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Sample records for her2-negative breast tumours

  1. HER2 somatic mutations are associated with poor survival in HER2-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tonghui; Xu, Ye; Sheng, Shuyan; Yuan, Hua; Ouyang, Tao; Li, Jinfeng; Wang, Tianfeng; Fan, Zhaoqing; Fan, Tie; Lin, Benyao; Xie, Yuntao

    2017-02-06

    It is well documented that HER2 overexpression/amplification is associated with the poor survival in breast cancer patients. However, it is largely unknown whether HER2 somatic mutations are associated with the survival in HER2-negative breast cancer patients. Here, we identified HER2 somatic mutations in tumors from 1,348 unselected breast cancer patients by sequencing the entire HER2 coding region. All these mutations were tested for in corresponding blood samples to determine whether they were somatic or germline mutations. We further investigated the associations between the HER2 somatic mutations and recurrence-free survival (RFS) and distant recurrence-free survival (DRFS) in this cohort of patients. We found that 27 of 1,348 (2.0%) of these patients carried a HER2 somatic mutation. In vitro experiments demonstrated that some of novel mutations and those with unknown functions increased HER2 activity. HER2 status was available for 1,306 patients, and the HER2 somatic mutation rates in HER2-positive (n=353) and HER2-negative breast cancers (n=953) were 1.4% and 2.3%, respectively. Among the HER2-negative patients, those with a HER2 somatic mutation had a significantly worse recurrence-free survival (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] =2.67; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25-5.72, P=0.002) and distant recurrence-free survival (unadjusted HR=2.50; 95% CI: 1.10-5.68, P=0.004) than those with wild-type HER2. Taken together, our findings suggested that HER2 somatic mutations occur at a higher frequency in HER2-negative breast cancer, and HER2-negative breast cancer patients with these mutations have poor survival. Therefore, HER2-negative patients with a HER2 somatic mutation are potentially good candidates for HER2-targeted therapy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Systemic treatment approaches in her2-negative advanced breast cancer—guidance on the guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Joy, A.A.; Ghosh, M.; Fernandes, R.; Clemons, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite advancements in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer, many patients still develop disease recurrence; others present with de novo metastatic disease. For most patients with advanced breast cancer, the primary treatment intent is noncurative—that is, palliative—in nature. The goals of treatment should therefore focus on maximizing symptom control and extending survival. Treatments should be evaluated on an individualized basis in terms of evidence, but also with full respect for the wishes of the patient in terms of acceptable toxicity. Given the availability of extensive reviews on the roles of endocrine therapy and her2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2)–targeted therapies for advanced disease, we focus here mainly on treatment guidelines for the non-endocrine management of her2-negative advanced breast cancer in a Canadian health care context. PMID:25848337

  3. Bevacizumab in combination with paclitaxel for HER-2 negative metastatic breast cancer: an economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dedes, Konstantin J; Matter-Walstra, Klazien; Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Pestalozzi, Bernhard C; Fink, Daniel; Brauchli, Peter; Szucs, Thomas D

    2009-05-01

    The addition of bevacizumab to weekly paclitaxel as primary chemotherapy for HER-2 negative metastatic breast cancer (MBC) prolongs progression-free survival without a substantial increase of toxicity. A Markov cohort simulation was used to follow the clinical course of typical patients with MBC. Information on response rates and major adverse effects was derived, and transition probabilities were estimated, based on the results of the E2100 clinical trial. Direct costs were assessed from the perspective of the Swiss health system. The addition of bevacizumab to weekly paclitaxel is estimated to cost an additional 40,369euro and to yield a gain of 0.22 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 189,427euro/QALY gained. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that the willingness-to-pay threshold of 60,000euro was never reached. The addition of bevacizumab to paclitaxel in MBC patients is expensive given the clinical benefit in terms of QALYs gained.

  4. Recent advances in systemic therapy. When HER2 is not the target: advances in the treatment of HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miles, David W

    2009-01-01

    The anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) agent trastuzumab has improved outcomes in breast cancer patients with HER2 over-expressing tumours. However, systemic treatment for patients with HER2-negative disease is still limited to endocrine and cytotoxic therapies. The increasing use of the anthracyclines and taxanes in early stage disease has reduced the available therapeutic options for patients with relapsed disease, and choices are further limited for patients with triple-negative tumours, who typically have a poor prognosis. The novel agents bevacizumab and ixabepilone were recently approved for metastatic breast cancer, and numerous other agents are currently in clinical development that may contribute further valuable therapeutic options. PMID:19744307

  5. Veliparib and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  6. Detection of HER2-Positive Metastases in Patients with HER2-Negative Primary Breast Cancer Using 89Zr-Trastuzumab PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Ulaner, Gary A; Hyman, David M; Ross, Dara S; Corben, Adriana; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Goldfarb, Shari; McArthur, Heather; Erinjeri, Joseph P; Solomon, Stephen B; Kolb, Hartmuth; Lyashchenko, Serge K; Lewis, Jason S; Carrasquillo, Jorge A

    2016-10-01

    Our objective was to determine whether imaging with a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted PET tracer can detect HER2-positive metastases in patients with HER2-negative primary breast cancer.

  7. HER2-associated radiation resistance of breast cancer stem cells isolated from HER2-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Duru, Nadire; Fan, Ming; Candas, Demet; Menaa, Cheikh; Liu, Hsin-Chen; Nantajit, Danupon; Wen, Yunfei; Xiao, Kai; Eldridge, Angela; Chromy, Brett A.; Li, Shiyong; Spitz, Douglas R.; Lam, Kit S.; Wicha, Max S.; Li, Jian Jian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To understand the role of HER2-associated signaling network in breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs); using radiation-resistant breast cancer cells and clinical recurrent breast cancers to evaluate HER2-targeted therapy as a tumor eliminating strategy for recurrent HER2−/low breast cancers. Experimental Design HER2-expressing BCSCs (HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low) were isolated from radiation-treated breast cancer MCF7 cells and in vivo irradiated MCF7 xenograft tumors. Tumor aggressiveness and radiation resistance were analyzed by gap filling, Matrigel invasion, tumor-sphere formation, and clonogenic survival assays. The HER2/CD44 feature was analyzed in 40 primary and recurrent breast cancer specimens. Protein expression profiling in HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low versus HER2−/CD44+/CD24−/low BCSCs was conducted with 2-D DIGE and HPLC-MS/MS analysis and HER2-mediated signaling network was generated by MetaCore™ program. Results Compared to HER2-negative BCSCs, HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low cells showed elevated aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity and aggressiveness tested by matrigel invasion, tumor sphere formation and in vivo tumorigenesis. The enhanced aggressive phenotype and radioresistance of the HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low cells were markedly reduced by inhibition of HER2 via siRNA or Herceptin treatments. Clinical breast cancer specimens revealed that cells co-expressing HER2 and CD44 were more frequently detected in recurrent (84.6%) than primary tumors (57.1%). In addition, 2-D DIGE and HPLC-MS/MS of HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low versus HER2−/CD44+/CD24−/low BCSCs reported a unique HER2-associated protein profile including effectors involved in tumor metastasis, apoptosis, mitochondrial function and DNA repair. A specific feature of HER2-STAT3 network was identified. Conclusion This study provides the evidence that HER2-mediated pro-survival signaling network is responsible for the aggressive phenotype of breast cancer stem cells that could be targeted to control

  8. Current approaches to the management of Her2-negative metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    While metastatic breast cancer (MBC) remains incurable, a vast array of active therapeutic agents has provided the opportunity for long-term disease control while maintaining quality of life and physical function. Optimal management of MBC balances a multitude of factors, including a woman's performance status, social support, symptoms, disease burden, prior therapies, and surrogates for tumor biology. Choosing the most appropriate initial therapy and subsequent sequence of treatments demands flexibility as goals and patient preferences may change. Knowledge of the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and Her2 receptor status of the metastatic tumor has become critical to determining the optimal treatment strategy in the metastatic setting as targeted therapeutic approaches are developed. Patients with ER+ or PR+ breast cancer or both have a wide array of hormonal therapy options that can forestall the use of cytotoxic therapies, although rapidly progressive phenotypes and the emergence of resistance may ultimately lead to the need for chemotherapy in this setting. So-called 'triple-negative' breast cancer - lacking ER, PR, and Her2 overexpression - remains a major challenge. These tumors have an aggressive phenotype, and clear targets for therapy have not yet been established. Chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment in this group, but biologically based clinical trials of new agents are critical to developing a more effective set of therapies for this patient population. PMID:22429313

  9. Capecitabine Monotherapy: Review of Studies in First-Line HER-2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Manfred; Siedentopf, Friederike; Dalivoust, Philippe; Debled, Marc; Robert, Nicholas J.; Harbeck, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    The goals of treatment for metastatic breast cancer (MBC) are to prolong overall survival (OS) while maximizing quality of life, palliating symptoms, and delaying tumor progression. For many years, anthracyclines and taxanes have been the mainstay of treatment for MBC, but these agents are now commonly administered earlier in the course of the disease. A recent meta-analysis revealed adverse effects on OS and overall response rates in patients with MBC receiving first-line anthracycline-based chemotherapy following relapse on adjuvant chemotherapy. Noncrossresistant cytotoxic agents and combinations that combine high clinical activity and acceptable tolerability while being convenient for patients are therefore needed for the first-line treatment of MBC patients. Capecitabine has substantial antitumor activity in the first-line treatment of patients with MBC in prospective, randomized, phase II/III clinical trials as monotherapy and in combination with biologic and novel agents. First-line capecitabine monotherapy has a favorable safety profile, lacking myelosuppression and alopecia, and does not compromise the administration of further lines of chemotherapy. Capecitabine is suitable for long-term administration without the cumulative toxicity that can limit the prolonged use of other chemotherapy agents. Here, we review the available data on capecitabine as a single agent for first-line treatment of patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–negative MBC. PMID:22418569

  10. Challenges in the treatment of hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minetta C; Cortés, Javier; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce

    2016-06-01

    Brain metastases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality for women with hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer, yet little is known about the optimal treatment of brain disease in this group of patients. Although these patients are at lower risk for brain metastases relative to those with HER2-positive and triple-negative disease, they comprise the majority of women diagnosed with breast cancer. Surgery and radiation continue to have a role in the treatment of brain metastases, but there is a dearth of effective systemic therapies due to the poor penetrability of many systemic drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Additionally, patients with brain metastases have long been excluded from clinical trials, and few studies have been conducted to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of systemic therapies specifically for the treatment of HER2-negative breast cancer brain metastases. New approaches are on the horizon, such as nanoparticle-based cytotoxic drugs that have the potential to cross the BBB and provide clinically meaningful benefits to patients with this life-threatening consequence of HR-positive breast cancer.

  11. Positive Association of Fibroadenomatoid Change with HER2-Negative Invasive Breast Cancer: A Co-Occurrence Study

    PubMed Central

    Kovatich, Albert J.; Hooke, Jeffrey A.; Liu, Jianfang; Kvecher, Leonid; Fantacone-Campbell, J. Leigh; Mitchell, Edith P.; Rui, Hallgeir; Shriver, Craig D.; Hu, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Background Risk assessment of a benign breast disease/lesion (BBD) for invasive breast cancer (IBC) is typically done through a longitudinal study. For an infrequently-reported BBD, the shortage of occurrence data alone is a limiting factor to conducting such a study. Here we present an approach based on co-occurrence analysis, to help address this issue. We focus on fibroadenomatoid change (FAC), an under-studied BBD, as our preliminary analysis has suggested its previously unknown significant co-occurrence with IBC. Methods A cohort of 1667 female patients enrolled in the Clinical Breast Care Project was identified. A single experienced breast pathologist reviewed all pathology slides for each case and recorded all observed lesions, including FAC. Fibroadenoma (FA) was studied for comparison since FAC had been speculated to be an immature FA. FA and Fibrocystic Changes (FCC) were used for method validation since they have been comprehensively studied. Six common IBC and BBD risk/protective factors were also studied. Co-occurrence analyses were performed using logistic regression models. Results Common risk/protective factors were associated with FA, FCC, and IBC in ways consistent with the literature in general, and they were associated with FAC, FA, and FCC in distinct patterns. Age was associated with FAC in a bell-shape curve so that middle-aged women were more likely to have FAC. We report for the first time that FAC is positively associated with IBC with odds ratio (OR) depending on BMI (OR = 6.78, 95%CI = 3.43-13.42 at BMI<25 kg/m2; OR = 2.13, 95%CI = 1.20-3.80 at BMI>25 kg/m2). This association is only significant with HER2-negative IBC subtypes. Conclusions We conclude that FAC is a candidate risk factor for HER2-negative IBCs, and it is a distinct disease from FA. Co-occurrence analysis can be used for initial assessment of the risk for IBC from a BBD, which is vital to the study of infrequently-reported BBDs. PMID:26098961

  12. A phase I clinical trial of bavituximab and paclitaxel in patients with HER2 negative metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chalasani, Pavani; Marron, Marilyn; Roe, Denise; Clarke, Kathryn; Iannone, Maria; Livingston, Robert B; Shan, Joseph S; Stopeck, Alison T

    2015-07-01

    Bavituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets phosphatidylserine (PS). PS is externalized on cells in the tumor microenvironment when exposed to hypoxia and/or other physiological stressors. On attaching to PS, bavituximab is thought to promote antitumor immunity through its effects on PS receptors in monocytes, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, as well as trigger antitumor effects by inducing an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity on tumor-associated endothelial cells. We conducted a phase I clinical trial of bavituximab in combination with paclitaxel in patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. Patients were treated with weekly paclitaxel (80 mg/m(2) for 3/4 weeks) and weekly bavituximab (3 mg/kg for 4/4 weeks). Correlative studies included the measurement of circulating microparticles, endothelial cells, and apoptotic tumor cells by flow cytometry. Fourteen patients with metastatic breast cancer were enrolled; all were evaluable for toxicity and 13 were evaluable for response. Treatment resulted in an overall response rate (RR) of 85% with a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 7.3 months. Bone pain, fatigue, headache, and neutropenia were the most common adverse effects. Infusion-related reactions were the most common adverse event related to bavituximab therapy. Correlative studies showed an increase in the PS-expressing apoptotic circulating tumor cells in response to bavituximab, but not with paclitaxel. No changes in the number of circulating endothelial cells or apoptotic endothelial cells were observed with therapy. Platelet and monocyte-derived microparticles decreased after initiation of bavituximab. Bavituximab in combination with paclitaxel is well tolerated for treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer with promising results observed in terms of clinical RRs and PFS. The toxicity profile of bavituximab is notable for manageable infusion-related reactions with no evidence for increased

  13. Capecitabine and cisplatin (XP) combination systemic chemotherapy in heavily pre-treated HER2 negative metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jieun; Kim, Hyun Ho; Ro, Sang Mi; Yang, Ji Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) After taxane and anthracycline failure, no standard chemotherapy regimen is established in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Capecitabine and cisplatin (XP) combination shows promising results in gastrointestinal cancer, but there are relatively scarce data in MBC. We reviewed the clinical outcome of XP regimen in anthracycline and taxane resistant, heavily pretreated MBC patients. Materials/Methods Between Jan. 2010 to Feb. 2016, 48 HER2 negative MBC patients who failed anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy were enrolled. In 43.8% of patients, more than 4 regimens were administrated before XP. Thirty-four patients (70.8%) were hormone receptor (HR) positive MBC. Patients were treated with XP (capecitabine [2000mg/m2 per oral; day 1–14] plus cisplatin [60mg/m2 IV; day 1], every 3 weeks) regimen. Results Median progression-free survival (PFS) in total population was 4.33 months (range 1.1~33.57 months). HR positive patients showed trends for superior PFS compared to triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), without statistical significance (6.53 vs. 3.83 months, P = 0.168). In HR positive group, patients receiving 3 or less lines of chemotherapy showed superior PFS compared to others (10.1 vs. 3.0 months, P = 0.039). In multivariate analysis, HR positive patients receiving 3 or less lines of regimens still showed superior PFS (HR = 2.624, 95% CI; 1.071~6.43, P = 0.032). Most common toxicity was grade 3–4 neutropenia, without treatment-related deaths. Conclusions XP combination regimen showed clinical benefit with tolerable toxicity in heavily pretreated patients, including HR positive patients. After anthracycline and taxane failure, early administration of XP regimen in selected patients may have improve clinical outcome in breast cancer. PMID:28234911

  14. Retrospective study of the effect of disease progression on patient reported outcomes in HER-2 negative metastatic breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This retrospective study evaluated the impact of disease progression and of specific sites of metastasis on patient reported outcomes (PROs) that assess symptom burden and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in women with metastatic breast cancer (mBC). Methods HER-2 negative mBC patients (n = 102) were enrolled from 7 U.S. community oncology practices. Demographic, disease and treatment characteristics were abstracted from electronic medical records and linked to archived Patient Care Monitor (PCM) assessments. The PCM is a self-report measure of symptom burden and HRQoL administered as part of routine care in participating practices. Linear mixed models were used to examine change in PCM scores over time. Results Mean age was 57 years, with 72% of patients Caucasian, and 25% African American. Median time from mBC diagnosis to first disease progression was 8.8 months. Metastasis to bone (60%), lung (28%) and liver (26%) predominated at initial metastatic diagnosis. Results showed that PCM items assessing fatigue, physical pain and trouble sleeping were sensitive to either general effects of disease progression or to effects associated with specific sites of metastasis. Progression of disease was also associated with modest but significant worsening of General Physical Symptoms, Treatment Side Effects, Acute Distress and Impaired Performance index scores. In addition, there were marked detrimental effects of liver metastasis on Treatment Side Effects, and of brain metastasis on Acute Distress. Conclusions Disease progression has a detrimental impact on cancer-related symptoms. Delaying disease progression may have a positive impact on patients' HRQoL. PMID:21689425

  15. Phase III randomized trial of sunitinib versus capecitabine in patients with previously treated HER2-negative advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei-Ching; Lee, Soo Chin; Vanlemmens, Laurence; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Tabei, Toshio; Pivot, Xavier; Iwata, Hiroji; Aogi, Kenjiro; Lugo-Quintana, Roberto; Harbeck, Nadia; Brickman, Marla J.; Zhang, Ke; Kern, Kenneth A.; Martin, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    This multicenter, randomized, open-label phase III trial (planned enrollment: 700 patients) was conducted to test the hypothesis that single-agent sunitinib improves progression-free survival (PFS) compared with capecitabine as treatment for advanced breast cancer (ABC). Patients with HER2-negative ABC that recurred after anthracycline and taxane therapy were randomized (1:1) to sunitinib 37.5 mg/day or capecitabine 1,250 mg/m2 (1,000 mg/m2 in patients >65 years) BID on days 1–14 q3w. The independent data-monitoring committee (DMC) determined during the first interim analysis (238 patients randomized to sunitinib, 244 to capecitabine) that the trial be terminated due to futility in reaching the primary endpoint. No statistical evidence supported the hypothesis that sunitinib improved PFS compared with capecitabine (one-sided P = 0.999). The data indicated that PFS was shorter with sunitinib than capecitabine (median 2.8 vs. 4.2 months, respectively; HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.16–1.87; two-sided P = 0.002). Median overall survival (15.3 vs. 24.6 months; HR, 1.17; two-sided P = 0.350) and objective response rates (11 vs. 16%; odds ratio, 0.65; P = 0.109) were numerically inferior with sunitinib versus capecitabine. While no new or unexpected safety findings were reported, sunitinib treatment was associated with higher frequencies and greater severities of many common adverse events (AEs) compared with capecitabine, resulting in more temporary discontinuations due to AEs with sunitinib (66 vs. 51%). The relative dose intensity was lower with sunitinib than capecitabine (73 vs. 95%). Based on these efficacy and safety results, sunitinib should not be used as monotherapy for patients with ABC. PMID:20339913

  16. Detection of HER2-positive metastases in patients with HER2-negative primary breast cancer using 89Zr-trastuzumab PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Ulaner, Gary A.; Hyman, David M.; Ross, Dara S.; Corben, Adriana; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Goldfarb, Shari; McArthur, Heather; Erinjeri, Joseph P; Solomon, Stephen B; Kolb, Hartmuth; Lyashchenko, Serge K; Lewis, Jason S.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    To determine if imaging with a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeting PET tracer can detect HER2-positive metastases in patients with HER2-negative primary breast cancer. Materials and Methods Patients with HER2-negative primary breast cancer and evidence of distant metastases were enrolled in an Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved prospective clinical trial. Archived pathology from the patient’s primary breast cancer was retested to confirm HER2-negative disease. Patients with confirmed HER2-negative primary breast cancer underwent 89Zr-trastuzumab PET/CT to screen for 89Zr-trastuzumab metastases. Metastases avid for 89Zr-trastuzumab by PET/CT were biopsied and pathologically examined to define HER2 status. Patients with pathologically proven HER2-positive metastases subsequently received off-protocol HER2 targeted therapy to evaluate treatment response. Results Nine patients were enrolled, all of whom had pathologic retesting that confirmed HER2-negative primary breast cancer. Five demonstrated suspicious foci on 89Zr-trastuzumab PET/CT. Of these five with suspicious foci, two had biopsy proven HER2-positive metastases and went on to benefit from HER2 targeted therapy. Three of the five patients with suspicious foci had biopsy without evidence of HER2-positive disease, and were considered false positive false positive 89Zr-trastuzumab PET foci. Conclusion In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate that 89Zr-trastuzmab PET/CT detects unsuspected HER2-positive metastases in patients with HER2-negtive primary breast cancer. While these are only initial results in a small sample, it is a proof of concept that HER2-targeted imaging can identify additional candidates for HER2-targeted therapy. More specific HER2-targeting agents will be needed for clinical use. PMID:27151988

  17. A phase I clinical trial of bavituximab and paclitaxel in patients with HER2 negative metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chalasani, Pavani; Marron, Marilyn; Roe, Denise; Clarke, Kathryn; Iannone, Maria; Livingston, Robert B; Shan, Joseph S; Stopeck, Alison T

    2015-01-01

    Bavituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets phosphatidylserine (PS). PS is externalized on cells in the tumor microenvironment when exposed to hypoxia and/or other physiological stressors. On attaching to PS, bavituximab is thought to promote antitumor immunity through its effects on PS receptors in monocytes, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, as well as trigger antitumor effects by inducing an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity on tumor-associated endothelial cells. We conducted a phase I clinical trial of bavituximab in combination with paclitaxel in patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. Patients were treated with weekly paclitaxel (80 mg/m2 for 3/4 weeks) and weekly bavituximab (3 mg/kg for 4/4 weeks). Correlative studies included the measurement of circulating microparticles, endothelial cells, and apoptotic tumor cells by flow cytometry. Fourteen patients with metastatic breast cancer were enrolled; all were evaluable for toxicity and 13 were evaluable for response. Treatment resulted in an overall response rate (RR) of 85% with a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 7.3 months. Bone pain, fatigue, headache, and neutropenia were the most common adverse effects. Infusion-related reactions were the most common adverse event related to bavituximab therapy. Correlative studies showed an increase in the PS-expressing apoptotic circulating tumor cells in response to bavituximab, but not with paclitaxel. No changes in the number of circulating endothelial cells or apoptotic endothelial cells were observed with therapy. Platelet and monocyte-derived microparticles decreased after initiation of bavituximab. Bavituximab in combination with paclitaxel is well tolerated for treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer with promising results observed in terms of clinical RRs and PFS. The toxicity profile of bavituximab is notable for manageable infusion-related reactions with no evidence for increased

  18. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy adaptation and serial MRI response monitoring in ER-positive HER2-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rigter, L S; Loo, C E; Linn, S C; Sonke, G S; van Werkhoven, E; Lips, E H; Warnars, H A; Doll, P K; Bruining, A; Mandjes, I A; Vrancken Peeters, M J; Wesseling, J; Gilhuijs, K G; Rodenhuis, S

    2013-01-01

    Background: Changing the neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen in insufficiently responding breast cancer is not a standard policy. We analysed a series of patients with ‘luminal'-type breast cancer in whom the second half of neoadjuvant chemotherapy was selected based on the response to the first half. Methods: Patients with oestrogen receptor-positive (ER+) human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2−) breast cancer received three courses of neoadjuvant dose-dense doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (ddAC). Three further courses of ddAC were administered in case of a ‘favourable response' on the interim magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a switch to docetaxel and capecitabine (DC) was made in case of an ‘unfavourable response', using previously published response criteria. The efficacy of this approach was evaluated by tumour size reductions on serial contrast-enhanced MRI, pathologic response and relapse-free survival. Results: Two hundred and forty-six patients received three courses of ddAC. One hundred and sixty-four patients (67%) had a favourable response at the interim MRI, with a mean tumour size reduction of 31% after the first three courses and 34% after the second three courses. Patients with unfavourable responsive tumours had a mean tumour size reduction of 12% after three courses and received three courses of DC rather than ddAC. This led to a mean shrinkage of 27%. Conclusion: The tumour size reduction of initially less responsive tumours after treatment adaptation adds further evidence that a response-adapted strategy may enhance the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:24149178

  19. GWAS in the SIGNAL/PHARE clinical cohort restricts the association between the FGFR2 locus and estrogen receptor status to HER2-negative breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cox, David G; Curtit, Elsa; Romieu, Gilles; Fumoleau, Pierre; Rios, Maria; Bonnefoi, Hervé; Bachelot, Thomas; Soulié, Patrick; Jouannaud, Christelle; Bourgeois, Hugues; Petit, Thierry; Tennevet, Isabelle; Assouline, David; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Jacquin, Jean-Philippe; Lavau-Denes, Sandrine; Darut-Jouve, Ariane; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Tarpin, Carole; Lévy, Christelle; Delecroix, Valérie; Trillet-Lenoir, Véronique; Cojocarasu, Oana; Meunier, Jérôme; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Faure-Mercier, Céline; Blanché, Hélène; Sahbatou, Mourad; Boland, Anne; Bacq, Delphine; Besse, Céline; Deleuze, Jean-François; Pauporté, Iris; Thomas, Gilles; Pivot, Xavier

    2016-11-22

    Genetic polymorphisms are associated with breast cancer risk. Clinical and epidemiological observations suggest that clinical characteristics of breast cancer, such as estrogen receptor or HER2 status, are also influenced by hereditary factors. To identify genetic variants associated with pathological characteristics of breast cancer patients, a Genome Wide Association Study was performed in a cohort of 9365 women from the French nationwide SIGNAL/PHARE studies (NCT00381901/RECF1098). Strong association between the FGFR2 locus and ER status of breast cancer patients was observed (ER-positive n=6211, ER-negative n=2516; rs3135718 OR=1.34 p=5.46×10-12). This association was limited to patients with HER2-negative tumors (ER-positive n=4267, ER-negative n=1185; rs3135724 OR=1.85 p=1.16×10-11). The FGFR2 locus is known to be associated with breast cancer risk. This study provides sound evidence for an association between variants in the FGFR2 locus and ER status among breast cancer patients, particularly among patients with HER2-negative disease. This refinement of the association between FGFR2 variants and ER-status to HER2-negative disease provides novel insight to potential biological and clinical influence of genetic polymorphisms on breast tumors.

  20. GWAS in the SIGNAL/PHARE clinical cohort restricts the association between the FGFR2 locus and estrogen receptor status to HER2-negative breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Cox, David G.; Curtit, Elsa; Romieu, Gilles; Fumoleau, Pierre; Rios, Maria; Bonnefoi, Hervé; Bachelot, Thomas; Soulié, Patrick; Jouannaud, Christelle; Bourgeois, Hugues; Petit, Thierry; Tennevet, Isabelle; Assouline, David; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Jacquin, Jean-Philippe; Lavau-Denes, Sandrine; Darut-Jouve, Ariane; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Tarpin, Carole; Lévy, Christelle; Delecroix, Valérie; Trillet-Lenoir, Véronique; Cojocarasu, Oana; Meunier, Jérôme; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Faure-Mercier, Céline; Blanché, Hélène; Sahbatou, Mourad; Boland, Anne; Bacq, Delphine; Besse, Céline; Deleuze, Jean-François; Pauporté, Iris; Thomas, Gilles; Pivot, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms are associated with breast cancer risk. Clinical and epidemiological observations suggest that clinical characteristics of breast cancer, such as estrogen receptor or HER2 status, are also influenced by hereditary factors. To identify genetic variants associated with pathological characteristics of breast cancer patients, a Genome Wide Association Study was performed in a cohort of 9365 women from the French nationwide SIGNAL/PHARE studies (NCT00381901/RECF1098). Strong association between the FGFR2 locus and ER status of breast cancer patients was observed (ER-positive n=6211, ER-negative n=2516; rs3135718 OR=1.34 p=5.46×10−12). This association was limited to patients with HER2-negative tumors (ER-positive n=4267, ER-negative n=1185; rs3135724 OR=1.85 p=1.16×10−11). The FGFR2 locus is known to be associated with breast cancer risk. This study provides sound evidence for an association between variants in the FGFR2 locus and ER status among breast cancer patients, particularly among patients with HER2-negative disease. This refinement of the association between FGFR2 variants and ER-status to HER2-negative disease provides novel insight to potential biological and clinical influence of genetic polymorphisms on breast tumors. PMID:27764800

  1. EndoPredict predicts for the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    The EndoPredict (EP) signature is a prognostic 11-gene expression signature specifically developed in ER+/HER2- node-negative/positive breast cancer. It is associated with relapse-free survival in patients treated with adjuvant hormone therapy, suggesting that EP low-risk patients could be treated with adjuvant hormone therapy alone whereas high-risk patients would deserve addition of adjuvant chemotherapy. Thus, it is important to determine whether EP high-risk patients are or are not more sensitive to chemotherapy than low-risk patients. Here, we have assessed the EP predictive value for pathological complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in ER+/HER2- breast cancer. We gathered gene expression and histoclinical data of 553 pre-treatment ER+/HER2- breast carcinomas treated with anthracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We searched for correlation between the pathological complete response (pCR) and the EP score-based classification. The overall pCR rate was 12%. Fifty-one percent of samples were classified as low-risk according to the EP score and 49% as high-risk. EP classification was associated with a pCR rate of 7% in the low-risk group and 17% in the high-risk group (p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the EP score remained significantly associated with pCR. Many genes upregulated in the high-risk tumours were involved in cell proliferation, whereas many genes upregulated in the low-risk tumours were involved in ER-signalling and stroma. Despite higher chemosensitivity, the high-risk group was associated with worse disease-free survival. In conclusion, EP high-risk ER+/HER2- breast cancers are more likely to respond to anthracycline-based chemotherapy.

  2. Bevacizumab Addition in Neoadjuvant Treatment Increases the Pathological Complete Response Rates in Patients with HER-2 Negative Breast Cancer Especially Triple Negative Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Binglan; Shi, Changle; Liu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant therapy is administered to breast cancer patients as an induction process before surgery or radiotherapy to reduce tumor size. Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) negative breast cancer lacks effective standard target therapy. Bevacizumab has a controversial role in the treatment of breast cancer and we conduct a meta-analysis to evaluate the value of adding bevacizumab in neoadjuvant regimen. Methods Potentially eligible studies were retrieved using PubMed, EMBASE and Medline. Clinical characteristics of patients and statistical data with pathological complete response (pCR) data were collected. Then a meta-analysis model was established to investigate the correlation between administration of bevacizumab in neoadjuvant therapy and pCR rates in HER-2 negative breast cancer. Results Seven eligible studies and 5408 patients were yielded. The pCR rates for “breast” or “breast plus lymph node” were similar. In subgroup analysis, we emphasized on patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). In the criterion of “lesions in breast” the pooled ORs was 1.55 [1.29, 1.86], P<0.00001 and regarding to the evaluation criterion of “lesions in breast and lymph nodes”, the pooled ORs was 1.48 [1.23, 1.78], P<0.0001, in favor of bevacizumab administration. Conclusion According to our pooled results, we finally find that bevacizumab addition as a neoadjuvant chemotherapy component, for induction use with limited cycle to improve the pCR rates and patients may avoid long-term adverse event and long-term invalid survival improvement. Especially in subgroup analysis, pCR rates could be improved significantly and physicians could consider bevacizumab with caution. As patients could avoid the adverse event caused by long-term using of bevacizumab, long-term quality of life improvement may be achieved, especially in TNBC. PMID:27579484

  3. FDA Approval of Palbociclib in Combination with Fulvestrant for the Treatment of Hormone Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Walker, Amanda J; Wedam, Suparna; Amiri-Kordestani, Laleh; Bloomquist, Erik; Tang, Shengui; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Chen, Wei; Palmby, Todd R; Fourie Zirkelbach, Jeanne; Fu, Wentao; Liu, Qi; Tilley, Amy; Kim, Geoffrey; Kluetz, Paul G; McKee, Amy E; Pazdur, Richard

    2016-10-15

    On February 19, 2016, the FDA approved palbociclib (Ibrance, Pfizer) for use in combination with fulvestrant (Faslodex, AstraZeneca) for the treatment of women with hormone receptor (HR)-positive, HER2-negative advanced or metastatic breast cancer (MBC) with disease progression following endocrine therapy. The approval was based on the results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted in 521 pre- and postmenopausal women with HR-positive, HER2-negative advanced or MBC. Patients were randomized (2:1) to receive palbociclib plus fulvestrant (n = 347) or placebo plus fulvestrant (n = 174). The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed progression-free survival (PFS). A statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in PFS (9.5 months vs. 4.6 months) was observed in patients receiving palbociclib plus fulvestrant [HR 0.46; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.36-0.59; P < 0.0001]. Safety data confirmed the known adverse reaction profile of palbociclib. The most common adverse reactions (>20%) in patients treated with palbociclib were neutropenia, leukopenia, infections, fatigue, nausea, anemia, stomatitis, headache, diarrhea, and thrombocytopenia. This approval was granted in the context of a prior accelerated approval for palbociclib in combination with letrozole in patients with HR-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer as initial endocrine-based therapy. Clin Cancer Res; 22(20); 4968-72. ©2016 AACR.

  4. Phase II, multicenter, open-label, randomized study of YM155 plus docetaxel as first-line treatment in patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Michael R; Gladkov, Oleg A; Gartner, Elaina; Vladimirov, Vladimir; Crown, John; Steinberg, Joyce; Jie, Fei; Keating, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of YM155, a survivin suppressor, in combination with docetaxel, compared with docetaxel alone in patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. This phase II, multicenter, open-label, 2-arm study randomized patients (≥18 years) with histologically or cytologically confirmed stage IV HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer and ≥1 measurable lesion, to receive docetaxel alone or docetaxel plus YM155. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints included objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), duration of response (DOR), clinical benefit rate (CBR), time to response (TTR), biomarker assessment, and analysis of circulating tumor cells. Patients were women diagnosed with HER2-negative breast cancer; most had received prior drug therapies. The median PFS was 8.4 months with YM155 plus docetaxel (n = 50) and 10.5 months with docetaxel alone (n = 51; HR 1.53; 95 % CI 0.83, 2.83; P = 0.176). No statistically significant differences were observed for secondary endpoints, although slightly greater OS (630 vs 601 days; P = 0.768), CBR (84.3 vs 82.0 %; P = 0.855), DOR, and TTR were observed with docetaxel alone compared with YM155 plus docetaxel, whereas ORR was similar (25.5 vs 26.0). The most common TEAEs observed with YM155 plus docetaxel compared with docetaxel alone were neutropenia (83.3 vs 84.3 %), alopecia (62.5 vs 52.9 %), fatigue (50 vs 41.2 %), and nausea (37.5 vs 41.2 %). Although YM155 is a novel drug that suppresses survivin, YM155 plus docetaxel exhibited no statistically significant differences in endpoints compared with docetaxel alone. The combination regimen was well tolerated.

  5. Cell surface interaction of annexin A2 and galectin-3 modulates epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in Her-2 negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Praveenkumar; Bargale, Anil; Patil, Basavraj R; Mohan, Rajashekar; Dinesh, U S; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K; Gai, Pramod B; Patil, Vidya S; Amsavardani, T S

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression and activation of tyrosine kinase receptors like EGFR and Src regulate the progression and metastasis of Her-2 negative breast cancer. Recently we have reported the role of cell membrane interaction of phospholipid-binding protein annexin A2 (AnxA2) and EGFR in regulating cellular signaling in the activation of angiogenesis, matrix degradation, invasion, and cancer metastasis. Beta-galactoside-specific animal lectin galectin-3 is an apoptosis inhibitor, and cell surface-associated extracellular galectin-3 also has a role in cell migration, cancer progression, and metastasis. Similar expression pattern and membrane co-localization of these two proteins made us to hypothesize in the current study that galectin-3 and AnxA2 interaction is critical for Her-2 negative breast cancer progression. By various experimental analyses, we confirm that glycosylated AnxA2 at the membrane surface interacts with galectin-3. N-linked glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin treatment convincingly blocked AnxA2 membrane translocation and its association with galectin-3. To analyze whether this interaction has any functional relevance, we tried to dissociate this interaction with purified plant lectin from chickpea (Cicer arietinum agglutinin). This highly specific 30 kDa plant lectin could dissociate AnxA2 from endogenous lectin galectin-3 interaction at the cell surface. This dissociation could down-regulate Bcl-2 family proteins, cell proliferation, and migration simultaneously triggering cell apoptosis. Targeting this interaction of membrane surface glycoprotein and its animal lectin in Her-2 negative breast cancer may be of therapeutic value.

  6. Feasibility Study of EndoTAG-1, a Tumor Endothelial Targeting Agent, in Combination with Paclitaxel followed by FEC as Induction Therapy in HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lemort, Marc; Wilke, Celine; Vanderbeeken, Marie-Catherine; D’Hondt, Veronique; De Azambuja, Evandro; Gombos, Andrea; Lebrun, Fabienne; Dal Lago, Lissandra; Bustin, Fanny; Maetens, Marion; Ameye, Lieveke; Veys, Isabelle; Michiels, Stefan; Paesmans, Marianne; Larsimont, Denis; Sotiriou, Christos; Nogaret, Jean-Marie; Piccart, Martine; Awada, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background EndoTAG-1, a tumor endothelial targeting agent has shown activity in metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (BC) in combination with paclitaxel. Methods HER2-negative BC patients candidates for neoadjuvant chemotherapy were scheduled to receive 12 cycles of weekly EndoTAG-1 22mg/m2 plus paclitaxel 70mg/m2 followed by 3 cycles of FEC (Fluorouracil 500mg/m2, Epirubicin 100mg/m2, Cyclophosphamide 500mg/m2) every 3 weeks followed by surgery. Primary endpoint was percent (%) reduction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) estimated Gadolinium (Gd) enhancing tumor volume at the end of EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel administration as compared to baseline. Safety, pathological complete response (pCR) defined as no residual tumor in breast and axillary nodes at surgery and correlation between % reduction in MRI estimated tumor volume and pCR were also evaluated. Results Fifteen out of 20 scheduled patients were included: Six patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative/HER2-negative and 9 with ER-positive/HER2-negative BC. Nine patients completed treatment as per protocol. Despite premedication and slow infusion rates, grade 3 hypersensitivity reactions to EndoTAG-1 were observed during the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 6th weekly infusion in 4 patients, respectively, and required permanent discontinuation of the EndoTAG-1. Moreover, two additional patients stopped EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel after 8 and 9 weeks due to clinical disease progression. Two patients had grade 3 increases in transaminases and 1 patient grade 4 neutropenia. pCR was achieved in 5 of the 6 ER-/HER2- and in none of the 9 ER+/HER2- BC patients. The mean % reduction in MRI estimated tumor volume at the end of EndoTAG-1 plus paclitaxel treatment was 81% (95% CI, 66% to 96%, p<0.001) for the 15 patients that underwent surgery; 96% for patients with pCR and 73% for patients with no pCR (p = 0.04). Conclusions The EndoTAG-1 and paclitaxel combination showed promising preliminary activity as preoperative treatment

  7. Integrated MicroRNA–mRNA Profiling Identifies Oncostatin M as a Marker of Mesenchymal-Like ER-Negative/HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bottai, Giulia; Diao, Lixia; Baggerly, Keith A.; Paladini, Laura; Győrffy, Balázs; Raschioni, Carlotta; Pusztai, Lajos; Calin, George A.; Santarpia, Libero

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) simultaneously modulate different oncogenic networks, establishing a dynamic system of gene expression and pathway regulation. In this study, we analyzed global miRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression profiles of 17 cell lines representing different molecular breast cancer subtypes. Spearman’s rank correlation test was used to evaluate the correlation between miRNA and mRNA expression. Hierarchical clustering and pathway analysis were also performed. Publicly available gene expression profiles (n = 699) and tumor tissues (n = 80) were analyzed to assess the relevance of key miRNA-regulated pathways in human breast cancer. We identified 39 significantly deregulated miRNAs, and the integration between miRNA and mRNA data revealed the importance of immune-related pathways, particularly the Oncostatin M (OSM) signaling, associated with mesenchymal-like breast cancer cells. OSM levels correlated with genes involved in the inflammatory response, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling in human estrogen receptor (ER)-negative/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer. Our results suggest that the deregulation of specific miRNAs may cooperatively impair immune and EMT pathways. The identification of the OSM inflammatory pathway as an important mediator of EMT in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) may provide a novel potential opportunity to improve therapeutic strategies. PMID:28106823

  8. Final results of a phase II study of nab-paclitaxel, bevacizumab, and gemcitabine as first-line therapy for patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Christopher; Lopes, Gilberto; Baez, Odalys; Castrellon, Aurelio; Ferrell, Annapoorna; Higgins, Connie; Hurley, Erin; Hurley, Judith; Reis, Isildinha; Richman, Stephen; Seo, Pearl; Silva, Orlando; Slingerland, Joyce; Tukia, Keleni; Welsh, Catherine; Glück, Stefan

    2010-09-01

    In order to examine the efficacy and safety of nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-P) in combination with bevacizumab (B) and gemcitabine (G) for the first-line treatment of patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer (MBC). In this single-center, open-label phase II trial, patients with HER2-negative MBC received gemcitabine 1500 mg/m(2), nab-paclitaxel 150 mg/m(2), and bevacizumab 10 mg/kg (each administered intravenously) on days 1 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. The primary end point was progression free survival (PFS); secondary end points were overall response rate (ORR), complete (CR) and partial (PR) response rates, clinical benefit (ORR + stable disease), overall survival (OS), and safety. Thirty patients were enrolled. One patient was ineligible and was not included in analysis. Median PFS was 10.4 months (95% CI: 5.6-15.2 months). ORR was 75.9%, comprising eight (27.6%) CRs and 14 (48.3%) PRs; five patients had stable disease (SD) and two patients (6.9%) had progressive disease (PD) as their best response. The clinical benefit rate was 93.1% (27/29) in the overall group and 84.6% in the triple-negative cohort (11/13). The 18-month survival rate was 77.2% (95% CI: 51.1-90.5%). Eight (27.6%) patients experienced grade 3 or 4 toxicity: grade 4 neutropenic fever (n = 1) and grade 3 infection (n = 6), leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, peripheral neuropathy, seizure, shortness of breath, hematuria, and cardiac tamponade (one each). First-line therapy with nab-P, B, and G demonstrated a median PFS of 10.4 months and a 75.9% ORR with acceptable toxicity; this novel combination warrants investigation in a randomized study.

  9. A functional signal profiling test for identifying a subset of HER2-negative breast cancers with abnormally amplified HER2 signaling activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yao; Burns, David J; Rich, Benjamin E; MacNeil, Ian A; Dandapat, Abhijit; Soltani, Sajjad M.; Myhre, Samantha; Sullivan, Brian F; Furcht, Leo T; Lange, Carol A; Hurvitz, Sara A; Laing, Lance G

    2016-01-01

    The results of clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of HER2 inhibitors in patients with breast cancer indicate that the correlation between HER2 receptor levels and patient outcomes is as low as 50%. The relatively weak correlation between HER2 status and response to HER2-targeting drugs suggests that measurement of HER2 signaling activity, rather than absolute HER2 levels, may more accurately diagnose HER2-driven breast cancer. A new diagnostic test, the CELx HER2 Signaling Profile (CELx HSP) test, is demonstrated to measure real-time HER2 signaling function in live primary cells. In the present study, epithelial cells extracted fresh from breast cancer patient tumors classified as HER2 negative (HER2−, n = 34 of which 33 were estrogen receptor positive) and healthy subjects (n = 16) were evaluated along with reference breast cancer cell lines (n = 19). Live cell response to specific HER2 agonists (NRG1b and EGF) and antagonist (pertuzumab) was measured. Of the HER2− breast tumor cell samples tested, 7 of 34 patients (20.5%; 95% CI = 10%–37%) had HER2 signaling activity that was characterized as abnormally high. Amongst the tumor samples there was no correlation between HER2 protein status (by cell cytometry) and HER2 signaling activity (hyperactive or normal) (Regression analysis P = 0.144, R2 = 0.068). One conclusion is that measurement of HER2 signaling activity can identify a subset of breast cancers with normal HER2 receptor levels with abnormally high levels of HER2 signaling. This result constitutes a new subtype of breast cancer that should be considered for treatment with HER2 pathway inhibitors. PMID:27713176

  10. The association of chemotherapy versus hormonal therapy and health outcomes among patients with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer: experience from the patient perspective.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shaloo; Zhang, Jie; Jerusalem, Guy

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to characterize the impact of metastatic breast cancer (MBC) and cancer treatments on health-related quality of life, treatment satisfaction, and daily productivity from the patient perspective. This was a cross-sectional survey of patients with MBC (USA, n = 200; EU, n = 160). Post-menopausal women aged ≥50 years with hormone receptor positive (HR+), HER2-negative (HER2-) MBC, currently using hormonal therapy (HT) or using chemotherapy (CT) for ≤1 year were recruited. Fifty three percent (n = 191) reported CT and 47% (n = 169) reported HT use. Adjusting for covariates, HT users reported greater health-related quality of life (p < 0.05), greater satisfaction with treatment and better feelings about side-effects (p < 0.001). HT users reported less bother with treatment side-effects (0-5 scale, p < 0.001) and less activity impairment than CT users (p < 0.001). HT was associated with better patient-reported outcomes than CT in first-line MBC management. These findings should be taken into consideration while making treatment decisions for HR+/HER2- MBC.

  11. Frequent detection of PIK3CA mutations in single circulating tumor cells of patients suffering from HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gasch, Christin; Oldopp, Theresa; Mauermann, Oliver; Gorges, Tobias M; Andreas, Antje; Coith, Cornelia; Müller, Volkmar; Fehm, Tanja; Janni, Wolfgang; Pantel, Klaus; Riethdorf, Sabine

    2016-10-01

    Modern technologies enable detection and characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTC) in peripheral blood samples. Thus, CTC have attracted interest as markers for therapeutic response in breast cancer. First studies have incorporated CTC analyses to guide therapeutic interventions and stratification of breast cancer patients. Aim of this study was to analyze characteristic features of CTC as biomarker for predicting resistance to HER2-targeted therapies. Therefore, CTC from metastatic breast cancer patients with HER2-negative primary tumors screened for the prospective randomized phase III trial DETECT III were explored for their HER2 status and the presence of PIK3CA mutations. Detection and characterization of HER2 expression of CTC were conducted with the CellSearch(®) system. Fifteen of 179 CTC-positive patients (8.4%) contained ≥1 CTC with strong HER2 expression. Genomic DNA from individual CTC isolated by micromanipulation was propagated by whole genome amplification and analyzed for PIK3CA mutations in exons 9 and 20 by Sanger sequencing. One or more CTC/7.5 mL were detected in 179/290 patients (61.7%). In 109 patients (34.8%), ≥5 CTC/7.5 mL were found. We detected at least one CTC with the mutation p.E542K, p.E545K, p.H1047R, p.H1047L or p.M1043V in 12/33 patients (36.4%). Thirty six of 114 CTC (31.6%) harbored one of these mutations. CTC in individual patients exhibited heterogeneity concerning PIK3CA mutations and HER2 expression. In conclusion, clinically relevant genomic aberrations such as mutations in the hotspot regions of exon 9 and 20 of the PIK3CA gene can be detected in single CTC and might provide insights into mechanisms of resistance to HER2-targeted therapies.

  12. Predictive role of hand–foot syndrome in patients receiving first-line capecitabine plus bevacizumab for HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Christoph; Lang, Istvan; Beslija, Semir; Kahan, Zsuzsanna; Inbar, Moshe J; Stemmer, Salomon M; Anghel, Rodica; Vrbanec, Damir; Messinger, Diethelm; Brodowicz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Correlations between development of hand–foot syndrome (HFS) and efficacy in patients receiving capecitabine (CAP)-containing therapy are reported in the literature. We explored the relationship between HFS and efficacy in patients receiving CAP plus bevacizumab (BEV) in the TURANDOT randomised phase III trial. Methods: Patients with HER2-negative locally recurrent/metastatic breast cancer (LR/mBC) who had received no prior chemotherapy for LR/mBC were randomised to BEV plus paclitaxel or BEV–CAP until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. This analysis included patients randomised to BEV–CAP who received ⩾1 CAP dose. Potential associations between HFS and both overall survival (OS; primary end point) and progression-free survival (PFS; secondary end point) were explored using Cox proportional hazards analyses with HFS as a time-dependent covariate (to avoid overestimating the effect of HFS on efficacy). Landmark analyses were also performed. Results: Among 277 patients treated with BEV–CAP, 154 (56%) developed HFS. In multivariate analyses, risk of progression or death was reduced by 44% after the occurrence of HFS; risk of death was reduced by 56%. The magnitude of effect on OS increased with increasing HFS grade. In patients developing HFS within the first 3 months, median PFS from the 3-month landmark was 10.0 months vs 6.2 months in patients without HFS. Two-year OS rates were 63% and 44%, respectively. Conclusions: This exploratory analysis indicates that HFS occurrence is a strong predictor of prolonged PFS and OS in patients receiving BEV–CAP for LR/mBC. Early appearance of HFS may help motivate patients to continue therapy. PMID:26657657

  13. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT after two cycles of neoadjuvant therapy may predict response in HER2-negative, but not in HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jingyi; Wang, Yujie; Mo, Miao; Bao, Xiao; Zhang, Yingjian; Liu, Guangyu; Zhang, Jun; Geng, Daoying

    2015-10-06

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the ability of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanning to predict pathological complete response (pCR) in breast cancer, and to investigate whether timing of the scan and trastuzumab treatment influence the accuracy of pCR prediction in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive breast cancer patients. We treated 81 locally advanced breast cancer patients with four cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). HER2-negative breast cancer patients received NAC alone, while HER2-positive breast cancer patients received NAC plus trastuzumab. (18)FDG PET/CT scans were scheduled at baseline and after the second cycle of NAC. Axillary lymph node (ALN) dissection was performed after the last cycle of neoadjuvant therapy. Relative changes in standardized uptake values (SUV) between the two PET/CT scans (ΔSUV) in primary tumors and ALN metastases were calculated. There were 75 patients with 150 PET/CT scans in the final analysis, including 41 HER2-negative and 34 HER2-positive cases. In the HER2-negative group, the ΔSUV predicted overall and ALN pCR; the receiver operating characteristics-areas under curve (ROC-AUC) were 0.87 and 0.80 (P = 0.0014 and 0.031, respectively) and the negative predictive values were 94% and 89% respectively. However, in the HER2-positive group, ΔSUV could predict neither overall nor ALN pCR; the ROC-AUCs were only 0.56 and 0.53, with P = 0.53 and 0.84, respectively. Hence, the ΔSUV after two cycles of neoadjuvant therapy could predict pCR in HER2-negative patients treated with NAC alone, but not in HER2-positive patients treated with NAC plus trastuzumab.

  14. FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-02

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  15. Vaccine Therapy in Preventing Cancer Recurrence in Patients With Non-Metastatic, Node Positive, HER2 Negative Breast Cancer That is in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-28

    HER2/Neu Negative; No Evidence of Disease; One or More Positive Axillary Nodes; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  16. Tamoxifen Citrate or Z-Endoxifen Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic, Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-12

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  17. Predictive value and clinical utility of centrally assessed ER, PgR, and Ki-67 to select adjuvant endocrine therapy for premenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative early breast cancer: TEXT and SOFT trials.

    PubMed

    Regan, Meredith M; Pagani, Olivia; Francis, Prudence A; Fleming, Gini F; Walley, Barbara A; Kammler, Roswitha; Dell'Orto, Patrizia; Russo, Leila; Szőke, János; Doimi, Franco; Villani, Laura; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Öhlschlegel, Christian; Sessa, Fausto; Peg Cámara, Vicente; Rodríguez Peralto, José Luis; MacGrogan, Gaëtan; Colleoni, Marco; Goldhirsch, Aron; Price, Karen N; Coates, Alan S; Gelber, Richard D; Viale, Giuseppe

    2015-11-01

    The SOFT and TEXT randomized phase III trials investigated adjuvant endocrine therapies for premenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive (HR+) early breast cancer. We investigated the prognostic and predictive value of centrally assessed levels of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), and Ki-67 expression in women with HER2-negative disease. Of 5707 women enrolled, 4115 with HER2-negative (HR+/HER2-) disease had ER, PgR, and Ki-67 centrally assessed by immunohistochemistry. Breast cancer-free interval (BCFI) was defined from randomization to first invasive local, regional, or distant recurrence or contralateral breast cancer. The prognostic and predictive values of ER, PgR and Ki-67 expression levels were assessed using Cox modeling and STEPP methodology. In this HR+/HER2- population, the median ER, PgR, and Ki-67 expressions were 95, 90, and 18 % immunostained cells. As most patients had strongly ER-positive tumors, the predictive value of ER levels could not be investigated. Lower PgR and higher Ki-67 expression were associated with reduced BCFI. There was no consistent evidence of heterogeneity of the relative treatment effects according to PgR or Ki-67 expression levels, though there was a greater 5-year absolute benefit of exemestane + ovarian function suppression (OFS) versus tamoxifen with or without OFS at lower levels of PgR and higher levels of Ki-67. Women with poor prognostic features of low PgR and/or high Ki-67 have greater absolute benefit from exemestane + OFS versus tamoxifen + OFS or tamoxifen alone, but individually PgR and Ki-67 are of limited predictive value for selecting adjuvant endocrine therapy for premenopausal women with HR+/HER2- early breast cancer.

  18. Medico-economic impact of MSKCC non-sentinel node prediction nomogram for ER-positive HER2-negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Guillot, Eugénie; Feron, Jean-Guillaume; Fourchotte, Virginie; Alran, Séverine; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Cottu, Paul; Lerebours, Florence; Stevens, Denise; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Campana, François; Rouzier, Roman; Reyal, Fabien

    2017-01-01

    Background Avoiding axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) for invasive breast cancers with isolated tumor cells or micrometastatic sentinel node biopsy (SNB) could decrease morbidity with minimal clinical significance. Purpose The aim of this study is to simulate the medico-economic impact of the routine use of the MSKCC non-sentinel node (NSN) prediction nomogram for ER+ HER2- breast cancer patients. Methods We studied 1036 ER+ HER2- breast cancer patients with a metastatic SNB. All had a complementary ALND. For each patient, we calculated the probability of the NSN positivity using the MSKCC nomogram. After validation of this nomogram in the population, we described how the patients’ characteristics spread as the threshold value changed. Then, we performed an economic simulation study to estimate the total cost of caring for patients treated according to the MSKCC predictive nomogram results. Results A 0.3 threshold discriminate the type of sentinel node (SN) metastases: 98.8% of patients with pN0(i+) and 91.6% of patients with pN1(mic) had a MSKCC score under 0.3 (false negative rate = 6.4%). If we use the 0.3 threshold for economic simulation, 43% of ALND could be avoided, reducing the costs of caring by 1 051 980 EUROS among the 1036 patients. Conclusion We demonstrated the cost-effectiveness of using the MSKCC NSN prediction nomogram by avoiding ALND for the pN0(i+) or pN1(mic) ER+ HER2- breast cancer patients with a MSKCC score of less than or equal to 0.3. PMID:28241044

  19. Maintenance bevacizumab beyond first-line paclitaxel plus bevacizumab in patients with Her2-negative hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer: efficacy in combination with hormonal therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Data on efficacy of bevacizumab (B) beyond first-line taxane -including regimen (BT) as first-line treatment are lacking. Although preclinical results that anti-angiogenic agents combined with hormonal therapy (HT) could be active, no clinical data exist about combination of maintenance Bevacizumab (mBev) with HT. Methods Thirty-five patients who experienced a response after first-line BT, were given mBev at the dose of 15 mg/kg every 3 weeks. Among 30 pts with hormonal receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC), 20 (66.6%) received HT with mBev (mHTBev). Objective of the study was the outcome and safety of mBev and in two groups of patients receiving HT or not. Results Complete response and partial response was achieved/maintained in 4 (11.4%) and 13 (37.1%) patients, respectively (overall response rate: 48.5%). Clinical benefit was obtained on 23 patients (65.7%). Median of mBev PFS and clinical benefit were 6.8 months (95% CI: 0.8-12.7) and 17.1 months (95% CI :12.2-21.9), respectively. Median PFS of patients who received mHTBev was longer than mBev without HT (13 months and 4.1 months, respectively, p = 0.05). The most common severe toxicities were proteinuria (11.4%) and hypertension (8.5%). No additional toxicity was observed with HTBev. Conclusion Maintenance bevacizumab with or without anti-hormonal therapy in patients with hormone receptor positive breast cancer is tolerable and associated with long-term clinical outcome; these results encourage the strategy of prolonging bevacizumab until progression in combination with anti-hormonal agents. PMID:23083011

  20. Nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) as second-line chemotherapy in HER2-negative, taxane-pretreated metastatic breast cancer patients: prospective evaluation of activity, safety, and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Raffaella; Sottotetti, Federico; Trifirò, Giuseppe; Piazza, Elena; Ferzi, Antonella; Gambaro, Anna; Spinapolice, Elena Giulia; Pozzi, Emma; Tagliaferri, Barbara; Teragni, Cristina; Bernardo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background A prospective, multicenter trial was undertaken to assess the activity, safety, and quality of life of nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) as second-line chemotherapy in HER2-negative, taxane-pretreated metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Patients and methods Fifty-two women with HER2-negative MBC who were candidates for second-line chemotherapy for the metastatic disease were enrolled and treated at three centers in Northern Italy. All patients had previously received taxane-based chemotherapy in the adjuvant or first-line metastatic setting. Single-agent nab-paclitaxel was given at the dose of 260 mg/m2 as a 30-minute intravenous infusion on day 1 each treatment cycle, which lasted 3 weeks, in the outpatient setting. No steroid or antihistamine premedication was provided. Treatment was stopped for documented disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or patient refusal. Results All of the enrolled patients were evaluable for the study endpoints. The objective response rate was 48% (95% CI, 31.5%–61.3%) and included complete responses from 13.5%. Disease stabilization was obtained in 19 patients and lasted >6 months in 15 of them; the overall clinical benefit rate was 77%. The median time to response was 70 days (range 52–86 days). The median progression-free survival time was 8.9 months (95% CI, 8.0–11.6 months, range 5–21+ months). The median overall survival point has not yet been reached. Toxicities were expected and manageable with good patient compliance and preserved quality of life in patients given long-term treatment. Conclusion Our results showed that single-agent nab-paclitaxel 260 mg/m2 every 3 weeks is an effective and well tolerated regimen as second-line chemotherapy in HER2-negative, taxane-pretreated MBC patients, and that it produced interesting values of objective response rate and progression-free survival without the concern of significant toxicity. Specifically, the present study shows that such a regimen

  1. Paclitaxel, bevacizumab, and everolimus/placebo as first-line treatment for patients with metastatic HER2-negative breast cancer: a randomized placebo-controlled phase II trial of the Sarah Cannon Research Institute.

    PubMed

    Yardley, Denise A; Bosserman, Linda D; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A; Harwin, William N; Morgan, Susan K; Priego, Victor M; Peacock, Nancy W; Bass, J David; Burris, Howard A; Hainsworth, John D

    2015-11-01

    Amplified PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling is common in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). The mTOR inhibitor everolimus improves progression-free survival (PFS) when added to steroidal aromatase inhibitor therapy. This randomized phase II trial compares the efficacy of paclitaxel/bevacizumab/everolimus and paclitaxel/bevacizumab/placebo as first-line treatment for MBC. Patients with untreated HER2-negative MBC were randomized (1:1) to receive 28-day cycles of paclitaxel 90 mg/m(2) IV (days 1, 8, and 15) and bevacizumab 10 mg/kg IV (days 1, 15) with either everolimus 10 mg (Arm 1) or placebo (Arm 2) daily. Treatment continued (evaluation every 8 weeks) until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Treatment of 110 patients allowed detection of an improvement in median PFS from 11 to 16 months (70 % power, α = 0.10). Between August 2009 and June 2011, 113 patients (median age 58 years; 88 % ER or PR positive) were randomized (Arm 1, 56; Arm 2, 57). Patients in both arms received a median of six treatment cycles. Median PFS (95 % CI) was 9.1 months (6.8-18.8) for Arm 1, and 7.1 months (5.6-10.8) for Arm 2 (p = 0.89). Comparisons of other efficacy endpoints were also similar in the two treatment arms. Patients receiving everolimus had more anemia, stomatitis, diarrhea, rash, and arthralgia/myalgia, although the overall incidence of severe (grade 3/4) toxicity was similar. The addition of everolimus did not improve the efficacy of weekly paclitaxel/bevacizumab as first-line treatment for patients with HER2-negative MBC. These results contrast with the demonstrated efficacy of adding everolimus to either hormonal or HER2-targeted therapy in previously treated patients.

  2. Efficacy and safety of adding an agent to bevacizumab/taxane regimens for the first-line treatment of Her2-negative patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: results from seven randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqun; Liu, Xiangdong; Qiao, Tiankui; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Sujuan

    2016-01-01

    Background The combined therapy of bevacizumab (BEV) with taxane (paclitaxel or docetaxel) has shown an improvement on progression-free survival (PFS) and objective remission in Her2-negative patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer (LR/MBC). However, there was no benefit in overall survival (OS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adding an agent to the BEV/taxane regimens for the treatment of Her2-negative patients with LR/MBC in a first-line setting. Materials and methods We searched PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, EBSCO, and the Cochrane Library databases for eligible trials. A meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.0 freeware package. We calculated the hazard ratio (HR) for PFS and OS. The odds ratio (OR) was used to calculate objective response rate (ORR) and grade 3/4 drug-related adverse events. The heterogeneity of study outcomes was calculated by the χ2 test or I2 statistics. Results A total of 1,124 patients from seven randomized controlled trials were analyzed. Our meta-analysis showed that the ORR was significantly improved in the BEV/taxane-based triplet group when compared with the BEV/taxane-based doublet group (OR =1.31, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03–1.67, P=0.03). A subset analysis showed that a similar result was achieved in the triplet group in which a cytotoxic agent was added (OR =1.46, 95% CI: 1.09–1.95, P=0.01). However, the PFS and OS had no statistically significant differences between the two groups (HR =0.87, 95% CI: 0.68–1.13, P=0.31; HR =0.98, 95% CI: 0.82–1.16, P=0.78, respectively). Regarding safety, thromboembolic events, fatigue, and diarrhea (all $grade 3) were more frequently observed in the BEV/taxane-based triplet group (OR =3.8, 95% CI: 1.86–7.79, P=0.0003; OR =1.55, 95% CI: 1.05–2.27, P=0.03; OR =2.1, 95% CI: 1.29–3.41, P=0.003, respectively). Other toxic effects had no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Conclusion Our

  3. Entinostat, Nivolumab, and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-10

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Metastatic Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Unresectable Solid Neoplasm

  4. Palbociclib as a first-line treatment in oestrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative, advanced breast cancer not cost-effective with current pricing: a health economic analysis of the Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research (SAKK).

    PubMed

    Matter-Walstra, K; Ruhstaller, T; Klingbiel, D; Schwenkglenks, M; Dedes, K J

    2016-07-01

    Endocrine therapy continues to be the optimal systemic treatment for metastatic ER(+)HER2(-) breast cancer. The CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib combined with letrozole has recently been shown to significantly improve progression-free survival. Here we examined the cost-effectiveness of this regimen for the Swiss healthcare system. A Markov cohort simulation based on the PALOMA-1 trial (Finn et al. in Lancet Oncol 16:25-35, 2015) was used as the clinical course. Input parameters were based on summary trial data. Costs were assessed from the Swiss healthcare system perspective. Adding palbociclib to letrozole (PALLET) compared to letrozole monotherapy was estimated to cost an additional CHF342,440 and gain 1.14 quality-adjusted life years, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of CHF301,227/QALY gained. In univariate sensitivity analyses, no tested variation in key parameters resulted in an ICER below a willingness-to-pay threshold of CHF100,000/QALY. PALLET had a 0 % probability of being cost-effective in probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Lowering PALLET's price by 75 % resulted in an ICER of CHF73,995/QALY and a 73 % probability of being cost-effective. At current prices, PALLET would cost the Swiss healthcare system an additional CHF155 million/year. Palbociclib plus letrozole cannot be considered cost-effective for the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer in the Swiss healthcare system.

  5. The positive is inside the negative: HER2-negative tumors can express the HER2 intracellular domain and present a HER2-positive phenotype.

    PubMed

    Panis, Carolina; Pizzatti, Luciana; Corrêa, Stephany; Binato, Renata; Lemos, Gabriela Ferreira; Herrera, Ana Cristina da Silva do Amaral; Seixas, Teresa Fernandes; Cecchini, Rubens; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2015-02-01

    Overexpression of human epithelial growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a poor prognostic factor in breast cancer. HER2 is a transmembrane receptor comprising an extracellular domain (ECD), a single transmembrane domain, and an intracellular domain (ICD) with tyrosine-kinase activity. Receptor dimerization triggers pivotal effector pathways in cancer, such as phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Currently, screening of HER2 in breast tumors for prognostic and therapeutic purposes involves immunohistochemical (IHC) phenotyping for the ECD, in which tumors with IHC scores below 2+ are reported as HER2-negative. We used a label-free liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) proteomic approach to compare plasma samples from patients with HER2-positive breast tumors and patients with HER2-negative tumors. Patients with HER2-negative tumors expressed higher circulating levels of calpain-10 than patients with HER2-positive tumors. Calpains cleave HER2, releasing its ECD and transforming phenotypically positive tumors into phenotypically negative tumors. Therefore, we investigated the expression of the ICD in HER2-negative samples that overexpressed calpain-10. We found that 16% of HER2-negative tumors were positive for HER2-ICD, which was associated with circulating HER2-ECD. HER2 gene amplification was also observed in some HER2-negative tumors. Positive staining for the PI3K pathway was observed in the HER2-negative, ICD-positive tumors, similar to the HER2-positive cohort. Microarray analysis revealed that HER2-negative, ICD-positive samples clustered between HER2-positive tumors and triple-negative tumors. Survival analysis revealed that outcome in women with HER2-negative, ICD-positive tumors was better than in women bearing HER2-negative, ICD-negative (triple negative) tumors but was quite similar to HER2-positive tumors and worse than women with luminal A tumors. Moreover, in vitro analyses revealed that MDA-MB 231, a triple negative cell line

  6. Tumour markers in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cove, D. H.; Woods, K. L.; Smith, S. C.; Burnett, D.; Leonard, J.; Grieve, R. J.; Howell, A.

    1979-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of 8 potential tumour markers has been evaluated in 69 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer and 57 patients with Stage III and IV. Serum CEA concentrations were raised in 13% of patients with local and 65% of those with advanced breast cancer. In patients with clinical evidence of progression or regression of tumour, serum CEA levels changed appropriately in 83% of cases. Taking 4 of the markers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), lactalbumin, alpha subunit and haptoglobin) serum concentrations of one or more were raised in 33% of patients with local disease and 81% of those with advanced breast cancer. However, marker concentrations were often only marginally raised, and are unlikely to provide sensitive guide to tumour burden. CEA, lactalbumin and alpha subunit were detectable in 68%, 43% and 40% respectively of extracts of primary breast cancers. PMID:92331

  7. [Phyllodes tumour: a rare, rapidly growing breast tumour].

    PubMed

    den Exter, Paul L; Hornstra, Bonne J; Vree, Robbert

    2009-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman presented at the breast outpatient clinic with a giant tumour of her left breast. The size, rapid growth and radiological characteristics of the lesion led us to suspect a phyllodes tumour. A histological examination of a needle biopsy confirmed this diagnosis. An additional CT scan revealed no signs of metastases. We performed a mastectomy during which a tumour measuring 48 x 33 x 25 cm was resected. Histological examination revealed a borderline phyllodes tumour. Phyllodes tumours are rare fibroepithelial neoplasms of the breast and pre-operatively these are often difficult to differentiate from fibroadenomas. Phyllodes tumours have a variable clinical course with the ability to metastasize and a propensity to recur locally. Complete excision with wide margins is essential to prevent local recurrence. In our case, the surgical margins were limited and our patient was therefore treated with postoperative radiation therapy.

  8. Tetraploidy in BRCA2 breast tumours.

    PubMed

    Jonsdottir, Asta Bjork; Stefansson, Olafur Andri; Bjornsson, Johannes; Jonasson, Jon G; Ogmundsdottir, Helga M; Eyfjord, Jorunn E

    2012-02-01

    Tetraploidy and aneuploidy can be caused by cell division errors and are frequently observed in many human carcinomas. We have recently reported delayed cytokinesis in primary human fibroblasts from BRCA2 mutation carriers, implying a function for the BRCA2 tumour suppressor in completion of cell division. Here, we address ploidy aberrations in breast tumours derived from BRCA2 germline mutation carriers. Ploidy aberrations were evaluated from flow cytometry histograms on selected breast tumour samples (n=236), previously screened for local BRCA mutations. The ploidy between BRCA2-mutated (n=71) and matched sporadic (n=165) cancers was compared. Differences in ploidy distribution were examined with respect to molecular tumour subtypes, previously defined by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarray sections. Tetraploidy was significantly 3 times more common in BRCA2 breast cancers than sporadic. However, no differences were found in the overall ploidy distribution between BRCA2-mutation carriers and non-carriers. In BRCA2 cancers, tetraploidy was associated with luminal characteristics. The increased frequency of tetraploidy in BRCA2 associated cancers may be linked to cell division errors, particularly cytokinesis. Additionally, tetraploidy emerges predominantly in BRCA2 breast cancers displaying luminal rather than triple-negative phenotypes.

  9. [An immobilising malignant phyllodes tumour of the breast].

    PubMed

    Fritsche, E; Hug, U; Winterholer, D

    2015-04-01

    Phyllodes tumours of the breast are rare occurrences, but they can reach huge dimensions. Descriptions of tumours whereby the women are immobilised as a consequence of the size of the tumour, are hard to find in the literature. In this presentation we show a case of a woman in otherwise healthy condition with a giant phyllodes tumour of her left breast. Because of the weight of the tumour, the patient could not leave her bed for more than 6 months.

  10. Giant malignant phyllodes tumour of breast.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Ramakrishnan; Savasere, Thejas; Prabhuswamy, Vinod Kumar; Babu, Rajashekhara; Shivaswamy, Sadashivaiah

    2014-01-01

    The term phyllodes tumour includes lesions ranging from completely benign tumours to malignant sarcomas. Clinically phyllodes tumours are smooth, rounded, and usually painless multinodular lesions indistinguishable from fibroadenomas. Percentage of phyllodes tumour classified as malignant ranges from 23% to 50%. We report a case of second largest phyllodes tumour in a 35-year-old lady who presented with swelling of right breast since 6 months, initially small in size, that progressed gradually to present size. Examination revealed mass in the right breast measuring 36×32 cms with lobulated firm surface and weighing 10 kgs. Fine needle aspiration cytology was reported as borderline phyllodes; however core biopsy examination showed biphasic neoplasm with malignant stromal component. Simple mastectomy was done and specimen was sent for histopathological examination which confirmed the core biopsy report. Postoperatively the patient received chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The patient is on follow-up for a year and has not shown any evidence of metastasis or recurrence.

  11. Circulating tumour markers in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Seregni, Ettore; Coli, Antonio; Mazzucca, Nicola

    2004-06-01

    A large number of markers have been proposed for breast cancer, but among them only CA 15.3, CEA and cytokeratins (i.e. TPA, TPS and Cyfra 21.1) are currently used in clinical practice. Serum marker levels reflect tumour burden and for this reason they are not sensitive enough to be used for screening and early diagnosis of primary breast cancer. By contrast, the role of tumour markers is established in the diagnosis of recurrent disease and in the evaluation of response to treatment. In the former case, however, prospective randomised studies are required to demonstrate any survival benefit when earlier therapeutic interventions are instituted upon elevation of serum markers. In the second case, tumour marker evaluation represents a simple, objective method for monitoring of therapeutic response that seems to offer significant advantages over conventional imaging methods (e.g. objectivity, modifications in tumour biology). Furthermore, research studies are ongoing to identify and validate new biochemical parameters which can be of use not only in advanced disease but also in other stages of the diagnostic work-up of breast cancer.

  12. Primary extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumour of breast.

    PubMed

    Ikhwan, S M; Kenneth, V K T; Seoparjoo, A; Zin, A A M

    2013-06-21

    Primary primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) and extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma belongs to the Ewing's family of tumours. Primary tumours arising from breast are very rare. There are only a few case reports published on primary extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma and PNET arising from breast. We present an extremely rare case of an inoperable primary Ewing's sarcoma arising from left breast with contralateral breast, lymphatic and lung metastasis.

  13. Ileocaecal intussusception secondary to metastatic phyllodes tumour of the breast.

    PubMed

    Morcos, Basem B; Baker, Bilal; Hashem, Sameh A

    2010-09-01

    A patient with phyllodes tumour of the breast is discussed. During follow-up, she presented with intestinal obstruction caused by ileocaecal intussusception. The cause of the intussusception was metastatic phyllodes tumour, which is a unique presentation.

  14. Concentrations of parabens in human breast tumours.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D; Aljarrah, A; Miller, W R; Coldham, N G; Sauer, M J; Pope, G S

    2004-01-01

    Parabens are used as preservatives in many thousands of cosmetic, food and pharmaceutical products to which the human population is exposed. Although recent reports of the oestrogenic properties of parabens have challenged current concepts of their toxicity in these consumer products, the question remains as to whether any of the parabens can accumulate intact in the body from the long-term, low-dose levels to which humans are exposed. Initial studies reported here show that parabens can be extracted from human breast tissue and detected by thin-layer chromatography. More detailed studies enabled identification and measurement of mean concentrations of individual parabens in samples of 20 human breast tumours by high-pressure liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry. The mean concentration of parabens in these 20 human breast tumours was found to be 20.6 +/- 4.2 ng x g(-1) tissue. Comparison of individual parabens showed that methylparaben was present at the highest level (with a mean value of 12.8 +/- 2.2 ng x g(-1) tissue) and represents 62% of the total paraben recovered in the extractions. These studies demonstrate that parabens can be found intact in the human breast and this should open the way technically for more detailed information to be obtained on body burdens of parabens and in particular whether body burdens are different in cancer from those in normal tissues.

  15. Evolution of breast cancer therapeutics: Breast tumour kinase's role in breast cancer and hope for breast tumour kinase targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Haroon A; Harvey, Amanda J

    2014-08-10

    There have been significant improvements in the detection and treatment of breast cancer in recent decades. However, there is still a need to develop more effective therapeutic techniques that are patient specific with reduced toxicity leading to further increases in patients' overall survival; the ongoing progress in understanding recurrence, resistant and spread also needs to be maintained. Better understanding of breast cancer pathology, molecular biology and progression as well as identification of some of the underlying factors involved in breast cancer tumourgenesis and metastasis has led to the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Over a number of years interest has risen in breast tumour kinase (Brk) also known as protein tyrosine kinase 6; the research field has grown and Brk has been described as a desirable therapeutic target in relation to tyrosine kinase inhibition as well as disruption of its kinase independent activity. This review will outline the current "state of play" with respect to targeted therapy for breast cancer, as well as discussing Brk's role in the processes underlying tumour development and metastasis and its potential as a therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  16. Breast-conserving surgery is contraindicated for recurrent giant multifocal phyllodes tumours of breast

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The controversy between breast conserving surgery and simple mastectomy for phyllodes tumours of the breast remains because of the unpredictable nature of the disease. Although some benign tumours may show an unusually aggressive behaviour, modified radical surgery for phyllodes tumours offers no survival advantage, and recently more conservative surgical approaches have been deployed. Case presentation A 30-year-old woman with a giant multifocal tumour of the breast underwent breast-conserving surgery that made use of the well- circumscribed feature of the tumour. The case demonstrates the safety, and cosmetic benefit of the breast-conserving approach for multifocal phyllodes tumours except for the high recurrence rate. Conclusions Large size, multifocality, and borderline or malignant histology are contraindications for breast-conserving surgery. PMID:25023082

  17. Breast tumour visualization using 3D quantitative ultrasound methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangeh, Mehrdad J.; Raheem, Abdul; Tadayyon, Hadi; Liu, Simon; Hadizad, Farnoosh; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancer types accounting for 29% of all cancer cases. Early detection and treatment has a crucial impact on improving the survival of affected patients. Ultrasound (US) is non-ionizing, portable, inexpensive, and real-time imaging modality for screening and quantifying breast cancer. Due to these attractive attributes, the last decade has witnessed many studies on using quantitative ultrasound (QUS) methods in tissue characterization. However, these studies have mainly been limited to 2-D QUS methods using hand-held US (HHUS) scanners. With the availability of automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) technology, this study is the first to develop 3-D QUS methods for the ABUS visualization of breast tumours. Using an ABUS system, unlike the manual 2-D HHUS device, the whole patient's breast was scanned in an automated manner. The acquired frames were subsequently examined and a region of interest (ROI) was selected in each frame where tumour was identified. Standard 2-D QUS methods were used to compute spectral and backscatter coefficient (BSC) parametric maps on the selected ROIs. Next, the computed 2-D parameters were mapped to a Cartesian 3-D space, interpolated, and rendered to provide a transparent color-coded visualization of the entire breast tumour. Such 3-D visualization can potentially be used for further analysis of the breast tumours in terms of their size and extension. Moreover, the 3-D volumetric scans can be used for tissue characterization and the categorization of breast tumours as benign or malignant by quantifying the computed parametric maps over the whole tumour volume.

  18. Towards a more realistic biomechanical modelling of breast malignant tumours.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Carolina; Schnabel, Julia A; Brady, Michael

    2012-02-07

    We develop a biomechanical model of an isolated stellate breast tumour under mammographic compression forces for a range of reported mechanical properties, both linear elastic and hyperelastic. We also introduce different volumes of increased density/stiffness around the tumour as well as a solid pressure effect. We show that each of these issues--well known to clinicians but ignored to date in models--has a non-negligible effect on stresses and strains/deformations.

  19. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-06

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  20. A Study of Neoadjuvant Paclitaxel in Combination With Bavituximab in Early- Stage Triple- Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-08

    Breast Cancer; Triple Negative Breast Neoplasms; Triple-Negative Breast Neoplasm; Triple-Negative Breast Cancer; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; ER-Negative PR-Negative HER2-Negative Breast Neoplasms; ER-Negative PR-Negative HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

  1. Phyllodes tumours of the breast: a consensus review

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Benjamin Y; Acs, Geza; Apple, Sophia K; Badve, Sunil; Bleiweiss, Ira J; Brogi, Edi; Calvo, José P; Dabbs, David J; Ellis, Ian O; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Farshid, Gelareh; Fox, Stephen B; Ichihara, Shu; Lakhani, Sunil R; Rakha, Emad A; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Richardson, Andrea L; Sahin, Aysegul; Schmitt, Fernando C; Schnitt, Stuart J; Siziopikou, Kalliopi P; Soares, Fernando A; Tse, Gary M; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumours constitute an uncommon but complex group of mammary fibroepithelial lesions. Accurate and reproducible grading of these tumours has long been challenging, owing to the need to assess multiple stratified histological parameters, which may be weighted differently by individual pathologists. Distinction of benign phyllodes tumours from cellular fibroadenomas is fraught with difficulty, due to overlapping microscopic features. Similarly, separation of the malignant phyllodes tumour from spindle cell metaplastic carcinoma and primary breast sarcoma can be problematic. Phyllodes tumours are treated by surgical excision. However, there is no consensus on the definition of an appropriate surgical margin to ensure completeness of excision and reduction of recurrence risk. Interpretive subjectivity, overlapping histological diagnostic criteria, suboptimal correlation between histological classification and clinical behaviour and the lack of robust molecular predictors of outcome make further investigation of the pathogenesis of these fascinating tumours a matter of active research. This review consolidates the current understanding of their pathobiology and clinical behaviour, and includes proposals for a rational approach to the classification and management of phyllodes tumours. PMID:26768026

  2. Biomarkers characterization of circulating tumour cells in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Increasing evidence supports the view that the detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) predicts outcomes of nonmetastatic breast cancer patients. CTCs differ genetically from the primary tumor and may contribute to variations in prognosis and response to therapy. As we start to understand more about the biology of CTCs, we can begin to address how best to treat this form of disease. Methods Ninety-eight nonmetastatic breast cancer patients were included in this study. CTCs were isolated by immunomagnetic techniques using magnetic beads labelled with a multi-CK-specific antibody (CK3-11D5) and CTC detection through immunocytochemical methods. Estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were evaluated by immunofluorescence experiments and HER2 and TOP2A by fluorescence in situ hybridization. We aimed to characterize this set of biomarkers in CTCs and correlate it with clinical-pathological characteristics. Results Baseline detection rate was 46.9% ≥ 1 CTC/30 ml threshold. CTC-positive cells were more frequent in HER2-negative tumors (p = 0.046). In patients younger than 50 years old, HER2-amplified and G1-G2 tumors had a higher possibility of being nondetectable CTCs. Heterogeneous expression of hormonal receptors (HRs) in samples from the same patients was found. Discordances between HR expression, HER2 and TOP2A status in CTCs and their primary tumor were found in the sequential blood samples. Less that 35% of patients switched their CTC status after receiving chemotherapy. EGFR-positive CTCs were associated with Luminal tumors (p = 0.03). Conclusions This is the largest exploratory CTC biomarker analysis in nonmetastatic BC patients. Our study suggests that CTC biomarkers profiles might be useful as a surrogate marker for therapeutic selection and monitoring since heterogeneity of the biomarker distribution in CTCs and the lack of correlation with the primary tumor biomarker status were found. Further

  3. Prognostic significance of tumour stroma ratio in inflammatory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Downey, Candice L; Thygesen, Helene H; Sharma, Nisha; Shaaban, Abeer M

    2015-01-01

    Tumour stroma ratio (TSR) is emerging as an important prognostic indicator in cancer. We have previously shown TSR to be prognostic in oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer. Its role in inflammatory breast cancer, a rare but aggressive form of breast cancer, has not been identified. Here we aimed to determine the prognostic significance of TSR in a cohort of patients with inflammatory breast carcinoma. TSR was measured by point counting virtual H&E stained tissue sections in 45 inflammatory breast cancer cases. The whole tumour area was sampled. Optimum cut-offs to distinguish high and low TSR was determined by log-rank test. The relationship of TSR to overall survival and disease-free survival (DFS) was analysed alongside multivariate analysis. The optimal cut-offs between high and low TSR were determined to be 31% for OS and 46% for DFS. There was no significant difference in OS (p = 0.53) nor DFS (p = 0.66) between high and low TSR groups. Multivariate analysis did not demonstrate any new trends, within the limits of a small data sample. A significant correlation was found between pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and survival (p = 0.008). There is no evidence that TSR has prognostic significance in inflammatory breast cancer. When compared with published data in non-inflammatory breast carcinoma, this supports the view that differences in stromal biology exist between tumour types and highlights the importance of considering this when interpreting the prognostic value of TSR. However, these findings must be interpreted in the light of the small sample size.

  4. 0927GCC: Entinostat and Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Women With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  5. Patient-derived tumour xenografts for breast cancer drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Ankita S; Greenwood, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Despite remarkable advances in our understanding of the drivers of human malignancies, new targeted therapies often fail to show sufficient efficacy in clinical trials. Indeed, the cost of bringing a new agent to market has risen substantially in the last several decades, in part fuelled by extensive reliance on preclinical models that fail to accurately reflect tumour heterogeneity. To halt unsustainable rates of attrition in the drug discovery process, we must develop a new generation of preclinical models capable of reflecting the heterogeneity of varying degrees of complexity found in human cancers. Patient-derived tumour xenograft (PDTX) models prevail as arguably the most powerful in this regard because they capture cancer’s heterogeneous nature. Herein, we review current breast cancer models and their use in the drug discovery process, before discussing best practices for developing a highly annotated cohort of PDTX models. We describe the importance of extensive multidimensional molecular and functional characterisation of models and combination drug–drug screens to identify complex biomarkers of drug resistance and response. We reflect on our own experiences and propose the use of a cost-effective intermediate pharmacogenomic platform (the PDTX-PDTC platform) for breast cancer drug and biomarker discovery. We discuss the limitations and unanswered questions of PDTX models; yet, still strongly envision that their use in basic and translational research will dramatically change our understanding of breast cancer biology and how to more effectively treat it. PMID:27702751

  6. Mucoadhesive Oral Wound Rinse in Preventing and Treating Stomatitis in Patients With ER- or PR-Positive Metastatic or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery Receiving Everolimus

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Oral Complications; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  7. Tumour-adapted Reduction Mammoplasty – a New (Old) Breast Conserving Strategy: Review

    PubMed Central

    Eichbaum, M.; Dietrich, A.; Reinhard, J.; Steinwasser, R.; Eichbaum, C.

    2016-01-01

    Today over 70 % of patients treated for primary breast carcinoma in certified breast centres are managed with breast conserving surgery. The classical semicircular incision directly above the tumour, though in many cases easily carried out and associated with good cosmetic results, does have limitations. Unsatisfactory aesthetic results often occur when tumour location is unfavourable or when there is unfavourable tumour size relative to breast size. Distortion of the nipple, changes to breast shape and retraction of skin overlying surgical defects can occur. Tumour-adapted reduction mammoplasty/mastopexy or the “modified B technique” offer excellent chances of combining the oncological demands of breast surgery with satisfactory symmetrical cosmetic results. This article reviews a traditional, old operative technique that has been re-embraced in various new forms. PMID:26855438

  8. Breast carcinoma and phyllodes tumour: a case series.

    PubMed

    Sin, Eliza I-Lin; Wong, Chow Yin; Yong, Wei Sean; Ong, Kong Wee; Madhukumar, Preetha; Tan, Veronique Kiak Mien; Thike, Aye Aye; Tan, Puay Hoon; Tan, Benita Kiat Tee

    2016-04-01

    Malignant transformation of the epithelial component of phyllodes tumours (PT) is rare and only reported in literature as sporadic cases of carcinoma associated with PTs. We report the clinicopathological characteristics of in situ and invasive carcinoma coexisting with PT in 10 patients treated in our institution over an 11-year period from 1992 to 2012. Ten patients with coexisting PT and in situ or invasive carcinoma were identified from our records. Six had carcinoma found within the PT. All were female with a median age of 47 (43-72) years. One patient had a history of PT in the same breast while another had a history of PT in the same breast as well as invasive ductal carcinoma in the contralateral breast. The rest did not have any risk factors of breast cancer. Five patients had a preoperative core needle biopsy performed with the report of a fibroepithelial lesion. The rest of the patients had surgery upfront for their breast masses. Two patients who had ER/PR positive invasive carcinoma received adjuvant hormonal therapy. Patients were followed up for a mean of 3.6 years (9 months-10 years) and all patients were alive and recurrence free. PT associated with carcinoma is rare, and we present a series of cases that add to the limited current literature. It is often difficult to detect the presence of the carcinomatous component preoperatively. Hence, close examination of resected PT specimens must be carried out to allow prompt detection of any associated carcinomas, however rare, such that adequate treatment can be given.

  9. Epigenetic regulation of the ras effector/tumour suppressor RASSF2 in breast and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cooper, W N; Dickinson, R E; Dallol, A; Grigorieva, E V; Pavlova, T V; Hesson, L B; Bieche, I; Broggini, M; Maher, E R; Zabarovsky, E R; Clark, G J; Latif, F

    2008-03-13

    RASSF2 is a recently identified member of a class of novel tumour suppressor genes, all containing a ras-association domain. RASSF2 resides at 20p13, a region frequently lost in human cancers. In this report we investigated methylation status of the RASSF2 promoter CpG island in a series of breast, ovarian and non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). RASSF2 was frequently methylated in breast tumour cell lines (65%, 13/20) and in primary breast tumours (38%, 15/40). RASSF2 expression could be switched back on in methylated breast tumour cell lines after treatment with 5'-aza-2'deoxycytidine. RASSF2 was also frequently methylated in NSCLC tumours (44%, (22/50). The small number of corresponding normal breast and lung tissue DNA samples analysed were unmethylated. We also did not detect RASSF2 methylation in ovarian tumours (0/17). Furthermore no mutations were found in the coding region of RASSF2 in these ovarian tumours. We identified a highly conserved putative bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) and demonstrated that endogenous RASSF2 localized to the nucleus. Mutation of the putative NLS abolished the nuclear localization. RASSF2 suppressed breast tumour cell growth in vitro and in vivo, while the ability of NLS-mutant RASSF2 to suppress growth was much diminished. Hence we demonstrate that RASSF2 has a functional NLS that is important for its tumour suppressor gene function. Our data from this and a previous report indicate that RASSF2 is frequently methylated in colorectal, breast and NSCLC tumours. We have identified RASSF2 as a novel methylation marker for multiple malignancies and it has the potential to be developed into a valuable marker for screening several cancers in parallel using promoter hypermethylation profiles.

  10. Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  11. Specific-site methylation of tumour suppressor ANKRD11 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sue Ping; Wong, Nick C; Suetani, Rachel J; Ho, Kristen; Ng, Jane Lee; Neilsen, Paul M; Gill, Peter G; Kumar, Raman; Callen, David F

    2012-11-01

    ANKRD11 is a putative tumour suppressor gene in breast cancer, which has been shown in our laboratory to be a co-activator of p53. Our data suggest that down-regulation of ANKRD11 is associated with breast tumourigenesis. Breast cancer cell lines treated with DNA demethylating agents resulted in up-regulation of ANKRD11 expression suggesting that promoter DNA methylation may be responsible for its down-regulation. The transcriptional activity of a CpG-rich region 2kb upstream of the transcription initiation site of ANKRD11 was investigated using dual-luciferase reporter assays. The constructs carrying -661 to -571 bp promoter sequence showed significant transcriptional activity. Using the SEQUENOM Epityper Platform, the region between -770 and +399 bp was analysed in 25 breast tumours, four normal breast tissues and five normal blood samples. The region between -770 and -323 bp was shown to be frequently methylated in breast tumours. The methylation patterns of all analysed CpGs in this region were identical in the normal and tumour samples, except for a 19 bp region containing three CpG sites. These sites had significantly higher levels of methylation in tumours (40%) compared to normal samples (6%). Our findings support the role of ANKRD11 as a tumour suppressor gene and suggest that aberrant DNA methylation of three CpGs in a 19 bp region within the ANKRD11 promoter may be responsible for its down-regulation in breast cancer.

  12. Tumour prothymosin alpha content, a potential prognostic marker for primary breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Magdalena, C; Dominguez, F; Loidi, L; Puente, J L

    2000-01-01

    In a previous report we suggested that the estimation of prothymosin α (PTA) levels in primary breast tumours might be used to identify breast cancer patients at high risk for distant metastasis (Dominguez F et al (1993) Eur J Cancer29A: 893–897). Here the role of tumour PTA levels as predictor was investigated with respect to both disease-free survival (DFS) and survival. Tumours were obtained from a series of 210 consecutive female patients with ductal carcinoma who underwent surgery at the Hospital Xeral de Galicia (Santiago de Compostela, Spain). Characteristics including PTA tumour levels, number of positive axillary nodes, patient's age at surgery and tumour histological grade were significantly associated with DFS and survival, as determined by univariate analysis. Patients with tumours with low or moderate PTA levels demonstrated a statistically decreased rate of tumour recurrence and a statistically significant increased overall survival in comparison with those whose tumours had high PTA levels. Patient's relative risk of dying was 2.1 times greater for tumours with high PTA levels than for those tumours with low or moderate PTA levels. In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that tumour high PTA levels is associated with a worse outcome. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10682670

  13. Decreased NK-cell tumour immunosurveillance consequent to JAK inhibition enhances metastasis in breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Bottos, Alessia; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Gill, Jason W.; Gattelli, Albana; Frei, Anna; Tzankov, Alexandar; Sexl, Veronika; Wodnar-Filipowicz, Aleksandra; Hynes, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    The JAK/STAT pathway is an attractive target for breast cancer therapy due to its frequent activation, and clinical trials evaluating JAK inhibitors (JAKi) in advanced breast cancer are ongoing. Using patient biopsies and preclinical models of breast cancer, we demonstrate that the JAK/STAT pathway is active in metastasis. Unexpectedly, blocking the pathway with JAKi enhances the metastatic burden in experimental and orthotopic models of breast cancer metastasis. We demonstrate that this prometastatic effect is due to the immunosuppressive activity of JAKi with ensuing impairment of NK-cell-mediated anti-tumour immunity. Furthermore, we show that immunostimulation with IL-15 overcomes the enhancing effect of JAKi on metastasis formation. Our findings highlight the importance of evaluating the effect of targeted therapy on the tumour environment. The impact of JAKi on NK cells and the potential value of immunostimulators to overcome the weakened tumour immunosurveillance, are worthwhile considering in the clinical setting of breast cancer. PMID:27406745

  14. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression. Methods Primary cultures were established from human breast tumour and adjacent non-tumour tissue. Putative progenitor cell populations were isolated based on co-expression or concomitant absence of the epithelial and myoepithelial markers EPCAM and CALLA respectively. Results Significant reductions in cellular senescence were observed in tumour versus non-tumour cultures, accompanied by a stepwise increase in proliferation:senescence ratios. A novel correlation between tumour aggressiveness and an imbalance of putative progenitor subpopulations was also observed. Specifically, an increased double-negative (DN) to double-positive (DP) ratio distinguished aggressive tumours of high grade, estrogen receptor-negativity or HER2-positivity. The DN:DP ratio was also higher in malignant MDA-MB-231 cells relative to non-tumourogenic MCF-10A cells. Ultrastructural analysis of the DN subpopulation in an invasive tumour culture revealed enrichment in lipofuscin bodies, markers of ageing or senescent cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that an imbalance in tumour progenitor subpopulations imbalances the functional relationship between proliferation and senescence, creating a microenvironment favouring tumour progression. PMID:21521500

  15. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-14

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  16. Significance of the detection of esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) in human breast tumours.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Philip W; Everett, David J

    2004-01-01

    This issue of Journal of Applied Toxicology publishes the paper Concentrations of Parabens in Human Breast Tumours by Darbre et al. (2004), which reports that esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) can be detected in samples of tissue from human breast tumours. Breast tumour samples were supplied from 20 patients, in collaboration with the Edinburgh Breast Unit Research Group, and analysed by high-pressure liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. The parabens are used as antimicrobial preservatives in underarm deodorants and antiperspirants and in a wide range of other consumer products. The parabens also have inherent oestrogenic and other hormone related activity (increased progesterone receptor gene expression). As oestrogen is a major aetiological factor in the growth and development of the majority of human breast cancers, it has been previously suggested by Darbre that parabens and other chemicals in underarm cosmetics may contribute to the rising incidence of breast cancer. The significance of the finding of parabens in tumour samples is discussed here in terms of 1). Darbre et al's study design, 2). what can be inferred from this type of data (and what can not, such as the cause of these tumours), 3). the toxicology of these compounds and 4). the limitations of the existing toxicology database and the need to consider data that is appropriate to human exposures.

  17. Expression of pepsinogen C in human breast tumours and correlation with clinicopathologic parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Diez-Itza, I.; Merino, A. M.; Tolivia, J.; Vizoso, F.; Sánchez, L. M.; López-Otín, C.

    1993-01-01

    We have examined by immunohistochemistry the ability of breast carcinomas to produce pepsinogen C, an aspartyl proteinase usually involved in the digestion of proteins in the stomach. A total of 113 out of 245 breast tumours (46%) were positive for pepsinogen C immunostaining. There was a significant association between pepsinogen C and oestrogen receptors with proteinase levels higher (HSCORE) in oestrogen receptor positive tumours than in oestrogen receptor negative. There was also a significant association between pepsinogen C and histological grade, pepsinogen C levels being higher in well and moderately differentiated breast carcinomas than in poorly differentiated tumours. On the basis of these results, we suggest that pepsinogen C may be useful as a marker of good prognosis in breast cancer. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 PMID:8353054

  18. A Study Evaluating INIPARIB in Combination With Chemotherapy to Treat Triple Negative Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative (ER-Negative) Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Negative (PR-Negative) Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Negative (HER2-Negative) Breast Cancer; Brain Metastases

  19. MicroRNA-based molecular classification of non-BRCA1/2 hereditary breast tumours

    PubMed Central

    Tanic, M; Andrés, E; M Rodriguez-Pinilla, S; Marquez-Rodas, I; Cebollero-Presmanes, M; Fernandez, V; Osorio, A; Benítez, J; Martinez-Delgado, B

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hereditary breast cancer comprises 5–10% of all breast cancers. Mutations in two high-risk susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, along with rare intermediate-risk genes and common low-penetrance alleles identified, altogether explain no more than 45% of the high-risk breast cancer families, although the majority of cases are unaccounted for and are designated as BRCAX tumours. Micro RNAs have called great attention for classification of different cancer types and have been implicated in a range of important biological processes and are deregulated in cancer pathogenesis. Methods: Here we have performed an exploratory hypothesis-generating study of miRNA expression profiles in a large series of 66 primary hereditary breast tumours by microarray analysis. Results: Unsupervised clustering analysis of miRNA molecular profiles revealed distinct subgroups of BRCAX tumours, ‘normal-like' BRCAX-A, ‘proliferative' BRCAX-B, ‘BRCA1/2-like' BRCAX-C and ‘undefined' BRCAX-D subgroup. These findings introduce a new insight in the biology of hereditary breast cancer, defining specific BRCAX subgroups, which could help in the search for novel susceptibility pathways in hereditary breast cancer. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate that BRCAX hereditary breast tumours can be sub-classified into four previously unknown homogenous groups characterised by specific miRNA expression signatures and histopathological features. PMID:24104964

  20. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  1. Exclusion of a major role for the PTEN tumour-suppressor gene in breast carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Freihoff, D; Kempe, A; Beste, B; Wappenschmidt, B; Kreyer, E; Hayashi, Y; Meindl, A; Krebs, D; Wiestler, O D; Deimling, A von; Schmutzler, R K

    1999-01-01

    PTEN is a novel tumour-suppressor gene located on chromosomal band 10q23.3. This region displays frequent loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in a variety of human neoplasms including breast carcinomas. The detection of PTEN mutations in Cowden disease and in breast carcinoma cell lines suggests that PTEN may be involved in mammary carcinogenesis. We here report a mutational analysis of tumour specimens from 103 primary breast carcinomas and constitutive DNA from 25 breast cancer families. The entire coding region of PTEN was screened by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and direct sequencing using intron-based primers. No germline mutations could be identified in the breast cancer families and only one sporadic carcinoma carried a PTEN mutation at one allele. In addition, all sporadic tumours were analysed for homozygous deletions by differential polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for allelic loss using the microsatellite markers D10S215, D10S564 and D10S573. No homozygous deletions were detected and only 10 out of 94 informative tumours showed allelic loss in the PTEN region. These results suggest that PTEN does not play a major role in breast cancer formation. 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10070865

  2. Cell-free circulating tumour DNA as a liquid biopsy in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    De Mattos-Arruda, Leticia; Caldas, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Recent developments in massively parallel sequencing and digital genomic techniques support the clinical validity of cell-free circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) as a 'liquid biopsy' in human cancer. In breast cancer, ctDNA detected in plasma can be used to non-invasively scan tumour genomes and quantify tumour burden. The applications for ctDNA in plasma include identifying actionable genomic alterations, monitoring treatment responses, unravelling therapeutic resistance, and potentially detecting disease progression before clinical and radiological confirmation. ctDNA may be used to characterise tumour heterogeneity and metastasis-specific mutations providing information to adapt the therapeutic management of patients. In this article, we review the current status of ctDNA as a 'liquid biopsy' in breast cancer.

  3. Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-30

    Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  4. Relationship between oestrogen-receptor content and histological grade in human primary breast tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, P. V.; Davies, C. J.; Blamey, R. W.; Elston, C. W.; Johnson, J.; Griffiths, K.

    1978-01-01

    A series of 300 patients presenting consecutively with primary operable breast cancer has been studied. A significant correlation was found between oestrogen-receptor (ER) content and histological grade: the better-differentiated tumours rarely lacked receptor. This correlation was significant only in women defined as post-menopausal. Data on early recurrence of disease indicate a worse prognosis for women in whom primary tumours are ER-. PMID:743491

  5. Phyllodes tumours of the breast: retrospective analysis of a University Hospital's experience.

    PubMed

    Toh, Y F; Cheah, P L; Looi, L M; Teoh, K H; Tan, P H

    2016-04-01

    Taking cognizance of the purported variation of phyllodes tumours in Asians compared with Western populations, this study looked at phyllodes tumours of the breast diagnosed at the Department of Pathology, University of Malaya Medical Centre over an 8-year period with regards to patient profiles, tumour parameters, treatment offered and outcome. Sixty-four new cases of phyllodes tumour were diagnosed during the period, however only 30 (21 benign, 4 borderline and 5 malignant) finally qualified for entry into the study. These were followed-up for 4-102 months (average = 41.7 months). Thirteen cases (8 benign, 3 borderline, 2 malignant) were Chinese, 9 (all benign) Malay, 7 (4 benign, 1 borderline, 2 malignant) Indian and 1 (malignant) Indonesian. Prevalence of benign versus combined borderline and malignant phyllodes showed a marginally significant difference (p=0.049) between the Malays and Chinese. Patients' ages ranged from 21-70 years with a mean of 44.9 years with no significant difference in age between benign, borderline or malignant phyllodes tumours. Except for benign phyllodes tumours (mean size = 5.8 cm) being significantly smaller at presentation compared with borderline (mean size = 12.5 cm) and malignant (mean size = 15.8 cm) (p<0.05) tumours, history of previous pregnancy, breast feeding, hormonal contraception and tumour laterality did not differ between the three categories. Family history of breast cancer was noted in 2 cases of benign phyllodes. Local excision was performed in 17 benign, 2 borderline and 3 malignant tumours and mastectomy in 4 benign, 2 borderline and 2 malignant tumours. Surgical clearance was not properly recorded in 10 benign phyllodes tumours. Six benign and all 4 borderline and 5 malignant tumours had clearances of <10 mm. Two benign tumours recurred locally at 15 and 49 months after local excision, however information regarding surgical clearance was not available in both cases. One patient with a malignant tumour developed

  6. New ASCO/CAP guideline recommendations for HER2 testing increase the proportion of reflex in situ hybridization tests and of HER2 positive breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Tchrakian, N; Flanagan, L; Harford, J; Gannon, J M; Quinn, C M

    2016-02-01

    Accurate determination of tumour human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) status is critical for optimal treatment of breast cancer. In October 2013, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the College of American Pathologists (CAP) issued joint updated guideline recommendations for HER2 testing in breast cancer, with a revised algorithm for interpretation of immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridisation (ISH) results. This study investigates the impact on HER2 IHC categorisation, implication for reflex ISH testing and potential for identification of false negative IHC. HER2 IHC preparations on 251 invasive breast tumours, originally reported according to 2007 guidelines, were re-scored using 2013 guidelines and the diagnostic categories compared. The results of ISH testing on a separate cohort of 32 breast tumours reported as HER2 IHC 2+ following the introduction of the 2013 guidelines, that would have been designated 1+ according to 2007, were reviewed. Application of 2013 guidelines resulted in a decrease in tumours classified as HER2 negative (83/251 vs 144/251) and a comparable increase in those classified as equivocal (2+) (139/251 vs 80/251). Relatively few tumours were re-classified as positive (29/251 vs 27/251). Furthermore, 3/32 breast cancer cases (HER2 IHC 2+ as per 2013 guidelines, 1+ using 2007 guidelines) were HER2 ISH positive. Application of the 2013 guidelines increases the HER2 IHC equivocal (2+) category and requirement for reflex ISH testing. The reduced threshold for ISH testing identifies some patients with HER2 positive breast cancer whose tumours would have been categorised as HER2 negative according to the 2007 guidelines.

  7. Molecular profiles of BRCA1-mutated and matched sporadic breast tumours: relation with clinico-pathological features

    PubMed Central

    Berns, E M J J; Staveren, I L van; Verhoog, L; Ouweland, A M W van de; Gelder, M Meijer-van; Meijers-Heijboer, H; Portengen, H; Foekens, J A; Dorssers, L C J; Klijn, J G M

    2001-01-01

    About 5–10% of breast cancers are hereditary; a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disease in which several susceptibility genes, including BRCA1, have been identified. While distinct tumour features can be used to estimate the likelihood that a breast tumour is caused by a BRCA1 germline mutation it is not yet possible to categorize a BRCA1 mutated tumour. The aim of the present study is to molecularly classify BRCA1 mutated breast cancers by resolving gene expression patterns of BRCA1 and matched sporadic surgical breast tumour specimens. The expression profiles of 6 frozen breast tumour tissues with a proven BRCA1 gene mutation were weighed against those from 12 patients without a known family history but who had similar clinico-pathological characteristics. In addition two fibroblast cultures, the breast cancer cell-line HCC1937 and its corresponding B-lymphoblastoid cell line (heterozygous for mutation BRCA1 5382insC) and an epithelial ovarian cancer cell line (A2780) were studied. Using a high density membrane based array for screening of RNA isolated from these samples and standard algorithms and software, we were able to distinguish subgroups of sporadic cases and a group consisting mainly of BRCA1-mutated breast tumours. Furthermore this pilot analysis revealed a gene cluster that differentially expressed genes related to cell substrate formation, adhesion, migration and cell organization in BRCA1-mutated tumours compared to sporadic breast tumours. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11506493

  8. α3 Chains of type V collagen regulate breast tumour growth via glypican-1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guorui; Ge, Gaoxiang; Izzi, Valerio; Greenspan, Daniel S.

    2017-01-01

    Pericellular α3(V) collagen can affect the functioning of cells, such as adipocytes and pancreatic β cells. Here we show that α3(V) chains are an abundant product of normal mammary gland basal cells, and that α3(V) ablation in a mouse mammary tumour model inhibits mammary tumour progression by reducing the proliferative potential of tumour cells. These effects are shown to be primarily cell autonomous, from loss of α3(V) chains normally produced by tumour cells, in which they affect growth by enhancing the ability of cell surface proteoglycan glypican-1 to act as a co-receptor for FGF2. Thus, a mechanism is presented for microenvironmental influence on tumour growth. α3(V) chains are produced in both basal-like and luminal human breast tumours, and its expression levels are tightly coupled with those of glypican-1 across breast cancer types. Evidence indicates α3(V) chains as potential targets for inhibiting tumour growth and as markers of oncogenic transformation. PMID:28102194

  9. Intra-tumour signalling entropy determines clinical outcome in breast and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Christopher R S; Severini, Simone; Caldas, Carlos; Teschendorff, Andrew E

    2015-03-01

    The cancer stem cell hypothesis, that a small population of tumour cells are responsible for tumorigenesis and cancer progression, is becoming widely accepted and recent evidence has suggested a prognostic and predictive role for such cells. Intra-tumour heterogeneity, the diversity of the cancer cell population within the tumour of an individual patient, is related to cancer stem cells and is also considered a potential prognostic indicator in oncology. The measurement of cancer stem cell abundance and intra-tumour heterogeneity in a clinically relevant manner however, currently presents a challenge. Here we propose signalling entropy, a measure of signalling pathway promiscuity derived from a sample's genome-wide gene expression profile, as an estimate of the stemness of a tumour sample. By considering over 500 mixtures of diverse cellular expression profiles, we reveal that signalling entropy also associates with intra-tumour heterogeneity. By analysing 3668 breast cancer and 1692 lung adenocarcinoma samples, we further demonstrate that signalling entropy correlates negatively with survival, outperforming leading clinical gene expression based prognostic tools. Signalling entropy is found to be a general prognostic measure, valid in different breast cancer clinical subgroups, as well as within stage I lung adenocarcinoma. We find that its prognostic power is driven by genes involved in cancer stem cells and treatment resistance. In summary, by approximating both stemness and intra-tumour heterogeneity, signalling entropy provides a powerful prognostic measure across different epithelial cancers.

  10. Annexin A1 influences in breast cancer: Controversies on contributions to tumour, host and immunoediting processes.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yan; Johnstone, Cameron N; Stewart, Alastair G

    2017-02-14

    Annexin A1 is a multifunctional protein characterised by its actions in modulating the innate and adaptive immune response. Accumulating evidence of altered annexin A1 expression in many human tumours raises interest in its functional role in cancer biology. In breast cancer, altered annexin A1 expression levels suggest a potential influence on tumorigenic and metastatic processes. However, reports of conflicting results reveal a relationship that is much more complex than first conceptualised. In this review, we explore the diverse actions of annexin A1 on breast tumour cells and various host cell types, including stromal immune and structural cells, particularly in the context of cancer immunoediting.

  11. Potentialities of steady-state and transient thermography in breast tumour depth detection: A numerical study.

    PubMed

    Amri, Amina; Pulko, Susan Helen; Wilkinson, Anthony James

    2016-01-01

    Breast thermography still has inherent limitations that prevent it from being fully accepted as a breast screening modality in medicine. The main challenges of breast thermography are to reduce false positive results and to increase the sensitivity of a thermogram. Further, it is still difficult to obtain information about tumour parameters such as metabolic heat, tumour depth and diameter from a thermogram. However, infrared technology and image processing have advanced significantly and recent clinical studies have shown increased sensitivity of thermography in cancer diagnosis. The aim of this paper is to study numerically the possibilities of extracting information about the tumour depth from steady state thermography and transient thermography after cold stress with no need to use any specific inversion technique. Both methods are based on the numerical solution of Pennes bioheat equation for a simple three-dimensional breast model. The effectiveness of two approaches used for depth detection from steady state thermography is assessed. The effect of breast density on the steady state thermal contrast has also been studied. The use of a cold stress test and the recording of transient contrasts during rewarming were found to be potentially suitable for tumour depth detection during the rewarming process. Sensitivity to parameters such as cold stress temperature and cooling time is investigated using the numerical model and simulation results reveal two prominent depth-related characteristic times which do not strongly depend on the temperature of the cold stress or on the cooling period.

  12. The relationship between total and phosphorylated STAT1 and STAT3 tumour cell expression, components of tumour microenvironment and survival in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gujam, Fadia J.A.; McMillan, Donald C.; Edwards, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between tumour cell expression of total and phosphorylated STAT1 (ph-STAT1) and STAT3 (ph-STAT-3), components of tumour microenvironment and survival in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of total and ph-STAT1, and STAT3 were performed on tissue microarray of 384 breast cancer specimens. Tumour cell expression of STAT1 and STAT3 at both cytoplasmic and nuclear locations were combined and identified as STAT1/STAT3 tumour cell expression. These results were related to cancer specific survival (CSS) and phenotypic features of the tumour and the host. High ph-STAT1 and ph-STAT3 tumour cell expression were associated with increased ER (both P≤0.001) and PR (both P <0.05), reduced tumour grade (P=0.015 and P<0.001 respectively) and necrosis (both P=0.001). Ph-STAT1 was associated with increased general inflammatory infiltrate (P=0.007) and ph-STAT3 was associated with lower CD4+ infiltration (P=0.024). In multivariate survival analysis, only high ph-STAT3 tumour cell expression was a predictor of improved CSS (P=0.010) independent of other tumour and host-based factors. STAT1 and STAT3 tumour cell expression appeared to be an important determinant of favourable outcome in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. The present results suggest that STAT1 and STAT3 may affect disease outcome through direct impact on tumour cells, counteracting aggressive tumour features, as well as interaction with the surrounding microenvironment. PMID:27769057

  13. A positive role for PEA3 in HER2-mediated breast tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Myers, E; Hill, A D K; Kelly, G; McDermott, E W; O'Higgins, N J; Young, L S

    2006-01-01

    Overexpression of HER2 is associated with an adverse prognosis in breast cancer. Despite this, the mechanism of its transcriptional regulation remains poorly understood. PEA3, a MAP kinase (MAPK)-activated member of the Ets transcription factor family has been implicated in the transcriptional regulation of HER2. The direction of its modulation remains controversial. We assessed relative levels of PEA3 expression and DNA binding in primary breast cultures derived from patient tumours (n=18) in the presence of an activated MAPK pathway using Western blotting and shift analysis. Expression of PEA3 in breast tumours from patients of known HER2 status (n=107) was examined by immunohistochemistry. In primary breast cancer cell cultures, growth factors induced interaction between PEA3 and its DNA response element. Upregulation of PEA3 expression in the presence of growth factors associated with HER2 positivity and axillary lymph node metastasis (P=0.034 and 0.049, respectively). PEA3 expression in breast cancer tissue associated with reduced disease-free survival (P<0.001), Grade III tumours (P<0.0001) and axillary lymph node metastasis (P=0.026). Co-expression of PEA3 and HER2 significantly associated with rate of recurrence compared to patients who expressed HER2 alone (P=0.0039). These data support a positive role for PEA3 in HER2-mediated oncogenesis in breast cancer. PMID:17060941

  14. Systematic analysis of tumour cell-extracellular matrix adhesion identifies independent prognostic factors in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jocelyn P.; Natrajan, Rachael C.; Yuan, Yinyin; Tan, Aik-Choon; Huang, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions are fundamental for discrete steps in breast cancer progression. In particular, cancer cell adhesion to ECM proteins present in the microenvironment is critical for accelerating tumour growth and facilitating metastatic spread. To assess the utility of tumour cell-ECM adhesion as a means for discovering prognostic factors in breast cancer survival, here we perform a systematic phenotypic screen and characterise the adhesion properties of a panel of human HER2 amplified breast cancer cell lines across six ECM proteins commonly deregulated in breast cancer. We determine a gene expression signature that defines a subset of cell lines displaying impaired adhesion to laminin. Cells with impaired laminin adhesion showed an enrichment in genes associated with cell motility and molecular pathways linked to cytokine signalling and inflammation. Evaluation of this gene set in the Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium (METABRIC) cohort of 1,964 patients identifies the F12 and STC2 genes as independent prognostic factors for overall survival in breast cancer. Our study demonstrates the potential of in vitro cell adhesion screens as a novel approach for identifying prognostic factors for disease outcome. PMID:27556857

  15. Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes and the emerging role of immunotherapy in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Luen, Stephen J; Savas, Peter; Fox, Stephen B; Salgado, Roberto; Loi, Sherene

    2017-02-01

    Breast cancer has not previously been considered a highly immunogenic cancer. Observations of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in and around neoplastic cells in tumour samples, and associations with improved pathological complete response and clinical survival end points have changed our perspective on this. Lymphocytic infiltrates have long been observed in breast cancer; however, more recently, retrospective analysis of prospectively collected tissue samples from clinical trials has demonstrated the potential role of host immunosurveillance in influencing the biology of breast cancer. This association appears to be strongest in triple negative and HER2 positive breast cancer subtypes. Contrastingly, the association in luminal tumours is less clear, and is potentially limited by substantial tumoural heterogeneity. Several methodologies have been employed to quantify, and describe the composition of TILs, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. The results of these analyses have been generally consistent, and valuable efforts are currently underway to standardise the evaluation of TILs toward a universal approach. More technical methods of TIL characterisation remain important in the research setting. The evaluation of TILs becomes increasingly relevant with the emerging role of immunotherapy in breast cancer. Early phase trials of checkpoint blockade show promising results; however, it is likely that some patients will require combination treatments to maximise therapeutic benefits. Equally, some patients may not derive any benefit from immunotherapies. This underscores the importance of the development of relevant predictive biomarkers. As a key representative of the immune interaction between host and tumour, lymphocytic infiltrates are ideally placed for continued research into the determinants of immunogenicity, and response to immunotherapeutic approaches. In this review, we will discuss the current methodologies of evaluation, and the clinical

  16. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-27

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA1; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA2; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  17. Metaplastic breast carcinoma; melanocytic variant, a very rare tumour

    PubMed Central

    Nzegwu, Martin A.; Sule, Emmanuel; Uzoigwe, Joseph; Achi, Franklyn

    2015-01-01

    Metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC) is a rare heterogeneous malignancy, accounting for <1% of all invasive breast carcinomas, in which adenocarcinoma is found to coexist with an admixture of spindle, squamous, chondroid or bone-forming neoplastic cells. Melanocytic variant was first described by Ruffolo et al. in 1997. We report a case of MBC, melanocytic variant, in a 57-year-old Nigerian female who presented with a left breast mass 8 cm in diameter in the upper outer quadrant, hard and gradually increase in size to become painful. Breast examination showed gross asymmetry. Left breast was oedematous and shiny with extensive peau d'orange. No palpable axillary nodes were seen. Chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound scan showed no involvement. Breast biopsy revealed an invasive metaplastic ductal carcinoma with melanocytic differentiation. PMID:25666364

  18. Parametric study of the biopotential equation for breast tumour identification using ANOVA and Taguchi method.

    PubMed

    Ng, Eddie Y K; Ng, W Kee

    2006-03-01

    Extensive literatures have shown significant trend of progressive electrical changes according to the proliferative characteristics of breast epithelial cells. Physiologists also further postulated that malignant transformation resulted from sustained depolarization and a failure of the cell to repolarize after cell division, making the area where cancer develops relatively depolarized when compared to their non-dividing or resting counterparts. In this paper, we present a new approach, the Biofield Diagnostic System (BDS), which might have the potential to augment the process of diagnosing breast cancer. This technique was based on the efficacy of analysing skin surface electrical potentials for the differential diagnosis of breast abnormalities. We developed a female breast model, which was close to the actual, by considering the breast as a hemisphere in supine condition with various layers of unequal thickness. Isotropic homogeneous conductivity was assigned to each of these compartments and the volume conductor problem was solved using finite element method to determine the potential distribution developed due to a dipole source. Furthermore, four important parameters were identified and analysis of variance (ANOVA, Yates' method) was performed using design (n = number of parameters, 4). The effect and importance of these parameters were analysed. The Taguchi method was further used to optimise the parameters in order to ensure that the signal from the tumour is maximum as compared to the noise from other factors. The Taguchi method used proved that probes' source strength, tumour size and location of tumours have great effect on the surface potential field. For best results on the breast surface, while having the biggest possible tumour size, low amplitudes of current should be applied nearest to the breast surface.

  19. Incidence and tumour stages of breast cancer in the region of Aachen, Germany.

    PubMed

    Seemayer, C A; Breuer, Elisabeth; Kroll, G; Markus-Sellhaus, S; Reineke, T H; Mittermayer, C

    2002-03-01

    We present epidemiological data of female breast cancer in the region of Aachen (Germany) including incidence and tumour stages for the period 1996-1997. Furthermore, we compare epidemiological data from Aachen with data from the directly neighbouring Dutch region South-Middle Limburg before and after the introduction of a national mammographic screening programme. The field study of breast cancer was undertaken at the Institute of Pathology and Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Aachen, supported by the Federal Ministry of Health (Germany), using data files from the Cancer Registry Aachen. The patient's consent to collect all data concerning her epidemiological and social situation as well as information on the outcome of disease was obtained in 83.4% of all cases. The remaining 16.6% of the cases without a patient's consent are based on histopathological reports. Only those patients are included who were documented as residing in the region of Aachen at the time of diagnosis. Tumour cases were counted according to International Agency for Research on Cancer rules and tumour stages are classified according to UICC guidelines. Incidence rates are calculated as crude value, adapted to the European and World Standard population (ESR, WSR), and the age specific incidence is presented in 5-year intervals. The cumulative risk is assessed for a certain life span by summarizing the age-specific incidences. The age-standardized breast cancer incidence rate in Aachen was 94 per 100 000 women in 1996 and 90 cases of invasive breast cancer per 100 000 women in 1997 according to the ESR. The cumulative risk of developing breast cancer in the life span ranging from 0 to 74 years is approximately 8%. The stage distribution of breast cancer reveals only 4% favourable carcinomata in situ, but 12% advanced T4 tumours. T1 and T2 tumour stages count for about 40% and T3 tumour stages about 4%. Incidence rates and the tumour stages of breast cancer in the region of

  20. Parameter estimation of breast tumour using dynamic neural network from thermal pattern.

    PubMed

    Saniei, Elham; Setayeshi, Saeed; Akbari, Mohammad Esmaeil; Navid, Mitra

    2016-11-01

    This article presents a new approach for estimating the depth, size, and metabolic heat generation rate of a tumour. For this purpose, the surface temperature distribution of a breast thermal image and the dynamic neural network was used. The research consisted of two steps: forward and inverse. For the forward section, a finite element model was created. The Pennes bio-heat equation was solved to find surface and depth temperature distributions. Data from the analysis, then, were used to train the dynamic neural network model (DNN). Results from the DNN training/testing confirmed those of the finite element model. For the inverse section, the trained neural network was applied to estimate the depth temperature distribution (tumour position) from the surface temperature profile, extracted from the thermal image. Finally, tumour parameters were obtained from the depth temperature distribution. Experimental findings (20 patients) were promising in terms of the model's potential for retrieving tumour parameters.

  1. RA-XII inhibits tumour growth and metastasis in breast tumour-bearing mice via reducing cell adhesion and invasion and promoting matrix degradation

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Hoi-Wing; Zhao, Si-Meng; Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Tan, Ning-Hua; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells acquire invasive ability to degrade and adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM) and migrate to adjacent tissues. This ultimately results metastasis. Hence, the present study investigated the in vitro effects of cyclopeptide glycoside, RA-XII on cell adhesion, invasion, proliferation and matrix degradation, and its underlying mechanism in murine breast tumour cells, 4T1. The effect of RA-XII on tumour growth and metastasis in 4T1-bearing mice was also investigated. Our results showed that RA-XII inhibited tumour cell adhesion to collagen, fibronectin and laminin, RA-XII also reduced the expressions of vascular cell adhesion molecule, intracellular adhesion molecule and integrins, and integrin binding. In addition, RA-XII significantly inhibited breast tumour cell migration via interfering cofilin signaling and chemokine receptors. The activities of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and urokinase-type of plasminogen activator, and the expressions of ECM-associated proteinases were attenuated significantly by RA-XII. Furthermore, RA-XII induced G1 phase arrest and inhibited the expressions of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases. RA-XII inhibited the expressions of molecules in PI3K/AKT, NF-kappaB, FAK/pSRC, MAPK and EGFR signaling. RA-XII was also shown to have anti-tumour, anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic activities in metastatic breast tumour-bearing mice. These findings strongly suggested that RA-XII is a potential anti-metastatic agent for breast cancer. PMID:26592552

  2. Adipocytes promote malignant growth of breast tumours with monocarboxylate transporter 2 expression via β-hydroxybutyrate

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Kai; Chang, Po-Hao; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Chen, Chi-Long; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Chang, King-Jen; Shew, Jin-Yuh; Hu, Chun-Mei; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Adipocytes are the most abundant stromal partners in breast tissue. However, the crosstalk between breast cancer cells and adipocytes has been given less attention compared to cancer-associated fibroblasts. Here we find, through systematic screening, that primary mammary gland-derived adipocytes (MGDAs) promote growth of breast cancer cells that express monocarboxylate transporter 2 (MCT2) both in vitro and in vivo. We show that β-hydroxybutyrate is secreted by MGDAs and is required to enhance breast cancer cells malignancy in vitro. Consistently, β-hydroxybutyrate is sufficient to promote tumorigenesis of a mouse xenograft model of MCT2-expressing breast cancer cells. Mechanistically we observe that upon co-culturing with MGDAs or treatment with β-hydroxybutyrate, breast cancer cells expressing MCT2 increase the global histone H3K9 acetylation and upregulate several tumour-promoting genes. These results suggest that adipocytes promote malignancy of MCT2-expressing breast cancer via β-hydroxybutyrate potentially by inducing the epigenetic upregulation of tumour-promoting genes. PMID:28281525

  3. Gamma-secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Triple Negative Invasive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-28

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  4. Detection of Circulating Tumour Cells from Blood of Breast Cancer Patients via RT-qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Andergassen, Ulrich; Kölbl, Alexandra C.; Hutter, Stefan; Friese, Klaus; Jeschke, Udo

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is still the most frequent cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Often death is not caused only by the primary tumour itself, but also by metastatic lesions. Today it is largely accepted, that these remote metastases arise out of cells, which detach from the primary tumour, enter circulation, settle down at secondary sites in the body and are called Circulating Tumour Cells (CTCs). The occurrence of such minimal residual diseases in the blood of breast cancer patients is mostly linked to a worse prognosis for therapy outcome and overall survival. Due to their very low frequency, the detection of CTCs is, still a technical challenge. RT-qPCR as a highly sensitive method could be an approach for CTC-detection from peripheral blood of breast cancer patients. This assumption is based on the fact that CTCs are of epithelial origin and therefore express a different gene panel than surrounding blood cells. For the technical approach it is necessary to identify appropriate marker genes and to correlate their gene expression levels to the number of tumour cells within a sample in an in vitro approach. After that, samples from adjuvant and metastatic patients can be analysed. This approach may lead to new concepts in diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24202442

  5. Heterogeneity of luminal breast cancer characterised by immunohistochemical expression of basal markers

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hyuna; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Blows, Fiona M; Ali, H Raza; Figueroa, Jonine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Fagerholm, Rainer; Heikkilä, Päivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Southey, Melissa C; McLean, Catriona; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Sironen, Reijo; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Hallberg, Emily; Olswold, Curtis; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Kraft, Peter; Tamimi, Rulla M; Eliassen, A Heather; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Easton, Douglas; Howat, William J; Coulson, Penny; Pharoah, Paul DP; Sherman, Mark E; Yang, Xiaohong R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Luminal A breast cancer defined as hormone receptor positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negative is known to be heterogeneous. Previous study showed that luminal A tumours with the expression of basal markers ((cytokeratin (CK) 5 or CK5/6) or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)) were associated with poorer prognosis compared with those that stained negative for basal markers. Prompted by this study, we assessed whether tumour characteristics and risk factors differed by basal marker status within luminal A tumours. Methods: We pooled 5040 luminal A cases defined by immunohistochemistry (4490 basal-negative ((CK5 (or CK5/6))− and EGFR−) and 550 basal-positive ((CK5 (or CK5/6+)) or EGFR+)) from eight studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Case–case comparison was performed using unconditional logistic regression. Results: Tumour characteristics and risk factors did not vary significantly by the expression of basal markers, although results suggested that basal-positive luminal tumours tended to be smaller and node negative, and were more common in women with a positive family history and lower body mass index. Conclusions: Most established breast cancer risk factors were similar in basal-positive and basal-negative luminal A tumours. The non-significant but suggestive differences in tumour features and family history warrant further investigations. PMID:26679376

  6. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-09

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  7. High incidence of interleukin 10 mRNA but not interleukin 2 mRNA detected in human breast tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Venetsanakos, E.; Beckman, I.; Bradley, J.; Skinner, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    Despite the presence of a lymphocytic infiltrate in solid cancers, the failure for tumour growth to be contained suggests an inadequate immune response to the tumour. Poor cytotoxicity exerted by tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) against tumour cells in vitro, combined with continued tumour growth in vivo, suggests deficiencies in TIL function or numbers. Various theories have been postulated to explain how tumour cells may escape immunosurveillance and control. One of the many hypotheses is the failure of production of cytokines, which are necessary for T cells to mediate their function. Thus, the expression of cytokine mRNA in human breast tumour sections was investigated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with cytokine-specific primers. A relatively consistent finding was detection of interleukin (IL) 10 mRNA among the tumours. No IL-2 and little IL-4 mRNA was detected in the tumours. IL-6 and IL-10 mRNA was detected in only one and two of the normal breast tissues respectively. IL-2, IL-4 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha mRNA was not detected in any of the normal breast tissues. The reduced function of TILs may be related to IL-10, which has known inhibitory effects on T-cell activation. Images Figure 1 PMID:9192989

  8. Modelling Circulating Tumour Cells for Personalised Survival Prediction in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers among women, and the main cause of death is the formation of metastases. The development of metastases is caused by cancer cells that migrate from the primary tumour site (the mammary duct) through the blood vessels and extravasating they initiate metastasis. Here, we propose a multi-compartment model which mimics the dynamics of tumoural cells in the mammary duct, in the circulatory system and in the bone. Through a branching process model, we describe the relation between the survival times and the four markers mainly involved in metastatic breast cancer (EPCAM, CD47, CD44 and MET). In particular, the model takes into account the gene expression profile of circulating tumour cells to predict personalised survival probability. We also include the administration of drugs as bisphosphonates, which reduce the formation of circulating tumour cells and their survival in the blood vessels, in order to analyse the dynamic changes induced by the therapy. We analyse the effects of circulating tumour cells on the progression of the disease providing a quantitative measure of the cell driver mutations needed for invading the bone tissue. Our model allows to design intervention scenarios that alter the patient-specific survival probability by modifying the populations of circulating tumour cells and it could be extended to other cancer metastasis dynamics. PMID:25978366

  9. Tensor based multichannel reconstruction for breast tumours identification from DCE-MRIs

    PubMed Central

    Yin, X. -X.; Hadjiloucas, S.; Chen, J. -H.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, J. -L.; Su, M. -Y.

    2017-01-01

    A new methodology based on tensor algebra that uses a higher order singular value decomposition to perform three-dimensional voxel reconstruction from a series of temporal images obtained using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is proposed. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used to robustly extract the spatial and temporal image features and simultaneously de-noise the datasets. Tumour segmentation on enhanced scaled (ES) images performed using a fuzzy C-means (FCM) cluster algorithm is compared with that achieved using the proposed tensorial framework. The proposed algorithm explores the correlations between spatial and temporal features in the tumours. The multi-channel reconstruction enables improved breast tumour identification through enhanced de-noising and improved intensity consistency. The reconstructed tumours have clear and continuous boundaries; furthermore the reconstruction shows better voxel clustering in tumour regions of interest. A more homogenous intensity distribution is also observed, enabling improved image contrast between tumours and background, especially in places where fatty tissue is imaged. The fidelity of reconstruction is further evaluated on the basis of five new qualitative metrics. Results confirm the superiority of the tensorial approach. The proposed reconstruction metrics should also find future applications in the assessment of other reconstruction algorithms. PMID:28282379

  10. The mammary ducts create a favourable microenvironment for xenografting of luminal and molecular apocrine breast tumours.

    PubMed

    Richard, Elodie; Grellety, Thomas; Velasco, Valerie; MacGrogan, Gaetan; Bonnefoi, Hervé; Iggo, Richard

    2016-11-01

    There is a paucity of models for hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancer because of the difficulty of establishing xenografts from these tumours. We show that this obstacle can be overcome by injecting human tumour cells directly into the mammary ducts of immunodeficient mice. Tumours from 31 patients were infected overnight with a lentiviral vector expressing tdTomato and injected through the nipple into the mammary ducts of NOD-SCID-IL2RG-/- mice. Tumours formed in the mice in 77% of cases after the first injection (6/8 luminal A, 15/20 luminal B, and 3/3 molecular apocrine). Four luminal A and one molecular apocrine graft were tested in secondary and tertiary grafts: all were successfully passaged in secondary and 4/5 in tertiary grafts. None of the samples engrafted when injected subcutaneously. The morphology, oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), androgen receptor (AR), and Ki-67 profiles of the clinical samples were maintained in the tertiary grafts. We also show that the intraductal approach can be used to test the response to targeted therapy with fulvestrant and palbociclib, using a genetically defined ER+ model. We conclude that the mammary ducts create a microenvironment that is uniquely favourable to the survival and growth of tumours derived from mammary hormone-sensing cells. This approach opens the door to testing genomically targeted treatment of HR+ tumours in precision medicine programmes. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Frequent somatic loss of BRCA1 in breast tumours from BRCA2 germ-line mutation carriers and vice versa

    PubMed Central

    Staff, S; Isola, J J; Johannsson, O; Borg, Å; Tanner, M M

    2001-01-01

    Breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are tumour suppressor genes the alleles of which have to be inactivated before tumour development occurs. Hereditary breast cancers linked to germ-line mutations of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes almost invariably show allelic imbalance (AI) at the respective loci. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are believed to take part in a common pathway in maintenance of genomic integrity in cells. We carried out AI and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses of BRCA2 in breast tumours from germ-line BRCA1 mutation carriers and vice versa. For comparison, 14 sporadic breast tumours were also studied. 8 of the 11 (73%) informative BRCA1 mutation tumours showed AI at the BRCA2 locus. 53% of these tumours showed a copy number loss of the BRCA2 gene by FISH. 5 of the 6 (83%) informative BRCA2 mutation tumours showed AI at the BRCA1 locus. Half of the tumours (4/8) showed a physical deletion of the BRCA1 gene by FISH. Combined allelic loss of both BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene was seen in 12 of the 17 (71%) informative hereditary tumours, whereas copy number losses of both BRCA genes was seen in only 4/14 (29%) sporadic control tumours studied by FISH. In conclusion, the high prevalence of AI at BRCA1 in BRCA2 mutation tumours and vice versa suggests that somatic events occurring at the other breast cancer susceptibility gene locus may be selected in the cancer development. The mechanism resulting in AI at these loci seems more complex than a physical deletion.   http://www.bjcancer.com © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11710835

  12. Brachytherapy boost to the tumour bed in high risk patients after limited surgery for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ulutin, H C; Ash, D; Dodwell, D

    2003-05-01

    The results of treatment for 174 patients at high risk of local recurrence, referred for radiotherapy after conservative surgery for early breast cancer, are evaluated. Microscopic margin involvement, extensive carcinoma in situ, and vascular/lymphatic invasion were the main risk factors for local recurrence. Whole-breast irradiation (40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks) followed with a brachytherapy boost (Ir192 wire implant or PDR Ir192) of 25 Gy was applied. Median follow-up was 80 months. The actuarial 6-year overall survival rate was 91% and the within breast recurrence-free survival was 88%. The most common risk factor among those recurring within the breast was involved surgical margins (13 out of 17). Cosmesis was reported to be good or excellent in 79% of cases. In patients at high risk for local recurrence, tumour-bed boost with brachytherapy can provide satisfactory local control after limited surgery and external radiotherapy.

  13. Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Carboplatin Followed by Surgery and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  14. Early prognosis of metastasis risk in inflammatory breast cancer by texture analysis of tumour microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Kolarevic, Daniela; Tomasevic, Zorica; Dzodic, Radan; Kanjer, Ksenija; Vukosavljevic, Dragica Nikolic; Radulovic, Marko

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive type of locally advanced breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the value of microscopic tumour histomorphology texture for prognosis of local and systemic recurrence at the time of initial IBC diagnosis. This retrospective study included a group of 52 patients selected on the basis of non-metastatic IBC diagnosis, stage IIIB. Gray-Level-Co-Occurrence-Matrix (GLCM) texture analysis was performed on digital images of primary tumour tissue sections stained with haematoxylin/eosin. Obtained values were categorized by use of both data- and outcome-based methods. All five acquired GLCM texture features significantly associated with metastasis outcome. By accuracies of 69-81% and AUCs of 0.71-0.81, prognostic performance of GLCM parameters exceeded that of standard major IBC clinical prognosticators such as tumour grade and response to induction chemotherapy. Furthermore, a composite score consisting of tumour grade, contrast and correlation as independent features resulted in further enhancement of prognostic performance by accuracy of 89%, discrimination efficiency by AUC of 0.93 and an outstanding hazard ratio of 71.6 (95%CI, 41.7-148.4). Internal validation was successfully performed by bootstrap and split-sample cross-validation, suggesting that the model is generalizable. This study indicates for the first time the potential use of primary breast tumour histology texture as a highly accurate, simple and cost-effective prognostic indicator of metastasis risk in IBC. Clinical relevance of the obtained results rests on the role of prognosis in decisions on induction chemotherapy and the resulting impact on quality of life and survival.

  15. Ribociclib as First-Line Treatment for Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of interim results from a phase III trial testing ribociclib plus letrozole (Femara®) as a first-line treatment for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer.

  16. Association of tumour necrosis factor alpha and its receptors with thymidine phosphorylase expression in invasive breast carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Leek, R. D.; Landers, R.; Fox, S. B.; Ng, F.; Harris, A. L.; Lewis, C. E.

    1998-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential requirement for tumour growth and metastasis and is regulated by a complex network of factors produced by both stromal cells and neoplastic cells within solid tumours. The cytokine tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and the enzyme thymidine phosphorylase (TP) are two factors known to promote tumour angiogenesis. We have demonstrated recently that high numbers of tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) are significantly associated with increased tumour angiogenesis and poor prognosis in invasive carcinoma of the breast. We have also shown that TAMs are a major source of TNF-alpha in invasive breast carcinomas, and that macrophage-like stromal cells as well as tumour cells synthesize TP in such tumours. However, little is known of the factors that regulate the production or activity of these factors in the tumour microenvironment. As TNF-alpha has been shown to up-regulate TP expression in tumour cells in vitro we performed an immunohistochemical study to investigate the possibility that TNF-alpha may be involved in the regulation of TP expression by malignant breast epithelial cells in vivo. To do this, we used a cocktail of non-neutralizing monoclonal anti-TNF-alpha antibodies to visualize both TNF-alpha-expressing macrophages and TNF-alpha bound to its receptors on tumour cells and endothelial cells in a series of 93 invasive carcinomas of the breast. A semiquantitative grading system was then used to compare these staining patterns with that for TP in the same biopsies. TNF-alpha immunoreactivity was also compared with various important tumour variables known to relate to outcome in this disease (microvessel density, node status, grade, stage, receptor status and macrophage infiltration), as well as relapse-free and overall survival data for these patients. Our data show significant positive correlations between TNF-alpha bound to its receptors on tumour cells and: (1) TP protein production by tumour cells, and (2) axillary lymph

  17. Comparison between Real-Time Quantitative PCR Detection of HER2 mRNA Copy Number in Peripheral Blood and ELISA of Serum HER2 Protein for Determining HER2 Status in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Savino, Maria; Parrella, Paola; Copetti, Massimiliano; Barbano, Raffaela; Murgo, Roberto; Fazio, Vito Michele; Valori, Vanna Maria; Carella, Massimo; Garrubba, Maria; Santini, Stefano Angelo

    2009-01-01

    Background: The development of non-invasive procedure to determine HER2 status may represent a powerful method for monitoring disease progression and response to the treatment. Methods: Serum samples and RNA from peripheral blood were evaluated in 85 breast cancer patients (49 HER2 positive and 36 HER2 negative) and 22 healthy controls. HER2 mRNA levels were measured by real-time quantitative PCR (QPCR) and serum HER2 protein by immunoenzimatic assay (EIA). ROC curve analyses were used to determine the optimal cut off values. Results: A statistically significant difference was detected for both QPCR and EIA in HER2 positive patients as compared with both healthy controls and HER2 negative tumours. QPCR showed a 91% (CI95%: 84%–98%) specificity and a 78% (CI95%: 68%–88%) sensitivity for an optimal cut off value of 4.74. The optimal cut off value for EIA was 22 ng/ml yielding a 95% (CI95%: 90%–100%) specificity and a 59% (CI95%: 48%–70%) sensitivity. The QPCR assay was slightly less specific than EIA in discriminating HER2 positive breast cancers from HER2 negative tumours (78% CI95%: 69%–87% versus 86% CI95%: 79%–93%), but it was more sensitive (76% CI95%: 67%–85% versus 55% CI95%: 44%–66%). Conclusions: Our results indicate that QPCR performs better than EIA in the determination of HER2 status of breast cancer patients and could be useful in monitoring the disease during follow up. PMID:19478388

  18. Subtyping of Breast Cancer by Immunohistochemistry to Investigate a Relationship between Subtype and Short and Long Term Survival: A Collaborative Analysis of Data for 10,159 Cases from 12 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Wesseling, Jelle; Cheang, Maggie C.; Gelmon, Karen; Nielsen, Torsten O.; Blomqvist, Carl; Heikkilä, Päivi; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Nevanlinna, Heli; Akslen, Lars A.; Bégin, Louis R.; Foulkes, William D.; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Cafourek, Vicky; Olson, Janet E.; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; McLean, Catriona A.; Southey, Melissa C.; Rakha, Emad; Green, Andrew R.; Ellis, Ian O.; Sherman, Mark E.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Anderson, William F.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Provenzano, Elena; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Dunning, Alison M.; Humphreys, Manjeet; Easton, Douglas F.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Caldas, Carlos; Pharoah, Paul D.; Huntsman, David

    2010-01-01

    Background Immunohistochemical markers are often used to classify breast cancer into subtypes that are biologically distinct and behave differently. The aim of this study was to estimate mortality for patients with the major subtypes of breast cancer as classified using five immunohistochemical markers, to investigate patterns of mortality over time, and to test for heterogeneity by subtype. Methods and Findings We pooled data from more than 10,000 cases of invasive breast cancer from 12 studies that had collected information on hormone receptor status, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) status, and at least one basal marker (cytokeratin [CK]5/6 or epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR]) together with survival time data. Tumours were classified as luminal and nonluminal tumours according to hormone receptor expression. These two groups were further subdivided according to expression of HER2, and finally, the luminal and nonluminal HER2-negative tumours were categorised according to expression of basal markers. Changes in mortality rates over time differed by subtype. In women with luminal HER2-negative subtypes, mortality rates were constant over time, whereas mortality rates associated with the luminal HER2-positive and nonluminal subtypes tended to peak within 5 y of diagnosis and then decline over time. In the first 5 y after diagnosis the nonluminal tumours were associated with a poorer prognosis, but over longer follow-up times the prognosis was poorer in the luminal subtypes, with the worst prognosis at 15 y being in the luminal HER2-positive tumours. Basal marker expression distinguished the HER2-negative luminal and nonluminal tumours into different subtypes. These patterns were independent of any systemic adjuvant therapy. Conclusions The six subtypes of breast cancer defined by expression of five markers show distinct behaviours with important differences in short term and long term prognosis. Application of these markers in the clinical

  19. Prognostic value of tumour cell detection in peripheral blood of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zach, O; Kasparu, H; Wagner, H; Krieger, O; Lutz, D

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the prognostic value of tumour cells in peripheral blood (pB) of breast cancer (BC) patients, pB samples from 143 patients with benign lesions of the breast and from 467 BC patients were tested via a nested RT-PCR assay for mammaglobin mRNA. No sample from patients with benign lesions of the breast was found to be mammaglobin positive in contrast to 5/310 (2%) BC patients with no evidence of disease (NED) and 46/157 (29%) patients with metastatic disease (MD). Two hundred and eighteen BC patients with NED were followed for at least 12 months. All five mammaglobin-positive BC patients relapsed 1-13 months after first examination of positive pB samples in contrast to 27/213 (13%) patients without detectable tumour cells in pB. Fifty-nine BC patients with MD were tested for mammaglobin expression in pB at the time of first diagnosis of MD; 20 of them (34%) were mammaglobin positive. Patients were followed for a median of 19 months (2-51 months). During this time, 19/59 (32%) died due to tumour progression. In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, BC patients with mammaglobin-negative pB samples at time of diagnosis of MD lived significantly longer than mammaglobin-positive patients (log-rank test: P = 0.0013). In addition, mammaglobin was an independent prognostic parameter and the difference reached significance in univariate as well as in multivariate analysis (P < 0.01). We conclude that the presence of tumour cells in pB of BC patients is of prognostic value.

  20. Role of CD10 Immunoexpression in Grading Phyllodes Tumour of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Khandeparkar, Siddhi Gaurish Sinai; Joshi, Avinash R; Kothikar, Vishakha; Nasare, Anuja; Patil, Sukhada; Niraspatil, Supriya; Dhande, Bhagyashree

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Fibroepithelial tumours are a heterogeneous group of biphasic neoplasms consisting of a proliferation of both epithelial and stromal components. Fibroadenoma (FA) and Phyllodes Tumour (PT) constitute the major entities. It is crucial to distinguish benign from borderline PT (low grade malignant PT), because the former do not metastasize, have a lesser risk of local recurrence and initial local recurrences are histologically benign in almost all instances. Multiple Immunohistochemical (IHC) markers are being studied to find their utility in grading the PT accurately for planning proper treatment. Aim To study, the IHC expression of CD10 in the stromal cells of a series of PTs and FA, with the aim of determining whether the degree of CD10 expression in the stromal cells is related to the grade of the tumour. Materials and Methods Records of 28 cases of PT and 35 cases of FA received in the Department of Pathology in a tertiary care hospital were obtained. Histopathology reports and slides of all the cases were reviewed and clinical data such as age and histomorphological features such as tumour cellularity, stromal overgrowth, mitotic count and nuclear atypia were noted. Representative block of the tumour with maximum cellularity was subjected to CD10 staining. For FA and benign PT a technique of tissue microarray was used. For borderline and malignant PT, representative section was used. Stromal cell staining was assessed, using cytoplasmic staining of the breast myoepithelium as internal control. Results Present study included 35 cases of FA, 20 cases of benign PT, five cases of borderline PT and three cases of malignant PT. The mean age of the patients increased with the increasing tumour grade of PT and this was also observed for FA and benign PT. The mean age increased with increase in tumour grade of PT and was statistically significant (p<0.05). The mean size did not increase with the increasing tumour grade of PT and was statistically

  1. The human tumour cloning assay in the management of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, C.; Jakesz, R.; Wrba, F.; Havelec, L.; Haas, O.; Spona, J.; Holzner, H.; Kolb, R.; Moser, K.

    1985-01-01

    A tumour cloning system was used to cultivate breast cancer specimens. Fifty-six percent of 87 samples were adequate for evaluation, showing clonal growth in about one third (35%). Effusions yielded significantly better growth than solid specimens, the median colony numbers being 64 and 18 respectively. An attempt was made to examine whether there was any association between parameters accepted as prognostic factors for breast cancer and clonal growth in vitro. No correlation was found between preoperative tumour burden, histopathologic grading, menopausal status or overall survival and clonal growth in vitro, whereas we observed an inverse trend between progesterone receptor content of the tumours and their growth potential (P less than 0.01). In those few cases where in vitro and in vivo data could be compared, a high accuracy of the predicted sensitivities was found with respect to chemotherapy, but not in relation to hormonal treatment. A statistically significant higher overall chemosensitivity was associated with the absence of oestrogen receptors (P less than 0.01). PMID:4027163

  2. Addition of vasopressin synthetic analogue [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP to standard chemotherapy enhances tumour growth inhibition and impairs metastatic spread in aggressive breast tumour models.

    PubMed

    Garona, Juan; Pifano, Marina; Pastrian, Maria B; Gomez, Daniel E; Ripoll, Giselle V; Alonso, Daniel F

    2016-08-01

    [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP is a novel 2nd generation vasopressin analogue with robust antitumour activity against metastatic breast cancer. We recently reported that, by acting on vasopressin V2r membrane receptor present in tumour cells and microvascular endothelium, [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP inhibits angiogenesis and metastatic progression of the disease without overt toxicity. Despite chemotherapy remaining as a primary therapeutic option for aggressive breast cancer, its use is limited by low selectivity and associated adverse effects. In this regard, we evaluated potential combinational benefits by adding [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP to standard-of-care chemotherapy. In vitro, combination of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP with sub-IC50 concentrations of paclitaxel or carmustine resulted in a cooperative inhibition of breast cancer cell growth in comparison to single-agent therapy. In vivo antitumour efficacy of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP addition to chemotherapy was first evaluated using the triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model. Tumour-bearing mice were treated with i.v. injections of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP (0.3 μg/kg, thrice weekly) in combination with weekly cycles of paclitaxel (10 mg/kg i.p.). After 6 weeks of treatment, combination regimen resulted in greater tumour growth inhibition compared to monotherapy. [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP addition was also associated with reduction of local aggressiveness, and impairment of tumour invasion and infiltration of the skin. Benefits of combined therapy were confirmed in the hormone-independent and metastatic F3II breast cancer model by combining [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP with carmustine (25 mg/kg i.p.). Interestingly, [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP plus cytotoxic agents severely impaired colony forming ability of tumour cells and inhibited breast cancer metastasis to lung. The present study shows that [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP may complement conventional chemotherapy by modulating metastatic progression and early stages of microtumour establishment, and thus supports further preclinical testing of

  3. Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE); a rare association with phyllodes tumour of breast.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, R N; Phaujdar, Sibaji; Banerjee, Siwalik; Siddhanta, Sattik; De, Dibyendu; Bhattachary, Kuntal; Pal, Hare Krishna

    2012-04-01

    Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) is a rare entity mainly found in elderly males. It is characterized by pitting edema mainly of dorsum of both hands giving a "boxing glove hand" appearance; rarely involving feet also, acute in onset, negative rheumatoid factor and a good response to low dose corticosteroid therapy. Clinically it almost resembles a case of polymyalgia rheumatica, late onset rheumatoid arthritis or other seronegative spondyloarthropathy.Though there are multiple underlying factors causing this rare entity but it has very close associations with many malignancies.So far its association with solid tumours and hematological malignancies has been reported. Phyllodes tumour of breast shows wide spectrum of activity from a benign condition to a locally aggressive and sometimes metastatic tumour.One fourth of the cases recur after definitive treatment.Our case represent an unusual association with recurrent phyllodes tumour of breast with RS3PE.

  4. Genomic profiling of mitochondrion-rich breast carcinoma: chromosomal changes may be relevant for mitochondria accumulation and tumour biology.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Felipe C; de Biase, Dario; Lambros, Maryou B K; Ragazzi, Moira; Lopez-Garcia, Maria A; Natrajan, Rachael; Mackay, Alan; Kurelac, Ivana; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Ashworth, Alan; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Tallini, Giovanni

    2012-02-01

    Oncocytic carcinomas are composed of mitochondrion-rich cells. Though recognised by the WHO classification as a histological special type of breast cancer, their status as a discrete pathological entity remains a matter of contention. Given that oncocytic tumours of other anatomical sites display distinct clinico-pathological and molecular features, we sought to define the molecular genetic features of mitochondrion-rich breast tumours and to compare them with a series of histological grade- and oestrogen receptor status-matched invasive ductal carcinomas of no special type. Seventeen mitochondrion-rich breast carcinomas, including nine bona fide oncocytic carcinomas, were profiled with antibodies against oestrogen, progesterone and androgen receptors, HER2, Ki67, GCDFP-15, chromogranin, epithelial membrane antigen, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 14, CD68 and mitochondria antigen. These tumours were microdissected and DNA extracted from samples with >70% of tumour cells. Fourteen cases yielded DNA of sufficient quality/quantity and were subjected to high-resolution microarray comparative genomic hybridisation analysis. The genomic profiles were compared to those of 28 grade- and oestrogen receptor status-matched invasive ductal carcinomas of no special type. Oncocytic and other mitochondrion-rich tumours did not differ significantly between themselves. As a group, mitochondrion-rich carcinomas were immunophenotypically heterogenous. Recurrent copy number changes were similar to those described in unselected breast cancers. However, unsupervised and supervised analysis identified a subset of mitochondrion-rich cancers, which often displayed gains of 11q13.1-q13.2 and 19p13. Changes in the latter two chromosomal regions have been shown to be associated with oncocytic tumours of the kidney and thyroid, respectively, and host several nuclear genes with specific mitochondrial function. Our results indicate that in a way akin to oncocytic tumours of other anatomical sites

  5. Spontaneous Perforation as a First Presentation of Ileal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST) with Synchronous Breast Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sharma M, Bir Kumar; Barad, Arun Kumar; Padu, Kemba; Singh K, Sridartha; Singh Th, Sudhir Chandra

    2014-05-01

    Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours (GIST's) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. Majority of the GISTs are asymptomatic and often diagnosis is incidental. Synchronous second malignancies have been reported in patients with GIST. We report a case of 50-year-old female presenting with features of hollow viscous perforation, found to have ileal GIST with perforations along with a synchronous breast sarcoma. GIST with spontaneous perforation as its first clinical manifestation is rare. Synchronous occurrence of an ileal GIST with a breast sarcoma is unique and deserves reporting. This case report highlights the varied nature of clinical presentation of the GIST and also stresses on the importance of extensive search for the synchronous second malignancies in the extra abdominal sites as well.

  6. Identification of circulating tumour cells in early stage breast cancer patients using multi marker immunobead RT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Raynor, Michael P; Stephenson, Sally-Anne; Pittman, Kenneth B; Walsh, David CA; Henderson, Michael A; Dobrovic, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The ability to screen blood of early stage operable breast cancer patients for circulating tumour cells is of potential importance for identifying patients at risk of developing distant relapse. We present the results of a study of the efficacy of the immunobead RT-PCR method in identifying patients with circulating tumour cells. Results Immunomagnetic enrichment of circulating tumour cells followed by RT-PCR (immunobead RT-PCR) with a panel of five epithelial specific markers (ELF3, EPHB4, EGFR, MGB1 and TACSTD1) was used to screen for circulating tumour cells in the peripheral blood of 56 breast cancer patients. Twenty patients were positive for two or more RT-PCR markers, including seven patients who were node negative by conventional techniques. Significant increases in the frequency of marker positivity was seen in lymph node positive patients, in patients with high grade tumours and in patients with lymphovascular invasion. A strong trend towards improved disease free survival was seen for marker negative patients although it did not reach significance (p = 0.08). Conclusion Multi-marker immunobead RT-PCR analysis of peripheral blood is a robust assay that is capable of detecting circulating tumour cells in early stage breast cancer patients. PMID:19500345

  7. The role of the tumour inflammatory cell infiltrate in predicting recurrence and survival in patients with primary operable breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Zahra M A; Going, James J; Edwards, Joanne; McMillan, Donald C

    2012-12-01

    Although the first studies highlighting the importance of the tumour inflammatory cell infiltrate were reported more than 80 years ago, the prognostic value of this response in breast cancer is still controversial. With the realisation of the importance of the inflammatory response in determining tumour progression there has been renewed interest in establishing the relationship between the type, density and location of inflammatory cell infiltrate and survival in patients with primary operable breast cancer. The aim was to undertake a systematic review of the literature examining the evidence for the role of the tumour inflammatory cell infiltrate in predicting recurrence and survival in patients with primary operable breast cancer. A systematic review of published papers up to September 2011 was undertaken according to a pre-defined protocol (Fig. 1). A total of 66 independent studies (34,086 patients) were identified. It can be concluded from the review that despite the large number of studies and considerable effort over an extended period, the relationship between different aspects of tumour inflammatory cell infiltrate and outcome in primary operable breast cancer remains unclear. This is in large part due to the absence of methodological validation, underpowered studies (small sample size and sample subtype heterogeneity, insufficient follow-up) and the absence of validation datasets. Therefore, although there are tantalising examples of the potential of the tumour inflammatory cell infiltrate to improve risk stratification patients with operable breast cancer (personalised care), this has not yet been realised. Future studies with standardised methodology, large and homogenous groups, sufficient follow-up and validation datasets should be undertaken to unlock the potential of the tumour inflammatory infiltrate to predict outcome in patients with primary operable breast cancer.

  8. Regulation of cytochrome P450 gene expression in human colon and breast tumour xenografts.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G.; Harrison, D. J.; East, N.; Rae, F.; Wolf, H.; Wolf, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    It is extremely difficult to identify the factors which regulate the expression of drug-metabolising enzymes in man. To address this problem, we have developed a model involving the use of human tumours grown as xenografts in immune deficient mice. Mice bearing human colon or breast tumours as xenografts were challenged with a range of compounds, known from animal studies to be inducers of cytochrome P450s from a variety of gene families. Almost all of the compounds tested could induce human tumour P450 expression, measured either by Western blot or immunohistochemical analysis. Indeed, the levels of P450s from several distinct gene families or subfamilies including CYP2A, CYP2B, CYP2C, CYP3A and CYP4A were induced. Of particular interest was the profound induction of human P450s by 1,4 bis 2-(3,5dichloro-pyridyloxybenzene)(TCPOBOP), a compound which exhibits a marked species specificity in its ability to induce P450 expression in experimental animals. Induction of a human CYP2B protein by this compound was confirmed by Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridisation for mRNA, indicating that induction occurred at the level of transcription. These studies have a variety of implications: they provide a method for approaching the previously intractable problem of how environmental, hormonal and metabolic factors regulate human P450 genes and other genes involved in drug metabolism; they demonstrate that human tumours express P450s constitutively and that the levels of these proteins can be modulated by exogenous agents. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8318421

  9. Recent developments in the histological diagnosis of spindle cell carcinoma, fibromatosis and phyllodes tumour of the breast.

    PubMed

    Lee, A H S

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in the diagnosis of these three unusual tumours of the breast. Spindle cell carcinoma needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of many mammary spindle cell lesions: it is important to be aware of the wide range of appearances, including the recently described fibromatosis-like variant. Immunohistochemistry using a broad panel of cytokeratin antibodies is needed to exclude spindle cell carcinoma; there is frequent expression of basal cytokeratins and p63. CD34 is often expressed by the stroma of phyllodes tumours, but does not appear to be expressed by spindle cell carcinoma or fibromatosis. Nuclear beta-catenin is found in about 80% of fibromatoses, but can also be seen in spindle cell carcinomas and phyllodes tumours. Two recent studies have described features useful in the distinction of phyllodes tumour and fibroadenoma on core biopsy, including increased cellularity, mitoses and overgrowth of the stroma, adipose tissue in the stroma and fragmentation of the biopsy specimen. Periductal stromal tumour is a recently described biphasic tumour composed of spindle cells around open tubules or ducts (but no leaf-like architecture) with frequent CD34 expression. The overlap of morphology with phyllodes tumour suggests that it may be best regarded as a variant of phyllodes tumour.

  10. Gene expression-based classifications of fibroadenomas and phyllodes tumours of the breast.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Maria; Peg, Vicente; Galván, Patricia; Tres, Alejandro; Cortés, Javier; Ramón y Cajal, Santiago; Rubio, Isabel T; Prat, Aleix

    2015-06-01

    Fibroepithelial tumors (FTs) of the breast are a heterogeneous group of lesions ranging from fibroadenomas (FAD) to phyllodes tumors (PT) (benign, borderline, malignant). Further understanding of their molecular features and classification might be of clinical value. In this study, we analysed the expression of 105 breast cancer-related genes, including the 50 genes of the PAM50 intrinsic subtype predictor and 12 genes of the Claudin-low subtype predictor, in a panel of 75 FTs (34 FADs, 5 juvenile FADs, 20 benign PTs, 5 borderline PTs and 11 malignant PTs) with clinical follow-up. In addition, we compared the expression profiles of FTs with those of 14 normal breast tissues and 49 primary invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs). Our results revealed that the levels of expression of all breast cancer-related genes can discriminate the various groups of FTs, together with normal breast tissues and IDCs (False Discovery Rate < 5%). Among FTs, the levels expression of proliferation-related genes (e.g. CCNB1 and MKI67) and mesenchymal/epithelial-related (e.g. CLDN3 and EPCAM) genes were found to be most discriminative. As expected, FADs showed the highest and lowest expression of epithelial- and proliferation-related genes, respectively, whereas malignant PTs showed the opposite expression pattern. Interestingly, the overall profile of benign PTs was found more similar to FADs and normal breast tissues than the rest of tumours, including juvenile FADs. Within the dataset of IDCs and normal breast tissues, the vast majority of FADs, juvenile FADs, benign PTs and borderline PTs were identified as Normal-like by intrinsic breast cancer subtyping, whereas 7 (63.6%) and 3 (27.3%) malignant PTs were identified as Claudin-low and Basal-like, respectively. Finally, we observed that the previously described PAM50 risk of relapse prognostic score better predicted outcome in FTs than the morphological classification, even within PTs-only. Our results suggest that classification of FTs

  11. The genomic and transcriptomic architecture of 2,000 breast tumours reveals novel subgroups.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Christina; Shah, Sohrab P; Chin, Suet-Feung; Turashvili, Gulisa; Rueda, Oscar M; Dunning, Mark J; Speed, Doug; Lynch, Andy G; Samarajiwa, Shamith; Yuan, Yinyin; Gräf, Stefan; Ha, Gavin; Haffari, Gholamreza; Bashashati, Ali; Russell, Roslin; McKinney, Steven; Langerød, Anita; Green, Andrew; Provenzano, Elena; Wishart, Gordon; Pinder, Sarah; Watson, Peter; Markowetz, Florian; Murphy, Leigh; Ellis, Ian; Purushotham, Arnie; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brenton, James D; Tavaré, Simon; Caldas, Carlos; Aparicio, Samuel

    2012-04-18

    The elucidation of breast cancer subgroups and their molecular drivers requires integrated views of the genome and transcriptome from representative numbers of patients. We present an integrated analysis of copy number and gene expression in a discovery and validation set of 997 and 995 primary breast tumours, respectively, with long-term clinical follow-up. Inherited variants (copy number variants and single nucleotide polymorphisms) and acquired somatic copy number aberrations (CNAs) were associated with expression in ~40% of genes, with the landscape dominated by cis- and trans-acting CNAs. By delineating expression outlier genes driven in cis by CNAs, we identified putative cancer genes, including deletions in PPP2R2A, MTAP and MAP2K4. Unsupervised analysis of paired DNA–RNA profiles revealed novel subgroups with distinct clinical outcomes, which reproduced in the validation cohort. These include a high-risk, oestrogen-receptor-positive 11q13/14 cis-acting subgroup and a favourable prognosis subgroup devoid of CNAs. Trans-acting aberration hotspots were found to modulate subgroup-specific gene networks, including a TCR deletion-mediated adaptive immune response in the ‘CNA-devoid’ subgroup and a basal-specific chromosome 5 deletion-associated mitotic network. Our results provide a novel molecular stratification of the breast cancer population, derived from the impact of somatic CNAs on the transcriptome.

  12. An Approach to Breast Cancer Immunotherapy: The Apoptotic Activity of Recombinant Anti-Interleukin-6 Monoclonal Antibodies in Intact Tumour Microenvironment of Breast Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Abou-Shousha, S; Moaaz, M; Sheta, M; Motawea, M A

    2016-06-01

    Current work is one of our comprehensive preclinical studies, a new approach to breast cancer (BC) immunotherapy through induction of tumour cell apoptosis. Tumour growth is not just a result of uncontrolled cell proliferation but also of reduced apoptosis. High levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) are associated with metastatic BC and correlated with poor survival as it promotes growth of tumour-initiating cells during early tumorigenesis protecting these cells from apoptosis. Therefore, this study aims at investigating the potential of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies to suppress IL-6 proliferative/anti-apoptotic activities in intact tumour microenvironment of BC. Fresh sterile tumour and normal breast tissue specimens were taken from 50 female Egyptian patients with BC undergoing radical mastectomy. A unique tissue culture system designed to provide cells of each intact tumour/normal tissue sample with its proper microenvironment either supplemented or not with anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies. To evaluate the apoptotic activity of anti-IL-6 as a novel candidate for BC treatment strategy, we compared its effects with those obtained using tumour necrosis-related apoptosis-inducing ligand TRAIL as an established apoptotic agent. Our results revealed that levels of either anti-IL-6- or TRAIL-induced apoptosis in the tumour or normal tissue cultures were significantly higher than those in their corresponding untreated ones (P < 0.001). No statistically significant differences have been found between apoptosis levels induced by anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies and those induced by TRAIL. Recombinant anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies could represent a novel effective element of immunotherapeutic treatment strategy for BC. The selectivity and anti-apoptotic potential of anti-IL-6 is highly hopeful in IL-6- abundant BC tumour microenvironment.

  13. Highlights in breast cancer from ASCO 2016

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Click here to listen to the Podcast A critical review of the highlights in breast cancer research from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting 2016, held in June 2016 in Chicago, is presented in this podcast. Considering the most interesting and practice-changing studies reported at the meeting, in the advanced breast cancer setting several important confirmatory studies on the use of CDK inhibitors, and studies on using data on oestrogen receptor mutations to guide choices of endocrine therapy are discussed. The PHEREXA trial, in which a combination trastuzumab and pertuzumab was studied in the advanced setting is also considered. In the early breast cancer setting, the KRISTINE and ADAPT studies evaluated the potential of dual blockade in HER2-positive tumours. In HER2-negative early breast cancer several trials are also discussed with respect to types of adjuvant chemotherapy. The results of the MA.17R trial, which considered extending the duration of adjuvant endocrine therapy, are also discussed. The potential role of immunotherapy in breast cancer therapy is briefly mentioned. PMID:27900208

  14. Fc receptor-bearing peripheral blood mononuclear cells in breast cancer patients: a possible marker of tumour burden and prognosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bray, J; McPherson, T A

    1981-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence was used to identify and quantitate peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM) cells possessing high avidity Fc receptors in 105 patients upon referral to the breast cancer clinic at the Cross Cancer Institute. The cell detected was shown to be a non-adherent PBM, probably belonging to the T or null cell population. The mean percentage +/- 2 standard deviations of PBM-positive cells in 75 patients with no disease or benign breast disease was 5.3 +/- ;6.7, and this was significantly (P less than 0.001) less than the percentage found for 31 patients with breast cancer. The percentage of PBM-positive cells correlated directly with tumour burden in patient with small (less than or equal to 5 cm) tumours without regional node or extranodal metastases (5/13 had greater than or equal to 12% positive PBM) and in those with small tumours plus regional node metastases, but without extranodal metastases (8/10 had greater than or equal to 12% positive PBM). This correlation was less, however, in patients with large tumours (greater than 5 cm), and in those with extranodal metastases (4/8 had greater than or equal to 12% positive PBM), and in patients tested postoperatively (1/13 had greater than or equal to 12% positive PBM) even though 6!13 had regional node metastases at the time of surgery. Thus, this relatively simple assay, which can be done on peripheral blood samples, may turn out to be useful in patients with breast cancer as a prognostic marker insofar as it may be an indirect indicator of tumour burden preoperatively. If so, it may lead to a more aggressive postoperative adjuvant therapy approach to the subpopulation of node-negative PBM-positive breast cancer patients than is currently used for node-negative patients. PMID:7035033

  15. Deletion of the amino acid transporter Slc6a14 suppresses tumour growth in spontaneous mouse models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Babu, Ellappan; Bhutia, Yangzom D; Ramachandran, Sabarish; Gnanaprakasam, Jaya P; Prasad, Puttur D; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2015-07-01

    SLC6A14 mediates Na(+)/Cl(-)-coupled concentrative uptake of a broad-spectrum of amino acids. It is expressed at low levels in many tissues but up-regulated in certain cancers. Pharmacological blockade of SLC6A14 causes amino acid starvation in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer cells and suppresses their proliferation in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we interrogated the role of this transporter in breast cancer by deleting Slc6a14 in mice and monitoring the consequences of this deletion in models of spontaneous breast cancer (Polyoma middle T oncogene-transgenic mouse and mouse mammary tumour virus promoter-Neu-transgenic mouse). Slc6a14-knockout mice are viable, fertile and phenotypically normal. The plasma amino acids were similar in wild-type and knockout mice and there were no major compensatory changes in the expression of other amino acid transporter mRNAs. There was also no change in mammary gland development in the knockout mouse. However, when crossed with PyMT-Tg mice or MMTV/Neu (mouse mammary tumour virus promoter-Neu)-Tg mice, the development and progression of breast cancer were markedly decreased on Slc6a14(-/-) background. Analysis of transcriptomes in tumour tissues from wild-type mice and Slc6a14-null mice indicated no compensatory changes in the expression of any other amino acid transporter mRNA. However, the tumours from the null mice showed evidence of amino acid starvation, decreased mTOR signalling and decreased cell proliferation. These studies demonstrate that SLC6A14 is critical for the maintenance of amino acid nutrition and optimal mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling in ER+ breast cancer and that the transporter is a potential target for development of a novel class of anti-cancer drugs targeting amino acid nutrition in tumour cells.

  16. miR-10b*, a master inhibitor of the cell cycle, is down-regulated in human breast tumours.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, Francesca; Bossel Ben-Moshe, Noa; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Canu, Valeria; Mori, Federica; Antoniani, Barbara; Di Benedetto, Anna; Santoro, Raffaela; Germoni, Sabrina; De Angelis, Fernanda; Cambria, Anna; Avraham, Roi; Grasso, Giuseppe; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Yarden, Yosef; Domany, Eytan; Blandino, Giovanni

    2012-11-01

    Deregulated proliferation is a hallmark of cancer cells. Here, we show that microRNA-10b* is a master regulator of breast cancer cell proliferation and is downregulated in tumoural samples versus matched peritumoural counterparts. Two canonical CpG islands (5 kb) upstream from the precursor sequence are hypermethylated in the analysed breast cancer tissues. Ectopic delivery of synthetic microRNA-10b* in breast cancer cell lines or into xenograft mouse breast tumours inhibits cell proliferation and impairs tumour growth in vivo, respectively. We identified and validated in vitro and in vivo three novel target mRNAs of miR-10b* (BUB1, PLK1 and CCNA2), which play a remarkable role in cell cycle regulation and whose high expression in breast cancer patients is associated with reduced disease-free survival, relapse-free survival and metastasis-free survival when compared to patients with low expression. This also suggests that restoration of microRNA-10b* expression might have therapeutic promise.

  17. miR-10b*, a master inhibitor of the cell cycle, is down-regulated in human breast tumours

    PubMed Central

    Biagioni, Francesca; Bossel Ben-Moshe, Noa; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Canu, Valeria; Mori, Federica; Antoniani, Barbara; Di Benedetto, Anna; Santoro, Raffaela; Germoni, Sabrina; De Angelis, Fernanda; Cambria, Anna; Avraham, Roi; Grasso, Giuseppe; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Yarden, Yosef; Domany, Eytan; Blandino, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Deregulated proliferation is a hallmark of cancer cells. Here, we show that microRNA-10b* is a master regulator of breast cancer cell proliferation and is downregulated in tumoural samples versus matched peritumoural counterparts. Two canonical CpG islands (5 kb) upstream from the precursor sequence are hypermethylated in the analysed breast cancer tissues. Ectopic delivery of synthetic microRNA-10b* in breast cancer cell lines or into xenograft mouse breast tumours inhibits cell proliferation and impairs tumour growth in vivo, respectively. We identified and validated in vitro and in vivo three novel target mRNAs of miR-10b* (BUB1, PLK1 and CCNA2), which play a remarkable role in cell cycle regulation and whose high expression in breast cancer patients is associated with reduced disease-free survival, relapse-free survival and metastasis-free survival when compared to patients with low expression. This also suggests that restoration of microRNA-10b* expression might have therapeutic promise. PMID:23125021

  18. Neoadjuvant endocrine treatment in early breast cancer: An overlooked alternative?

    PubMed

    van Dam, P A; van Dam, V C N; Altintas, S; Papadimitriou, K; Rolfo, C; Trinh, X B

    2016-03-01

    During the last decade neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NET) has moved from being reserved for elderly and frail non-chemotherapy candidates to a primary systemic modality in selected patients with hormone sensitive breast cancer. Neoadjuvant hormonal treatment in patients with hormone receptor positive, HER-2 negative early breast cancer is proven to be an effective and safe option; it is associated with a higher rate of breast conserving surgery (BCS), may reduce the need for adjuvant chemotherapy and enables a delay of surgery for medical or practical reasons. Clinical responses range from 13% to 100% with at least 3 months of NET. Methods of assessing response should include MRI of the breast, particularly in lobular tumours. In studies comparing tamoxifen with aromatase inhibitors (AI), AI proved to be superior in terms of tumour response and rates of BCS. Change in Ki67 is accepted as a validated endpoint for comparing endocrine neoadjuvant agents. Levels of Ki67 during treatment are more closely related to long-term prognosis than pretreatment Ki67. Neoadjuvant endocrine therapy provides a unique opportunity for studies of endocrine responsiveness and the development of new experimental drugs combined with systemic hormonal treatment.

  19. Objective measurement of therapeutic response in breast cancer using tumour markers.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, J. F.; Pearson, D.; Price, M. R.; Selby, C.; Blamey, R. W.; Howell, A.

    1991-01-01

    In 65 patients with systemic breast cancer, a biochemical response index using three tumour markers in combination, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), allowed objective biochemical assessment of response to endocrine therapy. Changes in these three markers at 2, 4 and 6 months showed a highly significant correlation with UICC assessed response at 6 months. At 4 months, changes in these three markers resulted in a selectivity of 93%, with a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 82%. Survival of groups of patients assessed biochemically or by UICC criteria for non-progression or progression showed no significant difference. The advantage of the biochemical assessment are that it is objective and reproducible. The assessment gives similar information to the UICC assessment but can be carried out earlier. Changes in the three markers appears to reflect the dynamics of change in tumour mass in response to systemic therapy in contrast to the UICC criteria which reflect structural change. PMID:1911226

  20. Targeting multiple cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways with a resorcinol derivative leads to inhibition of advanced stages of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murase, Ryuichi; Kawamura, Rumi; Singer, Eric; Pakdel, Arash; Sarma, Pranamee; Judkins, Jonathon; Elwakeel, Eiman; Dayal, Sonali; Martinez-Martinez, Esther; Amere, Mukkanti; Gujjar, Ramesh; Mahadevan, Anu; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; McAllister, Sean D

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The psychoactive cannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and the non-psychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) can both reduce cancer progression, each through distinct anti-tumour pathways. Our goal was to discover a compound that could efficiently target both cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways. Experimental Approach To measure breast cancer cell proliferation/viability and invasion, MTT and Boyden chamber assays were used. Modulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis was measured using dichlorodihydrofluorescein and annexin/propidium iodide, respectively, in combination with cell flow cytometry. Changes in protein levels were evaluated using Western analysis. Orthotopic and i.v. mouse models of breast cancer metastasis were used to test the activity of cannabinoids in vivo. Key Results CBD reduced breast cancer metastasis in advanced stages of the disease as the direct result of down-regulating the transcriptional regulator Id1. However, this was associated with moderate increases in survival. We therefore screened for analogues that could co-target cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways (CBD- and THC-associated) and discovered the compound O-1663. This analogue inhibited Id1, produced a marked stimulation of ROS, up-regulated autophagy and induced apoptosis. Of all the compounds tested, it was the most potent at inhibiting breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in culture and metastasis in vivo. Conclusions and Implications O-1663 prolonged survival in advanced stages of breast cancer metastasis. Developing compounds that can simultaneously target multiple cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways efficiently may provide a novel approach for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer. PMID:24910342

  1. The administration of milk fermented by the probiotic Lactobacillus casei CRL 431 exerts an immunomodulatory effect against a breast tumour in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Aragón, Félix; Carino, Silvia; Perdigón, Gabriela; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra

    2014-06-01

    Antitumour activity is one of the health-promoting effects attributed to probiotics specially analysed from preclinical models, mostly murine. Here, the effect of milk fermented by the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus casei CRL 431, on a murine breast cancer model was analysed. Mice were fed with milk fermented by Lactobacillus casei or unfermented milk before and after tumour injection. Rate of tumour development, cytokines in serum, IgA, CD4, CD8, F4/80 and cytokines positive cells in mammary glands were determined. Microvasculature in the tumour tissues was monitored. The effect of fermented milk administration after tumour injection was also evaluated. It was observed that probiotic administration delayed or blocked tumour development. This effect was associated to modulation of the immune response triggered by the tumour. The area occupied by blood vessels decreased in the tumours from mice given fermented milk which agrees with their small tumours, and fewer side effects. Finally, it was observed that probiotic administration after tumour detection was also beneficial to delay the tumour growth. In conclusion, we showed in this study the potential of milk fermented by the probiotic Lactobacillus casei CRL431 to stimulate the immune response against this breast tumour, avoiding or delaying its growth when it was preventively administrated and also when the administration started after tumour cells injection.

  2. Deep tissue volume imaging of birefringence through fibre-optic needle probes for the delineation of breast tumour

    PubMed Central

    Villiger, Martin; Lorenser, Dirk; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Quirk, Bryden C.; Kirk, Rodney W.; Bouma, Brett E.; Sampson, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying tumour margins during breast-conserving surgeries is a persistent challenge. We have previously developed miniature needle probes that could enable intraoperative volume imaging with optical coherence tomography. In many situations, however, scattering contrast alone is insufficient to clearly identify and delineate malignant regions. Additional polarization-sensitive measurements provide the means to assess birefringence, which is elevated in oriented collagen fibres and may offer an intrinsic biomarker to differentiate tumour from benign tissue. Here, we performed polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography through miniature imaging needles and developed an algorithm to efficiently reconstruct images of the depth-resolved tissue birefringence free of artefacts. First ex vivo imaging of breast tumour samples revealed excellent contrast between lowly birefringent malignant regions, and stromal tissue, which is rich in oriented collagen and exhibits higher birefringence, as confirmed with co-located histology. The ability to clearly differentiate between tumour and uninvolved stroma based on intrinsic contrast could prove decisive for the intraoperative assessment of tumour margins. PMID:27364229

  3. Deep tissue volume imaging of birefringence through fibre-optic needle probes for the delineation of breast tumour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villiger, Martin; Lorenser, Dirk; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Quirk, Bryden C.; Kirk, Rodney W.; Bouma, Brett E.; Sampson, David D.

    2016-07-01

    Identifying tumour margins during breast-conserving surgeries is a persistent challenge. We have previously developed miniature needle probes that could enable intraoperative volume imaging with optical coherence tomography. In many situations, however, scattering contrast alone is insufficient to clearly identify and delineate malignant regions. Additional polarization-sensitive measurements provide the means to assess birefringence, which is elevated in oriented collagen fibres and may offer an intrinsic biomarker to differentiate tumour from benign tissue. Here, we performed polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography through miniature imaging needles and developed an algorithm to efficiently reconstruct images of the depth-resolved tissue birefringence free of artefacts. First ex vivo imaging of breast tumour samples revealed excellent contrast between lowly birefringent malignant regions, and stromal tissue, which is rich in oriented collagen and exhibits higher birefringence, as confirmed with co-located histology. The ability to clearly differentiate between tumour and uninvolved stroma based on intrinsic contrast could prove decisive for the intraoperative assessment of tumour margins.

  4. Concentration and oxygen saturation of haemoglobin of 50 breast tumours determined by time-domain optical mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosenick, Dirk; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Moesta, K. Thomas; Mucke, Jörg; Möller, Michael; Stroszczynski, Christian; Stößel, Jana; Wassermann, Bernhard; Schlag, Peter M.; Rinneberg, Herbert

    2004-04-01

    Using a dual-wavelength (670 nm, 785 nm) time-domain scanning instrument we have recorded optical mammograms of 93 patients suspected of having breast cancer which was subsequently assessed histologically. Among 65 histologically confirmed carcinomas, 54 were detectable in at least one of two optical mammograms recorded of each tumour-bearing breast in craniocaudal and mediolateral projection. Optical mammograms were based on photon counts in selected time windows of measured distributions of times of flight of photons. Optical properties of 50 carcinomas investigated at both wavelengths were derived by modelling the breast as partially homogeneous infinite slab with an embedded spherical inhomogeneity representing the tumour and by calculating the diffraction of photon density waves. In selected cases, additional information about the location of the tumour along the compression direction was used that was obtained from scans at selected offsets between source and detector optical fibres. A correlation plot of haemoglobin concentration and blood oxygen saturation of tumours and healthy tissue shows good separation between both kinds of tissue. The majority of carcinomas exhibited increased total haemoglobin concentration compared to healthy tissue.

  5. Aberrant cytoplasmic expression of the p16 protein in breast cancer is associated with accelerated tumour proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Emig, R.; Magener, A.; Ehemann, V.; Meyer, A.; Stilgenbauer, F.; Volkmann, M.; Wallwiener, D.; Sinn, H. P.

    1998-01-01

    The p16 protein plays an important role in the transition of cells into the G1 phase of the cell cycle. We have studied the prevalence of p16 protein expression in breast carcinomas in a prospective series of 368 invasive and 52 non-invasive malignancies, as well as in 88 locally recurring tumours and three tumour cell lines. p16 protein expression was evaluated immunohistochemically on paraffin sections using monoclonal and polyclonal anti-p16 antibodies, and by immunoblotting of tumour cell suspensions. Tumour cell lines were also subjected to polymerase chain reaction-single strand polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis and direct DNA sequencing. The results were compared with established prognostic parameters, DNA flow cytometry and p53 protein expression. In 33 (9%) invasive and two (4%) intraductal carcinomas, a cytoplasmic accumulation of the p16 protein was seen. These cases were characterized by poor histological grade of differentiation, loss of of oestrogen receptors and progesterone receptors and frequent overexpression of the p53 protein. In addition, breast carcinomas with aberrant p16 expression demonstrated a high proliferative activity, with median S-phase fractions 74% higher than in the control group and the median Ki67 fractions elevated to 75%. A genetic alteration of the p16 gene was not detectable in three analysed cell lines with cytoplasmic p16 expression applying PCR-SSCP and direct DNA sequencing. These results indicate that cytoplasmic accumulation of the p16 protein identifies a subset of highly malignant breast carcinomas with accelerated tumour proliferation and other unfavourable parameters in breast cancer. The described protein accumulation is apparently not caused by an alteration of the p16 gene. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:9862580

  6. Automatic prediction of tumour malignancy in breast cancer with fractal dimension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent types of cancer today in women. The main avenue of diagnosis is through manual examination of histopathology tissue slides. Such a process is often subjective and error-ridden, suffering from both inter- and intraobserver variability. Our objective is to develop an automatic algorithm for analysing histopathology slides free of human subjectivity. Here, we calculate the fractal dimension of images of numerous breast cancer slides, at magnifications of 40×, 100×, 200× and 400×. Using machine learning, specifically, the support vector machine (SVM) method, the F1 score for classification accuracy of the 40× slides was found to be 0.979. Multiclass classification on the 40× slides yielded an accuracy of 0.556. A reduction of the size and scope of the SVM training set gave an average F1 score of 0.964. Taken together, these results show great promise in the use of fractal dimension to predict tumour malignancy. PMID:28083100

  7. Highlights from the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2015

    PubMed Central

    Jassem, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    https://soundcloud.com/bmjpodcasts/highlights-from-san-antonio-breast-cancer-symposium-2015 A critical review on the practice changing studies presented at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held December 2015, is presented in this podcast. A number of areas, including neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment, treatment of metastatic disease and the emergence of new biomarkers are addressed. Trials discussed include the WSG-ADAPT HER2+/HR+ phase II trial, which assessed 12-weeks of neoadjuvant TDM1 with or without endocrine therapy versus trastuzumab+endocrine therapy in HER2-positive hormone-receptor-positive early breast cancer, the CREATE-X study, which assessed adjuvant capecitabine in patients with HER2-negative pathologic residual invasive disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and the TH3RESA study, which investigated trastuzumab emtansine use in patients with previously treated HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. Further, studies on new promising biomarkers such as the prognostic value of circulating tumour cells in follow up of early breast cancer patients after adjuvant chemotherapy are highlighted. Overall, the present podcast represents a comprehensive overview on some of the most important studies presented at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. PMID:27843589

  8. Epstein-Barr Virus, Human Papillomavirus and Mouse Mammary Tumour Virus as Multiple Viruses in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Wendy K.; Heng, Benjamin; Delprado, Warick; Iacopetta, Barry; Whitaker, Noel J.; Lawson, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this investigation is to determine if Epstein Barr virus (EBV), high risk human papillomavirus (HPV), and mouse mammary tumour viruses (MMTV) co-exist in some breast cancers. Materials and Methods All the specimens were from women residing in Australia. For investigations based on standard PCR, we used fresh frozen DNA extracts from 50 unselected invasive breast cancers. For normal breast specimens, we used DNA extracts from epithelial cells from milk donated by 40 lactating women. For investigations based on in situ PCR we used 27 unselected archival formalin fixed breast cancer specimens and 18 unselected archival formalin fixed normal breast specimens from women who had breast reduction surgery. Thirteen of these fixed breast cancer specimens were ductal carcinoma in situ (dcis) and 14 were predominantly invasive ductal carcinomas (idc). Results EBV sequences were identified in 68%, high risk HPV sequences in 50%, and MMTV sequences in 78% of DNA extracted from 50 invasive breast cancer specimens. These same viruses were identified in selected normal and breast cancer specimens by in situ PCR. Sequences from more than one viral type were identified in 72% of the same breast cancer specimens. Normal controls showed these viruses were also present in epithelial cells in human milk – EBV (35%), HPV, 20%) and MMTV (32%) of 40 milk samples from normal lactating women, with multiple viruses being identified in 13% of the same milk samples. Conclusions We conclude that (i) EBV, HPV and MMTV gene sequences are present and co-exist in many human breast cancers, (ii) the presence of these viruses in breast cancer is associated with young age of diagnosis and possibly an increased grade of breast cancer. PMID:23183846

  9. ApoA-I mimetic administration, but not increased apoA-I-containing HDL, inhibits tumour growth in a mouse model of inherited breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cedó, Lídia; García-León, Annabel; Baila-Rueda, Lucía; Santos, David; Grijalva, Victor; Martínez-Cignoni, Melanie Raquel; Carbó, José M.; Metso, Jari; López-Vilaró, Laura; Zorzano, Antonio; Valledor, Annabel F.; Cenarro, Ana; Jauhiainen, Matti; Lerma, Enrique; Fogelman, Alan M.; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc) have been associated with breast cancer risk, but several epidemiologic studies have reported contradictory results with regard to the relationship between apolipoprotein (apo) A-I and breast cancer. We aimed to determine the effects of human apoA-I overexpression and administration of specific apoA-I mimetic peptide (D-4F) on tumour progression by using mammary tumour virus-polyoma middle T-antigen transgenic (PyMT) mice as a model of inherited breast cancer. Expression of human apoA-I in the mice did not affect tumour onset and growth in PyMT transgenic mice, despite an increase in the HDLc level. In contrast, D-4F treatment significantly increased tumour latency and inhibited the development of tumours. The effects of D-4F on tumour development were independent of 27-hydroxycholesterol. However, D-4F treatment reduced the plasma oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) levels in mice and prevented oxLDL-mediated proliferative response in human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, our study shows that D-4F, but not apoA-I-containing HDL, hinders tumour growth in mice with inherited breast cancer in association with a higher protection against LDL oxidative modification. PMID:27808249

  10. Tumour Necrosis Factor-α Gene Polymorphism Is Associated with Metastasis in Patients with Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui-Hui; Zhu, Hui; Liu, Li-Sheng; Huang, Yong; Guo, Jun; Li, Jie; Sun, Xin-Ping; Chang, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Zhe-Hai; Zhai, Kan

    2015-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is critical in the regulation of inflammation and tumour progression. TNF-α-308G > A is associated with constitutively elevated TNF-α expression. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between TNF-α-308G > A and breast cancer (BC) risk by subtype and the connection between genotypes and clinical features of BC. A total of 768 patients and 565 controls were enrolled in this study, and genotypes were detected using the TaqMan assay. No effect on susceptibility for any BC subtype was found for the TNF-α-308 polymorphism in our study or in the pooled meta-analysis. This polymorphism was shown to be associated with age at menarche in all BC and in progesterone receptor-negative BC. Interestingly, triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients with TNF-α-308A had an increased risk of distant tumour metastasis (OR = 3.80, 95% CI: 1.31–11.02, P = 0.009). Multi-regression analysis showed that TNF-α-308A was also a risk factor for distant tumour metastasis after adjustment for tumour size and lymph node metastasis status (OR = 6.26, 95% CI: 1.88–20.87, P = 0.003). These findings indicate that TNF-α might play a distinct role in the progression of TNBC, especially in distant tumour metastasis of TNBC. PMID:26165253

  11. The clinical value of HER-2 overexpression and PIK3CA mutations in the older breast cancer population: a FOCUS study analysis.

    PubMed

    Engels, Charla C; Kiderlen, Mandy; Bastiaannet, Esther; van Eijk, Ronald; Mooyaart, Antien; Smit, Vincent T H B M; de Craen, Anton J M; Kuppen, Peter J K; Kroep, Judith R; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Liefers, Gerrit Jan

    2016-04-01

    Studies to confirm the effect of acknowledged prognostic markers in older breast cancer patients are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of HER-2 overexpression and PIK3CA mutations in older breast cancer patients. Female breast cancer patients aged 65 years or older, diagnosed between 1997 and 2004 in a geographical region in The Netherlands, with an invasive, non-metastatic tumour and tumour material available, were included in the study. The primary endpoint was relapse-free period and secondary endpoint was relative survival. Determinants were immunochemical HER-2 scores (0/1+, 2+ or 3+) and PIK3CA as a binary measure. Overall, 1698 patients were included, and 103 had a HER-2 score of 3+. HER-2 overexpression was associated with a higher recurrence risk (5 years recurrence risk 34 % vs. 12 %, adjusted p = 0.005), and a worse relative survival (10 years relative survival 48 % vs. 84 % for HER-2 negative; p = 0.004). PIK3CA mutations had no significant prognostic effect. We showed, in older breast cancer patients, that HER-2 overexpression was significantly associated with a worse outcome, but PIK3CA mutations had no prognostic effect. These results imply that older patients with HER-2 overexpressing breast cancer might benefit from additional targeted anti-HER-2 therapy.

  12. Towards intra-operative diagnosis of tumours during breast conserving surgery by selective-sampling Raman micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Kenny; Zaabar, Fazliyana; Rakha, Emad; Ellis, Ian; Koloydenko, Alexey; Notingher, Ioan

    2014-10-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is increasingly employed for the treatment of early stage breast cancer. One of the key challenges in BCS is to ensure complete removal of the tumour while conserving as much healthy tissue as possible. In this study we have investigated the potential of Raman micro-spectroscopy (RMS) for automated intra-operative evaluation of tumour excision. First, a multivariate classification model based on Raman spectra of normal and malignant breast tissue samples was built and achieved diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma (DC) with 95.6% sensitivity and 96.2% specificity (5-fold cross-validation). The tumour regions were discriminated from the healthy tissue structures based on increased concentration of nucleic acids and reduced concentration of collagen and fat. The multivariate classification model was then applied to sections from fresh tissue of new patients to produce diagnosis images for DC. The diagnosis images obtained by raster scanning RMS were in agreement with the conventional histopathology diagnosis but were limited to long data acquisition times (typically 10 000 spectra mm-2, which is equivalent to ~5 h mm-2). Selective-sampling based on integrated auto-fluorescence imaging and Raman spectroscopy was used to reduce the number of Raman spectra to ~20 spectra mm-2, which is equivalent to an acquisition time of ~15 min for 5 × 5 mm2 tissue samples. This study suggests that selective-sampling Raman microscopy has the potential to provide a rapid and objective intra-operative method to detect mammary carcinoma in tissue and assess resection margins.

  13. Liposomal Nanoparticles Carrying anti-IL6R Antibody to the Tumour Microenvironment Inhibit Metastasis in Two Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chunlei; Chen, Yanan; Gao, Wenjuan; Chang, Antao; Ye, Yujie; Shen, Wenzhi; Luo, Yunping; Yang, Shengyong; Sun, Peiqing; Xiang, Rong; Li, Na

    2017-01-01

    Tumour microenvironment (TME) contributes significantly towards potentiating the stemness and metastasis properties of cancer cells. IL6-Stat3 is one of the important cell signaling pathways in mediating the communication between tumour and immune cells. Here, we have systematically developed a novel anti-CD44 antibody-mediated liposomal nanoparticle delivery system loaded with anti-IL6R antibody, which could specifically target the TME of CD44+ breast cancer cells in different mouse models for triple negative and luminal breast cancer. This nanoparticle had an enhanced and specific tumour targeting efficacy with dramatic anti-tumour metastasis effects in syngeneic BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 cells as was in the syngeneic MMTV-PyMT mice. It inhibited IL6R-Stat3 signaling and moderated the TME, characterized by the reduced expression of genes encoding Stat3, Sox2, VEGFA, MMP-9 and CD206 in the breast tissues. Furthermore, this nanoparticle reduced the subgroups of Sox2+ and CD206+ cells in the lung metastatic foci, demonstrating its inhibitory effect on the lung metastatic niche for breast cancer stem cells. Taken together, the CD44 targeted liposomal nanoparticles encapsulating anti-IL6R antibody achieved a significant effect to inhibit the metastasis of breast cancer in different molecular subtypes of breast cancer mouse models. Our results shed light on the application of nanoparticle mediated cancer immune-therapy through targeting TME. PMID:28255366

  14. Secretory Carcinoma of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Aktepe, Fatma; Sarsenov, Dauren; Özmen, Vahit

    2016-01-01

    Secretory carcinoma is a very rare subtype of breast carcinoma. These tumors are generally associated with a favorable prognosis, although having triple-negative phenotype (estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) negative and c-erbB2 (HER2) negative). In this presentation, a rare secretory carcinoma of the breast in a woman aged 24 years is discussed and the literature is reviewed. PMID:28331758

  15. Upregulation of miRNA-155 promotes tumour angiogenesis by targeting VHL and is associated with poor prognosis and triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kong, W; He, L; Richards, EJ; Challa, S; Xu, C-X; Permuth-Wey, J; Lancaster, JM; Coppola, D; Sellers, TA; Djeu, JY; Cheng, JQ

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) is frequently up-regulated in various types of human cancer; however, its role in cancer angiogenesis remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate the role of miR-155 in angiogenesis through targeting von Hippel-Lindau tumour suppressor (VHL) in breast cancer. Ectopic expression of miR-155 induced whereas knockdown of miR-155 inhibited HUVEC network formation, proliferation, invasion, and migration. Furthermore, mammary fat pad xenotransplantation of ectopically expressed miR-155 resulted in extensive angiogenesis, proliferation, tumour necrosis, and recruitment of pro-inflammatory cells such as tumour associated macrophages. Expression of VHL abrogated these miR-155 effects. Moreover, miR-155 expression inversely correlates with VHL expression level and is associated with late stage, lymph node metastasis, and poor prognosis as well as triple-negative tumour in breast cancer. These findings indicate that miR-155 plays a pivotal role in tumour angiogenesis by downregulation of VHL, and provide a basis for miR-155-expressing tumours to embody an aggressive malignant phenotype, and therefore, miR-155 is an important therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:23353819

  16. Analysis of and prognostic information from disseminated tumour cells in bone marrow in primary breast cancer: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Disseminated tumour cells (DTCs) in the bone marrow of patients with breast cancer have been identified as an independent predictor of poor prognosis in patients with non-metastatic disease. This prospective study aimed to evaluate the presence and prognostic value of DTCs in the bone marrow of female patients with primary breast cancer. Methods Between 1999 and 2003, bone marrow aspirates were obtained from patients at the time of surgery for primary invasive breast cancer. DTCs in bone marrow were identified using monoclonal antibodies against cytokeratins for detection of epithelial cells. The detection of DTCs was related to clinical follow-up with distant disease-free survival (DDFS) and breast cancer-specific survival as endpoints. Bone marrow aspirates from adult healthy bone marrow donors were analysed separately. Results DTCs were analysed in 401 patients, and cytokeratin-positive cells were found in 152 of these (38%). An immunofluorescence (IF) staining procedure was used in 327 patients, and immunocytochemistry (IC) was performed in 74 patients. The IF-based method resulted in 40% DTC-positive cases, whereas 30% were positive using IC (p = 0.11). The presence of DTCs in bone marrow was not significantly related to patient or tumour characteristics. The presence of DTCs was not a prognostic factor for DDFS (IF: hazards ratio [HR], 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.63–2.2; p = 0.60; IC: HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.09–8.1; p = 0.88). Significant prognostic factors were lymph node metastases, oestrogen receptor positivity, Nottingham histological grade, and tumour size using Cox univariate analysis. The analyses were positive for epithelial cells in bone marrow from adult healthy donors in 19 (25%) samples. Conclusions The detection of DTCs in bone marrow in primary breast cancer was previously shown to be a predictor of poor prognosis. We were not able to confirm these results in a prospective cohort including unselected patients

  17. Chemotherapy for Metastatic Breast Cancer – An Anachronism in the Era of Personalised and Targeted Oncological Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Schneeweiss, A.; Ruckhäberle, E.; Huober, J.

    2015-01-01

    Based on the findings of modern molecular biology, breast cancer is nowadays considered to be a heterogeneous disease. This leads to the objective of an individualised, more patient-oriented therapy. A series of target molecules for this purpose has already been identified. The principle of targeted oncological therapy was realised decades ago with the introduction of endocrine therapy for patients with hormone receptor-positive tumours. The modern therapy for HER2-positive tumours is a further example for the translation of targeted therapy into clinical routine. For patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer, to date two targeted drugs, bevacizumab and everolimus, are available for routine clinical use. Many other substances are still undergoing clinical development. However, validated predictive markers to aid in therapeutic decision-making and therapy control are still lacking. Chemotherapy constitutes an effective palliative therapy with proven efficacy for the patients. In this process strategies have also been realised for a targeted therapy against tumour cells with the help of chemotherapeutic agents such as, for example, the intracellular activation of the prodrug capecitabine or the active albumin-mediated transport of nab-paclitaxel which leads to higher peri- and intratumoural enrichments. The continuing unchanged relevance of chemotherapy is often underestimated in the current discussions and will be comprehensively evaluated in this review. PMID:26166838

  18. Impact of tumour bed boost integration on acute and late toxicity in patients with breast cancer: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Daniel George; Bale, Rebecca; Jones, Claire; Fitzgerald, Emma; Khor, Richard; Knight, Kellie; Wasiak, Jason

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to summarise the evidence from studies investigating the integration of tumour bed boosts into whole breast irradiation for patients with Stage 0-III breast cancer, with a focus on its impact on acute and late toxicities. A comprehensive systematic electronic search through the Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed databases from January 2000 to January 2015 was conducted. Studies were considered eligible if they investigated the efficacy of hypo- or normofractionated whole breast irradiation with the inclusion of a daily concurrent boost. The primary outcomes of interest were the degree of observed acute and late toxicity following radiotherapy treatment. Methodological quality assessment was performed on all included studies using either the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale or a previously published investigator-derived quality instrument. The search identified 35 articles, of which 17 satisfied our eligibility criteria. Thirteen and eleven studies reported on acute and late toxicities respectively. Grade 3 acute skin toxicity ranged from 1 to 7% whilst moderate to severe fibrosis and telangiectasia were both limited to 9%. Reported toxicity profiles were comparable to historical data at similar time-points. Studies investigating the delivery of concurrent boosts with whole breast radiotherapy courses report safe short to medium-term toxicity profiles and cosmesis rates. Whilst the quality of evidence and length of follow-up supporting these findings is low, sufficient evidence has been generated to consider concurrent boost techniques as an alternative to conventional sequential techniques.

  19. ERCC1 and telomere status in breast tumours treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and their association with patient prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Gay‐Bellile, Mathilde; Romero, Pierre; Cayre, Anne; Véronèse, Lauren; Privat, Maud; Singh, Shalini; Combes, Patricia; Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Abrial, Catherine; Bignon, Yves‐Jean; Vago, Philippe; Penault‐Llorca, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dysfunctional telomeres and DNA damage repair (DDR) play important roles in cancer progression. Studies have reported correlations between these factors and tumour aggressiveness and clinical outcome in breast cancer. We studied the characteristics of telomeres and expression of ERCC1, a protein involved in a number of DNA repair pathways and in telomere homeostasis, to assess their prognostic value, alone or in combination, in 90 residual breast tumours after treatment with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT). ERCC1 status was investigated at different molecular levels (protein and gene expression and gene copy‐number variations) by immunohistochemistry, qRT‐PCR and quantitative multiplex fluorescent‐PCR (QMF‐PCR). A comprehensive analysis of telomere characteristics was performed using qPCR for telomere length and qRT‐PCR for telomerase (hTERT), tankyrase 1 (TNKS) and shelterin complex (TRF1, TRF2, POT1, TPP1, RAP1 and TIN2) gene expression. Short telomeres, high hTERT and TNKS expression and low ERCC1 protein expression were independently associated with worse survival outcome. Interestingly, ERCC1 gains and losses correlated with worse disease‐free (p = 0.026) and overall (p = 0.043) survival as compared to survival of patients with normal gene copy‐numbers. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of all ERCC1 and telomere parameters identified four subgroups with distinct prognosis. In particular, a cluster combining low ERCC1, ERCC1 gene alterations, dysfunctional telomeres and high hTERT and a cluster with high TNKS and shelterin expression correlated with poor disease‐free (HR= 5.41, p= 0.0044) and overall survival (HR= 6.01, p= 0.0023) irrespective of tumour stage and grade. This comprehensive study demonstrates that telomere dysfunction and DDR can contribute synergistically to tumour progression and chemoresistance. These parameters are predictors of clinical outcome in breast cancer patients treated with NCT and could be useful

  20. RO4929097 and Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy or Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Brain Metastases From Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-22

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  1. Consensus Analysis of Whole Transcriptome Profiles from Two Breast Cancer Patient Cohorts Reveals Long Non-Coding RNAs Associated with Intrinsic Subtype and the Tumour Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Angela; Bernard, Philip; Camp, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as crucial regulators of cellular processes and diseases such as cancer; however, their functions remain poorly characterised. Several studies have demonstrated that lncRNAs are typically disease and tumour subtype specific, particularly in breast cancer where lncRNA expression alone is sufficient to discriminate samples based on hormone status and molecular intrinsic subtype. However, little attempt has been made to assess the reproducibility of lncRNA signatures across more than one dataset. In this work, we derive consensus lncRNA signatures indicative of breast cancer subtype based on two clinical RNA-Seq datasets: the Utah Breast Cancer Study and The Cancer Genome Atlas, through integration of differential expression and hypothesis-free clustering analyses. The most consistent signature is associated with breast cancers of the basal-like subtype, leading us to generate a putative set of six lncRNA basal-like breast cancer markers, at least two of which may have a role in cis-regulation of known poor prognosis markers. Through in silico functional characterization of individual signatures and integration of expression data from pre-clinical cancer models, we discover that discordance between signatures derived from different clinical cohorts can arise from the strong influence of non-cancerous cells in tumour samples. As a consequence, we identify nine lncRNAs putatively associated with breast cancer associated fibroblasts, or the immune response. Overall, our study establishes the confounding effects of tumour purity on lncRNA signature derivation, and generates several novel hypotheses on the role of lncRNAs in basal-like breast cancers and the tumour microenvironment. PMID:27685983

  2. Consensus Analysis of Whole Transcriptome Profiles from Two Breast Cancer Patient Cohorts Reveals Long Non-Coding RNAs Associated with Intrinsic Subtype and the Tumour Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Bradford, James R; Cox, Angela; Bernard, Philip; Camp, Nicola J

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as crucial regulators of cellular processes and diseases such as cancer; however, their functions remain poorly characterised. Several studies have demonstrated that lncRNAs are typically disease and tumour subtype specific, particularly in breast cancer where lncRNA expression alone is sufficient to discriminate samples based on hormone status and molecular intrinsic subtype. However, little attempt has been made to assess the reproducibility of lncRNA signatures across more than one dataset. In this work, we derive consensus lncRNA signatures indicative of breast cancer subtype based on two clinical RNA-Seq datasets: the Utah Breast Cancer Study and The Cancer Genome Atlas, through integration of differential expression and hypothesis-free clustering analyses. The most consistent signature is associated with breast cancers of the basal-like subtype, leading us to generate a putative set of six lncRNA basal-like breast cancer markers, at least two of which may have a role in cis-regulation of known poor prognosis markers. Through in silico functional characterization of individual signatures and integration of expression data from pre-clinical cancer models, we discover that discordance between signatures derived from different clinical cohorts can arise from the strong influence of non-cancerous cells in tumour samples. As a consequence, we identify nine lncRNAs putatively associated with breast cancer associated fibroblasts, or the immune response. Overall, our study establishes the confounding effects of tumour purity on lncRNA signature derivation, and generates several novel hypotheses on the role of lncRNAs in basal-like breast cancers and the tumour microenvironment.

  3. Breast tumour initiating cell fate is regulated by microenvironmental cues from an extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sharmistha; Lo, Pang-Kuo; Duan, Xinrui; Chen, Hexin; Wang, Qian

    2012-08-01

    Cancer stem cells, also known as tumour-initiating cells (TICs), are identified as highly tumorigenic population within tumours and hypothesized to be main regulators in tumour growth, metastasis and relapse. Evidence also suggests that a tumour microenvironment plays a critical role in the development and progression of cancer, by constantly modulating cell-matrix interactions. Scientists have tried to characterize and identify the TIC population but the actual combination of extracellular components in deciphering the fate of TICs has not been explored. The basic unanswered question is the phenotypic stability of this TIC population in a tissue extracellular matrix setting. The in vivo complexity makes it difficult to identify parameters in a diverse milieu that affect TICs behaviour. Herein we studied how the TIC population would respond when subjected to a unique microenvironment composed of different extracellular proteins. The TIC-enriched population isolated from a Her2/neu-induced mouse mammary tumour was cultured on collagen, fibronectin and laminin coated substrates for one to two weeks. Our observations indicate that a laminin substrate can maintain the majority of the self-renewing and tumorigenic TIC population, whereas collagen induced a more differentiated phenotype of the cells. Also interestingly, fibronectin substrates dictated an invasive phenotype of TICs as evidenced from the EMT-related gene expression pattern. The results of this study signify that the microenvironmental cues play a considerable role in tumour relapse and progression by altering the cancer stem cell behaviour and thus this knowledge could be used to design novel cancer therapeutics.

  4. An autopsy case of acute cor pulmonale and paradoxical systemic embolism due to tumour cell microemboli in a patient with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Uga, Sayuri; Ikeda, Shuntaro; Matsukage, Sho-ichi; Hamada, Mareomi

    2012-09-30

    A 62-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of severe respiratory distress. Diagnostic imaging studies suggested the existence of inexplicable cor pulmonale. Although we immediately sought the aetiology of her severe condition, she died suddenly on the fourth day after admission. Postmortem autopsy revealed tumour cell microemboli in the small pulmonary arteries. In addition, tumour cell embolisation identical to that in primary breast cancer cells was also observed in microvessels in systemic multiple organs, such as the liver, brain, kidneys, spleen, uterus, bone marrow and adrenal glands-with simultaneous findings of peripheral infarction. Systemic tumour cell embolism mediated through the patent foramen ovale superimposed on pulmonary tumour cell emboli (PTCE) is considered to be the mechanism underlying inexplicable cor pulmonale. The rapid aggravation of her condition terminated in death.

  5. Use of Finite Difference Time Domain Simulations and Debye Theory for Modelling the Terahertz Reflection Response of Normal and Tumour Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Anthony J.; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma; Wallace, Vincent P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the capabilities of Debye theory combined with Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) methods to simulate the terahertz (THz) response of breast tissues. Being able to accurately model breast tissues in the THz regime would facilitate the understanding of image contrast parameters used in THz imaging of breast cancer. As a test case, the model was first validated using liquid water and simulated reflection pulses were compared to experimental measured pulses with very good agreement (p = 1.00). The responses of normal and cancerous breast tissues were simulated with Debye properties and the correlation with measured data was still high for tumour (p = 0.98) and less so for normal breast (p = 0.82). Sections of the time domain pulses showed clear differences that were also evident in the comparison of pulse parameter values. These deviations may arise from the presence of adipose and other inhomogeneities in the breast tissue that are not accounted for when using the Debye model. In conclusion, the study demonstrates the power of the model for simulating THz reflection imaging; however, for biological tissues extra Debye terms or a more detailed theory may be required to link THz image contrast to physiological composition and structural changes of breast tissue associated with differences between normal and tumour tissues. PMID:25010734

  6. Oncologic safety of breast conserving surgery after tumour downsizing by neoadjuvant therapy: a retrospective single centre cohort study.

    PubMed

    Fitzal, F; Riedl, O; Mittlböck, M; Dubsky, P; Bartsch, R; Steger, G; Jakesz, R; Gnant, M

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study is to analyse local recurrence rates in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (nCT) comparing mastecomized (MX) patients with those undergoing breast conserving therapy (BCT). Patients undergoing breast cancer surgery after nCT (3xCMF or 3-6xED) between 1995 and 2007 at our department were retrospectively analysed. The median follow up was 60 months for 308 patients. Patients who were downsized from MX to BCT with partial or complete response (n = 104) had a similar local recurrence free survival (LRFS) compared to patients who did not experience successful downsizing (n = 67) and finally undergoing MX (LRFS MX-BCT 81% vs. MX-MX 91%; P = 0.79). Uni- and multivariate analyses demonstrated that BCT itself was not an independent prognostic factor for a worse LRFS (P = 0.07 and 0.14). After no pathologic change or progressive disease the risk of local recurrence was increased in patients undergoing BCT (MX-BCT; n = 6 LRFS 66%) compared with MX (n = 44; LRFS 90%; P = 0.04). Overall survival in general was better for the BCT group (n = 197) compared with MX group (n = 111) regardless of clinical response (92% vs. 72%; P < 0.0001). Breast conservation, nodal negativity and low or medium grade histology were prognostic factors for an improved OS (P = 0.02, 0.01, 0.004). In conclusion, our study suggests that BCT is oncologically safe after tumour downsizing by nCT in patients primarily scheduled for mastectomy. These patients, however, should not be treated with breast conservation in the absence of any proven response after nCT.

  7. Wide-field optical coherence elastography for intraoperative assessment of tumour margins in breast cancer (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Wes M.; Chin, Lixin; Sampson, David D.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2016-03-01

    Incomplete excision of tumour margins is a major issue in breast-conserving surgery. Currently 20 - 60% of cases require a second surgical procedure required as a result of cancer recurrence. A number of techniques have been proposed to assess margin status, including frozen section analysis and imprint cytology. However, the recurrence rate after using these techniques remains very high. Over the last several years, our group has been developing optical coherence elastography (OCE) as a tool for the intraoperative assessment of tumour margins in breast cancer. We have reported a feasibility study on 65 ex vivo samples from patients undergoing mastectomy or wide local excision demonstrates the potential of OCE in differentiating benign from malignant tissue. In this study, malignant tissue was readily distinguished from surrounding relative tissue by a distinctive heterogeneous pattern in micro-elastograms. To date the largest field of view for a micro-elastogram is 20 x 20mm, however, lumpectomy samples are typically ~50 x 50 x 30mm. For OCE to progress as a useful clinical tool, elastograms must be acquired over larger areas to allow a greater portion of the surface area of lumpectomies to be assessed. Here, we propose a wide-field OCE scanner that utilizes a piezoelectric transducer with an internal diameter of 65mm. In this approach partially overlapped elastograms are stitched together forming a mosaic with overall dimensions of 50 x 50mm in a total acquisition time of 15 - 30 minutes. We present results using this approach on both tissue-mimicking phantoms and tissue, and discuss prospects for shorter acquisitions times.

  8. CA27.29 as a tumour marker for risk evaluation and therapy monitoring in primary breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rack, Brigitte; Jückstock, Julia; Trapp, Elisabeth; Weissenbacher, Tobias; Alunni-Fabbroni, Marianna; Schramm, Amelie; Widschwendter, Peter; Lato, Krisztian; Zwingers, Thomas; Lorenz, Ralf; Tesch, Hans; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Fasching, Peter; Mahner, Sven; Beckmann, Matthias W; Lichtenegger, Werner; Janni, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    Several trials showed that tumour markers are associated with an impaired prognosis for breast cancer. Whether earlier treatment can improve the course of the disease remains controversial. The SUCCESS Trial compares FEC (500/100/500)-docetaxel (100) vs. FEC (500/100/500)-docetaxel/gemcitabine (75/2000) as well as 2 vs. 5 years of zoledronate in high-risk primary breast cancer patients. In 2669 patients, CA27.29 was measured before and after chemotherapy with the ST AIA-PACK CA27.29 reagent for the AIA-600II automated enzyme immunoassay (Tosoh Bioscience, Belgium). Values above 31 U/ml were considered positive. Of the patients, 7.6 % (n = 202, mean 19, range 3-410) and 19.1 % (n = 511, mean 21, range 3-331) had elevated marker levels before and after chemotherapy, respectively. Of the patients, 4.9 and 78 % showed elevated and low CA27.29, respectively, at both time points. After treatment, 35 % of the pre-therapy positive patients were negative, and 15 % of the initially negative patients became positive. The correlation between both time points was significant (p < 0.0001). No correlations among nodal status, grading, hormonal status, HER2 status and CA27.29 levels were found. However, tumour size (p = 0.02), older age (p < 0.001) and post-menopausal status (p = 0.006) were significantly associated with higher CA27.29 levels. Before treatment, the prevalence of elevated CA27.29 was equally distributed between both treatment arms, whereas after chemotherapy, 13.7 % of the patients in the FEC-doc arm showed an increased level vs. 25.4 % of the patients in the FEC-doc/gemcitabine arm (p < 0.0001). However, we could not show a significant association between the G-CSF application (yes vs. no) and CA27.29 status before/after chemotherapy (p = 0.75). These results indicate a close relationship between CA27.29 levels and tumour mass. Increased values after the completion of chemotherapy might be attributed to treatment effects and should be

  9. A Clinicopathological Study of Benign Phyllodes Tumour of Breast with Emphasis on Unusual Features

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Benign Phyllodes Tumours (PTs) are rare fibroepithelial neoplasms that resemble fibroadenoma. But unlike fibroadenoma, benign PT can recur and both stromal & epithelial components can progress to malignancy. Contrary to earlier belief that benign PT is a stromal neoplasm and possibly arises from fibroadenoma, more recent molecular studies have suggested that both stroma and epithelium can become neoplastic. Sometimes, benign PT can occur synchronously with fibroadenoma. Here histomorphologic analysis of eleven cases of benign PT are presented including some unusual features. Materials and Methods Eleven cases of benign PT diagnosed between Dec 2014 and Jan 2016 in the Department of Pathology were studied. The demographic and clinicopathological features were analysed. Results The most common age group affected was 20-30 years (range: 13-45). Clinical features included pain, lump and bleeding from nipple. The tumour size varied from 2.5-18 cm in diameter. H&E stained sections showed secondary changes (haemorrhage, myxoid, change, cystic degeneration), epithelial hyperplasia (8), squamous & columnar metaplasia (1), benign tubular adenoma like areas (1), Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) (1), Invasive Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) (1), Pseudoangiomatous Stromal Hyperplasia (PASH) (1), histologic infarction (2), tumour necrosis (1) and synchronous fibroadenoma (1). Unusual histologic features included atypical ductal hyperplasia, DCIS, IDC, synchronous fibroadenoma and tubular adenoma like areas arising within benign PT. Conclusion This study shows a spectrum of hyperplastic, metaplastic, dysplastic, benign, in-situ-malignancy and even invasive ductal malignancy occurring in benign PT. Therefore adequate and extensive sampling is recommended for accurate diagnosis. PMID:27630851

  10. WT1 expression in breast cancer disrupts the epithelial/mesenchymal balance of tumour cells and correlates with the metabolic response to docetaxel

    PubMed Central

    Artibani, Mara; Sims, Andrew H.; Slight, Joan; Aitken, Stuart; Thornburn, Anna; Muir, Morwenna; Brunton, Valerie G.; Del-Pozo, Jorge; Morrison, Linda R.; Katz, Elad; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Hohenstein, Peter

    2017-01-01

    WT1 is a transcription factor which regulates the epithelial-mesenchymal balance during embryonic development and, if mutated, can lead to the formation of Wilms’ tumour, the most common paediatric kidney cancer. Its expression has also been reported in several adult tumour types, including breast cancer, and usually correlates with poor outcome. However, published data is inconsistent and the role of WT1 in this malignancy remains unclear. Here we provide a complete study of WT1 expression across different breast cancer subtypes as well as isoform specific expression analysis. Using in vitro cell lines, clinical samples and publicly available gene expression datasets, we demonstrate that WT1 plays a role in regulating the epithelial-mesenchymal balance of breast cancer cells and that WT1-expressing tumours are mainly associated with a mesenchymal phenotype. WT1 gene expression also correlates with CYP3A4 levels and is associated with poorer response to taxane treatment. Our work is the first to demonstrate that the known association between WT1 expression in breast cancer and poor prognosis is potentially due to cancer-related epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and poor chemotherapy response. PMID:28345629

  11. Initial Fludeoxyglucose (18F) Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (FDG-PET/CT) Imaging of Breast Cancer – Correlations with the Primary Tumour and Locoregional Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Sevin; Gültekin, Salih Sinan; Ayaz, Ümit Yaşar; Dilli, Alper

    2017-01-01

    Summary Backround We aimed to evaluate initial PET/CT features of primary tumour and locoregional metastatic lymph nodes (LNs) in breast cancer and to look for potential relationships between several parameters from PET/CT. Material/Methods Twenty-three women (mean age; 48.66±12.23 years) with a diagnosis of primary invasive ductal carcinoma were included. They underwent PET/CT imaging for the initial tumour staging and had no evidence of distant metastates. Patients were divided into two groups. The LABC (locally advanced breast cancer) group included 17 patients with ipsilateral axillary lymph node (LN) metastases. The Non-LABC group consisted of six patients without LN metastases. PET/CT parameters including tumour size, axillary LN size, SUVmax of ipsilateral axillary LNs (SUVmax-LN), SUVmax of primary tumour (SUVmax-T) and NT ratios (SUVmax-LN/SUVmax-T) were compared between the groups. Correlations between the above-mentioned PET/CT parameters in the LABC group as well as the correlation between tumour size and SUVmax-T within each group were evaluated statistically. Results The mean values of the initial PET/CT parameters in the LABC group were significantly higher than those of the non-LABC group (p<0.05). The correlation between tumour size and SUVmax-T value within both LABC and non-LABC groups was statistically significant (p<0.05). In the LABC group, the correlations between the size and SUVmax-LN values of metastatic axillary LNs, between tumour size and metastatic axillary LN size, between SUVmax-T values and metastatic axillary LN size, between SUVmax-T and SUVmax-LN values, and between tumour size and SUVmax-LN values were all significant (p<0.05). Conclusions We found significant correlations between PET/CT parameters of the primary tumour and those of metastatic axillary LNs. Patients with LN metastases had relatively larger primary tumours and higher SUVmax values. PMID:28105247

  12. Not all secondary bone tumours are secondaries. Concurrent metastatic breast carcinoma and chondrosarcoma of the femur.

    PubMed

    Nath, Preethy; Sankey, Elizabeth; Murray, Elisabeth; Kurup, Harish

    2015-04-09

    We present a case of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the breast in a patient who sustained a pathological fracture of the distal femur. Histology of the distal femur lesion excised at the time of endoprosthetic replacement confirmed this to be a primary chondrosarcoma. We have reviewed the literature and identified previously documented cases of concurrent breast carcinoma and chondrosarcoma of bone. A high index of suspicion is warranted and the diagnosis must be first confirmed before rushing to internal fixation (therapeutic or prophylactic) assuming them to be secondary bone lesions from the known primary cancer even in patients with multiple metastases.

  13. Fractal analysis for assessing tumour grade in microscopic images of breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambasco, Mauro; Costello, Meghan; Newcomb, Chris; Magliocco, Anthony M.

    2007-03-01

    In 2006, breast cancer is expected to continue as the leading form of cancer diagnosed in women, and the second leading cause of cancer mortality in this group. A method that has proven useful for guiding the choice of treatment strategy is the assessment of histological tumor grade. The grading is based upon the mitosis count, nuclear pleomorphism, and tubular formation, and is known to be subject to inter-observer variability. Since cancer grade is one of the most significant predictors of prognosis, errors in grading can affect patient management and outcome. Hence, there is a need to develop a breast cancer-grading tool that is minimally operator dependent to reduce variability associated with the current grading system, and thereby reduce uncertainty that may impact patient outcome. In this work, we explored the potential of a computer-based approach using fractal analysis as a quantitative measure of cancer grade for breast specimens. More specifically, we developed and optimized computational tools to compute the fractal dimension of low- versus high-grade breast sections and found them to be significantly different, 1.3+/-0.10 versus 1.49+/-0.10, respectively (Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, p<0.001). These results indicate that fractal dimension (a measure of morphologic complexity) may be a useful tool for demarcating low- versus high-grade cancer specimens, and has potential as an objective measure of breast cancer grade. Such prognostic value could provide more sensitive and specific information that would reduce inter-observer variability by aiding the pathologist in grading cancers.

  14. Predictive diagnosis of the risk of breast cancer recurrence after surgery by single-particle quantum dot imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gonda, Kohsuke; Miyashita, Minoru; Higuchi, Hideo; Tada, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Watanabe, Mika; Ishida, Takanori; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer, the prognosis of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive patients (20–25%) has been dramatically improved by the clinical application of the anti-HER2 antibody drugs trastuzumab and pertuzumab. However, the clinical outcomes of HER2-negative cases with a poor prognosis have not improved, and novel therapeutic antibody drugs or diagnostic molecular markers of prognosis are urgently needed. Here, we targeted protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) as a new biomarker for HER2-negative patients. The developed anti-PAR1 antibody inhibited PAR1 activation by matrix metalloprotease 1 and thereby prevented cancer-cell migration and invasion. To estimate PAR1 expression levels in HER2-negative patient tissues using the antibody, user-friendly immunohistochemistry with fluorescence nanoparticles or quantum dots (QDs) was developed. Previously, immunohistochemistry with QDs was affected by tissue autofluorescence, making quantitative measurement extremely difficult. We significantly improved the quantitative sensitivity of immunohistochemistry with QDs by using an autofluorescence-subtracted image and single-QD imaging. The immunohistochemistry showed that PAR1 expression was strongly correlated with relapse-free survival time in HER2-negative breast cancer patients. Therefore, the developed anti-PAR1 antibody is a strong candidate for use as an anticancer drug and a prognostic biomarker for HER2-negative patients. PMID:26392299

  15. The sodium channel β1 subunit mediates outgrowth of neurite-like processes on breast cancer cells and promotes tumour growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michaela; Millican-Slater, Rebecca; Forrest, Lorna C; Brackenbury, William J

    2014-11-15

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) are heteromeric proteins composed of pore-forming α subunits and smaller β subunits. The β subunits are multifunctional channel modulators and are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). β1, encoded by SCN1B, is best characterized in the central nervous system (CNS), where it plays a critical role in regulating electrical excitability, neurite outgrowth and migration during development. β1 is also expressed in breast cancer (BCa) cell lines, where it regulates adhesion and migration in vitro. In the present study, we found that SCN1B mRNA/β1 protein were up-regulated in BCa specimens, compared with normal breast tissue. β1 upregulation substantially increased tumour growth and metastasis in a xenograft model of BCa. β1 over-expression also increased vascularization and reduced apoptosis in the primary tumours, and β1 over-expressing tumour cells had an elongate morphology. In vitro, β1 potentiated outgrowth of processes from BCa cells co-cultured with fibroblasts, via trans-homophilic adhesion. β1-mediated process outgrowth in BCa cells required the presence and activity of fyn kinase, and Na(+) current, thus replicating the mechanism by which β1 regulates neurite outgrowth in CNS neurons. We conclude that when present in breast tumours, β1 enhances pathological growth and cellular dissemination. This study is the first demonstration of a functional role for β1 in tumour growth and metastasis in vivo. We propose that β1 warrants further study as a potential biomarker and targeting β1-mediated adhesion interactions may have value as a novel anti-cancer therapy.

  16. A class of extracellular vesicles from breast cancer cells activates VEGF receptors and tumour angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qiyu; Zhang, Chengliang; Lum, David; Druso, Joseph E.; Blank, Bryant; Wilson, Kristin F.; Welm, Alana; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Non-classical secretory vesicles, collectively referred to as extracellular vesicles (EVs), have been implicated in different aspects of cancer cell survival and metastasis. Here, we describe how a specific class of EVs, called microvesicles (MVs), activates VEGF receptors and tumour angiogenesis through a unique 90 kDa form of VEGF (VEGF90K). We show that VEGF90K is generated by the crosslinking of VEGF165, catalysed by the enzyme tissue transglutaminase, and associates with MVs through its interaction with the chaperone Hsp90. We further demonstrate that MV-associated VEGF90K has a weakened affinity for Bevacizumab, causing Bevacizumab to be ineffective in blocking MV-dependent VEGF receptor activation. However, treatment with an Hsp90 inhibitor releases VEGF90K from MVs, restoring the sensitivity of VEGF90K to Bevacizumab. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which cancer cell-derived MVs influence the tumour microenvironment and highlight the importance of recognizing their unique properties when considering drug treatment strategies. PMID:28205552

  17. Role of HER2 mutations in refractory metastatic breast cancers: targeted sequencing results in patients with refractory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeon Hee; Shin, Hyun-Tae; Jung, Hae Hyun; Choi, Yoon-La; Ahn, TaeJin; Park, Kyunghee; Lee, Aeri; Do, In-Gu; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Woong-Yang; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2015-10-13

    In women with metastatic breast cancer (MBC), introduction of the anti-HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor-2) directed therapies including trastuzumab, pertuzumab, lapatinib, and/or trastuzumab-DM1 has markedly improved overall survival. However, not all cases of HER2-positive breast tumours derive similar benefit from HER2-directed therapy, and a significant number of patients experience disease progression because of primary or acquired resistance to anti-HER2-directed therapies. We integrated genomic and clinicopathological analyses in a cohort of patients with refractory breast cancer to anti-HER2 therapies to identify the molecular basis for clinical heterogeneity. To study the molecular basis underlying refractory MBC, we obtained 36 MBC tumours tissues and used next-generation sequencing to investigate the mutational and transcriptional profiles of 83 genes. We focused on HER2 mutational sites and HER2 pathways to identify the roles of HER2 mutations and the HER2 pathway in the refractoriness to anti-HER2 therapies. Analysis using massively parallel sequencing platform, CancerSCAN™, revealed that HER2 mutations were found in six of 36 patients (16.7%). One patient was ER (estrogen receptor)-positive and HER2-negative and the other five HER2 mutated patients were HER2-positive and HR (hormone receptor)-negative. Most importantly, four of these five patients did not show any durable clinical response to HER2-directed therapies. The HER2 pathway score obtained through transcriptional analyses identified that Growth Receptor Biding protein 2 (GRB2) was the most significantly down regulated gene in the HER2 mutated samples. Detection of HER2 mutations using higher deep DNA sequencing may identify a predictive biomarker of resistance to HER2-directed therapy. Functional validation is warranted.

  18. Inhibition of bone resorption, rather than direct cytotoxicity, mediates the anti-tumour actions of ibandronate and osteoprotegerin in a murine model of breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Zhou, Hong; Brennan, Karen; Blair, Julie M; Modzelewski, James R K; Seibel, Markus J; Dunstan, Colin R

    2007-02-01

    Inhibition of bone resorption either by bisphosphonate (BP) treatment or by blocking RANKL signalling with osteoprotegerin (OPG) has been shown to reduce tumour burden in bone and inhibit bone destruction in murine xenograft models of breast cancer. However, whether the anti-tumour effect of OPG or BP in bone is mediated by inhibition of bone resorption or by direct effects on tumour cells is uncertain. The current study is designed to investigate anti-tumour effects of OPG and ibandronate (IBN), dosed alone or in combination, on tumour growth to determine if there is experimental support for combination treatments and to provide evidence for the presence of direct anti-tumour effects. To this aim, 10 microl (5 x 10(6) cells/ml) of the bone-seeking MDA-MB-231 (Tx-SA) cell line was injected intra-tibially into nude mice. After 10 days, when the tumours were evident radiologically, mice were treated with vehicle, OPG (1 mg/kg/day), ibandronate (IBN) (160 microg/kg/day) or IBN and OPG at the same doses (IBN+OPG) for a week, and the effects of each treatment on lytic lesions, tumour cell growth, cell apoptosis and proliferation were measured by radiography, immunohistochemistry and histomorphometry. Compared to vehicle controls, in vivo treatment with OPG, IBN, or IBN+OPG, each prevented the expansion of osteolytic bone lesions (increase in lytic lesion area day 10 to day 17: OPG -3.2%, IBN 6.6%, IBN+OPG 3.6%, Vehicle 232.5%; p<0.01). Treatment with OPG, IBN or IBN+OPG each produced similar reductions in tumour area relative to vehicle-treated mice (OPG 52%, IBN 54%, IBNp and OPG 48%, p<0.01 vs. vehicle) OPG and IBN alone and in combination each produced a similar increase in cancer cell apoptosis (OPG 330%, IBN 342%, IBN and OPG 347%, p<0.01 vs. vehicle) and a decrease in cancer cell proliferation (OPG 59%, IBN 62%, IBN and OPG 58%, p<0.05 vs. vehicle). Our findings indicate that (i) combined treatment with OPG and a bisphosphonate is not significantly more effective

  19. Biochemical signatures of in vitro radiation response in human lung, breast and prostate tumour cells observed with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Q.; Jirasek, A.; Lum, J. J.; Brolo, A. G.

    2011-11-01

    This work applies noninvasive single-cell Raman spectroscopy (RS) and principal component analysis (PCA) to analyze and correlate radiation-induced biochemical changes in a panel of human tumour cell lines that vary by tissue of origin, p53 status and intrinsic radiosensitivity. Six human tumour cell lines, derived from prostate (DU145, PC3 and LNCaP), breast (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7) and lung (H460), were irradiated in vitro with single fractions (15, 30 or 50 Gy) of 6 MV photons. Remaining live cells were harvested for RS analysis at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h post-irradiation, along with unirradiated controls. Single-cell Raman spectra were acquired from 20 cells per sample utilizing a 785 nm excitation laser. All spectra (200 per cell line) were individually post-processed using established methods and the total data set for each cell line was analyzed with PCA using standard algorithms. One radiation-induced PCA component was detected for each cell line by identification of statistically significant changes in the PCA score distributions for irradiated samples, as compared to unirradiated samples, in the first 24-72 h post-irradiation. These RS response signatures arise from radiation-induced changes in cellular concentrations of aromatic amino acids, conformational protein structures and certain nucleic acid and lipid functional groups. Correlation analysis between the radiation-induced PCA components separates the cell lines into three distinct RS response categories: R1 (H460 and MCF7), R2 (MDA-MB-231 and PC3) and R3 (DU145 and LNCaP). These RS categories partially segregate according to radiosensitivity, as the R1 and R2 cell lines are radioresistant (SF2 > 0.6) and the R3 cell lines are radiosensitive (SF2 < 0.5). The R1 and R2 cell lines further segregate according to p53 gene status, corroborated by cell cycle analysis post-irradiation. Potential radiation-induced biochemical response mechanisms underlying our RS observations are proposed, such as (1) the regulated

  20. Glucocorticoid resistance of migration and gene expression in a daughter MDA-MB-231 breast tumour cell line selected for high metastatic potential

    PubMed Central

    Fietz, Ebony R.; Keenan, Christine R.; López-Campos, Guillermo; Tu, Yan; Johnstone, Cameron N.; Harris, Trudi; Stewart, Alastair G.

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are commonly used to prevent chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting despite a lack of understanding of their direct effect on cancer progression. Recent studies suggest that glucocorticoids inhibit cancer cell migration. However, this action has not been investigated in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast tumour cells, although activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is associated with a worse prognosis in ER-negative breast cancers. In this study we have explored the effect of glucocorticoids on the migration of the ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast tumour cell line and the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231-HM.LNm5 cell line that was generated through in vivo cycling. We show for the first time that glucocorticoids inhibit 2- and 3-dimensional migration of MDA-MB-231 cells. Selection of cells for high metastatic potential resulted in a less migratory cell phenotype that was resistant to regulation by glucocorticoids and showed decreased GR receptor expression. The emergence of glucocorticoid resistance during metastatic selection may partly explain the apparent disparity between the clinical and in vitro evidence regarding the actions of glucocorticoids in cancer. These findings highlight the highly plastic nature of tumour cells, and underscore the need to more fully understand the direct effect of glucocorticoid treatment on different stages of metastatic progression. PMID:28262792

  1. Effect of Tumour Necrosis Factor-Alpha on Estrogen Metabolic Pathways in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Marwa; Shouman, Samia; El-Merzebany, Mahmoud; Kilic, Gokhan; Veenstra, Timothy; Saeed, Muhammad; Wagih, Mohamed; Diaz-Arrastia, Concepcion; Patel, Deepa; Salama, Salama

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a proinflammatory cytokine that has been linked to breast cancer development. Estrogen metabolic pathway is also involved in breast carcinogenesis and DNA adducts formation. In this study we investigated the effect of TNF-α on the estrogen metabolic pathway in MCF-7, a breast cancer cell line. Capillary liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were used for analysis of estrogen metabolites and estrogen-DNA adducts levels respectively. Reporter gene assay, Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real time RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to assess the expression of estrogen metabolizing genes and enzymes. TNF-α significantly increased the total EM and decreased the estrone (E1) / 17-β estradiol (E2) ratio. Moreover, it altered the expression of genes and enzymes involved in E2 activation and deactivation pathways e.g. Cytochrome P-450 1A1 (CYP1A1), Cytochrome P-450 1B1 (CYP1B1), Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) and Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). In addition, there were increased levels of some catechol estrogens e.g. 4-hydroxy-estrone (4-OHE1) and 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2) with decreased levels of methylated catechols e.g. 2-methoxy estradiol (2-MeOE2). DNA adducts especially 4-OHE1-[2]-1-N3 Adenine was significantly increased. TNF-α directs the estrogen metabolism into more hormonally active and carcinogenic products in MCF-7. This may implicate a new possible explanation for inflammation associated breast cancer. PMID:22866165

  2. Optimised nuclear medicine method for tumour marking and sentinel node detection in occult primary breast lesions.

    PubMed

    De Cicco, C; Trifirò, G; Intra, M; Marotta, G; Ciprian, A; Frasson, A; Prisco, G; Luini, A; Viale, G; Paganelli, G

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of sentinel node (SN) biopsy in occult breast lesions with different radiopharmaceuticals and to establish the optimal lymphoscintigraphic method to detect both occult lesions and SNs (SNOLL: sentinel node and occult lesion localisation). Two hundred and twenty-seven consecutive patients suspected to have clinically occult breast carcinoma were enrolled in the study. In addition to the radioguided occult lesion localisation (ROLL) procedure, using macroaggregates of technetium-99m labelled human serum albumin (MAA) injected directly into the lesion, lymphoscintigraphy was performed with nanocolloids (NC) injected in a peritumoral (group I) or a subdermal site (group II). In group III, a sole injection of NC was done into the lesion in order to perform both ROLL and SNOLL. Overall, axillary SNs were identified in 205 of the 227 patients (90.3%). In 12/62 (19.4%) patients of group I and 9/79 (11.4%) patients of group III, radioactive nodes were not visualised, whereas SNs were successfully localised in 85 of 86 patients of group II ( P<0.001). Pathological findings revealed breast carcinoma in 148/227 patients (65.2%) and benign lesions in 79 (34.8%). A total of 131 axillary SNs were removed in 118 patients with breast carcinoma; intraoperative examination of the SNs revealed metastatic involvement in 16 out of 96 cases of invasive carcinoma (16.7%). It is concluded that the combination of the ROLL procedure with direct injection of MAA into the lesion and lymphoscintigraphy performed with subdermal injection of radiocolloids represents the method of choice for accurate localisation of both non-palpable lesions and SNs.

  3. Real-time RT-PCR systems for CTC detection from blood samples of breast cancer and gynaecological tumour patients (Review).

    PubMed

    Andergassen, Ulrich; Kölbl, Alexandra C; Mahner, Sven; Jeschke, Udo

    2016-04-01

    Cells, which detach from a primary epithelial tumour and migrate through lymphatic vessels and blood stream are called 'circulating tumour cells'. These cells are considered to be the main root of remote metastasis and are correlated to a worse prognosis concerning progression-free and overall survival of the patients. Therefore, the detection of the minimal residual disease is of great importance regarding therapeutic decisions. Many different detection strategies are already available, but only one method, the CellSearch® system, reached FDA approval. The present review focusses on the detection of circulating tumour cells by means of real-time PCR, a highly sensitive method based on differences in gene expression between normal and malignant cells. Strategies for an enrichment of tumour cells are mentioned, as well as a large panel of potential marker genes. Drawbacks and advantages of the technique are elucidated, whereas, the greatest advantage might be, that by selection of appropriate marker genes, also tumour cells, which have already undergone epithelial to mesenchymal transition can be detected. Finally, the application of real-time PCR in different gynaecological malignancies is described, with breast cancer being the most studied cancer entity.

  4. Even With Very Small Breast Tumors, Studies Find HER2 Status Matters | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Two retrospective studies have found that women with HER2-positive breast tumors (that is, tumors that produce too much of the HER2 protein) that are 1 centimeter or smaller had a higher risk of their disease returning within 5 years than women with similarly small HER2-negative tumors. |

  5. Refining Post-Surgical Therapy for Women with Lymph Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, women with HER2-negative, HR-positive breast cancer and 1-3 positive lymph nodes with recurrence scores of 25 or lower will be randomized to undergo adjuvant chemotherapy before starting endocrine therapy or to begin endocrine therapy.

  6. Combination of microdissection and microarray analysis to identify gene expression changes between differentially located tumour cells in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gang; Reynolds, Louise; Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana; Gillett, Cheryl E; Dublin, Edwin A; Marshall, John F; Barnes, Diana; D'Arrigo, Corrado; Van Trappen, Philippe O; Lemoine, Nicholas R; Hart, Ian R

    2003-06-12

    Comparison of gene expression changes between cancer cells at the periphery and in the centre of breast cancers was performed using a combination of microdissection and microarray analysis. Cancer cells from the two areas were pooled separately from five patients with ductal carcinoma in situ and separately from five patients with frankly invasive cancer. Limited total RNA, 100-200 ng, from this microdissected tissue required use of the Atlas SMART trade mark Probe Amplification Kit to synthesize and amplify cDNA and make (33)P-labelled probes. Probes were then hybridized to Atlas Human Cancer 1.2 Arrays containing 1176 known genes. Triplicate analysis revealed that 22 genes changed their expression levels in the periphery relative to the central region: 15 upregulated and seven downregulated (arbitrary threshold of 1.5-fold or greater). Differences in RNA levels were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR for two of the genes and by changes in protein levels, detected by immunohistochemistry, for a couple of representative gene products. Thus, changes in gene expression associated with variation in microanatomical location of neoplastic cells can be detected within even small developing tumour masses.

  7. RUNX2 correlates with subtype-specific breast cancer in a human tissue microarray, and ectopic expression of Runx2 perturbs differentiation in the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Laura; Ferrari, Nicola; Terry, Anne; Bell, Margaret; Mohammed, Zahra M; Orange, Clare; Jenkins, Alma; Muller, William J; Gusterson, Barry A; Neil, James C; Edwards, Joanne; Morris, Joanna S; Cameron, Ewan R; Blyth, Karen

    2014-05-01

    RUNX2, a master regulator of osteogenesis, is oncogenic in the lymphoid lineage; however, little is known about its role in epithelial cancers. Upregulation of RUNX2 in cell lines correlates with increased invasiveness and the capacity to form osteolytic disease in models of breast and prostate cancer. However, most studies have analysed the effects of this gene in a limited number of cell lines and its role in primary breast cancer has not been resolved. Using a human tumour tissue microarray, we show that high RUNX2 expression is significantly associated with oestrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR)/HER2-negative breast cancers and that patients with high RUNX2 expression have a poorer survival rate than those with negative or low expression. We confirm RUNX2 as a gene that has a potentially important functional role in triple-negative breast cancer. To investigate the role of this gene in breast cancer, we made a transgenic model in which Runx2 is specifically expressed in murine mammary epithelium under the control of the mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV) promoter. We show that ectopic Runx2 perturbs normal development in pubertal and lactating animals, delaying ductal elongation and inhibiting lobular alveolar differentiation. We also show that the Runx2 transgene elicits age-related, pre-neoplastic changes in the mammary epithelium of older transgenic animals, suggesting that elevated RUNX2 expression renders such tissue more susceptible to oncogenic changes and providing further evidence that this gene might have an important, context-dependent role in breast cancer.

  8. St Gallen molecular subtypes in primary breast cancer and matched lymph node metastases - aspects on distribution and prognosis for patients with luminal A tumours: results from a prospective randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The St Gallen surrogate molecular subtype definitions classify the oestrogen (ER) positive breast cancer into the luminal A and luminal B subtypes according to proliferation rate and/or expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) with differences in prognosis and chemo-responsiveness. Primary tumours and lymph node metastases might represent different malignant clones, but in the clinical setting only the biomarker profile of the primary tumour is used for selection of adjuvant systemic treatment. The present study aimed to classify primary breast tumours and matched lymph node metastases into luminal A, luminal B, HER2-positive and triple-negative subtypes and compare the distributions. Methods Eighty-five patients with available tumour tissue from both locations were classified. The distribution of molecular subtypes in primary tumours and corresponding lymph node metastases were compared, and related to 5-year distant disease-free survival (DDFS). Results The St Gallen molecular subtypes were discordant between primary tumours and matched lymph node metastases in 11% of the patients (p = 0.06). The luminal A subtype in the primary tumour shifted to a subtype with a worse prognostic profile in the lymph node metastases in 7 of 45 cases (16%) whereas no shift in the opposite direction was observed (0/38) (p = 0.02). All subtypes had an increased hazard for developing distant metastasis during the first 5 years after diagnosis in both primary breast tumours and matched lymph node metastases, compared with the luminal A subtype. Conclusion The classification according to the St Gallen molecular subtypes in primary tumours and matched lymph node metastases, implicates a shift to a more aggressive subtype in synchronous lymph node metastases compared to the primary breast tumour. The selection of systemic adjuvant therapy might benefit from taking the molecular subtypes in the metastatic node into account. PMID:24274821

  9. C-erbB-2 onco-protein expression in breast cancer: relationship to tumour characteristics and short-term survival in Universiti Kebansaan Malaysia Medical Centre.

    PubMed

    Sharifah, N A; Lee, B R; Clarence-Ko, C H; Tan, G C; Shiran, M S; Naqiyah, I; Rohaizak, M; Fuad, I; Tamil, A M

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest cancer affecting females in Malaysia, contributing 31% of all newly diagnosed cases amongst Malaysian women. The present retrospective cohort study evaluated the relationship between cerbB- 2 onco-protein overexpression with various tumour characteristics and survival rate of breast cancer patients treated at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) between 1996-2000. CerbB- 2 oncoprotein overexpression was determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and tumors showing 2+ positivity were verified by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH). One hundred and seventy two patients were eligible for the study with a short-term follow-up (median) of 5.1 years. C-erbB-2 oncoprotein overexpression correlated with lymph node positivity, oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) negativity. Univariate analyses showed shorter disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with cerbB- 2 oncoprotein overexpression, Malay ethnicity, higher tumour grade, lymph node positivity, ER and PR negativity. In a subgroup of patients with c-erbB-2 oncoprotein overexpression, a shorter OS was observed in those with lymph node positivity, ER and PR negativity. In multivariate prognostic analysis, lymph node status, ER status and tumour grading were the strongest independent prognostic factors for both OS and DFS. However, c-erbB-2 status was not a significantly independent prognostic factor, even in subsets with lymph node positive or negative group. C-erbB-2 oncoprotein overexpression correlated well with lymph node status, ER and PR. Shorter OS and DFS were significantly observed in patients with c-erbB-2 oncoprotein overexpression. Lymph node status, ER status and tumour grading were the only three independent prognostic factors for OS and DFS in this study. Although c-erbB-2 expression is obviously important from a biological standpoint, multivariate analysis showed that it is not an independent prognostic

  10. A randomised controlled phase II trial of pre-operative celecoxib treatment reveals anti-tumour transcriptional response in primary breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is frequently over-expressed in primary breast cancer. In transgenic breast cancer models, over-expression of COX-2 leads to tumour formation while COX-2 inhibition exerts anti-tumour effects in breast cancer cell lines. To further determine the effect of COX-2 inhibition in primary breast cancer, we aimed to identify transcriptional changes in breast cancer tissues of patients treated with the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib. Methods In a single-centre double-blind phase II study, thirty-seven breast cancer patients were randomised to receive either pre-operative celecoxib (400 mg) twice daily for two to three weeks (n = 22) or a placebo according to the same schedule (n = 15). Gene expression in fresh-frozen pre-surgical biopsies (before treatment) and surgical excision specimens (after treatment) was profiled by using Affymetrix arrays. Differentially expressed genes and altered pathways were bioinformatically identified. Expression of selected genes was validated by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Immunohistochemical protein expression analyses of the proliferation marker Ki-67, the apoptosis marker cleaved caspase-3 and the neo-angiogenesis marker CD34 served to evaluate biological response. Results We identified 972 and 586 significantly up- and down-regulated genes, respectively, in celecoxib-treated specimens. Significant expression changes in six out of eight genes could be validated by qPCR. Pathway analyses revealed over-representation of deregulated genes in the networks of proliferation, cell cycle, extracellular matrix biology, and inflammatory immune response. The Ki-67 mean change relative to baseline was -29.1% (P = 0.019) and -8.2% (P = 0.384) in the treatment and control arm, respectively. Between treatment groups, the change in Ki-67 was statistically significant (P = 0.029). Cleaved caspase-3 and CD34 expression were not significantly different between the celecoxib-treated and placebo-treated groups

  11. The novel desmopressin analogue [V4Q5]dDAVP inhibits angiogenesis, tumour growth and metastases in vasopressin type 2 receptor-expressing breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    GARONA, JUAN; PIFANO, MARINA; ORLANDO, ULISES D.; PASTRIAN, MARIA B.; IANNUCCI, NANCY B.; ORTEGA, HUGO H.; PODESTA, ERNESTO J.; GOMEZ, DANIEL E.; RIPOLL, GISELLE V.; ALONSO, DANIEL F.

    2015-01-01

    Desmopressin (dDAVP) is a safe haemostatic agent with previously reported antitumour activity. It acts as a selective agonist for the V2 vasopressin membrane receptor (V2r) present on tumour cells and microvasculature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the novel peptide derivative [V4Q5]dDAVP in V2r-expressing preclinical mouse models of breast cancer. We assessed antitumour effects of [V4Q5]dDAVP using human MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells, as well as the highly metastatic mouse F3II cell line. Effect on in vitro cancer cell growth was evaluated by cell proliferation and clonogenic assays. Cell cycle distribution was analysed by flow cytometry. In order to study the effect of intravenously administered [V4Q5]dDAVP on tumour growth and angiogenesis, breast cancer xenografts were generated in athymic mice. F3II cells were injected into syngeneic mice to evaluate the effect of [V4Q5]dDAVP on spontaneous and experimental metastatic spread. In vitro cytostatic effects of [V4Q5]dDAVP against breast cancer cells were greater than those of dDAVP, and associated with V2r-activated signal transduction and partial cell cycle arrest. In MDA-MB-231 xenografts, [V4Q5]dDAVP (0.3 μg/kg, thrice a week) reduced tumour growth and angiogenesis. Treatment of F3II mammary tumour-bearing immunocompetent mice resulted in complete inhibition of metastatic progression. [V4Q5]dDAVP also displayed greater antimetastatic efficacy than dDAVP on experimental lung colonisation by F3II cells. The novel analogue was well tolerated in preliminary acute toxicology studies, at doses ≥300-fold above that required for anti-angiogenic/antimetastatic effects. Our data establish the preclinical activity of [V4Q5]dDAVP in aggressive breast cancer, providing the rationale for further clinical trials. PMID:25846632

  12. Na (+)/H (+)exchange in the tumour microenvironment: does NHE1 drive breast cancer carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Amith, Schammim R; Fong, Sunny; Baksh, Shairaz; Fliegel, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Ionic messengers signal several critical events in carcinogenesis, including metastasis, the leading cause of patient mortality. The aberrant metabolic, proliferative and anti-apoptotic nature of neoplastic cells can be traced to the abnormal expression of their ion transporters and related signalling networks. In this manuscript, we discuss Na(+)/H(+)flux, as mediated by the sodium-hydrogen exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1), a major ion transporter involved in tumourigenesis. Allosteric activation of NHE1 by external stimuli is controlled by phosphorylation of key amino acids on its cytosolic C-terminal tail, which also acts as a signal scaffold for its regulation by intracellular protein and lipid binding partners. In breast cancer cells, pH homeostasis and proton dynamics are disrupted early in transformation. This constitutively activates NHE1, causing a reversal of the plasma membrane pH gradient, resulting in a more alkaline intracellular pH and a more acidic extracellular pH. NHE1-mediated cellular alkalinization potentiates cytoskeletal remodelling, mobilizing cells for directed migration. Concomitant redistribution of NHE1 to invadopodia, where increased proton extrusion promotes proteolytic digestion of the extracellular matrix, primes cells for invasion into the bloodstream. NHE1 hyperactivity therefore heralds an important stage in cancer cell development, critically facilitating the acquisition of the invasive phenotype necessary for metastasis to occur. The potential for targeting NHE1 in the development of novel chemotherapeutic applications is explored.

  13. Circulating tumour cells are linked to plasma D-dimer levels in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mego, Michal; Zuo, Zhuang; Gao, Hui; Cohen, Evan N; Giordano, Antonio; Tin, Sanda; Anfossi, Simone; Jackson, Summer; Woodward, Wendy; Ueno, Naoto T; Valero, Vicente; Alvarez, Ricardo H; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Khoury, Joseph D; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Reuben, James M

    2015-03-01

    Cancer is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Elevated plasma D-dimer and fibrinogen levels are also risk factors for VTE. Furthermore, in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC), the presence of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) is a risk factor for VTE. The relationship between CTCs and D-dimer is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether CTCs correlate with plasma D-dimer level, fibrinogen level, and risk of VTE in MBC. This prospective study included 47 MBC patients treated from July 2009 through December 2010 at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. CTCs in peripheral blood were detected and enumerated using the CellSearch system. D-dimer and fibrinogen were measured in plasma at the time of CTC detection. Thirty-three patients (70 %) had ≥ 1 CTC, and 22 patients (47 %) had ≥ 5 CTCs. Patients with ≥ 1 CTC or ≥ 5 CTCs had significantly higher mean plasma D-dimer levels (µg/mL) than patients with no CTCs and < 5 CTCs (2.48 and 3.31 vs 0.80 and 0.84, respectively; p=0.006 for cut-off ≥ 1 CTC and p=0.003 for cut-off ≥ 5 CTCs). In multivariate analysis, presence of CTCs and number of metastases were positively associated with plasma D-dimer level. CTCs were not associated with plasma fibrinogen level. At median follow-up of 13.5 months, three of 33 patients (9 %) with ≥ 1 CTC had VTE, vs no patients with undetectable CTCs. In conclusion, the presence of CTCs was associated with higher levels of plasma D-dimer in MBC patients. This study further confirms an association between CTCs and risk of VTE.

  14. Matrix metalloproteinases are involved in both type I (apoptosis) and type II (autophagy) cell death induced by sodium phenylacetate in MDA-MB-231 breast tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Sébastien; Berard, Madeleine; Kellaf, Sabine; Peyri, Nicole; Fauvel-Lafève, Françoise; Legrand, Chantal; He, Lu; Crépin, Michel

    2009-04-01

    The effects of sodium phenylacetate (NaPa), an antitumoral molecule, on cell death and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activities and synthesis were investigated in two metastatic breast tumour cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435, cultured on three-dimensional type I collagen gels (3-D cultures). In both cell lines, NaPa inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptotic cell death as measured by TUNEL assay, with an IC(30) of 20 mM and 10 mM for MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435 cells, respectively. In MDA-MB-231 cells, NaPa also induced (i) an autophagic process evidenced by the appearance of autophagic vacuoles and an increased phosphatase acid activity, (ii) the formation of pseudopodia and (iii) an increase in MMP-1 and MMP-9 secretion without affecting MT1-MMP. In NaPa-treated MDA-MB-435 cells, no autophagic vacuoles were formed but F-actin depolymerisation was observed. MMP-1, MMP-9 and MT1-MMP levels were strongly enhanced in these cells but MMPs were not secreted and accumulated intracellularly. When breast cancer cells were treated with NaPa in the presence of an MMP inhibitor (GM6001), apoptotic cell death decreased and the induction of autophagic vacuoles in MDA-MB-231 cells was inhibited. Taken together, these data suggest that MMPs are involved in the autophagic cell death and/or apoptosis of breast tumour cells.

  15. Macrophage-tumour cell interactions: identification of MUC1 on breast cancer cells as a potential counter-receptor for the macrophage-restricted receptor, sialoadhesin.

    PubMed

    Nath, D; Hartnell, A; Happerfield, L; Miles, D W; Burchell, J; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J; Crocker, P R

    1999-10-01

    In many carcinomas, infiltrating macrophages are commonly found closely associated with tumour cells but little is known concerning the nature or significance of adhesion molecules involved in these cellular interactions. Here we demonstrate in primary human breast cancers that sialoadhesin (Sn), a macrophage-restricted adhesion molecule, is frequently expressed on infiltrating cells that often make close contact with breast carcinoma cells. To determine whether Sn could act as a specific receptor for ligands on breast cancer cell lines, binding assays were performed with a recombinant form of the protein fused to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) (Sn-Fc). Sn-Fc was found to bind specifically and in a sialic acid-dependent manner to the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, T47.D and BT-20 both in solid- and solution-phase binding assays. To investigate the nature of the sialoglycoproteins recognized by Sn on breast cancer cells, MCF-7 cells were labelled with [6-3H]glucosamine. Following precipitation with Sn-Fc, a major band of approximately 240000 MW was revealed, which was shown in reprecipitation and Western blotting experiments to be the epithelial mucin, MUC1.

  16. Methodological issues in estimating survival in patients with multiple primary cancers: an application to women with breast cancer as a first tumour

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Stefano; Ricceri, Fulvio; Terracini, Lea; Zanetti, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Background Comparing survival of patients with a single tumour and patients with multiple primaries poses different methodological problems. In population based studies, where we cannot rely on detailed clinical information, the issue is disentangling the share of survival probability from the first and second cancer, and their compounded effect. We examined three hypotheses: A) the survival probability since the first tumour does not change with the occurrence of a second tumour; B) the probability of surviving a tumour does not change with the presence of a previous primary; C) the probabilities of surviving two subsequent primary tumours are independent (additivity hypothesis on mortality rates). Methods We studied the survival probabilities modelling mortality rates according to hypotheses A), B) and C). Mortality rates were calculated using Aalen-Johansen estimators which allowed to discount for the lag-time survival before developing a second tumour. We applied this approach to a cohort of 436 women with breast cancer (BC) and a subsequent tumour in the resident population of Turin, Italy, between 1985 and 2002. Results We presented our results in term of a Standardised Mortality Ratio calculated (SMRAJ) after 10 years of follow-up. For hypothesis A we observed a significant excess mortality of 2.21 (95% C.I. 1.94 – 2.45). Concerning hypothesis B we found a not significant SMRAJ of 0.98 (95% C.I. 0.87 – 1.10). The additivity hypothesis (C) was not confirmed as it overestimated the risk of death, in fact SMRsAJ were all below 1: 0.75 (95% C.I. 0.66 – 0.84) for BC and all subsequent cancers, 0.72 (95% C.I. 0.55 – 0.94) for BC and colon-rectum cancer, 0.76 (95% C.I. 0.48 – 1.14) for BC and corpus uteri cancer (not significant). Conclusion This method proved to be useful in disentangling the effect of different subsequent cancers on mortality. In our application it shows a worse long-term mortality for women with two cancers than that with BC only

  17. MED12 exon 2 mutation as a highly sensitive and specific marker in distinguishing phyllodes tumours from other spindle neoplasms of the breast.

    PubMed

    Lien, Huang-Chun; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Yang, Ya-Wen; Jeng, Yung-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Spindle neoplasms of the breast (SNB) primarily include metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC), phyllodes tumour (PT), fibromatosis and primary nonspecific sarcoma (PNS). Mutations in MED12 exon 2 have been reported in PTs. Because spindle tumour components are shared by SNB, we assessed the diagnostic use of MED12 exon 2 mutation in SNB. We investigated MED12 exon 2 mutations in a total of 91 samples of SNB, including 49 PT cases that have been previously analysed. Mutations were identified using direct sequencing. MED12 exon 2 mutation was absent in all cases of MBC, fibromatosis and PNS, in contrast to the 71.4% positivity in PTs. MED12 mutations were identified in four of six previously diagnosed monophasic sarcomatous MCB cases, however, these four cases were revised as malignant PT based on additional bcl-2 staining, albeit very focal. Consistence in the MED12 mutational status between a paired core biopsy and a surgical specimen was observed in all 20 tested PT cases. In conclusion, we demonstrated the restriction of MED12 exon 2 mutation to PTs (73.6%, 39/53) and its absence in other SNB. MED12 exon 2 mutational analysis can be included in the differential diagnosis between PT and other SNB, especially with limited specimen where diagnostic clues are not evident.

  18. Could HER2 Heterogeneity Open New Therapeutic Options in Patients with HER2-Primary Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    PET/CT. Two of five patients with suspicious foci had biopsy proven HER2-positive metastases. In this early stage clinical trial, 89 Zr-trastuzumab...prospective clinical trial. Archived pathology from the patient’s primary breast cancer was retested to confirm HER2-negative disease. Patients with...In this early-stage clinical trial, 89 Zr-trastuzumab PET/CT may detect HER2-positive metastases in patients with HER2-negtive primary breast

  19. CD3+, CD4+ & CD8+ tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are predictors of favourable survival outcome in infiltrating ductal carcinoma of breast

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Ankita Singh; Kumar, Sandeep; Konwar, Rituraj; Makker, Annu; Negi, M.P.S.; Goel, Madhu Mati

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) represent the host immune response against cancer cells associated with good or bad prognosis in different tumour types. This study was undertaken to evaluate the significance of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ TILs in breast cancer tissues in relation to clinico-pathological variables and survival outcome. Methods: Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed with antibodies against CD3, CD4 and CD8 antigens on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 150 breast cancer patients. Intratumoural and stromal TIL counting was performed semiquantitatively. Results: The higher CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ intratumoural and stromal counts showed independent and direct association with good prognosis. The prognostic predictor value of intratumoural counts was higher than stromal counts. The independent associations of intratumoural and stromal counts became more prominent when adjusted with stage and grade, respectively. Among intratumoural counts, the high (++/+++) CD4+ count (OR=3.85, 95% CI=3.28-16.71, P<0.001) showed the highest survival followed by CD3+ (OR=2.70, 95% CI=1.76-8.30, P=0.001) and CD8+ (OR=2.58, 95% CI=1.55-5.86, P=0.001) the least when compared to respective low (+) counts. In contrast, among stromal counts, the high CD8+ count (OR=3.13, 95% CI=2.20-9.57, P<0.001) showed the highest survival followed by CD4+ (OR=3.02, 95% CI=2.07-8.89, P<0.001) and CD3+ (OR=2.45, 95% CI=1.53-6.73, P=0.002) the least. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results suggest that intratumoural CD4+ and stromal CD8+ counts by immunohistochemistry may serve as an independent prognosticator for favourable outcome in breast cancer. PMID:25366203

  20. Phage display biopanning identifies the translation initiation and elongation factors (IF1α-3 and eIF-3) as components of Hsp70-peptide complexes in breast tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Siebke, Christina; James, Tharappel C; Cummins, Robert; O'Grady, Tony; Kay, Elaine; Bond, Ursula

    2012-03-01

    The heat shock protein, HSP70, is over-expressed in many tumours and acts at the crossroads of key intracellular processes in its role as a molecular chaperone. HSP70 associates with a vast array of peptides, some of which are antigenic and can mount adaptive immune responses against the tumour from which they are derived. The pool of peptides associated with HSP70 represents a unique barcode of protein metabolism in tumour cells. With a view to identifying unique protein targets that may be developed as tumour biomarkers, we used purified HSP70 and its associated peptide pool (HSP70-peptide complexes, HSP70-PCs) from different human breast tumour cell lines as targets for phage display biopanning. Our results show that HSP70-PCs from each cell line interact with unique sets of peptides within the phage display library. One of the peptides, termed IST, enriched in the biopanning process, was used in a 'pull-down' assay to identify the original protein from which the HSP70-associated peptides may have been derived. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF-3), a member of the elongation factor EF1α family, and the HSP GRP78, were pulled down by the IST peptide. All of these proteins are known to be up-regulated in cancer cells. Immunohistochemical staining of tumour tissue microarrays showed that the peptide co-localised with HSP70 in breast tumour tissue. The data indicate that the reservoir of peptides associated with HSP70 can act as a unique indicator of cellular protein activity and a novel source of potential tumour biomarkers.

  1. The Subclonal Architecture of Metastatic Breast Cancer: Results from a Prospective Community-Based Rapid Autopsy Program “CASCADE”

    PubMed Central

    Flensburg, Christoffer; Alsop, Kathryn; Mansour, Mariam; Francis, Prudence A.; Thorne, Heather A.; Silva, Maria Joao; Kanu, Nnennaya; Dietzen, Michelle; Bowtell, David D.; Speed, Terence P.; Swanton, Charles; Loi, Sherene

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding the cancer genome is seen as a key step in improving outcomes for cancer patients. Genomic assays are emerging as a possible avenue to personalised medicine in breast cancer. However, evolution of the cancer genome during the natural history of breast cancer is largely unknown, as is the profile of disease at death. We sought to study in detail these aspects of advanced breast cancers that have resulted in lethal disease. Methods and Findings Three patients with oestrogen-receptor (ER)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer and one patient with triple negative breast cancer underwent rapid autopsy as part of an institutional prospective community-based rapid autopsy program (CASCADE). Cases represented a range of management problems in breast cancer, including late relapse after early stage disease, de novo metastatic disease, discordant disease response, and disease refractory to treatment. Between 5 and 12 metastatic sites were collected at autopsy together with available primary tumours and longitudinal metastatic biopsies taken during life. Samples underwent paired tumour-normal whole exome sequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. Subclonal architectures were inferred by jointly analysing all samples from each patient. Mutations were validated using high depth amplicon sequencing. Between cases, there were significant differences in mutational burden, driver mutations, mutational processes, and copy number variation. Within each case, we found dramatic heterogeneity in subclonal structure from primary to metastatic disease and between metastatic sites, such that no single lesion captured the breadth of disease. Metastatic cross-seeding was found in each case, and treatment drove subclonal diversification. Subclones displayed parallel evolution of treatment resistance in some cases and apparent augmentation of key oncogenic drivers as an alternative resistance mechanism. We

  2. Complete regression of breast tumour with a single dose of docetaxel-entrapped core-cross-linked polymeric micelles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qizhi; Rijcken, Cristianne J; Bansal, Ruchi; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert; Prakash, Jai

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with chemotherapy such as docetaxel (DTX) is associated with significant toxicity and tumour recurrence. In this study, we developed DTX-entrapped core-cross-linked polymeric micelles (DTX-CCL-PMs, 66 nm size) by covalently conjugating DTX to CCL-PMs via a hydrolysable ester bond. The covalent conjugation allowed for sustained release of DTX under physiological conditions in vitro. In vivo, DTX-CCL-PMs demonstrated superior therapeutic efficacy in mice bearing MDA-MB-231 tumour xenografts as compared to the marketed formulation of DTX (Taxotere(®)). Strikingly, a single intravenous injection of DTX-CCL-PMs enabled complete regression of both small (∼150 mm(3)) and established (∼550 mm(3)) tumours, leading to 100% survival of the animals. These remarkable antitumour effects of DTX-CCL-PMs are attributed to its enhanced tumour accumulation and anti-stromal activity. Furthermore, DTX-CCL-PMs exhibited superior tolerability in healthy rats as compared to Taxotere. These preclinical data strongly support clinical translation of this novel nanomedicinal product for the treatment of cancer.

  3. Gallic acid indanone and mangiferin xanthone are strong determinants of immunosuppressive anti-tumour effects of Mangifera indica L. bark in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    García-Rivera, Dagmar; Delgado, René; Bougarne, Nadia; Haegeman, Guy; Berghe, Wim Vanden

    2011-06-01

    Vimang is a standardized extract derived from Mango bark (Mangifera Indica L.), commonly used as anti-inflammatory phytomedicine, which has recently been used to complement cancer therapies in cancer patients. We have further investigated potential anti-tumour effects of glucosylxanthone mangiferin and indanone gallic acid, which are both present in Vimang extract. We observed significant anti-tumour effects of both Vimang constituents in the highly aggressive and metastatic breast cancer cell type MDA-MB231. At the molecular level, mangiferin and gallic acid both inhibit classical NFκB activation by IKKα/β kinases, which results in impaired IκB degradation, NFκB translocation and NFκB/DNA binding. In contrast to the xanthone mangiferin, gallic acid further inhibits additional NFκB pathways involved in cancer cell survival and therapy resistance, such as MEK1, JNK1/2, MSK1, and p90RSK. This results in combinatorial inhibition of NFκB activity by gallic acid, which results in potent inhibition of NFκB target genes involved in inflammation, metastasis, anti-apoptosis and angiogenesis, such as IL-6, IL-8, COX2, CXCR4, XIAP, bcl2, VEGF. The cumulative NFκB inhibition by gallic acid, but not mangiferin, is also reflected at the level of cell survival, which reveals significant tumour cytotoxic effects in MDA-MB231 cells. Altogether, we identify gallic acid, besides mangiferin, as an essential anti-cancer component in Vimang extract, which demonstrates multifocal inhibition of NFκB activity in the cancer-inflammation network.

  4. A randomized controlled trial comparing primary tumour resection plus systemic therapy with systemic therapy alone in metastatic breast cancer (PRIM-BC): Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG1017.

    PubMed

    Shien, Tadahiko; Nakamura, Kenichi; Shibata, Taro; Kinoshita, Takayuki; Aogi, Kenjiro; Fujisawa, Tomomi; Masuda, Norikazu; Inoue, Kenichi; Fukuda, Haruhiko; Iwata, Hiroji

    2012-10-01

    This trial is being conducted to confirm the superiority, in terms of overall survival, of primary tumour resection plus systemic therapy to systemic therapy alone in patients with Stage IV breast cancer who are not refractory to primary systemic therapy. The inclusion criteria for the study are as follows: untreated patients with histologically confirmed invasive breast cancer with one or more measurable metastatic lesions diagnosed by radiological examination. All patients receive primary systemic therapy according to the estrogen receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor type-2 status of the primary breast cancer after the first registration. After 3 months, the patients without disease progression are randomized to the primary tumour resection plus systemic therapy arm or the systemic therapy alone arm. The primary endpoint is the overall survival, and the secondary endpoints are proportion of patients without tumour progression at the metastatic sites, yearly local recurrence-free survival, proportion of local ulcer/local bleeding, yearly primary tumour resection-free survival, adverse events of chemotherapy, operative morbidity and serious adverse events. The patient recruitment was commenced in May 2011. Enrolment of 410 patients for randomization is planned over a 5 year recruitment period. We hereby report the details of the study.

  5. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers defined by estrogen (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) status of the tumour. Methods We used genotype data on up to 11,421 BRCA1 and 7,080 BRCA2 carriers, of whom 4,310 had been affected with breast cancer and had information on either ER or PR status of the tumour, to assess the associations of 12 loci with breast cancer tumour characteristics. Associations were evaluated using a retrospective cohort approach. Results The results suggested stronger associations with ER-positive breast cancer than ER-negative for 11 loci in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Among BRCA1 carriers, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2981582 (FGFR2) exhibited the biggest difference based on ER status (per-allele hazard ratio (HR) for ER-positive = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.17 to 1.56 vs HR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.85 to 0.98 for ER-negative, P-heterogeneity = 6.5 × 10-6). In contrast, SNP rs2046210 at 6q25.1 near ESR1 was primarily associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. In BRCA2 carriers, SNPs in FGFR2, TOX3, LSP1, SLC4A7/NEK10, 5p12, 2q35, and 1p11.2 were significantly associated with ER-positive but not ER-negative disease. Similar results were observed when differentiating breast cancer cases by PR status. Conclusions The associations of the 12 SNPs with risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers differ by ER-positive or ER-negative breast cancer status. The apparent differences in SNP associations between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, and non-carriers, may be explicable by differences in the prevalence of tumour subtypes. As more risk modifying variants are identified, incorporating these associations into breast cancer subtype-specific risk models

  6. c-erbB-2/c-erbA co-amplification indicative of lymph node metastasis, and c-myc amplification of high tumour grade, in human breast carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Tavassoli, M.; Quirke, P.; Farzaneh, F.; Lock, N. J.; Mayne, L. V.; Kirkham, N.

    1989-01-01

    A panel of 73 samples, including 52 primary breast carcinomas, 10 normal breast tissues and 11 axillary lymph nodes, has been analysed for the presence of amplifications and gross structural alterations, in the oncogenes c-erbB-2, c-erbA, c-myc, N-myc, c-mos and c-Ha-ras. The tumours were also classified, graded and staged histopathologically and their DNA ploidy (42 samples) was determined by flow cytometry. Three breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, ZR-75-1 and T47D) were also included in the study. Amplification of c-erbB-2 was detected in 28% of the tumours, of which 91% had an increased steady-state level of c-erbB-2 mRNA. Amplification of c-erbA was found in 23% of tumours and was always associated with the amplification of c-erbB-2. Ten out of 12 (83%) tumours which had c-erbB-2 and c-erbA co-amplification had metastasised to axillary lymph nodes (P less than 0.006). However, the human thymidine kinase gene, which is present at the same chromosomal location as these two oncogenes (17q21-22), was amplified in only tw tumours. Amplification of c-myc was detected in 21% of the tumours studied, of which 82% (P less than 0.005) were of histopathological grade 3 and none were of grade 1. Flow cytometry showed that 90% (P less than 0.01) of the analysed tumours with c-erbB-2 and c-erbA co-amplification, and 70% (P less than 0.1) of those with c-myc amplification were DNA aneuploid. This study demonstrates the potential value of c-myc amplification in the assessment of the tumour grade, rather than metastatic potential; and of the co-amplification of c-erbB-2 and c-erbA as a strong indicator of metastatic potential, rather than tumour grade. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2572268

  7. Breast tumour growth inhibition in vitro through the combination of cyclophosphamide/metotrexate/5-fluorouracil, epirubicin/cyclophosphamide, epirubicin/paclitaxel, and epirubicin/docetaxel with the bisphosphonates ibandronate and zoledronic acid.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Ulf; Bielawski, Krzysztof P; Bosse, Ulrich; Schlotter, Claus M

    2004-11-01

    Breast cancer has a significant capacity to metastasize to bone. Bisphosphonates are the standard treatment for hypocalcaemia of malignancy (HCM), which is a common complication of bone metastasis. The combination of bisphosphonates with standard anticancer drugs such as paclitaxel or tamoxifen results in a synergistic apoptotic effect greater than that produced by either single agent alone. Potential antitumour effects in vitro of the two bisphosphonates zoledronic acid (Zol) and ibandronate (Ib) (each at 30 microM) combined with different anticancer drug combinations: cyclophosphamide/metotrexate/5-fluorouracil (CMF), epirubicin/cyclophosphamide (EC), epirubicin/paclitaxel (ET), and epirubicin/docetaxel (EDoc) were investigated using ATP-cell viability assay (ATP-CVA). Twenty cases of female primary, invasive breast cancer were assessed. Ibandronate and zoledronic acid alone showed an inhibitory effect on breast cancer tumour cells in vitro. The breast tumour growth inhibition effect for those two drugs amounted to 22 and 25% respectively. Inhibitory effects were clearly visible for all four combinations of anticancer drugs together with both bisphosphonates. Combinations of anticancer drugs with zoledronic acid seem to be more effective with respect to tumour growth inhibition than combinations with ibandronate.

  8. [Commentary to the paper: immobilising malignant phyllodes tumour of the breast by E. Fritsche, U. Hug und D. Winterholer].

    PubMed

    Horch, R E

    2015-04-01

    The size of a tumor should not be the limiting factor when it comes to the decision for surgical treatment of such entities. Due to modern plastic reconstructive techniques an R0 situaiton should always be attempted, and in the worst case an interdisciplinary palliative resection should be possible and recommendable. As the present case with a tumour that led to immobility clearly indicates, the gain in quality of life undoubtedly is a proof of the necessity and value of the surgical treatment of this entity.

  9. 8-Oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine and other lesions along the coding strand of the exon 5 of the tumour suppressor gene P53 in a breast cancer case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Brancato, Beniamino; Munnia, Armelle; Cellai, Filippo; Ceni, Elisabetta; Mello, Tommaso; Bianchi, Simonetta; Catarzi, Sandra; Risso, Gabriella G.; Galli, Andrea; Peluso, Marco E.M.

    2016-01-01

    The next-generation sequencing studies of breast cancer have reported that the tumour suppressor P53 (TP53) gene is mutated in more than 40% of the tumours. We studied the levels of oxidative lesions, including 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), along the coding strand of the exon 5 in breast cancer patients as well as in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-attacked breast cancer cell line using the ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction technique. We detected a significant ‘in vitro’ generation of 8-oxodG between the codons 163 and 175, corresponding to a TP53 region with high mutation prevalence, after treatment with xanthine plus xanthine oxidase, a ROS-generating system. Then, we evaluated the occurrence of oxidative lesions in the DNA-binding domain of the TP53 in the core needle biopsies of 113 of women undergoing breast investigation for diagnostic purpose. An increment of oxidative damage at the −G− residues into the codons 163 and 175 was found in the cancer cases as compared to the controls. We found significant associations with the pathological stage and the histological grade of tumours. As the major news of this study, this largest analysis of genomic footprinting of oxidative lesions at the TP53 sequence level to date provided a first roadmap describing the signatures of oxidative lesions in human breast cancer. Our results provide evidence that the generation of oxidative lesions at single nucleotide resolution is not an event highly stochastic, but causes a characteristic pattern of DNA lesions at the site of mutations in the TP53, suggesting causal relationship between oxidative DNA adducts and breast cancer. PMID:27260513

  10. Prolonged Response to Trastuzumab in a Patient With HER2-Nonamplified Breast Cancer With Elevated HER2 Dimerization Harboring an ERBB2 S310F Mutation.

    PubMed

    Chumsri, Saranya; Weidler, Jodi; Ali, Siraj; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Wallweber, Gerald; DeFazio-Eli, Lisa; Chenna, Ahmed; Huang, Weidong; DeRidder, Angela; Goicocheal, Lindsay; Perez, Edith A

    2015-09-01

    In the current genomic era, increasing evidence demonstrates that approximately 2% of HER2-negative breast cancers, by current standard testings, harbor activating mutations of ERBB2. However, whether patients with HER2-negative breast cancer with activating mutations of ERBB2 also experience response to anti-HER2 therapies remains unclear. This case report describes a patient with HER2-nonamplified heavily pretreated breast cancer who experienced prolonged response to trastuzumab in combination with pertuzumab and fulvestrant. Further molecular analysis demonstrated that her tumors had an elevated HER2 dimerization that corresponded to ERBB2 S310F mutation. Located in the extracellular domain of the HER2 protein, this mutation was reported to promote noncovalent dimerization that results in the activation of the downstream signaling pathways. This case highlights the fact that HER2-targeted therapy may be valuable in patients harboring an ERBB2 S310F mutation.

  11. Peculiarities of hyperlipidaemia in tumour patients.

    PubMed Central

    Dilman, V. M.; Berstein, L. M.; Ostroumova, M. N.; Tsyrlina, Y. V.; Golubev, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    The study group included 684 cases: 258 patients with breast carcinoma, 113 males with lung cancer, 42 patients with rectal tumours, 42 patients with stomach tumours, 59 patients with fibroadenomatosis, and 170 healthy subjects of varying age (male and female). A relatively high blood triglyceride level was found in patients with breast, lung, rectal (females), and stomach (female) tumours. The blood concentration of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in patients with breast, lung, and stomach (female) tumours was relatively low. The elimination of tumour (breast carcinoma) did not lead to significant changes in lipid metabolism. There was no correlation between degree of lipidaemia and stage of tumour progression except in the cases of rectal cancer. Preliminary results are presented on the tentative classification of hyperlipoproteinaemia in tumour patients, using the lipid concentration threshold values advocated by Carlson et al. (1977); an increased frequency of Type IV hyperlipoproteinaemia proved to be the most characteristic feature of tumour patients. The results are discussed in terms of the concept of the importance of lipid metabolic disturbances, primarily those due to ageing, in the genesis of the syndrome of "cancerophilia" (predisposition to cancer). PMID:7248149

  12. [Single-cell sequencing and tumour heterogeneity].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2014-12-01

    The heterogeneity of tumours is now beginning to be documented precisely by single-cell new-generation sequencing. Recently published results on breast tumours show that each of the cells analysed displays a unique pattern of point mutations. This extensive genetic diversity is present before any treatment, and is likely to cause resistance to initially successful targeted therapies.

  13. Radiotherapy in Phyllodes Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, Balukrishna; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Paul, M J; Backianathan, Selvamani

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Phyllodes Tumour (PT) of the breast is a relatively rare breast neoplasm (<1%) with diverse range of pathology and biological behaviour. Aim To describe the clinical course of PT and to define the role of Radiotherapy (RT) in PT of the breast. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of hospital data of patients with PT presented from 2005 to 2014 was done. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the results. Simple description of data was done in this study. Age and duration of symptoms were expressed in median and range. Percentages, tables and general discussions were used to understand the meaning of the data analyzed. Results Out of the 98 patients, 92 were eligible for analysis. The median age of presentation was 43 years. A total of 64/92 patients were premenopausal. There was no side predilection for this tumour but 57/92 patients presented as an upper outer quadrant lump. Fifty percent of the patients presented as giant (10 cm) PT. The median duration of symptoms was 12 months (range: 1-168 months). A 60% of patients had Benign (B), 23% had Borderline (BL) and 17% had malignant (M) tumours. The surgical treatment for benign histology included Lumpectomy (L) for 15%, Wide Local Excision (WLE) for 48%, and Simple Mastectomy (SM) for 37%. All BL and M tumours were treated with WLE or SM. There was no recurrence in B and BL group when the margin was ≥1 cm. All non-metastatic M tumours received adjuvant RT irrespective of their margin status. Total 3/16 patients with M developed local recurrence. Total 6/16 M patients had distant metastases (lung or bone). Our median duration of follow up was 20 months (range: 1-120 months). Conclusion Surgical resection with adequate margins (>1 cm) gave excellent local control in B and BL tumours. For patients with BL PT, local radiotherapy is useful, if margins are close or positive even after the best surgical resection. There is a trend towards improved local control with adjuvant radiotherapy for

  14. Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ: Mammographic Features and Its Relation to Prognosis and Tumour Biology in a Population Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Sollie, Thomas; Blomqvist, Carl; Abdsaleh, Shahin; Liljegren, Göran

    2017-01-01

    Casting-type calcifications and a histopathological picture with cancer-filled duct-like structures have been presented as breast cancer with neoductgenesis. We correlated mammographic features and histopathological neoductgenesis with prognosis in a DCIS cohort with long follow-up. Mammographic features were classified into seven groups according to Tabár. Histopathological neoductgenesis was defined by concentration of ducts, lymphocyte infiltration, and periductal fibrosis. Endpoints were ipsilateral (IBE) in situ and invasive events. Casting-type calcifications and neoductgenesis were both related to high nuclear grade, ER- and PR-negativity, and HER2 overexpression but not to each other. Casting-type calcifications and neoductgenesis were both related to a nonsignificant lower risk of invasive IBE, HR 0.38 (0.13–1.08) and 0.82 (0.29–2.27), respectively, and the HR of an in situ IBE was 0.90 (0.41–1.95) and 1.60 (0.75–3.39), respectively. Casting-type calcifications could not be related to a worse prognosis in DCIS. We cannot explain why a more aggressive phenotype of DCIS did not correspond to a worse prognosis. Further studies on how the progression from in situ to invasive carcinoma is driven are needed. PMID:28286675

  15. Massively parallel sequencing of phyllodes tumours of the breast reveals actionable mutations, and TERT promoter hotspot mutations and TERT gene amplification as likely drivers of progression

    PubMed Central

    Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Murray, Melissa; Burke, Kathleen A; Edelweiss, Marcia; Geyer, Felipe C; Macedo, Gabriel S; Inagaki, Akiko; Papanastasiou, Anastasios D; Martelotto, Luciano G; Marchio, Caterina; Lim, Raymond S; Ioris, Rafael A; Nahar, Pooja K; De Bruijn, Ino; Smyth, Lillian; Akram, Muzaffar; Ross, Dara; Petrini, John H; Norton, Larry; Solit, David B; Baselga, Jose; Brogi, Edi; Ladanyi, Marc; Weigelt, Britta; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumours (PTs) are breast fibroepithelial lesions that are graded based on histological criteria as benign, borderline or malignant. PTs may recur locally. Borderline PTs and malignant PTs may metastasize to distant sites. Breast fibroepithelial lesions, including PTs and fibroadenomas, are characterized by recurrent MED12 exon 2 somatic mutations. We sought to define the repertoire of somatic genetic alterations in PTs and whether these may assist in the differential diagnosis of these lesions. We collected 100 fibroadenomas, 40 benign PTs, 14 borderline PTs and 22 malignant PTs. Six, 6 and 13 benign, borderline and malignant PTs respectively and their matched normal tissue were subjected to targeted massively parallel sequencing (MPS) using the MSK-IMPACT sequencing assay. Recurrent MED12 mutations were found in 56% of PTs; in addition, mutations affecting cancer genes (e.g. TP53, RB1, SETD2 and EGFR) were exclusively detected in borderline and malignant PTs. We found a novel recurrent clonal hotspot mutation in the TERT promoter (−124 C>T) in 52% and TERT gene amplification in 4% of PTs. Laser capture microdissection revealed that these mutations were restricted to the mesenchymal component of PTs. Sequencing analysis of the entire cohort revealed that the frequency of TERT alterations increased from benign (18%), to borderline (57%) and to malignant PTs (68%; P<0.01), and TERT alterations were associated with increased levels of TERT mRNA (P<0.001). No TERT alterations were observed in fibroadenomas. An analysis of TERT promoter sequencing and gene amplification distinguished PTs from fibroadenomas with a sensitivity and a positive predictive value of 100% (CI 95.38%–100%) and 100% (CI 85.86%–100%), respectively, and a sensitivity and a negative predictive value of 39% (CI 28.65%–51.36%) and 68% (CI 60.21%–75.78%), respectively. Our results suggest that TERT alterations may drive the progression of PTs, and may assist in the differential

  16. Colloidal stability, surface characterisation and intracellular accumulation of Rhodium(II) citrate coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in breast tumour: a promising platform for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Nunes, Eloiza; Carneiro, Marcella Lemos Brettas; de Oliveira, Ricardo Guirelli Simões; Báo, Sônia Nair; de Souza, Aparecido Ribeiro

    2013-06-01

    The colloidal stability of a rhodium(II) citrate, Rh2(H2cit)4, coating on the surface of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles was studied and compared in different dispersion media. The adsorption of Rh2(H2cit)4 at the water-maghemite interface was evaluated as a function of pH and complex concentration. A slight pH-dependent adsorption of the complex was observed with a maximum at pH 3. The colloidal stability of the functionalised nanoparticles with different amounts of Rh2(H2cit)4 as a function of pH was evaluated using dynamic light scattering measurements. The particles have a mean magnetic core size of 5.6 nm and the hydrodynamic diameters are approximately 60 nm, which remained unchanged in the pH range in which the samples were a stable sol. The tolerance to different dispersion media, which were deionised water, saline, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), foetal bovine serum (FBS) and NaCl solutions with different concentrations, was investigated. At moderate ionic strength, the colloidal stability of the dispersions was similar in saline and in PBS compared to the stability of dispersions diluted in water. Moreover, the intracellular accumulation of nanoparticles in 4T1 breast tumour was examined by ultrastructural analysis performed by transmission electron microscopy. The rhodium(II) citrate-coated nanoparticles were found mostly in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Thus, we suggest that these SPIO nanoparticles functionalized with Rh2(H2Cit)4 can be potential tools for anticancer therapy.

  17. Achieving higher pathological complete response rates in HER-2-positive patients with induction chemotherapy without trastuzumab in operable breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Abrial, Catherine; Mouret-Reynier, Marie-Ange; Raoelfils, Inès; Durando, Xavier; Leheurteur, Marianne; Gimbergues, Pierre; Tortochaux, Jacques; Curé, Hervé; Chollet, Philippe

    2007-04-01

    Recent trials of induction chemotherapy in bulky operable breast cancer have shown much higher pathological complete response (pCR) rates with trastuzumab-driven combinations. However, it is useful to take into account the specific chemosensitivity of HER-2-positive tumors. The aim of this study was to assess the pCR rate according to HER-2 status in response to chemotherapy, without an anti-HER-2 specific biological agent, in 710 operable breast cancer patients. Since 1982, these patients have been treated with several different neoadjuvant chemotherapy combinations. During this period, HER-2 overexpression was most often not assessed. Subsequently, we assessed HER-2 expression using archival paraffin-embedded tissue. A technically usable specimen was available for 413 of the 710 patients. Before treatment, 51 patients were HER-2 positive, 287 patients were HER-2 negative, and the results were inconclusive for 75 patients. Of these patients, a pCR in breast and nodes was obtained in 94 patients (14.3%), but this event was threefold more frequent for HER-2-positive patients (23.5%) than for HER-2-negative patients (7%). The overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates at 10 years were 66.6% and 57.4%, respectively. The DFS rate was, as expected, better for HER-2-negative patients, with HER-2 status assessed before as well as after chemotherapy. A significant difference was found for OS in favor of HER-2-negative patients only with postchemotherapy assessment of HER-2, a fact similar to our previous findings. Finally, there was a tendency toward a higher DFS rate for HER-2-positive patients who achieved a pCR compared with HER-2-positive patients who did not.

  18. [Malignant phyllodes tumour : a case report].

    PubMed

    Radermacher, J; Burlet, O; Sylvestre, R M; Wetz, P; Delvenne, Ph

    2016-11-01

    A 28 year old woman has suffered over the previous month from a post-traumatic swelling sensation of the left breast. Ultrasonography demonstrates a 9 cm, sharply-cut, rounded, hypo-echogenic lesion. Surgery is performed, with the hypothesis of an haematoma. The pathological analysis of the lesion shows a malignant phyllodes tumour with heterologous rhabdomyosarcomatous features. No metastasis is found. A radical mastectomy is performed and the patient benefits from an adjuvant radio-chemotherapy. Phyllodes tumours represent up to 1 % of all mammary cancers, with 10-20 % of malignant lesions. These tumours behave differently from usual breast cancers. This atypical case, arising in a traumatic context, provides the opportunity to discuss the treatment and classification of phyllodes tumours of the breast.

  19. "Targeting" triple-negative breast cancer: the lessons learned from BRCA1-associated breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Rita

    2011-04-01

    Breast cancer has long been recognized as a heterogeneous entity, with distinct subsets characterized by differences in tumor biology and response to therapy. With the advent of molecular profiling, we have gained a further appreciation of the heterogeneity of this complex disease. While the last decade has seen advances in the treatment of hormone receptor (HR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/erb-B2 (HER2)-positive breast cancers, outcomes for women with estrogen receptor (ER)-, progesterone receptor (PR)-, and HER2-negative-or "triple-negative"-breast cancer (TNBC) remain poor. A better understanding of the shared biology of BRCA1-associated breast cancer and sporadic TNBC holds much promise for changing the outlook for women with this aggressive disease. This review focuses on our current understanding of the clinicopathological features of TNBC, therapeutic options and ongoing research efforts.

  20. Tumour angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, F.

    1985-01-01

    Tumours induce the growth of host blood vessels to support their proliferation. This process of angiogenesis is evoked by specific chemical signals. Recognition of these angiogenic factors has led to experimental methods for cancer diagnosis and for inhibiting malignant growth by specifically blocking neovascularisation. The clinical potential of these techniques is discussed. PMID:2413796

  1. Oral Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Lecavalier, D.R.; Main, J.H.P.

    1988-01-01

    The authors of this article review briefly the anatomy of the oral soft tissues and describe the more common benign and malignant tumours of the mouth, giving emphasis to their clinical features. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:21253197

  2. Relative microvessel area of the primary tumour, and not lymph node status, predicts the presence of bone marrow micrometastases detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in patients with clinically non-metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Benoy, Ina H; Salgado, Roberto; Elst, Hilde; Van Dam, Peter; Weyler, Joost; Van Marck, Eric; Scharpé, Simon; Vermeulen, Peter B; Dirix, Luc Y

    2005-01-01

    About 50% of patients with breast cancer have no involvement of axillary lymph nodes at diagnosis and can be considered cured after primary locoregional treatment. However, about 20-30% will experience distant relapse. The group of patients at risk is not well characterised: recurrence is probably due to the establishment of micrometastases before treatment. Given the early steps of metastasis in which tumour cells interact with endothelial cells of blood vessels, and, given the independent prognostic value in breast cancer of both the quantification of tumour vascularisation and the detection of micrometastases in the bone marrow, the aim of this study was to determine the relationship between vascularisation, measured by Chalkley morphometry, and the bone marrow content of cytokeratin-19 (CK-19) mRNA, quantified by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, in a series of 68 patients with localised untreated breast cancer. The blood concentration of factors involved in angiogenesis (interleukin-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor) and of factors involved in coagulation (D-dimer, fibrinogen, platelets) was also measured. When bone marrow CK-19 relative gene expression (RGE) was categorised according to the cut-off value of 0.77 (95th centile of control patients), 53% of the patients had an elevated CK-19 RGE. Patients with bone marrow micrometastases, on the basis of an elevated CK-19 RGE, had a mean Chalkley count of 7.5 +/- 1.7 (median 7, standard error [SE] 0.30) compared with a mean Chalkley count of 6.5 +/- 1.7 in other patients (median 6, SE 0.3) (Mann-Whitney U-test; P = 0.04). Multiple regression analysis revealed that Chalkley count, not lymph node status, independently predicted CK-19 RGE status (P = 0.04; odds ratio 1.38; 95% confidence interval 1.009-1.882). Blood parameters reflecting angiogenesis and coagulation were positively correlated with Chalkley count and/or CK-19 RGE. Our data are in support of an association between

  3. In phyllodes tumour of the breast expression of c-kit but not of ALDH1A1 is associated with adverse clinico-pathological features.

    PubMed

    Chougule, Abhijit; Bal, Amanjit; Das, Ashim; Kohli, Pavneet Singh; Singh, Gurpreet

    2016-12-01

    Attempts at identification of an ideal prognostic/predictive biomarker in phyllodes tumour (PT) have not been fruitful so far. Studies evaluating c-kit expression in PT have shown contradictory results. Recently aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1) was proposed as a stem cell marker for malignant PT but its expression has not been studied in benign and borderline tumours. We aimed to evaluate expression and prognostic significance of c-kit and ALDH1A1 in different grades of PT. Epithelial and stromal c-kit and ALDH1A1 expression were studied in 104 PT cases (86 primary and 18 recurrent tumours) and compared with different clinico-pathological features and recurrence rates. Stromal c-kit expression at 1 % cutoff correlated with increasing tumour grade, larger tumour size, hypercellularity, nuclear atypia, stromal overgrowth, infiltrative margins and mitotic count. These associations, however, were lost with higher (5 or 10 %) cutoffs. Conversely, decreased c-kit expression in the epithelial component correlated with increasing tumour grade, regardless of the cutoffs used. Stromal ALDH1A1 expression did not have significant associations with tumour grade or other adverse clinico-pathological features, regardless of different cutoffs. None of the cases showed significant epithelial ALDH1A1 expression. Expression of c-kit was associated with poorer overall survival (p = 0.011), while ALDH1A1 expression was associated with shorter recurrence-free survival (p = 0.036). In conclusion, c-kit expression was associated with higher tumour grade and adverse clinico-pathological features. However, these associations are cutoff dependent, partly explaining the variability in previously reported studies. ALDH1A1 expression did not have significant correlations with tumour grade and adverse clinico-pathological variables.

  4. p85 protein expression is associated with poor survival in HER2-positive patients with advanced breast cancer treated with trastuzumab.

    PubMed

    Pavlakis, Kitty; Bobos, Mattheos; Batistatou, Anna; Kotoula, Vassiliki; Eleftheraki, Anastasia G; Stofas, Anastasios; Timotheadou, Eleni; Pentheroudakis, George; Psyrri, Amanda; Koutras, Angelos; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Papakostas, Pavlos; Razis, Evangelia; Christodoulou, Christos; Kalogeras, Konstantine T; Fountzilas, George

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the immunohistochemical expression of p85 in a cohort of trastuzumab-treated HER2-positive and HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer patients. The medical records of all patients with metastatic breast cancer treated with trastuzumab-based regimens between 1998 and 2010 were reviewed and clinical information was obtained. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue samples with adequate material were retrospectively collected from 183 patients. Samples were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for p85, estrogen receptors (ER), progesterone receptors (PgR), HER2, Ki67, PTEN and phosphorylated Akt (S473 and T308). HER2 status was studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization, as well. PIK3CA mutational status was also evaluated. Median follow-up for all patients was 72 months. Central re-evaluation for HER2 revealed only 111 HER2-positive cases, with the remaining 72 patients being HER2-negative. Median survival was longer in HER2-positive patients (50.7 months) compared to HER2-negative patients (36.6 months) both treated with trastuzumab, but this difference has not reached significance (p = 0.068). In total, 62% of the patients were found positive for p85, however the p85 protein was not found to be differentially expressed in HER2-positive versus HER2-negative cases. There were no significant associations between protein expression of p85 and any of the markers under study, or with time to progression. Positive p85 protein expression was however associated with poor survival in trastuzumab-treated HER2-positive patients. In our cohort of trastuzumab-treated HER2-positive breast cancer patients, positive p85 protein expression appears to be a prognostic factor of poor survival and, if validated, might have important implications in the treatment of such patients.

  5. Feasibility, endocrine and anti-tumour effects of a triple endocrine therapy with tamoxifen, a somatostatin analogue and an antiprolactin in post-menopausal metastatic breast cancer: a randomized study with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Bontenbal, M.; Foekens, J. A.; Lamberts, S. W.; de Jong, F. H.; van Putten, W. L.; Braun, H. J.; Burghouts, J. T.; van der Linden, G. H.; Klijn, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Suppression of the secretion of prolactin, growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) might be important in the growth regulation and treatment of breast cancer. Because oestrogens may counteract the anti-tumour effects of such treatment, the combination of an anti-oestrogen (tamoxifen), a somatostatin analogue (octreotide) and a potent anti-prolactin (CV 205-502) might be attractive. In this respect, we performed a first exploratory long-term study on the feasibility of combined treatment and possible clear differences in endocrine and anti-tumour effects during such combined treatment vs standard treatment with tamoxifen alone. Twenty-two post-menopausal patients with metastatic breast cancer (ER and/or PR positive or unknown) were randomized to receive either 40 mg of tamoxifen per day or the combination of 40 mg of tamoxifen plus 75 microg of CV 205-502 orally plus 3 x 0.2 mg of octreotide s.c. as first-line endocrine therapy. An objective response was found in 36% of the patients treated with tamoxifen alone and in 55% of the patients treated with combination therapy. Median time to progression was 33 weeks for patients treated with tamoxifen and 84 weeks for patients treated with combination therapy, but the numbers are too small for hard conclusions. There was no difference in overall post-relapse survival between the two treatment arms. With respect to the endocrine parameters, there was a significant decrease of plasma IGF-1 levels in both treatment arms, whereas during combined treatment plasma growth hormone tended to decrease and plasma prolactin levels were strongly suppressed; in some patients insulin and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) decreased during the triple therapy. Although there was no significant difference in mean decrease of plasma IGF-1 levels between the two treatment arms, combined treatment resulted in a more uniform suppression of IGF-1. Therefore, the addition of a somatostatin analogue and an anti

  6. Delaying Chemotherapy in the Treatment of Hormone Receptor–Positive, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Negative Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brufsky, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    Global guidelines for the management of locally advanced or metastatic hormone receptor–positive (HR-positive), human epidermal growth factor 2–negative (HER2-negative) breast cancer recommend endocrine therapy as first-line treatment for all patients, regardless of age or postmenopausal status. However, current practice patterns in the United States and Europe suggest that these modes of therapy are not being used as recommended, and many patients with advanced HR-positive, HER2-negative disease are being treated first-line with chemotherapy or switched to chemotherapy after a single endocrine therapy. Given that chemotherapy is associated with increased toxicity and reduced quality of life (QOL) compared with endocrine therapy, prolonging the duration of response obtained with endocrine therapy may help delay chemotherapy and its attendant toxicities. Several strategies to delay or overcome endocrine resistance and thereby postpone chemotherapy have been explored, including the use of second-line endocrine agents with different mechanisms of action, adding targeted agents that inhibit specific resistance pathways, and adding agents that act in complementary or synergistic ways to inhibit tumor cell proliferation. This review analyzes the different therapy options available to HR-positive, HER2-negative patients with advanced breast cancer that can be used to delay chemotherapy and enhance QOL. PMID:26793013

  7. Geographic differences in the distribution of molecular subtypes of breast cancer in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To compare the distribution of the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer based on immunohistochemical profile in the five major geographic regions of Brazil, a country of continental dimension, with a wide racial variation of people. Methods The study was retrospective observational. We classified 5,687 invasive breast cancers by molecular subtype based on immunohistochemical expression of estrogen-receptor (ER), progesterone-receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and Ki-67 proliferation index. Cases were classified as luminal A (ER and/or PR positive and HER2 negative, Ki-67 < 14%), luminal B (ER and/or PR positive, HER2 negative, and Ki-67 > 14%), triple-positive (ER and/or PR positive and HER2 positive), HER2-enriched (ER and PR negative, and HER2- positive), and triple-negative (TN) (ER negative, PR negative, and HER2- negative). Comparisons of the ages of patients and molecular subtypes between different geographic regions were performed. Results South and Southeast regions with a higher percentage of European ancestry and higher socioeconomic status presented with the highest proportion of luminal tumors. The North region presented with more aggressive subtypes (HER2-enriched and triple-negative), while the Central-West region predominated triple-positive carcinomas. The Northeast—a region with a high African influence—presented intermediate frequency of the different molecular subtypes. The differences persisted in subgroups of patients under and over 50 years. Conclusions The geographic regions differ according to the distribution of molecular subtypes of breast cancer. However, other differences, beside those related to African ancestry, such as socioeconomic, climatic, nutritional, and geographic, have to be considered to explain our results. The knowledge of the differences in breast cancer characteristics among the geographic regions may help to organize healthcare programs in large countries

  8. The calpain system is associated with survival of breast cancer patients with large but operable inflammatory and non-inflammatory tumours treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Storr, Sarah J; Zhang, Siwei; Perren, Tim; Lansdown, Mark; Fatayer, Hiba; Sharma, Nisha; Gahlaut, Renu; Shaaban, Abeer; Martin, Stewart G

    2016-07-26

    The calpains are a family of intracellular cysteine proteases that function in a variety of important cellular functions, including cell signalling, motility, apoptosis and survival. In early invasive breast cancer expression of calpain-1, calpain-2 and their inhibitor, calpastatin, have been associated with clinical outcome and clinicopathological factors.The expression of calpain-1, calpain-2 and calpastatin was determined using immunohistochemistry on core biopsy samples, in a cohort of large but operable inflammatory and non-inflammatory primary breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Information on treatment and prognostic variables together with long-term clinical follow-up was available for these patients. Diagnostic pre-chemotherapy core biopsy samples and surgically excised specimens were available for analysis.Expression of calpastatin, calpain-1 or calpain-2 in the core biopsies was not associated with breast cancer specific survival in the total patient cohort; however, in patients with non-inflammatory breast cancer, high calpastatin expression was significantly associated with adverse breast cancer-specific survival (P=0.035), as was low calpain-2 expression (P=0.031). Low calpastatin expression was significantly associated with adverse breast cancer-specific survival of the inflammatory breast cancer patients (P=0.020), as was low calpain-1 expression (P=0.003).In conclusion, high calpain-2 and low calpastatin expression is associated with improved breast cancer-specific survival in non-inflammatory large but operable primary breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In inflammatory cases, high calpain-1 and high calpastatin expression is associated with improved breast cancer-specific survival. Determining the expression of these proteins may be of clinical relevance. Further validation, in multi-centre cohorts of breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, is warranted.

  9. Postoperative Depression of Tumour-directed Cell-mediated Immunity in Patients with Malignant Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, A. J.; Spilg, W. G. S.; Mackie, Rona M.; Thomas, Catherine E.

    1972-01-01

    Leucocytes from 46 melanoma patients, 45 breast carcinoma patients, and 95 control donors were tested by the leucocyte migration test against the supernatants of homogenates of malignant melanomas, breast carcinomas, simple breast tumours, and breasts showing simple cystic disease. By comparison with controls inhibition of migration occurred significantly more frequently when tumour patients' leucocytes were exposed to extracts of histogenetically similar tumours. Cell-mediated immunity to tumour-associated antigens was measured in 12 patients with breast carcinoma and 12 with malignant melanoma immediately before surgical operation and in the postoperative period. All patients tested before operation showed significant inhibition of migration on contact with extracts of histogenetically similar tumours. Postoperatively the degree of leucocyte migration inhibition was reduced in all patients with melanoma and breast carcinoma. Significant inhibition of leucocyte migration returned in most patients 6-22 days after operation. PMID:5077468

  10. HER2 status in molecular apocrine breast cancer: associations with clinical, pathological, and molecular features

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenwen; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yun; Zhu, Xiaojing; Shi, Zhongyuan; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Molecular apocrine breast cancer (MABC) is a distinct subtype of breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between HER2 status and clinicopathologic characteristics of MABCs from Chinese Han cohort. A cohort of 90 MABC patients were enrolled. Immunohistochemical method was performed to analyze the molecular expression, and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) amplification was verified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). By studying these 90 MABC cases, the majority of studied patients were premenopausal young women (median age 48 yr) with high grade tumors. We also found that MABCs had high positive expression rates of HER2, CK8, CD44, CD166, p53 and BRCA1, the elevated Ki-67 labeling index, and favorable prognosis. There was a significantly higher incidence of lymph node metastasis and lower CD166 positive rate in HER2-negative patients compared to HER2-positive patients (54.5% vs. 37.0%, P = 0.044 and 72.7% vs. 91.3%, P = 0.021, respectively). The CK5/6 and EGFR expression rates were significant higher in HER2-negative cases than in HER2-positive cases, suggesting that there is overlap between MABC with HER2-negative phenotype and basal-like breast cancer. In addition, HER2 positive was found to be significantly associated a poor overall survival in MABCs. In conclusion, HER2 are highly expressed, and HER2 positivity could be considered as a significant biomarker of poor prognosis in MABC. The results also suggest that a subtype tumor with distinct patterns of molecule expression depending on HER2 status presented in MABC. PMID:26339367

  11. Poorer breast cancer survival outcomes in males than females might be attributable to tumor subtype

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shan; Wu, Juan; Li, Xiang; Liu, Qian; Wei, Wen; Sun, Shengrong

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Substantial controversy exists regarding the differences in tumor subtypes between male breast cancer (MBC) and female breast cancer (FBC). This is the largest population-based study to compare MBC and FBC patients. Methods Using data obtained by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program from 2010-2012, a retrospective, population-based cohort study was conducted to investigate tumor subtype-specific differences in various characteristics, overall survival (OS) and breast cancer-specific mortality (BCSM) between males and females. Results In all, 181,814 BC patients (1,516 male and 180,298 female) were eligible for this study. The male patients were more likely to be black, older, and have lower histological grades, more advanced stages, larger tumors, more lymph node and distant metastases and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative tumors (each p<0.05). A matched analysis showed that the 2-year OS was 91.2% and 93.7% and that the BCSM was 2.2% and 2.5% for male and female patients, respectively. The univariate analysis showed that male triple-negative (TN), hormone receptor (HoR)-positive/HER2-positive and HoR-positive/HER2-negative patients had poorer OS (p <0.01). Meanwhile, the HoR-positive/HER2-positive and TN subtypes were associated with a higher BCSM in MBC patients (p<0.01). The multivariate analysis revealed that TN MBC patients had poorer OS and BCSM (p<0.05). Simultaneously, the results showed that male patients in the HoR-positive/HER2-negative subgroup were less likely to die of BC when adjusting for other factors (p<0.05). Conclusions The analysis of 2-year OS and BCSM among the BC subtypes showed clear differences between MBC and FBC patients with the TN subtype; these differences warrant further investigation PMID:27655704

  12. HER2 status in molecular apocrine breast cancer: associations with clinical, pathological, and molecular features.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenwen; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yun; Zhu, Xiaojing; Shi, Zhongyuan; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Molecular apocrine breast cancer (MABC) is a distinct subtype of breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between HER2 status and clinicopathologic characteristics of MABCs from Chinese Han cohort. A cohort of 90 MABC patients were enrolled. Immunohistochemical method was performed to analyze the molecular expression, and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) amplification was verified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). By studying these 90 MABC cases, the majority of studied patients were premenopausal young women (median age 48 yr) with high grade tumors. We also found that MABCs had high positive expression rates of HER2, CK8, CD44, CD166, p53 and BRCA1, the elevated Ki-67 labeling index, and favorable prognosis. There was a significantly higher incidence of lymph node metastasis and lower CD166 positive rate in HER2-negative patients compared to HER2-positive patients (54.5% vs. 37.0%, P = 0.044 and 72.7% vs. 91.3%, P = 0.021, respectively). The CK5/6 and EGFR expression rates were significant higher in HER2-negative cases than in HER2-positive cases, suggesting that there is overlap between MABC with HER2-negative phenotype and basal-like breast cancer. In addition, HER2 positive was found to be significantly associated a poor overall survival in MABCs. In conclusion, HER2 are highly expressed, and HER2 positivity could be considered as a significant biomarker of poor prognosis in MABC. The results also suggest that a subtype tumor with distinct patterns of molecule expression depending on HER2 status presented in MABC.

  13. Economic evaluation of eribulin as second-line treatment for metastatic breast cancer in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Gabriel; Majethia, Unnati; Breeze, Janis L; Kontoudis, Ilias; Park, Jeongae

    2016-01-01

    Background Metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is associated with poor prognosis, particularly for those patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2)-negative tumor. Similar to the rest of the world, treatment options are limited in South Korea following first-line chemotherapy with anthracyclines and/or taxanes. This study examined the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of eribulin in South Korean patients with HER2-negative MBC who have progressed after usage of at least one chemotherapeutic regimen for advanced disease (second-line therapy). Methods A partition survival model was developed from the perspective of the South Korean health care system. The economic impact of introducing eribulin as second-line therapy for HER2-negative MBC was compared to that of capecitabine and vinorelbine. The analysis estimated incremental cost per life-year (LY), that is, cost-effectiveness, and cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), that is, cost-utility, of eribulin for management of HER2-negative MBC in South Korea. The model accounted for overall survival, progression-free survival, drug costs, grade 3/4 adverse events, and health care utilization. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to identify uncertainty in the results of the economic evaluation. Results Second-line eribulin was associated with greater benefits in terms of LY and QALY, compared to capecitabine and vinorelbine. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was ₩10.5M (approximately USD 9,200) per LY, and the incremental cost-utility ratio was ₩17M (approximately USD 14,800) per QALY in the basecase analysis. The incremental cost-utility ratio ranged from ₩12M (USD 10,461) to ₩27M (USD 23,538) per QALY in the deterministic sensitivity analysis. In the probabilistic sensitivity analysis, >99% of the simulations were below ₩50M (USD 42,300), and the lower and upper 95% confidence intervals were ₩3M (USD 2,600) and ₩24M (USD 20,900) per QALY

  14. Palbociclib and Letrozole in Advanced Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Finn, Richard S; Martin, Miguel; Rugo, Hope S; Jones, Stephen; Im, Seock-Ah; Gelmon, Karen; Harbeck, Nadia; Lipatov, Oleg N; Walshe, Janice M; Moulder, Stacy; Gauthier, Eric; Lu, Dongrui R; Randolph, Sophia; Diéras, Véronique; Slamon, Dennis J

    2016-11-17

    Background A phase 2 study showed that progression-free survival was longer with palbociclib plus letrozole than with letrozole alone in the initial treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative advanced breast cancer. We performed a phase 3 study that was designed to confirm and expand the efficacy and safety data for palbociclib plus letrozole for this indication. Methods In this double-blind study, we randomly assigned, in a 2:1 ratio, 666 postmenopausal women with ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, who had not had prior treatment for advanced disease, to receive palbociclib plus letrozole or placebo plus letrozole. The primary end point was progression-free survival, as assessed by the investigators; secondary end points were overall survival, objective response, clinical benefit response, patient-reported outcomes, pharmacokinetic effects, and safety. Results The median progression-free survival was 24.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 22.1 to not estimable) in the palbociclib-letrozole group, as compared with 14.5 months (95% CI, 12.9 to 17.1) in the placebo-letrozole group (hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.46 to 0.72; P<0.001). The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were neutropenia (occurring in 66.4% of the patients in the palbociclib-letrozole group vs. 1.4% in the placebo-letrozole group), leukopenia (24.8% vs. 0%), anemia (5.4% vs. 1.8%), and fatigue (1.8% vs. 0.5%). Febrile neutropenia was reported in 1.8% of patients in the palbociclib-letrozole group and in none of the patients in the placebo-letrozole group. Permanent discontinuation of any study treatment as a result of adverse events occurred in 43 patients (9.7%) in the palbociclib-letrozole group and in 13 patients (5.9%) in the placebo-letrozole group. Conclusions Among patients with previously untreated ER-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer, palbociclib

  15. A comparison of Ki-67 counting methods in luminal Breast Cancer: The Average Method vs. the Hot Spot Method

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min Hye; Kim, Hyun Jung; Chung, Yul Ri; Lee, Yangkyu

    2017-01-01

    In spite of the usefulness of the Ki-67 labeling index (LI) as a prognostic and predictive marker in breast cancer, its clinical application remains limited due to variability in its measurement and the absence of a standard method of interpretation. This study was designed to compare the two methods of assessing Ki-67 LI: the average method vs. the hot spot method and thus to determine which method is more appropriate in predicting prognosis of luminal/HER2-negative breast cancers. Ki-67 LIs were calculated by direct counting of three representative areas of 493 luminal/HER2-negative breast cancers using the two methods. We calculated the differences in the Ki-67 LIs (ΔKi-67) between the two methods and the ratio of the Ki-67 LIs (H/A ratio) of the two methods. In addition, we compared the performance of the Ki-67 LIs obtained by the two methods as prognostic markers. ΔKi-67 ranged from 0.01% to 33.3% and the H/A ratio ranged from 1.0 to 2.6. Based on the receiver operating characteristic curve method, the predictive powers of the KI-67 LI measured by the two methods were similar (Area under curve: hot spot method, 0.711; average method, 0.700). In multivariate analysis, high Ki-67 LI based on either method was an independent poor prognostic factor, along with high T stage and node metastasis. However, in repeated counts, the hot spot method did not consistently classify tumors into high vs. low Ki-67 LI groups. In conclusion, both the average and hot spot method of evaluating Ki-67 LI have good predictive performances for tumor recurrence in luminal/HER2-negative breast cancers. However, we recommend using the average method for the present because of its greater reproducibility. PMID:28187177

  16. A comparison of Ki-67 counting methods in luminal Breast Cancer: The Average Method vs. the Hot Spot Method.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Hye; Kim, Hyun Jung; Chung, Yul Ri; Lee, Yangkyu; Park, So Yeon

    2017-01-01

    In spite of the usefulness of the Ki-67 labeling index (LI) as a prognostic and predictive marker in breast cancer, its clinical application remains limited due to variability in its measurement and the absence of a standard method of interpretation. This study was designed to compare the two methods of assessing Ki-67 LI: the average method vs. the hot spot method and thus to determine which method is more appropriate in predicting prognosis of luminal/HER2-negative breast cancers. Ki-67 LIs were calculated by direct counting of three representative areas of 493 luminal/HER2-negative breast cancers using the two methods. We calculated the differences in the Ki-67 LIs (ΔKi-67) between the two methods and the ratio of the Ki-67 LIs (H/A ratio) of the two methods. In addition, we compared the performance of the Ki-67 LIs obtained by the two methods as prognostic markers. ΔKi-67 ranged from 0.01% to 33.3% and the H/A ratio ranged from 1.0 to 2.6. Based on the receiver operating characteristic curve method, the predictive powers of the KI-67 LI measured by the two methods were similar (Area under curve: hot spot method, 0.711; average method, 0.700). In multivariate analysis, high Ki-67 LI based on either method was an independent poor prognostic factor, along with high T stage and node metastasis. However, in repeated counts, the hot spot method did not consistently classify tumors into high vs. low Ki-67 LI groups. In conclusion, both the average and hot spot method of evaluating Ki-67 LI have good predictive performances for tumor recurrence in luminal/HER2-negative breast cancers. However, we recommend using the average method for the present because of its greater reproducibility.

  17. Clinical relevance associated to the analysis of circulating tumour cells in patients with solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Serrano Fernádez, María José; Alvarez Merino, Juan Carlos; Martínez Zubiaurre, Iñigo; Fernández García, Ana; Sánchez Rovira, Pedro; Lorente Acosta, José Antonio

    2009-10-01

    The distant growth of tumour cells escaping from primary tumours, a process termed metastasis, represents the leading cause of death among patients affected by malignant neoplasias from breast and colon. During the metastasis process, cancer cells liberated from primary tumour tissue, also termed circulating tumour cells (CTCs), travel through the circulatory and/or lymphatic systems to reach distant organs. The early detection and the genotypic and phenotypic characterisation of such CTCs could represent a powerful diagnostic tool of the disease, and could also be considered an important predictive and prognostic marker of disease progression and treatment response. In this article we discuss the potential relevance in the clinic of monitoring CTCs from patients suffering from solid epithelial tumours, with emphasis on the impact of such analyses as a predictive marker for treatment response.

  18. Effects of Herceptin on circulating tumor cells in HER2 positive early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J-L; Yao, Q; Chen Y Wang, J-H; Wang, H; Fan, Q; Ling, R; Yi, J; Wang, L

    2015-03-20

    The objective of this study was to determine the changes in peripheral blood circulating tumor cells in HER2-positive early breast cancer before and after Herceptin therapy, and to explore the effects of the HER2 gene and Herceptin on circulating tumor cells. CK19 mRNA expression in peripheral blood was evaluated by qRT-PCR as an index of circulating tumor cells in 15 cases of HER-2-positive breast cancer and 18 cases of HER2-negative breast cancer before, and after chemotherapy as well. Ten cases of HER2-positive breast cancer continued on Herceptin therapy for 3 months after chemotherapy, and their peripheral blood was again drawn and assayed for CK-19 mRNA expression. Preoperatively, all cases of HER2-positive cancer were positive for CK19 mRNA in peripheral blood, but 6 cases of HER2-negative breast cancer were positive (33.3%), where there was a substantial difference between the two groups. After 6 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy, CK19 positive rates in cases of HER2-positive and -negative breast cancer reduced by 93.3 and 11.1%, respectively, with a significant difference still existing. After 3 months of Herceptin therapy, expression of CK19 mRNA declined considerably in 10 cases of HER2 positive breast cancer (113.66 ± 88.65 vs 63.35 ± 49.27, P = 0.025). HER-2 gene expression closely correlated with circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood of early breast cancer patients. Moreover, Herceptin, a monoclonal antibody for HER2, can reduce the number of circulating tumor cells, which can be an early predictive factor for Herceptin therapy effectiveness against breast cancer.

  19. Double-edged role of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 in breast cancer prognosis: an analysis of 167 breast cancer samples and online data sets

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Shao, Zhi-Min

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1) is widely expressed in breast cancer; however, its prognostic significance in breast cancer patients remains controversial. In this study, expression levels of GPER1 were analyzed by using real-time polymerase chain reaction in 167 primary breast cancer samples, and overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were analyzed by using Kaplan–Meier curves and multivariable Cox regression. In addition, a meta-analysis was conducted with all available online data sets found in the Web sites kmplot.com and www.prognoscan.org. The results showed that there was no significant correlation between GPER1 expression and OS, RFS, DMFS, and DFS in the total breast cancer patient population. In contrast, the meta-analysis of online data sets found that expression levels of GPER1 were slightly associated with better RFS in the total breast cancer population (P=0.021). Interestingly, higher expression of GPER1 was associated with poorer DFS in HER2-positive subtype of breast cancer (P=0.047) but with better DMFS (P=0.040) and DFS (P=0.035) in HER2-negative subtype of breast cancer. In addition, it was found that HER2 overexpression in MDA-MB-231 cell increased GPER1, which may help explain protumor effect of GPER1 in HER2-overexpressed patients. The overall results suggested that the expression of GPER1 has distinct prognostic values in HER2-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer patients. PMID:27822058

  20. Eribulin Mesylate Combined with Local Treatment for Brain Metastasis from Breast Cancer: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Byun, Kyung-Do; Ahn, Sung Gwe; Baik, Hyung Joo; Lee, Anbok; Bae, Ki Beom; An, Min Sung; Kim, Kwang Hee; Shin, Jae Ho; Park, Ha Kyoung; Cho, Heunglae; Jeong, Joon; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2016-06-01

    The prognosis associated with brain metastasis arising from breast cancer is very poor. Eribulin is a microtubule dynamic inhibitor synthesized from halichondrin B, a natural marine product. In a phase III study (EMBRACE), eribulin improved overall survival in patients with heavily pretreated metastatic breast cancers. However, these studies included few patients with brain metastases. Metastatic brain tumors (MBT) were detected during first-line palliative chemotherapy in a 43-year-old woman with breast cancer metastasis to the lung and mediastinal nodes; the genetic subtype was luminal B-like human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative. Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) followed by eribulin treatment continuously decreased the size, and induced regression, of the MBT with systemic disease stability for 12 months. Another 48-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer (HER2+ subtype) presented with MBT. Following surgical resection of the tumor, eribulin with concurrent WBRT showed regression of the MBT without systemic progression for 18 months.

  1. [The drug of the month: everolimus (Afinitor) for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Jerusalem, G; Rorive, A; Collignon, J

    2014-09-01

    Sequential endocrine treatments are recommended for estrogen receptor (ER) positive human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER 2) negative metastatic breast cancers except in the case of symptomatic visceral disease. However, patients who suffer from disease progression while receiving a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor (NSAI) have a very poor prognosis with standard endocrine therapy alone. Recently, based onthe results of the BOLERO 2 trial, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus, combined with exemestane, a steroidal aromatase inhibitor, has been approved in Europe and the US for patients suffering from ER positive HER2 negative advanced breast cancer previously treated by a NSAI. The median progression-free survival (PFS) increased from 3.2 to 7.8 months in patients receiving everolimus and exemestane compared to placebo and exemestane. The magnitude of benefit was consistent in all pre-specified subgroups. Side effects were manageable and the quality of life was at least maintained. Everolimus has also beenrecently studied in HER2 positive locally advanced or metastatic disease in heavily pretreated patients (BOLERO 3 trial). This trial met its primary endpoint. The median PFS was increased in patients receiving trastuzumab, vinorelbine and everolimus compared to patients receiving trastuzumab, vinorelbine and placebo. We review pharmacological data and side effects of the drug. We also review the most important clinical trials leading to reimbursement of everolimus in metastatic breast cancer.

  2. Tumour macrophages as potential targets of bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Tumour cells communicate with the cells of their microenvironment via a series of molecular and cellular interactions to aid their progression to a malignant state and ultimately their metastatic spread. Of the cells in the microenvironment with a key role in cancer development, tumour associated macrophages (TAMs) are among the most notable. Tumour cells release a range of chemokines, cytokines and growth factors to attract macrophages, and these in turn release numerous factors (e.g. VEGF, MMP-9 and EGF) that are implicated in invasion-promoting processes such as tumour cell growth, flicking of the angiogenic switch and immunosuppression. TAM density has been shown to correlate with poor prognosis in breast cancer, suggesting that these cells may represent a potential therapeutic target. However, there are currently no agents that specifically target TAM's available for clinical use. Bisphosphonates (BPs), such as zoledronic acid, are anti-resorptive agents approved for treatment of skeletal complication associated with metastatic breast cancer and prostate cancer. These agents act on osteoclasts, key cells in the bone microenvironment, to inhibit bone resorption. Over the past 30 years this has led to a great reduction in skeletal-related events (SRE's) in patients with advanced cancer and improved the morbidity associated with cancer-induced bone disease. However, there is now a growing body of evidence, both from in vitro and in vivo models, showing that zoledronic acid can also target tumour cells to increase apoptotic cell death and decrease proliferation, migration and invasion, and that this effect is significantly enhanced in combination with chemotherapy agents. Whether macrophages in the peripheral tumour microenvironment are exposed to sufficient levels of bisphosphonate to be affected is currently unknown. Macrophages belong to the same cell lineage as osteoclasts, the major target of BPs, and are highly phagocytic cells shown to be sensitive to

  3. Relevance of high-dose chemotherapy in solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Nieboer, P; de Vries, E G E; Mulder, N H; van der Graaf, W T A

    2005-05-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in the treatment of solid tumours. Based on a steep dose-response relationship for especially alkylating agents on tumour cell survival, high-dose chemotherapy was considered of interest for the treatment of solid tumours. Results of phase 1 and 2 studies with high-dose chemotherapy in a variety of tumour types showed good response rates. Nowadays, several phase 3 studies are available especially in metastatic and high-risk breast cancer patients. The high expectations of high-dose chemotherapy did not come true. This review analyses results of randomised studies and comments on the discrepancy between findings in patients versus those in tissue culture. Potential factors involved are the presence of tumour stem cells with different characteristics from more mature tumour cells, limitations in drug escalation in the clinic, transplant mortality, trial design and tumour cell contamination of the haematopoietic stem cell transplant. Maturation of the results from recent studies indicating a more modest benefit in, e.g., adjuvant breast cancer balanced versus long-term side effects will ultimately determine the role of high-dose chemotherapy in certain solid tumours. In case of well-defined indications for high-dose chemotherapy, further selection of patients based on patient and tumour characteristics as well as the introduction of new agents will most likely play a role.

  4. PTEN loss is associated with worse outcome in HER2-amplified breast cancer patients but is not associated with trastuzumab resistance

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Howard M.; Gardner, Humphrey; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Elatre, Wafaa; O’Brien, Carol; Lackner, Mark R.; Pestano, Gary A.; Santiago, Angela; Villalobos, Ivonne; Eiermann, Wolfgang; Pienkowski, Tadeusz; Martin, Miguel; Robert, Nicholas; Crown, John; Nuciforo, Paolo; Bee, Valerie; Mackey, John; Slamon, Dennis J.; Press, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the clinical relevance of PTEN in HER2-amplified and HER2-non-amplified disease. Experimental Design We assessed PTEN status in two large adjuvant breast cancer trials (BCIRG-006 and BCIRG-005) using a PTEN IHC assay that was previously validated in a panel of 33 breast cancer cell lines and prostate cancer tissues with known PTEN gene deletion. Results In the HER2-positive patient population, absence of tumor cell PTEN staining occurred at a rate of 5.4% and was independent of ER/PR status. In contrast, 15.9% of HER2-negative patients exhibited absence of PTEN staining with the highest frequency seen in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) subgroup versus ER/PR-positive patients (35.1% vs. 10.9%). Complete absence of PTEN staining in tumor cells was associated with poor clinical outcome in HER2-positive disease. Those patients whose cancers demonstrated absent PTEN staining had a significant decrease in disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) compared to patients with tumors exhibiting any PTEN staining patterns (low, moderate or high). Trastuzumab appeared to provide clinical benefit even for patients lacking PTEN staining. In the HER2-negative population there were no statistically significant differences in clinical outcome based on PTEN status. Conclusions This study is the largest to date examining PTEN status in breast cancer and the data suggest that the rate and significance of PTEN status differ between HER2-positive and HER2-negative disease. Furthermore, the data clearly suggest that HER2-positive patients with PTEN loss still benefit from trastuzumab. PMID:25649019

  5. Weekly paclitaxel and concurrent pazopanib following doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide as neoadjuvant therapy for HER-negative locally advanced breast cancer: NSABP Foundation FB-6, a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Tan, A R; Johannes, H; Rastogi, P; Jacobs, S A; Robidoux, A; Flynn, P J; Thirlwell, M P; Fehrenbacher, L; Stella, P J; Goel, R; Julian, T B; Provencher, L; Bury, M J; Bhatt, K; Geyer, C E; Swain, S M; Mamounas, E P; Wolmark, N

    2015-01-01

    This multicenter single-arm phase II study evaluated the addition of pazopanib to concurrent weekly paclitaxel following doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide as neoadjuvant therapy in human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2)-negative locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Patients with HER2-negative stage III breast cancer were treated with doxorubicin 60 mg/m(2) and cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m(2) for four cycles every 3 weeks followed by weekly paclitaxel 80 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days for four cycles concurrently with pazopanib 800 mg orally daily prior to surgery. Post-operatively, pazopanib was given daily for 6 months. The primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) in the breast and lymph nodes. Between July 2009 and March 2011, 101 patients with stage IIIA-C HER2-negative breast cancer were enrolled. The pCR rate in evaluable patients who initiated paclitaxel and pazopanib was 17 % (16/93). The pCR rate was 9 % (6/67) in hormone receptor-positive tumors and 38 % (10/26) in triple-negative tumors. Pre-operative pazopanib was completed in only 39 % of patients. The most frequent grade 3 and 4 adverse events during paclitaxel and pazopanib were neutropenia (27 %), diarrhea (5 %), ALT and AST elevations (each 5 %), and hypertension (5 %). Although the pCR rate of paclitaxel and pazopanib following AC chemotherapy given as neoadjuvant therapy in women with LABC met the pre-specified criteria for activity, there was substantial toxicity, which led to a high discontinuation rate of pazopanib. The combination does not appear to warrant further evaluation in the neoadjuvant setting for breast cancer.

  6. Active transport of RB protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm as one of the development mechanisms of HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kowalik, Artur; Kopczyński, Janusz; Wypiórkiewicz, Elżbieta; Góźdź, Stanisław; Meżyk, Ryszard; Siedlecki, Janusz Aleksander

    2013-04-01

    HER2-positive breast cancer (HER2+) occurs in approximately 15-20% of all breast cancers. Biologically this cancer subtype is characterized by an aggressive clinical course (often spread to regional lymph nodes at the time of diagnosis), and after successful treatment high risk of recurrence. Deregulation of the cell cycle is the basis for cancer aggressiveness. The RB protein is one of the key regulators of the cell cycle. There are only a few published studies on the expression and localization of RB protein in the cells of HER2-positive breast cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are differences in the expression and localization of RB protein in HER2-positive breast cancers compared to breast cancers showing no expression of HER2. We used 50 tissue samples from HER2 positive breast cancer and 21 tissue samples derived from patients with HER2 negative breast cancer. The RB protein expression was measured by immunohistochemical techniques in tissue microarray format. Cytoplasmic RB expression was observed in 29 out of 50 (58%) HER2 positive breast cancers. In this group only cytoplasmic expression was observed. There was no case with nuclear expression. In contrast, in the HER2-negative breast cancer control group, in no case RB expression was observed in the cytoplasm (0/21, 0%). All 21 samples (100%) showed expression of RB protein in the nucleus (p < 0.0001). We can speculate that lack of expression suggests alternative mechanisms in the development of HER2 positive breast cancer. We hypothesize that HER2 overexpression is in some way associated with active transport of RB protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. This may be an indirect mechanism of inactivation of tumor suppressor protein in breast cancer exhibiting overexpression of HER2.

  7. Extrarenal teratoid Wilms' tumour.

    PubMed

    Chowhan, A K; Reddy, M K; Javvadi, V; Kannan, T

    2011-06-01

    We report an unusual case of extrarenal teratoid Wilms' tumour in a 15-month-old male child. The tumour was retroperitoneal in location and consisted of triphasic Wilms' tumour elements, along with the presence of heterologous components. The heterologous teratoid elements were composed of predominantly glandular epithelium with the presence of focal skeletal muscle, adipose and neuroglial tissues. Although extrarenal Wilms' tumours have been documented in the literature, only a few cases have been noted to date. We present the relevant clinical, radiological, histomorphological, histochemical and immunohistochemical features of this rare tumour, and discuss the various theories of its histogenesis.

  8. Tumour morphology predicts PALB2 germline mutation status

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Z L; Provenzano, E; Dite, G S; Park, D J; Apicella, C; Sawyer, S D; James, P A; Mitchell, G; Trainer, A H; Lindeman, G J; Shackleton, K; Cicciarelli, L; Buys, S S; Andrulis, I L; Mulligan, A M; Glendon, G; John, E M; Terry, M B; Daly, M; Odefrey, F A; Nguyen-Dumont, T; Giles, G G; Dowty, J G; Winship, I; Goldgar, D E; Hopper, J L; Southey, M C

    2013-01-01

    Background: Population-based studies of breast cancer have estimated that at least some PALB2 mutations are associated with high breast cancer risk. For women carrying PALB2 mutations, knowing their carrier status could be useful in directing them towards effective cancer risk management and therapeutic strategies. We sought to determine whether morphological features of breast tumours can predict PALB2 germline mutation status. Methods: Systematic pathology review was conducted on breast tumours from 28 female carriers of PALB2 mutations (non-carriers of other known high-risk mutations, recruited through various resources with varying ascertainment) and on breast tumours from a population-based sample of 828 Australian women diagnosed before the age of 60 years (which included 40 BRCA1 and 18 BRCA2 mutation carriers). Tumour morphological features of the 28 PALB2 mutation carriers were compared with those of 770 women without high-risk mutations. Results: Tumours arising in PALB2 mutation carriers were associated with minimal sclerosis (odds ratio (OR)=19.7; 95% confidence interval (CI)=6.0–64.6; P=5 × 10−7). Minimal sclerosis was also a feature that distinguished PALB2 mutation carriers from BRCA1 (P=0.05) and BRCA2 (P=0.04) mutation carriers. Conclusion: This study identified minimal sclerosis to be a predictor of germline PALB2 mutation status. Morphological review can therefore facilitate the identification of women most likely to carry mutations in PALB2. PMID:23787919

  9. [Thrombophlebitis in an Elderly Japanese Woman Treated with Tamoxifen for Breast Cancer].

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Hiroyuki; Hayami, Ryosuke; Tsuneizumi, Michiko; Nakagami, Kazuhiko

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we report the rare case of an elderly woman who developed thrombophlebitis after being treated with tamoxifen for breast cancer. She visited our department with a lump in her left breast. She underwent core needle biopsy, and she was diagnosed with breast cancer (invasive ductal carcinoma, ER- and PgR-positive, HER2-negative). We chose hormonal therapy because surgical treatment was deemed too invasive considering her general status. She was administered tamoxifen (20 mg/day) instead of an aromatase inhibitor in consideration of her osteoporosis. Six months after initiating tamoxifen therapy, she exhibited swelling in her left leg. Computed tomography and ultrasound revealed thrombophlebitis in her left femoral vein. She stopped taking tamoxifen and started warfarin potassium as thrombolytic therapy, after which thrombophlebitis was relieved. Advanced age may be a risk factor for thrombophlebitis associated with tamoxifen treatment; therefore, precautions should be taken accordingly.

  10. [Brain metastases in breast cancer. Epidemiology and natural history. The Institut Curie experience].

    PubMed

    Gachet, Julie; Giroux, Julie; Girre, Véronique; Brain, Étienne; Kirova, Youlia; Mignot, Laurent; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Dutertre, Guillaume; Pouit, Bernard; Mosseri, Véronique; Falcou, Marie-Christine; Cottu, Paul H

    2011-04-01

    Breast cancer is the second cause for brain metastases. Their incidence is rising, partly due to the therapeutic improvements which alter the natural history of breast cancer. Predictive factors for brain metastases have been identified: HER2 oncogene overexpression, lack of expression of hormone receptors, young age and triple negative status. Brain metastases prognosis remains poor with a median survival shorter than 1 year, except for solitary lesions treated by surgery or radiosurgery. We have analysed two series of data from Institut Curie (Paris and Saint-Cloud). In women younger than 65 years, with HER2 negative breast carcinoma, median survival was 7.1 months. In women older than 65 years, median survival was 4 months.

  11. Clinicopathological significance and potential drug target of CDH1 in breast cancer: a meta-analysis and literature review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ruixue; Ding, Ping; Yang, Fei

    2015-01-01

    CDH1, as a tumor suppressor gene, contributes sporadic breast cancer (BC) progression. However, the association between CDH1 hypermethylation and BC, and its clinicopathological significance remains unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the relationship between the CDH1 methylation profile and the major clinicopathological features. A detailed literature was searched through the electronic databases PubMed, Web of Science™, and EMBASE™ for related research publications. The data were extracted and assessed by two reviewers independently. Odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated and summarized respectively. The frequency of CDH1 methylation was significantly higher in invasive ductal carcinoma than in normal breast tissues (OR =5.83, 95% CI 3.76-9.03, P<0.00001). CDH1 hypermethylation was significantly higher in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative BC than in ER-positive BC (OR =0.62, 95% CI 0.43-0.87, P=0.007). In addition, we found that the CDH1 was significantly methylated in HER2-negative BC than in HER2-positive BC (OR =0.26, 95% CI 0.15-0.44, P<0.00001). However, CDH1 methylation frequency was not associated with progesterone receptor (PR) status, or with grades, stages, or lymph node metastasis of BC patients. Our results indicate that CDH1 hypermethylation is a potential novel drug target for developing personalized therapy. CDH1 hypermethylation is strongly associated with ER-negative and HER2-negative BC, respectively, suggesting CDH1 methylation status could contribute to the development of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of ER-negative or HER2-negative BC with aggressive tumor biology.

  12. Malignant tumours after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fahlenkamp, D; Reinke, P; Kirchner, S; Schnorr, D; Lindeke, A; Loening, S A

    1996-10-01

    In 1243 patients after renal transplantation, 39 malignant tumours were detected in 37 patients. The average latency period between transplantation and tumour disease was 72 months. Tumours included 8 malignant lymphomas, 7 dermatomas and 24 visceral tumours. The patients who developed a tumour had received fewer blood transfusions before transplantation than a tumour-free control group of 60 patients with renal transplants. Rejection crises occurred in a significantly smaller number of tumour patients compared with the control group.

  13. Progress with palbociclib in breast cancer: latest evidence and clinical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Andrea; Schirone, Alessio; Maltoni, Roberta; Bravaccini, Sara; Cecconetto, Lorenzo; Farolfi, Alberto; Bronte, Giuseppe; Andreis, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Deregulation of the cell cycle is a hallmark of cancer, and research on cell cycle control has allowed identification of potential targets for anticancer treatment. Palbociclib is a selective inhibitor of the cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK4/6), which are involved, with their coregulatory partners cyclin D, in the G1-S transition. Inhibition of this step halts cell cycle progression in cells in which the involved pathway, including the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) and the E2F family of transcription factors, is functioning, although having been deregulated. Among breast cancers, those with functioning cyclin D-CDK4/6-Rb-E2F are mainly hormone-receptor (HR) positive, with some HER2-positive and rare triple-negative cases. Deregulation results from genetic or otherwise occurring hyperactivation of molecules subtending cell cycle progression, or inactivation of cell cycle inhibitors. Based on results of randomized clinical trials, palbociclib was granted accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in combination with letrozole as initial endocrine-based therapy for metastatic disease in postmenopausal women with HR-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, and was approved for use in combination with fulvestrant in women with HR-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer with disease progression following endocrine therapy. This review provides an update of the available knowledge on the cell cycle and its regulation, on the alterations in cyclin D-CDK4/6-Rb-E2F axis in breast cancer and their roles in endocrine resistance, on the preclinical activity of CDK4/6 inhibitors in breast cancer, both as monotherapy and as partners of combinatorial synergic treatments, and on the clinical development of palbociclib in breast cancer. PMID:28203301

  14. Progress with palbociclib in breast cancer: latest evidence and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Andrea; Schirone, Alessio; Maltoni, Roberta; Bravaccini, Sara; Cecconetto, Lorenzo; Farolfi, Alberto; Bronte, Giuseppe; Andreis, Daniele

    2017-02-01

    Deregulation of the cell cycle is a hallmark of cancer, and research on cell cycle control has allowed identification of potential targets for anticancer treatment. Palbociclib is a selective inhibitor of the cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK4/6), which are involved, with their coregulatory partners cyclin D, in the G1-S transition. Inhibition of this step halts cell cycle progression in cells in which the involved pathway, including the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) and the E2F family of transcription factors, is functioning, although having been deregulated. Among breast cancers, those with functioning cyclin D-CDK4/6-Rb-E2F are mainly hormone-receptor (HR) positive, with some HER2-positive and rare triple-negative cases. Deregulation results from genetic or otherwise occurring hyperactivation of molecules subtending cell cycle progression, or inactivation of cell cycle inhibitors. Based on results of randomized clinical trials, palbociclib was granted accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in combination with letrozole as initial endocrine-based therapy for metastatic disease in postmenopausal women with HR-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, and was approved for use in combination with fulvestrant in women with HR-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer with disease progression following endocrine therapy. This review provides an update of the available knowledge on the cell cycle and its regulation, on the alterations in cyclin D-CDK4/6-Rb-E2F axis in breast cancer and their roles in endocrine resistance, on the preclinical activity of CDK4/6 inhibitors in breast cancer, both as monotherapy and as partners of combinatorial synergic treatments, and on the clinical development of palbociclib in breast cancer.

  15. CCR 20th Anniversary Commentary: Gene-Expression Signature in Breast Cancer--Where Did It Start and Where Are We Now?

    PubMed

    Gingras, Isabelle; Desmedt, Christine; Ignatiadis, Michail; Sotiriou, Christos

    2015-11-01

    Desmedt and colleagues published two articles, one in the June 1, 2007 issue, and the other in the August 15, 2008, issue of Clinical Cancer Research, that showed gene-expression signatures to be proliferation driven and time dependent, with their prognostic power decreasing with increasing follow-up years. Moreover, the articles showed that immune response is a crucial determinant of prognosis in the HER2-positive and estrogen receptor-negative/HER2-negative subtypes, providing a rationale to further explore the role of the antitumor immune response in these breast cancer subtypes.

  16. Development of Lu-177-trastuzumab for radioimmunotherapy of HER2 expressing breast cancer and its feasibility assessment in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bhusari, Priya; Vatsa, Rakhee; Singh, Gurpreet; Parmar, Madan; Bal, Amanjit; Dhawan, Devinder K; Mittal, Bhagwant R; Shukla, Jaya

    2017-02-15

    HER2/neu is over expressed in 20-25% of breast cancers. HER2 breast cancers are aggressive and are associated with poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to develop the clinical grade Lu-177-trastuzumab and its preliminary evaluation for specific tumor targeting in HER2 positive breast cancer patients. Trastuzumab was conjugated to bifunctional chelator, DOTA, and characterized for integrity and the number of molecules conjugated. Radiolabeling of DOTA-conjugated trastuzumab was optimized using Lu-177. Quality control parameters including radiochemical purity, stability, sterility, pyrogenicity and immunoreactivity were assessed. A preliminary pilot study was conducted on breast cancer patients (n = 6 HER2 positive and n = 4 HER2 negative) to evaluate the ability of Lu-177-trastuzumab for HER2 specific tumor targeting. The conjugates were efficiently labeled with Lu-177 with high radiochemical purity (up to 91%) and specific activity (6-13 µCi/µg). Lu-177-trastuzumab was stable up to 12 hr post labeling. The radioimmunoassay demonstrated good antigen binding ability and specificity for HER2 receptor protein. The patient studies showed the localization of Lu-177-trastuzumab at primary as well as metastatic sites (HER2 positive) in the planar and SPECT/CT images. No tracer uptake was observed in HER2 negative patients that indicated the specificity of Lu-177-trastuzumab. The study demonstrated that in-house developed Lu-177-trastuzumab has specific targeting ability for HER2 expressing lesions and may in future become a palliative treatment option in the form of targeted radionuclide therapy for disseminated HER2 positive breast cancer.

  17. Phenotypic heterogeneity of disseminated tumour cells is preset by primary tumour hypoxic microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Fluegen, Georg; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Wang, Yarong; Padgen, Michael R; Williams, James K; Nobre, Ana Rita; Calvo, Veronica; Cheung, Julie F; Bravo-Cordero, Jose Javier; Entenberg, David; Castracane, James; Verkhusha, Vladislav; Keely, Patricia J; Condeelis, John; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A

    2017-02-01

    Hypoxia is a poor-prognosis microenvironmental hallmark of solid tumours, but it is unclear how it influences the fate of disseminated tumour cells (DTCs) in target organs. Here we report that hypoxic HNSCC and breast primary tumour microenvironments displayed upregulation of key dormancy (NR2F1, DEC2, p27) and hypoxia (GLUT1, HIF1α) genes. Analysis of solitary DTCs in PDX and transgenic mice revealed that post-hypoxic DTCs were frequently NR2F1(hi)/DEC2(hi)/p27(hi)/TGFβ2(hi) and dormant. NR2F1 and HIF1α were required for p27 induction in post-hypoxic dormant DTCs, but these DTCs did not display GLUT1(hi) expression. Post-hypoxic DTCs evaded chemotherapy and, unlike ER(-) breast cancer cells, post-hypoxic ER(+) breast cancer cells were more prone to enter NR2F1-dependent dormancy. We propose that primary tumour hypoxic microenvironments give rise to a subpopulation of dormant DTCs that evade therapy. These post-hypoxic dormant DTCs may be the source of disease relapse and poor prognosis associated with hypoxia.

  18. Endolymphatic sac tumour.

    PubMed

    Zulkarnaen, Mohammad; Tang, Ing Ping; Wong, Siong Lung

    2012-06-01

    We present a case of a papillary tumour at the cerebellopontine angle in a 41-year-old man. He presented with left-sided facial and ear pain associated with dizziness, nystagmus and hearing loss. CT scan of the temporal bone showed a destructive tumour at the left cerebellopontine angle. Surgical excision was performed and the diagnosis of the endolymphatic sac tumour was made. Endolymphatic tumour is a low grade adenocarcinoma that originates from the endolymphatic sac. The definitive diagnosis requires a combination of clinical features, radiological finding and pathological correlation.

  19. Tumour progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour’s survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  20. Metastatic Tumours to the Oral Cavity: Report of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Astreidis, Ioannis T.; Kontos, Konstantinos I.; Lazaridou, Maria N.; Bourlidou, Eleni T.; Gerasimidou, Domniki K.; Vladika, Natalia P.; Mangoudi, Doxa L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Metastatic tumours to the oral cavity from distant organs are uncommon and represent approximately 1 - 3% of all oral malignancies. Such metastases can occur to the bone or to the oral soft tissues. Almost any malignancy from any site is capable of metastasis to the oral cavity and a wide variety of tumours have been reported to spread to the mouth. Methods Careful examination of the oral cavity and a high degree of clinical suspicion as well as a multidisciplinary approach are suggested. Results In this article we present three patients, a female and two males with metastatic tumours to the oral cavity, who were referred to our Department. The primary tumours were invasive lobular breast carcinoma, gastric adenocarcinoma and small cell lung carcinoma respectively. Conclusions Metastases to the oral cavity are quite uncommon among population. They usually present with symptoms similar to odontogenic infections and benign tumours, causing a delayed diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26904182

  1. Parthenolide generates reactive oxygen species and autophagy in MDA-MB231 cells. A soluble parthenolide analogue inhibits tumour growth and metastasis in a xenograft model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    D'Anneo, A; Carlisi, D; Lauricella, M; Puleio, R; Martinez, R; Di Bella, S; Di Marco, P; Emanuele, S; Di Fiore, R; Guercio, A; Vento, R; Tesoriere, G

    2013-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are clinically aggressive forms associated with a poor prognosis. We evaluated the cytotoxic effect exerted on triple-negative MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells both by parthenolide and its soluble analogue dimethylamino parthenolide (DMAPT) and explored the underlying molecular mechanism. The drugs induced a dose- and time-dependent decrement in cell viability, which was not prevented by the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. In particular in the first hours of treatment (1–3 h), parthenolide and DMAPT strongly stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The drugs induced production of superoxide anion by activating NADPH oxidase. ROS generation caused depletion of thiol groups and glutathione, activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and downregulation of nuclear factor kB (NF-kB). During this first phase, parthenolide and DMAPT also stimulated autophagic process, as suggested by the enhanced expression of beclin-1, the conversion of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-I (LC3-I) to LC3-II and the increase in the number of cells positive to monodansylcadaverine. Finally, the drugs increased RIP-1 expression. This effect was accompanied by a decrement of pro-caspase 8, while its cleaved form was not detected and the expression of c-FLIPS markedly increased. Prolonging the treatment (5–20 h) ROS generation favoured dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and the appearance of necrotic events, as suggested by the increased number of cells positive to propidium iodide staining. The administration of DMAPT in nude mice bearing xenografts of MDA-MB231 cells resulted in a significant inhibition of tumour growth, an increment of animal survival and a marked reduction of the lung area invaded by metastasis. Immunohistochemistry data revealed that treatment with DMAPT reduced the levels of NF-kB, metalloproteinase-2 and -9 and vascular endothelial growth factor, while induced upregulation of phosphorylated

  2. Change in HER2 (ERBB2) gene status after taxane-based chemotherapy for breast cancer: polyploidization can lead to diagnostic pitfalls with potential impact for clinical management.

    PubMed

    Valent, Alexander; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Cayre, Anne; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-01-01

    The status of the HER2 (ERBB2) gene in breast cancer is not static and may change among the primary tumor, lymph node metastases, and distant metastases. This status change can be a consequence of the natural evolution of the tumor or can be induced by therapy. The HER2 gene status is, in the majority of cases, established at the moment of diagnosis. After chemotherapy, monitoring HER2 status can be a challenge because of ploidy changes induced by drugs. The cytogeneticist or the pathologist can face real difficulties in distinguishing between a true HER2 amplification and HER2 copy number increase by polyploidization. We performed a HER2 genetic examination by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of invasive breast cancers before and after taxane treatment. The majority of patients (91%) were HER2-negative both at diagnosis and after treatment. Thirty of 344 patients (9%) whose tumors were initially HER2-negative were found by FISH to have supernumerary HER2 gene copies (up to 15 copies) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This HER2 copy increase could not be attributed to true gene amplifications and instead reflected polyploidization events, which presumably affected all chromosomes. Indeed, when we used other FISH probes, we found other gene copy numbers to parallel those of HER2. We recommend careful checking of invasive breast carcinomas by supplementary FISH probes if the copy number of the HER2 gene is >6. This procedure allows the discrimination of specific HER2 gene amplifications and global increases in ploidy.

  3. Correlations Between Oncotype DX Recurrence Score and Classic Risk Factors in Early Breast Cancer: Results of A Prospective Multicenter Study in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Özmen, Vahit; Atasoy, Ajlan; Gökmen, Erhan; Özdoğan, Mustafa; Güler, Nilufer; Uras, Cihan; Ok, Engin; Demircan, Orhan; Işıkkdoğan, Abdurrahman; Cabioğlu, Neslihan; Şen, Fatma; Saip, Pınar

    2016-01-01

    Objective Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among Turkish women and the rate of early stage disease is increasing. The Oncotype DX 21-gene assay is predictive of distant recurrence in ER-positive, HER2-negative early breast cancer. We aimed to evaluate the correlations between Recurrence Score (RS) and routine risk factors. Materials and Methods Ten academic centers across Turkey participated in this prospective trial. Consecutive patients with breast cancer who had pT1-3, pN0-N1mic, ER-positive, and HER2-negative tumors were identified at tumor conferences. Both pre- and post-RS treatment decisions and physician perceptions were recorded on questionnaire forms. Correlations between RS and classic risk factors were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Ten centers enrolled a total of 165 patients. The median tumor size was 2 cm. Of the 165 patients, 57% had low RS, 35% had intermediate RS, and 8% had high RS, respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that progesterone receptor (PR) and Ki67 scores were significantly related to RS. Conclusion Oncotype DX Recurrence Score does not seem to have a significant correlation with the majority of classic risk factors, but it may have a correlation with PR score and Ki67 score.

  4. Progressive dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Hamish; Tannenburg, Anthony; Walker, David G; Coyne, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour (DNET) is a benign tumour characterised by cortical location and presentation with drug resistant partial seizures in children. Recently the potential for malignant transformation has been reported, however progression without malignant transformation remains rare. We report a case of clinical and radiologic progression of a DNET in a girl 10 years after initial biopsy.

  5. Advanced MRI applications and findings of malignant phyllodes tumour: review of two cases.

    PubMed

    Alhabshi, Sharifah Majedah Idrus; Rahmat, Kartini; Abu Hassan, Hasyma; Westerhout, Caroline Judy; Chandran, Patricia Ann

    2013-05-01

    Phyllodes tumour or cystosarcoma phyllodes is a rare stromal breast tumour that is usually benign but on rare occasions can turn malignant. Non-specificity of the imaging features on sonography and mammography makes it difficult to distinguish malignant from benign counterparts solely based on imaging. The final diagnosis is still highly dependent on histopathological assessment. Herein, we describe two cases of malignant phyllodes tumour with emphasis on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features using advanced MR applications.

  6. Approach to the Triple Negative Breast Cancer in New Drugs Area.

    PubMed

    Mirzania, Mehrzad

    2016-04-01

    Triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are associated with aggressive course, higher rates of visceral and central nervous system metastases and lower survival rate than hormone receptor positive. Once metastasis has occurred, a median survival was approximately one year. Currently, chemotherapy in TNBC is similar to other HER2- negative breast cancers but in the near future, it will revolutionize. TNBCs are quite heterogeneous based on biomarkers and genetic variations. The series of new drugs have been tried; in this article, platinum, anti-epigenetic drugs, PARP inhibitors, epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor, Src family kinase inhibitor, anti androgen, glycoprotein Non-metastatic melanoma B (gpNMB) antibody, LHRH conjugated to cytotoxic drugs and inhibition of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway will be explained. What is the optimal therapy for TNBC patients? It is still not clear but it seems that the road map according to biological and genetic markers is taking shape.

  7. Tumour evolution inferred by single-cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Navin, Nicholas; Kendall, Jude; Troge, Jennifer; Andrews, Peter; Rodgers, Linda; McIndoo, Jeanne; Cook, Kerry; Stepansky, Asya; Levy, Dan; Esposito, Diane; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi; Krasnitz, Alex; McCombie, W Richard; Hicks, James; Wigler, Michael

    2011-04-07

    Genomic analysis provides insights into the role of copy number variation in disease, but most methods are not designed to resolve mixed populations of cells. In tumours, where genetic heterogeneity is common, very important information may be lost that would be useful for reconstructing evolutionary history. Here we show that with flow-sorted nuclei, whole genome amplification and next generation sequencing we can accurately quantify genomic copy number within an individual nucleus. We apply single-nucleus sequencing to investigate tumour population structure and evolution in two human breast cancer cases. Analysis of 100 single cells from a polygenomic tumour revealed three distinct clonal subpopulations that probably represent sequential clonal expansions. Additional analysis of 100 single cells from a monogenomic primary tumour and its liver metastasis indicated that a single clonal expansion formed the primary tumour and seeded the metastasis. In both primary tumours, we also identified an unexpectedly abundant subpopulation of genetically diverse 'pseudodiploid' cells that do not travel to the metastatic site. In contrast to gradual models of tumour progression, our data indicate that tumours grow by punctuated clonal expansions with few persistent intermediates.

  8. Breast self-examination: importance of technique in early diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hislop, T G; Coldman, A J; Skippen, D H

    1984-01-01

    Shortly after diagnosis of breast cancer 416 patients were interviewed about their use of screening procedures and the method of tumour detection. Although 72% reported that they performed breast self-examination (BSE), only 12% actually inspected and palpated their breasts monthly. BSE was not significantly associated with tumour size or involvement of the lymph nodes; however, thorough inspection was associated with smaller tumours, and careful palpation with the absence of palpable nodes. Of those who no longer or never had examined their breasts 40% reported having annual breast examinations by their physician and had significantly smaller tumours than did the others. Most of the women (86%) reported having detected their own tumours, and BSE did not significantly increase the likelihood of self-detection. The frequency of use of screening procedures was similar in a sample of women without breast cancer. PMID:6498686

  9. Chromosome 2 (2p16) abnormalities in Carney complex tumours

    PubMed Central

    Matyakhina, L; Pack, S; Kirschner, L; Pak, E; Mannan, P; Jaikumar, J; Taymans, S; Sandrini, F; Carney, J; Stratakis, C

    2003-01-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is an autosomal dominant multiple endocrine neoplasia and lentiginosis syndrome characterised by spotty skin pigmentation, cardiac, skin, and breast myxomas, and a variety of endocrine and other tumours. The disease is genetically heterogeneous; two loci have been mapped to chromosomes 17q22–24 (the CNC1 locus) and 2p16 (CNC2). Mutations in the PRKAR1A tumour suppressor gene were recently found in CNC1 mapping kindreds, while the CNC2 and perhaps other genes remain unidentified. Analysis of tumour chromosome rearrangements is a useful tool for uncovering genes with a role in tumorigenesis and/or tumour progression. CGH analysis showed a low level 2p amplification recurrently in four of eight CNC tumours; one tumour showed specific amplification of the 2p16-p23 region only. To define more precisely the 2p amplicon in these and other tumours, we completed the genomic mapping of the CNC2 region, and analysed 46 tumour samples from CNC patients with and without PRKAR1A mutations by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) using bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). Consistent cytogenetic changes of the region were detected in 40 (87%) of the samples analysed. Twenty-four samples (60%) showed amplification of the region represented as homogeneously stained regions (HSRs). The size of the amplicon varied from case to case, and frequently from cell to cell in the same tumour. Three tumours (8%) showed both amplification and deletion of the region in their cells. Thirteen tumours (32%) showed deletions only. These molecular cytogenetic changes included the region that is covered by BACs 400-P-14 and 514-O-11 and, in the genetic map, corresponds to an area flanked by polymorphic markers D2S2251 and D2S2292; other BACs on the centromeric and telomeric end of this region were included in varying degrees. We conclude that cytogenetic changes of the 2p16 chromosomal region that harbours the CNC2 locus are frequently observed in tumours from CNC

  10. Diabetes and Breast Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Bronsveld, Heleen K.; Jensen, Vibeke; Vahl, Pernille; De Bruin, Marie L.; Cornelissen, Sten; Sanders, Joyce; Auvinen, Anssi; Haukka, Jari; Andersen, Morten; Vestergaard, Peter; Schmidt, Marjanka K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Women with diabetes have a worse survival after breast cancer diagnosis compared to women without diabetes. This may be due to a different etiological profile, leading to the development of more aggressive breast cancer subtypes. Our aim was to investigate whether insulin and non-insulin treated women with diabetes develop specific clinicopathological breast cancer subtypes compared to women without diabetes. Methods and Findings This cross-sectional study included randomly selected patients with invasive breast cancer diagnosed in 2000–2010. Stratified by age at breast cancer diagnosis (≤50 and >50 years), women with diabetes were 2:1 frequency-matched on year of birth and age at breast cancer diagnosis (both in 10-year categories) to women without diabetes, to select ~300 patients with tumor tissue available. Tumor MicroArrays were stained by immunohistochemistry for estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER, PR), HER2, Ki67, CK5/6, CK14, and p63. A pathologist scored all stains and revised morphology and grade. Associations between diabetes/insulin treatment and clinicopathological subtypes were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Morphology and grade were not significantly different between women with diabetes (n = 211) and women without diabetes (n = 101), irrespective of menopausal status. Premenopausal women with diabetes tended to have more often PR-negative (OR = 2.44(95%CI:1.07–5.55)), HER2-negative (OR = 2.84(95%CI:1.11–7.22)), and basal-like (OR = 3.14(95%CI:1.03–9.60) tumors than the women without diabetes, with non-significantly increased frequencies of ER-negative (OR = 2.48(95%CI:0.95–6.45)) and triple negative (OR = 2.60(95%CI:0.88–7.67) tumors. After adjustment for age and BMI, the associations remained similar in size but less significant. We observed no evidence for associations of clinicopathological subtypes with diabetes in postmenopausal women, or with insulin treatment in general. Conclusions We found no

  11. Carboplatin+Nab-paclitaxel, Plus Trastuzumab (HER2+) or Bevacizumab (HER2-) in the Neoadjuvant Setting

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-28

    Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  12. 75 FR 30045 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... cancer known as HER2-negative breast cancer, in combination with the chemotherapy drug docetaxel; and (2) first-line treatment of HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer in combination with one of two classes of... for their locally recurrent or metastatic HER2 negative breast cancer. FDA intends to make...

  13. Tumour biology: Herceptin acts as an anti-angiogenic cocktail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Yotaro; Xu, Lei; di Tomaso, Emmanuelle; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2002-03-01

    Malignant tumours secrete factors that enable them to commandeer their own blood supply (angiogenesis), and blocking the action of these factors can inhibit tumour growth. But because tumours may become resistant to treatments that target individual angiogenic factors by switching over to other angiogenic molecules, a cocktail of multiple anti-angiogenic agents should be more effective. Here we show that herceptin, a monoclonal antibody against the cell-surface receptor HER2 (for human epidermal growth factor receptor-2; ref. 4), induces normalization and regression of the vasculature in an experimental human breast tumour that overexpresses HER2 in mice, and that it works by modulating the effects of different pro- and anti-angiogenic factors. As a single agent that acts against multiple targets, herceptin, or drugs like it, may offer a simple alternative to combination anti-angiogenic treatments.

  14. Patient-derived Mammosphere and Xenograft Tumour Initiation Correlates with Progression to Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Eyre, Rachel; Alférez, Denis G; Spence, Kath; Kamal, Mohamed; Shaw, Frances L; Simões, Bruno M; Santiago-Gómez, Angélica; Sarmiento-Castro, Aida; Bramley, Maria; Absar, Mohammed; Saad, Zahida; Chatterjee, Sumohan; Kirwan, Cliona; Gandhi, Ashu; Armstrong, Anne C; Wardley, Andrew M; O'Brien, Ciara S; Farnie, Gillian; Howell, Sacha J; Clarke, Robert B

    2016-12-01

    Breast cancer specific mortality results from tumour cell dissemination and metastatic colonisation. Identification of the cells and processes responsible for metastasis will enable better prevention and control of metastatic disease, thus reducing relapse and mortality. To better understand these processes, we prospectively collected 307 patient-derived breast cancer samples (n = 195 early breast cancers (EBC) and n = 112 metastatic samples (MBC)). We assessed colony-forming activity in vitro by growing isolated cells in both primary (formation) and secondary (self-renewal) mammosphere culture, and tumour initiating activity in vivo through subcutaneous transplantation of fragments or cells into mice. Metastatic samples formed primary mammosphere colonies significantly more frequently than early breast cancers and had significantly higher primary mammosphere colony formation efficiency (0.9 % vs. 0.6 %; p < 0.0001). Tumour initiation in vivo was significantly higher in metastatic than early breast cancer samples (63 % vs. 38 %, p = 0.04). Of 144 breast cancer samples implanted in vivo, we established 20 stable patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models at passage 2 or greater. Lung metastases were detected in mice from 14 PDX models. Mammosphere colony formation in vitro significantly correlated with the ability of a tumour to metastasise to the lungs in vivo (p = 0.05), but not with subcutaneous tumour initiation. In summary, the breast cancer stem cell activities of colony formation and tumour initiation are increased in metastatic compared to early samples, and predict metastasis in vivo. These results suggest that breast stem cell activity will predict for poor outcome tumours, and therapy targeting this activity will improve outcomes for patients with metastatic disease.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro study of biocompatible cinnamaldehyde functionalized magnetite nanoparticles (CPGF Nps) for hyperthermia and drug delivery applications in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wani, Kirtee D; Kadu, Brijesh S; Mansara, Prakash; Gupta, Preeti; Deore, Avinash V; Chikate, Rajeev C; Poddar, Pankaj; Dhole, Sanjay D; Kaul-Ghanekar, Ruchika

    2014-01-01

    Cinnamaldehyde, the bioactive component of the spice cinnamon, and its derivatives have been shown to possess anti-cancer activity against various cancer cell lines. However, its hydrophobic nature invites attention for efficient drug delivery systems that would enhance the bioavailability of cinnamaldehyde without affecting its bioactivity. Here, we report the synthesis of stable aqueous suspension of cinnamaldehyde tagged Fe3O4 nanoparticles capped with glycine and pluronic polymer (CPGF NPs) for their potential application in drug delivery and hyperthermia in breast cancer. The monodispersed superparamagnetic NPs had an average particulate size of ∼ 20 nm. TGA data revealed the drug payload of ∼ 18%. Compared to the free cinnamaldehyde, CPGF NPs reduced the viability of breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and MDAMB231, at lower doses of cinnamaldehyde suggesting its increased bioavailability and in turn its therapeutic efficacy in the cells. Interestingly, the NPs were non-toxic to the non-cancerous HEK293 and MCF10A cell lines compared to the free cinnamaldehyde. The novelty of CPGF nanoparticulate system was that it could induce cytotoxicity in both ER/PR positive/Her2 negative (MCF7) and ER/PR negative/Her2 negative (MDAMB231) breast cancer cells, the latter being insensitive to most of the chemotherapeutic drugs. The NPs decreased the growth of the breast cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner and altered their migration through reduction in MMP-2 expression. CPGF NPs also decreased the expression of VEGF, an important oncomarker of tumor angiogenesis. They induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells through loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of caspase-3. Interestingly, upon exposure to the radiofrequency waves, the NPs heated up to 41.6 °C within 1 min, suggesting their promise as a magnetic hyperthermia agent. All these findings indicate that CPGF NPs prove to be potential nano-chemotherapeutic agents in breast cancer.

  16. Synthesis, Characterization and In Vitro Study of Biocompatible Cinnamaldehyde Functionalized Magnetite Nanoparticles (CPGF Nps) For Hyperthermia and Drug Delivery Applications in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Kirtee D.; Kadu, Brijesh S.; Mansara, Prakash; Gupta, Preeti; Deore, Avinash V.; Chikate, Rajeev C.; Poddar, Pankaj; Dhole, Sanjay D.; Kaul-Ghanekar, Ruchika

    2014-01-01

    Cinnamaldehyde, the bioactive component of the spice cinnamon, and its derivatives have been shown to possess anti-cancer activity against various cancer cell lines. However, its hydrophobic nature invites attention for efficient drug delivery systems that would enhance the bioavailability of cinnamaldehyde without affecting its bioactivity. Here, we report the synthesis of stable aqueous suspension of cinnamaldehyde tagged Fe3O4 nanoparticles capped with glycine and pluronic polymer (CPGF NPs) for their potential application in drug delivery and hyperthermia in breast cancer. The monodispersed superparamagnetic NPs had an average particulate size of ∼20 nm. TGA data revealed the drug payload of ∼18%. Compared to the free cinnamaldehyde, CPGF NPs reduced the viability of breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and MDAMB231, at lower doses of cinnamaldehyde suggesting its increased bioavailability and in turn its therapeutic efficacy in the cells. Interestingly, the NPs were non-toxic to the non-cancerous HEK293 and MCF10A cell lines compared to the free cinnamaldehyde. The novelty of CPGF nanoparticulate system was that it could induce cytotoxicity in both ER/PR positive/Her2 negative (MCF7) and ER/PR negative/Her2 negative (MDAMB231) breast cancer cells, the latter being insensitive to most of the chemotherapeutic drugs. The NPs decreased the growth of the breast cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner and altered their migration through reduction in MMP-2 expression. CPGF NPs also decreased the expression of VEGF, an important oncomarker of tumor angiogenesis. They induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells through loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of caspase-3. Interestingly, upon exposure to the radiofrequency waves, the NPs heated up to 41.6°C within 1 min, suggesting their promise as a magnetic hyperthermia agent. All these findings indicate that CPGF NPs prove to be potential nano-chemotherapeutic agents in breast cancer. PMID:25268975

  17. Malignant phyllodes tumour with intraductal and invasive carcinoma and lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Korula, A; Varghese, J; Thomas, M; Vyas, F; Korula, A

    2008-11-01

    Phyllodes tumours constitute 2-3 percent of fibroepithelial breast tumours, with a 1-2 percent rate of malignancy. Metastasis is usually haematogeneous, and axillary lymph node dissection is not routinely performed. Carcinoma in a phyllodes tumour is distinctly uncommon, but has been known to occur in benign phyllodes tumours. We describe a 51-year-old woman with a malignant phyllodes tumour with foci of intraductal carcinoma within the tumour and adjacent breast tissue. Though the carcinoma was found to be invasive based on the presence of carcinomatous lymph node metastasis, extensive sampling did not yield an invasive component within the breast, probably because of the marked stromal overgrowth of the phyllodes. A malignant phyllodes tumour with foci of intraductal carcinoma and axillary lymph node metastases was diagnosed rather than carcinosarcoma. Chemotherapy and irradiation were included in the postoperative management. Coexistence of phyllodes tumour and carcinoma is rare, and extensive sampling may be necessary to find the foci of carcinoma within an extensive and obviously malignant stromal overgrowth. There is little consensus on the treatment and prognosis in these cases, and it is recommended that treatment be tailored to individual patients, based on the presence of invasion, lymph node metastasis and/or distant metastasis.

  18. The Role of Oncoplastic Breast Surgery in Breast Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Emiroğlu, Mustafa; Sert, İsmail; İnal, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to discuss indications, advantages, disadvantages, oncologic and aesthetic results of Oncoplastic Surgery (OBS). Pubmed and Medline database were searched for articles published between 1998 and 2014 for keywords: oncoplastic breast surgery, therapeutic mammoplasty, oncoplastic breast reduction, synchrenous reconstructions. Role of OBS in breast cancer surgery, its aspects to be considered, its value and results have been interpreted. This technique has advantages by providing more extensive tumourectomy, yielding better aesthetic results compared with breast conserving surgery, allowing oncoplastic reduction in breast cancer patients with macromastia, with higher patient satisfaction and quality of life and by being inexpensive due to single session practice. As for its disadvantages are: re-excision is more difficult, risk for mastectomy is higher, it is depent on the Surgeron’s experience, it has a risk for delay in adjuvant therapies and its requirement for additional imaging studies during management. Main indications are patients with small tumour/breast volume, macromastia, multifocality, procedures which can disrupt breast cosmesis such as surgeries for upper inner breas tquadrient tumours. Contraindications are positive margin problems after wide excision, diffuse malign microcalsifications, inflammatory breast cancer, history of radiotherapy and patients’ preferences. Despite low evidence level, Oncoplastic Breast Surgery seems to be both reliable and acceptable in terms of oncologic and aesthetic aspects. Oncoplastic Breast Surgery increase the application rate of breast conserving surgery by obviating practical limitations and improve the results of breast conserving surgery. Correct patient and technique choice in OBS is vital for optimization of post surgical

  19. The determinants of tumour immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Blankenstein, Thomas; Coulie, Pierre G.; Gilboa, Eli; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Many standard and targeted therapies, as well as radiotherapy, have been shown to induce an anti-tumour immune response, and immunotherapies rely on modulating the host immune system to induce an anti-tumour immune response. However, the immune response to such therapies is often reliant on the immunogenicity of a tumour. Tumour immunogenicity varies greatly between cancers of the same type in different individuals and between different types of cancer. So, what do we know about tumour immunogenicity and how might we therapeutically improve tumour immunogenicity? We asked four leading cancer immunologists around the world for their opinions on this important issue. PMID:22378190

  20. miR-21 Expression in Cancer Cells may Not Predict Resistance to Adjuvant Trastuzumab in Primary Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Balslev, Eva; Poulsen, Tim Svenstrup; Nielsen, Dorte; Møller, Trine; Mortensen, Christiane Ehlers; Holmstrøm, Kim; Høgdall, Estrid

    2014-01-01

    Trastuzumab is established as standard care for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer both in the adjuvant and metastatic setting. However, 50% of the patients do not respond to the trastuzumab therapy, and therefore new predictive biomarkers are highly warranted. MicroRNAs (miRs) constitute a new group of biomarkers and their cellular expression can be determined in tumor samples by in situ hybridization (ISH) analysis. miR-21 is highly prevalent and up-regulated in breast cancer and has been linked to drug resistance in clinical and in vitro settings. To determine expression patterns of miR-21 in high-grade breast cancers, we examined miR-21 expression in 22 HER2-positive tumors and 15 HER2-negative high-grade tumors by ISH. The histological examination indicated that patient samples could be divided into three major expression patterns: miR-21 predominantly in tumor stroma, predominantly in cancer cells, or in both stromal and cancer cells. There was no obvious difference between the HER2-positive and HER2-negative tumors in terms of the miR-21 expression patterns and intensities. To explore the possibility that miR-21 expression levels and/or cellular localization could predict resistance to adjuvant trastuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer patients, we analyzed additional 16 HER2-positive tumors from patients who were treated with trastuzumab in the adjuvant setting. Eight of the 16 patients showed clinical recurrence and were considered resistant. Examination of the miR-21 expression patterns and intensities revealed no association between the miR-21 scores in the cancer cell population (p = 0.69) or the stromal cells population (p = 0.13) and recurrent disease after adjuvant trastuzumab. Thus, our findings show that elevated miR-21 expression does not predict resistance to adjuvant trastuzumab.

  1. α2-Adrenoceptor action on cell proliferation and mammary tumour growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bruzzone, A; Piñero, C Pérez; Castillo, L F; Sarappa, M G; Rojas, P; Lanari, C; Lüthy, I A

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Breast cancer, the most common cancer in women in most countries, is a highly stressful disease. Catecholamines released during stress bind to adrenoceptors and we have recently described α2-adrenoceptors in human breast cell lines, linked to enhanced cell proliferation. The purpose was to assess the in vivo effects of compounds acting on α2-adrenoceptors in a reliable model of breast cancer. Experimental approach: The expression of α2-adrenoceptors was confirmed by immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and reverse transcription-PCR in the mouse mammary tumour cell line MC4-L5. Proliferation was assessed by [3H]thymidine incorporation and tumours were measured daily. Apoptosis was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP digoxigenin nick-end labelling. Key results: Incubation for 2 days with α2-adrenoceptor agonists (clonidine and dexmedetomidine) significantly enhanced proliferation of the mouse mammary tumour cell line MC4-L5. These agonists also significantly stimulated tumour growth of the progestin-dependent tumour C4-HD even in the presence of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). In every tumour tested (C4-HD, CC4-2-HD and CC4-3-HI), regardless of MPA sensitivity, clonidine significantly enhanced tumour growth in the absence of MPA. The α2-adrenoceptor antagonists, yohimbine and rauwolscine, completely reversed the effects of clonidine. However, the group receiving yohimbine alone showed a nonsignificant but constant increase in tumour growth, whereas rauwolscine alone diminished tumour growth significantly, behaving as a reverse agonist. In CC4-3-HI tumours, rauwolscine treatment enhanced apoptosis and diminished the mitotic index, whereas clonidine had the inverse effect. Conclusions and implications: α2-Adrenoceptor agonists enhanced tumour growth and rauwolscine behaved in vivo as a reverse agonist, suggesting that it may be tested for adjuvant treatment. PMID:18604234

  2. Tumour Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Laura; Baker, Ann-Marie; Graham, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    The population of cells that make up a cancer are manifestly heterogeneous at the genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic levels. In this mini-review, we summarise the extent of intra-tumour heterogeneity (ITH) across human malignancies, review the mechanisms that are responsible for generating and maintaining ITH, and discuss the ramifications and opportunities that ITH presents for cancer prognostication and treatment. PMID:26973786

  3. The site of binding of anti-CEA antibodies to tumour CEA in vivo: an immunocytochemical and autoradiographic approach.

    PubMed Central

    Moshakis, V.; Ormerod, M. G.; Westwood, J. H.; Imrie, S.; Neville, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    Radiolabelled affinity-purified antibody to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was injected i.v. into immune-suppressed mice carrying xenografts of human breast carcinoma. Its distribution in the tumours was examined by a combination of immunocytochemistry and autoradiography. The antibody interacted predominantly with the CEA in the extracellular tumour space, rather than on the cell membrane or cytoplasm. Images Figure PMID:7104194

  4. Analysis of circulating tumor cells in patients with triple negative breast cancer during preoperative chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lavrov, A V; Zubtsova, Zh I; Zubtsov, D A; Frolova, M A; Ignatova, E O; Skrypnikova, M A; Malysheva, E V; Legchenko, E V; Petrovskii, A V; Utyashev, I A; Tyulyandin, S A; Gol'dshtein, D V

    2014-05-01

    The presence of circulating tumor cells in the blood of patients with triple negative breast cancer (early and locally advanced cancer) before and after preoperative chemotherapy was assessed using expression markers. Before therapy, circulating tumor cells were detected in 5 of 13 (38%) patients with early cancer and in 7 of 17 (41.2%) patients with locally advanced cancer. After therapy, the circulating immune cells were detected in one patient with locally advanced cancer, who had no circulating cells before therapy. The tumor was resistant to chemotherapy and the disease progressed. The detected circulating tumor cells were HER-2-positive, while the primary tumor was HER-2-negative. It was concluded that the circulating immune cells can be a potential marker of the efficiency of therapy and predictors of the disease course, while their phenotype can differ from the phenotype of the primary tumor.

  5. Zoledronic acid has differential anti-tumour activity in the pre-and post-menopausal bone microenvironment in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ottewell, Penelope D; Wang, Ning; Brown, Hannah K; Reeves, Kimberly J; Fowles, C Anne; Croucher, Peter I; Eaton, Colby L; Holen, Ingunn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Clinical trials in early breast cancer have suggested that benefits of adjuvant bone targeted treatments are restricted to women with established menopause. We developed models that mimic pre- and post-menopausal status to investigate effects of altered bone turnover on growth of disseminated breast tumour cells. Here we report a differential anti-tumour effect of zoledronic acid (ZOL) in these two settings. Experimental design 12-week old female Balb/c-nude mice with disseminated MDA-MB-231 breast tumour cells in bone underwent sham operation or ovariectomy (OVX), mimicking the pre- and post-menopausal bone microenvironment, respectively. To determine the effects of bone-targeted therapy, sham/OVX animals received saline or 100ug/kg ZOL weekly. Tumour growth was assessed by in vivo imaging and effects on bone by RT-PCR, microCT, histomorphometry and measurements of bone markers. Disseminated tumour cells were detected by two-photon microscopy. Results OVX increased bone resorption and induced growth of disseminated tumour cells in bone. Tumours were detected in 83% of animals following OVX (post-menopausal model) compared to 17% following sham operation (pre-menopausal model). OVX had no effect on tumours outside of bone. OVX-induced tumour growth was completely prevented by ZOL, despite the presence of disseminated tumour cells. ZOL did not affect tumour growth in bone in the sham-operated animals. ZOL increased bone volume in both groups. Conclusions This is the first demonstration that tumour growth is driven by osteoclast-mediated mechanisms in models that mimic post-but not pre-menopausal bone, providing a biological rationale for the differential anti-tumour effects of ZOL reported in these settings. PMID:24687923

  6. Recapitulating tumour microenvironment in chitosan–gelatin three-dimensional scaffolds: an improved in vitro tumour model

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Neha; Sardana, Viren; Saxena, Meera; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Katti, Dhirendra S.

    2012-01-01

    Owing to the reduced co-relationship between conventional flat Petri dish culture (two-dimensional) and the tumour microenvironment, there has been a shift towards three-dimensional culture systems that show an improved analogy to the same. In this work, an extracellular matrix (ECM)-mimicking three-dimensional scaffold based on chitosan and gelatin was fabricated and explored for its potential as a tumour model for lung cancer. It was demonstrated that the chitosan–gelatin (CG) scaffolds supported the formation of tumoroids that were similar to tumours grown in vivo for factors involved in tumour-cell–ECM interaction, invasion and metastasis, and response to anti-cancer drugs. On the other hand, the two-dimensional Petri dish surfaces did not demonstrate gene-expression profiles similar to tumours grown in vivo. Further, the three-dimensional CG scaffolds supported the formation of tumoroids, using other types of cancer cells such as breast, cervix and bone, indicating a possible wider potential for in vitro tumoroid generation. Overall, the results demonstrated that CG scaffolds can be an improved in vitro tool to study cancer progression and drug screening for solid tumours. PMID:22977099

  7. Parametric optimization for tumour identification: bioheat equation using ANOVA and the Taguchi method.

    PubMed

    Sudharsan, N M; Ng, E Y

    2000-01-01

    Breast cancer is the number one killer disease among women. It is known that early detection of a tumour ensures better prognosis and higher survival rate. In this paper an intelligent, inexpensive and non-invasive diagnostic tool is developed for aiding breast cancer detection objectively. This tool is based on thermographic scanning of the breast surface in conjunction with numerical simulation of the breast using the bioheat equation. The medical applications of thermographic scanning make use of the skin temperature as an indication of an underlying pathological process. The thermal pattern over a breast tumour reflects the vascular reaction to the abnormality. Hence an abnormal temperature pattern may be an indicator of an underlying tumour. Seven important parameters are identified and analysis of variance (ANOVA) is performed using a 2n design (n = number of parameters, 7). The effect and importance of the various parameters are analysed. Based on the above 2(7) design, the Taguchi method is used to optimize the parameters in order to ensure the signal from the tumour maximized compared with the noise from the other factors. The model predicts that the ideal setting for capturing the signal from the tumour is when the patient is at basal metabolic activity with a correspondingly lower subcutaneous perfusion in a low temperature environment.

  8. Endocrine resistance in breast cancer – an overview and update

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Robert; Tyson, John J.; Dixon, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Tumors that express detectable levels of the product of the ESR1 gene (estrogen receptor-α; ERα) represent the single largest molecular subtype of breast cancer. More women eventually die from ERα+ breast cancer than from either HER2+ disease (almost half of which also express ERα) and/or from triple negative breast cancer (ERα-negative, progesterone receptor-negative, and HER2-negative). Antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors are largely indistinguishable from each other in their abilities to improve overall survival and almost 50% of ERα+ breast cancers will eventually fail one or more of these endocrine interventions. The precise reasons why these therapies fail in ERα+ breast cancer remain largely unknown. Pharmacogenetic explanations for Tamoxifen resistance are controversial. The role of ERα mutations in endocrine resistance remains unclear. Targeting the growth factors and oncogenes most strongly correlated with endocrine resistance has proven mostly disappointing in their abilities to improve overall survival substantially, particularly in the metastatic setting. Nonetheless, there are new concepts in endocrine resistance that integrate molecular signaling, cellular metabolism, and stress responses including endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) that provide novel insights and suggest innovative therapeutic targets. Encouraging evidence that drug combinations with CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors can extend recurrence free survival may yet translate to improvements in overall survival. Whether the improvements seen with immunotherapy in other cancers can be achieved in breast cancer remains to be determined, particularly for ERα+ breast cancers. This review explores the basic mechanisms of resistance to endocrine therapies, concluding with some new insights from systems biology approaches further implicating autophagy and the UPR in detail, and a brief discussion of exciting new avenues and future prospects. PMID:26455641

  9. Prognostic significance of tumor subtypes in male breast cancer: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Leone, José Pablo; Leone, Julieta; Zwenger, Ariel Osvaldo; Iturbe, Julián; Vallejo, Carlos Teodoro; Leone, Bernardo Amadeo

    2015-08-01

    Substantial controversy exists about the prognostic role of tumor subtypes in male breast cancer (MaBC). The aim of this study was to analyze the characteristics of each tumor subtype in MaBC and its association with prognosis compared with other factors. We evaluated MaBC patients between 2010 and 2012 with known estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor [together hormone receptor (HR)] status, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status reported to the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program. Patients were classified as: HR-positive/HER2-negative, HR-positive/HER2-positive, HR-negative/HER2-positive, and triple-negative (TN). Univariate and multivariate analyses determined the effect of each variable on overall survival (OS). We included 960 patients. Patient distribution was 84.9 % HR-positive/HER2-negative, 11.6 % HR-positive/HER2-positive, 0.6 % HR-negative/HER2-positive, and 2.9 % TN. TN patients were younger, had higher grade, presented with more advanced stage, were more likely to have mastectomy, and to die of breast cancer (all P < 0.05). Univariate analysis showed that HER2 positivity was associated with shorter OS (hazard ratio 1.90, P = 0.031) and TN patients had worse prognosis (hazard ratio 5.10, P = 0.0004). In multivariate analysis, older patients (hazard ratio 3.10, P = 0.032), those with stage IV (hazard ratio 16.27, P < 0.001) and those with TN tumors (hazard ratio 4.61, P = 0.002) had significantly worse OS. We observed significant differences in patient characteristics according to tumor subtype. HER2-positive and TN represented a small proportion of cases. In addition to age and stage, tumor subtype has clear influence on OS in MaBC.

  10. Phase II Study of Everolimus Beyond Progression

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-23

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  11. Diagnosing Musculoskeletal Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Simon R.; Spooner, David; Sneath, Rodney S.

    2001-01-01

    In 1993 we became aware of a worrying increase in apparent errors in the histopathological diagnosis of musculoskeletal tumours in our Unit. As a result all cases seen over the past 8 years were reviewed by an independent panel. Of the 1996 cases reviewed there was an error in 87. In 54 cases (2.7%) this had led to some significant change in the active management of the patient. The main areas where errors arose were in those very cases where clinical and radiological features were not helpful in confirming or refuting the diagnosis. The incidence of errors rose with the passage of time, possibly related to a deterioration in the pathologist’s health. The error rate in diagnosing bone tumours in previously published series ranges from 9 to 40%. To ensure as accurate a rate of diagnosis as possible multidisciplinary working and regular audit are essential. PMID:18521309

  12. Diagnosis, classification and grading of canine mammary tumours as a model to study human breast cancer: an Clinico-Cytohistopathological study with environmental factors influencing public health and medicine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The human “Elston and Ellis grading method” was utilized in dogs with mammary tumor to examine its relation to prognosis in this species, based on a 2-year follow-up period. Although cytopathology is widely used for early diagnosis of human neoplasms, it is not commonly performed in veterinary medicine. Our objectives in this study were to identify cytopathology criteria of malignancy for canine mammary tumors and the frequency of different types of mammary lesions and their relationship with histologic grade was investigated. Another aim of this study was to differentiate the simple and adenocarcinoma tumors from the complex or mixed tumor described by Elston and Ellis grading method. Methods The study was performed in 15 pure or mixed-breed female dogs submitted to surgical resections of mammary tumours. The mammary tumours were excised by simple mastectomy or regional mastectomy, with or without the superficial inguinal lymph nodes. Female dogs were mainly terriers (9 dogs) or mixed (3 dogs), the 3 other animals were a German shepherd, Dachshund and Pekingese. Before surgical excision of the tumour, FNAC was performed using a 0.6 mm diameter needle attached to a 10 ml syringe held in a standard metal syringe holder. The cytological sample was smeared onto a glass slide and either air-dried for May-Grünwald-stain, or ethanol-fixed for Papanicolaou stain and masses were surgically removed, the tumours were grossly examined and tissue samples were fixed in 10%-buffered-formalin and embedded in paraffin. Sections 4 μm thick were obtained from each sample and H&E stained. Results We obtained a correct cytohistological correlation in 14/15 cases (93.3%) when all cytopathological examinations were considered. Of the 15 cases examined, 2(13.3%) had well-differentiated (grade I), 6(40%) had moderately differentiated (grade II) and 7(46.7%) had poorly differentiated (grade III) tumours. Classification of all canine mammary gland lesions revealed 13

  13. [Adrenal tumours in childhood].

    PubMed

    Martos-Moreno, G A; Pozo-Román, J; Argente, J

    2013-09-01

    This special article aims to summarise the current knowledge regarding the two groups of tumours with their origin in the adrenal gland: 1) adrenocortical tumours, derived from the cortex of the adrenal gland and 2) phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas, neuroendocrine tumours derived from nodes of neural crest derived cells symmetrically distributed at both sides of the entire spine (paragangliomas [PG]). These PGs can be functioning tumors that secrete catecholamines, which confers their typical dark colour after staining with chromium salts (chromaffin tumors). Among these, the term phaeochromocytoma (PC) is restricted to those PGs derived from the chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla (intra-adrenal PGs), whereas the term PG is used for those sympathetic or parasympathetic ones in an extra-adrenal location. We analyse the state of the art of their pathogenic and genetic bases, as well as their clinical signs and symptoms, the tests currently available for performing their diagnosis (biochemical, hormonal, imaging and molecular studies) and management (surgery, pre- and post-surgical medical treatment), considering the current and developing strategies in chemo- and radiotherapy.

  14. Tumours of the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Svend W.; Mackey, L. J.; Misdorp, W.

    1976-01-01

    The most frequent renal tumours of animals are renal cell carcinoma and nephroblastoma. Renal cell carcinomas are seen mainly in dogs and cattle and nephroblastoma is encountered in pigs, puppies, and calves. Renal cell carcinomas are usually papillary in the dog. They show a marked propensity for vascular invasion, penetration of the posterior vena cava, and subsequent pulmonary metastasis. Nephroblastoma, which is morphologically identical to Wilms' tumour of children, is almost always a benign tumour in animals. It is one of the most frequent neoplasms of pigs, possibly owing to the fact that most pigs are slaughtered (and examined) when a few months old. Lymphosarcoma involving the kidney is particularly frequent in the cat, but is also seen in other species as part of a generalized disease. ImagesFig. 5,6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 1,2Fig. 3,4Fig. 16,17,18,19Fig. 9,10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14,15 PMID:1086154

  15. Stromal influences on breast cancer cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    van Roozendaal, C. E.; van Ooijen, B.; Klijn, J. G.; Claassen, C.; Eggermont, A. M.; Henzen-Logmans, S. C.; Foekens, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Paracrine influences from fibroblasts derived from different sources of breast tissue on epithelial breast cancer cell growth in vitro were investigated. Medium conditioned (CM) by fibroblasts derived from tumours, adjacent normal breast tissue, and normal breast tissue obtained from reduction mammoplasty or from skin tissue significantly stimulated the growth of the steroid-receptor positive cell lines MCF-7 and ZR 75.1. The proliferation index (PI) on MCF-7 cells with CM from fibroblasts derived from breast tumour tissue was significantly higher than that obtained with fibroblasts derived from adjacent normal breast tissue (2p less than 0.05, n = 8). The PI obtained with CM from normal fibroblast cultures from reduction mammoplasty tissue, like normal tissue adjacent to the tumour, fell in the lower range of values. Skin fibroblast, like tumour tissue derived fibroblast, CM caused a high range PI. MDA-MB-231 and Evsa-T, two steroid-receptor negative cell lines, showed only a minor growth stimulatory responses with some of the fibroblast CM's. Evsa-T was occasionally inhibited by CM's. In conclusion, stromal factors play a role in the growth regulation of human breast cancer cells. The effects on cancer cell growth are, however, varying depending on the source of the stroma and the characteristics of the epithelial tumour cells. PMID:1733444

  16. [Breast self-examination as main technique for breast cancer prevention].

    PubMed

    Guerrero Mercedes, Rocío; Llamas Muñoz, M Carmen

    2013-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Breast self-examination stands out as the main preventive measure, since almost 95% of breast tumours are detected by the woman herself through this technique. Nursing is the group most closely related to health education appropriate guidelines to perform the technique correctly: monthly technical realization, recognition of abnormalities in the breast, go to the doctor for possible doubt about changes in them, etc.

  17. Refractive index of carcinogen-induced rat mammary tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zysk, Adam M.; Chaney, Eric J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2006-05-01

    Near-infrared optical techniques for clinical breast cancer screening in humans are rapidly advancing. Based on the computational inversion of the photon diffusion process through the breast, these techniques rely on optical tissue models for accurate image reconstruction. Recent interest has surfaced regarding the effect of refractive index variations on these reconstructions. Although many data exist regarding the scattering and absorption properties of normal and diseased tissue, no measurements of refractive index appear in the literature. In this paper, we present near-infrared refractive index data acquired from N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced rat mammary tumours, which are similar in pathology and disease progression to human ductal carcinoma. Eight animals, including one control, were employed in this study, yielding data from 32 tumours as well as adjacent adipose and connective tissues.

  18. Clinical features of gastroenteropancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) endocrine tumours (carcinoids and pancreatic islet cell tumours) are composed of multipotent neuroendocrine cells that exhibit a unique ability to produce, store, and secrete biologically active substances and cause distinct clinical syndromes. The classification of GEP tumours as functioning or non-functioning is based on the presence of symptoms that accompany these syndromes secondary to the secretion of hormones, neuropeptides and/or neurotransmitters (functioning tumours). Non-functioning tumours are considered to be neoplasms of neuroendocrine differentiation that are not associated with obvious symptoms attributed to the hypersecretion of metabolically active substances. However, a number of these tumours are either capable of producing low levels of such substances, which can be detected by immunohistochemistry but are insufficient to cause symptoms related to a clinical syndrome, or alternatively, they may secrete substances that are either metabolically inactive or inappropriately processed. In some cases, GEP tumours are not associated with the production of any hormone or neurotransmitter. Both functioning and non-functioning tumours can also produce symptoms due to mass effects compressing vital surrounding structures. Gastroenteropancreatic tumours are usually classified further according to the anatomic site of origin: foregut (including respiratory tract, thymus, stomach, duodenum, and pancreas), midgut (including small intestine, appendix, and right colon), and hindgut (including transverse colon, sigmoid, and rectum). Within these subgroups the biological and clinical characteristics of the tumours vary considerably, but this classification is still in use because a significant number of previous studies, mainly observational, have used it extensively. PMID:26516377

  19. From bench to bedside: What do we know about hormone receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Wu, Victoria Shang; Kanaya, Noriko; Lo, Chiao; Mortimer, Joanne; Chen, Shiuan

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. Thanks to extensive efforts from research scientists and clinicians, treatment for breast cancer has advanced into the era of targeted medicine. With the use of several well-established biomarkers, such as hormone receptors (HRs) (i.e., estrogen receptor [ER] and progesterone receptor [PgR]) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), breast cancer patients can be categorized into multiple subgroups with specific targeted treatment strategies. Although therapeutic strategies for HR-positive (HR+) HER2-negative (HER2-) breast cancer and HR-negative (HR-) HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer are well-defined, HR+ HER2+ breast cancer is still an overlooked subgroup without tailored therapeutic options. In this review, we have summarized the molecular characteristics, etiology, preclinical tools and therapeutic options for HR+ HER2+ breast cancer. We hope to raise the attention of both the research and the medical community on HR+ HER2+ breast cancer, and to advance patient care for this subtype of disease.

  20. Clinical application of circulating tumor cells in breast cancer: overview of the current interventional trials.

    PubMed

    Bidard, François-Clément; Fehm, Tanja; Ignatiadis, Michail; Smerage, Jeffrey B; Alix-Panabières, Catherine; Janni, Wolfgang; Messina, Carlo; Paoletti, Costanza; Müller, Volkmar; Hayes, Daniel F; Piccart, Martine; Pierga, Jean-Yves

    2013-06-01

    In 2004, circulating tumor cells (CTC) enumeration by the CellSearch® technique at baseline and during treatment was reported to be associated with prognosis in metastatic breast cancer patients. In 2008, the first evidence of the impact of CTC detection by this technique on survival of cM0(i+) patients were reported. These findings were confirmed by other non-interventional studies, whereas CTC were also investigated as a surrogate for tumor biology, mainly for HER2 expression/amplification. The aim of this report is to present the current prospective large interventional studies that have been specifically designed to demonstrate that CTC enumeration/characterization may improve the management of breast cancer patients: STIC CTC METABREAST (France) and Endocrine Therapy Index (USA) assess the CTC-guided hormone therapy vs chemotherapy decision in M1 patients; SWOG0500 (USA) and CirCe01 (France) assess the CTC count changes during treatment in metastatic patients; DETECT III (M1 patients, Germany) and Treat CTC (cM0(i+) patients, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Breast International Group) assess the use of anti-HER2 treatments in HER2-negative breast cancer patients selected on the basis of CTC detection/characterization. These trials have different designs in various patient populations but are expected to be the pivotal trials for CTC implementation in the routine management of breast cancer patients.

  1. PTEN/PIK3CA genes are frequently mutated in spontaneous and medroxyprogesterone acetate-accelerated 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary tumours of tree shrews.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hou-Jun; He, Bao-Li; Wang, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Hai-Lin; Ge, Guang-Zhe; Zhang, Yuan-Xu; Lv, Long-Bao; Jiao, Jian-Lin; Chen, Ceshi

    2014-12-01

    Tree shrew has increasingly become an attractive experimental animal model for human diseases, particularly for breast cancer due to spontaneous breast tumours and their close relationship to primates and by extension to humans. However, neither normal mammary glands nor breast tumours have been well characterised in the Chinese tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri chinensis). In this study, normal mammary glands from four different developmental stages and 18 spontaneous breast tumours were analysed. Haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed that normal mammary gland morphology and structures of tree shrews were quite similar to those found in humans. Spontaneous breast tumours of tree shrews were identified as being intraductal papilloma, papillary carcinoma, and invasive ductal carcinoma with or without lung metastasis. To further analyse breast cancer tumours among tree shrews, 40 3-4 month-old female tree shrews were orally administrated 20 mg 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) or peanut oil thrice, and then, 15 of these DMBA administrated tree shrews were implanted with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) pellets. DMBA was shown to induce breast tumours (12%) while the addition of MPA increased the tumour incidence (50%). Of these, three induced breast tumours were intraductal papillary carcinomas and one was invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). The PTEN/PIK3CA (phosphatase and tensin homologue/phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha), but not TP53 and GATA3, genes are frequently mutated in breast tumours, and the PTEN/PIK3CA gene mutation status correlated with the expression of pAKT in tree shrew breast tumours. These results suggest that tree shrews may be a promising animal model for a subset of human breast cancers with PTEN/PIK3CA gene mutations.

  2. Aberrant Keap1 methylation in breast cancer and association with clinicopathological features

    PubMed Central

    Barbano, Raffaela; Muscarella, Lucia Anna; Pasculli, Barbara; Valori, Vanna Maria; Fontana, Andrea; Coco, Michelina; la Torre, Annamaria; Balsamo, Teresa; Poeta, Maria Luana; Marangi, Giovanni Francesco; Maiello, Evaristo; Castelvetere, Marina; Pellegrini, Fabio; Murgo, Roberto; Fazio, Vito Michele; Parrella, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Keap1 (Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1) is an adaptor protein that mediates the ubiquitination/degradation of genes regulating cell survival and apoptosis under oxidative stress conditions. We determined methylation status of the KEAP1 promoter in 102 primary breast cancers, 14 pre-invasive lesions, 38 paired normal breast tissues and 6 normal breast from reductive mammoplasty by quantitative methylation specific PCR (QMSP). Aberrant promoter methylation was detected in 52 out of the 102 primary breast cancer cases (51%) and 10 out of 14 pre-invasive lesions (71%). No mutations of the KEAP1 gene were identified in the 20 breast cancer cases analyzed by fluorescence based direct sequencing. Methylation was more frequent in the subgroup of patients identified as ER positive-HER2 negative tumors (66.7%) as compared with triple-negative breast cancers (35%) (p = 0.05, Chi-square test). The impact of the interactions between Er, PgR, Her2 expression and KEAP1 methylation on mortality was investigated by RECPAM multivariable statistical analysis, identifying four prognostic classes at different mortality risks. Triple-negative breast cancer patients with KEAP1 methylation had higher mortality risk than patients without triple-negative breast cancer (HR = 14.73, 95%CI: 3.65–59.37). Both univariable and multivariable COX regressions analyses showed that KEAP1 methylation was associated with a better progression free survival in patients treated with epirubicin/cyclophosfamide and docetaxel as sequential chemotherapy (HR = 0.082; 95%CI: 0.007–0.934). These results indicate that aberrant promoter methylation of the KEAP1 gene is involved in breast cancerogenesis. In addition, identifying patients with KEAP1 epigenetic abnormalities may contribute to disease progression prediction in breast cancer patients. PMID:23249627

  3. Metabolic scaling in solid tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milotti, E.; Vyshemirsky, V.; Sega, M.; Stella, S.; Chignola, R.

    2013-06-01

    Tumour metabolism is an outstanding topic of cancer research, as it determines the growth rate and the global activity of tumours. Recently, by combining the diffusion of oxygen, nutrients, and metabolites in the extracellular environment, and the internal motions that mix live and dead cells, we derived a growth law of solid tumours which is linked to parameters at the cellular level. Here we use this growth law to obtain a metabolic scaling law for solid tumours, which is obeyed by tumours of different histotypes both in vitro and in vivo, and we display its relation with the fractal dimension of the distribution of live cells in the tumour mass. The scaling behaviour is related to measurable parameters, with potential applications in the clinical practice.

  4. Metabolic scaling in solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Milotti, E.; Vyshemirsky, V.; Sega, M.; Stella, S.; Chignola, R.

    2013-01-01

    Tumour metabolism is an outstanding topic of cancer research, as it determines the growth rate and the global activity of tumours. Recently, by combining the diffusion of oxygen, nutrients, and metabolites in the extracellular environment, and the internal motions that mix live and dead cells, we derived a growth law of solid tumours which is linked to parameters at the cellular level1. Here we use this growth law to obtain a metabolic scaling law for solid tumours, which is obeyed by tumours of different histotypes both in vitro and in vivo, and we display its relation with the fractal dimension of the distribution of live cells in the tumour mass. The scaling behaviour is related to measurable parameters, with potential applications in the clinical practice. PMID:23727729

  5. Cancer of the breast with nipple involvement.

    PubMed Central

    Menon, R. S.; van Geel, A. N.

    1989-01-01

    In the absence of gross deformity of the nipple, such as its retraction or Paget's disease, histological examination of this area is often neglected, or at best confined to a cursory look at a single sagittal section. The inadequacy of this approach is illustrated by this study of 33 consecutive cases of carcinoma of the breast treated with mastectomy. Multiple transverse sections showed tumour in 19 nipples (58%) involving one or more levels. Of these, 17 showed non-invasive tumour, either ductal or lobular type. Invasive tumour was seen in only two nipples, one of which was metastatic extension from the underlying breast tumour. Paget's cells were seen in two cases. The most significant finding was the eccentric location of tumour in 14 nipples. A single central sagittal section would have detected only five cases involving the centrally situated duct. An inexplicable finding was a preponderance of right nipple with tumour. No statistically significant correlation between nipple involvement and the size, location, multicentricity, type of tumour in the breast and metastases in axillary lymph nodes could be found. It became evident from this study that malignant changes in the nipple occur more commonly than is realised, and that it is also one of the sites of multicentric origin of the tumour. This factor will have to be taken into account in planning conservative therapeutic programmes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2547416

  6. Measuring HER2-Receptor Expression In Metastatic Breast Cancer Using [68Ga]ABY-025 Affibody PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Sörensen, Jens; Velikyan, Irina; Sandberg, Dan; Wennborg, Anders; Feldwisch, Joachim; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Orlova, Anna; Sandström, Mattias; Lubberink, Mark; Olofsson, Helena; Carlsson, Jörgen; Lindman, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of HER2 expression could potentially be used to select patients for HER2-targed therapy, predict response based on uptake and be used for monitoring. In this phase I/II study the HER2-binding Affibody molecule ABY-025 was labeled with 68Ga-gallium ([68Ga]ABY-025) for PET to study effect of peptide mass, test-retest variability and correlation of quantified uptake in tumors to histopathology. Experimental design: Sixteen women with known metastatic breast cancer and on-going treatment were included and underwent FDG PET/CT to identify viable metastases. After iv injection of 212±46 MBq [68Ga]ABY-025 whole-body PET was performed at 1, 2 and 4 h. In the first 10 patients (6 with HER2-positive and 4 with HER2-negative primary tumors), [68Ga]ABY-025 PET/CT with two different doses of injected peptide was performed one week apart. In the last six patients (5 HER2-positive and 1 HER2-negative primary tumors), repeated [68Ga]ABY-025 PET were performed one week apart as a test-retest of uptake in individual lesions. Biopsies from 16 metastases in 12 patients were collected for verification of HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Results: Imaging 4h after injection with high peptide content discriminated HER2-positive metastases best (p<0.01). PET SUV correlated with biopsy HER2-scores (r=0.91, p<0.001). Uptake was five times higher in HER2-positive than in HER2-negative lesions with no overlap (p=0.005). The test-retest intra-class correlation was r=0.996. [68Ga]ABY-025 PET correctly identified conversion and mixed expression of HER2 and targeted treatment was changed in 3 of the 16 patients. Conclusion: [68Ga]ABY-025 PET accurately quantifies whole-body HER2-receptor status in metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26877784

  7. VEGF targets the tumour cell.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2013-12-01

    The function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cancer is not limited to angiogenesis and vascular permeability. VEGF-mediated signalling occurs in tumour cells, and this signalling contributes to key aspects of tumorigenesis, including the function of cancer stem cells and tumour initiation. In addition to VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases, the neuropilins are crucial for mediating the effects of VEGF on tumour cells, primarily because of their ability to regulate the function and the trafficking of growth factor receptors and integrins. This has important implications for our understanding of tumour biology and for the development of more effective therapeutic approaches.

  8. Pooled analyses of eribulin in metastatic breast cancer patients with at least one prior chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pivot, X.; Marmé, F.; Koenigsberg, R.; Guo, M.; Berrak, E.; Wolfer, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Based on data from two multicenter, phase III clinical trials (Studies 301 and 305), eribulin (a microtubule dynamics inhibitor) is indicated in the European Union (EU) for patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer (MBC) after ≥1 prior chemotherapy for advanced disease, including an anthracycline and a taxane in either the adjuvant or metastatic setting. Data from Studies 305 and 301 were pooled to investigate the efficacy of eribulin in various subgroups of patients who matched the EU label, including those with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative and triple-negative disease. Patients and methods In Study 305 (NCT00388726), patients were randomized 2:1 to eribulin mesylate 1.4 mg/m2 (equivalent to eribulin 1.23 mg/m2 [expressed as free base]) intravenously on days 1 and 8 every 21 days] or treatment of physician's choice after 2–5 prior chemotherapies (≥2 for advanced disease), including an anthracycline and a taxane (in early/advanced setting). In Study 301 (NCT00337103), patients were randomized 1:1 to eribulin (as above) or capecitabine (1.25 g/m2 orally twice daily on days 1–14 every 21 days) following ≤3 prior chemotherapies (≤2 for advanced disease), including an anthracycline and a taxane. Efficacy end points were investigated in the intent-to-treat population and subgroups, pooled as discussed above. Results Overall, 1644 patients were included (eribulin: 946; control: 698); baseline characteristics were well matched. Overall survival was significantly longer with eribulin versus control (P < 0.01), as were progression-free survival and clinical benefit rate (both P < 0.05). Significant survival benefits with eribulin versus control were observed in a wide range of patient subgroups, including HER2-negative or triple-negative disease (all P < 0.05). Conclusion Our findings underline the survival benefit achieved by eribulin used according to EU label in the overall MBC population and in various

  9. Prognostic studies of canine and feline mammary tumours: the need for standardized procedures.

    PubMed

    Matos, A J F; Baptista, C S; Gärtner, M F; Rutteman, G R

    2012-07-01

    For several years, veterinary oncologists have been struggling with the prognosis of mammary tumours in dogs and cats. Translation of tumour characteristics into prognostic information is an invaluable tool for the use of the most appropriate therapies, as well as for planning innovative therapeutic trials. Moreover, canine and feline spontaneous mammary gland tumours are good models for the study of human breast cancer. Collecting and interpreting information regarding the prognosis of canine and feline mammary tumours is difficult due to the fact that different methods have been applied to study various components and characteristics. This review identifies some of the challenges of prognostic studies of spontaneous canine and feline mammary tumours and suggests standardized procedures to overcome these challenges and facilitate reproducibility and assessment of results.

  10. [Rol of pituitary tumour-transforming gene (PTTG) in the pituitary adenomas].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ortiga, Ruth; Sánchez Tejada, Laura; Peiró Cabrera, Gloria; Moreno-Pérez, Oscar; Arias Mendoza, Nieves; Aranda López, F Ignacio; Picó Alfonso, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pituitary tumours is far to be understood. Pituitary transforming tumour gene (PTTG), a gen that induces aneuploidy, genetic instability, cellular proliferation and to stimulate angiogenesis, has been involved in neoplasic transformation and shown overexpressed in many neoplasm as lung, breast, endometrium, thyroid and colon malignant tumours. On the other hand, PTTG has been inconsistently studied in pituitary tumours. The majority of studies have been performed in animals and there is a great variability in the methods used in its determination. The goal of this review is to resume the role of PTTG in tumourogenesis and critically to revise the studies published in humans in order to advance in the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas and to find clinical useful predictors of the behavior of these tumours.

  11. Metastasis-associated gene, mag-1 improves tumour microenvironmental adaptation and potentiates tumour metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Jia, Haiquan; Lin, Huiyun; Tan, Xiaogang; Du, Zhiyan; Chen, Huihua; Xu, Yuanji; Han, Xiaoxi; Zhang, Jiakai; Zhao, Siyang; Yu, Xiaodan; Lu, Yinglin

    2012-12-01

    Metastasis is a major cause of death from malignant diseases, and the underlying mechanisms are still largely not known. A detailed probe into the factors which may regulate tumour invasion and metastasis contributes to novel anti-metastatic therapies. We previously identified a novel metastasis-associated gene 1 (mag-1) by means of metastatic phenotype cloning. Then we characterized the gene expression profile of mag-1 and showed that it promoted cell migration, adhesion and invasion in vitro. Importantly, the disruption of mag-1 via RNA interference not only inhibited cellular metastatic behaviours but also significantly reduced tumour weight and restrained mouse breast cancer cells to metastasize to lungs in spontaneous metastatic assay in vivo. Furthermore, we proved that mag-1 integrates dual regulating mechanisms through the stabilization of HIF-1α and the activation of mTOR signalling pathway. We also found that mag-1-induced metastatic promotion could be abrogated by mTOR specific inhibitor, rapamycin. Taken together, the findings identified a direct role that mag-1 played in metastasis and implicated its function in cellular adaptation to tumour microenvironment.

  12. Imaging biomarkers of brain tumour margin and tumour invasion.

    PubMed

    Price, S J; Gillard, J H

    2011-12-01

    Invasion of tumour cells into the normal brain is one of the major reasons of treatment failure for gliomas. Although there is a good understanding of the molecular and cellular processes that occur during this invasion, it is not possible to detect the extent of the tumour with conventional imaging. However, there is an understanding that the degree of invasion differs with individual tumours, and yet they are all treated the same. Newer imaging techniques that probe the pathological changes within tumours may be suitable biomarkers for invasion. Imaging methods are now available that can detect subtle changes in white matter organisation (diffusion tensor imaging), tumour metabolism and cellular proliferation (using MR spectroscopy and positron emission tomography) occurring in regions of tumour that cannot be detected by conventional imaging. The role of such biomarkers of invasion should allow better delineation of tumour margins, which should improve treatment planning (especially surgery and radiotherapy) and provide information on the invasiveness of an individual tumour to help select the most appropriate therapy and help stratify patients for clinical trials.

  13. Surgical Resection of Phyllodes Tumour: a Radical Approach as a Safeguard Against Local Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Badwe, Rajendra A; Kataria, Kamal; Srivastava, Anurag

    2015-04-01

    Phyllodes tumour is a rare benign neoplasm of the breast. It is a mixed tumour of epithelial and mesenchymal origin. The epithelial element is characterized by proliferation of ductolobular units. The fibrous tissue and collagen bundles represent the mesenchymal element. It is also known as "cystosarcoma" phyllodes to characterize some important features, viz. cyst-like or cleft-like spaces within the mass along with a leaf- or frond-like pattern of the stromal element. The tumour is well known for its high potential for local recurrence. Most patients in developing countries present with very large breast tumours with close proximity to the skin and pectoralis major. In these cases, there is a need to perform a three-dimensional en bloc removal of the mass with overlying skin and underlying muscle(s). If a skin flap is raised in the vicinity of the tumour, there is a risk of cutting close to the tumour, increasing risk of local recurrence. Here, we describe a surgical technique that permits a three-dimensional en bloc removal of phyllodes tumour.

  14. Uterine Tumour Resembling Ovarian Sex Cord Tumour- A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Ilhan, Tolgay Tuyan; Gül, Ayhan; Ugurluoglu, Ceyhan; Çelik, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    Uterine Tumour Resembling Ovarian Sex-Cord Tumours (UTROSCTs) are an extremely rare type of uterine body tumours arising from the endometrial stroma. Epidemiology, aetiology, pathogenesis, management and natural history of UTROSCTs are still a question of debate, as there is little available data in the literature. Although rare, the possibility of UTROSCTs should be kept in mind, when a patient presents with abnormal bleeding and an enlarged uterus. UTROSCTs appear dirty white/cream-coloured, gelatinous, well-circumscribed mass with smooth surface on macroscopic examination. We present a rare case of endometrial stromal tumour with sex-cord-like differentiation which was successfully treated by hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. The clinical manifestations, pathologic characteristics, diagnosis and management of these tumours are reviewed here. PMID:28208949

  15. A software tool based on the Surface Evolver for precise location of tumours as a preoperative procedure to partial mastectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias Fabris, Antonio; Zanchetta do Nascimento, Marcelo; Ramos Batista, Valério

    2015-09-01

    We present a fast and reliable program that gives precise location of breast tumours for a partial mastectomy. Our program is fully implemented in the Surface Evolver, which is a general-purpose simulator of physical experiments. By starting from the mammograms that show a tumour one takes its 2D coordinates in each view (CC and MLO). These coordinates, together with some measurements of the patient's breast, are given as input to our simulator. From this point on the simulator reproduces all main steps of taking mammography with a virtual transparent breast that matches the patient's. The virtual mammography procedure is graphically displayed on the computer screen, so that users can track the virtual tumour inside the breast. As output we have the coordinates of the tumour position when the woman lies on the operating table for the surgery. With these coordinates the surgeon can make a small incision into the breast and reach the tumour for its removal. The whole structure of the breast is preserved after a simple plastic correction.

  16. SWOG S0221: A Phase III Trial Comparing Chemotherapy Schedules in High-Risk Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Budd, George T.; Barlow, William E.; Moore, Halle C.F.; Hobday, Timothy J.; Stewart, James A.; Isaacs, Claudine; Salim, Muhammad; Cho, Jonathan K.; Rinn, Kristine J.; Albain, Kathy S.; Chew, Helen K.; Burton, Gary V.; Moore, Timothy D.; Srkalovic, Gordan; McGregor, Bradley A.; Flaherty, Lawrence E.; Livingston, Robert B.; Lew, Danika L.; Gralow, Julie R.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the optimal dose and schedule of anthracycline and taxane administration as adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer. Patients and Methods A 2 × 2 factorial design was used to test two hypotheses: (1) that a novel continuous schedule of doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide was superior to six cycles of doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide once every 2 weeks and (2) that paclitaxel once per week was superior to six cycles of paclitaxel once every 2 weeks in patients with node-positive or high-risk node-negative early-stage breast cancer. With 3,250 patients, a disease-free survival (DFS) hazard ratio of 0.82 for each randomization could be detected with 90% power with two-sided α = .05. Overall survival (OS) was a secondary outcome. Results Interim analyses crossed the futility boundaries for demonstrating superiority of both once-per-week regimens and once-every-2-weeks regimens. After a median follow-up of 6 years, a significant interaction developed between the two randomization factors (DFS P = .024; OS P = .010) in the 2,716 patients randomly assigned in the original design, which precluded interpretation of the two factors separately. Comparing all four arms showed a significant difference in OS (P = .040) but not in DFS (P = .11), with all treatments given once every 2 weeks associated with the highest OS. This difference in OS seemed confined to patients with hormone receptor–negative/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) –negative tumors (P = .067), with no differences seen with hormone receptor–positive/HER2-negative (P = .90) or HER2-positive tumors (P = .40). Conclusion Patients achieved a similar DFS with any of these regimens. Subset analysis suggests the hypothesis that once-every-2-weeks dosing may be best for patients with hormone receptor–negative/HER2-negative tumors. PMID:25422488

  17. Clinical benefit of lapatinib-based therapy in patients with HER2-positive breast tumors co-expressing the truncated p95HER2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Scaltriti, Maurizio; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Prudkin, Ludmila; Aura, Claudia; Jimenez, José; Angelini, Pier Davide; Sánchez, Gertrudis; Guzman, Marta; Parra, Josep Lluis; Ellis, Catherine; Gagnon, Robert; Koehler, Maria; Gomez, Henry; Geyer, Charles; Cameron, David; Arribas, Joaquin; Rosen, Neal; Baselga, José

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A subgroup of HER2 overexpressing breast tumors co-expresses p95HER2, a truncated HER2 receptor that retains a highly functional HER2 kinase domain but lacks the extracellular domain and results in intrinsic trastuzumab resistance. We hypothesized that lapatinib, a HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, would be active in these tumors. We have studied the correlation between p95HER2 expression and response to lapatinib, both in preclinical models and in the clinical setting Experimental design Two different p95HER2 animal models were used for preclinical studies. Expression of p95HER2 was analyzed in HER2 overexpressing breast primary tumors from a first line lapatinib monotherapy study (EGF20009) and a second line lapatinib in combination with capecitabine study (EGF100151). p95HER2 expression was correlated with overall response rate (complete + partial response), clinical benefit rate (complete response + partial response + stable disease ≥ 24 weeks) and progression-free survival using logistic regression and Cox-proportional hazard models. Results Lapatinib inhibited tumor growth and HER2 downstream signaling of p95HER2 expressing tumors. A total of 68 and 156 tumors from studies EGF20009 and EGF100151 were evaluable, respectively, for p95HER2 detection. The percentage of p95HER2 positive patients was 20.5% in the EGF20009 study and 28.5% in the EGF100151 study. In both studies there was no statistically significant difference in progression-free survival, clinical benefit rate and overall response rate between p95HER2-positive and p95HER2-negative tumors. Conclusions Lapatinib as a monotherapy or in combination with capecitabine appears to be equally effective in patients with p95HER2-positive and p95HER2-negative HER2-positive breast tumors. PMID:20406840

  18. Segmentation of breast cancer cells positive 1+ and 3+ immunohistochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labellapansa, Ause; Muhimmah, Izzati; Indrayanti

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is a disease occurs as a result of uncontrolled cells growth. One examination method of breast cancer cells is using Immunohistochemistry (IHC) to determine status of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor2 (HER2) protein. This study helps anatomic pathologist to determine HER2 scores using image processing techniques to obtain HER2 overexpression positive area percentages of 1+ and 3+ scores. This is done because the score of 0 is HER2 negative cells and 2+ scores have equivocal results, which means it could not be determined whether it is necessary to give targeted therapy or not. HER2 overexpression positive area percentage is done by dividing the area with a HER2 positive tumor area. To obtain better tumor area, repair is done by eliminating lymphocytes area which is not tumor area using morphological opening. Results of 10 images IHC scores of 1+ and 3+ and 10 IHC images testing without losing lymphocytes area in tumor area, has proven that the system has been able to provide an overall correct classification in accordance with the experts analysis. However by doing operation to remove non-tumor areas, classification can be done correctly 100% for scores of 3+ and 65% for scores of 1+.

  19. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  20. Eribulin Mesylate Combined with Local Treatment for Brain Metastasis from Breast Cancer: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Kyung-Do; Ahn, Sung Gwe; Baik, Hyung Joo; Lee, Anbok; Bae, Ki Beom; An, Min Sung; Kim, Kwang Hee; Shin, Jae Ho; Park, Ha Kyoung; Cho, Heunglae; Jeong, Joon

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis associated with brain metastasis arising from breast cancer is very poor. Eribulin is a microtubule dynamic inhibitor synthesized from halichondrin B, a natural marine product. In a phase III study (EMBRACE), eribulin improved overall survival in patients with heavily pretreated metastatic breast cancers. However, these studies included few patients with brain metastases. Metastatic brain tumors (MBT) were detected during first-line palliative chemotherapy in a 43-year-old woman with breast cancer metastasis to the lung and mediastinal nodes; the genetic subtype was luminal B-like human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative. Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) followed by eribulin treatment continuously decreased the size, and induced regression, of the MBT with systemic disease stability for 12 months. Another 48-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer (HER2+ subtype) presented with MBT. Following surgical resection of the tumor, eribulin with concurrent WBRT showed regression of the MBT without systemic progression for 18 months. PMID:27382400

  1. Impact of autoimmune diseases on outcome of patients with early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Criscitiello, Carmen; Bagnardi, Vincenzo; Esposito, Angela; Gelao, Lucia; Santillo, Barbara; Viale, Giulia; Rotmensz, Nicole; Goldhirsch, Aron; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to analyze the impact of a concurrent autoimmune disease on outcome of patients with early breast cancer. We reviewed medical charts of patients with a diagnosis of autoimmune diseases (AD) among a population of 17.153 cases. We categorized ADs as endocrine, rheumatic, systemic, neurological diseases and vasculitis. For each patient in the study group, we matched 2 patients. The events to determine overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) were identified from follow-up data. We identified 279 (1.62%) patients with early breast cancer and concurrent ADs. The median follow-up was 7.0 years. The 10-year OS rate was 86% (95% CI, 80% to 91%) in the study group and 90% (95% CI, 86% to 93%) for the control group (p = 0.011). In patients with ER positive/HER2 negative subtype a worse OS was observed in the study group when compared to the control group (p = 0.0046); this difference remained statistically significant when the analysis was restricted to breast cancer mortality (p = 0.045). The 10-year DFS rate was 69% (95% CI, 61% to 76%) in the study group and 72% (95% CI, 66% to 77%) for the control group (p = 0.22). Autoimmunity at diagnosis of early breast cancer is associated with worse survival. PMID:27323400

  2. In Vivo Uptake of Rare Earth Metals by Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Roncati, Luca; Gatti, Antonietta Morena; Barbolini, Giuseppe; Piscioli, Francesco; Pusiol, Teresa; Maiorana, Antonio

    2017-02-09

    Rare earth metals (REM) are a group of 17 chemical elements in the periodic table, namely scandium (Sc), yttrium (Y) and the lanthanides. In relation to atomic volume and geological behavior, the lanthanides are further subdivided into light, medium and heavy REM. They find many applications in the technological field; however, their impact on the human health is still conflicting and, for many aspects, unknown. During a research program carried on 113 cases of female breast cancer, immunohistochemically categorized in Her2-positive (29 cases), Her2-negative (57 cases) and triple negative (27 cases), aimed to evaluate the role of environmental particulate in carcinogenesis by elemental microanalysis, for the first time in literature we have detected a REM uptake, in detail europium (Eu), dysprosium (Dy) and praseodymium (Pr), inside the neoplastic cells belonging to a single triple negative breast cancer. Curiously, the woman affected by this form of malignancy had worked in the ceramic industry, a well-known source of REM, during her life, and she was the one and only patient of our series to be dedicated to this activity. The medical repercussions of our findings are here discussed: in fact, a REM detection in only 1 of 113 examined cases seems to exclude active roles in breast carcinogenesis and discloses new possibilities for therapeutic developments in triple negative breast cancer.

  3. Genomic Signatures in Breast Cancer: Limitations of Available Predictive Data and the Importance of Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Esteva, Francisco J

    2015-06-01

    Several biomarkers and gene mutations in breast cancer have been shown to be predictive, in that they determine which treatments a patient should receive. Ideally, predictive markers would be available that could determine the most appropriate treatment plan based on a patient’s biology. This goal is becoming a reality in some treatment settings and cancer types, with the increasing use of targeted therapies directed against specific molecular abnormalities. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing is in standard use for guiding breast cancer therapy. Testing for the estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) guides the use of endocrine therapy, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) testing guides the use of HER2-targeted therapies. Although IHC provides some discrimination among breast cancer subsets and helps identify appropriate therapy, more information can be gained through gene expression analyses. Contemporary multianalyte assays have demonstrated greater precision and reproducibility than seen with IHC-based assays. The most important contribution of multigene assays is the identification of women with ER/PR-positive, HER2-negative, early-stage breast cancer who are at low risk of recurrence and therefore will likely do well with endocrine therapy alone. These patients can be safely spared from the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy.

  4. HER2 expression identifies dynamic functional states within circulating breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Nicole Vincent; Bardia, Aditya; Wittner, Ben S.; Benes, Cyril; Ligorio, Matteo; Zheng, Yu; Yu, Min; Sundaresan, Tilak K.; Licausi, Joseph A.; Desai, Rushil; O’Keefe, Ryan M.; Ebright, Richard Y.; Boukhali, Myriam; Sil, Srinjoy; Onozato, Maristela L.; Iafrate, Anthony J.; Kapur, Ravi; Sgroi, Dennis; Ting, David T.; Toner, Mehmet; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Haas, Wilhelm; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in women with advanced estrogen receptor-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer acquire a HER2-positive subpopulation following multiple courses of therapy1,2. In contrast to HER2-amplified primary breast cancer, which is highly sensitive to HER2-targeted therapy, the clinical significance of acquired HER2 heterogeneity during the evolution of metastatic breast cancer is unknown. Here, we analyzed CTCs from 19 ER+/HER2− patients, 84% of whom had acquired CTCs expressing HER2. Cultured CTCs maintain discrete HER2+ and HER2− subpopulations: HER2+ CTCs are more proliferative but not addicted to HER2, consistent with activation of multiple signaling pathways. HER2− CTCs show activation of Notch and DNA damage pathways, exhibiting resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapy, but sensitivity to Notch inhibition. HER2+ and HER2− CTCs interconvert spontaneously, with cells of one phenotype producing daughters of the opposite within four cell doublings. While HER2+ and HER2− CTCs have comparable tumor initiating potential, differential proliferation favors the HER2+ state, while oxidative stress or cytotoxic chemotherapy enhances transition to the HER2− phenotype. Simultaneous treatment with paclitaxel and Notch inhibitors achieves sustained suppression of tumorigenesis in orthotopic CTC-derived tumor models. Together, these results point to distinct yet interconverting phenotypes within patient-derived CTCs, contributing to progression of breast cancer and acquisition of drug resistance. PMID:27556950

  5. Intraspinal tumours in the Kenya African.

    PubMed

    Ruberti, R F; Carmagnani, A L

    1976-06-01

    Thirty-one cases of intraspinal tumours in the African have been described, with age, sex incidence, frequency, site and histopathology shown. Intraspinal tumours in this series are compared with the larger series. Extradural and intramedullary tumours together with cervical spine tumours appear to be more frequent in this series. There is a high incidence of dumbell tumours in the neurinomas. Sarcomas are the most common type of tumours and mainly affect the thoracic spine.

  6. Benign hepatic tumours and tumour like conditions in men.

    PubMed Central

    Karhunen, P J

    1986-01-01

    In a consecutive medicolegal necropsy series benign hepatic tumours and tumour like conditions occurred in 52% of the 95 men aged 35-69 years. The incidence increased with age, mainly due to small bile duct tumours (n = 26; mean age 56.7 years; p less than 0.01; mean size 1.3 mm). The next most common tumours were cavernous hemangiomas (n = 19; mean age 53.9 years; mean size 5.2 mm) that were not related to age. Focal nodular hyperplasia (n = 3; mean size 8.0 mm) tended to occur in a younger age group (mean age 40.3 years; p less than 0.001). Multiple bile duct tumours were present in 46% and hemangiomas in 50% of the men studied. Liver cell adenoma, nodular regenerative hyperplasia, and peliosis hepatis were incidental findings (one case of each). Nodular regenerative hyperplasia was associated with the consumption of alcohol and a total dose of 21.5 g of testosterone. These results indicate that benign hepatic tumours and tumour like conditions are not rare in men but may remain undetected because of their small size. Images PMID:3950039

  7. A common variant at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus is associated with estrogen receptor–negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haiman, Christopher A; Chen, Gary K; Vachon, Celine M; Canzian, Federico; Dunning, Alison; Millikan, Robert C; Wang, Xianshu; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Ahmed, Shahana; Ambrosone, Christine B; Baglietto, Laura; Balleine, Rosemary; Bandera, Elisa V; Beckmann, Matthias W; Berg, Christine D; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William J; Brauch, Hiltrud; Buring, Julie E; Carey, Lisa A; Carpenter, Jane E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chasman, Daniel I; Clarke, Christine L; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Deming, Sandra L; Diasio, Robert B; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M; Driver, W Ryan; Dünnebier, Thomas; Durcan, Lorraine; Eccles, Diana; Edlund, Christopher K; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Feigelson, Heather S; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fostira, Florentia; Försti, Asta; Fountzilas, George; Gerty, Susan M; Giles, Graham G; Godwin, Andrew K; Goodfellow, Paul; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hamann, Ute; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Holbrook, Andrea; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Jennifer J; Hunter, David J; Ingles, Sue A; Irwanto, Astrid; Ivanovich, Jennifer; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nicola; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Kolonel, Laurence N; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kulkarni, Swati; Lambrechts, Diether; Lee, Adam M; Le Marchand, Loïc; Lesnick, Timothy; Liu, Jianjun; Lindstrom, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Martin, Nicholas G; Miron, Penelope; Montgomery, Grant W; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nickels, Stephan; Nyante, Sarah; Olswold, Curtis; Palmer, Julie; Pathak, Harsh; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Perou, Charles M; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Pooler, Loreall C; Press, Michael F; Pylkäs, Katri; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Rosenberg, Lynn; Ross, Eric; Rüdiger, Thomas; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Sawyer, Elinor; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Schumacher, Fredrick; Severi, Gianluca; Sheng, Xin; Signorello, Lisa B; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Stevens, Kristen N; Southey, Melissa C; Tapper, William J; Tomlinson, Ian; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Wauters, Els; Weaver, JoEllen; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Van Den Berg, David; Wan, Peggy; Xia, Lucy Y; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Siddiq, Afshan; Slager, Susan L; Stram, Daniel O; Easton, Douglas; Kraft, Peter; Henderson, Brian E; Couch, Fergus J

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer shows a higher incidence in women of African ancestry compared to women of European ancestry. In search of common risk alleles for ER-negative breast cancer, we combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from women of African ancestry (1,004 ER-negative cases and 2,745 controls) and European ancestry (1,718 ER-negative cases and 3,670 controls), with replication testing conducted in an additional 2,292 ER-negative cases and 16,901 controls of European ancestry. We identified a common risk variant for ER-negative breast cancer at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus on chromosome 5p15 (rs10069690: per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18 per allele, P = 1.0 × 10−10). The variant was also significantly associated with triple-negative (ER-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2)-negative) breast cancer (OR = 1.25, P = 1.1 × 10−9), particularly in younger women (<50 years of age) (OR = 1.48, P = 1.9 × 10−9). Our results identify a genetic locus associated with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer subtypes in multiple populations. PMID:22037553

  8. A common variant at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus is associated with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Haiman, Christopher A; Chen, Gary K; Vachon, Celine M; Canzian, Federico; Dunning, Alison; Millikan, Robert C; Wang, Xianshu; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Ahmed, Shahana; Ambrosone, Christine B; Baglietto, Laura; Balleine, Rosemary; Bandera, Elisa V; Beckmann, Matthias W; Berg, Christine D; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William J; Brauch, Hiltrud; Buring, Julie E; Carey, Lisa A; Carpenter, Jane E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chasman, Daniel I; Clarke, Christine L; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Deming, Sandra L; Diasio, Robert B; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M; Driver, W Ryan; Dünnebier, Thomas; Durcan, Lorraine; Eccles, Diana; Edlund, Christopher K; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Feigelson, Heather S; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fostira, Florentia; Försti, Asta; Fountzilas, George; Gerty, Susan M; Giles, Graham G; Godwin, Andrew K; Goodfellow, Paul; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hamann, Ute; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Holbrook, Andrea; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Jennifer J; Hunter, David J; Ingles, Sue A; Irwanto, Astrid; Ivanovich, Jennifer; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nicola; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Kolonel, Laurence N; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kulkarni, Swati; Lambrechts, Diether; Lee, Adam M; Marchand, Loïc Le; Lesnick, Timothy; Liu, Jianjun; Lindstrom, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Martin, Nicholas G; Miron, Penelope; Montgomery, Grant W; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nickels, Stephan; Nyante, Sarah; Olswold, Curtis; Palmer, Julie; Pathak, Harsh; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Perou, Charles M; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Pooler, Loreall C; Press, Michael F; Pylkäs, Katri; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Rosenberg, Lynn; Ross, Eric; Rüdiger, Thomas; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Sawyer, Elinor; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Schumacher, Fredrick; Severi, Gianluca; Sheng, Xin; Signorello, Lisa B; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Stevens, Kristen N; Southey, Melissa C; Tapper, William J; Tomlinson, Ian; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Wauters, Els; Weaver, JoEllen; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Van Den Berg, David; Wan, Peggy; Xia, Lucy Y; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Siddiq, Afshan; Slager, Susan L; Stram, Daniel O; Easton, Douglas; Kraft, Peter; Henderson, Brian E; Couch, Fergus J

    2011-10-30

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer shows a higher incidence in women of African ancestry compared to women of European ancestry. In search of common risk alleles for ER-negative breast cancer, we combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from women of African ancestry (1,004 ER-negative cases and 2,745 controls) and European ancestry (1,718 ER-negative cases and 3,670 controls), with replication testing conducted in an additional 2,292 ER-negative cases and 16,901 controls of European ancestry. We identified a common risk variant for ER-negative breast cancer at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus on chromosome 5p15 (rs10069690: per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18 per allele, P = 1.0 × 10(-10)). The variant was also significantly associated with triple-negative (ER-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2)-negative) breast cancer (OR = 1.25, P = 1.1 × 10(-9)), particularly in younger women (<50 years of age) (OR = 1.48, P = 1.9 × 10(-9)). Our results identify a genetic locus associated with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer subtypes in multiple populations.

  9. Tumours of bones and joints

    PubMed Central

    Misdorp, W.; Van Der Heul, R. O.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of bones and joints are not infrequent in dogs but are rare in other domestic animals. In the dog, most bone tumours are malignant; osteosarcomas are by far the most frequently encountered tumours, especially in giant breeds and boxers. The following main categories of bone tumour are described: bone-forming, cartilage-forming, giant cell, marrow, vascular, miscellaneous, metastatic, unclassified, and tumour-like lesions. The tumours of joints and related structures are classified as synovial sarcomas, fibroxanthomas, and malignant giant cell tumour of soft tissues. ImagesFig. 21Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 29Fig. 30Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 33Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 28Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 37Fig. 38Fig. 39Fig. 40Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12 PMID:1086157

  10. Murine Bioluminescent Hepatic Tumour Model

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Simon; Salwa, Slawomir; Gao, Xuefeng; Tabirca, Sabin; O'Hanlon, Deirdre; O'Sullivan, Gerald C.; Tangney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This video describes the establishment of liver metastases in a mouse model that can be subsequently analysed by bioluminescent imaging. Tumour cells are administered specifically to the liver to induce a localised liver tumour, via mobilisation of the spleen and splitting into two, leaving intact the vascular pedicle for each half of the spleen. Lewis lung carcinoma cells that constitutively express the firefly luciferase gene (luc1) are inoculated into one hemi-spleen which is then resected 10 minutes later. The other hemi-spleen is left intact and returned to the abdomen. Liver tumour growth can be monitored by bioluminescence imaging using the IVIS whole body imaging system. Quantitative imaging of tumour growth using IVIS provides precise quantitation of viable tumour cells. Tumour cell death and necrosis due to drug treatment is indicated early by a reduction in the bioluminescent signal. This mouse model allows for investigating the mechanisms underlying metastatic tumour-cell survival and growth and can be used for the evaluation of therapeutics of liver metastasis. PMID:20689502

  11. COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib prevents chronic morphine-induced promotion of angiogenesis, tumour growth, metastasis and mortality, without compromising analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Farooqui, M; Li, Y; Rogers, T; Poonawala, T; Griffin, R J; Song, C W; Gupta, K

    2007-01-01

    Morphine and its congener opioids are the main therapy for severe pain in cancer. However, chronic morphine treatment stimulates angiogenesis and tumour growth in mice. We examined if celecoxib (a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor) prevents morphine-induced tumour growth without compromising analgesia. The effect of chronic treatment with celecoxib (by gavage) and/or morphine (subcutaneously), or PBS on tumour prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), COX-2, angiogenesis, tumour growth, metastasis, pain behaviour and survival was determined in a highly invasive SCK breast cancer model in A/J mice. Two weeks of chronic morphine treatment at clinically relevant doses stimulates COX-2 and PGE2 (4.5-fold compared to vehicle alone) and angiogenesis in breast tumours in mice. This is accompanied by increased tumour weight (∼35%) and increased metastasis and reduced survival. Co-administration of celecoxib prevents these morphine-induced effects. In addition, morphine and celecoxib together provided better analgesia than either agent alone. Celecoxib prevents morphine-induced stimulation of COX-2, PGE2, angiogenesis, tumour growth, metastasis and mortality without compromising analgesia in a murine breast cancer model. In fact, the combination provided significantly better analgesia than with morphine or celecoxib alone. Clinical trials of this combination for analgesia in chronic and severe pain in cancer are warranted. PMID:17971769

  12. [Male breast diseases].

    PubMed

    Firmin-Lefebvre, D; Misery, L

    2013-01-01

    Because andrology is relatively undeveloped in France, the dermatologist is often the doctor first consulted for diseases of the nipple in men. All dermatological diseases can in fact occur at this site. There are some specific nipple diseases such as gynaecomastia, congenital abnormalities, hyperplasia, benign tumours and breast cancer. All clinical examinations and laboratory examinations should focus on diagnosis of this type of cancer and its elimination.

  13. Tumours of the nasal cavity*

    PubMed Central

    Stünzi, H.; Hauser, B.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of the nasal cavity are rare in domestic animals, most cases occurring in the dog. Epithelial tumours are the most common type in carnivores (dogs and cats). In general, the same types of tumour occur in domestic animals as occur in man. There was no significant predisposition for breed in dogs, but in both dogs and cats far more males than females were affected. Metastases occurred only rarely. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:1086156

  14. Discordance rate of HER2 status in primary breast carcinomas versus synchronous axillary lymph node metastases: a multicenter retrospective investigation

    PubMed Central

    Ieni, Antonio; Barresi, Valeria; Caltabiano, Rosario; Cascone, Anna Maria; Del Sordo, Rachele; Cabibi, Daniela; Zeppa, Pio; Lanzafame, Salvatore; Sidoni, Angelo; Franco, Vito; Tuccari, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Background Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is considered to be a therapeutic and prognostic marker in the management of breast carcinoma (BC), although discordance rates between primary and metastatic or locally recurrent lesions have been reported. Methods One hundred and forty-eight paraffin-embedded BC tissues from patients of mean age 59.27 (33–96) years and corresponding synchronous lymph node metastases were collected and retrospectively studied using immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization to evaluate HER2 status. Fleiss-Cohen weighted k statistics were used to assess the concordance rate between HER2 status of the primary BC and the synchronous metastatic lesions. Results The overall concordance rate for HER2 was 95.28%. Eighty-nine cases were concordantly HER2-negative in primary BC and nodal metastases, and 52 cases were HER2-positive in both primary and metastatic tumors. Changes in HER2 status between primary BC and corresponding synchronous metastases were observed in seven (4.72%) cases. Three of the discordant cases were HER2-negative in the primary tumor and HER2-positive in the metastases, while four cases were HER2-positive in the primary BC and HER2-negative in the metastases. No significant correlations were identified between HER2 status and expression of hormone receptors, growth fraction (Ki-67), or other histopathological parameters (pT, pN, grade). Conclusion Simultaneous determination of HER2 in BC and corresponding metastatic lymph nodes is not mandatory, but may strongly influence the therapeutic management. It was demonstrated that loss of HER2 amplification results in worse post-relapse survival and overall survival in BC patients and, on the other hand, a gain in HER2 expression in metastatic lymph nodes of BC may allow the possibility of a targeted treatment. Thus, our opinion is that significant prognostic information may be obtained by simultaneous assessment of HER2 status in both primary and

  15. High-throughput screens identify microRNAs essential for HER2 positive breast cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Leivonen, Suvi-Katri; Sahlberg, Kristine Kleivi; Mäkelä, Rami; Due, Eldri Undlien; Kallioniemi, Olli; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Perälä, Merja

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs regulating gene expression post-transcriptionally. We have characterized the role of miRNAs in regulating the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-pathway in breast cancer. We performed miRNA gain-of-function assays by screening two HER2 amplified cell lines (KPL-4 and JIMT-1) with a miRNA mimic library consisting of 810 human miRNAs. The levels of HER2, phospho-AKT, phospho-ERK1/2, cell proliferation (Ki67) and apoptosis (cPARP) were analyzed with reverse-phase protein arrays. Rank product analyses identified 38 miRNAs (q < 0.05) as inhibitors of HER2 signaling and cell growth, the most effective being miR-491-5p, miR-634, miR-637 and miR-342-5p. We also characterized miRNAs directly targeting HER2 and identified seven novel miRNAs (miR-552, miR-541, miR-193a-5p, miR-453, miR-134, miR-498, and miR-331-3p) as direct regulators of the HER2 3'UTR. We demonstrated the clinical relevance of the miRNAs and identified miR-342-5p and miR-744* as significantly down-regulated in HER2-positive breast tumors as compared to HER2-negative tumors from two cohorts of breast cancer patients (101 and 1302 cases). miR-342-5p specifically inhibited HER2-positive cell growth, as it had no effect on the growth of HER2-negative control cells in vitro. Furthermore, higher expression of miR-342-5p was associated with better survival in both breast cancer patient cohorts. In conclusion, we have identified miRNAs which are efficient negative regulators of the HER2 pathway that may play a role in vivo during breast cancer progression. These results give mechanistic insights in HER2 regulation which may open potential new strategies towards prevention and therapeutic inhibition of HER2-positive breast cancer.

  16. REAL-TIME INTRAVITAL IMAGING ESTABLISHES TUMOUR-ASSOCIATED MACROPHAGES AS THE EXTRASKELETAL TARGET OF BISPHOSPHONATE ACTION IN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Junankar, Simon; Shay, Gemma; Jurczyluk, Julie; Ali, Naveid; Down, Jenny; Pocock, Nicholas; Parker, Andrew; Nguyen, Akira; Sun, Shuting; Kashemirov, Boris; McKenna, Charles E.; Croucher, Peter I.; Swarbrick, Alexander; Weilbaecher, Katherine; Phan, Tri Giang; Rogers, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent clinical trials have shown that bisphosphonate drugs improve breast cancer patient survival independent of their anti-resorptive effects on the skeleton. However, since bisphosphonates bind rapidly to bone mineral, the exact mechanisms of their anti-tumour action, particularly on cells outside of bone, remain unknown. Here we used real-time intravital two-photon microscopy to show extensive leakage of fluorescent bisphosphonate from the vasculature in 4T1 mouse mammary tumours, where it initially binds to areas of small, granular microcalcifications that are engulfed by tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs), but not tumour cells. Importantly, we also observed uptake of radiolabeled bisphosphonate in the primary breast tumour of a patient and showed the resected tumour to be infiltrated with TAMs and to contain similar granular microcalcifications. These data represent the first compelling in vivo evidence that bisphosphonates can target cells in tumours outside the skeleton and that their anti-tumour activity is likely to be mediated via TAMs. PMID:25312016

  17. A comparison of the clinical outcomes of patients with invasive lobular carcinoma and invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast according to molecular subtype in a Korean population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To investigate the clinicopathological characteristics and the survival outcomes of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) patients compared to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) patients according to their molecular subtype. Methods We compared the clinicopathological characteristics, breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) and overall survival (OS) between patients with IDC (n = 14,547) and ILC (n = 528). Results The ILC presented with a larger tumor size, more advanced cancer stage, increased rate of hormonal receptor positivity, human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) negativity and mastectomy than the IDC. The ILC patients more frequently presented with the luminal A subtype, whereas the IDC patients more frequently presented with the luminal B, HER2-overexpression, or triple negative subtype. The BCSS and OS were not significantly different between the IDC and ILC for each molecular subtype. Conclusions Similar to IDC patients, molecular subtype should be considered when determining the prognosis and treatment regimen for ILC patients. PMID:24621330

  18. Multicellular Streaming in Solid Tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kas, Josef

    As early as 400 BCE, the Roman medical encyclopaedist Celsus recognized that solid tumours are stiffer than surrounding tissue. However, cancer cell lines are softer, and softer cells facilitate invasion. This paradox raises several questions: Does softness emerge from adaptation to mechanical and chemical cues in the external microenvironment, or are soft cells already present inside a primary solid tumour? If the latter, how can a more rigid tissue contain more soft cells? Here we show that in primary tumour samples from patients with mammary and cervix carcinomas, cells do exhibit a broad distribution of rigidities, with a higher fraction of softer and more contractile cells compared to normal tissue. Mechanical modelling based on patient data reveals that, surprisingly, tumours with a significant fraction of very soft cells can still remain rigid. Moreover, in tissues with the observed distributions of cell stiffnesses, softer cells spontaneously self-organize into lines or streams, possibly facilitating cancer metastasis.

  19. Digital Microscopy Assessment of Angiogenesis in Different Breast Cancer Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Rogojanu, Radu; Croitoru, Camelia; Jitaru, Daniela; Tarniceriu, Cristina; Carasevici, Eugen

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim. Tumour angiogenesis defined by microvessel density (MVD) is generally accepted as a prognostic factor in breast cancer. However, due to variability of measurement systems and cutoffs, it is questionable to date whether it contributes to predictive outline. Our study aims to grade vascular heterogeneity by comparing clear-cut compartments: tumour associated stroma (TAS), tumour parenchyma, and tumour invasive front. Material and Methods. Computerized vessel area measurement was performed using a tissue cytometry system (TissueFAXS) on slides originated from 50 patients with breast cancer. Vessels were marked using immunohistochemistry with CD34. Regions of interest were manually defined for each tumour compartment. Results. Tumour invasive front vascular endothelia area was 2.15 times higher than that in tumour parenchyma and 4.61 times higher than that in TAS (P < 0.002). Worth to mention that the lymph node negative subgroup of patients show a slight but constant increase of vessel index in all examined compartments of breast tumour. Conclusion. Whole slide digital examination and region of interest (ROI) analysis are a valuable tool in scoring angiogenesis markers and disclosing their prognostic capacity. Our study reveals compartments' variability of vessel density inside the tumour and highlights the propensity of invasive front to associate an active process of angiogenesis with potential implications in adjuvant therapy. PMID:24073397

  20. Clinical implications of the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Prat, Aleix; Pineda, Estela; Adamo, Barbara; Galván, Patricia; Fernández, Aranzazu; Gaba, Lydia; Díez, Marc; Viladot, Margarita; Arance, Ana; Muñoz, Montserrat

    2015-11-01

    Gene-expression profiling has had a considerable impact on our understanding of breast cancer biology. During the last 15 years, 5 intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer (Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2-enriched, Basal-like and Claudin-low) have been identified and intensively studied. In this review, we will focus on the current and future clinical implications of the intrinsic molecular subtypes beyond the current pathological-based classification endorsed by the 2013 St. Gallen Consensus Recommendations. Within hormone receptor-positive and HER2-negative early breast cancer, the Luminal A and B subtypes predict 10-year outcome regardless of systemic treatment administered as well as residual risk of distant recurrence after 5 years of endocrine therapy. Within clinically HER2-positive disease, the 4 main intrinsic subtypes can be identified and dominate the biological and clinical phenotype. From a clinical perspective, patients with HER2+/HER2-enriched disease seem to benefit the most from neoadjuvant trastuzumab, or dual HER2 blockade with trastuzumab/lapatinib, in combination with chemotherapy, and patients with HER2+/Luminal A disease seem to have a relative better outcome compared to the other subtypes. Finally, within triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), the Basal-like disease predominates (70-80%) and, from a biological perspective, should be considered a cancer-type by itself. Importantly, the distinction between Basal-like versus non-Basal-like within TNBC might predict survival following (neo)adjvuvant multi-agent chemotherapy, bevacizumab benefit in the neoadjuvant setting (CALGB40603), and docetaxel vs. carboplatin benefit in first-line metastatic disease (TNT study). Overall, this data suggests that intrinsic molecular profiling provides clinically relevant information beyond current pathology-based classifications.

  1. Adaptive Randomization of Veliparib–Carboplatin Treatment in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rugo, Hope S.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; DeMichele, Angela; Yau, Christina; van ‘t Veer, Laura J.; Buxton, Meredith B.; Hogarth, Michael; Hylton, Nola M.; Paoloni, Melissa; Perlmutter, Jane; Symmans, W. Fraser; Yee, Douglas; Chien, A. Jo; Wallace, Anne M.; Kaplan, Henry G.; Boughey, Judy C.; Haddad, Tufia C.; Albain, Kathy S.; Liu, Minetta C.; Isaacs, Claudine; Khan, Qamar J.; Lang, Julie E.; Viscusi, Rebecca K.; Pusztai, Lajos; Moulder, Stacy L.; Chui, Stephen Y.; Kemmer, Kathleen A.; Elias, Anthony D.; Edmiston, Kirsten K.; Euhus, David M.; Haley, Barbara B.; Nanda, Rita; Northfelt, Donald W.; Tripathy, Debasish; Wood, William C.; Lyandres, Julia; Davis, Sarah E.; Hirst, Gillian L.; Sanil, Ashish; Berry, Donald A.; Esserman, Laura J.

    2017-01-01

    Background I-SPY 2 is a phase 2 standing multicenter platform trial designed to screen multiple experimental regimens in combination with standard neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. The goal is to matching experimental regimens with responding patient subtypes. We report results for veliparib, a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, combined with carboplatin (VC). Methods Eligible women had ≥2.5 cm stage II/III breast cancer, categorized into 8 biomarker subtypes based on HER2, hormone-receptor status (HR) and MammaPrint. Patients are adaptively randomized within subtype to better performing regimens compared to standard therapy (control). Regimens are evaluated within 10 signatures, prospectively defined combinations of subtypes. VC plus standard therapy was considered for HER2-negative tumors and therefore evaluated in 3 signatures. The primary endpoint of I-SPY 2 is pathologic complete response (pCR). MR volume changes during treatment inform the likelihood that a patient will achieve pCR. Regimens graduate if and when they have a high (Bayesian) predictive probability of success in a subsequent phase 3 neoadjuvant trial within the graduating signature. Results VC graduated in triple-negative breast cancer with 88% predicted probability of phase 3 success. A total of 72 patients were randomized to VC and 44 to concurrent controls. Respective pCR estimates (95% probability intervals) were 51% (35%–69%) vs 26% (11%–40%). Greater toxicity of VC was manageable. Conclusion The design of I-SPY 2 has the potential to efficiently identify responding tumor subtypes for the various therapies being evaluated. VC added to standard therapy improves pCR rates specifically in triple-negative breast cancer. PMID:27406347

  2. Primitive neuroectodermal adrenal gland tumour.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Y P; Lang, Brian H H; Tam, S C; Wong, K P

    2014-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma, also called primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the adrenal gland, is extremely rare. Only a few cases have been reported in the literature. We report on a woman with adult-onset primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the adrenal gland presenting with progressive flank pain. Computed tomography confirmed an adrenal tumour with invasion of the left diaphragm and kidney. Radical surgery was performed and the pain completely resolved; histology confirmed the presence of primitive neuroectodermal tumour, for which she was given chemotherapy. The clinical presentation of this condition is non-specific, and a definitive diagnosis is based on a combination of histology, as well as immunohistochemical and cytogenic analysis. According to the literature, these tumours demonstrate rapid growth and aggressive behaviour but there are no well-established guidelines or treatment strategies. Nevertheless, surgery remains the mainstay of local disease control; curative surgery can be performed in most patients. Adjuvant chemoirradiation has been advocated yet no consensus is available. The prognosis of patients with primitive neuroectodermal tumours remains poor.

  3. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  4. Intracellular Fas ligand in normal and malignant breast epithelium does not induce apoptosis in Fas-sensitive cells

    PubMed Central

    Ragnarsson, G B; Mikaelsdottir, E K; Vidarsson, H; Jónasson, J G; Ólafsdóttir, K; Kristjánsdóttir, K; Kjartansson, J; Ögmundsdóttir, H M; Rafnar, T

    2000-01-01

    Fas ligand (FasL) is expressed on some cancers and may play a role in the immune evasion of the tumour. We used immuno-histochemistry to study the expression of Fas and FasL in tissue samples from breast cancer patients, as well as normal breast tissue. Our results show that Fas and FasL are co-expressed both in normal tissue and in breast tumours. Fas and FasL mRNA were expressed in fresh normal and malignant breast tissue, as well as cultured breast epithelium and breast cancer cell lines. Flow cytometry analysis of live cells failed to detect FasL on the surface of normal or malignant breast cells; however, both stained positive for FasL after permeabilization. Fas was detected on the surface of normal breast cells and T47D and MCF-10A cell lines but only intracellularly in other breast cell lines tested. Neither normal breast epithelium nor breast cell lines induced Fas-dependent apoptosis in Jurkat cells. Finally, 20 tumour samples were stained for apoptosis. Few apoptotic cells were detected and there was no increase in apoptotic cells on the borders between tumour cells and lymphocytes. We conclude that FasL is expressed intracellularly in both normal and malignant breast epithelium and unlikely to be important for the immune evasion of breast tumours. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11104571

  5. Can Biomarker Assessment on Circulating Tumor Cells Help Direct Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Natalie; Pestrin, Marta; Galardi, Francesca; De Luca, Francesca; Malorni, Luca; Di Leo, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) count has prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer, but the predictive utility of CTCs is uncertain. Molecular studies on CTCs have often been limited by a low number of CTCs isolated from a high background of leukocytes. Improved enrichment techniques are now allowing molecular characterisation of single CTCs, whereby molecular markers on single CTCs may provide a real-time assessment of tumor biomarker status from a blood test or “liquid biopsy”, potentially negating the need for a more invasive tissue biopsy. The predictive ability of CTC biomarker analysis has predominantly been assessed in relation to HER2, with variable and inconclusive results. Limited data exist for other biomarkers, such as the estrogen receptor. In addition to the need to define and validate the most accurate and reproducible method for CTC molecular analysis, the clinical relevance of biomarkers, including gain of HER2 on CTC after HER2 negative primary breast cancer, remains uncertain. This review summarises the currently available data relating to biomarker evaluation on CTCs and its role in directing management in metastatic breast cancer, discusses limitations, and outlines measures that may enable future development of this approach. PMID:24670368

  6. Expression of APOBEC3B mRNA in Primary Breast Cancer of Japanese Women

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, Eriko; Yamashita, Nami; Tanaka, Kimihiro; Inoue, Yuka; Akiyoshi, Sayuri; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have identified the apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3B (APOBEC3B) as a source of mutations in various malignancies. APOBEC3B is overexpressed in several human cancer types, including breast cancer. In this study, we analyzed APOBEC3B mRNA expression in 305 primary breast cancers of Japanese women using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and investigated the relationships between the APOBEC3B mRNA expression and clinicopathological characteristics, prognosis, and TP53 mutations. The expression of APOBEC3B mRNA was detected in 277 tumors and not detected in 28 tumors. High APOBEC3B mRNA expression was significantly correlated with ER- and PR-negativity, high grade and high Ki67 index. The APOBEC3B mRNA expression was highest in the triple-negative and lowest in the hormone receptor-positive/HER2-negative subtypes. The TP53 gene was more frequently mutated in the tumors with high APOBEC3B mRNA expression. High APOBEC3B mRNA expression was significantly associated with poor recurrence-free survival in all cases and the ER-positive cases. These findings were almost consistent with the previous reports from the Western countries. In conclusion, high APOBEC3B mRNA expression was related to the aggressive phenotypes of breast cancer, high frequency of TP53 mutation and poor prognosis, especially in ER-positive tumors. PMID:27977754

  7. Genome remodelling in a basal-like breast cancer metastasis and xenograft.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Ellis, Matthew J; Li, Shunqiang; Larson, David E; Chen, Ken; Wallis, John W; Harris, Christopher C; McLellan, Michael D; Fulton, Robert S; Fulton, Lucinda L; Abbott, Rachel M; Hoog, Jeremy; Dooling, David J; Koboldt, Daniel C; Schmidt, Heather; Kalicki, Joelle; Zhang, Qunyuan; Chen, Lei; Lin, Ling; Wendl, Michael C; McMichael, Joshua F; Magrini, Vincent J; Cook, Lisa; McGrath, Sean D; Vickery, Tammi L; Appelbaum, Elizabeth; Deschryver, Katherine; Davies, Sherri; Guintoli, Therese; Lin, Li; Crowder, Robert; Tao, Yu; Snider, Jacqueline E; Smith, Scott M; Dukes, Adam F; Sanderson, Gabriel E; Pohl, Craig S; Delehaunty, Kim D; Fronick, Catrina C; Pape, Kimberley A; Reed, Jerry S; Robinson, Jody S; Hodges, Jennifer S; Schierding, William; Dees, Nathan D; Shen, Dong; Locke, Devin P; Wiechert, Madeline E; Eldred, James M; Peck, Josh B; Oberkfell, Benjamin J; Lolofie, Justin T; Du, Feiyu; Hawkins, Amy E; O'Laughlin, Michelle D; Bernard, Kelly E; Cunningham, Mark; Elliott, Glendoria; Mason, Mark D; Thompson, Dominic M; Ivanovich, Jennifer L; Goodfellow, Paul J; Perou, Charles M; Weinstock, George M; Aft, Rebecca; Watson, Mark; Ley, Timothy J; Wilson, Richard K; Mardis, Elaine R

    2010-04-15

    Massively parallel DNA sequencing technologies provide an unprecedented ability to screen entire genomes for genetic changes associated with tumour progression. Here we describe the genomic analyses of four DNA samples from an African-American patient with basal-like breast cancer: peripheral blood, the primary tumour, a brain metastasis and a xenograft derived from the primary tumour. The metastasis contained two de novo mutations and a large deletion not present in the primary tumour, and was significantly enriched for 20 shared mutations. The xenograft retained all primary tumour mutations and displayed a mutation enrichment pattern that resembled the metastasis. Two overlapping large deletions, encompassing CTNNA1, were present in all three tumour samples. The differential mutation frequencies and structural variation patterns in metastasis and xenograft compared with the primary tumour indicate that secondary tumours may arise from a minority of cells within the primary tumour.

  8. Dasatinib inhibits mammary tumour development in a genetically engineered mouse model.

    PubMed

    Karim, Saadia A; Creedon, Helen; Patel, Hitesh; Carragher, Neil O; Morton, Jennifer P; Muller, William J; Evans, Thomas Rj; Gusterson, Barry; Sansom, Owen J; Brunton, Valerie G

    2013-08-01

    Src family kinase activity is elevated in a number of human cancers including breast cancer. This increased activity has been associated with aggressive disease and poor prognosis. Src inhibitors are currently in clinical development with a number of trials currently assessing their activity in breast cancer. However, the results to date have been disappointing and a further evaluation of the preclinical effects of Src inhibitors is required to help establish whether these agents will be useful in the treatment of breast cancer. In this study we investigate the effects of dasatinib, which is a potent inhibitor of Src family kinases, on the initiation and development of breast cancer in a genetically engineered model of the disease. The mouse model utilized is driven by expression of activated ErbB-2 under the transcriptional control of its endogenous promoter coupled with conditional loss of Pten under the control of Cre recombinase expressed by the BLG promoter. We show that daily oral administration of dasatinib delays tumour onset and increases overall survival but does not inhibit the proliferation of established tumours. The striking difference between the dasatinib-treated group of tumours and the vehicle controls was the prominent squamous metaplasia that was seen in six out of 11 dasatinib-treated tumours. This was accompanied by a dramatic up-regulation of both E-cadherin and β-catenin and down-regulation of ErbB-2 in the dasatinib-treated tumours. Dasatinib also inhibited both the migration and the invasion of tumour-derived cell lines in vitro. Together these data support the argument that benefits of Src inhibitors may predominate in early or even pre-invasive disease.

  9. Betulin elicits anti-cancer effects in tumour primary cultures and cell lines in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Stepulak, Andrzej; Szymański, Marek; Juszczak, Małgorzata; Grabarska, Aneta; Sifringer, Marco; Kaczor, Józef; Kandefer-Szerszeń, Martyna

    2009-12-01

    Betulin is a pentacyclic triterpene found in many plant species, among others, in white birch bark. The aim of the study was in vitro characterization of the anticancer activity of betulin in a range of human tumour cell lines (neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma-medulloblastoma, glioma, thyroid, breast, lung and colon carcinoma, leukaemia and multiple myeloma), and in primary tumour cultures isolated from patients (ovarian carcinoma, cervical carcinoma and glioblastoma multiforme). In this study, we demonstrated a remarkable anti-proliferative effect of betulin in all tested tumour cell cultures. Neuroblastoma (SK-N-AS) and colon carcinoma (HT-29) were the most sensitive to the anti-proliferative effect of betulin. Furthermore, betulin altered tumour cells morphology, decreased their motility and induced apoptotic cell death. These findings demonstrate the anti-cancer potential of betulin and suggest that they may be applied as an adjunctive measure in cancer treatment.

  10. Clinical-Pathologic Features and Long-Term Outcomes of Tubular Carcinoma of the Breast Compared With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gene-Fu F.; Yang Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Moran, Meena S.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate our institutional experience of treating tubular carcinoma of the breast (TC) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) with conservative surgery and radiation therapy, to compare clinical-pathologic features and long-term outcomes. Methods and Materials: A review of our institution's tumor registry from 1975 to 2007, followed by a central pathology review of available slides, yielded 71 cases of Stage I/II TC and 2,238 cases of Stage I/II IDC treated with breast conservation therapy. Clinical-pathologic features and outcomes were analyzed by subtype to detect significant differences. Results: The median follow-up was 7 years. The TC cohort presented more frequently with pT1 disease (97% vs. 80%, p = 0.0007), pN0 disease (95% vs. 74%, p = 0.0004), hormone-receptor positivity (ER+, 89% vs. 62%, p = 0.0001; PR+, 81% vs. 52%, p = 0.0001), and HER-2 negativity (89% vs. 71%, p = 0.04). Clinical outcomes also favored the TC cohort, with lower rates of breast cancer-related death (1% vs. 10%; p = 0.0109) and distant metastasis (1% vs. 13%; p = 0.0028) and higher rates of 10-year overall (90% vs. 80%; p = 0.033), cause-specific (99% vs. 86%; p = 0.011), and disease-free (99% vs. 82%; p = 0.003) survival. There was a nonsignificant trend toward improved breast cancer relapse-free survival for the TC cohort (95% vs. 87%; p = 0.062) but no difference in nodal relapse-free survival or contralateral breast cancer relapse-free survival (all p values >0.05) between the cohorts. Conclusion: Our institutional experience suggests that TC, when compared with IDC, is associated with more favorable clinical-pathologic features and comparable, if not superior, outcomes after breast conservation therapy, suggesting the appropriateness of a conservative approach to this rare subtype.

  11. Microsatellite instability in thyroid tumours and tumour-like lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lazzereschi, D; Palmirotta, R; Ranieri, A; Ottini, L; Verì, M C; Cama, A; Cetta, F; Nardi, F; Colletta, G; Mariani-Costantini, R

    1999-01-01

    Fifty-one thyroid tumours and tumour-like lesions were analysed for instability at ten dinucleotide microsatellite loci and at two coding mononucleotide repeats within the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) type II receptor (TβRII) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) receptor (IGFIIR) genes respectively. Microsatellite instability (MI) was detected in 11 out of 51 cases (21.5%), including six (11.7%) with MI at one or two loci and five (9.8%) with Ml at three or more loci (RER+ phenotype). No mutations in the TβRII and IGFIIR repeats were observed. The overall frequency of MI did not significantly vary in relation to age, gender, benign versus malignant status and tumour size. However, widespread MI was significantly more frequent in follicular adenomas and carcinomas than in papillary and Hürthle cell tumours: three out of nine tumours of follicular type (33.3%) resulted in replication error positive (RER+), versus 1 out of 29 papillary carcinomas (3.4%, P = 0.01), and zero out of eight Hürthle cell neoplasms. Regional lymph node metastases were present in five MI-negative primary cancers and resulted in MI-positive in two cases. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:9888478

  12. Therapy-induced tumour secretomes promote resistance and tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Obenauf, Anna C.; Zou, Yilong; Ji, Andrew L.; Vanharanta, Sakari; Shu, Weiping; Shi, Hubing; Kong, Xiangju; Bosenberg, Marcus C.; Wiesner, Thomas; Rosen, Neal; Lo, Roger S.; Massagué, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance invariably limits the clinical efficacy of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors against cancer1,2. Here we show that targeted therapy with BRAF, ALK, or EGFR kinase inhibitors induces a complex network of secreted signals in drug-stressed melanoma and lung adenocarcinoma cells. This therapy-induced secretome (TIS) stimulates the outgrowth, dissemination, and metastasis of drug-resistant cancer cell clones and supports the survival of drug-sensitive cancer cells, contributing to incomplete tumour regression. The vemurafenib reactive secretome in melanoma is driven by down-regulation of the transcription factor FRA1. In situ transcriptome analysis of drug-resistant melanoma cells responding to the regressing tumour microenvironment revealed hyperactivation of multiple signalling pathways, most prominently the AKT pathway. Dual inhibition of RAF and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways blunted the outgrowth of the drug-resistant cell population in BRAF mutant melanoma tumours, suggesting this combination therapy as a strategy against tumour relapse. Thus, therapeutic inhibition of oncogenic drivers induces vast secretome changes in drug-sensitive cancer cells, paradoxically establishing a tumour microenvironment that supports the expansion of drug-resistant clones, but is susceptible to combination therapy. PMID:25807485

  13. [Skin-sparing mastectomy: an alternative to conventional mastectomy in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Ramos Boyero, Manuel

    2008-10-01

    Women who require or desire mastectomy for breast cancer one option should be immediate breast reconstruction. Skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) describes the surgery that maximises breast skin and infra- mammary fold preservation, significantly improves the symmetry and natural appearance and a more satisfied patient. In multiple studies, SSM seems to be oncologically safe in patients undergoing mastectomy for invasive T1-T2 tumours, multicentric tumours, ductal carcinoma in situ or risk-reduction. However, the technique should be avoided in patients with inflammatory breast cancer or in those with extensive tumour involvement of the skin. SSM with nipple areola complex preservation appears to be oncologically safe, providing that the tumour is not close to the nipple and the retro-areolar tissue is free of tumour. Though adjuvant radiotherapy is not an absolute contraindication to SSM, it should be used with caution since it decreases the final cosmetic result.

  14. Nuclear expression of Survivin in paediatric ependymomas and choroid plexus tumours correlates with morphologic tumour grade.

    PubMed

    Altura, R A; Olshefski, R S; Jiang, Y; Boué, D R

    2003-11-03

    Survivin is a gene that is widely expressed throughout the development of the normal mammalian embryo. Subcellular localisation of Survivin to both the nucleus and cytoplasm has suggested multiple functional roles, including inhibition of cell death, especially as demonstrated within a variety of malignant cell types, as well as regulation of the mitotic spindle checkpoint. The expression of Survivin has been associated with an adverse clinical outcome in a large number of malignancies. However, nuclear Survivin expression has been described as an independent variable of favourable prognosis in two large clinical studies of breast and gastric carcinomas. Reports of Survivin expression in normal postnatal, differentiated tissues have been restricted to cell types with high proliferative capacities, including vascular endothelium, endometrium, colonic epithelium, and activated lymphocytes. Prior to this report, expression within the normal human brain had not been characterised. Here, we analyse the expression of Survivin in human brain sections obtained from perinatal and paediatric autopsy cases. We report a strikingly high level of expression of Survivin within normal ependyma and choroid plexus (CP). Analysis of corresponding neoplastic tissue in paediatric ependymomas and CP tumours shows that expression of the nuclear form of Survivin correlates with morphologic tumour grade, with a loss of nuclear expression associated with progressive cytologic anaplasia. This pattern of expression supports a hypothesis that Survivin plays a functional role in normal ependymal growth and/or neural stem cell differentiation, and that abnormally low levels of expression of the nuclear form of this protein may be a marker of more aggressive disease and/or higher morphologic grade in ependymal and CP tumours.

  15. Efficacy of Lapatinib in Therapy-Resistant HER2-Positive Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Markomanolaki, Harris; Papadaki, Maria A.; Kallergi, Galatea; Hatzidaki, Dora; Kalbakis, Kostas; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the efficacy of lapatinib, a dual EGFR and HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in therapy-resistant HER2-positive CTCs in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Patients and Methods Patients with MBC and HER2-positive CTCs despite disease stabilization or response to prior therapy, received lapatinib 1500 mg daily in monthly cycles, till disease progression or CTC increase. CTC monitoring was performed by immunofluorescent microscopy using cytospins of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) double stained for HER2 or EGFR and cytokeratin. Results A total of 120 cycles were administered in 22 patients; median age was 62.5 years, 15 (68.2%) patients were post-menopausal and 20 (90.1%) had HER2-negative primary tumors. At the end of the second course, HER2-positive CTC counts decreased in 76.2% of patients; the median number of HER2-positive CTCs/patient also declined significantly (p = 0.013), however the decrease was significant only among patients presenting disease stabilization (p = 0.018) but not among those with disease progression during lapatinib treatment. No objective responses were observed. All CTC-positive patients harbored EGFR-positive CTCs on progression compared to 62.5% at baseline (p = 0.054). The ratio of EGFR-positive CTCs/total CTCs detected in all patients increased from 17.1% at baseline to 37.6% on progression, whereas the mean percentage of HER2-negative CTCs/patient increased from 2.4% to 30.6% (p = 0.03). Conclusions The above results indicate that lapatinib is effective in decreasing HER2-positive CTCs in patients with MBC irrespectively of the HER2 status of the primary tumor and imply the feasibility of monitoring the molecular changes on CTCs during treatment with targeted agents. Trial Registration Clinical trial.gov NCT00694252 PMID:26083256

  16. Vasoproliferative tumours of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, H.; Bornfeld, N.; Vij, O.; Coupland, S.; Bechrakis, N.; Kellner, U.; Foerster, M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Vasoproliferative tumours of the retina (VPTR) are benign tumours of unknown origin, occurring mostly in otherwise healthy patients. VPTR may be associated with other chorioretinal diseases, such as uveitis. The tumours, which histologically represent reactive gliovascular proliferations, are characterised by a pink to yellow appearance on funduscopy and are accompanied by exudative and haemorrhagic changes of the retina.
METHODS—22 cases of VPTR in 21 patients were examined with a follow up period between 1 month and 6 years. Ophthalmological changes associated with VPTR were intraretinal and subretinal exudations (n=18), exudative detachments of the surrounding sensory retina (n=13), intraretinal and subretinal haemorrhages (n=10), exudative changes within the macula (n=10), hyperpigmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium at the border of the exudative retinal changes (n=9), and vitreous haemorrhages (n=4). Tumour biopsy was performed in two cases. Treatment consisted of plaque radiotherapy (n=14), plaque radiotherapy and cryotherapy (two), cryotherapy only (two), observation (three), and enucleation in one case of a blind and painful eye.
RESULTS—Regression of the tumour and the associated exudative changes could be observed in all treated cases. Visual acuity at last follow up improved two lines or more in two cases, remained within two lines of the initial visual acuity in 15 cases, and worsened in the remaining five. Histopathological examination of the biopsy specimens and the tumour of the enucleated eye showed massive capillary proliferation with perivascular spindle-shaped glial cells of retinal origin.
CONCLUSION—The correct diagnosis of VPTR is of importance as these lesions may lead to visual loss. Further, VPTR must be differentiated from angiomas associated with von Hippel-Lindau disease as well as from ocular and systemic malignancies. Regression of tumour thickness and associated retinal changes can be achieved with

  17. Significant survival improvement of patients with recurrent breast cancer in the periods 2001-2008 vs. 1992-2000

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether individualized treatments based on biological factors have improved the prognosis of recurrent breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the survival improvement of patients with recurrent breast cancer after the introduction of third generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs) and trastuzumab. Methods A total of 407 patients who received first diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer and treatment at National Kyushu Cancer Center between 1992 and 2008 were retrospectively evaluated. As AIs and trastuzumab were approved for clinical use in Japan in 2001, the patients were divided into two time cohorts depending on whether the cancer recurred before or after 2001. Cohort A: 170 patients who were diagnosed between 1992 and 2000. Cohort B: 237 patients who were diagnosed between 2001 and 2008. Tumor characteristics, treatments, and outcome were compared. Results Fourteen percent of cohort A and 76% of cohort B received AIs and/or trastuzumab (P < 0.001). The median overall survival (OS) times after breast cancer recurrence were 1.7 years and 4.2 years for these respective cohorts (P < 0.001). Both the time period and treatment of AIs and/or trastuzumab for recurrent disease were significant prognostic factors in multivariate analysis (cohort B vs. cohort A: HR = 0.70, P = 0.01; AIs and/or trastuzumab for recurrent disease: yes vs. no: HR = 0.46, P < 0.001). When patients were categorized into 4 subgroups by the expression of hormone receptor (HR) and HER-2 status, the median OS times of the HR-positive/HER-2-negative, HR-positive/HER-2-positive, HR-negative/HER-2-positive, and HR-negative/HER-2-negative subtypes were 2.2, 2.4, 1.6, and 1.0 years in cohort A and 4.5, 5.1, 5.0, and 1.4 years in cohort B. Conclusions The prognosis of patients with recurrent breast cancer was improved over time following the introduction of AIs and trastuzumab and the survival improvement was apparent in HR- and/or HER-2-positive tumors. PMID:21453503

  18. Induced p53 loss in mouse luminal cells causes clonal expansion and development of mammary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Luwei; Xiang, Dongxi; Xie, Ying; Bronson, Roderick T.; Li, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Most breast cancers may have a luminal origin. TP53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in breast cancers. However, how p53 deficiency contributes to breast tumorigenesis from luminal cells remains elusive. Here we report that induced p53 loss in Krt8+ mammary luminal cells leads to their clonal expansion without directly affecting their luminal identity. All induced mice develop mammary tumours with 9qA1 (Yap1) and/or 6qA2 (Met) amplification(s). These tumours exhibit a mammary stem cell (MaSC)-like expression signature and most closely resemble claudin-low breast cancer. Thus, although p53 does not directly control the luminal fate, its loss facilitates acquisition of MaSC-like properties by luminal cells and predisposes them to development of mammary tumours with loss of luminal identity. Our data also suggest that claudin-low breast cancer can develop from luminal cells, possibly via a basal-like intermediate state, although further study using a different luminal promoter is needed to fully support this conclusion. PMID:28194015

  19. 19p13.1 is a triple negative-specific breast cancer susceptibility locus

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Kristen N.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Vachon, Celine M.; Wang, Xianshu; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Nevanlinna, Heli; Greco, Dario; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Vrieling, Alina; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Nickels, Stefan; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Meindl, Alfons; Bartram, Claus R.; Schott, Sarah; Engel, Christof; Godwin, Andrew K.; Weaver, JoEllen; Pathak, Harsh B.; Sharma, Priyanka; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Miron, Penelope; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Stavropoulou, Alexandra; Fountzilas, George; Gogas, Helen J.; Swann, Ruth; Dwek, Miriam; Perkins, Annie; Milne, Roger L.; Benítez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Pérez, José Ignacio Arias; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmé, Frederick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Peto, Julian; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartmann, Arndt; Ekici, Arif B.; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Muir, Kenneth; Puttawibul, Puttisak; Wiangnon, Surapon; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Braaf, Linde M; Rosenberg, Efraim H; Hopper, John L.; Apicella, Carmel; Park, Daniel J.; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Dur, Christina Clarke; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Hamann, Ute; Dünnebier, Thomas; Rüdiger, Thomas; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Pharoah, Paul P.; Dunning, Alison M; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcom W.; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Hwang, Helena; Eccles, Diana M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Sherman, Mark E.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona A; Severi, Gianluca; Kosel, Matthew L.; Pankratz, V.S.; Slager, Susan; Olson, Janet E.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Lambrechts, Diether; Hatse, Sigrid; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Soini, Ylermi; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2012-01-01

    The 19p13.1 breast cancer susceptibility locus is a modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is also associated with risk of ovarian cancer. Here we investigated 19p13.1 variation and risk of breast cancer subtypes, defined by estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) status, using 48,869 breast cancer cases and 49,787 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Variants from 19p13.1 were not associated with breast cancer overall or with ER-positive breast cancer but were significantly associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk [rs8170 Odds Ratio (OR)=1.10, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.05 – 1.15, p=3.49 × 10-5] and triple negative (TN) (ER, PR and HER2 negative) breast cancer [rs8170 OR=1.22, 95% CI 1.13 – 1.31, p=2.22 × 10-7]. However, rs8170 was no longer associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk when TN cases were excluded [OR=0.98, 95% CI 0.89 – 1.07, p=0.62]. In addition, a combined analysis of TN cases from BCAC and the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC) (n=3,566) identified a genome-wide significant association between rs8170 and TN breast cancer risk [OR=1.25, 95% CI 1.18 – 1.33, p=3.31 × 10-13]. Thus, 19p13.1 is the first triple negative-specific breast cancer risk locus and the first locus specific to a histological subtype defined by ER, PR, and HER2 to be identified. These findings provide convincing evidence that genetic susceptibility to breast cancer varies by tumor subtype and that triple negative tumors and other subtypes likely arise through distinct etiologic pathways. PMID:22331459

  20. Implementation of TMA and digitalization in routine diagnostics of breast pathology.

    PubMed

    Rossing, Henrik Holm; Talman, Maj-Lis Møller; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Wielenga, Vera Timmermans

    2012-04-01

    To ensure optimal treatment of breast cancer patients, breast tumours are classified based on clinico-pathological features. As part of this process, routine diagnostics of breast tumours includes histological typing and grading, as well as profiling by use of an immunohistochemistry panel of antibodies, probes and in situ hybridization. This will, as a minimum, include assessment of oestrogen receptor (OR) and HER2. The individual preparation and staining of many breast tumours in a large laboratory with this standard panel is thus time consuming and costly. Herein, we show that in breast cancer routine diagnostics the use of the tissue microarray technique in combination with digitalization of the stained multi-slides is not only economical, with a considerable cost reduction, but it also enhances standardization of tumour profiling. We demonstrate that 2 mm breast tumour cores correlate with the corresponding tumour on whole mount slides, regarding staining/hybridizing results with the biomarkers in our panel consisting of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, OR and Topiomerase IIa. Furthermore, we show that simultaneous staining/hybridizing of multiple breast tumour specimens reduces variation of staining/hybridizing quality, hereby increasing reliability of interpretation. By scanning and digitalization of the stained and hybridized multi-slides, we could optimize documentation and filing of the results. Our work is an example of translational research by implementing a tool in daily diagnostics originally developed for high throughput analyses in the search for prognostic and predictive markers in targeted medicine.

  1. Surface impedance based microwave imaging method for breast cancer screening: contrast-enhanced scenario.

    PubMed

    Güren, Onan; Çayören, Mehmet; Ergene, Lale Tükenmez; Akduman, Ibrahim

    2014-10-07

    A new microwave imaging method that uses microwave contrast agents is presented for the detection and localization of breast tumours. The method is based on the reconstruction of breast surface impedance through a measured scattered field. The surface impedance modelling allows for representing the electrical properties of the breasts in terms of impedance boundary conditions, which enable us to map the inner structure of the breasts into surface impedance functions. Later a simple quantitative method is proposed to screen breasts against malignant tumours where the detection procedure is based on weighted cross correlations among impedance functions. Numerical results demonstrate that the method is capable of detecting small malignancies and provides reasonable localization.

  2. Low Dose, Low Cost Estradiol Pellets Can Support MCF-7 Tumour Growth in Nude Mice without Bladder Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Dall, Genevieve; Vieusseux, Jessica; Unsworth, Ashleigh; Anderson, Robin; Britt, Kara

    2015-01-01

    MCF-7 cells are a slow growing estrogen receptor (ER) positive human breast cancer cell line that is commonly used to model estrogen responsive breast cancer cell growth in-vitro and tumour growth in-vivo. These tumours require estrogen supplementation, and in-vivo doses of between 0.72mg and 2mg estradiol pellets are commonly implanted in the dorsal flank of ovariectomised, immunocompromised mice. We wanted to grow MCF-7 tumours in immunocompromised mice without the need to be ovariectomised. When we treated immunocompromised mice with 0.72mg pellets to induce MCF7 tumour growth, the mice developed urosepsis. We have now shown that lower doses of estradiol pellets, 0.3mg and 0.5mg, induce elevated serum estrogen levels and maintain tumour growth, without causing urosepsis. Supplementation for only one week did not support sustained MCF7 tumour growth. In conclusion, 0.3mg and 0.5mg silastic pellets can be used to stimulate ER+ breast cancer growth in ovary-intact, immune compromised mice.

  3. Tumour banking: the Spanish design.

    PubMed

    Morente, M M; de Alava, E; Fernandez, P L

    2007-01-01

    In the last decade the technical advances in high throughput techniques to analyze DNA, RNA and proteins have had a potential major impact on prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of many human diseases. Key pieces in this process, mainly thinking about the future, are tumour banks and tumour bank networks. To face these challenges, diverse suitable models and designs can be developed. The current article presents the development of a nationwide design of tumour banks in Spain based on a network of networks, specially focusing on its harmonization efforts mainly regarding technical procedures, ethical requirements, unified quality control policy and unique sample identification. We also describe our most important goals for the next years. This model does not correspond to a central tumour bank, but to a cooperative and coordinated network of national and regional networks. Independently from the network in which it is included, sample collections reside in their original institution, where it can be used for further clinical diagnosis, teaching and research activities of each independent hospital. The herein described 'network of networks' functional model could be useful for other countries and/or international tumour bank activities.

  4. Tumour-associated eosinophilia in the bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, D; Fletcher, C D; Gower, R L

    1984-01-01

    Tumour eosinophilia is an uncommon but striking phenomenon which has been found in many tumours, mostly of large cell type or squamous differentiation. The incidence, appearance and importance of tumour eosinophilia in the bladder are described. Eosinophilia is commoner in deeply invasive tumours and in tumours showing squamous metaplasia. Transitional cell carcinomas with eosinophilia have a better prognosis than those without, but this improvement is not seen in squamous cell carcinomas of the bladder. When eosinophilia is found on superficial biopsies of a bladder tumour, the possibility of muscle invasion should be considered. PMID:6725595

  5. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    PubMed

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  6. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, T H; Amin, M R; Bashar, M A; Ahmed, Z; Matin, A; Hasan, G Z; Islam, M D; Hossain, M Z

    2011-04-01

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour in infancy is rare, mainly benign with little tendency to recur after excision or effective curettage. This pigmented neoplasm of neural crest origin occurring in infants before 1 year of age. The most common site of occurrence is the anterior maxillary alveolar ridge (70%), following by the skull, brain and mandible. The genital organ is the most frequent extra cranial site. We report a 6 months old male baby with a similar tumour arising from right half of cheek involving the maxilla. We diagnosed the case after histological report. We remove the tumour through a sub-labial incision. The mass was blackish in colour, and was mobilized from all side including from the maxillary sinuses. The author thought that this should be reported for improving the clinical awareness and treatment of pigmented soft tissue mass in children. Almost one year follow up of the patients showed no recurrence.

  7. PHD2 in tumour angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, D A; Giaccia, A J

    2010-01-01

    Originally identified as the enzymes responsible for catalysing the oxidation of specific, conserved proline residues within hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), the additional roles for the prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) proteins have remained elusive. Of the four identified PHD enzymes, PHD2 is considered to be the key oxygen sensor, as knockdown of PHD2 results in elevated HIF protein. Several recent studies have highlighted the importance of PHD2 in tumourigenesis. However, there is conflicting evidence as to the exact role of PHD2 in tumour angiogenesis. The divergence seems to be because of the contribution of stromal-derived PHD2, and in particular the involvement of endothelial cells, vs tumour-derived PHD2. This review summarises our current understanding of PHD2 and tumour angiogenesis, focusing on the influences of PHD2 on vascular normalisation and neovascularisation. PMID:20461086

  8. Identification of breast cancer cell subtypes sensitive to ATG4B inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bortnik, Svetlana; Choutka, Courtney; Horlings, Hugo M.; Leung, Samuel; Baker, Jennifer H.; Lebovitz, Chandra; Dragowska, Wieslawa H.; Go, Nancy E.; Bally, Marcel B.; Minchinton, Andrew I.; Gelmon, Karen A.; Gorski, Sharon M.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy, a lysosome-mediated degradation and recycling process, functions in advanced malignancies to promote cancer cell survival and contribute to cancer progression and drug resistance. While various autophagy inhibition strategies are under investigation for cancer treatment, corresponding patient selection criteria for these autophagy inhibitors need to be developed. Due to its central roles in the autophagy process, the cysteine protease ATG4B is one of the autophagy proteins being pursued as a potential therapeutic target. In this study, we investigated the expression of ATG4B in breast cancer, a heterogeneous disease comprised of several molecular subtypes. We examined a panel of breast cancer cell lines, xenograft tumors, and breast cancer patient specimens for the protein expression of ATG4B, and found a positive association between HER2 and ATG4B protein expression. We showed that HER2-positive cells, but not HER2-negative breast cancer cells, require ATG4B to survive under stress. In HER2-positive cells, cytoprotective autophagy was dependent on ATG4B under both starvation and HER2 inhibition conditions. Combined knockdown of ATG4B and HER2 by siRNA resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability, and the combination of ATG4B knockdown with trastuzumab resulted in a greater reduction in cell viability compared to trastuzumab treatment alone, in both trastuzumab-sensitive and -resistant HER2 overexpressing breast cancer cells. Together these results demonstrate a novel association of ATG4B positive expression with HER2 positive breast cancers and indicate that this subtype is suitable for emerging ATG4B inhibition strategies. PMID:27556700

  9. ESPL1 is a candidate oncogene of luminal B breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Pascal; Guille, Arnaud; Adelaide, José; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max; Bertucci, François

    2014-08-01

    ESPL1/separase is a putative oncogene of luminal B breast cancers. Histoclinical correlations of its expression have never been explored in large series of breast tumors, and specifically in the luminal subtype. In a pooled series of invasive breast carcinomas profiled using DNA microarrays, we identified 3,074 luminal cases, including 1,307 luminal B tumors, in which we searched for correlations between ESPL1 mRNA expression and molecular and histoclinical features. Compared to normal breast samples, ESPL1 was overexpressed in 52 % of luminal tumors, and much more frequently in luminal B (83 %) than luminal A tumors (29 %). In luminal breast cancers, higher ESPL1 expression was associated with poor-prognosis criteria (age ≤ 50 years, ductal type, advanced stage, large tumor size, lymph node-positive status, high grade, PR-negative status, luminal B subtype) and with poor metastasis-free survival in both uni- and multivariate analyses. This independent prognostic value was also observed in luminal B tumors only, and persisted when compared with gene expression signatures (PAM50, Recurrence Score, Mammaprint, EndoPredict) currently proposed to refine the indications of adjuvant chemotherapy in hormone receptor-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer. We also confirmed the observations made with experimental mouse models: ESPL1-overexpressing luminal tumors showed complex genomic profiles and molecular features of chromosomal instability and loss of tumor suppressor genes (P53 and Rb). Our results reinforce the idea that ESPL1 is a candidate oncogene in luminal B cancers. Its expression may help improve the prognostication. Inhibiting ESPL1 may represent a promising therapeutic approach for these poor-prognosis tumors.

  10. Tumour endothelial cells in high metastatic tumours promote metastasis via epigenetic dysregulation of biglycan

    PubMed Central

    Maishi, Nako; Ohba, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Alam, Mohammad Towfik; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Inoue, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels are gateways for distant metastasis. Recent studies have revealed that tumour endothelial cells (TECs) demonstrate distinct phenotypes from their normal counterparts. We have demonstrated that features of TECs are different depending on tumour malignancy, suggesting that TECs communicate with surrounding tumour cells. However, the contribution of TECs to metastasis has not been elucidated. Here, we show that TECs actively promote tumour metastasis through a bidirectional interaction between tumour cells and TECs. Co-implantation of TECs isolated from highly metastatic tumours accelerated lung metastases of low metastatic tumours. Biglycan, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan secreted from TECs, activated tumour cell migration via nuclear factor-κB and extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2. Biglycan expression was upregulated by DNA demethylation in TECs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that TECs are altered in their microenvironment and, in turn, instigate tumour cells to metastasize, which is a novel mechanism for tumour metastasis. PMID:27295191

  11. mTOR function and therapeutic targeting in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Stephen H; Harvey, Amanda J

    2017-01-01

    The mTOR pathway was discovered in the late 1970s after the compound and natural inhibitor of mTOR, rapamycin was isolated from the bacterium Streptomyces hygroscopicus. mTOR is serine/threonine kinase belonging to the phosphoinositide 3-kinase related kinase (PIKK) family. It forms two distinct complexes; mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1 has a key role in regulating protein synthesis and autophagy whilst mTORC2 is involved in regulating kinases of the AGC family. mTOR signaling is often over active in multiple cancer types including breast cancer. This can involve mutations in mTOR itself but more commonly, in breast cancer, this is related to an increase in activity of ErbB family receptors or alterations and mutations of PI3K signaling. Rapamycin and its analogues (rapalogues) bind to the intercellular receptor FKBP12, and then predominantly inhibit mTORC1 signaling via an allosteric mechanism. Research has shown that inhibition of mTOR is a useful strategy in tackling cancers, with it acting to slow tumor growth and limit the spread of a cancer. Rapalogues have now made their way into the clinic with the rapalogue everolimus (RAD-001/Afinitor) approved for use in conjunction with exemestane, in post-menopausal breast cancer patients with advanced disease who are HER-2 negative (normal expression), hormone receptor positive and whose prior treatment with non-steroidal aromatase inhibitors has failed. Testing across multiple trials has proven that everolimus and other rapalogues are a viable way of treating certain types of cancer. However, rapalogues have shown some drawbacks both in research and clinically, with their use often activating feedback pathways that counter their usefulness. As such, new types of inhibitors are being explored that work via different mechanisms, including inhibitors that are ATP competitive with mTOR and which act to perturb signaling from both mTOR complexes.

  12. Characterization of HOX gene expression in canine mammary tumour cell lines from spontaneous tumours.

    PubMed

    DeInnocentes, P; Perry, A L; Graff, E C; Lutful Kabir, F M; Curtis Bird, R

    2015-09-01

    Spatial/temporal controls of development are regulated by the homeotic (HOX) gene complex and require integration with oncogenes and tumour suppressors regulating cell cycle exit. Spontaneously derived neoplastic canine mammary carcinoma cell models were investigated to determine if HOX expression profiles were associated with neoplasia as HOX genes promote neoplastic potential in human cancers. Comparative assessment of human and canine breast cancer expression profiles revealed remarkable similarity for all four paralogous HOX gene clusters and several unlinked HOX genes. Five canine HOX genes were overexpressed with expression profiles consistent with oncogene-like character (HOXA1, HOXA13, HOXD4, HOXD9 and SIX1) and three HOX genes with underexpressed profiles (HOXA11, HOXC8 and HOXC9) were also identified as was an apparent nonsense mutation in HOXC6. This data, as well as a comparative analysis of similar data from human breast cancers suggested expression of selected HOX genes in canine mammary carcinoma could be contributing to the neoplastic phenotype.

  13. Isolation of canine mammary cells with stem cell properties and tumour-initiating potential.

    PubMed

    Cocola, C; Anastasi, P; Astigiano, S; Piscitelli, E; Pelucchi, P; Vilardo, L; Bertoli, G; Beccaglia, M; Veronesi, M C; Sanzone, S; Barbieri, O; Reinbold, R A; Luvoni, G C; Zucchi, I

    2009-07-01

    Recent data suggest that mammary carcinogenesis may be driven by cancer stem cells (CSCs) derived from mutated adult stem cells, which have acquired aberrant cell self-renewal or by progenitor cells that have acquired the capacity for cell self-renewal. Spontaneous mammary cancers in cats and dogs are important models for the understanding of human breast cancer and may represent alternative species model systems that can significantly contribute to the study of human oncogenesis. With the goal of identifying markers for isolating human breast CSCs, we have generated a canine model system to isolate and characterize normal and CSCs from dog mammary gland. Insight into the hierarchical organization of canine tumours may contribute to the development of universal concepts in oncogenesis by CSCs. Cells with stem cell properties were isolated from normal and tumoural canine breast tissue and propagated as mammospheres and tumourspheres in long-term non-adherent culture conditions. We showed that cells obtained from spheres that display self-renewing properties, have multi-lineage differentiation potential, could generate complex branched tubular structures in vitro and form tumours in NOD/SCID mice. We analysed these cells for the expression of human stem and CSC markers and are currently investigating the tumour-initiating properties of these cells and the hierarchical organization of normal and neoplastic canine mammary tissue.

  14. Remodelling of extracellular matrix due to solid stress accumulation during tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Pirentis, Athanassios P.; Polydorou, Christiana; Papageorgis, Panagiotis; Voutouri, Chrysovalantis; Mpekris, Fotios; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2015-01-01

    Solid stresses emerge as the expanding tumour displaces and deforms the surrounding normal tissue, and also as a result of intratumoural component interplay. Among other things, solid stresses are known to induce extensive extracellular matrix synthesis and reorganization. In the present study, we developed a mathematical model of tumour growth that distinguishes the contribution to stress generation by collagenous and non-collagenous tumour structural components, and also investigates collagen fibre remodelling exclusively due to solid stress. To this end, we initially conducted in vivo experiments using an orthotopic mouse model for breast cancer to monitor primary tumour growth and derive the mechanical properties of the tumour. Subsequently, we fitted the mathematical model to experimental data to determine values of the model parameters. According to the model, intratumoural solid stress is compressive, whereas extratumoural stress in the tumour vicinity is compressive in the radial direction and tensile in the periphery. Furthermore, collagen fibres engaged in stress generation only in the peritumoural region, and not in the interior where they were slackened due to the compressive stress state. Peritumoural fibres were driven away from the radial direction, tended to realign tangent to the tumour-host interface, and were also significantly stretched by tensile circumferential stresses. By means of this remodelling, the model predicts that the tumour is enveloped by a progressively thickening capsule of collagen fibres. This prediction is consistent with long-standing observations of tumour encapsulation and histologic sections that we performed, and it further corroborates the expansive growth hypothesis for the capsule formation. PMID:26194953

  15. Significance and therapeutic implications of endothelial progenitor cells in angiogenic-mediated tumour metastasis.

    PubMed

    Flamini, Valentina; Jiang, Wen G; Lane, Jane; Cui, Yu-Xin

    2016-04-01

    Cancer conveys profound social and economic consequences throughout the world. Metastasis is responsible for approximately 90% of cancer-associated mortality and, when it occurs, cancer becomes almost incurable. During metastatic dissemination, cancer cells pass through a series of complex steps including the establishment of tumour-associated angiogenesis. The human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPCs) are a cell population derived from the bone marrow which are required for endothelial tubulogenesis and neovascularization. They also express abundant inflammatory cytokines and paracrine angiogenic factors. Clinically hEPCs are highly correlated with relapse, disease progression, metastasis and treatment response in malignancies such as breast cancer, ovarian cancer and non-small-cell lung carcinoma. It has become evident that the hEPCs are involved in the angiogenesis-required progression and metastasis of tumours. However, it is not clear in what way the signalling pathways, controlling the normal cellular function of human BM-derived EPCs, are hijacked by aggressive tumour cells to facilitate tumour metastasis. In addition, the actual roles of hEPCs in tumour angiogenesis-mediated metastasis are not well characterised. In this paper we reviewed the clinical relevance of the hEPCs with cancer diagnosis, progression and prognosis. We further summarised the effects of tumour microenvironment on the hEPCs and underlying mechanisms. We also hypothesized the roles of altered hEPCs in tumour angiogenesis and metastasis. We hope this review may enhance our understanding of the interaction between hEPCs and tumour cells thus aiding the development of cellular-targeted anti-tumour therapies.

  16. Multiple primary breast and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ron, E.; Curtis, R.; Hoffman, D. A.; Flannery, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    The occurrence of breast and thyroid multiple primary cancers was evaluated using data from the Connecticut Tumor Registry. The study population consisted of 1618 women with primary thyroid cancer and 39,194 women with primary breast cancer diagnosed between 1935 and 1978. Thirty-four thyroid cancer patients subsequently developed breast cancer and 24 breast cancer patients later had thyroid cancer. A significantly elevated risk of thyroid cancer following breast cancer (SIR = 1.68) and breast cancer following thyroid cancer (SIR = 1.89) was demonstrated. The finding was even more notable when compared with the risks obtained for other sites. The elevated risk was particularly evident in women under 40 years of age at time of diagnosis of the first cancer. Analysis by histologic type revealed that the highest risk of second primary breast cancer was found among patients with follicular or mixed papillary-follicular thyroid cancer. Women under age 40 with follicular carcinoma had a 10-fold risk of developing breast cancer (4 observed, 0.4 expected). An enhanced risk of second primary tumours was evident for the entire period after treatment of the first primary, although it was highest within one year after diagnosis of the first primary. This may be due to the close medical surveillance of cancer patients which would increase early diagnosis of second tumours. Our findings suggest that breast and thyroid cancer may share common aetiologic features. PMID:6691901

  17. Apoptosis-, proliferation, immune function-, and drug resistance- related genes in ER positive, HER2 positive and triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kolacinska, A; Chalubinska, J; Zawlik, I; Szymanska, B; Borowska-Garganisz, E; Nowik, M; Fendler, W; Kubiak, R; Pawlowska, Z; Morawiec, Z; Szemraj, J

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to examine an association between gene expression assessed using a 23-gene microarray and receptor status of breast cancer samples categorized as ER positive, HER2 positive and triple negative subtypes. The ER positive cohort was subsequently divided into Luminal A, Luminal B HER2 negative and Luminal B HER2 positive subtypes. Core- needle biopsies were collected from 78 female patients with inoperable locally advanced breast cancer or resectable tumors suitable for downstaging, before any treatment. Expressions of 23 genes were determined by means of TagMan Low Density Arrays. Analysis of variance was used to select genes with discriminatory potential between receptor subtypes. We introduced a correction for false discovery rates (presented as q values) due to testing multiple hypothesis. Pairwise post-hoc comparisons of receptor subtypes were performed using Tukey 's HSD test. Five genes out of a 23-gene microarray differed significantly in relation to breast cancer receptor-based subtypes. Among these five genes, we identified: BCL2 (p=0.0002, q=0.0009), MKI67 (p=0.0037, q=0.0064), IGF1R (p=0.0040, q=0.0064), FOXC1 (p=0.0113, q=0.0135) and IRF1 (p=0.0435, q=0.0416) as ones showing ER positive, HER2 positive and triple negative -subtype specific expression profiles. When incorporating Luminal A, Luminal B HER2 negative, Luminal B HER2 positive subtypes into analysis, four genes: BCL2 (p=0.0006, q=0.0034), MKI67 (p=0.0078, q=0.0198), FOXC1 (p=0.0102, q=0.0198) and IGF1R (p=0.0174, q=0.0254) were selected. Elevated levels of IGF1R and BCL2 were significantly linked with Luminal A subtype. Triple negative breast cancer subtype was associated with higher expression of IRF1, FOXC1 and MKI67. In HER2 positive cohort lower expression of all five analyzed genes was noted.

  18. Role of nuclear receptors in breast cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Papi, Alessio; Orlandi, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The recapitulation of primary tumour heterogenity and the existence of a minor sub-population of cancer cells, capable of initiating tumour growth in xenografts on serial passages, led to the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist. CSCs are present in many tumours, among which is breast cancer. Breast CSCs (BCSCs) are likely to sustain the growth of the primary tumour mass, as well as to be responsible for disease relapse and metastatic spreading. Consequently, BCSCs represent the most significant target for new drugs in breast cancer therapy. Both the hypoxic condition in BCSCs biology and pro-inflammatory cytokine network has gained increasing importance in the recent past. Breast stromal cells are crucial components of the tumours milieu and are a major source of inflammatory mediators. Recently, the anti-inflammatory role of some nuclear receptors ligands has emerged in several diseases, including breast cancer. Therefore, the use of nuclear receptors ligands may be a valid strategy to inhibit BCSCs viability and consequently breast cancer growth and disease relapse. PMID:27022437

  19. Primary brain tumours in adults.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Damien; Idbaih, Ahmed; Ducray, François; Lahutte, Marion; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Delattre, Jean-Yves

    2012-05-26

    Important advances have been made in the understanding and management of adult gliomas and primary CNS lymphomas--the two most common primary brain tumours. Progress in imaging has led to a better analysis of the nature and grade of these tumours. Findings from large phase 3 studies have yielded some standard treatments for gliomas, and have confirmed the prognostic value of specific molecular alterations. High-throughput methods that enable genome-wide analysis of tumours have improved the knowledge of tumour biology, which should lead to a better classification of gliomas and pave the way for so-called targeted therapy trials. Primary CNS lymphomas are a group of rare non-Hodgkin lymphomas. High-dose methotrexate-based regimens increase survival, but the standards of care and the place of whole-brain radiotherapy remain unclear, and are likely to depend on the age of the patient. The focus now is on the development of new polychemotherapy regimens to reduce or defer whole-brain radiotherapy and its delayed complications.

  20. Breast infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... female breast anatomy Breast infection Female breast References Hunt KK, Mittendorf EA. Diseases of the breast. In: ... Jacobson, MD, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda Center for ...

  1. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of a direct link between breast cancer and pesticides. Symptoms Early breast cancer often does not cause ... breast cancer should not drink alcohol at all) Alternative Names Cancer - breast; Carcinoma - ductal; Carcinoma - lobular; DCIS; ...

  2. [Economic assessment of the routine use of Oncotype DX® assay for early breast cancer in Franche-Comte region].

    PubMed

    Nerich, Virginie; Curtit, Elsa; Bazan, Fernando; Montcuquet, Philippe; Villanueva, Cristian; Chaigneau, Loïc; Cals, Laurent; Méneveau, Nathalie; Dobi, Erion; Altmotlak, Hamadi; Algros, Marie-Paule; Choulot, Marie-Jeanne; Nallet, Gilles; Limat, Samuel; Mansion, Sylvie; Pivot, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Oncotype DX® has been validated as quantifying the likelihood of distant recurrence at 10 years and overall chemotherapy benefit in patients with estrogen-receptor-positive and HER-2-negative early breast cancer. In 2012, this genomic signature was routinely available for patients in Franche-Comté, France. Patients eligible for Oncotype DX(®) testing had a ER-positive, HER-2-négative early breast cancer with a nodal involvement limited to 0 or 1 positive-node without extracapsular spread; an adjuvant chemotherapy was indicated based on usual prognostic factors. The aim was to assess the economic impact of Oncotype DX(®) testing in a French region. A cost-minimisation analysis from the French Public Healthcare System perspective was performed. The availability of Oncotype DX(®) in Franche-Comté, France, and its use in clinical routine allowed a decrease of 73 % of adjuvant chemotherapy without increase of the cost of the patients' management and with a potential reduction of the cost for the French Public Healthcare System. This strategy was successful and may allow the reimbursement of this test in France for patients with early breast cancer.

  3. Ultrasensitive and selective electrochemical diagnosis of breast cancer based on a hydrazine-Au nanoparticle-aptamer bioconjugate.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ye; Chandra, Pranjal; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2013-01-15

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells were detected using an electrochemical immunosensor combined with hydrazine and aptamer-conjugated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The sensor probe was fabricated by covalently immobilizing anti-HER2 onto a nanocomposite layer that was composed of self-assembled 2,5-bis(2-thienyl)-1H-pyrrole-1-(p-benzoic acid) (DPB) on AuNPs. The hydrazine-AuNP-aptamer bioconjugate, where the hydrazine reductant was directly attached onto AuNPs to avoid the nonspecific deposition of silver on the sensor surface, was designed and used to reduce silver ion for signal amplification selectively. The silver-stained target cells were visualized easily by the bare eye and an optical microscope, and the cells were quantitatively analyzed using stripping voltammetry. The parameters affecting the analytical response were optimized. The proposed sensor was capable of differentiating between HER2-positive breast cancer cells and HER2-negative cells. This method exhibited an excellent diagnosis method for the ultrasensitive detection of SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells in human serum samples with a detection limit of 26 cells/mL.

  4. A dual mode targeting probe for distinguishing HER2-positive breast cancer cells using silica-coated fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; An, Yan-Li; Zang, Feng-Chao; Zong, Shen-Fei; Cui, Yi-Ping; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2013-10-01

    We report a composite nanoprobe based on silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) for distinguishing breast cancers at different HER2 statuses. The nanoprobe has a core-shell structure, with Fe3O4 NPs as the magnetic core and dye-embedded silica as the fluorescent shell, whose average size is about 150 nm. Besides, the outmost surfaces of the probes were modified with specific antibodies to endow the probe with a targeting ability. With such a structure, the nanoprobe can accomplish dual mode targeting of human breast cancer cells based on fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the experiments, three human breast cancer cell lines were used to test the targeting ability of the nanoprobe. Specifically, SKBR3 cells with a high HER2 expression level were used as the model target cells, while MCF7 cells with a lower HER2 expression levels and HER2-negative MDA-MB-231 cells were used as the controls. Both the fluorescence and MRI imaging results confirmed that the nanoprobe can distinguish three cancer cell lines with different HER2 expression levels. With the dual mode imaging and specific targeting properties, we anticipate that the presented nanoprobe may have a great potential in the diagnosis and treatment of cancerous diseases.

  5. Tumour angiogenesis regulation by the miR-200 family

    PubMed Central

    Pecot, Chad V.; Ivan, Cristina; Lu, Chunhua; Wu, Sherry; Han, Hee-Dong; Shah, Maitri Y.; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Liu, Yuexin; Kim, Sang Bae; Unruh, Anna; Gonzalez-Villasana, Vianey; Huang, Li; Zand, Behrouz; Moreno-Smith, Myrthala; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Taylor, Morgan; Dalton, Heather J.; Sehgal, Vasudha; Wen, Yunfei; Kang, Yu; Baggerly, Keith A.; Lee, Ju-Seog; Ram, Prahlad T.; Ravoori, Murali K.; Kundra, Vikas; Zhang, Xinna; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana-Maria; Massion, Pierre P.; Calin, George A.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Zhang, Wei; Sood, Anil K.

    2013-01-01

    The miR-200 family is well known to inhibit the epithelial–mesenchymal transition, suggesting it may therapeutically inhibit metastatic biology. However, conflicting reports regarding the role of miR-200 in suppressing or promoting metastasis in different cancer types have left unanswered questions. Here we demonstrate a difference in clinical outcome based on miR-200's role in blocking tumour angiogenesis. We demonstrate that miR-200 inhibits angiogenesis through direct and indirect mechanisms by targeting interleukin-8 and CXCL1 secreted by the tumour endothelial and cancer cells. Using several experimental models, we demonstrate the therapeutic potential of miR-200 delivery in ovarian, lung, renal and basal-like breast cancers by inhibiting angiogenesis. Delivery of miR-200 members into the tumour endothelium resulted in marked reductions in metastasis and angiogenesis, and induced vascular normalization. The role of miR-200 in blocking cancer angiogenesis in a cancer-dependent context defines its utility as a potential therapeutic agent. PMID:24018975

  6. [Liver Atrophy and Failure Associated with Paclitaxel and Bevacizumab Combination Therapy for Metastatic Breast Cancer].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Mari; Ikeda, Masahiko; Kubo, Shinichiro; Tsukioki, Takahiro; Nakamoto, Shougo

    2016-07-01

    We managed 6 cases of severe liver atrophy and failure associated with paclitaxel and bevacizumab combination therapy (PB therapy)for HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. In this case-controlstudy, we examined the records of these 6 patients to investigate past treatment, medication history, and degree of atrophy, and compared their data with that of 67 patients without liver atrophy. The degree of the liver atrophy used SYNAPSE VINCENT®of the image analysis software. The results showed that patients with liver atrophy had a longer pretreatment period than those without liver atrophy(33.5 months vs 15.5 months), and they also experienced a longer median time to treatment failure with PB therapy than other patients(11 months vs 6 months). The ratio of individuals presenting with diffuse liver metastasis among patients with liver metastasis was 80% with liver atrophy, compared to 8% without liver atrophy. The degree of liver atrophy was an average of 67%in terms of volume ratio before/after PB therapy(57-82%). The individualwith the greatest extent of liver atrophy died of liver failure, not as a result of breast cancer progression. The direct causal link between bevacizumab and liver atrophy and failure is unclear, but the individuals in this study had a long previous history of treatment, and diffuse liver metastases may develop in patients undergoing long periods of PB therapy, which may also cause liver atrophy; therefore, the possibility of liver failure should be considered in such cases.

  7. An Improved Tumour Temperature Measurement and Control Method for Superficial Tumour Ultrasound Hyperthermia Therapeutic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen1, G. F.; Chen, Y. Z.; Ren, G. X.

    2006-10-01

    In tumour hyperthermia therapy, the research on measurement and control of tumour temperature is very important. Based on the hardware platform of superficial tumour ultrasound hyperthermia therapeutic system, an improved tumour temperature measurement and control method is presented in this paper. The experiment process, data and results are discussed in detail. The improved method will greatly reduce the pain and dread of the patients during the therapy period on the tumour temperature measurement and control by using the pinhead sensor.

  8. 'Primary extrarenal Wilms' tumour': rare presentation of a common paediatric tumour.

    PubMed

    Goel, Vandana; Verma, Amit Kumar; Batra, Vineeta; Puri, Sunil Kumar

    2014-06-06

    Wilms' tumour (nephroblastoma), the most common abdominal malignancy of childhood, occurs primarily as a malignant renal tumour. Extrarenal Wilms' tumour is rare with occasional reports from the Indian subcontinent. The various locations of extrarenal Wilms' tumour include retroperitoneum, uterus, skin and thorax. In this report we will discuss the imaging features highlighting the imaging differential diagnosis in a case of retroperitoneal (extrarenal) primary Wilms' tumour.

  9. Radiosensitizing effect of lapatinib in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Min; Kim, Dan Hyo; Kim, In Ah

    2016-01-01

    Trastuzumab has been widely used for the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing breast cancer, however, it cannot easily cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and is known to increase the incidence of brain metastases. In contrast, lapatinib has a low molecular weight and can cross the BBB and it could be useful to treat brain metastases in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. To explore the impact of lapatinib on radiation response, we conducted an in vitro experiment using SKBR3 and BT474 breast carcinoma cells exhibiting HER2/neu amplification. Lapatinib down-regulated phosphorylated (p)-HER2, p-epidermal growth factor receptor, p-AKT, and p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Pretreatment of lapatinib increased the radiosensitivity of SKBR3 (sensitizer enhancement ratio [SER]: 1.21 at a surviving fraction of 0.5) and BT474 (SER: 1.26 at a surviving fraction of 0.5) cells and hindered the repair of DNA damage, as suggested by the prolongation of radiation-induced γH2AX foci and the down-regulation of phosphorylated DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (p-DNAPKcs). Increases in radiation-induced apoptosis and senescence were suggested to be the major modes of cell death induced by the combination of lapatinib and radiation. Furthermore, lapatinib did not radiosensitize a HER2- negative breast cancer cell line or normal human astrocytes. These findings suggest that lapatinib can potentiate radiation-induced cell death in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells and may increase the efficacy of radiotherapy. A phase II clinical trial using lapatinib concurrently with whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is currently being conducted. PMID:27738326

  10. Reduced risk of breast cancer associated with recreational physical activity varies by HER2 status

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huiyan; Xu, Xinxin; Ursin, Giske; Simon, Michael S; Marchbanks, Polly A; Malone, Kathleen E; Lu, Yani; McDonald, Jill A; Folger, Suzanne G; Weiss, Linda K; Sullivan-Halley, Jane; Deapen, Dennis M; Press, Michael F; Bernstein, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    Convincing epidemiologic evidence indicates that physical activity is inversely associated with breast cancer risk. Whether this association varies by the tumor protein expression status of the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), or p53 is unclear. We evaluated the effects of recreational physical activity on risk of invasive breast cancer classified by the four biomarkers, fitting multivariable unconditional logistic regression models to data from 1195 case and 2012 control participants in the population-based Women’s Contraceptive and Reproductive Experiences Study. Self-reported recreational physical activity at different life periods was measured as average annual metabolic equivalents of energy expenditure [MET]-hours per week. Our biomarker-specific analyses showed that lifetime recreational physical activity was negatively associated with the risks of ER-positive (ER+) and of HER2-negative (HER2−) subtypes (both Ptrend ≤ 0.04), but not with other subtypes (all Ptrend > 0.10). Analyses using combinations of biomarkers indicated that risk of invasive breast cancer varied only by HER2 status. Risk of HER2–breast cancer decreased with increasing number of MET-hours of recreational physical activity in each specific life period examined, although some trend tests were only marginally statistically significant (all Ptrend ≤ 0.06). The test for homogeneity of trends (HER2– vs. HER2+ ) reached statistical significance only when evaluating physical activity during the first 10 years after menarche (Phomogeneity = 0.03). Our data suggest that physical activity reduces risk of invasive breast cancers that lack HER2 overexpression, increasing our understanding of the biological mechanisms by which physical activity acts. PMID:25924995

  11. Reduced risk of breast cancer associated with recreational physical activity varies by HER2 status.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huiyan; Xu, Xinxin; Ursin, Giske; Simon, Michael S; Marchbanks, Polly A; Malone, Kathleen E; Lu, Yani; McDonald, Jill A; Folger, Suzanne G; Weiss, Linda K; Sullivan-Halley, Jane; Deapen, Dennis M; Press, Michael F; Bernstein, Leslie

    2015-07-01

    Convincing epidemiologic evidence indicates that physical activity is inversely associated with breast cancer risk. Whether this association varies by the tumor protein expression status of the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), or p53 is unclear. We evaluated the effects of recreational physical activity on risk of invasive breast cancer classified by the four biomarkers, fitting multivariable unconditional logistic regression models to data from 1195 case and 2012 control participants in the population-based Women's Contraceptive and Reproductive Experiences Study. Self-reported recreational physical activity at different life periods was measured as average annual metabolic equivalents of energy expenditure [MET]-hours per week. Our biomarker-specific analyses showed that lifetime recreational physical activity was negatively associated with the risks of ER-positive (ER+) and of HER2-negative (HER2-) subtypes (both Ptrend  ≤ 0.04), but not with other subtypes (all Ptrend  > 0.10). Analyses using combinations of biomarkers indicated that risk of invasive breast cancer varied only by HER2 status. Risk of HER2-breast cancer decreased with increasing number of MET-hours of recreational physical activity in each specific life period examined, although some trend tests were only marginally statistically significant (all Ptrend  ≤ 0.06). The test for homogeneity of trends (HER2- vs. HER2+ ) reached statistical significance only when evaluating physical activity during the first 10 years after menarche (Phomogeneity  = 0.03). Our data suggest that physical activity reduces risk of invasive breast cancers that lack HER2 overexpression, increasing our understanding of the biological mechanisms by which physical activity acts.

  12. Clinicopathologic characteristics of breast cancer in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Chin, Sheray Nicole; Green, Cheryl; Strachan, Georgiana Gordon; Wharfe, Gilian

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in Jamaican women. This study assessed the clinicopathologic features of cases in a hospital-based specialist clinic in Kingston, Jamaica. A retrospective chart review was performed for the 2-year study period and relevant clinical and surgico-pathologic data were recorded and analyzed. Median age of the 121 breast cancer patients was 52 years (range 22-84, IQR 20) and there was 1 case of male breast cancer. Most patients (65%) were referred from the surgical service after definitive breast cancer surgery, 20% were referred for pre-operative systemic therapy, and 15% had a diagnosis of metastatic disease. The surgico-pathologic group comprised 78 women who were referred for adjuvant therapy. The majority had presented with a palpable breast lump (91%), with median tumour size 3.5cm (range 0.4-13, IQR 4). Most tumours were node positive (56%). Approximately one-third of patients had stage III disease (33%). Most women presented with large palpable tumours and had lymph node involvement confirmed on surgicopathological evaluation, indicative of limited early breast cancer detection. A national screening mammography programme is recommended for detection of earlier lesions. Pre-operative systemic therapy should be considered as an option for eligible patients.

  13. Third-harmonic generation imaging of breast tissue biopsies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woowon; Kabir, Mohammad M; Emmadi, Rajyasree; Toussaint, Kimani C

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate for the first time the imaging of unstained breast tissue biopsies using third-harmonic generation (THG) microscopy. As a label-free imaging technique, THG microscopy is compared to phase contrast and polarized light microscopy which are standard imaging methods for breast tissues. A simple feature detection algorithm is applied to detect tumour-associated lymphocyte rich regions in unstained breast biopsy tissue and compared with corresponding regions identified by a pathologist from bright-field images of hematoxylin and eosin stained breast tissue. Our results suggest that THG imaging holds potential as a complementary technique for analysing breast tissue biopsies.

  14. Isolation of inflammatory cells from human tumours.

    PubMed

    Polak, Marta E

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory cells are present in many tumours, and understanding their function is of increasing importance, particularly to studies of tumour immunology. The tumour-infiltrating leukocytes encompass a variety of cell types, e.g. T lymphocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells, and mast cells. Choice of the isolation method greatly depends on the tumour type and the leukocyte subset of interest, but the protocol usually includes tissue disaggregation and cell enrichment. We recommend density centrifugation for initial enrichment, followed by specific magnetic bead negative or positive panning with leukocyte and tumour cell selective antibodies.

  15. Selecting first-line bevacizumab-containing therapy for advanced breast cancer: TURANDOT risk factor analyses

    PubMed Central

    Brodowicz, T; Lang, I; Kahan, Z; Greil, R; Beslija, S; Stemmer, S M; Kaufman, B; Petruzelka, L; Eniu, A; Anghel, R; Koynov, K; Vrbanec, D; Pienkowski, T; Melichar, B; Spanik, S; Ahlers, S; Messinger, D; Inbar, M J; Zielinski, C

    2014-01-01

    Background: The randomised phase III TURANDOT trial compared first-line bevacizumab–paclitaxel (BEV–PAC) vs bevacizumab–capecitabine (BEV–CAP) in HER2-negative locally recurrent/metastatic breast cancer (LR/mBC). The interim analysis revealed no difference in overall survival (OS; primary end point) between treatment arms; however, progression-free survival (PFS) and objective response rate were significantly superior with BEV–PAC. We sought to identify patient populations that may be most appropriately treated with one or other regimen. Methods: Patients with HER2-negative LR/mBC who had received no prior chemotherapy for advanced disease were randomised to either BEV–PAC (bevacizumab 10 mg kg−1 days 1 and 15 plus paclitaxel 90 mg m−2 days 1, 8 and 15 q4w) or BEV–CAP (bevacizumab 15 mg kg−1 day 1 plus capecitabine 1000 mg m−2 bid days 1–14 q3w). The study population was categorised into three cohorts: triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), high-risk hormone receptor-positive (HR+) and low-risk HR+. High- and low-risk HR+ were defined, respectively, as having ⩾2 vs ⩽1 of the following four risk factors: disease-free interval ⩽24 months; visceral metastases; prior (neo)adjuvant anthracycline and/or taxane; and metastases in ⩾3 organs. Results: The treatment effect on OS differed between cohorts. Non-significant OS trends favoured BEV–PAC in the TNBC cohort and BEV–CAP in the low-risk HR+ cohort. In all three cohorts, there was a non-significant PFS trend favouring BEV–PAC. Grade ⩾3 adverse events were consistently less common with BEV–CAP. Conclusions: A simple risk factor index may help in selecting bevacizumab-containing regimens, balancing outcome, safety profile and patient preference. Final OS results are expected in 2015 (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00600340). PMID:25268370

  16. High levels of loss at the 17p telomere suggest the close proximity of a tumour suppressor.

    PubMed Central

    White, G. R.; Stack, M.; Santibáñez-Koref, M.; Liscia, D. S.; Venesio, T.; Wang, J. C.; Helms, C.; Donis-Keller, H.; Betticher, D. C.; Altermatt, H. J.; Hoban, P. R.; Heighway, J.

    1996-01-01

    High levels of loss of distal markers on 17p13.3 in breast cancer suggested the presence within the region of at least one tumour-suppressor gene. Here we describe the derivation of two biallelic polymorphisms from the 17p telomeric yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) TYAC98. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and multiplex PCR analysis demonstrated that the high level of allelic imbalance observed in breast tumours represented loss of constitutional heterozygosity (LOH) and that this LOH extended to the telomere. Lung carcinoma (but not Wilms' tumour)-derived DNA again revealed a high level of loss of subtelomeric 17p sequences. Telomeric microsatellite polymorphisms from other chromosome arms did not show such elevated loss in either tumour type. This suggested that the 17p loss observed did not reflect a general telomeric instability and provided further evidence for the presence of a breast cancer tumour-suppressor gene in the distal region of 17p13.3. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8826850

  17. Feasibility Evaluation of Radioimmunoguided Surgery of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Ananth; Reilly, Raymond M.; Holloway, Claire M. B.; Caldwell, Curtis B.

    2012-01-01

    Breast-conserving surgery involves completely excising the tumour while limiting the amount of normal tissue removed, which is technically challenging to achieve, especially given the limited intraoperative guidance available to the surgeon. This study evaluates the feasibility of radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) to guide the detection and delineation of tumours intraoperatively. The 3D point-response function of a commercial gamma-ray-detecting probe (GDP) was determined as a function of radionuclide (131I, 111In, 99mTc), energy-window threshold, and collimator length (0.0–3.0-cm). This function was used to calculate the minimum detectable tumour volumes (MDTVs) and the minimum tumour-to-background activity concentration ratio (T:B) for effective delineation of a breast tumour model. The GDP had larger MDTVs and a higher minimum required T:B for tumour delineation with 131I than with 111In or 99mTc. It was shown that for 111In there was a benefit to using a collimator length of 0.5-cm. For the model used, the minimum required T:B required for effective tumour delineation was 5.2 ± 0.4. RIGS has the potential to significantly improve the accuracy of breast-conserving surgery; however, before these benefits can be realized, novel radiopharmaceuticals need to be developed that have a higher specificity for cancerous tissue in vivo than what is currently available. PMID:22518303

  18. Prolactin, TNF alpha and nitric oxide expression in nitroso-N-methylurea-induced-mammary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Vegh, Irene; de Salamanca, Rafael Enríquez

    2007-01-01

    Background The N-Nitrosomethylurea breast cancer model induced in rats is used for the study of carcinogenesis in mammary cancer, prostate, pancreas, etc. This model is very similar to human neoplastic disease. Methods The present experimental study was designed to assess whether metoclopramide administration has any effect on development of MNU-induced tumours, and evaluate the treatment of goserelin acetate on PRL, TNF alpha and NO expression. NMU was administered to female Wistar rats on 2 occasions (5 mg/100 g body w/rat). PRL and TNF alpha were performed by immune-assay. Nitric Oxide by semi automated-assay and ploidy analyses by flow cytometry. Results The administration of metoclopramide made the induction time shorter and increased the incidence and average of tumours per rat. Tumours development was inhibited by a goserelin chronic administration. The ploidy of adenocarcinoma was polyploid-aneuploid type (average S = 60%). It was higher basal PRL plasma levels in rats with NMU induced tumours than in basal controls without tumour (p < 0.001). The goserelin "in bolus" administration showed maximal inhibition of plasma PRL at 90 min. Plasmatic TNF alpha expression was inhibited at 60 min and also remained inhibited in tissue homogenate post chronic treatment (P < 0.0125). Plasmatic NO expression is higher in rats with induced tumours than healthy controls (P < 0.001). In tissue homogenate NO values were inhibited at 90 min (P < 0.01), as well during chronically goserelin treatment (P < 0.005). Conclusion The increase of blood PRL levels in NMU-induced rats may be an indicator of a poor prognosis of mammary cancer evolution. The metoclopramide administration accelerates tumour growth. However goserelin administration achieves regression in tumour development associated to inhibition PRL, TNF alpha and NO expression. PMID:18045456

  19. Recombinant IgE antibodies for passive immunotherapy of solid tumours: from concept towards clinical application.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Sophia N; Josephs, Debra H; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Gilbert, Amy E; Saul, Louise; Rudman, Sarah M; Dodev, Tihomir; Koers, Alexander; Blower, Philip J; Corrigan, Christopher; Beavil, Andrew J; Spicer, James F; Nestle, Frank O; Gould, Hannah J

    2012-09-01

    Therapeutic antibodies have revolutionised treatment of some cancers and improved prognosis for many patients. Over half of those available are approved for haematological malignancies, but efficacious antibodies for solid tumours are still urgently needed. Clinically available antibodies belong to the IgG class, the most prevalent antibody class in human blood, while other classes have not been extensively considered. We hypothesised that the unique properties of IgE, a class of tissue-resident antibodies commonly associated with allergies, which can trigger powerful immune responses through strong affinity for their particular receptors on effector cells, could be employed for passive immunotherapy of solid tumours such as ovarian and breast carcinomas. Our laboratory has examined this concept by evaluating two chimaeric antibodies of the same specificity (MOv18) but different isotype, an IgG1 and an IgE against the tumour antigen folate receptor α (FRα). The latter demonstrates the potency of IgE to mount superior immune responses against tumours in disease-relevant models. We identified Fcε receptor-expressing cells, monocytes/macrophages and eosinophils, activated by MOv18 IgE to kill tumour cells by mechanisms such as ADCC and ADCP. We also applied this notion to a marketed therapeutic, the humanised IgG1 antibody trastuzumab and engineered an IgE counterpart, which retained the functions of trastuzumab in restricting proliferation of HER2/neu-expressing tumour cells but also activated effector cells to kill tumour cells by different mechanisms. On-going efficacy, safety evaluations and future first-in-man clinical studies of IgE therapeutics constitute key metrics for this concept, providing new scope for antibody immunotherapies for solid tumours.

  20. Early neoplastic and metastatic mammary tumours of transgenic mice detected by 5-aminolevulinic acid-stimulated protoporphyrin IX accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Dorward, A M; Fancher, K S; Duffy, T M; Beamer, W G; Walt, H

    2005-01-01

    A photodynamic technique for human breast cancer detection founded upon the ability of tumour cells to rapidly accumulate the fluorescent product protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) has been applied to transgenic mouse models of mammary tumorigenesis. A major goal of this investigation was to determine whether mouse mammary tumours are reliable models of human disease in terms of PpIX accumulation, for future mechanistic and therapeutic studies. The haeme substrate 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) (200 mg kg−1) was administered to mouse strains that develop mammary tumours of various histological subtypes upon expression of the transgenic oncogenes HRAS, Polyoma Virus middle T antigen, or Simian Virus 40 large T antigen in the mammary gland. Early neoplastic lesions, primary tumours and metastases showed consistent and rapid PpIX accumulation compared to the normal surrounding tissues, as evidenced by red fluorescence (635 nm) when the tumours were directly illuminated with blue light (380–440 nm). Detection of mouse mammary tumours at the stage of ductal carcinoma in situ by red fluorescence emissions suggests that enhanced PpIX synthesis is a good marker for early tumorigenic processes in the mammary gland. We propose the mouse models provide an ideal experimental system for further investigation of the early diagnostic and therapeutic potential of 5-ALA-stimulated PpIX accumulation in human breast cancer patients. PMID:16251872

  1. Breast self examination and breast cancer stage at diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mant, D.; Vessey, M. P.; Neil, A.; McPherson, K.; Jones, L.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between breast self examination (BSE) and breast cancer stage at diagnosis was examined in 616 women aged 15-59 years. Differences in tumour characteristics between those not practising BSE and those practising but not taught were small and inconstant. However, women who had both practised and had been taught BSE had more favourable tumours than the non-practising group. The difference was most marked in terms of tumour size and the involvement of axillary nodes. The proportions of women in the non-BSE and taught-BSE groups with each characteristic were respectively: size less than or equal to 2 cm 33% and 45%, T1 clinical stage 27% and 42%, and N0 pathological stage 37% and 50%. This advantage to taught-BSE women persisted after adjustment for the identified confounding factors of age, social class and oral contraceptive use. The likely impact on breast cancer mortality is difficult to assess, although the potential benefit of the lead time gained must not be ignored when assessing the costs and benefits of BSE. PMID:3814490

  2. Notch as a tumour suppressor.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Craig S; Radtke, Freddy

    2017-03-01

    The Notch signalling cascade is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that has a crucial role in regulating development and homeostasis in various tissues. The cellular processes and events that it controls are diverse, and continued investigation over recent decades has revealed how the role of Notch signalling is multifaceted and highly context dependent. Consistent with the far-reaching impact that Notch has on development and homeostasis, aberrant activity of the pathway is also linked to the initiation and progression of several malignancies, and Notch can in fact be either oncogenic or tumour suppressive depending on the tissue and cellular context. The Notch pathway therefore represents an important target for therapeutic agents designed to treat many types of cancer. In this Review, we focus on the latest developments relating specifically to the tumour-suppressor activity of Notch signalling and discuss the potential mechanisms by which Notch can inhibit carcinogenesis in various tissues. Potential therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring or augmenting Notch-mediated tumour suppression will also be highlighted.

  3. New frontiers for astrocytic tumours.

    PubMed

    Nano, Rosanna; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Corti, Maurizio; Paolini, Alessandro; Pasi, Francesca; Corbella, Franco; DI Liberto, Riccardo

    2012-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, the most common type of primary brain tumour, remains an unsolved clinical problem. A great deal of work has been done in an effort to understand the biology and genetics of glioblastoma multiforme, but clinically effective treatments remain elusive. It is well known that malignant gliomas develop resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. In this review we evaluated the literature data regarding therapeutic progress for the treatment of astrocytic tumours, focusing our attention on new frontiers for glioblastoma. The research studies performed in in vitro and in vivo models show that the application of hyperthermia using magnetic nanoparticles is safe and could be a promising tool in the treatment of glioblastoma patients. Our efforts are focused towards new fields of research, for example nanomedicine and the study of the uptake and cytotoxic effects of magnetic nanoparticles. The improvement of the quality of life of patients, by increasing their survival rate is the best result to be pursued, since these tumours are considered as ineradicable.

  4. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak Mohanty, Sweta; Ray, Jay Gopal; Richa; Mukherjee, Sanjit; Mandal, Chitra; Chaudhuri, Keya

    2010-11-23

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy (MNTI) is a rare benign tumour of neural crest origin that was first described by Krompecher in 1918.1 It is predominantly found in infancy, with about 92% of cases below the age of 12 months and 82% below the age of 6 months. The predominant site of origin is in the premaxilla though it is reported at other sites also including the skull, the mandible, the epididymis and the brain.2 The lesions often have areas of bluish discolouration on the surface and are characterised by displacement of the involved tooth bud and local aggressiveness. The present report deals with two cases of MNTI, a 5-month-old baby girl and a 6-month-old baby boy who reported to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Dr R Ahmed Dental College and Hospital, Kolkata, India. The clinical, radiological, histological and immunohistochemical findings, confirmed the diagnosis of MNTI. Flow cytometry was performed to analyse aneuploidy. The tumours were treated surgically with no history of recurrence to date.

  5. [What is the role of intraoperative radiotherapy in breast cancer treatment?].

    PubMed

    Aumont, M

    2016-10-01

    Breast-conserving surgery followed by whole breast postoperative irradiation is considered to be the current standard treatment for patients with early stage breast cancer. It allows an excellent local tumour control with 6% of local recurrence. Over the last years, partial breast radiotherapy has been developed to reduce treatment volume and duration. Intraoperative radiotherapy is one of the techniques. It offers an excellent delineation of the tumour bed and high normal tissue sparing. This purpose of this review is to describe the different intraoperative radiotherapy techniques available, to assess their potential clinical efficiency and tolerance, the recommendations for new practice with a selected population of patients and for future research.

  6. Impact of palbociclib combinations on treatment of advanced estrogen receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor 2-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boér, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with multiple subgroups based on clinical and molecular characteristics. For the largest subgroup of breast cancers, hormone receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2)-negative tumors, hormone treatment is the mainstay of therapy and is likely to result in significant improvement in disease outcomes. However, some of these cancers demonstrate de novo or acquired resistance to endocrine therapy. Despite intensive research to develop new strategies to enhance the efficacy of currently available treatment options for hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, progress has been slow, and there were few advances for a period of 10 years. In 2012, a new molecularly targeted therapeutic strategy, inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin with everolimus, was introduced into clinical practice. Everolimus, in combination with a steroidal aromatase inhibitor, exemestane, resulted in an increase in progression-free survival, but not overall survival in patients with estrogen receptor (ER)+ve advanced disease who had progressed on hormone therapy. In 2015, the first cyclin-dependent kinases 4/6 (CDK4/6) inhibitor, palbociclib, received accelerated US Food and Drug Administration approval for use in combination with letrozole for the treatment of postmenopausal ER+ve/HER2−ve advanced breast cancer as initial, endocrine-based therapy. The addition of palbociclib to endocrine therapy resulted in longer progression-free survival than letrozole alone. One year later, palbociclib received a new indication, use in combination with fulvestrant, in both premenopausal and postmenopausal females with advanced breast cancer of the same subtype with disease progression following endocrine therapy. Adding palbociclib to fulvestrant resulted in a significantly increased median progression-free survival compared to fulvestrant monotherapy. These new combination regimens of palbociclib with endocrine agents represent an important

  7. Effect of Tumor Subtype on Survival and the Graded Prognostic Assessment for Patients With Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Sperduto, Paul W.; Kased, Norbert; Roberge, David; Xu Zhiyuan; Shanley, Ryan; Luo, Xianghua; Sneed, Penny K.; Chao, Samuel T.; Weil, Robert J.; Suh, John; Bhatt, Amit; Jensen, Ashley W.; Brown, Paul D.; Shih, Helen A.; Kirkpatrick, John; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Fiveash, John B.; and others

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The diagnosis-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) was published to clarify prognosis for patients with brain metastases. This study refines the existing Breast-GPA by analyzing a larger cohort and tumor subtype. Methods and Materials: A multi-institutional retrospective database of 400 breast cancer patients treated for newly diagnosed brain metastases was generated. Prognostic factors significant for survival were analyzed by multivariate Cox regression and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA). Factors were weighted by the magnitude of their regression coefficients to define the GPA index. Results: Significant prognostic factors by multivariate Cox regression and RPA were Karnofsky performance status (KPS), HER2, ER/PR status, and the interaction between ER/PR and HER2. RPA showed age was significant for patients with KPS 60 to 80. The median survival time (MST) overall was 13.8 months, and for GPA scores of 0 to 1.0, 1.5 to 2.0, 2.5 to 3.0, and 3.5 to 4.0 were 3.4 (n = 23), 7.7 (n = 104), 15.1 (n = 140), and 25.3 (n = 133) months, respectively (p < 0.0001). Among HER2-negative patients, being ER/PR positive improved MST from 6.4 to 9.7 months, whereas in HER2-positive patients, being ER/PR positive improved MST from 17.9 to 20.7 months. The log-rank statistic (predictive power) was 110 for the Breast-GPA vs. 55 for tumor subtype. Conclusions: The Breast-GPA documents wide variation in prognosis and shows clear separation between subgroups of patients with breast cancer and brain metastases. This tool will aid clinical decision making and stratification in clinical trials. These data confirm the effect of tumor subtype on survival and show the Breast-GPA offers significantly more predictive power than the tumor subtype alone.

  8. Development of three-dimensional radiotherapy techniques in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Charlotte E.

    Radiotherapy following conservation surgery decreases local relapse and death from breast cancer. Currently, the challenge is to minimise the morbidity caused by this treatment without losing efficacy. Despite many advances in radiation techniques in other sites of the body, the majority of breast cancer patients are still planned and treated using 2-dimensional simple radiotherapy techniques. In addition, breast irradiation currently consumes 30% of the UK's radiotherapy workload. Therefore, any change to more complex treatment should be of proven benefit. The primary objective of this research is to develop and evaluate novel radiotherapy techniques to decrease irradiation of normal structures and improve localisation of the tumour bed. I have developed a forward-planned intensity modulated (IMRT) breast radiotherapy technique, which has shown improved dosimetry results compared to standard breast radiotherapy. Subsequently, I have developed and implemented a phase III randomised controlled breast IMRT trial. This National Cancer Research Network adopted trial will answer an important question regarding the clinical benefit of breast IMRT. It will provide DNA samples linked with high quality clinical outcome data, for a national translational radiogenomics study investigating variation in normal tissue toxicity. Thus, patients with significant late normal tissue side effects despite good dose homogeneity will provide the best model for finding differences due to underlying genetics. I evaluated a novel technique using high definition free-hand 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound in a phantom study, and the results suggested that this is an accurate and reproducible method for tumour bed localisation. I then compared recognised methods of tumour bed localisation with the 3D ultrasound method in a clinical study. The 3D ultrasound technique appeared to accurately represent the shape and spatial position of the tumour cavity. This tumour bed localisation research

  9. Resistance to tumour challenge after tumour laser thermotherapy is associated with a cellular immune response

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, K; Myllymäki, L; Jansner, K; Stenram, U; Tranberg, K-G

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that interstitial laser thermotherapy (ILT) of an experimental liver tumour is superior to surgical excision, at least partly due to a laser-induced immunological effect. The aim of the present study was to investigate the time–response relationship of the ILT-induced immunisation and the cellular response of macrophages and lymphocytes. A dimethylhydrazine-induced adenocarcinoma was transplanted into the liver of syngeneic rats. Rats with tumour were treated 6–8 days later (tumour size 0.25–0.40 cm3) with ILT of tumour or resection of the tumour-bearing lobe. Two groups of rats without tumour were treated with resection of a normal liver lobe or ILT of normal liver. A challenging tumour was implanted into the liver of each rat 2, 5 or 10 weeks after primary treatment. Rats were killed 6, 12 and 48 days (or earlier due to their condition) after challenge (n=8 in all groups). Immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine lymphocytes (CD8, CD4) and macrophages (ED1, ED2) in rats having had treatment of a primary tumour. Interstitial laser thermotherapy of the first tumour was followed by eradication of challenging tumour and absence of tumour spread. This contrasted with rapid growth and spread of challenging tumour in the other groups. In the challenging vital tumour tissue and in the interface between the tumour and surroundings, the number of ED1 macrophages and CD8 lymphocytes was higher in rats having been treated with the ILT of tumour than in those having undergone resection of the tumour-bearing lobe. The number of ED2 macrophages and CD4 lymphocytes was low and did not vary between these two groups. Interstitial laser thermotherapy elicited an immune response that eradicated a challenging tumour and was associated with increased numbers of tumour-infiltrating macrophages and CD8 lymphocytes. PMID:16091763

  10. The induction of human peripheral blood lymphoid colonies by conditioned media from human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Vesole, D H; Moore, G E

    1980-01-01

    Conditioned medium (CM) from 29 human tumour cell lines and 3 malignant pleural fluids were tested for their ability to stimulate lymphoid colony formation in semi-solid agar; 9 of 14 malignant melanomas, 3 of 6 colonic carcinomas, 2 of 5 ovarian carcinomas, 3 of 4 breast carcinomas and 1 of 3 pleural fluids from breast cancer patients contained colony-stimulating activity (CSA) for human peripheral blood lymphoid cells (PBL) in semi-solid agar. Conditioned media also stimulated PBL proliferation in liquid medium; these effects were dose dependent. With the exception of one pleural fluid, extensive dialysis of CM did not significantly increase colony formation; CM from two tumour cell lines demonstrated a significant decrease in the induction of colony formation after dialysis. PMID:6970165

  11. PET imaging of primary mediastinal tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, K.; Yamada, S.; Kondo, T.; Yamada, K.; Fukuda, H.; Fujiwara, T.; Ito, M.; Ido, T.

    1996-01-01

    Mediastinal masses include a wide variety of tumours and remain an interesting diagnostic challenge for radiologist. We performed positron emission tomography (PET) studies of primary mediastinal tumours in order to predict the malignancy of these tumours preoperatively. Twenty-two patients with primary mediastinal tumours were studied with PET using 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG). The histological findings of surgical pathology or biopsy, or mediastinoscopy were compared with those of computerised tomography (CT) and PET. PET images were evaluated semiquantitatively using the differential uptake ratio (DUR). Increased FDG uptake was observed in nine of ten patients with malignant tumours, including thymic carcinomas, lymphomas, invasive thymomas and a case of sarcoidosis. A moderate level of FDG uptake was found in a myeloma, non-invasive thymomas, and a schwannoma, whereas a low uptake was observed in a teratoma and various benign cysts. The mean FDG uptake of malignant tumours was significantly higher than that of benign tumours. Both thymic cancer and invasive thymoma showed a high FDG uptake. CT examination resulted in three false-negative and two false-positive cases when used in predicting tumour invasion, while PET was associated with a false-positive and a false-negative case. In conclusion, the use of FDG with PET is clinically helpful in evaluating the malignant nature of primary mediastinal tumours. Our results also suggest that a high FDG uptake reflects the invasiveness of malignant nature of thymic tumours. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8611400

  12. Gene expression profiling of human ovarian tumours

    PubMed Central

    Biade, S; Marinucci, M; Schick, J; Roberts, D; Workman, G; Sage, E H; O'Dwyer, P J; LiVolsi, V A; Johnson, S W

    2006-01-01

    There is currently a lack of reliable diagnostic and prognostic markers for ovarian cancer. We established gene expression profiles for 120 human ovarian tumours to identify determinants of histologic subtype, grade and degree of malignancy. Unsupervised cluster analysis of the most variable set of expression data resulted in three major tumour groups. One consisted predominantly of benign tumours, one contained mostly malignant tumours, and one was comprised of a mixture of borderline and malignant tumours. Using two supervised approaches, we identified a set of genes that distinguished the benign, borderline and malignant phenotypes. These algorithms were unable to establish profiles for histologic subtype or grade. To validate these findings, the expression of 21 candidate genes selected from these analyses was measured by quantitative RT–PCR using an independent set of tumour samples. Hierarchical clustering of these data resulted in two major groups, one benign and one malignant, with the borderline tumours interspersed between the two groups. These results indicate that borderline ovarian tumours may be classified as either benign or malignant, and that this classifier could be useful for predicting the clinical course of borderline tumours. Immunohistochemical analysis also demonstrated increased expression of CD24 antigen in malignant versus benign tumour tissue. The data that we have generated will contribute to a growing body of expression data that more accurately define the biologic and clinical characteristics of ovarian cancers. PMID:16969345

  13. Gene expression profiling of human ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Biade, S; Marinucci, M; Schick, J; Roberts, D; Workman, G; Sage, E H; O'Dwyer, P J; Livolsi, V A; Johnson, S W

    2006-10-23

    There is currently a lack of reliable diagnostic and prognostic markers for ovarian cancer. We established gene expression profiles for 120 human ovarian tumours to identify determinants of histologic subtype, grade and degree of malignancy. Unsupervised cluster analysis of the most variable set of expression data resulted in three major tumour groups. One consisted predominantly of benign tumours, one contained mostly malignant tumours, and one was comprised of a mixture of borderline and malignant tumours. Using two supervised approaches, we identified a set of genes that distinguished the benign, borderline and malignant phenotypes. These algorithms were unable to establish profiles for histologic subtype or grade. To validate these findings, the expression of 21 candidate genes selected from these analyses was measured by quantitative RT-PCR using an independent set of tumour samples. Hierarchical clustering of these data resulted in two major groups, one benign and one malignant, with the borderline tumours interspersed between the two groups. These results indicate that borderline ovarian tumours may be classified as either benign or malignant, and that this classifier could be useful for predicting the clinical course of borderline tumours. Immunohistochemical analysis also demonstrated increased expression of CD24 antigen in malignant versus benign tumour tissue. The data that we have generated will contribute to a growing body of expression data that more accurately define the biologic and clinical characteristics of ovarian cancers.

  14. Differential expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 in association with invasion of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Punsawad, Chuchard; Chupeerach, Chaowanee; Songsri, Apiram; Charoenkijkajorn, Lek; Petmitr, Songsak

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) has a potential role in tumour invasion and metastasis. However, its relevance to the prognosis of human breast cancer is poorly understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression patterns of MMP-13 protein and to determine its prognostic value in breast cancer, and to define its relation to the clinicopathological features. Immunohistochemistry analysis of MMP-13 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of cancerous breast tissue (n = 76) and normal breast tissue (n = 20), all of which had clinicopathological information available. Based on the principle of immunoreactivity, the detection of MMP-13 on breast tissue was conducted using monoclonal antibodies against MMP-13. A semi-quantitative scoring system was used to assess the presence of, as well as the cellular localisation of MMP-13. MMP-13 expression was significantly greater in the cancerous breast tissues in comparison to those of normal breast tissues. In addition, high levels of MMP-13 expression were also found to be related to the positive detection of breast cancer cells in lymph nodes-amongst breast cancer patients. The results of this study showed that MMP-13 was frequently present in breast tumours, especially when tumours were accompanied by positive breast cancer cell detection in lymph nodes. This suggests that MMP-13 plays a potentially significant role in breast cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:27647987

  15. Second non-breast primary cancer following adjuvant therapy for early breast cancer: A report from the International Breast Cancer Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Gianni, Lorenzo; Gelber, Shari; Ravaioli, Alberto; Price, Karen N.; Panzini, Ilaria; Fantini, Manuela; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Pagani, Olivia; Simoncini, Edda; Gelber, Richard D.; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of second non-breast primary cancer following adjuvant treatment was evaluated using data from patients enrolled from 1978 to 1999 in four International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) trials. The occurrence of these tumours as sites of first failure was assessed separately for two treatment comparisons: toremifene versus tamoxifen for five years in 1035 patients in IBCSG Trials 12-93 and 14-93 with a median follow-up of eight years and endocrine therapy (toremifene or tamoxifen) versus chemoendocrine therapy (CMF or AC plus toremifene or tamoxifen) in 1731 patients from IBCSG Trials III, VII and 12-93, with a combined median follow-up of 14 years. No significant differences in second non-breast primary tumours were observed in either comparison. In particular the incidences of second primary uterine tumours with toremifene and tamoxifen were similar and no significant increase of secondary leukaemias was observed with chemoendocrine therapy compared with endocrine therapy. PMID:19062268

  16. Immunological Characterization of Whole Tumour Lysate-Loaded Dendritic Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ottobrini, Luisa; Biasin, Mara; Borelli, Manuela; Lucignani, Giovanni; Trabattoni, Daria; Clerici, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dendritic cells play a key role as initiators of T-cell responses, and even if tumour antigen-loaded dendritic cells can induce anti-tumour responses, their efficacy has been questioned, suggesting a need to enhance immunization strategies. Matherials & Methods We focused on the characterization of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells pulsed with whole tumour lysate (TAA-DC), as a source of known and unknown antigens, in a mouse model of breast cancer (MMTV-Ras). Dendritic cells were evaluated for antigen uptake and for the expression of MHC class I/II and costimulatory molecules and markers associated with maturation. Results Results showed that antigen-loaded dendritic cells are characterized by a phenotypically semi-mature/mature profile and by the upregulation of genes involved in antigen presentation and T-cell priming. Activated dendritic cells stimulated T-cell proliferation and induced the production of high concentrations of IL-12p70 and IFN-γ but only low levels of IL-10, indicating their ability to elicit a TH1-immune response. Furthermore, administration of Antigen loaded-Dendritic Cells in MMTV-Ras mice evoked a strong anti-tumour response in vivo as demonstrated by a general activation of immunocompetent cells and the release of TH1 cytokines. Conclusion Data herein could be useful in the design of antitumoral DC-based therapies, showing a specific activation of immune system against breast cancer. PMID:26795765

  17. [Radiotherapy of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Barillot, I; Azria, D; Belkacémi, Y; Bollet, M; Chauvet, B; Cowen, D; Cutuli, B; Fourquet, A; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Leblanc, M; Mahé, M A

    2016-09-01

    In breast cancer, radiotherapy is an essential component of the treatment. After conservative surgery for an infiltrating carcinoma, radiotherapy must be systematically performed, regardless of the characteristics of the disease, because it decreases the rate of local recurrence and by this way, specific mortality. Partial breast irradiation could not be proposed routinely but only in very selected and informed patients. For ductal carcinoma in situ, adjuvant radiotherapy must be also systematically performed after lumpectomy. After mastectomy, chest wall irradiation is required for pT3-T4 tumours and if there is an axillary nodal involvement, whatever the number of involved lymph nodes. After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, in case of pN0 disease, chest wall irradiation is recommended if there is a clinically or radiologically T3-T4 or node positive disease before chemotherapy. Axillary irradiation is recommended only if there is no axillary surgical dissection and a positive sentinel lymph node. Supra and infra-clavicular irradiation is advised in case of positive axillary nodes. Internal mammary irradiation must be discussed case by case, according to the benefit/risk ratio (cardiac toxicity). Dose to the chest wall or the breast must be between 45-50Gy with a conventional fractionation. A boost dose over the tumour bed is required if the patient is younger than 60 years old. Hypofractionation (42.5 Gy in 16 fractions, or 41.6 Gy en 13 or 40 Gy en 15) is possible after tumorectomy and if a nodal irradiation is not mandatory. Delineation of the breast, the chest wall and the nodal areas are based on clinical and radiological evaluations. 3D-conformal irradiation is the recommended technique, intensity-modulated radiotherapy must be proposed only in case of specific clinical situations. Respiratory gating could be useful to decrease the cardiac dose. Concomitant administration of chemotherapy in unadvised, but hormonal treatment could be start with

  18. Clinicopathological Features of Triple Negative Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Gowry Maram; Pai, Radha R.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Breast carcinoma is one of the most common malignancies affecting women in developing countries. Molecular studies of breast carcinoma have classified the tumour based on the immunohistochemical staining into 4 subtypes, such as Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2/neu Positive and Triple Negative Breast Carcinoma (TNBC). TNBCs are reported to have an aggressive behaviour and wide metastasis, leading to selective treatment outcomes. Aim The aim was to study the clinicopathological features such as age, site, tumour size, histopathological type, histologic grade, lymph node status, stage and treatment outcomes of triple negative breast carcinoma. Materials and Methods A retrospective study was conducted on 108 cases of breast carcinoma received during the period of 2 years. The tumour was classified based on immunohistochemical staining into four subtypes. The clinicopathological details, histomorphological and immunohistochemical features of TNBC were studied. Results Of the 108 patients, 34 patients were diagnosed as TNBC. The average age at presentation was 48 years. Most of the cases showed Nottingham Modification of Scarff Bloom-Richardson (NMBR) grade 3 (55.9%) and stage II (67.6%). Ly-mph node metastasis was seen in 50% of cases. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma (not otherwise specified) type (91.2%) was the most common histological type. Among the other subtypes, Luminal A carcinoma was the most common (36.1%), followed by TNBC (31.5%) and HER2/neu positive carcinomas (28.7%). Compared to the other types of tumours, TNBC showed the most frequent distant lymph node metastasis (50%) when compared to luminal A (38.5%), luminal B (25%), HER2/neu positive (48.4%). Unlike the other types of tumours, TNBC were mostly high-grade. Conclusion TNBC have an aggressive behaviour compared to other subtypes with higher NMBR grade, nuclear pleomorphism, high mitotic rate and lymph node metastasis. PMID:28273970

  19. p16INK4a expression in basal-like breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Olga L; Fuertes-Camilo, Mariana; Navarro, Leticia; Saldivar, Jesus; Sanchez-Sosa, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    BLBC represents a distinctive group of invasive breast carcinomas with specific genotype and immunopro-file. BLBC is usually defined by gene expression profiling and is currently associated with poor outcome. BLBCs are estrogen receptor (ER) negative, progesterone receptor (PgR) negative, HER2 negative, and usually show a variable expression of basal cytokeratins (CKs), EGFR and CD117. p16 INK4a is a tumor suppressor protein, encoded by the CDKN2A gene, which regulates cell cycle. The reported association of abnormalities in the p16/Rb pathway with increased risk of malignancy prompted us to determine the expression of p16INK4a in a group of BLBC; the results were compared with a group of high-grade invasive carcinoma (HG-IC) of breast. Tissue microarrays (TMA) were constructed in triplicate including 18 BLBC and 18 HG-IC. All BLBC cases were ER-/PgR-/HER2-. Seventeen (94%) BLBC were CK 5/6+/CK 14+; 14 (78%) BLCB showed EGFR expression and 13 (72%) were CD117 positive. BLBCs showed a strong positive reaction with p16 INK4a antibody in 16 of 18 (89%) cases. Although the significance of p16 INK4a expression in breast cancer is not fully understood, we have shown that p16INK4a is strongly expressed in breast cancers with basal-like phenotype. Since it is known that p16INK4a is associated with aggressive behavior in human carcinomas, these data suggest that p16INK4a play a role in the poor prognosis of BLBC. PMID:20661408

  20. Cystic brain metastasis is associated with poor prognosis in patients with advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bing; Huang, Zhou; Wu, Shikai; Ding, Lijuan; Shen, Ge; Cha, Lei; Wang, Junliang; Song, Santai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Brain metastasis (BM) with a cystic component from breast cancer is rare and largely uncharacterized. The purpose of this study was to identify the characteristics of cystic BM in a large cohort of breast cancer patients. Results A total of 35 eligible patients with cystic BM and 255 patients with solid BM were analyzed. Three factors were significantly associated with an increased probability of developing cystic lesions: age at diagnosis ≤ 40 years, age at BM ≤ 45 years, and poor histological grade (p < 0.05). Patients with cystic metastasis were also characterized by a larger metastasis volume, a shorter progression-free survival (PFS) following their first treatment for BM, and poor overall survival after BM (p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis further demonstrated that local control of cystic BM was only potentially achieved for HER2-negative primary tumors (p = 0.084). Methods Breast cancer patients with parenchymal BM were reviewed from consecutive cases treated at our institution. Cystic BM was defined when the volume of a cystic lesion was greater than 50% of the aggregated volume of all lesions present. Clinicopathologic and radiographic variables were correlated with development of cystic lesions and with prognosis of cystic BM. Conclusions This study shows that cystic BM from breast cancer, a special morphological type of BM, had worse prognosis than the more commonly observed solid BM. Younger age and low tumor grade were associated with the development of cystic lesions. Further comprehensive research and management of cystic BM are warranted to improve its poor prognosis. PMID:27659537

  1. Prognosis of metastatic breast cancer subtypes: the hormone receptor/HER2-positive subtype is associated with the most favorable outcome.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, Dorien J A; van Kampen, Roel J W; Voogd, Adri C; Dercksen, M Wouter; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; Smilde, Tineke J; van de Wouw, Agnes J; Peters, Frank P J; van Riel, Johanna M G H; Peters, Natascha A J B; de Boer, Maaike; Borm, George F; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G

    2013-10-01

    Contrary to the situation in early breast cancer, little is known about the prognostic relevance of the hormone receptor (HR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in metastatic breast cancer. The objectives of this study were to present survival estimates and to determine the prognostic impact of breast cancer subtypes based on HR and HER2 status in a recent cohort of metastatic breast cancer patients, which is representative of current clinical practice. Patients diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer between 2007 and 2009 were included. Information regarding patient and tumor characteristics and treatment was collected. Patients were categorized in four subtypes based on the HR and HER2 status of the primary tumor: HR positive (+)/HER2 negative (-), HR+/HER2+, HR-/HER2+ and triple negative (TN). Survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine the prognostic impact of breast cancer subtype, adjusted for possible confounders. Median follow-up was 21.8 months for the 815 metastatic breast cancer patients included; 66 % of patients had the HR+/HER2- subtype, 8 % the HR-/HER2+ subtype, 15 % the TN subtype and 11 % the HR+/HER2+ subtype. The longest survival was observed for the HR+/HER2+ subtype (median 34.4 months), compared to 24.8 months for the HR+/HER2- subtype, 19.8 months for the HR-/HER2+ subtype and 8.8 months for the TN subtype (P < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, subtype was an independent prognostic factor, as were initial site of metastases and metastatic-free interval. The HR+/HER2+ subtype was associated with the longest survival after diagnosis of distant metastases.

  2. Surgical treatment of benign endobronchial tumours

    PubMed Central

    Halttunen, P; Meurala, H; Standertskjöld-Nordenstam, C-G

    1982-01-01

    Four cases of benign endobronchial tumour are reported which were successfully treated by bronchial resection. In two cases (of fibroma and leiomyoma respectively) a cylinder of bronchus alone was resected; in one case (lipoma) a healthy right upper lobe was preserved by a bronchoplastic procedure and in the other (chondroma) the tumour was removed with the right lower lobe, which was irreversibly damaged. It is important to recognise that such tumours are unsuitable for treatment by endoscopic means alone. Images PMID:7157223

  3. Phyto-oestrogens and breast cancer chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Limer, Jane L; Speirs, Valerie

    2004-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenol compounds of plant origin that exhibit a structural similarity to the mammalian steroid hormone 17β-oestradiol. In Asian nations the staple consumption of phyto-oestrogen-rich foodstuffs correlates with a reduced incidence of breast cancer. Human dietary intervention trials have noted a direct relationship between phyto-oestrogen ingestion and a favourable hormonal profile associated with decreased breast cancer risk. However, these studies failed to ascertain the precise effect of dietary phyto-oestrogens on the proliferation of mammary tissue. Epidemiological and rodent studies crucially suggest that breast cancer chemoprevention by dietary phyto-oestrogen compounds is dependent on ingestion before puberty, when the mammary gland is relatively immature. Phyto-oestrogen supplements are commercially marketed for use by postmenopausal women as natural and safe alternatives to hormone replacement therapy. Of current concern is the effect of phyto-oestrogen compounds on the growth of pre-existing breast tumours. Data are contradictory, with cell culture studies reporting both the oestrogenic stimulation of oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cell lines and the antagonism of tamoxifen activity at physiological phyto-oestrogen concentrations. Conversely, phyto-oestrogen ingestion by rodents is associated with the development of less aggressive breast tumours with reduced metastatic potential. Despite the present ambiguity, current data do suggest a potential benefit from use of phyto-oestrogens in breast cancer chemoprevention and therapy. These aspects are discussed. PMID:15084232

  4. A new molecular prognostic score for predicting the risk of distant metastasis in patients with HR+/HER2− early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Gyungyub; Kwon, Mi Jeong; Han, Jinil; Lee, Hee Jin; Lee, Se Kyung; Lee, Jeong Eon; Lee, Seon-Heui; Park, Sarah; Choi, Jong-Sun; Cho, Soo Youn; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Lee, Jong Won; Cho, Sang Rae; Moon, Youngho; Nam, Byung-Ho; Nam, Seok Jin; Choi, Yoon-La; Shin, Young Kee

    2017-01-01

    To make an optimal treatment decision for early stage breast cancer, it is important to identify risk of recurrence. Here, we developed and validated a new prognostic model for predicting the risk of distant metastasis in patients with pN0-N1, hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative (HR+/HER2−) breast cancer treated with hormone therapy alone. RNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor tissues and gene expression was measured by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR. The relative expression of six novel prognostic genes was combined with two clinical variables (nodal status and tumor size) to calculate a risk score (BCT score). In the validation cohort treated with hormone therapy alone, the 10 year rate of distant metastasis in the high-risk group (26.3%) according to BCT score was significantly higher than that in the low-risk group (3.8%) (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis adjusted for clinical variables revealed that BCT score is an independent predictor of distant metastasis. Moreover, the C-index estimate revealed that BCT score has a prognostic power superior to that of prognostic models based on clinicopathological parameters. The BCT score outperforms prognostic models based on traditional clinicopathological factors and predicts the risk of distant metastasis in patients with HR+/HER2− early breast cancer. PMID:28350001

  5. Androgen deprivation by adrenal suppression using low-dose hydrocortisone for the treatment of breast carcinoma with apocrine features: a case report illustrating this new paradigm.

    PubMed

    Jongen, Lynn; Paridaens, Robert; Floris, Giuseppe; Wildiers, Hans; Neven, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    We report on a postmenopausal patient with a secondary metastatic apocrine breast cancer successfully treated with low-dose hydrocortisone only following several lines of chemotherapy. The tumor cells in the primary and metastatic lesion exhibited a 'triple-negative' status (estrogen receptor (ER)-, progesterone receptor (PR)-, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative); the androgen receptor (AR) was strongly expressed. Twenty milligrams of hydrocortisone, a low substitution dose known to suppress adrenal steroid production, twice daily led to a clinical benefit lasting for one year, with symptom control, radiologically stable disease, and steady decrease in CA15.3. Our observation demonstrates that an AR-expressing apocrine breast cancer may respond to androgen deprivation, as an ER-positive breast cancer may benefit from estrogen deprivation. It highlights the importance of further research targeting the AR pathway in apocrine carcinoma, for which androgens represent the sole (known) steroid hormone stimulating tumor growth. Future clinical trials should not only focus on AR inhibitors like enzalutamide, but also on ablative modalities like low-dose hydrocortisone aiming at medical adrenalectomy. This method of androgen deprivation is largely available, cheap, and nearly devoid of toxicity.

  6. Intraoperative Period and Breast Cancer: Review

    PubMed Central

    Akan, Arzu; Şimsek, Şerife

    2014-01-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy in breast cancer (IORT) delivers a concentrated dose of radiation therapy to a tumor bed during surgery. IORT offers some of the following advantages with typically fewer complications like; maximum effect, sparing healthy tissues and organs, to help the patients finish treatment and get back to their normal activities. The goal of IORT is to improve local tumor control and survival rates for patients with breast cancer. IORT can both be performed with electron beams (ELIOT) and X-rays. Two main randomised trials testing intraoperative partial breast radiotherapy are TARGIT trial and the ELIOT (intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons) trial, but the techniques are fundamentally different. Whereas TARGIT delivers radiation from within the undisturbed tumour bed, for ELIOT, the mammary gland is mobilised, a prepectoral lead shield is inserted, the edges of the tumour bed are apposed, and radiation is delivered from without.

  7. Tumour promotion versus tumour suppression in chronic hepatic iron overload.

    PubMed

    Bloomer, Steven A; Brown, Kyle E

    2015-06-01

    Although iron-catalysed oxidative damage is presumed to be a major mechanism of injury leading to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in hemochromatosis, these events have been difficult to recapitulate in an animal model. In this study, we evaluated regulators of hepatocarcinogenesis in a rodent model of chronic iron overload. Sprague-Dawley rats were iron loaded with iron dextran over 6 months. Livers were harvested and analysed for markers of oxidative stress, as well as the following proteins: p53, murine double minute 2, the Shc proteins p66, p52, p46; β-catenin, CHOP, C/EBPα and Yes-associated protein. In this model, iron loading is associated with hepatocyte proliferation, and indices of oxidative damage are mildly increased in tandem with augmented antioxidant defenses. Alterations potentially favouring carcinogenesis included a modest but significant decrease in p53 levels and increases in p52, p46 and β-catenin levels compared with control livers. Countering these factors, the iron-loaded livers demonstrated a significant decrease in CHOP, which has recently been implicated in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as a reciprocal increase in C/EBPα and decrease in Yes-associated protein. Our results suggest that chronic iron overload elicits both tumour suppressive as well as tumour-promoting mechanisms in rodent liver.

  8. Endovascular treatment of primary hepatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Popiel, M; Gulie, L; Turculeţ, C; Beuran, M

    2008-01-01

    First transcatheter embolization of hepatic artery has been materializing in 1974, in France, for unresectable hepatic tumours. Then, this treatment has become use enough in many countries, especially in Japan, where primary hepatic tumours are very frequent. In this article, we present procedures of interventional endovascular treatment for primary hepatic tumours: chemoembolization, intra–arterial chemotherapy. The study comprises patients with primary hepatic tumours investigated by hepatic–ultrasound and contrast–enhanced CT or MRI. DSA–hepatic angiography is very important to verify the accessory hepatic supply. It has been performed selective catheterization of right/left hepatic branches followed by cytostatics injection. Most of the patients have benefit by hepatic chemoembolization (cytostatics, Lipiodol and embolic materials). The selective intra–arterial chemotherapy (cytostatics without Lipiodol) was performing in cases with contraindications for Lipiodol or embolic materials injection (cirrhosis–Child C, thrombosis of portal vein, hepatic insufficiency). For treatment of primary hepatic tumours we use 5–F–Uracil, Farmarubicin and Mytomicin C. Less numbers of the reservoirs were placed because financial causes. Chemoembolization was better than procedures without Lipiodol or embolic materials. Lipiodol reached in tumoural tissue and the distribution of Lipiodol harmonises with degree of vascularisation. After the chemoembolization procedure, the diameter of tumours decreased gradually depending on the size of tumour. Effective alternative for unresectable primary hepatic tumours (big size, hepatic dysfunction, and other surgical risk factors) is endovascular interventional treatment. PMID:20108517

  9. Tumours of the upper alimentary tract

    PubMed Central

    Head, K. W.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of the oropharynx of domestic animals are common in most parts of the world, but squamous cell carcinoma of the upper alimentary tract shows differences in prevalence in different geographical areas and occurs at different sites in the various species. Oral tumours of the melanogenic system are more common in dogs than in man. The following main histological categories, which broadly correspond to those used in the classification of tumours of man, are described: papilloma; squamous cell carcinoma; salivary gland tumours; malignant melanoma; tumours of soft (mesenchymal) tissues; tumours of the facial bones; tumours of haematopoietic and related tissues; and odontogenic tumours and jaw cysts. Papilloma, squamous cell carcinoma, malignant melanoma, fibroma, and fibrosarcoma account for about 80% of the tumours that occur in the upper alimentary tract of domestic animals. ImagesFig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36Fig. 37Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24