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Sample records for hepatitis a

  1. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A Hepatitis A Hepatitis A is a contagious viral infection that can easily affect children and adults. It is one of the most common types of hepatitis virus. Often when you hear about hepatitis A ...

  2. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... transaminase enzyme levels Treatment There is no specific treatment for hepatitis A. You should rest when the symptoms are ... and have not had hepatitis A or the hepatitis A vaccine. Common reasons for getting one or both of these treatments include: You live with someone who has hepatitis ...

  3. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... washed in untreated water Putting into your mouth a finger or object that came into contact with ...

  4. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation of the liver.” This inflammation can be caused by a wide variety of toxins, drugs, and metabolic diseases, as well as infection. There are at least 5 hepatitis viruses. Hepatitis A is contracted when a child eats food or drinks water that is contaminated with the virus or has ...

  5. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... MW, Sheffield JS. Prevention and management of viral hepatitis in pregnancy. Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America . 2014;41(4):573–592. [4] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chapter 9: Hepatitis A. In Hamborsky J, Kroger A, Wolfe S, eds. ...

  6. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... bowel movements Loss of appetite Low-grade fever Dark urine Joint pain Yellowing of the skin and ... person ingests even tiny amounts of contaminated fecal matter. The hepatitis A virus infects liver cells and ...

  7. Hepatitis A - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hepatitis A Vaccine: What You Need to Know - English Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) -- Hepatitis A Vaccine: What ... Hepatitis A Vaccine: What You Need to Know - English Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) -- Hepatitis A Vaccine: What ...

  8. Hepatitis A Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Hepatitis A Testing Share this page: Was this page ... HAV-Ab total; Anti-HAV Formal name: Viral Hepatitis A Antibody Related tests: Hepatitis B Testing ; Hepatitis ...

  9. Hepatitis A Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Twinrix® (as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... Why get vaccinated against hepatitis A?Hepatitis A is a serious liver disease. It is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). HAV is spread from ...

  10. Preventing hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A is inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus. You can take several steps to ... reduce your risk of spreading or catching the hepatitis A virus: Always wash your hands thoroughly after ...

  11. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Chapter 3 - Helminths, Soil-Transmitted Chapter 3 - Hepatitis B Hepatitis A ... Dec 20;2(6):227–30. Chapter 3 - Helminths, Soil-Transmitted Chapter 3 - Hepatitis B File Formats ...

  12. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... have liver damage because of it. What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  13. Hepatitis A FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... now routinely vaccinate all children, travelers to certain countries, and persons at risk for the disease. Many experts believe Hepatitis A vaccination has dramatically affected rates of the disease in the United States. Transmission / Exposure How is Hepatitis A spread? Hepatitis A ...

  14. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... a problem with the liver itself What Is Hepatitis A? Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is contagious, usually spreading to others ... objects contaminated by feces (poop) containing HAV. The hepatitis A vaccine has helped to make the infection rare ...

  15. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... clotting problems or chronic liver disease. previous continue Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Although hep A is a ... does — through direct contact with infected body fluids. Hepatitis B and C are even more easily passed in ...

  16. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A if they've been vaccinated against it. Hepatitis B Hepatitis B is a more serious infection. It may lead ... of which cause severe illness and even death. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is transmitted from person to person ...

  17. Hepatitis A through E (Viral Hepatitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the treatment of chronic hepatitis B include alpha interferon and peginterferon, which slow the replication of the ... Chronic hepatitis D is usually treated with pegylated interferon, although other potential treatments are under study. Hepatitis ...

  18. Hepatic cysticercosis: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina; Kumar, Praveen; Narula, Mahender Kaur; Anand, Rama

    2014-12-01

    Hepatic cysticercosis is a very rare entity; only four cases have been reported to date. High-resolution ultrasonography of the abdomen is the initial and most reliable modality for evaluation of hepatic cysticercosis. Medical therapy is the mainstay of treatment. We report a case of hepatic cysticercosis in a 28-year-old male who presented with right upper quadrant pain, fever, and jaundice. The article also describes the imaging patterns of hepatic cysticercosis based on different stages of evolution.

  19. Hepatitis A -- children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pediatric ER, Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital, Hollywood, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Hepatitis A Read more Latest Health News Read more ...

  20. Hepatitis A transmitted by food.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Anthony E

    2004-03-01

    Hepatitis A is caused by hepatitis A virus (HAV). Transmission occurs by the fecal-oral route, either by direct contact with an HAV-infected person or by ingestion of HAV-contaminated food or water. Foodborne or waterborne hepatitis A outbreaks are relatively uncommon in the United States. However, food handlers with hepatitis A are frequently identified, and evaluation of the need for immunoprophylaxis and implementation of control measures are a considerable burden on public health resources. In addition, HAV-contaminated food may be the source of hepatitis A for an unknown proportion of persons whose source of infection is not identified.

  1. Feature Hepatitis: The Dangers of Hepatitis: What you should know from A to E

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hepatitis: What you should know from A to E Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of Contents For ... condition is called chronic hepatitis. Hepatitis A and E do not cause chronic hepatitis. Hepatitis viruses B, ...

  2. Autoimmune hepatitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Gossard, Andrea A; Lindor, Keith D

    2012-05-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an inflammatory liver disease that predominantly affects females. The disease is characterized histologically by interface hepatitis, biochemically by increased aspartate and alanine aminotransferase levels, and serologically by the presence of autoantibodies and elevated levels of immunoglobulin G. AIH affects both adults and children, and is particularly aggressive in the latter group. It is a relatively rare but devastating disease, which progresses rapidly unless immunosuppressive treatment is started promptly. Treatment is often successful at inducing remission of disease, and this can lead to a normal life expectancy. However, progression to cirrhosis can and does occur in some. For those with advanced-stage disease and complications, consideration of liver transplantation is appropriate.

  3. [Prevention of hepatitis A and hepatitis B with vaccination].

    PubMed

    Buisson, Y; Meyran, M

    1995-02-01

    In spite of low endemic levels in France, hepatitis A and hepatitis B remains major concerns for public health. Seroprevalence of antibodies against hepatitis A (anti-HAV), declining below 15% in the 20 years-aged subjects, highlights an increasing susceptibility to hepatitis A. Later in the life, HAV infections become more serious and expansive. Control measures against hepatitis B have nearly stopped HBV spread linked to blood transfusions and mothers to infants transmission. Now, common risk factors are first sexual exposure, then injecting drug use, especially among young people. Vaccination is recognized as the most effective process for prevention. Recombinant hepatitis B vaccines have taken the place of plasma-derived vaccines. Although non responder individuals and escape mutants of HBV may hamper vaccinal coverage, hepatitis vaccines are highly immunogenic in immunocompetent people, allowing simplified schedules and reduced HBsAg dosages for children. Inactivated HAV vaccines now licensed prove to be highly immunogenic after only one injection. Hepatitis B vaccination targeted on high risk groups remains imperative but inadequate for reducing hepatitis B occurrence. A universal hepatitis B vaccination program in childhood and early adolescence would nearly stop the spread of HBV in the populations before ten years. Likewise, hepatitis A vaccination of travelers to endemic areas, all individuals exposed to contaminations from fecal sources, and food handlers, could reduce the spread of HAV in the community but would not completely prevent outbreaks of hepatitis A. Advantages of universal immunization of babies are not proved yet. Implementation of preventive strategies first needs a comprehensive surveillance of viral hepatitis in France.

  4. [Prevention of hepatitis A and hepatitis B by vaccination].

    PubMed

    Buisson, Y; Meyran, M

    1995-10-01

    In spite of low endemic levels in France, hepatitis A and hepatitis B remain major concerns for public health. Seroprevalence of antibodies against hepatitis A (anti-HAV), declining below 15% in the 20 years-aged subjects, highlights an increasing susceptibility to hepatitis A. Later in the life, HAV infections become more serious and expansive. Control measures against hepatitis B have nearly stopped HBV spread linked to blood transfusions and mothers to infants transmission. Now, common risk factors are first sexual exposure, then injecting drug use, especially among young people. Vaccination is recognized as the most effective process for prevention. Recombinant hepatitis B vaccines have taken the place of plasma-derived vaccines. Although non responder individuals and escape mutants of HBV may hamper vaccinal coverage, hepatitis vaccines are highly immunogenic in immunocompetent people, allowing simplified schedules and reduced HBsAg dosages for children. Inactivated HAV vaccines now licensed prove to be highly immunogenic after only one injection. Hepatitis B vaccination targeted on high risk groups remains imperative but inadequate for reducing hepatitis B occurrence. A universal hepatitis B vaccination program in childhood and early adolescence would nearly stop the spread of HBV in the populations before ten years. Likewise, hepatitis A vaccination of travelers to endemic areas, all individuals exposed to contaminations from fecal sources, and food handlers, could reduce the spread of HAV in the community but would not completely prevent outbreaks of hepatitis A. Advantages of universal immunization of babies are not proved yet. Implementation of preventive strategies first needs a comprehensive surveillance of viral hepatitis in France.

  5. Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond

    MedlinePlus

    Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is inflammation of the liver caused ...

  6. Hepatitis in clinical practice. 1. Hepatitis A and B.

    PubMed

    Sarver, D K

    1986-03-01

    As is evident from the foregoing discussion, hepatitis A and hepatitis B are not static, passé disease. Knowledge concerning these illnesses continues to expand at a fantastic rate--all of it of extreme practical clinical significance. Most interesting is the elucidation of the etiology of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the increase this knowledge is hoped to produce on the utilization of hepatitis B vaccine. Also extremely important is the development of recombinant DNA vaccine, which will permit total circumvention of the question of AIDS and safety of the hepatitis B vaccine.

  7. Changing Epidemiology of Hepatitis A and Hepatitis E Viruses in China, 1990–2014

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiang; Wu, Peng; Wang, Liping; Geng, Mengjie; Zeng, Lingjia; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ningshao; Lai, Shengjie; Dalton, Harry R.; Cowling, Benjamin J.

    2017-01-01

    We compared the epidemiology of hepatitis A and hepatitis E cases in China from 1990–2014 to better inform policy and prevention efforts. The incidence of hepatitis A cases declined dramatically, while hepatitis E incidence increased. During 2004–2014, hepatitis E mortality rates surpassed those of hepatitis A. PMID:28098527

  8. [Overview on duck virus hepatitis A].

    PubMed

    Ren, Liqian; Li, Jing; Bi, Yuhai; Chen, Can; Zhang, Dabing; Liu, Wenjun

    2012-07-01

    This article describes the nomenclature, history and genetic evolution of duck hepatitis A virus, and updates the epidemiology, clinical symptom and surveillances of duck virus hepatitis A. It also summarizes the present status and progress of duck virus hepatitis A and illustrated the necessity and urgency of its research, which provides rationale for the control of duck hepatitis A virus disease in China.

  9. Living with hepatitis C: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Hill, Rebekah; Pfeil, Michael; Moore, Jenny; Richardson, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    To explore the experience of adults living with hepatitis C over time. Hepatitis C virus is a growing problem affecting thousands of people worldwide. The majority of individuals infected develop chronic liver disease, but treatment is not always successful, leaving many to live with the virus indefinitely. Experiences of living with hepatitis C are poorly understood yet essential to meet the needs of an increasing number of affected people. A qualitative study using a descriptive phenomenological methodology. Unstructured interviews were conducted with 23 hepatitis C-positive individuals in the East of England; participants were interviewed twice within a year. Data analysis revealed six themes of the experience of living with hepatitis C: hepatitis C and self; hepatitis C, self and others; self and handling hepatitis C; self and handling hepatitis C treatment issues; living with the consequences of hepatitis C; self, hepatitis C and thoughts of the future. Diagnosis of hepatitis C can disrupt people's sense of identity and trigger a life transition. A complex range of factors create uncertainty for people living with hepatitis C. Many struggle to make a healthy transition to life with the condition, instead living in a state of sustained uncertainty. Nurses working within a chronic care framework of ongoing advice and support can improve experiences for those living with hepatitis C. Practice aimed at reducing both the disruptive effect of the diagnosis and the uncertainties it creates can help facilitate a transition to life with the disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. [Prevention of virus hepatitis A to E].

    PubMed

    Cornberg, M; Manns, M P

    2011-03-01

    Infection with hepatitis viruses can lead to acute hepatitis with the risk of developing liver failure. Chronic viral hepatitis may evolve into liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, prevention of viral hepatitis and its sequels is essential. Vaccination against hepatitis A is successful in almost all individuals. Protective antibodies maintain for at least 20 years. Booster vaccinations are not necessary. Since the introduction of hepatitis A vaccines, the incidence of new HAV-infections has declined significantly. Hepatitis B vaccines are safe and highly effective. Special populations such as dialysis patients or immunocompromised patients require special vaccine schedules. New vaccines with improved adjuvants are currently being tested in clinical trials. So far there is no hepatitis C vaccine on the horizon. Prophylaxis of HCV-infections relies primarily on hygiene measures. Early therapy of acute hepatitis C can prevent chronic hepatitis C. HDV-infection can only be established if HBsAg is present. Thus, prevention of hepatitis B or elimination of HBsAg means prevention of hepatitis delta. Hepatitis E vaccines have been evaluated in phase III studies. The development of HEV vaccines becomes more relevant since chronic HEV infections have been reported in immunosuppressed individuals.

  11. Hepatic tumor angiography: a subject review

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, V.P.

    1983-09-01

    The dual blood supply of the normal hepatic parenchyma and the single arterial supply of hepatic neoplasms are important factors in the interpretation of celiac and hepatic arteriograms. Depending on whether the hepatic artery, portal vein, or both are opacified, three types of hepatogram can occur: arterial, portal, or mixed. On the celiac arteriogram, the densely opacified hepatic parenchyma makes the less well opacified tumor appear relatively hypovascular; and conversely, on the hepatic arteriogram the nonopacified portal flow has a ''wash-out'' effect on the normal parenchyma so that the neoplasm remains hypervascular. Thus most hepatic neoplasms are hypervascular on the hepatic arteriogram, and conversion of a hypervascular tumor to a hypovascular one is indicative of its response to treatment.

  12. Seroepidemiology of hepatitis A and hepatitis B virus in Luxembourg.

    PubMed

    Mossong, J; Putz, L; Patiny, S; Schneider, F

    2006-08-01

    A prospective seroepidemiological survey was carried out in Luxembourg in 2000-2001 to determine the antibody status of the Luxembourg population against hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). One of the objectives of this survey was to assess the impact of the hepatitis B vaccination programme, which started in May 1996 and included a catch-up campaign for all adolescents aged 12-15 years. Venous blood from 2679 individuals was screened for the presence of antibodies to HAV antigen and antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) using an enzyme immunoassay. Samples positive for anti-HBs were tested for antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) using a chemiluminiscent microparticle immunoassay to distinguish between individuals with past exposure to vaccine or natural infection. The estimated age-standardized anti-HAV seroprevalence was 42.0% [95% confidence interval (CI) 39.8-44.1] in the population >4 years of age. Seroprevalence was age-dependent and highest in adult immigrants from Portugal and the former Yugoslavia. The age-standardized prevalence of anti-HBs and anti-HBc was estimated at 19.7% (95% CI 18.1-21.3) and 3.16% (95% CI 2.2-4.1) respectively. Anti-HBs seroprevalence exceeding 50% was found in the cohorts targeted by the routine hepatitis B vaccination programme, which started in 1996. Our study illustrates that most young people in Luxembourg are susceptible to HAV infection and that the hepatitis B vaccination programme is having a substantial impact on population immunity in children and teenagers.

  13. Know thy hepatitis: A through TT.

    PubMed

    Glick, M

    1999-05-01

    Several viruses have been identified as causative agents of hepatitis in humans. Other hepatotropic viruses have been implicated as potentially disease-causing. This article reviews hepatitis A virus through the newly discovered hepatitis TT virus and their implication for the profession of dentistry.

  14. Hepatitis A: Old and New

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, Jennifer A.

    2001-01-01

    The hepatitis A virus (HAV), a picornavirus, is a common cause of hepatitis worldwide. Spread of infection is generally person to person or by oral intake after fecal contamination of skin or mucous membranes; less commonly, there is fecal contamination of food or water. Hepatitis A is endemic in developing countries, and most residents are exposed in childhood. In contrast, the adult population in developed countries demonstrates falling rates of exposure with improvements in hygiene and sanitation. The export of food that cannot be sterilized, from countries of high endemicity to areas with low rates of infection, is a potentially important source of infection. After ingestion and uptake from the gastrointestinal tract, the virus replicates in the liver and is excreted into the bile. Cellular immune responses to the virus lead to destruction of infected hepatocytes with consequent development of symptoms and signs of disease. Humoral immune responses are the basis for diagnostic serologic assays. Acute HAV infection is clinically indistinguishable from other causes of acute viral hepatitis. In young children the disease is often asymptomatic, whereas in older children and adults there may be a range of clinical manifestations from mild, anicteric infection to fulminant hepatic failure. Clinical variants include prolonged, relapsing, and cholestatic forms. Management of the acute illness is supportive, and complete recovery without sequelae is the usual outcome. Research efforts during World War II led to the development of passive immunoprophylaxis. Pooled immune serum globulin is efficacious in the prevention and attenuation of disease in exposed individuals. More recently, active immunoprophylaxis by vaccination has been accomplished. Future eradication of this disease can now be contemplated. PMID:11148002

  15. Bivalent inactivated hepatitis A and recombinant hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Beran, Jiri

    2007-12-01

    Hepatitis A and B remain serious global public health problems. Monovalent vaccines against hepatitis A and B have been available for many years. Since 1996, licenses have been gradually introduced for different formulations and immunization schedules of the first combined vaccines against both diseases. Twinrix Adult (with conventional and accelerated schedules) is available for the immunization of individuals aged 16 years or older in Europe and 18 years or older the USA. Twinrix Pediatric, with its three-dose schedule, and AmBirix, with its two-dose schedule, are licensed in Europe for ages 1-15 years. These vaccines offer a single injection for satisfactory protection against hepatitis A and B and an excellent safety and reactogenicity profile in comparison with monovalent vaccines. This article focuses on immunogenicity of the vaccines and proposes expert opinion and future directions in this field.

  16. Chronic urticaria following acute hepatitis A.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Paul M; Kevat, Dev A S; McCarthy, James S; Woods, Marion L

    2012-09-18

    Urticaria has a documented association with the prodromal phases of hepatitis A, B and, although still contentious, likely hepatitis C. Despite the documented association there are few actual reported cases of urticaria occurring with hepatitis A infection and in all of the cases reported so far the urticaria preceded the diagnosis of hepatitis A and was acute rather than chronic. We describe a case of urticaria occurring following acute infection with hepatitis A, which persisted beyond 6 weeks and therefore was by definition chronic. Although chronic urticaria has been reported to be associated with other forms of viral hepatitis, to the best of our knowledge this has not been reported previously with hepatitis A.

  17. Chronic urticaria following acute hepatitis A

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Paul M; Kevat, Dev A S; McCarthy, James S; Woods, Marion L

    2012-01-01

    Urticaria has a documented association with the prodromal phases of hepatitis A, B and, although still contentious, likely hepatitis C. Despite the documented association there are few actual reported cases of urticaria occurring with hepatitis A infection and in all of the cases reported so far the urticaria preceded the diagnosis of hepatitis A and was acute rather than chronic. We describe a case of urticaria occurring following acute infection with hepatitis A, which persisted beyond 6 weeks and therefore was by definition chronic. Although chronic urticaria has been reported to be associated with other forms of viral hepatitis, to the best of our knowledge this has not been reported previously with hepatitis A. PMID:22989421

  18. [Hepatitis: a longstanding companion in human history].

    PubMed

    Craxi, Lucia

    2012-03-01

    Hepatitis has gone along with human history since its origins, due to its prompt identifiability linked to jaundice as a symptom. Written evidence of outbreaks of epidemic jaundice can be tracked back a few millenniums before Christ. Unavoidable confusion arises due to the overlap of different sources possibly linked to different aetiologies, identified over time as epidemic jaundice (HAV or HEV hepatitis?) and serum hepatitis (HBV or HCV hepatitis?). The journey that brought to recognize viruses as the main cause of jaundice was long and started midway during the last century, when the infectious hypothesis, which had taken place step by step, was finally confirmed by epidemiological investigations of an outbreak occurring in the US army in 1942, after a yellow fever immunization campaign. Further research identified two clinically different types of hepatitis, called for the first time hepatitis A and hepatitis B.

  19. Hepatic yersiniosis in a cougar (Felis concolor).

    PubMed

    Owston, Michael A; Wu, Ching Ching; Ramos-Vara, José A

    2006-09-01

    A cougar (Felis concolor) was diagnosed with hepatic yersiniosis by bacterial culture and histopathology. The animal had a 2-week history of anorexia and jaundice before its death. Grossly, the liver exhibited caseo-necrotic foci. Histopathologically, there was necrotizing and suppurative hepatitis, with large numbers of intralesional gram-negative coccobacilli. Additional hepatic lesions included central vein thrombosis, lymphoplasmacytic portal hepatitis, and capsulitis. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis coccobacilli were isolated in pure culture from the hepatic lesions. Because the hepatic lesions in this animal resemble those of other zoonotic diseases, such as plague and tularemia, veterinarians and laboratory personnel who handle samples should take adequate safety precautions. This report is the first to describe the pathology associated with hepatic yersiniosis in a cougar.

  20. Hepatic porphyria: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sumant; Young, Steven; Kodali, Sudha; Singal, Ashwani K

    2016-11-01

    Porphyrias are a group of metabolic disorders, which result from a specific abnormality in one of the eight enzymes of the heme biosynthetic pathway. These have been subdivided based on the predominant site of enzyme defect into hepatic and erythropoietic types and based on clinical presentation into acute neurovisceral and cutaneous blistering porphyrias. This review focuses on hepatic porphyrias, which include acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), variegate porphyria (VP), hereditary coproporphyria (HCP), aminolevulinic acid dehydratase deficiency porphyria (ADP), and porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT). Of these, AIP and ADP are classified as acute porphyria, PCT as cutaneous, while VP and HCP present with both acute and cutaneous clinical manifestations. Porphobilinogen levels in a spot urine sample is the initial screening test for the diagnosis of acute hepatic porphyria, and plasma with spot urine porphyrin levels is the initial screening test to approach patients suspected of cutaneous porphyria. Specific biochemical porphyrin profile for each porphyria helps in determining the specific diagnosis. Pain relief and elimination of triggering agents are the initial steps in managing a patient presenting with an acute attack. Intravenous glucose administration terminates the mild episode of acute porphyria, with intravenous hemin needed for management of moderate to severe episodes. Liver transplantation is curative and may be needed for patients with a life-threatening acute porphyria attack or for patients with recurrent acute attacks refractory to prophylactic treatment. Of the cutaneous porphyrias, PCT is the most common and is frequently associated with a combination of multiple susceptibility factors such as alcohol use, smoking, hepatitis C virus infection, HIV infection, estrogen use, and mutations of the hemochromatosis gene. Regular phlebotomy schedule and low-dose hydroxychloroquine are effective and safe treatment options for management of PCT.

  1. Hepatitis A in Poland in 2012.

    PubMed

    Baumann-Popczyk, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the article is evaluation of the epidemiological situation of hepatitis A in Poland in 2012. Assessment of epidemiological situation of hepatitis A was based on results from analysis of the annual bulletins: "Infectious diseases and poisonings in Poland in 2012", "Vaccinations in Poland in 2012", reports from individual cases and epidemiological investigations of outbreaks linked to hepatitis A, sent by Epidemiological Departments in Sanitary Epidemiological Stations to the Department of Epidemiology at NIPH-NIH. In Poland, 71 cases of hepatitis A were registered in 2012. The incidence of 0.17/ per 100 000 inhabitants was slightly higher than previous year. The incidence of hepatitis A ranged from 0.08/100 000 in Łódzkie and Podlaskie to 0.35/100 000 in Śląskie. The incidence of hepatitis A in men and women was at an approximate level and amounted to 0.19 and 0.18/100 000 respectively. The peak of incidence was recorded during the summer and autumn-winter months. In 2012 imported cases constituted 52.1% of all cases of hepatitis A. There were five outbreaks involving of 11 registered cases in 2012. In 2012, there was a slight increase in the incidence of hepatitis A in compared with the previous year. However, apart from that there were no significant changes in the epidemiological situation of hepatitis A. In Poland there is still very low endemicity for hepatitis A. Decreased incidence and the small number of people vaccinated against hepatitis A facilitates the accumulation of a fairly numerous population of persons susceptible to infection which is connected with the possibility to increase the number of cases of hepatitis A. Despite the fact that the current epidemiological situation of hepatitis A in Poland is good, the disease still requires monitoring and analysis within the framework of epidemiological surveillance system.

  2. Experience with hepatitis A and B vaccines.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jeffrey P

    2005-10-01

    The lengthy history of efforts to understand the pathogenesis and means of preventing and controlling both hepatitis A and B is noteworthy for many exceptional scientific achievements. Among these are the development of vaccines to prevent the spread of infection through induction of active immunity to hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). The first plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine was licensed in the United States in 1981 and was replaced by recombinant hepatitis B vaccines in 1986 and 1989. Vaccines to prevent HAV infection were licensed in the United States in 1995 and 1996. Subsequently, combination vaccines that included both hepatitis A and B vaccine components, or the hepatitis B component in combination with other commonly administered vaccines, were licensed in the United States. Despite significant reductions in hepatitis-related morbidity and mortality that have resulted from widespread use of these vaccines, vaccine-preventable morbidity and mortality still occur. The purposes of this article are to review clinical trial and other experience with hepatitis A and B vaccines in healthy individuals as well as in those with chronic liver disease, infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, or requiring hemodialysis; describe the impact that these vaccines and national recommendations for vaccination have had on reducing the incidence of HAV and HBV infection; and recommend expansion of these recommendations to include universal vaccination of adults as a means of further reducing the burden of viral hepatitis.

  3. Hepatitis E as a Zoonosis.

    PubMed

    Widén, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E (HE) virus infection is not limited to spread from human to human but also occurs between animals and more importantly as zoonotic spread from animals to humans. Genotyping of strains from hepatitis E virus-infected patients has revealed that these infections are not all caused by genotypes 1 or 2 but often by genotypes 3 or 4. Therefore, it is important to understand the striking difference between the spread of genotypes 1 and 2 in countries with poor sanitary standards and the spread of genotypes 3 and 4 in countries with good sanitary standards. The number of animal species known to be infected with HEV is expanding rapidly. The finding of HEV in new host species always raises the question regarding the zoonotic potential of these newfound strains. However, as new strains are found, the complexity increases.Certain genotypes are known to have the ability of zoonotic spread from certain animal species and these animals may even constitute an infection reservoir. Some animal species may contribute to zoonotic infections albeit on a smaller scale, while others are believed to be of minor or no importance at all. This chapter reviews possible sources of zoonotic hepatitis E virus infection.

  4. Recurrent paratyphoid fever A co-infected with hepatitis A reactivated chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanling; Xiong, Yujiao; Huang, Wenxiang; Jia, Bei

    2014-05-12

    We report here a case of recurrent paratyphoid fever A with hepatitis A co-infection in a patient with chronic hepatitis B. A 26-year-old male patient, who was a hepatitis B virus carrier, was co-infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A and hepatitis A virus. The recurrence of the paratyphoid fever may be ascribed to the coexistence of hepatitis B, a course of ceftriaxone plus levofloxacin that was too short and the insensitivity of paratyphoid fever A to levofloxacin. We find that an adequate course and dose of ceftriaxone is a better strategy for treating paratyphoid fever. Furthermore, the co-infection of paratyphoid fever with hepatitis A may stimulate cellular immunity and break immunotolerance. Thus, the administration of the anti-viral agent entecavir may greatly improve the prognosis of this patient with chronic hepatitis B, and the episodes of paratyphoid fever and hepatitis A infection prompt the use of timely antiviral therapy.

  5. Hepatitis A Incidence and Hepatitis A Vaccination Among American Indians and Alaska Natives, 1990–2001

    PubMed Central

    Bialek, Stephanie R.; Thoroughman, Douglas A.; Hu, Diana; Simard, Edgar P.; Chattin, Jody; Cheek, Jim; Bell, Beth P.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the effect on trends in hepatitis A incidence of the 1996 recommendation for routine hepatitis A vaccination of American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) children. Methods. We examined trends in hepatitis A incidence among AIAN peoples during 1990–2001 and vaccination coverage levels among children on the largest American Indian reservation. Results. Hepatitis A rates among AIANs declined 20-fold during 1997–2001. Declines in hepatitis A incidence occurred among AIANs in reservation and metropolitan areas. Among 1956 children living on the Navajo Nation whose medical records were reviewed, 1508 (77.1%) had received at least one dose of hepatitis A vaccine, and 1020 (52.1%) had completed the vaccine series. Conclusions. Hepatitis A rates among AIAN peoples have declined dramatically coincident with implementation of routine hepatitis A vaccination of AIAN children. PMID:15249305

  6. [Acute herpesviridae hepatitis during pregnancy: A review].

    PubMed

    Dochez, Vincent; Ducarme, Guillaume

    2015-06-01

    Viral hepatitis are well defined during pregnancy, including hepatitis A, B, C, D or E. In contrast, viral hepatitis called non-alphabetic, like viruses Herpesviridae family hepatitis [cytomegalovirus (CMV), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) or herpes simplex virus (HSV)] are rarely described. The aim of this article is to make a focus on the care of these viral herpesviridae hepatitis during pregnancy. Herpes hepatitis is more common during pregnancy, with a neonatal risk at peripartum period. VZV infection can cause disease to the fetus, with possible vertical transmission, and induce congenital or neonatal varicella. While EBV infection during pregnancy seems benign, the CMV is a high risk of birth defects. The management of these patients therefore depends on the gestational age, but especially the type of virus involved. The diagnosis is therefore essential to adapt treatment and obstetrical care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Hepatitis A to E: what's new?

    PubMed

    Mohsen, Waled; Levy, Miriam T

    2017-04-01

    Viral hepatitis contributes to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. While acute infection may be self-limiting, unrecognised chronic infection and under-utilisation of guideline-based approaches to therapy contribute to increasing rates of cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and death. Our aim was to review the current evidence for screening, diagnosis and treatment in hepatitis A to E. Evidence for this review was sourced from international and Australian guidelines and high-quality clinical trials. MEDLINE was searched using structured key word strategy and retrieved articles were reviewed methodically to inform a brief and up-to-date synopsis of hepatitis A to E. We share some of the recent developments in viral hepatitis, specifically the new therapies for hepatitis C. Direct-acting antiviral therapies are safe, well-tolerated and effective. Subsidies allow access for all Australians with most strains of hepatitis C. We outline evidence underpinning efficacy and safety of treatment for hepatitis B, while clarifying some of the nuances in the setting of pregnancy and immunosuppression. We provide a simplified concept to facilitate understanding of the five phases of hepatitis B; practical for real-world setting. Hepatitis A to E is a broad topic, not all aspects of these viruses can be covered in this short review. We provided suggestions for evidence based guidelines, which are a suitable supplement to this article. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  8. Does chronic hepatitis B infection affect the clinical course of acute hepatitis A?

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Rin; Moh, In Ho; Jung, Sung Won; Kim, Jin Bae; Park, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyoung Su; Jang, Myung Kuk; Lee, Myung Seok

    2013-01-01

    The impact of chronic hepatitis B on the clinical outcome of acute hepatitis A remains controversial. The aim of present study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of acute hepatitis A in cases with underlying chronic hepatitis B compared to cases of acute hepatitis A alone. Data on 758 patients with acute hepatitis A admitted at two university-affiliated hospitals were reviewed. Patients were classified into three groups: group A, patients with both acute hepatitis A and underlying chronic hepatitis B (n = 27); group B, patients infected by acute hepatitis A alone whose sexes and ages were matched with patients in group A (n  = 54); and group C, patients with acute hepatitis A alone (n = 731). None of the demographic features of group A were significantly different from those of group B or C, except for the proportion of males and body weight, which differed from group C. When comparing to group B, clinical symptoms were more frequent, and higher total bilirubin and lower albumin levels were observed in group A. When comparing to group C, the albumin levels were lower in group A. There were no differences in the duration of hospital stay, occurrence of acute kidney injury, acute liver failure, prolonged cholestasis, or relapsing hepatitis. This study revealed that clinical symptoms and laboratory findings were less favorable for patients with acute hepatitis A and chronic hepatitis B compared to those with acute hepatitis A alone. However, there were no differences in fatal outcomes or serious complications. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Hepatic capillariasis in Maine presenting as a hepatic mass.

    PubMed

    Klenzak, Jennifer; Mattia, Anthony; Valenti, August; Goldberg, John

    2005-05-01

    We report the first case of hepatic capillariasis in Maine. The patient was a 54-year-old male carpenter who presented with a subacute history of severe abdominal pain, fevers, and weight loss. Initial diagnostic studies suggested a hepatic mass associated with para-aortic lymphadenopathy. The patient underwent open laparotomy for resection of the mass. He was found to have an eosinophilic granuloma in the liver; further evaluation revealed degenerating Capillaria hepatica. The exact route of infection in this case is unknown but is most likely due to accidental ingestion of soil contaminated with mature capillaria eggs. This patient had a low parasite burden and did not exhibit significant peripheral eosinophilia. After treatment with thiabendazole, he recovered uneventfully.

  10. Posttransfusion hepatitis B transmitted by blood from a hepatitis B surface antigen-negative hepatitis B virus carrier.

    PubMed

    Larsen, J; Hetland, G; Skaug, K

    1990-06-01

    A female blood donor at our institution was implicated in three cases of clinical posttransfusion hepatitis B. She had given blood 25 times in 8 years. Twenty-seven recipients were followed up, and about one-half of those who were still living had serologic markers of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The donor was repeatedly negative for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody, but she had high titers of antibody to hepatitis B core antigen. We conclude that blood from this HBsAg-negative blood donor was capable of transmitting hepatitis B.

  11. Hepatitis A, B, and C: Learn the Differences

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider about your need for hepatitis A vac- cine or a dose of immune globulin (IG). • Get ... transmission.) In addition to getting hepatitis A vac- cine, you should also get hepatitis B vaccine. www. ...

  12. Hepatitis A and the Vaccine (Shot) to Prevent It

    MedlinePlus

    ... Teen Vaccine Resources Related Links Vaccines & Immunizations Hepatitis A and the Vaccine (Shot) to Prevent It Language: ... vaccine. Why should my child get the hepatitis A shot? The hepatitis A shot: Protects your child ...

  13. Clinical and virological improvement of hepatitis B virus-related or hepatitis C virus-related chronic hepatitis with concomitant hepatitis A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sagnelli, Evangelista; Coppola, Nicola; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Pisapia, Raffaella; Onofrio, Mirella; Sagnelli, Caterina; Catuogno, Antonio; Scolastico, Carlo; Piccinino, Felice; Filippini, Pietro

    2006-06-01

    We evaluated the clinical and virological characteristics of hepatitis A virus infection in persons concomitantly infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV). We enrolled 21 patients with acute hepatitis A and chronic hepatitis with no sign of liver cirrhosis, 13 patients who were positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (case B group), 8 patients who were anti-HCV positive (case C group), and 21 patients with acute hepatitis A without a preexisting liver disease (control A group). Two control groups of patients with chronic hepatitis B (control B group) or C (control C group) were also chosen. All control groups were pair-matched by age and sex with the corresponding case group. Fulminant hepatitis A was never observed, and hepatitis A had a severe course in 1 patient in the case B group and in 1 patient in the control A group. Both patients recovered. On admission, HBV DNA was detected in 1 patient in the case B group (7.7%) and in 13 patients (50%) in the control B group; HCV RNA was found in no patient in the case C group and in 16 patients (81.2%) in the control C group. Of 9 patients in the case B group who were followed up for 6 months, 3 became negative for hepatitis B surface antigen and positive for hepatitis B surface antibody, 2 remained positive for hepatitis B surface antigen and negative for HBV DNA, and 4 became positive for HBV DNA with a low viral load [corrected] Of 6 patients in the case C group who were followed up for 6 months, 3 remained negative for HCV RNA, and 3 had persistently low viral loads. Concomitant hepatitis A was always self-limited, associated with a marked inhibition of HBV and HCV genomes, and possibly had a good prognosis for the underlying chronic hepatitis.

  14. Hepatitis A and parvovirus B19 infections in an infant with fulminant hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Ozçay, Figen; Bikmaz, Y Emre; Canan, Oğuz; Ozbek, Namik

    2006-06-01

    Acute viral hepatitis with hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E viruses in the etiology of fulminant hepatic failure either single or in combinations has been described. Parvovirus B19 is also an etiologic agent of acute liver failure and hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia. We present a patient diagnosed with fulminant hepatitis A referred for liver transplantation. Parvovirus B19 superinfection was detected when the patient developed anemia during the course of the disease. We discuss possible roles of both viruses in fulminant hepatitis and pure red cell aplasia.

  15. Prophylaxis against hepatitis A for travel.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, P; Oakeshott, P; Logan, J; Law, J; Harris, D M

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To develop a rational practice policy for prophylaxis against hepatitis A for travellers to high risk areas. DESIGN--18 Month prospective study of consecutive patients who requested prophylaxis against hepatitis A. SETTING--Inner city general practice. SUBJECTS--104 Patients aged 15-61 (mean 30) assessed for risk factors for hepatitis A and put into groups depending on predictions from the risk factors of their immunity. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES AND RESULTS--All patients were screened for antibody to hepatitis A virus. Of 52 patients with no risk factors 47 had no antibody and were thus susceptible to hepatitis A. All 27 patients with major risk factors (having been brought up in an endemic area or with a history of jaundice) were immune. Of 25 patients with minor risk factors (a history of previous travel in high risk areas, drug abuse, having lived in a squat or travelled rough, or having lived with someone who had jaundice) 12 were immune (p less than 0.001, chi 2 test). CONCLUSIONS--All travellers requesting prophylaxis against hepatitis A should be assessed for risk factors for previous exposure to hepatitis A. Those with no risk factors could be immunised with human normal immunoglobulin without screening. The remainder should be tested for hepatitis A antibody and those found to be susceptible should be immunised. PMID:2157514

  16. New developments in hepatitis A control.

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, L.

    1995-01-01

    An inactivated vaccine for hepatitis A was recently licensed in Canada. This is the first important development in control of the disease in 50 years. This article presents new information about the vaccine and about the groups who might benefit from it. It also provides a review of the clinical and epidemiological aspects of hepatitis A. PMID:7647625

  17. Animal models of hepatitis A and E.

    PubMed

    Purcell, R H; Emerson, S U

    2001-01-01

    Several useful animal models for both hepatitis A and E have been identified, characterized, and refined. At present, all of the best models utilize nonhuman primates: chimpanzees, tamarin species, and owl monkeys for hepatitis A; and macaque species, chimpanzees, and owl monkeys for hepatitis E. Pigs may prove useful for some studies of hepatitis E, and it is hoped that serological evidence of widespread infection of rats with an HEV-like agent may lead to the development of an animal model based on laboratory rats. As has been the case for each of the hepatitis viruses as they have been discovered, the development of useful and reproducible animal model systems has been critical for moving the field forward as expeditiously as possible.

  18. Chronic hepatitis E: A brief review.

    PubMed

    Murali, Arvind R; Kotwal, Vikram; Chawla, Saurabh

    2015-09-08

    Hepatitis E viral infection has traditionally been considered an acute, self-limited, water borne disease similar to hepatitis A, endemic to developing countries. However, over the past decade, zoonotic transmission and progression to chronicity in human patients has been identified, resulting in persistently elevated transaminase levels, progressive liver injury and cirrhosis. In addition to liver injury, neurological, renal and rheumatological manifestations have also been reported. Chronic hepatitis E occurs mainly in immunosuppressed individuals such as transplant recipients, human immunodeficiency virus patients with low CD4 counts and in patients with hematological malignancies receiving chemotherapy. Diagnosis is established by persistent elevation of hepatitis E virus RNA in the stool or serum. This population often requires treatment with antiviral agents, particularly ribavirin, as spontaneous clearance with reduction in immunosuppression occurs only in about a third of the patients. The purpose of this review, is to further discuss the clinical presentation, and recent advances in diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of chronic hepatitis E.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of hepatitis A vaccination for individuals with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Chapko, Michael K; Yee, Helen S; Monto, Alexander; Dominitz, Jason A

    2010-02-17

    The incidence of hepatitis A infection in the United States has decreased dramatically in recent years because of childhood immunization programs. A decision analysis of the cost-effectiveness of hepatitis A vaccination for adults with hepatitis C was conducted. No vaccination strategy is cost-effective for adults with hepatitis C using the recent lower anticipated hepatitis A incidence, private sector costs, and a cost-effectiveness criterion of $100,000/QALY. Vaccination is cost-effective only for individuals who have cleared the hepatitis C virus when Department of Veterans Affairs costs are used. The recommendation to vaccinate adults with hepatitis C against hepatitis A should be reconsidered. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Hepatic Resection Using a Water Jet Dissector

    PubMed Central

    Stain, S. C.; Guastella, T.; Maddern, G. J.; Blumgart, L. H.

    1993-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity in major hepatic resection is often related to hemorrhage. A high pressure, high velocity water jet has been developed and has been utilized to assist in hepatic parenchymal transection. Sixty-seven major hepatic resections were performed for solid hepatic tumors. The tissue fracture technique was used in 51 patients (76%), and the water jet dissector was used predominantly in 16 patients (24%). The extent of hepatic resection using each technique was similar. The results showed no difference in operative duration (p = .499). The mean estimated blood loss using the water jet was 1386 ml, and tissue fracture technique 2450 ml (p = .217). Transfusion requirements were less in the water jet group (mean 2.0 units) compared to the tissue fracture group (mean 5.2 units); (p = .023). Results obtained with the new water dissector are encouraging. The preliminary results suggest that blood loss may be diminished. PMID:8387808

  1. Cytokine Signatures Discriminate Highly Frequent Acute Hepatitis a Virus and Hepatitis E Virus Coinfections from Monoinfections in Mexican Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Realpe-Quintero, Mauricio; Copado-Villagrana, Edgar Daniel; Trujillo-Ochoa, Jorge Luis; Alvarez, Angel Hilario; Panduro, Arturo; Fierro, Nora Alma

    2017-07-01

    The frequency of hepatitis A virus and hepatitis E virus infections and their cytokine profiles were analyzed in Mexican pediatric patients with acute hepatitis. A high frequency of coinfections was found. Significant overexpression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-12, IL-13 and interferon-gamma during hepatitis A virus monoinfections and limited secretion of cytokines in hepatitis E virus infections were observed.

  2. Factors influencing the severity of acute viral hepatitis A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Il; Kim, Yun Soo; Jung, Young Kul; Kwon, Oh Sang; Kim, Yeon Suk; Ku, Yang Suh; Choi, Duck Joo; Kim, Ju Hyun

    2010-09-01

    Most patients with acute viral hepatitis A have a favorable course, but a few of them suffer from severe forms of hepatitis such as fulminant hepatitis. This study was carried out to identify the factors influencing the severity of acute viral hepatitis A. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 713 patients with acute hepatitis A, who were divided into two groups: severe hepatitis A (N=87) and non-severe hepatitis A (N=626). Severe hepatitis was defined as fulminant hepatitis or prolongation of prothrombin time (INR≥1.5). Clinical variables were compared between the two groups. The incidence of fulminant hepatitis was 1.4 % (10/713) in patients with acute hepatitis A. Thirty-three (4.6 %) cases exhibited HBsAg positivity. In multivariate analyses, significant alcohol intake and the presence of HBsAg were significant predictive factors of fulminant hepatitis A, and significant alcohol intake and age were significant predictive factors of severe hepatitis A. HBeAg and HBV-DNA status did not affect the clinical course of hepatitis A in chronic hepatitis B carriers. While most patients with acute hepatitis A have an uncomplicated clinical course, our data suggest that a more-severe clinical course is correlated with being older, significant alcohol intake, and chronic hepatitis-B-virus infection.

  3. Factors influencing the severity of acute viral hepatitis A

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Il; Jung, Young Kul; Kwon, Oh Sang; Kim, Yeon Suk; Ku, Yang Suh; Choi, Duck Joo; Kim, Ju Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Most patients with acute viral hepatitis A have a favorable course, but a few of them suffer from severe forms of hepatitis such as fulminant hepatitis. This study was carried out to identify the factors influencing the severity of acute viral hepatitis A. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 713 patients with acute hepatitis A, who were divided into two groups: severe hepatitis A (N=87) and non-severe hepatitis A (N=626). Severe hepatitis was defined as fulminant hepatitis or prolongation of prothrombin time (INR≥1.5). Clinical variables were compared between the two groups. Results The incidence of fulminant hepatitis was 1.4% (10/713) in patients with acute hepatitis A. Thirty-three (4.6%) cases exhibited HBsAg positivity. In multivariate analyses, significant alcohol intake and the presence of HBsAg were significant predictive factors of fulminant hepatitis A, and significant alcohol intake and age were significant predictive factors of severe hepatitis A. HBeAg and HBV-DNA status did not affect the clinical course of hepatitis A in chronic hepatitis B carriers. Conclusions While most patients with acute hepatitis A have an uncomplicated clinical course, our data suggest that a more-severe clinical course is correlated with being older, significant alcohol intake, and chronic hepatitis-B-virus infection. PMID:20924212

  4. Hepatitis A seroprevalence in patients with chronic viral hepatitis in Konya, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Özden, Hale T

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis A is among the diseases that can be prevented with vaccination in our time. Acute hepatitis A progresses more severely in individuals with a liver disease. Therefore, patients with a chronic liver disease (because of hepatitis B or hepatitis C) are advised vaccination with the hepatitis A vaccine. This study is aimed to determine the seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibodies in patients infected with hepatitis C virus or hepatitis B virus in Konya province of Turkey. A total of 537 patients who had chronic viral hepatitis between January 2011 and December 2014 were included in the study. Serum samples were collected from each patient and tested for anti-HAV using the chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. The overall seroprevalence of total anti-HAV IgG was 94.2%. The overall prevalence of anti-HAV IgG in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection was 97.5 and 93.6%, respectively. Anti-HAV IgG positivity was 97.4% in cirrhotic patients and 93.9% in noncirrhotic individuals. At the end of the study, being older than 40 years and living in a rural area were found to be independent risk factors for anti-HAV IgG seropositivity. In conclusion, we recommend that patients younger than 40 years and/or those living in cities and having a chronic liver disease should be vaccinated with the hepatitis A vaccine.

  5. Hepatitis A seroprevalence in patients with chronic viral hepatitis in Konya, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aim Hepatitis A is among the diseases that can be prevented with vaccination in our time. Acute hepatitis A progresses more severely in individuals with a liver disease. Therefore, patients with a chronic liver disease (because of hepatitis B or hepatitis C) are advised vaccination with the hepatitis A vaccine. This study is aimed to determine the seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibodies in patients infected with hepatitis C virus or hepatitis B virus in Konya province of Turkey. Methods A total of 537 patients who had chronic viral hepatitis between January 2011 and December 2014 were included in the study. Serum samples were collected from each patient and tested for anti-HAV using the chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. Results The overall seroprevalence of total anti-HAV IgG was 94.2%. The overall prevalence of anti-HAV IgG in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection was 97.5 and 93.6%, respectively. Anti-HAV IgG positivity was 97.4% in cirrhotic patients and 93.9% in noncirrhotic individuals. Conclusion At the end of the study, being older than 40 years and living in a rural area were found to be independent risk factors for anti-HAV IgG seropositivity. In conclusion, we recommend that patients younger than 40 years and/or those living in cities and having a chronic liver disease should be vaccinated with the hepatitis A vaccine. PMID:26703930

  6. Hepatitis A outbreak associated with kava drinking.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jo-Anne; Kurien, Thomas T; Huppatz, Clare

    2014-03-31

    Hepatitis A is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV), with transmission occurring through the faecal-oral route. In May 2013, a case of hepatitis A infection was reported to a Western Australian regional public health unit, with infection acquired in Fiji. Following this, 2 further cases were linked to the index case by kava drinking and 1 further case was a household contact of a secondary case. This outbreak highlights that the preparation of kava drink and/or the use of a common drinking vessel could be a vehicle for the transmission of HAV.

  7. Hepatic sarcoidosis: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Ennaifer, Rym; Ayadi, Shema; Romdhane, Hayfa; Cheikh, Myriam; Nejma, Houda Ben; Bougassas, Wassila; Hadj, Najet Bel

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic non caseous granulomas disease. Liver is a common location but usually asymptomatic. Evidence based guidelines for this location treatment is lacking and the effect of corticosteroids may be inadequate. The aim of our study was to describe the clinical, biochemical, radiological and therapeutic features of seven patients with systemic sarcoidosis and liver involvement. A retrospective and descriptive monocentric study, over 3 years, including seven patients with systemic sarcoidosis and liver involvement. We included 5 women and 2 men with an average age of 43 years. Hepatic localization revealed sarcoidosis in 5 cases. Hepatomegaly was observed in all patients as well as abnormal serum liver function test reflected by anicteric cholestasis. Liver biopsy, showed in all granulomatous lesions consistent with sarcoidosis and severe fibrosis in 2 cases. Extra-hepatic manifestations were present in all patients represented mainly by pulmonary location. All patients were treated, five by corticosteroid and two with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Complete response was observed in one case, partial response in another case and corticosteroid refractoriness in one case. In two cases, corticosteroid therapy was introduced for less than 1 month, not allowing assessment of response. Antimalarials in combination with UDCA were used successfully in a patient with steroid-resistant liver disease. Liver involvement can reveal systemic sarcoidois. Given the risk of progression to severe liver disease, it must be screened in all patients with systemic sarcoidosis. Treatment is not systematic, and still based on corticosteroid therapy. In the absence of prospective randomized controlled trials, the efficacy of UDCA need to be proven. PMID:27795804

  8. Hepatic sarcoidosis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Ennaifer, Rym; Ayadi, Shema; Romdhane, Hayfa; Cheikh, Myriam; Nejma, Houda Ben; Bougassas, Wassila; Hadj, Najet Bel

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic non caseous granulomas disease. Liver is a common location but usually asymptomatic. Evidence based guidelines for this location treatment is lacking and the effect of corticosteroids may be inadequate. The aim of our study was to describe the clinical, biochemical, radiological and therapeutic features of seven patients with systemic sarcoidosis and liver involvement. A retrospective and descriptive monocentric study, over 3 years, including seven patients with systemic sarcoidosis and liver involvement. We included 5 women and 2 men with an average age of 43 years. Hepatic localization revealed sarcoidosis in 5 cases. Hepatomegaly was observed in all patients as well as abnormal serum liver function test reflected by anicteric cholestasis. Liver biopsy, showed in all granulomatous lesions consistent with sarcoidosis and severe fibrosis in 2 cases. Extra-hepatic manifestations were present in all patients represented mainly by pulmonary location. All patients were treated, five by corticosteroid and two with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Complete response was observed in one case, partial response in another case and corticosteroid refractoriness in one case. In two cases, corticosteroid therapy was introduced for less than 1 month, not allowing assessment of response. Antimalarials in combination with UDCA were used successfully in a patient with steroid-resistant liver disease. Liver involvement can reveal systemic sarcoidois. Given the risk of progression to severe liver disease, it must be screened in all patients with systemic sarcoidosis. Treatment is not systematic, and still based on corticosteroid therapy. In the absence of prospective randomized controlled trials, the efficacy of UDCA need to be proven.

  9. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... low because of routine testing of donated blood. Sexual transmission and transmission among family members through close contact ... associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses ... B Blood, needles, sexual 10% of older children develop chronic infection. 90% ...

  10. Current hepatitis A status in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Zou, Shimian; Giulivi, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Hepatitis A, caused by the hepatitis A virus, occurs most frequently in developing countries, but also causes sporadic cases or outbreaks in industrialized countries. The most common route of transmission is fecal-oral. The incidence of hepatitis A varies with geography, and economic and environmental conditions. The epidemiological pattern of the disease has changed with improvements in hygiene and economic conditions. The incidence and prevalence of hepatitis A has decreased, while the average age of exposure and subsequent infection has increased. The present report describes the current status of hepatitis A in Canada. The incidence rate of reported cases in Canada varies from over 10/100,000 (1991) to 3.6/100,000 (1998), and is higher in males, 4.7/100,000 (1998), than in females, 2.5/100,000 (1998). The highest reported hepatitis A rates are in age groups 30 to 39 years and 40 to 59 years, and in British Columbia. Such information is important for assessing current immunization approaches and for decision-making about new preventive strategies against hepatitis A in Canada. PMID:18159360

  11. Autoimmune hepatitis: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Grant, Charlotte R; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2013-03-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an immune-mediated liver disorder characterised by female preponderance, elevated transaminase and immunoglobulin G levels, seropositivity for autoantibodies and interface hepatitis. Presentation is highly variable, therefore AIH should be considered during the diagnostic workup of any increase in liver enzyme levels. Overlap/variant forms of the disease, presenting with concomitant features of primary biliary cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis are increasingly recognised. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted promptly to prevent rapid deterioration and promote remission and long-term survival. Difficult-to-treat or non-responsive patients should be treated with mycophenolate mofetil or, failing that, calcineurin inhibitors. Persistent failure to respond or lack of adherence to treatment result in end-stage liver disease. These patients, and those with fulminant liver failure (encephalopathy grade II-IV) at diagnosis, will require liver transplantation. The pathogenesis of AIH is not fully understood, although there is mounting evidence that genetic susceptibility, molecular mimicry and impaired immunoregulatory networks contribute to the initiation and perpetuation of the autoimmune attack. Liver damage is thought to be mediated primarily by CD4(pos) T-cells, although recent studies support the involvement of diverse populations, including Th17 cells. Animal models faithfully representing the human condition are needed to unravel the contribution of innate and adaptive, effector and regulatory immune responses. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of AIH is likely to contribute to the development of novel treatments, such as the adoptive transfer of autologous expanded antigen-specific regulatory T-cells, which ultimately aim to restore tolerance to liver-derived antigens.

  12. Prevalence of hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis D virus and hepatitis E virus as causes of acute viral hepatitis in North India: a hospital based study.

    PubMed

    Jain, P; Prakash, S; Gupta, S; Singh, K P; Shrivastava, S; Singh, D D; Singh, J; Jain, A

    2013-01-01

    Acute viral hepatitis (AVH) is a major public health problem and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of the present study is to determine the prevalence of hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) as causes of AVH in a tertiary care hospital of North India. Blood samples and clinical information was collected from cases of AVH referred to the Grade I viral diagnostic laboratory over a 1-year period. Samples were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen, anti-HCV total antibodies, anti-HAV immunoglobulin M (IgM) and anti-HEV IgM by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PCR for nucleic acid detection of HBV and HCV was also carried out. Those positive for HBV infection were tested for anti-HDV antibodies. Fisher's exact test was used and a P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Of the 267 viral hepatitis cases, 62 (23.22%) patients presented as acute hepatic failure. HAV (26.96%) was identified as the most common cause of acute hepatitis followed by HEV (17.97%), HBV (16.10%) and HCV (11.98%). Co-infections with more than one virus were present in 34 cases; HAV-HEV co-infection being the most common. HEV was the most important cause of acute hepatic failure followed by co-infection with HAV and HEV. An indication towards epidemiological shift of HAV infection from children to adults with a rise in HAV prevalence was seen. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report indicating epidemiological shift of HAV in Uttar Pradesh.

  13. Combined hepatitis A and B vaccine: providing a bright future for preventing hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Hewlett, Alex T

    2009-09-01

    The first combined hepatitis A and B vaccine has been available in the United States since 2001. The vaccine provides protection against viral hepatitis with rapid seroprotection and lasting immunogenicity. This review outlines the product's components, clinical efficacy and opportunities for use in special circumstances. The vaccine has a good safety profile and has good tolerability. The combined hepatitis A and B vaccine is a well studied vaccine that provides rapid seroconversion with a good safety profile.

  14. Hepatitis E: A disease of reemerging importance.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Siddharth; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-08-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis worldwide. Originally considered to be restricted to humans, it is now clear that HEV and HEV-like viruses have several animal reservoirs with complex ecology and genetic diversity, as exemplified by the recent discovery of HEV in dromedaries, a previously underestimated reservoir of zoonotic viruses prior to the emergence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus. Zoonotic foodborne transmission from pigs and feral animals such as wild boar is of increasing importance in the rapidly industrializing countries of the Asia Pacific region. Such zoonotic hepatitis E infection has particular relevance to the increasing population living with immunosuppression, due to the risk of chronic hepatitis E in these patients. Fortunately, major strides have been made recently in the management of chronic hepatitis E patients. Furthermore, an effective vaccine is also available that promises better control of hepatitis E burden in the near future. This review highlights these major recent developments in the epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of hepatitis E.

  15. Hepatitis A and B immunity and vaccination in chronic hepatitis B and C patients in a large United States cohort.

    PubMed

    Henkle, Emily; Lu, Mei; Rupp, Lora B; Boscarino, Joseph A; Vijayadeva, Vinutha; Schmidt, Mark A; Gordon, Stuart C

    2015-02-15

    Hepatitis A and B vaccines are effective in preventing superinfection and sequelae in patients with chronic hepatitis B or C. We describe immunity and vaccination against hepatitis A and B in chronic hepatitis patients from the US Chronic Hepatitis Cohort Study. We identified chronic hepatitis B and C patients with healthcare utilization during 2006-2008 and 12 months of enrollment. We used electronic laboratory records to determine immunity and medical and billing records for vaccination history. Immunity against hepatitis A was defined by positive hepatitis A antibody or documented vaccination. Immunity against hepatitis B was defined as hepatitis B surface antibody level ≥10 mIU/mL or core antibody positive, or by documented vaccination. Among 1635 chronic hepatitis B patients, 978 (59.8%) were immune or vaccinated against hepatitis A, 122 (7.5%) had negative hepatitis A antibody tests, and 535 (32.7%) had no testing or vaccination record. Among 5328 chronic hepatitis C patients, 2998 (56.3%) were immune or vaccinated against hepatitis A, 659 (12.4%) had negative hepatitis A antibody tests, and 1671 (31.4%) had no testing or vaccination record. Additionally, 3150 (59.1%) chronic hepatitis C patients were immune or vaccinated against hepatitis B, 1003 (18.8%) had a negative test result, and 1175 (22.1%) were neither tested for nor vaccinated against hepatitis B. Approximately 40% of chronic hepatitis B and C patients are susceptible to or have no documented immunity or vaccination against hepatitis A or hepatitis B. Clinicians should consider antibody testing and vaccination for this vulnerable population. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Non-B hepatitis in Melbourne: a serological study of hepatitis A virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Gust, I D; Dienstag, J L; Purcell, R H; Lucas, C R

    1977-01-01

    A study was performed to establish the value of immune adherence haemagglutination tests for antibody to hepatitis A virus in the diagnosis of non-B hepatitis. Infection with hepatitis A virus was confirmed in 14 out of 16 patients from six families and seven out of nine patients in whom the source of infection was unknown. One additional patient, who had had two episodes of jaundice, was shown to have had an attack of hepatitis A followed by an attack of hepatitis B. In patients with acute hepatitis A antibody detectable by immune adherence haemagglutination becomes detectable three or four weeks after the onset of symptoms and reaches peak levels about five weeks later. PMID:188515

  17. [Estimation of risk areas for hepatitis A].

    PubMed

    Braga, Ricardo Cerqueira Campos; Valencia, Luís Iván Ortiz; Medronho, Roberto de Andrade; Escosteguy, Claudia Caminha

    2008-08-01

    This study estimated hepatitis A risk areas in a region of Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. A cross-sectional study consisting of a hepatitis A serological survey and a household survey were conducted in 19 census tracts. Of these, 11 tracts were selected and 1,298 children from one to ten years of age were included in the study. Geostatistical techniques allowed modeling the spatial continuity of hepatitis A, non-use of filtered drinking water, time since installation of running water, and number of water taps per household and their spatial estimation through ordinary and indicator kriging. Adjusted models for the outcome and socioeconomic variables were isotropic; risk maps were constructed; cross-validation of the four models was satisfactory. Spatial estimation using the kriging method detected areas with increased risk of hepatitis A, independently of the urban administrative area in which the census tracts were located.

  18. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  19. [A patient with cryoglobulinemia and hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Wallnöfer de Jong, A G; Conzelmann, M; Steiger, U

    1997-10-22

    We describe a 73-year-old woman who presented with purpura, recurrent ulcerations of both lower limbs as well as worsening of her condition. Laboratory tests revealed a mixed cryoglobulinemia (type-II). Two years after diagnosis, an amputation of the right femur had been performed due to extensive necrotizing ulcerations. Further complications such as membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, cirrhosis of the liver with portal hypertension and ultimately, hepatocellular carcinoma developed. A chronic hepatitis C infection was diagnosed rather late, mainly because of the false negative results of the first generation EIA. This case report illustrates the various complications-hepatic and extrahepatic-of chronic hepatitis C infection. The pathogenesis of mixed cryoglobulinemia remains unclear. However, a current literature review suggests a strong association with chronic hepatitic C. Diagnosis, clinical features and course of hepatitis C infection are discussed.

  20. Mincle Signaling Promotes Con-A Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Stephanie H.; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Kalabin, Aleksandr; Whiteman, Clint; Rokosh, Rae; Ravirala, Sushma; Ochi, Atsuo; Gutierrez, Johana; Salyana, Muhammad Atif; Mani, Vishnu R.; Nagaraj, Savitha V.; Deutsch, Michael; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Hundeyin, Mautin; Nikifrov, Yuriy; Tejada, Karla; Gelb, Bruce E.; Katz, Steven C.; Miller, George

    2016-01-01

    Concanavalin-A (Con-A) hepatitis is regarded as a T cell-mediated model of acute liver injury. Mincle is a C-type lectin receptor (CLR) that is critical in the immune response to mycobacteria and fungi, but does not have a well-defined role in pre-clinical models of non-pathogen mediated inflammation. Since Mincle can ligate the cell death ligand SAP130, we postulated that Mincle signaling drives intrahepatic inflammation and liver injury in Con-A hepatitis. Acute liver injury was assessed in the murine Con-A hepatitis model using C57BL/6, Mincle−/−, and Dectin-1−/− mice. The role of C/EBPβ and HIF-1α signaling was assessed using selective inhibitors. We found that Mincle was highly expressed in hepatic innate inflammatory cells and endothelial cells in both mice and humans. Furthermore, sterile Mincle ligands and Mincle signaling intermediates were increased in the murine liver in Con-A hepatitis. Most significantly, Mincle deletion or blockade protected against Con-A hepatitis whereas Mincle ligation exacerbated disease. Bone marrow chimeric and adoptive transfer experiments suggested that Mincle signaling in infiltrating myeloid cells dictates disease phenotype. Conversely, signaling via other CLRs did not alter disease course. Mechanistically, we found that Mincle blockade decreased the NF-κβ related signaling intermediates, C/EBPβ and HIF-1α, both of which are necessary in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses. Accordingly, Mincle deletion lowered production of nitrites in Con-A hepatitis and inhibition of both C/EBPβ and HIF1-α reduced the severity of liver disease. Our work implicates a novel innate immune driver of Con-A hepatitis and, more broadly, suggests a potential role for Mincle in diseases governed by sterile inflammation. PMID:27559045

  1. Mincle Signaling Promotes Con A Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Greco, Stephanie H; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Kalabin, Aleksandr; Whiteman, Clint; Rokosh, Rae; Ravirala, Sushma; Ochi, Atsuo; Gutierrez, Johana; Salyana, Muhammad Atif; Mani, Vishnu R; Nagaraj, Savitha V; Deutsch, Michael; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Hundeyin, Mautin; Nikifrov, Yuriy; Tejada, Karla; Gelb, Bruce E; Katz, Steven C; Miller, George

    2016-10-01

    Con A hepatitis is regarded as a T cell-mediated model of acute liver injury. Mincle is a C-type lectin receptor that is critical in the immune response to mycobacteria and fungi but does not have a well-defined role in preclinical models of non-pathogen-mediated inflammation. Because Mincle can ligate the cell death ligand SAP130, we postulated that Mincle signaling drives intrahepatic inflammation and liver injury in Con A hepatitis. Acute liver injury was assessed in the murine Con A hepatitis model using C57BL/6, Mincle(-/-), and Dectin-1(-/-) mice. The role of C/EBPβ and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) signaling was assessed using selective inhibitors. We found that Mincle was highly expressed in hepatic innate inflammatory cells and endothelial cells in both mice and humans. Furthermore, sterile Mincle ligands and Mincle signaling intermediates were increased in the murine liver in Con A hepatitis. Most significantly, Mincle deletion or blockade protected against Con A hepatitis, whereas Mincle ligation exacerbated disease. Bone marrow chimeric and adoptive transfer experiments suggested that Mincle signaling in infiltrating myeloid cells dictates disease phenotype. Conversely, signaling via other C-type lectin receptors did not alter disease course. Mechanistically, we found that Mincle blockade decreased the NF-κβ-related signaling intermediates C/EBPβ and HIF-1α, both of which are necessary in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses. Accordingly, Mincle deletion lowered production of nitrites in Con A hepatitis and inhibition of both C/EBPβ and HIF-1α reduced the severity of liver disease. Our work implicates a novel innate immune driver of Con A hepatitis and, more broadly, suggests a potential role for Mincle in diseases governed by sterile inflammation.

  2. Hepatitis A in Poland in 2013.

    PubMed

    Baumann-Popczyk, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the epidemiological situation of hepatitis A in Poland in 2013 compared to previous years. The evaluation was carried out on the basis of the results of the analysis of data from the annual bulletin "Infectious diseases and poisonings in Poland in 2013" and "Vaccinations in Poland in 2013", the information from individual diseases forms and epidemiological investigations forms for hepatitis A outbreaks, sent by sanitary-epidemiological stations to the Department of Epidemiology of NIZP-PZH. In 2013, 48 cases of hepatitis A were registered in Poland. The incidence per 100,000 inhabitants was 0.12, and in particular provinces it ranged from 0.05 in the Kujawsko-Pomorskie province to 0.26 in the Wielkopolska province. The incidence of hepatitis A for men and women was at a similar level and amounted to 0.13 and 0.12/100,000. In 2013 imported cases accounted for 45.8% of the total number of hepatitis A cases. There were three outbreaks, where the total of 13 people fell ill. 2013 saw a slight decrease in the number of cases compared to the previous year. Besides, there were no significant changes in the hepatitis A epidemiological situation. In Poland, there is still very low endemicity. Since several years, there has been a decline in the number of people vaccinated against hepatitis A. All of this affects the accumulation of a fairly large population of people susceptible to the infection, which may increase incidence. Although the current hepatitis A epidemiological situation in Poland is good, it still requires monitoring, analysis and constant observation within the structured epidemiological surveillance.

  3. Evaluation of pediatric patients with hepatitis A.

    PubMed

    Çetinkaya, Bilge; Tezer, Hasan; Özkaya Parlakay, Aslinur; Revide Sayli, Tulin

    2014-03-13

    Hepatitis A is the most common form of acute viral hepatitis worldwide, especially in children. The clinical severity of the hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection varies from an asymptomatic infection to a fulminant disease. In this study, we aimed to evaluate characteristics of pediatric patients diagnosed with HAV infection. Patients younger than 18 years of age admitted between January 1, 2006 and January 1, 2011 to our hospital, an important reference center located in the middle part of Turkey, diagnosed as having hepatitis A were evaluated. Of 427 patients, 49.4% were female and 50.6% were male. Hospitalization rate of the patients was 28.3%. The reason for hospitalization was vomitting in 58.7% of the patients and abdominal pain in 28%. The mean time of hospitalization was 5.2 ± 4.5 (1-40) days. There was no significant difference in hospitalization time by age. Vomiting and abdominal pain were significantly more common, and PT and aPTT levels were significantly elevated in patients with elevated AST and ALT levels over 1000 IU/L (p < 0.001). PT elevation was present in 15.2% of the patients, aPTT elevation in 11.9%, leukopenia in 16.6%, and thrombocytopenia in 2.6%. In terms of atypical course, four patients (0.9%) had cholestatic hepatitis, one had recurrent hepatitis, and one had fulminant hepatitis, yet no mortality was observed. Atypical courses of hepatitis A were more scarce in pediatric patients, but careful follow-up of patients with AST and ALT levels > 1000 IU/L is necessary.

  4. Chemosaturation Percutaneous Hepatic Perfusion: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Arndt; Gupta, Sanjay; Zeile, Martin; von Haken, Rebecca; Brüning, Roland; Lotz, Gösta; Vahrmeijer, Alexander; Vogl, Thomas; Wacker, Frank

    2017-01-01

    The Hepatic CHEMOSAT(®) Delivery System is an innovative medical device for the treatment of patients with unresectable primary liver tumors or unresectable hepatic metastases from solid organ malignancies. This system is used to perform chemosaturation percutaneous hepatic perfusion (CS-PHP), a procedure in which a high dose of the chemotherapeutic agent melphalan is delivered directly to the liver while limiting systemic exposure. In a clinical trial program, CS-PHP with melphalan significantly improved hepatic progression-free survival in patients with unresectable hepatic metastases from ocular or cutaneous melanoma. Clinically meaningful hepatic responses were also observed in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or neuroendocrine tumors. Furthermore, the results of published studies and case reports demonstrated that CS-PHP with melphalan resulted in favorable tumor response rates in a range of tumor histologies (ocular or cutaneous melanoma, colorectal cancer, and hepatobiliary tumors). Analyses of the safety profile of CS-PHP revealed that the most common adverse effects were hematologic events (thrombocytopenia, anemia, and neutropenia), which were clinically manageable. Taken together, these findings indicate that CS-PHP is a promising locoregional therapy for patients with primary and secondary liver tumors and has a acceptable safety profile.

  5. Hepatic Echinococcal Cysts: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Pakala, Tina; Molina, Marco; Wu, George Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a widely endemic helminthic disease caused by infection with metacestodes (larval stage) of the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm. E. granulosus are common parasites in certain parts of the world, and are present on every continent with the exception of Antarctica. As a result, a large number of people are affected by CE. The increased emigration of populations from endemic areas where prevalence rates are as high as 5–10% and the relatively quiescent clinical course of CE pose challenges for accurate and timely diagnoses. Upon infection with CE, cyst formation mainly occurs in the liver (70%). Diagnosis involves serum serologic testing for antibodies against hydatid antigens, but preferably with imaging by ultrasound or CT/MRI. Treatment methods include chemotherapy with benzimidazole carbamates and/or surgical approaches, including percutaneous aspiration injection and reaspiration. The success of these methods is influenced by the stage and location of hepatic cysts. However, CE can be clinically silent, and has a high risk for recurrence. It is important to consider the echinococcal parasite in the differential diagnosis of liver cystic lesions, especially in patients of foreign origin, and to perform appropriate long-term follow-ups. The aim of this review is to highlight the epidemiology, natural history, diagnostic methods, and treatment of liver disease caused by E. granulosus. PMID:27047771

  6. Viral hepatitis in the Arctic. A review from a Circumpolar Workshop on Viral hepatitis, ICCH13.

    PubMed

    Tulisov, Andrei; McMahon, Brian J; Koch, Anders; Minuk, Gerald; Chulanov, Vladimir; Bruce, Michael G; Uhanova, Julia; Børresen, Malene; Williams, James; Osiowy, Carla; Gelvan, Allan; Alexeeva, Marfa; Larke, Bryce; Watt, Kymberly

    2007-01-01

    This article is a review of the viral hepatitis workshop, held during the 13th International Congress of the Circumpolar Health consists of a review of data on viral hepatitis in the Arctic territories of four countries: Canada, Greenland, Russia and United States (Alaska). The main purpose of the workshop was to exchange knowledge on viral hepatitis in the Arctic and identify further needs for collaborative hepatitis research, which is planned to be implemented through the established Viral Hepatitis Working Group in the Arctic. The review is based on the available published research results, surveillance data and professional opinions of the authors. The information is presented by Arctic country. Viral hepatitis constitutes an important problem among Aboriginal peoples of the Arctic; the incidence of most types of viral hepatitis is higher among indigenous populations than in the general public. However, due to differences in the available information from each of the four Arctic countries, it is difficult to compare differences in types of disease in them. The main areas for future research are: HBV genotypes distribution, relations between different types of HBV, HCV and disease outcomes, HBV mutation rate and specific substitutions in the HBV genome over time in the Arctic, and occurrence of active liver disease in HBsAg carriers living in the Arctic, as well as further research in viral hepatitis A, C, D and E.

  7. Cost effectiveness of hepatitis A/B versus hepatitis B vaccination for US prison inmates.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, R Jake; Rosenthal, Philip; Meyerhoff, Allen S

    2004-03-12

    Hepatitis B immunization is provided in many US prison systems. We examined the cost effectiveness of substituting bivalent hepatitis A/B vaccine in this setting, considering regional variation in hepatitis A risks and the potential for disease transmission by former prisoners. Where hepatitis A rates are >200, 100-200, and <100% the national average, declines in hepatitis A treatment costs would offset 137, 88, and 40% of the bivalent vaccine's added cost. In the three regions considered, cost effectiveness would be US$ <0, 2131, and 22,819 per life-year saved, respectively. Prison-based hepatitis A/B immunization would meet accepted standards of cost effectiveness throughout the US.

  8. Prevention of hepatitis A by Havrix: a review.

    PubMed

    Van Herck, Koen; Van Damme, Pierre

    2005-08-01

    Hepatitis A is one of the most common vaccine-preventable infectious diseases in the world. With at least 1.5 million cases of hepatitis A worldwide each year, disease management constitutes a substantial economic burden. The first effective vaccine against hepatitis A, Havrix was introduced in 1992. This review summarizes data accumulated following more than a decade of clinical experience with this vaccine and compares clinical data with other currently available hepatitis A vaccines. Based on this data and on the current immunological knowledge, a recent consensus concluded that hepatitis A vaccines induce lifelong protection, and thus booster vaccinations against hepatitis A are unnecessary in fully immunized, healthy people. In view of this, current regulatory recommendations for the use of hepatitis A vaccines are reviewed and possible future strategies identified.

  9. Seasonality of hepatitis: a review update.

    PubMed

    Fares, Auda

    2015-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is an infection that has been reported to be present throughout the year, but some particular months are associated with higher incidences. The primary objective was to review and report on the current knowledge and evidence that existed on seasonality of different type of acute viral hepatitis worldwide in order to develop recommendations for future research, prevention and control. A systematic literature review was performed to identify all the primary reports and studies published during 1970-2013 on acute hepatitis A, B, C and E (AHA, AHB, AHC and AHE) in human subjects by searching PubMed, reference lists of major articles and correspondence with scientific experts. For each report or study included, the following information was extracted (as applicable to study): Location (country and setting), study population (number of cases, patients), seasonal or monthly rate and study duration. There is no definite and consistent seasonal pattern has been observed on AHA; AHB; AHE and AHC, although evidence points towards spring and summer peak for hepatitis A, B, C and E. Multiple source of transmission such as; summer travel to an endemic area, swimming habits of the population in hot months, increase sexual contact, tattoo, poor hygiene and environmental sanitation and food habits (feco-oral transmission of viral hepatitis) probably exists and should be further investigated through analytical and epidemiological.

  10. [Severe cholestatic hepatitis revealing a DRESS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Droz, N; Thiebaut, M; Terrier, B; Bérézné, A; Sogni, P; Beuvon, F; Guillevin, L; Mouthon, L

    2013-10-01

    Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, characterized by rash, hyereosinophilia and multiorgan failure, including cytolytic hepatitis. A 75-year-old man, treated with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, presented with jaundice and disabling pruritus associated with severe cholestatic hepatitis, related to a DRESS syndrome. Because of the persistence of cholestasis and the severity of pruritus, a treatment with corticosteroids and plasma exchanges was initiated, allowing a rapid and complete remission. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, although rarely described in the literature, is a rare cause of DRESS syndrome. Severe cholestatic hepatitis associated with disabling pruritus may be one of the systemic manifestations, with a good prognosis using corticosteroids and plasma exchanges. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Hepatitis C: a possible etiology for cryoglobulinaemia type II.

    PubMed Central

    Pechère-Bertschi, A; Perrin, L; de Saussure, P; Widmann, J J; Giostra, E; Schifferli, J A

    1992-01-01

    Out of 15 successive patients with mixed essential cryoglobulinaemia type II (monoclonal IgM kappa/IgG), 13 had serological evidence for hepatitis C infection as shown by specific enzyme immunoassays and immunoblot. RNA was purified from the serum of seven patients and hepatitis C sequences were identified in five following reverse transcription and DNA amplification. The liver histology showed chronic active hepatitis with or without cirrhosis in the 12 patients with hepatitis C who had a liver biopsy. The two patients without serological evidence of hepatitis C suffered from haematological malignancies. Hepatitis C may be a major etiological agent of cryoglobulinaemia type II. PMID:1381302

  12. Establishment of a hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension model by hepatic arterial perfusion with 80% alcohol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; He, Fu-Liang; Liu, Fu-Quan; Yue, Zhen-Dong; Zhao, Hong-Wei

    2015-08-28

    To determine the feasibility and safety of establishing a porcine hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension model by hepatic arterial perfusion with 80% alcohol. Twenty-one healthy Guizhou miniature pigs were randomly divided into three experimental groups and three control groups. The pigs in the three experimental groups were subjected to hepatic arterial perfusion with 7, 12 and 17 mL of 80% alcohol, respectively, while those in the three control groups underwent hepatic arterial perfusion with 7, 12 and 17 mL of saline, respectively. Hepatic arteriography and direct portal phlebography were performed on all animals before and after perfusion, and the portal venous pressure and diameter were measured before perfusion, immediately after perfusion, and at 2, 4 and 6 wk after perfusion. The following procedures were performed at different time points: routine blood sampling, blood biochemistry, blood coagulation and blood ammonia tests before surgery, and at 2, 4 and 6 wk after surgery; hepatic biopsy before surgery, within 6 h after surgery, and at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 wk after surgery; abdominal enhanced computed tomography examination before surgery and at 6 wk after surgery; autopsy and multi-point sampling of various liver lobes for histological examination at 6 wk after surgery. In experimental group 1, different degrees of hepatic fibrosis were observed, and one pig developed hepatic cirrhosis. In experimental group 2, there were cases of hepatic cirrhosis, different degrees of increased portal venous pressure, and intrahepatic portal venous bypass, but neither extrahepatic portal-systemic bypass circulation nor death occurred. In experimental group 3, two animals died and three animals developed hepatic cirrhosis, and different degrees of increased portal venous pressure and intrahepatic portal venous bypass were also observed, but there was no extrahepatic portal-systemic bypass circulation. It is feasible to establish an animal model of hepatic cirrhosis and

  13. [Antibody formation in type A viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Teokharova, M P; Losev, B B; Andonov, A P; Draganov, P I; Mineva, E G

    1978-01-01

    Immune response to hepatitis type A antigen (HAAg) was measured by the passive hemagglutination test (PHA) and by the immune adherence test (IAHA). Specific antibodies found by PHA are of the IgM class which indicates a recent exposure to hepatitis A virus. The antibodies found by IAHA reflect the level of postinfectious immune status. The antibody curve is highest in the age group of 30--49 years (95%). The above-mentioned serological tests were carried out with purified by gel filtration in Sepharose 6B Botevgrad faecal morphologically consisting of 27 nm particles with the buoyant density in CcCl of 1.40 g/ml. The same particles were aggregated with sera positive for antibody to hepatitis type A antigen in immune electron microscopy (IEM).

  14. Mean platelet volume in hepatitis A.

    PubMed

    Almiş, H; Bucak, I H; Çelik, V; Tekin, M; Karakoç, F; Konca, Ç; Turgut, M

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) still continues to be a serious public health problem worldwide. Mean platelet volume (MPV) is a marker of platelet function and activation. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between MPV in acute hepatitis A patients as compared to the control group and to assess MPV as an acute phase reactant in acute hepatitis A. Seventy-six patients were enrolled in this study. The control group consisted of 41 healthy age- and sex-matched individuals. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), bilirubin, prothrombin time (PT), platelet count (PC), serum albumin (ALB), and mean platelet volume (MPV) levels were recorded. The diagnosis of HAV infection was based on anti-HAV Ig M positivity. The mean levels of MPV in the study group were significantly statistically lower than in the control group (p < 0.001). The MPV levels revealed no correlation with the ALT, AST, ALP, and GGT levels (p > 0.05), but the MPV levels correlated with the platelet counts (p < 0.05). A 9.75 fL [area under the curve (AUC: 0.756)] optimal cutoff level of MPV with a sensitivity of 69.7% and specificity of 68.3% was determined in the children with acute hepatitis A. MPV levels were significantly lower in the patients with acute hepatitis A as compared to the healthy control group. This study demonstrated that MPV may be a negative acute phase reactant for acute hepatitis A. Further studies will explain the role that MPV plays in inflammation and other viral infections.

  15. Immune tolerant hepatitis B: a clinical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tram T

    2011-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus infection remains a global health concern, with perinatal transmission still a problem in many countries. Several new therapies for chronic hepatitis B virus infection have recently been introduced that can safely and effectively suppress viral replication with a low risk of resistance; thus, it has become increasingly tempting for many clinicians to treat patients in the immune tolerant stage of infection who have high levels of viremia yet persistently normal levels of transaminases. However, understanding the natural history of hepatitis B virus infection and how it pertains to disease progression, as well as how current therapies alter or do not alter this natural history, is important when deciding whether to treat these patients. This article will review the definition and natural history of immune tolerance, the current world guidelines and recommendations for treatment of immune tolerant patients, and data on the effectiveness of current therapies in this patient population.

  16. Reassessing Immune Control of Hepatitis A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christopher M.; Feng, Zongdi; Lemon, Stanley M.

    2015-01-01

    There is renewed interest in hepatitis A virus (HAV) pathogenesis and immunity after 2–3 decades of limited progress. From a public health perspective, the average age at infection has increased in developing countries, resulting in more severe hepatitis that is poorly understood mechanistically. More fundamentally, there is interest in comparing immunity to HAV and hepatitis C virus (HCV): small, positive-strand RNA viruses with very different infection outcomes. Here, we review evidence that circulating HAV virions are cloaked in membranes, with consequences for induction of innate immunity and antibody-mediated neutralization. We also consider the contribution of CD4+ helper versus CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to antiviral immunity and liver injury, and present a model of non-cytotoxic immune control of HAV infection. PMID:25617494

  17. Reassessing immune control of hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher M; Feng, Zongdi; Lemon, Stanley M

    2015-04-01

    There is renewed interest in hepatitis A virus (HAV) pathogenesis and immunity after 2-3 decades of limited progress. From a public health perspective, the average age at infection has increased in developing countries, resulting in more severe hepatitis that is poorly understood mechanistically. More fundamentally, there is interest in comparing immunity to HAV and hepatitis C virus (HCV): small, positive-strand RNA viruses with very different infection outcomes. Here, we review evidence that circulating HAV virions are cloaked in membranes, with consequences for induction of innate immunity and antibody-mediated neutralization. We also consider the contribution of CD4+ helper versus CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to antiviral immunity and liver injury, and present a model of non-cytotoxic immune control of HAV infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Hepatitis A vaccine - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC Hepatitis A Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/ ... statements/hep-a.html CDC review information for Hepatitis A VIS: Page last reviewed: July 20, 2016 ...

  19. Hepatitis A in Poland in 2014

    PubMed

    Polański, Piotr

    The aim of this article is to assess the epidemiological situation of hepatitis A in Poland in 2014 with the regard to the recent years. The assessment was conducted based on the results of the analysis of data from the bulletins “Infectious diseases and poisonings in Poland in 2014” and “Vaccinations in Poland in 2014”, as well as information from the individual cases questionnaires and reports of epidemiological investigations in outbreaks of hepatitis A, submitted by the sanitary-epidemiological stations to the Department of Epidemiology in NIPH-NIH. In 2014 in Poland there were 76 cases of hepatitis A registered. Incidence per 100 000 inhabitants was 0.20, and in different voivodeships varied from 0.07 (in Dolnosląskie voivodeship) to 0.30 (in Małopolskie voivodeship). The incidence among male and female did not differ (and was 0.20/ 100 000). In 2014 despite the increase in the number of cases (comparing it to the previous year) no significant change in epidemiological situation of hepatitis A was observed. Poland is still regarded as a country of low endemicity of hepatitis A. In routine surveillance system there is no information concerning the professional affiliation of persons being vaccinated, whereas the vaccinations themselves are recommended in the Polish vaccination schedule. Particular attention should be directed towards the vaccinations of persons who take part in berries primal production, product of which Poland is a major exporter of in the EU. In the light of increasing number of international hepatitis A outbreaks (which could be characterized by the prolonged duration, as well as the high possibility of secondary cases appearing- especially in countries of low endemicity) the maintenance of high level routine surveillance in Poland gains importance. The latter could also contribute to the efficiency of epidemiological investigations in multistate outbreaks.

  20. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor may want you to get the hepatitis B vaccine (and maybe the hepatitis A vaccine, too), if you don't already have these viruses. If you have hepatitis C, you are more likely to catch hepatitis A or hepatitis B, which would cause more damage to your liver. ...

  1. [Other viral food poisoning (hepatitis A and E)].

    PubMed

    Yano, Kunio

    2012-08-01

    Hepatitis A and E viruses are spread via the fecal-oral route. In the endemic area, restaurant and school outbreaks due to contaminated water or food have been reported. The clinical signs and symptoms in patients with typical hepatitis A and E are similar to those seen with other forms of acute viral hepatitis. Hepatitis A tends to be more severe when acquired at older ages. Hepatitis E appears to be relatively severe compared with hepatitis A. Although both hepatitis are self-limited illness, severe hepatits are rarely observed. Hepatitis A and E can be prevented by improved sanitary conditions, handwashing, heating foods appropriately. Avoidance of water and foods from endemic areas is also effective.

  2. A Study of Hepatitis B in the Canadian Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    Hepatitis B. REQUIREMENT: A new vaccine against Hepatitis B has recently become commercially available. In view of its high cost per ifmuniztng dose, it...the equivocal samples are treated as positives, since they indicate probable exposure to the Hepatitis B virus followed by incomplete development of ...MM~ASSIFIED LnCIOhTRAC14EPORT Ln 9770244A-6791 8SG83-00022 A STUDY OF HEPATITIS B IN THE CANADIAN FORCES Dr. J.A. Embl Dalhousie University Halifax

  3. Infection with hepatitis A, B, C, and delta viruses among patients with acute hepatitis in Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Tsatsralt-Od, Bira; Takahashi, Masaharu; Endo, Kazunori; Buyankhuu, Osorjin; Baatarkhuu, Oidov; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2006-05-01

    One hundred ten consecutive patients (60 males and 50 females; age, mean +/- standard deviation [SD], 22.6 +/- 6.4 years; range 16-48 years) who were clinically diagnosed with sporadic acute hepatitis between December 2004 and January 2005 in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, were studied. IgM antibodies to hepatitis A virus were detected in 18 patients (16.4%), IgM antibodies to hepatitis B core (anti-HBc IgM) in 38 patients (34.5%) including two patients with concurrent hepatitis delta virus (HDV) infection, and hepatitis C virus RNA in nine patients (8.2%). There were 30 hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers who had detectable hepatitis B surface antigen and antibodies to HDV but were negative for anti-HBc IgM, suggesting that they acquired type D acute hepatitis due to superinfection of HDV on a background of chronic HBV infection. None had IgM antibodies to hepatitis E virus (HEV). Consequently, 16.4, 32.7, 6.4, 1.8, and 27.3% of the patients were diagnosed as having acute hepatitis of type A, B, C, type B + D (HBV/HDV coinfection), and type D (superinfection of HDV), respectively. The cause of hepatitis was not known in the remaining 17 patients (15.5%). All 18 HAV isolates were genotyped as IA, all 9 HCV isolates were genotyped as 1b, and all 32 HDV isolates were classified into genotype I. The distribution of HBV genotypes among the 67 HBV isolates was A (1.5%, n = 1) and D (98.5%, n = 66). The present study indicates that de novo infections of HAV, HBV, HCV, and HDV are prevalent among young adults in Mongolia.

  4. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy: A review.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Taylor, Alexandra C; Höller, Yvonne; Brigo, Francesco; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-10-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the earliest form of hepatic encephalopathy and can affect up to 80% of patients with liver cirrhosis. By definition, MHE is characterized by cognitive function impairment in the domains of attention, vigilance and integrative function, but obvious clinical manifestation are lacking. MHE has been shown to affect daily functioning, quality of life, driving and overall mortality. The diagnosis can be achieved through neuropsychological testing, recently developed computerized psychometric tests, such as the critical flicker frequency and the inhibitory control tests, as well as neurophysiological procedures. Event related potentials can reveal subtle changes in patients with normal neuropsychological performances. Spectral analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) and quantitative analysis of sleep EEG provide early markers of cerebral dysfunction in cirrhotic patients with MHE. Neuroimaging, in particular MRI, also increasingly reveals diffuse abnormalities in intrinsic brain activity and altered organization of functional connectivity networks. Medical treatment for MHE to date has been focused on reducing serum ammonia levels and includes non-absorbable disaccharides, probiotics or rifaximin. Liver transplantation may not reverse the cognitive deficits associated with MHE. We performed here an updated review on epidemiology, burden and quality of life, neuropsychological testing, neuroimaging, neurophysiology and therapy in subjects with MHE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  5. [Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma: a rare hepatic tumor].

    PubMed

    Botella, M T; Cabrera, T; Sebastián, J J; Navarro, M J; Alvarez, R; Uribarrena, R

    1995-10-01

    We present a case of epithelioid hemangioendothelioma of the liver (EHL). The imaging techniques did not permit the diagnosis. A liver biopsy was done under laparoscopy. One year later, the patient remains without symptoms in spite of the presence of lung metastases and the therapeutic abstention. The most outstanding aspects of this rare hepatic tumor are discussed.

  6. [Severe aplastic anaemia in six children after non-A-E hepatitis without hepatic failure].

    PubMed

    Tschiedel, E; Gierenz, N; Wieland, R; Wulff, B; Ballauff, A

    2010-08-01

    Aplastic anaemia can coincide with non-A-E hepatitis. Treatment follows a standardised study protocol of the German Society of Paediatric Oncology and Haematology (GPOH). Patients receive immunosuppression and/or bone marrow transplantation. We present six cases of aplastic anaemia after non-A-E hepatitis with different courses. In four of these children illness first presented with acute gastroenteritis. Five out of six children fully recovered, two of these with immunosuppression alone, three after bone marrow transplantation. One patient died due to complications of the bone marrow transplantation. In two patients steroid therapy was carried out to treat the hepatitis. This did not have any effect on the course of their aplastic anemia. We emphasise this common combination of aplastic anemia following non-A-E hepatitis. This overview underlines the necessity of regular blood testing after non-A-E hepatitis. Often gastroenteritis seems to precede illness thus perhaps indicating an infectious trigger.

  7. Clearance of HCV RNA following acute hepatitis A superinfection.

    PubMed

    Cacopardo, B; Nunnari, G; Nigro, L

    2009-05-01

    A transient reduction of hepatitis C virus replication during the course of acute hepatitis A virus infection has already been reported in the literature. The present study reports the case study of a subject with chronic hepatitis due to hepatitis C virus who went on to develop an acute hepatitis A. From the early onset of acute disease, hepatitis C virus ribonucleic acid became undetectable. Following recovery from acute hepatitis, alanine amino-transferase levels became persistently normal and liver biopsy revealed a reduction in the Knodell histological activity index score. Hepatitis C virus ribonucleic acid clearance was maintained up to 4 years after the onset of acute hepatitis A. During the course of the acute disease, a sharp increase in interferon gamma levels was detected in serum and in the supernatant of both unstimulated and phytoemagglutinin/lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Interferon gamma levels were still high 3 months later. We hypothesize that acute hepatitis A virus superinfection during the course of chronic hepatitis C may lead to hepatitis C virus ribonucleic acid clearance through an immunological mechanism related to interferon gamma production.

  8. Controlling post-transfusion hepatitis: a proposal to publicize hepatitis rates of transfusion facilities.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, S N; Sapolsky, H M

    1979-01-01

    A federal requirement that donor blood be labelled as either "paid" or "volunteer" took effect on May 15, 1978. A major rationale for requiring such labelling is that physicians, now that they can distinguish between categories of blood, will fear liability for post-transfusion hepatitis resulting from the use of paid blood. Thus, supporters of the labelling requirement hope that it will deter the use of high-risk commercial blood. Some paid blood, however, is not commercial blood and in fact may be safer than volunteer blood. The labelling strategy for hepatitis control, therefore, has negative as well as positive attributes. This Article considers the efficacy of blood labelling as a hepatitis control measure and proposes an alternative strategy--the periodic publicizing of hepatitis rates of facilities that perform transfusions--that, if practiced responsibly, could significantly decrease hepatitis transmission rates.

  9. Hepatic trematodiasis in a Ganges River dolphin.

    PubMed

    Migaki, G; Lagios, M D; Herald, E S; Dempster, R P

    1979-11-01

    Hepatic trematodiasis caused by Cyclorchis campula was diagnosed in a juvenile Ganges River dolphin that had been in captivity at an aquarium for approximately 1 year. Histopathologic findings were severe chronic suppurative cholangitis, hyperplasia of the bile duct epithelium, and periductal fibrosis associated with fluke infection of the large bile ducts.

  10. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis C Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Hepatitis C is a viral infection that causes liver inflammation, sometimes leading to serious liver damage. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) spreads through contaminated ...

  11. Hypoxic Hepatitis: A Review and Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Waseem, Najeff; Chen, Po-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypoxic hepatitis (HH), also known as ischemic hepatitis or shock liver, is characterized by a massive, rapid rise in serum aminotransferases resulting from reduced oxygen delivery to the liver. The most common predisposing condition is cardiac failure, followed by circulatory failure as occurs in septic shock and respiratory failure. HH does, however, occur in the absence of a documented hypotensive event or shock state in 50% of patients. In intensive care units, the incidence of HH is near 2.5%, but has been reported as high as 10% in some studies. The pathophysiology is multifactorial, but often involves hepatic congestion from right heart failure along with reduced hepatic blood flow, total body hypoxemia, reduced oxygen uptake by hepatocytes or reperfusion injury following ischemia. The diagnosis is primarily clinical, and typically does not require liver biopsy. The definitive treatment of HH involves correction of the underlying disease state, but successful management includes monitoring for the potential complications such as hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, hyperammonemia and hepatopulmonary syndrome. Prognosis of HH remains poor, especially for cases in which there was a delay in diagnosis. The in-hospital mortality rate is >50%, and the most frequent cause of death is the predisposing condition and not the liver injury itself. PMID:27777895

  12. A comparative study of hepatitis caused by scrub typhus and viral hepatitis A in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun; Kim, Dong-Min; Yun, Na Ra; Byeon, Yu Mi; Kim, Young Dae; Park, Chan Guk; Kim, Man Woo; Han, Mi Ah

    2011-11-01

    We compared clinical features and laboratory findings of 104 patients with hepatitis A and 197 patients with scrub typhus. Nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, hepatomegaly, and jaundice were common in patient with hepatitis A, and fever and headache were significantly more common in patients with scrub typhus. At presentation, an alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level ≥ 500 U/L was observed in 1% of scrub typhus patients and in 87.5% of hepatitis A patients (P < 0.001). A bilirubin level ≥ 1.3 mg/dL was observed in 16.8% of scrub typhus patients and 90.4% of hepatitis A patients. The ALT:lactate dehydrogenase ratio was ≤ 5 in 97.4% of the patients with scrub typhus and > 5 in 95.2% of those with hepatitis A (P < 0.001). Fever, headache, rash, and eschar are findings that indicate scrub typhus. An ALT level ≥ 500 U/L (adjusted odds ratio = 0.011) a bilirubin level ≥ 1.3 (adjusted odds ratio = 0.024), an ALT:lactate dehydrogenase ratio > 5, and hepatomegaly are indications of viral hepatitis A.

  13. A Comparative Study of Hepatitis Caused by Scrub Typhus and Viral Hepatitis A in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun; Kim, Dong-Min; Yun, Na Ra; Byeon, Yu Mi; Kim, Young Dae; Park, Chan Guk; Kim, Man Woo; Han, Mi Ah

    2011-01-01

    We compared clinical features and laboratory findings of 104 patients with hepatitis A and 197 patients with scrub typhus. Nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, hepatomegaly, and jaundice were common in patient with hepatitis A, and fever and headache were significantly more common in patients with scrub typhus. At presentation, an alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level ≥ 500 U/L was observed in 1% of scrub typhus patients and in 87.5% of hepatitis A patients (P < 0.001). A bilirubin level ≥ 1.3 mg/dL was observed in 16.8% of scrub typhus patients and 90.4% of hepatitis A patients. The ALT:lactate dehydrogenase ratio was ≤ 5 in 97.4% of the patients with scrub typhus and > 5 in 95.2% of those with hepatitis A (P < 0.001). Fever, headache, rash, and eschar are findings that indicate scrub typhus. An ALT level ≥ 500 U/L (adjusted odds ratio = 0.011) a bilirubin level ≥ 1.3 (adjusted odds ratio = 0.024), an ALT:lactate dehydrogenase ratio > 5, and hepatomegaly are indications of viral hepatitis A. PMID:22049041

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of a transfusion-transmitted hepatitis A outbreak.

    PubMed

    Hettmann, Andrea; Juhász, Gabriella; Dencs, Ágnes; Tresó, Bálint; Rusvai, Erzsébet; Barabás, Éva; Takács, Mária

    2017-02-01

    A transfusion-associated hepatitis A outbreak was found in the first time in Hungary. The outbreak involved five cases. Parenteral transmission of hepatitis A is rare, but may occur during viraemia. Direct sequencing of nested PCR products was performed, and all the examined samples were identical in the VP1/2A region of the hepatitis A virus genome. HAV sequences found in recent years were compared and phylogenetic analysis showed that the strain which caused these cases is the same as that had spread in Hungary recently causing several hepatitis A outbreaks throughout the country.

  15. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chapter 3 - Hepatitis A Chapter 3 - Hepatitis C Hepatitis B Francisco Averhoff INFECTIOUS AGENT Hepatitis B is ... their exposures. Map 3-04. Prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus infection among adults PDF Version (printable) ...

  16. [Hepatitis non-A, non-B: epidemiological significance in acute viral hepatitis and chronic active hepatitis of hepatological consultation].

    PubMed

    Jmelnitzky, A C; Basualdo, J A; Belloni, P O; Ponce de León, H H; García, C; Curciarello, J

    1987-01-01

    157 acute viral hepatitis and 60 chronic active ones have been analyzed focusing on NANB etiology. HAV was implicated in 36.3% of the hole acute viral hepatitis sample, HBV in 29.3%, and HNANBV was presumed as etiology in 31.2%, 5 patients (3.2%) had acute infection by HAV, on previous one by HBV, except for Epstein-Barr virus, no other test for viruses were determined (CMV, HSV, etc.). Male/female ratio was 1.4:1, 1.9:1, and 1.4:1 for HAV, HBV and HNANBV acute hepatitis respectively; HAV was the main etiology in the 0-9 age group (72.2%) although it only represents 11.5% of the sample; small occurrence of HAV hepatitis were found in patients over 40 (8.8%); HBV was clearly prevalent in patients over 50 (65.2%); the highest concentration of NANB etiology was found between 20-39 years old, but it was represented in all age-groups. Out of 49 NANB acute hepatitis, 12.2% had related transfusional antecedents, 12.2% belonged to health care worker group, and 4.1% had a close family NANB hepatitis contact; 71.5% had no reported antecedent. Viral source was presumably implicated in 75.0% of chronic active hepatitis, 25.0% attributable to HNANBV. Results seem not feasible to transfer to general population due to the facts that most patients were of specialized consult, and pediatric assistance is unusual to the authors practice.

  17. A homosexual Japanese man with acute hepatitis due to hepatitis B virus genotype ae, concurrent with amebic colitis.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Ishikawa, Shin; Tatsukawa, Masashi; Nawa, Toru; Kato, Jun; Takaki, Akinobu; Kobashi, Haruhiko; Sakaguchi, Kohsaku; Shiratori, Yasushi

    2007-02-01

    We report herein a case with acute hepatitis due to hepatitis B virus genotype Ae, concurrent with amebic colitis. A 39-year-old homosexual Japanese man was admitted to our hospital with jaundice. Laboratory tests showed an elevation of transaminase and positivity for hepatitis B surface antigen and IgM-type antibody to hepatitis B core antigen. The hepatitis B virus genotype was determined to be Ae. Furthermore, a mud-like stool with blood and mucous had sometimes been noted during the past 3 years, and amebic colitis was shown by colonofiberscopy during hospitalization. The patient was diagnosed with acute hepatitis B, concurrent with amebic colitis, and was successfully treated with lamivudine and metronidazole. In Japanese patients with acute hepatitis B virus genotype A infection, homosexual activity tends to be high. Furthermore, in Japanese homosexual men, amebiasis has been increasing. Thus, in Japanese patients with acute hepatitis B, a determination of genotype should be performed in order to investigate the route of transmission of hepatitis B virus, and a search for amebiasis should be performed in patients with acute hepatitis due to hepatitis B virus genotype A. Furthermore, education of homosexual men regarding hepatitis B virus, hepatitis B virus vaccination, and amebiasis is urgently required.

  18. Autoimmune hepatitis in Japan: trends in a nationwide survey.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Atsushi; Arinaga-Hino, Teruko; Ohira, Hiromasa; Torimura, Takuji; Zeniya, Mikio; Abe, Masanori; Yoshizawa, Kaname; Takaki, Akinobu; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Kang, Jong-Hon; Nakamoto, Nobuhiro; Fujisawa, Tomoo; Yonemoto, Koji; Tanaka, Atsushi; Takikawa, Hajime

    2017-05-01

    A nationwide survey of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) patients was performed in Japan in 2015. The aims of this study were to elucidate the trends and characteristics of AIH in Japan, in addition to identifying differences in AIH between acute hepatitis and chronic hepatitis. Questionnaires about patients with AIH diagnosed from 2009 to 2013 were sent to 437 hospitals or clinics with hepatology specialists. A total of 1682 patients were enrolled. The mean age at diagnosis was 60.0 years, and 87.1 % of patients were female. Serum immunoglobulin G levels were high, peaking at 1.5-2.0 g/dL. Histological diagnoses of chronic hepatitis, acute hepatitis, and cirrhosis were seen in 79.6, 11.7, and 6.7 % of patients respectively. In addition to elevation of aminotransferase levels, the frequencies of emperipolesis and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR2 positivity were higher in patients with acute hepatitis than in those with chronic hepatitis. Approximately 80 % of patients were treated with corticosteroids, and in 97.7 % of them, their condition improved. Steroid pulse therapy was more frequently given to patients with acute hepatitis than to those with chronic hepatitis. In the present nationwide survey of AIH patients in Japan, patients with acute hepatitis had clinical features different from those of patients with chronic hepatitis.

  19. Comparison of autochthonous and imported cases of hepatitis A or hepatitis E.

    PubMed

    Hartl, J; Kreuels, B; Polywka, S; Addo, M; Luethgehetmann, M; Dandri, M; Dammermann, W; Sterneck, M; Lohse, A W; Pischke, S

    2015-07-01

    Hepatitis A and hepatitis E are not limited to tropical countries but are also present in industrialized countries. Both infections share similar clinical features. There is no comparative study evaluating the clinical parameters of autochthonous and imported hepatitis A virus and hepatitis E virus infections. The aim of this study was to determine differences between autochthonous and imported hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections. Medical charts of all patients at our center with acute HAV and HEV infections were analyzed retrospectively (n = 50, study period 01/2009 - 08/2013). Peak bilirubin (median 8.6 vs. 4.4 mg/dL, p = 0.008) and ALT levels (median 2998 vs. 1666 IU/mL, p = 0.04) were higher in patients with hepatitis A compared to hepatitis E. In comparison to autochthones hepatitis E cases, patients with imported infections had significantly higher peak values for AST, ALT, bilirubin and INR (p = 0.009, p = 0.002, p = 0.04 and p = 0.049, respectively). In HAV infection, AST levels tended to be higher in imported infections (p = 0.08). (i) It is not possible to differentiate certainly between acute HAV and HEV infections by clinical or biochemical parameters, however, HAV infections might be associated with more cholestasis and higher ALT values. (ii) Imported HEV infections are associated with higher transaminases, INR and bilirubin levels compared to autochthonous cases and (iii) imported HAV infections tend to be associated with higher transaminases in comparison to autochthonous cases. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. The hepatic cannabinoid 1 receptor as a modulator of hepatic energy state and food intake.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Martin E; Regnell, Simon E

    2014-01-01

    The cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) has a well-established role in appetite regulation. Central CB1R antagonists, notably rimonabant, induced weight loss and improved the metabolic profile in obese individuals, but were discontinued due to psychiatric side-effects. The CB1R is also expressed peripherally, where its effects include promotion of liver fat accumulation, which consumes ATP. Type 2 diabetes in obese subjects is linked to excess liver fat, whilst there is a negative correlation between hepatic ATP content and insulin resistance. A decreased hepatic ATP/AMP ratio increases food intake by signals via the vagus nerve to the brain. The hepatic cannabinoid system is highly upregulated in obesity, and the effects of hepatic CB1R activation include increased activity of lipogenic and gluconeogenic transcription factors. Thus, blockade of hepatic CB1Rs could contribute significantly to the weight-reducing and insulin-sensitizing effects of CB1R antagonists. Additionally, upregulation of the hepatic CB1R may contribute to chronic liver inflammation, fibrosis and cirrhosis from causes including obesity, alcoholism and viral hepatitis. Peripheral CB1R antagonists induce weight loss and metabolic improvements in obese rodents; however, as there is evidence that hepatic CB1Rs are predominately intracellular, due to high intrinsic clearance, many drugs may not effectively block these receptors and therefore have limited efficacy. Hepatoselective CB1R antagonists may be effective at reducing hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance and bodyweight in obese, diabetic patients, with far fewer side-effects than first-generation CB1R antagonists. Additionally, such compounds may be effective in treating inflammatory liver disease, such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, reducing the likelihood of disease progression to cirrhosis or cancer. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. The Success of Hepatitis A Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    possible to produce and considering that these viral agents were discovered in license the first product developed by using the new 19731 and 1965...Propagation of human hepatit s A virus great number of children, whereas the disease ranges in cell culture in vitro. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 1979:160:213...long immun ity’. 10. Provost PJ. Hughes JN, Miller WJ. Giesa PA, Banker FS, Emini EA. t An inactivated hepatitis A viral vaccine of cell culture

  2. Establishment of a hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension model by hepatic arterial perfusion with 80% alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; He, Fu-Liang; Liu, Fu-Quan; Yue, Zhen-Dong; Zhao, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the feasibility and safety of establishing a porcine hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension model by hepatic arterial perfusion with 80% alcohol. METHODS: Twenty-one healthy Guizhou miniature pigs were randomly divided into three experimental groups and three control groups. The pigs in the three experimental groups were subjected to hepatic arterial perfusion with 7, 12 and 17 mL of 80% alcohol, respectively, while those in the three control groups underwent hepatic arterial perfusion with 7, 12 and 17 mL of saline, respectively. Hepatic arteriography and direct portal phlebography were performed on all animals before and after perfusion, and the portal venous pressure and diameter were measured before perfusion, immediately after perfusion, and at 2, 4 and 6 wk after perfusion. The following procedures were performed at different time points: routine blood sampling, blood biochemistry, blood coagulation and blood ammonia tests before surgery, and at 2, 4 and 6 wk after surgery; hepatic biopsy before surgery, within 6 h after surgery, and at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 wk after surgery; abdominal enhanced computed tomography examination before surgery and at 6 wk after surgery; autopsy and multi-point sampling of various liver lobes for histological examination at 6 wk after surgery. RESULTS: In experimental group 1, different degrees of hepatic fibrosis were observed, and one pig developed hepatic cirrhosis. In experimental group 2, there were cases of hepatic cirrhosis, different degrees of increased portal venous pressure, and intrahepatic portal venous bypass, but neither extrahepatic portal-systemic bypass circulation nor death occurred. In experimental group 3, two animals died and three animals developed hepatic cirrhosis, and different degrees of increased portal venous pressure and intrahepatic portal venous bypass were also observed, but there was no extrahepatic portal-systemic bypass circulation. CONCLUSION: It is feasible to establish an

  3. Who should receive hepatitis A vaccine?

    PubMed

    Arankalle, V A; Chadha, M S

    2003-05-01

    Though a potent vaccine represents a powerful preventive tool, the policy of its use is governed by epidemiological and economical factors. Hepatitis A, an enterically transmitted disease shows distinct association with socio-economic status, populations with improvement experiencing lower exposure to the virus. With the availability of vaccine, it is pertinent to consider its use in the effective control of the disease. However, with the varied epidemiological patterns and economical constraints in different countries it does not seem to be possible to evolve universal policy for immunization. Though, universal immunization may be the most effective way of control, the same is not practical for many countries. It is proposed that irrespective of endemicity of hepatitis A, high-risk groups such as travelers to endemic areas, patients suffering from chronic liver diseases, HBV and HCV carriers, tribal communities with high HBV carrier rates, food handlers, sewage workers, recipients of blood products, troops, and children from day-care centers should be immunized with hepatitis A vaccine. In addition, for populations with intermediate prevalence, infants, children from affordable families may be immunized. As coupling the vaccine with EPI schedule would be beneficial, use of combined A & B or A, B & E vaccine may be an attractive alternative.

  4. [Surgical treatment of a solitary hepatic abscess].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, V V; Tishchenko, A M; Gusak, I V; Maloshtan, A A; Skoryĭ, D I; Smachilo, R M

    2013-06-01

    Retrospective analysis of the treatment results of 120 patients, suffering solitary hepatic abscess (SHA), was conducted. The sanation methods, in accordance to technology, the treatment impact intensity and aggressiveness, may be divided on three lines: aspirational, draining and resectional. The method of sanation is selected on the background of morphological peculiarities of abscess--its sizes, by presence of sequesters, divisioning septs, dense rigid capsule, grade of periprocess. Surgical access is determined by the abscess localization, the patient's state severity, instrumental equipment of the clinic. Differentiated approach, taking into account genesis, sizes, localization and stage of its formation, constitutes a background of successful treatment of SHA. In totally formatted acute SHA, as a rule, the methods of choice are aspirational and aspiration-draining methods of sanation under ultrasonographic control or laparoscopy. In the presence of chronic SHA or suppurated parasitic hepatic cyst it is mandatory to select the resectional methods.

  5. [Surveillance of hepatitis A by molecular epidemiologic studies].

    PubMed

    Stene-Johansen, K; Skaug, K; Blystad, H

    1999-10-20

    Hepatitis A virus was studied by molecular epidemiology in connection with an outbreak of hepatitis A associated with intravenous drug users (IVDU) in Norway. Hepatitis A virus was characterised by sequencing 114 of 1,242 notified cases of hepatitis A from January 1995 to July 1998. One hepatitis A variant (IVDU variant I) was detected among IVDU during an outbreak of hepatitis A, as well as among 19 out of 49 cases with no apparent association to this outbreak. During the autumn of 1997, a new variant (IVDU variant II) was detected in the IVDU communities. Genotyping of virus from imported cases associated with travel to endemic regions, revealed that they were distinct from the two other IVDU variants. Hepatitis A has disseminated among IVDU over years; this indicates that hepatitis A is endemic in these communities. At the turn of the year 1997/98, there was a smaller outbreak of hepatitis A among homosexual men in Oslo, distinguished by genotyping from the outbreaks in the IVDU communities. By molecular epidemiology we have been able to identify individual outbreaks of hepatitis A and distinguish them from the IVDU outbreak.

  6. A rat model for hepatitis E virus

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Niraj; Verbeken, Erik; Ramaekers, Kaat; Dallmeier, Kai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the prime causes of acute viral hepatitis, and chronic hepatitis E is increasingly recognized as an important problem in the transplant setting. Nevertheless, the fundamental understanding of the biology of HEV replication is limited and there are few therapeutic options. The development of such therapies is partially hindered by the lack of a robust and convenient animal model. We propose the infection of athymic nude rats with the rat HEV strain LA-B350 as such a model. A cDNA clone, pLA-B350, was constructed and the infectivity of its capped RNA transcripts was confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a subgenomic replicon, pLA-B350/luc, was constructed and validated for in vitro antiviral studies. Interestingly, rat HEV proved to be less sensitive to the antiviral activity of α-interferon, ribavirin and mycophenolic acid than genotype 3 HEV (a strain that infects humans). As a proof-of-concept, part of the C-terminal polymerase sequence of pLA-B350/luc was swapped with its genotype 3 HEV counterpart: the resulting chimeric replicon replicated with comparable efficiency as the wild-type construct, confirming that LA-B350 strain is amenable to humanization (replacement of certain sequences or motifs by their counterparts from human HEV strains). Finally, ribavirin effectively inhibited LA-B350 replication in athymic nude rats, confirming the suitability of the rat model for antiviral studies. PMID:27483350

  7. [A case of secondary syphilis with hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Tanyel, Esra; Taşdelen Fişgin, Nuriye; Sarikaya Genç, Hanife; Tülek, Necla

    2007-04-01

    Hepatitis is a rare clinical manifestation of syphilis. In this report a 50 years old male patient who was diagnosed as secondary syphilis presenting with hepatitis has been discussed. The patient was admitted to the hospital with high fever and skin rash, and his history revealed a suspected sexual contact. He indicated that he had been admitted to a health center eight months ago because of the presence of a penile wound, however VDRL (Venereal Disease Research Laboratory) test was negative at that time. Fever (39.5 degrees C), jaundice in skin and sclera, generalized macular and maculopapular skin rash including palms and soles, lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly were detected in physical examination. Laboratory tests yielded elevated erythrocyte sedimantation rate, high CRP levels and elevated liver enzyme levels, however viral hepatitis markers together with VDRL and TPHA (Treponema pallidum hemagglutination) tests were found negative. Ceftriaxone therapy was initiated because of the presence of high fever (40 degrees C) and 30 leukocyte/mm3 in urine, and the absence of bacteria in Gram staining of urine sample. However, the antibiotic therapy was discontinued since fever persisted. As the clinical signs and symptoms strongly indicated syphilis, the serological tests were repeated and VDRL positivity at 1/8 and TPHA positivity at 1/1280 titers were detected. Ceftriaxone therapy was restarted and continued for 14 days with complete cure. Since the spouse of the patient was also found VDRL and TPHA positive, she was treated with penicilin. The presentation of this case emphasized the importance of repeating the serological tests for syphilis since they might be negative in the early stages of infection. The case also indicates that syphilis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hepatitis.

  8. Identification of acute self-limited hepatitis B among patients presenting with hepatitis B virus-related acute hepatitis: a hospital-based epidemiological and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Han, Y-N

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to identify acute self-limited hepatitis B (ASL-HB) among patients presenting with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related acute hepatitis. Data were available for 220 patients diagnosed with HBV-related acute hepatitis, of whom 164 had acute hepatitis B (AHB). Of these, 160 were confirmed as ASL-HB: three (1.9%) evolved to chronic hepatitis B and one (0.6%) developed fulminant hepatitis and died. Comparisons were also made between AHB and acute infections with hepatitis A (HA) and hepatitis E (HE) viruses. During the study period, the number of patients with AHB exceeded the sum of those with acute HA and acute HE infections. There was no distinct seasonal peak for AHB infection, whereas both acute HA and acute HE infections occurred more frequently in the spring. Clinical symptoms and physical signs were similar for all three types of hepatitis, but significant differences were seen in some biochemical parameters. In conclusion, this study suggests that symptomatic AHB is not rare in China but it seldom evolves to chronic hepatitis B.

  9. Review: Occult hepatitis C virus infection: still remains a controversy.

    PubMed

    Vidimliski, Pavlina Dzekova; Nikolov, Igor; Geshkovska, Nadica Matevska; Dimovski, Aleksandar; Rostaing, Lionel; Sikole, Aleksandar

    2014-09-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by the presence of HCV RNA in the liver cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the patients whose serum samples test negative for HCV RNA, with or without presence of HCV antibodies. The present study reviews the existing literature on the persistence of occult hepatitis C virus infection, with description of the clinical characteristics and methods for identification of occult hepatitis C. Occult hepatitis C virus infection was detected in patients with abnormal results of liver function tests of unknown origin, with HCV antibodies and HCV RNA negativity in serum, and also in patients with spontaneous or treatment-induced recovery from hepatitis C. The viral replication in the liver cells and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cells was present in all clinical presentations of occult hepatitis C. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells represent an extra-hepatic site of HCV replication. The reason why HCV RNA was not detectable in the serum of patients with occult hepatitis C, could be the low number of circulating viral particles not detectable by the diagnostic tests with low sensitivity. It is uncertain whether occult hepatitis C is a different clinical entity or just a form of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Data accumulated over the last decade demonstrated that an effective approach to the diagnosis of HCV infection would be the implementation of more sensitive HCV RNA diagnostic assays, and also, examination of the presence of viral particles in the cells of the immune system.

  10. Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy Combined with Venous Embolization in a Patient with Hepatic Metastases with an Arteriovenous Shunt

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiofuku, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Sakaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kiyosei; Inoue, Masayoshi; Sueyoshi, Satoru; Shinnkai, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2009-07-15

    We describe herein a patient who had hepatic metastases with an arteriovenous shunt and was treated by hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy. The arteriovenous shunt was diagnosed by {sup 99m}Tc-macroaggregated albumin scintigraphy and hepatic venous embolization was performed to reduce shunt flow.

  11. Traumatic common hepatic artery injury causing isolated right hepatic ischemia due to a left accessory artery. A case report.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Eduardo; Pedrazzani, Corrado; Gerena, Marielia; Omi, Ellen

    2017-08-08

    Hepatic arterial liver flow is renowned for its redundancy. Previous studies have demonstrated that the common hepatic artery is not essential for liver survival. We present a case of a 31year-old involved in a high-speed motor vehicle accident whose liver survived thanks to the presence of an accessory hepatic artery. We present the case of a 31year-old male who sustained a traumatic injury of the proper hepatic artery following a motor vehicle accident. The patient suffered temporary right liver lobe ischemia due to the presence of an accessory left hepatic artery. This resulted in the selective formation of 'biliary lakes' distinctively within the territory of the right hepatic artery supply. Simultaneously the patient developed a pseudo-aneurysm of the proper hepatic artery which required radiology intervention. At the time of pseudo-aneurysm embolisation, a rich network of arterial collaterals had formed between the accessory left hepatic and the inferior phrenic artery. On follow up the biliary lakes to the right lobe had resolved, but a small area at the periphery of the right lobe had encountered atrophy. This case report is an 'in vivo' demonstration of liver resilience to arterial flow re-distribution and demonstrates the ability of the biliary epithelium to recover from and ischemic injury. Parenchymal liver survival is mostly independent from flow within the common hepatic artery. Acute and chronic liver parenchyma changes following interruption of hepatic artery flow can still occur. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Nucleotide sequence of a cloned woodchuck hepatitis virus genome: comparison with the hepatitis B virus sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Galibert, F; Chen, T N; Mandart, E

    1982-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a woodchuck hepatitis virus genome cloned in Escherichia coli was determined by the method of Maxam and Gilbert. This sequence was found to be 3,308 nucleotides long. Potential ATG initiator triplets and nonsense codons were identified and used to locate regions with a substantial coding capacity. A striking similarity was observed between the organization of human hepatitis B virus and woodchuck hepatitis virus. Nucleotide sequences of these open regions in the woodchuck virus were compared with corresponding regions present in hepatitis B virus. This allowed the location of four viral genes on the L strand and indicated the absence of protein coded by the S strand. Evolution rates of the various parts of the genome as well as of the four different proteins coded by hepatitis B virus and woodchuck hepatitis virus were compared. These results indicated that: (i) the core protein has evolved slightly less rapidly than the other proteins; and (ii) when a region of DNA codes for two different proteins, there is less freedom for the DNA to evolve and, moreover, one of the proteins can evolve more rapidly than the other. A hairpin structure, very well conserved in the two genomes, was located in the only region devoid of coding function, suggesting the location of the origin of replication of the viral DNA. Images PMID:7086958

  13. [Hepatitis and pregnancy--a short review].

    PubMed

    Zygmunt, M

    2003-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is one of the most serious infections in pregnant women. There are now at least five hepatitis viruses. This educational review describes the various types of hepatitis, clinical manifestations, their impact on mother and fetus, prevention and treatment options, risks of perinatal transmission and differential diagnosis. Several open questions regarding vaccination as well as perinatal transmission have been addressed.

  14. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the liver), liver cancer, and even death.Hepatitis A can cause varying symptoms, but most often causes fever, tiredness, ... important? The hepatitis B vaccine prevents infection with hepatitis B virus, which causes liver cancer. The hepatitis B virus is 100 ...

  15. Non-A, non-B hepatitis unrelated to the hepatitis C virus (non-ABC).

    PubMed

    Alter, H J; Bradley, D W

    1995-02-01

    The history of non-ABC hepatitis is a kaleidoscope of intriguing, but often conflicting and confounding data. Studies of transfusion-associated non-ABC hepatitis are less convincing than they originally seemed. Chimpanzee cross-challenge studies, once the bastion for the theory of multiple NANB hepatitis agents, now have an alternative explanation in the impaired immune response associated with HCV infection and the ability of this agent to reinfect individuals previously assumed to be immune. Nonetheless, there are so many cases of acute and chronic NANB hepatitis that cannot currently be attributed to HCV that it is hard to avoid the implication of at least one, and possibly more, non-ABC hepatitis agents. There are now some transmission studies in small primates to support this contention, though recent chimpanzee transmission studies have been disappointingly negative. As with the hepatitis C virus, the breakthrough in this disease will not come from classic serology or virology, but from molecular biology. Similar molecular approaches to those that elucidated HCV are in progress and are promising in preliminary experiments. It is anticipated that the pace of molecular biology is such that a great deal more will be known about non-ABC in a relatively brief time, and perhaps one or more non-ABC agents will prove to be real and clinically relevant.

  16. Secondary Syphilis With Hepatitis and Nephrotic Syndrome: A Rare Concurrence.

    PubMed

    Makker, Jasbir; Bajantri, Bharat; Nayudu, Suresh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Syphilis, a chronic multisystem disease, is caused by a spirochete, Treponema pallidum. Clinical presentation may expand to several stages including primary, secondary and latent syphilis, which may present as early or late syphilis. Nephrotic syndrome and acute hepatitis are well-known complications of secondary syphilis. To the best of our knowledge, secondary syphilis with coexisting renal and hepatic complications has rarely been reported. Here we present a rare case of concurrent nephrotic syndrome and acute hepatitis in a patient with secondary syphilis.

  17. Vaccination as a triggering event for autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Perumalswami, Ponni; Peng, Lan; Odin, Joseph A

    2009-08-01

    The pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis entails complex interactions between triggering factors, autoantigens, genetic predisposition, and immunoregulatory networks. Implicated triggering factors are numerous and include toxins, medications, and infectious agents. In this article, we present a unique case of a 31-year-old woman with severe autoimmune hepatitis apparently abruptly triggered by vaccination. All evidence suggests this was an idiosyncratic response to either hepatitis A or yellow fever vaccination. Copyright Thieme Medical Publishers.

  18. A plant-derived edible vaccine against hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, J; Modelska, A; Figlerowicz, M; Pniewski, T; Letellier, M; Lisowa, O; Yusibov, V; Koprowski, H; Plucienniczak, A; Legocki, A B

    1999-10-01

    The infectious hepatitis B virus represents 42 nm spherical double-shelled particles. However, analysis of blood from hepatitis B virus carriers revealed the presence of smaller 22 nm particles consisting of a viral envelope surface protein. These particles are highly immunogenic and have been used in the design of hepatitis B virus vaccine produced in yeast. Upon expression in yeast, these proteins form virus-like particles that are used for parenteral immunization. Therefore, the DNA fragment encoding hepatitis B virus surface antigen was introduced into Agrobacterium tumerifacience LBA4404 and used to obtain transgenic lupin (Lupinus luteus L.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cv. Burpee Bibb expressing envelope surface protein. Mice that were fed the transgenic lupin tissue developed significant levels of hepatitis B virus-specific antibodies. Human volunteers, fed with transgenic lettuce plants expressing hepatitis B virus surface antigen, developed specific serum-IgG response to plant produced protein.

  19. Hepatic Shock Differential Diagnosis and Risk Factors: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Safari, Saeid; Rahmani, Farzad; Nejabatian, Arezu; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2015-01-01

    Context: Liver as an important organ has a vital role in physiological processes in the body. Different causes can disrupt normal function of liver. Factors such as hypo-perfusion, hypoxemia, infections and some others can cause hepatic injury and hepatic shock. Evidence Acquisition: Published research resources from 2002 to May 2015 in some databases (PubMed, Scopus, Index Copernicus, DOAJ, EBSCO-CINAHL, Science direct, Cochrane library and Google scholar and Iranian search database like SID and Iranmedex) were investigated for the present study. Results: Different causes can lead to hepatic shock. Most of these causes can be prevented by early resuscitation and treatment of underlying factors. Conclusions: Hepatic shock is detected in ill patients, especially those with hemodynamic disorders. It can be prevented by early treatment of underlying disease. There is no definite treatment for hepatic shock and should be managed conservatively. Hepatic shock in patients can increase the mortality rate. PMID:26587034

  20. Hepatic Shock Differential Diagnosis and Risk Factors: A Review Article.

    PubMed

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Safari, Saeid; Rahmani, Farzad; Nejabatian, Arezu; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2015-10-01

    Liver as an important organ has a vital role in physiological processes in the body. Different causes can disrupt normal function of liver. Factors such as hypo-perfusion, hypoxemia, infections and some others can cause hepatic injury and hepatic shock. Published research resources from 2002 to May 2015 in some databases (PubMed, Scopus, Index Copernicus, DOAJ, EBSCO-CINAHL, Science direct, Cochrane library and Google scholar and Iranian search database like SID and Iranmedex) were investigated for the present study. Different causes can lead to hepatic shock. Most of these causes can be prevented by early resuscitation and treatment of underlying factors. Hepatic shock is detected in ill patients, especially those with hemodynamic disorders. It can be prevented by early treatment of underlying disease. There is no definite treatment for hepatic shock and should be managed conservatively. Hepatic shock in patients can increase the mortality rate.

  1. A case of typhoid Fever with hepatic granulomas and enteritis.

    PubMed

    Narechania, Shraddha; Duran, Marc; Karivedu, Vidhya; Gopalakrishna, K V

    2015-01-01

    The common histopathologic hepatic manifestations in patients infected with Salmonella include cloudy swelling and balloon degeneration with vacuolation of the hepatocytes and steatosis. Hepatic granulomas are a very rare finding, so far reported in very few cases. We report a 64-year-old patient with Salmonella enteritis who was found to have multiple 1.4 to 1.6 cm hypoechoic liver masses on ultrasound of the abdomen which on biopsy revealed hepatic granulomas. This case highlights the importance of keeping the differential diagnosis of Salmonella typhi (S. typhi) in mind in a patient with hepatic granulomas.

  2. Hepatitis A infection mimicking adult onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, S; Mossad, S; Hoffman, G

    2000-07-01

    Fever, rash, and arthritis may be components of the prodrome of viral hepatitis. In the absence of jaundice and abnormal liver function tests, this form of polyarthritis is easily confused with primary autoimmune diseases. Whereas the association of systemic illness with musculoskeletal symptoms and numerous viral infections is well known, such an association with hepatitis A has only been rarely reported. We describe a case of hepatitis A infection mimicking adult onset Still's disease, and review the pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of Still's disease and the extraarticular manifestations of hepatitis.

  3. Protective effect of inactivated hepatitis A vaccine against the outbreak of hepatitis A in an open rural community

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yue-Gen; Gu, Xie-Jun; Zhou, Jian-Hong

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the protective effect of inactivated hepatitis A vaccine (Healive®) against hepatitis A outbreak in an emergency vaccination campaign. METHODS: During an outbreak of hepatitis A in Honghe Town, Xiuzhou District, Jiaxing City, Zhejiang Province, two nonrandomized controlled trials were conducted in September 2006. The first trial was to vaccinate 108 anti-HAV negative individuals with close contacts of the patients from September with 1 dose of an inactivated hepatitis A vaccine, Healive®. The control group comprised of 115 individuals with close contacts of the patients before September. The second trial was to vaccinate 3365 primary and secondary school students who volunteered to receive a dose of Healive® and 2572 students who did not receive Healive® serving as its controls. An epidemiological survey was conducted to evaluate the protective efficacy of the vaccine. RESULTS: A total of 136 hepatitis A cases were reported during an outbreak that started in June, peaked in August and September, and ended after December of 2006. After a massive vaccination of school children in September, the number of cases declined significantly. No hepatitis A was detected in the 108 vaccinated individuals with close contacts of patients, whereas 4 cases of hepatitis A were found in the controls. The infection rate of hepatitis A was not significantly different in the individuals with close contacts of patients whether or not they received the vaccine (P = 0.122). No hepatitis A was detected in the 3365 students who received the vaccine, four cases of hepatitis A were found in the controls. The infection rate of students with or without vaccination was significantly different in the students who received the vaccine (0/3365 vs 4/2572, P = 0.035). The protective efficacy of the vaccine was 100%. CONCLUSION: Inactivated hepatitis A vaccine demonstrates a good protective effect against an outbreak of hepatitis A. PMID:18461664

  4. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Evaluate a Potential Hepatitis B Booster Vaccination Strategy Using Combined Hepatitis A and B Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangjun; Hu, Yuansheng; Zhou, Youming; Chen, Lixin; Xia, Wei; Song, Yufei; Tan, Zhengliang; Gao, Lidong; Yang, Zhong; Zeng, Gang; Han, Xing; Li, Junhua; Li, Jing

    2017-05-01

    Booster doses could play a major role in no responders or low responders to primary hepatitis B (HB) vaccine. Planed time point for hepatitis A vaccination in China provides a good opportunity to carry out HB booster dose by using combined hepatitis A and B vaccine. A randomized, double-blinded clinical trial was conducted to compare the immunogenicity and safety of toddlers 18-24 months of age receiving 3 different vaccination regimens: 2 doses of inactivated hepatitis A vaccine (group 1), 1 dose of inactivated hepatitis A vaccine plus 1 dose of combined hepatitis A and B vaccine (group 2) or 2 doses of combined hepatitis A and B vaccine (group 3). All 3 groups showed 100% seroprotection for antihepatitis A virus antibody after vaccination. Seroprotection rate for anti-HB antibody before vaccination ranged from 79.5% to 92.9% in the 3 groups. After second inoculation, anti-HBs seroprotection increased from 92.9% to 100% in group 2 with postvaccination geometric mean concentration (GMC) of 2258.3 mIU/mL and from 79.5% to 98.9% in group 3 with postvaccination GMC of 2055.3 mIU/mL. The adverse events were not statistically different among groups (P = 0.345). Combined hepatitis A and B vaccine could stimulate high level of both antihepatitis A virus and anti-HBs antibodies and not increase adverse events, providing a new choice for HB booster.

  5. Lethal outbreak of hepatitis B in a dental practice.

    PubMed

    Shaw, F E; Barrett, C L; Hamm, R; Peare, R B; Coleman, P J; Hadler, S C; Fields, H A; Maynard, J E

    1986-06-20

    Between April 1, 1984, and Feb 1, 1985, nine cases of hepatitis B occurred in the patients of a dentist practicing in a rural Indiana county (population, 35,000). This was over 20 times the mean annual incidence for the county in the previous decade. All of the patients had been treated by the dentist two to five months before illness. Although the dentist had never had hepatitis symptoms, his serum was positive for hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B e antigen and negative for anti-hepatitis B core IgM antibody, indicating that he was probably a hepatitis B carrier. Two patients (22%) died of fulminant hepatitis; the case-fatality ratio was over ten times the reported US mean for hepatitis B. Using a case definition based on anti-hepatitis B core IgM antibody positivity and exposure to the dentist during a defined time period, a serosurvey of the dentist's patients identified 15 asymptomatic cases (overall attack rate, 3.2%). Infection risk was related to the amount of trauma involved in the cases' dental procedures. No cause was found for the unusual lethality of the outbreak.

  6. Poor Outcomes in Hepatic Amyloidosis: A Report of 2 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kertowidjojo, Elizabeth; Zhang, Yue; Patel, Pruthvi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic amyloidosis is a rare disease entity that results from insoluble amyloid protein deposition in the liver. The disease often presents with vague, nonspecific clinical features. Currently, there is little literature describing treatment outcomes for biopsy-proven hepatic amyloidosis and current treatment guidelines recommend that patients enroll in a clinical trial due to insufficient evidence to suggest an optimal treatment regimen. Here, we present two cases of hepatic amyloidosis at an academic medical center and describe their presentation, treatment, and outcomes. These cases highlight the poor outcomes and difficult management of hepatic amyloidosis. Further understanding and investigation of this rare disease are warranted. PMID:27774327

  7. Viral Hepatitis: Retrospective Review in a Canadian Pediatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Cybulska, Paulina; Ni, Andy; Jimenez-Rivera, Carolina

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Clinical presentation of viral hepatitis ranges from mild symptoms to fulminant hepatitis. Our aim is to describe clinical presentation and outcomes of children with viral hepatitis from the Eastern Ontario/Western Quebec regions of Canada. Methods. Retrospective chart review of children diagnosed with viral hepatitis at our institution from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2007. Results. There were 261 charts reviewed, only 64 had a confirmed viral etiology: 34 (53%) hepatitis B (HBV), 16 (25%) hepatitis C (HCV), 4 (6.3%) hepatitis A (HAV), 7 (11%) cytomegalovirus (CMV), and 3 (4.7%) Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Children with HBV presented at a mean age of 6.4 ± 4.6 years. Spontaneous seroconversion (appearance of HBVeAb and loss of HBVeAg) occurred in 21/34 (61.7%). Children with acute hepatitis (HAV, CMV, and EBV) presented with mild abdominal pain, jaundice, and fevers. Overall outcome was excellent. Conclusion. Acute and chronic hepatitis in children has a benign course; moreover, HBV spontaneous seroconversion is common in pediatric patients. PMID:22482064

  8. Melatonin: a potential intervention for hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hang; Huang, Fang-fang; Qu, Shen

    2015-07-22

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, MLT) is a neuroendocrine hormone, which is primarily synthesized by the pineal gland in vertebrates. Melatonin is a remarkable molecule with diverse biological and physiological actions and is involved in the regulation of various important functions such as circadian rhythm, energy metabolism, the reproductive system, the cardiovascular system, and the neuropsychiatric system. It also plays a role in disease by having anti-neoplastic and anti-osteoarthritic effects among others. Recently, research has focused on the roles of melatonin in oxidative stress, lipid metabolism, and hepatic steatosis and its potential therapeutic roles.

  9. Seroepidemiology of hepatitis A virus in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Alkhalidi, Jameela; Alenezi, Bader; Al-mufti, Seham; Hussain, Entisar; Askar, Haifa; Kemmer, Nyingi; Neff, Guy W

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To find the current seroepidemiology of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in Kuwait. METHODS: A total of 2851 Kuwaitis applying for new jobs were screened. RESULTS: HAV-positive cases were 28.8%; 59% were males and 41% were females. The highest prevalence was in the Ahmadi area. High prevalence was among the group of non-educated rather than educated parents. This is the first study in Kuwait demonstrating the shifting epidemiology of HAV. CONCLUSION: This study reflects the need of the Kuwaiti population for an HAV vaccine. PMID:19115474

  10. Chronic hepatitis: a retrospective study in 34 dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Fuentealba, C; Guest, S; Haywood, S; Horney, B

    1997-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize the histological changes observed in 34 accessioned cases of canine chronic hepatitis and to correlate these changes with the clinical pathological data. Cases of chronic hepatitis were subdivided into 6 categories: chronic active hepatitis (10/34), chronic persistent hepatitis (7/32), chronic cholestatic hepatitis (6/34), fibrosing hepatitis with cirrhosis (3/34), chronic cholangiohepatitis (3/34), and miscellaneous secondary hepatitis (5/34). Iron accumulation was a consistent finding in all livers examined. Although all cases of chronic hepatitis had elevated liver enzymes, no correlation was detected between biochemical parameters and the severity of morphologic changes. Similarly, no correlation was detected between rhodanine staining for copper and morphologic or biochemical indicators of cholestasis. However, presence of copper correlated well with reticulo-fibrosis (r = 0.8) and bile duct hyperplasia, suggesting that changes in the hemodynamics of the hepatic acini due to fibrosis could influence storage of copper. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:9187802

  11. A brief history of hepatitis milestones.

    PubMed

    Trepo, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Hepatitis has been a major plague of mankind. The history of the discovery of causative viruses is one of the most fascinating scientific adventures of this half century. Individualization of several types of hepatitis only emerged after world war two. Their identification has been associated with milestones which revolutionized medicine and public health. The discovery of HBV brought the first ever vaccine not prepared by tissue culture but initially directly from plasma and soon the first vaccine produced by genetic engineering. HBV vaccine proved to be the first "anti-cancer" vaccine by preventing hepatocellular carcinoma and practically eradicating it from childhood in Taiwan. Successful vaccines became also available for HAV and more recently HEV. The discovery of HCV in 1989 opened a new era since it was the first virus was identified by a direct molecular approach. Two billion people are infected with HBV and 350 million are chronic carriers of the virus. The extraordinary effectiveness of HBV vaccination was best illustrated in Taiwan and Singapore where in less than 2 decades HBs Ag carriers dropped from 9,1% to 2,7% and HCC from 27% to 17%. Successful development of nucleos(t)ides analogs make it now possible to fully control disease progression with a daily pill long term therapy. The progress in HCV therapy has been even more spectacular and successful treatment jumped from 6 % with interferon alone in 1986 to more than 80% in 2013 with triple combination therapies. Remarkably chronic hepatitis C is the only chronic disease which is curable. It will be soon possible to eradicate HCV infection with, an all oral, daily single pill (containing several molecules) for 3 to 6 months which will cure over 90% of patients. This unprecedented therapeutic victory benefiting hundred millions of people matches the triumphs over small pox, polio and tuberculosis. The next 10 years should undoubtedly witness cure or full control over all forms of acute and chronic

  12. Hepatitis virus non-A, non-B: the cause of a major public health problem in India.

    PubMed

    Tandon, B N; Gandhi, B M; Joshi, Y K; Irshad, M; Gupta, H

    1985-01-01

    Serological studies of hepatitis viruses A and B were carried out on 362 patients with acute viral hepatitis, 130 with fulminant hepatitis, and 56 with subacute hepatitis, and on samples of serum from 230 subjects during epidemics of viral hepatitis. A diagnosis of non-A, non-B viral hepatitis was made when serological tests showed that anti-HAV IgM and anti-HBc IgM were absent. Hepatitis virus non-A, non-B was the causative agent responsible for 58% of cases with acute viral hepatitis, 58% with fulminant hepatitis, 87% with subacute hepatitis, and 66% with epidemic hepatitis. A considerable proportion of patients (6-32%) were infected with both hepatitis virus non-A, non-B and hepatitis virus B. Viral hepatitis non-A, non-B is probably transmitted by infection of drinking-water and is the principal cause of hepatitis in India.

  13. Hepatitis C prevalence--a nationwide serosurvey.

    PubMed

    Amin, Janiki; Gidding, Heather; Gilbert, Gwendolyn; Backhouse, Josephine; Kaldor, John; Dore, Greg; Burgess, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C is the most commonly notified disease in Australia. In 1998 the Hepatitis C Virus Projections Working Group (HCPWG) estimated that there were approximately 210,000 people who had been infected by hepatitis C virus (HCV) in Australia by 2001. Population-based serosurveys are required to validate this estimate. Here we estimate HCV prevalence on the basis of HCV antibody seroprevalence in the Australian national serosurvey. Between 1996 and 1998, 2,800 sera opportunistically collected from pathology laboratories throughout Australia were tested for HCV antibody. National HCV notifications reported from 1991 through 1998 were also assessed. Eighty-one sera were HCV antibody positive, giving an age standardised prevalence of 2.3 per cent (95% CI 1.8%-2.9%). The 20-24 year age group had the highest HCV prevalence, 5.3 per cent (95% CI 3.3%-8.1%) and the male to female ratio was 1.8:1.0. Approximately 111,000 HCV notifications were received from 1991 through 1998. HCV prevalence estimated by the serosurvey is approximately three times higher than cumulative HCV notifications. Age and sex distributions of seroprevalence are broadly consistent with cumulative notification data. These distributions are consistent with the majority of HCV infections in Australia being transmitted by injecting drug use. Very low age specific seroprevalence estimates in the over 50 years age group indicate that there is not a large pool of undiagnosed infection in this age group. The serosurvey provides an estimate of Australian HCV prevalence and baseline data to determine incidence trends, both of which are required for health-care planning.

  14. Acute hepatitis A in a pregnant woman at delivery.

    PubMed

    Motte, Anne; Blanc, Julie; Minodier, Philippe; Colson, Philippe

    2009-03-01

    We report a case of acute hepatitis A in a 30-year-old pregnant woman with hepatitis onset occurring at time of delivery. Both neonate and her mother were isolated from other patients. The hepatitis A virus (HAV) genotype was Ia. Total anti-HAV antibodies and HAV RNA were not detected from the newborn in a serum collected the first day of life; neither clinical symptoms nor increased ALT levels were observed during the six first days of life. The mother quickly and fully recovered. Hepatitis A has been scarcely reported during pregnancy; four cases, to our knowledge, have been previously described close to delivery. HAV vertical transmission seems to be very rare. No severe outcome has been described in mothers and newborns. Nevertheless, HAV infection might represent a concern in pregnant women in industrialized countries in view of its mortality rate among susceptible adults and its potential involvement in nosocomial outbreaks.

  15. Hepatitis C performance measure on hepatitis A and B vaccination: missed opportunities?

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Bridget; Hasson, Noelle K; Cheung, Ramsey

    2009-08-01

    Prevention of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) through vaccination is endorsed by all major professional societies. This study was conducted to determine adherence to the recently adopted physician performance measure on HAV and HBV vaccination. This was a retrospective study. Hepatitis A and B serology data and immunization records between 2000 and 2007 from CHC patients with detectable hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA were analyzed. A total of 2,968 CHC patients were included in the study. Of these, 2,143 patients (72%) were tested for susceptibility to HAV, of which 53% had immunity. Of the non-immune patients, 746 (74%) were vaccinated as well as an additional 218 without prior testing. For HBV, 2,303 patients (78%) were tested for immunity and 782 (34%) were immune. Of the susceptible patients, 1,086 (71%) were vaccinated as well as an additional 197 patients without prior testing. The overall vaccination performance measure adherence rate was 71% for HAV, 70% for HBV, and 62% for both HAV and HBV. Random review of 176 charts found the major reasons for non-adherence were missed opportunity (41%), change of health care system (31%), and documented vaccination outside our health care system (22%). Our study found a high and improved adherence to the recommendations, but missed opportunity was still the main reason of non-adherence. This study also supported the strategy of selective vaccination in the veteran population.

  16. Hepatitis A: Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... are Canada, Western Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and Japan. How does a person know if he or ... world except the United States, Canada, Western Europe, Japan, New Zealand, and Australia • Men who have sex ...

  17. [Clinical features of acute hepatitis A in recent two years].

    PubMed

    Lee, Eung Jun; Kwon, So Young; Seo, Tae Ho; Yun, Hyun Sung; Cho, Han Su; Kim, Byung Kook; Choe, Won Hyeok; Lee, Chang Hong; Kim, Jin Nam; Yim, Hyung Joon

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the clinical features of acute hepatitis A in Seoul and Gyeonggi province during the recent 2 years. We reviewed the medical records of 222 patients who were diagnosed as acute hepatitis A between August 2005 and March 2007 at the Konkuk University Hospital and Korea University, Ansan Hospital. The clinical manifestation, serological tests, and image findings were analyzed. Median age of the patients was 28.1 years and the age groups of highest incidence were the second and third decade. The frequent symptoms were anorexia (66.4%), fatigue (49.2%), fever (47.7%), and abdominal discomfort (42.5%). Fourteen cases (6.3%) showed renal insufficiency, and hemodialysis was performed in one. Cholestatic hepatitis in 2 cases, relapsing hepatitis in 4 cases and prolonged hepatitis in 13 cases were observed. However, there was no case of fulminant hepatitis or death. The underlying diseases including chronic hepatitis B, diabetes mellitus and thyroid disorder did not affect the disease severity of hepatitis A. IgM anti-HAV was not detected initially in 6.7% of the patients. Anti-HEV (IgM) was detected simultaneously in 3 of 150 patients. The age of patients with acute hepatitis A has been increased in the recent years. Most patients recovered uneventfully. However, unusual patterns of severe hepatitis and renal insufficiency occurred in considerable number of cases. Follow-up serologic test for IgM anti-HAV is needed in seronegative cases with hepatitis A.

  18. STUDIES OF A MYXOVIRUS RECOVERED FROM PATIENTS WITH INFECTIOUS HEPATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Liebhaber, Harvey; Krugman, Saul; McGregor, Dorothy; Giles, Joan P.

    1965-01-01

    A virus has been isolated from the serum and urine of patients with infectious hepatitis. This virus is a member of the parinfluenza group. It is serologically distinct from the known members of the group, but apparently is antigenically related to the simian type-2 parainfluenza viruses. A causal relationship between WB virus and infectious hepatitis has not been established. PMID:4285254

  19. A radioimmunoassay for hepatitis A antigen and antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Skidmore, S J; Boxall, E H

    1979-01-01

    The HAVAB radioimmunoassay for the detection of antibody to hepatitis A is assessed. Its modification to detect virus in faecal samples is described and in this it was found to be more sensitive and specific than electron microscopy. PMID:227943

  20. Protect Yourself against Hepatitis A and B: A Guide for Gay and Bisexual Men

    MedlinePlus

    Protect Yourself Against Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B... a guide for gay and bisexual men Men who have sex with men are at increased risk of becoming infected with both the hepatitis A virus and the hepatitis B virus. Although these ...

  1. Extra-hepatic manifestations associated with hepatitis E virus infection: a comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bazerbachi, Fateh; Haffar, Samir; Garg, Sushil K; Lake, John R

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a significant public health problem that afflicts almost 20 million individuals annually and causes acute liver injury in 3.5 million, with approximately 56 000 deaths. As with other viral hepatitides, extra-hepatic manifestations could represent an important aspect of this infection. The spectrum of these manifestations is still emerging. Acute pancreatitis and neurological, musculoskeletal, hematological, renal, and other immune-mediated manifestations have been described. The aim of this article is to comprehensively review the published literature of extra-hepatic manifestations associated with HEV infection. Data sources: We searched the PubMed database using the MeSH term “hepatitis E” and each of the extra-hepatic manifestations associated with HEV infection. No language or date restrictions were set in these searches. Searches retrieving articles with non-A, non-B hepatitis were excluded. Additional articles were identified through the reference lists of included articles. Results: Several extra-hepatic manifestations associated with HEV infection have been published. The temporal association between some extra-hepatic manifestations and HEV infection and the exclusion of other possible etiologies suggests that HEV infection could have caused some of them. According to the available data, HEV infection appears to be strongly associated with acute pancreatitis, neurological disorders (with primarily dominant peripheral nerve involvement, most commonly manifested as Guillain-Barré syndrome, followed by neuralgic amyotrophy), hematological diseases (hemolytic anemia due to glucose phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, and severe thrombocytopenia), glomerulonephritis, and mixed cryoglobulinemia. More data are needed to clarify whether an association exists with musculoskeletal or other immune-mediated manifestations. Conclusions: HEV infection should be considered in patients with acute pancreatitis

  2. Hepatitis A and B booster recommendations: implications for travelers.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Jane N; Connor, Bradley A; von Sonnenburg, Frank

    2005-10-01

    Hepatitis A and B are serious vaccine-preventable diseases with a predominantly overlapping epidemiological distribution. Travelers, a term encompassing a range of individuals, are at risk of contracting these diseases if they are unvaccinated. Although the benefits of the primary vaccination course of hepatitis A and B vaccines are clear, the administration of hepatitis A and B boosters varies worldwide. Recommendations on the need for booster vaccinations have recently been published, and the implications of these recommendations for travelers are discussed in this review. Until a greater understanding is reached on the immunogenicity of hepatitis A and B vaccines in certain special groups (e.g., immunocompromised persons), there will be a need to monitor antibody levels to assess whether booster vaccinations are required. However, for the majority of immunocompetent travelers, the full primary vaccination course will provide protection from both hepatitis A and B infection in the long term, without the need for boosters.

  3. Fatal Fulminant Hepatic Failure in a Diabetic with Primary Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Stalin; Iqbal, Nayyar; Anemon, P. Philip; Kumar, G. Shyam

    2010-01-01

    We report a 49-year-old diabetic with dengue hemorrhagic fever who developed fulminant hepatitis, severe coagulopathy, shock, and refractory metabolic acidosis and died on the eighth day of illness. This is the only second report of an adult with fatal fulminant hepatic failure due to dengue, and the first case arising from a primary dengue infection. PMID:21234316

  4. [Immunogenecity of combined hepatitis A and B vaccine].

    PubMed

    Shi, Li; Chu, Jia-you; Sun, Ming-bo; Huang, Xiao-qin; Yu, Jian-kun; Li, Chang-you; Sun, Hao; Yu, Liang

    2004-04-01

    To observe the immunogenicity of combined hepatitis A and B vaccine (HAB). The combined HAB vaccine was prepared and different concentrations of HAB were administered on mice in week 0, 4 and 24, and then we tested the antibodies to both hepatitis A virus and B virus. After the first injection, we tested the hepatitis A antigen-induced and hepatitis B surface antigen-induced stimulation indices in spleen monocyte as well as changes of CD4+ and CD8+ cell numbers. The serum antibody positive rates were 100% in all three groups, and the antibody induced by HAB vaccine were earlier than by monovalent vaccine. The hepatitis A antibody and hepatitis B surface antibody titers after the combined vaccine inoculation were not significantly higher than those after the monovalent vaccine inoculation. On the other hand, after the first injection of the combined vaccine, the hepatitis A antigen-induced and hepatitis B surface antigen-induced stimulation indices in spleen monocyte were detected. The numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ cells increased. HAB vaccine has reliable immunogenicity.

  5. Prevalence of Hepatitis A virus (HAV) and Hepatitis E virus (HEV) in the patients presenting with acute viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Joon, A; Rao, P; Shenoy, S M; Baliga, S

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) and Hepatitis E virus (HEV) are both enterically transmitted, resulting in acute viral hepatitis (AVH) in developing countries. They pose major health problems in our country. This study was done to determine prevalence of HAV and HEV in patients presenting with AVH and the co-infection of HAV and HEV in these patients. A cross-sectional study of 2-years duration was conducted in the Department of Microbiology, KMC, Mangalore. A non-random sampling of 958 patients presenting with AVH was considered in the study. On the basis of history, serum samples were analysed for IgM anti-HAV and IgM anti-HEV for the detection of HAV and HEV, respectively using commercially available ELISA kits. Data collected was analysed by using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 11.5. The seroprevalence of HAV- and HEV-positive patients were 19.31% and 10.54%, respectively. The seroprevalence of both HAV and HEV in patients with acute viral hepatitis was 11.5%. The prevalence of HAV and HEV among males (68% and 31%) was higher than in females (31% and 20%) and was predominantly seen among young adults. These infections were predominantly seen during end of monsoons and beginning of winter. Though the prevalence of HAV is much higher than that of HEV, co-infection rate of 11.5% mandates the screening for HEV which will be of immense importance in pregnant women and improving levels of personal hygiene among higher socio-economic population. These data will be essential for planning of future vaccination strategies and for better sanitation programme in this part of the country.

  6. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in alcoholic hepatitis: Hepatic encephalopathy a common theme

    PubMed Central

    John, Elizabeth S; Sedhom, Ramy; Dalal, Ishita; Sharma, Ranita

    2017-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neuro-radiologic diagnosis that has become more widely recognized and reported over the past few decades. As such, there are a number of known risk factors that contribute to the development of this syndrome, including volatile blood pressures, renal failure, cytotoxic drugs, autoimmune disorders, pre-eclampsia, and eclampsia. This report documents the first reported case of PRES in a patient with severe alcoholic hepatitis with hepatic encephalopathy and delves into a molecular pathophysiology of the syndrome. PMID:28127211

  7. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in alcoholic hepatitis: Hepatic encephalopathy a common theme.

    PubMed

    John, Elizabeth S; Sedhom, Ramy; Dalal, Ishita; Sharma, Ranita

    2017-01-14

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neuro-radiologic diagnosis that has become more widely recognized and reported over the past few decades. As such, there are a number of known risk factors that contribute to the development of this syndrome, including volatile blood pressures, renal failure, cytotoxic drugs, autoimmune disorders, pre-eclampsia, and eclampsia. This report documents the first reported case of PRES in a patient with severe alcoholic hepatitis with hepatic encephalopathy and delves into a molecular pathophysiology of the syndrome.

  8. [A study of 158 cases of acute delta hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Castro, A; Buti, M; Esteban, R; Jardí, R; Allende, H; Roget, M; Rodríguez-Frías, F; Guardia, J

    1990-09-22

    We have prospectively studied 158 cases of acute hepatitis delta observed during the last 7 years in a general hospital. Among them 136 were male and 22 female. The mean age was 22.7 years with a range between 16 and 61 years. The epidemiologic factors were drug addiction by parenteral route in 145 cases (92%), sexual transmission in 5 (3%), post transfusional in 2 (1%) and unknown in 6 (4%). With respect to the delta type infection, 105 cases (66%) were coinfections with type B and delta, and 53 patients had a type delta superinfection (34%). The clinical course was a fulminant hepatitis in three cases (two cases of coinfection B and delta an one case of delta superinfection), and an acute benign hepatitis in 155 patients. The follow-up of 118 patients revealed that 96% of coinfections by type B and delta evolved to the chronicity showing findings of active chronic hepatitis or hepatic cirrhosis. It should be noted that in 4 cases of superinfection delta type (11%) the HBsAg was negative after several months of positivity. In these patients the level of transaminases normalized and the hepatic histology evidenced alterations of chronic active hepatitis (2 cases) and hepatic cirrhosis (2 cases) without identification of tissular delta antigen.

  9. [Autoimmune hepatitis and pregnancy: about a patient's three consecutive pregnancies].

    PubMed

    Rivoire, C; Houlle, C; Bonnin, M; Cotte, B; Bolandard, F; Nohuz, E; Jardon, K; Rabischong, B; Canis, M; Mage, G

    2008-03-01

    Spontaneous evolution of autoimmune hepatitis during pregnancy is not well known, nor are its consequences on pregnancy evolution. Immunosuppressive treatment during pregnancy is sometimes necessary but the long- and short-term consequences are unrecognized. We relate a patient's disease with autoimmune hepatitis and cirrhosis and three consecutive pregnancies with different obstetrical and medical complications.

  10. Protozoal hepatitis in a western burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia hypugaea)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian

    2017-01-01

    A western burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) found dead in southern California had many light-colored lesions visible grossly on its liver, and histopathology revealed extensive necrosis throughout the hepatic parenchyma. Single-celled organisms were seen in clear spaces within the areas of necrosis. The owl was diagnosed with protozoal hepatitis.

  11. From hepatic diseases and jaundice to viral hepatitis: the configuration of a kaleidoscope.

    PubMed

    Gaze, Rosangela; Carvalho, Diana Maul de; Santoro-Lopes, Guilherme; Tura, Luiz Fernando Rangel

    2013-02-01

    Viral hepatitis A, B, C, D and E--systemic hepatotropic viral infections--present as acute hepatitis that, depending on the etiological agent, viral load and host conditions, may evolve into chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, liver cancer and acute fulminant disease. The ecological versatility of these viruses, their spectrum of transmission in time and space, potentialized by the sub-clinical course of a large proportion of infections, comprise an epidemiological challenge. This essay describes scenarios and tendencies in the socioepidemiologic profile, based on the history of these infections, and indicates the need to overcome patterns, models, and protocols and instead investigate each particular situation. In other words, it highlights the need to explore singularities in order to be able to develop new proposals for general actions tailored to local specificities.

  12. Egy-Score as a Noninvasive Score for the Assessment of Hepatic Fibrosis in Chronic Hepatitis C: A Preliminary Approach

    PubMed Central

    Alboraie, Mohamed; Khairy, Marwa; Elsharkawy, Aisha; Elsharkawy, Marwa; Asem, Noha; El-Seoud, Amany R. Abo; Elghamry, Fathy G.; Esmat, Gamal

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Egy-Score is a new noninvasive score for prediction of severe hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic liver diseases. The aim of this study was to validate Egy-Score as a noninvasive score for predicting stage of hepatic fibrosis in a group of Egyptian chronic hepatitis C patients. Patients and Methods: One hundred Egyptian patients with chronic hepatitis C were enrolled. Mean age was 40.25 ± 9.39 years. They were subjected to CA19-9, alpha-2-macroglobulin, total bilirubin, platelet count and albumin, liver biopsy, and histopathological staging of hepatic fibrosis according to METAVIR scoring system as part of their assessment for treatment. Egy-Score was calculated according to the following formula: Egy-Score = 3.52 + 0.0063 × CA19-9 + 0.0203 × age + 0.4485 × alpha-2-macroglobulin + 0.0303 × bilirubin – 0.0048 × platelet – 0.0462 × albumin. Egy-Score results were correlated to the stage of hepatic fibrosis. Results: Egy-Score correlates positively with the stage of hepatic fibrosis (F0–F4). Egy-Score was able to differentiate significant hepatic fibrosis, severe hepatic fibrosis, and cirrhosis accurately. Cutoff values of Egy-Score were 2.91850 (for significant fibrosis), 3.28624 (for severe fibrosis), and 3.67570 (for cirrhosis). Sensitivity, specificity, and areas-under-ROC curve (AUROCs) were 75.8%, 68.42%, and 0.776 (for significant fibrosis “≥F2”), 91.67%, 77.63%, and 0.875 (for severe fibrosis “≥F3”), and 81.82%, 86.52%, and 0.874 (for cirrhosis “F4”), respectively. Conclusion: Egy-Score is a useful noninvasive panel of surrogate biomarkers that could accurately predict different stages of hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C. PMID:24976280

  13. Liver Failure due to Acute Viral Hepatitis (A-E).

    PubMed

    Manka, Paul; Verheyen, Jens; Gerken, Guido; Canbay, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Viral hepatitis is still one of the key causes of acute liver failure (ALF) in the world. A selective literature search of the PubMed database was conducted, including current studies, reviews, meta-analyses, and guidelines. We obtained an overview of ALF due to viral hepatitis in terms of epidemiology, course, and treatment options. Most fulminant viral courses are reported after infection with hepatitis A, B, and B/D, but not with hepatitis C. Hepatitis E is also known to cause ALF but has not gained much attention in recent years. However, more and more autochthonous hepatitis E virus infections have been recently observed in Europe. Reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) under immunosuppressive conditions, such as after intensive chemotherapy, is also an increasing problem. For most viral-induced cases of ALF, liver transplantation represented the only therapeutic option in the past. Today, immediate treatment of HBV-induced ALF with nucleotide or nucleoside analogs is well tolerated and beneficially affects the course of the disease. Although numbers in Western European countries are decreasing rapidly, reliable diagnostic screening for hepatitis A-E is necessary to identify the etiology and to determine those most at risk of developing ALF.

  14. Liver Failure due to Acute Viral Hepatitis (A-E)

    PubMed Central

    Manka, Paul; Verheyen, Jens; Gerken, Guido; Canbay, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Viral hepatitis is still one of the key causes of acute liver failure (ALF) in the world. Methods A selective literature search of the PubMed database was conducted, including current studies, reviews, meta-analyses, and guidelines. We obtained an overview of ALF due to viral hepatitis in terms of epidemiology, course, and treatment options. Results Most fulminant viral courses are reported after infection with hepatitis A, B, and B/D, but not with hepatitis C. Hepatitis E is also known to cause ALF but has not gained much attention in recent years. However, more and more autochthonous hepatitis E virus infections have been recently observed in Europe. Reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) under immunosuppressive conditions, such as after intensive chemotherapy, is also an increasing problem. For most viral-induced cases of ALF, liver transplantation represented the only therapeutic option in the past. Today, immediate treatment of HBV-induced ALF with nucleotide or nucleoside analogs is well tolerated and beneficially affects the course of the disease. Conclusion Although numbers in Western European countries are decreasing rapidly, reliable diagnostic screening for hepatitis A-E is necessary to identify the etiology and to determine those most at risk of developing ALF. PMID:27413724

  15. A randomized clinical trial of immunization with combined hepatitis A and B versus hepatitis B alone for hepatitis B seroprotection in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Tung, Jennifer; Carlisle, Euan; Smieja, Marek; Kim, Peter T; Lee, Christine H

    2010-10-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend immunizing susceptible high-risk groups, such as hemodialysis patients, against hepatitis B virus. However, hemodialysis patients may not develop seroprotective antibodies despite receiving high doses of the vaccine. Recent reports indicate that combined vaccination against hepatitis B and hepatitis A viruses may improve the immunogenicity of hepatitis B vaccine in healthy individuals, but the effectiveness of this strategy in hemodialysis patients is unknown. Prospective randomized controlled trial. Hepatitis B virus-seronegative hemodialysis patients with undetectable antibody levels at baseline. Intramuscular administration of Twinrix (inactivated hepatitis A virus [720 ELISA units] and purified hepatitis B virus surface antigen [20 μg]; GlaxoSmithKline) and Engerix-B (purified hepatitis B virus surface antigen [20 μg]) at 0, 1, and 6 months plus Engerix-B, 40 μg, at month 2 (intervention arm) or Engerix-B, 40 μg, at 0, 1, 2, and 6 months (control arm). Both groups received a total dose of 160 μg of hepatitis B antigen. The primary outcome was the difference in seroprotection rates at 7 months, defined by antibody titers >10 mIU/mL. The secondary outcome was frequency of adverse events. Antibody response at months 3 and 7. 96 patients were enrolled, and 73 completed the investigation. At 3 months, there was no difference in the groups' seroprotection rates (25% vs 27%; P = 0.4). At the completion of the vaccination series, using per-protocol analysis, 27 of 40 (68%) and 16 of 33 (49%) had antibody titers >10 mIU/mL in the treatment and control groups, respectively (P = 0.05; RR, 1.4; absolute abatement, 19%). Intention-to-treat analysis showed 58% and 38% seroprotection rates in the treatment and control groups, respectively (P = 0.02; RR, 1.5; absolute abatement, 20%). There was no difference in adverse events. Lack of evidence of long-term protection. Vaccination of hemodialysis patients with a

  16. A Single Lineage of Hepatitis E Virus Causes both Outbreaks and Sporadic Hepatitis in Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Elduma, Adel Hussein; Zein, Mai Mohammed Adam; Karlsson, Marie; Elkhidir, Isam M.E.; Norder, Heléne

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have reported sporadic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections during non-outbreak periods in Africa. In this study, the prevalence of HEV infection in Sudan was investigated in 432 patients with acute hepatitis from 12 localities in North Kordofan, and from 152 patients involved in smaller outbreaks of hepatitis in the neighbouring Darfur. HEV infection was diagnosed in 147 (25%) patients: 98 from Kordofan and 49 from Darfur. The mortality was 10%; six of the patients who died from the infection were pregnant women. HEV RNA was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in 38 (26%) patients: 22 from Kordofan and 16 from Darfur. Partial open reading frame (ORF) 1 and ORF2 were sequenced from HEV from nine and three patients, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the Sudanese strains belonged to genotype 1 (HEV1), and confirmed the segregation of African HEV1 strains into one branch divergent from Asian HEV1. It also revealed that the Sudanese strains from this study and from an outbreak in 2004 formed a separate clade with a common ancestor, distinct from strains from the neighbouring Chad and Egypt. This HEV strain has thus spread in a large area of Sudan, where it has caused both sporadic hepatitis E and outbreaks from at least 2004 and onwards. These data demonstrate that hepatitis E is a constant, on-going public health problem in Sudan and that there is a need for hepatitis E surveillance, outbreak preparedness, and general improvements of the sanitation in these remote areas of the country. PMID:27782061

  17. Anti-hepatitis A seroprevalence among chronic viral hepatitis patients in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Fazlina; Hamzah, Nor Aizal Che; Mustaffa, Nazri; Gan, Siew Hua

    2011-09-28

    To determine the seroprevalence of anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibodies in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) and to justify the need for hepatitis A vaccination. Patients (n = 119) were enrolled between July and September 2009. The diagnosis of CLD was based on the presence of viral markers for more than 6 mo. The diagnosis of liver cirrhosis was based on clinical, biochemical and radiological profiles. Patient serum was tested for anti-HAV IgG. The overall anti-HAV seroprevalence was 88.2%. The aetiology of CLD was hepatitis B in 96 patients (80.7%) and hepatitis C in 23 patients (19.3%). Mean age was 44.4 ± 14 years. Patients were grouped according to age as follows: 24 (20.2%) patients in the 21-30 years age group, 22 (18.5%) in the 31-40 years age group, 31 (26.1%) in the 41-50 years age group, 23 (19.3%) in the 51-60 years age group and 19 (16.0%) patients aged greater than 60 years, with reported seroprevalences of 66.7%, 95.5%, 93.5%, 91.3% and 94.7%, respectively. There was a marked increase of seroprevalence in subjects older than 30 years (P = 0.001). Our study demonstrated that patients aged greater than 30 years of age were likely to have natural immunity to hepatitis A. Therefore, hepatitis A vaccination may not be routinely required in this age group.

  18. Hepatitis A and B vaccination and public health.

    PubMed

    Hollinger, F Blaine; Bell, B; Levy-Bruhl, D; Shouval, D; Wiersma, S; Van Damme, P

    2007-11-01

    The introduction and implementation of hepatitis B vaccination programmes in areas of high endemicity has been very stressful. However, this initial accomplishment has led to the reassessment of priorities in some countries which could undermine these early successes. Work still remains to be done to support and implement interventions that will bring us closer to the WHO goal and to the control of hepatitis B in the community at large. Hepatitis A vaccine strategy for immunizing toddlers is shifting to those countries with intermediate endemicity where increasing morbidity in adults is being observed. Accumulating evidence indicates that such programmes can result in impressive reductions in the incidence of hepatitis A by herd immunity. Monitoring of these populations to determine durability of protection will be important to avoid shifting the infection to the older age population, when symptoms are more likely to occur. National policies need to consider hepatitis A vaccination in the context of other public health priorities.

  19. Uveitis in autoimmune hepatitis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Romanelli, Roberto Giulio; Villa, Giorgio La; Almerigogna, Fabio; Vizzutti, Francesco; Pietro, Elena Di; Fedi, Valentina; Gentilini, Paolo; Laffi, Giacomo

    2006-01-01

    In this case report we describe for the first time an association between autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and uveitis, without any doubts about other possible etiologies, such as HCV, since all the old reports describe the association of AIH with iridocyclitis before tests for HCV-related hepatitis could be available. A 38-year-old businessman with abnormal liver function tests and hyperemia of the bulbar conjunctiva was admitted to the hospital. Six years before admission, the patient presented with persistent fever, arthralgias, conjunctival hyperemia, leukocytosis and increased ESR, referred to acute rheumatic fever. The presence of systemic diseases, most commonly associated with uveitis, was investigated without results and the patient was then treated with topical corticosteroids. His symptoms resolved. A test for anti-nuclear antibodies was positive, at a titre of 1:320, with a speckled and nucleolar staining pattern. Liver ultrasound showed mild hepatomegaly with an increased echostructure of the liver. Percutaneous liver biopsy was performed under ultrasound assistance. Histological examination showed necroinflammation over the portal, periportal and lobular areas, fibrotic portal tracts, with periportal fibrosis and occasional portal-to-portal bridgings, but intact hepatic architecture. Some hepatocytes showed barely discernible granules of hemosiderin in the lobular area. Bile ductules had not any significant morphological alterations. METAVIR score was A2-F3, according to the modified HAI grading/fibrosis staging. The patient was diagnosed to have AIH with mild activity and fibrosis and was discharged on 25 mg prednisone, entering clinical and biochemical remission, further confirming diagnosis. After discharge the patient continued to have treatment with corticosteroids as an outpatient at a dose of 5 mg. On January 2002 the patient was readmitted to the hospital. A test for anti-nuclear antibodies was positive, at a titre of 1:320, with a speckled and

  20. Acute viral hepatitis in Lebanon: evidence for a HAV-like non-A non-B hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Shamma'a, M H

    1984-02-01

    Ninety-three cases of acute viral hepatitis in adult Lebanese patients were followed-up prospectively for a period ranging from 6 to 18 months. These included 33 hepatitis A (HAV), 32 hepatitis B (HBV) and 21 non-A, non-B hepatitis (NANB) cases. The clinical and seroepidemiologic characteristics of the three types were evaluated. HAV was characterized by a short prodroma (less than 1 week) and a high IgM level. HBV did not differ from similar cases reported in the Western world except for a complete absence of male homosexuals and drug addicts as a possible route of transmission. NANB hepatitis in Lebanon is mainly a sporadic infection similar to HAV except that the prodromal phase is prolonged (greater than 14 days) and IgM levels are within normal limits. The failure to develop chronicity in NANB suggests that the virus of sporadic NANB may be different from that which causes post-transfusional (PTH) NANB.

  1. Hepatitis B surface antigen levels during natural history of chronic hepatitis B: a Chinese perspective study.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lin-Yan; Lian, Jiang-Shan; Chen, Jian-Yang; Jia, Hong-Yu; Zhang, Yi-Min; Xiang, Dai-Rong; Yu, Liang; Hu, Jian-Hua; Lu, Ying-Feng; Zheng, Lin; Li, Lan-Juan; Yang, Yi-Da

    2014-07-21

    To determine the baseline hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels during the different phases of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients in China. Six hundred and twenty-three hepatitis B virus or un-infected patients not receiving antiviral therapy were analyzed in a cross-sectional study. The CHB patients were classified into five phases: immune-tolerant (IT, n = 108), immune-clearance (IC, n = 161), hepatitis B e antigen negative hepatitis (ENH, n = 149), low-replicative (LR, n = 135), and liver cirrhosis (LC, n = 70). HBsAg was quantified (Abbott ARCHITECT assay) and correlated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA, and serum alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase (ALT/AST) in each phase of CHB was also determined. Median HBsAg titers were different in each phase of CHB (P < 0.001): IT (4.85 log10 IU/mL), IC (4.36 log10 IU/mL), ENH (2.95 log10 IU/mL), LR (3.18 log10 IU/mL) and LC (2.69 log10 IU/mL). HBsAg titers were highest in the IT phase and lowest in the LC phase. Serum HBsAg titers showed a strong correlation with HBV viral load in the IC phase (r = 0.683, P < 0.001). No correlation between serum HBsAg level and ALT/AST was observed. The mean baseline HBsAg levels differ significantly during the five phases of CHB, providing evidence on the natural history of HBV infection. HBsAg quantification may predict the effects of immune-modulator or oral nucleos(t)ide analogue therapy.

  2. Hepatic subcapsular haematoma in a premature newborn.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Cristina; Aguilar, Sara; Prior, Ana Rita; Oliveira, Graça

    2013-06-03

    Subcapsular haematoma of the liver rarely occurs in neonates and the diagnosis is often missed or delayed. It is a catastrophic condition that can be caused by maternal, placentar or fetal factors. A high index of suspicion is essential for early identification and stabilisation of babies with such a pathology. In a newborn with hypovolemic shock and abdominal distension, haemoperitoneum should be suspected and, along with exclusion of other aetiologies, supportive therapy should be instituted. The hepatic subcapsular haematoma has a non-specific presentation, and should be considered in very low birth weight infants with hypovolemic shock. Abdominal ultrasonography is the investigation of choice. It can delineate the lesion well, differentiate it from neoplasms, rule out rupture and aid in serial follow-up. We report a premature newborn who had this uncommon condition in the early neonatal period and survived without sequelae.

  3. Hepatitis A and B vaccination--the rate of uptake and course completion in patients with hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Fredericks, Trinity; Kwan, Kellie; Mak, Donna

    2010-10-01

    Western Australian general practitioners may order Department of Health funded hepatitis A and B vaccines for patients newly notified with hepatitis C to prevent complications associated with co-infections. The aim of this study was to determine vaccination uptake of hepatitis C patients through this program. We reviewed hepatitis C notifications and hepatitis A and B vaccine orders received in 2007 and 2008 to determine the rate of vaccine uptake and course completion. Vaccination orders for initial doses were received for 37% (448/1209) of patients. Vaccination uptake was positively associated with age and non- Aboriginality. Final vaccination doses were ordered for 30% of patients for whom an initial order had been received. Uptake of hepatitis A and B vaccination was higher than that of similar populations. However, vaccination course completion was low. General practitioners need to emphasise to their patients the importance of completing a vaccine course.

  4. Hepatic inflammatory pseudotumor: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Calomeni, Guilherme D.; Ataíde, Elaine B.; Machado, Ricardo R.; Escanhoela, Cecília A.F.; Costa, Larissa B.E.; Boin, Ilka F.F.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is a rare lesion consisted of inflammatory and myofibroblastic cells. These lesions may be found in different organs. There are less than 300 described cases. PRESENTATION OF CASE Case 1. 64-year-old cirrhotic male with a palpable epigastric mass. CT showed a lesion in liver segments 2 and 3 and left hepatic artery aneurism. Percutaneous embolization and wide spectrum antibiotics were tried, however the lesion grew. Left lateral hepatectomy was performed, and HIPT diagnosed. The patient died due to multiple organ dysfunction. Case 2. 30-year-old male with abdominal pain and fever. CT showed a hepatic hilar lesion. Surgical resection was performed after an ineffectual antibiotic trial, and HIPT was confirmed. The patient is doing well. Case 3. 73-year-old female with abdominal pain and fever. CT showed a 7 cm lesion in the left liver lobe. Unrewarding cancerous screening was performed, and unsuccessful antibiotic course was tried. Resection was performed, and HIPT diagnosed. The patient is doing well. Case 4. 50-year-old cirrhotic male with abdominal pain. CT showed a segment 6 lesion and portal vein thrombosis. Considering cancer as the first hypothesis and the MELD score of 9, segmentectomy was performed. HIPT was the final diagnosis. The patient died due to abdominal sepsis. DISCUSSION HIPT is a lesion with a vast list of differential diagnosis. Antibiotics are the first line of therapy, although surgery is often necessary. Overall prognosis is good, although comorbidities may worsen it. CONCLUSION HIPT is a rare and misleading entity. PMID:23399515

  5.  Acute hepatitis E mimicking a flare of disease in a patient with chronic autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Calisti, Giorgio; Irish, Dianne N; Ijaz, Samreen; Tedder, Richard S; Moore, Kevin

     Acute hepatitis E is becoming increasingly recognised in Europe with up to 40% of the population in Southern France being exposed to the virus, which is harboured in pigs. Patients with known liver disease may present with acute hepatitis E and present a diagnostic challenge. For example patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) who are immunosuppressed and contract hepatitis E may be at increased risk of developing chronicity due to concurrent immunosuppression. Importantly, the diagnosis may be missed with the infection misdiagnosed as an autoimmune flare, and immunosuppression increased by the attending physician, thus enhancing the risk of chronicity of infection leading to progressive liver injury in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of acute hepatitis E in a patient with AIH and discuss the features that helped us differentiating it from an autoimmune flare.

  6. Hepatitis A virus infections in Voyvodina.

    PubMed Central

    Vuković, B. S.; Rončević, N.; Borota, R.; Terzin, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    Sera of 1000 persons in Voyvodina were tested with radioimmunoassay for antibodies against hepatitis A virus (HAV). The morbidity and age incidence of positive findings have been analysed and compared with relevant findings in other countries. Below the age of 19 years the morbidity rates are higher (0.138 to 0.595 per mill) and the prevalences of seropositives are lower (17.1-64.0%) than the respective frequencies above that age (0.011 to 0.052 per mill and 85.7-98.7% respectively). Below the first year of life seropositivity is more frequent than in 1- to 14-year old children. After the first year until the age of 30-39 years the frequency of seropositives increases with increasing age up to a maximum of about 90%. PMID:6257777

  7. Overcoming barriers to hepatitis B immunisation by a dedicated hepatitis B immunisation service

    PubMed Central

    Larcher, V; Bourne, J; Aitken, C; Jeffries, D; Hodes, D; SLOAN, D.; RAMSAY, M.; GOLDBERG, D.; BRAMLEY, C.

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To determine the effectiveness of a selective hospital based hepatitis B immunisation programme and the barriers to be overcome in obtaining a successful outcome.
METHODS—Retrospective case note review of 265 infants born over a five year period to hepatitis B carrier mothers at a university affiliated hospital in Hackney, London.
RESULTS—A total of 242 infants (91%) were fully vaccinated; 217 (82%) had serology; 31 required booster doses. Percentages failing to reach second, third vaccinations, and serology on schedule rose exponentially (7%, 18%, 33% respectively). Mobility was high (25%) and significantly affected outcome. A total of 95% Hackney resident babies were fully vaccinated compared with 78% non-residents. Uptake of routine immunisations was higher in Hackney residents than non-residents and greater in those who were eligible for hepatitis B vaccine. Name changes occurred in 35%. Translation requirements were high (85% for Turkish, Vietnamese, and Asian families). Requirements for specific postnatal counselling of mothers and hepatology referral fell significantly during the course of the study. Only seven of 22 babies born in 1995 in Tower Hamlets compared with 53 of 58 Hackney babies received a full vaccination course in non-hospital based primary care.
CONCLUSION—In inner city areas with high prevalence of hepatitis B carriage, mobility, and diverse ethnicity, a dedicated centralised immunisation service can be highly effective, provided that adequate support services (translation, counselling, and parental referral) are available.
 PMID:11159283

  8. Breastmilk hepatitis A virus RNA in nursing mothers with acute hepatitis A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Daudi, Nili; Shouval, Daniel; Stein-Zamir, Chen; Ackerman, Zvi

    2012-08-01

    Breastmilk specimens from three women with acute hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection were studied. Anti-HAV immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies were detected in serum and breastmilk specimens of the three women. The three women also had serum HAV RNA. However, HAV RNA was detected only in two of the three breastmilk specimens. It is interesting that none of the three infants contracted clinical HAV infection. Furthermore, mothers with HAV infection should not be encouraged to discontinue breastfeeding.

  9. A case of primary hepatic Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Hyung Joon; Mun, Jang Sik; Oh, Hyoung-Chul; Lee, Hyun Woong; Choi, Chang Hwan; Kim, Jeong Wook; Do, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Jae Gyu; Chang, Sae Kyung; Kim, Mi Kyung

    2008-04-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma is a rare disease that belongs to the aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Herein, we report a case of primary hepatic Burkitt's lymphoma. A 19-year-old man visited the hospital for right upper quadrant pain. He felt fatigue for two months. Physical examination revealed hepatomegaly and no palpable lymph node. He had no fever, weight loss, or night sweating. Laboratory finding showed mild anemia (hemoglobin, 12.4 g/dL), mild elevated transaminase (ALT, 52 IU/L), elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, 437 IU/L), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP, 129 IU/L). The viral marker was positive for HBsAg, HBeAg, anti-HBs, and anti-HBc (IgG), and negative for anti-HBe, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV. CEA, AFP, and CA19-9 levels were within normal ranges. The HBV DNA quantitation was 1.3 x 10(9) copies/ml. Abdominal-Pelvis CT scan and abdominal MRI finding were compatible with malignant lymphoma. Liver biopsy examination confirmed Burkitt's lymphoma. No metastasis was detected in the thoracic cavity, bone marrow, and spinal fluid. The patient was treated with the combination regimen of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone and high dose methotrexate. Cytosine arabinoside and methotrexate were added for CNS prophylaxis by intrathecal installation. Chemotherapy was administered every 3 weeks for fifteen cycles. Serial follow-up CT scan showed a marked decrease in the size of hepatic lesions. Follow-up CT scan and PET-CT scan were performed 4 weeks after the final cycle disclosed no definite residual or active lesion confirming the state of complete remission.

  10. Chronic hepatitis without hepatic steatosis caused by citrin deficiency in a child.

    PubMed

    Inui, Ayano; Hashimoto, Takuji; Sogo, Tsuyoshi; Komatsu, Haruki; Saheki, Takeyori; Fujisawa, Tomoo

    2016-04-01

    Citrin deficiency manifests as both neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis (NICCD) during early infancy and adult-onset type II citrullinemia during adulthood. Hepatic steatosis is most frequently observed in patients with citrin deficiency. Thus, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease that is unrelated to being overweight is considered one of the clinical features of citrin deficiency in children and adults. However, it remains unknown whether citrin deficiency is a cause of chronic hepatitis in the absence of fatty changes to the liver that occur during childhood. We encountered an 8-year-old girl who showed no clinical features of NICCD during infancy and had persistently elevated transaminase levels for several years. Liver biopsy showed widening of the portal tracts with intense mononuclear cell infiltration and mild fibrosis but no fatty changes. However, she had peculiar dietary habits similar to those that have been observed in many patients with citrin deficiency. In addition, a slightly elevated plasma citrulline level and a high pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor level were detected by blood examination, and she was diagnosed with citrin deficiency. Analysis of the SLC25A13 gene revealed the presence of the compound heterozygous mutations 851del4 and IVS13 + 1G > A. Thus, citrin deficiency should be included in the differential diagnosis of chronic hepatitis in children, even in the absence of hepatic steatosis. © 2015 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  11. Epidemiological evidence for vaccinating wastewater treatment plant workers against hepatitis A and hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Arvanitidou, Malamatenia; Mamassi, Panagiota; Vayona, Argiri

    2004-01-01

    Exposed to sewage workers of a wastewater treatment plant and a control group in Thessaloniki, Greece, were examined for antibodies against hepatitis A (anti-HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection markers. The main objective of this study was to investigate for epidemiological evidence so as to recommend vaccination of the occupationally exposed workers against these viral infections. Antibodies against hepatitis A virus were detected in 65.7% of the wastewater treatment plant workers and in 32.6% of the control group. The prevalence of anti-HAV was significantly higher in less educated persons and was increasing with age (p < 0.001), whereas in logistic regression analysis the adjusted seroprevalence of wastewater treatment plant workers was 3.5 times higher (p < 0.01) than the control population. Serologic evidence of past HBV infection was observed in 32.4% of the exposed to sewage population and in 5.8% of the controls. Multivariate analysis showed that variables significantly and independently related to previous HBV infection was occupational exposure to sewage (OR: 5.81; 95% CI: 2.07-16.29) and age over 40 years old (OR: 4.49; 95% CI: 1.51-13.33). These results support the vaccination policy of young and sensitive to hepatitis A and B virus wastewater treatment plant workers in our region.

  12. Initial report of a hepatitis investigation in rural Belize.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, K J; Gaydos, J C; Krieg, R E; Duncan, J F; MacArthy, P O; Ticehurst, J R; Jaramillo, R; Reyes, L G; Sjogren, M H; Legters, L J

    1993-01-01

    In spring 1991, Belizian health officials expressed concern about a possible hepatitis outbreak in a banana farming district. A study was designed to identify cases and to address the serological prevalence of hepatitis virus markers. Three populations were studied: (i) persons meeting a clinical case definition for hepatitis; (ii) designated banana workers; and (iii) people in a random sample of households in the community. Information was collected using questionnaires and sera were collected for laboratory testing. This report presents the preliminary results of a study conducted in June 1991. Among people who met the clinical case definition, 24% of 42 tested had immunoglobulin M antibody to hepatitis B virus (HBV) core antigen (anti-HBc IgM). In the worker and household survey populations, 284 and 280 people, respectively, were tested for anti-HBc IgM. In each group, 4% were positive. HBV surface antigen was found in 37% of 43 clinical cases, 18% of workers, and 13% of people in the household survey. Among the 3 study populations, the prevalence of HBV core antibody (anti-HBc) ranged from 73% to 81%. Almost all tested persons had evidence of prior hepatitis A virus infection. Evidence of prior infection with hepatitis viruses A and B was widespread, but an aetiology could not be established for most of the clinical cases. However, the prevalence of hepatitis B markers in this population was very high compared to other reports from the Caribbean.

  13. Southern Tunisia: A still high endemicity area for hepatitis A.

    PubMed

    Neffatti, Houcine; Lebraud, Patricia; Hottelet, Corinne; Gharbi, Jawher; Challouf, Taieb; Roque-Afonso, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis A (HAV) and E (HEV) viruses are responsible for enterically transmitted hepatitis. Tunisia is reported to be of intermediate endemicity for HAV and of low seroprevalence for HEV; however, data from rural areas of South Tunisia are lacking. Sera from 216 asymptomatic pregnant women and from 92 patients with acute hepatitis were collected between October 2014 and November 2015. Total and IgM anti-HAV immunoglobulins and anti-HEV IgG and IgM were investigated. Anti-HAV IgM-positive samples were subjected to RT-PCR targeting the VP1/2A region and sequenced. HEV IgM positive samples and all samples from acute hepatitis patients were assessed for HEV RNA. Among pregnant women (mean age 32+/-8), HAV seroprevalence was 98.6%, none presented anti-HAV IgM; HEV seroprevalence was 5.1% and three presented weakly reactive anti-HEV IgM without detectable RNA. Among acute hepatitis patients (mean age 18.5 +/- 14), HEV seroprevalence was 19,5%, none presented anti-HEV IgM, nor HEV RNA. HAV seroprevalence exceeded 90% by age 5 and acute HAV infection was detected in 20 patients (21,7%), younger than patients with other hepatitis causes (9,8 years vs. 20,4 years, p = 0,004); 65% were male. Most acute HAV infections were observed in a coastal area where HAV infections represented 52% of hepatitis etiology. Phylogenetic analysis identified genotype IA strains, clustering close to previously published Tunisian sequences. The present study confirmed a low HEV endemicity and evidenced a still high level of HAV circulation in Southern Tunisia, suggesting distinct dissemination patterns for these viruses.

  14. A critical review of the Couinaud technique of hepatic resection.

    PubMed

    Thompson, E C; Grier, J F; Gholson, C F; McDonald, J C

    1995-05-01

    The Couinaud technique of left hepatic lobectomy involves the isolation and division of portal vein, hepatic artery, and biliary tributaries as a unit within the liver parenchyma. It saves time and minimizes blood loss by virtue of the common investment of the portal structures in a thick connective tissue sheath. Right hepatic lobectomy can be performed in a similar manner based on the same assumption that the biliary and vascular tributaries maintain a constant anatomic relationship with one another. We describe a patient who underwent right hepatic lobectomy by the Couinaud technique who (in retrospect) had congenital absence of a left hepatic duct. Because small bile ducts from the left lobe drained into the right hepatic duct deep to the sight of resection, obstructive jaundice resulted postoperatively, necessitating orthotopic liver transplantation. Presently, the patient is doing well 1 year after transplantation. When the Couinaud technique is used in the setting of a biliary anatomic variant, the results can be disastrous. This case illustrates that the Couinaud technique is unsafe unless biliary anatomic variants are excluded prior to hepatic lobectomy.

  15. [Acute myelitis related to hepatitis A after travel to Senegal].

    PubMed

    Ficko, C; Imbert, P; Mechaï, F; Barruet, R; Nicand, E; Rapp, C

    2010-02-01

    Neurological complications are rare following hepatitis A. Acute myelitis is even more uncommon. The purpose of this report is to describe a case of acute myelitis related to hepatitis A virus (HAV) in a 43-year-old-woman returning from Senegal. Diagnosis of myelitis was confirmed by spinal MRI and detection of anti-HAV Ig M antibodies in serum. The patient made a spontaneous clinical recovery in one month. Spinal MRI findings were normal at three months. Hepatitis A should be considered in the diagnostic approach to acute myelitis in returning travelers and patients living in highly endemic countries where prophylactic vaccination is unavailable.

  16. [Hepatitis A seroprevalence in HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Rey, D; Frick-Michot, E; Partisani, M; Hess-Kempf, G; Cheneau, C; Priester, M; Bernard-Henry, C; de Mautort, E; Wendling, M J; Meyer, P; Lang, J M

    2005-01-01

    The authors had for aim to prospectively study the hepatitis A seroprevalence of an HIV-infected population, followed-up in an outpatient clinic (CISIH Strasbourg). Blood tests were performed on all patients from September 2003 to March 2004 to screen for hepatitis A (total antibodies with Elisa). The overall seroprevalence was 219/514 (56.6%), similar in male and female patients. It increased with age, especially in European patients (P = 0.003). The seroprevalence was lower in European subjects: 46.3% (while it reached 100% in sub-Saharan Africans), the prevalence was similar whatever the HIV risk group (46% in homosexual as well as in heterosexual patients, 44% in intravenous drug users). Hepatitis B or C co-infection did not increase the seroprevalence of hepatitis A. The hepatitis A seroprevalence was similar in various CD4 T cell count categories. Our results stress the utility of hepatitis A serology in HIV-infected patients (more than 50% of European patients are non immune), and the importance of assessing hepatitis A vaccination.

  17. Acute seronegative hepatitis C manifesting itself as adult giant cell hepatitis--a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kryczka, Wiesław; Walewska-Zielecka, Bozena; Dutkiewicz, Ewa

    2003-08-01

    Adult giant cell hepatitis (AGCH) is a rare event and only about 100 cases have been reported within the last 20 years. The AGCH has been observed in association with viral infection, drug reactions or autoimmune disorders but in many cases its etiology remains unclear. AGCH manifests clinically as severe form of hepatitis histologically characterized by diffuse giant cell transformation of hepatocytes. We report the case of a 39-yr-old man with acute community-acquired hepatitis without previous pathology of the liver. Laboratory data revealed slight hypergammaglobulinemia and high titer of anti-smooth-muscle antibody with negative serology of hepatotropic viruses and absence of other known causes of hepatitis. Preliminary diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis was established, additionally confirmed by excellent clinical and biochemical improvement during corticosteroid treatment. A liver biopsy showed the typical findings of panlobular syncytial giant cell hepatitis and positive HCV-RNA both in serum and liver. The above verified the diagnosis of acute type C hepatitis manifested histologically as adult giant cell hepatitis. After three months of treatment we withdrew corticosteroids as spontaneous clearance of HCV occurred and the lack of autoantibodies in serum as well as significant improvement of liver histology was ascertained. Within 30 months of the follow-up we have not observed biochemical and immunological abnormalities and control liver biopsy has shown no signs of hepatitis.

  18. Post-transfusion hepatitis: impact of non-A, non-B hepatitis surrogate tests. Canadian Post-Transfusion Hepatitis Prevention Study Group.

    PubMed

    Blajchman, M A; Bull, S B; Feinman, S V

    1995-01-07

    Canada has not introduced the non-A, non-B (NANB) surrogate marker tests (antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen and alanine aminotransferase) to screen donated blood. We evaluated the effect of NANB surrogate markers in reducing post-transfusion hepatitis in a prospective randomised intervention study. From 1988 to 1992, 4588 subjects were enrolled into two study groups that received allogeneic blood from which units positive for NANB surrogate markers were either withheld (n = 2311) or not withheld (n = 2277). We also assessed a simultaneous non-randomised cohort (n = 650) of subjects who received only syngeneic blood. All subjects were followed up for 6 months and assessed for the presence of post-transfusion hepatitis due to hepatitis A, B, C, non ABC, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV). Withholding of blood containing NANB surrogate positive units reduced the overall post-transfusion hepatitis rate by 40% (p = 0.065) and the hepatitis C rate by 70% (p = 0.05). Most of the benefit of NANB surrogate testing was due to reduced frequency of hepatitis C virus after transfusion before all donor blood was screened for anti-HCV. During this time the overall post-transfusion hepatitis rate per 1000 transfusion recipients was 20.2 in the no-withhold group compared with 5.0 in the withhold group (p = 0.05), and the HCV hepatitis rate was 12.6 and 0 respectively (p = 0.06). After the introduction of HCV screening, the overall post-transfusion hepatitis rates were 8.6 and 6.8 per 1000 (p = 0.55) respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Efficiency of the incorporation of the hepatitis A vaccine as a combined A+B vaccine to the hepatitis B vaccination programme of preadolescents in schools.

    PubMed

    Navas, E; Salleras, L; Gisbert, R; Dominguez, A; Bruguera, M; Rodríguez, G; Galí, N; Prat, A

    2005-03-18

    In 1998, the Department of Health of Catalonia (Spain) began universal vaccination of preadolescents against hepatitis A by replacing the simple hepatitis B vaccine with a combined hepatitis A+B vaccine. Economic analyses were made of the two alternative strategies: to continue with the simple hepatitis B vaccination or to replace the simple vaccine with a combined hepatitis A+B vaccine. The analysis was made from the societal perspective and the time horizon considered was 25 years. In the base case, (estimated annual hepatitis A incidence of 15 per 100,000 and incremental price of the hepatitis A+B vaccine over the simple hepatitis B vaccine of 1.98) the net present value of the programme was positive (+533,708) and the benefit-cost ratio was 2.58. If the estimated disease incidence were reduced by half, the programme would still be efficient.

  20. Thrombopoietin is a growth factor for rat hepatic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Eva; Deiwick, Andrea; Bruns, Helge; Fiegel, Henning C; Bader, Augustinus

    2008-03-01

    The liver is the primary site of hematopoiesis during fetal development; it has been shown that thrombopoietin (TPO) produced by the liver during fetal development is a major regulator of megakaryocytopoiesis. As maximum liver growth and hematopoiesis occur simultaneously, we hypothesized that TPO may act as a growth factor for hepatic progenitors. Therefore, the influence of TPO on the proliferation of fetal hepatic progenitors in vitro compared with that of adult hepatocytes was analyzed. The expression of the TPO receptor, c-mpl, was investigated in fetal and adult liver. Cell proliferation was measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and total cell counts. TPO and c-mpl gene expression was investigated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The cell surface expression of c-mpl was analyzed in fetal and adult human liver by immunohistochemistry. Hepatic progenitors of fetal and adult liver but not hepatocytes expressed the TPO receptor, c-mpl, on the cell surface. Fetal hepatic progenitors expressed mRNA for TPO and its receptor. TPO stimulated cell proliferation and increased cell numbers of cultured rat fetal hepatic progenitors but not adult hepatocytes. We conclude that TPO acts in addition to its known role in megakaryocytopoiesis as a growth factor for hepatic progenitors but not hepatocytes in vitro; thus, TPO represents a growth factor for hepatic progenitors during fetal liver development.

  1. Prevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C infection in Libya: results from a national population based survey.

    PubMed

    Daw, Mohamed A; El-Bouzedi, Abdallah

    2014-01-09

    Libya is one of the largest countries in Africa and has the longest coast in the Mediterranean basin facing southern Europe. High rates of prevalence of viral hepatitis have been observed in various regions in Africa, but the prevalence in Libya is not well documented. We report on a large-scale nationwide study that evaluated the epidemiology of hepatitis B and hepatitis C in Libya and assessed the risk factors involved. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 2008 on 65,761 individuals all over Libya. The country was divided into 12 regions according to the population density and sampling within each region was carried out under the supervision of the National Centre for Prevention of Infectious Diseases. Serum samples were collected from both males and females of all ages in both urban and rural areas and tested for HBsAg for hepatitis B and anti-HCV antibody for hepatitis C. Prevalence rates were determined in regions and in different groups and correlated with different demographic and risk factors involved in the spread of these viruses. The prevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses varied regionally across the country. The overall prevalence of hepatitis B was 2.2% (95% CI 2.1%-2.3%) and was higher among males than females (1.4:1.0). Hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence was 1.2% (95% CI 1.1-1.3) and it increased gradually after the age of 30 years (0.7-0.9% for < 30 years; 3.6% for ≥ 60 years). Prevalence of HBsAg was 0.8-0.9% below the age of 10 years, and higher but similar in older age groups (2.3-2.7%). There was an association between literacy and prevalence of hepatitis, particularly for HCV. Hospital admission, surgical operation, blood transfusion, and intravenous drug use were the main risk factors, and they were associated independently with a higher prevalence rate of viral hepatitis. Libya may be considered an area of low-intermediate endemicity for hepatitis B virus infection, with lower rates in young age groups, and an area of low

  2. Prevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C infection in Libya: results from a national population based survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Libya is one of the largest countries in Africa and has the longest coast in the Mediterranean basin facing southern Europe. High rates of prevalence of viral hepatitis have been observed in various regions in Africa, but the prevalence in Libya is not well documented. We report on a large-scale nationwide study that evaluated the epidemiology of hepatitis B and hepatitis C in Libya and assessed the risk factors involved. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in 2008 on 65,761 individuals all over Libya. The country was divided into 12 regions according to the population density and sampling within each region was carried out under the supervision of the National Centre for Prevention of Infectious Diseases. Serum samples were collected from both males and females of all ages in both urban and rural areas and tested for HBsAg for hepatitis B and anti-HCV antibody for hepatitis C. Prevalence rates were determined in regions and in different groups and correlated with different demographic and risk factors involved in the spread of these viruses. Results The prevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses varied regionally across the country. The overall prevalence of hepatitis B was 2.2% (95% CI 2.1%-2.3%) and was higher among males than females (1.4:1.0). Hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence was 1.2% (95% CI 1.1-1.3) and it increased gradually after the age of 30 years (0.7-0.9% for < 30 years; 3.6% for ≥ 60 years). Prevalence of HBsAg was 0.8-0.9% below the age of 10 years, and higher but similar in older age groups (2.3-2.7%). There was an association between literacy and prevalence of hepatitis, particularly for HCV. Hospital admission, surgical operation, blood transfusion, and intravenous drug use were the main risk factors, and they were associated independently with a higher prevalence rate of viral hepatitis. Conclusions Libya may be considered an area of low-intermediate endemicity for hepatitis B virus infection, with lower

  3. Secondary Syphilis With Hepatitis and Nephrotic Syndrome: A Rare Concurrence

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Jasbir; Bajantri, Bharat; Nayudu, Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis, a chronic multisystem disease, is caused by a spirochete, Treponema pallidum. Clinical presentation may expand to several stages including primary, secondary and latent syphilis, which may present as early or late syphilis. Nephrotic syndrome and acute hepatitis are well-known complications of secondary syphilis. To the best of our knowledge, secondary syphilis with coexisting renal and hepatic complications has rarely been reported. Here we present a rare case of concurrent nephrotic syndrome and acute hepatitis in a patient with secondary syphilis. PMID:27298666

  4. Adverse events after hepatitis A B combination vaccine.

    PubMed

    Woo, Emily Jane; Miller, Nancy B; Ball, Robert

    2006-03-24

    In May 2001, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Hepatitis A Inactivated and Hepatitis B Recombinant Vaccine (HEPAB) for immunization of adults. From May 2001 to September 2003, the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) received 305 reports of adverse events after HEPAB. Many events were similar to those reported after the monovalent hepatitis A and B vaccines. Non-serious events included constitutional symptoms and local reactions. Serious events included neurologic, hepatobiliary, and dermatologic conditions, and detailed medical and epidemiological review did not suggest a clear pattern of evidence supporting a causal relationship with the vaccine, except for injection site reactions and some allergic reactions.

  5. A Dog Model for Acetaminophen-Induced Fulminant Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    FRANCAVILLA, A.; MAKOWKA, L.; POLIMENO, L.; BARONE, M.; DEMETRIS, J.; PRELICH, J.; Van THIEL, D. H.; STARZL, T. E.

    2010-01-01

    The development of a large animal model of fulminant hepatic failure produced with acetaminophen that should be useful in the development and evaluation of potential medical therapies for the important clinical problem of fulminant hepatic failure is described. Acetaminophen in dimethyl sulfoxide (600 mg/ml) given as three subcutaneous injections, with the first dose (750 mg/kg body wt) being given at noon, the second dose (200 mg/kg body wt) being given 9 h later, and the third dose (200 mg/kg body wt) being given 24 h after the initial dose consistently produces fulminant hepatic failure in dogs. The dimethyl sulfoxide vehicle, injected intramuscularly, does not influence either animal survival or hepatic function in control-treated dogs. No deaths occur within the first 36 h. By 72 h after initial drug administration, the mortality is 90%. Histopathological and biochemical investigations demonstrate a high degree of hepatocellular necrosis in nonsurviving animals without appreciable damage to the kidneys, lungs, or heart. The drug schedule and preparation outlined avoids the administration of large volumes of vehicle and results in prolonged high levels of acetaminophen in the blood sufficient to induce severe hepatic injury. Ranitidine (120 mg/kg body wt i.m.) given 30 min before each acetaminophen dose significantly reduces the mortality and hepatic necrosis produced using this model. This model satisfies all criteria established by Miller et al. for the production of a suitable large animal model of fulminant acute hepatic failure. PMID:2910762

  6. Vaccination Against Hepatitis A for Hemophilic Patients: Is It Necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Jamal; Ziaee, Masood; Farsad, Seyed Ali; Fereydooni, Mohammad; Anani Sarab, Gholamreza; Rezvani Khorashad, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemophilic patients require long-life intravenous infusion of factor concentrates to treat bleedings. This could increase the risk of transmission of blood-borne infections like hepatitis C. Objectives The current study was aimed at investigating the immunity status against hepatitis A in hemophilic patients in south Khorasan and evaluating the necessity of hepatitis A vaccination for this population. Patients and Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted between 2014 and 2015 on all hemophilic patients of south Khorasan province, Iran (n = 108) for anti-HAV total, anti- HCV, HBs-Ag, anti-HIV, and anti-HTLV-I /II. Note that no one had already received a hepatitis A vaccine. Results As our results show, 77.8% of the participants (59% under 20 and 88.4% above 20 years old) were seropositive for anti-HAV total; 20.4% and 2.8% (three patients) of the cases were anti-HCV positive and anti-HTLV-1 positive, respectively, while none of the subjects were HBS-Ag or HIV-Ab positive. Seventeen of the patients (15.75%) showed a co-infection of HAV with HCV, and five HCV-infected patients (22.73%) had no immunity against hepatitis A. There was a significant relationship between age, rural life, and anti-HAV positive state in our patients (P < 0.001). No significant relationship between positive anti-HAV status and sex (P = 0.16), severity of hemophilia (P = 0.23), and infection with HIV, HCV, HTLV-1, and hepatitis B (P > 0.05) was detected. Conclusions More than 40% of the hemophilic patients under 20 years of age in the present study had no immunity against hepatitis A, and 23% of hepatitis C patients had not had a hepatitis A co-infection yet. Since hepatitis A can show a fulminant course in hepatitis C patients, vaccination against hepatitis A seems necessary in hemophilic patients in the region. PMID:27257430

  7. Epidemiology of hepatitis A and E virus infection in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carrilho, F J; Mendes Clemente, C; Silva, L C da

    2005-03-01

    This review has the objective to discuss the epidemiological aspects of the enterically transmitted hepatitis A and E in Brazil. The prevalence of hepatitis A varies greatly in different Brazilian regions, from 56% in South and Southeast to 93% in North region (Manaus, Amazon). Such differences are also found in different socioeconomic levels among age groups. A significantly higher prevalence was seen in the low socioeconomic group between 1-30 years. This difference is most striking in the first 10 years of age (23.5% vs 60.0%, high/middle vs low, respectively). Despite the improvements in sanitary conditions, hepatitis A is still endemic and outbreaks may occur. As an increasing proportion of the population is becoming susceptible to hepatitis A virus infection and as adult individuals may present more severe forms of the disease, the authors conclude that the implement of hepatitis A vaccination should be considered. Some Brazilian data have shown that the genotype found in our country were IA and IB. Isolates from this study were closely related genetically (or even identical) to isolates originating in other South American countries and overseas, providing firm evidence for epidemiological links between persons who travel to endemic areas. In spite of favorable environmental conditions, outbreaks of hepatitis E have never been reported in Brazil. Nevertheless, reports have demonstrated the evidence of anti-hepatitis E virus antibodies in some Brazilian regions. The seroprevalence of IgG anti-hepatitis E virus among normal populations shows positivities of 6.1% in gold-miners, 3.3% in general population, 2.0-7.5% in blood donors, 1.0% in pregnant women, and 4.5% in children, with no differences among regions. In populations at risk the prevalence of anti-hepatits E virus varies greatly. Among patients with acute non-A, non-B, non-C hepatitis 2.1% was detected in the Southeast to 29% in the Northeast, in 10.6% of acute non-A, non-B, non-C hepatitis relatives in

  8. A noninvasive diagnostic model to assess nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Hongjie; Cai, Shaohang; Liu, Ying; Xia, Muye; Peng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to develop a noninvasive diagnostic test for nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) by using routinely available clinical markers. Methods: A retrospective study of patients with CHB, with or without hepatic steatosis (fatty change) who were diagnosed with controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) measured by transient elastography were included. Patient information was analyzed on lifestyle; laboratory tests, including serum lipid levels; blood pressure; blood uric acid; and medical history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Results: A total of 1312 patients were included in the study; 618 patients had confirmed hepatic steatosis. The CAP levels were significantly correlated with patient height (p < 0.001), weight (p < 0.001), waistline measurement (p < 0.001), hipline measurement (p < 0.001), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (p < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis resulted in the development of an equation for the diagnostic of simple steatosis: the fatty liver (FL) test. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve of the FL test was 0.79 (p < 0.001) in the training group and 0.82 in the validation group. When the FL test was >−0.425, the sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (LR) and negative LR were 74.72%, 72.12%, 2.68, and 0.35 respectively. The average FL test result was −0.54 ± 1.26 in patients with CHB without hypertension, and 0.42 ± 1.35, 1.12 ± 1.65, and 1.98 ± 1.22 in patients with hypertension grade 1, 2, and 3, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusion: This study has demonstrated a noninvasive test for hepatic steatosis in patients with CHB. PMID:28203279

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY THE MERGING PATHOGEN HEPATITIS E IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Like the hepatitis A virus, it is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and can cause short-term, acute hepatitis. In addition, hepatitis E has been found to cause a signific...

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY THE EMERGING PATHOGEN HEPATITIS E IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Like the hepatitis A virus, it is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and can cause short-term, acute hepatitis. In addition, hepatitis E has been found to cause a signific...

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY THE MERGING PATHOGEN HEPATITIS E IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Like the hepatitis A virus, it is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and can cause short-term, acute hepatitis. In addition, hepatitis E has been found to cause a signific...

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY THE EMERGING PATHOGEN HEPATITIS E IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Like the hepatitis A virus, it is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and can cause short-term, acute hepatitis. In addition, hepatitis E has been found to cause a signific...

  13. Treatment of Hepatitis C Infections with Interferon: A Historical Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    hepatic cirrhosis and hepatocellular transformation [24]. The resistance of HCV to IFN resides in a nonstructural viral protein NS3/4A, a serine protease...and inactivated influenza virus system [1]. The inactivated virus induced a protein that had a broad spectrum of antiviral activity, which...leukemia viruses [9] prompted addi- tional studies employing interferon as therapy for human chronic hepatitis B virus ( HBV ) infections. These had very

  14. Coxsackie A10 Virus Infection Among Infectious Hepatitis Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Embil, J. A.; Van Rooyen, C. E.; Nagler, F. P.

    1965-01-01

    During an outbreak of infectious hepatitis at a housing development, Coxsackie A10 virus was recovered from the stools of 45 different contacts and from the blood of four others. Caution should be exercised in attributing an etiological role to any given isolate of a Group A Coxsackie virus in view of the widespread distribution of these organisms. Nevertheless, the recovery of Coxsackie A10 viruses from the blood and stools of contacts with hepatitis cases appears to warrant record. PMID:5829398

  15. Effectiveness of a mass hepatitis A vaccination program in preadolescents.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Angela; Salleras, Lluís; Carmona, Glòria; Batalla, Juan

    2003-01-30

    A program of mass hepatitis A+B vaccination in preadolescents in schools was begun in the Catalonia in the last quarter of 1998. This study investigated the impact of the program by comparing the incidence of hepatitis A in vaccinated and unvaccinated cohort. The greatest reduction of the incidence rate of hepatitis A was observed in the 10-14 years age group, from 10.3 per 100000 persons-year in the period 1996-1998 to 1.8 per 100000 persons-year in the period 1999-2001. The global incidence decreased from 6.2 to 2.6 per 100000 persons-year. After analysis of cases occurring in the vaccinated and non vaccinated cohort, the effectiveness of the vaccination program was estimated at 97.0% (95% CI: 78.6-99.6).

  16. Inorganic Nanoparticle as a Carrier for Hepatitis B Viral Capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekhtyar, Yu.; Romanova, M.; Kachanovska, A.; Skrastiņa, D.; Reinhofa, R.; Pumpens, P.; Patmalnieks, A.

    Virus like particles (VLP) are used to transport immune response-modulating agents to target cells to treat them. In order to deliver a high concentration of VLP to the cell, a number of VLP can be attached to a nanoparticle to be used as a nanolorry. In this study, SiO2 nanoparticles were attached to Hepatitis B VLP. Spectrophotometry measurements, electron, and fluorescent microscopy evidence showed that the SiO2 - Hepatitis B VLP complexes were formed.

  17. An Hepatic Abscess in a Patient With Sickle Cell Anemia.

    PubMed

    Marolf, Marissa D; Chaudhary, Manu; Kaplan, Sheldon L

    2016-11-01

    We present a case of hepatic abscess in a transfusion-dependent 16-year-old patient with sickle cell disease. There have been 10 such cases in sickle cell disease patients reported, with the last report published greater than a decade ago. The diagnosis of hepatic abscess merits consideration in sickle cell disease patients presenting with fever without a source and/or abdominal pain.

  18. Viral Hepatitis: Information for Gay and Bisexual Men

    MedlinePlus

    VIRAL HEPATITIS Information for Gay and Bisexual Men What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is an infection of the liver caused by ... United States, the most common types of viral hepatitis are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. ...

  19. Hepatitis A hospitalizations in the United States, 2002-2011.

    PubMed

    Collier, Melissa G; Tong, Xin; Xu, Fujie

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis A illness severity increases with age. One indicator of hepatitis A illness severity is whether persons are hospitalized. We describe changes in primary hepatitis A hospitalization rates in the United States from 2002-2011, including changes in demographics, secondary discharge diagnoses, and factors affecting hospitalization duration. We describe changes from 2002-2011 among U.S. residents hospitalized with a principal hepatitis A diagnosis and accompanying secondary diagnoses using ICD-9 codes from the National Inpatient Survey discharge data. We calculated rates of hospitalizations with hepatitis A as the principal discharge diagnosis and rates of secondary discharge diagnoses. Using multiple regression, we assessed the effect of secondary diagnoses on hospitalization length of stay for five time intervals: 2002-2003, 2004-2005, 2006-2007, 2008-2009, and 2010-2011. Rates of hospitalization for hepatitis A as a principal diagnosis decreased from 0.72/100,000 to 0.29/100,000 (P < 0.0001) and mean age of those hospitalized increased from 37.6 years to 45.5 years (P < 0.0001) during 2002-2011. The percentage of hepatitis A hospitalizations covered by Medicare increased from 12.4% to 22.7% (P < 0.0001). Secondary comorbid discharge diagnoses increased, including liver disease, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, disorders of lipid metabolism, and chronic kidney disease. No changes in length-of-stay or in-hospital deaths from hepatitis A over time were found, but persons with liver disease were hospitalized longer. Hospitalization rates for hepatitis A illness have declined significantly from 2002-2011, but the characteristics of the hospitalized population also changed. Persons hospitalized for hepatitis A in recent years are older and more likely to have liver diseases and other comorbid medical conditions. Hepatitis A disease and resulting hospitalizations could be prevented through adult vaccination. © 2014 Published 2014. This article is a U

  20. Combining hepatitis A and B vaccination in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, P; Van der Wielen, M

    2001-03-21

    Hepatitis A and B are common infections worldwide and their severity is related to the individual's age upon initial infection. Furthermore, when hepatitis B infection occurs in infants, the risk of becoming a chronic carrier is 90%. For hepatitis A, the lower incidence of disease arising from an improvement in living conditions leaves a greater number of children, adolescents and young adults susceptible to residual circulating virus. Consequently, initial infection occurs later in life when clinical illness is more frequent and the rate of morbidity and mortality higher. Although both viruses differ greatly, including their modes of transmission, the overlap in their epidemiology warrants the combination of hepatitis A and B vaccination. The immune response elicited by the combined hepatitis A and B vaccine following a three-dose schedule compares well with the anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) and anti-hepatitis B sero-responses obtained with monovalent vaccines. In addition, it was shown that the seroprotection rate for anti-hepatitis B increased more rapidly with the administration of the combined vaccine, with values of more than 80% within 1 month after the first two doses (schedule, 0, 1 and 6 months). Currently, according to the World Health Organization recommendations, more than 116 countries are vaccinating their infants and/or adolescents against hepatitis B. Recently, several countries were considering or have decided to begin mass vaccination against HAV (more than fifteen states in the US, Spain (Catalonia), Italy (Puglia)). For these countries, the combination of hepatitis A and B antigens in one single vaccine offers the following advantages: fewer injections for protection against two infections, better compliance, lower implementation costs, and fewer missed vaccination opportunities. Further simplification of the schedule, by reducing the number of doses, would improve the compliance rate as well as being more convenient for the vaccinee. This

  1. [Vaccines against hepatitis A and B in Chile].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, M Teresa

    2009-06-01

    The mode of transmission and epidemiological approach for hepatitis A and B are different. However, both are preventable with vaccines whose efficacy and long lasting protection has been demonstrated. This review describes the secular tendency of both infections in Chile, their risk factors that have contributed to their persistence in the country and the interventions that have been carried out to reduce the disease burden. Although the vaccine for hepatitis B was incorporated to the immunization program in 2005, the vaccine for hepatitis A persists in the list of interventions that must be assumed with priority by the Ministry of Health. If Chilean health authorities pretend to reach the enteric disease indicators of developed countries, they must accelerate the epidemiological transition towards the elimination of hepatitis A.

  2. Viral hepatitis A, B, and C: grown-up issues.

    PubMed

    Sharapov, Umid M; Hu, Dale J

    2010-08-01

    Viral hepatitis is a major global health problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although there are five major and distinct human hepatitis viruses characterized to date--referred to as hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E, respectively--only hepatitis A, B, and C are epidemiologically and clinically relevant for adolescents in North America. The clinical presentation of acute infection with each of these viruses is similar; thus, diagnosis depends on the use of specific serologic markers and viral nucleic acids. This review provides data on the epidemiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of each of these three viral infections, along with points that are important or unique to adolescent patients.

  3. [Outbreak of hepatitis B at a butcher's shop].

    PubMed

    Gerlich, W H; Thomssen, R

    1982-10-29

    Within one year four butchers fell ill with acute hepatitis B in a butcher's shop with ten employees. A symptom-free hepatitis B virus carrier was detected among the non-diseased employees. Lack of IgM-anti-HBc antibodies showed that the carrier state had probably existed for more than one year. The time course of infections and the kind of cooperation made it very likely that the carrier had infected his symptomatic mates. The outbreak shows that hepatitis B can be an occupational disease also in non-medical occupations. Should hepatitis B occur in a workman exposed to trauma frequently due to his occupation, serological investigation of the workmates is required in order to identify potential sources of infection and to enable future protective measures.

  4. Mean platelet volume in children with hepatitis A.

    PubMed

    Akın, Fatih; Sert, Ahmet; Arslan, Şükrü

    2016-10-06

    Mean platelet volume (MPV), which is commonly used as a measure of platelet size, indicates the rate of platelet production and platelet activation. We aimed to evaluate the mean platelet volume in children with hepatitis A. In this retrospective case-controlled study, the study population consisted of 62 children with hepatitis A and 62 healthy control subjects. MPV values, aspartate transaminase (AST), and alanine transaminase (ALT) levels on admission were significantly increased in patients with hepatitis A when compared to controls whereas white blood cell (WBC) counts were significantly lower. Two weeks after admission, the MPV values showed a significant decrease from 9.47 ± 1.62 to 8.84 ± 1.48 fL in patients with hepatitis A, but these values were still significantly higher than the controls. There was a significant difference in terms of MPV, WBC, AST, and ALT values between the controls and the patient group 2 weeks after admission. This study is the first to evaluate the MPV levels in children with hepatitis A. MPV values were found to be increased in children hospitalized with hepatitis A.

  5. Effectiveness of hepatitis A vaccination as post-exposure prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Parrón, Ignasi; Planas, Caritat; Godoy, Pere; Manzanares-Laya, Sandra; Martínez, Ana; Sala, Maria Rosa; Minguell, Sofia; Torner, Nuria; Jané, Mireia; Domínguez, Angela

    2017-02-01

    Hepatitis A (HA) has been a vaccine-preventable disease since 1995. In Catalonia, a universal combined hepatitis A+B vaccination program of preadolescents was initiated at the end of 1998. However, outbreaks are reported each year and post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) with hepatitis A virus (HAV) vaccine or immunoglobulin (IG) is recommended to avoid cases. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of HAV vaccine and IG in preventing hepatitis A cases in susceptible exposed people. A retrospective cohort study of contacts of HA cases involved in outbreaks reported in Catalonia between January 2006 and December 2012 was made. The rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of HA in susceptible contacts receiving HAV or IG versus those without PEP were calculated. There were 3550 exposed persons in the outbreaks studied: 2381 received one dose of HAV vaccine (Hepatitis A or hepatitis A+B), 190 received IG, and 611 received no PEP. 368 exposed subjects received one dose of HAV vaccine and IG simultaneously and were excluded from the study. The effectiveness of PEP was 97.6% (95% CI 96.2-98.6) for HAV vaccine and 98.3% (95% CI 91.3-99.9) for IG; the differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.36). The elevated effectiveness of HAV vaccination for PEP in HA outbreaks, similar to that of IG, and the long-term protection of active immunization, supports the preferential use of vaccination to avoid secondary cases.

  6. Hepatitis A: Epidemiology and prevention in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Elisabetta; Meleleo, Cristina; Serino, Laura; Sorbara, Debora; Zaratti, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis A is the most common form of acute viral hepatitis in the world. Major geographical differences in endemicity of hepatitis A are closely related to hygienic and sanitary conditions and other indicators of the level of socioeconomic development. The anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) seroprevalence rate is presently decreasing in many parts of the world, but in less developed regions and in several developing countries, HAV infection is still very common in the first years of life and seroprevalence rates approach 100%. In areas of intermediate endemicity, the delay in the exposure to the virus has generated a huge number of susceptible adolescents and adults and significantly increased the average age at infection. As the severity of disease increases with age, this has led to outbreaks of hepatitis A. Several factors contribute to the decline of the infection rate, including rising socioeconomic levels, increased access to clean water and the availability of a hepatitis A vaccine that was developed in the 1990s. For populations with a high proportion of susceptible adults, implementing vaccination programs may be considered. In this report, we review available epidemiological data and implementation of vaccination strategies, particularly focusing on developing countries. PMID:22489258

  7. [Comparison of clinical and laboratory characteristics of viral hepatitis A and E in Montenegro].

    PubMed

    Terzić, Dragica; Mijović, Gordana; Dupanović, Brankica; Drasković, Nenad; Svirtlih, Neda

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis E has many similarities in with hepatitis A concerning clinical picture, route of transmission and nonexistence of chronicity. Comparison of clinical and laboratory parameters of patients with hepatitis A and E to estimate characteristics of these diseases. Total of 54 patients divided into two groups was investigated: 27 had hepatitis A, others had hepatitis E. Detailed history past, clinical examination, liver function tests and ultrasonography of the upper abdomen, were done in all patients. Aetiology of viral hepatitis was investigated serologically by enzyme immunoassay (ELISA) using commercial kits for following viruses: Hepatitis A-E viruses, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus. Asymptomatic infections (29.6%) and clinical forms without jaundice (59.3%) were more frequent in patients with hepatitis E. Splenomegaly was found more frequent in patients with hepatitis A than in hepatitis E (66.7% vs. 33.3%). Patients with hepatitis E had significantly lower activity of aminotransferases than patients with hepatitis A. A significant increase of gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase was found in patients with hepatitis E (mean value: 120 IU/L). Our results are in concordance with other reports that hepatitis E virus infection is more common asymptomatic disease than hepatitis A. In addition, hepatocyte necrosis in hepatitis E is less extensive than in hepatitis A measured by the activity of aminotransferases. Contrary to that the value of gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase is more increased in hepatitis E than in hepatitis A without exact explanation so far: Viral hepatitis E and A have differences in some clinical features and laboratory parameters although both diseases principally have resolved without consequences after 6-8 weeks.

  8. [Clinical characteristics and incidence in acute non A-G hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Yatsuhashi, H; Koga, M; Yano, M

    1999-06-01

    We investigated clinical characteristics and incidence of patients with acute non-A-G hepatitis, who were all registered in 17 Japanese National Hospitals. Seven hundreds thirty-one (24.0%) of 3052 patients with sporadic acute hepatitis and 73 (21.2%) of 344 patients with posttransfusion acute hepatitis were diagnosed as acute non-ABC hepatitis. Patients with acute non-ABC hepatitis were older (Mean +/- SD, 44 +/- 15 years) and male/female ratio was 0.70. Although mean levels of liver function abnormality was generally mild, 4(1.8%) of 250 patients with acute non-ABC hepatitis were died of fulminant hepatitis.

  9. Hepatic endometriosis: a rare case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Songyang; Dong, Bingfei; Liu, Yahui

    2015-04-04

    Hepatic endometriosis is one of the rarest disorders characterized by the presence of ectopic endometrium in the liver. To our knowledge, only 21 cases of hepatic endometrioma have been described in the medical literature. We report a case of a 36-year-old primiparous female with hepatic endometriosis forming a large cystic mass. The patient presented once with severe right quadrant pain as her only symptom and no history of endometriosis. Complete blood count and biochemical tests were normal. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography scans suggested the presence of a 6.5 × 6.0 cm cystic mass in segment III of the liver. The mass was completely removed by local liver resection. The intraoperative frozen sections suggested a diagnosis of hepatic endometriosis. The diagnosis was confirmed through histological immunostaining without intrinsic abnormality. A preoperative diagnosis of hepatic endometriosis is made on the basis of considering the possibility in advance. Hepatic endometriosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a cystic liver mass despite conducting exhaustive investigations in the absence of characteristic clinical and radiological features. Histological examination is essential, and surgery remains the treatment of choice.

  10. Hepatitis E as a cause of acute jaundice syndrome in northern Uganda, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Gerbi, Gemechu B; Williams, Roxanne; Bakamutumaho, Barnabas; Liu, Stephen; Downing, Robert; Drobeniuc, Jan; Kamili, Saleem; Xu, Fujie; Holmberg, Scott D; Teshale, Eyasu H

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a common cause of acute viral hepatitis in developing countries; however, its contribution to acute jaundice syndrome is not well-described. A large outbreak of hepatitis E occurred in northern Uganda from 2007 to 2009. In response to this outbreak, acute jaundice syndrome surveillance was established in 10 district healthcare facilities to determine the proportion of cases attributable to hepatitis E. Of 347 acute jaundice syndrome cases reported, the majority (42%) had hepatitis E followed by hepatitis B (14%), malaria (10%), hepatitis C (5%), and other/unknown (29%). Of hepatitis E cases, 72% occurred in Kaboong district, and 68% of these cases occurred between May and August of 2011. Residence in Kaabong district was independently associated with hepatitis E (adjusted odds ratio = 13; 95% confidence interval = 7-24). The findings from this surveillance show that an outbreak and sporadic transmission of hepatitis E occur in northern Uganda.

  11. Hepatitis E as a Cause of Acute Jaundice Syndrome in Northern Uganda, 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Gerbi, Gemechu B.; Williams, Roxanne; Bakamutumaho, Barnabas; Liu, Stephen; Downing, Robert; Drobeniuc, Jan; Kamili, Saleem; Xu, Fujie; Holmberg, Scott D.; Teshale, Eyasu H.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a common cause of acute viral hepatitis in developing countries; however, its contribution to acute jaundice syndrome is not well-described. A large outbreak of hepatitis E occurred in northern Uganda from 2007 to 2009. In response to this outbreak, acute jaundice syndrome surveillance was established in 10 district healthcare facilities to determine the proportion of cases attributable to hepatitis E. Of 347 acute jaundice syndrome cases reported, the majority (42%) had hepatitis E followed by hepatitis B (14%), malaria (10%), hepatitis C (5%), and other/unknown (29%). Of hepatitis E cases, 72% occurred in Kaboong district, and 68% of these cases occurred between May and August of 2011. Residence in Kaabong district was independently associated with hepatitis E (adjusted odds ratio = 13; 95% confidence interval = 7–24). The findings from this surveillance show that an outbreak and sporadic transmission of hepatitis E occur in northern Uganda. PMID:25448237

  12. Viral Hepatitis A to E in South Mediterranean Countries

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Sanaa M.; Mahmoud, Sara; Hafez, Tamer; EL-Fouly, Runia

    2010-01-01

    Viral hepatitis represents an important health problem in the South Mediterranean countries, Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco. Emerging natural history and epidemiological information reveal differences in the overall epidemiology, risk factors and modes of transmission of viral hepatitis A, B, C, D, E infections in the South Mediterranean region. The differences in the in incidence and prevalence of viral hepatitis across North African countries is attributed to variations in health care and sanitation standards, risk factors and immunization strategies. The active continuous population movement through travel, tourism and migration from and to the South Mediterranean countries contribute to the spread of infections due to hepatitis viruses across borders leading to outbreaks and emergence of new patterns of infection or introduction of uncommon genotypes in other countries, particularly in Europe. PMID:21415943

  13. Antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B: a review.

    PubMed

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2004-03-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a well-recognized risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which is becoming a more prevalent clinical problem, especially in HBV-endemic areas. It is estimated that 1.25 million people in the United States and more than 300 million people worldwide are chronically infected with HBV. Despite the introduction of universal vaccination against hepatitis B in over 100 countries, persistent HBV infection is still a serious problem worldwide, causing an estimated annual death rate of one million. It may take several decades until the effect of vaccination will be translated into reduced transmission and morbidity. Meanwhile, patients with persistent HBV infection require better antiviral therapeutic modalities than are currently available. It is well accepted that antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B is effective to improve prognosis of patients with HBV by preventing development of hepatitis state and HCC. The therapeutic endpoints for hepatitis B treatment are: 1) sustained suppression of HBV replication, as indicated by HBsAg and HBeAg loss, 2) decrease of serum HBV DNA of an undetectable level by a non-PCR method, 3) remission of disease, as shown by normalization of ALT, 4) improvement in liver histology, and 5) reduction of the acute exacerbation, cirrhosis, and HCC. In the present, the antiviral treatment of hepatitis B consists of either interferon alpha or oral lamivudine alone or in combination with existing therapy. Each major antiviral drug of interferon alpha and lamivudine has pros and cons, and effect of combination therapy of both drugs is also still limited. More powerful and safe new antiviral therapies are required to achieve final goal of these therapeutic endpoints. Management of chronic hepatitis B requires significant knowledge of approved pharmacotherapeutic agents and their limitations. Therapeutic options for managing hepatitis infection after liver transplantation (LT

  14. Fulminant Hepatic Failure Secondary to Herpes Hepatitis in a Patient With Myasthenia Crisis: An Elusive Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harish; Tariq, Hassan; Gaduputi, Vinaya; Vakde, Trupti; Makker, Jasbir; Daniel, Myrta

    2016-01-01

    Herpes hepatitis is a rare cause of fulminant hepatic failure contributing to less than 1% of all cases. It is most often seen in persons who are immunosuppressed and in pregnant women. The presentation is usually non-specific and rapidly progressive, thus making antemortem diagnosis of this condition rare. We present a patient who was on chronic immunosuppressive therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus and subsequently developed multi-organ failure with anicteric transaminitis as a result of disseminated herpes infection. The diagnosis was only made post-mortem. A confounding factor in this case was the fact that the patient underwent plasmapheresis, which skewed the interpretation of liver function tests in the setting of acute liver failure. PMID:27829961

  15. Fulminant Hepatic Failure Secondary to Herpes Hepatitis in a Patient With Myasthenia Crisis: An Elusive Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Harish; Tariq, Hassan; Gaduputi, Vinaya; Vakde, Trupti; Makker, Jasbir; Daniel, Myrta

    2016-12-01

    Herpes hepatitis is a rare cause of fulminant hepatic failure contributing to less than 1% of all cases. It is most often seen in persons who are immunosuppressed and in pregnant women. The presentation is usually non-specific and rapidly progressive, thus making antemortem diagnosis of this condition rare. We present a patient who was on chronic immunosuppressive therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus and subsequently developed multi-organ failure with anicteric transaminitis as a result of disseminated herpes infection. The diagnosis was only made post-mortem. A confounding factor in this case was the fact that the patient underwent plasmapheresis, which skewed the interpretation of liver function tests in the setting of acute liver failure.

  16. [Extracapillary IgA nephropathy associated with infection with hepatitis C virus and hepatic cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Cabezuelo, J B; Enríquez, R; Andrada, E; Amorós, F; Sirvent, A E; Reyes, A

    2000-01-01

    We describe a 36 year old man who was admitted to the hospital with dyspnea, edema of the lower limbs, arterial hypertension and oliguric renal failure. He had microhematuria and nephrotic range proteinuria, immunological tests were normal or negative. Renal biopsy revealed global (55%) or segmental glomeruloesclerosis, remaining glomeruli showed extracapillary proliferation (25%). Immunofluorescence study disclosed IgA mesangial deposits. He was also diagnosed as having liver cirrhosis with positive serology against hepatitis C virus. He was treated with dialysis, antihypertensive drugs and steroids with improvement of the renal function. However, ten months later maintenance hemodialysis became necessary. We emphasize two points: first IgA glomerulonephritis is rarely associated with hepatitis C infection, and second crescentic IgA nephropathy has been infrequently reported in liver cirrhosis.

  17. Hepatic encephalopathy: a critical current review.

    PubMed

    Hadjihambi, Anna; Arias, Natalia; Sheikh, Mohammed; Jalan, Rajiv

    2017-08-02

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a serious neuropsychiatric complication of cirrhosis and/or porto-systemic shunting. The clinical symptoms are widely variable, extending from subtle impairment in mental state to coma. The utility of categorizing the severity of HE accurately and efficiently serves not only to provide practical functional information about the current clinical status of the patient but also gives valuable prognostic information. In the past 20-30 years, there has been rapid progress in understanding the pathophysiological basis of HE; however, the lack of direct correlation between pathogenic factors and the severity of HE make it difficult to select appropriate therapy for HE patients. In this review, we will discuss the classification system and its limitations, the neuropsychometric assessments and their challenges, as well as the present knowledge on the pathophysiological mechanisms. Despite the many prevalent hypotheses around the pathogenesis of the disease, most treatments focus on targeting and lowering the accumulation of ammonia as well as inflammation. However, treatment of minimal HE remains a huge unmet need and a big concerted effort is needed to better define this condition to allow the development of new therapies. We review the currently available therapies and future approaches to treat HE as well as the scientific and clinical data that support their effectiveness.

  18. A method for quickly and exactly extracting hepatic vein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Qing; Yuan, Rong; Wang, Luyao; Wang, Yanchun; Li, Zhen; Hu, Daoyu; Xie, Qingguo

    2013-02-01

    It is of vital importance that providing detailed and accurate information about hepatic vein (HV) for liver surgery planning, such as pre-operative planning of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Due to the different blood flow rate of intra-hepatic vascular systems and the restrictions of CT scan, it is common that HV and hepatic portal vein (HPV) are both filled with contrast medium during the scan and in high intensity in the hepatic venous phase images. As a result, the HV segmentation result obtained from the hepatic venous phase images is always contaminated by HPV which makes accurate HV modeling difficult. In this paper, we proposed a method for quick and accurate HV extraction. Based on the topological structure of intra-hepatic vessels, we analyzed the anatomical features of HV and HPV. According to the analysis, three conditions were presented to identify the nodes that connect HV with HPV in the topological structure, and thus to distinguish HV from HPV. The method costs less than one minute to extract HV and provides a correct and detailed HV model even with variations in vessels. Evaluated by two experienced radiologists, the accuracy of the HV model obtained from our method is over 97%. In the following work, we will extend our work to a comprehensive clinical evaluation and apply this method to actual LDLT surgical planning.

  19. Hepatitis C virus and cardiovascular: A review.

    PubMed

    Petta, Salvatore

    2017-03-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a systemic disease that leads to increased risks of cirrhosis and its complications, as well as extrahepatic disturbances, including immune-related disorders and metabolic alterations such as insulin resistance and steatosis. Recent accumulating evidence suggests that HCV infection can increase cardiovascular risk, and that viral eradication can improve cardiovascular outcomes in the clinical setting. These data are strengthened by evidence identifying potential mechanisms (in)directly linking HCV infection to vascular damage. However, the high prevalence of both HCV infection and cardiovascular alterations, as well as the presence of contrasting results not identifying any association between HCV infection and cardiovascular dysfunction, provides uncertainty about a direct association of HCV infection with cardiovascular risk. Further studies are needed to clarify definitively the role of HCV infection in cardiovascular alterations, as well as the impact of viral eradication on cardiovascular outcomes. These features are now more attractive, considering the availability of new, safe, and very effective interferon-free antiviral agents for the treatment of HCV infection. This review aims to discuss carefully available data on the relationship between HCV infection and cardiovascular risk.

  20. Single-dose administration of inactivated hepatitis A vaccination in the context of hepatitis A vaccine recommendations.

    PubMed

    Ott, J J; Wiersma, S T

    2013-11-01

    Our objective was to identify evidence on the protection achieved by single-dose use of inactivated hepatitis A vaccines in order to evaluate the potential of a flexible booster administration in the form of a second dose. A search was conducted for evidence on single-dose administration of inactivated hepatitis A vaccine and its potential impacts on long-term seropositivity rates. The main pharmaceutical vaccine manufacturer federations and the corresponding authors of manuscripts were approached for additional epidemiologic data. Correspondence was also sent to the Argentinean Ministry of Health. We identified 15 data sources reporting on protection achieved by a single dose of inactivated hepatitis A vaccine. The consistent finding was that the immune and memory response to the booster dose, or post-booster geometric mean titer, was independent of the time since initial vaccination. The impact of the booster on seroprotection was the same across sexes and age-groups. The longest time interval between initial and booster dose was 10.67 years, indicating that booster doses can be highly immunogenic for up to 10.67 years after primary vaccination. Protective anti-hepatitis A virus antibody levels after a single dose of inactivated hepatitis A vaccine can persist for almost 11 years and increase or reappear after booster vaccination. Further research on the vaccine doses needed to achieve long-term protection against hepatitis A infection is required. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Seroepidemiology of hepatitis A, hepatitis B and varicella virus in people living with HIV in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Sadlier, Corinna; O'Rourke, Anna; Carr, Alison; Bergin, Colm

    2017-03-13

    Epidemiological studies investigating seroprevalence of vaccine preventable infections at both individual and population level are important in guiding screening and vaccination practices. Data on seroprevalence of common vaccine preventable infections in HIV-infected individuals is lacking. We carried out a retrospective cohort study to investigate serological immunity and factors associated with immunity to hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and varicalla virus (VZV) in a cohort of HIV-infected individuals attending a large ambulatory HIV specialist centre in Ireland. Basic demographic data including risk of acquisition of HIV and region of origin was recorded. Between-group prevalence was compared using the Chi2 test and Wilkoxin signed rank test. Univariate variables with p<0.2 were entered into a multivariate logistic regression model. Of 1287 HIV-infected individuals included in this study (median [SD] age 39 [10] years, 68% male, 46% Irish), 75% were hepatitis A IgG positive, 94% were VZV IgG positive, 3% were HBV surface antigen (sAg) positive while 29% were HBV core antibody (cAb) positive. This study identifies a significant proportion of HIV infected who were susceptible to common vaccine preventable infections. These results highlight the importance of proactive screening and immunization of HIV-infected individuals to ensure optimal protect ionagainst vaccine preventable diseases in this at risk patient group.

  2. Prevalence of hepatitis A IgG in individuals with chronic hepatitis B infection in Babol.

    PubMed

    Roushan, M R H; Bijani, A; Sagheb, R; Jazayeri, O

    2007-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of previous hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection in people chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), we assessed the prevalence of anti-HAV IgG in 392 patients. The study was carried out in Babol, northern Islamic Republic of Iran from September 2004 to March 2005. Prevalence in those aged 10-19 years was 59.4% and was significantly lower than that in those aged 20-29 years (89.8%) and those over 29 years (97.5%). There was no significant difference in prevalence according to sex or place of residence. A significant proportion of Iranian adolescents and young adults with chronic HBV infection are at risk of contracting HAV infection.

  3. Hepatitis D outbreak among children in a hepatitis B hyper-endemic settlement in Greenland.

    PubMed

    Børresen, M L; Olsen, O R; Ladefoged, K; McMahon, B J; Hjuler, T; Panum, I; Simonetti, J; Jones, C; Krarup, H; Koch, A

    2010-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is endemic in Greenland with 5-10% of the population being HBsAg-positive (chronic carriers). Surprisingly, despite of the high prevalence of HBV infection, acute and chronic hepatitis B, liver cirrhosis and primary hepatocellular carcinoma appear much less frequently than expected. The reasons for the low frequencies are unknown, but as a consequence implementation of a childhood HBV vaccination programme, though debated for years, has never been instituted. We describe an outbreak of hepatitis D (HDV) infection among children in a hepatitis B hyper-endemic settlement of 133 inhabitants on the west coast of Greenland. In 2006 a total of 27% of the inhabitants were HBsAg-positive (chronic carriers) and 83% were HBcAb-positive (previously exposed). Forty-six percent of the HBsAg-positive persons were below 20 years of age. On follow-up 1 year later a total of 68% of the HBsAg-positive persons were HDV-IgG positive. Five children, who were HBsAg-positive in 2006, had HDV-seroconverted from 2006 to 2007, indicating a HDV-super-infection. Most of the HDV-IgG positive children had markedly elevated liver enzymes. In the multivariate analysis, among the HBV and HDV markers, presence of HDV-IgG was most strongly associated with elevation of liver enzymes. In conclusion, the HBV-HDV super-infection and presumed HDV outbreak in this settlement challenges the notion that HBV infection may not be as harmless in Greenland as previously anticipated. The findings strongly suggest that HBV vaccination should be included in the child-immunization program in Greenland.

  4. Autoimmune hepatitis: a classic autoimmune liver disease.

    PubMed

    Moy, Libia; Levine, Jeremiah

    2014-12-01

    AIH is characterized by chronic inflammation of the liver, interface hepatitis, hypergammaglobulinemia, and production of autoantibodies. Based on the nature of the serum autoantibodies, two types of AIH are recognized: type 1 (AIH-1), positive for ANA and/or anti-smooth muscle antibody, and type 2 (AIH-2), defined by the positivity for anti-liver kidney microsomal type 1 antibody or for anti-liver cytosol type 1 antibody. AIH demonstrates a female preponderance with the female-to-male ratio of 4:1 in AIH-1 and 10:1 in AIH-2. Several genes confer susceptibility to AIH and influence clinical manifestation, response to treatment, and overall prognosis. Most are located within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, which is involved in the presentation of antigenic peptides to T cells and thus in the initiation of adaptive immune responses. The strongest associations are found within the HLA-DRB1 locus. In patients with increased genetic susceptibility to AIH, immune responses to liver autoantigens could be triggered by molecular mimicry. Because of molecular mimicry, different environmental agents, drugs, and viruses might produce AIH. In AIH, T cells are numerically and functionally impaired, permitting the perpetuation of effector immune responses with ensuing persistent liver destruction. AIH is rare but highly treatable inflammatory condition of the liver. Subclinical and asymptomatic disease is common. AIH therefore needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with elevated liver enzymes. Clinical response to immunosuppressive therapy is characteristic and supports the diagnosis.

  5. [Hepatitis E virus seroprevalence: a reappraisal].

    PubMed

    Covarrubías, Natalia; Hurtado, Carmen; Díaz, Alex; Mezzano, Gabriel; Brahm, Javier; Venegas, Mauricio

    2015-08-01

    Reported seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in developed countries is between 0.3-53%. Published data relies on the assays used and its technical performance. Sensitivity on new available tests has improved, which has changed HEV seroprevalence around the world. We re-evaluated retrospectively, 178 serum samples of patients with previous anti HEV IgG determination between 2009 and 2012. Initial analysis was performed with ELISA kit Genelabs (Singapore), with 7.3% positivity. The reevaluation was done with ELISA kit AccuDiag TM HEV-IgG (Diagnostic Automation, United States), with reported sensitivity and specificity over 99.8%. With the new assay, 32.6% positive samples were found, significantly greater to the previous result (p<0.001) (4.5 times more). There were no differences in gender but a significant association between age and HEV IgG seropositivity was found (p<0.001). This suggests that previous testing might have underestimated HEV seroprevalence in Chile, which should be reevaluated using the new available test.

  6. A framework for management of hepatitis C in prisons.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Anne C; Weinbaum, Cindy M; Lau, Daryl T-Y; Sterling, Richard; Seeff, Leonard B; Margolis, Harold S; Hoofnagle, Jay H

    2006-05-16

    The prevalence of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in prisons ranges from 12% to 31%. There are generally accepted--albeit still evolving--guidelines for identification and treatment of hepatitis C in the community. However, there is less agreement among health professionals caring for prisoners about best practices for identification, medical management, and treatment of hepatitis C. Inmates often lack health care before incarceration. In prisons, infected persons could be identified and the management of infection initiated; however, the high prevalence of HCV infection among prisoners would impose a disproportionate cost for hepatitis C care on the correctional system. The optimal solution is for prison and public health systems in the United States to jointly provide targeted HCV testing and standard-of-care hepatitis C medical management, treatment, and prevention programs to prison inmate populations. The authors report on a January 2003 meeting of experts in prison health, public health, hepatology, and infectious diseases and explore the clinical care, prevention, and collaboration needed to provide hepatitis C management in prisoners.

  7. Halothane-induced hepatitis: A forgotten issue in developing countries: Halothane-induced hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Habibollahi, Peiman; Mahboobi, Nastaran; Esmaeili, Sara; Safari, Saeid; Dabbagh, Ali; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2011-01-01

    Halothane was introduced as an anesthetic in the 1950s and was considered a revolutionary agent in the field of anesthesia. Soon after, halothane-induced hepatitis became a concern, leading to the development of less toxic gases that induced a lower incidence of side effects. Two types of halothane-related hepatotoxicity have been described: type 1, or mild hepatitis, is associated with elevated transaminase levels and self-limiting symptoms, and type 2, or severe hepatotoxicity, is associated with acute fatal liver failure and is fatal in most cases. Hepatotoxicity is most likely to be immune-related, based on much evidence. Free radicals that are produced by the metabolism of halothane in the liver can modify cellular proteins and introduce neo-antigens to the immune system. Sensitization to these neo-antigens induces a more severe response after multiple exposures; most cases of type 2 hepatitis occur after repeated contact. New halogenated anesthetics such as enflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane, are not metabolized in the liver, causing few cases of sensitization. Compared with halothane, these anesthetics are expensive. As a result, replacement of halothane with new halogenated anesthetics requires a precise cost-benefit analysis, especially in developing countries that have low health care budgets.

  8. Hepatitis E virus: A leading cause of waterborne viral hepatitis in Northwest Districts of Punjab, India

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Maninder; Sidhu, Shailpreet K.; Singh, Kanwardeep; Devi, Pushpa; Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, Nachhatar Jit

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute viral hepatitis (AVH) caused by enterically transmitted hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) poses a major health problem in developing countries such as India. Despite improving sanitation, heath awareness, and socioeconomic conditions, these infections continue to occur both in sporadic as well as in epidemic forms in different parts of India. AIMS: The aim of this study is to determine the total as well as age-specific prevalence rates of HAV and HEV in the outbreaks of waterborne hepatitis in districts surrounding Amritsar region of Punjab. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was conducted in the Virology Research and Diagnostic Laboratory, Government Medical College, Amritsar, during the study period of January 2015–March 2016. Samples from suspected outbreaks of AVH occurring in various districts around Amritsar were included as a part of the study. A total of 95 sera were tested for IgM antibody to HEV and HAV using IgM capture ELISA kit. RESULTS: Out of the total 95 samples received, 73 samples (76.84%) were positive for HAV/HEV. Out of the total positive cases, 65 (68.42%) had HEV infection, 2 (2.1%) had HAV, and 6 cases (6.31%) were coinfected with both HAV and HEV. The 21–30 years age group (25 cases) was identified as the most susceptible group for HEV infection. The coinfected subjects presented a wider range of age distribution (1–10 years: 1; 11–20 years: 3; 21–30 years: 1; 31–40 years: 1). Seasonal distribution of data revealed bimodal peaks for HEV infection. CONCLUSION: There should be some surveillance system to regularly monitor the portability of drinking water from time to time to avoid such preventable outbreaks in future. PMID:28367028

  9. Liver Retransplantation for Hepatic Abscess Due to Hepatic Artery Thrombosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zanus, G; Romano, M; Finotti, M; Dalla Bona, E; Sgarabotto, D; Bassi, D; Mescoli, C; Angeli, P; Burra, P; Gringeri, E; Vitale, A; D'Amico, F; Feltracco, P; Cillo, U

    2017-05-01

    Hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT) is a well-recognized complication of liver transplantation (LT). HAT is an important risk factor for infectious, in particular hepatic abscess, which can cause graft loss and increasing morbidity and mortality. We present a case report of complicated LT in a 52-year-old Caucasian man with primary sclerosing cholangitis. In 2007 the patient was included on the waiting list in Padua for LT. In 2012 the patient underwent percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage for bile duct stricture, complicated with acute pancreatitis. A diagnostic laparoscopy was performed with choledochotomy and Kehr's T tube drainage. On February 14, 2012, the patient underwent LT with arterial reconstruction and choledochojejunostomy. The postoperative course was complicated with HAT, multiple liver abscesses, and sepsis associated with bacteremia due to Enterococcus faecium despite massive intravenous antibiotic therapy and percutaneous drainages. On November 28, 2012, the patient underwent retransplantation. Four years after transplantation the patient is still in good general condition. Hepatic abscess formation secondary to HAT following LT is a major complication associated with important morbidity and mortality. In selected cases retransplantation should be considered as our case demonstrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Occult hepatitis C virus infection: A new form of hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Carreño, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a new recently characterized entity. This occult infection can be present in two different clinical situations: in anti-HCV negative, serum HCV-RNA negative patients with abnormal liver function tests and in anti-HCV positive subjects with normal values of liver enzymes and without serum HCV-RNA. This review describes recent studies of occult HCV infection in both kinds of patients. PMID:17109511

  11. Occult hepatitis C virus infection: a new form of hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Carreño, Vicente

    2006-11-21

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a new recently characterized entity. This occult infection can be present in two different clinical situations: in anti-HCV negative, serum HCV-RNA negative patients with abnormal liver function tests and in anti-HCV positive subjects with normal values of liver enzymes and without serum HCV-RNA. This review describes recent studies of occult HCV infection in both kinds of patients.

  12. Hepatitis C Virus in Arab World: A State of Concern

    PubMed Central

    Daw, Mohamed A.; Dau, Aghnaya A.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus has been considered to be one of the most important devastating causes of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatic cellular carcinoma. The prevalence of such virus varies greatly over the world. Arab world has a unique geography and consists over nineteen countries who share the same heritage and customs and do speak the same language. In this area, the epidemiology of hepatitis C is not well understandable. Hepatitis C virus was found to be endemic in Arabia. The serostatus of such virus was found to be variable among these countries with uniform patterns of genotypes. Such prevalence varies tremendously according to the risk factors involved. Blood and blood products, haemodialysis, intravenous, and percutaneous drug users, and occupational, habitual, and social behavior were found to be the important factors involved. Hepatitis C will have major social, economic, and even political burdens on such young and dynamic societies. Thus, strategies and clear policy of intervention are urgently needed to combat the consequences of HCV both regionally and at state level of each country. PMID:22629189

  13. Opt-Out Panel Testing for HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C in an Urban Emergency Department: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Sarah; Lillis, Darren; Cotter, Aoife; O'Dea, Siobhan; Tuite, Helen; Fleming, Catherine; Crowley, Brendan; Fitzgerald, Ian; Dalby, Linda; Barry, Helen; Shields, Darragh; Norris, Suzanne; Plunkett, Patrick K; Bergin, Colm

    2016-01-01

    Studies suggest 2 per 1000 people in Dublin are living with HIV, the level above which universal screening is advised. We aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a universal opt-out HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C testing programme for Emergency Department patients and to describe the incidence and prevalence of blood-borne viruses in this population. An opt-out ED blood borne virus screening programme was piloted from March 2014 to January 2015. Patients undergoing blood sampling during routine clinical care were offered HIV 1&2 antibody/antigen assay, HBV surface antigen and HCV antibody tests. Linkage to care where necessary was co-ordinated by the study team. New diagnosis and prevalence rates were defined as the new cases per 1000 tested and number of positive tests per 1000 tested respectively. Over 45 weeks of testing, of 10,000 patient visits, 8,839 individual patient samples were available for analysis following removal of duplicates. A sustained target uptake of >50% was obtained after week 3. 97(1.09%), 44(0.49%) and 447(5.05%) HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C tests were positive respectively. Of these, 7(0.08%), 20(0.22%) and 58(0.66%) were new diagnoses of HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C respectively. The new diagnosis rate for HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C was 0.8, 2.26 and 6.5 per 1000 and study prevalence for HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C was 11.0, 5.0 and 50.5 per 1000 respectively. Opt-out blood borne viral screening was feasible and acceptable in an inner-city ED. Blood borne viral infections were prevalent in this population and newly diagnosed cases were diagnosed and linked to care. These results suggest widespread blood borne viral testing in differing clinical locations with differing population demographic risks may be warranted.

  14. A review of the long-term protection after hepatitis A and B vaccination.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Pierre; Van Herck, Koen

    2007-03-01

    Vaccine-preventable viral hepatitis continues to be a cause of considerable morbidity and mortality: on worldwide basis, approximately 1.4 million cases of hepatitis A are reported every year. The true incidence, however, has been estimated to be 3-10 times higher. Regarding hepatitis B, more than a third of the world's population has been infected. The World Health Organization has estimated (2000) that there are 367 million chronic carriers of hepatitis B worldwide, and approximately 1 million deaths per year as a consequence of chronic complications and acute fulminant disease. Hepatitis B vaccines have been licensed since 1982, and hepatitis A vaccines since 1992. In 1996, a combined hepatitis A and B vaccine became available. An update on the long-term protection conferred by hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccines as well as the combined hepatitis A and B vaccine is offered in this paper. Long-term efficacy and booster policy for hepatitis B vaccines have often been a topic of discussion. Based on current data and field experience there is, in general, no necessity for booster doses for fully vaccinated immunocompetent individuals. Long-term protection has been demonstrated by the rapid (5-7 days) development of anamnestic antibody responses among vaccinees who no longer have detectable anti-HBs. Anamnestic responses correlate with lymphoproliferative T-cell responses following challenge with hepatitis B vaccine. Furthermore, employing Spot-ELISA techniques, circulating B-cells were shown to be able to produce anti-HBs in vaccinees who lost their detectable antibodies. The accumulated data from a large number of studies indicate that despite antibody decline or loss, immune memory exhibits long-term persistence. There is somewhat less information available for hepatitis A vaccines, yet an increasing number of studies indicate that the findings for hepatitis B vaccines are also applicable to hepatitis A vaccines. The necessity to provide a booster dose was based

  15. A Successful Hepatitis B Vaccination Program in a Dental School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, David; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A carefully controlled hepatitis B immunization program among the University of Pittsburgh's dental students and faculty resulted in 96 percent of tested recipients having positive protective antibody titers. A direct relationship between age and positive titers emerged, supporting vaccination early in the dental career. (MSE)

  16. A Successful Hepatitis B Vaccination Program in a Dental School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, David; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A carefully controlled hepatitis B immunization program among the University of Pittsburgh's dental students and faculty resulted in 96 percent of tested recipients having positive protective antibody titers. A direct relationship between age and positive titers emerged, supporting vaccination early in the dental career. (MSE)

  17. Hepatitis C virus induces a prediabetic state by directly impairing hepatic glucose metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Lerat, Hervé; Imache, Mohamed Rabah; Polyte, Jacqueline; Gaudin, Aurore; Mercey, Marion; Donati, Flora; Baudesson, Camille; Higgs, Martin R; Picard, Alexandre; Magnan, Christophe; Foufelle, Fabienne; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2017-08-04

    Virus-related type 2 diabetes is commonly observed in individuals infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV); however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Our aim was to unravel these mechanisms using FL-N/35 transgenic mice expressing the full HCV ORF. We observed that these mice displayed glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. We also found that Glut-2 membrane expression was reduced in FL-N/35 mice and that hepatocyte glucose uptake was perturbed, partly accounting for the HCV-induced glucose intolerance in these mice. Early steps of the hepatic insulin signaling pathway, from IRS2 to PDK1 phosphorylation, were constitutively impaired in FL-N/35 primary hepatocytes via deregulation of TNFα/SOCS3. Higher hepatic glucose production was observed in the HCV mice, despite higher fasting insulinemia, concomitant with decreased expression of hepatic gluconeogenic genes. Akt kinase activity was higher in HCV mice than in WT mice, but Akt-dependent phosphorylation of the forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 at serine 256, which triggers its nuclear exclusion, was lower in HCV mouse livers. These findings indicate an uncoupling of the canonical Akt/FoxO1 pathway in HCV protein-expressing hepatocytes. Thus, the expression of HCV proteins in the liver is sufficient to induce insulin resistance by impairing insulin signaling and glucose uptake. In conclusion, we observed a complete set of events leading to a prediabetic state in HCV-transgenic mice, providing a valuable mechanistic explanation for HCV-induced diabetes in humans. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Alcohol induced hepatic degeneration in a hepatitis C virus core protein transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Noh, Dong-Hyung; Lee, Eun-Joo; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Mi; Min, Chang-Woo; Kang, Kyung-Ku; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Kim, Sang-Hyeob; Sung, Soo-Eun; Hwang, Meeyul; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2014-03-07

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has become a major public health issue. It is prevalent in most countries. HCV infection frequently begins without clinical symptoms, before progressing to persistent viremia, chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the majority of patients (70% to 80%). Alcohol is an independent cofactor that accelerates the development of HCC in chronic hepatitis C patients. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate ethanol-induced hepatic changes in HCV core-Tg mice and mutant core Tg mice. Wild type (NTG), core wild-Tg mice (TG-K), mutant core 116-Tg mice (TG-116) and mutant core 99-Tg mice (TG-99) were used in this investigation. All groups were given drinking water with 10% ethanol and 5% sucrose for 13 weeks. To observe liver morphological changes, we performed histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Histopathologically, NTG, TG-K and TG-116 mice showed moderate centrilobular necrosis, while severe centrilobular necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation were observed in TG-99 mice with increasing lymphocyte infiltration and piecemeal necrosis. In all groups, a small amount of collagen fiber was found, principally in portal areas. None of the mice were found to have myofibroblasts based on immunohistochemical staining specific for α-SMA. CYP2E1-positive cells were clearly detected in the centrilobular area in all groups. In the TG-99 mice, we also observed cells positive for CK8/18, TGF-β1 and phosphorylated (p)-Smad2/3 and p21 around the necrotic hepatocytes in the centrilobular area (p < 0.01). Based on our data, alcohol intake induced piecemeal necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation in the TG-99 mice. These phenomena involved activation of the TGF-β1/p-Smad2/3/p21 signaling pathway in hepatocytes. Data from this study will be useful for elucidating the association between alcohol intake and HCV infection.

  19. The hepatitis C virus and its hepatic environment: a toxic but finely tuned partnership.

    PubMed

    Perrault, Marie; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle

    2009-10-12

    Twenty years after its discovery, HCV (hepatitis C virus) still infects 170 million people worldwide and cannot be properly treated due to the lack of efficient medication. Its life cycle must be better understood to develop targeted pharmacological arsenals. HCV is an enveloped virus bearing two surface glycoproteins, E1 and E2. It only infects humans through blood transmission, and hepatocytes are its only target cells. Hepatic trabeculae are formed by hepatocyte rows surrounded by sinusoid capillaries, irrigating hepatic cells. Hepatocytes are polarized and have basolateral and apical poles, separated by tight junctions in contact with blood and bile respectively. In blood, HCV remains in contact with lipoproteins. It then navigates through hepatic microenvironment and extracellular matrix, composed of glycosaminoglycans and proteins. HCV then encounters the hepatocyte basolateral membrane, where it interacts with its entry factors: the low-density lipoprotein receptor, CD81 tetraspanin, and the high-density lipoprotein (scavenger) receptor SR-BI (scavenger receptor BI). How these molecules interact with HCV remains unclear; however, a tentative sequence of events has been proposed. Two essential factors of HCV entry are the tight junction proteins claudin-1 and occludin. Cell polarity therefore seems to be a key for HCV entry. This raises several exciting questions on the HCV internalization pathway. Clathrin-dependent endocytosis is probably the route of HCV transport to intracellular compartments, and the ultimate step of its entry is fusion, which probably takes place within endosomes. The mechanisms of HCV membrane fusion are still unclear, notably the nature of the fusion proteins is unknown and the contribution of HCV-associated lipoproteins to this event is currently under investigation.

  20. Hepatitis A virus infection during pregnancy in Korea: Hepatitis A infection on pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Geum Joon; Kim, Yoon Byoung; Kim, Seong Min; Hong, Hye Ri; Kim, Ji Hoon; Seol, Hyun-Joo; Hong, Soon Cheol; Kim, Hai Joong

    2013-01-01

    Objective Although there is a large body of data on acute hepatitis A virus (HAV) worldwide, data regarding the occurrence of HAV during pregnancy is limited. It is commonly acknowledged that HAV is not associated with severe outcomes or complications during pregnancy. In contrast, there are several reported cases of vertical HAV transmission. Moreover, it has been recently reported that HAV infection during pregnancy is associated with gestational complications. In Korea, the incidence of HAV infection has increased from 317 cases in 2002 to 13,117 cases in 2009. However, HAV infection during pregnancy is rarely reported in Korea. Methods This study was conducted as a retrospective cohort series of pregnant women presenting to Korea University Medical Center between January 2000 and October 2009 in whom a diagnosis of HAV infection was made. Results During study period, there were 12 cases of HAV in pregnant women, including two cases with preterm contraction, two cases with cholestatic hepatitis, and one case with fetal ascites and intra-abdominal calcification. Conclusion HAV infection during pregnancy is associated with high prevalence of maternal and fetal complications. Because the incidence of HAV infection in women of reproductive age is increasing, a further focus on preventing HAV infection during pregnancy is warranted. PMID:24396815

  1. Effectiveness of 10-year vaccination (2001–2010) for Hepatitis A in Tianjin, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-lun; Zhu, Xiang-jun; Shan, Ai-lan; Gao, Zhi-gang; Zhang, Ying; Ding, Ya-xing; Liu, Hui; Wu, Wei-shen; Liu, Yong; He, Hai-yan; Xie, Xiao-hua; Xia, Wei-dong; Li, Chao; Xu, Wen-ti; Li, Zhi-yuan; Lin, Hua-Liang; Fu, Wei-ming

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is an effective strategy to prevent and control the transmission of hepatitis A. Hepatitis A immunization program has been taken into effect since 2001 in Tianjin, China. This study evaluated the effectiveness of strategies in the prevention and control of hepatitis A. Data of serological survey, annual hepatitis A incidence, immunization coverage and the positive rate of hepatitis A IgG before and after the immunization program in residents under 15 years old were used to do the analysis. The results indicated that hepatitis A vaccine induced a striking decrease of hepatitis A incidence and a significant increase in the positive rate of anti-HAV IgG among the children younger than 15 years old. Hepatitis A vaccination in children was proved to be effective in the prevention and control of hepatitis A in Tianjin, China. PMID:24503599

  2. Effectiveness of 10-year vaccination (2001-2010) on Hepatitis A in Tianjin, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-lun; Zhu, Xiang-jun; Shan, Ai-lan; Gao, Zhi-gang; Zhang, Ying; Ding, Ya-xing; Liu, Hui; Wu, Wei-shen; Liu, Yong; He, Hai-yan; Xie, Xiao-hua; Xia, Wei-dong; Li, Chao; Xu, Wen-ti; Li, Zhi-yuan; Lin, Hua-liang; Fu, Wei-ming

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is an effective strategy to prevent and control the transmission of hepatitis A. Hepatitis A immunization program has been taken into effect since 2001 in Tianjin, China. This study evaluated the effectiveness of strategies in the prevention and control of hepatitis A. Data of serological survey, annual hepatitis A incidence, immunization coverage and the positive rate of hepatitis A IgG before and after the immunization program in residents under 15 years old were used to do the analysis. The results indicated that hepatitis A vaccine induced a striking decrease of hepatitis A incidence and a significant increase in the positive rate of anti-HAV IgG among the children younger than 15 years old. Hepatitis A vaccination in children was proved to be effective in the prevention and control of hepatitis A in Tianjin, China.

  3. The costs of hepatitis A infections in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyohyun; Jeong, Baek-Geun; Ki, Moran; Park, Mira; Park, Jin Kyung; Choi, Bo Youl; Yoo, Weon-Seob

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The incidence of hepatitis A infections among young adults has recently increased in South Korea. Although universal vaccination has often been suggested to mitigate the problem, its rationale has not been well-understood. Estimating the societal costs of hepatitis A infections might support the development of intervention strategies. METHODS: We classified hepatitis A infections into eight clinical pathways and estimated the number of occurrences and cost per case for each clinical pathway using claim data from National Health Insurance and several national surveys as well as assumptions based on previous studies. To determine the total costs of a hepatitis A infection, both direct and indirect costs were estimated. Indirect costs were estimated using the human-capital approach. All costs are adjusted to the year 2008. RESULTS: There were 30,240 identified cases of hepatitis A infections in 2008 for a total cost of 80,873 million won (2.7 million won per case). Direct and indirect costs constituted 56.2% and 43.8% of the total costs, respectively. People aged 20-39 accounted for 71.3% of total cases and 74.6% of total costs. Medical costs per capita were the lowest in the 0-4 age group and highest in the 20-29 age group. CONCLUSIONS: This study could provide evidence for development of cost-effective interventions to control hepatitis A infections. But the true costs including uncaptured and intangible costs of hepatitis A infections might be higher than our results indicate. PMID:25139060

  4. Guillain-Barré syndrome associated with hepatitis A in a male homosexual

    PubMed Central

    Dunk, A; Jenkins, W J; Sherlock, S

    1982-01-01

    A 48-year-old male homosexual developed the Guillain-Barré syndrome in association with acute hepatitis. The hepatitis A virus was almost certainly transmitted sexually. Since the incidence of viral hepatitis is high in active male homosexuals, they are particularly at risk of developing such complications. PMID:7104658

  5. Serum cholinesterase: A predictive biomarker of hepatic reserves in chronic hepatitis D.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Minaam; Abbas, Zaigham

    2017-08-08

    To determine the predictive performance of cholinesterase compared to existing prognostic models in evaluating liver function in patients with chronic hepatitis D. In an observational, cross-sectional and retrospective study, consecutive patients with hepatitis D cirrhosis were evaluated. Demographic, clinical and laboratory parameters were recorded. Serum cholinesterase levels were correlated with existing scoring models for chronic liver disease and Liver function tests. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to find an optimal cholinesterase level predicting ascites, Child Turcotte Pugh (CTP) score ≥ 10, model for end stage liver disease (MELD) score ≥ 15, baseline-event-anticipation (BEA) score for hepatitis D ≥ 5 and the aspartate transaminase to Platelet Ratio Index (APRI) ≥ 1.5. This study investigated 233 patients with chronic liver disease due to hepatitis D; 192 were male, median age 42 (16-69 years). Fifty patients had ascites and 15 had encephalopathy. One hundred and sixty-seven (71.7%) were in Child class A, 52 (22.3%) in Child class B and 14 (5.0%) in class C. A MELD score of 15 or more was seen in 24 patients. Cholinesterase levels correlated well with the INR, albumin, CTP score, MELD, MELD sodium, BEA and APRI scores (P < 0.001 each). Area under the ROC curve for ascites, CTP ≥ 10, MELD ≥ 15, BEA ≥ 5, APRI ≥ 1.5 was 0.836, 0.966, 0.913, 0.871 and 0.825 respectively (P < 0.001 each). Cut off values of cholinesterase (IU/L) for predicting ascites, CTP ≥ 10, MELD ≥ 15, BEA ≥ 5 and APRI ≥ 1.5 were < 3812, < 2853, < 2829, < 4719 and < 3954 with a sensitivity of 80%, 100%, 91.67%, 82.50%, 58.0% and specificity of 81.97%, 84.79%, 87.56%, 77.06% and 55.64% respectively. Serum cholinesterase demonstrates promising correlations with serum albumin, INR and CTP, MELD, BEA and APRI scores and is predictive of liver reserves in hepatitis D cirrhosis.

  6. Response to hepatitis A and B vaccination in patients with chronic hepatitis C: 8-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kalyoncu, Derya; Urganci, Nafiye

    2012-08-01

    In patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), superinfection with hepatitis A (HAV) or B (HAB) viruses is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The seroconversion rate of these patients following vaccination is considered to be lower than in healthy subjects. To evaluate the response to HAV and HBV vaccination in children with CHC. Thirty patients with CHC aged from 7.3 to 18 years were compared with 50 healthy age-, gender- and body-mass-index-matched controls. Post-vaccination serological evaluation was performed 1 month after the last dose of primary vaccination, 1 month after the booster dose and once a year during follow-up. Twenty-two patients received hepatitis A vaccine and response rate was 95.4%. Thirty patients received hepatitis B vaccine and 80% responded (hepatitis Bs titres ≥10 mIU/ml). Thirty-five controls received hepatitis A vaccine and protective anti-HAV antibodies developed in all. All of the controls were vaccinated against hepatitis B virus and 90% responded. After the whole vaccination series, overall seroprotection rates were 86% in patients and 96% in controls. No significant reduction in antibody response was observed in patients or controls during 8-years follow-up. The rate of seroconversion to the HBV vaccine is lower in patients with CHC than in healthy controls but response to HAV is adequate.

  7. Hepatic Artery Pseudoaneurysm: Delayed Presentation after a Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Batur, Abdussamet; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Toktas, Osman; Bora, Aydın; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Ruptured hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare condition that is life-threatening if not diagnosed and treated rapidly. We present a case of a spontaneously ruptured hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm that occurred after a blunt trauma, and provide a review of the current literature on this topic. This case study demonstrates a spontaneously ruptured hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm which emerged following a blunt trauma and it also presents current literature studies on the topic. Case Report A man at the age of 34 years with blunt trauma dating back to 1.5 month was admitted to the emergency department of a hospital with hematemesis and epigastric tenderness. He also had a duodenal ulcer, blood in the gastric lumen and a large pseudoaneurysm that developed from the left hepatic artery. Soon after the diagnosis, the patient worsened and underwent distal gastrectomy and cholecystectomy that included removing the bleeding aneurysm. Conclusions Ruptured hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm stands as a deadly condition which has to be diagnosed and managed as soon as possible. Physicians need to take aneurysms of abdominal arteries into consideration after routine diagnostic practises as long as the cause of gastrointestinal haemorrhage is unidentified. PMID:26171087

  8. HHV-6A in syncytial giant-cell hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Potenza, Leonardo; Luppi, Mario; Barozzi, Patrizia; Rossi, Giulio; Cocchi, Stefania; Codeluppi, Mauro; Pecorari, Monica; Masetti, Michele; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio; Gennari, William; Portolani, Marinella; Gerunda, Giorgio Enrico; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Landini, Maria Paola; Schulz, Thomas F; Torelli, Giuseppe; Guaraldi, Giovanni

    2008-08-07

    Syncytial giant-cell hepatitis is a rare but severe form of hepatitis that is associated with autoimmune diseases, drug reactions, and viral infections. We used serologic, molecular, and immunohistochemical methods to search for an infectious cause in a case of syncytial giant-cell hepatitis that developed in a liver-transplant recipient who had latent infection with variant B of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6B) and who had received the organ from a donor with variant A latent infection (HHV-6A). At the onset of the disease, the detection of HHV-6A (but not HHV-6B) DNA in plasma, in affected liver tissue, and in single micromanipulated syncytial giant cells with the use of two different polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assays indicated the presence of active HHV-6A infection in the patient. Expression of the HHV-6A-specific early protein, p41/38, but not of the HHV-6B-specific late protein, p101, was demonstrated only in liver syncytial giant cells in the absence of other infectious pathogens. The same markers of HHV-6A active infection were documented in serial follow-up samples from the patient and disappeared only at the resolution of syncytial giant-cell hepatitis. Neither HHV-6B DNA nor late protein was identified in the same follow-up samples from the patient. Thus, HHV-6A may be a cause of syncytial giant-cell hepatitis.

  9. Hepatic cerebrospinal fluid pseudocyst: A rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt

    PubMed Central

    Dabdoub, Carlos B.; Fontoura, Emilio A.; Santos, Egmond A.; Romero, Paulo C.; Diniz, Cristiano A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts are among the most frequently performed operations in the management of hydrocephalus. Hepatic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pseudocyst is a rare but important complication in patients with a VP shunt insertion. In addition to presenting our own case, we performed a PubMed search to comprehensively illustrate the predisposing factors, clinical picture, diagnostic methods, and surgical treatment. This article represents an update for this condition. Case Description: A 40-year-old male was admitted to a hospital complaining of fever, abdominal distention, and pain. He had undergone a VP shunt for communicating hydrocephalus caused by a head trauma one year earlier. Laboratory studies showed liver enzymes alterations, and imaging studies demonstrated a well-defined intraaxially hepatic cyst with the shunt catheter placed inside. Staphylococcus epidermis was cultured via CSF. After removing the VP shunt and an adequate antibiotic treatment, the complication of hepatic CSF pseudocyst was resolved. Conclusion: Hepatic CSF pseudocyst is a rare complication of a VP shunt. Once the diagnosis is verified and if the CSF is sterile, just simply remove the peritoneal catheter and reposition a new one in the abdomen. We believe that it is not necessary to remove or aspirate the hepatic intraaxial pseudocyst, because of the risk of bleeding. In case of CSF infection, the VP shunt can be removed and/or an external derivation can be made, and after treatment with antibiotics, a new VP shunt is placed in the opposite side of the peritoneum. PMID:24523999

  10. Hepatitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  11. Spontaneous hepatic haemorrhage: a review of pathogenesis, aetiology and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasa, Sanket; Lee, Wai G; Aldameh, Ali; Koea, Jonathan B

    2015-01-01

    Background A spontaneous hepatic haemorrhage (SHH) is a rare condition that presents acutely to both hepatobiliary and general surgeons. Management of the condition is challenging because of the emergent presentation requiring immediate intervention, the presence of underlying chronic liver disease and the multiple potential underlying aetiological conditions. Methods A literature search on a spontaneous hepatic haemorrhage was instituted on Medline (1966–2014), Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE (1947–2014), PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar. The specific topics of interest were causes – including rare causes, pathophysiological mechanisms and management options. A narrative review was planned from the outset. Results After 1546 abstracts were reviewed, 74 studies were chosen for inclusion. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the commonest cause of a spontaneous haemorrhage with 10% of HCC presenting with bleeding. Other causes are benign hepatic lesions (hemangioma, adenoma, focal nodular hyperplasia, nodular regenerative hyperplasia, biliary cystadenoma and angiomyelolipoma), malignant hepatic tumours (angiosarcoma, haemangioendothelioma, hepatoblastoma and rhabdoid sarcoma), peliosis hepatis, amyloid, systemic lupus erythematosis, polyarteritis nodosa, HELLP syndrome and acute fatty liver of pregnancy. Treatment practice emphasizes arterial embolization to obtain haemostasis with a hepatectomy reserved for tumour-bearing patients after staging and assessment of liver function. Conclusion A spontaneous hepatic haemorrhage is an acute presentation of a spectrum of conditions that requires early diagnosis and multidisciplinary management. PMID:26252245

  12. Hepatitis A: epidemiology in resource-poor countries.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Rakesh; Goel, Amit

    2015-10-01

    Transmission of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is primarily fecal-oral. Symptomatic hepatitis, severe disease, and death are more likely to occur when infection occurs at an older age. Improvements in socioeconomic and hygienic conditions have led to a change in its epidemiology worldwide. In the last two decades, improved hygiene in several resource-poor countries has led to reduced transmission of HAV, an increase in average age at infection, and, consequently, a paradoxical increase in morbidity and mortality because of hepatitis A. In Argentina, introduction of one dose (instead of the conventional two doses, to reduce costs) of inactivated HAV vaccine at 12-month age in a universal childhood immunization program during such 'epidemiologic transition' has markedly reduced the incidence of symptomatic hepatitis A, and of fulminant hepatitis and liver transplantation caused by HAV infection. The monetary value of medical and nonmedical benefits of this strategy outweighed the expenditure on vaccination. These excellent results were possibly contingent upon a high vaccination coverage. Resource-poor countries should closely monitor the epidemiology of HAV infection and periodically undertake cost-effectiveness analyses of HAV immunization strategies. This should allow timely identification of epidemiologic transition and introduction of preventive strategies before HAV infection becomes a public health problem.

  13. Response to Hepatitis A Vaccination in Immunocompromised Travelers.

    PubMed

    Garcia Garrido, Hannah M; Wieten, Rosanne W; Grobusch, Martin P; Goorhuis, Abraham

    2015-08-01

    Hepatitis A vaccines are highly immunogenic in healthy patients, but there is uncertainty about their immunogenicity in immunocompromised patients. Our study included immunocompromised patients who received 1 or 2 hepatitis A vaccinations between January 2011 and June 2013. We assessed factors that influenced the serologic response to vaccination. We performed a literature review of previous studies on hepatitis A vaccination in immunocompromised patients. Of 85 immunocompromised patients, 65 used immunosuppressive drugs, 13 had received stem cell transplants, and 7 were infected with human immunodeficiency virus. After vaccination, 65 of 85 (76.5%) developed antibodies. Tumor necrosis factor α blocker use was associated with better serologic responses than other immunosuppressive drugs. Female patients were more compliant than male patients with postvaccination antibody titer measurements. In 11 relevant studies, antibody responses after the first and second vaccination averaged 37% and 82%, respectively. Factors that negatively influenced serologic response rates were high doses of immunosuppressive drugs, fewer hepatitis A vaccinations, and a short interval between vaccination and antibody measurement. Immunocompromised patients showed moderate to good serologic responses to hepatitis A vaccination, but may need more time to develop immunity. Tumor necrosis factor α blocker use was associated with better antibody responses than other drugs. Specifically, male patients should be motivated to return for antibody titer measurements. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Hepatitis A virus infection and hepatitis A vaccination in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients: A review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuan-Yin; Chen, Guan-Jhou; Lee, Yu-Lin; Huang, Yi-Chia; Cheng, Aristine; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Liu, Chun-Eng; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2017-05-28

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is one of the most common infectious etiologies of acute hepatitis worldwide. The virus is known to be transmitted fecal-orally, resulting in symptoms ranging from asymptomatic infection to fulminant hepatitis. HAV can also be transmitted through oral-anal sex. Residents from regions of low endemicity for HAV infection often remain susceptible in their adulthood. Therefore, clustered HAV infections or outbreaks of acute hepatitis A among men who have sex with men and injecting drug users have been reported in countries of low endemicity for HAV infection. The duration of HAV viremia and stool shedding of HAV may be longer in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals compared to HIV-negative individuals with acute hepatitis A. Current guidelines recommend HAV vaccination for individuals with increased risks of exposure to HAV (such as from injecting drug use, oral-anal sex, travel to or residence in endemic areas, frequent clotting factor or blood transfusions) or with increased risks of fulminant disease (such as those with chronic hepatitis). The seroconversion rates following the recommended standard adult dosing schedule (2 doses of HAVRIX 1440 U or VAQTA 50 U administered 6-12 mo apart) are lower among HIV-positive individuals compared to HIV-negative individuals. While the response rates may be augmented by adding a booster dose at week 4 sandwiched between the first dose and the 6-mo dose, the need of booster vaccination remain less clear among HIV-positive individuals who have lost anti-HAV antibodies.

  15. Hepatitis A virus infection and hepatitis A vaccination in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuan-Yin; Chen, Guan-Jhou; Lee, Yu-Lin; Huang, Yi-Chia; Cheng, Aristine; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Liu, Chun-Eng; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is one of the most common infectious etiologies of acute hepatitis worldwide. The virus is known to be transmitted fecal-orally, resulting in symptoms ranging from asymptomatic infection to fulminant hepatitis. HAV can also be transmitted through oral-anal sex. Residents from regions of low endemicity for HAV infection often remain susceptible in their adulthood. Therefore, clustered HAV infections or outbreaks of acute hepatitis A among men who have sex with men and injecting drug users have been reported in countries of low endemicity for HAV infection. The duration of HAV viremia and stool shedding of HAV may be longer in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals compared to HIV-negative individuals with acute hepatitis A. Current guidelines recommend HAV vaccination for individuals with increased risks of exposure to HAV (such as from injecting drug use, oral-anal sex, travel to or residence in endemic areas, frequent clotting factor or blood transfusions) or with increased risks of fulminant disease (such as those with chronic hepatitis). The seroconversion rates following the recommended standard adult dosing schedule (2 doses of HAVRIX 1440 U or VAQTA 50 U administered 6-12 mo apart) are lower among HIV-positive individuals compared to HIV-negative individuals. While the response rates may be augmented by adding a booster dose at week 4 sandwiched between the first dose and the 6-mo dose, the need of booster vaccination remain less clear among HIV-positive individuals who have lost anti-HAV antibodies. PMID:28611512

  16. Hepatitis-related stigma in chronic patients: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    HassanpourDehkordi, Ali; Mohammadi, Nooredin; NikbakhatNasrabadi, Alireza

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis is one of health problems throughout the world. It has numerous consequences on patients' life. Stigma, depression, social marginalization and financial problems are some of the challenges in these patients. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine hepatitis-related stigma and discrimination in patients living with chronic hepatitis in Iranian society. This present study was designed as a qualitative method, and this article shows up the results of a qualitative research study undertaken with patients living with hepatitis in Iran. The study uses a content analysis method. A purposive sample of 18 patients was chosen. Data were collected through a semi-structured interview and field note that the researchers will take during participants' observation. Data analysis process was performed on the texts which were generated from verbatim transcripts of the participants interviews. Participants were between 18 and 61 years old. The main theme, Stigma, emerged from three themes during the process data analysis in this study. These themes were including fear to lose of family and social support, fear to present in public and fear of transmission. This research indicates that stigma presents major challenges not only for patients living with chronic hepatitis but also for nurses, other healthcare practitioners, family and social networks, institutions and society. The researcher suggests that interventions to reduce or eliminate stigma should require individual, structural, cultural thought, society and systemic changes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment of low-grade hepatic encephalopathy: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kircheis, Gerald; Fleig, Wolfgang E; Görtelmeyer, Roman; Grafe, Susanne; Häussinger, Dieter

    2007-11-01

    The value of paper-pencil tests and West-Haven-criteria for assessment of low-grade hepatic encephalopathy under conditions of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial was evaluated in a cohort of 217 cirrhotics. Patients were graded at least twice clinically for severity of hepatic encephalopathy and tested concomitantly with a recommended psychometric test battery. Re-evaluation of the study documentation showed that at study entry 33% and during the study even 50% of the patients were wrongly allocated to minimal or overt hepatic encephalopathy. Despite the participating physicians' training, 31% of the number-connection-tests-A, 20% of the number-connection-tests-B and 28% of the line-tracing-test were in retrospect considered invalid by an independent psychologist. Neither the Portosystemic-Encephalopathy-Syndrome (PSE) test nor the Psychometric-Hepatic-Encephalopathy-Sum (PHES)-score reliably picked up clinical improvement in the individual patient. Although these test scores could statistically differentiate between patients with minimal and overt hepatic encephalopathy, the clinical classification of individual patients into one of the groups will have a high rate of error. The PHES-Score was less balanced than the score derived from the PSE-Syndrome-Test. Inaccuracies in conducting paper-pencil tests together with the subjectivity and incorrectness of clinical HE-grading question the usefulness of West-Haven-criteria and paper-pencil tests including related scores for quantification of low-grade HE at least in multicenter approaches.

  18. Hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma: a report from three university centers*

    PubMed Central

    Giardino, Antonello; Miller, Frank H.; Kalb, Bobby; Ramalho, Miguel; Martin, Diego R.; Rodacki, Karina; Woosley, John T.; Semelka, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine common imaging findings of hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma on magnetic resonance images. Materials and Methods A search was made of three institutional databases between January 2000 and August 2012. Seven patients (mean age, 47 years; range, 21-66 years; 6 women) with pathology-confirmed diagnosis of hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma who had undergone magnetic resonance imaging were identified. None of the patients had received any treatment for hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma at the time of the initial magnetic resonance imaging examination. Results Hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma tumors appeared as focal masses in 7/7 patients, greater than 5 in number, with a coalescing lesion in 1/5, and peripheral localization in 6/7. Capsular retraction was present in 4/7, and was associated with peripherally located lesions. Early ring enhancement was appreciated in the majority of lesions in 7/7 patients. Centripetal progressive enhancement was shown in 5/7 patients on venous phase that exhibited a distinctive thick inner border of low signal on venous phase images, and a central core of delayed enhancement. Small lesions did not show this. Conclusion The combination of multifocal round-configuration lesions that are predominantly peripheral and exhibit early peripheral ring enhancement and late appearance of an inner thick border of low signal and central core of high signal may represent an important feature for hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma. PMID:27818541

  19. Outbreak of hepatitis A in Korean military personnel.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Seop; Lee, Ju-Hyung; Kwon, Keun-Sang

    2008-05-01

    This report describes a hepatitis A outbreak among Korean military personnel. Each case of hepatitis A in this outbreak was defined as a person who had symptoms compatible with acute viral hepatitis A and had positive HAV IgM between May 2 and August 14, 2007 in Inje district, Gangwon, Korea. We tested 70 cases with symptoms for HAV IgM, and 67 cases showed positive results. They included 4 sergeants, 1 officer and 62 privates. A positive result for HAV IgG among asymptomatic military personnel was seen in 11.8% of cases. This epidemic occurred after a heavy rainfall in the military compound area where drinking water was supplied by the stream water. After the outbreak, the supply of drinking water was switched to a public water system. All of 178 military personnel who had no HAV IgG were vaccinated on July 26, 2007. The outbreak was resolved after the control measures were implemented.

  20. [Chronic hepatitis non-A, non-B hepatitis: a clinical and morphologic study].

    PubMed

    da Silva, L C; Coêlho, M E; Pessôa, M G; Carrilho, F J; Cançado, E L; Muszkat, R M; da Fonseca, L E; Antonelli, R; Alves, V A; Gayotto, L C

    1989-01-01

    Few data on chronic non-A, non-B hepatitis (NANB-CH) have been published so far in our country. We have studied 85 patients classified into four groups: I. post-transfusional (PT), 35 patients (41.2%); II. risk group (GR), including health professionals and drug addicts, 11 (12.9%); III. sporadic with a well defined beginning (EBD), 19 (22.4%) and IV. sporadic with ill-defined beginning (END), 20 (23.5%). The mean age in group I was significantly higher than in groups II and III. A polyphasic pattern of serum aminotransferases and severe histological forms were observed in all groups. It is concluded that the way of infection has probably no prognostic importance.

  1. [Hepatitis C--a health problem also in Norway].

    PubMed

    Vik, Inger Sofie Samdal; Skaug, Kjell; Dalgard, Olav; Steen, Tore W; Hoddevik, Gunnar

    2008-02-28

    Hepatitis C is a large global health problem; approximately 20 - 30 000 are infected in Norway. Hepatitis C-infection is often chronic and can progress into chronic liver disease, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The most important transmission route is through percutaneous exposure to infected blood. The aim of this article is to describe the clinical course, microbiological diagnostic approaches, therapy, prophylaxis and public health aspects of Hepatitis C infection. The paper is based on results from annual health examinations (conducted since 2001) of persons who abuse drugs intravenously in Oslo, from diagnostic work in a national reference laboratory for Hepatitis C and studies of literature (retrieved from Pubmed). The prevalence of Hepatitis C varies by country and subgroup of patients. In Norway the prevalence is 0.13 % among new blood donors, 0.7 % among pregnant women, 0.55 % in the general adult population and approximately 70 % among persons who abuse drugs intravenously. Treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin induces sustained virological response in 80 % of patients with genotypes 2 and 3 and in 30 - 40 % of those with genotype 1.

  2. [A role for the endocannabinoid system in hepatic steatosis].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Carina; Castillo, Valeska; Ronco, Ana María; Aguirre, Carolina; Hirsch, Sandra; Llanos, Miguel

    2014-03-01

    The endocannabinoid system (SEC) is an important modulator of several metabolic functions. This system is composed by cannabinoid receptors type 1 and 2 (RCB1 and RCB2), their endogenous ligands, known as endocannabinoids, and the enzymes involved in their synthesis and degradation. A deregulated SEC originates metabolic alterations in several tissues, resulting in the typical manifestations of the metabolic syndrome. Liver steatosis of different origins constitutes a physiopathological condition where an altered hepatic SEC is observed. In this condition, there is an increased expression of RCB1 and/or higher endocannabinoid levels in different hepatic cells, which may exert an autocrine/paracrine hyperstimulation of RCB1/RCB2. Activation of RCB1 stimulate the expression of several hepatocyte lipogenic factors, thus leading to increased de novo fatty acids synthesis and consequently to an abnormal accumulation of triglycerides. The effect of RCB2 activity on hepatic function is still controversial because, on one side its stimulation has an interesting protective effect on alcoholic liver disease while, on the other, it may enhance the development of hepatic steatosis in experimental models of diet-induced obesity. In this review we discuss the proposed mechanisms by which SEC is involved in the etiology of hepatic steatosis, as well as the therapeutic possibilities involving peripheral RCB1/RCB2 antagonism/agonism, for the treatment of this condition.

  3. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura as sole manifestation in a case of acute hepatitis A.

    PubMed

    Tanir, Gönül; Aydemir, Cumhur; Tuygun, Nilden; Kaya, Ozge; Yarali, Neşe

    2005-12-01

    Acute hepatitis due to hepatitis A virus is usually a benign selflimiting disease during childhood. Although many viral infections such as hepatitis B virus, Parvovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus are associated with extrahepatic autoimmune phenomena, such manifestations are rare in patients with acute hepatitis A infection. Immune thrombocytopenia is a benign, self-limiting disease in children, responding well to treatment and generally associated with viral infections. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura is rarely reported as a manifestation of acute hepatitis A. We report a five-year-old boy with immune thrombocytopenic purpura as the sole manifestation of anicteric acute hepatitis A infection. Acute hepatitis A should be included in the differential diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

  4. Hepatitis a screening for internationally adopted children from hepatitis A endemic countries.

    PubMed

    Raabe, Vanessa N; Sautter, Casey; Chesney, Mary; Eckerle, Judith K; Howard, Cynthia R; John, Chandy C

    2014-01-01

    Screening for hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is not currently routinely recommended in internationally adopted children. International adoptees seen at the University of Minnesota International Adoption Clinic from 2006 to 2010 were assessed for acute HAV infection (positive HAV immunoglobulin M). Thirty of the 656 children screened (4.6%) were acutely HAV infected. HAV-infected children emigrated from Ethiopia (16), Guatemala (4), China (2), Colombia (2), Haiti (2), Philippines (2), Liberia (1), and Nepal (1). Infection was most frequent among children younger than 2 years (6.7%). No symptoms distinguished children with acute HAV infection from uninfected children. HAV infection caused significant social disruption, including separation of children from their ill adoptive parents during the initial weeks postarrival, a period important for postadoption adjustment and attachment. All international adoptees arriving from countries with high or intermediate HAV endemicity should be screened for HAV infection on arrival to the United States.

  5. [Hepatic subcapsular hematoma: a case report and management update].

    PubMed

    Berveiller, P; Vandenbroucke, L; Popowski, T; Afriat, R; Sauvanet, E; Giovangrandi, Y

    2012-06-01

    Hepatic subcapsular hematoma (HSH) is a rare complication of pregnancy that keeps a materno-fetal high mortality rate. Given this severity, HSH management requires a prompt diagnosis and an appropriate care. Before focusing on the current management strategy of HSH, we illustrate this article with a clinical case presenting an original method of abdominal exploration, which has not been described to our knowledge. Thus, taking into account the presence of a moderate hemoperitoneum during a caesarean section procedure for HSH, introduction of laparoscopy through the same incision allowed a satisfactory evaluation of the abdominal cavity and hepatic area without performing an invasive midline laparotomy.

  6. Hepatitis Information for the Public

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hepatitis Contact Us Anonymous Feedback Quick Links to HepatitisA | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Local Partners & Grantees Policy and Programs Resource Center Hepatitis Information for the Public Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  7. Single-incision laparoscopic management of a giant hepatic cyst.

    PubMed

    Willems, Kaitlin; Monsivais, Sharon; Vassaur, Hannah; Buckley, Francis P

    2015-07-29

    Large symptomatic hepatic cysts may warrant surgical management. Traditional multiport laparoscopic technique is typically preferred over open laparotomy, but the use of the single-incision laparoscopic approach for this diagnosis is not well documented. Here, we describe the case of a 68-year-old woman who underwent complete anterior wall fenestration, excision and cauterization of a simple hepatic cyst via a single-incision laparoscopic technique through an incision at the umbilicus. The objective of this case report is to document single-incision laparoscopy as a safe, feasible and cosmetically appealing approach for the management of a large hepatic cyst. Published by Oxford University Press and JSCR Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015.

  8. Hepatic cyst infection in a healthy older male

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Eiichiro; Akai, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Takaki; Kawaratani, Hideto; Horii, Manabu; Iwano, Masayuki; Uemura, Shiro; Nonomura, Akitaka; Fukui, Hiroshi; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2012-01-01

    Simple hepatic cysts are usually asymptomatic and are not associated with impaired hepatic function. However, complications, such as obstructive jaundice, rupture, intracystic haemorrhage and infection, can occur. The authors describe the case of a 82-year-old man with fever and elevated C-reactive protein. A repeat contrast-enhanced abdominal CT scan revealed enlargement with peripheral enhancement in the left lateral segment of the liver. A diagnosis of infected hepatic cyst was made, and percutaneous transhepatic drainage of the cyst was performed. When a patient has liver cysts and high-grade fever, liver cysts should be considered as a focus of infection. Repetition of ultrasonography and/or CT studies should be considered, even if no typical findings are obtained initially. It is of note that conventional Ga-scintigraphy may be useful for the detection of infected site. PMID:22605693

  9. [Hepatitis A immunisation in the Argentinean mandatory schedule].

    PubMed

    Gentile, Ángela; Ramonet, Margarita D; Ciocca, Mirta

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis A (HA) presents a benign evolution, but occasionally some patients develop a more severe disease. Previously to 2005 hepatitis A was an important cause of acute liver failure (ALF) and hepatic transplant. In 2003, a consensus in the Argentinian Pediatrics Society was done; it had just recommended the inclusion of the vaccine in the mandatory immunisation schedule. This was issued by the Health Ministery, and was applied on June 1st, 2005. The schedule was one dose at the age of one year of age. Since then, an important reduction of HA was registered, without any case of ALF since 2006. Follow-up studies so far showed low viral circulation and persistence of antibodies to 5 years later.

  10. Multiplex hydrolysis probe real-time PCR for simultaneous detection of hepatitis A virus and hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Feng; Cao, Jingyuan; Su, Qiudong; Yi, Yao; Bi, Shengli

    2014-05-30

    Detection of hepatitis viral infections has traditionally relied on the circulating antibody test using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. However, multiplex real-time PCR has been increasingly used for a variety of viral nucleic acid detections and has proven to be superior to traditional methods. Hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) are the major causes of acute hepatitis worldwide; both HAV and HEV infection are a main public health problem. In the present study, a one-step multiplex reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay using hydrolysis probes was developed for simultaneously detecting HAV and HEV. This novel detection system proved specific to the target viruses, to be highly sensitive and to be applicable to clinical sera samples, making it useful for rapid, accurate and feasible identification of HAV and HEV.

  11. Multiplex Hydrolysis Probe Real-Time PCR for Simultaneous Detection of Hepatitis A Virus and Hepatitis E Virus

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Feng; Cao, Jingyuan; Su, Qiudong; Yi, Yao; Bi, Shengli

    2014-01-01

    Detection of hepatitis viral infections has traditionally relied on the circulating antibody test using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. However, multiplex real-time PCR has been increasingly used for a variety of viral nucleic acid detections and has proven to be superior to traditional methods. Hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) are the major causes of acute hepatitis worldwide; both HAV and HEV infection are a main public health problem. In the present study, a one-step multiplex reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay using hydrolysis probes was developed for simultaneously detecting HAV and HEV. This novel detection system proved specific to the target viruses, to be highly sensitive and to be applicable to clinical sera samples, making it useful for rapid, accurate and feasible identification of HAV and HEV. PMID:24886818

  12. Hepatic abscess linked to oral actinomycetes: a case report.

    PubMed

    De Farias, Deborah G

    2015-01-01

    Organ abscesses are rare, life-threatening complications that can be caused by bacteremia from oral infections. Metastatic infection is a well-established concept. Dental and periapical infections can cause infections in distant organs and tissues. The frequency of these systemic infections and systemic diseases is open to debate, as some patients are more susceptible to infections than others. This article presents the case report of a 52-year-old woman who was hospitalized with a hepatic abscess after a routine periodontal maintenance procedure. The patient had poor oral health, involving several nonrestorable teeth, multiple failed endodontic treatments, and asymptomatic chronic periapical pathologies. Her dental history included previous diagnoses of moderate generalized chronic periodontitis and advanced localized periodontitis. It was possible that bacteremia developed during her most recent dental treatment, leading to the hepatic abscess. Systemic antibiotic therapy, drainage of the hepatic abscess, and oral rehabilitation resulted in complete recovery.

  13. [Toxic hepatitis by consumption Herbalife products a case report].

    PubMed

    Chao, Sara; Anders, Margarita; Turbay, Maximiliano; Olaiz, Emiliano; Mc Cormack, Lucas; Mastai, Ricardo

    2008-12-01

    Toxic hepatitis by consumption Herbalife products is an affection poorly documented and with a great impact in the population due to their massive consumption. We present the case of a 63-years-old woman with probable diagnosis of toxic hepatitis secondary to the consumption of nutritional supplements Herbalife. The nutritional supplements based on natural ingredients are of massive consumption worldwide. Because they are recognized like innocuous and of non-controlled comercialization, they lack suitable controls. Although there are reported cases of hepatotoxicity and other side effects induced by these products, there is still not strong evidence to generate a positive reaction of the control organisms. We report a case of acute toxic hepatitis potencially due to the consumption of Herbalife.

  14. Hepatitis A Virus and Hepatitis E Virus Seroprevalence Among Blood Donors in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hesamizadeh, Khashayar; Sharafi, Heidar; Keyvani, Hossein; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Najafi-Tireh Shabankareh, Azar; Sharifi Olyaie, Roghiyeh; Keshvari, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis A virus (HAV) and Hepatitis E virus (HEV) are both transmitted by the fecal-oral route and are known as the leading causes of acute viral hepatitis in the world, especially in developing countries. There is a lack of updated data on HAV and HEV seroprevalence in Iran. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of HAV and HEV among a group of blood donors in Tehran, Iran. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was performed from July 2014 to December 2014, on a total of 559 blood donors referred to the Tehran blood transfusion center. The serum samples were tested for antibodies to HAV and HEV, using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results In the present study, 536 (95.9%) cases were male and 23 (4.1%) female with mean age of 38 years. Out of 559 blood donors, 107 (19.1%) were first-time donors, 163 (29.2%) lapsed donors and 289 (51.7%) regular donors. Anti-HAV was found in 395 (70.7%) and anti-HEV in 45 (8.1%) of the blood donors. The HAV and HEV seroprevalence increased by age. There was no significant difference between genders in terms of anti-HAV and anti-HEV status. The HAV and HEV seroprevalence was significantly related to the level of education, where the donors with higher level of education had lower rate of HAV and HEV seroprevalence. The HAV and HEV seroprevalence was significantly higher in regular and lapsed donors than in first-time donors. Conclusions The present study showed that both HAV and HEV infections are still endemic in Iran. PMID:27110256

  15. Virological pattern of hepatitis B infection in an HIV-positive man with fatal fulminant hepatitis B: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction There seem to be no published data concerning the clinical impact of populations of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in the hepatic and extrahepatic compartments of HIV-infected people with severe acute hepatitis. Case presentation A 26-year-old Caucasian man presenting to our hospital with clinical symptoms suggesting acute hepatitis was found to have an acute hepatitis B profile upon admission. He developed fatal fulminant hepatitis and was found to be heavily immunocompromised due to HIV-1 infection. He had a high plasma HBV and HIV load, and analysis of the partial pre-S1/pre-S2 domain showed the presence of mixed infection with D and F genotypes. Analysis of the point mutations within this region revealed the presence of HBV strains with amino acid substitutions at the immunodominant epitopes involved in B or T cell recognition. A homogeneous population of a pre-core mutant strain harbouring the A1896G and A1899G affecting HBeAg expression was invariably found in the liver tissue, plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells despite active HBeAg secretion; it was the dominant strain in the liver only, and was characterised by the presence of two point mutations in the direct repeat 1 domain involved in HBV replication activity. Taken together, these mutations are indicative of a highly replicative virus capable of evading immune responses. Conclusion This case report provides clinical evidence of a possible association between the rapid spread of highly replicative escape mutants and the development of fulminant hepatitis in a heavily immunocompromised patient. Virological surveillance of severe acute hepatitis B may be important in establishing an early treatment strategy involving antiviral drugs capable of preventing liver failure, especially in individuals for whom liver transplantation is not accepted as a standard indication. PMID:19946588

  16. Hepatitis C virus acquisition among Egyptians: analysis of a 10-year surveillance of acute hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Mohsen, Amira; Bernier, Adeline; LeFouler, Lenaig; Delarocque-Astagneau, Elisabeth; El-Daly, Mai; El-Kafrawy, Sherif; El-Mango, Salwa; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed; Gadallah, Mohsen; Esmat, Gamal; Mohamed, Mostafa K; Fontanet, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    To identify current risk factors for hepatitis C virus (HCV) acquisition among Egyptians. Patients with acute HCV were identified through a surveillance system of acute hepatitis in four fever hospitals in Egypt between 2002 and 2012. Case-control analysis was conducted, cases being incident acute symptomatic HCV and controls being acute hepatitis A identified at the same hospitals. The questionnaire covered iatrogenic, community and household exposures to HCV in the 1-6 months prior to onset of symptoms. Multivariate models were built to identify risk factors associated with HCV acquisition among non-drug users and drug users separately. Among non-drug users, hospital admission was independently associated with acute HCV infection (OR = 4.2, 95% CI = 1.7-10.5). Several iatrogenic procedures, for example admission in a surgery unit, sutures, IV injections and IV infusions, highly correlated with hospital admission, were also associated with acute HCV infection and could have been used in the final model instead of hospital admission. Among drug users, identified risk factors were multiple sexual relations (OR = 4.0, 95% CI = 1.1-14.7), intravenous drug use (OR = 3.9, 95% CI = 1.2-13.0) and shaving at the barbershops (OR = 8.7, 95% CI = 2.4-31.4). Illiteracy and marriage were significant risk factors in both groups. Invasive medical procedures are still a major risk for acquiring new HCV infections in Egypt, as is illicit drug use in spreading HCV infection. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. HIV and Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Hepatitis C (Last updated 8/31/2016; last reviewed ... the medicines for any side effects. What is hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a liver disease caused ...

  18. HIV and Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Hepatitis B (Last updated 8/31/2016; last reviewed ... should be treated for both diseases. What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a liver disease caused ...

  19. An outbreak of hepatitis A amongst injecting drug users.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donovan, D.; Cooke, R. P.; Joce, R.; Eastbury, A.; Waite, J.; Stene-Johansen, K.

    2001-01-01

    This descriptive study investigated an outbreak of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection among injecting drug users (IDUs) and their contacts. Twenty-seven cases of acute HAV infection were identified in a 5-month period. Connections with the local injecting drug using (IDU) population were established for 25 of the cases of whom 14 admitted to injecting drug use. HAV RNA genotyping revealed two HAV variants, closely related to variants found in Scandinavian IDUs and in South East Asia. The study demonstrates that once HAV enters the IDU population extensive outbreaks are possible. We recommend that all IDUs should be tested for HAV and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and offered combined hepatitis A and B vaccines if non-immune. PMID:11811880

  20. Molecular biology and inhibitors of hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed

    Debing, Yannick; Neyts, Johan; Thibaut, Hendrik Jan

    2014-09-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is a faeco-orally transmitted picornavirus and is one of the main causes of acute hepatitis worldwide. An overview of the molecular biology of HAV is presented with an emphasis on recent findings. Immune evasion strategies and a possible correlation between HAV and atopy are discussed as well. Despite the availability of efficient vaccines, antiviral drugs targeting HAV are required to treat severe cases of fulminant hepatitis, contain outbreaks, and halt the potential spread of vaccine-escape variants. Additionally, such drugs could be used to shorten the period of illness and decrease associated economical costs. Several known inhibitors of HAV with various mechanisms of action will be discussed. Since none of these molecules is readily useable in the clinic and since the availability of an anti-HAV drug would be of clinical importance, increased efforts should be targeted toward discovery and development of such antivirals.

  1. The Effect of Hepatic Impairment on the Pharmacokinetics of Grazoprevir, a Hepatitis C Virus Protease Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Caro, Luzelena; Wenning, Larissa; Guo, Zifang; Fraser, Iain P; Fandozzi, Christine; Talaty, Jennifer; Panebianco, Deborah; Ho, Maureen; Uemura, Naoto; Reitmann, Christina; Angus, Peter; Gane, Edward; Marbury, Thomas; Smith, William B; Iwamoto, Marian; Butterton, Joan R; Yeh, Wendy W

    2017-09-25

    Grazoprevir (GZR) plus elbasvir is an approved treatment for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 or 4 infection. HCV infection complications include liver cirrhosis, end-stage liver disease, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and safety of multiple-dose GZR 200, 100, and 50 mg in non-HCV participants with mild, moderate, or severe hepatic impairment (HI), respectively, versus healthy matched controls (Protocol MK-5172_p013). Participants with mild, moderate, or severe HI and race-, age-, sex-, and body mass index--matched controls (aged 18-65 years) were enrolled in a 3-part, open-label, sequential-panel, pharmacokinetic study. Participants received multiple oral doses of 200 (2×100-mg tablets), 100 (1×100-mg tablet), or 50 mg (2×25-mg tablets) GZR once daily for 10 days. A total of 50 participants were enrolled: 8 with mild HI, 9 with moderate HI, 8 with severe HI, and a corresponding number of healthy matched controls per hepatic cohort. Participants with HI demonstrated higher GZR exposure compared with healthy matched controls, and showed an increase in exposure with increasing HI severity. The steady-state GZR AUC0-24 in participants with mild, moderate, or severe HI was ≈2-, ≈5-, and ≈12-fold higher, respectively, than healthy matched controls. GZR was generally well tolerated in participants with HI. No dose adjustment is required for GZR in people with HCV with mild HI. GZR is contraindicated in those with moderate or severe HI (Child-Pugh B or C), as they may have significantly increased GZR exposures that may lead to increased risk of transaminase elevations. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Wandering biliary ascariasis with hepatic abscess in a postmenopausal woman.

    PubMed

    Nahar, N; Khan, N; Islam, S M; Chakraborty, R K; Rima, S Z; Alam, M N; Roy, A S

    2014-10-01

    Hepatobiliary ascariasis is common in developing countries where there is a low standard of public health and hygiene. We are reporting a rare case of ascariasis which induced multiple liver abscesses in a post menopausal woman who presented with fever, anorexia, nausea, vomiting and mild hepatomegaly. Ultrasonography revealed biliary ascariasis with multiple hepatic abscesses. Laparoscopic drainage of hepatic abscesses was done and microscopic examination of drainage materials showed decorticated eggs of Ascaris Lumbricoides. The post operative recovery of the patient was uneventful. Ultrasonography is a reliable modality to diagnose and follow up of such cases.

  3. Outbreak of Hepatitis A on an Offshore Petroleum Platform, Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Kosatsky, Tom; Middaugh, John P.; Hall, David

    1988-01-01

    An outbreak of 8 cases of hepatitis A among the 36-member crew of an offshore Alaska petroleum production platform was linked to a previous outbreak in an urban day-care center. Transmission of hepatitis A on the platform related most plausibly to refrigerated food items contaminated by a cook with mild disease. Control efforts included identifying and treating contacts of case patients who had traveled far from the platform before becoming ill. Early serologic confirmation of diagnosed cases and rapid reporting to public health authorities are essential to prevent disease transmission. Timely investigation can limit the administration of immune globulin to persons at high risk of contracting the disease. PMID:3348024

  4. [Hepatitis E--a new zoonotic disease in Germany?].

    PubMed

    Bächlein, Christine; Grummer, Beatrice

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most frequent pathogen of a fecal-oral transmitted hepatitis in humans in many developing countries. It is endemic in the Middle East, in India, in Southeast Asia, central Asia as well as in Central and South America. It can be predominantly found in young adults. The mortality rate comes up to 2% whereas in pregnant women death rate can reach about 25%. Until a few years ago, acute hepatitis E was thought to be rare in industrialized countries: most cases were found in persons with a corresponding travel history. However, after improvement of the diagnostic possibilities, an increasing number of autochthonous cases with acute hepatitis E have become evident. Besides, a relatively high seroprevalence of 1 to 5% in the population in industrialized countries is noticeable which is converse to the only sporadic occurrence of acute hepatitis E. As a reason for this an animal reservoir for HEV is being discussed. The first HEV recovering from an animal succeeded in 1997 from a pig in the USA. Genetic typing showed close relationship between the porcine HEVand human HEV types. This confirmed the suspicion on a zoonotic potential of HEV. Transmission experiments revealed that non-human primates were sensitive to the porcine HEV and pigs could be infected with human HEV. Besides, occupational groups with close contact to pigs evidently have an increased risk for HEV infections. In addition, reports of acute hepatitis E after the consumption of undercooked wild boar meat supported the zoonotic potential of HEV. In the domestic pig and wild boar population in several European countries the virus is ubiquitous. In Germany a high percentage of the wild boars was proven to be infected with HEV. In contrast, studies of HEV circulation in domestic pigs are still pending.

  5. Comparison of two vaccination strategies against hepatitis A and B in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Díez Redondo, M P; Almaraz, A; Jiménez Rodríguez-Vila, M; Santamaría, A; de Castro, J; Torrego, J C; Caro-Patón, A

    2009-04-01

    although the vaccination against hepatitis A (VAH) and hepatitis B (VBH) is recommended in patients with HCV, the most cost-effective strategy has not been established. Our objective was to compare the cost-effectiveness of universal strategy (vaccination all patients) with selective strategy (vaccination only patients against virus they lack immunity to) in patients with HCV. we compared the direct medical costs of the two vaccination strategies against both viruses in 313 patients with HC. Serological markers for HAV (anti-HAV) and HBV (HbsAg, anti HBs, anti HBc) were determined in the 313 patients and the costs of the vaccines and the blood tests necessary to determinate the immunity state in our care system were considered. the prevalence of anti-HAV was 81,2% and of anti-HBc was 24,6%. The prevalence of anti-HAV increases with age. HAV vaccination with universal strategy has a cost of 19.806,64 euro and with selective one of 9.899,62 euro. HBV vaccination with universal strategy rose to 18.780 euro and to 20.385,57 euro with selective one (employing anti-HBc). Costs were analysed in different groups of age and several hepatitis HBV risk factors. the selective vaccination strategy against HAV was most cost-effective in our patients with HCV. However, when the prevalence of the anti-HAV decreased to less than 20% universal strategy will be the best option. Difference of cost-effective between the two vaccination strategies against HBV was small, on behalf of universal one, so in groups with higher anti-HBc prevalence, like parenteral drugs users and tattoos, the selective strategy could be the best option.

  6. A rare case of a primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are well-differentiated low grade malignant neoplasms. Their pathogenesis is thought to be secondary to the unrestricted proliferation of neuroendocrine cells. They most commonly arise in the bronchopulmonary or gastrointestinal tract but can originate from almost any organ. While the liver is a common site of metastases, primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumors are an exceedingly rare pathology, of which fewer than 100 cases have been described in world literature. Thus, there exists a paucity of data regarding the clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of this disease. We present a case of a 35-year-old patient who presented to our facility for evaluation of a cough and cervical lymphadenopathy. Two biopsies of the lymph nodes were negative, however on workup for an occult malignancy a hypodense heterogeneous hypervascular lesion measuring 3.7 cm × 2.7 cm in segment IVb of the liver was noted on computer tomography (CT) scan. The levels of laboratory studies such as liver enzymes, alkaline phospatase, chromogranin A, 24-hour 5 hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and tumor markers including alpha fetoprotein were not elevated. An MRI confirmed the mass, and the patient underwent CT guided biopsy of the hepatic lesion. Staining from the biopsy resulted in cells reactive for synaptophysin, chromogranin, anti-Cytokeratin (CAM 5.2), MOC31, CD 56 and mucin glycoprotein (MUC) confirming a nonsecretory neuroendocrine tumor. Patient underwent octreotide scan, PET scan, CT chest, MRI head along with EUS, EGD and colonoscopy to evaluate for a primary source, however, none was found. The well localized presentation without extensive hepatic invasion made the patient a candidate for surgical resection which was successfully performed. The patient remains disease free over 36 months after initial presentation. Primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumors are an exceedingly rare entity whose variable presentation necessitates provider familiarity with this

  7. Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm; a rare complication of amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Khan, Anam; Pal, Khawaja Muhammad Inam; Khan, Hussain Ijaz

    2011-08-01

    Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm (HAP) is an infrequently encountered entity, usually seen secondary to blunt or penetrating trauma. The clinical presentation is often due to complications such as intrahepatic or intraperitoneal bleeding as a result of rupture of the pseudoaneurysm. Diagnosis is frequently delayed and made by splanchnic angiography. HAP associated with a liver abscess, has very rarely been described in the literature. We report the case of a 50-year-old man with amoebic liver abscess and right hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm which was suspected on high resolution contrast-enhanced abdominal computer tomography (CT). The lesion was confirmed by arteriography and treated prophylactically with transcatheteter embolization.

  8. Diagnosis of Hepatitis A Virus Infection: a Molecular Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nainan, Omana V.; Xia, Guoliang; Vaughan, Gilberto; Margolis, Harold S.

    2006-01-01

    Current serologic tests provide the foundation for diagnosis of hepatitis A and hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection. Recent advances in methods to identify and characterize nucleic acid markers of viral infections have provided the foundation for the field of molecular epidemiology and increased our knowledge of the molecular biology and epidemiology of HAV. Although HAV is primarily shed in feces, there is a strong viremic phase during infection which has allowed easy access to virus isolates and the use of molecular markers to determine their genetic relatedness. Molecular epidemiologic studies have provided new information on the types and extent of HAV infection and transmission in the United States. In addition, these new diagnostic methods have provided tools for the rapid detection of food-borne HAV transmission and identification of the potential source of the food contamination. PMID:16418523

  9. A comparison of hepatitis A and hepatitis B measures among vaccinated and susceptible online men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, L K; Levandowski, B A; Scanlon, K E; Peterson, R S

    2010-06-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) continue to be major health concerns among men who have sex with men (MSM). The Internet both facilitates high-risk sexual encounters and provides opportunities for promoting healthy behaviours. This study compared self-reported HAV and HBV vaccination levels, based on demographics, health characteristics, hepatitis knowledge, attitudes and risk behaviours among MSM using an online survey posted from February through June 2005. Each participant (n = 968) reported whether they were vaccinated, infected or susceptible for hepatitis A and/or for hepatitis B. Men whose health-care provider recommended vaccination were 12.91 (95% confidence interval [CI] 8.11, 20.55) times more likely to be vaccinated against HAV and 17.93 (95% CI 10.82, 29.70) times more likely to be vaccinated against HBV than those at risk of infection, respectively. These data provide essential information for public health professionals to successfully promote vaccination among members of this population.

  10. Hepatitis A outbreaks: the effect of a mass vaccination programme.

    PubMed

    Torner, N; Broner, S; Martinez, A; Godoy, P; Batalla, J; Dominguez, A

    2011-04-01

    A Hepatitis A vaccination programme of people belonging to risk groups begun in Catalonia in 1995 and a universal vaccination programme of pre-adolescents 12 years of age with the hepatitis A + B vaccine was added in 1998. The aim of the study was to investigate the characteristics of hepatitis A outbreaks occurring in Catalonia between 1991 and 2007 to determine the associated risk factors and optimize the use of vaccination. Incidence rates of outbreaks, cases and hospitalizations associated with outbreaks and the rate ratios (RR) of person-to-person transmission outbreaks between the periods before and after mass vaccination and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. A rate of 2.45 outbreaks per million persons per year was found. The rate of cases affected in these outbreaks was 1.28 per 10(5) persons per year and the rate of hospitalizations was 0.45 per million persons per year. In person-to-person outbreaks, the highest incidence rate (5.26 and 6.33 per million persons per year) of outbreaks according to the age of the index case was in the 5 to 14 year age group in both periods (RR:0.83; 95% CI:0.48-1.43). A significant increase was observed in the 25 to 44 year age group (RR: 0.35; 95% CI 0.14-0.77). Hepatitis A vaccination has made an important impact on burden and characteristics of outbreaks and could provide greater benefits to the community if the vaccine was administrated to children during their first years of life. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Clinical and laboratory features of viral hepatitis A in children.

    PubMed

    Blechová, Zuzana; Trojánek, Milan; Kynčl, Jan; Cástková, Jitka; John, Jerry; Malý, Marek; Herrmannová, Kristýna; Marešová, Vilma

    2013-02-01

    Recent outbreaks of viral hepatitis A in non-endemic European countries and the potential outbreak risk in susceptible populations has led us to evaluate the clinical characteristics of children hospitalised with hepatitis A. Retrospective study included 118 children (68 boys and 50 girls) with the mean age of 8.5 years hospitalised at Hospital Na Bulovce in Prague from June 2008 to June 2009. The clinical course was symptomatic icteric in 57 (48.3 %) children, symptomatic anicteric in 23 (19.5 %), subclinical in 22 (18.6 %) and asymptomatic inapparent in 16 (13.6 %). The relapse of the disease occurred in three patients. There were no cases of fulminant hepatitis. The most frequent symptoms included jaundice (57 cases), abdominal pain/discomfort (38), vomiting (38), dark urine (37), subfebrility (29) and fever (25). Hepatic injury markers were substantially elevated in icteric patients, but moderate elevations were identified in anicteric and subclinical cases as well. Lower white blood cell and lymphocyte counts were independently associated with symptomatic and more severe clinical course. Active immunisation was provided to 22 patients, and as a post-exposure prophylaxis to 19 of them. The clinical course and laboratory parameters in vaccinated children were not significantly different from non-vaccinated children. The clinical course of hepatitis A was largely self-limiting and benign. Asymptomatic infections are frequent, representing risk for disease spread; however, they are associated with elevations of hepatic injury markers. The inclusion of significant proportion of asymptomatic cases that were identified and investigated only because of active epidemiological surveillance in the outbreak focus represents the particular asset of this study.

  12. Managing chronic hepatitis B: A qualitative study exploring the perspectives of people living with chronic hepatitis B in Australia.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jack; McNally, Stephen; Richmond, Jacqui; Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Pitts, Marian

    2011-03-03

    The implementation of a comprehensive public health response to hepatitis B in Australia is urgently required to reduce the increasing burden of hepatitis B infection on the health system and the community. A significant gap in the public health response to hepatitis B is an understanding of how people with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) respond to CHB. A qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions was conducted. Interviews were held with 20 people with CHB from three states of Australia. In addition, four focus group discussions were held with a total of 40 community and health workers from culturally and linguistically diverse communities in four Australian states.People with CHB reported no formal or informal pre or post test discussion with little information about hepatitis B provided at the point of diagnosis. Knowledge deficits about hepatitis B were found among most participants. Few resources are available for people with CHB or their families to assist them in understanding the infection and promoting their health and well-being. A lack of confidence in the professional knowledge of service providers was noted throughout interviews. People with CHB need culturally and linguistically appropriate education and information, particularly at the point of diagnosis. Primary health care professionals need the knowledge, skills and motivation to provide appropriate information to people with CHB, to ensure they have the capacity to better manage their infection.

  13. Hepatitis-associated aplastic anaemia: a poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Vivian; Calado, Rita; Palaré, Maria João; Ferrão, Anabela; Morais, Anabela

    2013-02-13

    A 13-year-old boy presented with spontaneous skin and mucosal bleeds 3 weeks after acute hepatitis of unknown aetiology. Laboratory analyses revealed pancytopenia and bone marrow biopsy that confirmed the diagnosis of aplastic anaemia. Other causes of congenital and acquired aplastic anaemia were excluded. He was diagnosed with hepatitis-associated aplastic anaemia. He developed a critical clinical condition, becoming totally dependent on erythrocyte and platelet transfusions, and severe neutropenia, which led to invasive bacterial infection. He died due to sepsis with multiple organ failure 3 months after admission.

  14. [Dynamics of viral hepatitis A morbidity in Minsk].

    PubMed

    Orlova, S V; Petkevich, A S; Kretova, S F; Zaikina, T N; Rogacheva, T A; Shcherba, M A; Zasepskaia, D Iu; Fedorkova, V I; Ladut'ko, L S; Semenov, S F

    2005-01-01

    The results of the analysis of hepatitis A morbidity during the period of 1996 - 2001, are presented. The cyclic character of this morbidity in its dynamics over the period of several years was noted with the maximum morbidity level reached in 2000. The monthly dynamics of hepatitis A morbidity reflected its seasonal character with the maximum increase in autumn and winter. The virological control of drinking water revealed its contamination in spring and summer, with no subsequent rise in morbidity. The control of sewage reflected the emergence of the virus in the city collector in accordance with the increased morbidity.

  15. A Family of Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis and Atypical Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Sunil; Zanwar, Vinay; Mohite, Ashok; Surude, Ravindra; Rathi, Pravin; Balasubramani, Meenakshi

    2015-11-05

    Congenital hepatic fibrosis is a rare cause of portal hypertension and esophageal varices in children. We report cases of siblings with biopsy proven congenital hepatic fibrosis and with atypical retinitis pigmentosa. They presented with repeated episodes of jaundice along with progressive decrease of vision in night. They had hepatosplenomegaly and portal hypertension with esophageal varices. One of the siblings had a large regenerating nodule replacing the entire right lobe of the liver and other one developed repeated hematemesis. This constellation of diagnosis belongs to the ciliopathy group of disorders. The spectrum of ciliopathy disorders has been evolving, and it varies from mild to severe manifestations.

  16. Knowledge of Hepatitis B Virus Infection, Immunization with Hepatitis B Vaccine, Risk Perception, and Challenges to Control Hepatitis among Hospital Workers in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Adekanle, Olusegun; Ndububa, Dennis A.; Olowookere, Samuel Anu; Ijarotimi, Oluwasegun; Ijadunola, Kayode Thaddeus

    2015-01-01

    Background. Studies had reported high rate of hepatitis B infection among hospital workers with low participation in vaccination programmes, especially those whose work exposes them to the risk of HBV infection. The study assessed knowledge of hepatitis B virus infection, risk perception, vaccination history, and challenges to control hepatitis among health workers. Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional study. Consenting health care workers completed a self-administered questionnaire that assessed respondents' general knowledge of HBV, vaccination history and HBsAg status, risk perception, and challenges to control hepatitis. Data was analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results. Three hundred and eighty-two health care workers participated in the study. There were 182 males and 200 females. The respondents comprised 94 (25%) medical doctors, 168 (44%) nurses, 68 (18%) medical laboratory technologists, and 52 (14%) pharmacists. Over 33% had poor knowledge with 35% not immunized against HBV. Predictors of good knowledge include age less than 35 years, male sex, being a medical doctor, previous HBsAg test, and complete HBV immunisation. Identified challenges to control hepatitis include lack of hospital policy (91.6%), poor orientation of newly employed health workers (75.9%), and low risk perception (74.6%). Conclusion. Hospital policy issues and low risk perception of HBV transmission have grave implications for the control of HBV infection. PMID:25685549

  17. [Hepatitis A and E enterically transmitted virus infections of the liver].

    PubMed

    Siegl, G

    2004-08-01

    Hepatitis A virus (a picornavirus) and hepatitis E virus (so far unclassified) are small, non-enveloped and relatively stable RNA viruses with many similar, yet, not identical characteristics. Both viruses are transmitted preferentially by the fecal-oral route. Consequently, their spread is favoured by poor personal hygiene and inappropriate sanitary conditions. Infection can pass subclinically, take an acute and self limiting course, and can also manifest as fulminant hepatitis with liver failure. True chronic disease is unknown. Laboratory diagnosis is preferentially performed by serology, but can also be complemented by assay for viral RNA in stool or serum. Resolution of infection leads to immunity which, in the case of hepatitis A, is known to be fully protective and most likely lifelong. Available hepatitis A vaccines are able to induce a similar state of protection. Vaccines for hepatitis E are under development. Specific antiviral treatment is not yet available, neither for hepatitis A nor for hepatitis E.

  18. A New Soluble Gelatin Sponge for Transcatheter Hepatic Arterial Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Takasaka, Isao; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Sahara, Shinya; Minamiguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Motoki; Ikoma, Akira; Nakata, Kouhei; Sonomura, Tetsuo

    2010-12-15

    To prepare a soluble gelatin sponge (GS) and to explore the GS particles (GSPs) that inhibit development of collateral pathways when transcatheter hepatic arterial embolization is performed. The approval of the Institutional Committee on Research Animal Care of our institution was obtained. By means of 50 and 100 kDa of regenerative medicine-gelatin (RM-G), RM-G sponges were prepared by freeze-drying and heating to temperatures of 110-150{sup o}C for cross-linkage. The soluble times of RM-GSPs were measured in vitro. Eight swine for transcatheter hepatic arterial embolization were assigned into two groups: six received 135{sup o}C/50RM-GSPs, 125{sup o}C/100RM-GSPs, and 138{sup o}C/50RM-GSPs, with soluble time of 48 h or more in vitro; two swine received Gelpart GSPs (G-GSPs) with insoluble time of 14 days as a control. Transarterial chemoembolization was performed on two branches of the hepatic artery per swine. RM-GSPs heated at temperatures of 110-138{sup o}C were soluble. Mean soluble times of the RM-GSPs increased with higher temperature. Hepatic branches embolized with G-GSP remained occluded after 6 days, and development of collateral pathways was observed after 3 days. Hepatic branches embolized with 135{sup o}C/50RM-GSP and 125{sup o}C/100RM-GSP remained occluded for 4 h, and recanalization was observed after 1 day. Hepatic branches embolized with 138{sup o}C/50RM-GS remained occluded for 1 day, and recanalization was observed after 2 days with no development of collateral pathways. In RM-GSs with various soluble times that were prepared by modulating the heating temperature, 138{sup o}C/50RM-GSP was the soluble GSP with the longest occlusion time without inducing development of collateral pathways.

  19. Selective internal radiation therapy of hepatic tumors: procedural implications of a patent hepatic falciform artery.

    PubMed

    Schelhorn, Juliane; Ertle, Judith; Schlaak, Joerg F; Mueller, Stefan; Bockisch, Andreas; Schlosser, Thomas; Lauenstein, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) using 90-yttrium is a local therapy for unresectable liver malignancies. Non-targeted 90-yttrium diversion via a patent hepatic falciform artery (HFA) is seen as risk for periprocedural complications. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the impact of a patent HFA on SIRT. 606 patients with SIRT between 2006 and 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. SIRT preparation was performed by digital subtraction angiography including (99m)Tc-HSAM administration and subsequent SPECT/CT. Patients with an angiographically patent HFA were analyzed for procedural consequences and complications. 19 of 606 patients (3%) with an angiographically patent HFA were identified. Only 11 of these 19 patients received 90-yttrium in the hepatic vessel bed containing the HFA. Initial coil embolization of the HFA succeeded only in three of 11 patients. Out of the eight remaining patients four had no abdominal wall (99m)Tc-HSAM accumulation. The other four patients presented with an abdominal wall (99m)Tc-HSAM accumulation, for those a reattempt of HFA embolization was performed or ice packs were administered on the abdominal wall during SIRT. In summary, all patients tolerated SIRT well. A patent HFA should not be considered a SIRT contraindication. In patients with abdominal wall (99m)Tc-HSAM accumulation HFA embolization or ice pack administration seems to prevent complications.

  20. Prevalence of Hepatitis A Virus Antibody Among Navajo School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert

    1986-01-01

    A serologic investigation of prevalence of immunity to hepatitis A (anti-HAV) was conducted in a rural school adjacent to a Navajo reservation in New Mexico. The results show rates of anti-HAV that are the highest reported at the ages tested in any subpopulation in the United States, comparable only with those in developing countries. (KH)

  1. Prevalence of Hepatitis A Virus Antibody Among Navajo School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert

    1986-01-01

    A serologic investigation of prevalence of immunity to hepatitis A (anti-HAV) was conducted in a rural school adjacent to a Navajo reservation in New Mexico. The results show rates of anti-HAV that are the highest reported at the ages tested in any subpopulation in the United States, comparable only with those in developing countries. (KH)

  2. 21 CFR 866.3310 - Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays. 866... Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays. (a) Identification. HAV serological assays are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of hepatitis A virus-specific IgM, IgG, or...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3310 - Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays. 866... Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays. (a) Identification. HAV serological assays are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of hepatitis A virus-specific IgM, IgG, or...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3310 - Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays. 866... Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays. (a) Identification. HAV serological assays are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of hepatitis A virus-specific IgM, IgG, or...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3310 - Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays. 866... Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays. (a) Identification. HAV serological assays are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of hepatitis A virus-specific IgM, IgG, or...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3310 - Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays. 866... Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays. (a) Identification. HAV serological assays are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of hepatitis A virus-specific IgM, IgG, or total...

  7. Development of chronic hepatitis B infection in a hepatitis B vaccine responder.

    PubMed

    Sadlier, Corinna; Madden, Keeva; O'Gorman, Sean; Crowley, Brendan; Bergin, Colm

    2017-04-01

    The Hepatitis B vaccine is highly effective for the prevention of hepatitis B (HBV) infection. We report the development of chronic HBV infection (Genotype F) in a vaccinated immunocompetent individual with an anti-HBsAb of 35 mIU/mL post completion of vaccine series. HBV vaccine is based on recombinant proteins of genotype-A and D (predominant genotypes in Europe). It may not be as effective for the prevention of more genetically diverse viruses such as genotype F (predominant genotype in Central and South America). Healthcare providers and patients should be aware that the HB vaccine does not confer 100% protection against HBV infection, even in the setting of protective antibody levels. Partners of individuals infected with non-A or -D genotypes should be advised to consider additional precautions to prevent transmission even in the setting protective antibody levels. Surveillance of circulating HBV genotypes should be undertaken to inform public health policy in relation to prevention of HB in high-risk groups such as men who have sex with men.

  8. Compliance with a Voluntary Hepatitis B Vaccination Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Todd K.; Douglass, Chester W.

    1988-01-01

    Three years after the introduction of a voluntary hepatitis B vaccination program, the Harvard School of Dental Medicine has achieved a high vaccination rate among predoctoral students and a moderate rate among postdoctoral students and faculty. However, an unexpectedly low immunity was achieved, even among vaccinated individuals. (MSE)

  9. Compliance with a Voluntary Hepatitis B Vaccination Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Todd K.; Douglass, Chester W.

    1988-01-01

    Three years after the introduction of a voluntary hepatitis B vaccination program, the Harvard School of Dental Medicine has achieved a high vaccination rate among predoctoral students and a moderate rate among postdoctoral students and faculty. However, an unexpectedly low immunity was achieved, even among vaccinated individuals. (MSE)

  10. [Prevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis A virus infection among health sciences students in Catalonia, Spain].

    PubMed

    Bayas, J M; Bruguera, M; Vilella, A; Carbó, J M; Vidal, J; Navarro, G; Nebot, X; Prat, A; Salleras, L

    1996-09-14

    To know current hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis A (HAV) infection status among a group of health sciences students during 1990-1993 period. 1,734 health sciences students during 1990-1991, 1992-1993 and 1993-1994 academic years. demographic variables, vaccination history against HAV and HBV viruses, anti-HBc and anti-HAV antibody titres (ELISA kits). 1,734 subjects aged 22.5 +/- 2.9 years (75% women) were included. Anti-HBc total cumulated prevalence during the three year period was 2.5% (CI 95%, 1.9%-3.4%). Anti-HAV total cumulated prevalence during the three year period was 13.9% (CI 95%: 11.4%-16.8%). No statistical significant association between antibody prevalence and both age sex was found. Low prevalence, and thus, high susceptibility to HBV and HAV infection was found. We stress the importance of systematic vaccination among health sciences students not previously engaged in universal vaccination programmes. We also point out the need for further analysis upon the utility of combined HB/HA vaccine as an alternative to antihepatitis B universal vaccination programmes among adolescent cohorts.

  11. Management of patients with hepatitis C in a community population: diagnosis, discussions, and decisions to treat.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Liliana Gazzuola; Yawn, Barbara P; Wollan, Peter; Kim, W Ray

    2004-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C, a treatable condition caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV), can be found in almost all primary care and community practices. The rate of hepatitis C treatment is low, however. This study explores the frequency of hepatitis C treatment, documented discussions of treatment consideration, and the reasons treatment may not be offered in a community population. This study is a retrospective medical record review of care provided to all patients in Olmsted County, Minn, who had a confirmed diagnosis of hepatitis C. Using all records from all health care providers in Olmsted County, the rates of documented discussions regarding hepatitis C treatment and the treatment rates by specialty of diagnosing physician were assessed. In addition, comorbidities listed as reasons not to treat and or comorbid conditions in patients without a documented treatment discussion were assessed. Of the 366 patients with hepatitis C, 62% were men. Hepatitis C was more commonly diagnosed by generalist physicians (41% of cases). Treatment discussions were documented for 77% of patients with hepatitis C diagnosed by either a generalist or a gastrointestinal specialist (gastroenterologist or hepatologist) compared with 46% of patients with hepatitis C diagnosed by other physicians. Generalists' patients were more likely to have documented contraindications to treatment and were only one half as likely to receive hepatitis C treatment compared with patients with hepatitis C diagnosed by gastrointestinal specialists (16% vs 33%). Documented attempts to treat or reassess after resolution of potentially reversible contraindications to hepatitis C therapy were infrequent. In this community population, hepatitis C treatment was discussed with the majority of patients with a diagnosis of hepatitis C; however, the actual treatment rate was low. Many opportunities exist for treating more patients for HCV infection, particularly those found during emergency care and chemical dependency

  12. Management of Patients With Hepatitis C in a Community Population: Diagnosis, Discussions, and Decisions to Treat

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Liliana Gazzuola; Yawn, Barbara P.; Wollan, Peter; Kim, W. Ray

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic hepatitis C, a treatable condition caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV), can be found in almost all primary care and community practices. The rate of hepatitis C treatment is low, however. This study explores the frequency of hepatitis C treatment, documented discussions of treatment consideration, and the reasons treatment may not be offered in a community population. METHODS This study is a retrospective medical record review of care provided to all patients in Olmsted County, Minn, who had a confirmed diagnosis of hepatitis C. Using all records from all health care providers in Olmsted County, the rates of documented discussions regarding hepatitis C treatment and the treatment rates by specialty of diagnosing physician were assessed. In addition, comorbidities listed as reasons not to treat and or comorbid conditions in patients without a documented treatment discussion were assessed. RESULTS Of the 366 patients with hepatitis C, 62% were men. Hepatitis C was more commonly diagnosed by generalist physicians (41% of cases). Treatment discussions were documented for 77% of patients with hepatitis C diagnosed by either a generalist or a gastrointestinal specialist (gastroenterologist or hepatologist) compared with 46% of patients with hepatitis C diagnosed by other physicians. Generalists’ patients were more likely to have documented contraindications to treatment and were only one half as likely to receive hepatitis C treatment compared with patients with hepatitis C diagnosed by gastrointestinal specialists (16% vs 33%). Documented attempts to treat or reassess after resolution of potentially reversible contraindications to hepatitis C therapy were infrequent. CONCLUSIONS In this community population, hepatitis C treatment was discussed with the majority of patients with a diagnosis of hepatitis C; however, the actual treatment rate was low. Many opportunities exist for treating more patients for HCV infection, particularly those found

  13. Viral Hepatitis the US Military: A Study of Hospitalization Records from 1974 to 1999

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    inpatient health care provided worldwide in U.S. militaryV iral hepatitis remains.a health threat for military forces. treatment facilities. Social Security...25. Pueschel M: VHA hepatitis C costs placed at $250 million. US Med 1999; 35: 2, 2. Lemon SM, Lednar WM, Bancroft WH: Etiology of viral hepatitis in... Hepatitis in the U.S. Military: A Study of Hospitalization Records from 1974 to 1999 Guarantor: CAPT Kenneth C. Hyams, MC USN Contributors: CAPT Kenneth C

  14. Viral hepatitis and immigration: A challenge for the healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Cuenca-Gómez, J A; Salas-Coronas, J; Soriano-Pérez, M J; Vázquez-Villegas, J; Lozano-Serrano, A B; Cabezas-Fernández, M T

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a significant health problem in African countries. The increase in the immigrant population from this continent represents a challenge for the Spanish healthcare system. A descriptive study was conducted on the prevalence of the serological markers of hepatitis B (HBV), C (HCV) and D (HDV) in African immigrants treated in a specialised doctor's office. The study included 2518 patients (87.7% Sub-Saharan natives), with a mean age of 31.3 years. Some 78.8% of the patients had a positive infection marker for HBV, and 638 patients (25.3%) were diagnosed with active hepatitis B (HBsAg +). In 19 cases, antibodies against HDV were detected (4 cases with detection of the viral genome). Sixty-eight patients had antibodies against HCV, 26 of whom had a positive viral load. The high prevalence of viral hepatitis in immigrants, especially HBV infection, represents a significant change in the profile of patients treated in Spain and requires measures aimed at early diagnosis and transmission prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  15. Advances in hepatitis immunization (A, B, E): public health policy and novel vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, Greet; Vorsters, Alex; Van Damme, Pierre

    2012-10-01

    This review offers an update on hepatitis A, B and E vaccines based on relevant literature published in 2011-2012. Hepatitis A and B vaccines have been commercially available for years; however, the development of the hepatitis E vaccine is still facing some challenges. Current scientific evidence shows that both hepatitis A and B vaccines confer long-term protection. These data supported the updated recommendations from the WHO on hepatitis A and B vaccines and the respective booster policy. In addition, a single-dose hepatitis A vaccination programme may be an option for some intermediate endemic countries, as far as the epidemiological situation is further monitored. Recent data illustrate the co-administration of hepatitis A with infant vaccines, as well as the interchangeability with other hepatitis A vaccines. Two genetically engineered hepatitis E vaccines are currently in development, showing more than 95% protective efficacy. Follow-up of vaccinated individuals confirms the long-term protection offered by the hepatitis A as well as hepatitis B vaccines. Data confirm the safety and immunogenicity profile of both vaccines, also when used in patient groups. The first data on the hepatitis E vaccine look promising, but questions on cross-protection, long-term efficacy and safety and immunogenicity in pregnant women and children less than 2 years remain unanswered.

  16. Micrococcus luteus: a putative cause of hepatic abscess?

    PubMed

    Andreopoulos, T; Papanikolaou, G; Politou, M; Konstantopoulos, K; Stefanou, J; Loukopoulos, D

    2000-09-01

    Micrococcus luteus was repeatedly isolated in blood cultures during a prolonged feverish syndrome in a patient who presented with multiple hepatic abscesses as well. In contrast to the literature, this case is not related to prosthetic devices; an untreated limb wound may have been the site of microbial entry.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY HEPATITIS E VIRUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a waterborne emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Thus far, an HEV outbreak has not been reported in the U.S., although a swine variant of the virus is common in Midwestern hogs. Because viruses isolated from two ...

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY HEPATITIS E VIRUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a waterborne emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Thus far, an HEV outbreak has not been reported in the U.S., although a swine variant of the virus is common in Midwestern hogs. Because viruses isolated from two ...

  19. [Giant simple hepatic cysts as dyspnea symptom in a 93-year-old patient].

    PubMed

    Macho Pérez, O; Gómez Pavón, J; Núñez González, A; Narvaiza Grau, L; Albéniz Aguiriano, L

    2007-03-01

    Giant simple hepatic cysts is generally asymptomatic in the 3% of cases of adult patients. We present a woman case of 93 years old who was diagnoses of giant simple hepatic cyst presented as dysnea. The management of this patient was with percutaneous aspiration and fenol alcohol. It made a review of cystic lesions of the liver and of simple hepatic cysts management.

  20. Hepatic Enzyme Decline after Pediatric Blunt Trauma: A Tool for Timing Child Abuse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Amy L.; Lindberg, Daniel M.; Burke, Bonnie L.; Shults, Justine; Holmes, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Previous research in adult patients with blunt hepatic injuries has suggested a pattern of serum hepatic transaminase concentration decline. Evaluating this decline after pediatric blunt hepatic trauma could establish parameters for estimating the time of inflicted injuries. Deviation from a consistent transaminase resolution pattern…

  1. Hepatitis A and B Superimposed on Chronic Liver Disease: Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Keeffe, Emmet B

    2006-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that the acquisition of hepatitis A or hepatitis B in patients with chronic liver disease is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Superimposition of acute hepatitis A in patients with chronic hepatitis C has been associated with a particularly high mortality rate, and chronic hepatitis B virus coinfection with hepatitis C virus is associated with an accelerated progression of chronic liver disease to cirrhosis, decompensated liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. With the availability of vaccines against hepatitis B and hepatitis A since 1981 and 1995, respectively, these are vaccine-preventable diseases. Studies have confirmed that hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccines are safe and immunogenic in patients with mild to moderate chronic liver disease. However, hepatitis A and B vaccination is less effective in patients with advanced liver disease and after liver transplantation. These observations have led to the recommendation that patients undergo hepatitis A and B vaccination early in the natural history of their chronic liver disease. Vaccination rates are low in clinical practice, and public health and educational programs are needed to overcome barriers to facilitate timely implementation of these recommendations. PMID:18528476

  2. Hepatic Enzyme Decline after Pediatric Blunt Trauma: A Tool for Timing Child Abuse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Amy L.; Lindberg, Daniel M.; Burke, Bonnie L.; Shults, Justine; Holmes, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Previous research in adult patients with blunt hepatic injuries has suggested a pattern of serum hepatic transaminase concentration decline. Evaluating this decline after pediatric blunt hepatic trauma could establish parameters for estimating the time of inflicted injuries. Deviation from a consistent transaminase resolution pattern…

  3. Self-reported history of vaccination and disease and immunity against hepatitis A, hepatitis B, tetanus, diphtheria and varicella among Spanish military recruits.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Alejandro; Desviat, Pilar Vallejo; Jaqueti, Jeronimo; Santos, Juana; de Miguel, Angel Gil; Garcia, Rodrigo Jiménez

    2010-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate the immune status against hepatitis A, hepatitis B, tetanus, diphtheria and varicella in military recruits and the validity of self-reporting of their disease and vaccination history. A total of 226 participants were studied (mean age, 20.2 years; SD 1.7). 10.4% presented antibodies to hepatitis A, 78.3% to hepatitis B, 94.2% to tetanus, 77.4% to diphtheria and 81.9% to varicella. The relationship between self-reporting of vaccination history and seroprotection showed a high Positive Predictive Value for tetanus (98.8%) and a high Negative Predictive Value for hepatitis A (91%). Hepatitis A vaccination and serology testing for varicella and Hepatitis B on joining the Spanish armed forces are recommended.

  4. [Atypically localised hepatic haemangioma as a cause of dyspeptic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pudil, J; Martínek, J; Belsan, T; Ryska, M

    2006-07-01

    Haemangioma is a benign mesenchymal tumor growing from the endothehum of blood vessels. Most hepatic haemangiomas are asymptomatic while symptomatic haemangioma are usually manifested by non-specific pain dyspeptic syndrome, quite rarely also by hemorrhage, or icterus Symptomatic haemangiomas or large haemangiomas with fast growth, are indicated for surgical treatment. The authors present a 50-year-old patient with chronic dyspeptic condition and pressure pain in the epigastria. USG, CT, MR, CT angiography and EUS have all shown two lesiones (haemangioma of the left hepatic lobe, a tumor in the left subphrenic area of uncertain origin). We proposed an operational solution, and, surprisingly, the finding was a single haemangioma (2 parts-- intra- and extraparenchymatous--connected by a vascular bridge). We then performed left lobectomy. In the diagnosis of haemangioma, MR is a method of choice with high specificity and sensitivity. Why did not it yield the correct diagnosis? The structure, the signal and the type of postcontrast enhancement of the second lesion corresponded to a haemangioma, but the extraparenchymatous location and also the considerable remoteness from the liver invalidated this possibility before operation. Regarding to the differential diagnostics of the lesiones in the subphrenic area, which according to the imaging techniques are not related to the hepatic parenchyma, it is advisable to consider the possibility of the incidence of pedunculated hepatic haemangioma.

  5. Hepatitis B, interferon, and acne fulminans in a young girl

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sandeep; Malik, Ajay; Kumar, Dharmendra; Sodhi, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Acne fulminans (AF) is a very rare severe form of acne seen in young males, characterized by a sudden and explosive onset of hemorrhagic pustules and ulceration on the trunk, systemic features in the form of fever, polyarthropathy, malaise, erythema nodosum and painful osteolytic bone involvement with leukocytosis, and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Conventional treatment of AF includes corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agents for the initial phase followed by isotretinoin. Active hepatitis B infection with a high viral load precludes the administration of any immunosuppressive drugs. We present the case of an 18-year-old girl with a history of occasional acne who presented with AF of sudden onset following administration of interferon-alpha-2a for her recently detected hepatitis B infection. Management of hepatitis B was withheld in view of her general condition. The patient was managed with low dose isotretinoin with subsidence of lesions. AF in a young female precipitated by interferon and its management with isotretinoin in the presence of active hepatitis B infection make the case unique. PMID:27057488

  6. Hepatic erythropoietin response in cirrhosis. A contemporary review.

    PubMed

    Risør, Louise Madeleine; Fenger, Mogens; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Møller, Søren

    2016-01-01

    The main function of erythropoietin (EPO) is to maintain red blood cell mass, but in recent years, increasing evidence has suggested a wider biological role not solely related to erythropoiesis, e.g. angiogenesis and tissue protection. EPO is produced in the liver during fetal life, but the main production shifts to the kidney after birth. The liver maintains a production capacity of up to 10% of the total EPO synthesis in healthy controls, but can be up-regulated to 90-100%. However, the hepatic EPO synthesis has been shown not to be adequate for correction of anemia in the absence of renal-derived EPO. Elevated circulating EPO has been reported in a number of diseases, but data from cirrhotic patients are sparse and the level of plasma EPO in patients with cirrhosis is controversial. Cirrhosis is characterized by liver fibrosis, hepatic dysfunction and the release of proinflammatory cytokines, which lead to arterial hypotension, hepatic nephropathy and anemia. An increase in EPO due to renal hypoperfusion, hypoxia and anemia or an EPO-mediated hepato-protective and regenerative mechanism is plausible. However, poor hepatic synthesis capacity, a decreasing co-factor level and inflammatory feedback mechanisms may explain a potential insufficient EPO response in end-stage cirrhosis. Finally, the question remains as to whether a potential increase in EPO production in certain stages of cirrhosis originates from the kidney or liver. This paper aims to review contemporary aspects of EPO relating to chronic liver disease.

  7. Opt-Out Panel Testing for HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C in an Urban Emergency Department: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Sarah; Lillis, Darren; Cotter, Aoife; O’Dea, Siobhan; Tuite, Helen; Fleming, Catherine; Crowley, Brendan; Fitzgerald, Ian; Dalby, Linda; Barry, Helen; Shields, Darragh; Norris, Suzanne; Plunkett, Patrick K.; Bergin, Colm

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Studies suggest 2 per 1000 people in Dublin are living with HIV, the level above which universal screening is advised. We aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a universal opt-out HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C testing programme for Emergency Department patients and to describe the incidence and prevalence of blood-borne viruses in this population. Methods An opt-out ED blood borne virus screening programme was piloted from March 2014 to January 2015. Patients undergoing blood sampling during routine clinical care were offered HIV 1&2 antibody/antigen assay, HBV surface antigen and HCV antibody tests. Linkage to care where necessary was co-ordinated by the study team. New diagnosis and prevalence rates were defined as the new cases per 1000 tested and number of positive tests per 1000 tested respectively. Results Over 45 weeks of testing, of 10,000 patient visits, 8,839 individual patient samples were available for analysis following removal of duplicates. A sustained target uptake of >50% was obtained after week 3. 97(1.09%), 44(0.49%) and 447(5.05%) HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C tests were positive respectively. Of these, 7(0.08%), 20(0.22%) and 58(0.66%) were new diagnoses of HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C respectively. The new diagnosis rate for HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C was 0.8, 2.26 and 6.5 per 1000 and study prevalence for HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C was 11.0, 5.0 and 50.5 per 1000 respectively. Conclusions Opt-out blood borne viral screening was feasible and acceptable in an inner-city ED. Blood borne viral infections were prevalent in this population and newly diagnosed cases were diagnosed and linked to care. These results suggest widespread blood borne viral testing in differing clinical locations with differing population demographic risks may be warranted. PMID:26967517

  8. Hemodialysis and hepatitis B vaccination: a challenge to physicians

    PubMed Central

    Ayub¹, Munir Akar; Bacci, Marcelo Rodrigues; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso; Chehter, Ethel Zimberg

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B is responsible for the development of half of hepatocellular carcinoma cases and is a major cause of hepatic insufficiency. The vaccine against hepatitis B virus does not exhibit the same high efficacy in patients on hemodialysis as it does in immunocompetent individuals. The medical literature recommends vaccination with four doses (40 mg each) of the hepatitis B virus vaccine before beginning hemodialysis; however, approximately one-third of hemodialysis patients do not respond to this vaccination schedule. A new serologic test should be performed each year for individuals who respond adequately, whereas a booster dose should be offered to those with antibody titers below 10 mIU/mL. In this study, we followed 83 hemodialysis patients and collected quantitative serologic measurements every 2 months over a 1-year period. We made the measurements 1 month after the vaccination period. We found that 41% of the patients had antibody titers below 10 mIU/mL (nonresponders), 21.7% had antibody titers between 10 mIU/mL and 100 mIU/mL (poor responders), and 37.3% had antibody titers higher than 100 mIU/mL (good responders). Patients with diabetes and/or hypertension exhibited worse response to vaccination. All subjects displayed decreasing antibody titers during the observation period. The group of poorly responsive patients had antibody titers below 10 mIU/mL at the 6-month follow-up period. PMID:24520201

  9. Chronic Hepatitis C Infection in a Rural Medicaid HMO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert Jr., James F.; Goldenberg, Paula C.; Schock, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C infection (CHCI) is an increasingly common problem, affecting about 2% of the US population. The cost and complexity of treatment and difficulties in communicating with the infected population are of concern to insurers and health planners. Purpose: To describe the clinical features of patients with CHCI in a rural…

  10. Chronic Hepatitis C Infection in a Rural Medicaid HMO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert Jr., James F.; Goldenberg, Paula C.; Schock, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C infection (CHCI) is an increasingly common problem, affecting about 2% of the US population. The cost and complexity of treatment and difficulties in communicating with the infected population are of concern to insurers and health planners. Purpose: To describe the clinical features of patients with CHCI in a rural…

  11. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Africa: a review.

    PubMed

    Karoney, Mercy Jelagat; Siika, Abraham Mogisi

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a viral pandemic and a leading cause of chronic liver disease. This review highlights the epidemiology and management of Hepatitis C in Africa. We searched for articles on medline using the terms, "Hepatitis C", "Prevalence", "Epidemiology", "Africa" and "Treatment". The bibliographies of the articles found were used to find other references. We included articles published after 1995 only. The data was summarized and presented in tables and figures. Africa has the highest WHO estimated regional HCV prevalence (5.3%). Egypt has the highest prevalence (17.5%) of HCV in the world. Genotypes commonly found in Africa are 1, 4 and 5. Genotype 3 is found in Egypt and parts of Central Africa. Blood transfusion is a major means of acquisition of HCV infection. While treatment with peginterferon and ribavirin is recommended for patients with chronic HCV, no data were found on their use in Africa. Neither were there any data on definitive management (liver transplantation) for those with end stage disease. Data on HCV infection in Africa are scarce. This suggests that hepatitis C is still a neglected disease in many countries. Limited data exist in literature on HCV in Africa.

  12. Hemodialysis and hepatitis B vaccination: a challenge to physicians.

    PubMed

    Ayub, Munir Akar; Bacci, Marcelo Rodrigues; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso; Chehter, Ethel Zimberg

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B is responsible for the development of half of hepatocellular carcinoma cases and is a major cause of hepatic insufficiency. The vaccine against hepatitis B virus does not exhibit the same high efficacy in patients on hemodialysis as it does in immunocompetent individuals. The medical literature recommends vaccination with four doses (40 mg each) of the hepatitis B virus vaccine before beginning hemodialysis; however, approximately one-third of hemodialysis patients do not respond to this vaccination schedule. A new serologic test should be performed each year for individuals who respond adequately, whereas a booster dose should be offered to those with antibody titers below 10 mIU/mL. In this study, we followed 83 hemodialysis patients and collected quantitative serologic measurements every 2 months over a 1-year period. We made the measurements 1 month after the vaccination period. We found that 41% of the patients had antibody titers below 10 mIU/mL (nonresponders), 21.7% had antibody titers between 10 mIU/mL and 100 mIU/mL (poor responders), and 37.3% had antibody titers higher than 100 mIU/mL (good responders). Patients with diabetes and/or hypertension exhibited worse response to vaccination. All subjects displayed decreasing antibody titers during the observation period. The group of poorly responsive patients had antibody titers below 10 mIU/mL at the 6-month follow-up period.

  13. Hepatic abscess: a rare complication after liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Kornasiewicz, Oskar; Hołówko, Wacław; Grąt, Michał; Gorski, Zuzanna; Dudek, Krzysztof; Raszeja-Wyszomirska, Joanna; Krawczyk, Marek

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the predisposing factors, microbiology, treatment, and outcomes associated with hepatic abscess, a rare but serious complication which may accur after an orthotopic liver transplant (OLT). This was a retrospective study based on a prospectively maintained database of 1100 patients who underwent OLT at the Medical University of Warsaw. An abscess was defined on imaging as solitary or multiple localized parenchymal collections in patients with clinical signs of infection, with or without positive cultures from blood or abscess aspirate. Fifteen patients (1.4%) developed hepatic abscess, including 12 (80%) with multiple abscesses. Predisposing factors included biliary pathology (eight patients), hepaticojejunostomy (six patients), and hepatic artery stenosis or thrombosis (five patients). Ten patients were treated using multiple percutaneous and endoscopic interventional procedures in addition to antimicrobial treatment whereas five were treated solely with antibiotics. Five patients (33.3%) died due to multi-organ failure secondary to abscess treatment, including one unsuccessful case of re-OLT. Thirteen patients (87%) had bacterial growth and five (33.3%) had fungal growth in their blood or abscess aspirates. Hepatic abscess after liver transplantation may be treated successfully with percutaneous and endoscopic intervention, along with antibiotics according to the results of microbial cultures of blood and/or abscess aspirates. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Resolution of Hepatic Encephalopathy Following Hepatic Artery Embolization in a Patient with Well-Differentiated Neuroendocrine Tumor Metastatic to the Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Erinjeri, Joseph P. Deodhar, Ajita; Thornton, Raymond H.; Allen, Peter J.; Getrajdman, George I.; Brown, Karen T.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Reidy, Diane L.

    2010-06-15

    Hepatic encephalopathy is considered a contraindication to hepatic artery embolization. We describe a patient with a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor metastatic to the liver with refractory hepatic encephalopathy and normal liver function tests. The encephalopathy was refractory to standard medical therapy with lactulose. The patient's mental status returned to baseline after three hepatic artery embolization procedures. Arteriography and ultrasound imaging before and after embolization suggest that the encephalopathy was due to arterioportal shunting causing hepatofugal portal venous flow and portosystemic shunting. In patients with a primary or metastatic well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor whose refractory hepatic encephalopathy is due to portosystemic shunting (rather than global hepatic dysfunction secondary to tumor burden), hepatic artery embolization can be performed safely and effectively.

  15. Treatment of HEV Infection in Patients with a Solid-Organ Transplant and Chronic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kamar, Nassim; Lhomme, Sébastien; Abravanel, Florence; Marion, Olivier; Peron, Jean-Marie; Alric, Laurent; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection can cause hepatic and extra-hepatic manifestations. Treatment of HEV infection has been thoroughly studied in solid-organ-transplant patients who have developed a chronic HEV infection. In this review, we report on our current knowledge regarding treatment of HEV infection. PMID:27537905

  16. Hepatitis C Seroprevalence in an Institution for Residents with a Developmental Disability. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Eric

    1996-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in Australia of 156 individuals with developmental disabilities who were long-term clients of a residential institution, to determine the incidence of hepatitis C antibodies. Results indicated that none of the residents was seropositive and that hepatitis C is less prevalent than hepatitis B in residential…

  17. Hepatitis B and A Vaccines Are Imperative for Families Adopting from Abroad

    MedlinePlus

    ... completed or even begun the hepatitis B vaccine series by the time their adoption was completed. Most of the families ... part of the routine childhood immunization schedule. The time needed for an ... hepatitis B series and the two- dose hepatitis A series over ...

  18. Hepatitis C Seroprevalence in an Institution for Residents with a Developmental Disability. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Eric

    1996-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in Australia of 156 individuals with developmental disabilities who were long-term clients of a residential institution, to determine the incidence of hepatitis C antibodies. Results indicated that none of the residents was seropositive and that hepatitis C is less prevalent than hepatitis B in residential…

  19. Acute viral hepatitis in Hong Kong: a study of recent incidences.

    PubMed

    Chau, T N; Lai, S T; Lai, J Y; Yuen, H

    1997-09-01

    Acute hepatitis patients admitted to a referral centre from January 1995 through December 1995 were studied to determine the seroprevalence of the hepatitis viruses and related risk factors. Of the 434 patients with acute viral hepatitis, the episodes due to hepatitis A, B, C, D, and non-A, non-B, non-C, (non-ABC) were 214 (49.3%), 163 (37.6%), 7 (1.6%), 0 (0%), and 50 (11.5%), respectively. Acute hepatitis A and non-ABC hepatitis commonly occur in late spring and early summer and are probably related to the intake of shellfish and travel to endemic areas. Approximately 60% of cases of symptomatic hepatitis B infection were acute exacerbations of chronic infection. Sexual exposure was the single most important risk factor for acute hepatitis B infection. The rarity of acute hepatitis C and D might be related to the low rate of intravenous drug use in our locality. Hepatitis E virus probably contributed significantly to the cases of non-ABC hepatitis. Further studies are needed to establish the importance of various causative agents of acute hepatitis in Hong Kong.

  20. Methionine deficiency and hepatic injury in a dietary steatohepatitis model.

    PubMed

    Oz, Helieh S; Chen, Theresa S; Neuman, Manuela

    2008-03-01

    Methionine (Meth) is an essential amino acid involved in DNA methylation and glutathione biosynthesis. We examined the effect of Meth on the development of steatohepatitis. Rats were fed (five weeks) amino acid-based Meth-choline-sufficient (A-MCS) or total deficient (MCD) diets and gavaged daily (two weeks) with vehicle (B-vehicle/MCD), or Meth replacement (C-Meth/MCD). To assess the effect of short-term deficiency, after three weeks one MCS group was fed a deficient diet (D-MCS/MCD). Animals fed the deficient diet for two weeks lost (29%) weight and after five weeks weighed one third as much as those on the sufficient diet, and also developed anemia (P < 0.01). Hepatic transaminases progressively increased from two to five weeks (P < 0.01), leading to severe hepatic pathology. Meth administration normalized hematocrit, improved weight (P < 0.05), and suppressed abnormal enzymes activities (P < 0.01). Meth administration improved blood and hepatic glutathione (GSH), S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), and hepatic lesions (P < 0.01). The deficient diet significantly upregulated proinflammatory and fibrotic genes, which was ameliorated by Meth administration. These data support a pivotal role for methionine in the pathogenesis of the dietary model of Meth-choline-deficient (MCD) steatohepatitis (NASH).

  1. Epidemiology and prevention of hepatitis A in travelers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dong; Guo, Chuan-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis A is the second most common vaccine-preventable travel-associated infectious disease and hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the most common cause of viral hepatitis. The incidence of infection is closely related to sanitary conditions and the level of economic development. We evaluated HAV incidence, infection-related risk factors, and HAV vaccination rates in international travelers through retrospective analyses using major databases, such as CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the current literature describing epidemiological data for HAV infection in recent years. We found that the incidence of HAV infection in developed countries is very low. As international travel increases, the incidence of hepatitis A among travelers remains high and likely leads to regional outbreaks. Travelers should visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website or Infectious Disease Prevention Center of their countries to learn about the incidence of infectious diseases associated with their destination before going abroad to determine if they should be vaccinated. © 2013 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  2. Live attenuated hepatitis A vaccines developed in China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Xuan-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Two live, attenuated hepatitis A vaccines, H2 and LA-1 virus strains, were developed through serial passages of the viruses in cell cultures at 32 °C and 35 °C respectively. Both vaccines were safe and immunogenic, providing protection against clinical hepatitis A in 95% of the vaccinees, with a single dose by subcutaneous injection. The vaccine recipients were not protected from asymptomatic, subclinical hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection, which induced a similar antibody response as for unvaccinated subjects. A second dose caused anamnestic response and can be used for boosting. Oral immunization of human with H2 vaccine or of marmoset with LA-1 vaccine failed, and no evidence was found for person-to-person transmission of H2 strain or for marmoset-to-marmoset transmission of LA-1 strain by close contact. H2 strain was genetically stable when passaged in marmosets, humans or cell cultures at 37 °C; 3 consecutive passages of the virus in marmosets did not cause virulence mutation. The live vaccines offer the benefits of low cost, single dose injection, long- term protection, and increased duration of immunity through subclinical infection. Improved sanitation and administration of 150 million doses of the live vaccines to children had led to a 90% reduction in the annual national incidence rate of hepatitis A in China during the 16-year period, from 1991 to 2006. Hepatitis A (HA) immunization with both live and inactivated HA vaccines was implemented in the national routine childhood immunization program in 2008 and around 92% of the 16 million annual births received the affordable live, attenuated vaccines at 18 months of age. Near elimination of the disease was achieved in a county of China for 14 years following introduction of the H2 live vaccine into the Expanded Immunization Program (EPI) in 1992. PMID:24280971

  3. Live attenuated hepatitis A vaccines developed in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Xuan-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Two live, attenuated hepatitis A vaccines, H 2 and LA-1 virus strains, were developed through serial passages of the viruses in cell cultures at 32 °C and 35 °C respectively. Both vaccines were safe and immunogenic, providing protection against clinical hepatitis A in 95% of the vaccinees, with a single dose by subcutaneous injection. The vaccine recipients were not protected from asymptomatic, subclinical hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection, which induced a similar antibody response as for unvaccinated subjects. A second dose caused anamnestic response and can be used for boosting. Oral immunization of human with H 2 vaccine or of marmoset with LA-1 vaccine failed, and no evidence was found for person-to-person transmission of the H 2 strain or for marmoset-to-marmoset transmission of LA-1 strain, by close contact. H 2 strain was genetically stable when passaged in marmosets, humans or cell cultures at 37 °C; 3 consecutive passages of the virus in marmosets did not cause virulence mutation. The live vaccines offer the benefits of low cost, single dose injection, long- term protection, and increased duration of immunity through subclinical infection. Improved sanitation and administration of 150 million doses of the live vaccines to children had led to a 90% reduction in the annual national incidence rate of hepatitis A in China during the 16-year period, from 1991 to 2006. Hepatitis A immunization with both live and inactivated HA vaccines was implemented in the national routine childhood immunization program in 2008 and around 92% of the 16 million annual births received the affordable live, attenuated vaccines at 18 months of age. Near elimination of the disease was achieved in China for 14 years following introduction of the H 2 live vaccine into the Expanded Immunization Program (EPI) in 1992.

  4. Docosahexaenoic acid enrichment in NAFLD is associated with improvements in hepatic metabolism and hepatic insulin sensitivity: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Hodson, L; Bhatia, L; Scorletti, E; Smith, D E; Jackson, N C; Shojaee-Moradie, F; Umpleby, M; Calder, P C; Byrne, C D

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objective: Treatment of subjects with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs) suggests high levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) tissue enrichment decrease liver fat content. We assessed whether changes in erythrocyte DHA enrichment (as a surrogate marker of changes in tissue enrichment) were associated with alterations in hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL), postprandial FA partitioning and hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity in a sub-study of the WELCOME trial (Wessex Evaluation of fatty Liver and Cardiovascular markers in NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) with OMacor thErapy). Subjects/Methods: Sixteen participants were randomised to 4 g/day EPA+DHA (n=8) or placebo (n=8) for 15–18 months and underwent pre- and post-intervention measurements. Fasting and postprandial hepatic FA metabolism was assessed using metabolic substrates labelled with stable-isotope tracers (2H2O and [U13C]palmitate). Insulin sensitivity was measured by a stepped hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp using deuterated glucose. Participants were stratified according to change in DHA erythrocyte enrichment (< or ⩾2% post intervention). Results: Nine participants were stratified to DHA⩾2% (eight randomised to EPA+DHA and one to placebo) and seven to the DHA<2% group (all placebo). Compared with individuals with erythrocyte <2% change in DHA abundance, those with ⩾2% enrichment had significant improvements in hepatic insulin sensitivity, reduced fasting and postprandial plasma triglyceride concentrations, decreased fasting hepatic DNL, as well as greater appearance of 13C from dietary fat into plasma 3-hydroxybutyrate (all P<0.05). Conclusions: The findings from our pilot study indicate that individuals who achieved a change in erythrocyte DHA enrichment ⩾2% show favourable changes in hepatic FA metabolism and insulin sensitivity, which may contribute to decreasing hepatic fat content. PMID:28294174

  5. Development of a Murine Model of Blunt Hepatic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Nemzek-Hamlin, Jean A; Hwang, Haejin; Hampel, Joseph A; Yu, Bi; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of blunt hepatic trauma in humans, there are few rodent models of blunt trauma that can be used to study the associated inflammatory responses. We present a mouse model of blunt hepatic trauma that was created by using a cortical contusion device. Male mice were anesthetized with ketamine–xylazine–buprenorphine and placed in left lateral recumbency. A position of 2 mm ventral to the posterior axillary line and 5 mm caudal to the costal margin on the right side was targeted for impact. An impact velocity of 6 m/s and a piston depth of 12 mm produced a consistent pattern of hepatic injury with low mortality. All mice that recovered from anesthesia survived without complication for the length of the study. Mice were euthanized at various time points (n = 5 per group) until 7 d after injury for gross examination and collection of blood and peritoneal lavage fluids. Some mice were reanesthetized for serial monitoring of hepatic lesions via MRI. At 2 h after trauma, mice consistently displayed laceration, hematoma, and discoloration of the right lateral and caudate liver lobes, with intraabdominal hemorrhage but no other gross injuries. Blood and peritoneal lavage fluid were collected from all mice for cytokine analysis. At 2 h after trauma, there were significant increases in plasma IL10 as well as peritoneal lavage fluid IL6 and CXCL1/KC; however, these levels decreased within 24 h. At 7 d after trauma, the mice had regained body weight, and the hepatic lesions, which initially had increased in size during the first 48 h, had returned to their original size. In summary, this technique produced a reliable, low mortality, murine model that recreates features of blunt abdominal liver injury in human subjects with similar acute inflammatory response. PMID:24210016

  6. Macrophage Stimulating Protein Enhances Hepatic Inflammation in a NASH Model

    PubMed Central

    van Gorp, Patrick J.; Jeurissen, Mike L. J.; Houben, Tom; Walenbergh, Sofie M. A.; Debets, Jacques; Oligschlaeger, Yvonne; Gijbels, Marion J. J.; Neumann, Dietbert; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a common liver disease characterized by hepatic lipid accumulation (steatosis) and inflammation. Currently, therapeutic options are poor and the long-term burden to society is constantly increasing. Previously, macrophage stimulating protein (MSP)—a serum protein mainly secreted by liver—was shown to inhibit oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL)/lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced inflammation in mouse macrophages. Additionally, MSP could reduce palmitic acid (PA)-induced lipid accumulation and lipogenesis in the HepG2 cell line. Altogether, these data suggest MSP as a suppressor for metabolic inflammation. However, so far the potential of MSP to be used as a treatment for NASH was not investigated. We hypothesized that MSP reduces lipid accumulation and hepatic inflammation. To investigate the effects of MSP in the early stage of NASH, low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr-/-) mice were fed either a regular chow or a high fat, high cholesterol (HFC) diet for 7 days. Recombinant MSP or saline (control) was administrated to the mice by utilizing subcutaneously-implanted osmotic mini-pumps for the last 4 days. As expected, mice fed an HFC diet showed increased plasma and hepatic lipid accumulation, as well as enhanced hepatic inflammation, compared with chow-fed controls. Upon MSP administration, the rise in cholesterol and triglyceride levels after an HFC diet remained unaltered. Surprisingly, while hepatic macrophage and neutrophil infiltration was similar between the groups, MSP-treated mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic mediators in the liver, compared with saline-treated controls. Contrary to our expectations, MSP did not ameliorate NASH. Observed changes in inflammatory gene expression suggest that further research is needed to clarify the long-term effects of MSP. PMID:27685150

  7. [The coverage of hepatitis A vaccine among 2-29 year olds and the reporting incidence of hepatitis A in China, 2014].

    PubMed

    Wang, F Z; Zheng, H; Liu, J H; Sun, X J; Miao, N; Shen, L P; Zhang, G M; Cui, F Q

    2016-08-10

    To evaluate the hepatitis A vaccine coverage among 2-29 year olds and the reported incidence rates of hepatitis A, in China. Based on data from the national sero-survey on hepatitis B in 2014, information on hepatitis A vaccine immunization was collected and the coverage of hepatitis A vaccine was analyzed with SAS software (Version 9.4). Incidence data on hepatitis A was also collected from the National Notifiable Disease Reporting System between 2004 and 2014, and analyzed using the micro-software Excel 2007. Totally, data involving 29 058 people aged 2-29 years were available for analysis and the overall hepatitis A vaccine coverage was 44.6%. The younger the age, the higher the coverage appeared. Among the 2-6 year and the 7-14 year olds, rates of hepatitis A vaccine coverage were 91.2% and 76.0% respectively. From 2004 to 2014, the incidence rates of hepatitis A in the whole population were declining, annually. The incidence rates showed continuously declining as 82.5%, 90.6%, 72.1% among children at the age groups of 2-6 years, 7-14 years and in the whole population, from 2007 to 2013. After the inclusion of hepatitis A vaccine into the Expanded Programe on Immunization (EPI), the coverage of hepatitis A vaccine among the 2-6 year olds increased to over 90%, with no obvious difference between the urban and rural areas. Incidence of hepatitis A in the 2-6 year olds showed a more rapid decline than that in the whole population.

  8. Rare cause of acute hepatitis: a common energy drink

    PubMed Central

    Harb, Jennifer Nicole; Taylor, Zachary A; Khullar, Vikas; Sattari, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy man aged 50 years presented with malaise, anorexia, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, generalised jaundice, scleral icterus and dark urine. He was not on any prescription or over-the-counter medications, but reported drinking 4–5 energy drinks daily for 3 weeks prior to presentation. Physical examination revealed jaundice and right upper quadrant abdominal tenderness. Laboratory studies were remarkable for transaminitis and evidence of chronic hepatitis C infection. Ultrasound scan demonstrated an echogenic liver and diffuse gallbladder wall thickening. Liver biopsy showed severe acute hepatitis with bridging necrosis and marked cholestasis. The patient was treated supportively with complete resolution of his symptoms and marked improvement in his laboratory abnormalities. The development of acute hepatitis in this patient was likely secondary to excessive energy drink consumption. Energy drinks as well as other herbal/over-the-counter supplements should be considered by clinicians in the workup of patients with acute hepatitis, particularly once other aetiologies have been excluded. PMID:27803015

  9. Autoimmune hepatitis: a manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV infected patients?

    PubMed

    Murunga, Eric; Andersson, Monique; Rensburg, Christo van

    2016-07-01

    To describe a case series of patients presenting with autoimmune hepatitis after initiation of antiretroviral therapy. The demographics, clinical and laboratory features, and therapeutic response of HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy presenting to our Division between November 2011 and November 2014 with elevated liver enzymes, were analysed. Nine patients with elevated liver enzymes, immunoglobulin G and autoimmune markers in keeping with autoimmune hepatitis were identified. All were anti-hepatitis C virus negative. One patient was hepatitis B surface antigen positive but his hepatitis B viral load was undetectable. All patients denied using any traditional herbal remedies. Liver histology was consistent with autoimmune hepatitis showing interface hepatitis and infiltrates of lymphocytes and plasma cells. Diagnosis was made according to the Autoimmune Hepatitis Group Scoring Systems. All patients were started on 15-20 mg of oral prednisone with clinical and biochemical improvement after 1-6 weeks. Immune reconstitution related autoimmune hepatitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hepatitis in the HIV-infected patient on antiretroviral therapy. Liver biopsy should be performed and the diagnosis confirmed using scoring systems developed by the Autoimmune Hepatitis Group. Timely treatment with prednisone and other agents for autoimmune hepatitis is indicated, and can be lifesaving in acute liver failure.

  10. A large waterborne viral hepatitis E epidemic in Kanpur, India.

    PubMed Central

    Naik, S. R.; Aggarwal, R.; Salunke, P. N.; Mehrotra, N. N.

    1992-01-01

    In 1991 the largest epidemic of viral hepatitis E yet reported occurred in Kanpur (population, 2.1 million), India. The incidence of icteric hepatitis from December 1990 to April 1991 among the inhabitants of 420 randomly sampled houses in seven of the city's 50 wards was 3.76% (138 out of 3666 individuals), i.e., an estimated 79,091 persons in the city as a whole were affected. The attack rate was higher for males than females (5.3% versus 3.3%; P = 0.013) and for adults than children aged < 10 years (4.26% versus 1.29%; P = 0.0006). The incidence of hepatitis was higher in those city wards that were supplied with drinking-water consisting of a mixture of river Ganges and tubewell water than in those wards supplied only with tubewell water (5.6% versus 1.2%; P = 10(-6)). In the mixed-water areas, the incidence decreased as the drinking-water source changed from only tap to both tap and handpump, to only handpump (7.8%, 6.8%, and 4.3% respectively; P = 0.023). None of the sera collected from 41 hepatitis patients during the epidemic showed evidence of hepatitis virus A or B. There were two peaks in the epidemic (in February and April 1991). The first peak was probably caused by faecal contamination of river water, indicated by water analysis data, and the second, by inadequate chlorination of water in a reservoir. There was no evidence of secondary intrafamilial spread. PMID:1464145

  11. Viral hepatitis A, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    2011-08-01

    From 2000 to 2010, there were 214 incident diagnoses of acute hepatitis A among active component members of the U.S. Armed Forces; the crude overall incidence rate during the period was 1.37 per 100,000 person-years. Rates of incident diagnoses of acute hepatitis A were relatively low throughout the period and much lower than during the pre-vaccine era (1990-1996). There were disproportionate numbers of diagnoses of acute hepatitis A among service members born in countries endemic for the infection. The low rates of acute hepatitis A among U.S. military members overall reflect the widespread use of hepatitis A virus vaccine.

  12. Acute hepatitis due to hepatitis A virus subgenotype IA as an imported infectious disease from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Takako; Yano, Yoshihiko; Amin, Mochamad; Lusida, Maria I; Soetjipto; Hotta, Hak; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2014-10-01

    A 25-year-old Japanese man was admitted with general malaise and fever, which had developed 12 days after coming back to Japan from Indonesia. Blood examination revealed elevated transaminase levels and positivity for the IgM anti-HAV antibody; therefore, he was diagnosed with acute hepatitis A. HAV-RNA was detected in his serum and phylogenetically classified as subgenotype IA. The partial genome in the VP1/P2A region was consistent with the strain recently isolated from Surabaya, which indicated that he had been infected during his stay in Indonesia. Thus, HAV vaccination is recommended before visiting HAV-endemic countries for a long period of time.

  13. An epidemic outbreak of hepatitis A among homosexual men in Stockholm. Hepatitis A, a special hazard for the male homosexual subpopulation in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Christenson, B; Broström, C; Böttiger, M; Hermanson, J; Weiland, O; Ryd, G; Berg, J V; Sjöblom, R

    1982-10-01

    In 1979-1980, a distinct outbreak of hepatitis A occurred among homosexual men in Stockholm, Sweden, city and county area. The epidemic comprised 145 known cases. It began in December 1979 and progressed in waves during the following 10 months, with three distinct peaks separated by about six-week intervals. Actually, the incidence of hepatitis A in the Stockholm area showed a fivefold increase during 1980 as compared to the previous year. Clinical serologic, and social characteristics were studied more closely in 98 of the 145 homosexual men. Verification of hepatitis A was made by a solid-phase radioimmunoassay technique for detection of antibody to hepatitis A virus of the immunoglobulin M class. In addition, 64% of the men showed findings consistent with a prior hepatitis B (antibody to hepatitis B core antigen and/or antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen) and 34% were Treponema pallidum immobilization-positive from a prior or concomitant syphilis. Employment in risk professionals was common; thus, 19% worked in restaurants or otherwise handled food and 20% were engaged in medical care as compared to the 1% occupied in either branch of work among the general population in Sweden. Sexual habits with multiple partners and oral-anal sexual contacts were judged to be of major importance in the spread of this epidemic. Some spread of hepatitis A to the general population probably occurred due to the risk occupations of many homosexual men.

  14. An Outbreak of Acute Hepatitis Caused by Genotype IB Hepatitis A Viruses Contaminating the Water Supply in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ruchusatsawat, Kriangsak; Wongpiyabovorn, Jongkonnee; Kawidam, Chonthicha; Thiemsing, Laddawan; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Yoshizaki, Sayaka; Tatsumi, Masashi; Takeda, Naokazu; Ishii, Koji

    2016-01-01

    In 2000, an outbreak of acute hepatitis A was reported in a province adjacent to Bangkok, Thailand. To investigate the cause of the 2000 hepatitis A outbreaks in Thailand using molecular epidemiological analysis. Serum and stool specimens were collected from patients who were clinically diagnosed with acute viral hepatitis. Water samples from drinking water and deep-drilled wells were also collected. These specimens were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing of the VP1/2A region of the hepatitis A virus (HAV) genome. The entire genome sequence of one of the fecal specimens was determined and phylogenetically analyzed with those of known HAV sequences. Eleven of 24 fecal specimens collected from acute viral hepatitis patients were positive as determined by semi- nested reverse transcription PCR targeting the VP1/2A region of HAV. The nucleotide sequence of these samples had an identical genotype IB sequence, suggesting that the same causative agent was present. The complete nucleotide sequence derived from one of the samples indicated that the Thai genotype IB strain should be classified in a unique phylogenetic cluster. The analysis using an adjusted odds ratio showed that the consumption of groundwater was the most likely risk factor associated with the disease. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Primary Hepatic Marginal Zone Lymphoma in a Patient with Chronic Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Gherlan, George S; Stoia, Razvan; Enyedi, Mihaly; Dobrea, Camelia; Calistru, Petre I

    2016-09-01

    Extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) is a low-grade malignant lymphoma that appears frequently in the stomach, but other sites can also be involved: the intestinal tract, lungs, head, neck, skin, thyroid, breasts and liver. Recently, epidemiological evidences support the idea that there is an association between hepatitis C and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (that include MALT as a subtype). Primary non-Hodgkin lymphomas confi ned only to the liver are very rare (only 0.016% of all cases of all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas) and MALT is not the most frequent type. We present the case of a male patient, age 62, known with chronic hepatitis C, previously relapser a" er a 72 week treatment with peg-interferon alfa and ribavirin that was diagnosed at three years a" er the relapse with multiple focal liver lesions. One of the tumors was surgically removed and the histological exam performed demonstrated an extranodal marginal zone lymphoma with small B-cell with plasmacytoid diff erentiation confi ned only to the liver. Direct acting antiviral (DAA) therapy was started, but the virologic clearance was not obtained by week 10, leading to a change of DAA regimen at week 12. The antiviral therapy was continued until week 24. Imaging showed an increase in number and size of the focal lesions until week 12. At week 12 chemo- and immune-therapy was started with bendamustine and rituximab. A" erwards the evolution was favorable, the patient being now in complete remission and with undetectable viral load.

  16. HEPATIC VISCERAL LARVA MIGRANS DUE TO TOXOCARA CANIS IN A 72-YEAR-OLD MAN.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ki Dong; Lee, Jae Joon; Kim, Kyoung Kon; Suh, Heuy Sun; Hwang, In Cheol; Choi, Seung Joon

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic toxocariasis is visceral larva migrans caused by Toxocara. We report a case of hepatic toxocariasis detected incidentally during a health checkup. The patient had elevated levels of eosinophils, total IgE, and anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies. On contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) imaging he had a single, 2.16 cm, oval, ill-defined, low-attenuation hepatic nodule which was best appreciated during the portal venous phase of the scan. Clinicians should consider hepatic toxocariasis as a possible diagnosis in any individual who presents with eosinophilia of unknown etiology and an ill-defined hepatic lesion on CT imaging.

  17. Hepatitis B (HBV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hepatitis B (HBV) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hepatitis B (HBV) A A A What's in this article? ... poisons). There are several different types of hepatitis . Hepatitis B is a type that can move from one ...

  18. Comparison of hepatitis B, core, HBc, and hepatitis B antibody, anti HBs, in a presumed low risk donor population.

    PubMed

    Heck, Ellen; Cavanagh, H Dwight

    2014-09-01

    Donors screened by medical social history interview negative for high risk behavior or communicable disease history, but subsequently exhibiting reactive serological markers, emphasize importance of duel safe guarding factors for determining donor suitability. This report examines a relationship between two immunoabsorption assay tests, hepatitis B core (HBc) antibody, a required food and drug administration (FDA) test, and hepatitis B antibody (anti HBs), non-required test. Reactive serology results, 129 cases, 3,581 donors (2008-2012) for HBc as the only initially positive serological marker were subjected to anti HBs testing in this history pre-screened donor population. Enzyme linked immunoabsorption assay kits hepatitis B, core and antibody, were used in this study. All samples were initially tested for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C, utilizing nucleic acid testing and antigen antibody immunoabsorption assay. Testing was performed by a FDA-registered CLEA-certified reference laboratory. Samples were deceased donor blood samples and a limited number of pre-mortem samples, separated, stored and analyzed according to manufacturer recommendation and FDA regulations. 129 reactive HBc only samples, were subsequently tested for anti HBs. Of these 129, 94 were found to be reactive for anti HBs. This represented 72 % of samples tested for antibody, a higher percentage than anticipated for a medical history negative, low risk population.

  19. Hepatic acetyl CoA links adipose tissue inflammation to hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Perry, Rachel J; Camporez, João-Paulo G; Kursawe, Romy; Titchenell, Paul M; Zhang, Dongyan; Perry, Curtis J; Jurczak, Michael J; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Han, Myoung Sook; Zhang, Xian-Man; Ruan, Hai-Bin; Yang, Xiaoyong; Caprio, Sonia; Kaech, Susan M; Sul, Hei Sook; Birnbaum, Morris J; Davis, Roger J; Cline, Gary W; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Shulman, Gerald I

    2015-02-12

    Impaired insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose production (HGP) plays a major role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D), yet the molecular mechanism by which this occurs remains unknown. Using a novel in vivo metabolomics approach, we show that the major mechanism by which insulin suppresses HGP is through reductions in hepatic acetyl CoA by suppression of lipolysis in white adipose tissue (WAT) leading to reductions in pyruvate carboxylase flux. This mechanism was confirmed in mice and rats with genetic ablation of insulin signaling and mice lacking adipose triglyceride lipase. Insulin's ability to suppress hepatic acetyl CoA, PC activity, and lipolysis was lost in high-fat-fed rats, a phenomenon reversible by IL-6 neutralization and inducible by IL-6 infusion. Taken together, these data identify WAT-derived hepatic acetyl CoA as the main regulator of HGP by insulin and link it to inflammation-induced hepatic insulin resistance associated with obesity and T2D. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sero-prevalence and vaccination status of hepatitis A and hepatitis B among adults with cirrhosis in Sri Lanka: a hospital based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Niriella, Madunil Anuk; Kobbegala, Vipuli Jayendra; Karalliyadda, Hasnatha Nuwan; Ranawaka, Chamila Kumara; de Silva, Arjuna Priyadarshin; Dassanayake, Anuradha Supun; de Silva, Hithanadura Janaka

    2017-07-21

    As acute viral hepatitis can be fatal in patients with cirrhosis, vaccination against hepatitis A (HAV) and hepatitis B (HBV) is recommended for non-immune patients. With increasing affluence the incidence of hepatitis A in childhood has decreased leading to a significant proportion of non-immune adults. As part of their routine investigation, hepatitis A IgG antibodies (anti-HAV IgG), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti-HCV antibodies was checked and immunization status was assessed among consenting newly diagnosed cirrhotic patients presenting to a tertiary referral center. Out of 135 patients, 107 [79.3%; males 91; mean age (SD) at presentation: 55.5 (11.6) years] with complete data were included for analysis. Most patients had either cryptogenic cirrhosis (62.6%) or alcoholic cirrhosis (29.9%); 2 (1.9%) had HBV cirrhosis, none had hepatitis C (HCV) cirrhosis. None of the patients had received vaccination against hepatitis A, while 71 (67.6%) had been vaccinated against HBV. The majority [62 (58%)] were negative for anti-HAV IgG. Most cirrhotic patients in this cohort were not immune to hepatitis A. None had been vaccinated against HAV, while a third of patients had not been vaccinated against HBV. Cirrhotic patients should be routinely investigated for immunity against HAV and HBV, and vaccination offered to those found to be non-immune.

  1. Predictors of hepatitis A vaccine coverage among university students in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Seungmi; Choi, Jeong Sil

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the status of hepatitis A vaccination, knowledge, and health beliefs among university students in Korea and identify factors influencing their hepatitis A vaccination rate. A self-reporting survey was conducted with 367 university students in Korea via descriptive survey. Data were collected on demographics, status of hepatitis A vaccination, knowledge, and health beliefs. The hepatitis A vaccination rate was 23.4%. The hepatitis A vaccination rate was significantly higher in those who had a general awareness about the hepatitis A (odds ratio [OR] = 3.56, P = 0.003), those with some overseas travel experience (OR = 2.64, P = 0.025), those perceiving the benefits of hepatitis A vaccination (OR = 1.66, P = 0.023), and those perceiving barriers (inversed) to hepatitis A vaccination (OR = 1.95, P = 0.011). To promote hepatitis A vaccination among university students, information and education should be provided to improve their health beliefs. In addition, this demographic should be a major target population for hepatitis A vaccination. This study's results suggest that the development of national promotional campaigns and hepatitis A vaccination programs based on predictors of the vaccination rate are needed. © 2015 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  2. Antibodies against Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B Virus in Intravenous Immunoglobulin Products

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) has changed over the last two decades, indicating a declining incidence of HAV and HBV infections. Therefore, vaccinations against HAV and HBV are recommended for unimmunized people before traveling to an endemic area. Unfortunately, primary antibody deficiency (PAD) patients can only obtain humoral immunity through intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) replacement and not from vaccination because of a defect in antibody production. However, few studies have analyzed the titers of antibodies against HAV or HBV in IVIG products. In this study, the titers of anti-HAV and anti-HBs antibodies were measured in nineteen lots of IVIG products from five manufacturers from three countries (A, B from Korea; C, D from Japan; and E from the USA), and trough titers in plasma were estimated. Concentrations of anti-HAV antibody ranged from 1,888–8,927 mIU/mL and estimated trough titers exceeded the minimal protective value in all evaluated IVIG products. Concentrations of anti-HBs antibody ranged from 438–965 mIU/mL in products A and B and were 157, 123, and 1,945 mIU/mL in products C, D, and E, respectively. Estimated trough titers in products A, B, and E exceeded the minimal protective value but those in products C and D did not reach this threshold. These data demonstrated that available IVIG products generally provide sufficient antibodies against HAV and HBV to protect patients with PAD, although the trough concentrations of anti-HBs antibody in two IVIG products did not reach the minimum protective value. PMID:27822932

  3. Antibodies against Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B Virus in Intravenous Immunoglobulin Products.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soyoung; Kim, Han Wool; Kim, Kyung Hyo

    2016-12-01

    The worldwide seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) has changed over the last two decades, indicating a declining incidence of HAV and HBV infections. Therefore, vaccinations against HAV and HBV are recommended for unimmunized people before traveling to an endemic area. Unfortunately, primary antibody deficiency (PAD) patients can only obtain humoral immunity through intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) replacement and not from vaccination because of a defect in antibody production. However, few studies have analyzed the titers of antibodies against HAV or HBV in IVIG products. In this study, the titers of anti-HAV and anti-HBs antibodies were measured in nineteen lots of IVIG products from five manufacturers from three countries (A, B from Korea; C, D from Japan; and E from the USA), and trough titers in plasma were estimated. Concentrations of anti-HAV antibody ranged from 1,888-8,927 mIU/mL and estimated trough titers exceeded the minimal protective value in all evaluated IVIG products. Concentrations of anti-HBs antibody ranged from 438-965 mIU/mL in products A and B and were 157, 123, and 1,945 mIU/mL in products C, D, and E, respectively. Estimated trough titers in products A, B, and E exceeded the minimal protective value but those in products C and D did not reach this threshold. These data demonstrated that available IVIG products generally provide sufficient antibodies against HAV and HBV to protect patients with PAD, although the trough concentrations of anti-HBs antibody in two IVIG products did not reach the minimum protective value.

  4. Hepatitis A virus vaccination in persons with hepatitis C virus infection: consequences of quality measure implementation.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Ian A; Parker, Richard; Armstrong, Matthew J; Houlihan, Diarmaid D; Mutimer, David J

    2012-08-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) superinfection in persons with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been associated with a high mortality rate, and vaccination is recommended. The incidence of HAV is low, and the aim of this study was to determine the mortality risk of HAV superinfection and the consequences of routine vaccination in persons with HCV infection. To determine the mortality risk of HAV superinfection, a meta-analysis including studies reporting mortality in HCV-infected persons was performed. Data were extracted independently by two investigators and recorded on a standardized spreadsheet. The pooled mortality estimate was used to determine the number needed to vaccinate (NNV) to prevent mortality from HAV superinfection. The total vaccine cost was also calculated. A total of 239 studies were identified using a defined search strategy. Of these, 11 appeared to be relevant, and of these, 10 were suitable for inclusion in the meta-analysis. The pooled odds ratio (OR) for mortality risk in HAV superinfection of HCV-infected persons was 7.23 (95% confidence interval: 1.24-42.12) with significant heterogeneity (I(2) = 56%; P = 0.03) between studies. Using the pooled OR for mortality, this translates to 1.4 deaths per 1,000,000 susceptible persons with HCV per year. The NNV to prevent one death per year is therefore 814,849, assuming 90% vaccine uptake and 94.3% vaccine efficiency. The vaccine cost for this totals $162 million, or $80.1 million per death prevented per year. These data challenge the use of routine HAV vaccination in HCV-infected persons and its incorporation into clinical practice guidelines. HAV vaccination of all HCV-infected persons is costly and likely to expose many individuals to an intervention that is of no direct benefit. Copyright © 2012 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  5. Hepatic steatosis in hepatitis C is a storage disease due to HCV interaction with microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP).

    PubMed

    Mirandola, Silvia; Bowman, David; Hussain, Mahmood M; Alberti, Alfredo

    2010-02-23

    Liver steatosis is a frequent histological feature in patients chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The relationship between HCV and hepatic steatosis seems to be the result of both epigenetic and genetic factors. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that HCV can alter intrahepatic lipid metabolism by affecting lipid synthesis, oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, insulin resistance and the assembly and secretion of VLDL. Many studies suggest that HCV-related steatosis might be the result of a direct interaction between the virus and MTP. It has been demonstrated that MTP is critical for the secretion of HCV particles and that inhibition of its lipid transfer activity reduces HCV production. However, higher degrees of hepatic steatosis were found in chronic hepatitis C patients carrying the T allele of MTP -493G/T polymorphism that seems to be associated with increased MTP transcription. We propose here that liver steatosis in hepatitis C could be a storage disease induced by the effects of the virus and of its proteins on the intracellular lipid machinery and on MTP. Available data support the hypothesis that HCV may modulate MTP expression and activity through a number of mechanisms such as inhibition of its activity and transcriptional control. Initial up regulation could favour propagation of HCV while down regulation in chronic phase could cause impairment of triglyceride secretion and excessive lipid accumulation, with abnormal lipid droplets facilitating the "storage" of virus particles for persistent infection.

  6. HLA-DRB1 as a risk factor in children with autoimmune hepatitis and its relation to hepatitis A infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) are proteins found in the membranes of nearly all nucleated cells. People with certain HLA antigens are more likely to develop certain autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of HLA-DRB1 in children with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) as a risk factor for occurrence, its relation to preceding hepatitis A infection and treatment outcome. Subjects and methods 25 children with AIH were subjected to HLA-DRB 1 typing performed by sequence specific oligonucleotide probe technique and compared to HLA-DRB1 found in 548 normal populations. Results The most frequent alleles found in our children with AIH were HLA-DRB1*13 (36%), HLA-DRB1*04 (18%) and HLA-DRB1*03 (14%). HLA-DRB1*13 was significantly more frequent in AIH patients compared to controls. In type I AIH patients HLA-DRB1*13 was the most frequent allele (32.4%), followed by HLA-DRB1*04 in (20.6%) and HLA-DRB1*03 in (14.7%), While in type II, the most frequent alleles were HLA-DRB1*13 in (40%), HLA-DRB1*07 (20%) and HLA-DRB1*15 in (20%). HLA-DRB1*12 was significantly more frequent in AIH patients with positive Hepatitis A IgM than in patients with negative hepatitis A IgM. No statistically significant difference between partial responders and complete responders to treatment as regards HLA-DRB1 subtypes. Conclusion It is concluded from the previous study that HLA-DRB1*13 may be a susceptibility allele for the occurrence of autoimmune hepatitis in our population. HLA-DRB1*07 and HLA-DRB1*15 may be susceptibility alleles for occurrence of autoimmune hepatitis type 2. HLA-DRB1*12 association with AIH in patients triggered by hepatitis A needs further studies. PMID:21067577

  7. Ascariasis as a cause of hepatic abscess: A report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, V; Thakur, S; Rana, B

    2015-01-01

    We receive around 60 cases of hepatic abscess in a year. The commonest diagnosis reached at the time of discharge is amoebic liver abscess. The diagnosis of amoebic liver abscess is mostly presumptive and thus the patients are usually given a mixed treatment with injection ceftriaxone and tablet metronidazole. Here we report three cases of hepatic abscess diagnosed recently, where ascariasis was the probable etiology. Ascariasis may be a much commoner cause of hepatic abscesses in this region than we think.

  8. The Impact of Hepatic Steatosis on Hepatic Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Experimental Studies: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Michael J. J.; Hickey, Anthony J. R.; Phillips, Anthony R. J.; Bartlett, Adam S. J. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The impact of hepatic steatosis on outcome following hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) remains controversial with conflicting clinical results. A number of experimental studies have been published examining the relationship between hepatic steatosis and IRI. This systematic review evaluates these experimental studies. Methods. An electronic search of the Medline and Embase databases (January 1946 to June 2012) was performed to identify studies that reported relevant outcomes in animal models of hepatic steatosis subjected to IRI. Results. A total of 1314 articles were identified, of which 33 met the predefined criteria and were included in the study. There was large variation in the type of animal model, duration, and type of IRI and reporting of histological findings. Increased macrovesicular steatosis (>30%) was associated with increased histological damage, liver function derangement, and reduced survival. Increased duration of warm or cold ischemia had a negative impact on all outcomes measured. Microvesicular steatosis did not influence outcome. Conclusions. Findings from this systemic review support the hypothesis that livers with >30% macrovesicular steatosis are less tolerant of IRI. Clinically, it is likely that these findings are applicable to patients undergoing hepatic resection, but further studies are required to confirm these data. PMID:24062999

  9. Prevalence of hepatitis A, B and C serological markers in children from western Mexico.

    PubMed

    Escobedo-Meléndez, Griselda; Fierro, Nora A; Roman, Sonia; Maldonado-González, Monserrat; Zepeda-Carrillo, Eloy; Panduro, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Viral hepatitis in children is a major public health problem worldwide. To evaluate the prevalence of serological markers for hepatitis A, B and C infections in Mexican children diagnosed with hepatitis during a five-year period. A total of 31,818 children admitted to a tertiary level hospital in Mexico from 2005 to 2009 were evaluated for hepatitis. Hepatitis was found in 215 (0.7%) of the children. Serum samples from hepatitis-positive children were screened for anti-HAV IgM, HBsAg, total anti-HBc and anti-HCV. HAV was the leading cause of viral hepatitis (81%), followed by HBV and HCV (3.1 and 2%, respectively), whereas no serological marker was observed in 13.9% of the analyzed samples. Furthermore, when children were categorized by age, a significant increase in anti-HAV detection was observed in school-aged children (7-11 years old) (p < 0.001) and a reduction in adolescents (12-15 years old). In conclusion, hepatitis A is the most prevalent viral hepatitis infection detected in children, followed by HBV and HCV. In addition, the high percentage of hepatitis infections without a known etiological agent and the serological test limitations require the detection of occult HBV, HCV and hepatitis E infections. The age-dependent vulnerability of groups with HAV infections emphasizes the importance of HAV vaccination in young children in Mexico.

  10. Incidence of hepatitis non-A, non-B compared with types A and B in hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Richer, G.; Chen, Y. Y.; Huet, P. M.

    1982-01-01

    To establish the relative frequencies of types A, B and non-A, non-B hepatitis, stored samples of blood from all the cases of acute viral hepatitis seen over a period of 9 years in a general hospital for adults were classified according to their type by presently available serologic methods. The study included 456 episodes of hepatitis in 447 patients, distributed as follows: 114 episodes of hepatitis A (25%), 282 of hepatitis B (62%) and 60 of hepatitis non-A, non-B (13%). The episodes of non-A, non-B hepatitis were equally distributed between the sexes, suggesting a mode of transmission different from that of hepatitis A or B, which had male/female ratios of 2.4 and 3.1 respectively. The low proportion of hepatitis non-A, non-B may not reflect its real frequency, since it often escapes clinical recognition. PMID:6809306

  11. Fatal acute hepatic failure in a family infected with the hepatitis A virus subgenotype IB: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yuichi; Okada, Yohei; Suzuki, Akiko; Kakisaka, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Yasuhiro; Miyasaka, Akio; Takikawa, Yasuhiro; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2017-09-01

    Hepatitis A viral infection is a well-known cause of subclinical or acute self-limited hepatitis. Few cases of hepatitis A virus (HAV)-associated acute liver failure (ALF) have been reported in low HAV endemic countries annually. To investigate the possible factors that affected the severity of HAV infection, a family cluster infected with the HAV subgenotype IB strain, which is not common in Japan, was described. This family consisted of five members who all were infected with HAV. Four of the five patients hospitalized except for an asymptomatic patient. Two of the five patients, men in their 50s and 60s, developed ALF, and one patient died. Various host factors, including sex (male), age, and a high bilirubin level, may affect the outcomes. Based on viral factors, HAV RNA was higher in the fatal case compared with others, and it decreased within a short period of time. The similarity of the nucleotide sequences was 99.9% among the HAV isolates based on an entire genomic sequence. Deletions and/or insertions on the HAV protein-coding sequences that caused a frameshift were found in surviving cases but not in the fatal case. The rapid clearance of increased HAV and the absence of defective HAV might be closely associated with the onset of liver failure.

  12. [Immunogenetic criteria for prediction of mixed hepatitis A + B].

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, A L; Ustiuzhaninov, V N; Vozhegova, N P; Strazhnikova, G A

    2009-04-01

    The investigation has revealed that mixed hepatitis A + B is a genetically determined disease. HLA-A10, B21, Cw2, Cw5, A10-A19, B8-B13, B21-B35, A3-B21, and A9-B21 are immunogenetic markers of this disease. The carriers of HLA-B21, Cw5, A3-B21, and A9-B21 and those of HLA-A10, A10-A19, and A10-B14 are at high risk for this infection among men and women, respectively. The findings of the distribution of HLA antigens and their combinations in mixed infection with hepatitis A and B viruses allow prediction of its occurrence (including the consideration of examinees' gender) which will assist in solving the matter of timely prophylaxis of this pathology.

  13. Case report: living donor liver transplantation for giant hepatic hemangioma using a right lobe graft without the middle hepatic vein

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic hemangioma patients with Kasabach-Merritt syndrome have reportedly been cured by liver transplantation. However, liver transplantation as a potential cure for a stable patient without Kasabach-Merritt syndrome remains debatable. We report the case of a 27-year-old female patient with a giant hepatic hemangioma. The hemangioma measured 50 × 40 × 25 cm in size and weighed 15 kg, which is the largest and heaviest hemangioma reported in the literature. The patient showed jaundice, ascites, anemia, and appetite loss; but no disseminated intravascular coagulation was observed through laboratory findings. We successfully operated using a right lobe graft without the middle hepatic vein from a 55-year-old donor. At the long-term follow-up, the patient experienced two acute rejections, which were confirmed by biopsy. However, the patient still survives with good graft function after 50 months. PMID:24708716

  14. Diffuse Hepatic Calcifications in a Transfusion-Dependent Patient with Beta-Thalassemia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Saki, Forough; Bordbar, Mohammad Reza; Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi; Karimi, Mehran

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic calcification is usually associated with infectious, vascular, or neoplastic processes in the liver. We report the first case of beta-thalassemia major with isolated diffuse hepatic calcification in a 23 year old woman, who had been transfusion-dependent since the age of 6 months. She was referred to our center with a chief complaint of abdominal pain. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed diffuse hepatic calcification in the right, left, and caudate lobes of the liver. Her medical history disclosed hypoparathyroidism as well as chronic hepatitis C virus infection, which was successfully treated but led to early micronodular cirrhosis on liver biopsy. Other studies done to search for the cause of hepatic calcification failed to reveal any abnormalities. We suspect that hypoparathyroidism caused liver calcification, and should be, therefore, considered in the differential diagnosis of hepatic calcification if other causative factors have been ruled out. PMID:24174700

  15. Fish oil decreases hepatic lipogenic genes in rats fasted and refed on a high fructose diet.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Gabriela S; Cardoso, João Felipe R; Calder, Philip C; Jordão, Alceu A; Vannucchi, Helio

    2015-03-05

    Fasting and then refeeding on a high-carbohydrate diet increases serum and hepatic triacylglycerol (TAG) concentrations compared to standard diets. Fructose is a lipogenic monosaccharide which stimulates de novo fatty acid synthesis. Omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids stimulate hepatic β-oxidation, partitioning fatty acids away from TAG synthesis. This study investigated whether dietary n-3 fatty acids from fish oil (FO) improve the hepatic lipid metabolic response seen in rats fasted and then refed on a high-fructose diet. During the post-prandial (fed) period, rats fed a FO rich diet showed an increase in hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR-α) gene expression and decreased expression of carbohydrate responsive element binding protein (ChREBP), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP). Feeding a FO rich diet for 7 days prior to 48 h of fasting resulted in lower hepatic TAG, lower PPAR-α expression and maintenance of hepatic n-3 fatty acid content. Refeeding on a high fructose diet promoted an increase in hepatic and serum TAG and in hepatic PPAR-α, ChREBP and MTTP expression. FO did not prevent the increase in serum and hepatic TAG after fructose refeeding, but did decrease hepatic expression of lipogenic genes and increased the n-3 fatty acid content of the liver. n-3 Fatty acids can modify some components of the hepatic lipid metabolic response to later feeding with a high fructose diet.

  16. Fish Oil Decreases Hepatic Lipogenic Genes in Rats Fasted and Refed on a High Fructose Diet

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Gabriela S.; Cardoso, João Felipe R.; Calder, Philip C.; Jordão, Alceu A.; Vannucchi, Helio

    2015-01-01

    Fasting and then refeeding on a high-carbohydrate diet increases serum and hepatic triacylglycerol (TAG) concentrations compared to standard diets. Fructose is a lipogenic monosaccharide which stimulates de novo fatty acid synthesis. Omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids stimulate hepatic β-oxidation, partitioning fatty acids away from TAG synthesis. This study investigated whether dietary n-3 fatty acids from fish oil (FO) improve the hepatic lipid metabolic response seen in rats fasted and then refed on a high-fructose diet. During the post-prandial (fed) period, rats fed a FO rich diet showed an increase in hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR-α) gene expression and decreased expression of carbohydrate responsive element binding protein (ChREBP), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP). Feeding a FO rich diet for 7 days prior to 48 h of fasting resulted in lower hepatic TAG, lower PPAR-α expression and maintenance of hepatic n-3 fatty acid content. Refeeding on a high fructose diet promoted an increase in hepatic and serum TAG and in hepatic PPAR-α, ChREBP and MTTP expression. FO did not prevent the increase in serum and hepatic TAG after fructose refeeding, but did decrease hepatic expression of lipogenic genes and increased the n-3 fatty acid content of the liver. n-3 Fatty acids can modify some components of the hepatic lipid metabolic response to later feeding with a high fructose diet. PMID:25751821

  17. Hepatitis A virus genotype IA-infected patient with marked elevation of aspartate aminotransferase levels.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yoshifumi; Kanda, Tatsuo; Yasui, Shin; Takahashi, Koji; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Nakamura, Masato; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Arai, Makoto; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2017-02-01

    We describe a case of acute liver failure (ALF) without hepatic encephalopathy with marked elevation of aminotransferase due to hepatitis A, according to the revised Japanese criteria of ALF. This liver biopsy of the patient showed compatible to acute viral hepatitis and she immediately recovered without intensive care. She had no comorbid disorders. Of interest, phylogenetic tree analysis using almost complete genomes of hepatitis A virus (HAV) demonstrated that the HAV isolate from her belonged to the HAV subgenotype IA strain and was similar to the HAJFF-Kan12 strain (99% nucleotide identity) or FH1 strain (98% nucleotide identity), which is associated with severe or fulminant hepatitis A. Careful interpretation of the association between HAV genome variations and severity of hepatitis A is needed and the mechanism of the severe hepatitis should be explored.

  18. Chronic hepatitis E virus infection in a patient with leukemia and elevated transaminases: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Acute hepatitis E virus infection may cause mild, self-limiting hepatitis, either as epidemic outbreaks or sporadic cases, the latter of which have been reported in industrialized countries. Chronic infections are uncommon and have been reported in immunosuppressed patients, patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection, and patients with hematological malignancies. Case presentation A 46-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to the gastroenterology clinic with a history of increasing transaminases, persistent exhaustion, and occasional right-side abdominal pain over the course of a 6-month period. B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia had been diagnosed several years earlier, and the patient was treated with rituximab, pentostatin, and cyclophosphamide. A diagnostic workup ruled out autoimmune and metabolic liver disease, hepatitis A-C, and herpes virus infection. A physical examination revealed enlarged axillary lymph nodes. The results of an abdominal ultrasound examination were otherwise unremarkable. Hepatitis E virus infection was diagnosed by detection of hepatitis E virus-specific antibodies. Blood samples were positive for hepatitis E virus ribonucleic acid with high viral loads for at least 8 months, demonstrating a rare chronic hepatitis E virus infection. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis revealed hepatitis E virus genotype 3c with homologies to other European isolates from humans and swine, indicating an autochthonous infection. Conclusions Usually, hepatitis E virus infection appears as an acute infection; rare chronic infections have been reported for transplant patients, patients with human immunodeficiency virus, and patients with hematological malignancies. The chronic nature of hepatitis E infection in our patient was most likely induced by the immunosuppressive B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia treatment. The differential diagnosis in patients with unexplained hepatitis should include hepatitis E virus infection, and

  19. Screening for Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus at a Community Fair: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Garmen A.; Hill, Mary A.; de Medina, Maria D.

    2013-01-01

    Despite recommendations for screening for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), most individuals are still unaware of their infection status. The disparities in screening for HBV and HCV can be attributed to lack of awareness, language barriers, and difficulty in accessing healthcare. To address these issues, an exhibit booth was set up at an annual cultural festival to promote awareness about HBV and HCV and also provide free screening for a local Floridian community. Recruitment was conducted in various languages by physicians and nurses who specialize in hepatology. All materials associated with the screening process were sponsored by the Schiff Center for Liver Diseases, which is located at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Florida. In the first year of the screening initiative, 173 of 11,000 fair attendees were screened for HBV. Twenty-nine (17%) of those screened tested positive for antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), and only 1 individual tested positive for chronic HBV, with positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Screening for HCV and an extended patient questionnaire were added to the screening program in the second year of the initiative. A total 231 of 9,000 fair attendees volunteered to be screened for both HBV and HCV. Twenty-nine (13%) of these people tested positive for anti-HBc, and 3 tested positive for HBsAg. Only 1 person tested positive for anti-HCV, but this individual had undetectable HCV RNA levels. Our single-center experience illustrates that, despite efforts to improve access to screening, only 2-3% of attendees at a cultural fair embraced the screening efforts. Other strategies will be required to enhance participation in screening programs for viral hepatitis. PMID:23943664

  20. Screening for hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus at a community fair: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Woo, Garmen A; Hill, Mary A; de Medina, Maria D; Schiff, Eugene R

    2013-05-01

    Despite recommendations for screening for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), most individuals are still unaware of their infection status. The disparities in screening for HBV and HCV can be attributed to lack of awareness, language barriers, and difficulty in accessing healthcare. To address these issues, an exhibit booth was set up at an annual cultural festival to promote awareness about HBV and HCV and also provide free screening for a local Floridian community. Recruitment was conducted in various languages by physicians and nurses who specialize in hepatology. All materials associated with the screening process were sponsored by the Schiff Center for Liver Diseases, which is located at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Florida. In the first year of the screening initiative, 173 of 11,000 fair attendees were screened for HBV. Twenty-nine (17%) of those screened tested positive for antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), and only 1 individual tested positive for chronic HBV, with positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Screening for HCV and an extended patient questionnaire were added to the screening program in the second year of the initiative. A total 231 of 9,000 fair attendees volunteered to be screened for both HBV and HCV. Twenty-nine (13%) of these people tested positive for anti-HBc, and 3 tested positive for HBsAg. Only 1 person tested positive for anti-HCV, but this individual had undetectable HCV RNA levels. Our single-center experience illustrates that, despite efforts to improve access to screening, only 2-3% of attendees at a cultural fair embraced the screening efforts. Other strategies will be required to enhance participation in screening programs for viral hepatitis.

  1. The prevalence of atopy in children with antibodies against hepatitis A virus and hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Kocabaş, Emine; Yapicioğlu, Hacer; Yildizdaş, Dinçer; Güneşer Kendirli, Seval; Burgut, Refik

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between atopy and hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections, we studied 42 children who had had HAV infection (Group I), 28 children who had had HBV infection (Group II), and 31 children who were seronegative for both HAV and HBV infection (Control group). Serological tests for HAV and HBV infections (anti-HAV IgG, HBsAg, anti-HBc IgG) and allergic skin tests and specific IgE investigations for the detection of atopy were carried out. In this study, there was no significant divergence in the socio-demographic characteristics among the three groups. The rates of specific IgE positivity in children in the HAV seropositive group (11.9%) and in children in the HBV seropositive group (17.8%) were lower than in the control group (35.4%) (p = 0.03 and p = 0.22, respectively). Also, the number of children with respiratory allergic diseases (allergic rhinitis and/or asthma) both in the HAV seropositive group and in the HBV seropositive group were significantly lower than in the control group (p < 0.05). When atopy in all of the groups was evaluated, the prevalence of atopy was found to be more widespread in HAV seronegative children (Adjusted OR, 9.2; 95% CI, 1.7-48.2) and HBV seronegative children (Adjusted OR, 5.9; 95% CI, 1.1-31.8) than in HAV and HBV seropositive children, after adjustment for age, number of older siblings and education of the father. In conclusion, in this study, the prevalence of atopy in children who had had HAV or HBV infection was found to be low, and this situation was considered to be related to the relationship of HAV and HBV infections to poor hygiene and to the fact that these infections occur at early ages in Turkey.

  2. Increased serum IgE in acute type A, B and delta hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, D; Guardia, P; Delgado, J; Gutiérrez, J; Monteseirin, F J; de la Calle, A; Lobatón, P; Senra, A; Conde, J

    1997-01-01

    Serum IgE levels have been documented in patients of acute type B hepatitis. There are very few studies on serum IgE in acute type A hepatitis and, to our knowledge, there are no data on serum IgE in acute delta hepatitis patients. The purpose of this study was to measure total IgE levels in 38 patients with acute A, B and delta hepatitis and in 181 controls in order to determine the possible existence of changes in this parameter in the course of these infections. Our results showed a relevant increase in IgE levels in the three groups (hepatitis A, B and delta) with respect to the control group. Moreover, the hepatitis B group showed increased total serum IgE levels with respect to the hepatitis delta group.

  3. Prophylaxis of acute viral hepatitis by immune serum globulin, hepatitis B vaccine, and health education: a sixteen year study of Japan overseas cooperation volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ohara, H; Ebisawa, I; Naruto, H

    1997-01-01

    From 1978 to 1993 a study of acute viral hepatitis contracted by the Japan Overseas Cooperation Volunteers (JOCV) during their assignments in tropical and subtropical countries was conducted. Of 10,509 subjects in this study, 240 cases of acute viral hepatitis were confirmed (hepatitis A = 139, hepatitis B = 72, and non-A, non-B hepatitis = 29). The annual morbidity was 5.1% in 1978 and 4.9% in 1979, with hepatitis A accounting for 80% of the cases. However, it decreased significantly after the prophylactic inoculation with immune serum globulin (ISG) was started in 1980. A significant decrease of hepatitis B from 1.2% in 1980 to 0.1% in 1990 was also seen after vaccination was introduced for all volunteers in 1988. Health education concerning food and water sanitation, and providing general information on viral hepatitis, was also conducted throughout this period. These results indicate that acute viral hepatitis could be successfully prevented in the JOCV with a combination of ISG, hepatitis B vaccination, and health education.

  4. Hepatitis B reactivation in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis with antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen treated with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Gigi, E; Georgiou, T; Mougiou, D; Boura, P; Raptopoulou-Gigi, M

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) can still be found within the hepatocytes after its clearance and the control of viral replication depends on the immune response. However during immunosuppression, seroconversion of HBsAg has been described followed by disease reactivation. Hepatitis B virus reactivation represents an emerging cause of liver disease in patients undergoing treatment with biologic agents and in particular, by the use of rituximab (anti-CD20) and alemtuzumab (anti-CD52) that cause profound and long-lasting immunosuppression. We describe a case of a 64-year old female patient with rheumatoid arthritis and resolved HBV infection, who experienced a severe hepatitis B reactivation after the administration of rituximab.

  5. Protein restriction in hepatic encephalopathy is appropriate for selected patients: a point of view.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Douglas L; Morgan, Timothy

    2014-09-01

    Since the late nineteenth century, protein restriction has been shown to improve hepatic encephalopathy. However, malnutrition has been described in up to 60 % of cirrhotic patients and is associated with increased mortality. Furthermore, emerging clinical evidence has revealed that a large proportion of cirrhotic patients may tolerate normal protein intake. However, approximately one third of cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy may need a short course of protein restriction, in addition to maximum medical therapy, to ameliorate the clinical course of their hepatic encephalopathy. For patients with chronic hepatic encephalopathy who are protein-sensitive, modifying their sources of nitrogen by using more vegetable protein, less animal protein, and branched-chain amino acids may improve their encephalopathy without further loss of lean body mass. In conclusion, among cirrhotics with hepatic encephalopathy, modulation of normal protein intake must take into account the patient's hepatic reserve, severity of hepatic encephalopathy, and current nutritional status.

  6. Hepatitis A viral load in relation to severity of the infection.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Keiichi; Kojima, Hiroshige; Yasui, Shin; Okitsu, Koichiro; Yonemitsu, Yutaka; Omata, Masao; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2011-02-01

    A correlation between hepatitis A virus (HAV) genomes and the clinical severity of hepatitis A has not been established. The viral load in sera of hepatitis A patients was examined to determine the possible association between hepatitis A severity and HAV replication. One hundred sixty-four serum samples from 91 Japanese patients with sporadic hepatitis A, comprising 11 patients with fulminant hepatitis, 10 with severe acute hepatitis, and 70 with self-limited acute hepatitis, were tested for HAV RNA. The sera included 83 serial samples from 20 patients. Viral load was measured by real-time RT-PCR. The detection rates of HAV RNA from fulminant, severe acute, and acute hepatitis were 10/11 (91%), 10/10 (100%), and 55/70 (79%), respectively. Mean values of HAV RNA at admission were 3.48 ± 1.30 logcopies/ml in fulminant, 4.19 ± 1.03 in severe acute, and 2.65 ± 1.64 in acute hepatitis. Patients with severe infection such as fulminant hepatitis and severe acute hepatitis had higher initial viral load than patients with less severe infection (P < 0.001). Viremia persisted for 14.2 ± 5.8 days in patients with severe infection and 21.4 ± 10.6 days in those with acute hepatitis after clinical onset (P = 0.19). HAV RNA was detectable quantitatively in the majority of the sera of hepatitis A cases during the early convalescent phase by real-time PCR. Higher initial viral replication was found in severely infected patients. An excessive host immune response might follow, reducing the viral load rapidly as a result of the destruction of large numbers of HAV-infected hepatocytes, and in turn severe disease might be induced. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Public health perspective on vaccine-preventable hepatitis: integrating hepatitis A and B vaccines into public health settings.

    PubMed

    Hershey, Jody H; Schowalter, Laurie; Bailey, Stephanie B C

    2005-10-01

    Hepatitis A and B vaccinations can and should be integrated into public health settings that serve adults at high risk for infection (e.g., sexually transmitted disease and/or human immunodeficiency virus clinics, criminal justice settings), and a policy of universal immunization may be the best way to accomplish this goal in these settings. Although hepatitis vaccines should be given to all susceptible persons at risk, many opportunities to vaccinate adults at high risk are missed, and there are several barriers and challenges to vaccination of adults. These challenges and barriers can be overcome. Successful integration of hepatitis vaccination for adults into existing public health services and clinics has been accomplished across the United States at both state and local levels. Additional funds must be provided for the infrastructure and purchase of vaccines for adults in these settings.

  8. The terminology of hepatitis*

    PubMed Central

    1973-01-01

    It is proposed that the diseases formerly known as “infectious hepatitis” and “serum hepatitis” be referred to as viral hepatitis type A and viral hepatitis type B, respectively. It is further recommended that the “Australia” antigen be referred to as hepatitis B antigen (HB Ag) and the corresponding antibody as hepatitis B antibody (HB Ab). PMID:4544683

  9. Serum Osteopontin Predicts Degree of Hepatic Fibrosis and Serves as a Biomarker in Patients with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Matsue, Yasuhiro; Tsutsumi, Mikihiro; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Saito, Takashi; Tsuchishima, Mutsumi; Toshikuni, Nobuyuki; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; George, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Osteopontin (OPN) is a matricellular protein that upregulates during pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. The present study was aimed to evaluate whether serum OPN could be used as a biomarker to assess the degree of hepatic fibrosis in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Methods Needle biopsy was performed on HCV patients and scored as zero fibrosis (F0), mild fibrosis (F1), moderate fibrosis (F2), severe fibrosis (F3) and liver cirrhosis (F4) based on Masson’s trichrome and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) staining. Serum OPN levels were measured using ELISA and correlated with the degree of fibrosis. Furthermore, the OPN values were correlated and evaluated with platelets count, serum hyaluronic acid (HA), and collagen type IV and subjected to receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results Serum OPN levels were remarkably increased from F0 through F4 in a progressive manner and the differences were significant (P < 0.001) between each group. The data were highly correlated with the degree of hepatic fibrosis. The ROC curve analysis depicted that serum OPN is an independent risk factor and an excellent biomarker and a prognostic index in HCV patients. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that serum OPN levels reflect the degree of hepatic fibrosis and could be used as a biomarker to assess the stage of fibrosis in HCV patients which would help to reduce the number of liver biopsies. Furthermore, serum OPN serves as a prognostic index towards the progression of hepatic fibrosis to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25760884

  10. Hepatic Mass Caused by Fasciola Hepatica: A Tricky Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Bülent; Köklü, Seyfettin; Gedikoğlu, Gökhan

    2013-01-01

    Fascioliasis is a zoonotic infestation caused by the trematode fasciola hepatica. It presents a wide spectrum of clinical pictures ranging from fever and eosinophilia to ambiguous gastrointestinal symptoms in the acute phase. However, it may often be overlooked, especially in the acute phase, because of uncertain symptoms. Fasciola hepatica can have an initial presentation similar to the presentation of malignancy. Here, we report a case of a hepatic mass caused by fasciola hepatica. PMID:24080633

  11. Restorative effects of hydroxysafflor yellow A on hepatic function in an experimental regression model of hepatic fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanuo; Shi, Yan; Sun, Yan; Liu, Luying; Bai, Xianyong; Wang, Dong; Li, Hongxing

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a reversible pathological process, in which fibrotic tissue is excessively deposited in the liver during the repair process that follows hepatic injury. Early prevention or treatment of hepatic fibrosis has great significance on the treatment of chronic hepatic diseases. Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) is a water-soluble monomer extracted from safflower, which serves numerous pharmacological roles. However, it remains to be elucidated how HSYA regulates hepatic fibrogenesis. The aim of the present study was to reveal the possible mechanisms underlying the effects of HSYA on the prevention and treatment of hepatic fibrosis. A rat model of hepatic fibrosis was established in the present study, and the rats were administered various doses of HSYA. The effects of HSYA on pathological alterations of the liver tissue in rats with hepatic fibrosis were observed using hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson staining. In order to explore the anti-hepatic fibrosis effects and underlying mechanisms of HSYA, serum levels, and hepatic function and hepatic fibrosis indices were evaluated. The results demonstrated that HSYA can improve the general condition of rats with hepatic fibrosis and relieve cellular swelling of the liver, fatty degeneration, necrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration and fibroplastic proliferation. Subsequent to administration of HSYA, globulin was increased during hepatic fibrosis caused by tetrachloromethane. However, total cholesterol, triglyceride, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and levels of hyaluronic acid, laminin, procollagen III N-terminal peptide, collagen type IV and hydroxyproline were significantly reduced. The results additionally demonstrated that HSYA could enhance superoxide dismutase activity and reduce malondialdehyde levels, inhibiting lipid peroxidation caused by free radicals. PMID:27909717

  12. Epidemiology of hepatitis A virus infections, Germany, 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Faber, Mirko S; Stark, Klaus; Behnke, Susanne C; Schreier, Eckart; Frank, Christina

    2009-11-01

    Approximately 60% of hepatitis A virus infections in Germany occur in persons without a travel history to disease-endemic areas and for whom sources of infection are unknown. Recommendation of pretravel vaccination fails to prevent the remaining imported infections. Using enhanced surveillance in 2007-2008, we analyzed epidemiologic patterns of hepatitis A in Germany and appropriateness and adequacy of current immunization recommendations. Young patients with a migration background who had visited friends and family in their ancestral countries accounted for most imported cases. Phylogenetic analysis showed high diversity of sequence data and clustering of strains with similar regions of origin or patient migration backgrounds. Virologic findings are compatible with those of low-incidence countries, where virtually all infections are directly or indirectly imported from other regions. Germans with a migration background are seen as a special risk group so far insufficiently reached by pretravel vaccination advice.

  13. Hepatitis C in non-hepatic solid organ transplant candidates and recipients: A new horizon

    PubMed Central

    Belga, Sara; Doucette, Karen Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is estimated to affect 130-150 million people globally which corresponds to 2%-3% of the total world population. It remains the leading indication for liver transplant worldwide and has been demonstrated to negatively impact both patient and graft survival following non-hepatic organ transplantation. In the era of interferon-based therapy, although treatment and cure of HCV prior to non-hepatic transplant improved survival, tolerability and low cure rates substantially limited therapy. Interferon (IFN)-based therapy following non-hepatic solid organ transplant, due to the risk of allograft rejection, is generally contraindicated. Rapid advances in IFN-free therapy with direct acting antivirals (DAAs) in the last few years have completely changed the paradigm of hepatitis C therapy. Compared to IFN-based regimens, DAAs have less frequent and less severe adverse effects, shorter durations of therapy, and higher cure rates that are minimally impacted by historically negative predictors of response such as cirrhosis, ethnicity, and post-transplant state. Recent studies have shown that liver transplant (LT) recipients can be safely and effectively treated with DAA combination therapies; although data are limited, many of the principles of therapy in LT may be extrapolated to non-hepatic solid organ transplant recipients. Here we review the data on DAA combination therapies in transplantation, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of pre- vs post-transplant HCV therapy and future directions. PMID:26819530

  14. Arsenic, vinyl chloride, viral hepatitis, and hepatic angiosarcoma: A hospital-based study and review of literature in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatic angiosarcoma (HAS) is a rare type of liver cancer that is often fatal, and arsenic and vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) are two major causal agents. Whereas Taiwan is an endemic area of liver cancer, epidemiologic data on HAS are limited. We reviewed the cases observed at a teaching hospital to evaluate the roles of VCM, arsenic, and viral hepatitis in the occurrence of HAS. Methods We reviewed the medical records of patients with pathological proof of HAS from January 2000 to August 2010 at a teaching hospital which is adjacent to the major VCM processing area in Taiwan and nearby an endemic area of arsenic exposure from drinking water. We also conducted a literature review and included all patients of HAS reported in Taiwan. Results Six male and three female cases aged from 56 to 83 years (64.6 ± 8.2 years) were identified at the hospital. The differences in clinical features between men and women were not statistically significant. None of them had exposure to VCM or arsenic in drinking water. Two had evidence of hepatitis C infection, but none had evidence of hepatitis B infection. Five male and four female cases aged 30 to 82 years (58.6 ± 15.5 years) were identified in the literature, including two with arsenic exposure and one with chronic hepatitis B infection. Conclusions HAS is rare in Taiwan, and we found no evidence supporting a major role of VCM, arsenic in drinking water, or viral hepatitis in its occurrence. PMID:22200164

  15. Hepatitis B outbreak following a mass-casualty incident, Australia.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Claire M; Speers, David J; Chidlow, Glenys R; Dowse, Gary K; Robertson, Andrew G; Flexman, James P

    2011-08-01

    On 16 April 2009, a boat carrying 47 Afghan asylum seekers and 2 Indonesian crew exploded in Australian waters, resulting in mass casualties. Of these casualties, 23 persons who suffered significant burns were transferred to Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia. One patient was subsequently shown to be a hepatitis B virus (HBV) carrier at the time of the explosion. Over the following months, 3 other patients received a diagnosis of acute hepatitis B, and an additional 4 patients showed serological evidence of recent HBV infection, including 1 patient who was transferred to another Australian city. Molecular typing determined that the strains from the HBV carrier and the acute and recent case patients formed a closely related cluster, and the investigation suggested that transmission occurred at or around the time of the boat explosion. This is the first report of confirmed transmission of HBV following a disaster, and it reinforces the importance of postexposure prophylaxis for HBV in mass casualty situations.

  16. Exuberant pyoderma gangrenosum in a patient with autoimmune hepatitis*

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Stephanie Galiza; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira; Fernandes, Nurimar Conceição

    2017-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is a rare neutrophilic dermatosis, which usually presents as ulcers with erythematous-violaceous undermined edges and a rough base with purulent or sanguinous exudate. It can be primary or associated with an underlying disease. However, rare cases of its association with autoimmune hepatitis have been described in the literature. Diagnosis is based on a characteristic clinical picture and ruling out other causes of ulcers. This paper aims to discuss the management of corticosteroid therapy and the importance of local treatment. We report a case with torpid evolution, presented with multiple and deep ulcers in a young patient with autoimmune hepatitis, causing pain and significant disability. We observed complete healing of lesions after two months of successful treatment. PMID:28225969

  17. HDVDB: a data warehouse for hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarita; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Nischal, Anuradha; Pant, Kamlesh Kumar; Seth, Prahlad Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis Delta Virus (HDV) is an RNA virus and causes delta hepatitis in humans. Although a lot of data is available for HDV, but retrieval of information is a complicated task. Current web database 'HDVDB' provides a comprehensive web-resource for HDV. The database is basically concerned with basic information about HDV and disease caused by this virus, genome structure, pathogenesis, epidemiology, symptoms and prevention, etc. Database also supplies sequence data and bibliographic information about HDV. A tool 'siHDV Predict' to design the effective siRNA molecule to control the activity of HDV, is also integrated in database. It is a user friendly information system available at public domain and provides annotated information about HDV for research scholars, scientists, pharma industry people for further study.

  18. A Rare Case Report of Hepatic Subcapsular Pseudocyst of Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sandeep; Baruah, Arup

    2016-01-01

    A pancreatic pseudocyst arises as a result of acute or chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic trauma, or obstruction of the pancreatic duct by a neoplasm. Most of the pseudocysts are located within the head and the body of the pancreas but 20% are extra-pancreatic. We report a case of a 33-year-old gentleman presenting with acute on chronic alcoholic pancreatitis with hepatic sub-capsular pseudocyst involving left lobe of liver, with intra-cystic bleed was successfully treated with Ultrasonography (USG) guided drainage. Computed tomography (CT) and high level of amylase in the collection plays an important role in diagnosing this condition. Large hepatic sub-capsular pseudocyst presenting with severe pain due to intra-cystic bleed can be treated with percutaneous drainage to pre-empt rupture. PMID:28208933

  19. A Rare Case of Septic Shock Secondary to Emphysematous Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Nada, Khaled M; El Husseini, Ibrahim; Abu Hishmeh, Mohammad E; Shah, Neerav S; Ibragimova, Nadezhda; Basir, Riyad

    2017-01-01

    To describe a case of emphysematous hepatitis which is a rare clinical entity, characterized by a fatal, rapidly progressive infection of the liver with a radiological appearance simulating emphysematous pyelonephritis and to help provide more data about the causative organisms and precipitating factors of this pathology. Relevant literature was reviewed and, to the best of our knowledge, there is limited data regarding the pathogenesis, causative organisms, and management of this condition. Emphysematous hepatitis is a rapidly progressive infection that can be fatal in the absence of appropriate therapeutic intervention. Initial clinical manifestations are usually subtle and thus high clinical suspicion is required for early diagnosis and management of this condition to help decrease the mortality rates.

  20. A Rare Case of Septic Shock Secondary to Emphysematous Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    El Husseini, Ibrahim; Shah, Neerav S.; Ibragimova, Nadezhda; Basir, Riyad

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe a case of emphysematous hepatitis which is a rare clinical entity, characterized by a fatal, rapidly progressive infection of the liver with a radiological appearance simulating emphysematous pyelonephritis and to help provide more data about the causative organisms and precipitating factors of this pathology. Data Sources and Synthesis Relevant literature was reviewed and, to the best of our knowledge, there is limited data regarding the pathogenesis, causative organisms, and management of this condition. Conclusion Emphysematous hepatitis is a rapidly progressive infection that can be fatal in the absence of appropriate therapeutic intervention. Initial clinical manifestations are usually subtle and thus high clinical suspicion is required for early diagnosis and management of this condition to help decrease the mortality rates. PMID:28638665

  1. Nosocomial hepatitis A infection in a paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Drusin, L M; Sohmer, M; Groshen, S L; Spiritos, M D; Senterfit, L B; Christenson, W N

    1987-01-01

    Seven members of staff in a paediatric intensive care unit and two of their relatives developed hepatitis A over a period of five days. A 13 year old boy who was incontinent of faeces prior to his death, was presumed to be the source of infection. Two hundred and sixty seven other members of staff underwent serological testing and were given prophylactic pooled gamma globulin. Twenty three per cent were immune before exposure. Of people born in the United States, those at highest risk of developing the disease are physicians, dentists, nurses and those under the age of 40. Of those born outside the United States, being white and under the age of 30 are the two main risk factors. Data from a questionnaire sent to 19 nurses at risk (six cases, 13 controls) suggested that sharing food with patients or their families, drinking coffee, sharing cigarettes and eating in the nurses' office in the intensive care unit were associated with an increased incidence of hepatitis. Nurses with three or four of these habits were at particular risk. The costs of screening and prophylaxis were US $64.72 per employee, while prophylaxis alone would have cost US $8.42 per employee. Assessing risk factors on the one hand and costs of prophylaxis on the other are important elements in the control of nosocomial infections. PMID:3632014

  2. Abdominal hamartoma with pancreatic and hepatic differentiation in a sow.

    PubMed

    Ushio, Nanako; Chambers, James K; Watanabe, Kennichi; Kishimoto, Takuya E; Li, Jun-You; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Kazuyuki

    2016-09-01

    A 7-year-old Duroc sow exhibited emaciation, loss of appetite and rapid breathing, and was euthanized. Histopathological examination revealed mild to moderate fibrosis of the heart, cystic kidneys and ulcerative enteritis associated with Balantidium infection. Additionally, a small nodule was incidentally found in the peripancreatic fat tissue. The nodule consisted of disarranged cellular components: pancreatic islet cells (either insulin-, glucagon- or somatostatin-positive), pancreatic acinar cells, hepatocytes (human hepatocyte-positive) and ductal cells (cytokeratin 19-positive). Some of the human hepatocyte-positive cells were also positive for chromogranin A and cytokeratin 7, indicating that they were hepatic progenitor cells. The nodule was therefore diagnosed as hamartoma, probably originating from a fragment of the caudal verge of the liver bud, which contains hepatic and pancreatic progenitors.

  3. Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis due to Viral Hepatitis A

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Safak; Ay, Nurettin; Baysal, Birol; Bahadir, Mehmet Veysi; Onur, Arzu; Duymus, Recai

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation of the gallbladder without evidence of calculi is known as acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC). AAC is frequently associated with gangrene, perforation, and empyema. Due to these associated complications, AAC can be associated with high morbidity and mortality. Medical or surgical treatments can be chosen according to the general condition of the patient, underlying disease and agent. Particularly in acute acalculous cholecystitis cases, early diagnosis and early medical treatment have a positive effect on the patient and protect them from surgical trauma. ACC is a rare complication of acute viral hepatitis A. Herein, we present an adult patient of acalculous cholecystitis due to acute viral hepatitis A. She responded to the conservative management. PMID:24106622

  4. Euforia-induced acute hepatitis in a patient with scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Encarnación, Esther; Ríos, Grissel; Muñoz-Mirabal, Angel; Vilá, Luis M

    2012-01-01

    Euforia, a supplement containing a variety of natural ingredients, is widely used as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory formula. It is not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and its side effects are unknown. We report a 45-year-old woman with limited systemic sclerosis who presented with jaundice and marked elevation of serum transaminases. One month before, she started taking Euforia juice. A liver biopsy disclosed submassive hepatocellular necrosis with histopathological changes consistent with toxic hepatitis. The patient's symptoms resolved with cessation of Euforia. Six months later, she persisted with abnormal liver function tests, but these resolved 18 months after discontinuation of Euforia. The mechanism by which Euforia causes liver injury is unknown. Some ingredients contained in this supplement (green tea, Aloe vera, noni and goji) are linked to hepatic injury. To our knowledge, this is the first report of hepatotoxicity associated with Euforia. PMID:23257938

  5. Synchronous occurrence of a hepatic myelolipoma and two hepatocellular carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shao-Yan; Xie, Hai-Yang; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shu-Sen; Wang, Wei-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Myelolipoma is a rare tumor composed of fat and bone marrow components, most of which are located in the adrenal gland. Myelolipoma in the liver is extremely rare. To date, only 10 cases have been reported in the English-language medical literature. In one of these cases, the hepatic myelolipoma was found within a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In the present study, we report the first case of the synchronous occurrence of hepatic myelolipoma and HCCs in different liver sections of one patient, a 26-year-old female who was admitted to our hospital because of a 4-d history of upper abdominal pain. The unenhanced computed tomography (CT) images showed a well-defined low-density mass with adipose components in the right liver lobe, 4.2 cm × 4.1 cm in size. Two inhomogeneous low-density masses were found in the left liver lobe, 8.6 cm × 7.7 cm and 2.6 cm × 2.6 cm in size. The masses in both the right and left liver lobes were heterogeneously enhanced in the contrast-enhanced CT images. Based on the results of the imaging examination, the mass in the right liver lobe was preliminarily considered to be a hamartoma, and the two masses in the left liver were preliminarily considered to be HCCs. We performed a right hepatectomy, a left hepatic lobectomy, and a cholecystectomy. Microscopic and immunohistochemical results revealed that the tumor in the right liver lobe was a hepatic myelolipoma, and that the two tumors in the left liver lobe were HCCs. PMID:27920487

  6. TERT promoter mutation in resectable hepatocellular carcinomas: a strong association with hepatitis C infection and absence of hepatitis B infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Ling; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Chang, Chih-Ning; Lee, Hsin-Jung; Hsu, Hey-Chi; Lai, Po-Lin; Yuan, Ray-Hwang

    2014-01-01

    Mutation in the core promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene was determined to be a frequent event in malignant melanoma and other cancers. However, the role of TERT promoter mutation in hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) remains largely unknown. Genomic DNA samples from the tumor tissue of 195 HCCs were analyzed for TERT promoter mutation at 2 hotspots (-124 and -146 bp from the ATG start site, g.1,295,228 and g.1,295,250, respectively) through direct sequencing. The TERT promoter mutation was identified in 57 of the 195 HCCs (29.2%) and was associated with old age (P = 0.0122), presence of anti-hepatitis C (HCV; P = 0.0048), and absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg; P = 0.0007). However, the TERT promoter mutation did not correlate with serum α-fetoprotein levels, liver cirrhosis, tumor size, tumor grade, tumor stage, early tumor recurrence, β-catenin mutation or p53 mutation. A multivariate analysis confirmed that the absence of hepatitis B infection is an independent factor associated with TERT promoter mutation. Furthermore, among HCC patients infected with hepatitis C, those with concomitant hepatitis B infection exhibited infrequent TERT promoter mutation (P = 0.0435). Remarkably, patients presenting with TERT promoter mutation-positive and -negative HCCs exhibited similar disease-free and overall survival rates. Our study indicated that the TERT promoter mutation frequently occurred in HCV-associated HCCs. The absence of Hepatitis B infection was significantly associated with the TERT promoter mutation. These findings suggest that various etiological factors may be involved in differing mechanisms to preserve telomeres during the carcinogenesis of HCCs. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The SCAP/SREBP Pathway: A Mediator of Hepatic Steatosis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Young Ah

    2017-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is strongly associated with insulin resistance, obesity, and dyslipidemia. NAFLD encompasses a wide range of states from the simple accumulation of triglycerides in the hepatocytes to serious states accompanied by inflammation and fibrosis in the liver. De novo lipogenesis has been shown to be a significant factor in the development of hepatic steatosis in insulin-resistant states. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is the main transcription factor that mediates the activation of lipogenesis, and SREBP cleavage activating protein (SCAP) is required for the activation of SREBPs. Here, recent animal studies that suggest SCAP as a therapeutic target for hepatic steatosis and hypertriglyceridemia are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Korean Endocrine Society.

  8. A Feline Case of Hepatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma with Gastrin Immunoreactivity

    PubMed Central

    KITA, Chiaki; YAMAGAMI, Tetsushi; KINOUCHI, Shigemi; NAKANO, Masayuki; NAGATA, Nao; SUZUKI, Hitomi; OHTAKE, Yuzo; MIYOSHI, Takuma; IRIE, Mitsuhiro; UCHIDA, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 5-year-old castrated Japanese domestic cat was presented with persistent vomiting. Ultrasound examinations revealed many masses only in the liver, and the fine needle aspiration was performed. Cytologically, polygonal or oval shaped tumor cells forming rosette and cord-like patterns were demonstrated, and then, the hepatic lesions were diagnosed as neuroendocrine carcinoma tentatively. The cat died one month after admission and was necropsied. Histopathologically, the tumor cells of the hepatic mass were arranged in typical rosette and cord-like structures. They were considerably uniform in size with hyperchromatic round nuclei and eosinophilic cytoplasm. Most of tumor cells were immunopositive for chromogranin A, and some were positive for gastrin. The findings indicate the possibility that the present case was a gastrin-producing neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:24492315

  9. Hepatitis E – a “new” foodborne disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirbiš, A.; Raspor Lainšček, P.

    2017-09-01

    Hepatitis E (HE) is a zoonosis caused by hepatitis E virus (HEV). The disease that used to be problematic only in developing regions with inadequate water supplies and poor sanitary conditions is now considered one of the foodborne diseases in industrialized countries as well. According to current knowledge, the main reservoir of the virus is linked to domestic swine and wild boar. Consumption of raw or undercooked pork meat and liver is considered as a risk factor for HE human infection, together with some other sources of infection like blood transfusion or organ transplantation. Although the number of cases has been rising in the last decade, HEV is still a generally unknown virus among the general public. Consumers need to be warned and educated about HEV and its potential sources of contamination within the food supply chain.

  10. A feline case of hepatic neuroendocrine carcinoma with gastrin immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Kita, Chiaki; Yamagami, Tetsushi; Kinouchi, Shigemi; Nakano, Masayuki; Nagata, Nao; Suzuki, Hitomi; Ohtake, Yuzo; Miyoshi, Takuma; Irie, Mitsuhiro; Uchida, Kazuyuki

    2014-06-01

    A 5-year-old castrated Japanese domestic cat was presented with persistent vomiting. Ultrasound examinations revealed many masses only in the liver, and the fine needle aspiration was performed. Cytologically, polygonal or oval shaped tumor cells forming rosette and cord-like patterns were demonstrated, and then, the hepatic lesions were diagnosed as neuroendocrine carcinoma tentatively. The cat died one month after admission and was necropsied. Histopathologically, the tumor cells of the hepatic mass were arranged in typical rosette and cord-like structures. They were considerably uniform in size with hyperchromatic round nuclei and eosinophilic cytoplasm. Most of tumor cells were immunopositive for chromogranin A, and some were positive for gastrin. The findings indicate the possibility that the present case was a gastrin-producing neuroendocrine carcinoma.

  11. The SCAP/SREBP Pathway: A Mediator of Hepatic Steatosis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is strongly associated with insulin resistance, obesity, and dyslipidemia. NAFLD encompasses a wide range of states from the simple accumulation of triglycerides in the hepatocytes to serious states accompanied by inflammation and fibrosis in the liver. De novo lipogenesis has been shown to be a significant factor in the development of hepatic steatosis in insulin-resistant states. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is the main transcription factor that mediates the activation of lipogenesis, and SREBP cleavage activating protein (SCAP) is required for the activation of SREBPs. Here, recent animal studies that suggest SCAP as a therapeutic target for hepatic steatosis and hypertriglyceridemia are discussed. PMID:28116873

  12. Primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumor: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jeong Eun; Kim, Byung Seok; Lee, Chang Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    Primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumors (PHNETs) are extremely rare and difficult to distinguish from other liver tumors, such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cholangiocarcinoma, based on medical imaging findings. A 70-year-old man was referred for evaluation of liver mass incidentally discovered on abdominal computed tomography. The characteristic finding from dynamic liver magnetic resonance imaging led to a diagnosis of HCC. The patient underwent right hepatectomy. Histopathological and immunohistochemical examination revealed grade 2 neuroendocrine tumor. The postoperative 24-h urinary excretion of 5-hydroxy-indolacetic acid was within the normal range. Further imaging investigations were performed. No other lesions were found making probable the diagnosis of PHNET. This case shows that the diagnosis of PHNET is a medical challenge, requiring differentiation of PHNETs other hepatic masses and exclusion of occult primary neuroendocrine tumors. The diagnosis of PHNET can be ascertained after long term follow-up to exclude another primary origin. PMID:27574614

  13. Primary Hepatic Osteosarcoma: A Rare Cause of Primary Liver Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Tamang, Tsering Gyalpo Lama; Shuster, Marina; Chandra, Abhinav B.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Extraosseous osteosarcomas are rare, accounting for approximately 4% of all osteosarcomas. A literature review yields very few cases of osteosarcoma primarily arising from the hepatic parenchyma. CASE REPORT This report describes a case of a man in his 50s with a history of hepatitis C and cirrhosis who presented with 5 days of progressive right upper quadrant pain. Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen and pelvis demonstrated a 4.4 cm × 4.8 cm × 4.8 cm right hepatic lobe mass with a large area of necrosis and peripheral enhancement. The subsequent liver biopsy showed few cores of tumor composed of fibroblastic malignant cells producing lace-like osteoid matrix. Osteosarcomatous foci in other parts of the body were excluded by performing extensive physical examination, radiologic imaging, and biopsy. Hence, a primary osteosarcoma was diagnosed. The patient underwent portal vein embolization in preparation for a surgical resection of the right liver lobe. He was admitted six weeks after the embolization for dyspnea and abdominal distension and expired due to abdominal hematoma and pulmonary embolism. CONCLUSION Based on the rarity, lack of consensus in treatment, and dismal prognosis, extraosseous osteosarcoma should be considered a separate entity from osseous osteosarcoma. More data and research are needed in this rare and understudied malignancy. PMID:27081321

  14. Outcomes of patients with acetaminophen-associated toxic hepatitis at a far east poison center.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yi-Chou; Lin, Ja-Liang; Huang, Wen-Hung; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Lee, Shen-Yang; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Wang, I-Kuan; Liang, Chih-Chia; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Lin, Wey-Ran; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2013-01-01

    There is an overall paucity of data regarding the outcomes of patients with acetaminophen-associated toxic hepatitis in Taiwan. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to recruit a larger number of patients and to examine the clinical features, the degrees of toxic hepatitis, the physiological markers, and the clinical outcomes after intentional acetaminophen poisoning, and to determine what association, if any, might exist between these findings. We examined the medical records of 187 patients with intentional acetaminophen poisoning who were examined at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital between 2000 and 2011. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to hepatic complications, i.e. with (n = 15) or without (n = 172) toxic hepatitis. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected, and the mortality rate was analyzed. It was found that patients with toxic hepatitis had higher serum acetaminophen level (P = 0.007), but they also arrived to the hospital later (P < 0.001) than patients without toxic hepatitis. Furthermore, patients with toxic hepatitis showed higher incidences of acute respiratory failure (P = 0.012) than those shown by patients who did not have hepatitis. The laboratory examinations also revealed greater degrees of granulocytosis (P < 0.001) and poorer liver function tests (P < 0.001) in patients with hepatitis than in patients without hepatitis. Nevertheless, a univariate logistic regression model failed to identify any significant risk factors for toxic hepatitis complication after ingestion (P > 0.05). At the end of the analysis, 1 patient with toxic hepatitis died of liver failure. Finally, there was no significant difference in mortality between patients with and without hepatitis (P = 0.080). The analytical data revealed that toxic hepatitis was not uncommon (15/187 or 8.0%) after acetaminophen overdose. Further studies are warranted.

  15. Hepatitis Testing: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Hepatitis A Test (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Hepatitis B Test (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Hepatitis C Test (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) ...

  16. [Hepatic manifestation of a macrophage activation syndrome (MAS)].

    PubMed

    Nagel, Michael; Schwarting, Andreas; Straub, Beate K; Galle, Peter R; Zimmermann, Tim

    2017-04-04

    Background Elevated liver values are the most common pathological laboratory result in Germany. Frequent findings, especially in younger patients, are nutritive- or medicamentous- toxic reasons, viral or autoimmune hepatitis. A macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) may manifest like a viral infectious disease with fever, hepatosplenomegaly and pancytopenia and is associated with a high mortality. It is based on an enhanced activation of macrophages with increased cytokine release, leading to organ damage and multi-organ failure. In addition to genetic causes, MAS is commonly associated with infections and rheumatic diseases. We report the case of a 26-year-old female patient suffering from MAS as a rare cause of elevated liver enzymes. Methods Patient characteristics, laboratory values, liver histology, bone marrow and radiological imaging were documented and analyzed. Case Report After an ordinary upper airway infection with bronchitis, a rheumatic arthritis appeared and was treated with leflunomide und methotrexate. In the further course of the disease, the patient developed an acute hepatitis with fever, pancytopenia and massive hyperferritinemia. Immunohistochemistry of the liver biopsy revealed hemophagocytosis and activation of CD68-positive macrophages. In the radiological and histological diagnostics of the liver and bone marrow, an MAS was diagnosed as underlying disease of the acute hepatitis. Under therapy with prednisolone, the fever disappeared and transaminases and ferritin rapidly normalized. Conclusion Aside from the frequent causes of elevated liver values in younger patients, such as nutritive toxic, drug induced liver injury, viral or autoimmune hepatitis, especially in case of massive hyperferritinemia, a MAS should be considered as a rare cause of acute liver disease.

  17. Are liver transplant recipients protected against hepatitis A and B?

    PubMed

    Andersson, D; Castedal, M; Friman, V

    2013-04-01

    Liver transplant recipients are at an increased risk for liver failure when infected with hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). Therefore, it is important to vaccinate these individuals. The aim of the study was to evaluate how well liver transplanted patients in our unit were protected against HAV and HBV infection. Furthermore we investigated the vaccination rate and the antibody response to vaccination in these liver transplanted patients. Patients liver transplanted from January 2007 until August 2010 with a posttransplant check-up during the period March-November 2010 were included (n = 51). Information considering diagnose, date of transplantation, Child-Pugh score, and vaccination were collected from the patient records. Anti-HAV IgG and anti-HBs titers in serum samples were analyzed and protective levels were registered. Of the patients 45% were protected against hepatitis A infection and 29% against hepatitis B infection after transplantation. Only 26% were vaccinated according to a complete vaccination schedule and these patients had a vaccine response for HAV and HBV of 50% and 31%, respectively. An additional 31% received ≥ 1 doses of vaccine, but not a complete vaccination and the vaccine response was much lower among these patients, stressing the importance of completing the vaccination schedule. Even when patients were fully vaccinated, they did not respond to the same degree as healthy individuals. Patients seemed to be more likely to respond to a vaccination if they had a lower Child-Pugh score, suggesting that patients should be vaccinated as early as possible in the course of their liver disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Necrotizing hepatitis in a domestic pigeon (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Himmel, L; O'Connor, M; Premanandan, C

    2014-11-01

    An adult male domestic pigeon (Columba livia) was presented for necropsy following natural death after a period of chronic weight loss and severe intestinal ascariasis. Histopathologic examination of the liver found moderate to marked, multifocal necrotizing hepatitis with large, basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. Transmission electron microscopy of affected hepatocytes demonstrated numerous intra- and perinuclear icosahedral virions arranged in a lattice structure, consistent with adenoviral infection.

  19. Synthetic peptides for the immunodiagnosis of hepatitis A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Gauna, A; Losada, S; Lorenzo, M; Bermúdez, H; Toledo, M; Pérez, H; Chacón, E; Noya, O

    2015-12-01

    VP1, VP2 and VP3 molecules of hepatitis A virus are exposed capsid proteins that have shown to be antigenic and are used for diagnosis in recombinant-antigen commercial kits. In this study, we developed a sequence analysis in order to predict diagnostic peptide epitopes, followed by their spot synthesis on functionalized cellulose paper (Pepscan). This paper with synthetic peptides was tested against a sera pool of hepatitis A patients. Two peptide sequences, that have shown an antigenic recognition, were selected for greater scale synthesis on resin. A dimeric form of one of these peptides (IMT-1996), located in the C-Terminus region of protein VP1, was antigenic with a recognition frequency of 87-100% of anti-IgG antibodies and 100% of anti-IgM antibodies employing the immunological assays MABA and ELISA. We propose peptide IMT-1996, with less than twenty residues, as a cheaper alternative for prevalence studies and diagnosis of hepatitis A infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Entecavir: a new treatment option for chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Zoulim, Fabien

    2006-05-01

    Because of the slow kinetics of viral clearance and the spontaneous genetic variability of hepatitis B virus (HBV), antiviral therapy of chronic hepatitis B remains a clinical challenge. Despite the recent development of lamivudine, adefovir dipivoxil and pegylated interferon alpha for the treatment of chronic HBV infection, there is still a major need for new antiviral compounds. Entecavir, a guanosine analog, has been recently approved in US for the therapy of chronic hepatitis B and its registration is expected soon in Europe. Extensive studies have been performed to characterize its antiviral activity in enzymatic and tissue culture models, as well as in animal models of HBV infection. In clinical trails, entecavir administration was associated with a significantly more potent viral suppression compared to lamivudine, and a significant advantage in terms of biochemical and histological improvement compared to lamivudine. Entecavir was tolerated as well as lamivudine in these phase III trials. No case of resistance was detected after two years of therapy in nucleoside naive patients. Treatment of patients with lamivudine failure requires a higher dosage of entecavir and induces a significant decline in viraemia levels. However, 10% of these patients developed entecavir resistance after two years of therapy. The availability of entecavir as a new treatment option is providing clinicians more choice to keep both viral replication and liver disease under control. This provides new hope for improved treatment concepts for chronic HBV infection.

  1. [Acute non-A non-B viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Findor, J A; Lafage, M; Bruch Igartua, E M; Domecq, P; Firpo, A M; Domecq, R B

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-one patients HBs Ag negative seen between january 1978 and june 1980 were studied. Twenty-four of them were males and seven females. Their age ranged between 13 and 58 years. All of them were anti-HAV IgM negative. Six patients presented simultaneously Anti HBc and Anti HBs in the two first weeks of the illness. This fact could be imputed to an acquired immunity due to a previous infection with virus B. None of the patients studied had evidence of infectious mononucleosis or cytomegalovirus. In view of the absence of the markers of recent infection due to virus A and B these patients were considered to have a non A non B hepatitis. Twelve patients had evidence of previous hepatitis, thirteen had acquired the infection by parenteral route; four were post-transfusional and in six cases there was an epidemic medium. Forty-five percent of the patients studied had a biphasic elevation of the aminotransferases, and twenty percent had a cholestatic form. Two of the patients turned into a chronic active hepatitis and another one died of submasive necrosis; in both cases the via of infection was parenteral.

  2. The changing pattern of hepatitis A in Lebanese adults.

    PubMed

    Melhem, Nada M; Jaffa, Miran; Zaatari, Mohamad; Awada, Hanane; Salibi, Noura El; Ramia, Sami

    2015-01-01

    A shift in the age of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection from early childhood to adulthood has been observed in many developing countries. This epidemiological shift has been attributed to improved socioeconomic status and sanitary conditions resulting in growing cohorts of susceptible young people and hence an increased risk of HAV outbreaks. The aim of this study was to investigate the evolutionary trend of anti-HAV seroprevalence in Lebanon in a cohort of Lebanese adults. This was a cross-sectional study employing a convenience sample (voluntary blood donors) along with secondary data analysis. Sera from 283 healthy blood donors were tested for anti-HAV IgG antibodies. Moreover, we analyzed the national reports of HAV cases published by the Lebanese Ministry of Public Health since 2001. Anti-HAV seropositivity increased steadily from 60% in the younger age group (19-29 years) to 91% in the older age group (50-59 years), leaving the younger group at higher risk of acquiring HAV. The national data show that the number of acute hepatitis A infections is higher in the age groups 5-9 and 10-19 years. Our seroprevalence data reveal that young adults are becoming more at risk of acquiring HAV infection. Thus the introduction of hepatitis A vaccine is highly recommended. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Neuralgic amyotrophy complicating acute hepatitis E infection: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Theochari, Evangelia; Vincent-Smith, Lisa; Ellis, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus infection (HEV) is an emerging pathogen that is under-recognised in developed countries. Preceding infection manifested by acute transaminitis has been associated with neurological manifestations, predominately involving the peripheral nervous system, even in immunocompetent patients. We present a case of a 65-year-old previously fit and well Caucasian man with bilateral neuralgic amyotrophy (NA) and acute transaminitis. Serology testing for immunoglobulin (Ig) M and G established the diagnosis of acute HEV infection. The patient received immunomodulatory treatment with an excellent long-term outcome. The temporal association of the clinical presentation of bilateral NA and acute transaminitis from HEV infection suggested the causal association of HEV to NA. We propose screening for HEV in patients presenting with NA and acute hepatitis. PMID:25739795

  4. Excellent response rate to a double dose of the combined hepatitis A and B vaccine in previous nonresponders to hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cardell, Kristina; Akerlind, Britt; Sällberg, Matti; Frydén, Aril

    2008-08-01

    Hepatitis B vaccine has been shown to be highly efficient in preventing hepatitis B. However, 5%-10% of individuals fail to develop protective levels (>or=10 mIU/mL) of antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) and are considered to be nonresponders. A total of 48 nonresponders and 20 subjects naive to the HBV vaccine received a double dose of combined hepatitis A and B vaccine (Twinrix) at 0, 1, and 6 months. The levels of anti-HBs and antibodies to hepatitis A virus (anti-HAV) were determined before vaccination and 1 month after each dose. Among 44 nonresponders, protective anti-HBs levels were found in 26 (59%) after the first dose and in 42 (95%) after the third dose. Among the control subjects, the corresponding figures were 10% and 100%, respectively. All subjects seroconverted to anti-HAV. The titers of both anti-HBs and anti-HAV were lower in the previously nonresponsive subjects (P< .01). Revaccination of nonresponders to the standard hepatitis B vaccine regimen with a double dose of the combined hepatitis A and B vaccine was highly effective. This is most likely explained by the increased dose, a positive bystander effect conferred by the hepatitis A vaccine, or both.

  5. Inflammatory angiomyolipoma of the liver: a rare hepatic tumor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Angiomyolipoma (AML) is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm of the tumor, composed of a varying heterogeneous mixture of three tissue components: blood vessels, smooth muscle and adipose cells. Hepatic AML may demonstrate a marked histological diversity. We herein present one case of hepatic AML exhibiting prominent inflammatory cells in the background, which happened in a 61-year-old Chinese female patient, without signs of tuberous sclerosis. Histologically, the striking feature was the infiltration of numerous inflammatory cells in the background, including small lymphocytes, plasma cells, and eosnophils. The tumor cells were spindled and histiocytoid in shape, with slightly eosinophilic cytoplasm, and arranged along the vessels or scattered among the inflammatory background. Sinusoid structure was obviously seen in the tumor. Mature adipocytes and thick-walled blood vessels were focally observed at the boundaries between the tumor and surrounding liver tissues. The tumor cells were positive immunostaining for HMB-45, Melan-A, and smooth muscle actin. The inflammatory AML should be distinguished from other tumors with inflammatory background such as inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor and follicular dendritic cell tumor and deserves wider recognition for its occurrence as a primary hepatic tumor. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1828633072762370 PMID:22978636

  6. Sirtuin 1 deacetylase: a key regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Jongsook Kim; Choi, Sung-E; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a serious medical problem worldwide and disruption of metabolic/energy homeostasis plays a pivotal role in this global epidemic. In obese people, fatty liver (steatosis) develops, which increases the risk for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and even, liver cancer. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a NAD+-dependent deacetylase that functions as a key metabolic/energy sensor and mediates homeostatic responses to nutrient availability. Accumulating evidence indicates that SIRT1 is a master regulator of the transcriptional networks that control hepatic lipid metabolism. During energy-deprived conditions, SIRT1 deacetylates and alters the expression and activities of key transcriptional regulators involved in hepatic lipogenesis, fatty acid β-oxidation, and cholesterol/bile acid metabolism. This review will discuss the latest advances in this field, focusing on beneficial roles of SIRT1 in hepatic lipid metabolism including its potential as a therapeutic target for treatment of steatosis and other obesity-related metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hepatitis C, cryoglobulinemia, and cirrhosis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kayali, Zeid; Buckwold, Victor E; Zimmerman, Bridget; Schmidt, Warren N

    2002-10-01

    Approximately 40% of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection develop detectable serum cryoglobulins or cryoprecipitates (CP), although most do not show clinical or physical signs of syndromic cryoglobulinemia. Although association of HCV with the extrahepatic complications of cryoglobulinemia is widely recognized, the relationship of cryoglobulinemia with liver disease is unclear. We wished to study the relationship between CP and cirrhosis and to determine whether the development of CP is a true covariate for progressive liver disease or a confounding variable that impacts cirrhosis because of patient age, duration of disease, or differences in gender. We undertook a meta-analysis of 19 studies published between 1994 and 2001. The incidence of cirrhosis was compared in patients with and without CP after logistic regression adjustments for accepted risk factors for progressive liver disease, including age, gender, and estimated duration of disease (EDD). A total of 2,323 patients with chronic hepatitis C were identified, with 1,022 (44%) having detectable CP. Cirrhosis was present in 40% of patients with CP but only 17% of patients without CP (total Chi;(2) = 141.69, P <.001). After adjusting for age, gender, and estimated duration of disease by logistic regression, the combined odds ratio for incidence of cirrhosis in patients CP positive versus CP negative was 4.87, (95% CI: 3.32, 7.15), indicating a highly significant association between cirrhosis and cryoglobulinemia. In conclusion, cryoglobulins may be a useful prognostic indicator for increased risk of cirrhosis with chronic hepatitis C.

  8. Thermal inactivation kinetics of hepatitis A virus in spinach.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Hayriye; Ye, Xiaofei; Harte, Federico; D'Souza, Doris H; Davidson, P Michael

    2015-01-16

    Leafy vegetables have been recognized as important vehicles for the transmission of foodborne viral pathogens. To control hepatitis A viral foodborne illness outbreaks associated with mildly heated (e.g., blanched) leafy vegetables such as spinach, generation of adequate thermal processes is important both for consumers and the food industry. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the thermal inactivation behavior of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in spinach, and provide insights on HAV inactivation in spinach for future studies and industrial applications. The D-values calculated from the first-order model (50-72 °C) ranged from 34.40 ± 4.08 to 0.91 ± 0.12 min with a z-value of 13.92 ± 0.87 °C. The calculated activation energy value was 162 ± 11 kJ/mol. Using the information generated in the present study and the thermal parameters of industrial blanching conditions for spinach as a basis (100 °C for 120-180 s), the blanching of spinach in water at 100 °C for 120-180 s under atmospheric conditions will provide greater than 6 log reduction of HAV. The results of this study may be useful to the frozen food industry in designing blanching conditions for spinach to inactivate or control hepatitis A virus outbreaks.

  9. Inactivation of hepatitis A virus in heat-treated mussels.

    PubMed

    Croci, L; Ciccozzi, M; De Medici, D; Di Pasquale, S; Fiore, A; Mele, A; Toti, L

    1999-12-01

    Hepatitis A is a widespread infectious disease world-wide. In Italy, shellfish consumption was shown to be a major risk factor for hepatitis A infection, especially when these products are eaten raw or slightly cooked. The aim of the present study was to evaluate Hepatitis A virus (HAV) resistance in experimentally contaminated mussels treated at different temperatures (60, 80 and 100 degrees C) for various times. The presence of HAV was evaluated by cell culture infection and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction confirmation. The experiments, carried out on HAV suspension and contaminated mussel homogenate both containing about 10(5) 50% tissue culture infectious dose ml-1, showed that, under our experimental conditions, the treatments at 60 degrees C for 30 min, 80 degrees C for 10 min and an immersion at 100 degrees C for 1 min were not sufficient to inactivate all the viruses; it was necessary to prolong the treatment at 100 degrees C for 2 min to completely inactivate the virus. Thus it is advisable to eat only cooked shellfish, paying particular attention to the times and temperatures used in the cooking process, since evidence suggests that the shellfish body may protect the virus from the heat effect.

  10. Autoimmune hepatitis, cryoglobulinaemia and untreated coeliac disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Biecker, Erwin; Stieger, Muriel; Zimmermann, Arthur; Reichen, Jürg

    2003-04-01

    The clinical presentation of adult coeliac disease is often uncharacteristic, with extraintestinal symptoms being the main findings. We report a 48-year-old woman who presented with type II, hepatitis-C-negative cryoglobulinaemia, elevated liver enzymes, and iron deficiency. Antinuclear antibodies were positive, and immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels were elevated. On liver biopsy, a diagnosis of type I autoimmune hepatitis with a possible autoimmune cholangitis overlap syndrome was made. Immunosuppressive treatment led to a normalization of transaminase levels and resolved the cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis. In addition, the patient exhibited low ferritin and iron levels, which led to the diagnosis of coeliac disease. Long-standing, untreated coeliac disease is recognized to be a trigger for autoimmune disorders and is known to be associated with other autoimmune diseases, but the association with autoimmune hepatitis or autoimmune cholangitis is reported rarely. We conclude that in patients with autoimmune liver disease and unspecific clinical signs, such as iron deficiency, coeliac disease must be ruled out.

  11. Hepatitis A Surveillance and Vaccine Use in China From 1990 Through 2007

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Fuqiang; Hadler, Stephen C; Zheng, Hui; Wang, Fuzhen; Zhenhua, Wu; Yuansheng, Hu; Gong, Xiaohong; Chen, Yuansheng; Liang, Xiaofeng

    2009-01-01

    Background Hepatitis A vaccines have been highly effective in preventing hepatitis A. To investigate the epidemiology of hepatitis A in China after hepatitis A vaccine became available, we reviewed reported cases of hepatitis A and the use of hepatitis A vaccine in China during the period from 1990 through 2007. Methods Data from the National Notifiable Disease Reporting System from 1990 to 2007 and the Emergency Events Reporting System from 2004 to 2007 were reviewed and epidemiologic characteristics analyzed. Hepatitis A vaccine distribution between 1992 and 2007 was also reviewed. Results The incidence of hepatitis A has declined by 90% since 1990, from 56 to 5.9 per 105/year. Declines in age-specific incidence were seen in all age groups, most dramatically among children younger than 10 years. Disease incidence still varies substantially: poorer western provinces have had the highest incidences since 2000. In high-incidence provinces, children younger than 10 years continue to have a high disease incidence. Only 50% of cases were laboratory-confirmed, and only 3% occurred in reported local outbreaks. Over 156 million doses of hepatitis A vaccine have been distributed since 1992, and use has continued to increase since 2003. Conclusions Incidence of hepatitis A has decreased in all age groups, likely due to changing socioeconomic conditions and increasing hepatitis A vaccine use. Nevertheless, western populations remain at high risk, with transmission predominantly occurring among children. The epidemiology of hepatitis A transmission is not well understood. Improved surveillance with better laboratory confirmation is needed to monitor the impact of universal hepatitis A vaccination of young children; this strategy began to be implemented in 2008. PMID:19561383

  12. The Evolving Nature of Hepatic Abscess: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mavilia, Marianna G.; Molina, Marco; Wu, George Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hepatic abscess (HA) remains a serious and often difficult to diagnose problem. HAs can be divided into three main categories based on the underlying conditions: infectious, malignant, and iatrogenic. Infectious abscesses include those secondary to direct extension from local infection, systemic bacteremia, and intra-abdominal infections that seed the portal system. However, over the years, the etiologies and risks factors for HA have continued to evolve. Prompt recognition is important for instituting effective management and obtaining good outcomes. PMID:27350946

  13. Hepatic Subcapsular Biloma: A Rare Complication of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Georganas, Marios; Delaporta, Eirini; Karallas, Emmanouil; Koutsopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    The development of an intra-abdominal bile collection (biloma) is an infrequent complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). These bilomas develop in the subhepatic space most often secondary to iatrogenic injury of the extrahepatic ducts. We present a case of hepatic subcapsular biloma following LC and we discuss its etiology and management. Early diagnosis is crucial and percutaneous drainage under CT guidance should be employed to resolve this complication. PMID:25177507

  14. Hepatic subcapsular biloma: a rare complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, Vassilios; Georganas, Marios; Stratakis, Konstantinos; Delaporta, Eirini; Karallas, Emmanouil; Koutsopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    The development of an intra-abdominal bile collection (biloma) is an infrequent complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). These bilomas develop in the subhepatic space most often secondary to iatrogenic injury of the extrahepatic ducts. We present a case of hepatic subcapsular biloma following LC and we discuss its etiology and management. Early diagnosis is crucial and percutaneous drainage under CT guidance should be employed to resolve this complication.

  15. Brucella suis Biovar 1 isolated from a hepatic abscess drainage.

    PubMed

    Agostinelli, Daniel A; Sánchez de Bustamante, Joaquin; Grendene, Alberto; Barbon, Silvia M; Ayala, Sandra M; Lucero, Nidia E

    2012-07-01

    Positive cultures from hepatic abscess drainage are extremely rare, and in this case the infection would have remained undiagnosed if Brucella suis had not been isolated. Failure to correctly diagnose this zoonosis delays patient treatment and is dangerous, as in this case that could have been a laboratory-acquired disease. This type of infection is preventable if proper safety protocols are established and followed.

  16. The Evolving Nature of Hepatic Abscess: A Review.

    PubMed

    Mavilia, Marianna G; Molina, Marco; Wu, George Y

    2016-06-28

    Hepatic abscess (HA) remains a serious and often difficult to diagnose problem. HAs can be divided into three main categories based on the underlying conditions: infectious, malignant, and iatrogenic. Infectious abscesses include those secondary to direct extension from local infection, systemic bacteremia, and intra-abdominal infections that seed the portal system. However, over the years, the etiologies and risks factors for HA have continued to evolve. Prompt recognition is important for instituting effective management and obtaining good outcomes.

  17. Hepatic fibroblast growth factor 21 is regulated by PPARalpha and is a key mediator of hepatic lipid metabolism in ketotic states.

    PubMed

    Badman, Michael K; Pissios, Pavlos; Kennedy, Adam R; Koukos, George; Flier, Jeffrey S; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2007-06-01

    Mice fed a high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) exhibit marked changes in hepatic metabolism and energy homeostasis. Here, we identify liver-derived fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) as an endocrine regulator of the ketotic state. Hepatic expression and circulating levels of FGF21 are induced by both KD and fasting, are rapidly suppressed by refeeding, and are in large part downstream of PPARalpha. Importantly, adenoviral knockdown of hepatic FGF21 in KD-fed mice causes fatty liver, lipemia, and reduced serum ketones, due at least in part to altered expression of key genes governing lipid and ketone metabolism. Hence, induction of FGF21 in liver is required for the normal activation of hepatic lipid oxidation, triglyceride clearance, and ketogenesis induced by KD. These findings identify hepatic FGF21 as a critical regulator of lipid homeostasis and identify a physiological role for this hepatic hormone.

  18. [Clinico-pathogenetic features of viral hepatitis A course].

    PubMed

    Pak, S G; Volchkova, E V; Umbetova, K T

    1999-01-01

    To study mechanisms enhancing realization of autoimmune disorders in acute viral hepatitis A at initial stages. 32 patients with moderate and 4 patients with severe VHA (17 females and 19 males, age from 15 to 38 years) verified by finding serum anti-HAV IgM at enzyme immunoassay (EIA) have undergone examination which included: measurement of beta 2-microglobulin, C5-components of complement, circulating immune complexes (CIC), zero lymphocytes; test for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and smooth muscle antibodies (SMA). All the patients exhibited high levels of beta 2-microglobulin, zero lymphocytes, CIC, low concentration of C5-components of complement. SMA were detected at the height of intoxication in 27 patients, in early convalescence--in 31 patients. ANA were discovered only in one patient. The findings suggest development of autoimmune reactions in acute VHA patients. These reactions may trigger onset of autoimmune hepatitis.

  19. Hepatitis B vaccine immunogenicity among nurses of a hospital.

    PubMed

    Piratheepkumar, V; Kulendran, S; Nadarajah, S; Murugananthan, K

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the factors affecting hepatitis B vaccine immunogenicity among nursing staff of Teaching Hospital, Jaffna. 152 nursing staffs were recruited from April to July 2013. Those who received three doses had 7.7% failure rate in developing protective immune response. Failure rates were 20% in those who received one dose and 10.6% in two doses. Following vaccination, participants who had chickenpox had a failure rate of 75% (n=13; p=0.02). Pregnancy significantly impaired protective immunity among those who received two doses (p=0.03). Three doses of hepatitis B vaccine may not be sufficient to protect the vaccinees. Therefore assessment of HBsAb titres is warranted after vaccination.

  20. Changing Epidemiological Characteristics of Hepatitis A in Zhejiang Province, China: Increased Susceptibility in Adults.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhifang; Chen, Yaping; Xie, Shuyun; Lv, Huakun

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis A is a common acute hepatitis caused by hepatitis A virus (HAV). Annually, it affects 1.4 million people worldwide. Between 1991 and 1994, HAV infections were highly endemic in Zhejiang Province (China), with 78,720 reported HAV infections per year. Hepatitis A vaccine came on the market in 1995 and was implemented for voluntary immunization. Since 2008, hepatitis A vaccine has been integrated into the national childhood routine immunization program. To understand the current epidemiological profile of hepatitis A in Zhejiang Province since hepatitis A vaccine has been available for nearly two decades. This study used the 2005-2014 National Notifiable Diseases Reporting System data to evaluate the incidence rate of notified hepatitis A cases in Zhejiang Province. The overall trend of incidence rate of notified hepatitis A cases significantly decreased from 2005 to 2014 (P< 0.001). During the study period, the reported incidence rate in individuals aged ≤19 years declined to the historically lowest record in 2014. Compared with individuals aged ≤19 years, those aged ≥20 years showed the highest incidence rate (P< 0.001). Majority of HAV infected cases were Laborers, accounting for approximately 70% of reported cases. Childhood immunization strategy with hepatitis A vaccine seemed to be effective in decreasing notified hepatitis A incidence rate in individuals aged ≤19 years. Those aged ≥20 years were observed to be the most susceptible population. The vast majority of hepatitis A cases were notified among Laborers. Therefore, we strongly suggest that future preventive and control measures should focus more on adults, particularly Laborers, in addition to the current childhood hepatitis A vaccination programme.

  1. Changing Epidemiological Characteristics of Hepatitis A in Zhejiang Province, China: Increased Susceptibility in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhifang; Chen, Yaping; Xie, Shuyun; Lv, Huakun

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis A is a common acute hepatitis caused by hepatitis A virus (HAV). Annually, it affects 1.4 million people worldwide. Between 1991 and 1994, HAV infections were highly endemic in Zhejiang Province (China), with 78,720 reported HAV infections per year. Hepatitis A vaccine came on the market in 1995 and was implemented for voluntary immunization. Since 2008, hepatitis A vaccine has been integrated into the national childhood routine immunization program. Objective To understand the current epidemiological profile of hepatitis A in Zhejiang Province since hepatitis A vaccine has been available for nearly two decades. Methods This study used the 2005–2014 National Notifiable Diseases Reporting System data to evaluate the incidence rate of notified hepatitis A cases in Zhejiang Province. Results The overall trend of incidence rate of notified hepatitis A cases significantly decreased from 2005 to 2014 (P< 0.001). During the study period, the reported incidence rate in individuals aged ≤19 years declined to the historically lowest record in 2014. Compared with individuals aged ≤19 years, those aged ≥20 years showed the highest incidence rate (P< 0.001). Majority of HAV infected cases were Laborers, accounting for approximately 70% of reported cases. Conclusions Childhood immunization strategy with hepatitis A vaccine seemed to be effective in decreasing notified hepatitis A incidence rate in individuals aged ≤19 years. Those aged ≥20 years were observed to be the most susceptible population. The vast majority of hepatitis A cases were notified among Laborers. Therefore, we strongly suggest that future preventive and control measures should focus more on adults, particularly Laborers, in addition to the current childhood hepatitis A vaccination programme. PMID:27093614

  2. Metformin and metabolic diseases: a focus on hepatic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Shih-Lung; Hu, Xiang; Botchlett, Rachel; Chen, Lulu; Huo, Yuqing

    2015-01-01

    Metformin has been widely used as a first-line anti-diabetic medicine for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). As a drug that primarily targets the liver, metformin suppresses hepatic glucose production (HGP), serving as the main mechanism by which metformin improves hyperglycemia of T2D. Biochemically, metformin suppresses gluconeogenesis and stimulates glycolysis. Metformin also inhibits glycogenolysis, which is a pathway that critically contributes to elevated HGP. While generating beneficial effects on hyperglycemia, metformin also improves insulin resistance and corrects dyslipidemia in patients with T2D. These beneficial effects of metformin implicate a role for metformin in managing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. As supported by the results from both human and animal studies, metformin improves hepatic steatosis and suppresses liver inflammation. Mechanistically, the beneficial effects of metformin on hepatic aspects are mediated through both adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent and AMPK-independent pathways. In addition, metformin is generally safe and may also benefit patients with other chronic liver diseases. PMID:25676019

  3. Metformin and metabolic diseases: a focus on hepatic aspects.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Juan; Woo, Shih-Lung; Hu, Xiang; Botchlett, Rachel; Chen, Lulu; Huo, Yuqing; Wu, Chaodong

    2015-06-01

    Metformin has been widely used as a first-line anti-diabetic medicine for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). As a drug that primarily targets the liver, metformin suppresses hepatic glucose production (HGP), serving as the main mechanism by which metformin improves hyperglycemia of T2D. Biochemically, metformin suppresses gluconeogenesis and stimulates glycolysis. Metformin also inhibits glycogenolysis, which is a pathway that critically contributes to elevated HGP. While generating beneficial effects on hyperglycemia, metformin also improves insulin resistance and corrects dyslipidemia in patients with T2D. These beneficial effects of metformin implicate a role for metformin in managing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. As supported by the results from both human and animal studies, metformin improves hepatic steatosis and suppresses liver inflammation. Mechanistically, the beneficial effects of metformin on hepatic aspects are mediated through both adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent and AMPK-independent pathways. In addition, metformin is generally safe and may also benefit patients with other chronic liver diseases.

  4. Albendazole-induced granulomatous hepatitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Drug-related hepatotoxicity is a common medical problem with implications for health systems. It constitutes a cause of acute liver failure and, in many cases, is responsible for the rejection of new pharmacological agents during efficacy and safety studies. Risk factors, as well as pathogenesis of drug-induced liver injury, are poorly understood. The diagnosis of drug-induced liver injury is challenging; it is difficult to define the cause of drug hepatotoxicity due to the heterogeneity of the clinical presentation and the absence of established criteria for accurate and reproducible identification of drug-associated liver toxicity. Case presentation We report the case of a 25-year-old Hispanic woman admitted to our Clinical Hepatology Unit with symptoms of acute hepatitis of unknown etiology. She was diagnosed with albendazole-induced granulomatous hepatitis after ruling out other possible causes, based on laboratory studies, liver biopsy, medical history, detailed drug history, and spontaneous improvement of her liver biochemical profile after medication withdrawal. This diagnosis was supported by the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences-Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method, which showed a likely correlation between hepatocellular damage and drug toxicity as the etiology. Conclusions Our patient’s suspected diagnosis was albendazole-induced granulomatous hepatitis with confirmatory histologic pattern. This case deserves particular attention due to the wide use of albendazole in our country (Colombia) and the prevalent medical issue of drug-related hepatotoxicity. PMID:23889970

  5. A systematic review of hepatitis E virus infection in children.

    PubMed

    Verghese, Valsan Philip; Robinson, Joan L

    2014-09-01

    A systematic review was conducted, seeking all literature relevant to the epidemiology, clinical and laboratory features, and outcome of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in children. Transmission is thought to be primarily from fecal-oral transmission, with the role of transmission from animal reservoirs not being clear in children. Worldwide, seroprevalence is <10% up to 10 years of age, with the exception of 1 of 5 studies from India and the sole study from Egypt. Seroprevalence increases with age, but it is not clear if it is increasing over time. The clinical presentation of HEV infection has broad similarities to hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection, with most cases being subclinical. However, HEV differs from HAV in that infectivity is lower, perinatal transmission can result in neonatal morbidity and even mortality, and a chronic carrier state exists, accounting for chronic hepatitis in some pediatric solid organ transplant recipients. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... a mother who had hepatitis C Received a tattoo or acupuncture with needles that were not disinfected ... is very low with practitioners who have a tattoo license or permit or an acupuncture license) Received ...

  7. Hepatic Steatosis as a Marker of Metabolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fabbrini, Elisa; Magkos, Faidon

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the liver manifestation of the complex metabolic derangements associated with obesity. NAFLD is characterized by excessive deposition of fat in the liver (steatosis) and develops when hepatic fatty acid availability from plasma and de novo synthesis exceeds hepatic fatty acid disposal by oxidation and triglyceride export. Hepatic steatosis is therefore the biochemical result of an imbalance between complex pathways of lipid metabolism, and is associated with an array of adverse changes in glucose, fatty acid, and lipoprotein metabolism across all tissues of the body. Intrahepatic triglyceride (IHTG) content is therefore a very good marker (and in some cases may be the cause) of the presence and the degree of multiple-organ metabolic dysfunction. These metabolic abnormalities are likely responsible for many cardiometabolic risk factors associated with NAFLD, such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. Understanding the factors involved in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of NAFLD will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the metabolic complications of obesity, and hopefully to the discovery of novel effective treatments for their reversal. PMID:26102213

  8. Cost-effectiveness of hepatitis A vaccination in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Suwantika, Auliya A; Beutels, Philippe; Postma, Maarten J

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to assess the cost-effectiveness of hepatitis A immunization in Indonesia, including an explicit comparison between one-dose and two-dose vaccines. An age-structured cohort model based on a decision tree was developed for the 2012 Indonesia birth cohort. Using the model, we made a comparison on the use of two-dose and one-dose vaccines. The model involved a 70-year time horizon with 1-month cycles for children less than 2 years old and annually thereafter. Monte Carlo simulations were used to examine the economic acceptability and affordability of the hepatitis A vaccination. Vaccination would save US$ 3,795,148 and US$ 2,892,920 from the societal perspective, for the two-dose and one-dose vaccine schedules, respectively, in the context of hepatitis A treatment. It also would save 8917 and 6614 discounted quality-adjusted-life-years (QALYs), respectively. With the vaccine price of US$ 3.21 per dose, the implementation of single dose vaccine would yield an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of US$ 4933 per QALY gained versus no vaccination, whereas the two-dose versus one-dose schedule would cost US$ 14 568 per QALY gained. Considering the 2012 gross-domestic-product (GDP) per capita in Indonesia of US$ 3557, the results indicate that hepatitis A vaccination would be a cost-effective intervention, both for the two-dose and one-dose vaccine schedules in isolation, but two-dose vaccination would no longer be cost-effective if one-dose vaccination is a feasible option. Vaccination would be 100% affordable at budgets of US$ 71,408 000 and US$ 37,690,000 for the implementation of the two-dose and one-dose vaccine schedules, respectively. The implementation of hepatitis A vaccination in Indonesia would be a cost-effective health intervention under the market vaccine price. Given the budget limitations, the use of a one-dose-vaccine schedule would be more realistic to be applied than a two-dose schedule. The vaccine price, mortality rate and

  9. Cost-effectiveness of hepatitis A vaccination in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Suwantika, Auliya A; Beutels, Philippe; Postma, Maarten J

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aims to assess the cost-effectiveness of hepatitis A immunization in Indonesia, including an explicit comparison between one-dose and two-dose vaccines. Methods An age-structured cohort model based on a decision tree was developed for the 2012 Indonesia birth cohort. Using the model, we made a comparison on the use of two-dose and one-dose vaccines. The model involved a 70-year time horizon with 1-month cycles for children less than 2 years old and annually thereafter. Monte Carlo simulations were used to examine the economic acceptability and affordability of the hepatitis A vaccination. Results Vaccination would save US$ 3 795 148 and US$ 2 892 920 from the societal perspective, for the two-dose and one-dose vaccine schedules, respectively, in the context of hepatitis A treatment. It also would save 8917 and 6614 discounted quality-adjusted-life-years (QALYs), respectively. With the vaccine price of US$ 3.21 per dose, the implementation of single dose vaccine would yield an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of US$ 4933 per QALY gained versus no vaccination, whereas the two-dose versus one-dose schedule would cost US$ 14 568 per QALY gained. Considering the 2012 gross-domestic-product (GDP) per capita in Indonesia of US$ 3557, the results indicate that hepatitis A vaccination would be a cost-effective intervention, both for the two-dose and one-dose vaccine schedules in isolation, but two-dose vaccination would no longer be cost-effective if one-dose vaccination is a feasible option. Vaccination would be 100% affordable at budgets of US$ 71 408 000 and US$ 37 690 000 for the implementation of the two-dose and one-dose vaccine schedules, respectively. Conclusions The implementation of hepatitis A vaccination in Indonesia would be a cost-effective health intervention under the market vaccine price. Given the budget limitations, the use of a one-dose-vaccine schedule would be more realistic to be applied than a two

  10. Acute hepatitis A, B and C but not D is still prevalent in Mongolia: a time trend analysis.

    PubMed

    Baatarkhuu, Oidov; Lee, Hye Won; George, Jacob; Munkh-Orshikh, Dashchirev; Enkhtuvshin, Baasankhuu; Ariunaa, Sosorbaram; Eslam, Mohammed; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Kim, Do Young

    2017-06-01

    Mongolia has one of the highest hepatitis A, C, B and D infection incidences worldwide. We sought to investigate changes in the proportion of acute viral hepatitis types in Mongolia over the last decade. The cohort comprised 546 consecutive patients clinically diagnosed with acute viral hepatitis from January 2012 to December 2014 in Ulaanbaatar Hospital, Mongolia. A time trend analysis investigating the change in proportion of acute hepatitis A virus, hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis delta virus (HDV) infection among the cohort with respect to a previous published study was undertaken. Acute hepatitis A, B and C was diagnosed in 50.9%, 26.2% and 6.0% of the cohort. Notably, 16.8% of the cohort had a dual infection. The etiologies of acute viral hepatitis were varied by age groups. The most common cause of acute viral hepatitis among 2-19 year olds was hepatitis A, HBV and superinfection with HDV among 20-40 year olds, and HCV among 40-49 year olds. Patients with more than one hepatitis virus infection were significantly older, more likely to be male and had a higher prevalence of all risk factors for disease acquisition. These patients also had more severe liver disease at presentation compared to those with mono-infection. Acute viral hepatitis is still prevalent in Mongolia. Thus, the need for proper infection control is increasing in this country.

  11. The Economic Burden of Hepatitis A, B, and C in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Shon, Changwoo; Choi, Hyung-Yun; Shim, Jae-Jun; Park, So-Youn; Lee, Kyung Suk; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Oh, In-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of hepatitis in South Korea is relatively high compared to that in other high-income countries. For this reason, viral hepatitis infection not only affects the population's health, but also impacts national healthcare costs. This study was performed in order to estimate the individual economic costs of the hepatitis A, B, and C viruses as well as to determine, using nationally representative data, the trends in South Korea with respect to these viruses during the 2008-2011 period. The study found that the prevalence of hepatitis A had decreased, but those of hepatitis B and C had increased overall. The mortality rate of hepatitis C was higher than that of the other two types. The mortality rate of hepatitis B had changed little, whereas that of hepatitis C had risen. The total cost of hepatitis A had decreased, from US $62.2 million to US $45.7 million, although a notable exception occurred in 2009, when the cost was US $126.6 million. Conversely, the total cost of hepatitis B had increased rapidly during the same period, from US $501.4 million to US $607.8 million. Finally, the total cost of hepatitis C had also increased from US $63.9 million to US $90.7 million. The direct costs of hepatitis A, B, and C were estimated to account for approximately 35.5%, 46.6%, and 58.0% of the total, respectively. These findings demonstrate the economic burden associated with hepatitis A, B, and C, and demonstrate the need to establish an effective prevention and management policy for future planning in South Korea.

  12. A Macaca mulatta model of fulminant hepatic failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Xia, Jie; Guo, Gang; Huang, Zi-Xing; Lu, Qiang; Li, Li; Li, Hong-Xia; Shi, Yu-Jun; Bu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To establish an appropriate primate model of fulminant hepatic failure (FHF). METHODS: We have, for the first time, established a large animal model of FHF in Macaca mulatta by intraperitoneal infusion of amatoxin and endotoxin. Clinical features, biochemical indexes, histopathology and iconography were examined to dynamically investigate the progress and outcome of the animal model. RESULTS: Our results showed that the enzymes and serum bilirubin were markedly increased and the enzyme-bilirubin segregation emerged 36 h after toxin administration. Coagulation activity was significantly decreased. Gradually deteriorated parenchymal abnormality was detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography at 48 h. The liver biopsy showed marked hepatocyte steatosis and massive parenchymal necrosis at 36 h and 49 h, respectively. The autopsy showed typical yellow atrophy of the liver. Hepatic encephalopathy of the models was also confirmed by hepatic coma, MRI and pathological changes of cerebral edema. The lethal effects of the extrahepatic organ dysfunction were ruled out by their biochemical indices, imaging and histopathology. CONCLUSION: We have established an appropriate large primate model of FHF, which is closely similar to clinic cases, and can be used for investigation of the mechanism of FHF and for evaluation of potential medical therapies. PMID:22346249

  13. Bell's Palsy as a Possible Complication of Hepatitis B Vaccination in A Child

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hüseyin; Orbak, Zerrin

    2009-01-01

    Bell's Palsy is the sudden onset of unilateral temporary paralysis of facial muscles resulting from seventh cranial nerve dysfunction. Presented here is a two-year old female patient with right peripheral facial palsy following hepatitis B vaccination. Readers’ attention is drawn to an uncommon cause of Bell's Palsy, as a rare complication of hepatitis B vaccination. PMID:19902808

  14. Bell's palsy as a possible complication of hepatitis B vaccination in a child.

    PubMed

    Alp, Handan; Tan, Hüseyin; Orbak, Zerrin

    2009-10-01

    Bell's Palsy is the sudden onset of unilateral temporary paralysis of facial muscles resulting from seventh cranial nerve dysfunction. Presented here is a two-year old female patient with right peripheral facial palsy following hepatitis B vaccination. Readers' attention is drawn to an uncommon cause of Bell's Palsy, as a rare complication of hepatitis B vaccination.

  15. [A case of cryptococcal meningitis mimicking hepatic encephalopathy in a patient with liver cirrhosis caused by chronic hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye Mi; Jung, Gum Mo; Lee, Woong Ki; Lee, Hyeuk Soo; Kim, Byung Sun; Seong, Choong Sil; Yoon, So Hee; Cho, Yong Keun

    2014-11-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans, an encapsulated fungus, is an important opportunistic pathogen that can cause meningitis in im-munocompromised patients. Since patients with cryptococcemia have high mortality, it is essential to make an early diagnosis and promptly initiate antifungal therapy. However, it is often very difficult to differentiate between cryptococcal meningitis and hepatic encephalopathy in patients with liver cirrhosis, and there is delay in making the diagnosis. Therefore, these patients have a particularly grave prognosis and consequently many patients die before culture results become available. In one study, starting antifungal therapy within 48 hours of the blood culture was associated with improved survival, but patients with liver cirrhosis were significantly less likely to receive antifungal therapy within 48 hours compared to those without liver cirrhosis. Recently, the authors experience a case of a 68-year-old woman with liver cirrhosis who presented with fever and a drowsy mental status. She had a previous history of having been admitted for infection-associated hepatic encephlopathy. Cryptococcal meningitis and cryptococcemia were diagnosed by spinal puncture and culture of cerebrospinal fluid. In spite of adequate treatment, the patient developed multi-system organ failure and eventually expired. Herein, we report a case of cryptococcal meningitis mimicking hepatic encephalopathy in a patient with liver cirrhosis.

  16. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of acute hepatitis a in Korea: a nationwide multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Kwon, So Young; Park, Sang Hoon; Yeon, Jong Eun; Jeong, Sook Hyang; Kwon, Oh Sang; Lee, Jin Woo; Kim, Hong Soo; Seo, Yeon Seok; Kim, Young Seok; Sohn, Joo Hyun; Yim, Hyung Joon; Choi, Jong Young; Lee, Myung Seok; Kweon, Young Oh; Cheong, Jae Youn; Kim, Haak Cheoul; Lee, Heon Ju; Baik, Soon Koo; An, Hyonggin; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics of acute hepatitis A during a recent outbreak in Korea. Data of patients diagnosed with acute hepatitis A from 2007 to 2009 were collected from 21 tertiary hospitals retrospectively. Their demographic, clinical, and serological characteristics and their clinical outcomes were analyzed. A total of 4,218 patients (mean age 33.3 yr) were included. The median duration of admission was 9 days. The mean of the highest ALT level was 2,963 IU/L, total bilirubin was 7.3 mg/dL, prothrombin time INR was 1.3. HBsAg was positive in 3.7%, and anti-HCV positive in 0.7%. Renal insufficiency occurred in 2.7%, hepatic failure in 0.9%, relapsing hepatitis in 0.7%, and cholestatic hepatitis in 1.9% of the patients. Nineteen patients (0.45%) died or were transplanted. Complications of renal failure or prolonged cholestasis were more frequent in patients older than 30 yr. In conclusion, most patients with acute hepatitis A recover uneventfully, however, complication rates are higher in patients older than 30 yr than younger patients. Preventive strategies including universal vaccination in infants and active immunization of hepatitis A to adult population should be considered for prevention of community-wide outbreaks of hepatitis A in Korea.

  17. Quantification of hepatitis B surface antigen: a new concept for the management of chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Moucari, Rami; Marcellin, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    HBsAg is a very important clinical test that might not only indicate active hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection but might also be used to predict clinical and treatment outcome. Clearance of HBsAg in patients with chronic HBV infection is associated with a much better clinical outcome, although surveillance for early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) should continue. HBV DNA quantification is currently used for selecting candidates for therapy, monitoring response to therapy and detecting the emergence of drug resistance. Assays for HBsAg quantification are less expensive than HBV DNA and fully automated with a high throughput capacity. HBsAg titering may be a useful tool to manage patients with chronic HBV, to more clearly define which patients may, and more importantly, may not, benefit from treatment. Baseline and on-treatment HBsAg quantification may help to refine future treatment algorithms for both immune-modulator therapy and nucleos(t)ide analogues. Both HBV markers provide complementary information on the status of HBV infection. However, the relevance of serum HBsAg levels and its use as a reliable replacement for both covalently closed circular DNA and HBV DNA remain unclear.

  18. [Vaccinations in sports and recommendations for immunization against flu, hepatitis A and hepatitis B].

    PubMed

    Constantini, N; Ken-Dror, A; Eliakim, A; Galatzkia, L; Morag, A; Mann, G; Volach, B; Asharov, J; Shoval, D

    2001-12-01

    Intensive physical training in elite athletes can have an adverse effect on the immune system, and can increase the susceptibility to infectious diseases. The insult to the immune system includes the cellular, humoral and phagocitic pathways. The increased incidence of viral infections (in particularly of the upper respiratory tract) occurs mainly during periods of intense exercise training and competitions due to the combination of physiological and psychological stress. Other factors that may contribute to the decreased immunity and increased susceptibility to infections include eating disorders and nutritional deficiencies, jet lag, sleep deprivation, and lack of proper hygiene in shared food and sleeping quarters. For elite athletes, even a mild viral infection can be devastating due to loss of important training hours and/or compromise of competitive performance. Therefore, in addition to the goal of improving the athletes performance, another important responsibility/obligation of the staff working with athletes (physicians, nutritionists, physiotherapists, and psychologists), is to emphasize preventive medicine and maintenance of good health. In this article we define athletes, and especially elite athletes, as a population at risk of various infections, and recommend immunization against hepatitis A and B and a yearly immunization against influenza.

  19. Cyclosporin A inhibits hepatitis B and hepatitis D virus entry by cyclophilin-independent interference with the NTCP receptor.

    PubMed

    Nkongolo, Shirin; Ni, Yi; Lempp, Florian A; Kaufman, Christina; Lindner, Thomas; Esser-Nobis, Katharina; Lohmann, Volker; Mier, Walter; Mehrle, Stefan; Urban, Stephan

    2014-04-01

    Chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis D are global health problems caused by the human hepatitis B and hepatitis D virus. The myristoylated preS1 domain of the large envelope protein mediates specific binding to hepatocytes by sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP). NTCP is a bile salt transporter known to be inhibited by cyclosporin A. This study aimed to characterize the effect of cyclosporin A on HBV/HDV infection. HepaRG cells, primary human hepatocytes, and susceptible NTCP-expressing hepatoma cell lines were applied for infection experiments. The mode of action of cyclosporin A was studied by comparing the effect of different inhibitors, cyclophilin A/B/C-silenced cell lines as well as NTCP variants and mutants. Bile salt transporter and HBV receptor functions were investigated by taurocholate uptake and quantification of HBVpreS binding. Cyclosporin A inhibited hepatitis B and D virus infections during and--less pronounced--prior to virus inoculation. Binding of HBVpreS to NTCP was blocked by cyclosporin A concentrations at 8 μM. An NTCP variant deficient in HBVpreS binding but competent for bile salt transport showed resistance to cyclosporin A. Silencing of cyclophilins A/B/C did not abrogate transporter and receptor inhibition. In contrast, tacrolimus, a cyclophilin-independent calcineurin inhibitor, was inactive. HBV and HDV entry via sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide is inhibited by cyclosporin A. The interaction between the drug and the viral receptor is direct and overlaps with a functional binding site of the preS1 domain, which mediates viral entry. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Elevated hepatitis A and E seroprevalence rates in a Texas/Mexico border community.

    PubMed

    Redlinger, T; O'Rourke, K; Nickey, L; Martinez, G

    1998-05-01

    Two seroprevalence studies of viral hepatitis A and hepatitis E were conducted in El Paso, Tex, and Cd Juárez, Mexico. Subjects were randomly selected, low-income pregnant women. Blood from 557 women in El Paso and 307 women in Cd Juárez, obtained from routine prenatal testing, was analyzed for antibodies to hepatitis A and hepatitis E. Women from both cities showed high seroprevalence rates of hepatitis A (75.8% in El Paso and 96.1% in Cd Juárez). Rates increased significantly by age, with 100% of women in Cd Juárez older than 28 years testing positive. Nationality and ethnicity were significantly associated with hepatitis A seroprevalence: Mexican nationals, 96.1%; US Hispanics, 78.8%; and US Caucasians, 36.4% (P < .001). With respect to hepatitis E, 0.4% of women in El Paso and 1.6% of women in Cd Juárez tested positive for anti-HEV. The rate of hepatitis A seroprevalence was higher for women with lower educational levels and for women residing in crowded households, but these findings were not statistically significant.

  1. Risk of pancreatic cancer among individuals with hepatitis C or hepatitis B virus infection: a nationwide study in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J; Magnusson, M; Törner, A; Ye, W; Duberg, A-S

    2013-01-01

    Background: A few studies indicated that hepatitis C and hepatitis B virus (HCV/HBV) might be associated with pancreatic cancer risk. The aim of this nationwide cohort study was to examine this possible association. Methods: Hepatitis C virus- and hepatitis B virus-infected individuals were identified from the national surveillance database from 1990 to 2006, and followed to the end of 2008. The pancreatic cancer risk in the study population was compared with the general population by calculation of Standardized Incidence Ratios (SIRs), and with a matched reference population using a Cox proportional hazards regression model to calculate hazard ratios (HRs). Results: In total 340 819 person-years in the HCV cohort and 102 295 in the HBV cohort were accumulated, with 34 and 5 pancreatic cancers identified, respectively. The SIRHCV was 2.1 (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.4, 2.9) and the SIRHBV was 1.4 (0.5, 3.3). In the Cox model analysis, the HR for HCV infection was 1.9 (95% CI: 1.3, 2.7), diminishing to 1.6 (1.04, 2.4) after adjustment for potential confounders. Conclusion: Our results indicated that HCV infection might be associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer but further studies are needed to verify such association. The results in the HBV cohort indicated an excess risk, however, without statistical significance due to lack of power. PMID:24178755

  2. A highly conserved G-rich consensus sequence in hepatitis C virus core gene represents a new anti-hepatitis C target.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-Ru; Min, Yuan-Qin; Wang, Jia-Qi; Liu, Chao-Xing; Fu, Bo-Shi; Wu, Fan; Wu, Ling-Yu; Qiao, Zhi-Xian; Song, Yan-Yan; Xu, Guo-Hua; Wu, Zhi-Guo; Huang, Gai; Peng, Nan-Fang; Huang, Rong; Mao, Wu-Xiang; Peng, Shuang; Chen, Yu-Qi; Zhu, Ying; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Xiao-Lian; Zhou, Xiang

    2016-04-01

    G-quadruplex (G4) is one of the most important secondary structures in nucleic acids. Until recently, G4 RNAs have not been reported in any ribovirus, such as the hepatitis C virus. Our bioinformatics analysis reveals highly conserved guanine-rich consensus sequences within the core gene of hepatitis C despite the high genetic variability of this ribovirus; we further show using various methods that such consensus sequences can fold into unimolecular G4 RNA structures, both in vitro and under physiological conditions. Furthermore, we provide direct evidences that small molecules specifically targeting G4 can stabilize this structure to reduce RNA replication and inhibit protein translation of intracellular hepatitis C. Ultimately, the stabilization of G4 RNA in the genome of hepatitis C represents a promising new strategy for anti-hepatitis C drug development.

  3. Prevalence of Hepatitis A Virus Antibody in Portuguese Travelers: A New Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Sónia; Tejo, Sandra; Ferreira, Eugénia; Trindade, Luís; Rabadão, Eduardo; Marques, Nuno; Saraiva da Cunha, José

    2017-08-31

    In Portugal, the prevalence of hepatitis A virus infection has decreased in the past decades, especially in young adults. The aim of this study was to detect the prevalence of antibody to hepatitis A virus in a population observed in our Travel Clinic. Antibodies against hepatitis A, hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus were tested using standard enzyme immunoassay in patients older than 18. The exclusion criteria were: prior vaccination for hepatitis A virus, previous diagnosis of infection with hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and/or human immunodeficiency virus, foreign travelers and long-term expatriates. We applied an epidemiological survey and data was statistically analyzed with SPSS® 18.0. In the 665 travelers studied, natural immunity to hepatitis A virus was present in 57.6% (n = 383). They were stratified into 8 age groups and for each one hepatitis A immunity was clarified: 5.0% (n = 1) in 18 - 25 years, 32.3% (n = 21) in 26 - 30 years, 40.9% (n = 47) in 31 - 35 years, 45.8% (n = 54) in 36 - 40 years, 68.7% (n = 79) in 41 - 45 years, 70.1% (n = 68) in 46 - 50 years, 80.8% (n = 63) in 51 - 55 years and 87.7% (n = 50) over 56 years old. In those who accepted further screening, positivity for hepatitis B core antibody was found in 0.6% (n = 3) travelers, hepatitis C virus infection in 1.1% (n = 6) and human immunodeficiency virus infection in 0.5% (n = 3) whose previous status was unknown. The most frequent travel destination was sub-Saharan Africa (72.6%; n = 483). We found 49.1% (n = 260) travelers under 50 years old susceptible to hepatitis A virus infection and for those between 40 and 50 years, 30.7% (n = 65) still need vaccine protection. Across age groups there is a trend towards lower prevalence of hepatitis A virus antibody, in particular among youngsters, when compared with older Portuguese studies.

  4. Exploring the concurrent presence of hepatitis A virus genome in serum, stool, saliva, and urine samples of hepatitis A patients.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Madhuri S; Bhalla, Shilpa; Kalrao, Vijay R; Dhongade, Ramchandra K; Chitambar, Shobha D

    2014-04-01

    The use of saliva and urine as an alternative to serum samples for detection of anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) IgM antibodies has been documented. However, these samples remain underreported or unexplored for shedding of HAV. To address this issue, paired serum, stool, saliva, and urine samples collected from hepatitis A patients were screened by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for detection of HAV RNA. HAV RNA was detected in 67.6% (44/65), 52.3% (34/65), 8.7% (5/57), and 12.3% (8/65) of the serum, stool, saliva, and urine samples, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences obtained for partial RNA polymerase region grouped HAV strains from all of the clinical samples of the study in subgenotype IIIA. Low frequency of HAV nucleic acid in saliva and urine samples indicates limited utility of these samples in genomic studies on HAV but suggests its potential for transmission and infection of hepatitis A. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Non-A, non-B hepatitis: clinical laboratory course in patients on hemodialysis and its correlation with the presence of anti-hepatitis C virus antibodies.

    PubMed

    La Russa, A; Bufano, G; Cauzzi, L; Pecchini, P

    1992-01-01

    136 patients on hemodialysis, 89 males and 47 females, were studied; we evaluated the index of hepatic function (SGOT and SGPT) and antibodies against HCV. We observed 42 cases of increased transaminases classified as non-A, non-B (NANB) hepatitis. Antibodies against HCV were present in 40 patients. Among 42 patients with NANB hepatitis. 31 (73.8%) presented anti-HCV antibodies. No significant clinical or laboratory difference exists between anti-HCV-positive and -negative patients with NANB hepatitis. The distribution of patients who present anti-HCV antibodies is similar in post-transfusional and sporadic forms.

  6. Capsaicin affects brain function in a model of hepatic encephalopathy associated with fulminant hepatic failure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Avraham, Y; Grigoriadis, NC; Magen, I; Poutahidis, T; Vorobiav, L; Zolotarev, O; Ilan, Y; Mechoulam, R; Berry, EM

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hepatic encephalopathy is a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by liver failure. In view of the effects of cannabinoids in a thioacetamide-induced model of hepatic encephalopathy and liver disease and the beneficial effect of capsaicin (a TRPV1 agonist) in liver disease, we assumed that capsaicin may also affect hepatic encephalopathy. Experimental approach: Fulminant hepatic failure was induced in mice by thioacetamide and 24 h later, the animals were injected with one of the following compound(s): 2-arachidonoylglycerol (CB1, CB2 and TRPV1 receptor agonist); HU308 (CB2 receptor agonist), SR141716A (CB1 receptor antagonist); SR141716A+2-arachidonoylglycerol; SR144528 (CB2 receptor antagonist); capsaicin; and capsazepine (TRPV1 receptor agonist and antagonist respectively). Their neurological effects were evaluated on the basis of activity in the open field, cognitive function in an eight-arm maze and a neurological severity score. The mice were killed 3 or 14 days after thioacetamide administration. 2-arachidonoylglycerol and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, respectively. Results: Capsaicin had a neuroprotective effect in this animal model as shown by the neurological score, activity and cognitive function. The effect of capsaicin was blocked by capsazepine. Thioacetamide induced astrogliosis in the hippocampus and the cerebellum and raised brain 5-hydroxytryptamine levels, which were decreased by capsaicin, SR141716A and HU-308. Thioacetamide lowered brain 2-arachidonoylglycerol levels, an effect reversed by capsaicin. Conclusions: Capsaicin improved both liver and brain dysfunction caused by thioacetamide, suggesting that both the endocannabinoid and the vanilloid systems play important roles in hepatic encephalopathy. Modulation of these systems may have therapeutic value. PMID:19764982

  7. Prevalence and incidence of cryoglobulins in hepatitis C virus-related chronic hepatitis patients: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Persico, Marcello; De Marino, Fedele Antonio; Di Giacomo Russo, Giovanni; Persico, Eliana; Morante, Aristide; Palmentieri, Bruno; Torella, Roberto

    2003-04-01

    A high prevalence of cryoglobulins has been reported in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and the incidence of cryoglobulins and their association with clinical symptoms in chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis patients. The prevalence of cryoglobulins and cryoglobulinemic syndrome was investigated at enrollment in 237 patients (213 with chronic hepatitis and 24 with cirrhosis). A 7-yr follow-up was conducted evaluating the occurrence of cryoglobulins and/or cryoglobulinemic syndrome every 6 months. Rheumatoid factor was also tested in all patients. Prevalence of rheumatoid factor, cryoglobulins, and cryoglobulinemic syndrome in chronic hepatitis patients were 2%, 0.8%, and 0%, respectively. In cirrhosis patients the prevalence was 4%, 8%, and 0%, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups. During the follow-up only one patient for each group abruptly developed cryoglobulinemic syndrome, and none of the patients who showed signs of cryoglobulinemia developed the syndrome or showed signs of evolution of the disease. Our data demonstrate that the presence of cryoglobulins and/or cryoglobulinemic syndrome in HCV-related liver disease is unusual, as is the occurrence of cryoglobulinemia over time in these patients. This leads us to think that HCV-related cryoglobulinemic syndrome and HCV-related liver disease are independent diseases. This supports new and indirect evidence for an independent and direct role of HCV in liver and blood disorders.

  8. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis as an Extrahepatic Manifestation of Acute Anicteric Hepatitis A Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zis, Panagiotis; Kontogeorgi, Elli; Karakalos, Dimitrios; Pavlopoulou, Despoina; Sevastianos, Vassilios A.

    2012-01-01

    Among the many infective causes of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), viral hepatitis has been regarded as a rare associated condition. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with CVT associated with hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection, outlining probable pathogenic mechanisms. We suggest that hepatitis A serological markers should be routinely included in the investigation of cerebral venous thrombosis of unknown etiology, in nonvaccinated patients with risk factors of a recent HAV exposure. PMID:22934203

  9. CT, MRI and DWI Features of a Solid Organizing Hepatic Abscess.

    PubMed

    Savastano, Sergio; Pellizzer, Giampiero; Di Grazia, Lorenzo; Giacomini, Dario; Beghetto, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Solid organizing hepatic abscess is a rare form of focal infection, which needs differentiation from benign and malignant solid masses. We report a case of a 30-year-old man with a solid organizing hepatic abscess, diagnosed by imaging and ex juvantibus criteria. CT and MRI findings are presented and role of DWI is outlined. Noninvasive diagnosis of a solid organizing hepatic abscess is possible in the appropriate clinical setting; percutaneous or surgical biopsy may be indicated in equivocal cases.

  10. Prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV and risk factors in entrants to Irish prisons: a national cross sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jean; Allwright, Shane; Barry, Joseph; Reynolds, Sheilagh Reaper; Thornton, Lelia; Bradley, Fiona; Parry, John V

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen, hepatitis C virus, and HIV in entrants to Irish prisons and to examine risk factors for infection. Design Cross sectional, anonymous survey, with self completed risk factor questionnaire and oral fluid specimen for antibody testing. Setting Five of seven committal prisons in the Republic of Ireland. Participants 607 of the 718 consecutive prison entrants from 6 April to 1 May 1999. Main outcome measures Prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen, hepatitis C virus, and HIV in prison entrants, and self reported risk factor status. Results Prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen was 37/596 (6%; 95% confidence interval 4% to 9%), to hepatitis C virus was 130/596 (22%; 19% to 25%), and to HIV was 12/596 (2%; 1% to 4%). A third of the respondents had never previously been in prison; these had the lowest prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen (4/197, 2%), to hepatitis C (6/197, 3%), and to HIV (0/197). In total 29% of respondents (173/593) reported ever injecting drugs, but only 7% (14/197) of those entering prison for the first time reported doing so compared with 40% (157/394) of those previously in prison. Use of injected drugs was the most important predictor of antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen and hepatitis C virus. Conclusions Use of injected drugs and infection with hepatitis C virus are endemic in Irish prisons. A third of prison entrants were committed to prison for the first time. Only a small number of first time entrants were infected with one or more of the viruses. These findings confirm the need for increased infection control and harm reduction measures in Irish prisons. What is already known on this topicHigh rates of using injected drugs, initiation of use of injected drugs, and sharing injecting equipment occur in Irish prisonsInjecting drug users have high rates of infection with hepatitis B and C viruses, and hepatitis C is

  11. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the same symptoms as those of other liver diseases or metabolic disorders. Blood tests. A blood test involves drawing ... the same symptoms as those of other liver diseases or metabolic disorders. Treatment for autoimmune hepatitis includes medication to ...

  12. Hep