Science.gov

Sample records for heroin vapor inhalation

  1. Analysis of diacetylmorphine, caffeine, and degradation products after volatilization of pharmaceutical heroin for inhalation.

    PubMed

    Klous, Marjolein G; Lee, WeiChing; Hillebrand, Michel J X; van den Brink, Wim; van Ree, Jan M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2006-01-01

    Pharmaceutical smokable heroin was developed for a clinical trial on medical co-prescription of heroin and methadone. This product, consisting of 75% w/w diacetylmorphine base and 25% w/w caffeine anhydrate, was intended for use via "chasing the dragon", that is, inhalation after volatilization. This procedure involves heating the powder mixture, which may lead to formation of degradation products that could subsequently be inhaled. We developed a method that used a high-performance liquid chromatography system that was compatible with photodiode-array detection and mass spectrometric detection to separate diacetylmorphine- and caffeine-related compounds in a wide polarity range for analysis of the vapor. This method was used to analyze the contents of the plastic drinking straws that were used by patients to inhale the vapors from pharmaceutical heroin used via chasing the dragon, which were considered to be representative of the vapors the patients inhaled. They contained primarily unchanged diacetylmorphine, its main metabolite 6-acetylmorphine, caffeine, and some morphine. Several unidentified peaks were observed in the straw chromatograms. Chemical structures were proposed for nine degradation products: morphine derivatives with different substitution patterns of the C(3), C(6), and/or N(17) positions, which comprised 0.4-9.7% of the straw sample residue weight. Activity and toxicity of most of these compounds are unknown and require further investigation.

  2. Heroin self-administration by means of 'chasing the dragon': pharmacodynamics and bioavailability of inhaled heroin.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, V M; van den Brink, W; Blanken, P; Bosman, I J; van Ree, J M

    2001-06-01

    In this controlled clinical study, the bioavailability and pharmacodynamics of inhaled heroin are evaluated and compared between 'chasing the dragon' and inhalation from a heating device, and at three dose levels, 25, 50 and 100 mg heroin, in two separate study phases. In study phase 1, no differences between the inhalation methods were detected on any of the physiological or behavioral measures, nor in bioavailability. Subjectively, the participants had a strong preference for the method of chasing, which was therefore used in study phase 2. In phase 2, heroin produced a dose-related increase in subjective drug-liking, body temperature and heart rate, and a clear, dose-related decline in reaction time. Linearly dose-related differences were found in the amount of total morphine in urine, amounting to an average of 45% of the parent heroin base received. Based on these findings, it is concluded that chasing is quite an effective route of heroin administration, producing rapid, dose-related subjective and objective effects and a sufficiently high and reproducible bioavailability.

  3. Valsalva manoeuvre effect on distribution of lung damage in heroin inhalation.

    PubMed

    Prowse, S J; Lima, T; Irion, K L; Burhan, H; Hochhegger, B; Marchiori, E

    2011-10-01

    This article reports the case of a patient demonstrating acute bilateral pneumonitis almost completely confined to the upper lobes as a result of inhaling heroin. We attribute this distribution to the patient performing the Valsalva manoeuvre immediately after inhaling heroin. This pattern has not been reported before and we believe it may be seen more frequently owing to a switch amongst drug users from intravenous to inhaled heroin.

  4. Vapor inhalation of alcohol in rats.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Nicholas W; Richardson, Heather N; Cole, Maury; Koob, George F

    2008-07-01

    Alcohol dependence constitutes a neuroadaptive state critical for understanding alcoholism, and various methods have been utilized to induce alcohol dependence in animals, one of which is alcohol vapor exposure. Alcohol vapor inhalation provides certain advantages over other chronic alcohol exposure procedures that share the ultimate goal of producing alcohol dependence in rats. Chronic alcohol vapor inhalation allows the experimenter to control the dose, duration, and pattern of alcohol exposure. Also, this procedure facilitates testing of somatic and motivational aspects of alcohol dependence. Chronic exposure to alcohol vapor produces increases in alcohol-drinking behavior, increases in anxiety-like behavior, and reward deficits in rats. Alcohol vapor inhalation as a laboratory protocol is flexible, and the parameters of this procedure can be adjusted to accommodate the specific aims of different experiments. This unit describes the options available to investigators using this procedure for dependence induction, when different options are more or less appropriate, and the implications of each.

  5. Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Heroin KidsHealth > For Teens > Heroin A A A What's ... How Can Someone Quit? Avoiding Heroin What Is Heroin? Heroin is a highly addictive drug made from ...

  6. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of high doses of pharmaceutically prepared heroin, by intravenous or by inhalation route in opioid-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Rook, Elisabeth J; van Ree, Jan M; van den Brink, Wim; Hillebrand, Michel J X; Huitema, Alwin D R; Hendriks, Vincent M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2006-01-01

    A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study was performed in opioid-dependent patients in the Netherlands, who were currently treated with high doses of pharmaceutically prepared heroin on medical prescription. Besides intravenous heroin, heroin was prescribed for inhalation by "chasing the dragon" method. In this technique, heroin base is heated on aluminium foil, and heroin vapours are inhaled into the lungs. Not much is known about the pharmacokinetics profile and bioavailability of this specific administration method. Therefore, a study was performed on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of heroin inhalation and intravenous use. Eleven patients who injected heroin and 9 patients who inhaled heroin entered the study. They were on steady-state heroin treatment for at least 12 months. For safety reasons, there was no crossing-over between heroin injection or inhalation. In a double-blind randomised study, 67-100-150% of the regular heroin maintenance dose was administered to each patient. Maximal single heroin dose was 450 mg. Plasma concentrations of heroin and its metabolites 6-monoacetylmorphine, morphine and morphine-glucuronides were analysed using LC-MS-MS. Blood pressure, heart rate, skin temperature and reaction time were assessed. Furthermore, visual analogue scales regarding craving and appreciation of heroin effect were scored by the subjects. Both in inhaling and injecting patients, the areas under curve of heroin and all measured metabolites were linearly related to heroin dose. Mean C(max) of heroin and its metabolites were 2-6 times lower after inhalation, than after intravenous injection. Bioavailability (F) of heroin inhalation was estimated as 52% (95% CI 44-61%). Heroin was rapidly cleared from plasma. Cl/F was 930 l/hr (95% CI 799-1061 l/hr) after intravenous administration, and 1939 l/hr (95% CI 1661-2217 l/hr) after inhalation. Heroin Cl and Vd were correlated to body weight (R(2) 15-19%). Morphine-glucuronides levels were inversely related to

  7. [Heroin].

    PubMed

    Demaret, I; Lemaître, A; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Heroin (or diacetylmorphine), a depressant nervous central system, is a semi-synthetic opiate. Its main adverse effect, respiratory depression, can lead to death, especially after an intravenous injection. By loss of tolerance, an overdose can be lethal following heroin use after a period of abstinence (voluntary or not). Mortality rate among heroin users is between 1 and 3%. Addiction, following a regular and continuous use, occurs in less than a quarter of persons who ever tried heroine. Heroin addicts often present with different problems (for instance, a criminal behaviour), without any obvious link with addiction. For a fraction of the addicts, addiction becomes a chronic relapsing disease, requiring a long term maintenance substitution therapy. However, relapses and sometimes continuous heroin use are frequent, For treatment resistant and severe heroin addicts, heroin-assisted treatment can be a solution. Despite the numerous available therapies, heroin is considered to be the drug with the most negative effects on the user.

  8. Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, rhabdomyolysis and myocardial injury following heroin inhalation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bazoukis, G; Spiliopoulou, A; Mourouzis, K; Grigoropoulou, P; Yalouris, A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heroin use by non-injecting routes of administration (snorting, swallowing, “chasing the dragon”) is considered to be safer but is not risk-free for fatal overdose or serious side effects. We report the case of an adolescent who was transferred unconscious to the emergency department after heroin inhalation. Description of the case: A 17-year-old male was transferred to the emergency department unconscious (Glasgow coma scale: 6/15) after heroin inhalation. He was treated with non-rebreather mask and intravenous infusion of naloxone with gradual improvement of consciousness and arterial blood gasses. The chest computed tomography showed signs of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Laboratory exams on the second day of hospitalization showed elevated creatine kinase (CK) and troponin-I levels while his electrocardiography (ECG) showed J-point elevation in V1, V2, and V3 precordial leads. On the second day of hospitalization the pulmonary infiltrates were not present in his chest X-ray while on the eighth day, troponin-I and CK levels were normalized without dynamic ECG changes and the patient was discharged uneventfully. Conclusion: Heroin inhalation may cause severe complications, such as non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, rhabdomyolysis or myocardial injury. Hippokratia 2016, 20(1): 84-87 PMID:27895451

  9. Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... 19-23, 2016 DEA Museum and Visitors' Center Heroin Last Updated: Monday, April 3, 2017 What is ... from morphine and extracted from certain poppy plants. Heroin comes in a white or brownish powder, or ...

  10. Inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold ... Notes Articles Adolescent Cigarette, Alcohol Use Declines as Marijuana Use Rises ( February 2013 ) Program Helps Troubled Boys ...

  11. An Exploratory Study of Inhalers and Injectors Who Used Black Tar Heroin

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Jane Carlisle; Spence, Richard T.

    2011-01-01

    Aims To undertake an exploratory study to examine the characteristics of patients in narcotic treatment programs who started their use of black tar heroin either as inhalers or as injectors and to compare them with those who started as inhalers but shifted to injecting. Other studies in this area have used subjects using other forms of heroin more amenable to inhaling. Participants, Design, and Measurement A purposive sample of 199 patients in 6 methadone programs in Texas were interviewed in 2002-2003 using a structured instrument. Findings At admission to treatment, those who were heroin inhalers were more likely to be African American, to live with their families, to have income from wages, and to report fewer days of problems on most of the ASI measures. Those who shifted from inhaling to injecting were more likely to be Hispanic and to have had mental health problems that interfered with their lives and to have had less nurturing while growing up. Injectors were older at this treatment admission, had more treatment episodes and more times in jail, and were more likely to have hepatitis C, AIDS, or gonorrhea. There were high levels of physical and mental problems and histories of traumatization as children and adults for almost all the respondents. Males were as likely as females to have been sexually abused as children or as adults. Conclusions The high rates of mental and physical problems among all the clients interviewed showed the need for comprehensive services to be delivered within the substance abuse treatment programs. Histories of trauma and sexual abuse should be addressed for both male and female clients. PMID:21552428

  12. Performance assessment of heroin and cocaine vapor particle detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoglund, David E.; Lucero, Daniel P.

    1994-03-01

    This paper discusses the preparation to assess the performance of heroin and cocaine vapor/particle detection systems. Equipment available commercially and field prototype system equipment will be assessed. Breadboard or brassboard devices or prototype modules will not be assessed. The assessment comprises a performance specifications verification and target response and a controlled field test for equipment available commercially only. Special purpose test procedures, tools, and detection targets were developed to ensure the reproducibility and control of all assessment tests. The sampling equipment parameters and their relative importance and the test procedures and objectives were defined and designed to maximize the information obtained within the test constraints. Test results will be obtained for standardized fundamental representative targets, independent of detection strategy, which can be correlated to a wide range of applications by the potential users. United States Customs Service will not form conclusions regarding the equipment performance for specific applications. It is anticipated the utility of the assessment program will be in availing equipment standardized test results to law enforcement agencies to examine the compatibility of the equipment performance with their requirements, applications, and detection strategy.

  13. Pharmaceutical heroin for inhalation: thermal analysis and recovery experiments after volatilisation.

    PubMed

    Klous, Marjolein G; Bronner, Gaby M; Nuijen, Bastiaan; van Ree, Jan M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2005-10-04

    Pharmaceutical heroin for inhalation was developed for a clinical trial on co-prescription of heroin and methadone to chronic treatment-resistant heroin addicts. Diacetylmorphine base was selected as the active pharmaceutical ingredient for this product with caffeine anhydrate added as an excipient. Differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis showed that addition of caffeine resulted in a lower melting temperature and a higher volatilisation rate for the mixture than for diacetylmorphine base alone. Recovery experiments showed that 40.8+/-5.3% of diacetylmorphine base could be found in smoke condensate after volatilisation of diacetylmorphine-caffeine tablets. All of the caffeine from each tablet was recovered unchanged in the fumes, while 85.6% of the diacetylmorphine from each tablet was recovered, either unchanged in the fumes or as non-volatilised residue. Recovery was found to be reproducible and only small differences were found between the tablet types. The experimental set-up was found to efficiently collect the vapours resulting from heating the powder. Under the tested experimental conditions, no evidence was found that degradation products of diacetylmorphine or caffeine, other than 6-acetylmorphine (5.9%) had volatilised, even though a decomposed residue was present after heating diacetylmorphine-caffeine samples. Diacetylmorphine-caffeine was found to be a suitable basis for pharmaceutical heroin to be used by 'chasing the dragon'.

  14. Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heroin is a highly addictive drug made from morphine, a psychoactive (mind-altering) substance that is extracted ... an opioid. It is related to chemically to morphine and other prescription opiates like vicodin, which are ...

  15. Generation and characterization of aerosols and vapors for inhalation experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Tillery, M I; Wood, G O; Ettinger, H J

    1976-01-01

    Control of aerosol and vapor characteristics that affect the toxicity of inhaled contaminants often determines the methods of generating exposure atmospheres. Generation methods for aerosols and vapors are presented. The characteristics of the resulting exposure atmosphere and the limitations of the various generation methods are discussed. Methods and instruments for measuring the airborne contaminant with respect to various charcteristics are also described. PMID:797565

  16. Development and manufacture of diacetylmorphine/caffeine sachets for inhalation via 'chasing the dragon' by heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Klous, M G; Nuijen, B; van den Brink, W; van Ree, J M; Beijnen, J H

    2004-08-01

    In 1998, two clinical trials were started in The Netherlands to evaluate the effect of coprescription of heroin and methadone on the mental and physical health and social functioning of chronic, treatment-resistant, heroin-dependent patients. Since 75-85% of the heroin addicts in The Netherlands use their heroin by "chasing the dragon," one of the two study arms concerned the coprescription of inhalable heroin. A pharmaceutical dosage form for inhalable heroin was developed for this trial, consisting of a 3:1 powder mixture of diacetylmorphine base and caffeine anhydrate. We describe the manufacturing process that was developed for filling sachets with this mixture in four dosages using a micro dose auger filler. In order to control product quality, in-process controls were developed to monitor the filling process and quality control tests were performed on the finished product. In-process control results have shown the filling process to be accurate and precise. The diacetylmorphine/caffeine sachets were shown to comply with the specifications for content and uniformity of mass. The finished product was found to be stable for 2 years when stored at 25 degrees C, 60% relative humidity and for 6 months when stored at 40 degrees C, 75% relative humidity.

  17. A novel sulfur mustard (HD) vapor inhalation exposure system for accurate inhaled dose delivery

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Mark R.; Benson, Eric M.; Kohne, Jonathon W.; Plahovinsak, Jennifer L.; Babin, Michael C.; Platoff, Gennady E.; Yeung, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A custom designed HD exposure system was used to deliver controlled inhaled doses to an animal model through an endotracheal tube. Methods Target HD vapor challenges were generated by a temperature controlled bubbler/aerosol trap, while concentration was monitored near real-time by gas chromatography. Animal breathing parameters were monitored real-time by an in-line pneumotach, pressure transducer, and Buxco pulmonary analysis computer/software. For each exposure, the challenge atmosphere was allowed to stabilize at the desired concentration while the anesthetized animal was provided humidity controlled clean air. Once the target concentration was achieved and stable, a portion of the challenge atmosphere was drawn past the endotracheal tube, where the animal inhaled the exposure ad libitum. During the exposure, HD vapor concentration and animal weight were used to calculate the needed inhaled volume to achieve the target inhaled dose (μg/kg). The exposures were halted when the inhaled volume was achieved. Results The exposure system successfully controlled HD concentrations from 22.2 to 278 mg/m3 and accurately delivered inhaled doses between 49.3 and 1120 μg/kg with actual administered doses being within 4% of the target level. Discussion This exposure system administers specific HD inhaled doses to evaluate physiological effects and for evaluation of potential medical countermeasure treatments. PMID:25291290

  18. Estimation of the Time Interval between the Administration of Heroin and the Sampling of Blood in Chronic Inhalers.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Nathalie; Hallet, Claude; Seidel, Laurence; Demaret, Isabelle; Luppens, David; Ansseau, Marc; Rozet, Eric; Albert, Adelin; Hubert, Philippe; Charlier, Corinne

    2015-05-01

    To develop a model for estimating the time delay between last heroin consumption and blood sampling in chronic drug users. Eleven patients, all heroin inhalers undergoing detoxification, were included in the study. Several plasma samples were collected during the detoxification procedure and analyzed for the heroin metabolites 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), morphine (MOR), morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) and morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G), according to a UHPLC/MSMS method. The general linear mixed model was applied to time-related concentrations and a pragmatic four-step delay estimation approach was proposed based on the simultaneous presence of metabolites in plasma. Validation of the model was carried out using the jackknife technique on the 11 patients, and on a group of 7 test patients. Quadratic equations were derived for all metabolites except 6AM. The interval delay estimation was 2-4 days when only M3G present in plasma, 1-2 days when M6G and M3G were both present, 0-1 day when MOR, M6G and M3G were present and <2 h for all metabolites present. The 'jackknife' correlation between declared and actual estimated delays was 0.90. The overall precision of the delay estimates was 8-9 h. The delay between last heroin consumption and blood sampling in chronic drug users can be satisfactorily predicted from plasma heroin metabolites.

  19. The toxicity of inhaled methanol vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Kavet, R.; Nauss, K.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Methanol could become a major automotive fuel in the U.S., and its use may result in increased exposure of the public to methanol vapor. Nearly all of the available information on methanol toxicity in humans relates to the consequences of acute, rather than chronic, exposures. Acute methanol toxicity evolves in a well-understood pattern and consists of an uncompensated metabolic acidosis with superimposed toxicity to the visual system. The toxic properties of methanol are rooted in the factors that govern both the conversion of methanol to formic acid and the subsequent metabolism of formate to carbon dioxide in the folate pathway. In short, the toxic syndrome sets in if formate generation continues at a rate that exceeds its rate of metabolism. Current evidence indicates that formate accumulation will not challenge the metabolic capacity of the folate pathway at the anticipated levels of exposure to automotive methanol vapor.117 references.

  20. Nicotine vapor inhalation escalates nicotine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Nicholas W; Whitaker, Annie M; Baynes, Brittni; Abdel, Abdelrahim Y; Weil, Madelyn T; George, Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Humans escalate their cigarette smoking over time, and a major obstacle in the field of pre-clinical nicotine addiction research has been the inability to produce escalated nicotine self-administration in rats. In experiment 1, male Wistar rats were trained to respond for nicotine in 2-hour operant sessions, then exposed to chronic intermittent (12 hours/day) nicotine vapor and repeatedly tested for nicotine self-administration at 8-12 hours of withdrawal. Rats were tested intermittently on days 1, 3 and 5 of the vapor exposure procedure, then tested with nicotine vapor exposure on 6-15 consecutive days. Rats exhibited transient increases in operant nicotine responding during intermittent testing, regardless of vapor condition, and this responding returned to baseline levels upon resumption of consecutive-days testing (i.e. nicotine deprivation effect). Nicotine vapor-exposed rats then escalated nicotine self-administration relative to both their own baseline (∼200% increase) and non-dependent controls (∼3× higher). In experiment 2, rats were exposed or not exposed to chronic intermittent nicotine vapor, then tested for spontaneous and precipitated somatic signs of nicotine withdrawal. Eight hours following removal from nicotine vapor, rats exhibited robust mecamylamine-precipitated somatic signs of withdrawal. There was a strong correlation between nicotine flow rate and air-nicotine concentration, and the air-nicotine concentrations used in experiments 1 and 2 resemble concentrations experienced by human smokers. Collectively, these results suggest that chronic intermittent nicotine vapor inhalation produces somatic and motivational signs of nicotine dependence, the latter of which is evidenced by escalation of nicotine self-administration.

  1. Pulmonary hemorrhage due to inhalation of vapor containing pyromellitic dianhydride.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, V; Baur, X; Czuppon, A; Ruegger, M; Russi, E; Speich, R

    1993-08-01

    Pulmonary hemorrhage due to inhalation of fumes or powders containing trimellitic anhydride (TMA) is well known. We report pulmonary hemorrhage in a young man exposed to epoxy resin vapor containing pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA). Serum IgG antibodies to PMDA could be detected. We conclude that the pulmonary hemorrhage was mediated by a reaction to PMDA in analogy to the TMA-induced disease. We suggest that exposure to any acid anhydride should be considered a possible cause of pulmonary hemorrhage since these compounds share structural and functional similarities.

  2. Chasing the dragon - characterizing cases of leukoencephalopathy associated with heroin inhalation in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Buxton, Jane A; Sebastian, Renee; Clearsky, Lorne; Angus, Natalie; Shah, Lena; Lem, Marcus; Spacey, Sian D

    2011-01-21

    An association between leukoencephalopathy, a disease of the white matter of the brain, and smoking heroin is well recognized. This paper describes 27 cases of leukoencephalopathy identified in two cities in British Columbia, Canada 2001-2006; the largest number of geographically and temporally defined reported cases in North America.Twenty cases of leukoencephalopathy were identified in and around Vancouver with onset dates December 2001 to July 2003; seven further cases were identified in Victoria September 2005-August 2006. Twenty (74%) of all cases were male, two couples were reported and eleven cases (55%) had Asian ethnicity. One case reported smoking heroin on a single occasion and developed mild symptoms; all other cases were hospitalized. Thirteen (48%) cases died; all had smoked heroin for a minimum of 3 years. Testing of one available heroin sample identified no substance other than common cutting agents.Although a specific etiology was not identified our study supports the theory of an intermittent exposure to a toxic agent added to the heroin or a combustion by-product. It also suggests a dose response effect rather than genetic predisposition. Collaboration with public health, health professionals, law enforcement and persons who use illegal drugs, will facilitate the early identification of cases to enable timely and complete follow-up including obtaining samples. Testing of implicated heroin samples may allow identification of the contaminant and therefore prevent further cases. It is therefore important to ensure key stakeholders are aware of our findings.

  3. Biologically-based modeling insights in inhaled vapor absorption and dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Morris, John B

    2012-12-01

    The lung is a route of entry and also a target site for inhaled vapors, therefore, knowledge of the total absorbed dose and/or the dose absorbed in each airway during inhalation exposure is essential. Vapor absorption characteristics result primarily from the fact that vapors demonstrate equilibrium/saturation behavior in fluids. Thus, during inhalation exposures blood and airway tissue vapor concentrations increase to a steady state value and increase no further no matter how long the exposure. High tissue concentrations can be obtained with highly soluble vapors, thus solubility, as measured by blood:air partition coefficient, is a fundamentally important physical/chemical characteristic of vapors. While it is classically thought that vapor absorption occurs only in the alveoli it is now understood that this is not the case. Soluble vapors can be efficiently absorbed in the airways themselves and do not necessarily penetrate to the alveolar level. Such vapors are more likely to injure the proximal than distal airways because that is the site of the greatest delivered dose. There are substantial species differences in airway vapor absorption between laboratory animals and humans making interpretation of laboratory animal inhalation toxicity data difficult. Airway absorption is dependent on vapor solubility and is enhanced by local metabolism and/or direct reaction within airway tissues. Modern simulation models that incorporate terms for solubility, metabolism, and reaction rate accurately predict vapor absorption patterns in both animals and humans and have become essential tools for understanding the pharmacology and toxicology of airborne vapors.

  4. Mercury vapor inhalation and poisoning of a family.

    PubMed

    Oz, Serife Gul; Tozlu, Mukaddes; Yalcin, Songul Siddika; Sozen, Tumay; Guven, Gulay Sain

    2012-08-01

    Acute mercury vapor poisoning is a rare but fatal toxicological emergency. People are exposed to mercury in daily life by the way of foods, vaccines, antiseptics, ointments, amalgam or occupation. We present here, the clinical picture and management of four members of the same family who were exposed to elemental mercury. Three of the family members were seen in another hospital with malaise, fever, eritematous rash and pulmonary problems. Their questioning revealed the mercury exposure. Having a suspicion of heavy metal intoxication, blood and urine mercury levels were measured and mercury intoxication was diagnosed. On admission to our hospital, two patients already had chelation therapy. In three of them we found three distinct abnormalities: encephalopathy, nephrotic syndrome and polyneuropathy. The fourth family member had minor symptoms. This family is an example for the inhalation exposure resulting from inappropriate handling of liquid mercury. During the first days, flu like illness ensues. Then, severe pulmonary, neurological, renal, hepatic, hematological and dermatological dysfunctions develop. Blood and urine mercury levels should be tested on suspicion, but it must be kept in mind that blood level is unreliable in predicting the severity of mercury toxicity. The priority in the treatment should be removing the patient from the source of exposure. Then British anti-Lewisite, edetate calcium disodium, penicillamine, Sodium 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfhonate and 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid can be used for binding the mercury. We conclude that since mercury-containing devices are present in daily life, physicians must be able to recognize the clinical manifestations and treatment of mercury poisoning.

  5. Intravenous Heroin-Associated Delayed Spongiform Leukoencephalopathy: Case Report and Reviews of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Pirompanich, Pattarin; Chankrachang, Siwaporn

    2015-07-01

    Heroin-associated spongiform leukoencephalopathy is a rare, and sometimes fatal, condition usually caused by vapor inhalation of heroin. The authors report a 41-year-old man who was diagnosed with delayed spongiform leukoencephalopathy three weeks after injecting heroin intravenously. He had been admitted to another hospital due to acute heroin overdose, which had occurred four hours after intravenous injection of an unknown amount of heroin. His clinical condition showed progressive improvement and he was discharged 12 days after admission. Three weeks after this episode, his cognitive functioning declined. Akinetic mutism, spasticity and hyperreflexia of all extremities were observed. Electroencephalography (EEG) and imaging of the brain showed typical characteristics of spongiform leukoencephalopathy. The three and six-month follow-up of the patient showed clinical improvement and this was corroborated through EEG measures and brain imaging. The discussion summarizes eight previously reported cases of intravenous heroin associated spongiform leukoencephalopathy and compares them to the authors'case.

  6. Neurodevelopmental effects of inhaled vapors of gasoline and ethanol in rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gasoline-ethanol blends comprise the major fraction of the fuel used in the US automotive fleet. To address uncertainties regarding the health risks associated with exposure to gasoline with more than 10% ethanol, we are assessing the effects of prenatal exposure to inhaled vapor...

  7. Gestational Exposure to Inhaled Vapors of Ethanol and Gasoline-Ethanol Blends in Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US automotive fleet is powered primarily by gasoline-ethanol fuel blends containing up to 10% ethanol (ElO). Uncertainties regarding the health risks associated with exposure to ElO prompted assessment of the effects of prenatal exposure to inhaled vapors of gasoline-ethanol ...

  8. Inhaled delivery of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) to rats by e-cigarette vapor technology.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jacques D; Aarde, Shawn M; Vandewater, Sophia A; Grant, Yanabel; Stouffer, David G; Parsons, Loren H; Cole, Maury; Taffe, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Most human Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) use is via inhalation, and yet few animal studies of inhalation exposure are available. Popularization of non-combusted methods for the inhalation of psychoactive drugs (Volcano(®), e-cigarettes) further stimulates a need for rodent models of this route of administration. This study was designed to develop and validate a rodent chamber suitable for controlled exposure to vaporized THC in a propylene glycol vehicle, using an e-cigarette delivery system adapted to standard size, sealed rat housing chambers. The in vivo efficacy of inhaled THC was validated using radiotelemetry to assess body temperature and locomotor responses, a tail-flick assay for nociception and plasma analysis to verify exposure levels. Hypothermic responses to inhaled THC in male rats depended on the duration of exposure and the concentration of THC in the vehicle. The temperature nadir was reached after ∼40 min of exposure, was of comparable magnitude (∼3 °Celsius) to that produced by 20 mg/kg THC, i.p. and resolved within 3 h (compared with a 6 h time course following i.p. THC). Female rats were more sensitive to hypothermic effects of 30 min of lower-dose THC inhalation. Male rat tail-flick latency was increased by THC vapor inhalation; this effect was blocked by SR141716 pretreatment. The plasma THC concentration after 30 min of inhalation was similar to that produced by 10 mg/kg THC i.p. This approach is flexible, robust and effective for use in laboratory rats and will be of increasing utility as users continue to adopt "vaping" for the administration of cannabis.

  9. Medicinal Cannabis: In Vitro Validation of Vaporizers for the Smoke-Free Inhalation of Cannabis

    PubMed Central

    Lanz, Christian; Mattsson, Johan; Soydaner, Umut; Brenneisen, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation by vaporization is a promising application mode for cannabis in medicine. An in vitro validation of 5 commercial vaporizers was performed with THC-type and CBD-type cannabis. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to determine recoveries of total THC (THCtot) and total CBD (CBDtot) in the vapor. High-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection was used for the quantitation of acidic cannabinoids in the residue and to calculate decarboxylation efficiencies. Recoveries of THCtot and CBDtot in the vapor of 4 electrically-driven vaporizers were 58.4 and 51.4%, 66.8 and 56.1%, 82.7 and 70.0% and 54.6 and 56.7% for Volcano Medic®, Plenty Vaporizer®, Arizer Solo® and DaVinci Vaporizer®, respectively. Decarboxylation efficiency was excellent for THC (≥ 97.3%) and CBD (≥ 94.6%). The gas-powered Vape-or-Smoke™ showed recoveries of THCtot and CBDtot in the vapor of 55.9 and 45.9%, respectively, and a decarboxylation efficiency of ≥ 87.7 for both cannabinoids. However, combustion of cannabis was observed with this device. Temperature-controlled, electrically-driven vaporizers efficiently decarboxylate inactive acidic cannabinoids and reliably release their corresponding neutral, active cannabinoids. Thus, they offer a promising application mode for the safe and efficient administration of medicinal cannabis. PMID:26784441

  10. Inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    ... area of the brain that gets damaged. The hippocampus, for example, is responsible for memory, so someone ... stimulants like cocaine and narcotics like heroin or morphine can kill you immediately. The old standbys like ...

  11. Inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    ... place a chemical- soaked rag in their mouth. Abusers may also inhale fumes from a balloon or ... by inhalants usually lasts just a few minutes, abusers often try to prolong it by continuing to ...

  12. Inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Facts Chat Day: Inhalants Drug Facts Chat Day: Inhalants Print Can you get high off of ... Cool Order Free Materials National Drugs & Alcohol Chat Day Newsletter Sign up to receive National Drug & Alcohol ...

  13. Inhalational exposure to dimethyl sulfate vapor followed by reactive airway dysfunction syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aghabiklooei, Abbas; Zamani, Nasim; Shiva, Hamidreza; Rezaei, Nader

    2010-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfate (DMS) is an oily liquid used as a solvent, stabilizer, sulfonation agent, and catalyst. Exposure to DMS primarily happens in the workplace via inhalational contact and damages the upper and lower airways. Our manuscript reports a case of DMS-related reactive airway dysfunction syndrome (RADS). The patient was a healthy 29-year-old man who was referred to our ER after accidental exposure to the vapor of DMS with the complaint of dyspnea, dry cough, photophobia, and hoarseness. His vital signs were normal except for a low-grade fever. Redness of the pharynx, conjunctivitis, and cholinergic signs and symptoms were present. Conservative management with O2 and fluid therapy was initiated. Twenty hours later, the patient became drowsy and his respiratory symptoms exacerbated; chest X-ray revealed haziness in the base of the right lung and prominence of the vessels of the lung hillum. After 1 week, the liver transaminases rose and C-reactive protein elevated (2+). The patient got better with conservative treatment and was discharged after 9 days; however, exertional dyspnea, wheezing, and thick white sputum persisted and therefore, reactive airway dysfunction syndrome (RADS) related to DMS vapor was confirmed which was treated by prednisolone. Exertional dyspnea continued up to 10 months. Hoarseness lasted for 6 months. This case shows that DMS vapor inhalation can cause RADS especially in the chemical workers who continue working in the contaminated place despite the relatively good air conditioning. PMID:21461165

  14. Acute Inhalation Exposure to Vaporized Methamphetamine Causes Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Sandra M.; Buford, Mary C.; Braseth, Sarah N.; Hutchison, James D.; Holian, Andrij

    2009-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is currently the most widespread illegally used stimulant in the United States. Use of MA by smoking is the fastest growing mode of administration, which increases concerns about potential pulmonary and other medical complications. A murine exposure system was developed to study the pulmonary affects of inhaled MA. Mice were exposed to 25–100 mg vaporized MA and assessments were made 3 h following initiation of exposure to model acute lung injury. Inhalation of MA vapor resulted in dose-dependent increases in MA plasma levels that were in the range of those experienced by MA users. At the highest MA dose, histological changes were observed in the lung and small but significant increases in lung wet weight to body weight ratios (5.656 ± 0.176 mg/g for the controls vs. 6.706± 0.135 mg/g for the 100 mg MA-exposed mice) were found. In addition, there was 53% increase in total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, greater than 20% increase in albumin levels in the BAL fluid, greater than 2.5-fold increase in lactate dehydrogenase levels in the BAL fluid, and reduced total BAL cell numbers (approximately 77% of controls). Levels of the early response cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 were dose-dependently increased in BAL fluid of MA-exposed mice. Exposure to 100 mg MA significantly increased free radical generation in the BAL cells to 107–146% of controls and to approximately 135% of the controls in lung tissue in situ. Together, these data show that acute inhalation exposure to relevant doses of volatilized MA is associated with elevated free radical formation and significant lung injury. PMID:18645723

  15. GC/MS determination of pyrolysis products from diacetylmorphine and adulterants of street heroin samples.

    PubMed

    Brenneisen, Rudolf; Hasler, Felix

    2002-07-01

    The inhalation of heroin vapors after heating on aluminium foil ("chasing the dragon") is gaining popularity nowadays among heroin users seeking to avoid the risks of parenteral drug administration. The heroin-smoking procedure was simulated under laboratory conditions by heating the samples on aluminium foil at 250 to 400 degrees C and collecting the vapors in a condenser trap. A total of 72 pyrolysis products of diacetylmorphine, street heroin, residues from aluminium foils used to smoke street heroin, typical by-products, and adulterants were detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). About half of these compounds could be identified. Diacetylmorphine (base and salt) undergoes substantial to complete degradation. Some typical street heroin constituents, like morphine, codeine, acetylcodeine, papaverine, and caffeine, are rather heat-stable. Other compounds, like noscapine and paracetamol, are pyrolyzed to a greater extent. The principal chemical reactions leading to the formation of pyrolysis products are desacetylation, transacetylation, N-demethylation, O-methylation, ring cleavage and oxydation.

  16. Toxicological assessments of rats exposed prenatally to inhaled vapors of gasoline and gasoline-ethanol blends.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, Philip J; Beasley, Tracey E; Evansky, Paul A; Martin, Sheppard A; McDaniel, Katherine L; Moser, Virginia C; Luebke, Robert W; Norwood, Joel; Copeland, Carey B; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E; Lonneman, William A; Rogers, John M

    2015-01-01

    The primary alternative to petroleum-based fuels is ethanol, which may be blended with gasoline in the United States at concentrations up to 15% for most automobiles. Efforts to increase the amount of ethanol in gasoline have prompted concerns about the potential toxicity of inhaled ethanol vapors from these fuels. The well-known sensitivity of the developing nervous and immune systems to ingested ethanol and the lack of information about the neurodevelopmental toxicity of ethanol-blended fuels prompted the present work. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were exposed for 6.5h/day on days 9-20 of gestation to clean air or vapors of gasoline containing no ethanol (E0) or gasoline blended with 15% ethanol (E15) or 85% ethanol (E85) at nominal concentrations of 3000, 6000, or 9000 ppm. Estimated maternal peak blood ethanol concentrations were less than 5mg/dL for all exposures. No overt toxicity in the dams was observed, although pregnant dams exposed to 9000 ppm of E0 or E85 gained more weight per gram of food consumed during the 12 days of exposure than did controls. Fuel vapors did not affect litter size or weight, or postnatal weight gain in the offspring. Tests of motor activity and a functional observational battery (FOB) administered to the offspring between post-natal day (PND) 27-29 and PND 56-63 revealed an increase in vertical activity counts in the 3000- and 9000-ppm groups in the E85 experiment on PND 63 and a few small changes in sensorimotor responses in the FOB that were not monotonically related to exposure concentration in any experiment. Neither cell-mediated nor humoral immunity were affected in a concentration-related manner by exposure to any of the vapors in 6-week-old male or female offspring. Systematic concentration-related differences in systolic blood pressure were not observed in rats tested at 3 and 6 months of age in any experiment. No systematic differences were observed in serum glucose or glycated hemoglobin A1c (a marker of long-term glucose

  17. Propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate (PGMEA) metabolism, disposition, and short-term vapor inhalation toxicity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.R.; Hermann, E.A.; Young, J.T.; Calhoun, L.L.; Kastl, P.E.

    1984-09-30

    Male Fischer 344 rats were given a single po dose of approximately 8.7 mmol/kg of (1-14C)propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate (PGMEA) or exposed to 3000 ppm (1-14C)PGMEA for 6 hr. After dosing, expired air, excreta, and tissues were analyzed for 14C activity, and metabolites in urine were isolated and identified. Approximately 64% of the administered 14C activity was eliminated as 14CO2 and about 24% was excreted in urine within 48 hr after a single po dose of radiolabeled PGMEA. Similarly, 53% was eliminated as 14CO2 and 26% was excreted in urine within 48 hr after the inhalation exposure. Propylene glycol, propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PGME), and the sulfate and glucuronide conjugates of PGME were identified as urinary metabolites after po dosing, as well as after inhalation exposure to PGMEA. The urinary metabolite profile and disposition of (14C)PGMEA were nearly identical to results previously obtained with propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PGME), indicating that PGMEA is rapidly and extensively hydrolyzed to PGME in vivo. A short-term vapor inhalation toxicity study in which male and female Fischer 344 rats and B6C3F1 mice were exposed to 0, 300, 1000, or 3000 ppm PGMEA confirmed that there were no substantial differences in the systemic effects of PGMEA as compared to PGME. However, histopathologic examination did reveal changes in the olfactory portions of the nasal mucosa of rats and mice exposed to PGMEA, which may be related to acetic acid resulting from hydrolysis of PGMEA in the nasal epithelium.

  18. Sedative effects of vapor inhalation of agarwood oil and spikenard extract and identification of their active components.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Hiroaki; Ito, Michiho; Shiraki, Tomohiro; Yagura, Toru; Honda, Gisho

    2008-01-01

    Agarwood oil and spikenard extract were examined for their sedative activity using a spontaneous vapor administration system. It was shown that inhalation of agarwood oil vapor sedated mice. The main volatile constituents of the oil were found to be benzylacetone [agarwood oil from a Hong Kong market (1)], or alpha-gurjunene and (+)-calarene [agarwood oil made in Vietnam (2)]. A hexane extract of spikenard contained a lot of calarene, and its vapor inhalation had a sedative effect on mice. Individual principles benzylacetone, calarene, and alpha-gurjunene were administered to mice, which reproduced the result of the corresponding oil or extract. However, the most effective dose of the compounds was lower than their original content in the oil and extract (benzylacetone 0.1%, calarene 0.17%, alpha-gurjunene 1.5%).

  19. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: subchronic inhalation toxicity.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charles R; Schreiner, Ceinwen A; Parker, Craig M; Gray, Thomas M; Hoffman, Gary M

    2014-11-01

    Sprague Dawley rats were exposed via inhalation to vapor condensates of either gasoline or gasoline combined with various fuel oxygenates to assess whether their use in gasoline influences the hazard of evaporative emissions. Test substances included vapor condensates prepared from an EPA described "baseline gasoline" (BGVC), or gasoline combined with methyl tertiary butyl ether (G/MTBE), ethyl t-butyl ether (G/ETBE), t-amyl methyl ether (G/TAME), diisopropyl ether (G/DIPE), ethanol (G/EtOH), or t-butyl alcohol (G/TBA). Target concentrations were 0, 2000, 10,000 or 20,000mg/m(3) and exposures were for 6h/day, 5days/week for 13weeks. A portion of the animals were maintained for a four week recovery period to determine the reversibility of potential adverse effects. Increased kidney weight and light hydrocarbon nephropathy (LHN) were observed in treated male rats in all studies which were reversible or nearly reversible after 4weeks recovery. LHN is unique to male rats and is not relevant to human toxicity. The no observed effect level (NOAEL) in all studies was 10,000mg/m(3), except for G/MTBE (<2000) and G/TBA (2000). The results provide evidence that use of the studied oxygenates are unlikely to increase the hazard of evaporative emissions during refueling, compared to those from gasoline alone.

  20. Inhalation of vapor from black pepper extract reduces smoking withdrawal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Rose, J E; Behm, F M

    1994-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested that sensory cues associated with cigarette smoking can suppress certain smoking withdrawal symptoms, including craving for cigarettes. In this study we investigated the subjective effects of a cigarette substitute delivering a vapor of black pepper essential oil. Forty-eight cigarette smokers participated in a 3-h session conducted after overnight deprivation from smoking. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: one group of smokers puffed on a device that delivered a vapor from essential oil of black pepper; a second group puffed on the device with a mint/menthol cartridge, and a third group used a device containing an empty cartridge. Subjects puffed and inhaled ad libitum from the device throughout the session during which no smoking was allowed. Reported craving for cigarettes was significantly reduced in the pepper condition relative to each of the two control conditions. In addition, negative affect and somatic symptoms of anxiety were alleviated in the pepper condition relative to the unflavored placebo. The intensity of sensations in the chest was also significantly higher for the pepper condition. These results support the view that respiratory tract sensations are important in alleviating smoking withdrawal symptoms. Cigarette substitutes delivering pepper constituents may prove useful in smoking cessation treatment.

  1. Clearance concepts applied to the metabolism of inhaled vapors in tissues lining the nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Andersen, M E; Sarangapani, R

    1999-10-01

    Some inhaled vapors are metabolized by tissues in the nasal cavity or carried away in nasal venous blood after diffusing from the lumen through the nasal epithelial tissues. These processes remove chemical from the airstream. Clearance (volume/time) is the volumetric airflow from which chemical would have to be completely removed to account for the net loss. We present here a steady-state analysis of a series of physiologically based clearance-extraction (PBCE) models for nasal clearance of inhaled vapors, consisting of one, two, three, or four subcompartments. A two-compartment model is the simplest representation of tissues in the nasal cavity, with an air and a tissue compartment. The three-compartment model had air, mucus, and tissue phases. The four-compartment model included both epithelial and submucosal tissues in addition to the air and mucus compartments. For the two-, three-, and four-compartment models, the airstream clearance (Cl(sys)) equation has a common form. Cl(sys) = Cl(tot)H(m:a)PA(gas)Q divided by Cl(tot)H(m:a)(Q + PA(gas)) + PA(gas)Q. In this equation, Cl(tot) is the total tissue clearance, PA(gas) is the gas-phase diffusional clearance, Q is the airflow, and H(muc:a) is the mucus air partition coefficient. Cl(tot) varies in complexity for the different models since it encompasses tissue diffusion, tissue clearance due to metabolism, and blood flow. A physiologically based clearance-extraction (PBCE) model for the whole nose with three nasal tissue regions, each containing a four-compartment tissue stack, was used to simulate nasal uptake of three vapors-acetone, methyl methacrylate (MMA), and vinyl acetate (VA)-to show the dependence of clearance on different parameters for specific compounds. Acetone is not metabolized in the nose, MMA is metabolized at a moderate rate by nasal tissues, and VA is metabolized at a high rate in mucus and tissues. Equations derived from steady-state analyses show the importance of the specific biochemical and

  2. The Effect of Intermittent Alcohol Vapor or Pulsatile Heroin on Somatic and Negative Affective Indices during Spontaneous Withdrawal in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Angela M.; Reis, Daniel J.; Powell, Alexa S.; Neira, Louis J.; Nealey, Kathryn A.; Ziegler, Cole E.; Kloss, Nina; Bilimoria, Jessica L.; Smith, Chelsea E.; Walker, Brendan M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Once dependent on alcohol or opioids, negative affect may accompany withdrawal. Dependent individuals are hypothesized to “self-medicate” in order to cope with withdrawal, which promotes escalated drug or alcohol use. Objectives The current study aimed to develop a reliable animal model to assess symptoms that occur during spontaneous alcohol and opioid withdrawal. Methods Dependence was induced using intermittent alcohol exposure or pulsatile heroin delivery and assessed for the presence of withdrawal symptoms during acute withdrawal by measuring somatic signs, behavior in the forced swim test (FST) and air-puff induced 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs). Additional animals subjected to eight weeks of alcohol vapor exposure were evaluated for altered somatic signs, operant alcohol self-administration and 22-kHz USV production, as well as performance in the elevated plus-maze (EPM). Results During spontaneous withdrawal from pulsatile heroin or intermittent alcohol vapor, animals displayed increased somatic withdrawal signs, FST immobility and 22-kHz USV production, but did not show any behavioral change in the EPM unless the duration of exposure was extended to four weeks. Following eight weeks of alcohol vapor exposure, animals displayed somatic withdrawal signs, escalated alcohol self-administration and increased 22-kHz USVs. Conclusions These paradigms provide consistent methods to evaluate the behavioral ramifications, and neurobiological substrates, of alcohol and opioid dependence during spontaneous withdrawal. As immobility in the FST and percent open-arm time in the EPM were dissociable, with 22-kHz USVs paralleling immobility in the FST, assessment of air-puff induced 22-kHz USVs could provide an ethologically-valid alternative to the FST. PMID:22461104

  3. Fatal acute poisoning from massive inhalation of gasoline vapors: case report and comparison with similar cases.

    PubMed

    Papi, Luigi; Chericoni, Silvio; Bresci, Francesco; Giusiani, Mario

    2013-03-01

    We describe a case of an acute lethal poisoning with hydrocarbons resulting from massive accidental inhalation of gasoline vapors. The victim, a 50-year-old man was found unconscious inside a control room for the transport of unleaded fuel. Complete autopsy was performed and showed evidence of congestion and edema of the lungs. Toxicological investigation was therefore fundamental to confirm exposure to fumes of gasoline. Both venous and arterial blood showed high values of volatiles in particular for benzene (39.0 and 30.4 μg/mL, respectively), toluene (23.7 and 20.4 μg/mL), and xylene isomers (29.8 and 19.3 μg/mL). The relatively low values found in the lungs are consistent with the fact that the subject, during the rescue, underwent orotracheal intubation followed by resuscitation techniques, while the low concentrations for all substances found in urine and kidneys could point to a death that occurred in a very short time after first contact with the fumes of gasoline.

  4. Physicochemical characterization and water vapor sorption of organic solution advanced spray-dried inhalable trehalose microparticles and nanoparticles for targeted dry powder pulmonary inhalation delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojian; Mansour, Heidi M

    2011-12-01

    Novel advanced spray-dried inhalable trehalose microparticulate/nanoparticulate powders with low water content were successfully produced by organic solution advanced spray drying from dilute solution under various spray-drying conditions. Laser diffraction was used to determine the volumetric particle size and size distribution. Particle morphology and surface morphology was imaged and examined by scanning electron microscopy. Hot-stage microscopy was used to visualize the presence/absence of birefringency before and following particle engineering design pharmaceutical processing, as well as phase transition behavior upon heating. Water content in the solid state was quantified by Karl Fisher (KF) coulometric titration. Solid-state phase transitions and degree of molecular order were examined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and powder X-ray diffraction, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy showed a correlation between particle morphology, surface morphology, and spray drying pump rate. All advanced spray-dried microparticulate/nanoparticulate trehalose powders were in the respirable size range and exhibited a unimodal distribution. All spray-dried powders had very low water content, as quantified by KF. The absence of crystallinity in spray-dried particles was reflected in the powder X-ray diffractograms and confirmed by thermal analysis. DSC thermal analysis indicated that the novel advanced spray-dried inhalable trehalose microparticles and nanoparticles exhibited a clear glass transition (T(g)). This is consistent with the formation of the amorphous glassy state. Spray-dried amorphous glassy trehalose inhalable microparticles and nanoparticles exhibited vapor-induced (lyotropic) phase transitions with varying levels of relative humidity as measured by gravimetric vapor sorption at 25°C and 37°C.

  5. [Heroin addiction].

    PubMed

    Hosztafi, Sándor

    2011-01-01

    Heroin is an illicit, highly addictive drug. It is either the most abused or the most rapidly acting member of opioids. Abusers describe a feeling of a surge of pleasurable sensation, named as "rush" or "high". Repeated administration of high doses of heroin results in the induction of physical dependence. Physical dependence refers to an altered physiological state produced by chronic administration of heroin which necessitates the continued administration of the drug to prevent the appearance of a characteristic syndrome, the opioid withdrawal or abstinence syndrome. Withdrawal symptoms may occur within a few hours after the last administration of heroin. Symptoms of the withdrawal include restlessness, insomnia, drug craving, diarrhea, muscle and bone pain, cold flashes with goose bumps, and leg movements. Major withdrawal symptoms peak between 48 and 72 hours after the last dose of heroin and subside after about a week. At this time, weakness and depression are pronounced and nausea and vomiting are common. Nevertheless, some chronic addicts have shown persistent withdrawal signs for many months or even years. Heroin addiction is considered as a behavioural state of compulsive drug use and a high tendency to relapse after periods of abstinence. It is generally accepted that compulsive use and relapse are typically associated with the status of heroin craving or heroin hunger that are difficult to define but appear to be powerful motivational significance in the addiction process. The route of administering heroin varies largely and may indicate the degree of seriousness of the individual's addiction. Intravenous administration seems to be the predominant method of heroin use, but recently a shift in heroin use pattern has been found, i.e. from injection to sniffing and smoking. Frequent injections coupled with widespread sharing of syringes increase the risk of contracting HIV, hepatitis B, C and other blood-borne infectious diseases. Long-term use of heroin

  6. A cross-fostering analysis of bromine ion concentration in rats that inhaled 1-bromopropane vapor

    PubMed Central

    Ishidao, Toru; Fueta, Yukiko; Ueno, Susumu; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Hori, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Inhaled 1-bromopropane decomposes easily and releases bromine ion. However, the kinetics and transfer of bromine ion into the next generation have not been clarified. In this work, the kinetics of bromine ion transfer to the next generation was investigated by using cross-fostering analysis and a one-compartment model. Methods: Pregnant Wistar rats were exposed to 700 ppm of 1-bromopropane vapor for 6 h per day during gestation days (GDs) 1-20. After birth, cross-fostering was performed between mother exposure groups and mother control groups, and the pups were subdivided into the following four groups: exposure group, postnatal exposure group, gestation exposure group, and control group. Bromine ion concentrations in the brain were measured temporally. Results: Bromine ion concentrations in mother rats were lower than those in virgin rats, and the concentrations in fetuses were higher than those in mothers on GD20. In the postnatal period, the concentrations in the gestation exposure group decreased with time, and the biological half-life was 3.1 days. Conversely, bromine ion concentration in the postnatal exposure group increased until postnatal day 4 and then decreased. This tendency was also observed in the exposure group. A one-compartment model was applied to analyze the behavior of bromine ion concentration in the brain. By taking into account the increase of body weight and change in the bromine ion uptake rate in pups, the bromine ion concentrations in the brains of the rats could be estimated with acceptable precision. PMID:27108641

  7. Acute, 2-week, and 13-week inhalation toxicity studies on dimethylethoxysilane vapor in Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Dodd, D E; Stuart, B O; Rothenberg, S J; Kershaw, M; Mann, P C; James, J T; Lam, C W

    1994-01-01

    Dimethylethoxysilane (DMES), a volatile liquid, is used by NASA to waterproof the heat-protective silica tiles and blankets on the Space Shuttle. Acute, 2-wk, and 13-wk inhalation exposures to DMES vapor were conducted in male and female Fischer 344 rats. In the acute study, rats were exposed to 4000, 2000, 1000, 500, or 0 (control) ppm DMES for 4 h and observed for 14 days. There were no deaths. Narcosis and ataxia were observed in rats of the two highest concentrations only. These signs disappeared within 1 h following exposure. There were no DMES-related gross or microscopic tissue lesions in rats of all exposure groups. In the 2-wk study, rats were exposed for 6 h/day, 5 days/wk to 3000, 1000, 300, 100, or 0 ppm DMES. During exposure, narcosis was observed in rats of the 3000 and 1000 ppm groups. There was a mild decrease in body weight gain in rats of the 3000 ppm group. A decrease in platelet count, an increase in bile acids, and reduced weights of the thymus, testis, and liver were observed in rats of the 3000 ppm group. Microscopically, hypospermatogenesis and spermatid giant cells were observed in the seminiferous tubules of the testes of rats exposed to 3000 ppm DMES. In the 13-wk study, rats were exposed 6 h/day, 5 days/wk to 2000, 600, 160, 40, or 0 ppm DMES. During exposure, rats of the 2000 ppm group exhibited mild narcosis and loss of startle reflex. Recovery from these central nervous system signs was rapid. Body weights were mildly decreased for rats of the 2000 ppm group. There were no exposure-related effects in hematology, serum chemistry, or urinalysis. Female rats of the 2000 ppm group had delayed estrous cycles (6 days compared to 5 days in control rats). Noteworthy organ weight changes in rats of the 2000 ppm group included decreases in thymus, liver, and testicular weights; however, pathologic lesions were observed in the testes only. Sperm motility, epididymal sperm count, and testicular spermatid count were dramatically reduced

  8. Acute, 2-week, and 13-week inhalation toxicity studies on dimethylethoxysilane vapor in Fischer 344 rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodd, D. E.; Stuart, B. O.; Rothenberg, S. J.; Kershaw, M.; Mann, P. C.; James, J. T.; Lam, C. W.

    1994-01-01

    Dimethylethoxysilane (DMES), a volatile liquid, is used by NASA to waterproof the heat-protective silica tiles and blankets on the Space Shuttle. Acute, 2-wk, and 13-wk inhalation exposures to DMES vapor were conducted in male and female Fischer 344 rats. In the acute study, rats were exposed to 4000, 2000, 1000, 500, or 0 (control) ppm DMES for 4 h and observed for 14 days. There were no deaths. Narcosis and ataxia were observed in rats of the two highest concentrations only. These signs disappeared within 1 h following exposure. There were no DMES-related gross or microscopic tissue lesions in rats of all exposure groups. In the 2-wk study, rats were exposed for 6 h/day, 5 days/wk to 3000, 1000, 300, 100, or 0 ppm DMES. During exposure, narcosis was observed in rats of the 3000 and 1000 ppm groups. There was a mild decrease in body weight gain in rats of the 3000 ppm group. A decrease in platelet count, an increase in bile acids, and reduced weights of the thymus, testis, and liver were observed in rats of the 3000 ppm group. Microscopically, hypospermatogenesis and spermatid giant cells were observed in the seminiferous tubules of the testes of rats exposed to 3000 ppm DMES. In the 13-wk study, rats were exposed 6 h/day, 5 days/wk to 2000, 600, 160, 40, or 0 ppm DMES. During exposure, rats of the 2000 ppm group exhibited mild narcosis and loss of startle reflex. Recovery from these central nervous system signs was rapid. Body weights were mildly decreased for rats of the 2000 ppm group. There were no exposure-related effects in hematology, serum chemistry, or urinalysis. Female rats of the 2000 ppm group had delayed estrous cycles (6 days compared to 5 days in control rats). Noteworthy organ weight changes in rats of the 2000 ppm group included decreases in thymus, liver, and testicular weights; however, pathologic lesions were observed in the testes only. Sperm motility, epididymal sperm count, and testicular spermatid count were dramatically reduced

  9. Heroin overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... overdose. This type of medicine is called an antidote. Naloxone is injected under the skin or into ... effects of the heroin Outlook (Prognosis) If an antidote can be given, recovery from an acute overdose ...

  10. Transcriptional responses in the rat nasal epithelium following subchronic inhalation of naphthalene vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Clewell, H.J. Efremenko, A.; Campbell, J.L.; Dodd, D.E.; Thomas, R.S.

    2014-10-01

    Male and female Fischer 344 rats were exposed to naphthalene vapors at 0 (controls), 0.1, 1, 10, and 30 ppm for 6 h/d, 5 d/wk, over a 90-day period. Following exposure, the respiratory epithelium and olfactory epithelium from the nasal cavity were dissected separately, RNA was isolated, and gene expression microarray analysis was conducted. Only a few significant gene expression changes were observed in the olfactory or respiratory epithelium of either gender at the lowest concentration (0.1 ppm). At the 1.0 ppm concentration there was limited evidence of an oxidative stress response in the respiratory epithelium, but not in the olfactory epithelium. In contrast, a large number of significantly enriched cellular pathway responses were observed in both tissues at the two highest concentrations (10 and 30 ppm, which correspond to tumorigenic concentrations in the NTP bioassay). The nature of these responses supports a mode of action involving oxidative stress, inflammation and proliferation. These results are consistent with a dose-dependent transition in the mode of action for naphthalene toxicity/carcinogenicity between 1.0 and 10 ppm in the rat. In the female olfactory epithelium (the gender/site with the highest incidences of neuroblastomas in the NTP bioassay), the lowest concentration at which any signaling pathway was significantly affected, as characterized by the median pathway benchmark dose (BMD) or its 95% lower bound (BMDL) was 6.0 or 3.7 ppm, respectively, while the lowest female olfactory BMD values for pathways related to glutathione homeostasis, inflammation, and proliferation were 16.1, 11.1, and 8.4 ppm, respectively. In the male respiratory epithelium (the gender/site with the highest incidences of adenomas in the NTP bioassay), the lowest pathway BMD and BMDL were 0.4 and 0.3 ppm, respectively, and the lowest male respiratory BMD values for pathways related to glutathione homeostasis, inflammation, and proliferation were 0.5, 0.7, and 0.9 ppm

  11. Effects of inhaling the vapor of Lavandula burnatii super-derived essential oil and linalool on plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), catecholamine and gonadotropin levels in experimental menopausal female rats.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kenji; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Sashida, Yutaka

    2005-02-01

    The effects of inhaling the vapor of Lavandula burnatii super-derived essential oil and one of the main components of lavender oil, linalool on plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), catecholamine and gonadotropin levels in menopausal model rats under ether-inhalation were studied. The increased plasma ACTH levels induced by ether-inhalation tended to decrease by pre-inhalation of Lavandula burnetii super and linalool vapor was induced the decrease of ACTH level. The decrease in adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine levels induced by ether-inhalation tended to recover, especially, the dopamine level significantly recovered to the normal level by the inhalation of Lavandula burnetii super and linalool vapor. However, the increased plasma gonadotropin levels in ovariectomized retired female rats (menopausal model rats) was significantly decreased by the inhalation of linalool. These results suggest that lavender oil or one of the main components, linalool may contribute to relieving tension and may be applicable to the treatment of menopausal disorders in human beings.

  12. Toxicological Assessments of Rats Exposed Prenatally to Inhaled Vapors of Gasoline and Gasoline-Ethanol Blends

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary alternative to petroleum-based fuels is ethanol, which is blended with gasoline in the United States at concentrations up to 15% for most automobiles. Efforts to increase the amount of ethanol in gasoline have prompted concerns about the potential toxicity of inhaled ...

  13. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetic variability of heroin and its metabolites: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rook, Elisabeth J; Huitema, Alwin D R; van den Brink, Wim; van Ree, Jan M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the pharmacokinetics of heroin after intravenous, oral, intranasal, intramuscular and rectal application and after inhalation in humans, with a special focus on heroin maintenance therapy in heroin dependent patients. In heroin maintenance therapy high doses pharmaceutically prepared heroin (up to 1000 mg/day) are prescribed to chronic heroin dependents, who do not respond to conventional interventions such as methadone maintenance treatment. Possible drug-drug interactions with the hydrolysis of heroin into 6-monoacetylmorphine and morphine, the glucuronidation of morphine and interactions with drug transporting proteins are described. Since renal and hepatic impairment is common in the special population of heroin dependent patients, specific attention was paid on the impact of renal and hepatic impairment. Hepatic impairment did not seem to have a clinically relevant effect on the pharmacokinetics of heroin and its metabolites. However, some modest effects of renal impairment have been noted, and therefore control of the creatinine clearance during heroin-assisted treatment seems recommendable.

  14. Miss Heroin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Bernice

    This script, with music, lyrics and dialog, was written especially for youngsters to inform them of the potential dangers of various drugs. The author, who teaches in an elementary school in Harlem, New York, offers Miss Heroin as her answer to the expressed opinion that most drug and alcohol information available is either too simplified and…

  15. Comparative occupational exposures to formaldehyde released from inhaled wood product dusts versus that in vapor form.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Nathalie H; Brunet, Robert C; Carrier, Gaétan

    2003-05-01

    Particle boards and other wood boards are usually made with formaldehyde-based resins. Woodworkers are thus exposed to formaldehyde in vapor form as well as from airborne dust once it enters their respiratory tract. These workers remain exposed to formaldehyde released from the dust still present in their upper respiratory tract, even after their work shift. In assessing the risk associated with formaldehyde exposure, one needs to consider the relative importance of these two sources of exposure. This study proposes two kinetic models to estimate and compare the exposures. For various exposure scenarios, one model predicts the amount of formaldehyde absorbed from the ambient vapor form and the other predicts the amount absorbed by the respiratory tract upon its release from wood product dust. Model parameters are determined using data from published studies. Based on a daily work shift of 8 hr, with a dust concentration in air of 5 mg/m(3) and a formaldehyde concentration bound to dust of 9 microg/mg, model simulations predict that the amount of absorbed formaldehyde released from wood dust is approximately 1/100 of the amount absorbed from the ambient vapor form at a concentration level of 0.38 mg/m(3) (0.3 ppm). Since the formaldehyde concentration in wood dust used above is much higher than usually observed while the dust and vapor form formaldehyde concentrations are of the order of acceptable upper values, these results indicate that the formaldehyde exposure from wood dust is comparatively negligible.

  16. MTBE inhaled alone and in combination with gasoline vapor: uptake, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Benson, J M; Barr, E B; Krone, J R

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of these studies was to extend previous evaluation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)* tissue distribution, metabolism, and excretion in rats to include concentrations more relevant to human exposure (4 and 40 ppm) and to determine the effects of coinhalation of the volatile fraction of unleaded gasoline on the tissue distribution, metabolism, and excretion of MTBE. Groups of male F344 rats were exposed nose-only for 4 hours to 4, 40, or 400 ppm 14C-MTBE or to 20 or 200 ppm of the light fraction of unleaded gasoline (LFG) containing 4 or 40 ppm 14C-MTBE, respectively. To evaluate the effects of repeated inhalation of LFG on MTBE tissue distribution, metabolism, and excretion, rats were exposed for 4 hours on each of 7 consecutive days to 20 or 200 ppm LFG with MTBE (4 or 40 ppm) followed on the eighth day by a similar exposure to LFG containing 14C-MTBE. Subgroups of rats were evaluated for respiratory parameters, initial body burdens, rates and routes of excretion, and tissue distribution and elimination. The concentrations of MTBE and its chief metabolite, tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), were measured in blood and kidney immediately after exposure, and the major urinary metabolites-2-hydroxyisobutyric acid (IBA) and 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol (2MePD)-were measured in urine. Inhalation of MTBE alone or as a component of LFG had no concentration-dependent effect on respiratory minute volume. The initial body burdens of MTBE equivalents achieved after 4 hours of exposure to MTBE did not increase linearly with exposure concentration. MTBE equivalents rapidly distributed to all tissues examined, with the largest percentages distributed to liver. The observed initial body burden did not increase linearly between 4 and 400 ppm. At 400 ppm, elimination half-times of MTBE equivalents from liver increased and from lung, kidney, and testes decreased compared with the two smaller doses. Furthermore, at 400 ppm the elimination half-time for volatile organic compounds (VOCs

  17. Foetal distribution of inhaled mercury vapor in normal and acatalasaemic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, M.; Meguro, T.

    1986-01-01

    Levels of mercury distribution in placenta, amniotic sac and foetus and those in brain and liver of maternal acatasaemic mice were higher than those of normal, respectively. The levels of mercury distribution in the blood and lungs of maternal acatalasaemic mice exposed to metallic mercury vapor were also lower than those of normal. Mercury concentrations in placenta and foetus of acatalasaemic mice following exposure to metallic mercury vapor were higher than those of normal. Maternal acatalasaemic mice had decreased levels of mercury in the blood than those of normal mice. Thus, the placenta/blood or foetus/blood ratio of mercury concentration in acatalasaemic mice was significantly higher than that in normal mice. Similarly the brain/blood or liver/blood ratio of maternal acatalasaemic mice was higher than that of normal mice. These results suggest that metallic mercury in the blood readily passed through the blood-brain, blood-foetus barriers. In contrast to the results on exposures of mice to metallic mercury, the foetus/maternal blood ratio of mercuric concentration in the acatalasaemic mice following injection of mercuric chloride was similar to that in the normal mice. Moreover, the foetus/maternal blood ratio of mercury concentration in acatalasaemic or normal mice injected with mercuric chloride was lower than those in acatalasaemic or normal mice exposed to metallic mercury.

  18. Inhalation of mercury vapor can cause the toxic effects on rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Akgül, Nilgün; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zuhal; Altunkaynak, Muhammed Eyüp; Deniz, Ömür Gülsüm; Ünal, Deniz; Akgül, Hayati Murat

    2016-01-01

    Dental amalgam has been used in dentistry as a filling material. The filler comprises mercury (Hg). It is considered one of the most important and widespread environmental pollutants, which poses a serious potential threat for the humans and animals. However, mercury deposition affects the nervous, cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, and especially renal systems. In most animals' species and humans, the kidney is one of the main sites of deposition of mercury and target organ for its toxicity. In this study, the effects of mercury intake on kidney in rats were searched. For the this purpose; we used 24 adult female Wistar albino rats (200 g in weight) obtained from Experimental Research and Application Center of Atatürk University with ethical approval. Besides, they were placed into a specially designed glass cage. Along this experiment for 45 days, subjects were exposed to (1 mg/m(3)/day) mercury vapor. However, no application was used for the control subjects. At the end of the experiment, kidney samples were obtained from all subjects and processed for routine light microscopic level and stereological aspect were assessed. Finally, according to our results, mercury affects the histological features of the kidney. That means, the severe effects of mercury has been shown using stereological approach, which is one of the ideal quantitative methods in the current literature. In this study, it was detected that chronic exposure to mercury vapor may lead to renal damage and diseases in an experimental rat model.

  19. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Developmental toxicity of chloroprene vapors in New Zealand white rabbits. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1994-04-01

    Chloroprene, 2-chloro-1,3-butadiene, is a colorless liquid with a pungent ethereal odor that is primarily used as an intermediate in the manufacture of neoprene rubber, and has been used as such since about 1930. This study addressed the potential for chloroprene to cause developmental toxicity in New Zealand white rabbits following gestational exposure to 0, 10, 40, or 175 ppm chloroprene vapors, 6h/dy, 7dy/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 15 artificially inseminated females exposed on 6 through 28 days of gestation (dg). Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice on 29 dg. Implants were enumerated and their status recorded and live fetuses were examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. There were no overt signs of maternal toxicity and the change in maternal body weight over the course of the study was not affected. Exposure of pregnant rabbits to chloroprene vapors on 6-28 dg had no effect on the number of implantation, the mean percent of live pups per litter, or on the incidence of resorptions per litter. The incidence of fetal malformations was not increased by exposure to chloroprene. Results of this study indicate that gestational exposure of New Zealand white rabbits to 10, 40, or 175 ppm chloroprene did not result in observable toxicity to either the dam or the offspring.

  20. Heroin. Specialized Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Do It Now Foundation, Phoenix, AZ.

    The document presents a collection of articles about heroin. Article 1 provides general information on heroin identification, drug dependence, effects of abuse, cost, source of supply, and penalties for illegal heroin use. Article 2 gives statistical information on heroin-related deaths in the District of Columbia between 1971 and 1982. Article 3…

  1. [The history of heroin].

    PubMed

    Hosztafi, S

    2001-08-01

    The discovery of heroin and the development of heroin abuse are introduced. Heroin, the hydrochloride of diacetylmorphine, was discovered by acetylation of morphine. Heroin, in pharmacological studies, proved to be more effective than morphine or codeine. The Bayer Company started the production of heroin in 1898 on a commercial scale. The first clinical results were so promising that heroin was considered a wonder drug. Indeed, heroin was more effective than codeine in respiratory diseases. It has turned out, however, that repeated administration of heroin results in the development of tolerance and the patients become heroin-addicts soon. In the early 1910s morphine addicts "discovered" the euphorising properties of heroin and this effect was enhanced by intravenous administration. Heroin became a narcotic drug and its abuse began to spread quickly. Restrictions on its production, use and distribution were regulated by international treties. The total ban on heroin production was also proposed. As a result of the strict regulations the production and cosumption of heroin showed a significant decrease after 1931. At the same time the underworld recognized the shortage of heroin and started the illicit production and trafficking. The quantity of heroin seized by law enforcement agencies in the past decades rose gradually. As an indicator of the worldwide heroin market, the quantity of confiscated heroin underwent a tenfold increase since 1970. The paper surveys the most important heroin-producing and trafficking countries. Heroin, prepared in clandestine ("kitchen" or "jungle") laboratories, is diluted ("cut") by every member of the illegal heroin distributing chain, i.e. smugglers, traffickers, dealers and vendors.

  2. Pharmacokinetic comparison of two methods of heroin smoking: 'chasing the dragon' versus the use of a heating device.

    PubMed

    Klous, Marjolein G; Huitema, Alwin D R; Rook, Elisabeth J; Hillebrand, Michel J X; Hendriks, Vincent M; Van den Brink, Wim; Beijnen, Jos H; Van Ree, Jan M

    2005-05-01

    In preparation for a trial on co-prescription of inhalable heroin and methadone, two methods for inhalation of heroin/caffeine tablets were compared: the commonly used method of 'chasing the dragon' and a standardised procedure for inhalation of volatilised heroin, using a heating device. Five male addicts inhaled a tablet of smokable heroin daily for 5 days, alternating the inhalation method. Plasma concentrations of heroin, 6-acetylmorphine, morphine and morphine-3- and -6-glucuronide were determined using a liquid chromatography method with tandem mass spectrometric detection. The exposure to heroin and its metabolites (expressed as areas under the concentration-time curve) was significantly lower after smoking via the heating device than after 'chasing the dragon': heroin 80% and 6-acetylmorphine 73% lower (p < 0.05). Maximal concentrations of heroin and 6-acetylmorphine were also 80% and 70% lower (p < 0.05) after using the heating device. 'Chasing the dragon' is a more efficient inhalation method than inhalation via the heating device.

  3. Research Reports: Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... areas west of the Mississippi River. 3 The dark color associated with black tar heroin results from ... have shown some deterioration of the brain’s white matter due to heroin use, which may affect decision- ...

  4. DrugFacts: Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Badge NIDA TV Spotlight: Heroin in the Twin Cities YouTube embedded video: http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/ ... a highlight on heroin use in the Twin Cities from her June 2013 Report on "Drug Abuse ...

  5. Deuterodiacetylmorphine as a marker for use of illicit heroin by addicts in a heroin-assisted treatment program.

    PubMed

    Klous, Marjolein G; Rook, Elisabeth J; Hillebrand, Michel J X; van den Brink, Wim; van Ree, Jan M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2005-09-01

    In preparation for a treatment program concerning the medical coprescription of heroin and methadone to treatment-resistant addicts in the Netherlands, we studied a novel strategy for monitoring co-use of illicit (nonprescribed) heroin. A deuterated analogue of heroin was added (1:20) to pharmaceutical, smokable heroin (a powder mixture of 75% w/w diacetylmorphine base and 25% w/w caffeine anhydrate), to be used by inhalation after volatilization ("chasing the dragon"). Plasma and urine samples were collected from nine male patients who had used pharmaceutical, smokable heroin during a four-day stay in a closed clinical research unit, and these samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Ratios of deuterated and undeuterated diacetylmorphine and 6-acetylmorphine (MAM/MAM-d3) in plasma and urine were calculated from peak areas of these substances in the respective chromatograms. The MAM/MAM-d3 ratios in plasma and urine were normally distributed (with small standard deviations) and independent from concentrations of 6-acetylmorphine and from time after use of pharmaceutical heroin. A MAM/MAM-d3 ratio in urine above 32.8 was considered indicative of co-use of illicit heroin, and this value was associated with a false-positive rate of only 1% (95% confidence interval: -1 to 3%). The MAM/MAM-d3 ratio was detectable in urine for 4-9.5 h after use of pharmaceutical, smokable heroin. Addition of stable, isotopically labelled heroin to pharmaceutical, smokable heroin is considered to be a feasible strategy for the detection of co-use of illicit heroin by patients in heroin-assisted treatment.

  6. [Efficacy diacetylmorphine (pharmaceutical heroin) for heroin treatment ].

    PubMed

    Demaret, I; Lemaître, A; Ansseau, M

    2010-12-01

    Before implementing the TADAM project in Belgium (a heroin-assisted treatment trial), our research team studied the trials in other countries. Since 1994, six randomised controlled trials have been developed using the same treatment model of heroin-assisted treatment (HAT). Each trial concluded that HAT had more efficacy than methadone treatment. We analysed those trials in order to find on which levels patients in a HAT treatment are expected to improve. Improvements appeared after at least six months on the level of street heroin use, (physical and mental) health and criminal behaviour. In the longer term, the continuation of treatment had positive but limited effects on the social level. Due to his higher cost, this treatment should remain a second-line treatment for this special target group: severe heroin addicts, using continuously street heroin in spite of a methadone treatment.

  7. The uptake, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of methyl tertiary-butyl ether inhaled alone and in combination with gasoline vapor.

    PubMed

    Benson, Janet M; Tibbetts, Brad M; Barr, Edward B

    2003-06-13

    The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the tissue uptake, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) in rats and to determine the effects of coinhalation of the volatile fraction of unleaded gasoline on these parameters. Male F344 rats were exposed nose-only once for 4 h to 4, 40, or 400 ppm 14C-MTBE and to 20 and 200 ppm of the light fraction of unleaded gasoline (LFG) containing 4 and 40 ppm 14C-MTBE, respectively. To evaluate the effects of repeated inhalation of LFG on the fate of inhaled MTBE, rats were exposed for 7 consecutive days to 20 and 200 ppm LFG followed on d 8 by exposure to LFG containing 14C-MTBE. Three subgroups of rats were included for evaluation of respiratory parameters, rates and routes of excretion, and tissue distribution and elimination. MTBE and its chief metabolite, tertiary-butyl alcohol, were quantitated in blood and kidney (immediately after exposure), and the major urinary metabolites, 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid and 2-methyl-1,2- propanediol, were identified and quantified in urine. Inhalation of MTBE alone or as a component of LFG had no concentration-dependent effect on respiratory minute volume. The initial body burdens (IBBs) of MTBE equivalents achieved after 4 h of exposure to MTBE did not increase linearly with exposure concentration. MTBE equivalents rapidly distributed to all tissues examined, with the largest percentages distributed to liver. Between 40 and 400 ppm, there was a significant reduction in percentage of the IBB present in the major organs examined, both immediately and 72 h after exposure. At 400 ppm, the elimination rates of MTBE equivalents from tissues changed significantly. Furthermore, at 400 ppm there was a significant decrease in the elimination half-time of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in breath and a significant increase in the percentage of the IBB of MTBE equivalents eliminated as VOCs in breath. LFG coexposure significantly decreased the percentage of the

  8. Heroin Addicts Reporting Previous Heroin Overdoses Also Report Suicide Attempts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradvik, Louise; Frank, Arne; Hulenvik, Per; Medvedeo, Alvaro; Berglund, Mats

    2007-01-01

    Nonfatal heroin overdoses and suicide attempts are both common among heroin addicts, but there is limited knowledge about the association between them. The sample in the present study consisted of 149 regular heroin users in Malmo, Sweden. Out of these 98 had taken an unintentional heroin overdose at some time and 51 had made at least one attempt…

  9. [Therapy in heroin addiction].

    PubMed

    Hosztafi, Sáandor; Fürst, Zsuzsanna

    2014-09-01

    Heroin addiction is one of the most devastating and expensive of public health problems. The most effective treatment is opioid replacement therapy. Replacement of heroin, a short-acting euphoriant with methadone or other opioids that have significantly longer duration of action provides a number of therapeutic benefits. Opioid detoxification has a role in both preventing acute withdrawal and maintaining long-term abstinence. Opioid-based detoxification is based on the principle of cross-tolerance, in which one opioid is replaced with another one that is slowly tapered. For the treatment of heroin addicts a wide range of psychosocial and pharmacotherapeutic treatments are available; of these, methadone maintenance therapy has the most evidence of benefit. Methadone maintenance reduces and/or eliminates the use of heroin, reduces the death rate and criminality associated with heroin use, and allows patients to improve their health and social productivity. In addition, enrollment in methadone maintenance has the potential to reduce the transmission of infectious diseases associated with heroin injection, such as hepatitis and HIV. The principal effects of methadone maintenance are to relieve narcotic craving, suppress the abstinence syndrome, and block the euphoric effects associated with heroin. There is growing interest in expanding treatment into primary care, allowing opioid addiction to be managed like other chronic illnesses. Buprenorphine which is a long-acting partial agonist was also approved as pharmacotherapy for opioid dependence. Opioid antagonists can reduce heroin self-administration and opioid craving in detoxified addicts. Naltrexone, which is a long-acting competitive antagonist at the opioid receptors, blocks the subjective and objective responses produced by intravenous opioids. Naltrexone is employed to accelerate opioid detoxification by displacing heroin and as a maintenance agent for detoxified formerly heroin-dependent patients who want to

  10. Deterioration in brain and heart functions following a single sub-lethal (0.8 LCt{sub 50}) inhalation exposure of rats to sarin vapor:

    SciTech Connect

    Allon, N. Chapman, S.; Egoz, I.; Rabinovitz, I.; Kapon, J.; Weissman, B.A.; Yacov, G.; Bloch-Shilderman, E.; Grauer, E.

    2011-05-15

    The main injuries among victims of the terrorist act in the Tokyo subway resulted from sub-lethal inhalation and whole body exposure to sarin vapor. In order to study the long term effects of such exposure and to simulate these conditions, freely moving rats were exposed to sarin vapor (27.2 {+-} 1.7 {mu}g/l) for 10 min. About 50% of the rats showed no overt symptoms and the rest had mild to moderate clinical symptoms that subsided within 4 h following exposure. A reduction of weight was noted during the first 3 days with full recovery on the 4th day. Rat's heart was challenged with epinephrine 1 and 6 months post exposure. A significant reduction in the threshold for epinephrine-induced arrhythmia (EPIA) was noted in rats exposed to sarin. A time dependent increase in the kD and Bmax values of muscarinic auto receptors (M2) was recorded in the rat's cortex and striatum. No changes were recorded in the rats' brain trans locator protein (TSPO) levels, concomitant with no observed changes in the animals' performance in A Morris water maze test. A significant increase in open field activity was noted 6 months following exposure to sarin vapor as well as a significant decrease in prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) production in the brain. It is speculated that down regulation of the M2 auto receptor function, caused hyper reactivity of the cholinergic system which leads to the changes described above. The continuous reduction in M2 auto-receptor system through an unknown mechanism may be the cause for long lasting decline in sarin-exposed casualties' health.

  11. Heroin crystal nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Josef Edrik Keith; Merhi, Basma; Gregory, Oliver; Hu, Susie; Henriksen, Kammi; Gohh, Reginald

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present an interesting case of acute kidney injury and severe metabolic alkalosis in a patient with a history of heavy heroin abuse. Urine microscopy showed numerous broomstick-like crystals. These crystals are also identified in light and electron microscopy. We hypothesize that heroin crystalizes in an alkaline pH, resulting in tubular obstruction and acute kidney injury. Management is mainly supportive as there is no known specific therapy for this condition. This paper highlights the utility of urine microscopy in diagnosing the etiology of acute kidney injury and proposes a novel disease called heroin crystal nephropathy.

  12. Inhaled Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medications Long-Term Control Medications Inhaled Steroids Inhaled Steroids Make an Appointment Ask a Question Refer Patient ... more about steroids? What are some common inhaled steroids? Common inhaled steroids include: Asmanex ® (mometasone) Alvesco ® (ciclesonide) ...

  13. The Problem of Heroin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James Q.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Argues that most of the underlying assumptions of presently recommended solutions to the problem of heroin addiction are unreasonable, unwarranted, or at least open to more than one interpretation. (DM)

  14. Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Families? Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use Hurts Other People Drug ... was addicted to heroin. Here, he describes the drug's effects on his life. Read Deon's story The Prescription ...

  15. Heroin and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... seeds from poppy plants. Prescription opioids , like oxycodone, morphine and codeine, are used as painkillers after an ... a street (illegal) drug made from the opioid morphine. Heroin can be a white or brown powder, ...

  16. Infrared spectroscopy study of the influence of inhaled vapors/smoke produced by cigarettes of active smokers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Cristina

    2015-05-01

    While much is known about the effect of smoke and vapors on the composition of blood, little is known about their impact on the composition of breath. When tobacco from traditional cigarettes (T) is burned, it produces harmful smoke compared with the vapor produced when using electronic cigarettes (E). Using a noninvasive, safe, and rapid CO2 laser-photoacoustic method, this study aimed to examine the ethylene changes at different time intervals in the exhaled breath composition of E-cigarette smokers and T-cigarette smokers, before and after the consecutive exposures to cigarettes. Oxidative stress from exposure to tobacco smoke has a role in the pathogenic process, leading to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The evidence on the mechanisms by which T-smoking causes damage indicates that there is no risk-free level of exposure to tobacco smoke. The study revealed that the ethylene level (in the E-cigarette smoker's case) was found to be in smaller concentrations (compared with T-cigarette smoker's case) and that E-cigarettes may provide an alternative to T-cigarette smoking.

  17. Infrared spectroscopy study of the influence of inhaled vapors/smoke produced by cigarettes of active smokers.

    PubMed

    Popa, Cristina

    2015-05-01

    While much is known about the effect of smoke and vapors on the composition of blood, little is known about their impact on the composition of breath. When tobacco from traditional cigarettes (T) is burned, it produces harmful smoke compared with the vapor produced when using electronic cigarettes (E). Using a noninvasive, safe, and rapid CO2 laser-photoacoustic method, this study aimed to examine the ethylene changes at different time intervals in the exhaled breath composition of E-cigarette smokers and T-cigarette smokers, before and after the consecutive exposures to cigarettes. Oxidative stress from exposure to tobacco smoke has a role in the pathogenic process, leading to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The evidence on the mechanisms by which T-smoking causes damage indicates that there is no risk-free level of exposure to tobacco smoke. The study revealed that the ethylene level (in the E-cigarette smoker's case) was found to be in smaller concentrations (compared with T-cigarette smoker's case) and that E-cigarettes may provide an alternative to T-cigarette smoking.

  18. Multiple cerebral infarctions in a young patient with heroin-induced hypereosinophilic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bolz, Jan; Meves, Saskia H; Kara, Kaffer; Reinacher-Schick, Anke; Gold, Ralf; Krogias, Christos

    2015-09-15

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome represents a rare cause for cerebral infarctions and inflammatory neurological disorders. Various possible pathogenic mechanisms for cerebral infarctions have already been discussed. Complex mechanisms including a local hypercoagulability by eosinophilic granules as well as a direct damage to endothelial cells, leading to alterations of the microcirculation seem to be involved. The changing pattern of heroin use to inhalation/sniffing leading to an increasing abuse may cause a rise in the prevalence of Heroin induced eosinophilia, as it has been reported in a case of eosinophilic pneumonia associated with heroin inhalation. To our knowledge, the present case report displays the first description of stroke in the setting of heroin induced hypereosinophilia. Thus, besides usual vasoconstriction, HES should be considered in drug-induced cerebral infarctions.

  19. Inhalation toxicokinetics of soman stereoisomers in the atropinized guinea pig with nose-only exposure to soman vapor.

    PubMed

    Langenberg, J P; Spruit, H E; van der Wiel, H J; Trap, H C; Helmich, R B; Bergers, W W; van Helden, H P; Benschop, H P

    1998-07-01

    The toxicokinetics of the four stereoisomers of the nerve agent C(+/-)P(+/-)-soman were studied in anesthetized, atropinized guinea pigs for nose-only exposure to soman vapor. During exposure the respiratory minute volume (RMV) and respiratory frequency (RF) were monitored. Blood samples were taken for chiral gas chromatographic analysis of the concentrations of nerve agent stereoisomers and for measurement of the progressive inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The animals were exposed for 4-8 min to 0.4-0.8 LCt50 of C(+/-)P(+/-)-soman. Concentrations of the P(-)-isomers increased rapidly during exposure, up to several nanograms per milliliter of blood. Mathematical equations describing the concentration-time courses of the P(-)-isomers were obtained by nonlinear regression. The kinetics were mathematically described as a discontinuous process, with a monoexponential equation for the exposure period and a two-exponential equation for the postexposure period. The absorption phase of C(+)P(-)-soman lagged behind that of the C(-)P(-)-isomer, presumably due to preferential covalent binding at as yet unidentified binding sites. The terminal half-life observed after nose-only exposure is longer than that observed after an equitoxic iv bolus administration, which suggests the presence of a depot in the upper respiratory tract from which absorption continues after termination of the exposure. Two types of nonlinearity of the toxicokinetics were observed, i.e., with dose and with exposure time. The AChE activity was rapidly inhibited during exposure to the nerve agent vapor. There were no soman-related effects on RMV and RF. The toxicokinetics of the soman stereoisomers observed for nose-only exposure are compared with those determined for iv bolus and sc administration.

  20. Heroin addiction and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bashore, R A; Ketchum, J S; Staisch, K J; Barrett, C T; Zimmermann, E G

    1981-06-01

    Pregnant heroin addicts tend to be younger than nonaddicted pregnant patients, unmarried or separated from spouses, and a disproportionately large number are members of minority ethnic groups. Heroin addiction during pregnancy is associated with several significant medical and obstetrical complications and may result in both acute and chronic abnormalities in neonates. Malnutrition, venereal disease, hepatitis, pulmonary complications, preeclampsia and third-trimester bleeding are the most common maternal complications, while fetal death, intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity and withdrawal symptoms affect the fetus and neonate. There is controversy about treating addicts with methadone during pregnancy. The findings of studies in animals suggest that there may be a long-lasting drug-induced syndrome, characterized by growth retardation, delayed motor development and behavior abnormalities in offspring of heroin-addicted or methadone-treated mothers.

  1. Is the New Heroin Epidemic Really New? Racializing Heroin.

    PubMed

    Bowser, Benjamin; Fullilove, Robert; Word, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Heroin abuse as an outcome of the prior use of painkillers increased rapidly over the past decade. This "new epidemic" is unique because the new heroin users are primarily young White Americans in rural areas of virtually every state. This commentary argues that the painkiller-to-heroin transition could not be the only cause of heroin use on such a scale and that the new and old heroin epidemics are linked. The social marketing that so successfully drove the old heroin epidemic has innovated and expanded due to the use of cell-phones, text messaging and the "dark web" which requires a Tor browser, and software that allows one to communicate with encrypted sites without detection. Central city gentrification has forced traffickers to take advantage of larger and more lucrative markets. A second outcome is that urban black and Latino communities are no longer needed as heroin stages areas for suburban and exurban illicit drug distribution. Drug dealing can be done directly in predominantly white suburbs and rural areas without the accompanying violence associated with the old epidemic. Denial of the link between the new and old heroin epidemics racially segregates heroin users and more proactive prevention and treatment in the new epidemic than in the old. It also cuts off a half-century of knowledge about the supply-side of heroin drug dealing and the inevitable public policy measures that will have to be implemented to effectively slow and stop both the old and new epidemic.

  2. "Every 'never' I ever said came true": transitions from opioid pills to heroin injecting.

    PubMed

    Mars, Sarah G; Bourgois, Philippe; Karandinos, George; Montero, Fernando; Ciccarone, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    This qualitative study documents the pathways to injecting heroin by users in Philadelphia and San Francisco before and during a pharmaceutical opioid pill epidemic. Data was collected through in-depth, semi-structured interviews (conducted between 2010 and 2012) that were, conducted against a background of longer-term participant-observation, ethnographic studies of street-based drug users and dealers in Philadelphia (2007-12) and San Francisco (1994-2007, 2012). Philadelphia and San Francisco were selected for their contrasting political economies, immigration patterns and source type of heroin. In Philadelphia the ethnographers found heroin injectors, usually white users, who had started their opiate using careers with prescription opioids rather than transitioning from other drugs. In both Philadelphia and San Francisco, most of the young heroin injectors interviewed began, their drug-use trajectories with opioid pills--usually Percocet (oxycodone and acetaminophen), generic short acting oxycodone or, OxyContin (long-acting oxycodone)--before transitioning to heroin, usually by nasal inhalation (sniffing) or smoking at first, followed by injecting. While most of the Philadelphia users were born in the city or its suburbs and had started using both opioid pills and heroin there, many of the San Francisco users had initiated their pill and sometimes heroin use elsewhere and had migrated to the city from around the country. Nevertheless, patterns of transition of younger injectors were similar in both cities suggesting an evolving national pattern. In contrast, older users in both Philadelphia and San Francisco were more likely to have graduated to heroin injection from non-opiate drugs such as cannabis, methamphetamine and cocaine. Pharmaceutical opioid initiates typically reported switching to heroin for reasons of cost and ease-of-access to supply after becoming physically and emotionally dependent on opioid pills. Many expressed surprise and dismay at their

  3. Inhalation Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can inhale that can cause acute internal injuries. Particles in the air from fires and toxic ... and lung diseases worse. Symptoms of acute inhalation injuries may include Coughing and phlegm A scratchy throat ...

  4. Asthma Inhalers

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inhaler into the lungs. But CFCs are ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) that hurt the environment. Manufacturers ... inhalers, that do not rob the atmosphere of ozone. “The FDA [Food and Drug Administration] and various ...

  5. Inhalant Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Who may be abusing inhalants?The most common abusers of inhalants are teenagers, especially those who are ... to your child about the dangers of trying drugs can help him or her make the right ...

  6. Genetic signatures of heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaw-Ji; Liao, Ding-Lieh; Shen, Tsu-Wang; Yang, Hsin-Chou; Chen, Kuang-Chi; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-08-01

    Heroin addiction is a complex psychiatric disorder with a chronic course and a high relapse rate, which results from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Heroin addiction has a substantial heritability in its etiology; hence, identification of individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction may help prevent the occurrence and relapse of heroin addiction and its complications. The study aimed to identify a small set of genetic signatures that may reliably predict the individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction. We first measured the transcript level of 13 genes (RASA1, PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CD74, CEBPB, AUTS2, ENO2, IMPDH2, HAT1, MBD1, and RGS3) in lymphoblastoid cell lines in a sample of 124 male heroin addicts and 124 male control subjects using real-time quantitative PCR. Seven genes (PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CEBPB, ENO2, and HAT1) showed significant differential expression between the 2 groups. Further analysis using 3 statistical methods including logistic regression analysis, support vector machine learning analysis, and a computer software BIASLESS revealed that a set of 4 genes (JUN, CEBPB, PRKCB, ENO2, or CEBPG) could predict the diagnosis of heroin addiction with the accuracy rate around 85% in our dataset. Our findings support the idea that it is possible to identify genetic signatures of heroin addiction using a small set of expressed genes. However, the study can only be considered as a proof-of-concept study. As the establishment of lymphoblastoid cell line is a laborious and lengthy process, it would be more practical in clinical settings to identify genetic signatures for heroin addiction directly from peripheral blood cells in the future study.

  7. Substance use - inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    Substance abuse - inhalants; Drug abuse - inhalants; Drug use - inhalants; Glue - inhalants ... symptoms and may include: Strong cravings for the drug Having mood swings from feeling depressed to agitated ...

  8. The Dreams of Heroin Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looney, Maryanne

    1972-01-01

    Few heroin addicts get high'' in their dreams. An exploration of the reasons for this failure provides some clues to the conflicts and other problems that retard an addict's progress in therapy. (Author)

  9. Development of pharmaceutical heroin preparations for medical co-prescription to opioid dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Klous, Marjolein G; Van den Brink, Wim; Van Ree, Jan M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2005-12-12

    Presently, there is a considerable interest in heroin-assisted treatment: co-prescription of heroin to certain subgroups of chronic, treatment-resistant, opioid dependent patients. In 2002, nine countries had planned (Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Spain) or ongoing (Germany, The Netherlands, Switzerland, United Kingdom) clinical trials on this subject. These trials (and the routine heroin-assisted treatment programs that might result) will need pharmaceutical heroin (diacetylmorphine) to prescribe to the patients. Research into the development of pharmaceutical forms of heroin for prescription to addicts can benefit from the large amount of knowledge that already exists regarding this substance. Therefore, in this paper we review the physicochemical and pharmaceutical properties of diacetylmorphine and the clinically investigated routes of administration, as well as routes of administration utilised on the street in the context of developing pharmaceutical heroin formulations for prescription to addicts. Patient acceptability of the formulation is essential, because heroin-assisted treatment is aimed at treatment-resistant addicts, who often have to be encouraged to participate (or to maintain participation) in a treatment program. This means that the most suitable products would have pharmacokinetic profiles mimicking that of diacetylmorphine for injection, with rapid peak concentrations of diacetylmorphine and 6-acetylmorphine, ensuring the 'rush effect' and the sustained presence of morphine(-6-glucuronide) creating the prolonged euphoria. Diacetylmorphine for inhalation after volatilisation (via 'chasing the dragon') seems to be a suitable candidate, while intranasal and oral diacetylmorphine are currently thought to be unsuitable. However, oral and intranasal delivery systems might be improved and become suitable for use by heroin dependent patients.

  10. Heroin Epidemic Expands Its Grip on America

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_164350.html Heroin Epidemic Expands Its Grip on America Use of the narcotic grew ... people transition from painkillers to heroin, Martins explained. It is also related to availability, lower cost and ...

  11. Tips for Teens: The Truth about Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... glamorization of “heroin chic” in films, fashion, and music, heroin use can have tragic consequences that extend far beyond its users. Fetal effects, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, violence, and crime are all ...

  12. Opioids: The Prescription Drug & Heroin Overdose Epidemic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Law Enforcement Resources Opioids: The Prescription Drug & Heroin Overdose Epidemic Opioids are natural or synthetic chemicals ... in your brain or body. Common opioids include heroin and prescription drugs such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, and ...

  13. [X-ray diffraction spectrum of heroin].

    PubMed

    Hu, X; Kan, J; Yuan, B

    1999-06-01

    In this paper, practical measured X-ray diffraction spectra of heroin and opium are given and the parameters of each diffraction peak of the heroin are listed. The heroin belongs to orthorhombic crystal system; the basic vectors of the primitive cell are: a = 8.003, b = 14.373, c = 16.092 x 10(-10) m. As compared with the standard spectra of pure heroin and sucrose, the main doped additive checked by us, is sugar affirmatively.

  14. Deterioration in brain and heart functions following a single sub-lethal (0.8 LCt50) inhalation exposure of rats to sarin vapor: a putative mechanism of the long term toxicity.

    PubMed

    Allon, N; Chapman, S; Egoz, I; Rabinovitz, I; Kapon, J; Weissman, B A; Yacov, G; Bloch-Shilderman, E; Grauer, E

    2011-05-15

    The main injuries among victims of the terrorist act in the Tokyo subway resulted from sub-lethal inhalation and whole body exposure to sarin vapor. In order to study the long term effects of such exposure and to simulate these conditions, freely moving rats were exposed to sarin vapor (27.2±1.7 μg/l) for 10 min. About 50% of the rats showed no overt symptoms and the rest had mild to moderate clinical symptoms that subsided within 4h following exposure. A reduction of weight was noted during the first 3 days with full recovery on the 4th day. Rat's heart was challenged with epinephrine 1 and 6 months post exposure. A significant reduction in the threshold for epinephrine-induced arrhythmia (EPIA) was noted in rats exposed to sarin. A time dependent increase in the kD and Bmax values of muscarinic auto receptors (M2) was recorded in the rat's cortex and striatum. No changes were recorded in the rats' brain trans locator protein (TSPO) levels, concomitant with no observed changes in the animals' performance in A Morris water maze test. A significant increase in open field activity was noted 6 months following exposure to sarin vapor as well as a significant decrease in prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production in the brain. It is speculated that down regulation of the M2 auto receptor function, caused hyper reactivity of the cholinergic system which leads to the changes described above. The continuous reduction in M2 auto-receptor system through an unknown mechanism may be the cause for long lasting decline in sarin-exposed casualties' health.

  15. The Dynamics of a Heroin Addiction Epidemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPont, Robert L.; Greene, Mark H.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses recent trends in heroin addiction in Washington, D.C. In 1969 a comprehensive, multimodal treatment program for addicts was introduced and a major law enforcement commitment was made to reduce the heroin supply. These factors, together with changing community attitudes, may be responsible for a remarkable decline in heroin addiction. (JR)

  16. Pharmacokinetic correlates of the effects of a heroin vaccine on heroin self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Raleigh, Michael D; Pentel, Paul R; LeSage, Mark G

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a morphine-conjugate vaccine (M-KLH) on the acquisition, maintenance, and reinstatement of heroin self-administration (HSA) in rats, and on heroin and metabolite distribution during heroin administration that approximated the self-administered dosing rate. Vaccination with M-KLH blocked heroin-primed reinstatement of heroin responding. Vaccination also decreased HSA at low heroin unit doses but produced a compensatory increase in heroin self-administration at high unit doses. Vaccination shifted the heroin dose-response curve to the right, indicating reduced heroin potency, and behavioral economic demand curve analysis further confirmed this effect. In a separate experiment heroin was administered at rates simulating heroin exposure during HSA. Heroin and its active metabolites, 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM) and morphine, were retained in plasma and metabolite concentrations were reduced in brain in vaccinated rats compared to controls. Reductions in 6-AM concentrations in brain after vaccination were consistent with the changes in HSA rates accompanying vaccination. These data provide evidence that 6-AM is the principal mediator of heroin reinforcement, and the principal target of the M-KLH vaccine, in this model. While heroin vaccines may have potential as therapies for heroin addiction, high antibody to drug ratios appear to be important for obtaining maximal efficacy.

  17. Pharmacokinetic Correlates of the Effects of a Heroin Vaccine on Heroin Self-Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Raleigh, Michael D.; Pentel, Paul R.; LeSage, Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a morphine-conjugate vaccine (M-KLH) on the acquisition, maintenance, and reinstatement of heroin self-administration (HSA) in rats, and on heroin and metabolite distribution during heroin administration that approximated the self-administered dosing rate. Vaccination with M-KLH blocked heroin-primed reinstatement of heroin responding. Vaccination also decreased HSA at low heroin unit doses but produced a compensatory increase in heroin self-administration at high unit doses. Vaccination shifted the heroin dose-response curve to the right, indicating reduced heroin potency, and behavioral economic demand curve analysis further confirmed this effect. In a separate experiment heroin was administered at rates simulating heroin exposure during HSA. Heroin and its active metabolites, 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM) and morphine, were retained in plasma and metabolite concentrations were reduced in brain in vaccinated rats compared to controls. Reductions in 6-AM concentrations in brain after vaccination were consistent with the changes in HSA rates accompanying vaccination. These data provide evidence that 6-AM is the principal mediator of heroin reinforcement, and the principal target of the M-KLH vaccine, in this model. While heroin vaccines may have potential as therapies for heroin addiction, high antibody to drug ratios appear to be important for obtaining maximal efficacy. PMID:25536404

  18. [The message from heroin overdoses].

    PubMed

    Pap, Ágota; Hegedűs, Katalin

    2015-03-01

    Drug use can be defined as a kind of self destruction, and it is directly linked to attitudes toward death and suicide occurring in a significant number of users of different narcotics. The aim of the authors was to look for the background of this relationship between drug and death and examine the origin, development, and motives behind heroin overdose based on an analysis of previous studies. It seems clear that pure heroin overdose increased gradually over the years. The fear of the police is the inhibitory factor of the overdose prevention and notification of emergency health care service. Signs of suicide could be the own home as the chosen location for heroin overdose and the presence of partners ("moment of death companion"). Interventions should include simple techniques such as first aid, naloxone administration, resuscitation, prevention of relapse of prisoners and social network extension involving maintenance programs.

  19. Lay theories of heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    Furnham, A; Thomson, L

    1996-07-01

    This study examined the structure and determinants of lay people's implicit theories of heroin addiction. A questionnaire was derived from interviews with lay people about their beliefs and theories of heroin addiction and academic literature on the subject. One hundred and forty-four subjects completed the questionnaire, in which they rated 105 statements about the causes, correlates and cures of heroin addiction. The three parts of the questionnaire were individually factor analyzed and a clear, interpretable factor structure emerged for each. The factors seemed similar to explicit academic theories, but the exception was beliefs about cure, which did not show overall support for the most clinically used models. When the three factor analyses were combined into a single 'higher-order' factor analysis four factors emerged, labelled moralistic, psychosocial, sociocultural and drug treatment, which reflect more or less coherent views on the nature of heroin addiction. Subjects' political beliefs was the greatest (demographic and attitudinal) determinant of lay beliefs in these factors, with experience of addiction, addicts, drugs and age also highly correlated. Vote was the main determinant and best predictor of the four 'higher-order' structured lay theories: right-wing voters emphasizing moralistic and individualistic theory and left-wing voters supporting the psychological and societal ideas. Implications for policy and interventions to addicts of these lay theories are considered.

  20. Ciclesonide Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... ciclesonide inhaler while you are near an open flame or a heat source. The inhaler may explode ... inhaler near a heat source or an open flame. Protect the inhaler from freezing and direct sunlight. ...

  1. Fluticasone Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... aerosol inhaler while you are near an open flame or a heat source. The inhaler may explode ... inhaler near a heat source or an open flame. Protect the inhaler from freezing and direct sunlight. ...

  2. Flunisolide Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... flunisolide inhaler while you are near an open flame or a heat source. The inhaler may explode ... inhaler near a heat source or an open flame. Protect the inhaler from freezing and direct sunlight. ...

  3. Assessment of the Halogen Content of Brazilian Inhalable Particulate Matter (PM10) Using High Resolution Molecular Absorption Spectrometry and Electrothermal Vaporization Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, with Direct Solid Sample Analysis.

    PubMed

    de Gois, Jefferson S; Almeida, Tarcisio S; Alves, Jeferson C; Araujo, Rennan G O; Borges, Daniel L G

    2016-03-15

    Halogens in the atmosphere play an important role in climate change and also represent a potential health hazard. However, quantification of halogens is not a trivial task, and methods that require minimum sample preparation are interesting alternatives. Hence, the aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of direct solid sample analysis using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS MAS) for F determination and electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) for simultaneous Cl, Br, and I determination in airborne inhalable particulate matter (PM10) collected in the metropolitan area of Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil. Analysis using HR-CS MAS was accomplished by monitoring the CaF molecule, which was generated at high temperatures in the graphite furnace after the addition of Ca. Analysis using ETV-ICP-MS was carried out using Ca as chemical modifier/aerosol carrier in order to avoid losses of Cl, Br, and I during the pyrolysis step, with concomitant use of Pd as a permanent modifier. The direct analysis approach resulted in LODs that were proven adequate for halogen determination in PM10, using either standard addition calibration or calibration against a certified reference material. The method allowed the quantification of the halogens in 14 PM10 samples collected in a northeastern coastal city in Brazil. The results demonstrated variations of halogen content according to meteorological conditions, particularly related to rainfall, humidity, and sunlight irradiation.

  4. Australian heroin seizures and the causes of the 2001 heroin shortage.

    PubMed

    Jiggens, John

    2008-08-01

    This paper uses Australian heroin seizure data, along with estimates of the size of the Australian heroin market to evaluate the impact of drug law enforcement on the 2001 Australian heroin shortage from the percentage of the market seized. It also critically examines international heroin production trends and published reports on the causes of the Australian heroin shortage. Its conclusion is that previous studies may have overstated the success of drug law enforcement and that the most likely explanation for Australia's 2001 heroin shortage was a significant decline in heroin production world-wide, due to a general move away from heroin production in the countries of Southeast Asia and the prohibition on opium growing by the Taliban regime in Afghanistan.

  5. [Rapid analysis of added ingredients in heroin].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-fen; Yu, Jing; Guo, Xin; Sun, Xing-long; Wang, Ding-fang

    2011-07-01

    The method of rapid analysis of added ingredients in heroin was studied in the present paper. Adding sucrose, fructose, glucose, starch, caffeine and phenacetin to heroin with a certain percentage, the changes in the infrared spectrum with the concentration of heroin increasing and the detection limit of the additives were determined. Whether or not heroin can be detected in the sample with high concentration of added ingredients was studied using Raman spectroscopy. Similarly, in high purity of heroin, whether or not Raman spectroscopy can detect the added ingredients was tested. Through systematic experiments, the results showed that: using infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy to test the added ingredients of heroin is a rapid and effective method. Each has both advantages and disadvantages. We should select the appropriate method according to the actual cases.

  6. Impact of South American heroin on the US heroin market 1993–2004

    PubMed Central

    Ciccarone, Daniel; Unick, George J; Kraus, Allison

    2008-01-01

    Background The past two decades have seen an increase in heroin-related morbidity and mortality in the United States. We report on trends in US heroin retail price and purity, including the effect of entry of Colombian-sourced heroin on the US heroin market. Methods The average standardized price ($/mg-pure) and purity (% by weight) of heroin from 1993 to 2004 was from obtained from US Drug Enforcement Agency retail purchase data for 20 metropolitan statistical areas. Univariate statistics, robust Ordinary Least Squares regression and mixed fixed and random effect growth curve models were used to predict the price and purity data in each metropolitan statistical area over time. Results Over the 12 study years, heroin price decreased 62%. The median percentage of all heroin samples that are of South American origin increased an absolute 7% per year. Multivariate models suggest percent South American heroin is a significant predictor of lower heroin price and higher purity adjusting for time and demographics. Conclusion These analyses reveal trends to historically low-cost heroin in many US cities. These changes correspond to the entrance into and rapid domination of the US heroin market by Colombian-sourced heroin. The implications of these changes are discussed. PMID:19201184

  7. Screening for illicit heroin use in patients in a heroin-assisted treatment program.

    PubMed

    Rook, Elisabeth J; Huitema, Alwin D R; van den Brink, Wim; Hillebrand, Michel J X; van Ree, Jan M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of illicit heroin among patients in a heroin-assisted treatment program. In this program, pharmaceutical-grade heroin was administered to heroin-addicted patients. Monitoring of illicit heroin use was considered important for the evaluation of this treatment program. Acetylcodeine and codeine, common adulterants of "street" heroin, were used as markers for illicit heroin. A liquid chromatography method with tandem mass spectrometric detection (LC-MS-MS) was developed, for quantitative analysis of heroin and methadone, their metabolites, and the simultaneous detection of acetylcodeine. One-hundred patients in a heroin-assisted treatment program were screened for acetylcodeine in plasma. Furthermore, patients were interviewed about illicit heroin use, and they were tested for alcohol and cocaine use. In plasma samples of 16% of the patients, acetylcodeine was detected. Overall agreement between self-report and plasma samples was 95% (kappa: 0.81). Patients who tested positive for acetylcodeine had visited the outpatients' clinics significantly less frequently than the patients who tested negative. Alcohol and cocaine use was more common in patients who tested positive for acetylcodeine. Illicit heroin use was observed in a limited percentage of patients. Overall agreement between self-report and markers of illicit heroin use was good.

  8. Inhalation Injury.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    alpha,-antitrypsin resulting cur most often as the result of tracheal in prolonged action of proteases such as or laryngeal damage from the endotra... curs is determined by physicochemical Turbulent airflow, such as at bifurca- properties of the inhaled substance, its tions of the airway, separates

  9. Sudden Deaths Among Oil and Gas Extraction Workers Resulting from Oxygen Deficiency and Inhalation of Hydrocarbon Gases and Vapors - United States, January 2010-March 2015.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Robert J; Retzer, Kyla; Kosnett, Michael J; Hodgson, Michael; Jordan, Todd; Ridl, Sophia; Kiefer, Max

    2016-01-15

    In 2013, an occupational medicine physician from the University of California, San Francisco, contacted CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) about two oil and gas extraction worker deaths in the western United States. The suspected cause of these deaths was exposure to hydrocarbon gases and vapors (HGVs) and oxygen (O2)-deficient atmospheres after opening the hatches of hydrocarbon storage tanks. The physician and experts from NIOSH and OSHA reviewed available fatality reports from January 2010 to March 2015, and identified seven additional deaths with similar characteristics (nine total deaths). Recommendations were made to industry and regulators regarding the hazards associated with opening hatches of tanks, and controls to reduce or eliminate the potential for HGV exposure were proposed. Health care professionals who treat or evaluate oil and gas workers need to be aware that workers might report symptoms of exposure to high concentrations of HGVs and possible O2 deficiency; employers and workers need to be aware of this hazard and know how to limit exposure. Medical examiners investigating the death of oil and gas workers who open tank hatches should consider the contribution of O2 deficiency and HGV exposure.

  10. Heroin in brown, black and white: Structural factors and medical consequences in the US heroin market

    PubMed Central

    Ciccarone, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Background Heroin coming into the United States historically comes from three widely dispersed geographical regions: Southwest Asia, Southeast Asia and Mexico. A fourth source of US-bound heroin, from Colombia, originated in the early 1990s. The fact that the four heroin sources produce differing morphologies and qualities of heroin has not been critically examined. In addition, it is not well established how the contemporary competing dynamics of interdiction, or restriction of heroin flows across international boundaries, and neoliberal, e.g., global expansion of free trade, policies are affecting heroin markets. This paper will highlight changes in the US heroin market, including source trends, the political economy of the now dominant source and the resultant effects on the heroin risk environment by US region. Methods Using a structural and historical framework this paper examines two decades of secondary data sources, including government and drug control agency documents, on heroin flows together with published work on the political and economic dynamics in Latin America. Results Co-occurring neoliberal economic reforms may have contributed to paradoxical effects of US/Colombian interdiction efforts. Since entering the US market, heroin from Colombia has been distributed at a much higher quality and lower retail price. An increasingly exclusive market has developed with Mexican and Colombian heroin gaining market share and displacing Asian heroin. These trends have had dramatic effects on the risk environment for heroin consumers. An intriguing factor is that different global sources of heroin produce substantially different products. Plausible associations exist between heroin source/form and drug use behaviours and harms. For example, cold water-soluble powdered heroin (sources: Asia, Colombia) may be associated with higher HIV prevalence in the US, while low-solubility “black tar” heroin (BTH; source: Mexico) is historically used in areas with reduced

  11. Heroin fatality due to penile injection.

    PubMed

    Winek, C L; Wahba, W W; Rozin, L

    1999-03-01

    Death due to heroin overdose and/or rapid injection of heroin is a frequent occurrence among opioid addicts. We present an unusual case of heroin fatality due to the injection of the drug in the penis. Blood, urine, bile, and vitreous humor concentrations of morphine were 0.68, 0.49, 0.32 and 0.062 microg/ml, respectively. Ethanol was detected at concentrations of 104, 124, 106, and 94 mg/dl in the blood, urine, bile, and vitreous humor, respectively. The cause of death was determined to be due to heroin and ethanol intoxication.

  12. Non-injecting routes of administration among entrants to three treatment modalities for heroin dependence.

    PubMed

    Darke, Shane; Hetherington, Kate; Ross, Joanne; Lynskey, Michael; Teesson, Maree

    2004-06-01

    A sample of 535 entrants to opioid dependence treatments across three treatment modalities were administered a structured interview to ascertain the prevalence of non-injecting heroin use. Ten per cent of participants had used heroin primarily by smoking/inhaling in the month preceding interview, and 9% had used heroin and other drugs exclusively by non-injecting routes. Non-injectors were younger (25.3 vs. 29.5 years), had higher levels of education (10.6 vs. 10.0 years), were more likely to be employed (33 vs. 18%) and had lower levels of recent crime (31 vs. 56%). They also had shorter heroin using careers (5.1 vs. 9.9 years), fewer symptoms of dependence (5.1 vs. 5.6), had been enrolled in fewer previous treatment episodes (3.3 vs. 11.5) and had less extensive lifetime (8.0 vs. 9.1 drug classes) and recent (3.6 vs. 4.9) polydrug use. Non-injectors were substantially less likely to report lifetime (13% vs. 58%) or recent (2% vs. 29%) heroin overdoses. There were no differences between the general physical and psychological health of the two groups. While non-injectors had a lower level of post-traumatic stress disorder (29% vs. 34%), there were no differences in levels of major depression, attempted suicide, antisocial personality disorder, or borderline personality disorder. A substantial minority of Australian treatment entrants are now using heroin exclusively by non-injecting routes. While this group is younger, and has substantially reduced risk of overdose and blood borne virus transmission, the physical and psychological health of non-injectors mirrors that of injectors.

  13. [Heroin. II. Preparation, hydrolysis, stability, pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Hosztafi, S

    2001-10-01

    Heroin is prepared by treating morphine with acetyl chloride or acetic anhydride. It is a simple reaction and the yields are generally quantitative. Nowadays the whole process is illegal. Morphine is the major alkaloid present in the opium poppy. Opium is manufactured illicitly then morphine is extracted from it in clandestine laboratories. Numerous studies were carried out on heroin to investigate its rate of hydrolysis. It has been shown that heroin is rapidly deacylated in aqueous solution at alkaline or acidic pH to form 6-acethylmorphine and finally, to morphine. Heroin also rapidly decomposes in biological medium yielding first 6-acetylmorphine and then morphine. Hydrolysis can be performed in blood and in tissue homogenates. Heroin can be administered by several routes. Smoking and intravenous administration are preferred, but intranasal, intramuscular and subcutaneous administration are also common. Recently, there has been a shift in heroin use patterns from injection to sniffing and smoking. Sharing of the injection equipment can result in several severe infectious diseases, such as AIDS, hepatitis B and C. Soon after administration, heroin metabolizes to 6-acetylmorphine and morphine. Most of the pharmacological activities of heroin are due to these active metabolites. Therefore, knowledge of distribution of 6-acetylmorphine and morphine is essential to understand pharmacological properties of heroin. Heroin, which is relatively nonpolar compound compared with morphine, has high lipid solubility facilitating rapid absorption from the bloodstream and passage through the blood-brain barrier. When heroin is administered by intravenously the drug takes 10 s to reach the brain i.e. pharmacological effects appear quickly.

  14. The heroin addict! A personal view.

    PubMed

    Cyngler, Charles

    2002-04-01

    Heroin beckons like the sweet seductive calls of Ulysses' sirens. The alluring nectar of the poppy seed, once experienced is not easy to escape. The greed for pleasure is endless. Gratification begets gratification. This paper explores issues and complications of treatment intervention in heroin addiction. The author is a general practitioner with 25 years experience and special interest in substance abuse medicine.

  15. Heroin: Challenge for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Susan M.

    The rise in heroin use in the 1990s is attributed to an increase in snorting and smoking heroin as opposed to earlier epidemics that relied on intravenous use. An increase in purity has also added to the addiction problem. The trend towards use by young people was confirmed by the 2000 Monitoring the Future Study, which reported that 10.6% of high…

  16. Prenatal Inhalation Exposure to Evaporative Condensates of Gasoline with 15% Ethanol and Evaluation of Sensory Function in Adult Rat Offspring

    EPA Science Inventory

    The introduction of ethanol-blended automotive fuels has raised concerns about potential health effects from inhalation exposure to the combination of ethanol and gasoline hydrocarbon vapors. Previously, we evaluated effects of prenatal inhalation exposure to 100% ethanol (E100) ...

  17. Polysubstance Use and Heroin Relapse among Adolescents following Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Christopher E.; Clemmey, Philip; Harrell, Paul; Subramaniam, Geetha; Fishman, Marc

    2012-01-01

    This study examined posttreatment patterns of polysubstance use and heroin relapse in a sample of 43 adolescents (ages 14-20) entering short-term residential treatment for primary heroin use. At 12-month follow-up, youths that achieved heroin abstinence (N = 19) were significantly less likely than youths that relapsed to heroin (N = 24) to endorse…

  18. Heroin addiction and voluntary choice: the case of informed consent.

    PubMed

    Henden, Edmund

    2013-09-01

    Does addiction to heroin undermine the voluntariness of heroin addicts' consent to take part in research which involves giving them free and legal heroin? This question has been raised in connection with research into the effectiveness of heroin prescription as a way of treating dependent heroin users. Participants in such research are required to give their informed consent to take part. Louis C. Charland has argued that we should not presume that heroin addicts are competent to do this since heroin addiction by nature involves a loss of ability to resist the desire for heroin. In this article, I argue that Charland is right that we should not presume that heroin addicts are competent to consent, but not for the reason he thinks. In fact, as Charland's critics correctly point out, there is plenty of evidence showing that heroin addicts can resist their desire for heroin. These critics are wrong, however, to conclude from this that we should presume that heroin addicts are competent to give their voluntary consent. There are, I shall argue, other conditions associated with heroin addiction that might constrain heroin addicts' choice in ways likely to undermine the voluntariness of their consent. In order to see this, we need to move beyond the focus on the addicts' desires for heroin and instead consider the wider social and psychological circumstances of heroin addiction, as well as the effects these circumstances may have on the addicts' beliefs about the nature of their options.

  19. Heroin purchasing is income and price sensitive.

    PubMed

    Roddy, Juliette; Steinmiller, Caren L; Greenwald, Mark K

    2011-06-01

    Semi-structured interviews were used to assess behavioral economic drug demand in heroin dependent research volunteers. Findings on drug price, competing purchases, and past 30-day income and consumption, established in a previous study, are replicated. We extended these findings by having participants indicate whether hypothetical environmental changes would alter heroin purchasing. Participants (n = 109) reported they would significantly (p < .005) decrease heroin daily purchasing amounts (DPA) from past 30-day levels (M = $60/day) if: (a) they encountered a 33% decrease in income (DPA = $34), (b) family/friends no longer paid their living expenses (DPA = $32), or (c) they faced four-fold greater likelihood of police arrest at their purchasing location (DPA = $42). Participants in higher income quartiles (who purchase more heroin) show greater DPA reductions (but would still buy more heroin) than those in lower income quartiles. For participants receiving government aid (n = 31), heroin purchasing would decrease if those subsidies were eliminated (DPA = $28). Compared to participants whose urine tested negative for cocaine (n = 31), cocaine-positive subjects (n = 32) reported more efficient heroin purchasing, that is, they live closer to their primary dealer; are more likely to have heroin delivered or walk to obtain it (and less likely to ride the bus), thus reducing purchasing time (52 vs. 31 min, respectively); and purchase more heroin per episode. These simulation results have treatment and policy implications: Daily heroin users' purchasing repertoire is very cost-effective, more so for those also using cocaine, and only potent environmental changes (income reductions or increased legal sanctions) may impact this behavior.

  20. Levalbuterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Levalbuterol comes as a solution (liquid) to inhale by mouth using a nebulizer (machine that turns medication into a mist that can be inhaled), a concentrated solution to be mixed with normal saline and inhaled ...

  1. Should we prescribe heroin? A current Scottish debate.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, J; McKeganey, N

    2007-11-01

    There have been recent calls from within both Scotland and England for the wider prescription of heroin to heroin addicts as a way of coping with our burgeoning drug problem and as a route to reducing drug related criminality. But how feasible is heroin prescribing in this context? This paper considers some of the existing research evidence relating to heroin prescribing and looks also at the ethics and practicalities of prescribing heroin to heroin addicts in Scotland. We conclude that whilst the evidence on the benefits of heroin prescribing is far from clear cut there is a case for mounting a Scottish trial of heroin prescribing. Such a trial would need to be tightly controlled and rigorously evaluated. It would need to show that heroin prescribing was associated not only with a comparable level of harm reduction, as methadone prescribing, but that it was also an effective route towards drug users' eventual recovery and drug cessation.

  2. Heroin: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) - PDF Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Heroin updates by ... Opiate and opioid withdrawal Opioid intoxication Related Health Topics Drug Abuse Opioid Abuse and Addiction National Institutes ...

  3. "Addiction Proneness" and Personality in Heroin Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Jerome J.

    1975-01-01

    A carefully controlled comparison of the personality characteristics of heroin addict (n=27) and nonaddict (n=20) offenders was carried out so as to avoid methodological problems associated with earlier studies. (Editor)

  4. Signs of Heroin Abuse and Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Families? Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use Hurts Other People Drug ... was addicted to heroin. Here, he describes the drug's effects on his life. Read Deon's story About the ...

  5. Leucoencephalopathy following abuse of sniffed heroin.

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, Romain; Lebas, Axel; Gérardin, Emmanuel; Grangeon, Lou; Ozkul-Wermester, Ozlem; Aubier-Girard, Carole; Martinaud, Olivier; Maltête, David

    2017-01-01

    A 29-year-old man was admitted for acute cognitive impairment. Three weeks earlier, he had been admitted for coma due to sniffed heroin abuse responsive to naloxone infusion. At admission, the patient presented with apraxia, severe memory impairment and anosognosia. Brain MRI revealed symmetric hyperintensities of supratentorial white matter, sparing brainstem and cerebellum, on FLAIR and B1000 sequences. Four months later, repeated neuropsychological assessment revealed dramatic improvement of global cognitive functions. Toxic leucoencephalopathy excluding the cerebellum and brainstem is a rare complication of heroin abuse, and seems to concern especially patients that use heroin by sniff or injection. In these patients, cognitive troubles are predominant, prognosis seems better and infratentorial brain structures can be spared. In conclusion, our observation emphasizes that heroin-induced encephalopathy can have a favourable outcome and that imaging and clinical patterns can indicate the mode of drug administration.

  6. Heroin-associated anthrax with minimal morbidity.

    PubMed

    Black, Heather; Chapman, Ann; Inverarity, Donald; Sinha, Satyajit

    2017-03-08

    In 2010, during an outbreak of anthrax affecting people who inject drugs, a heroin user aged 37 years presented with soft tissue infection. He subsequently was found to have anthrax. We describe his management and the difficulty in distinguishing anthrax from non-anthrax lesions. His full recovery, despite an overall mortality of 30% for injectional anthrax, demonstrates that some heroin-related anthrax cases can be managed predominately with oral antibiotics and minimal surgical intervention.

  7. Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Am I in a Healthy Relationship? Who ... restlessness muscle and bone pain diarrhea vomiting alternating hot and cold flashes with goosebumps kicking movements severe ...

  8. The "lessons" of the Australian "heroin shortage".

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, Louisa; Day, Carolyn; Gilmour, Stuart; Hall, Wayne

    2006-05-02

    Heroin use causes considerable harm to individual users including dependence, fatal and nonfatal overdose, mental health problems, and blood borne virus transmission. It also adversely affects the community through drug dealing, property crime and reduced public amenity. During the mid to late 1990s in Australia the prevalence of heroin use increased as reflected in steeply rising overdose deaths. In January 2001, there were reports of an unpredicted and unprecedented reduction in heroin supply with an abrupt onset in all Australian jurisdictions. The shortage was most marked in New South Wales, the State with the largest heroin market, which saw increases in price, dramatic decreases in purity at the street level, and reductions in the ease with which injecting drug users reported being able to obtain the drug. The abrupt onset of the shortage and a subsequent dramatic reduction in overdose deaths prompted national debate about the causes of the shortage and later international debate about the policy significance of what has come to be called the "Australian heroin shortage". In this paper we summarise insights from four years' research into the causes, consequences and policy implications of the "heroin shortage".

  9. Heroin shortage in Coastal Kenya: A rapid assessment and qualitative analysis of heroin users’ experiences

    PubMed Central

    Mital, Sasha; Miles, Gillian; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; Muthui, Mercy; Needle, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction While relatively rare events, abrupt disruptions in heroin availability have a significant impact on morbidity and mortality risk among those who are heroin dependent. A heroin shortage occurred in Coast Province, Kenya from December 2010 to March 2011. This qualitative analysis describes the shortage events and consequences from the perspective of heroin users, along with implications for health and other public sectors. Methods As part of a rapid assessment, 66 key informant interviews and 15 focus groups among heroin users in Coast Province, Kenya were conducted. A qualitative thematic analysis was undertaken in Atlas.ti. to identify salient themes related to the shortage. Results Overall, participant accounts were rooted in a theme of desperation and uncertainty, with emphasis on six sub-themes: (1) withdrawal and strategies for alleviating withdrawal, including use of medical intervention and other detoxification attempts; (2) challenges of dealing with unpredictable drug availability, cost, and purity; (3) changes in drug use patterns, and actions taken to procure heroin and other drugs; (4) modifications in drug user relationship dynamics and networks, including introduction of risky group-level injection practices; (5) family and community response; and (6) new challenges with the heroin market resurgence. Conclusions The heroin shortage led to a series of consequences for drug users, including increased risk of morbidity, mortality and disenfranchisement at social and structural levels. Availability of evidence-based services for drug users and emergency preparedness plans could have mitigated this impact. PMID:26470646

  10. Heroin overdose deaths and heroin purity between 1990 and 2000 in Istanbul, Turkey*.

    PubMed

    Toprak, Sadik; Cetin, Ilhan

    2009-09-01

    Turkey has continuously experienced problems with abuse of, and addiction to, opium derivatives. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between heroin overdose deaths and the characteristics of seized opium derivatives. Data were gathered from the Council of Forensic Medicine of the Ministry of Justice in Istanbul from 1990 to 2000. There were 636 heroin-related deaths during this period, 595 of which were classified as heroin overdose deaths. Mean crude and weighted heroin purities remained relatively constant and were calculated to be 46% (57-34%) and 51% (39-59%), respectively. The weight of heroin and the number of heroin seizures, but not the heroin purity, were significantly associated with the number of heroin-related deaths. Prevention strategies are needed to reduce the number of deaths caused by overdoses in countries situated on drug trafficking routes. These strategies should focus on drug trafficking, by providing increased levels of, and support for, law enforcement, stopping the supply of precursor chemicals, and combating corruption among border officials.

  11. Orbitofrontal response to drug-related stimuli after heroin administration.

    PubMed

    Walter, Marc; Denier, Niklaus; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Lanz, Christian; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Scheffler, Klaus; Seifritz, Erich; McGuire, Philip; Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    The compulsion to seek and use heroin is frequently driven by stress and craving during drug-cue exposure. Although previous neuroimaging studies have indicated that craving is mediated by increased prefrontal cortex activity, it remains unknown how heroin administration modulates the prefrontal cortex response. This study examines the acute effects of heroin on brain function in heroin-maintained patients. Using a crossover, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 27 heroin-maintained patients performed functional magnetic resonance imaging 20 minutes after the administration of heroin or placebo (saline) while drug-related and neutral stimuli were presented. Images were processed and analysed with statistical parametric mapping. Plasma concentrations of heroin and its main metabolites were assessed using high-performance liquid chromatography. Region of interest analyses showed a drug-related cue-associated blood-oxygen-level-dependent activation in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in heroin-dependent patients during both treatment conditions (heroin and placebo). This activation of the OFC was significantly higher after heroin than after placebo administration. These findings may indicate the importance of OFC activity for impulse control and decision-making after regular heroin administration and may emphasize the benefit of the heroin-assisted treatment in heroin dependence.

  12. Extended heroin access increases heroin choices over a potent nondrug alternative.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Magalie; Cantin, Lauriane; Vanhille, Nathalie; Serre, Fuschia; Ahmed, Serge H

    2013-06-01

    Epidemiological research shows that the proportion of drug users who become addicted to heroin is higher than to cocaine. Here we tested whether this difference could be due to a difference in the addiction liability between the two drugs. Addiction liability was assessed under a discrete-trials choice procedure by measuring the proportion of rats that prefer the drug over a potent alternative reward (ie, water sweetened with saccharin). Previous research on choice between self-administration of i.v. cocaine or sweet water showed that the proportion of cocaine-preferring rats remains relatively low and invariable (ie, 15%), even after extended drug access and regardless of past drug consumption (ie, total drug use before choice testing). By contrast, the present study shows that under similar choice conditions, the proportion of heroin-preferring rats considerably increases with extended heroin access (6-9 h per day for several weeks) and with past heroin consumption, from 11 to 51% at the highest past drug consumption level. At this level, the proportion of drug-preferring rats was about three times higher with heroin than with cocaine (51% vs 15%). This increase in the rate of heroin preference after extended heroin access persisted even after recovery from acute heroin withdrawal. Overall, these findings show that choice procedures are uniquely sensitive to different drugs and suggest that heroin is more addictive than cocaine. This higher addiction liability may contribute to explain why more drug users become addicted to heroin than to cocaine in epidemiological studies.

  13. Heroin users in Australia: population trends.

    PubMed

    Kaya, C Yalçin; Tugai, Yuliya; Filar, Jerzy A; Agrawal, Manju R; Ali, Robert L; Gowing, Linda R; Cooke, Richard

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify certain important population trends among heroin users in Australia for the period 1971 - 97, such as: population growth, initiation, i.e. the number who were initiated to heroin in a given year, and quitting, i.e. the number that quit using heroin. For this purpose, we summarize and extract relevant characteristics from data from National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS 1998) conducted in Australia in 1998. We devise a systematic procedure to estimate historical trends from questions concerning past events. It is observed from our findings that the size of the heroin user population in Australia is in a sharp increase, especially from the early 1980s onwards. The general trend obtained for the period 1971 - 97 is strikingly similar to that obtained by Hall et al. (2000) for the dependent heroin user population in Australia, even though their study was based on different datasets and a different methodology. In our reconstruction of the time history we also detect a levelling-off prior to 1990. Initiation is also observed to be on a sharp increase. The latter trend is accompanied by a similar trend of quitting, perhaps indicating a relatively short heroin use career. A sharp decrease in both initiation and quitting is observed after 1990. In conclusion, in the case of the trend in the population of heroin users a high rate of growth has been identified that is consistent with the existing literature. In the process, we demonstrated that even a static survey such as NDSHS 1998 can, sometimes, be used to extract historical (dynamic) trends of certain important variables.

  14. Inhalation Therapy in Horses.

    PubMed

    Cha, Mandy L; Costa, Lais R R

    2017-04-01

    This article discusses the benefits and limitations of inhalation therapy in horses. Inhalation drug therapy delivers the drug directly to the airways, thereby achieving maximal drug concentrations at the target site. Inhalation therapy has the additional advantage of decreasing systemic side effects. Inhalation therapy in horses is delivered by the use of nebulizers or pressured metered dose inhalers. It also requires the use of a muzzle or nasal mask in horses. Drugs most commonly delivered through inhalation drug therapy in horses include bronchodilators, antiinflammatories, and antimicrobials.

  15. Birth Order and Polydrug Abuse Among Heroin Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Steven E.; Linder, Ronald L.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of possible relationships between birth order and polydrug use patterns of heroin addicts prior to undergoing treatment. Overrepresentation of "only child" heroin addicts was evident among the population studied. (Author)

  16. An investigation into the microflora of heroin.

    PubMed

    McLauchlin, J; Mithani, V; Bolton, F J; Nichols, G L; Bellis, M A; Syed, Q; Thomson, R P M; Ashton, J R

    2002-11-01

    In 2000, an unusual increase of morbidity and mortality among illegal injecting drug users in the UK and Ireland was reported and Clostridium novyi was identified as the likely source of the serious infection, although infections due to C. botulinum and Bacillus cereus were also reported. Because heroin was a possibile source of infection, this study investigated the microflora of heroin samples seized in England during 2000 and 2002. Two methods were developed for the examination of the microflora of heroin. The first consisted of suspension of the drug in maximum recovery diluent (MRD) which was inoculated directly into Clostridium Botulinum Isolation Cooked Meat Broth (CBI). The second method rendered the heroin soluble in citric acid, concentrated particulate material (and bacterial cells) by filtration and removed heroin residues by washing with citric acid and phosphate-buffered saline before placing the filter in CBI broth. Duplicate CBI broths from both methods were incubated without heating and after heating at 60 degrees C for 30 min. Subcultures were made after incubation for 7 and 14 days on to eight different solid media. The methods were evaluated with heroin samples spiked with either C. botulinum or C. novyi spore suspensions; recovery of 10 spores in the original sample was demonstrated. Fifty-eight heroin samples were tested by citric acid solubilisation and 34 by the MRD suspension technique. Fifteen different gram-positive species of four genera were recognised. No fungi were isolated. Aerobic endospore-forming bacteria (Bacillus spp. and Paenibacillus macerans) were the predominant microflora isolated and at least one species was isolated from each sample. B. cereus was the most common species and was isolated from 95% of all samples, with B. licheniformis isolated from 40%. Between one and five samples yielded cultures of B. coagulans, B. laterosporus, B. pumilus, B. subtilis and P. macerans. Staphylococcus spp. were isolated from 23 (40

  17. Orexin / hypocretin 1 receptor antagonist reduces heroin self-administration and cue-induced heroin seeking.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel J; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2012-03-01

    The orexin/hypocretin system is involved in several addiction-related behaviors. In the present experiments, we examined the involvement of orexin in heroin reinforcement and relapse by administering the orexin 1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 prior to heroin self-administration or prior to cue-induced or heroin-induced reinstatement of extinguished heroin seeking in male Sprague Dawley rats. SB-334867 (30 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) reduced heroin intake during self-administration under fixed ratio-1 and progressive ratio schedules. SB-334867 also attenuated reinstatement of heroin seeking elicited by cues, but not reinstatement elicited by a heroin prime. These results indicate that orexin antagonism reduces heroin self-administration, and they support a role for orexin in cue-triggered drug relapse.

  18. The resurgence of heroin abuse in the District of Columbia.

    PubMed

    Greene, M H

    1975-01-01

    Prospectively collected drug abuse trend surveillance data suggest that the rate of heroin use in Washington, D.C. is rising following a two year decline in the magnitude of this problem. Supportive data include increased potency of street level heroin, increased numbers of heroin-related deaths, increased detection of heroin positive urine specimens in the D.C. Superior Court arrestee population, increased demand for addiction treatment services and rising property crime rates. Increased prevalence of heroin use has not yet been associated with an increase in incidence, suggesting that former heroin users have begun to use once again following a period of abstinence. Analysis of heroin specimens seized across the United States suggests that cities formerly dependant upon European (white) heroin have now developed a new heroin distribution system which supplies Mexican (brown) heroin. This has offset the reduction in heroin use observed during 1972-1973 concomitant with the East Coast heroin shortage and widespread introduction of addiction treatment services.

  19. What You Need to Know About Drugs: Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What You Need to Know About Drugs: Heroin KidsHealth > For Kids > What You Need to Know About Drugs: Heroin A A A en español Lo que necesitas ... sobre las drogas: La heroína What It Is: Heroin (say: HAIR-uh-win) comes from the opium ...

  20. Isolation and purification of heroin from heroin street samples by preparative high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen; Zheng, Hui; Lu, Yanzhen; Wei, Yun

    2012-09-10

    The present study established a novel method using preparative high performance liquid chromatography to isolate and purify heroin·HCl from heroin street samples to be used as a reference standard. Different kinds of mobile phases and columns were used, ultimately the mobile phase consisting of hexane-isopropanol-methanol (65:28:7, v/v) and the SIL preparative column prepared in laboratory were selected as the final condition. Heroin was further purified by the drowning-out crystallization method using isopropanol-methanol (50:1, v/v) and hexane as drowning-out anti-solvents and salting-out agents, respectively. The purity was assessed by analytical high performance liquid chromatography and the confirmation of the chemical structure was performed by IR and NMR. About 110.7mg of heroin·HCl at a purity of over 99.52% was obtained from 180mg of heroin street samples which contained 156.15mg of heroin·HCl component by preparative high performance liquid chromatography. This method is suitable for preparing heroin standards in forensic science area.

  1. Formoterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... until you are ready to inhale your dose. Pull off the inhaler cover and twist the mouthpiece open in the direction shown by the arrow on the mouthpiece. Push the buttons on each side to be sure ...

  2. Albuterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Albuterol is used to prevent and treat difficulty breathing, wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing, and chest tightness ... for oral inhalation is also used to prevent breathing difficulties during exercise. Albuterol inhalation aerosol (Proair HFA, ...

  3. Smoke inhalation injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birky, M.

    The cause of death by fires was studied. The present results and information are, however, not enough to reduce loss of life or inhalation injury. The magnitude and type of inhalation injury for civilians and firefighters represents the most inadequately defined human element of accidental fires. Little information is available on compounds other than carbon monoxide, which are responsible for respiration injury or toxicological syndrome. Effective treatment methods for inhalation victims and studies on fatalities, inhalation injury and animals are suggested.

  4. Focus on Inhalants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Challenge: Safe, Disciplines, and Drug-Free Schools, 1994

    1994-01-01

    The use of inhalants is a major health concern among the school-age population. Information presented in this publication dispels the myths about inhalant use and presents common warning signs that alert teachers to a student's use. The short- and long-term effects of inhalant use are described to shed light on the health risks involved. Lesson…

  5. Plasma cholesterol and triglycerides in heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Maccari, S; Bassi, C; Zanoni, P; Plancher, A C

    1991-12-31

    We examined total cholesterolemia, triglyceridemia, high density lipoproteins- (HDL) cholesterolemia, apolipoproteins A1 and B, body mass index, albuminemia and alanine aminotransferase in 60 heroin addicts. After comparing 23 control subjects with the heroin addicts the result was that the latter have significantly lower mean values of total cholesterolemia and of HDL-cholesterolemia and higher values of triglyceridemia. They also have significantly higher prevalences of cases of hypocholesterolemia and of hypo-HDL-cholesterolemia. Within the addict group there is no linear correlation between total cholesterolemia and body mass index; there is, however, an inverse linear correlation between total cholesterolemia and alanine aminotransferase. Therefore, the alterations found in the lipid pattern of heroin addicts are not due to malnutrition but hypothetically to liver diseases which are frequent in these patients.

  6. Toxicological criterion of the heroin poisoning.

    PubMed

    Shigeev, S

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents toxicological characteristics of 198 cases of acute parenteral heroin intoxication, analyzes the clinically encountered range of blood and urinary concentrations of its metabolites. The principal causes of death are elucidated in victims of heroin poisoning at the hospital stage. Where there is a relationship of death probability to the detection of morphine in the victims' biological fluids is considered; its blood and urinary concentrations are determined, which undoubtedly suggests the occurrence of poisoning-related death. It has been established that death from poisoning by heroin may occur in the whole range of its detectable concentrations. There is no doubt that the blood morphine concentrations of at least 2.0 microg/ml should be considered to be fatal.

  7. Crystal in Iran: methamphetamine or heroin kerack

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, methamphetamine use has dramatically increased in Iran while there is a crucial misunderstanding about the colloquial words related to methamphetamine among health providers, policy makers, clinicians, scholars and people in the community. The word Crystal refers to methamphetamine in some parts of Iran while in some other parts of the country, Crystal refers to a high purity street-level heroin which is called Kerack and its abuse is epidemic. Methamphetamine and heroin Kerack are different drugs in Iran. Methamphetamine is a stimulant drug while heroin Kerack is an opioid. Health providers especially clinicians and emergency medicine specialists should consider colloquial words that Iranian drug users apply. Special training courses should be designed and implemented for clinicians in Iran to inform them about methamphetamine and its frequently used colloquial words in the community. This issue has important clinical and health implications. PMID:23497450

  8. From victim to heroine: children's stories revisited.

    PubMed

    Turkel, Ann Ruth

    2002-01-01

    The need to escape reality and the taste for adventure with the unknown fills a universal need for both adults and children. Fairy tales have a powerful grip on the imagination because they are homespun versions of myths and have passionate intensity without epic grandeur. The happy ending of fairy tales reflects gender stereotyping because the heroine usually does very little except sit, wish, and wait for marriage. She has no control over her destiny and no active involvement in selecting or planning her future. These heroines are really passive victims. Sexism was once rampant in children's books. The Oz books, with their independent, courageous, and active heroine were way ahead of their time. The advent of women's liberation has led to a reappraisal of the female in folk literature. Anthropologists have now discovered stories of admirable women who were strong characters in their own epic dramas.

  9. [Gender heteronomy of heroin addiction in adolescences].

    PubMed

    Bokhan, N A; Baturin, E V

    2010-01-01

    On the model of heroin addiction in adolescents the premises for grounding the concept of gender heteronomy of addictions have been identified. The clinical-dynamic patterns associated with gender--so called gender associated types of disease in which the leading factors of difference formation are biological sex, valuable orientation structure, sexual experience and social status were singled out. The gender-associated types of heroin addiction in boys and girls were specified as dominant, repressive, partner, utilitarian, integrating and independent. Gender-differentiated programs of pharmaco- and psychotherapy are proposed.

  10. Effects of cortisol administration on craving in heroin addicts

    PubMed Central

    Walter, M; Bentz, D; Schicktanz, N; Milnik, A; Aerni, A; Gerhards, C; Schwegler, K; Vogel, M; Blum, J; Schmid, O; Roozendaal, B; Lang, U E; Borgwardt, S; de Quervain, D

    2015-01-01

    Heroin dependence is a severe and chronically relapsing substance use disorder with limited treatment options. Stress is known to increase craving and drug-taking behavior, but it is not known whether the stress hormone cortisol mediates these stress effects or whether cortisol may rather reduce craving, for example, by interfering with addiction memory. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cortisol administration on craving in heroin-dependent patients and to determine whether the effects depend on the daily dose of heroin consumption. We used a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study in 29 heroin-dependent patients in a stable heroin-assisted treatment setting. A single oral dose of 20 mg of cortisol or placebo was administered 105 min before the daily heroin administration. The primary outcome measure was cortisol-induced change in craving. Secondary measures included anxiety, anger and withdrawal symptoms. For the visual analog scale for craving, we found a significant interaction (P=0.0027) between study medication and heroin-dose group (that is, daily low, medium or high dose of heroin). Cortisol administration reduced craving in patients receiving a low dose of heroin (before heroin administration: P=0.0019; after heroin administration: P=0.0074), but not in patients receiving a medium or high dose of heroin. In a picture-rating task with drug-related pictures, cortisol administration did not affect the ratings for the picture-characteristic craving in all the three heroin-dose groups. Cortisol also did not significantly affect secondary outcome measures. In conclusion, a single administration of cortisol leads to reduced craving in low-dose heroin addicts. The present findings might have important clinical implications with regard to understanding stress effects and regarding treatment of addiction. PMID:26218852

  11. Effects of cortisol administration on craving in heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Walter, M; Bentz, D; Schicktanz, N; Milnik, A; Aerni, A; Gerhards, C; Schwegler, K; Vogel, M; Blum, J; Schmid, O; Roozendaal, B; Lang, U E; Borgwardt, S; de Quervain, D

    2015-07-28

    Heroin dependence is a severe and chronically relapsing substance use disorder with limited treatment options. Stress is known to increase craving and drug-taking behavior, but it is not known whether the stress hormone cortisol mediates these stress effects or whether cortisol may rather reduce craving, for example, by interfering with addiction memory. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cortisol administration on craving in heroin-dependent patients and to determine whether the effects depend on the daily dose of heroin consumption. We used a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study in 29 heroin-dependent patients in a stable heroin-assisted treatment setting. A single oral dose of 20 mg of cortisol or placebo was administered 105 min before the daily heroin administration. The primary outcome measure was cortisol-induced change in craving. Secondary measures included anxiety, anger and withdrawal symptoms. For the visual analog scale for craving, we found a significant interaction (P = 0.0027) between study medication and heroin-dose group (that is, daily low, medium or high dose of heroin). Cortisol administration reduced craving in patients receiving a low dose of heroin (before heroin administration: P = 0.0019; after heroin administration: P = 0.0074), but not in patients receiving a medium or high dose of heroin. In a picture-rating task with drug-related pictures, cortisol administration did not affect the ratings for the picture-characteristic craving in all the three heroin-dose groups. Cortisol also did not significantly affect secondary outcome measures. In conclusion, a single administration of cortisol leads to reduced craving in low-dose heroin addicts. The present findings might have important clinical implications with regard to understanding stress effects and regarding treatment of addiction.

  12. Heroin reduces startle and cortisol response in opioid-maintained heroin-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Walter, Marc; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Degen, Bigna; Albrich, Jürgen; Oppel, Monika; Schulz, André; Schächinger, Hartmut; Dürsteler-MacFarland, Kenneth M

    2011-01-01

    Heroin dependence (HD) is a chronic relapsing brain disorder characterized by a compulsion to seek and use heroin. Stress is seen as a key factor for heroin use. Methadone maintenance and the prescription of pharmaceutical heroin [diacetylmorphine (DAM)] are established treatments for HD in several countries. The present study examined whether DAM-maintained patients and methadone-maintained patients differ from healthy controls in startle reflex and cortisol levels. Fifty-seven participants, 19 of each group matched for age, sex and smoking status, completed a startle session which included the presentation of 24 bursts of white noise while eye-blink responses to startling noises were recorded. Salivary cortisol was collected three times after awakening, before, during and after the startle session. DAM was administered before the experiment, while methadone was administered afterwards. Both heroin-dependent patient groups exhibited significantly smaller startle responses than healthy controls (P < 0.05). Whereas the cortisol levels after awakening did not differ across the three groups, the experimental cortisol levels were significantly lower in DAM-maintained patients, who received their opioid before the experiment, than in methadone-maintained patients and healthy controls (P < 0.0001). Opioid maintenance treatment for HD is associated with reduced startle responses. Acute DAM administration may suppress cortisol levels, and DAM maintenance treatment may represent an effective alternative to methadone in stress-sensitive, heroin-dependent patients.

  13. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen prevents heroin-induced reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Spano, Maria Sabrina; Fattore, Liana; Fratta, Walter; Fadda, Paola

    2007-06-01

    Opiate addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by high rates of relapse. The gamma-aminobutyric acid GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen is known to affect the reinforcing effects of several drugs of abuse, including heroin, as well as to decrease cue-maintained responding for heroin, cocaine and nicotine and suppress alcohol deprivation effect in rats. Here we studied the effect of baclofen on the reinstatement of extinguished heroin-seeking behavior triggered by a priming injection of heroin in abstinent rats trained to stably self-administer heroin (30 microg/kg per infusion) under a continuous reinforcement schedule. Following extinction, the effect of non-contingent non-reinforced primings with heroin, baclofen or heroin/baclofen combination on the resumption of responding was evaluated. Results indicate that heroin priming (0.25mg/kg) promptly reinitiated heroin-seeking behavior, an effect dose-dependently reduced by baclofen at doses (0.625 and 1.25mg/kg) not affecting responding per sè. Importantly, baclofen did not affect locomotion either alone or in combination with heroin, dispelling any doubt as to the eliciting of possible non-specific (motor) effects. The present results show that GABA(B) receptor activation may reduce the propensity to resume drug-induced heroin-seeking behavior thus offering a possible approach in maintaining opiate abstinence.

  14. Selective effects of a morphine conjugate vaccine on heroin and metabolite distribution and heroin-induced behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Raleigh, M D; Pravetoni, M; Harris, A C; Birnbaum, A K; Pentel, P R

    2013-02-01

    Morphine conjugate vaccines have effectively reduced behavioral effects of heroin in rodents and primates. To better understand how these effects are mediated, heroin and metabolite distribution studies were performed in rats in the presence and absence of vaccination. In non-vaccinated rats 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) was the predominant opioid in plasma and brain as early as 1 minute after i.v. administration of heroin and for up to 14 minutes. Vaccination with morphine conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (M-KLH) elicited high titers and concentrations of antibodies with high affinity for heroin, 6-MAM, and morphine. Four minutes after heroin administration vaccinated rats showed substantial retention of all three opioids in plasma compared to controls and reduced 6-MAM and morphine, but not heroin, distribution to brain. Administration of 6-MAM rather than heroin in M-KLH vaccinated rats showed a similar drug distribution pattern. Vaccination reduced heroin-induced analgesia and blocked heroin-induced locomotor activity throughout 2 weeks of repeated testing. Higher serum opioid-specific antibody concentrations were associated with higher plasma opioid concentrations, lower brain 6-MAM and morphine concentrations, and lower heroin-induced locomotor activity. Serum antibody concentrations over 0.2 mg/ml were associated with substantial effects on these measures. These data support a critical role for 6-MAM in mediating the early effects of i.v. heroin and suggest that reducing 6-MAM concentration in brain is essential to the efficacy of morphine conjugate vaccines.

  15. Selective Effects of a Morphine Conjugate Vaccine on Heroin and Metabolite Distribution and Heroin-Induced Behaviors in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pravetoni, M.; Harris, A.C.; Birnbaum, A.K.; Pentel, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    Morphine conjugate vaccines have effectively reduced behavioral effects of heroin in rodents and primates. To better understand how these effects are mediated, heroin and metabolite distribution studies were performed in rats in the presence and absence of vaccination. In non-vaccinated rats 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) was the predominant opioid in plasma and brain as early as 1 minute after i.v. administration of heroin and for up to 14 minutes. Vaccination with morphine conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (M-KLH) elicited high titers and concentrations of antibodies with high affinity for heroin, 6-MAM, and morphine. Four minutes after heroin administration vaccinated rats showed substantial retention of all three opioids in plasma compared to controls and reduced 6-MAM and morphine, but not heroin, distribution to brain. Administration of 6-MAM rather than heroin in M-KLH vaccinated rats showed a similar drug distribution pattern. Vaccination reduced heroin-induced analgesia and blocked heroin-induced locomotor activity throughout 2 weeks of repeated testing. Higher serum opioid-specific antibody concentrations were associated with higher plasma opioid concentrations, lower brain 6-MAM and morphine concentrations, and lower heroin-induced locomotor activity. Serum antibody concentrations over 0.2 mg/ml were associated with substantial effects on these measures. These data support a critical role for 6-MAM in mediating the early effects of i.v. heroin and suggest that reducing 6-MAM concentration in brain is essential to the efficacy of morphine conjugate vaccines. PMID:23220743

  16. Inhalation dosimetry modeling provides insights into regional respiratory tract toxicity of inhaled diacetyl.

    PubMed

    Cichocki, Joseph A; Morris, John B

    2016-11-13

    Vapor dosimetry models provide a means of assessing the role of delivered dose in determining the regional airway response to inspired vapors. A validated hybrid computational fluid dynamics physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for inhaled diacetyl has been developed to describe inhaled diacetyl dosimetry in both the rat and human respiratory tracts. Comparison of the distribution of respiratory tract injury with dosimetry estimates provides strong evidence that regional delivered dose rather than regional airway tissue sensitivity to diacetyl-induced injury is the critical determinant of the regional respiratory tract response to this water soluble reactive vapor. In the rat, inhalation exposure to diacetyl causes much lesser injury in the distal bronchiolar airways compared to nose and large tracheobronchial airways. The degree of injury correlates very strongly to model based estimates of local airway diacetyl concentrations. According to the model, regional dosimetry patterns of diacetyl in the human differ greatly from those in the rat with much greater penetration of diacetyl to the bronchiolar airways in the lightly exercising mouth breathing human compared to the rat, providing evidence that rat inhalation toxicity studies underpredict the risk of bronchiolar injury in the human. For example, repeated exposure of the rat to 200ppm diacetyl results in bronchiolar injury; the estimated bronchiolar tissue concentration in rats exposed to 200ppm diacetyl would occur in lightly exercising mouth breathing humans exposed to 12ppm. Consideration of airway dosimetry patterns of inspired diacetyl is critical to the proper evaluation of rodent toxicity data and its relevance for predicting human risk.

  17. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss after heroin injection.

    PubMed

    Schrock, Andreas; Jakob, Mark; Wirz, Stefan; Bootz, Friedrich

    2008-05-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a symptom of cochlear injury. Potential aetiologies are vascular diseases, viral infections, allergic reactions, autoimmune disorders, and traumatic rupture of the intralabyrinthe membrane. Unlike in unilateral cases bilateral sensorineural hearing loss is often associated with specific disease entities. We report a case of sudden bilateral deafness after intravenous heroin abuse. The putative pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed.

  18. Martha E. Rogers: heretic and heroine.

    PubMed

    Phillips, John R

    2015-01-01

    Rhythms of Martha Rogers' life and work are presented showing her evolution as a heretic and a heroine through her heretical thinking. New concepts of unitariology, energyspirit, wellbecoming, integral presence, and soul are presented with their relevance for advancing Rogers' science of unitary human beings. New dimensions of practice make explicit pandimensional ministering to humankind and living in the universe.

  19. Protecting against cocaine, heroin, and sarin gas.

    PubMed

    McRee, Duncan

    2003-04-01

    The first X-ray structure of human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) and the structures of hCE1 with drug analogs bound reveal important molecular details of how the drugs cocaine, heroin, and tacrine are metabolized and cleared.

  20. Sustained incentive value of heroin-related cues in short- and long-term abstinent heroin users.

    PubMed

    Preller, Katrin H; Wagner, Michael; Sulzbach, Christian; Hoenig, Klaus; Neubauer, Julia; Franke, Petra E; Petrovsky, Nadine; Frommann, Ingo; Rehme, Anne K; Quednow, Boris B

    2013-10-01

    Models of addiction and addiction memory propose that drug-associated cues elicit incentive effects in drug users, which play an important role in maintenance of drug use and relapse. Incentive effects have been demonstrated for smoking and alcohol-related cues but evidence for heroin-related cues has been inconclusive. Furthermore, it is unknown whether appetitive effects of heroin-related cues persist after prolonged abstinence, although heroin addiction is known to have high relapse rates. Therefore, we investigated implicit and explicit valence of heroin-related cues in dependent users at different stages of abstinence using affective startle modulation. In Study I, 15 current heroin users were measured before and after detoxification. Correspondingly, 15 healthy control participants were tested twice at an interval of 14 days. In Study II, 14 long-term abstinent heroin users were additionally measured in a single session. Implicit processing of drug-related stimuli was assessed using affective startle modulation by pictures of heroin and smoking scenes. Explicit reactions were measured using ratings of valence and craving. In contrast to controls, heroin-dependent participants showed a clear reduction of startle response during heroin-related pictures (p<0.05). Detoxification did not significantly change their startle responses to heroin-cues. No difference between non-detoxified current and long-term abstinent heroin users was found in implicit reactions to heroin-cues, whereas explicit measures differed between both groups (all p<0.05). After detoxification and even after prolonged abstinence, heroin cues still exert implicit appetitive effects in heroin users. This implies that drug-induced adaptations of reward circuits are long-lasting, resulting in a highly stable addiction memory.

  1. What caused the recent reduction in heroin supply in Australia?

    PubMed

    Wodak, Alex

    2008-08-01

    Heroin availability and purity decreased and prices increased in Australia suddenly in early 2001. The heroin market in Australia has still not returned to the status quo ante after more than six years. Benefits of the heroin shortage, including a substantial reduction in drug overdose deaths and property crime, are generally considered to have outweighed adverse effects which included increased use of other drugs, especially stimulants, with a subsequent increase in aggression, violence and mental illness. Some commentators attributed the heroin shortage to a combination of factors, while an influential study highlighted the importance of supply control asserting that increased funding and improved effectiveness of domestic drug law enforcement produced critical heroin seizures which disrupted major syndicates, thereby producing the heroin shortage. Evidence to support a critical role for drug law enforcement in the heroin shortage is weak with some recent evidence contradicting key assertions used to support the supply control hypothesis. Although the most likely interpretation is still a combination of multiple factors, the most important factors appear to have been a substantial recent reduction in source opium cultivation and heroin production in Burma, but probably also increased heroin consumption en route through China and a switch from heroin to amphetamine production in Burma. This interpretation is consistent with the international experience of several recent decades in numerous countries where national heroin shortages have occurred rarely and generally only briefly, notwithstanding vigorous and very well resourced supply control efforts. The recent reduction in heroin supply in Australia, the most severe, longest lasting and best-documented heroin shortage in the world, cannot be confidently attributed, solely or largely, to improved domestic drug law enforcement. At best, domestic law enforcement may have made a small contribution compared to several

  2. [Inhaled therapy in asthma].

    PubMed

    Plaza Moral, Vicente; Giner Donaire, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Because of its advantages, inhaled administration of aerosolized drugs is the administration route of choice for the treatment of asthma and COPD. Numerous technological advances in the devices used in inhaled therapy in recent decades have boosted the appearance of multiple inhalers and aerosolized drugs. However, this variety also requires that the prescribing physician is aware of their characteristics. The main objective of the present review is to summarize the current state of knowledge on inhalers and inhaled drugs commonly used in the treatment of asthma. The review ranges from theoretical aspects (fundamentals and available devices and drugs) to practical and relevant aspects for asthma care in the clinical setting (therapeutic strategies, education, and adherence to inhalers).

  3. Plasma level monitoring of the major metabolites of diacetylmorphine (heroin) by the "chasing the dragon" route in severe heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Dubois, N; Demaret, I; Ansseau, M; Rozet, E; Hubert, Ph; Charlier, C

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to verify if severe physical health problems frequently encountered in heroin addicts and the concomitant use of alcohol and legal or illegal drugs other than heroin influenced the pharmacokinetics of the major metabolites of heroin. We conducted a 90 minutes follow-up of the plasma concentrations of the pharmaceutical heroin, named diacetylmorphine (DAM), in patients recruited in a DAM assisted treatment centre. TADAM (Traitement Assisté par DiAcétylMorphine) aimed to compare the efficacy of heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) compared with methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) for heroin users considered as treatment resistant patients and who have severe physical and mental health problems. Eleven patients were recruited. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 15, 45 and 90 minutes after DAM administration. All patients received DAM by the "chasing the dragon" route. Plasma samples were analyzed by a previously described ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC/MS-MS) method. A principal component analysis (PCA) was performed and 8 metabolite concentrations ratios were calculated to evaluate the influence of various factors (DAM dose, patient pathologies, concomitant use of medications, methadone, street heroin, alcohol and cocaine) on heroin metabolite pharmacokinetics. It seemed to be not affected by the DAM dose, patient pathologies and the concomitant use of medications, methadone, street heroin and alcohol. Cocaine use was the only parameter which showed differences in heroin pharmacokinetics.

  4. Inhalant allergies in children.

    PubMed

    Mims, James W; Veling, Maria C

    2011-06-01

    Children with chronic or recurrent upper respiratory inflammatory disease (rhinitis) should be considered for inhalant allergies. Risk factors for inhalant allergies in children include a first-degree relative with allergies, food allergy in infancy, and atopic dermatitis. Although inhalant allergies are rare in infancy, inhalant allergies are common in older children and impair quality of life and productivity. Differentiating between viral and allergic rhinitis can be challenging in children, but the child's age, history, and risk factors can provide helpful information. Allergic rhinitis is a risk factor for asthma, and if one is present, medical consideration of the other is warranted.

  5. Inhalant Abuse and Dextromethorphan.

    PubMed

    Storck, Michael; Black, Laura; Liddell, Morgan

    2016-07-01

    Inhalant abuse is the intentional inhalation of a volatile substance for the purpose of achieving an altered mental state. As an important, yet underrecognized form of substance abuse, inhalant abuse crosses all demographic, ethnic, and socioeconomic boundaries, causing significant morbidity and mortality in school-aged and older children. This review presents current perspectives on epidemiology, detection, and clinical challenges of inhalant abuse and offers advice regarding the medical and mental health providers' roles in the prevention and management of this substance abuse problem. Also discussed is the misuse of a specific "over-the-counter" dissociative, dextromethorphan.

  6. The phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor rolipram attenuates heroin-seeking behavior induced by cues or heroin priming in rats.

    PubMed

    Lai, Miaojun; Zhu, Huaqiang; Sun, Anna; Zhuang, Dingding; Fu, Dan; Chen, Weisheng; Zhang, Han-Ting; Zhou, Wenhua

    2014-09-01

    Inhibition of phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4), an enzyme that specifically hydrolyzes cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) increases intracellular cAMP/cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) signaling. Activation of this signaling is considered as an important compensatory response that decreases motivational properties of drugs of abuse. However, it is not known whether PDE4 is involved in heroin seeking. Self-administration of heroin (50 μg/kg/infusion) was performed under the fixed ratio 1 (FR1) schedule for 14 d and then drug seeking was extinguished for 10 d. The progressive ratio schedule was used to evaluate the relative motivational value of heroin reinforcement. After training, the conditioned cue or heroin priming (250 μg/kg) was introduced for the reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior. Pretreatment (i.p.) with rolipram (0.03-0.3 mg/kg), a prototypical, selective PDE4 inhibitor, failed to inhibit heroin self-administration under the FR1 schedule, but decreased the reward values under the progressive ratio schedule in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, rolipram decreased the reinstatement of heroin seeking induced by cues or heroin priming even at the lowest dose (0.03 mg/kg); in contrast, the highest dose (0.3 mg/kg) of rolipram was required to decrease sucrose reinforcement. Finally, the effects of rolipram on heroin-seeking behavior were correlated with the increases in expression of phosphorylated CREB in the nucleus accumbens. The study demonstrated that rolipram inhibited heroin reward and heroin-seeking behavior. The results suggest that PDE4 plays an essential role in mediating heroin seeking and that PDE4 inhibitors may be used as a potential pharmacotherapeutic approach for heroin addiction.

  7. Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeutic dose delivered by inhaled pharmacological drugs. Howeve...

  8. [Analysis of two year heroin seizures in the Liege area].

    PubMed

    Denooz, R; Dubois, N; Charlier, C

    2005-09-01

    The results of heroin analysis from seizures in the Liege area during the last two years are presented in this article. Between January 2003 and January 2005, 50 samples were analysed in the Laboratory of Clinical Toxicology and Forensic Toxicology of the University of Liege. Mean heroin concentration was 14,7%. Noscapine and papaverine, other opium alcaloïds, were simultaneously present with heroin. As diluents, we only identified caffein and acetaminophen.

  9. Lemon juice as a solvent for heroin in Spain.

    PubMed

    Page, J B; Fraile, J S

    1999-06-01

    Preliminary observations and responses to interviews in Valencia, Spain reveal that injecting drug users (IDUs) dissolve heroin before injection with two or three drops of lemon juice. Solution in lemon juice makes heating of heroin in water unnecessary. This pattern apparently developed spontaneously in Spain, but is almost unknown elsewhere in the world. Its implications for IDUs' health remain speculative, but use of lemon juice to dissolve heroin for injection deserves further scientific study.

  10. Documentation of a heroin manufacturing process in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Zerell, U; Ahrens, B; Gerz, P

    2005-01-01

    The present article documents an authentic process of heroin manufacturing in Afghanistan: white heroin hydrochloride produced using simple equipment and a small quantity of chemicals. The quantities of chemicals actually used corresponded to the minimum needed for manufacturing heroin. The only organic solvent used was acetone, and only a very small quantity of it was used. Because the chemicals used in the demonstration were from actual seizures in Afghanistan, some of the chemicals had been disguised or repackaged by smugglers. Others had been put into labelled containers that proved to be counterfeit, and some glass containers used were not the original containers of the manufacturer displayed on the label. The brown heroin base prepared as an intermediate step in the process shares some of the characteristics of the South-West Asia type of heroin preparations often seized in Germany. The final product of the documented heroin manufacturing process was white heroin hydrochloride, which shares the key characteristics of the white heroin occasionally seized in Germany and other countries in Western Europe since 2000. The present article demonstrates that this kind of heroin can be produced in Afghanistan.

  11. Rethinking Informed Consent in Research on Heroin-Assisted Treatment.

    PubMed

    Uusitalo, Susanne; Broers, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Can heroin addicts give consent to research on trials in which heroin is prescribed to them? Analyses of addicts and informed consent have been objects of debate in several articles. Informed consent requires the agent not only to be competent but also to give consent voluntarily. This has been questioned because of alleged features of heroin addiction. Until recently the discussion has focused on heroin addicts' desires for heroin, whether these are irresistible and thus pose a problem for giving consent. Still, in light of empirical evidence, there seems to be a consensus more or less that the problem is not whether the addicts can resist their desire for heroin. A recent article concentrates specifically on heroin addicts' false assumptions of options and voluntariness. We argue that the prevailing framing of the options in this discussion in terms of heroin and access to it is problematic. The way in which the options are typically laid out suggests an assumption that participation in the research is allegedly based on the addicts' views on using the drug. We argue that this way of presenting the options is, first, a mismatch to the studies carried out and, second, symptomatic of potential misconceptions about heroin addiction and addicts. Furthermore, we also suggest that the account of voluntariness needs to be realistic in order for subjects to be able to give consent voluntarily in actual situations, and for medical research to carry out studies on improving outcomes in addiction treatment in an ethical way.

  12. Contact allergy and respiratory/mucosal complaints from heroin (diacetylmorphine).

    PubMed

    Hogen Esch, A J; van der Heide, S; van den Brink, W; van Ree, J M; Bruynzeel, D P; Coenraads, P J

    2006-01-01

    After the start of heroin (diacetylmorphine)-assisted treatment to a selected group of chronic treatment-resistant heroin-dependent patients in the Netherlands, we reported about work-related eczema and positive patch tests to heroin in some nurses and nasal and respiratory complaints. To investigate the prevalence of heroin contact allergy, we started a questionnaire-based study with follow-up by allergological examinations. Of 120 questionnaires sent, 101 (84%) was returned: 67 from nurses and 34 from other employees. Of 101 workers, 38 (38%) had reported work-related complaints: 33 of 67 (49%) nurses and 5 of 34 (15%) other employees. Patch tests to heroin were performed in 24 nurses and were positive in 8 (33%). All the 8 had eyelid or facial eczema and, in 6, accompanied by mucosal or respiratory complaints. The prevalence of heroin contact allergy in this study was 8% (8/101) among all employees and 12% (8/67) among nurses. Respiratory and mucosal complaints could not be ascribed to a contact allergy, and in these cases, serum was analysed for specific immunoglobulin E to heroin. A type 1 allergy to heroin could not be shown. These complaints are possibly due to the histamine-liberating effect of heroin, to atopic constitution, to a combination of these factors or - less likely - to other non-allergic factors.

  13. Pregnant heroin addict: what about the baby?

    PubMed Central

    Namboodiri, Vasudevan; George, Sanju; Boulay, Sylvie; Fair, Mandy

    2010-01-01

    Heroin misuse in pregnancy is a significant health and social problem, and it can have an adverse effect on the mother and the baby. Although heroin and methadone have no specific teratogenic potential, 48–94% of children exposed in utero will have neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). The primary aim of this case report is to raise awareness of NAS among clinicians and to remind them that although very common, it is not inevitable. The risk of NAS can be further minimised by offering comprehensive and co-ordinated antenatal care that addresses the various biopsychosocial needs of the pregnant woman. Further, a brief description of NAS and a review of evidence in the field of management of opioid misuse in pregnancy, as relevant to this case, are provided. We have also included the patient’s own reflections on her pregnancy and treatment. PMID:22328902

  14. A heroin addict with focal weakness.

    PubMed

    Galassi, Giuliana; Ariatti, Alessandra; Gozzi, Manuela; Cavazza, Stefano

    2013-05-01

    A 24-year-old female with 5 year history of heroin abuse experienced painless stiffness of elbow joints and weakness of shoulder and upper limb muscles. She was injecting herself 4-6 times daily alternatively in the upper extremities, sparing the lower limbs. Electromyography (EMG) showed myopathic changes in clinically affected and unaffected muscles. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed muscle fibrosis in directly injected muscles, whereas in subcutaneous fat and within muscles of anterior and posterior compartments of both thighs, not directly injected, there were signal changes supportive of oedema and inflammation. EMG and MRI were congruent in showing abnormalities in muscles not directly injected, suggesting long distant effects of heroin or adulterants with a mechanism either toxic or immunologically mediated.

  15. Nonthermal Inhalation Injury.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    understand the effects of the various byproducts of combustion on the human body. A thorough knowledge of the physiological mechanisms , relevant...as soon as possible. Overview of Smoke Inhalation Physiology The physiologic mechanisms of injury from smoke inhalation are multiple and complex...to breathe Lower airway obstruction Dyspnea, tachypnea, wheezing, rhonchi, carbonaceous sputum Parenchymal injury Dyspnea, tachypnea, rales Table 1

  16. A System Description of the Heroin Trade

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    104 Bibliography .............................................. log vii Figures 1.1. Worldwide Opium Production: NNICC and INCSR Estimates from 1983 to...United States (18 to 25 Years Old) ........................................ 5 2.1. The World’s Three Principal Opium Producing Regions ......... 10 2.2... Opium Production by the Major Producing Countries in 1991 ..... 11 2.3. Heroin Availability in the United States by Source Region ....... 14 3.1

  17. [Efficiency of noophen in heroin addiction].

    PubMed

    Kuchkarov, U I; Ashurov, Z Sh; Sultanov, Sh Kh

    2009-01-01

    24 patients with heroin addiction have been observed with the purpose to assess cognitive and neurosis-like disorders during the treatment with Noofen. The methods of research included clinical-psychopathological examination. The course therapy with Noofen reduced intensity of memory and attention disorders and improved general cognitive status of the patients. The therapy with Noofen has not increased a pathological drive to narcotics. Noofen use has improve cognitive sphere alongside with reduction in concomitant psychopathological symptoms including depressive and other disorders.

  18. Vapor Intrusion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Vapor intrusion occurs when there is a migration of volatile chemicals from contaminated groundwater or soil into an overlying building. Volatile chemicals can emit vapors that may migrate through subsurface soils and into indoor air spaces.

  19. Bacillus cereus cellulitis from contaminated heroin.

    PubMed

    Dancer, S J; McNair, D; Finn, P; Kolsto, A B

    2002-03-01

    Concern exists over recent unexplained deaths among intravenous drug users. This report describes a patient with crepitant cellulitis who was admitted complaining of severe pain in the right forearm. Ultrasonography demonstrated gas in the tissues and he was referred for early surgical debridement of the arm. He was treated with intravenous benzyl penicillin, gentamicin and metronidazole and made a full recovery. Aspirate samples grew Bacillus cereus, morphologically similar to the isolate obtained from a sample of the patient's own heroin. Antibiogram and API 50CHB profiles were also similar. Further typing included 'H' flagellar serotyping, which found both blood and heroin strains to be non-typable, and amplified fragment polymorphism analysis, which showed that the strains were indistinguishable. Genotyping of two selected genes from B. cereus confirmed almost certain identity between the two strains. This case illustrates the potential virulence of B. cereus when inoculated into tissues, and to our knowledge, is the first report to demonstrate a conclusive microbiological link between contaminated heroin and serious sepsis in a drug user due to B. cereus.

  20. Synthesis and immunological effects of heroin vaccines.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuying; Cheng, Kejun; Antoline, Joshua F G; Iyer, Malliga R; Matyas, Gary R; Torres, Oscar B; Jalah, Rashmi; Beck, Zoltan; Alving, Carl R; Parrish, Damon A; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Jacobson, Arthur E; Rice, Kenner C

    2014-10-07

    Three haptens have been synthesized with linkers for attachment to carrier macromolecules at either the piperidino-nitrogen or via an introduced 3-amino group. Two of the haptens, with a 2-oxopropyl functionality at either C6, or at both the C3 and C6 positions on the 4,5-epoxymorphinan framework, as well as the third hapten (DiAmHap) with diamido moieties at both the C3 and C6 positions, should be much more stable in solution, or in vivo in a vaccine, than a hapten with an ester in one of those positions, as found in many heroin-based haptens. A "classical" opioid synthetic scheme enabled the formation of a 3-amino-4,5-epoxymorphinan which could not be obtained using palladium chemistry. Our vaccines are aimed at the reduction of the abuse of heroin and, as well, at the reduction of the effects of its predominant metabolites, 6-acetylmorphine and morphine. One of the haptens, DiAmHap, has given interesting results in a heroin vaccine and is clearly more suited for the purpose than the other two haptens.

  1. Mechanisms of withdrawal-associated increases in heroin self-administration: pharmacologic modulation of heroin vs food choice in heroin-dependent rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Negus, S Stevens; Rice, Kenner C

    2009-03-01

    Opioid withdrawal can produce a constellation of physiological and behavioral signs, including an increase in opioid self-administration. Different mechanisms mediate different withdrawal signs, and the present study used pharmacologic tools to assess mechanisms underlying withdrawal-associated increases in opioid reinforcement. Five rhesus monkeys were rendered heroin dependent via daily 21-h heroin self-administration sessions. One hour after each heroin self-administration session, monkeys chose between heroin (0-0.1 mg/kg per injection) and food (1 g pellets) during 2-h choice sessions. Under these conditions, heroin maintained a dose-dependent increase in heroin choice, such that monkeys responded primarily for food when low heroin doses were available (0-0.01 mg/kg per injection) and primarily for heroin when higher heroin doses were available (0.032-0.1 mg/kg per injection). Periods of spontaneous withdrawal were intermittently introduced by omitting one 21-h heroin self-administration session, and test drugs were administered during these withdrawal periods. Untreated withdrawal robustly increased heroin choice during choice sessions. Withdrawal-associated increases in heroin choice were completely suppressed by the mu opioid agonist morphine (0.032-0.32 mg/kg/h, i.v.), but not by the alpha-2 noradrenergic agonist clonidine (0.01-0.1 mg/kg/h, i.v.), the dopamine/norepinephrine releaser amphetamine (0.032-0.1 mg/kg/h, i.v.), or the kappa-opioid antagonist 5'-guanidinonaltrindole (1.0 mg/kg, i.m.). The corticotropin-releasing factor 1 antagonist antalarmin (1.0-10 mg/kg per day, i.m.) produced a morphine-like suppression of withdrawal-associated increases in heroin choice in one of three monkeys. These results suggest that mechanisms of withdrawal-associated increases in the relative reinforcing efficacy of opioid agonists may be different from mechanisms of many other somatic, mood-related, and motivational signs of opioid withdrawal.

  2. Inhalants in Peru.

    PubMed

    Lerner, R; Ferrando, D

    1995-01-01

    In Peru, the prevalence and consequences of inhalant abuse appear to be low in the general population and high among marginalized children. Inhalant use ranks third in lifetime prevalence after alcohol and tobacco. Most of the use appears to be infrequent. Among marginalized children, that is, children working in the streets but living at home or children living in the street, the problem of inhalant abuse is a serious problem. Among children working in the streets but living at home, the lifetime prevalence rate for inhalant abuse is high, ranging from 15 to 45 percent depending on the study being cited. For children living in the streets, the use of inhalant is even more severe. As mentioned earlier in this chapter, most of these street children use inhalants on a daily basis. The lack of research on the problem of inhalant abuse is a serious impediment to development of intervention programs and strategies to address this problem in Peru. Epidemiologic and ethnographic research on the nature and extent of inhalant abuse are obvious prerequisites to targeted treatment and preventive intervention programs. The urgent need for current and valid data is underscored by the unique vulnerability of the youthful population at risk and the undisputed harm that results from chronic abuse of inhalants. Nonetheless, it is important to mention several programs that work with street children. Some, such as the Information and Education Center for the Prevention of Drug Abuse, Generation, and Centro Integracion de Menores en Abandono have shelters where street children are offered transition to a less marginal lifestyle. Teams of street educators provide the children with practical solutions and gain their confidence, as well as offer them alternative socialization experiences to help them survive the streets and avoid the often repressive and counterproductive environments typical of many institutions. Most of the children who go through these programs tend to abandon

  3. Testing human hair for drugs of abuse. III. Identification of heroin and 6-acetylmorphine as indicators of heroin use.

    PubMed

    Goldberger, B A; Caplan, Y H; Maguire, T; Cone, E J

    1991-01-01

    Hair samples from 20 documented heroin users contained 6-acetylmorphine, a unique metabolite of heroin, in all samples. Heroin was identified in smaller amounts in seven of these samples. The identity of 6-acetylmorphine and heroin was established by comparison of full scan spectra of extracts to standard reference materials. The presence of 6-acetylmorphine generally predominated over heroin, morphine, and codeine. The mean concentrations of analytes were as follows: 6-acetylmorphine, 0.90 ng/mg, N = 20; heroin, 0.17 ng/mg, N = 7; morphine, 0.26 ng/mg, N = 20; codeine, 0.18 ng/mg, N = 15. Analysis of hair samples obtained from 10 drug-free control subjects were negative for 6-acetylmorphine, morphine, and codeine. However, a small interfering peak was observed at the retention time for heroin. Control samples soaked in aqueous solutions of heroin and 6-acetylmorphine were found to be contaminated, even though an initial wash step was included in the analysis. These data suggest that hair analysis for 6-acetylmorphine can be used to differentiate heroin users from other types of opiate exposure (e.g., poppy seed, licit morphine, and codeine); however, environmental contamination can potentially produce false positives during opiate testing.

  4. The effects of heroin administration and drug cues on impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jermaine D; Vadhan, Nehal P; Luba, Rachel R; Comer, Sandra D

    2016-08-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by compulsive drug seeking and continued use despite negative consequences. Behavioral impulsivity is a strong predictor of the initiation and maintenance of drug addiction. Preclinical data suggest that heroin may exacerbate impulsive characteristics in an individual but this has yet to be assessed in clinical samples. The current secondary data analysis sought to investigate the effects of heroin on impulsivity along with the effects of exposure to drug cues. Using the current data set, we also tentatively assessed the etiological relationship between impulsivity and heroin abuse. Sixteen heroin-dependent participants were recruited to complete Immediate Memory Task/Delayed Memory Task (IMT/DMT) and GoStop tasks following repeated heroin administration, following acute heroin administration, and following a drug cue exposure session. Four preceding days of active heroin availability, compared to four preceding days of placebo drug availability, increased impulsivity assessed using the IMT and DMT. Presentation of drug cues similarly acted to increase impulsivity assessments on all three tasks. It also appears that heavier users were more susceptible to the influence of drug cues on impulsivity. The present study represents a step toward a more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between opioid abuse and impulsivity. A better understanding of these factors could provide critical insight into the maintenance of heroin use and relapse.

  5. Altered prefrontal connectivity after acute heroin administration during cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, André; Borgwardt, Stefan; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Bendfeldt, Kerstin; Smieskova, Renata; Lang, Undine E; Rubia, Katya; Walter, Marc

    2014-09-01

    Neuroimaging studies have reported reduced activity in a broad network of brain regions during response inhibition in heroin-dependent patients. However, how heroin in an acute dose modulates the neural correlates of response inhibition and the underlying brain connectivity has not yet been investigated. In this double-blind placebo-controlled study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine whether acute heroin administration changed whole brain activity during response inhibition in 26 heroin-dependent patients. We then applied dynamic causal modelling to investigate the effect of an acute dose of heroin on the functional interactions between the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the bilateral inferior frontal gyri (IFG). Heroin acutely reduced dACC activity, as well as the inhibition-induced modulation of connectivity from the dACC to the right IFG compared with placebo. Furthermore, dACC activity was positively related to false alarm rates after placebo but not heroin administration. These results suggest that acute heroin administration impairs cognitive control in dependent patients by reducing the activity in the dACC activity and the functional connectivity from the dACC to the right IFG.

  6. Heroin Use: What Communities Should Know. Monthly Action Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Join Together, Boston, MA.

    This action kit was created in response to a rise in heroin use. Facts are provided about the scope of heroin use since it is the one illegal drug that is growing in popularity in some areas among young people. A brief explanation of some treatment options is provided including detoxification, methadone treatment, other medications, and behavioral…

  7. Hopelessness in Alcohol- and Heroin-Dependent Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Aaron T.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Administered the Beck Hopelessness Scale to alcoholic (N=20) and heroin-addicted (N=20) women. Results indicated that although both groups expressed comparable levels of overall hopelessness, alcoholic women anticipated more success and better lives in the next 10 years than did the heroin-dependent women. (LLL)

  8. Neurobiological underpinnings of sensation seeking trait in heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gordon L F; Liu, Yu-Pin; Chan, Chetwyn C H; So, Kwok-Fai; Zeng, Hong; Lee, Tatia M C

    2015-11-01

    Neurobiological investigation of heroin revealed that abusers of this highly addictive substance show dysregulation in brain circuits for reward processing and cognitive control. Psychologically, personality traits related to reward processing and cognitive control differed between heroin abusers and non-abusers. Yet, there is no direct evidence on the relationship between these neurobiological and psychological findings on heroin abusers, and whether such relationship is altered in these abusers. The present study filled this research gap by integrating findings obtained via magnetic resonance imaging (structural volume and resting-state functional connectivity) and self-reported personality trait measures (Zuckerman׳s Sensation Seeking Scale and Barratt Impulsivity Scale) on 33 abstinent heroin users and 30 matched healthy controls. The key finding is a negative relationship between high sensation seeking tendency and midbrain structural volume in the heroin users. Importantly, there was stronger coupling between the midbrain and ventromedial prefrontal cortex and weaker coupling between the midbrain and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in heroin users. Our findings offer significant insight into the neural underpinning of sensation seeking in heroin users. Importantly, the data shed light on a novel relationship between the mesolimbic-prefrontal pathway of the reward system and the high sensation seeking personality trait in heroin abusers.

  9. Acetylcodeine as a urinary marker to differentiate the use of street heroin and pharmaceutical heroin.

    PubMed

    Brenneisen, Rudolf; Hasler, Felix; Würsch, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Acetylcodeine (ACOD) is a synthesis byproduct present in street heroin but not in pharmaceutical diacetylmorphine (DAM) as used in the Swiss program Heroin-Assisted Treatment for Opiate Dependent Drug Users (HAT). ACOD was evaluated and validated as an urine marker to detect the consumption of street heroin by HAT participants. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method allowing the quantitation of ACOD concentrations as low as 0.2 ng/mL urine has been developed. In opiate-naïve subjects, intravenous (i.v.) ACOD showed a plasma elimination half-life of 237 +/- 18 min, urine peak concentrations 2 h after administration, and a detection window of 8 h. Only 0.4 +/- 0.1% was excreted unchanged, with codeine (COD) as the main metabolite. ACOD may be formed by transacetylation when i.v. DAM and oral codeine are co-administered. To avoid false-positive results, the calculation of COD/ACOD ratios is recommended. In a study with 105 HAT participants, 14% of the tested urines were ACOD positive. Only a low correlation was found between the anonymously self-declared consumption of street heroin and the ACOD positive rate.

  10. Managing Heroin Addiction in an Outpatient Setting: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Malliarakis, Kate Driscoll

    2015-12-01

    Heroin use may be under-recognized among older adults. Baby Boomers are the largest age as well as the largest drug-using cohort in modern history. Although some drug users age out of their addiction, others do not. Nurses caring for older adults may come into contact with heroin users due to associated conditions or sequelae of their drug use that cause them to seek care. Few nurses are prepared to provide the care needed when heroin use accompanies other health problems. Using an individual example, the current article provides guidance for identifying heroin addiction, essential information about heroin use, and resources for guiding patients to experts for the comprehensive care needed for recovery.

  11. An exposure system for measuring nasal and lung uptake of vapors in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, A.R.; Brookins, L.K.; Gerde, P.

    1995-12-01

    Inhaled gases and vapors often produce biological damage in the nasal cavity and lower respiratory tract. The specific site within the respirator tract at which a gas or vapor is absorbed strongly influences the tissues at risk to potential toxic effects; to predict or to explain tissue or cell specific toxicity of inhaled gases or vapors, the sites at which they are absorbed must be known. The purpose of the work reported here was to develop a system for determining nose and lung absorption of vapors in rats, an animal commonly used in inhalation toxicity studies. In summary, the exposure system described allows us to measure in the rate: (1) nasal absorption and desorption of vapors; (2) net lung uptake of vapors; and (3) the effects of changed breathing parameters on vapor uptake.

  12. Personality Differences among Black, White, and Hispanic-American Male Heroin Addicts on MMPI Content Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, M. P.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Assessed personality differences among Black, White, and Hispanic-American heroin addicts (N=423). Results confirmed the hypotheses that minority group heroin addicts (Blacks and Hispanics) would show better adjustment than White heroin addicts and that Hispanic-American heroin addicts would evidence personality characteristics unlike those of…

  13. Budesonide Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Budesonide is used to prevent difficulty breathing, chest tightness, wheezing, and coughing caused by asthma. Budesonide powder for oral inhalation (Pulmicort Flexhaler) is used in adults and children 6 ...

  14. Acetylcysteine Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Acetylcysteine inhalation is used along with other treatments to relieve chest congestion due to thick or abnormal ... that causes problems with breathing, digestion, and reproduction). Acetylcysteine is in a class of medications called mucolytic ...

  15. Zanamivir Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you use an inhaled medication to treat asthma, emphysema, or other breathing problems and you are scheduled ... the air passages that lead to the lungs); emphysema (damage to air sacs in the lungs); or ...

  16. Ipratropium Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Ipratropium oral inhalation is used to prevent wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing, and chest tightness in people ... damage to the air sacs in the lungs). Ipratropium is in a class of medications called bronchodilators. ...

  17. Pirbuterol Acetate Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... mouth or throat irritation, rinse your mouth with water, chew gum, or suck sugarless hard candy after using pirbuterol.Inhalation devices require regular cleaning. Once a week, remove the mouthpiece cover, turn ...

  18. Umeclidinium Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest tightness caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; a group of diseases that affect the lungs ... Do not use umeclidinium inhalation during a sudden COPD attack. Your doctor will prescribe a short-acting ( ...

  19. Olodaterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest tightness caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; a group of diseases that affect the lungs ... Do not use olodaterol inhalation during a sudden COPD attack. Your doctor will prescribe a short-acting ( ...

  20. Supply of a nondrug substitute reduces escalated heroin consumption.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Magalie; Ahmed, Serge H

    2008-08-01

    Escalation of drug consumption-a hallmark of addiction-has been hypothesized to be associated with a relative devaluation of alternative nondrug rewards and thus with a decrease in their ability to compete with or to substitute for the drug. In a behavioral economic framework, decreased substitutability of nondrug rewards for drug would explain why drug consumption is behaviorally dominant and relatively resistant to change (eg price-inelastic) in drug-addicted individuals. The goal of the present study was to test this hypothesis using a validated rat model of heroin intake escalation. Escalation was precipitated by long (6 h, long access (LgA)), but not short (1 h, short access (ShA)), daily access to i.v. heroin self-administration. After escalation, the effects of price (ie fixed-ratio value) on heroin consumption were assessed under two alternative reward conditions: in the presence or absence of a nondrug substitute for heroin (ie four freely available chow pellets). As expected, escalated heroin consumption by LgA rats was less sensitive to price than heroin consumption by ShA rats, showing that heroin had acquired greater reinforcing strength during escalation. However, supplying a substitute during access to heroin was sufficient to reverse this post-escalation increase in the reinforcing effectiveness of heroin. Thus, escalated heroin consumption is not associated with a decreased sensitivity to competing nondrug rewards. Escalated drug use may therefore persist, not so much because of a relative devaluation of nondrug substitutes, but because of a loss or reduction of their availability.

  1. Escalation patterns of varying periods of heroin access.

    PubMed

    Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schlosburg, Joel E; Misra, Kaushik K; Chen, Scott A; Greenwell, Thomas N; Koob, George F

    2011-06-01

    The prevalence of opioid abuse and dependence has been on the rise in just the past few years. Animal studies indicate that extended access to heroin produces escalation of intake over time, whereas stable intake is observed under limited-access conditions. Escalation of drug intake has been suggested to model the transition from controlled drug use to compulsive drug seeking and taking. Here, we directly compared the pattern of heroin intake in animals with varying periods of heroin access. Food intake was also monitored over the course of escalation. Rats were allowed to lever press on a fixed-ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement to receive intravenous infusions of heroin for 1, 6, 12, or 23h per day for 14 sessions. The results showed that heroin intake in the 12 and 23h groups markedly increased over time, whereas heroin intake in the 1h group was stable. The 6h group showed a significant but modest escalation of intake. Total heroin intake was similar in the 12 and 23h groups, but the rate of heroin self-administration was two-fold higher in the 12h group compared with the 23h group. Food intake decreased over sessions only in the 12h group. The 12 and 23h groups showed marked physical signs of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. These findings suggest that 12h heroin access per day may be the optimal access time for producing escalation of heroin intake. The advantages of this model and the potential relevance for studying drug addiction are discussed.

  2. Plasma catecholamines during an ultrarapid heroin detoxification.

    PubMed

    Macedo, T R; Relvas, J; Fontes Ribeiro CA; Pacheco, F; Morgadinho, M T; Pinto, C M; Gomes, P C; Ventura, M; Henriques, V; Nunes, S V; Ruis, G R; Ramalheira, C; Boto, I; Vale, L L

    2000-09-01

    The adrenergic system has long been known to be activated in a situation of stress and thus during opiate withdrawal. A method for detoxification that decreases the stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system will prevent changes of catecholamine levels. Some of such methods have been developed. One of them uses direct transition from heroin to oral naltrexone after deep sedation with midazolam in conjunction with naloxone, droperidol, ondansetron, and clonidine treatment for 24 hours. Can such method prevent adrenergic changes? Moreover, 5-HT has been related to mood disorders. This study aims to determine plasma catecholamines and 5-HT before heroin withdrawal, during the day of the withdrawal, and at the ends of the first day, the first week, and the first 6 months. Forty-three patients with more than 6 years of drug abuse volunteered to seek help to detoxify. After clinical evaluation, blood samples were taken. Plasma catecholamines were isolated by standard alumina procedures and measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Only for NE was there a significant decrease in the day of heroin withdrawal with deep sedation, followed the next day by an increase. During the following days, NE plasma concentrations returned slowly to basal levels. Epinephrine and dopamine plasma levels did not significantly change. Platelet 5-HT levels progressively decreased from the day before detoxification until the last period of observation. We also found that there were no abrupt changes in cardiovascular functions. In conclusion, our results suggest that this type of ultrarapid opiate detoxification prevents the dramatic activation of the autonomic nervous system.

  3. A vitamin profile of heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    el-Nakah, A; Frank, O; Louria, D B; Quinones, M A; Baker, H

    1979-10-01

    Circulating thiamine, riboflavin, nicotinates, folates, vitamin B12, B6, A, and carotenes of 149 heroin addicts aged 17-60 years were compared to 204 healthy subjects not using drugs or vitamins. Only 24 per cent of the addicts had no evidence of hypovitaminemia; 45 per cent and 37 per cent had vitamin B6 and folate deficit respectively, whereas deficits of thiamine, vitamin B12, riboflavin, and nicotinate were recorded for 13-19 per cent of the addict population; impaired liver function in addicts did not influence these results.

  4. The price elasticity of demand for heroin: matched longitudinal and experimental evidence#

    PubMed Central

    Olmstead, Todd A.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Kline, Brendan; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Petry, Nancy M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports estimates of the price elasticity of demand for heroin based on a newly constructed dataset. The dataset has two matched components concerning the same sample of regular heroin users: longitudinal information about real-world heroin demand (actual price and actual quantity at daily intervals for each heroin user in the sample) and experimental information about laboratory heroin demand (elicited by presenting the same heroin users with scenarios in a laboratory setting). Two empirical strategies are used to estimate the price elasticity of demand for heroin. The first strategy exploits the idiosyncratic variation in the price experienced by a heroin user over time that occurs in markets for illegal drugs. The second strategy exploits the experimentally-induced variation in price experienced by a heroin user across experimental scenarios. Both empirical strategies result in the estimate that the conditional price elasticity of demand for heroin is approximately −0.80. PMID:25702687

  5. The price elasticity of demand for heroin: Matched longitudinal and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, Todd A; Alessi, Sheila M; Kline, Brendan; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Petry, Nancy M

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports estimates of the price elasticity of demand for heroin based on a newly constructed dataset. The dataset has two matched components concerning the same sample of regular heroin users: longitudinal information about real-world heroin demand (actual price and actual quantity at daily intervals for each heroin user in the sample) and experimental information about laboratory heroin demand (elicited by presenting the same heroin users with scenarios in a laboratory setting). Two empirical strategies are used to estimate the price elasticity of demand for heroin. The first strategy exploits the idiosyncratic variation in the price experienced by a heroin user over time that occurs in markets for illegal drugs. The second strategy exploits the experimentally induced variation in price experienced by a heroin user across experimental scenarios. Both empirical strategies result in the estimate that the conditional price elasticity of demand for heroin is approximately -0.80.

  6. [The development of vaporizers. A question of precise dose].

    PubMed

    Petermann, Heike

    2009-05-01

    Since the beginning of anaesthesia it was well known that anaesthetic agents administered by inhalation must be capable of existing in gaseous form. For vaporization various types tried to work accurately. Since oxygen was available there could be realized new concepts like the principles of injection or bubble through. With Copper Kettle (1948) for ether and chloroform and Draeger Vapor (1958) for Halothane accurate administration of volatile anaesthetics was available. Today vaporizers are part of anaesthetic machines.

  7. Inhaled human insulin.

    PubMed

    Strack, Thomas R

    2006-04-01

    The benefit of subcutaneous insulin therapy in patients with diabetes is frequently limited due to difficulty in convincing patients of the importance of multiple daily insulin injections to cope effectively with meal-associated glycemic changes. Thus, the aim of achieving tight glycemic control, which is critical for reducing the risk of long-term diabetes-related complications, frequently remains elusive. The successful development of an inhalable insulin as a noninvasive alternative promises to change the management of diabetes. The first product to become available to patients is inhaled human insulin, a dry-powder formulation packaged into discrete blisters containing 1 or 3 mg of dry-powder human insulin and administered via a unique pulmonary inhaler device. It has recently been approved in both the United States and the European Union for the control of hyperglycemia in adult patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The pharmacokinetic profile of inhaled human insulin closely mimics the natural pattern of insulin secretion, and resembles that of rapid-acting subcutaneous analogs. Similarly to rapid-acting subcutaneous analogs, inhaled human insulin has a more rapid onset of glucose-lowering activity compared to subcutaneous regular insulin, allowing it to be administered shortly before meals. It has a duration of glucose-lowering activity comparable to subcutaneous regular insulin and longer than rapid-acting insulin analogs. Inhaled human insulin effectively controls postprandial glucose concentrations in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia, and even improves fasting glucose levels compared to subcutaneous insulin. Inhaled human insulin has an overall favorable safety profile. There are small reductions in lung function (1-1.5% of total lung forced expiratory volume in the first second [FEV1] capacity) after onset of treatment that are reversible in most patients if treatment is discontinued. Inhaled human

  8. Neurophysiological Assessment of Auditory, Peripheral Nerve, Somatosensory, and Visual System Function After Developmental Exposure to Gasoline, E15 and E85 Vapors

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of gasolines blended with a range of ethanol concentrations may result in inhalation of vapors containing a variable combination of ethanol with other volatile gasoline constituents. The possibility of exposure and potential interactions between vapor constituents suggest...

  9. Reduced volume of the nucleus accumbens in heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Christian L; Magon, Stefano; Sprenger, Till; Lang, Undine E; Huber, Christian G; Denier, Niklaus; Vogel, Marc; Schmidt, André; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Borgwardt, Stefan; Walter, Marc

    2015-12-01

    The neural mechanisms of heroin addiction are still incompletely understood, even though modern neuroimaging techniques offer insights into disease-related changes in vivo. While changes on cortical structure have been reported in heroin addiction, evidence from subcortical areas remains underrepresented. Functional imaging studies revealed that the brain reward system and particularly the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of drug addiction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a volume difference of the NAcc in heroin addiction in comparison to healthy controls. A further aim was to correlate subcortical volumes with clinical measurements on negative affects in addiction. Thirty heroin-dependent patients under maintenance treatment with diacetylmorphine and twenty healthy controls underwent structural MRI scanning at 3T. Subcortical segmentation analysis was performed using FMRIB's Integrated Registration and Segmentation Tool function of FSL. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory were used to assess trait anxiety and depressive symptoms, respectively. A decreased volume of the left NAcc was observed in heroin-dependent patients compared to healthy controls. Depression score was negatively correlated with left NAcc volume in patients, whereas a positive correlation was found between the daily opioid dose and the volume of the right amygdala. This study indicates that there might be structural differences of the NAcc in heroin-dependent patients in comparison with healthy controls. Furthermore, correlations of subcortical structures with negative emotions and opioid doses might be of future relevance for the investigation of heroin addiction.

  10. Impaired decision-making in psychopathic heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, Jasmin; Petkova, Pavlina; Georgiev, Stefan; Martin, Eileen M; Tersiyski, Ruslan; Raycheva, Margarita; Velinov, Vladimir; Marinov, Peter

    2007-01-12

    Substance-dependent individuals (SDIs) often show neurocognitive deficits in decision-making, such that their choices are biased toward the greatest immediate reward rather than the optimal future outcome. However, studies of SDIs are often hampered by two significant methodological challenges: polysubstance dependence and comorbid conditions, which are independently associated with neurocognitive impairments. We addressed these methodological challenges by testing heroin addicts in Bulgaria, where heroin addiction is highly prevalent but polysubstance dependence is rare. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the potential contribution of psychopathy to decision-making processes among this group of Bulgarian heroin addicts. We tested 78 male currently abstaining heroin addicts, classified as psychopathic or non-psychopathic using the Hare Psychopathy Checklist, Revised (PCL-R). Psychopathic heroin addicts showed notable deficits in decision-making in that they made significantly more disadvantageous decisions relative to non-psychopathic heroin addicts. Results indicate that the presence of psychopathy may exacerbate decision-making deficits in heroin addicts.

  11. Fatal poisoning by alcohol and heroin.

    PubMed

    Sutlović, Davorka; Definis-Gojanović, Marija

    2007-09-01

    Drug abuse with alcohol consumption have been on the rise in Split-Dalmatian County for a while now. This article reports two separate cases with three deaths due to fatal combinations of heroin and alcohol. The first case of poisoning is related to a young couple, a 30-year-old man and a 28-year-old woman, who were found dead in a car, surrounded by cans of a variety alcoholic drinks. Two needles were found beside the bodies as well. The victims were registered drug abusers who had been in withdrawal programs. The second case was a 29-year-old man who was found dead in a house. Three fresh injection marks were visible on his right arm, and two needles were near his body. He was not known as a drug addict, but he had tried to commit suicide recently. Carboxyhaemoglobin was found in blood samples of both victims from the first case. The concentration was 25% and that could contribute to their death. In both described cases blood alcohol concentration was higher then 1.60 g kg(-1). Toxicology tests were positive for heroin, meconin, acetaminophen, 6-acetylmorphine, codeine, noscapine and papaverine. Ethanol, being a respiratory depressant, combined with morphine drastically increases the risk of rapid death due to respiration failure.

  12. Increases in heroin overdose deaths - 28 States, 2010 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Rose A; Paulozzi, Len J; Bauer, Michael J; Burleson, Richard W; Carlson, Rick E; Dao, Dan; Davis, James W; Dudek, Jennifer; Eichler, Beth Ann; Fernandes, Jessie C; Fondario, Anna; Gabella, Barbara; Hume, Beth; Huntamer, Theron; Kariisa, Mbabazi; Largo, Thomas W; Miles, JoAnne; Newmyer, Ashley; Nitcheva, Daniela; Perez, Beatriz E; Proescholdbell, Scott K; Sabel, Jennifer C; Skiba, Jessica; Slavova, Svetla; Stone, Kathy; Tharp, John M; Wendling, Tracy; Wright, Dagan; Zehner, Anne M

    2014-10-03

    Nationally, death rates from prescription opioid pain reliever (OPR) overdoses quadrupled during 1999-2010, whereas rates from heroin overdoses increased by <50%. Individual states and cities have reported substantial increases in deaths from heroin overdose since 2010. CDC analyzed recent mortality data from 28 states to determine the scope of the heroin overdose death increase and to determine whether increases were associated with changes in OPR overdose death rates since 2010. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which found that, from 2010 to 2012, the death rate from heroin overdose for the 28 states increased from 1.0 to 2.1 per 100,000, whereas the death rate from OPR overdose declined from 6.0 per 100,000 in 2010 to 5.6 per 100,000 in 2012. Heroin overdose death rates increased significantly for both sexes, all age groups, all census regions, and all racial/ethnic groups other than American Indians/Alaska Natives. OPR overdose mortality declined significantly among males, persons aged <45 years, persons in the South, and non-Hispanic whites. Five states had increases in the OPR death rate, seven states had decreases, and 16 states had no change. Of the 18 states with statistically reliable heroin overdose death rates (i.e., rates based on at least 20 deaths), 15 states reported increases. Decreases in OPR death rates were not associated with increases in heroin death rates. The findings indicate a need for intensified prevention efforts aimed at reducing overdose deaths from all types of opioids while recognizing the demographic differences between the heroin and OPR-using populations. Efforts to prevent expansion of the number of OPR users who might use heroin when it is available should continue.

  13. Aggressive responding in abstinent heroin addicts: neuroendocrine and personality correlates.

    PubMed

    Gerra, Gilberto; Zaimovic, Amir; Moi, Gabriele; Bussandri, Monica; Bubici, Cristina; Mossini, Matteo; Raggi, Maria Augusta; Brambilla, Francesca

    2004-01-01

    Objective measures of experimentally induced aggressiveness were evaluated in 20 abstinent heroin-dependent subjects, in comparison with 20 normal healthy male subjects. All the subjects were preliminarily submitted to DSM-IV interviews, Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI) and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI II). During a laboratory task, the Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm (PSAP), subjects earned monetary reinforcers with repeated button presses and were provoked by the subtraction of money, which was attributed to a fictitious other participant. Subjects could respond by ostensibly subtracting money from the fictitious subject (the aggressive response). Money-earning responses were not different in drug-free heroin addicts and controls during the first two sessions and significantly lower during the third session in heroin-dependent subjects (t=2.99, P<.01). Aggressive responses were significantly higher (F=4.9, P<.01) in heroin addicted individuals, in comparison with controls. During the experimentally induced aggressiveness, plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol (CORT) concentrations increased less significantly, and norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI) levels, together with heart rate (HR), increased more significantly in abstinent heroin-dependent subjects than in healthy subjects. PSAP aggressive responses positively correlated with catecholamine changes, BDHI "direct" and "irritability" scores, MMPI "psychopathic deviate" scores in heroin-dependent subjects and controls, and with CORT responses only in healthy subjects. No correlation was found between heroin-exposure extent (substance abuse history duration) and aggressiveness levels. The present findings suggest that heroin-dependent patients have higher outward-directed aggressiveness than healthy subjects, in relation with monoamine hyperreactivity, after long-term opiate discontinuation. Aggressiveness in heroin addicts seems to be related more to the

  14. The NK1 receptor antagonist L822429 reduces heroin reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Estelle; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schlosburg, Joel E; Edwards, Scott; Juergens, Nathan; Park, Paula E; Misra, Kaushik K; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Schank, Jesse; Schulteis, Gery; Koob, George F; Heilig, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Genetic deletion of the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) has been shown to decrease the reinforcing properties of opioids, but it is unknown whether pharmacological NK1R blockade has the same effect. Here, we examined the effect of L822429, a rat-specific NK1R antagonist, on the reinforcing properties of heroin in rats on short (1 h: ShA) or long (12 h: LgA) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. ShA produces heroin self-administration rates that are stable over time, whereas LgA leads to an escalation of heroin intake thought to model important dependence-related aspects of addiction. L822429 reduced heroin self-administration and the motivation to consume heroin, measured using a progressive-ratio schedule, in both ShA and LgA rats. L822429 also decreased anxiety-like behavior in both groups, measured on the elevated plus maze, but did not affect mechanical hypersensitivity observed in LgA rats. Expression of TacR1 (the gene encoding NK1R) was decreased in reward- and stress-related brain areas both in ShA and LgA rats compared with heroin-naïve rats, but did not differ between the two heroin-experienced groups. In contrast, passive exposure to heroin produced increases in TacR1 expression in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these results show that pharmacological NK1R blockade attenuates heroin reinforcement. The observation that animals with ShA and LgA to heroin were similarly affected by L822429 indicates that the SP/NK1R system is not specifically involved in neuroadaptations that underlie escalation resulting from LgA self-administration. Instead, the NK1R antagonist appears to attenuate acute, positively reinforcing properties of heroin and may be useful as an adjunct to relapse prevention in detoxified opioid-dependent subjects.

  15. A 50-Year-Old Woman Addicted to Heroin

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Charles P.

    2011-01-01

    Heroin addiction is a complicated medical and psychiatric issue, with well-established as well as newer modes of treatment. The case of Ms W, a 50-year-old woman with a long history of opiate addiction who has been treated successfully with methadone for 9 years and who now would like to consider newer alternatives, illustrates the complex issues of heroin addiction. The treatment of heroin addiction as a chronic disease is reviewed, including social, medical, and cultural issues and pharmacologic treatment with methadone and the more experimental medication options of buprenorphine and naltrexone. PMID:18594026

  16. Staff concerns in heroin-assisted treatment centres.

    PubMed

    Demaret, I; Lemaître, A; Ansseau, M

    2012-08-01

    Heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) is a solution for improving the condition of treatment-resistant heroin addicts. Since 1994, six randomized controlled trials have concluded that HAT is more efficacious than oral methadone for severe heroin addicts. We visited seven HAT treatment centres in four countries in order to observe diacetylmorphine (DAM) administration and to study the main concerns of the staff. Nurses were concerned by the risk taken if a previously intoxicated patient received his dose of DAM. Another concern was the smuggling of DAM doses. The HAT centres face a dilemma: treating patients while at the same time allowing their risky street habits in the centre.

  17. Opioid abstinence reinforcement delays heroin lapse during buprenorphine dose tapering.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Mark K

    2008-01-01

    A positive reinforcement contingency increased opioid abstinence during outpatient dose tapering (4, 2, then 0 mg/day during Weeks 1 through 3) in non-treatment-seeking heroin-dependent volunteers who had been maintained on buprenorphine (8 mg/day) during an inpatient research protocol. The control group (n=12) received $4.00 for completing assessments at each thrice-weekly visit during dose tapering; 10 of 12 lapsed to heroin use 1 day after discharge. The abstinence reinforcement group (n=10) received $30.00 for each consecutive opioid-free urine sample; this significantly delayed heroin lapse (median, 15 days).

  18. Analytical modeling of the subsurface volatile organic vapor concentration in vapor intrusion.

    PubMed

    Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G; Suuberg, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    The inhalation of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds that intrude from a subsurface contaminant source into indoor air has become the subject of health and safety concerns over the last twenty years. Building subslab and soil gas contaminant vapor concentration sampling have become integral parts of vapor intrusion field investigations. While numerical models can be of use in analyzing field data and in helping understand the subslab and soil gas vapor concentrations, they are not widely used due to the perceived effort in setting them up. In this manuscript, we present a new closed-form analytical expression describing subsurface contaminant vapor concentrations, including subslab vapor concentrations. The expression was derived using Schwarz-Christoffel mapping. Results from this analytical model match well the numerical modeling results. This manuscript also explores the relationship between subslab and exterior soil gas vapor concentrations, and offers insights on what parameters need to receive greater focus in field studies.

  19. Analytical modeling of the subsurface volatile organic vapor concentration in vapor intrusion

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    The inhalation of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds that intrude from a subsurface contaminant source into indoor air has become the subject of health and safety concerns over the last twenty years. Building subslab and soil gas contaminant vapor concentration sampling have become integral parts of vapor intrusion field investigations. While numerical models can be of use in analyzing field data and in helping understand the subslab and soil gas vapor concentrations, they are not widely used due to the perceived effort in setting them up. In this manuscript, we present a new closed-form analytical expression describing subsurface contaminant vapor concentrations, including subslab vapor concentrations. The expression was derived using Schwarz-Christoffel mapping. Results from this analytical model match well the numerical modeling results. This manuscript also explores the relationship between subslab and exterior soil gas vapor concentrations, and offers insights on what parameters need to receive greater focus in field studies. PMID:24034829

  20. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin.

    PubMed

    Jolley, Caroline J; Bell, James; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Moxham, John; Strang, John

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction) undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone) (IOT), and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine) after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%), end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2%) and neural respiratory drive (NRD) (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography). Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% < 90% for >10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression.

  1. Acute Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorguner, Metin; Akgun, Metin

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled substances may cause injury in pulmonary epithelium at various levels of respiratory tract, leading from simple symptoms to severe disease. Acute inhalation injury (AII) is not uncommon condition. There are certain high risk groups but AII may occur at various places including home or workplace. Environmental exposure is also possible. In addition to individual susceptibility, the characteristics of inhaled substances such as water solubility, size of substances and chemical properties may affect disease severity as well as its location. Although AII cases may recover in a few days but AII may cause long-term complications, even death. We aimed to discuss the effects of short-term exposures (minutes to hours) to toxic substances on the lungs. PMID:25610115

  2. Inhalation exposure methodology.

    PubMed Central

    Phalen, R F; Mannix, R C; Drew, R T

    1984-01-01

    Modern man is being confronted with an ever-increasing inventory of potentially toxic airborne substances. Exposures to these atmospheric contaminants occur in residential and commercial settings, as well as in the workplace. In order to study the toxicity of such materials, a special technology relating to inhalation exposure systems has evolved. The purpose of this paper is to provide a description of the techniques which are used in exposing laboratory subjects to airborne particles and gases. The various modes of inhalation exposure (whole body, head only, nose or mouth only, etc.) are described at length, including the advantages and disadvantages inherent to each mode. Numerous literature citations are included for further reading. Among the topics briefly discussed are the selection of appropriate animal species for toxicological testing, and the types of inhalation studies performed (acute, chronic, etc.). PMID:6383799

  3. Inhalation of two putative Gulf War toxins by mice.

    PubMed

    Repine, John E; Wilson, Paul; Elkins, Nancy; Klawitter, Jelena; Christians, Uwe; Peters, Ben; Smith, Dwight M

    2016-01-01

    We employed our inhalation methodology to examine whether biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress would be produced in mice following inhalation of aerosols containing carbonaceous particles or the vapor of pesticides prevalent during the first Gulf War. Exposure to two putative Gulf War Illness toxins, fine airborne particles and the pesticide malathion, increased biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in Friend virus B (FVB) female mice. Mice inhaling particles 24 h before had increased lung lavage and plasma Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) (a biomarker of inflammation) and PGF2α (a biomarker of oxidative stress) levels, lung lavage protein and lung lavage lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. These changes were a function of particle density and exposure time. Compared to particle inhalation, mice inhaling malathion 24 h before had small increase in plasma LTB4 and PGF2α levels but no increase in lung lavage LTB4, lung lavage protein, lung lavage LDH, and lung lavage alveolar macrophage (AM) levels compared to unexposed control mice. AM from particle-exposed mice contained phagocytosed particles, while AM from malathion-exposed mice showed no abnormalities. Our results indicate that inhaling particles or malathion can alter inflammatory and oxidative biomarkers in mice and raise the possibility that these toxins may have altered inflammation and oxidative stress biomarkers in Gulf War-exposed individuals.

  4. Facial recognition of heroin vaccine opiates: type 1 cross-reactivities of antibodies induced by hydrolytically stable haptenic surrogates of heroin, 6-acetylmorphine, and morphine.

    PubMed

    Matyas, Gary R; Rice, Kenner C; Cheng, Kejun; Li, Fuying; Antoline, Joshua F G; Iyer, Malliga R; Jacobson, Arthur E; Mayorov, Alexander V; Beck, Zoltan; Torres, Oscar B; Alving, Carl R

    2014-03-14

    Novel synthetic compounds similar to heroin and its major active metabolites, 6-acetylmorphine and morphine, were examined as potential surrogate haptens for the ability to interface with the immune system for a heroin vaccine. Recent studies have suggested that heroin-like haptens must degrade hydrolytically to induce independent immune responses both to heroin and to the metabolites, resulting in antisera containing mixtures of antibodies (type 2 cross-reactivity). To test this concept, two unique hydrolytically stable haptens were created based on presumed structural facial similarities to heroin or to its active metabolites. After conjugation of a heroin-like hapten (DiAmHap) to tetanus toxoid and mixing with liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A, high titers of antibodies after two injections in mice had complementary binding sites that exhibited strong type 1 ("true") specific cross-reactivity with heroin and with both of its physiologically active metabolites. Mice immunized with each surrogate hapten exhibited reduced antinociceptive effects caused by injection of heroin. This approach obviates the need to create hydrolytically unstable synthetic heroin-like compounds to induce independent immune responses to heroin and its active metabolites for vaccine development. Facial recognition of hydrolytically stable surrogate haptens by antibodies together with type 1 cross-reactivities with heroin and its metabolites can help to guide synthetic chemical strategies for efficient development of a heroin vaccine.

  5. Young people with heroin dependence: findings from the Australian Treatment Outcome Study (ATOS).

    PubMed

    Mills, Katherine L; Teesson, Maree; Darke, Shane; Ross, Joanne; Lynskey, Michael

    2004-07-01

    This paper examines the patterns and correlates of heroin use in a cohort of 210 young Australians aged between 18 and 24, who were participants in the Australian Treatment Outcome Study, a longitudinal study of treatment outcomes for heroin dependence. Of major importance were the high rates of psychiatric comorbidity found among this group (37% lifetime Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, 23% current Major Depression, 75% Anti-Social Personality Disorder, and 51% Borderline Personality Disorder). Seventeen percent had attempted suicide in the preceding year. Although both the young (aged 18-24 years) heroin users and their older counterparts (aged 25-56 years) initiated drug use at the same age, young heroin users progressed to heroin use, regular heroin use, and treatment for heroin use, twice as quickly as older heroin users. These findings suggest that there is a limited window of opportunity in which early interventions may be applied before young heroin users progress to problematic use.

  6. What You Need to Know About Drugs: Heroin

    MedlinePlus

    ... to a group of pain-relieving drugs called narcotics. Although certain narcotics such as codeine and morphine are legal if ... or breaks a bone, heroin is an illegal narcotic because it is has dangerous side effects and ...

  7. Quinine-induced thrombocytopenia following intravenous use of heroin

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, D.J.; Walker, R.H.; Kolins, M.D.; Wilner, F.M.; Aster, R.H.

    1983-06-01

    Profound thrombocytopenia developed in a 22-year-old man after intravenous use of heroin. A high-titer, quinine-dependent, platelet-specific antibody was detected in his serum using lysis of normal platelets labeled with chromium 51 and an electroimmunoassay for measurement of platelet-associated IgG. The antibody was specific for quinine and failed to react with platelets in the presence of quinidine hydrochloride or two structural analogues of heroin. Quinine, a common adulterant found in heroin, was detected in the patient's blood and urine. On the basis of these observations, the patient was judged to have quinine-induced immunologic thrombocytopenia. To our knowledge, this report is the first to confirm that quinine used as an adulterant can induce immunologic thrombocytopenia following an injection of heroin.

  8. GABAergic function in detoxified heroin addicts: relationship to anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Ferri, M; Zaimovic, A; Giucastro, G; Palladino, M; Sartori, R; Delsignore, R; Maestri, D; Marzocchi, G; Brambilla, F

    1998-02-09

    The function of the GABAergic system was examined in 20 subjects with heroin dependence and abuse, 2 months after detoxification, and in 10 healthy volunteers, by measuring the growth hormone (GH) response to a challenge with the GABA B receptor agonist baclofen. Ten heroin addicts had comorbid anxiety disorder (Group A), while the other ten had heroin addiction uncomplicated by Axis I and II psychopathologies (Group B). GH responses to baclofen stimulation of Group A patients were significantly blunted, while those of Group B subjects did not differ from responses of healthy volunteers. Our data show that the function of the GABAergic system is impaired only in heroin addicts with comorbid anxiety disorders (anxious cluster), suggesting that the GABA system is not persistently influenced by prolonged exposure to opioid receptor stimulation.

  9. MODELING DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles: ABSTRACT

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeut...

  10. Prevalence of heroin markers in urine for pain management patients.

    PubMed

    Knight, Julie; Puet, Brandi L; DePriest, Anne; Heltsley, Rebecca; Hild, Cheryl; Black, David L; Robert, Timothy; Caplan, Yale H; Cone, Edward J

    2014-10-01

    Surveys of current trends indicate heroin abuse is associated with nonmedical use of pain relievers. Consequently, there is an interest in evaluating the presence of heroin-specific markers in chronic pain patients who are prescribed controlled substances. A total of 926,084 urine specimens from chronic pain patients were tested for heroin/diacetylmorphine (DAM), 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), 6-acetylcodeine (6AC), codeine (COD), and morphine (MOR). Heroin and markers were analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Opiates were analyzed following hydrolysis using LC-MS-MS. The prevalence of heroin use was 0.31%, as 2871 were positive for one or more heroin-specific markers including DAM, 6AM, or 6AC (a known contaminant of illicit heroin). Of these, 1884 were additionally tested for the following markers of illicit drug use: 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), methamphetamine (MAMP), 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetracannabinol (THCCOOH), and benzoylecgonine (BZE); 654 (34.7%) had positive findings for one or more of these analytes. The overall prevalence of heroin markers were as follows: DAM 1203 (41.9%), 6AM 2570 (89.5%), 6AC 1082 (37.7%). MOR was present in 2194 (76.4%) and absent (heroin-positive specimens. COD was present in 1218 (42.4%) specimens. Prevalence of combinations for specimens containing MOR were as follows: DAM only 13 (0.59%), 6AM only 1140 (52.0%), 6AC only 24 (1.1%), DAM/6AM/6AC 710 (32.4%), 6AM/6AC 188 (8.6%), DAM/6AM 113 (5.2%), DAM/6AC 6 (0.27%). Importantly, the prevalence of combinations for specimens without MOR were as follows: DAM only 161 (23.8%), 6AM only 217 (32.1%), 6AC only 92 (13.6%), DAM/6AM/6AC 50 (7.4%), 6AM/6AC 7 (1.0%), DAM/6AM 145 (21.4%), DAM/6AC 5 (0.74%). Unexpected patterns of excretion were observed, such as the presence of DAM and 6AC in the absence of 6AM and MOR; therefore, multiple heroin markers may be useful to assess for

  11. Intrathecal diamorphine (heroin) for obstetric analgesia.

    PubMed

    Sneyd, J R; Meyer-Witting, M

    1992-05-01

    Intrathecal diamorphine (heroin, diacetyl morphine) 2.5 mg in isotonic saline 2.5 ml was given to 13 patients in labour through a 26 gauge Quincke needle. Three patients were given epidural bupivacaine at a mean of 295 min after injection of diamorphine and a further 2 used 50% nitrous oxide during the second stage of labour. Eight patients needed no additional analgesia for labour although 1 received a pudendal nerve block for forceps delivery. No neonatal complications attributable to diamorphine were observed. There was a high incidence of post partum headache (6/13 cases). The use of a Sprotte needle and a fine spinal catheter might overcome the limitations of spinal headache and limited duration of action respectively.

  12. Bacillus cereus panophthalmitis after intravenous heroin.

    PubMed

    Hatem, G; Merritt, J C; Cowan, C L

    1979-03-01

    Two healthy young black men developed panophthalmitis after intravenous heroin injections. Bacillus cereus, considered to be a relatively noncommon pathogen for man, was found to be the causative agent as it was recovered from the anterior chamber and viterous cavity of both cases. The ocular findings were unilateral in each case, and neither patient had any sistemic involvement from the bacteremia. The onset of visual symptoms varied from 24 to 36 hours after the last intravenous injection with the eye becoming rapidly blind. Photographs of the early fundus lesions included preretinal hypopyon-like lesions and peculiar changes in the blood vasculature. Intracameral gentamicin and steroids did not alter the cause, and treatment was enucleation.

  13. Vapor Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews the fundamental physics of vapor bubbles in liquids. Work on bubble growth and condensation for stationary and translating bubbles is summarized and the differences with bubbles containing a permanent gas stressed. In particular, it is shown that the natural frequency of a vapor bubble is proportional not to the inverse radius, as for a gas bubble, but to the inverse radius raised to the power 2/3. Permanent gas dissolved in the liquid diffuses into the bubble with strong effects on its dynamics. The effects of the diffusion of heat and mass on the propagation of pressure waves in a vaporous bubbly liquid are discussed. Other topics briefly touched on include thermocapillary flow, plasmonic nanobubbles, and vapor bubbles in an immiscible liquid.

  14. DNA profiling from heroin street dose packages.

    PubMed

    Zamir, Ashira; Cohen, Yaron; Azoury, Myriam

    2007-03-01

    A large amount of heroin street doses are seized and examined for drug content by the Israel police. These are generally wrapped in heat-sealed plastic. Occasionally it is possible to visualize latent fingerprints on the plastic wrap itself, but the small size of the plastic item and the sealing process makes the success rate very low. In this study, the possibility of extracting and profiling DNA from the burnt edge of the plastic wrap was investigated. The idea was based on the assumption that epithelial cells might be trapped during the sealing process. The results show that there are sufficient quantities of DNA deposited at the "amorphic" burnt edges of sealed street doses for DNA profiling to be carried out. A controlled experiment using a known donor was performed. This subject carried out sealing of "street drug" packages and consequent DNA extractions were performed to show that known DNA profiles could be recovered from such packages, as a result of handling by the "packer." "Square-like" burnt edges did not yield DNA profiles, probably because of differences in the sealing process. It was also shown that DNA could be recovered from the plastic wrap itself and not only from the amorphic burnt edges. As heroin dealers and drug users are often involved in other crimes and run-ins with the law, the effective extraction and addition of their DNA profiles from such items of evidence to the newly established DNA database in Israel provides new avenues in the continued fight against crime and drug traffickers.

  15. Neuroelectrophysiological approaches in heroin addiction research: A review of literatures.

    PubMed

    Motlagh, Farid; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Menke, J Michael; Rashid, Rusdi; Seghatoleslam, Tahereh; Habil, Hussain

    2016-04-01

    Neuroelectrophysiological properties have been used in human heroin addiction studies. These studies vary in their approach, experimental conditions, paradigms, and outcomes. However, it is essential to integrate previous findings and experimental methods for a better demonstration of current issues and challenges in designing such studies. This Review examines methodologies and experimental conditions of neuroelectrophysiological research among heroin addicts during withdrawal, abstinence, and methadone maintenance treatment and presents the findings. The results show decrements in attentional processing and dysfunctions in brain response inhibition as well as brain activity abnormalities induced by chronic heroin abuse. Chronic heroin addiction causes increased β and α2 power activity, latency of P300 and P600, and diminished P300 and P600 amplitude. Findings confirm that electroencephalography (EEG) band power and coherence are associated with craving indices and heroin abuse history. First symptoms of withdrawal can be seen in high-frequency EEG bands, and the severity of these symptoms is associated with brain functional connectivity. EEG spectral changes and event-related potential (ERP) properties have been shown to be associated with abstinence length and tend to normalize within 3-6 months of abstinence. From the conflicting criteria and confounding effects in neuroelectrophysiological studies, the authors suggest a comprehensive longitudinal study with a multimethod approach for monitoring EEG and ERP attributes of heroin addicts from early stages of withdrawal until long-term abstinence to control the confounding effects, such as nicotine abuse and other comorbid and premorbid conditions.

  16. Inhalants. Specialized Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Do It Now Foundation, Phoenix, AZ.

    The document presents a collection of articles about inhalant abuse. Article 1 presents findings on the psychophysiological effects related to the use of amyl or butyl nitrate as a "recreational drug." Article 2 suggests a strong association between chronic sniffing of the solvent toulene and irreversible brain damage. Article 3 warns…

  17. The dopamine receptor antagonist levo-tetrahydropalmatine attenuates heroin self-administration and heroin-induced reinstatement in rats.

    PubMed

    Yue, Kai; Ma, Baomiao; Ru, Qin; Chen, Lin; Gan, Yongping; Wang, Daisong; Jin, Guozhang; Li, Chaoying

    2012-07-01

    Opiate addiction is a chronic recrudescent disorder characterized by a high rate of relapse. Levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP) is an alkaloid substance extracted from Corydalis and Stephania and is contained in a number of traditional Chinese herbal preparations. Compared to other dopamine receptor antagonists, l-THP has lower affinity for D2 receptors than for D1 receptors, and a recent study showed that l-THP also binds to D3 receptors, possibly functioning as an antagonist. The unique pharmacological profile of l-THP suggests that l-THP may be effective for the treatment of opiate addiction. In this study, we investigated the effects of l-THP on heroin self-administration and reinstatement triggered by a priming injection of heroin in abstinent rats trained to stably self-administer heroin under an extinction/reinstatement protocol, and found that l-THP (2.5 and 5 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased heroin self-administration on the fixed-ratio 1 schedule and dose-dependently (1.25, 2.5 and 5 mg/kg, i.p.) inhibited heroin-induced reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior. Importantly, l-THP (1.25 and 2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) did not affect locomotion, indicating that the observed effects of l-THP on reinstatement do not appear to be due to motor impairments. The present results demonstrated that dopamine receptor antagonist l-THP attenuates heroin self-administration and heroin-induced reinstatement.

  18. ZNF804A variants confer risk for heroin addiction and affect decision making and gray matter volume in heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Zhao, Li-Yan; Wang, Gui-Bin; Yue, Wei-Hua; He, Yong; Shu, Ni; Lin, Qi-Xiang; Wang, Fan; Li, Jia-Li; Chen, Na; Wang, Hui-Min; Kosten, Thomas R; Feng, Jia-Jia; Wang, Jun; Tang, Yu-De; Liu, Shu-Xue; Deng, Gui-Fa; Diao, Gan-Huan; Tan, Yun-Long; Han, Hong-Bin; Lin, Lu; Shi, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Drug addiction shares common neurobiological pathways and risk genes with other psychiatric diseases, including psychosis. One of the commonly identified risk genes associated with broad psychosis has been ZNF804A. We sought to test whether psychosis risk variants in ZNF804A increase the risk of heroin addiction by modulating neurocognitive performance and gray matter volume (GMV) in heroin addiction. Using case-control genetic analysis, we compared the distribution of ZNF804A variants (genotype and haplotype) in 1035 heroin abusers and 2887 healthy subjects. We also compared neurocognitive performance (impulsivity, global cognitive ability and decision-making ability) in 224 subjects and GMV in 154 subjects based on the ZNF804A variants. We found significant differences in the distribution of ZNF804A intronic variants (rs1344706 and rs7597593) allele and haplotype frequencies between the heroin and control groups. Decision-making impairment was worse in heroin abusers who carried the ZNF804A risk allele and haplotype. Subjects who carried more risk alleles and haplotypes of ZNF804A had greater GMV in the bilateral insular cortex, right temporal cortex and superior parietal cortex. The interaction between heroin addiction and ZNF804A variants affected GMV in the left sensorimotor cortex. Our findings revealed several ZNF804A variants that were significantly associated with the risk of heroin addiction, and these variants affected decision making and GMV in heroin abusers compared with controls. The precise neural mechanisms that underlie these associations are unknown, which requires future investigations of the effects of ZNF804A on both dopamine neurotransmission and the relative increases in the volume of various brain areas.

  19. The role of inhalant food allergens in occupational asthma.

    PubMed

    Cartier, André

    2010-09-01

    Workers handling food products and derivatives are at increased risk of developing occupational asthma. Exposure to food allergens occurs primarily through inhalation of dust, steam, vapors, and aerosolized proteins generated during cutting, scrubbing or cleaning, cooking or boiling, and drying activities. Suspicion of the diagnosis of occupational asthma should lead to proper investigation to confirm the diagnosis objectively. Most inhaled food allergy is IgE mediated, and skin prick tests or specific IgE tests are useful tools to support the diagnosis, but objective evidence of asthma by monitoring of peak expiratory flows at and off work or specific inhalation challenges offers a better diagnostic value. This article provides a list of the various foods, food additives, and contaminants that have been associated with occupational asthma.

  20. A comparison of blood toxicology of heroin-related deaths and current heroin users in Sydney, Australia.

    PubMed

    Darke, S; Sunjic, S; Zador, D; Prolov, T

    1997-07-25

    Blood toxicology results for deaths attributed to heroin overdose during 1995 in the South Western Sydney (SWS) region (n = 39) were compared with those of a sample of 100 current SWS heroin users who had injected within the preceding 24 h. Heroin-related deaths had a higher median concentration of morphine than current heroin users (0.35 versus 0.09 mg/l). However, there was substantial overlap between the blood morphine concentrations of the two groups, ranging from 0.08-1.45 mg/l. This range incorporated 90% of heroin-related deaths. A third of current users had morphine concentrations over twice the toxic blood morphine concentration employed by the analytical laboratories, and 7% had morphine levels higher than the median recorded for fatal cases. Alcohol was detected in 51% of fatal cases (median = 0.10 g/100 ml) compared with 1% of current heroin user. There was a significant negative correlation among fatal cases between blood morphine and blood alcohol concentrations (r2 = -0.41). There was no significant difference between groups in the proportions of subjects positive for blood benzodiazepines. The results raise questions about the mechanisms of death in what are termed overdoses, and about the role of alcohol in these fatalities.

  1. TEMPORAL MOISTURE CONTENT VARIABILITY BENEATH AND EXTERNAL TO A BUILDING AND THE POTENTIAL EFFECTS ON VAPOR INTRUSION RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migration of vapors from organic chemicals residing in the subsurface into overlying buildings is known as vapor intrusion. Because of the difficulty in evaluating vapor intrusion by indoor air sampling, models are often employed to determine if a potential indoor inhalation exp...

  2. Food hypersensitivity by inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Daniel A; Bahna, Sami L

    2009-01-01

    Though not widely recognized, food hypersensitivity by inhalation can cause major morbidity in affected individuals. The exposure is usually more obvious and often substantial in occupational environments but frequently occurs in non-occupational settings, such as homes, schools, restaurants, grocery stores, and commercial flights. The exposure can be trivial, as in mere smelling or being in the vicinity of the food. The clinical manifestations can vary from a benign respiratory or cutaneous reaction to a systemic one that can be life-threatening. In addition to strict avoidance, such highly-sensitive subjects should carry self-injectable epinephrine and wear MedicAlert® identification. Asthma is a strong predisposing factor and should be well-controlled. It is of great significance that food inhalation can cause de novo sensitization. PMID:19232116

  3. Treatment of Inhalation Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-21

    injuries not visible with endoscopy. . Thermal and especially chemical inhalation injuries. Direct damage to the surfactant is probably implicated. o...exists a set of indirect alveolar lesions, subordinated to the skin burn itself, which is common in patients with extensive burns. This we call the...normo or hypocapnia. Very likely, a 5th lesional level exists which is the capillary itself(Venus et al). By primary or secondary damage , it affects the

  4. Brain Hyperglycemia Induced by Heroin: Association with Metabolic Neural Activation.

    PubMed

    Solis, Ernesto; Bola, R Aaron; Fasulo, Bradley J; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2017-02-15

    Glucose enters the brain extracellular space from arterial blood, and its proper delivery is essential for metabolic activity of brain cells. By using enzyme-based biosensors coupled with high-speed amperometry in freely moving rats, we previously showed that glucose levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) display high variability, increasing rapidly following exposure to various arousing stimuli. In this study, the same technology was used to assess NAc glucose fluctuations induced by intravenous heroin. Heroin passively injected at a low dose optimal for maintaining self-administration behavior (100 μg/kg) induces a rapid but moderate glucose rise (∼150-200 μM or ∼15-25% over resting baseline). When the heroin dose was doubled and tripled, the increase became progressively larger in magnitude and longer in duration. Heroin-induced glucose increases also occurred in other brain structures (medial thalamus, lateral striatum, hippocampus), suggesting that brain hyperglycemia is a whole-brain phenomenon but changes were notably distinct in each structure. While local vasodilation appears to be the possible mechanism underlying the rapid rise in extracellular glucose levels, the driving factor for this vasodilation (central vs peripheral) remains to be clarified. The heroin-induced NAc glucose increases positively correlated with increases in intracerebral heat production determined in separate experiments using multisite temperature recordings (NAc, temporal muscle and skin). However, glucose levels rise very rapidly, preceding much slower increases in brain heat production, a measure of metabolic activation associated with glucose consumption.

  5. Postmortem sole incisions - a new sign of heroin overdose?

    PubMed

    Benomran, Fawzi

    2008-01-01

    Postmortem sole incisions have been observed in a number of heroin overdose fatalities. Acqueintance of those victims confessed to producing those incisions as a life saving procedure in a futile attempt to help the comatose overdose victim. They thought that bleeding the unconscious victim would remove the overdose, in manner similar to bloodletting or phlebotomy which is still popular in the Gulf region. The presence of such wounds has become a first indication or rather "sign" of heroin poisoning. In such cases, laboratory investigation confirmed the pathologist's preliminary suspicion. In Dubai, postmortem sole incisions are important sign of death from heroin overdose even in the absence of other classical signs. This sign becomes more credible when accompanied by other signs and/or circumstantial evidence suggestive of heroin use. It is suggested that this should be called "bloodletting sign" of death from heroin overdose. The sign should not be confused with the self-inflicted cuts seen on the arms and forearms of drug misusers which are caused for other reasons.

  6. Toxicological analysis in rats subjected to heroin and morphine overdose.

    PubMed

    Strandberg, Joakim J; Kugelberg, Fredrik C; Alkass, Kanar; Gustavsson, Anna; Zahlsen, Kolbjørn; Spigset, Olav; Druid, Henrik

    2006-09-30

    In heroin overdose deaths the blood morphine concentration varies substantially. To explore possible pharmacokinetic explanations for variable sensitivity to opiate toxicity we studied mortality and drug concentrations in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Groups of rats were injected intravenously (i.v.) with heroin, 21.5 mg/kg, or morphine, 223 mg/kg, causing a 60-80% mortality among drug-naïve rats. Additional groups of rats were pre-treated with morphine for 14 days, with or without 1 week of subsequent abstinence. Brain, lung and blood samples were analyzed for 6-acetylmorphine, morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide. i.v. morphine administration to drug-naïve rats resulted in both rapid and delayed deaths. The brain morphine concentration conformed to an exponential elimination curve in all samples, ruling out accumulation of morphine as an explanation for delayed deaths. This study found no support for formation of toxic concentration of morphine-6-glucuronide. Spontaneous death among both heroin and morphine rats occurred at fairly uniform brain morphine concentrations. Morphine pre-treatment significantly reduced mortality upon i.v. morphine injection, but the protective effect was less evident upon i.v. heroin challenge. The morphine pre-treatment still afforded some protection after 1 week of abstinence among rats receiving i.v. morphine, whereas rats given i.v. heroin showed similar death rate as drug-naïve rats.

  7. Cerebral blood flow effects of acute intravenous heroin administration.

    PubMed

    Kosel, Markus; Noss, Roger S; Hämmig, Robert; Wielepp, Peter; Bundeli, Petra; Heidbreder, Rebeca; Kinser, Jane A; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Fisch, Hans-Ulrich; Kayser, Sarah; Schlaepfer, Thomas E

    2008-04-01

    We examined acute effects of intravenous diacetylmorphine (heroin) administration - which induces a characteristic biphasic response: A short rush-sensation associated with intense pleasurable feelings followed by a subjectively different period of euphoria on cerebral blood flow. This was assessed in nine male heroin dependent patients participating in a heroin maintenance program in a setting resembling everyday pattern of heroin abuse. 99mTc-HMPAO was administered 45 s (rush) and 15 min (euphoria) after administration of i.v. heroin and 45 s after administration of saline (placebo). Plasma concentration of diacetylmorphine and its metabolites were measured with high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Compared to the euphoria condition, rush was associated with blood flow increase in the left posterior cerebellar lobe, left anterior cingulate gyrus and right precuneus. Our results are in line with recent reports indicating that the cerebellum is an important component in functional brain systems subserving sensory and motor integration, learning, modulation of affect, motivation and social behaviour, which all play important roles in reinforcing properties of opioids.

  8. The Developmental Outcome of Children Born to Heroin-Dependent Mothers, Raised at Home or Adopted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornoy, Asher; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Children born to heroin-dependent mothers (n=83) were compared to 76 children born to heroin-dependent fathers and to 3 control groups with and without environmental deprivation and health problems. Results found that developmental delays and behavioral disorders found among heroin-exposed children resulted primarily from severe environmental…

  9. The alpha1 adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin reduces heroin self-administration in rats with extended access to heroin administration.

    PubMed

    Greenwell, Thomas N; Walker, Brendan M; Cottone, Pietro; Zorrilla, Eric P; Koob, George F

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that noradrenergic antagonists alleviate some of the symptoms of opiate withdrawal and dependence. Clinical studies also have shown that modification of the noradrenergic system may help protect patients from relapse. The present study tested the hypothesis that a dysregulated noradrenergic system has motivational significance in heroin self-administration of dependent rats. Prazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic antagonist (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg, i.p.), was administered to adult male Wistar rats with a history of limited (1 h/day; short access) or extended (12 h/day; long access) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. Prazosin dose-dependently reduced heroin self-administration in long-access rats but not short-access rats, with 2 mg/kg of systemic prazosin significantly decreasing 1 h and 2 h heroin intake. Prazosin also reversed some changes in meal pattern associated with extended heroin access, including the taking of smaller and briefer meals (at 3 h), while also increasing total food intake and slowing the eating rate within meals (both 3 h and 12 h). Thus, prazosin appears to stimulate food intake in extended access rats by restoring meals to the normal size and duration. The data suggest that the alpha1 adrenergic system may contribute to mechanisms that promote dependence in rats with extended access.

  10. [Pulmonary edemas due to acute heroin poisoning].

    PubMed

    Francois, G; Faizende, J; Reboul, J

    1975-01-01

    Their frequency is estimated with difficulty, although on autopsy pulmonary edema is found almost routinely. It is a major complication of overdoses (48 p. 100 of severe intoxications). Their formation can be suspected, when after the first phase of respiratory depressions, with coma, myosis, and a variable latent period, a second attack of respiratory insufficiency occurs with tachypnea, and cyanosis. The chest X-ray shows diffuse alveolar infiltration, sparing the apices. The heart being generally of normal size. Rapid disappearance of this infiltrate (24 to 48 hours) enables the elimination of two diagnoses: pneumonia due to inhalation of gastric fluid, an infectious pneumonia. Their pathogenesis remains very debatable: - in the majority of cases abrupt L.V.F. can be eliminated: -on the other hand it could be an allergic accident of the anaphylactic type, or local liberation of histamine, or a local toxic action on the pulmonary capillaries; - hypoxia, secondary to respiratory depression, could lead to pulmonary edema, by the same mechanism as at altitude; - finally, owing to the central neurological disorders a neurogenic theory can be put forward. Their treatment is essentially a combination of Nalorphine with oxygen therapy (by mask, or if necessary by assisted, controlled ventilation) with prevention of inhalation of gastric fluid (gastric emptying) or curative treatment of possible aspiration by antibiotics, and cortico-steroids. Diuretics can be useful, as well as cardiotonics.

  11. Genome-Wide Association of Heroin Dependence in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Jonathan R. I.; Ducci, Francesca; Aliev, Fazil; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Liu, Xiehe; Ma, Xiaohong; Wang, Yingcheng; Collier, David A.; Asherson, Philip; Li, Tao; Breen, Gerome

    2016-01-01

    Drug addiction is a costly and recurring healthcare problem, necessitating a need to understand risk factors and mechanisms of addiction, and to identify new biomarkers. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for heroin addiction have been limited; moreover they have been restricted to examining samples of European and African-American origin due to difficulty of recruiting samples from other populations. This is the first study to test a Han Chinese population; we performed a GWAS on a homogeneous sample of 370 Han Chinese subjects diagnosed with heroin dependence using the DSM-IV criteria and 134 ethnically matched controls. Analysis using the diagnostic criteria of heroin dependence yielded suggestive evidence for association between variants in the genes CCDC42 (coiled coil domain 42; p = 2.8x10-7) and BRSK2 (BR serine/threonine 2; p = 4.110−6). In addition, we found evidence for risk variants within the ARHGEF10 (Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 10) gene on chromosome 8 and variants in a region on chromosome 20q13, which is gene-poor but has a concentration of mRNAs and predicted miRNAs. Gene-based association analysis identified genome-wide significant association between variants in CCDC42 and heroin addiction. Additionally, when we investigated shared risk variants between heroin addiction and risk of other addiction-related and psychiatric phenotypes using polygenic risk scores, we found a suggestive relationship with variants predicting tobacco addiction, and a significant relationship with variants predicting schizophrenia. Our genome wide association study of heroin dependence provides data in a novel sample, with functionally plausible results and evidence of genetic data of value to the field. PMID:27936112

  12. Psychiatric morbidity among cocaine and heroin users in the community.

    PubMed

    Tortajada, Silvia; Herrero, Ma Jesús; Domingo-Salvany, Antònia; Molist, Gemma; Barrio, Gregorio; de la Fuente, Luís; Brugal, Ma Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Drug abuse is a serious public health problem. Moreover, co-occurring mental health and substance abuse disorders are common among drug users. This paper examines psychiatric disorders of young cocaine and heroin users using the World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI). A cohort of 1266 young (18-30 years) current regular cocaine (705) and heroin (561) users were recruited outside the health services in Barcelona, Madrid and Seville, Spain. The WMH-CIDI was used to evaluate mental disorders; the Severity of Dependence Scale (SDS) measured the degree of dependence; and the Duke-UNC Functional Social Support Questionnaire (FSSQ) assessed social support, in a crosssectional study design. About 43% was diagnosed with a lifetime mental disorder. The most common diagnoses were depression (37.5%) and specific phobia (6.8%). During the last 12 months, prevalence rates were also slightly higher in heroin group (26.4%) than in cocaine cohort (21.7%). Every day cocaine consumption, having unstable living conditions and low social support were variables highly associated with psychiatric morbidity in cocaine cohort. In heroin cohort, earning money through illegal activities was associated with psychiatric morbidity, while the moderate use of alcohol acted as a protective factor for mental pathology. Morbidity was associated to having received psychiatric/psychological treatment during the last 12 months in both cohorts. This study has shown a relatively high prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in cocaine and heroin users recruited in non-clinical settings. Future studies examining differences between cocaine and heroin patterns of consumption associated with mental diseases are necessary.

  13. Intravenous buprenorphine self-administration by detoxified heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Comer, Sandra D; Collins, Eric D; Fischman, Marian W

    2002-04-01

    Several sources indicate that intravenously administered buprenorphine may have significant abuse liability in humans. The present study evaluated the reinforcing effects of intravenously administered buprenorphine (0, 2, and 8 mg) in detoxified heroin-dependent participants during a 7.5-week inpatient study. Participants (n = 6) were detoxified from heroin over a 1.5-week period immediately after admission. Testing subsequently occurred in three 2-week blocks. During the first week of each 2-week block, the reinforcing effects of buprenorphine were evaluated. Participants first received a dose of buprenorphine and $20 and then were given either the opportunity to self-administer the dose or $20 during choice sessions. During the second week of each 2-week block, the direct effects of heroin were measured to evaluate potential long-lasting antagonist effects of buprenorphine. Progressive ratio break-point values were significantly higher after 2 and 8 mg of buprenorphine compared with placebo. Correspondingly, several positive subjective ratings increased after administration of active buprenorphine relative to placebo. Although there were few differences in peak effects produced by 2 versus 8 mg of buprenorphine, the higher buprenorphine dose generally produced longer-lasting effects. Heroin also produced dose-related increases in several subjective effects. Peak ratings produced by heroin were generally higher than peak ratings produced by buprenorphine. There was little evidence of residual antagonism produced by buprenorphine. These results demonstrate that buprenorphine served as a reinforcer under these conditions, and that it may have abuse liability in nonopioid-dependent individuals who abuse heroin.

  14. How to Use Metered-Dose Inhalers

    MedlinePlus

    ... inhaler the right way so that the full dose of medication reaches your lungs. You can use ... inhaler.These directions explain how to use metered-dose inhalers. If you are using a different type ...

  15. Injectional anthrax in a heroin skin-popper.

    PubMed

    Ringertz, S H; Høiby, E A; Jensenius, M; Maehlen, J; Caugant, D A; Myklebust, A; Fossum, K

    2000-11-04

    Anthrax is rare in western Europe but may arise sporadically in people exposed to animal products from endemic areas. A heroin-injecting drug user presented with a severe soft-tissue infection at the injection site, septic shock, and meningitis. A gram-positive endospore-forming aerobic rod was isolated from the soft tissue and cerebrospinal fluid; confirmation of Bacillus anthracis was made by PCR. Since contaminated heroin was the probable source of infection, this case is of concern and warrants surveillance.

  16. Analysis of Cocaine, Heroin, and their Metabolites in Saliva

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-10

    from a study of the metabolism of radiolabeled cocaine.6 Later, cocaine was found in the saliva of impaired drivers.7 Most studies show similar...reported.9,10 The latter was a controlled study examined the metabolism of heroin in plasma and saliva. This study followed the metabolism of heroin by...in Table 1. Table 1 - HPLC Conditions Column: Alltech/Applied Science Econosphere C8, 250 x 4.6 mm Solvent A: 0.1M Ammonium Acetate Solvent B: 10:90

  17. Noscapine as an adulterant in illicit heroin samples.

    PubMed

    Klemenc, S

    2000-01-24

    In this short report the evidence is given (based on the analyses of 22 case samples) that noscapine can be used as an adulterant in illicit heroin samples. In this context, the appearance of illicit heroin samples characterised by a high noscapine content (up to 61%) and a high noscapine/whole morphine ratio (up to 3.5) is highlighted. All samples discussed in the paper (132) were seized in Slovenia, in the period from 1997 to 1999 and were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  18. Options to Distinguish Heroin and Poppy Seed Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-28

    drug deterrence program were raised from 300 ng/ml to 4000 ng/ml for morphine and 2000 ng/ml for codeine in an attempt to distinguish between poppy seed ...Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5000 NRL Memorandum Report 6512 Options to Distinguish Heroin and Poppy Seed Use r- I- FCTE DAVID...Options to Distinguish Heroin and Poppy Seed Use 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Kidwell. D.A. 13a TYPE OF REPORT 113b TIME COVERED 14 DATE OF REPORT (Year

  19. Brugada phenocopy in concomitant ethanol and heroin overdose.

    PubMed

    Rambod, Mehdi; Elhanafi, Sherif; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2015-01-01

    Brugada phenocopy describes conditions with Brugada-like ECG pattern but without true congenital Brugada syndrome. We report a case of 44-year-old man with no known medical history who presented with loss of consciousness. Toxicology screening was positive for opiates and high serum alcohol level. His initial ECG showed Brugada type 1 pattern which resolved after several hours of observation and treatment with continuous naloxone infusion. Patient regained his consciousness and disclosed heroin abuse and drinking alcohol. This case highlights the heroin overdose as a possible cause of Brugada phenocopy.

  20. Health effects of inhaled gasoline engine emissions.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Jacob D; Reed, Matthew D; Campen, Matthew J; Barrett, Edward G; Seagrave, JeanClare; Mauderly, Joe L

    2007-01-01

    Despite their prevalence in the environment, and the myriad studies that have shown associations between morbidity or mortality with proximity to roadways (proxy for motor vehicle exposures), relatively little is known about the toxicity of gasoline engine emissions (GEE). We review the studies conducted on GEE to date, and summarize the findings from each of these studies. While there have been several studies, most of the studies were conducted prior to 1980 and thus were not conducted with contemporary engines, fuels, and driving cycles. In addition, many of the biological assays conducted during those studies did not include many of the assays that are conducted on contemporary inhalation exposures to air pollutants, including cardiovascular responses and others. None of the exposures from these earlier studies were characterized at the level of detail that would be considered adequate today. A recent GEE study was conducted as part of the National Environmental Respiratory Center (www.nercenter.org). In this study several in-use mid-mileage General Motors (Chevrolet S-10) vehicles were purchased and utilized for inhalation exposures. An exposure protocol was developed where engines were operated with a repeating California Unified Driving Cycle with one cold start per day. Two separate engines were used to provide two cold starts over a 6-h inhalation period. The exposure atmospheres were characterized in detail, including detailed chemical and physical analysis of the gas, vapor, and particle phase. Multiple rodent biological models were studied, including general toxicity and inflammation (e.g., serum chemistry, lung lavage cell counts/differentials, cytokine/chemokine analysis, histopathology), asthma (adult and in utero exposures with pulmonary function and biochemical analysis), cardiovascular effects (biochemical and electrocardiograph changes in susceptible rodent models), and susceptibility to infection (Pseudomonas bacteria challenge). GEE resulted in

  1. Inhalation exposure of animals.

    PubMed Central

    Phalen, R F

    1976-01-01

    Relative advantages and disadvantages and important design criteria for various exposure methods are presented. Five types of exposures are discussed: whole-body chambers, head-only exposures, nose or mouth-only methods, lung-only exposures, and partial-lung exposures. Design considerations covered include: air cleaning and conditioning; construction materials; losses of exposure materials; evenness of exposure; sampling biases; animal observation and care; noise and vibration control, safe exhausts, chamber loading, reliability, pressure fluctuations; neck seals, masks, animal restraint methods; and animal comfort. Ethical considerations in use of animals in inhalation experiments are also discussed. PMID:1017420

  2. Accelerated transition to injection among male heroin initiates in Hanoi, Vietnam: implications for early harm reduction interventions.

    PubMed

    Clatts, Michael C; Goldsamt, Lloyd A; Giang, Le Minh; Colón-López, Vivian

    2011-12-01

    This paper examines changes in the interval between first heroin smoking and onset of injection in a large, out-treatment sample of male heroin users in Hanoi, Vietnam (n = 1,115). Mean age at initiation of heroin use (smoking) was 18.4 and mean age of onset of heroin injection was 20.9 years. Full multivariate analysis indicates that the interval between first heroin use (smoking) and first heroin injection has been significantly attenuated among more recent heroin initiates (P = 0.0043), suggesting that heroin users in Vietnam may be at increased risk for exposure to HIV relatively soon after onset of heroin use, highlighting the need for behavioral interventions that target heroin smokers. Critical intervention goals include delaying the onset of injection and improved education about safer drug sharing and drug injection practices.

  3. Heroin epidemics, treatment and ODE modelling.

    PubMed

    White, Emma; Comiskey, Catherine

    2007-07-01

    The UN [United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC): World Drug Report, 2005, vol. 1: Analysis. UNODC, 2005.], EU [European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA): Annual Report, 2005.http://annualreport.emcdda.eu.int/en/home-en.html.] and WHO [World Health Organisation (WHO): Biregional Strategy for Harm Reduction, 2005-2009. HIV and Injecting Drug Use. WHO, 2005.] have consistently highlighted in recent years the ongoing and persistent nature of opiate and particularly heroin use on a global scale. While this is a global phenomenon, authors have emphasised the significant impact such an epidemic has on individual lives and on society. National prevalence studies have indicated the scale of the problem, but the drug-using career, typically consisting of initiation, habitual use, a treatment-relapse cycle and eventual recovery, is not well understood. This paper presents one of the first ODE models of opiate addiction, based on the principles of mathematical epidemiology. The aim of this model is to identify parameters of interest for further study, with a view to informing and assisting policy-makers in targeting prevention and treatment resources for maximum effectiveness. An epidemic threshold value, R(0), is proposed for the drug-using career. Sensitivity analysis is performed on R(0) and it is then used to examine the stability of the system. A condition under which a backward bifurcation may exist is found, as are conditions that permit the existence of one or more endemic equilibria. A key result arising from this model is that prevention is indeed better than cure.

  4. Comparison of striatal dopamine transporter levels in chronic heroin-dependent and methamphetamine-dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jie; Liu, Xing Dang; Han, Mei; Lv, Rong Bin; Wang, Yuan Kai; Zhang, Guang Ming; Li, Yu

    2017-01-01

    To compare the effects of heroin and methamphetamine (METH) addiction on dopamine transporters (DATs) in the same dose and duration, we assessed DAT levels in the striatum by (99m) Tc-TRODAT-1 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain images in people with heroin and METH dependence. We recruited 21 healthy human controls, 23 heroin-dependent subjects and 25 METH abusers. The heroin- and METH-dependent subjects exhibited negative urine toxicology after undergoing physiological detoxification. All subjects underwent SPECT brain imaging, and specific tracer uptake ratios (SURs) were assessed bilaterally in the regions of interest. A significant SUR reduction in heroin-dependent subjects and METH-dependent subjects compared with healthy controls was found in the left striatum, right striatum, left caudate nucleus, right caudate nucleus, left putamen and right putamen. There were no significant differences in the heroin group and METH group for the left striatum, right striatum, left caudate nucleus, right caudate nucleus, left putamen and right putamen. The scores of craving, HAMA (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale), in heroin abusers were lower than in the METH abusers. Our results show that people with heroin and METH dependence who are currently abstinent had lower DAT levels in the striatum than healthy controls. There were no differences in striatal DAT in heroin and METH users. These results suggest that chronic heroin and METH abuse appears to produce similar effects in striatal DAT in humans. METH users may have more serious craving and anxiety symptoms than heroin users with prolonged abstinence.

  5. Pupil responses to intravenous heroin (diamorphine) in dependent and non-dependent humans.

    PubMed

    Tress, K H; El-Sobky, A A

    1979-02-01

    1. Intravenous heroin was administered to volunteers, in doses of 2.5 and 5 mg to non-dependent subjects and does of 1/6, 1/3 and 1/2 of their prescribed daily does of opiates to dependent subjects, and pupillary responses measured before and three times during the 2 h after injection. 2. Tolerance to the miotic effects of heroin in the dependent subjects was demonstrated--larger doses of heroin were needed to produce the same pupil response in dependent subjects than in non-dependent subjects and the duration of action was shorter in the former group. 3. The effect of concurrent oral methadone medication on pupil response to heroin was demonstrated. Subjects prescribed both methadone and heroin showed smaller control pupil diameters and a reduced dose effect to heroin than did subjects prescribed heroin alone.

  6. Neurobehavioral evaluations of rats gestationally exposed to gasoline vapors

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the US fuel supply is moving towards blends with higher ethanol levels, there are questions regarding effects of these fuel vapors in the developing fetus. As part of a project evaluating gasoline-ethanol blends of different proportions. we included an evaluation of inhaled pu...

  7. Inhalation delivery of protein therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kane, Colleen; O'Neil, Karyn; Conk, Michelle; Picha, Kristen

    2013-04-01

    Inhaled therapeutics are used routinely to treat a variety of pulmonary diseases including asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis. In addition, biological therapies represent the fastest growing segment of approved pharmaceuticals. However, despite the increased availability of biological therapies, nearly all inhaled therapeutics are small molecule drugs with only a single inhaled protein therapeutic approved. There remains a significant unmet need for therapeutics in pulmonary diseases, and biological therapies with potential to alter disease progression represent a significant opportunity to treat these challenging diseases. This review provides a background into efforts to develop inhaled biological therapies and highlights some of the associated challenges. In addition, we speculate on the ideal properties of a biologic therapy for inhaled delivery.

  8. The therapeutic use of heroin: a review of the pharmacological literature.

    PubMed

    Sawynok, J

    1986-01-01

    Heroin is currently being advocated by some as a superior therapeutic agent for use in terminal illness. However, a review of the literature on heroin presently available does not support this contention. Administered orally, heroin is approximately 1.5 times more potent than morphine in controlling chronic pain in terminal cancer patients. Its effects on mood and the incidence and nature of side effects do not differ from those of morphine except in males where poorer pain control probably accounts for the worse effect on mood. Given parenterally for acute pain, heroin is 2-4 times more potent than morphine and faster in onset of action. When the potency difference is accounted for, the pharmacological effects of heroin do not differ appreciably from those of morphine. Heroin is metabolized to 6-acetylmorphine and morphine. After oral administration of heroin, morphine but not heroin or 6-acetylmorphine is detected in blood. In this case, heroin is a prodrug for the delivery of systemic morphine. Following acute i.v. administration, heroin appears transiently in blood with a half-life of about 3 min. The half-life of heroin exposed to blood or serum in vitro is 9-22 min, indicating that organ metabolism is involved in blood clearance as well. Direct renal clearance of heroin is less than 1% of the administered dose. In animal studies, heroin and 6-acetylmorphine are both more potent and faster acting than morphine as analgesics, effects attributed to their greater lipid solubility and subsequent penetration of the blood-brain barrier. Given centrally, morphine is more potent than heroin and 6-acetylmorphine in producing analgesia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Neurophysiological Assessment of Auditory, Peripheral Nerve, Somatosensory, and Visual System Functions after Developmental Exposure to Ethanol Vapors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol-blended gasoline entered the market in response to demand for domestic renewable energy sources, and may result in increased inhalation of ethanol vapors in combination with other volatile gasoline constituents. It is important to understand potential risks of inhalation ...

  10. Inhalation Exposure Systems for the Development of Rodent Models of Sulfur Mustard-Induced Pulmonary Injury

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Waylon M.; Kracko, Dean A.; Lehman, Mericka R.; Irvin, Clinton M.; Blair, Lee F.; White, Richard K.; Benson, Janet M.; Grotendorst, Gary R.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; McDonald, Jacob D.

    2011-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical threat agent for which its effects have no current treatment. Due to the ease of synthesis and dispersal of this material, the need to develop therapeutics is evident. The present manuscript details the techniques used to develop SM laboratory exposure systems for the development of animal models of pulmonary injury. These models are critical for evaluating SM injury and developing therapeutics against that injury. Iterative trials were conducted to optimize a lung injury model. The resulting pathology was used as a guide, with a goal of effecting homogeneous and diffuse lung injury comparable to that of human injury. Inhalation exposures were conducted by either nose-only inhalation or intubated inhalation. The exposures were conducted to either directly vaporized SM or SM that was nebulized from an ethanol solution. Inhalation of SM by nose-only inhalation resulted in severe nasal epithelial degeneration and minimal lung injury. The reactivity of SM did not permit it to transit past the upper airways to promote lower airway injury. Intratracheal inhalation of SM vapors at a concentration of 5400 mg · min/m3 resulted in homogeneous lung injury with no nasal degeneration. PMID:20025432

  11. Time course of pharmacokinetic and hormonal effects of inhaled high-dose salvinorin A in humans

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew W.; MacLean, Katherine A.; Caspers, Michael J.; Prisinzano, Thomas E.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2017-01-01

    Salvinorin A is a kappa opioid agonist and the principal psychoactive constituent of the Salvia divinorum plant, which has been used for hallucinogenic effects. Previous research on salvinorin A pharmacokinetics likely underestimated plasma levels typically resulting from the doses administered due to inefficient vaporization and not collecting samples during peak drug effects. Six healthy adults inhaled a single high dose of vaporized salvinorin A (n=4, 21 mcg/kg; n=2, 18 mcg/kg). Participant- and monitor-rated effects were assessed every 2 min for 60 min post-inhalation. Blood samples were collected at 13 time points up to 90 min post-inhalation. Drug levels peaked at 2 min and then rapidly decreased. Drug levels were significantly, positively correlated with participant and monitor drug effect ratings. Significant elevations in prolactin were observed beginning 5 min post-inhalation and peaking at 15 min post-inhalation. Cortisol showed inconsistent increases across participants. Hormonal responses were not well correlated with drug levels. This is the first study to demonstrate a direct relationship between changes in plasma levels of salvinorin A and drug effects in humans. The results confirm the efficacy of an inhalation technique for salvinorin A. PMID:26880225

  12. Time course of pharmacokinetic and hormonal effects of inhaled high-dose salvinorin A in humans.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew W; MacLean, Katherine A; Caspers, Michael J; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Griffiths, Roland R

    2016-04-01

    Salvinorin A is a kappa opioid agonist and the principal psychoactive constituent of the Salvia divinorum plant, which has been used for hallucinogenic effects. Previous research on salvinorin A pharmacokinetics likely underestimated plasma levels typically resulting from the doses administered due to inefficient vaporization and not collecting samples during peak drug effects. Six healthy adults inhaled a single high dose of vaporized salvinorin A (n = 4, 21 mcg/kg; n = 2, 18 mcg/kg). Participant- and monitor-rated effects were assessed every 2 min for 60 min post-inhalation. Blood samples were collected at 13 time points up to 90 min post-inhalation. Drug levels peaked at 2 min and then rapidly decreased. Drug levels were significantly, positively correlated with participant and monitor drug effect ratings. Significant elevations in prolactin were observed beginning 5 min post-inhalation and peaking at 15 min post-inhalation. Cortisol showed inconsistent increases across participants. Hormonal responses were not well correlated with drug levels. This is the first study to demonstrate a direct relationship between changes in plasma levels of salvinorin A and drug effects in humans. The results confirm the efficacy of an inhalation technique for salvinorin A.

  13. Inhalation exposure systems for the development of rodent models of sulfur mustard-induced pulmonary injury.

    PubMed

    Weber, Waylon M; Kracko, Dean A; Lehman, Mericka R; Irvin, Clinton M; Blair, Lee F; White, Richard K; Benson, Janet M; Grotendorst, Gary R; Cheng, Yung-Sung; McDonald, Jacob D

    2010-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical threat agent for which its effects have no current treatment. Due to the ease of synthesis and dispersal of this material, the need to develop therapeutics is evident. The present manuscript details the techniques used to develop SM laboratory exposure systems for the development of animal models of pulmonary injury. These models are critical for evaluating SM injury and developing therapeutics against that injury. Iterative trials were conducted to optimize a lung injury model. The resulting pathology was used as a guide, with a goal of effecting homogeneous and diffuse lung injury comparable to that of human injury. Inhalation exposures were conducted by either nose-only inhalation or intubated inhalation. The exposures were conducted to either directly vaporized SM or SM that was nebulized from an ethanol solution. Inhalation of SM by nose-only inhalation resulted in severe nasal epithelial degeneration and minimal lung injury. The reactivity of SM did not permit it to transit past the upper airways to promote lower airway injury. Intratracheal inhalation of SM vapors at a concentration of 5400 mg x min/m(3) resulted in homogeneous lung injury with no nasal degeneration.

  14. Youth, Heroin, Crack: A Review of Recent British Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seddon, Toby

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review the research evidence on recent British trends in the use of heroin and/or crack-cocaine by young people in order to appraise the scale and nature of the contemporary health problem they pose. Design/methodology/approach: The approach consists of a narrative review of the main current data sources on…

  15. Heroin Addiction: Psychosocial Characteristics and Considerations for Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faherty, John K.

    This paper presents a review of relevant medical and psychological literature that addresses the psychological characteristics of heroin addiction and addicts: dependence (both physical and psychological); explanations of the phenomenon of addiction (both medical and behavioral); and other psychosocial views of causation including escapism,…

  16. Neurotransmitter-precursor-supplement intervention for detoxified heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dingyan; Liu, Yan; He, Wulong; Wang, Hongxing; Wang, Zengzhen

    2012-06-01

    This study examined the effects of combined administration of tyrosine, lecithin, L-glutamine and L-5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) on heroin withdrawal syndromes and mental symptoms in detoxified heroin addicts. In the cluster-randomized placebo-controlled trial, 83 detoxified heroin addicts were recruited from a detoxification treatment center in Wuhan, China. Patients in the intervention group (n=41) were given the combined treatment with tyrosine, lecithin, L-glutamine and 5-HTP and those in the control group (n=42) were administered the placebo. The sleep status and the withdrawal symptoms were observed daily throughout the study, and the mood states were monitored pre- and post-intervention. The results showed that the insomnia and withdrawal scores were significantly improved over time in participants in the intervention group as compared with those in the control group. A greater reduction in tension-anxiety, depression-dejection, anger-hostility, fatigue-inertia and total mood disturbance, and a greater increase in their vigor-activity symptoms were found at day 6 in the intervention group than in the control group (all P<0.05). It was concluded that the neurotransmitter-precursor-supplement intervention is effective in alleviating the withdrawal and mood symptoms and it may become a supplementary method for patients' recovery from heroin addiction.

  17. [Non-infective neurologic complications associated to heroin use].

    PubMed

    Pascual Calvet, J; Pou, A; Pedro-Botet, J; Gutiérrez Cebollada, J

    1989-01-01

    The spectrum of neurological complications associated with heroin addiction has changed in the past six years because of the progressive knowledge of the neurological complications related to HIV infection. We reviewed 48 heroin addicts with neurological complications and 452 heroin overdose who were seen in the Emergency Unit of our hospital during 1988 and the publications since 1967. Regarding the overdose we present the results of a prospective study leading to determine the causes. We emphasize the relationship with the level of total morphine in serum, instead of conjugate morphine, and with the presence of high levels of benzodiazepines found in the plasma rather than an hypothetic hypersensitivity phenomenon. We resume the neurological complications related with heroin addiction: spongiform leukoencephalopathy, epileptic seizures, stroke, transverse myelopathy and neuromuscular complications such mononeuropathy, plexopathy, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, rhabdomyolysis, fibrosing myopathy, musculoskeletal syndrome and acute bacterial myopathy. Some of such complications (i.e. transverse myelitis, polyradiculoneuropathy, leucoencephalopathy) must rise the suspicion of an HIV infection. Likewise, in patients assisted for overdosage we believe it's necessary rule out myoglobinuria by means of CPK serum levels and detection of urine hematic pigments without red blood cels in the urine sediment, in order to prevent and treat the renal failure. We report the results of muscular biopsy found in the musculoskeletal syndrome, which are similar to those found in alcoholic myopathy. Finally, we describe the clinical and diagnostic aspects in an unusually neuromuscular complication: the acute bacterial myopathy.

  18. Risk Factors for Attempting Suicide in Heroin Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Alec

    2010-01-01

    In order to examine risk factors for attempting suicide in heroin dependent patients, a group of 527 abstinent opiate dependent patients had a psychiatric interview and completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Patients who had or had never attempted suicide were compared on putative suicide risk factors. It was found that 207 of the 527…

  19. The Cognitive Structure Underlying Heroin-Injecting Behaviour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnigan, Frances

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the identification of critical elements that will induce and maintain behavior change in drug education. Demonstrates how the Theory of Reasoned Action can be used to identify these elements. Data were gathered from a sample of heroin injectors and the cognitive structures underlying drug use were investigated. Discusses findings with…

  20. Inapparent pulmonary vascular disease in an ex-heroin user

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli Incalzi, R.; Ludovico Maini, C.; Giuliano Bonetti, M.; Campioni, P.; Pistelli, R.; Fuso, L.

    1986-04-01

    A severe pulmonary vascular derangement, usually reported in drug addicts, was diagnosed in a 28-year-old asymptomatic ex-heroin user by means of fortuitously performed pulmonary perfusion imaging. Neither physical findings nor pulmonary function tests, aroused suspicion of the diagnosis. A search for asymptomatic pulmonary vascular disease probably should be undertaken in drug addicts.

  1. Implosive Therapy Treatment of Heroin Addicts during Methadone Detoxification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirt, Michael; Greenfield, Heywood

    1979-01-01

    Examined effectiveness of implosive therapy with heroin addicts during detoxification from methadone. Treatment groups received 12 sessions of implosive therapy or eclectic counseling and were followed for a six-week period. The implosive therapy group were the only ones to significantly reduce their methadone level during treatment and follow-up.…

  2. Tracking Heroin Chic: The Abject Body Reconfigures the Rational Argument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harold, Christine L.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how a recent fashion trend known as "heroin chic" challenges conventional modes of argumentation. Considers how its popularization of abject, emaciated bodies presents an alternative to a logic of rationalism that grounds traditional argumentation. Discusses how by foregrounding corporeal performativity as a form of argument,…

  3. Opioid Abstinence Reinforcement Delays Heroin Lapse during Buprenorphine Dose Tapering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwald, Mark K.

    2008-01-01

    A positive reinforcement contingency increased opioid abstinence during outpatient dose tapering (4, 2, then 0 mg/day during Weeks 1 through 3) in non-treatment-seeking heroin-dependent volunteers who had been maintained on buprenorphine (8 mg/day) during an inpatient research protocol. The control group (n = 12) received $4.00 for completing…

  4. GABRB2 Haplotype Association with Heroin Dependence in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yung Su; Yang, Mei; Mat, Wai-Kin; Tsang, Shui-Ying; Su, Zhonghua; Jiang, Xianfei; Ng, Siu-Kin; Liu, Siyu; Hu, Taobo; Pun, Frank; Liao, Yanhui; Tang, Jinsong; Chen, Xiaogang; Hao, Wei; Xue, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Substance dependence is a frequently observed comorbid disorder in schizophrenia, but little is known about genetic factors possibly shared between the two psychotic disorders. GABRB2, a schizophrenia candidate gene coding for GABAA receptor β2 subunit, is examined for possible association with heroin dependence in Han Chinese population. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GABRB2, namely rs6556547 (S1), rs1816071 (S3), rs18016072 (S5), and rs187269 (S29), previously associated with schizophrenia, were examined for their association with heroin dependence. Two additional SNPs, rs10051667 (S31) and rs967771 (S32), previously associated with alcohol dependence and bipolar disorder respectively, were also analyzed. The six SNPs were genotyped by direct sequencing of PCR amplicons of target regions for 564 heroin dependent individuals and 498 controls of Han Chinese origin. Interestingly, it was found that recombination between the haplotypes of all-derived-allele (H1; OR = 1.00) and all-ancestral-allele (H2; OR = 0.74) at S5-S29 junction generated two recombinants H3 (OR = 8.51) and H4 (OR = 5.58), both conferring high susceptibility to heroin dependence. Additional recombination between H2 and H3 haplotypes at S1-S3 junction resulted in a risk-conferring haplotype H5 (OR = 1.94x109). In contrast, recombination between H1 and H2 haplotypes at S3-S5 junction rescued the risk-conferring effect of recombination at S5-S29 junction, giving rise to the protective haplotype H6 (OR = 0.68). Risk-conferring effects of S1-S3 and S5-S29 crossovers and protective effects of S3-S5 crossover were seen in both pure heroin dependent and multiple substance dependence subgroups. In conclusion, significant association was found with haplotypes of the S1-S29 segment in GABRB2 for heroin dependence in Han Chinese population. Local recombination was an important determining factor for switching haplotypes between risk-conferring and protective statuses. The present study

  5. Exubera. Inhale therapeutic systems.

    PubMed

    Bindra, Sanjit; Cefalu, William T

    2002-05-01

    Inhale, in colaboration with Pfizer and Aventis Pharma (formerly Hoechst Marion Roussel; HMR), is developing an insulin formulation utilizing its pulmonary delivery technology for macromolecules for the potential treatment of type I and II diabetes. By July 2001, the phase III program had been completed and the companies had begun to assemble data for MAA and NDA filings; however, it was already clear at this time that additional data might be required for filing. By December 2001, it had been decided that the NDA should include an increased level of controlled, long-term pulmonary safety data in diabetic patients and a major study was planned to be completed in 2002, with the NDA filed thereafter (during 2002). US-05997848 was issued to Inhale Therapeutic Systems in December 1999, and corresponds to WO-09524183, filed in February 1995. Equivalent applications have appeared to date in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Europe, Finland, Hungary, Japan, Norway, New Zealand, Poland and South Africa. This family of applications is specific to pulmonary delivery of insulin. In February 1999, Lehman Brothers gave this inhaled insulin a 60% probability of reaching market, with a possible launch date of 2001. The analysts estimated peak sales at $3 billion in 2011. In May 2000, Aventis predicted that estimated peak sales would be in excess of $1 billion. In February 2000, Merrill Lynch expected product launch in 2002 and predicted that it would be a multibillion-dollar product. Analysts Merril Lynch predicted, in September and November 2000, that the product would be launched by 2002, with sales in that year of e75 million, rising to euro 500 million in 2004. In April 2001, Merrill Lynch predicted that filing for this drug would occur in 2001. Following the report of the potential delay in regulatory filing, issued in July 2001, Deutsche Banc Alex Brown predicted a filing would take place in the fourth quarter of 2002 and launch would take place in the first

  6. Increased locomotor activity induced by heroin in mice: pharmacokinetic demonstration of heroin acting as a prodrug for the mediator 6-monoacetylmorphine in vivo.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jannike Mørch; Ripel, Ase; Boix, Fernando; Normann, Per Trygve; Mørland, Jørg

    2009-10-01

    We investigated the relative importance of heroin and its metabolites in eliciting a behavioral response in mice by studying the relationship between concentrations of heroin, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6MAM), and morphine in brain tissue and the effects on locomotor activity. Low doses (subcutaneous) of heroin (< or =5 micromol/kg) or 6MAM (< or =15 micromol/kg) made the mice run significantly more than mice given equimolar doses of morphine. There were no differences in the response between heroin and 6MAM, although we observed a shift to the left of the dose-response curve for the maximal response of heroin. The behavioral responses were abolished by pretreatment with 1 mg/kg naltrexone. Heroin was detected in brain tissue after injection, but the levels were low and its presence too short-lived to be responsible for the behavioral response observed. The concentration of 6MAM in brain tissue increased shortly after administration of both heroin and 6MAM and the concentration changes during the first hour roughly reflected the changes in locomotor activity. Both the maximal and the total concentration of 6MAM were higher after administration of heroin than after administration of 6MAM itself. The morphine concentration increased slowly after injection and could not explain the immediate behavioral response. In summary, the locomotor activity response after injection of heroin was mediated by 6MAM, which increased shortly after administration. Heroin acted as an effective prodrug. The concentration of morphine was too low to stimulate the immediate response observed but might have an effect on the later part of the heroin-induced behavioral response curve.

  7. Suppression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by acute heroin challenge in rats during acute and chronic withdrawal from chronic heroin administration

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Leri, Francesco; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    It is known that heroin dependence and withdrawal are associated with changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The objective of these studies in rats was to systematically investigate the level of HPA activity and response to a heroin challenge at two time points during heroin withdrawal, and to characterize the expression of associated stress-related genes 30 minutes after each heroin challenge. Rats received chronic (10-day) intermittent escalating-dose heroin administration (3×2.5 mg/kg/day on day 1; 3×20 mg/kg/day by day 10). Hormonal and neurochemical assessments were performed in acute (12 hours after last heroin injection) and chronic (10 days after the last injection) withdrawal. Both plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels were elevated during acute withdrawal, and heroin challenge at 20 mg/kg (the last dose of chronic escalation) at this time point attenuated this HPA hyperactivity. During chronic withdrawal, HPA hormonal levels returned to baseline, but heroin challenge at 5 mg/kg decreased ACTH levels. In contrast, this dose of heroin challenge stimulated the HPA axis in heroin naïve rats. In the anterior pituitary, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA levels were increased during acute withdrawal and retuned to control levels after chronic withdrawal. In the medial hypothalamus, however, the POMC mRNA levels were decreased during acute withdrawal, and increased after chronic withdrawal. Our results suggest a long-lasting change in HPA abnormal responsivity during chronic heroin withdrawal. PMID:23771528

  8. Inhaled matters of the heart

    PubMed Central

    Zaky, Ahmed; Ahmad, Aftab; Dell’Italia, Louis J; Jahromi, Leila; Reisenberg, Lee Ann; Matalon, Sadis; Ahmad, Shama

    2015-01-01

    Inhalations of atmospheric pollutants, especially particulate matters, are known to cause severe cardiac effects and to exacerbate preexisting heart disease. Heart failure is an important sequellae of gaseous inhalation such as that of carbon monoxide. Similarly, other gases such as sulphur dioxide are known to cause detrimental cardiovascular events. However, mechanisms of these cardiac toxicities are so far unknown. Increased susceptibility of the heart to oxidative stress may play a role. Low levels of antioxidants in the heart as compared to other organs and high levels of reactive oxygen species produced due to the high energetic demand and metabolic rate in cardiac muscle are important in rendering this susceptibility. Acute inhalation of high concentrations of halogen gases is often fatal. Severe respiratory injury and distress occurs upon inhalation of halogens gases, such as chlorine and bromine; however, studies on their cardiac effects are scant. We have demonstrated that inhalation of high concentrations of halogen gases cause significant cardiac injury, dysfunction, and failure that can be critical in causing mortalities following exposures. Our studies also demonstrated that cardiac dysfunction occurs as a result of a direct insult independent of coexisting hypoxia, since it is not fully reversed by oxygen supplementation. Therefore, studies on offsite organ effects of inhaled toxic gases can impact development of treatment strategies upon accidental or deliberate exposures to these agents. Here we summarize the knowledge of cardiovascular effects of common inhaled toxic gases with the intent to highlight the importance of consideration of cardiac symptoms while treating the victims. PMID:26665179

  9. Risk factors associated with the transition from heroin sniffing to heroin injection: a street addict role perspective.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jesús; Chitwood, Dale D; Koo, Dixie J

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify characteristics of heroin sniffers likely to shift to injection by evaluating the street addict role theory as an informing theoretical framework to explain transition from heroin sniffing to injection. A nested case-control research design was used to identify 142 heroin sniffers who never had injected a drug (controls) and 146 recently transitioned injection drug users (cases) from a larger study of 600 African-American, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white men and women who were street recruited from multiple communities known for high drug use. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to test the proposed hypotheses derived from the street addict role theory. Our findings partially support the utility of the street addict role perspective as an explanatory framework for understanding the role played by sociocultural factors in the transition to injection. This perspective can help contextualize this HIV-related behavior within the high risk social environment of heroin users. The development of effective prevention strategies for this group should be guided by a comprehensive understanding of the social environment where HIV-related risk behaviors occur.

  10. Comparison of urine results concerning co-consumption of illicit heroin and other drugs in heroin and methadone maintenance programs.

    PubMed

    Musshoff, Frank; Trafkowski, Jens; Lichtermann, Dirk; Madea, Burkhard

    2010-09-01

    Urine samples of patients from a heroin maintenance program (HMP) and a methadone maintenance program (MMP) were chromatographically analyzed 1 month before and 6 and 12 months into treatment for the presence of classical markers of heroin use as well as for the presence of markers for illicit heroin abuse. Furthermore, the samples were immunochemically tested for cannabinoids, cocaine metabolites, amphetamine, methylendioxyamphetamines and benzodiazepines. A co-consumption of illicit heroin (HER) in the HMP was determined to be 50% but was significantly lower compared to the MMP with a co-use of 71%. The incidence was high because not only acetylcodeine (AC) as a very specific marker was considered but also other marker substances for illicit HER use. Amphetamines played only a minor part in both collectives, and the proportion of HER and methadone patients using cocaine was similar and decreased during treatment. Also, the benzodiazepine use decreased, and cannabis use was high in both collectives during treatment. Considering only the AC in the present study, a co-use of illicit HER in the HMP was similar to previous reports concerning HER-assisted treatment programs. If additional marker substances were examined, the suspicion of a co-use of illicit HER is markedly enhanced.

  11. Gray Matter Density Negatively Correlates with Duration of Heroin Use in Young Lifetime Heroin-Dependent Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Yi; Zhu, Zude; Shi, Jinfu; Zou, Zhiling; Yuan, Fei; Liu, Yijun; Lee, Tatia M. C.; Weng, Xuchu

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented cognitive impairments and hypoactivity in the prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices in drug users. However, the relationships between opiate dependence and brain structure changes in heroin users are largely unknown. In the present study, we measured the density of gray matter (DGM) with voxel-based…

  12. Low-frequency heroin injection among out-of-treatment, street-recruited injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jennie L; Lorvick, Jennifer; Wenger, Lynn; Wilkins, Tania; Iguchi, Martin Y; Bourgois, Philippe; Kral, Alex H

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we explore the understudied phenomenon of "low-frequency" heroin injection in a sample of street-recruited heroin injectors not in drug treatment. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 2,410 active injection drug users (IDUs) recruited in San Francisco, California from 2000 to 2005. We compare the sociodemographic characteristics and injection risk behaviors of low-frequency heroin injectors (low-FHI; one to 10 self-reported heroin injections in the past 30 days) to high-frequency heroin injectors (high-FHI; 30 or more self-reported heroin injections in the past 30 days). Fifteen percent of the sample met criteria for low-FHI. African American race, men who have sex with men (MSM) behavior, and injection and noninjection methamphetamine use were independently associated with low-FHI. Compared to high-FHI, low-FHI were less likely to report syringe sharing and nonfatal heroin overdose. A small but significant proportion of heroin injectors inject heroin 10 or less times per month. Additional research is needed to qualitatively examine low-frequency heroin injection and its relationship to drug use trajectories.

  13. A monoclonal antibody specific for 6-monoacetylmorphine reduces acute heroin effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Bogen, Inger Lise; Boix, Fernando; Nerem, Elisabeth; Mørland, Jørg; Andersen, Jannike Mørch

    2014-06-01

    Immunotherapy against drugs of abuse is being studied as an alternative treatment option in addiction medicine and is based on antibodies sequestering the drug in the bloodstream and blocking its entry into the brain. Producing an efficient vaccine against heroin has been considered particularly challenging because of the rapid metabolism of heroin to multiple psychoactive molecules. We have previously reported that heroin's first metabolite, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM), is the predominant mediator for heroin's acute behavioral effects and that heroin is metabolized to 6-MAM primarily prior to brain entry. On this basis, we hypothesized that antibody sequestration of 6-MAM is sufficient to impair heroin-induced effects and therefore examined the effects of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for 6-MAM. In vitro experiments in human and rat blood revealed that the antibody was able to bind 6-MAM and block the metabolism to morphine almost completely, whereas the conversion of heroin to 6-MAM remained unaffected. Mice pretreated with the mAb toward 6-MAM displayed a reduction in heroin-induced locomotor activity that corresponded closely to the reduction in brain 6-MAM levels. Intraperitoneal and intravenous administration of the anti-6-MAM mAb gave equivalent protection against heroin effects, and the mAb was estimated to have a functional half-life of 8 to 9 days in mice. Our study implies that an antibody against 6-MAM is effective in counteracting heroin effects.

  14. Abnormal intracellular calcium homeostasis associated with vulnerability in the nerve cells from heroin-dependent rat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoshan; Wang, Guangyong; Pu, Hongwei; Jing, Hualan

    2014-07-14

    The cellular mechanisms by which opiate addiction develops with repetitive use remain largely unresolved. Intercellular calcium homeostasis is one of the most critical elements to determine neuroadaptive changes and neuronal fate. Heroin, one of the most addictive opiates, may induce neurotoxicity potentially inducing brain impairment, especially for those chronic users who get an overdose. Here we examined changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) after repeated exposure to heroin using cultured cerebral cortical neurons. Dynamic changes in [Ca2+]i indicated by fluo-3-AM were monitored using confocal laser scan microscopy, followed by cytotoxicity assessments. It showed that the cells dissociated from heroin-dependent rats had a smaller depolarization-induced [Ca2+]i responses, and a higher elevation in [Ca2+]i when challenged with a high concentration of heroin (500 μM). The restoration ability to remove calcium after washout of these stimulants was impaired. Calcium channel blocker verapamil inhibited the heroin-induced [Ca2+]i elevations as well as the heroin-induced cell damage. The relative [Ca2+]i of the nerve cells closely correlated with the number of damaged cells induced by heroin. These results demonstrate that nerve cells from heroin-dependent rats manifest abnormal [Ca2+]i homeostasis, as well as vulnerability to heroin overdose, suggesting involvement of [Ca2+]i regulation mechanisms in heroin addiction and neurotoxicity.

  15. Reduction in cerebral perfusion after heroin administration: a resting state arterial spin labeling study.

    PubMed

    Denier, Niklaus; Gerber, Hana; Vogel, Marc; Klarhöfer, Markus; Riecher-Rossler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Lang, Undine E; Borgwardt, Stefan; Walter, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Heroin dependence is a chronic relapsing brain disorder, characterized by the compulsion to seek and use heroin. Heroin itself has a strong potential to produce subjective experiences characterized by intense euphoria, relaxation and release from craving. The neurofunctional foundations of these perceived effects are not well known. In this study, we have used pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) in 15 heroin-dependent patients from a stable heroin-assisted treatment program to observe the steady state effects of heroin (60 min after administration). Patients were scanned in a cross-over and placebo controlled design. They received an injection of their regular dose of heroin or saline (placebo) before or after the scan. As phMRI method, we used a pulsed arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequence based on a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) spin labeling scheme combined with a single-shot 3D GRASE (gradient-spin echo) readout on a 3 Tesla scanner. Analysis was performed with Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM 8), using a general linear model for whole brain comparison between the heroin and placebo conditions. We found that compared to placebo, heroin was associated with reduced perfusion in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), the left medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and in the insula (both hemispheres). Analysis of extracted perfusion values indicate strong effect sizes and no gender related differences. Reduced perfusion in these brain areas may indicate self- and emotional regulation effects of heroin in maintenance treatment.

  16. Pharmacokinetic modeling of subcutaneous heroin and its metabolites in blood and brain of mice.

    PubMed

    Boix, Fernando; Andersen, Jannike M; Mørland, Jørg

    2013-01-01

    High blood-brain permeability and effective delivery of morphine to the brain have been considered as explanations for the high potency of heroin. Results from Andersen et al. indicate that 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM), and not morphine, is the active metabolite responsible for the acute effects observed for heroin. Here, we use pharmacokinetic modeling on data from the aforementioned study to calculate parameters of the distribution of heroin, 6-MAM and morphine in blood and brain tissue after subcutaneous heroin administration in mice. The estimated pharmacokinetic parameters imply that the very low heroin and the high 6-MAM levels observed both in blood and brain in the original experiment are likely to be caused by a very high metabolic rate of heroin in blood. The estimated metabolic rate of heroin in brain was much lower and cannot account for the low heroin and high 6-MAM levels in the brain, which would primarily reflect the concentrations of these compounds in blood. The very different metabolic rates for heroin in blood and brain calculated by the model were confirmed by in vitro experiments. These results show that heroin's fast metabolism in blood renders high concentrations of 6-MAM which, due to its relatively good blood-brain permeability, results in high levels of this metabolite in the brain. Thus, it is the high blood metabolism rate of heroin and the blood-brain permeability to 6-MAM, and not to heroin, which could account for the highly efficient delivery of active metabolites to the brain after heroin administration.

  17. Acute effects of intravenous heroin on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response: a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Walter, Marc; Gerber, Hana; Kuhl, Hans Christian; Schmid, Otto; Joechle, Wolfgang; Lanz, Christian; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Schächinger, Hartmut; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Borgwardt, Stefan J

    2013-04-01

    Heroin dependence is associated with a stressful environment and with dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The present study examined the acute effects of intravenous heroin versus placebo on the HPA axis response in heroin-dependent patients. Twenty-eight heroin-dependent patients in heroin-assisted treatment and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy participants were included in a controlled trial in which patients were twice administered heroin or saline in a crossover design, and healthy controls were only administered saline. The HPA axis response was measured by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels and by cortisol levels in serum and saliva before and 20 and 60 minutes after substance administration. Craving, withdrawal, and anxiety levels were measured before and 60 minutes after substance application. Plasma concentrations of heroin and its main metabolites were assessed using high-performance liquid chromatography. Heroin administration reduces craving, withdrawal, and anxiety levels and leads to significant decreases in ACTH and cortisol concentrations (P < 0.01). After heroin administration, cortisol concentrations did not differ from healthy controls, and ACTH levels were significantly lower (P < 0.01). In contrast, when patients receive saline, all hormone levels were significantly higher in patients than in healthy controls (P < 0.01). Heroin-dependent patients showed a normalized HPA axis response compared to healthy controls when they receive their regular heroin dose. These findings indicate that regular opioid administration protects addicts from stress and underscore the clinical significance of heroin-assisted treatment for heroin-dependent patients.

  18. SR141716A reduces the reinforcing properties of heroin but not heroin-induced increases in nucleus accumbens dopamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Caillé, Stéphanie; Parsons, Loren H

    2003-12-01

    The present experiments tested the hypothesis that the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A alters heroin self-administration by attenuating heroin-induced increases in nucleus accumbens dopamine levels. SR141716A pretreatment dose-dependently (0.3-3 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced operant heroin self-administration by male Wistar rats under a fixed ratio schedule of reinforcement, and significantly lowered the breaking point of responding for heroin under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement. These observations are consistent with recent reports that CB1 receptor inactivation reduces the rewarding properties of opiates. Operant responding for water reinforcement by water-restricted rats was unaltered by these SR141716A doses. Microdialysis tests revealed that heroin self-administration significantly increases interstitial dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens shell of vehicle-pretreated control rats. However, whereas SR141716A pretreatment dose-dependently reduced heroin self-administration, it did not alter the heroin-associated increase in nucleus accumbens dopamine. These findings suggest that the CB1 antagonist-induced attenuation of heroin reward does not involve dopaminergic mechanisms in the nucleus accumbens shell.

  19. Comparison of dermal and inhalation routes of entry for organic chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jepson, Gary W.; Mcdougal, James N.; Clewell, Harvey J., III

    1992-01-01

    The quantitative comparison of the chemical concentration inside the body as the result of a dermal exposure versus an inhalation exposure is useful for assessing human health risks and deciding on an appropriate protective posture. In order to describe the relationship between dermal and inhalation routes of exposure, a variety of organic chemicals were evaluated. The types of chemicals chosen for the study were halogenated hydrocarbons, aromatic compounds, non-polar hydrocarbons and inhalation anesthetics. Both dermal and inhalation exposures were conducted in rats and the chemicals were in the form of vapors. Prior to the dermal exposure, rat fur was closely clipped and during the exposure rats were provided fresh breathing air through latex masks. Blood samples were taken during 4-hour exposures and analyzed for the chemical of interest. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was used to predict permeability constants (cm/hr) consistent with the observed blood concentrations of the chemical. The ratio of dermal exposure to inhalation exposure required to achieve the same internal dose of chemical was calculated for each test chemical. The calculated ratio in humans ranged from 18 for styrene to 1180 for isoflurane. This methodology can be used to estimate the dermal exposure required to reach the internal dose achieved by a specific inhalation exposure. Such extrapolation is important since allowable exposure standards are often set for inhalation exposures, but occupational exposures may be dermal.

  20. Umeclidinium and Vilanterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest tightness caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; a group of diseases that affect the lungs ... use umeclidinium and vilanterol inhalation during a sudden COPD attack. Your doctor will prescribe a short-acting ( ...

  1. Fluticasone and Vilanterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... and chest tightness caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary (COPD; a group of diseases that affect the lungs ... use fluticasone and vilanterol inhalation during a sudden COPD attack. Your doctor will prescribe a short acting ( ...

  2. Fluticasone and Salmeterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; a group of lung diseases that includes chronic ... and salmeterol during an attack of asthma or COPD. Your doctor will prescribe a short-acting inhaler ...

  3. Inhalation exposure to haloacetic acids and haloketones during showering.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xu; Weisel, Clifford P

    2003-02-01

    Inhalation exposure to haloacetic acids (HAAs) and haloketones (HKs) in contaminated drinking water occurs during showering. The size distribution of the aerosols generated by a shower was determined using an eight size-range particle counter, which measured particles from 0.1 to >2 microm. An exponential increase in aerosol numbers was observed while the shower water was on, while the aerosol numbers declined exponentially once the water was turned off. The half-lives of the shower aerosols were longer than 5 min after the shower water was turned off. Although the majority of the shower-generated aerosols were smaller than 0.3 microm, these aerosols only contributed approximately 2% to the measured total aerosol mass. The total shower-generated particulate HAA and HK concentrations collected on an open face filter were approximately 6.3 and 0.13 microg/m3, respectively, for shower water HAA and HK concentrations of 250 and 25 microg/L, respectively. The vapor-phase HK concentrations were 25-50 microg/m3. The estimate of the dose from inhalation exposure of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in the particulate phase indicate that they represent less than 1% of the ingestion dose, so inhalation is not expected to be an important exposure route to nonvolatile water contaminants or the portion of volatile DBPs that stay in the particulate phase, unless the lung is the target organ. The vapor-phase levels of volatile HKs, though, are significantly higher and can contribute greater than 10% of the ingestion dose during a shower. Thus, risk assessment to the these DBPs needs to consider the inhalation route.

  4. Petroleum Vapor Intrusion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    One type of vapor intrusion is PVI, in which vapors from petroleum hydrocarbons such as gasoline, diesel, or jet fuel enter a building. Intrusion of contaminant vapors into indoor spaces is of concern.

  5. Potent Inhalational Anesthetics for Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Satuito, Mary; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide and the volatile inhalational anesthetics have defined anxiety and pain control in both dentistry and medicine for over a century. From curious experimentation to spectacular public demonstrations, the initial work of 2 dentists, Horace Wells and William T. G. Morton, persists to this day in modern surgery and anesthesia. This article reviews the history, similarities, differences, and clinical applications of the most popular inhalational agents used in contemporary dental surgical settings. PMID:26866411

  6. Levels of heroin and its metabolites in blood and brain extracellular fluid after i.v. heroin administration to freely moving rats

    PubMed Central

    Gottås, A; Øiestad, E L; Boix, F; Vindenes, V; Ripel, Å; Thaulow, C H; Mørland, J

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Heroin, with low affinity for μ-opioid receptors, has been considered to act as a prodrug. In order to study the pharmacokinetics of heroin and its active metabolites after i.v. administration, we gave a bolus injection of heroin to rats and measured the concentration of heroin and its metabolites in blood and brain extracellular fluid (ECF). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH After an i.v. bolus injection of heroin to freely moving Sprague–Dawley rats, the concentrations of heroin and metabolites in blood samples from the vena jugularis and in microdialysis samples from striatal brain ECF were measured by ultraperformance LC-MS/MS. KEY RESULTS Heroin levels decreased very fast, both in blood and brain ECF, and could not be detected after 18 and 10 min respectively. 6-Monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) increased very rapidly, reaching its maximal concentrations after 2.0 and 4.3 min, respectively, and falling thereafter. Morphine increased very slowly, reaching its maximal levels, which were six times lower than the highest 6-MAM concentrations, after 12.6 and 21.3 min, with a very slow decline during the rest of the experiment and only surpassing 6-MAM levels at least 30 min after injection. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS After an i.v. heroin injection, 6-MAM was the predominant opioid present shortly after injection and during the first 30 min, not only in the blood but also in rat brain ECF. 6-MAM might therefore mediate most of the effects observed shortly after heroin intake, and this finding questions the general assumption that morphine is the main and most important metabolite of heroin. PMID:23865556

  7. Heroin Mismatch in the Motor City: Addiction, Segregation and the Geography of Opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Draus, Paul; Roddy, Juliette; Greenwald, Mark

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we employ data drawn from economic and ethnographic interviews with Detroit heroin users, as well as other sources, to illustrate the relationship between heroin users’ mobility patterns and urban and suburban environments, especially in terms of drug acquisition and the geography of opportunity. We explore how the “spatial mismatch” (Kain 1968; 1992) between legal work opportunities and central city residents is seemingly reversed in the case of heroin users. We find that while both geographic location and social networks associated with segregation provide central city residents and African Americans with a strategic advantage over white suburbanites in locating and purchasing heroin easily and efficiently, this same segregation effectively focuses the negative externalities of heroin markets in central city neighborhoods. Finally, we consider how the heroin trade reflects and reproduces the segregated post-industrial landscape, and we discuss directions for potential future research on the relationship between ethnic and economic ghettos and regional drug markets. PMID:22679895

  8. Classification of illicit heroin by UPLC-Q-TOF analysis of acidic and neutral manufacturing impurities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuimei; Hua, Zhendong; Bai, Yanping

    2015-12-01

    The illicit manufacture of heroin results in the formation of trace levels of acidic and neutral manufacturing impurities that provide valuable information about the manufacturing process used. In this work, a new ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF) method; that features high resolution, mass accuracy and sensitivity for profiling neutral and acidic heroin manufacturing impurities was developed. After the UPLC-Q-TOF analysis, the retention times and m/z data pairs of acidic and neutral manufacturing impurities were detected, and 19 peaks were found to be evidently different between heroin samples from "Golden Triangle" and "Golden Crescent". Based on the data set of these 19 impurities in 150 authentic heroin samples, classification of heroin geographic origins was successfully achieved utilizing partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). By analyzing another data set of 267 authentic heroin samples, the developed discrimiant model was validated and proved to be accurate and reliable.

  9. Population pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its metabolites theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline after inhalation in combination with diacetylmorphine.

    PubMed

    Zandvliet, Anthe S; Huitema, Alwin D R; de Jonge, Milly E; den Hoed, Rob; Sparidans, Rolf W; Hendriks, Vincent M; van den Brink, Wim; van Ree, Jan M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2005-01-01

    The stimulant effect of caffeine, as an additive in diacetylmorphine preparations for study purposes, may interfere with the pharmacodynamic effects of diacetylmorphine. In order to obtain insight into the pharmacology of caffeine after inhalation in heroin users, the pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its dimethylxanthine metabolites were studied. The objectives were to establish the population pharmacokinetics under these exceptional circumstances and to compare the results to published data regarding intravenous and oral administration in healthy volunteers. Diacetylmorphine preparations containing 100 mg of caffeine were used by 10 persons by inhalation. Plasma concentrations of caffeine, theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Non-linear mixed effects modelling was used to estimate population pharmacokinetic parameters. The model was evaluated by the jack-knife procedure. Caffeine was rapidly and effectively absorbed after inhalation. Population pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its dimethylxanthine metabolites could adequately and simultaneously be described by a linear multi-compartment model. The volume of distribution for the central compartment was estimated to be 45.7 l and the apparent elimination rate constant of caffeine at 8 hr after inhalation was 0.150 hr(-1) for a typical individual. The bioavailability was approximately 60%. The presented model adequately describes the population pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its dimethylxanthine metabolites after inhalation of the caffeine sublimate of a 100 mg tablet. Validation proved the stability of the model. Pharmacokinetics of caffeine after inhalation and intravenous administration are to a large extent similar. The bioavailability of inhaled caffeine is approximately 60% in experienced smokers.

  10. Acute heroin intoxication in a baby chronically exposed to cocaine and heroin: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute intoxication with drugs of abuse in children is often only the tip of the iceberg, actually hiding chronic exposure. Analysis using non-conventional matrices such as hair can provide long-term information about exposure to recreational drugs. Case presentation We report the case of a one-month-old Caucasian boy admitted to our pediatric emergency unit with respiratory distress and neurological abnormalities. A routine urine test was positive for opiates, suggesting an acute opiate ingestion. No other drugs of misuse, such as cocaine, cannabis, amphetamines or derivatives, were detected in the baby's urine. Subsequently, hair samples from the baby and the parents were collected to evaluate the possibility of chronic exposure to drug misuse by segmental analysis. Opiates and cocaine metabolites were detected in hair samples from the baby boy and his parents. Conclusions In light of these and previous results, we recommend hair analysis in babies and children from risky environments to detect exposure to heroin and other drug misuse, which could provide the basis for specific social and health interventions. PMID:21729296

  11. Superfund Vapor Intrusion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In addition to basic information about vapor intrusion, the site contains technical and policy documents, tools and other resources to support vapor intrusion environmental investigations and mitigation activities.

  12. Comparison of sarin and cyclosarin toxicity by subcutaneous, intravenous and inhalation exposure in Gottingen minipigs.

    PubMed

    Hulet, Stanley W; Sommerville, Douglas R; Miller, Dennis B; Scotto, Jacqueline A; Muse, William T; Burnett, David C

    2014-02-01

    Sexually mature male and female Gottingen minipigs were exposed to various concentrations of GB and GF vapor via whole-body inhalation exposures or to liquid GB or GF via intravenous or subcutaneous injections. Vapor inhalation exposures were for 10, 60 or 180 min. Maximum likelihood estimation was used to calculate the median effect levels for severe effects (ECT50 and ED50) and lethality (LCT50 and LD50). Ordinal regression was used to model the concentration × time profile of the agent toxicity. Contrary to that predicted by Haber's rule, LCT50 values increased as the duration of the exposures increased for both nerve agents. The toxic load exponents (n) were calculated to be 1.38 and 1.28 for GB and GF vapor exposures, respectively. LCT50 values for 10-, 60- and 180-min exposures to vapor GB in male minipigs were 73, 106 and 182 mg min/m(3), respectively. LCT50 values for 10-, 60 - and 180-min exposures to vapor GB in female minipigs were 87, 127 and 174 mg min/m(3), respectively. LCT50 values for 10-, 60- and 180-min exposures to vapor GF in male minipigs were 218, 287 and 403 mg min/m(3), respectively. LCT50 values for 10-, 60- and 180-min exposures in female minipigs were 183, 282 and 365 mg min/m(3), respectively. For GB vapor exposures, there was a tenuous gender difference which did not exist for vapor GF exposures. Surprisingly, GF was 2-3 times less potent than GB via the inhalation route of exposure regardless of exposure duration. Additionally GF was found to be less potent than GB by intravenous and subcutaneous routes.

  13. Inhaler Technique in Asthma: How Does It Relate to Patients' Preferences and Attitudes Toward Their Inhalers?

    PubMed Central

    Jahedi, Lia; Downie, Sue R.; Saini, Bandana; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Correct inhaler technique can increase medication efficacy, reducing both dose and side effects. Patient preference for inhaler device has not been fully explored, and we hypothesized that if patients have a preference and can choose their inhaler, they might be more likely to use it correctly. Our aim was to determine the preferences, attitudes, and perceptions of patients with asthma toward their inhalers, and to evaluate whether any of these factors were related to inhalation technique. Methods: Twenty-five patients with asthma (mean age 43.1 years) participated. Qualitative semi-structured interviews and quantitative patient satisfaction and preference questionnaires (PASAPQ) were used to explore patients' preferences, attitudes, and perceptions about their inhalers. Objective inhalation technique assessment was performed. Data were triangulated to identify characteristics that could indicate a relationship between inhaler technique, satisfaction, preference, and decision making. Results: Themes from qualitative interviews were as follows: asthma inhalers and expectations; inhaler preference; characteristics of an ideal inhaler; perceived effectiveness of inhalers; and inhalers and patient decision making. PASAPQ scores indicated that all patients were at least “somewhat satisfied” with their inhalers, regardless of technique. Only 12% of inhalers were used correctly, despite pilot PASAPQ data suggesting that most patients were confident with their technique. The inhaler technique was unlikely to be related to satisfaction, perception of inhaler devices, or choice in device selection. Patients with correct inhaler technique were more aware of their asthma and expressed motivation to achieve optimal asthma control. Conclusions: The majority of the asthmatic patients did not use their inhaler(s) correctly, despite most having confidence in their technique. Patients attributed confidence in their inhaler technique to their belief that

  14. Normalizing effect of heroin maintenance treatment on stress-induced brain connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Marc; Gerber, Hana; Seifritz, Erich; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A.; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Lang, Undine E.; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that a single maintenance dose of heroin attenuates psychophysiological stress responses in heroin-dependent patients, probably reflecting the effectiveness of heroin-assisted therapies for the treatment of severe heroin addiction. However, the underlying neural circuitry of these effects has not yet been investigated. Using a cross-over, double-blind, vehicle-controlled design, 22 heroin-dependent and heroin-maintained outpatients from the Centre of Substance Use Disorders at the University Hospital of Psychiatry in Basel were studied after heroin and placebo administration, while 17 healthy controls from the general population were included for placebo administration only. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to detect brain responses to fearful faces and dynamic causal modelling was applied to compute fear-induced modulation of connectivity within the emotional face network. Stress responses were assessed by hormone releases and subjective ratings. Relative to placebo, heroin acutely reduced the fear-induced modulation of connectivity from the left fusiform gyrus to the left amygdala and from the right amygdala to the right orbitofrontal cortex in dependent patients. Both of these amygdala-related connectivity strengths were significantly increased in patients after placebo treatment (acute withdrawal) compared to healthy controls, whose connectivity estimates did not differ from those of patients after heroin injection. Moreover, we found positive correlations between the left fusiform gyrus to amygdala connectivity and different stress responses, as well as between the right amygdala to orbitofrontal cortex connectivity and levels of craving. Our findings indicate that the increased amygdala-related connectivity during fearful face processing after the placebo treatment in heroin-dependent patients transiently normalizes after acute heroin maintenance treatment. Furthermore, this study suggests that the assessment of

  15. A survey on acupuncture for giving up heroin and treatment of the withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Lanqiong; Zeng, Lin; Liao, Qishun; Chen, Ping

    2007-06-01

    This paper summarizes the study of acupuncture for giving up heroin and treatment of withdrawal syndrome in China from 1995 to 2003, which includes the selection of acupoints, the evaluation of the therapeutic effects, studies of acupoints and application of relevant instruments, as well as treatment of the withdrawal syndromes of heroin with acupuncture. The therapeutic effect of acupuncture and moxibustion is definite and indispensable, especially at the time when there is no specific remedy for heroin addition.

  16. Abnormal functional integration of thalamic low frequency oscillation in the BOLD signal after acute heroin treatment.

    PubMed

    Denier, Niklaus; Schmidt, André; Gerber, Hana; Vogel, Marc; Huber, Christian G; Lang, Undine E; Riecher-Rossler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Walter, Marc; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Heroin addiction is a severe relapsing brain disorder associated with impaired cognitive control, including deficits in attention allocation. The thalamus has a high density of opiate receptors and is critically involved in orchestrating cortical activity during cognitive control. However, there have been no studies on how acute heroin treatment modulates thalamic activity. In a cross-over, double-blind, vehicle-controlled study, 29 heroin-maintained outpatients were studied after heroin and placebo administration, while 20 healthy controls were included for the placebo condition only. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to analyze functional integration of the thalamus by three different resting state analysis techniques. Thalamocortical functional connectivity (FC) was analyzed by seed-based correlation, while intrinsic thalamic oscillation was assessed by analysis of regional homogeneity (ReHo) and the fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF). Relative to the placebo treatment and healthy controls, acute heroin administration reduced thalamocortical FC to cortical regions, including the frontal cortex, while the reductions in FC to the mediofrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and frontal pole were positively correlated with the plasma level of morphine, the main psychoactive metabolite of heroin. Furthermore, heroin treatment was associated with increased thalamic ReHo and fALFF values, whereas fALFF following heroin exposure correlated negatively with scores of attentional control. The heroin-associated increase in fALFF was mainly dominated by slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz) oscillations. Our findings show that there are acute effects of heroin within the thalamocortical system and may shed new light on the role of the thalamus in cognitive control in heroin addiction. Future research is needed to determine the underlying physiological mechanisms and their role in heroin addiction.

  17. Normalizing effect of heroin maintenance treatment on stress-induced brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, André; Walter, Marc; Gerber, Hana; Seifritz, Erich; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Lang, Undine E; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that a single maintenance dose of heroin attenuates psychophysiological stress responses in heroin-dependent patients, probably reflecting the effectiveness of heroin-assisted therapies for the treatment of severe heroin addiction. However, the underlying neural circuitry of these effects has not yet been investigated. Using a cross-over, double-blind, vehicle-controlled design, 22 heroin-dependent and heroin-maintained outpatients from the Centre of Substance Use Disorders at the University Hospital of Psychiatry in Basel were studied after heroin and placebo administration, while 17 healthy controls from the general population were included for placebo administration only. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to detect brain responses to fearful faces and dynamic causal modelling was applied to compute fear-induced modulation of connectivity within the emotional face network. Stress responses were assessed by hormone releases and subjective ratings. Relative to placebo, heroin acutely reduced the fear-induced modulation of connectivity from the left fusiform gyrus to the left amygdala and from the right amygdala to the right orbitofrontal cortex in dependent patients. Both of these amygdala-related connectivity strengths were significantly increased in patients after placebo treatment (acute withdrawal) compared to healthy controls, whose connectivity estimates did not differ from those of patients after heroin injection. Moreover, we found positive correlations between the left fusiform gyrus to amygdala connectivity and different stress responses, as well as between the right amygdala to orbitofrontal cortex connectivity and levels of craving. Our findings indicate that the increased amygdala-related connectivity during fearful face processing after the placebo treatment in heroin-dependent patients transiently normalizes after acute heroin maintenance treatment. Furthermore, this study suggests that the assessment of

  18. Association of frontal gray matter volume and cerebral perfusion in heroin addiction: a multimodal neuroimaging study.

    PubMed

    Denier, Niklaus; Schmidt, André; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Huber, Christian G; Lang, Undine E; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Walter, Marc; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Structure and function are closely related in the healthy human brain. In patients with chronic heroin exposure, brain imaging studies have identified long-lasting changes in gray matter (GM) volume. More recently, we showed that acute application of heroin in dependent patients results in hypoperfusion of fronto-temporal areas compared with the placebo condition. However, the relationship between structural and cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in heroin addiction has not yet been investigated. Moreover, it is not known whether there is any interaction between the chronic structural changes and the short and long-term effects on perfusion caused by heroin. Using a double-blind, within-subject design, heroin or placebo (saline) was administered to 14 heroin-dependent patients from a stable heroin-assisted treatment program, in order to observe acute short-term effects. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to calculate perfusion quantification maps in both treatment conditions, while Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) was conducted to calculate regional GM density. VBM and ASL data were used to calculate homologous correlation fields by Biological Parametric Mapping (BPM) and a whole-brain Pearson r correlation. We correlated each perfusion condition (heroin and placebo) separately with a VBM sample that was identical for the two treatment conditions. It was assumed that heroin-associated perfusion is manifested in short-term effects, while placebo-associated perfusion is more related to long-term effects. In order to restrict our analyses to fronto-temporal regions, we used an explicit mask for our analyses. Correlation analyses revealed a significant positive correlation in frontal areas between GM and both perfusion conditions (heroin and placebo). Heroin-associated perfusion was also negatively correlated with GM in the inferior temporal gyrus on both hemispheres. These findings indicate that, in heroin-dependent patients, low GM volume is positively associated with

  19. Results of the first North American prescription heroin study are promising.

    PubMed

    Symington, Alison

    2008-12-01

    In October 2008, the North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI) research team released the primary outcomes of a randomized controlled trial aimed at testing whether the provision of pharmaceutical-grade heroin under medical supervision benefits people suffering from chronic opiate addictions who have not benefitted from other treatments. The treatment phase was completed in June 2008. Retention and response rates were high, suggesting that heroin-assisted therapy is a safe and highly effective treatment for people with chronic heroin addiction.

  20. Nonmedical Opioid Use and Heroin Use in a Nationally Representative Sample of US High School Seniors*

    PubMed Central

    Palamar, Joseph J.; Shearston, Jenni A.; Dawson, Eric W.; Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Ompad, Danielle C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonmedical use of opioids has become increasingly problematic in recent years with increases in overdoses, treatment admissions, and deaths. Use also appears to be contributing to heroin initiation, which has increased in recent years. Further research is needed to examine which adolescents are at highest risk for nonmedical use of opioids and heroin and to explore potential links between nonmedical opioid use and heroin use. Methods Data were analyzed from a nationally representative sample of American high school seniors in the Monitoring the Future study (2009–2013, Weighted N = 67,822). We examined associations between frequency and recency of nonmedical use of opioids and heroin. Sociodemographic correlates of use of each drug were also examined. Results 12.4% of students reported lifetime nonmedical opioid use and 1.2% reported lifetime heroin use. As frequency of lifetime nonmedical opioid use increased, so too did the odds for reporting heroin use, with over three-quarters (77.3%) of heroin users reporting lifetime nonmedical opioid use. Recent (30-day) nonmedical opioid use was a robust risk factor for heroin use and almost a quarter (23.2%) of students who reported using opioids ≥40 times reported lifetime heroin use. Black and Hispanic students were less likely to report nonmedical opioid or heroin use than white students, but they were more likely to report heroin use in absence of nonmedical opioid use. Discussion Recent and frequent nonmedical opioid use are risk factors for heroin use among adolescents. Prevention needs to be targeted to those at highest risk. PMID:26653341

  1. [New inhalation anesthetics].

    PubMed

    Conzen, P; Nuscheler, M

    1996-08-01

    Recently, two new halogenated volatile anaesthetics, sevoflurane and desflurane, have been approved for clinical use in Germany. Their low solubility in blood is the most important common property, and this represents the most obvious difference from the inhalational anaesthetics currently used. Extensive clinical and experimental evaluations have confirmed the superior pharmacokinetic properties predicted. Both sevoflurane and desflurane provide more rapid emergence from anaesthesia, permit easier titration of the anaesthetic dose during maintenance and offer more rapid recovery from anaesthesia. For sevoflurane, there are additional advantages: a pleasant odor, negligible airway irritation, and excellent pharmacodynamic characteristics that even provide cardiovascular stability comparable to isoflurane. A certain disadvantage and source of potential nephrotoxicity result from the metabolism of sevoflurane (2-5%) to anorganic fluoride and degradation to compound A in carbon dioxide absorbents. The extensive clinical data reported to date have revealed no evidence that sevoflurane has adverse renal effects. New insight into the pathomechanism of nephrotoxicity associated with either production of fluoride or compound A may well support clinical experience. Desflurane strongly resists in vivo metabolism and because of this it appears to be devoid of toxicity. Nevertheless, potential side-effects may result from degradation in dry absorbents and subsequent release of CO, from its extreme pungency and irritating airway effects. Thus, desflurane is not recommended for induction of anaesthesia, especially in children. The tendency for desflurane transiently to stimulate sympathetic activity, especially at concentrations above 1.0 MAC, limits its application in patients with cardiac disease.

  2. Moisture transport into chlorofluorocarbon-free metered dose inhalers.

    PubMed

    Williams, G

    1999-12-01

    Moisture is known to affect the stability of some metered dose inhalers (MDIs). Hydrofluoroalkanes such as tetrafluoroethane (134a) and heptafluoropropane (227) are known to have higher affinity for moisture than the currently used chlorofluorocarbon propellents. An initial study was conducted to determine the water vapor transmission rates of various elastomers that may be used as gaskets in MDIs. A further study was conducted to measure the moisture ingress rates of various chlorofluorocarbon-free MDIs. The data indicate that moisture transport into chlorofluorocarbon-free MDIs is influenced by the elastomeric nature of the gaskets used and the type of hydrofluoroalkane formulation and storage conditions used.

  3. Exchanging expertise and constructing boundaries: The development of a transnational knowledge network around heroin-assisted treatment.

    PubMed

    Duke, Karen

    2016-05-01

    Over the last 20 years, supervised injectable and inhalable heroin prescribing has been developed, tested and in some cases introduced as a second line treatment for limited groups of entrenched heroin users in a number of European countries and Canada. Based on documentary analyses and eleven key informant interviews, this paper investigates the growth of 'expertise' and the sharing of knowledge between scientific stakeholders from different countries involved in researching and developing this area of treatment. Drawing on Stone's concept of the 'knowledge network' (Stone, 2013) and Gieryn's theory of 'boundary-work' (Gieryn, 1983), the analysis demonstrates the collective power of this group of scientists in producing a particular form of knowledge and expertise which has accrued and been exchanged over time. It also illustrates the ways in which this type of science has gained credibility and authority and become legitimised, reinforced and reproduced by those who employ it in both scientific and political debates. Boundaries were constructed by the knowledge network between different types of professions/disciplines, different forms of science and between the production of science and its consumption by non-scientists. The uniformity of the knowledge network in terms of their professional and disciplinary backgrounds, methodological expertise and ideological perspectives has meant that alternative forms of knowledge and perspectives have been neglected. This limits the nature and scope of the scientific evidence on which to base policy and practice decisions impacting on the work of policy makers and practitioners as well as the experiences of those in treatment who are most affected by this research and policy development.

  4. MAOA rs1137070 and heroin addiction interactively alter gray matter volume of the salience network

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Linwen; Feng, Jiajia; Yue, Weihua; Lu, Lin; Fan, Yong; Shi, Jie

    2017-01-01

    The rs1137070 polymorphism of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) is associated with alcoholism and smoking behavior. However, the association between rs1137070 and heroin addiction remains unclear. In this study, we examined the allelic distribution of rs1137070 in 1,035 heroin abusers and 2,553 healthy controls and investigated the interactive effects of rs1137070 and heroin addiction on gray matter volume (GMV) based on 78 heroin abusers and 79 healthy controls. The C allele frequency of rs1137070 was significantly higher in heroin abusers. Heroin addiction and the rs1137070 variant interactively altered measures of GMV in the anterior cingulate cortex, orbital frontal cortex, temporal pole, and insula, which were correlated with cognitive function. Heroin abusers with the C allele had lower measures of GMV in these regions than the healthy controls with the same allele, whereas those with the T allele displayed a different trend. The altered brain regions were connected with white matter tracts, yielding a structural network that partially overlapped with the salience network. These findings suggest that the low activity-related C allele of MAOA rs1137070 is associated with an increase in the sensitivity to heroin addiction and the damaging effects of heroin abuse on cognition and the salience network. PMID:28345608

  5. DRD3 variation associates with early-onset heroin dependence, but not specific personality traits.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shin-Chang; Yeh, Yi-Wei; Chen, Chun-Yen; Huang, Chang-Chih; Chang, Hsin-An; Yen, Che-Hung; Ho, Pei-Shen; Liang, Chih-Sung; Chou, Han-Wei; Lu, Ru-Band; Huang, San-Yuan

    2014-06-03

    Dopamine D3 receptor-mediated pathways are involved in the mechanism of addiction, and genetic factors play a role in the vulnerability to heroin dependence. The aim of this study was to examine whether the corresponding gene, DRD3, is associated with the development of heroin dependence and specific personality traits in HD patients. Eight polymorphisms in DRD3 were analyzed in 1067 unrelated Han Chinese subjects (566 heroin dependence patients and 501 controls). All participants were screened using the same assessment tool and all patients met the criteria for heroin dependence. A Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire was used to assess personality traits in 276 heroin dependence patients. In addition, heroin dependence patients were divided into 4 clinical subgroups based on age-of-onset and family history of substance abuse, to reduce the clinical heterogeneity. The rs6280 and rs9825563 variants showed association with the development of early-onset heroin dependence. The GTA haplotype frequency in the block (rs324029, rs6280, rs9825563) was significantly associated with early-onset heroin dependence (p=0.003). However, these significant associations were weaker after Bonferroni's correction. In addition, these DRD3 polymorphisms did not influence novelty seeking and harm avoidance scores in HD patients. DRD3 is possibly a genetic factor in the development of early-onset heroin dependence, but is not associated with specific personality traits in these patients among the Han Chinese population.

  6. Male heroin addicts and their female mates: impact on disorder and recovery.

    PubMed

    Lex, B W

    1990-01-01

    A pilot investigation was undertaken to determine whether the social relationships between men who currently used heroin with their female mates differed from those of men who formerly used heroin, but were currently abstinent, with their female mates. Six couples were selected for study via the representative case method. Men currently abstinent from heroin had begun drug use later, had a family history of affective disorders, and had initiated their conjugal relationship after cessation of heroin use. Female mates of males currently abstinent from heroin had never used heroin with their mates in conjunction with sexual activity, had significantly positive ratings of their mates' performance of social roles, and were striving to obtain formal training to improve their employment skills. In contrast, the couples including actively using heroin addicts used opiates together, especially to enhance their sexual activity. The relationships of these couples were not as mutually supportive, and the male's role was less responsible and attracted less respect than that of the abstinent male. The females were depressed and had little positive aspects to their lives. Partners in all couples experienced a large number of stressful events, but current heroin use increased stress and hampered coping efforts. Interaction analysis of dynamics in relationships of men currently abstinent from heroin revealed that participation in mates' family life served to reshape their behaviors into more socially acceptable roles.

  7. Effect of heroin-conditioned auditory stimuli on cerebral functional activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Trusk, T.C.; Stein, E.A.

    1988-08-01

    Cerebral functional activity was measured as changes in distribution of the free fatty acid (1-14C)octanoate in autoradiograms obtained from rats during brief presentation of a tone previously paired to infusions of heroin or saline. Rats were trained in groups of three consisting of one heroin self-administering animal and two animals receiving yoked infusions of heroin or saline. Behavioral experiments in separate groups of rats demonstrated that these training parameters imparts secondary reinforcing properties to the tone for animals self-administering heroin while the tone remains behaviorally neutral in yoked-infusion animals. The optical densities of thirty-seven brain regions were normalized to a relative index for comparisons between groups. Previous pairing of the tone to heroin infusions irrespective of behavior (yoked-heroin vs. yoked-saline groups) produced functional activity changes in fifteen brain areas. In addition, nineteen regional differences in octanoate labeling density were evident when comparison was made between animals previously trained to self-administer heroin to those receiving yoked-heroin infusions, while twelve differences were noted when comparisons were made between the yoked vehicle and self administration group. These functional activity changes are presumed related to the secondary reinforcing capacity of the tone acquired by association with heroin, and may identify neural substrates involved in auditory signalled conditioning of positive reinforcement to opiates.

  8. Neurocognitive Characterizations of Russian Heroin Addicts without a Significant History of Other Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, Diana H.; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Flannery, Barbara A.; Langevin, Doris J.; Bobashev, Georgiy; Verbitskaya, Elena; Augustine, Cynthia B.; Bolla, Karen I.; Zvartau, Edwin; Schech, Barry; Egorova, Valentina; Bushara, Natali; Tsoy, Marina

    2007-01-01

    Research on the neurocognitive characteristics of heroin addiction is sparse and studies that do exist include polydrug abusers; thus, they are unable to distinguish neurocognitive effects of heroin from those of other drugs. To identify neurocognitive correlates specific to heroin addiction, the present study was conducted in St. Petersburg, Russia where individuals typically abuse and/or become addicted to only one substance, generally alcohol or heroin. Heroin addicts were recruited from an inpatient treatment facility in St. Petersburg. Three comparison groups included alcoholics, addicts who used both alcohol and heroin, and non-abusers. Psychiatric, background, and drug history evaluations were administered after detoxification to screen for exclusion criteria and characterize the sample. Executive Cognitive Functions (ECF) that largely activate areas of the prefrontal cortex and its circuitry measured include complex visual pattern recognition (Paired Associates Learning), working memory (Delayed Matching to Sample), problem solving (Stockings of Cambridge), executive decision making (Cambridge Decision Making Task), cognitive flexibility (Stroop Color-Word Task) and response shifting (Stop Change Task). In many respects, the heroin addicts were similar to alcohol and alcohol\\heroin dependent groups in neurocognitive deficits relative to controls. The primary finding was that heroin addicts exhibited significantly more disadvantageous decision making and longer deliberation times while making risky decisions than the other groups. Because the nature and degree of recovery from drug abuse are likely a function of the type or pattern of neurocognitive impairment, differential drug effects must be considered. PMID:17382488

  9. Impaired emotion recognition is linked to alexithymia in heroin addicts

    PubMed Central

    Craparo, Giuseppe; Gori, Alessio; Dell’Aera, Stefano; Costanzo, Giulia; Fasciano, Silvia; Tomasello, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Several investigations document altered emotion processing in opiate addiction. Nevertheless, the origin of this phenomenon remains unclear. Here we examined the role of alexithymia in the ability (i.e., number of errors—accuracy and reaction times—RTs) of thirty-one heroin addicts and thirty-one healthy controls to detect several affective expressions. Results show generally lower accuracy and higher RTs in the recognition of facial expressions of emotions for patients, compared to controls. The hierarchical multivariate regression analysis shows that alexithymia might be responsible of the between groups difference with respect to the RTs in emotion detection. Overall, we provide new insights in the clinical interpretation of affective deficits in heroin addicts suggesting a role of alexithymia in their ability to recognize emotions. PMID:27069803

  10. PREDICTORS OF INPATIENT TREATMENT COMPLETION OF SUBJECTS WITH HEROIN DEPENDENCE

    PubMed Central

    Samantaray, P.K.; Ray, R.; Chandiramani, K.

    1997-01-01

    One hundred and four subjects with heroin dependence, consecutive new admission to a ward were studied prospectively to assess treatment retention. All these subjects were admitted voluntarily after pre-admission counselling wherein treatment package (four week′s stay), ward routine, rules and regulation were explained. Socio-demographic parameters, drug use history, motivation as understood by “readiness to change”, reasons for seeking treatment were obtained. Reasons for non completion were noted. Thirty two subjects (31%) completed treatment. Out of 72 non-completers, 38 subjects (36%) left against medical advice and 34(33%) were discharged prematurely by the treating team for violating ward norms. Multivariate analysis showed that readiness to change (being in action stage), age of onset of heroin use (late), legal problems (high) and self confidence regarding recovery (high) in order of significance, predicted treatment completion. Therapeutic strategies to minimise drop-out. are discussed. PMID:21584093

  11. Researching a local heroin market as a complex adaptive system.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Lee D; Bobashev, Georgiy; Morris, Robert J

    2009-12-01

    This project applies agent-based modeling (ABM) techniques to better understand the operation, organization, and structure of a local heroin market. The simulation detailed was developed using data from an 18-month ethnographic case study. The original research, collected in Denver, CO during the 1990s, represents the historic account of users and dealers who operated in the Larimer area heroin market. Working together, the authors studied the behaviors of customers, private dealers, street-sellers, brokers, and the police, reflecting the core elements pertaining to how the market operated. After evaluating the logical consistency between the data and agent behaviors, simulations scaled-up interactions to observe their aggregated outcomes. While the concept and findings from this study remain experimental, these methods represent a novel way in which to understand illicit drug markets and the dynamic adaptations and outcomes they generate. Extensions of this research perspective, as well as its strengths and limitations, are discussed.

  12. Inflammatory response in heroin addicts undergoing methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuan-Yu; Yang, Szu-Nian; Lin, Jyh-Chyang; Chang, Junn-Liang; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Lo, Wan-Yu

    2015-03-30

    Opioid addiction influences many physiological functions including reactions of the immune system. The objective of this study was to investigate the immune system function in heroin addicted patients undergoing methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) compared to healthy controls. We tested the cytokine production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α from a group of heroin addicts (n=34) and healthy controls (n=20). The results show that production of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 was significantly higher in the group of methadone-maintained patients than in the healthy control group. Plasma TNF-α and IL-6 levels were significantly correlated with the dairy methadone dosage administered, and the IL-1β level was significantly correlated with the duration of methadone maintenance treatment. These findings suggest that methadone maintenance treatment influences the immune system functions of opioid-dependent patients and may also induce long-term systemic inflammation.

  13. Recovering a fecal habitus: analyzing heroin users' toilet talk.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Lucy; Neale, Joanne; Nettleton, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    There is a particular silence around the social life of defecation. Little analyzed, rarely discussed in polite conversation, it largely appears only at moments of dysfunction. For active heroin users, digestion is often characterized by such dysfunction and experienced through constipation; recovery, a welcome return to defecating 'normally.' Drawing on interviews with active and recovering heroin users in southern England, we focus on this moment of transition in order to illuminate the experiences and transitions between a dysfunctional, constipated body and 'normal' defecation. We discuss the contrast between candor in talk in active use with the silences surrounding defecation talk in recovery, and analyze these twin shifts within the context of a historical progression within Europe toward ever-increasing levels of masking defecation from social life. Located thus, this analysis of the tipping point between constipation and 'normality,' disclosure and embarrassment, provides a powerful lens through which to view the invisibility of defecation in contemporary British social life.

  14. Nutritional effects of marijuana, heroin, cocaine, and nicotine.

    PubMed

    Mohs, M E; Watson, R R; Leonard-Green, T

    1990-09-01

    Use of addictive drugs, such as cocaine, marijuana, and nicotine, affects food and liquid intake behavior, taste preference, and body weight. Changes in specific nutrient status and metabolism can also develop; heroin addiction can cause hyperkalemia and morphine use can result in calcium inhibition. Nutrition-related physiological aspects, such as impaired gastrin release, hypercholesterolemia, hypothermia, and hyperthermia, are also seen with morphine use. Nutrition-related conditions can affect sensitivity to and dependence on drugs and their effects. Diabetes decreases sensitivity to and dependence on morphine, protein deprivation produces preferential fat utilization with low cocaine use, and vitamin D deficiency decelerates morphine dependency. During use and/or withdrawal from nicotine, heroin, marijuana, and cocaine, major changes in food selection and intake occur, which result in weight gain or loss. Detailed human studies are needed to investigate the effects of drug use on the broad spectrum of nutrients and to determine the role of nutrition during drug withdrawal.

  15. Talcum induced pneumoconiosis following inhalation of adulterated marijuana, a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Talcosis, a granulomatous inflammation of the lungs caused by inhalation of talcum dust, is a rare form of pneumoconiosis. Besides inhalative occupational exposure, intravenous abuse of adulterated drugs is a major cause for this condition. Minerals such as talcum (magnesium silicate) and sand (predominant silicon dioxide) are used to increase both volume and weight of illicit substances. In intravenous heroin-abuse, talcosis is a well-known complication. Here we describe a case of talcosis caused by inhalative abuse of adulterated marijuana. Clinical history A 29-year old man presented with persistent fever, dyspnea and cervical emphysema. He admitted consumption of 'cut' marijuana for several years, preferentially by water pipe smoking. Morphologic findings Lung-biopsies showed chronic interstitial lung disease, anthracotic pigments and birefringent material. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy revealed silicon-containing particles (1-2 μm) and fine aluminum particles (< 1 μm), magnesium and several other elements forming a spectrum compatible with the stated water pipe smoking of talcum-adulterated marijuana. Conclusions The exacerbated chronic interstitial lung disease in a 29-year old patient could be attributed to his prolonged abuse of talcum-adulterated marjuana by histopathology and x-ray spectroscopy. Since cannabis consumption is widely spread among young adults, it seems to be justified to raise attention to this form of interstitial pulmonary disease. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnomx.eu/vs/krause/html/start.html. PMID:22420484

  16. Predicting Heroin and Alcohol Usage Among Young Puerto Ricans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttall, Ronald L.; Nuttall, Ena Vazquez

    Using 1968 data collected from junior and senior high school students in Bayamon, Puerto Rico, substance usage patterns for heroin and alcohol were predicted for 1975-6. A sample of 1,000 of the initial 5,000 students were selected for re-interview; half were selected to be at high risk of substance abuse and half were selected randomly. Some 657…

  17. Personality Characteristics of Viet Nam veterans identified as heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Black, F W

    1975-07-01

    The author presents data on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) characteristics of a sample of enlisted Army men returning from Viet Nam identified as heroin abusers. Although a marked heterogeneity of MMPI profile types was found, a significant percentage of the subjects showed indications of marked psychopathology, and only a minority performed within normal limits on the MMPI. Theses military subjects showed neither greater nor less psychopathology and sociopathology than previously reported samples of civilian addicts.

  18. Heroin body packer's death in Haryana; India: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jakhar, Jitender Kumar; Dhattarwal, S K; Aggarwal, A D; Chikara, Pankaj; Khanagwal, Vijay Pal

    2013-08-01

    We report a case of death due to heroin leakage in a body packer, attempting to smuggle the drug by concealing it in his gastro-intestinal tract. The body was recovered 3-5 days of incidence that was confirmed by autopsy. Fifty pellets (packages) were recovered from the body, 42 identical oval shaped "egg" packages were found in the stomach out of which two were damaged, 6 in small intestine, 2 in large intestine. The total weight of the powder was 267 g. Toxicological analysis of the powder samples from the damaged package and other 48 packages was performed and was found positive for heroin, caffeine and codeine. The main pathological findings at autopsy were pulmonary and cerebral edema. This case illustrates the challenges in postmortem evaluation of narcotic fatalities and the need to consider factors such as ante-mortem history, thorough post mortem examination, toxicology results and photography in forensic diagnosis. This case is unique in the sense that cause of death was intoxication caused by leakage of heroin from damaged packages detected at autopsy and demonstrates that body packing is an existing problem in India.

  19. Epigenetically modified nucleotides in chronic heroin and cocaine treated mice.

    PubMed

    Chao, Mu-Rong; Fragou, Domniki; Zanos, Panos; Hu, Chiung-Wen; Bailey, Alexis; Kouidou, Sofia; Kovatsi, Leda

    2014-09-17

    Epigenetic changes include the addition of a methyl group to the 5' carbon of the cytosine ring, known as DNA methylation, which results in the generation of the fifth DNA base, namely 5-methylcytosine. During active or passive demethylation, an intermediate modified base is formed, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. We have currently quantified 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in the liver and brain of mice treated with cocaine or heroin, using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Our results show that global 5-methylcytosine levels are not affected by heroin or cocaine administration, neither in the liver nor in the brain. However, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels are reduced in the liver following cocaine administration, while they are not affected by cocaine in the brain or by heroin administration in the liver and the brain. Elucidation of the epigenetic phenomena that takes place with respect to drug abuse and addiction, via quantitative analysis of different modified bases, may enable a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms and may lead to more personalized and effective treatment options.

  20. Ethnic dimensions of habitus among homeless heroin injectors

    PubMed Central

    Bourgois, Philippe; Schonberg, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Ten years of participant-observation fieldwork and photography among a multi-ethnic social network of homeless heroin injectors and crack smokers in California reveal hierarchical interpersonal relations between African Americans, whites and Latinos despite the fact that they all share a physical addiction to heroin and live in indigent poverty in the same encampments. Focusing on tensions between blacks and whites, we develop the concept of ‘ethnicized habitus’ to understand how divisions drawn on the basis of skin color are enforced through everyday interaction to produce ‘intimate apartheid’ in the context of physical proximity and shared destitution. Specifically, we examine how two components of ethnic habitus are generated. One is a simple technique of the body, a preference for intravenous versus intramuscular or subcutaneous heroin injection. The second revolves around income-generation strategies and is more obviously related to external power constraints. Both these components fit into a larger constellation of ethnic distinction rooted in historically entrenched political, economic and ideological forces. An understanding of the generative forces of the ethnic dimensions of habitus allows us to recognize how macro-power relations produce intimate desires and ways of being that become inscribed on individual bodies and routinized in behavior. These distinctions are, for the most part, interpreted as natural attributes of genetics and culture by many people in the United States, justifying a racialized moral hierarchy. PMID:19777125

  1. Heroin: from drug to ambivalent medicine : on the introduction of medically prescribed heroin and the emergence of a new space for treatment.

    PubMed

    Schepelern Johansen, Birgitte; Schepelern Johansen, Katrine

    2015-03-01

    This article provides an anthropological analysis of the introduction of medically prescribed heroin as part of official substance abuse treatment. While anthropological inquiries of substance abuse treatment have mainly focused on providing the users perspectives on the (ab)use or unraveling the conflicts and negotiations between users and staff, the present article argues for the merits of paying attention to the spatial dimensions of substance abuse treatment. Focusing on the spatial and material ramification of the treatment can shed a nuanced light on the still vulnerable process of altering the heroin from drug to medicine, and thereby on the attempts to settle heroin in a new practical and semantic landscape. The heroin is anchored in some powerful discourses of crime, death, and pleasure, and the analysis shows how these discourses (re-)appear in the spatial textures of the clinic, contesting the attempts to medicalize the heroin. Further, the article argues that even though the treatment aims at a marginalization of the heroin in the life of the clients, the spatial arrangements and the practices within them simultaneously enforces a centralization of the heroin, making the space for treatment highly ambivalent.

  2. Pneumoconiosis after sericite inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Algranti, E; Handar, A; Dumortier, P; Mendonca, E; Rodrigues, G; Santos, A; Mauad, T; Dolhnikoff, M; De Vuyst, P; Saldiva, P; Bussacos, M

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To investigate and describe the radiological, clinical, and pathological changes in miners and millers exposed to sericite dust with mineralogical characteristics of inhaled dust. Methods: The working premises were visited to examine the sericite processing and to classify the jobs according to make qualitative evaluation. Respirable dust was collected and the amount of crystalline silica and particle size distribution were measured. Forty four workers were examined by a standard questionnaire for respiratory symptoms, spirometry, and chest x ray. Material from an open lung biopsy was reviewed for histopathological and mineralogical analysis, together with sericite samples from the work site to compare the mineral characteristics in lung lesions and work area. Results: Respirable dust contained 4.5–10.0% crystalline silica. Particle size distribution showed a heavy burden of very fine particles (23–55%) with a mean diameter of <0.5 µm. Mean age of sericite miners was 41.0 (11.9) and mean number of years of exposure was 13.5 (10.1). In 52.3% of workers (23/44), chest radiographs presented a median category of 1/0 or above, and 18.2% (8/44) had a reduced FEV1. There was a significant association between exposure indices and x ray category. Histological studies of the lung biopsy showed lesions compatible with mixed dust fibrosis with no silicotic nodules. x Ray diffraction analysis of the lung dust residue and the bulk samples collected from work area showed similar mineralogical characteristics. Muscovite and kaolinite were the major mineral particle inclusions in the lung. Conclusion: Exposure to fine sericite particles is associated with the development of functional and radiological changes in workers inducing mixed dust lesions, which are distinct histologically from silicosis. PMID:15723874

  3. Hanford Tank Ventilation System Condensates and Headspace Vapors: An Assessment of Potential Dermal Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, James L.; Springer, David L.

    2006-04-24

    This study considers the question of whether potential dermal exposures to Hanford high-level radioactive waste tank headspace vapors and their condensates could result in significant exposure to workers. Three types of potential exposures were evaluated; dermal contact with aqueous condensate, organic condensate, and direct contact with head space vapors. The dermal absorption rates from aqueous and organic condensates were estimated for selected chemicals using a model described by EPA (1992) with a modified correlation for dermal permeability suggested by Wilschut et al. (1995). Dermal absorption rates of vapors were estimated using a model given by AIHA (2000). Results were compared to an ''equivalent inhalation dose'' calculated by multiplying the inhalation occupational exposure limit by a nominal daily inhalation rate. The results should provide guidance for industrial hygienists to prepare specific recommendations based on specific scenarios.

  4. Greater Avoidance of a Heroin-Paired Taste Cue is Associated with Greater Escalation of Heroin Self-Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Imperio, Caesar G.; Grigson, Patricia S.

    2015-01-01

    Heroin addiction is a disease of chronic relapse affecting over half of its users. Therefore, modeling individual differences in addiction-like behavior is needed to better reflect the human condition. In a rodent model, avoidance of a cocaine-paired saccharin cue is associated with greater cocaine seeking and taking. Here, we tested whether rats would avoid a saccharin cue when paired with the opportunity to self-administer heroin and whether the rats that most greatly avoid the heroin-paired taste cue would exhibit the greatest drug escalation over time, the greatest willingness to work for drug, and the greatest heroin-induced relapse. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received 5 min access to a 0.15% saccharin solution followed by the opportunity to self-administer either saline or heroin for 3 h (short access) or 6 h (extended access). Following 16 – 18 pairings, terminal saccharin intake was used to categorize the rats into small (>200 licks/5min) or large (<200 licks/5min) suppressors and responding for drug was examined accordingly. Only 5% of the short access rats reached the criteria for large suppressors. This large suppressor did not differ from the small suppressors in drug taking behavior. Conversely, 50% of the extended access saccharin-heroin rats were large suppressors and showed the largest escalation of drug intake, drug-loading behavior, and the greatest relapse-like behaviors. Extended access small suppressors displayed drug-taking behaviors that were similar to rats in the short access heroin condition. Avoidance of a heroin-paired taste cue reliably identifies individual differences in addiction-like behavior for heroin using extended drug access. PMID:26214212

  5. Greater avoidance of a heroin-paired taste cue is associated with greater escalation of heroin self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Imperio, Caesar G; Grigson, Patricia S

    2015-08-01

    Heroin addiction is a disease of chronic relapse affecting over half of its users. Therefore, modeling individual differences in addiction-like behavior is needed to better reflect the human condition. In a rodent model, avoidance of a cocaine-paired saccharin cue is associated with greater cocaine seeking and taking. Here, we tested whether rats would avoid a saccharin cue when paired with the opportunity to self-administer heroin and whether the rats that most greatly avoid the heroin-paired taste cue would exhibit the greatest drug escalation over time, the greatest willingness to work for drug, and the greatest heroin-induced relapse. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received 5 min access to a 0.15% saccharin solution followed by the opportunity to self-administer either saline or heroin for 3 hr (short access) or 6 hr (extended access). Following 16 to 18 pairings, terminal saccharin intake was used to categorize the rats into small (>200 licks/5min) or large (<200 licks/5min) suppressors and responding for drug was examined accordingly. Only 5% of the short access rats reached the criteria for large suppressors. This large suppressor did not differ from the small suppressors in drug-taking behavior. On the other hand, 50% of the extended access saccharin-heroin rats were large suppressors and showed the largest escalation of drug intake, drug-loading behavior, and the greatest relapse-like behaviors. Extended access small suppressors displayed drug-taking behaviors that were similar to rats in the short access heroin condition. Avoidance of a heroin-paired taste cue reliably identifies individual differences in addiction-like behavior for heroin using extended drug access.

  6. Locomotor Stimulant and Rewarding Effects of Inhaling Methamphetamine, MDPV, and Mephedrone via Electronic Cigarette-Type Technology.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jacques D; Aarde, Shawn M; Cole, Maury; Vandewater, Sophia A; Grant, Yanabel; Taffe, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Although inhaled exposure to drugs is a prevalent route of administration for human substance abusers, preclinical models that incorporate inhaled exposure to psychomotor stimulants are not commonly available. Using a novel method that incorporates electronic cigarette-type technology to facilitate inhalation, male Wistar rats were exposed to vaporized methamphetamine (MA), 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), and mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) in propylene glycol vehicle using concentrations ranging from 12.5 to 200 mg/ml. Rats exhibited increases in spontaneous locomotor activity, measured by implanted radiotelemetry, following exposure to methamphetamine (12.5 and 100 mg/ml), MDPV (25, 50, and 100 mg/ml), and mephedrone (200 mg/ml). Locomotor effects were blocked by pretreatment with the dopamine D1-like receptor antagonist SCH23390 (10 μg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.)). MA and MDPV vapor inhalation also altered activity on a running wheel in a biphasic manner. An additional group of rats was trained on a discrete trial intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure interpreted to assess brain reward status. ICSS-trained rats that received vaporized MA, MDPV, or mephedrone exhibited a significant reduction in threshold of ICSS reward compared with vehicle. The effect of vapor inhalation of the stimulants was found comparable to the locomotor and ICSS threshold-reducing effects of i.p. injection of mephedrone (5.0 mg/kg), MA (0.5-1.0 mg/kg), or MDPV (0.5-1.0 mg/kg). These data provide robust validation of e-cigarette-type technology as a model for inhaled delivery of vaporized psychostimulants. Finally, these studies demonstrate the potential for human use of e-cigarettes to facilitate covert use of a range of psychoactive stimulants. Thus, these devices pose health risks beyond their intended application for the delivery of nicotine.

  7. Inferior Frontal Cortex Modulation with an Acute Dose of Heroin During Cognitive Control

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, André; Walter, Marc; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Smieskova, Renata; Bendfeldt, Kerstin; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Lang, Undine E; Rubia, Katya; McGuire, Philip; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Impairments in inhibitory control and in stimulus-driven attention are hallmarks of drug addiction and are associated with decreased activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Although previous studies indicate that the response inhibition function is impaired in abstinent heroin dependents, and that this is mediated by reduced IFG activity, it remains completely unknown whether and how an acute dose of heroin modulates IFG activity during cognitive control in heroin-dependent patients. This study investigates the acute effects of heroin administration on IFG activity during response inhibition and stimulus-driven attention in heroin-dependent patients. Using a cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, saline and heroin were administered to 26 heroin-dependent patients from stable heroin-assisted treatment, while performing a Go/No–Go event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging task to assess right IFG activity during motor response inhibition, as well as during oddball-driven attention allocation. Relative to saline, heroin significantly reduced right IFG activity during both successful response inhibition and oddball-driven attention allocation, whereas it did not change right IFG activity during response inhibition after correction for the effect of attention allocation. These heroin-induced effects were not related to changes in drug craving, state anxiety, behavioral performance, or co-consumption of psychostimulant drugs. This study demonstrates that heroin administration acutely impairs stimulus-driven attention allocation, as indicated by reduced IFG activity in response to infrequently presented stimuli, and does not specifically modulate IFG activity during response inhibition. PMID:23673865

  8. Discriminative stimulus effects of intravenous heroin and its metabolites in rhesus monkeys: opioid and dopaminergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Platt, D M; Rowlett, J K; Spealman, R D

    2001-11-01

    Heroin has characteristic subjective effects that contribute importantly to its widespread abuse. Drug discrimination procedures in animals have proven to be useful models for investigating pharmacological mechanisms underlying the subjective effects of drugs in humans. However, surprisingly little information exists concerning the mechanisms underlying the discriminative stimulus (DS) effects of heroin. This study characterized the DS effects of heroin in rhesus monkeys trained to discriminate i.v. heroin from saline. In drug substitution experiments, heroin, its metabolites 6-monoacetylmorphine, morphine, morphine-6-glucuronide, and morphine-3-glucuronide, and the mu-agonists fentanyl and methadone engendered dose-dependent increases in heroin-lever responding, reaching average maximums of >80% (full substitution) at doses that did not appreciably suppress response rate. In contrast, the delta-agonist SNC 80, the kappa-agonist spiradoline, and the dopamine uptake blockers/releasers cocaine, methamphetamine, and GBR 12909 did not engender heroin-like DS effects regardless of dose. In antagonism studies, in vivo apparent pA2 and pK(B) values for naltrexone combined with heroin, morphine, and 6-monoacetylmorphine (8.0-8.7) were comparable with those reported previously for naltrexone antagonism of prototypical mu-agonists. The results show that the DS effects of heroin are pharmacologically specific and mediated primarily at mu-opioid receptors. Moreover, the acetylated and glucuronated metabolites of heroin appear to play significant roles in these effects. Despite previous speculation that morphine-3-glucuronide lacks significant opioid activity, it substituted fully for heroin in our study, suggesting that it can exhibit prominent mu-agonist effects in vivo.

  9. Role of 6-monoacetylmorphine in the acute release of striatal dopamine induced by intravenous heroin.

    PubMed

    Gottås, A; Boix, F; Øiestad, E L; Vindenes, V; Mørland, J

    2014-09-01

    After injection, heroin is rapidly metabolized to 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) and further to morphine. As morphine has been shown to increase striatal dopamine, whereas 6-MAM has not been studied in this respect, we gave i.v. injections of 3 μmol 6-MAM, morphine or heroin to rats. Opioids were measured in blood, and dopamine and opioids in microdialysate from brain striatal extracellular fluid (ECF), by UPLC-MS/MS. After 6-MAM injection, 6-MAM ECF concentrations increased rapidly, and reached Cmax of 4.4 μM after 8 min. After heroin injection, 6-MAM increased rapidly in blood and reached Cmax of 6.4 μM in ECF after 8 min, while ECF Cmax for heroin was 1.2 μM after 2 min. T max for morphine in ECF was 29 and 24 min following 6-MAM and heroin administration, respectively, with corresponding Cmax levels of 1 and 2 μM. Dopamine levels peaked after 8 and 14 min following 6-MAM and heroin administration, respectively. The dopamine responses were equal, indicating no dopamine release by heroin per se. Furthermore, 6-MAM, and not morphine, appeared to mediate the early dopamine response, whereas morphine administration, giving rise to morphine ECF concentrations similar to those observed shortly after 6-MAM injection, did not increase ECF dopamine. 6-MAM appeared accordingly to be the substance responsible for the early increase in dopamine observed after heroin injection. As 6-MAM was formed rapidly from heroin in blood, and was the major substance reaching the brain after heroin administration, this also indicates that factors influencing blood 6-MAM concentrations might change the behavioural effects of heroin.

  10. Inferior frontal cortex modulation with an acute dose of heroin during cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, André; Walter, Marc; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Smieskova, Renata; Bendfeldt, Kerstin; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Lang, Undine E; Rubia, Katya; McGuire, Philip; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    Impairments in inhibitory control and in stimulus-driven attention are hallmarks of drug addiction and are associated with decreased activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Although previous studies indicate that the response inhibition function is impaired in abstinent heroin dependents, and that this is mediated by reduced IFG activity, it remains completely unknown whether and how an acute dose of heroin modulates IFG activity during cognitive control in heroin-dependent patients. This study investigates the acute effects of heroin administration on IFG activity during response inhibition and stimulus-driven attention in heroin-dependent patients. Using a cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, saline and heroin were administered to 26 heroin-dependent patients from stable heroin-assisted treatment, while performing a Go/No-Go event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging task to assess right IFG activity during motor response inhibition, as well as during oddball-driven attention allocation. Relative to saline, heroin significantly reduced right IFG activity during both successful response inhibition and oddball-driven attention allocation, whereas it did not change right IFG activity during response inhibition after correction for the effect of attention allocation. These heroin-induced effects were not related to changes in drug craving, state anxiety, behavioral performance, or co-consumption of psychostimulant drugs. This study demonstrates that heroin administration acutely impairs stimulus-driven attention allocation, as indicated by reduced IFG activity in response to infrequently presented stimuli, and does not specifically modulate IFG activity during response inhibition.

  11. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  12. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, John P.; Larson, Ronald A.; Goodrich, Lorenzo D.; Hall, Harold J.; Stoddard, Billy D.; Davis, Sean G.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Conrad, Frank J.

    1995-01-01

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

  13. Attitudes of Australian heroin users to peer distribution of naloxone for heroin overdose: perspectives on intranasal administration.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Debra; Dietze, Paul; Kelly, Anne-Maree; Jolley, Damien

    2008-05-01

    Naloxone distribution to injecting drug users (IDUs) for peer administration is a suggested strategy to prevent fatal heroin overdose. The aim of this study was to explore attitudes of IDUs to administration of naloxone to others after heroin overdose, and preferences for method of administration. A sample of 99 IDUs (median age 35 years, 72% male) recruited from needle and syringe programs in Melbourne were administered a questionnaire. Data collected included demographics, attitudes to naloxone distribution, and preferences for method of administration. The primary study outcomes were attitudes of IDUs to use of naloxone for peer administration (categorized on a five-point scale ranging from "very good idea" to "very bad idea") and preferred mode of administration (intravenous, intramuscular, and intranasal). The majority of the sample reported positive attitudes toward naloxone distribution (good to very good idea: 89%) and 92% said they were willing to participate in a related training program. Some participants raised concerns about peer administration including the competence of IDUs to administer naloxone in an emergency, victim response on wakening and legal implications. Most (74%) preferred intranasal administration in comparison to other administration methods (21%). There was no association with age, sex, or heroin practice. There appears to be strong support among Australian IDU for naloxone distribution to peers. Intranasal spray is the preferred route of administration.

  14. A reduction in blood morphine concentrations amongst heroin overdose fatalities associated with a sustained reduction in street heroin purity.

    PubMed

    Darke, Shane; Duflou, Johan; Torok, Michelle

    2010-05-20

    To determine the effects of a sudden and sustained reduction in heroin purity on the toxicology of heroin overdose, 959 consecutive heroin overdose cases autopsied at the NSW Department of Forensic Medicine (1/1/1998-31/12/2006) were analysed. There was a significant reduction in blood morphine concentration across the study period (beta=-0.07), declining from a median of 0.50mg/L in the years 1998-2000 prior to 0.40mg/L in the period 2001-2006. There was no significant change in the proportion of alcohol positive cases, but the proportion of benzodiazepine positive cases increased across time (OR 1.11), as did methadone positive cases (OR 1.12). The decline in blood morphine concentrations remained significant after controlling for these factors (beta=-0.07). In determining toxic and lethal morphine concentrations, the fact that the toxicology of overdose is responsive to changes in the opioid street market needs to be borne in mind.

  15. Heroin use among Miami's public school students, 1992: peers and the "drug subculture" overwhelm parents, religion and schools.

    PubMed

    Yarnold, B M

    1996-01-01

    This analysis examines the use of heroin by 481 adolescents in Dade County, Florida public schools during 1992. Statistically significant factors which tend to increase the probability of heroin use by adolescents include: peer use of heroin and students' involvement in school clubs. Not significantly related to heroin use is their access to the drug, their ethnic background or race, and their gender. Although not statistically significant, adolescents were more likely to use heroin if they knew of the risks associated with heroin use. There are no statistically significant variables which inhibit the rise of heroin by Miami adolescents. When religion was an important part of their lives, they were at lower risk for heroin use, but this was not significant. Also not significantly related to heroin use are a number of other variables, including family-related variables (whether adolescents live with their mothers, fathers, or alone: and whether someone in the family has a problem with drugs or alcohol). Similarly, early cigarette smoking and alcohol rise did not serve as gateways to later heroin use. Academic performance, and extracurricular school activities (athletics, music, and other activities) were all unrelated to the use of heroin by adolescents, with the exception of involvement in school clubs which substantially increased the risk of heroin use.

  16. Trajectories of Heroin Addiction: Growth Mixture Modeling Results Based on a 33-Year Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Huang, David; Chou, Chih-Ping; Anglin, M. Douglas

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates trajectories of heroin use and subsequent consequences in a sample of 471 male heroin addicts who were admitted to the California Civil Addict Program in 1964-1965 and followed over 33 years. Applying a two-part growth mixture modeling strategy to heroin use level during the first 16 years of the addiction careers since…

  17. Inhalation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB) Produces Hyperactivity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, John P; Berger, David F; Hunt, Anne; Carpenter, David O

    2015-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a serious behavioral syndrome seen in children, and more common in males than females. There is increasing evidence that prenatal and/or early life exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POP) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) is associated with increased risk of ADHD occurrence. While PCB exposure is usually attributed to ingestion of contaminated food, recent reports of elevated PCB concentrations in indoor air, especially in schools, raised concern regarding inhalation as an important route of exposure to PCB with consequent effects on neurobehavior. The effects of exposure to air contaminated with Aroclor 1248 or contaminated sediment (SED) from the St. Lawrence River were examined on operant behavior of male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. Data showed that relative to controls, vapor-phase inhalation of PCB, whether from blowing air over Aroclor 1248 or from blowing air over sediment contaminated with PCB, resulted in hyperactivity and impatience in rats, more pronounced in males than females. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that inhalation of PCB may contribute to behavioral abnormalities in children.

  18. Draft genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis UR-1, isolated from a German heroin user.

    PubMed

    Rückert, Christian; Licht, Katharina; Kalinowski, Jörn; Espírito Santo, Christophe; Antwerpen, Markus; Hanczaruk, Matthias; Reischl, Udo; Holzmann, Thomas; Gessner, André; Tiemann, Carsten; Grass, Gregor

    2012-11-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis UR-1, isolated from a fatal case of injectional anthrax in a German heroin user. Analysis of the genome sequence of strain UR-1 may aid in describing phylogenetic relationships between virulent heroin-associated isolates of B. anthracis isolated in the United Kingdom, Germany, and other European countries.

  19. Chronic intermittent heroin produces locomotor sensitization and long-lasting enhancement of conditioned reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Morrison, J; Thornton, V; Ranaldi, R

    2011-09-01

    In a previous study we showed that chronic intermittent heroin in rats enhanced responding with conditioned reinforcement and reversal learning of a conditioned magazine approach task when tested three days after the heroin treatment. Whether or not this enhanced appetitive learning persists after a protracted withdrawal period remains unknown and constitutes the aim of the present study. Forty-eight male Long Evans rats were each exposed to positive pairings of a light stimulus and food for 4 consecutive daily sessions. Then, two groups of rats received saline and two groups received heroin (2 mg/kg) injections before placement in activity monitors for 9 consecutive daily sessions. This was followed by testing in operant conditioning chambers where one lever produced the light stimulus previously paired with food and another no stimulus. For one saline and one heroin group this testing occurred after 2 days of withdrawal while for the other saline and heroin groups it occurred after 30 days of withdrawal. The results indicate that animals treated with heroin displayed progressively and significantly greater locomotor activity across sessions while animals treated with saline displayed locomotor activity that remained low and stable across sessions. In addition, the heroin groups in each withdrawal condition displayed significantly enhanced responding with conditioned reinforcement compared to their respective saline control groups. These results demonstrate that chronic intermittent heroin enhances appetitive learning for natural reinforcers and motivational processes and that this effect persists even after 30-days of withdrawal.

  20. Evidence from opiate binding studies that heroin acts through its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Inturrisi, C E; Schultz, M; Shin, S; Umans, J G; Angel, L; Simon, E J

    1983-01-01

    The relative affinity to opiate receptors of heroin, 6-acetylmorphine and morphine was estimated by determining their ability to displace specifically bound 3H-naltrexone from rat brain opiate binding sites. In vitro hydrolysis of heroin to 6-acetylmorphine was monitored in the binding assay filtrate by use of a quantitative HPLC procedure. The rate of heroin hydrolysis was significantly slower at 0 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. The displacement of 1 nM 3H-naltrexone by unlabeled ligand at concentrations ranging from 7 to 500 nM was measured at 0 degrees C for 120 minutes, yielding IC50 values of heroin = 483 nM, 6-acetylmorphine = 73 nM and morphine = 53 nM. When the binding data for heroin were recalculated to include the displacement that could be attributed to the 6-acetylmorphine derived from heroin degradation during the incubation, all of the apparent heroin binding was accounted for by the 6-acetylmorphine. These results are consistent with previous reports of the low binding affinity of morphine congeners (e.g., codeine) that lack a free phenolic 3-hydroxyl group and support the view that heroin is a prodrug which serves to determine the distribution of its intrinsically active metabolites, 6-acetylmorphine and morphine.

  1. Interactions between Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and heroin: self-administration in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Xu; Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P

    2012-12-01

    The cannabinoid receptor agonist Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) enhances the antinociceptive effects of µ-opioid receptor agonists, raising the possibility of using a combination of THC and opioids for treating pain. This study examined the effects of noncontingent and contingent administration of THC on intravenous heroin self-administration in rhesus monkeys. Self-administration of different unit doses of heroin (0.0001-0.1 mg/kg/infusion) generated a typical inverted U-shaped dose-response curve. In one experiment (n=4), noncontingent THC (0.1-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently shifted the heroin dose-response curve downward in three monkeys and slightly leftward in one monkey. In a second experiment (n=4), monkeys could self-administer THC alone (0.0032-0.032 mg/kg/infusion), heroin alone, or a mixture of THC and heroin. THC alone did not maintain responding above that obtained with saline; however, increasing the THC dose with heroin dose dependently decreased the number of infusions received and the rate of responding, as compared with data that were obtained with heroin alone. These results indicate that THC does not significantly enhance the positive reinforcing effects of heroin, further supporting the view that combining cannabinoid and opioid receptor agonists (e.g. for treating pain) does not increase, and might decrease, the abuse liability of individual drugs.

  2. A Collection of NIDA NOTES. Articles That Address Research on Heroin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    Included in this document are selections of topic-specific articles on heroin research reprinted from the National Institute on Drug Abuses (NIDA) research newsletter, NIDA Notes. Titles include: Buprenorphine Taken Three Times Per Week Is as Effective as Daily Doses in Treating Heroin Addiction; 33-Year Study Finds Lifelong, Lethal Consequences…

  3. Interactions between delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and heroin: self-administration in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-Xu; Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor agonist delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) enhances the antinociceptive effects of mu opioid receptor agonists, raising the possibility of using a combination of THC and opioids for treating pain. This study examined the effects of noncontingent and contingent administration of THC on i.v. heroin self-administration in rhesus monkeys. Self-administration of different unit doses of heroin (0.0001–0.1 mg/kg/infusion) generated a typical inverted U-shaped dose-response curve. In one experiment (n=4), noncontingent THC (0.1–1.0 mg/kg) dose-dependently shifted the heroin dose-response curve downward in three monkeys and slightly leftward in one monkey. In a second experiment (n=4), monkeys could self-administer THC alone (0.0032–0.032 mg/kg/infusion), heroin alone, or a mixture of THC and heroin. THC alone did not maintain responding above that obtained with saline; however, increasing the THC dose with heroin dose-dependently decreased the number of infusions received and the rate of responding, as compared to data that were obtained with heroin alone. These results indicate that THC does not significantly enhance the positive reinforcing effects of heroin, further supporting the view that combining cannabinoid and opioid receptor agonists (e.g., for treating pain) does not increase, and might decrease, the abuse liability of the individual drugs. PMID:23044830

  4. Marijuana Use by Heroin Abusers as a Factor in Program Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellner, Melvyn

    1977-01-01

    Primary heroin abusers who remained in a voluntary drug-free treatment program for an average of nine months were carefully matched with not-retained control subjects. Marijuana was used by the retained subjects as a heroin substitute and those who used marijuana were more apt to remain in the treatment program. (Author)

  5. Heroin Use among Southern Arrestees: Regional Findings from the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Ronald J., Jr.; Yacoubian, George S., Jr.; Baumler, Elizabeth R.; Ross, Michael W.; Johnson, Regina J.

    2002-01-01

    To be effective with rehabilitation counseling, counselors need to be aware of cultural patterns of drug use. This study analyzed trends in heroin use between 1990 and 1997 among the arrestee population in some parts of the South. Findings suggest geographic, ethnic, and age-related variables for heroin use. (JDM)

  6. Heroin: Abuse and Addiction. National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    Although heroin use has decreased in the general population during the last few years, a troubling new trend is emerging. Use is up among school-age children and they are now subject to a popular culture in music and films that glamorizes its use. This trend along with increased availability and purity of heroin has created a major health concern…

  7. Pleasure, power and dangerous substances: applying Foucault to the study of 'heroin dependence' in Germany.

    PubMed

    Bergschmidt, Viktoria B

    2004-04-01

    Taking the observation of disciplining and controlling everyday practices of methadone substitution as a point of departure, this paper explores the question of what exactly is so threatening or dangerous about heroin and heroin users. Drawing on the work of Michel Foucault and Judith Butler, the main argument of this article is that the danger of heroin use is a discursive construction in accordance with bio-power. On the one hand, the juridical governance of heroin dependence is shifting from punishment to therapy, and biomedical discourses proclaim the substitution of a moral notion of heroin dependence by a disease model. Nevertheless, in the context of the anxiety associated with HIV, heroin remains the dangerous drug par excellence, and heroin users are constructed as 'abject others', unable to subordinate to certain social norms. As a reaction to such injurious ascriptions, I argue, applicants to the methadone programme in their life stories intensely narrate a desire for normalization, which I read as a desire to emerge from the realm of the abject. Both the danger and the pleasure associated with heroin use are bound to fundamental processes of subject formation, which are often ignored in biomedical and anthropological discourses.

  8. Heroin mismatch in the Motor City: addiction, segregation, and the geography of opportunity.

    PubMed

    Draus, Paul; Roddy, Juliette; Greenwald, Mark

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors used data from economic and ethnographic interviews with heroin users from Detroit, Michigan, as well as other sources, to illustrate the relationship between heroin users' mobility patterns and urban and suburban environments, especially in terms of drug acquisition and the geography of opportunity. The authors found that although geographic location and social networks associated with segregation provided central city residents and African Americans with a strategic advantage over White suburbanites in locating and purchasing heroin easily and efficiently, this same segregation effectively focuses the negative externalities of heroin markets in central city neighborhoods. Finally, the authors consider how the heroin trade reflects and reproduces the segregated post-industrial landscape and discuss directions for future research about the relationship between ethnic and economic ghettos and regional drug markets.

  9. The development of preschool children of heroin-addicted mothers: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Wilson, G S; McCreary, R; Kean, J; Baxter, J C

    1979-01-01

    Disturbances of growth and behavior in infants and toddlers of women addicted to heroin during pregnancy have been reported in uncontrolled studies. In this study, 3- to 6-year-old children of heroin-addicted mothers were compared to three other groups matched for age, race, sex, birth weight, and socioeconomic status. Heroin-exposed children weighed less and were shorter than those in the comparison groups; 14% had a head circumference below the third percentile. Heroin-exposed children were rated by parents as less well adjusted than control children and they differed significantly in perceptual measures and on subtests of the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities and McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities relating to the process of organization. These findings suggest that chronic intrauterine exposure to heroin may affect growth and behavior as well as perceptual and learning processes in preschool children.

  10. Cannabinoid and heroin activation of mesolimbic dopamine transmission by a common mu1 opioid receptor mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tanda, G; Pontieri, F E; Di Chiara, G

    1997-06-27

    The effects of the active ingredient of Cannabis, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC), and of the highly addictive drug heroin on in vivo dopamine transmission in the nucleus accumbens were compared in Sprague-Dawley rats by brain microdialysis. Delta9-THC and heroin increased extracellular dopamine concentrations selectively in the shell of the nucleus accumbens; these effects were mimicked by the synthetic cannabinoid agonist WIN55212-2. SR141716A, an antagonist of central cannabinoid receptors, prevented the effects of Delta9-THC but not those of heroin. Naloxone, a generic opioid antagonist, administered systemically, or naloxonazine, an antagonist of micro1 opioid receptors, infused into the ventral tegmentum, prevented the action of cannabinoids and heroin on dopamine transmission. Thus, Delta9-THC and heroin exert similar effects on mesolimbic dopamine transmission through a common mu1 opioid receptor mechanism located in the ventral mesencephalic tegmentum.

  11. Region-specific contribution of the ventral tegmental area to heroin-induced conditioned immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Lee W; Szczytkowski, Jennifer L; Saurer, Timothy B; Lebonville, Christina; Fuchs, Rita A; Lysle, Donald T

    2014-05-01

    Dopamine receptor stimulation is critical for heroin-conditioned immunomodulation; however, it is unclear whether the ventral tegmental area (VTA) contributes to this phenomenon. Hence, rats received repeated pairings of heroin with placement into a distinct environmental context. At test, they were re-exposed to the previously heroin-paired environment followed by systemic lipopolysaccharide treatment to induce an immune response. Bilateral GABA agonist-induced neural inactivation of the anterior, but not the posterior VTA, prior to context re-exposure inhibited the ability of the heroin-paired environment to suppress peripheral nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α expression, suggesting a role for the anterior VTA in heroin-conditioned immunomodulation.

  12. Characterization of an inhaled toluene drug discrimination in mice: effect of exposure conditions and route of administration.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Keith L; Slavova-Hernandez, Galina

    2009-06-01

    The drug discrimination procedure in animals has been extensively utilized to model the abuse related, subjective effects of drugs in humans, but it has seldom been used to examine abused volatile inhalants like toluene. The present study sought to characterize the temporal aspects of toluene's discriminative stimulus as well assess toluene blood concentrations under identical exposure conditions. B6SJLF1/J mice were trained to discriminate 10 min of exposure to 6000 ppm inhaled toluene vapor from air. Toluene vapor concentration dependently substituted for the training exposure condition with longer exposures to equivalent concentrations producing greater substitution than shorter exposures. Toluene's discriminative stimulus effects dissipated completely by 60 min after the cessation of exposure. Injected liquid toluene dose-dependently substituted for toluene vapor as well as augmenting the discriminative stimulus effects of inhaled toluene. Toluene blood concentrations measured under several exposure conditions which produced full substitution were all nearly identical suggesting that the concentration of toluene in the animal tissues at the time of testing determined discriminative performance. These results indicate that the discriminative stimulus effects of inhaled toluene vapor are likely mediated by CNS effects rather than by its pronounced peripheral stimulus effects.

  13. INHALATION EXPOSURE-RESPONSE METHODOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Inhalation Exposure-Response Analysis Methodology Document is expected to provide guidance on the development of the basic toxicological foundations for deriving reference values for human health effects, focusing on the hazard identification and dose-response aspects of the ...

  14. Parental Influence on Inhalant Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltazar, Alina; Hopkins, Gary; McBride, Duane; Vanderwaal, Curt; Pepper, Sara; Mackey, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the dynamics of the relationship between parents and their adolescent children and their association with lifetime and past-month inhalant usage. The population studied was seventh- through ninth-grade students in rural Idaho (N = 570). The authors found a small, but consistent, significant inverse…

  15. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETD-02-047 (Martonen) GPRA # 10108

    TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS
    T. B. Martonen1, J. Schroeter2, Z. Zhang3, D. Hwang4, and J. S. Fleming5
    1Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park...

  16. Inhalant Use in Florida Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siqueira, Lorena; Crandall, Lee A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine (1) the prevalence of use, (2) risk and protective factors for use of inhalants in Florida youth. Methods: The Florida Youth Substance Abuse Survey 2004 is a comprehensive assessment of youth substance abuse attitudes and practices obtained by sampling youth from sixty-five counties. Results: The sample consisted of 60,345…

  17. Increased densities of nitric oxide synthase expressing neurons in the temporal cortex and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of polytoxicomanic heroin overdose victims: possible implications for heroin neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Trübner, Kurt; Krebs, Philipp; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Bielau, Hendrik; Steiner, Johann; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Heroin is one of the most dangerous drugs of abuse, which may exert various neurotoxic actions on the brain (such as gray matter loss, neuronal apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, synaptic defects, depression of adult neurogenensis, as well as development of spongiform leucoencephalopathy). Some of these toxic effects are probably mediated by the gas nitric oxide (NO). We studied by morphometric analysis the numerical density of neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in cortical and hypothalamic areas of eight heroin overdose victims and nine matched controls. Heroin addicts showed significantly increased numerical densities of nNOS immunoreactive cells in the right temporal cortex and the left paraventricular nucleus. Remarkably, in heroin abusers, but not in controls, we observed not only immunostained interneurons, but also cortical pyramidal cells. Given that increased cellular expression of nNOS was accompanied by elevated NO generation in brains of heroin addicts, these elevated levels of NO might have contributed to some of the known toxic effects of heroin (for example, reduced adult neurogenesis, mitochondrial pathology or disturbances in synaptic functioning).

  18. The cutting of cocaine and heroin: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Broséus, Julian; Gentile, Natacha; Esseiva, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    The illicit drug cutting represents a complex problem that requires the sharing of knowledge from addiction studies, toxicology, criminology and criminalistics. Therefore, cutting is not well known by the forensic community. Thus, this review aims at deciphering the different aspects of cutting, by gathering information mainly from criminology and criminalistics. It tackles essentially specificities of cocaine and heroin cutting. The article presents the detected cutting agents (adulterants and diluents), their evolution in time and space and the analytical methodology implemented by forensic laboratories. Furthermore, it discusses when, in the history of the illicit drug, cutting may take place. Moreover, researches studying how much cutting occurs in the country of destination are analysed. Lastly, the reasons for cutting are addressed. According to the literature, adulterants are added during production of the illicit drug or at a relatively high level of its distribution chain (e.g. before the product arrives in the country of destination or just after its importation in the latter). Their addition seems hardly justified by the only desire to increase profits or to harm consumers' health. Instead, adulteration would be performed to enhance or to mimic the illicit drug effects or to facilitate administration of the drug. Nowadays, caffeine, diltiazem, hydroxyzine, levamisole, lidocaïne and phenacetin are frequently detected in cocaine specimens, while paracetamol and caffeine are almost exclusively identified in heroin specimens. This may reveal differences in the respective structures of production and/or distribution of cocaine and heroin. As the relevant information about cutting is spread across different scientific fields, a close collaboration should be set up to collect essential and unified data to improve knowledge and provide information for monitoring, control and harm reduction purposes. More research, on several areas of investigation, should be

  19. Bartonella spp. antibodies in forensic samples from Swedish heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    McGill, Svena; Hjelm, Eva; Rajs, Jovan; Lindquist, Olle; Friman, Göran

    2003-06-01

    A high frequency of Bartonella elizabethae seropositivity (39%) was recorded among intravenous heroin addicts in Stockholm, Sweden, who died from a lethal injection. Some of the B. elizabethae-seropositive individuals also had antibodies to B. henselae Houston-1, B. grahamii, and B. quintana, but none had antibodies to B. henselae Marseille or B. vinsonii subsp. vinsonii. Hepatitis was a frequent finding but no case had peliosis hepatitis. There was no case of endocarditis, but in three persons active subacute-to-chronic myocarditis was found; two of these cases were Bartonella-positive and HIV-negative.

  20. Cardio-pulmonary effects of inhaled solvents: computer-assisted measurement and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Engwall, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    The physiological effects of the inhalation of three solvent vapors were measured on anesthetized dogs. The tested solvents were: acetone, ethanol, and toluene. Measurements of respiratory mechanics, pulmonary and systemic hemodynamics, cardiac output, and gas-exchange were taken while exposing the animals to the vaporized solvents. After the exposures, the animals were terminated and lung tissue and alveolar lining material (ALM) were collected. The ALM was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography for the amounts of component phospholipids. The tissues were inspected under light microscopy for evidence of acute damage associated with the solvent exposures.

  1. [Effects of Instruction on Inhalation Techniques Using iPads - Web Application "Inhalation Lessons"].

    PubMed

    Kogawa, Noriko; Ito, Reiko; Gon, Yasuhiro; Maruoka, Shuichiro; Hashimoto, Shu

    2015-12-01

    Instruction on inhalation techniques for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD)and asthma patients being treated with inhalants have sufficient therapeutic effects and are important to maintain adherence. However, problems continue to exist, including time constraints of medical staff that have a large number of patients and a lack of knowledge on inhalation instruction methods. A web application,"Inhalation Lessons,'for the iPad has been developed. It explains inhalation methods, and consists of videos and review tests. Instruction on inhalation techniques was performed using this application for patients that use Diskus, and the effects were examined. As a result, there are significant improvements in the inhalation techniques of patients after viewing the"Inhalation Lessons'application. Uniform instruction on inhalation techniques can be performed even in the field of homecare.

  2. Profile of inhalant users seeking treatment at a de-addiction centre in north India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sunil; Nebhinani, Naresh; Basu, Debasish; Mattoo, Surendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Inhalants are substances whose chemical vapors are inhaled to produce euphoric, disinhibiting, and exciting effects. Data on inhalant abuse in India are relatively scarce. We report the demographic and clinical profile of inhalant users among the treatment seekers at a Drug De-addiction and Treatment Centre in north India. Methods: The records of treatment seekers at the Drug De-addiction and Treatment Centre, over 10 years (2002-2011) were scanned to identify 92 cases reporting inhalant use. Of these 92 cases, the complete record files were available for 87 (94.6%) cases. These case files were reviewed and the relevant data were collected and analyzed. Results: Over the study period of 10 years, the number of cases with inhalant abuse per year rose steadily to peak at 20 cases (4.08% of new cases) in 2006 and then stabilized at 1-3 per cent of new cases annually. Of the 87 cases studied, all were males with a mean age of 18.9±4.12 yr, mean education of 9.8±3.42 yr and mean family income of 7676±7343.15 (median: 5000). Majority of subjects were unmarried (89.7%), urban resident (79.3%), and from a nuclear family (78.2%). About half of the subjects were students (50.6%). The most common inhalant used was typewriter correction fluid (73.6%) followed by typewriter diluent fluid (19.5%) and glue (6.9%). The most common reason for initiation was curiosity. The mean age of onset of inhalant use was 16.3±4.22 yr. Most subjects fulfilled the criteria for inhalant dependence (85.1%). Psychiatric co-morbidity and the family history of substance dependence were present in 26.4 and 32.9 per cent subjects, respectively. Majority of the subjects reported drug related problems, occupation and finance being the worst affected. Interpretations & conclusions: Our results showed that the inhalant users were mostly urban youth belonging to middle socio-economic class families. The principal sources of inhalant abuse were the commonly available substances

  3. Reporting a sudden death due to accidental gasoline inhalation.

    PubMed

    Martínez, María Antonia; Ballesteros, Salomé; Alcaraz, Rafael

    2012-02-10

    The investigation of uncertain fatalities requires accurate determination of the cause of death, with assessment of all factors that may have contributed to it. Gasoline is a complex and highly variable mixture of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons that can lead to cardiac arrhythmias due to sensitization of the myocardium to catecholamines or acts as a simple asphyxiant if the vapors displace sufficient oxygen from the breathing atmosphere. This work describes a sudden occupational fatality involving gasoline. The importance of this petroleum distillate detection and its quantitative toxicological significance is discussed using a validated analytical method. A 51 year-old Caucasian healthy man without significant medical history was supervising the repairs of the telephone lines in a manhole near to a gas station. He died suddenly after inhaling gasoline vapors from an accidental leak. Extensive blistering and peeling of skin were observed on the skin of the face, neck, anterior chest, upper and lower extremities, and back. The internal examination showed a strong odor of gasoline, specially detected in the respiratory tract. The toxicological screening and quantitation of gasoline was performed by means of gas chromatography with flame ionization detector and confirmation was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Disposition of gasoline in different tissues was as follows: heart blood, 35.7 mg/L; urine, not detected; vitreous humor, 1.9 mg/L; liver, 194.7 mg/kg; lung, 147.6 mg/kg; and gastric content, 116,6 mg/L (2.7 mg total). Based upon the toxicological data along with the autopsy findings, the cause of death was determined to be gasoline poisoning and the manner of death was accidental. We would like to alert on the importance of testing for gasoline, and in general for volatile hydrocarbons, in work-related sudden deaths involving inhalation of hydrocarbon vapors and/or exhaust fumes.

  4. Metabonomics of Pig Blood Plasma Following Whole Body Exposure to Low Levels of Gb Vapor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    METABONOMICS OF PIG BLOOD PLASMA FOLLOWING WHOLE BODY EXPOSURE TO LOW LEVELS OF GB VAPOR Vicky L. H. Bevilacqua▲, Terrence G...DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Metabonomics Of Pig Blood Plasma Following Whole Body Exposure To Low Levels Of Gb Vapor 5a. CONTRACT...analysis of minipig blood plasma by high field NMR after low-level exposure to GB by whole body inhalation. EXPERIMENTAL METHODS 1. SARIN

  5. [Inhalant abusers and psychiatric symptoms].

    PubMed

    Okudaira, K; Yabana, T; Takahashi, H; Iizuka, H; Nakajima, K; Saito, A

    1996-01-01

    There are different opinions about the cause of chronic psychiatric symptoms observed in drug abusers between Japanese and foreign psychiatrists. The Japanese seem to recognize the chronic psychosis as the result of drug abuse. In the other hand, foreigners diagnose these cases as dual diagnosis of drug abuse and psychosis. Authors studied the problem in this research. One of the authors has examined 120 inhalant abusers of all, in- and out-patients in Kanagawa Prefectural Center of Psychiatry, Serigaya Hospital from 1991 to 1995. These patients were classified into three groups: psychosis group (23 patients), dependence group (51 patients) and abuse group (46 patients) according to their clinical courses and psychiatric symptoms. The psychosis group consists of patients who showed psychiatric symptoms such as hallucination, delusion and thought disturbance for long time after detoxification. The dependence group contains patients whose inhalant dependence was severe and met DSM-4 Diagnostic Criteria for Substance Dependence, but manifested no chronic psychiatric symptoms after detoxification. The patients belonging to abuse group were at the earlier stages of inhalant abuse and had no chronic psychiatric symptoms. The average age of the first inhalant abuse was 14.7 years old in the psychosis group, 14.8 years in the dependence group and 14.7 years in the abuse group. The average years of abuse was 9.0 years in the psychosis group, and 8.5 years in the dependence group. There was little difference between these two groups. The psychosis patients manifested chronic symptoms 5.7 years on average after the first abuse of inhalants. About one forth (26.1%) of the psychosis patients and only 5.9% of the dependence patients had family history of schizophrenia. The difference was statistically significant. These results suggest that chronic psychiatric symptoms are caused not only by inhalant abuse, but also by the genetic factors of psychosis of each patient. There have

  6. Addiction, Heroin-Assisted Treatment and the Idea of Abstinence: A reply to Henden.

    PubMed

    Uusitalo, Susanne; Broers, Barbara

    2016-11-01

    In our previous article on the question whether heroin addicts are able to give informed consent voluntarily to research on heroin-assisted treatment, we criticized the ongoing bioethical discussion of a flawed conceptualization of heroin addicts' options. As a participant in this discussion, Edmund Henden defends the conceptualization as sufficient for determining whether heroin addicts are able to give informed consent to the research on heroin-assisted treatment voluntarily. This discussion on research on heroin-assisted treatment seems to go astray in several respects. In his reply to our article Henden maintains some of the biases, such as the necessity of abstinence in recovery, that seem to prevail in addiction research on a more general level as well. These biases run the danger of having implausible ethical implications on stakeholders in addiction research and treatment. In our reply to him, we will further clarify and discuss the importance of describing the relevant issues in plausible terms that do justice to the realities of the cases of informed consent in research on heroin-assisted treatment and also raise a wider issue of the ethics of wording as well as of the narrow scope, or 'tunnel vision', in addiction research as currently conducted.

  7. Molecular epidemiologic investigation of an anthrax outbreak among heroin users, Europe.

    PubMed

    Price, Erin P; Seymour, Meagan L; Sarovich, Derek S; Latham, Jennie; Wolken, Spenser R; Mason, Joanne; Vincent, Gemma; Drees, Kevin P; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M; Phillippy, Adam M; Koren, Sergey; Okinaka, Richard T; Chung, Wai-Kwan; Schupp, James M; Wagner, David M; Vipond, Richard; Foster, Jeffrey T; Bergman, Nicholas H; Burans, James; Pearson, Talima; Brooks, Tim; Keim, Paul

    2012-08-01

    In December 2009, two unusual cases of anthrax were diagnosed in heroin users in Scotland. A subsequent anthrax outbreak in heroin users emerged throughout Scotland and expanded into England and Germany, sparking concern of nefarious introduction of anthrax spores into the heroin supply. To better understand the outbreak origin, we used established genetic signatures that provided insights about strain origin. Next, we sequenced the whole genome of a representative Bacillus anthracis strain from a heroin user (Ba4599), developed Ba4599-specific single-nucleotide polymorphism assays, and genotyped all available material from other heroin users with anthrax. Of 34 case-patients with B. anthracis-positive PCR results, all shared the Ba4599 single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype. Phylogeographic analysis demonstrated that Ba4599 was closely related to strains from Turkey and not to previously identified isolates from Scotland or Afghanistan, the presumed origin of the heroin. Our results suggest accidental contamination along the drug trafficking route through a cutting agent or animal hides used to smuggle heroin into Europe.

  8. MiR-218 targets MeCP2 and inhibits heroin seeking behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Biao; Hu, Zhaoyang; Yao, Wenqing; Le, Qiumin; Xu, Bo; Liu, Xing; Ma, Lan

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of evolutionarily conserved, 18–25 nucleotide non-coding sequences that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. Recent studies implicated their roles in the regulation of neuronal functions, such as learning, cognition and memory formation. Here we report that miR-218 inhibits heroin-induced behavioral plasticity. First, network propagation-based method was used to predict candidate miRNAs that played potential key roles in regulating drug addiction-related genes. Microarray screening was also carried out to identify miRNAs responding to chronic heroin administration in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Among the collapsed miRNAs, top-ranked miR-218 was decreased after chronic exposure to heroin. Lentiviral overexpression of miR-218 in NAc could inhibit heroin-induced reinforcement in both conditioned place preference (CPP) test and heroin self-administration experiments. Luciferase activity assay indicated that miR-218 could regulate 3′ untranslated regions (3′ UTR) of multiple neuroplasticity-related genes and directly target methyl CpG binding protein 2 (Mecp2). Consistently, Mecp2308/y mice exhibited reduced heroin seeking behavior in CPP test. These data reveal a functional role of miR-218 and its target, MeCP2, in the regulation of heroin-induced behavioral plasticity. PMID:28074855

  9. Impact of the heroin 'drought' on patterns of drug use and drug-related harms.

    PubMed

    Longo, Marie C; Henry-Edwards, Susan M; Humeniuk, Rachel E; Christie, Paul; Ali, Robert L

    2004-06-01

    Since late 2000, anecdotal reports from drug users and health professionals have suggested that there was a reduction in the supply of heroin in Adelaide in the first half of 2001, referred to as a heroin 'drought'. The aim of this paper was to critically review evidence for this, using data obtained from 100 injecting drug users surveyed for the 2001 Illicit Drug Reporting System (IDRS). This project is carried out annually in all Australian jurisdictions, and collects up-to-date information on the markets for heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine and cannabis. This paper also investigates the possible implications of this 'drought' on patterns of drug use and drug-related harms. The 2001 IDRS found consistent reports by users of an increase in the price of heroin, together with decreases in purity and availability. These factors resulted in a decrease in the frequency of self-reported heroin use among those surveyed in 2001, and a concomitant increase in the use of other drugs, in particular methamphetamine and morphine. The heroin 'drought' appears to have had a substantial impact on several indices of drug-related harm. There was a marked decrease in the number of opioid-related fatalities, and hospital data also showed reductions in heroin-related presentations. Treatment service data showed an increase in the number of admissions related to amphetamines. There is a need for health promotion and education on the adverse effects of methamphetamine use, and the development of improved treatment protocols for methamphetamine abuse and dependence.

  10. Fire in the vein: Heroin acidity and its proximal effect on users’ health

    PubMed Central

    Ciccarone, Daniel; Harris, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    The loss of functioning veins (venous sclerosis) is a root cause of suffering for long-term heroin injectors. In addition to perpetual frustration and loss of pleasure/esteem, venous sclerosis leads to myriad medical consequences including skin infections, for example, abscess, and possibly elevated HIV/HCV risks due to injection into larger jugular and femoral veins. The etiology of venous sclerosis is unknown and users’ perceptions of cause/meaning unexplored. This commentary stems from our hypothesis that venous sclerosis is causally related to heroin acidity, which varies by heroin source-form and preparation. We report pilot study data on first ever in vivo measurements of heroin pH and as well as qualitative data on users’ concerns and perceptions regarding the caustic nature of heroin and its effects. Heroin pH testing in natural settings is feasible and a useful tool for further research. Our preliminary findings, for example, that different heroin source-forms and preparations have a two log difference in acidity, have potentially broad, vital and readily implementable harm reduction implications. PMID:26077143

  11. Serum concentrations of macro and trace elements in heroin addicts of the Canary Islands.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, José F; Sañudo, Ricardo I; Rodríguez, Elena M; Romero, Carlos Díaz

    2004-01-01

    Na, K, Ca, Mg, P, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se concentrations were determined in the serum of 106 heroin addicts and were compared with the concentrations obtained in a control group formed of 186 apparently healthy individuals. Heroin addicts displayed K and Se mean concentrations lower (p < 0.05), and Na, Mg, P mean concentrations and a Cu/Zn ratio higher (p < 0.05) than those mean values observed in the control group. The Mg and P concentrations in the serum of heroin addicts tended to normalize when age increased. The heroin addicts included in the methadone maintenance treatment program had higher serum mean concentrations of K and Mg than the heroin addicts in the detoxification process. The Na, K and Mg concentrations displayed highly significant correlations, with a different behavior for the heroin addicts group and the control group. When applying factor analysis and representing the scores of the first and second factors, the heroin addicts tended to differentiation from the control group. However, methadone substitution treatment was not able to normalize these concentrations.

  12. Fire in the vein: Heroin acidity and its proximal effect on users' health.

    PubMed

    Ciccarone, Daniel; Harris, Magdalena

    2015-11-01

    The loss of functioning veins (venous sclerosis) is a root cause of suffering for long-term heroin injectors. In addition to perpetual frustration and loss of pleasure/esteem, venous sclerosis leads to myriad medical consequences including skin infections, for example, abscess, and possibly elevated HIV/HCV risks due to injection into larger jugular and femoral veins. The etiology of venous sclerosis is unknown and users' perceptions of cause/meaning unexplored. This commentary stems from our hypothesis that venous sclerosis is causally related to heroin acidity, which varies by heroin source-form and preparation. We report pilot study data on first ever in vivo measurements of heroin pH and as well as qualitative data on users' concerns and perceptions regarding the caustic nature of heroin and its effects. Heroin pH testing in natural settings is feasible and a useful tool for further research. Our preliminary findings, for example, that different heroin source-forms and preparations have a two log difference in acidity, have potentially broad, vital and readily implementable harm reduction implications.

  13. Resting-state abnormalities in heroin-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Pandria, Niki; Kovatsi, Leda; Vivas, Ana B; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2016-11-21

    Drug addiction is a major health problem worldwide. Recent neuroimaging studies have shed light into the underlying mechanisms of drug addiction as well as its consequences to the human brain. The most vulnerable, to heroin addiction, brain regions have been reported to be specific prefrontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal regions, as well as, some subcortical regions. The brain regions involved are usually linked with reward, motivation/drive, memory/learning, inhibition as well as emotional control and seem to form circuits that interact with each other. So, along with neuroimaging studies, recent advances in resting-state dynamics might allow further assessments upon the multilayer complexity of addiction. In the current manuscript, we comprehensively review and discuss existing resting-state neuroimaging findings classified into three overlapping and interconnected groups: functional connectivity alterations, structural deficits and abnormal topological properties. Moreover, behavioral traits of heroin-addicted individuals as well as the limitations of the currently available studies are also reviewed. Finally, in need of a contemporary therapy a multimodal therapeutic approach is suggested using classical treatment practices along with current neurotechonologies, such as neurofeedback and goal-oriented video-games.

  14. Comparative toxicology of intentional and accidental heroin overdose.

    PubMed

    Darke, Shane; Duflou, Johan; Torok, Michelle

    2010-07-01

    The demographic and toxicological characteristics of deliberate (SUI, n = 50) and accidental (ACC, n = 927) fatal heroin overdose cases were examined. SUI cases were more likely to be female, had lower body mass indices, were more likely to be enrolled in treatment and less likely to have hepatic pathology. The median blood morphine concentration of SUI cases was significantly higher than that of ACC cases (0.70 vs. 0.40 mg/L, p < 0.001). Blood morphine concentrations of >1 mg/L were seen among 38.0% of SUI cases compared to 13.9% of ACC cases. Being a member of the SUI group remained a significant independent predictor of higher morphine concentrations after controlling for the effects of potential confounders (p < 0.001), other significant predictors being the absence of alcohol (p < 0.001), the presence of methadone (p < 0.05), and the presence of cocaine (p < 0.05). The current data are consistent with the view that suicide forms a small, but distinct, category of heroin overdose cases, rather than overdose being a parasuicidal phenomenon per se.

  15. Heroin-associated myocardial damages--conventional and immunohistochemical investigations.

    PubMed

    Dettmeyer, R; Friedrich, K; Schmidt, P; Madea, B

    2009-05-30

    Well-known complications related to drug abuse are myocardial insufficiency, myocardial infarction, endocarditis, myocarditis, aortic dissection, neurologic damages, ischemic colitis, thrombotic phenomenons, renal infarction and acute liver failure. Furthermore, microfocal fibrosis of the myocardium is found in stimulant abuse. The origin of myocardial fibrosis associated with opiate abuse (endocarditis, myocarditis, embolism) is still unclear. This question shall be investigated using immunohistochemical staining for early diagnosis of myocarditis. A quantification of myocardial interstitial leucocytic infiltrates was accomplished in 21 chronic drug abusers who died of heroin/morphine intoxication and compared to 15 normal subjects who died suddenly due to non-cardiac causes of death without intoxication (e.g. traffic accidents, head trauma). Toxicological investigations were performed and in addition, blood samples were checked to clarify the status of HIV, hepatitis A, B and C in both groups. To verify signs of inflammation, myocardial specimen from different locations were investigated with conventional histological stainings and immunohistochemical techniques for characterization and quantification of interstitial myocardial leucocytes, T-lymphocytes and macrophages. The number of cells were found up to fivefold increased in heroin addicts compared to the control group without reaching the cut-off values for immunohistochemically based diagnosis of myocarditis.

  16. Increased functional connectivity in the resting-state basal ganglia network after acute heroin substitution

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, A; Denier, N; Magon, S; Radue, E-W; Huber, C G; Riecher-Rossler, A; Wiesbeck, G A; Lang, U E; Borgwardt, S; Walter, M

    2015-01-01

    Reinforcement signals in the striatum are known to be crucial for mediating the subjective rewarding effects of acute drug intake. It is proposed that these effects may be more involved in early phases of drug addiction, whereas negative reinforcement effects may occur more in later stages of the illness. This study used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore whether acute heroin substitution also induced positive reinforcement effects in striatal brain regions of protracted heroin-maintained patients. Using independent component analysis and a dual regression approach, we compared resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) strengths within the basal ganglia/limbic network across a group of heroin-dependent patients receiving both an acute infusion of heroin and placebo and 20 healthy subjects who received placebo only. Subsequent correlation analyses were performed to test whether the rsFC strength under heroin exposure correlated with the subjective rewarding effect and with plasma concentrations of heroin and its main metabolites morphine. Relative to the placebo treatment in patients, heroin significantly increased rsFC of the left putamen within the basal ganglia/limbic network, the extent of which correlated positively with patients' feelings of rush and with the plasma level of morphine. Furthermore, healthy controls revealed increased rsFC of the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus in this network relative to the placebo treatment in patients. Our results indicate that acute heroin substitution induces a subjective rewarding effect via increased striatal connectivity in heroin-dependent patients, suggesting that positive reinforcement effects in the striatum still occur after protracted maintenance therapy. PMID:25803496

  17. Increased functional connectivity in the resting-state basal ganglia network after acute heroin substitution.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A; Denier, N; Magon, S; Radue, E-W; Huber, C G; Riecher-Rossler, A; Wiesbeck, G A; Lang, U E; Borgwardt, S; Walter, M

    2015-03-24

    Reinforcement signals in the striatum are known to be crucial for mediating the subjective rewarding effects of acute drug intake. It is proposed that these effects may be more involved in early phases of drug addiction, whereas negative reinforcement effects may occur more in later stages of the illness. This study used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore whether acute heroin substitution also induced positive reinforcement effects in striatal brain regions of protracted heroin-maintained patients. Using independent component analysis and a dual regression approach, we compared resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) strengths within the basal ganglia/limbic network across a group of heroin-dependent patients receiving both an acute infusion of heroin and placebo and 20 healthy subjects who received placebo only. Subsequent correlation analyses were performed to test whether the rsFC strength under heroin exposure correlated with the subjective rewarding effect and with plasma concentrations of heroin and its main metabolites morphine. Relative to the placebo treatment in patients, heroin significantly increased rsFC of the left putamen within the basal ganglia/limbic network, the extent of which correlated positively with patients' feelings of rush and with the plasma level of morphine. Furthermore, healthy controls revealed increased rsFC of the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus in this network relative to the placebo treatment in patients. Our results indicate that acute heroin substitution induces a subjective rewarding effect via increased striatal connectivity in heroin-dependent patients, suggesting that positive reinforcement effects in the striatum still occur after protracted maintenance therapy.

  18. Vapor phase pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, Wolfgang

    1992-01-01

    The vapor phase pyrolysis process is designed exclusively for the lunar production of oxygen. In this concept, granulated raw material (soil) that consists almost entirely of metal oxides is vaporized and the vapor is raised to a temperature where it dissociates into suboxides and free oxygen. Rapid cooling of the dissociated vapor to a discrete temperature causes condensation of the suboxides, while the oxygen remains essentially intact and can be collected downstream. The gas flow path and flow rate are maintained at an optimum level by control of the pressure differential between the vaporization region and the oxygen collection system with the aid of the environmental vacuum.

  19. Stratospheric water vapor feedback.

    PubMed

    Dessler, A E; Schoeberl, M R; Wang, T; Davis, S M; Rosenlof, K H

    2013-11-05

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry-climate model to be +0.3 W/(m(2)⋅K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause.

  20. Inhalation therapy in mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Maccari, Juçara Gasparetto; Teixeira, Cassiano; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Savi, Augusto; Dexheimer-Neto, Felippe Leopoldo; Knorst, Marli Maria

    2015-01-01

    Patients with obstructive lung disease often require ventilatory support via invasive or noninvasive mechanical ventilation, depending on the severity of the exacerbation. The use of inhaled bronchodilators can significantly reduce airway resistance, contributing to the improvement of respiratory mechanics and patient-ventilator synchrony. Although various studies have been published on this topic, little is known about the effectiveness of the bronchodilators routinely prescribed for patients on mechanical ventilation or about the deposition of those drugs throughout the lungs. The inhaled bronchodilators most commonly used in ICUs are beta adrenergic agonists and anticholinergics. Various factors might influence the effect of bronchodilators, including ventilation mode, position of the spacer in the circuit, tube size, formulation, drug dose, severity of the disease, and patient-ventilator synchrony. Knowledge of the pharmacological properties of bronchodilators and the appropriate techniques for their administration is fundamental to optimizing the treatment of these patients. PMID:26578139

  1. Neptunium-237 inhalation in rats.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M F; Ruemmler, P S; Buschbom, R L

    1986-12-01

    Groups of rats were exposed to aerosols of 237Np nitrate to determine clearance rates, retention and distribution at various intervals after inhalation. Initial lung burdens (ILB) after 237Np inhalation by three treatment groups were 0.12, 0.19 and 0.37 mu Ci/kg, respectively. Radiochemical analyses of animals killed at 4, 8, 14, 28 and 90 d, as well as data for others maintained until they became moribund, showed that their lung clearance followed a three-compartment model, clearance half-times for which were 1, 35, and 10,000 d, respectively. Only 3% of the ILB was retained after 90 d; 12% of that burden had translocated to the skeleton at 750 d; the half-time for skeletal retention was 2500 d. A single tumor was the only malignancy detected in the lungs of the 35 animals allowed to survive the early phase of the study.

  2. Inhaled anesthetics: an historical overview.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Francis X; Bacon, Douglas R; Smith, Hugh M

    2005-09-01

    Inhalational agents have played a pivotal role in anesthesia history. The first publicly demonstrated anesthetic of the modern era, diethyl ether, was an inhalational anesthetic. The attributes of a good agent, ability to rapidly induce anesthesia, with limited side effects has led research efforts for over a hundred and fifty years. The explosion hazard was largely conquered with the development of the halogenated agents in the 1950s. Rapid emergence, with limited nausea and vomiting continue to drive discovery efforts, yet the 'modern' agents continue to improve upon those in the past. The future holds promise, but perhaps the most interesting contrast over time is the ability to rapidly introduce new agents into practice. From James Young Simpson's dinner table one evening to the operating suite the next day, modern agents take decades from first synthesis to clinical introduction.

  3. Inhaled Therapies for Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hill, Nicholas S; Preston, Ioana R; Roberts, Kari E

    2015-06-01

    The inhaled route has a number of attractive features for treatment of pulmonary hypertension, including delivery of drug directly to the target organ, thus enhancing pulmonary specificity and reducing systemic adverse effects. It can also improve ventilation/perfusion matching by dilating vessels supplying ventilated regions, thus improving gas exchange. Furthermore, it can achieve higher local drug concentrations at a lower overall dose, potentially reducing drug cost. Accordingly, a number of inhaled agents have been developed to treat pulmonary hypertension. Most in current use are prostacyclins, including epoprostenol, which has been cleared for intravenous applications but is used off-label in acute care settings as a continuously nebulized medication. Aerosolized iloprost and treprostinil are both prostacyclins that have been cleared by the FDA to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Both require frequent administration (6 and 4 times daily, respectively), and both have a tendency to cause airway symptoms, including cough and wheeze, which can lead to intolerance. These agents cannot be used to substitute for the infused routes of prostacyclin because they do not permit delivery of medication at high doses. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) is cleared for the treatment of primary pulmonary hypertension in newborns. It is also used off-label to test acute vasoreactivity in PAH during right-heart catheterization and to treat acute right-heart failure in hospitalized patients. In addition, some studies on long-term application of INO either have been recently completed with results pending or are under consideration. In the future, because of its inherent advantages in targeting the lung, the inhaled route is likely to be tested using a variety of small molecules that show promise as PAH therapies.

  4. The developmental outcome of children born to heroin-dependent mothers, raised at home or adopted.

    PubMed

    Ornoy, A; Michailevskaya, V; Lukashov, I; Bar-Hamburger, R; Harel, S

    1996-05-01

    In the present investigation we were interested to study the possible role of in-utero exposure to heroin and of the home environmental in the etiology of long-term developmental problems in children born to heroin-dependent parents in comparison to matched controls. The children were examined at .5-6 years of age by a developmental pediatrician and a developmental psychologist using, for the children up to 2.5 years of age, the Bayley Developmental Scales, and for children aged 3-6 years the McCarthy Scales for Children's Abilities. We examined 83 children born to heroin-dependent mothers, and compared the results to those of 76 children born to heroin-dependent fathers and to three control groups; 50 children with environmental deprivation, 50 normal children from families of moderate or high socioeconomic class, without environmental deprivation, and 80 healthy children from kindergartens in Jerusalem. There were five children (6.0%) with significant neurological damage among the children born to heroin-dependent mothers and six (7.9%) children among those born to heroin-dependent fathers. The children born to heroin-dependent mothers had a lower birth weight and a lower head circumference at examination when compared to controls. The children born to heroin-dependent parents also had a high incidence of hyperactivity, inattention, and behavioral problems. The lowest DQ or IQ among the children with cognitive levels above 70 was found in the children with environmental deprivation, next was the DQ or IQ of children born to heroin-dependent fathers, then the DQ or IQ of the children born to heroin-dependent mothers. When the children born to heroin-dependent mothers were divided to those that were adopted at a very young age and to those raised at home, the adopted children were found to function similarly to the controls while those not adopted functioned significantly lower. Our results show that the developmental delay and behavioral disorders observed among

  5. The Australian Treatment Outcome Study (ATOS): what have we learnt about treatment for heroin dependence?

    PubMed

    Darke, Shane; Ross, Joanne; Teesson, Maree

    2007-01-01

    Opioids make the single largest contribution to illicit drug-related mortality and morbidity worldwide In this paper we reflect upon what has been learnt regarding treatment outcome and the natural history of heroin use from the Australian Treatment Outcome Study (ATOS). We focus on what we knew prior to ATOS, what ATOS revealed that is novel, and the implications for research, practice and policy. ATOS provided strong evidence for sustained improvement attributable to treatment across the three years of the study. It is argued that treatment for heroin dependence is money well spent, and leads to clear and sustained benefits to both heroin users and society.

  6. Heroin-assisted treatment: has a controversial treatment come of age?†.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Michael; Hall, Wayne

    2015-07-01

    This editorial considers the findings of the systematic review of heroin-assisted treatment, with six different studies from six different countries, published in this issue. The meta-analysis focuses on supervised injected heroin and reports significant crime reduction and an overall cost-effectiveness of treatment. Despite this body of evidence, policy makers remain reluctant to develop this treatment further. The question remains, what else is required to convince policy makers of the value of such treatment for severe and refractory heroin dependence?

  7. Brain permeability of inhaled corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Arya, Vikram; Issar, Manish; Wang, Yaning; Talton, James D; Hochhaus, Guenther

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if the permeability of inhaled corticosteroids entering the brain is reduced and if P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transporters are involved. Currently employed inhaled corticosteroids were given intravenously and intratracheally to rats at a dose of 100 microg kg-1. An ex-vivo receptor binding assay was used to monitor over 12 h the glucocorticoid receptor occupancy in the brain and a systemic reference organ (kidney). The involvement of P-gp in the brain permeability of triamcinolone acetonide was assessed in wild-type mice and mdr1a(-/-) knockout mice (mice lacking the gene for expressing P-gp). After both forms of administration, the average brain receptor occupancies were 20-56% of those of the reference organ, with the more lipophilic drugs showing a more pronounced receptor occupation. While the receptor occupancies in the liver of wild-type and mdr1a(-/-) mice were similar after administration of triamcinolone acetonide, brain receptor occupancies in mdr1a(-/-) mice were significantly greater (mdr1a(-/-): 47.6%, 40.2-55.0%, n=14; 2; wild-type: 11.5+/-33.0%, n=14; 3). Penetration into the brain for inhaled corticosteroids (especially those of lower lipophilicity) is reduced. Experiments in mdr1a(-/-) mice confirmed the involvement of P-gp transporters. Further studies are needed to assess whether potential drug interactions at the transporter level are of pharmacological significance.

  8. Prenatal exposure to vapors of gasoline-ethanol blends causes few cognitive deficits in adult rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental exposure to inhaled ethanol-gasoline fuel blends is a potential public health concern. Here we assessed cognitive functions in adult offspring of pregnant rats that were exposed to vapors of gasoline blended with a range of ethanol concentrations, including gasoli...

  9. Validated assay for the determination of markers of illicit heroin in urine samples for the control of patients in a heroin prescription program.

    PubMed

    Musshoff, F; Trafkowski, J; Madea, B

    2004-11-05

    A fully validated procedure for the simultaneous determination of morphine (MOR), morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G), morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G), 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), codeine (COD), codeine-6-glucuronide (C6G), acetylcodeine (AC), noscapine (NOS) and papaverine (PAP) based on liquid chromatography followed by electrospray mass spectrometry applying multiple reaction monitoring (LC-ESI-MS/MS) in urine samples is described. The extraction was carried out on a Zymark Rapid Trace Workstation using C18 solid-phase extraction cartridges. The separation was performed in 19 min on an Agilent 1100 HPLC system, using a Phenomenex C18 AQUA column (4 microm, 150 mm x 2 mm), which is coupled with an Applied Biosystems API 2000 mass spectrometer. Deuterated analogues were used as internal standards. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.1 ng/ml (PAP) to 7.4 ng/ml (M6G), the coefficients of correlation were higher than 0.996, the precisions ranged from 3% to 12% and the absolute recoveries were between 45% (M3G) and 98% (MOR). Analyses of samples from patients of a heroin prescription program demonstrated the usefulness of the procedure for the analytical differentiation between prescribed synthetic heroin (diamorphine) use and non-prescription heroin abuse on the basis of urine analysis. After the ingestion of pharmaceutical heroin only general markers for heroin use were detected, which are MOR, M3G, M6G and 6AM, respectively. When illicit heroin was abused, additionally to further general markers (COD, C6G) specific markers for non-prescription heroin abuse (AC, NOS, PAP) were found. However, it must be kept in mind that only AC may be regarded as absolute specific marker of non-prescription heroin, because all other compounds may appear in urine after ingestion of opiate alkaloids containing medicines or foods (e.g. poppy seeds). Therefore, patients of a heroin prescription program should be advised not to ingest such products.

  10. The role of alcohol abuse in the etiology of heroin-related deaths. Evidence for pharmacokinetic interactions between heroin and alcohol.

    PubMed

    Polettini, A; Groppi, A; Montagna, M

    1999-01-01

    In order to evaluate pharmacokinetic interactions between heroin and alcohol and their role in the etiology of heroin-related deaths (HRD), the alcohol concentration in blood (BAC), the free (FM) and total morphine (TM) concentrations in blood (determined by DPC Coat-A-Count radioimmunoassay before and after enzymatic hydrolysis), and the TM concentration in urine and bile (DPC Coat-A-Count after enzymatic hydrolysis) in a population of 39 lethal cases included in the records of the Department of Legal Medicine and Public Health at the University of Pavia from the period January 1997-April 1998 were examined. The cause of death in each case was attributed to either heroin or associated heroin-ethanol intoxication. Cases were arbitrarily divided into two groups according to BAC (low-ethanol group, LE, BAC < or = 1000 mg/L and high-ethanol group, HE, BAC > 1000 mg/L). The differences in the FM and TM concentrations in blood, bile, and urine and in the FM/TM ratios between the two . groups were statistically evaluated (Mann-Whitney U test). A similar statistical evaluation was carried out on data from a previously published study concerning the disposition of heroin and its metabolites (6-acetylmorphine and morphine) in blood and urine in 23 lethal cases attributed to either heroin or heroin and alcohol intoxication. The values of the following variables in the LE and HE groups were compared: FM, TM, and 6-acetylmorphine concentrations in blood (6-AM); the FM/ (FM + 6-AM) ratio; the FM/TM ratio; and the urinary concentrations of heroin, 6-acetylmorphine, and free morphine. Statistical analyses of data indicated that high BACs are associated with reduced hydrolysis of 6-AM to morphine (FM/[FM + 6-AM], p = 0.0022) and that a good inverse correlation exists between BAC and hydrolysis of 6-AM to morphine (r2 = 0.67). High BACs were also found to be associated with an increased FM/TM ratio and with reduced excretion of free and total morphine. These results suggest the

  11. Strain dependence of adolescent Cannabis influence on heroin reward and mesolimbic dopamine transmission in adult Lewis and Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Cadoni, Cristina; Simola, Nicola; Espa, Elena; Fenu, Sandro; Di Chiara, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent Cannabis exposure has been hypothesized to act as a gateway to opiate abuse. In order to investigate the role of genetic background in cannabinoid-opiate interactions, we studied the effect of Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exposure of adolescent Lewis and Fischer 344 rats on the responsiveness of accumbens shell and core dopamine (DA), as monitored by microdialysis, to THC and heroin at adulthood. Heroin reward and reinstatement by heroin priming were studied by conditioned place preference (CPP) and cognitive and emotional functions by object recognition, Y maze and elevated plus maze paradigms. THC stimulated shell DA in Lewis but not in Fischer 344 rats. Adolescent THC exposure potentiated DA stimulant effects of heroin in the shell and core of Lewis and only in the core of Fischer 344 rats. Control Lewis rats developed stronger CPP to heroin and resistance to extinction compared with Fischer 344 strain. In Lewis rats, THC exposure did not affect heroin CPP but potentiated the effect of heroin priming. In Fischer 344 rats, THC exposure increased heroin CPP and made it resistant to extinction. Lewis rats showed seeking reactions during extinction and hedonic reactions in response to heroin priming. Moreover, adolescent THC exposure affected emotional function only in Lewis rats. These observations suggest that long-term effects of Cannabis exposure on heroin addictive liability and emotionality are dependent on individual genetic background.

  12. [Inhalation therapy: inhaled generics, inhaled antidotes, the future of anti-infectives and the indications of inhaled pentamidine. GAT aerosolstorming, Paris 2012].

    PubMed

    Peron, N; Le Guen, P; Andrieu, V; Bardot, S; Ravilly, S; Oudyi, M; Dubus, J-C

    2013-12-01

    The working group on aerosol therapy (GAT) of the Société de pneumologie de langue française (SPLF) organized its third "Aerosolstorming" in 2012. During the course of one day, different aspects of inhaled therapy were discussed, and these will be treated separately in two articles, this one being the first. Inhaled products represent a large volume of prescriptions both in the community and in hospital settings and they involve various specialties particularly ENT and respiratory care. Technical aspects of the development of these products, their mode of administration and compliance with their indications are key elements for the effective therapeutic use of inhaled treatments. In this first article, we will review issues concerning generic inhaled products, the existence of inhaled antidotes, new anti-infective agents and indications for inhaled pentamidine.

  13. Methods for Derivation of Inhalation Reference Concentrations and Application of Inhalation Dosimetry

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's methodology for estimation of inhalation reference concentrations (RfCs) as benchmark estimates of the quantitative dose-response assessment of chronic noncancer toxicity for individual inhaled chemicals.

  14. Pharmacological Effects of a Monoclonal Antibody against 6-Monoacetylmorphine upon Heroin-Induced Locomotor Activity and Pharmacokinetics in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kvello, Anne Marte Sjursen; Andersen, Jannike Mørch; Øiestad, Elisabeth Leere; Mørland, Jørg; Bogen, Inger Lise

    2016-08-01

    Immunotherapy can provide a supplemental treatment strategy against heroin use on the principle of sequestering the active drug in the bloodstream, thereby reducing its distribution to the brain. Previous studies have shown that heroin's first metabolite, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM), is the main mediator of acute heroin effects. The objective of the present study was to characterize the pharmacological potential of a monoclonal antibody against 6-MAM (anti-6-MAM mAb) to counteract the heroin response. The individual contributions from heroin and 6-MAM to heroin effects were also examined by pretreating mice with anti-6-MAM mAb (10-100 mg/kg) prior to either heroin or 6-MAM injection (1.25-2.5 μmol/kg). The opioid-induced behavioral response was assessed in a locomotor activity test, followed by opioid and antibody quantification in blood and brain tissue. Pretreatment with mAb caused a profound reduction of heroin- and 6-MAM-induced behavior, accompanied by correspondingly decreased levels of 6-MAM in brain tissue. mAb pretreatment was more efficient against 6-MAM injection than against heroin, leading to an almost complete blockade of 6-MAM-induced effects. mAb pretreatment was unable to block the immediate (5-minute) transport of active metabolites across the blood-brain barrier after heroin injection, indicating that heroin itself appears to enhance the immediate delivery of 6-MAM to the brain. The current study provides additional evidence that 6-MAM sequestration is crucial for counteracting the acute heroin response, and demonstrates the pharmacological potential of immunotherapy against heroin use.

  15. Effects of olanzapine on aggressiveness in heroin dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Di Petta, G; D'Amore, A; Iannotta, P; Bardicchia, F; Falorni, F; Coacci, A; Strepparola, G; Campione, G; Lucchini, A; Vedda, G; Serio, G; Manzato, E; Antonioni, M; Bertacca, S; Moi, G; Zaimovic, A

    2006-09-30

    This study compared the anti-aggressiveness effects of the atypical anti-psychotic olanzapine with that of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and benzodiazepines (BZD) among patients with heroin dependence submitted to opioid-agonists substitution treatment. Sixty-seven (67) patients who met the DSM-IV criteria for heroin dependence and showed aggressive personality traits, not affected by comorbid schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, accepted to participate in a 12-week prospective, observational trial. Patients were included into two subgroups in relationship with treatment, for the evaluation of the endpoints at week 12: group 1: substitution treatment in combination with OLA (32 patients); group 2: substitution treatment in combination with fluoxetine/paroxetine and clonazepam (35 patients). Efficacy measures were Buss Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI), Symptoms Check List-90 (SCL 90) anger--hostility scores, incidence rates of aggressive incidents and attacks. The rates of patients who remained in treatment at week 12 in group 1, treated with OLA, and group 2, treated with SSRI and BDZ, were not significantly different (17 = 53.1% vs 16 = 45.7%). BDHI total, direct aggressiveness, verbal aggressiveness scores, SCL 90 aggressiveness scores and aggressive incidents rates showed a significantly more consistent decrease from baseline in group 1 than in group 2 subjects, in the patients who completed the treatment (p < 0.001; p < 0.01; p < 0.05; p < 0.01; p < 0.001). Among the completers, 69.3% achieved early full substance abuse remission, while 30.7% achieved partial substance abuse remission, with no significant difference between 1 and 2 treatment subgroups. Although obtained by an observational--open clinical study, with multiple limitations, our findings suggest that OLA may be useful as an adjunctive agent in reducing aggressive/hostile behaviour in heroin addicted individuals during maintenance substitution treatment. Otherwise, atypical anti

  16. The Toxicity of Inhaled Sulphur Mustard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    acetyl -L- cysteine (Mucomyst™; NAC ), in ameliorating inhaled HD-induced lung injury was then assessed in the established model. This work was conducted...J and Sciuto AM. N- acetyl -L- cysteine ( NAC ) Protects Against Inhaled Sulfur Mustard (HD) Poisoning in the Large Swine. Clinical Toxicology, 2012...2012. N- acetyl -L- cysteine ( NAC ) Protects against inhaled sulfur mustard (HD) poisoning in the large swine. Clinical Toxicology; in preparation

  17. Stop inhaling smoke: prevent coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kilburn, Kaye H

    2003-02-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was rare a century ago and was diagnosed in few living patients prior to 1925. By 1950, it was the most common heart problem seen by clinicians. Thought at first to have been overlooked, there were many explanations offered for its neglect. Smoking, hypertension, and elevated cholesterol are associated with AMI, but of these only smoking should be considered a cause. Hypertension and hypercholesterolemia may be co-effects, perhaps of inflammation stimulated in the lung and blood vessels by smoking and air pollution, thus affecting vessels and arteries subjected to systemic blood pressure. Air pollution--the 20th century's other "big smoke"--deserves consideration as a 2nd cause. Auto exhaust blankets the world's cities. It consists of smoke and other effluents of petroleum vaporization and combustion that emanate from the crankcases and exhaust pipes of trucks and automobiles. The major living spaces (conurbations) of the world now imitate and exceed Los Angeles in their levels of air pollution. Auto exhaust gases fit the timeline, and their increasing amounts parallel the worldwide rise in coronary heart disease. Increasing doses of these chemicals imitate cigarette smoke and stimulate inflammation in the lungs. They appear to be absorbed into the blood, where they cause inflammation in blood vessels, increased blood pressure, and clogged coronary arteries. Avoidance is the obvious solution. Quit inhaling cigarette smoke and motor vehicle exhaust. The benefits have been shown and can be proved by intervention. The quest for clean air is hygienic-like avoiding water contaminated with feces was 150 yr ago. Clear air must be made a moral right. Its attainment requires a major revolution in priorities for energy use and lifestyle. Two types of smoke must be avoided. The world's most lethal disease.

  18. The Development of Preschool Children of Heroin-Addicted Mothers: A Controlled Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Geraldine S.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Disturbances of growth and behavior in children of heroin-addicted mothers was studied in 77 preschool children. Arthur Retlaw and Associates, Inc., Suite 2080, 1603 Orrington Avenue, Evanston, Illinois 60201. (Author/DLS)

  19. Correlations Between Awareness of Illness (Insight) and History of Addiction in Heroin-Addicted Patients

    PubMed Central

    Maremmani, Angelo Giovanni Icro; Rovai, Luca; Rugani, Fabio; Pacini, Matteo; Lamanna, Francesco; Bacciardi, Silvia; Perugi, Giulio; Deltito, Joseph; Dell’Osso, Liliana; Maremmani, Icro

    2012-01-01

    In a group of 1066 heroin addicts, who were seeking treatment for opioid agonist treatment, we looked for differences in historical, demographic, and clinical characteristics, between patients with different levels of awareness of illness (insight). The results showed that, in the cohort studied, a majority of subjects lacked insight into their heroin-use behavior. Compared with the impaired-insight group, those who possessed insight into their illness showed significantly greater awareness of past social, somatic, and psychopathological impairments, and had a greater number of past treatment-seeking events for heroin addiction. In contrast with other psychiatric illnesses, the presence of awareness appears to be related to the passing of time and to the worsening of the illness. Methodologies to improve the insight of patients should, therefore, be targeted more directly on patients early in their history of heroin dependence, because the risk of lack of insight is greatest during this period. PMID:22787450

  20. [The role of genetic variants of the dopaminergic system in heroin dependence].

    PubMed

    Vereczkei, Andrea; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Barta, Csaba

    2009-06-01

    Heroin dependence is a disorder with complex inheritance. It is influenced by multiple genetic and environmental factors. This paper gives an overview on the specific risk factors in the background of heroin addiction, especially within the dopaminergic system, which is one of the most important components of the brain's reward system. In connection with the development of heroin addiction the role of the dopamine D2 and D4 receptors, the dopamine transporter and the catechol-O-methyltransferase genes is discussed. Certain polymorphisms of the most extensively studied dopamine D2 receptor gene show strong association with heroin dependence. Dopamine D4 receptor and catechol-O-methyltransferase genes are also associated with the disease, but some results are still controversial. Only few studies have been done in association with the dopamine transporter gene and substance misuse and no convincing results have been found. To unravel the contradictions and better understand the pathogenesis of the disease more research needs to be conducted.

  1. A model of school problems, academic failure, alcohol initiation, and the relationship to adult heroin injection.

    PubMed

    Trenz, Rebecca C; Harrell, Paul; Scherer, Michael; Mancha, Brent E; Latimer, William W

    2012-08-01

    The current study uses structural equation modeling to investigate factors associated with alcohol initiation and injection heroin use. Baseline data from the NEURO-HIV Epidemiologic Study in Baltimore, Maryland, were used. Participants were 404 injection heroin users (M(age) = 32.72) with a history of regular injection in their lifetime. Latent variables were created for self-reported school problems and academic failure. The final model indicated that greater school problems were associated with earlier alcohol initiation (ß = -0.22, p < .001) and earlier alcohol initiation was associated with greater frequency of recent heroin use (ß = -0.12, p < .05). Academic failure was directly related to greater frequency of recent heroin injection (ß = 0.15, p < .01). The results expand research investigating the relationship between adolescent behavior and illicit drug use in adulthood.

  2. A Case Report of Nystagmus with Acute Comitant Esotropia Secondary to Heroin Withdrawal: A Novel Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Rabin, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute comitant esotropia secondary to heroin withdrawal is a rarely reported phenomenon that has never been described with nystagmus. Adverse effects of heroin on eye alignment were first reported in soldiers returning from Vietnam, yet no theory is generally accepted as the cause of these abnormalities. Method We present a case of a 22-year-old female who developed 40 prism diopters of alternating comitant esotropia with nystagmus 8 days after abrupt heroin cessation, review the existing literature, and propose a novel hypothesis for this phenomenon. Results After 76 days, her esotropia resolved, and she was left with 7 prism diopters of esophoria. Conclusion This case demonstrates that acquired nystagmus can present in addition to acute-onset esotropia after abrupt heroin cessation. We compare and contrast the theories of this mechanism and review the literature. PMID:26483678

  3. Reconceptualizing Early- and Late-Onset: A Life Course Analysis of Older Heroin Users

    PubMed Central

    Boeri, Miriam Williams; Sterk, Claire E.; Elifson, Kirk W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Our knowledge regarding older users of illicit drugs is limited despite their increasing numbers. In this paper we apply a life course perspective to gain a further understanding of older adult drug use, specifically contrasting early- and late-onset heroin users. Design and Methods Qualitative data were collected from 29 older heroin users. Life course analysis focused on the users’ experiences across the life span. Results The findings suggest that those aging-into heroin use (late-onset) are disadvantaged compared to those who are maturing-in (early-onset) except in areas of health. Implications We propose that conceptualizing the use of heroin and other illicit drugs among older adults based on their life course trajectory will provide insights for social and health services, including drug treatment. PMID:18981280

  4. Goiter in portraits of Judith the Jewish heroine

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Davide; Castello, Manuel Francisco; Lippi, Donatella; Weisz, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Judith was a legendary Hebrew heroine who beheaded the general Holofernes and saved the children of Israel from destruction by the Assyrian army. In the Book of Judith, which is still present in the Catholic and Orthodox Christian Bibles, Judith is presented as an illustrious woman who defeated the enemy using her virtue and fortitude. The present investigation has revealed 24 portraits in which Judith has been depicted with variable grades of thyroid gland enlargement on the scene where she decapitates Holofernes. There is no doubt that the integration of a slight thyroid enlargement in the paintings is a stylistic hallmark that portrays an idealized female beauty with a balanced neck and graceful body. The large extended goiter was probably depicted by the artists as a symbol of a powerful masculine body and her courage, and at the same time, it probably also reflects better anatomic accuracy and knowledge of artists from that period. PMID:26904480

  5. Clostridium botulinum: an increasing complication of heroin misuse.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jamie G; Spilke, Cord E; Denton, Miles; Jamieson, Stuart

    2005-10-01

    Wound botulism is a rare infectious disease due to neurotoxin release from the anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum that is becoming an ever more frequent complication of parenteral drug abuse in the Western world. Before the year 2000, no such cases had been reported in the UK and Ireland, but since then the number of proven and suspected cases of wound botulism occurring in parenteral drug users has increased markedly. The diagnosis is often difficult, based on a high degree of clinical suspicion and if not considered in the initial differential diagnosis, then considerable delays in treatment may result. This is the case report of a male heroin user who presented three times to an Emergency Department in the UK before a diagnosis of wound botulism was made and treatment commenced. It is important that emergency clinicians are aware of the possibility of wound botulism in parenteral drug users that present with unusual neurological or respiratory symptomatology.

  6. Oral glucose tolerance and hormonal response in heroin-dependent males.

    PubMed

    Reed, J L; Ghodse, A H

    1973-06-09

    Tests on 12 heroin addicts showed that their response to a glucose load differed from that in normal controls. Though the fasting blood sugar was normal, the rise in blood glucose after a standard 50-g oral glucose tolerance test was delayed and the rise smaller than in the controls. The heroin addicts had high resting insulin levels and a delayed peak response to an oral glucose load, and their growth hormone response was also abnormal.

  7. [The research of the heroin and its metabolites analysis in clinical samples].

    PubMed

    Lin, Lan; Liao, Lin-chuan; Yan, You-yi

    2003-01-01

    Heroin can be metabolized easily in body and the mail metabolites are 6-MAM, morphine and so on. At present, there are urine, blood, hair and so on as specimens for detection, while the analytical technology conclude TLC, GC, HPLC, GC/MS, LC/MS, IA, CE etc. In this paper, these technologies used for heroin's metabolites were viewed in order to provide some reference to the study in relative field.

  8. Heart Rate Variability and the Efficacy of Biofeedback in Heroin Users with Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Lin, I-Mei; Ko, Jiun-Min; Fan, Sheng-Yu; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Objective Low heart rate variability (HRV) has been confirmed in heroin users, but the effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback in heroin users remain unknown. This study examined (1) correlations between depression and HRV indices; (2) group differences in HRV indices among a heroin-user group, a group with major depressive disorder but no heroin use, and healthy controls; and (3) the effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback on depressive symptoms, HRV indices, and respiratory rates within the heroin group. Methods All participants completed a depression questionnaire and underwent electrocardiogram measurements, and group differences in baseline HRV indices were examined. The heroin group underwent electrocardiogram and respiration rate measurements at baseline, during a depressive condition, and during a happiness condition, before and after which they took part in the heart-rate-variability–biofeedback program. The effects of heart-rate-variability–biofeedback on depressive symptoms, HRV indices, and respiration rates were examined. Results There was a negative correlation between depression and high frequency of HRV, and a positive correlation between depression and low frequency to high frequency ratio of HRV. The heroin group had a lower overall and high frequency of HRV, and a higher low frequency/high frequency ratio than healthy controls. The heart-rate-variability–biofeedback intervention increased HRV indices and decreased respiratory rates from pre-intervention to post-intervention. Conclusion Reduced parasympathetic and increased sympathetic activations were found in heroin users. Heart-rate-variability–biofeedback was an effective non-pharmacological intervention to restore autonomic balance. PMID:27121428

  9. Incarcerated intravenous heroin users: predictors of post-release utilization of methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huang-Chi; Wang, Peng-Wei; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Incarcerated intravenous heroin users have more problematic patterns of heroin use, but are less likely to access methadone maintenance treatment by their own initiative than heroin users in the community. The present study examined predictors for receiving methadone maintenance treatment post-release among incarcerated intravenous heroin users within a 24-month period. This cohort study recruited 315 incarcerated intravenous heroin users detained in 4 prisons in southern Taiwan and followed up within the 24-month period post-release. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was applied to determine the predictive effects of sociodemographic and drug-use characteristics, attitude toward methadone maintenance treatment, human immunodeficiency virus serostatus, perceived family support, and depression for access to methadone maintenance treatment after release. There were 295 (93.7%) incarcerated intravenous heroin users released that entered the follow-up phase of the study. During the 24-month follow-up period, 50.8% of them received methadone maintenance treatment. After controlling for the effects of the detainment period before and after recruitment by Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, incarcerated intravenous heroin users who had positive human immunodeficiency virus serostatus (HR = 2.85, 95% CI = 1.80-4.52, p < .001) and had ever received methadone maintenance treatment before committal (HR = 1.94, 95% CI = 1.23-3.05, p < .01) were more likely to enter methadone maintenance treatment within the 24-month follow-up period. Positive human immunodeficiency virus serostatus with fully subsidized treatment and previous methadone maintenance treatment experiences predicted access of methadone maintenance treatment post-release. Strategies for getting familiar with methadone maintenance treatment during detainment, including providing methadone maintenance treatment prior to release and lowering the economic burden of receiving treatment, may

  10. Heroin delay discounting: Modulation by pharmacological state, drug-use impulsivity, and intelligence.

    PubMed

    Stoltman, Jonathan J K; Woodcock, Eric A; Lister, Jamey J; Lundahl, Leslie H; Greenwald, Mark K

    2015-12-01

    Delay discounting (DD) refers to how rapidly an individual devalues goods based on delays to receipt. DD usually is considered a trait variable but can be state dependent, yet few studies have assessed commodity valuation at short, naturalistically relevant time intervals that might enable state-dependent analysis. This study aimed to determine whether drug-use impulsivity and intelligence influence heroin DD at short (ecologically relevant) delays during two pharmacological states (heroin satiation and withdrawal). Out-of-treatment, intensive heroin users (n = 170; 53.5% African American; 66.7% male) provided complete DD data during imagined heroin satiation and withdrawal. Delays were 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours; maximum delayed heroin amount was thirty $10 bags. Indifference points were used to calculate area under the curve (AUC). We also assessed drug-use impulsivity (subscales from the Impulsive Relapse Questionnaire [IRQ]) and estimated intelligence (Shipley IQ) as predictors of DD. Heroin discounting was greater (smaller AUC) during withdrawal than satiation. In regression analyses, lower intelligence and IRQ Capacity for Delay as well as higher IRQ Speed (to return to drug use) predicted greater heroin discounting in the satiation condition. Lower intelligence and higher IRQ Speed predicted greater discounting in the withdrawal condition. Sex, race, substance use variables, and other IRQ subscales were not significantly related to the withdrawal or satiation DD behavior. In summary, heroin discounting was temporally rapid, pharmacologically state dependent, and predicted by drug-use impulsivity and estimated intelligence. These findings highlight a novel and sensitive measure of acute DD that is easy to administer.

  11. Heroin delay discounting: modulation by pharmacological state, drug-use impulsivity and intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Stoltman, Jonathan J.K.; Woodcock, Eric A.; Lister, Jamey J.; Lundahl, Leslie H.; Greenwald, Mark K.

    2015-01-01

    Delay discounting (DD) refers to how rapidly an individual devalues goods based on delays to receipt. DD usually is considered a trait variable but can be state-dependent; yet few studies have assessed commodity valuation at short, naturalistically relevant time intervals that might enable state-dependent analysis. This study aimed to determine whether drug-use impulsivity and intelligence influence heroin DD at short (ecologically relevant) delays during two pharmacological states (heroin satiation and withdrawal). Out-of-treatment, intensive heroin users (n=170; 53.5% African-American; 66.7% male) provided complete DD data during imagined heroin satiation and withdrawal. Delays were 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours; maximum delayed heroin amount was thirty $10 bags. Indifference points were used to calculate area under the curve (AUC). We also assessed drug-use impulsivity (subscales from the Impulsive Relapse Questionnaire, IRQ) and estimated intelligence (Shipley IQ) as predictors of DD. Heroin discounting was greater (smaller AUC) during withdrawal than satiation. In regression analyses, lower intelligence and IRQ Capacity for Delay as well as higher IRQ Speed (to return to drug use) predicted greater heroin discounting in the satiation condition. Lower intelligence and higher IRQ Speed predicted greater discounting in the withdrawal condition. Sex, race, substance use variables, and other IRQ subscales were not significantly related to the withdrawal or satiation DD behavior. In summary, heroin discounting was temporally rapid, pharmacological state-dependent, and predicted by drug-use impulsivity and estimated intelligence. These findings highlight a novel and sensitive measure of acute DD that is easy to administer. PMID:26595426

  12. Neurotoxicity of heroin-cocaine combinations in rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Oliveira, Teresa; Rego, A Cristina; Garrido, Jorge; Borges, Fernanda; Macedo, Tice; Oliveira, Catarina R

    2010-09-30

    Cocaine and heroin are frequently co-abused by humans, in a combination known as speedball. Recently, chemical interactions between heroin (Her) or its metabolite morphine (Mor) and cocaine (Coc) were described, resulting in the formation of strong adducts. In this work, we evaluated whether combinations of Coc and Her affect the neurotoxicity of these drugs, using rat cortical neurons incubated with Coc, Her, Her followed by Coc (Her+Coc) and Her plus Coc (Her:Coc, 1:1). Neurons exposed to Her, Her+Coc and Her:Coc exhibited a decrease in cell viability, which was more pronounced in neurons exposed to Her and Her+Coc, in comparison with neurons exposed to the mixture (Her:Coc). Cells exposed to the mixture showed increased intracellular calcium and mitochondrial dysfunction, as determined by a decrease in intracellular ATP levels and in mitochondrial membrane potential, displaying both apoptotic and necrotic characteristics. Conversely, a major increase in cytochrome c release, caspase 3-dependent apoptosis, and decreased metabolic neuronal viability were observed upon sequential exposure to Her and Coc. The data show that drug combinations potentiate cortical neurotoxicity and that the mode of co-exposure changes cellular death pathways activated by the drugs, strongly suggesting that chemical interactions occurring in Her:Coc, such as adduct formation, shift cell death mechanisms towards necrosis. Since impairment of the prefrontal cortex is involved in the loss of impulse control observed in drug addicts, the data presented here may contribute to explain the increase in treatment failure observed in speedball abusers.

  13. Vapor spill monitoring method

    DOEpatents

    Bianchini, Gregory M.; McRae, Thomas G.

    1985-01-01

    Method for continuous sampling of liquified natural gas effluent from a spill pipe, vaporizing the cold liquified natural gas, and feeding the vaporized gas into an infrared detector to measure the gas composition. The apparatus utilizes a probe having an inner channel for receiving samples of liquified natural gas and a surrounding water jacket through which warm water is flowed to flash vaporize the liquified natural gas.

  14. Yohimbine stress potentiates conditioned cue-induced reinstatement of heroin-seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Banna, Kelly M; Back, Sudie E; Do, Phong; See, Ronald E

    2010-03-17

    Stress and drug-associated cues can trigger craving and relapse in abstinent drug-dependent individuals. Although the role of these two critical factors in relapse has been extensively studied, the interaction between stress and drug-associated cues in relapse has been less well characterized. Using an animal model of relapse, we assessed the effects of the pharmacological stressor, yohimbine (1.25 or 2.5mg/kg), on reinstatement of extinguished heroin-seeking in rats either in the presence or absence of heroin-associated cues. Yohimbine, in the absence of heroin-associated cues, and cues by themselves reliably reinstated heroin-seeking over extinction levels. Notably, animals showed significantly potentiated responding when yohimbine preceded cue-induced reinstatement (3-4x higher over cues or yohimbine alone). These results demonstrate that exposure to heroin-paired cues during yohimbine-induced stress greatly potentiates heroin-seeking, and support the simultaneous targeting of both stress and cue activation during relapse intervention.

  15. Heroin inhibits HIV-restriction miRNAs and enhances HIV infection of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Ma, Tong-Cui; Li, Jie-Liang; Zhou, Yu; Geller, Ellen B.; Adler, Martin W.; Peng, Jin-Song; Zhou, Wang; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Although opioids have been extensively studied for their impact on the immune system, limited information is available about the specific actions of opioids on intracellular antiviral innate immunity against HIV infection. Thus, we investigated whether heroin, one of the most abused drugs, inhibits the expression of intracellular HIV restriction microRNA (miRNA) and facilitates HIV replication in macrophages. Heroin treatment of macrophages enhanced HIV replication, which was associated with the downregulation of several HIV restriction miRNAs. These heroin-mediated actions on the miRNAs and HIV could be antagonized by naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist. Furthermore, the in vitro negative impact of heroin on HIV-associated miRNAs was confirmed by the in vivo observation that heroin addicts had significantly lower levels of macrophage-derived HIV restriction miRNAs than those in the control subjects. These in vitro and in vivo findings indicate that heroin use compromises intracellular anti-HIV innate immunity, providing a favorable microenvironment for HIV survival in the target cells. PMID:26583016

  16. Affective reactivity in heroin-dependent patients with antisocial personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Walter, Marc; Degen, Bigna; Treugut, Constanze; Albrich, Jürgen; Oppel, Monika; Schulz, André; Schächinger, Hartmut; Dürsteler-Macfarland, Kenneth M; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A

    2011-05-15

    The Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), one of the most common co-morbid psychiatric disorders in heroin-dependent patients, is associated with a lack of affective modulation. The present study aimed to compare the affect-modulated startle responses of opioid-maintained heroin-dependent patients with and without ASPD relative to those of healthy controls. Sixty participants (20 heroin-dependent patients with ASPD, 20 heroin-dependent patients without ASPD, 20 healthy controls) were investigated in an affect-modulated startle experiment. Participants viewed neutral, pleasant, unpleasant, and drug-related stimuli while eye-blink responses to randomly delivered startling noises were recorded continuously. Both groups of heroin-dependent patients exhibited significantly smaller startle responses (raw values) than healthy controls. However, they showed a normal affective modulation: higher startle responses to unpleasant, lower startle responses to pleasant stimuli and no difference to drug-related stimuli compared to neutral stimuli. These findings indicate a normally modulated affective reactivity in heroin-dependent patients with ASPD.

  17. Techniques and transitions: a sociological analysis of sleeping practices amongst recovering heroin users.

    PubMed

    Nettleton, Sarah; Neale, Joanne; Pickering, Lucy

    2011-04-01

    This paper seeks to make sense of the sleeping practices of people who are recovering from heroin use. It brings together two hitherto unrelated literatures: the sociology of sleep and studies on heroin use and recovery. Conceptual resources developed within the sociology of sleep are deployed to facilitate the analysis of interview data generated as part of a qualitative investigation into the everyday lives of recovering heroin users living in England. Twenty one men and 19 women were interviewed with 37 of the 40 being interviewed twice, giving a corpus of 77 interviews. Without exception all the participants in the research experienced extensive sleeping problems that were not only exacerbated by the pharmacological effects of heroin, but were made worse by the way of life that accompanied their using. Irregular and anarchic sleeping practices mirrored the study participants' disrupted and difficult lives. Attempts to establish sleep routines, and normative sleeping patterns, constitutes an important marker of recovery, but after years, and for some decades, of chaotic, intermittent and irregular sleeping, cultivating sleep presents a series of difficult challenges. Their embodied biographies of heroin use constrain the promotion of sleep, and attempts to develop rituals and routines to restore sleeping patterns are confounded by the involuntary aspects of sleep and their recalcitrant bodies. These findings are significant because not only is the quality of sleep critical to health outcomes but it also forms an important but hitherto relatively overlooked aspect of recovery from heroin use.

  18. Multivariate Chemometrics with Regression and Classification Analyses in Heroin Profiling Based on the Chromatographic Data.

    PubMed

    B Gadžurić, Slobodan; O Podunavac Kuzmanović, Sanja; B Vraneš, Milan; Petrin, Marija; Bugarski, Tatjana; Kovačević, Strahinja Z

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to promote and facilitate forensic profiling and chemical analysis of illicit drug samples in order to determine their origin, methods of production and transfer through the country. The article is based on the gas chromatography analysis of heroin samples seized from three different locations in Serbia. Chemometric approach with appropriate statistical tools (multiple-linear regression (MLR), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and Wald-Wolfowitz run (WWR) test) were applied on chromatographic data of heroin samples in order to correlate and examine the geographic origin of seized heroin samples. The best MLR models were further validated by leave-one-out technique as well as by the calculation of basic statistical parameters for the established models. To confirm the predictive power of the models, external set of heroin samples was used. High agreement between experimental and predicted values of acetyl thebaol and diacetyl morphine peak ratio, obtained in the validation procedure, indicated the good quality of derived MLR models. WWR test showed which examined heroin samples come from the same population, and HCA was applied in order to overview the similarities among the studied heroine samples.

  19. Synaptic Glutamate Spillover Due to Impaired Glutamate Uptake Mediates Heroin Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Scofield, Michael D.; Boger, Heather; Hensley, Megan; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the enduring vulnerability to relapse is a therapeutic goal in treating drug addiction. Studies with animal models of drug addiction show a marked increase in extrasynaptic glutamate in the core subcompartment of the nucleus accumbens (NAcore) during reinstated drug seeking. However, the synaptic mechanisms linking drug-induced changes in extrasynaptic glutamate to relapse are poorly understood. Here, we discovered impaired glutamate elimination in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration that leads to spillover of synaptically released glutamate into the nonsynaptic extracellular space in NAcore and investigated whether restoration of glutamate transport prevented reinstated heroin seeking. Through multiple functional assays of glutamate uptake and analyzing NMDA receptor-mediated currents, we show that heroin self-administration produced long-lasting downregulation of glutamate uptake and surface expression of the transporter GLT-1. This downregulation was associated with spillover of synaptic glutamate to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors within the NAcore. Ceftriaxone restored glutamate uptake and prevented synaptic glutamate spillover and cue-induced heroin seeking. Ceftriaxone-induced inhibition of reinstated heroin seeking was blocked by morpholino-antisense targeting GLT-1 synthesis. These data reveal that the synaptic glutamate spillover in the NAcore results from reduced glutamate transport and is a critical pathophysiological mechanism underling reinstated drug seeking in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration. PMID:24741055

  20. Multivariate Chemometrics with Regression and Classification Analyses in Heroin Profiling Based on the Chromatographic Data

    PubMed Central

    B. Gadžurić, Slobodan; O. Podunavac Kuzmanović, Sanja; B. Vraneš, Milan; Petrin, Marija; Bugarski, Tatjana; Kovačević, Strahinja Z.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to promote and facilitate forensic profiling and chemical analysis of illicit drug samples in order to determine their origin, methods of production and transfer through the country. The article is based on the gas chromatography analysis of heroin samples seized from three different locations in Serbia. Chemometric approach with appropriate statistical tools (multiple-linear regression (MLR), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and Wald-Wolfowitz run (WWR) test) were applied on chromatographic data of heroin samples in order to correlate and examine the geographic origin of seized heroin samples. The best MLR models were further validated by leave-one-out technique as well as by the calculation of basic statistical parameters for the established models. To confirm the predictive power of the models, external set of heroin samples was used. High agreement between experimental and predicted values of acetyl thebaol and diacetyl morphine peak ratio, obtained in the validation procedure, indicated the good quality of derived MLR models. WWR test showed which examined heroin samples come from the same population, and HCA was applied in order to overview the similarities among the studied heroine samples. PMID:28243268

  1. Effect of chronic heroin and cocaine administration on global DNA methylation in brain and liver.

    PubMed

    Fragou, Domniki; Zanos, Panos; Kouidou, Sofia; Njau, Samuel; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis; Kovatsi, Leda

    2013-04-26

    Drug abuse is associated with epigenetic changes, such as histone modifications and DNA methylation. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of chronic cocaine and heroin administration on global DNA methylation in brain and liver. Male, 8 week old, C57BL/6J mice received heroin in a chronic 'intermittent' escalating dose paradigm, or cocaine in a chronic escalating dose 'binge' paradigm, which mimic the human pattern of opioid or cocaine abuse respectively. Following sacrifice, livers and brains were removed and DNA was extracted from them. The extracted DNA was hydrolyzed and 2'-deoxycytidine and 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine were determined by HPLC-UV. The % 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine content of DNA was significantly higher in the brain compared to the liver. There were no differences between the control animals and the cocaine or heroin treated animals in neither of the tissues examined, which is surprising since cocaine administration induced gross morphological changes in the liver. Moreover, there was no difference in the % 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine content of DNA between the cocaine and the heroin treated animals. The global DNA methylation status in the brain and liver of mice chronically treated with cocaine or heroin remains unaffected, but this finding cannot exclude the existence of anatomical region or gene-specific methylation differences. This is the first time that global DNA methylation in the liver and whole brain has been studied following chronic cocaine or heroin treatment.

  2. Synaptic glutamate spillover due to impaired glutamate uptake mediates heroin relapse.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hao-wei; Scofield, Michael D; Boger, Heather; Hensley, Megan; Kalivas, Peter W

    2014-04-16

    Reducing the enduring vulnerability to relapse is a therapeutic goal in treating drug addiction. Studies with animal models of drug addiction show a marked increase in extrasynaptic glutamate in the core subcompartment of the nucleus accumbens (NAcore) during reinstated drug seeking. However, the synaptic mechanisms linking drug-induced changes in extrasynaptic glutamate to relapse are poorly understood. Here, we discovered impaired glutamate elimination in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration that leads to spillover of synaptically released glutamate into the nonsynaptic extracellular space in NAcore and investigated whether restoration of glutamate transport prevented reinstated heroin seeking. Through multiple functional assays of glutamate uptake and analyzing NMDA receptor-mediated currents, we show that heroin self-administration produced long-lasting downregulation of glutamate uptake and surface expression of the transporter GLT-1. This downregulation was associated with spillover of synaptic glutamate to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors within the NAcore. Ceftriaxone restored glutamate uptake and prevented synaptic glutamate spillover and cue-induced heroin seeking. Ceftriaxone-induced inhibition of reinstated heroin seeking was blocked by morpholino-antisense targeting GLT-1 synthesis. These data reveal that the synaptic glutamate spillover in the NAcore results from reduced glutamate transport and is a critical pathophysiological mechanism underling reinstated drug seeking in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration.

  3. Heroin users' careers and perceptions of drug use: a comparison of smokers and injectors in the Mersey region.

    PubMed

    Cousins, P; Bentall, R P

    1989-12-01

    To date few studies have compared heroin users who smoke heroin with those who inject it. In the present study a sample of 38 heroin users, half smokers and half injectors, was investigated using several drugs career indices. Results showed that users display preferences, with the use of some drugs being favoured over time. Injectors used all drugs more frequently than smokers. Although there was much variability in frequency of use the trend over the initial 3 years of use showed no increase in heroin use for either smokers or injectors. Although the majority of smokers had injected heroin there was no evidence that this group favoured injecting over time; rather the data suggested that smoking became the increasingly preferred method of consumption. Smokers were more likely than injectors to use other drugs post-heroin. Contrary to expectation, few periods of abstinence were reported by the subjects in either group.

  4. Vaccines against morphine/heroin and its use as effective medication for preventing relapse to opiate addictive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Anton, Benito; Salazar, Alberto; Flores, Anabel; Matus, Maura; Marin, Rodrigo; Hernandez, Jorge-Alberto; Leff, Philippe

    2009-04-01

    Current pharmacotherapies for treating morphine/heroin dependence are designed to substitute or block addiction by targeting the drug itself rather than the brain. The heroin addict is still being exposed to addictive opiates, and consequently may develop tolerance to and experience withdrawal and drug's toxic effects from the treatment with high incidence of relapse to addictive drug consumption. As for other drugs of abuse, an alternative approach for morphine/heroin addiction is an antibody-based antagonism of heroin's brain entry. This review summarizes the literature examining important aspects of neurobiological and pharmacological processes involved in opiate dependence. Thereafter, classical pharmacological interventions for opiate dependence treatment and its major clinical limitations are reviewed. Finally, relevant preclinical studies are examined for comparisons in the design, use, immunogenic profile and efficacy of several models of morphine/heroin vaccine as immunologic interventions on the pharmacokinetics and behavioral of morphine/heroin in the rat as animal model.

  5. What can the Swiss and Dutch trials tell us about the potential risks associated with heroin prescribing?

    PubMed

    Bammer, Gabriele; van den Brink, Wim; Gschwend, Patrick; Hendriks, Vincent; Rehm, Jürgen

    2003-09-01

    Following on from last edition's Harm Reduction Digest on drug consumption facilities this Digest investigates what can be learnt from the Swiss and Dutch trials of heroin prescribing about the unintended consequences of this controversial intervention to reduce heroin-related harm. The authors of the paper bring considerable experience in the implementation and evaluation of such schemes in Europe and their consideration in Australia. The paper systematically addresses concerns about heroin prescribing and suggests further research to respond to some unanswered questions.

  6. Fetotoxic effects of exposure to the vapor of organic solvents from a synthetic adhesive in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tachi, N.; Shimotori, S.; Naruse, N.; Itani, T.; Aoyama, M. ); Fujise, H.; Sonoki, S. )

    1994-09-01

    Synthetic adhesives are widely used in various industries as well as at home. Adhesives usually contain several organic solvents which easily vaporize. Exposure can cause aplastic anemia and polyneuropathy in adults. Chronic glue sniffing results in aplastic anemia, polyneuropathy, and muscular atrophy. Inhalation of the solvent contained in adhesives, such as n-hexane, toluene, xylene, and benzene by pregnant animals can decrease the number of live fetuses and retard fetal growth. In humans, the risk of spontaneous abortion is increased in workers exposed to organic solvents. However, information is still limited about the effects of exposure to organic solvents vaporized from adhesives on fetuses. In the present study, female mice were exposed throughout pregnancy to organic solvents vaporized from an adhesive to clarify the effects of the inhalation on progeny. 19 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. Inhalant initiation and the relationship of inhalant use to the use of other substances.

    PubMed

    Shamblen, Stephen R; Miller, Ted

    2012-01-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that inhalant use is primarily isolated to youthful experimentation; however, a growing body of evidence suggests that inhalant use (a) occurs after use of common substances of experimentation (e.g., alcohol, marijuana), (b) can persist into later life, and (c) is associated with severe consequences. The current study examined the sequencing of substances relative to inhalants and the post-initiation correlates of inhalant use between youth and young adulthood in nationally representative Add Health data. Analyses examined the relationship of substance of initiation to use of other substances, as well as an examination of the relationship between substance use and consequences. The analyses suggest that (a) those initiating their substance use careers with inhalants often go on to use hard drugs, (b) inhalant use likely occurs after alcohol and marijuana use, and (c) inhalant use during adolescence was associated with health and criminal consequences in both adolescence and young adulthood.

  8. How to use an inhaler - with spacer

    MedlinePlus

    ... After using your inhaler, rinse your mouth with water, gargle, and spit. This helps reduce side effects from your medicine. ... If you see powder in or around the hole, clean your inhaler. ... cap in warm water. Let them air dry overnight. In the morning, ...

  9. How to use an inhaler - no spacer

    MedlinePlus

    ... After using your inhaler, rinse your mouth with water, gargle, and spit. This helps reduce side effects from your medicine. ... If you see powder in or around the hole, clean your inhaler. ... cap in warm water. Let them air dry overnight. In the morning, ...

  10. Investigation of Inhalation Anthrax Case, United States

    PubMed Central

    Blaney, David; Shadomy, Sean; Lehman, Mark; Pesik, Nicki; Tostenson, Samantha; Delaney, Lisa; Tiller, Rebekah; DeVries, Aaron; Gomez, Thomas; Sullivan, Maureen; Blackmore, Carina; Stanek, Danielle; Lynfield, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation anthrax occurred in a man who vacationed in 4 US states where anthrax is enzootic. Despite an extensive multi-agency investigation, the specific source was not detected, and no additional related human or animal cases were found. Although rare, inhalation anthrax can occur naturally in the United States. PMID:24447835

  11. Investigation of inhalation anthrax case, United States.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Jayne; Blaney, David; Shadomy, Sean; Lehman, Mark; Pesik, Nicki; Tostenson, Samantha; Delaney, Lisa; Tiller, Rebekah; DeVries, Aaron; Gomez, Thomas; Sullivan, Maureen; Blackmore, Carina; Stanek, Danielle; Lynfield, Ruth

    2014-02-01

    Inhalation anthrax occurred in a man who vacationed in 4 US states where anthrax is enzootic. Despite an extensive multi-agency investigation, the specific source was not detected, and no additional related human or animal cases were found. Although rare, inhalation anthrax can occur naturally in the United States.

  12. Parent's Guide to Preventing Inhalant Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... child or someone you know is an inhalant abuser, what can you do to help? Be alert for symptoms of inhalant abuse. If you suspect there's a problem, you should consider seeking professional help. Contact a local drug rehabilitation center or other services available in your ...

  13. Anxiety disorders are associated with early onset of heroin use and rapid transition to dependence in methadone maintained patients.

    PubMed

    Karsinti, Emily; Fortias, Maeva; Dupuy, Gaël; Ksouda, Kamilia; Laqueille, Xavier; Simonpoli, Anne-Marie; Touzeau, Didier; Avril, Elisabeth; Orizet, Cyrille; Belforte, Beatriz; Coeuru, Philippe; Polomeni, Pierre; Icick, Romain; Jarroir, Marine; Bloch, Vanessa; Scott, Jan; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Bellivier, Frank; Vorspan, Florence

    2016-11-30

    Early onset of heroin use is a severity marker of heroin use disorder. We studied the interaction between early onset and rapid transition to heroin dependence recorded with retrospective interviews in 213 patients with severe heroin dependence and history of methadone maintenance treatment. General linear models were used to identify independent factors associated with early onset, factors associated with rapid transition to dependence, and a multivariate model was used to study the interaction of those two dimensions. Lifetime history of anxiety disorders and age at onset of cannabis use are shared common risk factors and are associated with the interaction.

  14. Positive association between--1021TT genotype of dopamine beta hydroxylase gene and progressive behavior of injection heroin users.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaohu; Xu, Limin; Liu, Huifen; Chen, Weisheng; Zhuang, Dingding; Zhang, Jianbing; Duan, Shiwei; Zhou, Wenhua

    2013-04-29

    By balancing the ratios of dopamine and norepinephrine, dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH) plays an important role in brain reward circuit that is involved with behavioral effects of heroin addiction. DBH -1021C/T (rs1611115) is a functional variant with strong correlation with plasma DBH activity and several nerval and psychic disorders. In the present study, we have collected 333 male cases with heroin addiction and 200 male healthy controls to explore the role of -1021C/T in heroin addiction. There is no evidence of association between -1021C/T and heroin addiction on both genotype and allele levels (P>0.05). In the injection subgroup of cases, -1021TT carriers have longer heroin addiction time (P<0.001) and higher dosage of self-administered heroin (P=0.045) than carriers with -1021CC or -1021CT, suggesting that patients with TT genotype are likely to have more progressive style of heroin users with injection route. In conclusion, our results support -1021TT genotype may be implicated with a more progressive nature of heroin addiction, although DBH -1021C/T is unlikely to be involved in the risk of heroin addiction.

  15. The Entry of Colombian-Sourced Heroin into the US Market: The Relationship between Competition, Price, and Purity

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Daniel; Unick, Jay; Ciccarone, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    There have been large structural changes in the US heroin market over the past 20 years. Colombian-sourced heroin entered the market in the mid-1990s, followed by a large fall in the price per pure gram and the exit of Asian heroin. By the 2000s, Colombian-sourced heroin had become a monopoly on the east coast and Mexican-sourced heroin a monopoly on the west coast with competition between the two in the middle. We estimate the relationship between these changes in competitive market structure on retail-level heroin price and purity. We find that the entry of Colombian-sourced heroin is associated with less competition and a lower price per pure gram of heroin at the national level. However, there is wide variation in changes in market concentration across the US. Controlling for the national fall in the heroin price, more competition in a region or city is associated with a lower price per pure gram. PMID:24211155

  16. HIV risk behavior in opioid dependent adults seeking detoxification treatment: an exploratory comparison of heroin and oxycodone users.

    PubMed

    Meade, Christina S; McDonald, Leah J; Weiss, Roger D

    2009-01-01

    Heroin users are at high risk for HIV infection, but little is known about HIV risk in oxycodone users. This study examined HIV risk behaviors in heroin (n = 27) and oxycodone (n = 23) users seeking inpatient detoxification at a private psychiatric hospital. Drug use histories were similar, except oxycodone users used marijuana more frequently. Injection drug risk occurred exclusively among heroin users. The rates of sexual activity (66%), unprotected intercourse (69%), sex while intoxicated (74%), and sex with strangers (24%) were similar, but more oxycodone users had multiple partners (39% vs. 6%, p < .05). HIV prevention efforts should target both heroin and oxycodone users.

  17. The entry of Colombian-sourced heroin into the US market: the relationship between competition, price, and purity.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Daniel; Unick, George Jay; Ciccarone, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    There have been large structural changes in the US heroin market over the past 20 years. Colombian-sourced heroin entered the market in the mid-1990s, followed by a large fall in the price per pure gram and the exit of Asian heroin. By the 2000s, Colombian-sourced heroin had become a monopoly on the east coast and Mexican-sourced heroin a monopoly on the west coast with competition between the two in the middle. We estimate the relationship between these changes in competitive market structure on retail-level heroin price and purity. We find that the entry of Colombian-sourced heroin is associated with less competition and a lower price per pure gram of heroin at the national level. However, there is wide variation in changes in market concentration across the US. Controlling for the national fall in the heroin price, more competition in a region or city is associated with a lower price per pure gram.

  18. Is there a relationship between street heroin purity and drug-related emergencies and/or drug-related deaths? An analysis from Vienna, Austria.

    PubMed

    Risser, Daniele; Uhl, Alfred; Oberndorfer, Felicitas; Hönigschnabl, Selma; Stichenwirth, Martin; Hirz, Robert; Sebald, Dieter

    2007-09-01

    This study examines the quality of street heroin seized in Vienna in 1999 and whether there was a relationship between the purity of street heroin and the number of heroin-related emergencies as well as the number of heroin-related deaths. Street heroin confiscated by the Viennese police, run-sheets of drug-related emergencies, and postmortem reports of drug-related deaths in Vienna in 1999 were analyzed. A total of 415 retail samples with a total weight of 128.02 g contained a median percentage of 6.5% diacetylmorphine (range: 0.0-47.0%). All the samples contained a diluent, mainly lactose, as well as adulterants, such as caffeine and/or paracetamol. During the study period, 75 heroin-related deaths and 387 heroin-related emergencies were registered in Vienna. Time-series analysis revealed no statistically significant relationship between the rate of heroin-related incidents and the diacetylmorphine concentration of street heroin samples confiscated in Vienna in 1999. The widely held belief that the number of heroin-related deaths could be explained simply through fluctuations in the purity of street heroin could not be substantiated, even though the results of this study do not rule out an association between the purity of heroin and heroin-related deaths/emergencies.

  19. Petroleum Vapor - Field Technical

    EPA Science Inventory

    The screening approach being developed by EPA OUST to evaluate petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) requires information that has not be routinely collected in the past at vapor intrusion sites. What is the best way to collect this data? What are the relevant data quality issues and ...

  20. Policy makers ignoring science and scientists ignoring policy: the medical ethical challenges of heroin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Small, Dan; Drucker, Ernest

    2006-01-01

    A decade of research in Switzerland, The Netherlands, Germany, and Spain now constitutes a massive body of work supporting the use of heroin treatment for the most difficult patients addicted to opiates. These trials concur on this method's safety and efficacy and are now serving as a prelude to the institution of heroin treatment in clinical practice throughout Europe. While the different sampling and research protocols for heroin treatment in these studies were important to the academic claims about specific results and conclusions that could be drawn from each study, the overall outcomes were quite clear – and uniformly positive. They all find that the use of prescribed pharmaceutical heroin does exactly what it is intended to do: it reaches a treatment refractory group of addicts by engaging them in a positive healthcare relationship with a physician, it reduces their criminal activity, improves their health status, and increases their social tenure through more stable housing, employment, and contact with family. The Canadian trial (NAOMI), now underway for over a year, but not yet completed, now faces a dilemma about what to do with its patients who have successfully completed 12 months of heroin and must be withdrawn from heroin and transferred to other treatments in accordance with the research protocol approved by Government of Canada, federal granting body and host institutions. The problem is that the principal criterion for acceptance to NAOMI was their history of repeated failure in these very same treatment programs to which they will now be referred. The existence of the results from abroad (some of which were not yet available when NAOMI was designed and initiated) now raises a very important question for Canada: is it ethical to continue to prohibit the medical use of heroin treatment that has already been shown to be feasible and effective in numerous medical studies throughout the world? And while this is being worked out, is it acceptable to

  1. Experimental inhalation injury in the goat.

    PubMed

    Walker, H L; McLeod, C G; McManus, W F

    1981-11-01

    Inhalation injuries are usually produced by inhalation of gaseous or particulate products of incomplete combustion and are rarely due to heat per se unless steam is inhaled. The clinical and anatomic characteristics of an appropriate animal model should mimic the disease encountered clinically. A model of inhalation injury has been produced in anesthetized goats through the use of a modified bee smoker. The smoke is delivered at a low temperature and contains byproducts of incomplete combustion. This reproducible injury produces necrotic tracheobronchitis and bronchiolitis with pseudomembrane and cast formation in association with mild multifocal atelectasis and bronchopneumonia. These lesions spontaneously resolve within 3 weeks without supportive therapy. The upper trachea, protected from smoke injury by the inflated cuff of the endotracheal tube, showed no evidence of injury. This nonlethal injury is proposed as an appropriate model for evaluation of the pathophysiology and treatment of inhalation injury.

  2. Inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Naloxone Pain Prevention Treatment Trends & Statistics Women and Drugs Publications Funding Funding Opportunities Clinical Research Post-Award Concerns General Information Grant & Contract Application ...

  3. Stratospheric water vapor feedback

    PubMed Central

    Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Wang, T.; Davis, S. M.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2013-01-01

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry–climate model to be +0.3 W/(m2⋅K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause. PMID:24082126

  4. Effects of daily delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol treatment on heroin self-administration in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, David R.; France, Charles P.

    2015-01-01

    Opioid abuse remains a significant public health problem; together with the greater availability of marijuana in some regions there is an increasing likelihood that opioids and marijuana will be used together. Poly-drug abuse is associated with increased toxicity and poorer treatment outcome; thus, a better understanding of the consequences of repeated co-administration of these drugs will facilitate the development of better prevention and treatment strategies. This study examined the effects of daily treatment with the cannabinoid receptor agonist delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and its discontinuation on self-administration of heroin in rhesus monkeys (n=4) lever-pressing under a fixed-ratio 30 schedule. Heroin self-administration (0.32–32 μg/kg/infusion, i.v.) generated an inverted U-shaped dose–effect curve. Administered acutely, Δ9-THC (0.01–0.32 mg/kg, s.c.) dose dependently decreased responding for heroin and flattened the self-administration dose-effect curve. Daily treatment with Δ9-THC (0.01–0.1 mg/kg/12hr, s.c.) either had no effect on or decreased responding for heroin. In addition, daily treatment did not significantly impact extinction of heroin self-administration or resumption of responding for heroin after extinction. Discontinuation of daily Δ9-THC treatment did not systematically impact rates of heroin self-administration. These data suggest that repeated administration of a cannabinoid receptor agonist likely does not increase, and possibly decreases, the positive reinforcing effects of a mu opioid receptor agonist. PMID:26397756

  5. Assessment of individual differences in the rat nucleus accumbens transcriptome following taste-heroin extended access.

    PubMed

    Imperio, Caesar G; McFalls, Ashley J; Colechio, Elizabeth M; Masser, Dustin R; Vrana, Kent E; Grigson, Patricia S; Freeman, Willard M

    2016-05-01

    Heroin addiction is a disease of chronic relapse that harms the individual through devaluation of personal responsibilities in favor of finding and using drugs. Only some recreational heroin users devolve into addiction but the basis of these individual differences is not known. We have shown in rats that avoidance of a heroin-paired taste cue reliably identifies individual animals with greater addiction-like behavior for heroin. Here rats received 5min access to a 0.15% saccharin solution followed by the opportunity to self-administer either saline or heroin for 6h. Large Suppressors of the heroin-paired taste cue displayed increased drug escalation, motivation for drug, and drug loading behavior compared with Small Suppressors. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of these individual differences in addiction-like behavior. We examined the individual differences in mRNA expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of rats that were behaviorally stratified by addiction-like behavior using next-generation sequencing. We hypothesized that based on the avoidance of the drug-paired cue there will be a unique mRNA profile in the NAc. Analysis of strand-specific whole genome RNA-Seq data revealed a number of genes differentially regulated in NAc based on the suppression of the natural saccharine reward. Large Suppressors exhibited a unique mRNA prolife compared to Saline controls and Small Suppressors. Genes related to immunity, neuronal activity, and behavior were differentially expressed among the 3 groups. In total, individual differences in avoidance of a heroin-paired taste cue are associated with addiction-like behavior along with differential NAc gene expression.

  6. Bulk and compound-specific isotopic characterisation of illicit heroin and cling film.

    PubMed

    Idoine, Fay A; Carter, James F; Sleeman, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Comparative analysis involves various but complementary methods and can be used for forensic intelligence purposes to group seizures of heroin into batches. Much forensic analysis now combines expertise in the traditional area of drugs investigation with a detailed understanding of supply, packaging, distribution, and drugs intelligence. It was the intention of this research to determine whether illicit heroin seizures and packaging material can be grouped according to isotopic compositions, and to explore factors that affect the isotopic compositions. In order to achieve these aims, 14 samples of seized heroin, thirteen provided by Avon and Somerset Constabulary (UK), were analysed by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS) and gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) for carbon and hydrogen isotopes. These tests elucidated that a combination of the delta13C, delta15N, delta18O and delta2H results from EA/IRMS is able to distinguish between most samples of bulk heroin. We speculate that the delta13C values of the alkaloids, obtained by GC/C/IRMS, give indications of different geographical or temporal origins of some of the heroin samples. GC/C/IRMS of the cutting agent, caffeine, provides a means to link dilution events. Fifteen retail cling film samples and seven cling film samples from heroin seizures were analysed by EA/IRMS. A multivariate comparison of the carbon, hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios was able to distinguish between most of the samples. This technique enabled the cling films from the heroin to be grouped according to seizure. Three solvents were tested on two samples of cling film of known composition. Methanol and chloroform were both found to extract material from PVC and from non-PVC cling films. Water-treated PVC was indistinguishable from the untreated PVC and thus water was found to be the most suitable solvent when washing cling film prior to IRMS analysis.

  7. Association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and heroin dependence: a meta-analytic study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pao-Yen; Wu, Yi-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies have examined the association between heroin dependence and serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms but yielded inconsistent results. The purpose of current study is to determine the overall effect of these polymorphisms on the risk for heroin dependence through a meta-analytic method. Methods A meta-analysis was conducted to examine the association of heroin dependence with two common polymorphisms of serotonin transporter gene, in the promoter (5-hydroxytryptamine transporter-linked promotor region [5-httlpr]) and intron 2 (a various number tandem repeat in serotonin transporter intron 2 [STin2]). Data from studies with 5-httlpr (6 studies) and STin2 (8 studies) were synthesized by random effects model. Results In the analysis, heroin dependence was found to be significantly associated with the S allele of 5-httlpr (odds ratio [OR] =1.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.08–1.41, P=0.002). The association between the S allele of 5-httlpr and heroin dependence was significant in Caucasian subjects (OR =1.37, 95% CI =1.12–1.68, P=0.003), but not in non-Caucasian subjects. On the other hand, no association with STin2 polymorphism was found (OR =1.14, 95% CI =0.91–1.42, P=0.242). Conclusion The results suggest an ethnic-specific effect of the 5-httlpr polymorphism on the risk for heroin dependence, but the influence of the genetic variance in the patients with comorbidities or intermediate phenotypes of heroin dependence needs to be further examined. PMID:27942217

  8. Pharmacokinetics of heroin and its metabolites in vitreous humor and blood in a living pig model.

    PubMed

    Gottås, André; Arnestad, Marianne; Halvorsen, Per Steinar; Bachs, Liliana C; Høiseth, Gudrun

    Vitreous humor (VH) is an alternative matrix for drug analysis in forensic toxicology. However, little is known about the distribution of xenobiotics, such as opioids, into VH in living organisms. The aim of this study was to simultaneously measure heroin and metabolite concentrations in blood and VH after injection of heroin in a living pig model. Six pigs were under non-opioid anesthesia during the surgical operation and experiment. Ocular microdialysis was used to acquire dialysate from VH, and a venous catheter was used for blood sampling. Twenty milligrams of heroin was injected intravenously with subsequent sampling of blood and dialysate for 6 h. The samples were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Heroin was not detected in VH; 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) and morphine were first detected in VH after 60 min. The morphine concentration in VH thereafter increased throughout the experimental period. For 6-MAM, Cmax was reached after 230 min in VH. In blood, 6-MAM reached Cmax after 0.5 min, with a subsequent biphasic elimination phase. The blood and VH 6-MAM concentrations reached equilibrium after 2 h. In blood, morphine reached Cmax after 4.3 min, with a subsequent slower elimination than 6-MAM. The blood and VH morphine concentrations were in equilibrium about 6 h after injection of heroin. In conclusion, both 6-MAM and morphine showed slow transport into VH; detection of 6-MAM in VH did not necessarily reflect a recent intake of heroin. Because postmortem changes are expected to be small in VH, these experimental results could assist the interpretation of heroin deaths.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and cytokine production in heroin and morphine-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, R; di Carlo, S; Bacosi, A; Pichini, S; Zuccaro, P

    2000-08-01

    The parallelism between serum levels of heroin and morphine (M) metabolites and the production of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) from murine splenocyte cultures following s.c. injection with 20 mg/kg heroin or M in C57/BL mice is described. The pharmacokinetic profiles of M and inactive morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) in morphine-treated mice nearly overlapped those in heroin-treated mice, with the only difference being the presence of 6-monoacetylmorphine (AM) in profiles of the latter group. Heroin and M significantly increased production of IL-1beta, IL-2, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma at 3, 20 and 40 min from treatment, peaking at 20 min, though the effect was very brief. At 24 h production was greatly inhibited, and this depressive effect lasted longer than the stimulatory effect. At 48 h only a partial recovery was observed. Heroin and M also had a highly stimulatory effect on the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as TGF-beta1 and IL-10, though this effect was observed after 120 min, peaking at 24 h and then somewhat decreasing at 48 h. This study demonstrates that the more rapid and pronounced immune response to heroin treatment was due to the presence of AM. Both heroin and M produced a biphasic effect on cytokine production: the central opioid or non-opioid receptors are involved in exogenous opiod-induced stimulatory effects, whereas peripheral opioid or non-opioid receptors are involved in depressive effects. Deficient or excess expression of these key mediators may predispose the host to aberrant defence mechanisms.

  10. The impact of cocaine and heroin on the placental transfer of methadone

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Antoine; Obrist, Cristina; Wenzinger, Silvana; von Mandach, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    Background Methadone is the therapeutic agent of choice for the treatment of opiate addiction in pregnancy. The co-consumption (heroin, cocaine) which may influence the effects of methadone is frequent. Therefore, the impact of cocaine and heroin on the placental transfer of methadone and the placental tissue was investigated under in vitro conditions. Methods Placentae (n = 24) were ex-vivo perfused with medium (m) (control, n = 6), m plus methadone (n = 6), m plus methadone and cocaine (n = 6) or m plus methadone and heroin (n = 6). Placental functionality parameters like antipyrine permeability, glucose consumption, lactate production, hormone production (hCG and leptin), microparticles release and the expression of P-glycoprotein were analysed. Results Methadone accumulated in placental tissue. Methadone alone decreased the transfer of antipyrine from 0.60 +/- 0.07 to 0.50 +/- 0.06 (fetal/maternal ratio, mean +/- SD, P < 0.01), whereas the combination with cocaine or heroin increased it (0.56 +/- 0.08 to 0.68 +/- 0.13, P = 0.03 and 0.58 +/- 0.21 to 0.71 +/- 0.24; P = 0.18). Microparticles (MPs) released from syncytiotrophoblast into maternal circuit increased by 30% after cocaine or heroin (P < 0.05) and the expression of P-glycoprotein in the tissue increased by ≥ 49% after any drug (P < 0.05). All other measured parameters did not show any significant effect when methadone was combined with cocaine or heroine. Conclusion The combination of cocaine or heroin with methadone increase antipyrine permeability. Changes of MPs resemble findings seen in oxidative stress of syncytiotrophoblast. PMID:19519880

  11. Effects of daily delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol treatment on heroin self-administration in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2016-04-01

    Opioid abuse remains a significant public health problem; together with the greater availability of marijuana in some regions there is an increasing likelihood that opioids and marijuana will be used together. Polydrug abuse is associated with increased toxicity and poorer treatment outcome; thus, a better understanding of the consequences of repeated coadministration of these drugs will facilitate the development of better prevention and treatment strategies. This study examined the effects of daily treatment with the cannabinoid receptor agonist delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ-THC) and its discontinuation on self-administration of heroin in rhesus monkeys (n=4) lever-pressing under a fixed-ratio 30 schedule. Heroin self-administration (0.32-32 μg/kg/infusion, intravenously) generated an inverted U-shaped dose-effect curve. Administered acutely, Δ-THC (0.01-0.32 mg/kg, subcutaneously) dose dependently decreased responding for heroin and flattened the self-administration dose-effect curve. Daily treatment with Δ-THC (0.01-0.1 mg/kg/12 h, subcutaneously) either had no effect on or decreased responding for heroin. In addition, daily treatment did not significantly impact extinction of heroin self-administration or resumption of responding for heroin after extinction. Discontinuation of daily Δ-THC treatment did not systematically impact rates of heroin self-administration. These data suggest that repeated administration of a cannabinoid receptor agonist likely does not increase, and possibly decreases, the positive reinforcing effects of a mu opioid receptor agonist.

  12. Inhalation injury: epidemiology, pathology, treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lung injury resulting from inhalation of smoke or chemical products of combustion continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Combined with cutaneous burns, inhalation injury increases fluid resuscitation requirements, incidence of pulmonary complications and overall mortality of thermal injury. While many products and techniques have been developed to manage cutaneous thermal trauma, relatively few diagnosis-specific therapeutic options have been identified for patients with inhalation injury. Several factors explain slower progress for improvement in management of patients with inhalation injury. Inhalation injury is a more complex clinical problem. Burned cutaneous tissue may be excised and replaced with skin grafts. Injured pulmonary tissue must be protected from secondary injury due to resuscitation, mechanical ventilation and infection while host repair mechanisms receive appropriate support. Many of the consequences of smoke inhalation result from an inflammatory response involving mediators whose number and role remain incompletely understood despite improved tools for processing of clinical material. Improvements in mortality from inhalation injury are mostly due to widespread improvements in critical care rather than focused interventions for smoke inhalation. Morbidity associated with inhalation injury is produced by heat exposure and inhaled toxins. Management of toxin exposure in smoke inhalation remains controversial, particularly as related to carbon monoxide and cyanide. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment has been evaluated in multiple trials to manage neurologic sequelae of carbon monoxide exposure. Unfortunately, data to date do not support application of hyperbaric oxygen in this population outside the context of clinical trials. Cyanide is another toxin produced by combustion of natural or synthetic materials. A number of antidote strategies have been evaluated to address tissue hypoxia associated with cyanide exposure. Data

  13. A series of forensic toxicology and drug seizure cases involving illicit fentanyl alone and in combination with heroin, cocaine or heroin and cocaine.

    PubMed

    Marinetti, Laureen J; Ehlers, Brooke J

    2014-10-01

    The Montgomery County Coroner's Office Toxicology Section and the Miami Valley Regional Crime Lab (MVRCL) Drug Chemistry Section have been receiving case work in drug seizures, death cases and human performance cases involving products marketed as heroin or as illicit fentanyl. Upon analysis by the Drug Chemistry Section, these products were found to contain various drug(s) including illicit fentanyl only, illicit fentanyl and heroin, illicit fentanyl and cocaine and illicit fentanyl, heroin and cocaine. Both the Chemistry and Toxicology Sections began seeing these combinations starting in late October 2013. The percentage of the combinations encountered by the MVRCL as well as the physical appearance of the product, and the results of presumptive screening tests will be discussed. The demographics of the users and the results of toxicology and autopsy findings on the decedents will also be discussed. According to regional drug task force undercover agents, there is evidence that some of the products are being sold as illicit fentanyl and not just as a heroin product. Also, there is no evidence to support that the fentanyl source is being diverted from pharmaceutical grade fentanyl. The chemistry section currently has over 109 confirmed cases, and the toxicology section currently has 81 confirmed drug deaths, 8 driving under the influence of drugs and 1 suicidal hanging. Both sections are continuing to see these cases at the present time.

  14. Heroin-related overdose: The unexplored influences of markets, marketing and source-types in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mars, Sarah G; Fessel, Jason N; Bourgois, Philippe; Montero, Fernando; Karandinos, George; Ciccarone, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Heroin overdose, more accurately termed 'heroin-related overdose' due to the frequent involvement of other drugs, is the leading cause of mortality among regular heroin users. (Degenhardt et al., 2010) Heroin injectors are at greater risk of hospital admission for heroin-related overdose (HOD) in the eastern United States where Colombian-sourced powder heroin is sold than in the western US where black 'tar' heroin predominates. (Unick et al., 2014) This paper examines under-researched influences on HOD, both fatal and non-fatal, using data from a qualitative study of injecting drug users of black tar heroin in San Francisco and powder heroin in Philadelphia Data were collected through in-depth, semi-structured interviews carried out in 2012 that were conducted against a background of longer-term participant-observation, ethnographic studies of drug users and dealers in Philadelphia (2007-12) and of users in San Francisco (1994-2007, 2012). Our findings suggest three types of previously unconsidered influences on overdose risk that arise both from structural socio-economic factors and from the physical properties of the heroin source-types: 1) retail market structure including information flow between users; 2) marketing techniques such as branding, free samples and pricing and 3) differences in the physical characteristics of the two major heroin source forms and how they affect injecting techniques and vascular health. Although chosen for their contrasting source-forms, we found that the two cities have contrasting dominant models of drug retailing: San Francisco respondents tended to buy through private dealers and Philadelphia respondents frequented an open-air street market where heroin is branded and free samples are distributed, although each city included both types of drug sales. These market structures and marketing techniques shape the availability of information regarding heroin potency and its dissemination among users who tend to seek out the

  15. Heroin-related overdose: The unexplored influences of markets, marketing and source-types in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Sarah G.; Fessel, Jason N.; Bourgois, Philippe; Montero, Fernando; Karandinos, George; Ciccarone, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Heroin overdose, more accurately termed ‘heroin-related overdose’ due to the frequent involvement of other drugs, is the leading cause of mortality among regular heroin users. (Degenhardt et al., 2010) Heroin injectors are at greater risk of hospital admission for heroin-related overdose (HOD) in the eastern United States where Colombian-sourced powder heroin is sold than in the western US where black ‘tar’ heroin predominates. (Unick et al., 2014) This paper examines under-researched influences on HOD, both fatal and non-fatal, using data from a qualitative study of injecting drug users of black tar heroin in San Francisco and powder heroin in Philadelphia Data were collected through in-depth, semi-structured interviews carried out in 2012 that were conducted against a background of longer-term participant-observation, ethnographic studies of drug users and dealers in Philadelphia (2007–12) and of users in San Francisco (1994–2007, 2012). Our findings suggest three types of previously unconsidered influences on overdose risk that arise both from structural socio-economic factors and from the physical properties of the heroin source-types: 1) retail market structure including information flow between users; 2) marketing techniques such as branding, free samples and pricing and 3) differences in the physical characteristics of the two major heroin source forms and how they affect injecting techniques and vascular health. Although chosen for their contrasting source-forms, we found that the two cities have contrasting dominant models of drug retailing: San Francisco respondents tended to buy through private dealers and Philadelphia respondents frequented an open-air street market where heroin is branded and free samples are distributed, although each city included both types of drug sales. These market structures and marketing techniques shape the availability of information regarding heroin potency and its dissemination among users who tend to seek out

  16. A Review on Hematological Factors in Opioid-Dependent People (Opium and Heroin) after the Withdrawal Period

    PubMed Central

    Haghpanah, Tahereh; Afarinesh, Mohammadreza; Divsalar, Kouros

    2010-01-01

    Background: Long-term use of opioids has acute effects on homeostasis of the body. Discovering the impacts of opioids on hematological parameters of narcotics withdrawal and dependents blood may be helpful in recognizing the homeostasis condition of their body for the useful treatment. Methods: In this study a cross-sectional method was applied. The abusers of opium and heroin for more than two consecutive years were considered as opium and heroin dependent groups, respectively. The dependent people, who passed the 1-month withdrawal period, entered the study as opium and heroin withdrawal groups. In this study, hematological factors of heroin and opium dependent and withdrawal groups were investigated. Findings: The RBC count remained unchanged in all groups. The WBC count had a significant increase in opium dependent group but in heroin dependent group and withdrawal group there was no significant difference. HGB level had a significant increase only in opium and heroin withdrawal groups. The percentage of HCT had a significant increase in all groups. The MCV increased in heroin and opium dependent groups. MCH level increased significantly in heroin and opium withdrawal groups. MCHC level had a significant increase in all groups. Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts in heroin and opium addicted groups significantly decreased. Platelet, neutrophil and monocyte counts significantly increased in opium dependent group. Monocyte countshowed a significant reduction in heroin withdrawal group. Eosinophil count showed no difference in any of the groups. Conclusion: The current study indicated that not only the chronic and long-term use of opium and heroin, also withdrawal of addicted people could change hematological parameters related to human serum. PMID:24494095

  17. Pharmacological effects of methamphetamine and alpha-PVP vapor and injection.

    PubMed

    Marusich, Julie A; Lefever, Timothy W; Blough, Bruce E; Thomas, Brian F; Wiley, Jenny L

    2016-07-01

    Vaporizing drugs in e-cigarettes is becoming a common method of administration for synthetic cathinones and classical stimulants. Heating during vaporization can expose the user to a cocktail of parent compound and thermolytic degradants, which could lead to different toxicological and pharmacological effects compared to ingesting the parent compound alone via injection or nasal inhalation. This study examined the in vivo toxicological and pharmacological effects of vaporized and injected methamphetamine (METH) and α-pyrrolidinopentiophenone (α-PVP). Male and female ICR mice were administered METH or α-PVP through vapor or i.p. injection. Dose-effect curves were determined for locomotor activity and a functional observational battery (FOB). METH and α-PVP vapor were also evaluated for place preference in male mice. Vapor exposure and injection led to more similarities than differences in toxicological and pharmacological effects. In the FOB, both routes of administration produced typical stimulant effects, and injection also increased some bizarre behaviors (e.g. licking, teeth chattering, darting). Both METH and α-PVP vapor exposure produced conditioned place preference. The two routes of administration had comparable efficacy in locomotor activation, with vapor producing longer lasting effects than injection. Females showed greater METH-induced locomotor activity, and greater incidence of a few somatic signs in the FOB than males. These results explore the toxicology of stimulant vapor inhalation in mice using an e-cigarette device. Despite the current technological and methodological difficulties, studying drug vapor promises to allow determination of toxicological effects of thermolytic products and flavor additives.

  18. Vapor Pressure of Hexamethylene Triperoxide Diamine (HMTD) Estimated Using Secondary Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aernecke, Matthew J; Mendum, Ted; Geurtsen, Geoff; Ostrinskaya, Alla; Kunz, Roderick R

    2015-11-25

    A rapid method for vapor pressure measurement was developed and used to derive the vapor pressure curve of the thermally labile peroxide-based explosive hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) over the temperature range from 28 to 80 °C. This method uses a controlled flow of vapor from a solid-phase HMTD source that is presented to an ambient-pressure-ionization mass spectrometer equipped with a secondary-electrospray-ionization (SESI) source. The subpart-per-trillion sensitivity of this system enables direct detection of HMTD vapor through an intact [M + H](+) ion in real time at temperatures near 20 °C. By calibrating this method using vapor sources of cocaine and heroin, which have known pressure-temperature (P-T) curves, the temperature dependence of HMTD vapor was determined, and a Clausius-Clapeyron plot of ln[P (Pa)] vs 1/[T (K)] yielded a straight line with the expression ln[P (Pa)] = {(-11091 ± 356) × 1/[T (K)]} + 25 ± 1 (error limits are the standard error of the regression analysis). From this equation, the sublimation enthalpy of HMTD was estimated to be 92 ± 3 kJ/mol, which compares well with the theoretical estimate of 95 kJ/mol, and the vapor pressure at 20 °C was estimated to be ∼60 parts per trillion by volume, which is within a factor of 2 of previous theoretical estimates. Thus, this method provides not only the first direct experimental determination of HMTD vapor pressure but also a rapid, near-real-time capability to quantitatively measure low-vapor-pressure compounds, which will be useful for aiding in the development of training aids for bomb-sniffing canines.

  19. Effects of the abused inhalant toluene on the mesolimbic dopamine system

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, John J.; Beckley, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Toluene is a representative member of a class of inhaled solvents that are voluntarily used by adolescents and adults for their euphorigenic effects. Research into the mechanisms of action of inhaled solvents has lagged behind that of other drugs of abuse despite mounting evidence that these compounds exert profound neurobehavioral and neurotoxicological effects. Results from studies carried out by the authors and others suggest that the neural effects of inhalants arise from their interaction with a discrete set of ion channels that regulate brain activity. Of particular interest is how these interactions allow toluene and other solvents to engage portions of an addiction neurocircuitry that includes midbrain and cortical structures. In this review, we focus on the current state of knowledge regarding toluene’s action on midbrain dopamine neurons, a key brain region involved in the initial assessment of natural and drug-induced rewards. Findings from recent studies in the authors’ laboratory show that brief exposures of adolescent rats to toluene vapor induce profound changes in markers of glutamatergic plasticity in VTA DA neurons. These changes are restricted to VTA DA neurons that project to limbic structures and are prevented by transient activation of the medial prefrontal cortex prior to toluene exposure. Together, these data provide the first evidence linking the voluntary inhalation of solvents to changes in reward –sensitive dopamine neurons. PMID:25360326

  20. Comparison of the Microgenics CEDIA heroin metabolite (6-AM) and the Roche Abuscreen ONLINE opiate immunoassays for the detection of heroin use in forensic urine samples.

    PubMed

    Holler, Justin M; Bosy, Thomas Z; Klette, Kevin L; Wiegand, Russel; Jemionek, John; Jacobs, Aaron

    2004-09-01

    Current Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) procedures for the detection of heroin abuse by testing urine utilize an initial opiate (codeine/morphine) immunoassay (IA) screen followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) confirmation of 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM), if the morphine concentration is above established cutoff. An alternative to the current opiates screen for heroin abuse is the direct IA for the metabolite of heroin, 6-acetylmorphine. In this regard, the performance of the Microgenics CEDIA heroin metabolite (6-AM) screening reagent was assessed. This evaluation was conducted on the P module of a Hitachi Modular automated IA analyzer calibrated using 6-AM at 10 ng/mL. Reproducibility, linearity, accuracy, sensitivity, and interferences associated with use of the 6-AM IA reagent were evaluated. The IA reagent precision (percent coefficient of variation (%CV)) around each of seven standards was less than 0.63%, with a linearity (r(2)) value of 0.9951. A total of 37,713 active duty service members' urine samples were analyzed simultaneously using the CEDIA heroin metabolite (6-AM) reagent and the Roche Abuscreen ONLINE opiate reagent to evaluate both the prevalence rate of 6-AM in the demographic group and the sensitivity and specificity of the reagents for the detection of heroin use. Of the 37,713 samples tested using the CEDIA heroin metabolite (6-AM) reagent, three samples screened positive at the DoD and HHS cutoff of 10 ng/mL. One of the three samples confirmed positive for 6-AM by GC-MS above the cutoff of 10 ng/mL, the two remaining samples confirmed negative for 6-AM at a GC-MS limit of detection (LOD) of 2.1 ng/mL. In contrast, the Roche Abuscreen ONLINE opiate IA produced 74 opiate-positive results for codeine/morphine, with 6 of the 74 specimens confirming positive for morphine above the DoD cutoff concentration of 4000 ng/mL (8% DoD morphine confirmation rate), only one of the 74 opiate

  1. Particle inhalability at low wind speeds.

    PubMed

    Brown, James S

    2005-12-15

    Accurate quantification of the dose delivered by aerosol exposures is essential for estimating the risk of potential adverse health effects. The fraction of airborne particles that can enter the nose or mouth during inhalation is referred to as the inspirable particulate mass fraction. This inhalable fraction is equivalent to delivered dose for particles greater than approximately 25 microm (aerodynamic particle diameter, d(ae)), which deposit completely and almost exclusively in the extrathoracic airways. Particle inhalability at high wind speeds (1-9 m/s) has been well characterized. However, there is a paucity of data describing the inhalability of particles at low wind speeds (< or =0.3 m/s), which are typical of indoor environments. High-wind-speed criteria poorly describe inhalability at low wind speeds. Based on the aspiration efficiencies of blunt and sharp-edged inlets, a function was developed for oral inhalability, P(I(O)), of particles at low wind speeds. This function predicts a slow decline in P(I(O)) from 0.95 at d(ae)= 8 microm, to 0.5 at d(ae) = 74 microm, and 0.1 at d(ae)= 175 microm. Data available from the literature for inhalability at relatively low wind speeds during oral breathing are well described by this logistic function (r(2)= 0.69).

  2. Dynamics of airflow in a short inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Bates, A. J.; Doorly, D. J.; Cetto, R.; Calmet, H.; Gambaruto, A. M.; Tolley, N. S.; Houzeaux, G.; Schroter, R. C.

    2015-01-01

    During a rapid inhalation, such as a sniff, the flow in the airways accelerates and decays quickly. The consequences for flow development and convective transport of an inhaled gas were investigated in a subject geometry extending from the nose to the bronchi. The progress of flow transition and the advance of an inhaled non-absorbed gas were determined using highly resolved simulations of a sniff 0.5 s long, 1 l s−1 peak flow, 364 ml inhaled volume. In the nose, the distribution of airflow evolved through three phases: (i) an initial transient of about 50 ms, roughly the filling time for a nasal volume, (ii) quasi-equilibrium over the majority of the inhalation, and (iii) a terminating phase. Flow transition commenced in the supraglottic region within 20 ms, resulting in large-amplitude fluctuations persisting throughout the inhalation; in the nose, fluctuations that arose nearer peak flow were of much reduced intensity and diminished in the flow decay phase. Measures of gas concentration showed non-uniform build-up and wash-out of the inhaled gas in the nose. At the carina, the form of the temporal concentration profile reflected both shear dispersion and airway filling defects owing to recirculation regions. PMID:25551147

  3. Inhalation challenge in humidifier fever.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J H; Cockcroft, A

    1981-05-01

    When exposed to an amount of contaminated humidifier water roughly equivalent to that inhaled over an 8-hour period at their work place, four out of six subjects developed symptoms of humidifier fever. Two non-exposed subjects failed to react to the same challenge. Characteristic lung function, temperature and leucocyte changes were recorded; however, a fall in gas transfer previously reported was not seen. That the reaction was immunologically mediated and not due to endotoxin activity was shown by a negative pyrogen response in rabbits inoculated intravenously with concentrated humidifier water. The nature of the immune response has not as yet been evaluated but it does not reside with the ability of humidifier fever antigens to activate complement. Skin testing produced an immediate weal and flare in the four subjects with precipitins and may reflect the presence of short-term anaphylactic IgG antibody.

  4. Inhaled Corticosteroids and Bone Health

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Carolyn; Sellahewa, Luckni; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are the cornerstones in the management of bronchial asthma and some cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although ICS are claimed to have low side effect profiles, at high doses they can cause systemic adverse effects including bone diseases such as osteopenia, osteoporosis and osteonecrosis. Corticosteroids have detrimental effects on function and survival of osteoblasts and osteocytes, and with the prolongation of osteoclast survival, induce metabolic bone disease. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO) can be associated with major complications such as vertebral and neck of femur fractures. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) published criteria in 2010 for the management of GIO. ACR recommends bisphosphonates along with calcium and vitamin D supplements as the first-line agents for GIO management. ACR recommendations can be applied to manage patients on ICS with a high risk of developing metabolic bone disease. This review outlines the mechanisms and management of ICS-induced bone disease. PMID:25674178

  5. Vapor resistant arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor); Dussinger, Peter M. (Inventor); Buchko, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A vapor block resistant liquid artery structure for heat pipes. A solid tube artery with openings is encased in the sintered material of a heat pipe wick. The openings are limited to that side of the artery which is most remote from the heat source. The liquid in the artery can thus exit the artery through the openings and wet the sintered sheath, but vapor generated at the heat source is unlikely to move around the solid wall of the artery and reverse its direction in order to penetrate the artery through the openings. An alternate embodiment uses finer pore size wick material to resist vapor entry.

  6. Vapor generator wand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robelen, David B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A device for producing a stream of vapor for wind tunnel airflow visualization is described. An electrically conductive heating tube is used to resistively heat a vapor producing liquid. The heating and delivery systems are integrated to allow the device to present a small cross section to the air flow, thereby reducing disturbances due to the device. The simplicity of the design allows for inexpensive implementation and construction. The design is readily scaled for use in various wind tunnel applications. The device may also find uses in manufacturing, producing a vapor for deposition on a substrate.

  7. Cis-Expression Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping Reveals Replicable Associations with Heroin Addiction in OPRM1

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Dana B.; Levy, Joshua L.; Gaddis, Nathan C.; Glasheen, Cristie; Saccone, Nancy L.; Page, Grier P.; Hulse, Gary; Wildenauer, Dieter; Kelty, Erin; Schwab, Sibylle; Degenhardt, Louisa; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J.; Bierut, Laura J.; Nelson, Elliot C.; Kral, Alex; Johnson, Eric O.

    2015-01-01

    Background No opioid receptor, mu 1 (OPRM1) gene polymorphisms, including the functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1799971, have been conclusively associated with heroin/other opioid addiction, despite their biological plausibility. We used evidence of polymorphisms altering OPRM1 expression in normal human brain tissue to nominate and then test associations with heroin addiction. Methods We tested 103 OPRM1 SNPs for association with OPRM1 mRNA expression in prefrontal cortex from 224 European Americans and African Americans of the BrainCloud cohort. We then tested the 16 putative cis-quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL) SNPs for association with heroin addiction in the Urban Health Study and two replication cohorts, totaling 16,729 European Americans, African Americans, and Australians of European ancestry. Results Four putative cis-eQTL SNPs were significantly associated with heroin addiction in the Urban Health Study (smallest P=8.9×10−5): rs9478495, rs3778150, rs9384169, and rs562859. Rs3778150, located in OPRM1 intron 1, was significantly replicated (P=6.3×10−5). Meta-analysis across all case-control cohorts resulted in P=4.3×10−8: the rs3778150-C allele (frequency=16%-19%) being associated with increased heroin addiction risk. Importantly, the functional SNP allele rs1799971-A was associated with heroin addiction only in the presence of rs3778150-C (P=1.48×10−6 for rs1799971-A/rs3778150-C and P=0.79 for rs1799971-A/rs3778150-T haplotypes). Lastly, replication was observed for six other intron 1 SNPs which had prior suggestive associations with heroin addiction (smallest P=2.7×10−8 for rs3823010). Conclusions Our findings show that common OPRM1 intron 1 SNPs have replicable associations with heroin addiction. The haplotype structure of rs3778150 and nearby SNPs may underlie the inconsistent associations between rs1799971 and heroin addiction. PMID:25744370

  8. 42 CFR 84.90 - Breathing resistance test; inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; inhalation. 84.90...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.90 Breathing resistance test; inhalation. (a) Resistance to inhalation... machine as described in § 84.88. (b) The inhalation resistance of open-circuit apparatus shall not...

  9. 42 CFR 84.90 - Breathing resistance test; inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; inhalation. 84.90...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.90 Breathing resistance test; inhalation. (a) Resistance to inhalation... machine as described in § 84.88. (b) The inhalation resistance of open-circuit apparatus shall not...

  10. Animal model of sensitization by inhalation.

    PubMed Central

    Barboriak, J J; Knoblock, H W; Hensley, G T; Gombas, O F; Fink, J N

    1976-01-01

    Groups of rats exposed to daily inhalation challenge with aerosolized pigeon serum developed precipitating antibody within 2 weeks and definitive granulomatous inflammatory changes in the lung after 7 weeks of exposure. The dissociation of the two responses to an inhalation challenge indicate that the rat model may serve for screening of the various inhalant antigens for their sensitizing potential, and for investigation of the contributory role of some of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:939055

  11. Genetic variation of hepatitis C virus in a cohort of injection heroin users in Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jin-Song; Wang, Xu; Liu, Man-Qing; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Gong, Jie; Xu, Han-Ming; Chen, Jian-Ping; Zhu, Hong-Hao; Zhou, Wang; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2008-07-01

    Since the majority of heroin abusers use injection as the primary route of admission, heroin abuse contributes significantly to the transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV). We determined HCV infection and its genotype distribution among injection heroin users in Wuhan, the largest city in the central China. Eight hundred seventy-eight (84%) out of 1046 serum specimens from the injection drug users were positive for HCV antibody. Out of randomly selected 122 specimens positive for HCV antibody, seventy-eight (64%) had detectable HCV RNA with genotype 6a as the predominant strain (50%), followed by 3b (32.2%), 1a (8.1%), 1b (6.5%), and 3a (3.2%). HCV RNA levels in male heroin users were significantly higher (P=0.013) than those in the female subjects. Although there was no significant difference in HCV RNA levels among the specimens positive for HCV 6a and 1a/1b, the samples with 6a or 1a/1b contained higher levels of HCV RNA than the specimens positive for HCV 3b (P=0.019, P=0.012, respectively). These findings indicate that there is a high prevalence of HCV infection with genotypes 6a and 3b as predominated strains among injection heroin users in Wuhan, China.

  12. Genetic susceptibility to heroin addiction; a candidate-gene association study

    PubMed Central

    Levran, O.; Londono, D.; O’Hara, K.; Nielsen, D. A.; Peles, E.; Rotrosen, J.; Casadonte, P.; Linzy, S.; Randesi, M.; Ott, J.; Adelson, M.; Kreek, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Heroin addiction is a chronic complex disease with a substantial genetic contribution. This study was designed to identify genetic variants that are associated with susceptibility to develop heroin addiction, by analyzing 1350 variants in 130 candidate genes. All subjects had Caucasian ancestry. The sample consisted of 412 former severe heroin addicts in methadone treatment, and 184 healthy controls with no history of drug abuse. Nine variants, in six genes, showed the lowest nominal P values in the association tests (P < 0.01). These variants were in non-coding regions of the genes encoding the mu (OPRM1; rs510769, rs3778151), kappa (OPRK1; rs6473797), and delta opioid receptors, (OPRD1; rs2236861, rs2236857 and rs3766951), the neuropeptide galanin (GAL; rs694066), the serotonin receptor subtype 3B (HTR3B; rs3758987) and the casein kinase 1 isoform epsilon (CSNK1E; rs1534891). Several haplotypes and multi-locus genotype patterns showed nominally significant associations (e.g. OPRM1; P = 0.0006 and CSNK1E; P = 0.0007). Analysis of a combined effect of OPRM1 and OPRD1 showed that rs510769 and rs2236861 increase the risk of heroin addiction (P = 0.0005). None of these associations remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing. This study suggests the involvement of several genes and variants in heroin addiction that is worthy of future study. PMID:18518925

  13. Underrepresentation of heroin involvement in unintentional drug overdose deaths in Allegheny County, PA.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Kristen J; Janssen, Jennifer K; Williams, Karl E

    2014-11-01

    Drugs contributing to overdose deaths are listed on death certificates, but their validity is rarely studied. To assess the accuracy of "morphine" and "codeine" listings on death certificates for unintentional overdose deaths in Allegheny County, PA, investigative and laboratory reports were reviewed. Deaths were reclassified as heroin-related if documentation showed 6-monoacetylmorphine in blood or urine, "stamp bags" or drug paraphernalia at scene, history of heroin use, or track marks. Deaths were considered morphine-related if notes indicated morphine use, prescription, or morphine at scene, or codeine-related if the codeine blood level exceeded morphine. Of 112 deaths with morphine but not heroin listed on the death certificate, 74 met heroin criteria and 21 morphine criteria. Of 20 deaths with both morphine and heroin listed, only one met morphine criteria. Of 34 deaths with codeine listed, only five were attributed to codeine. Consideration of patient history, death scene evidence, and expanded toxicology testing may improve the accuracy of death certificate drug listings.

  14. Hypocretin receptor 2 antagonism dose-dependently reduces escalated heroin self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Schmeichel, Brooke E; Barbier, Estelle; Misra, Kaushik K; Contet, Candice; Schlosburg, Joel E; Grigoriadis, Dimitri; Williams, John P; Karlsson, Camilla; Pitcairn, Caleb; Heilig, Markus; Koob, George F; Vendruscolo, Leandro F

    2015-03-13

    The hypocretin/orexin (HCRT) system has been associated with both positive and negative drug reinforcement, implicating HCRT receptor 1 (HCRT-R1) signaling in drug-related behaviors for all major drug classes, including opioids. However, to date there are limited studies investigating the role of HCRT receptor 2 (HCRT-R2) signaling in compulsive-like drug seeking. Escalation of drug intake with extended access has been suggested to model the transition from controlled drug use to compulsive-like drug seeking/taking. The current study examined the effects of a HCRT-R2 antagonist, NBI-80713, on heroin self-administration in rats allowed short- (1 h; ShA) or long- (12 h; LgA) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. Results indicate that systemically administered NBI-80713 dose-dependently decreased heroin self-administration in LgA, but not in ShA, animals. Quantitative PCR analyses showed an increase in Hcrtr2 mRNA levels in the central amygdala, a stress-related brain region, of LgA rats. These observations suggest a functional role for HCRT-R2 signaling in compulsive-like heroin self-administration associated with extended access and indicate HCRT-R2 antagonism as a potential pharmacological target for the treatment of heroin dependence.

  15. AMTEC vapor-vapor series connected cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Mark L. (Inventor); Williams, Roger M. (Inventor); Ryan, Margaret A. (Inventor); Nakamura, Barbara J. (Inventor); Oconnor, Dennis E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) having a plurality of cells structurally connected in series to form a septum dividing a plenum into two chambers, and electrically connected in series, is provided with porous metal anodes and porous metal cathodes in the cells. The cells may be planar or annular, and in either case a metal alkali vapor at a high temperature is provided to the plenum through one chamber on one side of the wall and returned to a vapor boiler after condensation at a chamber on the other side of the wall in the plenum. If the cells are annular, a heating core may be placed along the axis of the stacked cells. This arrangement of series-connected cells allows efficient generation of power at high voltage and low current.

  16. Site- and species-specific hydrolysis rates of heroin.

    PubMed

    Szöcs, Levente; Orgován, Gábor; Tóth, Gergő; Kraszni, Márta; Gergó, Lajos; Hosztafi, Sándor; Noszál, Béla

    2016-06-30

    The hydroxide-catalyzed non-enzymatic, simultaneous and consecutive hydrolyses of diacetylmorphine (DAM, heroin) are quantified in terms of 10 site- and species-specific rate constants in connection with also 10 site- and species-specific acid-base equilibrium constants, comprising all the 12 coexisting species in solution. This characterization involves the major and minor decomposition pathways via 6-acetylmorphine and 3-acetylmorphine, respectively, and morphine, the final product. Hydrolysis has been found to be 18-120 times faster at site 3 than at site 6, depending on the status of the amino group and the rest of the molecule. Nitrogen protonation accelerates the hydrolysis 5-6 times at site 3 and slightly less at site 6. Hydrolysis rate constants are interpreted in terms of intramolecular inductive effects and the concomitant local electron densities. Hydrolysis fraction, a new physico-chemical parameter is introduced and determined to quantify the contribution of the individual microspecies to the overall hydrolysis. Hydrolysis fractions are depicted as a function of pH.

  17. Heroin users: the need for improved treatment for incarcerated women.

    PubMed

    Horton, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the use of drugs, specifically heroin, by women. While women's rate of incarceration in the nation have dramatically increased, tripling in the last decade, prisons have not kept pace with the growth of the number of women in prison and the need for drug treatment and recovery for this population. This paper examines one programmatic effort to provide services to this most vulnerable population in the state of Illinois. The continuum of care model is considered in light of the challenges of high recidivism rates, particularly in the state of Illinois. It identifies a need for more effective evidence-based services at the state level for prison inmates before and after discharge. Effective program evaluation has not been a priority in some states, and perhaps Illinois correction is prototypical. More effective intervention may require more community involvement post-release for ex-offenders. Barriers to healthcare, employment and housing, are just as evident with female drug offenders as in the male population.

  18. Vapor Control Layer Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-08

    This information sheet describes the level of vapor control required on the interior side of framed walls with typical fibrous cavity insulation (fibreglass, rockwool, or cellulose, based on DOE climate zone of construction.

  19. Gasoline Vapor Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Gasoline is volatile and some of it evaporates during storage, giving off hydrocarbon vapor. Formerly, the vapor was vented into the atmosphere but anti-pollution regulations have precluded that practice in many localities, so oil companies and storage terminals are installing systems to recover hydrocarbon vapor. Recovery provides an energy conservation bonus in that most of the vapor can be reconverted to gasoline. Two such recovery systems are shown in the accompanying photographs (mid-photo at right and in the foreground below). They are actually two models of the same system, although.configured differently because they are customized to users' needs. They were developed and are being manufactured by Edwards Engineering Corporation, Pompton Plains, New Jersey. NASA technological information proved useful in development of the equipment.

  20. Gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA regulates the vapor pressure of gasoline sold at retail stations during the summer ozone season to reduce evaporative emissions from gasoline that contribute to ground-level ozone and diminish the effects of ozone-related health problems.