E (adjusted odds ratio = 13; 95% confidence interval = 7-24). The findings from this surveillance show that an outbreak and sporadic transmission of hepatitis E occur in northern Uganda. PMID:25448237

  16. A method for quickly and exactly extracting hepatic vein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Qing; Yuan, Rong; Wang, Luyao; Wang, Yanchun; Li, Zhen; Hu, Daoyu; Xie, Qingguo

    2013-02-01

    It is of vital importance that providing detailed and accurate information about hepatic vein (HV) for liver surgery planning, such as pre-operative planning of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Due to the different blood flow rate of intra-hepatic vascular systems and the restrictions of CT scan, it is common that HV and hepatic portal vein (HPV) are both filled with contrast medium during the scan and in high intensity in the hepatic venous phase images. As a result, the HV segmentation result obtained from the hepatic venous phase images is always contaminated by HPV which makes accurate HV modeling difficult. In this paper, we proposed a method for quick and accurate HV extraction. Based on the topological structure of intra-hepatic vessels, we analyzed the anatomical features of HV and HPV. According to the analysis, three conditions were presented to identify the nodes that connect HV with HPV in the topological structure, and thus to distinguish HV from HPV. The method costs less than one minute to extract HV and provides a correct and detailed HV model even with variations in vessels. Evaluated by two experienced radiologists, the accuracy of the HV model obtained from our method is over 97%. In the following work, we will extend our work to a comprehensive clinical evaluation and apply this method to actual LDLT surgical planning.

  17. Characterization of a hepatitis B and hepatitis delta virus receptor binding site.

    PubMed

    Engelke, Matthias; Mills, Kerry; Seitz, Stefan; Simon, Petra; Gripon, Philippe; Schnölzer, Martina; Urban, Stephan

    2006-04-01

    Insights into the early infection events of the human hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis delta virus (HDV) have been limited because of the lack of a cell culture system supporting the full replication cycle for these important pathogens. The human hepatoma cell line HepaRG allows the experimental induction of a differentiated state, thereby gaining susceptibility toward HBV and HDV infection. We recently identified HBV envelope protein-derived lipopeptides comprising amino acids 2 though 48 of the preS-domain of the L-surface protein, which block infection already at picomolar concentrations. To map the responsible sequence for the peptides' activity we describe an Escherichia coli expression system that permits myristoylation and investigated recombinant HBVpreS-GST fusion proteins with deletion- and point-mutations for their ability to prevent HBV and HDV infection. We found that (1) a myristoylated HBVpreS/2-48-GST fusion protein efficiently interferes with HBV infection of HepaRG cells; (2) deletions and point mutations in the highly conserved preS1 sequence between amino acids 11 through 21 result in the loss of infection inhibition activity; (3) hepatitis B viruses carrying single amino acid exchanges within this region lose infectivity; and (4) HDV infection of HepaRG cells can be inhibited by myristoylated HBVpreS peptides with the same specificity. In conclusion, HBV and HDV use at least one common step to enter hepatocytes and require a highly conserved preS1-sequence within the L-protein. This step is exceptionally sensitive toward inactivation by acylated HBVpreS1 peptides, which therefore represent a novel group of entry inhibitors that could be used for the treatment of hepatitis B and D.

  18. A Successful Hepatitis B Vaccination Program in a Dental School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, David; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A carefully controlled hepatitis B immunization program among the University of Pittsburgh's dental students and faculty resulted in 96 percent of tested recipients having positive protective antibody titers. A direct relationship between age and positive titers emerged, supporting vaccination early in the dental career. (MSE)

  19. Relationship between Differential Hepatic microRNA Expression and Decreased Hepatic Cytochrome P450 3A Activity in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Chirayu Pankaj; Nalamasu, Rohit; Li, Lang; Jones, David; Wei, Rongrong; Liu, Wanqing; Sarasani, Vishal; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Chalasani, Naga

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim Liver cirrhosis is associated with decreased hepatic cytochrome P4503A (CYP3A) activity but the pathogenesis of this phenomenon is not well elucidated. In this study, we examined if certain microRNAs (miRNA) are associated with decreased hepatic CYP3A activity in cirrhosis. Methods Hepatic CYP3A activity and miRNA microarray expression profiles were measured in cirrhotic (n=28) and normal (n=12) liver tissue. Hepatic CYP3A activity was measured via midazolam hydroxylation in human liver microsomes. Additionally, hepatic CYP3A4 protein concentration and the expression of CYP3A4 mRNA were measured. Analyses were conducted to identify miRNAs which were differentially expressed between two groups but also were significantly associated with lower hepatic CYP3A activity. Results Hepatic CYP3A activity in cirrhotic livers was 1.7-fold lower than in the normal livers (0.28 ± 0.06 vs. 0.47 ± 0.07mL* min-1*mg protein-1 (mean ± SEM), P=0.02). Six microRNAs (miR-155, miR-454, miR-582-5p, let-7f-1*, miR-181d, and miR-500) had >1.2-fold increase in cirrhotic livers and also had significant negative correlation with hepatic CYP3A activity (range of r = -0.44 to -0.52, P <0.05). Notably, miR-155, a known regulator of liver inflammation, had the highest fold increase in cirrhotic livers (2.2-fold, P=4.16E-08) and significantly correlated with hepatic CYP3A activity (r=-0.50, P=0.017). The relative expression (2-ΔΔCt mean ± SEM) of hepatic CYP3A4 mRNA was significantly higher in cirrhotic livers (21.76 ± 2.65 vs. 5.91 ± 1.29, P=2.04E-07) but their levels did not significantly correlate with hepatic CYP3A activity (r=-0.43, P=0.08). Conclusion The strong association between certain miRNAs, notably miR-155, and lower hepatic CYP3A activity suggest that altered miRNA expression may regulate hepatic CYP3A activity. PMID:24058572

  20. A review of the long-term protection after hepatitis A and B vaccination.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Pierre; Van Herck, Koen

    2007-03-01

    Vaccine-preventable viral hepatitis continues to be a cause of considerable morbidity and mortality: on worldwide basis, approximately 1.4 million cases of hepatitis A are reported every year. The true incidence, however, has been estimated to be 3-10 times higher. Regarding hepatitis B, more than a third of the world's population has been infected. The World Health Organization has estimated (2000) that there are 367 million chronic carriers of hepatitis B worldwide, and approximately 1 million deaths per year as a consequence of chronic complications and acute fulminant disease. Hepatitis B vaccines have been licensed since 1982, and hepatitis A vaccines since 1992. In 1996, a combined hepatitis A and B vaccine became available. An update on the long-term protection conferred by hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccines as well as the combined hepatitis A and B vaccine is offered in this paper. Long-term efficacy and booster policy for hepatitis B vaccines have often been a topic of discussion. Based on current data and field experience there is, in general, no necessity for booster doses for fully vaccinated immunocompetent individuals. Long-term protection has been demonstrated by the rapid (5-7 days) development of anamnestic antibody responses among vaccinees who no longer have detectable anti-HBs. Anamnestic responses correlate with lymphoproliferative T-cell responses following challenge with hepatitis B vaccine. Furthermore, employing Spot-ELISA techniques, circulating B-cells were shown to be able to produce anti-HBs in vaccinees who lost their detectable antibodies. The accumulated data from a large number of studies indicate that despite antibody decline or loss, immune memory exhibits long-term persistence. There is somewhat less information available for hepatitis A vaccines, yet an increasing number of studies indicate that the findings for hepatitis B vaccines are also applicable to hepatitis A vaccines. The necessity to provide a booster dose was based

  1. Alcohol induced hepatic degeneration in a hepatitis C virus core protein transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Noh, Dong-Hyung; Lee, Eun-Joo; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Mi; Min, Chang-Woo; Kang, Kyung-Ku; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Kim, Sang-Hyeob; Sung, Soo-Eun; Hwang, Meeyul; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has become a major public health issue. It is prevalent in most countries. HCV infection frequently begins without clinical symptoms, before progressing to persistent viremia, chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the majority of patients (70% to 80%). Alcohol is an independent cofactor that accelerates the development of HCC in chronic hepatitis C patients. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate ethanol-induced hepatic changes in HCV core-Tg mice and mutant core Tg mice. Wild type (NTG), core wild-Tg mice (TG-K), mutant core 116-Tg mice (TG-116) and mutant core 99-Tg mice (TG-99) were used in this investigation. All groups were given drinking water with 10% ethanol and 5% sucrose for 13 weeks. To observe liver morphological changes, we performed histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Histopathologically, NTG, TG-K and TG-116 mice showed moderate centrilobular necrosis, while severe centrilobular necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation were observed in TG-99 mice with increasing lymphocyte infiltration and piecemeal necrosis. In all groups, a small amount of collagen fiber was found, principally in portal areas. None of the mice were found to have myofibroblasts based on immunohistochemical staining specific for α-SMA. CYP2E1-positive cells were clearly detected in the centrilobular area in all groups. In the TG-99 mice, we also observed cells positive for CK8/18, TGF-β1 and phosphorylated (p)-Smad2/3 and p21 around the necrotic hepatocytes in the centrilobular area (p < 0.01). Based on our data, alcohol intake induced piecemeal necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation in the TG-99 mice. These phenomena involved activation of the TGF-β1/p-Smad2/3/p21 signaling pathway in hepatocytes. Data from this study will be useful for elucidating the association between alcohol intake and HCV infection.

  2. Effectiveness of 10-year vaccination (2001-2010) on Hepatitis A in Tianjin, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-lun; Zhu, Xiang-jun; Shan, Ai-lan; Gao, Zhi-gang; Zhang, Ying; Ding, Ya-xing; Liu, Hui; Wu, Wei-shen; Liu, Yong; He, Hai-yan; Xie, Xiao-hua; Xia, Wei-dong; Li, Chao; Xu, Wen-ti; Li, Zhi-yuan; Lin, Hua-liang; Fu, Wei-ming

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is an effective strategy to prevent and control the transmission of hepatitis A. Hepatitis A immunization program has been taken into effect since 2001 in Tianjin, China. This study evaluated the effectiveness of strategies in the prevention and control of hepatitis A. Data of serological survey, annual hepatitis A incidence, immunization coverage and the positive rate of hepatitis A IgG before and after the immunization program in residents under 15 years old were used to do the analysis. The results indicated that hepatitis A vaccine induced a striking decrease of hepatitis A incidence and a significant increase in the positive rate of anti-HAV IgG among the children younger than 15 years old. Hepatitis A vaccination in children was proved to be effective in the prevention and control of hepatitis A in Tianjin, China.

  3. Effectiveness of 10-year vaccination (2001–2010) for Hepatitis A in Tianjin, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-lun; Zhu, Xiang-jun; Shan, Ai-lan; Gao, Zhi-gang; Zhang, Ying; Ding, Ya-xing; Liu, Hui; Wu, Wei-shen; Liu, Yong; He, Hai-yan; Xie, Xiao-hua; Xia, Wei-dong; Li, Chao; Xu, Wen-ti; Li, Zhi-yuan; Lin, Hua-Liang; Fu, Wei-ming

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is an effective strategy to prevent and control the transmission of hepatitis A. Hepatitis A immunization program has been taken into effect since 2001 in Tianjin, China. This study evaluated the effectiveness of strategies in the prevention and control of hepatitis A. Data of serological survey, annual hepatitis A incidence, immunization coverage and the positive rate of hepatitis A IgG before and after the immunization program in residents under 15 years old were used to do the analysis. The results indicated that hepatitis A vaccine induced a striking decrease of hepatitis A incidence and a significant increase in the positive rate of anti-HAV IgG among the children younger than 15 years old. Hepatitis A vaccination in children was proved to be effective in the prevention and control of hepatitis A in Tianjin, China. PMID:24503599

  4. Daclatasvir: A Review in Chronic Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2016-09-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5A replication complex inhibitor daclatasvir (Daklinza(®)) is indicated for use in combination with sofosbuvir, with or without ribavirin, in a pangenotypic all-oral regimen. In patients with chronic HCV genotype 1 or 3 infection without cirrhosis, a 12-week regimen of daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir achieved high sustained virological response rates 12 weeks' post-treatment (SVR12), regardless of prior treatment experience, according to the results of the AI444040 and ALLY-3 trials. In the ALLY-3+ trial, high SVR12 rates were achieved with a 12- or 16-week regimen of daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir and ribavirin in patients with chronic HCV genotype 3 infection and advanced fibrosis or compensated cirrhosis. A daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir-based regimen demonstrated efficacy in patients with chronic HCV genotype 1, 3 or 4 infection and advanced cirrhosis or post-transplant recurrence in the ALLY-1 trial, and in patients co-infected with HCV genotype 1, 3 or 4 and HIV-1 in the ALLY-2 trial. Results of clinical trials were supported by real-world data from early-access programmes that included high numbers of patients who would have been excluded from phase 3 trials because of advanced disease and/or concomitant medical conditions. Daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir with or without ribavirin was generally well tolerated. In conclusion, an all-oral regimen comprising daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir with or without ribavirin is an important option for use in treatment-naive or treatment-experienced patients with chronic HCV genotype 1, 3 or 4 infection, including in patients with advanced liver disease, post-transplant recurrence and HIV-1 co-infection. PMID:27550544

  5. Viral hepatitis*

    PubMed Central

    Deinhardt, F.; Gust, I. D.

    1982-01-01

    Three forms of viral hepatitis can be recognized: hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis non-A, non-B. Hepatitis A is caused by a picornavirus, is transmitted by the faceal—oral route, does not become chronic, and no chronic virus carriers exist. The virus can be grown in cell cultures, and killed as well as live attenuated virus vaccines are under development. Hepatitis B is caused by an enveloped virus containing a circular, double-stranded form of DNA. The disease is transmitted parenterally through inoculation of blood or blood products containing virus or through close personal contact with a virus-positive person. Hepatitis B becomes chronic in a certain number of cases and can lead to cirrhosis and primary liver cell carcinoma. The blood and certain body secretions of individuals with a persistent or chronic infection may remain infectious for many years. The hepatitis B virus cannot be grown in cell cultures but the entire genome has been sequenced and cloned in bacterial and eukaryotic cells. An inactivated virus vaccine has been prepared from hepatitis B surface antigen present in the plasma of hepatitis B virus carriers and further vaccines are under development. The agents of hepatitis non-A, non-B have not been identified. It is possible to distinguish between a predominantly parenterally transmitted and an orally transmitted form of hepatitis non-A, non-B. The latter is reported to be caused by a picornavirus that does not, however, have any antigenic relationship with hepatitis A virus. PMID:6817933

  6. Hepatitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  7. Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination Information for Diabetes Educators What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis B virus. When first infected, a person can develop ...

  8. [Autoimmune hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Rajko

    2003-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is an unresolving, hepatocellular inflammation of unknown cause that is characterized by the presence of periportal hepatitis on histologic examination, tissue autoantibodies in serum, and hypergammaglobulinemia. By international consensus, the designation autoimmune hepatitis has replaced alternative terms for the condition. Three types of autoimmune hepatitis have been proposed based on immunoserologic findings. Type 1 autoimmune hepatitis is characterized by the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) or smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) (or both) in serum. Seventy percent of patients with type 1 of autoimmune hepatitis are women. This type is the most common form and accounts for at least 80% of cases. Type 2 is characterized by the presence of antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 (anti-LKM1) in serum. Patients with this type of autoimmune hepatitis are predominantly children. Type 3 autoimmune hepatitis is characterized by the presence of antibodies to soluble liver antigen (anti-SLA) in serum. There are no individual features that are pathognomonic of autoimmune hepatitis, and its diagnosis requires the confident exclusion of other conditions. The large majority of patients show satisfactory response to corticosteroid (usually prednisone or prednisolone) therapy. For the past 30 years it has been customary to add azathioprine as a "steroid sparing" agent to allow lower doses of steroids to be used and remission, once achieved, can be sustained in many patients with azathioprine alone after steroid withdrawal. Patients with autoimmune hepatitis who have decompensated during or after corticosteroid therapy are candidates for liver transplantation.

  9. Budd-Chiari Syndrome in a Patient with Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Frankl, Joseph; Hennemeyer, Charles; Flores, Michael S; Desai, Archita P

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Budd-Chiari syndrome can present with cirrhosis and signs and symptoms similar to those of other chronic liver diseases. We present a case of Budd-Chiari syndrome discovered during attempted transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting in a patient with decompensated cirrhosis believed to be secondary to hepatitis C. Although the patient had hepatocellular carcinoma, the Budd-Chiari syndrome was a primary disease due to hepatic venous webs. Angioplasty was performed in this case, which resolved the patient's symptoms related to portal hypertension. Follow-up venography 5 months after angioplasty demonstrated continued patency of the hepatic veins. A biopsy was obtained in the same setting, which showed centrilobular fibrosis indicating that venous occlusion was indeed the cause of cirrhosis. It is important to consider a second disease when treating a patient with difficult to manage portal hypertension. PMID:27525135

  10. A case of cholecystohepatic duct with atrophic common hepatic duct

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, A; Hankins, J

    2003-01-01

    Background Cholecystohepatic ducts are rare congenital variants of the biliary tree. Case outline An 81-year-old woman presented with biliary colic and elevated liver function tests. An ERCP demonstrated a common bile duct stone and stricture of the common hepatic duct. An operative cholangiogram demonstrated an atrophic common hepatic duct and retrograde filling of the gallbladder through a large cholecystoheptic duct. The patient had a cholecystectomy and reconstructive cholecystohepatic duct jejunostomy. Discussion This case demonstrates a rare congenital anomaly where the gallbladder fills retrograde during an intraoperative cholangiogram despite clipping of the cystic duct. The major path of biliary drainage was through a large cholecystoheptic duct similar to a gallbladder interposition; however, the common hepatic duct was still present but atrophic. This anomaly has not been described previously. PMID:18332999

  11. Budd-Chiari Syndrome in a Patient with Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Hennemeyer, Charles; Flores, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Budd-Chiari syndrome can present with cirrhosis and signs and symptoms similar to those of other chronic liver diseases. We present a case of Budd-Chiari syndrome discovered during attempted transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting in a patient with decompensated cirrhosis believed to be secondary to hepatitis C. Although the patient had hepatocellular carcinoma, the Budd-Chiari syndrome was a primary disease due to hepatic venous webs. Angioplasty was performed in this case, which resolved the patient's symptoms related to portal hypertension. Follow-up venography 5 months after angioplasty demonstrated continued patency of the hepatic veins. A biopsy was obtained in the same setting, which showed centrilobular fibrosis indicating that venous occlusion was indeed the cause of cirrhosis. It is important to consider a second disease when treating a patient with difficult to manage portal hypertension. PMID:27525135

  12. Possible roxithromycin-induced fulminant hepatic failure in a child.

    PubMed

    Easton-Carter, K L; Hardikar, W; Smith, A L

    2001-07-01

    A pediatric formulation of roxithromycin is a relatively new addition to the antibiotic market in Australia. A previously healthy 5-year-old boy with no significant medical history was treated with roxithromycin 50 mg twice/day for cough, fever, and anorexia. After completing a 5-day course of the agent, he developed a nonpruritic, nonurticarial, erythematous, maculopapular, generalized rash and occasional vomiting. Three days later his symptoms included jaundice, dark urine, and pale stools. Laboratory results revealed acute hepatitis, and the patient was admitted to the hospital. His hepatic function continued to deteriorate, so the boy was transferred to a tertiary pediatric hospital. His condition continued to worsen, and 6 days after transfer, he underwent liver transplantation. Clinicians should be aware of potential hepatic complications associated with the use of roxithromycin. PMID:11444584

  13. Predictors of Hepatitis Knowledge Improvement Among Methadone Maintained Clients Enrolled in a Hepatitis Intervention Program

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Darlene; Sinha, Karabi; Marfisee, Mary; Cohen, Allan; Greengold, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This randomized, controlled study (n = 256) was conducted to compare three interventions designed to promote hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination completion, among clients undergoing methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in Los Angeles and Santa Monica. The participants were randomized into three groups: Motivational Interviewing-Single Session (MI-Single), Motivational Interviewing-Group (MI-Group), or Nurse-Led Hepatitis Health Promotion (HHP). All three treatment groups received the 3-series HAV/HBV vaccine. The MI sessions were provided by trained therapists, the Nurse-Led HHP sessions were delivered by a research nurse. The main outcome variable of interest was improvement in HBV and HCV knowledge, measured by a 6-item HBV and a 7-item HCV knowledge and attitude tool that was administered at baseline and at 6-month follow-up. The study results showed that there was a significant increase in HBV- and HCV-related knowledge across all three groups (p < 0.0001). There were no significant differences found with respect to knowledge acquisition among the groups. Irrespective of treatment group, gender (P = 0.008), study site (P < 0.0001) and whether a participant was abused as a child (P = 0.017) were all found to be predictors of HCV knowledge improvement; only recruitment site (P < 0.0001) was found to be a predictor of HBV knowledge. The authors concluded that, although MI-Single, MI-Group and Nurse-Led HHP are all effective in promoting HBV and HCV knowledge acquisition among MMT clients, Nurse-Led HHP may be the method of choice for this population as it may be easier to integrate and with additional investigation may prove to be more cost efficient. PMID:20358265

  14. What Is Hepatitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Facebook Google + iTunes Play Store What is hepatitis? Online Q&A Reviewed July 2016 Q: What ... Question and answer archives Submit a question World Hepatitis Day Know hepatitis - Act now Event notice Key ...

  15. Rupture of a hepatic artery aneurysm caused by Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    den Bakker, M A; Tangkau, P L; Steffens, T W; Tjiam, S L; van der Loo, E M

    1997-01-01

    Among vasculitis syndromes Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is characterized by involvement of the upper and lower airways and kidneys. The associated vasculitis involves small and medium sized arteries and veins. Aneurysm formation and a segmental pattern of involvement of larger arteries is not typically seen in WG--a presentation more in keeping with polyarteritis nodosa. We report on a patient hospitalized with classical manifestations of WG who died suddenly of hypovolemic shock caused by intraperitoneal hemorrhage resulting from rupture of a hepatic artery aneurysm. The aneurysm was caused by involvement of the hepatic artery in the disease process. To our knowledge aneurysmatic dilatation of the hepatic artery due to WG has not been previously described. This case illustrates an unusual disease course in WG and the overlap which exists in classical vasculitis syndromes.

  16. Underdiagnosis of Foodborne Hepatitis A, the Netherlands, 2008–20101

    PubMed Central

    Verhoef, Linda; Vennema, Harry; van Hunen, Rianne; Baas, Dominique; van Steenbergen, Jim E.; Koopmans, Marion P.G.

    2014-01-01

    Outbreaks of foodborne hepatitis A are rarely recognized as such. Detection of these infections is challenging because of the infection’s long incubation period and patients’ recall bias. Nevertheless, the complex food market might lead to reemergence of hepatitis A virus outside of disease-endemic areas. To assess the role of food as a source of infection, we combined routine surveillance with real-time strain sequencing in the Netherlands during 2008–2010. Virus RNA from serum of 248 (59%) of 421 reported case-patients could be sequenced. Without typing, foodborne transmission was suspected for only 4% of reported case-patients. With typing, foodborne transmission increased to being the most probable source of infection for 16%. We recommend routine implementation of an enhanced surveillance system that includes prompt forwarding and typing of hepatitis A virus RNA isolated from serum, standard use of questionnaires, data sharing, and centralized interpretation of data. PMID:24655539

  17. "Know Hepatitis B:" A Multilingual Communications Campaign Promoting Testing for Hepatitis B Among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Cynthia; Chen, Sherry; Carnes, C Amanda; Block, Joan; Chen, Daniel; Caballero, Jeffrey; Moraras, Kate; Cohen, Chari

    2016-01-01

    The "Know Hepatitis B" campaign was the first national, multilingual communications campaign to promote testing for hepatitis B virus (HBV) among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs). This population comprises fewer than 5% of the total U.S. population but accounts for more than half of the up to 1.4 million Americans living with chronic HBV infection. To address this health disparity with a national campaign, CDC partnered with Hep B United, a national coalition of community-based partners working to educate AAPIs about hepatitis B and the need for testing. Guided by formative research, the "Know Hepatitis B" campaign was implemented in 2013 with a two-pronged communications strategy. CDC used available Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese media outlets on a national level and relied on Hep B United to incorporate campaign materials into educational efforts at the local level. This partnership helped facilitate HBV testing among the priority population.

  18. "Know Hepatitis B:" A Multilingual Communications Campaign Promoting Testing for Hepatitis B Among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Cynthia; Chen, Sherry; Carnes, C Amanda; Block, Joan; Chen, Daniel; Caballero, Jeffrey; Moraras, Kate; Cohen, Chari

    2016-01-01

    The "Know Hepatitis B" campaign was the first national, multilingual communications campaign to promote testing for hepatitis B virus (HBV) among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs). This population comprises fewer than 5% of the total U.S. population but accounts for more than half of the up to 1.4 million Americans living with chronic HBV infection. To address this health disparity with a national campaign, CDC partnered with Hep B United, a national coalition of community-based partners working to educate AAPIs about hepatitis B and the need for testing. Guided by formative research, the "Know Hepatitis B" campaign was implemented in 2013 with a two-pronged communications strategy. CDC used available Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese media outlets on a national level and relied on Hep B United to incorporate campaign materials into educational efforts at the local level. This partnership helped facilitate HBV testing among the priority population. PMID:27168659

  19. Hepatitis A Virus and Hepatitis E Virus Seroprevalence Among Blood Donors in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hesamizadeh, Khashayar; Sharafi, Heidar; Keyvani, Hossein; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Najafi-Tireh Shabankareh, Azar; Sharifi Olyaie, Roghiyeh; Keshvari, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis A virus (HAV) and Hepatitis E virus (HEV) are both transmitted by the fecal-oral route and are known as the leading causes of acute viral hepatitis in the world, especially in developing countries. There is a lack of updated data on HAV and HEV seroprevalence in Iran. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of HAV and HEV among a group of blood donors in Tehran, Iran. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was performed from July 2014 to December 2014, on a total of 559 blood donors referred to the Tehran blood transfusion center. The serum samples were tested for antibodies to HAV and HEV, using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results In the present study, 536 (95.9%) cases were male and 23 (4.1%) female with mean age of 38 years. Out of 559 blood donors, 107 (19.1%) were first-time donors, 163 (29.2%) lapsed donors and 289 (51.7%) regular donors. Anti-HAV was found in 395 (70.7%) and anti-HEV in 45 (8.1%) of the blood donors. The HAV and HEV seroprevalence increased by age. There was no significant difference between genders in terms of anti-HAV and anti-HEV status. The HAV and HEV seroprevalence was significantly related to the level of education, where the donors with higher level of education had lower rate of HAV and HEV seroprevalence. The HAV and HEV seroprevalence was significantly higher in regular and lapsed donors than in first-time donors. Conclusions The present study showed that both HAV and HEV infections are still endemic in Iran. PMID:27110256

  20. Hepatitis Information for the Public

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis Information for the Public Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  1. Acute Hepatic Failure in a Dog after Xylitol Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Renee D; Hovda, Lynn R

    2016-06-01

    Xylitol is a five-carbon sugar alcohol produced from natural resources frequently used as a sugar substitute for humans. We report the development and successful treatment of acute hepatic failure and coagulopathy in a dog after xylitol ingestion. A 9-year-old 4.95 kg (10.9 lb) neutered male Chihuahua was evaluated at a veterinary clinic for vomiting after ingesting 224 g (45 g/kg, 20.5 g/lb) of granulated xylitol. Hypoglycemia developed within 1-2 h, elevated liver values, suggesting the development of acute hepatic failure, within 12 h and coagulopathy less than 24 h after ingestion. Treatment included maropitant, intravenous dextrose, phytonadione, metronidazole, and fresh frozen plasma. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and S-adensoyl-L-methionine (SAMe) provided hepatic detoxification and support. The dog survived and liver values returned to normal within 1 month post ingestion. No adverse effects to hepatic function have been identified 2 years after acute xylitol toxicity. This paper is one of the few reports of successful management of a dog with hypoglycemia, hepatic failure, and coagulopathy caused by xylitol toxicity. To date, this is the highest published xylitol dose survived by a dog, as well as the only reported case that documents laboratory changes throughout the course of toxicity and includes normal hepatic indices for 7 months following xylitol toxicity. The rapidly expanding use of xylitol in a variety of products intended for human consumption has led to a rise in xylitol toxicity cases reported in dogs, and clinicians should be aware that more dogs may potentially be exposed and develop similar manifestations.

  2. A rare case of xanthogranulomatous pyelonepheritis with hepatic angiomyolipoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gongting; Hu, Weijian; Bao, Haili; Zhang, Qiyu

    2015-01-01

    Xantogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XGP) is a rare and chronic variant of pyelonephritis typically associated with obstruction and infection. Xantogranulomatous pyelonephritis can infiltrate liver and connect with hepatic dysfunction. Here we report on a 52-year-old female with a liver mass and a left renal mass detected by uitrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. Right lobectomy and partial nephrectomy were successively performed. Subsequent pathologic examination indicated hepatic angiomyolipoma and xanthogranulomatous pyelonepheritis, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of such rare combination. PMID:26617933

  3. Hepatitis C: Information on Testing and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    HEPATITIS C Information on Testing & Diagnosis What is Hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a serious liver disease that results from infection with the Hepatitis C virus. Hepatitis C has been called a silent ...

  4. Hepatitis A related acute liver failure by consumption of contaminated food.

    PubMed

    Chi, Heng; Haagsma, Elizabeth B; Riezebos-Brilman, Annelies; van den Berg, Arie P; Metselaar, Herold J; de Knegt, Robert J

    2014-11-01

    We present a patient with no medical history admitted for jaundice and dark coloured urine. Further investigations revealed hepatitis A related acute liver failure while the patient had no travel history, nor contact with infected individuals. After admission, the patient deteriorated fulfilling the King's College criteria for acute liver failure. Two days after admission, he underwent liver transplantation and recovered. Careful investigation identified imported semi-dried tomatoes as the source of the hepatitis A infection. This patient was part of a foodborne hepatitis A outbreak in the Netherlands in 2010 affecting 13 patients. Virus sequence analysis of our patient's virus showed a strain commonly found in Turkey. Hepatitis A related acute liver failure is rare, but is associated with a poor prognosis. In developed countries, the incidence of hepatitis A is low, but foodborne outbreaks are emerging. Further, we review the literature on recent foodborne hepatitis A outbreaks in developed countries, hepatitis A related acute liver failure, and hepatitis A vaccine.

  5. Ruptured Hepatic Epithelioid Angiomyolipoma: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Shogo; Suzuki, Akira; Suzumura, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to upper abdominal pain. Computed tomography revealed a hepatic angiomyolipoma (AML; 10.5 × 9.5 × 7.0 cm in size), which had ruptured into the space between the liver and the diaphragm. Following transcatheter arterial embolization, surgical resection was performed. The tumor consisted of epithelioid cells (50–60%), mature fat (40–50%), and thickened-wall blood vessels. Considering the amount of epithelioid cells and their positivity for E-cadherin and β-catenin, the tumor was diagnosed as hepatic epithelioid AML. Cases of ruptured hepatic AML are rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the sixth case reported in the English literature. PMID:24987358

  6. Polyarteritis nodosa in a patient with type 1 autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Giouleme, Olga; Mpoumponaris, Alexander; Aslanidis, Spiridon; Anagnostis, Panagiotis; Giamalis, Panagiotis; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos; Vasiliadis, Themistoklis; Evgenidis, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis that affects small- and medium-sized arteries. Liver involvement in patients with polyarteritis nodosa has been described, and ranges from asymptomatic elevation of aminotransferases to hepatic aneurysm rupture. We describe the case of a patient with type 1 autoimmune hepatitis and compensated liver cirrhosis who developed classic polyarteritis nodosa, complicated with cytomegalovirus and repeated urinary tract infections. After a long bedridden hospitalization, the patient's condition was stabilized. She is currently in good health, with well-controlled blood pressure, and stable kidney and liver function. To our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature with concurrent appearance of both diseases.

  7. Hepatitis A outbreaks: the effect of a mass vaccination programme.

    PubMed

    Torner, N; Broner, S; Martinez, A; Godoy, P; Batalla, J; Dominguez, A

    2011-04-01

    A Hepatitis A vaccination programme of people belonging to risk groups begun in Catalonia in 1995 and a universal vaccination programme of pre-adolescents 12 years of age with the hepatitis A + B vaccine was added in 1998. The aim of the study was to investigate the characteristics of hepatitis A outbreaks occurring in Catalonia between 1991 and 2007 to determine the associated risk factors and optimize the use of vaccination. Incidence rates of outbreaks, cases and hospitalizations associated with outbreaks and the rate ratios (RR) of person-to-person transmission outbreaks between the periods before and after mass vaccination and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. A rate of 2.45 outbreaks per million persons per year was found. The rate of cases affected in these outbreaks was 1.28 per 10(5) persons per year and the rate of hospitalizations was 0.45 per million persons per year. In person-to-person outbreaks, the highest incidence rate (5.26 and 6.33 per million persons per year) of outbreaks according to the age of the index case was in the 5 to 14 year age group in both periods (RR:0.83; 95% CI:0.48-1.43). A significant increase was observed in the 25 to 44 year age group (RR: 0.35; 95% CI 0.14-0.77). Hepatitis A vaccination has made an important impact on burden and characteristics of outbreaks and could provide greater benefits to the community if the vaccine was administrated to children during their first years of life.

  8. A comparison of hepatitis A and hepatitis B measures among vaccinated and susceptible online men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, L K; Levandowski, B A; Scanlon, K E; Peterson, R S

    2010-06-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) continue to be major health concerns among men who have sex with men (MSM). The Internet both facilitates high-risk sexual encounters and provides opportunities for promoting healthy behaviours. This study compared self-reported HAV and HBV vaccination levels, based on demographics, health characteristics, hepatitis knowledge, attitudes and risk behaviours among MSM using an online survey posted from February through June 2005. Each participant (n = 968) reported whether they were vaccinated, infected or susceptible for hepatitis A and/or for hepatitis B. Men whose health-care provider recommended vaccination were 12.91 (95% confidence interval [CI] 8.11, 20.55) times more likely to be vaccinated against HAV and 17.93 (95% CI 10.82, 29.70) times more likely to be vaccinated against HBV than those at risk of infection, respectively. These data provide essential information for public health professionals to successfully promote vaccination among members of this population.

  9. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Hepatitis B HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Influenza (Flu) Measles Meningococcal Disease Mumps Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Pneumococcal Disease Rubella (German Measles) Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Tetanus (Lockjaw) Professional Resources Adult ...

  10. A Family of Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis and Atypical Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Sunil; Zanwar, Vinay; Mohite, Ashok; Surude, Ravindra; Rathi, Pravin; Balasubramani, Meenakshi

    2015-11-01

    Congenital hepatic fibrosis is a rare cause of portal hypertension and esophageal varices in children. We report cases of siblings with biopsy proven congenital hepatic fibrosis and with atypical retinitis pigmentosa. They presented with repeated episodes of jaundice along with progressive decrease of vision in night. They had hepatosplenomegaly and portal hypertension with esophageal varices. One of the siblings had a large regenerating nodule replacing the entire right lobe of the liver and other one developed repeated hematemesis. This constellation of diagnosis belongs to the ciliopathy group of disorders. The spectrum of ciliopathy disorders has been evolving, and it varies from mild to severe manifestations. PMID:26918098

  11. A Family of Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis and Atypical Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Zanwar, Vinay; Mohite, Ashok; Surude, Ravindra; Rathi, Pravin; Balasubramani, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Congenital hepatic fibrosis is a rare cause of portal hypertension and esophageal varices in children. We report cases of siblings with biopsy proven congenital hepatic fibrosis and with atypical retinitis pigmentosa. They presented with repeated episodes of jaundice along with progressive decrease of vision in night. They had hepatosplenomegaly and portal hypertension with esophageal varices. One of the siblings had a large regenerating nodule replacing the entire right lobe of the liver and other one developed repeated hematemesis. This constellation of diagnosis belongs to the ciliopathy group of disorders. The spectrum of ciliopathy disorders has been evolving, and it varies from mild to severe manifestations. PMID:26918098

  12. Hepatitis A outbreak on a floating restaurant in Florida, 1986.

    PubMed

    Lowry, P W; Levine, R; Stroup, D F; Gunn, R A; Wilder, M H; Konigsberg, C

    1989-01-01

    In April and May 1986, the largest reported foodborne outbreak of hepatitis A in Florida state history occurred among patrons and employees of a floating restaurant. A total of 103 cases (97 patrons and six employees) were identified. The exposure period lasted 31 days (March 20-April 19), making this the most prolonged hepatitis A outbreak to occur in a restaurant that to date has been reported to the Centers for Disease Control. The exposure period was divided into time intervals (peak, early, late, and total) for calculation of food-specific attack rates. The authors showed that green salad was an important vehicle of transmission for each phase of the exposure period, with the highest adjusted odds ratio for the three-day peak exposure interval (March 28-30), 6.8 (p = 0.001). Non-salad pantry items and mixed bar drinks were also identified as vehicles of transmission; both were more important during the early interval of the exposure period than during the late interval. Two of six infected employees worked in the pantry and may have sequentially infected patrons. Though rare, this outbreak suggests that hepatitis A infection among employees may allow for transmission to patrons for prolonged periods of time. Prevention of such outbreaks requires prompt reporting of ill patrons with rapid identification of infected employees and correction of food handling practices.

  13. Autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, E A

    1995-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis can present as either acute or chronic disease in children. Clinical and laboratory features, including association with extrahepatic autoimmune syndromes and prompt response to immunosuppressive treatment, circulating autoantibodies and hypergammaglobulinemia, suggest an immune etiology. However, the disease mechanism remains uncertain. Different types of autoimmune hepatitis are defined on the basis of which autoantibodies are present: anti-smooth muscle (type 1), anti-liver/kidney microsomal (type 2), or anti-soluble liver antigen (type 3). Diseases which may be clinically similar to autoimmune hepatitis must be excluded before the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis is established: Wilson's disease, primary sclerosing cholangitis, chronic hepatitis B or C, and drug-induced liver disease are among the most important entities. Corticosteroids alone or with azathioprine constitute the usual treatment for autoimmune hepatitis. Although some children achieve a complete remission, or even recovery, and can stop immunosuppressive treatment, others required low-dose prednisone treatment indefinitely.

  14. Knowledge of Hepatitis B Virus Infection, Immunization with Hepatitis B Vaccine, Risk Perception, and Challenges to Control Hepatitis among Hospital Workers in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Adekanle, Olusegun; Ndububa, Dennis A.; Olowookere, Samuel Anu; Ijarotimi, Oluwasegun; Ijadunola, Kayode Thaddeus

    2015-01-01

    Background. Studies had reported high rate of hepatitis B infection among hospital workers with low participation in vaccination programmes, especially those whose work exposes them to the risk of HBV infection. The study assessed knowledge of hepatitis B virus infection, risk perception, vaccination history, and challenges to control hepatitis among health workers. Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional study. Consenting health care workers completed a self-administered questionnaire that assessed respondents' general knowledge of HBV, vaccination history and HBsAg status, risk perception, and challenges to control hepatitis. Data was analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results. Three hundred and eighty-two health care workers participated in the study. There were 182 males and 200 females. The respondents comprised 94 (25%) medical doctors, 168 (44%) nurses, 68 (18%) medical laboratory technologists, and 52 (14%) pharmacists. Over 33% had poor knowledge with 35% not immunized against HBV. Predictors of good knowledge include age less than 35 years, male sex, being a medical doctor, previous HBsAg test, and complete HBV immunisation. Identified challenges to control hepatitis include lack of hospital policy (91.6%), poor orientation of newly employed health workers (75.9%), and low risk perception (74.6%). Conclusion. Hospital policy issues and low risk perception of HBV transmission have grave implications for the control of HBV infection. PMID:25685549

  15. A New Soluble Gelatin Sponge for Transcatheter Hepatic Arterial Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Takasaka, Isao; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Sahara, Shinya; Minamiguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Motoki; Ikoma, Akira; Nakata, Kouhei; Sonomura, Tetsuo

    2010-12-15

    To prepare a soluble gelatin sponge (GS) and to explore the GS particles (GSPs) that inhibit development of collateral pathways when transcatheter hepatic arterial embolization is performed. The approval of the Institutional Committee on Research Animal Care of our institution was obtained. By means of 50 and 100 kDa of regenerative medicine-gelatin (RM-G), RM-G sponges were prepared by freeze-drying and heating to temperatures of 110-150{sup o}C for cross-linkage. The soluble times of RM-GSPs were measured in vitro. Eight swine for transcatheter hepatic arterial embolization were assigned into two groups: six received 135{sup o}C/50RM-GSPs, 125{sup o}C/100RM-GSPs, and 138{sup o}C/50RM-GSPs, with soluble time of 48 h or more in vitro; two swine received Gelpart GSPs (G-GSPs) with insoluble time of 14 days as a control. Transarterial chemoembolization was performed on two branches of the hepatic artery per swine. RM-GSPs heated at temperatures of 110-138{sup o}C were soluble. Mean soluble times of the RM-GSPs increased with higher temperature. Hepatic branches embolized with G-GSP remained occluded after 6 days, and development of collateral pathways was observed after 3 days. Hepatic branches embolized with 135{sup o}C/50RM-GSP and 125{sup o}C/100RM-GSP remained occluded for 4 h, and recanalization was observed after 1 day. Hepatic branches embolized with 138{sup o}C/50RM-GS remained occluded for 1 day, and recanalization was observed after 2 days with no development of collateral pathways. In RM-GSs with various soluble times that were prepared by modulating the heating temperature, 138{sup o}C/50RM-GSP was the soluble GSP with the longest occlusion time without inducing development of collateral pathways.

  16. Selective internal radiation therapy of hepatic tumors: procedural implications of a patent hepatic falciform artery.

    PubMed

    Schelhorn, Juliane; Ertle, Judith; Schlaak, Joerg F; Mueller, Stefan; Bockisch, Andreas; Schlosser, Thomas; Lauenstein, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) using 90-yttrium is a local therapy for unresectable liver malignancies. Non-targeted 90-yttrium diversion via a patent hepatic falciform artery (HFA) is seen as risk for periprocedural complications. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the impact of a patent HFA on SIRT. 606 patients with SIRT between 2006 and 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. SIRT preparation was performed by digital subtraction angiography including (99m)Tc-HSAM administration and subsequent SPECT/CT. Patients with an angiographically patent HFA were analyzed for procedural consequences and complications. 19 of 606 patients (3%) with an angiographically patent HFA were identified. Only 11 of these 19 patients received 90-yttrium in the hepatic vessel bed containing the HFA. Initial coil embolization of the HFA succeeded only in three of 11 patients. Out of the eight remaining patients four had no abdominal wall (99m)Tc-HSAM accumulation. The other four patients presented with an abdominal wall (99m)Tc-HSAM accumulation, for those a reattempt of HFA embolization was performed or ice packs were administered on the abdominal wall during SIRT. In summary, all patients tolerated SIRT well. A patent HFA should not be considered a SIRT contraindication. In patients with abdominal wall (99m)Tc-HSAM accumulation HFA embolization or ice pack administration seems to prevent complications. PMID:25332891

  17. Computed Tomography Measurement of Hepatic Steatosis: Prevalence of Hepatic Steatosis in a Canadian Population.

    PubMed

    Wells, Malcolm M; Li, Zhe; Addeman, Bryan; McKenzie, Charles A; Mujoomdar, Amol; Beaton, Melanie; Bird, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease that can progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. This retrospective chart review investigated the incidence of hepatic steatosis in London, Ontario, Canada. Methods. A retrospective chart review was performed on emergency room (ER) patients undergoing nonscheduled computed tomography (CT) imaging over a six-month period in London, Ontario. CT images and reports were examined to determine presence of steatosis. Analyses of the electronic chart for a period of six months following the CT and communication with the patients' family doctors were used to determine if there was follow-up. Waist circumference, subcutaneous fat depth, and abdominal fat volumes were calculated. Results. 48/450 patients meeting inclusion criteria were identified by radiology as having steatosis, with 34/40 (85%) family physicians unaware of the finding. 24.7% (100/405) of patients met standard CT criteria for steatosis, 40 of which were reported by the radiologist. Waist circumference, subcutaneous adipose tissue depth, subcutaneous adipose tissue volume, and visceral adipose tissue volume were significantly associated with steatosis. Conclusions. The hepatic steatosis prevalence we report is the first reported in a Canadian population. Early identification of steatosis will become more important as new pharmacologic therapies arise. PMID:27446844

  18. Hepatic angiosarcoma presenting as hepatic rupture in a patient with long-term ingestion of arsenic.

    PubMed

    Ho, Sheng-Yow; Tsai, Chiang-Chin; Tsai, Yi-Chang; Guo, How-Ran

    2004-05-01

    Hepatic angiosarcoma (HAS) is a rare primary mesenchymal malignancy of liver with close association to arsenic intoxication. Although the southwest coastal area of Taiwan is well known for its prevalence of arsenic intoxication from drinking well water, few cases of HAS associated with arsenic ingestion have been reported. We report a case of HAS complicated by spontaneous hepatic rupture in a 68-year-old female farmer who presented with acute onset of abdominal pain and shock. The arsenic level in her drinking water had been found to be 0.12 ppm at her childhood home and 0.005 ppm at her residence from age 21 to 68 years. The total ingested arsenic was estimated to be 1.9 g, and the latent period was about 25 years with a weighted mean exposure of 0.12 mg/day. We also reviewed data collected by the National Cancer Registry Program from 1981 to 1999 and identified 25 additional reported cases. The median age of these patients was 55 years, and the male-to-female ratio was 1.9 (17:9). Whereas no case was found during this period in the blackfoot disease (BFD) endemic area, a hyperendemic area of arsenic intoxication in Taiwan, this case demonstrates the existence of cases of HAS associated with exposure to high levels of arsenic near the BFD area in Taiwan.

  19. Computed Tomography Measurement of Hepatic Steatosis: Prevalence of Hepatic Steatosis in a Canadian Population

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Malcolm M.; Li, Zhe; Addeman, Bryan; McKenzie, Charles A.; Mujoomdar, Amol; Beaton, Melanie; Bird, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease that can progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. This retrospective chart review investigated the incidence of hepatic steatosis in London, Ontario, Canada. Methods. A retrospective chart review was performed on emergency room (ER) patients undergoing nonscheduled computed tomography (CT) imaging over a six-month period in London, Ontario. CT images and reports were examined to determine presence of steatosis. Analyses of the electronic chart for a period of six months following the CT and communication with the patients' family doctors were used to determine if there was follow-up. Waist circumference, subcutaneous fat depth, and abdominal fat volumes were calculated. Results. 48/450 patients meeting inclusion criteria were identified by radiology as having steatosis, with 34/40 (85%) family physicians unaware of the finding. 24.7% (100/405) of patients met standard CT criteria for steatosis, 40 of which were reported by the radiologist. Waist circumference, subcutaneous adipose tissue depth, subcutaneous adipose tissue volume, and visceral adipose tissue volume were significantly associated with steatosis. Conclusions. The hepatic steatosis prevalence we report is the first reported in a Canadian population. Early identification of steatosis will become more important as new pharmacologic therapies arise. PMID:27446844

  20. Prevalence of Hepatitis A Virus Antibody Among Navajo School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert

    1986-01-01

    A serologic investigation of prevalence of immunity to hepatitis A (anti-HAV) was conducted in a rural school adjacent to a Navajo reservation in New Mexico. The results show rates of anti-HAV that are the highest reported at the ages tested in any subpopulation in the United States, comparable only with those in developing countries. (KH)

  1. Diffuse hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma developed in a patient with hepatitis C cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Baron, Pedro W; Amankonah, Thomas; Cubas, Robert F; Kore, Arputharaj H; Elihu, Arvand; de Vera, Michael E; Perez, Mia C N

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HEHE) is an infrequent vascular tumor of endothelial origin that primarily occurs in women in the mid-fifth decade of life without underlying chronic liver disease or cirrhosis. Liver transplant should be the first-line of therapy in patients with large or diffuse unresectable tumors even in the presence of metastatic disease due to the favorable long-term outcome. We report the case of a 48-year-old female who complained of abdominal pain and weight loss. She has a history of cirrhosis secondary to chronic hepatitis C (HCV) and was treated with interferon and ribavirin with sustained virological response. Her work-up revealed multiple confluent infiltrating bilobar liver masses diagnosed as HEHE. She underwent a successful liver transplant without evidence of recurrent HCV infection. She developed cervical spine (C4-C6) HEHE metastases 4 years after transplant. She underwent surgical resection and local radiotherapy after resection with good clinical response. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of HEHE that developed in a patient with HCV cirrhosis successfully treated with antiviral therapy before transplant and liver transplant with good allograft function without evidence of recurrent liver tumor or HCV infection but developed metastases to the cervical spine 4 years after transplant. PMID:25276467

  2. Diffuse Hepatic Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma Developed in a Patient with Hepatitis C Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Pedro W.; Amankonah, Thomas; Cubas, Robert F.; Kore, Arputharaj H.; Elihu, Arvand; de Vera, Michael E.; Perez, Mia C. N.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HEHE) is an infrequent vascular tumor of endothelial origin that primarily occurs in women in the mid-fifth decade of life without underlying chronic liver disease or cirrhosis. Liver transplant should be the first-line of therapy in patients with large or diffuse unresectable tumors even in the presence of metastatic disease due to the favorable long-term outcome. We report the case of a 48-year-old female who complained of abdominal pain and weight loss. She has a history of cirrhosis secondary to chronic hepatitis C (HCV) and was treated with interferon and ribavirin with sustained virological response. Her work-up revealed multiple confluent infiltrating bilobar liver masses diagnosed as HEHE. She underwent a successful liver transplant without evidence of recurrent HCV infection. She developed cervical spine (C4-C6) HEHE metastases 4 years after transplant. She underwent surgical resection and local radiotherapy after resection with good clinical response. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of HEHE that developed in a patient with HCV cirrhosis successfully treated with antiviral therapy before transplant and liver transplant with good allograft function without evidence of recurrent liver tumor or HCV infection but developed metastases to the cervical spine 4 years after transplant. PMID:25276467

  3. Compliance with a Voluntary Hepatitis B Vaccination Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Todd K.; Douglass, Chester W.

    1988-01-01

    Three years after the introduction of a voluntary hepatitis B vaccination program, the Harvard School of Dental Medicine has achieved a high vaccination rate among predoctoral students and a moderate rate among postdoctoral students and faculty. However, an unexpectedly low immunity was achieved, even among vaccinated individuals. (MSE)

  4. A novel linear neutralizing epitope of hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zi-Min; Tang, Ming; Zhao, Min; Wen, Gui-Ping; Yang, Fan; Cai, Wei; Wang, Si-Ling; Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2015-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a serious public health problem that causes acute hepatitis in humans and is primarily transmitted through fecal and oral routes. The major anti-HEV antibody responses are against conformational epitopes located in a.a. 459-606 of HEV pORF2. All reported neutralization epitopes are present on the dimer domain constructed by this peptide. While looking for a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb)-recognized linear epitope, we found a novel neutralizing linear epitope (L2) located in a.a. 423-437 of pORF2. Moreover, epitope L2 is proved non-immunodominant in the HEV-infection process. Using the hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc) as a carrier to display this novel linear epitope, we show herein that this epitope could induce a neutralizing antibody response against HEV in mice and could protect rhesus monkeys from HEV infection. Collectively, our results showed a novel non-immunodominant linear neutralizing epitope of hepatitis E virus, which provided additional insight of HEV vaccine. PMID:26051517

  5. Viral Hepatitis: Information for Gay and Bisexual Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... common types of viral hepatitis are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. While all three types of ... new Hepatitis A cases and 20% of new Hepatitis B cases occur in gay or bisexual men. Gay ...

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY HEPATITIS E VIRUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a waterborne emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Thus far, an HEV outbreak has not been reported in the U.S., although a swine variant of the virus is common in Midwestern hogs. Because viruses isolated from two ...

  7. Hepatic Enzyme Decline after Pediatric Blunt Trauma: A Tool for Timing Child Abuse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Amy L.; Lindberg, Daniel M.; Burke, Bonnie L.; Shults, Justine; Holmes, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Previous research in adult patients with blunt hepatic injuries has suggested a pattern of serum hepatic transaminase concentration decline. Evaluating this decline after pediatric blunt hepatic trauma could establish parameters for estimating the time of inflicted injuries. Deviation from a consistent transaminase resolution pattern…

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of a Rat Hepatitis E Virus Strain Isolated in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Debing, Yannick; Emerson, Suzanne U.; Purcell, Robert H.; Dallmeier, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus is a common cause of acute hepatitis in humans. Related viruses have been isolated from multiple animal species, including rats, but their impact on human health is unclear. We present the first full-length genome sequence of a rat hepatitis E virus strain isolated in the United States (LA-B350). PMID:25377700

  9. Hepatitis A and B superimposed on chronic liver disease: vaccine-preventable diseases.

    PubMed

    Keeffe, Emmet B

    2006-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that the acquisition of hepatitis A or hepatitis B in patients with chronic liver disease is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Superimposition of acute hepatitis A in patients with chronic hepatitis C has been associated with a particularly high mortality rate, and chronic hepatitis B virus coinfection with hepatitis C virus is associated with an accelerated progression of chronic liver disease to cirrhosis, decompensated liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. With the availability of vaccines against hepatitis B and hepatitis A since 1981 and 1995, respectively, these are vaccine-preventable diseases. Studies have confirmed that hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccines are safe and immunogenic in patients with mild to moderate chronic liver disease. However, hepatitis A and B vaccination is less effective in patients with advanced liver disease and after liver transplantation. These observations have led to the recommendation that patients undergo hepatitis A and B vaccination early in the natural history of their chronic liver disease. Vaccination rates are low in clinical practice, and public health and educational programs are needed to overcome barriers to facilitate timely implementation of these recommendations.

  10. Self-reported history of vaccination and disease and immunity against hepatitis A, hepatitis B, tetanus, diphtheria and varicella among Spanish military recruits.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Alejandro; Desviat, Pilar Vallejo; Jaqueti, Jeronimo; Santos, Juana; de Miguel, Angel Gil; Garcia, Rodrigo Jiménez

    2010-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate the immune status against hepatitis A, hepatitis B, tetanus, diphtheria and varicella in military recruits and the validity of self-reporting of their disease and vaccination history. A total of 226 participants were studied (mean age, 20.2 years; SD 1.7). 10.4% presented antibodies to hepatitis A, 78.3% to hepatitis B, 94.2% to tetanus, 77.4% to diphtheria and 81.9% to varicella. The relationship between self-reporting of vaccination history and seroprotection showed a high Positive Predictive Value for tetanus (98.8%) and a high Negative Predictive Value for hepatitis A (91%). Hepatitis A vaccination and serology testing for varicella and Hepatitis B on joining the Spanish armed forces are recommended.

  11. Hepatitis B, interferon, and acne fulminans in a young girl.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sandeep; Malik, Ajay; Kumar, Dharmendra; Sodhi, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Acne fulminans (AF) is a very rare severe form of acne seen in young males, characterized by a sudden and explosive onset of hemorrhagic pustules and ulceration on the trunk, systemic features in the form of fever, polyarthropathy, malaise, erythema nodosum and painful osteolytic bone involvement with leukocytosis, and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Conventional treatment of AF includes corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agents for the initial phase followed by isotretinoin. Active hepatitis B infection with a high viral load precludes the administration of any immunosuppressive drugs. We present the case of an 18-year-old girl with a history of occasional acne who presented with AF of sudden onset following administration of interferon-alpha-2a for her recently detected hepatitis B infection. Management of hepatitis B was withheld in view of her general condition. The patient was managed with low dose isotretinoin with subsidence of lesions. AF in a young female precipitated by interferon and its management with isotretinoin in the presence of active hepatitis B infection make the case unique. PMID:27057488

  12. Hepatitis B, interferon, and acne fulminans in a young girl.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sandeep; Malik, Ajay; Kumar, Dharmendra; Sodhi, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Acne fulminans (AF) is a very rare severe form of acne seen in young males, characterized by a sudden and explosive onset of hemorrhagic pustules and ulceration on the trunk, systemic features in the form of fever, polyarthropathy, malaise, erythema nodosum and painful osteolytic bone involvement with leukocytosis, and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Conventional treatment of AF includes corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agents for the initial phase followed by isotretinoin. Active hepatitis B infection with a high viral load precludes the administration of any immunosuppressive drugs. We present the case of an 18-year-old girl with a history of occasional acne who presented with AF of sudden onset following administration of interferon-alpha-2a for her recently detected hepatitis B infection. Management of hepatitis B was withheld in view of her general condition. The patient was managed with low dose isotretinoin with subsidence of lesions. AF in a young female precipitated by interferon and its management with isotretinoin in the presence of active hepatitis B infection make the case unique.

  13. Hepatitis B, interferon, and acne fulminans in a young girl

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sandeep; Malik, Ajay; Kumar, Dharmendra; Sodhi, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Acne fulminans (AF) is a very rare severe form of acne seen in young males, characterized by a sudden and explosive onset of hemorrhagic pustules and ulceration on the trunk, systemic features in the form of fever, polyarthropathy, malaise, erythema nodosum and painful osteolytic bone involvement with leukocytosis, and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Conventional treatment of AF includes corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agents for the initial phase followed by isotretinoin. Active hepatitis B infection with a high viral load precludes the administration of any immunosuppressive drugs. We present the case of an 18-year-old girl with a history of occasional acne who presented with AF of sudden onset following administration of interferon-alpha-2a for her recently detected hepatitis B infection. Management of hepatitis B was withheld in view of her general condition. The patient was managed with low dose isotretinoin with subsidence of lesions. AF in a young female precipitated by interferon and its management with isotretinoin in the presence of active hepatitis B infection make the case unique. PMID:27057488

  14. Sarcoidosis and chronic hepatitis C: a case report.

    PubMed

    Brjalin, Vadim; Salupere, Riina; Tefanova, Valentina; Prikk, Kaiu; Lapidus, Natalia; Jõeste, Enn

    2012-10-28

    Several case reports deal with the relationship between hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and pulmonary or hepatic sarcoidosis. Most publications describe interferon α-induced sarcoidosis. However, HCV infection per se is also suggested to cause sarcoidosis. The present case report describes a case of biopsy-verified lung and liver sarcoidosis and HCV infection, and the outcome of antiviral therapy. In March 2009, a 25-year-old man presented with moderately elevated liver enzymes without any clinical symptoms. The patient was positive for HCV antibodies and HCV RNA of genotype 1b. Four months later the patient became dyspnoic and pulmonary sarcoidosis was diagnosed by lung biopsy and radiography. A short course of corticosteroid treatment relieved symptoms. Three months later, liver biopsy showed noncaseating granulomas consisting of epithelioid histiocytes and giant cells with a small amount of peripheral lymphocyte infiltration, without any signs of fibrosis. Chronic HCV infection with coexistence of pulmonary and hepatic sarcoidosis was diagnosed. Antiviral therapy with peginterferon α and ribavirin at standard doses was started, which lasted 48 wk, and sustained viral response was achieved. A second liver biopsy showed disappearance of granulomas and chest radiography revealed normalization of mediastinal and perihilar glands. The hypothesis that HCV infection per se may have triggered systemic sarcoidosis was proposed. Successful treatment of HCV infection led to continuous remission of pulmonary and hepatic sarcoidosis. Further studies are required to understand the relationship between systemic sarcoidosis and HCV infection. PMID:23155326

  15. Gallbladder mucocoele and concurrent hepatic lipidosis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Bennett, S L; Milne, M; Slocombe, R F; Landon, B P

    2007-10-01

    A 3-year-old Domestic Shorthair cat was presented with weight loss, anorexia and icterus. Feline hepatic lipidosis and gallbladder mucocoele were diagnosed; this is the first report of gallbladder mucocoele in the cat. The case was managed successfully with cholecystojejunostomy, gastrostomy tube placement and tube feeding for 3 months. The cat has survived over the long term with minimal complications.

  16. Hemodialysis and hepatitis B vaccination: a challenge to physicians

    PubMed Central

    Ayub¹, Munir Akar; Bacci, Marcelo Rodrigues; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso; Chehter, Ethel Zimberg

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B is responsible for the development of half of hepatocellular carcinoma cases and is a major cause of hepatic insufficiency. The vaccine against hepatitis B virus does not exhibit the same high efficacy in patients on hemodialysis as it does in immunocompetent individuals. The medical literature recommends vaccination with four doses (40 mg each) of the hepatitis B virus vaccine before beginning hemodialysis; however, approximately one-third of hemodialysis patients do not respond to this vaccination schedule. A new serologic test should be performed each year for individuals who respond adequately, whereas a booster dose should be offered to those with antibody titers below 10 mIU/mL. In this study, we followed 83 hemodialysis patients and collected quantitative serologic measurements every 2 months over a 1-year period. We made the measurements 1 month after the vaccination period. We found that 41% of the patients had antibody titers below 10 mIU/mL (nonresponders), 21.7% had antibody titers between 10 mIU/mL and 100 mIU/mL (poor responders), and 37.3% had antibody titers higher than 100 mIU/mL (good responders). Patients with diabetes and/or hypertension exhibited worse response to vaccination. All subjects displayed decreasing antibody titers during the observation period. The group of poorly responsive patients had antibody titers below 10 mIU/mL at the 6-month follow-up period. PMID:24520201

  17. Chronic Hepatitis C Infection in a Rural Medicaid HMO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert Jr., James F.; Goldenberg, Paula C.; Schock, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C infection (CHCI) is an increasingly common problem, affecting about 2% of the US population. The cost and complexity of treatment and difficulties in communicating with the infected population are of concern to insurers and health planners. Purpose: To describe the clinical features of patients with CHCI in a rural…

  18. Hepatitis A, B, and C: Learn the Differences

    MedlinePlus

    ... adoptee’s arrival in the U.S. • People with chronic liver disease, including HCV • People working with HAV in a ... Europe, or the Middle East); • People with chronic liver disease Who should be tested ? Hepatitis C caused by ...

  19. Opt-Out Panel Testing for HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C in an Urban Emergency Department: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Sarah; Lillis, Darren; Cotter, Aoife; O’Dea, Siobhan; Tuite, Helen; Fleming, Catherine; Crowley, Brendan; Fitzgerald, Ian; Dalby, Linda; Barry, Helen; Shields, Darragh; Norris, Suzanne; Plunkett, Patrick K.; Bergin, Colm

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Studies suggest 2 per 1000 people in Dublin are living with HIV, the level above which universal screening is advised. We aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a universal opt-out HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C testing programme for Emergency Department patients and to describe the incidence and prevalence of blood-borne viruses in this population. Methods An opt-out ED blood borne virus screening programme was piloted from March 2014 to January 2015. Patients undergoing blood sampling during routine clinical care were offered HIV 1&2 antibody/antigen assay, HBV surface antigen and HCV antibody tests. Linkage to care where necessary was co-ordinated by the study team. New diagnosis and prevalence rates were defined as the new cases per 1000 tested and number of positive tests per 1000 tested respectively. Results Over 45 weeks of testing, of 10,000 patient visits, 8,839 individual patient samples were available for analysis following removal of duplicates. A sustained target uptake of >50% was obtained after week 3. 97(1.09%), 44(0.49%) and 447(5.05%) HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C tests were positive respectively. Of these, 7(0.08%), 20(0.22%) and 58(0.66%) were new diagnoses of HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C respectively. The new diagnosis rate for HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C was 0.8, 2.26 and 6.5 per 1000 and study prevalence for HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C was 11.0, 5.0 and 50.5 per 1000 respectively. Conclusions Opt-out blood borne viral screening was feasible and acceptable in an inner-city ED. Blood borne viral infections were prevalent in this population and newly diagnosed cases were diagnosed and linked to care. These results suggest widespread blood borne viral testing in differing clinical locations with differing population demographic risks may be warranted. PMID:26967517

  20. Treatment of HEV Infection in Patients with a Solid-Organ Transplant and Chronic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kamar, Nassim; Lhomme, Sébastien; Abravanel, Florence; Marion, Olivier; Peron, Jean-Marie; Alric, Laurent; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection can cause hepatic and extra-hepatic manifestations. Treatment of HEV infection has been thoroughly studied in solid-organ-transplant patients who have developed a chronic HEV infection. In this review, we report on our current knowledge regarding treatment of HEV infection. PMID:27537905

  1. Hepatitis C Seroprevalence in an Institution for Residents with a Developmental Disability. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Eric

    1996-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in Australia of 156 individuals with developmental disabilities who were long-term clients of a residential institution, to determine the incidence of hepatitis C antibodies. Results indicated that none of the residents was seropositive and that hepatitis C is less prevalent than hepatitis B in residential…

  2. Treatment of HEV Infection in Patients with a Solid-Organ Transplant and Chronic Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Kamar, Nassim; Lhomme, Sébastien; Abravanel, Florence; Marion, Olivier; Peron, Jean-Marie; Alric, Laurent; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection can cause hepatic and extra-hepatic manifestations. Treatment of HEV infection has been thoroughly studied in solid-organ-transplant patients who have developed a chronic HEV infection. In this review, we report on our current knowledge regarding treatment of HEV infection. PMID:27537905

  3. Live attenuated hepatitis A vaccines developed in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Xuan-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Two live, attenuated hepatitis A vaccines, H 2 and LA-1 virus strains, were developed through serial passages of the viruses in cell cultures at 32 °C and 35 °C respectively. Both vaccines were safe and immunogenic, providing protection against clinical hepatitis A in 95% of the vaccinees, with a single dose by subcutaneous injection. The vaccine recipients were not protected from asymptomatic, subclinical hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection, which induced a similar antibody response as for unvaccinated subjects. A second dose caused anamnestic response and can be used for boosting. Oral immunization of human with H 2 vaccine or of marmoset with LA-1 vaccine failed, and no evidence was found for person-to-person transmission of the H 2 strain or for marmoset-to-marmoset transmission of LA-1 strain, by close contact. H 2 strain was genetically stable when passaged in marmosets, humans or cell cultures at 37 °C; 3 consecutive passages of the virus in marmosets did not cause virulence mutation. The live vaccines offer the benefits of low cost, single dose injection, long- term protection, and increased duration of immunity through subclinical infection. Improved sanitation and administration of 150 million doses of the live vaccines to children had led to a 90% reduction in the annual national incidence rate of hepatitis A in China during the 16-year period, from 1991 to 2006. Hepatitis A immunization with both live and inactivated HA vaccines was implemented in the national routine childhood immunization program in 2008 and around 92% of the 16 million annual births received the affordable live, attenuated vaccines at 18 months of age. Near elimination of the disease was achieved in China for 14 years following introduction of the H 2 live vaccine into the Expanded Immunization Program (EPI) in 1992.

  4. Macrophage Stimulating Protein Enhances Hepatic Inflammation in a NASH Model

    PubMed Central

    van Gorp, Patrick J.; Jeurissen, Mike L. J.; Houben, Tom; Walenbergh, Sofie M. A.; Debets, Jacques; Oligschlaeger, Yvonne; Gijbels, Marion J. J.; Neumann, Dietbert; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a common liver disease characterized by hepatic lipid accumulation (steatosis) and inflammation. Currently, therapeutic options are poor and the long-term burden to society is constantly increasing. Previously, macrophage stimulating protein (MSP)—a serum protein mainly secreted by liver—was shown to inhibit oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL)/lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced inflammation in mouse macrophages. Additionally, MSP could reduce palmitic acid (PA)-induced lipid accumulation and lipogenesis in the HepG2 cell line. Altogether, these data suggest MSP as a suppressor for metabolic inflammation. However, so far the potential of MSP to be used as a treatment for NASH was not investigated. We hypothesized that MSP reduces lipid accumulation and hepatic inflammation. To investigate the effects of MSP in the early stage of NASH, low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr-/-) mice were fed either a regular chow or a high fat, high cholesterol (HFC) diet for 7 days. Recombinant MSP or saline (control) was administrated to the mice by utilizing subcutaneously-implanted osmotic mini-pumps for the last 4 days. As expected, mice fed an HFC diet showed increased plasma and hepatic lipid accumulation, as well as enhanced hepatic inflammation, compared with chow-fed controls. Upon MSP administration, the rise in cholesterol and triglyceride levels after an HFC diet remained unaltered. Surprisingly, while hepatic macrophage and neutrophil infiltration was similar between the groups, MSP-treated mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic mediators in the liver, compared with saline-treated controls. Contrary to our expectations, MSP did not ameliorate NASH. Observed changes in inflammatory gene expression suggest that further research is needed to clarify the long-term effects of MSP. PMID:27685150

  5. Acute hepatitis due to hepatitis A virus subgenotype IA as an imported infectious disease from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Takako; Yano, Yoshihiko; Amin, Mochamad; Lusida, Maria I; Soetjipto; Hotta, Hak; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2014-10-01

    A 25-year-old Japanese man was admitted with general malaise and fever, which had developed 12 days after coming back to Japan from Indonesia. Blood examination revealed elevated transaminase levels and positivity for the IgM anti-HAV antibody; therefore, he was diagnosed with acute hepatitis A. HAV-RNA was detected in his serum and phylogenetically classified as subgenotype IA. The partial genome in the VP1/P2A region was consistent with the strain recently isolated from Surabaya, which indicated that he had been infected during his stay in Indonesia. Thus, HAV vaccination is recommended before visiting HAV-endemic countries for a long period of time.

  6. HEPATIC VISCERAL LARVA MIGRANS DUE TO TOXOCARA CANIS IN A 72-YEAR-OLD MAN.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ki Dong; Lee, Jae Joon; Kim, Kyoung Kon; Suh, Heuy Sun; Hwang, In Cheol; Choi, Seung Joon

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic toxocariasis is visceral larva migrans caused by Toxocara. We report a case of hepatic toxocariasis detected incidentally during a health checkup. The patient had elevated levels of eosinophils, total IgE, and anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies. On contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) imaging he had a single, 2.16 cm, oval, ill-defined, low-attenuation hepatic nodule which was best appreciated during the portal venous phase of the scan. Clinicians should consider hepatic toxocariasis as a possible diagnosis in any individual who presents with eosinophilia of unknown etiology and an ill-defined hepatic lesion on CT imaging. PMID:26513919

  7. Dual infection with hepatitis A and E virus presenting with aseptic meningitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Naha, Kushal; Karanth, Suman; Prabhu, Mukhyaprana; Sidhu, Manpreet Singh

    2012-07-01

    We report the case of a young male who presented with features of aseptic meningitis and elevated serum liver enzymes, but no symptoms or signs suggestive of an acute hepatitis. Subsequently, he was diagnosed with dual infection with hepatitis A and E viruses, and recovered completely with symptomatic therapy. Isolated aseptic meningitis, unaccompanied by hepatitic features is an unusual presentation of a hepatotrophic viral infection, and is yet to be reported with hepatitis A and E virus co-infection.

  8. [Serum antibodies to the hepatitis A virus in persons following a history of the infection].

    PubMed

    Prikazchikov, S A

    1987-02-01

    Enzyme immunoassay was used for titration of serum antibodies in subjects with a history of clinically pronounced or asymptomatic hepatitis A infection. Titers of hepatitis A virus antibodies (anti-HAV) essentially decreased during 3-4 years after the disease, then the rate of this decrease slowed down and antibody titers stabilized at low levels. After clinically pronounced hepatitis A anti-HAV levels were considerably higher than after the asymptomatic form of this infection.

  9. Comparison of hepatitis B, core, HBc, and hepatitis B antibody, anti HBs, in a presumed low risk donor population.

    PubMed

    Heck, Ellen; Cavanagh, H Dwight

    2014-09-01

    Donors screened by medical social history interview negative for high risk behavior or communicable disease history, but subsequently exhibiting reactive serological markers, emphasize importance of duel safe guarding factors for determining donor suitability. This report examines a relationship between two immunoabsorption assay tests, hepatitis B core (HBc) antibody, a required food and drug administration (FDA) test, and hepatitis B antibody (anti HBs), non-required test. Reactive serology results, 129 cases, 3,581 donors (2008-2012) for HBc as the only initially positive serological marker were subjected to anti HBs testing in this history pre-screened donor population. Enzyme linked immunoabsorption assay kits hepatitis B, core and antibody, were used in this study. All samples were initially tested for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C, utilizing nucleic acid testing and antigen antibody immunoabsorption assay. Testing was performed by a FDA-registered CLEA-certified reference laboratory. Samples were deceased donor blood samples and a limited number of pre-mortem samples, separated, stored and analyzed according to manufacturer recommendation and FDA regulations. 129 reactive HBc only samples, were subsequently tested for anti HBs. Of these 129, 94 were found to be reactive for anti HBs. This represented 72 % of samples tested for antibody, a higher percentage than anticipated for a medical history negative, low risk population. PMID:24374389

  10. Incidence of hepatitis non-A, non-B compared with types A and B in hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Richer, G; Chen, Y Y; Huet, P M

    1982-09-01

    To establish the relative frequencies of types A, B and non-A, non-B hepatitis, stored samples of blood from all the cases of acute viral hepatitis seen over a period of 9 years in a general hospital for adults were classified according to their type by presently available serologic methods. The study included 456 episodes of hepatitis in 447 patients, distributed as follows: 114 episodes of hepatitis A (25%), 282 of hepatitis B (62%) and 60 of hepatitis non-A, non-B (13%). The episodes of non-A, non-B hepatitis were equally distributed between the sexes, suggesting a mode of transmission different from that of hepatitis A or B, which had male/female ratios of 2.4 and 3.1 respectively. The low proportion of hepatitis non-A, non-B may not reflect its real frequency, since it often escapes clinical recognition. PMID:6809306

  11. [Immunogenetic criteria for prediction of mixed hepatitis A + B].

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, A L; Ustiuzhaninov, V N; Vozhegova, N P; Strazhnikova, G A

    2009-04-01

    The investigation has revealed that mixed hepatitis A + B is a genetically determined disease. HLA-A10, B21, Cw2, Cw5, A10-A19, B8-B13, B21-B35, A3-B21, and A9-B21 are immunogenetic markers of this disease. The carriers of HLA-B21, Cw5, A3-B21, and A9-B21 and those of HLA-A10, A10-A19, and A10-B14 are at high risk for this infection among men and women, respectively. The findings of the distribution of HLA antigens and their combinations in mixed infection with hepatitis A and B viruses allow prediction of its occurrence (including the consideration of examinees' gender) which will assist in solving the matter of timely prophylaxis of this pathology.

  12. Fish oil decreases hepatic lipogenic genes in rats fasted and refed on a high fructose diet.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Gabriela S; Cardoso, João Felipe R; Calder, Philip C; Jordão, Alceu A; Vannucchi, Helio

    2015-03-01

    Fasting and then refeeding on a high-carbohydrate diet increases serum and hepatic triacylglycerol (TAG) concentrations compared to standard diets. Fructose is a lipogenic monosaccharide which stimulates de novo fatty acid synthesis. Omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids stimulate hepatic β-oxidation, partitioning fatty acids away from TAG synthesis. This study investigated whether dietary n-3 fatty acids from fish oil (FO) improve the hepatic lipid metabolic response seen in rats fasted and then refed on a high-fructose diet. During the post-prandial (fed) period, rats fed a FO rich diet showed an increase in hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR-α) gene expression and decreased expression of carbohydrate responsive element binding protein (ChREBP), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP). Feeding a FO rich diet for 7 days prior to 48 h of fasting resulted in lower hepatic TAG, lower PPAR-α expression and maintenance of hepatic n-3 fatty acid content. Refeeding on a high fructose diet promoted an increase in hepatic and serum TAG and in hepatic PPAR-α, ChREBP and MTTP expression. FO did not prevent the increase in serum and hepatic TAG after fructose refeeding, but did decrease hepatic expression of lipogenic genes and increased the n-3 fatty acid content of the liver. n-3 Fatty acids can modify some components of the hepatic lipid metabolic response to later feeding with a high fructose diet.

  13. Screening for Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus at a Community Fair: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Garmen A.; Hill, Mary A.; de Medina, Maria D.

    2013-01-01

    Despite recommendations for screening for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), most individuals are still unaware of their infection status. The disparities in screening for HBV and HCV can be attributed to lack of awareness, language barriers, and difficulty in accessing healthcare. To address these issues, an exhibit booth was set up at an annual cultural festival to promote awareness about HBV and HCV and also provide free screening for a local Floridian community. Recruitment was conducted in various languages by physicians and nurses who specialize in hepatology. All materials associated with the screening process were sponsored by the Schiff Center for Liver Diseases, which is located at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Florida. In the first year of the screening initiative, 173 of 11,000 fair attendees were screened for HBV. Twenty-nine (17%) of those screened tested positive for antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), and only 1 individual tested positive for chronic HBV, with positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Screening for HCV and an extended patient questionnaire were added to the screening program in the second year of the initiative. A total 231 of 9,000 fair attendees volunteered to be screened for both HBV and HCV. Twenty-nine (13%) of these people tested positive for anti-HBc, and 3 tested positive for HBsAg. Only 1 person tested positive for anti-HCV, but this individual had undetectable HCV RNA levels. Our single-center experience illustrates that, despite efforts to improve access to screening, only 2-3% of attendees at a cultural fair embraced the screening efforts. Other strategies will be required to enhance participation in screening programs for viral hepatitis. PMID:23943664

  14. [Autoimmune hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Marcais, O; Larrey, D

    1994-01-01

    Acute and chronic autoimmune hepatitis are uncommon inflammatory liver diseases, mainly occurring in young women, in association with hypergammaglobulinemia and serum autoantibodies. Different types have been described: type 1 characterized by anti-smooth muscle and anti-nuclear antibodies; type 2 characterized by anti-LKM1 antibodies; type 3 characterized by anti-SLA antibodies. Other types, still not clearly defined, may exist. Autoimmune hepatitis are associated with HLA A1 B8 DR3 and HLA DR4. Without any treatment, the disease leads to cirrhosis and, uncommonly, to fulminant hepatitis. Large doses of corticosteroids usually allow to control the disease. Relapse of hepatitis is frequent after corticosteroid withdrawal. Concomitant administration of immunosuppressive agents such as azathioprine allows to reduce corticosteroid dosage and contributes to maintain the remission of the disease. Liver transplantation may be indicated in cases of severe cirrhosis or fulminant hepatitis.

  15. Public health perspective on vaccine-preventable hepatitis: integrating hepatitis A and B vaccines into public health settings.

    PubMed

    Hershey, Jody H; Schowalter, Laurie; Bailey, Stephanie B C

    2005-10-01

    Hepatitis A and B vaccinations can and should be integrated into public health settings that serve adults at high risk for infection (e.g., sexually transmitted disease and/or human immunodeficiency virus clinics, criminal justice settings), and a policy of universal immunization may be the best way to accomplish this goal in these settings. Although hepatitis vaccines should be given to all susceptible persons at risk, many opportunities to vaccinate adults at high risk are missed, and there are several barriers and challenges to vaccination of adults. These challenges and barriers can be overcome. Successful integration of hepatitis vaccination for adults into existing public health services and clinics has been accomplished across the United States at both state and local levels. Additional funds must be provided for the infrastructure and purchase of vaccines for adults in these settings.

  16. Serum Osteopontin Predicts Degree of Hepatic Fibrosis and Serves as a Biomarker in Patients with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Matsue, Yasuhiro; Tsutsumi, Mikihiro; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Saito, Takashi; Tsuchishima, Mutsumi; Toshikuni, Nobuyuki; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; George, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Osteopontin (OPN) is a matricellular protein that upregulates during pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. The present study was aimed to evaluate whether serum OPN could be used as a biomarker to assess the degree of hepatic fibrosis in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Methods Needle biopsy was performed on HCV patients and scored as zero fibrosis (F0), mild fibrosis (F1), moderate fibrosis (F2), severe fibrosis (F3) and liver cirrhosis (F4) based on Masson’s trichrome and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) staining. Serum OPN levels were measured using ELISA and correlated with the degree of fibrosis. Furthermore, the OPN values were correlated and evaluated with platelets count, serum hyaluronic acid (HA), and collagen type IV and subjected to receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results Serum OPN levels were remarkably increased from F0 through F4 in a progressive manner and the differences were significant (P < 0.001) between each group. The data were highly correlated with the degree of hepatic fibrosis. The ROC curve analysis depicted that serum OPN is an independent risk factor and an excellent biomarker and a prognostic index in HCV patients. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that serum OPN levels reflect the degree of hepatic fibrosis and could be used as a biomarker to assess the stage of fibrosis in HCV patients which would help to reduce the number of liver biopsies. Furthermore, serum OPN serves as a prognostic index towards the progression of hepatic fibrosis to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25760884

  17. Hepatitis C in non-hepatic solid organ transplant candidates and recipients: A new horizon

    PubMed Central

    Belga, Sara; Doucette, Karen Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is estimated to affect 130-150 million people globally which corresponds to 2%-3% of the total world population. It remains the leading indication for liver transplant worldwide and has been demonstrated to negatively impact both patient and graft survival following non-hepatic organ transplantation. In the era of interferon-based therapy, although treatment and cure of HCV prior to non-hepatic transplant improved survival, tolerability and low cure rates substantially limited therapy. Interferon (IFN)-based therapy following non-hepatic solid organ transplant, due to the risk of allograft rejection, is generally contraindicated. Rapid advances in IFN-free therapy with direct acting antivirals (DAAs) in the last few years have completely changed the paradigm of hepatitis C therapy. Compared to IFN-based regimens, DAAs have less frequent and less severe adverse effects, shorter durations of therapy, and higher cure rates that are minimally impacted by historically negative predictors of response such as cirrhosis, ethnicity, and post-transplant state. Recent studies have shown that liver transplant (LT) recipients can be safely and effectively treated with DAA combination therapies; although data are limited, many of the principles of therapy in LT may be extrapolated to non-hepatic solid organ transplant recipients. Here we review the data on DAA combination therapies in transplantation, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of pre- vs post-transplant HCV therapy and future directions. PMID:26819530

  18. Hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma in a patient with hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nisar; Adams, Denise M; Wang, Jiang; Prakash, Rajan; Karim, Nagla Abdel

    2014-09-01

    Hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HEHE) is a rare hepatic vascular tumor that represents a diagnostic challenge. The rarity of this neoplasm precludes establishment of a standard-of-care treatment. Risk factors for HEHE are not well-known. Liver transplant remains the most common therapeutic modality for nonmetastatic disease. This article describes a patient who presented with abdominal pain, fatigue, poor appetite, and weight loss. Genetic testing showed that the patient was homozygous for C282Y consistent with hereditary hemochromatosis, and liver biopsy was consistent with malignant epithelioid hemangioendothelioma. The patient was referred for a liver transplant but was deemed inappropriate for transplant secondary to peritoneal studding, with frozen-section analysis showing metastatic disease at the time of surgery. PMID:25190690

  19. Protect Yourself from Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop yellowish eyes and skin. All the hepatitis viruses can cause acute, or short-term, hepatitis. Some can also cause chronic hepatitis, in which the infection lasts a long time, sometimes for your whole life. Chronic hepatitis can eventually lead to scarring of ...

  20. Euforia-induced acute hepatitis in a patient with scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Encarnación, Esther; Ríos, Grissel; Muñoz-Mirabal, Angel; Vilá, Luis M

    2012-12-19

    Euforia, a supplement containing a variety of natural ingredients, is widely used as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory formula. It is not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and its side effects are unknown. We report a 45-year-old woman with limited systemic sclerosis who presented with jaundice and marked elevation of serum transaminases. One month before, she started taking Euforia juice. A liver biopsy disclosed submassive hepatocellular necrosis with histopathological changes consistent with toxic hepatitis. The patient's symptoms resolved with cessation of Euforia. Six months later, she persisted with abnormal liver function tests, but these resolved 18 months after discontinuation of Euforia. The mechanism by which Euforia causes liver injury is unknown. Some ingredients contained in this supplement (green tea, Aloe vera, noni and goji) are linked to hepatic injury. To our knowledge, this is the first report of hepatotoxicity associated with Euforia.

  1. Primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumor: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jeong Eun; Kim, Byung Seok; Lee, Chang Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    Primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumors (PHNETs) are extremely rare and difficult to distinguish from other liver tumors, such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cholangiocarcinoma, based on medical imaging findings. A 70-year-old man was referred for evaluation of liver mass incidentally discovered on abdominal computed tomography. The characteristic finding from dynamic liver magnetic resonance imaging led to a diagnosis of HCC. The patient underwent right hepatectomy. Histopathological and immunohistochemical examination revealed grade 2 neuroendocrine tumor. The postoperative 24-h urinary excretion of 5-hydroxy-indolacetic acid was within the normal range. Further imaging investigations were performed. No other lesions were found making probable the diagnosis of PHNET. This case shows that the diagnosis of PHNET is a medical challenge, requiring differentiation of PHNETs other hepatic masses and exclusion of occult primary neuroendocrine tumors. The diagnosis of PHNET can be ascertained after long term follow-up to exclude another primary origin. PMID:27574614

  2. Anaphylactic shock due to hepatitis B immunoglobulin in a newborn.

    PubMed

    Bulbul, Ali; Karadag, Ahmet; Köklü, Esad; Pamuk, Utku; Sarici, Serdar Umit

    2010-10-01

    Hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) is administered for the passive immunisation of all infants born to HBsAg-positive mothers within 12 h of birth. Adverse effects of HBIG are very rare. In this study, we report a newborn (a female, 33 weeks' gestation and 2030 g birth weight) developing anaphylaxis after HBIG administration. The mother was a Hepatitis B virus (HBV) carrier. Hypotension and erythematous rash developed 7 min after HBIG administration. Reporting the first anaphylaxis case in newborns due to HBIG in literature, we suggest the condition be taken into account, and requisite precautions should be taken against this probable complication in the newborn. PMID:20210693

  3. Chemical disinfection of hepatitis A virus on environmental surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Mbithi, J N; Springthorpe, V S; Sattar, S A

    1990-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus disinfection was assessed on contaminated stainless-steel disks. Ten microliters of fecally suspended hepatitis A virus was deposited on the center of each disk, dried for 20 min, and then covered with 20 microliters of the test product for 1 min. Of the 20 formulations tested, only 2% glutaraldehyde, a quaternary ammonium formulation containing 23% HCl (toilet bowl cleaner), and sodium hypochlorite (greater than 5,000 ppm [greater than 5,000 micrograms/ml] of free chlorine) reduced the virus titer by greater than 99.9%; phenolics, iodine-based products, alcohols, and solutions of acetic, peracetic, citric, and phosphoric acids were unable to do so. PMID:2176450

  4. Necrotizing hepatitis in a domestic pigeon (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Himmel, L; O'Connor, M; Premanandan, C

    2014-11-01

    An adult male domestic pigeon (Columba livia) was presented for necropsy following natural death after a period of chronic weight loss and severe intestinal ascariasis. Histopathologic examination of the liver found moderate to marked, multifocal necrotizing hepatitis with large, basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. Transmission electron microscopy of affected hepatocytes demonstrated numerous intra- and perinuclear icosahedral virions arranged in a lattice structure, consistent with adenoviral infection.

  5. Synthetic peptides for the immunodiagnosis of hepatitis A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Gauna, A; Losada, S; Lorenzo, M; Bermúdez, H; Toledo, M; Pérez, H; Chacón, E; Noya, O

    2015-12-01

    VP1, VP2 and VP3 molecules of hepatitis A virus are exposed capsid proteins that have shown to be antigenic and are used for diagnosis in recombinant-antigen commercial kits. In this study, we developed a sequence analysis in order to predict diagnostic peptide epitopes, followed by their spot synthesis on functionalized cellulose paper (Pepscan). This paper with synthetic peptides was tested against a sera pool of hepatitis A patients. Two peptide sequences, that have shown an antigenic recognition, were selected for greater scale synthesis on resin. A dimeric form of one of these peptides (IMT-1996), located in the C-Terminus region of protein VP1, was antigenic with a recognition frequency of 87-100% of anti-IgG antibodies and 100% of anti-IgM antibodies employing the immunological assays MABA and ELISA. We propose peptide IMT-1996, with less than twenty residues, as a cheaper alternative for prevalence studies and diagnosis of hepatitis A infection.

  6. Hepatitis B Virus Infection of a Mouse Hepatic Cell Line Reconstituted with Human Sodium Taurocholate Cotransporting Polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Lempp, Florian A; Qu, Bingqian; Wang, Yong-Xiang; Urban, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) enters hepatocytes via its receptor, human sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (hNTCP). So far, HBV infection has been achieved only in human hepatic cells reconstituted with hNTCP and not in cells of mouse origin. Here, the first mouse liver cell line (AML12) which gains susceptibility to HBV upon hNTCP expression is described. Thus, HBV infection of receptor-expressing mouse hepatocytes does not principally require a human cofactor but can be triggered by endogenous murine determinants.

  7. A neurotoxic alcohol exposure paradigm does not induce hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Joel G; Wiren, Kristine M; Wilhelm, Clare J

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is associated with neurological dysfunction, brain morphological deficits and frank neurotoxicity. Although these disruptions may be a secondary effect due to hepatic encephalopathy, no clear evidence of causality is available. This study examined whether a 72h period of alcohol intoxication known to induce physical dependence, followed by a single withdrawal, was sufficient to induce signs of hepatic encephalopathy in male and female mice. Animals were continuously intoxicated via alcohol vapor inhalation, a procedure previously shown to induce significant neurotoxicity in female mice. At peak synchronized withdrawal (8h following the end of alcohol exposure), blood samples were taken and levels of several liver-regulated markers and brain swelling were characterized. Glutathione levels were also determined in the medial frontal cortex (mFC) and hippocampus. Results revealed elevated levels of cholesterol, albumin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and decreased levels of blood urea nitrogen and total bilirubin in alcohol-exposed male and female groups compared to controls. Brain water weight was not affected by alcohol exposure, though males tended to have slightly more water weight overall. Alcohol exposure led to reductions in tissue levels of glutathione in both the hippocampus and mFC which may indicate increased oxidative stress. Combined, these results suggest that hepatic encephalopathy does not appear to play a significant role in the neurotoxicity observed following alcohol exposure in this model. PMID:27268733

  8. Foodborne outbreak of hepatitis A, November 2007-January 2008, Austria.

    PubMed

    Schmid, D; Fretz, R; Buchner, G; König, C; Perner, H; Sollak, R; Tratter, A; Hell, M; Maass, M; Strasser, M; Allerberger, F

    2009-04-01

    An outbreak of hepatitis A affecting 21 residents of an Austrian city occurred from the end of November 2007 until mid-January 2008. A case series investigation suggested the consumption of food purchased from supermarket X as the common link. A food handler employed in the delicatessen department of that supermarket had been serologically diagnosed with hepatitis A on 28th November 2007. During the infectious period of approximately 3 weeks, he worked on 11 days. Interviews with the other cluster cases revealed that the hepatitis A virus (HAV)-infected food handler did not practice appropriate hand hygiene. The investigation revealed no other possible source of infection. We hypothesize that the food of the delicatessen department contaminated by the HAV-infected food handler during his infectious period was the source of the outbreak. The district public health authority recommended the reinforcement of hygiene precautions, i.e., access to viricidal hand disinfectant and the use of disposable gloves and single-use paper towels, in the involved supermarket. The federal ministry of health recommended HAV vaccination for all food handlers in food production and gastronomy companies; this recommendation was included in the Austrian national vaccination plan 2008, even though the vaccination of food handlers is costly and its cost-effectiveness is not proven. Appropriate and regular hand hygiene, particularly after toilet visits, is the most effective measure for preventing HAV transmission. PMID:18850121

  9. Foodborne outbreak of hepatitis A, November 2007-January 2008, Austria.

    PubMed

    Schmid, D; Fretz, R; Buchner, G; König, C; Perner, H; Sollak, R; Tratter, A; Hell, M; Maass, M; Strasser, M; Allerberger, F

    2009-04-01

    An outbreak of hepatitis A affecting 21 residents of an Austrian city occurred from the end of November 2007 until mid-January 2008. A case series investigation suggested the consumption of food purchased from supermarket X as the common link. A food handler employed in the delicatessen department of that supermarket had been serologically diagnosed with hepatitis A on 28th November 2007. During the infectious period of approximately 3 weeks, he worked on 11 days. Interviews with the other cluster cases revealed that the hepatitis A virus (HAV)-infected food handler did not practice appropriate hand hygiene. The investigation revealed no other possible source of infection. We hypothesize that the food of the delicatessen department contaminated by the HAV-infected food handler during his infectious period was the source of the outbreak. The district public health authority recommended the reinforcement of hygiene precautions, i.e., access to viricidal hand disinfectant and the use of disposable gloves and single-use paper towels, in the involved supermarket. The federal ministry of health recommended HAV vaccination for all food handlers in food production and gastronomy companies; this recommendation was included in the Austrian national vaccination plan 2008, even though the vaccination of food handlers is costly and its cost-effectiveness is not proven. Appropriate and regular hand hygiene, particularly after toilet visits, is the most effective measure for preventing HAV transmission.

  10. Thermal inactivation kinetics of hepatitis A virus in spinach.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Hayriye; Ye, Xiaofei; Harte, Federico; D'Souza, Doris H; Davidson, P Michael

    2015-01-16

    Leafy vegetables have been recognized as important vehicles for the transmission of foodborne viral pathogens. To control hepatitis A viral foodborne illness outbreaks associated with mildly heated (e.g., blanched) leafy vegetables such as spinach, generation of adequate thermal processes is important both for consumers and the food industry. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the thermal inactivation behavior of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in spinach, and provide insights on HAV inactivation in spinach for future studies and industrial applications. The D-values calculated from the first-order model (50-72 °C) ranged from 34.40 ± 4.08 to 0.91 ± 0.12 min with a z-value of 13.92 ± 0.87 °C. The calculated activation energy value was 162 ± 11 kJ/mol. Using the information generated in the present study and the thermal parameters of industrial blanching conditions for spinach as a basis (100 °C for 120-180 s), the blanching of spinach in water at 100 °C for 120-180 s under atmospheric conditions will provide greater than 6 log reduction of HAV. The results of this study may be useful to the frozen food industry in designing blanching conditions for spinach to inactivate or control hepatitis A virus outbreaks.

  11. Hepatic Subcapsular Biloma: A Rare Complication of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Georganas, Marios; Delaporta, Eirini; Karallas, Emmanouil; Koutsopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    The development of an intra-abdominal bile collection (biloma) is an infrequent complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). These bilomas develop in the subhepatic space most often secondary to iatrogenic injury of the extrahepatic ducts. We present a case of hepatic subcapsular biloma following LC and we discuss its etiology and management. Early diagnosis is crucial and percutaneous drainage under CT guidance should be employed to resolve this complication. PMID:25177507

  12. The Evolving Nature of Hepatic Abscess: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mavilia, Marianna G.; Molina, Marco; Wu, George Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hepatic abscess (HA) remains a serious and often difficult to diagnose problem. HAs can be divided into three main categories based on the underlying conditions: infectious, malignant, and iatrogenic. Infectious abscesses include those secondary to direct extension from local infection, systemic bacteremia, and intra-abdominal infections that seed the portal system. However, over the years, the etiologies and risks factors for HA have continued to evolve. Prompt recognition is important for instituting effective management and obtaining good outcomes. PMID:27350946

  13. Metformin and metabolic diseases: a focus on hepatic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Shih-Lung; Hu, Xiang; Botchlett, Rachel; Chen, Lulu; Huo, Yuqing

    2015-01-01

    Metformin has been widely used as a first-line anti-diabetic medicine for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). As a drug that primarily targets the liver, metformin suppresses hepatic glucose production (HGP), serving as the main mechanism by which metformin improves hyperglycemia of T2D. Biochemically, metformin suppresses gluconeogenesis and stimulates glycolysis. Metformin also inhibits glycogenolysis, which is a pathway that critically contributes to elevated HGP. While generating beneficial effects on hyperglycemia, metformin also improves insulin resistance and corrects dyslipidemia in patients with T2D. These beneficial effects of metformin implicate a role for metformin in managing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. As supported by the results from both human and animal studies, metformin improves hepatic steatosis and suppresses liver inflammation. Mechanistically, the beneficial effects of metformin on hepatic aspects are mediated through both adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent and AMPK-independent pathways. In addition, metformin is generally safe and may also benefit patients with other chronic liver diseases. PMID:25676019

  14. Ischemic hepatitis after percutaneous nephrolitotomy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Temiz, Mustafa Zafer; Yuruk, Emrah; Teberik, Kutlu; Akbas, Burcu Kadriye; Piroglu, Mustafa Devrim; Oztorun, Hande Selvi; Kandirali, Engin

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Ischemic hepatitis (IH) is the necrosis of the centrilobular hepatocytes of liver and is secondary to liver hypoperfusion in most of the cases. The diagnosis is usually based on biochemical findings due to the absence of symptoms and signs. Although the disease course is often mild, and sometimes is even not diagnosed, the outcome is poor if the etiology of hypotension and liver anoxia is not promptly corrected. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 64-year-old patient who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) for right renal pelvic stone developed acute IH at first postoperative day as a result of hemorrhage related severe hypotension. After restoring hemodynamic parameters, she completely recovered 2 weeks after the operation. DISCUSSION IH is a frequent cause of marked serum aminotransferase elevation and most commonly occurs as a result of arterial hypoxemia and insufficient hepatic perfusion. Although no specific treatment of IH exists, stabilizing the hemodynamic parameters of the patient resolves the problem in most of the cases. CONCLUSION This case is presented to demonstrate that ischemic hepatitis should be kept in mind if severe hemorrhage occurs during PNL. PMID:25437690

  15. Changing Epidemiological Characteristics of Hepatitis A in Zhejiang Province, China: Increased Susceptibility in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhifang; Chen, Yaping; Xie, Shuyun; Lv, Huakun

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis A is a common acute hepatitis caused by hepatitis A virus (HAV). Annually, it affects 1.4 million people worldwide. Between 1991 and 1994, HAV infections were highly endemic in Zhejiang Province (China), with 78,720 reported HAV infections per year. Hepatitis A vaccine came on the market in 1995 and was implemented for voluntary immunization. Since 2008, hepatitis A vaccine has been integrated into the national childhood routine immunization program. Objective To understand the current epidemiological profile of hepatitis A in Zhejiang Province since hepatitis A vaccine has been available for nearly two decades. Methods This study used the 2005–2014 National Notifiable Diseases Reporting System data to evaluate the incidence rate of notified hepatitis A cases in Zhejiang Province. Results The overall trend of incidence rate of notified hepatitis A cases significantly decreased from 2005 to 2014 (P< 0.001). During the study period, the reported incidence rate in individuals aged ≤19 years declined to the historically lowest record in 2014. Compared with individuals aged ≤19 years, those aged ≥20 years showed the highest incidence rate (P< 0.001). Majority of HAV infected cases were Laborers, accounting for approximately 70% of reported cases. Conclusions Childhood immunization strategy with hepatitis A vaccine seemed to be effective in decreasing notified hepatitis A incidence rate in individuals aged ≤19 years. Those aged ≥20 years were observed to be the most susceptible population. The vast majority of hepatitis A cases were notified among Laborers. Therefore, we strongly suggest that future preventive and control measures should focus more on adults, particularly Laborers, in addition to the current childhood hepatitis A vaccination programme. PMID:27093614

  16. Hepatic manifestations of tuberous sclerosis complex: a genotypic and phenotypic analysis.

    PubMed

    Black, M E; Hedgire, S S; Camposano, S; Paul, E; Harisinghani, M; Thiele, E A

    2012-12-01

    Hepatic manifestations of tuberous sclerosis complex: a genotypic and phenotypic analysis. A retrospective review of the clinical records and radiological images of 205 patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) was performed to evaluate the prevalence and progression of hepatic lesions; examine the association of hepatic phenotype with genotype, age, and gender; and investigate the relationships between hepatic, renal, and pulmonary involvement. Hepatic angiomyolipomas (AML), cysts, and other benign lesions were identified in 30% of the cohort, and some lesions grew significantly over time. However, no patient had clinical symptoms or complications from hepatic lesions. TSC2 patients exhibited a higher frequency of AML compared to TSC1 patients (p = 0.037), and patients with no mutation identified exhibited a higher frequency of cysts compared to TSC2 patients (p = 0.023). Age was positively correlated with frequency of hepatic involvement (p < 0.001), whereas hepatic phenotype was independent of gender. Presence of hepatic AML was associated with presence of renal AML (p = 0.001). These findings confirm a high rate of asymptomatic hepatic lesions in TSC and further characterize the TSC phenotype.

  17. The Economic Burden of Hepatitis A, B, and C in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Shon, Changwoo; Choi, Hyung-Yun; Shim, Jae-Jun; Park, So-Youn; Lee, Kyung Suk; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Oh, In-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of hepatitis in South Korea is relatively high compared to that in other high-income countries. For this reason, viral hepatitis infection not only affects the population's health, but also impacts national healthcare costs. This study was performed in order to estimate the individual economic costs of the hepatitis A, B, and C viruses as well as to determine, using nationally representative data, the trends in South Korea with respect to these viruses during the 2008-2011 period. The study found that the prevalence of hepatitis A had decreased, but those of hepatitis B and C had increased overall. The mortality rate of hepatitis C was higher than that of the other two types. The mortality rate of hepatitis B had changed little, whereas that of hepatitis C had risen. The total cost of hepatitis A had decreased, from US $62.2 million to US $45.7 million, although a notable exception occurred in 2009, when the cost was US $126.6 million. Conversely, the total cost of hepatitis B had increased rapidly during the same period, from US $501.4 million to US $607.8 million. Finally, the total cost of hepatitis C had also increased from US $63.9 million to US $90.7 million. The direct costs of hepatitis A, B, and C were estimated to account for approximately 35.5%, 46.6%, and 58.0% of the total, respectively. These findings demonstrate the economic burden associated with hepatitis A, B, and C, and demonstrate the need to establish an effective prevention and management policy for future planning in South Korea.

  18. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of acute hepatitis a in Korea: a nationwide multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Kwon, So Young; Park, Sang Hoon; Yeon, Jong Eun; Jeong, Sook Hyang; Kwon, Oh Sang; Lee, Jin Woo; Kim, Hong Soo; Seo, Yeon Seok; Kim, Young Seok; Sohn, Joo Hyun; Yim, Hyung Joon; Choi, Jong Young; Lee, Myung Seok; Kweon, Young Oh; Cheong, Jae Youn; Kim, Haak Cheoul; Lee, Heon Ju; Baik, Soon Koo; An, Hyonggin; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics of acute hepatitis A during a recent outbreak in Korea. Data of patients diagnosed with acute hepatitis A from 2007 to 2009 were collected from 21 tertiary hospitals retrospectively. Their demographic, clinical, and serological characteristics and their clinical outcomes were analyzed. A total of 4,218 patients (mean age 33.3 yr) were included. The median duration of admission was 9 days. The mean of the highest ALT level was 2,963 IU/L, total bilirubin was 7.3 mg/dL, prothrombin time INR was 1.3. HBsAg was positive in 3.7%, and anti-HCV positive in 0.7%. Renal insufficiency occurred in 2.7%, hepatic failure in 0.9%, relapsing hepatitis in 0.7%, and cholestatic hepatitis in 1.9% of the patients. Nineteen patients (0.45%) died or were transplanted. Complications of renal failure or prolonged cholestasis were more frequent in patients older than 30 yr. In conclusion, most patients with acute hepatitis A recover uneventfully, however, complication rates are higher in patients older than 30 yr than younger patients. Preventive strategies including universal vaccination in infants and active immunization of hepatitis A to adult population should be considered for prevention of community-wide outbreaks of hepatitis A in Korea.

  19. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Change Plan Wallet card for patients to record their alcohol use over a 4-week period as a way to monitor and reduce their drinking behavior. Glossary Definitions of terms commonly used with viral hepatitis and ...

  20. Primary hepatic angiosarcoma: report of a case involving environmental arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Tsai, M H; Chien, R N; Hsieh, S Y; Hung, C F; Chen, T C; Sheen, I S

    1998-12-01

    Hepatic angiosarcoma is a rare malignant tumor with a rapidly fatal course. It has become a subject of interest because of its intimate relationship with environmental carcinogens, such as thorium dioxide (Thorotrast), vinyl chloride monomer, and arsenic. We describe a case of a chronic hepatitis B surface antigen carrier, with a 20-year history of environmental exposure to arsenical-containing agricultural herbicides and bactericides, who developed a hepatic angiosarcoma. He died due to rupture of the hepatic angiosarcoma with acute hemoperitoneum 9 weeks after initial diagnosis. This is a rare case of primary hepatic sarcoma, especially in Taiwan where hepatocellular carcinoma is endemic. This case not only serves to give more evidence of the relationship between hepatic angiosarcoma and arsenical exposure, but also demonstrates the key point in the differential diagnosis of liver tumors. Increased familiarity with this disease will facilitate correct diagnosis and help to improve management of the condition in the future.

  1. A highly conserved G-rich consensus sequence in hepatitis C virus core gene represents a new anti–hepatitis C target

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shao-Ru; Min, Yuan-Qin; Wang, Jia-Qi; Liu, Chao-Xing; Fu, Bo-Shi; Wu, Fan; Wu, Ling-Yu; Qiao, Zhi-Xian; Song, Yan-Yan; Xu, Guo-Hua; Wu, Zhi-Guo; Huang, Gai; Peng, Nan-Fang; Huang, Rong; Mao, Wu-Xiang; Peng, Shuang; Chen, Yu-Qi; Zhu, Ying; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Xiao-Lian; Zhou, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplex (G4) is one of the most important secondary structures in nucleic acids. Until recently, G4 RNAs have not been reported in any ribovirus, such as the hepatitis C virus. Our bioinformatics analysis reveals highly conserved guanine-rich consensus sequences within the core gene of hepatitis C despite the high genetic variability of this ribovirus; we further show using various methods that such consensus sequences can fold into unimolecular G4 RNA structures, both in vitro and under physiological conditions. Furthermore, we provide direct evidences that small molecules specifically targeting G4 can stabilize this structure to reduce RNA replication and inhibit protein translation of intracellular hepatitis C. Ultimately, the stabilization of G4 RNA in the genome of hepatitis C represents a promising new strategy for anti–hepatitis C drug development. PMID:27051880

  2. Exploring the concurrent presence of hepatitis A virus genome in serum, stool, saliva, and urine samples of hepatitis A patients.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Madhuri S; Bhalla, Shilpa; Kalrao, Vijay R; Dhongade, Ramchandra K; Chitambar, Shobha D

    2014-04-01

    The use of saliva and urine as an alternative to serum samples for detection of anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) IgM antibodies has been documented. However, these samples remain underreported or unexplored for shedding of HAV. To address this issue, paired serum, stool, saliva, and urine samples collected from hepatitis A patients were screened by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for detection of HAV RNA. HAV RNA was detected in 67.6% (44/65), 52.3% (34/65), 8.7% (5/57), and 12.3% (8/65) of the serum, stool, saliva, and urine samples, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences obtained for partial RNA polymerase region grouped HAV strains from all of the clinical samples of the study in subgenotype IIIA. Low frequency of HAV nucleic acid in saliva and urine samples indicates limited utility of these samples in genomic studies on HAV but suggests its potential for transmission and infection of hepatitis A.

  3. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis as an Extrahepatic Manifestation of Acute Anicteric Hepatitis A Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zis, Panagiotis; Kontogeorgi, Elli; Karakalos, Dimitrios; Pavlopoulou, Despoina; Sevastianos, Vassilios A.

    2012-01-01

    Among the many infective causes of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), viral hepatitis has been regarded as a rare associated condition. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with CVT associated with hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection, outlining probable pathogenic mechanisms. We suggest that hepatitis A serological markers should be routinely included in the investigation of cerebral venous thrombosis of unknown etiology, in nonvaccinated patients with risk factors of a recent HAV exposure. PMID:22934203

  4. Hepatitis C core antigen testing: a reliable, quick, and potentially cost-effective alternative to hepatitis C polymerase chain reaction in diagnosing acute hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, Fiona V; Fisher, Martin; Hughes, Daniel J; Shaw, Simon G; Homer, Gary; Hassan-Ibrahim, Mohammed O

    2015-01-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is increasingly common among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men. We evaluated the efficacy of HCV core antigen in diagnosing acute HCV in an HIV-infected cohort. Compared with HCV polymerase chain reaction, core antigen proved sensitive (100%) and specific (97.9%). As a quick, simple, and cost-effective test, it has considerable utility in screening for acute HCV.

  5. Prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV and risk factors in entrants to Irish prisons: a national cross sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jean; Allwright, Shane; Barry, Joseph; Reynolds, Sheilagh Reaper; Thornton, Lelia; Bradley, Fiona; Parry, John V

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen, hepatitis C virus, and HIV in entrants to Irish prisons and to examine risk factors for infection. Design Cross sectional, anonymous survey, with self completed risk factor questionnaire and oral fluid specimen for antibody testing. Setting Five of seven committal prisons in the Republic of Ireland. Participants 607 of the 718 consecutive prison entrants from 6 April to 1 May 1999. Main outcome measures Prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen, hepatitis C virus, and HIV in prison entrants, and self reported risk factor status. Results Prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen was 37/596 (6%; 95% confidence interval 4% to 9%), to hepatitis C virus was 130/596 (22%; 19% to 25%), and to HIV was 12/596 (2%; 1% to 4%). A third of the respondents had never previously been in prison; these had the lowest prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen (4/197, 2%), to hepatitis C (6/197, 3%), and to HIV (0/197). In total 29% of respondents (173/593) reported ever injecting drugs, but only 7% (14/197) of those entering prison for the first time reported doing so compared with 40% (157/394) of those previously in prison. Use of injected drugs was the most important predictor of antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen and hepatitis C virus. Conclusions Use of injected drugs and infection with hepatitis C virus are endemic in Irish prisons. A third of prison entrants were committed to prison for the first time. Only a small number of first time entrants were infected with one or more of the viruses. These findings confirm the need for increased infection control and harm reduction measures in Irish prisons. What is already known on this topicHigh rates of using injected drugs, initiation of use of injected drugs, and sharing injecting equipment occur in Irish prisonsInjecting drug users have high rates of infection with hepatitis B and C viruses, and hepatitis C is

  6. Introduction of a new hepatitis agent in retrospect: genetic studies of Swedish hepatitis D virus strains.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y Y; Hansson, B G

    1996-01-01

    The supposedly first outbreak of hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection in Sweden occurred among intravenous drug addicts in the Malmö area in the mid-1970s. Stored sera from this outbreak were used for viral RNA extraction and analysis. By sequence comparisons, the HDV genomes from those Swedish patients fell into two separate clusters, within which the RNA sequences were closely related. These two HDV groups genetically resembled the French and US-1 isolates of genotype I, respectively, indicating that there had been at least two separate sources of HDV infection. The genetic alterations of the HDV RNA were investigated by sequence analysis of nine annually drawn serum samples from one patient and paired samples collected between 2 and more than 10 years apart from six patients with chronic HDV infection. Only mutational changes were observed, and no insertion or deletion appeared throughout the periods observed. It was found that the Swedish HDV isolates mutationally evolved at an average rate of 1.1 x 10(-3) substitutions per nucleotide per year over a long time course of chronic HDV infection, which is of the same magnitude as that of other RNA viruses. PMID:8897170

  7. Diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility of a new noninvasive index for hepatic steatosis in patients with hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqiao; Wang, Gongsui; Kang, Kaifu; Wu, Guobiao; Wang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to construct a cost-effective noninvasive diagnostic index for prediction of hepatic steatosis in patients with hepatitis B virus(HBV) infection. From January 2011 to January 2015, a total of 364 consecutive subjects who underwent liver biopsies were enrolled. The Receiver-operating characteristic(ROC) curves and Obuchowski measure were constructed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the new index. The AUROCs of steatosis index of patients with HBV infection (SIHBV) in predicting of steatosis were 0.929 (95% confidence interval:0.889-0.970, P < 0.05) in the model group and 0.855 (0.794-0.917, P < 0.05) in the validation group respectively. Comparisons of AUROCs demonstrated that SIHBV was significantly superior to Korean Score, fatty liver index (FLI), hepatic steatosis index (HSI), lipid accumulation product(LAP), and fatty liver disease (FLD) index for prediction of hepatic steatosis in model group and validation group(all P < 0.01). Especially for patients with hepatic steatosis percentage of 5.0-9.9% and 10.0-19.9%, SIHBV had a sensitivity of 63.6% and 79.2%, whereas it were 29.1% and 45.8% for Ultrasonography (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, as a cost-effective, simple, noninvasive, and readily available method, SIHBV may act as a massive screening tool before further examinations such as MRI, CT, transient elastography, or liver biopsy, especially for developing countries. PMID:27597515

  8. Diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility of a new noninvasive index for hepatic steatosis in patients with hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiqiao; Wang, Gongsui; Kang, Kaifu; Wu, Guobiao; Wang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to construct a cost-effective noninvasive diagnostic index for prediction of hepatic steatosis in patients with hepatitis B virus(HBV) infection. From January 2011 to January 2015, a total of 364 consecutive subjects who underwent liver biopsies were enrolled. The Receiver-operating characteristic(ROC) curves and Obuchowski measure were constructed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the new index. The AUROCs of steatosis index of patients with HBV infection (SIHBV) in predicting of steatosis were 0.929 (95% confidence interval:0.889–0.970, P < 0.05) in the model group and 0.855 (0.794–0.917, P < 0.05) in the validation group respectively. Comparisons of AUROCs demonstrated that SIHBV was significantly superior to Korean Score, fatty liver index (FLI), hepatic steatosis index (HSI), lipid accumulation product(LAP), and fatty liver disease (FLD) index for prediction of hepatic steatosis in model group and validation group(all P < 0.01). Especially for patients with hepatic steatosis percentage of 5.0–9.9% and 10.0–19.9%, SIHBV had a sensitivity of 63.6% and 79.2%, whereas it were 29.1% and 45.8% for Ultrasonography (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, as a cost-effective, simple, noninvasive, and readily available method, SIHBV may act as a massive screening tool before further examinations such as MRI, CT, transient elastography, or liver biopsy, especially for developing countries. PMID:27597515

  9. Autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Heneghan, Michael A; Yeoman, Andrew D; Verma, Sumita; Smith, Alastair D; Longhi, Maria Serena

    2013-10-26

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a disease of the hepatic parenchyma that can present in acute or chronic forms. In common with many autoimmune diseases, autoimmune hepatitis is associated with non-organ-specific antibodies in the context of hepatic autoimmunity. This dichotomy has made definition of a unifying hypothesis in the pathophysiology of the disease difficult, although data from the past 8 years have drawn attention to the role of regulatory T cells. Several triggers have been identified, and the disease arises in genetically susceptible individuals. Clinical and biochemical remission is achievable in up to 85% of cases. For the remaining patients, alternative immunosuppression strategies are an option. Liver transplantation provides an excellent outcome for patients with acute liver failure or complications of end-stage liver disease, including hepatocellular carcinoma. Variant or overlapping syndromes are worthy of consideration when unexpected disease features arise.

  10. Theoretical basis of a beneficial role for vitamin D in viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lương, Khanh vinh quốc; Nguyễn, Lan Thi Hoàng

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal bone metabolism and dysfunction of the calcium-parathyroid hormone-vitamin D axis have been reported in patients with viral hepatitis. Some studies suggested a relationship between vitamin D and viral hepatitis. Genetic studies have provided an opportunity to identify the proteins that link vitamin D to the pathology of viral hepatitis (i.e., the major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, the vitamin D receptor, cytochrome P450, the renin-angiotensin system, apolipoprotein E, liver X receptor, toll-like receptor, and the proteins regulated by the Sp1 promoter gene). Vitamin D also exerts its effects on viral hepatitis via non-genomic factors, i.e., matrix metalloproteinase, endothelial vascular growth factor, prostaglandins, cyclooxygenase-2, and oxidative stress. In conclusion, vitamin D could have a beneficial role in viral hepatitis. Calcitriol is best used for viral hepatitis because it is the active form of the vitamin D3 metabolite. PMID:23082050

  11. [Hepatic amyloidosis as a rare differential diagnosis of progressive liver failure].

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Dominik; Lutz, Lisa; Schultheiß, Michael; Werner, Martin; Thimme, Robert; Neumann-Haefelin, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Primary systemic amyloidosis is a rare disorder resulting in extracellular deposition of insoluble fibrils in different organs. Liver involvement has been reported. Since hepatic amyloidosis often presents clinically asymptomatic without specific laboratory or imaging hallmarks, diagnosis is challenging. However, cases of progressive hepatic failure due to liver amyloidosis have been reported. A 63 year old man presented with newly diagnosed ascites to our department. The patient reported occasional alcohol consumption. Viral hepatitis, genetic-metabolic causes as well as hepatic vascular disorders were excluded and ultrasound did not show any signs of liver cirrhosis or intraabdominal malignancy. Initially, alcoholic hepatitis was suspected. Due to the rapid deterioration of liver function, however, transjugular liver biopsy was performed showing light chain amyloidosis of kappa isotype. As diagnosis of hepatic amyloidosis is challenging, early liver biopsy is mandatory in patients with unexplained acute or chronic liver disease to exclude rare diseases with high mortality. PMID:27642740

  12. [Hepatic amyloidosis as a rare differential diagnosis of progressive liver failure].

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Dominik; Lutz, Lisa; Schultheiß, Michael; Werner, Martin; Thimme, Robert; Neumann-Haefelin, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Primary systemic amyloidosis is a rare disorder resulting in extracellular deposition of insoluble fibrils in different organs. Liver involvement has been reported. Since hepatic amyloidosis often presents clinically asymptomatic without specific laboratory or imaging hallmarks, diagnosis is challenging. However, cases of progressive hepatic failure due to liver amyloidosis have been reported. A 63 year old man presented with newly diagnosed ascites to our department. The patient reported occasional alcohol consumption. Viral hepatitis, genetic-metabolic causes as well as hepatic vascular disorders were excluded and ultrasound did not show any signs of liver cirrhosis or intraabdominal malignancy. Initially, alcoholic hepatitis was suspected. Due to the rapid deterioration of liver function, however, transjugular liver biopsy was performed showing light chain amyloidosis of kappa isotype. As diagnosis of hepatic amyloidosis is challenging, early liver biopsy is mandatory in patients with unexplained acute or chronic liver disease to exclude rare diseases with high mortality.

  13. Enrichment of a bipotent hepatic progenitor cell from naive adult liver tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Natasha; Samuelson, Lisa; Walkup, Maggie H.; Chandrasekaran, Prakash; Gerber, David A.

    2008-02-08

    Background/Aim: Recent interest in the liver stem cell field has led to the identification and characterization of several hepatic progenitor cell populations from fetal and adult tissues. We isolated a hepatic progenitor cell from naive adult liver and the current studies focus on differentiation and growth. Results: A Sca-1{sup +} hepatic progenitor cell was identified within the liver parenchyma. This cell expresses numerous liver related genes and transcription found in the developing and/or adult liver. It is located in the peri-portal region and expresses markers associated with undifferentiated hepatic cell populations, mature hepatocytes and biliary cells which distinguish it from the Sca-1{sup -} fraction. Conclusion: This hepatic progenitor cell from uninjured liver has features of both hepatocytic and biliary populations and demonstrates proliferative potential. Further studies will focus on sca-HPC subsets and conditions that regulate differentiation towards hepatic or biliary lineages.

  14. Infantile Hepatic Hemangioendothelioma: An Uncommon Cause of Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension in a Newborn Infant.

    PubMed

    Chatmethakul, Trassanee; Bhat, Ramachandra; Alkaabi, Maryam; Siddiqui, Abdul; Peevy, Keith; Zayek, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Multifocal and diffuse infantile hepatic hemangioendotheliomas commonly present with signs of high-output congestive heart failure. In addition, prolonged persistent pulmonary overcirculation eventually leads to the development of pulmonary hypertension at a later age. We report a 2-day old, full-term infant with multifocal, large infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma, who presented with an early onset of pulmonary hypertension, managed successfully with supportive care and systemic therapy directed toward the involution of infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma.

  15. Infantile Hepatic Hemangioendothelioma: An Uncommon Cause of Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension in a Newborn Infant

    PubMed Central

    Chatmethakul, Trassanee; Bhat, Ramachandra; Alkaabi, Maryam; Siddiqui, Abdul; Peevy, Keith; Zayek, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal and diffuse infantile hepatic hemangioendotheliomas commonly present with signs of high-output congestive heart failure. In addition, prolonged persistent pulmonary overcirculation eventually leads to the development of pulmonary hypertension at a later age. We report a 2-day old, full-term infant with multifocal, large infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma, who presented with an early onset of pulmonary hypertension, managed successfully with supportive care and systemic therapy directed toward the involution of infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma. PMID:27468364

  16. Hepatic Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Micheal; Forouhar, Faripour; Wu, George Y

    2013-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disease characterized by the presence of non-caseating granulomas in affected organs. Pulmonary involvement is the most common site of disease activity. However, hepatic involvement is also common in sarcoidosis, occurring in up to 70% of patients. Most patients with liver involvement are asymptomatic. Therefore, the majority of cases are discovered incidentally, frequently by the finding of elevated liver enzymes. Pain in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen, fatigue, pruritus, and jaundice may be associated with liver involvement. Portal hypertension and cirrhosis are complications linked to long-standing hepatic sarcoidosis. Liver biopsy is usually required to confirm the diagnosis. It is important to differentiate hepatic sarcoidosis from other autoimmune and granulomatous liver diseases. Not all cases of hepatic sarcoidosis require treatment. For symptomatic patients, the first line treatment includes corticosteroids or ursodeoxycholic acid. Various immunosuppressant agents can be used as second line agents. Rarely, severe cases require liver transplantation.

  17. Viral hepatitis: Indian scenario.

    PubMed

    Satsangi, Sandeep; Chawla, Yogesh K

    2016-07-01

    Viral hepatitis is a cause for major health care burden in India and is now equated as a threat comparable to the "big three" communicable diseases - HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. Hepatitis A virus and Hepatitis E virus are predominantly enterically transmitted pathogens and are responsible to cause both sporadic infections and epidemics of acute viral hepatitis. Hepatitis B virus and Hepatitis C virus are predominantly spread via parenteral route and are notorious to cause chronic hepatitis which can lead to grave complications including cirrhosis of liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. Around 400 million people all over the world suffer from chronic hepatitis and the Asia-Pacific region constitutes the epicentre of this epidemic. The present article would aim to cover the basic virologic aspects of these viruses and highlight the present scenario of viral hepatitis in India. PMID:27546957

  18. Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterium: A Rare Cause of Granulomatous Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Enweluzo, Chijioke; Sharma, Anuradha; Lenfest, Stephen; Aziz, Fahad

    2013-01-01

    Granulomatous hepatitis is a syndrome usually characterized by fever of unknown origin, myalgias, hepatosplenomegaly, and arthralgias, right upper quadrant abdominal pain or tenderness, with or without an elevation in serum transaminases. In this article, we outline our experience with a 64-year-old male presenting with a 3.5 weeks history of fever of unknown origin, night sweats, extreme fatigue and a 20 lb. weight loss. He had an extensive evaluation including 2 liver biopsies that was indicative of fibrin ring granulomas and a positive PCR for Mycobacterium chelonae-abscessus. He was eventually treated empirically with antibiotics that led to an improvement of his symptoms.

  19. Establishment of a viral hepatitis surveillance system--Pakistan, 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    2011-10-14

    Hepatitis A is thought to infect almost all persons living in Pakistan by age 15 years, and hepatitis E is responsible for sporadic infections and outbreaks. The prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is estimated at 2.5% and the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, estimated at 4.8%, is one of the highest rates in the world. Hepatitis surveillance in Pakistan has been syndromic, failing to confirm infection, distinguish among viruses, or collect information on risk factors. To understand the epidemiology of viral hepatitis in Pakistan more clearly, the Ministry of Health (MOH) asked the Pakistan Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (FELTP) to establish a hepatitis sentinel surveillance system in five large public hospitals in four provinces and Islamabad Capital Territory. This report describes the implementation of the viral hepatitis surveillance system in Pakistan and summarizes major findings from June 2010 through March 2011. A total of 712 cases of viral hepatitis were reported; newly reported HCV infection accounted for 53.2% of reported cases, followed by acute hepatitis A (19.8%), acute hepatitis E (12.2%), and newly reported HBV infection (10.8%). A history of health-care--related exposures, particularly receipt of therapeutic injections and infusions, commonly were reported by persons infected with HBV and HCV, and most patients reported drinking unboiled water. These findings point to the need for improved provider and community education about risks associated with unsafe injections, strengthening infection control practices in health facilities, increasing hepatitis B vaccination coverage, and improving access to clean drinking water in Pakistan.

  20. Hepatitis B Virus Reactivation Following Salazosulfapyridine Monotherapy in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Kengo; Saegusa, Jun; Nakamachi, Yuji; Nakazawa, Takashi; Kumagai, Shunichi; Morinobu, Akio

    2016-01-01

    A 72-year-old man was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and prior hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. He began treatment with salazosulfapyridine (SASP). Several months later, his blood tests reflected a slightly elevated liver function. Serum tests were positive for hepatitis B surface antigen and HBV-DNA, and the diagnosis of de novo HBV hepatitis was made. A genetic analysis showed that he had polymorphisms of ABCG2 and NAT2, which could lead to high plasma concentrations of SASP and sulfapyridine. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of de novo hepatitis developing during SASP monotherapy for RA. PMID:27181550

  1. A Rare Case of Hepatitis C-Associated Cryoglobulinemic Duodenal Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Alexandra; Dholaria, Kevin; Arosemena, Leopoldo R.; Ladino-Avellaneda, Marco A.; Barisoni, Laura; Bhamidimarri, Kalyan R.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal involvement of cryoglobulinemia is an uncommon manifestation and marker of severe vasculitis. We describe the case of a woman admitted to our service for management of acute renal failure and progressive gastrointestinal symptoms after initiating hepatitis C virus treatment with ribavirin and sofosbuvir 4 weeks prior. With an undetectable hepatitis C viral load and persistent symptoms despite hepatitis C virus therapy cessation, an upper endoscopy revealed duodenal sloughing, erythema, and bleeding, sparking suspicion for recurrence of cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. PMID:27807586

  2. Refeeding syndrome in a cat with hepatic lipidosis.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Karen; KuKanich, Kate S; Smee, Nicole M

    2011-08-01

    Refeeding syndrome is characterized by severe hypophosphatemia occurring in patients given enteral or parenteral nutrition after severe weight loss. There are few veterinary reports that describe this syndrome but it is well documented in human medicine. This report describes a case of a domestic shorthair cat diagnosed with hepatic lipidosis following a 4-week history of decreased appetite and weight loss and in whom refeeding syndrome was documented after initiation of enteral nutrition. Clinical findings, blood work abnormalities and disease progression in this patient are described from the time of diagnosis through to recovery. A review of the current literature pertinent to this clinical syndrome is included.

  3. Evaluation of a rapid enzyme immunoassay for diagnosis of hepatic amoebiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Kraoul, L; Adjmi, H; Lavarde, V; Pays, J F; Tourte-Schaefer, C; Hennequin, C

    1997-01-01

    We compared the capability of rapid enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to detect antiamoebic antibodies during hepatic amoebiasis with those of indirect hemagglutination and latex agglutination. EIA is simple to perform and rapid (20 min) and does not require any special equipment (optical reading is sufficient). EIA of 143 sera (including 43 from patients with proven hepatic amoebic abscess, 33 from patients with other hepatic disorders and/or parasitic infections, and 67 from healthy individuals) yielded a specificity, a sensitivity, and positive and negative predictive values of 100, 93, 100, and 97.1, respectively. This test could thus be considered another valuable tool for the diagnosis of hepatic amoebiasis. PMID:9163475

  4. [A case report of alverine-citrate-induced acute hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Han, Jee Young; Lee, Jin Woo; Kim, Joon Mee; Joo, Kowoon; Chon, Ung; Lee, Jung Il; Jeong, Seok; Lee, Don Haeng; Kim, Young Soo; Min, Kyung Sun

    2010-03-01

    Alverine citrate is one of the most commonly used antispasmodic drugs for patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Alverine-citrate-induced hepatotoxicity is extremely rare, with only a few cases having been reported worldwide. We present a case of a 75-year-old female patient who experienced complicated jaundice and abdominal discomfort after taking alverine citrate. Other causes of hepatitis were ruled out and the results of the liver function test returned to normal after ceasing the drug. This is the first case report in Korea of alverine-citrate-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:20375645

  5. Surgical Treatment of Hepatic Hydrothorax: A "Four-Step Approach".

    PubMed

    Jung, Yochun

    2016-03-01

    Recently, various video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical techniques have been reported with occasional success in treating hepatic hydrothorax (HH). In 2 patients with refractory HH, we applied a combination of four therapeutic modalities as a single procedure named as a "four-step approach": (1) pneumoperitoneum for localization of diaphragmatic defects, (2) thoracoscopic pleurodesis, (3) postoperative continuous positive airway pressure, and (4) drainage of ascites for abdominal decompression. The treatment was successful in both patients, without recurrence during the follow-up period of 24 and 3 months, respectively.

  6. Oral psoriasis in a patient with hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Nishioka, Kiyoshi

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of 65-year-old patient with psoriasis vulgaris who developed a psoriatic manifestation on his lower lip, along with typical features of psoriasis on his trunk and extremities. Mucous membranes, palate and tongue were not affected. A biopsy specimen from lip showed acanthosis of the epidermis with parakeratosis, and mild cellular infiltrates in the upper dermis. He was also suffering from type C hepatitis, however, he had not been treated with interferons. Oral psoriasis involving the lip is extremely rare. PMID:11809602

  7. Hepatitis A outbreaks in the vaccination era in Catalonia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ana; Broner, Sonia; Torner, Nuria; Godoy, Pere; Batalla, Joan; Alvarez, Josep; Barrabeig, Irene; Camps, Neus; Carmona, Gloria; Minguell, Sofía; Sala, Rosa; Caylà, Joan; Domínguez, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis A outbreaks have a major impact on public health services and involve case investigation and intervention measures to susceptible contacts. At the end of 1998 a universal vaccination program with a combined hepatitis A+B vaccine was started in Catalonia (Spain) in 12-years-old preadolescents. The objective of this study was to compare the characteristics of hepatitis A outbreaks in the periods before and after the introduction of the preadolescent vaccination program and to estimate the preventable fraction of cases associated to outbreaks. The incidence rates of outbreaks, cases and hospitalization associated with each outbreak were calculated. Two periods were considered: before (1991-1998) and after (2000-2007) the introduction of mass vaccination. The preventable fraction and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of cases associated with outbreaks was calculated. The rate of associated cases with outbreaks was higher in the period before the vaccination program than in the post vaccination period (1.53 per 100,000 person-year vs 1.12 ; p< 0.001), but the rate of hospitalization was greater in the period after the introduction of vaccination program than in the period previous to vaccination (0.70 per million persons-year vs 0.08; p< 0.001). The preventable fraction of cases associated to outbreaks was 19.6%(95%CI 6.7-32.5) in the 0-4 years group and 16.7% (95% CI 6.0-27.5) in the 5-14 years group, but the highest figure (38.6%; 95%CI 21.3-55.9) was observed in the 15-24 years age group. The estimated proportion of cases associated with outbreaks that would theoretically have been prevented with the vaccination program suggests that substantial benefits have been obtained in Catalonia in people aged less than 25 years.

  8. Abundance of Hepatic Transporters in Caucasians: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Burt, Howard J.; Riedmaier, Arian Emami; Harwood, Matthew D.; Crewe, H. Kim; Gill, Katherine L.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to derive quantitative abundance values for key hepatic transporters suitable for in vitro–in vivo extrapolation within a physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling framework. A meta-analysis was performed whereby data on abundance measurements, sample preparation methods, and donor demography were collated from the literature. To define values for a healthy Caucasian population, a subdatabase was created whereby exclusion criteria were applied to remove samples from non-Caucasian individuals, those with underlying disease, or those with subcellular fractions other than crude membrane. Where a clinically relevant active genotype was known, only samples from individuals with an extensive transporter phenotype were included. Authors were contacted directly when additional information was required. After removing duplicated samples, the weighted mean, geometric mean, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, and between-study homogeneity of transporter abundances were determined. From the complete database containing 24 transporters, suitable abundance data were available for 11 hepatic transporters from nine studies after exclusion criteria were applied. Organic anion transporting polypeptides OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 showed the highest population abundance in healthy adult Caucasians. For several transporters, the variability in abundance was reduced significantly once the exclusion criteria were applied. The highest variability was observed for OATP1B3 > OATP1B1 > multidrug resistance protein 2 > multidrug resistance gene 1. No relationship was found between transporter expression and donor age. To our knowledge, this study provides the first in-depth analysis of current quantitative abundance data for a wide range of hepatic transporters, with the aim of using these data for in vitro–in vivo extrapolation, and highlights the significance of investigating the background of tissue(s) used in quantitative transporter proteomic studies. Similar

  9. Toxic hepatitis induced by a herbal medicine: Tinospora crispa.

    PubMed

    Langrand, J; Regnault, H; Cachet, X; Bouzidi, C; Villa, A F; Serfaty, L; Garnier, R; Michel, S

    2014-01-01

    Herbal remedies are becoming increasingly popular in many countries. Tinospora species (Menispermaceae) is commonly used as a herbal medicine in South Asia, but very few toxic effects have been described. We report a case of acute hepatitis associated with chronic use of high doses of Tinospora crispa. A 49-year-old male with chronic low back pain bought a herbal medicine at a market in Vietnam that was supposed to be Tinospora crispa, and started to take 10 pellets per day. He had no medical history and did not take any other drugs or toxins. Four weeks later; he developed dark urine and pale stools, associated with asthenia and right hypochondrial pain. Two months after starting treatment, he was referred to the hepatology department with jaundice. Blood tests showed aspartate aminotransferase: 1.169 IU/l, alanine aminotransferase: 2.029 IU/l, total bilirubin: 20.47 mg/dl, direct bilirubin: 13.29 mg/dl, and γ-glutamyltransferase: 243 IU/l. Viral and autoimmune hepatitis were eliminated. Upper abdominal ultrasound was normal. Histopathological findings were consistent with a toxic reaction. The herbal medicine was stopped on admission and the patient fully recovered without treatment, with normal liver function 2 months after the acute episode. Tinospora crispa was clearly identified in the pellets by microscopic analysis of the botanical characters combined with chromatographic fingerprints. The use of herbal medicines containing Tinospora crispa can induce toxic hepatitis. Recovery can be complete after discontinuation. This case highlights the risk associated with traditional herbal remedies. PMID:24867504

  10. Abundance of Hepatic Transporters in Caucasians: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Burt, Howard J; Riedmaier, Arian Emami; Harwood, Matthew D; Crewe, H Kim; Gill, Katherine L; Neuhoff, Sibylle

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to derive quantitative abundance values for key hepatic transporters suitable for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation within a physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling framework. A meta-analysis was performed whereby data on abundance measurements, sample preparation methods, and donor demography were collated from the literature. To define values for a healthy Caucasian population, a subdatabase was created whereby exclusion criteria were applied to remove samples from non-Caucasian individuals, those with underlying disease, or those with subcellular fractions other than crude membrane. Where a clinically relevant active genotype was known, only samples from individuals with an extensive transporter phenotype were included. Authors were contacted directly when additional information was required. After removing duplicated samples, the weighted mean, geometric mean, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, and between-study homogeneity of transporter abundances were determined. From the complete database containing 24 transporters, suitable abundance data were available for 11 hepatic transporters from nine studies after exclusion criteria were applied. Organic anion transporting polypeptides OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 showed the highest population abundance in healthy adult Caucasians. For several transporters, the variability in abundance was reduced significantly once the exclusion criteria were applied. The highest variability was observed for OATP1B3 > OATP1B1 > multidrug resistance protein 2 > multidrug resistance gene 1. No relationship was found between transporter expression and donor age. To our knowledge, this study provides the first in-depth analysis of current quantitative abundance data for a wide range of hepatic transporters, with the aim of using these data for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation, and highlights the significance of investigating the background of tissue(s) used in quantitative transporter proteomic studies. Similar

  11. Toxic hepatitis induced by a herbal medicine: Tinospora crispa.

    PubMed

    Langrand, J; Regnault, H; Cachet, X; Bouzidi, C; Villa, A F; Serfaty, L; Garnier, R; Michel, S

    2014-01-01

    Herbal remedies are becoming increasingly popular in many countries. Tinospora species (Menispermaceae) is commonly used as a herbal medicine in South Asia, but very few toxic effects have been described. We report a case of acute hepatitis associated with chronic use of high doses of Tinospora crispa. A 49-year-old male with chronic low back pain bought a herbal medicine at a market in Vietnam that was supposed to be Tinospora crispa, and started to take 10 pellets per day. He had no medical history and did not take any other drugs or toxins. Four weeks later; he developed dark urine and pale stools, associated with asthenia and right hypochondrial pain. Two months after starting treatment, he was referred to the hepatology department with jaundice. Blood tests showed aspartate aminotransferase: 1.169 IU/l, alanine aminotransferase: 2.029 IU/l, total bilirubin: 20.47 mg/dl, direct bilirubin: 13.29 mg/dl, and γ-glutamyltransferase: 243 IU/l. Viral and autoimmune hepatitis were eliminated. Upper abdominal ultrasound was normal. Histopathological findings were consistent with a toxic reaction. The herbal medicine was stopped on admission and the patient fully recovered without treatment, with normal liver function 2 months after the acute episode. Tinospora crispa was clearly identified in the pellets by microscopic analysis of the botanical characters combined with chromatographic fingerprints. The use of herbal medicines containing Tinospora crispa can induce toxic hepatitis. Recovery can be complete after discontinuation. This case highlights the risk associated with traditional herbal remedies.

  12. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » For Veterans and the Public Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... the Public Veterans and Public Home How is Hepatitis C Treated? Find the facts about the newest ...

  13. Hepatitis E in Israel: A nation-wide retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Erez-Granat, Ortal; Lachish, Tamar; Daudi, Nili; Shouval, Daniel; Schwartz, Eli

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the epidemiology, risk factors and clinical course of acute hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in Israel, an industrialized country. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of acute HEV cases diagnosed in Israel from 1993 to 2013. Acute HEV was defined by ALT/AST elevation and a positive HEV PCR test or positive anti-HEV-IgM serology. HEV RNA was tested by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Antibodies to HEV were tested retrospectively using an ELISA assay. HEV-RNA was sequenced using RT-PCR of ORF1 and ORF2 regions to diagnose genotype of the virus. Epidemiologic and clinical data were collected by reviewing the clinical files and through a telephone interview according to a structured questionnaire. RESULTS: Acute HEV was diagnosed in 68 patients. Among the 59 patients who gave an informed consent and were interviewed, 41% of infections were autochthonous (acquired in Israel), 44% travel-related and 15% imported by foreign workers. Autochthonous patients were mainly females (62.5%), more than half of them pregnant, 26% recalled consuming food or water in areas with poor sanitation, 44% ate non-kosher meat. Fulminant hepatitis developed in 3 patients (5%), all of them were females, two of them with post-partum infection, all acquired the disease in Israel (autochthonous). Israeli travelers with imported infection were predominantly males (73%), acquired the disease in the Indian subcontinent (81%), with 100% reporting having consumed fresh vegetables and drinks with ice cubes abroad. Six patients’ sera were tested for genotype and revealed HEV genotype 1 (all cases acquired in the Indian subcontinent). CONCLUSION: This is the first report which highlights the existence of hepatitis E as an autochthonous infection in Israel. Imported HEV originates mostly from the Indian subcontinent. PMID:27350735

  14. Proposal of a computed tomography classification for hepatic alveolar echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Graeter, Tilmann; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Oeztuerk, Suemeyra; Haenle, Mark Martin; Mason, Richard Andrew; Hillenbrand, Andreas; Kull, Thomas; Barth, Thomas F; Kern, Peter; Gruener, Beate

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To establish a computed tomography (CT)-morphological classification for hepatic alveolar echinococcosis was the aim of the study. METHODS: The CT morphology of hepatic lesions in 228 patients with confirmed alveolar echinococcosis (AE) drawn from the Echinococcus Databank of the University Hospital of Ulm was reviewed retrospectively. For this reason, CT datasets of combined positron emission tomography (PET)-CT examinations were evaluated. The diagnosis of AE was made in patients with unequivocal seropositivity; positive histological findings following diagnostic puncture or partial resection of the liver; and/or findings typical for AE at either ultrasonography, CT, magnetic resonance imaging or PET-CT. The CT-morphological findings were grouped into the new classification scheme. RESULTS: Within the classification a lesion was dedicated to one out of five “primary morphologies” as well as to one out of six “patterns of calcification”. “primary morphology” and “pattern of calcification” are primarily focussed on separately from each other and combined, whereas the “primary morphology” V is not further characterized by a “pattern of calcification”. Based on the five primary morphologies, further descriptive sub-criteria were appended to types I-III. An analysis of the calcification pattern in relation to the primary morphology revealed the exclusive association of the central calcification with type IV primary morphology. Similarly, certain calcification patterns exhibited a clear predominance for other primary morphologies, which underscores the delimitation of the individual primary morphological types from each other. These relationships in terms of calcification patterns extend into the primary morphological sub-criteria, demonstrating the clear subordination of those criteria. CONCLUSION: The proposed CT-morphological classification (EMUC-CT) is intended to facilitate the recognition and interpretation of lesions in hepatic

  15. Hepatic angiosarcoma and liver transplant: a report of 2 cases with diagnostic difficulties.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Ayşen; Deniz, Emine Ebru; Haberal, Nihan; Moray, Gökhan; Özdemir, Binnaz Handan

    2014-03-01

    Angiosarcoma is a rare primary malignant mesenchymal tumor of the liver. The prognosis of hepatic angiosarcoma is poor with an average life expectancy of 6 months after diagnosis. Diagnosing hepatic angiosarcoma is challenging because of nondiagnostic liver biopsy or specious history and radiologic presentation. We report 2 cases with hepatic angiosarcoma which were diagnosed histopathologically in the native liver after liver transplant. One of 2 patients was lost to follow-up, and another patient died of relapsing hepatic angiosarcoma 18 months after the liver transplant.

  16. BML-11, a lipoxin receptor agonist, protected carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Yan; Yu, Zhong-Jian; Yan, Dan; Wang, Hong-Mei; Huang, Yong-Hong; Sha, Juan; Xu, Fang-Yun; Cai, Zhen-Yu; Min, Wei-Ping

    2013-10-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the occurrence and development of fibrosis. Lipoxins (LXs) and BML-111 (lipoxin A4 agonist) have been approved for potent anti-inflammatory properties. Previously, we and others had showed LXs and BML-111 could protect acute hepatic injury, inhibit the growth and invasion of hepatic tumor. However, there are few reports dealing with their effects on hepatic fibrosis. To explore whether LXs and the analog could interrupt the process of hepatic fibrosis, the effects of BML-111 on tetrachloride-induced hepatic fibrosis were observed and the possible mechanism were discussed. Sprague-Dawley rats were induced liver fibrosis by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) for 10 weeks with or without BML-111, and the histopathology and collagen content were employed to quantify hepatic necro-inflammation and fibrosis. Moreover, the expression levels of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) were examined via Western blot or ELISA. Rats treated with BML-111 improved hepatic necro-inflammation and inhibited hepatic fibrosis in association with reduction of α-SMA expression and decreased collagen deposition. Furthermore, BML-111 could downregulate the expressions of TGF-β1 and PDGF significantly. BML-111 played a critical protective role in CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis through inhibiting the levels of TGF-β1 and PDGF in rats.

  17. A better regulation is required in viral hepatitis smartphone applications.

    PubMed

    Cantudo-Cuenca, Ma R; Robustillo-Cortés, Ma A; Cantudo-Cuenca, Ma D; Morillo-Verdugo, R

    2014-04-01

    Objetivo: describir las características y el contenido de aplicaciones móviles disponibles sobre hepatitis vírica, así como el nivel de participación de los profesionales médicos en su desarrollo. Métodos: Se realizó un estudio observacional descriptivo en septiembre de 2013. Buscamos en la tienda Google Play (Android) y en la tienda Apple App (iOS) aplicaciones para teléfonos inteligentes que se relacionasen específicamente con la hepatitis vírica empleando una búsqueda por palabras claves que incluía los siguientes términos: ‘hepatitis’, ‘hepatología’, “HBV” y ‘HCV’. Los datos recogidos incluían: nombre, plataforma, categoría, coste, puntuación del usuario por estrellas, número de descargas, fecha en la que el creador actualizó la aplicación y público objetivo. Analizamos el contenido de las aplicaciones y se distribuyeron en 3 categorías en función del tipo de hepatitis vírica. Realizamos un análisis en el que se examinó específicamente la autoría con el fin de evaluar la prevalencia de la participación de los profesionales sanitarios en su desarrollo. Resultados: Se incluyó un total de 33 aplicaciones (de 232 identificadas), de las cuales 10 estaban duplicadas. La mayoría de las aplicaciones se subían en la categoría médica. Tres tuvieron puntuaciones menores de 3,9 estrellas (de 5 posibles). Sólo 6 aplicaciones superaban las 1000 descargas. Un total de 12 aplicaciones estaban dirigidas a profesionales sanitarios mientras que 4 se centraban en los pacientes (7 para ambos colectivos). La participación de los profesionales sanitarios en el desarrollo de las aplicaciones fue del 56,6%. Conclusiones: Existen aplicaciones disponibles sobre hepatitis vírica tanto para profesionales sanitarios como para pacientes; sin embargo, la mayor parte de la información contenida en ellas a menudo no está validada. Deberían estar certificadas.

  18. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis A virus infection in Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Bose, Moumita; Bose, Sujoy; Saikia, Anjan; Medhi, Subhash; Deka, Manab

    2015-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to screen the molecular epidemiology of Hepatitis A virus (HAV) in Northeast India (NEI) who are ethnically distinct, tribal dominated and of lower socio-economic status with almost no information available from NEI on these aspects. Briefly, 3 ml blood was collected from 324 random liver disease cases with jaundice, receiving care at Central Hospital, N.F. Railway, Guwahati, Assam with informed consent. The patients detected with HAV-IgM positive status were included and were stratified as acute viral hepatitis (AVH) and fulminant hepatitis (FHF) based on clinical profile. Viral RNA was isolated and HAV-RNA was detected by Real-time PCR using primers for the VP3-VP1 region. HAV genotyping was studied by PCR-direct sequencing-phylogenetic analysis approach using the VP1/2A region of HAV isolates. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS13.0 software. A total of 69 cases were HAV infected with two HBV co-infected cases (n = 69 + 2 = 71), 62 cases and two co-infected cases were AVH and others were FHF cases. HAV infection was predominant in especially in the young and adult age group. HAV-RNA was detected in 28 cases, out of which 19 cases could be genotyped (12 AVH, 7 FHF); which showed the prevalence of genotype IIIA or IA only. Although HAV genotype IIIA was the major genotype in both the AVH (10/12, 83.33%) and FHF (5/7, 71.43%) group, but the difference in distribution of genotypes in AVH and FHF cases was statistically non-significant (P = 0.550). HAV genotype IIIA is associated with the majority of HAV infected cases and severity in NEI.

  19. Investigation of an Outbreak of Hepatitis A in a Coastal Area, Kerala, Southern India.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Sandhya; Rakesh, P S; Dev, Soumya; Vijayakumar, Nithin; Prasannakumar, Prathibha

    2016-10-01

    An outbreak investigation was initiated following an unusual occurrence of hepatitis A reported among people residing in the coastal belt of Vadi to Vedikunnu area, Kollam district, Kerala, southern India. The time frame of disease occurrence, pattern of its distribution, and the incubation period of hepatitis A infection indicated the probability of occurrence of the outbreak as a result of pipe line water contamination due to mixing of sewage from a canal. The results add evidence to the epidemiology of hepatitis A in the state and warrant the establishment of an efficient water quality surveillance system.

  20. Epidemiology of Hepatitis C Virus: A Battle on New Frontiers.

    PubMed

    Shire, Norah J; Sherman, Kenneth E

    2015-12-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality in the United States and other parts of the world. The epidemiology of the disease is highly variable between and within countries, and strategies to deal with HCV identification and treatment must be tailored to the geographic location and the political and economic environment of the region. Although great strides have been made in improving HCV transmission risk in blood supply products, new challenges related to changing patterns of disease incidence continue to require fresh evaluation and new approaches to disease prevention.

  1. Psammaplin A inhibits hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase.

    PubMed

    Salam, Kazi Abdus; Furuta, Atsushi; Noda, Naohiro; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Yamashita, Atsuya; Moriishi, Kohji; Nakakoshi, Masamichi; Tsubuki, Masayoshi; Tani, Hidenori; Tanaka, Junichi; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi

    2013-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the causative agent of hepatitis C, a chronic infectious disease that can lead to development of hepatocellular carcinoma. The NS3 nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase)/helicase has an essential role in HCV replication, and is therefore an attractive target for direct-acting antiviral strategies. In this study, we employed high-throughput screening using a photo-induced electron transfer (PET) system to identify an inhibitor of NS3 helicase from marine organism extracts. We successfully identified psammaplin A as a novel NS3 inhibitor. The dose-response relationship clearly demonstrates the inhibition of NS3 RNA helicase and ATPase activities by psammaplin A, with IC₅₀ values of 17 and 32 μM, respectively. Psammaplin A has no influence on the apparent Km value (0.4 mM) of NS3 ATPase activity, and acts as a non-competitive inhibitor. Additionally, it inhibits the binding of NS3 to single-stranded RNA in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, psammaplin A shows an inhibitory effect on viral replication, with EC₅₀ values of 6.1 and 6.3 μM in subgenomic replicon cells derived from genotypes 1b and 2a, respectively. We postulate that psammaplin A is a potential anti-viral agent through the inhibition of ATPase, RNA binding and helicase activities of NS3. PMID:23359228

  2. Hepatic iron overload, a possible consequence of treatment with imatinib mesylate: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Baidehi; Setrakian, Sebouh

    2009-01-01

    Imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor has revolutionized the therapy of Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myeloid leukemia. Side effects of imatinib include grade 1-4 hepatotoxicity in a subset of patients. We report the case of a 46-year-old male with chronic myeloid leukemia, who developed hepatic hemosiderosis during treatment with imatinib. After ruling out the established congenital and acquired causes of hepatic hemosiderosis, we attribute this to a possible side effect of imatinib therapy. This condition was successfully treated with periodic phlebotomy thus precluding discontinuation of imatinib. To our knowledge, this is the first report of hepatic hemosiderosis most likely consequent to imatinib therapy. PMID:19829996

  3. Valproic Acid and Hepatic Steatosis: A Possible Link? About a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mnif, Leila; Sellami, Rim; Masmoudi, Jawaher

    2016-01-01

    Background Valproic acid is a mood-stabilizing anticonvulsant. Hepatic injuries are among the occasionally observed adverse effects of this medication. Case presentation We present the case of a 47-year-old man who had bipolar disorder for ten years and treated with valproic acid. He demonstrated elevated serum aminotransferases and ultrasonography revealed that hepatomegaly was suggestive of hepatic steatosis. Conclusion This case report stresses the importance of a complete drug history and the need for clinicians to be aware of the delayed onset of hepatic injuries.

  4. Benign Hepatic Mesenchymal Hamartoma (HMH) - A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shaileshkumar Radheshyam; Misra, Vatsala; Verma, Kachnar; Gupta, Pooja; Dhingra, Vishal

    2014-03-01

    A one-year-old male child presented with progressive enlargement of abdomen and loss of appetite which he had suffered from, since 4 months. Physical examination showed a palpable mass in right hypochondrium. Ultrasonography and MRI showed a solid mass arising from right lobe of liver. The resected mass was well encapsulated, yellowish white in colour and it measured 20 x 18 x 17cm. Cut surface showed a Nutmeg like appearance. Histology showed a well-defined, fibrous capsule with numerous ducts which were lined by flat to low cuboidal epithelium and which were surrounded by concentric layers of fibrous tissue which showed myxoid changes at places. Intervening area showed normal appearing hepatocytes with clear cell changes, dilated congested sinusoids, along with extramedullary haematopoiesis. Based on distinctive morphological features, a histological diagnosis of Benign Hepatic Mesenchymal Hamartoma of liver was made. IHC was not done, as no specific marker has been described for making a differential diagnosis. Benign Hepatic Mesenchymal Hamrtoma (HMH) of liver is an extremely rare tumour of childhood and therefore, the case was considered worth documentation. PMID:24783100

  5. Comparison of accelerated and rapid schedules for monovalent hepatitis B and combined hepatitis A/B vaccines in children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Köksal, Yavuz; Varan, Ali; Aydin, G Burca; Sari, Neriman; Yazici, Nalan; Yalcin, Bilgehan; Kutluk, Tezer; Akyuz, Canan; Büyükpamukçu, Münevver

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of immunization against hepatitis A and B infections with "rapid" or "accelerated" schedules in children with cancer receiving chemotherapy. Fifty-one children were recruited to receive either vaccination schedule, in the "rapid vaccination schedule"; hepatitis B (group I) or combined hepatitis A/B vaccines (group III) were administered at months 0, 1, 2, and 12; in the "accelerated vaccination schedule," hepatitis B (group II) or combined hepatitis A/B (group IV) vaccines were administered on days 0, 7, 21, and 365 intramuscularly. The seroconversion rates at months 1 and 3 were 35.7 and 57.1% in group I and 25 and 18.8% in group II, respectively. Group I developed higher seroconversion rates at month 3. In group III the seroconversion rates for hepatitis B at months 1 and 3 were 54.5 and 60% and in group IV 50 and 70%, respectively. For hepatitis A, the seroconversion rates at months 1 and 3 were 81.8 and 90% in group III and 80 and 88.9% in group IV, respectively. The accelerated vaccination schedule seems to have no advantage in children receiving cancer chemotherapy except for high antibody levels at month 1. In conclusion, the accelerated vaccination schedules are not good choices for cancer patients. The combined hepatitis A/B vaccine is more effective than monovalent vaccine in cancer patients, which probably can be explained by an adjuvant effect of the antigens. The seroconversion of hepatitis A by the combined hepatitis A/B vaccination is very good in cancer patients.

  6. Hepatitis B reactivation in patients with multiple myeloma and isolated positive hepatitis B core antibody: a call for greater cognizance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ju Dong; Girotra, Mohit; Restrepo, Alejandro; Waheed, Sarah; Barlogie, Bart; Duarte-Rojo, Andres

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation is a well-established complication of severe immunosuppression in patients with hematologic malignancy and positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Patients who receive high-dose chemotherapy, corticosteroids, rituximab, or have a bone marrow transplant are particularly at increased risk for HBV reactivation. However, limited information is available in the literature regarding HBV reactivation in patients with isolated anti-HBc, particularly in the setting of multiple myeloma (MM). We report two cases of HBV reactivation in MM patients with isolated anti-HBc positive with a rather atypical presentation. In conclusion, our cases highlight that clinicians need to be cognizant about this potentially fatal but preventable complication of chemotherapy and immunosuppression.

  7. Simulating Microdosimetry in a Virtual Hepatic Lobule

    EPA Science Inventory

    The liver plays a key role in removing harmful chemicals from the body and is therefore often the first tissue to suffer potentially adverse consequences. To protect public health it is necessary to quantitatively estimate the risk of long-term low dose exposure to environmental ...

  8. A Specific Hepatic Transfer RNA for Phosphoserine*

    PubMed Central

    Mäenpää, Pekka H.; Bernfield, Merton R.

    1970-01-01

    Radioactive O-phosphoryl-L-serine was detected after alkaline deacylation of rat and rooster liver [3H]seryl-tRNA acylated in vitro with homologous synthetases. Ribonuclease treatment of this tRNA yielded a compound with the properties of phosphoseryl-adenosine. Benzoylated DEAE-cellulose chromatography of seryl-tRNA yielded four distinct peaks, only one of which contained phosphoserine. A unique fraction for phosphoserine was also found on chromatography of nonacylated tRNA. In ribosome binding studies, this fraction responded very slightly with poly(U,C), but not with any of the known serine trinucleotide codons. Substantial incorporation of [3H]-serine into protein from this tRNA species was observed in an aminoacyl-tRNA dependent polysomal system derived from chick oviducts. No phosphoserine was found in Escherichia coli or yeast seryl-tRNA acylated with homologous enzymes, nor in E. coli seryl-tRNA acylated with liver synthetase. In the absence of tRNA, free phosphoserine was not formed in reaction mixtures, which suggests that phosphoseryl-tRNA arises by phosphorylation of the unique seryl-tRNA species. These results demonstrate a discrete tRNASer species in rat and rooster liver containing phosphoserine and suggest that this tRNA is involved in ribosomal polypeptide synthesis. PMID:4943179

  9. Progress Toward Eliminating Hepatitis A Disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Trudy V; Denniston, Maxine M; Hill, Holly A; McDonald, Marian; Klevens, Monina R; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Nelson, Noele P; Iskander, John; Ward, John D

    2016-02-12

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) disease disproportionately affects adolescents and young adults, American Indian/Alaska Native and Hispanic racial/ethnic groups, and disadvantaged populations. During 1996-2006, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) made incremental changes in hepatitis A (HepA) vaccination recommendations to increase coverage for children and persons at high risk for HAV infection. This report examines the temporal association of ACIP-recommended HepA vaccination and disparities (on the absolute scale) in cases of HAV disease and on seroprevalence of HAV-related protection (measured as antibody to HAV [anti-HAV]). ACIP-recommended childhood HepA vaccination in the United States has eliminated most absolute disparities in HAV disease by age, race/ethnicity, and geographic area with relatively modest ≥1-dose and ≥2-dose vaccine coverage. However, the increasing proportion of cases of HAV disease among adults with identified and unidentified sources of exposure underscores the importance of considering new strategies for preventing HAV infection among U.S. adults. For continued progress to be made toward elimination of HAV disease in the United States, additional strategies are needed to prevent HAV infection among an emerging population of susceptible adults. Notably, HAV infection remains endemic in much of the world, contributing to U.S. cases through international travel and the global food economy. PMID:26916458

  10. Hepatic encephalopathy and Helicobacter pylori: a critical reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Morini, Sergio

    2003-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a frequent complication of liver cirrhosis, and plasma ammonia plays a pivotal role in its pathogenesis. Ammonia disposal in cirrhotics depend on intricately balanced enzyme and transport systems, involving liver, large and small bowel, muscle, and kidney. Recently, it has been suggested that Helicobacter pylori could contribute to hyperammonemia in cirrhotics, but conflicting data are available in the literature. This is a systematic review of experimental (animals and humans), epidemiological, case-control, and prospective studies, to evaluate the arguments in favor and against the role of H. pylori in HE pathogenesis. Although H. pylori produces ammonia in the stomach, several studies have shown that both basal ammonia levels and HE prevalence did not significantly differ between cirrhotics with and without infection. Moreover, some prospective studies have documented that both blood ammonia levels and mental status in HE cirrhotics are not significantly affected by H. pylori eradication. Even if a small sub-group of cirrhotics with both a high bacterial density and more severe hepatic impairment seems to benefit by bacterial eradication, data indicate that ammonia production in the stomach by H. pylori urease appears to be inadequate to clinically affect ammonia disposal in the majority of cirrhotic patients. Further studies are warranted in this field.

  11. Progress Toward Eliminating Hepatitis A Disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Trudy V; Denniston, Maxine M; Hill, Holly A; McDonald, Marian; Klevens, Monina R; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Nelson, Noele P; Iskander, John; Ward, John D

    2016-02-12

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) disease disproportionately affects adolescents and young adults, American Indian/Alaska Native and Hispanic racial/ethnic groups, and disadvantaged populations. During 1996-2006, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) made incremental changes in hepatitis A (HepA) vaccination recommendations to increase coverage for children and persons at high risk for HAV infection. This report examines the temporal association of ACIP-recommended HepA vaccination and disparities (on the absolute scale) in cases of HAV disease and on seroprevalence of HAV-related protection (measured as antibody to HAV [anti-HAV]). ACIP-recommended childhood HepA vaccination in the United States has eliminated most absolute disparities in HAV disease by age, race/ethnicity, and geographic area with relatively modest ≥1-dose and ≥2-dose vaccine coverage. However, the increasing proportion of cases of HAV disease among adults with identified and unidentified sources of exposure underscores the importance of considering new strategies for preventing HAV infection among U.S. adults. For continued progress to be made toward elimination of HAV disease in the United States, additional strategies are needed to prevent HAV infection among an emerging population of susceptible adults. Notably, HAV infection remains endemic in much of the world, contributing to U.S. cases through international travel and the global food economy.

  12. Molecular cloning of the human hepatitis C virus genome from Japanese patients with non-A, non-B hepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Nobuyuki; Hijikata, Makoto; Ootsuyama, Yuko; Nakagawa, Masanori; Ohkoshi, Showgo; Sugimura, Takashi; Shimotohno, Kunitada )

    1990-12-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Japanese type of hepatitis C virus (HCV-J) genome, consisting of 9413 nucleotides, was determined by analyses of cDNA clones from plasma specimens from Japanese patients with chronic hepatitis. HCV-J genome contains a long open reading frame that can encode a sequence of 3010 amino acid residues. Comparison of HCV-J with the American isolate of HCV showed 22.6% difference in nucleotide sequence and 15.1% difference in amino acid sequence. Thus HCV-J and the American isolate of HCV are probably different subtypes of HCV. The relationship of HCV-J with other animal RNA virus families and the putative organization of the HCV-J genome are discussed.

  13. Increasing hepatitis A immunity in men who have sex with men in Sydney, 1996-2012.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hammad; Regan, David G; Guy, Rebecca J; Robertson, Peter; Watchirs-Smith, Lucy; McNulty, Anna M; Donovan, Basil

    2015-09-11

    We examined the hepatitis A virus status of all MSM seen at a large sexual health clinic in inner Sydney between 1996 and 2012. Overall, the proportion of MSM susceptible to hepatitis A decreased from 68.1% in 1996 to 36.2% in 2012; most of this reduction was attributable to vaccination.

  14. Serum Levels of Annexin A2 as a Candidate Biomarker for Hepatic Fibrosis in Patients With Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Kolgelier, Servet; Demir, Nazlim Aktug; Inkaya, Ahmet Cagkan; Sumer, Sua; Ozcimen, Serap; Demir, Lutfi Saltuk; Pehlivan, Fatma Seher; Arslan, Mahmure; Arpaci, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepatologists have studied serologic markers of liver injury for decades. Annexins are a prominent group of such markers and annexin A2 (AnxA2) is one of the best characterized annexins. AnxA2 inhibits HBV polymerase among other functions. Its expression is up-regulated in regenerative hepatocytes. Objectives: To determine if serum AnxA2 level has a role in estimating liver damage in chronic HBV infection and investigate whether AnxA2 levels correlate with hepatic fibrosis. Patients and Methods: This study included 173 patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and 51 healthy controls. Liver fibrosis was graded histologically on liver biopsy samples. Blood samples were taken from patients during biopsy and serum AnxA2 levels were measured with ELISA. Results: In a group of adult patients with CHB, AnxA2 values were far higher than those of the control group (P = 0.001). When we assessed AnxA2 levels based on fibrosis stages, serum AnxA2 levels of patients with early stage fibrosis (stages 1 - 3) were significantly higher than those of patients with advanced stage fibrosis (stages 4 - 5; P = 0.001). Conclusions: AnxA2 is a useful biomarker for early stage fibrosis in patients with CHB. PMID:26587036

  15. Nucleotide sequence of a cloned duck hepatitis B virus genome: comparison with woodchuck and human hepatitis B virus sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Mandart, E; Kay, A; Galibert, F

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of an EcoRI duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) clone was elucidated by using the Maxam and Gilbert method. This sequence, which is 3,021 nucleotides long, was compared with the two previously analyzed hepatitis B-like viruses (human and woodchuck). From this comparison, it was shown that DHBV is derived from an ancestor common to the two others but has a slightly different genomic organization. There was no intergenic region between genes 5 and 8, which were fused into a single open reading frame in DHBV. Genes for the surface and core proteins were assigned to open reading frames 7 and 5/8. Amino acid comparisons showed some structural relationship between gene 6 product and avian reverse transcriptase, suggesting either evolution from a common ancestor or convergence to some particular structure to fulfill a specific function. This should be correlated with the synthesis of an RNA intermediate during DNA replication. This is also taken as an argument in favor of the hypothesis that gene 6 codes for the DNA polymerase that is found within the virion. DNA sequence comparison also showed that the two mammalian hepatitis B viruses are more homologous to each other than they are to DHBV, indicating that DHBV starts to evolve on its own earlier than the two other viruses, as do birds compared with mammals. From this it is proposed that the viruses evolved in a fashion parallel to the species they infect. PMID:6699938

  16. A case of autoimmune hepatitis combined with Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Jhee, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyun Ju; Kang, Wonseok; Kim, Sewha; Kim, Do Young

    2015-01-01

    A 25-year-old woman presented with jaundice, palpitation, and weight loss of 5 kg during a period of 2 weeks. Laboratory tests showed elevated levels of liver enzymes (AST 1,282 IU/L, ALT 1,119 IU/L) and total bilirubin (6.4 mg/dL); negative for hepatitis virus infection; elevated serum levels of triiodothyronine (T3, 3.60 ng/dL), free thyroxine (fT4, 3.82 ng/dL), and lowered serum level of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, <0.025 μIU/mL); and positive for thyroid stimulating antibody and anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA). The liver biopsy findings were consistent with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). Accordingly, oral steroid therapy was started with 60 mg of prednisolone under the impression of AIH associated with Graves' disease. After a week of steroid therapy, the clinical manifestation showed significant improvement, with normalization of both liver and thyroid functions. Diagnosis of the liver condition of patients who present with hyperthyroidism and liver dysfunction is important, so that appropriate therapy can be promptly initiated. PMID:25603854

  17. Green onions: potential mechanism for hepatitis A contamination.

    PubMed

    Chancellor, David D; Tyagi, Shachi; Bazaco, Michael C; Bacvinskas, Sara; Chancellor, Michael B; Dato, Virginia M; de Miguel, Fernando

    2006-06-01

    The largest documented foodborne hepatitis A outbreak in U.S. history occurred in November 2003. The source of that outbreak was green onions from a farm in Mexico. Two biomarkers were used to determine ways in which hepatitis A virus (HAV) can contaminate onions. Fluorescent microspheres (1.0 to 10 microm) and HAV vaccine were placed on the soil and the surfaces of pot-grown onions and in the liquid medium of hydroponically cultivated onions. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) was used to identify HAV RNA. Microspheres were found on the outside and inside of the pot-grown onions for up to 60 days. RT-PCR revealed HAV RNA from the vaccine in well-washed green onions. In the hydroponically grown onions, microspheres were found throughout the onion after only 1 day. RT-PCR also revealed HAV RNA inside the hydroponically grown onions. Both biomarkers support the hypothesis that HAV can contaminate the inside of the growing onion and can be taken up intracellularly through the roots. Once inside, the particles are impossible to remove by cleaning. PMID:16786877

  18. Hepatitis A virus: host interactions, molecular epidemiology and evolution.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Gilberto; Goncalves Rossi, Livia Maria; Forbi, Joseph C; de Paula, Vanessa S; Purdy, Michael A; Xia, Guoliang; Khudyakov, Yury E

    2014-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the commonest viral cause of liver disease and presents an important public health problem worldwide. Several unique HAV properties and molecular mechanisms of its interaction with host were recently discovered and should aid in clarifying the pathogenesis of hepatitis A. Genetic characterization of HAV strains have resulted in the identification of different genotypes and subtypes, which exhibit a characteristic worldwide distribution. Shifts in HAV endemicity occurring in different parts of the world, introduction of genetically diverse strains from geographically distant regions, genotype displacement observed in some countries and population expansion detected in the last decades of the 20th century using phylogenetic analysis are important factors contributing to the complex dynamics of HAV infections worldwide. Strong selection pressures, some of which, like usage of deoptimized codons, are unique to HAV, limit genetic variability of the virus. Analysis of subgenomic regions has been proven useful for outbreak investigations. However, sharing short sequences among epidemiologically unrelated strains indicates that specific identification of HAV strains for molecular surveillance can be achieved only using whole-genome sequences. Here, we present up-to-date information on the HAV molecular epidemiology and evolution, and highlight the most relevant features of the HAV-host interactions.

  19. Tff3, as a Novel Peptide, Regulates Hepatic Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yuan; Shen, Lian; Cui, Ying; Zhang, Huabing; Chen, Qi; Cui, Anfang; Fang, Fude; Chang, Yongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic metabolic disorder strongly associated with hepatic glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. The trefoil peptides are a family of small regulatory proteins and Tff3 is widely expressed in multiple tissues including liver. But the roles of Tff3 in regulation of glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in liver remain unclear. Here we show that the hepatic Tff3 expression levels were decreased in ob/ob and high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Overexpression of Tff3 in primary mouse hepatocytes inhibited the expression of gluconeogenic genes, including G6pc, PEPCK and PGC-1α, subsequently decreasing cellular glucose output. GTT and ITT experiments revealed that adenovirus-mediated overexpression of Tff3 in diabetic or obese mice improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Collectively, our results indicated that Tff3 peptides are involved in glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity, providing a promising peptide on new therapies against the metabolic disorders associated with T2DM. PMID:24086476

  20. Green onions: potential mechanism for hepatitis A contamination.

    PubMed

    Chancellor, David D; Tyagi, Shachi; Bazaco, Michael C; Bacvinskas, Sara; Chancellor, Michael B; Dato, Virginia M; de Miguel, Fernando

    2006-06-01

    The largest documented foodborne hepatitis A outbreak in U.S. history occurred in November 2003. The source of that outbreak was green onions from a farm in Mexico. Two biomarkers were used to determine ways in which hepatitis A virus (HAV) can contaminate onions. Fluorescent microspheres (1.0 to 10 microm) and HAV vaccine were placed on the soil and the surfaces of pot-grown onions and in the liquid medium of hydroponically cultivated onions. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) was used to identify HAV RNA. Microspheres were found on the outside and inside of the pot-grown onions for up to 60 days. RT-PCR revealed HAV RNA from the vaccine in well-washed green onions. In the hydroponically grown onions, microspheres were found throughout the onion after only 1 day. RT-PCR also revealed HAV RNA inside the hydroponically grown onions. Both biomarkers support the hypothesis that HAV can contaminate the inside of the growing onion and can be taken up intracellularly through the roots. Once inside, the particles are impossible to remove by cleaning.

  1. Exposure to a northern contaminant mixture (NCM) alters hepatic energy and lipid metabolism exacerbating hepatic steatosis in obese JCR rats.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Florian, Maria; Chen, Qixuan; Yan, Jin; Petrov, Ivan; Coughlan, Melanie C; Laziyan, Mahemuti; Caldwell, Don; Lalande, Michelle; Patry, Dominique; Gagnon, Claude; Sarafin, Kurtis; Truong, Jocelyn; Chan, Hing Man; Ratnayake, Nimal; Li, Nanqin; Willmore, William G; Jin, Xiaolei

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), defined by the American Liver Society as the buildup of extra fat in liver cells that is not caused by alcohol, is the most common liver disease in North America. Obesity and type 2 diabetes are viewed as the major causes of NAFLD. Environmental contaminants have also been implicated in the development of NAFLD. Northern populations are exposed to a myriad of persistent organic pollutants including polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, flame retardants, and toxic metals, while also affected by higher rates of obesity and alcohol abuse compared to the rest of Canada. In this study, we examined the impact of a mixture of 22 contaminants detected in Inuit blood on the development and progression of NAFLD in obese JCR rats with or without co-exposure to 10% ethanol. Hepatosteatosis was found in obese rat liver, which was worsened by exposure to 10% ethanol. NCM treatment increased the number of macrovesicular lipid droplets, total lipid contents, portion of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids in the liver. This was complemented by an increase in hepatic total cholesterol and cholesterol ester levels which was associated with changes in the expression of genes and proteins involved in lipid metabolism and transport. In addition, NCM treatment increased cytochrome P450 2E1 protein expression and decreased ubiquinone pool, and mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit ATP5A and Complex IV activity. Despite the changes in mitochondrial physiology, hepatic ATP levels were maintained high in NCM-treated versus control rats. This was due to a decrease in ATP utilization and an increase in creatine kinase activity. Collectively, our results suggest that NCM treatment decreases hepatic cholesterol export, possibly also increases cholesterol uptake from circulation, and promotes lipid accumulation and alters ATP homeostasis which exacerbates the existing hepatic steatosis in genetically obese JCR rats with or without co

  2. Exposure to a Northern Contaminant Mixture (NCM) Alters Hepatic Energy and Lipid Metabolism Exacerbating Hepatic Steatosis in Obese JCR Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mailloux, Ryan J.; Florian, Maria; Chen, Qixuan; Yan, Jin; Petrov, Ivan; Coughlan, Melanie C.; Laziyan, Mahemuti; Caldwell, Don; Lalande, Michelle; Patry, Dominique; Gagnon, Claude; Sarafin, Kurtis; Truong, Jocelyn; Chan, Hing Man; Ratnayake, Nimal; Li, Nanqin; Willmore, William G.; Jin, Xiaolei

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), defined by the American Liver Society as the buildup of extra fat in liver cells that is not caused by alcohol, is the most common liver disease in North America. Obesity and type 2 diabetes are viewed as the major causes of NAFLD. Environmental contaminants have also been implicated in the development of NAFLD. Northern populations are exposed to a myriad of persistent organic pollutants including polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, flame retardants, and toxic metals, while also affected by higher rates of obesity and alcohol abuse compared to the rest of Canada. In this study, we examined the impact of a mixture of 22 contaminants detected in Inuit blood on the development and progression of NAFLD in obese JCR rats with or without co-exposure to10% ethanol. Hepatosteatosis was found in obese rat liver, which was worsened by exposure to 10% ethanol. NCM treatment increased the number of macrovesicular lipid droplets, total lipid contents, portion of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids in the liver. This was complemented by an increase in hepatic total cholesterol and cholesterol ester levels which was associated with changes in the expression of genes and proteins involved in lipid metabolism and transport. In addition, NCM treatment increased cytochrome P450 2E1 protein expression and decreased ubiquinone pool, and mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit ATP5A and Complex IV activity. Despite the changes in mitochondrial physiology, hepatic ATP levels were maintained high in NCM-treated versus control rats. This was due to a decrease in ATP utilization and an increase in creatine kinase activity. Collectively, our results suggest that NCM treatment decreases hepatic cholesterol export, possibly also increases cholesterol uptake from circulation, and promotes lipid accumulation and alters ATP homeostasis which exacerbates the existing hepatic steatosis in genetically obese JCR rats with or without co

  3. Exposure to a northern contaminant mixture (NCM) alters hepatic energy and lipid metabolism exacerbating hepatic steatosis in obese JCR rats.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Florian, Maria; Chen, Qixuan; Yan, Jin; Petrov, Ivan; Coughlan, Melanie C; Laziyan, Mahemuti; Caldwell, Don; Lalande, Michelle; Patry, Dominique; Gagnon, Claude; Sarafin, Kurtis; Truong, Jocelyn; Chan, Hing Man; Ratnayake, Nimal; Li, Nanqin; Willmore, William G; Jin, Xiaolei

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), defined by the American Liver Society as the buildup of extra fat in liver cells that is not caused by alcohol, is the most common liver disease in North America. Obesity and type 2 diabetes are viewed as the major causes of NAFLD. Environmental contaminants have also been implicated in the development of NAFLD. Northern populations are exposed to a myriad of persistent organic pollutants including polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, flame retardants, and toxic metals, while also affected by higher rates of obesity and alcohol abuse compared to the rest of Canada. In this study, we examined the impact of a mixture of 22 contaminants detected in Inuit blood on the development and progression of NAFLD in obese JCR rats with or without co-exposure to 10% ethanol. Hepatosteatosis was found in obese rat liver, which was worsened by exposure to 10% ethanol. NCM treatment increased the number of macrovesicular lipid droplets, total lipid contents, portion of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids in the liver. This was complemented by an increase in hepatic total cholesterol and cholesterol ester levels which was associated with changes in the expression of genes and proteins involved in lipid metabolism and transport. In addition, NCM treatment increased cytochrome P450 2E1 protein expression and decreased ubiquinone pool, and mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit ATP5A and Complex IV activity. Despite the changes in mitochondrial physiology, hepatic ATP levels were maintained high in NCM-treated versus control rats. This was due to a decrease in ATP utilization and an increase in creatine kinase activity. Collectively, our results suggest that NCM treatment decreases hepatic cholesterol export, possibly also increases cholesterol uptake from circulation, and promotes lipid accumulation and alters ATP homeostasis which exacerbates the existing hepatic steatosis in genetically obese JCR rats with or without co

  4. Detection of surface asialoglycoprotein receptor expression in hepatic and extra-hepatic cells using a novel monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Kil Lyong; Cho, Eun-Wie

    2006-07-01

    The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is a heterodimeric membrane protein which is involved in the internalization of desialylated glycoproteins and also in the binding and uptake of various pathogenic viruses. To facilitate the analysis of ASGPR expression, we generated a monoclonal antibody, termed ASSA-1, that is specific to the ASGPR H1 subunit based on ELISA and Western blots analysis. ASSA-1 also reacted to surface-displayed ASGPR in live cells thus enabling analysis of ASGPR expression by immunofluorescence flow cytometry, which we used to analyze established human liver cell lines previously confirmed to be positive for ASGPR mRNA expression. In agreement with previous reports, surface ASGPR was also detected in extra-hepatic cells and, surprisingly, even in human T cell lines, which was then further confirmed in activated, but not in resting, primary human peripheral blood lymphocytes. These observations suggest that ASGPR has a broad pattern of expression that even extends into cells from the immune system, which biological meanings still have to be analyzed. We expect that monoclonal antibody ASSA-1 will serve as a new powerful tool in analyzing the biological role of ASGPR in hepatic and extra-hepatic cells.

  5. Oxidative Stress and Hepatic Stellate Cells: A PARADOXICAL RELATIONSHIP

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2016-01-01

    In physiology, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by most cells for normal function and as a defense mechanism against foreign particles, microbes and viruses. Hepatic macrophages (Kupffer cells), sinusoidal endothelial cells, hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are all capable of generating ROS in physiology and pathology. ROS are also produced by infiltrating inflammatory cells during acute and chronic liver injury. Increased levels of ROS have been implicated in apoptotic/necrotic death of hepatocytes, and liver failure. In contrast to causing injury to hepatocytes, ROS and lipid peroxidation products induce transdifferentiation of the quiescent HSCs into an activated highly proliferative myofibroblast-like phenotype. ROS and lipid peroxidation products also stimulate the synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) by activated HSCs. Deposition of excessive amounts of ECM is the primary mechanism of fibrosis and cirrhosis of the liver, and interactions between ROS and HSCs appear to play a major role in this pathology. Although these findings suggest that HSCs are resistant to the injurious actions of ROS, there is compelling evidence demonstrating ROS-induced death of activated HSCs. Detailed mechanistic understanding of such paradoxical interactions between ROS and HSCs will be critical for developing therapies for chronic fibrotic liver disease.

  6. A Fatal Case of Hepatic Portal Venous Gas Associated With Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Tahmina

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic portal venous gas is a rare cause of acute abdomen caused by leakage of air from the gastrointestinal tract to the portal venous system. The mortality is high, particularly when associated with intestinal ischemia or necrosis. We describe a fatal case of hepatic portal venous gas and pneumatosis intestinalis due to hemodialysis-related hypotension and severe atherosclerotic disease. PMID:27800516

  7. Cirrhosis due to chronic hepatitis E infection in a child post-bone marrow transplant.

    PubMed

    Halac, Ugur; Béland, Kathie; Lapierre, Pascal; Patey, Natacha; Ward, Pierre; Brassard, Julie; Houde, Alain; Alvarez, Fernando

    2012-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection occurs in immunosuppressed adults. We detected HEV ribonucleic acid in serum of an adolescent patient who had undergone bone marrow transplantation and subsequently presented with persistently increased aminotransferases and histologic chronic hepatitis, and eventually developed cirrhosis. Phylogenetic analysis revealed these HEV strains were similar to swine genotype 3a, suggesting a possible zoonosis. PMID:22341950

  8. Seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus in a cross-sectional study in Mexico: Implications for hepatitis A vaccination.

    PubMed

    Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Conde-Gonzalez, Carlos; Rojas, Rosalba; DeAntonio, Rodrigo; Romano-Mazzotti, Luis; Cervantes, Yolanda; Ortega-Barria, Eduardo

    2013-02-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) remains a public health concern worldwide contributing to significant morbidity in developed and developing countries. This cross-sectional database study estimated the overall HAV seroprevalence and the seroprevalence by gender, age, region and socioeconomic status in Mexico. Between January and October 2010, serum samples collected during the National Health and Nutrition survey (ENSANUT 2006) were obtained from subjects aged 1-95 y. Subjects' gender, age, geographical region and socioeconomic status were extracted from the survey and compiled into a subset database by the Mexican National Institute of Public Health. Anti-HAV antibodies were measured using a chemiluminescent immunoassay. A total of 3658 subjects were included in the according-to-protocol cohort. Overall, the HAV seroprevalence was 84.2%. The HAV seroprevalence rates were similar between females (86.1%) and males (82.2%). The percentage of subjects seropositive for anti-HAV antibodies was highest in adults aged ≥ 20 y (96.9%), followed by adolescents aged 10-19 y (80.1%) and lowest in children aged 1-9 y (45.0%) (p < 0.0001). Regionally, the highest HAV seroprevalence rate was observed in the South (88.8%) followed by Central and Northern Mexico and Mexico City (p = 0.02). The HAV seroprevalence was similar between subjects of high socioeconomic (90.1%) status and of low socioeconomic status (86.6%). This study confirms the intermediate HAV endemicity in Mexico. Cost-effectiveness studies are necessary to evaluate the inclusion of an effective hepatitis A vaccine from a population-based perspective in addition to continuous efforts to improve hygiene and sanitation that have a substantial impact on the disease burden.

  9. Spontaneous hepatic copper accumulation in Long-Evans Cinnamon rats with hereditary hepatitis. A model of Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Togashi, Y; Sato, S; Emoto, T; Kang, J H; Takeichi, N; Kobayashi, H; Kojima, Y; Une, Y; Uchino, J

    1991-05-01

    Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats, an inbred strain of a mutant rat isolated from Long-Evans rats, develop hereditary hepatitis. To elucidate the role of copper metabolism in the development of the hepatitis in LEC rats, we examined the copper concentration in the tissues and serum levels of copper and ceruloplasmin. Copper concentration in the liver of LEC rats was over 40 times that of normal Long-Evans Agouti (LEA) rats, while the serum ceruloplasmin and copper concentrations in LEC rats decreased significantly. The hepatocytes of LEC rats show steatosis in cytoplasm and pleomorphism of mitochondria, resembling the histologic features of the liver in Wilson's disease. These findings suggest that the hereditary hepatitis in LEC rats is closely associated with copper toxicity, and may be dealing with a rat form of Wilson's disease. Thus the LEC rats will provide a unique and useful animal model for clarifying the mechanism and for developing treatment strategies for Wilson's disease and other abnormal copper metabolism in humans.

  10. Hepatic artery aneurysm presenting with hemobilia in a patient with Behçet's disease: treatment with percutaneous transcatheteral embolization.

    PubMed

    Hatzidakis, Adam; Petrakis, Jannis; Krokidis, Miltiadis; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2006-03-01

    We herein report a case of hemobilia caused by a hepatic artery aneurysm. A 40-year-old male patient with a history of Behçet's disease with a thrombus hanging out of the papilla of Vater had a large hepatic aneurysm in angiography. The hepatic artery feeding the aneurysm was embolized. Endovascular treatment can treat patients with hepatic artery aneurysms caused by Behçet's disease.

  11. A Rare Association of Hepatitis A Virus Infection with Type-1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bokhari, Alaa; Alsahafi, Ashraf; Sukkar, Ghassan; Alzaben, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Patients with type-1 diabetes are predisposed to develop a spectrum of liver diseases, which includes fatty liver, steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. The association of hepatitis A infection with type-1 diabetes is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, our case is the first case report in children. We described a nine year-old girl who had type-1 diabetes and developed hepatitis A virus infection without complications. A review of the literature is also provided. PMID:27478582

  12. Spontaneous intra-hepatic haemorrhage in a patient with fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Leung, Vincent K S; Lam, Clement Y W; Chan, C C; Ng, W L; Loke, Tony K L; Luk, I Sc; Chau, T N; Wu, Arthur H W; Fong, W N; Lam, S H

    2007-08-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa is a systemic necrotising vasculitis that affects the small- and medium-sized arteries. Multifocal aneurysmal formation in the renal, hepatic, and mesenteric vasculature is a hallmark of this condition, and spontaneous aneurysmal rupture may occur, resulting in life-threatening haemorrhage. We describe a 42-year-old man who initially presented with fever of unknown origin. A diagnosis could not be reached at that time despite extensive investigations. The fever subsided spontaneously after 8 weeks, and the patient remained well for 6 years until he was admitted again for evaluation of fever. During his hospital stay, he developed a spontaneous massive intra-hepatic haemorrhage resulting in hepatic rupture and a haemoperitoneum. The bleeding was controlled at emergency laparotomy. An abdominal angiography demonstrated multiple microaneurysms in the hepatic and mesenteric arterial vasculature. The clinical findings suggested polyarteritis nodosa, and the source of bleeding was probably a ruptured intra-hepatic artery aneurysm.

  13. Show Me ECHO-Hepatitis C: A telemedicine mentoring program for patients with hepatitis C in underserved and rural areas in Missouri as a model in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Tahan, Veysel; Almashhrawi, Ashraf; Mutrux, Rachel; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2015-11-01

    Project (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) (ECHO) is a telemedicine case-based training model for primary care providers to treat complex diseases by mentoring academicians of universities. It was first developed by the University of New Mexico for rural and underserved areas in New Mexico. The project Show Me ECHO- Hepatitis C (HCV) is an adaptation of Project ECHO to improve healthcare and hepatitis C therapy in the entire state of Missouri, including rural and underserved areas. Show Me ECHO- HCV uses telemedicine as videoconferencing technology for the case-based learning. The medical specialists of the University of Missouri-Columbia provide training and mentoring to primary care providers working in rural and urban underserved areas to deliver the best evidence-based care for patients with hepatitis C. This type of a model is promising in the management of patients with hepatitis C in developing countries with the availability of basic internet connections and potential voluntary participants.

  14. Chronic alcohol consumption has a biphasic effect on hepatic retinoid loss

    PubMed Central

    Clugston, Robin D.; Huang, Li-Shin; Blaner, William S.

    2015-01-01

    The alcohol-induced depletion of hepatic retinoid stores correlates with the progression of liver injury; however, the mechanisms underlying alcohol’s effects have not been fully elucidated. Our goal was to gain a mechanistic understanding of alcohol-induced hepatic retinoid depletion. Wild-type and mutant mice were continuously fed alcohol through Lieber-DeCarli liquid diets, with matched control animals pair fed an isocaloric alcohol-free diet to ensure equal nutrient and calorie intake between groups. A systematic analysis of tissue retinol and retinyl ester levels was performed with HPLC, complemented by gene and protein expression analyses. Our results delineated 2 phases of alcohol-induced depletion of hepatic retinoid. Initially, ∼15% of hepatic retinoid content was mobilized from the liver, causing extrahepatic tissue retinoid levels to increase. Subsequently, there was a precipitous drop in hepatic retinoid content (>60%), without further retinoid accumulation in the periphery. Follow-up studies in mutant mice revealed roles for RBP, CRBP1, and CD36 in retinoid mobilization and extrahepatic retinoid uptake, as well as a role for CYP2E1 in the catabolism of hepatic retinoid. In summary, alcohol has a biphasic effect on hepatic retinoid stores, characterized by an initial phase of rapid mobilization to extrahepatic tissues followed by extensive catabolism within the liver.—Clugston, R. D., Huang, L.-S., Blaner, W. S. Chronic alcohol consumption has a biphasic effect on hepatic retinoid loss. PMID:25985802

  15. Multiplex qPCR for serodetection and serotyping of hepatitis viruses: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Irshad, Mohammad; Gupta, Priyanka; Mankotia, Dhananjay Singh; Ansari, Mohammad Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    The present review describes the current status of multiplex quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays developed and used globally for detection and subtyping of hepatitis viruses in body fluids. Several studies have reported the use of multiplex qPCR for the detection of hepatitis viruses, including hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV), and hepatitis E virus (HEV). In addition, multiplex qPCR has also been developed for genotyping HBV, HCV, and HEV subtypes. Although a single step multiplex qPCR assay for all six hepatitis viruses, i.e., A to G viruses, is not yet reported, it may be available in the near future as the technologies continue to advance. All studies use a conserved region of the viral genome as the basis of amplification and hydrolysis probes as the preferred chemistries for improved detection. Based on a standard plot prepared using varying concentrations of template and the observed threshold cycle value, it is possible to determine the linear dynamic range and to calculate an exact copy number of virus in the specimen. Advantages of multiplex qPCR assay over singleplex or other molecular techniques in samples from patients with co-infection include fast results, low cost, and a single step investigation process. PMID:27239109

  16. Experimental evidence of hepatitis A virus infection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Song, Young-Jo; Park, Woo-Jung; Park, Byung-Joo; Kwak, Sang-Woo; Kim, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Sang-Won; Seo, Kun-Ho; Kang, Young-Sun; Park, Choi-Kyu; Song, Jae-Young; Choi, In-Soo

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the leading cause of acute viral hepatitis worldwide, with HAV infection being restricted to humans and nonhuman primates. In this study, HAV infection status was serologically determined in domestic pigs and experimental infections of HAV were attempted to verify HAV infectivity in pigs. Antibodies specific to HAV or HAV-like agents were detected in 3.5% of serum samples collected from pigs in swine farms. When the pigs were infected intravenously with 2 × 10(5) 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50 ) of HAV, shedding of the virus in feces, viremia, and seroconversion were detected. In pigs orally infected with the same quantity of HAV, viral shedding was detected only in feces. HAV genomic RNA was detected in the liver and bile of intravenously infected pigs, but only in the bile of orally infected pigs. In further experiments, pigs were intravenously infected with 6 × 10(5) TCID50 of HAV. Shedding of HAV in feces, along with viremia and seroconversion, were confirmed in infected pigs but not in sentinel pigs. HAV genomic RNA was detected in the liver, bile, spleen, lymph node, and kidney of the infected pigs. HAV antigenomic RNA was detected in the spleen of one HAV-infected pig, suggesting HAV replication in splenic cells. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed in the livers of infected pigs but not in controls. This is the first experimental evidence to demonstrate that human HAV strains can infect pigs.

  17. Primary hepatic amyloidosis: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sonthalia, Nikhil; Jain, Samit; Pawar, Sunil; Zanwar, Vinay; Surude, Ravindra; Rathi, Praveen M

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of 42-year-old female presenting with abdominal pain associated with loss of weight and fever for 8 mo. On evaluation she had gross hepatomegaly with raised alkaline phosphatase and raised GGT levels with normal transaminases and bilirubin. On imaging she had diffuse enlargement of liver with heterogeneous contrast uptake in liver. Her viral marker and autoimmune markers were negative. Liver biopsy depicted massive deposition of amyloid in peri-sinusoidal spaces which revealed apple green birefringence on polarizing microscopy after Congo red staining. Cardiac and renal evaluation was unremarkable. Abdominal fat pad and rectum biopsy was negative for amyloid deposit. There was no evidence of primary amyloidosis as bone marrow examination was normal. Serum and urine immunofixation electrophoresis were normal. Immunoperoxidase staining for serum amyloid associated protein for secondary amyloidosis was negative from liver biopsy. We present this rare case of primary hepatic amyloidosis and review the literature regarding varied presentations of hepatic involvement in amyloidosis. PMID:26962400

  18. Hepatitis B (HBV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Hepatitis B (HBV) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hepatitis B (HBV) Print A A A Text Size ... Prevented? How Is It Treated? What Is It? Hepatitis (pronounced: hep-uh-TIE-tiss) is a disease ...

  19. Hepatitis C (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis C is a virus-caused liver inflammation which may cause jaundice, fever and cirrhosis. Persons who are most at risk for contracting and spreading hepatitis C are those who share needles for injecting drugs ...

  20. Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bharti; Kumar Dharma, Vijay; Chawla, Sumit; Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Following acute infection, 20% of people eliminate the virus over weeks or months and are often asymptomatic. The remaining 80% of people will develop chronic disease, of which approximately 20% will eventually develop liver cirrhosis and 1–5% will develop liver cancer. About 150 million people are chronically infected with HCV, and more than 350 000 people die every year from hepatitis C related liver diseases. The economic cost of hepatitis C is significant both to the individual and to the society. In the United States the average lifetime cost of the disease was estimated at $33 407 USD with the cost of a liver transplant approximately $200 000 USD. PEG-IFN and ribavirin treatment is also expensive and, at an average cost of approximately GB £7000 in the UK for a treatment course, is unaffordable in developing countries. Hepatitis C, not only brings down the quality of the life of individuals but also affect progress of the nation by adding financial burden. If we prevent the disease from occurring or find a perfect cure of the disease, in form of a prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine, it will be a boon to not only to the individual but to the nation as a whole. PMID:24165512

  1. A Case Report About the Most Common Yet Most Forgotten Hepatitis E

    PubMed Central

    Chandnani, Madhuri; Kaur, Mandeep; Ramadhas, Anusha; Tumarinson, Taisiya

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 59 Final Diagnosis: Acute hepatitis E infection Symptoms: Fever • jaundice • fatigue • loss of appetite Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Medical management Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Mistake in diagnosis Background: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most common cause of enterically acquired acute viral hepatitis worldwide with major prevalence in the developing countries. An increasing number of sporadic cases of acute HEV infection have also been found in developed countries, but there is still no role for HEV testing in cases of seronegative acute hepatitis in such nonendemic regions. Case Report: A 59-year-old male residing in the United States for seven months with a history of malaria treated one year ago presented with fatigue and cholestatic jaundice with very high bilirubin levels. Hepatitis A, B, and C viral serology along with other atypical infections were ruled out. No history of any kind of drug intake was reported. Liver biopsy was obtained and was suggestive of acute hepatitis. Eventually hepatitis E immunoglobulin M was checked and was found positive. The patient was treated with supportive care and improved gradually with normalization of liver function test in a few weeks. Conclusions: Autochthonous HEV infection must be suspected in cases of acute viral hepatitis in developed countries. Timely detection of HEV infection is necessary, especially in immunocompromised patients, in whom treatment is required to eradicate the infection. PMID:27527551

  2. Manifestation of psychiatric behaviors in a mouse model of griseofulvin-induced hepatic porphyria.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yoko; Iwadate, Reiko; Watanabe, Yukino; Kawai, Hiroshi; Kudo, Naomi; Kawashima, Yoichi; Mitsumoto, Atsushi

    2008-12-01

    Most patients with hepatic porphyria exhibit neuropsychiatric symptoms, including abdominal pain, peripheral neuropathy, confusion, insomnia and mental disturbances such as anxiety and depression. Although heme deficiency and accumulation of heme precursors are thought to be responsible for neuropsychiatric manifestations in patients with acute porphyria, the pathogenetic mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the present study, we observed psychiatric behaviors in mice with hepatic porphyria induced by the ingestion of a griseofulvin (GF)-containing diet over a period of 12 weeks. GF ingestion by the mice caused an accumulation of porphyrins in the feces and a decrease in heme in the liver; these effects were observed throughout the entire duration of the experiment, with maximum levels observed after circa 1 week of ingestion of this diet. In addition, the mice developed enlargement of the liver, hepatocyte injury, and cholestasis. Mice with hepatic porphyria manifested an anxiety-like behavior by the long-term treatment (over 5 weeks) in a GF-dose and duration dependent manner. The hepatic porphyria mice also manifested depression-like behaviors by the short-term treatment (3 weeks) of GF2.0, which was reversed by administration of anti-depressant, imipramine. In conclusion, this study for the first time demonstrated psychiatric manifestations in GF-induced hepatic porphyria mice. The present results suggest that model animals could be useful for elucidating the mechanisms underlying psychiatric manifestations in syndromes such as hepatic porphyria and hepatic encephalopathy that are associated with the impairment of hepatic function.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY HEPATITIS E VIRUS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes an infectious form of hepatitis associated with contaminated water. By analyzing the sequence of several HEV isolates, a reverse transciption-polymerase chain reaction method was developed and optimized that should be able to identify all of the kn...

  4. [A case of allopurinol-induced granulomatous hepatitis with ductopenia and cholestasis].

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jae Young; Min, Sun Yang; Park, Ju Yee; Hong, Seung Goun; Park, Sang Jong; Paik, So Ya; Park, Young Min

    2008-03-01

    Allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity syndrome is characterized by an idiosyncratic reaction involving multiple-organs, which usually begins 2 to 6 weeks after starting allopurinol. In rare cases, the adverse reactions to allopurinol are accompanied by a variety of liver injury, such as reactive hepatitis, granulomatous hepatitis, vanishing bile duct syndrome, or fulminant hepatic failure. Here we report a case with granulomatous hepatitis and ductopenia. A 69-year-old man with chronic renal failure, hyperuricemia, and previously normal liver function presented with jaundice, skin rash, and fever 2 weeks after taking allopurinol (200 mg/day). In histopathology, a liver biopsy specimen showed mild spotty necrosis of hepatocytes, marked cholestasis in parenchyma, and some granulomas in the portal area. There were vacuolar degeneration in the interlobular bile ducts and ductopenia in the portal tracts. Pathologic criteria strongly suggested the presence of allopurinol-induced granulomatous hepatitis with ductopenia and cholestasis. The patient fully recovered following the early administration of systemic corticosteroid therapy.

  5. Hepatitis C virus core protein triggers hepatic angiogenesis by a mechanism including multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohamed; Selimovic, Denis; Ghozlan, Hanan; Abdel-kader, Ola

    2009-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with the production of serum cytokines, including transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta2. Despite the occurrence of hepatic angiogenesis in liver conditions, the role of HCV proteins in this context is currently unknown. We demonstrated that the development of hepatic neoangiogenesis in patients infected with HCV is associated with the expression of TGF-beta2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and with activation of endothelial cells, as evidenced by CD34 expression. The analysis of liver biopsies of HCV-positive and HCV-negative patients using immunostaining showed significant elevation of TGF-beta2, VEGF, and CD34 expression in patients who were HCV-positive. Using an HCV established culture system, we confirmed further the production of both TGF-beta2 and VEGF proteins, in the hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Huh7 by transfection with full-length HCV RNA (JFH1) or by the regulated expression of core. In addition, regulated expression of core protein in HepG2 or Huh7 cells was found to induce expression and activation of the transcription factor E2F1 and apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), activation of c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38, and extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK), and transcription factors activator protein 1 (AP-1), activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2), cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding (CREB), E2F1, hypoxia inducing factor 1 alpha (HIF-1alpha), and specificity protein 1. Furthermore, data obtained from inhibitor experiments revealed the importance of E2F1 and ASK1 in the modulation of core-induced activation of JNK and p38 pathways and suggested an essential role for JNK, p38, and ERK pathways in the regulation of core-induced production of TGF-beta2 and VEGF proteins. Thus, our data provide insight into the molecular mechanisms whereby core protein mediates the development of hepatic angiogenesis in patients with chronic HCV infection.

  6. Isolated granulomatous hepatitis-A histopathological surprise mimicking cholangiocarcinoma in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Ashish; Gorsi, Ujjwal; Marginean, E Celia; Papadatos, Demetri; George, Uttam

    2013-01-01

    A 63-yr-old woman, known case of ulcerative colitis, was diagnosed with sclerosing cholangitis 2 years back. She was admitted for investigation of abdominal discomfort, fatigue with elevated alkaline phosphatase and deranged liver function test. Imaging studies (computerised tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) demonstrated a normal biliary tree with focal hepatic lesion which was showing features of cholangiocarcinoma. Ultrasound guided biopsy of the lesion surprisingly revealed non caseating granulomata. Granulomatous hepatitis occurs in less than 1 percent of cases of inflammatory bowel disease. A clinical diagnosis of isolated granulomatous hepatitis was established as the lesion remained stable on follow up and no other cause for it was identified on further investigation. Although the differential diagnosis of focal hepatic lesion in patients with ulcerative colitis with sclerosing cholangitis is wide, granulomatous hepatitis presenting as focal mass lesion mimicking cholangiocarcinoma has never been described previously.

  7. Molecular characteristics of a novel strain of canine minute virus associated with hepatitis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Won; Jung, Ji-Youl; Lee, Jae-Il; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Oem, Jae-Ku

    2016-08-01

    A 5-year-old female Yorkshire terrier dog died a few days following hernia and ovariohysterectomy surgeries. Necropsy performed on the dog revealed that the surgeries were not the cause of death; however, degenerative viral hepatitis, showing intranuclear inclusion bodies in hepatic cells, was observed in histopathologic examination. Several diagnostic methods were used to screen for the cause of disease, and minute virus of canines (MVC) was detected in all parenchymal organs, including the liver. Other pathogens that may cause degenerative viral hepatitis were not found. Infection with MVC was confirmed by in situ hybridization, which revealed the presence of MVC nucleic acid in the liver tissue of the dog. Through sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the nearly complete genome sequence, the strain was found to be distinct from other previously reported MVC strains. These results indicate that this novel MVC strain might be related to degenerative viral hepatitis in dogs.

  8. Molecular analysis of hepatitis A virus strains obtained from patients with acute hepatitis A in Mongolia, 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Tsatsralt-Od, Bira; Baasanjav, Nachin; Nyamkhuu, Dulmaa; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Tominari; Nagashima, Shigeo; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    Despite the high endemicity of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in Mongolia, the genetic information on those HAV strains is limited. Serum samples obtained from 935 patients with acute hepatitis in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia during 2004-2013 were tested for the presence of HAV RNA using reverse transcription-PCR with primers targeting the VP1-2B region (481 nucleotides, primer sequences at both ends excluded). Overall, 180 patients (19.3%) had detectable HAV RNA. These 180 isolates shared 94.6-100% identity and formed four phylogenetic clusters within subgenotype IA. One or three representative HAV isolates from each cluster exhibited 2.6-3.9% difference between clusters over the entire genome. Cluster 1 accounted for 65.0% of the total, followed by Cluster 2 (30.6%), Cluster 3 (3.3%), and Cluster 4 (1.1%). Clusters 1 and 2 were predominant throughout the observation period, whereas Cluster 3 was undetectable in 2009 and 2013 and Cluster 4 became undetectable after 2009. The Mongolian HAV isolates were closest to those of Chinese or Japanese origin (97.7-98.5% identities over the entire genome), suggesting the evolution from a common ancestor with those circulating in China and Japan. Further molecular epidemiological analyses of HAV infection are necessary to investigate the factors underlying the spread of HAV and to implement appropriate prevention measures in Mongolia.

  9. The cost-effectiveness of using hepatitis A/B combined vaccine versus hepatitis B vaccine alone for high-risk heterosexuals.

    PubMed

    Rein, David B; Weinbaum, Cindy M

    2008-10-01

    Previous studies estimated that vaccinating high-risk heterosexuals (HRH) with combination hepatitis A/B vaccine was a cost-effective alternative to vaccinating HRH against hepatitis B alone. Since then, the incidence of hepatitis A has declined dramatically in the United States. We re-estimate the cost-effectiveness of this policy accounting for modern declines in incidence. According to our estimates, vaccinating with combination vaccine resulted in a cost of $120,000 per quality adjusted life year gained (2.79 times the 2005 United States Gross Domestic Product per capita), a ratio that is less favorable than those for most other vaccination strategies.

  10. [Fulminant hepatitis induced by disulfiram in a patient with alcoholic cirrhosis. Survival after liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Vanjak, D; Samuel, D; Gosset, F; Derrida, S; Moreau, R; Soupison, T; Soulier, A; Bismuth, H; Sicot, C

    1989-12-01

    Fulminant hepatitis was observed in a 44-year-old patient with cirrhosis, 38 days after the beginning of a treatment by disulfiram. Hepatitis was associated with fever and hypereosinophilia. Liver transplantation was performed with success. We reviewed 15 previously published cases of disulfiram-induced hepatitis. They occurred from 10 to 180 days after the beginning of the treatment by disulfiram, aminotransferases were increased whereas alkaline phosphatases were not markedly changed; there was either focal or widespread necrosis. Fulminant hepatitis was observed mainly in patients with alcoholic chronic liver disease or in patients who continued to ingest disulfiram while jaundice was already present. An immunoallergic mechanism is thought to be responsible for disulfiram-induced hepatitis. PMID:2625187

  11. The role of young children in a community-wide outbreak of hepatitis A.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P. F.; Grabau, J. C.; Werzberger, A.; Gunn, R. A.; Rolka, H. R.; Kondracki, S. F.; Gallo, R. J.; Morse, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    An Hasidic Jewish community has experienced recurrent hepatitis A outbreaks since 1980. To assess risk factors for illness during a 1985-6 outbreak, the authors reviewed case records and randomly selected 93 households for an interview and serologic survey. In the outbreak, 117 cases of hepatitis A were identified, with the highest attack rate (4.2%) among 3-5 year olds. Among the survey households, the presence of 3-5 year olds was the only risk factor that increased a household's risk of hepatitis A (indeterminant relative risk, P = 0.02). Furthermore, case households from the outbreak were more likely to have 3-5 years olds than were control households from the survey (odds ratio = 16.4, P < 0.001). Children 3-5 years old were more likely to have hepatitis A and may have been the most frequent transmitters of hepatitis A in this community. Hepatitis A vaccination of 3-5 year olds can protect this age group and might prevent future outbreaks in the community. PMID:9207735

  12. Hepatitis A Associated with Chylothorax: An Uncommon Presentation of a Common Infection.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Kayur; Shinde, Supriya; Rego, Sylvan; Shet, Anita

    2015-12-01

    Extra-hepatic manifestations have seldom been described with hepatitis A, which usually manifests as mild hepatic dysfunction. We report a 3-year-old boy presenting with 3 days of fever, vomiting, abdominal distention and scleral icterus. On examination, he had tachypnea, hepatosplenomegaly, ascites and right-sided pleural effusion. A diagnostic pleural tap yielded a milky, lymphocyte-predominant exudative aspirate, with pleural fluid triglycerides of 175 mg/dl, suggestive of chylothorax. Serology for anti-HAV IgM was positive in both blood and pleural fluid. The massive effusion causing collapse of the underlying lung was drained by tube thoracostomy, which was followed by complete resolution within 2 weeks. This is the first reported case of chylothorax associated with hepatitis A infection. This report highlights that pleural effusion associated with hepatitis A infection is usually a benign, self-limiting condition which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pleural effusion or chylothorax in a patient with acute viral hepatitis.

  13. Autoimmune hepatitis in a child presenting with hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS).

    PubMed

    Grabinski, Zoe; Beg, Mirza; Wali, Prateek

    2016-05-01

    HPS has been described in 9-20% of children with end-stage liver disease. We present a case of a previously, asymptomatic nine-yr-old incidentally found to have low oxygen saturation. Physical exam was remarkable for digital clubbing, splenomegaly and orthodeoxia. Laboratory evaluation revealed a low platelet count, hyperammonemia, and prolonged coagulation studies. Sonography showed evidence of splenomegaly and portal venous hypertension. High resolution CT thorax and CTA were normal. HPS was confirmed by agitated saline contrast enhanced echocardiography and Tc-99m MAA scan with evidence of intrapulmonary vascular dilatations. Liver biopsy was performed and consistent with autoimmune hepatitis. A high clinical index of suspicion should be maintained for HPS in pediatric patients who have unexplained hypoxemia as typical signs and symptoms of severe liver disease are often absent. In this report, we discuss a case of HPS complicated AIH in a pediatric patient and review the relevant literature. PMID:26992455

  14. Analysis of a hepatitis C screening programme for US veterans.

    PubMed

    Zuniga, I A; Chen, J J; Lane, D S; Allmer, J; Jimenez-Lucho, V E

    2006-04-01

    This study analyses a screening programme for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among US veterans in a suburban Veterans Affairs Medical Center, in New York. This is the first study examining all 11 potential risk factors listed in the 2001 National U.S. Veterans Health Administration Screening Guidelines. A retrospective study was conducted of 5400 veterans 'at risk' of HCV, identified through a questionnaire in this institution's primary-care outpatient departments between 1 October 2001 and 31 December 2003. Multivariate logistic regression models were built to identify independent predictors of infection. Of 2282 veterans tested for HCV, 4.6% were confirmed by HCV PCR to be HCV infected. In the multivariate model developed, injection drug use, blood transfusion before 1992, service during the Vietnam era, tattoo, and a history of abnormal liver function tests were independent predictors of HCV infection. Our data support considering a more targeted screening approach that includes five of the 11 risk factors. PMID:16490127

  15. Hepatic Arteriolosclerosis: A Small Vessel Complication of Diabetes and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Maya; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe; Deng, Yanghong; Ciarleglio, Maria; Jain, Dhanpat

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aim Liver involvement in diabetes is well recognized in the form of steatohepatitis and glycogenic hepatopathy. More recently sinusoidal fibrosis, even in the absence of steatosis has also been suggested to be associated with diabetes (diabetic hepatosclerosis) however, case control studies are lacking. In addition, microangiopathy (hyaline arteriolosclerosis), a well-known complication of diabetes, has not been well studied in liver. Therefore, we undertook a cross-sectional blinded study with the specific aim of evaluating the association between hepatic sinusoidal fibrosis and hepatic arteriolosclerosis (HA) with diabetes. Methods Liver biopsy findings from 89 diabetic patients obtained between January 2006 and December 2009 were compared to those of 89 non-diabetic patients matched by age and HCV infection status. Patients with cirrhosis, liver mass, right heart failure, significant alcohol use, or insufficient available clinical information were excluded. Medical records were reviewed for the presence of diabetes, BMI, diabetes treatment, and comorbidities at time of biopsy (e.g. underlying liver disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia). Liver biopsies were evaluated blinded to all clinical data (including presence or absence of diabetes) for a variety of histologic features, especially patterns of fibrosis and HA. Results Diabetics had a higher average BMI (33m/kg2 vs. 30m/kg2, p=0.0039), prevalence of hypertension (78% vs. 33%, p <0.0001) and dyslipidemia (52% vs. 20%, p<0.0001). Among diabetics, 87% had type 2 diabetes and 57% used insulin. While sinusoidal fibrosis, with or without steatosis, was not significantly associated with the presence of diabetes, HA was significantly more prevalent among diabetics compared with controls: 45% vs. 29% (p=0.0298). The presence of both diabetes and hypertension had a significant odds of HA: with an adjusted odds ratio of 2.632 (95% CI 1.178–5.878, p=0.0183). Biliary changes were associated with HA in some

  16. Hepatitis B virus reactivation in a patient undergoing steroid-free chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Daisuke; Nomura, Kenichi; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Ueda, Kyoji; Yamaguchi, Kanji; Minami, Masahito; Itoh, Yoshito; Horiike, Shigeo; Morita, Masuji; Taniwaki, Masafumi; Okanoue, Takeshi

    2004-08-01

    A 62-year-old Japanese man who was positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti-HBe antibody, underwent chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Mutations were detected in the precore region (nt1896) of HBV. Because steroid-containing regimen may cause reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis may progress to be fulminant after its withdrawal, we administered CHO (CPA, DOX and VCR) therapy and the patient obtained complete response. However, he developed acute exacerbation of hepatitis due to HBV reactivation. Recovery was achieved with lamivudine (100 mg/d) and plasma exchange. The present case suggests that acute exacerbation of hepatitis can occur with steroid-free regimen. Because the efficacy of the prophylactic use of lamivudine has been reported and the steroid enhances curability of malignant lymphoma, the steroid containing regimen with prophylaxis of lamivudine should be evaluated further.

  17. Hepatic expression levels of interferons and interferon-stimulated genes in patients with chronic hepatitis C: A phenotype-genotype correlation study.

    PubMed

    Noureddin, M; Rotman, Y; Zhang, F; Park, H; Rehermann, B; Thomas, E; Liang, T J

    2015-01-01

    IFNL4 is linked to hepatitis C virus treatment response and type III interferons (IFNs). We studied the functional associations among hepatic expressions of IFNs and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), and treatment response to peginterferon and ribavirin. Type I IFNs (IFNA1, IFNB1), type II (IFNG), type III (IFNL1, IFNL2/3), IFNL4 and ISG hepatic expressions were measured by qPCR from in 65 chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients whose IFNL4-associated rs368234815 and IFNL3-associated rs12989760 genotype were determined. There was a robust correlation of hepatic expression within type I and type III IFNs and between type III IFNs and IFNL4 but no correlation between other IFN types. Expression of ISGs correlated with type III IFNs and IFNL4 but not with type I IFNs. Levels of ISGs and IFNL2/3 mRNAs were lower in IFNL3 rs12979860 CC patients compared with non-CC patients, and in treatment responders, compared with nonresponders. IFNL4-ΔG genotype was associated with high ISG levels and nonresponse. Hepatic levels of ISGs in CHC are associated with IFNL2/3 and IFNL4 expression, suggesting that IFNLs, not other types of IFNs, drive ISG expression. Hepatic IFNL2/3 expression is functionally linked to IFNL4 and IFNL3 polymorphisms, potentially explaining the tight association among ISG expression and treatment response.

  18. [A Measurement Method for the Hepatic Functional Reserves Anti Oxygen Fluctuations].

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang-da; Chen, Yong; Wang, Jing-jing

    2015-06-01

    Hepatic functional reserves parameters are the key indictors to assess if the hepatic metabolic function is normal, they are also the important basis to a successful hepatectomy. Currently clinical hepatic functional reserves parameters are achieved through Indocyanine Green (ICG) concentration measurement in the method of pulse dye spectrophotometry, with the assumption that blood oxygen saturation is 100%, this hypothetical bias leads to an error in the calculated value of the hepatic functional reserves parameters. In order to solve this problem, hepatic functional reserves parameters measurement that resist fluctuation from blood is presented. The method is based on the modified Lambert Beer's law and realize the correction of ICG concentration measurement in the method of pulse dye spectrophotometry. While the ICG is injected into the patient's body by the cubital veins, using the data acquisition unit that developed by project team to collect 805 nm, 940 nm wavelengths of transmission signals and 730 nm, 805 nm and 890 nm wavelengths of reflected signals in the fingertip skin synchronously, and then upload 5 sets of data to the computer. Draw the ICG concentration curve according the collected data and blood oxygen saturation before injecting ICG to the human body and then calculate the characteristic parameters, according to the characteristic parameters calculate the hepatic reserves functional parameters. Taking the measurement of effective hepatic blood flow as an example, the relative error was obviously decreased when comparing this method and the pulse dye concentration method with the electromagnetic flowmeter (EMF) measurement which is the most accurate method to measure effective hepatic blood flow (EHBF) respectively. The results demonstrate that this method can improve the accuracy of hepatic reserves parameters, and it can also provide a more accurate detection method of hepatic functional reserves parameters for clinical application.

  19. Coffee Consumption Decreases Risks for Hepatic Fibrosis and Cirrhosis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gang; Chen, Ling; Hu, Peng; Ren, Hong; Hu, Huaidong

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim Previous studies have demonstrated that coffee consumption may be inversely correlated with hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis. However, the reported results have been inconsistent. To summarize previous evidences quantitatively, a meta-analysis was performed. Methods The Medline, Web of Science, and Embase databases (from inception to June 2015) were searched to identify relevant trials that evaluated the effects of coffee consumption on hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis. Odds ratios (ORs) of advanced hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis for low or moderate, high, and any coffee consumption versus no consumption were pooled. Two cups per day was used as the cut-off level between low or moderate and high consumption. Results Sixteen studies were included, involving 3034 coffee consumers and 132076 people who do not consume coffee. The pooled results of the meta-analysis indicated that coffee consumers were less likely to develop cirrhosis compared with those who do not consume coffee, with a summary OR of 0.61 (95%CI: 0.45–0.84). For low or moderate coffee consumption versus no consumption, the pooled OR of hepatic cirrhosis was 0.66 (95%CI: 0.47–0.92). High coffee consumption could also significantly reduce the risk for hepatic cirrhosis when compared with no coffee consumption (OR = 0.53, 95%CI: 0.42–0.68). The effect of coffee consumption on hepatic fibrosis was summarized as well. The pooled OR of advanced hepatic fibrosis for coffee consumption versus no consumption was 0.73 (95%CI: 0.58–0.92). The protective effect of coffee on hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis was also identified in subgroup meta-analyses of patients with alcoholic liver disease and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Conclusion Coffee consumption can significantly reduce the risk for hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis. PMID:26556483

  20. Acute toxic hepatitis caused by an aloe vera preparation in a young patient: a case report with a literature review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeonghun; Lee, Mi Sun; Nam, Kwan Woo

    2014-07-01

    Aloe is one of the leading products used in phytomedicine. Several cases of aloe-induced toxic hepatitis have been reported in recent years. However, its toxicology has not yet been systematically described in the literature. A 21-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with acute hepatitis after taking an aloe vera preparation for four weeks. Her history, clinical manifestation, laboratory findings, and histological findings all led to the diagnosis of aloe vera-induced toxic hepatitis. We report herein on a case of acute toxic hepatitis induced by aloe vera.

  1. Survival and Elimination of Hepatitis E Virus: A Review.

    PubMed

    Cook, Nigel; van der Poel, Wim H M

    2015-09-01

    Recently, foodborne transmission of hepatitis E virus (HEV) has become a concern due to the identification of undercooked pork products as a risk factor for infection. The limited number of studies which have been performed indicate that HEV could remain infectious at temperatures used in some cooking regimes, although inactivation by heating at 71 °C for 20 min has been demonstrated. There are significant gaps in our knowledge regarding the survival of HEV in foods and the environment (including food contact surfaces), and also regarding the effect of elimination procedures used in food supply chain settings. The lack of a reliable infectivity assay has hampered extensive study. It is recommended that studies be undertaken to develop an efficient propagation system (based on in vitro cell culture), to facilitate the acquisition of extensive information on the survival of HEV in food and the environment, and its response to disinfection and elimination procedures. PMID:25989918

  2. Identifying target groups for a potential vaccination program during a hepatitis A communitywide outbreak.

    PubMed Central

    Hutin, Y J; Bell, B P; Marshall, K L; Schaben, C P; Dart, M; Quinlisk, M P; Shapiro, C N

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to identify groups for targeted vaccination during a communitywide hepatitis A outbreak in 1996. METHODS: Residents of the Sioux City, Iowa, metropolitan area reported with hepatitis A between September 1995 and August 1996 were sampled and compared with population-based controls. RESULTS: In comparison with 51 controls, the 40 case patients were more likely to inject methamphetamine, to attend emergency rooms more often than other health care facilities, and to have a family member who used the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children. CONCLUSIONS: Groups at increased risk of hepatitis A can be identified that might be [corrected] accessed for vaccination during communitywide outbreaks. PMID:10358687

  3. Betaine alleviates hepatic lipid accumulation via enhancing hepatic lipid export and fatty acid oxidation in rats fed with a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Huang, Danping; Hu, Qiaolin; Wu, Jing; Wang, Yizhen; Feng, Jie

    2015-06-28

    To assess the effects of betaine on hepatic lipid accumulation and investigate the underlying mechanism, thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 100 (sd 2·50) g were divided into four groups, and started on one of four treatments: basal diet, basal diet with betaine administration, high-fat diet and high-fat diet with betaine administration. The results showed that no significant difference of body weight was found among experimental groups. Compared with high-fat diet-fed rats, a betaine supplementation decreased (P< 0·05) hepatic TAG accumulation induced by high-fat diet, which was also supported by hepatic histology results. Additionally, hepatic betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase concentration [corrected] as well as its mRNA abundance and lecithin level were found increased (P< 0·05) by betaine supplementation in both basal diet-fed rats and high-fat diet-fed rats. Betaine administration in high-fat diet-fed rats exhibited a higher (P< 0·05) concentration [corrected] of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) compared with high-fat diet-fed rats. High-fat diet inhibited (P< 0·05) the gene expression of hepatic PPARα and CPT1. However, betaine administration in high-fat diet-fed rats elevated (P< 0·05) the gene expression of PPARα and CPT1. Moreover, concentration, gene and protein expressions of hepatic fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) were increased (P< 0·05) in response to betaine administration in high-fat diet group; meanwhile the gene expression of hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase was increased (P< 0·05) as well. The results suggest that betaine administration enhanced hepatic lipid export and fatty acid oxidation in high-fat diet-fed rats, thus effectively alleviating fat accumulation in the liver.

  4. Hepatitis A outbreak among adults with developmental disabilities in group homes--Michigan, 2013.

    PubMed

    Bohm, Susan R; Berger, Keira Wickliffe; Hackert, Pamela B; Renas, Richard; Brunette, Suzanne; Parker, Nicole; Padro, Carolyn; Hocking, Anne; Hedemark, Mary; Edwards, Renai; Bush, Russell L; Khudyakov, Yury; Nelson, Noele P; Teshale, Eyasu H

    2015-02-20

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infections among persons with developmental disabilities living in institutions were common in the past, but with improvements in care and fewer persons institutionalized, the number of HAV infections has declined in these institutions. However, residents in institutions are still vulnerable if they have not been vaccinated. On April 24, 2013, a resident of a group home (GH) for adults with disabilities in southeast Michigan (GH-A) was diagnosed with hepatitis A and died 2 days later of fulminant liver failure. Four weeks later, a second GH-A resident was diagnosed with hepatitis A. None of the GH-A residents or staff had been vaccinated against hepatitis A. Over the next 3 months, six more cases of hepatitis A were diagnosed in residents in four other Michigan GHs. Three local health departments were involved in case investigation and management, including administration of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP). Serum specimens from seven cases were found to have an identical strain of HAV genotype 1A. This report describes the outbreak investigation, the challenges of timely delivery of PEP for hepatitis A, and the need for preexposure vaccination against hepatitis A for adults living or working in GHs for the disabled.

  5. Congenital echovirus 21 infection causing fulminant hepatitis in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Cristina; Lage, Maria João; Virella, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Enteroviral infection in pregnancy is common and there is growing evidence relating it to congenital anomalies and neonatal mortality. Neonatal disease may range from unapparent infection to overwhelming systemic illness. Passively acquired maternal serotype specific antibodies determine the severity of the disease in the newborn. A fatal case of congenital echovirus 21 infection, confirmed by PCR in the patient's blood and positive culture of the mother's stools, is reported. A sibling had symptoms of respiratory tract infection and their mother had fever, which prompted iatrogenic delivery that same day. The newborn presented with bradycardia and hypotonia in the first minutes of life and later developed respiratory distress, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, fulminant hepatitis, acute renal failure and necrotising enterocolitis. Death occurred on the 8 day of life. This case highlights the potential severity of Enteroviral infection in the newborn. Since only supportive treatment is available, prevention is paramount. PMID:23576650

  6. Hepatitis C: a review for primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tom; Lee, Samuel S

    2006-02-28

    Primary care physicians see many of the estimated 250 000 Canadians chronically infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Of this number, about one-third are unaware they are infected, which constitutes a large hidden epidemic. They continue to spread HCV unknowingly and cannot benefit from advances in antiviral therapy that may clear them of the virus. Many HCV-infected people remain asymptomatic, which means it is important to assess for risk factors and test patients accordingly. The third-generation enzyme immunoassay for HCV antibodies is a sensitive and specific test, although the presence of the virus can be confirmed by polymerase chain reaction testing for HCV RNA in some circumstances. Pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin combination therapy clears the virus in about 45%-80% of patients, depending on viral genotype. Preventive strategies and counselling recommendations are also reviewed. PMID:16505462

  7. Hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Juan; Mínguez, Beatriz

    2008-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a severe complication of cirrhosis that is related to the effects of ammonia. Analysis of interorgan ammonia trafficking has identified an important role of skeletal muscle in ammonia removal and has highlighted the importance of the nutritional status. Ammonia causes neurotransmitter abnormalities and induces injury to astrocytes that is partially mediated by oxidative stress. These disturbances lead to astrocyte swelling and brain edema, which appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of neurological manifestations. Inflammatory mediators worsen brain disturbances. New methods for assessing hepatic encephalopathy include clinical scales, neuropsychological tests, imaging of portal-systemic circulation, and magnetic resonance of the brain. Reappraisal of current therapy indicates the need for performing placebo-controlled trials and the lack of evidence for administering diets with restricted protein content. Liver transplant should be considered in selected patients with hepatic encephalopathy. Future prospects include new drugs that decrease plasma ammonia, measures to reduce brain edema, and liver-support devices. PMID:18293278

  8. Hepatic sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Karagiannidis, Alexandros; Karavalaki, Maria; Koulaouzidis, Anastasios

    2006-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disease of unknown aetiology. Histological evidence of non-caseating granulomas represents the main finding. It affects mostly young people, targeting primary the lung and hilar lymph nodes although liver involvement is often encountered. Hepatic sarcoidosis covers a broad spectrum from asymptomatic hepatic granulomas formation and slightly deranged liver function tests to clinically evident disease with cholestasis or, in advanced cases, cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Other granulomatous diseases (mainly systemic infections like tuberculosis) should be excluded prior to treatment, as longstanding corticosteroid administration is the main stem of therapy. In advanced cases, liver transplantation represents the ultimate therapeutic option.

  9. Hepatic capillariasis in a Cape ground squirrel (Xerus inaurus).

    PubMed

    Erlwanger, K H; De Witt, B A; Fick, L G; Hetem, R S; Meyer, L C R; Mitchell, D; Wilson, W A; Mitchell, B

    2009-12-01

    We report, for the first time, an incidental finding of Calodium hepaticum infestation in a sub-adult female Cape ground squirrel (Xerus inaurus). Post mortem examination of the squirrel revealed severe haemoperitoneum, splenomegaly and hepatomegaly with miliary white spots distributed diffusely throughout the hepatic parenchyma. Histologically the portal tracts in the liver showed granulomatous inflammation with fibrosis and numerous giant cells. Occasional adult worms were identified and there were multiple C. hepaticum eggs distributed diffusely throughout the portal tracts and the parenchyma. The spleen also contained C. hepaticum eggs. The genus Rattus is the primary host and reservoir of C. hepaticum, but C. hepaticum infections have been reported previously in other Sciuridae. Based on our findings, people should be cautious of the zoonotic potential of C. hepaticum, when they come into contact with the Cape ground squirrel.

  10. Epidemiological study of hepatitis A, B and C in the largest Afro-Brazilian isolated community.

    PubMed

    Matos, Márcia A D; Reis, Nádia Rúbia S; Kozlowski, Aline G; Teles, Sheila A; Motta-Castro, Ana Rita C; Mello, Francisco C A; Gomes, Selma A; Martins, Regina M B

    2009-09-01

    This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence and molecular epidemiological features of viral hepatitis A, B and C in the Kalunga population, which represents the largest Afro-Brazilian isolated community. Among 878 individuals studied, the overall prevalence of anti-hepatitis A virus antibodies was 80.9%, with a significant rise from 44.8% to near 100% between the first and fourth decade of life. Rates for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) of 1.8% and 35.4%, respectively, were found. Increasing age, male gender, illiteracy and history of multiple sexual partners were associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. An occult HBV infection rate of 1.7% (5/295) was found among anti-HBc-positive individuals. HBV genotype A (subtype Aa) was dominant in this community. Only 5/878 individuals (0.6%) were positive for anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV RNA was detected in three of them, who were infected with genotype 1 (subtype 1a). These findings point out high, intermediate and low endemicity for hepatitis A, B and C, respectively, in the Kalunga community in Brazil. Circulation of HBV genotype A (subtype Aa) in this Afro-Brazilian isolated community indicates the introduction of this virus during the slave trade from Africa to Brazil.

  11. A Thermodynamic Model for Genome Packaging in Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2015-10-20

    Understanding the fundamentals of genome packaging in viral capsids is important for finding effective antiviral strategies and for utilizing benign viral particles for gene therapy. While the structure of encapsidated genomic materials has been routinely characterized with experimental techniques such as cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction, much less is known about the molecular driving forces underlying genome assembly in an intracellular environment and its in vivo interactions with the capsid proteins. Here we study the thermodynamic basis of the pregenomic RNA encapsidation in human Hepatitis B virus in vivo using a coarse-grained molecular model that captures the essential components of nonspecific intermolecular interactions. The thermodynamic model is used to examine how the electrostatic interaction between the packaged RNA and the highly charged C-terminal domains (CTD) of capsid proteins regulate the nucleocapsid formation. The theoretical model predicts optimal RNA content in Hepatitis B virus nucleocapsids with different CTD lengths in good agreement with mutagenesis measurements, confirming the predominant role of electrostatic interactions and molecular excluded-volume effects in genome packaging. We find that the amount of encapsidated RNA is not linearly correlated with the net charge of CTD tails as suggested by earlier theoretical studies. Our thermodynamic analysis of the nucleocapsid structure and stability indicates that ∼10% of the CTD residues are free from complexation with RNA, resulting in partially exposed CTD tails. The thermodynamic model also predicts the free energy of complex formation between macromolecules, which corroborates experimental results for the impact of CTD truncation on the nucleocapsid stability.

  12. Hepatic glycogen can regulate hypoglycemic counterregulation via a liver-brain axis.

    PubMed

    Winnick, Jason J; Kraft, Guillaume; Gregory, Justin M; Edgerton, Dale S; Williams, Phillip; Hajizadeh, Ian A; Kamal, Maahum Z; Smith, Marta; Farmer, Ben; Scott, Melanie; Neal, Doss; Donahue, E Patrick; Allen, Eric; Cherrington, Alan D

    2016-06-01

    Liver glycogen is important for the counterregulation of hypoglycemia and is reduced in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Here, we examined the effect of varying hepatic glycogen content on the counterregulatory response to low blood sugar in dogs. During the first 4 hours of each study, hepatic glycogen was increased by augmenting hepatic glucose uptake using hyperglycemia and a low-dose intraportal fructose infusion. After hepatic glycogen levels were increased, animals underwent a 2-hour control period with no fructose infusion followed by a 2-hour hyperinsulinemic/hypoglycemic clamp. Compared with control treatment, fructose infusion caused a large increase in liver glycogen that markedly elevated the response of epinephrine and glucagon to a given hypoglycemia and increased net hepatic glucose output (NHGO). Moreover, prior denervation of the liver abolished the improved counterregulatory responses that resulted from increased liver glycogen content. When hepatic glycogen content was lowered, glucagon and NHGO responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia were reduced. We conclude that there is a liver-brain counterregulatory axis that is responsive to liver glycogen content. It remains to be determined whether the risk of iatrogenic hypoglycemia in T1D humans could be lessened by targeting metabolic pathway(s) associated with hepatic glycogen repletion. PMID:27140398

  13. Interferon-free therapy for hepatitis C: The hurdles amid a golden era.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Massimo

    2015-09-01

    The long awaited all-oral therapy for hepatitis C virus infection has officially been inaugurated by the registration of the hepatitis C nucleotide inhibitor sofosbuvir in a combination regimen with ribavirin. More recently, the oral array to treat hepatitis C has been enriched by the arrival of the NS5A inhibitors ledipasvir (also in a single formulation with sofosbuvir, Harvoni(®)) and daclatasvir; the protease inhibitor simeprevir, and the Viekirax(®)+Exviera™ regimen based on the ritonavir boosted protease inhibitor paritaprevir; the NS5A inhibitor ombitasvir, and the non-nucleoside inhibitor dasabuvir. Owing to the budget-breaking price of the newer oral medicines, the Italian National Health System elected to restrict reimbursement of oral anti-hepatitis C therapy to patients with advanced liver disease or transplanted organs, and those who are interferon unable, only. While this therapeutic strategy harmonizes with principles of distributive justice, at the same time it fuelled the argument of its doubtful cost-effectiveness, owing to the National Health System's reimbursement of the sole sofosbuvir+ribavirin regimen, which has suboptimal efficacy against the prevalent hepatitis C virus genotype 1b. As a consequence, we are left with a number of uncertainties regarding the optimal treatment modality for certain subgroups of hepatitis C patients, and the clinical benefits provided by hepatitis C virus clearance in patients with advanced liver disease.

  14. Hepatic glycogen can regulate hypoglycemic counterregulation via a liver-brain axis

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Guillaume; Williams, Phillip; Hajizadeh, Ian A.; Kamal, Maahum Z.; Smith, Marta; Farmer, Ben; Scott, Melanie; Neal, Doss; Donahue, E. Patrick; Allen, Eric; Cherrington, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    Liver glycogen is important for the counterregulation of hypoglycemia and is reduced in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Here, we examined the effect of varying hepatic glycogen content on the counterregulatory response to low blood sugar in dogs. During the first 4 hours of each study, hepatic glycogen was increased by augmenting hepatic glucose uptake using hyperglycemia and a low-dose intraportal fructose infusion. After hepatic glycogen levels were increased, animals underwent a 2-hour control period with no fructose infusion followed by a 2-hour hyperinsulinemic/hypoglycemic clamp. Compared with control treatment, fructose infusion caused a large increase in liver glycogen that markedly elevated the response of epinephrine and glucagon to a given hypoglycemia and increased net hepatic glucose output (NHGO). Moreover, prior denervation of the liver abolished the improved counterregulatory responses that resulted from increased liver glycogen content. When hepatic glycogen content was lowered, glucagon and NHGO responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia were reduced. We conclude that there is a liver-brain counterregulatory axis that is responsive to liver glycogen content. It remains to be determined whether the risk of iatrogenic hypoglycemia in T1D humans could be lessened by targeting metabolic pathway(s) associated with hepatic glycogen repletion. PMID:27140398

  15. [Infection by hepatitis virus among the indigenous populations of South America: a review of the problem].

    PubMed

    Echevarría, J M; Blitz-Dorfman, L; Pujot, F H

    1996-09-01

    After the report of the epidemic outbreak of delta hepatitis among the Yukpa amerindians in the early 80s, the viral hepatitis arose as an important health problem in all the Amerindian communities from the north of South America and the Amazonian Basin. Despite the few data available, the results obtained in different communities from Venezuela (Yukpa, Barí, Yanomami) have shown a high endemicity of hepatitis B and D virus infections and a significant prevalence of hepatitis E virus-specific antibody among their members. By contrast, the infection by hepatitis C virus, which is present in all the urban areas from South America, seems uncommon, or even absent among some Amerindian populations. At the moment, a satisfactory explanation for this findings has not yet been arised. However, it could be possible that the margination of these populations regarding the health care system has been keeping them free of an infection largely linked worldwide to iatrogeny. Vaccination of Amerindian populations against hepatitis B should be taken as a priority of the health care programs. Moreover, such programs should consider the iatrogenic transmission of the HCV as a matter of concern regarding such populations, since parenterally transmitted hepatitis viruses seems to spread quickly among their members once they are introduced, giving rise to serious health problems. PMID:8983357

  16. Hepatic tuberculosis mimicking metastasis in a case of carcinoma sigmoid colon.

    PubMed

    Husain, Musharraf; Khan, Sabina; Hassan, Mohammad Jaseem

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) presenting as isolated liver mass without clinical evidence of TB is difficult to diagnose preoperatively and is usually mimicked by primary or metastatic carcinoma of the liver. Hepatic TB associated with carcinoma colon is a rare association which has very rarely been reported in the literature. This case illustrates the diagnostic difficulties of hepatic TB and the need to consider it in the differential diagnosis of hepatic nodular lesions in carcinoma colon patients. Here, we report a case of 48-year-old female who presented in the casualty with features of acute intestinal obstruction. Preoperatively a mass was seen at the hepatic flexure along with three lesions in the liver presumed to be metastatic in origin. However, histopathology of the mass revealed adenocarcinoma colon and the liver lesion proved to be hepatic TB. We wish to highlight that on encountering a hepatic lesion in a carcinoma colon patient the possibility of hepatic TB should also be kept in mind apart from the obvious possibility of metastasis especially in an endemic country like India.

  17. Progression of chronic hepatitis and preneoplasia in Helicobacter hepaticus-infected A/JCr mice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Arlin B; Boutin, Samuel R; Whary, Mark T; Sundina, Nataliya; Ge, Zhongming; Cormier, Kathleen; Fox, James G

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus infection induces sustained inflammation and carcinoma of the liver in A/JCr mice, and serves as a model of human cancers associated with viral hepatitis and H. pylorichronic gastritis. Here we describe the pathogenesis of premalignant disease in A/JCr mice infected with H. hepaticus. We inoculated dams intragestationally and/or pups postnatally, and evaluated offspring at 3, 6, or 12 months. Mice infected at or before 3 weeks of age, but not at 12 weeks, developed disease. Male mice were most affected, but expressed a bimodal pattern of susceptibility. Males exhibited lobular necrogranulomatous and interface (chronic active) hepatitis, while females usually developed intraportal (chronic persistent) hepatitis. Portal inflammation was slowly progressive, with tertiary lymphoid nodule development by 12 months. Hepatic bacterial load and preneoplastic lesions, including clear and tigroid cell foci of cellular alteration, were correlated with lobular hepatitis severity. No extrahepatic surrogate disease marker reliably predicted individual hepatitis grade. In conclusion, gender and bacterial exposure timing are key determinants of H. hepaticus disease outcomes. Intrahepatic inflammation is driven by local signals characterized by a vigorous but nonsterilizing immune response. Continued study of chronic hepatitis progression may reveal therapeutic targets to reduce the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  18. A Case Report About the Most Common Yet Most Forgotten Hepatitis E.

    PubMed

    Chandnani, Madhuri; Kaur, Mandeep; Ramadhas, Anusha; Tumarinson, Taisiya

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most common cause of enterically acquired acute viral hepatitis worldwide with major prevalence in the developing countries. An increasing number of sporadic cases of acute HEV infection have also been found in developed countries, but there is still no role for HEV testing in cases of seronegative acute hepatitis in such nonendemic regions. CASE REPORT A 59-year-old male residing in the United States for seven months with a history of malaria treated one year ago presented with fatigue and cholestatic jaundice with very high bilirubin levels. Hepatitis A, B, and C viral serology along with other atypical infections were ruled out. No history of any kind of drug intake was reported. Liver biopsy was obtained and was suggestive of acute hepatitis. Eventually hepatitis E immunoglobulin M was checked and was found positive. The patient was treated with supportive care and improved gradually with normalization of liver function test in a few weeks. CONCLUSIONS Autochthonous HEV infection must be suspected in cases of acute viral hepatitis in developed countries. Timely detection of HEV infection is necessary, especially in immunocompromised patients, in whom treatment is required to eradicate the infection. PMID:27527551

  19. Classic polyarteritis nodosa associated with hepatitis C virus infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis C virus has been under-recognized as an etiologic factor for polyarteritis nodosa and the presence of hepatitis C antigenemia in patients with polyarteritis nodosa has been reported as insignificant. In the literature hepatitis C virus-associated polyarteritis nodosa is a rare and controversial entity. Case presentation A 34-year-old Sri Lankan Tamil man presented to our facility with a two-week history of slow-resolving pneumonia of the right mid and lower zones. On physical examination he had panniculitic type tender skin nodules with background livedo reticularis. A skin biopsy was suggestive of a small and medium vessel vasculitis compatible with polyarteritis nodosa. He was tested positive for hepatitis C antibodies. A serum cryoglobulin test was negative but perinuclear antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody test was positive. Serum complement levels were reduced. He was diagnosed as having classic polyarteritis nodosa associated with hepatitis C infection. He later developed left-sided radiculopathy involving both upper and lower limbs and an ischemic cardiac event. His hepatitis C infection was managed with polyethylene glycol-interferon 2α combined with oral ribavirin. Simultaneously, his classic polyarteritis nodosa was treated with prednisolone and cyclophosphamide. He made a good recovery. Conclusions Hepatitis C virus infection is capable of inducing a fulminant form of vasculitis in the form of polyarteritis nodosa. It may be easily confused early in its course with mixed cryoglobulinemia, which is commonly known to be associated with hepatitis C virus. Awareness of hepatitis C virus-related polyarteritis nodosa helps in diagnosing the condition early so combined immunosuppressive and antiviral treatment can be started as soon as possible. PMID:22979958

  20. Pioneering a Global Cure for Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Vilarinho, Silvia; Lifton, Richard P

    2016-09-22

    This year's Lasker∼Debakey Clinical Medical Research Award honors Ralf Bartenschlager, Charles Rice, and Michael Sofia, pioneers in the development of curative and safe therapies for the 170 million people with hepatitis C virus infection. PMID:27634325

  1. Hemoperitoneum secondary to bleeding of a hepatic metastasis of testicular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Espínola, Daniella; Faundes, Víctor; Calderón, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Testicular cancer is the most common type of cancer among young patients. At the moment of diagnosis, between 30% and 50% of them have developed metastases, which affect retroperitoneal lymph nodes and lungs especially. Hepatic compromise is rare and is associated with poor prognosis. Besides this, hepatic lesions can complicate with necrosis and overgrowth, a phenomenon that is mainly seen in primary lesions. Furthermore, bleeding of secondary lesions is very uncommon. We present a case of a patient with massive hemoperitoneum secondary to rupture of hepatic metastatic lesions of a primary testicular tumor. PMID:24578860

  2. Studies of nosocomial outbreaks of hepatitis B in nursing homes in Germany suggest a major role of hepatitis B e antigen expression in disease severity and progression.

    PubMed

    Seiz, Pia L; Slanina, Heiko; Ziebuhr, John; Gerlich, Wolfram H; Glebe, Dieter; Schüttler, Christian G

    2015-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes acute or chronic hepatitis B. Local outbreaks of HBV infections in skilled nursing facilities is a matter of growing concern in developed countries. Here, we investigated two outbreaks of hepatitis B that recently occurred in nursing homes in Germany. The outbreak at location A was associated with acute fulminant hepatitis with fatal outcome in several cases, while individuals infected at location B developed asymptomatic or mild hepatitis B. Sequence analysis of viruses involved in these outbreaks revealed different, but unique HBV strains for each location. Each of the strains produced high viremia of more than 10(9) virions/mL serum. We found that the mild course of hepatitis B at location B was caused by a circulating wild-type HBV genotype A2 strain, which is commonly found in Central Europe. Complete genome sequences of isolates obtained from infected patients revealed nearly 100% sequence identity at the nucleotide level as well as expression of HBV e protein (HBeAg), a known T cell tolerogen in the incubation or chronic phases of HBV infection. By contrast, the outbreak at location A was associated with an HBV genotype D2 variant that lacked HBeAg expression, suggesting that immunopathology and selection of specific HBV variants played a major role in the severe (or even fulminant) acute hepatitis observed at location A. Importantly, all patients were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus, a known risk factor for healthcare-associated transmission of HBV. The study leads us to suggest that, besides strict adherence to hygiene standards, additional efforts are required to reduce the risk of HBV transmission and fulminant disease progression in healthcare settings and nursing homes. In this context, a general screening for HBsAg and active hepatitis B vaccination should be considered for people living in nursing homes, especially for those with diagnosed diabetes or other predisposing factors for HBV transmission.

  3. [Coincidence of a chronic Hepatitis C and an autoimmune Hepatitis Type 3 - successful therapy with the new direct-acting antiviral agents].

    PubMed

    Dikopoulos, N; Zizer, E

    2016-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis C infection may be associated with several features of autoimmunity (i. e., detection of different kinds of autoantibodies in the serum). Hepatitis C is also associated with different autoimmune diseases, such as autoimmune thyroiditis, lichen ruber planus, and membranous glomerulonephritis being the most relevant. There are very few cases of a coincidence of chronic hepatitis C with an autoimmune hepatitis, that is usually diagnosed by detection of specific autoantibodies and typical histological features. During the time of interferon-based antiviral therapies, we often faced a therapeutic dilemma as interferon could lead to an exacerbation of the coincident autoimmune disease. So, in these cases, a prophylactic immunosuppression had to be started before initiation of interferon therapy. Meanwhile, in the new era of direct antiviral agents against hepatitis C, highly specific and effective therapeutic options are available. The case report presented here describes the very rare coincidence of a chronic hepatitis C, genotype 1 with an autoimmune hepatitis type 3 diagnosed by the presence of anti-SLA-antibodies. In the past, the patient had several unsuccessful interferon-based therapies without achieving a sustained virological response in parallel with an immunosuppressive treatment with azathioprine. During the further course of the disease, the patient generated a liver cirrhosis CHILD A after only a few years. After the approval of the direct antiviral agents sofosbuvir and daclatasvir in 2014, we conducted an antiviral therapy, including ribavirin, for 24 weeks and fortunately achieved a sustained virological response. Due to the persistent disease activity caused by the autoimmune hepatitis after the end of antiviral therapy, we treated the patient with prednisolone and azathioprine and could induce a stable and persistent remission of the autoimmune disease. PMID:27529527

  4. [Coincidence of a chronic Hepatitis C and an autoimmune Hepatitis Type 3 - successful therapy with the new direct-acting antiviral agents].

    PubMed

    Dikopoulos, N; Zizer, E

    2016-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis C infection may be associated with several features of autoimmunity (i. e., detection of different kinds of autoantibodies in the serum). Hepatitis C is also associated with different autoimmune diseases, such as autoimmune thyroiditis, lichen ruber planus, and membranous glomerulonephritis being the most relevant. There are very few cases of a coincidence of chronic hepatitis C with an autoimmune hepatitis, that is usually diagnosed by detection of specific autoantibodies and typical histological features. During the time of interferon-based antiviral therapies, we often faced a therapeutic dilemma as interferon could lead to an exacerbation of the coincident autoimmune disease. So, in these cases, a prophylactic immunosuppression had to be started before initiation of interferon therapy. Meanwhile, in the new era of direct antiviral agents against hepatitis C, highly specific and effective therapeutic options are available. The case report presented here describes the very rare coincidence of a chronic hepatitis C, genotype 1 with an autoimmune hepatitis type 3 diagnosed by the presence of anti-SLA-antibodies. In the past, the patient had several unsuccessful interferon-based therapies without achieving a sustained virological response in parallel with an immunosuppressive treatment with azathioprine. During the further course of the disease, the patient generated a liver cirrhosis CHILD A after only a few years. After the approval of the direct antiviral agents sofosbuvir and daclatasvir in 2014, we conducted an antiviral therapy, including ribavirin, for 24 weeks and fortunately achieved a sustained virological response. Due to the persistent disease activity caused by the autoimmune hepatitis after the end of antiviral therapy, we treated the patient with prednisolone and azathioprine and could induce a stable and persistent remission of the autoimmune disease.

  5. Hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus prevalence among dialysis patients in Bahrain and Saudi Arabia: a survey by serologic and molecular methods.

    PubMed

    Qadi, Abeer A; Tamim, Hala; Ameen, Ghada; Bu-Ali, Abdulrahman; Al-Arrayed, Sameer; Fawaz, Naglaa A; Almawi, Wassim Y

    2004-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections were assessed among 81 Bahraini and 34 Saudi hemodialysis patients and 7714 Bahraini and 2330 Saudi blood donors. Higher prevalence of HCV (9.24% vs 0.30%), hepatitis B surface antigen (5.88% vs 0.62%) were seen in patients versus control patients, and in Saudi patients compared with Bahraini patients. HCV genotypes were HCV 1a/1b plus HCV 4 among Bahraini patients and HCV 2/2a plus HCV 4 among Saudi patients. This is the first report on viral hepatitis in Bahrain and the first to compare HBV/HCV among dialysis patients in the Eastern Arabian Peninsula.

  6. Hepatic artery thrombosis in live liver donor transplantation: how to solve--a case report.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, S; Martins, A; Barroso, E

    2014-01-01

    The decrease in the number of cadaveric donors has proved a limiting factor in the number of liver transplants, leading to the death of many patients on the waiting list. The living donor liver transplantation is an option that allows, in selected cases, increase the number of donors. One of the most serious complications in liver transplantation is hepatic artery thrombosis, in the past considered potentially fatal without urgent re-transplantation. A white male patient, 48 years old, diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma in chronic liver failure caused by hepatitis B virus, underwent living donor liver transplantation (right lobe). Doppler echocardiography performed in the immediate postoperative period did not identify arterial flow in the right branch, having been confirmed thrombosis of the right hepatic artery in CT angiography. Urgent re-laparotomy was performed, which consisted of thrombectomy and re-anastomosis of the hepatic artery with segmental splenic artery allograft interposition. The patient started anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy with acetylsalicylic acid. Serial evaluation with Doppler echocardiography showed hepatic artery patency. At present, the patient is asymptomatic. One of the most devastating complications in liver transplantation, and particularly in living liver donor, is thrombosis of the hepatic artery; thus, early diagnosis and treatment is vital. The rapid intervention for revascularization of the graft avoids irreversible ischemia of the bile ducts and hepatic parenchyma, thus avoiding the need for re-transplantation.

  7. Hepatitis: protecting BMETs & CEs.

    PubMed

    Baker, S A

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis is the primary occupational hazard for healthcare workers. Not until the 1970s were hepatitis viruses isolated and identified as types A and B. In the late 1970s, hepatitis D was discovered as a major cause of fulminant hepatitis. Soon, it was evident that another type was also at work. Because testing was only available for types A and B, the new category was referred to as non-A, non-B. In the 1980s, scientists identified two more viruses from this non-A, non-B group, namely hepatitis E and hepatitis C. These five types of hepatitis have different modes of transmission. The fecal-to-oral route is the mode of transmission for hepatitis types A and E. But, types B and D are bloodborne pathogens. With the advent of a safe vaccine for hepatitis B, this category is declining. To date, hepatitis C appears to have multiple routes of transmission, with half the cases being posttransfusion. In the United States, 85,000 people per year develop chronic hepatitis C, which ultimately leads to severe liver damage. This paper addresses each of the five viruses that have been grouped by routes of transmission, prevention techniques for BMETs and CEs, and statistics of reported cases to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCP) over the last 20 years. PMID:10139739

  8. Original Research: Analysis of hepatic microRNA alterations in response to hepatitis B virus infection and pegylated interferon alpha-2a treatment.

    PubMed

    Jinato, Thananya; Chuaypen, Natthaya; Poomipak, Witthaya; Praianantathavorn, Kesmanee; Makkoch, Jarika; Kiatbumrung, Rattanaporn; Jampoka, Kanisa; Tangkijvanich, Pisit; Payungporn, Sunchai

    2016-10-01

    Interferons play important roles in defense mechanisms against viral infection, and thus interferon therapy has been a standard treatment in chronic hepatitis B patients. Interferons signaling pathways promote interferon-inducible genes including microRNAs. In this research, we aimed to determine microRNAs expression profiles in vitro and in vivo For in vitro model, Huh7 cells were transfected with or without hepatitis B virus plasmid for 6 h, and then treated with 100 ng of pegylated-interferon alpha-2a for 24 h. In vivo, we defined microRNAs expression profiles in pair-liver tissues of chronic hepatitis B patients in comparison between before and after treatment of pegylated-interferon alpha-2a for 48 weeks. Cellular small RNAs were extracted followed by library preparation. To determine microRNAs expression profiles, the next-generation sequencing was carried out on MiSeq platform (Illumina®). In vitro analysis demonstrated that microRNAs can be classified into up-regulated and down-regulated microRNAs in response to hepatitis B virus, interferon, and combination of hepatitis B virus and interferon. Moreover, in vivo analysis revealed microRNAs profiles in non-responders, responders without hepatitis B surface antigen clearance, and responders with hepatitis B surface antigen clearance. The target genes of the candidate microRNAs were determined in terms of roles in cellular pathways and immune response, which might be related to treatment in chronic hepatitis B patients. Results revealed that two down-regulated microRNAs including miR-185-5p and miR-186-5p were correlated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. These two microRNAs might be represented as specific hepatic microRNAs responding to hepatitis B virus and pegylated-interferon alpha-2a treatment, which may remarkable and attractive for further study involving in the association of their target genes and prediction of pegylated-interferon alpha-2a response. Interestingly, micro

  9. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  10. Emperipolesis is a potential histological hallmark associated with chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Jiang, L; Zhou, G; Liu, S; Liu, Y; Zhang, X; Zhao, S; Wu, L; Yang, M; Ma, L; Wang, X; Zhao, J

    2015-01-01

    Although emperipolesis exists in infectious liver diseases, the diagnostic value of emperipolesis in chronic hepatitis B is not exactly known. The aim of this study is to evaluate the histological characteristics and laboratory parameters of emperipolesis in chronic hepatitis B. Totally 402 patients with hepatitis B and other liver diseases were processed in a retrospective assessment. Inflammatory severity of hepatitis B was evaluated with Ishak Scoring System. Immunofluorescent staining was performed for CD8 (T cells), CD20 (B cells), CD56 (NK cells), CD68 (macrophages) and MPO (neutrophils). Emperipolesis was observed in 74.0% of patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and 82.8% of patients with acute hepatitis B (AHB). In emperipolesis, CD8(+) T cell was the main cell type. Patients with emperipolesis in CHB got high scores of inflammatory activity. Among patients with CHB, emperipolesis was present with higher serum ALT, AST and GGT levels. HBV DNA Load in patients with emperipolesis was as 10 times high as those without emperipolesis. HBeAb was significantly correlated with the evidence of emperipolesis. In chronic hepatitis B, emperipolesis was associated with severity of liver injury. The presence of emperipolesis was an indicator of active liver inflammation. PMID:26511703

  11. Serum Ferritin as a Predictor of Host Response to Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustbader, Edward D.; Hann, Hie-Won L.; Blumberg, Baruch S.

    1983-04-01

    With hemodialysis patients, a high serum ferritin before there was serological evidence of hepatitis B virus infection increased the likelihood that the infection would be persistent. This finding suggested that hepatitis B virus is likely to infect and actively replicate in liver cells with the propensity for increased ferritin synthesis. The virus itself could stimulate the synthesis of ferritin in a cyclic positive feedback mechanism that increases intracellular ferritin concentration and, eventually, intracellular iron. Transformed liver cells have low iron content, do not replicate hepatitis B virus, and require iron for growth. Infected, nonmalignant liver cells could supply iron to the transformed cells and nourish their expansion.

  12. Rare anatomic variation of left gastric artery and right hepatic artery in a female cadaver.

    PubMed

    Troupis, Theodore; Chatzikokolis, Stamatis; Zachariadis, Michael; Troupis, George; Anagnostopoulou, Sofia; Skandalakis, Panayiotis

    2008-05-01

    The present report describes a rare case in which the left gastric artery arises directly from the abdominal aorta and the right hepatic artery from the superior mesenteric artery, as observed during the dissection of a female cadaver. The left gastric artery usually rises as one of the three branches of the celiac trunk, which was originally described by Haller in 1756, whereas the right hepatic artery usually originates from the proper hepatic artery. The knowledge of the typical anatomy of the abdominal arteries, and their variations, is especially important due to the numerous interventions performed in the abdominal area.

  13. Successful Pregnancy in Autoimmune Hepatitis/Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Overlap Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Subarna; Nayak, Prasanta Kumar; Padma, Alaganandam; Kurian, George

    2012-01-01

    Medical literature on pregnancy outcomes in hepatic overlap syndromes is limited. Autoimmune liver diseases are associated with sub-fertility and pregnancy is usually dissuaded in presence of portal hypertension and cirrhosis due to guarded prognosis for the pregnancy as well as the liver disease. We report a 24-year-old primigravida with autoimmune hepatitis/primary biliary cirrhosis overlap syndrome who had a successful pregnancy owing to intensive monitoring and meticulous treatment with drugs like immunosuppressants and ursodeoxycholic acid. She developed preterm prelabour rupture of membranes and delivered at 35 weeks without any major obstetric or hepatic complications.

  14. Rates and risk factors for hepatitis B reactivation in a cohort of persons in the inactive phase of chronic hepatitis B—Alaska, 2001–2010

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Rania A.; Bulkow, Lisa; Homan, Chriss E.; Negus, Susan; McMahon, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Background A high prevalence of reactivation of hepatitis B has been documented among immunosuppressed individuals in the inactive phase of chronic hepatitis B; However, the proportion of and the risk factors for reactivation are largely unknown among non-immunosuppressed persons. Objectives Estimate the incidence rate of and risk factors for hepatitis B reactivation in a population-based cohort of persons in the inactive phase of chronic hepatitis B in Alaska. Study design A cohort of 414 Alaska Native Persons in the inactive phase of hepatitis B (HBV DNA < 2000 IU/mL and normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) for 12 months) was followed-up for 10 years. Reactivation of hepatitis B was defined as HBV DNA ≥ 2000 IU/mL and ALT ≥ 40 IU/L. Cox-proportional hazards regression models were used to identify factors associated with reactivation. Results A total of 36 (9%) persons had reactivation during 2984 person-years of follow-up, with an annual incidence of 1.2%. Persons aged ≥50 years (1.8%) at study entry had the highest incidence rates of reactivation although incidence rates were not significantly different by age group. Risk factors for hepatitis B reactivation were male sex (Hazard Ratio (HR) = 2.41; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.17–4.96), HBV DNA ≥ 1000 IU/mL at study entry (HR = 7.61; 95% CI: 2.81–20.6), and HBV genotype B (HR = 6.08; 95% CI: 1.32–28.0). Conclusions The incidence of hepatitis B reactivation was low during the 10 years of follow-up. However, given the higher risk of reactivation than their counterparts, males, and those with HBV DNA ≥ 1000 IU/mL need to be followed-up more frequently. PMID:24001884

  15. [Experience on the management of a hepatitis A outbreak in a children daycare center].

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Gaytán, David Alejandro; Nava-Martínez, Martha Lorena; Ontiveros, David; Niebla-Fuentes, María Rosario; Grajales-Muñiz, Concepción; Rojas-Mendoza, Teresita

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: dado que el virus de la hepatitis A se transmite vía fecal-oral, en las guarderías los brotes son favorecidos por los cambios constantes de pañal y las fallas en las medidas higiénicas. El objetivo de esta investigación fue describir un brote de hepatitis A entre noviembre de 2012 y febrero de 2013 en una guardería de Mexicali, Baja California, así como las medidas adoptadas para su control. MÉTODOS: se realizó un estudio descriptivo del brote y de las medidas de control, con cálculo de tasas de ataque y determinación de proporciones por escala de Wilson. Se consideró caso sospechoso a los alumnos, trabajadores o familiares que presentaran sintomatología compatible con hepatitis A. Se revisaron los registros de primera vez de hepatitis A del Informe Semanal de Casos Nuevos de Enfermedades de las unidades médicas involucradas y de los registros de enfermería de la guardería.

  16. A Case of Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis Associated With Medullary Sponge Kidney-Radiologic and Pathologic Features

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; Zhao, Gang; Jia, Chong-Fu; Li, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Congenital hepatic fibrosis is an exceedingly rare disease in China, where only very few cases with sufficient evidences and clinical data have been reported up to now. Here we reported a young patient, onset of hematemesis and melena, who had striking portal hypertension but without liver function damage. Computer tomography scans showed hepatosplenomegaly, intra-hepatic bile ducts dilation, thickening portal vein and tortuous spleen vein, and medullary sponge kidney. Liver biopsy found significant fibrosis in the portal area and ectasia of bile ductules. With sufficient radiologic and pathologic data, our case revealed the features of congenital hepatic fibrosis associated with medullary sponge kidney.

  17. Epidemiological and genetic analysis of a 2014 outbreak of hepatitis A in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Koji; Kiyohara, Tomoko; Yoshizaki, Sayaka; Kawabata, Kunio; Kanayama, Atsuhiro; Yahata, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Takuri; Kinoshita, Hitomi; Saitou, Takehito; Sunagawa, Tomimasa; Oishi, Kazunori; Uema, Masashi; Noda, Mamoru; Wakita, Takaji

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is one of the most common causes of feces-transmitted acute hepatitis worldwide. In Japan, most of HAV infections have been sporadic cases and a relatively low number of cases (approximately 100-150) of acute hepatitis A were reported in 2012 and 2013. However, in 2014, 342 cases were reported as of week 22. In order to characterize the viral agents causing this outbreak, we collected stool or sera (and both for three case) from patients with hepatitis A from many regions throughout Japan and performed genotyping of the VP1/P2A regions of HAV. We then used a multiple-alignment algorithm to compare the nucleotide sequences with those of reference strains. Phylogenetic tree analyses revealed that the 159 HAV isolates were divided into three subgenotypes: IA (137 cases), IB (4 cases), and IIIA (18 cases). The most unique feature of this outbreak was that for most subgenotype IA cases (103 out of 137 IA cases) the sequences analyzed shared 100% homology. Interestingly, the peak week for these IA infections was almost the same nationwide, suggesting that the epidemic of hepatitis A caused by this subgenotype IA strain may have expanded from a single source possibly because of one food-borne or waterborne source that was distributed nationwide at once.

  18. Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Liddle, C

    1996-04-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome was isolated during the late 1980s using molecular cloning techniques. It is recognized as the cause of most cases of percutaneously transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis. Prevalence of antibodies to HCV(anti-HCV) in the general Australian population is 0.3%. However, among regular intravenous drug users the prevalence exceeds 90%. The predominant risk factors for HCV are intravenous drug use, tattoos, exposure to blood products, occupational risk and ethnicity. In contrast to hepatitis B, sexual spread and vertical transmission of HCV from mother to neonate are relatively uncommon. The risk of acquiring HCV from a single HCV-contaminated needlestick accident is about 5%. Most cases of acute HCV infection are asymptomatic, but 50 to 80% progress to chronic disease. The percentage of those with chronic HCV progressing to cirrhosis is not accurately known, but is probably 20%. Treatment strategies for HCV, utilizing recombinant interferons, are proving useful in patients with mild to moderate liver disease, but fare less well in patients with cirrhosis. Currently, there is no vaccine for hepatitis C, so pre-exposure prophylaxis is not possible. Equally, no post-exposure intervention, for example with gamma globulin, has been shown to be beneficial, though there may be a role for early interferon therapy.

  19. PP2A inhibition results in hepatic insulin resistance despite Akt2 activation.

    PubMed

    Galbo, Thomas; Perry, Rachel J; Nishimura, Erica; Samuel, Varman T; Quistorff, Bjørn; Shulman, Gerald I

    2013-10-01

    In the liver, insulin suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis by activating Akt, which inactivates the key gluconeogenic transcription factor FoxO1 (Forkhead Box O1). Recent studies have implicated hyperactivity of the Akt phosphatase Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and impaired Akt signaling as a molecular defect underlying insulin resistance. We therefore hypothesized that PP2A inhibition would enhance insulin-stimulated Akt activity and decrease glucose production. PP2A inhibitors increased hepatic Akt phosphorylation and inhibited FoxO1in vitro and in vivo, and suppressed gluconeogenesis in hepatocytes. Paradoxically, PP2A inhibition exacerbated insulin resistance in vivo. This was explained by phosphorylation of both hepatic glycogen synthase (GS) (inactivation) and phosphorylase (activation) resulting in impairment of glycogen storage. Our findings underline the significance of GS and Phosphorylase as hepatic PP2A substrates and importance of glycogen metabolism in acute plasma glucose regulation. PMID:24150286

  20. Preoperative segmental embolization of the proper hepatic artery prior to pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Masanobu; Sata, Naohiro; Kaneda, Yuji; Koizumi, Masaru; Hyodo, Masanobu; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Kawata, Hirotoshi; Yasuda, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Radical resection of bile duct carcinoma may require resection of hepatic arteries. Preoperative segmental embolization of the hepatic artery for resection of hilar cholangiocarcinoma has been reported. We report a patient with bile duct carcinoma infiltrating the proper hepatic artery. Presentation of case A 66-year old male with jaundice was diagnosed with mid-distal bile duct carcinoma. A replaced left hepatic artery originated from the left gastric artery. Pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD) with combined resection of hepatic artery was planned. To promote the development of collateral blood flow after excision of the hepatic artery, preoperative segmental embolization of the proper hepatic artery was performed. The patient underwent PPPD with concurrent resection of the common hepatic, right hepatic, and middle hepatic arteries without arterial reconstruction. He received adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine for six months and is alive three years after surgery without tumor recurrence. Discussion The growth of collateral vessels after selective embolization of the proper hepatic artery has been used for hilar lesions and bile duct lesions. Resection of the hepatic artery without the need for complex arterial reconstruction, allowing a radical resection, may have contributed to this patient's relatively unremarkable recovery and long-term survival. Retroperitoneal mobilization of the pancreatic head and duodenum must be limited as important collaterals may originate in that area. Conclusion Preoperative segmental embolization of the hepatic artery before PPPD for a patient with a replaced left hepatic artery encouraged the growth of collateral blood supply, allowing radical resection including the vessels and obviated the need for arterial reconstruction. PMID:25625493

  1. Scarlet fever associated with hepatitis--a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Girisch, M; Heininger, U

    2000-01-01

    Infection with group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS) is the most common bacterial cause of acute pharyngitis and tonsillitis beyond infancy. We report on two patients with scarlet fever associated with hepatitis. The patients (boys aged 6 and 7 years) both presented with a scarlatiniform rash, dark urine and light-colored stools. Laboratory studies revealed elevated liver transaminases and negative antibody tests against hepatitis viruses A, B and C, cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus. Both patients were treated with antibiotics and recovered completely within a few days. Although the association between scarlet fever and hepatitis has been known for many decades, the pathogenesis is still unknown. Physicians treating patients with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections should be aware of possible hepatic involvement.

  2. Visualizing the hepatic vascular architecture using superb microvascular imaging in patients with hepatitis C virus: A novel technique

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Hidekatsu; Abe, Tamami; Kakisaka, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Yudai; Yoshida, Yuichi; Miyasaka, Akio; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Ishida, Hideaki; Sugai, Tamotsu; Takikawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify the hepatic vascular architecture of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) using superb microvascular imaging (SMI) and investigate the use of SMI in the evaluation of liver fibrosis. METHODS: SMI was performed in 100 HCV patients. SMI images were classified into five types according to the vascular pattern, and these patterns were compared with the fibrosis stage. Moreover, the images were analyzed to examine vascularity by integrating the number of SMI signals in the region of interest ROI [number of vascular trees (VT)]. The number of VT, fibrosis stage, serum parameters of liver function, and CD34 expression were investigated. RESULTS: There was a significant difference between SMI distribution pattern and fibrosis stage (P < 0.001). The mean VT values in each of the fibrosis stages were as follows: 26.69 ± 7.08 in F0, 27.72 ± 9.32 in F1, 36.74 ± 9.23 in F2, 37.36 ± 5.32 in F3, and 58.14 ± 14.08 in F4. The VT showed excellent diagnostic ability for F4 [area under the receiver operator characteristic (AUROC): 0.911]. The VT was significantly correlated with the CD34 labeling index (r = 0.617, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: SMI permitted the detailed delineation of the vascular architecture in chronic liver disease. SMI appears to be a reliable tool for noninvasively detecting significant fibrosis or cirrhosis in HCV patients. PMID:27468197

  3. Chemical disinfection of duck hepatitis B virus: a model for inactivation of infectivity of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Tsiquaye, K N; Barnard, J

    1993-08-01

    The susceptibility of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) to the virucidal effects of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) was compared to hepatitis B virus (HBV) with the aim of using the duck as a model for studying HBV disinfection. Using viral DNA polymerase (DNAP) as a target, inhibition of DNAP activity by chlorine disinfectants was found to be concentration-dependent but independent of contact time. Two minute exposure of minimal effective concentrations of sodium hypochlorite (domestic bleach: 3600 ppm and industrial bleach: 3180 ppm) and sodium dichloroisocyanurate (3000 ppm available chlorine) to DHBV- and HBV-rich plasma totally inhibited DNA polymerase activity. DHBV particles in DHBV-carrier duck plasma (10(4.5) ID50/mL) were treated with these concentrations and inoculated intravenously into 18 one-day old ducklings (six animals/disinfectant). Analysis of plasma (0, 7 and 14 days post-infection) and post-mortem liver (14 days post-infection) by DNA hybridization techniques showed that DHBV DNA was undetectable in samples from all animals inoculated with disinfected virus particles. However, post-inoculation plasma and liver of 18 of 18 control ducklings inoculated with untreated virions were positive for DHBV DNA. These results show for the first time that total inhibition in vitro of hepadnavirus DNA polymerase activity by chemical disinfectants is predictive of inactivation of infectivity in vivo. PMID:8226434

  4. Right Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Associated With Hepatic Pulmonary Fusion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Laamiri, Rachida; Belhassen, Samia; Ksia, Amine; Ben Salem, Amina; Kechiche, Nahla; Mosbahi, Sana; Sahnoun, Lassaad; Mekki, Mongi; Belghith, Mohsen; Nouri, Abdellatif

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of male newborn presented with respiratory distress at 21 hours of life. The patient was operated for right congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Hepatic pulmonary fusion (HPF) was found at surgery. PMID:27433453

  5. Serological markers for hepatitis types A and B among U.S. Arym soldiers, Germany.

    PubMed Central

    James, J J; Smith, L

    1979-01-01

    Viral hepatitis rates among U.S. Army soldiers in Europe have been found to be two to three times higher than corresponding rates for soldiers stationed in the U.S. Sera from 89 per cent of a representative Army unit with 865 members and a known hepatitis problem were tested for HBsAg, anti-HBs, anti-HBc, and anti-HA. The prevalence of HB markers was 20 per cent, and hepatitis A antibody was present in 25 per cent. A six-month follow-up, conducted on 260 individuals initially negative for all four tests, revealed that 11 of these were now HB seropositive, whereas none had seroconverted to anti-HA positive. The HB virus was the principal agent responsible for hepatitis in the unit surveyed. PMID:228562

  6. Elbasvir/Grazoprevir: A Review of the Latest Agent in the Fight against Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is estimated to affect up to 150 million people worldwide. Despite worldwide prevalence, treatment modalities prior to 2011 remained suboptimal, with low virologic response rates and intolerable side effect profiles. Fortunately, the landscape of treatment for chronic hepatitis C has rapidly evolved since the introduction of HCV NS3/4 protease inhibitors in 2011. Elbasvir, a NS5A inhibitor, combined with grazoprevir, a NS3/4A protease inhibitor, is the latest FDA-approved therapy for patients with genotype 1 or 4 chronic hepatitis C, with or without compensated cirrhosis. This review will focus on the current literature and clinical evidence supporting elbasvir/grazoprevir as first-line therapy in patients with genotypes 1 and 4 chronic hepatitis C. PMID:27403342

  7. Protective Effects of N-Acetylcysteine in Concanavalin A-Induced Hepatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chengfen; Xia, Yujing; Dai, Weiqi; Wang, Fan; Chen, Kan; Li, Jingjing; Li, Sainan; Zhu, Rong; Yang, Jing; Yin, Qin; Zhang, Huawei; Wang, Junshan; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun; Guo, Chuanyong

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to study the protective effects and mechanisms of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in concanavalin A-induced hepatitis in mice. In this study, pretreatment with NAC ameliorated the histopathological changes and suppressed inflammatory cytokines in ConA-induced hepatitis. The expression of IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ was significantly reduced in the NAC-treated groups. NAC activated PI3K/Akt pathway and inhibited the activation of NF-κB. Additionally, NAC reduced autophagosome formation, as assessed by detecting the expression of LC3 and Beclin 1. Our results demonstrate that NAC can alleviate ConA-induced hepatitis by regulating the PI3K/Akt pathway and reducing the late stages of autophagy. Our results described a new pharmaceutical to provide more effective therapies for immune hepatitis. PMID:25821351

  8. Elbasvir/Grazoprevir: A Review of the Latest Agent in the Fight against Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Bell, Allison M; Wagner, Jamie L; Barber, Katie E; Stover, Kayla R

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is estimated to affect up to 150 million people worldwide. Despite worldwide prevalence, treatment modalities prior to 2011 remained suboptimal, with low virologic response rates and intolerable side effect profiles. Fortunately, the landscape of treatment for chronic hepatitis C has rapidly evolved since the introduction of HCV NS3/4 protease inhibitors in 2011. Elbasvir, a NS5A inhibitor, combined with grazoprevir, a NS3/4A protease inhibitor, is the latest FDA-approved therapy for patients with genotype 1 or 4 chronic hepatitis C, with or without compensated cirrhosis. This review will focus on the current literature and clinical evidence supporting elbasvir/grazoprevir as first-line therapy in patients with genotypes 1 and 4 chronic hepatitis C.

  9. The lollipop sign: a new cross-sectional sign of hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma.

    PubMed

    Alomari, Ahmad I

    2006-09-01

    In four cases of hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HEHE), multiple liver lesions were depicted on enhanced computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. A peculiar sign, a hepatic or portal vein terminating at or just within the periphery of some of the liver lesions, was noted in all four; the images look like a lollipop. Imaging findings of HEHE can suggest other diseases, but this sign buttressed by other radiological findings, seems to be specific for this entity. PMID:16644166

  10. Transient facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) following administration of hepatitis B recombinant vaccine: a case report.

    PubMed

    Paul, R; Stassen, L F A

    2014-01-01

    Bell's palsy is the sudden onset of unilateral transient paralysis of facial muscles resulting from dysfunction of the seventh cranial nerve. Presented here is a 26-year-old female patient with right lower motor neurone facial palsy following hepatitis B vaccination. Readers' attention is drawn to an uncommon cause of Bell's palsy, as a possible rare complication of hepatitis B vaccination, and steps taken to manage such a presentation.

  11. Necrolytic acral erythema: a rare skin disease associated with hepatitis C virus infection*

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Luciane Francisca Fernandes; Enokihara, Milvia Maria Simões e Silva; Enokihara, Mauro Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Necrolytic acral erythema is a rare skin disease associated with hepatitis C virus infection. We report a case of a 31-year-old woman with hepatitis C virus infection and decreased zinc serum level. Physical examination revealed scaly, lichenified plaques, well-demarcated with an erythematous peripheral rim located on the lower limbs. After blood transfusion and oral zinc supplementation the patient presented an improvement of lesions.

  12. Injections given in healthcare settings as a major source of acute hepatitis B in Moldova.

    PubMed

    Hutin, Y J; Harpaz, R; Drobeniuc, J; Melnic, A; Ray, C; Favorov, M; Iarovoi, P; Shapiro, C N; Woodruff, B A

    1999-08-01

    Two case-control studies were conducted between January 1994 and August 1995 to determine the relative importance of injections and other exposures as a source of acute hepatitis B in Moldova among adults (aged 15 years) and children (aged 2-15 years). Results showed that injections in various health care settings were associated with acute hepatitis B and showed a higher proportion among adults compared with children. Contact with an HBsAg-positive person was also associated with illnesses; however, there was no statistically significant association between acute hepatitis B and other exposures. The risk of HBV transmission following percutaneous exposure is high (at least 30%). Calculation of the population attributable to risk suggests that injections associated with acute hepatitis B cases occurred in adults (52%) and children (21%). Adverse effects of injections may not be apparent in causing chronic infections. Transmission of blood-borne pathogens through unsafe injection practices is a problem increasingly identified worldwide.

  13. Hepatic Copper Accumulation: A Novel Feature in Transient Infantile Liver Failure Due to TRMU Mutations?

    PubMed

    Grover, Z; Lewindon, P; Clousten, A; Shaag, A; Elpeleg, O; Coman, D

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the mitochondrial respiratory chain can induce a heterogeneous range of clinical and biochemical manifestations. Hepatic involvement includes acute fulminant hepatic failure, microvesicular steatosis, neonatal non-alloimmune haemochromatosis and cirrhosis. Recently pathogenic mutations in tRNA 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate methyltransferase (TRMU) gene (OMIM 610230) have been demonstrated to cause transient infantile liver failure (OMIM 613070). The human TRMU gene encodes a mitochondrial protein, 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate methyltransferase, whose molecular function is that of mitochondrial tRNA modification.We report an infant who presented with acute liver failure, in whom we observed hepatic copper intoxication and cirrhosis on liver biopsy. We postulate that the hepatic copper intoxication observed in our patient is most likely a secondary event associated with cholangiopathy. Periportal copper accumulation has been implicated in causing secondary mitochondrial dysfunction; the impact of copper accumulation in patients with TRMU mutations is unclear and warrants long-term clinical follow-up.

  14. Coil embolization of multiple hepatic artery aneurysms in a patient with undiagnosed polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Stambo, Glenn W; Guiney, Michael J; Cannella, Xavier F; Germain, Bernard F

    2004-05-01

    Hepatic aneurysms are a rare sequela of vascular abnormalities in the liver, including trauma, infection, necrotizing vasculitis such as polyarteritis nodosa (PAN), and iatrogenic and arterial mediolysis. Presentation with intra-abdominal hemorrhage is associated with a high mortality rate. We describe life-saving transcatheter coil embolization of multiple isolated ruptured hepatic pseudoaneurysms in a patient with no history or clinical findings of PAN. We present angiographic findings and intra-arterial transcatheter embolization techniques in the treatment of ruptured large hepatic artery aneurysms. Endovascular specialists should recognize that PAN could present with classic angiographic findings and, in some cases, as life-threatening ruptured isolated hepatic artery aneurysms as its first presentation.

  15. Protective Effects of Dracocephalum heterophyllum in ConA-Induced Acute Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qilan; Lu, Xiaohua; Shi, Qiangqiang; Zou, Junhui

    2016-01-01

    Dracocephalum heterophyllum (DH) is a Chinese herbal medicine used in treating hepatitis. However, the protective effects and pharmacological mechanisms of DH in hepatitis are unknown. In this study, we found that pretreatment with DH extract significantly ameliorated liver injury and suppressed the production of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in Concanavalin A- (ConA-) induced hepatitis (CIH). DH recruited more CD11b+ Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) to the liver and suppressed infiltration of macrophages (Kupffer cells) in the liver. The present work explores DH as an effective hepatoprotective medicine to inhibit inflammation and liver injury caused by hepatitis. PMID:27524863

  16. Chronic Hepatitis C: An Overview of Evidence on Epidemiology and Management from a Brazilian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Rodolfo; Perazzo, Hugo; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Hyde, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C remains one of the main causes of chronic liver disease worldwide and presents a variable natural history ranging from minimal changes to advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis and its complications, such as development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Approximately, 1.45 million people are estimated to be infected by HCV in Brazil representing a major public health issue. The aim of this paper was to review the epidemiology and management of chronic hepatitis C from a Brazilian perspective. The management of chronic hepatitis C has been challenged by the use of noninvasive methods to stage liver fibrosis as an alternative to liver biopsy and the high cost of new interferon-free antiviral treatments. Moreover, the need of cost-effectiveness analysis in hepatitis C and the recent changes in treatment protocols were discussed. PMID:26693356

  17. Histopathology of hepatitis C in children, a systematic review: implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Indolfi, Giuseppe; Guido, Maria; Azzari, Chiara; Resti, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C in children is usually considered a clinically mild and slowly progressive disease. Few pediatric studies focused on histopathology of children with hepatitis C are available. Those available show, overall, a wide spectrum of findings ranging from normal liver to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The present systematic review provides a comprehensive overview of the studies that explored histopathology in children with hepatitis C. Factors affecting the presence and the degree of necroinflammation, fibrosis and steatosis and the risk of progression to advanced liver disease were extensively evaluated. Insights on the possible role of histopathology findings in the decision-making process of whether or not to treat children with hepatitis C are provided.

  18. Successful Treatment of a Hepatitis C-Positive Patient Who Received Kidney Transplant From a Hepatitis C-Positive Donor: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Papayannis, Ioannis; Patel, P

    2016-09-01

    Kidney transplantation from hepatitis C virus (HCV)-positive donors to HCV-positive recipients has always been controversial regarding the safety and the outcomes. In the posttransplant period, treatment of hepatitis C with interferon-based regimens could lead to serious side effects. A patient with chronic hepatitis C and nephropathy, on dialysis, underwent renal transplantation from an HCV-positive donor and received direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs thereafter. His renal and liver functions, as well as the hepatitis C viral load, were evaluated at predetermined intervals throughout and after his treatment. Patient's viral load was undetectable 4, 12, and 24 weeks after initiation of his treatment. Renal and liver functions were maintained at baseline, with no evidence of transplant rejection. Our clinical case is one of the few examples in the medical literature that shows successful suppression of replication of HCV in an HCV-infected kidney transplant candidate who received within 2 months of listing a deceased donor kidney transplant from an HCV-infected donor. The recipient was treated with DAAs, and this case illustrates potential safety and efficacy of this approach.

  19. Successful Treatment of a Hepatitis C-Positive Patient Who Received Kidney Transplant From a Hepatitis C-Positive Donor: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Papayannis, Ioannis; Patel, P

    2016-09-01

    Kidney transplantation from hepatitis C virus (HCV)-positive donors to HCV-positive recipients has always been controversial regarding the safety and the outcomes. In the posttransplant period, treatment of hepatitis C with interferon-based regimens could lead to serious side effects. A patient with chronic hepatitis C and nephropathy, on dialysis, underwent renal transplantation from an HCV-positive donor and received direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs thereafter. His renal and liver functions, as well as the hepatitis C viral load, were evaluated at predetermined intervals throughout and after his treatment. Patient's viral load was undetectable 4, 12, and 24 weeks after initiation of his treatment. Renal and liver functions were maintained at baseline, with no evidence of transplant rejection. Our clinical case is one of the few examples in the medical literature that shows successful suppression of replication of HCV in an HCV-infected kidney transplant candidate who received within 2 months of listing a deceased donor kidney transplant from an HCV-infected donor. The recipient was treated with DAAs, and this case illustrates potential safety and efficacy of this approach. PMID:27597771

  20. [Epidemiology and prevention of hepatitis A and B in developing countries].

    PubMed

    Zaratti, Laura; Meleleo, Cristina; Serino, Laura; Bagnato, Barbara; Marino, Maria Giulia; Morciano, Laura; Sorbara, Debora; Franco, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Viral hepatitis A and B are serious public health problems all over the world. Effective prophylactic measures and improvement in the hygienic and sanitary conditions have considerably modified the diseases trend, characterized by high prevalence levels in developing countries. In this paper the epidemiology of hepatitis A and B is reviewed, focused on endemic areas, on the basis of data collected from local and international studies in order to evaluate prevention strategies for both local population and travelers.

  1. [The state of cellular immunity in women with a history of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Dyndar, O A

    1998-08-01

    Overall sixty puerperants were examined with a history of viral hepatitis before true pregnancy has set in, with 50 healthy puerperants being controls. In women with prior viral hepatitis, the B-cell link of immunity was found out to be disordered, especially so postpartum, as evidenced by investigations designed to study the chief classes of immunoglobulin G, A, M in parturient women's blood sera and the postpartum complications patterns.

  2. Hepatitis A outbreak in Ba subdivision, Fiji, October–December 2013

    PubMed Central

    Rafai, Eric; Tolosa, Maria Ximena; Dawainavesi, Akanisi; Tabua, Anaseini Maisema; Tabua, Josefa

    2015-01-01

    Objective A cluster of suspected hepatitis A cases was notified to the Fiji Ministry of Health on 22 October 2013. An outbreak investigation team was mobilized to confirm the existence of an outbreak of hepatitis A and advise appropriate public health interventions. Methods A case definition for the outbreak investigation was established, and standardized data collection tools were used to collect information on clinical presentation and risk factors. An environmental assessment was also conducted. Results There were 160 clinical cases of hepatitis A of which 15 were laboratory-confirmed. The attack rate was 349 per 10 000 population in the Nukuloa nursing zone; there were no reported deaths. Residents of the Nukuloa settlement were 6.6 times more likely to present with symptomatic hepatitis A infection (95% confidence interval: 3.8–12.6) compared with residents of another village with a different water supply. Discussion This is the first significant hepatitis A outbreak documented in Ba subdivision and possibly in Fiji. Enhanced surveillance of hepatitis A may reveal other clusters in the country. Improving the primary water source dramatically reduced the occurance of disease in the affected community and adjacent areas. PMID:26306214

  3. [Nodular liver lesions with fever in a Moroccan man: hepatic brucelloma].

    PubMed

    Ennibi, K; Rabhi, M; Chemsi, M; Elouennass, M; Chaari, J; Toloune, F

    2009-10-01

    Hepatic brucelloma is an exceptional localization in brucellosis. The purpose of this report is to describe an uncommon case involving a 42-year-old man hospitalized for febrile hepatic cytolysis. Diagnosis was established based on positive rose bengal test results, positive blood culture, hypoechogenic masses on ultrasound, and hypodense enhancing masses on CT scan. Hepatic brucelloma is a focal suppurative lesion occurring after undetected acute brucellosis or undertreated brucellosis. Diagnosis is based on the association of imaging showing characteristic features (hepatic calcifications) and on positive blood culture and serology. First-line treatment should consist of doxycyclin and rifampicin for 2 to 12 months. If medical treatment fails, surgical drainage should be performed. PMID:20025187

  4. The Woodchuck, a Nonprimate Model for Immunopathogenesis and Therapeutic Immunomodulation in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Roggendorf, Michael; Kosinska, Anna D; Liu, Jia; Lu, Mengji

    2015-12-01

    The woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) and its host, the eastern woodchuck, is a very valuable model system for hepatitis B virus infection. Many aspects of WHV replication and pathogenesis resemble acute and chronic hepatitis B infection in patients. Since the establishment of immunological tools, woodchucks were used to develop new therapeutic vaccines and immunomodulatory approaches to treat chronic hepadnaviral infections. Combination therapy of nucleos(t)ide analogs, with prime-boost vaccination and triple therapy, including immunomodulatory strategies by blocking the interaction of the programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor with its ligand inducing a potent T-cell response in chronic WHV carrier woodchucks, suppression of viral replication, and complete elimination of the virus in 30% of the animals. Both strategies may be used for future therapies in patients with chronic hepatitis B. PMID:26511761

  5. Chinese green tea and acute hepatitis: a rare yet recurring theme.

    PubMed

    Lugg, Sebastian Thomas; Braganza Menezes, Darryl; Gompertz, Simon

    2015-09-23

    A previously healthy 16-year-old girl presented with signs of acute hepatitis. On initial enquiry, she had not taken any prescribed or 'over-the-counter' medications, and there was no recent travel history. Further investigations revealed no viral, autoimmune or metabolic cause of hepatitis. Only following specific questioning did she reveal that she had, in the preceding 3 months, regularly consumed internet ordered Chinese green tea, which contained Camellia sinensis. After ceasing green tea consumption, there was a rapid and sustained recovery of her hepatitis. The authors discuss the probable cause of herbal tea in this case of acute hepatitis, and the importance of awareness of this rare yet recurring theme for patients and clinicians alike.

  6. Hepatic NAD salvage pathway is enhanced in mice on a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Penke, Melanie; Larsen, Per S; Schuster, Susanne; Dall, Morten; Jensen, Benjamin A H; Gorski, Theresa; Meusel, Andrej; Richter, Sandy; Vienberg, Sara G; Treebak, Jonas T; Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje

    2015-09-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) is the rate-limiting enzyme for NAD salvage and the abundance of Nampt has been shown to be altered in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. It is, however, unknown how hepatic Nampt is regulated in response to accumulation of lipids in the liver of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). HFD mice gained more weight, stored more hepatic lipids and had an impaired glucose tolerance compared with control mice. NAD levels as well as Nampt mRNA expression, protein abundance and activity were significantly increased in HFD mice. Enhanced NAD levels were associated with deacetylation of p53 and Nfκb indicating increased activation of Sirt1. Despite impaired glucose tolerance and increased hepatic lipid levels in HFD mice, NAD metabolism was significantly enhanced. Thus, improved NAD metabolism may be a compensatory mechanism to protect against negative impact of hepatic lipid accumulation.

  7. Hydroxychloroquine-induced toxic hepatitis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Abdel Galil, S M

    2015-05-01

    Increased serum level of liver enzymes is a common finding in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Hepatotoxic drugs, viral hepatitis and fatty liver are thought to be the main causes of hepatic lesion in these patients. Our aim was to determine the cause of strikingly elevated liver enzymes in a case with systemic lupus presenting with acute abdomen. Liver enzyme abnormality was defined as a 10-fold or greater increase in aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. Acute toxic hepatitis was diagnosed, which rapidly returned to normal after cessation of the suspected causative medication, hydroxychloroquine, and subsequent administration of mycophenolate mofetil. Elevated liver enzymes are a major concern and should be well investigated in SLE patients.

  8. Hepatitis A and B immunization for individuals with inherited bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Steele, M; Cochrane, A; Wakefield, C; Stain, A-M; Ling, S; Blanchette, V; Gold, R; Ford-Jones, L

    2009-03-01

    Hepatitis A and B vaccines are highly effective tools that can greatly reduce infection risk in the bleeding disorder population. Although hepatitis A and B immunization for individuals with bleeding disorders is universally recommended, various advisory bodies often differ with respect to many practical aspects of vaccination. To review the published literature and guidelines and form a practical, comprehensive and consistent approach to hepatitis A and B immunization for individuals with bleeding disorders. We reviewed published immunization guidelines from North American immunization advisory bodies and published statements from North American and international haemophilia advisory bodies. A search of the MEDLINE database was performed to find original published literature pertaining to hepatitis A or B immunization of patients with haemophilia or bleeding disorder patients that provided supporting or refuting evidence for advisory body guidelines. Various advisory bodies' immunization guidelines regarding individuals with bleeding disorders have contradictory statements and often did not clarify issues (e.g. post vaccination surveillance). Published literature addressing immunization in bleeding disorder patients is sparse and mostly examines route of vaccine administration, complications and corresponding antibody response. Although the risk of hepatitis A and B infection is low, the use of simple measures such as vaccination is reasonable and advocated by haemophilia advisory bodies. Following our review of the available literature and North American guidelines, we have developed comprehensive and practical recommendations addressing hepatitis A and B immunization for the bleeding disorder population that may be applicable in Bleeding Disorder clinics.

  9. Genetic analysis of hepatitis A virus strains that induced epidemics in Korea during 2007-2009.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeokjin; Jeong, Hyesook; Yun, Heasun; Kim, Kisang; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Yang, Jai Myung; Cheon, Doo-Sung

    2012-04-01

    Hepatitis A virus is one of the most prominent causes of fecally transmitted acute hepatitis worldwide. In order to characterize the viral agents causing an outbreak in Korea (comprising North and South Korea) from June 2007 to May 2009, we collected specimens and performed genotyping of the VP1/P2A and VP3/VP1 regions of hepatitis A virus. We then used a multiple-alignment algorithm to compare the nucleotide sequences of the 2 regions with those of reference strains. Hepatitis A virus antibodies were detected in 64 patients from 5 reported outbreaks (North Korea, June 2007 [n = 11]; Jeonnam, April 2008 [n = 15]; Daegu, May 2008 [n = 13]; Seoul, May 2009 [n = 22]; and Incheon, May 2009 [n = 3]). We found 100% homology between strains isolated from the Kaesong Industrial Region and Jeonnam. While those strains were classified as genotype IA strains, strains from Seoul and Incheon were identified as genotype IIIA strains and showed 98.9 to 100% homology. Genotype IIIA was also dominant in Daegu, where strains were 95.7 to 100% homologous. All hepatitis A virus strains isolated from the Kaesong Industrial Region, Jeonnam, Seoul, and Incheon belonged to a single cluster. However, strains from Daegu could be classified into 2 clusters, suggesting that the outbreak had multiple sources. This study indicates that hepatitis A virus strains of 2 different genotypes are currently cocirculating in Korea. Moreover, it documents an increasing prevalence of genotype IIIA strains in the country. PMID:22238447

  10. [A French soldier returns from the Central Africa Republic with hepatitis A: Vaccination failure is possible!].

    PubMed

    Ficko, C; Conan, P L; Bigaillon, C; Duron, S; Rapp, C

    2015-01-01

    In stays in tropical countries, the French military, and travelers in general, are exposed to diseases transmitted by the fecal-oral route, some of which are vaccine-preventable. Here we report a 42-yer-old soldier with hepatitis A, which first appeared on his return from a military operation in the Central African Republic. Despite its excellent immunogenicity and a duration of seroprotection extending beyond 20 years in the vast majority of cases, the hepatitis A vaccine can fail. This reminds us of the importance of combining vaccine and non-vaccine prevention in tropical countries, especially in precarious living conditions.

  11. A Facile Inhibitor Screening of Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Protein Using Nanoparticle-Based RNA

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Changhyun

    2012-01-01

    Globally, over hundreds of million people are infected with the hepatitis C virus: the global rate of death as a direct result of the hepatitis C virus has increased remarkably. For this reason, the development of efficient drug treatments for the biological effects of the hepatitis C virus is highly necessary. We have previously shown that quantum dots (QDs)-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide can recognize the hepatitis C virus NS3 protein specifically and sensitively. In this study, we elucidated that this biochip can analyze inhibitors to the hepatitis C virus NS3 protein using a nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide. Among the polyphenolic compounds examined, 7,8,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone and 6,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone demonstrated a remarkable inhibition activity on the hepatitis C virus NS3 protein. Both 7,8,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone and 6,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone attenuated the binding affinity in a concentrated manner as evidenced by QDs conjugated RNA oligonucleotide. At a concentration of 0.01 μg·mL−1, 7,8,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone and 6,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone showed more than a 30% inhibition activity of a nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide biochip system. PMID:25586033

  12. Extensive myocardial iron deposition in a patient with hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Rusovici, Arthur; Ibrahim, Samia; Sood, Sunita; Maher, James; Gerula, Christine; Kaluski, Edo; Klapholz, Marc

    2012-01-01

    During a cardiac evaluation prior to liver transplantation, a 51-year-old man with hepatitis C and cirrhosis was found to have nonischemic cardiomyopathy-a condition that would have made him ineligible for liver transplantation. Right ventricular biopsy revealed extensive cardiac hemosiderosis. Despite the elevated levels of serum ferritin, the patient had no history of multiple red blood cell transfusions; moreover, genetic testing for hereditary hemochromatosis was negative for the HFE mutations C282Y and H63D. Chelation therapy was considered for this patient, to reduce the cardiac iron deposits. However, before a course of treatment was established, the patient's clinical condition worsened, and chelation therapy was no longer feasible. He was referred for combined heart and liver transplantation. Cardiac iron deposition can be diagnosed readily using right ventricular biopsy or T2* magnetic resonance imaging. Early detection may allow time for intensive chelation therapy, which might, in turn, reverse the myopathic process. Improved cardiac function should improve cirrhosis patients' chances to be placed on the liver transplant waiting list and ultimately optimize transplantation outcomes.

  13. Hepatitis E virus infection--a new threat for Europe.

    PubMed

    Łapiński, Tadeusz Wojciech; Jaroszewicz, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Of 20 million of patients infected with hepatitis E virus (HEV) worldwide 57 thousand dies each year. HEV-infection is not longer regarded as a diseases in developing endemic countries of Asia, Africa and Latin America. The majority of European countries faces increasing number of endemic infections. They are caused by seven different genotypes and be responsible for acute and chronic infections. HEV is of zoonotic origin causing infections in pigs and boars which are a source of infection for humans. Infections occur orally after consumption of infected water or meat. HEV-infection is most dangerous for patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, infected with HIV, after transplantations of solid organs and elderly. In some patients, including pregnant women, acute HEV has a serious course with fatalities reaching even 25%. Chronic HEV-infection may develop in patients following solid organ transplantations and requires long-term antiviral therapy. HEV-infection is a growing public health problem in Europe, which implies the necessity of routine screening in selected populations, especially immunocompromised. PMID:27344467

  14. HBVdb: a knowledge database for Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Hayer, Juliette; Jadeau, Fanny; Deléage, Gilbert; Kay, Alan; Zoulim, Fabien; Combet, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a specialized database, HBVdb (http://hbvdb.ibcp.fr), allowing the researchers to investigate the genetic variability of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and viral resistance to treatment. HBV is a major health problem worldwide with more than 350 million individuals being chronically infected. HBV is an enveloped DNA virus that replicates by reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate. HBV genome is optimized, being circular and encoding four overlapping reading frames. Indeed, each nucleotide of the genome takes part in the coding of at least one protein. However, HBV shows some genome variability leading to at least eight different genotypes and recombinant forms. The main drugs used to treat infected patients are nucleos(t)ides analogs (reverse transcriptase inhibitors). Unfortunately, HBV mutants resistant to these drugs may be selected and be responsible for treatment failure. HBVdb contains a collection of computer-annotated sequences based on manually annotated reference genomes. The database can be accessed through a web interface that allows static and dynamic queries and offers integrated generic sequence analysis tools and specialized analysis tools (e.g. annotation, genotyping, drug resistance profiling).

  15. Primary Hepatic Lymphoma: A Retrospective, Multicenter Rare Cancer Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Ugurluer, Gamze; Miller, Robert C.; Li, Yexiong; Thariat, Juliette; Ghadjar, Pirus; Schick, Ulrike; Ozsahin, Mahmut

    2016-01-01

    Primary hepatic lymphoma (PHL) is a rare malignancy. We aimed to assess the clinical profile, outcome and prognostic factors in PHL through the Rare Cancer Network (RCN). A retrospective analysis of 41 patients was performed. Median age was 62 years (range, 23-86 years) with a male-to-female ratio of 1.9:1.0. Abdominal pain or discomfort was the most common presenting symptom. Regarding B-symptoms, 19.5% of patients had fever, 17.1% weight loss, and 9.8% night sweats. The most common radiological presentation was multiple lesions. Liver function tests were elevated in 56.1% of patients. The most common histopathological diagnosis was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (65.9%). Most of the patients received Chop-like (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone) regimens; 4 patients received radiotherapy (dose range, 30.6-40.0 Gy). Median survival was 163 months, and 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 77 and 59%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year disease-free and lymphoma-specific survival rates were 69, 56, 87 and 70%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that fever, weight loss, and normal hemoglobin level were the independent factors influencing the outcome. In this retrospective multicenter RCN study, patients with PHL had a relatively better prognosis than that reported elsewhere. Multicenter prospective studies are still warranted to establish treatment guidelines, outcome, and prognostic factors. PMID:27746888

  16. Seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus among Iranian soldiers

    PubMed Central

    Izadi, Morteza; Esfahani, Ali Aliakbar; Hassannia, Hadi; Jonaidi Jafari, Nematollah; Rahmati Najarkolaei, Fatemeh; Rezaee-Zavareh, Mohammad Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to investigate the seroprevalence of HAV immunity among Iranian soldiers and determine whether vaccination should be given to military draftees. Background: Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is highly contagious in individuals living in crowded conditions such as military centers. To the best of our knowledge, there are limited data about HAV prevalence among Iranian soldiers. Patients and methods: In this cross-sectional study, a total of 1554 soldiers were recruited through a random clustering sampling. Serum anti-HAV antibody was measured by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS. Results: A total of 1554 male soldiers with age ranged from 18 to 34 years (mean age: 21.2±1.9 years) at baseline were evaluated. Overall, 80.3% of the analyzed specimens were anti-HAV seropositive. Seroprevalence rates significantly increased with the age. Conclusion: Our results suggest that vaccination for HAV is not necessary for Iranian military draftees. However, the vaccination is recommended for high-risk groups, including anti-HAV seronegative soldiers. PMID:27099669

  17. Acute acalculous cholecystitis caused by Hepatitis C: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Ahmed; Osman, Medhet; Bonnet, Gerard; Ghamri, Nafiz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is rarely encountered in clinical practice and has a high morbidity and mortality. AAC caused by viral hepatitis, with hepatitis A, B and EBV infections are rare, but well documented in the literature. Hepatitis C virus has not been reported as cause of AAC. This case report documents the first case of AAC associated with Acute Hepatitis C. Presenting concerns We present a 40 years old female with abdominal pain. She has a history of previous HCV infection. Her liver function tests were markedly deranged with elevated inflammatory markers. USS scan showed rather a very unusual appearance of an inflamed gallbladder with no gallstones and associated acute hepatitis, confirmed by an abdominal CT scan. HCV RNA PCR confirms flair up of the virus. The patient was managed conservatively in the hospital with follow up USS scan and Liver function tests showed complete recovery. Follow up HCV RNA PCR also returned to an undetectable level. The patient recovered completely with no adverse outcomes. Conclusion This case report is to the first to document the association between acute HCV and AAC. Despite being uncommon in western countries, viral hepatitis should be suspected as a causative agent of AAC, particularly when there is abnormal liver function test and no biliary obstruction. PMID:26722714

  18. Endothelial cells are damaged by autophagic induction before hepatocytes in Con A-induced acute hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Chen; Chang, Chih-Peng; Lei, Huan-Yao

    2010-08-01

    We have reported both T-cell-dependent and -independent hepatitis in immunocompetent and immunodeficiency mice, respectively, after intravenous injection of Con A in mice. The mode of hepatocyte cell death is different: autophagy for T-cell-independent hepatitis in contrast to apoptosis for T-cell-dependent one. In this study, we further demonstrate that liver blood vessels are the first target in both modes. The infused Con A bond to the hepatic vascular endothelial cells and cause its damage with autophagy. Before the elevation of the serum alanine aminotransferase at 6 h post-injection, the plasma leakage and hemorrhage occur at 1-3 h without inflammation. Con A induces autophagy of endothelial cells and hemorrhage that is enhanced by IFN-gamma. Using the endothelial cell line HMEC-1, a dose- and time-dependent cell death with autophagic LC3-II (microtubule-associated protein light chain 3) conversion was induced by Con A and was enhanced by IFN-gamma. In conclusion, Con A induced autophagy on hepatic endothelial cells; the damage of liver blood vessel occurs before the induction of T-cell-dependent hepatitis via apoptosis or T-cell-independent hepatitis via autophagy.

  19. Correlation between histologic staging, hepatitis C virus genotypes and clinical features in HCV chronic hepatitis: evidence of a new pattern.

    PubMed

    Di Tommaso, L; Macchia, S; Morandi, L; Leoncini, S; Pession, A; Dal Monte, P R; Foschini, M P

    2003-07-01

    Genome heterogeneity may be related to the wide variability of clinical and pathological features in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related chronic liver disease. This paper addresses the possible association between HCV subtypes and clinical and histological features of chronically infected patients. Sixty-eight consecutive liver biopsies of chronic hepatitis constituted the basis of the study. HCV genotyping was performed on frozen tissue. Grading of necroinflammatory activity and staging of fibrosis were histologically assessed. Serologic HCV-RNA and liver function were assessed at the same time. All information was compared with clinical data including age, sex, HCV serology, and probable data and route of infection. Two cases were excluded as inadequate tissue was available. Five cases were negative to HCV-RNA in both serum and tissue. In 61 cases HCV RNA was present at the same time in serum and liver tissue. Forty-four patients were men (72%) and 17 (28%) were women. Two peaks of age were observed: 1 in the 4th decade of life, the 2nd in the 7th. The 2 groups had different HCV genotypes. Patients with genotypes 1b (mean age 50.7 years), 2c (mean age 61.3 years), and a subgroup of coinfections (mean age 60 years) were older than patients with genotypes 1a (mean age 35.5 years), 3 (mean age 36 years), and a subgroup of coinfections (mean age 33 years). Patients with genotypes 1b, 2, or 2c and a subgroup of coinfections more frequently had a history of blood transfusion and or surgical intervention dating up to 49 years previously. Patients with HCV 1a, 3, and a subgroup of coinfections frequently admitted a period of intravenous drug abuse. Patients with advanced liver disease, i.e., severe fibrosis and cirrhosis, showed the same 2 peaks of incidence: in the 4th and 7th decades of life, the first group mainly comprising patients with HCV types 1a and 3, the second, patients with HCV types 1b and 2c. Both these groups shared a clinical history of a long

  20. Assessment of a Flavone-Polysaccharide Based Prescription for Treating Duck Virus Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hongxu; Zhang, Shuaibing; Song, Meiyun; Wang, Yixuan; Zeng, Ling; Chen, Yun; Xiong, Wen; Yang, Jingjing; Yao, Fangke; Wu, Yi; Wang, Deyun; Hu, Yuanliang; Liu, Jiaguo

    2016-01-01

    Because polysaccharide and flavone ingredients display good antiviral activity, we developed a flavone/polysaccharide-containing prescription that would be effective against duck viral hepatitis (DVH) and investigated its hepatoprotective effects. Flavones were derived from Hypericum japonicum (HJF) (entire herb of Hypericum japonicum Thunb) and Salvia plebeia (SPF) (entire herb of Salvia plebeia R. Br.), and polysaccharides were derived from Radix Rehmanniae Recens (RRRP) (dried root of Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch). This prescription combination was based on the theory of syndrome differentiation and treatment in traditional Chinese veterinary medicine. In vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted using the three single ingredients compared to the combined HRS prescription to determine their anti-duck hepatitis A viral (anti-DHAV) activity. The results showed that all experimental conditions displayed anti-DHAV activity, but the HRS prescription presented the best effect. To further investigate the hepatoprotective effect of the HRS prescription on DHAV-induced hepatic injury, we tested the mortality rate, the hepatic pathological severity score, plasma biochemical indexes of hepatic function, blood DHAV gene expression levels and peroxidation damage evaluation indexes and then analyzed correlations among these indexes. The results demonstrated that the HRS prescription significantly decreased the mortality rate, reduced the severity of hepatic injury, decreased the hepatic pathological severity score, depressed blood DHAV gene expression levels, and returned the indexes of hepatic function and peroxidation almost to a normal level. These results indicate that the HRS prescription confers an outstanding hepatoprotective effect, and we expect that it will be developed into a new candidate anti-DHAV drug. PMID:26731101

  1. Transmission of nonA/nonB hepatitis during coagulation pyelolithotomy.

    PubMed

    McVary, K T; O'Conor, V J

    1989-04-01

    The use of coagulum for renal stone surgery is an important yet less frequently used tool in the urological armamentarium. We report the first documented case of transmission of viral hepatitis during coagulum pyelolithotomy. We review the basic tenets of its use, with a brief discussion of the blood-borne transmission of viral particles and risk of hepatic injury with volatile anesthetic agents, and propose the continued safe use of coagulum by autologous donation of cryoprecipitate. PMID:2494360

  2. Sex hormone influence on hepatitis in young male A/JCr mice infected with Helicobacter hepaticus.

    PubMed

    Theve, Elizabeth J; Feng, Yan; Taghizadeh, Koli; Cormier, Kathleen S; Bell, David R; Fox, James G; Rogers, Arlin B

    2008-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), the leading cause of human hepatocellular carcinoma, is especially virulent in males infected at an early age. Likewise, the murine liver carcinogen Helicobacter hepaticus is most pathogenic in male mice infected before puberty. We used this model to investigate the influence of male sex hormone signaling on infectious hepatitis. Male A/JCr mice were infected with H. hepaticus or vehicle at 4 weeks and randomized into surgical and pharmacologic treatment groups. Interruption of androgen pathways was confirmed by hormone measurements, histopathology, and liver gene and Cyp4a protein expression. Castrated males and those receiving the competitive androgen receptor antagonist flutamide had significantly less severe hepatitis as determined by histologic activity index than intact controls at 4 months. Importantly, the powerful androgen receptor agonist dihydrotestosterone did not promote hepatitis. No effect on hepatitis was evident in males treated with the 5alpha-reductase inhibitor dutasteride, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha agonist bezafibrate, or the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug flufenamic acid. Consistent with previous observations of hepatitis-associated liver-gender disruption, transcriptional alterations involved both feminine (cytochrome P450 4a14) and masculine (cytochrome P450 4a12 and trefoil factor 3) genes, as well gender-neutral (H19 fetal liver mRNA, lipocalin 2, and ubiquitin D) genes. Hepatitis was associated with increased unsaturated C(18) long-chain fatty acids (oleic acid and linoleic acid) relative to saturated stearic acid. Our results indicate that certain forms of androgen interruption can inhibit H. hepaticus-induced hepatitis in young male mice, whereas androgen receptor agonism does not worsen disease. This raises the possibility of targeted hormonal therapy in young male patients with childhood-acquired HBV.

  3. Hepatic encephalopathy: a review of its pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Dbouk, Nader; McGuire, Brendan M

    2006-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a broad spectrum of neuropsychiatric manifestations usually affecting individuals with end-stage liver disease. The presence of HE is a poor prognostic sign, with 1-year mortality rates of almost 60%. There is much debate about the underlying mechanisms that result in this syndrome; however, elevated plasma and central nervous system ammonia levels are considered key factors in its pathogenesis. Initial evaluation of the patient presenting with overt HE should include a careful search for predisposing factors, including underlying infection, gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, electrolyte disturbances, hepatocellular carcinoma, dehydration, hypotension, and excessive use of benzodiazepines, psychoactive drugs, or alcohol. The mainstay of treatment for many years has been nonabsorbable disaccharides, particularly lactulose. Alternative treatments, which usually are second line in patients who do not respond to lactulose, include zinc, antibiotics (neomycin, metronidazole, and rifaximin), ornithine aspartate, sodium benzoate, probiotics, and surgical intervention. Accepted treatments for HE are associated with significant unpleasant side effects, including diarrhea, renal failure, neuropathy, and other GI disturbance. Newer therapies are still in development, and most are awaiting human trials in order to confirm their benefit. These include manganese chelators, L-carnitine, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists, blood purification dialysis system, and an intravenous combination of sodium benzoate and phenylacetate. PMID:17081480

  4. A probability cellular automaton model for hepatitis B viral infections.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Shao, Shi-Huang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2006-04-01

    The existing models of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection dynamics are based on the assumption that the populations of viruses and cells are uniformly mixed. However, the real virus infection system is actually not homogeneous and some spatial factors might play a nontrivial role in governing the development of HBV infection and its outcome. For instance, the localized populations of dead cells might adversely affect the spread of infection. To consider this kind of inhomogeneous feature, a simple 2D (dimensional) probability Cellular Automaton model was introduced to study the dynamic process of HBV infection. The model took into account the existence of different types of HBV infectious and non-infectious particles. The simulation results thus obtained showed that the Cellular Automaton model could successfully account for some important features of the disease, such as its wide variety in manifestation and its age dependency. Meanwhile, the effects of the model's parameters on the dynamical process of the infection were also investigated. It is anticipated that the Cellular Automaton model may be extended to serve as a useful vehicle for studying, among many other complicated dynamic biological systems, various persistent infections with replicating parasites.

  5. Acute pancreatitis associated with acute viral hepatitis A (HAV) - a case report.

    PubMed

    Arafat, S M; Azad, A K; Basher, A; Ananna, M A; Islam, M S; Abdullah, S; Abdullah, A M; Islam, M A

    2013-01-01

    In this case report, a young woman had acute viral hepatitis (HAV) and acute pancreatitis together. She was admitted to our hospital with fever, jaundice and abdominal pain. Hepatic and pancreatic enzymes were elevated. Her serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level was high. An initial abdominal ultrasound was per-formed at hospital and revealed features of acute viral hepatitis. Spiral computed imaging revealed imaging features of an acute stage of pancreatitis and gallbladder wall thickness. HAV infection was diagnosed by the detection of immunoglobulin M (IgM) against HAV in the serum. She was closely monitored and treated conservatively. On 10th day of hospital admission she was discharge after an uneventful recovery. In the current literature HAV infections have rarely been reported as a cause of acute pancreatitis.

  6. A trial to reduce hepatitis C seroincidence in drug users.

    PubMed

    Stein, Michael D; Herman, Debra S; Anderson, Bradley J

    2009-10-01

    To test whether a four-session motivational intervention would reduce hepatitis C virus (HCV) seroincidence among injection and non-injection drug users compared to an assessment-only condition, we performed a randomized 24-month clinical trial. At baseline, 277 participants reported using heroin or cocaine at least three times weekly were HCV antibody negative, 65% were male and 46% were Caucasian and 39% reported having injected drugs. Of the 15 (5.4%) individuals who seroconverted, all reported injecting drugs either at baseline or during follow-up. Seroconversion rates did not differ significantly by treatment assignment (p =.79). The annual HCV incident rate was 8.20 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.76-14.13) for injectors and 0.74 (95% CI = 0.19-2.98) for non-injectors per 100 person-years. Significantly fewer participants in the intervention group initiated injection drug use behaviors (p =.009). This intervention was no more effective at reducing HCV seroconversion than assessment alone but did decrease injection initiation. PMID:20155608

  7. Genetic characterization of Duck Hepatitis A Viruses isolated in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Bi, Yuhai; Chen, Can; Yang, Limin; Ding, Chan; Liu, Wenjun

    2013-12-26

    In recent years, the spread of Duck Hepatitis A Viruses (DHAVs) has represented a serious threat and significant economic impact in duck industry of China. The sixteen reported DHAV isolates (15 DHAV-1 strains and one DHAV-3) were identified from infected ducks with clinical symptoms in China between 2009 and 2012. In the present study, the virulence of these viruses and complete sequences of the virion protein 1 (VP1) genes of the 16 DHAVs were characterized. The median embryonic lethal doses (ELD50) of the second generation duck embryo allantoic fluid of the 16 DHAV isolates were calculated on duck and chicken embryos. The results demonstrated that the various DHAV-1 strains have shown different pathogenic ability in embryos, and duck eggs were more susceptible to DHAV than chicken eggs. The histopathological examination revealed significant signs of virus infection, severe vacuolation, and hepatocyte necrosis. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the 15 DHAV-1 viruses display significant correlation in their geographic distribution. The DHAV-1 strains isolated from Shandong Province were more evolutionarily divergent than the JX strains. There were two hypervariable regions in the VP1 protein, which may determine the virulence of DHAV-1 isolates in chicken eggs but not virulence in duck eggs. These results demonstrate the genetic and biological diversity of DHAVs in China and aid in understanding the epidemiology and evolution of DHAVs.

  8. Dysplastic Hepatocytes Develop Nuclear Inclusions in a Mouse Model of Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Priyanka; Lamoke, Folami; Chaffin, Joanna M.; Bartoli, Manuela; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Duncan, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Viral hepatitis resulting in chronic liver disease is an important clinical challenge and insight into the cellular processes that drive pathogenesis will be critical in order to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic options. Nuclear inclusions in viral and non-viral hepatitis are well documented and have diagnostic significance in some disease contexts. However, the origins and functional consequences of these nuclear inclusions remain elusive. To date the clinical observation of nuclear inclusions in viral and non-viral hepatitis has not been explored at depth in murine models of liver disease. Herein, we report that in a transgenic model of hepatitis B surface antigen mediated hepatitis, murine hepatocytes exhibit nuclear inclusions. Cells bearing nuclear inclusions were more likely to express markers of cell proliferation. We also established a correlation between these inclusions and oxidative stress. N-acetyl cysteine treatment effectively reduced oxidative stress levels, relieved endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and the number of nuclear inclusions we observed in the transgenic mice. Our results suggest that the presence of nuclear inclusions in hepatocytes correlates with oxidative stress and cellular proliferation in a model of antigen mediated hepatitis. PMID:24932583

  9. Hepatitis C in Pakistan: a review of available data.

    PubMed

    Umar, Muhammad; Bushra, Hamama Tul; Ahmad, Masood; Data, Available; Ahmad, Masood; Khurram, Muhammad; Usman, Saima; Arif, Mohammad; Adam, Tashfeen; Minhas, Zahid; Arif, Adnan; Naeem, Abdul; Ejaz, Khushnud; Butt, Zameer; Bilal, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is increasingly recognized as a major health care problem, and is found frequently in Pakistani settings. In this article we reviewed published and unpublished data related to the seroepidemiology of HCV infection in Pakistan. For this article, data from 132 published studies and three unpublished data sets published/ presented between the period 1992-2008 were utilized. Data of 1,183,329 individuals were gathered. Blood donors (982,481) and the general population (178,322) constituted the majority of these subjects. The frequency of HCV infection in blood donors and in the general population was 3.0 % (95% CI: 3.0- 3.1) and 4.7 (95% CI: 4.6 -4.8), respectively. The frequency among 6,148 pregnant females was 7.3% (95% CI = 6.7 - 8.0). The frequency in healthy children ranged from 0.4 to 4.1% (95% CI = 1.4 - 2.3). Pakistani HCV serofrequency figures are significantly higher (P < 0.0001) compared to those of the corresponding populations in surrounding countries like India, Nepal, Myanmar, Iran and Afghanistan.

  10. Hepatic sarcoidosis complicating treatment-naive viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Aravinthan, Aloysious; Gelson, William; Limbu, Anita; Brais, Rebecca; Richardson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic sarcoidosis is usually asymptomatic but rarely leads to adverse liver-related outcome. Co-existence of viral hepatitis and hepatic sarcoidosis is a rare, but recognised phenomenon. Obtaining a balance between immune suppression and anti-viral therapy may be problematic. Immunosuppression in the presence of viral hepatitis can lead to rapid deterioration of liver disease. Similarly, anti-viral therapy may exacerbate granulomatous hepatitis. Here we present two cases of viral hepatitis co-existing with sarcoidosis that illustrate successful management strategies. In one, hepatitis B replication was suppressed with oral anti-viral therapy before commencing prednisolone. In the second, remission of hepatic sarcoidosis was achieved with prednisolone, before treating hepatitis C and obtaining a sustained virological response with pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy. PMID:23355920

  11. Hepatic metastasis is a poor predictive marker for erlotinib in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    He, Yayi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Shijia; Ren, Shengxiang; Li, Jiayu; Zhou, Caicun

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related death worldwide and most of lung cancer patients have had metastases when they are diagnosed. With respect to chemotherapy, target therapy is a more effective and less toxic treatments. The epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), such as gefitinib or erlotinib, are one of the representatives of targeted therapy which have been widely used in first line, maintenance and 2nd/3rd line therapy among advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). But those with hepatic metastases may insensitive to EGFR-TKIs due to MET activation by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). In our retrospective analysis, 164 lung adenocarcinoma patients with known epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status who received the treatment of erlotinib as 2nd/3rd line setting were reviewed. The disease control rate (DCR) in patients without hepatic metastases group was higher than that in patients with hepatic metastases (66.1% vs 54.5%, p<0.001). In EGFR mutation-positive patients, median PFS was significantly longer in patients without hepatic metastases than that in those with hepatic metastases (9.9months 95% CI 7.74-12.06months vs. 7.9months 95% CI 5.88-9.92months; p=0.017). Therefore, we assume that hepatic metastasis may be a poor predictive marker for erlotinib in lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27515192

  12. [A Case of Composite Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Neuroendocrine Carcinoma in a Patient with Liver Cirrhosis Caused by Chronic Hepatitis B].

    PubMed

    Yun, Eun Young; Kim, Tae Hyo; Lee, Sang Soo; Kim, Hong Jun; Kim, Hyun Jin; Jung, Woon Tae; Lee, Ok Jae; Song, Dae Hyun

    2016-08-25

    Primary hepatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (PHNEC) is rare and its origin is not clearly understood. The coexistence of PHNEC and hepaotcellular carcinoma has been reported in only a few cases. We report a rare case of combined PHNEC and hepaotcellular carcinoma in a patient with liver cirrhosis caused by chronic hepatitis B that resulted in aggressive behavior and poor prognosis. PMID:27554219

  13. Hepatitis B and Liver Cancer Among Three Asian American Sub-Groups: A Focus Group Inquiry

    PubMed Central

    Erby, Lori A. H.; Lee, Sunmin; Juon, Hee-Soon

    2013-01-01

    Prevalence of hepatitis B among Asian Americans is higher than for any other ethnic group in the United States. Since more than 50% of liver cancer is hepatitis B related, the burden of morbidity and mortality is extremely high among Asian Americans, highlighting the need for culturally appropriate interventions. We conducted focus groups (n = 8) with a total of 58 Korean, Vietnamese, and Chinese immigrants in Maryland to explore knowledge, awareness and perceived barriers toward hepatitis B screening and vaccinations. Thematic analysis uncovered generally low levels of knowledge and awareness of hepatitis B risks, screening, and vaccination; inter-generational differences; and barriers to prevention. Some differences arose across ethnic groups, particularly toward perceived orientation to preventive activities and the role of religious groups. High rates of hepatitis B infection among Asian Americans highlight the need for tailored interventions. These findings may assist policy strategists in implementing interventions that will facilitate the integration and scale-up of hepatitis B education, screening, and vaccination campaigns. PMID:21901445

  14. Psychological Reactions among Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B: a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Leila; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Negarandeh, Reza; Zamani, Farhad; Hamidia, Angela; Zabihi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hepatitis B is the most prevalent type of viral hepatitis. Psychological reactions among patients with hepatitis B infection is considerably different and affects their decision about treating and following up the disease. The present study aims at explaining the psychological demonstrations experienced by these patients. Methods: In this qualitative study, a total of 18 patients with hepatitis B (8 women and 10 men) were selected by purposive sampling method. Data were collected by unstructured in-depth interviews during 2014-2015 in the medical centers of three cities in Iran. All interviews were recorded, typed and analyzed by the conventional content analysis approach. Results: By analyzing the data, the main theme including psychological instability, with three sub-themes were emerged: grief reaction (stupor, denial, anger and aggression), emotional challenges (worry and apprehension, contradiction with beliefs, fear of deprivation, fear of stigma, waiting for death and prognosis ambiguity) and inferiority complex (social withdrawal, sense of humiliation and embarrassment and sense of guilt and blame) were acquired. Conclusion: The findings indicate that patients with hepatitis B experience various psychological reactions that need to be controlled and managed by themselves or healthcare providers. Thus, implementation of health interventions with emphasis on psychological care to prevent problems and execution of educational and consultation programs about hepatitis especially by medical centers and mass media is seems necessary. PMID:26989666

  15. A proposal for management of rheumatic disease patients with hepatitis B virus infection receiving immunosuppressive therapy.

    PubMed

    Harigai, Masayoshi; Mochida, Satoshi; Mimura, Toshihide; Koike, Takao; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and de novo HBV hepatitis in patients with rheumatic diseases given intensive and long-term immunosuppressive therapy with or without biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs is of great concern, especially in regions where the virus is endemic, including Japan. To ascertain a better benefit-risk balance for immunosuppressive therapy for patients with rheumatic diseases, the Japan College of Rheumatology developed this proposal. All patients with rheumatic diseases commencing immunosuppressive therapy should be screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg); those who are negative for HBsAg should be screened for hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb) and hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb) as well. HBV carriers and serum HBV DNA positive patients with resolved infection should receive nucleoside analog as soon as possible, prior to commencing immunosuppressive therapy. For serum HBV DNA negative patients with resolved infection, careful monthly monitoring using serum levels of aspartate and alanine aminotransferases and HBV DNA is recommended during and at least 12 months after withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy. If serum HBV DNA becomes positive, patients should receive nucleoside analog treatment as soon as possible, while ongoing immunosuppressive therapy should be continued to avoid severe or fulminant hepatitis development. To facilitate proper management of patients with HBV infection, collaboration between rheumatologists and hepatologists is strongly encouraged.

  16. Activated Kupffer cells play an important role in intra-hepatic Th1-associated necro-inflammation in Concanavalin A-induced hepatic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Morita, Atsuhiro; Itoh, Yoshito; Toyama, Tetsuya; Fujii, Hideki; Nishioji, Kenichi; Kirishima, Toshihiko; Makiyama, Akiko; Yamauchi, Norihito; Okanoue, Takeshi

    2003-10-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: To examine whether or not activated Kupffer cells play an important role in intra-hepatic Th1-associated necro-inflammation in Concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatic injury in mice. METHODS: Con A was administered to Balb/c mice pretreated with or without gadolinium chloride (GdCl(3)). Kupffer cell activation was evaluated by their ability to produce superoxide anions in situ under liver perfusion with nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT). Hepatic concentration of cytokines was measured by ELISA and the mRNA expression of CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) was evaluated by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemical detection of CD4 positive lymphocytes in the liver was also performed. RESULTS: GdCl(3)-pretreatment significantly (P<0.01) reduced the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in Con A-treated mice. Formazan deposition in Kupffer cells, the hepatic concentration of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma, the mRNA expression of CXCR3 and the CD4 positive lymphocytes in the liver were decreased in GdCl(3)-pretreated mice as compared with those without GdCl(3)-pretreatment (P<0.05, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Activated Kupffer cells, which produce superoxide anions, are involved in Con A-induced hepatic necro-inflammation in mice possibly through the activation of Th1-associated immune response mediated by CD4 and/or CXCR3 positive cells recruited into the liver.

  17. Evolutionary origins of hepatitis A virus in small mammals

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Corman, Victor M.; Lukashev, Alexander N.; van den Brand, Judith M. A.; Gmyl, Anatoly P.; Brünink, Sebastian; Rasche, Andrea; Seggewiβ, Nicole; Feng, Hui; Leijten, Lonneke M.; Vallo, Peter; Kuiken, Thijs; Dotzauer, Andreas; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Lemon, Stanley M.; Drosten, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is an ancient and ubiquitous human pathogen recovered previously only from primates. The sole species of the genus Hepatovirus, existing in both enveloped and nonenveloped forms, and with a capsid structure intermediate between that of insect viruses and mammalian picornaviruses, HAV is enigmatic in its origins. We conducted a targeted search for hepatoviruses in 15,987 specimens collected from 209 small mammal species globally and discovered highly diversified viruses in bats, rodents, hedgehogs, and shrews, which by pairwise sequence distance comprise 13 novel Hepatovirus species. Near-complete genomes from nine of these species show conservation of unique hepatovirus features, including predicted internal ribosome entry site structure, a truncated VP4 capsid protein lacking N-terminal myristoylation, a carboxyl-terminal pX extension of VP1, VP2 late domains involved in membrane envelopment, and a cis-acting replication element within the 3Dpol sequence. Antibodies in some bat sera immunoprecipitated and neutralized human HAV, suggesting conservation of critical antigenic determinants. Limited phylogenetic cosegregation among hepatoviruses and their hosts and recombination patterns are indicative of major hepatovirus host shifts in the past. Ancestral state reconstructions suggest a Hepatovirus origin in small insectivorous mammals and a rodent origin of human HAV. Patterns of infection in small mammals mimicked those of human HAV in hepatotropism, fecal shedding, acute nature, and extinction of the virus in a closed host population. The evolutionary conservation of hepatovirus structure and pathogenesis provide novel insight into the origins of HAV and highlight the utility of analyzing animal reservoirs for risk assessment of emerging viruses. PMID:26575627

  18. Evolutionary origins of hepatitis A virus in small mammals.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Corman, Victor M; Lukashev, Alexander N; van den Brand, Judith M A; Gmyl, Anatoly P; Brünink, Sebastian; Rasche, Andrea; Seggewiβ, Nicole; Feng, Hui; Leijten, Lonneke M; Vallo, Peter; Kuiken, Thijs; Dotzauer, Andreas; Ulrich, Rainer G; Lemon, Stanley M; Drosten, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is an ancient and ubiquitous human pathogen recovered previously only from primates. The sole species of the genus Hepatovirus, existing in both enveloped and nonenveloped forms, and with a capsid structure intermediate between that of insect viruses and mammalian picornaviruses, HAV is enigmatic in its origins. We conducted a targeted search for hepatoviruses in 15,987 specimens collected from 209 small mammal species globally and discovered highly diversified viruses in bats, rodents, hedgehogs, and shrews, which by pairwise sequence distance comprise 13 novel Hepatovirus species. Near-complete genomes from nine of these species show conservation of unique hepatovirus features, including predicted internal ribosome entry site structure, a truncated VP4 capsid protein lacking N-terminal myristoylation, a carboxyl-terminal pX extension of VP1, VP2 late domains involved in membrane envelopment, and a cis-acting replication element within the 3D(pol) sequence. Antibodies in some bat sera immunoprecipitated and neutralized human HAV, suggesting conservation of critical antigenic determinants. Limited phylogenetic cosegregation among hepatoviruses and their hosts and recombination patterns are indicative of major hepatovirus host shifts in the past. Ancestral state reconstructions suggest a Hepatovirus origin in small insectivorous mammals and a rodent origin of human HAV. Patterns of infection in small mammals mimicked those of human HAV in hepatotropism, fecal shedding, acute nature, and extinction of the virus in a closed host population. The evolutionary conservation of hepatovirus structure and pathogenesis provide novel insight into the origins of HAV and highlight the utility of analyzing animal reservoirs for risk assessment of emerging viruses. PMID:26575627

  19. Evolutionary origins of hepatitis A virus in small mammals.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Corman, Victor M; Lukashev, Alexander N; van den Brand, Judith M A; Gmyl, Anatoly P; Brünink, Sebastian; Rasche, Andrea; Seggewiβ, Nicole; Feng, Hui; Leijten, Lonneke M; Vallo, Peter; Kuiken, Thijs; Dotzauer, Andreas; Ulrich, Rainer G; Lemon, Stanley M; Drosten, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is an ancient and ubiquitous human pathogen recovered previously only from primates. The sole species of the genus Hepatovirus, existing in both enveloped and nonenveloped forms, and with a capsid structure intermediate between that of insect viruses and mammalian picornaviruses, HAV is enigmatic in its origins. We conducted a targeted search for hepatoviruses in 15,987 specimens collected from 209 small mammal species globally and discovered highly diversified viruses in bats, rodents, hedgehogs, and shrews, which by pairwise sequence distance comprise 13 novel Hepatovirus species. Near-complete genomes from nine of these species show conservation of unique hepatovirus features, including predicted internal ribosome entry site structure, a truncated VP4 capsid protein lacking N-terminal myristoylation, a carboxyl-terminal pX extension of VP1, VP2 late domains involved in membrane envelopment, and a cis-acting replication element within the 3D(pol) sequence. Antibodies in some bat sera immunoprecipitated and neutralized human HAV, suggesting conservation of critical antigenic determinants. Limited phylogenetic cosegregation among hepatoviruses and their hosts and recombination patterns are indicative of major hepatovirus host shifts in the past. Ancestral state reconstructions suggest a Hepatovirus origin in small insectivorous mammals and a rodent origin of human HAV. Patterns of infection in small mammals mimicked those of human HAV in hepatotropism, fecal shedding, acute nature, and extinction of the virus in a closed host population. The evolutionary conservation of hepatovirus structure and pathogenesis provide novel insight into the origins of HAV and highlight the utility of analyzing animal reservoirs for risk assessment of emerging viruses.

  20. Hepatitis B surface antigen clearance in inactive hepatitis B surface antigen carriers treated with peginterferon alfa-2a

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-Hui; Xie, Yao; Zhang, Lu; Lu, Yao; Shen, Ge; Wu, Shu-Ling; Chang, Min; Mu, Cai-Qin; Hu, Lei-Ping; Hua, Wen-Hao; Song, Shu-Jing; Zhang, Shu-Feng; Cheng, Jun; Xu, Dao-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the association between interferon (IFN) therapy and loss of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in inactive HBsAg carriers. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study in inactive HBsAg carriers, who were treatment-naive, with a serum HBsAg level < 100 IU/mL and an undetectable hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA level (< 100 IU/mL). All the 20 treated patients received subcutaneous PEG-IFN alfa-2a 180 μg/wk for 72 wk and were then followed for 24 wk. There were 40 untreated controls matched with 96 wk of observation. Serum HBsAg, HBV DNA, and alanine aminotransferases were monitored every 3 mo in the treatment group and every 3-6 mo in the control group. RESULTS: Thirteen (65.0%) of 20 treated patients achieved HBsAg loss, 12 of whom achieved HBsAg seroconversion. Mean HBsAg level in treated patients decreased to 6.69 ± 13.04 IU/mL after 24 wk of treatment from a baseline level of 26.22 ± 33.00 IU/mL. Serum HBV DNA level remained undetectable (< 100 IU/mL) in all treated patients during the study. HBsAg level of the control group decreased from 25.72 ± 25.58 IU/mL at baseline to 17.11 ± 21.62 IU/mL at week 96 (P = 0.108). In the control group, no patient experienced HBsAg loss/seroconversion, and two (5.0%) developed HBV reactivation. CONCLUSION: IFN treatment results in HBsAg loss and seroconversion in a considerable proportion of inactive HBsAg carriers with low HBsAg concentrations. PMID:27239256

  1. Outbreak of Hepatitis A in Italy Associated with Frozen Redcurrants Imported from Poland: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Terio, V; Bottaro, M; Di Pinto, A; Catella, C; Chironna, M; Bozzo, G; Kingsley, D H; Bonerba, E; Morea, A; Martella, V

    2015-09-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) was detected in a batch of imported non-packaged frozen redcurrants purchased in a Bari grocery. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed the HAV strain clustered tightly with the HAV strain from the 2013 Italian epidemic, providing additional evidence that frozen redcurrants were the main vehicle of the HAV outbreak.

  2. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 facilitates con a-induced IFN-γ-- mediated immune hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Chieh; Huang, Wei-Ching; Chen, Chia-Ling; Hsieh, Chia-Yuan; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chen, Shun-Hua; Yang, Kao-Chi; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2011-10-01

    Immune hepatic injury induced by Con A results primarily from IFN-γ-mediated inflammation, followed by hepatic cell death. Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3, which acts proapoptotically and is proinflammatory, is also important for facilitating IFN-γ signaling. We hypothesized a pathogenic role for GSK-3 in Con A hepatic injury. Con A stimulation caused GSK-3 activation in the livers of C57BL/6 mice. Inhibiting GSK-3 reduced Con A hepatic injury, including hepatic necrosis and apoptosis, inflammation, infiltration of T cells and granulocytes, and deregulated expression of adhesion molecule CD54. Con A induced hepatic injury in an IFN-γ receptor 1-dependent manner. Con A/IFN-γ induced activation and expression of STAT1 in a GSK-3-dependent manner. GSK-3 facilitated IFN-γ-induced inducible NO synthase, but had limited effects on CD95 upregulation and CD95-mediated hepatocyte apoptosis in vitro. Notably, inhibiting GSK-3 decreased Con A-induced IFN-γ production in both wild-type and IFN-γ receptor 1-deficient C57BL/6 mice. In Con A-activated NKT cells, GSK-3 was also activated and was required for nuclear translocation of T-box transcription factor Tbx21, a transcription factor of IFN-γ, but it was not required for CD95 ligand expression or activation-induced cell death. These results demonstrate the dual and indispensable role of GSK-3 in Con A hepatic injury by facilitating IFN-γ-induced hepatopathy.

  3. Alcoholic hepatitis 2010: a clinician's guide to diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Amini, Maziyar; Runyon, Bruce A

    2010-10-21

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) remains a common and life threatening cause of liver failure, especially when it is severe. Although the adjective "acute" is frequently used to describe this form of liver injury, it is usually subacute and has been developing for weeks to months before it becomes clinically apparent. Patients with this form of alcoholic liver disease usually have a history of drinking heavily for many years. While certain aspects of therapy, mainly nutritional support and abstinence are well established, significant debate has surrounded the pharmacologic treatment of AH, and many institutions practice widely varying treatment protocols. In recent years a significant amount of literature has helped focus on the details of treatment, and more data have accumulated regarding risks and benefits of pharmacologic treatment. In particular, the efficacy of pentoxifylline has become increasingly apparent, and when compared with the risks associated with prednisolone, has brought this drug to the forefront of therapy for severe AH. This review will focus on the clinical and laboratory diagnosis and pharmacologic therapies that should be applied during hospitalization and continued into outpatient management. We conclude that the routine use of glucocorticoids for severe AH poses significant risk with equivocal benefit, and that pentoxifylline is a better, safer and cheaper alternative. While the full details of nutritional support lie beyond the scope of this article, nutrition is a cornerstone of therapy and must be addressed in every patient diagnosed with AH. Finally, while traditional psychosocial techniques play a major role in post-hospitalization care of alcoholics, we hope to make the medical clinician realize his or her role in reducing recidivism rates with early and frequent outpatient visits and with the use of baclofen to reduce alcohol craving. PMID:20954276

  4. Hepatitis C Virus Infection as a Traumatic Experience

    PubMed Central

    Morais-de-Jesus, Mychelle; Daltro-Oliveira, Renato; Pettersen, Karine Miranda; Dantas-Duarte, Adriana; Amaral, Luciana Di-Domizio; Cavalcanti-Ribeiro, Patrícia; Santos, Carlos Teles; Schinoni, Maria Isabel; Netto, Liana R.; Araújo-de-Freitas, Lucas; Paraná, Raymundo; Miranda-Scippa, Ângela; Koenen, Karestan C.; Quarantini, Lucas C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether individuals consider their HCV infection to be a potentially traumatic experience. Additionally, we investigated its association with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and the impact of PTSD diagnosis on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in HCV infected subjects. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 127 HCV-infected outpatients recruited at a University Hospital in Salvador, Brazil. All subjects answered an orally-administered questionnaire to gather clinical and socio-demographic data. We investigated traumatic experiences and the subject's perception of the disease using the Trauma History Questionnaire. PTSD and other psychiatric diagnoses were assessed through the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview-Brazilian Version 5.0.0 (M.I.N.I. PLUS). HRQoL was assessed using Short-Form 36 (SF-36). Results Approximately 38.6% of the patients considered hepatitis C to be a traumatic experience. Of these, 60.7% had a PTSD diagnosis. PTSD was associated with significant impairment in quality of life for individuals in seven SF-36 domains as shown bymultivariate analysis: Role-Physical (β: −24.85; 95% CI: −42.08; −7.61), Bodily Pain (β: −19.36; 95% CI: −31.28; −7.45), General Health (β: −20.79; 95% CI: −29.65; −11.92), Vitality (β: −11.92; 95% CI: −20.74; −3.1), Social Functioning (β: −34.73; 95% CI: −46.79; −22.68), Role-Emotional (β: −26.07; 95% CI: −44.61; −7.53), Mental Health (β: −17.46; 95% CI: −24.38; −10.54). Conclusion HCV is frequently a traumatic experience and it is strongly associated with PTSD diagnosis. PTSD significantly impaired HRQoL. PMID:25340574

  5. Synthesis of a non-radioactive hepatitis B virus DNA probe from human serum by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Frías, F; Arranz, J A; Buti, M; Esteban, R; Jardí, R

    1994-05-01

    A method for synthesizing probes for detecting hepatitis B virus DNA in serum was developed. It uses DNA extracted from the serum of an hepatitis B virus carrier as target, and digoxigenin-11-dUTP incorporated in DNA sequences during the polymerase chain reaction as tracer. Using a spot hybridization assay, the sensitivity and specificity of the digoxigenin-labelled DNA probe were compared with two standard hepatitis B virus DNA probes, synthesized with cloned hepatitis B virus DNA and labelled either with digoxigenin or 32P by random priming. Data obtained from the three methods showed an excellent correlation. Thus, hepatitis B virus DNA extracted from human serum and labelled by polymerase chain reaction may be considered a suitable alternative to cloned DNA. It provides reliable probes and eliminates the need for facilities and personnel dedicated to the manipulation of clones. These advantages will allow a wider application of hepatitis B virus DNA testing in clinical practice.

  6. Diagnosis and Treatment of Alcoholic Hepatitis: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Singal, Ashwani K; Kodali, Sudha; Vucovich, Lee A; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Schiano, Thomas D

    2016-07-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) occurs in about one-third of individuals reporting long-term heavy alcohol use. It is associated with high short-term mortality, economic burden, and hospital resources utilization. We performed this systematic review to (i) describe clinical characteristics and genomics associated with the risk of AH; (ii) discuss role and limitations of liver biopsy and prognostic scoring systems; (iii) summarize evidence regarding the currently available therapies including liver transplantation; and (iv) outline emerging therapies with areas of unmet need. Literature search was performed for studies published in English language (January 1971 through March 2016). The following search engines were used: PubMed, Elsevier Embase, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Library. For the treatment section, only randomized controlled studies were included for this review. A total of 138 studies (59 randomized, 22 systematic reviews or meta-analyses, 7 surveys or guidelines, 7 population-based, and 43 prospective cohorts) were cited. There are over 325,000 annual admissions with AH contributing to about 0.8% of all hospitalizations in the United States. Liver biopsy may be required in about 25 to 30% cases for uncertain clinical diagnosis. Corticosteroids with or without N-acetylcysteine remains the only available therapy for severe episodes. Data are emerging on the role of liver transplantation as salvage therapy for select patients. Abstinence remains the most important factor impacting long-term prognosis. Results from the ongoing clinical trials within the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism-funded consortia are awaited for more effective and safer therapies. AH is a potentially lethal condition with a significant short-term mortality. A high index of suspicion is required. There remains an unmet need for noninvasive biomarkers for the diagnosis, and predicting prognosis and response to therapy. PMID:27254289

  7. Cysteine Sulfinic Acid Decarboxylase Regulation: A Role for FXR and SHP in Murine Hepatic Taurine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Thomas A.; Matsumoto, Yuri; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Xie, Yan; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.; Stipanuk, Martha H.; Anakk, Sayeepriyadarshini; Moore, David D.; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Kennedy, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Background Bile acid synthesis is regulated by nuclear receptors including farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and small heterodimer partner (SHP), and by fibroblast growth factor15/19 (FGF15/19). Because bile acid synthesis involves amino acid conjugation, we hypothesized that hepatic cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSAD) (a key enzyme in taurine synthesis) is regulated by bile acids. Aims To investigate CSAD regulation by bile acids and CSAD regulatory mechanisms. Methods Mice were fed a control diet or a diet supplemented with either 0.5% cholate or 2% cholestyramine. To gain mechanistic insight into CSAD regulation, we utilized GW4064 (FXR agonist), FGF19, or T-0901317 (LXR agonist) and Shp−/− mice. Tissue mRNA expression was determined by qRT-PCR. Amino acids were measured by HPLC. Results Mice supplemented with dietary cholate exhibited reduced hepatic CSAD mRNA expression while those receiving cholestyramine exhibited increased hepatic CSAD mRNA expression. Activation of FXR suppressed CSAD mRNA expression whereas hepatic CSAD mRNA expression was increased in Shp−/− mice. Hepatic hypotaurine concentration (the product of CSAD) was higher in Shp−/− mice with a corresponding increase in serum (but not hepatic) taurine-conjugated bile acids. FGF19 administration suppressed hepatic CYP7A1 mRNA but did not change CSAD mRNA expression. LXR activation induced CYP7A1 mRNA yet failed to induce CSAD mRNA expression. Conclusion CSAD mRNA expression is physiologically regulated by bile acids in a feedback fashion via mechanisms involving SHP and FXR but not FGF15/19 or LXR. These novel findings implicate bile acids as regulators of CSAD mRNA via mechanisms shared in part with CYP7A1. PMID:24033844

  8. A liver-on-a-chip platform with bioprinted hepatic spheroids.

    PubMed

    Bhise, Nupura S; Manoharan, Vijayan; Massa, Solange; Tamayol, Ali; Ghaderi, Masoumeh; Miscuglio, Mario; Lang, Qi; Shrike Zhang, Yu; Shin, Su Ryon; Calzone, Giovanni; Annabi, Nasim; Shupe, Thomas D; Bishop, Colin E; Atala, Anthony; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-03-01

    The inadequacy of animal models in correctly predicting drug and biothreat agent toxicity in humans has resulted in a pressing need for in vitro models that can recreate the in vivo scenario. One of the most important organs in the assessment of drug toxicity is liver. Here, we report the development of a liver-on-a-chip platform for long-term culture of three-dimensional (3D) human HepG2/C3A spheroids for drug toxicity assessment. The bioreactor design allowed for in situ monitoring of the culture environment by enabling direct access to the hepatic construct during the experiment without compromising the platform operation. The engineered bioreactor could be interfaced with a bioprinter to fabricate 3D hepatic constructs of spheroids encapsulated within photocrosslinkable gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogel. The engineered hepatic construct remained functional during the 30 days culture period as assessed by monitoring the secretion rates of albumin, alpha-1 antitrypsin, transferrin, and ceruloplasmin, as well as immunostaining for the hepatocyte markers, cytokeratin 18, MRP2 bile canalicular protein and tight junction protein ZO-1. Treatment with 15 mM acetaminophen induced a toxic response in the hepatic construct that was similar to published studies on animal and other in vitro models, thus providing a proof-of-concept demonstration of the utility of this liver-on-a-chip platform for toxicity assessment. PMID:26756674

  9. A liver-on-a-chip platform with bioprinted hepatic spheroids.

    PubMed

    Bhise, Nupura S; Manoharan, Vijayan; Massa, Solange; Tamayol, Ali; Ghaderi, Masoumeh; Miscuglio, Mario; Lang, Qi; Shrike Zhang, Yu; Shin, Su Ryon; Calzone, Giovanni; Annabi, Nasim; Shupe, Thomas D; Bishop, Colin E; Atala, Anthony; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-03-01

    The inadequacy of animal models in correctly predicting drug and biothreat agent toxicity in humans has resulted in a pressing need for in vitro models that can recreate the in vivo scenario. One of the most important organs in the assessment of drug toxicity is liver. Here, we report the development of a liver-on-a-chip platform for long-term culture of three-dimensional (3D) human HepG2/C3A spheroids for drug toxicity assessment. The bioreactor design allowed for in situ monitoring of the culture environment by enabling direct access to the hepatic construct during the experiment without compromising the platform operation. The engineered bioreactor could be interfaced with a bioprinter to fabricate 3D hepatic constructs of spheroids encapsulated within photocrosslinkable gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogel. The engineered hepatic construct remained functional during the 30 days culture period as assessed by monitoring the secretion rates of albumin, alpha-1 antitrypsin, transferrin, and ceruloplasmin, as well as immunostaining for the hepatocyte markers, cytokeratin 18, MRP2 bile canalicular protein and tight junction protein ZO-1. Treatment with 15 mM acetaminophen induced a toxic response in the hepatic construct that was similar to published studies on animal and other in vitro models, thus providing a proof-of-concept demonstration of the utility of this liver-on-a-chip platform for toxicity assessment.

  10. Co-infection of dengue fever and hepatitis A in a Russian traveler.

    PubMed

    Volchkova, Elena; Umbetova, Karina; Belaia, Olga; Sviridova, Maria; Dmitrieva, Ludmila; Arutyunova, Daria; Chernishov, Dmitriy; Karan, Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    We report a hepatitis A (HAV) and dengue virus (DENV) co-infection in Russian man who had been traveling to Dominican Republic. At admission to the hospital hemorrhagic and jaundice symptoms were observed in patient. PCR tests of blood serum and urine revealed RNA dengue virus type 3, HAV RNA, anti-HAV-IgM. PMID:27516967

  11. Co-infection of dengue fever and hepatitis A in a Russian traveler.

    PubMed

    Volchkova, Elena; Umbetova, Karina; Belaia, Olga; Sviridova, Maria; Dmitrieva, Ludmila; Arutyunova, Daria; Chernishov, Dmitriy; Karan, Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    We report a hepatitis A (HAV) and dengue virus (DENV) co-infection in Russian man who had been traveling to Dominican Republic. At admission to the hospital hemorrhagic and jaundice symptoms were observed in patient. PCR tests of blood serum and urine revealed RNA dengue virus type 3, HAV RNA, anti-HAV-IgM.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hepatic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions congenital hepatic fibrosis congenital hepatic fibrosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital hepatic fibrosis is a disease of the liver that is ...

  13. Borderline tuberculoid leprosy and type 1 leprosy reaction in a hepatitis C patient during treatment with interferon and ribavirin*

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Mônica; Franco, Emily dos Santos; Ferreira, Paulo Luis da Costa; Braga, Wornei Silva Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C is an inflammatory disease of the liver caused by a single-stranded RNA virus belonging to the Hepacivirus genus in the Flaviviridae family, called the hepatitis C virus. After initial infection, 70% to 85% of the patients develop chronic hepatitis C with hepatic fibrosis. In addition to specific liver changes, various extrahepatic manifestations have been associated with the hepatitis C virus infection or with medications used to treat the condition. We report the case of a patient with chronic hepatitis C who presented with the signs and symptoms of borderline tuberculoid leprosy and type 1 reaction four months after the start of treatment with a pegylated interferon/ribavirin combination. PMID:24346894

  14. Clinical experience with a recombinant DNA hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Andre, F E

    1988-09-01

    The clinical testing of EngerixR-B, the hepatitis B vaccine produced by SmithKline Biologicals using recombinant DNA technology, started in February 1984. Since extensive pre-clinical laboratory work had established that the polypeptide (HBsAg) expressed in genetically engineered yeast cells was after purification--physically, chemically and antigenically similar to the viral surface antigen particles found in the blood of chronic carriers, the aims of the clinical trials were to compare the safety, reactogenicity, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of yeast-derived (YDV) and plasma-derived (PDV) vaccines. By September 1987, 89 studies had been initiated involving a total of 10,545 subjects aged from birth to 82 years. This extensive experience has established that the risk of hypersensitivity to yeast-derived contaminants is negligible since no hypersensitivity reaction has been observed in any vaccinee, the incidence and severity of local reactions have not increased after repeated inoculations and no anti-yeast antibodies were produced by vaccination. Reactogenicity has been comparable to that of PDV's consisting essentially of transient mild irritation at the site of injection presumably caused by the aluminium hydroxide used as adjuvant. The anti-HBs responses to YDV and PDV's were quantitatively (seroconversion rates, peak antibody levels and persistence) as well as qualitatively (epitope specificity and affinity) similar. The expected protective effect of the immune response to the vaccine was confirmed in a challenge study in chimpanzees and in vaccinated human populations (male homosexuals, institutionalized mentally retarded patients, neonates of carrier women) with historically a high infection rate. PMID:2464196

  15. Detection of hepatitis B virus infection: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Mallika; Nandi, Srijita; Dutta, Shrinwanti; Saha, Malay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review published methods for detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. METHODS: A thorough search on Medline database was conducted to find original articles describing different methods or techniques of detection of HBV, which are published in English in last 10 years. Articles outlining methods of detection of mutants or drug resistance were excluded. Full texts and abstracts (if full text not available) were reviewed thoroughly. Manual search of references of retrieved articles were also done. We extracted data on different samples and techniques of detection of HBV, their sensitivity (Sn), specificity (Sp) and applicability. RESULTS: A total of 72 studies were reviewed. HBV was detected from dried blood/plasma spots, hepatocytes, ovarian tissue, cerumen, saliva, parotid tissue, renal tissue, oocytes and embryos, cholangiocarcinoma tissue, etc. Sensitivity of dried blood spot for detecting HBV was > 90% in all the studies. In case of seronegative patients, HBV DNA or serological markers have been detected from hepatocytes or renal tissue in many instances. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and Chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) are most commonly used serological tests for detection. CLIA systems are also used for quantitation. Molecular techniques are used qualitatively as well as for quantitative detection. Among the molecular techniques version 2.0 of the CobasAmpliprep/CobasTaqMan assay and Abbott’s real time polymerase chain reaction kit were found to be most sensitive with a lower detection limit of only 6.25 IU/mL and 1.48 IU/mL respectively. CONCLUSION: Serological and molecular assays are predominant and reliable methods for HBV detection. Automated systems are highly sensitive and quantify HBV DNA and serological markers for monitoring. PMID:26483870

  16. Hepatic visceral larva migrans, a resilient entity on imaging: Experience from a tertiary liver center

    PubMed Central

    Laroia, Shalini Thapar; Rastogi, Archana; Bihari, Chhagan; Bhadoria, Ajeet Singh; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hepatic visceral larva migrans (VLM) is an uncommon parasitic manifestation seen in the liver. It presents as coalescing, conglomerated, or solitary abscess cavities in the liver on imaging. We conducted a retrospective clinico-radiological analysis of 24 patients with biopsy proven VLM who were reviewed and followed up at our tertiary liver institute over a period of 4 years. Materials and Methods: The study was performed to correlate the radiological features and imaging response to therapy for hepatic VLM. The disease course, imaging findings, progressive, absolute eosinophil counts (AEC), hydatid serology, and the extent of radiological regression of the liver lesions, on follow-up were analyzed. Results: Imaging showed a diagnostic accuracy of 42%. Hydatid serology was positive in 46% patients before starting treatment. The median pretreatment AEC of 507 showed a significant posttreatment AEC decline to median value of 117. The Wilcoxon signed ranks test showed significant decline in the AEC (P < 0.001). Radiological regression was present in all lesions. However, patients showed residual abscesses on imaging, up to 2 years on follow-up. Conclusion: This study reveals that AEC has a significant predictive value in diagnosis and as a marker for disease regression. Complete radiological resolution of hepatic lesions does not correlate with total clinical remission. This finding warrants the need for further studies to look into the role of prolonged medical therapy or surgery as an alternate to current therapy module in cases of hepatic visceral larva abscesses. PMID:26998435

  17. Spasms of the Hepatic Artery Following Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty and Tolazoline Administration in a Liver Transplant Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Propst, Albert; Waldenberger, Peter; Propst, Theresa; Vogel, Wolfgang; Koenigsrainer, Alfred

    1996-05-15

    Vascular complications after liver transplantation include occlusion or stenosis near the sites of anastomosis in the hepatic artery, portal vein, and vena cava. Balloon angioplasty of these stenoses carries little risk and is a useful procedure for the treatment of these problems. Here we describe the case of a liver transplant patient who underwent balloon angioplasty for stenosis of the hepatic artery and who developed spasms of the hepatic artery which were aggravated following intraarterial administration of Tolazoline.

  18. Recurrent Acute Liver Failure Because of Acute Hepatitis Induced by Organic Solvents: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ito, Daisuke; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Ito, Kyoji; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Nakagawa, Hayato; Fujinaga, Hidetaka; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    The authors present a case of recurrent acute liver failure because of occupational exposure to organic solvents. A 35-year-old man with a 3-week history of worsening jaundice and flu-like symptoms was admitted to our hospital. Viral hepatitis serology and autoimmune factors were negative. The authors considered liver transplantation, but the patient's liver function spontaneously recovered. Liver biopsy revealed massive infiltration of neutrophils, but the cause of the acute hepatitis was not identified. Four months after discharge, the patient's liver function worsened again. The authors considered the possibility of antinuclear antibody-negative autoimmune hepatitis and initiated steroid treatment, which was effective. Four months after discharge, the patient was admitted for repeated liver injury. The authors started him on steroid pulse therapy, but this time it was not effective. Just before the first admission, he had started his own construction company where he was highly exposed to organic solvents, and thus the authors considered organic solvent-induced hepatitis. Although urine test results for organic solvents were negative, a second liver biopsy revealed severe infiltration of neutrophils, compatible with toxic hepatitis. Again, his liver function spontaneously improved. Based on the pathology and detailed clinical course, including the patient's high exposure to organic solvents since just before the first admission, and the spontaneous recovery of his liver damage in the absence of the exposure, he was diagnosed with toxic hepatitis. The authors strongly advised him to avoid organic solvents. Since then, he has been in good health without recurrence. This is the first report of recurrent acute liver failure because of exposure to organic solvents, which was eventually diagnosed through a meticulous medical history and successfully recovered by avoiding the causative agents. In acute liver failure with an undetermined etiology, clinicians should rule

  19. Hepatitis B and A vaccination in HIV-infected adults: A review.

    PubMed

    Mena, G; García-Basteiro, A L; Bayas, J M

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B and A account for considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. Immunization is the most effective means of preventing hepatitis B and A. However, the immune response to both hepatitis vaccines seems to be reduced in HIV-infected subjects. The aim of this review was to analyze the immunogenicity, safety, long-term protection and current recommendations of hepatitis B and A vaccination among HIV-infected adults. The factors most frequently associated with a deficient level of anti-HBs or IgG anti-HAV after vaccination are those related to immunosuppression (CD4 level and HIV RNA viral load) and to the frequency of administration and/or the amount of antigenic load per dose. The duration of the response to both HBV and HAV vaccines is associated with suppression of the viral load at vaccination and, in the case of HBV vaccination, with a higher level of antibodies after vaccination. In terms of safety, there is no evidence of more, or different, adverse effects compared with HIV-free individuals. Despite literature-based advice on the administration of alternative schedules, revaccination after the failure of primary vaccination, and the need for periodic re-evaluation of antibody levels, few firm recommendations are found in the leading guidelines.

  20. Hepatitis B and A vaccination in HIV-infected adults: A review.

    PubMed

    Mena, G; García-Basteiro, A L; Bayas, J M

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B and A account for considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. Immunization is the most effective means of preventing hepatitis B and A. However, the immune response to both hepatitis vaccines seems to be reduced in HIV-infected subjects. The aim of this review was to analyze the immunogenicity, safety, long-term protection and current recommendations of hepatitis B and A vaccination among HIV-infected adults. The factors most frequently associated with a deficient level of anti-HBs or IgG anti-HAV after vaccination are those related to immunosuppression (CD4 level and HIV RNA viral load) and to the frequency of administration and/or the amount of antigenic load per dose. The duration of the response to both HBV and HAV vaccines is associated with suppression of the viral load at vaccination and, in the case of HBV vaccination, with a higher level of antibodies after vaccination. In terms of safety, there is no evidence of more, or different, adverse effects compared with HIV-free individuals. Despite literature-based advice on the administration of alternative schedules, revaccination after the failure of primary vaccination, and the need for periodic re-evaluation of antibody levels, few firm recommendations are found in the leading guidelines. PMID:26208678

  1. Hepatitis B and A vaccination in HIV-infected adults: A review

    PubMed Central

    Mena, G; García-Basteiro, AL; Bayas, JM

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B and A account for considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. Immunization is the most effective means of preventing hepatitis B and A. However, the immune response to both hepatitis vaccines seems to be reduced in HIV-infected subjects. The aim of this review was to analyze the immunogenicity, safety, long-term protection and current recommendations of hepatitis B and A vaccination among HIV-infected adults. The factors most frequently associated with a deficient level of anti-HBs or IgG anti-HAV after vaccination are those related to immunosuppression (CD4 level and HIV RNA viral load) and to the frequency of administration and/or the amount of antigenic load per dose. The duration of the response to both HBV and HAV vaccines is associated with suppression of the viral load at vaccination and, in the case of HBV vaccination, with a higher level of antibodies after vaccination. In terms of safety, there is no evidence of more, or different, adverse effects compared with HIV-free individuals. Despite literature-based advice on the administration of alternative schedules, revaccination after the failure of primary vaccination, and the need for periodic re-evaluation of antibody levels, few firm recommendations are found in the leading guidelines. PMID:26208678

  2. Hepatitis A among workers from a waste water treatment plant during a small community outbreak.

    PubMed Central

    De Serres, G; Laliberté, D

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This is a case report describing the occurrence of hepatitis A in three workers at a waste water treatment plant during a small community outbreak involving 16 cases. CASE REPORT: The first case was a 26 year old operator who had worked in the plant for two years, the second was a 23 year old employee hired to add new biolite in the secondary treatment area. These two cases never worked together and only met two or three times before the onset of disease in the second case. The third case occurred three months later in a 34 year old ventilation mechanic. All three cases were confirmed by IgM serology and virus was recovered by polymerase chain reaction in the stools of the last two cases. Despite an extensive search for other risk factors for hepatitis A in these workers none was found. CONCLUSION: This report confirms that hepatitis A is an occupational hazard for sewage workers. The numerous potential sources of contamination associated with that occupation support the use of vaccine to provide effective prevention. PMID:9072036

  3. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus in Brazil’s inmate population: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Magri, Mariana Cavalheiro; Ibrahim, Karim Yaqub; Pinto, Walkyria Pereira; França, Francisco Oscar de Siqueira; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; Tengan, Fátima Mitiko

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in Brazil’s inmate population. METHODS Systematic review on hepatitis C virus infection in the inmate population. Brazilian studies published from January 1, 1989 to February 20, 2014 were evaluated. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed using a scale of 0 to 8 points. RESULTS Eleven eligible studies were analyzed and provided data on hepatitis C virus infection among 4,375 inmates from seven states of Brazil, with a mean quality classification of 7.4. The overall hepatitis C virus prevalence among Brazilian inmates was 13.6% (ranging from 1.0% to 41.0%, depending on the study). The chances of inmates being seropositive for hepatitis C virus in the states of Minas Gerais (MG), Sergipe (SE), Mato Grosso do Sul (MS), Rio Grande do Sul (RS), Goiás (GO) and Espirito Santo (ES) were 84.0% (95%CI 0.06;0.45), 92.0% (95%CI 0.04;0.13), 88.0% (95%CI 0.09;0.18), 74.0% (95%CI 0.16;0.42), 84.0% (95%CI 0.08;0.31) and 89.0% (95%CI 0.01;0.05) respectively, lower than that observed in the Sao Paulo state (seroprevalence of 29.3%). The four studies conducted in the city of Sao Paulo revealed a lower prevalence in more recent studies compared to older ones. CONCLUSIONS The highest prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in Brazil’s inmate population was found in Sao Paulo, which may reflect the urban diversity of the country. Despite Brazilian studies having good methodological quality to evaluate the prevalence of the hepatitis C virus, they are scarce and lack data on risk factors associated with this infection, which could support decisions on prevention and implementation of public health policies for Brazilian prisons. PMID:26247383

  4. Hepatic arterial perfusion scintigraphy with Tc-99m-MAA: use of a totally implanted drug delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Ziessman, H.A.; Thrall, J.H.; Yang, P.J.; Walker, S.C.; Cozzi, E.A.; Niederhuber, J.E.; Gyves, J.W.; Ensminger, W.D.; Tuscan, M.C.

    1984-07-01

    Tc-99m-MAA hepatic arterial perfusion scintigraphy (HAPS) using a totally implanted drug delivery system was employed for hepatic arterial chemotherapy in 147 patients (335 studies). Complete perfusion of the involved liver was seen in 88% of patients initially and remained good on follow-up. A significant decrease in hepatic and/or extrahepatic perfusion associated with a hot spot at the tip of the catheter indicated hepatic arterial thrombosis. Extrahepatic perfusion was seen in 14% of cases, usually in the distribution of the stomach, small bowel, and spleen. Significant symptoms of drug toxicity were seen in 70% of patients with extrahepatic perfusion, compared to 19% of those without it.

  5. Immune Response to Hepatitis A Vaccine Combined or Given Simultaneously with Typhoid Fever Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Vodopija; Baklaic; Vodopija; Clemens

    1997-09-01

    Background: Because both hepatitis A and typhoid vaccination are frequently indicated in the same traveler, a prospective, randomized controlled study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of simultaneous administration of hepatitis A and typhoid fever vaccines in adult volunteers. Methods: Two groups of 25 subjects received either separate injections of hepatitis A (Havrixtrade mark, SmithKline Beecham Biologicals) and typhoid fever (Typhim Vitrade mark, Pasteur-Mérieux) vaccines in opposite arms, or a syringe-mixed combination of both vaccines as a single injection. A booster dose of Havrix was given at 6 months. Results: The immune response to hepatitis A tended to be higher in the mixed-injection group, but this difference was significant (p=.048) only following the booster dose. Adverse reactions were generally mild with no differences between the two groups. Conclusion: A combined formulated vaccine against both typhoid fever and hepatitis A is feasible and offers more convenience without added adverse reactions to travelers who have appropriate indications for both vaccines.

  6. Investigating a Community-Wide Outbreak of Hepatitis A in India

    PubMed Central

    Rakesh, PS; Sherin, Daniel; Sankar, Hari; Shaji, Marydasan; Subhagan, Saraswathy; Salila, Sreekumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: There was an outbreak of acute hepatitis in Mylapore village, Kollam district, Kerala, southern India during February to June 2013. An outbreak investigation was initiated with the objective of describing the epidemiological features of the hepatitis outbreak. Materials and Methods: House-to-house visits were undertaken to identify symptomatic cases. The outbreak was described in terms of person, place and time. Hypothesis was generated based on findings from descriptive study, laboratory investigation of water samples, and environmental observations. A case-control study was designed to test the hypothesis. Chi-square test, univariate analysis, and logistic regression to identify the risk factors associated with hepatitis A infection were done. Results: Line list generated consisted of 45 cases. Attack rate was the highest among the age group 15-24 years (4.6%) followed by 5-14 years (3.1%). The geographical distribution of the cases suggested a clustering around the water supply through the pipeline and epidemic curve showed a sharp rise in cases suggestive of a common source outbreak. Water samples collected form pipeline showed evidence of fecal contamination and absence of residual chlorine. In the case-control study, having consumed water from the pipeline (odds ratio: 9.01 [95% confidence interval: 2.16-37.61]) was associated with the hepatitis A cases. Conclusion: The time frame of disease occurrence, environmental observations, anecdotal evidences, laboratory results and results of the analytical study indicated the possibility of occurrence of hepatitis A outbreak as a result of pipe water contamination supplied from a bore well. The study warrants establishment of an efficient water quality surveillance system. PMID:24926165

  7. A family cluster of hepatitis A virus due to an uncommon IA strain circulating in Campania (southern Italy), not associated with raw shellfish or berries: a wake-up call to implement vaccination against hepatitis A?

    PubMed

    Tosone, Grazia; Mascolo, Silvia; Bruni, Roberto; Taffon, Stefania; Equestre, Michele; Tosti, Maria Elena; Ciccaglione, Anna Rita; Martucci, Fiorella; Liberti, Alfonso; Iannece, Maria Donata; Orlando, Raffaele

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis A virus is a widely occurring disease, with different prevalence rates between countries in the North and West and those in the South and East. In Italy endemicity is low/medium, but not homogeneously distributed: in the northern/central regions a large hepatitis A outbreak due to genotype IA, related to the consumption of contaminated mixed frozen berries, occurred between 2013 and 2014, whereas in southern Italian regions recurrent outbreaks of hepatitis A, due to the IB genotype, still result from consumption of raw seafood. In 2014 an uncommon genotype IA strain was isolated from five patients (2 adults and 3 children) with hepatitis A, living in the surroundings of Naples (Campania) who did not have any of the most common risk factors for hepatitis A in Italy, such as consumption of raw shellfish or frozen berries, or travel to endemic countries. Moreover, based on the analysis of viral sequences obtained, this strain differed from several others in the national database, which had been recently isolated during Italian outbreaks. This case report reinforces the need to implement both information campaigns about the prevention of hepatitis A and vaccination programmes in childhood; in addition, it would be suitable to sequence strains routinely not only during large outbreaks of hepatitis A in order to obtain a more detailed national database of HAV strains circulating in Italy. PMID:27668904

  8. A family cluster of hepatitis A virus due to an uncommon IA strain circulating in Campania (southern Italy), not associated with raw shellfish or berries: a wake-up call to implement vaccination against hepatitis A?

    PubMed

    Tosone, Grazia; Mascolo, Silvia; Bruni, Roberto; Taffon, Stefania; Equestre, Michele; Tosti, Maria Elena; Ciccaglione, Anna Rita; Martucci, Fiorella; Liberti, Alfonso; Iannece, Maria Donata; Orlando, Raffaele

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis A virus is a widely occurring disease, with different prevalence rates between countries in the North and West and those in the South and East. In Italy endemicity is low/medium, but not homogeneously distributed: in the northern/central regions a large hepatitis A outbreak due to genotype IA, related to the consumption of contaminated mixed frozen berries, occurred between 2013 and 2014, whereas in southern Italian regions recurrent outbreaks of hepatitis A, due to the IB genotype, still result from consumption of raw seafood. In 2014 an uncommon genotype IA strain was isolated from five patients (2 adults and 3 children) with hepatitis A, living in the surroundings of Naples (Campania) who did not have any of the most common risk factors for hepatitis A in Italy, such as consumption of raw shellfish or frozen berries, or travel to endemic countries. Moreover, based on the analysis of viral sequences obtained, this strain differed from several others in the national database, which had been recently isolated during Italian outbreaks. This case report reinforces the need to implement both information campaigns about the prevention of hepatitis A and vaccination programmes in childhood; in addition, it would be suitable to sequence strains routinely not only during large outbreaks of hepatitis A in order to obtain a more detailed national database of HAV strains circulating in Italy.

  9. Establishment of hepatitis A detection antibodies set BRR batch 3 for antigen content determination by ELISA.

    PubMed

    Morgeaux, S; Manniam, I; Variot, P; Daas, A; Costanzo, A

    2015-01-01

    The current batch of the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) Biological Reference Reagents (BRRs) used for the in vitro potency assay of hepatitis A vaccines (HAV) by ELISA (enzymelinked immunosorbent assay) was established in 2012 for use in conjunction with Ph. Eur. general chapter 2.7.14 Assay of hepatitis A vaccine. It is composed of a coating reagent and a set of detection antibodies. As stocks of the latter are running low, the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM) organised a collaborative study to qualify replacement batches. The candidate BRR antibodies (primary monoclonal antibody and labelled secondary antibody) were prepared under appropriate conditions from starting materials similar to those used for the current batches. The new batches of antibodies were tested alongside previous batches of BRRs to ensure continuity, and the results confirmed that they were suitable for use in the potency assay of hepatitis A vaccines by ELISA using the standard method referenced in Ph. Eur. general chapter 2.7.14 at the same final concentrations as the previous batches, i.e. 1:500 for the primary monoclonal antibody and 1:400 for the secondary conjugated antibody. The outcome of the study allowed their establishment by the Ph. Eur. Commission in March 2015 as anti-hepatitis A virus primary detection antibody BRR batch 3 and conjugated secondary detection antibody BRR batch 3 respectively. They are available from the EDQM as hepatitis A vaccine ELISA detection antibodies set BRR batch 3.

  10. Comparison of concentration methods for detection of hepatitis A virus in water samples.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuting; Sui, Zhiwei; Hu, Guoliang; Cao, Huabin; Yang, Guoxiang; Li, Yong; Lei, Yongsong; Zhao, Lihua; Chen, Quanjiao

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis A virus is a pathogen associated with water pollution. Contaminated drinking water can cause hepatitis A outbreaks, lead to economic losses, and even threaten human lives. It is difficult to detect low levels of hepatitis A virus in water, so the virus must be concentrated in order to quantify it accurately. Here, we present a simple, rapid, efficient technique for the concentration and detection of hepatitis A virus in water. Our data showed that adding phosphate-buffered saline to the water, pre-filtering the water, and adding Trizol reagent directly to the filtration membrane can significantly improve concentration efficiency. Of three types of filtration membranes studied (mixed cellulose ester membrane, polyvinylidene fluoride membrane, and nylon membrane), the concentration efficiency using mixed cellulose ester membrane with a 0.1-μm pore size was the highest, reaching 92.62 ± 5.17%. This method was used to concentrate hepatitis A virus in water samples from Donghu Lake. Using SYBR Green real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, the detection sensitivity of this method reached 10(1) copies/μL and its concentration efficiency reached 79.45 ± 9.88%.

  11. Cost effectiveness of vaccinating food service workers against hepatitis A infection.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, R J; Grover, S F; Meyerhoff, A S; Paivana, T A

    2000-06-01

    Foodborne transmission is an important means of hepatitis A infection that may be reduced through vaccination of food service workers (FSWs). Several states are considering actions to encourage or mandate FSW vaccination, but the cost effectiveness of such policies has not been assessed. We estimated the clinical and economic consequences of vaccinating FSWs from the 10 states with the highest reported rates of hepatitis A. A decision analytic model was used to predict the effects of vaccinating FSWs at age 20 years. It was assumed all FSWs would receive one dose of inactivated hepatitis A vaccine, and 50% would receive the second recommended dose. Parameter estimates were obtained from published reports and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention databases. The primary endpoint was cost per year of life saved (YOLS). Secondary endpoints were symptomatic infections, days of illness, deaths, and costs of hepatitis A treatment, public health intervention, and work loss. Each endpoint was considered separately for FSWs and patrons. We estimate vaccination of 100,000 FSWs would cost $8.1 million but reduce the costs of hepatitis A treatment, public health intervention, and work loss by $3.0 million, $2.3 million, and $3.1 million, respectively. Vaccination would prevent approximately 2,500 symptomatic infections, 93,000 days of illness, and 8 deaths. A vaccination policy would reduce societal costs while costing the health system $13,969 per YOLS, a ratio that exceeds generally accepted standards of cost effectiveness. PMID:10852572

  12. Comparison of concentration methods for detection of hepatitis A virus in water samples.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuting; Sui, Zhiwei; Hu, Guoliang; Cao, Huabin; Yang, Guoxiang; Li, Yong; Lei, Yongsong; Zhao, Lihua; Chen, Quanjiao

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis A virus is a pathogen associated with water pollution. Contaminated drinking water can cause hepatitis A outbreaks, lead to economic losses, and even threaten human lives. It is difficult to detect low levels of hepatitis A virus in water, so the virus must be concentrated in order to quantify it accurately. Here, we present a simple, rapid, efficient technique for the concentration and detection of hepatitis A virus in water. Our data showed that adding phosphate-buffered saline to the water, pre-filtering the water, and adding Trizol reagent directly to the filtration membrane can significantly improve concentration efficiency. Of three types of filtration membranes studied (mixed cellulose ester membrane, polyvinylidene fluoride membrane, and nylon membrane), the concentration efficiency using mixed cellulose ester membrane with a 0.1-μm pore size was the highest, reaching 92.62 ± 5.17%. This method was used to concentrate hepatitis A virus in water samples from Donghu Lake. Using SYBR Green real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, the detection sensitivity of this method reached 10(1) copies/μL and its concentration efficiency reached 79.45 ± 9.88%. PMID:27535067

  13. Hepatitis A and hepatitis B infection prevalence and associated risk factors in men who have sex with men, Bangkok, 2006-2008.

    PubMed

    Linkins, Robert W; Chonwattana, Wannee; Holtz, Timothy H; Wasinrapee, Punneeporn; Chaikummao, Supaporn; Varangrat, Anchalee; Tongtoyai, Jaray; Mock, Philip A; Curlin, Marcel E; Sirivongrangson, Pachara; van Griensven, Frits; McNicholl, Janet M

    2013-09-01

    Despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines, little is known about prevalence and risk factors for hepatitis A (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection among Thai men who have sex with men. The prevalence of HAV and HBV infection among men who have sex with men cohort in Bangkok was assessed. Baseline blood specimens were drawn and demographic and behavioral data were collected. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to analyze risk factors for prevalent HAV and HBV infection. One thousand two hundred ninety-nine Thai men who have sex with men 18 years and older were enrolled. Among those with results, 349/1,291 (27.0%) had evidence of past or current hepatitis A infection. Of the 1,117 (86.5%) men with unambiguous HBV test results, 442 (39.6%) had serologic evidence of past/current infection, 103 (9.2%) were immune due to hepatitis B vaccination, 572 (51.2%) had no evidence of immunological exposure to HBV or vaccine. Of those with past/current HBV infection, 130 (29.4%) were HIV positive. Age >35 years was independently associated with both HAV and HBV infection. University education was protective against both HAV and HBV infection. Increased alcohol consumption, number of lifetime male sexual partners ≥10, and prevalent HIV infection were also independently associated with HBV infection. The prevalence of past/current HAV and HBV infection was high in Bangkok men who have sex with men. Age-cohorts with a higher prevalence of hepatitis B vaccine induced immunity may be expected in the future. Hepatitis A and B vaccination is recommended.

  14. Changing hepatitis A epidemiology in the European Union: new challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Gossner, C M; Severi, E; Danielsson, N; Hutin, Y; Coulombier, D

    2015-04-23

    This perspective on hepatitis A in the European Union and European Economic Area (EU/EEA) presents epidemiological data on new cases and outbreaks and vaccination policies. Hepatitis A endemicity in the EU/EEA ranges from very low to intermediate with a decline in notification rates in recent decades. Vaccination uptake has been insufficient to compensate for the increasing number of susceptible individuals. Large outbreaks occur. Travel increases the probability of introducing the virus into susceptible populations and secondary transmission. Travel medicine services and healthcare providers should be more effective in educating travellers and travel agents regarding the risk of travel-associated hepatitis A. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) endorses the World Health Organization's recommendations on vaccination of high-risk groups in countries with low and very low endemicity and on universal vaccination in countries with intermediate endemicity. Those recommendations do not cover the use of hepatitis A vaccine to control outbreaks. ECDC together with EU/EEA countries should produce evidence-based recommendations on hepatitis A immunisation to control outbreaks. Data about risk behaviours, exposure and mortality are scarce at the EU/EEA level. EU/EEA countries should report to ECDC comprehensive epidemiological and microbiological data to identify opportunities for prevention.

  15. Hepatitis C: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » Hepatitis C » Hepatitis C Treatment Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Hepatitis C Treatment for Veterans and the Public Treatment ...

  16. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Lupoid hepatitis; Chronic acute liver disease ... This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy body tissue and harmful, outside ...

  17. Hepatitis D

    MedlinePlus

    ... if the hepatitis B virus is also present. Transmission Hepatitis D can be found in the blood, ... other body fluids of people who are infected. Transmission happens when infected body fluid enters another person’s ...

  18. Hepatic Lipidosis in a Research Colony of Big Brown Bats (Eptesicus fuscus)

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Jessica M; Treuting, Piper M; Brabb, Thea; Miller, Kimberly E; Covey, Ellen; Lencioni, Karen L

    2015-01-01

    During a nearby construction project, a sudden decrease in food intake and guano production occurred in an outdoor colony of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), and one animal was found dead. Investigation revealed that the project was generating a large amount of noise and vibration, which disturbed the bats’ feeding. Consequently the bats were moved into an indoor enclosure away from the construction noises, and the colony resumed eating. Over the next 3 wk, additional animals presented with clinical signs of lethargy, weight loss, ecchymoses, and icterus and were necropsied. Gross necropsy of the affected bats revealed large, pale yellow to tan, friable livers with rounded edges that floated when placed in 10% neutral-buffered formalin. Some bats had ecchymoses on the webbing and skin and gross perirenal hemorrhage. Histologic examination showed hepatic and renal tubular lipidosis. The clinical and pathologic signs of hemorrhage and icterus were suggestive of hepatic failure. Hepatic lipidosis was attributed to stress and inappetence associated with environmental perturbations. Once the environmental stressor was removed, the colony morbidity and mortality decreased. However, 2 y later, a series of new environmental stressors triggered additional deaths associated with hepatic lipidosis. Over a 9-y period, 21 cases of hepatic lipidosis were diagnosed in this bat colony. PMID:25926399

  19. Fighting Hepatitis B in North Korea: Feasibility of a Bi-modal Prevention Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Stich, August

    2015-01-01

    In North Korea, the prevalence of hepatitis B is high due to natural factors, gaps in vaccination, and the lack of antiviral treatment. Aid projects are urgently needed, however impeded by North Korea's political and economical situation and isolation. The feasibility of a joint North Korean and German humanitarian hepatitis B prevention program was assessed. Part 1: Hepatitis B vaccination catch-up campaign. Part 2: Implementation of endoscopic ligation of esophageal varices (EVL) by trainings in Germany and North Korea. By vaccinating 7 million children between 2010 and 2012, the hepatitis B vaccination gap was closed. Coverage of 99.23% was reached. A total of 11 hepatitis B-induced liver cirrhosis patients (mean age 41.1 yr) with severe esophageal varices and previous bleedings were successfully treated by EVL without major complications. A clinical standard operating procedure, a feedback system and a follow-up plan were developed. The bi-modal preventive strategy was implemented successfully. Parts of the project can serve as an example for other low-income countries, however its general transferability is limited due to the special circumstances in North Korea. PMID:26539001

  20. Fighting Hepatitis B in North Korea: Feasibility of a Bi-modal Prevention Strategy.

    PubMed

    Unnewehr, Markus; Stich, August

    2015-11-01

    In North Korea, the prevalence of hepatitis B is high due to natural factors, gaps in vaccination, and the lack of antiviral treatment. Aid projects are urgently needed, however impeded by North Korea's political and economical situation and isolation. The feasibility of a joint North Korean and German humanitarian hepatitis B prevention program was assessed. Part 1: Hepatitis B vaccination catch-up campaign. Part 2: Implementation of endoscopic ligation of esophageal varices (EVL) by trainings in Germany and North Korea. By vaccinating 7 million children between 2010 and 2012, the hepatitis B vaccination gap was closed. Coverage of 99.23% was reached. A total of 11 hepatitis B-induced liver cirrhosis patients (mean age 41.1 yr) with severe esophageal varices and previous bleedings were successfully treated by EVL without major complications. A clinical standard operating procedure, a feedback system and a follow-up plan were developed. The bi-modal preventive strategy was implemented successfully. Parts of the project can serve as an example for other low-income countries, however its general transferability is limited due to the special circumstances in North Korea.

  1. [Autoimmune hepatitis in a girl with presence of anti-LKM1 antibodies].

    PubMed

    Larraín, F; Miquel, J F; González, S

    1997-06-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is an inflammatory liver disease characterized by dense mononuclear cell infiltrate in the portal tract, and serologically by the presence of non-organ and liver-specific autoantibodies and increased levels of gammaglobulins in the absence of a known etiology. Three subgroups of autoimmune hepatitis have been recognized, depending on the nature of the autoantibody present in the serum: Type 1 autoimmune hepatitis, associated with smooth-muscle (SMA) or antinuclear antibody (ANA) seropositivity; type 2, with anti-liver/kidney microsome antibody (anti-LKM1), and type 3, with the absence of ANA, SMA and anti-LKM1 and presence of other autoantibodies such as anti-soluble liver antigen (SLA). Subtypes of chronic autoimmune hepatitis have clinically different features and prognoses. An 8 year old female patient presented mild jaundice of insidious onset. The liver was tender and enlarged. Serologic markers for A, B, C, E, Epstein Barr and cytomegalovirus were negative. The liver biopsy showed a histological picture consistent with chronic active hepatitis. High titers of anti-liver/kidney-microsome antibody were found by indirect immunofluorescence test, and this finding was confirmed by Western blot against specific liver microsome antigens. Therapy with prednisolone induced a clinical and biochemical remission after four weeks. The suspension of therapy under strict medical control produced a rapid relapse of clinical and biochemical features. The reinitiation of prednisolone was successful, and an alternate-day program was started and maintained until 8 months follow-up.

  2. Hepatitis A Is a Health Hazard for Iranian Pilgrims Who Go to Holly Karbala: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemian, Roya; Babamahmoodi, Farhang; Ahangarkani, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Iraq is a highly endemic area for the prevalence of hepatitis A and annually hosts a large number of Iranian pilgrims, most of whom are susceptible to infection with the hepatitis A virus (HAV). Objectives This study reports the health hazard of hepatitis A for Iranian pilgrims who go to holly Karbala from the Mazandaran province. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, the data of all patients with acute hepatitis A admitted in the Razi teaching hospital from November 23, 2014 to January 24, 2015, with a history of recently returning from holly Karbala or being exposed to Karbala pilgrims, were registered. Results A total number of nine patients were registered. Seven patients were male and two were female. The mean age was 30.11 ± 10.09.Two patients were from the same family. All patients had typical symptoms of acute hepatitis A. None of the patients died nor did fulminant occur in any patients. In addition, all patients were treated with supportive treatment and subsequently recovered. Conclusions This number of pilgrim patients with acute hepatitis A from a single province compels us to conduct more evaluations and follow up monitoring on all persons travelling to Karbala and be sensitive to early diagnoses of the pilgrims. In the future, it is important to be mindful of administering the HAV vaccine and Ig. PMID:27630729

  3. Ectopic Intrathoracic Hepatic Tissue and Accessory Lung Lobe Aplasia in a Dog.

    PubMed

    Lande, Rachel; Dvorak, Laura; Gardiner, David W; Bahr, Anne

    2015-01-01

    A 6 yr old male Yorkshire terrier was presented for an ~6 yr history of progressive cough and dyspnea. Thoracic radiographs revealed a 6 cm diameter mass within the right caudal thorax. Thoracic ultrasound identified an intrathoracic mass ultrasonographically consistent with liver tissue and a chronic diaphragmatic hernia was suspected. Exploratory laparotomy was performed, but no evidence of a diaphragmatic hernia was identified. Thoracic exploration identified abnormal lung parenchyma. The accessory lung lobe was removed using a stapling devise near its base. The consolidated mass had the gross appearance of liver and was histologically identified as ectopic hepatic tissue. Ectopic hepatic tissue, unlike ectopic splenic and pancreatic tissue, is rare and generally has a subdiaphragmatic distribution. This solitary case report demonstrates that ectopic intrathoracic hepatic tissue should be considered a differential diagnosis for a caudal mediastinal mass.

  4. Hepatic cerebrospinal fluid pseudocyst: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, C T; Pai, C C; Tsai, T H; Chiang, Y H; Su, Y H

    2006-03-01

    An abdominal pseudocyst is a rare, but important complication in patients with a ventriculo-peritoneal (VP) shunt insertion. Several predisposing factors for this complication have been suggested, including infection, obstruction or dislodgement, but the pathophysiology is still unknown. However, the abdominal inflammatory process is accepted widely as a hypothesis for the formation of an abdominal pseudocyst. In this study, we report the case of a 21-year-old male that presented with a high-grade fever, poor appetite, shortness of breath and unconsciousness 1 week after receiving a VP shunt insertion for obstructive hydrocephalus. Ultrasonography and computed tomographic scans of the abdomen revealed a well-defined large hepatic cyst surrounding the peritoneal tube of the VP shunt. A hepatic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cyst was diagnosed and Staphylococcus epidermis was cultured via CSF. After externalization of the VP shunt and adequate antibiotic treatment, the hepatic cyst was resolved. There was no recurrence observed in the regular follow up. PMID:16679653

  5. Application of toxicogenomics in hepatic systems toxicology for risk assessment: Acetaminophen as a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Kienhuis, Anne S.; Bessems, Jos G.M.; Pennings, Jeroen L.A.; Driessen, Marja; Delft, Joost H.M. van

    2011-01-15

    Hepatic systems toxicology is the integrative analysis of toxicogenomic technologies, e.g., transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, in combination with traditional toxicology measures to improve the understanding of mechanisms of hepatotoxic action. Hepatic toxicology studies that have employed toxicogenomic technologies to date have already provided a proof of principle for the value of hepatic systems toxicology in hazard identification. In the present review, acetaminophen is used as a model compound to discuss the application of toxicogenomics in hepatic systems toxicology for its potential role in the risk assessment process, to progress from hazard identification towards hazard characterization. The toxicogenomics-based parallelogram is used to identify current achievements and limitations of acetaminophen toxicogenomic in vivo and in vitro studies for in vitro-to-in vivo and interspecies comparisons, with the ultimate aim to extrapolate animal studies to humans in vivo. This article provides a model for comparison of more species and more in vitro models enhancing the robustness of common toxicogenomic responses and their relevance to human risk assessment. To progress to quantitative dose-response analysis needed for hazard characterization, in hepatic systems toxicology studies, generation of toxicogenomic data of multiple doses/concentrations and time points is required. Newly developed bioinformatics tools for quantitative analysis of toxicogenomic data can aid in the elucidation of dose-responsive effects. The challenge herein is to assess which toxicogenomic responses are relevant for induction of the apical effect and whether perturbations are sufficient for the induction of downstream events, eventually causing toxicity.

  6. Occupational Hepatitis B Exposure: A Peek into Indian Dental Students' Knowledge, Opinion, and Preventive Practices

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Basak, Debashish; Kumar, Amit; Dasar, Pralhad; Mishra, Prashant; Kumar, Arunoday; Kumar Singh, Siddharth; Debnath, Nitai; Gupta, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the level of knowledge, opinions, and preventive practices followed by dental students against Hepatitis B. The study also explored if any correlation existed between knowledge, opinion, and preventive practices score. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a dental teaching institution. The subjects comprised 216 dental students. The study was conducted using a pretested, self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire was prepared to assess knowledge, opinion, and preventive practices against Hepatitis B. Kruskal-Wallis and Kendall Tau test were performed. Results. The study found that only 44.4% of the students were vaccinated with Hepatitis B vaccine. 59.3% of the students reported washing their hands after contact with patient's body fluids. 63.9% used personal protective measures like facemask, aprons, head cap, eye shields, and so forth, while treating patients. Median knowledge, opinion, and practice scores were found to be 5.00, 3.00, and 3.00, respectively. Significant correlation was obtained between knowledge and preventive practices score (r = 0.385, p value <0.0001). Conclusion. Effective measures need to be taken to improve preventive practices of the students to prevent them from risk of Hepatitis transmission. Mandatory vaccination against Hepatitis B needs to be implemented. PMID:26413091

  7. Syncytial giant cell hepatitis in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    GUPTA, Neil; NJEI, Basile

    2016-01-01

    While it commonly occurs in the pediatric population, syncytial giant cell hepatitis is rare in adults, which is diagnosed histologically by the presence of multinucleated cells in the liver. The literature has recorded only approximately one hundred cases in adults during the past two decades in whom malignancy is rarely associated with giant cell hepatitis. Our patient is a 66-year-old woman who was diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and subsequently developed syncytial giant cell hepatitis. This disease is usually linked to virus infection, autoimmune diseases, and drug medications. The association between CLL and giant cell hepatitis is rare, with only three cases reported. In most cases viral particles on electron microscopy are reported and the patients usually have a history of chemotherapy and hypogammaglobulinemia. Unlike such cases, our patient developed giant cell hepatitis in the absence of such confounding variables. The treatment for our patient was a high-dose corticosteroid and rituxan, with improvement in liver enzymes. PMID:26147671

  8. Occupational Hepatitis B Exposure: A Peek into Indian Dental Students' Knowledge, Opinion, and Preventive Practices.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Basak, Debashish; Kumar, Amit; Dasar, Pralhad; Mishra, Prashant; Kumar, Arunoday; Kumar Singh, Siddharth; Debnath, Nitai; Gupta, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the level of knowledge, opinions, and preventive practices followed by dental students against Hepatitis B. The study also explored if any correlation existed between knowledge, opinion, and preventive practices score. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a dental teaching institution. The subjects comprised 216 dental students. The study was conducted using a pretested, self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire was prepared to assess knowledge, opinion, and preventive practices against Hepatitis B. Kruskal-Wallis and Kendall Tau test were performed. Results. The study found that only 44.4% of the students were vaccinated with Hepatitis B vaccine. 59.3% of the students reported washing their hands after contact with patient's body fluids. 63.9% used personal protective measures like facemask, aprons, head cap, eye shields, and so forth, while treating patients. Median knowledge, opinion, and practice scores were found to be 5.00, 3.00, and 3.00, respectively. Significant correlation was obtained between knowledge and preventive practices score (r = 0.385, p value <0.0001). Conclusion. Effective measures need to be taken to improve preventive practices of the students to prevent them from risk of Hepatitis transmission. Mandatory vaccination against Hepatitis B needs to be implemented. PMID:26413091

  9. Hepatitis A in New South Wales, Australia from consumption of oysters: the first reported outbreak.

    PubMed Central

    Conaty, S.; Bird, P.; Bell, G.; Kraa, E.; Grohmann, G.; McAnulty, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    Between 22 January and 4 April 1997, 467 hepatitis A cases were reported to the New South Wales Health Department, Australia. To identify the cause of the outbreak, we conducted a matched case-control study, and an environmental investigation. Among 66 cases and 66 postcode-matched controls, there was a strong association between illness and consumption of oysters (adjusted odds ratio 42; 95 % confidence interval 5-379). More than two-thirds of cases reported eating oysters, including one third of cases and no controls who reported eating oysters in the Wallis Lake area. A public warning was issued on 14 February, and Wallis Lake oysters were withdrawn from sale. Hepatitis A virus was subsequently identified in oyster samples taken from the lake. Hepatitis A virus poses a special risk to consumers who eat raw oysters because it can survive for long periods in estuaries and cause severe disease. PMID:10722139

  10. A Vitamin D Receptor/SMAD Genomic Circuit Gates Hepatic Fibrotic Response

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ning; Yu, Ruth T.; Subramaniam, Nanthakumar; Sherman, Mara H.; Wilson, Caroline; Rao, Renuka; Leblanc, Mathias; Coulter, Sally; He, Mingxiao; Scott, Christopher; Lau, Sue L.; Atkins, Annette R.; Barish, Grant D.; Gunton, Jenny E.; Liddle, Christopher; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Liver fibrosis is a reversible wound-healing response involving TGFβ1 activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Here we show that vitamin D receptor (VDR) ligands inhibit HSC activation and abrogate liver fibrosis, while Vdr knockout mice spontaneously developed hepatic fibrosis. Mechanistically, we describe a pronounced redistribution of genome wide VDR binding sites (VDR cistrome) in HSCs elicited by a TGFβ1 pro-fibrotic insult. This TGFβ1-induced VDR cistrome overlaps extensively with SMAD3 binding sites, with co-occupancy at numerous cis-regulatory elements identified on a large set of pro-fibrotic genes. Addition of VDR ligand reduces SMAD3 occupancy at co-regulated genes, revealing an intersecting VDR/SMAD genomic circuit that regulates hepatic fibrogenesis. These results define a role for VDR as a endocrine checkpoint to modulate the wound healing response in liver, and suggest VDR ligands as a potential therapy for liver fibrosis. PMID:23622244

  11. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis C, is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with ... childbirth. Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. If ...

  12. Preventing primary liver cancer: how well are we faring towards a national hepatitis B strategy?

    PubMed

    Robotin, Monica C; George, Jacob; Supramaniam, Rajah; Sitas, Freddy; Penman, Andrew G

    2008-03-17

    Worldwide, over 80% of primary liver cancers are attributable to chronic infection with hepatitis B or C virus. Over the past two decades, primary liver cancer incidence rates have been consistently rising in Australia. In New South Wales, the standardised incidence ratios for primary liver cancer in males born in Vietnam, Hong Kong and Macau, Korea, Indonesia and China and in females born in Vietnam and China are 6-12 times those in Australian-born populations. The incidence of liver cancer is likely to continue to increase unless a coordinated approach to disease control can be developed. Effective programs for chronic hepatitis B management need to link prevention, treatment and care, and enhance opportunities for research and surveillance activities. The evidence that suppression of hepatitis B virus replication could limit disease progression needs to inform the development of a public health response. Lessons learned in the development of the National Hepatitis C Strategy and the experience of international hepatitis B control programs need to inform this process.

  13. Vascular anatomy of canine hepatic venous system: a basis for liver surgery.

    PubMed

    Mari, L; Acocella, F

    2015-06-01

    Detailed knowledge of the vascular anatomy is important for improving surgical approaches to the liver. Twelve canine livers were skeletonized to describe the anatomy of their portal and hepatic veins in details. Our data suggest that the liver can be divided into two sections, three divisions, seven lobes and two to four sub-lobes. This differs from the classic division into four lobes, four sub-lobes and two processes. The right section was perfused by the right portal branch and drained by independent hepatic veins, while most of the left section, perfused by the left portal branch, was drained by the main hepatic vein deriving from the middle and the left hepatic vein confluence. Part of the right medial lobe, and in some cases the papillary process of the caudate lobe, drained directly into the caudal vena cava. A proper right hepatic vein draining blood from more than one lobe was never observed. Portal connections between the quadrate and the left medial lobe were frequently recorded. Two sub-lobes with different portal blood supply and venous drainage could be identified in the right lateral (33.3% of cases) and the left lateral (100% of cases) lobes. From our results, the classic nomenclature of the liver lobes does not reflect their vascularization. Based on similarities between canine lobes and human segments, a new nomenclature is possible and may be less confounding in surgical settings.

  14. Vitamin E treatment for children with chronic hepatitis B: A randomized placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gerner, Patrick; Posselt, Hans-Georg; Krahl, Andreas; Ballauff, Antje; Innerhofer, Albina; Binder, Christa; Wenzl, Tobias G; Zense, Matthias; Hector, Ariadne; Dockter, Gerhard; Adam, Rüdiger; Neubert, Jenny; Claßen, Martin; van Gemmern, Robert; Wirth, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of vitamin E in children with chronic hepatitis B. METHODS: We randomly assigned patients with chronic hepatitis B, positive for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), to receive either vitamin E or placebo once daily for 6 mo in a 3:1 ratio and double-blind manner. The primary end point was HBeAg seroconversion, defined as the loss of HBeAg, undetectable levels of serum hepatitis B virus DNA, and the appearance of antibodies against HBeAg 12 mo after therapy. RESULTS: At baseline visit, 49 patients had normal and 43 had increased serum aminotransferase levels. Twenty-nine patients did not respond to previous treatment with interferon-α or lamivudine. Seventy-six children completed the study; 16 were non-compliant (n = 7), lost to follow-up (n = 7), or started another antiviral treatment (n = 3). Intention-to-treat analysis showed HBeAg seroconversion in 16 children (23.2%) treated with vitamin E and two (8.7%) in the placebo group (P = 0.13). Vitamin E was well tolerated. CONCLUSION: There is only a tendency that vitamin E may promote HBeAg seroconversion. Therefore larger studies are needed to clarify the role of antioxidants in the therapy of chronic hepatitis B. PMID:19084935

  15. Infant and adolescent hepatitis B immunization up to 1999: a global overview.

    PubMed

    Vryheid, R E; Kane, M A; Muller, N; Schatz, G C; Bezabeh, S

    2000-12-01

    This article presents a global overview of hepatitis B infant and adolescent immunization programmes. The 108 reported universal infant or adolescent immunization programmes and 87 reported national infant coverage rates fit a pattern, explained by hepatitis B endemicity, prosperity, policy emphasis, and immunization programme strength. Most East and Southeast Asian, Pacific, and Middle Eastern countries have intermediate to highly endemic hepatitis B. Most have achieved 65-100% coverage. South and Central Asia and sub-Saharan Africa have intermediate to high endemicity, with some countries having hepatitis B immunization programmes. Some Southern and Eastern European countries, with intermediate endemicity, have high coverage. Low endemic Northern European countries vaccinate higher risk groups; some have universal infant or adolescent programmes. Caribbean and Latin American countries have varying endemicity, and most started programmes. Low endemic North American countries have universal vaccination programmes. Universal immunization strategies have greatly reduced incidence and prevalence, and are cost-effective for many countries, but many have difficulties affording this vaccine. Globally, most infants are not being immunized against hepatitis B virus infection. Increasing coverage, and decreasing the numbers of people diseased and dying from this virus, may require delivering heat-stable vaccine beyond cold chains, creative financing to reduce prices, and multivalent vaccines.

  16. Unsafe injections and the transmission of hepatitis B and C in a periurban community in Pakistan.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, A. J.; Luby, S. P.; Fikree, F.; Karim, A.; Obaid, S.; Dellawala, S.; Mirza, S.; Malik, T.; Fisher-Hoch, S.; McCormick, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    Following reports of frequent deaths associated with jaundice and chronic liver disease among adults in a periurban community of Karachi, Pakistan, an investigation was conducted to evaluate the relationship between injections and viral hepatitis infections, to identify the reasons why patients received frequent injections, and to observe the injection practices employed in clinics. Two hundred and three adult patients were interviewed as they left each of the 18 area clinics. Practitioners were interviewed and three consecutive injections were observed at each clinic. Eighty-one per cent of patients received an injection on the day of the interview. Of the 135 patients who provided a serum sample, 59 (44%) had antibodies against hepatitis C virus and 26 (19%) had antibodies against hepatitis B virus. Patients who received more injections were more likely to be infected with hepatitis C. If oral and injected medications were equally effective, 44% of patients preferred injected medication. None of the practitioners knew that hepatitis C could be transmitted by injections. Non-sterile syringes and needles that had been used earlier in the day on other patients were used for 94% of the observed injections. Interventions to limit injections to those which are safe and clinically indicated are needed to prevent injection-associated infections in Pakistan and other low-income countries. PMID:10994278

  17. MiR-10a improves hepatic fibrosis by regulating the TGFβl/Smads signal transduction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangyao; Lin, Wei; Fang, Peipei; Lin, Xiuzhen; Zhuge, Lu; Hu, Zhiqiu; Jin, Lingxiang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the expression variation of the mouse hepatic fibrosis tissue transforming growth factor (TGF)-βl/Smads signal transduction pathway and its correlation with progression of hepatic fibrosis. The promotion effect of microRNA (miR)-10a on hepatic fibrosis and its possible mechanism was also assessed. Forty healthy female 8-week-old C57BL6/J mice were randomly divided into the control group (intraperitoneal injection of 5 µl/g normal saline, twice per week for 8 weeks) and the hepatic fibrosis group (intraperitoneal injection of 5 µl/g 10% CCI4 olive oil, twice per week for 8 weeks), with 20 mice per group. RT-PCR was used to test miR-10a expression in cells in the control and hepatic fibrosis groups. Cell culture and transfection of miR-10a mimics were conducted in the two groups and a Cell Counting Kit-8 was used to test the expression of TGF-β1 and Smad7 in hepatic fibroblasts. It was found that in comparison with the control group, miR-10a expression was significantly increased in the hepatic fibrosis group compared with the control group (P<0.05). The expression quantity of miR-10a was significantly increased in the transfection group compared with the control group (P<0.05). A high expression of miR-10a significantly improved TGF-β1 expression and reduced Smad7 expression in the hepatic fibrosis group (P<0.05). In conclusion, miR-10a expression was high in mouse hepatic tissues, transfection of miR-10a mimics significantly promoted the cell proliferation of hepatic fibrosis, and miR-10a improved hepatic fibrosis by regulating the TGF-βl/Smads signal transduction pathway. PMID:27602086

  18. MiR-10a improves hepatic fibrosis by regulating the TGFβl/Smads signal transduction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangyao; Lin, Wei; Fang, Peipei; Lin, Xiuzhen; Zhuge, Lu; Hu, Zhiqiu; Jin, Lingxiang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the expression variation of the mouse hepatic fibrosis tissue transforming growth factor (TGF)-βl/Smads signal transduction pathway and its correlation with progression of hepatic fibrosis. The promotion effect of microRNA (miR)-10a on hepatic fibrosis and its possible mechanism was also assessed. Forty healthy female 8-week-old C57BL6/J mice were randomly divided into the control group (intraperitoneal injection of 5 µl/g normal saline, twice per week for 8 weeks) and the hepatic fibrosis group (intraperitoneal injection of 5 µl/g 10% CCI4 olive oil, twice per week for 8 weeks), with 20 mice per group. RT-PCR was used to test miR-10a expression in cells in the control and hepatic fibrosis groups. Cell culture and transfection of miR-10a mimics were conducted in the two groups and a Cell Counting Kit-8 was used to test the expression of TGF-β1 and Smad7 in hepatic fibroblasts. It was found that in comparison with the control group, miR-10a expression was significantly increased in the hepatic fibrosis group compared with the control group (P<0.05). The expression quantity of miR-10a was significantly increased in the transfection group compared with the control group (P<0.05). A high expression of miR-10a significantly improved TGF-β1 expression and reduced Smad7 expression in the hepatic fibrosis group (P<0.05). In conclusion, miR-10a expression was high in mouse hepatic tissues, transfection of miR-10a mimics significantly promoted the cell proliferation of hepatic fibrosis, and miR-10a improved hepatic fibrosis by regulating the TGF-βl/Smads signal transduction pathway.

  19. Coexistence of hepatoma with mantle cell lymphoma in a hepatitis B carrier

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mu-Hsien; Lin, Yu-Ching; Cheng, Hao-Tsai; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Huang, Hsin-Chih; Kao, Hsiao-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The coexistence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) in the liver is rare. Reports show that these patients have cirrhotic livers or hepatitis virus infections before they develop HCC and NHL. We present a patient with hepatitis B virus infection who was transferred to our hospital with a newly detected liver mass; abdominal computed tomography examination showed one hypodense mass of 7 cm in diameter and multiple mesenteric and mediastinal lymph nodes. A liver tumor biopsy showed a hepatoma, and the pathologic findings from an inguinal lymph node excision showed mantle cell lymphoma. An immunohistochemical stain confirmed that the atypical lymphoid cells within the HCC were positive for the CD20, CD5 and cyclin D1 antigens. Taking these findings into account, the hepatic tumor was determined to be a HCC infiltrated by mantle cell lymphoma. PMID:26668520

  20. [Sutureless hepatic transection using a new radiofrequency assisted device. Theoretical model, experimental study and clinic trial].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Serrano, María Ángeles; Grande, Luis; Burdío, Fernando; Berjano, Enrique; Poves, Ignasi; Quesada, Rita

    2011-03-01

    The ideal instrument for performing hepatic transection should combine safe and rapid haemostasis in a single tool. We present a new multidisciplinary investigation designed to develop a hepatic transection device assisted by radiofrequency (RF); the investigation included: a computerised theoretical model, and experimental study and a clinical trial of this device. The theoretic modelling was performed by computer, based on the Finite Elements Method (FEM), with the objective of studying the distribution of electrical energy and temperature in the tissue, and to assess the effect of the characteristics of the instrument. The experimental study, based on an in vivo porcine model, suggested that the new instrument would allow the transection velocity of the hepatic parenchyma to be increased with lower bleeding per transection area compared with other techniques extensively used in liver surgery. These data should enable the first phase of clinical trial to be conducted, with preliminary results that suggest that the new device is safe and effective.