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Sample records for her2-negative breast tumours

  1. Targeted Therapy of HER2-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Florian; Domschke, Christoph; Schneeweiss, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Personalized and targeted treatments are the most discussed topics in oncology. However, how much personalized medicine is standard of care nowadays and how much is part of our hope for a better future? So far, only a few targeted therapies are available in daily practice for the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer. And even for these few targeted agents - besides those targeting the estrogen receptor (ER) for endocrine treatment - thus far, predictive factors are missing. There are many new drugs and strategies under evaluation but, unfortunately, they are being developed without any cross-comparison. What drug will we choose for which patient in the future? Without answering this question oncologists will not be able to individualize treatment. Predictive factors for every new splendid drug are eagerly needed before it comes to an approval.

  2. Blood Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profiles of HER2 Negative Breast Cancers Patients

    PubMed Central

    Balacescu, Ovidiu; Balacescu, Loredana; Gherman, Claudia; Drigla, Flaviu; Pop, Laura; Bolba-Morar, Gabriela; Tudoran, Oana; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2016-01-01

    Tumors act systemically to sustain cancer progression, affecting the physiological processes in the host and triggering responses in the blood circulating cells. In this study, we explored blood transcriptional patterns of patients with two subtypes of HER2 negative breast cancers, with different prognosis and therapeutic outcome. Peripheral blood samples from seven healthy female donors and 29 women with breast cancer including 14 triple-negative breast cancers and 15 hormone-dependent breast cancers were evaluated by microarray. We also evaluated the stroma in primary tumors. Transcriptional analysis revealed distinct molecular signatures in the blood of HER2− breast cancer patients according to ER/PR status. Our data showed the implication of immune signaling in both breast cancer subtypes with an enrichment of these processes in the blood of TNBC patients. We observed a significant alteration of “chemokine signaling,” “IL-8 signaling,” and “communication between innate and adaptive immune cells” pathways in the blood of TNBC patients correlated with an increased inflammation and necrosis in their primary tumors. Overall, our data indicate that the presence of triple-negative breast cancer is associated with an enrichment of altered systemic immune-related pathways, suggesting that immunotherapy could possibly be synergistic to the chemotherapy, to improve the clinical outcome of these patients. PMID:26884644

  3. Association between Ultrasound Features and the 21-Gene Recurrence Score Assays in Patients with Oestrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative, Invasive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chae, Eun Young; Moon, Woo Kyung; Kim, Hak Hee; Kim, Won Hwa; Cha, Joo Hee; Shin, Hee Jung; Choi, Woo Jung; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young; Lee, Sae Byul; Ahn, Sei Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A multigene expression assay corresponds to the likelihood of breast cancer recurrence after the initial diagnosis and can be used to guide the decision for additional chemotherapy. However, only few studies have investigated the associations between the imaging features of breast cancer and the results of multigene expression assays. Our study was to identify the relationship between imaging features on ultrasound (US) and the recurrence score (RS) on a 21-gene expression assay in patients with oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer. 267 patients with ER-positive, HER-negative invasive breast cancer who underwent examinations using US and Oncotype DX assay were included. US images were independently reviewed by dedicated breast radiologists who were blind to the RS. Tumour roundness was measured using a laboratory-developed software program. The pathological data were reviewed, including immunohistochemistry results. Univariate analysis was performed to assess the associations between the RS and each variable. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors of high RS. Of 267 patients, 147 (55%) had low, 96 (36%) intermediate, and 24 (9%) had high RS. According to the univariate analysis, parallel orientation, presence of calcification in the mass, and tumour roundness were positively associated with high RS. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that parallel orientation (OR = 5.53) and tumour roundness (OR = 1.70 per 10 increase) were associated with high RS. Parallel orientation and tumour roundness are independent variables that may predict high RS in patients with ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer. PMID:27362843

  4. Association between Ultrasound Features and the 21-Gene Recurrence Score Assays in Patients with Oestrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative, Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Eun Young; Kim, Won Hwa; Cha, Joo Hee; Shin, Hee Jung; Choi, Woo Jung; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young; Lee, Sae Byul; Ahn, Sei Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A multigene expression assay corresponds to the likelihood of breast cancer recurrence after the initial diagnosis and can be used to guide the decision for additional chemotherapy. However, only few studies have investigated the associations between the imaging features of breast cancer and the results of multigene expression assays. Our study was to identify the relationship between imaging features on ultrasound (US) and the recurrence score (RS) on a 21-gene expression assay in patients with oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer. 267 patients with ER-positive, HER-negative invasive breast cancer who underwent examinations using US and Oncotype DX assay were included. US images were independently reviewed by dedicated breast radiologists who were blind to the RS. Tumour roundness was measured using a laboratory-developed software program. The pathological data were reviewed, including immunohistochemistry results. Univariate analysis was performed to assess the associations between the RS and each variable. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors of high RS. Of 267 patients, 147 (55%) had low, 96 (36%) intermediate, and 24 (9%) had high RS. According to the univariate analysis, parallel orientation, presence of calcification in the mass, and tumour roundness were positively associated with high RS. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that parallel orientation (OR = 5.53) and tumour roundness (OR = 1.70 per 10 increase) were associated with high RS. Parallel orientation and tumour roundness are independent variables that may predict high RS in patients with ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer. PMID:27362843

  5. Veliparib and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-02

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  6. Phase I clinical trial of nintedanib plus paclitaxel in early HER-2-negative breast cancer (CNIO-BR-01-2010/GEICAM-2010-10 study)

    PubMed Central

    Quintela-Fandino, M; Urruticoechea, A; Guerra, J; Gil, M; Gonzalez-Martin, A; Marquez, R; Hernandez-Agudo, E; Rodriguez-Martin, C; Gil-Martin, M; Bratos, R; Escudero, M J; Vlassak, S; Hilberg, F; Colomer, R

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Previous small-molecule antiangiogenics have compromised chemotherapy dose intensity in breast cancer. We present a phase I trial of a novel selective agent, nintedanib, plus standard chemotherapy in early breast cancer. Methods: Her-2-negative breast cancer patients with tumours larger than 2 cm were eligible for dose-escalation trial (classic 3+3 method). Results: The recommended phase II dose (RP2D) was 150 mg BID of nintedanib combined with standard dose of weekly paclitaxel followed by adriamycin plus cyclophosphamide. The dose-limiting toxicity was transaminase elevation. At the RP2D, the dose intensity was ∼100%. The pathologic complete response was 50%. Conclusions: The combination allows the delivery of full-dose intensity, while efficacy seems promising. PMID:25058346

  7. [Advanced luminal breast cancer (hormone receptor-positive, HER2 negative): New therapeutic options in 2015].

    PubMed

    Vanacker, Hélène; Bally, Olivia; Kassem, Loay; Tredan, Olivier; Heudel, Pierre; Bachelot, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Despite improvements in early detection, surgery and systemic therapy, metastatic breast cancer remains a major cause of death. Luminal type breast cancers expressing hormone estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone (PR) and without HER2 overexpression are generally sensitive to endocrine therapy, but raise the issue of the occurrence of resistance to treatment, particularly at metastatic stage. A better understanding of hormone resistance may guide the development of new therapeutics. New strategies aim at enhancing and prolonging of endocrine sensitivity, by optimizing existing schemes, or by combining an endocrine therapy with a targeted therapies specific to hormone resistance pathways: ER signaling, PI3K/AKT/mTOR and Cyclin Dependent Kinase (CDK). Key corners of 2014 include confirmation of benefit of high dose fulvestrant, and commercialization of everolimus as the first mTOR inhibitor in this indication. Other strategies are being tested dealing with new endocrine therapies or new molecular targets such as PI3K inhibitors, insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-R) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Coming years may be fruitful and might radically change our way to treat these patients.

  8. [Advanced luminal breast cancer (hormone receptor-positive, HER2 negative): New therapeutic options in 2015].

    PubMed

    Vanacker, Hélène; Bally, Olivia; Kassem, Loay; Tredan, Olivier; Heudel, Pierre; Bachelot, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Despite improvements in early detection, surgery and systemic therapy, metastatic breast cancer remains a major cause of death. Luminal type breast cancers expressing hormone estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone (PR) and without HER2 overexpression are generally sensitive to endocrine therapy, but raise the issue of the occurrence of resistance to treatment, particularly at metastatic stage. A better understanding of hormone resistance may guide the development of new therapeutics. New strategies aim at enhancing and prolonging of endocrine sensitivity, by optimizing existing schemes, or by combining an endocrine therapy with a targeted therapies specific to hormone resistance pathways: ER signaling, PI3K/AKT/mTOR and Cyclin Dependent Kinase (CDK). Key corners of 2014 include confirmation of benefit of high dose fulvestrant, and commercialization of everolimus as the first mTOR inhibitor in this indication. Other strategies are being tested dealing with new endocrine therapies or new molecular targets such as PI3K inhibitors, insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-R) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Coming years may be fruitful and might radically change our way to treat these patients. PMID:26118876

  9. Hydrophobic Proteome Analysis of Triple Negative and Hormone-Receptor-Positive-Her2-Negative Breast Cancer by Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming; Whelan, Stephen A; He, Jianbo; Saxton, Romaine E; Faull, Kym F; Whitelegge, Julian P; Chang, Helena R

    2010-09-01

    INTRODUCTION: It is widely believed that discovery of specific, sensitive, and reliable tumor biomarkers can improve the treatment of cancer. Currently, there are no obvious targets that can be used in treating triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). METHODS: To better understand TNBC and find potential biomarkers for targeted treatment, we combined a novel hydrophobic fractionation protocol with mass spectrometry LTQ-orbitrap to explore and compare the hydrophobic sub-proteome of TNBC with another subtype of breast cancer, hormone-receptor-positive-Her2-negative breast cancer (non-TNBC). RESULTS: Hydrophobic sub-proteome of breast cancer is rich in membrane proteins. Hundreds of proteins with various defined key cellular functions were identified from TNBC and non-TNBC tumors. In this study, protein profiles of TNBC and non-TNBC were systematically examined, compared, and validated. We have found that nine keratins are down-regulated and several heat shock proteins are up-regulated in TNBC tissues. Our study may provide insights of molecules that are responsible for the aggressiveness of TNBC. CONCLUSION: The initial results obtained using a combination of hydrophobic fractionation and nano-LC mass spectrometry analysis of these proteins appear promising in the discovery of potential cancer biomarkers and bio-signatures. When sufficiently refined, this approach may prove useful in improving breast cancer treatment.

  10. Low Concordance between Gene Expression Signatures in ER Positive HER2 Negative Breast Carcinoma Could Impair Their Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Laas, Enora; Mallon, Peter; Duhoux, Francois P.; Hamidouche, Amina; Rouzier, Roman; Reyal, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous prognostic gene expression signatures have been recently described. Among the signatures there is variation in the constituent genes that are utilized. We aim to evaluate prognostic concordance among eight gene expression signatures, on a large dataset of ER positive HER2 negative breast cancers. Methods We analysed the performance of eight gene expression signatures on six different datasets of ER+ HER2- breast cancers. Survival analyses were performed using the Kaplan–Meier estimate of survival function. We assessed discrimination and concordance between the 8 signatures on survival and recurrence rates The Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) was used to to stratify the risk of recurrence/death. Results The discrimination ability of the whole signatures, showed fair discrimination performances, with AUC ranging from 0.64 (95%CI 0.55–0.73 for the 76-genes signatures, to 0.72 (95%CI 0.64–0.8) for the Molecular Prognosis Index T17. Low concordance was found in predicting events in the intermediate and high-risk group, as defined by the NPI. Low risk group was the only subgroup with a good signatures concordance. Conclusion Genomic signatures may be a good option to predict prognosis as most of them perform well at the population level. They exhibit, however, a high degree of discordance in the intermediate and high-risk groups. The major benefit that we could expect from gene expression signatures is the standardization of proliferation assessment. PMID:26895349

  11. Phase III randomized trial of sunitinib versus capecitabine in patients with previously treated HER2-negative advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei-Ching; Lee, Soo Chin; Vanlemmens, Laurence; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Tabei, Toshio; Pivot, Xavier; Iwata, Hiroji; Aogi, Kenjiro; Lugo-Quintana, Roberto; Harbeck, Nadia; Brickman, Marla J.; Zhang, Ke; Kern, Kenneth A.; Martin, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    This multicenter, randomized, open-label phase III trial (planned enrollment: 700 patients) was conducted to test the hypothesis that single-agent sunitinib improves progression-free survival (PFS) compared with capecitabine as treatment for advanced breast cancer (ABC). Patients with HER2-negative ABC that recurred after anthracycline and taxane therapy were randomized (1:1) to sunitinib 37.5 mg/day or capecitabine 1,250 mg/m2 (1,000 mg/m2 in patients >65 years) BID on days 1–14 q3w. The independent data-monitoring committee (DMC) determined during the first interim analysis (238 patients randomized to sunitinib, 244 to capecitabine) that the trial be terminated due to futility in reaching the primary endpoint. No statistical evidence supported the hypothesis that sunitinib improved PFS compared with capecitabine (one-sided P = 0.999). The data indicated that PFS was shorter with sunitinib than capecitabine (median 2.8 vs. 4.2 months, respectively; HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.16–1.87; two-sided P = 0.002). Median overall survival (15.3 vs. 24.6 months; HR, 1.17; two-sided P = 0.350) and objective response rates (11 vs. 16%; odds ratio, 0.65; P = 0.109) were numerically inferior with sunitinib versus capecitabine. While no new or unexpected safety findings were reported, sunitinib treatment was associated with higher frequencies and greater severities of many common adverse events (AEs) compared with capecitabine, resulting in more temporary discontinuations due to AEs with sunitinib (66 vs. 51%). The relative dose intensity was lower with sunitinib than capecitabine (73 vs. 95%). Based on these efficacy and safety results, sunitinib should not be used as monotherapy for patients with ABC. PMID:20339913

  12. Detection of HER2-positive metastases in patients with HER2-negative primary breast cancer using 89Zr-trastuzumab PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Ulaner, Gary A.; Hyman, David M.; Ross, Dara S.; Corben, Adriana; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Goldfarb, Shari; McArthur, Heather; Erinjeri, Joseph P; Solomon, Stephen B; Kolb, Hartmuth; Lyashchenko, Serge K; Lewis, Jason S.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    To determine if imaging with a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeting PET tracer can detect HER2-positive metastases in patients with HER2-negative primary breast cancer. Materials and Methods Patients with HER2-negative primary breast cancer and evidence of distant metastases were enrolled in an Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved prospective clinical trial. Archived pathology from the patient’s primary breast cancer was retested to confirm HER2-negative disease. Patients with confirmed HER2-negative primary breast cancer underwent 89Zr-trastuzumab PET/CT to screen for 89Zr-trastuzumab metastases. Metastases avid for 89Zr-trastuzumab by PET/CT were biopsied and pathologically examined to define HER2 status. Patients with pathologically proven HER2-positive metastases subsequently received off-protocol HER2 targeted therapy to evaluate treatment response. Results Nine patients were enrolled, all of whom had pathologic retesting that confirmed HER2-negative primary breast cancer. Five demonstrated suspicious foci on 89Zr-trastuzumab PET/CT. Of these five with suspicious foci, two had biopsy proven HER2-positive metastases and went on to benefit from HER2 targeted therapy. Three of the five patients with suspicious foci had biopsy without evidence of HER2-positive disease, and were considered false positive false positive 89Zr-trastuzumab PET foci. Conclusion In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate that 89Zr-trastuzmab PET/CT detects unsuspected HER2-positive metastases in patients with HER2-negtive primary breast cancer. While these are only initial results in a small sample, it is a proof of concept that HER2-targeted imaging can identify additional candidates for HER2-targeted therapy. More specific HER2-targeting agents will be needed for clinical use. PMID:27151988

  13. EndoPredict predicts for the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    The EndoPredict (EP) signature is a prognostic 11-gene expression signature specifically developed in ER+/HER2- node-negative/positive breast cancer. It is associated with relapse-free survival in patients treated with adjuvant hormone therapy, suggesting that EP low-risk patients could be treated with adjuvant hormone therapy alone whereas high-risk patients would deserve addition of adjuvant chemotherapy. Thus, it is important to determine whether EP high-risk patients are or are not more sensitive to chemotherapy than low-risk patients. Here, we have assessed the EP predictive value for pathological complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in ER+/HER2- breast cancer. We gathered gene expression and histoclinical data of 553 pre-treatment ER+/HER2- breast carcinomas treated with anthracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We searched for correlation between the pathological complete response (pCR) and the EP score-based classification. The overall pCR rate was 12%. Fifty-one percent of samples were classified as low-risk according to the EP score and 49% as high-risk. EP classification was associated with a pCR rate of 7% in the low-risk group and 17% in the high-risk group (p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the EP score remained significantly associated with pCR. Many genes upregulated in the high-risk tumours were involved in cell proliferation, whereas many genes upregulated in the low-risk tumours were involved in ER-signalling and stroma. Despite higher chemosensitivity, the high-risk group was associated with worse disease-free survival. In conclusion, EP high-risk ER+/HER2- breast cancers are more likely to respond to anthracycline-based chemotherapy.

  14. Ano1/TMEM16A Overexpression Is Associated with Good Prognosis in PR-Positive or HER2-Negative Breast Cancer Patients following Tamoxifen Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huizhe; Guan, Shu; Sun, Mingli; Yu, Zhaojin; Zhao, Lin; He, Miao; Zhao, Haishan; Yao, Weifan; Wang, Enhua; Jin, Feng; Xiao, Qinghuan; Wei, Minjie

    2015-01-01

    The calcium-activated chloride channel Ano1 (TMEM16A) is overexpressed in many tumors. Although Ano1 overexpression is found in breast cancer due to 11q13 amplification, it remains unclear whether signaling pathways are involved in Ano1 overexpression during breast cancer tumorigenesis in vivo. Estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have been known to contribute to breast cancer progression. It is unclear whether Ano1 is associated with clinical outcomes in breast cancer patients with different ER, PR and HER2 status. In the present study, we investigated the Ano1 expression in 431 patients with invasive ductal breast carcinoma and 46 patients with fibroadenoma, using immunohistochemistry, and analyzed the association between Ano1 expression and clinical characteristics and outcomes of breast cancer patients with different ER, PR, and HER2 status. Ano1 was overexpressed in breast cancer compared with fibroadenoma. Ano1 was significantly more associated with breast cancer with the lower clinical stage (stage I or II), or triple-negative status. Mostly importantly, Ano1 overexpression was associated with good prognosis in patients with the PR-positive or HER2-negative status, and in patients following tamoxifen treatment. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that Ano1 overexpression was a prognostic factor for longer overall survival in PR-positive or HER2-negative patients, and a predictive factor for longer overall survival in patients following tamoxifen treatment. Our findings suggest that Ano1 may be a potential marker for good prognosis in PR-positive or HER2-negative patients following tamoxifen treatment. The PR and HER2 status defines a subtype of breast cancer in which Ano1 overexpression is associated with good prognosis following tamoxifen treatment. PMID:25961581

  15. Bevacizumab Addition in Neoadjuvant Treatment Increases the Pathological Complete Response Rates in Patients with HER-2 Negative Breast Cancer Especially Triple Negative Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Binglan; Shi, Changle; Liu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant therapy is administered to breast cancer patients as an induction process before surgery or radiotherapy to reduce tumor size. Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) negative breast cancer lacks effective standard target therapy. Bevacizumab has a controversial role in the treatment of breast cancer and we conduct a meta-analysis to evaluate the value of adding bevacizumab in neoadjuvant regimen. Methods Potentially eligible studies were retrieved using PubMed, EMBASE and Medline. Clinical characteristics of patients and statistical data with pathological complete response (pCR) data were collected. Then a meta-analysis model was established to investigate the correlation between administration of bevacizumab in neoadjuvant therapy and pCR rates in HER-2 negative breast cancer. Results Seven eligible studies and 5408 patients were yielded. The pCR rates for “breast” or “breast plus lymph node” were similar. In subgroup analysis, we emphasized on patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). In the criterion of “lesions in breast” the pooled ORs was 1.55 [1.29, 1.86], P<0.00001 and regarding to the evaluation criterion of “lesions in breast and lymph nodes”, the pooled ORs was 1.48 [1.23, 1.78], P<0.0001, in favor of bevacizumab administration. Conclusion According to our pooled results, we finally find that bevacizumab addition as a neoadjuvant chemotherapy component, for induction use with limited cycle to improve the pCR rates and patients may avoid long-term adverse event and long-term invalid survival improvement. Especially in subgroup analysis, pCR rates could be improved significantly and physicians could consider bevacizumab with caution. As patients could avoid the adverse event caused by long-term using of bevacizumab, long-term quality of life improvement may be achieved, especially in TNBC. PMID:27579484

  16. EndoPredict improves the prognostic classification derived from common clinical guidelines in ER-positive, HER2-negative early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dubsky, P.; Filipits, M.; Jakesz, R.; Rudas, M.; Singer, C. F.; Greil, R.; Dietze, O.; Luisser, I.; Klug, E.; Sedivy, R.; Bachner, M.; Mayr, D.; Schmidt, M.; Gehrmann, M. C.; Petry, C.; Weber, K. E.; Kronenwett, R.; Brase, J. C.; Gnant, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background In early estrogen receptor (ER)-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer, the decision to administer chemotherapy is largely based on prognostic criteria. The combined molecular/clinical EndoPredict test (EPclin) has been validated to accurately assess prognosis in this population. In this study, the clinical relevance of EPclin in relation to well-established clinical guidelines is assessed. Patients and methods We assigned risk groups to 1702 ER-positive/HER2-negative postmenopausal women from two large phase III trials treated only with endocrine therapy. Prognosis was assigned according to National Comprehensive Cancer Center Network-, German S3-, St Gallen guidelines and the EPclin. Prognostic groups were compared using the Kaplan–Meier survival analysis. Results After 10 years, absolute risk reductions (ARR) between the high- and low-risk groups ranged from 6.9% to 11.2% if assigned according to guidelines. It was at 18.7% for EPclin. EPclin reassigned 58%–61% of women classified as high-/intermediate-risk (according to clinical guidelines) to low risk. Women reclassified to low risk showed a 5% rate of distant metastasis at 10 years. Conclusion The EPclin score is able to predict favorable prognosis in a majority of patients that clinical guidelines would assign to intermediate or high risk. EPclin may reduce the indications for chemotherapy in ER-positive postmenopausal women with a limited number of clinical risk factors. PMID:23035151

  17. Feasibility Study of EndoTAG-1, a Tumor Endothelial Targeting Agent, in Combination with Paclitaxel followed by FEC as Induction Therapy in HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lemort, Marc; Wilke, Celine; Vanderbeeken, Marie-Catherine; D’Hondt, Veronique; De Azambuja, Evandro; Gombos, Andrea; Lebrun, Fabienne; Dal Lago, Lissandra; Bustin, Fanny; Maetens, Marion; Ameye, Lieveke; Veys, Isabelle; Michiels, Stefan; Paesmans, Marianne; Larsimont, Denis; Sotiriou, Christos; Nogaret, Jean-Marie; Piccart, Martine; Awada, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background EndoTAG-1, a tumor endothelial targeting agent has shown activity in metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (BC) in combination with paclitaxel. Methods HER2-negative BC patients candidates for neoadjuvant chemotherapy were scheduled to receive 12 cycles of weekly EndoTAG-1 22mg/m2 plus paclitaxel 70mg/m2 followed by 3 cycles of FEC (Fluorouracil 500mg/m2, Epirubicin 100mg/m2, Cyclophosphamide 500mg/m2) every 3 weeks followed by surgery. Primary endpoint was percent (%) reduction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) estimated Gadolinium (Gd) enhancing tumor volume at the end of EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel administration as compared to baseline. Safety, pathological complete response (pCR) defined as no residual tumor in breast and axillary nodes at surgery and correlation between % reduction in MRI estimated tumor volume and pCR were also evaluated. Results Fifteen out of 20 scheduled patients were included: Six patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative/HER2-negative and 9 with ER-positive/HER2-negative BC. Nine patients completed treatment as per protocol. Despite premedication and slow infusion rates, grade 3 hypersensitivity reactions to EndoTAG-1 were observed during the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 6th weekly infusion in 4 patients, respectively, and required permanent discontinuation of the EndoTAG-1. Moreover, two additional patients stopped EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel after 8 and 9 weeks due to clinical disease progression. Two patients had grade 3 increases in transaminases and 1 patient grade 4 neutropenia. pCR was achieved in 5 of the 6 ER-/HER2- and in none of the 9 ER+/HER2- BC patients. The mean % reduction in MRI estimated tumor volume at the end of EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel treatment was 81% (95% CI, 66% to 96%, p<0.001) for the 15 patients that underwent surgery; 96% for patients with pCR and 73% for patients with no pCR (p = 0.04). Conclusions The EndoTAG-1 and paclitaxel combination showed promising preliminary activity as preoperative treatment

  18. Bevacizumab in combination with a taxane for the first-line treatment of HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, M; Soares, M; Epstein, D; Yang, H; Fox, D; Eastwood, A

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the use of bevacizumab (Avastin®, Roche) in combination with a taxane for the treatment of untreated metastatic breast cancer (mBC). The main clinical effectiveness data were derived from a single, open-label randomised controlled trial (RCT) (E2100) that evaluated the addition of bevacizumab to weekly (q.w.) paclitaxel in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative mBC who had not previously received chemotherapy for advanced disease. This trial reported statistically significant increases in median progression-free survival (PFS) for the addition of bevacizumab (5.8-11.3 months). Median overall survival was not significantly different between the two groups; whether this is a true null finding or due to crossover between treatment arms cannot be established, as relevant data were not collected. The manufacturer reported that the addition of bevacizumab to paclitaxel q.w. therapy was associated with a significant improvement in quality of life, as measured by FACT-B (functional assessment of cancer therapy for breast cancer) scores. However, the ERG noted that these results were based on extreme imputed values, the removal of which led to non-significant differences in quality of life. The manufacturer conducted an indirect comparison. However, owing to methodological limitations and concerns about the validity and exchangeability of the included trials, the ERG did not consider the findings to be reliable. One additional relevant RCT [AVADO (Avastin and Docetaxel); BO17708] evaluating the addition of bevacizumab to docetaxel was excluded from the manufacturer's submission. This was summarised by the ERG. In terms of response rate and PFS, AVADO reported a markedly smaller benefit of adding bevacizumab to docetaxel than that reported for adding bevacizumab to q.w. paclitaxel in E2100. AVADO also reported no statistically significant effect of combination therapy

  19. Prospective Validation of Immunological Infiltrate for Prediction of Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in HER2-Negative Breast Cancer – A Substudy of the Neoadjuvant GeparQuinto Trial

    PubMed Central

    Issa-Nummer, Yasmin; Darb-Esfahani, Silvia; Loibl, Sibylle; Kunz, Georg; Nekljudova, Valentina; Schrader, Iris; Sinn, Bruno Valentin; Ulmer, Hans-Ullrich; Kronenwett, Ralf; Just, Marianne; Kühn, Thorsten; Diebold, Kurt; Untch, Michael; Holms, Frank; Blohmer, Jens-Uwe; Habeck, Jörg-Olaf; Dietel, Manfred; Overkamp, Friedrich; Krabisch, Petra; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Denkert, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We have recently described an increased lymphocytic infiltration rate in breast carcinoma tissue is a significant response predictor for anthracycline/taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). The aim of this study was to prospectively validate the tumor-associated lymphocyte infiltrate as predictive marker for response to anthracycline/taxane-based NACT. Patients and Methods The immunological infiltrate was prospectively evaluated in a total of 313 core biopsies from HER2 negative patients of the multicenter PREDICT study, a substudy of the neoadjuvant GeparQuinto study. Intratumoral lymphocytes (iTuLy), stromal lymphocytes (strLy) as well as lymphocyte-predominant breast cancer (LPBC) were evaluated by histopathological assessment. Pathological complete response (pCR) rates were analyzed and compared between the defined subgroups using the exact test of Fisher. Results Patients with lymphocyte-predominant breast cancer (LPBC) had a significantly increased pCR rate of 36.6%, compared to non-LPBC patients (14.3%, p<0.001). LPBC and stromal lymphocytes were significantly independent predictors for pCR in multivariate analysis (LPBC: OR 2.7, p = 0.003, strLy: OR 1.2, p = 0.01). The amount of intratumoral lymphocytes was significantly predictive for pCR in univariate (OR 1.2, p = 0.01) but not in multivariate logistic regression analysis (OR 1.2, p = 0.11). Conclusion Confirming previous investigations of our group, we have prospectively validated in an independent cohort that an increased immunological infiltrate in breast tumor tissue is predictive for response to anthracycline/taxane-based NACT. Patients with LPBC and increased stromal lymphocyte infiltration have significantly increased pCR rates. The lymphocytic infiltrate is a promising additional parameter for histopathological evaluation of breast cancer core biopsies. PMID:24312450

  20. Patients' preferences and willingness-to-pay for postmenopausal hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer treatments after failure of standard treatments.

    PubMed

    Ngorsuraches, Surachat; Thongkeaw, Klangjai

    2015-01-01

    Patients' preferences increasingly play roles in cancer treatments. The objective of this study is to examine breast cancer patients' preferences and willingness-to-pay (WTP) for postmenopausal hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer treatments after failure of standard treatments. Four attributes, i.e. progression free survival (PFS), anemia, pneumonitis, and cost, and their levels of exemestane and exemestane plus everolimus from literature and patient interviews were used to develop a discrete choice experiment questionnaire. Each questionnaire was composed of seven choice sets and each choice set contained those four attributes with different levels. Breast cancer patients were asked to choose one treatment alternative in each choice set. Multinomial logit model was used to determine relative preferences of each attribute and the WTP for all attributes and treatments were calculated. A total of 146 patients were included in study analyses. Results showed that the patients preferred treatments with higher PFS and lower side effects. The patients were willing to pay US$151.6, US$69.8, and US$278.3 per month in exchange for every 1 month increase in PFS and every 1 % decreased risk of anemia and pneumonitis, respectively. The patients were willing to pay for exemestane and exemestane plus everolimus US$551.8 and US$414.2 per month, respectively. In conclusion, patients weighted importance on PFS, anemia, and pneumonitis, when they needed to choose an aromatase inhibitor plus mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor for advanced breast cancer treatments after failure of standard treatments. They valued exemestane alone more than exemestane plus everolimus.

  1. Predictive value of angiogenesis-related gene profiling in patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer treated with bevacizumab and weekly paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Mendiola, Marta; Martínez-Marin, Virginia; Herranz, Jesús; Heredia, Victoria; Yébenes, Laura; Zamora, Pilar; Castelo, Beatriz; Pinto, Álvaro; Miguel, María; Díaz, Esther; Gámez, Angelo; Fresno, Juan Ángel; de Molina, Ana Ramírez; Hardisson, David; Espinosa, Enrique; Redondo, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Bevacizumab plus weekly paclitaxel improves progression-free survival (PFS) in HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer (mBC), but its use has been questioned due to the absence of a predictive biomarker, lack of benefit in overall survival (OS) and increased toxicity. We examined the baseline tumor angiogenic-related gene expression of 60 patients with mBC with the aim of finding a signature that predicts benefit from this drug. Multivariate analysis by Lasso-penalized Cox regression generated two predictive models: one, named G-model, including 11 genes, and the other one, named GC-model, including 13 genes plus 5 clinical covariates. Both models identified patients with improved PFS (HR (Hazard Ratio) 2.57 and 4.04, respectively) and OS (HR 3.29 and 3.43, respectively). The G-model distinguished low and high risk patients in the first 6 months, whereas the GC-model maintained significance over time. PMID:26992213

  2. The association of chemotherapy versus hormonal therapy and health outcomes among patients with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer: experience from the patient perspective.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shaloo; Zhang, Jie; Jerusalem, Guy

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to characterize the impact of metastatic breast cancer (MBC) and cancer treatments on health-related quality of life, treatment satisfaction, and daily productivity from the patient perspective. This was a cross-sectional survey of patients with MBC (USA, n = 200; EU, n = 160). Post-menopausal women aged ≥50 years with hormone receptor positive (HR+), HER2-negative (HER2-) MBC, currently using hormonal therapy (HT) or using chemotherapy (CT) for ≤1 year were recruited. Fifty three percent (n = 191) reported CT and 47% (n = 169) reported HT use. Adjusting for covariates, HT users reported greater health-related quality of life (p < 0.05), greater satisfaction with treatment and better feelings about side-effects (p < 0.001). HT users reported less bother with treatment side-effects (0-5 scale, p < 0.001) and less activity impairment than CT users (p < 0.001). HT was associated with better patient-reported outcomes than CT in first-line MBC management. These findings should be taken into consideration while making treatment decisions for HR+/HER2- MBC.

  3. Randomized Controlled Trial of Zoledronic Acid plus Chemotherapy versus Chemotherapy Alone as Neoadjuvant Treatment of HER2-Negative Primary Breast Cancer (JONIE Study)

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yoshie; Tanino, Hirokazu; Horiguchi, Jun; Miura, Daishu; Ishikawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Mitsuhiro; Takao, Shintaro; Kim, Seung Jin; Yamagami, Kazuhiko; Miyashita, Masaru; Konishi, Muneharu; Shigeoka, Yasushi; Suzuki, Masato; Taguchi, Tetsuya; Kubota, Tomoyuki; Akazawa, Kouhei; Kohno, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate that induces osteoclast apoptosis and inhibits bone resorption by inhibiting the mevalonate pathway. Its benefit for the prevention of skeletal complications due to bone metastases has been established. However, the antitumor efficacy of ZOL, although suggested by multiple preclinical and clinical studies, has not yet been clinically proven. We performed the present randomized Phase 2 trial to investigate the antitumor effect of ZOL with chemotherapy (CT). Methods Asian patients with HER2-negative invasive breast cancer were randomly assigned to either the CT or CT+ZOL (CTZ) group. One hundred and eighty-eight patients were randomized to either the CT group (n = 95) or the CTZ group (n = 93) from March 2010 to April 2012, and 180 patients were assessed. All patients received four cycles of FEC100 (fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, epirubicin 100 mg/m2, and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2), followed by 12 cycles of paclitaxel at 80 mg/m2 weekly. ZOL (4 mg) was administered three to four times weekly for 7 weeks to the patients in the CTZ group. The primary endpoint was the pathological complete response (pCR) rate, which was defined as no invasive cancer in the breast tissue specimen. Safety was assessed in all patients who received at least one dose of the study drug. Results This randomized controlled trial indicated that the rates of pCR in CTZ group (14.8%) was doubled to CT group (7.7%), respectively (one-sided chi-square test, p = 0.068), though the additional efficacy of zoledronic acid was not demonstrated statistically. The pCR rate in postmenopausal patients was 18.4% and 5.1% in the CTZ and CT groups, respectively (one-sided Fisher’s exact test, p = 0.071), and that in patients with triple-negative breast cancer was 35.3% and 11.8% in the CTZ and CT groups, respectively (one-sided Fisher’s exact test, p = 0.112). Thus the addition of ZOL to neoadjuvant CT has potential anticancer benefits in

  4. Real-world adjuvant TAC or FEC-D for HER2-negative node-positive breast cancer in women less than 50 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Lupichuk, S.; Tilley, D.; Kostaras, X.; Joy, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We compared the efficacy, toxicity, and use of granulocyte colony–stimulating factor (g-csf) with tac (docetaxel–doxorubicin–cyclophosphamide) and fec-d (5-fluorouracil–epirubicin–cyclophosphamide followed by docetaxel) in women less than 50 years of age. Methods The study included all women more than 18 years but less than 50 years of age with her2-negative, node-positive, stage ii or iii breast cancer diagnosed in Alberta between 2008 and 2012 who received tac (n = 198) or fec-d (n = 274). Results The patient groups were well-balanced, except that radiotherapy use was higher in the tac group (91.9% vs. 79.9%, p < 0.001). At a median follow-up of 49.6 months, disease-free survival was 91.4% for tac and 92.0% for fec-d (p = 0.76). Overall survival (os) was 96% with tac and 95.3% with fec-d (p = 0.86).The incidences of grades 3 and 4 toxicities were similar in the two groups (all p > 0.05). Overall, febrile neutropenia (fn) was reported in 11.6% of tac patients and 15.7% of fec-d patients (p = 0.26). However, use of g-csf was higher in the tac group than in the fec-d group (96.4% vs. 71.5%, p < 0.001). Hospitalization for fn was required in 10.5% of tac patients and 13.0% of fec-d patients (p = 0.41). In g-csf–supported and –unsupported patients receiving tac, fn occurred at rates of 11.1% and 33.3% respectively (p = 0.08); in patients receiving the fec portion of fec-d, those proportions were 2.9% and 8.1% respectively (p = 0.24); and in patients receiving docetaxel after fec, the proportions were 4.1% and 17.6% respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusions In women less than 50 years of age receiving adjuvant tac or fec-d, we observed no differences in efficacy or other nonhematologic toxicities. Based on the timing and rates of fn, use of prophylactic g-csf should be routine for the docetaxel-containing portion of treatment; however, prophylactic g-csf could potentially be avoided during the fec portion of fec-d treatment. PMID:27330344

  5. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT after two cycles of neoadjuvant therapy may predict response in HER2-negative, but not in HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Miao; Bao, Xiao; Zhang, Yingjian; Liu, Guangyu; Zhang, Jun; Geng, Daoying

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the ability of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanning to predict pathological complete response (pCR) in breast cancer, and to investigate whether timing of the scan and trastuzumab treatment influence the accuracy of pCR prediction in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive breast cancer patients. We treated 81 locally advanced breast cancer patients with four cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). HER2-negative breast cancer patients received NAC alone, while HER2-positive breast cancer patients received NAC plus trastuzumab. 18FDG PET/CT scans were scheduled at baseline and after the second cycle of NAC. Axillary lymph node (ALN) dissection was performed after the last cycle of neoadjuvant therapy. Relative changes in standardized uptake values (SUV) between the two PET/CT scans (ΔSUV) in primary tumors and ALN metastases were calculated. There were 75 patients with 150 PET/CT scans in the final analysis, including 41 HER2-negative and 34 HER2-positive cases. In the HER2-negative group, the ΔSUV predicted overall and ALN pCR; the receiver operating characteristics-areas under curve (ROC-AUC) were 0.87 and 0.80 (P = 0.0014 and 0.031, respectively) and the negative predictive values were 94% and 89% respectively. However, in the HER2-positive group, ΔSUV could predict neither overall nor ALN pCR; the ROC-AUCs were only 0.56 and 0.53, with P = 0.53 and 0.84, respectively. Hence, the ΔSUV after two cycles of neoadjuvant therapy could predict pCR in HER2-negative patients treated with NAC alone, but not in HER2-positive patients treated with NAC plus trastuzumab. PMID:26336821

  6. FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-02

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. TRIO-012: a multicenter, multinational, randomized, double-blind phase III study of IMC-1121B plus docetaxel versus placebo plus docetaxel in previously untreated patients with HER2-negative, unresectable, locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mackey, John; Gelmon, Karen; Martin, Miguel; McCarthy, Nicole; Pinter, Tamas; Rupin, Mathieu; Youssoufian, Hagop

    2009-11-01

    In this multinational, placebo-controlled, randomized phase III trial, Translational Research In Oncology (TRIO) will define the efficacy and safety of adding a novel antiangiogenic agent, IMC-1121B (ramucirumab), to standard first-line docetaxel chemotherapy for women with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. We will evaluate whether the addition of IMC-1121B prolongs progression-free survival and whether its use improves overall survival. Accrual is under way.

  8. Vaccine Therapy in Preventing Cancer Recurrence in Patients With Non-Metastatic, Node Positive, HER2 Negative Breast Cancer That is in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-28

    HER2/Neu Negative; No Evidence of Disease; One or More Positive Axillary Nodes; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  9. Transition probabilities of HER2-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer patients treated with Trastuzumab obtained from a clinical cancer registry dataset

    PubMed Central

    Pobiruchin, Monika; Bochum, Sylvia; Martens, Uwe M.; Kieser, Meinhard; Schramm, Wendelin

    2016-01-01

    Records of female breast cancer patients were selected from a clinical cancer registry and separated into three cohorts according to HER2-status (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) and treatment with or without Trastuzumab (a humanized monoclonal antibody). Propensity score matching was used to balance the cohorts. Afterwards, documented information about disease events (recurrence of cancer, metastases, remission of local/regional recurrences, remission of metastases and death) found in the dataset was leveraged to calculate the annual transition probabilities for every cohort. PMID:27054173

  10. Transition probabilities of HER2-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer patients treated with Trastuzumab obtained from a clinical cancer registry dataset.

    PubMed

    Pobiruchin, Monika; Bochum, Sylvia; Martens, Uwe M; Kieser, Meinhard; Schramm, Wendelin

    2016-06-01

    Records of female breast cancer patients were selected from a clinical cancer registry and separated into three cohorts according to HER2-status (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) and treatment with or without Trastuzumab (a humanized monoclonal antibody). Propensity score matching was used to balance the cohorts. Afterwards, documented information about disease events (recurrence of cancer, metastases, remission of local/regional recurrences, remission of metastases and death) found in the dataset was leveraged to calculate the annual transition probabilities for every cohort. PMID:27054173

  11. mTOR inhibitors, a new era for metastatic luminal HER2-negative breast cancer? A systematic review and a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Rotundo, Maria Saveria; Galeano, Teresa; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated if standard hormonal therapy (HT) could be improved by the addition of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR-I) in metastatic luminal breast cancer. A meta-analysis on 4 phase II-III randomized clinical trials was performed. Pooled hazard ratio (HR) for progression free survival (PFS)/ time to progression (TTP) was 0.62 in favor of mTOR-I+HT arm (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.55-0.70; p<0.0001). There was significant heterogeneity for PFS/TTP (Cochran's Q 32, p<0.0001, I2 index 90.6%). Pooled HR for overall survival (OS) was 0.84 in favor of the combination arm (95% CI 0.71-0.99; p=0.04). Heterogeneity was not significant (Cochran's Q 4.47, p=0.1, I2 index 55.3%). Pooled risk ratio (RR) for objective response rate (ORR) was 0.88 in favor of experimental arm (95% CI 0.85-0.91; p<0.0001). Heterogeneity was not significant (Cochran's Q 2.11, p=0.3, I2 index 5.2%). Adverse events (AEs), in particular those of grade 3-4, mostly occurred in mTOR-I+HT arm. Combination therapy of HT plus mTOR-I improves the outcome of metastatic luminal breast cancer patients. Our results provide evidence of a class-effect of these targeting molecules. PMID:26895472

  12. Analysis of PI3K/mTOR Pathway Biomarkers and Their Prognostic Value in Women with Hormone Receptor–Positive, HER2-Negative Early Breast Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Azim, Hamdy A.; Kassem, Loay; Treilleux, Isabelle; Wang, Qing; El Enein, Mona Abu; Anis, Shady E.; Bachelot, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway alterations have been shown to play significant roles in the development, progression, and metastatic spread of breast cancer. Furthermore, they have been implicated in the process of drug resistance, especially endocrinal therapies. In this study, we aimed to define the correlation between the PI3K mutations and the expression of the phosphorylated forms of different downstream molecules in women with estrogen receptor (ER)–positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–negative (luminal) early breast cancer treated at Cairo university hospitals. METHODS: Next-generation sequencing was used to detect mutations in the PIK3CA hotspots (in exons 9 and 20). Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue microarray blocks prepared from samples of 35 Egyptian luminal breast cancer patients in the pathology department of Centre Léon Bérard (CLB). The intensity and the percentage of stained tumor cells were integrated to define high versus low biomarker expression. The cytoplasmic and nuclear stainings were graded separately. Patients were followed for a median of 4.7 years (2.1 to 6.9 years). Correlation was done between PI3K mutations and the immunohistochemistry expression of pAKT, LKB1, p4EBP1, and pS6 ribosomal protein (pS6RP) with the clinicopathologic features and disease free survival (DFS) of the patients. RESULTS: Median age at diagnosis was 51.3 years (range, 25 to 82 years). Tumors were larger than 20 mm in 79.2% of the cases, whereas 57.9% had axillary lymph node deposits. Only 12.3% of the patients had SBR grade I tumors, 50.8% had grade II, and 36.8% had grade III. ERs were negative in 6 patients (17%) after pathology review. Thirty-two cases were assessable for LKB1 and pAKT, 33 for p4EBP1 and pS6RP, and 24 for PI3K mutations. Nuclear LKB1, cytoplasmic LKB1, nuclear pAKT, cytoplasmic pAKT, nuclear p4EBP1, and cytoplasmic pS6RP expression was high in 65.6%, 62.5%, 62.5%, 68.8%, 42.4%, and 57.6%, respectively

  13. Phase II randomized clinical trial evaluating neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimens with weekly paclitaxel or eribulin followed by doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide in women with locally advanced HER2-negative breast cancer: NSABP Foundation Study FB-9.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Jame; Robidoux, André; Tan, Antoinette R; Limentani, Steven; Sturtz, Keren; Shalaby, Ibrahim; Alcorn, Hope; Buyse, Marc E; Wolmark, Norman; Jacobs, Samuel A

    2015-07-01

    Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) is a good setting in which to monitor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, to downsize the tumor (which facilitates breast-conserving surgery), and to test newer agents in untreated patients. Eribulin (E) has shown activity in patients who have undergone previous taxane, anthracycline, and capecitabine treatment. We aimed to evaluate the neoadjuvant use of E followed by doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (AC) in patients with HER2-negative LABC, using as a control a randomized group of women who received weekly paclitaxel (WP). Fifty women with LABC were accrued January-August 2013. Patients were randomized (1:2) to receive either WP (N = 19) for 12 treatments or E (N = 31) every 3 weeks for 4 cycles followed by AC every 3 weeks for 4 cycles before surgery. 17/19 patients who took WP and 25/30 who took E completed all cycles. Patients were evaluated by clinical examination and breast MRI at baseline and after completion of E or WP. Surgical pCR in breast and lymph nodes was determined by a local pathologist following chemotherapy. Forty-nine patients received ≥1 dose of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and are included in this analysis. Forty-eight underwent surgery; one had disease that was inoperable (on E) and is included as no-pCR patient. 17/19 of these patients who took WP completed 12 doses; 28/30 on E completed 4 cycles. Six discontinued treatment on WP, E, or AC. Both treatments were well tolerated. pCR on WP = 5/19(26 %) and on E = 5/30(17 %). Both regimens were equally well tolerated with no unexpected toxicities. pCR did not suggest higher activity with E than with other standard regimens in these LABC patients.

  14. Efficacy and safety of adding an agent to bevacizumab/taxane regimens for the first-line treatment of Her2-negative patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: results from seven randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqun; Liu, Xiangdong; Qiao, Tiankui; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Sujuan

    2016-01-01

    Background The combined therapy of bevacizumab (BEV) with taxane (paclitaxel or docetaxel) has shown an improvement on progression-free survival (PFS) and objective remission in Her2-negative patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer (LR/MBC). However, there was no benefit in overall survival (OS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adding an agent to the BEV/taxane regimens for the treatment of Her2-negative patients with LR/MBC in a first-line setting. Materials and methods We searched PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, EBSCO, and the Cochrane Library databases for eligible trials. A meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.0 freeware package. We calculated the hazard ratio (HR) for PFS and OS. The odds ratio (OR) was used to calculate objective response rate (ORR) and grade 3/4 drug-related adverse events. The heterogeneity of study outcomes was calculated by the χ2 test or I2 statistics. Results A total of 1,124 patients from seven randomized controlled trials were analyzed. Our meta-analysis showed that the ORR was significantly improved in the BEV/taxane-based triplet group when compared with the BEV/taxane-based doublet group (OR =1.31, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03–1.67, P=0.03). A subset analysis showed that a similar result was achieved in the triplet group in which a cytotoxic agent was added (OR =1.46, 95% CI: 1.09–1.95, P=0.01). However, the PFS and OS had no statistically significant differences between the two groups (HR =0.87, 95% CI: 0.68–1.13, P=0.31; HR =0.98, 95% CI: 0.82–1.16, P=0.78, respectively). Regarding safety, thromboembolic events, fatigue, and diarrhea (all $grade 3) were more frequently observed in the BEV/taxane-based triplet group (OR =3.8, 95% CI: 1.86–7.79, P=0.0003; OR =1.55, 95% CI: 1.05–2.27, P=0.03; OR =2.1, 95% CI: 1.29–3.41, P=0.003, respectively). Other toxic effects had no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Conclusion Our

  15. Entinostat, Nivolumab, and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  16. Survival Outcome of Combined GnRH Agonist and Tamoxifen Is Comparable to That of Sequential Adriamycin and Cyclophosphamide Chemotherapy Plus Tamoxifen in Premenopausal Patients with Lymph-Node–Negative, Hormone-Responsive, HER2-Negative, T1-T2 Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Guiyun; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Kim, Hee Jeong; Son, Byung-Ho; Lee, Jong Won; Ko, Beom Seok; Lee, Yura; Lee, Sae Byul; Baek, Seunghee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare treatment outcomes between combined gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist and tamoxifen (GnRHa+T) and sequential adriamycin and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy and tamoxifen (AC->T) in premenopausal patients with hormone-responsive, lymph-node–negative breast cancer. Materials and Methods In total, 994 premenopausal women with T1-T2, lymph-node–negative, hormone-receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer between January 2003 and December 2008 were included in this retrospective cohort study. GnRHa+T and AC->T were administered to 608 patients (61.2%) and 386 patients (38.8%), respectively. Propensity score matching and inverse probability weighting were applied to the original cohort, and 260 patients for each treatment arm were included in the final analysis. Recurrence-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival was compared between the two treatment groups. Results A total of 994 patients were followed up for a median of 7.4 years (range, 0.5 to 11.4 years). The 5-year follow-up rate was 98.7%, and 13 patients were lost to follow-up. In propensity-matched cohorts (n=520), there was no difference in recurrence-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival rates between the two treatment groups (p=0.306, p=0.212, and p=0.102, respectively), and this was maintained after applying inverse probability weighting. Conclusion GnRHa+T is a reasonable alternative to AC->T in patients with premenopausal, hormone-responsive, HER2-negative, lymph-node–negative, T1-T2 breast cancer. PMID:27063654

  17. Palbociclib as a first-line treatment in oestrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative, advanced breast cancer not cost-effective with current pricing: a health economic analysis of the Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research (SAKK).

    PubMed

    Matter-Walstra, K; Ruhstaller, T; Klingbiel, D; Schwenkglenks, M; Dedes, K J

    2016-07-01

    Endocrine therapy continues to be the optimal systemic treatment for metastatic ER(+)HER2(-) breast cancer. The CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib combined with letrozole has recently been shown to significantly improve progression-free survival. Here we examined the cost-effectiveness of this regimen for the Swiss healthcare system. A Markov cohort simulation based on the PALOMA-1 trial (Finn et al. in Lancet Oncol 16:25-35, 2015) was used as the clinical course. Input parameters were based on summary trial data. Costs were assessed from the Swiss healthcare system perspective. Adding palbociclib to letrozole (PALLET) compared to letrozole monotherapy was estimated to cost an additional CHF342,440 and gain 1.14 quality-adjusted life years, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of CHF301,227/QALY gained. In univariate sensitivity analyses, no tested variation in key parameters resulted in an ICER below a willingness-to-pay threshold of CHF100,000/QALY. PALLET had a 0 % probability of being cost-effective in probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Lowering PALLET's price by 75 % resulted in an ICER of CHF73,995/QALY and a 73 % probability of being cost-effective. At current prices, PALLET would cost the Swiss healthcare system an additional CHF155 million/year. Palbociclib plus letrozole cannot be considered cost-effective for the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer in the Swiss healthcare system. PMID:27277747

  18. Palbociclib as a first-line treatment in oestrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative, advanced breast cancer not cost-effective with current pricing: a health economic analysis of the Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research (SAKK).

    PubMed

    Matter-Walstra, K; Ruhstaller, T; Klingbiel, D; Schwenkglenks, M; Dedes, K J

    2016-07-01

    Endocrine therapy continues to be the optimal systemic treatment for metastatic ER(+)HER2(-) breast cancer. The CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib combined with letrozole has recently been shown to significantly improve progression-free survival. Here we examined the cost-effectiveness of this regimen for the Swiss healthcare system. A Markov cohort simulation based on the PALOMA-1 trial (Finn et al. in Lancet Oncol 16:25-35, 2015) was used as the clinical course. Input parameters were based on summary trial data. Costs were assessed from the Swiss healthcare system perspective. Adding palbociclib to letrozole (PALLET) compared to letrozole monotherapy was estimated to cost an additional CHF342,440 and gain 1.14 quality-adjusted life years, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of CHF301,227/QALY gained. In univariate sensitivity analyses, no tested variation in key parameters resulted in an ICER below a willingness-to-pay threshold of CHF100,000/QALY. PALLET had a 0 % probability of being cost-effective in probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Lowering PALLET's price by 75 % resulted in an ICER of CHF73,995/QALY and a 73 % probability of being cost-effective. At current prices, PALLET would cost the Swiss healthcare system an additional CHF155 million/year. Palbociclib plus letrozole cannot be considered cost-effective for the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer in the Swiss healthcare system.

  19. ICON 2013: practical consensus recommendations for hormone receptor-positive Her2-negative advanced or metastatic breastcancer.

    PubMed

    Parikh, P M; Gupta, S; Dawood, S; Rugo, H; Bhattacharyya, G S; Agarwal, A; Chacko, R; Sahoo, T P; Babu, G; Agarwal, S; Munshi, A; Goswami, C; Smruti, B K; Bondarde, S; Desai, C; Rajappa, S; Somani, N; Singh, M; Nimmagadda, R; Pavitran, K; Mehta, A; Parmar, V; Desai, S; Nair, R; Doval, D

    2014-01-01

    The management of hormone receptor-positive Her2-negative breast cancer patients with advanced or metastatic disease is a common problem in India and other countries in this region. This expert group used data from published literature, practical experience, and opinion of a large group of academic oncologists, to arrive at practical consensus recommendations for use by the community oncologists.

  20. The positive is inside the negative: HER2-negative tumors can express the HER2 intracellular domain and present a HER2-positive phenotype.

    PubMed

    Panis, Carolina; Pizzatti, Luciana; Corrêa, Stephany; Binato, Renata; Lemos, Gabriela Ferreira; Herrera, Ana Cristina da Silva do Amaral; Seixas, Teresa Fernandes; Cecchini, Rubens; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2015-02-01

    Overexpression of human epithelial growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a poor prognostic factor in breast cancer. HER2 is a transmembrane receptor comprising an extracellular domain (ECD), a single transmembrane domain, and an intracellular domain (ICD) with tyrosine-kinase activity. Receptor dimerization triggers pivotal effector pathways in cancer, such as phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Currently, screening of HER2 in breast tumors for prognostic and therapeutic purposes involves immunohistochemical (IHC) phenotyping for the ECD, in which tumors with IHC scores below 2+ are reported as HER2-negative. We used a label-free liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) proteomic approach to compare plasma samples from patients with HER2-positive breast tumors and patients with HER2-negative tumors. Patients with HER2-negative tumors expressed higher circulating levels of calpain-10 than patients with HER2-positive tumors. Calpains cleave HER2, releasing its ECD and transforming phenotypically positive tumors into phenotypically negative tumors. Therefore, we investigated the expression of the ICD in HER2-negative samples that overexpressed calpain-10. We found that 16% of HER2-negative tumors were positive for HER2-ICD, which was associated with circulating HER2-ECD. HER2 gene amplification was also observed in some HER2-negative tumors. Positive staining for the PI3K pathway was observed in the HER2-negative, ICD-positive tumors, similar to the HER2-positive cohort. Microarray analysis revealed that HER2-negative, ICD-positive samples clustered between HER2-positive tumors and triple-negative tumors. Survival analysis revealed that outcome in women with HER2-negative, ICD-positive tumors was better than in women bearing HER2-negative, ICD-negative (triple negative) tumors but was quite similar to HER2-positive tumors and worse than women with luminal A tumors. Moreover, in vitro analyses revealed that MDA-MB 231, a triple negative cell line

  1. The positive is inside the negative: HER2-negative tumors can express the HER2 intracellular domain and present a HER2-positive phenotype.

    PubMed

    Panis, Carolina; Pizzatti, Luciana; Corrêa, Stephany; Binato, Renata; Lemos, Gabriela Ferreira; Herrera, Ana Cristina da Silva do Amaral; Seixas, Teresa Fernandes; Cecchini, Rubens; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2015-02-01

    Overexpression of human epithelial growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a poor prognostic factor in breast cancer. HER2 is a transmembrane receptor comprising an extracellular domain (ECD), a single transmembrane domain, and an intracellular domain (ICD) with tyrosine-kinase activity. Receptor dimerization triggers pivotal effector pathways in cancer, such as phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Currently, screening of HER2 in breast tumors for prognostic and therapeutic purposes involves immunohistochemical (IHC) phenotyping for the ECD, in which tumors with IHC scores below 2+ are reported as HER2-negative. We used a label-free liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) proteomic approach to compare plasma samples from patients with HER2-positive breast tumors and patients with HER2-negative tumors. Patients with HER2-negative tumors expressed higher circulating levels of calpain-10 than patients with HER2-positive tumors. Calpains cleave HER2, releasing its ECD and transforming phenotypically positive tumors into phenotypically negative tumors. Therefore, we investigated the expression of the ICD in HER2-negative samples that overexpressed calpain-10. We found that 16% of HER2-negative tumors were positive for HER2-ICD, which was associated with circulating HER2-ECD. HER2 gene amplification was also observed in some HER2-negative tumors. Positive staining for the PI3K pathway was observed in the HER2-negative, ICD-positive tumors, similar to the HER2-positive cohort. Microarray analysis revealed that HER2-negative, ICD-positive samples clustered between HER2-positive tumors and triple-negative tumors. Survival analysis revealed that outcome in women with HER2-negative, ICD-positive tumors was better than in women bearing HER2-negative, ICD-negative (triple negative) tumors but was quite similar to HER2-positive tumors and worse than women with luminal A tumors. Moreover, in vitro analyses revealed that MDA-MB 231, a triple negative cell line

  2. Prognostic ability of EndoPredict compared to research-based versions of the PAM50 risk of recurrence (ROR) scores in node-positive, estrogen receptor-positive, and HER2-negative breast cancer. A GEICAM/9906 sub-study.

    PubMed

    Martin, Miguel; Brase, Jan C; Ruiz, Amparo; Prat, Aleix; Kronenwett, Ralf; Calvo, Lourdes; Petry, Christoph; Bernard, Philip S; Ruiz-Borrego, Manuel; Weber, Karsten E; Rodriguez, César A; Alvarez, Isabel M; Segui, Miguel A; Perou, Charles M; Casas, Maribel; Carrasco, Eva; Caballero, Rosalía; Rodriguez-Lescure, Alvaro

    2016-02-01

    There are several prognostic multigene-based tests for managing breast cancer (BC), but limited data comparing them in the same cohort. We compared the prognostic performance of the EndoPredict (EP) test (standardized for pathology laboratory) with the research-based PAM50 non-standardized qRT-PCR assay in node-positive estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) and HER2-negative (HER2-) BC patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy followed by endocrine therapy (ET) in the GEICAM/9906 trial. EP and PAM50 risk of recurrence (ROR) scores [based on subtype (ROR-S) and on subtype and proliferation (ROR-P)] were compared in 536 ER+/HER2- patients. Scores combined with clinical information were evaluated: ROR-T (ROR-S, tumor size), ROR-PT (ROR-P, tumor size), and EPclin (EP, tumor size, nodal status). Patients were assigned to risk-categories according to prespecified cutoffs. Distant metastasis-free survival (MFS) was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier. ROR-S, ROR-P, and EP scores identified a low-risk group with a relative better outcome (10-year MFS: ROR-S 87 %; ROR-P 89 %; EP 93 %). There was no significant difference between tests. Predictors including clinical information showed superior prognostic performance compared to molecular scores alone (10-year MFS, low-risk group: ROR-T 88 %; ROR-PT 92 %; EPclin 100 %). The EPclin-based risk stratification achieved a significantly improved prediction of MFS compared to ROR-T, but not ROR-PT. All signatures added prognostic information to common clinical parameters. EPclin provided independent prognostic information beyond ROR-T and ROR-PT. ROR and EP can reliably predict risk of distant metastasis in node-positive ER+/HER2- BC patients treated with chemotherapy and ET. Addition of clinical parameters into risk scores improves their prognostic ability. PMID:26909792

  3. The significance of circulating tumour cells in breast cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Castle, J; Shaker, H; Morris, K; Tugwood, J D; Kirwan, C C

    2014-10-01

    Haematogenous spread of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) is the principle mechanism for development of metastases. Research into the enumeration and characterisation of CTCs, particularly in the last decade, has allowed the introduction of semi-automated CTC assessment in the clinical setting. In breast cancer, CTC enumeration is being used as a prognostic biomarker, a predictive biomarker of treatment response and is being assessed to guide treatment in both the early and metastatic setting. CTC characterisation has the potential to direct targeted therapies, such as HER2 therapies in HER2 negative primary breast tumour patients. However, CTC assessment has considerable challenges. Capture and identification of these very rare cells is currently largely dependent on a presumed homogeneity of phenotype. In addition, high throughput assays are lacking. The clinical significance of CTCs is incompletely understood. A large proportion of CTC positive patients have no evidence of metastases, raising the issue of either inconsequential tumour dormancy or non-viable CTCs. CTCs may have additional clinical sequelae such as promoting venous thrombosis. However CTCs provide a real-time liquid biopsy of the tumour and represent an exciting, minimally invasive method of assessing disease status and also a novel therapeutic target for malignancy.

  4. Giant malignant phyllodes tumour of breast.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Ramakrishnan; Savasere, Thejas; Prabhuswamy, Vinod Kumar; Babu, Rajashekhara; Shivaswamy, Sadashivaiah

    2014-01-01

    The term phyllodes tumour includes lesions ranging from completely benign tumours to malignant sarcomas. Clinically phyllodes tumours are smooth, rounded, and usually painless multinodular lesions indistinguishable from fibroadenomas. Percentage of phyllodes tumour classified as malignant ranges from 23% to 50%. We report a case of second largest phyllodes tumour in a 35-year-old lady who presented with swelling of right breast since 6 months, initially small in size, that progressed gradually to present size. Examination revealed mass in the right breast measuring 36×32 cms with lobulated firm surface and weighing 10 kgs. Fine needle aspiration cytology was reported as borderline phyllodes; however core biopsy examination showed biphasic neoplasm with malignant stromal component. Simple mastectomy was done and specimen was sent for histopathological examination which confirmed the core biopsy report. Postoperatively the patient received chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The patient is on follow-up for a year and has not shown any evidence of metastasis or recurrence. PMID:25548696

  5. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumours.

    PubMed

    2012-10-01

    We analysed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, messenger RNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse-phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at >10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein-expression-defined subgroups, possibly produced by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signalling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/phosphorylated HER2/EGFR/phosphorylated EGFR signature within the HER2-enriched expression subtype. Comparison of basal-like breast tumours with high-grade serous ovarian tumours showed many molecular commonalities, indicating a related aetiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biological finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biological subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:23000897

  6. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumours.

    PubMed

    2012-10-01

    We analysed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, messenger RNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse-phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at >10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein-expression-defined subgroups, possibly produced by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signalling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/phosphorylated HER2/EGFR/phosphorylated EGFR signature within the HER2-enriched expression subtype. Comparison of basal-like breast tumours with high-grade serous ovarian tumours showed many molecular commonalities, indicating a related aetiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biological finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biological subtypes of breast cancer.

  7. Concentrations of parabens in human breast tumours.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D; Aljarrah, A; Miller, W R; Coldham, N G; Sauer, M J; Pope, G S

    2004-01-01

    Parabens are used as preservatives in many thousands of cosmetic, food and pharmaceutical products to which the human population is exposed. Although recent reports of the oestrogenic properties of parabens have challenged current concepts of their toxicity in these consumer products, the question remains as to whether any of the parabens can accumulate intact in the body from the long-term, low-dose levels to which humans are exposed. Initial studies reported here show that parabens can be extracted from human breast tissue and detected by thin-layer chromatography. More detailed studies enabled identification and measurement of mean concentrations of individual parabens in samples of 20 human breast tumours by high-pressure liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry. The mean concentration of parabens in these 20 human breast tumours was found to be 20.6 +/- 4.2 ng x g(-1) tissue. Comparison of individual parabens showed that methylparaben was present at the highest level (with a mean value of 12.8 +/- 2.2 ng x g(-1) tissue) and represents 62% of the total paraben recovered in the extractions. These studies demonstrate that parabens can be found intact in the human breast and this should open the way technically for more detailed information to be obtained on body burdens of parabens and in particular whether body burdens are different in cancer from those in normal tissues.

  8. Evolution of breast cancer therapeutics: Breast tumour kinase's role in breast cancer and hope for breast tumour kinase targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Haroon A; Harvey, Amanda J

    2014-08-10

    There have been significant improvements in the detection and treatment of breast cancer in recent decades. However, there is still a need to develop more effective therapeutic techniques that are patient specific with reduced toxicity leading to further increases in patients' overall survival; the ongoing progress in understanding recurrence, resistant and spread also needs to be maintained. Better understanding of breast cancer pathology, molecular biology and progression as well as identification of some of the underlying factors involved in breast cancer tumourgenesis and metastasis has led to the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Over a number of years interest has risen in breast tumour kinase (Brk) also known as protein tyrosine kinase 6; the research field has grown and Brk has been described as a desirable therapeutic target in relation to tyrosine kinase inhibition as well as disruption of its kinase independent activity. This review will outline the current "state of play" with respect to targeted therapy for breast cancer, as well as discussing Brk's role in the processes underlying tumour development and metastasis and its potential as a therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  9. Mixed tumour of salivary gland type of the male breast.

    PubMed

    Simha, M R; Doctor, V M; Udwadia, T E

    1992-03-01

    Benign breast tumours with a mixed cartilaginous and epithelial component are distinctly rare as evident from the literature. A case of Mixed Tumour of the breast presenting pre-operatively as a hard mass in a 65 year old male is reported. Histologically, it was composed of a mixture of benign cartilage, myoepithelial cells, tubules and a myxoid stroma in fat. A brief review of cartilage bearing lesions and mixed tumour in the mammary region is discussed.

  10. Metastatic breast cancer presenting as a primary hindgut neuroendocrine tumour.

    PubMed

    Okines, Alicia F C; Hawkes, Eliza A; Rao, Sheela; VAN As, Nicholas; Marsh, Henry; Riddell, Angela; Wilson, Philip O G; Osin, Peter; Wotherspoon, Andrew C; Wetherspoon, Andrew C

    2010-07-01

    The examination of limited, potentially non-representative fragments of tumour tissue from a core biopsy can be misleading and misdirect subsequent treatment, especially in cases where a primary tumour has not been identified. This case report is of a 65-year-old woman presenting with a destructive sacral mass, diagnosed on radiological imaging and core biopsy as a hindgut neuroendocrine tumour, which on histopathological review of the subsequently resected tumour was found instead to represent a metastasis from an occult hormone-positive breast cancer with neuroendocrine features.

  11. Breast tumour visualization using 3D quantitative ultrasound methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangeh, Mehrdad J.; Raheem, Abdul; Tadayyon, Hadi; Liu, Simon; Hadizad, Farnoosh; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancer types accounting for 29% of all cancer cases. Early detection and treatment has a crucial impact on improving the survival of affected patients. Ultrasound (US) is non-ionizing, portable, inexpensive, and real-time imaging modality for screening and quantifying breast cancer. Due to these attractive attributes, the last decade has witnessed many studies on using quantitative ultrasound (QUS) methods in tissue characterization. However, these studies have mainly been limited to 2-D QUS methods using hand-held US (HHUS) scanners. With the availability of automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) technology, this study is the first to develop 3-D QUS methods for the ABUS visualization of breast tumours. Using an ABUS system, unlike the manual 2-D HHUS device, the whole patient's breast was scanned in an automated manner. The acquired frames were subsequently examined and a region of interest (ROI) was selected in each frame where tumour was identified. Standard 2-D QUS methods were used to compute spectral and backscatter coefficient (BSC) parametric maps on the selected ROIs. Next, the computed 2-D parameters were mapped to a Cartesian 3-D space, interpolated, and rendered to provide a transparent color-coded visualization of the entire breast tumour. Such 3-D visualization can potentially be used for further analysis of the breast tumours in terms of their size and extension. Moreover, the 3-D volumetric scans can be used for tissue characterization and the categorization of breast tumours as benign or malignant by quantifying the computed parametric maps over the whole tumour volume.

  12. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  13. Benign mixed salivary-type tumour of the breast.

    PubMed

    Betta, P G; Spinoglio, G

    1992-06-01

    A case of benign mixed salivary-type tumour of the breast is described. This is a rare neoplasm, only 20 cases having been reported to date, characterized by a mixture of epithelial and mesenchymal components, as in similar tumours occurring in the salivary glands and skin. Because this tumour frequently simulates carcinoma clinically, mammographically and histologically, familiarity of both the surgeon and pathologist with this lesion is essential, to avoid the overdiagnosis of malignancy, unfortunately initially made in nearly 50% of previously reported cases.

  14. Expression of CD151/Tspan24 and integrin alpha 3 complex in aid of prognostication of HER2-negative high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    Romanska, Hanna M; Potemski, Piotr; Kusinska, Renata; Kopczynski, Janusz; Sadej, Rafal; Kordek, Radzislaw

    2015-01-01

    The pro-tumorigenic and pro-metastatic functions of the tetraspanin protein CD151 (Tspan24) are thought to be dependent on its ability to form complexes with laminin-binding integrin receptors (i.e. alpha6beta1, alpha3beta1, alpha6beta4). We have previously reported that in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), CD151/alpha3beta1 complex was of prognostic value in patients with HER2-negative tumors. Extrapolating these findings to the pre-invasive setting, we aimed to make an assessment of a potential relationship between expression of the CD151/alpha3beta1 complex in DCIS and Van Nuys prognostic index (VNPI) in high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in relation to the HER2 status. Protein distributions were analyzed in 49 samples of pure DCIS using immunohistochemistry. For each case immunoreactivity was assessed in at least 5 ducts (325 ducts in total) and an average score was taken for statistical analyses. When analyzed in the whole cohort, there was no statistical association between the VNPI and any of the proteins scored either separately or in combination. When stratified according to the HER2 status, in the HER2-negative subgroup, CD151 assessed in combination with alpha3beta1 was significantly correlated with VNPI (P = 0.044), while neither protein analyzed individually showed any significant link with the prognostic index. Expression of the CD151/alpha3beta1 complex in HER2-negative DCIS might reflect tumor behavior relevant to the patient outcome and thus might aid prognostication of the disease. PMID:26464707

  15. A Study of Neoadjuvant Paclitaxel in Combination With Bavituximab in Early- Stage Triple- Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-12

    Breast Cancer; Triple Negative Breast Neoplasms; Triple-Negative Breast Neoplasm; Triple-Negative Breast Cancer; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; ER-Negative PR-Negative HER2-Negative Breast Neoplasms; ER-Negative PR-Negative HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

  16. Carboplatin and Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IIIC Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  17. Effects of childhood body size on breast cancer tumour characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Although a role of childhood body size in postmenopausal breast cancer risk has been established, less is known about its influence on tumour characteristics. Methods We studied the relationships between childhood body size and tumour characteristics in a Swedish population-based case-control study consisting of 2,818 breast cancer cases and 3,111 controls. Our classification of childhood body size was derived from a nine-level somatotype. Relative risks were estimated by odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals, derived from fitting unconditional logistic regression models. Association between somatotype at age 7 and tumour characteristics were evaluated in a case-only analysis where P values for heterogeneity were obtained by performing one degree of freedom trend tests. Results A large somatotype at age 7 was found to be associated with decreased postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Although strongly associated with other risk factors such as age of menarche, adult body mass index and mammographic density, somatotype at age 7 remained a significant protective factor (odds ratio (OR) comparing large to lean somatotype at age 7 = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.58-0.91, P trend = 0.004) after adjustment. The significant protective effect was observed within all subgroups defined by estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status, with a stronger effect for ER-negative (0.40, 95% CI = 0.21-0.75, P trend = 0.002), than for ER-positive (0.80, 95% CI = 0.62-1.05, P trend = 0.062), tumours (P heterogeneity = 0.046). Somatotype at age 7 was not associated with tumour size, histology, grade or the presence or absence of metastatic nodes. Conclusions Greater body size at age 7 is associated with a decreased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, and the associated protective effect is stronger for the ER-negative breast cancer subtype than for the ER-positive subtype. PMID:20398298

  18. Phyllodes tumours of the breast: a consensus review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Benjamin Y; Acs, Geza; Apple, Sophia K; Badve, Sunil; Bleiweiss, Ira J; Brogi, Edi; Calvo, José P; Dabbs, David J; Ellis, Ian O; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Farshid, Gelareh; Fox, Stephen B; Ichihara, Shu; Lakhani, Sunil R; Rakha, Emad A; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Richardson, Andrea L; Sahin, Aysegul; Schmitt, Fernando C; Schnitt, Stuart J; Siziopikou, Kalliopi P; Soares, Fernando A; Tse, Gary M; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumours constitute an uncommon but complex group of mammary fibroepithelial lesions. Accurate and reproducible grading of these tumours has long been challenging, owing to the need to assess multiple stratified histological parameters, which may be weighted differently by individual pathologists. Distinction of benign phyllodes tumours from cellular fibroadenomas is fraught with difficulty, due to overlapping microscopic features. Similarly, separation of the malignant phyllodes tumour from spindle cell metaplastic carcinoma and primary breast sarcoma can be problematic. Phyllodes tumours are treated by surgical excision. However, there is no consensus on the definition of an appropriate surgical margin to ensure completeness of excision and reduction of recurrence risk. Interpretive subjectivity, overlapping histological diagnostic criteria, suboptimal correlation between histological classification and clinical behaviour and the lack of robust molecular predictors of outcome make further investigation of the pathogenesis of these fascinating tumours a matter of active research. This review consolidates the current understanding of their pathobiology and clinical behaviour, and includes proposals for a rational approach to the classification and management of phyllodes tumours.

  19. Phyllodes tumours of the breast: a consensus review

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Benjamin Y; Acs, Geza; Apple, Sophia K; Badve, Sunil; Bleiweiss, Ira J; Brogi, Edi; Calvo, José P; Dabbs, David J; Ellis, Ian O; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Farshid, Gelareh; Fox, Stephen B; Ichihara, Shu; Lakhani, Sunil R; Rakha, Emad A; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Richardson, Andrea L; Sahin, Aysegul; Schmitt, Fernando C; Schnitt, Stuart J; Siziopikou, Kalliopi P; Soares, Fernando A; Tse, Gary M; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumours constitute an uncommon but complex group of mammary fibroepithelial lesions. Accurate and reproducible grading of these tumours has long been challenging, owing to the need to assess multiple stratified histological parameters, which may be weighted differently by individual pathologists. Distinction of benign phyllodes tumours from cellular fibroadenomas is fraught with difficulty, due to overlapping microscopic features. Similarly, separation of the malignant phyllodes tumour from spindle cell metaplastic carcinoma and primary breast sarcoma can be problematic. Phyllodes tumours are treated by surgical excision. However, there is no consensus on the definition of an appropriate surgical margin to ensure completeness of excision and reduction of recurrence risk. Interpretive subjectivity, overlapping histological diagnostic criteria, suboptimal correlation between histological classification and clinical behaviour and the lack of robust molecular predictors of outcome make further investigation of the pathogenesis of these fascinating tumours a matter of active research. This review consolidates the current understanding of their pathobiology and clinical behaviour, and includes proposals for a rational approach to the classification and management of phyllodes tumours. PMID:26768026

  20. Phyllodes tumours of the breast: a consensus review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Benjamin Y; Acs, Geza; Apple, Sophia K; Badve, Sunil; Bleiweiss, Ira J; Brogi, Edi; Calvo, José P; Dabbs, David J; Ellis, Ian O; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Farshid, Gelareh; Fox, Stephen B; Ichihara, Shu; Lakhani, Sunil R; Rakha, Emad A; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Richardson, Andrea L; Sahin, Aysegul; Schmitt, Fernando C; Schnitt, Stuart J; Siziopikou, Kalliopi P; Soares, Fernando A; Tse, Gary M; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumours constitute an uncommon but complex group of mammary fibroepithelial lesions. Accurate and reproducible grading of these tumours has long been challenging, owing to the need to assess multiple stratified histological parameters, which may be weighted differently by individual pathologists. Distinction of benign phyllodes tumours from cellular fibroadenomas is fraught with difficulty, due to overlapping microscopic features. Similarly, separation of the malignant phyllodes tumour from spindle cell metaplastic carcinoma and primary breast sarcoma can be problematic. Phyllodes tumours are treated by surgical excision. However, there is no consensus on the definition of an appropriate surgical margin to ensure completeness of excision and reduction of recurrence risk. Interpretive subjectivity, overlapping histological diagnostic criteria, suboptimal correlation between histological classification and clinical behaviour and the lack of robust molecular predictors of outcome make further investigation of the pathogenesis of these fascinating tumours a matter of active research. This review consolidates the current understanding of their pathobiology and clinical behaviour, and includes proposals for a rational approach to the classification and management of phyllodes tumours. PMID:26768026

  1. Numerical modelling of biopotential field for detection of breast tumour.

    PubMed

    Ng, E Y K; Ng, W K; Sim, L S J; Rajendra Acharya, U

    2007-08-01

    Breast cancer is a disease characterised by the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells. These cancer cells can travel through the body by way of blood or lymph nodes. Previous studies have indicated that, changes in the electrical properties of abnormal breast are more significant compared to the breast normal tissues. In the present study, a simple 2D models of breast (close to realistic), with and without artificially inserted malignant cancer were simulated, based upon electrical activity within the breast. We developed an inhomogeneous female breast model, closer to the actual, by considering a breast as a hemisphere with various layers of unequal thickness in supine condition. In order to determine the potential distribution developed due to a dipole source, isotropic homogeneous conductivity was assigned to each of these compartments and the volume conductor problem was solved using finite element method. Significant changes in the potential distribution were recoded in the malignant and normal breast regions. The surface potential decreases about 0.5%, for the small malignant region of surface area 13 mm(2) (spherical diameter=2mm). And it (surface potential) decreases about 16.4% for large malignant surface area of 615 mm(2) (spherical diameter=14 mm). Hence, the results show that, the sizes of tumours result in the reduction of surface potential and follows a fourth order polynomial equation. Thus, biofield analysis yields promising results in the detection of the breast cancer of various sizes.

  2. Sox2 expression in breast tumours and activation in breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Leis, O; Eguiara, A; Lopez-Arribillaga, E; Alberdi, M J; Hernandez-Garcia, S; Elorriaga, K; Pandiella, A; Rezola, R; Martin, A G

    2012-03-15

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model does not imply that tumours are generated from transformed tissue stem cells. The target of transformation could be a tissue stem cell, a progenitor cell, or a differentiated cell that acquires self-renewal ability. The observation that induced pluripotency reprogramming and cancer are related has lead to the speculation that CSCs may arise through a reprogramming-like mechanism. Expression of pluripotency genes (Oct4, Nanog and Sox2) was tested in breast tumours by immunohistochemistry and it was found that Sox2 is expressed in early stage breast tumours. However, expression of Oct4 or Nanog was not found. Mammosphere formation in culture was used to reveal stem cell properties, where expression of Sox2, but not Oct4 or Nanog, was induced. Over-expression of Sox2 increased mammosphere formation, effect dependent on continuous Sox2 expression; furthermore, Sox2 knockdown prevented mammosphere formation and delayed tumour formation in xenograft tumour initiation models. Induction of Sox2 expression was achieved through activation of the distal enhancer of Sox2 promoter upon sphere formation, the same element that controls Sox2 transcription in pluripotent stem cells. These findings suggest that reactivation of Sox2 represents an early step in breast tumour initiation, explaining tumour heterogeneity by placing the tumour-initiating event in any cell along the axis of mammary differentiation.

  3. 0927GCC: Entinostat and Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Women With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  4. Attenuating tumour angiogenesis: a preventive role of metformin against breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Jiang, Jingcheng; Li, Pan; Song, Huijuan; Wang, Weiwei; Li, Chen; Kong, Deling

    2015-01-01

    Metformin is one of the most widely prescribed antidiabetics for type 2 diabetes. A critical role of metformin against tumorigenesis has recently been implicated, although several studies also reported the lack of anticancer property of the antidiabetics. Given the controversies regarding the potential role of metformin against tumour progression, the effect of metformin against breast, cervical, and ovarian tumour cell lines was examined followed by in vivo assessment of metformin on tumour growth using xenograft breast cancer models. Significant inhibitory impact of metformin was observed in MCF-7, HeLa, and SKOV-3 cells, suggesting an antiproliferative property of metformin against breast, cervical, and ovarian tumour cells, respectively, with the breast tumour cells, MCF-7, being the most responsive. In vivo assessment was subsequently carried out, where mice with breast tumours were treated with metformin (20 mg/kg body weight) or sterile PBS solution for 15 consecutive days. No inhibition of breast tumour progression was detected. However, tumour necrosis was significantly increased in the metformin-treated group, accompanied by decreased capillary formation within the tumours. Thus, despite the lack of short-term benefit of metformin against tumour progression, a preventive role of metformin against breast cancer was implicated, which is at partially attributable to the attenuation of tumour angiogenesis. PMID:25883966

  5. Attenuating Tumour Angiogenesis: A Preventive Role of Metformin against Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shan; Jiang, Jingcheng; Li, Pan; Song, Huijuan; Wang, Weiwei; Li, Chen; Kong, Deling

    2015-01-01

    Metformin is one of the most widely prescribed antidiabetics for type 2 diabetes. A critical role of metformin against tumorigenesis has recently been implicated, although several studies also reported the lack of anticancer property of the antidiabetics. Given the controversies regarding the potential role of metformin against tumour progression, the effect of metformin against breast, cervical, and ovarian tumour cell lines was examined followed by in vivo assessment of metformin on tumour growth using xenograft breast cancer models. Significant inhibitory impact of metformin was observed in MCF-7, HeLa, and SKOV-3 cells, suggesting an antiproliferative property of metformin against breast, cervical, and ovarian tumour cells, respectively, with the breast tumour cells, MCF-7, being the most responsive. In vivo assessment was subsequently carried out, where mice with breast tumours were treated with metformin (20 mg/kg body weight) or sterile PBS solution for 15 consecutive days. No inhibition of breast tumour progression was detected. However, tumour necrosis was significantly increased in the metformin-treated group, accompanied by decreased capillary formation within the tumours. Thus, despite the lack of short-term benefit of metformin against tumour progression, a preventive role of metformin against breast cancer was implicated, which is at partially attributable to the attenuation of tumour angiogenesis. PMID:25883966

  6. Mucoadhesive Oral Wound Rinse in Preventing and Treating Stomatitis in Patients With ER- or PR-Positive Metastatic or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery Receiving Everolimus

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Oral Complications; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  7. The Er/Ki-67 Proportion in Breast Tumours - An Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Rai, M K

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Breast tumours are classified as benign, proliferative and invasive tumours. Estrogen hormone influences the proliferative activity and progression of the tumour. Estrogen Receptor (ER) status and proliferative index (Ki 67) are important histopathological factors in the development and prognosis of these tumours. Aim The present study was aimed to evaluate the variations in ER and Ki-67 expression in three broad categories of breast lesions namely benign breast disease, proliferative breast disease and malignant breast disease. Materials and Methods ER% and Ki-67% was evaluated on the histopathological tissues of 15 patients each of benign, proliferative and invasive breast tumours. The ER+/ Ki-67± ratio was calculated and the variation of expression between the three categories was analyzed using student’s t-test. Pearson’s coefficient of correlation was used to correlate ER and Ki-67 positivity within each category. Results The mean ER+/Ki-67+ in benign, proliferative and invasive tumours was 0.81, 0.87 and 1.42 respectively. A statistically significant difference in ER+/Ki-67+ proportions was observed between proliferative breast disease category and malignant breast disease category and also between benign breast disease category and malignant breast disease category (p<0.05). However, no significant difference was observed in benign breast disease category and proliferative breast disease category (p>0.05). A significant correlation was observed in proliferative breast disease and malignant breast disease categories. However, no significant correlation was observed in benign breast disease category Conclusion ER+/Ki-67+ ratio is an important determinant of the invasive breast cancer and can be used to differentiate invasive cancers from benign and proliferative breast tumours. PMID:27190810

  8. Tumour-adapted Reduction Mammoplasty – a New (Old) Breast Conserving Strategy: Review

    PubMed Central

    Eichbaum, M.; Dietrich, A.; Reinhard, J.; Steinwasser, R.; Eichbaum, C.

    2016-01-01

    Today over 70 % of patients treated for primary breast carcinoma in certified breast centres are managed with breast conserving surgery. The classical semicircular incision directly above the tumour, though in many cases easily carried out and associated with good cosmetic results, does have limitations. Unsatisfactory aesthetic results often occur when tumour location is unfavourable or when there is unfavourable tumour size relative to breast size. Distortion of the nipple, changes to breast shape and retraction of skin overlying surgical defects can occur. Tumour-adapted reduction mammoplasty/mastopexy or the “modified B technique” offer excellent chances of combining the oncological demands of breast surgery with satisfactory symmetrical cosmetic results. This article reviews a traditional, old operative technique that has been re-embraced in various new forms. PMID:26855438

  9. Breast carcinoma and phyllodes tumour: a case series.

    PubMed

    Sin, Eliza I-Lin; Wong, Chow Yin; Yong, Wei Sean; Ong, Kong Wee; Madhukumar, Preetha; Tan, Veronique Kiak Mien; Thike, Aye Aye; Tan, Puay Hoon; Tan, Benita Kiat Tee

    2016-04-01

    Malignant transformation of the epithelial component of phyllodes tumours (PT) is rare and only reported in literature as sporadic cases of carcinoma associated with PTs. We report the clinicopathological characteristics of in situ and invasive carcinoma coexisting with PT in 10 patients treated in our institution over an 11-year period from 1992 to 2012. Ten patients with coexisting PT and in situ or invasive carcinoma were identified from our records. Six had carcinoma found within the PT. All were female with a median age of 47 (43-72) years. One patient had a history of PT in the same breast while another had a history of PT in the same breast as well as invasive ductal carcinoma in the contralateral breast. The rest did not have any risk factors of breast cancer. Five patients had a preoperative core needle biopsy performed with the report of a fibroepithelial lesion. The rest of the patients had surgery upfront for their breast masses. Two patients who had ER/PR positive invasive carcinoma received adjuvant hormonal therapy. Patients were followed up for a mean of 3.6 years (9 months-10 years) and all patients were alive and recurrence free. PT associated with carcinoma is rare, and we present a series of cases that add to the limited current literature. It is often difficult to detect the presence of the carcinomatous component preoperatively. Hence, close examination of resected PT specimens must be carried out to allow prompt detection of any associated carcinomas, however rare, such that adequate treatment can be given.

  10. Mesenchymal tumours of the breast and their mimics: a review with approach to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Alison L; Billings, Steven D; Rowe, J Jordi

    2016-08-01

    Mesenchymal tumours of the breast comprise a broad spectrum of entities that frequently pose diagnostic challenges to surgical pathologists. Metaplastic carcinoma and phyllodes tumour are site-specific mimics that account for the majority of tumours in the breast with a sarcomatoid appearance. Although uncommon, mammary tumours with fibroblastic, adipocytic or vascular differentiation may be encountered, spanning the spectrum from benign to malignant. Tumours with histiocytoid morphology are potential traps due to bland cytomorphology and resemblance to reactive processes. This comprehensive review provides a diagnostic approach to specific challenging mesenchymal tumours of the breast and their mimics, with a discussion on the salient morphological, immunohistochemical and molecular features that allow accurate diagnosis and will help the pathologist avoid potential pitfalls. PMID:27318503

  11. Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  12. Disseminated and circulating tumour cells and their role in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Čabiňaková, M; Tesařová, P

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic spread of the primary tumour is responsible for the vast majority of cancer-related deaths. Detection of disseminated tumour cells in the bone marrow and circulating tumour cells in the peripheral blood is correlated with early metastatic relapse in breast cancer. Positive detection of disseminated tumour cells was associated with poor overall survival of patients. Current research has been focused on integrating minimal residual disease as a prognostic and predictive tool in the management of breast cancer. Detection of disseminated tumour cells/circulating tumour cells is not yet standardized in clinical practice because of using different enrichment and detection methods. Therefore, standardization of the used methods is necessary in the future. Previous achieved findings must be verified in larger prospective multicentre studies. Further characterization of disseminated tumour cells/circulating tumour cells will be essential for developing and monitoring the efficacy of new therapeutic concepts. The aim of this review was to provide a short survey of the metastatic cascade and cancer stem cell theory, and data on the molecular and functional characterization of disseminated tumour cells/circulating tumour cells. Finally, we discuss the potential clinical impact of disseminated tumour cells/circulating tumour cells and results of several recent studies.

  13. Anti-tumour activity of bisphosphonates in preclinical models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Holen, Ingunn; Coleman, Robert E

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence of anti-tumour effects of bisphosphonates from pre-clinical studies, supporting a role for these drugs beyond their traditional use in treatment of cancer-induced bone disease. A range of model systems have been used to investigate the effects of different bisphosphonates on tumour growth, both in bone and at peripheral sites. Most of these studies conclude that bisphosphonates cause a reduction in tumour burden, but that early intervention and the use of high and/or repeated dosing is required. Successful eradication of cancer may only be achievable by targeting the tumour cells directly whilst also modifying the tumour microenvironment. In line with this, bisphosphonates are demonstrated to be particularly effective at reducing breast tumour growth when used in combination with agents that directly target cancer cells. Recent studies have shown that the effects of bisphosphonates on breast tumours are not limited to bone, and that prolonged anti-tumour effects may be achieved following their inclusion in combination therapy. This has opened the field to a new strand of bisphosphonate research, focussed on elucidating their effects on cells and components of the local, regional and distal tumour microenvironment. This review highlights the recent developments in relation to proposed anti-tumour effects of bisphosphonates reported from in vitro and in vivo models, and summarises the data from key breast cancer studies. Evidence for effects on different processes and cell types involved in cancer development and progression is discussed, and the main outstanding issues identified.

  14. Tumour prothymosin alpha content, a potential prognostic marker for primary breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Magdalena, C; Dominguez, F; Loidi, L; Puente, J L

    2000-01-01

    In a previous report we suggested that the estimation of prothymosin α (PTA) levels in primary breast tumours might be used to identify breast cancer patients at high risk for distant metastasis (Dominguez F et al (1993) Eur J Cancer29A: 893–897). Here the role of tumour PTA levels as predictor was investigated with respect to both disease-free survival (DFS) and survival. Tumours were obtained from a series of 210 consecutive female patients with ductal carcinoma who underwent surgery at the Hospital Xeral de Galicia (Santiago de Compostela, Spain). Characteristics including PTA tumour levels, number of positive axillary nodes, patient's age at surgery and tumour histological grade were significantly associated with DFS and survival, as determined by univariate analysis. Patients with tumours with low or moderate PTA levels demonstrated a statistically decreased rate of tumour recurrence and a statistically significant increased overall survival in comparison with those whose tumours had high PTA levels. Patient's relative risk of dying was 2.1 times greater for tumours with high PTA levels than for those tumours with low or moderate PTA levels. In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that tumour high PTA levels is associated with a worse outcome. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10682670

  15. Molecular Classification of Breast Cancer Tumours from Patients Treated with Doxorubicin and Docetaxel

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    It is known that four main molecular breast cancer subtypes have different prognoses and different responses to therapy. Luminal A tumours have a better prognosis and they tend to be sensitive to anti-estrogen drugs. Luminal B tumours have incomplete sensitivity to endocrine therapy. Her2 tumours, which have an aggressive natural history, are sensitive to trastuzumab. Finally, basal-like tumours might be eligible for chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemosensitivity to docetaxel and doxorubicin of breast cancer subtypes. Patients with locally advanced breast cancer were randomized to receive 4 cycles of full dose doxorubicin (75 mg/m2) or docetaxel (100 mg/m2). After the fourth cycle, patients were submitted to surgery to ascertain pathological response. Treatment response was assessed according to Symmans classification. Among 130 samples analysed most ER positive tumours were luminal subtype. 41% of Her2 positive tumours assessed by immunohistochemistry and FISH were Her2 according to the gene expression profile. Luminal A and normal-like tumours have low expression of proliferation genes as well as ki67, whereas Her2 and basal-like tumours are highly proliferative. Both treatments have the same efficiency (20% of responses). However, basal tumours have the poorest outcome in the doxorubicin branch (0% of responses) while they are the most sensitive to docetaxel (50% of responses). Luminal and normal-like tumours have the poorest responses to both treatments. Finally, Her2 tumours had similar outcome in both branches (20% of responses). Genomic classification may assist the physician to choose a specific treatment based on the sub-type of tumour. This study provides the basis for building individualized neoadjuvant therapies for breast cancer.

  16. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-14

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  17. Decreased NK-cell tumour immunosurveillance consequent to JAK inhibition enhances metastasis in breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Bottos, Alessia; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Gill, Jason W.; Gattelli, Albana; Frei, Anna; Tzankov, Alexandar; Sexl, Veronika; Wodnar-Filipowicz, Aleksandra; Hynes, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    The JAK/STAT pathway is an attractive target for breast cancer therapy due to its frequent activation, and clinical trials evaluating JAK inhibitors (JAKi) in advanced breast cancer are ongoing. Using patient biopsies and preclinical models of breast cancer, we demonstrate that the JAK/STAT pathway is active in metastasis. Unexpectedly, blocking the pathway with JAKi enhances the metastatic burden in experimental and orthotopic models of breast cancer metastasis. We demonstrate that this prometastatic effect is due to the immunosuppressive activity of JAKi with ensuing impairment of NK-cell-mediated anti-tumour immunity. Furthermore, we show that immunostimulation with IL-15 overcomes the enhancing effect of JAKi on metastasis formation. Our findings highlight the importance of evaluating the effect of targeted therapy on the tumour environment. The impact of JAKi on NK cells and the potential value of immunostimulators to overcome the weakened tumour immunosurveillance, are worthwhile considering in the clinical setting of breast cancer. PMID:27406745

  18. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression. Methods Primary cultures were established from human breast tumour and adjacent non-tumour tissue. Putative progenitor cell populations were isolated based on co-expression or concomitant absence of the epithelial and myoepithelial markers EPCAM and CALLA respectively. Results Significant reductions in cellular senescence were observed in tumour versus non-tumour cultures, accompanied by a stepwise increase in proliferation:senescence ratios. A novel correlation between tumour aggressiveness and an imbalance of putative progenitor subpopulations was also observed. Specifically, an increased double-negative (DN) to double-positive (DP) ratio distinguished aggressive tumours of high grade, estrogen receptor-negativity or HER2-positivity. The DN:DP ratio was also higher in malignant MDA-MB-231 cells relative to non-tumourogenic MCF-10A cells. Ultrastructural analysis of the DN subpopulation in an invasive tumour culture revealed enrichment in lipofuscin bodies, markers of ageing or senescent cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that an imbalance in tumour progenitor subpopulations imbalances the functional relationship between proliferation and senescence, creating a microenvironment favouring tumour progression. PMID:21521500

  19. Multifocal clonal evolution characterized using circulating tumour DNA in a case of metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murtaza, Muhammed; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Pogrebniak, Katherine; Rueda, Oscar M.; Provenzano, Elena; Grant, John; Chin, Suet-Feung; Tsui, Dana W. Y.; Marass, Francesco; Gale, Davina; Ali, H. Raza; Shah, Pankti; Contente-Cuomo, Tania; Farahani, Hossein; Shumansky, Karey; Kingsbury, Zoya; Humphray, Sean; Bentley, David; Shah, Sohrab P.; Wallis, Matthew; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Caldas, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumour DNA analysis can be used to track tumour burden and analyse cancer genomes non-invasively but the extent to which it represents metastatic heterogeneity is unknown. Here we follow a patient with metastatic ER-positive and HER2-positive breast cancer receiving two lines of targeted therapy over 3 years. We characterize genomic architecture and infer clonal evolution in eight tumour biopsies and nine plasma samples collected over 1,193 days of clinical follow-up using exome and targeted amplicon sequencing. Mutation levels in the plasma samples reflect the clonal hierarchy inferred from sequencing of tumour biopsies. Serial changes in circulating levels of sub-clonal private mutations correlate with different treatment responses between metastatic sites. This comparison of biopsy and plasma samples in a single patient with metastatic breast cancer shows that circulating tumour DNA can allow real-time sampling of multifocal clonal evolution. PMID:26530965

  20. A Study Evaluating INIPARIB in Combination With Chemotherapy to Treat Triple Negative Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative (ER-Negative) Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Negative (PR-Negative) Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Negative (HER2-Negative) Breast Cancer; Brain Metastases

  1. Significance of the detection of esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) in human breast tumours.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Philip W; Everett, David J

    2004-01-01

    This issue of Journal of Applied Toxicology publishes the paper Concentrations of Parabens in Human Breast Tumours by Darbre et al. (2004), which reports that esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) can be detected in samples of tissue from human breast tumours. Breast tumour samples were supplied from 20 patients, in collaboration with the Edinburgh Breast Unit Research Group, and analysed by high-pressure liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. The parabens are used as antimicrobial preservatives in underarm deodorants and antiperspirants and in a wide range of other consumer products. The parabens also have inherent oestrogenic and other hormone related activity (increased progesterone receptor gene expression). As oestrogen is a major aetiological factor in the growth and development of the majority of human breast cancers, it has been previously suggested by Darbre that parabens and other chemicals in underarm cosmetics may contribute to the rising incidence of breast cancer. The significance of the finding of parabens in tumour samples is discussed here in terms of 1). Darbre et al's study design, 2). what can be inferred from this type of data (and what can not, such as the cause of these tumours), 3). the toxicology of these compounds and 4). the limitations of the existing toxicology database and the need to consider data that is appropriate to human exposures.

  2. Salivary gland-like tumours of the breast: surgical and molecular pathology.

    PubMed

    Pia-Foschini, M; Reis-Filho, J S; Eusebi, V; Lakhani, S R

    2003-07-01

    Breast glands and salivary glands are tubulo-acinar exocrine glands that can manifest as tumours with similar morphological features, but that differ in incidence and clinical behaviour depending on whether they are primary in breast or salivary glands. Salivary gland-like tumours of the breast are of two types: tumours with myoepithelial differentiation and those devoid of myoepithelial differentiation. The first and more numerous group comprises a spectrum of lesions ranging from "bona fide" benign (such as benign myoepithelioma and pleomorphic adenoma), to low grade malignant (such as adenoid cystic carcinoma, low grade adenosquamous carcinoma, and adenomyoepithelioma), to high grade malignant lesions (malignant myoepithelioma). The second group comprises lesions that have only recently been recognised, such as acinic cell carcinoma, oncocytic carcinoma of the breast, and the rare mucoepidermoid carcinoma.

  3. MicroRNA-based molecular classification of non-BRCA1/2 hereditary breast tumours

    PubMed Central

    Tanic, M; Andrés, E; M Rodriguez-Pinilla, S; Marquez-Rodas, I; Cebollero-Presmanes, M; Fernandez, V; Osorio, A; Benítez, J; Martinez-Delgado, B

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hereditary breast cancer comprises 5–10% of all breast cancers. Mutations in two high-risk susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, along with rare intermediate-risk genes and common low-penetrance alleles identified, altogether explain no more than 45% of the high-risk breast cancer families, although the majority of cases are unaccounted for and are designated as BRCAX tumours. Micro RNAs have called great attention for classification of different cancer types and have been implicated in a range of important biological processes and are deregulated in cancer pathogenesis. Methods: Here we have performed an exploratory hypothesis-generating study of miRNA expression profiles in a large series of 66 primary hereditary breast tumours by microarray analysis. Results: Unsupervised clustering analysis of miRNA molecular profiles revealed distinct subgroups of BRCAX tumours, ‘normal-like' BRCAX-A, ‘proliferative' BRCAX-B, ‘BRCA1/2-like' BRCAX-C and ‘undefined' BRCAX-D subgroup. These findings introduce a new insight in the biology of hereditary breast cancer, defining specific BRCAX subgroups, which could help in the search for novel susceptibility pathways in hereditary breast cancer. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate that BRCAX hereditary breast tumours can be sub-classified into four previously unknown homogenous groups characterised by specific miRNA expression signatures and histopathological features. PMID:24104964

  4. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  5. Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-25

    Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  6. Paclitaxel and Cyclophosphamide With or Without Trastuzumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-12-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  7. New ASCO/CAP guideline recommendations for HER2 testing increase the proportion of reflex in situ hybridization tests and of HER2 positive breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Tchrakian, N; Flanagan, L; Harford, J; Gannon, J M; Quinn, C M

    2016-02-01

    Accurate determination of tumour human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) status is critical for optimal treatment of breast cancer. In October 2013, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the College of American Pathologists (CAP) issued joint updated guideline recommendations for HER2 testing in breast cancer, with a revised algorithm for interpretation of immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridisation (ISH) results. This study investigates the impact on HER2 IHC categorisation, implication for reflex ISH testing and potential for identification of false negative IHC. HER2 IHC preparations on 251 invasive breast tumours, originally reported according to 2007 guidelines, were re-scored using 2013 guidelines and the diagnostic categories compared. The results of ISH testing on a separate cohort of 32 breast tumours reported as HER2 IHC 2+ following the introduction of the 2013 guidelines, that would have been designated 1+ according to 2007, were reviewed. Application of 2013 guidelines resulted in a decrease in tumours classified as HER2 negative (83/251 vs 144/251) and a comparable increase in those classified as equivocal (2+) (139/251 vs 80/251). Relatively few tumours were re-classified as positive (29/251 vs 27/251). Furthermore, 3/32 breast cancer cases (HER2 IHC 2+ as per 2013 guidelines, 1+ using 2007 guidelines) were HER2 ISH positive. Application of the 2013 guidelines increases the HER2 IHC equivocal (2+) category and requirement for reflex ISH testing. The reduced threshold for ISH testing identifies some patients with HER2 positive breast cancer whose tumours would have been categorised as HER2 negative according to the 2007 guidelines.

  8. [Gene expression classifiers in the prognosis of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Drukker, Caroline A; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van Dalen, Thijs; van der Hoeven, Jacobus J M; Linn, Sabine C; Rutgers, Emiel J T

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression classifiers such as the 70-gene signature that reflect the biology of breast tumours have started to find their way into daily clinical practice. Several retrospective validation studies in breast cancer have established the prognostic value of the 70-gene signature (MammaPrint). The prospective observational RASTER study shows excellent 5-year distant recurrence-free intervals in 98.4% of patients who had a high clinical risk but who according to the 70-gene signature had a low risk. Particularly in patients aged 45 years or older with an oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive, HER2-negative tumour, diameter 1-2 cm, grade 2 there is prospective evidence that the 70-gene signature can make a useful contribution towards decision-making on adjuvant chemotherapy.

  9. Phyllodes tumours of the breast: retrospective analysis of a University Hospital's experience.

    PubMed

    Toh, Y F; Cheah, P L; Looi, L M; Teoh, K H; Tan, P H

    2016-04-01

    Taking cognizance of the purported variation of phyllodes tumours in Asians compared with Western populations, this study looked at phyllodes tumours of the breast diagnosed at the Department of Pathology, University of Malaya Medical Centre over an 8-year period with regards to patient profiles, tumour parameters, treatment offered and outcome. Sixty-four new cases of phyllodes tumour were diagnosed during the period, however only 30 (21 benign, 4 borderline and 5 malignant) finally qualified for entry into the study. These were followed-up for 4-102 months (average = 41.7 months). Thirteen cases (8 benign, 3 borderline, 2 malignant) were Chinese, 9 (all benign) Malay, 7 (4 benign, 1 borderline, 2 malignant) Indian and 1 (malignant) Indonesian. Prevalence of benign versus combined borderline and malignant phyllodes showed a marginally significant difference (p=0.049) between the Malays and Chinese. Patients' ages ranged from 21-70 years with a mean of 44.9 years with no significant difference in age between benign, borderline or malignant phyllodes tumours. Except for benign phyllodes tumours (mean size = 5.8 cm) being significantly smaller at presentation compared with borderline (mean size = 12.5 cm) and malignant (mean size = 15.8 cm) (p<0.05) tumours, history of previous pregnancy, breast feeding, hormonal contraception and tumour laterality did not differ between the three categories. Family history of breast cancer was noted in 2 cases of benign phyllodes. Local excision was performed in 17 benign, 2 borderline and 3 malignant tumours and mastectomy in 4 benign, 2 borderline and 2 malignant tumours. Surgical clearance was not properly recorded in 10 benign phyllodes tumours. Six benign and all 4 borderline and 5 malignant tumours had clearances of <10 mm. Two benign tumours recurred locally at 15 and 49 months after local excision, however information regarding surgical clearance was not available in both cases. One patient with a malignant tumour developed

  10. Phyllodes tumours of the breast: retrospective analysis of a University Hospital's experience.

    PubMed

    Toh, Y F; Cheah, P L; Looi, L M; Teoh, K H; Tan, P H

    2016-04-01

    Taking cognizance of the purported variation of phyllodes tumours in Asians compared with Western populations, this study looked at phyllodes tumours of the breast diagnosed at the Department of Pathology, University of Malaya Medical Centre over an 8-year period with regards to patient profiles, tumour parameters, treatment offered and outcome. Sixty-four new cases of phyllodes tumour were diagnosed during the period, however only 30 (21 benign, 4 borderline and 5 malignant) finally qualified for entry into the study. These were followed-up for 4-102 months (average = 41.7 months). Thirteen cases (8 benign, 3 borderline, 2 malignant) were Chinese, 9 (all benign) Malay, 7 (4 benign, 1 borderline, 2 malignant) Indian and 1 (malignant) Indonesian. Prevalence of benign versus combined borderline and malignant phyllodes showed a marginally significant difference (p=0.049) between the Malays and Chinese. Patients' ages ranged from 21-70 years with a mean of 44.9 years with no significant difference in age between benign, borderline or malignant phyllodes tumours. Except for benign phyllodes tumours (mean size = 5.8 cm) being significantly smaller at presentation compared with borderline (mean size = 12.5 cm) and malignant (mean size = 15.8 cm) (p<0.05) tumours, history of previous pregnancy, breast feeding, hormonal contraception and tumour laterality did not differ between the three categories. Family history of breast cancer was noted in 2 cases of benign phyllodes. Local excision was performed in 17 benign, 2 borderline and 3 malignant tumours and mastectomy in 4 benign, 2 borderline and 2 malignant tumours. Surgical clearance was not properly recorded in 10 benign phyllodes tumours. Six benign and all 4 borderline and 5 malignant tumours had clearances of <10 mm. Two benign tumours recurred locally at 15 and 49 months after local excision, however information regarding surgical clearance was not available in both cases. One patient with a malignant tumour developed

  11. Molecular profiles of BRCA1-mutated and matched sporadic breast tumours: relation with clinico-pathological features

    PubMed Central

    Berns, E M J J; Staveren, I L van; Verhoog, L; Ouweland, A M W van de; Gelder, M Meijer-van; Meijers-Heijboer, H; Portengen, H; Foekens, J A; Dorssers, L C J; Klijn, J G M

    2001-01-01

    About 5–10% of breast cancers are hereditary; a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disease in which several susceptibility genes, including BRCA1, have been identified. While distinct tumour features can be used to estimate the likelihood that a breast tumour is caused by a BRCA1 germline mutation it is not yet possible to categorize a BRCA1 mutated tumour. The aim of the present study is to molecularly classify BRCA1 mutated breast cancers by resolving gene expression patterns of BRCA1 and matched sporadic surgical breast tumour specimens. The expression profiles of 6 frozen breast tumour tissues with a proven BRCA1 gene mutation were weighed against those from 12 patients without a known family history but who had similar clinico-pathological characteristics. In addition two fibroblast cultures, the breast cancer cell-line HCC1937 and its corresponding B-lymphoblastoid cell line (heterozygous for mutation BRCA1 5382insC) and an epithelial ovarian cancer cell line (A2780) were studied. Using a high density membrane based array for screening of RNA isolated from these samples and standard algorithms and software, we were able to distinguish subgroups of sporadic cases and a group consisting mainly of BRCA1-mutated breast tumours. Furthermore this pilot analysis revealed a gene cluster that differentially expressed genes related to cell substrate formation, adhesion, migration and cell organization in BRCA1-mutated tumours compared to sporadic breast tumours. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11506493

  12. Relationship between cathepsin D, urokinase, and plasminogen activator inhibitors in malignant vs benign breast tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Foucré, D.; Bouchet, C.; Hacène, K.; Pourreau-Schneider, N.; Gentile, A.; Martin, P. M.; Desplaces, A.; Oglobine, J.

    1991-01-01

    The concentrations of cathepsin D (Cath D), urokinase (uPA) and two plasminogen activator inhibitors (PAI-1 and PAI-2) were analysed in the cytosols of 130 human mammary tumours (43 benign tumours and 87 primary and unilateral breast carcinomas). uPA, PAI-1 and PAI-2 levels were measured by antigenic immunoassays and Cath D by immunoradiometric assay. The median levels of the four parameters were significantly higher in the malignant tumours than in the benign ones. Cath D and uPA increases were 4-fold and 5-fold respectively. PAI-1 and PAI-2 increases were much more important, 74-fold and 29-fold respectively. In malignant tumours, median levels of Cath D and uPA did not vary according to classical prognostic factors (histologic grade, presence or absence of axillary lymph nodes, steroid receptors, UICC stage, tumour size, age, and menopausal status). However, PAI-1 decreased in ER+ and PR+ tumours and PAI-2 increased in menopausal women's tumours. When Cath D, uPA, PAI-1 and PAI-2 levels in malignant tumours were compared, positive correlations were found for all combinations. The implication of plasminogen activator inhibitors in the phenomenon was surprising and merits further investigation using tools other than global antigen measurements in tumours. PMID:1931618

  13. Canine mammary tumours as a model to study human breast cancer: most recent findings.

    PubMed

    Queiroga, Felisbina Luisa; Raposo, Teresa; Carvalho, Maria Isabel; Prada, Justina; Pires, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and molecular similarities between canine mammary tumours and human breast cancer have been described in recent decades. Clinically, the similarities are very strong: spontaneous tumours, hormonal aetiology, age of onset and an identical course of the disease. The clinical characteristics that have an impact on the clinical outcome are also identical: tumour size, lymph node invasiveness and clinical stage. Nowadays, as far as human medicine is concerned, the goal is to identify prognostic factors, mainly at the molecular level, such as those involved in metastasis, which could be used as therapeutic targets to support a better outcome. Moreover, in this area, canine mammary tumours seem to mimic human breast cancer, as a range of similarities are found at the molecular level concerning the overexpression of steroid receptors, proliferation markers, epidermal growth factor, p53 supressor gene mutations, metalloproteinases, cyclooxygenases, among many others. Clinical and molecular data that support canine mammary tumours as a model to study human breast cancer are analysed in this review. Additionally, it is shown that some recent molecular targets in canine mammary tumours may be seen as indicators for similar research to be performed in the corresponding human disease. PMID:21576423

  14. Detection of circulating tumour cells in patients with breast or ovarian cancer by molecular cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Engel, H; Kleespies, C; Friedrich, J; Breidenbach, M; Kallenborn, A; Schöndorf, T; Kolhagen, H; Mallmann, P

    1999-01-01

    Detection of micrometastases in patients with solid tumours may aid the establishment of prognosis and development of new therapeutic approaches. This study was designed to investigate the presence and frequency of tumour cells in the peripheral blood (PB) of patients with breast or ovarian cancer by using a combination of magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Separated tumour cell and PB-samples from 48 patients (35 breast cancers, 12 ovarian tumours, one uterine sarcoma) were analysed for the presence of numerical aberrations of chromosomes 7, 12, 17 and 17 q11.2–q12. Twenty-five patients had primary disease and 23 had relapsed. The technique allows the detection of one tumour cell in 106 normal cells. Circulating tumour cells were detected in 35/48 cases (17 patients had relapsed and 13 primary carcinoma with lymph node or solid metastases) by the expression of anti-cytokeratin and the presence of numerical chromosomal abnormalities. PB-tumour cells of patients with a primary carcinoma and without solid metastases had a significantly lower percentage of chromosomal aberrations, especially for chromosome 12 (P = 0.035; P = 0.038) compared to those with relapsed disease and solid metastases. Detection and quantification of minimal residual disease may monitor the response to cytotoxic or hormonal therapy and may identify women at risk of relapse. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10584878

  15. Intra-tumour signalling entropy determines clinical outcome in breast and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Christopher R S; Severini, Simone; Caldas, Carlos; Teschendorff, Andrew E

    2015-03-01

    The cancer stem cell hypothesis, that a small population of tumour cells are responsible for tumorigenesis and cancer progression, is becoming widely accepted and recent evidence has suggested a prognostic and predictive role for such cells. Intra-tumour heterogeneity, the diversity of the cancer cell population within the tumour of an individual patient, is related to cancer stem cells and is also considered a potential prognostic indicator in oncology. The measurement of cancer stem cell abundance and intra-tumour heterogeneity in a clinically relevant manner however, currently presents a challenge. Here we propose signalling entropy, a measure of signalling pathway promiscuity derived from a sample's genome-wide gene expression profile, as an estimate of the stemness of a tumour sample. By considering over 500 mixtures of diverse cellular expression profiles, we reveal that signalling entropy also associates with intra-tumour heterogeneity. By analysing 3668 breast cancer and 1692 lung adenocarcinoma samples, we further demonstrate that signalling entropy correlates negatively with survival, outperforming leading clinical gene expression based prognostic tools. Signalling entropy is found to be a general prognostic measure, valid in different breast cancer clinical subgroups, as well as within stage I lung adenocarcinoma. We find that its prognostic power is driven by genes involved in cancer stem cells and treatment resistance. In summary, by approximating both stemness and intra-tumour heterogeneity, signalling entropy provides a powerful prognostic measure across different epithelial cancers.

  16. Intra-Tumour Signalling Entropy Determines Clinical Outcome in Breast and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Banerji, Christopher R. S.; Severini, Simone; Caldas, Carlos; Teschendorff, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    The cancer stem cell hypothesis, that a small population of tumour cells are responsible for tumorigenesis and cancer progression, is becoming widely accepted and recent evidence has suggested a prognostic and predictive role for such cells. Intra-tumour heterogeneity, the diversity of the cancer cell population within the tumour of an individual patient, is related to cancer stem cells and is also considered a potential prognostic indicator in oncology. The measurement of cancer stem cell abundance and intra-tumour heterogeneity in a clinically relevant manner however, currently presents a challenge. Here we propose signalling entropy, a measure of signalling pathway promiscuity derived from a sample’s genome-wide gene expression profile, as an estimate of the stemness of a tumour sample. By considering over 500 mixtures of diverse cellular expression profiles, we reveal that signalling entropy also associates with intra-tumour heterogeneity. By analysing 3668 breast cancer and 1692 lung adenocarcinoma samples, we further demonstrate that signalling entropy correlates negatively with survival, outperforming leading clinical gene expression based prognostic tools. Signalling entropy is found to be a general prognostic measure, valid in different breast cancer clinical subgroups, as well as within stage I lung adenocarcinoma. We find that its prognostic power is driven by genes involved in cancer stem cells and treatment resistance. In summary, by approximating both stemness and intra-tumour heterogeneity, signalling entropy provides a powerful prognostic measure across different epithelial cancers. PMID:25793737

  17. Potentialities of steady-state and transient thermography in breast tumour depth detection: A numerical study.

    PubMed

    Amri, Amina; Pulko, Susan Helen; Wilkinson, Anthony James

    2016-01-01

    Breast thermography still has inherent limitations that prevent it from being fully accepted as a breast screening modality in medicine. The main challenges of breast thermography are to reduce false positive results and to increase the sensitivity of a thermogram. Further, it is still difficult to obtain information about tumour parameters such as metabolic heat, tumour depth and diameter from a thermogram. However, infrared technology and image processing have advanced significantly and recent clinical studies have shown increased sensitivity of thermography in cancer diagnosis. The aim of this paper is to study numerically the possibilities of extracting information about the tumour depth from steady state thermography and transient thermography after cold stress with no need to use any specific inversion technique. Both methods are based on the numerical solution of Pennes bioheat equation for a simple three-dimensional breast model. The effectiveness of two approaches used for depth detection from steady state thermography is assessed. The effect of breast density on the steady state thermal contrast has also been studied. The use of a cold stress test and the recording of transient contrasts during rewarming were found to be potentially suitable for tumour depth detection during the rewarming process. Sensitivity to parameters such as cold stress temperature and cooling time is investigated using the numerical model and simulation results reveal two prominent depth-related characteristic times which do not strongly depend on the temperature of the cold stress or on the cooling period.

  18. Potentialities of steady-state and transient thermography in breast tumour depth detection: A numerical study.

    PubMed

    Amri, Amina; Pulko, Susan Helen; Wilkinson, Anthony James

    2016-01-01

    Breast thermography still has inherent limitations that prevent it from being fully accepted as a breast screening modality in medicine. The main challenges of breast thermography are to reduce false positive results and to increase the sensitivity of a thermogram. Further, it is still difficult to obtain information about tumour parameters such as metabolic heat, tumour depth and diameter from a thermogram. However, infrared technology and image processing have advanced significantly and recent clinical studies have shown increased sensitivity of thermography in cancer diagnosis. The aim of this paper is to study numerically the possibilities of extracting information about the tumour depth from steady state thermography and transient thermography after cold stress with no need to use any specific inversion technique. Both methods are based on the numerical solution of Pennes bioheat equation for a simple three-dimensional breast model. The effectiveness of two approaches used for depth detection from steady state thermography is assessed. The effect of breast density on the steady state thermal contrast has also been studied. The use of a cold stress test and the recording of transient contrasts during rewarming were found to be potentially suitable for tumour depth detection during the rewarming process. Sensitivity to parameters such as cold stress temperature and cooling time is investigated using the numerical model and simulation results reveal two prominent depth-related characteristic times which do not strongly depend on the temperature of the cold stress or on the cooling period. PMID:26522612

  19. Circulating tumour cells and lung microvascular tumour cell retention in patients with metastatic breast and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Dieter J E; Brouwer, Anja; Van den Eynden, Gert G; Rutten, Annemie; Onstenk, Wendy; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Van Laere, Steven J; Huget, Philippe; Pauwels, Patrick; Peeters, Marc; Vermeulen, Peter B; Dirix, Luc Y

    2015-01-28

    We have shown that in up to half of the patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC), higher numbers of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are present in the central venous blood (CVB) compared to the peripheral venous blood (PVB), suggesting that the lungs might retain a substantial number of CTCs. Here we report the presence of tumour cell emboli (TCE) in the microvasculature of the lungs in three out of eight patients with MBC and one patient with metastatic cervical carcinoma who had markedly elevated numbers of CTCs in the blood. All these patients suffered from symptomatic dyspnoea not easily attributable to other causes. No TCE were observed in five patients with MBC and elevated CTC counts and three patients with MBC who had low CTC counts (<5/7.5 ml). To investigate whether CTCs derived from CVB or PVB exhibit different transcriptional characteristics that might explain selective CTC retention, paired CTC samples from CVB and PVB of 12 patients with advanced breast cancer were subjected to gene expression analysis of 105 genes. No significant differences in CTC gene expression were observed. Together, these data suggest that potentially clinically relevant CTC retention in the microvasculature of the lung can occur in a subset of patients with advanced metastatic breast and cervical cancer, which seems to be transcriptionally non-selectively.

  20. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA1; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA2; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  1. DT-diaphorase and cytochrome B5 reductase in human lung and breast tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Marín, A.; López de Cerain, A.; Hamilton, E.; Lewis, A. D.; Martinez-Peñuela, J. M.; Idoate, M. A.; Bello, J.

    1997-01-01

    The level of expression of enzymes that can activate or detoxify bioreductive agents within tumours has emerged as an important feature in the development of these anti-tumour compounds. The levels of two such reductase enzymes have been determined in 19 human non-small-cell lung tumours and 20 human breast tumours, together with the corresponding normal tissue. DT-diaphorase (DTD) enzyme levels (both expression and activity) were determined in these samples. Cytochrome b5 reductase (Cytb5R) activity was also assessed. With the exception of six patients, the levels of DTD activity were below 45 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) in the normal tissues assayed. DTD tumour activity was extremely variable, distinguishing two different groups of patients, one with DTD activity above 79 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) and the other with levels that were in the same range as found for the normal tissues. In 53% of the lung tumour samples, DTD activity was increased with respect to the normal tissue by a factor of 2.4-90.3 (range 79-965 nmol min[-1] mg[-1]). In 70% of the breast tumour samples, DTD activity was over 80 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) (range 83-267 nmol min[-1] mg[-1]). DTD expression measured by Western blot correlated well with the enzyme activity measured in both tumour and normal tissues. The levels of the other reductase enzyme, Cytb5R, were not as variable as those for DTD, being in the same range in both tumour and normal tissue or slightly higher in the normal tissues. The heterogeneous nature of DTD activity and expression reinforces the need to measure enzyme levels in individual patients before therapy with DTD-activated bioreductive drugs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9328153

  2. Targeting breast to brain metastatic tumours with death receptor ligand expressing therapeutic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bagci-Onder, Tugba; Du, Wanlu; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Martinez-Quintanilla, Jordi; Shah, Khalid

    2015-06-01

    Characterizing clinically relevant brain metastasis models and assessing the therapeutic efficacy in such models are fundamental for the development of novel therapies for metastatic brain cancers. In this study, we have developed an in vivo imageable breast-to-brain metastasis mouse model. Using real time in vivo imaging and subsequent composite fluorescence imaging, we show a widespread distribution of micro- and macro-metastasis in different stages of metastatic progression. We also show extravasation of tumour cells and the close association of tumour cells with blood vessels in the brain thus mimicking the multi-foci metastases observed in the clinics. Next, we explored the ability of engineered adult stem cells to track metastatic deposits in this model and show that engineered stem cells either implanted or injected via circulation efficiently home to metastatic tumour deposits in the brain. Based on the recent findings that metastatic tumour cells adopt unique mechanisms of evading apoptosis to successfully colonize in the brain, we reasoned that TNF receptor superfamily member 10A/10B apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) based pro-apoptotic therapies that induce death receptor signalling within the metastatic tumour cells might be a favourable therapeutic approach. We engineered stem cells to express a tumour selective, potent and secretable variant of a TRAIL, S-TRAIL, and show that these cells significantly suppressed metastatic tumour growth and prolonged the survival of mice bearing metastatic breast tumours. Furthermore, the incorporation of pro-drug converting enzyme, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, into therapeutic S-TRAIL secreting stem cells allowed their eradication post-tumour treatment. These studies are the first of their kind that provide insight into targeting brain metastasis with stem-cell mediated delivery of pro-apoptotic ligands and have important clinical implications.

  3. Parametric study of the biopotential equation for breast tumour identification using ANOVA and Taguchi method.

    PubMed

    Ng, Eddie Y K; Ng, W Kee

    2006-03-01

    Extensive literatures have shown significant trend of progressive electrical changes according to the proliferative characteristics of breast epithelial cells. Physiologists also further postulated that malignant transformation resulted from sustained depolarization and a failure of the cell to repolarize after cell division, making the area where cancer develops relatively depolarized when compared to their non-dividing or resting counterparts. In this paper, we present a new approach, the Biofield Diagnostic System (BDS), which might have the potential to augment the process of diagnosing breast cancer. This technique was based on the efficacy of analysing skin surface electrical potentials for the differential diagnosis of breast abnormalities. We developed a female breast model, which was close to the actual, by considering the breast as a hemisphere in supine condition with various layers of unequal thickness. Isotropic homogeneous conductivity was assigned to each of these compartments and the volume conductor problem was solved using finite element method to determine the potential distribution developed due to a dipole source. Furthermore, four important parameters were identified and analysis of variance (ANOVA, Yates' method) was performed using design (n = number of parameters, 4). The effect and importance of these parameters were analysed. The Taguchi method was further used to optimise the parameters in order to ensure that the signal from the tumour is maximum as compared to the noise from other factors. The Taguchi method used proved that probes' source strength, tumour size and location of tumours have great effect on the surface potential field. For best results on the breast surface, while having the biggest possible tumour size, low amplitudes of current should be applied nearest to the breast surface.

  4. Incidence and tumour stages of breast cancer in the region of Aachen, Germany.

    PubMed

    Seemayer, C A; Breuer, Elisabeth; Kroll, G; Markus-Sellhaus, S; Reineke, T H; Mittermayer, C

    2002-03-01

    We present epidemiological data of female breast cancer in the region of Aachen (Germany) including incidence and tumour stages for the period 1996-1997. Furthermore, we compare epidemiological data from Aachen with data from the directly neighbouring Dutch region South-Middle Limburg before and after the introduction of a national mammographic screening programme. The field study of breast cancer was undertaken at the Institute of Pathology and Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Aachen, supported by the Federal Ministry of Health (Germany), using data files from the Cancer Registry Aachen. The patient's consent to collect all data concerning her epidemiological and social situation as well as information on the outcome of disease was obtained in 83.4% of all cases. The remaining 16.6% of the cases without a patient's consent are based on histopathological reports. Only those patients are included who were documented as residing in the region of Aachen at the time of diagnosis. Tumour cases were counted according to International Agency for Research on Cancer rules and tumour stages are classified according to UICC guidelines. Incidence rates are calculated as crude value, adapted to the European and World Standard population (ESR, WSR), and the age specific incidence is presented in 5-year intervals. The cumulative risk is assessed for a certain life span by summarizing the age-specific incidences. The age-standardized breast cancer incidence rate in Aachen was 94 per 100 000 women in 1996 and 90 cases of invasive breast cancer per 100 000 women in 1997 according to the ESR. The cumulative risk of developing breast cancer in the life span ranging from 0 to 74 years is approximately 8%. The stage distribution of breast cancer reveals only 4% favourable carcinomata in situ, but 12% advanced T4 tumours. T1 and T2 tumour stages count for about 40% and T3 tumour stages about 4%. Incidence rates and the tumour stages of breast cancer in the region of

  5. Gamma-secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Triple Negative Invasive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-19

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  6. RA-XII inhibits tumour growth and metastasis in breast tumour-bearing mice via reducing cell adhesion and invasion and promoting matrix degradation

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Hoi-Wing; Zhao, Si-Meng; Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Tan, Ning-Hua; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells acquire invasive ability to degrade and adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM) and migrate to adjacent tissues. This ultimately results metastasis. Hence, the present study investigated the in vitro effects of cyclopeptide glycoside, RA-XII on cell adhesion, invasion, proliferation and matrix degradation, and its underlying mechanism in murine breast tumour cells, 4T1. The effect of RA-XII on tumour growth and metastasis in 4T1-bearing mice was also investigated. Our results showed that RA-XII inhibited tumour cell adhesion to collagen, fibronectin and laminin, RA-XII also reduced the expressions of vascular cell adhesion molecule, intracellular adhesion molecule and integrins, and integrin binding. In addition, RA-XII significantly inhibited breast tumour cell migration via interfering cofilin signaling and chemokine receptors. The activities of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and urokinase-type of plasminogen activator, and the expressions of ECM-associated proteinases were attenuated significantly by RA-XII. Furthermore, RA-XII induced G1 phase arrest and inhibited the expressions of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases. RA-XII inhibited the expressions of molecules in PI3K/AKT, NF-kappaB, FAK/pSRC, MAPK and EGFR signaling. RA-XII was also shown to have anti-tumour, anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic activities in metastatic breast tumour-bearing mice. These findings strongly suggested that RA-XII is a potential anti-metastatic agent for breast cancer. PMID:26592552

  7. Primary breast cancer tumours contain high amounts of IgA1 immunoglobulin: an immunohistochemical analysis of a possible carrier of the tumour-associated Tn antigen.

    PubMed

    Welinder, Charlotte; Baldetorp, Bo; Blixt, Ola; Grabau, Dorthe; Jansson, Bo

    2013-01-01

    The Tn antigen (GalNAc alpha-O-Ser/Thr) as defined by the binding of the lectin, helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) or anti-Tn monoclonal antibodies, is known to be exposed in a majority of cancers, and it has also been shown to correlate positively with the metastatic capacity in breast carcinoma. The short O-glycan that forms the antigen is carried by a number of different proteins. One potential carrier of the Tn antigen is immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1), which we surprisingly found in tumour cells of the invasive parts of primary breast carcinoma. Conventional immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded sections from primary breast cancers showed IgA1 to be present in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane of 35 out of 36 individual primary tumours. The immunohistochemical staining of HPA and anti-Tn antibody (GOD3-2C4) did to some extent overlap with the presence of IgA1 in the tumours, but differences were seen in the percentage of stained cells and in the staining pattern in the different breast cancers analysed. Anti-Tn antibody and HPA were also shown to specifically bind to a number of possible constellations of the Tn antigen in the hinge region of IgA1. Both reagents could also detect the presence of Tn positive IgA in serum. On average 51% of the tumour cells in the individual breast cancer tumour sections showed staining for IgA1. The overall amount of staining in the invasive part of the tumour with the anti Tn antibody was 67%, and 93% with HPA. The intra-expression or uptake of IgA1 in breast cancer makes it a new potential carrier of the tumour associated and immunogenic Tn antigen.

  8. Tumour-initiating capacity is independent of epithelial–mesenchymal transition status in breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Xie, G; Ji, A; Yuan, Q; Jin, Z; Yuan, Y; Ren, C; Guo, Z; Yao, Q; Yang, K; Lin, X; Chen, L

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered to be crucial for cancer biology. The purpose of this study was to determine whether EMT directly led to the acquisition of tumour-initiating capacity in breast cancer cell lines. Methods: Epithelial–mesenchymal transition was induced in five breast cancer cell lines and one normal breast cell line by EMT-related cytokine stimulation. Mesenchymal–epithelial transition (MET) was induced by stably overexpressing miR-200c in three mesenchymal-like breast cancer cell lines. Molecular expression and cell function analysis were performed to evaluate the effect of EMT or MET on tumour-initiating capacity and other biological characteristics. Results: The induction of EMT did not enhance tumour-initiating capacity but, instead, conferred a CD44+/CD24−/low phenotype as well as cell proliferation, migration, and resistance to doxorubicin and radiation on breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, MET did not lead to inhibition or loss of the tumour-initiating capacity in mesenchymal-like breast cancer cell lines, but it markedly attenuated other malignant properties, including proliferation, invasion, and resistance to therapy. Conclusions: Epithelial–mesenchymal transition does not alter tumour-initiating capacity of breast cancer cells but some other biological characteristics. Therefore, EMT and tumour-initiating capacity may not be directly linked in breast cancer cell lines. PMID:24755887

  9. Identification of long-term survivors in primary breast cancer by dynamic modelling of tumour response

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, D A; Gregory, W M; Bowman, A; Anderson, E D C; Levack, P; Forouhi, P; Leonard, R C F

    2000-01-01

    Although clinical response to primary chemotherapy in stage II and III breast cancer is associated with a survival advantage, it is the degree of pathological response in the breast and ipsilateral axilla that best identifies patients with a good long-term outcome. A mathematical model of the initial response of 39 locally advanced tumours to anthracycline-based primary chemotherapy has been previously shown to predict subsequent clinical tumour size. This model allows for the possibility of primary resistant disease, the presence of which should therefore be associated with a worse outcome. This study reports the application of this model to an additional five patients with locally advanced breast cancer, as well as to 63 patients with operable breast cancer, and confirms the biological reality of the model parameters for these 100 breast cancers treated with primary anthracycline-based chemotherapy. The tumours that responded to chemotherapy had higher cell-kill (P< 0.0005), lower resistance (P< 0.0001) and slower tumour regrowth (P< 0.002). Furthermore, ER-negative tumours had higher cell-kill (P< 0.05), as compared with ER-positive tumours. All patients with a pathological complete response had zero resistance according to the model. Furthermore, the long-term implication of chemo-resistant disease was demonstrated by survival analysis of these two groups of patients. At a median follow-up of 3.7 years, there was a statistically significantly worse survival for the 37 patients with locally advanced breast cancer identified by the model to have more than 8% primary resistant tumour (P< 0.003). The specificity of this putative prognostic indicator was confirmed in the 63 patients presenting with operable disease where, at a median follow-up of 7.7 years, those women with a resistant fraction of greater than 8% had a significantly worse survival (P< 0.05). Application of this model to patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy may allow earlier identification

  10. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  11. Computerised counting of tumour infiltrating lymphocytes in 90 breast cancer specimens.

    PubMed

    Marsigliante, S; Biscozzo, L; Marra, A; Nicolardi, G; Leo, G; Lobreglio, G B; Storelli, C

    1999-05-01

    Tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) implicated in immunologic cytotoxicity were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and digitally counted in serial sections from 90 breast cancers in order to assess their number, the relationships between them and to tumour histology. CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD20+, CD25+ and CD56+ lymphocytes were found in 58 (64.4%), 52 (57.7%), 50 (55.5%), 22 (24.4%), 11 (12.2%) and 21 (23.3%) tumours, respectively. There was no difference in the number of TILs between pure infiltrating ductal (NOS) and non-ductal carcinomas, and no relationship between TILs and histological grades was found. CD3+ TILs directly correlated to age, while lymph node negative patients had tumours infiltrated by fewer CD4+ TILs with respect to lymph node positive patients. In 25/90 patients, randomly chosen, the status of peripheral blood lymphocytes was evaluated but no differences with respect to the status found in healthy blood donors was obtained; nonetheless while in some patients CD8+ TILs outnumbered CD4+ TILs in situ, the CD4/CD8 ratio was normal in their peripheral blood. The results show a considerable diversity of TILs among breast tumours, their lack of relationship with the status of the peripheral blood cells, and their potential important relationship with age (CD3+) and lymph node status (CD4+). PMID:10408906

  12. DNA methylation profiling of phyllodes and fibroadenoma tumours of the breast.

    PubMed

    Huang, Katie T; Dobrovic, Alexander; Yan, Max; Karim, Rooshdiya Z; Lee, C Soon; Lakhani, Sunil R; Fox, Stephen B

    2010-11-01

    Phyllodes tumours and cellular fibroadenomas are both fibroepithelial tumours of the breast. Phyllodes tumours, unlike fibroadenomas, have the ability to recur and metastasise. Although these lesions can be distinguished by their stromal cellularity, mitotic index, presence or absence of stromal overgrowth and cellular atypia, there is overlap and not infrequently a definitive diagnosis cannot be made, particularly on biopsy. We sought to evaluate whether DNA promoter methylation profiling using selected genes known to be methylated in cancer would allow us to learn more about the biology of these tumours, and whether it could identify methylation markers that could differentiate phyllodes tumours from fibroadenomas and/or distinguish phyllodes tumours of different grades. Methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) was used to screen promoter DNA methylation changes in 86 phyllodes tumours (15 benign, 28 borderline, 43 malignant) and 26 fibroadenomas. A panel of 11 genes (RASSF1A, TWIST1, APC, WIF1, MGMT, MAL, RARβ, CDKN2A, CDH1, TP73 and MLH1) was tested. Methylation status was correlated with histology and with clinicopathological parameters. Five of the gene promoters showed some methylation in a proportion of phyllodes tumours; RASSF1A, 45.3%; TWIST1, 10.7%; APC, 4.1%; WIF1, 2.9% and MGMT, 1.3%. Only two genes showed any methylation in fibroadenomas usually at background levels; RASSF1A, 53.8% and MGMT, 8.3%. No CDKN2A methylation was observed in either tumour type, contrary to previous reports. Overall, the methylation patterns differed little from that which might be seen in normal cells. However, significant levels of methylation of RASSF1A (24.4%) and TWIST1 (7.1%) was observed in some phyllodes tumours. Elevated RASSF1A and/or TWIST1 methylation was significantly associated with phyllodes tumours compared with fibroadenomas (P = 0.02), TWIST1 methylation correlated with increasing malignancy in phyllodes tumours (P < 0.001). In conclusion

  13. Modelling circulating tumour cells for personalised survival prediction in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ascolani, Gianluca; Occhipinti, Annalisa; Liò, Pietro

    2015-05-01

    Ductal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers among women, and the main cause of death is the formation of metastases. The development of metastases is caused by cancer cells that migrate from the primary tumour site (the mammary duct) through the blood vessels and extravasating they initiate metastasis. Here, we propose a multi-compartment model which mimics the dynamics of tumoural cells in the mammary duct, in the circulatory system and in the bone. Through a branching process model, we describe the relation between the survival times and the four markers mainly involved in metastatic breast cancer (EPCAM, CD47, CD44 and MET). In particular, the model takes into account the gene expression profile of circulating tumour cells to predict personalised survival probability. We also include the administration of drugs as bisphosphonates, which reduce the formation of circulating tumour cells and their survival in the blood vessels, in order to analyse the dynamic changes induced by the therapy. We analyse the effects of circulating tumour cells on the progression of the disease providing a quantitative measure of the cell driver mutations needed for invading the bone tissue. Our model allows to design intervention scenarios that alter the patient-specific survival probability by modifying the populations of circulating tumour cells and it could be extended to other cancer metastasis dynamics.

  14. Modelling Circulating Tumour Cells for Personalised Survival Prediction in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers among women, and the main cause of death is the formation of metastases. The development of metastases is caused by cancer cells that migrate from the primary tumour site (the mammary duct) through the blood vessels and extravasating they initiate metastasis. Here, we propose a multi-compartment model which mimics the dynamics of tumoural cells in the mammary duct, in the circulatory system and in the bone. Through a branching process model, we describe the relation between the survival times and the four markers mainly involved in metastatic breast cancer (EPCAM, CD47, CD44 and MET). In particular, the model takes into account the gene expression profile of circulating tumour cells to predict personalised survival probability. We also include the administration of drugs as bisphosphonates, which reduce the formation of circulating tumour cells and their survival in the blood vessels, in order to analyse the dynamic changes induced by the therapy. We analyse the effects of circulating tumour cells on the progression of the disease providing a quantitative measure of the cell driver mutations needed for invading the bone tissue. Our model allows to design intervention scenarios that alter the patient-specific survival probability by modifying the populations of circulating tumour cells and it could be extended to other cancer metastasis dynamics. PMID:25978366

  15. Impact of tumour epithelial subtype on circulating microRNAs in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Waters, Peadar S; Dwyer, Roisin M; Brougham, Cathy; Glynn, Claire L; Wall, Deirdre; Hyland, Peter; Duignan, Maria; McLoughlin, Mark; Newell, John; Kerin, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    While a range of miRNAs have been shown to be dysregulated in the circulation of patients with breast cancer, little is known about the relationship between circulating levels and tumour characteristics. The aim of this study was to analyse alterations in circulating miRNA expression during tumour progression in a murine model of breast cancer, and to detemine the clinical relevance of identified miRNAs at both tissue and circulating level in patient samples. Athymic nude mice received a subcutaneous or mammary fat pad injection of MDA-MB-231 cells. Blood sampling was performed at weeks 1, 3 and 6 following tumour induction, and microRNA extracted. MicroRNA microArray analysis was performed comparing samples harvested at week 1 to those collected at week 6 from the same animals. Significantly altered miRNAs were validated across all murine samples by RQ-PCR (n = 45). Three miRNAs of interest were then quantified in the circulation(n = 166) and tissue (n = 100) of breast cancer patients and healthy control individuals. MicroArray-based analysis of murine blood samples revealed levels of 77 circulating microRNAs to be changed during disease progression, with 44 demonstrating changes >2-fold. Validation across all samples revealed miR-138 to be significantly elevated in the circulation of animals during disease development, with miR-191 and miR-106a levels significantly decreased. Analysis of patient tissue and blood samples revealed miR-138 to be significantly up-regulated in the circulation of patients with breast cancer, with no change observed in the tissue setting. While not significantly changed overall in breast cancer patients compared to controls, circulating miR-106a and miR-191 were significantly decreased in patients with basal breast cancer. In tissue, both miRNAs were significantly elevated in breast cancer compared to normal breast tissue. The data demonstrates an impact of tumour epithelial subtype on circulating levels of miRNAs, and

  16. Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Carboplatin Followed by Surgery and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  17. Is a histological section representative of whole tumour vascularity in breast cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, L.; Holcombe, C.; Green, B.; Leinster, S. J.; Winstanley, J.

    1997-01-01

    The assessment of a tumour's angiogenic potential, by measuring the microvessel density in histological sections, assumes that a 4-microm section is representative of whole tumour vascularity. This study has examined this assumption by comparing the vessel density found radiologically, after injecting specimens with contrast, with that found immunohistochemically. Twenty-one breast angiograms were performed following mastectomy for carcinoma and graded 1-3 for vessel density. Sections (4 microm) from these carcinomas were labelled for endothelial cells using anti-CD34, and the vessel counts were compared with the radiological grades. A significant correlation was found between the densities (P < 0.003, Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA). We therefore conclude that the microvessel density measured in histological sections is representative of whole tumour vascularity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9218730

  18. Early prognosis of metastasis risk in inflammatory breast cancer by texture analysis of tumour microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Kolarevic, Daniela; Tomasevic, Zorica; Dzodic, Radan; Kanjer, Ksenija; Vukosavljevic, Dragica Nikolic; Radulovic, Marko

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive type of locally advanced breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the value of microscopic tumour histomorphology texture for prognosis of local and systemic recurrence at the time of initial IBC diagnosis. This retrospective study included a group of 52 patients selected on the basis of non-metastatic IBC diagnosis, stage IIIB. Gray-Level-Co-Occurrence-Matrix (GLCM) texture analysis was performed on digital images of primary tumour tissue sections stained with haematoxylin/eosin. Obtained values were categorized by use of both data- and outcome-based methods. All five acquired GLCM texture features significantly associated with metastasis outcome. By accuracies of 69-81% and AUCs of 0.71-0.81, prognostic performance of GLCM parameters exceeded that of standard major IBC clinical prognosticators such as tumour grade and response to induction chemotherapy. Furthermore, a composite score consisting of tumour grade, contrast and correlation as independent features resulted in further enhancement of prognostic performance by accuracy of 89%, discrimination efficiency by AUC of 0.93 and an outstanding hazard ratio of 71.6 (95%CI, 41.7-148.4). Internal validation was successfully performed by bootstrap and split-sample cross-validation, suggesting that the model is generalizable. This study indicates for the first time the potential use of primary breast tumour histology texture as a highly accurate, simple and cost-effective prognostic indicator of metastasis risk in IBC. Clinical relevance of the obtained results rests on the role of prognosis in decisions on induction chemotherapy and the resulting impact on quality of life and survival. PMID:26286863

  19. Association of tumour necrosis factor alpha and its receptors with thymidine phosphorylase expression in invasive breast carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Leek, R. D.; Landers, R.; Fox, S. B.; Ng, F.; Harris, A. L.; Lewis, C. E.

    1998-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential requirement for tumour growth and metastasis and is regulated by a complex network of factors produced by both stromal cells and neoplastic cells within solid tumours. The cytokine tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and the enzyme thymidine phosphorylase (TP) are two factors known to promote tumour angiogenesis. We have demonstrated recently that high numbers of tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) are significantly associated with increased tumour angiogenesis and poor prognosis in invasive carcinoma of the breast. We have also shown that TAMs are a major source of TNF-alpha in invasive breast carcinomas, and that macrophage-like stromal cells as well as tumour cells synthesize TP in such tumours. However, little is known of the factors that regulate the production or activity of these factors in the tumour microenvironment. As TNF-alpha has been shown to up-regulate TP expression in tumour cells in vitro we performed an immunohistochemical study to investigate the possibility that TNF-alpha may be involved in the regulation of TP expression by malignant breast epithelial cells in vivo. To do this, we used a cocktail of non-neutralizing monoclonal anti-TNF-alpha antibodies to visualize both TNF-alpha-expressing macrophages and TNF-alpha bound to its receptors on tumour cells and endothelial cells in a series of 93 invasive carcinomas of the breast. A semiquantitative grading system was then used to compare these staining patterns with that for TP in the same biopsies. TNF-alpha immunoreactivity was also compared with various important tumour variables known to relate to outcome in this disease (microvessel density, node status, grade, stage, receptor status and macrophage infiltration), as well as relapse-free and overall survival data for these patients. Our data show significant positive correlations between TNF-alpha bound to its receptors on tumour cells and: (1) TP protein production by tumour cells, and (2) axillary lymph

  20. The association of subtypes of breast cancer with tumour characteristics and reproductive factors in 1326 Mexican women

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Gabriel; Aranda-Moreno, Catalina; Olivares-Corichi, Ivonne M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study In breast cancer, oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), and HER2 (HER2/Neu) expression status are used to classify neoplasms into subtypes: Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2/Neu type, and Basallike. The aim of the present study was to establish the molecular subtypes of breast cancers and their association with tumour characteristics and reproductive factors in Mexican women. Material and methods A total of 1326 biopsies of breast tumour tissues were analysed for ER, PR, and HER2/Neu by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Information regarding age, tumour characteristics, and node involvement profiles were collected. Results IHC established that the most common subtype of breast cancer was Luminal A (64.93%), followed by Basal-Like (13.88%), Luminal B (12.52%), and HER2/Neu (8.67%). T2-size tumours (> 2 cm but < 5 cm) were present in 47.59% of all patients. Univariate analysis showed that lymph node positivity (p = 0.009), stage (p = 0.013), and placement of the tumour (p = 0.001) were factors associated with breast cancer subtype. Conclusions Our data show that IHC is useful for distinguishing different subtypes of breast cancer and that Luminal A is the most common breast cancer subtype in the Mexican population. All subtypes were associated with unfavourable clinicopathological features, suggesting that late diagnosis is an important contributor to high mortality rates in the Mexican population. PMID:26843843

  1. A progesterone-receptor-positive huge retroperitoneal tumour mimics metastasis in a breast cancer patient: sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Z-J; Chu, C-H; Fan, H-L; Hsu, K-F; Hsu, G-C; Yu, C-P; Char, D-L; Yu, J-C

    2011-01-01

    We report a rare case of breast cancer concomitant with progesterone-receptor-positive renal cell carcinoma. A 48-year-old woman was diagnosed as having infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast and underwent modified radical mastectomy. A synchronous retroperitoneal tumour was detected by sonography of the abdomen in a routine cancer staging. Initially, the tumour was diagnosed as a synchronous retroperitoneal metastasis by needle biopsy; further tests revealed that it was progesterone receptor-positive. The retroperitoneal tumour showed poor response to full courses of adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Subsequently, the patient underwent a radical operation that included nephrectomy. The final pathology confirmed a sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma. The post-operative course was uneventful. The patient had no recurrence at the 1-year follow-up. In this report, accurate diagnosis and adequate treatment were discussed. An intra-abdominal tumour with progesterone receptor- (PR) positive features is usually considered to be metastatic in breast cancer patients. For breast cancer patients with a PR-positive retroperitoneal tumour, renal cell carcinoma should be differentiated from a metastatic lesion of breast cancer, even if PR-expression is rare in renal cell carcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of PR-positive expression in breast cancer concomitant with renal carcinoma. In clinical settings, it is challenging for the surgeon to make an accurate diagnosis and to provide prompt treatment in such cases.

  2. Medullary carcinoma of the breast: a tumour lacking keratin 19.

    PubMed

    Larsimont, D; Lespagnard, L; Degeyter, M; Heimann, R

    1994-06-01

    The presence of keratin 19 (K19) was searched for by immunostaining in 16 medullary carcinomas, comprising 12 typical and four atypical cases, in 29 undifferentiated high-grade carcinomas (NOS-HG) with conspicuous lymphoid response and in 12 well differentiated low-grade carcinomas (NOS-LG). The medullary carcinomas were all negative whereas 23 of the high-grade and all 12 low-grade carcinomas expressed K19. Staining for K19 could be of value in the differential diagnosis of these tumours. Furthermore, these findings, with other observations, raise the possibility that medullary carcinoma cells could be linked to precursor cells of the terminal duct lobular units because both populations share several characteristics. PMID:7520414

  3. Imaging tumour heterogeneity of the consequences of a PKCα-substrate interaction in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Weitsman, Gregory; Lawler, Katherine; Kelleher, Muireann T; Barrett, James E; Barber, Paul R; Shamil, Eamon; Festy, Frederic; Patel, Gargi; Fruhwirth, Gilbert O; Huang, Lufei; Tullis, Iain D C; Woodman, Natalie; Ofo, Enyinnaya; Ameer-Beg, Simon M; Irshad, Sheeba; Condeelis, John; Gillett, Cheryl E; Ellis, Paul A; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Coolen, Anthony C C; Ng, Tony

    2014-12-01

    Breast cancer heterogeneity demands that prognostic models must be biologically driven and recent clinical evidence indicates that future prognostic signatures need evaluation in the context of early compared with late metastatic risk prediction. In pre-clinical studies, we and others have shown that various protein-protein interactions, pertaining to the actin microfilament-associated proteins, ezrin and cofilin, mediate breast cancer cell migration, a prerequisite for cancer metastasis. Moreover, as a direct substrate for protein kinase Cα, ezrin has been shown to be a determinant of cancer metastasis for a variety of tumour types, besides breast cancer; and has been described as a pivotal regulator of metastasis by linking the plasma membrane to the actin cytoskeleton. In the present article, we demonstrate that our tissue imaging-derived parameters that pertain to or are a consequence of the PKC-ezrin interaction can be used for breast cancer prognostication, with inter-cohort reproducibility. The application of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded patient samples to probe protein proximity within the typically <10 nm range to address the oncological challenge of tumour heterogeneity, is discussed.

  4. Tumour cell detection in G-CSF mobilised stem cell harvests of patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Krüger, W; Tögel, F; Kröger, N; Rössing, S; Gieseking, F; Gutensohn, K; Lindner, C; Jänicke, F; Zander, A R

    1999-04-01

    Peripheral blood stem cells were mobilised with G-CSF from steady-state haemopoiesis after previous anthracyclin-containing standard dose chemotherapy in patients with high-risk breast cancer. 48 samples were obtained from patients with stage II-III breast cancer and > or = 10 lymph nodes, 15 samples from patients with chemotherapy sensitive metastatic disease, and 13 samples from women with inflammatory breast cancer. 44 samples were first or single leukaphereses and 32 samples were second or third harvests. Aliquots were searched for contaminating tumour cells by immunocytochemistry (IC) and cytokeratin-19 reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction rtPCR). The median count of MNCs examined by IC was 2 x 10(6); cDNA prepared from 2 x 10(7) cells was subjected to PCR. Fifty-nine samples were examined by immunocytochemistry, 36 samples by rtPCR, and 19 samples by both techniques. Samples investigated by IC and rtPCR were judged as positive if there was at least one positive test. On the whole, 42/79 (55.3%) of the samples were positive with an insignificant trend to a higher positivity rate in second or subsequent leukaphereses (52.3% vs 59.3%). The median tumour cell load per 10(6) MNCs was low with 0.5 (0-7) cells in all, and a total of 2.2 (0.5-7) cells in positive specimen. Differences in the cancer cell load of first and subsequent leukaphereses and between subgroups of patients were not found. PCR and IC gave consistent results in 63.2%. This phenomenon can be explained by the greater sensitivity of the molecular method and by a Poisson distribution of coharvested tumour cells in samples. Tumour cell contamination in G-CSF mobilised stem cells from patients with breast cancer from steady state haemopoiesis after preceding anthacyclin-containing chemotherapy is frequent, but the tumour cell load is low. To allow a comparison of different studies dealing with cancer cell contamination in stem cells, standardisation of assays is necessary.

  5. FDG PET and tumour markers in the diagnosis of recurrent and metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Siggelkow, Wulf; Rath, Werner; Buell, Udalrich; Zimny, Michael

    2004-06-01

    Breast cancer continues to be one of the most common cancers in North America and Western Europe. Positron emission tomography with 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG PET) represents a non-invasive functional imaging modality that is based on metabolic characteristics of malignant tumours. In breast cancer, FDG PET is more accurate than conventional methods for staging of distant metastases or local recurrences and enables early assessment of treatment response in patients undergoing primary chemotherapy. Recent data indicate a rationale for the use of FDG PET in cases of asymptomatically elevated tumour marker levels in the presence of uncertain results of conventional imaging. Despite the fact that PET cannot rule out microscopic disease, it does have particular value in providing, in a single examination, a reliable assessment of the true extent of the disease. This technique is complementary to morphological imaging for primary diagnosis, staging and re-staging. It may become the method of choice for the assessment of asymptomatic patients with elevated tumour marker levels. This method, however, cannot replace invasive procedures if microscopic disease is of clinical relevance. PMID:15146295

  6. Breast cancer nodal metastasis correlates with tumour and lymph node methylation profiles of Caveolin-1 and CXCR4.

    PubMed

    Alevizos, Leonidas; Kataki, Agapi; Derventzi, Anastasia; Gomatos, Ilias; Loutraris, Christos; Gloustianou, Georgia; Manouras, Andreas; Konstadoulakis, Manousos M; Zografos, George

    2014-06-01

    DNA methylation is the best characterised epigenetic change so far. However, its role in breast cancer metastasis has not as yet been elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences between the methylation profiles characterising primary tumours and their corresponding positive or negative for metastasis lymph nodes (LN) and correlate these with tumour metastatic potential. Methylation signatures of Caveolin-1, CXCR4, RAR-β, Cyclin D2 and Twist gene promoters were studied in 30 breast cancer primary lesions and their corresponding metastasis-free and tumour-infiltrated LN with Methylation-Specific PCR. CXCR4 and Caveolin-1 expression was further studied by immunohistochemistry. Tumours were typified by methylation of RAR-β and hypermethylation of Cyclin-D2 and Twist gene promoters. Tumour patterns were highly conserved in tumour-infiltrated LN. CXCR4 and Caveolin-1 promoter methylation patterns differentiated between node-negative and metastatic tumours. Nodal metastasis was associated with tumour and lymph node profiles of extended methylation of Caveolin-1 and lack of CXCR4 hypermethylation. Immunodetection studies verified CXCR4 and Caveolin-1 hypermethylation as gene silencing mechanism. Absence of Caveolin-1 expression in stromal cells associated with tumour aggressiveness while strong Caveolin-1 expression in tumour cells correlated with decreased 7-year disease-free survival. Methylation-mediated activation of CXCR4 and inactivation of Caveolin-1 was linked with nodal metastasis while intratumoral Caveolin-1 expression heterogeneity correlated with disease progression. This evidence contributes to the better understanding and, thereby, therapeutic management of breast cancer metastasis process.

  7. Addition of vasopressin synthetic analogue [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP to standard chemotherapy enhances tumour growth inhibition and impairs metastatic spread in aggressive breast tumour models.

    PubMed

    Garona, Juan; Pifano, Marina; Pastrian, Maria B; Gomez, Daniel E; Ripoll, Giselle V; Alonso, Daniel F

    2016-08-01

    [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP is a novel 2nd generation vasopressin analogue with robust antitumour activity against metastatic breast cancer. We recently reported that, by acting on vasopressin V2r membrane receptor present in tumour cells and microvascular endothelium, [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP inhibits angiogenesis and metastatic progression of the disease without overt toxicity. Despite chemotherapy remaining as a primary therapeutic option for aggressive breast cancer, its use is limited by low selectivity and associated adverse effects. In this regard, we evaluated potential combinational benefits by adding [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP to standard-of-care chemotherapy. In vitro, combination of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP with sub-IC50 concentrations of paclitaxel or carmustine resulted in a cooperative inhibition of breast cancer cell growth in comparison to single-agent therapy. In vivo antitumour efficacy of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP addition to chemotherapy was first evaluated using the triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model. Tumour-bearing mice were treated with i.v. injections of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP (0.3 μg/kg, thrice weekly) in combination with weekly cycles of paclitaxel (10 mg/kg i.p.). After 6 weeks of treatment, combination regimen resulted in greater tumour growth inhibition compared to monotherapy. [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP addition was also associated with reduction of local aggressiveness, and impairment of tumour invasion and infiltration of the skin. Benefits of combined therapy were confirmed in the hormone-independent and metastatic F3II breast cancer model by combining [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP with carmustine (25 mg/kg i.p.). Interestingly, [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP plus cytotoxic agents severely impaired colony forming ability of tumour cells and inhibited breast cancer metastasis to lung. The present study shows that [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP may complement conventional chemotherapy by modulating metastatic progression and early stages of microtumour establishment, and thus supports further preclinical testing of

  8. Addition of vasopressin synthetic analogue [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP to standard chemotherapy enhances tumour growth inhibition and impairs metastatic spread in aggressive breast tumour models.

    PubMed

    Garona, Juan; Pifano, Marina; Pastrian, Maria B; Gomez, Daniel E; Ripoll, Giselle V; Alonso, Daniel F

    2016-08-01

    [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP is a novel 2nd generation vasopressin analogue with robust antitumour activity against metastatic breast cancer. We recently reported that, by acting on vasopressin V2r membrane receptor present in tumour cells and microvascular endothelium, [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP inhibits angiogenesis and metastatic progression of the disease without overt toxicity. Despite chemotherapy remaining as a primary therapeutic option for aggressive breast cancer, its use is limited by low selectivity and associated adverse effects. In this regard, we evaluated potential combinational benefits by adding [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP to standard-of-care chemotherapy. In vitro, combination of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP with sub-IC50 concentrations of paclitaxel or carmustine resulted in a cooperative inhibition of breast cancer cell growth in comparison to single-agent therapy. In vivo antitumour efficacy of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP addition to chemotherapy was first evaluated using the triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model. Tumour-bearing mice were treated with i.v. injections of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP (0.3 μg/kg, thrice weekly) in combination with weekly cycles of paclitaxel (10 mg/kg i.p.). After 6 weeks of treatment, combination regimen resulted in greater tumour growth inhibition compared to monotherapy. [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP addition was also associated with reduction of local aggressiveness, and impairment of tumour invasion and infiltration of the skin. Benefits of combined therapy were confirmed in the hormone-independent and metastatic F3II breast cancer model by combining [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP with carmustine (25 mg/kg i.p.). Interestingly, [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP plus cytotoxic agents severely impaired colony forming ability of tumour cells and inhibited breast cancer metastasis to lung. The present study shows that [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP may complement conventional chemotherapy by modulating metastatic progression and early stages of microtumour establishment, and thus supports further preclinical testing of

  9. Novel genetic aberrations in breast phyllodes tumours: comparison between prognostically distinct groups.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wai Jin; Lai, Johnathan C; Thike, Aye Aye; Lim, Jeffrey Chun Tatt; Tan, Sie Yong; Koh, Valerie Cui Yun; Lim, Tse Hui; Bay, Boon Huat; Tan, Min-Han; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2014-06-01

    Phyllodes tumours of the breast are uncommon fibroepithelial neoplasms which pose management challenges due to difficulties in accurate prediction of clinical behaviour, as histological assessment has its limitations. Molecular studies have improved the understanding of these rare tumours but such findings are scant. We aimed to investigate genetic aberrations in phyllodes tumours stratified according to clinical behaviour, to identify potential genes contributing to disease progression. Twenty phyllodes tumours were separated into prognostically distinct categories depending on whether they had recurred/metastasized within the follow-up period. DNA extracted from FFPE materials was subjected to Affymetrix OncoScan™ FFPE Express molecular inversion probe microarray platform for analysis of copy number changes and mutational status. Results were cross validated with Sanger sequencing, FISH and immunohistochemistry. A higher number of chromosomal aberrations were observed in cases which recurred/metastasized, with median events of 19 compared to 3.5 in cases which did not recur/metastasize. High-level amplification and homozygous deletions were detected exclusively in the former group. Regions of high-level amplification included MDM4 (1q32.1), RAF1 (3p25), EGFR (7p12) and PDZD2 (5p13.3). EGFR amplification was confirmed on FISH and accompanied by intense EGFR immunostaining. Regions of homozygous deletion included CDKN2A (9p21) and MACROD2 (20p12.1). Homozygous deletion of 9p21 which involved CDKN2A was accompanied by loss of protein expression. No mutations were identified in all samples. These findings provide insights into identifying target genes and pathways exploited by phyllodes tumours, which would aid future development of individualised therapy.

  10. Genomic profiling of mitochondrion-rich breast carcinoma: chromosomal changes may be relevant for mitochondria accumulation and tumour biology.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Felipe C; de Biase, Dario; Lambros, Maryou B K; Ragazzi, Moira; Lopez-Garcia, Maria A; Natrajan, Rachael; Mackay, Alan; Kurelac, Ivana; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Ashworth, Alan; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Tallini, Giovanni

    2012-02-01

    Oncocytic carcinomas are composed of mitochondrion-rich cells. Though recognised by the WHO classification as a histological special type of breast cancer, their status as a discrete pathological entity remains a matter of contention. Given that oncocytic tumours of other anatomical sites display distinct clinico-pathological and molecular features, we sought to define the molecular genetic features of mitochondrion-rich breast tumours and to compare them with a series of histological grade- and oestrogen receptor status-matched invasive ductal carcinomas of no special type. Seventeen mitochondrion-rich breast carcinomas, including nine bona fide oncocytic carcinomas, were profiled with antibodies against oestrogen, progesterone and androgen receptors, HER2, Ki67, GCDFP-15, chromogranin, epithelial membrane antigen, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 14, CD68 and mitochondria antigen. These tumours were microdissected and DNA extracted from samples with >70% of tumour cells. Fourteen cases yielded DNA of sufficient quality/quantity and were subjected to high-resolution microarray comparative genomic hybridisation analysis. The genomic profiles were compared to those of 28 grade- and oestrogen receptor status-matched invasive ductal carcinomas of no special type. Oncocytic and other mitochondrion-rich tumours did not differ significantly between themselves. As a group, mitochondrion-rich carcinomas were immunophenotypically heterogenous. Recurrent copy number changes were similar to those described in unselected breast cancers. However, unsupervised and supervised analysis identified a subset of mitochondrion-rich cancers, which often displayed gains of 11q13.1-q13.2 and 19p13. Changes in the latter two chromosomal regions have been shown to be associated with oncocytic tumours of the kidney and thyroid, respectively, and host several nuclear genes with specific mitochondrial function. Our results indicate that in a way akin to oncocytic tumours of other anatomical sites

  11. Involvement of α2- and β2-adrenoceptors on breast cancer cell proliferation and tumour growth regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pérez Piñero, C; Bruzzone, A; Sarappa, MG; Castillo, LF; Lüthy, IA

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE β-Adrenoceptors are expressed in human and experimental animal breast cancer cells. However, the effect of the agonists and antagonists reported on cell proliferation and tumour growth was paradoxical, precluding their utilization as possible adjuvant therapy, mainly in the cases of refractory tumours. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH β-Adrenoceptor expression was analysed by immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. Cell proliferation was assessed by [3H]-thymidine incorporation, tumour growth by measuring with a calliper and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation by Western blotting. KEY RESULTS β2-Adrenoceptor expression was confirmed in the mouse and human cells tested. Cell proliferation was increased by adrenaline (by α2-adrenoceptor action) and decreased in every tested cell line by the β-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline and the β2-adrenoceptor agonist salbutamol. Isoprenaline and salbutamol reduced tumour growth in every tumour tested (mouse C4-HD and CC4-3-HI and human IBH-4, IBH-6 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines growing as xenografts in nude mice). These effects were reversed by the β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol. The α2-adrenoceptor antagonist rauwolscine and the β2-adrenoceptor agonist salbutamol were equally effective in diminishing tumour growth. ERK 1/2 activation analysed in IBH-4 tumours correlated with tumour growth, with the β-adrenoceptor agonists decreasing its activation. Inhibition of ERK 1/2 phosphorylation in vitro was mainly mediated by the PKA pathway. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS In our experimental models, the β-adrenoceptor agonists inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation and tumour growth, probably mediated by inhibition of ERK 1/2 phosphorylation. The β-adrenoceptor agonists were as effective as the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist rauwolscine, providing possible novel adjuvant treatments for breast cancer. PMID:22122228

  12. Exploiting changes in the tumour microenvironment with sequential cytokine and matrix metalloprotease inhibitor treatment in a murine breast cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Scott, K A; Holdsworth, H; Balkwill, F R; Dias, S

    2000-01-01

    The study of treatment-induced changes in the tumour microenvironment might lead to effective combinations of biological therapy. IL-12 induced tumour regression and cure of an experimental murine breast cancer, HTH-K, but only after long-term treatment that was associated with chronic toxicity. During IL-12 therapy, tumour levels of the matrix metalloprotease MMP-9 declined and its inhibitor TIMP-1 was strongly induced. We therefore administered alternate cycles of IL-12 and the MMP inhibitor Batimastat (BB94) to mice. Therapeutic efficacy was increased compared with short-term IL-12 therapy but without the chronic toxicity associated with long-term IL-12 treatment. Image analysis of treated tumours revealed that BB94 prevented regeneration of tumour and stromal compartments that normally occurred after short-term IL-12 therapy. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11076665

  13. Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptors in human breast tumour: localisation and quantification by histo-autoradiographic analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Jammes, H.; Peyrat, J. P.; Ban, E.; Vilain, M. O.; Haour, F.; Djiane, J.; Bonneterre, J.

    1992-01-01

    To assess the precise role of IGF1 in benign and malignant breast diseases, we analysed the tissular localisation, characterised, and quantified specific insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) binding sites in these heterogenous tissues, using histo-autoradiographic analysis (HAA). The 125I-IGF1 binding was performed on frozen tissue sections and analysed using 3H Ultrofilm autoradiography coupled to computerised image analysis. Competitive binding experiments using unlabelled IGF1, IGF2 and insulin showed that the tissues exhibited typical type I IGF binding sites. This specificity was confirmed by the use of alpha IR-3 monoclonal antibody, as inhibitor of 125I-IGF1 binding. IGF1 binding sites were detected in 18 human primary breast cancers, 12 benign breast tumours and two normal breast tissues. Using HAA we found that the human breast carcinomas studied exhibit a specific and high binding capacity for 125I-IGF1 exclusively localised on the proliferative epithelial component. The 125I-IGF1 binding activity of benign breast tumours or normal breast tissue was significantly lower than in cancerous tissues. There was a significant correlation between IGF1-R concentrations detected with HAA and those detected with a classical biochemical method. Moreover, HAA could be useful in further detailing whether a tumour is IGF1-R positive or negative HAA appears to be a useful method for the detection of growth factor receptors, specially in small biopsy specimens. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1323990

  14. Multifractal analysis of tumour microscopic images in the prediction of breast cancer chemotherapy response.

    PubMed

    Vasiljevic, Jelena; Pribic, Jelena; Kanjer, Ksenija; Jonakowski, Wojtek; Sopta, Jelena; Nikolic-Vukosavljevic, Dragica; Radulovic, Marko

    2015-10-01

    Due to the individual heterogeneity, highly accurate predictors of chemotherapy response in invasive breast cancer are needed for effective chemotherapeutic management. However, predictive molecular determinants for conventional chemotherapy are only emerging and still incorporate a high degree of predictive variability. Based on such pressing need for predictive performance improvement, we explored the value of pre-therapy tumour histology image analysis to predict chemotherapy response. Fractal analysis was applied to hematoxylin/eosin stained archival tissue of diagnostic biopsies derived from 106 patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. The tissue was obtained prior to neoadjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy and patients were subsequently divided into three groups according to their actual chemotherapy response: partial pathological response (pPR), pathological complete response (pCR) and progressive/stable disease (PD/SD). It was shown that multifractal analysis of breast tumour tissue prior to chemotherapy indeed has the capacity to distinguish between histological images of the different chemotherapy responder groups with accuracies of 91.4% for pPR, 82.9% for pCR and 82.1% for PD/SD. F(α)max was identified as the most important predictive parameter. It represents the maximum of multifractal spectrum f(α), where α is the Hölder's exponent. This is the first study investigating the predictive value of multifractal analysis as a simple and cost-effective tool to predict the chemotherapy response. Improvements in chemotherapy prediction provide clinical benefit by enabling more optimal chemotherapy decisions, thus directly affecting the quality of life and survival.

  15. The role of tumour markers in predicting skeletal metastases in breast cancer patients with equivocal bone scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Nicolini, A; Ferrari, P; Sagripanti, A; Carpi, A

    1999-01-01

    Bone scintigraphy (BS) is commonly performed in the staging and postoperative monitoring of breast cancer. Nevertheless, due to low specificity it often demonstrates hot spots with equivocal interpretation, which may be misleading in the management of these patients. The aim of this study was to assess the value of a serum tumour marker panel in selecting among the patients with equivocal BS those with bone metastases. Between January 1986 and December 1995, 297 breast cancer patients were followed-up after mastectomy with serial determinations of a CEA-TPA-CA15.3 tumour marker panel, BS and liver echography. The tumour marker panel was used to select patients with equivocal BS for examination of suspicious bone areas by further imaging techniques. Up to December 1995, 158 (53%) patients showed an equivocal BS and 47 patients developed bone metastases. In the 158 patients with equivocal BS, prolonged clinical and imaging follow-up over 45 months (mean; range 12–120) was used to ascertain the presence or absence of bone metastases. In these 158 patients the negative predictive value and positive predictive value of the tumour marker panel to predict bone metastases was 97% and 75% respectively. This study shows that in breast cancer patients the CEA-TPA-CA15.3 tumour marker panel has a high value in selecting those patients with bone metastases, or at high risk of developing clinically-evident bone metastases, among the large number of subjects with equivocal BS. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10188888

  16. Gene expression-based classifications of fibroadenomas and phyllodes tumours of the breast.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Maria; Peg, Vicente; Galván, Patricia; Tres, Alejandro; Cortés, Javier; Ramón y Cajal, Santiago; Rubio, Isabel T; Prat, Aleix

    2015-06-01

    Fibroepithelial tumors (FTs) of the breast are a heterogeneous group of lesions ranging from fibroadenomas (FAD) to phyllodes tumors (PT) (benign, borderline, malignant). Further understanding of their molecular features and classification might be of clinical value. In this study, we analysed the expression of 105 breast cancer-related genes, including the 50 genes of the PAM50 intrinsic subtype predictor and 12 genes of the Claudin-low subtype predictor, in a panel of 75 FTs (34 FADs, 5 juvenile FADs, 20 benign PTs, 5 borderline PTs and 11 malignant PTs) with clinical follow-up. In addition, we compared the expression profiles of FTs with those of 14 normal breast tissues and 49 primary invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs). Our results revealed that the levels of expression of all breast cancer-related genes can discriminate the various groups of FTs, together with normal breast tissues and IDCs (False Discovery Rate < 5%). Among FTs, the levels expression of proliferation-related genes (e.g. CCNB1 and MKI67) and mesenchymal/epithelial-related (e.g. CLDN3 and EPCAM) genes were found to be most discriminative. As expected, FADs showed the highest and lowest expression of epithelial- and proliferation-related genes, respectively, whereas malignant PTs showed the opposite expression pattern. Interestingly, the overall profile of benign PTs was found more similar to FADs and normal breast tissues than the rest of tumours, including juvenile FADs. Within the dataset of IDCs and normal breast tissues, the vast majority of FADs, juvenile FADs, benign PTs and borderline PTs were identified as Normal-like by intrinsic breast cancer subtyping, whereas 7 (63.6%) and 3 (27.3%) malignant PTs were identified as Claudin-low and Basal-like, respectively. Finally, we observed that the previously described PAM50 risk of relapse prognostic score better predicted outcome in FTs than the morphological classification, even within PTs-only. Our results suggest that classification of FTs

  17. Gene expression-based classifications of fibroadenomas and phyllodes tumours of the breast.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Maria; Peg, Vicente; Galván, Patricia; Tres, Alejandro; Cortés, Javier; Ramón y Cajal, Santiago; Rubio, Isabel T; Prat, Aleix

    2015-06-01

    Fibroepithelial tumors (FTs) of the breast are a heterogeneous group of lesions ranging from fibroadenomas (FAD) to phyllodes tumors (PT) (benign, borderline, malignant). Further understanding of their molecular features and classification might be of clinical value. In this study, we analysed the expression of 105 breast cancer-related genes, including the 50 genes of the PAM50 intrinsic subtype predictor and 12 genes of the Claudin-low subtype predictor, in a panel of 75 FTs (34 FADs, 5 juvenile FADs, 20 benign PTs, 5 borderline PTs and 11 malignant PTs) with clinical follow-up. In addition, we compared the expression profiles of FTs with those of 14 normal breast tissues and 49 primary invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs). Our results revealed that the levels of expression of all breast cancer-related genes can discriminate the various groups of FTs, together with normal breast tissues and IDCs (False Discovery Rate < 5%). Among FTs, the levels expression of proliferation-related genes (e.g. CCNB1 and MKI67) and mesenchymal/epithelial-related (e.g. CLDN3 and EPCAM) genes were found to be most discriminative. As expected, FADs showed the highest and lowest expression of epithelial- and proliferation-related genes, respectively, whereas malignant PTs showed the opposite expression pattern. Interestingly, the overall profile of benign PTs was found more similar to FADs and normal breast tissues than the rest of tumours, including juvenile FADs. Within the dataset of IDCs and normal breast tissues, the vast majority of FADs, juvenile FADs, benign PTs and borderline PTs were identified as Normal-like by intrinsic breast cancer subtyping, whereas 7 (63.6%) and 3 (27.3%) malignant PTs were identified as Claudin-low and Basal-like, respectively. Finally, we observed that the previously described PAM50 risk of relapse prognostic score better predicted outcome in FTs than the morphological classification, even within PTs-only. Our results suggest that classification of FTs

  18. The genomic and transcriptomic architecture of 2,000 breast tumours reveals novel subgroups.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Christina; Shah, Sohrab P; Chin, Suet-Feung; Turashvili, Gulisa; Rueda, Oscar M; Dunning, Mark J; Speed, Doug; Lynch, Andy G; Samarajiwa, Shamith; Yuan, Yinyin; Gräf, Stefan; Ha, Gavin; Haffari, Gholamreza; Bashashati, Ali; Russell, Roslin; McKinney, Steven; Langerød, Anita; Green, Andrew; Provenzano, Elena; Wishart, Gordon; Pinder, Sarah; Watson, Peter; Markowetz, Florian; Murphy, Leigh; Ellis, Ian; Purushotham, Arnie; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brenton, James D; Tavaré, Simon; Caldas, Carlos; Aparicio, Samuel

    2012-04-18

    The elucidation of breast cancer subgroups and their molecular drivers requires integrated views of the genome and transcriptome from representative numbers of patients. We present an integrated analysis of copy number and gene expression in a discovery and validation set of 997 and 995 primary breast tumours, respectively, with long-term clinical follow-up. Inherited variants (copy number variants and single nucleotide polymorphisms) and acquired somatic copy number aberrations (CNAs) were associated with expression in ~40% of genes, with the landscape dominated by cis- and trans-acting CNAs. By delineating expression outlier genes driven in cis by CNAs, we identified putative cancer genes, including deletions in PPP2R2A, MTAP and MAP2K4. Unsupervised analysis of paired DNA–RNA profiles revealed novel subgroups with distinct clinical outcomes, which reproduced in the validation cohort. These include a high-risk, oestrogen-receptor-positive 11q13/14 cis-acting subgroup and a favourable prognosis subgroup devoid of CNAs. Trans-acting aberration hotspots were found to modulate subgroup-specific gene networks, including a TCR deletion-mediated adaptive immune response in the ‘CNA-devoid’ subgroup and a basal-specific chromosome 5 deletion-associated mitotic network. Our results provide a novel molecular stratification of the breast cancer population, derived from the impact of somatic CNAs on the transcriptome.

  19. Serum tumour markers as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in Libyan breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Elfagieh, Mohamed; Abdalla, Fathi; Gliwan, Asma; Boder, Jamela; Nichols, Wafa; Buhmeida, Abdelbaset

    2012-12-01

    Results from studies on efficacy of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 15.3 (CA 15.3) and thymidine kinase (TK1) as diagnostic and prognostic tools for primary breast cancer (BC) have presented conflicting results, and usefulness of these markers for clinical use in BC remains unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate potential of concentration of the sera CEA, CA15.3 and TK1 peptides' use as markers in the diagnosis and prognosis of breast lesions of Libyan patients. Serum tumour markers were studied in 20 healthy subjects, 30 patient with benign lesion diseases and 50 patients with histologically confirmed BC diagnosed at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Misurata, Libya during the period 2005-2009. The concentrations of the BC patients' cutoff points used for diagnostic and prognostic sensitivity were 8.82 ng/ml, 35.57 U/ml and 32.57 U/mg/protein for CEA, CA15.3 and TK1, respectively. Increased CEA (>8.82 ng/ml), CA 15.3 (>35.57 U/ml) and TK1 (>32.57 U/mg/protein) concentrations were found in 62 %, 70 % and 78 % of the BC patients, respectively. For all three tumour markers, increased concentrations correlated increased tumour size and nodal involvement. Significantly higher serum TK1 levels were found in patients with advanced disease (p < 0.0001) and TK1 levels also correlated with disease-specific survival (DSS, p < 0.07). The combined data set of the three markers' data from three markers increased the diagnostic sensitivity to 90 %. The serum marker analysis for CEA, CA 15.3, and S-TK1 concentrations is shown to be a useful tool for identification of malignant cases in our BC population and for the prognostic evaluation of patients with primary BC. Increased concentrations of the markers were also observed to be higher in patients with advanced tumours and indicative of the development of distant metastasis.

  20. Tumour marker CA15-3: possible uses in the routine management of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, I P; Whyman, A; Barrett, J A; Kremer, J K

    1995-06-01

    Tumour markers are a potentially powerful means of obtaining information about cancers whilst causing minimal morbidity, inconvenience and cost. CA15-3 has been suggested as a marker of distant metastasis (M+ disease) in breast cancer. We have measured CA15-3 in 77 patients with carcinoma of the breast in order to determine whether routine assay of this tumour marker would be useful in the oncology unit of a district general hospital. A highly significant correlation existed between elevated CA15-3 levels (> or = 30 U/ml) and M+ disease. The CA15-3 assay was found to have a sensitivity of 70%, a specificity of 96% and a predictive value of 87%, in agreement with previous studies. There was evidence that CA15-3 levels frequently increased in advance of otherwise detectable distant metastases. 70 patients had a 99m Tc bone scan close to the date on which CA15-3 was measured. All patients with a positive bone scan and raised levels of CA15-3 were subsequently confirmed as having bony metastases; no patient with normal bone scan and normal CA15-3 developed M+ disease (to the date of follow-up). CA15-3 levels were raised in 83% of patients who developed non-bony distant metastases. In clinical practice it may be possible to exploit the high specificity of CA15-3, in order to provide additional information to that already determined by current investigations. For example, CA15-3 might be assayed alongside a bone scan to confirm positive or negative results. Another role might be as a screen for breast cancer metastases in departments with limited access to bone scans and other imaging facilities. CA15-3 might also be used in monitoring patients for the development of distant metastases during follow-up. It is, however, unlikely that CA15-3 can substitute directly for a bone scan or other imaging currently used routinely by a department. Clinical trials are now necessary to determine the effect of using tumour markers such as CA15-3 on patient morbidity and mortality.

  1. Fc receptor-bearing peripheral blood mononuclear cells in breast cancer patients: a possible marker of tumour burden and prognosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bray, J; McPherson, T A

    1981-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence was used to identify and quantitate peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM) cells possessing high avidity Fc receptors in 105 patients upon referral to the breast cancer clinic at the Cross Cancer Institute. The cell detected was shown to be a non-adherent PBM, probably belonging to the T or null cell population. The mean percentage +/- 2 standard deviations of PBM-positive cells in 75 patients with no disease or benign breast disease was 5.3 +/- ;6.7, and this was significantly (P less than 0.001) less than the percentage found for 31 patients with breast cancer. The percentage of PBM-positive cells correlated directly with tumour burden in patient with small (less than or equal to 5 cm) tumours without regional node or extranodal metastases (5/13 had greater than or equal to 12% positive PBM) and in those with small tumours plus regional node metastases, but without extranodal metastases (8/10 had greater than or equal to 12% positive PBM). This correlation was less, however, in patients with large tumours (greater than 5 cm), and in those with extranodal metastases (4/8 had greater than or equal to 12% positive PBM), and in patients tested postoperatively (1/13 had greater than or equal to 12% positive PBM) even though 6!13 had regional node metastases at the time of surgery. Thus, this relatively simple assay, which can be done on peripheral blood samples, may turn out to be useful in patients with breast cancer as a prognostic marker insofar as it may be an indirect indicator of tumour burden preoperatively. If so, it may lead to a more aggressive postoperative adjuvant therapy approach to the subpopulation of node-negative PBM-positive breast cancer patients than is currently used for node-negative patients. PMID:7035033

  2. Deletion of the amino acid transporter Slc6a14 suppresses tumour growth in spontaneous mouse models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Babu, Ellappan; Bhutia, Yangzom D; Ramachandran, Sabarish; Gnanaprakasam, Jaya P; Prasad, Puttur D; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2015-07-01

    SLC6A14 mediates Na(+)/Cl(-)-coupled concentrative uptake of a broad-spectrum of amino acids. It is expressed at low levels in many tissues but up-regulated in certain cancers. Pharmacological blockade of SLC6A14 causes amino acid starvation in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer cells and suppresses their proliferation in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we interrogated the role of this transporter in breast cancer by deleting Slc6a14 in mice and monitoring the consequences of this deletion in models of spontaneous breast cancer (Polyoma middle T oncogene-transgenic mouse and mouse mammary tumour virus promoter-Neu-transgenic mouse). Slc6a14-knockout mice are viable, fertile and phenotypically normal. The plasma amino acids were similar in wild-type and knockout mice and there were no major compensatory changes in the expression of other amino acid transporter mRNAs. There was also no change in mammary gland development in the knockout mouse. However, when crossed with PyMT-Tg mice or MMTV/Neu (mouse mammary tumour virus promoter-Neu)-Tg mice, the development and progression of breast cancer were markedly decreased on Slc6a14(-/-) background. Analysis of transcriptomes in tumour tissues from wild-type mice and Slc6a14-null mice indicated no compensatory changes in the expression of any other amino acid transporter mRNA. However, the tumours from the null mice showed evidence of amino acid starvation, decreased mTOR signalling and decreased cell proliferation. These studies demonstrate that SLC6A14 is critical for the maintenance of amino acid nutrition and optimal mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling in ER+ breast cancer and that the transporter is a potential target for development of a novel class of anti-cancer drugs targeting amino acid nutrition in tumour cells.

  3. miR-10b*, a master inhibitor of the cell cycle, is down-regulated in human breast tumours

    PubMed Central

    Biagioni, Francesca; Bossel Ben-Moshe, Noa; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Canu, Valeria; Mori, Federica; Antoniani, Barbara; Di Benedetto, Anna; Santoro, Raffaela; Germoni, Sabrina; De Angelis, Fernanda; Cambria, Anna; Avraham, Roi; Grasso, Giuseppe; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Yarden, Yosef; Domany, Eytan; Blandino, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Deregulated proliferation is a hallmark of cancer cells. Here, we show that microRNA-10b* is a master regulator of breast cancer cell proliferation and is downregulated in tumoural samples versus matched peritumoural counterparts. Two canonical CpG islands (5 kb) upstream from the precursor sequence are hypermethylated in the analysed breast cancer tissues. Ectopic delivery of synthetic microRNA-10b* in breast cancer cell lines or into xenograft mouse breast tumours inhibits cell proliferation and impairs tumour growth in vivo, respectively. We identified and validated in vitro and in vivo three novel target mRNAs of miR-10b* (BUB1, PLK1 and CCNA2), which play a remarkable role in cell cycle regulation and whose high expression in breast cancer patients is associated with reduced disease-free survival, relapse-free survival and metastasis-free survival when compared to patients with low expression. This also suggests that restoration of microRNA-10b* expression might have therapeutic promise. PMID:23125021

  4. miR-10b*, a master inhibitor of the cell cycle, is down-regulated in human breast tumours.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, Francesca; Bossel Ben-Moshe, Noa; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Canu, Valeria; Mori, Federica; Antoniani, Barbara; Di Benedetto, Anna; Santoro, Raffaela; Germoni, Sabrina; De Angelis, Fernanda; Cambria, Anna; Avraham, Roi; Grasso, Giuseppe; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Yarden, Yosef; Domany, Eytan; Blandino, Giovanni

    2012-11-01

    Deregulated proliferation is a hallmark of cancer cells. Here, we show that microRNA-10b* is a master regulator of breast cancer cell proliferation and is downregulated in tumoural samples versus matched peritumoural counterparts. Two canonical CpG islands (5 kb) upstream from the precursor sequence are hypermethylated in the analysed breast cancer tissues. Ectopic delivery of synthetic microRNA-10b* in breast cancer cell lines or into xenograft mouse breast tumours inhibits cell proliferation and impairs tumour growth in vivo, respectively. We identified and validated in vitro and in vivo three novel target mRNAs of miR-10b* (BUB1, PLK1 and CCNA2), which play a remarkable role in cell cycle regulation and whose high expression in breast cancer patients is associated with reduced disease-free survival, relapse-free survival and metastasis-free survival when compared to patients with low expression. This also suggests that restoration of microRNA-10b* expression might have therapeutic promise. PMID:23125021

  5. Relationship between tumour shrinkage and reduction in Ki67 expression after primary chemotherapy in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bottini, A; Berruti, A; Bersiga, A; Brizzi, M P; Bruzzi, P; Aguggini, S; Brunelli, A; Bolsi, G; Allevi, G; Generali, D; Betri, E; Bertoli, G; Alquati, P; Dogliotti, L

    2001-01-01

    The association between tumour shrinkage and reduction in kinetic cell activity after primary chemotherapy in human breast cancer is still a matter of investigation. 157 patients with T2-4, N0-1, M0 breast cancer received primary chemotherapy consisting of either the CMF regimen + tamoxifen (the first consecutive 76 cases) or the single agent epirubicin (the subsequent 81). Ki67, p53, bcl2, c-erbB2 and steroid hormone receptors were evaluated immunohistochemically in tumour specimens obtained before chemotherapy and at surgery. Tumour shrinkage of >50% occurred in 72.4% of patients. Ki67 expression significantly decreased after chemotherapy; the reduction correlated with tumour response in both univariate (P < 0.005) and multivariate analysis (P = 0.02). p53, bcl-2, steroid hormone receptor and c-erbB2 immunostaining were scarcely affected. Baseline bcl2 (P = 0.04) and c-erbB2 (P = 0.02) were directly and inversely associated with the reduction in Ki67 immunostaining, respectively. Baseline p53 expression (P < 0.01) was directly related with Ki67 expression at residual tumour, whereas oestrogen receptor expression (P < 0.001) was inversely related. Ki67 at residual tumour was a better predictor for relapse-free survival (RFS) than baseline Ki67. Clinical response (P < 0.03), but not reduction in Ki67, was a significant independent predictor for disease recurrence. Chemotherapy was found to induce tumour shrinkage and to reduce the number of cells in the cell cycle, but its effect on tumour biology/aggressiveness was minimal. Reduction in Ki67 immunostaining correlated with clinical response but failed to be related to RFS. Ki67 expression at surgery rather than at baseline appears to be a better predictor for disease relapse. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign  http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11710821

  6. Chemokine CXCL13 is overexpressed in the tumour tissue and in the peripheral blood of breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Panse, J; Friedrichs, K; Marx, A; Hildebrandt, Y; Luetkens, T; Bartels, K; Horn, C; Stahl, T; Cao, Y; Milde-Langosch, K; Niendorf, A; Kröger, N; Wenzel, S; Leuwer, R; Bokemeyer, C; Hegewisch-Becker, S; Atanackovic, D

    2008-01-01

    The abilities of chemokines in orchestrating cellular migration are utilised by different (patho-)biological networks including malignancies. However, except for CXCR4/CXCL12, little is known about the relation between tumour-related chemokine expression and the development and progression of solid tumours like breast cancer. In this study, microarray analyses revealed the overexpression of chemokine CXCL13 in breast cancer specimens. This finding was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction in a larger set of samples (n=34) and cell lines, and was validated on the protein level performing Western blot, ELISA, and immunohistochemistry. Levels of CXCR5, the receptor for CXCL13, were low in malignant and healthy breast tissues, and surface expression was not detected in vitro. However, we observed a strong (P=0.0004) correlation between the expressions of CXCL13 and CXCR5 in breast cancer tissues, indicating a biologically relevant role of CXCR5 in vivo. Finally, we detected significantly elevated serum concentrations of CXCL13 in patients with metastatic disease (n=54) as compared with controls (n=44) and disease-free patients (n=48). In conclusion, CXCL13 is overexpressed within breast cancer tissues, and increased serum levels of this cytokine can be found in breast cancer patients with metastatic disease pointing to a role of CXCL13 in the progression of breast cancer, suggesting that CXCL13 might serve as a useful therapeutic target and/or diagnostic marker in this malignancy. PMID:18781150

  7. Clinical challenges in the molecular characterization of circulating tumour cells in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lianidou, E S; Mavroudis, D; Georgoulias, V

    2013-06-25

    Blood testing for circulating tumour cells (CTC) has emerged as one of the hottest fields in cancer research. CTC detection and enumeration can serve as a 'liquid biopsy' and an early marker of response to systemic therapy, whereas their molecular characterisation has a strong potential to be translated to individualised targeted treatments and spare breast cancer (BC) patients unnecessary and ineffective therapies. Different analytical systems for CTC detection and isolation have been developed and new areas of research are directed towards developing novel assays for CTC molecular characterisation. Molecular characterisation of single CTC holds considerable promise for predictive biomarker assessment and to explore CTC heterogeneity. The application of extremely powerful next-generation sequencing technologies in the area of CTC molecular characterisation in combination with reliable single CTC isolation opens new frontiers for the management of patients in the near future. This review is mainly focused on the clinical potential of the molecular characterisation of CTC in BC.

  8. Breast sarcomas and malignant phyllodes tumours: comparison of clinicopathological features, treatment strategies, prognostic factors and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sue Zann; Selvarajan, Sathiyamoorthy; Thike, Aye Aye; Nasir, Nur Diyana Binte Md; Tan, Benita Kiat Tee; Ong, Kong Wee; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to compare the clinicopathological features, treatment strategies and clinical outcomes of breast sarcomas (BS) and malignant phyllodes tumours (MPT), and determine their prognostic factors. Cases of BS and MPT diagnosed at the Department of Pathology, Singapore General Hospital from January 1991 to December 2014 were derived from department files. Clinicopathological features, treatment strategies and survivals of patients with BS and MPT were compared. Prognostic indicators for BS and MPT were identified. BS and MPT were comparable in all except one of their clinicopathological features. A significantly higher proportion of BS patients had a history of previous breast carcinoma and thus radiation to the chest as compared to the MPT group (17.6 vs 0 %, P = 0.018). There was no significant difference in survival outcomes between BS and MPT. The 5-year disease-free survivals (DFS) for BS and MPT were 59.1 and 57.4 % respectively (P = 0.816), while the 5-year overall survivals (OS) for BS and MPT were 86.5 and 78.5 % respectively (P = 0.792). Combining both groups of tumours, univariate analysis showed that DFS was significantly affected by multifocality (P = 0.019), histological subtype (P = 0.014), presence of malignant heterologous elements (P < 0.001) and margin status (P = 0.023). Margin status was the only parameter which had a significant impact on OS (P = 0.040). Multivariate analysis confirmed the above findings. BS and MPT are rare entities with remarkable heterogeneity. They share similar clinicopathological features and outcomes, provoking thoughts on their biological relationship and clinical significance of pathologic distinction. PMID:27541020

  9. BRCA1 promoter hypermethylation, 53BP1 protein expression and PARP-1 activity as biomarkers of DNA repair deficit in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Poly(adenosine diphosphate–ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) and the balance between BRCA1 and 53BP1 play a key role in the DNA repair and cell stress response. PARP inhibitors show promising clinical activity in metastatic triple negative (TN) or BRCA-mutated breast cancer. However, a comprehensive analysis of PARP-1 activity, BRCA1 promoter methylation and 53BP1 expression in tumours without known BRCA1 mutation has not yet been carried out. Methods We investigated cytosolic PARP-1 activity, 53BP1 protein levels and BRCA1 promoter methylation in 155 surgical breast tumour samples from patients without familial breast cancer history or known BRCA1 mutations who were treated between January 2006 and November 2009 and evaluated their statistical association with classical predictive and prognostic factors. Results The mitotic count score was the only parameter clearly associated with PARP-1 activity. BRCA1 promoter hypermethylation (15.4% of all cancers) was significantly associated with uPA and PAI-1 levels, tumour grade, mitotic count score, hormone receptor and HER2 negative status and TN profile (29% of TN tumours showed BRCA1 promoter hypermethylation compared to 5% of grade II-III hormone receptor-positive/HER2-negative and 2% of HER2-positive tumours). No statistical association was found between BRCA1 promoter hypermethylation and PARP-1 activity. High 53BP1 protein levels correlated with lymph node positivity, hormone receptor positivity, molecular grouping, unmethylated BRCA1 promoter and PARP-1 activity. In TN tumours, BRCA1 promoter methylation was only marginally associated with age, PARP-1 activity was not associated with any of the tested clinico-pathological factors and high 53BP1 protein levels were significantly associated with lymph node positivity. Only 3 of the 14 TN tumours with BRCA1 promoter hypermethylation presented high 53BP1 protein levels. Conclusions Breast cancers that harbour simultaneously high 53BP1 protein level and BRCA1

  10. Deep tissue volume imaging of birefringence through fibre-optic needle probes for the delineation of breast tumour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villiger, Martin; Lorenser, Dirk; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Quirk, Bryden C.; Kirk, Rodney W.; Bouma, Brett E.; Sampson, David D.

    2016-07-01

    Identifying tumour margins during breast-conserving surgeries is a persistent challenge. We have previously developed miniature needle probes that could enable intraoperative volume imaging with optical coherence tomography. In many situations, however, scattering contrast alone is insufficient to clearly identify and delineate malignant regions. Additional polarization-sensitive measurements provide the means to assess birefringence, which is elevated in oriented collagen fibres and may offer an intrinsic biomarker to differentiate tumour from benign tissue. Here, we performed polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography through miniature imaging needles and developed an algorithm to efficiently reconstruct images of the depth-resolved tissue birefringence free of artefacts. First ex vivo imaging of breast tumour samples revealed excellent contrast between lowly birefringent malignant regions, and stromal tissue, which is rich in oriented collagen and exhibits higher birefringence, as confirmed with co-located histology. The ability to clearly differentiate between tumour and uninvolved stroma based on intrinsic contrast could prove decisive for the intraoperative assessment of tumour margins.

  11. Deep tissue volume imaging of birefringence through fibre-optic needle probes for the delineation of breast tumour

    PubMed Central

    Villiger, Martin; Lorenser, Dirk; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Quirk, Bryden C.; Kirk, Rodney W.; Bouma, Brett E.; Sampson, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying tumour margins during breast-conserving surgeries is a persistent challenge. We have previously developed miniature needle probes that could enable intraoperative volume imaging with optical coherence tomography. In many situations, however, scattering contrast alone is insufficient to clearly identify and delineate malignant regions. Additional polarization-sensitive measurements provide the means to assess birefringence, which is elevated in oriented collagen fibres and may offer an intrinsic biomarker to differentiate tumour from benign tissue. Here, we performed polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography through miniature imaging needles and developed an algorithm to efficiently reconstruct images of the depth-resolved tissue birefringence free of artefacts. First ex vivo imaging of breast tumour samples revealed excellent contrast between lowly birefringent malignant regions, and stromal tissue, which is rich in oriented collagen and exhibits higher birefringence, as confirmed with co-located histology. The ability to clearly differentiate between tumour and uninvolved stroma based on intrinsic contrast could prove decisive for the intraoperative assessment of tumour margins. PMID:27364229

  12. Deep tissue volume imaging of birefringence through fibre-optic needle probes for the delineation of breast tumour.

    PubMed

    Villiger, Martin; Lorenser, Dirk; McLaughlin, Robert A; Quirk, Bryden C; Kirk, Rodney W; Bouma, Brett E; Sampson, David D

    2016-01-01

    Identifying tumour margins during breast-conserving surgeries is a persistent challenge. We have previously developed miniature needle probes that could enable intraoperative volume imaging with optical coherence tomography. In many situations, however, scattering contrast alone is insufficient to clearly identify and delineate malignant regions. Additional polarization-sensitive measurements provide the means to assess birefringence, which is elevated in oriented collagen fibres and may offer an intrinsic biomarker to differentiate tumour from benign tissue. Here, we performed polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography through miniature imaging needles and developed an algorithm to efficiently reconstruct images of the depth-resolved tissue birefringence free of artefacts. First ex vivo imaging of breast tumour samples revealed excellent contrast between lowly birefringent malignant regions, and stromal tissue, which is rich in oriented collagen and exhibits higher birefringence, as confirmed with co-located histology. The ability to clearly differentiate between tumour and uninvolved stroma based on intrinsic contrast could prove decisive for the intraoperative assessment of tumour margins. PMID:27364229

  13. Prognostic significance of epithelial-mesenchymal transition proteins Twist and Foxc2 in phyllodes tumours of the breast.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeffrey Chun Tatt; Koh, Valerie Cui Yun; Tan, Jane Sie Yong; Tan, Wai Jin; Thike, Aye Aye; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2015-02-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), an important process during embryonic development, is reportedly exploited during tumour progression. Deregulation of EMT-related molecules has been shown in many malignancies, including breast carcinoma. We aim to investigate the clinical relevance and prognostic significance of EMT proteins, Twist and Foxc2, in breast phyllodes tumours (PTs). The study cohort comprised 271 PTs diagnosed from 2003 to 2010. Of these, 188 (69.4 %) were benign, 60 (22.1 %) borderline, and 23 (8.5 %) malignant. Immunohistochemistry for Twist and Foxc2 was performed on tissue microarray sections. Percentage of tumour cells stained was evaluated and correlated with clinicopathological parameters and clinical outcome. Twist and Foxc2 stromal nuclear expression was associated with tumour grade (P = 0.038 and 0.012). Foxc2 stromal nuclear expression was positively correlated with epithelial expression (P < 0.001), tumour relapse, and metastasis (P = 0.037). Furthermore, stromal nuclear immunoreactivity of Twist and Foxc2 was interrelated (P < 0.001). Tumours expressing Foxc2 and those co-expressing both Twist and Foxc2 revealed a shorter time to recurrence (P < 0.001 and 0.001) and death (P = 0.044 and 0.015). Twist and Foxc2 stromal expression in PTs was significantly correlated with tumour grade and worse histological features. In addition, expression of Foxc2 and co-expression of Twist and Foxc2 in the stroma of PTs contributed to poorer prognosis. Clinical relevance of EMT-related molecules may be worthy of further investigation in PTs.

  14. Prognostic significance of epithelial-mesenchymal transition proteins Twist and Foxc2 in phyllodes tumours of the breast.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeffrey Chun Tatt; Koh, Valerie Cui Yun; Tan, Jane Sie Yong; Tan, Wai Jin; Thike, Aye Aye; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2015-02-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), an important process during embryonic development, is reportedly exploited during tumour progression. Deregulation of EMT-related molecules has been shown in many malignancies, including breast carcinoma. We aim to investigate the clinical relevance and prognostic significance of EMT proteins, Twist and Foxc2, in breast phyllodes tumours (PTs). The study cohort comprised 271 PTs diagnosed from 2003 to 2010. Of these, 188 (69.4 %) were benign, 60 (22.1 %) borderline, and 23 (8.5 %) malignant. Immunohistochemistry for Twist and Foxc2 was performed on tissue microarray sections. Percentage of tumour cells stained was evaluated and correlated with clinicopathological parameters and clinical outcome. Twist and Foxc2 stromal nuclear expression was associated with tumour grade (P = 0.038 and 0.012). Foxc2 stromal nuclear expression was positively correlated with epithelial expression (P < 0.001), tumour relapse, and metastasis (P = 0.037). Furthermore, stromal nuclear immunoreactivity of Twist and Foxc2 was interrelated (P < 0.001). Tumours expressing Foxc2 and those co-expressing both Twist and Foxc2 revealed a shorter time to recurrence (P < 0.001 and 0.001) and death (P = 0.044 and 0.015). Twist and Foxc2 stromal expression in PTs was significantly correlated with tumour grade and worse histological features. In addition, expression of Foxc2 and co-expression of Twist and Foxc2 in the stroma of PTs contributed to poorer prognosis. Clinical relevance of EMT-related molecules may be worthy of further investigation in PTs. PMID:25677742

  15. Epstein-Barr Virus, Human Papillomavirus and Mouse Mammary Tumour Virus as Multiple Viruses in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Wendy K.; Heng, Benjamin; Delprado, Warick; Iacopetta, Barry; Whitaker, Noel J.; Lawson, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this investigation is to determine if Epstein Barr virus (EBV), high risk human papillomavirus (HPV), and mouse mammary tumour viruses (MMTV) co-exist in some breast cancers. Materials and Methods All the specimens were from women residing in Australia. For investigations based on standard PCR, we used fresh frozen DNA extracts from 50 unselected invasive breast cancers. For normal breast specimens, we used DNA extracts from epithelial cells from milk donated by 40 lactating women. For investigations based on in situ PCR we used 27 unselected archival formalin fixed breast cancer specimens and 18 unselected archival formalin fixed normal breast specimens from women who had breast reduction surgery. Thirteen of these fixed breast cancer specimens were ductal carcinoma in situ (dcis) and 14 were predominantly invasive ductal carcinomas (idc). Results EBV sequences were identified in 68%, high risk HPV sequences in 50%, and MMTV sequences in 78% of DNA extracted from 50 invasive breast cancer specimens. These same viruses were identified in selected normal and breast cancer specimens by in situ PCR. Sequences from more than one viral type were identified in 72% of the same breast cancer specimens. Normal controls showed these viruses were also present in epithelial cells in human milk – EBV (35%), HPV, 20%) and MMTV (32%) of 40 milk samples from normal lactating women, with multiple viruses being identified in 13% of the same milk samples. Conclusions We conclude that (i) EBV, HPV and MMTV gene sequences are present and co-exist in many human breast cancers, (ii) the presence of these viruses in breast cancer is associated with young age of diagnosis and possibly an increased grade of breast cancer. PMID:23183846

  16. An adaptive microwave phased array for targeted heating of deep tumours in intact breast: animal study results.

    PubMed

    Fenn, A J; Wolf, G L; Fogle, R M

    1999-01-01

    It has previously been reported in phantoms, that an adaptive radiofrequency phased array can generate deep focused heating distributions without overheating the skin and superficial healthy tissues. The present study involves adaptive microwave phased array hyperthermia tests in animals (rabbits) with and without tumours. The design of the adaptive phased array as applied to the treatment of tumours in intact breast, is described. The adaptive phased array concept uses breast compression and dual-opposing 915 MHz air-cooled waveguide applicators with electronic phase shifters and electric-field feedback, to focus automatically by computer control the microwave radiation in deep tissue. Temperature measurements for a clinical adaptive phased array hyperthermia system demonstrate tissue heating at depth with reduced skin heating.

  17. Breast-specific gamma imaging as an adjunct modality for the diagnosis of invasive breast cancer with correlation to tumour size and grade

    PubMed Central

    Tadwalkar, R V; Rapelyea, J A; Torrente, J; Rechtman, L R; Teal, C B; Mcswain, A P; Donnelly, C; Kidwell, A B; Coffey, C M; Brem, R F

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity of breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) in the detection of invasive breast cancers and to characterise the sensitivity of BSGI based on tumour size and pathological grade. Methods 139 females with invasive carcinoma who underwent BSGI were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were injected in the antecubital vein with 20–30 mCi (925–1110 MBq) of 99mTc-sestamibi. Images were obtained with a high-resolution, breast-specific gamma camera (Dilon 6800; Dilon Technologies, Newport News, VA) and were categorised based on radiotracer uptake as normal, normal with heterogeneous uptake, probably abnormal and abnormal. For a positive examination, the region of the area of increased uptake had to correlate with the laterality and location of the biopsy-proven cancer. Results 149 invasive cancers in 139 patients with a mean size of 1.8 cm (0.2–8.5 cm) were included. 146 were identified with BSGI (98.0%). All cancers which measured ≥0.7 cm (n=123) as well as all cancers grade 2 or higher (n=102), regardless of tumour size, were identified with BSGI (100%). There were 6 cancers that were pathological grade 1 and measured <7 mm, of which 50% (3/6) were identified with BSGI. The overall sensitivity of BSGI for the detection of invasive breast cancer is 98.0%. The sensitivity for subcentimetre cancers is 88.5% (23/26). Conclusion BSGI has a high sensitivity for the detection of invasive breast cancer. Our results demonstrate that BSGI detected all invasive breast cancers pathological grade 2 and higher regardless of size and all cancers which measured ≥7 mm regardless of grade. BSGI can reliably detect invasive breast cancers and is a useful adjunct imaging modality for the diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:21712429

  18. Breast Cancer Update 2014 – Focus on the Patient and the Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Maass, N.; Schütz, F.; Fasching, P. A.; Fehm, T.; Janni, W.; Kümmel, S.; Kolberg, H.-C.; Lüftner, D.; Wallwiener, M.; Lux, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    The therapy for patients with breast cancer has developed markedly in the past ten years. Our understanding of the molecular biology of tumours and the characteristics of the patients has shaped the recent advances. In this review we present the latest knowledge about the therapy for breast cancer. There are new tests and options not only in the field of anti-HER2 therapy but also in the management of triple negative and hormone receptor-positive patients. Comprehension of prognosis and therapeutic response to chemotherapies is little by little helping to define patient groups who will not respond to chemotherapy or who do not need treatment because their prognosis is extremely good. In the field of anti-HER2 therapy, work is continuing on the development of drugs suitable for and able to overcome trastuzumab resistance. For hormone receptor-positive cancers, we now have a better understanding of which therapy groups will benefit from which anti-endocrine drugs, and which will be able to overcome a possible resistance (treatment of the PI3K pathways, inhibition of the cell cycle). Molecular tests are still being evaluated with regard to the clinical situations in which they may have the greatest relevance for therapeutic decision-making; however, evidence is also increasing as to the fields in which good predictions for the prognosis can be obtained. On the whole, more work is needed to promote our understanding of the new developments in diagnostics and therapy and to involve both physicians and patients equally in the procedures. PMID:25797960

  19. Tumour-Associated Autoantibodies as Diagnostic Biomarkers for Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xia, J; Shi, J; Wang, P; Song, C; Wang, K; Zhang, J; Ye, H

    2016-06-01

    Tumour-associated autoantibodies may be promising biomarkers that could facilitate breast cancer (BC) diagnosis and improve patient outcomes. This review aims to identify the tumour-associated autoantibodies with the greatest diagnostic potential. Systematic searches were conducted using PubMed and Web of Science. The most studied tumour-associated autoantibody was included in a meta-analysis, and its clinical value was determined using Fagan's nomogram. The analysis included 84 studies regarding tumour-associated autoantibodies with the diagnostic value. Anti-p53 antibody was the most frequently studied autoantibody, followed by autoantibodies against MUC1, HER2 and cyclin B1. Although individual tumour-associated autoantibodies showed low diagnostic sensitivity, combinations of autoantibodies offered relatively high sensitivity. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was the most common detection method, and nucleic acid programmable protein microarrays appeared preferable to common protein microarrays. As the most commonly studied autoantibody, anti-p53 antibody was included in a meta-analysis. When it had been detected using ELISA and cut-off values were defined as the mean +2 or 3 standard deviations, the summary area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the presence of BC was 0.78. Fagan's nomogram showed post-test probabilities of 32% and 6% for positive and negative results, respectively. Mammography might be supplemented by the use of tumour-associated autoantibodies as biomarkers for BC diagnosis in younger women with increased risks of BC. Even though several studies have investigated the diagnostic use of tumour-associated autoantibodies as biomarkers for BC detection, a high-quality prospective study is needed to validate their diagnostic value in practice. PMID:26991924

  20. Cytogenetic analysis of multifocal breast carcinomas: detection of karyotypically unrelated clones as well as clonal similarities between tumour foci.

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, M. R.; Pandis, N.; Bardi, G.; Andersen, J. A.; Mandahl, N.; Mitelman, F.; Heim, S.

    1994-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis was performed on short-term cell cultures of two foci (A and B) from each of three multifocal breast carcinomas. In case I, four clones (three related and one unrelated) were detected in sample A. In sample B, two of the three related clones and the unrelated clone seen in A were found, as was also a third subclone showing a pattern of clonal evolution slightly different from that detected in A. In cases II and III, multiple cytogenetically unrelated clones were found in A and B, with only one clone being shared by both foci in each case. Our finding of cytogenetic similarities between macroscopically distinct tumour lesions indicates that the multifocality reflects intramammary tumour spread rather than the synchronous emergence of pathogenetically independent carcinomas within the same breast. On the other hand, the detection of karyotypic heterogeneity in the form of cytogenetically unrelated clones in all foci suggests that human breast carcinoma may be polyclonal. This polyclonality may be part of the explanation for the cellular heterogeneity commonly seen at the phenotypic level in breast cancer. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7947098

  1. Detection of HER2 amplification in circulating free DNA in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Page, K; Hava, N; Ward, B; Brown, J; Guttery, D S; Ruangpratheep, C; Blighe, K; Sharma, A; Walker, R A; Coombes, R C; Shaw, J A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is amplified and overexpressed in 20–25% of breast cancers. This study investigated circulating free DNA (cfDNA) for detection of HER2 gene amplification in patients with breast cancer. Methods: Circulating free DNA was extracted from plasma of unselected patients with primary breast cancer (22 before surgery and 68 following treatment), 30 metastatic patients and 98 female controls using the QIAamp Blood DNA Mini Kit (Qiagen). The ratio of HER2 to an unamplified reference gene (contactin-associated protein 1 (CNTNAP1)) was measured in cfDNA samples by quantitative PCR (qPCR) using SK-BR-3 cell line DNA as a positive control. Results: We validated the qPCR assay with DNA extracted from 23 HER2 3+ and 40 HER2-negative tumour tissue samples; the results agreed for 60 of 63 (95.2%) tumours. Amplification was detected in cfDNA for 8 of 68 patients following primary breast cancer treatment and 5 of 30 metastatic patients, but was undetected in 22 patients with primary breast cancer and 98 healthy female controls. Of the patients with amplification in cfDNA, 10 had HER2 3+ tumour status by immunohistochemistry. Conclusions: The results demonstrate for the first time the existence of amplified HER2 in cfDNA in the follow-up of breast cancer patients who are otherwise disease free. This approach could potentially provide a marker in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:21427727

  2. Fully automated microvessel counting and hot spot selection by image processing of whole tumour sections in invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Beliën, J A; Somi, S; de Jong, J S; van Diest, P J; Baak, J P

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Manual counting of microvessels is subjective and may lead to unacceptable interobserver variability, which may explain conflicting results. AIMS: To develop and test an automated method for microvessel counting and objective selection of the hot spot, based on image processing of whole sections, and to compare this with manual selection of a hot spot and counting of microvessels. METHODS: Microvessels were stained by CD31 immunohistochemistry in 10 cases of invasive breast cancer. The number of microvessels was counted manually in a subjectively selected hot spot, and also in the same complete tumour sections by interactive and automated image processing methods. An algorithm identified the hot spots from microvessel maps of the whole tumour section. RESULTS: No significant difference in manual microvessel counts was found between two observers within the same hot spot, and counts were significantly correlated. However, when the hot spot was reselected, significantly different results were found between repeated counts by the same observer. Counting all microvessels manually within the entire tumour section resulted in significantly different hot spots than manual counts in selected hot spots by the same observer. Within the entire tumour section no significant differences were found between the hot spots of the manual and automated methods using an automated microscope. The hot spot was found using an eight connective path search algorithm, was located at or near the border of the tumour, and (depending on the size of the hot spot) did not always contain the field with the largest number of microvessels. CONCLUSIONS: The automated counting of microvessels is preferable to the manual method because of the reduction in measurement time when the complete tumour is scanned, the greater accuracy and objectivity of hot spot selection, and the possibility of visual inspection and relocation of each measurement field afterwards. Images PMID:10450177

  3. Oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and growth factors in breast cancer: novel targets for diagnosis, prognosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Callahan, R; Salomon, D S

    1993-01-01

    The complexity of growth factors and growth factor receptors that are aberrantly expressed, as well as the mutational events that either directly cause or influence the expression of these and other gene products, should provide in the near future multiple diagnostic, prognostic indicators or targets for therapeutic intervention. It seems reasonable to expect that soon the search for aberrantly expressed gene products in breast cancer cells will merge with the search and characterization of somatic mutations that are selected during tumour progression. Clearly, the current rapid development of new molecular biological methodologies aimed at detecting and cloning of RNA sequences that are aberrantly expressed in breast tumour cells, as well as molecular probes and reagents to detect and physically map mutated genes on affected chromosomes, should accelerate the effort to identify targets for therapeutic intervention. We are at the beginning of this learning curve, but already several potential target gene products have been identified. A major challenge will be to sort out those approaches and reagents that appear efficacious on the basis of results from in vitro and in vivo model systems that will actually have an impact on the treatment of the disease in the clinic. Reagents that target some of these gene products are currently in clinical trials; however, there are others such as immunotherapy against the mutated TP53 protein and human CG treatment of high risk breast cancer patients that warrant testing in this context.

  4. Effect of human, bovine and ovine prolactin on DNA synthesis by organ cultures of benign human breast tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Welsch, C. W.; Dombroske, S. E.; McManus, M. J.; Calaf, G.

    1979-01-01

    Ten benign breast tumours from 9 female patients (8 with fibrocystic disease and 1 with fibroadenoma) and 1 male patient (with gynaecomastia) were processed into slices and individually cultured for 2 days in serum-free Medium 199. [3H]-TdR was added to the culture medium to assess DNA synthesis. The addition of human prolactin to the culture medium (500 ng/ml) significantly (0.05 greater than P greater than 0.01) increased DNA synthesis; all 9 biopsy specimens from the 9 female patients responded positively to this hormone. Ovine prolactin (500 ng/ml) and bovine prolactin (500 ng/ml) increased the mean incorporation of [3H]-TdR into extracted DNA and increased the mean number of [3H]-TdR-labelled cells, but this increase did not reach the 5% level of probability. The sole case of male breast dysplasia analysed in this study did not respond to either human, ovine or bovine prolactin. These results provide evidence that human prolactin and, to a lesser degree, ovine and bovine prolactin are direct mitogenic stimulants to the epithelium in human (female) benign breast tumours. PMID:575047

  5. Towards intra-operative diagnosis of tumours during breast conserving surgery by selective-sampling Raman micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Kenny; Zaabar, Fazliyana; Rakha, Emad; Ellis, Ian; Koloydenko, Alexey; Notingher, Ioan

    2014-10-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is increasingly employed for the treatment of early stage breast cancer. One of the key challenges in BCS is to ensure complete removal of the tumour while conserving as much healthy tissue as possible. In this study we have investigated the potential of Raman micro-spectroscopy (RMS) for automated intra-operative evaluation of tumour excision. First, a multivariate classification model based on Raman spectra of normal and malignant breast tissue samples was built and achieved diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma (DC) with 95.6% sensitivity and 96.2% specificity (5-fold cross-validation). The tumour regions were discriminated from the healthy tissue structures based on increased concentration of nucleic acids and reduced concentration of collagen and fat. The multivariate classification model was then applied to sections from fresh tissue of new patients to produce diagnosis images for DC. The diagnosis images obtained by raster scanning RMS were in agreement with the conventional histopathology diagnosis but were limited to long data acquisition times (typically 10 000 spectra mm-2, which is equivalent to ~5 h mm-2). Selective-sampling based on integrated auto-fluorescence imaging and Raman spectroscopy was used to reduce the number of Raman spectra to ~20 spectra mm-2, which is equivalent to an acquisition time of ~15 min for 5 × 5 mm2 tissue samples. This study suggests that selective-sampling Raman microscopy has the potential to provide a rapid and objective intra-operative method to detect mammary carcinoma in tissue and assess resection margins.

  6. Optimization of the accuracy of retention and washout measurements of 99mTc-Sestamibi from breast tumours using an anthropomorphic phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Christopher; Griffiths, Peter A.

    2005-05-01

    Quantifying the retention or washout of 99mTc-Sestamibi (MIBI) in breast tumours in vivo may provide a basis for predicting the chemotherapy response. The aim of this study is to investigate the variations and limitations of the different methods used to quantify these parameters. A phantom was developed that allowed the modelling of MIBI pharmacokinetics in both the breast tumour and normal breast tissue. Washout and retention were calculated from tumour uptake values based on (1) background corrected counts or (2) total counts in the tumour region of interest (ROI), or (3) tumour to background ratios (TBR), or (4) normalized TBR (nTBR). Method 1 was the most accurate method of quantification whilst method 3 was the most inaccurate. The accuracy of method 1 was independent of the times at which images were acquired, but three sources of error are identified involving incorrect background selection, ROI reproducibility and inconsistent temporal separation of images. In conclusion, background subtracted tumour counts should be used in the calculation of MIBI retention or washout. Accurate results are dependent on selecting the appropriate background, drawing consistent ROIs and using reproducible time intervals between images.

  7. Anti-nicastrin monoclonal antibodies elicit pleiotropic anti-tumour pharmacological effects in invasive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Filipović, Aleksandra; Lombardo, Ylenia; Faronato, Monica; Fronato, Monica; Abrahams, Joel; Aboagye, Eric; Nguyen, Quang-De; d'Aqua, Barbara Borda; Ridley, Anne; Green, Andrew; Rahka, Emad; Ellis, Ian; Recchi, Chiara; Przulj, Natasa; Sarajlić, Anida; Alattia, Jean-Rene; Fraering, Patrick; Deonarain, Mahendra; Coombes, R Charles

    2014-11-01

    The goal of targeted cancer therapies is to specifically block oncogenic signalling, thus maximising efficacy, while reducing side-effects to patients. The gamma-secretase (GS) complex is an attractive therapeutic target in haematological malignancies and solid tumours with major pharmaceutical activity to identify optimal inhibitors. Within GS, nicastrin (NCSTN) offers an opportunity for therapeutic intervention using blocking monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Here we explore the role of anti-nicastrin monoclonal antibodies, which we have developed as specific, multi-faceted inhibitors of proliferation and invasive traits of triple-negative breast cancer cells. We use 3D in vitro proliferation and invasion assays as well as an orthotopic and tail vail injection triple-negative breast cancer in vivo xenograft model systems. RNAScope assessed nicastrin in patient samples. Anti-NCSTN mAb clone-2H6 demonstrated a superior anti-tumour efficacy than clone-10C11 and the RO4929097 small molecule GS inhibitor, acting by inhibiting GS enzymatic activity and Notch signalling in vitro and in vivo. Confirming clinical relevance of nicastrin as a target, we report evidence of increased NCSTN mRNA levels by RNA in situ hybridization (RNAScope) in a large cohort of oestrogen receptor negative breast cancers, conferring independent prognostic significance for disease-free survival, in multivariate analysis. We demonstrate here that targeting NCSTN using specific mAbs may represent a novel mode of treatment for invasive triple-negative breast cancer, for which there are few targeted therapeutic options. Furthermore, we propose that measuring NCSTN in patient samples using RNAScope technology may serve as companion diagnostic for anti-NCSTN therapy in the clinic. PMID:25248409

  8. Multiple molecular and cellular changes associated with tumour stasis and regression during IL-12 therapy of a murine breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Dias, S; Thomas, H; Balkwill, F

    1998-01-01

    IL-12 treatment of a murine transplantable breast carcinoma (HTH-K) led to tumour regression and cure which was related to the duration of treatment. We studied the sequential molecular and phenotypic changes in IL-12-treated tumours. IFN-gamma mRNA was detected 8 hr after the first treatment. mRNA expression for the IFN-gamma-inducible genes beta 2-microglobulin and indoleamine dioxygenase (IDO) was induced subsequently, together with the chemokine IP-10. IL-12-treated tumours had an abundant cellular infiltrate, consisting mainly of CD8+ T cells. mRNA for granzyme B and perforin also could be detected, suggesting that those cells were activated. After 7 days of daily therapy, tumours in IL-12-treated mice had a significant reduction in vasculature. Finally, the number of apoptotic tumour cells increased throughout IL-12 treatment. We compared the anti-tumour effects of IL-12 to those induced by IFN-gamma therapy, which caused initial tumour stasis but subsequent tumour progression. IFN-gamma induced beta 2-microglobulin and IDO over a 7-day period, but IP-10 was induced only transiently. IFN-gamma caused a lesser cellular infiltrate, a minor anti-angiogenic effect and a transient apoptotic effect. The success of IL-12 may be due to its ability to produce a distinct sequence of molecular and phenotypic changes in tumours, leading to an anti-tumour immune response, toxicity against tumour cells and an anti-angiogenic effect. Other cytokines, such as IFN-gamma, induce some, but not all, of these actions. Comparison of IL-12 and IFN-gamma suggests that sustained induction of IP-10 and activation of a resulting cellular infiltrate may be key changes in regressing tumours. PMID:9426704

  9. ERCC1 and telomere status in breast tumours treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and their association with patient prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Gay‐Bellile, Mathilde; Romero, Pierre; Cayre, Anne; Véronèse, Lauren; Privat, Maud; Singh, Shalini; Combes, Patricia; Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Abrial, Catherine; Bignon, Yves‐Jean; Vago, Philippe; Penault‐Llorca, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dysfunctional telomeres and DNA damage repair (DDR) play important roles in cancer progression. Studies have reported correlations between these factors and tumour aggressiveness and clinical outcome in breast cancer. We studied the characteristics of telomeres and expression of ERCC1, a protein involved in a number of DNA repair pathways and in telomere homeostasis, to assess their prognostic value, alone or in combination, in 90 residual breast tumours after treatment with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT). ERCC1 status was investigated at different molecular levels (protein and gene expression and gene copy‐number variations) by immunohistochemistry, qRT‐PCR and quantitative multiplex fluorescent‐PCR (QMF‐PCR). A comprehensive analysis of telomere characteristics was performed using qPCR for telomere length and qRT‐PCR for telomerase (hTERT), tankyrase 1 (TNKS) and shelterin complex (TRF1, TRF2, POT1, TPP1, RAP1 and TIN2) gene expression. Short telomeres, high hTERT and TNKS expression and low ERCC1 protein expression were independently associated with worse survival outcome. Interestingly, ERCC1 gains and losses correlated with worse disease‐free (p = 0.026) and overall (p = 0.043) survival as compared to survival of patients with normal gene copy‐numbers. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of all ERCC1 and telomere parameters identified four subgroups with distinct prognosis. In particular, a cluster combining low ERCC1, ERCC1 gene alterations, dysfunctional telomeres and high hTERT and a cluster with high TNKS and shelterin expression correlated with poor disease‐free (HR= 5.41, p= 0.0044) and overall survival (HR= 6.01, p= 0.0023) irrespective of tumour stage and grade. This comprehensive study demonstrates that telomere dysfunction and DDR can contribute synergistically to tumour progression and chemoresistance. These parameters are predictors of clinical outcome in breast cancer patients treated with NCT and could be useful

  10. RO4929097 and Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy or Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Brain Metastases From Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-22

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. Tumour-targeted delivery of TRAIL using Salmonella typhimurium enhances breast cancer survival in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ganai, S; Arenas, R B; Forbes, N S

    2009-01-01

    Background: An effective cancer therapeutic must selectively target tumours with minimal systemic toxicity. Expression of a cytotoxic protein using Salmonella typhimurium would enable spatial and temporal control of delivery because these bacteria preferentially target tumours over normal tissue. Methods: We engineered non-pathogenic S. typhimurium to secrete murine TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) under the control of the prokaryotic radiation-inducible RecA promoter. The response of the RecA promoter to radiation was measured using fluorometry and immunoblotting. TRAIL toxicity was determined using flow cytometry and by measuring caspase-3 activation. A syngeneic murine tumour model was used to determine bacterial accumulation and the response to expressed TRAIL. Results: After irradiation, engineered S. typhimurium secreted TRAIL, which caused caspase-3-mediated apoptosis and death in 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells in culture. Systemic injection of Salmonella and induction of TRAIL expression using 2 Gy γ-irradiation caused a significant delay in mammary tumour growth and reduced the risk of death by 76% when compared with irradiated controls. Repeated dosing with TRAIL-bearing Salmonella in conjunction with radiation improved the 30-day survival from 0 to 100%. Conclusion: These results show the pre-clinical utility of S. typhimurium as a TRAIL expression vector that effectively reduces tumour growth and extends host survival. PMID:19861961

  12. AP-2γ promotes proliferation in breast tumour cells by direct repression of the CDKN1A gene

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Christopher M J; Scibetta, Angelo G; Friedrich, J Karsten; Canosa, Monica; Berlato, Chiara; Moss, Charlotte H; Hurst, Helen C

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of the activator protein (AP)-2γ transcription factor in breast tumours has been identified as an independent predictor of poor outcome and failure of hormone therapy. To understand further the function of AP-2γ in breast carcinoma, we have used an RNA interference and gene expression profiling strategy with the MCF-7 cell line as a model. Gene expression changes between control and silenced cells implicate AP-2γ in the control of cell cycle progression and developmental signalling. A function for AP-2γ in cell cycle control was verified using flow cytometry: AP-2γ silencing led to a partial G1/S arrest and induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21cip/CDKN1A. Reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated a direct, functional interaction by AP-2γ at the CDKN1A proximal promoter. AP-2γ silencing coincided with acquisition of an active chromatin conformation at the CDKN1A locus and increased gene expression. These data provide a mechanism whereby AP-2γ overexpression can promote breast epithelial proliferation and, coupled with previously published data, suggest how loss of oestrogen regulation of AP-2γ may contribute to the failure of hormone therapy in patients. PMID:19798054

  13. Consensus Analysis of Whole Transcriptome Profiles from Two Breast Cancer Patient Cohorts Reveals Long Non-Coding RNAs Associated with Intrinsic Subtype and the Tumour Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Angela; Bernard, Philip; Camp, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as crucial regulators of cellular processes and diseases such as cancer; however, their functions remain poorly characterised. Several studies have demonstrated that lncRNAs are typically disease and tumour subtype specific, particularly in breast cancer where lncRNA expression alone is sufficient to discriminate samples based on hormone status and molecular intrinsic subtype. However, little attempt has been made to assess the reproducibility of lncRNA signatures across more than one dataset. In this work, we derive consensus lncRNA signatures indicative of breast cancer subtype based on two clinical RNA-Seq datasets: the Utah Breast Cancer Study and The Cancer Genome Atlas, through integration of differential expression and hypothesis-free clustering analyses. The most consistent signature is associated with breast cancers of the basal-like subtype, leading us to generate a putative set of six lncRNA basal-like breast cancer markers, at least two of which may have a role in cis-regulation of known poor prognosis markers. Through in silico functional characterization of individual signatures and integration of expression data from pre-clinical cancer models, we discover that discordance between signatures derived from different clinical cohorts can arise from the strong influence of non-cancerous cells in tumour samples. As a consequence, we identify nine lncRNAs putatively associated with breast cancer associated fibroblasts, or the immune response. Overall, our study establishes the confounding effects of tumour purity on lncRNA signature derivation, and generates several novel hypotheses on the role of lncRNAs in basal-like breast cancers and the tumour microenvironment. PMID:27685983

  14. Wide-field optical coherence elastography for intraoperative assessment of tumour margins in breast cancer (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Wes M.; Chin, Lixin; Sampson, David D.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2016-03-01

    Incomplete excision of tumour margins is a major issue in breast-conserving surgery. Currently 20 - 60% of cases require a second surgical procedure required as a result of cancer recurrence. A number of techniques have been proposed to assess margin status, including frozen section analysis and imprint cytology. However, the recurrence rate after using these techniques remains very high. Over the last several years, our group has been developing optical coherence elastography (OCE) as a tool for the intraoperative assessment of tumour margins in breast cancer. We have reported a feasibility study on 65 ex vivo samples from patients undergoing mastectomy or wide local excision demonstrates the potential of OCE in differentiating benign from malignant tissue. In this study, malignant tissue was readily distinguished from surrounding relative tissue by a distinctive heterogeneous pattern in micro-elastograms. To date the largest field of view for a micro-elastogram is 20 x 20mm, however, lumpectomy samples are typically ~50 x 50 x 30mm. For OCE to progress as a useful clinical tool, elastograms must be acquired over larger areas to allow a greater portion of the surface area of lumpectomies to be assessed. Here, we propose a wide-field OCE scanner that utilizes a piezoelectric transducer with an internal diameter of 65mm. In this approach partially overlapped elastograms are stitched together forming a mosaic with overall dimensions of 50 x 50mm in a total acquisition time of 15 - 30 minutes. We present results using this approach on both tissue-mimicking phantoms and tissue, and discuss prospects for shorter acquisitions times.

  15. Estrogen, progesterone, and HER2/neu receptor discordance between primary and metastatic breast tumours-a review.

    PubMed

    Yeung, C; Hilton, J; Clemons, M; Mazzarello, S; Hutton, B; Haggar, F; Addison, C L; Kuchuk, I; Zhu, X; Gelmon, K; Arnaout, A

    2016-09-01

    Discordance in estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and HER2/neu status between primary breast tumours and metastatic disease is well recognized. In this review, we highlight how receptor discordance between primary tumours and paired metastasis can help elucidate the mechanism of metastasis but can also effect patient management and the design of future trials. Discordance rates and ranges were available from 47 studies (3384 matched primary and metastatic pairs) reporting ER, PR, and HER2/neu expression for both primary and metastatic sites. Median discordance rates for ER, PR, and HER2/neu were 14 % (range 0-67 %, IQR 9-25 %), 21 % (range 0-62 %, IQR 15-41 %), and 10 % (range 0-44 %, IQR 4-17 %), respectively. Loss of receptor expression was more common (9.17 %) than gain (4.51 %). Discordance rates varied amongst site of metastasis with ER discordance being highest in bone metastases suggesting that discordance is a true biological phenomenon. Discordance rates vary for both the biomarker and the metastatic site. Loss of expression is more common than gain. This can affect patient management as it can lead to a reduction in both the efficacy and availability of potential therapeutic agents. Future studies are recommended to explore both the mechanisms of discordance as well as its impact on patient outcome and management.

  16. Expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG), TNF related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) in human breast tumours

    PubMed Central

    Van Poznak, C; Cross, S S; Saggese, M; Hudis, C; Panageas, K S; Norton, L; Coleman, R E; Holen, I

    2006-01-01

    Background Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is involved in the regulation of bone turnover through binding to the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), and has also been reported to be a potential survival factor for several different cell types. The survival effects are mediated through inhibition of the activity of tumour necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). Both breast and prostate cancer cells produce sufficient amounts of OPG to be protected against the effects of TRAIL in vitro. Aims To investigate the spatial expression of OPG, RANKL, and TRAIL in non‐neoplastic breast tissue and breast cancer, and its relation with oestrogen receptor (ER) expression. Methods Forty breast cancers (20 ER+, 20 ER−) and five non‐neoplastic breast tissue samples were stained with antibodies against OPG, RANKL, and TRAIL. Results OPG was not expressed in non‐neoplastic breast tissue except when colocalised with altered columnar epithelium. RANKL was expressed at the apical surface of luminal epithelial cells and TRAIL was expressed in myoepithelial cells. All three proteins were expressed in some breast cancers but showed no significant association with tumour type. OPG expression showed a significant positive correlation with ER expression (p = 0.011). Conclusions This is the first published study of the spatial expression of OPG, RANKL, and TRAIL in breast tissue and breast cancer. The localisation of each protein was specific and they were not colocalised. This specificity may provide a useful marker of functional differentiation in breast cancer; for example, TRAIL expression as a marker of myoepithelial differentiation. PMID:16394281

  17. The FGF-1-specific single-chain antibody scFv1C9 effectively inhibits breast cancer tumour growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hengliang; Fu, Chunling; Wang, Wei; Li, Yu; Du, Shuang; Cao, Rangjuan; Chen, Jingying; Sun, Dong; Zhang, Zhongyu; Wang, Xingzhi; Zhu, Xiaojuan

    2014-01-01

    Immunotherapy mediated by recombinant antibodies is an effective therapeutic strategy for a variety of cancers. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF-1)-specific recombinant antibody scFv1C9 arrests the cell cycle at the G0/G1 transition by blocking the intracrine FGF-1 pathway in breast cancer cells. Here, we further show that the overexpression of scFv1C9 in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells by lentiviral infection resulted in decreased tumourigenicity, tumour growth and lung metastasis through FGF-1 neutralization. We found that scFv1C9 resulted in the up-regulation of p21, which in turn inhibited the expression of CDK2 and blocked cell cycle progression. To explore the potential role of scFv1C9 in vivo, we delivered the gene into solid tumours by electroporation, which resulted in significant inhibition of tumour growth. In tumour tissue sections, immunohistochemical staining of the cellular proliferation marker Ki-67 and the microvessel marker CD31 showed a reduction in the proliferative index and microvessel density, respectively, upon expression of scFv1C9 compared with the appropriate controls. Thus, our data indicate a central role for scFv1C9 in blocking the intracrine pathway of FGF-1, therefore, scFv1C9 could be developed in an effective therapeutic for breast cancer. PMID:25124967

  18. A Clinicopathological Study of Benign Phyllodes Tumour of Breast with Emphasis on Unusual Features

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Benign Phyllodes Tumours (PTs) are rare fibroepithelial neoplasms that resemble fibroadenoma. But unlike fibroadenoma, benign PT can recur and both stromal & epithelial components can progress to malignancy. Contrary to earlier belief that benign PT is a stromal neoplasm and possibly arises from fibroadenoma, more recent molecular studies have suggested that both stroma and epithelium can become neoplastic. Sometimes, benign PT can occur synchronously with fibroadenoma. Here histomorphologic analysis of eleven cases of benign PT are presented including some unusual features. Materials and Methods Eleven cases of benign PT diagnosed between Dec 2014 and Jan 2016 in the Department of Pathology were studied. The demographic and clinicopathological features were analysed. Results The most common age group affected was 20-30 years (range: 13-45). Clinical features included pain, lump and bleeding from nipple. The tumour size varied from 2.5-18 cm in diameter. H&E stained sections showed secondary changes (haemorrhage, myxoid, change, cystic degeneration), epithelial hyperplasia (8), squamous & columnar metaplasia (1), benign tubular adenoma like areas (1), Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) (1), Invasive Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) (1), Pseudoangiomatous Stromal Hyperplasia (PASH) (1), histologic infarction (2), tumour necrosis (1) and synchronous fibroadenoma (1). Unusual histologic features included atypical ductal hyperplasia, DCIS, IDC, synchronous fibroadenoma and tubular adenoma like areas arising within benign PT. Conclusion This study shows a spectrum of hyperplastic, metaplastic, dysplastic, benign, in-situ-malignancy and even invasive ductal malignancy occurring in benign PT. Therefore adequate and extensive sampling is recommended for accurate diagnosis. PMID:27630851

  19. Minimal residual disease in breast cancer: an overview of circulating and disseminated tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Tachtsidis, A; McInnes, L M; Jacobsen, N; Thompson, E W; Saunders, C M

    2016-08-01

    Within the field of cancer research, focus on the study of minimal residual disease (MRD) in the context of carcinoma has grown exponentially over the past several years. MRD encompasses circulating tumour cells (CTCs)-cancer cells on the move via the circulatory or lymphatic system, disseminated tumour cells (DTCs)-cancer cells which have escaped into a distant site (most studies have focused on bone marrow), and resistant cancer cells surviving therapy-be they local or distant, all of which may ultimately give rise to local relapse or overt metastasis. Initial studies simply recorded the presence and number of CTCs and DTCs; however recent advances are allowing assessment of the relationship between their persistence, patient prognosis and the biological properties of MRD, leading to a better understanding of the metastatic process. Technological developments for the isolation and analysis of circulating and disseminated tumour cells continue to emerge, creating new opportunities to monitor disease progression and perhaps alter disease outcome. This review outlines our knowledge to date on both measurement and categorisation of MRD in the form of CTCs and DTCs with respect to how this relates to cancer outcomes, and the hurdles and future of research into both CTCs and DTCs.

  20. Minimal residual disease in breast cancer: an overview of circulating and disseminated tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Tachtsidis, A; McInnes, L M; Jacobsen, N; Thompson, E W; Saunders, C M

    2016-08-01

    Within the field of cancer research, focus on the study of minimal residual disease (MRD) in the context of carcinoma has grown exponentially over the past several years. MRD encompasses circulating tumour cells (CTCs)-cancer cells on the move via the circulatory or lymphatic system, disseminated tumour cells (DTCs)-cancer cells which have escaped into a distant site (most studies have focused on bone marrow), and resistant cancer cells surviving therapy-be they local or distant, all of which may ultimately give rise to local relapse or overt metastasis. Initial studies simply recorded the presence and number of CTCs and DTCs; however recent advances are allowing assessment of the relationship between their persistence, patient prognosis and the biological properties of MRD, leading to a better understanding of the metastatic process. Technological developments for the isolation and analysis of circulating and disseminated tumour cells continue to emerge, creating new opportunities to monitor disease progression and perhaps alter disease outcome. This review outlines our knowledge to date on both measurement and categorisation of MRD in the form of CTCs and DTCs with respect to how this relates to cancer outcomes, and the hurdles and future of research into both CTCs and DTCs. PMID:27189371

  1. A Clinicopathological Study of Benign Phyllodes Tumour of Breast with Emphasis on Unusual Features

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Benign Phyllodes Tumours (PTs) are rare fibroepithelial neoplasms that resemble fibroadenoma. But unlike fibroadenoma, benign PT can recur and both stromal & epithelial components can progress to malignancy. Contrary to earlier belief that benign PT is a stromal neoplasm and possibly arises from fibroadenoma, more recent molecular studies have suggested that both stroma and epithelium can become neoplastic. Sometimes, benign PT can occur synchronously with fibroadenoma. Here histomorphologic analysis of eleven cases of benign PT are presented including some unusual features. Materials and Methods Eleven cases of benign PT diagnosed between Dec 2014 and Jan 2016 in the Department of Pathology were studied. The demographic and clinicopathological features were analysed. Results The most common age group affected was 20-30 years (range: 13-45). Clinical features included pain, lump and bleeding from nipple. The tumour size varied from 2.5-18 cm in diameter. H&E stained sections showed secondary changes (haemorrhage, myxoid, change, cystic degeneration), epithelial hyperplasia (8), squamous & columnar metaplasia (1), benign tubular adenoma like areas (1), Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) (1), Invasive Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) (1), Pseudoangiomatous Stromal Hyperplasia (PASH) (1), histologic infarction (2), tumour necrosis (1) and synchronous fibroadenoma (1). Unusual histologic features included atypical ductal hyperplasia, DCIS, IDC, synchronous fibroadenoma and tubular adenoma like areas arising within benign PT. Conclusion This study shows a spectrum of hyperplastic, metaplastic, dysplastic, benign, in-situ-malignancy and even invasive ductal malignancy occurring in benign PT. Therefore adequate and extensive sampling is recommended for accurate diagnosis.

  2. Predictive diagnosis of the risk of breast cancer recurrence after surgery by single-particle quantum dot imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gonda, Kohsuke; Miyashita, Minoru; Higuchi, Hideo; Tada, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Watanabe, Mika; Ishida, Takanori; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer, the prognosis of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive patients (20–25%) has been dramatically improved by the clinical application of the anti-HER2 antibody drugs trastuzumab and pertuzumab. However, the clinical outcomes of HER2-negative cases with a poor prognosis have not improved, and novel therapeutic antibody drugs or diagnostic molecular markers of prognosis are urgently needed. Here, we targeted protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) as a new biomarker for HER2-negative patients. The developed anti-PAR1 antibody inhibited PAR1 activation by matrix metalloprotease 1 and thereby prevented cancer-cell migration and invasion. To estimate PAR1 expression levels in HER2-negative patient tissues using the antibody, user-friendly immunohistochemistry with fluorescence nanoparticles or quantum dots (QDs) was developed. Previously, immunohistochemistry with QDs was affected by tissue autofluorescence, making quantitative measurement extremely difficult. We significantly improved the quantitative sensitivity of immunohistochemistry with QDs by using an autofluorescence-subtracted image and single-QD imaging. The immunohistochemistry showed that PAR1 expression was strongly correlated with relapse-free survival time in HER2-negative breast cancer patients. Therefore, the developed anti-PAR1 antibody is a strong candidate for use as an anticancer drug and a prognostic biomarker for HER2-negative patients. PMID:26392299

  3. Predictive diagnosis of the risk of breast cancer recurrence after surgery by single-particle quantum dot imaging.

    PubMed

    Gonda, Kohsuke; Miyashita, Minoru; Higuchi, Hideo; Tada, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Tomonobu M; Watanabe, Mika; Ishida, Takanori; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer, the prognosis of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive patients (20-25%) has been dramatically improved by the clinical application of the anti-HER2 antibody drugs trastuzumab and pertuzumab. However, the clinical outcomes of HER2-negative cases with a poor prognosis have not improved, and novel therapeutic antibody drugs or diagnostic molecular markers of prognosis are urgently needed. Here, we targeted protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) as a new biomarker for HER2-negative patients. The developed anti-PAR1 antibody inhibited PAR1 activation by matrix metalloprotease 1 and thereby prevented cancer-cell migration and invasion. To estimate PAR1 expression levels in HER2-negative patient tissues using the antibody, user-friendly immunohistochemistry with fluorescence nanoparticles or quantum dots (QDs) was developed. Previously, immunohistochemistry with QDs was affected by tissue autofluorescence, making quantitative measurement extremely difficult. We significantly improved the quantitative sensitivity of immunohistochemistry with QDs by using an autofluorescence-subtracted image and single-QD imaging. The immunohistochemistry showed that PAR1 expression was strongly correlated with relapse-free survival time in HER2-negative breast cancer patients. Therefore, the developed anti-PAR1 antibody is a strong candidate for use as an anticancer drug and a prognostic biomarker for HER2-negative patients. PMID:26392299

  4. Role of HER2 mutations in refractory metastatic breast cancers: targeted sequencing results in patients with refractory breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hae Hyun; Choi, Yoon-La; Ahn, TaeJin; Park, Kyunghee; Lee, Aeri; Do, In-Gu; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Woong-Yang; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2015-01-01

    In women with metastatic breast cancer (MBC), introduction of the anti-HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor-2) directed therapies including trastuzumab, pertuzumab, lapatinib, and/or trastuzumab-DM1 has markedly improved overall survival. However, not all cases of HER2-positive breast tumours derive similar benefit from HER2-directed therapy, and a significant number of patients experience disease progression because of primary or acquired resistance to anti-HER2-directed therapies. We integrated genomic and clinicopathological analyses in a cohort of patients with refractory breast cancer to anti-HER2 therapies to identify the molecular basis for clinical heterogeneity. To study the molecular basis underlying refractory MBC, we obtained 36 MBC tumours tissues and used next-generation sequencing to investigate the mutational and transcriptional profiles of 83 genes. We focused on HER2 mutational sites and HER2 pathways to identify the roles of HER2 mutations and the HER2 pathway in the refractoriness to anti-HER2 therapies. Analysis using massively parallel sequencing platform, CancerSCAN™, revealed that HER2 mutations were found in six of 36 patients (16.7%). One patient was ER (estrogen receptor)-positive and HER2-negative and the other five HER2 mutated patients were HER2-positive and HR (hormone receptor)-negative. Most importantly, four of these five patients did not show any durable clinical response to HER2-directed therapies. The HER2 pathway score obtained through transcriptional analyses identified that Growth Receptor Biding protein 2 (GRB2) was the most significantly down regulated gene in the HER2 mutated samples. Detection of HER2 mutations using higher deep DNA sequencing may identify a predictive biomarker of resistance to HER2-directed therapy. Functional validation is warranted. PMID:26397225

  5. Fractal analysis for assessing tumour grade in microscopic images of breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambasco, Mauro; Costello, Meghan; Newcomb, Chris; Magliocco, Anthony M.

    2007-03-01

    In 2006, breast cancer is expected to continue as the leading form of cancer diagnosed in women, and the second leading cause of cancer mortality in this group. A method that has proven useful for guiding the choice of treatment strategy is the assessment of histological tumor grade. The grading is based upon the mitosis count, nuclear pleomorphism, and tubular formation, and is known to be subject to inter-observer variability. Since cancer grade is one of the most significant predictors of prognosis, errors in grading can affect patient management and outcome. Hence, there is a need to develop a breast cancer-grading tool that is minimally operator dependent to reduce variability associated with the current grading system, and thereby reduce uncertainty that may impact patient outcome. In this work, we explored the potential of a computer-based approach using fractal analysis as a quantitative measure of cancer grade for breast specimens. More specifically, we developed and optimized computational tools to compute the fractal dimension of low- versus high-grade breast sections and found them to be significantly different, 1.3+/-0.10 versus 1.49+/-0.10, respectively (Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, p<0.001). These results indicate that fractal dimension (a measure of morphologic complexity) may be a useful tool for demarcating low- versus high-grade cancer specimens, and has potential as an objective measure of breast cancer grade. Such prognostic value could provide more sensitive and specific information that would reduce inter-observer variability by aiding the pathologist in grading cancers.

  6. The sodium channel β1 subunit mediates outgrowth of neurite-like processes on breast cancer cells and promotes tumour growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michaela; Millican-Slater, Rebecca; Forrest, Lorna C; Brackenbury, William J

    2014-11-15

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) are heteromeric proteins composed of pore-forming α subunits and smaller β subunits. The β subunits are multifunctional channel modulators and are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). β1, encoded by SCN1B, is best characterized in the central nervous system (CNS), where it plays a critical role in regulating electrical excitability, neurite outgrowth and migration during development. β1 is also expressed in breast cancer (BCa) cell lines, where it regulates adhesion and migration in vitro. In the present study, we found that SCN1B mRNA/β1 protein were up-regulated in BCa specimens, compared with normal breast tissue. β1 upregulation substantially increased tumour growth and metastasis in a xenograft model of BCa. β1 over-expression also increased vascularization and reduced apoptosis in the primary tumours, and β1 over-expressing tumour cells had an elongate morphology. In vitro, β1 potentiated outgrowth of processes from BCa cells co-cultured with fibroblasts, via trans-homophilic adhesion. β1-mediated process outgrowth in BCa cells required the presence and activity of fyn kinase, and Na(+) current, thus replicating the mechanism by which β1 regulates neurite outgrowth in CNS neurons. We conclude that when present in breast tumours, β1 enhances pathological growth and cellular dissemination. This study is the first demonstration of a functional role for β1 in tumour growth and metastasis in vivo. We propose that β1 warrants further study as a potential biomarker and targeting β1-mediated adhesion interactions may have value as a novel anti-cancer therapy.

  7. A new human breast cancer cell line, KPL-3C, secretes parathyroid hormone-related protein and produces tumours associated with microcalcifications in nude mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kurebayashi, J.; Kurosumi, M.; Sonoo, H.

    1996-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is the main cause of humoral hypercalcaemia of malignancy (HHM). We recently established a new human breast cancer cell line, designated KPL-3C, from the malignant effusion of a breast cancer patient with HHM. Morphological, cytogenetic and immunohistochemical analyses indicated that the cell line is derived from human breast cancer. The KPL-3C cells stably secrete immunoreactive PTHrP measured by a two-site immunoradiometric assay, possess both oestrogen and progesterone receptors and are tumorigenic in female nude mice. The addition of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate to the medium significantly increased PTHrP secretion from the cells. In contrast, hydrocortisone, medroxyprogesterone acetate and 22-oxacalcitriol decreased PTHrP secretion in a dose-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, a number of microcalcifications were observed in the transplanted tumours. Radiographical examination indicated that the microcalcifications in the tumours are very similar to those commonly observed in human breast cancer. These findings suggest that this KPL-3C cell line may be useful for studying the regulatory mechanisms of PTHrP secretion and the mechanisms that lead to the deposition of microcalcifications in breast cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:8688322

  8. Biochemical signatures of in vitro radiation response in human lung, breast and prostate tumour cells observed with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Q.; Jirasek, A.; Lum, J. J.; Brolo, A. G.

    2011-11-01

    This work applies noninvasive single-cell Raman spectroscopy (RS) and principal component analysis (PCA) to analyze and correlate radiation-induced biochemical changes in a panel of human tumour cell lines that vary by tissue of origin, p53 status and intrinsic radiosensitivity. Six human tumour cell lines, derived from prostate (DU145, PC3 and LNCaP), breast (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7) and lung (H460), were irradiated in vitro with single fractions (15, 30 or 50 Gy) of 6 MV photons. Remaining live cells were harvested for RS analysis at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h post-irradiation, along with unirradiated controls. Single-cell Raman spectra were acquired from 20 cells per sample utilizing a 785 nm excitation laser. All spectra (200 per cell line) were individually post-processed using established methods and the total data set for each cell line was analyzed with PCA using standard algorithms. One radiation-induced PCA component was detected for each cell line by identification of statistically significant changes in the PCA score distributions for irradiated samples, as compared to unirradiated samples, in the first 24-72 h post-irradiation. These RS response signatures arise from radiation-induced changes in cellular concentrations of aromatic amino acids, conformational protein structures and certain nucleic acid and lipid functional groups. Correlation analysis between the radiation-induced PCA components separates the cell lines into three distinct RS response categories: R1 (H460 and MCF7), R2 (MDA-MB-231 and PC3) and R3 (DU145 and LNCaP). These RS categories partially segregate according to radiosensitivity, as the R1 and R2 cell lines are radioresistant (SF2 > 0.6) and the R3 cell lines are radiosensitive (SF2 < 0.5). The R1 and R2 cell lines further segregate according to p53 gene status, corroborated by cell cycle analysis post-irradiation. Potential radiation-induced biochemical response mechanisms underlying our RS observations are proposed, such as (1) the regulated

  9. Effect of Tumour Necrosis Factor-Alpha on Estrogen Metabolic Pathways in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Marwa; Shouman, Samia; El-Merzebany, Mahmoud; Kilic, Gokhan; Veenstra, Timothy; Saeed, Muhammad; Wagih, Mohamed; Diaz-Arrastia, Concepcion; Patel, Deepa; Salama, Salama

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a proinflammatory cytokine that has been linked to breast cancer development. Estrogen metabolic pathway is also involved in breast carcinogenesis and DNA adducts formation. In this study we investigated the effect of TNF-α on the estrogen metabolic pathway in MCF-7, a breast cancer cell line. Capillary liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were used for analysis of estrogen metabolites and estrogen-DNA adducts levels respectively. Reporter gene assay, Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real time RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to assess the expression of estrogen metabolizing genes and enzymes. TNF-α significantly increased the total EM and decreased the estrone (E1) / 17-β estradiol (E2) ratio. Moreover, it altered the expression of genes and enzymes involved in E2 activation and deactivation pathways e.g. Cytochrome P-450 1A1 (CYP1A1), Cytochrome P-450 1B1 (CYP1B1), Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) and Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). In addition, there were increased levels of some catechol estrogens e.g. 4-hydroxy-estrone (4-OHE1) and 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2) with decreased levels of methylated catechols e.g. 2-methoxy estradiol (2-MeOE2). DNA adducts especially 4-OHE1-[2]-1-N3 Adenine was significantly increased. TNF-α directs the estrogen metabolism into more hormonally active and carcinogenic products in MCF-7. This may implicate a new possible explanation for inflammation associated breast cancer. PMID:22866165

  10. Glycosyltransferases as marker genes for the quantitative polymerase chain reaction-based detection of circulating tumour cells from blood samples of patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Kölbl, Alexandra C; Hiller, Roman A; Ilmer, Mathias; Liesche, Friederike; Heublein, Sabine; Schröder, Lennard; Hutter, Stefan; Friese, Klaus; Jeschke, Udo; Andergassen, Ulrich

    2015-08-01

    Altered glycosylation is a predominant feature of tumour cells; it serves for cell adhesion and detachment, respectively, and facilitates the immune escape of these cells. Therefore changes in the expression of glycosyltransferase genes could help to identify circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in the blood samples of cancer patients using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach. Blood samples of healthy donors were inoculated with certain numbers of established breast cancer cell line cells, thus creating a model system. These samples were analysed by quantitative PCR for the expression of six different glycosyltransferase genes. The three genes with the best results in the model system were consecutively applied to samples from adjuvant breast cancer patients and of healthy donors. FUT3 and GALNT6 showed the highest increase in relative expression, while GALNT6 and ST3GAL3 were the first to reach statistically significant different ∆CT-values comparing the sample with and without addition of tumour cells. These three genes were applied to patient samples, but did not show any significant results that may suggest the presence of CTCs in the blood. Although the relative expression of some of the glycosyltransferase genes exhibited reasonable results in the model system, their application to breast cancer patient samples will have to be further improved, e.g. by co-analysis of patient blood samples by gold-standard methods.

  11. Even With Very Small Breast Tumors, Studies Find HER2 Status Matters | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Two retrospective studies have found that women with HER2-positive breast tumors (that is, tumors that produce too much of the HER2 protein) that are 1 centimeter or smaller had a higher risk of their disease returning within 5 years than women with similarly small HER2-negative tumors. |

  12. Refining Post-Surgical Therapy for Women with Lymph Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, women with HER2-negative, HR-positive breast cancer and 1-3 positive lymph nodes with recurrence scores of 25 or lower will be randomized to undergo adjuvant chemotherapy before starting endocrine therapy or to begin endocrine therapy.

  13. Predictive value of c-erbB-2, p53, cathepsin-D and histology of the primary tumour in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Niskanen, E.; Blomqvist, C.; Franssila, K.; Hietanen, P.; Wasenius, V. M.

    1997-01-01

    The value of various prognostic factors in breast cancer patients has been determined in a number of studies. Few reports have been published on the dependence of treatment outcome on histological and immunohistochemical characteristics in the primary tumour in patients with metastatic disease. We studied the incidence and prognostic value of histological and molecular abnormalities in the primary tumour of patients who had developed metastatic breast cancer. Eligible patients received a fluorouracil, epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (FEC) regimen either once a week or once every 4 weeks. Adequate specimens for various analyses were available from 127 patients. Median follow-up time of the patients ranged from 15 to 101 months. In this study, the histological grade of the malignancy best predicted response to chemotherapy (P < 0.0005). Most of the responses were observed in patients with grade 1 tumours; in this group, time to progression was delayed. C-erb B-2 gene amplification and oncoprotein expression had no predictive value. Neither p53 nor cathepsin-D predicted treatment outcome after chemotherapy. None of the factors had an effect on overall survival. Among breast cancer patients who received anthracycline-containing chemotherapy, response to treatment correlated with histological grade. In patients with histological grade 1 breast cancer, the time to progression was longest. However, overall survival was not affected by histological grade nor the other parameters tested. In addition to histological grade, other prognostic factors that are not included in this study need to be identified to determine which patients with metastatic breast cancer would benefit from cytotoxic treatment. PMID:9328152

  14. RUNX2 correlates with subtype-specific breast cancer in a human tissue microarray, and ectopic expression of Runx2 perturbs differentiation in the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Laura; Ferrari, Nicola; Terry, Anne; Bell, Margaret; Mohammed, Zahra M; Orange, Clare; Jenkins, Alma; Muller, William J; Gusterson, Barry A; Neil, James C; Edwards, Joanne; Morris, Joanna S; Cameron, Ewan R; Blyth, Karen

    2014-05-01

    RUNX2, a master regulator of osteogenesis, is oncogenic in the lymphoid lineage; however, little is known about its role in epithelial cancers. Upregulation of RUNX2 in cell lines correlates with increased invasiveness and the capacity to form osteolytic disease in models of breast and prostate cancer. However, most studies have analysed the effects of this gene in a limited number of cell lines and its role in primary breast cancer has not been resolved. Using a human tumour tissue microarray, we show that high RUNX2 expression is significantly associated with oestrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR)/HER2-negative breast cancers and that patients with high RUNX2 expression have a poorer survival rate than those with negative or low expression. We confirm RUNX2 as a gene that has a potentially important functional role in triple-negative breast cancer. To investigate the role of this gene in breast cancer, we made a transgenic model in which Runx2 is specifically expressed in murine mammary epithelium under the control of the mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV) promoter. We show that ectopic Runx2 perturbs normal development in pubertal and lactating animals, delaying ductal elongation and inhibiting lobular alveolar differentiation. We also show that the Runx2 transgene elicits age-related, pre-neoplastic changes in the mammary epithelium of older transgenic animals, suggesting that elevated RUNX2 expression renders such tissue more susceptible to oncogenic changes and providing further evidence that this gene might have an important, context-dependent role in breast cancer.

  15. Circulating tumour cells: insights into tumour heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hayes, D F; Paoletti, C

    2013-08-01

    Tumour heterogeneity is a major barrier to cure breast cancer. It can exist between patients with different intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer or within an individual patient with breast cancer. In the latter case, heterogeneity has been observed between different metastatic sites, between metastatic sites and the original primary tumour, and even within a single tumour at either a metastatic or a primary site. Tumour heterogeneity is a function of two separate, although linked, processes. First, genetic instability is a hallmark of malignancy, and results in 'fixed' genetic changes that are almost certainly carried forward through progression of the cancer over time, with increasingly complex additional genetic changes in new metastases as they arise. The second type of heterogeneity is due to differential but 'plastic' expression of various genes important in the biology and response to various therapies. Together, these processes result in highly variable cancers with differential response, and resistance, to both targeted (e.g. endocrine or anti-human epithelial growth receptor type 2 (HER2) agents) and nontargeted therapies (e.g. chemotherapy). Ideally, tumour heterogeneity would be monitored over time, especially in relation to therapeutic strategies. However, biopsies of metastases require invasive and costly procedures, and biopsies of multiple metastases, or serially over time, are impractical. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) represent a potential surrogate for tissue-based cancer and therefore might provide the opportunity to monitor serial changes in tumour biology. Recent advances have enabled accurate and reliable quantification and molecular characterization of CTCs with regard to a number of important biomarkers including oestrogen receptor alpha and HER2. Preliminary data have demonstrated that expression of these markers between CTCs in individual patients with metastatic breast cancer reflects the heterogeneity of the underlying tumours. Future

  16. A randomised controlled phase II trial of pre-operative celecoxib treatment reveals anti-tumour transcriptional response in primary breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is frequently over-expressed in primary breast cancer. In transgenic breast cancer models, over-expression of COX-2 leads to tumour formation while COX-2 inhibition exerts anti-tumour effects in breast cancer cell lines. To further determine the effect of COX-2 inhibition in primary breast cancer, we aimed to identify transcriptional changes in breast cancer tissues of patients treated with the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib. Methods In a single-centre double-blind phase II study, thirty-seven breast cancer patients were randomised to receive either pre-operative celecoxib (400 mg) twice daily for two to three weeks (n = 22) or a placebo according to the same schedule (n = 15). Gene expression in fresh-frozen pre-surgical biopsies (before treatment) and surgical excision specimens (after treatment) was profiled by using Affymetrix arrays. Differentially expressed genes and altered pathways were bioinformatically identified. Expression of selected genes was validated by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Immunohistochemical protein expression analyses of the proliferation marker Ki-67, the apoptosis marker cleaved caspase-3 and the neo-angiogenesis marker CD34 served to evaluate biological response. Results We identified 972 and 586 significantly up- and down-regulated genes, respectively, in celecoxib-treated specimens. Significant expression changes in six out of eight genes could be validated by qPCR. Pathway analyses revealed over-representation of deregulated genes in the networks of proliferation, cell cycle, extracellular matrix biology, and inflammatory immune response. The Ki-67 mean change relative to baseline was -29.1% (P = 0.019) and -8.2% (P = 0.384) in the treatment and control arm, respectively. Between treatment groups, the change in Ki-67 was statistically significant (P = 0.029). Cleaved caspase-3 and CD34 expression were not significantly different between the celecoxib-treated and placebo-treated groups

  17. Elastosis in malignant tumours.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, C; Greeff, H; Murray, J F; Posen, J; Schmaman, A

    1985-07-01

    Elastosis is common in infiltrating ductal and lobular carcinomas of the breast, occurring in approximately 90% of cases. It is also well described in some benign lesions of the breast and tumours of the salivary gland. Reports of venous elastosis in association with large-bowel carcinomas are rare. We describe elastosis in single cases of prostatic, gastric, bronchiolar-alveolar and cervical carcinoma.

  18. The novel desmopressin analogue [V4Q5]dDAVP inhibits angiogenesis, tumour growth and metastases in vasopressin type 2 receptor-expressing breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    GARONA, JUAN; PIFANO, MARINA; ORLANDO, ULISES D.; PASTRIAN, MARIA B.; IANNUCCI, NANCY B.; ORTEGA, HUGO H.; PODESTA, ERNESTO J.; GOMEZ, DANIEL E.; RIPOLL, GISELLE V.; ALONSO, DANIEL F.

    2015-01-01

    Desmopressin (dDAVP) is a safe haemostatic agent with previously reported antitumour activity. It acts as a selective agonist for the V2 vasopressin membrane receptor (V2r) present on tumour cells and microvasculature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the novel peptide derivative [V4Q5]dDAVP in V2r-expressing preclinical mouse models of breast cancer. We assessed antitumour effects of [V4Q5]dDAVP using human MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells, as well as the highly metastatic mouse F3II cell line. Effect on in vitro cancer cell growth was evaluated by cell proliferation and clonogenic assays. Cell cycle distribution was analysed by flow cytometry. In order to study the effect of intravenously administered [V4Q5]dDAVP on tumour growth and angiogenesis, breast cancer xenografts were generated in athymic mice. F3II cells were injected into syngeneic mice to evaluate the effect of [V4Q5]dDAVP on spontaneous and experimental metastatic spread. In vitro cytostatic effects of [V4Q5]dDAVP against breast cancer cells were greater than those of dDAVP, and associated with V2r-activated signal transduction and partial cell cycle arrest. In MDA-MB-231 xenografts, [V4Q5]dDAVP (0.3 μg/kg, thrice a week) reduced tumour growth and angiogenesis. Treatment of F3II mammary tumour-bearing immunocompetent mice resulted in complete inhibition of metastatic progression. [V4Q5]dDAVP also displayed greater antimetastatic efficacy than dDAVP on experimental lung colonisation by F3II cells. The novel analogue was well tolerated in preliminary acute toxicology studies, at doses ≥300-fold above that required for anti-angiogenic/antimetastatic effects. Our data establish the preclinical activity of [V4Q5]dDAVP in aggressive breast cancer, providing the rationale for further clinical trials. PMID:25846632

  19. Circulating tumour cells are linked to plasma D-dimer levels in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mego, Michal; Zuo, Zhuang; Gao, Hui; Cohen, Evan N; Giordano, Antonio; Tin, Sanda; Anfossi, Simone; Jackson, Summer; Woodward, Wendy; Ueno, Naoto T; Valero, Vicente; Alvarez, Ricardo H; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Khoury, Joseph D; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Reuben, James M

    2015-03-01

    Cancer is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Elevated plasma D-dimer and fibrinogen levels are also risk factors for VTE. Furthermore, in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC), the presence of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) is a risk factor for VTE. The relationship between CTCs and D-dimer is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether CTCs correlate with plasma D-dimer level, fibrinogen level, and risk of VTE in MBC. This prospective study included 47 MBC patients treated from July 2009 through December 2010 at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. CTCs in peripheral blood were detected and enumerated using the CellSearch system. D-dimer and fibrinogen were measured in plasma at the time of CTC detection. Thirty-three patients (70 %) had ≥ 1 CTC, and 22 patients (47 %) had ≥ 5 CTCs. Patients with ≥ 1 CTC or ≥ 5 CTCs had significantly higher mean plasma D-dimer levels (µg/mL) than patients with no CTCs and < 5 CTCs (2.48 and 3.31 vs 0.80 and 0.84, respectively; p=0.006 for cut-off ≥ 1 CTC and p=0.003 for cut-off ≥ 5 CTCs). In multivariate analysis, presence of CTCs and number of metastases were positively associated with plasma D-dimer level. CTCs were not associated with plasma fibrinogen level. At median follow-up of 13.5 months, three of 33 patients (9 %) with ≥ 1 CTC had VTE, vs no patients with undetectable CTCs. In conclusion, the presence of CTCs was associated with higher levels of plasma D-dimer in MBC patients. This study further confirms an association between CTCs and risk of VTE.

  20. Human breast cancer bone metastasis in vitro and in vivo: a novel 3D model system for studies of tumour cell-bone cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Holen, I; Nutter, F; Wilkinson, J M; Evans, C A; Avgoustou, P; Ottewell, Penelope D

    2015-10-01

    Bone is established as the preferred site of breast cancer metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for this preference remain unidentified. In order to improve outcome for patients with advanced breast cancer and skeletal involvement, we need to better understand how this process is initiated and regulated. As bone metastasis cannot be easily studied in patients, researchers have to date mainly relied on in vivo xenograft models. A major limitation of these is that they do not contain a human bone microenvironment, increasingly considered to be an important component of metastases. In order to address this shortcoming, we have developed a novel humanised bone model, where 1 × 10(5) luciferase-expressing MDA-MB-231 or T47D human breast tumour cells are seeded on viable human subchaodral bone discs in vitro. These discs contain functional osteoclasts 2-weeks after in vitro culture and positive staining for calcine 1-week after culture demonstrating active bone resorption/formation. In vitro inoculation of MDA-MB-231 or T47D cells colonised human bone cores and remained viable for <4 weeks, however, use of matrigel to enhance adhesion or a moving platform to increase diffusion of nutrients provided no additional advantage. Following colonisation by the tumour cells, bone discs pre-seeded with MDA-MB-231 cells were implanted subcutaneously into NOD SCID mice, and tumour growth monitored using in vivo imaging for up to 6 weeks. Tumour growth progressed in human bone discs in 80 % of the animals mimicking the later stages of human bone metastasis. Immunohistochemical and PCR analysis revealed that growing MDA-MB-231 cells in human bone resulted in these cells acquiring a molecular phenotype previously associated with breast cancer bone metastases. MDA-MB-231 cells grown in human bone discs showed increased expression of IL-1B, HRAS and MMP9 and decreased expression of S100A4, whereas, DKK2 and FN1 were unaltered compared with the same cells grown in

  1. ASCT2/SLC1A5 controls glutamine uptake and tumour growth in triple-negative basal-like breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Geldermalsen, M; Wang, Q; Nagarajah, R; Marshall, A D; Thoeng, A; Gao, D; Ritchie, W; Feng, Y; Bailey, C G; Deng, N; Harvey, K; Beith, J M; Selinger, C I; O'Toole, S A; Rasko, J E J; Holst, J

    2016-01-01

    Alanine, serine, cysteine-preferring transporter 2 (ASCT2; SLC1A5) mediates uptake of glutamine, a conditionally essential amino acid in rapidly proliferating tumour cells. Uptake of glutamine and subsequent glutaminolysis is critical for activation of the mTORC1 nutrient-sensing pathway, which regulates cell growth and protein translation in cancer cells. This is of particular interest in breast cancer, as glutamine dependence is increased in high-risk breast cancer subtypes. Pharmacological inhibitors of ASCT2-mediated transport significantly reduced glutamine uptake in human breast cancer cell lines, leading to the suppression of mTORC1 signalling, cell growth and cell cycle progression. Notably, these effects were subtype-dependent, with ASCT2 transport critical only for triple-negative (TN) basal-like breast cancer cell growth compared with minimal effects in luminal breast cancer cells. Both stable and inducible shRNA-mediated ASCT2 knockdown confirmed that inhibiting ASCT2 function was sufficient to prevent cellular proliferation and induce rapid cell death in TN basal-like breast cancer cells, but not in luminal cells. Using a bioluminescent orthotopic xenograft mouse model, ASCT2 expression was then shown to be necessary for both successful engraftment and growth of HCC1806 TN breast cancer cells in vivo. Lower tumoral expression of ASCT2 conferred a significant survival advantage in xenografted mice. These responses remained intact in primary breast cancers, where gene expression analysis showed high expression of ASCT2 and glutamine metabolism-related genes, including GLUL and GLS, in a cohort of 90 TN breast cancer patients, as well as correlations with the transcriptional regulators, MYC and ATF4. This study provides preclinical evidence for the feasibility of novel therapies exploiting ASCT2 transporter activity in breast cancer, particularly in the high-risk basal-like subgroup of TN breast cancer where there is not only high expression of ASCT2, but

  2. Accumulation of uPA-PAI-1 complexes inside the tumour cells is associated with axillary nodal invasion in progesterone-receptor-positive early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J; Pollán, M; Tejerina, A; Sánchez, J; Lucas, A R

    2003-01-13

    Both urokinase-like plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), as well as uPA-PAI-1 complexes, have been identified as important prognostic factors in breast cancer. We have recently reported that the latter are identifiable inside breast cancer cells by means of immunohistochemistry. Using this technique, we have studied a series of 212 early (pT1) unifocal breast cancers and have correlated the expression of uPA-PAI-1 complexes, together with other clinical and biological features (histologic variety, histologic and nuclear grade, hormone receptors, Ki67 labelling index, c-erb-B2-, p53- and CD44std-expression) with or without the occurrence of axillary node invasion. In a logistic regression model, looking for associations with axillary metastasis, we found a statistically significant interaction between the presence of uPA-PAI-1 complexes and progesterone receptor positivity (P=0.04). A final model showed that the presence of uPA-PAI-1 complexes was a determinant factor for axillary metastasis among women carrying tumours expressing progesterone receptors. In these cases, the presence of uPA-PAI-1 complexes carried with it a nearly 14-fold risk of axillary node invasion (P=0.009). These results may indicate that small, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancers (with a theoretical good prognosis) may carry an elevated risk of nodal involvement if accumulation of uPA-PAI-1 complexes is shown inside their tumour cells by means of immunohistochemistry. PMID:12556966

  3. MED12 exon 2 mutation as a highly sensitive and specific marker in distinguishing phyllodes tumours from other spindle neoplasms of the breast.

    PubMed

    Lien, Huang-Chun; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Yang, Ya-Wen; Jeng, Yung-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Spindle neoplasms of the breast (SNB) primarily include metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC), phyllodes tumour (PT), fibromatosis and primary nonspecific sarcoma (PNS). Mutations in MED12 exon 2 have been reported in PTs. Because spindle tumour components are shared by SNB, we assessed the diagnostic use of MED12 exon 2 mutation in SNB. We investigated MED12 exon 2 mutations in a total of 91 samples of SNB, including 49 PT cases that have been previously analysed. Mutations were identified using direct sequencing. MED12 exon 2 mutation was absent in all cases of MBC, fibromatosis and PNS, in contrast to the 71.4% positivity in PTs. MED12 mutations were identified in four of six previously diagnosed monophasic sarcomatous MCB cases, however, these four cases were revised as malignant PT based on additional bcl-2 staining, albeit very focal. Consistence in the MED12 mutational status between a paired core biopsy and a surgical specimen was observed in all 20 tested PT cases. In conclusion, we demonstrated the restriction of MED12 exon 2 mutation to PTs (73.6%, 39/53) and its absence in other SNB. MED12 exon 2 mutational analysis can be included in the differential diagnosis between PT and other SNB, especially with limited specimen where diagnostic clues are not evident.

  4. Evaluation of IGF1R and phosphorylated IGF1R as targets in HER2-positive breast cancer cell lines and tumours.

    PubMed

    Browne, Brigid C; Eustace, Alex J; Kennedy, Susan; O'Brien, Neil A; Pedersen, Kasper; McDermott, Martina S J; Larkin, Annemarie; Ballot, Jo; Mahgoub, Thamir; Sclafani, Francesco; Madden, Stephen; Kennedy, John; Duffy, Michael J; Crown, John; O'Donovan, Norma

    2012-12-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) signalling is implicated in resistance to trastuzumab. However, the benefit of co-targeting HER2 and IGF1R has not been extensively studied, and the relationship between activated IGF1R and clinical response to trastuzumab has not been reported. This study aimed to evaluate the combination of trastuzumab with IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in a panel of HER2-positive breast cancer cell lines, and to examine the relationship between IGF1R expression and activation and response to trastuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer patients. The anti-proliferative effects of trastuzumab combined with IGF1R TKIs BMS-536924 or NVP-AEW541 were measured in nine HER2-positive cell lines. IGF1R and phosphorylated IGF1R/insulin receptor (pIGF1R/IR) were measured by immunohistochemistry in 160 tumour samples from trastuzumab-treated patients (ICORG 06-22). The HER2-positive cell lines displayed varying sensitivity to IGF1R TKIs alone (IC(50)s: 0.7 to >10 μM). However, when combined with trastuzumab, a significantly enhanced effect was observed in five cell lines treated with BMS-536924, and three with NVP-AEW541. While IGF1R levels correlated with reduced response to NVP-AEW541 alone, neither IGF1R nor pIGF1R were predictive of response to BMS-536924 or NVP-AEW541 in combination with trastuzumab. Low HER2 levels correlated with response to BMS-536924 in combination with trastuzumab. Akt levels correlated with improved response to trastuzumab and NVP-AEW541 (P = 0.039). Cytoplasmic IGF1R staining was observed in all tumours, membrane IGF1R was detected in 13.8 %, and pIGF1R/IR was detected in 48.8 %. Although membrane IGF1R staining was associated with larger tumour size (P = 0.041), and lower tumour grade (P = 0.024), no association between IGF1R or pIGF1R/IR and patient survival was observed. In conclusion, while neither IGF1R expression nor activation was predictive of response to trastuzumab, these pre-clinical data provide

  5. Higher levels of antibodies to the tumour-associated antigen cyclin B1 in cancer-free individuals than in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, J P; Kistner-Griffin, E; Namboodiri, A M; Iwasaki, M; Kasuga, Y; Hamada, G S; Tsugane, S

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin B1 is a checkpoint protein that regulates cell division from G2 to the M phase. Studies in mice have shown that cyclin B1 vaccine-induced immunity significantly delayed or prevented the spontaneous cancer development later in life. We hypothesized that if these results showing a protective effect of anti-cyclin B1 antibodies could be extrapolated to the human condition, cancer-free individuals should have higher levels of endogenous antibodies than patients with cancers characterized by the over-expression of this tumour-associated antigen. To test this hypothesis, we characterized a large (1739 subjects) number of multi-ethnic patients with breast cancer (which over-expresses cyclin B1) and matched controls for anti-cyclin B1 immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies. Multivariate analyses, after adjusting for the covariates, showed that cancer-free individuals had significantly higher levels of naturally occurring IgG antibodies to cyclin B1 than patients with breast cancer (mean ± standard deviation: 148·0 ± 73·6 versus 126·1 ± 67·8 arbitrary units per ml; P < 0·0001). These findings may have important implications for cyclin B1-based immunotherapy against breast cancer and many other cyclin B1-over-expressing malignancies. PMID:24852823

  6. Gallic acid indanone and mangiferin xanthone are strong determinants of immunosuppressive anti-tumour effects of Mangifera indica L. bark in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    García-Rivera, Dagmar; Delgado, René; Bougarne, Nadia; Haegeman, Guy; Berghe, Wim Vanden

    2011-06-01

    Vimang is a standardized extract derived from Mango bark (Mangifera Indica L.), commonly used as anti-inflammatory phytomedicine, which has recently been used to complement cancer therapies in cancer patients. We have further investigated potential anti-tumour effects of glucosylxanthone mangiferin and indanone gallic acid, which are both present in Vimang extract. We observed significant anti-tumour effects of both Vimang constituents in the highly aggressive and metastatic breast cancer cell type MDA-MB231. At the molecular level, mangiferin and gallic acid both inhibit classical NFκB activation by IKKα/β kinases, which results in impaired IκB degradation, NFκB translocation and NFκB/DNA binding. In contrast to the xanthone mangiferin, gallic acid further inhibits additional NFκB pathways involved in cancer cell survival and therapy resistance, such as MEK1, JNK1/2, MSK1, and p90RSK. This results in combinatorial inhibition of NFκB activity by gallic acid, which results in potent inhibition of NFκB target genes involved in inflammation, metastasis, anti-apoptosis and angiogenesis, such as IL-6, IL-8, COX2, CXCR4, XIAP, bcl2, VEGF. The cumulative NFκB inhibition by gallic acid, but not mangiferin, is also reflected at the level of cell survival, which reveals significant tumour cytotoxic effects in MDA-MB231 cells. Altogether, we identify gallic acid, besides mangiferin, as an essential anti-cancer component in Vimang extract, which demonstrates multifocal inhibition of NFκB activity in the cancer-inflammation network.

  7. A randomized controlled trial comparing primary tumour resection plus systemic therapy with systemic therapy alone in metastatic breast cancer (PRIM-BC): Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG1017.

    PubMed

    Shien, Tadahiko; Nakamura, Kenichi; Shibata, Taro; Kinoshita, Takayuki; Aogi, Kenjiro; Fujisawa, Tomomi; Masuda, Norikazu; Inoue, Kenichi; Fukuda, Haruhiko; Iwata, Hiroji

    2012-10-01

    This trial is being conducted to confirm the superiority, in terms of overall survival, of primary tumour resection plus systemic therapy to systemic therapy alone in patients with Stage IV breast cancer who are not refractory to primary systemic therapy. The inclusion criteria for the study are as follows: untreated patients with histologically confirmed invasive breast cancer with one or more measurable metastatic lesions diagnosed by radiological examination. All patients receive primary systemic therapy according to the estrogen receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor type-2 status of the primary breast cancer after the first registration. After 3 months, the patients without disease progression are randomized to the primary tumour resection plus systemic therapy arm or the systemic therapy alone arm. The primary endpoint is the overall survival, and the secondary endpoints are proportion of patients without tumour progression at the metastatic sites, yearly local recurrence-free survival, proportion of local ulcer/local bleeding, yearly primary tumour resection-free survival, adverse events of chemotherapy, operative morbidity and serious adverse events. The patient recruitment was commenced in May 2011. Enrolment of 410 patients for randomization is planned over a 5 year recruitment period. We hereby report the details of the study.

  8. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers defined by estrogen (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) status of the tumour. Methods We used genotype data on up to 11,421 BRCA1 and 7,080 BRCA2 carriers, of whom 4,310 had been affected with breast cancer and had information on either ER or PR status of the tumour, to assess the associations of 12 loci with breast cancer tumour characteristics. Associations were evaluated using a retrospective cohort approach. Results The results suggested stronger associations with ER-positive breast cancer than ER-negative for 11 loci in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Among BRCA1 carriers, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2981582 (FGFR2) exhibited the biggest difference based on ER status (per-allele hazard ratio (HR) for ER-positive = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.17 to 1.56 vs HR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.85 to 0.98 for ER-negative, P-heterogeneity = 6.5 × 10-6). In contrast, SNP rs2046210 at 6q25.1 near ESR1 was primarily associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. In BRCA2 carriers, SNPs in FGFR2, TOX3, LSP1, SLC4A7/NEK10, 5p12, 2q35, and 1p11.2 were significantly associated with ER-positive but not ER-negative disease. Similar results were observed when differentiating breast cancer cases by PR status. Conclusions The associations of the 12 SNPs with risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers differ by ER-positive or ER-negative breast cancer status. The apparent differences in SNP associations between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, and non-carriers, may be explicable by differences in the prevalence of tumour subtypes. As more risk modifying variants are identified, incorporating these associations into breast cancer subtype-specific risk models

  9. Hyperplasia and tumours in lung, breast and other tissues in mice carrying a RAR beta 4-like transgene.

    PubMed

    Bérard, J; Gaboury, L; Landers, M; De Repentigny, Y; Houle, B; Kothary, R; Bradley, W E

    1994-12-01

    Transgenic mice were generated which express a truncated nuclear retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR beta), closely resembling the natural isoform RAR beta 4, under the control of the MMTV promoter. The transgene was expressed in salivary gland, testis, lung and mammary tissue in two different lines. At approximately 11-14 months virtually all the transgenic mice showed hyperplasia of the lung alveolar epithelium with an excess of type II pneumocytes. Hyperplasia of the mammary alveoli and terminal ducts was also seen in some females. Salivary glands and some sebaceous glands were hyperplastic in most male transgenic mice, but only rarely in females or in non-transgenics. Primary benign and malignant tumours were more numerous in transgenic mice than in controls, with a total of 23 in 43 mice versus two in 33 non-transgenic animals. Treatment with dexamethasone to increase transgene expression resulted in exaggerated versions of the above phenotypes. Overexpression of RAR beta 4 therefore appears to predispose various tissues to hyperplasia and neoplasia, and this by contrast to the RAR beta 2 isoform, which has tumour suppressor activity. A survey of ratios of RAR beta 4:RAR beta 2 expression in human lung tumour cell lines showed an increase compared with normal lung tissue, suggesting that RAR beta 4 may play a similar role in human tumorigenesis.

  10. Inhibition of Wnt signalling and breast tumour growth by the multi-purpose drug suramin through suppression of heterotrimeric G proteins and Wnt endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Koval, Alexey; Ahmed, Kamal; Katanaev, Vladimir L

    2016-02-15

    Overactivation of the Wnt signalling pathway underlies oncogenic transformation and proliferation in many cancers, including the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), the deadliest form of tumour in the breast, taking about a quarter of a million lives annually worldwide. No clinically approved targeted therapies attacking Wnt signalling currently exist. Repositioning of approved drugs is a promising approach in drug discovery. In the present study we show that a multi-purpose drug suramin inhibits Wnt signalling and proliferation of TNBC cells in vitro and in mouse models, inhibiting a component in the upper levels of the pathway. Through a set of investigations we identify heterotrimeric G proteins and regulation of Wnt endocytosis as the likely target of suramin in this pathway. G protein-dependent endocytosis of plasma membrane-located components of the Wnt pathway was previously shown to be important for amplification of the signal in this cascade. Our data identify endocytic regulation within Wnt signalling as a promising target for anti-Wnt and anti-cancer drug discovery. Suramin, as the first example of such drug or its analogues might pave the way for the appearance of first-in-class targeted therapies against TNBC and other Wnt-dependent cancers.

  11. Dissecting the role of curcumin in tumour growth and angiogenesis in mouse model of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bimonte, Sabrina; Barbieri, Antonio; Palma, Giuseppe; Rea, Domenica; Luciano, Antonio; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Arra, Claudio; Izzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is considered the most common cancer for women worldwide and it is now the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among females in the world. Since breast cancer is highly resistant to chemotherapy, alternative anticancer strategies have been developed. In particular, many studies have demonstrated that curcumin, a derivative of turmeric, can be used as natural agent in treatment of some types of cancer by playing antiproliferative and antioxidant effects. In our study, we assessed the antitumor activities of curcumin in ER-negative human breast cancer cell line resistant to chemotherapy, MDA.MB231 by in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro data allowed us to demonstrate that curcumin played a role in regulation of proliferation and apoptosis in MDA.MB231 cells. In vivo, by generation of mouse model of breast cancer, we showed that treatment of curcumin inhibited tumor growth and angiogenesis. Specifically, we showed that curcumin is able to deregulate the expression of cyclin D1, PECAM-1, and p65, which are regulated by NF-κB. Our data demonstrated that curcumin could be used as an adjuvant agent to chemotherapy in treatment of triple negative breast cancer.

  12. Association between breast cancer and tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) gene 1595C/T SNP in a Pakistani population

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Saima F.; Mansoor, Qaisar; Nazir, Nusrat; Kausar, Rukhsana; Jabeen, Nyla; Ismail, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the Study TRAIL-mediated signalling has emerged as an extensively studied biological mechanism reported to differentially induce apoptosis in cancer cells. However, overwhelmingly increasing experimentally verified data is shedding light on resistance against TRAIL-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. Moreover, genetic and epigenetic mutations also exert effects on the functionality of TRAIL and its receptors. In this study we investigated the association between breast cancer and polymorphisms in tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in a Pakistani Population. Material and methods Genotyping for TRAIL gene 1595 C/T polymorphism was done for 363 breast cancer patients and 193 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. DNA was extracted using standard organic methods. PCR-RFLP analysis was done for C/T polymorphism at position 1595 in exon 5 of the TRAIL gene using site-specific primers and restriction enzyme. The results were statistically evaluated by SPSS14. Results In this study, CC homozygotes were 46.3% in patients and 49.7% in controls, p = 0.729 with OR value 0.8705 (95% CI: 0.6137–1.2348). CT was statistically insignificant, p = 0.837 with OR value 0.9242 (95% CI: 0.6494–1.3154). However, the minor allele or risk allele genotype TT had a higher percentage among breast cancer patients (12.1%) than in the control group (6.7%). Since there was a statistically insignificant difference (p = 0.212, OR value 1.9098 with 95% CI 1.0019 to 3.6406) of TT genotype between the two groups, the contrastingly higher percentage of TT genotype in breast cancer patients seems to be a risk factor for the disease. Moreover, the frequency of minor allele T was also found to be higher in the patients (0.329) than in the controls (0.285). Conclusions The TRAIL gene 1595 C/T SNP has a contradictory role in cancer development in different populations. In our population group although the percentage of homozygous risk allele TT was higher in patients

  13. 8-Oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine and other lesions along the coding strand of the exon 5 of the tumour suppressor gene P53 in a breast cancer case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Brancato, Beniamino; Munnia, Armelle; Cellai, Filippo; Ceni, Elisabetta; Mello, Tommaso; Bianchi, Simonetta; Catarzi, Sandra; Risso, Gabriella G.; Galli, Andrea; Peluso, Marco E.M.

    2016-01-01

    The next-generation sequencing studies of breast cancer have reported that the tumour suppressor P53 (TP53) gene is mutated in more than 40% of the tumours. We studied the levels of oxidative lesions, including 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), along the coding strand of the exon 5 in breast cancer patients as well as in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-attacked breast cancer cell line using the ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction technique. We detected a significant ‘in vitro’ generation of 8-oxodG between the codons 163 and 175, corresponding to a TP53 region with high mutation prevalence, after treatment with xanthine plus xanthine oxidase, a ROS-generating system. Then, we evaluated the occurrence of oxidative lesions in the DNA-binding domain of the TP53 in the core needle biopsies of 113 of women undergoing breast investigation for diagnostic purpose. An increment of oxidative damage at the −G− residues into the codons 163 and 175 was found in the cancer cases as compared to the controls. We found significant associations with the pathological stage and the histological grade of tumours. As the major news of this study, this largest analysis of genomic footprinting of oxidative lesions at the TP53 sequence level to date provided a first roadmap describing the signatures of oxidative lesions in human breast cancer. Our results provide evidence that the generation of oxidative lesions at single nucleotide resolution is not an event highly stochastic, but causes a characteristic pattern of DNA lesions at the site of mutations in the TP53, suggesting causal relationship between oxidative DNA adducts and breast cancer. PMID:27260513

  14. Prolonged Response to Trastuzumab in a Patient With HER2-Nonamplified Breast Cancer With Elevated HER2 Dimerization Harboring an ERBB2 S310F Mutation.

    PubMed

    Chumsri, Saranya; Weidler, Jodi; Ali, Siraj; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Wallweber, Gerald; DeFazio-Eli, Lisa; Chenna, Ahmed; Huang, Weidong; DeRidder, Angela; Goicocheal, Lindsay; Perez, Edith A

    2015-09-01

    In the current genomic era, increasing evidence demonstrates that approximately 2% of HER2-negative breast cancers, by current standard testings, harbor activating mutations of ERBB2. However, whether patients with HER2-negative breast cancer with activating mutations of ERBB2 also experience response to anti-HER2 therapies remains unclear. This case report describes a patient with HER2-nonamplified heavily pretreated breast cancer who experienced prolonged response to trastuzumab in combination with pertuzumab and fulvestrant. Further molecular analysis demonstrated that her tumors had an elevated HER2 dimerization that corresponded to ERBB2 S310F mutation. Located in the extracellular domain of the HER2 protein, this mutation was reported to promote noncovalent dimerization that results in the activation of the downstream signaling pathways. This case highlights the fact that HER2-targeted therapy may be valuable in patients harboring an ERBB2 S310F mutation. PMID:26358791

  15. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacological and anti-tumour effects of the specific anti-oestrogen ICI 182780 in women with advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, A.; DeFriend, D. J.; Robertson, J. F.; Blamey, R. W.; Anderson, L.; Anderson, E.; Sutcliffe, F. A.; Walton, P.

    1996-01-01

    We have assessed the pharmacokinetics, pharmacological and anti-tumour effects of the specific steroidal anti-oestrogen ICI 182780 in 19 patients with advanced breast cancer resistant to tamoxifen. The agent was administered as a monthly depot intramuscular injection. Peak levels of ICI 182780 occurred a median of 8-9 days after dosing and then declined but were above the projected therapeutic threshold at day 28. Cmax during the first month was 10.5 ng/ml-1 and during the sixth month was 12.6 ng ml-1. The AUCs were 140.5 and 206.8 ng day ml-1 on the first and sixth month of dosing respectively, suggesting some drug accumulation. Luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels rose after withdrawal of tamoxifen and then plateaued, suggesting no effect of ICI 182780 on the pituitary-hypothalamic axis. There were no significant changes in serum levels of prolactin, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) or lipids. Side-effects were infrequent. Hot-flushes and sweats were not induced and there was no apparent effect of treatment upon the endometrium or vagina. Thirteen (69%) patients responded (seven had partial responses and six showed "no change' responses) to ICI 182780, after progression on tamoxifen, for a median duration of 25 months. Thus ICI 182780, given by monthly depot injection, and at the drug levels described, is an active second-line anti-oestrogen without apparent negative effects on the liver, brain or genital tract and warrants further evaluation in patients with advanced breast cancer. PMID:8688341

  16. Phyllodes tumour in pregnancy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Way, Jeffrey C.; Culham, Beverley A.

    1998-01-01

    Phyllodes tumour (cystosarcoma phyllodes) is a rare breast tumour that grows rapidly and to a relatively large size, especially during pregnancy. These tumours may be classified as benign, borderline or malignant. They have a high incidence of local recurrence but little tendency to metastasize to distant organs. The question of whether the tumour is hormone dependent remains unresolved. This report describes the case of a patient who had a phyllodes tumour that first became apparent in her 31st week of pregnancy. After enucleation and subsequent wide excision she remained tumour free through a second pregnancy. Although the follow-up period is short, it appears that subsequent pregnancy is not necessarily associated with recurrent or new disease for patients who have had their initial tumour completely excised. The goal for the management of these tumours is complete surgical excision. PMID:9793511

  17. Prognostic impact of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in cytosols and pellet extracts derived from primary breast tumours

    PubMed Central

    Witte, J H de; Foekens, J A; Brünner, N; Heuvel, J J T M; Tienoven, ThH van; Look, M P; Klijn, J G M; Geurts-Moespot, A; Grebenchtchikov, N; Benraad, ThJ; Sweep, C G J

    2001-01-01

    Using a previously developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the levels of the receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPAR) were determined in cytosols and corresponding membrane pellets derived from 878 primary breast tumours. The levels of uPAR in the pellet extracts were more than 3-fold higher than those measured in the cytosols (P< 0.001). Moreover, the uPAR levels in the two types of extracts were weakly, though significantly, correlated with each other (rS= 0.20, P< 0.001). In Cox univariate analysis, high cytosolic levels of uPAR were significantly associated with reduced overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS). The levels of uPAR in pellet extracts appeared not to be related with patient survival. In multivariate analysis, elevated levels of uPAR measured in cytosols and pellet extracts were found to be independent predictors of poor OS, not RFS. The prediction of poor prognosis on the basis of high uPAR levels emphasizes its important role in plasmin-mediated degradation of extracellular matrix proteins during cancer invasion and metastasis. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11437407

  18. Multiple drug resistance-related messenger RNA expression in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human breast tumour tissue.

    PubMed

    O'Driscoll, L; Kennedy, S; McDermott, E; Kelehan, P; Clynes, M

    1996-01-01

    A method is described by which RNA, suitable for reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, can be extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and subsequently used for detecting the expression of several genes. Using this technique, RNA can be extracted from specimens, quantified, reverse transcribed and regions of interest amplified and analysed within 36 h. The tissue specimens included in this study were from human breast carcinoma, investigating a range of genes associated with the development and/or maintenance of multiple drug resistance (MDR). This technique, applied to archival tissues, offers great potential for increasing our understanding of alterations in expression levels of genes associated with MDR. The method developed is also applicable to studies on expression of other genes in paraffin-embedded tissues.

  19. Neonatal tumours.

    PubMed

    Moore, S W

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal or perinatal tumours frequently relate to prenatal or developmental events and have a short exposure window which provides an opportunity to study tumours in a selective sensitive period of development. As a result, they display a number of host-specific features which include occasional spontaneous maturational changes with cells still responding to developmental influences. Neonatal tumours (NNT) are studied for a number of important reasons. Firstly, many of the benign tumours arising from soft tissue appear to result from disturbances in growth and development and some are associated with other congenital anomalies. Study of these aspects may open the door for investigation of genetic and epigenetic changes in genes controlling foetal development as well as environmental and drug effects during pregnancy. Secondly, the clinical behaviour of NNT differs from that of similar tumours occurring later in childhood. In addition, certain apparently malignant NNT can 'change course' in infancy leading to the maturation of apparently highly malignant tumours. Thirdly, NNT underline the genetic associations of most tumours but appear to differ in the effects of proto-oncogenes and other oncogenic factors. In this context, there are also connections between the foetal and neonatal period and some "adult" cancers. Fourthly, they appear to arise in a period in which minimal environmental interference has occurred, thus providing a unique potential window of opportunity to study the pathogenesis of tumour behaviour. This study will seek to review what is currently known in each of these areas of study as they apply to NNT. Further study of the provocative differences in tumour behaviour in neonates provides insights into the natural history of cancer in humans and promotes novel cancer therapies.

  20. "Targeting" triple-negative breast cancer: the lessons learned from BRCA1-associated breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Rita

    2011-04-01

    Breast cancer has long been recognized as a heterogeneous entity, with distinct subsets characterized by differences in tumor biology and response to therapy. With the advent of molecular profiling, we have gained a further appreciation of the heterogeneity of this complex disease. While the last decade has seen advances in the treatment of hormone receptor (HR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/erb-B2 (HER2)-positive breast cancers, outcomes for women with estrogen receptor (ER)-, progesterone receptor (PR)-, and HER2-negative-or "triple-negative"-breast cancer (TNBC) remain poor. A better understanding of the shared biology of BRCA1-associated breast cancer and sporadic TNBC holds much promise for changing the outlook for women with this aggressive disease. This review focuses on our current understanding of the clinicopathological features of TNBC, therapeutic options and ongoing research efforts.

  1. Massively parallel sequencing of phyllodes tumours of the breast reveals actionable mutations, and TERT promoter hotspot mutations and TERT gene amplification as likely drivers of progression.

    PubMed

    Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte Ky; Murray, Melissa; Burke, Kathleen A; Edelweiss, Marcia; Geyer, Felipe C; Macedo, Gabriel S; Inagaki, Akiko; Papanastasiou, Anastasios D; Martelotto, Luciano G; Marchio, Caterina; Lim, Raymond S; Ioris, Rafael A; Nahar, Pooja K; Bruijn, Ino De; Smyth, Lillian; Akram, Muzaffar; Ross, Dara; Petrini, John H; Norton, Larry; Solit, David B; Baselga, Jose; Brogi, Edi; Ladanyi, Marc; Weigelt, Britta; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-03-01

    Phyllodes tumours (PTs) are breast fibroepithelial lesions that are graded based on histological criteria as benign, borderline or malignant. PTs may recur locally. Borderline PTs and malignant PTs may metastasize to distant sites. Breast fibroepithelial lesions, including PTs and fibroadenomas, are characterized by recurrent MED12 exon 2 somatic mutations. We sought to define the repertoire of somatic genetic alterations in PTs and whether these may assist in the differential diagnosis of these lesions. We collected 100 fibroadenomas, 40 benign PTs, 14 borderline PTs and 22 malignant PTs; six, six and 13 benign, borderline and malignant PTs, respectively, and their matched normal tissue, were subjected to targeted massively parallel sequencing (MPS) using the MSK-IMPACT sequencing assay. Recurrent MED12 mutations were found in 56% of PTs; in addition, mutations affecting cancer genes (eg TP53, RB1, SETD2 and EGFR) were exclusively detected in borderline and malignant PTs. We found a novel recurrent clonal hotspot mutation in the TERT promoter (-124 C>T) in 52% and TERT gene amplification in 4% of PTs. Laser capture microdissection revealed that these mutations were restricted to the mesenchymal component of PTs. Sequencing analysis of the entire cohort revealed that the frequency of TERT alterations increased from benign (18%) to borderline (57%) and to malignant PTs (68%; p < 0.01), and TERT alterations were associated with increased levels of TERT mRNA (p < 0.001). No TERT alterations were observed in fibroadenomas. An analysis of TERT promoter sequencing and gene amplification distinguished PTs from fibroadenomas with a sensitivity and a positive predictive value of 100% (CI 95.38-100%) and 100% (CI 85.86-100%), respectively, and a sensitivity and a negative predictive value of 39% (CI 28.65-51.36%) and 68% (CI 60.21-75.78%), respectively. Our results suggest that TERT alterations may drive the progression of PTs, and may assist in the differential diagnosis

  2. Massively parallel sequencing of phyllodes tumours of the breast reveals actionable mutations, and TERT promoter hotspot mutations and TERT gene amplification as likely drivers of progression.

    PubMed

    Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte Ky; Murray, Melissa; Burke, Kathleen A; Edelweiss, Marcia; Geyer, Felipe C; Macedo, Gabriel S; Inagaki, Akiko; Papanastasiou, Anastasios D; Martelotto, Luciano G; Marchio, Caterina; Lim, Raymond S; Ioris, Rafael A; Nahar, Pooja K; Bruijn, Ino De; Smyth, Lillian; Akram, Muzaffar; Ross, Dara; Petrini, John H; Norton, Larry; Solit, David B; Baselga, Jose; Brogi, Edi; Ladanyi, Marc; Weigelt, Britta; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-03-01

    Phyllodes tumours (PTs) are breast fibroepithelial lesions that are graded based on histological criteria as benign, borderline or malignant. PTs may recur locally. Borderline PTs and malignant PTs may metastasize to distant sites. Breast fibroepithelial lesions, including PTs and fibroadenomas, are characterized by recurrent MED12 exon 2 somatic mutations. We sought to define the repertoire of somatic genetic alterations in PTs and whether these may assist in the differential diagnosis of these lesions. We collected 100 fibroadenomas, 40 benign PTs, 14 borderline PTs and 22 malignant PTs; six, six and 13 benign, borderline and malignant PTs, respectively, and their matched normal tissue, were subjected to targeted massively parallel sequencing (MPS) using the MSK-IMPACT sequencing assay. Recurrent MED12 mutations were found in 56% of PTs; in addition, mutations affecting cancer genes (eg TP53, RB1, SETD2 and EGFR) were exclusively detected in borderline and malignant PTs. We found a novel recurrent clonal hotspot mutation in the TERT promoter (-124 C>T) in 52% and TERT gene amplification in 4% of PTs. Laser capture microdissection revealed that these mutations were restricted to the mesenchymal component of PTs. Sequencing analysis of the entire cohort revealed that the frequency of TERT alterations increased from benign (18%) to borderline (57%) and to malignant PTs (68%; p < 0.01), and TERT alterations were associated with increased levels of TERT mRNA (p < 0.001). No TERT alterations were observed in fibroadenomas. An analysis of TERT promoter sequencing and gene amplification distinguished PTs from fibroadenomas with a sensitivity and a positive predictive value of 100% (CI 95.38-100%) and 100% (CI 85.86-100%), respectively, and a sensitivity and a negative predictive value of 39% (CI 28.65-51.36%) and 68% (CI 60.21-75.78%), respectively. Our results suggest that TERT alterations may drive the progression of PTs, and may assist in the differential diagnosis

  3. Genomic and mutational profiling of ductal carcinomas in situ and matched adjacent invasive breast cancers reveals intra-tumour genetic heterogeneity and clonal selection

    PubMed Central

    Lambros, Maryou B; Campion-Flora, Adriana; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Gauthier, Arnaud; Cabral, Cecilia; Pawar, Vidya; Mackay, Alan; A’Hern, Roger; Marchiò, Caterina; Palacios, Jose; Natrajan, Rachael; Weigelt, Britta; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the progression from ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast are yet to be fully elucidated. Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain the progression from DCIS to IDC, including the selection of a subpopulation of cancer cells with specific genetic aberrations, the acquisition of new genetic aberrations or non-genetic mechanisms mediated by the tumour microenvironment. To determine whether synchronously diagnosed ipsilateral DCIS and IDCs have modal populations with distinct repertoires of gene copy number aberrations and mutations in common oncogenes, matched frozen samples of DCIS and IDCs were retrieved from 13 patients and subjected to microarray-based comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH), and Sequenom MassARRAY (Oncocarta v1.0 panel). Fluorescence in situ hybridisation and Sanger sequencing were employed to validate the aCGH and Sequenom findings, respectively. Although the genomic profiles of matched DCIS and IDCs were similar, in three of 13 matched pairs amplification of distinct loci (i.e. 1q41, 2q24.2, 6q22.31, 7q11.21, 8q21.2 and 9p13.3) was either restricted to, or more prevalent in, the modal population of cancer cells of one of the components. Sequenom MassARRAY identified PIK3CA mutations restricted to the DCIS component in two cases, and in a third case, the frequency of the PIK3CA mutant allele reduced from 49% in the DCIS to 25% in the IDC component. Despite the genomic similarities between synchronous DCIS and IDC, our data provide strong circumstantial evidence to suggest that in some cases the progression from DCIS to IDC is driven by the selection of non-modal clones that harbour a specific repertoire of genetic aberrations. PMID:22252965

  4. hAG-2 and hAG-3, human homologues of genes involved in differentiation, are associated with oestrogen receptor-positive breast tumours and interact with metastasis gene C4.4a and dystroglycan.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, G C; Patel, S; Tyson, K; Adam, P J; Schenker, M; Loader, J A; Daviet, L; Legrain, P; Parekh, R; Harris, A L; Terrett, J A

    2003-02-24

    hAG-2 and hAG-3 are recently discovered human homologues of the secreted Xenopus laevis proteins XAG-1/2 (AGR-1/2) that are expressed in the cement gland, an ectodermal organ in the head associated with anteroposterior fate determination during early development. Although the roles of hAG-2 and hAG-3 in mammalian cells are unknown, both proteins share a high degree of protein sequence homology and lie adjacent to one another on chromosome 7p21. hAG-2 mRNA expression has previously been demonstrated in oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive cell lines. In this study, we have used real-time quantitative RT - PCR analysis and immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays to demonstrate concordant expression of hAG-2 and hAG-3 mRNA and protein in breast tumour tissues. Tumour expression of both genes correlated with OR (hAG2, P=0.0002; hAG-3, P=0.0012), and inversely correlated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (P=0.003). Yeast two-hybrid cloning identified metastasis-associated GPI-anchored C4.4a protein and extracellular alpha-dystroglycan (DAG-1) as binding partners for both hAG-2 and hAG-3, which if replicated in clinical oncology would demonstrate a potential role in tumour metastasis through the regulation of receptor adhesion and functioning. hAG-2 and hAG-3 may therefore serve as useful molecular markers and/or potential therapeutic targets for hormone-responsive breast tumours.

  5. Feasibility, endocrine and anti-tumour effects of a triple endocrine therapy with tamoxifen, a somatostatin analogue and an antiprolactin in post-menopausal metastatic breast cancer: a randomized study with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Bontenbal, M.; Foekens, J. A.; Lamberts, S. W.; de Jong, F. H.; van Putten, W. L.; Braun, H. J.; Burghouts, J. T.; van der Linden, G. H.; Klijn, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Suppression of the secretion of prolactin, growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) might be important in the growth regulation and treatment of breast cancer. Because oestrogens may counteract the anti-tumour effects of such treatment, the combination of an anti-oestrogen (tamoxifen), a somatostatin analogue (octreotide) and a potent anti-prolactin (CV 205-502) might be attractive. In this respect, we performed a first exploratory long-term study on the feasibility of combined treatment and possible clear differences in endocrine and anti-tumour effects during such combined treatment vs standard treatment with tamoxifen alone. Twenty-two post-menopausal patients with metastatic breast cancer (ER and/or PR positive or unknown) were randomized to receive either 40 mg of tamoxifen per day or the combination of 40 mg of tamoxifen plus 75 microg of CV 205-502 orally plus 3 x 0.2 mg of octreotide s.c. as first-line endocrine therapy. An objective response was found in 36% of the patients treated with tamoxifen alone and in 55% of the patients treated with combination therapy. Median time to progression was 33 weeks for patients treated with tamoxifen and 84 weeks for patients treated with combination therapy, but the numbers are too small for hard conclusions. There was no difference in overall post-relapse survival between the two treatment arms. With respect to the endocrine parameters, there was a significant decrease of plasma IGF-1 levels in both treatment arms, whereas during combined treatment plasma growth hormone tended to decrease and plasma prolactin levels were strongly suppressed; in some patients insulin and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) decreased during the triple therapy. Although there was no significant difference in mean decrease of plasma IGF-1 levels between the two treatment arms, combined treatment resulted in a more uniform suppression of IGF-1. Therefore, the addition of a somatostatin analogue and an anti

  6. Geographic differences in the distribution of molecular subtypes of breast cancer in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To compare the distribution of the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer based on immunohistochemical profile in the five major geographic regions of Brazil, a country of continental dimension, with a wide racial variation of people. Methods The study was retrospective observational. We classified 5,687 invasive breast cancers by molecular subtype based on immunohistochemical expression of estrogen-receptor (ER), progesterone-receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and Ki-67 proliferation index. Cases were classified as luminal A (ER and/or PR positive and HER2 negative, Ki-67 < 14%), luminal B (ER and/or PR positive, HER2 negative, and Ki-67 > 14%), triple-positive (ER and/or PR positive and HER2 positive), HER2-enriched (ER and PR negative, and HER2- positive), and triple-negative (TN) (ER negative, PR negative, and HER2- negative). Comparisons of the ages of patients and molecular subtypes between different geographic regions were performed. Results South and Southeast regions with a higher percentage of European ancestry and higher socioeconomic status presented with the highest proportion of luminal tumors. The North region presented with more aggressive subtypes (HER2-enriched and triple-negative), while the Central-West region predominated triple-positive carcinomas. The Northeast—a region with a high African influence—presented intermediate frequency of the different molecular subtypes. The differences persisted in subgroups of patients under and over 50 years. Conclusions The geographic regions differ according to the distribution of molecular subtypes of breast cancer. However, other differences, beside those related to African ancestry, such as socioeconomic, climatic, nutritional, and geographic, have to be considered to explain our results. The knowledge of the differences in breast cancer characteristics among the geographic regions may help to organize healthcare programs in large countries

  7. Trastuzumab-grafted PAMAM dendrimers for the selective delivery of anticancer drugs to HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kulhari, Hitesh; Pooja, Deep; Shrivastava, Shweta; Kuncha, Madhusudana; Naidu, V. G. M.; Bansal, Vipul; Sistla, Ramakrishna; Adams, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 20% of breast cancer cases are human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive. This type of breast cancer is more aggressive and tends to reoccur more often than HER2-negative breast cancer. In this study, we synthesized trastuzumab (TZ)-grafted dendrimers to improve delivery of docetaxel (DTX) to HER2-positive breast cancer cells. Bioconjugation of TZ on the surface of dendrimers was performed using a heterocrosslinker, MAL-PEG-NHS. For imaging of cancer cells, dendrimers were also conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate. Comparative in vitro studies revealed that these targeted dendrimers were more selective, and had higher antiproliferation activity, towards HER2-positive MDA-MB-453 human breast cancer cells than HER2-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. When compared with unconjugated dendrimers, TZ-conjugated dendrimers also displayed higher cellular internalization and induction of apoptosis against MDA-MB-453 cells. Binding of TZ to the dendrimer surface could help site-specific delivery of DTX and reduce systemic toxicity resulting from its lack of specificity. In addition, in vivo studies revealed that the pharmacokinetic profile of DTX was significantly improved by the conjugated nanosystem. PMID:27052896

  8. Primary radiotherapy after tumour excision as an alternative to mastectomy for early breast cancer. Rationale and preliminary results of a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Browde, S; Nissenbaum, M M

    1983-09-28

    A conservative approach to the management of breast cancer is gaining acceptance. The evidence from many retrospective and prospective studies indicates that breast-preserving surgery and radiation therapy give results equal to those of mastectomy. Relapse affecting the breast alone has been shown not to be detrimental to survival, while the psychological benefits to the patients have been gratifying. A prospective study of early breast cancer treated by conservative surgery and radiation was commenced at the Johannesburg Hospital in 1980. The results in 57 patients are reported. So far there have been 2 cases of local recurrence. In the majority of cases satisfactory cosmetic results were achieved. It is considered that lumpectomy with axillary dissection to establish nodal status followed by irradiation is the treatment of choice for stage I and II carcinoma of the breast.

  9. [Genome Abnormality and Histological Findings in Breast Carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Moriya, Takuya; Suzuki, Soichiro; Kanomata, Naoki

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancers contain variable histologies as well as biology. Gene expression profiling and cluster analyses have been performed since the beginning of the 21st century. The use of intrinsic subtype classification has replaced histological classification of breast carcinomas, as it frequently yields the same results. For examples, around 80% of triple negative (estrogen receptor-, progesterone receptor-, and HER2-negative) cancers are of the basal-like subtype. In daily practice, adjuvant therapy is selected based on histological features, but the results of ordinal cluster analyses and histological intrinsic subtypes are not always the same for individual cases. With advanced genetic analysis, new concepts have been elucidated, ie, the molecular identification of claudin-low breast cancer. Proposals of a new classification system and a new therapeutic approach are expected in the future. PMID:27067844

  10. Gastric calcifying fibrous tumour

    PubMed Central

    Attila, Tan; Chen, Dean; Gardiner, Geoffrey W; Ptak, Theadore W; Marcon, Norman E

    2006-01-01

    Intramucosal gastric tumours are most commonly found to be gastrointestinal stromal tumours or leiomyomas (smooth muscle tumours); however, a variety of other uncommon mesenchymal tumours can occur in the stomach wall. A rare benign calcifying fibrous tumour is reported and the endoscopic appearance, ultrasound findings and morphology are documented. A review of the literature found only two similar cases. PMID:16858502

  11. Multiple tumours in survival estimates.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Stefano; De Angelis, Roberta; Ciccolallo, Laura; Carrani, Eugenio; Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Grande, Enrico; Zigon, Giulia; Brenner, Hermann

    2009-04-01

    In international comparisons of cancer registry based survival it is common practice to restrict the analysis to first primary tumours and exclude multiple cancers. The probability of correctly detecting subsequent cancers depends on the registry's running time, which results in different proportions of excluded patients and may lead to biased comparisons. We evaluated the impact on the age-standardised relative survival estimates of also including multiple primary tumours. Data from 2,919,023 malignant cancers from 69 European cancer registries participating in the EUROCARE-4 collaborative study were used. A total of 183,683 multiple primary tumours were found, with an overall proportion of 6.3% over all the considered cancers, ranging from 0.4% (Naples, Italy) to 12.9% (Iceland). The proportion of multiple tumours varied greatly by type of tumour, being higher for those with high incidence and long survival (breast, prostate and colon-rectum). Five-year relative survival was lower when including patients with multiple cancers. For all cancers combined the average difference was -0.4 percentage points in women and -0.7 percentage points in men, and was greater for older registries. Inclusion of multiple tumours led to lower survival in 44 out of 45 cancer sites analysed, with the greatest differences found for larynx (-1.9%), oropharynx (-1.5%), and penis (-1.3%). Including multiple primary tumours in survival estimates for international comparison is advisable because it reduces the bias due to different observation periods, age, registration quality and completeness of registration. The general effect of inclusion is to reduce survival estimates by a variable amount depending on the proportion of multiple primaries and cancer site.

  12. Economic evaluation of eribulin as second-line treatment for metastatic breast cancer in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Gabriel; Majethia, Unnati; Breeze, Janis L; Kontoudis, Ilias; Park, Jeongae

    2016-01-01

    Background Metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is associated with poor prognosis, particularly for those patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2)-negative tumor. Similar to the rest of the world, treatment options are limited in South Korea following first-line chemotherapy with anthracyclines and/or taxanes. This study examined the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of eribulin in South Korean patients with HER2-negative MBC who have progressed after usage of at least one chemotherapeutic regimen for advanced disease (second-line therapy). Methods A partition survival model was developed from the perspective of the South Korean health care system. The economic impact of introducing eribulin as second-line therapy for HER2-negative MBC was compared to that of capecitabine and vinorelbine. The analysis estimated incremental cost per life-year (LY), that is, cost-effectiveness, and cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), that is, cost-utility, of eribulin for management of HER2-negative MBC in South Korea. The model accounted for overall survival, progression-free survival, drug costs, grade 3/4 adverse events, and health care utilization. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to identify uncertainty in the results of the economic evaluation. Results Second-line eribulin was associated with greater benefits in terms of LY and QALY, compared to capecitabine and vinorelbine. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was ₩10.5M (approximately USD 9,200) per LY, and the incremental cost-utility ratio was ₩17M (approximately USD 14,800) per QALY in the basecase analysis. The incremental cost-utility ratio ranged from ₩12M (USD 10,461) to ₩27M (USD 23,538) per QALY in the deterministic sensitivity analysis. In the probabilistic sensitivity analysis, >99% of the simulations were below ₩50M (USD 42,300), and the lower and upper 95% confidence intervals were ₩3M (USD 2,600) and ₩24M (USD 20,900) per QALY

  13. Economic evaluation of eribulin as second-line treatment for metastatic breast cancer in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Gabriel; Majethia, Unnati; Breeze, Janis L; Kontoudis, Ilias; Park, Jeongae

    2016-01-01

    Background Metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is associated with poor prognosis, particularly for those patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2)-negative tumor. Similar to the rest of the world, treatment options are limited in South Korea following first-line chemotherapy with anthracyclines and/or taxanes. This study examined the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of eribulin in South Korean patients with HER2-negative MBC who have progressed after usage of at least one chemotherapeutic regimen for advanced disease (second-line therapy). Methods A partition survival model was developed from the perspective of the South Korean health care system. The economic impact of introducing eribulin as second-line therapy for HER2-negative MBC was compared to that of capecitabine and vinorelbine. The analysis estimated incremental cost per life-year (LY), that is, cost-effectiveness, and cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), that is, cost-utility, of eribulin for management of HER2-negative MBC in South Korea. The model accounted for overall survival, progression-free survival, drug costs, grade 3/4 adverse events, and health care utilization. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to identify uncertainty in the results of the economic evaluation. Results Second-line eribulin was associated with greater benefits in terms of LY and QALY, compared to capecitabine and vinorelbine. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was ₩10.5M (approximately USD 9,200) per LY, and the incremental cost-utility ratio was ₩17M (approximately USD 14,800) per QALY in the basecase analysis. The incremental cost-utility ratio ranged from ₩12M (USD 10,461) to ₩27M (USD 23,538) per QALY in the deterministic sensitivity analysis. In the probabilistic sensitivity analysis, >99% of the simulations were below ₩50M (USD 42,300), and the lower and upper 95% confidence intervals were ₩3M (USD 2,600) and ₩24M (USD 20,900) per QALY

  14. Imaging of testicular tumours.

    PubMed

    Owens, E J; Kabala, J; Goddard, P

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the diagnosis, pathology and imaging of testicular tumours, predominantly germ cell tumours. It will discuss the imaging techniques used in their diagnosis, staging and surveillance.

  15. Chondromyxoid Fibroma: An Unusual Tumour at An Atypical Location

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Mallikarjuna Devaredappa; Govindarajan, Abhay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Rib tumours are mostly secondaries arising from breast or prostrate malignancies. Among primary rib tumours, osteochondromas are reported as the commonest cause. Chondromyxoid fibromas are primary benign rib tumours that are seldom seen, occurring almost exclusively at the metaphyseal ends of large tubular bones. Here a case of chondromyxoid fibroma of rib, its clinical and radiological features, management and prognosis, is discussed which has only an occasional mention in literature. PMID:26393192

  16. Effects of Herceptin on circulating tumor cells in HER2 positive early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J-L; Yao, Q; Chen Y Wang, J-H; Wang, H; Fan, Q; Ling, R; Yi, J; Wang, L

    2015-03-20

    The objective of this study was to determine the changes in peripheral blood circulating tumor cells in HER2-positive early breast cancer before and after Herceptin therapy, and to explore the effects of the HER2 gene and Herceptin on circulating tumor cells. CK19 mRNA expression in peripheral blood was evaluated by qRT-PCR as an index of circulating tumor cells in 15 cases of HER-2-positive breast cancer and 18 cases of HER2-negative breast cancer before, and after chemotherapy as well. Ten cases of HER2-positive breast cancer continued on Herceptin therapy for 3 months after chemotherapy, and their peripheral blood was again drawn and assayed for CK-19 mRNA expression. Preoperatively, all cases of HER2-positive cancer were positive for CK19 mRNA in peripheral blood, but 6 cases of HER2-negative breast cancer were positive (33.3%), where there was a substantial difference between the two groups. After 6 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy, CK19 positive rates in cases of HER2-positive and -negative breast cancer reduced by 93.3 and 11.1%, respectively, with a significant difference still existing. After 3 months of Herceptin therapy, expression of CK19 mRNA declined considerably in 10 cases of HER2 positive breast cancer (113.66 ± 88.65 vs 63.35 ± 49.27, P = 0.025). HER-2 gene expression closely correlated with circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood of early breast cancer patients. Moreover, Herceptin, a monoclonal antibody for HER2, can reduce the number of circulating tumor cells, which can be an early predictive factor for Herceptin therapy effectiveness against breast cancer.

  17. Concordant HER2 status between metastatic breast cancer cells in CSF and primary breast cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Park, In Hae; Kwon, Youngmee; Ro, Jae Y; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil

    2010-08-01

    It is not known whether the HER2 status of malignant CSF cells coincides with that of the original breast carcinoma cells. We investigated whether CSF cytology specimens were suitable to evaluate HER2 status by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in patient with leptomeningeal metastasis (LM). Both formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) breast cancer tissue and liquid based CSF cytology specimens were evaluated for HER2 status in 16 patients with LM. We evaluated HER2 gene amplification using FISH on destained CSF cytology slides containing a minimum of 20 malignant cells per slide, and compared these with the HER2 status by immunohistochemistry (IHC) or FISH in FFPE tissues. HER2 was considered positive when the HER2:CEP17 ratio was >or=2.0 or IHC 3+. Of 16 cases, four were HER2 positive and 12 were HER2 negative by FISH analysis in CSF cytology. All CSF-positive cases were HER2 positive by IHC in FFPE tissue. Of 12 HER2 FISH-negative cases in CSF cytology, 10 were HER2 negative (IHC 0 or 1+) and two were IHC 2+ in FFPE tissue. Two IHC 2+ cases had HER2:CEP17 ratios of 1.27 and 2.1, respectively, by FISH in FFPE tissue. As a result, the HER2 status concordance rate between metastatic breast cancer cells in CSF and FFPE primary tissue by IHC and FISH was very high. When CSF cytology specimens were appropriately prepared and had adequate cellularity without dry artifacts, the CSF cytology was suitable to evaluate HER2 status by FISH analysis in patients with LM.

  18. PTEN loss is associated with worse outcome in HER2-amplified breast cancer patients but is not associated with trastuzumab resistance

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Howard M.; Gardner, Humphrey; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Elatre, Wafaa; O’Brien, Carol; Lackner, Mark R.; Pestano, Gary A.; Santiago, Angela; Villalobos, Ivonne; Eiermann, Wolfgang; Pienkowski, Tadeusz; Martin, Miguel; Robert, Nicholas; Crown, John; Nuciforo, Paolo; Bee, Valerie; Mackey, John; Slamon, Dennis J.; Press, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the clinical relevance of PTEN in HER2-amplified and HER2-non-amplified disease. Experimental Design We assessed PTEN status in two large adjuvant breast cancer trials (BCIRG-006 and BCIRG-005) using a PTEN IHC assay that was previously validated in a panel of 33 breast cancer cell lines and prostate cancer tissues with known PTEN gene deletion. Results In the HER2-positive patient population, absence of tumor cell PTEN staining occurred at a rate of 5.4% and was independent of ER/PR status. In contrast, 15.9% of HER2-negative patients exhibited absence of PTEN staining with the highest frequency seen in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) subgroup versus ER/PR-positive patients (35.1% vs. 10.9%). Complete absence of PTEN staining in tumor cells was associated with poor clinical outcome in HER2-positive disease. Those patients whose cancers demonstrated absent PTEN staining had a significant decrease in disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) compared to patients with tumors exhibiting any PTEN staining patterns (low, moderate or high). Trastuzumab appeared to provide clinical benefit even for patients lacking PTEN staining. In the HER2-negative population there were no statistically significant differences in clinical outcome based on PTEN status. Conclusions This study is the largest to date examining PTEN status in breast cancer and the data suggest that the rate and significance of PTEN status differ between HER2-positive and HER2-negative disease. Furthermore, the data clearly suggest that HER2-positive patients with PTEN loss still benefit from trastuzumab. PMID:25649019

  19. Tumour biology: Senescence in premalignant tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, Manuel; Gil, Jesús; Efeyan, Alejo; Guerra, Carmen; Schuhmacher, Alberto J.; Barradas, Marta; Benguría, Alberto; Zaballos, Angel; Flores, Juana M.; Barbacid, Mariano; Beach, David; Serrano, Manuel

    2005-08-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence is a cellular response that may be crucial for protection against cancer development, but its investigation has so far been restricted to cultured cells that have been manipulated to overexpress an oncogene. Here we analyse tumours initiated by an endogenous oncogene, ras, and show that senescent cells exist in premalignant tumours but not in malignant ones. Senescence is therefore a defining feature of premalignant tumours that could prove valuable in the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer.

  20. Weekly paclitaxel and concurrent pazopanib following doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide as neoadjuvant therapy for HER-negative locally advanced breast cancer: NSABP Foundation FB-6, a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Tan, A R; Johannes, H; Rastogi, P; Jacobs, S A; Robidoux, A; Flynn, P J; Thirlwell, M P; Fehrenbacher, L; Stella, P J; Goel, R; Julian, T B; Provencher, L; Bury, M J; Bhatt, K; Geyer, C E; Swain, S M; Mamounas, E P; Wolmark, N

    2015-01-01

    This multicenter single-arm phase II study evaluated the addition of pazopanib to concurrent weekly paclitaxel following doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide as neoadjuvant therapy in human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2)-negative locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Patients with HER2-negative stage III breast cancer were treated with doxorubicin 60 mg/m(2) and cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m(2) for four cycles every 3 weeks followed by weekly paclitaxel 80 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days for four cycles concurrently with pazopanib 800 mg orally daily prior to surgery. Post-operatively, pazopanib was given daily for 6 months. The primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) in the breast and lymph nodes. Between July 2009 and March 2011, 101 patients with stage IIIA-C HER2-negative breast cancer were enrolled. The pCR rate in evaluable patients who initiated paclitaxel and pazopanib was 17 % (16/93). The pCR rate was 9 % (6/67) in hormone receptor-positive tumors and 38 % (10/26) in triple-negative tumors. Pre-operative pazopanib was completed in only 39 % of patients. The most frequent grade 3 and 4 adverse events during paclitaxel and pazopanib were neutropenia (27 %), diarrhea (5 %), ALT and AST elevations (each 5 %), and hypertension (5 %). Although the pCR rate of paclitaxel and pazopanib following AC chemotherapy given as neoadjuvant therapy in women with LABC met the pre-specified criteria for activity, there was substantial toxicity, which led to a high discontinuation rate of pazopanib. The combination does not appear to warrant further evaluation in the neoadjuvant setting for breast cancer.

  1. RECIST for Response (Clinical and Imaging) in Neoadjuvant Clinical Trials in Operable Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Semiglazov, Vladimir

    2015-05-01

    Although approximately 70% of breast cancer patients demonstrate a clinical response on neoadjuvant systemic therapy on physical examination or on anatomic radiographic imaging, only 3%-40% achieve a pathologic complete response (pCR). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is superior to physical examination, ultrasound, and mammography in response evaluation during neoadjuvant systemic therapy. The accuracy of breast MRI to predict pCR has a moderate sensitivity, but high specificity. The accuracy of anatomic imaging to assess residual disease and predict pCR depended on anatomic radiographic imaging cancer subtypes. Response monitoring using breast is accurate in triple-negative or HER2-positive tumors. It was inaccurate in estrogen receptor-positive/HER2-negative subtype. Another approach currently under investigation is dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and diffusion weighted-imaging, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. PMID:26063880

  2. [Brain metastases in breast cancer. Epidemiology and natural history. The Institut Curie experience].

    PubMed

    Gachet, Julie; Giroux, Julie; Girre, Véronique; Brain, Étienne; Kirova, Youlia; Mignot, Laurent; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Dutertre, Guillaume; Pouit, Bernard; Mosseri, Véronique; Falcou, Marie-Christine; Cottu, Paul H

    2011-04-01

    Breast cancer is the second cause for brain metastases. Their incidence is rising, partly due to the therapeutic improvements which alter the natural history of breast cancer. Predictive factors for brain metastases have been identified: HER2 oncogene overexpression, lack of expression of hormone receptors, young age and triple negative status. Brain metastases prognosis remains poor with a median survival shorter than 1 year, except for solitary lesions treated by surgery or radiosurgery. We have analysed two series of data from Institut Curie (Paris and Saint-Cloud). In women younger than 65 years, with HER2 negative breast carcinoma, median survival was 7.1 months. In women older than 65 years, median survival was 4 months.

  3. HER2 status of circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic breast cancer: a prospective, multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Fehm, Tanja; Müller, Volkmar; Aktas, Bahriye; Janni, Wolfgang; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Stickeler, Elmar; Lattrich, Claus; Löhberg, Christian R; Solomayer, Erich; Rack, Brigitte; Riethdorf, Sabine; Klein, Christoph; Schindlbeck, Christian; Brocker, Kerstin; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Pantel, Klaus

    2010-11-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that HER2 status can change during disease recurrence or progression in breast cancer patients. In this context, re-evaluation of HER2 status by assessment of HER2 expression on circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is a strategy with potential clinical application. The aim of this trial was to determine the HER2 status of CTCs in metastatic breast cancer patients comparing two CTC assays. A total of 254 patients with metastatic breast cancer from nine German university breast cancer centers were enrolled in this prospective study. HER2 status of CTCs was assessed using both the FDA-approved CellSearch® assay and AdnaTest BreastCancer™. Using the CellSearch assay, 122 of 245 (50%) patients had ≥5 CTCs, and HER2-positive CTCs were observed in 50 (41%) of these patients. Ninety of 229 (39%) patients were CTC positive using AdnaTest BreastCancer, and HER2 positivity rate was 47% (42 of 90). The rate of breast cancer patients with HER2-negative primary tumors but HER2-positive CTCs was 32% (25 of 78) and 49% (28 of 57) using the CellSearch assay and AdnaTest BreastCancer, respectively. Considering only those patients who had CTCs on both tests (n = 62), concordant results regarding HER2 positivity were obtained in 50% of the patients (31/62) (P = 0.96, κ = -0.006). HER2-positive CTCs can be detected in a relevant number of patients with HER2 negative primary tumors. Therefore, it will be mandatory to correlate the assay-dependent HER2 status of CTCs to the clinical response on HER2-targeted therapies.

  4. The localisation and micro-mapping of copper and other trace elements in breast tumours using a synchrotron micro-XRF system.

    PubMed

    Farquharson, M J; Geraki, K; Falkenberg, G; Leek, R; Harris, A

    2007-02-01

    Trace elements have critical roles in cancer biology. The quantity and distribution of the elements Cl, Ca, K, P, S, Ti, Fe, Cu and Zn in samples of primary breast cancer have been assessed. The samples were formalin fixed tissue specimens formatted as microarrays of cores 1.0 mm diameter and 10 microm thick each. The data were obtained using a synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe system. The spatial resolution of elemental maps was approximately 20 microm. Maps were compared with light transmission images of the samples and then the images were stained for cancer. The synchrotron system proved successful in producing data that could be mapped into high-resolution images where clear structure could be identified. Correlation of these distributions with the concentrations of cancer cells was achieved in some samples.

  5. Glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes in human tumours and tumour derived cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, A. D.; Forrester, L. M.; Hayes, J. D.; Wareing, C. J.; Carmichael, J.; Harris, A. L.; Mooghen, M.; Wolf, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that glutathione S-transferases play a role in the intrinsic and acquired resistance of tumours to anticancer drugs. In view of the wide use of tumour cell lines to understand the factors which confer either sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapeutic agents we have determined glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and isozyme composition in nine human cell lines. These data have been compared with the values obtained in solid tumours. In most cases overall GST activity was higher in the tumours than in the cell lines. This was most pronounced for the breast tumour samples relative to MCF7 cell line. The pi class GST subunit was present at similar concentration in the cell lines and the tumours, and in most cases was the most abundant subunit present. The alpha and mu class GST were expressed in most of the cell lines but at much lower concentration than the pi class subunit. Also considerable variability particularly in the expression of the mu subunits was observed. This was also the case for the expression of these subunits in the solid tumour samples. The levels of these GSTs (when expressed) in the solid tumours was invariably higher than that observed in the cell lines. There are therefore several similarities but also some significant differences in GST expression in solid tumours and cell lines. Whether the differences are because expression is lost during the generation of the cell lines or whether it reflects the individuality of human tumours remains to be clearly established. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:2789940

  6. Mouse Models of Brain Metastasis for Unravelling Tumour Progression.

    PubMed

    Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Sibson, Nicola R

    2016-01-01

    Secondary tumours in the brain account for 40 % of triple negative breast cancer patients, and the percentage may be higher at the time of autopsy. The use of in vivo models allow us to recapitulate the molecular mechanisms potentially used by circulating breast tumour cells to proliferate within the brain.Metastasis is a multistep process that depends on the success of several stages including cell evasion from the primary tumour, distribution and survival within the blood stream and cerebral microvasculature, penetration of the blood-brain barrier and proliferation within the brain microenvironment. Cellular adhesion molecules are key proteins involved in all of the steps in the metastatic process. Our group has developed two different in vivo models to encompass both seeding and colonisation stages of the metastatic process: (1) haematogenous dissemination of tumour cells by direct injection into the left ventricle of the heart, and (2) direct implantation of the tumour cells into the mouse brain.This chapter describes, in detail, the practical implementation of the intracerebral model, which can be used to analyse tumour proliferation within a specific area of the central nervous system and tumour-host cell interactions. We also describe the use of immunohistochemistry techniques to identify, at the molecular scale, tumour-host cell interactions, which may open new windows for brain metastasis therapy.

  7. Bronchial mucous gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Spencer, H

    1979-07-27

    Tumours arising in the bronchial mucous glands closely resemble tumours arising in the mixed salivary glands. Bronchial mucous gland tumours account for less than 0.5 per cent of all lung tumours. Twenty six tumours are reviewed and they have been divided into five types, (a) adenoidcystic carcinomas, (b) muco-epidermoid tumors, (c) mixed (pleomorphic) tumors, (d) cystadenomas and (f) oxyphilic adenoma. The clinical features, and postoperative course of the patients are reviewed. Adenocystic carcinomas, arising in the bronchus frequently involve the neighbouring trachea and spread mainly by direct infiltration. Most muco-epidermoid bronchial tumours were confined to young persons, and the only malignant muco-epidermoid tumour occurred in an elderly person. The prognosis in young persons is good provided the tumours are completely excised. The two mixed bronchial tumours resembled their salivary counterparts and one subsequently behaved as a carcinoma and metastasised. Bronchial cystadenomas all proved to be benign tumours but in two cases were associated with surface papillary proliferation. The only example of an oxyphil cell adenoma was discovered at post mortem examination. The histogenesis of the tumours is considered.

  8. Tumour progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour's survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible.

  9. T-cell immunity in the induction and maintenance of a tumour dormant state.

    PubMed

    Schirrmacher, V

    2001-08-01

    We conclude from animal tumour model studies that T cell immunity can play an essential role in the induction and maintenance of tumour dormancy. Evidence was found in tumour dormancy situations for active control of proliferating tumour cells by CD8 memory T cells leading to a long-term balance in the bone marrow between low numbers of tumour cells and immunological memory. In breast cancer patients, too, the bone marrow may represent a privileged compartment for tumour dormancy and immunological memory. Upon restimulation with tumour antigen pulsed autologous dendritic cells, bone marrow-derived memory T cells from cancer patients could be shown to exist and to become activated into potent anti-tumour effector cells.

  10. Molecular subtypes of breast carcinoma in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alnegheimish, Norah A.; Alshatwi, Razan A.; Alhefdhi, Reem M.; Arafah, Maha M.; AlRikabi, Ammar C.; Husain, Sufia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the distribution of various molecular subtypes of breast cancer in Saudi Arabia and to assess the association between these subtypes and age at diagnosis, tumor size, histopathological type, grade, presence of carcinoma in-situ, and lymph node status. Methods: This observational retrospective study, between January 2010 and December 2014, was conducted at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. We classified 359 breast cancers into 4 molecular subtypes, using immunohistochemistry: luminal A (estrogen receptor [ER], or progesterone receptor [PR] positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 [HER2] negative), luminal B (ER and/or PR positive and HER2 positive), HER2-positive (ER and PR negative and HER2 positive), and triple negative (ER, PR, and HER2 negative). We evaluated the relationship between these subtypes and clinicopathological features using Chi square test. Results: The most prevalent subtype was luminal A (58.5%), followed in descending order of frequency by triple negative (14.8%), luminal B (14.5%), and HER2-positive (12.3%). The average age at diagnosis was 49.8 years, and average tumor size at diagnosis was 3.19 cm. Conclusion: Luminal A tumor was the most common molecular subtype and HER2-positive was the least common. Most lobular carcinomas were luminal A tumors. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive and triple negative tumors had a higher histologic grade and a larger tumor size at diagnosis, and they were more common in women under 50 years. Carcinoma-in-situ was least common in triple negative tumors. We found no association between lymph node status and molecular subtypes. PMID:27146612

  11. Tumour progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour’s survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  12. A Splice Variant of HER2 Corresponding to Herstatin Is Expressed in the Noncancerous Breast and in Breast Carcinomas1

    PubMed Central

    Koletsa, Triantafyllia; Kostopoulos, Ioannis; Charalambous, Elpida; Christoforidou, Barbara; Nenopoulou, Eleni; Kotoula, Vassiliki

    2008-01-01

    Herstatin (HST) is an alternatively spliced HER2 product with growth-inhibitory properties in experimental cancer systems. The role of HST in adult human tissues and disease remains unexplored. Here, we investigated HST expression at the mRNA and protein (immunohistochemistry [IHC]) level in parallel with parameters reflecting HER activation in 187 breast carcinomas and matched noncancerous breast tissues (NCBT). Noncancerous breast tissues demonstrated the highest HST/HER2 transcript ratios corresponding to a few positive epithelial and stromal cells by IHC. Although HST/HER2 transcript ratios in tumors were inversely associated with HER2 IHC grading (P = .0048 for HER2 IHC-1+ and P = .0006 for HER2 IHC-2+ vs HER2-negative tumors), relative HST expression within the same tumor/NCBT system remained constant. HST/HER2 ratios did not predict the presence of HST protein, which was found in 46 (25%) of 187 tumors. A subgroup of HER2 IHC-3+ tumors exhibited high HST/HER2 transcript ratios, strong HST protein positivity, and cytoplasmic phospho-Akt/PKB and p21CIP1/WAF1 localization. In conclusion, HST may act as a paracrine factor in the adult breast. Because HST is described as an endogenous pan-HER inhibitor, the presence of this protein in breast carcinomas may portent the inefficiency of exogenous efforts to block HER2 dimerization, whereas its absence may justify such interventions. PMID:18592003

  13. Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Breast: A Rare Breast Cancer Subtype – Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ratti, Vilma; Pagani, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    Background Glycogen-rich clear cell breast carcinoma is a rare histological breast cancer subtype. Its prognosis may vary depending on specific clinical and pathological characteristics such as low grade, strong positivity of estrogen receptor (ER) expression and early diagnosis. Case Presentation We present the case of a 53-year-old woman with a bleeding 10-cm-diameter mass in the left breast. The histological examination showed a poorly differentiated tumor with malignant cells characterized by abundant clear cytoplasm. The diagnosis of clear cell carcinoma was based on the histological characteristics of the tumor, and a nonmammary origin was initially ruled out. The tumor was triple negative [i.e. ER, progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2 negative]. Four months after the initial locoregional treatment, the patient developed lung and distant lymph node metastases. Conclusions Glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma of the breast is a rare tumor. Early diagnosis, absence of lymph node metastases and ER/PR positivity are associated with a better prognosis, as in other common breast cancer subtypes. PMID:26600782

  14. p53 alteration in morphologically normal/benign breast tissue in patients with triple-negative high-grade breast carcinomas: breast p53 signature?

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Stolla, Moritz; Ring, Brian Z; Yang, Qi; Laughlin, Todd S; Rothberg, Paul G; Skinner, Kristin; Hicks, David G

    2016-09-01

    p53 alterations have been identified in approximately 23% of breast carcinomas, particularly in hormone receptor-negative high-grade carcinomas. It is considered to be an early event in breast carcinogenesis. Nevertheless, the putative precursor lesion of high-grade breast carcinoma remains elusive. Breast excision specimens from 93 triple-negative high-grade invasive ductal carcinomas, 48 estrogen receptor (ER)-positive/progesterone receptor-positive/Her2-negative non-high-grade invasive ductal carcinomas, and 50 mammoplasty breasts were selected. At least 2 tissue blocks with tumor and adjacent benign tissue were sectioned and subjected to immunohistochemistry staining for p53. TP53 gene sequencing was performed on select tumors. Further immunohistochemistry staining for ER and Ki-67 was performed on consecutive sections of tissue with p53-positive normal/benign cells. Of the 93 high-grade carcinomas, 51 (55%) were positive for p53 alteration, whereas only 3 (6.25%) of the 48 non-high-grade carcinomas were p53 altered. Focal p53 positivity in adjacent normal/benign breast tissue was identified in 19 cases, and 18 of them also had p53 alteration in their carcinomas. Only 1 case had focal p53 staining in normal/benign tissue, but the tumor was negative for p53 alteration. No p53 staining positivity was identified in the mammoplasty specimens. The p53-stained normal/benign cells were ER negative and did not show an increase in the Ki-67 labeling index. These findings indicate that the p53 staining positivity in normal/benign breast tissue is not a random event. It could be considered as the "p53 signature" in breast and serve as an indicator for future potential risk of p53-positive high-grade breast carcinoma.

  15. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF MAMMARY GLAND TUMOURS OF DIFFERENT AGE PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Lykholat, T; Lykholat, O; Antonyuk, S

    2016-01-01

    Immunohistochemical and biochemical study of infiltrative ductal breast carcinoma and tissue adjacent to the tumour revealed a particular molecular profile and characteristics of the oxidant-antioxidant status neoplasms depending on the age of the patients and the presence of metastases in regional lymph nodes. Some causes of high aggressiveness and low hormone sensitivity of tumours in premenopausal women, as well as stability and high metastatic potential of tumours in postmenopausal women have been found. PMID:27266184

  16. Carboplatin+Nab-paclitaxel, Plus Trastuzumab (HER2+) or Bevacizumab (HER2-) in the Neoadjuvant Setting

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-03

    Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. 75 FR 30045 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... cancer known as HER2-negative breast cancer, in combination with the chemotherapy drug docetaxel; and (2) first-line treatment of HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer in combination with one of two classes of... for their locally recurrent or metastatic HER2 negative breast cancer. FDA intends to make...

  18. Uveal tumour resection

    PubMed Central

    Char, D.; Miller, T.; Crawford, J

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To review the ocular retention rates, visual results, and metastases in uveal tumours managed with eye wall resection techniques.
METHODS—This was a retrospective analysis of consecutive local uveal tumour resections performed by a single surgeon. All enucleation specimens were reviewed by one author. Both parametric and non-parametric analysis of data were performed.
RESULTS—138 eyes were scheduled for eye wall resection surgery. The mean age was 52 years (range 11-86 years). Tumours involved predominantly the iris in 14 cases, iris-ciliary body in 57, ciliary body alone in 18 patients, and in 49 cases the choroid was involved (ciliochoroidal, iris-ciliary body-choroid, or choroid). 125 eyes harboured melanomas; posterior tumours were more likely to have epithelioid cells (p<0.05). The mean follow up was 6 years. The mean clock hours in iris and iris-ciliary body tumours was 3.5. In tumours that involved the choroid the mean largest diameter was 12.9 mm and the mean thickness 8.5 mm. 105 of 138 (76%) eyes were retained. Histological assessment of surgical margins did not correlate evidence of tumour in enucleated eyes or metastatic disease. Surgical margins of more anterior tumours were more likely to be clear on histological evaluation (p<0.05). Approximately 53% of retained eyes had a final visual acuity of ⩾20/40; visual results were significantly better in more anteriorly located tumours (p<0.05). All retained iris tumour cases had ⩾20/40 final visual acuity. In tumours that involved the choroid nine of 31 retained eyes kept that level of visual acuity. Eight patients developed metastases; all metastatic events developed in patients with tumours that involved the choroid, and seven of eight were mixed cell melanomas.
CONCLUSIONS—76% of eyes were retained and 53% of these had a final visual acuity of ⩾20/40. Only 7% of uveal melanoma patients developed metastatic disease with a mean follow up of 6 years. Survival did not

  19. Evaluation of cell-line-derived xenograft tumours as controls for immunohistochemical testing for ER and PR.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Tahrim; Carter, Beverley; Denic, Nash; Gai, Luis; Power, Jennifer; Voisey, Kim; Kao, K R

    2015-09-01

    Quality control (QC) for immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis routinely incorporates archived specimens for on-slide control material. We have assessed the utility of cell-line-derived xenograft (CDX) tumours for QC in breast estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) biomarker testing. Immunoblot and IHC analyses were used to select cell lines with different steady-state levels of ER and PR expression. CDX tumours all demonstrated consistent and comparable expression of ER and PR with corresponding cell lines from which they were derived. Three pathologists experienced in breast biomarker reporting scored tumours from different locations on mammary fat pads to determine reproducibility. Tumours from different locations were consistently scored as identical, and the CDX tumours representing different levels of biomarker expression were similar to patient-derived controls. Pathologists could not consistently distinguish CDX tumours from patient-derived controls, suggesting that within the appropriate quality management setting, CDX tumours may serve as control material for reporting purposes.

  20. Chronic stress in mice remodels lymph vasculature to promote tumour cell dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Le, Caroline P.; Nowell, Cameron J.; Kim-Fuchs, Corina; Botteri, Edoardo; Hiller, Jonathan G.; Ismail, Hilmy; Pimentel, Matthew A.; Chai, Ming G.; Karnezis, Tara; Rotmensz, Nicole; Renne, Giuseppe; Gandini, Sara; Pouton, Colin W.; Ferrari, Davide; Möller, Andreas; Stacker, Steven A.; Sloan, Erica K.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress induces signalling from the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and drives cancer progression, although the pathways of tumour cell dissemination are unclear. Here we show that chronic stress restructures lymphatic networks within and around tumours to provide pathways for tumour cell escape. We show that VEGFC derived from tumour cells is required for stress to induce lymphatic remodelling and that this depends on COX2 inflammatory signalling from macrophages. Pharmacological inhibition of SNS signalling blocks the effect of chronic stress on lymphatic remodelling in vivo and reduces lymphatic metastasis in preclinical cancer models and in patients with breast cancer. These findings reveal unanticipated communication between stress-induced neural signalling and inflammation, which regulates tumour lymphatic architecture and lymphogenous tumour cell dissemination. These findings suggest that limiting the effects of SNS signalling to prevent tumour cell dissemination through lymphatic routes may provide a strategy to improve cancer outcomes. PMID:26925549

  1. Synthesis, Characterization and In Vitro Study of Biocompatible Cinnamaldehyde Functionalized Magnetite Nanoparticles (CPGF Nps) For Hyperthermia and Drug Delivery Applications in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Kirtee D.; Kadu, Brijesh S.; Mansara, Prakash; Gupta, Preeti; Deore, Avinash V.; Chikate, Rajeev C.; Poddar, Pankaj; Dhole, Sanjay D.; Kaul-Ghanekar, Ruchika

    2014-01-01

    Cinnamaldehyde, the bioactive component of the spice cinnamon, and its derivatives have been shown to possess anti-cancer activity against various cancer cell lines. However, its hydrophobic nature invites attention for efficient drug delivery systems that would enhance the bioavailability of cinnamaldehyde without affecting its bioactivity. Here, we report the synthesis of stable aqueous suspension of cinnamaldehyde tagged Fe3O4 nanoparticles capped with glycine and pluronic polymer (CPGF NPs) for their potential application in drug delivery and hyperthermia in breast cancer. The monodispersed superparamagnetic NPs had an average particulate size of ∼20 nm. TGA data revealed the drug payload of ∼18%. Compared to the free cinnamaldehyde, CPGF NPs reduced the viability of breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and MDAMB231, at lower doses of cinnamaldehyde suggesting its increased bioavailability and in turn its therapeutic efficacy in the cells. Interestingly, the NPs were non-toxic to the non-cancerous HEK293 and MCF10A cell lines compared to the free cinnamaldehyde. The novelty of CPGF nanoparticulate system was that it could induce cytotoxicity in both ER/PR positive/Her2 negative (MCF7) and ER/PR negative/Her2 negative (MDAMB231) breast cancer cells, the latter being insensitive to most of the chemotherapeutic drugs. The NPs decreased the growth of the breast cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner and altered their migration through reduction in MMP-2 expression. CPGF NPs also decreased the expression of VEGF, an important oncomarker of tumor angiogenesis. They induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells through loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of caspase-3. Interestingly, upon exposure to the radiofrequency waves, the NPs heated up to 41.6°C within 1 min, suggesting their promise as a magnetic hyperthermia agent. All these findings indicate that CPGF NPs prove to be potential nano-chemotherapeutic agents in breast cancer. PMID:25268975

  2. Molecular mechanisms for tumour resistance to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Li, Zhi-Ling; He, Zhi-Xu; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the prevailing methods used to treat malignant tumours, but the outcome and prognosis of tumour patients are not optimistic. Cancer cells gradually generate resistance to almost all chemotherapeutic drugs via a variety of distinct mechanisms and pathways. Chemotherapeutic resistance, either intrinsic or acquired, is caused and sustained by reduced drug accumulation and increased drug export, alterations in drug targets and signalling transduction molecules, increased repair of drug-induced DNA damage, and evasion of apoptosis. In order to better understand the mechanisms of chemoresistance, this review highlights our current knowledge of the role of altered drug metabolism and transport and deregulation of apoptosis and autophagy in the development of tumour chemoresistance. Reduced intracellular activation of prodrugs (e.g. thiotepa and tegafur) or enhanced drug inactivation by Phase I and II enzymes contributes to the development of chemoresistance. Both primary and acquired resistance can be caused by alterations in the transport of anticancer drugs which is mediated by a variety of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance associated proteins, and breast cancer resistance protein. Presently there is a line of evidence indicating that deregulation of programmed cell death including apoptosis and autophagy is also an important mechanism for tumour resistance to anticancer drugs. Reversal of chemoresistance is likely via pharmacological and biological approaches. Further studies are warranted to grasp the full picture of how each type of cancer cells develop resistance to anticancer drugs and to identify novel strategies to overcome it.

  3. Molecular mechanisms for tumour resistance to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Li, Zhi-Ling; He, Zhi-Xu; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the prevailing methods used to treat malignant tumours, but the outcome and prognosis of tumour patients are not optimistic. Cancer cells gradually generate resistance to almost all chemotherapeutic drugs via a variety of distinct mechanisms and pathways. Chemotherapeutic resistance, either intrinsic or acquired, is caused and sustained by reduced drug accumulation and increased drug export, alterations in drug targets and signalling transduction molecules, increased repair of drug-induced DNA damage, and evasion of apoptosis. In order to better understand the mechanisms of chemoresistance, this review highlights our current knowledge of the role of altered drug metabolism and transport and deregulation of apoptosis and autophagy in the development of tumour chemoresistance. Reduced intracellular activation of prodrugs (e.g. thiotepa and tegafur) or enhanced drug inactivation by Phase I and II enzymes contributes to the development of chemoresistance. Both primary and acquired resistance can be caused by alterations in the transport of anticancer drugs which is mediated by a variety of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance associated proteins, and breast cancer resistance protein. Presently there is a line of evidence indicating that deregulation of programmed cell death including apoptosis and autophagy is also an important mechanism for tumour resistance to anticancer drugs. Reversal of chemoresistance is likely via pharmacological and biological approaches. Further studies are warranted to grasp the full picture of how each type of cancer cells develop resistance to anticancer drugs and to identify novel strategies to overcome it. PMID:27097837

  4. Associations between metabolic syndrome, breast cancer recurrence, and the 21-gene recurrence score assay.

    PubMed

    Muniz, Jeanette; Kidwell, Kelley M; Henry, N Lynn

    2016-06-01

    The 21-gene recurrence score (RS) assay is prognostic in estrogen receptor-positive (HR+), HER2-negative, node-negative breast cancer (BC). The interaction between RS and host factors including metabolic syndrome (MS) is unclear. MS conditions such as obesity have been associated with worse BC prognosis. The aim of this study was to identify associations between presence of MS conditions and RS group or breast cancer recurrence. Demographic, pathologic, and treatment data, MS criteria, and menopausal status were abstracted from medical records of women with stage I-II, HR+, HER2-negative BC evaluated with the RS assay at a single institution since 2005. MS was defined as presence of ≥3 of the following within 2 years of diagnosis: body mass index ≥27.7 kg/m(2); hypertension; impaired fasting glucose; HDL <50 mg/dL; hypertriglyceridemia. Of 533 eligible women, 22 % had MS. MS was more common in post- vs premenopausal women (30 vs 9 %; P < 0.0001). There was no significant association between RS group and overall MS status or any individual criterion, controlling for stage, and no association after stratification by menopausal status. Postmenopausal status was associated with higher RS group (P = 0.039), independent of stage. With 4.2-year median follow-up, no association between disease recurrence and MS was identified. Although MS has been associated with worse BC outcomes, we were unable to identify associations between RS group and MS criteria. Identification of prognostic factors other than RS that underlie this higher risk will be important for optimizing breast cancer treatment decision-making in patients with MS. PMID:27271766

  5. Pleomorphic adenoma in the breast of a human female. Aspiration biopsy findings and receptor determinations. Case report.

    PubMed

    Willén, R; Uvelius, B; Cameron, R

    1986-11-01

    A case of multiple pleomorphic adenomas ("mixed" tumour of salivary gland type) of the breast is reported. This rare benign tumour can be misinterpreted as a malignant tumour both clinically and radiologically. The aspiration biopsy findings suggested cystosarcoma phyllodes. Oestrogen and progesterone receptor determinations revealed medium high levels, comparable to carcinoma of the breast.

  6. [Desmoid tumor of the breast in a 9 years old little girl].

    PubMed

    Muller, Matthieu; Dessogne, Philippe; Baron, Marc; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Riopel, Céline; Diologent, Brigitte; Dupre, Pierre-François; Collet, Michel

    2011-02-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis (desmoid tumour) of the breast is a rare tumour that accounts only for 0.2% of primary breast tumours. This is a benign mesenchymal tumour that develops from muscular fasciae and aponeuroses. It is characterized by its local evolution and its tendency to relapse without metastasizing. Wide radical resection should be attempted whenever possible. Positive margins at resection and reoperation are associated with a high risk of local recurrence. The role of radiotherapy and of medical treatments- especially anti-estrogens - remains unclear. We report here the case of desmoid tumour of the breast arising in a 9-year-old little girl.

  7. Framework for estimating tumour parameters using thermal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Umadevi, V.; Raghavan, S.V.; Jaipurkar, Sandeep

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Non-invasive and non-ionizing medical imaging techniques are safe as these can be repeatedly used on as individual and are applicable across all age groups. Breast thermography is a non-invasive and non-ionizing medical imaging that can be potentially used in breast cancer detection and diagnosis. In this study, we used breast thermography to estimate the tumour contour from the breast skin surface temperature. Methods: We proposed a framework called infrared thermography based image construction (ITBIC) to estimate tumour parameters such as size and depth from cancerous breast skin surface temperature data. Markov Chain Monte Carlo method was used to enhance the accuracy of estimation in order to reflect clearly realistic situation. Results: We validated our method experimentally using Watermelon and Agar models. For the Watermelon experiment error in estimation of size and depth parameters was 1.5 and 3.8 per cent respectively. For the Agar model it was 0 and 8 per cent respectively. Further, thermal breast screening was done on female volunteers and compared it with the magnetic resonance imaging. The results were positive and encouraging. Interpretation & conclusions: ITBIC is computationally fast thermal imaging system and is perhaps affordable. Such a system will be useful for doctors or radiologists for breast cancer diagnosis. PMID:22199114

  8. Loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 1p in different solid human tumours: association with survival

    PubMed Central

    Ragnarsson, G; Eiriksdottir, G; Johannsdottir, J Th; Jonasson, J G; Egilsson, V; Ingvarsson, S

    1999-01-01

    The distal half of chromosome 1p was analysed with 15 polymorphic microsatellite markers in 683 human solid tumours at different locations. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was observed at least at one site in 369 cases or 54% of the tumours. LOHs detected ranged from 30–64%, depending on tumour location. The major results regarding LOH at different tumour locations were as follows: stomach, 20/38 (53%); colon and rectum, 60/109 (55%); lung, 38/63 (60%); breast, 145/238 (61%); endometrium, 18/25 (72%); ovary, 17/31 (55%); testis, 11/30 (37%); kidney, 22/73 (30%); thyroid, 4/14 (29%); and sarcomas, 9/14 (64%). High percentages of LOH were seen in the 1p36.3, 1p36.1, 1p35–p34.3, 1p32 and 1p31 regions, suggesting the presence of tumour-suppressor genes. All these regions on chromosome 1p show high LOH in more than one tumour type. However, distinct patterns of LOH were detected at different tumour locations. There was a significant separation of survival curves, with and without LOH at chromosome 1p, in the breast cancer patients. Multivariate analysis showed that LOH at 1p in breast tumours is a better indicator for prognosis than the other variables tested in our model, including nodal metastasis. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10188892

  9. Prognostic Significance of Progesterone Receptor–Positive Tumor Cells Within Immunohistochemically Defined Luminal A Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Prat, Aleix; Cheang, Maggie Chon U.; Martín, Miguel; Parker, Joel S.; Carrasco, Eva; Caballero, Rosalía; Tyldesley, Scott; Gelmon, Karen; Bernard, Philip S.; Nielsen, Torsten O.; Perou, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Current immunohistochemical (IHC)-based definitions of luminal A and B breast cancers are imperfect when compared with multigene expression-based assays. In this study, we sought to improve the IHC subtyping by examining the pathologic and gene expression characteristics of genomically defined luminal A and B subtypes. Patients and Methods Gene expression and pathologic features were collected from primary tumors across five independent cohorts: British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA) tamoxifen-treated only, Grupo Español de Investigación en Cáncer de Mama 9906 trial, BCCA no systemic treatment cohort, PAM50 microarray training data set, and a combined publicly available microarray data set. Optimal cutoffs of percentage of progesterone receptor (PR) –positive tumor cells to predict survival were derived and independently tested. Multivariable Cox models were used to test the prognostic significance. Results Clinicopathologic comparisons among luminal A and B subtypes consistently identified higher rates of PR positivity, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negativity, and histologic grade 1 in luminal A tumors. Quantitative PR gene and protein expression were also found to be significantly higher in luminal A tumors. An empiric cutoff of more than 20% of PR-positive tumor cells was statistically chosen and proved significant for predicting survival differences within IHC-defined luminal A tumors independently of endocrine therapy administration. Finally, no additional prognostic value within hormonal receptor (HR) –positive/HER2-negative disease was observed with the use of the IHC4 score when intrinsic IHC-based subtypes were used that included the more than 20% PR-positive tumor cells and vice versa. Conclusion Semiquantitative IHC expression of PR adds prognostic value within the current IHC-based luminal A definition by improving the identification of good outcome breast cancers. The new proposed IHC-based definition of luminal A

  10. Tumours of the thymus

    PubMed Central

    Sellors, T. Holmes; Thackray, A. C.; Thomson, A. D.

    1967-01-01

    Eighty-eight cases of thymoma are discussed with the object of trying to co-ordinate the histological and clinical features. The pathological specimens were in all cases obtained at operation. The pathology classification introduced by Thomson and Thackray in 1957 has been found to correspond adequately with the clinical pattern. The most common groups of tumours are basically epithelial and can be separated into five or six subdivisions, each of which has a separate pattern of behaviour. Lymphoid and teratomatous tumours also occur, but there were only two examples in this series. Clinically, separation of patients who suffered from myasthenia (38) and those who did not (50) affords the first main grouping. The majority of patients who had myasthenia gravis had tumours classified as epidermoid (19) and lymphoepithelial (14), the former with a more malignant appearance and behaviour than the latter. Removal of the tumour with or without radiation gave considerable and sometimes complete relief from myasthenic symptoms. Non-myasthenic thymoma (50) was usually discovered as a result of pressure signs or in the course of routine radiography. Spindle or oval celled tumours followed a benign pattern whereas undifferentiated thymoma was in every sense malignant, as also were teratomatous growths. Granulomatous or Hodgkin-like thymomas were of special interest and had an unpredictable course, some patients surviving many years after what was regarded as inadequate treatment. The place of radiotherapy as a pre- or post-operative agent complementary to surgery is discussed. Images PMID:6033387

  11. Salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Speight, P M; Barrett, A W

    2002-09-01

    Salivary gland tumours are a relatively rare and morphologically diverse group of lesions. Although most clinicians and pathologists will have encountered the more common benign neoplasms, few have experience of the full range of salivary cancers, which are best managed in specialist centres. This review considers some current areas of difficulty and controversy in the diagnosis and management of these neoplasms. The classification of these lesions is complex, encompassing nearly 40 different entities, but precise classification and terminology is essential for an accurate diagnosis and for the allocation of tumours to prognostic groups. For many salivary tumours diagnosis is straightforward but the wide range of morphological diversity between and within tumour types means that a diagnosis may not be possible on small incisional biopsies and careful consideration of the clinical and pathological features together is essential. Although tumour grading is important and helpful, it is not an independent prognostic indicator and must be considered in the context of stage. Large malignancies tend to have a poor prognosis regardless of grade and even high-grade neoplasms may do well when they are small. A helpful guide to management of salivary cancers is the '4 cm rule'.

  12. BCL2 as a Subtype-Specific Prognostic Marker for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Yong Hwa; Kim, Hyung Suk; Lee, Ahwon; Song, Byung Joo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) is an antiapoptosis protein and an important clinical breast cancer prognostic marker. As the role of BCL2 is dependent on the estrogen receptor (ER) status, this effect might differ according to molecular subtypes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the prognostic outcomes and BCL2 expression among the molecular subtypes. Methods We retrieved the data of 1,356 patients who were newly diagnosed with malignant breast cancer between November 2006 and November 2011. Immunohistochemistry was used to measure ER, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), Ki-67, and BCL2 expression. We classified breast cancer into five molecular subtypes based on the 13th St. Gallen International Expert Consensus, including luminal A, luminal B (HER2-negative), luminal B (HER2-positive), HER2-overexpression, and triple-negative subtypes. We analyzed the clinicopathological features and assessed the correlation between BCL2 expression and clinical outcomes, such as relapse-free survival (RFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) according to the five molecular subtypes. Results A total of 605 cases of breast cancer (53.8%) showed BCL2 expression. BCL2-positive expression was associated with young age (<50 years, p=0.036), lower histological grade (p<0.001), low Ki-67 level (<14%, p<0.001), hormone receptor positivity (p<0.001), HER2 negativity (p<0.001), luminal breast cancer (p<0.001), and low recurrence rate (p=0.016). BCL2-positive expression was also associated with favorable 5-year RFS (p=0.008, 91.4%) and DSS (p=0.036, 95.6%) in all the patients. BCL2-positive expression in luminal A breast cancer resulted in significantly favorable 5-year RFS and DSS (p=0.023 and p=0.041, respectively). However, BCL2 expression was not associated with the prognosis in the other subtypes. Conclusion The prognostic role of BCL2 expression in breast cancer is subtype-specific. BCL2 expression differs according to

  13. Analysis of circulating tumor cells in patients with triple negative breast cancer during preoperative chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lavrov, A V; Zubtsova, Zh I; Zubtsov, D A; Frolova, M A; Ignatova, E O; Skrypnikova, M A; Malysheva, E V; Legchenko, E V; Petrovskii, A V; Utyashev, I A; Tyulyandin, S A; Gol'dshtein, D V

    2014-05-01

    The presence of circulating tumor cells in the blood of patients with triple negative breast cancer (early and locally advanced cancer) before and after preoperative chemotherapy was assessed using expression markers. Before therapy, circulating tumor cells were detected in 5 of 13 (38%) patients with early cancer and in 7 of 17 (41.2%) patients with locally advanced cancer. After therapy, the circulating immune cells were detected in one patient with locally advanced cancer, who had no circulating cells before therapy. The tumor was resistant to chemotherapy and the disease progressed. The detected circulating tumor cells were HER-2-positive, while the primary tumor was HER-2-negative. It was concluded that the circulating immune cells can be a potential marker of the efficiency of therapy and predictors of the disease course, while their phenotype can differ from the phenotype of the primary tumor.

  14. Prior exposure to chemotherapy: a marker of sensitivity and selection for antiangiogenic therapy in breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Xynos, Ioannis D; Tanna, Nikhil; Patten, Darren K; Palmieri, Carlo

    2014-02-01

    The identification of patients who are more likely to derive benefit from antiangiogenic therapy is a key to refine patient selection and so maximize clinical benefit, and reduce unnecessary treatment costs. Improved patient selection will equally be effective in minimizing the exposure of non-eligible patients to ineffectual treatment which could be associated with adverse effects as well as delaying effective treatment. Herein, we review the literature from clinical trials suggesting that the addition of antiangiogenic agents to chemotherapy for the treatment of HER-2 negative metastatic breast cancer in patients previously exposed to chemotherapy may deliver differential therapeutic benefit and may serve as a selection criteria in the current absence of a robust biomarker.

  15. Endocrine resistance in breast cancer--An overview and update.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Robert; Tyson, John J; Dixon, J Michael

    2015-12-15

    Tumors that express detectable levels of the product of the ESR1 gene (estrogen receptor-α; ERα) represent the single largest molecular subtype of breast cancer. More women eventually die from ERα+ breast cancer than from either HER2+ disease (almost half of which also express ERα) and/or from triple negative breast cancer (ERα-negative, progesterone receptor-negative, and HER2-negative). Antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors are largely indistinguishable from each other in their abilities to improve overall survival and almost 50% of ERα+ breast cancers will eventually fail one or more of these endocrine interventions. The precise reasons why these therapies fail in ERα+ breast cancer remain largely unknown. Pharmacogenetic explanations for Tamoxifen resistance are controversial. The role of ERα mutations in endocrine resistance remains unclear. Targeting the growth factors and oncogenes most strongly correlated with endocrine resistance has proven mostly disappointing in their abilities to improve overall survival substantially, particularly in the metastatic setting. Nonetheless, there are new concepts in endocrine resistance that integrate molecular signaling, cellular metabolism, and stress responses including endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) that provide novel insights and suggest innovative therapeutic targets. Encouraging evidence that drug combinations with CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors can extend recurrence free survival may yet translate to improvements in overall survival. Whether the improvements seen with immunotherapy in other cancers can be achieved in breast cancer remains to be determined, particularly for ERα+ breast cancers. This review explores the basic mechanisms of resistance to endocrine therapies, concluding with some new insights from systems biology approaches further implicating autophagy and the UPR in detail, and a brief discussion of exciting new avenues and future prospects.

  16. Immunology of naturally transmissible tumours

    PubMed Central

    Siddle, Hannah V; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Naturally transmissible tumours can emerge when a tumour cell gains the ability to pass as an infectious allograft between individuals. The ability of these tumours to colonize a new host and to cross histocompatibility barriers contradicts our understanding of the vertebrate immune response to allografts. Two naturally occurring contagious cancers are currently active in the animal kingdom, canine transmissible venereal tumour (CTVT), which spreads among dogs, and devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), among Tasmanian devils. CTVT are generally not fatal as a tumour-specific host immune response controls or clears the tumours after transmission and a period of growth. In contrast, the growth of DFTD tumours is not controlled by the Tasmanian devil's immune system and the disease causes close to 100% mortality, severely impacting the devil population. To avoid the immune response of the host both DFTD and CTVT use a variety of immune escape strategies that have similarities to many single organism tumours, including MHC loss and the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines. However, both tumours appear to have a complex interaction with the immune system of their respective host, which has evolved over the relatively long life of these tumours. The Tasmanian devil is struggling to survive with the burden of this disease and it is only with an understanding of how DFTD passes between individuals that a vaccine might be developed. Further, an understanding of how these tumours achieve natural transmissibility should provide insights into general mechanisms of immune escape that emerge during tumour evolution. PMID:25187312

  17. Parallel evolution of tumour subclones mimics diversity between tumours.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A; Rowan, Andrew J; Joshi, Tejal; Fisher, Rosalie; Larkin, James; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2013-08-01

    Intratumour heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumour adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicine approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumour (intratumour heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumours (intertumour heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, we obtained 48 biopsies from eight stage III and IV clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and used DNA copy-number analyses to compare biopsies from the same tumour with 440 single tumour biopsies from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of TCGA and multi-region ccRCC samples revealed segregation of samples from the same tumour into unrelated clusters; 25% of multi-region samples appeared more similar to unrelated samples than to any other sample originating from the same tumour. We found that the majority of recurrent DNA copy number driver aberrations in single biopsies were not present ubiquitously in late-stage ccRCCs and were likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumour progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumours may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumours reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumour sampling bias and impact upon tumour progression and clinical outcome.

  18. Parallel evolution of tumour subclones mimics diversity between tumours.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A; Rowan, Andrew J; Joshi, Tejal; Fisher, Rosalie; Larkin, James; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2013-08-01

    Intratumour heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumour adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicine approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumour (intratumour heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumours (intertumour heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, we obtained 48 biopsies from eight stage III and IV clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and used DNA copy-number analyses to compare biopsies from the same tumour with 440 single tumour biopsies from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of TCGA and multi-region ccRCC samples revealed segregation of samples from the same tumour into unrelated clusters; 25% of multi-region samples appeared more similar to unrelated samples than to any other sample originating from the same tumour. We found that the majority of recurrent DNA copy number driver aberrations in single biopsies were not present ubiquitously in late-stage ccRCCs and were likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumour progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumours may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumours reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumour sampling bias and impact upon tumour progression and clinical outcome. PMID:23716380

  19. Unbiased quantitative assessment of Her-2 expression of circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic and non-metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ligthart, S T; Bidard, F-C; Decraene, C; Bachelot, T; Delaloge, S; Brain, E; Campone, M; Viens, P; Pierga, J-Y; Terstappen, L W M M

    2013-05-01

    Background Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can provide the basis for a liquid biopsy and may guide the use of targeted therapies. We report on unbiased quantification of Her-2 protein expression of CTCs. Patients and methods Her-2 assessment of CTCs was carried out using the CellSearch(®) system in 103 metastatic (M1) and 88 non-metastatic (M0) breast-cancer patients. Expression of Her-2 on CTCs was determined by a manual review and an automated algorithm using Her-2- fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) fluorescence of leukocytes to determine the Her-2-expression threshold in each sample. Results Her-2 expression of CTCs varied greatly within and among patients compared with Her-2 expression of leukocytes. In M1 patients, a threshold of 75% of Her-2 positive CTCs in patients with ≥5 CTCs was set. Applying this threshold, 9% of M1 patients with Her-2-negative primary tumors had Her-2-positive CTC status and 29% of M1 patients with Her-2-positive primary tumors had Her-2-negative CTC status. No Her-2 discrepancy was observed between CTCs and primary tumors in M0 patients. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that Her-2 expression is heterogeneous among CTCs within each patient. We show the feasibility of unbiased quantitative and reproducible assessment of treatment targets on CTCs, opening a path towards personalized treatment.

  20. Breast Conservation Surgery: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    White, Jonathan; Achuthan, Raj; Turton, Philip; Lansdown, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Breast conservation surgery is available to the vast majority of women with breast cancer. The combination of neoadjuvant therapies and oncoplastic surgical techniques allows even large tumours to be managed with a breast-conserving approach. The relationship between breast size and the volume of tissue to be excised determines the need for volume displacement or replacement. Such an approach can also be used in the management of carefully selected cases of multifocal or multicentric breast cancer. The role of novel techniques, such as endoscopic breast surgery and radiofrequency ablation, is yet to be precisely defined. PMID:22295209

  1. Primary retroperitoneal tumours and cysts.

    PubMed

    Bors, G; Polyák, L; Frang, D

    1986-01-01

    The authors give a summarizing report on retroperitoneal tumours and cysts. They review the origin and classification of tumours and cysts, their diagnostic and differential diagnostic possibilities as well as the therapeutic measures. Finally, their own 3 cases are reported.

  2. Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Larner, Fiona; Woodley, Laura N; Shousha, Sami; Moyes, Ashley; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Halliday, Alex N; Rehkämper, Mark; Coombes, R Charles

    2015-01-01

    An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn isotopic lightness in tumours suggests that sulphur rich metallothionein dominates the isotopic selectivity of a breast tissue cell, rather than Zn-specific proteins. This reveals a possible mechanism of Zn delivery to Zn-sequestering vesicles by metallothionein, and is supported by a similar signature observed in the copper isotopic compositions of one breast cancer patient. This change in intrinsic isotopic compositions due to cancer has the potential to provide a novel early biomarker for breast cancer.

  3. Differential expression of osteopontin and bone sialoprotein in bone metastasis of breast and prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Carlinfante, Gabriele; Vassiliou, Daphne; Svensson, Olle; Wendel, Mikael; Heinegård, Dick; Andersson, Göran

    2003-01-01

    Breast and prostate cancer often metastasise to the skeleton. Interestingly, the histopathological characteristics of the bone lesions that arise from these two cancer types differ. Breast tumours give rise to metastases in the skeleton with a mixed lytic/sclerotic pattern, whereas a predominantly sclerotic pattern is seen in metastases from prostate tumours. Osteopontin (OPN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP) are bone matrix proteins that have been implicated in the selective affinity of cancer cells for bone. In the present study, 21 patient cases with skeletal metastasis and their respective primary tumours (12 with breast cancer, 9 with prostate cancer) were investigated by immunohistochemistry in order to assess the level of OPN and BSP. Moderate to strong OPN expression was found in 42% of all breast tumours and in 56% of all prostate tumours. Significantly more breast cancer bone metastases exhibited high OPN expression, 83%, as compared with prostate tumour bone metastases, 11% (P = 0.0019). In contrast, moderate to strong BSP expression was found in 33% of breast tumours and in 89% of prostate tumours. In the bone lesions, only 33% of breast tumour metastases showed moderate/strong BSP expression compared to 100% of prostate tumour metastases (P = 0.0046). This divergent pattern of OPN/BSP expression could be an important determinant for the different characteristics of these two types of bone metastasis, i.e., lytic vs. sclerotic, consistent with the proposed role of OPN in differentiation and activation of osteoclasts and of BSP as a stimulator of bone mineralisation.

  4. Phase II Study of Everolimus Beyond Progression

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-23

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  5. Tumour Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Laura; Baker, Ann-Marie; Graham, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    The population of cells that make up a cancer are manifestly heterogeneous at the genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic levels. In this mini-review, we summarise the extent of intra-tumour heterogeneity (ITH) across human malignancies, review the mechanisms that are responsible for generating and maintaining ITH, and discuss the ramifications and opportunities that ITH presents for cancer prognostication and treatment. PMID:26973786

  6. Tumour dose estimation using automated TLD techniques.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, H M; Lambert, G D; Gustard, D; Harrison, R M

    1998-01-01

    Lithium fluoride (TLD-700) dosimeters were used to measure exit surface absorbed doses in external beam radiotherapy using an automated TLD reader. Delivered tumour absorbed doses were derived from these measurements for head and neck, pelvis and breast treatments. For the head and neck treatments (first fraction only), the mean percentage difference between prescribed and delivered tumour absorbed doses was -0.15 +/- 3.0% (+/- 1 SD), for the pelvic treatments -0.83 +/- 2.8% and for the breast treatments +0.26 +/- 2.9%. The spread of results is approximately +/- 3% (+/- 1 SD). This is comparable with the estimated uncertainty in a single TLD absorbed dose measurement in phantom (+/- 2%; +/- 1 SD). Thus, ICRU recommended tolerances for absorbed dose delivery of +/- 5% may not be unequivocally detectable using this method. An action level of +/- 10% is suggested, allowing investigation of possible gross errors in treatment delivery at an early stage, before the course of treatment has progressed to a point at which absorbed dose compensation is impossible.

  7. Circadian clocks and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Victoria; Williams, Jack L; Meng, Qing-Jun; Streuli, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks respond to environmental time cues to coordinate 24-hour oscillations in almost every tissue of the body. In the breast, circadian clocks regulate the rhythmic expression of numerous genes. Disrupted expression of circadian genes can alter breast biology and may promote cancer. Here we overview circadian mechanisms, and the connection between the molecular clock and breast biology. We describe how disruption of circadian genes contributes to cancer via multiple mechanisms, and link this to increased tumour risk in women who work irregular shift patterns. Understanding the influence of circadian rhythms on breast cancer could lead to more efficacious therapies, reformed public health policy and improved patient outcome. PMID:27590298

  8. From bench to bedside: what do we know about Hormone Receptor-positive and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-positive breast cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Victoria Shang; Kanaya, Noriko; Lo, Chiao; Mortimer, Joanne; Chen, Shiuan

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. Thanks to extensive efforts from research scientists and clinicians, treatment for breast cancer has advanced into the era of targeted medicine. With the use of several well-established biomarkers, such as hormone receptors (HRs) (i.e. estrogen receptor [ER] and progesterone receptor [PgR]) and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2 (HER2), breast cancer patients can be categorized into multiple subgroups with specific targeted treatment strategies. Although therapeutic strategies for HR-positive (HR+) HER2-negative (HER2−) breast cancer and HR-negative (HR−) HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer are well-defined, HR+ HER2+ breast cancer is still an overlooked subgroup without tailored therapeutic options. In this review, we have summarized the molecular characteristics, etiology, preclinical tools and therapeutic options for HR+ HER2+ breast cancer. We hope to raise the attention of both the research and the medical community on HR+ HER2+ breast cancer, and to advance patient care for this subtype of disease. PMID:25998416

  9. From bench to bedside: What do we know about hormone receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Wu, Victoria Shang; Kanaya, Noriko; Lo, Chiao; Mortimer, Joanne; Chen, Shiuan

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. Thanks to extensive efforts from research scientists and clinicians, treatment for breast cancer has advanced into the era of targeted medicine. With the use of several well-established biomarkers, such as hormone receptors (HRs) (i.e., estrogen receptor [ER] and progesterone receptor [PgR]) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), breast cancer patients can be categorized into multiple subgroups with specific targeted treatment strategies. Although therapeutic strategies for HR-positive (HR+) HER2-negative (HER2-) breast cancer and HR-negative (HR-) HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer are well-defined, HR+ HER2+ breast cancer is still an overlooked subgroup without tailored therapeutic options. In this review, we have summarized the molecular characteristics, etiology, preclinical tools and therapeutic options for HR+ HER2+ breast cancer. We hope to raise the attention of both the research and the medical community on HR+ HER2+ breast cancer, and to advance patient care for this subtype of disease.

  10. [Resection margins in conservative breast cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Medina Fernández, Francisco Javier; Ayllón Terán, María Dolores; Lombardo Galera, María Sagrario; Rioja Torres, Pilar; Bascuñana Estudillo, Guillermo; Rufián Peña, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    Conservative breast cancer surgery is facing a new problem: the potential tumour involvement of resection margins. This eventuality has been closely and negatively associated with disease-free survival. Various factors may influence the likelihood of margins being affected, mostly related to the characteristics of the tumour, patient or surgical technique. In the last decade, many studies have attempted to find predictive factors for margin involvement. However, it is currently the new techniques used in the study of margins and tumour localisation that are significantly reducing reoperations in conservative breast cancer surgery.

  11. Cancer of the breast with nipple involvement.

    PubMed Central

    Menon, R. S.; van Geel, A. N.

    1989-01-01

    In the absence of gross deformity of the nipple, such as its retraction or Paget's disease, histological examination of this area is often neglected, or at best confined to a cursory look at a single sagittal section. The inadequacy of this approach is illustrated by this study of 33 consecutive cases of carcinoma of the breast treated with mastectomy. Multiple transverse sections showed tumour in 19 nipples (58%) involving one or more levels. Of these, 17 showed non-invasive tumour, either ductal or lobular type. Invasive tumour was seen in only two nipples, one of which was metastatic extension from the underlying breast tumour. Paget's cells were seen in two cases. The most significant finding was the eccentric location of tumour in 14 nipples. A single central sagittal section would have detected only five cases involving the centrally situated duct. An inexplicable finding was a preponderance of right nipple with tumour. No statistically significant correlation between nipple involvement and the size, location, multicentricity, type of tumour in the breast and metastases in axillary lymph nodes could be found. It became evident from this study that malignant changes in the nipple occur more commonly than is realised, and that it is also one of the sites of multicentric origin of the tumour. This factor will have to be taken into account in planning conservative therapeutic programmes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2547416

  12. Measuring HER2-Receptor Expression In Metastatic Breast Cancer Using [68Ga]ABY-025 Affibody PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Sörensen, Jens; Velikyan, Irina; Sandberg, Dan; Wennborg, Anders; Feldwisch, Joachim; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Orlova, Anna; Sandström, Mattias; Lubberink, Mark; Olofsson, Helena; Carlsson, Jörgen; Lindman, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of HER2 expression could potentially be used to select patients for HER2-targed therapy, predict response based on uptake and be used for monitoring. In this phase I/II study the HER2-binding Affibody molecule ABY-025 was labeled with 68Ga-gallium ([68Ga]ABY-025) for PET to study effect of peptide mass, test-retest variability and correlation of quantified uptake in tumors to histopathology. Experimental design: Sixteen women with known metastatic breast cancer and on-going treatment were included and underwent FDG PET/CT to identify viable metastases. After iv injection of 212±46 MBq [68Ga]ABY-025 whole-body PET was performed at 1, 2 and 4 h. In the first 10 patients (6 with HER2-positive and 4 with HER2-negative primary tumors), [68Ga]ABY-025 PET/CT with two different doses of injected peptide was performed one week apart. In the last six patients (5 HER2-positive and 1 HER2-negative primary tumors), repeated [68Ga]ABY-025 PET were performed one week apart as a test-retest of uptake in individual lesions. Biopsies from 16 metastases in 12 patients were collected for verification of HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Results: Imaging 4h after injection with high peptide content discriminated HER2-positive metastases best (p<0.01). PET SUV correlated with biopsy HER2-scores (r=0.91, p<0.001). Uptake was five times higher in HER2-positive than in HER2-negative lesions with no overlap (p=0.005). The test-retest intra-class correlation was r=0.996. [68Ga]ABY-025 PET correctly identified conversion and mixed expression of HER2 and targeted treatment was changed in 3 of the 16 patients. Conclusion: [68Ga]ABY-025 PET accurately quantifies whole-body HER2-receptor status in metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26877784

  13. Pooled analyses of eribulin in metastatic breast cancer patients with at least one prior chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pivot, X.; Marmé, F.; Koenigsberg, R.; Guo, M.; Berrak, E.; Wolfer, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Based on data from two multicenter, phase III clinical trials (Studies 301 and 305), eribulin (a microtubule dynamics inhibitor) is indicated in the European Union (EU) for patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer (MBC) after ≥1 prior chemotherapy for advanced disease, including an anthracycline and a taxane in either the adjuvant or metastatic setting. Data from Studies 305 and 301 were pooled to investigate the efficacy of eribulin in various subgroups of patients who matched the EU label, including those with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative and triple-negative disease. Patients and methods In Study 305 (NCT00388726), patients were randomized 2:1 to eribulin mesylate 1.4 mg/m2 (equivalent to eribulin 1.23 mg/m2 [expressed as free base]) intravenously on days 1 and 8 every 21 days] or treatment of physician's choice after 2–5 prior chemotherapies (≥2 for advanced disease), including an anthracycline and a taxane (in early/advanced setting). In Study 301 (NCT00337103), patients were randomized 1:1 to eribulin (as above) or capecitabine (1.25 g/m2 orally twice daily on days 1–14 every 21 days) following ≤3 prior chemotherapies (≤2 for advanced disease), including an anthracycline and a taxane. Efficacy end points were investigated in the intent-to-treat population and subgroups, pooled as discussed above. Results Overall, 1644 patients were included (eribulin: 946; control: 698); baseline characteristics were well matched. Overall survival was significantly longer with eribulin versus control (P < 0.01), as were progression-free survival and clinical benefit rate (both P < 0.05). Significant survival benefits with eribulin versus control were observed in a wide range of patient subgroups, including HER2-negative or triple-negative disease (all P < 0.05). Conclusion Our findings underline the survival benefit achieved by eribulin used according to EU label in the overall MBC population and in various

  14. Laryngeal solitary fibrous tumour.

    PubMed

    Stomeo, Francesco; Padovani, Davide; Bozzo, Corrado; Pastore, Antonio

    2007-09-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFT) are rare neoplasms, with an uncommon laryngeal involvement. Only five cases of laryngeal localization have been described in literature. The following is a case of a 75-year-old man with a supraglottic neoplasm of the larynx; after the biopsy immunohistochemical study demonstrated a strong positivity for vimentin, CD34 and Bcl-2. The neoplasm was consequently classified as a SFT. CO(2) laser surgery of the supraglottic larynx, with a wide excision of the neoplasm, was performed. Twenty-four months on, the patient is alive, well and free of disease. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for laryngeal SFT, but tumour-free resection margins must be achieved to prevent the possibility of local recurrence. Endoscopic resection by means of the CO(2) laser must be accurately planned with MRI or CT imaging to confirm of this kind of surgery.

  15. Electrochemotherapy of Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sersa, Gregor; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2008-01-01

    Electrochemotherapy is a combined use of certain chemotherapeutic drugs and electric pulses applied to the treated tumour nodule. Local application of electric pulses to the tumour increases drug delivery into cells, specifically at the site of electric pulse application. Drug uptake by delivery of electric pulses is increased for only those chemotherapeutic drugs whose transport through the plasma membrane is impeded. Among many drugs that have been tested so far, bleomycin and cisplatin found their way from preclinical testing to clinical use. Clinical data collected within a number of clinical studies indicate that approximately 80% of the treated cutaneous and subcutaneous tumour nodules of different malignancies are in an objective response, from these, approximately 70% in complete response after a single application of electrochemotherapy. Usually only one treatment is needed, however, electrochemotherapy can be repeated several times every few weeks with equal effectiveness each time. The treatment results in an effective eradication of the treated nodules, with a good cosmetic effect without tissue scarring. PMID:19229171

  16. Strong adverse effect of epidermal growth factor receptor 2 overexpression on prognosis of patients with invasive lobular breast cancer: a comparative study with invasive ductal breast cancer in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Ma, Yuanyuan; Wang, Liang; Liu, Hong; Chen, Meixuan; Niu, Ruifang

    2015-08-01

    The data on the outcome of breast invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) are conflicting. In addition, the prognostic effect of molecular subtypes on ILC remains unclear. In this study, the clinicopathological and prognostic data between 269 ILC and 816 invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) cases in a Chinese population were extensively compared, with a median follow-up time of 7.8 years. Compared with the IDC group, ILC tumors had more lymph node invasion, hormonal receptor positivity, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negativity. ILC patients showed overall survival (OS) and recurrence/metastasis-free survival (RFS) rates similar to those of IDC patients but exhibited worse disease-free survival (DFS) rate because of the higher rate of contralateral breast cancer (BC). Further analysis showed that OS, RFS, and DFS were similar between ILC and IDC patients in the subgroups of luminal A and triple-negative BC with HER2 negativity but were worse in ILC patients than those in IDC patients in the subgroups of luminal B and HER2 overexpression with positive HER2 expression. Multivariate analysis indicated HER2 positivity as an independent risk factor for OS, RFS, and DFS of ILC patients, which increased the risk in the ILC group than that in IDC group. The interaction of HER2 and ILC was also defined as an independent risk factor for OS, RFS, and DFS of the entire population. In conclusion, overexpression of HER2 exhibited stronger negative effect on the prognosis of ILC patients than that in IDC patients, suggesting that treatment targeting HER2 is crucial for this BC subgroup. PMID:25804795

  17. Clinical features of gastroenteropancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) endocrine tumours (carcinoids and pancreatic islet cell tumours) are composed of multipotent neuroendocrine cells that exhibit a unique ability to produce, store, and secrete biologically active substances and cause distinct clinical syndromes. The classification of GEP tumours as functioning or non-functioning is based on the presence of symptoms that accompany these syndromes secondary to the secretion of hormones, neuropeptides and/or neurotransmitters (functioning tumours). Non-functioning tumours are considered to be neoplasms of neuroendocrine differentiation that are not associated with obvious symptoms attributed to the hypersecretion of metabolically active substances. However, a number of these tumours are either capable of producing low levels of such substances, which can be detected by immunohistochemistry but are insufficient to cause symptoms related to a clinical syndrome, or alternatively, they may secrete substances that are either metabolically inactive or inappropriately processed. In some cases, GEP tumours are not associated with the production of any hormone or neurotransmitter. Both functioning and non-functioning tumours can also produce symptoms due to mass effects compressing vital surrounding structures. Gastroenteropancreatic tumours are usually classified further according to the anatomic site of origin: foregut (including respiratory tract, thymus, stomach, duodenum, and pancreas), midgut (including small intestine, appendix, and right colon), and hindgut (including transverse colon, sigmoid, and rectum). Within these subgroups the biological and clinical characteristics of the tumours vary considerably, but this classification is still in use because a significant number of previous studies, mainly observational, have used it extensively. PMID:26516377

  18. Segmentation of breast cancer cells positive 1+ and 3+ immunohistochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labellapansa, Ause; Muhimmah, Izzati; Indrayanti

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is a disease occurs as a result of uncontrolled cells growth. One examination method of breast cancer cells is using Immunohistochemistry (IHC) to determine status of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor2 (HER2) protein. This study helps anatomic pathologist to determine HER2 scores using image processing techniques to obtain HER2 overexpression positive area percentages of 1+ and 3+ scores. This is done because the score of 0 is HER2 negative cells and 2+ scores have equivocal results, which means it could not be determined whether it is necessary to give targeted therapy or not. HER2 overexpression positive area percentage is done by dividing the area with a HER2 positive tumor area. To obtain better tumor area, repair is done by eliminating lymphocytes area which is not tumor area using morphological opening. Results of 10 images IHC scores of 1+ and 3+ and 10 IHC images testing without losing lymphocytes area in tumor area, has proven that the system has been able to provide an overall correct classification in accordance with the experts analysis. However by doing operation to remove non-tumor areas, classification can be done correctly 100% for scores of 3+ and 65% for scores of 1+.

  19. Maspin as a Tumour Suppressor in Salivary Gland Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Ashok, Nipun; Sheirawan, Mohammad Kinan; Altamimi, Mohammed Alsakran; Alenzi, Faris; Azzeghaiby, Saleh Nasser; Baroudi, Kusai; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2014-01-01

    Maspin is a protein that belongs to serin protease inhibitor (serpin) superfamily. The purpose of this study was to review the literature concerning the expression of maspin in salivary gland tumours. A literature search was done using MEDLINE, accessed via the National Library of Medicine PubMed interface. Statistical analysis was not done because only seven studies were available in literature, the collected data were different and the results could not be compared. Expression of maspin was down regulated in more aggressive salivary gland tumours. Maspin may function as a tumour suppressor in salivary gland tumours. PMID:25654053

  20. Genomic Signatures in Breast Cancer: Limitations of Available Predictive Data and the Importance of Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Esteva, Francisco J

    2015-06-01

    Several biomarkers and gene mutations in breast cancer have been shown to be predictive, in that they determine which treatments a patient should receive. Ideally, predictive markers would be available that could determine the most appropriate treatment plan based on a patient’s biology. This goal is becoming a reality in some treatment settings and cancer types, with the increasing use of targeted therapies directed against specific molecular abnormalities. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing is in standard use for guiding breast cancer therapy. Testing for the estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) guides the use of endocrine therapy, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) testing guides the use of HER2-targeted therapies. Although IHC provides some discrimination among breast cancer subsets and helps identify appropriate therapy, more information can be gained through gene expression analyses. Contemporary multianalyte assays have demonstrated greater precision and reproducibility than seen with IHC-based assays. The most important contribution of multigene assays is the identification of women with ER/PR-positive, HER2-negative, early-stage breast cancer who are at low risk of recurrence and therefore will likely do well with endocrine therapy alone. These patients can be safely spared from the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy.

  1. Improving Pathological Assessment of Breast Cancer by Employing Array-Based Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mihály, Zsuzsanna; Győrffy, Balázs

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer research has paved the way of personalized oncology with the introduction of hormonal therapy and the measurement of estrogen receptor as the first widely accepted clinical biomarker. The expression of another receptor—HER2/ERBB2/neu—was initially a sign of worse prognosis, but targeted therapy has granted improved outcome for these patients so that today HER2 positive patients have better prognosis than HER2 negative patients. Later, the introduction of multigene assays provided the pathologists with an unbiased assessment of the tumors’ molecular fingerprint. The recent FDA approval of complete microarray pipelines has opened new possibilities for the objective classification of breast cancer samples. Here we review the applications of microarrays for determining ER and HER2 status, molecular subtypes as well as predicting prognosis and grade for breast cancer patients. An open question remains the role of single genes within such signatures. Openly available microarray datasets enable the execution of an independent cross-validation of new marker and signature candidates. In summary, we review the current state regarding clinical applications of microarrays in breast cancer molecular pathology.

  2. Clinicopathological analysis of CD44 and CD24 expression in invasive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min Hye; Kang, Hyun Jong; Jang, Ki Seok; Paik, Seung Sam; Kim, Wan Seop

    2016-01-01

    A subpopulation of breast cancer cells with cluster of differentiation (CD)44-positive and CD24-negative expression has been reported to have stem cell properties and to have a higher tumorigenic capacity than other cells. However, the clinicopathological characteristics of this subpopulation are not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to identify the correlations between the expression of CD44 and CD24 and clinicopathological parameters and overall survival. We studied specimens from 262 patients with invasive breast cancer. Immunohistochemical staining for CD44 and CD24 was performed using tissue microarrays. The clinicopathological factors were evaluated from the patients' medical records. In correlation analysis, CD44 expression was significantly associated with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative status (P<0.001). Conversely, CD24 expression was significantly associated with HER2-positive status (P<0.001). CD44 and CD24 expression did not demonstrate any correlation with the age, tumor size, axillary lymph node metastasis status, tumor stage, histological grade, estrogen receptor status and progesterone receptor status of patients. Upon survival analysis, there was no statistical difference in overall survival according to the expression of CD44 and CD24. The results from this study suggest that CD44 and CD24 are clinically significant markers associated with breast tumorigenesis, but not sufficient factors in determining the prognosis of invasive breast cancer.

  3. Differential involvement of RASSF2 hypermethylation in breast cancer subtypes and their prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Janices, Noemi; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Torrea, Natalia; Liechtenstein, Therese; Escors, David; Cordoba, Alicia; Vicente-Garcia, Francisco; Jauregui, Isabel; De La Cruz, Susana; Illarramendi, José Juan; Coca, Valle; Berdasco, Maria; Kochan, Grazyna; Ibañez, Berta; Lera, José Miguel; Guerrero-Setas, David

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease that can be subdivided into clinical, histopathological and molecular subtypes (luminal A-like, luminal B-like/HER2-negative, luminal B-like/HER2-positive, HER2-positive, and triple-negative). The study of new molecular factors is essential to obtain further insights into the mechanisms involved in the tumorigenesis of each tumor subtype. RASSF2 is a gene that is hypermethylated in breast cancer and whose clinical value has not been previously studied. The hypermethylation of RASSF1 and RASSF2 genes was analyzed in 198 breast tumors of different subtypes. The effect of the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine in the re-expression of these genes was examined in triple-negative (BT-549), HER2 (SK-BR-3), and luminal cells (T-47D). Different patterns of RASSF2 expression for distinct tumor subtypes were detected by immunohistochemistry. RASSF2 hypermethylation was much more frequent in luminal subtypes than in non-luminal tumors (p = 0.001). The re-expression of this gene by lentiviral transduction contributed to the differential cell proliferation and response to antineoplastic drugs observed in luminal compared with triple-negative cell lines. RASSF2 hypermethylation is associated with better prognosis in multivariate statistical analysis (P = 0.039). In conclusion, RASSF2 gene is differently methylated in luminal and non-luminal tumors and is a promising suppressor gene with clinical involvement in breast cancer. PMID:26284587

  4. Analysis of tumour cell composition in tumours composed of paired mixtures of mammary tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, B. E.; Miller, F. R.; Wilburn, D. J.; Heppner, G. H.

    1987-01-01

    In order to quantitate the effects of tumour subpopulation interactions, we have devised a method to determine the subpopulation composition of tumours by using paired tumour cell lines able to grow in different selective media. Line 4T07 forms colonies in thioguanine but not in HAT and line 168 forms colonies in HAT but not in thioguanine. An independent technique of determining tumour cell content was used to validate this method: line 168 and 4T07 cells are distinguishable by flow cytometry after staining with propidium iodide for DNA content. Mixtures of cell suspensions prepared from each unmixed tumour, as well as from tumours arising from mixtures of these lines, were analysed by both the colony formation assay and by the DNA content assay. The colony formation assay yielded values in good agreement with the DNA content assay, but was considerably more sensitive in that it was able to quantitate minority subpopulations that constituted less than 10% of the tumour. Both methods revealed that in tumours arising from mixtures, the tumour cells were almost entirely line 4T07, even when the inoculum had contained a high proportion of 168 cells. Since line 168 cells are very tumorigenic per se, these results suggest that line 4T07 cells are capable of interfering with 168 proliferation in mixed tumours, either directly or through a host-mediated mechanism. PMID:3426919

  5. Methods for detection of circulating tumour cells and their clinical value in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Mikulová, V; Kološtová, K; Zima, T

    2011-01-01

    Currently available analytical methods enable identification, detection and characterization of circulating tumour cells in the peripheral blood and disseminated tumour cells in the bone marrow of breast cancer patients. About 0.01 % of the circulating tumour cells observed in the blood are able to form metastases. Therefore, they could be used for estimation of the risk for metastatic relapse, as a diagnostic tool for patient stratification, early determination of the therapy failure, or potential risk of resistance to the given therapeutic intervention. New therapeutic molecular targets could be identified for management of cancer patients using circulating tumour cell detection. The following review summarizes introduced methods of circulating tumour cell detection and their possible application in clinics.

  6. LET-painting increases tumour control probability in hypoxic tumours.

    PubMed

    Bassler, Niels; Toftegaard, Jakob; Lühr, Armin; Sørensen, Brita Singers; Scifoni, Emanuele; Krämer, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver; Mortensen, Lise Saksø; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B

    2014-01-01

    LET-painting was suggested as a method to overcome tumour hypoxia. In vitro experiments have demonstrated a well-established relationship between the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and linear energy transfer (LET), where OER approaches unity for high-LET values. However, high-LET radiation also increases the risk for side effects in normal tissue. LET-painting attempts to restrict high-LET radiation to compartments that are found to be hypoxic, while applying lower LET radiation to normoxic tissues. Methods. Carbon-12 and oxygen-16 ion treatment plans with four fields and with homogeneous dose in the target volume, are applied on an oropharyngeal cancer case with an identified hypoxic entity within the tumour. The target dose is optimised to achieve a tumour control probability (TCP) of 95% when assuming a fully normoxic tissue. Using the same primary particle energy fluence needed for this plan, TCP is recalculated for three cases assuming hypoxia: first, redistributing LET to match the hypoxic structure (LET-painting). Second, plans are recalculated for varying hypoxic tumour volume in order to investigate the threshold volume where TCP can be established. Finally, a slight dose boost (5-20%) is additionally allowed in the hypoxic subvolume to assess its impact on TCP. Results. LET-painting with carbon-12 ions can only achieve tumour control for hypoxic subvolumes smaller than 0.5 cm(3). Using oxygen-16 ions, tumour control can be achieved for tumours with hypoxic subvolumes of up to 1 or 2 cm(3). Tumour control can be achieved for tumours with even larger hypoxic subvolumes, if a slight dose boost is allowed in combination with LET-painting. Conclusion. Our findings clearly indicate that a substantial increase in tumour control can be achieved when applying the LET-painting concept using oxygen-16 ions on hypoxic tumours, ideally with a slight dose boost.

  7. VEGF targets the tumour cell.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2013-12-01

    The function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cancer is not limited to angiogenesis and vascular permeability. VEGF-mediated signalling occurs in tumour cells, and this signalling contributes to key aspects of tumorigenesis, including the function of cancer stem cells and tumour initiation. In addition to VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases, the neuropilins are crucial for mediating the effects of VEGF on tumour cells, primarily because of their ability to regulate the function and the trafficking of growth factor receptors and integrins. This has important implications for our understanding of tumour biology and for the development of more effective therapeutic approaches.

  8. Brain Tumours Simulating Psychiatric Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, G. E.

    1963-01-01

    Brain tumours may present with symptoms indistinguishable from psychiatric disease. The impression of most psychiatrists is that individuals suffering from brain tumour rarely appear among their patients. A priori reasoning based on evidence from neurological, neurosurgical and pathological sources suggests the contrary. The present study is a frequency analysis of cases of previously undiagnosed brain tumours admitted to either an open psychoneurotic ward or a mental hospital over a period of 15 years. The results support the impression held by psychiatrists that brain tumours are uncommon among psychiatric patients. PMID:13954870

  9. A common variant at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus is associated with estrogen receptor–negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haiman, Christopher A; Chen, Gary K; Vachon, Celine M; Canzian, Federico; Dunning, Alison; Millikan, Robert C; Wang, Xianshu; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Ahmed, Shahana; Ambrosone, Christine B; Baglietto, Laura; Balleine, Rosemary; Bandera, Elisa V; Beckmann, Matthias W; Berg, Christine D; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William J; Brauch, Hiltrud; Buring, Julie E; Carey, Lisa A; Carpenter, Jane E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chasman, Daniel I; Clarke, Christine L; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Deming, Sandra L; Diasio, Robert B; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M; Driver, W Ryan; Dünnebier, Thomas; Durcan, Lorraine; Eccles, Diana; Edlund, Christopher K; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Feigelson, Heather S; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fostira, Florentia; Försti, Asta; Fountzilas, George; Gerty, Susan M; Giles, Graham G; Godwin, Andrew K; Goodfellow, Paul; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hamann, Ute; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Holbrook, Andrea; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Jennifer J; Hunter, David J; Ingles, Sue A; Irwanto, Astrid; Ivanovich, Jennifer; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nicola; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Kolonel, Laurence N; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kulkarni, Swati; Lambrechts, Diether; Lee, Adam M; Le Marchand, Loïc; Lesnick, Timothy; Liu, Jianjun; Lindstrom, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Martin, Nicholas G; Miron, Penelope; Montgomery, Grant W; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nickels, Stephan; Nyante, Sarah; Olswold, Curtis; Palmer, Julie; Pathak, Harsh; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Perou, Charles M; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Pooler, Loreall C; Press, Michael F; Pylkäs, Katri; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Rosenberg, Lynn; Ross, Eric; Rüdiger, Thomas; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Sawyer, Elinor; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Schumacher, Fredrick; Severi, Gianluca; Sheng, Xin; Signorello, Lisa B; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Stevens, Kristen N; Southey, Melissa C; Tapper, William J; Tomlinson, Ian; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Wauters, Els; Weaver, JoEllen; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Van Den Berg, David; Wan, Peggy; Xia, Lucy Y; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Siddiq, Afshan; Slager, Susan L; Stram, Daniel O; Easton, Douglas; Kraft, Peter; Henderson, Brian E; Couch, Fergus J

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer shows a higher incidence in women of African ancestry compared to women of European ancestry. In search of common risk alleles for ER-negative breast cancer, we combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from women of African ancestry (1,004 ER-negative cases and 2,745 controls) and European ancestry (1,718 ER-negative cases and 3,670 controls), with replication testing conducted in an additional 2,292 ER-negative cases and 16,901 controls of European ancestry. We identified a common risk variant for ER-negative breast cancer at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus on chromosome 5p15 (rs10069690: per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18 per allele, P = 1.0 × 10−10). The variant was also significantly associated with triple-negative (ER-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2)-negative) breast cancer (OR = 1.25, P = 1.1 × 10−9), particularly in younger women (<50 years of age) (OR = 1.48, P = 1.9 × 10−9). Our results identify a genetic locus associated with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer subtypes in multiple populations. PMID:22037553

  10. Loss of B-cell translocation gene 2 expression in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer predicts tamoxifen resistance

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Maiko; Hayashida, Tetsu; Okazaki, Hiroshi; Miyao, Kazuhiro; Jinno, Hiromitsu; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2), a gene suppressed in a subset of aggressive breast cancer, is repressed by estrogen. BTG2 inhibits the expression of HER ligands and promotes AKT activation, which plays an essential role in the tamoxifen resistance of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. To determine if BTG2 expression modifies tamoxifen efficacy, a cohort of 60 patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen monotherapy was analyzed. We found that increased BTG2 expression showed better clinical survival and was the only independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.691; 95% confidence interval, 0.495–0.963; P = 0.029). Tamoxifen suppressed the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-Akt signaling in BTG2 expressing ER-positive breast cancer cells with a correlated increase in sensitivity, whereas BTG2 knockdown abrogated this sensitivity. Consistent with this observation, tamoxifen significantly suppressed the growth ratio, tumor weight and Ki-67 expression in BTG2 expressing breast cancer xenografts in mice. These studies demonstrate that BTG2 is a significant factor in tamoxifen response, acting through modification of AKT activation in ER-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer. PMID:24698107

  11. Malignant testicular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, Pierre Del; Tawil, Elie; Béland, Gilles

    1974-01-01

    A series of 71 patients with malignant testicular tumours treated primarily by orchiectomy and irradiation is reviewed with respect to pathological and clinical features and modes of treatment. The three-year crude survival rate in 36 patients with seminoma was 86% and in 24 patients with carcinoma it was 41.7%. There were no survivors among patients with choriocarcinoma. Our results are comparable with those of other series. A prospective study is proposed of the value of irradiation and subsequent limited lymph node dissection following orchiectomy in cases of carcinoma of the testis. PMID:4855670

  12. Surgical Resection of Phyllodes Tumour: a Radical Approach as a Safeguard Against Local Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Badwe, Rajendra A; Kataria, Kamal; Srivastava, Anurag

    2015-04-01

    Phyllodes tumour is a rare benign neoplasm of the breast. It is a mixed tumour of epithelial and mesenchymal origin. The epithelial element is characterized by proliferation of ductolobular units. The fibrous tissue and collagen bundles represent the mesenchymal element. It is also known as "cystosarcoma" phyllodes to characterize some important features, viz. cyst-like or cleft-like spaces within the mass along with a leaf- or frond-like pattern of the stromal element. The tumour is well known for its high potential for local recurrence. Most patients in developing countries present with very large breast tumours with close proximity to the skin and pectoralis major. In these cases, there is a need to perform a three-dimensional en bloc removal of the mass with overlying skin and underlying muscle(s). If a skin flap is raised in the vicinity of the tumour, there is a risk of cutting close to the tumour, increasing risk of local recurrence. Here, we describe a surgical technique that permits a three-dimensional en bloc removal of phyllodes tumour. PMID:26139976

  13. A software tool based on the Surface Evolver for precise location of tumours as a preoperative procedure to partial mastectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias Fabris, Antonio; Zanchetta do Nascimento, Marcelo; Ramos Batista, Valério

    2015-09-01

    We present a fast and reliable program that gives precise location of breast tumours for a partial mastectomy. Our program is fully implemented in the Surface Evolver, which is a general-purpose simulator of physical experiments. By starting from the mammograms that show a tumour one takes its 2D coordinates in each view (CC and MLO). These coordinates, together with some measurements of the patient's breast, are given as input to our simulator. From this point on the simulator reproduces all main steps of taking mammography with a virtual transparent breast that matches the patient's. The virtual mammography procedure is graphically displayed on the computer screen, so that users can track the virtual tumour inside the breast. As output we have the coordinates of the tumour position when the woman lies on the operating table for the surgery. With these coordinates the surgeon can make a small incision into the breast and reach the tumour for its removal. The whole structure of the breast is preserved after a simple plastic correction.

  14. Radiological Patterns of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients: A Subproject of the German Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer (BMBC) Registry.

    PubMed

    Laakmann, Elena; Witzel, Isabell; Scriba, Verena; Grzyska, Ulrich; Zu Eulenburg, Christine; Burchardi, Nicole; Hesse, Tobias; Würschmidt, Florian; Fehm, Tanja; Möbus, Volker; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Loibl, Sibylle; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Mueller, Volkmar

    2016-01-01

    Evidence about distribution patterns of brain metastases with regard to breast cancer subtypes and its influence on the prognosis of patients is insufficient. Clinical data, cranial computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 300 breast cancer patients with brain metastases (BMs) were collected retrospectively in four centers participating in the Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Registry (BMBC) in Germany. Patients with positive estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) statuses, had a significantly lower number of BMs at diagnosis. Concerning the treatment mode, HER2-positive patients treated with trastuzumab before the diagnosis of BMs showed a lower number of intracranial metastases (p < 0.001). Patients with a HER2-positive tumor-subtype developed cerebellar metastases more often compared with HER2-negative patients (59.8% vs. 44.5%, p = 0.021), whereas patients with triple-negative primary tumors had leptomeningeal disease more often (31.4% vs. 18.3%, p = 0.038). The localization of Brain metastases (BMs) was associated with prognosis: patients with leptomeningeal disease had shorter survival compared with patients without signs of leptomeningeal disease (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.025). A shorter survival could also be observed in the patients with metastases in the occipital lobe (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.012). Our findings suggest a different tumor cell homing to different brain regions depending on subtype and treatment. PMID:27669228

  15. Radiological Patterns of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients: A Subproject of the German Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer (BMBC) Registry.

    PubMed

    Laakmann, Elena; Witzel, Isabell; Scriba, Verena; Grzyska, Ulrich; Zu Eulenburg, Christine; Burchardi, Nicole; Hesse, Tobias; Würschmidt, Florian; Fehm, Tanja; Möbus, Volker; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Loibl, Sibylle; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Mueller, Volkmar

    2016-01-01

    Evidence about distribution patterns of brain metastases with regard to breast cancer subtypes and its influence on the prognosis of patients is insufficient. Clinical data, cranial computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 300 breast cancer patients with brain metastases (BMs) were collected retrospectively in four centers participating in the Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Registry (BMBC) in Germany. Patients with positive estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) statuses, had a significantly lower number of BMs at diagnosis. Concerning the treatment mode, HER2-positive patients treated with trastuzumab before the diagnosis of BMs showed a lower number of intracranial metastases (p < 0.001). Patients with a HER2-positive tumor-subtype developed cerebellar metastases more often compared with HER2-negative patients (59.8% vs. 44.5%, p = 0.021), whereas patients with triple-negative primary tumors had leptomeningeal disease more often (31.4% vs. 18.3%, p = 0.038). The localization of Brain metastases (BMs) was associated with prognosis: patients with leptomeningeal disease had shorter survival compared with patients without signs of leptomeningeal disease (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.025). A shorter survival could also be observed in the patients with metastases in the occipital lobe (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.012). Our findings suggest a different tumor cell homing to different brain regions depending on subtype and treatment.

  16. Radiological Patterns of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients: A Subproject of the German Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer (BMBC) Registry

    PubMed Central

    Laakmann, Elena; Witzel, Isabell; Scriba, Verena; Grzyska, Ulrich; zu Eulenburg, Christine; Burchardi, Nicole; Hesse, Tobias; Würschmidt, Florian; Fehm, Tanja; Möbus, Volker; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Loibl, Sibylle; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Mueller, Volkmar

    2016-01-01

    Evidence about distribution patterns of brain metastases with regard to breast cancer subtypes and its influence on the prognosis of patients is insufficient. Clinical data, cranial computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 300 breast cancer patients with brain metastases (BMs) were collected retrospectively in four centers participating in the Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Registry (BMBC) in Germany. Patients with positive estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) statuses, had a significantly lower number of BMs at diagnosis. Concerning the treatment mode, HER2-positive patients treated with trastuzumab before the diagnosis of BMs showed a lower number of intracranial metastases (p < 0.001). Patients with a HER2-positive tumor-subtype developed cerebellar metastases more often compared with HER2-negative patients (59.8% vs. 44.5%, p = 0.021), whereas patients with triple-negative primary tumors had leptomeningeal disease more often (31.4% vs. 18.3%, p = 0.038). The localization of Brain metastases (BMs) was associated with prognosis: patients with leptomeningeal disease had shorter survival compared with patients without signs of leptomeningeal disease (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.025). A shorter survival could also be observed in the patients with metastases in the occipital lobe (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.012). Our findings suggest a different tumor cell homing to different brain regions depending on subtype and treatment. PMID:27669228

  17. MEK inhibition prevents tumour-shed transforming growth factor-β-induced T-regulatory cell augmentation in tumour milieu

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Dewan M S; Panda, Abir K; Chakrabarty, Sreeparna; Bhattacharjee, Pushpak; Kajal, Kirti; Mohanty, Suchismita; Sarkar, Irene; Sarkar, Diptendra K; Kar, Santosh K; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2015-01-01

    Tumour progression is associated with immune-suppressive conditions that facilitate the escape of tumour cells from the regimen of immune cells, subsequently paralysing the host defence mechanisms. Induction of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells has been implicated in the tumour immune escape mechanism, although the novel anti-cancer treatment strategies targeting Treg cells remain unknown. The focus of this study is to define the interaction between tumour and immune system, i.e. how immune tolerance starts and gradually leads to the induction of adaptive Treg cells in the tumour microenvironment. Our study identified hyperactivated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) -signalling as a potential target for reversing Treg cell augmentation in breast cancer patients. In more mechanistic detail, pharmacological inhibitors of MEK/ERK signalling inhibited transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in tumour cells that essentially blocked TGF-β-SMAD3/SMAD4-mediated induction of CD25/interleukin-2 receptor α on CD4+ T-cell surface. As a result high-affinity binding of interleukin-2 on those cells was prohibited, causing lack of Janus kinase 1 (JAK1)/JAK3-mediated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)/STAT5 activation required for FoxP3 expression. Finally, for a more radical approach towards a safe MEK inhibitor, we validate the potential of multi-kinase inhibitor curcumin, especially the nano-curcumin made out of pure curcumin with greater bioavailability; in repealing tumour-shed TGF-β-induced Treg cell augmentation. PMID:25284464

  18. Prognostic value of Ki67 and p53 in patients with estrogen receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative breast cancer: Validation of the cut-off value of the Ki67 labeling index as a predictive factor

    PubMed Central

    OHARA, MASAHIRO; MATSUURA, KAZUO; AKIMOTO, ETSUSHI; NOMA, MIDORI; DOI, MIHOKO; NISHIZAKA, TAKASHI; KAGAWA, NAOKI; ITAMOTO, TOSHIYUKI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of the Ki67 labeling index and p53 status as prognostic and predictive indicators of operable estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer. Among 697 consecutive patients with primary breast cancer who underwent curative surgery between 2002 and 2013, 308 patients with ER-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer were assessed. The results of the multivariate Cox analysis demonstrated that a high Ki67 labeling index was significantly associated with a short recurrence-free interval (RFI) (p=0.004) and was marginally associated with a worse overall survival (p=0.074). A positive p53 status was not associated with worse outcomes. To validate the cut-off values of the Ki67 labeling index for identifying patients who may benefit from additional chemotherapy, prognostic factors were investigated in breast cancer patients treated postoperatively with endocrine therapy alone. Analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves demonstrated that a Ki67 labeling index cut-off of 20.0% was optimal for predicting recurrence among patients who did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. The 5-year RFIs for patients with Ki67 <20 and ≥20% were 97.2 and 86.6%, respectively (p=0.0244). A high Ki67 labeling index (≥20%) was significantly associated with large tumors (p<0.01), lymph node metastasis (p=0.0236) and positive p53 status (p<0.001). The univariate analysis demonstrated that Ki67 labeling index ≥20%, lymph node metastasis and progesterone receptor negativity were significant worse prognostic factors for RFI (p=0.0333, 0.0116 and 0.0573, respectively). The Ki67 labeling index was found to be a useful prognostic factor in patients with ER-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer and the cut-off values of the Ki67 labeling index for making a decision regarding adjuvant treatment were validated. PMID:27073684

  19. Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab plus Chemotherapy versus Chemotherapy Alone to Treat Non-Metastatic Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min-feng; Chen, Lu-jia; Hu, Xiao-lei; Ye, Chang-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Results from previous randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating whether the addition of bevacizumab to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) could statistically significantly increase the pathological complete response (pCR) and to identify which subgroup would benefit most from such regimens have produced conflicting results. This meta-analysis was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy compared with chemotherapy alone in the neoadjuvant setting. Methods A literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and the Cochrane library was performed to identify eligible studies. The primary endpoint of interest was pCR. The secondary endpoints were clinical complete rate (cCR), surgery rate, breast-conserving surgery (BCS) rate, and toxicity. The meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager software version 5.3. Results Nine RCTs matched the selection criteria, yielding a total of 4967 patients (bevacizumab plus chemotherapy: 50.1%, chemotherapy alone: 49.9%). The results of this meta-analysis demonstrated that the addition of bevacizumab to NAC significantly increased the pCR rate (odds ratio [OR] = 1.34 [1.18–1.54]; P < 0.0001) compared with chemotherapy alone. Subgroup analysis showed that the effect of bevacizumab was more pronounced in patients with HER2-negative cancer (OR = 1.34 [1.17–1.54]; P < 0.0001) compared with HER2-positive cancer (OR = 1.69 [0.90–3.20]; P = 0.11). Similarly, in patients with HER2-negative cancer, the effect of bevacizumab was also more pronounced in patients with HR-negative cancer (OR = 1.38 [1.09–1.74]; P = 0.007) compared with HR-positive cancer (OR = 1.36 [0.78–2.35]; P = 0.27). No significant differences were observed between the groups with respect to cCR, surgery rate, or BCS rate. Additionally bevacizumab was associated with a higher incidence of neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, and hand–foot syndrome. Conclusions Higher proportions of patients achieved pCR when

  20. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  1. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  2. Dural invasion by pituitary tumours.

    PubMed

    Shaffi, O M; Wrightson, P

    1975-04-23

    In 12 cases of pituitary tumour the dura mater of the sella turcica or diaphragma sellae in contact with the tumour was examined histologically. In nine cases tumour cells were found lying deep in the substance of the dura. Dura from the sella of seven subjects without pituitary disease, obtianed at autopsy, showed no inclusions of pituitary tissue. Four of the cases studied were known before death to suffer from an invasive pituitary adenoma. Of eight surviving cases operated upon in the last two years, five showed dural invasion by tumour. The present report suggests that the condition may be more frequent than expected and that with more study it may provide an index of prognosis. It also defines a requirement for the surgeon aiming to prevent recurrence of tumour after operation or to achieve a complete endocrine ablation.

  3. Clinical implications of the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Prat, Aleix; Pineda, Estela; Adamo, Barbara; Galván, Patricia; Fernández, Aranzazu; Gaba, Lydia; Díez, Marc; Viladot, Margarita; Arance, Ana; Muñoz, Montserrat

    2015-11-01

    Gene-expression profiling has had a considerable impact on our understanding of breast cancer biology. During the last 15 years, 5 intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer (Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2-enriched, Basal-like and Claudin-low) have been identified and intensively studied. In this review, we will focus on the current and future clinical implications of the intrinsic molecular subtypes beyond the current pathological-based classification endorsed by the 2013 St. Gallen Consensus Recommendations. Within hormone receptor-positive and HER2-negative early breast cancer, the Luminal A and B subtypes predict 10-year outcome regardless of systemic treatment administered as well as residual risk of distant recurrence after 5 years of endocrine therapy. Within clinically HER2-positive disease, the 4 main intrinsic subtypes can be identified and dominate the biological and clinical phenotype. From a clinical perspective, patients with HER2+/HER2-enriched disease seem to benefit the most from neoadjuvant trastuzumab, or dual HER2 blockade with trastuzumab/lapatinib, in combination with chemotherapy, and patients with HER2+/Luminal A disease seem to have a relative better outcome compared to the other subtypes. Finally, within triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), the Basal-like disease predominates (70-80%) and, from a biological perspective, should be considered a cancer-type by itself. Importantly, the distinction between Basal-like versus non-Basal-like within TNBC might predict survival following (neo)adjvuvant multi-agent chemotherapy, bevacizumab benefit in the neoadjuvant setting (CALGB40603), and docetaxel vs. carboplatin benefit in first-line metastatic disease (TNT study). Overall, this data suggests that intrinsic molecular profiling provides clinically relevant information beyond current pathology-based classifications.

  4. Heavy ion tumour therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, M.

    2000-03-01

    Ion beams represent a promising radiotherapy modality for the treatment of deep seated tumours. Compared to conventional photon beams, in particular beams of heavier ions like e.g. carbon show several advantages which are related to their different physical and radiobiological properties: The dose increases with penetration depth and shows a sharp distal fall off at the end of the particle range, i.e., the depth dose profile is inverted compared to photon beams. They exhibit an increased biological effectiveness in particular at the end of their range and thus in the target volume. The spatial distribution of stopping particles can be monitored by means of PET-techniques making use of the small amount of radioactive projectile fragments. Ion beams were first used for medical applications in 1954 in Berkeley. Since then, several treatment facilities for tumour therapy have been established worldwide, and approximately 25 000 patients have been treated with protons and 3000 patients with heavier ions successfully. As an example, the specific advantages of the heavy ion therapy facility at GSI Darmstadt established in cooperation with the Radiological Clinics and DKFZ Heidelberg and FZ Rossendorf will be described. In contrast to most existing facilities, it is based on an active beam delivery system, using magnetic deflection of a pencil beam (raster scan) and accelerator energy variation to adjust the penetration depth. Thus, an optimal conformation of the dose to the target volume is achieved. PET-measurements allow for a quasi on-line monitoring of the 3D distribution of stopping particles and in particular of the position of the distal edge of the dose distribution. Furthermore, in the treatment planning procedure the radiobiological properties of ion beams are taken into account in great detail. In December 1997, patient treatments started at GSI, and up to now 42 patients were treated with carbon ions alone or in a mixed carbon/photon beam regime.

  5. Pertuzumab in human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer: clinical and economic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Lamond, Nathan WD; Younis, Tallal

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of specific therapy, the 15%–20% of breast cancers demonstrating human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein overexpression and/or gene amplification are characterized by a more aggressive phenotype and poorer prognosis compared to their HER2-negative counterparts. Trastuzumab (Herceptin), the first anti-HER2-targeted therapy, has been associated with improved survival outcomes in HER2-positive breast cancer. However, many patients with early stage disease continue to relapse, and metastatic disease remains incurable. In order to further improve these outcomes, several novel HER2-targeted agents have recently been developed. Pertuzumab (Perjeta), a monoclonal antibody against the HER2 dimerization domain, has also been associated with improved patient outcomes in clinical trials, and has recently been approved in combination with chemotherapy and trastuzumab for neoadjuvant therapy of early stage, HER2-positive breast cancer and first-line treatment of metastatic disease. This review briefly summarizes pertuzumab’s clinical development as well as the published evidence supporting its use, and highlights some of the currently unanswered questions that will influence pertuzumab’s incorporation into clinical practice. PMID:24876795

  6. A Review of Systemic Treatment in Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zeichner, Simon B.; Terawaki, Hiromi; Gogineni, Keerthi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with breast cancer along with metastatic estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER/PR)- and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative tumors are referred to as having metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (mTNBC) disease. Although there have been many new treatment options approved by the Food and Drug Administration for ER/PR-positive and Her2/neu-amplified metastatic breast cancer, relatively few new agents have been approved for patients with mTNBC. There have been several head-to-head chemotherapy trials performed within the metastatic setting, and much of what is applied in clinical practice is extrapolated from chemotherapy trials in the adjuvant setting, with taxanes and anthracyclines incorporated early on in the patient’s treatment course. Select synergistic combinations can produce faster and more significant response rates compared with monotherapy and are typically used in the setting of visceral threat or symptomatic disease. Preclinical studies have implicated other possible targets and mechanisms in mTNBC. Ongoing clinical trials are underway assessing new chemotherapeutic strategies and agents, including targeted therapy and immunotherapy. In this review, we evaluate the standard systemic and future treatment options in mTNBC. PMID:27042088

  7. Clinical-Pathologic Features and Long-Term Outcomes of Tubular Carcinoma of the Breast Compared With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gene-Fu F.; Yang Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Moran, Meena S.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate our institutional experience of treating tubular carcinoma of the breast (TC) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) with conservative surgery and radiation therapy, to compare clinical-pathologic features and long-term outcomes. Methods and Materials: A review of our institution's tumor registry from 1975 to 2007, followed by a central pathology review of available slides, yielded 71 cases of Stage I/II TC and 2,238 cases of Stage I/II IDC treated with breast conservation therapy. Clinical-pathologic features and outcomes were analyzed by subtype to detect significant differences. Results: The median follow-up was 7 years. The TC cohort presented more frequently with pT1 disease (97% vs. 80%, p = 0.0007), pN0 disease (95% vs. 74%, p = 0.0004), hormone-receptor positivity (ER+, 89% vs. 62%, p = 0.0001; PR+, 81% vs. 52%, p = 0.0001), and HER-2 negativity (89% vs. 71%, p = 0.04). Clinical outcomes also favored the TC cohort, with lower rates of breast cancer-related death (1% vs. 10%; p = 0.0109) and distant metastasis (1% vs. 13%; p = 0.0028) and higher rates of 10-year overall (90% vs. 80%; p = 0.033), cause-specific (99% vs. 86%; p = 0.011), and disease-free (99% vs. 82%; p = 0.003) survival. There was a nonsignificant trend toward improved breast cancer relapse-free survival for the TC cohort (95% vs. 87%; p = 0.062) but no difference in nodal relapse-free survival or contralateral breast cancer relapse-free survival (all p values >0.05) between the cohorts. Conclusion: Our institutional experience suggests that TC, when compared with IDC, is associated with more favorable clinical-pathologic features and comparable, if not superior, outcomes after breast conservation therapy, suggesting the appropriateness of a conservative approach to this rare subtype.

  8. Triple negative breast cancer: the role of metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Dean, S J R; Rhodes, A

    2014-12-01

    The incidence of breast cancer in Malaysia and other Asian countries is on the increase, reflecting lifestyle changes some of which are known risk factors for the development of breast cancer. Most breast cancers are amenable to adjuvant therapies that target hormone receptors or HER2 receptors on the surface of the cancer cells and bring about significant improvement in survival. However, approximately 17% of Malaysian women with breast cancer, present with tumours that are devoid of these receptors and are consequently termed 'triple negative' breast cancers. These triple negative breast cancers typically occur in women of a younger age than receptor positive cancers, are predominantly of high grade tumours and the prognosis is usually poor. There is therefore a pressing need to understand the biological pathways that drive these tumours, in order that effective strategies are developed to treat these aggressive tumours. With the increasing affluence of developing countries, obesity and Type II Diabetes are also on the rise. These diseases are associated with an increased risk of developing a range of cancers including those of the breast. In particular, the metabolic syndrome has been shown to be associated with triple negative breast cancer. This article reviews some of the metabolic pathways and biomarkers which have been shown to be aberrantly expressed in triple negative breast cancer and highlights some of the ongoing work in this area. PMID:25500513

  9. Benign cardiac tumours, malignant arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kimberley A; Wong, Kenny K; Tipple, Marion; Sanatani, Shubhayan

    2010-01-01

    Four cases of pediatric cardiac tumours (PCTs) associated with ventricular arrhythmias are reported. Sudden cardiac death attributable to the tumour occurred in two children. A third child received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator and the fourth had persistent ventricular arrhythmia despite medical therapy. Most PCTs are considered benign; however, the development of malignant arrhythmias may complicate the management of these tumours in some patients. The literature regarding the arrhythmogenic potential of PCTs and the use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in these patients is reviewed. The series highlights the deficiency of prognostic information for this cohort. PMID:20151061

  10. Malignant tumours of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Ryska, M; Hrabal, P

    2015-12-01

    No comprehensive knowledge of duodenal tumours exists in the current literature; individual types of malignant tumours may be described within malignancies of the small bowel, sets of case reports, or individual cases. Ampullary carcinomas are the exception and they are detailed in the current WHO histological classification of tumours of digestive system. Neither national nor international literature sources provide a comprehensive review of their therapy. The situation is similar when searching for surgical procedures. Resection procedures on the duodenum should thus be performed in specialized centres with sufficient experience with hepato-pancreato-biliary surgery. PMID:26767899

  11. REAL-TIME INTRAVITAL IMAGING ESTABLISHES TUMOUR-ASSOCIATED MACROPHAGES AS THE EXTRASKELETAL TARGET OF BISPHOSPHONATE ACTION IN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Junankar, Simon; Shay, Gemma; Jurczyluk, Julie; Ali, Naveid; Down, Jenny; Pocock, Nicholas; Parker, Andrew; Nguyen, Akira; Sun, Shuting; Kashemirov, Boris; McKenna, Charles E.; Croucher, Peter I.; Swarbrick, Alexander; Weilbaecher, Katherine; Phan, Tri Giang; Rogers, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent clinical trials have shown that bisphosphonate drugs improve breast cancer patient survival independent of their anti-resorptive effects on the skeleton. However, since bisphosphonates bind rapidly to bone mineral, the exact mechanisms of their anti-tumour action, particularly on cells outside of bone, remain unknown. Here we used real-time intravital two-photon microscopy to show extensive leakage of fluorescent bisphosphonate from the vasculature in 4T1 mouse mammary tumours, where it initially binds to areas of small, granular microcalcifications that are engulfed by tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs), but not tumour cells. Importantly, we also observed uptake of radiolabeled bisphosphonate in the primary breast tumour of a patient and showed the resected tumour to be infiltrated with TAMs and to contain similar granular microcalcifications. These data represent the first compelling in vivo evidence that bisphosphonates can target cells in tumours outside the skeleton and that their anti-tumour activity is likely to be mediated via TAMs. PMID:25312016

  12. 19p13.1 is a triple negative-specific breast cancer susceptibility locus

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Kristen N.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Vachon, Celine M.; Wang, Xianshu; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Nevanlinna, Heli; Greco, Dario; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Vrieling, Alina; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Nickels, Stefan; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Meindl, Alfons; Bartram, Claus R.; Schott, Sarah; Engel, Christof; Godwin, Andrew K.; Weaver, JoEllen; Pathak, Harsh B.; Sharma, Priyanka; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Miron, Penelope; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Stavropoulou, Alexandra; Fountzilas, George; Gogas, Helen J.; Swann, Ruth; Dwek, Miriam; Perkins, Annie; Milne, Roger L.; Benítez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Pérez, José Ignacio Arias; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmé, Frederick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Peto, Julian; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartmann, Arndt; Ekici, Arif B.; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Muir, Kenneth; Puttawibul, Puttisak; Wiangnon, Surapon; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Braaf, Linde M; Rosenberg, Efraim H; Hopper, John L.; Apicella, Carmel; Park, Daniel J.; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Dur, Christina Clarke; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Hamann, Ute; Dünnebier, Thomas; Rüdiger, Thomas; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Pharoah, Paul P.; Dunning, Alison M; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcom W.; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Hwang, Helena; Eccles, Diana M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Sherman, Mark E.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona A; Severi, Gianluca; Kosel, Matthew L.; Pankratz, V.S.; Slager, Susan; Olson, Janet E.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Lambrechts, Diether; Hatse, Sigrid; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Soini, Ylermi; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2012-01-01

    The 19p13.1 breast cancer susceptibility locus is a modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is also associated with risk of ovarian cancer. Here we investigated 19p13.1 variation and risk of breast cancer subtypes, defined by estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) status, using 48,869 breast cancer cases and 49,787 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Variants from 19p13.1 were not associated with breast cancer overall or with ER-positive breast cancer but were significantly associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk [rs8170 Odds Ratio (OR)=1.10, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.05 – 1.15, p=3.49 × 10-5] and triple negative (TN) (ER, PR and HER2 negative) breast cancer [rs8170 OR=1.22, 95% CI 1.13 – 1.31, p=2.22 × 10-7]. However, rs8170 was no longer associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk when TN cases were excluded [OR=0.98, 95% CI 0.89 – 1.07, p=0.62]. In addition, a combined analysis of TN cases from BCAC and the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC) (n=3,566) identified a genome-wide significant association between rs8170 and TN breast cancer risk [OR=1.25, 95% CI 1.18 – 1.33, p=3.31 × 10-13]. Thus, 19p13.1 is the first triple negative-specific breast cancer risk locus and the first locus specific to a histological subtype defined by ER, PR, and HER2 to be identified. These findings provide convincing evidence that genetic susceptibility to breast cancer varies by tumor subtype and that triple negative tumors and other subtypes likely arise through distinct etiologic pathways. PMID:22331459

  13. Expression and significance of PTEN and VEGF in canine mammary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Qiu, C W; Lin, D G; Wang, J Q; Li, C Y; Deng, G Z

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between the expression of the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosometen) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) and the clinicopathological features in canine mammary gland tumours, the expression levels of PTEN and VEGF protein were assessed in 50 cases of canine mammary gland tumours tissues and 4 cases of normal mammary gland tissues with using immunohistochemical method. The over-expression rate of PTEN protein was 100% in normal and well-differentiated mammary gland tissues and 67% in breast cancer cases respectively with a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.01). Expression of PTEN was not related to age and tumour size, but closely correlated to lymph node metastasis (P<0.01). The over-expression rate of VEGF protein was 33.3% in normal mammary gland tissues, and 78% in canine mammary gland tumours with a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.01). Expression of VEGF was not related to age or tumour size, but closely correlated with lymph node metastasis and clinical stage (P<0.05). Therefore the combination detection of PTEN and VEGF could serve as an important index to estimate the biological behavior and prognosis of canine mammary gland tumours. Reduced expression of PTEN might be involved in carcinogenesis and progression of canine breast cancer by up-regulating the VEGF expression to enhance angiogenesis.

  14. Influence of "diagnostic delay" upon cancer survival: an analysis of five tumour sites.

    PubMed Central

    Porta, M; Gallén, M; Malats, N; Planas, J

    1991-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to assess the relationship between survival, tumour stage, and the interval from first symptom to diagnosis (SDI, or duration of symptoms). DESIGN--This was a retrospective follow up study of a cohort of patients registered in the tumour registry of the Hospital del Mar (Barcelona). SETTING--Hospital based tumour registry, with patients derived mainly from the City of Barcelona. PARTICIPANTS--1247 cases of lung, breast, stomach, colon, or rectal cancer were analysed using survival curves and Cox proportional hazards regression. Subjects (mean age 63.6 years) were followed for a median length of 12.9 months after diagnosis. At the time of diagnosis one fourth of patients had disseminated disease. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Based on clinical records, a physician registered the onset time of the first symptom attributable to cancer (from which the SDI is computed), as well as the tumour stage at diagnosis. Other measurements followed standard tumour registry procedures. Overall, the crude mean SDI was 5.15 months (SD 8.03, median 2.03); only 24.5% of cases had an SDI less than a month. Crude mean SDIs by anatomical site were as follows: lung cancer 3.07 months; breast 7.44; stomach 5.34; colon 5.74; rectum 5.03. Tumour extension did not appear to be significantly influenced by SDI, only breast cancer showing a distinct pattern of increased extension with increasing SDI. As expected, the probability of survival decreased monotonically with increasing stage in all sites. Tumour site was also a significant predictor of survival, which at one year ranged from 93% for breast cancer to 28% for lung cancer. However, a longer SDI tended sometimes to be associated with a better chance of survival, a fact that was most apparent in colon cancer. All Cox proportional hazards models showed a consistent picture: SDI was not a significant predictor of survival (age and sex adjusted hazard ratios ranging from 0.97 to 1.01), neither was sex; age did

  15. Intra-tumoural microvessel density in human solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, J; Byers, R; Jayson, G C

    2002-01-01

    Over the last decade assessment of angiogenesis has emerged as a potentially useful biological prognostic and predictive factor in human solid tumours. With the development of highly specific endothelial markers that can be assessed in histological archival specimens, several quantitative studies have been performed in various solid tumours. The majority of published studies have shown a positive correlation between intra-tumoural microvessel density, a measure of tumour angiogenesis, and prognosis in solid tumours. A minority of studies have not demonstrated an association and this may be attributed to significant differences in the methodologies employed for sample selection, immunostaining techniques, vessel counting and statistical analysis, although a number of biological differences may account for the discrepancy. In this review we evaluate the quantification of angiogenesis by immunohistochemistry, the relationship between tumour vascularity and metastasis, and the clinicopathological studies correlating intra-tumoral microvessel density with prognosis and response to anti-cancer therapy. In view of the extensive nature of this retrospective body of data, comparative studies are needed to identify the optimum technique and endothelial antigens (activated or pan-endothelial antigens) but subsequently prospective studies that allocate treatment on the basis of microvessel density are required. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1566–1577. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600315 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12085206

  16. EGFR and microvessel density in canine malignant mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Maria Isabel; Guimarães, Maria João; Pires, Isabel; Prada, Justina; Silva-Carvalho, Ricardo; Lopes, Carlos; Queiroga, Felisbina L

    2013-12-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor which has been shown to have an important role in human breast cancer. Its role appears to be associated with increased angiogenesis and metastasis. In order to clarify its role in canine mammary tumours (CMT), 61 malignant neoplasms were studied by using immunohistochemistry, comparing expression of EGFR, microvessel density (MVD) by CD31 immunolabelling and characteristics of tumour aggressiveness. High EGFR immunoexpression was statistically significantly associated with tumour size, tumour necrosis, mitotic grade, histological grade of malignancy and clinical stage. High CD31 immunoreactivity was statistically significantly associated with tubule formation, histological grade of malignancy and clinical stage. A positive correlation between EGFR and CD31 immunoexpression (r = 0.843; P < 0.001) was also observed. Results suggest that an over-expression of EGFR may contribute to increased angiogenesis and aggression in malignant CMT, presenting the possibility of using EGFR inhibitors in the context of metastatic disease treatment. PMID:24091029

  17. Rewiring macrophages for anti-tumour immunity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yunqin; Biswas, Subhra K

    2016-06-28

    Tumour-associated macrophages facilitate cancer progression, but whether they can be reprogrammed to elicit an anti-tumour response remains unclear. Deletion of the microRNA-processing enzyme Dicer is now shown to rewire macrophages to an anti-tumour mode, leading to an enhanced response to immunotherapy and inhibition of tumour progression. PMID:27350442

  18. Leydig cell tumours in childhood.

    PubMed

    Mengel, W; Knorr, D

    1983-01-01

    Two cases of Leydig cell tumours in childhood are presented. In one case, delayed diagnosis and operation led to pubertas praecox vera whereas in the other case normal growth and development occurred after early diagnosis and operation. PMID:6878724

  19. A rare benign ovarian tumour.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro, Marta Morna; Cunha, Teresa Margarida; Loureiro, Ana Luisa; Esteves, Gonçalo

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumour (SST) of the ovary is an extremely rare and benign ovarian neoplasm, accounting for 6% of the sex cord stromal ovarian tumours subtype. Usually, it is found during the second and third decades of life. Patients commonly present with pelvic pain, a palpable pelvic mass or menstrual irregularity. We report a case of a 20-year-old woman reporting of mild pelvic pain, with normal laboratory data. On imaging examinations, a large right adnexal tumour was found, with features suggesting an ovarian sex cord tumour. The patient underwent right salpingo-oophorectomy, diagnosing a SST of the ovary. This paper also reviews the literature, and emphasises the typical pathological and imaging characteristics of these rare benign ovarian lesions, and their impact, in a conservative surgery. PMID:26933186

  20. Multicellular Streaming in Solid Tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kas, Josef

    As early as 400 BCE, the Roman medical encyclopaedist Celsus recognized that solid tumours are stiffer than surrounding tissue. However, cancer cell lines are softer, and softer cells facilitate invasion. This paradox raises several questions: Does softness emerge from adaptation to mechanical and chemical cues in the external microenvironment, or are soft cells already present inside a primary solid tumour? If the latter, how can a more rigid tissue contain more soft cells? Here we show that in primary tumour samples from patients with mammary and cervix carcinomas, cells do exhibit a broad distribution of rigidities, with a higher fraction of softer and more contractile cells compared to normal tissue. Mechanical modelling based on patient data reveals that, surprisingly, tumours with a significant fraction of very soft cells can still remain rigid. Moreover, in tissues with the observed distributions of cell stiffnesses, softer cells spontaneously self-organize into lines or streams, possibly facilitating cancer metastasis.

  1. Tumour of the juxtaoral organ.

    PubMed

    Bénateau, H; Rigau, V; Comoz, F; Benchemam, Y; Galateau, F; Compère, J F

    2003-02-01

    The juxtaoral organ is a normal and constant structure of the oral cavity. It consists of benign epithelial nests. We describe an intraoral tumour of the juxtaoral organ in a child. The tumour was not diagnosed after clinical and radiological examinations because it is extremely rare. A histological examination revealed a tumour of the juxtaoral organ, presumed to be neuroid hamartoma. This is only the second time that a tumour of the juxtaoral organ has been described in a child. We also describe the location, the embryology, the histology and the function of this organ. This is important because this structure can be confused with carcinomas of the oral cavity when examining frozen sections.

  2. Surface impedance based microwave imaging method for breast cancer screening: contrast-enhanced scenario.

    PubMed

    Güren, Onan; Çayören, Mehmet; Ergene, Lale Tükenmez; Akduman, Ibrahim

    2014-10-01

    A new microwave imaging method that uses microwave contrast agents is presented for the detection and localization of breast tumours. The method is based on the reconstruction of breast surface impedance through a measured scattered field. The surface impedance modelling allows for representing the electrical properties of the breasts in terms of impedance boundary conditions, which enable us to map the inner structure of the breasts into surface impedance functions. Later a simple quantitative method is proposed to screen breasts against malignant tumours where the detection procedure is based on weighted cross correlations among impedance functions. Numerical results demonstrate that the method is capable of detecting small malignancies and provides reasonable localization.

  3. Pituitary tumours: acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Chanson, Philippe; Salenave, Sylvie; Kamenicky, Peter; Cazabat, Laure; Young, Jacques

    2009-10-01

    Excessive production of the growth hormone (GH) is responsible for acromegaly. It is related to a pituitary GH-secreting adenoma in most cases. Prevalence is estimated 40-130 per million inhabitants. It is characterised by slowly progressive acquired somatic disfigurement (mainly involving the face and extremities) and systemic manifestations. The rheumatologic, cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic consequences determine its prognosis. The diagnosis is confirmed by an increased serum GH concentration, unsuppressible by an oral glucose load and by detection of increased levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Treatment is aimed at correcting (or preventing) tumour compression by excising the disease-causing lesion, and at reducing GH and IGF-I levels to normal values. When surgery, the usual first-line treatment, fails to correct GH/IGF-I hypersecretion, medical treatment with somatostatin analogues and/or radiotherapy can be used. The GH-receptor antagonist (pegvisomant) is helpful in patients who are resistant to somatostatin analogues. Thanks to this multistep therapeutic strategy, adequate hormonal disease control is achieved in most cases, allowing a normal life expectancy. PMID:19945023

  4. Imaging of skull base tumours.

    PubMed

    Thust, Stefanie Catherine; Yousry, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    The skull base is a highly complex and difficult to access anatomical region, which constitutes a relatively common site for neoplasms. Imaging plays a central role in establishing the differential diagnosis, to determine the anatomic tumour spread and for operative planning. All skull base imaging should be performed using thin-section multiplanar imaging, whereby CT and MRI can be considered complimentary. An interdisciplinary team approach is central to improve the outcome of these challenging tumours.

  5. MRI characteristics of midbrain tumours.

    PubMed

    Sun, B; Wang, C C; Wang, J

    1999-03-01

    We diagnosed 60 cases of midbrain tumours by MRI between 1993 to 1997. There were 39 males and 21 females, aged 2-64 years, mean 25.6 years. We found 38 patients with true intramedullary mid-brain tumours, 11 predominantly in the tectum, 20 in the tegmentum and 7 with a downward extension to the pons; there were 7 within the cerebral aqueduct. There were 22 patients with infiltrating midbrain tumours extending from adjacent structures, 11 cases each from the thalamus and pineal region. All patients received surgical treatment. Gross total resection was achieved in 42 cases, subtotal (> 75 %) resection in 18. Pathological diagnoses included 16 low-grade and 15 high-grade astrocytomas; 5 oligodendroastrocytomas; 2 ependymomas; 11 glioblastomas; and 11 pineal parenchymal or germ-cell tumours. Midbrain tumours are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, with wide variation in clinical and MRI features, related to the site and type of tumour. MRI not only allows precise analysis of their growth pattern, but also can lead to a correct preoperative diagnosis in the majority of cases.

  6. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge) and to characterize potential abnormalities seen on mammography or breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ultrasound imaging ... supply in breast lesions . Supplemental Breast Cancer Screening Mammography is the only screening tool for breast cancer ...

  7. Breast pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - breast; Mastalgia; Mastodynia; Breast tenderness ... There are many possible causes for breast pain. For example, hormone level changes from menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast tenderness. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period ...

  8. Therapy-induced tumour secretomes promote resistance and tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Obenauf, Anna C.; Zou, Yilong; Ji, Andrew L.; Vanharanta, Sakari; Shu, Weiping; Shi, Hubing; Kong, Xiangju; Bosenberg, Marcus C.; Wiesner, Thomas; Rosen, Neal; Lo, Roger S.; Massagué, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance invariably limits the clinical efficacy of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors against cancer1,2. Here we show that targeted therapy with BRAF, ALK, or EGFR kinase inhibitors induces a complex network of secreted signals in drug-stressed melanoma and lung adenocarcinoma cells. This therapy-induced secretome (TIS) stimulates the outgrowth, dissemination, and metastasis of drug-resistant cancer cell clones and supports the survival of drug-sensitive cancer cells, contributing to incomplete tumour regression. The vemurafenib reactive secretome in melanoma is driven by down-regulation of the transcription factor FRA1. In situ transcriptome analysis of drug-resistant melanoma cells responding to the regressing tumour microenvironment revealed hyperactivation of multiple signalling pathways, most prominently the AKT pathway. Dual inhibition of RAF and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways blunted the outgrowth of the drug-resistant cell population in BRAF mutant melanoma tumours, suggesting this combination therapy as a strategy against tumour relapse. Thus, therapeutic inhibition of oncogenic drivers induces vast secretome changes in drug-sensitive cancer cells, paradoxically establishing a tumour microenvironment that supports the expansion of drug-resistant clones, but is susceptible to combination therapy. PMID:25807485

  9. Low Dose, Low Cost Estradiol Pellets Can Support MCF-7 Tumour Growth in Nude Mice without Bladder Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Dall, Genevieve; Vieusseux, Jessica; Unsworth, Ashleigh; Anderson, Robin; Britt, Kara

    2015-01-01

    MCF-7 cells are a slow growing estrogen receptor (ER) positive human breast cancer cell line that is commonly used to model estrogen responsive breast cancer cell growth in-vitro and tumour growth in-vivo. These tumours require estrogen supplementation, and in-vivo doses of between 0.72mg and 2mg estradiol pellets are commonly implanted in the dorsal flank of ovariectomised, immunocompromised mice. We wanted to grow MCF-7 tumours in immunocompromised mice without the need to be ovariectomised. When we treated immunocompromised mice with 0.72mg pellets to induce MCF7 tumour growth, the mice developed urosepsis. We have now shown that lower doses of estradiol pellets, 0.3mg and 0.5mg, induce elevated serum estrogen levels and maintain tumour growth, without causing urosepsis. Supplementation for only one week did not support sustained MCF7 tumour growth. In conclusion, 0.3mg and 0.5mg silastic pellets can be used to stimulate ER+ breast cancer growth in ovary-intact, immune compromised mice. PMID:26640593

  10. Role of nuclear receptors in breast cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Papi, Alessio; Orlandi, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The recapitulation of primary tumour heterogenity and the existence of a minor sub-population of cancer cells, capable of initiating tumour growth in xenografts on serial passages, led to the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist. CSCs are present in many tumours, among which is breast cancer. Breast CSCs (BCSCs) are likely to sustain the growth of the primary tumour mass, as well as to be responsible for disease relapse and metastatic spreading. Consequently, BCSCs represent the most significant target for new drugs in breast cancer therapy. Both the hypoxic condition in BCSCs biology and pro-inflammatory cytokine network has gained increasing importance in the recent past. Breast stromal cells are crucial components of the tumours milieu and are a major source of inflammatory mediators. Recently, the anti-inflammatory role of some nuclear receptors ligands has emerged in several diseases, including breast cancer. Therefore, the use of nuclear receptors ligands may be a valid strategy to inhibit BCSCs viability and consequently breast cancer growth and disease relapse. PMID:27022437

  11. Absence of canine papillomavirus sequences in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Sardon, D; Blundell, R; Burrai, G P; Alberti, A; Tore, G; Passino, E Sanna; Antuofermo, E

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (PVs) are found in human breast cancer tissue; however, it remains controversial as to whether these viruses play a role in the aetiology of this tumour. There has been minimal study of whether PVs are found in normal or abnormal mammary glands of animals. The present study investigated whether a PV sequence could be found in the mammary glands of 33 female dogs by rolling circle amplification and polymerase chain reaction. No PV DNA was found in normal or neoplastic canine mammary tissues, suggesting that canine PVs are probably not involved in the pathogenesis of canine mammary neoplasia. PMID:25435511

  12. The prognostic significance and value of cyclin D1, CDK4 and p16 in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Loss of the retinoblastoma protein tumor suppressor gene (RB) coding for a nuclear phosphoprotein that regulates the cell cycle is found in many human cancers and probably leads to disruption of the p16-cyclin D1-CDK4/6-RB pathway. Cyclin D1 is known to activate CDK4, which then phosphorylates the RB protein, leading to cell cycle progression. p16 inhibits CDK4, keeping RB hypophosphorylated and preventing cell cycle progression. The significance of these three markers, cyclin D1, CDK4 and p16, for breast cancer and carcinogenesis is nevertheless still controversial. Methods The material consisted of 102 formalin-fixed human breast cancer samples, in which cyclin D1, CDK4 and p16 expression was evaluated immunohistochemically. The amounts of cyclin D1 mRNA present were analyzed by quantitative real time PCR. Results High cyclin D1 expression statistically significantly correlated with lower tumor grade, estrogen and progesterone receptor positivity and lower proliferation activity in breast tumors and increased breast cancer-specific survival and overall survival. Tumors with high cyclin D1 protein had 1.8 times higher expression of cyclin D1 mRNA. CDK4 expression did not correlate with cyclin D1 expression or the survival data. p16 expression was associated with Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) negativity and increased breast cancer-specific survival and disease-free survival. No statistical correlations between cyclin D1, CDK4 and p16 were found. Conclusions Cyclin D1 was associated with a good breast cancer prognosis but functioned independently of CDK4. High cyclin D1 expression may be partially due to increased CCND1 transcription. p16 correlated with a better prognosis and may function without CDK4. In conclusion, it appears that cyclin D1, CDK4 and p16 function independently in human breast cancer. PMID:23336272

  13. [Safety and compliance with UFT (tegafur and uracil) alone and in combination with hormone therapy in patients with breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Tetsuya; Noguchi, Shinzaburo

    2009-09-01

    Recently, some new anticancer agents and hormonal agents can be used to treat breast cancer, and more patients are administering combinations of these drugs in clinical practice. Tegafur and Uracil (UFT) have been widely used for the postoperative chemotherapy of breast cancer, and often combined with hormonal agents. However, due consideration has not been given to safety and compliance of the combined use of UFT and aromatase inhibitor (AI). We therefore studied the safety and compliance with UFT alone and in combination with the hormonal agents tamoxifen or anastrozole as postoperative therapy in postmenopausal women with breast cancer. Our results confirmed that longterm postoperative therapy with UFT alone was feasible, provided that early adverse events are carefully monitored. Combined therapy was not associated with a significant increase in the incidence of adverse events or a decrease in compliance, even in older adult patients. Therefore, we consider UFT plus a hormonal agent (especially anastrozole) to be a treatment option for patients with HER2-negative highly or incompletely endocrine responsive disease who require relatively moderate chemotherapy or for older adult patients who require treatment with low toxicity.

  14. Ultrasensitive and selective electrochemical diagnosis of breast cancer based on a hydrazine-Au nanoparticle-aptamer bioconjugate.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ye; Chandra, Pranjal; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2013-01-15

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells were detected using an electrochemical immunosensor combined with hydrazine and aptamer-conjugated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The sensor probe was fabricated by covalently immobilizing anti-HER2 onto a nanocomposite layer that was composed of self-assembled 2,5-bis(2-thienyl)-1H-pyrrole-1-(p-benzoic acid) (DPB) on AuNPs. The hydrazine-AuNP-aptamer bioconjugate, where the hydrazine reductant was directly attached onto AuNPs to avoid the nonspecific deposition of silver on the sensor surface, was designed and used to reduce silver ion for signal amplification selectively. The silver-stained target cells were visualized easily by the bare eye and an optical microscope, and the cells were quantitatively analyzed using stripping voltammetry. The parameters affecting the analytical response were optimized. The proposed sensor was capable of differentiating between HER2-positive breast cancer cells and HER2-negative cells. This method exhibited an excellent diagnosis method for the ultrasensitive detection of SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells in human serum samples with a detection limit of 26 cells/mL.

  15. Tenascin in salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Soini, Y; Pääkkö, P; Virtanen, I; Lehto, V P

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of tenascin immunoreactivity was analysed in salivary gland tissue and in various benign and malignant tumours of the salivary gland. In the non-neoplastic tissue, tenascin was seen in the areas of basement membranes of the ductal epithelium. No immunoreactivity could be observed in the serous or mucous glands. In pleomorphic adenomas, tenascin immunoreactivity could be seen in the stromal compartment. It was more pronounced in the dense stromal areas and chondroid elements than in the myxoid area. In Warthin's tumours, strong tenascin immunoreactivity could be observed in the basement membrane zone of the epithelial component. In the lymphatic component, faint reticular staining could be seen. In adenoid cystic carcinomas, acinic cell tumours and mucoepidermoid carcinomas, tenascin showed a linear stromal distribution. No intracytoplasmic immunoreactivity could be seen in any of the cases. The widespread tenascin positivity in salivary gland tumours suggests that tenascin may play a role in the induction and progression of salivary gland tumours, presumably by interfering with the normal parenchymal-mesenchymal interaction.

  16. Tuberculosis simulating brain tumour.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, U R; Farooq, M; Rauf, F; Bhatti, S K

    2011-06-30

    The purpose of the study is to highlight the varied presentation of tuberculosis (TB) simulating a brain tumour. Headache and seizures are becoming frequent presenting complaints without any history of tuberculosis. The study comprises 1200 patients of both sexes with ages ranging from ten to sixty years. CT scan and MRI brain control with and without contrast medium were the investigations performed in these cases. In some patients Electroencephalography (EEG), cerebral angiography (DSA) and spectroscopy were also performed. The final diagnosis of tuberculosis was made on the basis of craniotomy, stereotactic and burr hole biopsies with histopathology in most of the cases. Forty per cent of the patients were followed up for eight months. They were put on anti-tuberculosis treatment with symptomatic and anti-epileptic drugs. The incidence was 544 and 757 per 100,000 in Africa and Indo Pakistan respectively. The male to female ratio was 1:1. Tuberculosis, especially with CNS involvement, is not only common in immunosuppressed patients in our setting, but TB has been and remains an important public health problem. TB may involve the CNS either as meningitis or as parenchymal granulomas or abscesses. Patients with brain TB usually present with fever, multiple cranial nerve involvement and occasional behavioural changes. CSF findings remain non specific in most cases. The most common sites are the cerebral hemisphere and basal ganglion in adults and the cerebellum in children. Tuberculosis has unique findings on brain CT and MRI. Cortical and subcortical locations are typical whereas the brain stem is a less common site. Tuberculosis lesions are usually solitary but multiple in 10% to 35% of cases. In spite of all these facts some cases of brain TB still need aggressive neurointervention to reach the final diagnosis of brain TB. Tuberculosis in the CNS may manifest in many different ways. So one should always include tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis in the

  17. Breast cancer epidemiology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Broeders, M J; Verbeek, A L

    1997-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in the Western society. Over the past decades it has become apparent that breast cancer incidence rates are increasing steadily, whereas the mortality rates for breast cancer have remained relatively constant. Information through the media on this rising number of cases has increased breast health awareness but has also introduced anxiety in the female population. This combination of factors has made the need for prevention of breast cancer an urgent matter. Breast cancer does not seem to be a single disease entity. A specific etiologic factor may therefore have more influence on one form of breast cancer than another. So far though, as shown in our summary of current knowledge on established and dubious risk factors, no risk factors have been identified that can explain a major part of the incidence. Efforts to identify other ways for primary prevention have also been discouraging, even though breast cancer is one of the most investigated tumours world-wide. Thus, at this point in time, the most important strategy to reduce breast cancer mortality is early detection through individual counselling and organised breast screening programs. The recent isolation of breast cancer susceptibility genes may introduce new ways to reduce the risk of breast cancer in a small subset of women. PMID:9274126

  18. Impact of Diabetes and Hyperglycemia on Survival in Advanced Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Shaw-Dulin, Robin; Lara-Medina, Fernando; Bacon, Ludwing; Rivera, Daniel; Urzua, Lorena; Aguila, Christian; Ramirez-Morales, Rebeca; Santamaria, Julieta; Bargallo, Enrique; Mohar, Alejandro; Herrera, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We examined the impact of diabetes and hyperglycemia on cancer-specific survival of patients with metastatic or recurrent breast cancer (BC). Methods. We performed a retrospective analysis of 265 patients with advanced BC receiving palliative chemotherapy. BC-specific mortality was compared for diabetic and nondiabetic patients as well as for patients that presented hyperglycemia during treatment. Results. No difference was observed between the diabetic and nondiabetic patients in terms of overall survival (OS). A difference in OS was observed between nondiabetic patients and diabetic patients who had hyperglycemia. The OS was greater in diabetic patients with proper metabolic control than diabetic patients with hyperglycemia. The risk of death was higher in patients with mean glucose levels >130 mg/dL during treatment. Several factors were associated with poor OS: tumor stage, hormone-receptor-negative tumors, HER2 negative disease, multiple metastatic sites, presence of visceral metastases, and mean glucose >130 mg/dL. Conclusion. Elevated glucose levels are associated with a poor outcome in diabetic and nondiabetic patients in contrast to patients with normoglycemic levels, conferring an elevated risk of death. According to these results, clinicians should monitor glucose levels during treatment for advanced breast cancer disease and take action to maintain normal glucose levels. PMID:22919369

  19. Does obesity compromise survival in women with breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Carmichael, A R; Bendall, S; Lockerbie, L; Prescott, R J; Bates, T

    2004-04-01

    Obesity, measured by high body mass index (BMI >30 kg/m2) is associated with an increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer but the effect of obesity on prognosis is not clear. A prospectively accrued and regularly validated database of 1579 patients with breast cancer treated in a district general hospital between 1963 and 1999 was analysed for clinical and pathological tumour characteristics including the family history, grade, tumour type, treatment and outcome. The risk factors and outcome of obese and non-obese patients were compared. Breast cancer in obese women was associated with significantly larger tumour size and worse Nottingham prognostic index. There was no statistically significant difference in overall and disease-free survival between obese and non-obese group. Hazard ratios (95% Cl) were 0.81 (0.62-1.06) and 0.80 (0.63-1.01), respectively. In the present study, obesity is not an indicator of worst prognosis of breast cancer.

  20. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-01-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown. PMID:23238442

  1. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    PubMed

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  2. Is Interleukin 10 (IL10) Expression in Breast Cancer a Marker of Poor Prognosis?

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Hemanga Kumar; Bansal, Virinder Kumar; Nepal, Bikash; Srivastava, Sandeep; Dinda, Amit K; Misra, Mahesh C

    2016-09-01

    Interleukin 10 (IL10) is a poor prognostic marker in several cancers. Its role in breast cancer is not well elucidated. The present study is designed to see the expression of IL10 in breast cancer tissue and to evaluate its correlation with the established markers of prognosis. Sixty female patients who underwent surgery for breast cancer were enrolled for the study. Immediately after surgery, 2-5 g of tumour tissue and similar volume of peritumoural normal breast tissue were collected for IL10 assay. IL10 expression was assayed by immunohistochemistry. IL10 expressing tumours and IL10 non expressing tumours were compared. Chi square/Fisher exact test and student's t test were used to compare the data. p- valueless than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Thirty six patients (60 %) of carcinoma breast showed IL 10 expression in tumour tissue as compared to no IL 10 expression in any peritumouralnormal breast tissue (p < 0.01). IL10 expression had statistically significant correlation with locally advanced disease, tumour grade, HER2 + ve tumours and ER-ve, PR-ve, HER2 + ve breast cancer subtypes (p = 0.001, 0.001, 0.001 and 0.01 respectively). No correlation could be found with patient's age, tumour size, tumour histology and ER and PR status. Correlation of IL10 expressing tumours with several established poor prognostic markers of breast cancer may indicate the possible association of IL10 expression with poor prognosis. Large studies with long term follow up are needed to substantiate the association of IL10 with poor prognosis. PMID:27651693

  3. Effect of Metformin on Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Proliferation in a Randomized Presurgical Trial.

    PubMed

    DeCensi, Andrea; Puntoni, Matteo; Guerrieri-Gonzaga, Aliana; Cazzaniga, Massimiliano; Serrano, Davide; Lazzeroni, Matteo; Vingiani, Andrea; Gentilini, Oreste; Petrera, Marilena; Viale, Giuseppe; Cuzick, Jack; Bonanni, Bernardo; Pruneri, Giancarlo

    2015-10-01

    Metformin is associated with lower breast cancer risk in epidemiologic studies and showed decreased proliferation in HER2-positive breast cancer in a presurgical trial. To provide insight into its preventive potential, we measured proliferation by Ki-67 labeling index (LI) of intraepithelial lesions surrounding breast cancer. We randomly assigned 200 nondiabetic patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer in core biopsies to metformin, 1,700 mg or placebo once daily for 28 days before surgery. Upon surgery, five to seven specimens of cancer adjacent (≤1 cm) and distant (>1 cm) tissue were screened for LCIS, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and ductal hyperplasia (DH). The prevalence of LCIS, DCIS, and DH was 4.5% (9/200), 67% (133/200), and 35% (69/200), respectively. Overall, metformin did not affect Ki-67 LI in premalignant disorders. The median posttreatment Ki-67 LI (IQR) in the metformin and placebo arm was, respectively, 15% (5-15) versus 5% (4-6) in LCIS (P = 0.1), 12% (8-20) versus 10% (7-24) in DCIS (P = 0.9), and 3% (1-4) versus 3% (1-4) in DH (P = 0.5). However, posttreatment Ki-67 in HER2-positive DCIS lesions was significantly lower in women randomized to metformin especially when ER was coexpressed: 22% (11-32) versus 35% (30-40) in HER2-positive DCIS (n = 22, P = .06); 12% (7-18) versus 32% (27-42) in ER-positive/HER2-positive DCIS (n = 15, P = .004). Eight of 22 (36%) HER2-positive DCIS were adjacent to HER2-negative invasive breast cancer. In tissue samples obtained following 4 weeks of study drug, proliferation was lower in HER2-positive DCIS for women randomized to metformin versus placebo. An adjuvant trial incorporating metformin in HER2-positive DCIS is warranted. PMID:26276754

  4. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of the claudin-low intrinsic subtype of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction In breast cancer, gene expression analyses have defined five tumor subtypes (luminal A, luminal B, HER2-enriched, basal-like and claudin-low), each of which has unique biologic and prognostic features. Here, we comprehensively characterize the recently identified claudin-low tumor subtype. Methods The clinical, pathological and biological features of claudin-low tumors were compared to the other tumor subtypes using an updated human tumor database and multiple independent data sets. These main features of claudin-low tumors were also evaluated in a panel of breast cancer cell lines and genetically engineered mouse models. Results Claudin-low tumors are characterized by the low to absent expression of luminal differentiation markers, high enrichment for epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers, immune response genes and cancer stem cell-like features. Clinically, the majority of claudin-low tumors are poor prognosis estrogen receptor (ER)-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative, and epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative (triple negative) invasive ductal carcinomas with a high frequency of metaplastic and medullary differentiation. They also have a response rate to standard preoperative chemotherapy that is intermediate between that of basal-like and luminal tumors. Interestingly, we show that a group of highly utilized breast cancer cell lines, and several genetically engineered mouse models, express the claudin-low phenotype. Finally, we confirm that a prognostically relevant differentiation hierarchy exists across all breast cancers in which the claudin-low subtype most closely resembles the mammary epithelial stem cell. Conclusions These results should help to improve our understanding of the biologic heterogeneity of breast cancer and provide tools for the further evaluation of the unique biology of claudin-low tumors and cell lines. PMID:20813035

  5. Reduced risk of breast cancer associated with recreational physical activity varies by HER2 status

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huiyan; Xu, Xinxin; Ursin, Giske; Simon, Michael S; Marchbanks, Polly A; Malone, Kathleen E; Lu, Yani; McDonald, Jill A; Folger, Suzanne G; Weiss, Linda K; Sullivan-Halley, Jane; Deapen, Dennis M; Press, Michael F; Bernstein, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    Convincing epidemiologic evidence indicates that physical activity is inversely associated with breast cancer risk. Whether this association varies by the tumor protein expression status of the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), or p53 is unclear. We evaluated the effects of recreational physical activity on risk of invasive breast cancer classified by the four biomarkers, fitting multivariable unconditional logistic regression models to data from 1195 case and 2012 control participants in the population-based Women’s Contraceptive and Reproductive Experiences Study. Self-reported recreational physical activity at different life periods was measured as average annual metabolic equivalents of energy expenditure [MET]-hours per week. Our biomarker-specific analyses showed that lifetime recreational physical activity was negatively associated with the risks of ER-positive (ER+) and of HER2-negative (HER2−) subtypes (both Ptrend ≤ 0.04), but not with other subtypes (all Ptrend > 0.10). Analyses using combinations of biomarkers indicated that risk of invasive breast cancer varied only by HER2 status. Risk of HER2–breast cancer decreased with increasing number of MET-hours of recreational physical activity in each specific life period examined, although some trend tests were only marginally statistically significant (all Ptrend ≤ 0.06). The test for homogeneity of trends (HER2– vs. HER2+ ) reached statistical significance only when evaluating physical activity during the first 10 years after menarche (Phomogeneity = 0.03). Our data suggest that physical activity reduces risk of invasive breast cancers that lack HER2 overexpression, increasing our understanding of the biological mechanisms by which physical activity acts. PMID:25924995

  6. Tumour endothelial cells in high metastatic tumours promote metastasis via epigenetic dysregulation of biglycan

    PubMed Central

    Maishi, Nako; Ohba, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Alam, Mohammad Towfik; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Inoue, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels are gateways for distant metastasis. Recent studies have revealed that tumour endothelial cells (TECs) demonstrate distinct phenotypes from their normal counterparts. We have demonstrated that features of TECs are different depending on tumour malignancy, suggesting that TECs communicate with surrounding tumour cells. However, the contribution of TECs to metastasis has not been elucidated. Here, we show that TECs actively promote tumour metastasis through a bidirectional interaction between tumour cells and TECs. Co-implantation of TECs isolated from highly metastatic tumours accelerated lung metastases of low metastatic tumours. Biglycan, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan secreted from TECs, activated tumour cell migration via nuclear factor-κB and extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2. Biglycan expression was upregulated by DNA demethylation in TECs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that TECs are altered in their microenvironment and, in turn, instigate tumour cells to metastasize, which is a novel mechanism for tumour metastasis. PMID:27295191

  7. Tailored nanoparticles for tumour therapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pei-Shin; Drake, Philip; Cho, Hui-Ju; Kao, Chao-Hung; Lee, Kun-Feng; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Lin, Xi-Zhang; Lin, Yuh-Jiuan

    2012-06-01

    Gd doped iron-oxide nanoparticles were developed for use in tumour therapy via magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). The effect of the Gd3+ dopant on the particle size and magnetic properties was investigated. The final particle composition varied from Gd0.01Fe2.99O4 to Gd0.04Fe2.96O4 as determined by Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). TEM image analysis showed the average magnetic core diameters to be 12 nm and 33 nm for the lowest and highest Gd levels respectively. The specific power adsorption rate (SAR) determined with a field strength of 246 Oe and 52 kHz had a maximum of 38Wg(-1) [Fe] for the Gd0.03Fe2.97O4 sample. This value is about 4 times higher than the reported SAR values for Fe3O4. The potential for in vivo tumour therapy was investigated using a mouse model. The mouse models treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 displayed much slower tumour growth after the first treatment cycle, the tumour had increased its mass by 25% after 7 days post treatment compared to a 79% mass increase over the same period for those models treated with standard iron-oxide or saline solution. After a second treatment cycle the mouse treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 showed complete tumour regression with no tumour found for at least 5 days post treatment. PMID:22905580

  8. Activation of Src and transformation by an RPTPα splice mutant found in human tumours

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Yao, Ling; Xu, Rongting; Wu, Huacheng; Wang, Min; White, Brian S; Shalloway, David; Zheng, Xinmin

    2011-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase α (RPTPα)-mediated Src activation is required for survival of tested human colon and oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cell lines. To explore whether mutated RPTPα participates in human carcinogenesis, we sequenced RPTPα cDNAs from five types of human tumours and found splice mutants in ∼30% of colon, breast, and liver tumours. RPTPα245, a mutant expressed in all three tumour types, was studied further. Although it lacks any catalytic domain, RPTPα245 expression in the tumours correlated with Src tyrosine dephosphorylation, and its expression in rodent fibroblasts activated Src by a novel mechanism. This involved RPTPα245 binding to endogenous RPTPα (eRPTPα), which decreased eRPTPα–Grb2 binding and increased eRPTPα dephosphorylation of Src without increasing non-specific eRPTPα activity. RPTPα245–eRPTPα binding was blocked by Pro210 → Leu/Pro211 → Leu mutation, consistent with the involvement of the structural ‘wedge' that contributes to eRPTPα homodimerization. RPTPα245-induced fibroblast transformation was blocked by either Src or eRPTPα RNAi, indicating that this required the dephosphorylation of Src by eRPTPα. The transformed cells were tumourigenic in nude mice, suggesting that RPTPα245-induced activation of Src in the human tumours may have contributed to carcinogenesis. PMID:21725282

  9. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  10. Characterization of HOX gene expression in canine mammary tumour cell lines from spontaneous tumours.

    PubMed

    DeInnocentes, P; Perry, A L; Graff, E C; Lutful Kabir, F M; Curtis Bird, R

    2015-09-01

    Spatial/temporal controls of development are regulated by the homeotic (HOX) gene complex and require integration with oncogenes and tumour suppressors regulating cell cycle exit. Spontaneously derived neoplastic canine mammary carcinoma cell models were investigated to determine if HOX expression profiles were associated with neoplasia as HOX genes promote neoplastic potential in human cancers. Comparative assessment of human and canine breast cancer expression profiles revealed remarkable similarity for all four paralogous HOX gene clusters and several unlinked HOX genes. Five canine HOX genes were overexpressed with expression profiles consistent with oncogene-like character (HOXA1, HOXA13, HOXD4, HOXD9 and SIX1) and three HOX genes with underexpressed profiles (HOXA11, HOXC8 and HOXC9) were also identified as was an apparent nonsense mutation in HOXC6. This data, as well as a comparative analysis of similar data from human breast cancers suggested expression of selected HOX genes in canine mammary carcinoma could be contributing to the neoplastic phenotype. PMID:24034269

  11. Characterization of HOX gene expression in canine mammary tumour cell lines from spontaneous tumours.

    PubMed

    DeInnocentes, P; Perry, A L; Graff, E C; Lutful Kabir, F M; Curtis Bird, R

    2015-09-01

    Spatial/temporal controls of development are regulated by the homeotic (HOX) gene complex and require integration with oncogenes and tumour suppressors regulating cell cycle exit. Spontaneously derived neoplastic canine mammary carcinoma cell models were investigated to determine if HOX expression profiles were associated with neoplasia as HOX genes promote neoplastic potential in human cancers. Comparative assessment of human and canine breast cancer expression profiles revealed remarkable similarity for all four paralogous HOX gene clusters and several unlinked HOX genes. Five canine HOX genes were overexpressed with expression profiles consistent with oncogene-like character (HOXA1, HOXA13, HOXD4, HOXD9 and SIX1) and three HOX genes with underexpressed profiles (HOXA11, HOXC8 and HOXC9) were also identified as was an apparent nonsense mutation in HOXC6. This data, as well as a comparative analysis of similar data from human breast cancers suggested expression of selected HOX genes in canine mammary carcinoma could be contributing to the neoplastic phenotype.

  12. RECQL4 helicase has oncogenic potential in sporadic breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Arora, Arvind; Agarwal, Devika; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek Ma; Lu, Huiming; Croteau, Deborah L; Moseley, Paul; Aleskandarany, Mohammed A; Green, Andrew R; Ball, Graham; Rakha, Emad A; Chan, Stephen Yt; Ellis, Ian O; Wang, Lisa L; Zhao, Yongliang; Balajee, Adayabalam S; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2016-03-01

    RECQL4 helicase is a molecular motor that unwinds DNA, a process essential during DNA replication and DNA repair. Germ-line mutations in RECQL4 cause type II Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS), characterized by a premature ageing phenotype and cancer predisposition. RECQL4 is widely considered to be a tumour suppressor, although its role in human breast cancer is largely unknown. As the RECQL4 gene is localized to chromosome 8q24, a site frequently amplified in sporadic breast cancers, we hypothesized that it may play an oncogenic role in breast tumourigenesis. To address this, we analysed large cohorts for gene copy number changes (n = 1977), mRNA expression (n = 1977) and protein level (n = 1902). Breast cancer incidence was also explored in 58 patients with type II RTS. DNA replication dynamics and chemosensitivity was evaluated in RECQL4-depleted breast cancer cells in vitro. Amplification or gain in gene copy number (30.6%), high-level mRNA expression (51%) and high levels of protein (23%) significantly associated with aggressive tumour behaviour, including lymph node positivity, larger tumour size, HER2 overexpression, ER-negativity, triple-negative phenotypes and poor survival. RECQL4 depletion impaired the DNA replication rate and increased chemosensitivity in cultured breast cancer cells. Thus, although recognized as a 'safe guardian of the genome', our data provide compelling evidence that RECQL4 is tumour promoting in established breast cancers. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The treatment of sublingual gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Sun, G; Yang, X; Tang, E; Wen, J; Lu, M; Hu, Q

    2010-09-01

    This study assessed the clinical and histological features and therapeutic efficacy of 25 cases of sublingual gland tumours from 1998 to 2008. There were 17 female patients and 8 male, the ratio of females to males was 2.1:1. The mean age was 48.6 years. 4 cases were benign tumours (16%). 21 cases were malignant sublingual gland tumours (84%) and of these, 18 were adenoid cystic carcinoma (86%). Adenoid cystic carcinoma was mainly of the histological type, and the other histological classifications included mucoepidermoid carcinoma, pleomorphic adenoma, myoepithelioma, oncocytoma and polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma. Sublingual gland tumours are rare and most are malignant. For malignant sublingual gland tumours, early diagnosis and aggressive surgical treatment, especially for tumours with nerve involvement, is the key to improving prognosis. Free radial forearm flap or pectoralis major myocutaneous flap are appropriate methods for mouth floor reconstruction. For benign sublingual gland tumours, the resection of tumour and sublingual gland is the preferred treatment.

  14. Molecular response of 4T1-induced mouse mammary tumours and healthy tissues to zinc treatment.

    PubMed

    Sztalmachova, Marketa; Gumulec, Jaromir; Raudenska, Martina; Polanska, Hana; Holubova, Monika; Balvan, Jan; Hudcova, Kristyna; Knopfova, Lucia; Kizek, Rene; Adam, Vojtech; Babula, Petr; Masarik, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer patients negative for the nuclear oestrogen receptor α have a particularly poor prognosis. Therefore, the 4T1 cell line (considered as a triple-negative model) was chosen to induce malignancy in mice. The aim of the present study was to assess if zinc ions, provided in excess, may significantly modify the process of mammary oncogenesis. Zn(II) ions were chosen because of their documented antitumour effects. Zn(II) is also known to induce the expression of metallothioneins (MT) and glutathion (GSH). A total dose of zinc sulphate per one gram of mouse weight used in the experiment was 0.15 mg. We studied the expression of MT1, MT2, TP53 and MTF-1 genes and also examined the effect of the tumour on antioxidant capacity. Tumour-free mice had significantly higher expression levels of the studied genes (p<0.003). Significant differences were also revealed in the gene expression between the tissues (p<0.001). The highest expression levels were observed in the liver. As compared to brain, lung and liver, significantly lower concentrations of MT protein were found in the primary tumour; an inverse trend was observed in the concentration of Zinc(II). In non-tumour mice, the amount of hepatic hydrosulphuryl groups significantly increased by the exposure to Zn(II), but the animals with tumour induction showed no similar trend. The primary tumour size of zinc-treated animals was 20% smaller (p=0.002); however, no significant effect on metastasis progression due to the zinc treatment was discovered. In conclusion, Zn(II) itself may mute the growth of primary breast tumours especially at their early stages.

  15. Feasibility Evaluation of Radioimmunoguided Surgery of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Ananth; Reilly, Raymond M.; Holloway, Claire M. B.; Caldwell, Curtis B.

    2012-01-01

    Breast-conserving surgery involves completely excising the tumour while limiting the amount of normal tissue removed, which is technically challenging to achieve, especially given the limited intraoperative guidance available to the surgeon. This study evaluates the feasibility of radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) to guide the detection and delineation of tumours intraoperatively. The 3D point-response function of a commercial gamma-ray-detecting probe (GDP) was determined as a function of radionuclide (131I, 111In, 99mTc), energy-window threshold, and collimator length (0.0–3.0-cm). This function was used to calculate the minimum detectable tumour volumes (MDTVs) and the minimum tumour-to-background activity concentration ratio (T:B) for effective delineation of a breast tumour model. The GDP had larger MDTVs and a higher minimum required T:B for tumour delineation with 131I than with 111In or 99mTc. It was shown that for 111In there was a benefit to using a collimator length of 0.5-cm. For the model used, the minimum required T:B required for effective tumour delineation was 5.2 ± 0.4. RIGS has the potential to significantly improve the accuracy of breast-conserving surgery; however, before these benefits can be realized, novel radiopharmaceuticals need to be developed that have a higher specificity for cancerous tissue in vivo than what is currently available. PMID:22518303

  16. Tumour spectrum in the FAMMM syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, H. T.; Fusaro, R. M.; Pester, J.; Oosterhuis, J. A.; Went, L. N.; Rumke, P.; Neering, H.; Lynch, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    The Familial Atypical Multiple Mole-Melanoma Syndrome (FAMMM) is characterized by an autosomal dominantly inherited susceptibility to multiple atypical naevi. Patients with this hereditary phenotype show a strong susceptibility to cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). Our investigation of an extended Dutch kindred showing the FAMMM phenotype revealed a proband with bilateral intraocular malignant melanoma (IOM) and multiple CMM. The family revealed an array of tumours which included carcinoma of the lung, skin, larynx, and breast in addition to CMM and IOM, which were transmitted vertically through 3 generations. There was male-to-male transmission, and the number of affected males and females was about the same, which was consistent with an autosomal dominant inheritance. Thus the FAMMM syndrome not only indicates a potential for CMM, but a susceptibility to other systemic cancers as well. These observations, though limited to a single kindred, merit a painstaking evaluation of cancer of all anatomical sites in other kindreds showing the FAMMM syndrome. Such studies could yield clues to cancer aetiology, pathogenesis, and control. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7295511

  17. Multiple cilia suppress tumour formation.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Primary cilia are cellular structures that have important functions in development and disease. The suppression of multiciliate differentiation of choroid plexus precursors, and maintenance of a single primary cilium by Notch1, is now shown to be involved in choroid plexus tumour formation. PMID:27027488

  18. Mixed tumour of the vagina.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, M; Endo, Y; Ishikawa, E; Ushigome, S

    1996-05-01

    A 33-year-old Japanese woman presented with a polypoid 2.5 x 2.5 x 1.9 cm mass located in the posterior wall of the lower vagina. Microscopically, the tumour was composed of benign epithelial and stromal-type elements. Predominant epithelial elements were mucinous glands with squamous metaplasia and islands of mature squamous epithelium. The stromal-type cells showed reticular or short fascicular patterns with a transition to the epithelial elements. There was no dual epithelial-myoepithelial combination in the glands as seen in so-called mixed tumours (pleomorphic adenomas) of the salivary gland. Immunohistochemically, the epithelial elements were strongly positive for cytokeratin, PKK1 and epithelial membrane antigen, while the stromal-type cells co-expressed PKK1 and vimentin. Staining for S-100 protein, muscle actin, alpha-smooth muscle actin, desmin, and CD34 was uniformly negative in the tumour cells. The DNA pattern was diploid. The patient is alive and well without recurrence for 50 months after excision. These results indicate that an epithelial cell proliferation, probably of the remnant vestibular gland, plays a major role in the development of mixed tumours of the vagina.

  19. Impact of palbociclib combinations on treatment of advanced estrogen receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor 2-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boér, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with multiple subgroups based on clinical and molecular characteristics. For the largest subgroup of breast cancers, hormone receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2)-negative tumors, hormone treatment is the mainstay of therapy and is likely to result in significant improvement in disease outcomes. However, some of these cancers demonstrate de novo or acquired resistance to endocrine therapy. Despite intensive research to develop new strategies to enhance the efficacy of currently available treatment options for hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, progress has been slow, and there were few advances for a period of 10 years. In 2012, a new molecularly targeted therapeutic strategy, inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin with everolimus, was introduced into clinical practice. Everolimus, in combination with a steroidal aromatase inhibitor, exemestane, resulted in an increase in progression-free survival, but not overall survival in patients with estrogen receptor (ER)+ve advanced disease who had progressed on hormone therapy. In 2015, the first cyclin-dependent kinases 4/6 (CDK4/6) inhibitor, palbociclib, received accelerated US Food and Drug Administration approval for use in combination with letrozole for the treatment of postmenopausal ER+ve/HER2−ve advanced breast cancer as initial, endocrine-based therapy. The addition of palbociclib to endocrine therapy resulted in longer progression-free survival than letrozole alone. One year later, palbociclib received a new indication, use in combination with fulvestrant, in both premenopausal and postmenopausal females with advanced breast cancer of the same subtype with disease progression following endocrine therapy. Adding palbociclib to fulvestrant resulted in a significantly increased median progression-free survival compared to fulvestrant monotherapy. These new combination regimens of palbociclib with endocrine agents represent an important

  20. Effect of Tumor Subtype on Survival and the Graded Prognostic Assessment for Patients With Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Sperduto, Paul W.; Kased, Norbert; Roberge, David; Xu Zhiyuan; Shanley, Ryan; Luo, Xianghua; Sneed, Penny K.; Chao, Samuel T.; Weil, Robert J.; Suh, John; Bhatt, Amit; Jensen, Ashley W.; Brown, Paul D.; Shih, Helen A.; Kirkpatrick, John; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Fiveash, John B.; and others

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The diagnosis-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) was published to clarify prognosis for patients with brain metastases. This study refines the existing Breast-GPA by analyzing a larger cohort and tumor subtype. Methods and Materials: A multi-institutional retrospective database of 400 breast cancer patients treated for newly diagnosed brain metastases was generated. Prognostic factors significant for survival were analyzed by multivariate Cox regression and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA). Factors were weighted by the magnitude of their regression coefficients to define the GPA index. Results: Significant prognostic factors by multivariate Cox regression and RPA were Karnofsky performance status (KPS), HER2, ER/PR status, and the interaction between ER/PR and HER2. RPA showed age was significant for patients with KPS 60 to 80. The median survival time (MST) overall was 13.8 months, and for GPA scores of 0 to 1.0, 1.5 to 2.0, 2.5 to 3.0, and 3.5 to 4.0 were 3.4 (n = 23), 7.7 (n = 104), 15.1 (n = 140), and 25.3 (n = 133) months, respectively (p < 0.0001). Among HER2-negative patients, being ER/PR positive improved MST from 6.4 to 9.7 months, whereas in HER2-positive patients, being ER/PR positive improved MST from 17.9 to 20.7 months. The log-rank statistic (predictive power) was 110 for the Breast-GPA vs. 55 for tumor subtype. Conclusions: The Breast-GPA documents wide variation in prognosis and shows clear separation between subgroups of patients with breast cancer and brain metastases. This tool will aid clinical decision making and stratification in clinical trials. These data confirm the effect of tumor subtype on survival and show the Breast-GPA offers significantly more predictive power than the tumor subtype alone.

  1. Tumour vasculature--a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, C. T.; Winslet, M. C.; Bradley, N. J.

    1995-01-01

    The tumour vasculature is vital for the establishment, growth and metastasis of solid tumours. Its physiological properties limit the effectiveness of conventional anti-cancer strategies. Therapeutic approaches directed at the tumour vasculature are reviewed, suggesting the potential of anti-angiogenesis and the targeting of vascular proliferation antigens as cancer treatments. PMID:7543770

  2. Development of three-dimensional radiotherapy techniques in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Charlotte E.

    Radiotherapy following conservation surgery decreases local relapse and death from breast cancer. Currently, the challenge is to minimise the morbidity caused by this treatment without losing efficacy. Despite many advances in radiation techniques in other sites of the body, the majority of breast cancer patients are still planned and treated using 2-dimensional simple radiotherapy techniques. In addition, breast irradiation currently consumes 30% of the UK's radiotherapy workload. Therefore, any change to more complex treatment should be of proven benefit. The primary objective of this research is to develop and evaluate novel radiotherapy techniques to decrease irradiation of normal structures and improve localisation of the tumour bed. I have developed a forward-planned intensity modulated (IMRT) breast radiotherapy technique, which has shown improved dosimetry results compared to standard breast radiotherapy. Subsequently, I have developed and implemented a phase III randomised controlled breast IMRT trial. This National Cancer Research Network adopted trial will answer an important question regarding the clinical benefit of breast IMRT. It will provide DNA samples linked with high quality clinical outcome data, for a national translational radiogenomics study investigating variation in normal tissue toxicity. Thus, patients with significant late normal tissue side effects despite good dose homogeneity will provide the best model for finding differences due to underlying genetics. I evaluated a novel technique using high definition free-hand 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound in a phantom study, and the results suggested that this is an accurate and reproducible method for tumour bed localisation. I then compared recognised methods of tumour bed localisation with the 3D ultrasound method in a clinical study. The 3D ultrasound technique appeared to accurately represent the shape and spatial position of the tumour cavity. This tumour bed localisation research

  3. Canine Mammary Tumours Are Affected by Frequent Copy Number Aberrations, including Amplification of MYC and Loss of PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Borge, Kaja S.; Nord, Silje; Van Loo, Peter; Lingjærde, Ole C.; Gunnes, Gjermund; Alnæs, Grethe I. G.; Solvang, Hiroko K.; Lüders, Torben; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Lingaas, Frode

    2015-01-01

    Background Copy number aberrations frequently occur during the development of many cancers. Such events affect dosage of involved genes and may cause further genomic instability and progression of cancer. In this survey, canine SNP microarrays were used to study 117 canine mammary tumours from 69 dogs. Results We found a high occurrence of copy number aberrations in canine mammary tumours, losses being more frequent than gains. Increased frequency of aberrations and loss of heterozygosity were positively correlated with increased malignancy in terms of histopathological diagnosis. One of the most highly recurrently amplified regions harbored the MYC gene. PTEN was located to a frequently lost region and also homozygously deleted in five tumours. Thus, deregulation of these genes due to copy number aberrations appears to be an important event in canine mammary tumour development. Other potential contributors to canine mammary tumour pathogenesis are COL9A3, INPP5A, CYP2E1 and RB1. The present study also shows that a more detailed analysis of chromosomal aberrations associated with histopathological parameters may aid in identifying specific genes associated with canine mammary tumour progression. Conclusions The high frequency of copy number aberrations is a prominent feature of canine mammary tumours as seen in other canine and human cancers. Our findings share several features with corresponding studies in human breast tumours and strengthen the dog as a suitable model organism for this disease. PMID:25955013

  4. The anti-apoptotic protein lifeguard is expressed in breast cancer cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Bucan, Vesna; Reimers, Kerstin; Choi, Claudia Yu; Eddy, Mau-Thek; Vogt, Peter M

    2010-06-01

    Lifeguard (LFG) is an anti-apoptotic protein that inhibits Fas-mediated death in tumour cells. However, the molecular function of human LFG in the carcinogenesis of human breast cells is uncertain. We studied the expression and function of endogenous LFG in four breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, T-47D and HS 578T), a human breast epithelial cell line (HS 578Bst), and in healthy and cancerous breast tissues. Molecular (Western blot and RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical techniques were used to investigate the LFG expression. To investigate the breast cancer cell proliferation in the presence of Fas, we performed fluorescent cell viability assays. The possible association of Fas with LFG was analyzed by immunofluorescence microscopy. In this paper, we provide convincing evidence that LFG is overexpressed in several human breast cancer cell lines. More importantly, we found that the LFG expression correlates with high tumour grades in primary breast tumours. Finally, we demonstrated that Fas sensitivity is reduced in breast cancer cell lines expressing LFG. Our results indicated that LFG is strongly expressed in breast cancer epithelial cells. Moreover, the overexpression of LFG correlated with tumour grade and reduced Fas sensitivity. Our findings support the idea that LFG may have a role in the downregulation of apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

  5. Oncogenic mTOR signalling recruits myeloid-derived suppressor cells to promote tumour initiation.

    PubMed

    Welte, Thomas; Kim, Ik Sun; Tian, Lin; Gao, Xia; Wang, Hai; Li, June; Holdman, Xue B; Herschkowitz, Jason I; Pond, Adam; Xie, Guorui; Kurley, Sarah; Nguyen, Tuan; Liao, Lan; Dobrolecki, Lacey E; Pang, Lan; Mo, Qianxing; Edwards, Dean P; Huang, Shixia; Xin, Li; Xu, Jianming; Li, Yi; Lewis, Michael T; Wang, Tian; Westbrook, Thomas F; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Zhang, Xiang H-F

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play critical roles in primary and metastatic cancer progression. MDSC regulation is widely variable even among patients harbouring the same type of malignancy, and the mechanisms governing such heterogeneity are largely unknown. Here, integrating human tumour genomics and syngeneic mammary tumour models, we demonstrate that mTOR signalling in cancer cells dictates a mammary tumour's ability to stimulate MDSC accumulation through regulating G-CSF. Inhibiting this pathway or its activators (for example, FGFR) impairs tumour progression, which is partially rescued by restoring MDSCs or G-CSF. Tumour-initiating cells (TICs) exhibit elevated G-CSF. MDSCs reciprocally increase TIC frequency through activating Notch in tumour cells, forming a feedforward loop. Analyses of primary breast cancers and patient-derived xenografts corroborate these mechanisms in patients. These findings establish a non-canonical oncogenic role of mTOR signalling in recruiting pro-tumorigenic MDSCs and show how defined cancer subsets may evolve to promote and depend on a distinct immune microenvironment. PMID:27183469

  6. [Radiotherapy of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Barillot, I; Azria, D; Belkacémi, Y; Bollet, M; Chauvet, B; Cowen, D; Cutuli, B; Fourquet, A; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Leblanc, M; Mahé, M A

    2016-09-01

    In breast cancer, radiotherapy is an essential component of the treatment. After conservative surgery for an infiltrating carcinoma, radiotherapy must be systematically performed, regardless of the characteristics of the disease, because it decreases the rate of local recurrence and by this way, specific mortality. Partial breast irradiation could not be proposed routinely but only in very selected and informed patients. For ductal carcinoma in situ, adjuvant radiotherapy must be also systematically performed after lumpectomy. After mastectomy, chest wall irradiation is required for pT3-T4 tumours and if there is an axillary nodal involvement, whatever the number of involved lymph nodes. After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, in case of pN0 disease, chest wall irradiation is recommended if there is a clinically or radiologically T3-T4 or node positive disease before chemotherapy. Axillary irradiation is recommended only if there is no axillary surgical dissection and a positive sentinel lymph node. Supra and infra-clavicular irradiation is advised in case of positive axillary nodes. Internal mammary irradiation must be discussed case by case, according to the benefit/risk ratio (cardiac toxicity). Dose to the chest wall or the breast must be between 45-50Gy with a conventional fractionation. A boost dose over the tumour bed is required if the patient is younger than 60 years old. Hypofractionation (42.5 Gy in 16 fractions, or 41.6 Gy en 13 or 40 Gy en 15) is possible after tumorectomy and if a nodal irradiation is not mandatory. Delineation of the breast, the chest wall and the nodal areas are based on clinical and radiological evaluations. 3D-conformal irradiation is the recommended technique, intensity-modulated radiotherapy must be proposed only in case of specific clinical situations. Respiratory gating could be useful to decrease the cardiac dose. Concomitant administration of chemotherapy in unadvised, but hormonal treatment could be start with

  7. Angiogenesis and inflammation in invasive carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A H; Happerfield, L C; Bobrow, L G; Millis, R R

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relation between angiogenesis and inflammation in invasive carcinoma of the breast. METHODS: Sections from 75 invasive carcinomas of the breast were stained using immunohistochemistry for von Willebrand factor, CD3, CD8, CD45RO, CD45RA, CD20, CD68, and c-erbB-2. Tumour vascularity was assessed by counting vessels in the three most vascular areas, and calculating the average (x 400 magnification, field 0.168 mm2). Each pattern of inflammation was scored semiquantitatively. RESULTS: The main pattern of inflammation was a diffuse infiltrate of macrophages, and to a lesser extent T cells. Perivascular and perilobular clusters of B and T cells were noted at the edge of the carcinomas, but were less prominent than the diffuse inflammation. Diffuse inflammation, particularly macrophages, was associated with high tumour grade, tumour necrosis, large tumour size, and c-erbB-2 expression. Perivascular and perilobular inflammation also increased with tumour grade. Tumour vascularity increased slightly with intensity of diffuse inflammation (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient rs = 0.17, p = 0.08), and was inversely related to perilobular inflammation (rs = -0.23, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: The correlations between inflammation and vascularity were weak in this study (r2 about 0.04) and thus there was no evidence of an important relation. Discrepancies between this and other studies may be resolved by studying expression of angiogenic cytokines and proteolytic enzymes by tumour infiltrating inflammatory cells, and their relation to tumour vascularity. PMID:9301551

  8. Dense Breasts

    MedlinePlus

    ... woman’s breasts. It is most commonly determined using mammography, a diagnostic test that uses low dose x- ... woman’s breasts, which is most commonly determined through mammography. The breast is made up of glandular, connective, ...

  9. Breast lump

    MedlinePlus

    Breast mass ... males and females of all ages have normal breast tissue. This tissue responds to hormone changes. Because of this, lumps can come and go. Breast lumps may appear at any age: Both male ...

  10. Breast Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Most women experience breast changes at some time. Your age, hormone levels, and medicines you take may cause lumps, bumps, and discharges (fluids that are not breast milk). If you have a breast lump, pain, ...

  11. Brain metastases free survival differs between breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Berghoff, A; Bago-Horvath, Z; De Vries, C; Dubsky, P; Pluschnig, U; Rudas, M; Rottenfusser, A; Knauer, M; Eiter, H; Fitzal, F; Dieckmann, K; Mader, R M; Gnant, M; Zielinski, C C; Steger, G G; Preusser, M; Bartsch, R

    2012-01-01

    Background: Brain metastases (BM) are frequently diagnosed in patients with HER-2-positive metastatic breast cancer; in addition, an increasing incidence was reported for triple-negative tumours. We aimed to compare brain metastases free survival (BMFS) of breast cancer subtypes in patients treated between 1996 until 2010. Methods: Brain metastases free survival was measured as the interval from diagnosis of extracranial breast cancer metastases until diagnosis of BM. HER-2 status was analysed by immunohistochemistry and reanalysed by fluorescent in situ hybridisation if a score of 2+ was gained. Oestrogen-receptor (ER) and progesterone-receptor (PgR) status was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Brain metastases free survival curves were estimated with the Kaplan–Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Results: Data of 213 patients (46 luminal/124 HER-2/43 triple-negative subtype) with BM from breast cancer were available for the analysis. Brain metastases free survival differed significantly between breast cancer subtypes. Median BMFS in triple-negative tumours was 14 months (95% CI: 11.34–16.66) compared with 18 months (95% CI: 14.46–21.54) in HER-2-positive tumours (P=0.001) and 34 months (95% CI: 23.71–44.29) in luminal tumours (P=0.001), respectively. In HER-2-positive patients, co-positivity for ER and HER-2 prolonged BMFS (26 vs 15 m; P=0.033); in luminal tumours, co-expression of ER and PgR was not significantly associated with BMFS. Brain metastases free survival in patients with lung metastases was significantly shorter (17 vs 21 months; P=0.014). Conclusion: Brain metastases free survival in triple-negative breast cancer, as well as in HER-2-positive/ER-negative, is significantly shorter compared with HER-2/ER co-positive or luminal tumours, mirroring the aggressiveness of these breast cancer subtypes. PMID:22233926

  12. Second non-breast primary cancer following adjuvant therapy for early breast cancer: A report from the International Breast Cancer Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Gianni, Lorenzo; Gelber, Shari; Ravaioli, Alberto; Price, Karen N.; Panzini, Ilaria; Fantini, Manuela; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Pagani, Olivia; Simoncini, Edda; Gelber, Richard D.; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of second non-breast primary cancer following adjuvant treatment was evaluated using data from patients enrolled from 1978 to 1999 in four International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) trials. The occurrence of these tumours as sites of first failure was assessed separately for two treatment comparisons: toremifene versus tamoxifen for five years in 1035 patients in IBCSG Trials 12-93 and 14-93 with a median follow-up of eight years and endocrine therapy (toremifene or tamoxifen) versus chemoendocrine therapy (CMF or AC plus toremifene or tamoxifen) in 1731 patients from IBCSG Trials III, VII and 12-93, with a combined median follow-up of 14 years. No significant differences in second non-breast primary tumours were observed in either comparison. In particular the incidences of second primary uterine tumours with toremifene and tamoxifen were similar and no significant increase of secondary leukaemias was observed with chemoendocrine therapy compared with endocrine therapy. PMID:19062268

  13. Differential expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 in association with invasion of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kotepui, Manas; Punsawad, Chuchard; Chupeerach, Chaowanee; Songsri, Apiram; Charoenkijkajorn, Lek; Petmitr, Songsak

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) has a potential role in tumour invasion and metastasis. However, its relevance to the prognosis of human breast cancer is poorly understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression patterns of MMP-13 protein and to determine its prognostic value in breast cancer, and to define its relation to the clinicopathological features. Immunohistochemistry analysis of MMP-13 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of cancerous breast tissue (n = 76) and normal breast tissue (n = 20), all of which had clinicopathological information available. Based on the principle of immunoreactivity, the detection of MMP-13 on breast tissue was conducted using monoclonal antibodies against MMP-13. A semi-quantitative scoring system was used to assess the presence of, as well as the cellular localisation of MMP-13. MMP-13 expression was significantly greater in the cancerous breast tissues in comparison to those of normal breast tissues. In addition, high levels of MMP-13 expression were also found to be related to the positive detection of breast cancer cells in lymph nodes-amongst breast cancer patients. The results of this study showed that MMP-13 was frequently present in breast tumours, especially when tumours were accompanied by positive breast cancer cell detection in lymph nodes. This suggests that MMP-13 plays a potentially significant role in breast cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:27647987

  14. Differential expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 in association with invasion of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Punsawad, Chuchard; Chupeerach, Chaowanee; Songsri, Apiram; Charoenkijkajorn, Lek; Petmitr, Songsak

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) has a potential role in tumour invasion and metastasis. However, its relevance to the prognosis of human breast cancer is poorly understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression patterns of MMP-13 protein and to determine its prognostic value in breast cancer, and to define its relation to the clinicopathological features. Immunohistochemistry analysis of MMP-13 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of cancerous breast tissue (n = 76) and normal breast tissue (n = 20), all of which had clinicopathological information available. Based on the principle of immunoreactivity, the detection of MMP-13 on breast tissue was conducted using monoclonal antibodies against MMP-13. A semi-quantitative scoring system was used to assess the presence of, as well as the cellular localisation of MMP-13. MMP-13 expression was significantly greater in the cancerous breast tissues in comparison to those of normal breast tissues. In addition, high levels of MMP-13 expression were also found to be related to the positive detection of breast cancer cells in lymph nodes-amongst breast cancer patients. The results of this study showed that MMP-13 was frequently present in breast tumours, especially when tumours were accompanied by positive breast cancer cell detection in lymph nodes. This suggests that MMP-13 plays a potentially significant role in breast cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:27647987

  15. High levels of loss at the 17p telomere suggest the close proximity of a tumour suppressor.

    PubMed Central

    White, G. R.; Stack, M.; Santibáñez-Koref, M.; Liscia, D. S.; Venesio, T.; Wang, J. C.; Helms, C.; Donis-Keller, H.; Betticher, D. C.; Altermatt, H. J.; Hoban, P. R.; Heighway, J.

    1996-01-01

    High levels of loss of distal markers on 17p13.3 in breast cancer suggested the presence within the region of at least one tumour-suppressor gene. Here we describe the derivation of two biallelic polymorphisms from the 17p telomeric yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) TYAC98. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and multiplex PCR analysis demonstrated that the high level of allelic imbalance observed in breast tumours represented loss of constitutional heterozygosity (LOH) and that this LOH extended to the telomere. Lung carcinoma (but not Wilms' tumour)-derived DNA again revealed a high level of loss of subtelomeric 17p sequences. Telomeric microsatellite polymorphisms from other chromosome arms did not show such elevated loss in either tumour type. This suggested that the 17p loss observed did not reflect a general telomeric instability and provided further evidence for the presence of a breast cancer tumour-suppressor gene in the distal region of 17p13.3. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8826850

  16. pH in human tumour xenografts: effect of intravenous administration of glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Volk, T.; Jähde, E.; Fortmeyer, H. P.; Glüsenkamp, K. H.; Rajewsky, M. F.

    1993-01-01

    pH frequency distributions of tumours grown s.c. from 30 human tumour xenograft lines in rnu/rnu rats were analysed with the use of H+ ion-sensitive semi-microelectrodes prior to and following stimulation of tumour cell glycolysis by i.v. infusion of glucose. At normoglycemia, the average pH of the tumours investigated was 6.83 (range, 6.72-7.01; n = 268). Without exception, all xenografts responded to the temporary increase in plasma glucose concentration (PGC) from 6 +/- 1 to 30 +/- 3 mM by an accumulation of acidic metabolites, as indicated by a pH reduction to an average value of 6.43 (range, 6.12-6.78; n = 292). This pH value corresponds to a ten-fold increase in H+ ion activity in tumour tissue as compared to arterial blood. Tumour pH approached minimum values at 2-4 h after the onset of glucose administration and could be maintained at acidic levels for 24 h by controlled glucose infusion. Irrespective of pH variations between tumours grown from individual xenograft lines, there was no major difference in pH response to glucose between the four main histopathological tumour entities investigated, i.e. breast, lung and gastrointestinal carcinomas, and sarcomas. In tumours from several xenograft lines, an increase in blood glucose to only 2.5-times the normal value (14 mM) was sufficient to reduce the mean pH to 6.4. Glucose-induced acidosis was tumour-specific. The pH frequency distributions in liver, kidney and skeletal muscle of tumour-bearing rnu/rnu rats were only marginally sensitive to hyperglycemia (average pH, 6.97 vs normal value of 7.14). Tumour-selective activation of pH-sensitive anti-cancer agents, e.g. alkylating drugs, acid-labile prodrugs or pH-sensitive immunoconjugates may thus be feasible in a wide variety of human cancers. PMID:8353039

  17. Primary Angiosarcoma of the Breast: An Uncommon Histopathological Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Dhirajkumar; Bonde, Vijay Subhashrao; Jagtap, Swati Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Primary angiosarcoma of the breast is extremely rare malignant tumour of the breast. The cytological and radiological findings are often non specific for diagnosis. Histopathology plays an important role in diagnosis and grading of tumour. Herewith we present a case of 55-year-old postmenopausal woman having history of rapidly enlarging right breast lump with prominent vascularity and associated bluish discolouration of overlying skin. Mammography shows ill defined mass lesion. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done which showed haemorrhagic aspirate with few clusters of highly pleomorphic neoplastic cells. Patient underwent modified radical mastectomy. On histopathological evaluation it showed primary angiosarcoma of the breast, poorly differentiated, grade-III. We are presenting this extremely rare malignancy of breast for its clinical, cytological and histopathological findings. PMID:26813535

  18. Sarcoma of the breast: an update on a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sue Zann; Ong, Kong Wee; Tan, Benita Kiat Tee; Selvarajan, Sathiyamoorthy; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2016-05-01

    Breast sarcoma is a rare condition. It consists of a heterogeneous group of non-epithelial tumours arising from the mesenchymal tissue of the breast. It has a distinctly different natural history, treatment response and prognosis as compared with carcinoma of the breast. A different diagnostic approach and treatment strategy have to be defined for this group of tumours. Due to its rarity, the current understanding on breast sarcoma is limited and is mostly based on small retrospective case series or case reports. Hence, the management generally follows the algorithms derived from randomised control trials of soft tissue sarcomas in the extremities and chest wall. Through this review, we discuss the results of major retrospective studies on breast sarcomas including data on epidemiology, aetiology, diagnostic approach, treatment strategies and outcomes of this challenging and potentially aggressive condition.

  19. Histomorphometric evidence for osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Taube, T; Elomaa, I; Blomqvist, C; Beneton, M N; Kanis, J A

    1994-01-01

    We studied bone biopsies from 65 normocalcaemic women with breast cancer and predominantly osteolytic bone metastases in order to examine the pathophysiology of bone destruction in metastatic bone disease. Quantitative histomorphometric measurements were made at sites of tumour involvement, at sites adjacent to tumour tissue and at sites distant from tumour tissue. There were no significant differences in bone volume or in indices of bone resorption or formation between biopsies taken from sites distant from tumour and the controls. Bone resorption, as judged by eroded surface, increased progressively from bone distant from tumour to tumour-laden bone. The number of osteoclasts was significantly increased in bone immediately adjacent to tumour and within metastases. There was no decrease in the ratio of osteoclast to eroded surface in breast cancer compared to controls suggesting that increased resorption in breast cancer was mainly osteoclast mediated and locally activated by the tumour. Two thirds of the biopsies taken from tumour involved regions showed osteosclerosis with woven bone formation. The volume of the pre-existing lamellar trabecular bone was lower than normal in 75% of these biopsies, suggesting that bone resorption must have been increased before the onset of woven bone formation. Since all patients were receiving hormonal treatment or chemotherapy, it is likely that osteosclerosis at sites of previous resorption mainly resulted from the basic cancer treatment as a sign of response to treatment. Osteoclastic bone resorption was, however, not completely inhibited by the active cancer treatment.

  20. A phase II study of tamoxifen plus melatonin in metastatic solid tumour patients.

    PubMed

    Lissoni, P; Paolorossi, F; Tancini, G; Ardizzoia, A; Barni, S; Brivio, F; Maestroni, G J; Chilelli, M

    1996-11-01

    Preliminary data would suggest that the pineal hormone, melatonin (MLT), may enhance tamoxifen (TMX) anti-tumour efficacy. Both MLT and TMX have been used as single agents in the palliative treatment of metastatic neoplasms, other than the classical hormone-dependent tumours, without, however, any clear efficacy. On this basis, a phase II study with TMX plus MLT has been performed in untreatable metastatic solid tumour patients. The study included 25 metastatic solid tumour patients other than breast cancer and prostate cancer (six unknown primary tumour; four melanoma; four uterine cervix carcinoma; five pancreatic cancer; three hepatocarcinoma; two ovarian cancer; one non-small-cell lung cancer), for whom no other effective standard therapy was available, because of poor clinical conditions, no response to previous chemotherapies and/or chemotherapy-resistant tumours. Both drugs were given orally every day until disease progression (TMX, 20 mg day-1 at noon; MLT, 20 mg day-1 in the evening). Three patients had a partial response (PR) (12%; 95% confidence limits 2-24%) (one cervix carcinoma; one melanoma; one unknown primary tumour). A stable disease (SD) was achieved in 13 other patients, whereas the remaining nine patients progressed. Performance status (PS) improved in 9/25 patients, whose median score increased from 50% to 70%. Finally, a survival longer than 1 year was observed in 7/25 (28%) patients. This phase II study would suggest that the neuroendocrine combination with TMX plus MLT may have some benefit in untreatable metastatic solid tumour patients, either in controlling cancer cell proliferation or improving the PS.

  1. A phase II study of tamoxifen plus melatonin in metastatic solid tumour patients.

    PubMed Central

    Lissoni, P.; Paolorossi, F.; Tancini, G.; Ardizzoia, A.; Barni, S.; Brivio, F.; Maestroni, G. J.; Chilelli, M.

    1996-01-01

    Preliminary data would suggest that the pineal hormone, melatonin (MLT), may enhance tamoxifen (TMX) anti-tumour efficacy. Both MLT and TMX have been used as single agents in the palliative treatment of metastatic neoplasms, other than the classical hormone-dependent tumours, without, however, any clear efficacy. On this basis, a phase II study with TMX plus MLT has been performed in untreatable metastatic solid tumour patients. The study included 25 metastatic solid tumour patients other than breast cancer and prostate cancer (six unknown primary tumour; four melanoma; four uterine cervix carcinoma; five pancreatic cancer; three hepatocarcinoma; two ovarian cancer; one non-small-cell lung cancer), for whom no other effective standard therapy was available, because of poor clinical conditions, no response to previous chemotherapies and/or chemotherapy-resistant tumours. Both drugs were given orally every day until disease progression (TMX, 20 mg day-1 at noon; MLT, 20 mg day-1 in the evening). Three patients had a partial response (PR) (12%; 95% confidence limits 2-24%) (one cervix carcinoma; one melanoma; one unknown primary tumour). A stable disease (SD) was achieved in 13 other patients, whereas the remaining nine patients progressed. Performance status (PS) improved in 9/25 patients, whose median score increased from 50% to 70%. Finally, a survival longer than 1 year was observed in 7/25 (28%) patients. This phase II study would suggest that the neuroendocrine combination with TMX plus MLT may have some benefit in untreatable metastatic solid tumour patients, either in controlling cancer cell proliferation or improving the PS. PMID:8912546

  2. Clinical Implications of TβRII Expression in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ningning; Zhai, Qixi; Li, Yinyan; Huang, Kun; Bian, Donglin; Wang, Xuemei; Liu, Caigang; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Teng

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between TβRII [type II TGFβ (transforming growth factor β) receptor] expression and clinicopathological characteristics, and to evaluate the prognostic significance of TβRII expression in breast cancer. Methods Clinicopathological data and prognostic information of 108 patients with histologically confirmed breast cancer who were surgically treated at China Medical University between January 2007 and September 2008 were reviewed and the association between the clinicopathological characteristics and TβRII expression was analyzed by chi-square test and multivariate analysis. The expression of TβRII was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Of the 108 patients, 60 cases were TβRII positive and 48 cases were negative. There was no significant association between TβRII expression of the patients older than 40 years and that of the younger than 40 years (56.0% vs 50.0%; P = 0.742). The TβRII expression rate was significantly increased in patients with lymph node metastasis compared to those without lymph node metastasis (67.40% vs 46.8%; P = 0.033). Statistically significant relationships were found between increasing tumor clinical stage and high TβRII expression (P = 0.011). TβRII expression was not associated with the expression of ER(estrogen receptor)、PR, (progesterone receptor)、Her-2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) (P = 0.925,P = 0.861, and P = 0.840, respectively). Patients with high TβRII expression showed poorer 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) compared to those with low expression (66.7% vs 45.6%; P = 0.028) by univariate analysis. Survival analysis demonstrated that TβRII was associated with poor DFS (P = 0.011). Subgroup analysis revealed that TβRII expression was associated with shorter DFS in patients with lymph node metastasis, ER-positive, PR-positive or Her-2-negative tumors (P = 0.006, P = 0.016, P = 0.022, and P = 0.033, respectively). Cox regression analysis revealed that high

  3. Breast MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    MRI - breast; Magnetic resonance imaging - breast; Breast cancer - MRI; Breast cancer screening - MRI ... the same breast or the other breast after breast cancer has been diagnosed Distinguish between scar tissue and ...

  4. Presence of mouse mammary tumour‐like virus gene sequences may be associated with morphology of specific human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, J S; Tran, D D; Carpenter, E; Ford, C E; Rawlinson, W D; Whitaker, N J; Delprado, W

    2006-01-01

    Background Mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV) has a proven role in breast carcinogenesis in wild mice and genetically susceptible in‐bred mice. MMTV‐like env gene sequences, which indicate the presence of a replication‐competent MMTV‐like virus, have been identified in some human breast cancers, but rarely in normal breast tissues. However, no evidence for a causal role of an MMTV‐like virus in human breast cancer has emerged, although there are precedents for associations between specific histological characteristics of human cancers and the presence of oncogenic viruses. Aim To investigate the possibility of an association between breast cancer and MMTV‐like viruses. Methods Histological characteristics of invasive ductal human breast cancer specimens were compared with archival MMTV‐associated mammary tumours from C3H experimental mice. The presence of MMTV‐like env DNA sequences in the human breast cancer specimens was determined by polymerase chain reaction and confirmed by Southern hybridisation. Results MMTV‐like env gene sequences were identified in 22 of 59 (37.3%) human breast cancer specimens. Seventeen of 43 (39.5%) invasive ductal carcinoma breast cancer specimens and 4 of 16 (25%) ductal carcinoma in situ specimens had some histological characteristics, which were similar to MMTV‐associated mouse mammary tumours. However, these similarities were not associated with the presence or absence of MMTV‐like gene sequences in the human breast tumour specimens. A significant (p = 0.05) correlation was found between the grade of the human breast cancer and similarity to the mouse mammary tumours. The lower the grade, the greater the similarity. Conclusion Some human breast cancer specimens, in which MMTV‐like env DNA sequences have been identified, were shown to have histological characteristics (morphology) similar to MMTV‐associated mouse mammary tumours. These observations are compatible with, but not conclusive of, an

  5. Analysis of tumour- and stroma-supplied proteolytic networks reveals a brain-metastasis-promoting role for cathepsin S.

    PubMed

    Sevenich, Lisa; Bowman, Robert L; Mason, Steven D; Quail, Daniela F; Rapaport, Franck; Elie, Benelita T; Brogi, Edi; Brastianos, Priscilla K; Hahn, William C; Holsinger, Leslie J; Massagué, Joan; Leslie, Christina S; Joyce, Johanna A

    2014-09-01

    Metastasis remains the most common cause of death in most cancers, with limited therapies for combating disseminated disease. While the primary tumour microenvironment is an important regulator of cancer progression, it is less well understood how different tissue environments influence metastasis. We analysed tumour-stroma interactions that modulate organ tropism of brain, bone and lung metastasis in xenograft models. We identified a number of potential modulators of site-specific metastasis, including cathepsin S as a regulator of breast-to-brain metastasis. High cathepsin S expression at the primary site correlated with decreased brain metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients. Both macrophages and tumour cells produce cathepsin S, and only the combined depletion significantly reduced brain metastasis in vivo. Cathepsin S specifically mediates blood-brain barrier transmigration through proteolytic processing of the junctional adhesion molecule, JAM-B. Pharmacological inhibition of cathepsin S significantly reduced experimental brain metastasis, supporting its consideration as a therapeutic target for this disease.

  6. Microfluidic processor allows rapid HER2 immunohistochemistry of breast carcinomas and significantly reduces ambiguous (2+) read-outs

    PubMed Central

    Ciftlik, Ata Tuna; Lehr, Hans-Anton; Gijs, Martin A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Biomarker analysis is playing an essential role in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction. Quantitative assessment of immunohistochemical biomarker expression on tumor tissues is of clinical relevance when deciding targeted treatments for cancer patients. Here, we report a microfluidic tissue processor that permits accurate quantification of the expression of biomarkers on tissue sections, enabled by the ultra-rapid and uniform fluidic exchange of the device. An important clinical biomarker for invasive breast cancer is human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 [(HER2), also known as neu], a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that connotes adverse prognostic information for the patients concerned and serves as a target for personalized treatment using the humanized antibody trastuzumab. Unfortunately, when using state-of-the-art methods, the intensity of an immunohistochemical signal is not proportional to the extent of biomarker expression, causing ambiguous outcomes. Using our device, we performed tests on 76 invasive breast carcinoma cases expressing various levels of HER2. We eliminated more than 90% of the ambiguous results (n = 27), correctly assigning cases to the amplification status as assessed by in situ hybridization controls, whereas the concordance for HER2-negative (n = 31) and -positive (n = 18) cases was 100%. Our results demonstrate the clinical potential of microfluidics for accurate biomarker expression analysis. We anticipate our technique will be a diagnostic tool that will provide better and more reliable data, onto which future treatment regimes can be based. PMID:23479638

  7. The lncRNA landscape of breast cancer reveals a role for DSCAM-AS1 in breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Niknafs, Yashar S.; Han, Sumin; Ma, Teng; Speers, Corey; Zhang, Chao; Wilder-Romans, Kari; Iyer, Matthew K.; Pitchiaya, Sethuramasundaram; Malik, Rohit; Hosono, Yasuyuki; Prensner, John R.; Poliakov, Anton; Singhal, Udit; Xiao, Lanbo; Kregel, Steven; Siebenaler, Ronald F.; Zhao, Shuang G.; Uhl, Michael; Gawronski, Alexander; Hayes, Daniel F.; Pierce, Lori J.; Cao, Xuhong; Collins, Colin; Backofen, Rolf; Sahinalp, Cenk S.; Rae, James M.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Feng, Felix Y.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular classification of cancers into subtypes has resulted in an advance in our understanding of tumour biology and treatment response across multiple tumour types. However, to date, cancer profiling has largely focused on protein-coding genes, which comprise <1% of the genome. Here we leverage a compendium of 58,648 long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) to subtype 947 breast cancer samples. We show that lncRNA-based profiling categorizes breast tumours by their known molecular subtypes in breast cancer. We identify a cohort of breast cancer-associated and oestrogen-regulated lncRNAs, and investigate the role of the top prioritized oestrogen receptor (ER)-regulated lncRNA, DSCAM-AS1. We demonstrate that DSCAM-AS1 mediates tumour progression and tamoxifen resistance and identify hnRNPL as an interacting protein involved in the mechanism of DSCAM-AS1 action. By highlighting the role of DSCAM-AS1 in breast cancer biology and treatment resistance, this study provides insight into the potential clinical implications of lncRNAs in breast cancer. PMID:27666543

  8. P-glycoprotein expression in canine mammary gland tumours related with myoepithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, N-H; Hwang, Y-H; Im, K-S; Kim, J-H; Chon, S-K; Kim, H-Y; Sur, J-H

    2012-12-01

    P-glycoprotein is influential in chemotherapy-resistance in numerous cancers and has been widely studied in human breast cancer research, but is less studied in canine mammary gland tumour (MGT). The study was to evaluate P-glycoprotein expression and its localisations related with prognostic factors with monoclonal antibody C219, by immunohistochemistry (IHC) of 68 cases of canine malignant (n=54) and benign (n=14) MGT. Additional immunofluorescence (IF) and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were also performed. There was a novel finding that P-glycoprotein expression with C219 localised at two different cell types: epithelial and myoepithelial cells. Myoepithelial localised tumours were 5 benign (35.5%) and 21 malignant (63.6%), while epithelial localised tumours were 12 cases, all malignant (36.5%). Unlike conventional belief, semi-quantitative evaluation of IHC intensity scores of C219 expression in malignant MGT was related with favourable histopathological parameters. PMID:22554937

  9. 2-(fluorine-18)-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography after breast conserving surgery: Correlation with molecular markers of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozguven, Salih; Inanir, Sabahat; Turoglu, Halil Turgut; Erdil, Tanju Yusuf; Ugurlu, Mustafa Umit; Gulluoglu, Bahadir

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the role of 2-(fluorine-18)-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) early after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in patients with breast cancer (BC) and whether we can determine which molecular biomarkers of breast carcinoma put the patients at risk. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study involved 88 patients with histologically proven T1 or T2 BC, who were treated with BCS and underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT study. The correlation between biological markers (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 [HER2], and Ki-67) of the primary tumor and 18F-FDG PET/CT findings was analyzed. Results: 18F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated the presence of BC disease (locoregional disease [LRD], distant metastases, or contralateral BC) in 26 of 88 patients (29.5%). Regarding immunohistochemical profiles, BC expressing high levels of Ki-67 were associated with an increased percentage of LRD, which was the major recurrence pattern on 18F-FDG PET/CT. Although the BC disease was observed more commonly in patients with HER2 positivity compared to those of HER2 negative, the difference did not reach statistical significance. The patients with T2 tumor or a higher histopathological grade had a higher percentage of BC disease. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that patients with early stage BC treated with BCS have a remarkable risk of the presence of BC even early after surgery, and there was a clinically important relationship between 18F-FDG PET/CT findings and biological markers of BC. These findings suggest that high-risk molecular biomarkers (Ki-67, HER2) can be taken into account in the decision-making the process for both preoperative imaging and planning of the surgical approach. PMID:27385883

  10. The induction of human peripheral blood lymphoid colonies by conditioned media from human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Vesole, D H; Moore, G E

    1980-01-01

    Conditioned medium (CM) from 29 human tumour cell lines and 3 malignant pleural fluids were tested for their ability to stimulate lymphoid colony formation in semi-solid agar; 9 of 14 malignant melanomas, 3 of 6 colonic carcinomas, 2 of 5 ovarian carcinomas, 3 of 4 breast carcinomas and 1 of 3 pleural fluids from breast cancer patients contained colony-stimulating activity (CSA) for human peripheral blood lymphoid cells (PBL) in semi-solid agar. Conditioned media also stimulated PBL proliferation in liquid medium; these effects were dose dependent. With the exception of one pleural fluid, extensive dialysis of CM did not significantly increase colony formation; CM from two tumour cell lines demonstrated a significant decrease in the induction of colony formation after dialysis. PMID:6970165

  11. Targeting of preexisting and induced breast cancer stem cells with trastuzumab and trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1)

    PubMed Central

    Diessner, J; Bruttel, V; Stein, R G; Horn, E; Häusler, S F M; Dietl, J; Hönig, A; Wischhusen, J

    2014-01-01

    The antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin) has substantially improved overall survival for patients with aggressive HER2-positive breast cancer. However, about 70% of all treated patients will experience relapse or disease progression. This may be related to an insufficient targeting of the CD44highCD24low breast cancer stem cell subset, which is not only highly resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy but also a poor target for trastuzumab due to low HER2 surface expression. Hence, we explored whether the new antibody-drug conjugate T-DM1, which consists of the potent chemotherapeutic DM1 coupled to trastuzumab, could improve the targeting of these tumor-initiating or metastasis-initiating cells. To this aim, primary HER2-overexpressing tumor cells as well as HER2-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer cell lines were treated with T-DM1, and effects on survival, colony formation, gene and protein expression as well as antibody internalization were assessed. This revealed that CD44highCD24lowHER2low stem cell-like breast cancer cells show high endocytic activity and are thus particularly sensitive towards the antibody-drug conjugate T-DM1. Consequently, preexisting CD44highCD24low cancer stem cells were depleted by concentrations of T-DM1 that did not affect the bulk of the tumor cells. Likewise, colony formation was efficiently suppressed. Moreover, when tumor cells were cocultured with natural killer cells, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity was enhanced, and EMT-mediated induction of stem cell-like properties was prevented in differentiated tumor cells. Thus our study reveals an unanticipated targeting of stem cell-like breast cancer cells by T-DM1 that may contribute to the clinical efficacy of this recently approved antibody-drug conjugate. PMID:24675467

  12. Tumours of Oddi: Diagnosis and Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jeppsson, B.; El-Khoury, W.; Hannoun, L.; Frileux, P.; Huguet, C.; Malafosse, M.; Parc, R.

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective review of 56 patients operated upon for tumours of Oddi was performed in order to determine optimal diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Common presenting symptoms were jaundice (86%) and anemia (21%). Mean size of the tumour was 2.3 cm. Five tumours were benign and 51 were malignant. According to the classification of Martin, five were grade I: 10 grade II; 18 grade III; and 18 grade IV. Forty-seven patients underwent resection of the tumour: three local excisions for small benign tumors, six ampullectomies (followed in three by a Whipples’ procedure for recurrence) and 41 Whipples’ procedures. The hospital mortality was 5.3%, minor complications appeared in 21%. The overall five years survival was 41%. It was 75% in grade I, 50% in grade II, 40% in grade III and 10% in grade IV. The patients who received ampullectomies were alive with a follow-up of one, two and three years. All patients operated upon for a benign tumour were alive except one who died of cardiac failure. Ultrasonography and duodenoscopy are the most useful tests for the diagnosis of tumours of Oddi. Prognosis depends on the degree of infiltration of the duodenal wall and the presence of positive lymph nodes. Whipples’ procedure is best but ampullectomy can be used in elderly or poor risk patients. Malignant tumours of the ampullary region are infrequent and reported to constitute betwee 0.02 and five percent of all cancers of the digestive tract. With wider application of endoscopic techniques, there has been an increasing interest in this group of tumours during recent years. In the literature tumours of Oddi are usually reported in the group of periampullary tumours, including tumours of the ampulla itself, duodenal wall surrounding the ampulla, the distal part of the common bile duct and head of the pancreas. We have wanted to distinguish specifically the tumours of the ampulla of Vater and have adopted the term tumour of Oddi introduced by Marchal and Hureau

  13. Sentinel node localization in patients with non-palpable breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, A; Escobedo, A; Benito, E; Azpeitia, D; Guma, A; Prieto, L; Moreno, A; Martin-Comin, J

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate that radionuclide sentinel node detection can be applied to patients with non-palpable breast cancer. One hundred and ten consecutive women with unilateral breast cancer were studied. Group 1 was made up of 80 patients with palpable breast cancer (mean age, 58 years) and group 2 of 30 patients with non-palpable breast cancer detected mammographically (mean age, 55 years). Tc-nanocolloid (111 MBq) was injected peritumorally in palpable tumours, and in the tumour area (ultrasound guided) in non-palpable tumours. At 2 h post-injection, anterior and lateral scintigrams were obtained from patients in the supine position. The location of the sentinel node was marked on the patient's skin. Patients with non-palpable tumours were moved to the surgery room 3 h later, and those with palpable tumours 24 h later. The histopathological study included three haematoxylineosin sections and immunochemistry. All patients underwent axillary lymphadenectomy. The sentinel node was detected in 67 cases (84%) in group 1 and in 28 cases (93%) in group 2. In four patients (5%) in group 1 and two patients (7%) in group 2, no axillary sentinel node was detected in the surgical bed, although it had been seen in scintigraphy. In nine patients (11%) in group 1, neither scintigraphic nor surgical detection was successful. Skip metastasis was seen in six cases (10%) of palpable tumours and in one case (4%) of non-palpable tumours. It can be concluded that non-palpable breast tumours cannot be considered an exclusion criterion for sentinel node localization and biopsy. Ultrasonography-guided injection, followed by scintigraphic and surgical detection of the sentinel node, may help in the management of patients with non-palpable breast tumours. PMID:12464780

  14. [On the possibility to determine genetic identity of the tissues with malignant tumours imbedded in paraffin blocks].

    PubMed

    Pigolkin, Yu I; Dolzhansky, O V; Korostylev, S A; Pal'tseva, E M; Fedorov, D N

    2016-01-01

    The results of analysis of the literature data were used to develop the forensic medical criteria for the assessment of the suitability of paraffin blocks containing the imbedded malignant tumours for the genetic identification of the tissues. The forensic medical criteria and the algorithm for the preliminary characteristic of the material of interest were proposed to avoid the potential errors. It is not recommended to use gastrointestinal carcinomas, breast tumours, and poorly differentiated ovarian tumours. Also unsuitable is the material formerly exposed to radio- and chemotherapeutic agents or paraffin blocks stored during more than 5-7 years. In the doubtful cases, immunohistochemical studies must be carried out to confirm microsatellite instability. Moreover, the tumour genotype and DNA composition from the patients' blood should be confirmed.

  15. A robust screening method for dietary agents that activate tumour-suppressor microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, Keitaro; Gailhouste, Luc; Yasukawa, Ken; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Certain dietary agents, such as natural products, have been reported to show anti-cancer effects. However, the underlying mechanisms of these substances in human cancer remain unclear. We recently found that resveratrol exerts an anti-cancer effect by upregulating tumour-suppressor microRNAs (miRNAs). In the current study, we aimed to identify new dietary products that have the ability to activate tumour-suppressor miRNAs and that therefore may serve as novel tools for the prevention and treatment of human cancers. We describe the generation and use of an original screening system based on a luciferase-based reporter vector for monitoring miR-200c tumour-suppressor activity. By screening a library containing 139 natural substances, three natural compounds — enoxolone, magnolol and palmatine chloride — were identified as being capable of inducing miR-200c expression in breast cancer cells at 10 μM. Moreover, these molecules suppressed the invasiveness of breast cancer cells in vitro. Next, we identified a molecular pathway by which the increased expression of miR-200c induced by natural substances led to ZEB1 inhibition and E-cadherin induction. These results indicate that our method is a valuable tool for a fast identification of natural molecules that exhibit tumour-suppressor activity in human cancer through miRNA activation. PMID:26423775

  16. Immunological Characterization of Whole Tumour Lysate-Loaded Dendritic Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ottobrini, Luisa; Biasin, Mara; Borelli, Manuela; Lucignani, Giovanni; Trabattoni, Daria; Clerici, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dendritic cells play a key role as initiators of T-cell responses, and even if tumour antigen-loaded dendritic cells can induce anti-tumour responses, their efficacy has been questioned, suggesting a need to enhance immunization strategies. Matherials & Methods We focused on the characterization of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells pulsed with whole tumour lysate (TAA-DC), as a source of known and unknown antigens, in a mouse model of breast cancer (MMTV-Ras). Dendritic cells were evaluated for antigen uptake and for the expression of MHC class I/II and costimulatory molecules and markers associated with maturation. Results Results showed that antigen-loaded dendritic cells are characterized by a phenotypically semi-mature/mature profile and by the upregulation of genes involved in antigen presentation and T-cell priming. Activated dendritic cells stimulated T-cell proliferation and induced the production of high concentrations of IL-12p70 and IFN-γ but only low levels of IL-10, indicating their ability to elicit a TH1-immune response. Furthermore, administration of Antigen loaded-Dendritic Cells in MMTV-Ras mice evoked a strong anti-tumour response in vivo as demonstrated by a general activation of immunocompetent cells and the release of TH1 cytokines. Conclusion Data herein could be useful in the design of antitumoral DC-based therapies, showing a specific activation of immune system against breast cancer. PMID:26795765

  17. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein function by XR9576 in a solid tumour model can restore anticancer drug efficacy.

    PubMed

    Walker, J; Martin, C; Callaghan, R

    2004-03-01

    Resistance to cancer chemotherapy involves both altered drug activity at the designated target and modified intra-tumour pharmacokinetic properties (e.g. uptake, metabolism). The membrane transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) plays a major role in pharmacokinetic resistance by preventing sufficient intracellular accumulation of several anticancer agents. Whilst inhibiting P-gp has great potential to restore chemotherapeutic effectiveness in blood-borne cancers, the situation in solid tumours is less clear. Therefore, the degree of resistance tumours pose to the cytotoxicity of vinblastine and doxorubicin was characterised using the multicellular tumour spheroid model. Tumour spheroids were generated from either drug-sensitive MCF7(WT) breast cancer cells or a resistant P-gp-expressing variant (NCI/ADR(Res)). Drug-induced cytotoxicity in tumour spheroids was measured using an outgrowth assay and compared with that observed in monolayer cultures. As anticipated, the 3-D organisation of MCF7(WT) in tumour spheroids was associated with a reduction in the potency of doxorubicin and vinblastine-i.e. the inherent multicellular resistance phenomenon. In contrast, tumour spheroids from NCI/ADR(Res) cells did not display multicellular resistance. However their constitutive expression of P-gp reduced the potency of both anticancer drugs. Moreover, the highly potent P-gp inhibitor, the anthranilic acid derivative, XR9576, was able to restore the cytotoxic efficacy of both drugs in tumour spheroids comprising NCI/ADR(Res) cells. The results suggest that inhibition of P-gp in solid tumours is achievable and that generation of potent inhibitors will provide a significant benefit towards restoration of chemotherapy in solid tissues. PMID:14962729

  18. Fibroadenoma - breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider if you notice: Any new breast lumps A breast lump that your provider has checked before that grows or changes Bruising on your breast for no reason Dimpled or wrinkled skin (like an orange) on your breast Nipple changes or nipple discharge

  19. Pilomatrixoma of the breast, a rare lesion simulating breast cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Nori, Jacopo; Abdulcadir, Dalmar; Giannotti, Elisabetta; Calabrese, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Pilomatrixoma or calcifying epithelioma of Malherbe is a rare, benign, skin tumour originating from piliferous follicles; breast localization is considered to be very rare. These lesions can origin from the peri-areolar piliferous bulbs and, due to the clinical and imaging features, be easily misdiagnosed as a breast neoplasm. We present a case of pilomatrixoma of the left breast in a woman of 43 years appearing as a firm, deep nodule in the external quadrants. The lesion had mammographic and sonographic malignant features, but histological analysis on core-needle biopsy and surgical specimens revealed this unusual benign lesion. PMID:24421922

  20. Pilomatrixoma of the breast, a rare lesion simulating breast cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nori, Jacopo; Abdulcadir, Dalmar; Giannotti, Elisabetta; Calabrese, Massimo

    2013-10-01

    Pilomatrixoma or calcifying epithelioma of Malherbe is a rare, benign, skin tumour originating from piliferous follicles; breast localization is considered to be very rare. These lesions can origin from the peri-areolar piliferous bulbs and, due to the clinical and imaging features, be easily misdiagnosed as a breast neoplasm. We present a case of pilomatrixoma of the left breast in a woman of 43 years appearing as a firm, deep nodule in the external quadrants. The lesion had mammographic and sonographic malignant features, but histological analysis on core-needle biopsy and surgical specimens revealed this unusual benign lesion. PMID:24421922

  1. Endoscopic Breast Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  2. Iodide transport and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Poole, Vikki L; McCabe, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the leading cause of cancer death in women, with incidence rates that continue to rise. The heterogeneity of the disease makes breast cancer exceptionally difficult to treat, particularly for those patients with triple-negative disease. To address the therapeutic complexity of these tumours, new strategies for diagnosis and treatment are urgently required. The ability of lactating and malignant breast cells to uptake and transport iodide has led to the hypothesis that radioiodide therapy could be a potentially viable treatment for many breast cancer patients. Understanding how iodide is transported, and the factors regulating the expression and function of the proteins responsible for iodide transport, is critical for translating this hypothesis into reality. This review covers the three known iodide transporters - the sodium iodide symporter, pendrin and the sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter - and their role in iodide transport in breast cells, along with efforts to manipulate them to increase the potential for radioiodide therapy as a treatment for breast cancer.

  3. Medical image segmentation to estimate HER2 gene status in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios-Navarro, Guillermo; Acirón-Pomar, José Manuel; Vilchez-Sorribas, Enrique; Zambrano, Eddie Galarza

    2016-02-01

    This work deals with the estimation of HER2 Gene status in breast tumour images treated with in situ hybridization techniques (ISH). We propose a simple algorithm to obtain the amplification factor of HER2 gene. The obtained results are very close to those obtained by specialists in a manual way. The developed algorithm is based on colour image segmentation and has been included in a software application tool for breast tumour analysis. The developed tool focus on the estimation of the seriousness of tumours, facilitating the work of pathologists and contributing to a better diagnosis.

  4. Classification of breast cancer stroma as a tool for prognosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Sara; Gazinska, Patrycja; Hipwell, John H.; Mertzanidou, Thomy; Naidoo, Kalnisha; Pinder, Sarah; Hawkes, David J.

    2016-03-01

    It has been shown that the tumour microenvironment plays a crucial role in regulating tumour progression by a number of different mechanisms, including the remodeling of collagen fibres in tumour-associated stroma. It is still unclear, however, if these stromal changes are of benefit to the host or the tumour. We hypothesise that stromal maturity is an important reflection of tumour biology, and thus can be used to predict prognosis. The aim of this study is to develop a texture analysis methodology which will automatically classify stromal regions from images of hematoxylin and eosin-stained (H and E) sections into two categories: mature and immature. Subsequently we will investigate whether stromal maturity could be used as a predictor of survival and also as a means to better understand the relationship between the radiological imaging signal and the underlying tissue microstructure. We present initial results for 118 regions-of-interest from a dataset of 39 patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer.

  5. Case Studies in the Management of Metastatic Breast Cancer with Eribulin

    PubMed Central

    Wilks, Sharon; McIntyre, Kristi

    2015-01-01

    Outcomes for triple-negative or hormone-refractory metastatic breast cancer (MBC) are poor and treatment options are limited. Described herein are cases of two women who developed MBC following adjuvant chemotherapy and endocrine therapy for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative ductal carcinoma. Both underwent treatment with fulvestrant, followed by paclitaxel and letrozole or nab-paclitaxel. Following disease progression, both patients started single-agent eribulin mesylate (1.4 mg/m2 on Days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle). The first patient is currently continuing on eribulin at full dose, despite interruption for hip surgery and the presence of grade 1 neuropathy in the hands and feet. The second patient had a partial response with eribulin, which was sustained for 4 months. She was able to tolerate the full dose of eribulin despite slight worsening of the neuropathy that was present at baseline. Eribulin may be a beneficial option for hormone-refractory MBC with extensive treatment experience. PMID:26508896

  6. Estrogen Receptor Expression Is Associated with DNA Repair Capacity in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Jaime; Morales, Luisa; Ortiz, Carmen; Adams, Damian; Vargas, Wanda; Casbas, Patricia; Dutil, Julie; Echenique, Miguel; Suárez, Erick

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) tumors employ complex signaling that engages in crosstalk with multiple pathways through genomic and non-genomic regulation. A greater understanding of these pathways is important for developing improved biomarkers that can better determine treatment choices, risk of recurrence and cancer progression. Deficiencies in DNA repair capacity (DRC) is a hallmark of breast cancer (BC); therefore, in this work we tested whether ER signaling influences DRC. We analyzed the association between ER positivity (% receptor activation) and DRC in 270 BC patients, then further stratified our analysis by HER2 receptor status. Our results show that among HER2 negative, the likelihood of having low DRC values among ER- women is 1.92 (95% CI: 1.03, 3.57) times the likelihood of having low DRC values among ER+ women, even adjusting for different potential confounders (p<0.05); however, a contrary pattern was observed among HER2 positives women. In conclusion, there is an association between DRC levels and ER status, and this association is modified by HER2 receptor status. Adding a DNA repair capacity test to hormone receptor testing may provide new information on defective DNA repair phenotypes, which could better stratify BC patients who have ER+ tumors. ER+/HER2- tumors are heterogeneous, incompletely defined, and clinically challenging to treat; the addition of a DRC test could better characterize and classify these patients as well as help clinicians select optimal therapies, which could improve outcomes and reduce recurrences. PMID:27032101

  7. Stratification and therapeutic potential of PML in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Martín-Martín, Natalia; Piva, Marco; Urosevic, Jelena; Aldaz, Paula; Sutherland, James D; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Arreal, Leire; Torrano, Verónica; Cortazar, Ana R; Planet, Evarist; Guiu, Marc; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Garcia, Stephane; Macías, Iratxe; Salvador, Fernando; Domenici, Giacomo; Rueda, Oscar M; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Zúñiga-García, Patricia; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Valcárcel-Jiménez, Lorea; Sánchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Varela-Rey, Marta; Martínez-Chantar, Maria Luz; Anguita, Juan; Ibrahim, Yasir H; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Lawrie, Charles H; Aransay, Ana M; Iovanna, Juan L; Baselga, Jose; Caldas, Carlos; Barrio, Rosa; Serra, Violeta; Vivanco, Maria dM; Matheu, Ander; Gomis, Roger R; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-01-01

    Patient stratification has been instrumental for the success of targeted therapies in breast cancer. However, the molecular basis of metastatic breast cancer and its therapeutic vulnerabilities remain poorly understood. Here we show that PML is a novel target in aggressive breast cancer. The acquisition of aggressiveness and metastatic features in breast tumours is accompanied by the elevated PML expression and enhanced sensitivity to its inhibition. Interestingly, we find that STAT3 is responsible, at least in part, for the transcriptional upregulation of PML in breast cancer. Moreover, PML targeting hampers breast cancer initiation and metastatic seeding. Mechanistically, this biological activity relies on the regulation of the stem cell gene SOX9 through interaction of PML with its promoter region. Altogether, we identify a novel pathway sustaining breast cancer aggressiveness that can be therapeutically exploited in combination with PML-based stratification. PMID:27553708

  8. Stratification and therapeutic potential of PML in metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Martín, Natalia; Piva, Marco; Urosevic, Jelena; Aldaz, Paula; Sutherland, James D.; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Arreal, Leire; Torrano, Verónica; Cortazar, Ana R.; Planet, Evarist; Guiu, Marc; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Garcia, Stephane; Macías, Iratxe; Salvador, Fernando; Domenici, Giacomo; Rueda, Oscar M.; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Zúñiga-García, Patricia; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Valcárcel-Jiménez, Lorea; Sánchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Varela-Rey, Marta; Martínez-Chantar, Maria Luz; Anguita, Juan; Ibrahim, Yasir H.; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Lawrie, Charles H.; Aransay, Ana M.; Iovanna, Juan L.; Baselga, Jose; Caldas, Carlos; Barrio, Rosa; Serra, Violeta; dM Vivanco, Maria; Matheu, Ander; Gomis, Roger R.; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-01-01

    Patient stratification has been instrumental for the success of targeted therapies in breast cancer. However, the molecular basis of metastatic breast cancer and its therapeutic vulnerabilities remain poorly understood. Here we show that PML is a novel target in aggressive breast cancer. The acquisition of aggressiveness and metastatic features in breast tumours is accompanied by the elevated PML expression and enhanced sensitivity to its inhibition. Interestingly, we find that STAT3 is responsible, at least in part, for the transcriptional upregulation of PML in breast cancer. Moreover, PML targeting hampers breast cancer initiation and metastatic seeding. Mechanistically, this biological activity relies on the regulation of the stem cell gene SOX9 through interaction of PML with its promoter region. Altogether, we identify a novel pathway sustaining breast cancer aggressiveness that can be therapeutically exploited in combination with PML-based stratification. PMID:27553708

  9. Benign tumours of the bone: A review☆

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, David N.; Pelly, Theo; Kulendran, Myutan; Caris, Jochem A.

    2015-01-01

    Benign tumours of the bone are not cancerous and would not metastasise to other regions of the body. However, they can occur in any part of the skeleton, and can still be dangerous as they may grow and compress healthy bone tissue. There are several types of benign tumours that can be classified by the type of matrix that the tumour cells produce; such as bone, cartilage, fibrous tissue, fat or blood vessel. Overall, 8 different types can be distinguished: osteochondroma, osteoma, osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, giant cell tumour, aneurysmal bone cyst, fibrous dysplasia and enchondroma. The incidence of benign bone tumours varies depending on the type. However, they most commonly arise in people less than 30 years old, often triggered by the hormones that stimulate normal growth. The most common type is osteochondroma. This review discusses the different types of common benign tumours of the bone based on information accumulated from published literature. PMID:26579486

  10. Solitary fibrous tumour: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sharmila; Shet, Tanuja M; Chinoy, R F; Kane, S V

    2007-07-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is a rare spindle cell neoplasm arising at pleural and extrapleural sites. Five cases of SFT diagnosed at our institution over a five year period were reviewed. Haematoxylin and eosin stained histological sections, immuno-histochemical markers including CD34 and electron microscopy were the different methods used to study these tumours. Three histological features were consistently observed in all the tumours: the tumours were composed of short spindle cells separated by dense collagen bands and arranged in alternate hypocellular and hypercellular areas. CD34 positivity was seen in all the cases. SFT's have been reported to behave in an unpredictable fashion and hence prolonged follow up is essential. Histology, CD34 positivity and electron microscopy are useful tools in diagnosing SFT. While the pleural tumours can be diagnosed based on histology, this must be substantiated by ancillary techniques in case of extrapleural tumours.

  11. Involvement of chemokine receptors in breast cancer metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Anja; Homey, Bernhard; Soto, Hortensia; Ge, Nianfeng; Catron, Daniel; Buchanan, Matthew E.; McClanahan, Terri; Murphy, Erin; Yuan, Wei; Wagner, Stephan N.; Barrera, Jose Luis; Mohar, Alejandro; Verástegui, Emma; Zlotnik, Albert

    2001-03-01

    Breast cancer is characterized by a distinct metastatic pattern involving the regional lymph nodes, bone marrow, lung and liver. Tumour cell migration and metastasis share many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is critically regulated by chemokines and their receptors. Here we report that the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7 are highly expressed in human breast cancer cells, malignant breast tumours and metastases. Their respective ligands CXCL12/SDF-1α and CCL21/6Ckine exhibit peak levels of expression in organs representing the first destinations of breast cancer metastasis. In breast cancer cells, signalling through CXCR4 or CCR7 mediates actin polymerization and pseudopodia formation, and subsequently induces chemotactic and invasive responses. In vivo, neutralizing the interactions of CXCL12/CXCR4 significantly impairs metastasis of breast cancer cells to regional lymph nodes and lung. Malignant melanoma, which has a similar metastatic pattern as breast cancer but also a high incidence of skin metastases, shows high expression levels of CCR10 in addition to CXCR4 and CCR7. Our findings indicate that chemokines and their receptors have a critical role in determining the metastatic destination of tumour cells.

  12. Is immediate postoperative CA15.3 assay a predictive marker of early postoperative recurrence of carcinoma breast?

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Diptendra Kumar; Panda, Nilanjan; Biswas, Subikas; Saha, M L; Majumder, A

    2012-03-01

    Breast cancer is still an enigma. Systemic metastasis is an important prognostic factor. Tumour marker can predict occult systemic metastasis. To evaluate the immediate postoperative CA15.3 as predictor of early recurrence, a study was carried out in 48 patients of carcinoma breast in whom immediate postoperative marker level was done. In follow-up, recurrence was noted and relation with tumour size and stage done. Null hypothesis and 't' test were used for analysis. Relation of tumour size with marker is weak but strong relation exists between tumour stage with marker and recurrence with marker. CA15.3 predicts tumour load, can also predict occult residual/occult metastatic disease better than other prognostic markers which only predict tumour behaviour.

  13. [Solitary fibrous tumours of the kidney].

    PubMed

    Gres, Pascal; Avances, Christophe; Ben Naoum, Kamel; Chapuis, Héliette; Costa, Pierre

    2004-02-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFT) are mesenchymal tumours that usually arise from the pleura. Renal SFT are exceptional (9 cases reported in the literature). The authors report a new case discovered during assessment of HT and treated by radical right nephrectomy. The histological appearance is characteristic: a tumour with a fibrous centre, composed of a monomorphic proliferation of spindle cells, with positive CD 34, CD 99, and bcl 2 labelling. The prognosis after complete resection is generally favourable.

  14. Solitary fibrous tumour of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Piattelli, A; Fioroni, M; Rubini, C

    1998-09-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is a neoplasm most often localised in the pleura and peritoneum. The tumour is composed of spindled fibroblastic cells arranged in a haphazard way. Recently SFT has been described in many locations. Only one case of oral SFT has been described in the cheek: this is the second case of an oral SFT located in the tongue. The differential diagnosis must be made from many soft tissue tumours. SFTs stain strongly, in almost all cases, for CD34.

  15. [Adenomatoid tumour of the adrenal gland].

    PubMed

    Bandier, Philippe Claus; Hansen, Alastair; Thorelius, Lars

    2009-01-26

    An adenomatoid tumour in the right suprarenal gland was discovered during clinical cancer staging of a 73-year-old woman. Adenomatoid tumours in the suprarenal glands are rare and are most often found incidentally. A definitive diagnosis is made on the basis of histology since imaging methods are non-specific. Differential diagnoses comprise malignant vascular neoplasm or adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry or electron microscopy allows uncomplicated distinction between these tumours. In general, it is recommended to obtain biopsies from suprarenal processes.

  16. Predominant fatty variant of myofibroblastoma of breast

    PubMed Central

    Baxendine-Jones, J; Theaker, J; Baldwin, L

    2001-01-01

    Myofibroblastoma of the breast is an uncommon but well defined benign stromal tumour. This report describes a case in which the predominant histological component was mature adipose tissue and two further cases with a major adipocytic component. Although small foci of adipose tissue are a recognised feature of this tumour, the dominance of the histological pattern by fat has not been described previously, and the recognition of this variant is important to allow confident diagnosis and avoid confusion with other primary adipocytic or stromal lesions, especially in the setting of potential needle core biopsy of such a lesion. Key Words: myofibroblastoma • variant • fatty PMID:11429434

  17. Sensitive capture of circulating tumour cells by functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hyeun Joong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Zhang, Zhuo; Azizi, Ebrahim; Pham, Trinh M.; Paoletti, Costanza; Lin, Jules; Ramnath, Nithya; Wicha, Max S.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Simeone, Diane M.; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2013-10-01

    The spread of cancer throughout the body is driven by circulating tumour cells (CTCs). These cells detach from the primary tumour and move from the bloodstream to a new site of subsequent tumour growth. They also carry information about the primary tumour and have the potential to be valuable biomarkers for disease diagnosis and progression, and for the molecular characterization of certain biological properties of the tumour. However, the limited sensitivity and specificity of current methods for measuring and studying these cells in patient blood samples prevents the realization of their full clinical potential. The use of microfluidic devices is a promising method for isolating CTCs. However, the devices are reliant on three-dimensional structures, which limits further characterization and expansion of cells on the chip. Here we demonstrate an effective approach to isolating CTCs from blood samples of pancreatic, breast and lung cancer patients, by using functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets on a patterned gold surface. CTCs were captured with high sensitivity at a low concentration of target cells (73 +/- 32.4% at 3-5 cells per ml blood).

  18. In vivo magnetic enrichment and multiplex photoacoustic detection of circulating tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Shashkov, Evgeny V; Kelly, Thomas; Kim, Jin-Woo; Yang, Lily; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2009-12-01

    The spread of cancer cells between organs, a process known as metastasis, is the cause of most cancer deaths. Detecting circulating tumour cells -- a common marker for the development of metastasis -- is difficult because ex vivo methods are not sensitive enough owing to limited blood sample volume and in vivo diagnosis is time-consuming as large volumes of blood must be analysed. Here, we show a way to magnetically capture circulating tumour cells in the bloodstream of mice followed by rapid photoacoustic detection. Magnetic nanoparticles, which were functionalized to target a receptor commonly found in breast cancer cells, bound and captured circulating tumour cells under a magnet. To improve detection sensitivity and specificity, gold-plated carbon nanotubes conjugated with folic acid were used as a second contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging. By integrating in vivo multiplex targeting, magnetic enrichment, signal amplification and multicolour recognition, our approach allows circulating tumour cells to be concentrated from a large volume of blood in the vessels of tumour-bearing mice, and this could have potential for the early diagnosis of cancer and the prevention of metastasis in humans.

  19. Sensitive capture of circulating tumour cells by functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyeun Joong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Zhang, Zhuo; Azizi, Ebrahim; Pham, Trinh M; Paoletti, Costanza; Lin, Jules; Ramnath, Nithya; Wicha, Max S; Hayes, Daniel F; Simeone, Diane M; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2013-10-01

    The spread of cancer throughout the body is driven by circulating tumour cells (CTCs). These cells detach from the primary tumour and move from the bloodstream to a new site of subsequent tumour growth. They also carry information about the primary tumour and have the potential to be valuable biomarkers for disease diagnosis and progression, and for the molecular characterization of certain biological properties of the tumour. However, the limited sensitivity and specificity of current methods for measuring and studying these cells in patient blood samples prevents the realization of their full clinical potential. The use of microfluidic devices is a promising method for isolating CTCs. However, the devices are reliant on three-dimensional structures, which limits further characterization and expansion of cells on the chip. Here we demonstrate an effective approach to isolating CTCs from blood samples of pancreatic, breast and lung cancer patients, by using functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets on a patterned gold surface. CTCs were captured with high sensitivity at a low concentration of target cells (73 ± 32.4% at 3-5 cells per ml blood).

  20. Improvement of the separation of tumour cells from peripheral blood cells using magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalbe, M.; Pachmann, K.; Höffken, K.; Clement, J. H.

    2006-09-01

    Circulating tumour cells are a key challenge in tumour therapy. Numerous approaches are on the way to achieving the elimination of these potential sources of metastasis formation. Antibody-directed magnetic cell sorting is supposed to enrich tumour cells with high selectivity, but low efficiency. The short term application of carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) coated magnetit/maghemit nanoparticles allows the discrimination of tumour cells from leukocytes. In the present work we show that the interaction of CMD nanoparticles is cell-type specific and time dependent. The breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and the CML cell line K-562 are characterized by a rapid and high interaction rate, whereas leukocytes exhibit a decelerated behaviour. The addition of carboxymethyl dextran or glucose stimulated the magnetic labelling of leukocytes. The variation of the degree of substitution of dextran with carboxymethyl groups did not affect the labelling profile of leukocytes and MCF-7 cells. In order to verify the in vitro results, whole blood samples from 13 cancer patients were analysed ex vivo. Incubation of the purified leukocyte fraction with CMD nanoparticles in the presence of low amounts of plasma reduced the overall cell content in the positive fraction. In contrast, the absolute number of residual tumour cells in the positive fraction was 90% of the initial amount.

  1. Gastric stromal tumours: a practical approach.

    PubMed Central

    Mihssin, N.; Moorthy, K.; Sengupta, A.; Houghton, P. W.

    2000-01-01

    Recent findings on the pathological diversity of gastric stromal tumours and their unpredictable behaviour prompted us to review our series of 16 patients who had undergone surgery for these tumours from 1991 to 1998. There were 13 benign and 3 malignant lesions. The majority of patients presented with either upper gastrointestinal bleeding or anaemia alone (12 of 16). Endoscopy was an extremely useful diagnostic tool, revealing the lesion as an intraluminal protuberant tumour with or without ulcer in 10 cases and as an ulcer alone in 4 cases, and in 1 case features suggesting an extrinsic mass. All the patients in the series underwent surgery. We used staplers (AutosutureR TA 55) to excise the tumours in 7 cases, all of which on histological examination were benign with clear resection margins. Gastric resections were performed in 5 cases for either large tumours or those situated at the fundus or antrum and local excision of the remaining 4. The mean follow-up of these patients was 24 months. Two patients with malignant lesions died of irresectable recurrences, one 2 months and one 18 months after surgery. There have been no recurrences in the tumours diagnosed as benign on histology. Tumour size, position and the ability to apply the stapler leaving adequate margin below the tumour should be the determinants of extent and type of excision. Reliable determinants of behaviour are tumour size, grade and mitotic index. Images Figure 1 PMID:11103152

  2. Solitary fibrous tumour of the pleura.

    PubMed

    Sikri, V; Chawla, R

    2013-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) of the pleura is a rare, usually benign primary tumour of the pleura. Spectrum of presentation can vary from an incidental finding on chest radiograph done for some other purpose, features of compression of surrounding structures to symptoms resulting from the tumour per se. We report a case of a female who presented with complaints of cough and chest pain in whom a diagnosis of SFT was confirmed on tru-cut biopsy and immunohistochemistry studies. The patient underwent thoracotomy and successful removal of the tumour.

  3. Oncogenic osteomalacia: strange tumours in strange places.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, D.; Bar, R. S.; Weidner, N.; Wener, M.; Lee, F.

    1985-01-01

    Two patients presented with hypophosphataemic osteomalacia and were subsequently found to have small tumours unusual histopathology and location causing the osteomalacia. Each tumour was found after an intensive search for occult masses. Studies of vitamin D metabolism and renal tubular function before and after surgery yielded further insight into the pathophysiology of oncogenic osteomalacia. These cases demonstrate that microscopic quantities of tumour are capable of causing the syndrome and further illustrate the high index of suspicion often necessary to locate causative tumours in patients with hypophosphataemic osteomalacia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:4022870

  4. Recommendations for Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Testing in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Antonio C.; Hammond, M. Elizabeth H.; Hicks, David G.; Dowsett, Mitch; McShane, Lisa M.; Allison, Kimberly H.; Allred, Donald C.; Bartlett, John M.S.; Bilous, Michael; Fitzgibbons, Patrick; Hanna, Wedad; Jenkins, Robert B.; Mangu, Pamela B.; Paik, Soonmyung; Perez, Edith A.; Press, Michael F.; Spears, Patricia A.; Vance, Gail H.; Viale, Giuseppe; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)/College of American Pathologists (CAP) guideline recommendations for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) testing in breast cancer to improve the accuracy of HER2 testing and its utility as a predictive marker in invasive breast cancer. Methods ASCO/CAP convened an Update Committee that included coauthors of the 2007 guideline to conduct a systematic literature review and update recommendations for optimal HER2 testing. Results The Update Committee identified criteria and areas requiring clarification to improve the accuracy of HER2 testing by immunohistochemistry (IHC) or in situ hybridization (ISH). The guideline was reviewed and approved by both organizations. Recommendations The Update Committee recommends that HER2 status (HER2 negative or positive) be determined in all patients with invasive (early stage or recurrence) breast cancer on the basis of one or more HER2 test results (negative, equivocal, or positive). Testing criteria define HER2-positive status when (on observing within an area of tumor that amounts to >10% of contiguous and homogeneous tumor cells) there is evidence of protein overexpression (IHC) or gene amplification (HER2 copy number or HER2/CEP17 ratio by ISH based on counting at least 20 cells within the area). If results are equivocal (revised criteria), reflex testing should be performed using an alternative assay (IHC or ISH). Repeat testing should be considered if results seem discordant with other histopathologic findings. Laboratories should demonstrate high concordance with a validated HER2 test on a sufficiently large and representative set of specimens. Testing must be performed in a laboratory accredited by CAP or another accrediting entity. The Update Committee urges providers and health systems to cooperate to ensure the highest quality testing. PMID:24099077

  5. Differential expression of immune-related markers in breast cancer by molecular phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Junjeong; Kim, Do Hee; Jung, Woo Hee; Koo, Ja Seung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between expression of immune-related molecules such as STAT1, CD20, IL-8, IFN-γ, tumor genetic phenotype, and the clinical course of invasive breast cancer. We constructed tissue microarrays from the breast cancers of 727 patients and classified the cases as either luminal A, luminal B, HER-2, or triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) based on standard pathological and clinical classifications using genetic phenotype. Surrogate immunohistochemical stains (STAT1, CD20, IL-8, IFN-γ) and HER-2 FISH were performed on each microarray. Of the 727 patients cases, 303 (41.7 %) were luminal A, 169 (23.2 %) were luminal B, 71 (9.8 %) were HER2+, and 184 (25.3 %) were TNBC. The expression of STAT1 in tumor cells was higher in luminal-type cancers than in HER2+ and TNBC (P < 0.001), and the TNBC-type tumors showed the highest levels of stromal STAT1 expression (P < 0.001), stromal IL-8 expression (P = 0.005), and CD20 index (P < 0.001). Luminal A type tumors showed the lowest expression of these markers. The stromal IL-8 positivity was associated with shorter DFS and OS in ER positive group, HER-2 negative group, and luminal A group (P < 0.05). To conclude, the immune-related molecules, STAT1, IFN-γ, IL-8, and CD20 are differentially expressed and define particular molecular subtypes which correlate with genetically defined types of tumors. High expression of STAT1 in tumor cells is observed in luminal-type tumors, whereas stromal expression of STAT1, stromal IL-8, and IL-8 in tumor cells is the highest in TNBC-type tumors.

  6. Herb-related aneuploidy in breast fibroadenoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Ju; Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Wu, Chew-Wun; Lui, Wing-Yu

    2009-01-01

    There is consensus that attitudes toward seeking complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are different between oriental and western patients. A 16-year-old girl who presented with enlarged breast tumours also had a 3-year history of "Si-Wu-Tang" (SWT) intake. Pathology of the resected breast tumour disclosed a giant fibroadenoma with aneuploid status. A cohort study was conducted between two groups of patients with fibroadenomas: SWT intake (+) group and SWT intake (-) group. Patients were told to discontinue SWT intake for 3 months, and this was followed by breast ultrasonographic examination in both groups. The tumour sizes before and after discontinued SWT intake were 2.3±0.11 cm and 1.5±0.12 cm in the SWT (+) group, and 1.7±0.15 cm and 1.6±0.14 cm in SWT (-) group, respectively (p<0.05). It is concluded that this report provides important information for patients with breast tissue diseases and that continuous intake of medicinal herbs is recommended only under the guidance of trained CAM providers.

  7. [Pancreatic tumour in a child].

    PubMed

    Schouenborg Schultz, Thea; Thyssen Vestergaard, Esben

    2014-07-28

    Abdominal pain is a common symptom in children and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) has a prevalence of 8.4% in childhood. In 90-95% of RAPs no organic disease is identified. Thus, it is important that the few of somatic origin are diagnosed. We describe a case concerning a 12-year-old girl, diagnosed with a solid pseudopapillary tumour of the pancreas. The symptoms were RAP and postprandial vomiting. The purpose of this article is to increase the knowledge of "alarm findings" indicating an organic disease in children with RAP. PMID:25292323

  8. Radiofrequency ablation of lung tumours

    PubMed Central

    Goh, PYT

    2006-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established local therapy for hepatic malignancies. It is rapidly emerging as an effective treatment modality for small lesions elsewhere in the body, in particular, the kidney and the lung. It is a relatively safe and minimally invasive treatment for small lung malignancies, both primary and secondary. In particular, it is the preferred form of treatment for non-surgical candidates. This paper describes the technique employed for radiofrequency ablation of lung tumours, as well as the protocol established, at the Mount Elizabeth Hospital, Singapore. PMID:21614247

  9. Future Prospects in Breast Cancer Research – Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Henk R.; Klaase, Joost M.; Brinkhuis, Mariël; van den Berg, Albert; Vermes, István

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths among women. Although significant advances in the prevention, diagnosis and management are made, still every year half a million women die of breast cancer. Personalised treatment has the potential to increase treatment efficacy, and hence decrease mortality rates. Moreover, understanding cancer biology and translating this knowledge to the clinic, will improve the breast cancer therapy regime tremendously. Recently, it has been proposed that cancer stem cells (CSC) play an important role in tumour biology. CSC have the ability for self-renewal and are pivotal in setting the heterogeneous character of a tumour. Additionally, CSC possess several characteristics that make them resistant and more aggressive to the conventional chemo- and radiotherapy. Nowadays, breast cancer therapy is focused on killing the differentiated tumour cells, leaving the CSC unharmed, potentially causing recurrence of the disease and metastasis. Specific targeting of the CSC will improve the disease-free survival of breast cancer patients. In this article, two methods are described, aiming at specifically attacking the differentiated tumour cells (‘Apoptosis chip’) and the cancer stem cell. For this, microfluidics is used.

  10. Locoregional treatments for triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Eiermann, W; Vallis, K A

    2012-08-01

    The absence of drug-targetable receptors in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) makes the use of targeted systemic therapy inappropriate for this breast cancer subgroup. Although patients with TNBC show sensitivity to some chemotherapy regimens, in early-stage disease greater emphasis is placed on locoregional treatments, based on surgery and radiation therapy (RT). Ongoing improvements in both screening and surgical techniques have reduced the need for radical surgical intervention in all breast cancers, and breast-conserving surgery (BCS) followed by RT is now increasingly common for all tumour types. However, while evidence has clearly established the importance of post-surgical RT for favourable long-term outcomes in breast cancer, it is less well-established as to where and under which conditions more radical surgeries than BCS, such as modified radical mastectomy (MRM), may be indicated for TNBC. A high proportion of TNBC tumours are BRCA1-mutated and therefore patients with this type of tumour are at a potentially elevated risk of ipsilateral or contralateral recurrence. In addition, while some studies indicate that post-BCS locoregional TNBC relapse rates generally appear similar to other tumour types, some evidence suggests that distant relapse rates may be higher. There is evidence that some subtypes of TNBC may require MRM rather than BCS for optimal long-term outcomes. More research is needed to establish whether TNBC-specific approaches to locoregional treatment may be required.

  11. A review of bovine urothelial tumours and tumour-like lesions of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Roperto, S; Borzacchiello, G; Brun, R; Leonardi, L; Maiolino, P; Martano, M; Paciello, O; Papparella, S; Restucci, B; Russo, V; Salvatore, G; Urraro, C; Roperto, F

    2010-01-01

    Four hundred bovine urothelial tumours and tumour-like lesions were classified in accordance with the 2004 World Health Organization (WHO) morphological classification for human urothelial tumours. The spectrum of neoplastic lesions of the urinary bladder of cattle is becoming wider and bovine urothelial tumours share striking morphological features with their human counterparts. A classification system based on the WHO scheme would also be appropriate for the classification of bovine bladder tumours. Bovine urothelial tumours are most often multiple. Four distinct growth patterns of bovine urothelial tumours and tumour-like lesions are recognized: flat, exophytic or papillary, endophytic and invasive. Carcinoma in situ (CIS) is the most common flat urothelial lesion, accounting for approximately 4% of urothelial tumours. CIS is detected adjacent to papillary and invasive tumours in 80-90% of cases. Approximately 3% of papillary lesions are papillomas and approximately 5% are 'papillary urothelial neoplasms of low malignant potential' (PUNLMP). Low-grade carcinoma is the most common urothelial tumour of cattle. High-grade carcinomas, and low and high-grade invasive tumours, are less commonly seen. Bovine papillomavirus (BPV) infection and ingestion of bracken fern both play a central role in carcinogenesis of these lesions.

  12. [Modalities of breast cancer irradiation in 2016: Aims and indications of intensity modulated radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Bourgier, C; Fenoglietto, P; Lemanski, C; Ducteil, A; Charissoux, M; Draghici, R; Azria, D

    2016-10-01

    Irradiation techniques for breast cancer (arctherapy, tomotherapy) are evolving and intensity-modulated radiation therapy is being increasingly considered for the management of these tumours. Here, we propose a review of intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning issues, clinical toxicities and indications for breast cancer. PMID:27614497

  13. Is clinical breast examination important for breast cancer detection?

    PubMed Central

    Provencher, L.; Hogue, J.C.; Desbiens, C.; Poirier, B.; Poirier, E.; Boudreau, D.; Joyal, M.; Diorio, C.; Duchesne, N.; Chiquette, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Screening clinical breast examination (cbe) is controversial; the use of cbe is declining not only as a screening tool, but also as a diagnostic tool. In the present study, we aimed to assess the value of cbe in breast cancer detection in a tertiary care centre for breast diseases. Methods This retrospective study of all breast cancers diagnosed between July 1999 and December 2010 at our centre categorized cases according to the mean of detection (cbe, mammography, or both). A cbe was considered “abnormal” in the presence of a mass, nipple discharge, skin or nipple retraction, edema, erythema, peau d’orange, or ulcers. Results During the study period, a complete dataset was available for 6333 treated primary breast cancers. Cancer types were ductal carcinoma in situ (15.3%), invasive ductal carcinoma (75.7%), invasive lobular carcinoma (9.0%), or others (2.2%). Of the 6333 cancers, 36.5% (n = 2312) were detected by mammography alone, 54.8% (n = 3470) by mammography and cbe, and 8.7% (n = 551) by physician-performed cbe alone (or 5.3% if considering ultrasonography). Invasive tumours diagnosed by cbe alone were more often triple-negative, her2-positive, node-positive, and larger than those diagnosed by mammography alone (p < 0.05). Conclusions A significant number of cancers would have been missed if cbe had not been performed. Compared with cancers detected by mammography alone, those detected by cbe had more aggressive features. Clinical breast examination is a very low-cost test that could improve the detection of breast cancer and could prompt breast ultrasonography in the case of a negative mammogram. PMID:27536182

  14. A preliminary investigation of the role of the transcription co-activators YAP/TAZ of the Hippo signalling pathway in canine and feline mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Beffagna, G; Sacchetto, R; Cavicchioli, L; Sammarco, A; Mainenti, M; Ferro, S; Trez, D; Zulpo, M; Michieletto, S; Cecchinato, A; Goldschmidt, M; Zappulli, V

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Cancer metastases are responsible for the high mortality rate. A small but distinct subset of cells, cancer stem cells (CSCs), have the capacity to self-renew, initiate tumour formation, and develop metastases. The CSC content in human breast cancer correlates with the Hippo tumour suppressor signalling pathway. Specifically, the activity of YAP/TAZ, transcription co-activators of the Hippo pathway, sustains the self-renewal and tumour-initiation capacities of CSCs. Little is known about YAP/TAZ in canine and feline mammary tumours, which are very common tumours. The preliminary aim of the study was to investigate the expression of YAP/TAZ in canine and feline mammary tumours by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Increased cytoplasmic and nuclear expression of YAP/TAZ was observed in all carcinomas compared to normal tissues, indicating neoplastic deregulation of the Hippo pathway. Nuclear expression significantly increased in grade III (high grade carcinomas) compared to grade I (low grade carcinomas) tumours, suggesting that YAP/TAZ play a role in the increased aggressiveness of these tumours. Moreover, different scoring systems for immunohistochemical analyses were compared and the H index and the Allred scores were the most significant. In conclusion, YAP/TAZ are expressed in aggressive canine and feline mammary tumours as reported in some human cancers. Further studies might better elucidate the role of the Hippo pathway in prognosis and as a target for new therapies. In addition, tumours in dogs and cats may be a useful model to study this pathway. PMID:26626094

  15. Spectrum of very early breast cancer in a setting without organised screening

    PubMed Central

    Bhoo-Pathy, N; Subramaniam, S; Taib, N A; Hartman, M; Alias, Z; Tan, G-H; Ibrahim, R I; Yip, C-H; Verkooijen, H M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Within a setting without organised breast cancer screening, the characteristics and survival of very early breast cancer were determined. Methods: All 4930 women diagnosed with breast cancer in University Malaya Medical Center, Malaysia from 1993 to 2011 were included. Factors associated with very early presentation (stage I) at diagnosis were identified. Tumour characteristics, management patterns, and survival of very early breast cancer were described, and where appropriate, compared with other settings. Results: Proportion of women presenting with stage I breast cancer significantly increased from 15.2% to 25.2% over two decades. Factors associated with very early presentation were Chinese ethnicity, positive family history of breast cancer, and recent period of diagnosis. Within stage I breast cancers, median tumour size at presentation was 1.5 cm. A majority of stage I breast cancer patients received mastectomy, which was associated with older age, Chinese ethnicity, postmenopausal status, and larger tumours. Chemotherapy was administered in 36% of patients. Five-year age-adjusted relative survival for women with stage I breast cancer was 99.1% (95% CI: 97.6–99.6%). Conclusions: The proportion of women presenting with very early breast cancer in this setting without organised screening is increasing. These women seem to survive just as well as their counterparts from affluent settings. PMID:24736587

  16. Transillumination imaging of intraocular tumours.

    PubMed

    Kjersem, Bård; Krohn, Jørgen

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss a recently described modification of a standard photo slit lamp system for ocular transillumination, with special emphasis on the light transmission through the eye wall and the photographic technique. Transillumination photography was carried out with the Haag-Streit Photo-Slit Lamp BX 900 (Haag-Streit AG, Koeniz, Switzerland). After having released the background lighting optic fibre cable from its holder, the patient was positioned at the slit lamp, and the fibre tip was gently pressed against the sclera or the cornea of the patient's eye. During about 1/1000 of a second, the eye was illuminated by the flash and the scleral shadow of the tumour was exposed to the camera sensor. The images were of good diagnostic quality, making it easy to outline the tumours and to evaluate the involvement of intraocular structures. None of the examined patients experienced discomfort or negative side effects. The method is recommended in cases where photographic transillumination documentation of intraocular pathologies is considered important. PMID:23641762

  17. Matrix stiffness drives Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and tumour metastasis through a TWIST1-G3BP2 mechanotransduction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Spencer C.; Fattet, Laurent; Tsai, Jeff H.; Guo, Yurong; Pai, Vincent H.; Majeski, Hannah E.; Chen, Albert C.; Sah, Robert L.; Taylor, Susan S.; Engler, Adam J.; Yang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Matrix stiffness potently regulates cellular behavior in various biological contexts. In breast tumours, the presence of dense clusters of collagen fibrils indicates increased matrix stiffness and correlates with poor survival. It is unclear how mechanical inputs are transduced into transcriptional outputs to drive tumour progression. Here we report that TWIST1 is an essential mechano-mediator that promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in response to increasing matrix stiffness. High matrix stiffness promotes nuclear translocation of TWIST1 by releasing TWIST1 from its cytoplasmic binding partner G3BP2. Loss of G3BP2 leads to constitutive TWIST1 nuclear localization and synergizes with increasing matrix stiffness to induce EMT and promote tumour invasion and metastasis. In human breast tumours, collagen fiber alignment, a marker of increasing matrix stiffness, and reduced expression of G3BP2 together predict poor survival. Our findings reveal a TWIST1-G3BP2 mechanotransduction pathway that responds to biomechanical signals from the tumour microenvironment to drive EMT, invasion, and metastasis. PMID:25893917

  18. Matrix stiffness drives epithelial-mesenchymal transition and tumour metastasis through a TWIST1-G3BP2 mechanotransduction pathway.

    PubMed

    Wei, Spencer C; Fattet, Laurent; Tsai, Jeff H; Guo, Yurong; Pai, Vincent H; Majeski, Hannah E; Chen, Albert C; Sah, Robert L; Taylor, Susan S; Engler, Adam J; Yang, Jing

    2015-05-01

    Matrix stiffness potently regulates cellular behaviour in various biological contexts. In breast tumours, the presence of dense clusters of collagen fibrils indicates increased matrix stiffness and correlates with poor survival. It is unclear how mechanical inputs are transduced into transcriptional outputs to drive tumour progression. Here we report that TWIST1 is an essential mechanomediator that promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in response to increasing matrix stiffness. High matrix stiffness promotes nuclear translocation of TWIST1 by releasing TWIST1 from its cytoplasmic binding partner G3BP2. Loss of G3BP2 leads to constitutive TWIST1 nuclear localization and synergizes with increasing matrix stiffness to induce EMT and promote tumour invasion and metastasis. In human breast tumours, collagen fibre alignment, a marker of increasing matrix stiffness, and reduced expression of G3BP2 together predict poor survival. Our findings reveal a TWIST1-G3BP2 mechanotransduction pathway that responds to biomechanical signals from the tumour microenvironment to drive EMT, invasion and metastasis.

  19. Dynamics of genomic clones in breast cancer patient xenografts at single cell resolution

    PubMed Central

    Eirew, Peter; Steif, Adi; Khattra, Jaswinder; Ha, Gavin; Yap, Damian; Farahani, Hossein; Gelmon, Karen; Chia, Stephen; Mar, Colin; Wan, Adrian; Laks, Emma; Biele, Justina; Shumansky, Karey; Rosner, Jamie; McPherson, Andrew; Nielsen, Cydney; Roth, Andrew J. L.; Lefebvre, Calvin; Bashashati, Ali; de Souza, Camila; Siu, Celia; Aniba, Radhouane; Brimhall, Jazmine; Oloumi, Arusha; Osako, Tomo; Bruna, Alejandra; Sandoval, Jose; Algara, Teresa; Greenwood, Wendy; Leung, Kaston; Cheng, Hongwei; Xue, Hui; Wang, Yuzhuo; Lin, Dong; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard; Zhao, Yongjun; Lorette, Julie; Nguyen, Long; Huntsman, David; Eaves,