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Sample records for herbicides insecticides fungicides

  1. The 1975 Insecticide, Herbicide, Fungicide Quick Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Bill G.; Thomson, W. T.

    This is a quick guide for choosing a chemical to use to control a certain pest on a specific crop. Information in the book was obtained from manufacturers' labels and from the USDA and FDA pesticide summary. The book is divided into four parts: (1) insecticides, (2) herbicides, (3) fungicides, and (4) conversion tables. Each of the first three…

  2. The effect of stereochemistry on the biological activity of natural phytotoxins, fungicides, insecticides and herbicides.

    PubMed

    Evidente, Antonio; Cimmino, Alessio; Andolfi, Anna

    2013-02-01

    Phytotoxins are secondary microbial metabolites that play an essential role in the development of disease symptoms induced by fungi on host plants. Although phytotoxins can cause extensive-and in some cases devastating-damage to agricultural crops, they can also represent an important tool to develop natural herbicides when produced by fungi and plants to inhibit the growth and spread of weeds. An alternative strategy to biologically control parasitic plants is based on the use of plant and fungal metabolites, which stimulate seed germination in the absence of the host plant. Nontoxigenic fungi also produce bioactive metabolites with potential fungicide and insecticide activity, and could be applied for crop protection. All these metabolites represent important tools to develop eco-friendly pesticides. This review deals with the relationships between the biological activity of some phytotoxins, seed germination stimulants, fungicides and insecticides, and their stereochemistry. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Insecticidal and fungicidal compounds from Isatis tinctoria.

    PubMed

    Seifert, K; Unger, W

    1994-01-01

    Tryptanthrin (1), indole-3-acetonitrile (2) and p-coumaric acid methylester (3) were isolated from the aerial parts of Isatis tinctoria L. The compounds show insecticidal and anti-feedant activity against termites (Reticulitermis santonensis), insect preventive and control activity against larvae of the house longhorn beetle (Hylotrupes bajulus) and fungicidal activity against the brown-rot fungus (Coniophora puteana).

  4. Trifluoromethylphenyl amides as novel insecticides and fungicides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Because of increased resistance to insecticides in arthropods, it is necessary to identify new chemicals that may have novel modes of action. Following an extensive literature search for compounds with insecticidal and mosquito repellent activity, we have designed and synthesized a set of 20 trif...

  5. Trifluoromethylphenyl amides as novel insecticides and fungicides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Because of increased resistance to insecticides in arthropods, it is necessary to identify new chemicals that may have novel modes of action. Following an extensive literature search for compounds with insecticidal and mosquito repellent activity, we have designed and synthesized a set of 20 trifluo...

  6. Trifluoromethylphenyl amides as novel insecticides and fungicides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Because of increased resistance to insecticides in arthropods, it is necessary to identify new chemicals that may have novel modes of action. Following an extensive literature search for compounds with insecticidal and mosquito repellent activity, we have designed and synthesized a set of 20 triflu...

  7. Herbicidal and Fungicidal Activities of Lactones in Kava (Piper methysticum).

    PubMed

    Xuan, T D; Elzaawely, A A; Fukuta, M; Tawata, S

    2006-02-08

    This is the first report showing that kava lactones are plant and plant fungus growth inhibitors. Aqueous extract of kava roots showed high allelopathic potential and strongly suppressed germination and growth of lettuce, radish, barnyardgrass, and monochoria. Nine kava lactones were detected using GC-MS including desmethoxyyagonin, kavain, 7,8-dihydrokavain, hydroxykavain, yagonin, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroxyyagonin, methysticin, dihydromethysticin, and 11-hydroxy-12-methoxydihydrokavain. Quantities of desmethoxyyagonin, kavain, 7,8-dihydrokavain, yagonin, methysticin, and dihydromethysticin detected were 4.3, 6.9, 18.6, 5.7, 1.4, and 5.4 mg/g of dry weight, respectively. These six major lactones in kava roots showed great herbicidal and antifungal activities. Growth of lettuce and barnyardgrass were significantly inhibited at 1-10 ppm, and four plant fungi including Colletotrichum gloeosporides, Fusarium solani, Fusarium oxysporum, and Trichoderma viride were significantly inhibited at 10-50 ppm. The biological activities of kava lactones were characterized by different double-bond linkage patterns in positions 5,6 and 7,8. The findings of this study suggest that kava lactones may be useful for the development of bioactive herbicides and fungicides.

  8. Consequences of co-applying insecticides and fungicides for managing Thrips tabaci (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on onion.

    PubMed

    Nault, Brian A; Hsu, Cynthia L; Hoepting, Christine A

    2013-07-01

    Insecticides and fungicides are commonly co-applied in a tank mix to protect onions from onion thrips, Thrips tabaci Lindeman, and foliar pathogens. Co-applications reduce production costs, but past research shows that an insecticide's performance can be reduced when co-applied with a fungicide. An evaluation was made of the effects of co-applying spinetoram, abamectin and spirotetramat with commonly used fungicides, with and without the addition of a penetrating surfactant, on onion thrips control in onion fields. Co-applications of insecticides with chlorothalonil fungicides reduced thrips control by 25-48% compared with control levels provided by the insecticides alone in three of five trials. Inclusion of a penetrating surfactant at recommended rates with the insecticide and chlorothalonil fungicide did not consistently overcome this problem. Co-applications of insecticides with other fungicides did not interfere with thrips control. Co-applications of pesticides targeting multiple organisms should be examined closely to ensure that control of each organism is not compromised. To manage onion thrips in onion most effectively, insecticides should be applied with a penetrating surfactant, and should be applied separately from chlorothalonil fungicides. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. 48 CFR 1552.235-73 - Access to Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996). 1552.235-73 Section... Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996). As prescribed in... Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996) In order to perform duties under the contract, the...

  10. Synergistic effects of a combined exposure to herbicides and an insecticide in Hyla versicolor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazanti, L.; Sparling, D.W.; Rice, C.; Bialek, K.; Stevenson, C.; Teels, B.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Combinations of the herbicides atrazine and metolachlor and the insecticide chlorpyrifos were tested under both laboratory and field conditions to determine their individual and combined effects on amphibian populations. In the lab Hyla versicolor tadpoles experienced 100% mortality when exposed to a high combination of the pesticides (2.0 mg/L atrazine, 2.54 mg/L metolachlor, 1.0 mg/L chlorpyrifos) whereas low concentrations of the pesticides (0.2 mg/L atrazine, 0.25 mg/L metolachlor, 0.1 mg/L chlorpyrifos) or high concentrations of either herbicides or insecticide alone caused lethargy, reduced growth and delayed metamorphosis but no significant mortality. In the field high herbicide, low insecticide and low herbicide, low insecticide mixtures significantly reduced amphibian populations compared to controls but in the low herbicide, low insecticide wetlands amphibian populations were able to recover through recruitment by the end of the season.

  11. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma risk and insecticide, fungicide and fumigant use in the Agricultural Health Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Farming and pesticide use have previously been linked to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM). We evaluated agricultural use of specific insecticides, fungicides, and fumigants and risk of NHL and NHL-subtypes (including CLL an...

  12. Insecticidal, repellent and fungicidal properties of novel trifluoromethylphenyl amides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Twenty trifluoromethylphenyl amides were synthesized and evaluated as fungicides and as mosquito toxicants and repellents. Against Aedes aegypti larvae, (trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-3,5-dinitrobenzamide (1e) was the most toxic compound (24 h LC50 1940 nM), while against adults (trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-...

  13. Insecticidal, Repellent and Fungicidal Properties of Novel Trifluoromethylphenyl Amides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    strawberry at relative high rates, in the range of 1.64 kg (ai/ha), and azoxystrobin, a QoI (quinone outside inhib- itor) is applied at 0.131 oz (ai/ha...1980, pp. 172–194. [23] D.E. Wedge, B.J. Smith, J.P. Quebedeaux, R.J. Constain, Fungicide management strategies for control of strawberry fruit rot

  14. Insecticidal, repellent and fungicidal properties of novel trifluoromethylphenyl amides.

    PubMed

    Tsikolia, Maia; Bernier, Ulrich R; Coy, Monique R; Chalaire, Katelyn C; Becnel, James J; Agramonte, Natasha M; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Clark, Gary G; Linthicum, Kenneth J; Swale, Daniel R; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R

    2013-09-01

    Twenty trifluoromethylphenyl amides were synthesized and evaluated as fungicides and as mosquito toxicants and repellents. Against Aedes aegypti larvae, N-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-3,5-dinitrobenzamide (1e) was the most toxic compound (24 h LC50 1940 nM), while against adults N-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2,2,2-trifluoroacetamide (1c) was most active (24 h LD50 19.182 nM, 0.5 μL/insect). However, the 24 h LC50 and LD50 values of fipronil against Ae. aegypti larvae and adults were significantly lower: 13.55 nM and 0.787 × 10(-4) nM, respectively. Compound 1c was also active against Drosophila melanogaster adults with 24 h LC50 values of 5.6 and 4.9 μg/cm(2) for the Oregon-R and 1675 strains, respectively. Fipronil had LC50 values of 0.004 and 0.017 μg/cm(2) against the two strains of D. melanogaster, respectively. In repellency bioassays against female Ae. aegypti, 2,2,2-trifluoro-N-(2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)acetamide (4c) had the highest repellent potency with a minimum effective dosage (MED) of 0.039 μmol/cm(2) compared to DEET (MED of 0.091 μmol/cm(2)). Compound N-(2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)hexanamide (4a) had an MED of 0.091 μmol/cm(2) which was comparable to DEET. Compound 4c was the most potent fungicide against Phomopsis obscurans. Several trends were discerned between the structural configuration of these molecules and the effect of structural changes on toxicity and repellency. Para- or meta- trifluoromethylphenyl amides with an aromatic ring attached to the carbonyl carbon showed higher toxicity against Ae. aegypti larvae, than ortho- trifluoromethylphenyl amides. Ortho- trifluoromethylphenyl amides with trifluoromethyl or alkyl group attached to the carbonyl carbon produced higher repellent activity against female Ae. aegypti and Anopheles albimanus than meta- or para- trifluoromethylphenyl amides. The presence of 2,6-dichloro- substitution on the phenyl ring of the amide had an influence on larvicidal and repellent

  15. Degradation of Linuron and Some Other Herbicides and Fungicides by a Linuron-Inducible Enzyme Obtained from Bacillus sphaericus

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, G.; Wallnöfer, P. R.; Plapp, R.

    1971-01-01

    Linuron [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1-methoxy-1-methylurea] induces the formation of an enzyme (acylamidase) responsible for the degradation of a large variety of different herbicides and fungicides of the acylanilide and phenylurea type. The former type is degraded at a rate at least 10 times higher than the latter. PMID:5119200

  16. Effects of Insecticides and Fungicides Commonly Used in Tomato Production on Phytoseiulus persimilis (Acari: Phtyoseiidae).

    PubMed

    Ditillo, J L; Kennedy, G G; Walgenbach, J F

    2016-12-01

    The twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae), is an important pest of tomatoes in North Carolina. Resident populations of the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis have recently been detected on field-grown tomatoes in central North Carolina, and potentially can be a useful biological control agent against T. urticae Laboratory bioassays were used to assess lethal and reproductive effects of 10 insecticides and five fungicides commonly used in commercial tomato production (chlorantraniliprole, spinetoram, permethrin, imidacloprid, dimethoate, dinotefuran, thiamethoxam, bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, azoxystrobin, chlorothalonil, boscalid, cyazofamid, and mancozeb) on P. persimilis adult females and eggs. Insecticides were tested using concentrations equivalent to 1×, 0.5×, and 0.1× of the recommended field rates. Fungicides were tested at the 1× rate only. Dimethoate strongly impacted P. persimilis with high adult mortality, reduced fecundity, and reduced hatch of eggs laid by treated adults, particularly at high concentrations. The pyrethroids lambda-cyhalothrin, bifenthrin, and fenpropathrin were associated with repellency and reproductive effects at high concentrations. Bifenthrin additionally caused increased mortality at high concentrations. Chlorantraniliprole, dinotefuran, and permethrin did not significantly affect mortality or reproduction. Imidacloprid significantly reduced fecundity and egg viability, but was not lethal to adult P. persimilis Thiamethoxam negatively impacted fecundity at the 1× rate. There were no negative effects associated with fungicide exposure with the exception of mancozeb, which impacted fecundity. Field trials were conducted to explore the in vivo impacts of screened insecticides on P. persimilis populations in the field. Field trials supported the incompatibility of dimethoate with P. persimilis populations. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf

  17. Effects of selected herbicides and fungicides on growth, sporulation and conidial germination of entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Celar, Franci A; Kos, Katarina

    2016-11-01

    The in vitro fungicidal effects of six commonly used fungicides, namely fluazinam, propineb, copper(II) hydroxide, metiram, chlorothalonil and mancozeb, and herbicides, namely isoxaflutole, fluazifop-P-butyl, flurochloridone, foramsulfuron, pendimethalin and prosulfocarb, on mycelial growth, sporulation and conidial germination of entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (ATCC 74040) were investigated. Mycelial growth rates and sporulation at 15 and 25 °C were evaluated on PDA plates containing 100, 75, 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25 and 0% of the recommended application rate of each pesticide. The tested pesticides were classified in four scoring categories based on reduction in mycelial growth and sporulation. All pesticides, herbicides and fungicides tested had fungistatic effects of varying intensity, depending on their rate in the medium, on B. bassiana. The most inhibitory herbicides were flurochloridone and prosulfocarb, and fluazinam and copper(II) hydroxide were most inhibitory among the fungicides, while the least inhibitory were isoxaflutole and chlorothalonil. Sporulation and conidial germination of B. bassiana were significantly inhibited by all tested pesticides compared with the control treatment. Flurochloridone, foramsulfuron, prosulfocarb and copper(II) hydroxide inhibited sporulation entirely at 100% rate (99-100% inhibition), and the lowest inhibition was shown by fluazifop-P-butyl (22%) and metiram (33%). At 100% dosage, all herbicides in the test showed a high inhibitory effect on conidial germination. Conidial germination inhibition ranged from 82% with isoxaflutole to 100% with fluorochloridone, pendimethalin and prosulfocarb. At 200% dosage, inhibition rates even increased (96-100%). All 12 pesticides tested had a fungistatic effect on B. bassiana of varying intensity, depending on the pesticide and its concentration. B. bassiana is highly affected by some herbicides and fungicides even at very low rates. Flurochloridone, foramsulfuron

  18. Leaching and sorption of neonicotinoid insecticides and fungicides from seed coatings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalling, Kelly; Hladik, Michelle; Sanders, Corey; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2018-01-01

    Seed coatings are a treatment used on a variety of crops to improve production and offer protection against pests and fungal outbreaks. The leaching of the active ingredients associated with the seed coatings and the sorption to soil was evaluated under laboratory conditions using commercially available corn and soybean seeds to study the fate and transport of these pesticides under controlled conditions. The active ingredients (AI) included one neonicotinoid insecticide (thiamethoxam) and five fungicides (azoxystrobin, fludioxonil, metalaxyl, sedaxane thiabendazole). An aqueous leaching experiment was conducted with treated corn and soybean seeds. Leaching potential was a function of solubility and seed type. The leaching of fludioxonil, was dependent on seed type with a shorter time to equilibrium on the corn compared to the soybean seeds. Sorption experiments with the treated seeds and a solution of the AIs were conducted using three different soil types. Sorption behavior was a function of soil organic matter as well as seed type. For most AIs, a negative relationship was observed between the aqueous concentration and the log Koc. Sorption to all soils tested was limited for the hydrophilic pesticides thiamethoxam and metalaxyl. However, partitioning for the more hydrophobic fungicides was dependent on both seed type and soil properties. The mobility of fludioxonil in the sorption experiment varied by seed type indicating that the adjuvants associated with the seed coating could potentially play a role in the environmental fate of fludioxonil. This is the first study to assess, under laboratory conditions, the fate of pesticides associated with seed coatings using commercially available treated seeds. This information can be used to understand how alterations in agricultural practices (e.g., increasing use of seed treatments) can impact the exposure (concentration and duration) and potential effects of these chemicals to aquatic and terrestrial organisms.

  19. Reducing insecticide and fungicide loads in runoff from plastic mulch with vegetative-covered furrows.

    PubMed

    Rice, Pamela J; Harman-Fetcho, Jennifer A; Sadeghi, Ali M; McConnell, Laura L; Coffman, C Benjamin; Teasdale, John R; Abdul-Baki, Aref; Starr, James L; McCarty, Gregory W; Herbert, Rachel R; Hapeman, Cathleen J

    2007-02-21

    A common management practice for the production of fresh-market vegetables utilizes polyethylene (plastic) mulch because it increases soil temperature, decreases weed pressure, maintains soil moisture, and minimizes soil contact with the product. However, rain events afford much more erosion and runoff because 50-75% of the field is covered with an impervious surface. A plot study was conducted to compare and to quantify the off-site movement of soil, insecticides, and fungicides associated with runoff from plots planted with Sunbeam tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) using the conventional polyethylene mulch management practice vs an alternative management practice-polyethylene mulch-covered beds with cereal rye (Secale cereale) planted in the furrows between the beds. The use of cereal rye-covered furrows with the conventional polyethylene system decreased runoff volume by more than 40%, soil erosion by more than 80%, and pesticide loads by 48-74%. Results indicate that vegetative furrows are critical to minimizing the negative aspects of this management practice.

  20. Risk and Prognostic Factors of Inpatient Mortality Associated with Unintentional Insecticide and Herbicide Poisonings: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Wu-Chien; Chung, Chi-Hsiang; Jaakkola, Jouni J. K.; Chu, Chi-Ming; Kao, Senyeong; Su, Sui-Lung; Lai, Ching-Huang

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Pesticide poisoning is an important public health problem worldwide. The study aimed to determine the risk of all-cause and cause-specific inpatient mortality and to identify prognostic factors for inpatient mortality associated with unintentional insecticide and herbicide pesticide poisonings. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of 3,986 inpatients recruited at hospitalization between 1999 and 2008 in Taiwan. We used the International Classification of Disease, 9th ed., Clinical Modification external causes of injury codes to classify poisoning agents into accidental poisoning by insecticides and herbicides. Comparisons in mortality rates were made between insecticide poisoning patients and herbicide poisoning patients by using the Cox proportional hazards models to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results There were 168 deaths during 21,583 person-days of follow-up evaluation (7.8 per 1,000 person-days). The major causes of mortality for insecticide poisonings were the toxic effect of organophosphate and coma, and the major causes of mortality for herbicide poisonings were the toxic effect of other pesticides and the toxic effect of organophosphate. The mortality for herbicide exposure was fourfold higher than that for insecticide exposure. The factors associated with inpatient mortality were herbicide poisonings (HR = 4.58, 95% CI 3.29 to 6.37) and receiving mechanical ventilation treatment (HR = 3.85, 95% CI 2.73 to 5.42). Conclusions We demonstrated that herbicides stand out as the dominant agent for poisoning-related fatalities. The control of and limiting access to herbicide agents and developing appropriate therapeutic regimens, including emergency care, should be priorities. PMID:23029146

  1. Effects of a fungicide (imazalil) and an insecticide (diazinon) on stream fungi and invertebrates associated with litter breakdown.

    PubMed

    Flores, L; Banjac, Z; Farré, M; Larrañaga, A; Mas-Martí, E; Muñoz, I; Barceló, D; Elosegi, A

    2014-04-01

    The intensification of agriculture has promoted the use of pesticides such as fungicides and insecticides. Many pesticides readily leach into natural water bodies and affect both organisms and ecosystem processes such as leaf breakdown, a crucial process in headwater streams. As leaf breakdown in streams involves sequential steps by different groups of organisms (first microbial conditioning, then invertebrate shredding), pesticides targeting different organisms are likely to affect one or the other step, and a mixture of contaminants might have interactive effects. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of a fungicide (imazalil) and an insecticide (diazinon) on stream fungal and invertebrate activities, and their effects on leaf consumption. After an initial assay to define 'effective concentration' of both pesticides in a laboratory experiment, we manipulated pesticide presence/absence during the conditioning and shredding phases. Both pesticides affected fungal community and reduced the performance of the shredding amphipod Echinogammarus berilloni, and leaf consumption. The impact of pesticides on fungal sporulation depended on the length of the exposure period. In addition, pesticides seemed to cause an energetic imbalance in the amphipod, affecting body condition and mortality. The combined effect of both pesticides was similar to those of the fungicide. Overall, our results show that the effects of pesticide mixtures on leaf breakdown are hard to predict from those observed in either fungi or macroinvertebrate performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Richness and density of aquatic benthic macroinvertebrates after exposure to fungicides and insecticides in rice paddy fields.

    PubMed

    Wandscheer, Alana C D; Marchesan, Enio; Santos, Sandro; Zanella, Renato; Silva, Marília F; Londero, Guilherme P; Donato, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to verify the richness and density of aquatic benthic macroinvertebrates after exposure to fungicides and insecticides of the rice paddy fields. In the crop seasons of 2012/13 and 2013/14, field experiments were performed, which consisted of single-dose applications of the fungicides trifloxystrobin + tebuconazole and tricyclazole, and the insecticides lambda-cyhalothrin + thiamethoxam and diflubenzuron, in 10 m2 experimental plots, over rice plants in the R3 stage. Control plots with and without rice plants were maintained in order to simulate a natural environment. Soil samples were collected during rice cultivation for assessment of the macroinvertebrate fauna. Chemical-physical parameters assessed in the experiments included temperature, pH and oxygen dissolved in the water and pesticide persistence in the water and in the soil. The application of a single dose of the pesticides and fungicides in the recommended period does not cause significant negative effects over the richness and density of the macroinvertebrates. Tebuconazole, tricyclazole and thiamethoxam showed high persistence in the irrigation water of rice paddy fields. Thus, the doses and number of applications of these products in crops should be carefully handled in order to avoid contamination of the environment.

  3. Organochlorine insecticide, herbicide and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) inhibition of NaK-ATPase in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Paul W.; Friedhoff, Jacqueline M.; Wedemeyer, Gary A.

    1972-01-01

    The current widespread presence of chlorinated insecticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) and herbicides in world waterways has elicited much interest in the mechanisms of their toxicity in fishes. Inhibition of Na+,K+-activated adenosinetriphosphatase (NaK-ATPase) and Mg++-dependent ATPase (Mg-ATPase) by DDT, endosulfan and dicofol has been demonstrated in gill, brain and kidney microsomes of rainbow trout (1,2). Intestinal and gill ATPases in marine teleosts were recently reported to be sensitive to organochlorines (3). CutkonTp et al (4) noted inhibition of NaK-ATPase and Mg-ATPase in bluegill brain, liver, muscle and kidney by DDT and related chlorinated hydrocarbons. Inhibition of ATPases by PCB's has been recently shown in bluegill kidney, brain and liver (5). In the present study, we have further examined the NaK-ATPase enzyme system in trout gill as a site for the possible toxicity of selected organopolychlors, i.e., chlorinated insecticides, herbicides and PCB's.

  4. Evaluations of Insecticides and Fungicides for Reducing Attack Rates of a new invasive ambrosia beetle (Euwallacea Sp., Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in Infested Landscape Trees in California.

    PubMed

    Eatough Jones, Michele; Kabashima, John; Eskalen, Akif; Dimson, Monica; Mayorquin, Joey S; Carrillo, Joseph D; Hanlon, Christopher C; Paine, Timothy D

    2017-08-01

    A recently discovered ambrosia beetle with the proposed common name of polyphagous shot hole borer (Euwallacea sp., Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is reported to attack >200 host tree species in southern California, including many important native and urban landscape trees. This invasive beetle, along with its associated fungi, causes branch dieback and tree mortality in a large variety of tree species including sycamore (Platanus racemosa Nutt.). Due to the severity of the impact of this Euwallacea sp., short-term management tools must include chemical control options for the arboriculture industry and private landowners to protect trees. We examined the effectiveness of insecticides, fungicides, and insecticide-fungicide combinations for controlling continued Euwallacea sp. attacks on previously infested sycamore trees which were monitored for 6 mo after treatment. Pesticide combinations were generally more effective than single pesticide treatments. The combination of a systemic insecticide (emamectin benzoate), a contact insecticide (bifenthrin), and a fungicide (metconazole) provided some level of control when applied on moderate and heavily infested trees. The biological fungicide Bacillus subtilis provided short-term control. There was no difference in the performance of the three triazole fungicides (propiconazole, tebuconazole, and metconazole) included in this study. Although no pesticide combination provided substantial control over time, pesticide treatments may be more effective when trees are treated during early stages of attack by this ambrosia beetle. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Cyanobacterial Toxins as Allelochemicals with Potential Applications as Algaecides, Herbicides and Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Berry, John P.; Gantar, Miroslav; Perez, Mario H.; Berry, Gerald; Noriega, Fernando G.

    2008-01-01

    Cyanobacteria (“blue-green algae”) from marine and freshwater habitats are known to produce a diverse array of toxic or otherwise bioactive metabolites. However, the functional role of the vast majority of these compounds, particularly in terms of the physiology and ecology of the cyanobacteria that produce them, remains largely unknown. A limited number of studies have suggested that some of the compounds may have ecological roles as allelochemicals, specifically including compounds that may inhibit competing sympatric macrophytes, algae and microbes. These allelochemicals may also play a role in defense against potential predators and grazers, particularly aquatic invertebrates and their larvae. This review will discuss the existing evidence for the allelochemical roles of cyanobacterial toxins, as well as the potential for development and application of these compounds as algaecides, herbicides and insecticides, and specifically present relevant results from investigations into toxins of cyanobacteria from the Florida Everglades and associated waterways. PMID:18728763

  6. Evaluation of potential embryotoxicity and teratogenicity of 42 herbicides, insecticides, and petroleum contaminants to mallard eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Albers, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    Results are reported for the embryotoxicity of 42 environmental contaminants applied externally to mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) eggs including crude and refined petroleum, and commercial formulations of herbicides and insecticides. Many of the petroleum pollutants were embryotoxic and moderately teratogenic and had LD50s of 0.3 to 5 ?l per egg (~6?90 ?g/g egg). The most toxic was a commercial oil used for control of road dust followed by South Louisiana crude oil, Kuwait crude, no. 2 fuel oil, bunker C fuel oil, and industrial and automotive waste oil. Prudhoe Bay crude, unused crankcase oil, aviation kerosene, and aliphatic hydrocarbon mixtures were less toxic ( LD50s of 18 to over 75 ? l) and less teratogenic. The LD50s of herbicides and insecticides in aqueous emulsion were measured by egg immersion; the most toxic were paraquat and trifluralin (LD50s of about 1.5 Ibs/A; 1.7 kg/ha). Propanil, bromoxynil with MCPA, methyl diclofop, prometon, endrin, sulprofos, and parathion were toxic (LD50s of 7 to 40 Ibs/A; 7.8?44.8 kg/ha), whereas 2,4-D, glyphosate, atrazine, carbaryl, dalapon, dicamba, methomyl, and phosmet were only slightly toxic or not toxic (LD50s of 178 to over 500 Ibs/A; 199?560 kg/ha). Pesticides in nontoxic oil vehicle applied by microliter pipet were up to 18 times more toxic than when applied in water vehicle, which was probably due to better penetration of the pesticide past the eggshell and its membranes. Teratogenic effects and impaired embryonic growth are reported and results discussed in terms of potential hazard at field levels of application. A discussion is provided on the effects of pollutants on the eggs of other species of birds under laboratory and field conditions.

  7. Occupational use of insecticides, fungicides ~and fumigants and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and nultiplc myeloma in the Agricultural Health Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Farming and exposure to pesticides have been linked to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and multiple myeloma (MM) in previous studies. We evaluated use of insecticides, fungicides and fumigants and risk of NHL, including MM and other NHL sub-types in the Agricultural Health Study, a ...

  8. Synergistic interactions between a variety of insecticides and an ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitor fungicide in dietary exposures of bumble bees (Bombus terrestris L.).

    PubMed

    Raimets, Risto; Karise, Reet; Mänd, Marika; Kaart, Tanel; Ponting, Sally; Song, Jimao; Cresswell, James E

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, concern has been raised over honey bee colony losses, and also among wild bees there is evidence for extinctions and range contractions in Europe and North America. Pesticides have been proposed as a potential cause of this decline. Bees are exposed simultaneously to a variety of agrochemicals, which may cause synergistically detrimental impacts, which are incompletely understood. We investigated the toxicity of the fungicide imazalil in mixture with four common insecticides: fipronil (phenylpyrazoid), cypermethrin (pyrethroid), thiamethoxam, and imidacloprid (neonicotinoids). Ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitor (EBI) fungicides like imazalil can inhibit P450 detoxification systems in insects and therefore fungicide - insecticide co-occurrence might produce synergistic toxicity in bees. We assessed the impact of dietary fungicide - insecticide mixtures on the mortality and feeding rates of laboratory bumble bees (Bombus terrestris L.). Regarding mortality, imazalil synergised the toxicity of fipronil, cypermethrin and thiamethoxam, but not imidacloprid. We found no synergistic effects on feeding rates. Our findings suggest that P450-based detoxification processes are differentially important in mitigating the toxicity of certain insecticides, even those of the same chemical class. Our evidence that cocktail effects can arise in bumble bees should extend concern about the potential impacts of agrochemical mixtures to include wild bee species in farmland. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Examining multiple sublethal contaminants on the gray treefrog (Hyla versicolor): effects of an insecticide, herbicide, and fertilizer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, M.D.; Bridges-Britton, C. M.

    2006-01-01

    We examined the single and interactive effects of an insecticide, an herbicide, and a fertilizer on gray treefrog (Hyla versicolor) tadpoles. Tadpoles were reared in mesocosms from hatching through metamorphosis and were exposed to the presence or absence of as many as three contaminants. Tadpoles did not appear to be more susceptible to single versus multiple contaminants, which may result from positive changes in food resources that compensate for the effects of other contaminants. ?? 2006 SETAC.

  10. Interactions of an insecticide, herbicide, and natural stressors in amphibian community mesocosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, M.D.; James, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Amphibians developing in wetlands embedded within or near agricultural lands may frequently encounter chemical mixtures. The objectives of our study were to determine the effects that post-application concentrations of an insecticide (carbaryl) and an herbicide (atrazine) have on body mass, development, and survival of two anuran species (southern leopard frog, Rana sphenocephala; American toad, Bufo americanus) and two caudate species (spotted salamander, Ambystoma maculatum; small-mouthed salamander, A. texanum) reared in outdoor cattle tank mesocosms. In one experiment, we manipulated tadpole density (low or high), carbaryl exposure (0, 3.5, 7.0 mg/L), and atrazine exposure (0 or 200 μg/L) to test for effects on development, mass, and survival of larvae. In a second experiment, we manipulated pond hydroperiod (constant or drying), carbaryl exposure (0 or 5 mg/L), and atrazine exposure (0 or 200 μg/L) to test for effects on mass, time, and survival to metamorphosis. Salamanders were virtually eliminated in carbaryl treatments, indicating that at realistic levels, this insecticide could cause population declines for salamanders in contaminated habitats. Carbaryl also had negative effects on toad survival. Exposure to atrazine had negative effects on body size, development, and time to metamorphosis in anuran species, which were associated with reduced chlorophyll levels. Both chemicals interacted significantly with density or hydroperiod, indicating that the environmental conditions could influence the impact of a contaminant. A significant atrazine-by-carbaryl interaction resulted in smaller and less developed spotted salamander larvae than in control ponds. Atrazine exposure, however, appeared to moderate negative effects of carbaryl for spotted salamanders. Our research suggests that important changes in the community's food web result from chemical exposure, which influence the susceptibility of amphibian species to contaminants.

  11. The characteristics of emergency department presentations related to acute herbicide or insecticide poisoning in South Korea between 2011 and 2014.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong Mi; Chun, Byeong Jo; Cho, Yong Soo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine epidemiologic data regarding acute herbicide or insecticide poisoning in adults from 2011 to 2014 at the national level in South Korea. Further, the association between governmental regulations involving pesticides and changes in pesticide poisoning occurrences over time was determined. Data were obtained from the emergency department (ED)-based Injury In-depth Surveillance system conducted by the Korea Center for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC). Governmental regulations on pesticides were downloaded from the homepage of the Korea Rural Development Administration. Pesticides were classified according to guidelines provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) and by the respective Resistance Action Committee (RAC). Trends in the number of ED presentations and case fatality rate (CFR) due to pesticide poisoning were investigated. The overall CFR due to poisoning from herbicides or insecticides in adults in South Korea was 16.8% during 2011-2014. However, CFR significantly decreased over the 4-year period. The ED presentations of paraquat (PQ) poisoning fell significantly, whereas poisoning due to glyphosate, glufosinate, or combined herbicides increased markedly over the 4 years. Between 2011 and 2013, PQ was the most common pesticide poisoning, whereas glyphosate became the most frequent in 2014. PQ produced the highest rate of fatality followed by endosulfan. Although the frequency of PQ poisoning decreased, which may be attributed to governmental regulations, the CFR and incidence of pesticide poisoning in adults remain a public health concern that needs to be addressed.

  12. In vitro studies of cellular and molecular developmental toxicity of adjuvants, herbicides, and fungicides commonly used in Red River Valley, Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Lin, N; Garry, V F

    2000-07-28

    Recent epidemiologic studies showed increased frequency of birth defects in pesticide applicators and general population of the Red River Valley, Minnesota. These studies further indicated that this crop growing area used more chlorophenoxy herbicides and fungicides than elsewhere in Minnesota. Based on frequency of use and known biology, certain herbicides, pesticide additives, fungicides, and mycotoxins are suspect agents. To define whether these agents affect developmental endpoints in vitro, 16 selected agrochemicals were examined using the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. In the flow cytometric assay, cell proliferation in this estrogen-responsive cell line indicates xenobiotic-mediated estrogenic effects. Cell viability, morphology, ploidy, and apoptosis were incorporated in this assay. Data showed that the adjuvants X-77 and Activate Plus induced significant cell proliferation at 0.1 and 1 microg/ml. The commercial-grade herbicides 2,4-D LV4 and 2,4-D amine induced cell proliferation at 1 and 10 microg/ml. The reagent-grade 2,4-D products failed to induce proliferation over the same concentration range, suggesting that other ingredients in the commercial products, presumably adjuvants, could be a factor in these results. The fungicides triphenyltin and mancozeb induced apoptosis at concentrations of 4.1 microg/ml (10(-5) M) and 50 microg/ml, respectively. Triphenyltin also induced aneuploidy (C2/M arrest) at 0.41 microg/ml (10(-6) M). Data provide a mechanistic step to understanding human reproductive and developmental effects in populations exposed to these agrochemicals, and initiative to focusing limited resources for future in vivo animal developmental toxicity studies.

  13. Flood Stress as a Technique to Assess Preventive Insecticide and Fungicide Treatments for Protecting Trees against Ambrosia Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Ranger, Christopher M.; Schultz, Peter B.; Reding, Michael E.; Frank, Steven D.; Palmquist, Debra E.

    2016-01-01

    Ambrosia beetles tunnel into the heartwood of trees where they cultivate and feed upon a symbiotic fungus. We assessed the effectiveness of flood stress for making Cercis canadensis L. and Cornus florida L. trees attractive to attack as part of insecticide and fungicide efficacy trials conducted in Ohio and Virginia. Since female ambrosia beetles will not begin ovipositing until their symbiotic fungus is established within the host, we also assessed pre-treatment of trees with permethrin, azoxystrobin, and potassium phosphite on fungal establishment and beetle colonization success. Permethrin reduced attacks on flooded trees, yet no attacks occurred on any of the non-flooded trees. Fewer galleries created within flooded trees pre-treated with permethrin, azoxystrobin, and potassium phosphite contained the purported symbiotic fungus; foundress’ eggs were only detected in flooded but untreated trees. While pre-treatment with permethrin, azoxystrobin, and potassium phosphite can disrupt colonization success, maintaining tree health continues to be the most effective and sustainable management strategy. PMID:27548230

  14. Impact of insecticide and fungicide residue contact on plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), mobility and mortality: implications for pest management

    PubMed Central

    Leskey, Tracy C; Wright, Starker E; Saguez, Julien; Vincent, Charles

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND An evaluation was made of the effects of seven neurotoxic insecticides (esfenvalerate, indoxacarb, clothianidin, thiacloprid, azinphosmethyl, phosmet and imidacloprid), one insect growth regulator (novaluron) and two fungicides (myclobutanin and mancozeb), with water as the control, on the horizontal mobility of plum curculios exposed to dried pesticide residues. Mobility was recorded over a 2 h period using ethological tracking software. Mortality was recorded immediately after horizontal mobility experiments and 24 h later. RESULTS Esfenvalerate had the greatest impact on mobility. Immediately after exposure to this compound, plum curculios moved significantly greater distances and for a significantly longer period of time compared with all other compounds. After 24 h, esfenvalerate also led to high mortality rates (>86.0%). Exposure to azinphosmethyl and phosmet also led to high rates of mortality, although the impact on mobility was less pronounced. Exposure to indoxacarb, thiacloprid, imidacloprid, novaluron, myclobutanin and mancozeb had no impact on mobility and resulted in little to no mortality. Clothianidin affected mobility after a 2 h exposure period, and high mortality (60%) was recorded after 24 h. CONCLUSIONS The results indicate that, in the context of a treated orchard, plum curculios exposed to dried pesticide residues may be capable of foraging before succumbing to toxicant exposure, while exposure to pesticides such as esfenvalerate may rapidly incapacitate adult plum curculios. PMID:23213003

  15. Synergistic mortality between a neonicotinoid insecticide and an ergosterol-biosynthesis-inhibiting fungicide in three bee species.

    PubMed

    Sgolastra, Fabio; Medrzycki, Piotr; Bortolotti, Laura; Renzi, Maria Teresa; Tosi, Simone; Bogo, Gherardo; Teper, Dariusz; Porrini, Claudio; Molowny-Horas, Roberto; Bosch, Jordi

    2017-06-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides have been identified as an important factor contributing to bee diversity declines. Nonetheless, uncertainties remain about their impact under field conditions. Most studies have been conducted on Apis mellifera and tested single compounds. However, in agricultural environments, bees are often exposed to multiple pesticides. We explore the synergistic mortality between a neonicotinoid (clothianidin) and an ergosterol-biosynthesis-inhibiting fungicide (propiconazole) in three bee species (A. mellifera, Bombus terrestris, Osmia bicornis) following oral exposure in the laboratory. We developed a new approach based on the binomial proportion test to analyse synergistic interactions. We estimated uptake of clothianidin per foraging bout in honey bees foraging on seed-coated rapeseed fields. We found significant synergistic mortality in all three bee species exposed to non-lethal doses of propiconazole and their respective LD 10 of clothianidin. Significant synergism was only found at the first assessment times in A. mellifera (4 and 24 h) and B. terrestris (4 h), but persisted throughout the experiment (96 h) in O. bicornis. O. bicornis was also the most sensitive species to clothianidin. Our results underscore the importance to test pesticide combinations likely to occur in agricultural environments, and to include several bee species in environmental risk assessment schemes. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Interactive effects of an insecticide and a fungicide on different organism groups and ecosystem functioning in a stream detrital food web.

    PubMed

    Dawoud, Mohab; Bundschuh, Mirco; Goedkoop, Willem; McKie, Brendan G

    2017-05-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are often affected by cocktails of multiple pesticides targeting different organism groups. Prediction and evaluation of the ecosystem-level effects of these mixtures is complicated by the potential not only for interactions among the pesticides themselves, but also for the pesticides to alter biotic interactions across trophic levels. In a stream microcosm experiment, we investigated the effects of two pesticides targeting two organism groups (the insecticide lindane and fungicide azoxystrobin) on the functioning of a model stream detrital food web consisting of a detritivore (Ispoda: Asellus aquaticus) and microbes (an assemblage of fungal hyphomycetes) consuming leaf litter. We assessed how these pesticides interacted with the presence and absence of the detritivore to affect three indicators of ecosystem functioning - leaf decomposition, fungal biomass, fungal sporulation - as well as detritivore mortality. Leaf decomposition rates were more strongly impacted by the fungicide than the insecticide, reflecting especially negative effects on leaf processing by detritivores. This result most like reflects reduced fungal biomass and increased detritivore mortality under the fungicide treatment. Fungal sporulation was elevated by exposure to both the insecticide and fungicide, possibly representing a stress-induced increase in investment in propagule dispersal. Stressor interactions were apparent in the impacts of the combined pesticide treatment on fungal sporulation and detritivore mortality, which were reduced and elevated relative to the single stressor treatments, respectively. These results demonstrate the potential of trophic and multiple stressor interactions to modulate the ecosystem-level impacts of chemicals, highlighting important challenges in predicting, understanding and evaluating the impacts of multiple chemical stressors on more complex food webs in situ. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Dacthal and chlorophenoxy herbicides and chlorothalonil fungicide in eggs of osprey (Pandion haliaetus) from the Duwamish-Lake Washington-Puget Sound area of Washington state, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chu, S.; Henny, C.J.; Kaiser, J.L.; Drouillard, K.G.; Haffner, G.D.; Letcher, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Current-use chlorophenoxy herbicides including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, dicamba, triclopyr, dicamba, dimethyl tetrachloroterephthalate (DCPA or dacthal), and the metabolite of pyrethroids, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), and the fungicide, chlorothalonil, were investigated in the eggs of osprey (Pandion haliaetus) that were collected from 15 sites from five study areas Puget Sound/Seattle area of Washington State, USA. DCPA differs from acidic chlorophenoxy herbicides, and is not readily hydrolyzed to free acid or acid metabolites, and thus we developed a new method. Of the 12 chlorophenoxy herbicides and chlorothalonil analyzed only DCPA could be quantified at six of these sites (2.0 to 10.3 pg/g fresh weight). However, higher levels (6.9 to 85.5 pg/g fresh weight) of the unexpected DCPA structural isomer, dimethyl tetrachlorophthalate (diMe-TCP) were quantified in eggs from all sites. diMe-TCP concentrations tended to be higher in eggs from the Everett Harbor area. As diMe-TCP is not an industrial product, and not commercially available, the source of diMe-TCP is unclear. Regardless, these findings indicate that DCPA and diMe-TCP can be accumulated in the food chain of fish-eating osprey, and transferred in ovo to eggs, and thus may be of concern to the health of the developing chick and the general reproductive health of this osprey population. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Gene transcription in Daphnia magna: effects of acute exposure to a carbamate insecticide and an acetanilide herbicide.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Joana Luísa; Hill, Christopher J; Sibly, Richard M; Bolshakov, Viacheslav N; Gonçalves, Fernando; Heckmann, Lars-Henrik; Callaghan, Amanda

    2010-05-05

    Daphnia magna is a key invertebrate in the freshwater environment and is used widely as a model in ecotoxicological measurements and risk assessment. Understanding the genomic responses of D. magna to chemical challenges will be of value to regulatory authorities worldwide. Here we exposed D. magna to the insecticide methomyl and the herbicide propanil to compare phenotypic effects with changes in mRNA expression levels. Both pesticides are found in drainage ditches and surface water bodies standing adjacent to crops. Methomyl, a carbamate insecticide widely used in agriculture, inhibits acetylcholinesterase, a key enzyme in nerve transmission. Propanil, an acetanilide herbicide, is used to control grass and broad-leaf weeds. The phenotypic effects of single doses of each chemical were evaluated using a standard immobilisation assay. Immobilisation was linked to global mRNA expression levels using the previously estimated 48h-EC(1)s, followed by hybridization to a cDNA microarray with more than 13,000 redundant cDNA clones representing >5000 unique genes. Following exposure to methomyl and propanil, differential expression was found for 624 and 551 cDNAs, respectively (one-way ANOVA with Bonferroni correction, P

  19. Comparative assessment of herbicide and fungicide runoff risk: a case study for peanut production in the Southern Atlantic Coastal Plain (USA).

    PubMed

    Potter, Thomas L; Bosch, David D; Strickland, Timothy C

    2014-08-15

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is produced intensively in the southern Atlantic Coastal Plain of the eastern USA. To effectively protect the region's water quality data are needed which quantify runoff of pesticides used to protect these crops. Fungicides are used intensively yet there is little published data which describe their potential for loss in surface runoff. This study compared runoff of a fungicide, tebuconazole (α-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-α-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol), and an herbicide, metolachlor (2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)acetamide) from 0.2 ha fields in strip (ST), a commonly used conservation-tillage practice, and conventional tillage (CT) near Tifton, GA (USA). Following their first application, metolachlor and tebuconazole were detected at high frequency in runoff. Concentrations and their annual losses increased with application frequency and runoff event timing and frequency with respect to applications, and when fields were positioned at the top of the slope and CT was practiced. Runoff one day after treatment (DAT) contributed to high tebuconazole runoff loss, up to 9.8% of the amount applied on an annual basis. In all cases, metolachlor loss was more than 10 times less even though total application was 45% higher. This was linked to the fact that the one metolachlor application to each crop was in May, one of the region's driest months. In sum, studies showed that fungicide runoff rates may be relatively high and emphasize the need to focus on these products in future studies on peanut and other crops. The study also showed that peanut farmers should be encouraged to use conservation tillage practices like ST which can substantially reduce pesticide runoff. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Environmental fate of fungicides and other current-use pesticides in a central California estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Kuivila, Kathryn; Orlando, James L.; Phillips, Bryn M.; Anderson, Brian S.; Siegler, Katie; Hunt, John W.; Hamilton, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The current study documents the fate of current-use pesticides in an agriculturally-dominated central California coastal estuary by focusing on the occurrence in water, sediment and tissue of resident aquatic organisms. Three fungicides (azoxystrobin, boscalid, and pyraclostrobin), one herbicide (propyzamide) and two organophosphate insecticides (chlorpyrifos and diazinon) were detected frequently. Dissolved pesticide concentrations in the estuary corresponded to the timing of application while bed sediment pesticide concentrations correlated with the distance from potential sources. Fungicides and insecticides were detected frequently in fish and invertebrates collected near the mouth of the estuary and the contaminant profiles differed from the sediment and water collected. This is the first study to document the occurrence of many current-use pesticides, including fungicides, in tissue. Limited information is available on the uptake, accumulation and effects of current-use pesticides on non-target organisms. Additional data are needed to understand the impacts of pesticides, especially in small agriculturally-dominated estuaries.

  1. Occurrence and persistence of fungicides in bed sediments and suspended solids from three targeted use areas in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    To document the environmental occurrence and persistence of fungicides, a robust and sensitive analytical method was used to measure 34 fungicides and an additional 57 current-use pesticides in bed sediments and suspended solids collected from areas of intense fungicide use within three geographic areas across the United States. Sampling sites were selected near or within agricultural research farms using prophylactic fungicides at rates and types typical of their geographic location. At least two fungicides were detected in 55% of the bed and 83% of the suspended solid samples and were detected in conjunction with herbicides and insecticides. Six fungicides were detected in all samples including pyraclostrobin (75%), boscalid (53%), chlorothalonil (41%) and zoxamide (22%). Pyraclostrobin, a strobilurin fungicide, used frequently in the United States on a variety of crops, was detected more frequently than p,p′-DDE, the primary degradate of p,p′-DDT, which is typically one of the most frequently occurring pesticides in sediments collected within highly agricultural areas. Maximum fungicide concentrations in bed sediments and suspended solids were 198 and 56.7 μg/kg dry weight, respectively. There is limited information on the occurrence, fate, and persistence of many fungicides in sediment and the environmental impacts are largely unknown. The results of this study indicate the importance of documenting the persistence of fungicides in the environment and the need for a better understanding of off-site transport mechanisms, particularly in areas where crops are grown that require frequent treatments to prevent fungal diseases.

  2. Single and Combined Effects of Pesticide Seed Dressings and Herbicides on Earthworms, Soil Microorganisms, and Litter Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Van Hoesel, Willem; Tiefenbacher, Alexandra; König, Nina; Dorn, Verena M; Hagenguth, Julia F; Prah, Urša; Widhalm, Theresia; Wiklicky, Viktoria; Koller, Robert; Bonkowski, Michael; Lagerlöf, Jan; Ratzenböck, Andreas; Zaller, Johann G

    2017-01-01

    Seed dressing, i.e., the treatment of crop seeds with insecticides and/or fungicides, aiming to protect seeds from pests and diseases, is widely used in conventional agriculture. During the growing season, those crop fields often receive additional broadband herbicide applications. However, despite this broad utilization, very little is known on potential side effects or interactions between these different pesticide classes on soil organisms. In a greenhouse pot experiment, we studied single and interactive effects of seed dressing of winter wheat ( Triticum aestivum L. var. Capo ) with neonicotinoid insecticides and/or strobilurin and triazolinthione fungicides and an additional one-time application of a glyphosate-based herbicide on the activity of earthworms, soil microorganisms, litter decomposition, and crop growth. To further address food-web interactions, earthworms were introduced to half of the experimental units as an additional experimental factor. Seed dressings significantly reduced the surface activity of earthworms with no difference whether insecticides or fungicides were used. Moreover, seed dressing effects on earthworm activity were intensified by herbicides (significant herbicide × seed dressing interaction). Neither seed dressings nor herbicide application affected litter decomposition, soil basal respiration, microbial biomass, or specific respiration. Seed dressing did also not affect wheat growth. We conclude that interactive effects on soil biota and processes of different pesticide classes should receive more attention in ecotoxicological research.

  3. Insecticide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Cannon RD, Ruha A-M. Insecticides, herbicides, and rodenticides. In: Adams JG, ed. Emergency Medicine . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 146. Welker K, Thompson TM. Pesticides. ...

  4. Incidental contact with insecticides and fungicides on plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), movement and mortality: implications for pest management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Exposure to Guthion and Imidan also led to high rates of mortality, though the impact on movement was less pronounced. Exposure to the neonicotinoid compounds, Calypso, Clutch, and Provado, to the insect growth regulator, Rimon, and to the fungicides, Nova and Penncozeb, had no impact on mobility a...

  5. Urinary Concentrations of Insecticide and Herbicide Metabolites among Pregnant Women in Rural Ghana: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Blair J; Ae-Ngibise, Kenneth A; Boamah, Ellen A; Mujtaba, Mohammed; Messerlian, Carmen; Hauser, Russ; Coull, Brent; Calafat, Antonia M; Jack, Darby; Kinney, Patrick L; Whyatt, Robin; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Asante, Kwaku P

    2017-03-29

    Use of pesticides by households in rural Ghana is common for residential pest control, agricultural use, and for the reduction of vectors carrying disease. However, few data are available about exposure to pesticides among this population. Our objective was to quantify urinary concentrations of metabolites of organophosphate (OP), pyrethroid, and select herbicides during pregnancy, and to explore exposure determinants. In 2014, 17 pregnant women from rural Ghana were surveyed about household pesticide use and provided weekly first morning urine voids during three visits ( n = 51 samples). A total of 90.1% (46/51) of samples had detectable OP metabolites [geometric mean, GM (95% CI): 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol 0.54 µg/L (0.36-0.81), para-nitrophenol 0.71 µg/L (0.51-1.00)], 75.5% (37/49) had detectable pyrethroid metabolites [GM: 3-phenoxybenzoic acid 0.23 µg/L (0.17, 0.32)], and 70.5% (36/51) had detectable 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid levels, a herbicide [GM: 0.46 µg/L (0.29-0.73)]. Concentrations of para-nitrophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in Ghanaian pregnant women appear higher when compared to nonpregnant reproductive-aged women in a reference U.S. Larger studies are necessary to more fully explore predictors of exposure in this population.

  6. Differential effects of herbicides atrazine and fenoxaprop-ethyl, and insecticides diazinon and malathion, on viability and maturation of porcine oocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Casas, Eduardo; Bonilla, Edmundo; Ducolomb, Yvonne; Betancourt, Miguel

    2010-02-01

    Exposure to pesticides may be a major cause of reproductive dysfunction in humans and animals. Atrazine and fenoxaprop-ethyl, widely used herbicides, and malathion and diazinon, organophosphate insecticides, are considered only slightly toxic to vertebrates; however, there is evidence of greater effects on reproductive function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of these pesticides on oocyte viability and in vitro maturation. Gametes were matured in increasing concentrations of the pesticides and then stained with MTT to evaluate viability and bisbenzimide to assess the maturation stage, in the same oocyte. Atrazine had no effect on viability but maturation was significantly reduced, while fenoxaprop-ethyl affected both parameters. The insecticides affected viability and maturation but to a different degree. The four pesticides showed a more pronounced effect on maturation than on viability, due to a blockage at germinal vesicle stage.

  7. Field-relevant doses of the systemic insecticide fipronil and fungicide pyraclostrobin impair mandibular and hypopharyngeal glands in nurse honeybees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Zaluski, Rodrigo; Justulin, Luis Antonio; Orsi, Ricardo de Oliveira

    2017-11-09

    Global decreases in bee populations emphasize the importance of assessing how environmental stressors affect colony maintenance, especially considering the extreme task specialization observed in honeybee societies. Royal jelly, a protein secretion essential to colony nutrition, is produced by nurse honeybees, and development of bee mandibular glands, which comprise a reservoir surrounded by secretory cells and hypopharyngeal glands that are shaped by acini, is directly associated with production of this secretion. Here, we examined individual and combined effects of the systemic fungicide pyraclostrobin and insecticide fipronil in field-relevant doses (850 and 2.5 ppb, respectively) on mandibular and hypopharyngeal glands in nurse honeybees. Six days of pesticide treatment decreased secretory cell height in mandibular glands. When pyraclostrobin and fipronil were combined, the reservoir volume in mandibular glands also decreased. The total number of acini in hypopharyngeal glands was not affected, but pesticide treatment reduced the number of larger acini while increasing smaller acini. These morphological impairments appeared to reduce royal jelly secretion by nurse honeybees and consequently hampered colony maintenance. Overall, pesticide exposure in doses close to those experienced by bees in the field impaired brood-food glands in nurse honeybees, a change that could negatively influence development, survival, and colony maintenance.

  8. Urinary biomarkers of exposure to insecticides, herbicides, and one insect repellent among pregnant women in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ryan C; Cantonwine, David E; Anzalota Del Toro, Liza V; Calafat, Antonia M; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Davis, Mark D; Baker, Samuel E; Alshawabkeh, Akram N; Cordero, José F; Meeker, John D

    2014-11-19

    There are potential adverse health risks to the mother and fetus from exposure to pesticides. Thus, studies of exposure to pesticides among pregnant women are of interest as they will assist with understanding the potential burden of exposure globally, identifying sources of exposure, and designing epidemiology studies. We measured urinary concentrations of the insect repellent N-N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET) and two of its metabolites [3-diethyl-carbamoyl benzoic acid (DCBA) and N,N-diethyl-3-hydroxymethylbenzamide (DHMB)], four pyrethroid insecticide metabolites [4-fluoro-3-phenoxybenzoic acid (4-F-3-PBA); 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA); trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (trans-DCCA); and cis-3-(2,2-dibromovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (cis-DBCA)], and two chlorophenoxy herbicides [2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T)] in 54 pregnant women from Puerto Rico at three separate time points (20 ± 2 weeks, 24 ± 2 weeks, and 28 ± 2 weeks of gestation). We calculated the distributions of the biomarker concentrations and compared them to those of women of reproductive age from the general U.S. population where available, and estimated the within-subject temporal variability of these repeated measurements. We also collected questionnaire data on demographics, consumption of select fruits, vegetables, and legumes in the past 48-hr, and pest-related issues, and associations between these variables and biomarker concentrations were examined. We found that 95th percentile urinary concentrations of DEET, 3-PBA, trans-DCCA, and 2,4-D were lower than women of reproductive age on the U.S. mainland, whereas 95th percentile urinary concentrations of 4-F-3-PBA, cis-DBCA, and 2,4,5-T were similar. DCBA, the only urinary biomarker detected in >50% of the samples, showed fair to good reproducibility across pregnancy (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.60). Women were more likely

  9. Abundance of Soil-Borne Entomopathogenic Fungi in Organic and Conventional Fields in the Midwestern USA with an Emphasis on the Effect of Herbicides and Fungicides on Fungal Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Eric H.; Jaronski, Stefan T.; Hodgson, Erin W.; Gassmann, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) are widespread in agricultural fields and help suppress crop pests. These natural enemies may be hindered by certain agronomic practices associated with conventional agriculture including the use of pesticides. We tested whether the abundance of EPF differed between organic and conventional fields, and whether specific cropping practices and soil properties were correlated with their abundance. In one year of the survey, soil from organic fields and accompanying margins had significantly more EPF than conventional fields and accompanying margins. Regression analysis revealed that the percentage of silt and the application of organic fertilizer were positively correlated with EPF abundance; but nitrogen concentration, tillage, conventional fields, and margins of conventional fields were negatively correlated with EPF abundance. A greenhouse experiment in which fungicides and herbicides were applied to the soil surface showed no significant effect on EPF. Though organic fields were perceived to be more suitable environments for EPF, abiotic factors and cropping practices such as tillage may have greater impacts on the abundance of EPF. Also, fungicides and herbicides may not be as toxic to soil-borne EPF as originally thought. PMID:26191815

  10. Abundance of Soil-Borne Entomopathogenic Fungi in Organic and Conventional Fields in the Midwestern USA with an Emphasis on the Effect of Herbicides and Fungicides on Fungal Persistence.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Eric H; Jaronski, Stefan T; Hodgson, Erin W; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) are widespread in agricultural fields and help suppress crop pests. These natural enemies may be hindered by certain agronomic practices associated with conventional agriculture including the use of pesticides. We tested whether the abundance of EPF differed between organic and conventional fields, and whether specific cropping practices and soil properties were correlated with their abundance. In one year of the survey, soil from organic fields and accompanying margins had significantly more EPF than conventional fields and accompanying margins. Regression analysis revealed that the percentage of silt and the application of organic fertilizer were positively correlated with EPF abundance; but nitrogen concentration, tillage, conventional fields, and margins of conventional fields were negatively correlated with EPF abundance. A greenhouse experiment in which fungicides and herbicides were applied to the soil surface showed no significant effect on EPF. Though organic fields were perceived to be more suitable environments for EPF, abiotic factors and cropping practices such as tillage may have greater impacts on the abundance of EPF. Also, fungicides and herbicides may not be as toxic to soil-borne EPF as originally thought.

  11. Evaluation of diamide insecticides co-applied with other agrochemicals at various times to manage Ostrinia nubilalis in processing snap bean.

    PubMed

    Huseth, Anders S; Groves, Russell L; Chapman, Scott A; Nault, Brian A

    2015-12-01

    Multiple applications of pyrethroid insecticides are used to manage European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis Hübner, in snap bean, but new diamide insecticides may reduce application frequency. In a 2 year small-plot study, O. nubilalis control was evaluated by applying cyantraniliprole (diamide) and bifenthrin (pyrethroid) insecticides at one of three phenological stages (bud, bloom and pod formation) of snap bean development. Co-application of these insecticides with either herbicides or fungicides was also examined as a way to reduce the total number of sprays during a season. Cyantraniliprole applications timed either during bloom or during pod formation controlled O. nubilalis better than similar timings of bifenthrin. Co-applications of insecticides with fungicides controlled O. nubilalis as well as insecticide applications alone. Insecticides applied either alone or with herbicides during bud stage did not control this pest. Diamides are an alternative to pyrethroids for the management of O. nubilalis in snap bean. Adoption of diamides by snap bean growers could improve the efficiency of production by reducing the number of sprays required each season. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Analysis of the herbicide diuron, three diuron degradates, and six neonicotinoid insecticides in water-Method details and application to two Georgia streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, Michelle; Calhoun, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    A method for the determination of the widely used herbicide diuron, three degradates of diuron, and six neonicotinoid insecticides in environmental water samples is described. Filtered water samples were extracted by using solid-phase extraction (SPE) with no additional cleanup steps. Quantification of the pesticides from the extracted water samples was done by using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Recoveries in test water samples fortified at 20 nanograms per liter (ng/L) for each compound ranged from 75 to 97 percent; relative standard deviations ranged from 5 to 10 percent. Method detection limits (MDLs) in water ranged from 3.0 to 6.2 ng/L using LC/MS/MS. The method was applied to water samples from two streams in Georgia, Sope Creek and the Chattahoochee River. Diuron and 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA) were detected in 100 and 80 percent, respectively, of the samples from the Chattahoochee River, whereas Sope creek had detection frequencies of 15 percent for diuron and 31 percent for 3,4-DCA. Detection frequencies for the neonicotinoid insecticide, imidacloprid, were 60 percent for the Chattahoochee River and 85 percent for Sope Creek. Field matrix-spike recoveries for each compound, when averaged over four water samples, ranged from 79 to 100 percent. The average percentage difference between replicate pairs for all compounds detected in the field samples was 10.1 (± 4.5) percent.

  13. 75 FR 28077 - Small Business Size Standards: Waiver of the Nonmanufacturer Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... for Herbicides, Insecticides, and Fungicides, under Product Service Code (PSC) 6840, under North... Nonmanufacturer Rule for Herbicides, Insecticides, and Fungicides, under PSC 6840, under NAICS code 325120...

  14. Structural and functional effects of herbicides on non-target organisms in aquatic ecosystems with an emphasis on atrazine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, James; Kortekamp, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Herbicide use has increased dramatically around the world over the past 6 decades (Gianessi and Reigner, 2007). Few herbicides were in use in the 1950s. However, by 2001 approximately 1.14 billion kilograms of herbicides were applied globally for the control of undesireable vegetation in agricultural, silvicultural, lawncare, aquacultural, and irrigation/recreational water management activities (Kiely et al., 2004). Twenty-eight percent of the total mass of herbicides is applied in the United States, with the remaining 72 percent being applied elsewhere around the globe (Kiely et al., 2004). Herbicides represent 36% of global pesticide use, followed by insecticides (25%), fungicides (10%) and other chemical classes (Kiely et al., 2004). Agricultural production accounts for approximately 90% of herbicide use in the U.S. (Kiely et al., 2004). Gianessi and Reigner (2007) indicated that herbicides are routinely used on more than 90% of the area designated for large commercial crops including corn, soybeans, cotton, sugar beets, peanuts, and rice. Increased farm mechanization, technological advancements in production of inexpensive sources of inorganic nitrogen fertilizer (e.g., anhydrous ammonia), and conversion of forest, grassland, and wetland habitats to cropland has led to a tremendous increase in global food production over the past half-century. Herbicides have augmented advances in large-scale agricultural systems and have largely replaced mechanical and hand-weeding control mechanisms (Gianessi and Reigner, 2007). The wide-spread use of herbicides in agriculture has resulted in frequent chemical detections in surface and groundwaters (Gilliom, 2007). The majority of herbicides used are highly water soluble and are therefore prone to runoff from terrestrial environments. In additon, spray drift and atmospheric deposition can contribute to herbicide contamination of aquatic environments. Lastly, selected herbicides are deliberately applied to aquatic environments

  15. Occurrence and Environmental Effects of Boscalid and Other Fungicides in Three Targeted Use Areas in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, T. J.; Smalling, K. L.; Wilson, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    Fungicides are typically used to control the outbreak of persistent, historically significant plant diseases like late blight (caused by Phytophthora infestans and responsible for the Irish Potato famine of 1846) and newer plant diseases like Asian Soy Rust, both of which are potentially devastating if not controlled. Of the more than 67,000 pesticide products currently registered for use in the United States, over 3,600 are used to combat fungal diseases. Although they are widely used, relatively little is known about the fate and potential secondary effects of fungicides in the aquatic environment. Even less is known about the fate and environmental occurrence of recently registered fungicides including boscalid, which was first registered for use in the US in 2003. Unlike most other pesticides, multiple fungicides are typically applied as a prophylactic crop protectant upwards of ten times per season (depending upon conditions and crop type), but at lower application rates than herbicides or insecticides. This difference in usage increases the likelihood of chronic exposure of aquatic ecosystems to low concentrations of fungicides. Using a newly developed analytical method, the U.S. Geological Survey measured 33 fungicides in surface water and shallow groundwater in three geographic areas of intense fungicide use across the US. Sampling sites were selected near or within farms using prophylactic fungicides at rates and types typical of the crop type and their geographic location. At least one fungicide was detected in 75% of the surface waters (n=60) and 58% of the groundwater (n=12) samples. Twelve fungicides were detected in surface- and groundwater including boscalid (72%), azoxystrobin (51%), pyraclostrobin (40%), chlorothalonil (38%) and pyrimethanil (28%). Boscalid was the most frequently detected pesticide and has not been previously documented in the aquatic environment. In this study, an average of 44% of the pesticide concentration in a water sample

  16. Herbicide Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Lanzilotta, R. P.; Pramer, David

    1970-01-01

    Replacement cultures liberated 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA) from 3,4-dichloropropionanilide (propanil). The kinetics of the conversion suggest a requirement for de novo enzyme synthesis, but the system was not influenced by chloramphenicol or puromycin. Enzyme activity was detected when acetanilide (Km = 0.195 mm) was used to replace propanil as substrate. Fungal acylamidase (E.C. 3.5.1., an aryl acylamine amidohydrolase) was concentrated by salt precipitation and characterized. The Fusarium solani acylamidase exhibited an optimum at pH 7.5 to 9.0 and was inactivated in 10 min at 50 C. The enzyme was not sensitive to methyl-carbamate or organophosphate insecticides, but the herbicide, Ramrod (N-isopropyl-2-chloroacetanilide), acted as a competitive inhibitor of acetanilide hydrolysis (Ki = 0.167 mm). Hydrolysis rates were decreased by various para substitutions of acetanilide. Chloro substitution in the acyl moiety of acetanilide also reduced the rate of hydrolysis. 3,4-Dichloroacetanilide was less susceptible to enzyme action than acetanilide, but 3,4-dichloropropionanilide was hydrolyzed much more rapidly than propionanilide. The fungal acylamidase was highly specific for N-acetylarylamines. It did not catalyze hydrolysis of formanilide, butyranilide, dicryl, Karsil, fenuron, monuron, or isopropyl-N-phenylcarbamate. It appears to differ from acylamidases that have been isolated from rice, rat liver, chick kidney, and Neurospora. PMID:5437306

  17. Annual Fungicide Loadings

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticides, Herbicides, Fungicides...etc, are used for a variety of purposes, including control of household, lawn, and garden pests; for control of mosquitoes and other insect vectors of animal and human diseases; for control of brush in rangelands, on roadsides, and along power line rights-of-way; as wood preservatives; as disinfectants; and in golf courses, parks and forest lands. The toxicity that makes pesticides useful in agriculture, silviculture, disease vector, and nuisance control can, however, also endanger humans, nontarget wildlife, and ecosystems. EPA carries the mandated responsibility for solving this policy and regulatory dilemma, first through registering pesticides so that their labels explain how to avoid unreasonable risks when using them, and second by setting allowable levels of pesticide residues to ensure the safety of drinking water and the food supply (Schierow 1996). More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  18. Antifungal, phytotoxic and insecticidal properties of essential oil isolated from Turkish Origanum acutidens and its three components, carvacrol, thymol and p-cymene.

    PubMed

    Kordali, Saban; Cakir, Ahmet; Ozer, Hakan; Cakmakci, Ramazan; Kesdek, Memis; Mete, Ebru

    2008-12-01

    The chemical composition of essential oil isolated by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of Origanum acutidens was analyzed by GC-MS. Carvacrol (87.0%), p-cymene (2.0%), linalool acetate (1.7%), borneol (1.6%) and beta-caryophyllene (1.3%) were found to be as main constituents. Antifungal, phytotoxic and insecticidal activities of the oil and its aromatic monoterpene constituents, carvacrol, p-cymene and thymol were also determined. The antifungal assays showed that O. acutidens oil, carvacrol and thymol completely inhibited mycelial growth of 17 phytopathogenic fungi and their antifungal effects were higher than commercial fungicide, benomyl. However, p-cymene possessed lower antifungal activity. The oil, carvacrol and thymol completely inhibited the seed germination and seedling growth of Amaranthus retroflexus, Chenopodium album and Rumex crispus and also showed a potent phytotoxic effect against these plants. However, p-cymene did not show any phytotoxic effect. Furthermore, O. acutidens oil showed 68.3% and 36.7% mortality against Sitophilus granarius and Tribolium confusum adults, respectively. The findings of the present study suggest that antifungal and herbicidal properties of the oil can be attributed to its major component, carvacrol, and these agents have a potential to be used as fungicide, herbicide as well as insecticide.

  19. NOVEL HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low-dose, high-potency herbicides are defined as those herbicides with a maximum label application rate of 0.5 pounds of active ingredient per acre. Several classes of chemicals fall into this category, including the acetolactate synthase (ALSase) inhibitor herbicides, imidazoli...

  20. 75 FR 40857 - Small Business Size Standards: Waiver of the Nonmanufacturer Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-14

    ... Herbicides, Insecticides, and Fungicides, under Product Service Code (PSC) 6840, under North American... Rule for Herbicides, Insecticides, and Fungicides, under PSC 6840, under NAICS code 325320. The basis... Herbicides, Insecticides, and Fungicides, PSC 6840, under NAICS code 325320, Pesticides and Other...

  1. A pesticide paradox: Fungicides indirectly increase fungal infections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rohr, Jason R.; Brown, Jenise; Battaglin, William A.; McMahon, Teagan A.; Reylea, Rick A.

    2017-01-01

    There are many examples where the use of chemicals have had profound unintended consequences, such as fertilizers reducing crop yields (paradox of enrichment) and insecticides increasing insect pests (by reducing natural biocontrol). Recently, the application of agrochemicals, such as agricultural disinfectants and fungicides, has been explored as an approach to curb the pathogenic fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), which is associated with worldwide amphibian declines. However, the long-term, net effects of early-life exposure to these chemicals on amphibian disease risk have not been thoroughly investigated. Using a combination of laboratory experiments and analysis of data from the literature, we explored the effects of fungicide exposure on Bd infections in two frog species. Extremely low concentrations of the fungicides azoxystrobin, chlorothalonil, and mancozeb were directly toxic to Bd in culture. However, estimated environmental concentrations of the fungicides did not reduce Bd on Cuban tree frog (Osteopilus septentrionalis) tadpoles exposed simultaneously to any of these fungicides and Bd, and fungicide exposure actually increased Bd-induced mortality. Additionally, exposure to any of these fungicides as tadpoles resulted in higher Bd abundance and greater Bd-induced mortality when challenged with Bd post-metamorphosis, an average of 71 d after their last fungicide exposure. Analysis of data from the literature revealed that previous exposure to the fungicide itraconazole, which is commonly used to clear Bd infections, made the critically endangered booroolong frog (Litoria booroolongensis) more susceptible to Bd. Finally, a field survey revealed that Bd prevalence was positively associated with concentrations of fungicides in ponds. Although fungicides show promise for controlling Bd, these results suggest that, if fungicides do not completely eliminate Bd or if Bd recolonizes, exposure to fungicides has the potential

  2. The effects of low levels of herbicides on simple plant communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the United States, the US Environmental Protection Agency has the responsibility for the registration of pesticides under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act. Prior to registration applicants must demonstrate that their product will not adversely affect hu...

  3. Determination of manganese- and manganese-containing fungicides with lucigenin-Tween-20-enhanced chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Mohammad; Asghar, Mohammad; Nabi, Abdul

    2015-11-01

    A flow-injection (FI) method is reported for the determination of Mn(II), maneb and mancozeb fungicides based on the catalytic effect of Mn(II) on the oxidation of lucigenin and dissolved oxygen in a basic solution. The Tween-20 surfactant has been reported for first time to enhance lucigenin chemiluminescence (CL) intensity in the presence of Mn(II) (53%) and maneb and mancozeb (89%). The calibration graphs were linear in the concentration range of 0.001-1.5 mg L(-1) (R(2) = 0.9982 (n = 11) with a limit of detection (S/N = 3) of 0.1 µg L(-1) for Mn(II) and 0.01-3.0 mg L(-1) [R(2) = 0.9989 and R(2) = 0.9992 (n = 6)] with a limit of detection (S/N =3) of 1.0 µg L(-1) for maneb and mancozeb respectively. Injection throughputs of 90 and 120 h(-1) for Mn(II) and maneb and mancozeb respectively, and relative standard deviations of 1.0-3.4% were obtained in the concentration range studied. The experimental variables, e.g., reagents concentrations, flow rates, sample volume, and photomultiplier tube voltage, were optimized and potential interferences were investigated. The analysis of Mn(II) in river water reference materials (SLRS-4 and SLRS-5) showed good agreement with the certified values incorporating an on-line 8-hydroxyquinoline chelating column in the manifold for removing interfering metal ions. Recoveries for maneb and mancozeb were in the range of 92 ± 5 to 104 ± 3% and 91 ± 2 to 100 ± 4% (n = 3) respectively. The effect of 30 other pesticides (fungicides, herbicides and insecticides) was also examined in the lucigenin-Tween-20 CL system. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. An update of the Worldwide Integrated Assessment (WIA) on systemic insecticides. Part 1: new molecules, metabolism, fate, and transport.

    PubMed

    Giorio, Chiara; Safer, Anton; Sánchez-Bayo, Francisco; Tapparo, Andrea; Lentola, Andrea; Girolami, Vincenzo; van Lexmond, Maarten Bijleveld; Bonmatin, Jean-Marc

    2017-11-05

    With the exponential number of published data on neonicotinoids and fipronil during the last decade, an updated review of literature has been conducted in three parts. The present part focuses on gaps of knowledge that have been addressed after publication of the Worldwide Integrated Assessment (WIA) on systemic insecticides in 2015. More specifically, new data on the mode of action and metabolism of neonicotinoids and fipronil, and their toxicity to invertebrates and vertebrates, were obtained. We included the newly detected synergistic effects and/or interactions of these systemic insecticides with other insecticides, fungicides, herbicides, adjuvants, honeybee viruses, and parasites of honeybees. New studies have also investigated the contamination of all environmental compartments (air and dust, soil, water, sediments, and plants) as well as bees and apicultural products, food and beverages, and the exposure of invertebrates and vertebrates to such contaminants. Finally, we review new publications on remediation of neonicotinoids and fipronil, especially in water systems. Conclusions of the previous WIA in 2015 are reinforced; neonicotinoids and fipronil represent a major threat worldwide for biodiversity, ecosystems, and all the services the latter provide.

  5. Forestry Herbicides

    Treesearch

    Jerry L. Michael; William L. Boyer

    1983-01-01

    If you own or manage pine timberlands in the South, you know only too well that unwanted vegetation can be stubborn when you arc trying to reforest, convert a stand, or improve pine growth by reducing competition. Are you aware. however, that many forestry herbicides are proving effective in eliminating this undesirable vegetation, both before and after pine...

  6. Phorate can reverse P450 metabolism-based herbicide resistance in Lolium rigidum.

    PubMed

    Busi, Roberto; Gaines, Todd Adam; Powles, Stephen

    2017-02-01

    Organophosphate insecticides can inhibit specific cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in metabolic herbicide resistance mechanisms, leading to synergistic interactions between the insecticide and the herbicide. In this study we report synergistic versus antagonistic interactions between the organophosphate insecticide phorate and five different herbicides observed in a population of multiple herbicide-resistant Lolium rigidum. Phorate synergised with three different herbicide modes of action, enhancing the activity of the ALS inhibitor chlorsulfuron (60% LD 50 reduction), the VLCFAE inhibitor pyroxasulfone (45% LD 50 reduction) and the mitosis inhibitor trifluralin (70% LD 50 reduction). Conversely, phorate antagonised the two thiocarbamate herbicides prosulfocarb and triallate with a 12-fold LD 50 increase. We report the selective reversal of P450-mediated metabolic multiple resistance to chlorsulfuron and trifluralin in the grass weed L. rigidum by synergistic interaction with the insecticide phorate, and discuss the putative mechanistic basis. This research should encourage diversity in herbicide use patterns for weed control as part of a long-term integrated management effort to reduce the risk of selection of metabolism-based multiple herbicide resistance in L. rigidum. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Mechanisms and significance of fungicide resistance†

    PubMed Central

    Deising, Holger B.; Reimann, Sven; Pascholati, Sérgio F.

    2008-01-01

    In this review article, we show that occurrence of fungicide resistance is one of the most important issues in modern agriculture. Fungicide resistance may be due to mutations of genes encoding fungicide targets (qualitative fungicide resistance) or to different mechanisms that are induced by sub-lethal fungicide stress. These mechanisms result in different and varying levels of resistance (quantitative fungicide resistance). We discuss whether or not extensive use of fungicides in agricultural environments is related to the occurrence of fungicide resistance in clinical environments. Furthermore, we provide recommendations of how development of fungicide resistant pathogen populations may be prevented or delayed. PMID:24031218

  8. Synthesis, fungicidal evaluation and 3D-QSAR studies of novel 1,3,4-thiadiazole xylofuranose derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Guanghui; Yan, Xiaojing; Bi, Jiawei; Jiang, Rui; Qin, Yinan; Yuan, Huizhu; Lu, Huizhe; Dong, Yanhong; Jin, Shuhui; Zhang, Jianjun

    2017-01-01

    1,3,4-Thiadiazole and sugar-derived molecules have proven to be promising agrochemicals with growth promoting, insecticidal and fungicidal activities. In the research field of agricultural fungicide, applying union of active group we synthesized a new set of 1,3,4-thiadiazole xylofuranose derivatives and all of the compounds were characterized by 1H NMR and HRMS. In precise toxicity measurement, some of compounds exhibited more potent fungicidal activities than the most widely used commercial fungicide Chlorothalonil, promoting further research and development. Based on our experimental data, 3D-QSAR (three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship) was established and investigated using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) techniques, helping to better understand the structural requirements of lead compounds with high fungicidal activity and environmental compatibility. PMID:28746366

  9. Annual Insecticide Loadings

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticides, Herbicides, Fungicides...etc, are used for a variety of purposes, including control of household, lawn, and garden pests; for control of mosquitoes and other insect vectors of animal and human diseases; for control of brush in rangelands, on roadsides, and along power line rights-of-way; as wood preservatives; as disinfectants; and in golf courses, parks and forest lands. The toxicity that makes pesticides useful in agriculture, silviculture, disease vector, and nuisance control can, however, also endanger humans, nontarget wildlife, and ecosystems. EPA carries the mandated responsibility for solving this policy and regulatory dilemma, first through registering pesticides so that their labels explain how to avoid unreasonable risks when using them, and second by setting allowable levels of pesticide residues to ensure the safety of drinking water and the food supply (Schierow 1996). More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  10. Toxicity, sublethal effects, and potential modes of action of select fungicides on freshwater fish and invertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elskus, Adria A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite decades of agricultural and urban use of fungicides and widespread detection of these pesticides in surface waters, relatively few data are available on the effects of fungicides on fish and invertebrates in the aquatic environment. Nine fungicides are reviewed in this report: azoxystrobin, boscalid, chlorothalonil, fludioxonil, myclobutanil, fenarimol, pyraclostrobin, pyrimethanil, and zoxamide. These fungicides were identified as emerging chemicals of concern because of their high or increasing global use rates, detection frequency in surface waters, or likely persistence in the environment. A review of the literature revealed significant sublethal effects of fungicides on fish, aquatic invertebrates, and ecosystems, including zooplankton and fish reproduction, fish immune function, zooplankton community composition, metabolic enzymes, and ecosystem processes, such as leaf decomposition in streams, among other biological effects. Some of these effects can occur at fungicide concentrations well below single-species acute lethality values (48- or 96-hour concentration that effects a response in 50 percent of the organisms, that is, effective concentration killing 50 percent of the organisms in 48 or 96 hours) and chronic sublethal values (for example, 21-day no observed adverse effects concentration), indicating that single-species toxicity values may dramatically underestimate the toxic potency of some fungicides. Fungicide modes of toxic action in fungi can sometimes reflect the biochemical and (or) physiological effects of fungicides observed in vertebrates and invertebrates; however, far more studies are needed to explore the potential to predict effects in nontarget organisms based on specific fungicide modes of toxic action. Fungicides can also have additive and (or) synergistic effects when used with other fungicides and insecticides, highlighting the need to study pesticide mixtures that occur in surface waters. For fungicides that partition to

  11. Herbicide Resistant Weed Management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Metribuzin and rimsulfuron are the only two herbicides registered for postemergence broadleaf weed control in potatoes, and represent the two classes of herbicides, triazines and ALS inhibitors, with the most reported cases of resistant weeds world wide. Other postemergence grass herbicides belongin...

  12. Inhibition of Phenylamide Hydrolysis by Bacillus sphaericus with Methylcarbamate and Organophosphorus Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, G.; Wallnöfer, P. R.

    1975-01-01

    The degradation of the phenylamide herbicides monolinuron, linuron, and solan by cultures of Bacillus sphaericus ATCC 12123 was inhibited by the methylcarbamate insecticides metmercapturon, aldicarb, propoxur, and carbaryl and by the organophosphorus insecticides fenthion and parathion. The extent of inhibition was largest with metmercapturon and smallest with parathion. Inhibition of hydrolysis of the two phenylurea herbicides was greater than of the acylanilide compound. Tests with crude enzyme preparations of aryl acylamidase derived from B. sphaericus showed that the inhibition of the hydrolysis of linuron with methylcarbamates is a competitive one. The insecticides tested did not induce the enzyme, nor could they serve as its substrate. PMID:1155931

  13. Herbicides and plant hormesis.

    PubMed

    Belz, Regina G; Duke, Stephen O

    2014-05-01

    Herbicide hormesis is commonly observed at subtoxic doses of herbicides and other phytotoxins. The occurrence and magnitude of this phenomenon are influenced by plant growth stage and physiological status, environmental factors, the endpoint measured and the timing between treatment and endpoint measurement. The mechanism in some cases of herbicide hormesis appears to be related to the target site of the herbicide, whereas in other examples hormesis may be by overcompensation to moderate stress induced by the herbicides or a response to disturbed homeostasis. Theoretically, herbicide hormesis could be used in crop production, but this has been practical only in the case of the use of herbicides as sugar cane 'ripeners' to enhance sucrose accumulation. The many factors that can influence the occurrence, the magnitude and the dose range of hormetic increases in yield for most crops make it too unpredictable and risky as a production practice with the currently available knowledge. Herbicide hormesis can cause undesired effects in situations in which weeds are unintentionally exposed to hormetic doses (e.g. in adjacent fields, when shielded by crop vegetation). Some weeds that have evolved herbicide resistance may have hormetic responses to recommended herbicide application rates. Little is known about such effects under field conditions. A more complete understanding of herbicide hormesis is needed to exploit its potential benefits and to minimize its potential harmful effects in crop production. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Effects of fungicides on the yeast-like symbiotes and their host, Nilaparvata lugens Stål (Hemiptera: Delphacidae).

    PubMed

    Shentu, Xu-Ping; Li, Dan-Ting; Xu, Jian-Feng; She, Liang; Yu, Xiao-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Yeast-like symbiotes (YLS) are endosymbionts that are closely related to the growth, development and reproduction of their host, the brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens Stål (Hemiptera: Delphacidae). In order to understand the relationship between the population of YLS in BPH cells and the survival rate of BPH, eight different fungicides were applied to rice plants infested by BPH, and the number of YLS and mortality of BPH were determined. Three of the fungicides, 27% toyocamycin & tetramycin P & tetrin B & tetramycin A, 0.01% trichodermin, and 75% trifloxystrobin & tebuconazole WG, were found to significantly reduce the number of YLS in BPH, subsequently causing a high mortality of BPH. The three fungicides were each mixed with a commonly used insecticide-imidacloprid, and the fungicide/insecticide mixtures could cause a marked reduction in YLS number in BPH, resulting in a significantly higher mortality of BPH than did the imidacloprid alone. The mixture of 27% toyocamycin & tetramycin P & tetrin B & tetramycin A with imidacloprid showed the best inhibitory effect on BPH population. Our study demonstrated a high dependence of the BPH survival rate on the number of YLS harbored in BPH fat-body cells. It implies that using specific fungicides as an additive to imidacloprid for controlling BPH could be a novel way to enhance the efficacy of insecticide, minimizing the use of imidacloprid in paddy fields. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Insect P450 inhibitors and insecticides: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Feyereisen, René

    2015-06-01

    P450 enzymes are encoded by a large number of genes in insects, often over a hundred. They play important roles in insecticide metabolism and resistance, and growing numbers of P450 enzymes are now known to catalyse important physiological reactions, such as hormone metabolism or cuticular hydrocarbon synthesis. Ways to inhibit P450 enzymes specifically or less specifically are well understood, as P450 inhibitors are found as drugs, as fungicides, as plant growth regulators and as insecticide synergists. Yet there are no P450 inhibitors as insecticides on the market. As new modes of action are constantly needed to support insecticide resistance management, P450 inhibitors should be considered because of their high potential for insect selectivity, their well-known mechanisms of action and the increasing ease of rational design and testing. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Specific persistence and fate of a soil active herbicide-hexazinone and implications for management

    Treesearch

    J.L. Michael

    2001-01-01

    Federal pesticide regulation began officially in 1947 with the promulgation of P.L. 80-104, also known as the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). This early version was administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Responsibility for administration of FIFRA was transferred to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) when it was...

  17. Fungicide dissipation and impact on metolachlor aerobic soil degradation and soil microbial dynamics.

    PubMed

    White, Paul M; Potter, Thomas L; Culbreath, Albert K

    2010-02-15

    Pesticides are typically applied as mixtures and or sequentially to soil and plants during crop production. A common scenario is herbicide application at planting followed by sequential fungicide applications post-emergence. Fungicides depending on their spectrum of activity may alter and impact soil microbial communities. Thus there is a potential to impact soil processes responsible for herbicide degradation. This may change herbicide efficacy and environmental fate characteristics. Our study objective was to determine the effects of 4 peanut fungicides, chlorothalonil (2,4,5,6-tetrachloro-1,3-benzenedicarbonitrile), tebuconazole (alpha-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-alpha-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol), flutriafol (alpha-(2-fluorophenyl)-alpha-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol), and cyproconazole (alpha-(4-chlorophenyl)-alpha-(1-cyclopropylethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol) on the dissipation kinetics of the herbicide, metolachlor (2-chloro-N-(6-ethyl-o-tolyl)-N-[(1RS)-2-methoxy-1-methylethyl]acetamide), and on the soil microbial community. This was done through laboratory incubation of field treated soil. Chlorothalonil significantly reduced metolachlor soil dissipation as compared to the non-treated control or soil treated with the other fungicides. Metolachlor DT(50) was 99 days for chlorothalonil-treated soil and 56, 45, 53, and 46 days for control, tebuconazole, flutriafol, and cyproconazole-treated soils, respectively. Significant reductions in predominant metolachlor metabolites, metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid (MESA) and metolachlor oxanilic acid (MOA), produced by oxidation of glutathione-metolachlor conjugates were also observed in chlorothalonil-treated soil. This suggested that the fungicide impacted soil glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity. Fungicide DT(50) was 27-80 days but impacts on the soil microbial community as indicated by lipid biomarker analysis were minimal. Overall study results indicated that

  18. Herbicides for Forest Plantations

    Treesearch

    H. H. Hadley; C. B. Briscoe

    1966-01-01

    MSMA, sodium cacodylate, diquat, aminotriazole, paraquat + surfactant, 2,4-0 amine, ametryne, and picram were tested for use as herbicides in forest plantations. MSMA gave best weed control per dollar of her bicide. Picram also gave good control on dry sites, although more expensive than MSMA, but damaged planted trees. When herbicides were applied during or just...

  19. Fungicides affect Japanese beetle Popillia japonica (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) egg hatch, larval survival and detoxification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Obear, Glen R; Adesanya, Adekunle W; Liesch, Patrick J; Williamson, R Chris; Held, David W

    2016-05-01

    Larvae of the Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), have a patchy distribution in soils, which complicates detection and management of this insect pest. Managed turf systems are frequently under pest pressure from fungal pathogens, necessitating frequent fungicide applications. It is possible that certain turfgrass fungicides may have lethal or sublethal adverse effects on eggs and larvae of P. japonica that inhabit managed turf systems. In this study, eggs and first-, second- and third-instar larvae were treated with the fungicides chlorothalonil and propiconazole, and survival was compared with that of untreated controls as well as positive controls treated with the insecticide trichlorfon. Chlorothalonil reduced survival of first-instar larvae treated directly and hatched from treated eggs. Propiconazole delayed egg hatch, reduced the proportion of eggs that successfully hatched and reduced survival of first-instar larvae treated directly and hatched from treated eggs. Sublethal doses of the fungicides lowered the activities of certain detoxification enzymes in third-instar grubs. Fungicide applications to turfgrass that coincide with oviposition and egg hatch of white grubs may have sublethal effects. This work is applicable both to high-maintenance turfgrass such as golf courses, where applications of pesticides are more frequent, and to home lawn services, where mixtures of multiple pesticides are commonly used. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Evaluation of various QuEChERS based methods for the analysis of herbicides and other commonly used pesticides in polished rice by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Pareja, Lucía; Cesio, Verónica; Heinzen, Horacio; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2011-02-15

    Four different extraction and clean-up protocols based on the QuEChERS method were compared for the development of an optimized sample preparation procedure for the multiresidue analysis of 16 commonly applied herbicides in rice crops using LC-QqQ/MS. Additionally the methods were evaluated for the analysis of 26 insecticides and fungicides currently used in rice crops. The methods comprise, in general, the hydratation of the sample with water followed by the extraction with acetonitrile, phase separation with the addition of different salts and finally a clean-up step with various sorbents. Matrix effects were evaluated for the 4 studied methods using LC-QqQ/MS. Additionally LC-TOF/MS was used to compare the co-extractants obtained with the four assayed methodologies. Thirty-six pesticides presented good performance with recoveries in the range 70-120% and relative standard deviations below 20% using 7.5 g of milled polished rice and the buffered acetate QuEChERS method without clean-up at both fortification levels: 10 and 300 μg kg(-1). The other six pesticides presented low recovery rates, nevertheless all these analytes could be analyzed with at least one of the other three studied procedures. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Rationale for Selection of Pesticides, Herbicides, and Related Compounds from the Hanford SST/DST Waste Considered for Analysis in Support of the Regulatory DQO (Privatization)

    SciTech Connect

    Wiemers, K.D.; Daling, P.; Meier, K.

    1999-01-04

    Regulated pesticides, herbicides, miticides, and fungicides were evaluated for their potential past and current use at the Hanford Site. The starting list of these compounds is based on regulatory analyte input lists discussed in the Regulatory DQO. Twelve pesticide, herbicide, miticide, and fungicide compounds are identified for analysis in the Hanford SST and DST waste in support of the Regulatory DQO. The compounds considered for additional analyses are non-detected, considered stable in the tank waste matrix, and of higher toxicity/carcinogenicity.

  2. Apyrase inhibitors enhance the ability of diverse fungicides to inhibit the growth of different plant-pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Kumar Tripathy, Manas; Weeraratne, Gayani; Clark, Greg; Roux, Stanley J

    2017-09-01

    A previous study has demonstrated that the treatment of Arabidopsis plants with chemical inhibitors of apyrase enzymes increases their sensitivity to herbicides. In this study, we found that the addition of the same or related apyrase inhibitors could potentiate the ability of different fungicides to inhibit the growth of five different pathogenic fungi in plate growth assays. The growth of all five fungi was partially inhibited by three commonly used fungicides: copper octanoate, myclobutanil and propiconazole. However, when these fungicides were individually tested in combination with any one of four different apyrase inhibitors (AI.1, AI.10, AI.13 or AI.15), their potency to inhibit the growth of five fungal pathogens was increased significantly relative to their application alone. The apyrase inhibitors were most effective in potentiating the ability of copper octanoate to inhibit fungal growth, and least effective in combination with propiconazole. Among the five pathogens assayed, that most sensitive to the fungicide-potentiating effects of the inhibitors was Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Overall, among the 60 treatment combinations tested (five pathogens, four apyrase inhibitors, three fungicides), the addition of apyrase inhibitors increased significantly the sensitivity of fungi to the fungicide treatments in 53 of the combinations. Consistent with their predicted mode of action, inhibitors AI.1, AI.10 and AI.13 each increased the level of propiconazole retained in one of the fungi, suggesting that they could partially block the ability of efflux transporters to remove propiconazole from these fungi. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  3. Marine Natural Products as Prototype Agrochemical Agents

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jiangnan; Shen, Xiaoyu; El Sayed, Khalid A.; Dunbar, D. C Harles; Perry, Tony L.; Wilkins, Scott P.; Hamann, Mark T.; Bobzin, Steve; Huesing, Joseph; Camp, Robin; Prinsen, Mike; Krupa, Dan; Wideman, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    In the interest of identifying new leads that could serve as prototype agrochemical agents, 18 structurally diverse marine-derived compounds were examined for insecticidal, herbicidal, and fungicidal activities. Several new classes of compounds have been shown to be insecticidal, herbicidal, and fungicidal, which suggests that marine natural products represent an intriguing source for the discovery of new agrochemical agents. PMID:12670165

  4. Value of Neonicotinoid Insecticide Seed Treatments in Mid-South Corn (Zea mays) Production Systems.

    PubMed

    North, J H; Gore, J; Catchot, A L; Stewart, S D; Lorenz, G M; Musser, F R; Cook, D R; Kerns, D L; Leonard, B R; Dodds, D M

    2018-02-09

    Neonicotinoid seed treatments are one of several effective control options used in corn, Zea mays L., production in the Mid-South for early season insect pests. An analysis was performed on 91 insecticide seed treatment trials from Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee to determine the value of neonicotinoids in corn production systems. The analysis compared neonicotinoid insecticide treated seed plus a fungicide to seed only with the same fungicide. When analyzed by state, corn yields were significantly higher when neonicotinoid seed treatments were used compared to fungicide only treated seed in Louisiana and Mississippi. Corn seed treated with neonicotinoid seed treatments yielded 111, 1,093, 416, and 140 kg/ha, higher than fungicide only treatments for Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee, respectively. Across all states, neonicotinoid seed treatments resulted in a 700 kg/ha advantage compared to fungicide only treated corn seed. Net returns for corn treated with neonicotinoid seed treatment were $1,446/ha compared with $1,390/ha for fungicide only treated corn seed across the Mid-South. Economic returns for neonicotinoid seed treated corn were significantly greater than fungicide-only-treated corn seed in 8 out of 14 yr. When analyzed by state, economic returns for neonicotinoid seed treatments were significantly greater than fungicide-only-treated seed in Louisiana. In some areas, dependent on year, neonicotinoid seed treatments provide significant yield and economic benefits in Mid-South corn. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Insecticide solvents: interference with insecticidal action.

    PubMed

    Brattsten, L B; Wilkinson, C F

    1977-06-10

    Several commercial solvent mixtures commonly used as insecticide carriers in spray formulations increase by more than threefold the microsomal N-demethylation of p-chloro N-methylaniline in midgut preparations of southern army-worm (Spodoptera eridania) larvae exposed orally to the test solvents. Under laboratory conditions, the same solvent mixtures exhibit a protective action against the in vivo toxicity of the insecticide carbaryl to the larvae. The data are discussed with respect to possible solvent-insecticide interactions occurring under field conditions and, more broadly, to potential toxicological hazards of these solvents to humans.

  6. Application of Fungicides and Microalgal Phenolic Extracts for the Direct Control of Fumonisin Contamination in Maize.

    PubMed

    Scaglioni, Priscila Tessmer; Blandino, Massimo; Scarpino, Valentina; Giordano, Debora; Testa, Giulio; Badiale-Furlong, Eliana

    2018-05-16

    Fungicides and, for the first time, microalgal phenolic extracts (MPE) from Spirulina sp. and Nannochloropsis sp. were applied on maize culture media under field conditions to evaluate their ability to minimize Fusarium species development and fumonisin production. An in vitro assay against F. verticillioides was carried out using maize grains as the culture medium. An open-field experiment was carried out in Northwest Italy under natural infection conditions. The compared treatments were factorial combinations of two insecticide treatments (an untreated control and pyrethroid, used against European Corn Borer), four antifungal treatments (an untreated control, MPE from Spirulina sp., MPE from Nannochloropsis sp., and a synthetic fungicide), and two timings of the application of the antifungal compounds (at maize flowering and at the milk stage). The MPE compounds were capable of inhibiting fumonisin production in vitro more efficiently than tebuconazole. Insecticide application reduced the infection by Fusarium species and subsequent fumonisin contamination. However, fumonisins in maize fields were not significantly controlled by either fungicide or MPE application.

  7. ANALYTICAL MASS SPECTROMETRY OF HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herbicides are chemical substances that are applied to agricultural soils, gardens, lawns, or plants to destroy or to prevent the growth of undesirable vegetation. The herbicides included in this review are generally syntehtic organic compuonds that are ingredients in commercial...

  8. Herbicide options for hardwood management

    Treesearch

    Andrew W. Ezell; A. Brady Self

    2016-01-01

    The use of herbicides in hardwood management presents special problems in that many of the most effective herbicides are either designed to control hardwoods or the product is not labeled for such applications. Numerous studies involving herbicide application in hardwoods have been completed at Mississippi State University. This paper is a compilation of results from...

  9. Weed control without herbicides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Managing weeds without herbicides is challenging and requires an integration of tactics and a change in how weeds problems are approached. Weeds should be managed in a holistic, intentional and proactive manner. Growers that successfully manage weeds in organic systems examine why certain weed speci...

  10. Brassica greens herbicide screening

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to screen herbicides for potential use in brassica greens. Plots were in a RBD with 4 replications. The study was direct seeded on May 19, 2009 with a seeding rate of 272,000 seeds/acre (‘Savanna’ mustard). Treatments included trifluralin PPI + DCPA pre-emergence ap...

  11. [Susceptibility of Trichogramma pretiosum Riley (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) adults to fungicides used to control apple diseases].

    PubMed

    Manzon, Cristiane G; Grützmacher, Anderson D; Giolo, Fabrizio P; de Lima, Crislaine A B Lima; Nörnberg, Sandro D; Müller, Cristiane; da R Härter, Wagner

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the susceptibility under laboratory conditions of Trichogrammapretiosum Riley adults to fungicides recommended by the Integrated Production of Apple (IPA). The bioassays were carried out using the International Organization for Biological Control (IOBC), West Palearctic Regional Section (WPRS) standard protocols. Twelve selected fungicides were studied in the doses (g or ml active ingredient/100 L) captan 1 (0.115), captan 2 (0.120), kresoxim-methyl (0.010), sulphur 1 (AG) (0.480), sulphur 2 (0.480), folpet (0.105), mancozeb (0.160), pyraclostrobin (0.010), tebuconazole (0.010), tetraconazole (0.005), thiophanate-methyl (0.050) and triforine (0.024). Distilled water was used as the blank treatment and the insecticide triclorfon (0.150) as a positive control. The parasitoids were exposed to dry residues applied on glass plates. The reduction in the capacity of parasitism was used to measure the effect of the chemical in comparison to the blank treatment. Each treatment was replicated four times. The results allowed us to classify the fungicides tested in four categories: 1, harmless (< 30%); 2, slightly harmful (30-79%); 3, moderately harmful (80-99%); and 4, harmful (> 99%). 75% of the tested substances were classified as selective (classes 1 and 2) to the parasitoid. The fungicides captan 1, captan 2, kresoxim-methyl, folpet, pyraclostrobin, tebuconazole, thiophanate-methyl and triforine were harmless; mancozeb was slightly harmful; sulphur 1 (AG) and tetraconazole were moderately harmful and sulphur 2 was harmful. These findings should be taken into account when selecting fungicides to spray apple orchards against fungi diseases to preserve the egg parasitoid T. pretiosum.

  12. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Herbicides

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the herbicides module, when to list herbicides as a candidate cause, ways to measure herbicides, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for herbicides, herbicides module references and literature reviews.

  13. Novel insecticides and acaricides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grapov, Artur F.

    1999-08-01

    This review outlines the major achievements in design of novel chemical insecticides and acaricides, especially those with non-standard mechanisms of action, viz., neonicotinoids and oxidative phosphorylation decouplers. The bibliography includes 119 references.

  14. Insecticides and Biological Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furness, G. O.

    1972-01-01

    Use of insecticides has been questioned due to their harmful effects on edible items. Biological control of insects along with other effective practices for checking spread of parasites on crops are discussed. (PS)

  15. Chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friend, M.; Franson, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides (OCs) are diverse synthetic chemicals that belong to several groups, based on chemical structure. DDT is the best known of these insecticides. First synthesized in 1874, DDT remained obscure until its insecticidal properties became known in 1939, a discovery that earned a Nobel Prize in 1948. The means of synthesizing the cyclodiene group, the most toxic of the OCs, was discovered in 1928 and resulted in a Nobel Prize in 1950. The insecticidal properties of cyclodienes, which include aldrin, dieldrin, and endrin (Table 40.1), were discovered about 1945. OCs became widely used in the United States following World War II. Their primary uses included broad spectrum applications for agricultural crops and forestry and, to a lesser extent, human health protection by spraying to destroy mosquitoes and other potential disease carriers. These compounds also became widely used to combat insect carriers of domestic animal diseases.

  16. Status of Some New Herbicides

    Treesearch

    W.F. Mann; M.J. Haynes

    1978-01-01

    If herbicides are handled, applied, or disposed of improperly they may be injurious to humans, domestic animals, desirable plants, and pollinating insects, fish, or other wildlife, and may contaminate water supplies. Use herbicides only when needed and handle them with care. Follow the directions and heed all precautions on the container label. The use of trade, firm,...

  17. Herbicide practices in hardwood plantings

    Treesearch

    Brian D. Beheler; Charles H. Michler

    2013-01-01

    Control of competing vegetation is an important early cultural practice that can improve survival and vigor in hardwood tree plantings. The type of program used depends on landowner objectives, species of weeds present, equipment available, and types of herbicides available. Pre-planting planning can greatly increase effectiveness of an herbicide program for the first...

  18. Current state of herbicides in herbicide-resistant crops.

    PubMed

    Green, Jerry M

    2014-09-01

    Current herbicide and herbicide trait practices are changing in response to the rapid spread of glyphosate-resistant weeds. Growers urgently needed glyphosate when glyphosate-resistant crops became available because weeds were becoming widely resistant to most commonly used selective herbicides, making weed management too complex and time consuming for large farm operations. Glyphosate made weed management easy and efficient by controlling all emerged weeds at a wide range of application timings. However, the intensive use of glyphosate over wide areas and concomitant decline in the use of other herbicides led eventually to the widespread evolution of weeds resistant to glyphosate. Today, weeds that are resistant to glyphosate and other herbicide types are threatening current crop production practices. Unfortunately, all commercial herbicide modes of action are over 20 years old and have resistant weed problems. The severity of the problem has prompted the renewal of efforts to discover new weed management technologies. One technology will be a new generation of crops with resistance to glyphosate, glufosinate and other existing herbicide modes of action. Other technologies will include new chemical, biological, cultural and mechanical methods for weed management. From the onset of commercialization, growers must now preserve the utility of new technologies by integrating their use with other weed management technologies in diverse and sustainable systems. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Organophosphorus Insecticide Pharmacokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Charles

    2010-01-01

    This chapter highlights a number of current and future applications of pharmacokinetics to assess organophosphate (OP) insecticide dosimetry, biological response and risk in humans exposed to these agents. Organophosphates represent a large family of pesticides where insecticidal as well as toxicological mode of action is associated with their ability to target and inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Pharmacokinetics entails the quantitative integration of physiological and metabolic processes associated with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of drugs and xenobiotics. Pharmacokinetic studies provide important data on the amount of toxicant delivered to a target site as well as species-, age-, gender-specific andmore » dose-dependent differences in biological response. These studies have been conducted with organophosphorus insecticides in multiple species, at various dose levels, and across different routes of exposure to understand their in vivo pharmacokinetics and how they contribute to the observed toxicological response. To access human exposure to organophosphorus insecticides, human pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted and used to develop biological monitoring strategies based on the quantitation of key metabolites in biological fluids. Pharmacokinetic studies with these insecticides are also useful to facilitate extrapolation of dosimetry and biological response from animals to humans and for the assessment of human health risk. In this regard, physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models are being utilized to assess risk and understand the toxicological implications of known or suspected exposures to various insecticides. In this chapter a number of examples are presented that illustrate the utility and limitation of pharmacokinetic studies to address human health concerns associated with organophosphorus insecticides.« less

  20. Triazole Fungicides Can Induce Cross-Resistance to Medical Triazoles in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Karawajczyk, Anna; Schaftenaar, Gijs; Kema, Gert H. J.; van der Lee, Henrich A.; Klaassen, Corné H.; Melchers, Willem J. G.; Verweij, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Azoles play an important role in the management of Aspergillus diseases. Azole resistance is an emerging global problem in Aspergillus fumigatus, and may develop through patient therapy. In addition, an environmental route of resistance development has been suggested through exposure to 14α-demethylase inhibitors (DMIs). The main resistance mechanism associated with this putative fungicide-driven route is a combination of alterations in the Cyp51A-gene (TR34/L98H). We investigated if TR34/L98H could have developed through exposure to DMIs. Methods and Findings Thirty-one compounds that have been authorized for use as fungicides, herbicides, herbicide safeners and plant growth regulators in the Netherlands between 1970 and 2005, were investigated for cross-resistance to medical triazoles. Furthermore, CYP51-protein homology modeling and molecule alignment studies were performed to identify similarity in molecule structure and docking modes. Five triazole DMIs, propiconazole, bromuconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and difenoconazole, showed very similar molecule structures to the medical triazoles and adopted similar poses while docking the protein. These DMIs also showed the greatest cross-resistance and, importantly, were authorized for use between 1990 and 1996, directly preceding the recovery of the first clinical TR34/L98H isolate in 1998. Through microsatellite genotyping of TR34/L98H isolates we were able to calculate that the first isolate would have arisen in 1997, confirming the results of the abovementioned experiments. Finally, we performed induction experiments to investigate if TR34/L98H could be induced under laboratory conditions. One isolate evolved from two copies of the tandem repeat to three, indicating that fungicide pressure can indeed result in these genomic changes. Conclusions Our findings support a fungicide-driven route of TR34/L98H development in A. fumigatus. Similar molecule structure characteristics of five triazole DMIs

  1. Insecticide Resistance in Fleas.

    PubMed

    Rust, Michael K

    2016-03-17

    Fleas are the major ectoparasite of cats, dogs, and rodents worldwide and potential vectors of animal diseases. In the past two decades the majority of new control treatments have been either topically applied or orally administered to the host. Most reports concerning the development of insecticide resistance deal with the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis felis. Historically, insecticide resistance has developed to many of the insecticides used to control fleas in the environment including carbamates, organophosphates, and pyrethroids. Product failures have been reported with some of the new topical treatments, but actual resistance has not yet been demonstrated. Failures have often been attributed to operational factors such as failure to adequately treat the pet and follow label directions. With the addition of so many new chemistries additional monitoring of flea populations is needed.

  2. Mycotoxin and fungicide residues in wheat grains from fungicide-treated plants measured by a validated LC-MS method.

    PubMed

    da Luz, Suzane Rickes; Pazdiora, Paulo Cesar; Dallagnol, Leandro José; Dors, Giniani Carla; Chaves, Fábio Clasen

    2017-04-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum) is an annual crop, cultivated in the winter and spring and susceptible to several pathogens, especially fungi, which are managed with fungicides. It is also one of the most consumed cereals, and can be contaminated by mycotoxins and fungicides. The objective of this study was to validate an analytical method by LC-MS for simultaneous determination of mycotoxins and fungicide residues in wheat grains susceptible to fusarium head blight treated with fungicides, and to evaluate the relationship between fungicide application and mycotoxin production. All parameters of the validated analytical method were within AOAC and ANVISA limits. Deoxynivalenol was the prevalent mycotoxin in wheat grain and epoxiconazole was the fungicide residue found in the highest concentration. All fungicidal treatments induced an increase in AFB2 production when compared to the control (without application). AFB1 and deoxynivalenol, on the contrary, were reduced in all fungicide treatments compared to the control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of fungicides on Wyoming big sagebrush seed germination

    Treesearch

    Robert D. Cox; Lance H. Kosberg; Nancy L. Shaw; Stuart P. Hardegree

    2011-01-01

    Germination tests of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young [Asteraceae]) seeds often exhibit fungal contamination, but the use of fungicides should be avoided because fungicides may artificially inhibit germination. We tested the effect of seed-applied fungicides on germination of Wyoming big sagebrush at 2 different...

  4. Identification of Genes Related to Fungicide Resistance in Fusarium fujikuroi

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Younghae; Jung, Boknam; Li, Taiying

    2017-01-01

    We identified two genes related to fungicide resistance in Fusarium fujikuroi through random mutagenesis. Targeted gene deletions showed that survival factor 1 deletion resulted in higher sensitivity to fungicides, while deletion of the gene encoding F-box/WD-repeat protein increased resistance, suggesting that the genes affect fungicide resistance in different ways. PMID:28781543

  5. Herbicide Tests For Kudzu Eradication

    Treesearch

    James H. Miller; Ronald E. True

    1986-01-01

    Kudzu control treatments using 15 herbicides at 1 and 2 rates were tested at six locations in Georgia and Alabama. Treatments and retreatments occurred over a 2-year period. Tordon® 101 Mixture at 2 gal/acre was the most cost-effective treatment, averaging about $77 per acre for herbicide costs. Tordon® 10K Pellets (presently not being manufactured) gave slightly...

  6. Natural compounds as next-generation herbicides.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Franck E; Duke, Stephen O

    2014-11-01

    Herbicides with new modes of action (MOAs) are badly needed due to the rapidly evolving resistance to commercial herbicides, but a new MOA has not been introduced in over 20 years. The greatest pest management challenge for organic agriculture is the lack of effective natural product herbicides. The structural diversity and evolved biological activity of natural phytotoxins offer opportunities for the development of both directly used natural compounds and synthetic herbicides with new target sites based on the structures of natural phytotoxins. Natural phytotoxins are also a source for the discovery of new herbicide target sites that can serve as the focus of traditional herbicide discovery efforts. There are many examples of strong natural phytotoxins with MOAs other than those used by commercial herbicides, which indicates that there are molecular targets of herbicides that can be added to the current repertoire of commercial herbicide MOAs. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Natural Compounds as Next-Generation Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Franck E.; Duke, Stephen O.

    2014-01-01

    Herbicides with new modes of action (MOAs) are badly needed due to the rapidly evolving resistance to commercial herbicides, but a new MOA has not been introduced in over 20 years. The greatest pest management challenge for organic agriculture is the lack of effective natural product herbicides. The structural diversity and evolved biological activity of natural phytotoxins offer opportunities for the development of both directly used natural compounds and synthetic herbicides with new target sites based on the structures of natural phytotoxins. Natural phytotoxins are also a source for the discovery of new herbicide target sites that can serve as the focus of traditional herbicide discovery efforts. There are many examples of strong natural phytotoxins with MOAs other than those used by commercial herbicides, which indicates that there are molecular targets of herbicides that can be added to the current repertoire of commercial herbicide MOAs. PMID:24784133

  8. METABOLISM OF CARBAMATE INSECTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of studies conducted to determine the metabolic fate of carbamate insecticides and its toxicological significance are presented. Methomyl metabolism in rats was investigated in detail as was Croneton in the rat, cow, pig and chicken. Carbaryl and carbofuran were admin...

  9. Efficacy of Rice Insecticide Seed Treatments at Selected Nitrogen Rates for Control of the Rice Water Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Everett, Mallory; Lorenz, Gus; Slaton, Nathan; Hardke, Jarrod

    2015-08-01

    Seed-applied insecticides are the standard control method used in the United States to minimize rice water weevil (Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel) injury to rice (Oryza sativa L.) roots, and often results in greater yields than rice that receives no seed-applied insecticide. Yield increases from seed-applied insecticides often occur even when insect pressure is low and should not cause yield loss. The research objective was to evaluate the effect of urea-nitrogen rate and seed-applied insecticide on number of rice water weevil larvae, nitrogen uptake, and rice grain yield. Six trials were conducted at the Pine Tree Research Station (PTRS) and the Rice Research Extension Center (RREC) to examine the response of rice plants receiving different insecticide-seed treatments and urea-nitrogen rate combinations. Insecticide-seed treatments included label rates of clothianidin, thiamethoxam, and a no-insecticide (fungicide only) control, in combination with season-total nitrogen rates of 0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 kg urea-nitrogen/ha. Rice seed that was treated with clothianidin or thiamethoxam generally had equal numbers of rice water weevil larvae, which were significantly fewer compared with rice that received no insecticide with an equivalent urea-nitrogen rate. Nitrogen uptake at panicle differentiation was not affected by insecticide-seed treatments at four of six sites and usually increased positively and linearly as urea-nitrogen rate increased. As urea-nitrogen rate increased, grain yield increased either linearly or nonlinearly. Averaged across urea-nitrogen rates, both insecticide seed treatments had similar yields that were 4 to 7% greater than the grain yields of rice that received no insecticide at four of the five harvested sites. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Anticholinesterase insecticide retrospective.

    PubMed

    Casida, John E; Durkin, Kathleen A

    2013-03-25

    The anticholinesterase (antiChE) organophosphorus (OP) and methylcarbamate (MC) insecticides have been used very effectively as contact and systemic plant protectants for seven decades. About 90 of these compounds are still in use - the largest number for any insecticide chemotype or mode of action. In both insects and mammals, AChE inhibition and acetylcholine accumulation leads to excitation and death. The cholinergic system of insects is located centrally (where it is protected from ionized OPs and MCs) but not at the neuromuscular junction. Structural differences between insect and mammalian AChE are also evident in their genomics, amino acid sequences and active site conformations. Species selectivity is determined in part by inhibitor and target site specificity. Pest population selection with OPs and MCs has resulted in a multitude of modified AChEs of altered inhibitor specificity some conferring insecticide resistance and others enhancing sensitivity. Much of the success of antiChE insecticides results from a suitable balance of bioactivation and detoxification by families of CYP450 oxidases, hydrolases, glutathione S-transferases and others. Known inhibitors for these enzymes block detoxification and enhance potency which is particularly important in resistant strains. The current market for OPs and MCs of 19% of worldwide insecticide sales is only half of that of 10 years ago for several reasons: there have been no major new compounds for 30 years; resistance has eroded their effectiveness; human toxicity problems are still encountered; the patents have expired reducing the incentive to update registration packages; alternative chemotypes or control methods have been developed. Despite this decline, they still play a major role in pest control and the increasing knowledge on their target sites and metabolism may make it possible to redesign the inhibitors for insensitive AChEs and to target new sites in the cholinergic system. The OPs and MCs are down

  11. ANTICHOLINESTERASE INSECTICIDE RETROSPECTIVE

    PubMed Central

    Casida, John E.; Durkin, Kathleen A.

    2012-01-01

    The anticholinesterase (antiChE) organophosphorus (OP) and methylcarbamate (MC) insecticides have been used very effectively as contact and systemic plant protectants for seven decades. About 90 of these compounds are still in use – the largest number for any insecticide chemotype or mode of action. In both insects and mammals, AChE inhibition and acetylcholine accumulation leads to excitation and death. The cholinergic system of insects is located centrally (where it is protected from ionized OPs and MCs) but not at the neuromuscular junction. Structural differences between insect and mammalian AChE are also evident in their genomics, amino acid sequences and active site conformations. Species selectivity is determined in part by inhibitor and target site specificity. Pest population selection with OPs and MCs has resulted in a multitude of modified AChEs of altered inhibitor specificity some conferring insecticide resistance and others enhancing sensitivity. Much of the success of antiChE insecticides results from a suitable balance of bioactivation and detoxification by families of CYP450 oxidases, hydrolases, glutathione S-transferases and others. Known inhibitors for these enzymes block detoxification and enhance potency which is particularly important in resistant strains. The current market for OPs and MCs of 19% of worldwide insecticide sales is only half of that of 10 years ago for several reasons: there have been no major new compounds for 30 years; resistance has eroded their effectiveness; human toxicity problems are still encountered; the patents have expired reducing the incentive to update registration packages; alternative chemotypes or control methods have been developed. Despite this decline, they still play a major role in pest control and the increasing knowledge on their target sites and metabolism may make it possible to redesign the inhibitors for insensitive AChEs and to target new sites in the cholinergic system. The OPs and MCs are down

  12. Pesticides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherma, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    This review is devoted to methods for the determination of residues of pesticides and some related industrial chemicals. Topics include: residue methods, sampling, chromatography, organochlorine pesticides, organophosphorus pesticides, carbamate insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, pyrethrins, fumigants, and related chemicals. (MVL)

  13. AN OVERVIEW FOR THE TECHNICAL SESSION: EXPOSURE MEDIUM FOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Historically, research on food as a source of human exposure to environmental contaminants has focused on a few chemical categories. Crops are treated with insecticides, fungicides and herbicides to enhance production and market appeal. Pestidice residues persist and are routin...

  14. ADVANCED PESTICIDE RISK ASSESSMENT TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, and growth regulating chemicals is necessary in modern agriculture, silviculture, and public health vector control operations. The task for environmental risk assessment is to delineate the food chain contamination and ecological v...

  15. SEPARATION AND DETECTION OF THREE ARYLTINS BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS-UV/VIS DIODE ARRAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The trialkyltins and triphenyltins have widespread application as fungicides, antifouling coatings for porous surfaces, herbicides, insecticides, and generic biocides. Due to the varied toxicity of each species of organotins, it is important that methods address the speciation of...

  16. Spot Spraying Reduces Herbicide Concentrations in Runoff.

    PubMed

    Melland, Alice R; Silburn, D Mark; McHugh, Allen D; Fillols, Emilie; Rojas-Ponce, Samuel; Baillie, Craig; Lewis, Stephen

    2016-05-25

    Rainfall simulator trials were conducted on sugar cane paddocks across dry-tropical and subtropical Queensland, Australia, to examine the potential for spot spraying to reduce herbicide losses in runoff. Recommended rates of the herbicides glyphosate, 2,4-D, fluoroxypyr, atrazine, and diuron were sprayed onto 0, 20, 40, 50, 70, or 100% of the area of runoff plots. Simulated rainfall was applied 2 days after spraying to induce runoff at one plant cane and three ratoon crop sites. Over 50% of all herbicides were transported in the dissolved phase of runoff, regardless of the herbicide's sediment-water partition coefficient. For most sites and herbicides, runoff herbicide concentrations decreased with decreasing spray coverage and with decreasing herbicide load in the soil and cane residues. Importantly, sites with higher infiltration prior to runoff and lower total runoff had lower runoff herbicide concentrations.

  17. Marine-Natural-Product Development: First Discovery of Nortopsentin Alkaloids as Novel Antiviral, Anti-phytopathogenic-Fungus, and Insecticidal Agents.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaofei; Guo, Jincheng; Liu, Yuxiu; Lu, Aidang; Wang, Ziwen; Li, Yongqiang; Yang, Shaoxiang; Wang, Qingmin

    2018-04-25

    Nortopsentin alkaloids were found to have potent antiviral, anti-phytopathogenic-fungus, and insecticidal activities for the first time. Antiviral-activity tests revealed that these compounds were very sensitive to substituents, so a series of nortopsentin derivatives were designed, synthesized, and systematically evaluated for their antiviral activities against TMV, their fungicidal activities, and their insecticidal activities on the basis of a structural-diversity-derivation strategy. Compounds 2e (in vivo inactivation-, curative-, and protective-activity inhibitory rates of 50, 59, and 56%, respectively, at 500 μg/mL) and 2k (in vivo inactivation-, curative-, and protective-activity inhibitory rates of 60, 58, and 52%, respectively, at 500 μg/mL), with excellent antiviral activities and good physicochemical properties, emerged as new lead compounds for novel-antiviral-agent development. Further fungicidal-activity tests revealed that these alkaloids displayed broad-spectrum fungicidal activities. Compounds 2f, 2h, and 2j emerged as new lead compounds for antifungal-activity research. Additionally, all the compounds displayed good insecticidal activities against five kinds of insects, including Mythimna separate, Helicoverpa armigera, Ostrinia nubilalis, Plutella xylostella, and Culex pipiens pallens.

  18. Rust Inhibitor And Fungicide For Cooling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James F.; Greer, D. Clay

    1988-01-01

    Mixture of benzotriazole, benzoic acid, and fungicide prevents growth of rust and fungus. Water-based cooling mixture made from readily available materials prevents formation of metallic oxides and growth of fungi in metallic pipes. Coolant remains clear and does not develop thick sludge tending to collect in low points in cooling systems with many commercial rust inhibitors. Coolant compatible with iron, copper, aluminum, and stainless steel. Cannot be used with cadmium or cadmium-plated pipes.

  19. Cross-induction of detoxification genes by environmental xenobiotics and insecticides in the mosquito Aedes aegypti: impact on larval tolerance to chemical insecticides.

    PubMed

    Poupardin, Rodolphe; Reynaud, Stéphane; Strode, Clare; Ranson, Hilary; Vontas, John; David, Jean-Philippe

    2008-05-01

    The effect of exposure of Aedes aegypti larvae to sub-lethal doses of the pyrethroid insecticide permethrin, the organophosphate temephos, the herbicide atrazine, the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon fluoranthene and the heavy metal copper on their subsequent tolerance to insecticides, detoxification enzyme activities and expression of detoxification genes was investigated. Bioassays revealed a moderate increase in larval tolerance to permethrin following exposure to fluoranthene and copper while larval tolerance to temephos increased moderately after exposure to atrazine, copper and permethrin. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases activities were induced in larvae exposed to permethrin, fluoranthene and copper while glutathione S-transferase activities were induced after exposure to fluoranthene and repressed after exposure to copper. Microarray screening of the expression patterns of all detoxification genes following exposure to each xenobiotic with the Aedes Detox Chip identified multiple genes induced by xenobiotics and insecticides. Further expression studies using real-time quantitative PCR confirmed the induction of multiple CYP genes and one carboxylesterase gene by insecticides and xenobiotics. Overall, this study reveals the potential of xenobiotics found in polluted mosquito breeding sites to affect their tolerance to insecticides, possibly through the cross-induction of particular detoxification genes. Molecular mechanisms involved and impact on mosquito control strategies are discussed.

  20. BOREAS TGB-7 Dry Deposition Herbicide and Organochlorine Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, Don; Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-7 team measured the concentration and flux of several agricultural pesticides in air, rainwater, and dry deposition samples in order to determine the associated yearly deposition rates. This data set contains information on the dry deposition flux of seven herbicides [2,4- dichlorophenoxyacidic_acid (2,4-D), bromoxynil, dicamb, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), triallate, trifluralin, and diclop-methyl] known to appear in the atmosphere of the Canadian prairies. Also, the concentration of three herbicides (atrazine, alachlor, and metolachlor), two groups of insecticides (lindane and breakdown products and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) and breakdown products), and several polychlorinated biphenyls commonly used in the central United States was measured. All of these chemicals are reported, in the literature, to be transported in the atmosphere. Many have been reported to occur in boreal and arctic food chains. The sampling was carried out from 16-Jun to 13-Aug-1993 and 04-May to 20-Jul-1994 at the BOREAS site in the Prince Albert National Park (Waskesiu). The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  1. BOREAS TGB-7 Rainwater Herbicide and Organochlorine Concentration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, Don; Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-7 team measured the concentration and flux of several agricultural pesticides in air and rainwater samples in order to determine the associated yearly deposition rates. This data set contains information on the rainwater concentration of seven herbicides [2,4- dichlorophenoxyacidic_acid (2,4-D), bromoxynil, dicamb, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), triallate, trifluralin, and diclop-methyl] known to appear in the atmosphere of the Canadian prairies. Also, the concentration of three herbicides (atrazine, alachlor, and metolachlor), two groups of insecticides (lindane and breakdown products and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) and breakdown products), and several polychlorinated biphenyls commonly used in the central United States was measured. All of these chemicals are reported, in the literature, to be transported in the atmosphere. Many have been reported to occur in boreal and arctic food chains. The sampling was carried out from 16-Jun to 13-Aug-1993 and 04-May to 20-Jul-1994 at the BOREAS site in the Prince Albert National Park (Waskesiu). The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  2. BOREAS TGB-7 Ambient Air Herbicide and Organochlorine Concentration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, Don; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Trace Gas Biogeochemistry (BOREAS TGB)-7 team measured the concentration and flux of several agricultural pesticides in air, rainwater, and dry deposition samples in order to determine the associated yearly deposition rates. This data set contains information on the ambient air concentration of seven herbicides [2,4- dichlorophenoxyacidic_acid (2,4-D), bromoxynil, dicamb, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), triallate, trifluralin, and diclop-methyl] known to appear in the atmosphere of the Canadian prairies. Also, the concentration of three herbicides (atrazine, alachlor, and metolachlor), two groups of insecticides (lindane and breakdown products and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) and breakdown products), and several polychlorinated biphenyls commonly used in the central United States was measured. All of these chemicals are reported, in the literature, to be transported in the atmosphere. Many have been reported to occur in boreal and arctic food chains. The sampling was carried out from 16-Jun to 13-Aug-1993 and 04-May to 20-Jul-1994 at the BOREAS site in the Prince Albert National Park (Waskesiu). The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  3. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Insecticides

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the insecticides module, when to list insecticides as a candidate cause, ways to measure insecticides, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for insecticides, insecticides module references and literature reviews.

  4. Introduction to Weeds and Herbicides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartwig, Nathan L.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University is an introduction to weed control and herbicide use. An initial discussion of the characteristics of weeds includes scientific naming, weed competition with crops, weed dispersal and dormancy, and conditions affecting weed seed germination. The main body of the…

  5. Biotechnology: herbicide-resistant crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgenic, herbicide-resistant (HR) crops are planted on about 80% of the land covered by transgenic crops. More than 90% of HR crios are glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, the others being resistant to glufosinate. The wide-scale adoption of HR crops, largely for economic reasons, has been the mos...

  6. Recent Trends in Studies on Botanical Fungicides in Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Mi-Young; Cha, Byeongjin; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    Plants are attacked by various phytopathogenic fungi. For many years, synthetic fungicides have been used to control plant diseases. Although synthetic fungicides are highly effective, their repeated use has led to problems such as environmental pollution, development of resistance, and residual toxicity. This has prompted intensive research on the development of biopesticides, including botanical fungicides. To date, relatively few botanical fungicides have been registered and commercialized. However, many scientists have reported isolation and characterization of a variety of antifungal plant derivatives. Here, we present a survey of a wide range of reported plant-derived antifungal metabolites. PMID:25288923

  7. Bacterial insecticides and inert materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The term “novel insecticides” can be regarded as a category that includes the insecticides with novel mode of action, but also insecticides that are novel in terms of their low mammalian toxicity and environmental-friendly profiles. Under this context, it is difficult to identify active ingredients ...

  8. Can herbicide safeners allow selective control of weedy rice infesting rice crops?

    PubMed

    Busi, Roberto; Nguyen, Nghia K; Chauhan, Bhagirath S; Vidotto, Francesco; Tabacchi, Maurizio; Powles, Stephen B

    2017-01-01

    Rice is a major field crop of paramount importance for global food security. However, the increased adoption of more profitable and resource-efficient direct-seeded rice (DSR) systems has contributed to greater weed infestations, including weedy rice, which has become a severe problem in several Asian regions. In this study we have developed a conceptually novel method to protect rice plants at high doses of clomazone and triallate. The insecticide phorate applied to rice seeds provided a substantial level of protection against the herbicides clomazone or triallate. A quantity of 15 kg phorate ha -1 significantly increased the LD 50 values, which were more than twofold greater than for rice plants treated only with clomazone. A quantity of 20 kg phorate ha -1 in combination with 2000 g triallate ha -1 safened rice plants (80% survival) with LD 50 >3.4-fold greater than in phorate-untreated rice. Weed control efficacy was not lowered by the presence of phorate-treated rice seeds. Weedy rice is one of the most damaging global weeds and a major threat to DSR systems. In this study we have developed a proof-of-concept method to allow selective weedy rice control in rice crops. We call for herbicide discovery programmes and research to identify candidate safener and herbicide combinations to achieve selective herbicide control of weedy rice and alleviate weed infestations in global rice crops. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. 75 FR 67088 - Clean Water Act (CWA) and Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) Common...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [EPA-HQ-OPP-2010-0818; FRL-9218-6] Clean Water Act (CWA) and... solicit input on methods being evaluated by the Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP) and the Office of Water (OW), with the support of the Office of Research and Development (ORD) to develop common...

  10. Notification: National Pesticide Information Center Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Enforcement Referrals

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OPE-FY14-0035, March 21, 2014. The Office of Inspector General is starting preliminary research on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's oversight of the National Pesticide Information Center program.

  11. Notification: Evaluation of EPA’s Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Section 18 Emergency Exemptions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OPE-FY17-0024, August 21, 2017. The EPA OIG plans to begin preliminary research on the emergency exemption process used by the EPA’s Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention’s Office of Pesticide Programs.

  12. Herbicide Persistence in Seawater Simulation Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Mercurio, Philip; Mueller, Jochen F.; Eaglesham, Geoff; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Herbicides are detected year-round in marine waters, including those of the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef (GBR). The few previous studies that have investigated herbicide persistence in seawater generally reported half-lives in the order of months, and several studies were too short to detect significant degradation. Here we investigated the persistence of eight herbicides commonly detected in the GBR or its catchments in standard OECD simulation flask experiments, but with the aim to mimic natural conditions similar to those found on the GBR (i.e., relatively low herbicide concentrations, typical temperatures, light and microbial communities). Very little degradation was recorded over the standard 60 d period (Experiment 1) so a second experiment was extended to 365 d. Half-lives of PSII herbicides ametryn, atrazine, diuron, hexazinone and tebuthiuron were consistently greater than a year, indicating high persistence. The detection of atrazine and diuron metabolites and longer persistence in mercuric chloride-treated seawater confirmed that biodegradation contributed to the breakdown of herbicides. The shortest half-life recorded was 88 d for growth-regulating herbicide 2,4-D at 31°C in the dark, while the fatty acid-inhibitor metolachlor exhibited a minimum half-life of 281 d. The presence of moderate light and elevated temperatures affected the persistence of most of the herbicides; however, the scale and direction of the differences were not predictable and were likely due to changes in microbial community composition. The persistence estimates here represent some of the first appropriate data for application in risk assessments for herbicide exposure in tropical marine systems. The long persistence of herbicides identified in the present study helps explain detection of herbicides in nearshore waters of the GBR year round. Little degradation of these herbicides would be expected during the wet season with runoff and associated flood plumes

  13. Herbicide Persistence in Seawater Simulation Experiments.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Philip; Mueller, Jochen F; Eaglesham, Geoff; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Herbicides are detected year-round in marine waters, including those of the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef (GBR). The few previous studies that have investigated herbicide persistence in seawater generally reported half-lives in the order of months, and several studies were too short to detect significant degradation. Here we investigated the persistence of eight herbicides commonly detected in the GBR or its catchments in standard OECD simulation flask experiments, but with the aim to mimic natural conditions similar to those found on the GBR (i.e., relatively low herbicide concentrations, typical temperatures, light and microbial communities). Very little degradation was recorded over the standard 60 d period (Experiment 1) so a second experiment was extended to 365 d. Half-lives of PSII herbicides ametryn, atrazine, diuron, hexazinone and tebuthiuron were consistently greater than a year, indicating high persistence. The detection of atrazine and diuron metabolites and longer persistence in mercuric chloride-treated seawater confirmed that biodegradation contributed to the breakdown of herbicides. The shortest half-life recorded was 88 d for growth-regulating herbicide 2,4-D at 31°C in the dark, while the fatty acid-inhibitor metolachlor exhibited a minimum half-life of 281 d. The presence of moderate light and elevated temperatures affected the persistence of most of the herbicides; however, the scale and direction of the differences were not predictable and were likely due to changes in microbial community composition. The persistence estimates here represent some of the first appropriate data for application in risk assessments for herbicide exposure in tropical marine systems. The long persistence of herbicides identified in the present study helps explain detection of herbicides in nearshore waters of the GBR year round. Little degradation of these herbicides would be expected during the wet season with runoff and associated flood plumes

  14. Widespread contamination of wildflower and bee-collected pollen with complex mixtures of neonicotinoids and fungicides commonly applied to crops.

    PubMed

    David, Arthur; Botías, Cristina; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Nicholls, Elizabeth; Rotheray, Ellen L; Hill, Elizabeth M; Goulson, Dave

    2016-03-01

    There is considerable and ongoing debate as to the harm inflicted on bees by exposure to agricultural pesticides. In part, the lack of consensus reflects a shortage of information on field-realistic levels of exposure. Here, we quantify concentrations of neonicotinoid insecticides and fungicides in the pollen of oilseed rape, and in pollen of wildflowers growing near arable fields. We then compare this to concentrations of these pesticides found in pollen collected by honey bees and in pollen and adult bees sampled from bumble bee colonies placed on arable farms. We also compared this with levels found in bumble bee colonies placed in urban areas. Pollen of oilseed rape was heavily contaminated with a broad range of pesticides, as was the pollen of wildflowers growing nearby. Consequently, pollen collected by both bee species also contained a wide range of pesticides, notably including the fungicides carbendazim, boscalid, flusilazole, metconazole, tebuconazole and trifloxystrobin and the neonicotinoids thiamethoxam, thiacloprid and imidacloprid. In bumble bees, the fungicides carbendazim, boscalid, tebuconazole, flusilazole and metconazole were present at concentrations up to 73nanogram/gram (ng/g). It is notable that pollen collected by bumble bees in rural areas contained high levels of the neonicotinoids thiamethoxam (mean 18ng/g) and thiacloprid (mean 2.9ng/g), along with a range of fungicides, some of which are known to act synergistically with neonicotinoids. Pesticide exposure of bumble bee colonies in urban areas was much lower than in rural areas. Understanding the effects of simultaneous exposure of bees to complex mixtures of pesticides remains a major challenge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of fungicide on Wyoming big sagebrush seed germination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Because fungal infection may complicate both the logistics and the interpretation of germination tests, seeds are sometimes treated with chemical fungicides. Fungicides may reduce the germination rate and/or germination percentage, and should be avoided unless fungal contamination is severe enough ...

  16. Evaluation of fungicides for hop downy mildew, Hubbard, Oregon, 2016

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This research was conducted to quantify the degree of control of the disease with a phosphorous acid-based fungicide, the present industry-standard for management of downy mildew on hop in the Pacific Northwestern U.S. No suppression of the disease was observed with the industry standard fungicide,...

  17. Fungicide residue remediation on table grapes using ozone fumigation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ozone fumigation was explored as a means for degrading contemporary organic fungicides related to table grape production. Separate fumigations were conducted in a flow-through chamber on fungicides sorbed to model abiotic glass surfaces or to table grapes. Gaseous ozone at constant ozone concentrati...

  18. Fungicide-induced transposon movement in Monilinia fructicola.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fengping; Everhart, Sydney E; Bryson, P Karen; Luo, Chaoxi; Song, Xi; Liu, Xili; Schnabel, Guido

    2015-12-01

    Repeated applications of fungicides with a single mode of action are believed to select for pre-existing resistant strains in a pathogen population, while the impact of sub-lethal doses of such fungicides on sensitive members of the population is unknown. In this study, in vitro evidence is presented that continuous exposure of Monilinia fructicola mycelium to some fungicides can induce genetic change in form of transposon transposition. Three fungicide-sensitive M. fructicola isolates were exposed in 12 weekly transfers of mycelia to a dose gradient of demethylation inhibitor fungicide (DMI) SYP-Z048 and quinone outside inhibitor fungicide (QoI) azoxystrobin in solo or mixture treatments. Evidence of mutagenesis was assessed by monitoring Mftc1, a multicopy transposable element of M. fructicola, by PCR and Southern blot analysis. Movement of Mftc1 was observed following azoxystrobin and azoxystrobin plus SYP-Z048 treatments in two of the three isolates, but not in the non-fungicide-treated controls. Interestingly, the upstream promoter region of MfCYP51 was a prime target for Mftc1 transposition in these isolates. Transposition of Mftc1 was verified by Southern blot in two of three isolates from another, similar experiment following prolonged, sublethal azoxystrobin exposure, although in these isolates movement of Mftc1 in the upstream MfCYP51 promoter region was not observed. More research is warranted to determine whether fungicide-induced mutagenesis may also happen under field conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of fungicides for control of Phytophthora ramorum

    Treesearch

    S. Wagner; K. Kaminski; S. Werres

    2008-01-01

    As part of the project European Phytophthora ramorum Pest Risk Analysis (RAPRA) a wide range of fungicides was tested for in vitro activity against mycelial growth and zoospore germination of P. ramorum. A preliminary set of experiments was performed to study the effect of nine common fungicides specific for

  20. Sensitivity of Texas strains of Ceratocystis fagacearum to triazole fungicides

    Treesearch

    A. Dan Wilson; L.B. Forse

    1997-01-01

    Ten geographically diverse Texas strains of the oak wilt fungus Ceratocystis fagacearum were tested in vitro for their sensitivity to five triazole fungicides based on accumulated linear growth, linear growth rates, and dry weight accumulation in response to fungicide concentrations of 0.1 to 600 parts per billion (ppb). None of the triazoles inhibited growth at 0.1...

  1. Evaluating variable rate fungicide applications for control of Sclerotinia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Oklahoma peanut growers continue to try to increase yields and reduce input costs. Perhaps the largest input in a peanut crop is fungicide applications. This is especially true for areas in the state that have high disease pressure from Sclerotinia. On average, a single fungicide application cost...

  2. Intelligent herbicide application system for reduced herbicide vegetation control : phase II-commercialization

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-12-01

    This report describes the development of a commercial prototype intelligent herbicide application system : (IHAS). The improved design incorporates a parallel add-on type fluid handling system to allow existing : variable-rate herbicide injecti...

  3. Misuse of organomercury fungicides in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, W. F.; Pregnolatto, W.; Pigati, P.

    1976-01-01

    A methoxyethyl mercuric compound, licensed in Brazil as a fungicide for seed dressing, was widely used for spraying tomato and other vegetable crops in 1966 and 1967. Mercury residues ranging from 0.05 to 0.30 mg/kg were detected in 14% of the tomatoes, 13% of other vegetable samples, and 57% of the tomato paste batches. A wide campaign through newspapers, radio, and television was quickly established to educate farmers and the population in general on the hazards of ingestion of mercury-contaminated food. All samples of tomatoes and other vegetables positive for mercury (residues above 0.05 mg/kg) were destroyed. Inspection posts on the main roads and highways prevented the delivery of contaminated food to cities and food processing plants. The sale of organomercury fungicides is now controlled in Brazil; however, treated seeds which are not planted may be diverted to human or animal consumption. There is no official record of accidents, but occasional cases of poisoning are known. The mercury residue level in Brazilian fish is low, indicating that environmental pollution by mercury is not a big problem in the country. However, some fresh-water and estuarine fish may contain mercury residues ranging from 0.01 to 0.66 mg/kg. PMID:1086162

  4. Kudzu eradication trials testing fifteen herbicides

    Treesearch

    James H. Miller

    1986-01-01

    Two studies examined herbicide treatments for controlling kudzu [Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi]. In one study, fifteen herbicides were tested at 1 or 2 rates at 5 locations. Treatments and re-treatments occurred over a 2-yr period. The most effective herbicides were picloram pellets (4.7 and 5.8 lb ai/a), tebuthiuron pellets (6 lb ai/a), and picloram...

  5. Delivery of calibration workshops covering herbicide application equipment : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-03-31

    Proper herbicide sprayer set-up and calibration are critical to the success of the Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) herbicide program. Sprayer system set-up and calibration training is provided in annual continuing education herbicide wor...

  6. Development of reproduction in Allegheny hardwood stands after herbicide-clearcuts and herbicide-shelterwood cuts

    Treesearch

    Stephen B. Horsley

    1982-01-01

    Dense ground covers of fern and grass interfere with the regeneration of Allegheny hardwoods. An herbicide containing N-phosphonomethyl glycine controls the fern and grass, but also kills advance reproduction of desirable tree species. Preliminary results of an experiment comparing regeneration 3 years after herbicide-clearcuts and herbicide-shelterwood seed cuts...

  7. Occurrence of fungicides and other pesticides in surface water, groundwater, and sediment from three targeted-use areas in the United States, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orlando, James L.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Boehlke, Adam; Meyer, Michael T.; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Surface-water, groundwater, and suspended- and bedsediment samples were collected in three targeted-use areas in the United States where potatoes were grown during 2009 and analyzed for an extensive suite of fungicides and other pesticides by gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Fungicides were detected in all environmental matrices sampled during the study. The most frequently detected fungicides were azoxystrobin, boscalid, chlorothalonil, and pyraclostrobin. Other pesticides that were detected frequently included amino phosphonic acid (AMPA), atrazine, metolaclor, and the organochlorine insecticide p,p’-DDT and its degradates p,p’-DDD and p,p’-DDE. A greater number of pesticides were detected in surface water relative to the other environmental matrices sampled, and at least one pesticide was detected in 62 of the 63 surfacewater samples. The greatest numbers of pesticides and the maximum observed concentrations for most pesticides were measured in surface-water samples from Idaho. In eight surface- water samples (six from Idaho and two from Wisconsin), concentrations of bifenthrin, metolachlor, or malathion exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency freshwater aquatic-life benchmarks for chronic toxicity to invertebrates. Thirteen pesticides, including seven fungicides, were detected in groundwater samples. Shallow groundwater samples collected beneath recently harvested potato fields contained more pesticides and had higher concentrations of pesticides than samples collected from other groundwater sources sampled during the study. Generally, pesticide concentrations were lower in groundwater samples than in surfacewater or sediment samples, with the exception of the fungicide boscalid, which was found to have its highest concentration in a shallow groundwater sample collected in Wisconsin. Thirteen pesticides, including four fungicides, were detected in suspended-sediment samples. The most

  8. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Herbicides - Detailed Conceptual Diagram

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the herbicides module, when to list herbicides as a candidate cause, ways to measure herbicides, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for herbicides, herbicides module references and literature reviews.

  9. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Herbicides - Simple Conceptual Diagram

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the herbicides module, when to list herbicides as a candidate cause, ways to measure herbicides, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for herbicides, herbicides module references and literature reviews.

  10. Insecticides against headlice in Glasgow.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, S W; Peock, S

    1993-08-01

    A postal questionnaire for describing current practices of insecticide usage for the prevention and treatment of pediculosis was sent to 53 pharmacists in Glasgow. 91% returned completed questionnaires. Between 19,000 to 36,000 bottles of insecticide against headlice were bought by the public in Glasgow in 1991. Most of these were sold in small volumes (less than 100 ml) and sales were highest during the autumn. Although pharmacists sold a range of different classes of insecticide, the most popular were those that contained malathion, the treatment for pediculosis recommended by the Health Board. Choice of treatment was probably influenced by advice given to the public by pharmacists and general practitioners. Clients preferred shampoo formulations. There was evidence that treatments were used prophylactically against headlice. However, there was little indication of large scale resistance to insecticides in the louse population. The results indicate that headlice remain a persistent problem in Glasgow, despite the public adhering to the advice of health professionals.

  11. Design, synthesis, and fungicidal activities of imino diacid analogs of valine amide fungicides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Man; Yang, Hui-Hui; Tian, Lei; Li, Jian-Qiang; Zhao, Wei-Guang

    2015-12-15

    The novel imino diacid analogs of valine amides were synthesized via several steps, including the protection, amidation, deprotection, and amino alkylation of valine, with the resulting structures confirmed by (1)H and (13)C NMR and HRMS. Bioassays showed that some of these compounds exhibited good fungicidal activity. Notably, isopropyl 2-((1-((1-(3-fluorophenyl)ethyl)amino)-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)amino)propanoate 5i displayed significant levels of control, at 50%, against Erysiphe graminis at 3.9μM as well as a level of potency very similar to the reference azoxystrobin, which gave 60% activity at this concentration. The present work demonstrates that imino diacid analogs of valine amides could be potentially useful key compounds for the development of novel fungicides against wheat powdery mildew. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mitochondrial impacts of insecticidal formate esters in insecticide-resistant and insecticide-susceptible Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Song, Cheol; Scharf, Michael E

    2009-06-01

    Previous research on insecticidal formate esters in flies and mosquitoes has documented toxicity profiles, metabolism characteristics and neurological impacts. The research presented here investigated mitochondrial impacts of insecticidal formate esters and their hydrolyzed metabolite formic acid in the model dipteran insect Drosophila melanogaster Meig. These studies compared two Drosophila strains: an insecticide-susceptible strain (Canton-S) and a strain resistant by cytochrome P450 overexpression (Hikone-R). In initial studies investigating inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase, two proven insecticidal materials (hydramethylnon and sodium cyanide) caused significant inhibition. However, for insecticidal formate esters and formic acid, no significant inhibition was identified in either fly strain. Mitochondrial impacts of formate esters were then investigated further by tracking toxicant-induced cytochrome c release from mitochondria into the cytoplasm, a biomarker of apoptosis and neurological dysfunction. Formic acid and three positive control treatments (rotenone, antimycin A and sodium cyanide) induced cytochrome c release, verifying that formic acid is capable of causing mitochondrial disruption. However, when comparing formate ester hydrolysis and cytochrome c release between Drosophila strains, formic acid liberation was only weakly correlated with cytochrome c release in the susceptible Canton-S strain (r(2) = 0.70). The resistant Hikone-R strain showed no correlation (r(2) < 0.0001) between formate ester hydrolysis and cytochrome c release. The findings of this study provide confirmation of mitochondrial impacts by insecticidal formate esters and suggest links between mitochondrial disruption, respiratory inhibition, apoptosis and formate-ester-induced neurotoxicity.

  13. FLAMMABILITY OF HERBICIDE-TREATED GUAVA FOLIAGE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Guava leaves treated with herbicide were found to be less flammable than untreated green leaves or dead leaves . Differences in flammability were...determined by small-scale laboratory fires, differential thermal analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. The herbicide-treated leaves had a higher ash

  14. Kudzu eradication trials with new herbicides

    Treesearch

    James H. Miller

    1988-01-01

    Two screening studies in Georgia tested new herbicides as potential eradicators of kudzu (Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi). One study was conducted on a Coastal Plain and the other on a Piedmont site. Tordon 101 was applied as the standard. Those herbicides which are currently labeled for forest land site preparation and which gave control comparable...

  15. Economics of herbicide application methods in hardwoods

    Treesearch

    Gary W. Miller

    1988-01-01

    Forest managers can use the data presented here to determine the least-cost herbicide application method for precommercial thinning treatments in hardwood sapling stands. Herbicides used in managing immature hardwood stands must be applied ustng individual-tree methods: broadcast applications in hardwoods are not selective and may result in signtficant damage to...

  16. Herbicide residues in grapes and wine.

    PubMed

    Ying, G G; Williams, B

    1999-05-01

    The persistence of several common herbicides from grapes to wine has been studied. Shiraz, Tarrango and Doradillo grapes were separately sprayed with either norflurazon, oxyfluorfen, oxadiazon or trifluralin-persistent herbicides commonly used for weed control in vineyards. The dissipation of the herbicides from the grapes was followed for 28 days following treatment. Results showed that norflurazon was the most persist herbicide although there were detectable residues of all the herbicides on both red and white grapes at the end of the study period. The penetration of herbicides into the flesh of the grapes was found to be significantly greater for white grapes than for red grapes. Small-lot winemaking experiments showed that norflurazon persisted at levels close to the initial concentration through vinification and into the finished wine. The other herbicides degraded, essentially via first-order kinetics, within the period of "first fermentation" and had largely disappeared after 28 days. The use of charcoal together with filter pads, or with diatomaceous earth was shown to be very effective in removing herbicide residues from the wine. A 5% charcoal filter removed more than 96% of the norflurazon persisting in the treated wine.

  17. Control of Butterfly Bush with Postemergence Herbicides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Butterfly bush (Buddleja davidii) is classified as invasive in several parts of the United States. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of four herbicides and two application methods on postemergence butterfly bush control. The four herbicides included: Roundup (glyphosate)...

  18. Response of Saw Palmetto to Three Herbicides

    Treesearch

    J.L. Michael; D.G. Neary

    1985-01-01

    Saw palmetto [Serona repens (Bartram) Small] can be controlled with herbicides. Garion® 4E1/2 and Brush Killer® 800 were evaluated for effectiveness againest saw palmetto when they were applied at three rates in April, June, and August. Oust® was tested at three rates in April only. Herbicides were not effective with April...

  19. Aerial spray adjuvants for herbicidal drift control.

    Treesearch

    Gratkowski H.; Stewart R.

    1973-01-01

    Increased public concern about pesticides requires that foresters reduce drift and insure precise application of herbicides to the areas requiring treatment. Drift control is necessary near waterways and other ecologically sensitive areas. This publication discusses available drift control adjuvants for herbicidal sprays. These include invert emulsions, thickening...

  20. Resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides: current understanding.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen B

    2014-09-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) inhibitor herbicides currently comprise the largest site-of-action group (with 54 active ingredients across five chemical groups) and have been widely used in world agriculture since they were first introduced in 1982. Resistance evolution in weeds to AHAS inhibitors has been rapid and identified in populations of many weed species. Often, evolved resistance is associated with point mutations in the target AHAS gene; however non-target-site enhanced herbicide metabolism occurs as well. Many AHAS gene resistance mutations can occur and be rapidly enriched owing to a high initial resistance gene frequency, simple and dominant genetic inheritance and lack of major fitness cost of the resistance alleles. Major advances in the elucidation of the crystal structure of the AHAS (Arabidopsis thaliana) catalytic subunit in complex with various AHAS inhibitor herbicides have greatly improved current understanding of the detailed molecular interactions between AHAS, cofactors and herbicides. Compared with target-site resistance, non-target-site resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides is less studied and hence less understood. In a few well-studied cases, non-target-site resistance is due to enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism (metabolic resistance), mimicking that occurring in tolerant crop species and often involving cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. However, the specific herbicide-metabolising, resistance-endowing genes are yet to be identified in resistant weed species. The current state of mechanistic understanding of AHAS inhibitor herbicide resistance is reviewed, and outstanding research issues are outlined. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. The use of herbicides in hardwood forestery

    Treesearch

    James H. Miller

    1987-01-01

    Herbicides can play an important role in hardwood management by providing foresters and landowners with a means to eliminate undesirable stand components. Although herbicide technology for hardwood management still needs much development, some methods are available and MU be used to enhance the value of the stand. With an emphasis on safety, detailed information about...

  2. Managing the evolution of herbicide resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Herbicide-resistant (HR) weeds are widespread threats to the sustainability, productivity, and profitability of many cropping systems. Efforts to combat their spread through herbicide rotation schedules have been marginally effective at best. Despite the scope of the problem, we lack sound empirical...

  3. Precision Herbicide Application Technologies To Decrease Herbicide Losses in Furrow Irrigation Outflows in a Northeastern Australian Cropping System.

    PubMed

    Davis, Aaron M; Pradolin, Jordan

    2016-05-25

    This study compared water quality benefits of using precision herbicide application technologies in relation to traditional spraying approaches across several pre- and postemergent herbicides in furrow-irrigated canefarming systems. The use of shielded sprayers (herbicide banding) provided herbicide load reductions extending substantially beyond simple proportionate decreases in amount of active herbicide ingredient applied to paddocks. These reductions were due largely to the extra management control available to irrigating growers in relation to where both herbicides and irrigation water can be applied to paddocks, coupled with knowledge of herbicide toxicological and physicochemical properties. Despite more complex herbicide mixtures being applied in banded practices, banding provided capacity for greatly reduced environmental toxicity in off-paddock losses. Similar toxicological and loss profiles of alternative herbicides relative to recently regulated pre-emergent herbicides highlight the need for a carefully considered approach to integrating alternative herbicides into improved pest management.

  4. Biochemical changes induced by fungicides in nitrogen fixing Nostoc sp.

    PubMed

    Deviram, G V N S; Pant, Gaurav; Prasuna, R Gyana

    2013-01-01

    The present study indicates the effect of fungicides (approved by WHO) and their behavior on nitrogen fixer of rice eco system Nostoc sp. Application of plant protecting chemicals at recommended levels braced up the growth of blue green algae thereby enhancing heterocyst formation and nitrogenase activity. Nostoc sp demoed varying degrees of sensitivity to fungicides. Biomass yield, protein, carbohydrate content reduced after 3pg/mL concentration. Heterocyst damage was observed from 4μg/mL, Proline content increased with increase in fungicide concentration, utmost yellowing of the culture started from 4μg/mL. The decreasing order of the toxicity to Nostoc sp with fungicides was Mancozeb> Ediphenphos> Carbendazim> Hexaconazole.

  5. In vitro fungicide sensitivity of Rhizoctonia isolates collected from turfgrasses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Different Rhizoctonia species and anastomosis groups (AGs) have been reported to show variable sensitivity to various commercial fungicides. Thirty–six isolates of Rhizoctonia collected from turfgrasses were tested in vitro for sensitivity to commercial formulations of iprodione, triticonazole, and ...

  6. In vivo mutagenicity of conazole fungicides correlates with tumorigenicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. All three conazoles are generally inactive in short-term genotoxicity te...

  7. Effects of Conazole Fungicides on Spontaneous Activity in Neural Networks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hexaconazole (HEX), Tetraconazole (TET), Fluconazole (FLU), and Triadimefon (TRI) are conazole fungicides, used to control powdery mildews on crops, and as veterinary and clinical treatments. TRI, a demethylation inhibitor, is neurotoxic in vivo, and previous in vitro experiments...

  8. CHARACTERIZING THE CONFORMATIONAL AND ELECTRONIC PROPERTIES OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazole fungicides have important environmental and human health considerations including chemical reactivity and transformation pathways. The electronic and conformational properties of an organic molecule determines in conjunction with solvent properties, its chemical reacti...

  9. Silvicultural use of herbicides in Pacific Northwest forests.

    Treesearch

    H. Gratkowski

    1975-01-01

    After a brief description of silvicultural problems, the author tells how to prescribe herbicidal sprays for aerial, application in Pacific Northwest forests. The publication offers a detailed discussion of the five basic considerations: (1) selection of the best herbicide or herbicides, (2) amount of herbicide to be applied per acre, (3) carriers, (4) volume of spray...

  10. Effects of Fungicides on Aquatic Fungi and Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conners, D. E.; Rosemond, A. D.; Black, M. C.

    2005-05-01

    Aquatic microorganisms play an important role in conditioning leaf litter that enters streams and serves as an important base of production for consumers. Contamination of streams by fungicides may adversely affect microorganisms and alter leaf litter processing rates. Unfortunately, microorganisms are rarely used in acute toxicity tests for fungicide evaluation and registration. We adapted the resazurin reduction assay, which is used in medical microbiology, to assess the acute toxicity of four fungicides (azoxystrobin, trifloxystrobin, kresoxim-methyl and chlorothalonil) to aquatic fungi (Articulospora tetracladia) and bacteria (Cytophaga spp.), and investigated the ability of the toxicants to inhibit leaf breakdown in microcosms. Fungi were more sensitive to fungicides than many standard test organisms (cladocerans, green algae, trout), while bacteria were often the least sensitive. All of the fungicides except kresoxim-methyl, when added to microcosms at concentrations that inhibited the fungi by 90 percent in acute tests, reduced leaf breakdown rates by an average of 14.7 percent. Thus, aquatic fungi and their associated functions in streams may be relatively sensitive to fungicides applied terrestrially that enter streams through non-point sources. These data highlight the importance of including aquatic fungi in safety assessments of pesticides for protection of microbial function.

  11. Potential of agricultural fungicides for antifungal drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Jampilek, Josef

    2016-01-01

    While it is true that only a small fraction of fungal species are responsible for human mycoses, the increasing prevalence of fungal diseases has highlighted an urgent need to develop new antifungal drugs, especially for systemic administration. This contribution focuses on the similarities between agricultural fungicides and drugs. Inorganic, organometallic and organic compounds can be found amongst agricultural fungicides. Furthermore, fungicides are designed and developed in a similar fashion to drugs based on similar rules and guidelines, with fungicides also having to meet similar criteria of lead-likeness and/or drug-likeness. Modern approved specific-target fungicides are well-characterized entities with a proposed structure-activity relationships hypothesis and a defined mode of action. Extensive toxicological evaluation, including mammalian toxicology assays, is performed during the whole discovery and development process. Thus modern agrochemical research (design of modern agrochemicals) comes close to drug design, discovery and development. Therefore, modern specific-target fungicides represent excellent lead-like structures/models for novel drug design and development.

  12. Inhibition of Efflux Transporter-Mediated Fungicide Resistance in Pyrenophora tritici-repentis by a Derivative of 4′-Hydroxyflavone and Enhancement of Fungicide Activity

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, Sven; Deising, Holger B.

    2005-01-01

    Populations of the causal agent of wheat tan spot, Pyrenophora tritici-repentis, that are collected from fields frequently treated with reduced fungicide concentrations have reduced sensitivity to strobilurin fungicides and azole fungicides (C14-demethylase inhibitors). Energy-dependent efflux transporter activity can be induced under field conditions and after in vitro application of sublethal amounts of fungicides. Efflux transporters can mediate cross-resistance to a number of fungicides that belong to different chemical classes and have different modes of action. Resistant isolates can grow on substrata amended with fungicides and can infect plants treated with fungicides at levels above recommended field concentrations. We identified the hydroxyflavone derivative 2-(4-ethoxy-phenyl)-chromen-4-one as a potent inhibitor of energy-dependent fungicide efflux transporters in P. tritici-repentis. Application of this compound in combination with fungicides shifted fungicide-resistant P. tritici-repentis isolates back to normal sensitivity levels and prevented infection of wheat leaves. These results highlight the role of energy-dependent efflux transporters in fungicide resistance and could enable a novel disease management strategy based on the inhibition of fungicide efflux to be developed. PMID:15933029

  13. Managing the evolution of herbicide resistance.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jeffrey A; Tranel, Patrick J; Hager, Aaron G; Schutte, Brian; Wu, Chenxi; Chatham, Laura A; Davis, Adam S

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and managing the evolutionary responses of pests and pathogens to control efforts is essential to human health and survival. Herbicide-resistant (HR) weeds undermine agricultural sustainability, productivity and profitability, yet the epidemiology of resistance evolution - particularly at landscape scales - is poorly understood. We studied glyphosate resistance in a major agricultural weed, Amaranthus tuberculatus (common waterhemp), using landscape, weed and management data from 105 central Illinois grain farms, including over 500 site-years of herbicide application records. Glyphosate-resistant (GR) A. tuberculatus occurrence was greatest in fields with frequent glyphosate applications, high annual rates of herbicide mechanism of action (MOA) turnover and few MOAs field(-1) year(-1) . Combining herbicide MOAs at the time of application by herbicide mixing reduced the likelihood of GR A. tuberculatus. These findings illustrate the importance of examining large-scale evolutionary processes at relevant spatial scales. Although measures such as herbicide mixing may delay GR or other HR weed traits, they are unlikely to prevent them. Long-term weed management will require truly diversified management practices that minimize selection for herbicide resistance traits. © 2015 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Use of butterflies as nontarget insect test species and the acute toxicity and hazard of mosquito control insecticides.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tham C; Pryor, Rachel L; Rand, Gary M; Frakes, Robert A

    2011-04-01

    Honeybees are the standard insect test species used for toxicity testing of pesticides on nontarget insects for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) under the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). Butterflies are another important insect order and a valued ecological resource in pollination. The current study conducted acute toxicity tests with naled, permethrin, and dichlorvos on fifth larval instar (caterpillars) and adults of different native Florida, USA, butterfly species to determine median lethal doses (24-h LD50), because limited acute toxicity data are available with this major insect group. Thorax- and wing-only applications of each insecticide were conducted. Based on LD50s, thorax and wing application exposures were acutely toxic to both caterpillars and adults. Permethrin was the most acutely toxic insecticide after thorax exposure to fifth instars and adult butterflies. However, no generalization on acute toxicity (sensitivity) of the insecticides could be concluded based on exposures to fifth instars versus adult butterflies or on thorax versus wing exposures of adult butterflies. A comparison of LD50s of the butterflies from this study (caterpillars and adults) with honeybee LD50s for the adult mosquito insecticides on a µg/organism or µg/g basis indicates that several butterfly species are more sensitive to these insecticides than are honeybees. A comparison of species sensitivity distributions for all three insecticides shows that permethrin had the lowest 10th percentile. Using a hazard quotient approach indicates that both permethrin and naled applications in the field may present potential acute hazards to butterflies, whereas no acute hazard of dichlorvos is apparent in butterflies. Butterflies should be considered as potential test organisms when nontarget insect testing of pesticides is suggested under FIFRA. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  15. Global perspective of herbicide-resistant weeds.

    PubMed

    Heap, Ian

    2014-09-01

    Two hundred and twenty weed species have evolved resistance to one or more herbicides, and there are now 404 unique cases (species × site of action) of herbicide-resistant weeds globally. ALS inhibitor-resistant weeds account for about a third of all cases (133/404) and are particularly troublesome in rice and cereals. Although 71 weed species have been identified with triazine resistance, their importance has dwindled with the shift towards Roundup Ready® crops in the USA and the reduction of triazine usage in Europe. Forty-three grasses have evolved resistance to ACCase inhibitors, with the most serious cases being Avena spp., Lolium spp., Phalaris spp., Setaria spp. and Alopecurus myosuroides, infesting more than 25 million hectares of cereal production globally. Of the 24 weed species with glyphosate resistance, 16 have been found in Roundup Ready® cropping systems. Although Conyza canadensis is the most widespread glyphosate-resistant weed, Amaranthus palmeri and Amaranthus tuberculartus are the two most economically important glyphosate-resistant weeds because of the area they infest and the fact that these species have evolved resistance to numerous other herbicide sites of action, leaving growers with few herbicidal options for their control. The agricultural chemical industry has not brought any new herbicides with novel sites of action to market in over 30 years, making growers reliant on using existing herbicides in new ways. In addition, tougher registration and environmental regulations on herbicides have resulted in a loss of some herbicides, particularly in Europe. The lack of novel herbicide chemistries being brought to market combined with the rapid increase in multiple resistance in weeds threatens crop production worldwide. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Hybridization using cytoplasmic male sterility, cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance, and herbicide tolerance from nuclear genes

    SciTech Connect

    Beversdorf, W.D.; Erickson, L.R.; Grant, I.

    An improved process is described for producing a substantially homogeneous population of plants of a predetermined hybrid variety of crop which is capable of undergoing self-pollination and cross-pollination. The process comprises: growing in a first planting area a substantially random population of cytoplasmic male sterile plants which exhibit cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance to at least one Type A herbicide and exhibit tolerance to at least one Type B herbicide which is attributable solely to homozygous dominant nuclear genes and male fertile plants which are homozygous recessive maintainer plants for the cytoplasmic male sterile plants and which lack the cytoplasmic herbicide tolerancemore » to at least one Type A herbicide and exhibit tolerance to at least one Type B herbicide attributable solely to the homozygous dominant nuclear genes.« less

  17. Applicator Training Manual for: Forest Pest Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Jim

    Described in this manual is the use of insecticides, fungicides, and herbicides in forestry. Both diseases and insects found in hardwoods and conifers are covered. Detailed information is given on methods of herbicide application. Finally, five important environmental considerations are given. (BB)

  18. Limonene--A Natural Insecticide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Joseph H.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a high school chemistry student's research project in which limonene was isolated from the oil of lemons and oranges. Outlines the students' tests on the use of this chemical as an insecticide. Discusses possible extensions of the exercises based on questions generated by the students. (TW)

  19. Radioligand Recognition of Insecticide Targets.

    PubMed

    Casida, John E

    2018-04-04

    Insecticide radioligands allow the direct recognition and analysis of the targets and mechanisms of toxic action critical to effective and safe pest control. These radioligands are either the insecticides themselves or analogs that bind at the same or coupled sites. Preferred radioligands and their targets, often in both insects and mammals, are trioxabicyclooctanes for the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor, avermectin for the glutamate receptor, imidacloprid for the nicotinic receptor, ryanodine and chlorantraniliprole for the ryanodine receptor, and rotenone or pyridaben for NADH + ubiquinone oxidoreductase. Pyrethroids and other Na + channel modulator insecticides are generally poor radioligands due to lipophilicity and high nonspecific binding. For target site validation, the structure-activity relationships competing with the radioligand in the binding assays should be the same as that for insecticidal activity or toxicity except for rapidly detoxified or proinsecticide analogs. Once the radioligand assay is validated for relevance, it will often help define target site modifications on selection of resistant pest strains, selectivity between insects and mammals, and interaction with antidotes and other chemicals at modulator sites. Binding assays also serve for receptor isolation and photoaffinity labeling to characterize the interactions involved.

  20. Antifungal and Herbicidal Effects of Fruit Essential Oils of Four Myrtus communis Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Kordali, Saban; Usanmaz, Ayse; Cakir, Ahmet; Komaki, Amanmohammad; Ercisli, Sezai

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils isolated by hydrodistillation from the fruits of four selected Myrtus communis L. genotypes from Turkey was characterized by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. 1,8-Cineole (29.20-31.40%), linalool (15.67-19.13%), α-terpineol (8.40-18.43%), α-pinene (6.04-20.71%), and geranyl acetate (3.98-7.54%) were found to be the major constituents of the fruit essential oils of all M. communis genotypes investigated. The oils were characterized by high amounts of oxygenated monoterpenes, representing 73.02-83.83% of the total oil compositions. The results of the fungal growth inhibition assays showed that the oils inhibited the growth of 19 phytopathogenic fungi. However, their antifungal activity was generally lower than that of the commercial pesticide benomyl. The herbicidal effects of the oils on the seed germination and seedling growth of Amaranthus retroflexus L., Chenopodium album L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Lactuca serriola L., and Rumex crispus L. were also determined. The oils completely or partly inhibited the seed germinations and seedling growths of the plants. The findings of the present study suggest that the M. communis essential oils might have potential to be used as natural herbicides as well as fungicides. Copyright © 2016 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  1. Herbicide glufosinate inhibits yeast growth and extends longevity during wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Beatriz; Picazo, Cecilia; Orozco, Helena; Matallana, Emilia; Aranda, Agustín

    2017-09-29

    Glufosinate ammonium (GA) is a widely used herbicide that inhibits glutamine synthetase. This inhibition leads to internal amino acid starvation which, in turn, causes the activation of different nutrient sensing pathways. GA also inhibits the enzyme of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in such a way that, although it is not used as a fungicide, it may alter yeast performance in industrial processes like winemaking. We describe herein how GA indeed inhibits the yeast growth of a wine strain during the fermentation of grape juice. In turn, GA extends longevity in a variety of growth media. The biochemical analysis indicates that GA partially inhibits the nutrient sensing TORC1 pathway, which may explain these phenotypes. The GCN2 kinase mutant is hypersensitive to GA. Hence the control of translation and amino acid biosynthesis is required to also deal with the damaging effects of this pesticide. A global metabolomics analysis under winemaking conditions indicated that an increase in amino acid and in polyamines occurred. In conclusion, GA affects many different biochemical processes during winemaking, which provides us with some insights into both the effect of this herbicide on yeast physiology and into the relevance of the metabolic step for connecting nitrogen and carbon metabolism.

  2. Insecticide susceptibility of natural populations of Anopheles coluzzii and Anopheles gambiae (sensu stricto) from Okyereko irrigation site, Ghana, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Chabi, Joseph; Baidoo, Philip K; Datsomor, Alex K; Okyere, Dora; Ablorde, Aikins; Iddrisu, Alidu; Wilson, Michael D; Dadzie, Samuel K; Jamet, Helen P; Diclaro, Joseph W

    2016-03-31

    The increasing spread of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors has been well documented across sub-Saharan Africa countries. The influence of irrigation on increasing vector resistance is poorly understood, and is critical to successful and ethical implementation of food security policies. This study investigated the insecticide resistance status of An. gambiae (s.l.) mosquitoes collected from the irrigated rice area of Okyereko, a village containing about 42 hectares of irrigated field within an irrigation project plan in the Central Region of Ghana. Large amounts of insecticides, herbicides and fertilizers are commonly used in the area to boost the annual production of the rice. Mosquito larvae were collected and adults were assayed from the F1 progeny. The resistance status, allele and genotype were characterized using WHO susceptibility testing and PCR methods respectively. The An. gambiae (s.l.) populations from Okyereko are highly resistant to DDT and pyrethroid insecticides, with possible involvement of metabolic mechanisms including the elevation of P450 and GST enzyme as well as P-gp activity. The population was mostly composed of An. coluzzii specimens (more than 96 %) with kdr and ace-1 frequencies of 0.9 and 0.2 %, respectively. This study brings additional information on insecticide resistance and the characterization of An. gambiae (s.l.) mosquitoes from Okyereko, which can be helpful in decision making for vector control programmes in the region.

  3. Developmental neurotoxicity of succeeding generations of insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Villaça, Yael; Levin, Edward D.

    2016-01-01

    Insecticides are by design toxic. They must be toxic to effectively kill target species of insects. Unfortunately, they also have off-target toxic effects that can harm other species, including humans. Developmental neurotoxicity is one of the most prominent off-target toxic risks of insecticides. Over the past seven decades several classes of insecticides have been developed, each with their own mechanisms of effect and toxic side effects. This review covers the developmental neurotoxicity of the succeeding generations of insecticides including organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids, carbamates and neonicotinoids. The goal of new insecticide development is to more effectively kill target species with fewer toxic side effects on non-target species. From the experience with the developmental neurotoxicity caused by the generations of insecticides developed in the past advice is offered how to proceed with future insecticide development to decrease neurotoxic risk. PMID:27908457

  4. Neurotoxicoses of small animals

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, S.T.

    1976-02-01

    Among the great variety of potentially neurotoxic substances are insecticides, rodenticides, herbicides, fungicides, heavy metals, plants, drugs, reptile and insect venoms, industrial chemicals and contaminated foodstuffs. The neurotoxicoses associated with several of these are described. Of the insecticides, organophosphates and chlorinated hydrocarbons are discussed. The heavy metals thallium and lead are discussed along with botulism and polyradiculoneuritis. 22 references.

  5. Mechanism of inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase in human blood platelets by carbamate insecticides.

    PubMed Central

    Krug, H F; Hamm, U; Berndt, J

    1988-01-01

    Carbamates are a widely used class of insecticides and herbicides. They were tested for their ability to affect human blood platelet aggregation and arachidonic acid metabolism in platelets. (1) The herbicides of the carbamate type have no, or only little, influence up to a concentration of 100 microM; the carbamate insecticides, however, inhibit both aggregation and arachidonic acid metabolism in a dose- and time-dependent manner. (2) Carbaryl, the most effective compound, inhibits platelet aggregation and cyclo-oxygenase activity completely at 10 microM. The liberation of arachidonic acid from phospholipids and the lipoxygenase pathway are not affected, whereas the products of the cyclo-oxygenase pathway are drastically decreased. (3) By using [14C]carbaryl labelled in the carbamyl or in the ring moiety, it could be proved that the carbamyl residue binds covalently to platelet proteins. In contrast with acetylsalicylic acid, which acetylates only one protein, carbaryl carbamylates a multitude of platelet proteins. (4) One of the carbamylated proteins was found to be the platelet cyclo-oxygenase, indicating that carbaryl resembles in this respect acetylsalicylic acid, which is known to inhibit this enzyme specifically by acetylation. Images Fig. 4. PMID:3128272

  6. Antibiotics do not affect the degradation of fungicides and enhance the mineralization of chlorpyrifos in biomixtures.

    PubMed

    Castillo-González, Humberto; Pérez-Villanueva, Marta; Masís-Mora, Mario; Castro-Gutiérrez, Víctor; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carlos E

    2017-05-01

    The use of antibiotics in agriculture produces residues in wastewaters. The disposal of such wastewaters in biopurification systems (BPS) employed for the treatment of pesticides could result in the inhibition of the degrading capacity of the biomixtures used in the BPS. We assayed the effect of two commercial formulations of antibiotics used in agriculture, one containing kasugamycin (KSG) and the other oxytetracycline plus gentamicin (OTC+GTM), on the biomixture performance. Doses from 0.1mgkg -1 to 1000mgkg -1 of KSG increased the respiration of the biomixture, and low doses enhanced the mineralization rate of the insecticide 14 C-chlorpyrifos. On the contrary, OTC+GTM depressed the respiration of the biomixture and the initial mineralization rate of 14 C-chlorpyrifos; nonetheless, the antibiotics did not decrease overall mineralization values. The application of both formulations in the biomixture at a relevant concentration did not harm the removal of the fungicides carbendazim and metalaxyl, or their enhanced degradation; on the other hand, the biomixture was unable to dissipate tebuconazol or triadimenol, a result that was unchanged during the addition of the antibiotic formulations. These findings reveal that wastewater containing these antibiotics do not affect the performance of BPS. However, such a response may vary depending on the type of pesticide and microbial consortium in the biomixture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Insecticidal activity and fungitoxicity of plant extracts and components of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) and garlic (Allium sativum).

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, Paola; Leis, Marilena; Pezzi, Marco; Civolani, Stefano; Maietti, Annalisa; Brandolini, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    To avoid environmental pollution and health problems caused by the use of traditional synthetic pesticides, there is a trend to search for naturally occurring toxicants from plants. Among the compounds discussed for anti-fungal and insecticidal activity, the natural extracts from garlic and horseradish have attracted considerable attention. The objective of this study is to determine the insecticidal and anti-fungal activity of Armoracia rusticana and Allium sativum L. extracts against larvae of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) and some pathogenic fungi. For the insecticidal test, horseradish and garlic extracts were prepared from fresh plants (cultivated in Emilia Romagna region) in a solution of ethanol 80 % and the two different solutions were used at different concentrations (for the determination of the lethal dose) against the fourth instar mosquito's larvae. The fungicidal test was carried out by the agar plates technique using garlic and horseradish extracts in a 10 % ethanol solution against the following organisms: Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc., Trichoderma longibrachiatum, Botrytis cinerea Pers., Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht. and Fusarium culmorum (Wm. G. Sm.) Sacc. The first results demonstrated that the horseradish ethanol extracts present only a fungistatic activity against Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc., Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht. and F. culmorum (Wm.G. Sm) Sacc. while garlic extracts at the same concentration provided a good fungicidal activity above all against Botrytis cinerea Pers. and S. rolfsii. A. rusticana and A. sativum preparations showed also an interesting and significant insecticidal activity against larvae of A. albopictus, even if horseradish presented a higher efficacy (LC₅₀ value of 2.34 g/L), approximately two times higher than garlic one (LC₅₀ value of 4.48 g/L).

  8. Degradation of conazole fungicides in water by electrochemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Urzúa, J; González-Vargas, C; Sepúlveda, F; Ureta-Zañartu, M S; Salazar, R

    2013-11-01

    The electrochemical oxidation (EO) treatment in water of three conazole fungicides, myclobutanil, triadimefon and propiconazole, has been carried out at constant current using a BDD/SS system. First, solutions of each fungicide were electrolyzed to assess the effect of the experimental parameters such as current, pH and fungicide concentration on the decay of each compound and total organic carbon abatement. Then a careful analysis of the degradation by-products was made by high performance liquid chromatography, ion chromatography and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry in order to provide a detailed discussion on the original reaction pathways. Thus, during the degradation of conazole fungicides by the electrochemical oxidation process, aromatic intermediates, aliphatic carboxylic acids and Cl(-) were detected prior to their complete mineralization to CO2 while NO3(-) anions remained in the treated solution. This is an essential preliminary step towards the applicability of the EO processes for the treatment of wastewater containing conazole fungicides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Plant growth regulatory effect and insecticidal activity of the extracts of the Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima L.)

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Rong; Romanchuk, Frieda E; Peterson, Chris J; Coats, Joel R

    2002-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need to explore and utilize naturally occurring products for combating harmful agricultural and public health pests. Secondary metabolites in the leaves of the Tree of Heaven, Ailanthus altissima L. have been reported to be herbicidal and insecticidal. The mode of action, however, of the active compounds in A. altissima are not understood. In this paper, we report the chemical characteristics of the herbicidal and insecticidal components in this tree, and will discuss the effect of light on the bioactivity of the active components. Results Extracts from the fresh leaves of A. altissima showed a strong plant germination/growth inhibitory effect in laboratory bioassays against alfalfa (Medicago sativa). The effect was dose-dependent. The growth inhibitory components were in the methylene chloride soluble fraction of the extract. The effect was greater in the light than in the dark. Other fractions had plant growth enhancing effect at lower concentrations. The extract was slightly insecticidal against yellow fever mosquito larvae (Aedes aegypti). Conclusions The extract or its semi-purified fractions of A. altissima were strong plant growth inhibitors, therefore good candidates as potential environmentally safe and effective agricultural pest management agents. The finding that light affects the activity will be useful in the application of such natural products. PMID:11860616

  10. Potential organic herbicides for squash production: Pelargonic acid herbicides AXXE® and Scythe®

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Organic squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) producers need appropriate herbicides that can effectively provide season-long weed control. Although corn gluten meal has shown promise as an early-season pre-emergent organic herbicide in squash production, any uncontrolled weeds can inflict serious yield reducti...

  11. Potential organic herbicides for squash production: Pelargonic acid herbicides AXXE (registered trademark) and Scythe (registered trademark)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Organic squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) producers need appropriate herbicides that can effectively provide season- long weed control. Research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma (Atoka County, Lane, OK) to determine the impact of potential organic herbicides on weed control efficacy, crop injury, and y...

  12. Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact.

    PubMed

    Bonny, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite. In fact, since 1996, most cultivated GMOs have been GMHT crops, which involve the use of an associated herbicide, generally glyphosate. In their very first years of adoption, HT crops often led to some decrease in herbicide use. However, the repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds, using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on recent data. The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA. Finally, the last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds. The concluding comments deal more widely with trends in GM crops.

  13. Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonny, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite. In fact, since 1996, most cultivated GMOs have been GMHT crops, which involve the use of an associated herbicide, generally glyphosate. In their very first years of adoption, HT crops often led to some decrease in herbicide use. However, the repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds, using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on recent data. The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA. Finally, the last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds. The concluding comments deal more widely with trends in GM crops.

  14. Herbicide resistance and biodiversity: agronomic and environmental aspects of genetically modified herbicide-resistant plants.

    PubMed

    Schütte, Gesine; Eckerstorfer, Michael; Rastelli, Valentina; Reichenbecher, Wolfram; Restrepo-Vassalli, Sara; Ruohonen-Lehto, Marja; Saucy, Anne-Gabrielle Wuest; Mertens, Martha

    2017-01-01

    Farmland biodiversity is an important characteristic when assessing sustainability of agricultural practices and is of major international concern. Scientific data indicate that agricultural intensification and pesticide use are among the main drivers of biodiversity loss. The analysed data and experiences do not support statements that herbicide-resistant crops provide consistently better yields than conventional crops or reduce herbicide amounts. They rather show that the adoption of herbicide-resistant crops impacts agronomy, agricultural practice, and weed management and contributes to biodiversity loss in several ways: (i) many studies show that glyphosate-based herbicides, which were commonly regarded as less harmful, are toxic to a range of aquatic organisms and adversely affect the soil and intestinal microflora and plant disease resistance; the increased use of 2,4-D or dicamba, linked to new herbicide-resistant crops, causes special concerns. (ii) The adoption of herbicide-resistant crops has reduced crop rotation and favoured weed management that is solely based on the use of herbicides. (iii) Continuous herbicide resistance cropping and the intensive use of glyphosate over the last 20 years have led to the appearance of at least 34 glyphosate-resistant weed species worldwide. Although recommended for many years, farmers did not counter resistance development in weeds by integrated weed management, but continued to rely on herbicides as sole measure. Despite occurrence of widespread resistance in weeds to other herbicides, industry rather develops transgenic crops with additional herbicide resistance genes. (iv) Agricultural management based on broad-spectrum herbicides as in herbicide-resistant crops further decreases diversity and abundance of wild plants and impacts arthropod fauna and other farmland animals. Taken together, adverse impacts of herbicide-resistant crops on biodiversity, when widely adopted, should be expected and are indeed very hard

  15. Nanosulfur: A Potent Fungicide Against Food Pathogen, Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Samrat Roy; Goswami, Arunava; Nair, Kishore K.

    2010-10-04

    Elemental sulfur (S{sup 0}), man's oldest eco-friendly fungicide for curing fungal infections in plants and animals, is registered in India as a non-systemic and contact fungicide. However due to its high volume requirement, Indian agrochemical industry and farmers could not effectively use this product till date. We hypothesize that intelligent nanoscience applications might increase the visibility of nanosulfur in Indian agriculture as a potent and eco-safe fungicide. Sulfur nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized bottom-up via a liquid synthesis method with average particle size in the range of 50-80 nm and the shapes of the NPs were spherical. A comparative study ofmore » elemental and nano-sulfur produced has been tested against facultative fungal food pathogen, Aspergillus niger. Results showed that nanosulfur is more efficacious than its elemental form.« less

  16. Acaricide, Fungicide and Drug Interactions in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Reed M.; Dahlgren, Lizette; Siegfried, Blair D.; Ellis, Marion D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chemical analysis shows that honey bees (Apis mellifera) and hive products contain many pesticides derived from various sources. The most abundant pesticides are acaricides applied by beekeepers to control Varroa destructor. Beekeepers also apply antimicrobial drugs to control bacterial and microsporidial diseases. Fungicides may enter the hive when applied to nearby flowering crops. Acaricides, antimicrobial drugs and fungicides are not highly toxic to bees alone, but in combination there is potential for heightened toxicity due to interactive effects. Methodology/Principal Findings Laboratory bioassays based on mortality rates in adult worker bees demonstrated interactive effects among acaricides, as well as between acaricides and antimicrobial drugs and between acaricides and fungicides. Toxicity of the acaricide tau-fluvalinate increased in combination with other acaricides and most other compounds tested (15 of 17) while amitraz toxicity was mostly unchanged (1 of 15). The sterol biosynthesis inhibiting (SBI) fungicide prochloraz elevated the toxicity of the acaricides tau-fluvalinate, coumaphos and fenpyroximate, likely through inhibition of detoxicative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase activity. Four other SBI fungicides increased the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate in a dose-dependent manner, although possible evidence of P450 induction was observed at the lowest fungicide doses. Non-transitive interactions between some acaricides were observed. Sublethal amitraz pre-treatment increased the toxicity of the three P450-detoxified acaricides, but amitraz toxicity was not changed by sublethal treatment with the same three acaricides. A two-fold change in the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate was observed between years, suggesting a possible change in the genetic composition of the bees tested. Conclusions/Significance Interactions with acaricides in honey bees are similar to drug interactions in other animals in that P450-mediated detoxication appears to play an

  17. The influence of fungicides on the growth of Trichoderma asperellum.

    PubMed

    De Schutter, B; Aerts, R; Rombouts, L

    2002-01-01

    Numbers of strains of Trichoderma asperellum are known as biological control agents of certain root pathogens of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). The restricted use of fungicides is sometimes useful in combination with these biological control agents. Therefore some experiments were conducted to evaluate the growth of T. asperellum in the presence of fungicides as Previcur (active substance propamocarb) and Sumico (with the active substance carbendazim and diethofencarb). The influence of these fungicides was first examined in laboratory conditions. The fungus was brought on a potato dextrose agar where the fungicides Previcur, Sumico and carbendazim were added in a concentration of 0.1x, 1x and 10x the recommended dose. The growth of T. asperellum was totally inhibited by the three Sumico and carbendazim concentrations. T. asperellum knew a small but significant decrease of growth when the 10x dose of Previcur was added. Afterwards the influence of these fungicides on the fungus was tested in field conditions in the greenhouse. The fungus was applied to the roots of the tomato plant, which was grown on a rockwool medium. Previcur and Sumico were submitted to the plants using the normal procedure. The results of the tests showed that in field conditions there was no effect of the fungicide treatment on the presence of the fungus, although the laboratory tests showed the opposite for Sumico. To explain this contradiction two other experiments were conducted to follow the migration of the Sumico after treatment. A residue analysis showed that the highest concentration of Sumico was detected in the rockwool medium, and some residues were found in the drain water and the stems. Even with a 100x recommended dose of Sumico the fungus was still present the day after the treatment.

  18. Empirical, metagenomic, and computational techniques illuminate the mechanisms by which fungicides compromise bee health

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Because disease can be devastating to crops, growers often spray fungicides as preventative measures. Unfortunately, many sprays are applied to in-bloom crops, which expose bees to fungicide residues. Generally considered “bee-safe,” fungicides are applied globally on flowering crops. However, there...

  19. Fungicide residue identification and discrimination using a conducting polymer electronic-nose

    Treesearch

    Alphus D. Wilson

    2013-01-01

    The identification of fungicide residues on crop foliage is necessary to make periodic pest management decisions. The determination of fungicide residue identities currently is difficult and time consuming using conventional chemical analysis methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Different fungicide types produce unique electronic aroma signature...

  20. Environmental fate of fungicides in surface waters of a horticultural-production catchment in southeastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Wightwick, Adam M; Bui, Anh Duyen; Zhang, Pei; Rose, Gavin; Allinson, Mayumi; Myers, Jackie H; Reichman, Suzanne M; Menzies, Neal W; Pettigrove, Vincent; Allinson, Graeme

    2012-04-01

    Fungicides are regularly applied in horticultural production systems and may migrate off-site, potentially posing an ecological risk to surface waterways. However, few studies have investigated the fate of fungicides in horticultural catchments. This study investigated the presence of 24 fungicides at 18 sites during a 5-month period within a horticultural catchment in southeastern Australia. Seventeen of the 24 fungicides were detected in the waterways, with fungicides detected in 63% of spot water samples, 44% of surface sediment samples, and 44% of the passive sampler systems deployed. One third of the water samples contained residues of two or more fungicides. Myclobutanil, trifloxystrobin, pyrimethanil, difenoconazole, and metalaxyl were the fungicides most frequently detected, being present in 16-38% of the spot water samples. Iprodione, myclobutanil, pyrimethanil, cyproconazole, trifloxystrobin, and fenarimol were found at the highest concentrations in the water samples (> 0.2 μg/l). Relatively high concentrations of myclobutanil and pyrimethanil (≥ 120 μg/kg dry weight) were detected in the sediment samples. Generally the concentrations of the fungicides detected were several orders of magnitude lower than reported ecotoxicological effect values, suggesting that concentrations of individual fungicides in the catchment were unlikely to pose an ecological risk. However, there is little information on the effects of fungicides, especially fungi and microbes, on aquatic ecosystems. There is also little known about the combined effects of simultaneous low-level exposure of multiple fungicides to aquatic organisms. Further research is required to adequately assess the risk of fungicides in aquatic environments.

  1. Influence of the agrochemicals used for rice and vegetable cultivation on insecticide resistance in malaria vectors in southern Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Chouaïbou, Mouhamadou S; Fodjo, Behi K; Fokou, Gilbert; Allassane, Ouattara F; Koudou, Benjamin G; David, Jean-Philippe; Antonio-Nkondjio, Christophe; Ranson, Hilary; Bonfoh, Bassirou

    2016-08-24

    Vector control can contribute to the development of resistance to insecticides in malaria vectors. As the swamps and wetlands used for some agricultural activities constitute productive breeding sites for many mosquito species, agricultural pest control may increase the selection pressure for insecticide resistance in mosquitoes. Understanding the use of agrochemicals by farmers is important to plan and initiate effective integrated pest and vector management interventions. A knowledge-attitude-practice study, using questionnaires, was undertaken with 102 rice farmers in Tiassalé and 106 vegetable farmers in Dabou (South Côte d'Ivoire) in order to generate information on pesticide usage. In addition, insecticide susceptibility bioassays were conducted using adult mosquitoes obtained from larvae collected within farms, and the persistence of agricultural pesticides in the farming environment, including sediment and mosquito breeding site water, was investigated by HPLC. Herbicides and insecticides appeared to be the most frequently used pesticides for both crops. Amino phosphonates (mostly glyphosate) represented the most used herbicides (45 % for rice up to 89 % for vegetables). Pyrethroids appeared to be the most used insecticides (accounting for 90 % of all the insecticide use reported). Approximately 75 % of respondents had not been to school and do not understand product labels. Only about 45 % of farmers respect the recommended pesticide dosage and about 10-15 % of pesticides used for rice and vegetable, respectively, are not recommended for these crops. As per WHO criteria, the mosquito local populations from the two localities were resistant to three of the four insecticides tested, as mortalities were less than 35 % for deltamethrin, DDT and bendiocarb. Higher susceptibility was observed for malathion, although the population was considered resistant in Dabou (80 % mortality) and susceptible in Tiassalé (98 % mortality). With the exception of

  2. Transposable elements and insecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Rostant, Wayne G; Wedell, Nina; Hosken, David J

    2012-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are mobile DNA sequences that are able to copy themselves within a host genome. They were initially characterized as selfish genes because of documented or presumed costs to host fitness, but it has become increasingly clear that not all TEs reduce host fitness. A good example of TEs benefiting hosts is seen with insecticide resistance, where in a number of cases, TE insertions near specific genes confer resistance to these man-made products. This is particularly true of Accord and associated TEs in Drosophila melanogaster and Doc insertions in Drosophila simulans. The first of these insertions also has sexually antagonistic fitness effects in the absence of insecticides, and although the magnitude of this effect depends on the genetic background in which Accord finds itself, this represents an excellent example of intralocus sexual conflict where the precise allele involved is well characterized. We discuss this finding and the role of TEs in insecticide resistance. We also highlight areas for further research, including the need for surveys of the prevalence and fitness consequences of the Doc insertion and how Drosophila can be used as models to investigate resistance in pest species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The benefits of herbicide-resistant crops.

    PubMed

    Green, Jerry M

    2012-10-01

    Since 1996, genetically modified herbicide-resistant crops, primarily glyphosate-resistant soybean, corn, cotton and canola, have helped to revolutionize weed management and have become an important tool in crop production practices. Glyphosate-resistant crops have enabled the implementation of weed management practices that have improved yield and profitability while better protecting the environment. Growers have recognized their benefits and have made glyphosate-resistant crops the most rapidly adopted technology in the history of agriculture. Weed management systems with glyphosate-resistant crops have often relied on glyphosate alone, have been easy to use and have been effective, economical and more environmentally friendly than the systems they have replaced. Glyphosate has worked extremely well in controlling weeds in glyphosate-resistant crops for more than a decade, but some key weeds have evolved resistance, and using glyphosate alone has proved unsustainable. Now, growers need to renew their weed management practices and use glyphosate with other cultural, mechanical and herbicide options in integrated systems. New multiple-herbicide-resistant crops with resistance to glyphosate and other herbicides will expand the utility of existing herbicide technologies and will be an important component of future weed management systems that help to sustain the current benefits of high-efficiency and high-production agriculture. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. 0-6733 : evaluation of generic and branded herbicides.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-08-01

    As with other products in the marketplace, : generic herbicides often have a lower initial : product cost than their brand-name : counterparts.Herbicide formulations are : patented for 17 years with proprietary rights for : name, formula, and product...

  5. Herbicide-Resistant Crops: Utilities and Limitations for Herbicide-Resistant Weed Management

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Since 1996, genetically modified herbicide-resistant (HR) crops, particularly glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, have transformed the tactics that corn, soybean, and cotton growers use to manage weeds. The use of GR crops continues to grow, but weeds are adapting to the common practice of using only glyphosate to control weeds. Growers using only a single mode of action to manage weeds need to change to a more diverse array of herbicidal, mechanical, and cultural practices to maintain the effectiveness of glyphosate. Unfortunately, the introduction of GR crops and the high initial efficacy of glyphosate often lead to a decline in the use of other herbicide options and less investment by industry to discover new herbicide active ingredients. With some exceptions, most growers can still manage their weed problems with currently available selective and HR crop-enabled herbicides. However, current crop management systems are in jeopardy given the pace at which weed populations are evolving glyphosate resistance. New HR crop technologies will expand the utility of currently available herbicides and enable new interim solutions for growers to manage HR weeds, but will not replace the long-term need to diversify weed management tactics and discover herbicides with new modes of action. This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of anticipated weed management options and the best management practices that growers need to implement in HR crops to maximize the long-term benefits of current technologies and reduce weed shifts to difficult-to-control and HR weeds. PMID:20586458

  6. Occurrence of selected herbicides and herbicide degradation products in Iowa's Ground Water, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Kalkhoff, S.J.; Goolsby, D.A.; Sneck-Fahrer, D. A.; Thurman, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    The occurrence of herbicide compounds had a significant, inverse relation to well depth and a significant, positive relation to dissolved-oxygen concentration. It is felt that both well depth and dissolved oxygen are acting as rough surrogates to ground-water age, with younger ground water being more likely to contain herbicide compounds. The occurrence of herbicide compounds was substantially different among the major aquifer types across Iowa, being detected in 82.5% of the alluvial, 81.8% of the bedrock/ karst region, 40.0% of the glacial-drift, and 25.0% of the bedrock/nonkarst region aquifers. The observed distribution was partially attributed to variations in general ground-water age among these aquifer types. A significant, inverse relation was determined between total herbicide compound concentrations in ground water and the average soil slope within a 2-km radius of sampled wells. Steeper soil slopes may increase the likelihood of surface runoff occurring rather than ground-water infiltration–decreasing the transport of herbicide compounds to ground water. As expected, a significant positive relation was determined between intensity of herbicide use and herbicide concentrations in ground water.

  7. Occurrence of azoxystrobin, propiconazole, and selected other fungicides in US streams, 2005-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, William A.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Kuivila, Kathryn; Kolpin, Dana W.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    Fungicides are used to prevent foliar diseases on a wide range of vegetable, field, fruit, and ornamental crops. They are generally more effective as protective rather than curative treatments, and hence tend to be applied before infections take place. Less than 1% of US soybeans were treated with a fungicide in 2002 but by 2006, 4% were treated. Like other pesticides, fungicides can move-off of fields after application and subsequently contaminate surface water, groundwater, and associated sediments. Due to the constant pressure from fungal diseases such as the recent Asian soybean rust outbreak, and the always-present desire to increase crop yields, there is the potential for a significant increase in the amount of fungicides used on US farms. Increased fungicide use could lead to increased environmental concentrations of these compounds. This study documents the occurrence of fungicides in select US streams soon after the first documentation of soybean rust in the US and prior to the corresponding increase in fungicide use to treat this problem. Water samples were collected from 29 streams in 13 states in 2005 and/or 2006, and analyzed for 12 target fungicides. Nine of the 12 fungicides were detected in at least one stream sample and at least one fungicide was detected in 20 of 29 streams. At least one fungicide was detected in 56% of the 103 samples, as many as five fungicides were detected in an individual sample, and mixtures of fungicides were common. Azoxystrobin was detected most frequently (45% of 103 samples) followed by metalaxyl (27%), propiconazole (17%), myclobutanil (9%), and tebuconazole (6%). Fungicide detections ranged from 0.002 to 1.15 μ/L. There was indication of a seasonal pattern to fungicide occurrence, with detections more common and concentrations higher in late summer and early fall than in spring. At a few sites, fungicides were detected in all samples collected suggesting the potential for season-long occurrence in some streams

  8. Discovery of new herbicide modes of action with natural phytotoxins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    About 20 modes of action (MOAs) are utilized by commercial herbicides, and almost 30 years have passed since the last new MOA was introduced. Rapidly increasing evolution of resistance to herbicides with these MOAs has greatly increased the need for herbicides with new MOAs. Combinatorial chemistry ...

  9. Bioassay techniques for detecting root leakage of auxinic herbicides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biological assay (bioassay) techniques are a simple way to determine the presence of herbicides in soil or other potting media. Understanding the fate of herbicides after absorption is important when guidelines for use are developed. Greenhouse studies were conducted with the herbicide aminocyclopyr...

  10. Tolerance evaluation of vegetatively established Miscanthus x giganteus to herbicides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In spite of the recent focus on herbicide resistant weeds, herbicide resistant weeds are not new to agriculture; the first herbicide resistant weed was documented in 1957, with the first widespread resistance occurring in common groundsel with atrazine in the early 1970’s. Glyphosate resistant weed...

  11. Inheritance of evolved resistance to a novel herbicide (pyroxasulfone).

    PubMed

    Busi, Roberto; Gaines, Todd A; Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Powles, Stephen B

    2014-03-01

    Agricultural weeds have rapidly adapted to intensive herbicide selection and resistance to herbicides has evolved within ecological timescales. Yet, the genetic basis of broad-spectrum generalist herbicide resistance is largely unknown. This study aims to determine the genetic control of non-target-site herbicide resistance trait(s) that rapidly evolved under recurrent selection of the novel lipid biosynthesis inhibitor pyroxasulfone in Lolium rigidum. The phenotypic segregation of pyroxasulfone resistance in parental, F1 and back-cross (BC) families was assessed in plants exposed to a gradient of pyroxasulfone doses. The inheritance of resistance to chemically dissimilar herbicides (cross-resistance) was also evaluated. Evolved resistance to the novel selective agent (pyroxasulfone) is explained by Mendelian segregation of one semi-dominant allele incrementally herbicide-selected at higher frequency in the progeny. In BC families, cross-resistance is conferred by an incompletely dominant single major locus. This study confirms that herbicide resistance can rapidly evolve to any novel selective herbicide agents by continuous and repeated herbicide use. The results imply that the combination of herbicide options (rotation, mixtures or combinations) to exploit incomplete dominance can provide acceptable control of broad-spectrum generalist resistance-endowing monogenic traits. Herbicide diversity within a set of integrated management tactics can be one important component to reduce the herbicide selection intensity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Herbicide Trials in Intensively Cultured Populus Plantations in Northern Wisconsin

    Treesearch

    Daniel A. Netzer; Nonan V. Noste

    1978-01-01

    Populus had good survival and growth when planting sites had been treated with linuron, a pre-emergent herbicide, alone or in combination with paraquat, a post-emergent herbicide. the herbicide treatments that are most effective in intensive culture are discussed.

  13. Effectiveness of Glyphosate Mixed With Soil-Active Herbicides

    Treesearch

    James D. Haywood; Thomas W. Melder

    1991-01-01

    Broadcasting mixtures of glyphosate and soil-active herbicides over loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings may control established weeds and emerging weed seedlings better than either glyphosate or soil-active herbicides alone. However, herbicides will injure young pines if applied improperly. To examine seedling injury, we broadcast two rates of...

  14. Testing the efficacy of bicarbonates as fungicides against Cercospora beticola

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cercospora leaf spot (CLS), caused by the fungal pathogen Cercospora beticola, is an economically important pathogen of sugar beets in many production areas throughout the world. The application of fungicides has been one of the most effective management tools for CLS, but their effectiveness has di...

  15. Analysis of the mutations inducedd by conazole fungicides in vivo

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mouse liver tumorigenic conazo1e fungicides triadimefon and propiconazo1e have previously been shown to be in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses, whereas the nontumorigenic conazo1e myc1obutani1 ...

  16. Timing fungicide application intervals based on airborne Erysiphe necator concentrations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Management of grape powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator) and other polycyclic diseases relies on numerous fungicide applications that follow a calendar or model-based application intervals, both of which assume that inoculum is always present. Quantitative molecular assays have been previously develope...

  17. Influence of fungicides on gas exchange of pecan foliage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are several fungicide chemistries used for disease control on pecan (Carya illinoinensis), but there is little or no knowledge of subtle short- or long-term side-effects of these chemistries on host physiological processes, including photosynthesis (Pn). This study quantifies the impact of se...

  18. Fungicides for organic cantaloupe production in Oklahoma: An initial assessment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fungicides that are potentially useful in organic production were evaluated for foliar disease control in cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L. var. reticulates ’Israeli’) during 2009 at Lane, Oklahoma. Milstop (85% potassium bicarbonate), Neem oil, Bonide liquid copper (10% copper octanoate), Serenade (QST ...

  19. Fungicide Injection to Control Dutch Elm Disease: Understanding the Options

    Treesearch

    Linda Haugen; Mark Stennes

    1999-01-01

    In some situations, injecting trees with fungicides is an effective treatment for the management of Dutch elm disease (DED). Several injection products are on the market, and various means of application are recommended. Each product and method has pros and cons. The "best" product depends on the individual tree? its current condition, the objectives of the...

  20. Systemic fungicidal activity of 1,4-oxathiin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Schmeling, B V; Kulka, M

    1966-04-29

    Treatment of pinto bean and barley seed with 1,4-oxathiin derivatives gave disease control by systemic fungicidal action of such pathogenic fungi as Uromyces phaseoli and Ustilago nuda. The two chemicals, D735 and F461, were highly specific and selective against the pathogens without injury of the hosts.

  1. Evaluation of fungicides for hop downy mildew, Woodburn, Oregon, 2016

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This research was conducted to quantify the degree of control of the disease downy mildew with a phosphorous acid-based fungicide, the present industry-standard for management of downy mildew on hop in the Pacific Northwestern U.S. No suppression of the disease was observed with the industry standa...

  2. Gene and protein expression biomarkers in fungicide exposed zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, the impact of prochloraz (PCZ) on reproductively mature male and female zebrafish was examined following up to 96 h continuous exposure to a flow-through system to control (water only), low (100 ug/l) and high (500 ug/l) PCZ dose. An imidazole fungicide used to rpo...

  3. Fungicide sensitivity in the wild rice pathogen Bipolaris oryzae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In recent years the occurrence of fungal brown spot, caused by Bipolaris oryzae has increased in cultivated wild rice (Zizania palustris) paddies in spite of the use of fungicides. To implement an efficient integrated disease management system, we are exploring whether field isolates have developed ...

  4. Herbicide Orange Site Characterization Study, Eglin AFB

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    F THIS PAGE Availabilit o this r is sp f o.n" the reverse of fo cove* . - .’.r. 717 CSAT CO ES ’SU JEC TE MS Coninu onrevrseif ece~ar an idntiy b...of Hardstand 7 and Surface Water Drainages ......... 4 3 Hardstand 7 Herbicide Oran&e Storage Locations .............. 5 4 Concentrations (in ppb) of...insoluble in water . The formula contained an approximate 50/50 mixture of the herbicides 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,-D) and 2,4,5

  5. Surface plasmon resonance application for herbicide detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chegel, Vladimir I.; Shirshov, Yuri M.; Piletskaya, Elena V.; Piletsky, Sergey A.

    1998-01-01

    The optoelectronic biosensor, based on Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) for detection of photosynthesis-inhibiting herbicides in aqueous solutions is presented. The pesticide capability to replace plastoquinone from its complex with D1 protein is used for the detection. This replacement reaction results in the changes of the optical characteristics of protein layer, immobilized on the gold surface. Monitoring of these changes with SPR-technique permit to determine 0.1 - 5.0 mkg/ml herbicide in solution within one hour.

  6. Surface plasmon resonance application for herbicide detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chegel, Vladimir I.; Shirshov, Yuri M.; Piletskaya, Elena V.; Piletsky, Sergey A.

    1997-12-01

    The optoelectronic biosensor, based on Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) for detection of photosynthesis-inhibiting herbicides in aqueous solutions is presented. The pesticide capability to replace plastoquinone from its complex with D1 protein is used for the detection. This replacement reaction results in the changes of the optical characteristics of protein layer, immobilized on the gold surface. Monitoring of these changes with SPR-technique permit to determine 0.1 - 5.0 mkg/ml herbicide in solution within one hour.

  7. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Insecticides - Simple Conceptual Diagram

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the insecticides module, when to list insecticides as a candidate cause, ways to measure insecticides, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for insecticides, insecticides module references and literature reviews.

  8. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Insecticides - Detailed Conceptual Diagram

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the insecticides module, when to list insecticides as a candidate cause, ways to measure insecticides, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for insecticides, insecticides module references and literature reviews.

  9. Empirical, Metagenomic, and Computational Techniques Illuminate the Mechanisms by which Fungicides Compromise Bee Health.

    PubMed

    Steffan, Shawn A; Dharampal, Prarthana S; Diaz-Garcia, Luis; Currie, Cameron R; Zalapa, Juan; Hittinger, Chris Todd

    2017-10-09

    Growers often use fungicide sprays during bloom to protect crops against disease, which exposes bees to fungicide residues. Although considered "bee-safe," there is mounting evidence that fungicide residues in pollen are associated with bee declines (for both honey and bumble bee species). While the mechanisms remain relatively unknown, researchers have speculated that bee-microbe symbioses are involved. Microbes play a pivotal role in the preservation and/or processing of pollen, which serves as nutrition for larval bees. By altering the microbial community, it is likely that fungicides disrupt these microbe-mediated services, and thereby compromise bee health. This manuscript describes the protocols used to investigate the indirect mechanism(s) by which fungicides may be causing colony decline. Cage experiments exposing bees to fungicide-treated flowers have already provided the first evidence that fungicides cause profound colony losses in a native bumble bee (Bombus impatiens). Using field-relevant doses of fungicides, a series of experiments have been developed to provide a finer description of microbial community dynamics of fungicide-exposed pollen. Shifts in the structural composition of fungal and bacterial assemblages within the pollen microbiome are investigated by next-generation sequencing and metagenomic analysis. Experiments developed herein have been designed to provide a mechanistic understanding of how fungicides affect the microbiome of pollen-provisions. Ultimately, these findings should shed light on the indirect pathway through which fungicides may be causing colony declines.

  10. Mesoionic Pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidinone Insecticides: From Discovery to Triflumezopyrim and Dicloromezotiaz.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenming

    2017-09-19

    One of the greatest global challenges is to feed the ever-increasing world population. The agrochemical tools growers currently utilize are also under continuous pressure, due to a number of factors that contribute to the loss of existing products. Mesoionic pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidinones are an unusual yet very intriguing class of compounds. Known for several decades, this class of compounds had not been systemically studied until we started our insecticide discovery program. This Account provides an overview of the efforts on mesoionic pyrido[1,2-a]pyridinone insecticide discovery, beginning from the initial high throughput screen (HTS) discovery to ultimate identification of triflumezopyrim (4, DuPont Pyraxalt) and dicloromezotiaz (5) for commercialization as novel insecticides. Mesoionic pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidinones with a n-propyl group at the 1-position, such as compound 1, were initially isolated as undesired byproducts from reactions for a fungicide discovery program at DuPont Crop Protection. Such compounds showed interesting insecticidal activity in a follow-up screen and against an expanded insect species list. The area became an insecticide hit for exploration and then a lead area for optimization. At the lead optimization stage, variations at three regions of compound 1, i.e., side-chain (n-propyl group), substituents on the 3-phenyl group, and substitutions on the pyrido- moiety, were explored with many analogues prepared and evaluated. Breakthrough discoveries included replacing the n-propyl group with a 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl group to generate compound 2, and then with a 2-chlorothiazol-5-ylmethyl group to form compound 3. 3 possesses potent insecticidal activity not only against a group of hopper species, including corn planthopper (Peregrinus maidis (Ashmead), CPH) and potato leafhopper (Empoasca fabae (Harris), PLH), as well as two key rice hopper species, namely, brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), BPH) and rice green leafhopper (Nephotettix

  11. Insecticide Recommendations for Arkansas. MP 144.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Bill F.; Barnes, Gordon

    This publication gives, in chart form, insecticides for use on animals, field crops, fruits, flowers, trees and shrubs, household pests, recreation areas, lawn and turf grass, pecans, stored grain, and vegetables. Included in the charts are the insecticides recommended for each insect, formulation to be used, amount, time to apply, and other…

  12. Leaching of two fungicides in spent mushroom substrate amended soil: Influence of amendment rate, fungicide ageing and flow condition.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Martín, Alba; Sánchez-Martín, María J; Ordax, José M; Marín-Benito, Jesús M; Sonia Rodríguez-Cruz, M

    2017-04-15

    A study has been conducted on the leaching of two fungicides, tebuconazole and cymoxanil, in a soil amended with spent mushroom substrate (SMS), with an evaluation of how different factors influence this process. The objective was based on the potential use of SMS as a biosorbent for immobilizing pesticides in vulnerable soils, and the need to know how it could affect the subsequent transport of these retained compounds. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) for 14 C-fungicides, non-incubated and incubated over 30days, were obtained in columns packed with an unamended soil (S), and this soil amended with SMS at rates of 5% (S+SMS5) and 50% (S+SMS50) under saturated and saturated-unsaturated flows. The highest leaching of tebuconazole (>50% of the total 14 C added) was found in S when a saturated water flow was applied to the column, but the percentage of leached fungicide decreased when a saturated-unsaturated flow was applied in both SMS-amended soils. Also a significant decrease in leaching was observed for tebuconazole after incubation in the column, especially in S+SMS50 when both flows were applied. Furthermore, cymoxanil leaching was complete in S and S+SMS when a saturated flow was applied, and maximum peak concentrations were reached at 1pore volume (PV), although BTCs showed peaks with lower concentrations in S+SMS. The amounts of cymoxanil retained only increased in S+SMS when a saturated-unsaturated flow was applied. A more relevant effect of SMS for reducing the leaching of fungicide was observed when cymoxanil was previously incubated in the column, although mineralization was enhanced in this case. These results are of interest for extending SMS application on the control of the leaching of fungicides with different physicochemical characteristics after different ageing times in the soil and water flow conditions applied. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Development and Characterization of Transgenic Sugarcane with Insect Resistance and Herbicide Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen Zhi; Yang, Ben Peng; Feng, Xiao Yan; Cao, Zheng Ying; Feng, Cui Lian; Wang, Jun Gang; Xiong, Guo Ru; Shen, Lin Bo; Zeng, Jun; Zhao, Ting Ting; Zhang, Shu Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Genetically modified crops which had been commercial applied extensively majorly are the insect resistance and herbicide tolerance events. In this study, the Bt insecticidal gene Cry1Ab, the glyphosate-tolerant gene EPSPS, and the selection marker gene PMI were combined into a single transferred DNA fragment and introduced into sugarcane by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Thirty-three resistant plantlets were obtained after selection using a PMI/mannose selection system. Thirty of these resistant plantlets were PCR positive for the three target genes. Southern blot assay revealed that the copy number of the integrated fragment in the transformed plantlets varied from 1 to 7. ELISA analysis showed that 23 of the 33 resistant plantlets expressed Cry1Ab and EPSPS protein. Five single-copy and ELISA-positive transgenic lines were tested under laboratory and field conditions to determine their resistance to insects and herbicides, and also evaluated their agronomic characteristics and industrial traits. Results showed that larvae fed with fodder mixture containing stem tissues from single-copy transgenic lines were weak and small, moreover, pupation and eclosion were delayed significantly during voluntary feeding bioassays. None of transgenic sugarcane was destroyed by cane borer while more than 30% of wild type sugarcane was destroyed by cane borer. For herbicide resistance, the transgenic plantlets grew healthy even when treated with up to 0.5% roundup while wild type plantlets would die off when treated with 0.1% roundup. Thus demonstrate that these transgenic lines showed strong insect resistance and glyphosate tolerance under both laboratory and field conditions. But in the field most of the transgenic plants were shorter and more slender than non-transformed control plants. So they presented poor agronomic characteristics and industrial traits than non-transformed control plants. Thus, a considerable number of embryogenic calli should be infected to obtain

  14. Development and Characterization of Transgenic Sugarcane with Insect Resistance and Herbicide Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen Zhi; Yang, Ben Peng; Feng, Xiao Yan; Cao, Zheng Ying; Feng, Cui Lian; Wang, Jun Gang; Xiong, Guo Ru; Shen, Lin Bo; Zeng, Jun; Zhao, Ting Ting; Zhang, Shu Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Genetically modified crops which had been commercial applied extensively majorly are the insect resistance and herbicide tolerance events. In this study, the Bt insecticidal gene Cry1Ab, the glyphosate-tolerant gene EPSPS, and the selection marker gene PMI were combined into a single transferred DNA fragment and introduced into sugarcane by Agrobacterium -mediated transformation. Thirty-three resistant plantlets were obtained after selection using a PMI/mannose selection system. Thirty of these resistant plantlets were PCR positive for the three target genes. Southern blot assay revealed that the copy number of the integrated fragment in the transformed plantlets varied from 1 to 7. ELISA analysis showed that 23 of the 33 resistant plantlets expressed Cry1Ab and EPSPS protein. Five single-copy and ELISA-positive transgenic lines were tested under laboratory and field conditions to determine their resistance to insects and herbicides, and also evaluated their agronomic characteristics and industrial traits. Results showed that larvae fed with fodder mixture containing stem tissues from single-copy transgenic lines were weak and small, moreover, pupation and eclosion were delayed significantly during voluntary feeding bioassays. None of transgenic sugarcane was destroyed by cane borer while more than 30% of wild type sugarcane was destroyed by cane borer. For herbicide resistance, the transgenic plantlets grew healthy even when treated with up to 0.5% roundup while wild type plantlets would die off when treated with 0.1% roundup. Thus demonstrate that these transgenic lines showed strong insect resistance and glyphosate tolerance under both laboratory and field conditions. But in the field most of the transgenic plants were shorter and more slender than non-transformed control plants. So they presented poor agronomic characteristics and industrial traits than non-transformed control plants. Thus, a considerable number of embryogenic calli should be infected to obtain

  15. Managing weeds in potato rotations without herbicides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Managing weeds without herbicides requires an integration of methods and strategies and a change in how weeds are perceived. Weeds should be managed in a holistic, intentional and proactive manner. Successful weed management in organic systems attempts to understand the interactions between the crop...

  16. Effectiveness of Hexazinone as a Forestry Herbicide

    Treesearch

    Jerry L. Michael

    1985-01-01

    Hexuinone has proven to be a useful herbicide in southern forestry. Its effectiveness in controlling many woody and herbaceour weeds at application rates tolerated by pines provides foresters with a selective vegetation management tool. Hexazinone is an environmentally safe chemical because lt is low in toxicity, is degraded readily, does not bioaccumulate; and does...

  17. Hardwood control using pelleted herbicides and burning

    Treesearch

    James H. Miller

    1982-01-01

    Treatments using combinations of pelletized herbicides with prescribe burning were tested for planting site preparation on steep terrain (>35% slopes) in the Alabama Piedmont. Mixed forests of southern pines, oaks, and hickories occupied areas before logging. Three burning treatments (no-burn, pre- and post-harvest) were applied randomly among three 4-acre major...

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herbicides comprise over 75% of all the agricultural pesticide use in the United States. This amounts to over 500 million pounds of active ingredients applied each year. The US EPA has the responsibility to register these products and label them for use such that unintended effec...

  19. Herbicide drift affects plant and arthropod communities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Field edges, old fields, and other semi-natural habitats in agricultural landscapes support diverse plant communities that help sustain pollinators, predators, and other beneficial arthropods. These plant and arthropod communities may be at persistent ecotoxicological risk from herbicides applied to...

  20. Forest Herbicide Washoff From Foliar Applications

    Treesearch

    J.L. Michael; Kevin L. Talley; H.C. Fishburn

    1992-01-01

    Field and laboratory experiments were conducted to develop and test methods for determining washoff of foliar applied herbicides typically used in forestry in the South.Preliminary results show good agreement between results of laboratory methods used and observations from field experiments on actual precipitation events. Methods included application of...

  1. Herbicide dissipation from low density polyethylene mulch

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted to examine herbicide dissipation when applied to low density polyethylene (LDPE) mulch for dry scenarios vs. washing off with water. In field studies, halosulfuron, paraquat, carfentrazone, glyphosate, and flumioxazin were applied to black 1.25-mil LDPE at...

  2. Herbicide Dissipation Studies in Southern Forest Ecosystems

    Treesearch

    Jerry L. Michael; Daniel G. Neary

    1993-01-01

    Results of research on the movement of bexazinone, imazapyr, picloram, and sulfometuron in first-order watersheds in the southern United States are presented. Herbicides contaminate surface waters to varying degrees, depending on application rate, method of application, product formulation, and site-spezific characteristics. Highest concentrations are observed in...

  3. Chapter 10. Herbicides for plant control

    Treesearch

    John F. Vallentine

    2004-01-01

    Herbicides can be an effective, necessary, and environmentally sound tool for the control of weeds and brush on rangelands (Young and others 1981b). As a result, chemical control is a widely used means of removing unwanted or noxious plants from range and other pasture lands. Selective plant control by mechanical, biological, fire, or manual means should also be...

  4. Herbicide options for suppressing bermudagrass in sugarcane

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bermudagrass is a problematic weed in Louisiana sugarcane. The most effective herbicide options are limited to the fallow period prior to planting. Frequently, efforts to eliminate bermudagrass from fields during the fallow season are unsuccessful. This subjects newly planted sugarcane to competitio...

  5. Insecticide resistance and intracellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Richard M

    2017-12-01

    Pesticide resistance is an example of evolution in action with mechanisms of resistance arising from mutations or increased expression of intrinsic genes. Intracellular proteases have a key role in maintaining healthy cells and in responding to stressors such as pesticides. Insecticide-resistant insects have constitutively elevated intracellular protease activity compared to corresponding susceptible strains. This increase was shown for some cases originally through biochemical enzyme studies and subsequently putatively by transcriptomics and proteomics methods. Upregulation and expression of proteases have been characterised in resistant strains of some insect species, including mosquitoes. This increase in proteolysis results in more degradation products (amino acids) of intracellular proteins. These may be utilised in the resistant strain to better protect the cell from stress. There are changes in insect intracellular proteases shortly after insecticide exposure, suggesting a role in stress response. The use of protease and proteasome inhibitors or peptide mimetics as synergists with improved application techniques and through protease gene knockdown using RNA interference (possibly expressed in crop plants) may be potential pest management strategies, in situations where elevated intracellular proteases are relevant. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Nucleic adaptability of heterokaryons to fungicides in a multinucleate fungus, Sclerotinia homoeocarpa.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Dylan; Sang, Hyunkyu; Bousquet, Amanda; Hulvey, Jonathan P; Garcia, Dawlyn; Rhee, Siyeon; Hoshino, Yoichiro; Yamada, Toshihiko; Jung, Geunhwa

    2018-06-01

    Sclerotinia homoeocarpa is the causal organism of dollar spot in turfgrasses and is a multinucleate fungus with a history of resistance to multiple fungicide classes. Heterokaryosis gives rise to the coexistence of genetically distinct nuclei within a cell, which contributes to genotypic and phenotypic plasticity in multinucleate fungi. We demonstrate that field isolates, resistant to either a demethylation inhibitor or methyl benzimidazole carbamate fungicide, can form heterokaryons with resistance to each fungicide and adaptability to serial combinations of different fungicide concentrations. Field isolates and putative heterokaryons were assayed on fungicide-amended media for in vitro sensitivity. Shifts in fungicide sensitivity and microsatellite genotypes indicated that heterokaryons could adapt to changes in fungicide pressure. Presence of both nuclei in heterokaryons was confirmed by detection of a single nucleotide polymorphism in the β-tubulin gene, the presence of microsatellite alleles of both field isolates, and the live-cell imaging of two different fluorescently tagged nuclei using laser scanning confocal microscopy. Nucleic adaptability of heterokaryons to fungicides was strongly supported by the visualization of changes in fluorescently labeled nuclei to fungicide pressure. Results from this study suggest that heterokaryosis is a mechanism by which the pathogen adapts to multiple fungicide pressures in the field. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sensitivity of Phakopsora pachyrhizi (soybean rust) isolates to fungicides and the reduction of fungal sporulation based on fungicide and timing of application

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean rust is a damaging foliar fungal disease of soybean in many soybean-growing areas throughout the world. Strategies to manage soybean rust include the use of foliar fungicides. Fungicides types, the rate of product application, and the number and timing of applications are critical components...

  8. Insecticide exposure impacts vector-parasite interactions in insecticide-resistant malaria vectors.

    PubMed

    Alout, Haoues; Djègbè, Innocent; Chandre, Fabrice; Djogbénou, Luc Salako; Dabiré, Roch Kounbobr; Corbel, Vincent; Cohuet, Anna

    2014-07-07

    Currently, there is a strong trend towards increasing insecticide-based vector control coverage in malaria endemic countries. The ecological consequence of insecticide applications has been mainly studied regarding the selection of resistance mechanisms; however, little is known about their impact on vector competence in mosquitoes responsible for malaria transmission. As they have limited toxicity to mosquitoes owing to the selection of resistance mechanisms, insecticides may also interact with pathogens developing in mosquitoes. In this study, we explored the impact of insecticide exposure on Plasmodium falciparum development in insecticide-resistant colonies of Anopheles gambiae s.s., homozygous for the ace-1 G119S mutation (Acerkis) or the kdr L1014F mutation (Kdrkis). Exposure to bendiocarb insecticide reduced the prevalence and intensity of P. falciparum oocysts developing in the infected midgut of the Acerkis strain, whereas exposure to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane reduced only the prevalence of P. falciparum infection in the Kdrkis strain. Thus, insecticide resistance leads to a selective pressure of insecticides on Plasmodium parasites, providing, to our knowledge, the first evidence of genotype by environment interactions on vector competence in a natural Anopheles-Plasmodium combination. Insecticide applications would affect the transmission of malaria in spite of resistance and would reduce to some degree the impact of insecticide resistance on malaria control interventions. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Insecticide Control of Vector-Borne Diseases: When Is Insecticide Resistance a Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, Ana; Vézilier, Julien; Weill, Mylène; Read, Andrew F.; Gandon, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    Many of the most dangerous human diseases are transmitted by insect vectors. After decades of repeated insecticide use, all of these vector species have demonstrated the capacity to evolve resistance to insecticides. Insecticide resistance is generally considered to undermine control of vector-transmitted diseases because it increases the number of vectors that survive the insecticide treatment. Disease control failure, however, need not follow from vector control failure. Here, we review evidence that insecticide resistance may have an impact on the quality of vectors and, specifically, on three key determinants of parasite transmission: vector longevity, competence, and behaviour. We argue that, in some instances, insecticide resistance is likely to result in a decrease in vector longevity, a decrease in infectiousness, or in a change in behaviour, all of which will reduce the vectorial capacity of the insect. If this effect is sufficiently large, the impact of insecticide resistance on disease management may not be as detrimental as previously thought. In other instances, however, insecticide resistance may have the opposite effect, increasing the insect's vectorial capacity, which may lead to a dramatic increase in the transmission of the disease and even to a higher prevalence than in the absence of insecticides. Either way—and there may be no simple generality—the consequence of the evolution of insecticide resistance for disease ecology deserves additional attention. PMID:20700451

  10. Final Natural Resource Actions Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-22

    populations through use of insecticides and rodenticides would be accomplished under the supervision of the Base Pest Management Office and coordinated... Insecticide , Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act; DoD Directive 4150.7, DoD Pest Management Program; AFI 32-1053, Pest Management Program; and the North... insecticide and herbicide. Grand Forks AFB constructed a 2,400-square-foot pest management facility in 1996 in accor- dance with the guidelines

  11. Pesticide distributions in surface water: The distribution of pesticide concentrations at two study sites points to herbicides that may affect management of public water supplies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamer, J.K.; Wieczorek, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    Distributions of concentrations of 46 pesticides were documented from May 1992 through March 1994 for Maple Creek near Nickerson, Neb., and Platte River at Louisville, Neb. As their source of public water supplies, Lincoln and the western part of Omaha withdraw groundwater from the adjacent alluvium near the Platte River site, which is hydraulically connected to the Platte River. Organonitrogen herbicides dominated the pesticide distributions at each site. Variations in the distributions of pesticides at the two sites partly reflect differences in land use and land management practices. Diazinon, an insecticide used in urban areas, was commonly detected at the Platte River site but not at the Maple Creek site. Of the 46 pesticides analyzed at the Platte River site, the herbicides atrazine and alachlor were more likely to exceed their respective maximum contaminant levels of 3.0 and 2.0 pg/L; cyanazine was more likely to exceed the health advisory level of 1.0 ??g/L.

  12. Peptides of the Constant Region of Antibodies Display Fungicidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Polonelli, Luciano; Ciociola, Tecla; Magliani, Walter; Zanello, Pier Paolo; D'Adda, Tiziana; Galati, Serena; De Bernardis, Flavia; Arancia, Silvia; Gabrielli, Elena; Pericolini, Eva; Vecchiarelli, Anna; Arruda, Denise C.; Pinto, Marcia R.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Pertinhez, Thelma A.; Spisni, Alberto; Conti, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic peptides with sequences identical to fragments of the constant region of different classes (IgG, IgM, IgA) of antibodies (Fc-peptides) exerted a fungicidal activity in vitro against pathogenic yeasts, such as Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Malassezia furfur, including caspofungin and triazole resistant strains. Alanine-substituted derivatives of fungicidal Fc-peptides, tested to evaluate the critical role of each residue, displayed unaltered, increased or decreased candidacidal activity in vitro. An Fc-peptide, included in all human IgGs, displayed a therapeutic effect against experimental mucosal and systemic candidiasis in mouse models. It is intriguing to hypothesize that some Fc-peptides may influence the antifungal immune response and constitute the basis for devising new antifungal agents. PMID:22470523

  13. Fungicidal activity of silver nanoparticles against Alternaria brassicicola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Deepika; Chauhan, Pratima

    2016-04-01

    This work highlighted the fungicidal properties of silver nanoparticles against Alternaria brassicicola. Alternaria brassicicola causes Black spot of Cauliflower, radish, cabbage, kale which results in sever agricultural loss. We treat the synthesised silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) of 10, 25, 50, 100 and 110 ppm concentrations against Alternaria brassicicola on PDA containing Petri dish. We calculated inhibitory rate (%) in order to evaluate the antifungal efficacy of silver nanoparticles against pathogens. Treatment with 100ppm AgNPs resulted in maximum inhibition of Alternaria brassicicola i.e.92.2%. 110ppm of AgNPS also shows the same result, therefore 100ppm AgNPs was treated as optimize concentration. AgNPs effectively inhibited the growth of a Alternaria brassicicola, which suggests that AgNPs could be used as fungicide in plant disease management. Further research and development are necessary to translate this technology into plant disease management strategies.

  14. Toxicological effects of fungicide mixtures on the amphipod Austrochiltonia subtenuis.

    PubMed

    Vu, Hung T; Keough, Michael J; Long, Sara M; Pettigrove, Vincent J

    2017-10-01

    Approaches to assess the toxicity of mixtures often use predictive models with acute mortality as an endpoint at relatively high concentrations. However, these approaches do not reflect realistic situations where organisms could be exposed to chemical mixtures over long periods at low concentrations at which no significant mortalities occur. The present study investigated chronic effects of 2 common fungicides, Filan® (active ingredient [a.i]) boscalid) and Systhane™ (a.i. myclobutanil), on the amphipod Austrochiltonia subtenuis at environmentally relevant concentrations under laboratory conditions. Sexually mature amphipods were exposed singly and in combination to Filan (1, 10, and 40 μg a.i./L) and Systhane (3 μg a.i./L) over 28 d. Survival, growth, a wide range of reproduction endpoints, and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity were measured at the end of the experiment. Both fungicides had significant independent effects on male growth, sex ratio, and juvenile size. Filan mainly affected female growth and the number of embryos per gravid female, whereas Systhane mainly affected the time for females to become gravid. The combined effects of these fungicides on numbers of gravid females and juveniles were antagonistic, causing a 61% reduction in the number of gravid females and a 77% reduction in the number of juveniles produced at the highest concentrations (40 μg a.i./L of boscalid and 3 μg a.i./L of myclobutanil) compared with the controls. There were no significant effects on survival or GST activity. The present study demonstrated that the effects of mixtures were endpoint dependent and that using a variety of endpoints should be considered for a comprehensive understanding of mixture effects. Also, chronic studies are more informative than acute studies for environmentally relevant fungicide concentrations. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2651-2659. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  15. Weevil x Insecticide: Does 'Personality' Matter?

    PubMed

    Morales, Juliana A; Cardoso, Danúbia G; Della Lucia, Terezinha Maria C; Guedes, Raul Narciso C

    2013-01-01

    An insect's behavior is the expression of its integrated physiology in response to external and internal stimuli, turning insect behavior into a potential determinant of insecticide exposure. Behavioral traits may therefore influence insecticide efficacy against insects, compromising the validity of standard bioassays of insecticide activity, which are fundamentally based on lethality alone. By extension, insect 'personality' (i.e., an individual's integrated set of behavioral tendencies that is inferred from multiple empirical measures) may also be an important determinant of insecticide exposure and activity. This has yet to be considered because the behavioral studies involving insects and insecticides focus on populations rather than on individuals. Even among studies of animal 'personality', the relative contributions of individual and population variation are usually neglected. Here, we assessed behavioral traits (within the categories: activity, boldness/shyness, and exploration/avoidance) of individuals from 15 populations of the maize weevil (Sitophilus zeamais), an important stored-grain pest with serious problems of insecticide resistance, and correlated the behavioral responses with the activity of the insecticide deltamethrin. This analysis was performed at both the population and individual levels. There was significant variation in weevil 'personality' among individuals and populations, but variation among individuals within populations accounted for most of the observed variation (92.57%). This result emphasizes the importance of individual variation in behavioral and 'personality' studies. When the behavioral traits assessed were correlated with median lethal time (LT50) at the population level and with the survival time under insecticide exposure, activity traits, particularly the distance walked, significantly increased survival time. Therefore, behavioral traits are important components of insecticide efficacy, and individual variation should be

  16. Fate of a novel strobilurin fungicide pyraoxystrobin in flooded soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tilong; Xu, Chao; Liu, Xunyue; Chen, Xia; Zhang, Jianbo; Ding, Xingcheng

    2014-05-01

    Pyraoxystrobin, ((E)-2-(2-((3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yloxy) methyl) phenyl)-3-methoxyacrylate) is a novel strobilurin fungicide with excellent and broad spectrum antifungal efficiency. Environmental behaviors of the new fungicide must be assessed to understand its potential risks to the environment. In this study, the extractable residues, bound residues and mineralization, as well as the dissipation rates of pyraoxystrobin were investigated in three flooded soils using a (14)C tracing technique. Results showed that pyraoxystrobin didn't undergo appreciable dissipation during the 100 day incubation period in some tested soils, with 70.01%, 28.58% and 83.85% of the parent compound remaining in the solonchak, cambisol and acrisol soils at the end of the experiment, respectively. Almost no (14)C-pyraoxystrobin was mineralized to (14)CO2 (<0.5%) over the experimental period. Organic matter had a dominating influence on the bound residues formation and the fractions of bound residues increased as the soil organic matter content increased. Less than 9% of the radioactivity was found in the aqueous phase, while the majority of extractable residues (>65.39%) were recovered in the organic extracts. This study aims to give a deep insight into the environmental behaviors of pyraoxystrobin and may be beneficial for the risk assessment of other analogous fungicides.

  17. Fungicides degradation in an organic biomixture: impact on microbial diversity.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Laura; Comitini, Francesca; Casucci, Cristiano; Milanovic, Vesna; Monaci, Elga; Marinozzi, Maria; Taccari, Manuela; Ciani, Maurizio; Vischetti, Costantino

    2011-12-15

    Biological systems are being developed all over EU countries to protect water-bodies from pesticide contamination at farm level. A laboratory experiment was carried out to test the efficiency of a mixture of compost and straw in bio-degrading different mixtures of fungicides usually applied in vineyards. At the same time the effects of fungicide applications on microbial community of biomixture were also evaluated. Results showed that the biomixture had a good capability of degrading pesticides. Indeed, at the end of the experiment (112 days), the concentration of most of the pesticides was close to complete degradation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis showed an evident modification of microbial diversity after the addition of fungicides. However, at the end of degradation process, no significant changes in the composition of microbial community were seen. In this specific substrate used in the biomixture, yeast flora and ascomycete filamentous fungi seemed to be involved in the degradation activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Famoxadone: the discovery and optimisation of a new agricultural fungicide.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, J A; Geffken, D; Adams, J B; Pöstages, R; Sternberg, C G; Campbell, C L; Moberg, W K

    2001-02-01

    Famoxadone (3-anilino-5-methyl-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-1,3-oxazolidine-2,4-dione), is a new agricultural fungicide recently commercialized by DuPont under the trade name Famoxate. Famoxadone is a member of a new class of oxazolidinone fungicides that demonstrate excellent control of plant pathogens in the Ascomycete, Basidiomycete, and Oomycete classes that infect grapes, cereals, tomatoes, potatoes and other crops. DuPont's entry into the oxazolidinone area resulted from the procurement of 5-methyl-5-phenyl-3-phenylamino-2-thioxo-4-oxazolidinone (1) from Professor Detlef Geffken, then at the University of Bonn. An extensive analog program was initiated immediately after the fungicidal activity of 1 was discovered through routine greenhouse testing. The discovery program in the oxazolidinone area eventually culminated in the advancement of famoxadone to commercial development in the early 1990s. The synthesis of various oxazolidinone ring systems and the development of the structure-activity relationships that led to the discovery of famoxadone are described.

  19. Method for in vitro screening of aquatic fungicides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    Methods were developed for in vitro screening of candidate aquatic fungicides for efficacy against Achlya fiagellata, A. racemosa, Saprolegnia hypogyna and S. megasperma. Agar plugs containing fungal hyphae, removed from the edge of actively growing colonies, were placed in the depressions of spot plates containing 1a??0, 10a??0 and 100 mg/I of the candidate compounds for 15 or 60 min. After exposure, the plugs were transferred on to filter papers (0a??45-A?m pore) in a holder, rinsed, and then placed on cornmeal agar medium in tri-petri dishes. The plates were checked for mycelial growth after 48, 96 and 168 h of incubation in a lighted (400-800 A?m) environmental control chamber at 20A?2A?C. Criteria for the acceptance or rejection of candidate aquatic fungicides for further study were based on the antifungal spectrum index (ASI) comparisons between respective compounds and malachite green after 48 h and the concentration level producing complete growth inhibition. Candidate compounds whose ASI was less than 50% that of malachite green after 48 h or did not inhibit growth at levels less than 100 mg/l were rejected. This method provides a base from which in vivo and definitive test regimens can be developed. Preliminary in vitro screening of candidate fungicides reduces the need for costly in vivo tests on compounds that have low antifungal activity.

  20. Dachtal Isomers and Acidic Herbicides and Pesticides in Eggs of Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) from the Seattle and Everett Areas, Washington, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chu, S.; Henny, Charles J.; Kaiser, James L.; Drouillard, K.G.; Haffner, G.D.; Letcher, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Current-use chlorophenoxy herbicides including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, dicamba, triclopyr, dicamba, dimethyl tetrachloroterephthalate (DCPA or dacthal), and the metabolite of pyrethroids, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), and the fungicide, chlorothalonil, were investigated in the eggs of osprey (Pandion haliaetus) that were collected from 15 sites from five study areas Puget Sound/Seattle area of Washington State, USA. DCPA differs from acidic chlorophenoxy herbicides, and is not readily hydrolyzed to free acid or acid metabolites, and thus we developed a new method. Of the 12 chlorophenoxy herbicides and chlorothalonil analyzed only DCPA could be quantified at six of these sites (2.0 to 10.3 pg/g fresh weight). However, higher levels (6.9 to 85.5 pg/g fresh weight) of the unexpected DCPA structural isomer, dimethyl tetrachlorophthalate (diMe-TCP) were quantified in eggs from all sites. diMe-TCP concentrations tended to be higher in eggs from the Everett Harbor area. As diMe-TCP is not an industrial product, and not commercially available, the source of diMe-TCP is unclear. Regardless, these findings indicate that DCPA and diMe-TCP can be accumulated in the food chain of fish-eating osprey, and transferred in ovo to eggs, and thus may be of concern to the health of the developing chick and the general reproductive health of this osprey population.

  1. EPA Accepting Public Comments on Nominees for the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Scientific Advisory Panel (FIFRA SAP)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    FRN professional affiliations of recent nominees by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation for service on the FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel established under section 25(d) of the FIFRA

  2. Multianalyte, high-throughput liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for the sensitive determination of fungicides and insecticides in wine.

    PubMed

    Castro, Gabriela; Pérez-Mayán, Leticia; Rodríguez-Cabo, Tamara; Rodríguez, Isaac; Ramil, Maria; Cela, Rafael

    2018-01-01

    Evidence of pesticide transfer from grapes to wine, added to differences in the national regulations regarding the number and the maximum concentration of these species in wine, demands analytical procedures suitable for their routine control in this foodstuff. In this research, solid-phase extraction (SPE) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) detection, are combined to obtain a sensitive and rapid procedure to determine 50 pesticides in red and white wines. Efficiency and selectivity of sample preparation are correlated with the type of sorbent, the elution solvent, and the physicochemical properties of pesticides. SPE of 2-mL wine samples followed by direct injection of the extract in the UPLC-MS/MS system provides quantification limits (LOQs) below 1 ng mL -1 for 48 out of 50 compounds, linear responses up to 200 ng mL -1 , and acceptable accuracy, employing quantification against solvent-based standards, for 45 species. A total analysis time of 10 min, including compounds separation and re-equilibration of the UPLC column, was achieved. The developed methodology was applied to 25 wines (20 conventional and 5 ecological), produced in 7 different countries. Out of 27 pesticides quantified in these wines, 12 displayed occurrence frequencies above 24%; moreover, all wines, except one of the ecological ones, contained residues from at least one pesticide.

  3. Notification: Evaluation of the Adequacy of EPA’s Oversight of State Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Programs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OPE-FY14-0007, June 19, 2014. Our updated objective is to determine how the EPA's state oversight ensures the quality of state-performed Worker Protection Standard inspections and Certification and Training inspections.

  4. 40 CFR 2.307 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... any information to which this section applies to physicians, pharmacists, and other qualified persons... might otherwise be entitled to confidential treatment under this subpart) to physicians, pharmacists...

  5. 40 CFR 2.307 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... any information to which this section applies to physicians, pharmacists, and other qualified persons... might otherwise be entitled to confidential treatment under this subpart) to physicians, pharmacists...

  6. 40 CFR 2.307 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... any information to which this section applies to physicians, pharmacists, and other qualified persons... might otherwise be entitled to confidential treatment under this subpart) to physicians, pharmacists...

  7. 40 CFR 2.307 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... any information to which this section applies to physicians, pharmacists, and other qualified persons... might otherwise be entitled to confidential treatment under this subpart) to physicians, pharmacists...

  8. 40 CFR 2.307 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... any information to which this section applies to physicians, pharmacists, and other qualified persons... might otherwise be entitled to confidential treatment under this subpart) to physicians, pharmacists...

  9. Early signs of lethal effects in Daphnia magna (Branchiopoda, Cladocera) exposed to the insecticide cypermethrin and the fungicide azoxystrobin.

    PubMed

    Friberg-Jensen, Ursula; Nachman, Gösta; Christoffersen, Kirsten S

    2010-10-01

    This study presents the effects of sublethal concentrations of pesticides cypermethrin and azoxystrobin on the activity of several physiological parameters of egg-carrying Daphnia magna studied using a video-image technique. Single tethered daphnids were continuously recorded for 24 h of pesticide exposure, and the activity of the heart, the filtering limbs, the mandibles, and the focal spine were subsequently analyzed. Acute toxicity tests based on the criteria of immobilization were performed on egg-carrying D. magna, and sublethal concentrations of 0.1, 1.0, and 10 µg/L cypermethrin and 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/L azoxystrobin were established. At a concentration as low as 0.1 µg/L cypermethrin, the 5% effective concentration after 24 h of exposure (EC5,24h), the activity of the focal spine increased and the filtering limb activity decreased. The activity of the mandibles was reduced by exposure to 1.0 (EC18,24 h) and 10 µg/L (EC41,24 h) cypermethrin, whereas heart activity increased at a concentration of 10 µg/L (EC41,24 h). With regard to azoxystrobin, the activity of all response parameters except the focal spine decreased by exposure to 0.5 mg/L (EC4,24h) azoxystrobin. The focal spine was not affected by azoxystrobin. The results show that physiological mechanisms important for ingestion of food in D. magna may be impaired by low concentrations of commonly used pesticides. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2010;29:2371-2378. © 2010 SETAC.

  10. 48 CFR 1552.235-77 - Data Security for Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Data Security for Federal... 1552.235-77 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1552.235-77 Data Security for...

  11. 48 CFR 1552.235-77 - Data Security for Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Data Security for Federal... 1552.235-77 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1552.235-77 Data Security for...

  12. 48 CFR 1552.235-77 - Data Security for Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Data Security for Federal... 1552.235-77 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1552.235-77 Data Security for...

  13. 48 CFR 1552.235-77 - Data Security for Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Data Security for Federal... 1552.235-77 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1552.235-77 Data Security for...

  14. 48 CFR 1552.235-77 - Data Security for Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Confidential Business...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Data Security for Federal... 1552.235-77 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1552.235-77 Data Security for...

  15. Flood stress as a technicque to assess preventive insecticide and fungicide treatments for protecting trees against ambrosia beetles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The exotic ambrosia beetles Xylosandrus germanus, Xylosandrus crassiusculus, and Xylosandrus compactus tunnel into the heartwood of trees where they cultivate and feed upon a symbiotic fungus. We assessed the effectiveness of flood stress as a tactic for making trees attractive and vulnerable to att...

  16. A bill to amend the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act to improve the use of certain registered pesticides.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Roberts, Pat [R-KS

    2011-04-04

    Senate - 04/04/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  17. A bill to amend the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act to improve the use of certain registered pesticides.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Roberts, Pat [R-KS

    2013-01-29

    Senate - 01/29/2013 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. A bill to amend the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act to improve the use of certain registered pesticides.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Lincoln, Blanche L. [D-AR

    2010-08-05

    Senate - 08/05/2010 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. Maize, switchgrass, and ponderosa pine biochar added to soil increased herbicide sorption and decreased herbicide efficacy.

    PubMed

    Clay, Sharon A; Krack, Kaitlynn K; Bruggeman, Stephanie A; Papiernik, Sharon; Schumacher, Thomas E

    2016-08-02

    Biochar, a by-product of pyrolysis made from a wide array of plant biomass when producing biofuels, is a proposed soil amendment to improve soil health. This study measured herbicide sorption and efficacy when soils were treated with low (1% w/w) or high (10% w/w) amounts of biochar manufactured from different feedstocks [maize (Zea mays) stover, switchgrass (Panicum vigatum), and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa)], and treated with different post-processing techniques. Twenty-four hour batch equilibration measured sorption of (14)C-labelled atrazine or 2,4-D to two soil types with and without biochar amendments. Herbicide efficacy was measured with and without biochar using speed of seed germination tests of sensitive species. Biochar amended soils sorbed more herbicide than untreated soils, with major differences due to biochar application rate but minor differences due to biochar type or post-process handling technique. Biochar presence increased the speed of seed germination compared with herbicide alone addition. These data indicate that biochar addition to soil can increase herbicide sorption and reduce efficacy. Evaluation for site-specific biochar applications may be warranted to obtain maximal benefits without compromising other agronomic practices.

  20. Decrease of insecticide resistance over generations without exposure to insecticides in Nilaparvata lugens (Hemipteran: Delphacidae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Yajun; Dong, Biqin; Xu, Hongxing; Zheng, Xusong; Tian, Junce; Heong, Kongleun; Lu, Zhongxian

    2014-08-01

    The brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), is one of the most important insect pests on paddy rice in tropical and temperate Asia. Overuse and misuse of insecticides have resulted in the development of high resistance to many different insecticides in this pest. Studies were conducted to evaluate the change of resistance level to four insecticides over 15 generations without any exposure to insecticides in brown planthopper. After 15 generations' rearing without exposure to insecticide, brown planthopper could reverse the resistance to imidacloprid, chlorpyrifos, fipronil, and fenobucarb. The range and style of resistance reversal of brown planthopper differed when treated with four different insecticides. To monitor potential changes in insect physiological responses, we measured the activity of each of the three selected enzymes, including acetylcholinesterases (AChE), general esterases (EST), and glutathione S-transferases. After multiple generations' rearing without exposure to insecticide, AChE and EST activities of brown planthopper declined with the increased generations, suggesting that the brown planthopper population adjusted activities of EST and AChE to adapt to the non-insecticide environment. These findings suggest that the reducing, temporary stop, or rotation of insecticide application could be incorporated into the brown planthopper management.

  1. Solid-phase extraction of acidic herbicides.

    PubMed

    Wells, M J; Yu, L Z

    2000-07-14

    A discussion of solid-phase extraction method development for acidic herbicides is presented that reviews sample matrix modification, extraction sorbent selection, derivatization procedures for gas chromatographic analysis, and clean-up procedures for high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis. Acidic herbicides are families of compounds that include derivatives of phenol (dinoseb, dinoterb and pentachlorophenol), benzoic acid (acifluorfen, chloramben, dicamba, 3,5-dichlorobenzoic acid and dacthal--a dibenzoic acid derivative), acetic acid [2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T)], propanoic acid [dichlorprop, fluazifop, haloxyfop, 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)propanoic acid (MCPP) and silvex], butanoic acid [4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)butanoic acid (2,4-DB) and 4-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)butanoic acid (MCPB)], and other miscellaneous acids such as pyridinecarboxylic acid (picloram) and thiadiazine dioxide (bentazon).

  2. Herbicide Metabolites in Surface Water and Groundwater: Introduction and Overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Meyer, M.T.

    1996-01-01

    Several future research topics for herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water are outlined in this chapter. They are herbicide usage, chemical analysis of metabolites, and fate and transport of metabolites in surface and ground water. These three ideas follow the themes in this book, which are the summary of a symposium of the American Chemical Society on herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water. First, geographic information systems allow the spatial distribution of herbicide-use data to be combined with geochemical information on fate and transport of herbicides. Next these two types of information are useful in predicting the kinds of metabolites present and their probable distribution in surface and ground water. Finally, methods development efforts may be focused on these specific target analytes. This chapter discusses these three concepts and provides an introduction to this book on the analysis, chemistry, and fate and transport of herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water.

  3. Photocatalytic and Photoelectrochemically Degradation of Chlorsulfuron herbicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xu; Liu, Hongwei; Miao, Jinjie; Ma, Zhen

    2017-12-01

    Photocatalytic and photo electrochemical (PEC) degradation of chlorsulfuron herbicide were studied. Two novel PEC electrodes Ti/IrO2-Pt-WO3 (TIW) and Ti/IrO2-Pt-Ag3PO4 (TIA) were designed and some important factors were studied. Lower current density showed lower removal efficiency than higher conditions by electrochemical method. Furthermore, PEC showed higher degradation efficiency than the sum of individual EO and photocatalytic methode.

  4. Mechanisms of action of the insecticide endrin.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1963-08-01

    Cardiovascular effects of endrin insecticide are obscure. Experiments to investigate this phenomenon were carried out on dogs and suggested mechanisms of actions have been proposed. Results show that acute administration of endrin produces bradycardi...

  5. Electrochemical degradation and mineralization of glyphosate herbicide.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nam; Drogui, Patrick; Doan, Tuan Linh; Le, Thanh Son; Nguyen, Hoai Chau

    2017-12-01

    The presence of herbicide is a concern for both human and ecological health. Glyphosate is occasionally detected as water contaminants in agriculture areas where the herbicide is used extensively. The removal of glyphosate in synthetic solution using advanced oxidation process is a possible approach for remediation of contaminated waters. The ability of electrochemical oxidation for the degradation and mineralization of glyphosate herbicide was investigated using Ti/PbO 2 anode. The current intensity, treatment time, initial concentration and pH of solution are the influent parameters on the degradation efficiency. An experimental design methodology was applied to determine the optimal condition (in terms of cost/effectiveness) based on response surface methodology. Glyphosate concentration (C 0  = 16.9 mg L -1 ) decreased up to 0.6 mg L -1 when the optimal conditions were imposed (current intensity of 4.77 A and treatment time of 173 min). The removal efficiencies of glyphosate and total organic carbon were 95 ± 16% and 90.31%, respectively. This work demonstrates that electrochemical oxidation is a promising process for degradation and mineralization of glyphosate.

  6. Toxicity of herbicides in highway runoff.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinjiang; Fong, Stephanie; Deanovic, Linda; Young, Thomas M

    2005-09-01

    Previous field monitoring at two highway sites found highway-applied herbicides in storm water runoff at maximum concentrations ranging from 10 microg/L for glyphosate and diuron to as high as 200 microg/L for oryzalin. To determine whether these herbicides at these concentrations can cause any toxicity to aquatic organisms, a standard toxicity study was conducted. Storm water was collected along Highway 37, Sonoma County, California, USA, and the herbicides isoxaben, oryzalin, diuron, clopyralid, and glyphosate were spiked into the storm water at the highest concentrations observed during the five previous field-monitoring campaigns. Three different toxicity studies were conducted and the results showed the following: No significant reduction in reproduction or increase in mortality relative to the control for an 8-d Ceriodaphnia (water flea) toxicity test; no significant increase in mortality or decrease in biomass compared to the control during a 7-d Pimephales (fish) toxicity test; and, in a 96-h Selenastrum (algae) toxicity test, both the 10-microg/L diuron treatment and the combined 50-microg/L isoxaben plus 200-microg/L oryzalin treatment produced significant (p < 0.05) reductions in algal growth compared to the controls, although the 30-microg/L clopyralid or 10-microg/L glyphosate treatments did not exhibit any toxic effects.

  7. Ethical reflections on herbicide-resistant crops.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Kathrine Hauge; Sandøe, Peter

    2005-03-01

    The introduction of genetically modified (GM) crops has caused a fierce public debate in Europe. Much of the controversy centres on possible risks to the environment. A specific problem here is that risk perception of the scientific experts differs from that of the public. In this paper, risks associated with herbicide-resistant crops are presented from the point of view of experts and lay people. In the public perception, herbicide-resistant (HR) crops are troublesome because of their association with two technologies: genetic engineering of crops and the use of herbicides. These technologies are perceived as risky because they seem to share certain features: in particular, their long-term effects are unknown and they are dreaded. Other value questions also come into play. The public seems to be concerned that risks are not outweighed by usefulness, that using HR crops is the wrong path to sustainable agriculture, that the individual's right to choose GM-free products may be violated, and that these crops are unnatural. In contrast, on the issue of the uncertainty inherent in risk assessment, experts and the public seem to share a good deal of ground. Copyright 2005 Society of Chemical Industry

  8. Phytotoxicity of four photosystem II herbicides to tropical seagrasses.

    PubMed

    Flores, Florita; Collier, Catherine J; Mercurio, Philip; Negri, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    Coastal waters of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are contaminated with agricultural pesticides, including the photosystem II (PSII) herbicides which are the most frequently detected at the highest concentrations. Designed to control weeds, these herbicides are equally potent towards non-target marine species, and the close proximity of seagrass meadows to flood plumes has raised concerns that seagrasses may be the species most threatened by herbicides from runoff. While previous work has identified effects of PSII herbicides on the photophysiology, growth and mortality in seagrass, there is little comparative quantitative toxicity data for seagrass. Here we applied standard ecotoxicology protocols to quantify the concentrations of four priority PSII herbicides that inhibit photochemistry by 10, 20 and 50% (IC10, IC20 and IC50) over 72 h in two common seagrass species from the GBR lagoon. The photosystems of seagrasses Zosteramuelleri and Haloduleuninervis were shown to be generally more sensitive to the PSII herbicides Diuron, Atrazine, Hexazinone and Tebuthiuron than corals and tropical microalgae. The herbicides caused rapid inhibition of effective quantum yield (∆F/F m '), indicating reduced photosynthesis and maximum effective yields (Fv/Fm ) corresponding to chronic damage to PSII. The PSII herbicide concentrations which affected photosynthesis have been exceeded in the GBR lagoon and all of the herbicides inhibited photosynthesis at concentrations lower than current marine park guidelines. There is a strong likelihood that the impacts of light limitation from flood plumes and reduced photosynthesis from PSII herbicides exported in the same waters would combine to affect seagrass productivity. Given that PSII herbicides have been demonstrated to affect seagrass at environmental concentrations, we suggest that revision of environmental guidelines and further efforts to reduce PSII herbicide concentrations in floodwaters may both help protect seagrass meadows of

  9. Phytotoxicity of Four Photosystem II Herbicides to Tropical Seagrasses

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Florita; Collier, Catherine J.; Mercurio, Philip; Negri, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    Coastal waters of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are contaminated with agricultural pesticides, including the photosystem II (PSII) herbicides which are the most frequently detected at the highest concentrations. Designed to control weeds, these herbicides are equally potent towards non-target marine species, and the close proximity of seagrass meadows to flood plumes has raised concerns that seagrasses may be the species most threatened by herbicides from runoff. While previous work has identified effects of PSII herbicides on the photophysiology, growth and mortality in seagrass, there is little comparative quantitative toxicity data for seagrass. Here we applied standard ecotoxicology protocols to quantify the concentrations of four priority PSII herbicides that inhibit photochemistry by 10, 20 and 50% (IC10, IC20 and IC50) over 72 h in two common seagrass species from the GBR lagoon. The photosystems of seagrasses Zostera muelleri and Halodule uninervis were shown to be generally more sensitive to the PSII herbicides Diuron, Atrazine, Hexazinone and Tebuthiuron than corals and tropical microalgae. The herbicides caused rapid inhibition of effective quantum yield (∆F/F m ′), indicating reduced photosynthesis and maximum effective yields (Fv/Fm) corresponding to chronic damage to PSII. The PSII herbicide concentrations which affected photosynthesis have been exceeded in the GBR lagoon and all of the herbicides inhibited photosynthesis at concentrations lower than current marine park guidelines. There is a strong likelihood that the impacts of light limitation from flood plumes and reduced photosynthesis from PSII herbicides exported in the same waters would combine to affect seagrass productivity. Given that PSII herbicides have been demonstrated to affect seagrass at environmental concentrations, we suggest that revision of environmental guidelines and further efforts to reduce PSII herbicide concentrations in floodwaters may both help protect seagrass meadows

  10. Occurrence of dichloroacetamide herbicide safeners and co-applied herbicides in midwestern U.S. streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodward, Emily; Hladik, Michelle; Kolpin, Dana W.

    2018-01-01

    Dichloroacetamide safeners (e.g., AD-67, benoxacor, dichlormid, and furilazole) are co-applied with chloroacetanilide herbicides to protect crops from herbicide toxicity. While such safeners have been used since the early 1970s, there are minimal data about safener usage, occurrence in streams, or potential ecological effects. This study focused on one of these research gaps, occurrence in streams. Seven Midwestern U.S. streams (five in Iowa and two in Illinois), with extensive row-crop agriculture, were sampled at varying frequencies from spring 2016 through summer 2017. All four safeners were detected at least once; furilazole was the most frequently detected (31%), followed by benoxacor (29%), dichlormid (15%), and AD-67 (2%). The maximum concentrations ranged from 42 to 190 ng/L. Stream detections and concentrations of safeners appear to be driven by a combination of timing of application (spring following herbicide application) and precipitation events. Detected concentrations were below known toxicity levels for aquatic organisms.

  11. Uses of thaxtomin and thaxtomin compositions as herbicides

    DOEpatents

    Koivunen, Marja; Marrone, Pamela

    2016-12-27

    There is a need for a selective, low-risk herbicide that can be used to control weeds in cereal cultures and turf. The present invention discloses that a bacterial secondary metabolite, thaxtomin and optionally another herbicide is an effective herbicide on broadleaved, sedge and grass weeds. Thaxtomin A and structurally similar compounds can be used as natural herbicides to control the germination and growth of weeds in cereal, turf grass, Timothy grass and pasture grass cultures with no phytotoxicity to these crops. As a natural, non-toxic compound, thaxtomin can be used as a safe alternative for weed control in both conventional and organic farming and gardening systems.

  12. Discrimination of herbicide-resistant kochia with hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, Paul W.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Jha, Prashant; Scherrer, Bryan; Donelick, Andrew; Kumar, Vipan

    2018-01-01

    A hyperspectral imager was used to differentiate herbicide-resistant versus herbicide-susceptible biotypes of the agronomic weed kochia, in different crops in the field at the Southern Agricultural Research Center in Huntley, Montana. Controlled greenhouse experiments showed that enough information was captured by the imager to classify plants as either a crop, herbicide-susceptible or herbicide-resistant kochia. The current analysis is developing an algorithm that will work in more uncontrolled outdoor situations. In overcast conditions, the algorithm correctly identified dicamba-resistant kochia, glyphosate-resistant kochia, and glyphosate- and dicamba-susceptible kochia with 67%, 76%, and 80% success rates, respectively.

  13. [Purification and structural identification of herbicides from Botrytis cinerea].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Meng; Xu, Kuo; Dong, Jingao

    2008-10-01

    Toxin produced by phytopathogenic fungi is one of the important microbial herbicides. We found a new compound with herbicidal activity. Five different ultraviolet absorption components were isolated from the filtrate of Botrytis cinerea isolate 7-3 culture. Of the five components, one showed strong inhibitory to Digitaria sanguinalis. The pure fraction with high herbicidal activity was obtained by HPLC purification. Its structure was identified as 10-syn-dihydrobotrydial by Ultraviolet and Visible Spectroscopy, Infrared Spectrum, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy analysis. The findings are important for future preparation and application of the herbicide.

  14. DNA analysis of herbarium Specimens of the grass weed Alopecurus myosuroides reveals herbicide resistance pre-dated herbicides.

    PubMed

    Délye, Christophe; Deulvot, Chrystel; Chauvel, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) alleles carrying one point mutation that confers resistance to herbicides have been identified in arable grass weed populations where resistance has evolved under the selective pressure of herbicides. In an effort to determine whether herbicide resistance evolves from newly arisen mutations or from standing genetic variation in weed populations, we used herbarium specimens of the grass weed Alopecurus myosuroides to seek mutant ACCase alleles carrying an isoleucine-to-leucine substitution at codon 1781 that endows herbicide resistance. These specimens had been collected between 1788 and 1975, i.e., prior to the commercial release of herbicides inhibiting ACCase. Among the 734 specimens investigated, 685 yielded DNA suitable for PCR. Genotyping the ACCase locus using the derived Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence (dCAPS) technique identified one heterozygous mutant specimen that had been collected in 1888. Occurrence of a mutant codon encoding a leucine residue at codon 1781 at the heterozygous state was confirmed in this specimen by sequencing, clearly demonstrating that resistance to herbicides can pre-date herbicides in weeds. We conclude that point mutations endowing resistance to herbicides without having associated deleterious pleiotropic effects can be present in weed populations as part of their standing genetic variation, in frequencies higher than the mutation frequency, thereby facilitating their subsequent selection by herbicide applications.

  15. Toxicity of selected insecticides and insecticide mixtures to adult brown stink bug (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glass vial bioassay were conducted to evaluate the toxicity of selected insecticides and insecticide mixtures to the brown stink bug (BSB), Euschistus servus (Say) collected from blacklight traps, cotton plants and weeds in farming areas in the Brazos Valley of Texas. Dicrotophos was 5- and 18-fold...

  16. THE ANTICHOLINESTERASE INSECTICIDE, DIAZINON, MAY POTENTIATE THE TOXICITY OF THE PYRETHROID INSECTICIDE DELTAMETHRIN AT LOW DOSAGES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This present study explores the interaction of the toxicity induced by an organophosphorus insecticide, diazinon (diethyl 2-isopropyl-6methyl-4-pyrimidal phosphorothionate), with a pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin ((S)-a-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl (1R,3R)-3-(2,2-dibromovinyl)-2,...

  17. THE INTERACTION OF AN ANTICHOLINESTERASE INSECTICIDE, DIAZINON, WITH A PYRETHROID INSECTICIDE, DELTAMETHRIN.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This present study explores the interaction of the toxicity induced by an organophosphorus insecticide, diazinon (diethyl 2-isopropyl-6methyl-4-pyrimidal phosphorothionate), with a pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin ((S)-a-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl (1R,3R)-3-(2,2-dibromovinyl)-2,...

  18. Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on soil and its components. III. Influence of clay acidity, humic acid coating and herbicide structure on acetanilide herbicide adsorption on homoionic clays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-ping; Fang, Zhuo; Liu, Hui-jun; Yang, Wei-chun

    2002-04-01

    Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on homoionic montmorillonite, soil humic acid, and their mixtures was studied by coupling batch equilibration and FT-IR analysis. Adsorption isotherms of acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor and propachlor on Ca(2+)-, Mg(2+)-, Al(3+)- and Fe(3+)-saturated clays were well described by the Freundlich equation. Regardless of the type of exchange cations, Kf decreased in the order of metolachlor > acetolachlor > alachlor > propachlor on the same clay. FT-IR spectra showed that the carbonyl group of the herbicide molecule was involved in binding, probably via H-bond with water molecules in the clay interlayer. The type and position of substitutions around the carbonyl group may have affected the electronegativity of oxygen, thus influencing the relative adsorption of these herbicides. For the same herbicide, adsorption on clay increased in the order of Mg2+ < Ca2+ < Al3+ < or = Fe3+ which coincided with the increasing acidity of homoionic clays. Acidity of cations may have affected the protonation of water, and thus the strength of H-bond between the clay water and herbicide. Complexation of clay and humic acid resulted in less adsorption than that expected from independent adsorption by the individual constituents. The effect varied with herbicides, but the greatest decrease in adsorption occurred at a 60:40 clay-to-humic acid ratio for all the herbicides. Causes for the decreased adsorption need to be characterized to better understand adsorption mechanisms and predict adsorption from soil compositions.

  19. TOXICITY PROFILES IN MICE TREATED WITH HEPATOTUMORIGENIC AND NON-HEPATOTUMORIGENIC TRIAZOLE CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES: PROPICONAZOLE, TRIADIMEFON, AND MYCLOBUTANIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles comprise a class of fungicides used in agriculture and as pharmaceutical products. The fungicidal properties of conazoles are due to their inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis. Certain conazoles are tumorigenic in rodents; both propiconazole and triadimefon are hepatot...

  20. Malaria Vector Control Still Matters despite Insecticide Resistance.

    PubMed

    Alout, Haoues; Labbé, Pierrick; Chandre, Fabrice; Cohuet, Anna

    2017-08-01

    Mosquito vectors' resistance to insecticides is usually considered a major threat to the recent progresses in malaria control. However, studies measuring the impact of interventions and insecticide resistance reveal inconsistencies when using entomological versus epidemiological indices. First, evaluation tests that do not reflect the susceptibility of mosquitoes when they are infectious may underestimate insecticide efficacy. Moreover, interactions between insecticide resistance and vectorial capacity reveal nonintuitive outcomes of interventions. Therefore, considering ecological interactions between vector, parasite, and environment highlights that the impact of insecticide resistance on the malaria burden is not straightforward and we suggest that vector control still matters despite insecticide resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Controlled Release Formulations of Auxinic Herbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Witold J.; Siłowiecki, Andrzej.; Romanowska, Iwona; Glazek, Mariola; Bajor, Justyna; Cieciwa, Katarzyna; Rychter, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    Controlled release formulations are applied extensively for the release of active ingredients such as plant protection agents and fertilizers in response to growing concern for ecological problems associated with increased use of plant protection chemicals required for intensive agricultural practices [1]. We synthesized oligomeric mixtures of (R,S)-3-hydroxy butyric acid chemically bonded with 2,4-D, Dicamba and MCPA herbicides (HBA) respectively, and determined their molecular structure and molecular weight dispersion by the size exclusion chromatography, proton magnetic resonance spectrometry and electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry. Further we carried out bioassays of herbicidal effectiveness of the HBA herbicides vs. series of dicotyledonous weeds and crop injury tests [2, 3, 4]. Field bioassays were accomplished according to the EPPO standards [5]. Groups of representative weeds (the development stages in the BCCH scale: 10 - 30) were selected as targets. Statistical variabilities were assessed by the Fisher LSD test for plants treated with the studied herbicides in form of HBA oligomers, the reference herbicides in form of dimethyl ammonium salts (DMA), and untreated plants. No statistically significant differences in the crop injuries caused by the HBA vs. the DMA reference formulation were observed. The effectiveness of the HBA herbicides was lower through the initial period (ca. 2 weeks) relative to the DMA salts, but a significant increase in the effectiveness of the HBA systems followed during the remaining fraction of each assay. After 6 weeks all observed efficiencies approached 100%. The death of weeds treated with the HBA herbicides was delayed when compared with the DMA reference herbicides. The delayed uptake observed for the HBA oligomers relative to the DMA salts was due to controlled release phenomena. In case of the DMA salts the total amount of active ingredients was available at the target site. By contrast, the amount of an active

  2. Honey bee gut microbial communities are robust to the fungicide Pristine® consumed in pollen

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Honeybees that consume pollen with sublethal levels of the fungicide Pristine® can have reduced pollen digestion, lower ATP synthesis and in many ways resemble malnourished bees. Reduced nutrient acquisition in bees exposed to Pristine® might be because this fungicide affects the composition of gut ...

  3. Fungicide resistance profiles for 13 Botrytis cinerea isolated from strawberry in southeastern Louisiana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BACKGROUND: Fungicidal sprays have been widely used for disease control of gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea. In recent years strawberry growers in southeastern Louisiana reported a failure of their fungicide spray programs to control Botrytis fruit rot. Botrytis cinerea has become resistant ...

  4. Activity of two strobilurin fungicides against three species of decay fungi in agar plate tests

    Treesearch

    Juliet D. Tang; Tina Ciaramitaro; Maria Tomaso-Peterson; Susan V. Diehl

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the toxicity of strobilurin fungicides against wood decay fungi in order to assess their potential to act as a co-biocide for copper-based wood protection. Two strobilurin fungicides, Heritage (50% azoxystrobin active ingredient) and Insignia (20% pyraclostrobin active ingredients), and copper sulfate pentahydrate were tested...

  5. Cercospora leaf spot: monitoring and managing fungicide resistance in populations of Cercospora beticola in Michigan

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cercospora leaf spot (CLS, Cercospora beticola) is the most serious foliar disease of sugarbeet in Michigan and Ontario.Management of CLS depends on timely fungicide applications, disease forecasting prediction models and the use of CLS resistant sugar beet varieties. Fungicides have a dominant role...

  6. Effectiveness of fungicides in protecting Douglas-fir shoots from infection by Phytophthora ramorum

    Treesearch

    G.A. Chastagner; E.M. Hansen; K.L. Riley; W. Sutton

    2006-01-01

    The effectiveness of 20 systemic and contact fungicides in protecting Douglas-fir seedlings from infection by Phytophthora ramorum was determined. Some systemic products were applied about a week prior to bud break, while most treatments were applied just after bud break. In addition to the fungicides, two surfactants were included in the post-bud...

  7. Chemical control of blister rust on sugar pine...two fungicides show promise in California tests

    Treesearch

    Clarence R. Quick

    1967-01-01

    Among several fungicides tested, Phytoactin L-340 and Dowicide 1 (o-phenylphenol) showed the most promise for systemic chemical control of blister rust on sugar pine in northern California. The trials included 22 tests on 224 sugar pines: five with Acti-dione BR (cycloheximide), one each with five common chemical fungicides,and 12 with phytoactin. Apparent...

  8. Evaluating Headline fungicide on alfalfa production and sensitivity of pathogens to pyraclostrobin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Headline fungicide was recently registered for management of foliar diseases on alfalfa. The effect of disease control on yield, forage quality, and potential return on investment for fungicide application was determined for field experiments conducted at five locations in 2012, three in Wisconsin a...

  9. Development and evaluation of adverse outcome pathways predicting adverse effects of conazole fungicides on avian species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are a class of fungicides commonly used in agriculture and as pharmaceuticals to prevent the spread of fungus through inhibition of cytochrome P450 14á-demethylase (CYP51). However these fungicides are known to act promiscuously on other cytochrome P450 enzymes (...

  10. Effects of the azole fungicide imazalil on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) steroidogenesis pathway

    EPA Science Inventory

    Azole fungicides, used for both agriculture and human therapeutic applications may disrupt endocrine function of aquatic life. Azole fungicides are designed to inhibit the fungal enzyme lanosterol 14 á-demethylase (cytochrome P450 [CYP] 51). However, they can also interact...

  11. trans-Cinnamic acid and Xenorhabdus szentirmaii metabolites synergize the potency of some commercial fungicides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study we explored the efficacy of commercial fungicide interactions when combined with either TCA or X. szentirmaii. Fungicides (active ingredient) included Abound® (Azoxystrobin), Serenade® (Bacillus subtilis), Elast® (dodine), Regalia® (extract of Reynoutria sachalinensis), Prophyt® (potas...

  12. The effect of the residues of vineyard fungicides on postharvest decay, 2011

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose for this experiment was to quantify the effect of residues of vineyard fungicides on control of postharvest decay of table grapes. Mature (22% soluble solids content), freshly harvested ‘Princess Seedless’ grape clusters were arranged on metal racks. Fungicides were applied with an air b...

  13. [Effect of five fungicides on growth of Glycyrrhiza uralensis and efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis].

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-ying; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Xiu-teng; Zhou, Liane-yun; Shao, Ai-juan; Chen, Mei-lan

    2015-12-01

    In order to obtain the fungicides with minimal impact on efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis, the effect of five fungicides including polyoxins, jinggangmycins, thiophanate methylate, chlorothalonil and carbendazim on the growth of medicinal plant and efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis were studied. Pot cultured Glycyrrhiza uralensis was treated with different fungicides with the concentration that commonly used in the field. 60 d after treated with fungicides, infection rate, infection density, biomass indexes, photosyn- thetic index and the content of active component were measured. Experimental results showed that carbendazim had the strongest inhibition on mycorrhizal symbiosis effect. Carbendazim significantly inhibited the mycorrhizal infection rate, significantly suppressed the actual photosynthetic efficiency of G. uralensis and the most indicators of biomass. Polyoxins showed the lowest inhibiting affection. Polyoxins had no significant effect on mycorrhizal infection rate, the actual photosynthetic efficiency of G. uralensis and the most indicators of biomass. The other three fungicides also had an inhibitory effect on efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis, and the inhibition degrees were all between polyoxins's and carbendazim's. The author considered that fungicide's inhibition degree on mycorrhizal effect might be related with the species of fungicides, so the author suggested that the farmer should try to choose bio-fungicides like polyoxins.

  14. Experimental fungicidal control of blister rust on sugar pine in California

    Treesearch

    Clarence R. Quick

    1964-01-01

    Parallel series of exploratory experiments with antifungal antibiotics and conventional chemical fungicides for control of blister rust on sugar pine were started in northern California in 1959. Several fungicides, both antibiotic and conventional, appear slightly systemic, but all tested materials are more effective when sprayed directly on infected tissues....

  15. Seed Treatment with Systemic Fungicides for the Control of Fusiform Rust in Loblolly Pine

    Treesearch

    John G. Mexal; Glenn A. Snow

    1978-01-01

    A new systemic fungicide, Bayleton, may economically control fusiform rust in southern pine nurseries. Stratified seeds of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) were imbibed with Bayleton and two other systemic fungicides, and the seedlings were inoculated at three stages of emergence with spores of Cronartium quercuum (Berk.) Miyabe ex...

  16. Effects of Oral Exposure to Fungicides on Honey Bee Nutrition and Virus Levels.

    PubMed

    Degrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Chen, Yanping; Watkins Dejong, Emily; Chambers, Mona L; Hidalgo, Geoffrey

    2015-12-01

    Sublethal exposure to fungicides can affect honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in ways that resemble malnutrition. These include reduced brood rearing, queen loss, and increased pathogen levels. We examined the effects of oral exposure to the fungicides boscalid and pyraclostrobin on factors affecting colony nutrition and immune function including pollen consumption, protein digestion, hemolymph protein titers, and changes in virus levels. Because the fungicides are respiratory inhibitors, we also measured ATP concentrations in flight muscle. The effects were evaluated in 3- and 7-d-old worker bees at high fungicide concentrations in cage studies, and at field-relevant concentrations in colony studies. Though fungicide levels differed greatly between the cage and colony studies, similar effects were observed. Hemolymph protein concentrations were comparable between bees feeding on pollen with and without added fungicides. However, in both cage and colony studies, bees consumed less pollen containing fungicides and digested less of the protein. Bees fed fungicide-treated pollen also had lower ATP concentrations and higher virus titers. The combination of effects we detected could produce symptoms that are similar to those from poor nutrition and weaken colonies making them more vulnerable to loss from additional stressors such as parasites and pathogens. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  17. Sarmentine, a natural herbicide from Piper species with multiple herbicide mechanisms of action

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sarmentine, 1-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-(2E,4E)-2,4-decadien-1-one, is a natural amide isolated from the fruits of Piper species. The compound has a number of interesting biological properties, including its broad-spectrum activity on weeds as a contact herbicide. Initial studies highlighted a similarity in ...

  18. Herbicides and herbicide degradation products in upper midwest agricultural streams during august base-flow conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkhoff, S.J.; Lee, K.E.; Porter, S.D.; Terrio, P.J.; Thurman, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Herbicide concentrations in streams of the U.S. Midwest have been shown to decrease through the growing season due to a variety of chemical and physical factors. The occurrence of herbicide degradation products at the end of the growing season is not well known. This study was conducted to document the occurrence of commonly used herbicides and their degradation products in Illinois, Iowa, and Minnesota streams during base-flow conditions in August 1997. Atrazine, the most frequently detected herbicide (94%), was present at relatively low concentrations (median 0.17 μg L−1). Metolachlor was detected in 59% and cyanazine in 37% of the samples. Seven of nine compounds detected in more than 50% of the samples were degradation products. The total concentration of the degradation products (median of 4.4 μg L−1) was significantly greater than the total concentration of parent compounds (median of 0.26 μg L−1). Atrazine compounds were present less frequently and in significantly smaller concentrations in streams draining watersheds with soils developed on less permeable tills than in watersheds with soils developed on more permeable loess. The detection and concentration of triazine compounds was negatively correlated with antecedent rainfall (April–July). In contrast, acetanalide compounds were positively correlated with antecedant rainfall in late spring and early summer that may transport the acetanalide degradates into ground water and subsequently into nearby streams. The distribution of atrazine degradation products suggests regional differences in atrazine degradation processes.

  19. Herbicidal activity of slow-release herbicide formulations in wheat stands infested by weeds.

    PubMed

    Zhila, Natalia; Murueva, Anastasiya; Shershneva, Anna; Shishatskaya, Ekaterina; Volova, Tatiana

    2017-10-03

    The present study reports the herbicidal activity of metribuzin and tribenuron-methyl embedded in the degradable matrix of natural poly-3-hydroxybutyrate [P(3HB)/MET and P(3HB)/TBM]. The developed formulations were constructed as films and microgranules, which were tested against the weeds such as white sweet clover Melilotus albus and lamb's quarters Chenopodium album in the presence of soft spring wheat (Triticum aestivum, cv. Altaiskaya 70) as the subject crop for investigation. The activity was measured in laboratory scale experiments by determining the density and weight of the vegetative organs of weeds. The study was also aimed at testing the effect of the experimental formulation on the growth of wheat crop as dependent on the method of herbicide delivery. The experimental MET and TBM formulations showed pronounced herbicidal activity against the weed species used in the study. The effectiveness of the experimental formulations in inhibiting weed growth was comparable to and, sometimes, higher than that of the commercial formulations (positive control). The amount of the biomass of the wheat treated with the experimental herbicide formulations was significantly greater than that of the wheat treated with commercial formulations.

  20. Expanding the eco-evolutionary context of herbicide resistance research.

    PubMed

    Neve, Paul; Busi, Roberto; Renton, Michael; Vila-Aiub, Martin M

    2014-09-01

    The potential for human-driven evolution in economically and environmentally important organisms in medicine, agriculture and conservation management is now widely recognised. The evolution of herbicide resistance in weeds is a classic example of rapid adaptation in the face of human-mediated selection. Management strategies that aim to slow or prevent the evolution of herbicide resistance must be informed by an understanding of the ecological and evolutionary factors that drive selection in weed populations. Here, we argue for a greater focus on the ultimate causes of selection for resistance in herbicide resistance studies. The emerging fields of eco-evolutionary dynamics and applied evolutionary biology offer a means to achieve this goal and to consider herbicide resistance in a broader and sometimes novel context. Four relevant research questions are presented, which examine (i) the impact of herbicide dose on selection for resistance, (ii) plant fitness in herbicide resistance studies, (iii) the efficacy of herbicide rotations and mixtures and (iv) the impacts of gene flow on resistance evolution and spread. In all cases, fundamental ecology and evolution have the potential to offer new insights into herbicide resistance evolution and management. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Herbicidal drift control: aerial spray equipment, formulations, and supervision.

    Treesearch

    H. Gratkowski

    1974-01-01

    Public concern over environmental pollution requires increasingly sophisticated procedures when herbicides are used in silviculture. Many specialized aerial application systems and spray additives have been developed to reduce drift of herbicidal sprays. This publication provides forest-land managers with a brief description of these aerial spray systems and additives...

  2. Factors Influencing Observed Tillage Impacts on Herbicide Transport

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The widespread use and potential human health effects of the herbicides atrazine and glyphosate have generated interest in establishing how no-tillage impacts loading of these herbicides to runoff water in comparison to other tillage practices. In this study, potentially confounding factors such as ...

  3. Confirmation of resistance to herbicides and evaluation of resistance levels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As cases of resistance to herbicides escalate worldwide, there is increasing demand from growers to test for weed resistance and how to manage it. Scientists have developed resistance testing protocols for numerous herbicides and weed species. Growers need immediate answers and scientists are faced ...

  4. ACETANILIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS BY LC/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acetanilide herbicides are frequently applied in the U.S. on crops (corn, soybeans, popcorn, etc.) to control broadleaf and annual weeds. The acetanilide and acetamide herbicides currently registered for use in the U.S. are alachlor, acetochlor, metolachlor, propachlor, flufen...

  5. Pelargonic acid as a herbicide in sweet bell peppers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pelargonic acid, although not certified as organic, is naturally occurring in many plants, animals, and foods. It is also phytotoxic to plants as a contact herbicide, injuring and killing plants by destroying the cell membrane. Vegetable producers would benefit from additional herbicide options tha...

  6. Herbicide volatilization trumps runoff losses, a multi-year investigation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Surface runoff and volatilization are two processes critical to herbicide off-site transport. To determine the relevance of these off-site transport mechanisms, runoff and turbulent vapor fluxes were simultaneously monitored on the same site for eight years. Site location, herbicide formulations, ...

  7. Impact of irrigation rate on pre-emergence herbicide activity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The importance of preemergence herbicide applications in cotton has increased since the development of glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri). Cotton producers are relying on residual herbicides for control of Palmer amaranth, as postemergence options are limited or ineffective. S...

  8. Herbicide Leaching Column for a Weed Science Teaching Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahrens, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an experiment which enables weed science students to observe first-hand the process of herbicide leaching in soils. Features of this technique which demonstrate the movement of herbicide within a column of soil are outlined. Diagrams are provided of the apparatus employed in the exercise. (ML)

  9. The effect of herbicide application on rangeland soil nutrient availability

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Very sparse literature exists on the effect of soil active herbicides on nutrient availability. As part of a larger rangeland rehabilitation project, on four sites in northern Nevada, we quantified the effect of the herbicides Landmark®, Perspective®, and Plateau® relative to controls on surface soi...

  10. Herbicides in Florida's Flatwoods-Efficacy and Opportunity

    Treesearch

    D.G. Neary; J.L. Michael

    1985-01-01

    Herb in the usage in the intensively-managed forests of north Florida have moved from a testing phase to full-scale operational use over the past 4 years. Much information still needs to be developed on the combinations of herbicides and rates needed to control weeds during site preparation. and release operations. Use of herbicides in Florida's forests will...

  11. Oak plantation establishment using mechanical, burning, and herbicide treatments

    Treesearch

    James H. Miller

    1993-01-01

    Abstract.Mechanical methods, prescribed burning, and herbicide treatments for establishing oak plantations are reviewed, with emphasis on herbicides. Integrated prescriptions for site preparation using these silvicultural tools are outlined for both clearcut forests and old field sites. The basic premise is that intensive cultural treatments will be...

  12. No herbicide residues found in smoke from prescribed fires

    Treesearch

    Charles K. McMahon; Parshall B. Bush

    1992-01-01

    Some concerns have been expressed by workers conducting prescribed burns on forest lands treated with herbicides.The major concern has based on speculation that hazardous levels of airborne herbicide residues may be present in the smoke near breathing zones of forest workers. Much of this speculation is based on fire hazard caution statements found on product labels...

  13. Tolerance of chickpeas (Cicer arietinum) to postemergence applied broadleaf herbicides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chickpea producers currently have no postemergence (POST) applied herbicides labeled for broadleaf weed control and rely heavily on preemergence (PRE) herbicides to manage weeds. Severe crop losses from broadleaf weed competition and harvest losses from weeds impeding harvest can occur when PRE herb...

  14. The role of low impact herbicide treatments in ecosystem management

    Treesearch

    Charles K. McMahon; James H. Miller; David F. Thomas

    1994-01-01

    Abstract. Environmentally safe, selective herbicide treatments can be adapted to manage habitats and direct succession toward desired future conditions within the principles of ecosystem 0. Six roles for herbicide treatments in ecosystem management are suggested: create and maintain desired habitats; create mixed and uneven-aged stands; restore...

  15. Role of herbicide-resistant crops in integrated weed management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chemical weed control began with the use of 2,4-D in the mid-1940s. Since then, a wide array of herbicides has been commercialized and that has greatly contributed to increased crop yields. With the introduction of several new, more specific and more effective herbicides, the cost of weed control wi...

  16. Evaluation of generic and branded herbicides : technical report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-03-01

    As with other generic brand products in the marketplace, generic herbicides often have a lower initial product cost than : their brand-name counterparts. While the purchase price of herbicides is important to TxDOT, it is essential to look at : more ...

  17. Enantioselective Phytotoxicity and the Relative Mechanism of Current Chiral Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cui; Lu, Dezhao; Yang, Jinhuan; Xu, Yingling; Gong, Chenxue; Li, Zhuoyu

    2017-01-01

    Regardless of the achievable of chiral switch, most of the chiral nature agrochemical is still sold as racemate or enantiomer-enriched pesticides. Herbicides, accounted for a large proportion in pesticide market, are of great concern due to the frequent occurrence in environment and the structure selective phyto-biochemical impact on plants. We give a systematic search on the literature database and included approximately 50 papers which were related to the review. We do careful categories for the chiral herbicides according to their structure and listed out the acute phytotoxicity endpoints. The potential mechanism for the enantioselective toxicity was concluded into 5 main points. The enantiomer-specific toxicity on plant growth and flowers are limited on phenoxyalkanoic acid herbicide, aryloxyphenoxypropanoic acid, imidazolinone herbicide, and acetamide pesticide. Data available on the potential mechanism explanation of enantioselective phytotoxicity has been concerned on the genetic transcription, oxidative stress, and photosynthesis disruption, etc. A comparison between the two enantiomers' enantioselective effects identified an organ-specific and species-specific phenomenon for several herbicides. Moreover, a more herbicidal activity enantiomer is also displayed the more toxicity than its antipode. The review elucidated a paucity of information on the enantioselective effect research on various types of plants at the different life stages. It appealed us to conduct a more holistic approach to balance the benefit between herbicidal activity and phytotoxicity when try to develop an enantio-pure herbicide.

  18. Herbicide-resistant crop biotechnology: potential and pitfalls

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Herbicide-resistant crops are an important agricultural biotechnology that can enable farmers to effectively control weeds without harming their crops. Glyphosate-resistant (i.e. Roundup Ready) crops have been the most commercially successful varieties of herbicide-resistant crops and have been plan...

  19. Rationale for a natural products approach to herbicide discovery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Weeds continue to evolve resistance to all the known modes of herbicidal action, but no herbicide with a new target site has been commercialized in nearly 20 years. The so-called ‘new chemistries’ are simply molecules belonging to new chemical classes that have the same mechanisms of action as olde...

  20. Effectiveness of agricultural oils alongside fungicides in the late dormant treatment for suppression of peach scab in Georgia, 2016

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The efficacy of different fungicide applications for control of peach scab was tested on cv Flameprince. The fungicidal applications were applied with an airblast sprayer with a spray volume of 100 gal/A. Control treatment regimens included a non-treated control, a standard fungicidal spray program ...

  1. Herbicide concentrations in the Mississippi River Basin - The importance of chloroacetanilide herbicide degradates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rebich, R.A.; Coupe, R.H.; Thurman, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    The proportion of chloroacetanilide herbicide degradates, specifically the ethane sulfonic (ESA) and oxanilic (OA) acids, averaged 70% of the total herbicide concentration in samples from the Upper Mississippi River. In samples from the Missouri River and the Ohio River, the proportion of chloroacetanilide degradates in the total herbicide concentration was much less, 24% and 41%, respectively. The amount of tile drainage throughout the Mississippi River Basin appeared to be related to the occurrence and distribution of chloroacetanilide degradates in water samples. Pesticide concentrations in streams of the Mississippi River Basin have been well characterized. However, recent research demonstrates that in order to more fully understand the fate and transport of pesticides, the major pesticide degradates need to be included in the analysis. From March 1999 through May 2001, water samples from four major junctures of the Mississippi River Basin were collected and analyzed for a suite of herbicides and their degradate compounds. Each sampling site was selected to represent a major part of the Mississippi River: upper and lower Mississippi, Missouri and Ohio Rivers. Each basin has unique landscape variables, geology, hydrology, precipitation, and land use, which is reflected in the pesticide content at the most downstream sample site near the mouth of the Mississippi River. Atrazine was the most frequently detected herbicide (detected in 97% of the samples), followed by metolachlor (60%), and acetochlor (31%). The most frequently detected degradates were metolachlor ESA (69%), followed by deethylatrazine (62%), metolachlor OA (37%), and alachlor ESA (37%). Metolachlor ESA was detected more frequently than its parent compound (69 vs. 60%), as was alachlor ESA (37 vs. 9%). After an improvement was made in the analytical method, metolachlor ESA was detected in every sample, metolachlor OA in 89% of the samples, alachlor ESA in 84%, acetochlor ESA in 71%, and acetochlor

  2. Insecticide discovery: an evaluation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Thomas C

    2013-09-01

    There is an on-going need for the discovery and development of new insecticides due to the loss of existing products through the development of resistance, the desire for products with more favorable environmental and toxicological profiles, shifting pest spectrums, and changing agricultural practices. Since 1960, the number of research-based companies in the US and Europe involved in the discovery of new insecticidal chemistries has been declining. In part this is a reflection of the increasing costs of the discovery and development of new pesticides. Likewise, the number of compounds that need to be screened for every product developed has, until recently, been climbing. In the past two decades the agrochemical industry has been able to develop a range of new products that have more favorable mammalian vs. insect selectivity. This review provides an analysis of the time required for the discovery, or more correctly the building process, for a wide range of insecticides developed during the last 60 years. An examination of the data around the time requirements for the discovery of products based on external patents, prior internal products, or entirely new chemistry provides some unexpected observations. In light of the increasing costs of discovery and development, coupled with fewer companies willing or able to make the investment, insecticide resistance management takes on greater importance as a means to preserve existing and new insecticides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Newer insecticides for plant virus disease management.

    PubMed

    Castle, Steven; Palumbo, John; Prabhaker, Nilima

    2009-05-01

    Effective management of insect and mite vectors of plant pathogens is of crucial importance to minimize vector-borne diseases in crops. Pesticides play an important role in managing vector populations by reducing the number of individuals that can acquire and transmit a virus, thereby potentially lowering disease incidence. Certain insecticides exhibit properties other than lethal toxicity that affect feeding behaviours or otherwise interfere with virus transmission. To evaluate the potential of various treatments against the Bemisia tabaci-transmitted Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus (CYSDV), insecticide field trials were conducted in Yuma, AZ, USA, during spring and autumn growing seasons. Differences in vector-intensity each season led to mixed results, but at least five insecticide treatments showed promise in limiting virus spread during spring 2008. Increasing concern among growers in this region regarding recent epidemics of CYSDV is leading to more intensive use of insecticides that threatens to erupt into unmanageable resistance. Sustainability of insecticides is an important goal of pest management and more specifically resistance management, especially for some of the most notorious vector species such as B. tabaci and Myzus persiscae that are likely to develop resistance.

  4. Herbicidal cyanoacrylates with antimicrotubule mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Tresch, Stefan; Plath, Peter; Grossmann, Klaus

    2005-11-01

    The herbicidal mode of action of the new synthetic cyanoacrylates ethyl (2Z)-3-amino-2-cyano-4-ethylhex-2-enoate (CA1) and its isopropyl ester derivative CA2 was investigated. For initial characterization, a series of bioassays was used indicating a mode of action similar to that of mitotic disrupter herbicides such as the dinitroaniline pendimethalin. Cytochemical fluorescence studies including monoclonal antibodies against polymerized and depolymerized tubulin and a cellulose-binding domain of a bacterial cellulase conjugated to a fluorescent dye were applied to elucidate effects on cell division processes including mitosis and microtubule and cell wall formation in maize roots. When seedlings were root treated with 10 microM of CA1 or CA2, cell division activity in meristematic root tip cells decreased within 4 h. The chromosomes proceeded to a condensed state of prometaphase, but were unable to progress further in the mitotic cycle. The compounds caused a complete loss of microtubular structures, including preprophase, spindle, phragmoplast and cortical microtubules. Concomitantly, in the cytoplasm, an increase in labelling of free tubulin was observed. This suggests that the herbicides disrupt polymerization and microtubule stability, whereas tubulin synthesis or degradation appeared not to be affected. In addition, cellulose labelling in cell walls of root tip cells was not influenced. The effects of CA1 and CA2 were comparable with those caused by pendimethalin. In transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a green fluorescent protein-microtubule-associated protein4 fusion protein, labelled arrays of cortical microtubules in living epidermal cells of hypocotyls collapsed within 160 min after exposure to 10 microM CA1 or pendimethalin. Moreover, a dinitroaniline-resistant biotype of goosegrass (Eleusine indica (L) Gaertn) with a point mutation in alpha-tubulin showed cross-resistance against CA1 and CA2. The results strongly indicate that the cyanoacrylates are

  5. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Walton, Jonathan D.; Scott-Craig, John S.

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is set forth in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 1. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 2. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with said vectors and seeds from said plants.

  6. Effects of herbicide applications in wheat fields

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Sugandha; Hayat, Shamshul; Alyemeni, Mohammed Nasser; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-01-01

    The present review encompasses the physiological and yield constraints of herbicide applications with special reference to wheat productivity. Post-independence lagging of Indian agriculture to feed its population led to haphazard use of chemical pesticides and weedicides which deteriorated the productivity pay-off particularly of wheat and rice. Past some decades witnessed the potential use of certain phytohormones in augmenting abiotic stress to get rid of yield gap and productivity constraints. We summed up with reviewing the potential role of these natural regulators in overcoming above mentioned drawbacks to substitute or to integrate these chemicals with the use of plant hormones. PMID:22516826

  7. Activity of a novel strobilurin fungicide benzothiostrobin against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Congying; Hou, Yiping; Wang, Jianxin; Yang, Guangfu; Liang, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Mingguo

    2014-10-01

    Benzothiostrobin is a novel strobilurin fungicide. In this study, baseline sensitivity of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary to benzothiostrobin was determined using 100 strains collected during 2012 and 2013 from different geographical regions in Jiangsu Province of China, and the average EC50 value was 0.0218 (± 0.0111)μg/mL for mycelial growth. After benzothiostrobin treatment, hyphae were contorted with offshoot of top increasing and cell membrane permeability increased markedly, while sclerotial production and oxalic acid content significantly decreased. Benzothiostrobin strongly inhibited mycelial respiration within 12h and the oxygen consumption of the mycelia could not be inhibited after 24h. On detached rapeseed leaves, the protective and curative activity test of benzothiostrobin suggested that benzothiostrobin had good control efficiency against S. sclerotiorum, and protective activity was better than curative activity. These results will contribute to us evaluating the potential of the new strobilurin fungicide benzothiostrobin for management of diseases caused by S. sclerotiorum and understanding the mode of action of benzothiostrobin against S. sclerotiorum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Selective effects of two systemic fungicides on soil fungi.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fattah, H M; Abdel-Kader, M I; Hamida, S

    1982-08-20

    BAS 317 00F was not toxic to the total count of fungi after 2 days but was regularly significantly toxic at the three doses after 5, 20 and 40 days and toxic at the low and the high doses after 80 days. In the agar medium, it was toxic to the counts of total fungi. Aspergillus, A. terreus, Rhizopus oryzae and Mucor racemosus at the high dose. Only the mycelial growth of Trichoderma viride which was significantly inhibited by the three doses when this fungicide was added to the liquid medium. Polyram-Combi induced two effects on the total population of soil fungi. One inhibitory and this was demonstrated almost regularly after 2, 10 and 40 days and the other stimulatory after 80 days of treatment with the low and the high doses. In the agar medium, this fungicide was very toxic to total fungi and to almost all fungal genera and species at the three doses. Several fungi could survive the high dose. In liquid medium, the test fungi showed variable degree of sensitivity and the most sensitive was Gliocladium roseum which was completely eradicated by the three doses.

  9. Assessment of spent mushroom substrate as sorbent of fungicides: influence of sorbent and sorbate properties.

    PubMed

    Marín-Benito, Jesús M; Rodríguez-Cruz, M Sonia; Andrades, M Soledad; Sánchez-Martín, María J

    2012-01-01

    The capacity of spent mushroom substrate (SMS) as a sorbent of fungicides was evaluated for its possible use in regulating pesticide mobility in the environment. The sorption studies involved four different SMS types in terms of nature and treatment and eight fungicides selected as representative compounds from different chemical groups. Nonlinear sorption isotherms were observed for all SMS-fungicide combinations. The highest sorption was obtained by composted SMS from Agaricus bisporus cultivation. A significant negative and positive correlation was obtained between the K(OC) sorption constants and the polarity index values of sorbents and the K(OW) of fungicides, respectively. The statistic revealed that more than 77% of the variability in the K(OW) could be explained considering these properties jointly. The other properties of both the sorbent (total carbon, dissolved organic carbon, or pH) and the sorbate (water solubility) were nonsignificant. The hysteresis values for cyprodinil (log K(OW)= 4) were for all the sorbents much higher (>3) than for other fungicides. This was consistent with the remaining sorption after desorption considered as an indicator of the sorption efficiency of SMS for fungicides. Changes in the absorption bands of fungicides sorbed by SMS observed by FTIR permitted establishing the interaction mechanism of fungicides with SMS. The findings of this work provide evidence for the potential capacity of SMS as a sorbent of fungicides and the low desorption observed especially for some fungicides, although they suggest that more stabilized or humified organic substrates should be produced to enhance their efficiency in environmental applications. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. Deciphering the evolution of herbicide resistance in weeds.

    PubMed

    Délye, Christophe; Jasieniuk, Marie; Le Corre, Valérie

    2013-11-01

    Resistance to herbicides in arable weeds is increasing rapidly worldwide and threatening global food security. Resistance has now been reported to all major herbicide modes of action despite the development of resistance management strategies in the 1990s. We review here recent advances in understanding the genetic bases and evolutionary drivers of herbicide resistance that highlight the complex nature of selection for this adaptive trait. Whereas early studied cases of resistance were highly herbicide-specific and largely under monogenic control, cases of greatest concern today generally involve resistance to multiple modes of action, are under polygenic control, and are derived from pre-existing stress response pathways. Although 'omics' approaches should enable unraveling the genetic bases of complex resistances, the appearance, selection, and spread of herbicide resistance in weed populations can only be fully elucidated by focusing on evolutionary dynamics and implementing integrative modeling efforts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Neurobehavioral toxicology of pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Crofton, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are classified as either Type I or Type II based upon in vivo toxic signs, and neurophysiological and biochemical data. Both axonal sodium channels and the ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor complex have been proposed as the major site of action of the Type II pyrethroids. This investigation characterized the behavior and biochemical effects of low dosages of pyrethroids in rats. Type I and II pyrethroids were tested for effects on figure-eight maze activity and the acoustic startle response (ASR). All compounds decreased figure-eight maze activity. Interactions of Type I and II pyrethroids with the three major binding sitesmore » on the GABA complex were determined in vivo. Radioligand binding experiments assessed in vitro interactions of pyrethroids with the three major GABA-complex binding sites. None of the pyrethroids competed for (/sup 3/H)-muscimol or (/sup 3/H)-flunitrazepam binding. Only Type II pyrethroids inhibited binding of (/sup 35/S)-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) in cortical synaptosome preparations with K/sub i/ values of 5 to 10 ..mu..M. The (/sup 35/S)-TBPS data implicate the TBPS/picrotoxinin binding site in the mechanism of Type II pyrethroid toxicity. The results of these experiments support the classification of pyrethroids into two classes, and demonstrate the utility of the figure-eight maze and the ASR in studies to elucidate neurotoxic mechanisms. The interaction of the Type II pyrethroids is probably restricted to the TBPS/picrotoxinin binding domain on the GABA complex as shown by both the in vivo and in vitro studies.« less

  12. [Effects of herbicide on grape leaf photosynthesis and nutrient storage].

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei; Wang, Hui; Zhai, Heng

    2011-09-01

    Selecting three adjacent vineyards as test objects, this paper studied the effects of applying herbicide in growth season on the leaf photosynthetic apparatus and branch nutrient storage of grape Kyoho (Vitis vinfrraxVitis labrusca). In the vineyards T1 and T2 where herbicide was applied in 2009, the net photosynthesis rate (Pa) of grape leaves had a significant decrease, as compared with that in vineyard CK where artificial weeding was implemented. The leaves at the fourth node in vineyard T1 and those at the sixth node in vineyard T2 had the largest decrement of Pn (40.5% and 32.1%, respectively). Herbicide had slight effects on the leaf stomatal conductance (Gs). In T1 where herbicide application was kept on with in 2010, the Pn, was still significantly lower than that in CK; while in T2 where artificial weeding was implemented in 2010, the Pn and Gs of top- and middle node leaves were slightly higher than those in T1, but the Pn was still lower than that in CK, showing the aftereffects of herbicide residual. The herbicide application in 2009 decreased the leaf maximum photochemical efficiency of PS II (Fv/Fm) and performance index (P1) while increased the relative variable fluorescence in the J step and K step, indicating the damage of electron transportation of PS II center and oxygen-evolving complex. Herbicide application decreased the pigment content of middle-node leaves in a dose-manner. Applying herbicide enhanced the leaf catalase and peroxidase activities significantly, increased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of middle-node leaves, but decreased the SOD activity of top- and bottom node leaves. After treated with herbicide, the ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity of middle- and bottom node leaves increased, but that of top-node leaves decreased. Herbicide treatment aggravated leaf lipid peroxidation, and reduced the soluble sugar, starch, free amino acids, and soluble protein storage in branches.

  13. Insecticide susceptibility of Anopheles stephensi to DDT and current insecticides in an elimination area in Iran.

    PubMed

    Zare, Mehdi; Soleimani-Ahmadi, Moussa; Davoodi, Sayed Hossein; Sanei-Dehkordi, Alireza

    2016-11-04

    Iran has recently initiated a malaria elimination program with emphasis on vector control strategies which are heavily reliant on indoor residual spraying and long-lasting insecticidal nets. Insecticide resistance seriously threatens the efficacy of vector control strategies. This study was conducted to determine the insecticide susceptibility of Anopheles stephensi to DDT and current insecticides in Jask county as an active malaria focus in southeastern Iran. In this study, the anopheline larvae were collected from different aquatic habitats in Jask county and transported to insectarium, fed with sugar and then 3-day-old adults were used for susceptibility tests. WHO insecticide susceptibility tests were performed with DDT (4 %), malathion (5 %), lambda-cyhalothrin (0.05 %), deltamethrin (0.05 %) and permethrin (0.75 %). The field strain of An. stephensi was found resistant to DDT and lambda-cyhalothrin. The LT 50 values for DDT and lambda-cyhalothrin in this species were 130.25, and 37.71 min, respectively. Moreover, An. stephensi was completely susceptible to malathion and permethrin and tolerant to deltamethrin. The present study results confirm the resistance of the major malaria vector, An. stephensi, to DDT and lambda-cyhalothrin, and tolerance to deltamethrin, which could gradually increase and spread into other malaria endemic areas. Thus, there is a need for regular monitoring of insecticide resistance in order to select suitable insecticides for vector control interventions towards malaria elimination.

  14. Structure—activity relationships for insecticidal carbamates*

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Robert L.

    1971-01-01

    Carbamate insecticides are biologically active because of their structural complementarity to the active site of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and their consequent action as substrates with very low turnover numbers. Carbamates behave as synthetic neurohormones that produce their toxic action by interrupting the normal action of AChE so that acetylcholine accumulates at synaptic junctions. The necessary properties for a suitable insecticidal carbamate are lipid solubility, suitable structural complementarity to AChE, and sufficient stability to multifunction-oxidase detoxification. The relationships between the structure and the activity of a large number of synthetic carbamates are analysed in detail, with particular attention to the second of these properties. PMID:5315358

  15. Research methods in weed science: herbicide absorption and translocation in plants using radioisotopes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Herbicide absorption and translocation in plants is a key component in the study of herbicide physiology, mode of action, selectivity, resistance mechanisms, and in the registration process. Radioactive herbicides have been in use for over half-a-century in the research and study of herbicide absorp...

  16. Analysis of transcriptomic changes in Echinochloa colona in response to treatment with the herbicide imazamox

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Herbicides are the most frequently used means of controlling weeds. For many herbicides the target site is known; however, it is considerably less clear how plant gene expression changes in response to herbicide exposure. Understanding which genes are activated in response to herbicides provides i...

  17. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: The Challenge of Herbicides for Aquatic Weeds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Dean F.; Martin, Barbara B.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses problems in selecting the correct herbicide for use in controlling aquatic weeds, considering specificity, size of the market, fear of trace contaminants, and herbicide resistance in weeds. Also summarizes some successful herbicides, providing a table listing mode of action of some herbicides used for control of aquatic plants. (JN)

  18. Impacts of the herbicide butachlor on the larvae of a paddy field breeding frog (Fejervarya limnocharis) in subtropical Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan-Yi; Wang, Ching-Yuh; Wang, Tsu-Shing; Fellers, Gary M; Lai, Bo-Chi; Kam, Yeong-Choy

    2011-03-01

    Butachlor is the most commonly used herbicide on paddy fields in Taiwan and throughout Southeast Asia. Since paddy fields provide habitat for pond breeding amphibians, we examined growth, development, time to metamorphosis, and survival of alpine cricket frog tadpoles (Fejervarya limnocharis) exposed to environmentally realistic concentrations of butachlor. We documented negative impacts of butachlor on survival, development, and time to metamorphosis, but not on tadpole growth. The 96 h LC(50) for tadpoles was 0.87 mg/l, much lower than the 4.8 mg/l recommended dosage for application to paddy fields. Even given the rapid breakdown of butachlor, tadpoles would be exposed to concentrations in excess of their 96 h LC(50) for an estimated 126 h. We also documented DNA damage (genotoxicity) in tadpoles exposed to butachlor at concentrations an order of magnitude less than the 4.8 mg/l recommended application rate. We did not find that butachlor depressed cholinesterase activity of tadpoles, unlike most organophosphorus insecticides. We conclude that butachlor is likely to have widespread negative impacts on amphibians occupying paddy fields with traditional herbicide application.

  19. Impacts of the herbicide butachlor on the larvae of a paddy field breeding frog (Fejervarya limnocharis) in subtropical Taiwan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Wan-Yi; Wang, Ching-Yuh; Wang, Tsu-Shing; Fellers, Gary M.; Lai, Bo-Chi; Kam, Yeong-Choy

    2011-01-01

    Butachlor is the most commonly used herbicide on paddy fields in Taiwan and throughout Southeast Asia. Since paddy fields provide habitat for pond breeding amphibians, we examined growth, development, time to metamorphosis, and survival of alpine cricket frog tadpoles (Fejervarya limnocharis) exposed to environmentally realistic concentrations of butachlor. We documented negative impacts of butachlor on survival, development, and time to metamorphosis, but not on tadpole growth. The 96 h LC50 for tadpoles was 0.87 mg/l, much lower than the 4.8 mg/l recommended dosage for application to paddy fields. Even given the rapid breakdown of butachlor, tadpoles would be exposed to concentrations in excess of their 96 h LC50 for an estimated 126 h. We also documented DNA damage (genotoxicity) in tadpoles exposed to butachlor at concentrations an order of magnitude less than the 4.8 mg/l recommended application rate. We did not find that butachlor depressed cholinesterase activity of tadpoles, unlike most organophosphorus insecticides. We conclude that butachlor is likely to have widespread negative impacts on amphibians occupying paddy fields with traditional herbicide application.

  20. Spread of Botrytis cinerea Strains with Multiple Fungicide Resistance in German Horticulture

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Sabrina; Weber, Roland W. S.; Rieger, Daniel; Detzel, Peter; Hahn, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a major plant pathogen, causing gray mold rot in a variety of cultures. Repeated fungicide applications are common but have resulted in the development of fungal populations with resistance to one or more fungicides. In this study, we have monitored fungicide resistance frequencies and the occurrence of multiple resistance in Botrytis isolates from raspberries, strawberries, grapes, stone fruits and ornamental flowers in Germany in 2010 to 2015. High frequencies of resistance to all classes of botryticides was common in all cultures, and isolates with multiple fungicide resistance represented a major part of the populations. A monitoring in a raspberry field over six seasons revealed a continuous increase in resistance frequencies and the emergence of multiresistant Botrytis strains. In a cherry orchard and a vineyard, evidence of the immigration of multiresistant strains from the outside was obtained. Inoculation experiments with fungicide-treated leaves in the laboratory and with strawberry plants cultivated in the greenhouse or outdoors revealed a nearly complete loss of fungicide efficacy against multiresistant strains. B. cinerea field strains carrying multiple resistance mutations against all classes of site-specific fungicides were found to show similar fitness as sensitive field strains under laboratory conditions, based on their vegetative growth, reproduction, stress resistance, virulence and competitiveness in mixed infection experiments. Our data indicate an alarming increase in the occurrence of multiresistance in B. cinerea populations from different cultures, which presents a major threat to the chemical control of gray mold. PMID:28096799

  1. Spread of Botrytis cinerea Strains with Multiple Fungicide Resistance in German Horticulture.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Sabrina; Weber, Roland W S; Rieger, Daniel; Detzel, Peter; Hahn, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a major plant pathogen, causing gray mold rot in a variety of cultures. Repeated fungicide applications are common but have resulted in the development of fungal populations with resistance to one or more fungicides. In this study, we have monitored fungicide resistance frequencies and the occurrence of multiple resistance in Botrytis isolates from raspberries, strawberries, grapes, stone fruits and ornamental flowers in Germany in 2010 to 2015. High frequencies of resistance to all classes of botryticides was common in all cultures, and isolates with multiple fungicide resistance represented a major part of the populations. A monitoring in a raspberry field over six seasons revealed a continuous increase in resistance frequencies and the emergence of multiresistant Botrytis strains. In a cherry orchard and a vineyard, evidence of the immigration of multiresistant strains from the outside was obtained. Inoculation experiments with fungicide-treated leaves in the laboratory and with strawberry plants cultivated in the greenhouse or outdoors revealed a nearly complete loss of fungicide efficacy against multiresistant strains. B. cinerea field strains carrying multiple resistance mutations against all classes of site-specific fungicides were found to show similar fitness as sensitive field strains under laboratory conditions, based on their vegetative growth, reproduction, stress resistance, virulence and competitiveness in mixed infection experiments. Our data indicate an alarming increase in the occurrence of multiresistance in B. cinerea populations from different cultures, which presents a major threat to the chemical control of gray mold.

  2. Chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites in Wisconsin groundwater: 2001 survey results.

    PubMed

    Postle, Jeffrey K; Rheineck, Bruce D; Allen, Paula E; Baldock, Jon O; Cook, Cody J; Zogbaum, Randy; Vandenbrook, James P

    2004-10-15

    A survey of agricultural chemicals in Wisconsin groundwater was conducted between October 2000 and April 2001 to obtain a current picture of agricultural chemicals in groundwater used for private drinking water. A stratified, random sampling procedure was used to select 336 sampling locations. Water from private drinking water wells randomly selected from within the 336 sampling locations was analyzed for 18 compounds including herbicides, herbicide metabolites, and nitrate. This report focuses on the frequency and concentration of chloroacetanilide herbicides and their metabolites. Analysis of data resulted in an estimated proportion of 38+/-5.0% of wells that contained detectable levels of a herbicide or herbicide metabolite. The most commonly detected compound was alachlor ESA with a proportion estimate of 28+/-4.6%. Other detected compounds in order of prevalence were metolachlor ESA, metolachlor OA, alachlor OA, acetochlor ESA, and parent alachlor. Estimates of the mean concentration for the detects ranged from 0.15+/-0.082 microg/L for acetochlor ESA to 1.8+/-0.60 microg/L for alachlor OA. Water quality standards have not been developed for these chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites. The results of this survey emphasize the need for toxicological assessments of herbicide metabolite compounds and establishment of water quality standards at the state and federal levels.

  3. Rationale for a natural products approach to herbicide discovery.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Franck E; Owens, Daniel K; Duke, Stephen O

    2012-04-01

    Weeds continue to evolve resistance to all the known modes of herbicidal action, but no herbicide with a new target site has been commercialized in nearly 20 years. The so-called 'new chemistries' are simply molecules belonging to new chemical classes that have the same mechanisms of action as older herbicides (e.g. the protoporphyrinogen-oxidase-inhibiting pyrimidinedione saflufenacil or the very-long-chain fatty acid elongase targeting sulfonylisoxazoline herbicide pyroxasulfone). Therefore, the number of tools to manage weeds, and in particular those that can control herbicide-resistant weeds, is diminishing rapidly. There is an imminent need for truly innovative classes of herbicides that explore chemical spaces and interact with target sites not previously exploited by older active ingredients. This review proposes a rationale for a natural-products-centered approach to herbicide discovery that capitalizes on the structural diversity and ingenuity afforded by these biologically active compounds. The natural process of extended-throughput screening (high number of compounds tested on many potential target sites over long periods of times) that has shaped the evolution of natural products tends to generate molecules tailored to interact with specific target sites. As this review shows, there is generally little overlap between the mode of action of natural and synthetic phytotoxins, and more emphasis should be placed on applying methods that have proved beneficial to the pharmaceutical industry to solve problems in the agrochemical industry. Published 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Comprehensive understanding of acetohydroxyacid synthase inhibition by different herbicide families.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Mario D; Nouwens, Amanda; Lonhienne, Thierry G; Guddat, Luke W

    2017-02-14

    Five commercial herbicide families inhibit acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS, E.C. 2.2.1.6), which is the first enzyme in the branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis pathway. The popularity of these herbicides is due to their low application rates, high crop vs. weed selectivity, and low toxicity in animals. Here, we have determined the crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana AHAS in complex with two members of the pyrimidinyl-benzoate (PYB) and two members of the sulfonylamino-carbonyl-triazolinone (SCT) herbicide families, revealing the structural basis for their inhibitory activity. Bispyribac, a member of the PYBs, possesses three aromatic rings and these adopt a twisted "S"-shaped conformation when bound to A. thaliana AHAS ( At AHAS) with the pyrimidinyl group inserted deepest into the herbicide binding site. The SCTs bind such that the triazolinone ring is inserted deepest into the herbicide binding site. Both compound classes fill the channel that leads to the active site, thus preventing substrate binding. The crystal structures and mass spectrometry also show that when these herbicides bind, thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) is modified. When the PYBs bind, the thiazolium ring is cleaved, but when the SCTs bind, ThDP is modified to thiamine 2-thiazolone diphosphate. Kinetic studies show that these compounds not only trigger reversible accumulative inhibition of AHAS, but also can induce inhibition linked with ThDP degradation. Here, we describe the features that contribute to the extraordinarily powerful herbicidal activity exhibited by four classes of AHAS inhibitors.

  5. Potential roles for microbial endophytes in herbicide tolerance in plants.

    PubMed

    Tétard-Jones, Catherine; Edwards, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Herbicide tolerance in crops and weeds is considered to be monotrophic, i.e. determined by the relative susceptibility of the physiological process targeted and the plant's ability to metabolise and detoxify the agrochemical. A growing body of evidence now suggests that endophytes, microbes that inhabit plant tissues and provide a range of growth, health and defence enhancements, can contribute to other types of abiotic and biotic stress tolerance. The current evidence for herbicide tolerance being bitrophic, with both free-living and plant-associated endophytes contributing to tolerance in the host plant, has been reviewed. We propose that endophytes can directly contribute to herbicide detoxification through their ability to metabolise xenobiotics. In addition, we explore the paradigm that microbes can 'prime' resistance mechanisms in plants such that they enhance herbicide tolerance by inducing the host's stress responses to withstand the downstream toxicity caused by herbicides. This latter mechanism has the potential to contribute to the growth of non-target-site-based herbicide resistance in weeds. Microbial endophytes already contribute to herbicide detoxification in planta, and there is now significant scope to extend these interactions using synthetic biology approaches to engineer new chemical tolerance traits into crops via microbial engineering. © 2015 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Protocols for Robust Herbicide Resistance Testing in Different Weed Species.

    PubMed

    Panozzo, Silvia; Scarabel, Laura; Collavo, Alberto; Sattin, Maurizio

    2015-07-02

    Robust protocols to test putative herbicide resistant weed populations at whole plant level are essential to confirm the resistance status. The presented protocols, based on whole-plant bioassays performed in a greenhouse, can be readily adapted to a wide range of weed species and herbicides through appropriate variants. Seed samples from plants that survived a field herbicide treatment are collected and stored dry at low temperature until used. Germination methods differ according to weed species and seed dormancy type. Seedlings at similar growth stage are transplanted and maintained in the greenhouse under appropriate conditions until plants have reached the right growth stage for herbicide treatment. Accuracy is required to prepare the herbicide solution to avoid unverifiable mistakes. Other critical steps such as the application volume and spray speed are also evaluated. The advantages of this protocol, compared to others based on whole plant bioassays using one herbicide dose, are related to the higher reliability and the possibility of inferring the resistance level. Quicker and less expensive in vivo or in vitro diagnostic screening tests have been proposed (Petri dish bioassays, spectrophotometric tests), but they provide only qualitative information and their widespread use is hindered by the laborious set-up that some species may require. For routine resistance testing, the proposed whole plant bioassay can be applied at only one herbicide dose, so reducing the costs.

  7. Evolution of herbicide resistance mechanisms in grass weeds.

    PubMed

    Matzrafi, Maor; Gadri, Yaron; Frenkel, Eyal; Rubin, Baruch; Peleg, Zvi

    2014-12-01

    Herbicide resistant weeds are becoming increasingly common, threatening global food security. Here, we present BrIFAR: a new model system for the functional study of mechanisms of herbicide resistance in grass weeds. We have developed a large collection of Brachypodium accessions, the BrI collection, representing a wide range of habitats. Wide screening of the responses of the accessions to four major herbicide groups (PSII, ACCase, ALS/AHAS and EPSPS inhibitors) identified 28 herbicide-resistance candidate accessions. Target-site resistance to PSII inhibitors was found in accessions collected from habitats with a known history of herbicide applications. An amino acid substitution in the psbA gene (serine264 to glycine) conferred resistance and also significantly affected the flowering and shoot dry weight of the resistant accession, as compared to the sensitive accession. Non-target site resistance to ACCase inhibitors was found in accessions collected from habitats with a history of herbicide application and from a nature reserve. In-vitro enzyme activity tests and responses following pre-treatment with malathion (a cytochrome-P450 inhibitor) indicated sensitivity at the enzyme level, and give strong support to diclofop-methyl and pinoxaden enhanced detoxification as NTS resistance mechanism. BrIFAR can promote better understanding of the evolution of mechanisms of herbicide resistance and aid the implementation of integrative management approaches for sustainable agriculture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fungicide application method’ and the interpretation of mycorrhizal fungus insect indirect effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Robert A.; Addicott, John F.

    2008-09-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi, by altering their host plant's physiology, can have indirect effects on insect herbivores. The 'fungicide application method' is a common approach used to investigate the indirect effects of mycorrhizal fungi on insects. This approach works by using initially mycorrhizal plants, and then generating a subset of these plants that are free of mycorrhizal fungi by applying fungicide to their roots. When insect feeding-bioassays are conducted using the resulting mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants, differences in insect performance are typically attributed to differences in mycorrhizal colonization per se, rather than the application of the fungicide. Thus, the fungicide application method relies on the assumption that there is no direct toxicity of the fungicide on the focal insect species, and no indirect effects on the focal insect resulting from effects of the fungicide on the host plant or on non-target soil micro-organisms. We tested this critical assumption by feeding Zygogramma exclamationis (Chrysomelidae) larvae on non-mycorrhizal Helianthus annuus (Asteraceae) plants whose roots were treated with a solution of the fungicide benomyl or with a distilled water control. Larvae fed on benomyl-treated plants had reduced survival, lower relative growth rate, and lower food conversion efficiency, compared to larvae fed on control plants. Hence, fungicides applied to roots can affect herbivorous insect performance even in the absence of the possibility of mycorrhizal fungi-mediated effects. We recommend caution when using fungicide application and suggest that selective inoculation is a preferable method of generating mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants when studying mycorrhizal fungi-insect indirect effects.

  9. Additive and synergistic antiandrogenic activities of mixtures of azol fungicides and vinclozolin

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, Verena; Crettaz, Pierre; Fent, Karl, E-mail: karl.fent@fhnw.ch

    Objective: Many pesticides including pyrethroids and azole fungicides are suspected to have an endocrine disrupting property. At present, the joint activity of compound mixtures is only marginally known. Here we tested the hypothesis that the antiandrogenic activity of mixtures of azole fungicides can be predicted by the concentration addition (CA) model. Methods: The antiandrogenic activity was assessed in MDA-kb2 cells. Following assessing single compounds activities mixtures of azole fungicides and vinclozolin were investigated. Interactions were analyzed by direct comparison between experimental and estimated dose–response curves assuming CA, followed by an analysis by the isobole method and the toxic unit approach.more » Results: The antiandrogenic activity of pyrethroids deltamethrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate and permethrin was weak, while the azole fungicides tebuconazole, propiconazole, epoxiconazole, econazole and vinclozolin exhibited strong antiandrogenic activity. Ten binary and one ternary mixture combinations of five antiandrogenic fungicides were assessed at equi-effective concentrations of EC{sub 25} and EC{sub 50}. Isoboles indicated that about 50% of the binary mixtures were additive and 50% synergistic. Synergism was even more frequently indicated by the toxic unit approach. Conclusion: Our data lead to the conclusion that interactions in mixtures follow the CA model. However, a surprisingly high percentage of synergistic interactions occurred. Therefore, the mixture activity of antiandrogenic azole fungicides is at least additive. Practice: Mixtures should also be considered for additive antiandrogenic activity in hazard and risk assessment. Implications: Our evaluation provides an appropriate “proof of concept”, but whether it equally translates to in vivo effects should further be investigated. - Highlights: • Humans are exposed to pesticide mixtures such as pyrethroids and azole fungicides. • We assessed the antiandrogenicity of

  10. Chemical management in fungicide sensivity of Mycosphaerella fijiensis collected from banana fields in México

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Barragan, Alejandra; García-Torres, Ana Elisa; Odriozola-Casas, Olga; Macedo-Raygoza, Gloria; Ogura, Tetsuya; Manzo-Sánchez, Gilberto; James, Andrew C.; Islas-Flores, Ignacio; Beltrán-García, Miguel J.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical management of the black leaf streak disease in banana caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis (Morelet) requires numerous applications of fungicides per year. However this has led to fungicide resistance in the field. The present study evaluated the activities of six fungicides against the mycelial growth by determination of EC50 values of strains collected from fields with different fungicide management programs: Rustic management (RM) without applications and Intensive management (IM) more than 25 fungicide application/year. Results showed a decreased sensitivity to all fungicides in isolates collected from IM. Means of EC50 values in mg L−1 for RM and IM were: 13.25 ± 18.24 and 51.58 ± 46.14 for azoxystrobin, 81.40 ± 56.50 and 1.8575 ± 2.11 for carbendazim, 1.225 ± 0.945 and 10.01 ± 8.55 for propiconazole, 220 ± 67.66 vs. 368 ± 62.76 for vinclozolin, 9.862 ± 3.24 and 54.5 ± 21.08 for fludioxonil, 49.2125 ± 34.11 and 112.25 ± 51.20 for mancozeb. A molecular analysis for β-tubulin revealed a mutation at codon 198 in these strains having an EC50 greater than 10 mg L−1 for carbendazim. Our data indicate a consistency between fungicide resistance and intensive chemical management in banana fields, however indicative values for resistance were also found in strains collected from rustic fields, suggesting that proximity among fields may be causing a fungus interchange, where rustic fields are breeding grounds for development of resistant strains. Urgent actions are required in order to avoid fungicide resistance in Mexican populations of M. fijiensis due to fungicide management practices. PMID:24948956

  11. Genetic progress in oat associated with fungicide use in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Follmann, D N; Cargnelutti Filho, A; Lúcio, A D; de Souza, V Q; Caraffa, M; Wartha, C A

    2016-12-19

    The State of Rio Grande do Sul (RS) is the largest producer of oat in Brazil with the aid of consolidated breeding programs, which are constantly releasing new cultivars. The main objectives of this study were to: 1) evaluate the annual genetic progress in grain yield and hectoliter weight of the oat cultivars in RS, with and without fungicide use on aerial parts of plants; and 2) evaluate the efficiency of oat breeding programs in introducing disease-resistant genes in the released cultivars through network yield trials conducted with and without fungicide use on aerial plant parts. The data on grain yield and hectoliter weight were obtained from 89 competition field trials of oat cultivars carried out from 2007 to 2014 in nine municipalities of RS. Of the total 89 trials, 44 were carried out with fungicide application on aerial plant parts and 45 were carried out without fungicide application. The annual genetic progress in oat cultivars was studied using the methodology proposed by Vencovsky (1988). The annual genetic progress in oat grain yield was 1.02% with fungicide use and 4.02% without fungicide use during the eight-year study period in RS. The annual genetic progress with respect to the hectoliter weight was 0.08% for trials with fungicide use and 0.71% for trials without fungicide use. Performing network yield trials with and without fungicide use on the aerial plants parts is a feasible method to evaluate the efficiency of oat breeding programs in introducing disease-resistant genes in the released cultivars.

  12. Effects of Paraquat Ban on Herbicide Poisoning-Related Mortality.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dong Ryul; Chung, Sung Phil; You, Je Sung; Cho, Soohyung; Park, Yongjin; Chun, Byeongjo; Moon, Jeongmi; Kim, Hyun; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Hyun Jin; Lee, Kyung Woo; Choi, SangChun; Park, Junseok; Park, Jung Soo; Kim, Seung Whan; Seo, Jeong Yeol; Park, Ha Young; Kim, Su Jin; Kang, Hyunggoo; Hong, Dae Young; Hong, Jung Hwa

    2017-07-01

    In Korea, registration of paraquat-containing herbicides was canceled in November 2011, and sales thereof were completely banned in November 2012. We evaluated the effect of the paraquat ban on the epidemiology and mortality of herbicide-induced poisoning. This retrospective study analyzed patients treated for herbicide poisoning at 17 emergency departments in South Korea between January 2010 and December 2014. The overall and paraquat mortality rates were compared pre- and post-ban. Factors associated with herbicide mortality were evaluated using logistic analysis. To determine if there were any changes in the mortality rates before and after the paraquat sales ban and the time point of any such significant changes in mortality, R software, version 3.0.3 (package, bcp) was used to perform a Bayesian change point analysis. We enrolled 2257 patients treated for herbicide poisoning (paraquat=46.8%). The overall and paraquat poisoning mortality rates were 40.6% and 73.0%, respectively. The decreased paraquat poisoning mortality rate (before, 75% vs. after, 67%, p=0.014) might be associated with increased intentionality. The multivariable logistic analysis revealed the paraquat ban as an independent predictor that decreased herbicide poisoning mortality (p=0.035). There were two major change points in herbicide mortality rates, approximately 3 months after the initial paraquat ban and 1 year after complete sales ban. This study suggests that the paraquat ban decreased intentional herbicide ingestion and contributed to lowering herbicide poisoning-associated mortality. The change point analysis suggests a certain timeframe was required for the manifestation of regulatory measures outcomes. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017

  13. 75 FR 55991 - Ammonium Formate; Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... lifelong study in rats via drinking water did not produce any systemic toxicity. Therefore, a conservative... for ammonium formate. In the absence of specific residue data, EPA has developed an approach which... high-use insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides. A complete description of the general approach taken...

  14. Alternative technologies for water quality management

    Treesearch

    Mandla A. Tshabalala

    2002-01-01

    Cranberry growers are concerned about the quality of water discharged from cranberry bogs into receiving surface waters. These water discharges may contain traces of pesticides arising from herbicide, insecticide or fungicide applications. They may also contain excess phosphorus from fertilizer application. Some cranberry farms have holding ponds to reduce the amount...

  15. A Field Scale Investigation of Enhanced Petroleum Hydrocarbon Biodegradation in the Vadose Zone Combining Soil Venting as an Oxygen Source with Moisture and Nutrient Addition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides is dependent upon both biotic and abiotic reactions, and the rate of these reactions determines the required...The most commonly isolated I hydrocarbon degrading fungi in decreasing order include: Trichoderma , i Penicillium, Aspergillus, and Mortierella (Dragun

  16. Commercial Economic Poisons Applicators Licensing Manual, Rough Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Agriculture, Lansing, Div. of Plant Industry.

    This pesticide manual gives information on types of pest management, labels and labeling of pesticide containers, safety, types of pesticides (including chapters on insecticides, fungicides, herbicides, and nematicides), spray equipment, identification of pests (including weeds, plant diseases, and vertebrates), and environmental considerations.…

  17. Comparison Study of Overlap among 21 Scientific Databases in Searching Pesticide Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Daniel E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Evaluates overlapping coverage of 21 scientific databases used in 10 online pesticide searches in an attempt to identify minimum number of databases needed to generate 90 percent of unique, relevant citations for given search. Comparison of searches combined under given pesticide usage (herbicide, fungicide, insecticide) is discussed. Nine…

  18. Effect of foliar application of glyphosate and cobalt on sugarcane yields and quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sugarcane is one of the principal crops of the world, and is used in the production of sugar, alcohol and clean energy. In many sugarcane producing regions of the world selected herbicides, insecticides and fungicides are being evaluated for their potential bioactivator effects on sugarcane yields. ...

  19. Forest Pest Control. Bulletin 759.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, V. Rodney

    This manual describes the major forest types, the major species, seed orchards, and tree nurseries. Methods of identifying forest insect pests and diseases are given. The most common types of insecticides, fungicides, and herbicides are described. Both sprayer and granular applicator methods are discussed. Environmental considerations are…

  20. Toxicity of Pesticides. Agrichemical Fact Sheet 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hock, Winand K.

    This fact sheet gives the acute oral and dermal toxicity (LD 50) of over 250 pesticides in lab animals. The chemicals are categorized as fungicides, herbicides, insecticides, or miscellaneous compounds. One or more trade names are given for each pesticide. In addition, a brief explanation of toxicity determination is given. (BB)

  1. Ornamental and Turfgrass Pest Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Univ., Tucson. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This guide provides basic information regarding the utilization and application of pesticides. Classifications are given for herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, and fumigants with indications of how each works. Types of application and appropriate equipment are discussed. Safety to both the applicator and the environment are stressed. A glossary…

  2. Agricultural Pesticides. An Instructional Unit for Teachers of Adult Vocational Education in Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Kenneth M.; Iverson, Maynard J.

    The proper use of agricultural pesticides is the major emphasis on the unit of instruction developed as a guide for use by teachers in planning and conducting young farmer and adult farmer classes. Seven lessons are included in the unit covering topical areas related to the utilization of pesticides, herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, and the…

  3. Market Aspects of Diffusion: A Spatial Perspective on the Diffusion of Innovations in Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pontius, Steven K.

    How market factors affected the diffusion of four agricultural inputs (fertilizer, herbicide, insecticide, and fungicide) among farmers on the Central Plain of Thailand is examined. Market factors investigated were the distribution policies of the propagators and the travel behavior of the potential adopters. Data were gathered through personal…

  4. Pest Control For Container-Grown Longleaf Pine

    Treesearch

    Scott Enebak; Bill Carey

    2002-01-01

    Several insect, weed, and disease pests are discussed that have been observed affecting container-grown longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) seedlings. The available tools to minimize the effects of these pests are limited to a few select insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides. Extreme care should be taken to ensure that the chemical chosen is...

  5. Mercurial fungicidal seed protectant toxic for sheep and chickens

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, J.S.

    1963-01-01

    An experiment was performed to determine the amount of a mercurial fungicidal seed protectant that would produce toxicosis in sheep and chickens. Varying daily doses were used in the tolerance study. All experimental subjects died from toxicosis after varying treatment periods. Signs of toxicosis were loss of weight associated with anorexia, diarrhea, stilted gait, lameness in 1 or more limbs, and clear mucous nasal discharge in treated sheep; in chickens, there were bleached combs, depression, and partial and complete paralysis. Necropsy findings were typical of metallic weight losses in all sheep on treatment, varying in direct proportion to daily intake.more » In the chickens, weight gains were observed in all but 1 of the treated birds as well as in the controls; however, the treated chickens had lower gains. 2 tables.« less

  6. Insecticide Resistance: Challenge to Pest Management and Basic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brattsten, L. B.; Holyoke, C. W.; Leeper, J. R.; Raffa, K. F.

    1986-03-01

    The agricultural use of synthetic insecticides usually protects crops but imposes strong selection pressures that can result in the development of resistance. The most important resistance mechanisms are enhancement of the capacity to metabolically detoxify insecticides and alterations in target sites that prevent insecticides from binding to them. Insect control methods must incorporate strategies to minimize resistance development and preserve the utility of the insecticides. The most promising approach, integrated pest management, includes the use of chemical insecticides in combination with improved cultural and biologically based techniques.

  7. Sorption of polar herbicides and herbicide metabolites by biochar-amended soil.

    PubMed

    Dechene, Annika; Rosendahl, Ingrid; Laabs, Volker; Amelung, Wulf

    2014-08-01

    Biochar-amended soil has been proven to possess superior sorption capacities for several environmental pollutants compared with pure soil. However, the role of biochar in the immobilization of polar pesticides and their metabolites has hardly been tested. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the effect of a soil amendment with biochar on the sorption of selected polar herbicides and herbicide metabolites (log Kow 0.3-<2). To simulate worst-case sorption, a sandy soil (1.7% organic matter) was amended with 1.5% biochar (fresh or composted) to determine sorption/desorption isotherms of the test compounds. One herbicide (imazamox) and three herbicide metabolites (methyl-desphenyl-chloridazon, metazachlor oxalic acid, metazachlor sulfonic acid) were tested, i.e. three anionic and one neutral polar compound. The results showed that the presence of biochar increased the sorption capacity of the soil only in the case of the uncharged compound methyl-desphenyl-chloridazon, for which the average distribution coefficients in biochar-amended soils were higher than in pure soil by a factor of 2.1-2.5. However, this effect rather seemed to reflect the increased soil organic carbon content after the addition of biochar than a preferred sorption of methyl-desphenyl-chloridazon to biochar. In the case of the three anionic compounds imazamox, metazachlor oxalic acid and metazachlor sulfonic acid, biochar amendment did not increase the sorption capacity of the soil for these compounds, presumably as a result of its negative net charge. Similarly, desorption experiments did not show any significant effect of the biochar amendment on desorption. This suggests that the potential of using biochar to mitigate the leaching of the tested polar pesticides or metabolites is limited. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Triazine herbicide resistance in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alfred E.; Gilbert, Carl W.; Guy, Rachel; Arntzen, Charles J.

    1984-01-01

    The photoaffinity herbicide azidoatrazine (2-azido-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) selectively labels the L subunit of the reaction center of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Herbicide-resistant mutants retain the L subunit and have altered binding properties for methylthio- and chloro-substituted triazines as well as altered equilibrium constants for electron transfer between primary and secondary electron acceptors. We suggest that a subtle alteration in the L subunit is responsible for herbicide resistance and that the L subunit is the functional analog of the 32-kDa QB protein of chloroplast membranes. Images PMID:16593520

  9. Effects of Fungicides on Rat's Neurosteroid Synthetic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiuwei; Chen, Fan; Chen, Lanlan; Su, Ying; Huang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to environmental endocrine disruptors may interfere with nervous system's activity. Fungicides such as tebuconazole, triadimefon, and vinclozolin have antifungal activities and are used to prevent fungal infections in agricultural plants. In the present study, we studied effects of tebuconazole, triadimefon, and vinclozolin on rat's neurosteroidogenic 5α-reductase 1 (5α-Red1), 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD), and retinol dehydrogenase 2 (RDH2). Rat's 5α-Red1, 3α-HSD, and RDH2 were cloned and expressed in COS-1 cells, and effects of these fungicides on them were measured. Tebuconazole and triadimefon competitively inhibited 5α-Red1, with IC50 values of 8.670 ± 0.771 × 10−6 M and 17.390 ± 0.079 × 10−6 M, respectively, while vinclozolin did not inhibit the enzyme at 100 × 10−6 M. Triadimefon competitively inhibited 3α-HSD, with IC50 value of 26.493 ± 0.076 × 10−6 M. Tebuconazole and vinclozolin weakly inhibited 3α-HSD, with IC50 values about 100 × 10−6 M, while vinclozolin did not inhibit the enzyme even at 100 × 10−6 M. Tebuconazole and triadimefon weakly inhibited RDH2 with IC50 values over 100 × 10−6 M and vinclozolin did not inhibit this enzyme at 100 × 10−6 M. Docking study showed that tebuconazole, triadimefon, and vinclozolin bound to the steroid-binding pocket of 3α-HSD. In conclusion, triadimefon potently inhibited rat's neurosteroidogenic enzymes, 5α-Red1 and 3α-HSD. PMID:28812018

  10. The fungicide mancozeb induces toxic effects on mammalian granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paro, Rita; Tiboni, Gian Mario; Buccione, Roberto

    2012-04-15

    The ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate mancozeb is a widely used fungicide with low reported toxicity in mammals. In mice, mancozeb induces embryo apoptosis, affects oocyte meiotic spindle morphology and impairs fertilization rate even when used at very low concentrations. We evaluated the toxic effects of mancozeb on the mouse and human ovarian somatic granulosa cells. We examined parameters such as cell morphology, induction of apoptosis, and p53 expression levels. Mouse granulosa cells exposed to mancozeb underwent a time- and dose-dependent modification of their morphology, and acquired the ability to migrate but not to proliferate. The expression level of p53, in terms of mRNAmore » and protein content, decreased significantly in comparison with unexposed cells, but no change in apoptosis was recorded. Toxic effects could be attributed, at least in part, to the presence of ethylenthiourea (ETU), the main mancozeb catabolite, which was found in culture medium. Human granulosa cells also showed dose-dependent morphological changes and reduced p53 expression levels after exposure to mancozeb. Altogether, these results indicate that mancozeb affects the somatic cells of the mammalian ovarian follicles by inducing a premalignant-like status, and that such damage occurs to the same extent in both mouse and human GC. These results further substantiate the concept that mancozeb should be regarded as a reproductive toxicant. Highlights: ► The fungicide mancozeb affects oocyte spindle morphology and fertilization rate. ► We investigated the toxic effects of mancozeb on mouse and human granulosa cells. ► Granulosa cells modify their morphology and expression level of p53. ► Mancozeb induces a premalignant-like status in exposed cells.« less

  11. Effects of the fungicide imazalil on the fathead minnow ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Since its introduction in 1983 imazalil has been used primarily as a fungicide on crops post-harvest, such as tubers and citrus fruits. Its effectiveness lies in the ability to inhibit the fungal enzyme, lanosterol 14 á-demethylase. However, like other azole fungicides, imazalil can inhibit a range of cytochrome p450 enzymes, including one or more involved in steroid biosynthesis. Previous in vitro and high throughput screening assays showed that imazalil can cause aromatase inhibition and reduce 17â-estradiol (E2) production by H295R cells. In the present study, we tested imazalil in a number of in vitro and in vivo bioassays with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to evaluate whether it would elicit effects consistent with an adverse outcome pathway (AOP) linking inhibition of aromatase to reduced fecundity. Ex vivo ovarian E2 and testosterone (T) production by ovary tissue from reproductively mature female P. promelas exposed to imazalil for 24 h at concentrations of 100, 500 and 1580 µg/L were significantly lower (p<0.05) than controls. Plasma E2 concentrations of females exposed for 24 h were significantly lower at imazalil concentrations of 80 and 250 µg/L, but not 2.5, 8, and 25 µg/L. In a separate 60 h exposure, plasma E2 concentrations were significantly lower than controls in mature P. promelas exposed to 200 ìg imazalil/L, but not at 0.2, 2, or 20 ug/L. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses measuring relative abundance of mRNA transcripts for v

  12. Effects of the fungicide imazalil on the fathead minnow ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Since its introduction in 1983, imazalil has been used primarily as a fungicide on crops post-harvest. Its effectiveness lies in the ability to inhibit the fungal cytochrome P450 (cyp), lanosterol 14 á-demethylase. However, like other azole fungicides, imazalil can inhibit a range of cyp enzymes, including one or more involved in steroid biosynthesis in vertebrates. Previous in vitro assays showed that imazalil can cause aromatase inhibition and reduce 17â-estradiol (E2) production by H295R cells. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of imazalil in a 21 d Fish Short-Term Reproduction Assay (FSTRA) with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to evaluate whether the chemical would elicit effects consistent with an adverse outcome pathway (AOP) linking inhibition of aromatase to reduced fecundity. Fish were sampled at two time points (10, 21 d) and several endpoints (including key events [KE]s) associated with the AOP were measured. Fecundity also was determined daily. These data, combined with results of two previous exposures of 24 h and 60 h, produce a full time-course of effects. Ex vivo ovarian E2 production in females exposed to imazalil was significantly lower (p<0.05) than controls after 24 h at concentrations of 100, 500, and 1580 µg/L and remained significantly lower at 60 h, 10 d, and 21 d in fish exposed to 200 µg/L. Plasma E2 concentrations from females exposed for 24 h were significantly lower at imazalil concentrations of 80 and 250 µg/

  13. Aggregative stability of fungicidal nanomodifier based on zinc hydrosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishina, Anna; Korolev, Evgeniy

    2018-03-01

    Currently, there is a strong need of high performance multi functional materials in high-rise construction. Obviously, such materials should be characterized by high strength; but for interior rooms biosafety is important as well. The promising direction to obtain both high strength and maintain biosafety in buildings and structures is to manage the structure of mineral binders by means of fungicidal nanomodifier based on zinc hydrosilicates. In the present work the aggregative stability of colloidal solutions of zinc hydrosilicates after one year of storage was studied. It has been established that the concentration of iron (III) hydroxide used to prepare the precursor of zinc hydrosilicates has a significant effect on the long-term aggregative stability: as the concentration of iron (III) hydroxide increases, the resistance of the fungicidal nanomodifier increases. It was found that, despite the minimal concentration of nano-sized zinc hydrosilicates (0.028%), the colloidal solution possesses a low long-term aggregative stability; while in the initial period (not less than 14 days) the colloidal solution of the nanomodifier is aggregatively stable. It is shown that when the ratio in the colloidal solution of the amount of the substance CH3COOH / SiO2 = 0.43 is reached, an increase in the polymerization rate is observed, which is the main cause of low aggregative stability. Colloidal solutions containing zinc hydrosilicates synthesized at a concentration of iron (III) hydroxide used to produce a precursor equal to 0.7% have a long-term aggregative stability and do not significantly change the reduced particle. Such compositions are to be expediently used for the nanomodifying of building composites in order to control their structure formation and to create conditions that impede the development of various mycelial fungi.

  14. Sublethal exposure, insecticide resistance, and community stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although a prevalent pest management tool and anthropogenic stressors of widespread occurrence, insecticides are subject to biased perceptions and research demands largely guided by their use, market value, and regulatory requirements. As a result, short-term and simplistic efforts focusing on letha...

  15. Newer insecticides for plant virus disease management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Effective management of insect and mite vectors of plant pathogens is of crucial importance to minimizing vector-borne diseases in crops. Insecticides play an important role in managing vector populations by reducing the number of individuals that can acquire and transmit a virus, thereby potentiall...

  16. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY OF PYRETHROID INSECTICIDES: CRITICAL REVIEW.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroids are widely utilized insecticides whose primary action is the disruption of voltage-sensitive sodium channels (VSSC). Although these compounds have been in use for over 30 years and their acute neurotoxicity has been well characterized, there is considerably less info...

  17. Insecticides for Suppression of Nylanderia fulva

    PubMed Central

    Oi, Faith; Oi, David; Mannion, Catharine

    2017-01-01

    Nylanderia fulva (Mayr) is an invasive ant that is a serious pest in the southern United States. Pest control operators and homeowners are challenged to manage pest populations below acceptable thresholds. Contact and bait insecticides are key components of an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategy, however, little is known about their efficacy. In repellency and efficacy bioassays, N. fulva were not completely repelled by any insecticide tested, although fewer ants crossed a surface treated with Temprid®. Few insecticides provided rapid control. Termidor® and Temprid® were the best performing with mean mortality of 100% in 13.4 and 19.0 days, respectively. In no-choice bait acceptance studies, it was shown that N. fulva generally had greater acceptance of carbohydrate-based ant baits (Advion®, InTiceTM (gel), and InTiceTM (granular)). However, mortality was low for the InTiceTM baits in a 7-day bioassay. Maxforce® Ant Killer Bait Gel and Advance® 375A in the spring and Maxforce® Complete in the summer and fall required the fewest days to reach 100% mortality. Bait active ingredients that resulted in the highest mortality were hydramethylnon and fipronil. These data on the efficacy of commercially available contact and bait insecticides provide valuable information to manage this invasive pest. PMID:28858251

  18. Insecticides for suppression of Nylanderia fulva

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nylanderia fulva (Mayr) is an invasive ant that is a serious pest in the southern United States. Pest control operators and homeowners are challenged to manage pest populations below acceptable thresholds. Contact and bait insecticides are key components of an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strate...

  19. Wightianines A-E, dihydro-β-agarofuran sesquiterpenes from Parnassia wightiana, and their antifungal and insecticidal activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-Mei; Zhang, Cheng-Chen; Zhang, Qiang; Shafiq, Nusrat; Pescitelli, Gennaro; Li, Deng-Wu; Gao, Jin-Ming

    2014-07-16

    Five new sesquiterpene polyol esters with a dihydro-β-agarofuran skeleton, designated as wightianines A-E (1-5), besides two known compounds, were isolated from the methanolic extract of the whole plant of the traditional herbal medicine Parnassia wightiana Wall. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analyses, including two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques (correlation spectroscopy, heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence, nuclear Overhauser effect spectrometry, and heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation) and electronic circular dichroism studies. The antifungal and insecticidal activities of five compounds were evaluated against several plant pathogenic fungi and armyworm larvae (Mythimna separata Walker). Among the test metabolites, compounds 2 and 7 both exhibited potent antifungal activity against the phytopathogenic fungus Cytospora sp. with minimum inhibitory concentration values of 0.78 μg/mL, which are equal to the two positive controls, hymexazol and carbendazim. However, no insecticidal activity of the test compounds was observed in the present study. Compounds 2 and 7 could be promising leads for developing new fungicides against agriculturally important fungus Cytospora sp.

  20. Method for Estimating Pesticide Use for County Areas of the Conterminous United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Insecticide 42,104 290,444 MCPB 1889 Herbicide 36,328 57,324 Metsulfuron 4003 Herbicide 35,534 7,747,924 Oxytetracycline 5038 Fungicide 35,321 71,207...22,841 114,203 Olives 22,441 6,397 Onions 16,110 76,704 Plums 15,092 30,005 Walnuts 12,552 46,490 Oxytetracycline Pears 17,638 45,258 Peaches 17,292

  1. Bleaching Herbicide Flurtamone Interferes with Phytoene Desaturase

    PubMed Central

    Sandmann, Gerhard; Ward, Carl E.; Lo, William C.; Nagy, Jon O.; Böger, Peter

    1990-01-01

    The mode of action of the furanone herbicide flurtamone and derivatives was investigated with cress seedlings and with the unicellular cyanobacterium Anacystis. Either in the light or in the dark these compounds inhibited the formation of α- and β-carotene and all of the xanthophylls in the seedlings. Instead, phytoene, a precursor of colored carotenoids, was accumulated. In illuminated seedlings photooxidative destruction of chlorophyll was observed. The I50 value of flurtamone inhibition of carotenoid biosynthesis in intact Anacystis cells and the K1 value for interaction of flurtamone with phytoene desaturase with Anacystis thylakoids were 30 and 18 nanomoles, respectively. Concentrations of flurtamone which strongly inhibited carotenoid synthesis had no direct peroxidative activities and did not inhibit photosynthetic electron transport. PMID:16667736

  2. Dinitroaniline herbicide resistance and the microtubule cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Anthony; Hussey

    1999-03-01

    Dinitroaniline herbicides have been used for pre-emergence weed control for the past 25 years in cotton, soybean, wheat and oilseed crops. Considering their long persistence and extensive use, resistance to dinitroanilines is fairly rare. However, the most widespread dinitroaniline-resistant weeds, the highly resistant (R) and the intermediate (I) biotypes of the invasive goosegrass Eleusine indica, are now infesting more than 1000 cotton fields in the southern states of the USA. The molecular basis of this resistance has been identified, and found to be a point mutation in a major microtubule cytoskeletal protein, alpha-tubulin. These studies have served both to explain the establishment of resistance and to reveal fundamental properties of tubulin gene expression and microtubule structure.

  3. New effects of Roundup on amphibians: predators reduce herbicide mortality; herbicides induce antipredator morphology.

    PubMed

    Relyea, Rick A

    2012-03-01

    The use of pesticides is important for growing crops and protecting human health by reducing the prevalence of targeted pest species. However, less attention is given to the potential unintended effects on nontarget species, including taxonomic groups that are of current conservation concern. One issue raised in recent years is the potential for pesticides to become more lethal in the presence of predatory cues, a phenomenon observed thus far only in the laboratory. A second issue is whether pesticides can induce unintended trait changes in nontarget species, particularly trait changes that might mimic adaptive responses to natural environmental stressors. Using outdoor mesocosms, I created simple wetland communities containing leaf litter, algae, zooplankton, and three species of tadpoles (wood frogs [Rana sylvatica or Lithobates sylvaticus], leopard frogs [R. pipiens or L. pipiens], and American toads [Bufo americanus or Anaxyrus americanus]). I exposed the communities to a factorial combination of environmentally relevant herbicide concentrations (0, 1, 2, or 3 mg acid equivalents [a.e.]/L of Roundup Original MAX) crossed with three predator-cue treatments (no predators, adult newts [Notophthalmus viridescens], or larval dragonflies [Anax junius]). Without predator cues, mortality rates from Roundup were consistent with past studies. Combined with cues from the most risky predator (i.e., dragonflies), Roundup became less lethal (in direct contrast to past laboratory studies). This reduction in mortality was likely caused by the herbicide stratifying in the water column and predator cues scaring the tadpoles down to the benthos where herbicide concentrations were lower. Even more striking was the discovery that Roundup induced morphological changes in the tadpoles. In wood frog and leopard frog tadpoles, Roundup induced relatively deeper tails in the same direction and of the same magnitude as the adaptive changes induced by dragonfly cues. To my knowledge, this

  4. VERTEBRAL DYSPLASIA IN YOUNG FISH EXPOSED TO THE HERBICIDE TRIFLURALIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sheepshead minnows, Cyprinodon variegatus Lacepede, exposed to 5-5 to 31 micrograms/l of the herbicide trifluralin, throughout their first 28 days of life, developed a heretofore, undescribed vertebral dysplasia. This dysplasia consisted of semisymmetrical hypertrophy of vertebra...

  5. Response of avian communities to herbicide-induced vegetation changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, M.L.; Meslow, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    The relationships between avian communities and herbicide modification of vegetation were analyzed on early-growth clear-cuts in western Oregon that had received phenoxy herbicide treatment 1 or 4 years previously. For both 1 and 4 years post-spray, vegetation development was greater in the third height interval (> 3.0 m) on untreated sites. All measures of vegetative diversity on untreated sites exceeded those on treated sites. Overall density and diversity of birds were similar between treated and untreated sites. Several bird species altered their foraging behavior on treated sites, i.e., birds using deciduous trees increased use of shrubs on treated sites. The primary effect of herbicide application was a reduction in the complexity of vegetation, a condition due primarity to the removal of deciduous trees. Small patches of deciduous trees scattered in clear-cuts treated with phenoxy herbicides can maintain an avian community similar to that on untreated sites.

  6. Impacts of forest herbicides on wildlife: Toxicity and habitat alteration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, M.L.; Meslow, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper begins with a review of both laboratory and field studies on tbe possible direct toxic effects of herbicides on terrestrial vertebrates, primarily birds and mammals. Alteration of the palatability of forage and changes in reproductive success are also discussed. Emphasis is placed on the use of herbicides in forestry; studies dealing with agricultural systems are referenced where appropriate. The indirect effects of herbicides on wildlife-habitat are then conceptualized and quantified using data from a 3-year study on effects of phenoxy and glyphosate herbicides on bird and small mammal communities in western Oregon. Data on density and habitat use are presented and compared with data available from other geographic regions.

  7. Biodegradation of acetanilide herbicides acetochlor and butachlor in soil.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chang-ming; Wang, Xing-jun; Zheng, He-hui

    2002-10-01

    The biodegradation of two acetanilide herbicides, acetochlor and butachlor in soil after other environmental organic matter addition were measured during 35 days laboratory incubations. The herbicides were applied to soil alone, soil-SDBS (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate) mixtures and soil-HA (humic acid) mixtures. Herbicide biodegradation kinetics were compared in the different treatment. Biodegradation products of herbicides in soil alone samples were identified by GC/MS at the end of incubation. Addition of SDBS and HA to soil decreased acetochlor biodegradation, but increased butachlor biodegradation. The biodegradation half-life of acetochlor and butachlor in soil alone, soil-SDBS mixtures and soil-HA mixtures were 4.6 d, 6.1 d and 5.4 d and 5.3 d, 4.9 d and 5.3 d respectively. The biodegradation products were hydroxyacetochlor and 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline for acetochlor, and hydroxybutachlor and 2,6-diethylaniline for butachlor.

  8. Selective Herbicides Reduce Weeding Costs in Two Mississippi Nurseries

    Treesearch

    W. B. Smyly; T. H. Filer

    1979-01-01

    In tests conducted from 1974 to 1977, the preemergence herbicides, Treflan, Eptam, Dymid, and Dectun reduced weeds and weeding costs in seedling beds of loblolly, slash, and short leaf pine. Velpar and Roundup controlled weeds along riser lines.

  9. TRIADIMEFON, A TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDE, INDUCES STEREOTYPED BEHAVIOR AND ALTERS MONOAMINE METABOLISM IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, a triazole fungicide, has been observed to increase locomotion and induce stereotyped behavior in rodents. he present experiments characterized the stereotyped behavior induced by triadimefon using a computer-supported observational method, and tested the hypothesis ...

  10. RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY-BASED METABOLOMICS FOR DIFFERENTIATING EXPOSURES TO TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES USING RAT URINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Normal Raman spectroscopy was evaluated as a metabolomic tool for assessing the impacts of exposure to environmental contaminants, using rat urine collected during the course of a toxicological study. Specifically, one of three triazole fungicides, myclobutanil, propiconazole or ...

  11. REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY OF EXPOSURE TO CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES IN THE FEMALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazole fungicides are used extensively in pharmaceutical and agricultural applications. Although some conazoles have been investigated extensively for toxicological effects, there is little published information on the reproductive toxicity of many of the agriculturally importa...

  12. Gene Expression Profiling in Liver and Testis of Rats to Characterize the Toxicity of Triazole Fungicides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four triazole fungicides were studied using toxicogenomic techniques to identify potential mechanisms of action. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed for 14 days by gavage with fluconazole, myclobutanil, propiconazole, or triadimefon. Following exposure, serum was collected ...

  13. IN VIVO MUTAGENICITY OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES CORRELATES WITH TUMORIGENICITY-JOURNAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. All three conazoles are generally inactive in short-term genotoxicity t...

  14. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING IN LIVER AND TESTIS OF RATS TO CHARACTERIZE THE TOXICITY OF TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four triazole fungicides were studied using toxicogenomic techniques to identify potential mechanisms of action. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed for 14 days by gavage with fluconazole, myclobutanil, propiconazole, or triadimefon. Following exposure, serum was collected ...

  15. USING PHARMACOKINETIC DATA TO INTERPRET METABOLOMIC CHANGES IN CD-1 MICE TREATED WITH TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triazoles are a class of fungicides widely used in both pharmaceutical and agricultural applications. These compounds elicit a variety of toxic effects including disruption of normal metabolic processes such as steroidogenesis. Metabolomics is used to measure dynamic changes in e...

  16. Fast and Accurate Microplate Method (Biolog MT2) for Detection of Fusarium Fungicides Resistance/Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Frąc, Magdalena; Gryta, Agata; Oszust, Karolina; Kotowicz, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The need for finding fungicides against Fusarium is a key step in the chemical plant protection and using appropriate chemical agents. Existing, conventional methods of evaluation of Fusarium isolates resistance to fungicides are costly, time-consuming and potentially environmentally harmful due to usage of high amounts of potentially toxic chemicals. Therefore, the development of fast, accurate and effective detection methods for Fusarium resistance to fungicides is urgently required. MT2 microplates (Biolog(TM)) method is traditionally used for bacteria identification and the evaluation of their ability to utilize different carbon substrates. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no reports concerning the use of this technical tool to determine fungicides resistance of the Fusarium isolates. For this reason, the objectives of this study are to develop a fast method for Fusarium resistance to fungicides detection and to validate the effectiveness approach between both traditional hole-plate and MT2 microplates assays. In presented study MT2 microplate-based assay was evaluated for potential use as an alternative resistance detection method. This was carried out using three commercially available fungicides, containing following active substances: triazoles (tebuconazole), benzimidazoles (carbendazim) and strobilurins (azoxystrobin), in six concentrations (0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2%), for nine selected Fusarium isolates. In this study, the particular concentrations of each fungicides was loaded into MT2 microplate wells. The wells were inoculated with the Fusarium mycelium suspended in PM4-IF inoculating fluid. Before inoculation the suspension was standardized for each isolates into 75% of transmittance. Traditional hole-plate method was used as a control assay. The fungicides concentrations in control method were the following: 0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 25, and 50%. Strong relationships between MT2 microplate and traditional hole

  17. Effects of Sublethal Fungicides on Mutation Rates and Genomic Variation in Fungal Plant Pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    PubMed Central

    Amaradasa, B. Sajeewa

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen exposure to sublethal doses of fungicides may result in mutations that may represent an important and largely overlooked mechanism of introducing new genetic variation into strictly clonal populations, including acquisition of fungicide resistance. We tested this hypothesis using the clonal plant pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Nine susceptible isolates were exposed independently to five commercial fungicides with different modes of action: boscalid (respiration inhibitor), iprodione (unclear mode of action), thiophanate methyl (inhibition of microtubulin synthesis) and azoxystrobin and pyraclostrobin (quinone outside inhibitors). Mycelium of each isolate was inoculated onto a fungicide gradient and sub-cultured from the 50–100% inhibition zone for 12 generations and experiment repeated. Mutational changes were assessed for all isolates at six neutral microsatellite (SSR) loci and for a subset of isolates using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). SSR analysis showed 12 of 85 fungicide-exposed isolates had a total of 127 stepwise mutations with 42 insertions and 85 deletions. Most stepwise deletions were in iprodione- and azoxystrobin-exposed isolates (n = 40/85 each). Estimated mutation rates were 1.7 to 60-fold higher for mutated loci compared to that expected under neutral conditions. AFLP genotyping of 33 isolates (16 non-exposed control and 17 fungicide exposed) generated 602 polymorphic alleles. Cluster analysis with principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC) identified fungicide-exposed isolates as a distinct group from non-exposed control isolates (PhiPT = 0.15, P = 0.001). Dendrograms based on neighbor-joining also supported allelic variation associated with fungicide-exposure. Fungicide sensitivity of isolates measured throughout both experiments did not show consistent trends. For example, eight isolates exposed to boscalid had higher EC50 values at the end of the experiment

  18. Fast and Accurate Microplate Method (Biolog MT2) for Detection of Fusarium Fungicides Resistance/Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Frąc, Magdalena; Gryta, Agata; Oszust, Karolina; Kotowicz, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The need for finding fungicides against Fusarium is a key step in the chemical plant protection and using appropriate chemical agents. Existing, conventional methods of evaluation of Fusarium isolates resistance to fungicides are costly, time-consuming and potentially environmentally harmful due to usage of high amounts of potentially toxic chemicals. Therefore, the development of fast, accurate and effective detection methods for Fusarium resistance to fungicides is urgently required. MT2 microplates (BiologTM) method is traditionally used for bacteria identification and the evaluation of their ability to utilize different carbon substrates. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no reports concerning the use of this technical tool to determine fungicides resistance of the Fusarium isolates. For this reason, the objectives of this study are to develop a fast method for Fusarium resistance to fungicides detection and to validate the effectiveness approach between both traditional hole-plate and MT2 microplates assays. In presented study MT2 microplate-based assay was evaluated for potential use as an alternative resistance detection method. This was carried out using three commercially available fungicides, containing following active substances: triazoles (tebuconazole), benzimidazoles (carbendazim) and strobilurins (azoxystrobin), in six concentrations (0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2%), for nine selected Fusarium isolates. In this study, the particular concentrations of each fungicides was loaded into MT2 microplate wells. The wells were inoculated with the Fusarium mycelium suspended in PM4-IF inoculating fluid. Before inoculation the suspension was standardized for each isolates into 75% of transmittance. Traditional hole-plate method was used as a control assay. The fungicides concentrations in control method were the following: 0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 25, and 50%. Strong relationships between MT2 microplate and traditional hole

  19. Effects of two commonly used fungicides on the amphipod Austrochiltonia subtenuis.

    PubMed

    Vu, Hung T; Keough, Michael J; Long, Sara M; Pettigrove, Vincent J

    2017-03-01

    Fungicides are used widely in agriculture and have been detected in adjacent rivers and wetlands. However, relatively little is known about the potential effects of fungicides on aquatic organisms. The present study investigated the effects of 2 commonly used fungicides, the boscalid fungicide Filan ® and the myclobutanil fungicide Systhane ™ 400 WP, on life history traits (survival, growth, and reproduction) and energy reserves (lipid, protein, and glycogen content) of the amphipod Austrochiltonia subtenuis under laboratory conditions, at concentrations detected in aquatic environments. Amphipods were exposed to 3 concentrations of Filan (1 μg active ingredient [a.i.]/L, 10 μg a.i./L, and 40 μg a.i./L) and Systhane (0.3 μg a.i./L, 3 μg a.i./L, and 30 μg a.i./L) over 56 d. Both fungicides had similar effects on the amphipod at the organism level. Reproduction was the most sensitive endpoint, with offspring produced in controls but none produced in any of the fungicide treatments, and total numbers of gravid females in all fungicide treatments were reduced by up to 95%. Female amphipods were more sensitive than males in terms of growth. Systhane had significant effects on survival at all concentrations, whereas significant effects of Filan on survival were observed only at 10 μg a.i./L and 40 μg a.i./L. The effects of fungicides on energy reserves of the female amphipod were different. Filan significantly reduced amphipod protein content, whereas Systhane significantly reduced the lipid content. The present study demonstrates wide-ranging effects of 2 common fungicides on an ecologically important species that has a key role in trophic transfer and nutrient recycling in aquatic environments. These results emphasize the importance of considering the long-term effects of fungicides in the risk assessment of aquatic ecosystems. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:720-726. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  20. Effects of Sublethal Fungicides on Mutation Rates and Genomic Variation in Fungal Plant Pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Amaradasa, B Sajeewa; Everhart, Sydney E

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen exposure to sublethal doses of fungicides may result in mutations that may represent an important and largely overlooked mechanism of introducing new genetic variation into strictly clonal populations, including acquisition of fungicide resistance. We tested this hypothesis using the clonal plant pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Nine susceptible isolates were exposed independently to five commercial fungicides with different modes of action: boscalid (respiration inhibitor), iprodione (unclear mode of action), thiophanate methyl (inhibition of microtubulin synthesis) and azoxystrobin and pyraclostrobin (quinone outside inhibitors). Mycelium of each isolate was inoculated onto a fungicide gradient and sub-cultured from the 50-100% inhibition zone for 12 generations and experiment repeated. Mutational changes were assessed for all isolates at six neutral microsatellite (SSR) loci and for a subset of isolates using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). SSR analysis showed 12 of 85 fungicide-exposed isolates had a total of 127 stepwise mutations with 42 insertions and 85 deletions. Most stepwise deletions were in iprodione- and azoxystrobin-exposed isolates (n = 40/85 each). Estimated mutation rates were 1.7 to 60-fold higher for mutated loci compared to that expected under neutral conditions. AFLP genotyping of 33 isolates (16 non-exposed control and 17 fungicide exposed) generated 602 polymorphic alleles. Cluster analysis with principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC) identified fungicide-exposed isolates as a distinct group from non-exposed control isolates (PhiPT = 0.15, P = 0.001). Dendrograms based on neighbor-joining also supported allelic variation associated with fungicide-exposure. Fungicide sensitivity of isolates measured throughout both experiments did not show consistent trends. For example, eight isolates exposed to boscalid had higher EC50 values at the end of the experiment, and

  1. Protoporphyrin IX Content Correlates with Activity of Photobleaching Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Becerril, Jose M.; Duke, Stephen O.

    1989-01-01

    Several laboratories have demonstrated recently that photobleaching herbicides such as acifluorfen and oxadiazon cause accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), a photodynamic pigment capable of herbicidal activity. We investigated, in acifluorfen-treated tissues, the in vivo stability of PPIX, the kinetics of accumulation, and the correlation between concentration of PPIX and herbicidal damage. During a 20 hour dark period, PPIX levels rose from barely detectable concentrations to 1 to 2 nanomoles per 50 cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) cotyledon discs treated with 10 micromolar acifluorfen. When placed in 500 micromoles per square meter per second PAR, PPIX levels decayed logarithmically, with an initial half-life of about 2.5 hours. PPIX levels at each time after exposure to light correlated positively with the cellular damage that occurred during the following 1 hour in both green and yellow (tentoxin-treated) cucumber cotyledon tissues. PPIX levels in discs incubated for 20 hours in darkness correlated positively with the acifluorfen concentration in which they were incubated. In cucumber, the level of herbicidal damage caused by several p-nitrodiphenyl other herbicides, a p-chlorodiphenylether herbicide, and oxadiazon correlated positively with the amount of PPIX induced to accumulate by each of the herbicide treatments. Similar results were obtained with acifluorfen-treated pigweed and velvetleaf primary leaf tissues. In cucumber, PPIX levels increased within 15 and 30 minutes after exposure of discs to 10 micromolar acifluorfen in the dark and light, respectively. These data strengthen the view that PPIX is responsible for all or a major part of the photobleaching activity of acifluorfen and related herbicides. PMID:16666869

  2. Picloram herbicide for killing chaparral species...a preliminary rating

    Treesearch

    Lisle R. Green; Joe R. Goodin; Theordore R. Plumb

    1966-01-01

    Picloram, in spray and pellet forms, was tested for its ability to kill chaparral species at several sites in southern California, in 1963. This herbicide proved to be as effective as brushkiller (2.4-D and 2,4, 5-T) or slightly more so. Both herbicides kilIed chamise readily at low rates, but failed to kill scrub oak. Kill of other species varied between these two...

  3. Underplanting northern red oak in Missouri without herbicides.

    Treesearch

    Paul S. Johnson

    1992-01-01

    Describes a provisional assessment of the effectiveness of applying herbicides to woody competitors between 0.5- and 1.5- inches d.b.h. before underplanting northern red oak. Results suggest that no weed control, i.e., not using herbicides, would require only modest increases in the numbers or initial size of nursery stock needed to obtain a given future stocking goal...

  4. Fungi and bacteria. [fungicide and bactericide measures for spacecraft in tropical regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    Spacecraft equipment is usually protected from fungi and bacteria by incorporating a fungicide-bactericide in the material, by a fungicide-bactericide spray, or by reducing the relative humidity to a degree where growth will not take place. A unique method to protect delicate, expensive bearings in equipment was to maintain a pressure (with dry air or nitrogen) slightly above the outside atmosphere (few millibars) within the working parts of the equipment, thus preventing fungi from entering equipment.

  5. Changes in bacterial community after application of three different herbicides.

    PubMed

    Moretto, Jéssica Aparecida Silva; Altarugio, Lucas Miguel; Andrade, Pedro Avelino; Fachin, Ana Lúcia; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2017-07-06

    The native soil microbiota is very important to maintain the quality of that environment, but with the intensive use of agrochemicals, changes in microbial biomass and formation of large quantities of toxic waste were observed in soil, groundwater and surface water. Thereby, the goal of this study was to evaluate if the selective pressure exerted by the presence of the herbicides atrazine, diuron and 2,4-D changes the bacterial community structure of an agricultural soil, using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis technique. According to PERMANOVA analysis, a greater effect of the herbicide persistence time in the soil, the effect of the herbicide class and the effect of interaction between these two factors (persistence time and herbicide class) were observed. In conclusion, the results showed that the selective pressure exerted by the presence of these herbicides altered the composition of the local microbiota, being atrazine and diuron that most significantly affected the bacterial community in soil, and the herbicide 2,4-D was the one that less altered the microbial community and that bacterial community was reestablished first. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Strategies to evaluate biodegradability: application to chlorinated herbicides.

    PubMed

    Sanchis, S; Polo, A M; Tobajas, M; Rodriguez, J J; Mohedano, A F

    2014-01-01

    The biodegradability of nitrochlorinated (diuron and atrazine) and chlorophenoxy herbicides (2,4-D and MCPA) has been studied through several bioassays using different testing times and biomass/substrate ratios. A fast biodegradability test using unacclimated activated sludge yielded no biodegradation of the herbicides in 24 h. The inherent biodegradability test gave degradation percentages of around 20-30% for the nitrochlorinated herbicides and almost complete removal of the chlorophenoxy compounds. Long-term biodegradability assays were performed using sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and sequencing batch membrane bioreactor (SB-MBR). Fixed concentrations of each herbicide below the corresponding EC50 value for activated sludge were used (30 mg L(-1) for diuron and atrazine and 50 mg L(-1) for 2,4-D and MCPA). No signs of herbicide degradation appeared before 35 days in the case of diuron and atrazine and 21 days for 2,4-D, whereas MCPA was partially degraded since the early stages. Around 25-36% degradation of the nitrochlorinated herbicides and 53-77% of the chlorophenoxy ones was achieved after 180 and 135 days, respectively, in SBR, whereas complete disappearance of 2,4-D was reached after 80 days in SB-MBR.

  7. Proteolytic Pathways Induced by Herbicides That Inhibit Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zulet, Amaia; Gil-Monreal, Miriam; Villamor, Joji Grace; Zabalza, Ana; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Royuela, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Background The herbicides glyphosate (Gly) and imazamox (Imx) inhibit the biosynthesis of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids, respectively. Although these herbicides inhibit different pathways, they have been reported to show several common physiological effects in their modes of action, such as increasing free amino acid contents and decreasing soluble protein contents. To investigate proteolytic activities upon treatment with Gly and Imx, pea plants grown in hydroponic culture were treated with Imx or Gly, and the proteolytic profile of the roots was evaluated through fluorogenic kinetic assays and activity-based protein profiling. Results Several common changes in proteolytic activity were detected following Gly and Imx treatment. Both herbicides induced the ubiquitin-26 S proteasome system and papain-like cysteine proteases. In contrast, the activities of vacuolar processing enzymes, cysteine proteases and metacaspase 9 were reduced following treatment with both herbicides. Moreover, the activities of several putative serine protease were similarly increased or decreased following treatment with both herbicides. In contrast, an increase in YVADase activity was observed under Imx treatment versus a decrease under Gly treatment. Conclusion These results suggest that several proteolytic pathways are responsible for protein degradation upon herbicide treatment, although the specific role of each proteolytic activity remains to be determined. PMID:24040092

  8. Measuring Rates of Herbicide Metabolism in Dicot Weeds with an Excised Leaf Assay.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rong; Skelton, Joshua J; Riechers, Dean E

    2015-09-07

    In order to isolate and accurately determine rates of herbicide metabolism in an obligate-outcrossing dicot weed, waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus), we developed an excised leaf assay combined with a vegetative cloning strategy to normalize herbicide uptake and remove translocation as contributing factors in herbicide-resistant (R) and -sensitive (S) waterhemp populations. Biokinetic analyses of organic pesticides in plants typically include the determination of uptake, translocation (delivery to the target site), metabolic fate, and interactions with the target site. Herbicide metabolism is an important parameter to measure in herbicide-resistant weeds and herbicide-tolerant crops, and is typically accomplished with whole-plant tests using radiolabeled herbicides. However, one difficulty with interpreting biokinetic parameters derived from whole-plant methods is that translocation is often affected by rates of herbicide metabolism, since polar metabolites are usually not mobile within the plant following herbicide detoxification reactions. Advantages of the protocol described in this manuscript include reproducible, accurate, and rapid determination of herbicide degradation rates in R and S populations, a substantial decrease in the amount of radiolabeled herbicide consumed, a large reduction in radiolabeled plant materials requiring further handling and disposal, and the ability to perform radiolabeled herbicide experiments in the lab or growth chamber instead of a greenhouse. As herbicide resistance continues to develop and spread in dicot weed populations worldwide, the excised leaf assay method developed and described herein will provide an invaluable technique for investigating non-target site-based resistance due to enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism and detoxification.

  9. Additive and synergistic antiandrogenic activities of mixtures of azol fungicides and vinclozolin.

    PubMed

    Christen, Verena; Crettaz, Pierre; Fent, Karl

    2014-09-15

    Many pesticides including pyrethroids and azole fungicides are suspected to have an endocrine disrupting property. At present, the joint activity of compound mixtures is only marginally known. Here we tested the hypothesis that the antiandrogenic activity of mixtures of azole fungicides can be predicted by the concentration addition (CA) model. The antiandrogenic activity was assessed in MDA-kb2 cells. Following assessing single compounds activities mixtures of azole fungicides and vinclozolin were investigated. Interactions were analyzed by direct comparison between experimental and estimated dose-response curves assuming CA, followed by an analysis by the isobole method and the toxic unit approach. The antiandrogenic activity of pyrethroids deltamethrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate and permethrin was weak, while the azole fungicides tebuconazole, propiconazole, epoxiconazole, econazole and vinclozolin exhibited strong antiandrogenic activity. Ten binary and one ternary mixture combinations of five antiandrogenic fungicides were assessed at equi-effective concentrations of EC25 and EC50. Isoboles indicated that about 50% of the binary mixtures were additive and 50% synergistic. Synergism was even more frequently indicated by the toxic unit approach. Our data lead to the conclusion that interactions in mixtures follow the CA model. However, a surprisingly high percentage of synergistic interactions occurred. Therefore, the mixture activity of antiandrogenic azole fungicides is at least additive. Mixtures should also be considered for additive antiandrogenic activity in hazard and risk assessment. Our evaluation provides an appropriate "proof of concept", but whether it equally translates to in vivo effects should further be investigated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessing the impact of fungicide enostroburin application on bacterial community in wheat phyllosphere.

    PubMed

    Gu, Likun; Bai, Zhihui; Jin, Bo; Hu, Qing; Wang, Huili; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Zhang, Hongxun

    2010-01-01

    Fungicides have been used extensively for controlling fungal pathogens of plants. However, little is known regarding the effects that fungicides upon the indigenous bacterial communities within the plant phyllosphere. The aims of this study were to assess the impact of fungicide enostroburin upon bacterial communities in wheat phyllosphere. Culture-independent methodologies of 16S rDNA clone library and 16S rDNA directed polymerase chain reaction with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) were used for monitoring the change of bacterial community. The 16S rDNA clone library and PCR-DGGE analysis both confirmed the microbial community of wheat plant phyllosphere were predominantly of the gamma-Proteobacteria phyla. Results from PCR-DGGE analysis indicated a significant change in bacterial community structure within the phyllosphere following fungicide enostroburin application. Bands sequenced within control cultures were predominantly of Pseudomonas genus, but those bands sequenced in the treated samples were predominantly strains of Pantoea genus and Pseudomonas genus. Of interest was the appearance of two DGGE bands following fungicide treatment, one of which had sequence similarities (98%) to Pantoea sp. which might be a competitor of plant pathogens. This study revealed the wheat phyllosphere bacterial community composition and a shift in the bacterial community following fungicide enostroburin application.

  11. Fate and transport of agriculturally applied fungicidal compounds, azoxystrobin and propiconazole.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Paul G; Murphy, Tracye M; Lydy, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Fungicidal active ingredients azoxystrobin and propiconazole, individually and in combination, have been marketed worldwide in a range of fungicide treatment products for preventative and curative purposes, respectively. Their presence in streams located throughout the midwestern and southeastern United States warrant the need for research into the potential routes of transport of these fungicides in an agricultural field setting. Potential canopy penetration and drift effects of these fungicides during aerial and ground applications were studied in the current project. Canopy penetration was observed for both application types, however drift was associated only with the aerial application of these fungicides. Azoxystrobin and propiconazole persisted in the soil up to 301 d, with peak concentrations occurring approximately 30 d after application. The predominant mode of transport for these compounds was agricultural runoff water, with the majority of the fungicidal active ingredients leaving the target area during the first rain event following application. The timing of application in relation to the first rain event significantly affected the amount of loss that occurred, implying application practices should follow manufacturer recommended guidelines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Exploration of Novel Botanical Insecticide Leads: Synthesis and Insecticidal Activity of β-Dihydroagarofuran Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ximei; Xi, Xin; Hu, Zhan; Wu, Wenjun; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-02-24

    The discovery of novel leads and new mechanisms of action is of vital significance to the development of pesticides. To explore lead compounds for botanical insecticides, 77 β-dihydroagarofuran derivatives were designed and synthesized. Their structures were mainly confirmed by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, DEPT-135°, IR, MS, and HRMS. Their insecticidal activity was evaluated against the third-instar larvae of Mythimna separata Walker, and the results indicated that, of these derivatives, eight exhibited more promising insecticidal activity than the positive control, celangulin-V. Particularly, compounds 5.7, 6.6, and 6.7 showed LD50 values of 37.9, 85.1, and 21.1 μg/g, respectively, which were much lower than that of celangulin-V (327.6 μg/g). These results illustrated that β-dihydroagarofuran ketal derivatives can be promising lead compounds for developing novel mechanism-based and highly effective botanical insecticides. Moreover, some newly discovered structure-activity relationships are discussed, which may provide some important guidance for insecticide development.

  13. Insecticide residues on weathered passerine carcass feet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vyas, N.B.; Spann, J.W.; Hulse, C.S.; Butterbrodt, J.J.; Mengelkoch, J.; MacDougall, K.; Williams, B.; Pendergrass, P.

    2003-01-01

    Nine brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) were exposed to turf srayed with either EarthCare? (25% diazinon; 477 L a.i./ha) or Ortho-Klor? (12 .6% chlorpyrifos; 5.21 L a.i./ha.). Birds were euthanized and one foot from each bird was weathered outdoors for up to 28 days and the other foot was kept frozen until residue analysis. When compared to the unweathered feet, feet weathered for 28 days retained 43% and 37% of the diazinon and chlorpyrifors, respectively. Insecticide residues were below the level of detection (1.0 ppm) on control feet. Weathered feet may be used for determining organophosphorus insecticide exposure to birds.

  14. Neem (Azadirachta indica): towards the ideal insecticide?

    PubMed

    Benelli, Giovanni; Canale, Angelo; Toniolo, Chiara; Higuchi, Akon; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Pavela, Roman; Nicoletti, Marcello

    2017-02-01

    Pesticide resistance is going to change rapidly our antibiotics and insecticides arsenal. In this scenario, plant-derived natural products are considered valuable candidates to reverse this negative trend. Growing research attention is focused on neem (Azadirachta indica, Meliaceae), exploring the utility of its products as insecticides and antibiotics. In this review, we summarised the knowledge on neem oil and neem cake by-products in arthropod pest control, with special reference to mosquito vectors of public health importance. To the best of our knowledge, neem-borne products currently showed effective and eco-friendly features, including little non-target effects, multiple mechanisms of action, low cost, easy production in countries with limited industrial facilities. In particular, the potentiality of neem cake as ideal and affordable source of mosquitocidal compounds in anopheline and aedine control programmes is outlined. Overall, we propose the employ of neem-based products as an advantageous alternative to build newer and safer arthropod control tools.

  15. Insecticidal activity of certain medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Pavela, Roman

    2004-12-01

    The methanol extracts of eight species of medicinal plants were tested for insecticidal activity in third instar larvae of Egyptian cottonworm (Spodoptera littoralis). All extracts showed a certain degree of larval toxicity. The extracts of Ocimum basilicum, Origanum majorana and Salvia officinalis appeared to be highly toxic. The extracts significantly affected the growth indexes [relative growth rate (RGR), efficiency of conversion of ingested food (ECI), efficiency of conversion of digested food (ECD)].

  16. Contribution of leaf growth on the disappearance of fungicides used on tea under south Indian agroclimatic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Karthika, Chinnachamy; Muraleedharan, Narayanan Nair

    2009-01-01

    The sprayed chemicals on tea leaves disappear over a period of time by the influence of rainfall elution, evaporation, growth dilution, and photodegradation. Influence of plant growth on the four fungicides (hexaconazole, propiconazole, tridemorph, and c) was studied to know the constructive loss of fungicides. The study shows that residues of fungicides sprayed on tea shoots got diluted by the growing process. The expansion of a leaf took 8 to 11 d and more than 50% of the fungicide residues were cleaned out during this leaf expansion period. Under south Indian agroclimatic condition, the fungicides are sprayed at an interval of 10 d, so it is safe that the tea is harvested on the 10th day of the application of fungicides. PMID:19489107

  17. Contribution of leaf growth on the disappearance of fungicides used on tea under South Indian agroclimatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Karthika, Chinnachamy; Muraleedharan, Narayanan Nair

    2009-06-01

    The sprayed chemicals on tea leaves disappear over a period of time by the influence of rainfall elution, evaporation, growth dilution, and photodegradation. Influence of plant growth on the four fungicides (hexaconazole, propiconazole, tridemorph, and c) was studied to know the constructive loss of fungicides. The study shows that residues of fungicides sprayed on tea shoots got diluted by the growing process. The expansion of a leaf took 8 to 11 d and more than 50% of the fungicide residues were cleaned out during this leaf expansion period. Under south Indian agroclimatic condition, the fungicides are sprayed at an interval of 10 d, so it is safe that the tea is harvested on the 10th day of the application of fungicides.

  18. Sarmentine, a natural herbicide from Piper species with multiple herbicide mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Franck E.; Owens, Daniel K.; Watson, Susan B.; Asolkar, Ratnakar N.; Boddy, Louis G.

    2015-01-01

    Sarmentine, 1-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-(2E,4E)-2,4-decadien-1-one, is a natural amide isolated from the fruits of Piper species. The compound has a number of interesting biological properties, including its broad-spectrum activity on weeds as a contact herbicide. Initial studies highlighted a similarity in response between plants treated with sarmentine and herbicidal soaps such as pelargonic acid (nonanoic acid). However, little was known about the mechanism of action leading to the rapid desiccation of foliage treated by sarmentine. In cucumber cotyledon disc-assays, sarmentine induced rapid light-independent loss of membrane integrity at 100 μM or higher concentration, whereas 3 mM pelargonic acid was required for a similar effect. Sarmentine was between 10 and 30 times more active than pelargonic acid on wild mustard, velvetleaf, redroot pigweed and crabgrass. Additionally, the potency of 30 μM sarmentine was greatly stimulated by light, suggesting that this natural product may also interfere with photosynthetic processes. This was confirmed by observing a complete inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport at that concentration. Sarmentine also acted as an inhibitor of photosystem II (PSII) on isolated thylakoid membranes by competing for the binding site of plastoquinone. This can be attributed in part to structural similarities between herbicides like sarmentine and diuron. While this mechanism of action accounts for the light stimulation of the activity of sarmentine, it does not account for its ability to destabilize membranes in darkness. In this respect, sarmentine has some structural similarity to crotonoyl-CoA, the substrate of enoyl-ACP reductase, a key enzyme in the early steps of fatty acid synthesis. Inhibitors of this enzyme, such as triclosan, cause rapid loss of membrane integrity in the dark. Sarmentine inhibited the activity of enoyl-ACP reductase, with an I50app of 18.3 μM. Therefore, the herbicidal activity of sarmentine appears to be a

  19. The molecular genetics of insecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Ffrench-Constant, Richard H

    2013-08-01

    The past 60 years have seen a revolution in our understanding of the molecular genetics of insecticide resistance. While at first the field was split by arguments about the relative importance of mono- vs. polygenic resistance and field- vs. laboratory-based selection, the application of molecular cloning to insecticide targets and to the metabolic enzymes that degrade insecticides before they reach those targets has brought out an exponential growth in our understanding of the mutations involved. Molecular analysis has confirmed the relative importance of single major genes in target-site resistance and has also revealed some interesting surprises about the multi-gene families, such as cytochrome P450s, involved in metabolic resistance. Identification of the mutations involved in resistance has also led to parallel advances in our understanding of the enzymes and receptors involved, often with implications for the role of these receptors in humans. This Review seeks to provide an historical perspective on the impact of molecular biology on our understanding of resistance and to begin to look forward to the likely impact of rapid advances in both sequencing and genome-wide association analysis.

  20. Insecticide Resistance and Management Strategies in Urban Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fang; Lavine, Laura; O’Neal, Sally; Lavine, Mark; Foss, Carrie; Walsh, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    The increased urbanization of a growing global population makes imperative the development of sustainable integrated pest management (IPM) strategies for urban pest control. This emphasizes pests that are closely associated with the health and wellbeing of humans and domesticated animals. Concurrently there are regulatory requirements enforced to minimize inadvertent exposures to insecticides in the urban environment. Development of insecticide resistance management (IRM) strategies in urban ecosystems involves understanding the status and mechanisms of insecticide resistance and reducing insecticide selection pressure by combining multiple chemical and non-chemical approaches. In this review, we will focus on the commonly used insecticides and molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying insecticide resistance in six major urban insect pests: house fly, German cockroach, mosquitoes, red flour beetle, bed bugs and head louse. We will also discuss several strategies that may prove promising for future urban IPM programs. PMID:26751480

  1. Metabolism-Based Herbicide Resistance and Cross-Resistance in Crop Weeds: A Threat to Herbicide Sustainability and Global Crop Production1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Weedy plant species that have evolved resistance to herbicides due to enhanced metabolic capacity to detoxify herbicides (metabolic resistance) are a major issue. Metabolic herbicide resistance in weedy plant species first became evident in the 1980s in Australia (in Lolium rigidum) and the United Kingdom (in Alopecurus myosuroides) and is now increasingly recognized in several crop-weed species as a looming threat to herbicide sustainability and thus world crop production. Metabolic resistance often confers resistance to herbicides of different chemical groups and sites of action and can extend to new herbicide(s). Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, glycosyl transferase, and glutathione S-transferase are often implicated in herbicide metabolic resistance. However, precise biochemical and molecular genetic elucidation of metabolic resistance had been stalled until recently. Complex cytochrome P450 superfamilies, high genetic diversity in metabolic resistant weedy plant species (especially cross-pollinated species), and the complexity of genetic control of metabolic resistance have all been barriers to advances in understanding metabolic herbicide resistance. However, next-generation sequencing technologies and transcriptome-wide gene expression profiling are now revealing the genes endowing metabolic herbicide resistance in plants. This Update presents an historical review to current understanding of metabolic herbicide resistance evolution in weedy plant species. PMID:25106819

  2. Metabolism-based herbicide resistance and cross-resistance in crop weeds: a threat to herbicide sustainability and global crop production.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    Weedy plant species that have evolved resistance to herbicides due to enhanced metabolic capacity to detoxify herbicides (metabolic resistance) are a major issue. Metabolic herbicide resistance in weedy plant species first became evident in the 1980s in Australia (in Lolium rigidum) and the United Kingdom (in Alopecurus myosuroides) and is now increasingly recognized in several crop-weed species as a looming threat to herbicide sustainability and thus world crop production. Metabolic resistance often confers resistance to herbicides of different chemical groups and sites of action and can extend to new herbicide(s). Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, glycosyl transferase, and glutathione S-transferase are often implicated in herbicide metabolic resistance. However, precise biochemical and molecular genetic elucidation of metabolic resistance had been stalled until recently. Complex cytochrome P450 superfamilies, high genetic diversity in metabolic resistant weedy plant species (especially cross-pollinated species), and the complexity of genetic control of metabolic resistance have all been barriers to advances in understanding metabolic herbicide resistance. However, next-generation sequencing technologies and transcriptome-wide gene expression profiling are now revealing the genes endowing metabolic herbicide resistance in plants. This Update presents an historical review to current understanding of metabolic herbicide resistance evolution in weedy plant species. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Sertaconazole Nitrate Shows Fungicidal and Fungistatic Activities against Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Epidermophyton floccosum, Causative Agents of Tinea Pedis▿

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Muñoz, Alfonso J.; Tur-Tur, Cristina; Cárdenes, Delia C.; Estivill, Dolors; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The fungistatic and fungicidal activities of sertaconazole against dermatophytes were evaluated by testing 150 clinical isolates of causative agents of tinea pedis, Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Epidermophyton floccosum. The overall geometric means for fungistatic and fungicidal activities of sertaconazole against these isolates were 0.26 and 2.26 μg/ml, respectively, although values were higher for T. mentagrophytes than for the others. This is the first comprehensive demonstration of the fungicidal activity of sertaconazole against dermatophytes. PMID:21746955

  4. Chlorogenic acid is a fungicide active against phytopathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Guadalupe; Regente, Mariana; Jacobi, Santiago; Del Rio, Marianela; Pinedo, Marcela; de la Canal, Laura

    2017-08-01

    Plants synthesize diverse types of secondary metabolites and some of them participate in plant protection against pathogen attack. These compounds are biodegradable and renewable alternatives, which may be envisaged for the control of plant pests and diseases. Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is a phenolic secondary metabolite which accumulates in diverse plant tissues and can be found in several agro-industrial by-products and waste. The aim of this work was to determine whether CGA could control the growth of various plant pathogenic fungi, gaining insight into its mechanism of action. Microscopic analysis showed the complete inhibition of spore germination or reduction of mycelial growth for Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Fusarium solani, Verticillium dahliae, Botrytis cinerea and Cercospora sojina. CGA concentrations that did not completely abolish spore germination were able to produce a partial inhibition of mycelial growth. Viability tests and vital dye staining demonstrate that CGA induces fungal cell lysis. Its fungicidal activity involves an early membrane permeabilization of the spores. These results show the antifungal activity of CGA against phytopathogenic fungi relevant in horticulture and agriculture highlighting the potential of CGA-enriched wastes and by-products to be used as biofungicides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dissipation of the fungicide hexaconazole in oil palm plantation.

    PubMed

    Maznah, Zainol; Halimah, Muhamad; Ismail, Sahid; Idris, Abu Seman

    2015-12-01

    Hexaconazole is a potential fungicide to be used in the oil palm plantation for controlling the basal stem root (BSR) disease caused by Ganoderma boninense. Therefore, the dissipation rate of hexaconazole in an oil palm agroecosystem under field conditions was studied. Two experimental plots were treated with hexaconazole at the recommended dosage of 4.5 g a.i. palm(-1) (active ingredient) and at double the recommended dosage (9.0 g a.i. palm(-1)), whilst one plot was untreated as control. The residue of hexaconazole was detected in soil samples in the range of 2.74 to 0.78 and 7.13 to 1.66 mg kg(-1) at the recommended and double recommended dosage plots, respectively. An initial relatively rapid dissipation rate of hexaconazole residues occurred but reduced with time. The dissipation of hexaconazole in soil was described using first-order kinetics with the value of coefficient regression (r (2) > 0.8). The results indicated that hexaconazole has moderate persistence in the soil and the half-life was found to be 69.3 and 86.6 days in the recommended and double recommended dosage plot, respectively. The results obtained highlight that downward movement of hexaconazole was led by preferential flow as shown in image analysis. It can be concluded that varying soil conditions, environmental factors, and pesticide chemical properties of hexaconazole has a significant impact on dissipation of hexaconazole in soil under humid conditions.

  6. Phototransformation of azoxystrobin fungicide in organic solvents. Photoisomerization vs. photodegradation.

    PubMed

    Chastain, Jeoffrey; ter Halle, Alexandra; de Sainte Claire, Pascal; Voyard, Guillaume; Traikïa, Mounir; Richard, Claire

    2013-12-01

    Azoxystrobin is a systemic fungicide that has a tendency to accumulate at the surface of crop leaves or inside their cuticle where it undergoes photodegradation. Its photochemistry was investigated in n-heptane and isopropanol to mimic the polarity of wax leaves. Using analytical and kinetic data, we demonstrate that azoxystrobin (isomer E) undergoes efficient photoisomerization into the isomer Z with a quantum yield of 0.75 ± 0.08. This value is 30-fold higher than that reported in aqueous solution. The photoisomerization of isomer Z into azoxystrobin is more efficient with a chemical yield of 0.95 ± 0.1. In addition, a pseudo photostationary equilibrium is reached when the ratio [azoxystrobin]/[isomer Z] is 2.0 ± 0.1. Photodegradation also takes place from azoxystrobin (quantum yield = 0.073 ± 0.008). Photoproducts mainly arise from bond cleavage between rings and from demethylation of the ether with or without saturation of the acrylate double bond. Theoretical calculations were undertaken to investigate the photoisomerization mechanism and the solvent effect. These data show that the photochemical reactivity of azoxystrobin is enhanced when the solvent polarity decreases and thus should be significant in leaf waxes.

  7. Stereoselective degradation of chiral fungicide myclobutanil in rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xinru; Wang, Yao; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Wentao

    2014-01-01

    Myclobutanil, (RS)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-(1H-1, 2, 4-triazol-1-ylmethyl)hexanenitrile is a broad-spectrum systemic triazole fungicide which consists of a pair of enantiomers. The stereoselective degradation of myclobutanil was investigated in rat liver microsomes. The concentrations of myclobutanil enantiomers were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a cellulose-tris-(3,5-dimethyl-phenylcarbamate)-based chiral stationary phase (CDMPC-CSP) under reversed phase condition. The t(1/2) of (+)-myclobutanil is 8.49 min, while the t(1/2) of (-)-myclobutanil is 96.27 min. Such consequences clearly indicated that the degradation of myclobutanil in rat liver microsomes was stereoselective and the degradation rate of (+)-myclobutanil was much faster than (-)-myclobutanil. In addition, significant differences between two enantiomers were also observed in enzyme kinetic parameters. The V(max) of (+)-myclobutanil was about 4-fold of (-)-myclobutanil and the CL(int) of (+)-myclobutanil was three times as much as (-)-myclobutanil after incubation in rat liver microsomes. Corresponding consequences may shed light on the environmental and ecological risk assessment for myclobutanil and may improve human health. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Analysis of the mutations induced by conazole fungicides in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jeffrey A; Leavitt, Sharon A

    2010-05-01

    The mouse liver tumorigenic conazole fungicides triadimefon and propiconazole have previously been shown to be in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses, whereas the non-tumorigenic conazole myclobutanil was not mutagenic. DNA sequencing of the mutants recovered from each treatment group as well as from animals receiving control diet was conducted to gain additional insight into the mode of action by which tumorigenic conazoles induce mutations. Relative dinucleotide mutabilities (RDMs) were calculated for each possible dinucleotide in each treatment group and then examined by multivariate statistical analysis techniques. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of RDM values segregated two independent control groups together, along with the non-tumorigen myclobutanil. The two tumorigenic conazoles clustered together in a distinct grouping. Partitioning around mediods of RDM values into two clusters also groups the triadimefon and propiconazole together in one cluster and the two control groups and myclobutanil together in a second cluster. Principal component analysis of these results identifies two components that account for 88.3% of the variability in the points. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that propiconazole- and triadimefon-induced mutations do not represent clonal expansion of background mutations and support the hypothesis that they arise from the accumulation of reactive electrophilic metabolic intermediates within the liver in vivo.

  9. In vivo mutagenicity of conazole fungicides correlates with tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jeffrey A; Moore, Tanya; Leavitt, Sharon A

    2009-03-01

    Triadimefon, propiconazole and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. All three conazoles are generally inactive in short-term genotoxicity tests. We studied the in vivo mutagenicity of these three conazoles using the Big Blue mouse assay system. Groups of mice were fed either control diet or diet containing 1800 p.p.m. triadimefon, 2500 p.p.m. propiconazole or 2000 p.p.m. myclobutanil. After 4 days of feeding, mice were immediately euthanized, livers were removed, DNA isolated and lacI genes recovered into infectious bacteriophage lambda particles by in vitro packaging. Bacteriophage with mutations in the lacI gene was detected by infecting into Escherichia coli, and mutant frequencies were determined using a colorimetric plaque assay. Propiconazole induced a 1.97-fold increase in mutant frequency compared to concurrent controls (P = 0.018) and triadimefon induced a 1.94-fold increase compared to concurrent controls (P = 0.009). Myclobutanil did not induce any change in mutant frequency (P = 0.548). These results provide the first evidence that the hepatotumorigenic conazoles are capable of inducing mutations in liver in vivo while the non-tumorigen myclobutanil is not, suggesting that mutagenicity may represent a key event in conazoles tumorigenic mode of action.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide as a fungicide for fish culture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, V.K.; Rach, J.J.; Schreier, Theresa M.

    1994-01-01

    Antifungal agents are needed to maintain healthy stocks of fish in the intensive culture systems currently employed in fish hatcheries. Malachite green has been the most widely used antifungal agent; however, its potential for producing teratology in animals and fish precludes further use in fish culture. Preliminary studies at the National Fisheries Research Center, La Crosse, WI, USA (La Crosse Center) indicate that hydrogen peroxide is effective for control of Saprolegnia sp. fungus on incubating eggs of rainbow trout. It is also effective against a wide variety of other organisms such as bacteria, yeasts, viruses, and spores, and has been proposed as a treatment for sea lice on salmon. Hydrogen peroxide and its primary decomposition products, oxygen and water, are not systemic poisons and are considered environmentally compatible. In response to a petition from the La Crosse Center, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently classified hydrogen peroxide as a 'low regulatory priority' when used for control of fungus on fish and fish eggs. Preliminary tests conducted at the La Crosse Center suggest that prophylactic treatments of 250 to 500 ppm (based on 100% active ingredient) for 15 minutes every other day will inhibit fungal infections on healthy rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) eggs. This treatment regime also seems to inhibit fungal development and increase hatching success among infected eggs. Efficacy and safety of hydrogen peroxide as a fungicide for fish are currently being evaluated.

  11. Azole fungicides: occurrence and fate in wastewater and surface waters.

    PubMed

    Kahle, Maren; Buerge, Ignaz J; Hauser, Andrea; Müller, Markus D; Poiger, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    The mode of action of azole compounds implies a potential to affect endocrine systems of different organisms and is reason for environmental concern. The occurrence and fate of nine agricultural azole fungicides, some of them also used as biocides, and four azole pharmaceuticals were studied in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and lakes in Switzerland. Two pharmaceuticals (fluconazole, clotrimazole, 10-110 ng L(-1)) and two biocides (propiconazole, tebuconazole, 1-30 ng L(-1)) were consistently observed in WWTP influents. Loads determined in untreated and treated wastewater indicated thatfluconazole, propiconazole, and tebuconazole were largely unaffected by wastewater treatment, but clotrimazole was effectively eliminated (> 80%). Incubation studies with activated sludge showed no degradation for fluconazole and clotrimazole within 24 h, but strong sorption of clotrimazole to activated sludge. Slow degradation and some sorption were observed for tebuconazole and propiconazole (degradation half-lives, 2-3 d). In lakes, fluconazole, propiconazole, and tebuconazole were detected at low nanogram-per-liter levels. Concentrations of the pharmaceutical fluconazole correlated with the expected contamination by domestic wastewater, but not those of the biocides. Per capita loads of propiconazole and tebuconazole in lakes suggested additional inputs; for example, from agricultural use or urban runoff rainwater.

  12. Acylamino acid chiral fungicides on toxiciepigenetics in lambda DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jing; Zhu, Feilong; Hao, Weiyu; Xu, Qi; Chang, Jin; Wang, Huili; Guo, Baoyuan

    2017-11-01

    Acylamino acid chiral fungicides (AACFs) are low-toxicity pesticides and considered as non-carcinogenic chemicals to laboratory animals. Though AACFs have potential toxicological effects on mammals by non-genotoxic mechanisms, the toxicoepigenomics of AACFs has not been documented. In this article, we explored toxiciepigenetics of metalaxyl, benalaxyl and furalaxyl through epigenetics research on lambda DNA under different concentration exposure. The toxicoepigenomic difference of stereoisomers was examined also. Our results showed that AACFs would affect methyltransferase activity resulting in modulating DNA methylation levels and pattern. The LOAEL of R-metalaxyl and S-metalaxyl were 30 mM and 0.3 mM, respectively. The LOAEL of (R, S)-benalaxyl and (R, S)-furalaxyl were 0.3 Mm and 30 mM, respectively. A significant dose-response effect between (R, S)-benalaxyl and global methylation level was observed. Global methylation level was more susceptible to S-enantiomer compared to R-enantiomer, which indicated enantiomers of AACFs have the enantioselectivity in toxiciepigenetics. Moreover, the dependence of the methylation inhibition on the chiral center of metalaxyl may suggest a considerable specificity of the compound of AACFs for DNA methyltransferases. The inhibition effect between R-enantiomer and S-enantiomer of AACFs on DNA methylation levels generated in this study is important for low-toxicity pesticides toxicoepigenomics evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effectiveness of organo-phosphorus insecticides against houseflies and mosquitos

    PubMed Central

    Lindquist, A. W.

    1957-01-01

    The paper describes the research being undertaken on organo-phosphorus insecticides for the control of houseflies and mosquitos. The information obtained from laboratory and field tests indicates that these insecticides are at present effective substitutes for DDT and other chlorinated-hydrocarbon insecticides for use against resistant houseflies and culicine mosquitos, but the residual applications are not as long lasting as those of DDT and therefore will probably not be as efficient in anopheline control. PMID:13413645

  14. Proximity to crops and residential to agricultural herbicides in Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, M.H.; Lubin, J.; Giglierano, J.; Colt, J.S.; Wolter, C.; Bekiroglu, N.; Camann, D.; Hartge, P.; Nuckols, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Rural residents can be exposed to agricultural pesticides through the proximity of their homes to crop fields. Previously, we developed a method to create historical crop maps using a geographic information system. The aim of the present study was to determine whether crop maps are useful for predicting levels of crop herbicides in carpet dust samples from residences. From homes of participants in a case-control study of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Iowa (1998-2000), we collected vacuum cleaner dust and measured 14 herbicides with high use on corn and soybeans in Iowa. Of 112 homes, 58% of residences had crops within 500 m of their home, an intermediate distance for primary drift from aerial and ground applications. Detection rates for herbicides ranged from 0% for metribuzin and cyanazine to 95% for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Six herbicides used almost exclusively in agriculture were detected in 28% of homes. Detections and concentrations were highest in homes with an active farmer. Increasing acreage of corn and soybean fields within 750 m of homes was associated with significantly elevated odds of detecting agricultural herbicides compared with homes with no crops within 750 m (adjusted odds ratio per 10 acres = 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.11). Herbicide concentrations also increased significantly with increasing acreage within 750 m. We evaluated the distance of crop fields from the home at < 100, 101-250, 251-500, and 501-750 m. Including the crop buffer distance parameters in the model did not significantly improve the fit compared with a model with total acres within 750 m. Our results indicate that crop maps may be a useful method for estimating levels of herbicides in homes from nearby crop fields.

  15. Herbicides interfere with antigrazer defenses in Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuexia; Sun, Yunfei; Zhang, Xingxing; Heng, Hailu; Nan, Haihong; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Yuan; Yang, Zhou

    2016-11-01

    The extensive application of herbicides has led to a serious threat of herbicide contamination to aquatic ecosystem. Herbicide exposure affects aquatic communities not only by exerting toxicity on single species but also by changing interspecific interactions. This study investigated the antigrazer defenses of the common green alga Scenedesmus obliquus against different herbicides [glyphosate, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), and atrazine] at various concentrations (0-2.0 mg L(-1)). In the presence of grazer (Daphnia)-derived cues, S. obliquus populations without herbicides formed high proportions of multicelled (e.g., four- and eight-celled) colonies. This result confirms that S. obliquus exhibits a morphological defense against grazing risk. At the low concentration range of 0.002-0.02 mg L(-1), the three herbicides exerted no influence on the growth and photosynthetic efficiency of S. obliquus, and multicelled colonies showed constant proportions. At the high concentration range of 0.20-2.0 mg L(-1), atrazine significantly inhibited the algal growth and photosynthesis whereas glyphosate or 2,4-D did not. Nonetheless, these levels of glyphosate or 2,4-D remarkably decreased the proportion of multicelled colonies, with reduced numbers of cells per particle in Daphnia filtrate-treated population. No eight-celled colony was formed after treatment with atrazine at 0.20-2.0 mg L(-1) despite the addition of Daphnia filtrate. These results suggest that herbicide exposure impairs antigrazer colonial morphs in phytoplankton although it is not sufficient to hamper algal growth. This phenomenon can increase the risk of predation by herbivores, thereby disrupting the inducible phytoplankton community. Furthermore, the predator-prey interactions between herbivores and phytoplankton can be potentially changed more seriously than previously considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comprehensive understanding of acetohydroxyacid synthase inhibition by different herbicide families

    PubMed Central

    Nouwens, Amanda; Lonhienne, Thierry G.; Guddat, Luke W.

    2017-01-01

    Five commercial herbicide families inhibit acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS, E.C. 2.2.1.6), which is the first enzyme in the branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis pathway. The popularity of these herbicides is due to their low application rates, high crop vs. weed selectivity, and low toxicity in animals. Here, we have determined the crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana AHAS in complex with two members of the pyrimidinyl-benzoate (PYB) and two members of the sulfonylamino-carbonyl-triazolinone (SCT) herbicide families, revealing the structural basis for their inhibitory activity. Bispyribac, a member of the PYBs, possesses three aromatic rings and these adopt a twisted “S”-shaped conformation when bound to A. thaliana AHAS (AtAHAS) with the pyrimidinyl group inserted deepest into the herbicide binding site. The SCTs bind such that the triazolinone ring is inserted deepest into the herbicide binding site. Both compound classes fill the channel that leads to the active site, thus preventing substrate binding. The crystal structures and mass spectrometry also show that when these herbicides bind, thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) is modified. When the PYBs bind, the thiazolium ring is cleaved, but when the SCTs bind, ThDP is modified to thiamine 2-thiazolone diphosphate. Kinetic studies show that these compounds not only trigger reversible accumulative inhibition of AHAS, but also can induce inhibition linked with ThDP degradation. Here, we describe the features that contribute to the extraordinarily powerful herbicidal activity exhibited by four classes of AHAS inhibitors. PMID:28137884

  17. Measuring herbicide volatilization from bare soil.

    PubMed

    Yates, S R

    2006-05-15

    A field experiment was conducted to measure surface dissipation and volatilization of the herbicide triallate after application to bare soil using micrometeorological, chamber, and soil-loss methods. The volatilization rate was measured continuously for 6.5 days and the range in the daily peak values for the integrated horizontal flux method was from 32.4 (day 5) to 235.2 g ha(-1) d(-1) (day 1), for the theoretical profile shape method was from 31.5 to 213.0 g ha(-1) d(-1), and for the flux chamber was from 15.7 to 47.8 g ha(-1) d(-1). Soil samples were taken within 30 min after application and the measured mass of triallate was 8.75 kg ha(-1). The measured triallate mass in the soil at the end of the experiment was approximately 6 kg ha(-1). The triallate dissipation rate, obtained by soil sampling, was approximately 334 g ha(-1) d(-1) (98 g d(-1)) and the average rate of volatilization was 361 g ha(-1) d(-1). Soil sampling at the end of the experiment showed that approximately 31% (0.803 kg/2.56 kg) of the triallate mass was lost from the soil. Significant volatilization of triallate is possible when applied directly to the soil surface without incorporation.

  18. Herbicides and transformation products in surface waters of the Midwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Kalkhoff, S.J.; Porter, S.D.

    2003-01-01

    Most herbicides applied to crops are adsorbed by plants or transformed (degraded) in the soil, but small fractions are lost from fields and either move to streams in overland runoff, near surface flow, or subsurface drains, or they infiltrate slowly to ground water. Herbicide transformation products (TPs) can be more or less mobile and more or less toxic in the environment than their source herbicides. To obtain information on the concentrations of selected herbicides and TPs in surface waters of the Midwestern United States, 151 water samples were collected from 71 streams and five reservoir outflows in 1998. These samples were analyzed for 13 herbicides and 10 herbicide TPs. Herbicide TPs were found to occur as frequently or more frequently than source herbicides and at concentrations that were often larger than their source herbicides. Most samples contained a mixture of more than 10 different herbicides or TPs. The ratios of TPs to herbicide concentrations can be used to determine the source of herbicides in streams. Results of a two-component mixing model suggest that on average 90 percent or more of the herbicide mass in Midwestern streams during early summer runoff events originates from the runoff and 10 percent or less comes from increased ground water discharge.

  19. Impact of Chemical and Biological Fungicides Applied to Grapevine on Grape Biofilm, Must, and Wine Microbial Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Escribano-Viana, Rocío; López-Alfaro, Isabel; López, Rosa; Santamaría, Pilar; Gutiérrez, Ana R.; González-Arenzana, Lucía

    2018-01-01

    This study was aimed to measure the impact of the application of a bio-fungicide against Botrytis cinerea on the microbiota involved in the alcoholic fermentation (AF) of Tempranillo Rioja wines. For this purpose, a bio-fungicide composed of the biological control bacterium Bacillus subtilis QST713 was applied to the vineyard. The microbial diversity was analyzed from grape biofilm to wine. Impact on microbial diversity was measured employing indexes assessed with the software PAST 3.10 P.D. Results were compared to non-treated samples and to samples treated with a chemical fungicide mainly composed by fenhexamid. Overall, the impact of the biological-fungicide (bio-fungicide) on the microbial diversity assessed for grape biofilm and for musts was not remarkable. Neither of the tested fungicides enhanced the growth of any species or acted against the development of any microbial groups. The bio-fungicide had no significant impact on the wine microbiota whereas the chemical fungicide caused a reduction of microbial community richness and diversity. Although environmental threats might generate a detriment of the microbial species richness, in this study the tested bio-fungicide did not modify the structure of the microbial community. Indeed, some of the Bacillus applied at the grape surface, were detected at the end of the AF showing its resilience to the harsh environment of the winemaking; in contrast, its impact on wine quality during aging is yet unknown. PMID:29467723

  20. Impact of Chemical and Biological Fungicides Applied to Grapevine on Grape Biofilm, Must, and Wine Microbial Diversity.

    PubMed

    Escribano-Viana, Rocío; López-Alfaro, Isabel; López, Rosa; Santamaría, Pilar; Gutiérrez, Ana R; González-Arenzana, Lucía

    2018-01-01

    This study was aimed to measure the impact of the application of a bio-fungicide against Botrytis cinerea on the microbiota involved in the alcoholic fermentation (AF) of Tempranillo Rioja wines. For this purpose, a bio-fungicide composed of the biological control bacterium Bacillus subtilis QST713 was applied to the vineyard. The microbial diversity was analyzed from grape biofilm to wine. Impact on microbial diversity was measured employing indexes assessed with the software PAST 3.10 P.D. Results were compared to non-treated samples and to samples treated with a chemical fungicide mainly composed by fenhexamid. Overall, the impact of the biological-fungicide (bio-fungicide) on the microbial diversity assessed for grape biofilm and for musts was not remarkable. Neither of the tested fungicides enhanced the growth of any species or acted against the development of any microbial groups. The bio-fungicide had no significant impact on the wine microbiota whereas the chemical fungicide caused a reduction of microbial community richness and diversity. Although environmental threats might generate a detriment of the microbial species richness, in this study the tested bio-fungicide did not modify the structure of the microbial community. Indeed, some of the Bacillus applied at the grape surface, were detected at the end of the AF showing its resilience to the harsh environment of the winemaking; in contrast, its impact on wine quality during aging is yet unknown.

  1. Comparative toxicity of insecticides to Choristoneura species (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    Treesearch

    Jacqueline L. Robertson; Nancy L. Gillette; Barbara A. Lucas; Robert M. Russell; N.E. Savin

    1978-01-01

    Selected carbamate, chlorinated hydrocarbon, organophosphorous, and pyrethroid insecticides were tested on six Choristoneura species: conflictana (Walker), fumiferana (Clemens), lambertiana ponderosana Obraztsov, occidentalis Freeman, pinus Freeman, and...

  2. Toxicity of Pesticide Tank Mixtures from Rice Crops Against Telenomus podisi Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae).

    PubMed

    de B Pazini, J; Pasini, R A; Rakes, M; de Armas, F S; Seidel, E J; da S Martins, J F; Grützmacher, A D

    2017-08-01

    The use of insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides commonly occurs in mixtures in tanks in order to control phytosanitary problems in crops. However, there is no information regarding the effects of these mixtures on non-target organisms associated to the rice agroecosystem. The aim of this study was to know the toxicity of pesticide tank mixtures from rice crops against Telenomus podisi Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae). Based on the methods adapted from the International Organisation for Biological and Integrated Control of Noxious Animals and Plants (IOBC), adults of T. podisi were exposed to residues of insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides, individually or in mixture commonly used by growers, in laboratory and on rice plants in a greenhouse. The mixture between fungicides tebuconazole, triclyclazole, and azoxystrobin and the mixture between herbicides cyhalofop-butyl, imazethapyr, imazapyr/imazapic, and penoxsulam are harmless to T. podisi and can be used in irrigated rice crops without harming the natural biological control. The insecticides cypermethin, thiamethoxam, and bifenthrin/carbosulfan increase the toxicity of the mixtures in tank with herbicides and fungicides, being more toxic to T. podisi and less preferred for use in phytosanitary treatments in the rice crop protection.

  3. A Two-Locus Model of the Evolution of Insecticide Resistance to Inform and Optimise Public Health Insecticide Deployment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We develop a flexible, two-locus model for the spread of insecticide resistance applicable to mosquito species that transmit human diseases such as malaria. The model allows differential exposure of males and females, allows them to encounter high or low concentrations of insecticide, and allows selection pressures and dominance values to differ depending on the concentration of insecticide encountered. We demonstrate its application by investigating the relative merits of sequential use of insecticides versus their deployment as a mixture to minimise the spread of resistance. We recover previously published results as subsets of this model and conduct a sensitivity analysis over an extensive parameter space to identify what circumstances favour mixtures over sequences. Both strategies lasted more than 500 mosquito generations (or about 40 years) in 24% of runs, while in those runs where resistance had spread to high levels by 500 generations, 56% favoured sequential use and 44% favoured mixtures. Mixtures are favoured when insecticide effectiveness (their ability to kill homozygous susceptible mosquitoes) is high and exposure (the proportion of mosquitoes that encounter the insecticide) is low. If insecticides do not reliably kill homozygous sensitive genotypes, it is likely that sequential deployment will be a more robust strategy. Resistance to an insecticide always spreads slower if that insecticide is used in a mixture although this may be insufficient to outperform sequential use: for example, a mixture may last 5 years while the two insecticides deployed individually may last 3 and 4 years giving an overall ‘lifespan’ of 7 years for sequential use. We emphasise that this paper is primarily about designing and implementing a flexible modelling strategy to investigate the spread of insecticide resistance in vector populations and demonstrate how our model can identify vector control strategies most likely to minimise the spread of insecticide resistance

  4. Cloud based, Open Source Software Application for Mitigating Herbicide Drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraswat, D.; Scott, B.

    2014-12-01

    The spread of herbicide resistant weeds has resulted in the need for clearly marked fields. In response to this need, the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service launched a program named Flag the Technology in 2011. This program uses color-coded flags as a visual alert of the herbicide trait technology within a farm field. The flag based program also serves to help avoid herbicide misapplication and prevent herbicide drift damage between fields with differing crop technologies. This program has been endorsed by Southern Weed Science Society of America and is attracting interest from across the USA, Canada, and Australia. However, flags have risk of misplacement or disappearance due to mischief or severe windstorms/thunderstorms, respectively. This presentation will discuss the design and development of a cloud-based, free application utilizing open-source technologies, called Flag the Technology Cloud (FTTCloud), for allowing agricultural stakeholders to color code their farm fields for indicating herbicide resistant technologies. The developed software utilizes modern web development practices, widely used design technologies, and basic geographic information system (GIS) based interactive interfaces for representing, color-coding, searching, and visualizing fields. This program has also been made compatible for a wider usability on different size devices- smartphones, tablets, desktops and laptops.

  5. Mode of Action Studies on Nitrodiphenyl Ether Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Bowyer, John R.; Smith, Beverly J.; Camilleri, Patrick; Lee, Susan A.

    1987-01-01

    5-[2-Chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-2-nitroacetophenone oxime-o-(acetic acid, methyl ester) (DPEI), is a potent nitrodiphenyl ether herbicide which causes rapid leaf wilting, membrane lipid peroxidation, and chlorophyll destruction in a process which is both light- and O2-dependent. These effects resemble those of other nitrodiphenyl ether herbicides. Unlike paraquat, the herbicidal effects of DPEI are only slightly reduced by pretreatment with the photosynthetic electron transport inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea. DPEI is a weak inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport (I50 15 micromolar for water to paraquat) in vitro, with at least one site of action at the cytochrome b6f complex. Ultrastructural studies and measurements of ethane formation resulting from lipid peroxidation indicate that mutants of barley lacking photosystem I (PSI) (viridis-zb63) or photosystem II (viridis-zd69) are resistant to paraquat but susceptible to DPEI. The results indicate that electron transfer through both photosystems is not essential for the toxic effects of nitrodiphenyl ether herbicides. Furthermore, the results show that neither cyclic electron transport around PSI, nor the diversion of electrons from PSI to O2 when NADPH consumption is blocked are essential for the phytotoxicity of nitrodiphenyl ether herbicides. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16665297

  6. The structure-activity relationship in herbicidal monosubstituted sulfonylureas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zheng-Ming; Ma, Yi; Guddat, Luke

    The herbicide sulfonylurea (SU) belongs to one of the most important class of herbicides worldwide. It is well known for its ecofriendly, extreme low toxicity towards mammals and ultralow dosage application. The original inventor, G Levitt, set out structure-activity relationship (SAR) guidelines for SU structural design to attain superhigh bioactivity. A new approach to SU molecular design has been developed. After the analysis of scores of SU products by X-ray diffraction methodology and after greenhouse herbicidal screening of 900 novel SU structures synthesized in the authors laboratory, it was found that several SU structures containing a monosubstituted pyrimidine moiety retainmore » excellent herbicidal characteristics, which has led to partial revision of the Levitt guidelines. Among the novel SU molecules, monosulfuron and monosulfuron-ester have been developed into two new herbicides that have been officially approved for field application and applied in millet and wheat fields in China. A systematic structural study of the new substrate-target complex and the relative mode of action in comparison with conventional SU has been carried out. A new mode of action has been postulated.« less

  7. Effects of the herbicide imazapyr on juvenile Oregon spotted frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yahnke, Amy E.; Grue, Christian E.; Hayes, Marc P.; Troiano, Alexandra T.

    2013-01-01

    Conflict between native amphibians and aquatic weed management in the Pacific Northwest is rarely recognized because most native stillwater-breeding amphibian species move upland during summer, when herbicide application to control weeds in aquatic habitats typically occurs. However, aquatic weed management may pose a risk for aquatic species present in wetlands through the summer, such as the Oregon spotted frog (OSF, Rana pretiosa), a state endangered species in Washington. Acute toxicity of herbicides used to control aquatic weeds tends to be low, but the direct effects of herbicide tank mixes on OSFs have remained unexamined. We exposed juvenile OSFs to tank mixes of the herbicide imazapyr, a surfactant, and a marker dye in a 96-h static-renewal test. The tank mix was chosen because of its low toxicity to fish and its effectiveness in aquatic weed control. Concentrations were those associated with low-volume (3.5 L/ha) and high-volume (7.0 L/ha) applications of imazapyr and a clean-water control. Following exposure, frogs were reared for two months in clean water to identify potential latent effects on growth. Endpoints evaluated included feeding behavior, growth, and body and liver condition indices. We recorded no mortalities and found no significant differences for any end point between the herbicide-exposed and clean-water control frogs. The results suggest that imazapyr use in wetland restoration poses a low risk of direct toxic effects on juvenile OSFs.

  8. Phenylurea herbicide sorption to biochars and agricultural soil

    PubMed Central

    WANG, DAOYUAN; MUKOME, FUNGAI N. D.; YAN, DENGHUA; WANG, HAO; SCOW, KATE M.; PARIKH, SANJAI J.

    2016-01-01

    Biochar is increasingly been used as a soil amendment to improve water holding capacity, reduce nutrient leaching, increase soil pH and also as a means to reduce contamination through sorption of heavy metals or organic pollutants. The sorption behavior of three phenylurea herbicides (monuron, diuron, linuron) on five biochars (Enhanced Biochar, Hog Waste, Turkey Litter, Walnut Shell and Wood Feedstock) and an agricultural soil (Yolo silt loam) was investigated using a batch equilibration method. Sorption isotherms of herbicides to biochars were well described by the Freundlich model (R2 = 0.93 -- 0.97). The adsorption KF values ranged from 6.94 to 1306.95 mg kg−1 and indicated the sorption of herbicides in the biochars and Yolo soil was in the sequence of linuron > diuron > monuron and walnut shell biochar > wood feedstock biochar > turkey litter biochar > enhanced biochar > hog waste biochar > Yolo soil. These data show that sorption of herbicides to biochar can have both positive (reduced off-site transport) and negative (reduced herbicide efficacy) implications and specific biochar properties, such as H/C ratio and surface area, should be considered together with soil type, agriculture chemical and climate condition in biochar application to agricultural soil to optimize the system for both agricultural and environmental benefits. PMID:26065514

  9. Development of imidazolinone herbicide tolerant borage (Borago officinalis L.).

    PubMed

    Song, Dongyan; Wu, Guohai; Vrinten, Patricia; Qiu, Xiao

    2017-09-01

    Borage (Borago officinalis) is an annual herb that produces a high level of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) in its seed oil. Due to the recognized health benefits of GLA, borage is now commercially cultivated worldwide. However, an herbicide-tolerant variety for effective weed management has not yet been developed. Here we report the generation and characterization of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) induced borage mutant lines tolerant to the herbicide imidazolinone. An EMS-mutagenized borage population was generated by using a series of concentrations of EMS to treat mature borage seeds. Screening of the M2 and M3 borage plants using an herbicide treatment resulted in the identification of two imidazolinone-tolerant lines. Sequence analysis of two acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) genes, AHAS1 and AHAS2, from the mutant (tolerant) and wild type (susceptible) borage plants showed that single nucleotide substitutions which resulted in amino acid changes occurred in AHAS1 and AHAS2, respectively in the two tolerant lines. A KASP marker was then developed to differentiate the homozygous susceptible, homozygous tolerant and heterozygous borage plants. An in vitro assay showed that homozygous tolerant borage carrying the AHAS1 mutation retained significantly higher AHAS activity than susceptible borage across different imazamox concentrations. A herbicide dose response test indicated that the line with the AHAS1 mutation could tolerate four times the normally used field concentration of "Solo" herbicide. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Catchment-scale herbicides transport: Theory and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Thomet, M.; Botter, G.; Rinaldo, A.

    2013-02-01

    This paper proposes and tests a model which couples the description of hydrologic flow and transport of herbicides at catchment scales. The model accounts for streamflow components' age to characterize short and long term fluctuations of herbicide flux concentrations in stream waters, whose peaks exceeding a toxic threshold are key to exposure risk of aquatic ecosystems. The model is based on a travel time formulation of transport embedding a source zone that describes near surface herbicide dynamics. To this aim we generalize a recently proposed scheme for the analytical derivation of travel time distributions to the case of solutes that can be partially taken up by transpiration and undergo chemical degradation. The framework developed is evaluated by comparing modeled hydrographs and atrazine chemographs with those measured in the Aabach agricultural catchment (Switzerland). The model proves reliable in defining complex transport features shaped by the interplay of long term processes, related to the persistence of solute components in soils, and short term dynamics related to storm inter-arrivals. The effects of stochasticity in rainfall patterns and application dates on concentrations and loads in runoff are assessed via Monte Carlo simulations, highlighting the crucial role played by the first rainfall event occurring after herbicide application. A probabilistic framework for critical determinants of exposure risk to aquatic communities is defined. Modeling of herbicides circulation at catchment scale thus emerges as essential tools for ecological risk assessment.

  11. Impact of agriculture on the selection of insecticide resistance in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae: a multigenerational study in controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Nkya, Theresia Estomih; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Laporte, Frederic; Akhouayri, Idir; Mosha, Franklin; Magesa, Stephen; Kisinza, William; David, Jean-Philippe

    2014-10-16

    Resistance of mosquitoes to insecticides is mainly attributed to their adaptation to vector control interventions. Although pesticides used in agriculture have been frequently mentioned as an additional force driving the selection of resistance, only a few studies were dedicated to validate this hypothesis and characterise the underlying mechanisms. While insecticide resistance is rising dramatically in Africa, deciphering how agriculture affects resistance is crucial for improving resistance management strategies. In this context, the multigenerational effect of agricultural pollutants on the selection of insecticide resistance was examined in Anopheles gambiae. An urban Tanzanian An. gambiae population displaying a low resistance level was used as a parental strain for a selection experiment across 20 generations. At each generation larvae were selected with a mixture containing pesticides and herbicides classically used in agriculture in Africa. The resistance levels of adults to deltamethrin, DDT and bendiocarb were compared between the selected and non-selected strains across the selection process together with the frequency of kdr mutations. A microarray approach was used for pinpointing transcription level variations selected by the agricultural pesticide mixture at the adult stage. A gradual increase of adult resistance to all insecticides was observed across the selection process. The frequency of the L1014S kdr mutation rose from 1.6% to 12.5% after 20 generations of selection. Microarray analysis identified 90 transcripts over-transcribed in the selected strain as compared to the parental and the non-selected strains. Genes encoding cuticle proteins, detoxification enzymes, proteins linked to neurotransmitter activity and transcription regulators were mainly affected. RT-qPCR transcription profiling of candidate genes across multiple generations supported their link with insecticide resistance. This study confirms the potency of agriculture in selecting

  12. ASSESSING THE RISKS OF NON-TARGET TERRESTRIAL PLANTS FROM HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of chemical herbicides to reduce weed competition is a major contributing factor to the high productivity of conventional intensive agricultural cropping systems. However, because of their inherent phytotoxicity, movement of herbicides from target crops and soils can adverse...

  13. Plant reproduction is altered by simulated herbicide drift to constructed plant communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herbicide drift may have unintended impacts on native vegetation, adversely affecting structure and function of plant communities. However, these potential effects have been rarely studied or quantified. To determine potential ecological effects of herbicide drift, we construct...

  14. Bioactivity of Several Herbicides on the Nanogram Level Under Different Soil Moisture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jung, S C; Kuk, Y I; Senseman, S A; Ahn, H G; Seong, C N; Lee, D J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a double-tube centrifuge method was employed to determine the effects of soil moisture on the bioactivity of cafenstrole, pretilachlor, benfuresate, oxyfluorfen and simetryn. In general, the available herbicide concentration in soil solution (ACSS) showed little change as soil moisture increased for herbicides. The total available herbicide in soil solution (TASS) typically increased as soil moisture increased for all herbicides. The relationship between TASS and % growth rate based on dry weight showed strong linear relationships for both cafenstrole and pretilachlor, with r2 values of 0.95 and 0.84, respectively. Increasing TASS values were consistent with increasing herbicide water solubility, with the exception of the ionizable herbicide simetryn. Plant absorption and % growth rate exhibited a strong linear relationship with TASS. According to the results suggested that TASS was a better predictor of herbicidal bioactivity than ACSS for all herbicides under unsaturated soil moisture conditions.

  15. Accelerated biodegradation of a herbicide applied to the roadside environment using adapted soil microorganisms : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1994-06-01

    The extent and duration of pollution from herbicide spills and deliberate applications is related to properties of the herbicide and soil. Objectives of this study included the development of experimental procedures and mathematical models to determi...

  16. Long-term trends in the intensity and relative toxicity of herbicide use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniss, Andrew R.

    2017-04-01

    Herbicide use is among the most criticized aspects of modern farming, especially as it relates to genetically engineered (GE) crops. Many previous analyses have used flawed metrics to evaluate herbicide intensity and toxicity trends. Here, I show that herbicide use intensity increased over the last 25 years in maize, cotton, rice and wheat. Although GE crops have been previously implicated in increasing herbicide use, herbicide increases were more rapid in non-GE crops. Even as herbicide use increased, chronic toxicity associated with herbicide use decreased in two out of six crops, while acute toxicity decreased in four out of six crops. In the final year for which data were available (2014 or 2015), glyphosate accounted for 26% of maize, 43% of soybean and 45% of cotton herbicide applications. However, due to relatively low chronic toxicity, glyphosate contributed only 0.1, 0.3 and 3.5% of the chronic toxicity hazard in those crops, respectively.

  17. Interaction of chiral herbicides with soil microorganisms, algae and vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Asad, Muhammad Asad Ullah; Lavoie, Michel; Song, Hao; Jin, Yujian; Fu, Zhengwei; Qian, Haifeng

    2017-02-15

    Chiral herbicides are often used in agriculture as racemic mixtures, although studies have shown that the fate and toxicity of herbicide enantiomers to target and non-target plants can be enantioselective and that herbicide toxicity can be mediated by only one enantiomer. If one enantiomer is active against the target plant, the use of enantiomer-rich herbicide mixtures instead of racemic herbicides could decrease the amount of herbicide applied to a crop and the cost of herbicide application, as well as unintended toxic herbicide effects in the environment. Such a change in the management of herbicide applications requires in-depth knowledge and a critical analysis of the fate and effects of herbicide enantiomers in the environment. This review article first synthesizes the current state of knowledge on soil and plant biodegradation of herbicide enantiomers. Second, we discuss our understanding of the biochemical toxicity mechanisms associated with both enantiomers in target and non-target plants gained from state-of-the-art genomic, proteomic and metabolomic tools. Third, we present the emerging view on the "side effects" of herbicides in the root microbiome and their repercussions on target or non-target plant metabolism. Although our review of the literature indicates that the toxicity of herbicide enantiomers is highly variable depending on plant species and herbicides, we found general trends in the enantioselective toxic effects of different herbicides in vascular plants and algae. The present study will be helpful for pesticide risk assessments as well as for the management of applying enriched-enantiomer herbicides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of fungicide on Fusarium verticillioides mycelial morphology and fumonisin B 1 production

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, Tatiana de Á.; Bordini, Jaqueline G.; Saito, Gervásio H.; Andrade, Célia G.T. de J.; Ono, Mario A.; Hirooka, Elisa Y.; Vizoni, Édio; Ono, Elisabete Y.S.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of fludioxonil + metalaxyl-M on the mycelial morphology, sporulation and fumonisin B 1 production by Fusarium verticillioides 103 F was evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the fungicide caused inhibition of hyphal growth and defects on hyphae morphology such as cell wall disruption, withered hyphae, and excessive septation. In addition, extracellular material around the hyphae was rarely observed in the presence of fludioxonil + metalaxyl-M. While promoting the reduction of mycelial growth, the fungicide increased sporulation of F. verticillioides compared to the control, and the highest production occurred on the 14 th day in the treatments and on the 10 th day in the control cultures. Fumonisin B 1 production in the culture media containing the fungicide (treatment) was detected from the 7 th day incubation, whereas in cultures without fungicide (control) it was detected on the 10 th day. The highest fumonisin B 1 production occurred on the 14 th day, both for the control and for the treatment. Fludioxonil + metalaxyl - M can interfere in F. verticillioides mycelial morphology and sporulation and increase fumonisin B 1 levels. These data indicate the importance of understanding the effects of fungicide to minimize the occurrence of toxigenic fungi and fumonisins. PMID:26221120

  19. Effect of fungicide on Fusarium verticillioides mycelial morphology and fumonisin B₁ production.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Tatiana de Á; Bordini, Jaqueline G; Saito, Gervásio H; Andrade, Célia G T de J; Ono, Mario A; Hirooka, Elisa Y; Vizoni, Édio; Ono, Elisabete Y S

    2015-03-01

    The effect of fludioxonil + metalaxyl-M on the mycelial morphology, sporulation and fumonisin B 1 production by Fusarium verticillioides 103 F was evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the fungicide caused inhibition of hyphal growth and defects on hyphae morphology such as cell wall disruption, withered hyphae, and excessive septation. In addition, extracellular material around the hyphae was rarely observed in the presence of fludioxonil + metalaxyl-M. While promoting the reduction of mycelial growth, the fungicide increased sporulation of F. verticillioides compared to the control, and the highest production occurred on the 14 (th) day in the treatments and on the 10 (th) day in the control cultures. Fumonisin B 1 production in the culture media containing the fungicide (treatment) was detected from the 7 (th) day incubation, whereas in cultures without fungicide (control) it was detected on the 10 (th) day. The highest fumonisin B 1 production occurred on the 14 (th) day, both for the control and for the treatment. Fludioxonil + metalaxyl - M can interfere in F. verticillioides mycelial morphology and sporulation and increase fumonisin B 1 levels. These data indicate the importance of understanding the effects of fungicide to minimize the occurrence of toxigenic fungi and fumonisins.

  20. Resistance Mechanisms and Molecular Docking Studies of Four Novel QoI Fungicides in Peronophythora litchii

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuxin; Chen, Lei; Hu, Jian; Duan, Hongxia; Lin, Dong; Liu, Pengfei; Meng, Qingxiao; Li, Bin; Si, Naiguo; Liu, Changling; Liu, Xili

    2015-01-01

    Peronophythora litchii is the causal agent of litchi downy blight. Enestroburin, SYP-1620, SYP-2815 and ZJ0712 are four novel QoI fungicides developed by China. Eight mutants of P. litchii resistant to these QoI fungicides and azoxystrobin (as a known QoI fungicide) were obtained in our preliminary work. In this study, the full length of the cytochrome b gene in P. litchii, which has a full length of 382 amino acids, was cloned from both sensitive isolates and resistant mutants, and single-site mutations G142A, G142S, Y131C, or F128S were found in resistant mutants. Molecular docking was used to predict how the mutations alter the binding of the five QoI fungicides to the Qo-binding pockets. The results have increased our understanding of QoI fungicide-resistance mechanisms and may help in the development of more potent inhibitors against plant diseases in the fields. PMID:26657349

  1. Sensitivity of some nitrogen fixers and the target pest Fusarium oxysporum to fungicide thiram.

    PubMed

    Osman, Awad G; Sherif, Ashraf M; Elhussein, Adil A; Mohamed, Afrah T

    2012-03-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the toxic effects of the fungicide thiram (TMTD) against five nitrogen fixers and the thiram target pest Fusarium oxysporum under laboratory conditions. Nitrogen fixing bacteria Falvobacterium showed the highest values of LD(50) and proved to be the most resistant to the fungicide followed by Fusarium oxysporum, while Pseudomonas aurentiaca was the most affected microorganism. LD(50) values for these microorganisms were in 2-5 orders of magnitude lower in comparison with LD(50) value for Fusarium oxysporum. Thiram was most toxic to Pseudomonas aurentiaca followed by Azospirillum. The lowest toxicity index was recorded for Fusarium oxysporum and Flavobacterium. The slope of the curve for Azomonas, Fusarium oxysporum and Flavobacterium is more steep than that of the other curves, suggesting that even a slight increase of the dose of the fungicide can cause a very strong negative effect. Thiram was more selective to Pseudomonas aurentiaca followed by Azospirillum, Rhizobium meliloti and Azomonas. The lowest selectivity index of the fungicide was recorded for Falvobacterium followed by Fusarium oxysporum. The highest safety coefficient of the fungicide was assigned for Flavobacterium, while Pseudomonas aurentiaca showed the lowest value.

  2. Effects of 2 fungicide formulations on microbial and macroinvertebrate leaf decomposition under laboratory conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elskus, Adria; Smalling, Kelly L.; Hladik, Michelle; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic fungi contribute significantly to the decomposition of leaves in streams, a key ecosystem service. However, little is known about the effects of fungicides on aquatic fungi and macroinvertebrates involved with leaf decomposition. Red maple (Acer rubrum) leaves were conditioned in a stream to acquire microbes (bacteria and fungi), or leached in tap water (unconditioned) to simulate potential reduction of microbial biomass by fungicides. Conditioned leaves were exposed to fungicide formulations QUILT (azoxystrobin + propiconazole) or PRISTINE (boscalid + pyraclostrobin), in the presence and absence of the leaf shredder, Hyalella azteca (amphipods; 7-d old at start of exposures) for 14 d at 23 °C. QUILT formulation (~ 0.3 μg/L, 1.8 μg/L, 8 μg/L) tended to increase leaf decomposition by amphipods (not significant) without a concomitant increase in amphipod biomass, indicating potential increased consumption of leaves with reduced nutritional value. PRISTINE formulation (~ 33 μg/L) significantly reduced amphipod growth and biomass (p<0.05), effects similar to those observed with unconditioned controls. The significant suppressive effects of PRISTINE on amphipod growth, and the trend towards increased leaf decomposition with increasing QUILT concentration, indicate the potential for altered leaf decay in streams exposed to fungicides. Further work is needed to evaluate fungicide effects on leaf decomposition under conditions relevant to stream ecosystems, including temperature shifts and pulsed exposures to pesticide mixtures.

  3. Sensitivity of Podosphaera xanthii populations to anti-powdery-mildew fungicides in Spain.

    PubMed

    Bellón-Gómez, Davinia; Vela-Corcía, David; Pérez-García, Alejandro; Torés, Juan A

    2015-10-01

    Cucurbit powdery mildew caused by Podosphaera xanthii limits crop production in Spain, where disease control is largely dependent on fungicides. In previous studies, high levels of resistance to QoI and DMI fungicides were documented in south-central Spain. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity of P. xanthii populations to other fungicides and to provide tools for improved disease management. Using a leaf-disc assay, sensitivity to thiophanate-methyl, bupirimate and quinoxyfen of 50 isolates of P. xanthii was analysed to determine discriminatory concentrations between sensitive and resistant isolates. With the exception of thiophanate-methyl, no clearly different groups of isolates could be identified, and as a result, discriminatory concentrations were established on the basis of the maximum fungicide field application rate. Subsequently, a survey of P. xanthii resistance to these fungicides was carried out by testing a collection of 237 isolates obtained during the 2002-2011 cucurbit growing seasons. This analysis revealed very high levels of resistance to thiophanate-methyl (95%). By contrast, no resistance to bupirimate and quinoxyfen was found. Results suggest that thiophanate-methyl has become completely ineffective for controlling cucurbit powdery mildew in Spain. By contrast, bupirimate and quinoxyfen remain as very effective tools for cucurbit powdery mildew management. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Chronic aquatic effect assessment for the fungicide azoxystrobin.

    PubMed

    van Wijngaarden, Rene P A; Belgers, Dick J M; Zafar, Mazhar I; Matser, Arrienne M; Boerwinkel, Marie-Claire; Arts, Gertie H P

    2014-12-01

    The present study examined the ecological effects of a range of chronic exposure concentrations of the fungicide azoxystrobin in freshwater experimental systems (1270-L outdoor microcosms). Intended and environmentally relevant test concentrations of azoxystrobin were 0 µg active ingredient (a.i.)/L, 0.33 µg a.i./L, 1 µg a.i./L, 3.3 µg a.i./L, 10 µg a.i./L, and 33 µg a.i./L, kept at constant values. Responses of freshwater populations and community parameters were studied. During the 42-d experimental period, the time-weighted average concentrations of azoxystrobin ranged from 93.5% to 99.3% of intended values. Zooplankton, especially copepods and the Daphnia longispina group, were the most sensitive groups. At the population level, a consistent no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) of 1 µg a.i./L was calculated for Copepoda. The NOEC at the zooplankton community level was 10 µg azoxystrobin/L. The principle of the European Union pesticide directive is that lower-tier regulatory acceptable concentrations (RACs) are protective of higher-tier RACs. This was tested for chronic risks from azoxystrobin. With the exception of the microcosm community chronic RAC (highest tier), all other chronic RAC values were similar to each other (0.5-1 µg a.i./L). The new and stricter first-tier species requirements of the European Union pesticide regulation (1107/2009/EC) are not protective for the most sensitive populations in the microcosm study, when based on the higher tier population RAC. In comparison, the Water Framework Directive generates environmental quality standards that are 5 to 10 times lower than the derived chronic RACs. © 2014 SETAC.

  5. Diagnostic Doses of Insecticides for Adult Aedes aegypti to Assess Insecticide Resistance in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, María Magdalena; Crespo, Ariel; Hurtado, Daymi; Fuentes, Ilario; Rey, Jorge; Bisset, Juan Andrés

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine diagnostic doses (DDs) of 5 insecticides for the Rockefeller susceptible strain of Aedes aegypti , using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) bottle bioassay as a tool for monitoring insecticide resistance in the Cuban vector control program. The 30-min DD values determined in this study were 13.5 μg/ml, 6.5 μg/ml, 6 μg/ml, 90.0 μg/ml, and 15.0 μg/ml for cypermethrin, deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, chlorpyrifos, and propoxur, respectively. To compare the reliability of CDC bottle bioassay with the World Health Organization susceptible test, 3 insecticide-resistant strains were evaluated for deltamethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin. Results showed that the bottles can be used effectively from 21 to 25 days after treatment and reused up to 4 times, depending on the storage time. The CDC bottle bioassay is an effective tool to assess insecticide resistance in field populations of Ae. aegypti in Cuba and can be incorporated into vector management programs using the diagnostic doses determined in this study.

  6. Mesoionic insecticides: a novel class of insecticides that modulate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Holyoke, Caleb W; Cordova, Daniel; Zhang, Wenming; Barry, James D; Leighty, Robert M; Dietrich, Robert F; Rauh, James J; Pahutski, Thomas F; Lahm, George P; Tong, My-Hanh Thi; Benner, Eric A; Andreassi, John L; Smith, Rejane M; Vincent, Daniel R; Christianson, Laurie A; Teixeira, Luis A; Singh, Vineet; Hughes, Kenneth A

    2017-04-01

    As the world population grows towards 9 billion by 2050, it is projected that food production will need to increase by 60%. A critical part of this growth includes the safe and effective use of insecticides to reduce the estimated 20-49% loss of global crop yields owing to pests. The development of new insecticides will help to sustain this protection and overcome insecticide resistance. A novel class of mesoionic compounds has been discovered, with exceptional insecticidal activity on a range of Hemiptera and Lepidoptera. These compounds bind to the orthosteric site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and result in a highly potent inhibitory action at the receptor with minimal agonism. The synthesis, biological activity, optimization and mode of action will be discussed. Triflumezopyrim insect control will provide a powerful tool for control of hopper species in rice throughout Asia. Dicloromezotiaz can provide a useful control tool for lepidopteran pests, with an underexploited mode of action among these pests. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Agricultural herbicide transport in a first-order intermittent stream, Nebraska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vogel, J.R.; Linard, J.I.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of herbicides in surface waters is a function of many variables, including scale of the watershed, physical and chemical properties of the herbicide, physical and chemical properties of the soil, rainfall intensity, and time of year. In this study, the transport of 6 herbicides and 12 herbicide degradates was examined during the 2004 growing season in an intermediate-scale agricultural watershed (146 ha) that is drained by a first-order intermittent stream, and the mass load for each herbicide in the stream was estimated. The herbicide load during the first week of storm events after application ranged from 17% of annual load for trifluralin to 84% of annual load for acetochlor. The maximum weekly herbicide load in the stream was generally within the first 3 weeks after application for those compounds that were applied within the watershed during 2004, and later for herbicides not applied within the watershed during 2004 but still detected in the stream. The apparent dominant mode of herbicide transport in the stream-determined by analysis amongst herbicide and conservative ion concentrations at different points in the hydrograph and in base flow samples-was either overland runoff or shallow subsurface flow, depending on the elapsed time after application and type of herbicide. The load as a percentage of use (LAPU) for the parent compounds in this study was similar to literature values for those compounds applied by the farmer within the watershed, but smaller for those herbicides that had rainfall as their only source within the watershed.

  8. Midstory hardwood species respond differently to chainsaw girdle method and herbicide treatment

    Treesearch

    Ronald A. Rathfon; Michael R. Saunders

    2013-01-01

    Foresters in the Central Hardwoods Region commonly fell or girdle interfering trees and apply herbicide to the cut surface when performing intermediate silvicultural treatments. The objective of this study was to compare the use of single and double chainsaw girdle methods in combination with a herbicide treatment and, within the double girdle method, compare herbicide...

  9. Using a Hydrological Model to Determine Environmentally Safer Windows for Herbicide Application

    Treesearch

    J.L. Michael; M.C. Smith; W.G. Knisel; D.G. Neary; W.P. Fowler; D.J. Turton

    1996-01-01

    A modification of the GLEAMS model was used to determine application windows which would optimise efficacy and environmental safety for herbicide application to a forest site. Herbicide/soil partition coefficients were determined using soil samples collected from the study site for two herbicides (imazapyr, Koc=46, triclopyr ester, K

  10. Vegetable Response to Herbicides Applied to Low-Density Polyethylene Mulch Prior to Transplant

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Few herbicides are available for weed control in vegetables. The elimination of methyl bromide increases the need for herbicides. An experiment was conducted to evaluate crop injury from herbicides applied to LDPE mulch prior to transplant. Irrigation (1 cm) or no irrigation following crop transplan...

  11. 33 CFR Appendix E to Part 273 - Preventive Safety Measures in Handling of Herbicides

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Handling of Herbicides E Appendix E to Part 273 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS...—Preventive Safety Measures in Handling of Herbicides 1. Follow the label on each container before using the... accidental poisoning to the public or domestic animals. 3. Smoking is not permitted while herbicides are...

  12. 75 FR 17857 - Removal of Obsolete References to Herbicides Containing Dioxin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ... Herbicides Containing Dioxin AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The... health effects of exposure to herbicides containing dioxin and radiation to remove the obsolete references to herbicides containing dioxin. This final rule reflects changes made by the Agent Orange Act of...

  13. The Effect of Four Herbicides on the Survival and Growth of Nine Hardwood Species

    Treesearch

    Robert D. Williams; John E. Krajicek

    1976-01-01

    To learn more about the tolerance of hardwoods to herbicides, the survival and growth on nine hardwood species were compared in plots eitehr cultivated or treated with various herbicides applied at different rates, on prepared and unprepared ground, and before and after planting. Black walnut and white oak were very tolerant to all herbicides tested but American...

  14. 33 CFR Appendix E to Part 273 - Preventive Safety Measures in Handling of Herbicides

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Handling of Herbicides E Appendix E to Part 273 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS...—Preventive Safety Measures in Handling of Herbicides 1. Follow the label on each container before using the... accidental poisoning to the public or domestic animals. 3. Smoking is not permitted while herbicides are...

  15. How benthic diatoms within natural communities respond to eight common herbicides with different modes of action.

    PubMed

    Wood, Rebecca J; Mitrovic, Simon M; Lim, Richard P; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-07-01

    Herbicides are common pollutants of rivers in agricultural regions. These contaminants include various types of chemicals with different modes of toxic action. Herbicides can have toxic effects on freshwater benthic diatoms, the base of the aquatic food web. We examined the effects of (non-mixture) herbicide exposure to the health of diatoms for eight common herbicides with three different modes of action; the photosystem II (PSII) inhibitors: atrazine, simazine, hexazinone, tebuthiuron and diuron; two auxinic herbicides: MCPA and 2,4-D; and the EPSP synthase inhibitor: glyphosate. Benthic diatoms within riverine communities were exposed to each herbicide in rapid toxicity tests at concentrations of 50, 200 and 500μgL(-1). The most sensitive taxa were Gomphonema spp. and Encyonema gracilis. Navicula cryptotenella was the most tolerant to herbicide exposure. There was no significant effect of the different herbicide modes of action at the community level. Herbicide mode of action did not alter which taxa were most sensitive within the community and sensitivity rankings of the dominant diatom taxa were similar for each of the eight herbicides. The consistency of the results between herbicides suggests that freshwater benthic diatoms may be suitable in situ indicators for detecting the toxicity of herbicides with differing modes of action. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of herbicides for enhancing productivity and conserving land for biodiversity in North America

    Treesearch

    Robert G. Wagner; Michael Newton; Elizabeth C. Cole; James H. Miller; Barry D. Shiver

    2004-01-01

    Herbicide technology has evolved with forest management in North America over the past 60 years and has become an integral part of modern forestry practice. Forest managers have prescribed herbicides to increase reforestation success and long-term timber yields. Wildlife managers and others interested in conserving biodi- versity, however, have often viewed herbicide...

  17. Why have no new herbicide modes of action appeared in recent years?

    PubMed

    Duke, Stephen O

    2012-04-01

    Herbicides with new modes of action are badly needed to manage the evolution of resistance of weeds to existing herbicides. Yet no major new mode of action has been introduced to the market place for about 20 years. There are probably several reasons for this. New potential products may have remained dormant owing to concerns that glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops have reduced the market for a new herbicide. The capture of a large fraction of the herbicide market by glyphosate with GR crops led to significantly diminished herbicide discovery efforts. Some of the reduced herbicide discovery research was also due to company consolidations and the availability of more generic herbicides. Another problem might be that the best herbicide molecular target sites may have already been discovered. However, target sites that are not utilized, for which there are inhibitors that are highly effective at killing plants, suggests that this is not true. Results of modern methods of target site discovery (e.g. gene knockout methods) are mostly not public, but there is no evidence of good herbicides with new target sites coming from these approaches. In summary, there are several reasons for a long dry period for new herbicide target sites; however, the relative magnitude of each is unclear. The economic stimulus to the herbicide industry caused by the evolution of herbicide-resistant weeds, especially GR weeds, may result in one or more new modes of action becoming available in the not too distant future. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. 33 CFR Appendix E to Part 273 - Preventive Safety Measures in Handling of Herbicides

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Handling of Herbicides E Appendix E to Part 273 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS...—Preventive Safety Measures in Handling of Herbicides 1. Follow the label on each container before using the... accidental poisoning to the public or domestic animals. 3. Smoking is not permitted while herbicides are...

  19. Herbicide-Resistance in Crops and Weeds: A Historical and Current Perspective

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Herbicides are the principal economic means of weed management on >90% of U.S. farmland. Herbicide-resistant crop cultivars have been used widely since 1995. Pest disciplines and other life sciences have various definitions of resistance that share commonalities. Development of herbicide resistant w...

  20. Transcript markers of herbicide stress in Arabidopsis and their cross-species extrapolation to Brassica

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low concentrations and short environmental persistence times of some herbicides make it difficult to develop analytical methods to detect herbicide residues in plants or soils. In contrast, genomics may provide tools to identify herbicide exposure to plants in field settings. Usi...