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Sample records for herpes zoster-associeret morbiditet

  1. Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Was this page helpful? Also known as: Herpes Culture; Herpes Simplex Viral Culture; HSV DNA; HSV by PCR; HSV-1 or ... of testing for the virus are the herpes culture and HSV DNA testing (PCR). PCR testing is ...

  2. Herpes - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Genital herpes - resources; Resources - genital herpes ... The following organizations are good resources for information on genital herpes : March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.com/pregnancy/complications-herpes The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists -- ...

  3. Herpes Simplex

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by a herpes simplex virus (HSV). Oral herpes causes cold sores around the mouth or face. Genital herpes affects the genitals, buttocks ... type 2 is the usual cause of genital herpes, but it also can infect the mouth. HSV spreads through direct contact. Some people have ...

  4. Herpes - oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... the lips, mouth, or gums due to the herpes simplex virus. It causes small, painful blisters commonly called cold ... the mouth area. It is caused by the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Most people in the ...

  5. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Some persons who contract genital herpes have concerns about how it will impact their overall health, ... a patient’s relationships. 10 Clinicians can address these concerns by encouraging patients to recognize that while herpes ...

  6. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... who have sex with women get genital herpes? Yes. It is possible to get genital herpes, or any other STI, if you are a woman who ... sex and avoid sexual activity during an outbreak. Yes. It is possible to get genital herpes, or any other STI, if you are a woman who ...

  7. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... a sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by a herpes simplex virus (HSV). It can cause sores on your genital or rectal area, buttocks, and thighs. You can get it from having vaginal, anal, or ... of herpes are called outbreaks. You usually get sores near ...

  8. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... to another person's genitals. Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) . It can cause sores in the genital ... TOPIC Talking to Your Partner About Condoms About Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Talking to Your Partner About STDs 5 ...

  9. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... fetal scalp electrode (tiny wire used to check fetal heart rate). Cesarean birth may be recommended if you have an active herpes sore or prodromal symptoms such as pain or burning when you go into labor. After ...

  10. [Herpes gestationis].

    PubMed

    Mairos, João S; Veca, Concetta P; Ribeiro, Rui

    2004-01-01

    Herpes Gestationis is a serious dermatological disease, albeit rare, associated to pregnancy or to the trophoblast diseases. Contrary to what the name suggests, it is not a viral disease but an auto-immune disease. We present the clinical case of a 38 year-old woman to whom a case of Herpes Gestationis was diagnosed when she was 15 weeks pregnant and whom has been treated with corticosteroids and antihistamine's showing positive results and without major complications for the mother or the embryo. The authors are undertaking a review of the existing literature, based on this clinic case.

  11. Genital Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Scappatura, F. Philip

    1987-01-01

    The author reviews the prevalence of genital herpes, outlines the typical clinical courses of the disease in its primary and recurrent forms. He discusses the physical, psychological and social effects of this sexually transmitted disease and provides three protocols for the use of oral acyclovir in its treatment. PMID:21263803

  12. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... best way to prevent genital herpes is abstinence. Teens who do have sex must properly use a latex condom every time ... Date reviewed: February 2016 previous 1 • ... Boyfriend Has an STD Before We Have Sex? Telling Your Partner You Have an STD Contact ...

  13. Genital herpes.

    PubMed

    Garland, Suzanne M; Steben, Marc

    2014-10-01

    Genital herpes is a relatively common infection caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) type one or two (HSV-1, HSV-2) respectively. It is acquired most commonly via sexual activity. More recently there has been an increase in infections due to HSV-1. Most new cases of genital HSV are not diagnosed due to HSV infections having short-lived signs and symptoms, or in many instances are asymptomatic. Hence many people infected with HSV are unaware that they have it. The risk of transmission to a partner is highest during outbreak periods, when there are visible lesions, although genital HSV can also be transmitted during asymptomatic periods. Use of condoms and antiviral medications assist in preventing transmission. Antiviral agents are effective in controlling clinical episodes, but do not eradicate infection, which remains latent for the life of a patient. Despite the surge in vaccine research, there is unfortunately no readily available preventative or therapeutic vaccine for HSV to date.

  14. [Herpes serology for genital herpes].

    PubMed

    Legoff, Jérôme; Aymard, Michèle; Braig, Suzanne; Ramel, Françoise; Dreno, Brigitte; Bélec, Laurent; Malkin, Jean-Elie

    2008-09-01

    The epidemiology of genital herpes is changing. The seroprevalence of HSV-2 infections is increasing, while HSV-1 is an increasingly common cause of herpetic ulcerations. The reference examination provides direct diagnosis after viral isolation in a cell culture or genome amplification. Herpes serology is indicated principally if direct examination is negative and in the absence of lesions. Non-type-specific serology detects antibodies common to HSV-1 and HSV-2. Its specificity and sensitivity are excellent, and it is approved as a reimbursable laboratory procedure. It cannot specify the viral type involved. Type-specific serology can distinguish between anti-HSV-1 and anti-HSV-2 antibodies. Currently available kits have a sensitivity and specificity, depending on the population studied, of 90 to 100%. It is not approved as a reimbursable laboratory procedure. HSV-1-specific serology cannot diagnose old HSV-1 genital infections, but seropositivity for HSV-2 generally suffices to diagnose HSV-2 genital herpes. The indication for type-specific serology must be discussed according to clinical context. The value of non-type-specific serology is limited.

  15. Meet the Herps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Describes some of the characteristics of "herps" (amphibians and reptiles). Contains teaching activities dealing with ancient herps, learning stations that encourage sensory experiences with herps, and games, puzzles, and a dramatic play about herps. Includes reproducible handouts designed to be used with the activities, as well as a quiz. (TW)

  16. Herpes zoster and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Chawla, Aastha

    2016-08-01

    This review is a succinct description of the relationship between herpes zoster and diabetes. It makes a strong case for screening for diabetes in all patients of herpes zoster, and for using insulin to achieve optimal glycaemic control in persons with concomitant diabetes and herpes zoster. It highlights potential impact of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor therapy and statin usage on herpes zoster incidence.

  17. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003352.htm Serum herpes simplex antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Serum herpes simplex antibodies is a blood test that looks for antibodies ...

  18. Genital Herpes (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... transmitted disease (STD) that's usually caused by the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV2), although it also can be caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1), which normally causes cold sores ...

  19. Pregnancy and herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Newborn infants can become infected with herpes virus during pregnancy, during labor or delivery, or after birth. Causes Newborn infants can become infected with herpes virus: In the ...

  20. Herpes zoster virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Woolery, William Alan

    2008-10-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is the etiologic agent of varicella and herpes zoster (HZ) in humans. Herpes zoster is the result of reactivation of VZV within certain sensory ganglia. The burden of illness from HZ and post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) is high. Herpes-zoster vaccine contains live attenuated varicella-zoster virus in an amount approximately 14 times greater than that found in the varicella virus vaccine. Herpes zoster vaccine is approved for the prevention of shingles in appropriate persons aged 60 and older. The vaccine is administered in a single subcutaneous dose. Reported side effects are mild and generally limited to localized injection site findings. Herpes-zoster vaccine reportedly decreases the occurrence of herpes zoster by approximately 50 percent and prevents the development of PHN by two thirds. The vaccine appears to be minimally effective in those individuals over the age of 80 and is not recommended in this age group.

  1. Herpes zoster following cryosurgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael R; Ryman, William

    2005-02-01

    A 56-year-old man developed reactivation of herpes zoster infection on his right forehead after treatment of several solar keratoses with cryosurgery. The rash was blistering and painful. Treatment with oral aciclovir was instituted and the lesions healed within 2 weeks. Known risk factors for reactivation include age and decreased immunity. Previous case reports have indicated trauma may be a risk factor in herpes zoster. We report a case of herpes zoster as a complication of cryosurgery.

  2. Herpes biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... if a person has been infected with the herpes simplex virus (I or II). This test does not detect the virus itself. If antibodies to the virus are present, the person has been infected with herpes simplex at some point in his or her life. ...

  3. Genital herpes simplex.

    PubMed Central

    Tummon, I. S.; Dudley, D. K.; Walters, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the herpes simplex virus. Following the initial infection the virus becomes latent in the sacral ganglia. Approximately 80% of patients are then subject to milder but unpredictable recurrences and may shed the virus even when they are asymptomatic. The disorder causes concern because genital herpes in the mother can result in rare but catastrophic neonatal infection and because of a possible association between genital herpes and cancer of the cervix. No effective treatment is as yet available. Weekly monitoring for virus by cervical culture from 32 weeks' gestation is recommended for women with a history of genital herpes and for those whose sexual partner has such a history. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:7020907

  4. Human herpes simplex labialis.

    PubMed

    Fatahzadeh, M; Schwartz, R A

    2007-11-01

    Humans are the natural host for eight of more than 80 known herpes viruses. Infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) are ubiquitous worldwide and highly transmissible. Herpes simplex labialis (HSL) is the best-recognized recrudescent infection of the lips and perioral tissues caused by HSV-1. Facial lesions of HSL may be unsightly, frequent outbreaks unpleasant, and the infection itself more severe locally and systemically in immunocompromised people. This article highlights the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnostic features and management issues for HSL.

  5. Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Julie L; Amzat, Rianot; Martin, Nicolle

    2015-09-01

    Herpes zoster is a commonly encountered disorder. It is estimated that there are approximately 1 million new cases of herpes zoster in the United States annually, with an incidence of 3.2 per 1000 person-years. Patients with HIV have the greatest risk of developing herpes zoster ophthalmicus compared with the general population. Other risk factors include advancing age, use of immunosuppressive medications, and primary infection in infancy or in utero. Vaccination against the virus is a primary prevention modality. Primary treatments include antivirals, analgesics, and anticonvulsants. Management may require surgical intervention and comanagement with pain specialists, psychiatrists, and infectious disease specialists.

  6. Polyneuritis and herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, A. D.; Ogul, E.; Graveson, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Widespread neurological disorders following herpes zoster are exceptional. They include encephalitis and myelitis, and a type of polyneuropathy. The latter is particularly rare as only 16 cases have been described since the first account by Wohlwill in 1924. We present two clinical cases of polyneuropathy following herpes zoster with neuropathological studies on one of them, and discuss its possible aetiology and pathogenesis in the light of previous reports and recent experimental studies. Images PMID:5037030

  7. Herpes zoster (shingles) disseminated (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Herpes zoster (shingles) normally occurs in a limited area that follows a dermatome (see the "dermatome" picture). In individuals with damaged immune systems, herpes zoster may be widespread (disseminated), causing serious illness. ...

  8. Herpes zoster vaccine (Zostavax).

    PubMed

    2006-09-11

    A live attenuated varicella-zoster vaccine (Zostavax--Merck) has been approved by the FDA for prevention of herpes zoster (HZ; zoster; shingles) in persons > or = 60 years old. Each dose of Zostavax contains about 14 times as much varicella-zoster virus (VZV) as Varivax, which has been used in the US since 1995 to vaccinate against varicella (chicken pox).

  9. Vaccine against herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Jacyr

    2013-01-01

    The herpes zoster vaccine is made using high doses of live attenuated varicella/zoster virus. The vaccine is well tolerated and has few adverse effects: the most common one is pain at the injection site. Complications can occur mainly in persons who had prior zoster keratitis or uveitis. The vaccine can prevent this disease with low mortality but high morbidity.

  10. Hands-on Herps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Presents a hands-on activity to help primary, intermediate, and advanced students learn about and compare the general characteristics of reptiles and amphibians. Suggests "herp stations" to provide experiences. Details materials, background and procedures necessary for using this activity. (CW)

  11. Genital Herpes: A Review.

    PubMed

    Groves, Mary Jo

    2016-06-01

    Genital herpes is a common sexually transmitted disease, affecting more than 400 million persons worldwide. It is caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) and characterized by lifelong infection and periodic reactivation. A visible outbreak consists of single or clustered vesicles on the genitalia, perineum, buttocks, upper thighs, or perianal areas that ulcerate before resolving. Symptoms of primary infection may include malaise, fever, or localized adenopathy. Subsequent outbreaks, caused by reactivation of latent virus, are usually milder. Asymptomatic shedding of transmissible virus is common. Although HSV-1 and HSV-2 are indistinguishable visually, they exhibit differences in behavior that may affect management. Patients with HSV-2 have a higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Polymerase chain reaction assay is the preferred method of confirming HSV infection in patients with active lesions. Treatment of primary and subsequent outbreaks with nucleoside analogues is well tolerated and reduces duration, severity, and frequency of recurrences. In patients with HSV who are HIV-negative, treatment reduces transmission of HSV to uninfected partners. During pregnancy, antiviral prophylaxis with acyclovir is recommended from 36 weeks of gestation until delivery in women with a history of genital herpes. Elective cesarean delivery should be performed in laboring patients with active lesions to reduce the risk of neonatal herpes.

  12. Can You Get Genital Herpes from a Cold Sore?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lucy* Yes — it is possible to get genital herpes from oral sex. Genital herpes is caused by the herpes ... Genital herpes is usually caused by HSV-2; oral herpes (cold sores) is usually caused by HSV-1. ...

  13. Herpes zoster vaccine in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Suk

    2013-07-01

    Herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia deteriorate the quality of life because of severe pain and complications, and cause considerable social and economic burden of disease. In 2012, herpes zoster vaccine was released in Korea. The efficacy of herpes zoster vaccine is known to be 51.3-66.5% among the aged over 60 and 69.8-72.4% among adults between 50 and 59. It is also known that preventive efficacy is maintained for at least 5 years. Although there can be local reactions such as redness, pain and swelling at the site of injection and systemic reaction such as headache and eruption after herpes zoster vaccination, most of the adverse reactions are minor and disappear within days by themselves. As it is a live vaccine, persons with severe immune-suppression and pregnant women should not be vaccinated with the vaccine. Currently, Korean Society of Infectious Diseases recommended for the aged over 60 to be vaccinated with herpes zoster vaccine by subcutaneous route. In this article, clinical aspects and burden of disease of herpes zoster, efficacy and effects of herpes zoster vaccine, and herpes zoster vaccine recommendation by Korean Society of Infectious Diseases are discussed.

  14. Genital herpes - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Herpes - genital - self-care; Herpes simplex - genital - self-care; Herpesvirus 2 - self-care; HSV-2 - self-care ... Call your health care provider if you have any of the following: Symptoms of an outbreak that worsen despite medicine and self-care ...

  15. Genital herpes: a review.

    PubMed

    Beauman, John G

    2005-10-15

    Genital herpes simplex virus infection is a recurrent, lifelong disease with no cure. The strongest predictor for infection is a person's number of lifetime sex partners. The natural history includes first-episode mucocutaneous infection, establishment of latency in the dorsal root ganglion, and subsequent reactivation. Most infections are transmitted via asymptomatic viral shedding. Classic outbreaks consist of a skin prodrome and possible constitutional symptoms such as headache, fever, and inguinal lymphadenopathy. As the infection progresses, papules, vesicles on an erythematous base, and erosions appear over hours to days. These lesions usually crust, re-epithelialize, and heal without scarring. First-episode infections are more extensive: primary lesions last two to six weeks versus approximately one week for lesions in recurrent disease. Atypical manifestations are common. Infected persons experience a median of four recurrences per year after their first episode, but rates vary greatly. Genital herpes simplex virus type 2 recurs six times more frequently than type 1. Viral culture is preferred over polymerase chain reaction testing for diagnosis. Serologic testing can be useful in persons with a questionable history. Effective oral antiviral medications are available for initial, episodic, and suppressive therapy but are not a cure. There is some evidence that alternative therapies such as L-lysine, zinc, and some herbal preparations may offer some benefit. Counseling patients about the risk of transmission is crucial and helps prevent the spread of disease and neonatal complications.

  16. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections are uncommon, but because of the morbidity and mortality associated with the infection they are often considered in the differential diagnosis of ill neonates. The use of polymerase chain reaction for diagnosis of central nervous system infections and the development of safe and effective antiviral therapy has revolutionized the diagnosis and management of these infants. Initiation of long-term antiviral suppressive therapy in these infants has led to significant improvement in morbidity. This article summarizes the epidemiology of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections and discusses clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and follow up of infants with neonatal herpes disease.

  17. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cherpes, Thomas L; Matthews, Dean B; Maryak, Samantha A

    2012-12-01

    Neonatal herpes, seen roughly in 1 of 3000 live births in the United States, is the most serious manifestation of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in the perinatal period. Although acyclovir therapy decreases infant mortality associated with perinatal HSV transmission, development of permanent neurological disabilities is not uncommon. Mother-to-neonate HSV transmission is most efficient when maternal genital tract HSV infection is acquired proximate to the time of delivery, signifying that neonatal herpes prevention strategies need to focus on decreasing the incidence of maternal infection during pregnancy and more precisely identifying infants most likely to benefit from prophylactic antiviral therapy.

  18. Herpes viral culture of lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus; Herpes simplex virus culture Images Viral lesion culture References Costello M, Sabatini LM, Yungbluth M. Viral infections. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  19. Reading Recovery Following Herpes Encephalitis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, C. D.; Peters, Phyllis

    1979-01-01

    The article presents the medical, psychological, and reading diagnoses of a 24-year-old man with herpes encephalitis, an acute neurological disease. Test results are reported and the client's response to learning disability remedial techniques are reviewed. (SBH)

  20. The Significance of Herpes Simplex for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensor, Deirdre

    2005-01-01

    Herpes simplex is a common recurrent viral infection caused by the herpes simplex virus. The two closely related but distinct viruses that cause herpes simplex infections are herpes simplex 1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex 2 (HSV-2). HSV-1 is commonly associated with infections around the oral mucosa and is the cause of herpes labialis, often referred…

  1. Recurrent facial urticaria following herpes simplex labialis.

    PubMed

    Zawar, Vijay; Godse, Kiran

    2012-03-01

    We describe recurrent acute right-sided facial urticaria associated with herpes labialis infection in a middle-aged female patient. Antiviral medications and antihistamines not only successfully cleared the herpes infection and urticaria but also prevented further recurrences.

  2. Herpes Simplex - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Herpes Simplex URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Herpes Simplex - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  3. Maternal and neonatal herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2013-02-01

    Genital herpes infections are extremely common worldwide and ~22% of pregnant women are infected with herpes simplex virus. Eighty percent of those affected with genital herpes are unaware of being infected. The most devastating consequence of maternal genital herpes is neonatal herpes disease. Fortunately, neonatal herpes simplex infections are uncommon but due to the morbidity and mortality associated with the infection are often considered in the differential diagnosis of ill neonates. The use of polymerase chain reaction assay for diagnosis of central nervous system infections and the development of safe and effective antiviral therapy have revolutionized the diagnosis and management of these infants. Most recently, the initiation of long-term antiviral suppressive therapy in these infants has led to significant improvement in morbidity. This review will summarize the epidemiology of maternal and neonatal herpes infections and discuss clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and follow-up of infants with neonatal herpes disease.

  4. Valacyclovir for the treatment of genital herpes.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Julie S; Hicks, Lindsey; Sra, Karan; Tyring, Stephen K

    2006-06-01

    Genital herpes is the most prevalent sexually transmitted infection in the USA. While sometimes mild in severity, it can be a distressing and painful chronic condition. Likewise, herpes labialis and herpes zoster can be both physically and psychologically painful. While there is no cure for these conditions, treatment to alleviate symptoms, suppress recurrences and reduce transmission has been drastically improved over the past 20 years with the use of guanine nucleoside antivirals, such as valacyclovir hydrochloride (Valtrex), GlaxoSmithKline) the highly bioavailable prodrug of acyclovir (Zovirax((R)), GlaxoSmithKline), and famciclovir (Famvir, Novartis), a highly bioavailable prodrug of penciclovir (Denavir, Novartis). Clinical trials involving approximately 10,000 patients (including patients from nongenital herpes studies, such as herpes zoster) have assessed the safety and efficacy of valacyclovir in the treatment of initial genital herpes outbreaks, episodic treatment of recurrent episodes and daily suppressive therapy. It was shown that valacyclovir has similar efficacy to acyclovir in the episodic and suppressive treatment of genital herpes. Valacyclovir is the only antiviral drug approved for a once-daily dose of suppressive therapy for genital herpes, as well as the only antiviral drug US FDA approved for a 3-day regimen of episodic treatment of recurrent genital herpes. In addition, valacyclovir is also indicated in the reduction of the sexual transmission of herpes simplex virus infection and for the treatment of herpes labialis. In herpes zoster, valacyclovir is more effective than acyclovir or placebo (and as equally effective as famciclovir) in shortening the length and severity of herpes zoster-associated pain and postherpetic neuralgia. Valacyclovir has an acceptable safety profile in patients with herpes simplex and herpes zoster. The less frequent dosing regimen makes it an attractive option in the treatment of genital herpes and other viral

  5. Treatment of herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    Opstelten, Wim; Eekhof, Just; Neven, Arie Knuistingh; Verheij, Theo

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the evidence regarding treatment of herpes zoster (HZ) in the short-term, focusing on the prevention of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). QUALITY OF EVIDENCE The evidence relating to treatment of HZ is derived mainly from randomized controlled trials (level I evidence). MAIN MESSAGE Antiviral drugs might have some effect on the severity of acute pain and on the duration of skin lesions. Corticosteroids also alleviate acute pain. Oral antiviral medication reduces the risk of eye complications in patients with ophthalmic HZ. There is no convincing evidence that antiviral medication reduces the risk of PHN. Some studies, however, have shown that famciclovir and valacyclovir shorten the duration of PHN. The effectiveness of amitriptyline or cutaneous and percutaneous interventions in preventing PHN has not been proven. CONCLUSION Oral antiviral drugs should be prescribed to elderly HZ patients with high risk of PHN. Moreover, these drugs should be prescribed to all patients at the first signs of ophthalmic HZ, irrespective of age or severity of symptoms. PMID:18337531

  6. Herpes zoster: A clinicocytopathological insight

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Snehal; Singaraju, Sasidhar; Einstein, A; Sharma, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster or shingles is reactivation of the varicella zoster virus that had entered the cutaneous nerve endings during an earlier episode of chicken pox traveled to the dorsal root ganglia and remained in a latent form. This condition is characterized by occurrence of multiple, painful, unilateral vesicles and ulceration which shows a typical single dermatome involvement. In this case report, we present a patient with herpes zoster involving the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve, with unilateral vesicles over the right side of lower third of face along the trigeminal nerve tract, with intraoral involvement of buccal mucosa, labial mucosa and the tongue of the same side. Cytopathology revealed classic features of herpes infection including inclusion bodies, perinuclear halo and multinucleated cells. PMID:27721631

  7. [Herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Machetanz, J

    2016-08-01

    Herpes zoster develops by endogenous reactivation of varizella zoster virus (VZV). Incidence increases with age. Females are more frequently affected than males. The reactivation rate in seropositive individuals is about 20 %. After a short prodromal stage, herpetiform-grouped vesicles appear in segmental arrangement. Pain and paresthesia are typical zoster symptoms. Complications like bacterial superinfections, vasculopathy, paresis, and oculopathy may occur. During pregnancy herpes zoster is a threat for mother and child. Among elderly patients, cardiovascular risk is increased during the first week of herpes zoster infection. Postherpetic neuropathy is feared. Diagnosis can be made clinically and by the use of polymerase chain reaction. First-line treatment is systemic antiviral drug therapy with either acyclovir or brivudine. Adjuvant therapies consist of pain management and topical treatment.

  8. Let's Hear It for Herps!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Let's Hear It for the Herps!" Contents are organized into the…

  9. Herpes: Removing Fact from Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Elbert D.

    1984-01-01

    Factual information dealing with the virus herpes is provided in hopes of allaying the public fears that have recently appeared because of misinformation presented by the media. Symptoms, types, and new developments in treatment are explored. Recommendations for obtaining additional information are offered. (DF)

  10. Optimal management of genital herpes: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sauerbrei, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, genital herpes is a global medical problem with significant physical and psychological morbidity. Genital herpes is caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 or type 2 and can manifest as primary and/or recurrent infection. This manuscript provides an overview about the fundamental knowledge on the virus, its epidemiology, and infection. Furthermore, the current possibilities of antiviral therapeutic interventions and laboratory diagnosis of genital herpes as well as the present situation and perspectives for the treatment by novel antivirals and prevention of disease by vaccination are presented. Since the medical management of patients with genital herpes simplex virus infection is often unsatisfactory, this review aims at all physicians and health professionals who are involved in the care of patients with genital herpes. The information provided would help to improve the counseling of affected patients and to optimize the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of this particular disease. PMID:27358569

  11. Optimal management of genital herpes: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sauerbrei, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, genital herpes is a global medical problem with significant physical and psychological morbidity. Genital herpes is caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 or type 2 and can manifest as primary and/or recurrent infection. This manuscript provides an overview about the fundamental knowledge on the virus, its epidemiology, and infection. Furthermore, the current possibilities of antiviral therapeutic interventions and laboratory diagnosis of genital herpes as well as the present situation and perspectives for the treatment by novel antivirals and prevention of disease by vaccination are presented. Since the medical management of patients with genital herpes simplex virus infection is often unsatisfactory, this review aims at all physicians and health professionals who are involved in the care of patients with genital herpes. The information provided would help to improve the counseling of affected patients and to optimize the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of this particular disease.

  12. Herpes simplex virus infection during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Stephenson-Famy, Alyssa; Gardella, Carolyn

    2014-12-01

    Genital herpes in pregnancy continues to cause significant maternal morbidity, with an increasing number of infections being due to oral-labial transmission of herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1. Near delivery, primary infections with HSV-1 or HSV-2 carry the highest risk of neonatal herpes infection, which is a rare but potentially devastating disease for otherwise healthy newborns. Prevention efforts have been limited by lack of an effective intervention for preventing primary infections and the unclear role of routine serologic testing.

  13. Immunity and the burden of herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Suk; Kwon, Soon Sun; Lee, Jacob; Choi, Su-Mi; Lee, Jin Soo; Eom, Joong Sik; Sohn, Jang Wook; Choeng, Hee Jin

    2014-03-01

    The burden of herpes zoster may be related to patients' immunity, although this has not been studied extensively. This hypothesis was tested in a matched case-control study of patients with herpes zoster who sought treatment at one of seven university hospitals in Korea from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2010. Patients diagnosed with herpes zoster were placed into three groups based on their immune status: severely immunocompromised, mild-to-moderately immunocompromised, and normal immunity. Each patient in the severely immunocompromised group was matched with one patient in the mild-to-moderately immunocompromised group and one patient in the normal immunity group in the same hospital based on age, sex, and date of herpes zoster onset. A total of 582 patients with herpes zoster were included in the analysis: 194 in each of the three groups. Patients in the severely immunocompromised group had the highest herpes zoster-related hospitalization rate as compared to patients in the mild-to-moderately immunocompromised and normal immune groups (P < 0.01). The length of hospital stay and herpes zoster-related medical cost increased significantly with the deterioration of patients' immunity (P < 0.01, respectively). Cutaneous complications occurred more frequently in the severely immunocompromised group than in the other two groups (P < 0.01). An increase in herpes zoster burden was observed as the patients' immunity decreased. Therefore, effective measures are necessary to prevent herpes zoster and reduce its burden in severely immunocompromised patients.

  14. Therapeutic Options for Herpes Simplex Infections.

    PubMed

    Au, Eugene; Sacks, Stephen L.

    2003-02-01

    Herpes simplex viruses are responsible for a number of disease states in infected individuals. Capable of establishing latent infection, herpes simplex can reactivate, causing pain, discomfort, and psychosocial consequences. Because no cure is available, treatment modalities for herpes simplex infection are required, from both personal and public health standpoints. To date, therapy has centered around the use of antiviral drugs to control infection and suppress recurrences. To expand the scope of available treatments, efforts have focused on the development of vaccines against herpes simplex virus and new agents such as immune response modifiers. Recent data suggest that these new agents are promising in their therapeutic potential.

  15. Generating protective immunity against genital herpes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Haina; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2013-10-01

    Genital herpes is an incurable, chronic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Not only does genital herpes cause painful, recurrent symptoms, it is also a significant risk factor for the acquisition of other sexually transmitted infections such as HIV-1. Antiviral drugs are used to treat herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection, but they cannot stop viral shedding and transmission. Thus, developing a vaccine that can prevent or clear infection will be crucial in limiting the spread of disease. In this review we outline recent studies that improve our understanding of host responses against HSV infection, discuss past clinical vaccine trials, and highlight new strategies for vaccine design against genital herpes.

  16. Herpes simplex virus following stab phlebectomy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Lum, Ying Wei; Heller, Jennifer A

    2017-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus infection following surgery is an unusual postoperative phenomenon. Many mechanisms have been suggested, with the most likely explanation related to latent virus reactivation due to a proinflammatory response in the setting of local trauma. Here, we present a case of herpes simplex virus reactivation in an immunocompetent female following a conventional right lower extremity stab phlebectomy. Salient clinical and physical examination findings are described, and management strategies for herpes simplex virus reactivation are outlined. This is the first known case report of herpes simplex virus reactivation following lower extremity phlebectomy.

  17. Natural remedies for Herpes simplex.

    PubMed

    Gaby, Alan R

    2006-06-01

    Herpes simplex is a common viral infection of the skin or mucous membranes. The lesions caused by this infection are often painful, burning, or pruritic, and tend to recur in most patients. Short-term treatment with acyclovir can accelerate the healing of an acute outbreak, and continuous acyclovir therapy is often prescribed for people with frequent recurrences. While this drug can reduce the recurrence rate by 60-90 percent, it can also cause a wide array of side effects, including renal failure, hepatitis, and anaphylaxis. Safe and effective alternatives are therefore needed. There is evidence that certain dietary modifications and natural substances may be useful for treating active Herpes simplex lesions or preventing recurrences. Treatments discussed include lysine, vitamin C, zinc, vitamin E, adenosine monophosphate, and lemon balm (Melissa officinalis).

  18. Prevention agenda for genital herpes.

    PubMed

    Handsfield, H H; Stone, K M; Wasserheit, J N

    1999-04-01

    Few meeting participants envisioned a prevention and control program on the scale or scope of CDC's programs to prevent HIV infection, syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydial infection, but all agreed that the virtual absence of public health interventions to prevent genital herpes is no longer appropriate in light of evolving epidemiologic knowledge and other research advances. The ultimate scope of a national genital herpes prevention effort will depend in part on the results of the recommended research agenda, which probably will evolve over the better part of a decade. Numerous other STD prevention partners will also need to contribute to this effort and help to determine the makeup of future programs. Substantial new fiscal resources will be required both to implement the proposed research agenda and, depending on the results, to undertake the prevention efforts indicated by those studies. Competing STD prevention priorities and other national health needs will influence the availability of those resources. The consultants' meeting and the research and program activities summarized above are described in more detail in the full meeting report, which is posted on the Division's web site (www.cdc.gov/nchstp/dstd/dstdp.html) or may be requested directly from the Division. DSTDP is interested in receiving comments and suggestions about herpes prevention.

  19. Experiential Interventions for Clients with Genital Herpes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Anne L.

    1999-01-01

    Explores potential benefits of incorporating concepts and interventions from experimental therapy to help clients with psychosocial difficulties in learning to live with genital herpes. Recommends experimental counseling of two-chair dialog, empty chair, and metaphor for helping clients with emotional sequelae of genital herpes. Presents case…

  20. Herpes in Dyadic Relationships: Patterns and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drob, Sanford; Bernard, Harold S.

    1985-01-01

    Explores how dyadic relationships can be affected when one partner suffers from genital herpes. Six patterns are described: When One Partner Does Not Know, The Compromise Relationship, The Enraged Partner, The Mark of Guilt, Problems in Risk Management, and Herpes Used as Weapon. Treatment strategies for dealing with patterns are offered.…

  1. Autism and Herpes Simplex Encephalitis. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaziuddin, Mohammad; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents two case studies of children who developed herpes virus infection in the intrauterine or early postnatal period and presented with features of autism around two years of age. Other research suggesting a link between herpes and autism is reviewed. (DB)

  2. Psychosocial Treatment for Recurrent Genital Herpes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, David J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Assigned 21 individuals with recurrent genital herpes to psychosocial intervention, social support, or waiting-list control conditions. Those receiving psychosocial intervention (herpes simplex virus information, relaxation training, stress management instructions, and an imagery technique) reported significantly greater reductions in herpes…

  3. An updated approach to treating and preventing herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Garrubba, Carl; Donkers, Kelly

    2013-12-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes chickenpox and herpes zoster. Herpes zoster is a common infection in older adults and can lead to potentially debilitating postherpetic neuralgia. This article reviews the diagnosis and management of herpes zoster, including strategies to reduce disease frequency and severity with the herpes zoster vaccine.

  4. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305... simplex virus serological assays. (a) Identification. Herpes simplex virus serological assays are devices... herpes simplex virus in serum. Additionally, some of the assays consist of herpes simplex virus...

  5. Pediatrics and herpes simplex virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Richard; Rosenthal, Susan L; Stanberry, Lawrence R

    2005-01-01

    This review explores the development of prophylactic genital herpes vaccines and their potential impact on perinatal and oral-facial disease. Vaccine strategies have included the use of whole killed virus, viral subunits, attenuated live virus, viral vectors, and bare DNA. To date, the recombinant subunit vaccine, truncated HSV-2 gD and alum/MPL, has been the most efficacious. The vaccine is 73 to 74 percent effective in preventing genital disease in herpes simplex virus seronegative women but is not effective in men or seropositive women. Models predict a significant impact on genital herpes if it limits viral shedding. Reductions in perinatal and oral-facial disease are likely to occur as well. Once an efficacious herpes vaccine is available, its effectiveness will depend ultimately on vaccine acceptance by professional organizations, healthcare professionals, and parents. Further research is required to improve on and fully understand the implications of prophylactic herpes simplex vaccines.

  6. Muscle Paralysis in Herpes Zoster

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, David; Fusfeld, Robert D.

    1965-01-01

    Herpes zoster may, in some instances, cause motor paralysis as well as the usual sensory and cutaneous manifestations. It is suggested that the presence of electromyographic denervation potentials be used as the criterion of muscle paresis in order to avoid mistaking atrophy of disuse for true lower motor neuron disease. Use of the proper physical therapy procedures hastens the recovery of function and may serve to retard denervation atrophy and fibrosis in patients with muscle paralysis. ImagesFigure 1 (Case 1).Figure 1 (Case 1). PMID:5828175

  7. Herpes Mastitis: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Arnaud; Simonson, Colin; Valla, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Herpetic lesions most frequently occur on oral and genital areas. However, herpes simplex virus (HSV) can be a rare cause of breast infection. In few published articles, the route of transmission is predominantly from infant to mother. We report two cases about simultaneous mammary and extramammary (oral and genital) herpetic infection in nonlactating women. In both cases, HSV breast lesions were acquired by sexual contacts with partners who were asymptomatic HSV carriers. Through a review of literature, we highlight clinical signs for an early diagnosis. We also emphasize the advantage of the valacyclovir for treating this uncommon pathology.

  8. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 infections are highly prevalent worldwide and are characterized by establishing lifelong infection with periods of latency interspersed with periodic episodes of reactivation. Acquisition of HSV by an infant during the peripartum or postpartum period results in neonatal HSV disease, a rare but significant infection that can be associated with severe morbidity and mortality, especially if there is dissemination or central nervous system involvement. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances have led to improvements in mortality and, to a lesser extent, neurodevelopmental outcomes, but room exists for further improvement.

  9. The genital herpes problem in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Guerra, B; Puccetti, C; Cervi, F

    2012-10-01

    Genital herpes is a common sexually transmitted infection. In reproductive age it involves the additional risk of vertical transmission to the neonate. Rates of transmission are affected by the viral type and whether the infection around delivery is primary or recurrent. Neonatal herpes is a rare but very severe complication of genital herpes infection and is caused by contact with infected genital secretions at the time of labor. Maternal acquisition of herpes simplex virus (HSV) in the third trimester of pregnancy carries the highest risk of neonatal transmission. Prevention of neonatal herpes depends on preventing acquisition of genital HSV infection during late pregnancy and avoiding exposure of the infant to herpetic lesions during delivery. Uninfected woman should be counselled about the need of avoiding sexual contact during the third trimester. Elective caesarean section before the onset of labor is the choice mode of delivery for women with genital lesions or with prodromal symptoms near the term, even if it offers only a partial protection against neonatal infection. Antiviral suppressive therapy is used from 36 weeks of gestation until delivery in pregnant women with recurrences to prevent genital lesions at the time of labor so reducing the need of caesarean sections. Currently, routine maternal serologic screening is not yet recommended. Because most mothers of infants who acquire neonatal herpes lack histories of clinically evident genital herpes, researchers should focus on the recognition of asymptomatic primary genital HSV infections.

  10. Herpes Simplex Virus: Partner for Life

    PubMed Central

    Blondeau, Joseph M.; Embil, Juan A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors provide a careful review of the characteristics of the herpes simplex virus and its various manifestations. They offer suggestions for its diagnosis and treatment, in various forms, and outline an approach to physician counselling of infected persons.

  11. Herpes Genitalis: Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Sauerbrei, A.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes genitalis is caused by the herpes simplex virus type 1 or type 2 and can manifest as primary or recurrent infection. It is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections and due to associated physical and psychological morbidity it constitutes a considerable, often underestimated medical problem. In addition to providing the reader with basic knowledge of the pathogen and clinical presentation of herpes genitalis, this review article discusses important aspects of the laboratory diagnostics, antiviral therapy and prophylaxis. The article is aimed at all health-care workers managing patients with herpes genitalis and attempts to improve the often suboptimal counselling, targeted use of laboratory diagnostics, treatment and preventive measures provided to patients. PMID:28017972

  12. Herpes Genitalis: Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Sauerbrei, A

    2016-12-01

    Herpes genitalis is caused by the herpes simplex virus type 1 or type 2 and can manifest as primary or recurrent infection. It is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections and due to associated physical and psychological morbidity it constitutes a considerable, often underestimated medical problem. In addition to providing the reader with basic knowledge of the pathogen and clinical presentation of herpes genitalis, this review article discusses important aspects of the laboratory diagnostics, antiviral therapy and prophylaxis. The article is aimed at all health-care workers managing patients with herpes genitalis and attempts to improve the often suboptimal counselling, targeted use of laboratory diagnostics, treatment and preventive measures provided to patients.

  13. Herpes simplex type-1 virus infection.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michaell A

    2003-06-01

    Oral infection caused by the herpes simplex virus represents one of the more common conditions the dental practitioner will be called upon to manage. Unique in its ability to establish latency and undergo subsequent recurrence, it is an ubiquitous infectious agent for which a cure does not exist. For the immunocompetent patient, herpes virus simplex infection typically represents nothing more than a nuisance. However, for the immunocompromised patient, this infection is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Recently introduced antiviral drug regimens may reduce the morbidity and potential mortality of the herpes simplex virus, especially in immunocompromised patients. The value of antiviral therapy in the management of recurrent herpes simplex virus infection in the immunocompetent patient remains an area of contentious debate.

  14. The management of herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Yeung-Yue, Kimberly A; Brentjens, Mathijs H; Lee, Patricia C; Tyring, Stephen K

    2002-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus persists in a latent form for the life of its host, periodically reactivating and often resulting in significant psychosocial distress for the patient. Currently no cure is available. Antiviral therapy is the main treatment modality, used either orally, intravenously, or topically to prohibit further replication of the virus and thereby minimize cellular destruction. However, immunologic advances in the treatment and prevention of herpes simplex infections are promising and continue to be studied.

  15. Therapeutic options for herpes labialis: experimental and natural therapies.

    PubMed

    Elish, Diana; Singh, Fiza; Weinberg, Jeffrey M

    2005-07-01

    Herpes labialis, a common condition characterized by recurrent vesicular eruptions primarily on the lips and perioral skin, causes pain and discomfort for millions of adults each year. Over the past several years, the major focus of herpes research has been on the treatment of genital herpes. However, several studies have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of therapies specifically for herpes labialis. Last year in Cutis, we reviewed oral and topical therapies for herpes labialis. In this final part of the series, we review experimental and natural treatments that are available for herpes labialis and its associated symptoms.

  16. Recent advances in management of genital herpes.

    PubMed Central

    Tétrault, I.; Boivin, G.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update on new diagnostic tests and antiviral strategies for managing genital herpes. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Treatment guidelines are based on randomized clinical trials and recommendations from the Expert Working Group on Canadian Guidelines for Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Recommendations concerning other aspects of managing genital herpes (e.g., indications for using type-specific serologic tests) are mainly based on expert opinion. MAIN MESSAGE: Genital herpes is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, affecting about 20% of sexually active people; up to 80% of cases are undiagnosed. Because of frequent atypical presentation and the emotional burden associated with genital herpes, clinical diagnosis should be confirmed by viral culture. Type-specific serologic assays are now available, but their use is often restricted to special situations and requires adequate counseling. New antivirals (valacyclovir and famciclovir) with improved pharmacokinetic profiles have now been approved for episodic treatment of recurrences and suppressive therapy. CONCLUSION: Wise use of new diagnostic assays for herpes simplex coupled with more convenient treatment regimens should provide better management of patients with genital herpes. Images Figure 1 PMID:10955181

  17. Genital Herpes Vaccine Shows Promise in Animal Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163137.html Genital Herpes Vaccine Shows Promise in Animal Trials Two-pronged approach ... THURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new vaccine for genital herpes could be nearing human clinical ...

  18. Public awareness and knowledge of herpes labialis.

    PubMed

    Pica, Francesca; Volpi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Between 20% and 40% of the population is estimated to suffer from episodes of recurrent herpes labialis, although few reports in the literature have addressed the public awareness of this infection in the general population. The aims of this study were to determine the existing level of awareness and knowledge of this disease and to assess the source of this knowledge, the ability of the public to recognize the characteristics of the disease and the behavior of patients with clinical cases of disease manifestation. To this end, 2,000 individuals (961 male and 1,039 female) of 14 years of age and older were surveyed using the ECOcapi system [Eurisko Consumer Omnibus-CAPI (computer-assisted personal interviewing) version]. Eighty-nine percent of those surveyed had some knowledge of herpes labialis; 92% were able to refer to at least one symptom of herpes labialis, 91% were able to identify correctly his infection from pictures, and 45% had experienced personally at least one episode of herpes labialis infection. The majority of the individuals suffering from herpes labialis self-medicated using a topical therapy. Women were found to be affected more commonly by herpes labialis than men [OR 1.42 (1.18-1.70)], and women were also more likely to recognize the disease [OR 1.65 (1.30-2.08)] and to seek medical advice for the condition [OR 1.38 (1.12-1.70)]. In conclusion, herpes labialis is a common and well-known condition, and it is often self-diagnosed correctly, as the prodromal phase and the use of self-medication are very common.

  19. Hyperleukocytosis in a premature infant with intrauterine herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Underwood, M A; Wartell, A E; Borghese, R A

    2012-06-01

    Herpes encephalitis is a rare but devastating infection in premature infants. We report a 29 week gestation infant with severe intrauterine cutaneous and central nervous system herpes accompanied by hyperleukocytosis. Leukemoid reactions are not uncommon in this population, but the association of herpes encephalitis and a leukemoid reaction or hyperleukocytosis has not been reported previously.

  20. Treatment and prevention of herpes labialis

    PubMed Central

    Opstelten, Wim; Neven, Arie Knuistingh; Eekhof, Just

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To review the evidence regarding the treatment and prevention of herpes labialis. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE The evidence relating to treatment and prevention of herpes labialis is derived from randomized controlled trials (level I evidence). MAIN MESSAGE Treatment with an indifferent cream (zinc oxide or zinc sulfate), an anesthetic cream, or an antiviral cream has a small favourable effect on the duration of symptoms, if applied promptly. This is also the case with oral antiviral medication. If antiviral medicine (cream or oral) is started before exposure to the triggering factor (sunlight), it will provide some protection. Research on sunscreens has shown mixed results: some protection has been reported under experimental conditions that could not be replicated under natural conditions. In the long term, the number of relapses of herpes labialis can be limited with oral antiviral medication. CONCLUSION Only prompt topical or oral therapy will alleviate symptoms of herpes labialis. Both topical and oral treatment can contribute to the prevention of herpes labialis. PMID:19074705

  1. Herpes simplex ulcerative esophagitis in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman A; Fagih, Mosa A

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus is a common cause of ulcerative esophagitis in the immunocompromised or debilitated host. Despite a high prevalence of primary and recurrent Herpes simplex virus infection in the general population, Herpes simplex virus esophagitis (HSVE) appears to be rare in the immunocompetent host. We report three cases of endoscopically-diagnosed HSVE in apparently immunocompetent children; the presentation was characterized by acute onset of fever, odynophagia, and dysphagia. In two cases, the diagnosis was confirmed histologically by identification of herpes viral inclusions and culture of the virus in the presence of inflammation. The third case was considered to have probable HSVE based on the presence of typical cold sore on his lip, typical endoscopic finding, histopathological evidence of inflammation in esophageal biopsies and positive serologic evidence of acute Herpes simplex virus infection. Two cases received an intravenous course of acyclovir and one had self-limited recovery. All three cases had normal immunological workup and excellent health on long-term follow-up.

  2. Designing herpes viruses as oncolytics

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Cole; Rabkin, Samuel D

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) was one of the first genetically-engineered oncolytic viruses. Because HSV is a natural human pathogen that can cause serious disease, it is incumbent that it can be genetically-engineered or significantly attenuated for safety. Here, we present a detailed explanation of the functions of HSV-1 genes frequently mutated to endow oncolytic activity. These genes are nonessential for growth in tissue culture cells but are important for growth in postmitotic cells, interfering with intrinsic antiviral and innate immune responses or causing pathology, functions dispensable for replication in cancer cells. Understanding the function of these genes leads to informed creation of new oHSVs with better therapeutic efficacy. Virus infection and replication can also be directed to cancer cells through tumor-selective receptor binding and transcriptional- or post-transcriptional miRNA-targeting, respectively. In addition to the direct effects of oHSV on infected cancer cells and tumors, oHSV can be “armed” with transgenes that are: reporters, to track virus replication and spread; cytotoxic, to kill uninfected tumor cells; immune modulatory, to stimulate antitumor immunity; or tumor microenvironment altering, to enhance virus spread or to inhibit tumor growth. In addition to HSV-1, other alphaherpesviruses are also discussed for their oncolytic activity. PMID:26462293

  3. [Severe form of herpes gestationis].

    PubMed

    Orsini, G; Loizzi, P; Morelli, L; Chiechi, L M; Sabatini, R; Distante, G

    2003-06-01

    We report a very severe form of herpers gestationis that arose at the 26(th) week of pregnancy and reached us for observation at the 30(th) week. Herpes gestationis in an autoimmune vesicobullous dermatosis characterised by skin eruptions, intense itching and consequent increase in fetal morbility, with delayed intrauterine growth and prematurity. Owing to its particular severity (involvement of the entire body surface including the face), between the 30th and the 32(nd) weeks we had to address a severe clinical condition characterised by anaemia, marked hypoproteinaemia, hypoalbuminaemia, hupertension and hyperglycaemia which led us to resort to the maximum dose of oral corticotherapy in association with topical therapy using clobetasol propionate. In our opinion the results obtained were highly statisfactory with the result that at the end of the 37(th) week, in consideration of the patient's obstetric history, podalic presentation and parity, we performed a Caesarean delivering a newborn of 3000 g in excellent condition. The patient was discharged symptom-free on the 6(th) day and the newborn was in full healt.

  4. The Uncommon Localization of Herpes Zoster

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Herpes zoster is an acute, cutaneous viral infection caused by the reactivation of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) that is the cause of varicella. It is an acute neurological disease which can often lead to serious postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Different nerves can be included with the skin rash in the area of its enervation especially cranial nerves (CV) and intercostal nerves. Case report: In this report we present a patient with herpes zoster which involved ulnar nerve with skin rash in the region of ulnar innervations in women with no disease previously diagnosed. The failure of her immune system may be explained by great emotional stress and overwork she had been exposed to with neglecting proper nutrition in that period. Conclusion: Herpes zoster may involve any nerve with characteristic skin rash in the area of its innervations, and failure in immune system which leads reactivation of VZV may be caused by other factors besides the underlying illness. PMID:26980938

  5. [Immune evasion by herpes simplex viruses].

    PubMed

    Retamal-Díaz, Angello R; Suazo, Paula A; Garrido, Ignacio; Kalergis, Alexis M; González, Pablo A

    2015-02-01

    Herpes simplex viruses and humans have co-existed for tens of thousands of years. This long relationship has translated into the evolution and selection of viral determinants to evade the host immune response and reciprocally the evolution and selection of host immune components for limiting virus infection and damage. Currently there are no vaccines available to avoid infection with these viruses or therapies to cure them. Herpes simplex viruses are neurotropic and reside latently in neurons at the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia, occasionally reactivating. Most viral recurrences are subclinical and thus, unnoticed. Here, we discuss the initial steps of infection by herpes simplex viruses and the molecular mechanisms they have developed to evade innate and adaptive immunity. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms evolved by these viruses to evade host immunity should help us envision novel vaccine strategies and therapies that limit infection and dissemination.

  6. Therapeutic options for herpes labialis, I: Oral agents.

    PubMed

    Elish, Diana; Singh, Fiza; Weinberg, Jeffrey M

    2004-07-01

    Given the prevalence of herpes labialis, effective therapy has the potential to affect the lives of many and presents a challenge for clinicians. Over the last several years, most of the focus of herpes research has been on the treatment of genital herpes. Recently, however, several studies have been published examining the efficacy of therapies specifically for herpes labialis. Several therapeutic agents, both prescription and over-the-counter, are available for controlling and managing the disease. In this series of articles, we review oral and topical therapeutic agents that are available in the treatment of herpes labialis and its associated symptoms. This article will review oral treatment options.

  7. Preventing herpes simplex virus in the newborn.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2014-12-01

    Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are very common worldwide. Approximately 22% of pregnant women are infected genitally with HSV, and most of them are unaware of this. The most devastating consequence of maternal genital herpes is HSV disease in the newborn. Although neonatal HSV infections remain uncommon, due to the significant morbidity and mortality associated with the infection, HSV infection in the newborn is often considered in the differential diagnosis of ill neonates. This review summarizes the epidemiology and management of neonatal HSV infections and discusses strategies to prevent HSV infection in the newborn.

  8. [Treatment of cutaneous herpes and herpes zoster with Nivcrisol-D].

    PubMed

    Giurcăneanu, F; Crişan, I; Eşanu, V; Cioca, V; Cajal, N

    1988-01-01

    The results obtained at the Dermatological service of the Colentina Hospital show that the product NIVCRISOL-D, containing propolis, has a significant therapeutical effect against recurrent herpes and zona zoster.

  9. Anorexia nervosa with herpes simplex encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    George, G. C. W.

    1981-01-01

    Studies of patients suffering from anorexia nervosa appear to show an increased immunity to certain infections, as well as immunological deficiencies. This is the report of a patient with anorexia nervosa who developed herpes simplex encephalitis, a condition associated with lowered immunological defence mechanisms. PMID:7301681

  10. Herpes simplex esophagitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    PubMed

    Eymard, D; Martin, L; Doummar, G; Piché, J

    1997-11-01

    Over four months, three cases of biopsy-proven herpes simplex esophagitis were seen at Centre hospitalier Pierre-Boucher, Longueuil, in young adult males with no evidence of immunosuppression and negative serological testing for antibody against the human immunodeficiency virus. Clinical presentation consisted of odynophagia, fever and retrosternal chest pain. All patients rapidly improved with acyclovir therapy.

  11. Herpes simplex esophagitis in immunocompetent hosts

    PubMed Central

    Eymard, Daniel; Martin, Luc; Doummar, Gilbert; Piché, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Over four months, three cases of biopsy-proven herpes simplex esophagitis were seen at Centre hospitalier Pierre-Boucher, Longueuil, in young adult males with no evidence of immunosuppression and negative serological testing for antibody against the human immunodeficiency virus. Clinical presentation consisted of odynophagia, fever and retrosternal chest pain. All patients rapidly improved with acyclovir therapy. PMID:22346532

  12. Can Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis Cause Aphasia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naude, H.; Pretorius, E.

    2003-01-01

    Aphasia implies the loss or impairment of language caused by brain damage. The key to understanding the nature of aphasic symptoms is the neuro-anatomical site of brain damage, and not the causative agent. However, because "Herpes simplex" virus (HSV) encephalitis infection usually affects the frontal and temporal lobes, subcortical…

  13. Herpes Zoster Vaccination: Controversies and Common Clinical Questions.

    PubMed

    Van Epps, Puja; Schmader, Kenneth E; Canaday, David H

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster, clinically referred to as shingles, is an acute, cutaneous viral infection caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster virus, the same virus that causes chickenpox. The incidence of herpes zoster and its complications increase with decline in cell-mediated immunity, including age-associated decline. The most effective management strategy for herpes zoster is prevention of the disease through vaccination in those who are most vulnerable. Despite the demonstrated efficacy in reducing the incidence and severity of herpes zoster, the uptake of vaccine remains low. Here, we will discuss the controversies that surround the live herpes zoster vaccine and address the common clinical questions that arise. We will also discuss the new adjuvanted herpes zoster vaccine currently under investigation.

  14. Pharmacologic management of herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed Central

    Mamdani, F. S.

    1994-01-01

    Herpes zoster is an infection caused by reactivation of dormant varicella-zoster virus. The acute course of herpes zoster is generally benign; however, some patients will experience postherpetic neuralgia characterized by severe, relentless, and at times disabling pain that is often refractory to treatment. While herpes zoster responds to acyclovir, cost-benefit considerations limit the drug's usefulness to only a select group. Postherpetic neuralgia requires a holistic approach, including pharmacologic therapy using several different classes of drugs. PMID:7907508

  15. 2014 UK national guideline for the management of anogenital herpes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Raj; Green, John; Clarke, Emily; Seneviratne, Kanchana; Abbt, Naomi; Evans, Ceri; Bickford, Jane; Nicholson, Marian; O'Farrell, Nigel; Barton, Simon; FitzGerald, Mark; Foley, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    These guidelines concern the management of anogenital herpes simplex virus infections in adults and give advice on diagnosis, management, and counselling of patients. This guideline replaces the 2007 BASHH herpes guidelines and includes new sections on herpes proctitis, key points to cover with patients regarding transmission and removal of advice on the management of HSV in pregnancy which now has a separate joint BASHH/RCOG guideline.

  16. Mucosal Herpes Immunity and Immunopathology to Ocular and Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are amongst the most common human infectious viral pathogens capable of causing serious clinical diseases at every stage of life, from fatal disseminated disease in newborns to cold sores genital ulcerations and blinding eye disease. Primary mucocutaneous infection with HSV-1 & HSV-2 is followed by a lifelong viral latency in the sensory ganglia. In the majority of cases, herpes infections are clinically asymptomatic. However, in symptomatic individuals, the latent HSV can spontaneously and frequently reactivate, reinfecting the muco-cutaneous surfaces and causing painful recurrent diseases. The innate and adaptive mucosal immunities to herpes infections and disease remain to be fully characterized. The understanding of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms operating at muco-cutaneous surfaces is fundamental to the design of next-generation herpes vaccines. In this paper, the phenotypic and functional properties of innate and adaptive mucosal immune cells, their role in antiherpes immunity, and immunopathology are reviewed. The progress and limitations in developing a safe and efficient mucosal herpes vaccine are discussed. PMID:23320014

  17. Improving immunogenicity and efficacy of vaccines for genital herpes containing herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Sita; Shaw, Carolyn; Friedman, Harvey

    2014-12-01

    No vaccines are approved for prevention or treatment of genital herpes. The focus of genital herpes vaccine trials has been on prevention using herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D (gD2) alone or combined with glycoprotein B. These prevention trials did not achieve their primary end points. However, subset analyses reported some positive outcomes in each study. The most recent trial was the Herpevac Trial for Women that used gD2 with monophosphoryl lipid A and alum as adjuvants in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 seronegative women. Unexpectedly, the vaccine prevented genital disease by HSV-1 but not HSV-2. Currently, HSV-1 causes more first episodes of genital herpes than HSV-2, highlighting the importance of protecting against HSV-1. The scientific community is conflicted between abandoning vaccine efforts that include gD2 and building upon the partial successes of previous trials. We favor building upon success and present approaches to improve outcomes of gD2-based subunit antigen vaccines.

  18. Bell's palsy associated with herpes simplex gingivostomatitis. A case report.

    PubMed

    Nasatzky, E; Katz, J

    1998-09-01

    Bell's palsy is a sudden, isolated, peripheral facial paralysis caused by various known and sometimes unknown factors. The case of an 18-year-old man who developed Bell's palsy after onset of primary herpetic gingivostomatitis is presented. Although Bell's palsy has already been associated with herpes simplex virus type 1, the described case is the first in the literature in which enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for immunoglobulin G to herpes simplex virus type 1 and herpes simplex virus type 1 culture were both positive. The recent literature regarding the possible relationship between herpes simplex virus type 1 and Bell's palsy is reviewed and discussed.

  19. [Pain in herpes zoster: Prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Calvo-Mosquera, G; González-Cal, A; Calvo-Rodríguez, D; Primucci, C Y; Plamenov-Dipchikov, P

    2016-04-01

    Shingles is a painful rash that results from reactivation of latent varicella-zoster virus in the dorsal root ganglia or cranial nerves. In this article an update is presented on the prevention and pharmacological treatment of the secondary pain from the virus infection. The most effective way to prevent post-herpetic neuralgia and its consequences is the prevention of herpes itself. A live attenuated vaccine (the Oka strain varicella zoster virus) has been available for several years, and is approved in adults aged 50 years old. Although this vaccine has shown to be effective against herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia, its effectiveness decreases with age and is contraindicated in patients with some form of immunosuppression. Today the recombinant vaccines provide an alternative, and may be administered to immunocompromised persons.

  20. [Ocular hypertension in herpes simplex keratouveitis].

    PubMed

    Burcea, M; Avram, Corina-Ioana; Stamate, Alina-Cristina; Malciolu, R; Oprea, S; Zemba, M

    2014-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus is one of the most common pathogens in humans, who are seropositive for the virus in 90% of the cases at the adult age. It determines reccurent infections in more than a third of the population and these infections depend on the immune response of the host. Ocular infections of newborns are due to the herpes simplex virus type 2, meanwhile type 1 is found predominantly at adults; almost all ocular structures can be affected. HSV-1 in the most frequent etiologic agent in infectious anterior uveitis (with the varicelo-zosterian virus) and it is responsible for 6-10% of all cases of anterior uveitis. More than half of the keratouveitides due to HSV will develop intraocular hypertension and open-angle secondary glaucoma, during reccurences and most of them will resolve after proper control of inflammation.

  1. Herpes encephalitis preceded by ipsilateral vestibular neuronitis.

    PubMed

    Philpot, Stephen J; Archer, John S

    2005-11-01

    A 74-year-old woman developed vertigo and jerk nystagmus to the left with normal cerebral imaging. Three days later she developed fever, altered mental state and left medial temporal lobe hypodensity, confirmed on lumbar puncture to be due to herpes simplex type 1 encephalitis. We propose that the patient had vestibular neuronitis caused by HSV-1 that progressed to ipsilateral temporal lobe encephalitis.

  2. Herpes Viral Origin of the Parsonage-Turner Syndrome: Highlighting of Serological Immune Anti-Herpes Deficiency Cured by Anti-Herpes Therapy.

    PubMed

    Goaster, Jacqueline Le; Bourée, Patrice; Ifergan, Charles; Tangy, Frederic; Olivier, René; Haenni, Anne-Lise

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, a 50 year-old athletic male presented with weakness, pain and unilateral phrenic paralysis, followed by bilateral phrenic paralysis with deep dyspnea. In 2013, the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was diagnosed. When the patient was seen in September 2014 for the first time, he was facing phrenic neuromuscular failure, which led to the hypothesis of neurotropic herpes viruses. A control of the global serological anti-Herpes immunity to analyze his antibody (Ab) levels confirmed herpes immune genetic deficiency. An appropriate herpes chemotherapy treatment was proposed. Immediately, a spectacular recovery of the patient was observed, and after a few weeks, the respiratory function tests showed normal values. The hypothesis of the inductive role of viruses of the herpes family in the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was thus substantiated. The patient's immune deficiency covers the HSV2, HHV3, HHV4, HHV5 and HHV6 Ab levels. This led to the control of herpes in the family lineage: indeed, his daughter presented alterations of her serological herpes Ab levels.

  3. Mitochondrial Haplogroups as a Risk Factor for Herpes Zoster

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Rebecca T.; Hulgan, Todd; Kalams, Spyros A.; Fessel, Joshua P.; Samuels, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Herpes zoster, or shingles, is a common, painful reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus infection. Understanding host factors that predispose to herpes zoster may permit development of more effective prevention strategies. Our objective was to examine mitochondrial haplogroups as a potential host factor related to herpes zoster incidence. Methods. Study participants were drawn from BioVU, a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biobank connected to deidentified electronic medical records (EMRs) from Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Our study used 9691 Caucasian individuals with herpes zoster status determined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes 053–053.9. Cases and controls were matched on sex and date of birth within 5 years. Mitochondrial haplogroups were defined from mitochondrial DNA variants genotyped on the Illumina 660W or Illumina Infinium Human-Exome Beadchip. Sex and date of birth were extracted from the EMR. Results. European mitochondrial haplogroup H had a protective association with herpes zoster status (odds ratio [OR] = .82; 95% confidence interval [CI], .71–.94; P = .005), whereas haplogroup clade IWX was a risk factor for herpes zoster status (OR = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.07–1.77; P = .01). Conclusions. Mitochondrial haplogroup influences herpes zoster risk. Knowledge of a patient's mitochondrial haplogroup could allow for a precision approach to the management of herpes zoster risk through vaccination strategies and management of other modifiable risk factors. PMID:27807590

  4. Update on recommendations for use of herpes zoster vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hales, Craig M; Harpaz, Rafael; Ortega-Sanchez, Ismael; Bialek, Stephanie R

    2014-08-22

    Herpes zoster vaccine (Zostavax [Merck & Co., Inc.]) was licensed in 2006 and recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) in 2008 for prevention of herpes zoster (shingles) and its complications among adults aged ≥60 years. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of Zostavax in 2011 for adults aged 50 through 59 years based on a large study of safety and efficacy in this age group. ACIP initially considered the use of herpes zoster vaccine among adults aged 50 through 59 years in June 2011, but declined to recommend the vaccine in this age group, citing shortages of Zostavax and limited data on long-term protection afforded by herpes zoster vaccine. In October 2013, ACIP reviewed the epidemiology of herpes zoster and its complications, herpes zoster vaccine supply, short-term vaccine efficacy in adults aged 50 through 59 years, short- and long- term vaccine efficacy and effectiveness in adults aged ≥60 years, an updated cost-effectiveness analysis, and deliberations of the ACIP herpes zoster work group, all of which are summarized in this report. No vote was taken, and ACIP maintained its current recommendation that herpes zoster vaccine be routinely recommended for adults aged ≥60 years. Meeting minutes are available at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/acip/meetings/meetings-info.html.

  5. Mitochondrial Haplogroups as a Risk Factor for Herpes Zoster.

    PubMed

    Levinson, Rebecca T; Hulgan, Todd; Kalams, Spyros A; Fessel, Joshua P; Samuels, David C

    2016-10-01

    Background.  Herpes zoster, or shingles, is a common, painful reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus infection. Understanding host factors that predispose to herpes zoster may permit development of more effective prevention strategies. Our objective was to examine mitochondrial haplogroups as a potential host factor related to herpes zoster incidence. Methods.  Study participants were drawn from BioVU, a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biobank connected to deidentified electronic medical records (EMRs) from Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Our study used 9691 Caucasian individuals with herpes zoster status determined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes 053-053.9. Cases and controls were matched on sex and date of birth within 5 years. Mitochondrial haplogroups were defined from mitochondrial DNA variants genotyped on the Illumina 660W or Illumina Infinium Human-Exome Beadchip. Sex and date of birth were extracted from the EMR. Results.  European mitochondrial haplogroup H had a protective association with herpes zoster status (odds ratio [OR] = .82; 95% confidence interval [CI], .71-.94; P = .005), whereas haplogroup clade IWX was a risk factor for herpes zoster status (OR = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.07-1.77; P = .01). Conclusions.  Mitochondrial haplogroup influences herpes zoster risk. Knowledge of a patient's mitochondrial haplogroup could allow for a precision approach to the management of herpes zoster risk through vaccination strategies and management of other modifiable risk factors.

  6. [Clinical presentations of Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus (diagnosis and therapy)].

    PubMed

    Chernakova, G M; Kleshcheva, E A; Semenova, T B

    Approximately a quarter of the world's population at some point in life is at risk of developing shingles (Herpes Zoster). In 10-20% of cases the first branch of the trigeminal nerve gets involved (Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus, HZO). Ophthalmic complications of HZO are able to cause a significant reduction in visual function.

  7. Genital herpes and its treatment in relation to preterm delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, De-Kun; Raebel, Marsha A; Cheetham, T Craig; Hansen, Craig; Avalos, Lyndsay; Chen, Hong; Davis, Robert

    2014-12-01

    To examine the risks of genital herpes and antiherpes treatment during pregnancy in relation to preterm delivery (PTD), we conducted a multicenter, member-based cohort study within 4 Kaiser Permanente regions: northern and southern California, Colorado, and Georgia. The study included 662,913 mother-newborn pairs from 1997 to 2010. Pregnant women were classified into 3 groups based on genital herpes diagnosis and treatment: genital herpes without treatment, genital herpes with antiherpes treatment, and no herpes diagnosis or treatment (unexposed controls). After controlling for potential confounders, we found that compared with being unexposed, having untreated genital herpes during first or second trimester was associated with more than double the risk of PTD (odds ratio (OR) = 2.23, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.80, 2.76). The association was stronger for PTD due to premature rupture of membrane (OR = 3.57, 95% CI: 2.53, 5.06) and for early PTD (≤35 weeks gestation) (OR = 2.87, 95% CI: 2.22, 3.71). In contrast, undergoing antiherpes treatment during pregnancy was associated with a lower risk of PTD compared with not being treated, and the PTD risk was similar to that observed in the unexposed controls (OR = 1.11, 95% CI: 0.89, 1.38). The present study revealed increased risk of PTD associated with genital herpes infection if left untreated and a potential benefit of antiherpes medications in mitigating the effect of genital herpes infection on the risk of PTD.

  8. A case of late herpes simplex encephalitis relapse.

    PubMed

    Rigamonti, Andrea; Lauria, Giuseppe; Mantero, Vittorio; Salmaggi, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Late relapse of herpes simplex encephalitis, defined as recurrence more than 3 months after the first initial encephalitic episode, is a rare condition. We describe the case of an adult patient who presented a relapse of herpes simplex encephalitis 8 years after the first episode occurred at the age of 57 years and review the literature of this topic.

  9. Management of oral and genital herpes in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Mell, Howard K

    2008-05-01

    The epidemiology of oral and genital herpes has dramatically changed over the past decade. Herpes simplex virus-1, traditionally associated with oral herpes, is now implicated in an increasing percentage of genital herpes cases. The possibility of "autoinoculation" (or self-infection) of anatomic sites other than that of the primary infection has been recognized. New methods of suppression therapy are being examined. These changes have led to a revision in the recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This review discusses herpes infections of the oral and genital mucosa and the suggested approach to the infected patient who presents in the emergency department. Specific attention is given to the CDC's 2006 guidelines for the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases.

  10. Genital herpes testing among persons living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Mark, Hayley D; Lucea, Marguerite; Nanda, Joy P; Farley, Jason E; Gilbert, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This cross-sectional survey explored the frequency of genital herpes testing among 110 people living with HIV (PLWH) and reported barriers and facilitators related to testing. Forty-four percent of the respondents had not been tested for genital herpes since receiving an HIV diagnosis, 34% had been tested, and 22% preferred not to say. Respondents' most frequently cited factors affecting a decision to not be tested were: (a) testing not being recommended by a provider, (b) not having herpes symptoms, and (c) not thinking they had herpes. Data from this study indicated that PLWH were not frequently tested for genital herpes; there was a limited understanding of the frequently subclinical nature of infection; and provider recommendations for testing, or lack thereof, affected testing decisions.

  11. Status of prophylactic and therapeutic genital herpes vaccines.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Sita; Friedman, Harvey M

    2014-06-01

    A half billion people have genital herpes infections worldwide. Approximately one-fifth of American women between ages 14 and 49 are HSV-2 seropositive. The development of an effective genital herpes vaccine is a global health necessity based on the mental anguish genital herpes causes for some individuals, the fact that pregnant women with genital herpes risk transmitting infection to their newborn children, and the observation that HSV-2 infection is associated with a 3-fold to 4-fold increased probability of HIV acquisition. We review the strengths and limitations of preclinical animal models used to assess genital herpes vaccine candidates and the goals of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. We also discuss the current pipeline of vaccine candidates and lessons learned from past clinical trials that serve as a stimulus for new strategies, study designs and endpoint determinations.

  12. Herpes simplex virus and the alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Eric A; Coyle, Walter J

    2008-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is well known as a sexually transmitted disease. However, relatively little has been published concerning the presentations and treatment of HSV infection within the gastrointestinal tract, where HSV most commonly affects the esophagus in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. HSV proctitis is not uncommon and occurs primarily in males having sex with males. In patients with normal immune systems, gastrointestinal HSV infections are generally self-limited and rarely require antiviral therapy. Treatment of infection is suggested for immunocompromised patients, though no large randomized controlled trials have been performed. This article reviews the manifestations of HSV infection within the luminal gastrointestinal tract and options for diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Herpes simplex encephalitis: some interesting presentations.

    PubMed

    Jha, S; Jose, M; Kumar, V

    2003-09-01

    Herpes Simplex Encephalitis (HSE) is the most common cause of fatal viral encephalitis. A high index of suspicion is mandatory for early diagnosis and successful therapy to restrict morbidity and mortality. We report 4 patients of HSE, with interesting presentations, viz. brainstem involvement in an immunosuppressed patient, Kluver-Bucy Syndrome-a consequence of untreated HSE, HSE in the postpartum period mistaken as cortical venous thrombosis, and response to inadequate treatment. They demonstrate the wide spectrum of clinical features, pitfalls in diagnosis, and a variable response to therapy in HSE.

  14. Update on oral herpes virus infections.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Ramesh; Kuperstein, Arthur S; Stoopler, Eric T

    2014-04-01

    Oral herpes virus infections (OHVIs) are among the most common mucosal disorders encountered by oral health care providers. These infections can affect individuals at any age, from infants to the elderly, and may cause significant pain and dysfunction. Immunosuppressed patients may be at increased risk for serious and potential life-threatening complications caused by OHVIs. Clinicians may have difficulty in diagnosing these infections because they can mimic other conditions of the oral mucosa. This article provides oral health care providers with clinically relevant information regarding etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of OHVIs.

  15. Behaviour disturbances during recovery from herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, R; Bhalla, A; Gordon, A; Roberts, J

    1983-01-01

    Bizarre behaviour disturbances in four patients occurring during incomplete recovery from herpes simplex encephalitis are described. Some aspects of their behaviour were similar to that originally described by Klüver and Bucy in monkeys following bilateral temporal lobectomy. Previous reports of behavioural disturbances in man after herpes simplex encephalitis are reviewed and attention drawn to the aggressive and disruptive behaviour that is often seen. With the reduced mortality in herpes simplex encephalitis in recent years it is possible that behaviour disturbances such as those described here will be seen more frequently. Images PMID:6619889

  16. Primary herpes simplex virus infection mimicking cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Tomkins, Andrew; White, Catherine; Higgins, Stephen Peter

    2015-06-02

    We report the case of an 18-year-old woman presenting with ulceration of the cervix caused by primary type 2 herpes simplex infection in the absence of skin lesions. The differential diagnosis included cervical cancer and we referred the patient for urgent colposcopy. However, laboratory tests proved the viral aetiology of the cervical ulceration and the cervix had healed completely 3 weeks later. The case highlights the need to consider herpes simplex infection in the differential diagnosis of ulceration of the cervix even when there are no cutaneous signs of herpes.

  17. [The lysate and recombinant antigens in ELISA-test-systems for diagnostic of herpes simplex].

    PubMed

    Ganova, L A; Kovtoniuk, G V; Korshun, L N; Kiseleva, E K; Tereshchenko, M I; Vudmaska, M I; Moĭsa, L N; Shevchuk, V A; Spivak, N Ia

    2014-08-01

    The lysate and recombinant antigens of various production included informula of ELISA-test-systems were analyzed. The ELISA-test-systems are used for detection of IgG to Herpes simplex virus type I and II. For testing the panel of serums PTH 201 (BBI Inc.) were used. The samples of this panel contain antibodies to Herpes simplex virus type I and II in mixed titers. The 69 serums of donors were used too (17 samples had IgG to Herpes simplex virus type I, 23 samples to Herpes simplex virus type II and 29 samples had no antibodies to Herpes simplex virus). The diagnostic capacity of mixture of recombinant antigens gG1 Herpes simplex virus type I and gG2 Herpes simplex virus type II (The research-and-production complex "DiaprofMed") was comparable with mixture of lysate antigen Herpes simplex virus type I and II (Membrane) EIE Antigen ("Virion Ltd."). In the test-systems for differentiation of IgG to Herpes simplex virus type I the recombinant antigen gG1 Herpes simplex virus type I proved to be comparable with commercial analogue Herpes simplex virus-1 gG1M ("Viral Therapeutics Inc."'). At the same time, capacity to detect IgG to Herpes simplex virus type II in recombinant protein gG2 Herpes simplex virus type II is significantly higher than in its analogue Herpes simplex virus-2 gG2c ("Viral Therapeutics Inc.").

  18. Vaccinia Virus Recombinant Expressing Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Glycoprotein D Prevents Latent Herpes in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Kenneth J.; Mackett, Michael; Wohlenberg, Charles; Notkins, Abner Louis; Moss, Bernard

    1985-05-01

    In humans, herpes simplex virus causes a primary infection and then often a latent ganglionic infection that persists for life. Because these latent infections can recur periodically, vaccines are needed that can protect against both primary and latent herpes simplex infections. Infectious vaccinia virus recombinants that contain the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D gene under control of defined early or late vaccinia virus promoters were constructed. Tissue culture cells infected with these recombinant viruses synthesized a glycosylated protein that had the same mass (60,000 daltons) as the glycoprotein D produced by HSV-1. Immunization of mice with one of these recombinant viruses by intradermal, subcutaneous, or intraperitoneal routes resulted in the production of antibodies that neutralized HSV-1 and protected the mice against subsequent lethal challenge with HSV-1 or HSV-2. Immunization with the recombinant virus also protected the majority of the mice against the development of a latent HSV-1 infection of the trigeminal ganglia. This is the first demonstration that a genetically engineered vaccine can prevent the development of latency.

  19. Study Casts Doubt on A Brain Cancer's Link to Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... between a common type of herpes virus and aggressive brain cancers, according to a new study that ... researchers analyzed tumor tissue from 125 patients with aggressive brain cancers called gliomas. Ninety-nine of the ...

  20. Herpes zoster on the face in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Preeti; Gharote, Harshkant; Singh, Pooja; Jain-Choudhary, Palak

    2014-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a localised disease caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster virus that enters the cutaneous nerve endings during an earlier episode of chicken pox, travels to the dorsal root ganglia, and remains in latent form. The condition is characterised by occurrence of multiple, painful, unilateral vesicles and ulceration, and shows a typical single dermatome innervated by single dorsal root or cranial sensory ganglion. Involvement of three or more dermatomes is known as disseminated zoster and seen in immunocompromised individuals. Complications of herpes zoster include ocular sequelae, bacterial superinfection of the lesions, meningoencephalitis and postherpetic neuralgia. The incidence of herpes zoster increases with age and immunosuppression, therefore prompt management is necessary to avoid morbidity and mortality in these individuals. We present two case reports of herpes zoster, one involving the maxillary and mandibular branches of the trigeminal nerve while the other involves all branches of the trigeminal nerve. PMID:25331144

  1. Can You Get Genital Herpes from a Cold Sore?

    MedlinePlus

    ... during any type of sex (oral, vaginal, or anal). Girls should have their partners use a dental_ ... BC Date reviewed: January 2015 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Genital Herpes ...

  2. Multiplex PCR for identification of herpes virus infections in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Durzyńska, Julia; Pacholska-Bogalska, Joanna; Kaczmarek, Maria; Hanć, Tomasz; Durda, Magdalena; Skrzypczak, Magdalena; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a multiplex PCR (mPCR) for a rapid and simultaneous detection of herpes simplex 1 (HSV-1), herpes simplex 2 (HSV-2), and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA in squamous oral cells obtained from adolescents. Accuracy of the method was tested in a group of 513 adolescents, almost 11% of subjects were positive for infection with herpes viruses. Correlations with gender, age, and place of residence were sought. A similar incidence of HSV-2 and HCMV was found (4.3% and 5.4%, respectively) and the incidence of HSV-1 was the lowest (1%) in the study group. Conversely to HSV-2, HCMV was detected mostly in the youngest individuals. The same occurrence of all viruses was observed in boys and girls. The mPCR method described is suggested as a useful tool for epidemiologic studies of active herpes infections.

  3. Maternal herpes labialis in pregnancy and neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Nørgård, Bente; Nørgaard, Mette; Czeizel, Andrew E; Puhó, Erzsébet; Sørensen, Henrik T

    2006-08-01

    According to previous case reports, some congenital abnormalities (CAs) of the brain, such as microcephaly, are a result of intrauterine herpes simplex virus infection. A population-based case-control study was conducted to determine the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) after maternal herpes labialis infection during pregnancy. Data were taken from the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities from 1980 to 1996, which included 1202 children with NTDs and 21641 comparison children with CAs other than NTDs. The adjusted relative risks (odds ratio [OR]) for NTDs associated with maternal herpes labialis in the first trimester of pregnancy was OR 1.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.68-2.06), and in the entire pregnancy was OR 0.94 (95% CI 0.61-1.44). Self-reported maternal herpes labialis during pregnancy was not associated with a substantially increased risk of NTDs in infants.

  4. Herpes zoster on the face in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Nair, Preeti; Gharote, Harshkant; Singh, Pooja; Jain-Choudhary, Palak

    2014-10-19

    Herpes zoster is a localised disease caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster virus that enters the cutaneous nerve endings during an earlier episode of chicken pox, travels to the dorsal root ganglia, and remains in latent form. The condition is characterised by occurrence of multiple, painful, unilateral vesicles and ulceration, and shows a typical single dermatome innervated by single dorsal root or cranial sensory ganglion. Involvement of three or more dermatomes is known as disseminated zoster and seen in immunocompromised individuals. Complications of herpes zoster include ocular sequelae, bacterial superinfection of the lesions, meningoencephalitis and postherpetic neuralgia. The incidence of herpes zoster increases with age and immunosuppression, therefore prompt management is necessary to avoid morbidity and mortality in these individuals. We present two case reports of herpes zoster, one involving the maxillary and mandibular branches of the trigeminal nerve while the other involves all branches of the trigeminal nerve.

  5. AIDS and Herpes Carry Weighty Policy Implications for Your Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Kathleen

    1985-01-01

    Few schools have policies to deal specifically with herpes and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Discusses some schools and states that have developed such policies and includes a source list for more information. (MD)

  6. Fatal Neonatal Herpes Simplex Infection Likely from Unrecognized Breast Lesions.

    PubMed

    Field, Scott S

    2016-02-01

    Type 1 herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) is very prevalent yet in rare circumstances can lead to fatal neonatal disease. Genital acquisition of type 2 HSV is the usual mode for neonatal herpes, but HSV-1 transmission by genital or extragenital means may result in greater mortality rates. A very rare scenario is presented in which the mode of transmission was likely through breast lesions. The lesions were seen by nurses as well as the lactation consultant and obstetrician in the hospital after delivery of the affected baby but not recognized as possibly being caused by herpes. The baby died 9 days after birth with hepatic failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Peripartum health care workers need to be aware of potential nongenital (including from the breast[s]) neonatal herpes acquisition, which can be lethal.

  7. Herpes simplex infection of the larynx requiring laryngectomy.

    PubMed

    Sims, John R; Massoll, Nicole A; Suen, James Y

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus infection of the larynx is an exceedingly rare clinical entity, most frequently reported in the pediatric population or in immunocompromised adults. We present a 62-year-old woman presented with neck pain, hoarseness, crepitus over the larynx, and what appeared to be a necrotic mass of the right true vocal cord on laryngoscopy. Due to near-complete destruction of the cartilaginous framework of the larynx, a total laryngectomy was performed. The final pathology report showed squamous mucosal changes consistent with herpes simplex infection, confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. Though herpes simplex laryngitis is uncommon, this case shows the potential for herpes simplex to cause extensive damage and compromise airway patency when left untreated.

  8. Localized Eruptive Blue Nevi after Herpes Zoster

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Fany; Arrese, Jorge E.; Nikkels, Arjen F.

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old White man presented with a dozen small, well-restricted, punctiform, asymptomatic, blue-gray macules on the left shoulder. A few months earlier, he had been treated with oral acyclovir for herpes zoster (HZ) affecting the left C7–C8 dermatomes. All the blue macules appeared over a short period of time and then remained stable. The patient had not experienced any previous trauma or had tattooing in this anatomical region. The clinical diagnosis suggested blue nevi. Dermatoscopy revealed small, well-limited, dark-blue, compact, homogeneous areas evoking dermal blue nevi. An excisional biopsy was performed and the histological examination confirmed a blue nevus. As far as we are aware of, this is the first report of eruptive blue nevi following HZ, and it should be included in the differential diagnosis of zosteriform dermatoses responding to an isotopic pathway. In addition, a brief review concerning eruptive nevi is presented. PMID:27462219

  9. [Herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Hashizume, K

    2001-09-01

    Pain associated with herpes zoster arise from the virul neuritis of the suffered trigeminal or spinal dorsal ganglion. Prolonged neuritis makes an irreversible nerve injury and continuous pain impulse develops a central sensitization. A post-herpetic neuralgia is thought to be a neuropathic pain due to the irreversible nerve injury and sensitization. It is important to treat herpetic pain completely before the development of the post-herpetic neuralgia, because there are few effective therapies to cure post-herpetic neuralgia. A sympathetic nerve block increases the nerve blood flow supply, and may improve the nerve injury. It is also known that some sympathetic mechanisms relate to the development of the sensitization. A sensory nerve block reduces pain impulse to the dorsal horn, and may interfere the sensitization. A cortico-steroid administrated with a nerve block can reduce the neuritis, and may improve the nerve injury.

  10. Herpes zoster developing within recent subciliary incision scar.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hwan Jun; Kim, Jun Hyuk; Lee, Young Man

    2012-05-01

    Herpes zoster is a common dermatologic disease characterized by unilateral pain and vesicular lesions over the unilateral sensory dermatomes being caused by the reactivation of varicella zoster virus, and its incidence seems to be increasing recently. In case of involving the ganglion of the fifth cranial nerve (trigeminal nerve), it can descend down the affected nerve into the skin, then producing an eruption in the dermatome. Among the patients with this disease, about 40% to 50% had associated conditions such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, pulmonary tuberculosis, liver diseases, peptic ulcer, hypothyroidism, or pharyngitis but rarely facial trauma. Generally, herpes zoster was commonly associated with systemic disorders, and the treatment duration was prolonged in associated diseases. However, herpes zoster occurring specifically at the site of previously traumatized facial bone has not yet been reported. Retrospective study of 1 case of herpes zoster with blow-out fracture, which had been treated with acyclovir and steroid, was done. Follow-up length was about 3 months. After treatment, the patient became stable, and there was no complication. We treated herpes zoster developing within a recent operative subciliary scar, and the case is presented with the review of literature. Finally, facial trauma or reconstruction of the orbital floor with alloplastic implant might be a risk factor for herpes zoster in traumatized patient.

  11. Association between recent herpes zoster but not herpes simplex infection and subsequent risk of malignancy in women: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Buntinx, F; Bartholomeeusen, S; Belmans, A; Mathei, C; Opdenakker, G; Sweldens, K; Truyers, C; Van Ranst, M

    2014-05-01

    The association between herpes zoster and subsequent cancer risk is still unclear. Consequently, doubts remain regarding the need for investigation of herpes patients for co-existing or subsequent malignancy. This is a retrospective cohort study comparing cancer risk in patients after herpes zoster and age-/sex-matched non-herpes zoster patients, in a primary care-based continuous morbidity database. We tested for interaction by gender, age, diabetes, HRT use or antiviral therapy. Analyses were repeated for patients with and without herpes simplex. The hazard ratio (HR) comparing cancer risk in herpes zoster vs. control patients was significant in all women, women aged > 65 years and subgroups of breast and colorectal cancer (HRs 1·60, 1·82, 2·14, 2·19, respectively). For men, a significant association was found for haematological cancers (HR 2·92). No associations were found with herpes simplex. No interaction was identified with antiviral therapy, diabetes or HRT treatment. We concluded that there was a moderate significant association between herpes zoster and subsequent cancer risk in women aged > 65 years, without any influence of antiviral therapy. No association was found with herpes simplex. There is insufficient reason for extensively testing older patients with herpes zoster or herpes simplex for the presence of occult cancer.

  12. 75 FR 59611 - Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 Serological Assays...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 Serological Assays; Confirmation of Effective Date AGENCY: Food and... corrects the regulation classifying herpes simplex virus (HSV) serological assays by removing the...

  13. Genital Herpes - Initial Visits to Physicians' Offices, United States, 1966-2012

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data & Statistics Sexually Transmitted Diseases Figure 48. Genital Herpes — Initial Visits to Physicians’ Offices, United States, 1966 – ... page . NOTE : The relative standard errors for genital herpes estimates of more than 100,000 range from ...

  14. Pediatric herpes simplex virus infections: an evidence-based approach to treatment.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Jennifer E; Garcia, Sylvia E

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus is a common virus that causes a variety of clinical presentations ranging from mild to life-threatening. Orolabial and genital herpes are common disorders that can often be managed in an outpatient setting; however, some patients do present to the emergency department with those conditions, and emergency clinicians should be aware of possible complications in the pediatric population. Neonatal herpes is a rare disorder, but prompt recognition and initiation of antiviral therapy is imperative, as the morbidity and mortality of the disease is high. Herpes encephalitis is an emergency that also requires a high index of suspicion to diagnose. Herpes simplex virus is also responsible for a variety of other clinical presentations, including herpes gladiatorum, herpetic whitlow, eczema herpeticum, and ocular herpes. This issue reviews the common clinical presentations of the herpes simplex virus, the life-threatening infections that require expedient identification and management, and recommended treatment regimens.

  15. Treatment of mucocutaneous presentations of herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Nikkels, Arjen F; Pièrard, Gérald E

    2002-01-01

    Infections by herpes simplex virus (HSV) types I and II are diverse and quite frequent. After primary infection, the virus establishes a life-long latency in the sensory ganglia and recrudescences may occur at an unpredictable rate. Recurrent labial and genital herpes infections represent the majority of clinical manifestations of HSV infections. Their management is currently well established using evidence-based medicine data. Primary labial herpes is generally not treated with antivirals in otherwise healthy children, although intravenous aciclovir may be offered in severe primary infections, particularly in the immunocompromised patient. The decision whether or not to treat recurrent labial herpes should be evaluated individually and depends on the frequency and severity of relapses, the impairment of the quality of life, and the cost of therapy. Patients with mild disease may benefit from topical therapy, and those with severe and frequent recurrences may be considered for intermittent or long-term oral antiviral therapy. Primary genital herpes is treated with oral or intravenous antivirals, depending on the severity of the infection and associated symptoms. Recurrent genital herpes can be managed with episodic short courses of oral antivirals in patients whose recurrences are moderate to severe and rare, and have a clear prodrome. Patients with >5 episodes/year, severe recurrences or unrecognisable prodromes may be best managed with long-term suppressive antiviral prophylaxis. HSV is also responsible for a variety of other clinical manifestations, including herpetic whitlow, neonatal infection, disseminated and atypical cutaneous infections, traumatic herpes, eczema herpeticum, and HSV-associated erythema multiforme. HSV infection may also represent a complication following cosmetic procedures of the oro-facial region, surgical and dental interventions, sun exposure and burns. Precise treatment guidelines for these HSV infections are not firmly established.

  16. Focused review: neuraxial morphine and oral herpes reactivation in the obstetric population.

    PubMed

    Bauchat, Jeanette R

    2010-11-01

    Neuraxial morphine administration is a common strategy for providing postcesarean delivery analgesia. Morphine delivered via this route increases the risk of herpes labialis (oral herpes) reactivation, a disease common in women of childbearing age. A primary concern is risk of transmission to the neonate from maternal reactivation. The benefits to the mother of this form of analgesia outweigh the risk of neonatal herpes acquired postpartum from maternal recurrence because serious neonatal morbidity from recurrent herpes has not been described.

  17. Engineered Herpes Simplex Viruses for the Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0498 TITLE: Engineered Herpes Simplex Viruses for the...August 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Engineered Herpes Simplex Viruses for the Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...for each blot. Glyco-protein D is produced at extraordinarily high levels by our herpes simplex virus, and thus, it is quite common in herpes simplex

  18. Latent Herpes Viruses Reactivation in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Satish K.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2008-01-01

    Space flight has many adverse effects on human physiology. Changes in multiple systems, including the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, neurovestibular, endocrine, and immune systems have occurred (12, 32, 38, 39). Alterations in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (12), nutritional needs (31), renal stone formation (40), and microbial flora (2) have also been reported. Evidence suggests that the magnitude of some changes may increase with time in space. A variety of changes in immunity have been reported during both short (.16 days) and long (>30 days) space missions. However, it is difficult to determine the medical significance of these immunological changes in astronauts. Astronauts are in excellent health and in superb physical condition. Illnesses in astronauts during space flight are not common, are generally mild, and rarely affect mission objectives. In an attempt to clarify this issue, we identified the latent herpes viruses as medically important indicators of the effects of space flight on immunity. This chapter demonstrates that space flight leads to asymptomatic reactivation of latent herpes viruses, and proposes that this results from marked changes in neuroendocrine function and immunity caused by the inherent stressfullness of human space flight. Astronauts experience uniquely stressful environments during space flight. Potential stressors include confinement in an unfamiliar, crowded environment, isolation, separation from family, anxiety, fear, sleep deprivation, psychosocial issues, physical exertion, noise, variable acceleration forces, increased radiation, and others. Many of these are intermittent and variable in duration and intensity, but variable gravity forces (including transitions from launch acceleration to microgravity and from microgravity to planetary gravity) and variable radiation levels are part of each mission and contribute to a stressful environment that cannot be duplicated on Earth. Radiation outside the Earth

  19. Bell's Palsy and Herpes Zoster Oticus.

    PubMed

    Morrow

    2000-09-01

    Normal facial movement is required for chewing, swallowing, speaking, and protecting the eye. Bell's palsy causes most cases of acute, unilateral facial palsy; infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 may be its major cause. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation (Ramsay Hunt syndrome) is less common, but may appear without skin lesions in a form indistinguishable from Bell's palsy. Symptoms improve in nearly all patients with Bell's palsy, and most patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome, but many are left with functional and cosmetic deficits. Steroids are frequently used to optimize outcomes in Bell's palsy, but proof of their effectiveness is marginal. Oral prednisone has been studied extensively, although some reports have suggested a higher recovery rate with intravenous steroids. Given the existing data, we support the use of oral prednisone in those patients with complete facial palsy, and no contraindications to their use (Fig. 1). In this author's opinion, the greatly increased cost and inconvenience of intravenous steroids cannot be justified by the data available. Antiviral agents may also be effective in treatment of Bell's palsy; HSV is susceptible to acyclovir and related agents. There have been few investigations of acyclovir treatment in Bell's palsy, but one controlled study showed added benefit when the drug was used with prednisone. The risk and cost of acyclovir is low enough that we support its use, with oral steroids, in those patients with complete facial paralysis. Several small studies have implied that oral acyclovir improves the outcome of facial palsy for patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Although these studies do not prove efficacy, evidence for the benefits of antiviral agents in other forms of zoster is strong enough to recommend their use when the facial nerve is involved. VZV is less sensitive to acyclovir than HSV, so higher doses are recommended to treat Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Because some Ramsay Hunt syndrome patients

  20. Case report: symptomatic oral herpes simplex virus type 2 and asymptomatic genital shedding.

    PubMed

    Olin, Laura; Wald, Anna

    2006-05-01

    A 42-year-old bisexual man with a history of recurrent oral herpes and no history of genital herpes was noted to have antibody to herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) only. During a symptomatic oral recurrence, HSV-2 was found in a perioral lesion as well as in the genital area.

  1. 76 FR 48715 - Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of the Herpes Simplex Virus Serological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ...; Reclassification of the Herpes Simplex Virus Serological Assay Device AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... the herpes simplex virus (HSV) serological assay device type, which is classified as class II (special... tests to identify antibodies to herpes simplex virus in serum, and the devices that consist of...

  2. 75 FR 59670 - Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of the Herpes Simplex Virus Serological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ...; Reclassification of the Herpes Simplex Virus Serological Assay Device AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... controls for the herpes simplex virus (HSV) serological assay device type, which is classified as class II... serological tests to identify antibodies to herpes simplex virus in serum, and the devices that consist...

  3. Diaphragmatic paralysis associated with herpes zoster and HIV-tuberculosis co-infection.

    PubMed

    Benabdellah, A; Souhil, Touati; Farouk, Zaoui Omar

    2014-08-01

    Motor complications after herpes zoster are not uncommon. There have been reports of muscular paralysis following herpes zoster. The association between diaphragmatic paralysis and zoster was first reported in 1949 by Halpern. The case presented below showed diaphragmatic involvement following herpes zoster in a HIV-tuberculosis coinfected patient.

  4. Investigation of a sub-unit vaccine using an animal model of herpes simplex keratitis.

    PubMed

    Harney, B A; Easty, D L; Skinner, G R

    1983-01-01

    A rabbit and a mouse model of herpes simplex eye disease have been used to evaluate a sub-unit herpes simplex vaccine. Various immunization schedules were investigated. The vaccine was found to stimulate humoral and cellular immune responses and to offer protection against corneal infection with liver herpes simplex virus.

  5. Emerging therapies for herpes viral infections (types 1 - 8).

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Arun; Pang, Katie R; Wu, Jashin J; Narvaez, Julio; Rauser, Michael; Huang, David B; Beutner, Karl R; Tyring, Stephen K

    2004-11-01

    There are eight members of the herpesviridae family: herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), HSV-2, varicella-zoster virus, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, human herpes virus-6, human herpes virus-7 and human herpes virus-8. The diseases caused by viruses of the herpesviridae family are treated with and managed by systemic and topical antiviral therapies and immunomodulating drugs. Because these viruses establish a latent state in hosts, antiherpetic agents, such as nucleoside analogues, only control symptoms of disease or prevent outbreaks, and cannot cure the infections. There is a need for treatments that require less frequent dosing, can be taken even when lesions are more advanced than the first signs or symptoms, and can treat resistant strains of the viruses without the toxicities of existing therapies. Immunomodulating agents, such as resiquimod, can act on the viruses indirectly by inducing host production of cytokines, and can thereby reduce recurrences of herpes. The new helicase primase inhibitors, which are the first non-nucleoside antiviral compounds, are being investigated for treatment of HSV disease, including infections resistant to existing therapy.

  6. THE PATHOGENESIS OF HERPES VIRUS ENCEPHALITIS

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Richard T.

    1964-01-01

    The pathogenesis of herpes simplex virus encephalitis and myelitis was studied in suckling mice using routine titration procedures and fluorescent antibody staining for the identification of infected cells. After intracerebral inoculation virus was shown to disperse rapidly in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), multiply in meninges and ependyma, and then invade the underlying parenchyma infecting both neurons and glia. Following extraneural inoculation virus gained access to the central nervous system (CNS) by both hematogenous and neural pathways. After intraperitoneal and intranasal inoculation virus was found to multiply in viscera and produce viremia; foci of CNS infection then developed around small cerebral vessels. After subcutaneous and intranasal inoculation neural spread of virus was demonstrated along corresponding peripheral and cranial nerves. This spread resulted from the centripetal infection of endoneural cells (Schwann cells and fibroblasts). Antigen was not found in axons even after infection of the corresponding ganglion cell perikaryon. Subsequent spread within the CNS was unrelated to neural tracts, and there was no evidence of axonal spread of virus in the host-virus system studied. These findings are discussed in relation to previous and current theories of the viral "blood-brain barrier" and neural pathways of infection. PMID:14164487

  7. Fulminant herpes hepatitis mimicking hepatic abscesses.

    PubMed

    Wolfsen, H C; Bolen, J W; Bowen, J L; Fenster, L F

    1993-01-01

    Fulminant hepatitis due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) in adults is a rare and deadly disease. We describe a 23-year-old woman with a 20-year history of Crohn's disease (CD) who was hospitalized with an acute febrile illness and diarrhea. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen demonstrated an intramural sigmoid colon abscess and multiple abscesses in the liver. Despite high-dose parenteral corticosteroids and broad-spectrum antibiotics, the patient remained acutely ill, with high fever and markedly elevated serum transaminase levels, but no jaundice. Sigmoid resection and wedge liver biopsy were performed at laparotomy. Histologic examination documented HSV-type intranuclear inclusions and inflammation with necrosis in both the sigmoid colon and liver specimens. The patient subsequently died despite parenteral acyclovir treatment. Although rare, fulminant hepatitis due to HSV simplex virus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with severe hepatitis. Of special note, the necrotizing liver lesions may be mistaken for pyogenic abscesses on CT scan.

  8. Incidence of herpes zoster, 1997-2002.

    PubMed Central

    Mullooly, J. P.; Riedlinger, K.; Chun, C.; Weinmann, S.; Houston, H.

    2005-01-01

    We estimated age-specific herpes zoster (HZ) incidence rates in the Kaiser Permanente Northwest Health Plan (KPNW) during 1997-2002 and tested for secular trends and differences between residents of two states with different varicella vaccine coverage rates. The cumulative proportions of 2-year-olds vaccinated increased from 35% in 1997 to 85% in 2002 in Oregon, and from 25% in 1997 to 82% in 2002 in Washington. Age-specific HZ incidence rates in KPNW during 1997-2002 were compared with published rates in the Harvard Community Health Plan (HCHP) during 1990-1992. The overall HZ incidence rate in KPNW during 1997-2002 (369/100,000 person-years) was slightly higher than HCHP's 1990-1992 rate when adjusted for age differences. For children 6-14 years old, KPNW's rates (182 for females, 123 for males) were more than three times HCHP's rates (54 for females, 39 for males). This increase appears to be associated with increased exposure of children to oral corticosteroids. The percentage of KPNW children exposed to oral corticosteroids increased from 2.2% in 1991 to 3.6% in 2002. Oregon residents had slightly higher steroid exposure rates during 1997-2002 than Washington residents. There were significant increases in HZ incidence rates in Oregon and Washington during 1997-2002 among children aged 10-17 years, associated with increased exposure to oral steroids. PMID:15816149

  9. Vaccines for herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Koelle, David M

    2006-02-01

    Infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2) can have serious medical consequences. Although antiviral medications can suppress symptomatic disease, asymptomatic shedding and transmission, they neither cure nor alter the natural history of HSV infections. Manipulation of the immune response is one potential method to decrease disease burden. Current research on prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination approaches is discussed in this review, with a focus on compounds that have entered clinical trials or that display novel compositions or proposed mechanisms of action. One such vaccine is an alum and monophosphoryl lipid A-adjuvanted subunit glycoprotein D2 vaccine that has demonstrated activity in the prevention of HSV-2 infection and disease in HSV-uninfected women in a phase III clinical trial. Further confirmatory clinical trials of this vaccine are currently underway. Other vaccine formats also in development include attenuated live or replication-incompetent HSV-2 strains and technologies that target virus-specific CD8 T-cell responses.

  10. Peptide inhibitors against herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Galdiero, Stefania; Falanga, Annarita; Tarallo, Rossella; Russo, Luigi; Galdiero, Emilia; Cantisani, Marco; Morelli, Giancarlo; Galdiero, Massimiliano

    2013-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a significant human pathogen causing mucocutaneous lesions primarily in the oral or genital mucosa. Although acyclovir (ACV) and related nucleoside analogs provide successful treatment, HSV remains highly prevalent worldwide and is a major cofactor for the spread of human immunodeficiency virus. Encephalitis, meningitis, and blinding keratitis are among the most severe diseases caused by HSV. ACV resistance poses an important problem for immunocompromised patients and highlights the need for new safe and effective agents; therefore, the development of novel strategies to eradicate HSV is a global public health priority. Despite the continued global epidemic of HSV and extensive research, there have been few major breakthroughs in the treatment or prevention of the virus since the introduction of ACV in the 1980s. A therapeutic strategy at the moment not fully addressed is the use of small peptide molecules. These can be either modeled on viral proteins or derived from antimicrobial peptides. Any peptide that interrupts protein-protein or viral protein-host cell membrane interactions is potentially a novel antiviral drug and may be a useful tool for elucidating the mechanisms of viral entry. This review summarizes current knowledge and strategies in the development of synthetic and natural peptides to inhibit HSV infectivity.

  11. Experimental investigation of herpes simplex virus latency.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, E K; Bloom, D C

    1997-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of herpes simplex virus infection generally involve a mild and localized primary infection followed by asymptomatic (latent) infection interrupted sporadically by periods of recrudescence (reactivation) where virus replication and associated cytopathologic findings are manifest at the site of initial infection. During the latent phase of infection, viral genomes, but not infectious virus itself, can be detected in sensory and autonomic neurons. The process of latent infection and reactivation has been subject to continuing investigation in animal models and, more recently, in cultured cells. The initiation and maintenance of latent infection in neurons are apparently passive phenomena in that no virus gene products need be expressed or are required. Despite this, a single latency-associated transcript (LAT) encoded by DNA encompassing about 6% of the viral genome is expressed during latent infection in a minority of neurons containing viral DNA. This transcript is spliced, and the intron derived from this splicing is stably maintained in the nucleus of neurons expressing it. Reactivation, which can be induced by stress and assayed in several animal models, is facilitated by the expression of LAT. Although the mechanism of action of LAT-mediated facilitation of reactivation is not clear, all available evidence argues against its involving the expression of a protein. Rather, the most consistent models of action involve LAT expression playing a cis-acting role in a very early stage of the reactivation process. PMID:9227860

  12. Herpes Zoster Duplex Unilateralis: Two Cases and Brief Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jee Hee; Chung, Bo Young; Kim, Hye One; Cho, Hee Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cases involving dermatomal herpes zoster in two or more locations are rare, especially in immunocompetent patients. When two noncontiguous dermatomes are involved, if affected unilaterally, it is called herpes zoster duplex unilateralis; if bilaterally, bilateralis. Here, we report two cases of herpes zoster duplex unilateralis. A 66-year-old man presented with painful erythematous grouped vesicles on his left scalp, forehead, trunk, and back (left [Lt.] V1, Lt. T8). Histologic findings were consistent with herpetic infection. A 33-year-old woman presented with painful erythematous grouped vesicles and crust on her left forehead and neck (Lt. V1, Lt. C5). Both patients were treated with oral administration of famcyclovir 750 mg/day for seven days. PMID:27904277

  13. Common questions about herpes: analysis of chat-room transcripts.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Lisa K; Omisore, Folashade

    2009-01-01

    Patients diagnosed with genital herpes typically undergo a period of psychological adjustment. Although healthcare providers can play a key role in this adjustment, in several patient surveys patients have expressed dissatisfaction with the information and counselling offered by professionals. To address this gap, providers must first identify the common questions and myths that are not addressed, or are addressed inadequately. This article is that first step. Through a content analysis of herpes chat-room transcripts captured on their website from autumn 2001 to spring 2006, researchers from the American Social Health Association identified common herpes questions and myths. The 1968 chat passages were coded into 12 themes and 50 sub-themes. Frequently, visitors' questions concerned transmission, symptoms and diagnosis followed by natural history, psychosocial issues and treatment options. The results of this analysis will aid in the creation of tailored messages to address common factual questions and provide psychosocial support.

  14. Herpes Zoster Immunization in Older Adults Has Big Benefits.

    PubMed

    Breivik, Harald

    2015-09-01

    A case of acute herpes zoster neuralgia (shingles) in a 78-year-old patient is described. The value and importance of immunizing against herpes zoster to decrease the incidence and severity of both acute herpes zoster neuralgia and postherpetic neuralgia are described. --This report is adapted from paineurope 2015: Issue 1, ©Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd., and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International, Ltd., and is distributed free of charge to health care professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be viewed via the Web site: www.paineurope.com , at which health professionals can find links to the original articles and request copies of the quarterly publication and access additional pain education and pain management resources.

  15. [Efficacy of polyprenyl phosphates in the experimental genital herpes model].

    PubMed

    Narovlyansky, A N; Ivanova, A M; Shevlyagina, N V; Didenko, L V; Borovaya, T G; Izmest'eva, A V; Sanin, A V; Pronin, A V; Ershov, F I

    2015-01-01

    An experimental model of the primary genital herpes (herpes simplex type 2, HSV-2) in the female guinea pigs was suggested to study the infectious process activity of polyprenyl phosphates (PPP) and PPP+acyclovir (AC) complex treatment. The morphofunctional features of the guinea pig ovaries were studied in the control and experimental groups (the latter were inoculated with PPP and/or AC as a primary infection treatment) at the stage of the recurrent genital herpes aggravation. It was shown that in the case of combined PPP +AC use significant changes in the disease symptoms were observed, as well as a decrease in the infectious process activity and duration, and positive remote effect on the ovarian morphophysiology.

  16. The challenge of developing a herpes simplex virus 2 vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Dropulic, Lesia K; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2013-01-01

    HSV infections are prevalent worldwide. A vaccine to prevent genital herpes would have a significant impact on this disease. Several vaccines have shown promise in animal models; however, so far these have not been successful in human clinical studies. Prophylactic HSV vaccines to prevent HSV infection or disease have focused primarily on eliciting antibody responses. Potent antibody responses are needed to result in sufficiently high levels of virus-specific antibody in the genital tract. Therapeutic vaccines that reduce recurrences need to induce potent T-cell responses at the site of infection. With the increasing incidence of HSV-1 genital herpes, an effective herpes vaccine should protect against both HSV-1 and HSV-2. Novel HSV vaccines, such as replication-defective or attenuated viruses, have elicited humoral and cellular immune responses in preclinical studies. These vaccines and others hold promise in future clinical studies. PMID:23252387

  17. Herpes simplex virus lymphadenitis: the elusive doppelganger in immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Cases, Margaret; Leduc, Charles; Farmer, Patricia L; Richardson, Susan E; Zoutman, Dick E

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus has protean manifestations and is an important cause of morbidity in the immunocompromised host. We report a case of recurrent lymphadenopathy and rash in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The elusive clinical diagnosis eventually required core biopsy of a lymph node with immunohistochemistry and confirmation by polymerase chain reaction. This case illustrates the challenging clinical and laboratory diagnosis of herpes simplex virus lymphadenitis and the need to maintain a high index of suspicion for infection when treating an immunocompromised patient with unusual and/or persistent symptoms.

  18. Herpes virus infection of the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Israel

    2013-01-01

    Among the human herpes viruses, three are neurotropic and capable of producing severe neurological abnormalities: herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV). Both the acute, primary infection and the reactivation from the site of latent infection, the dorsal sensory ganglia, are associated with severe human morbidity and mortality. The peripheral nervous system is one of the major loci affected by these viruses. The present review details the virology and molecular biology underlying the human infection. This is followed by detailed description of the symtomatology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, course, therapy, and prognosis of disorders of the peripheral nervous system caused by these viruses.

  19. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Complicated by Cerebral Hemorrhage during Acyclovir Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Yukinori; Hara, Yuuta

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) can be complicated by adverse events in the acute phase. We herein present the case of a 71-year-old woman with HSE complicated by cerebral hemorrhage. She presented with acute deterioration of consciousness and fever and was diagnosed with HSE based on the detection of herpes simplex virus-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid by a polymerase chain reaction. The cerebral hemorrhage developed during acyclovir therapy; however, its diagnosis was delayed for 2 days. After the conservative treatment of the cerebral hemorrhage, the patient made a near-complete recovery. Cerebral hemorrhage should be considered as an acute-phase complication of HSE. PMID:28090058

  20. Purpuric herpes zoster in patients in therapy with clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Veraldi, S; Vaira, F; Nazzaro, G

    2015-08-01

    Clopidogrel is an adenosine diphosphate receptor antagonist used for the prevention of vascular events in patients with atherothrombotic diseases manifested by recent myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke or peripheral arterial disease. Diarrhoea, rash and pruritus are rather common side effects of clopidogrel. Other side effects include epistaxis, nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting, gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer. Thrombocytopenia is the most common laboratory abnormality. Leucopenia and neutropenia are rare. We report three cases of purpuric herpes zoster in patients in therapy with clopidogrel. To our knowledge, only one case of haemorrhagic herpes zoster has been published in a patient in therapy with this drug.

  1. Associations between individual and relationship characteristics and genital herpes disclosure.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jaime L; Buhi, Eric R; Marhefka, Stephanie; Daley, Ellen; Dedrick, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Disclosure is often a challenge for individuals living with genital herpes. This study explores determinants of genital herpes disclosure with one's most recent sexual partner using an online questionnaire (n = 93). The majority of participants reported (80.4%) disclosure. Among non-disclosers, fear of negative partner reactions was the primary reason for non-disclosure. Age, relationship commitment, time in relationship, and expectations of partner's reaction were statistically significant predictors at the bivariate level. Reaction expectations and relationship commitment remained significant in the multivariate logistic regression model. Findings indicate that future disclosure research should focus on relationship context and managing negative expectations to increase disclosure.

  2. Herpes zoster-associated acute urinary retention in immunocompetent patient*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Hortense, Juliana

    2014-01-01

    Herpes zoster-associated urinary retention is an uncommon event related to virus infection of the S2-S4 dermatome. The possible major reasons are ipsilateral hemicystitis, neuritis-induced or myelitis-associated virus infection. We report a case of a 65-year-old immunocompetent female patient who presented an acute urinary retention after four days under treatment with valacyclovir for gluteal herpes zoster. The patient had to use a vesical catheter, was treated with antibiotics and corticosteroids and fully recovered after eight weeks. PMID:25387508

  3. Human herpes simplex virus: life cycle and development of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kukhanova, M K; Korovina, A N; Kochetkov, S N

    2014-12-01

    WHO reports that 90% of human population is infected by different types of herpesviruses, which develop latency or cause oral and genital herpes, conjunctivitis, eczema herpeticum, and other diseases. Herpesvirus almost always accompanies HIV-infection and complicates AIDS treatment. Herpes simplex virus type 1 is one of the most wide spread viruses from the Herpesviridae family. HSV virion, genome structure, replication mechanisms, antiherpes drug development strategies, including design of prodrugs, and mutations causing ACV-resistance in clinical HSV isolates are discussed in this review.

  4. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Complicated by Cerebral Hemorrhage during Acyclovir Therapy.

    PubMed

    Harada, Yukinori; Hara, Yuuta

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) can be complicated by adverse events in the acute phase. We herein present the case of a 71-year-old woman with HSE complicated by cerebral hemorrhage. She presented with acute deterioration of consciousness and fever and was diagnosed with HSE based on the detection of herpes simplex virus-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid by a polymerase chain reaction. The cerebral hemorrhage developed during acyclovir therapy; however, its diagnosis was delayed for 2 days. After the conservative treatment of the cerebral hemorrhage, the patient made a near-complete recovery. Cerebral hemorrhage should be considered as an acute-phase complication of HSE.

  5. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infection: epidemiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) are highly prevalent viruses capable of establishing lifelong infection. Genital herpes in women of childbearing age represents a major risk for mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HSV infection, with primary and first-episode genital HSV infections posing the highest risk. The advent of antiviral therapy with parenteral acyclovir has led to significant improvement in neonatal HSV disease mortality. Further studies are needed to improve the clinician's ability to identify infants at increased risk for HSV infection and prevent MTCT, and to develop novel antiviral agents with increased efficacy in infants with HSV infection.

  6. Latent Herpes Viral Reactivation in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Stowe, R.

    2008-01-01

    Latent viruses are ubiquitous and reactivate during stressful periods with and without symptoms. Latent herpes virus reactivation is used as a tool to predict changes in the immune status in astronauts and to evaluate associated health risks. Methods: Viral DNA was detected by real time polymerase chain reaction in saliva and urine from astronauts before, during and after short and long-duration space flights. Results and Discussion: EpsteinBarr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivated, and viral DNA was shed in saliva (EBV and VZV) or urine (CMV). EBV levels in saliva during flight were 10fold higher than baseline levels. Elevations in EBV specific CD8+ T-cells, viral antibody titers, and specific cytokines were consistent with viral reactivation. Intracellular levels of cytokines were reduced in EBVspecific Tcells. CMV, rarely present in urine of healthy individuals, was shed in urine of 27% of astronauts during all phases of spaceflight. VZV, not found in saliva of asymptomatic individuals, was found in saliva of 50% of astronauts during spaceflight and 35 days after flight. VZV recovered from astronaut saliva was found to be live, infectious virus. DNA sequencing demonstrated that the VZV recovered from astronauts was from the common European strain of VZV. Elevation of stress hormones accompanied viral reactivation indicating involvement of the hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal and sympathetic adrenal-medullary axes in the mechanism of viral reactivation in astronauts. A study of 53 shingles patients found that all shingles patients shed VZV DNA in their saliva and the VZV levels correlated with the severity of the disease. Lower VZV levels in shingles patients were similar to those observed in astronauts. We proposed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective assay to detect VZV in saliva of patients with suspected shingles. Early detection of VZV infection allows early medical intervention.

  7. Retargeting Strategies for Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Campadelli-Fiume, Gabriella; Petrovic, Biljana; Leoni, Valerio; Gianni, Tatiana; Avitabile, Elisa; Casiraghi, Costanza; Gatta, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Most of the oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) exhibit a high safety profile achieved through attenuation. They carry defects in virulence proteins that antagonize host cell response to the virus, including innate response, apoptosis, authophagy, and depend on tumor cell proliferation. They grow robustly in cancer cells, provided that these are deficient in host cell responses, which is often the case. To overcome the attenuation limits, a strategy is to render the virus highly cancer-specific, e.g., by retargeting their tropism to cancer-specific receptors, and detargeting from natural receptors. The target we selected is HER-2, overexpressed in breast, ovarian and other cancers. Entry of wt-HSV requires the essential glycoproteins gD, gH/gL and gB. Here, we reviewed that oncolytic HSV retargeting was achieved through modifications in gD: the addition of a single-chain antibody (scFv) to HER-2 coupled with appropriate deletions to remove part of the natural receptors’ binding sites. Recently, we showed that also gH/gL can be a retargeting tool. The insertion of an scFv to HER-2 at the gH N-terminus, coupled with deletions in gD, led to a recombinant capable to use HER-2 as the sole receptor. The retargeted oncolytic HSVs can be administered systemically by means of carrier cells-forcedly-infected mesenchymal stem cells. Altogether, the retargeted oncolytic HSVs are highly cancer-specific and their replication is not dependent on intrinsic defects of the tumor cells. They might be further modified to express immunomodulatory molecules. PMID:26927159

  8. Retargeting Strategies for Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Viruses.

    PubMed

    Campadelli-Fiume, Gabriella; Petrovic, Biljana; Leoni, Valerio; Gianni, Tatiana; Avitabile, Elisa; Casiraghi, Costanza; Gatta, Valentina

    2016-02-26

    Most of the oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) exhibit a high safety profile achieved through attenuation. They carry defects in virulence proteins that antagonize host cell response to the virus, including innate response, apoptosis, authophagy, and depend on tumor cell proliferation. They grow robustly in cancer cells, provided that these are deficient in host cell responses, which is often the case. To overcome the attenuation limits, a strategy is to render the virus highly cancer-specific, e.g., by retargeting their tropism to cancer-specific receptors, and detargeting from natural receptors. The target we selected is HER-2, overexpressed in breast, ovarian and other cancers. Entry of wt-HSV requires the essential glycoproteins gD, gH/gL and gB. Here, we reviewed that oncolytic HSV retargeting was achieved through modifications in gD: the addition of a single-chain antibody (scFv) to HER-2 coupled with appropriate deletions to remove part of the natural receptors' binding sites. Recently, we showed that also gH/gL can be a retargeting tool. The insertion of an scFv to HER-2 at the gH N-terminus, coupled with deletions in gD, led to a recombinant capable to use HER-2 as the sole receptor. The retargeted oncolytic HSVs can be administered systemically by means of carrier cells-forcedly-infected mesenchymal stem cells. Altogether, the retargeted oncolytic HSVs are highly cancer-specific and their replication is not dependent on intrinsic defects of the tumor cells. They might be further modified to express immunomodulatory molecules.

  9. Bell's palsy and herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Schirm, J; Mulkens, P S

    1997-11-01

    Bell's palsy, which is defined as idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis of sudden onset, accounts for > 50% of all cases of facial paralysis. Different theories on the etiology of Bell's palsy have been proposed and investigated. Various clinical studies have suggested an etiological link between Bell's palsy and herpes simplex virus (HSV). In addition, animal experiments have shown the ability of HSV to induce facial paralysis. In our opinion, the possible link between Bell's palsy and HSV can only be explored properly by studying the human facial nerve, and especially the geniculate ganglion itself. Different groups have tried to detect hypothetically reactivated and hypothetically latent HSV in the facial nerves of Bell's palsy patients and control patients, respectively. The isolation of infectious HSV from facial nerve tissue by conventional cell culture methods appeared to be very difficult, also when Bell's palsy patients were tested. Instead, modern molecular methods, such as in situ hybridization and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) could easily detect HSV DNA in geniculate ganglia. The detection of HSV-specific latency-associated transcripts in the ganglia of control patients provided further evidence for the hypothetically latent state of HSV in the geniculate ganglia in these patients. Recent PCR experiments performed by a Japanese group strongly suggest that the area adjacent to the geniculate ganglia does not usually contain any HSV at all, except in patients with Bell's palsy. This well-controlled study provides conclusive evidence that reactivation of HSV genomes from the geniculate ganglia is the most important cause of Bell's palsy. Consequently, it has been suggested that "Bell's palsy" be renamed as "herpetic facial paralysis".

  10. Performance of HerpeSelect and Kalon Assays in Detection of Antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2▿

    PubMed Central

    LeGoff, Jérôme; Mayaud, Philippe; Gresenguet, Gérard; Weiss, Helen A.; Nzambi, Khonde; Frost, Eric; Pepin, Jacques; Belec, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    The performances of commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in detecting herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) antibodies have been inconsistent for African and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive populations. We compared the performances of the HerpeSelect and Kalon glycoprotein G2 ELISAs for patients with genital ulcer disease in Ghana and the Central African Republic. Sera from 434 women were tested with the HerpeSelect assay, and a subsample (n = 199) was tested by the Kalon assay. Ulcer swabs and cervicovaginal lavage samples were tested for HSV-2 DNA by PCR. HSV-2-seronegative women with detectable genital HSV-2 DNA were retested for HSV-2 antibodies 14 and 28 days later by the two ELISAs. A total of 346 (80%) women were positive by HerpeSelect at baseline, and 225 (54%) had detectable genital (lesional or cervicovaginal) HSV-2 DNA. Sixty-six (19%) HerpeSelect-positive samples had low-positive index values (1.1 to 3.5), and 58% of these samples had detectable genital HSV-2 DNA. Global agreement between the two serological assays was 86%. Concordance was high (99%) for sera that were negative by HerpeSelect or had high index values (>3.5). Defining infection detected by HSV-2 DNA PCR and/or Kalon assay as true infection, 71% of sera with low-positive index values were associated with true HSV-2 infection. Twenty-five women were identified as having nonprimary first-episode genital HSV-2 infection. Rates of HSV-2 seroconversion at day 14 were 77% (10/13 patients) by HerpeSelect assay and 23% (3/13 patients) by Kalon assay, with four additional seroconversions detected by Kalon assay at day 28. HIV serostatus did not influence assay performance. Low index values obtained with the HerpeSelect assay may correspond to true HSV-2 infection, in particular to nonprimary first episodes of genital HSV-2 infection, and need to be interpreted in the context of clinical history. PMID:18385443

  11. Performance of HerpeSelect and Kalon assays in detection of antibodies to herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed

    LeGoff, Jérôme; Mayaud, Philippe; Gresenguet, Gérard; Weiss, Helen A; Nzambi, Khonde; Frost, Eric; Pepin, Jacques; Belec, Laurent

    2008-06-01

    The performances of commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in detecting herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) antibodies have been inconsistent for African and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive populations. We compared the performances of the HerpeSelect and Kalon glycoprotein G2 ELISAs for patients with genital ulcer disease in Ghana and the Central African Republic. Sera from 434 women were tested with the HerpeSelect assay, and a subsample (n = 199) was tested by the Kalon assay. Ulcer swabs and cervicovaginal lavage samples were tested for HSV-2 DNA by PCR. HSV-2-seronegative women with detectable genital HSV-2 DNA were retested for HSV-2 antibodies 14 and 28 days later by the two ELISAs. A total of 346 (80%) women were positive by HerpeSelect at baseline, and 225 (54%) had detectable genital (lesional or cervicovaginal) HSV-2 DNA. Sixty-six (19%) HerpeSelect-positive samples had low-positive index values (1.1 to 3.5), and 58% of these samples had detectable genital HSV-2 DNA. Global agreement between the two serological assays was 86%. Concordance was high (99%) for sera that were negative by HerpeSelect or had high index values (>3.5). Defining infection detected by HSV-2 DNA PCR and/or Kalon assay as true infection, 71% of sera with low-positive index values were associated with true HSV-2 infection. Twenty-five women were identified as having nonprimary first-episode genital HSV-2 infection. Rates of HSV-2 seroconversion at day 14 were 77% (10/13 patients) by HerpeSelect assay and 23% (3/13 patients) by Kalon assay, with four additional seroconversions detected by Kalon assay at day 28. HIV serostatus did not influence assay performance. Low index values obtained with the HerpeSelect assay may correspond to true HSV-2 infection, in particular to nonprimary first episodes of genital HSV-2 infection, and need to be interpreted in the context of clinical history.

  12. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305 Section 866.3305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... and mucous membranes to a severe form of encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). Neonatal...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305 Section 866.3305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... and mucous membranes to a severe form of encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). Neonatal...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305 Section 866.3305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... and mucous membranes to a severe form of encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). Neonatal...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305 Section 866.3305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... and mucous membranes to a severe form of encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). Neonatal...

  16. Prevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus Antibodies in Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodu, Brad; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study of 125 sophomore preclinical dental students found that these young professionals, because of having a low prevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) antibodies, are at risk for acquiring a primary HSV infection when treating HSV positive patients and should take precautions to avoid virus transmission. (MSE)

  17. Genome Sequence of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Strain SC16

    PubMed Central

    Rastrojo, Alberto; López-Muñoz, Alberto Domingo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), also known as Human herpesvirus 1, is a highly prevalent human neurotropic pathogen that causes a variety of diseases, including lethal encephalitis. Here, we report the genome sequence of the HSV-1 strain SC16. PMID:28126930

  18. Herpes simplex virus-induced cardiomyopathy successfully treated with acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Kuchynka, Petr; Palecek, Tomas; Hrbackova, Hana; Vitkova, Ivana; Simek, Stanislav; Nemecek, Eduard; Aster, Viktor; Louch, William E; Aschermann, Michael; Linhart, Ales

    2010-10-01

    Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMi) represents an acquired form of dilated cardiomyopathy. Viral infection is the most common cause of DCMi. In contrast with other cardiotropic viruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a very rare finding in endomyocardial biopsies of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. We report a case of HSV-induced cardiomyopathy successfully treated with acyclovir.

  19. Topical Acyclovir for Recurrent Herpes Labialis in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Worrall, Graham

    1991-01-01

    I reviewed the literature on the treatment of recurrent herpes labialis with topical acyclovir ointment to determine the effectiveness of this treatment for family practice patients. This article discusses the generalizability of the results to family practice. I concluded that the evidence supporting this therapy is weak and that it cannot, in the light of current knowledge, be strongly recommended. PMID:21234082

  20. Human Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in Confiscated Gorilla

    PubMed Central

    Oxford, Kristie L.; Gardner-Roberts, David; Kinani, Jean-Felix; Spelman, Lucy; Barry, Peter A.; Cranfield, Michael R.; Lowenstine, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, we detected human herpes simplex virus type 1, which caused stomatitis, in a juvenile confiscated eastern lowland gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri) that had a high degree of direct contact with human caretakers. Our findings confirm that pathogens can transfer between nonhuman primate hosts and humans. PMID:25341185

  1. The "Other" Venereal Diseases: Herpes Simplex, Trichomoniasis and Candidiasis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNab, Warren L.

    1979-01-01

    Although the term venereal disease has been synonymous with gonorrhea and syphilis, the Center for Disease Control now states that the number of new cases of herpes simplex, trichomoniasis, and candidiasis is rapidly approaching the number of cases of syphilis and gonorrhea. (MM)

  2. Management of neonatal herpes simplex virus infection and exposure.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2014-05-01

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are rare but are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Advances in diagnostic modalities to identify these infants, as well as the development of safe and effective antiviral therapy, have revolutionised the management of affected infants. This review will summarise the epidemiology of neonatal HSV infections and discuss the management of infants with HSV exposure and infection.

  3. The mortality of neonatal herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Medina, Eduardo; Cantey, Joseph B; Sánchez, Pablo J

    2015-06-01

    This retrospective study characterized the clinical course of 13 neonates who died with herpes simplex virus infection from 2001 to 2011, representing a 26% case-fatality rate. Fatal disease developed at ≤ 48 hours of age in one-third of infants, was mostly disseminated disease, and occurred despite early administration of high-dose acyclovir therapy.

  4. Recurrent genital herpes treatments and their impact on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Brentjens, Mathijs H; Yeung-Yue, Kimberly A; Lee, Patricia C; Tyring, Stephen K

    2003-01-01

    Herpes genitalis is one of the most common viral sexually transmitted diseases in the world, with an estimated seroprevalence in the US of greater than 20%. Two viruses of the same family cause herpes genitalis: herpes simplex virus 1 and 2. After the resolution of primary infection, the virus persists in the nerve roots of the sacral plexus, often causing recurrent (though generally less severe) outbreaks. These outbreaks, as well as the infectious potential to the patient's sexual partners, results in significant psychological stress on the patient, and has a tremendous negative impact on QOL. Current treatment modalities may result in a reduction in the number of outbreaks and viral shedding, but no cure exists. Although studies have clearly demonstrated the negative impact of recurrent genital herpes on QOL, an assessment scale specific to herpes was not developed until recently. Earlier studies indicated that patients did not perceive a significant benefit from episodic treatment with antivirals, but studies using the Recurrent Genital Herpes Quality of Life Questionnaire (RGHQoL) have now demonstrated that suppressive antiviral therapy improves quality of life in patients with frequent recurrences of genital herpes. However, not all patients with recurrent genital herpes need suppressive therapy, and proposed factors to consider include frequency of recurrence, physical and psychological distress caused by recurrences, and the potential for transmission to the patient's sexual partner. Newer therapeutic modalities, including the topical immune response modifier resiquimod and herpes vaccines, may eventually be shown to further decrease the psychological morbidity of recurrent genital herpes.

  5. Incidence of herpes zoster infections in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Nimmrich, S; Horneff, G

    2015-03-01

    The risk of herpes zoster among patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) exposed to biologics has not been evaluated. We determined incidence rates of herpes zoster among children with JIA in correlation with medication at time of occurrence and total drug exposure. The German biologics register database was used to identify patients with herpes zoster. Crude infection rates and incidence ratios (IRR) were compared to published rates. Demographics and overall exposure and particular exposure time to corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs and biologics were analyzed. The JIA cohort included 3,042 patients with 5,557.9 person-years of follow-up; 1,628 have used corticosteroids, 2,930 methotrexate and 1,685 etanercept. In total, 17 herpes zoster events have been documented [6/1,000 patients (3.5-9.0); 3.1/1,000 patient-years (1.9-4.9)]. Thus, the incidence rate in JIA patients was higher than expected [IRR 2.9 (1.8-4.5), p < 0.001]. In all patients, the event resolved completely. There were two complications, one patient developed intercostal neuralgia, and one had a recurrent herpes zoster. Compared to the healthy population, a significant higher IRR is observed in JIA patients who received a monotherapy with etanercept or in combination with steroids and methotrexate, but not in JIA patients exposed to methotrexate without biologics. In comparison with our control group of patients treated with methotrexate, the IRR was higher for exposure to etanercept monotherapy and combination of etanercept and corticosteroids irrespective of methotrexate use. A generally higher incidence rate in JIA patients treated with etanercept was observed. No serious or refractory manifestations occurred.

  6. Replication-Competent Controlled Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, David C.; Feller, Joyce; McAnany, Peterjon; Vilaboa, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present the development and characterization of a replication-competent controlled herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). Replication-essential ICP4 and ICP8 genes of HSV-1 wild-type strain 17syn+ were brought under the control of a dually responsive gene switch. The gene switch comprises (i) a transactivator that is activated by a narrow class of antiprogestins, including mifepristone and ulipristal, and whose expression is mediated by a promoter cassette that comprises an HSP70B promoter and a transactivator-responsive promoter and (ii) transactivator-responsive promoters that drive the ICP4 and ICP8 genes. Single-step growth experiments in different cell lines demonstrated that replication of the recombinant virus, HSV-GS3, is strictly dependent on an activating treatment consisting of administration of a supraphysiological heat dose in the presence of an antiprogestin. The replication-competent controlled virus replicates with an efficiency approaching that of the wild-type virus from which it was derived. Essentially no replication occurs in the absence of activating treatment or if HSV-GS3-infected cells are exposed only to heat or antiprogestin. These findings were corroborated by measurements of amounts of viral DNA and transcripts of the regulated ICP4 gene and the glycoprotein C (gC) late gene, which was not regulated. Similar findings were made in experiments with a mouse footpad infection model. IMPORTANCE The alphaherpesviruses have long been considered vectors for recombinant vaccines and oncolytic therapies. The traditional approach uses vector backbones containing attenuating mutations that restrict replication to ensure safety. The shortcoming of this approach is that the attenuating mutations tend to limit both the immune presentation and oncolytic properties of these vectors. HSV-GS3 represents a novel type of vector that, when activated, replicates with the efficiency of a nonattenuated virus and whose safety is derived from deliberate

  7. Herpes simplex virus 2 ICP0 mutant viruses are avirulent and immunogenic: implications for a genital herpes vaccine.

    PubMed

    Halford, William P; Püschel, Ringo; Rakowski, Brandon

    2010-08-17

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP0(-) mutants are interferon-sensitive, avirulent, and elicit protective immunity against HSV-1 (Virol J, 2006, 3:44). If an ICP0(-) mutant of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) exhibited similar properties, such a virus might be used to vaccinate against genital herpes. The current study was initiated to explore this possibility. Several HSV-2 ICP0(-) mutant viruses were constructed and evaluated in terms of three parameters: i. interferon-sensitivity; ii. virulence in mice; and iii. capacity to elicit protective immunity against HSV-2. One ICP0(-) mutant virus in particular, HSV-2 0DeltaNLS, achieved an optimal balance between avirulence and immunogenicity. HSV-2 0DeltaNLS was interferon-sensitive in cultured cells. HSV-2 0DeltaNLS replicated to low levels in the eyes of inoculated mice, but was rapidly repressed by an innate, Stat 1-dependent host immune response. HSV-2 0DeltaNLS failed to spread from sites of inoculation, and hence produced only inapparent infections. Mice inoculated with HSV-2 0DeltaNLS consistently mounted an HSV-specific IgG antibody response, and were consistently protected against lethal challenge with wild-type HSV-2. Based on their avirulence and immunogenicity, we propose that HSV-2 ICP0(-) mutant viruses merit consideration for their potential to prevent the spread of HSV-2 and genital herpes.

  8. Herpes Simplex Virus 2 ICP0− Mutant Viruses Are Avirulent and Immunogenic: Implications for a Genital Herpes Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Halford, William P.; Püschel, Ringo; Rakowski, Brandon

    2010-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP0− mutants are interferon-sensitive, avirulent, and elicit protective immunity against HSV-1 (Virol J, 2006, 3:44). If an ICP0− mutant of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) exhibited similar properties, such a virus might be used to vaccinate against genital herpes. The current study was initiated to explore this possibility. Several HSV-2 ICP0− mutant viruses were constructed and evaluated in terms of three parameters: i. interferon-sensitivity; ii. virulence in mice; and iii. capacity to elicit protective immunity against HSV-2. One ICP0− mutant virus in particular, HSV-2 0ΔNLS, achieved an optimal balance between avirulence and immunogenicity. HSV-2 0ΔNLS was interferon-sensitive in cultured cells. HSV-2 0ΔNLS replicated to low levels in the eyes of inoculated mice, but was rapidly repressed by an innate, Stat 1-dependent host immune response. HSV-2 0ΔNLS failed to spread from sites of inoculation, and hence produced only inapparent infections. Mice inoculated with HSV-2 0ΔNLS consistently mounted an HSV-specific IgG antibody response, and were consistently protected against lethal challenge with wild-type HSV-2. Based on their avirulence and immunogenicity, we propose that HSV-2 ICP0− mutant viruses merit consideration for their potential to prevent the spread of HSV-2 and genital herpes. PMID:20808928

  9. Topical application of polyethylenimine as a candidate for novel prophylactic therapeutics against genital herpes caused by herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kyoko; Onoue, Hiroki; Sasaki, Kohei; Lee, Jung-Bum; Kumar, Penmetcha K R; Gopinath, Subash C B; Maitani, Yoshie; Kai, Takashi; Hayashi, Toshimitsu

    2014-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) cause genital herpes, which can enhance the acquisition of human immunodeficiency virus. The development of anti-HSV agents with novel mechanisms of action is urgently required in the topical therapy of genital herpes. In this study, the in vitro and in vivo anti-HSV effects of Epomin SP-012(®), a highly cationic polyethylenimine, were evaluated. When the in vitro antiviral effects of SP-012 were assessed, this compound showed potent activity against HSV-1 and HSV-2. It inhibited the attachment of HSV-2 to host cells and cell-to-cell spread of infection in a concentration-dependent manner and exerted a virucidal effect. No SP-012-resistant HSV-2 was found when the virus was successively passaged in the presence of SP-012. In a mouse genital herpes model, topically administered SP-012 inhibited the progression of the disease caused by HSV infection. These data illustrate that SP-012 may be a novel class of HSV inhibitor that would be acceptable for long-term topical application.

  10. Acute retinal necrosis caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 in children: reactivation of an undiagnosed latent neonatal herpes infection.

    PubMed

    Grose, Charles

    2012-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is known to cause acute retinal necrosis (ARN). The availability of HSV-2-specific polymerase chain reaction tests for diagnostic analysis has greatly increased our ability to discriminate ARN caused by HSV-2 from ARN caused by either herpes simplex virus type 1 or varicella zoster virus (VZV). Of great interest, HSV-2 appears to be the most common cause of viral ARN in children and adolescents. Although a few children with ARN are known to have had neonatally acquired herpes infection, most children lack a history of known herpes disease. Thus, the origin of the HSV-2 infection is a mystery. The hypothesis of this review is that HSV-2 ARN in children and adolescents may be the first sign of a previously undiagnosed and asymptomatic neonatal HSV-2 infection, which has reactivated several years later from latency in a cranial nerve and entered the retina. The review brings together 7 previously published ARN cases, plus one new case is added. Thus, this review also expands the spectrum of complications from neonatal HSV-2 infection.

  11. The diagnosis of genital herpes – beyond culture: An evidence-based guide for the utilization of polymerase chain reaction and herpes simplex virus type-specific serology

    PubMed Central

    Ratnam, S; Severini, A; Zahariadis, G; Petric, M; Romanowski, B

    2007-01-01

    Accurate identification of persons with genital herpes is necessary for optimal patient management and prevention of transmission. Because of inherent inaccuracies, clinical diagnosis of genital herpes should be confirmed by laboratory testing for the causative agents herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV type 2 (HSV-2). Further identification of the HSV type is valuable for counselling on the natural history of infection and risk of transmission. Laboratory methods include antigen detection, culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and conventional and type-specific serology (TSS). PCR has, by far, the greater sensitivity and should be the test of choice for symptomatic cases. HSV-2 TSS is indicated for patients with genital lesions in whom antigen detection, culture or PCR fail to detect HSV, and for patients who are asymptomatic but have a history suggestive of genital herpes. HSV-2 TSS is further indicated for patients infected with HIV. HSV-2 TSS along with HSV-1 TSS may be considered, as appropriate, in evaluating infection and/or immune status in couples discordant for genital herpes, women who develop their first clinical episode of genital herpes during pregnancy, asymptomatic pregnant women whose partners have a history of genital herpes or HIV infection, and women contemplating pregnancy or considering sexual partnership with those with a history of genital herpes. The above should be performed in conjunction with counselling of infected persons and their sex partners. PMID:18923735

  12. The relative infrequency and low levels of neutralising and immunoprecipitating antibody to herpes simplex viruses types 1 and 2 in patients with a history of recurrent herpes genitalis.

    PubMed

    Woodman, C B; Stocker, D; Sugrue, D; Desberbasques, M; Hartley, C E; Fuller, A; Buchan, A; Skinner, G R

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-seven per cent of 70 patients with a history of recurrent herpes genitalis but no concomitant history of recurrent oral or peri-genital disease, had no detectable neutralising antibody against type 1 or type 2 herpes simplex virus; the prevalence and levels of neutralising antibody were similar to 53 patients with no history of herpetic disease and significantly lower than 67 patients with a history of recurrent herpes genitalis in association with oral or peri-genital disease all of whom had neutralising antibody against both virus types. There were similar differences between groups for immunoprecipitating antibody where 80% of patients were herpes genitalis alone had no detectable immunoprecipitating antibody. The results indicate that the failure to detect immunising and immunoprecipitating antibody in an individual's serum is compatible with a long and even severe history of recurrent herpes genitalis and consequently that the development of neutralising antibody does not necessarily indicate an episode of primary herpetic disease.

  13. Central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection in afebrile children with seizures.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Indrajit; Hartley-McAndrew, Michelle E; Weinstock, Arie L

    2012-04-01

    Central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection is suspected in patients presenting with acute-onset seizures and lethargy. The potential neurologic sequelae from untreated herpes infection can prompt empirical acyclovir therapy, even in afebrile subjects. The objectives of this study were to determine the frequency of central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection in children presenting with afebrile seizures and to assess the need for empirical acyclovir therapy. Clinical and laboratory data of children with acute-onset afebrile seizures and children with central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection were compared. Polymerase chain reaction and viral cultures of the cerebrospinal fluid for herpes simplex virus infection were negative in all subjects with afebrile seizures; 32.7% of these subjects were empirically treated with acyclovir. In conclusion, central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection is uncommon in children presenting with afebrile seizures, and acyclovir therapy is rarely necessary in subjects with normal neurologic examination and cerebrospinal fluid analysis.

  14. Novel agents and strategies to treat herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Kleymann, Gerald

    2003-02-01

    The quiet pandemic of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection has plagued humanity since ancient times, causing mucocutaneous infection, such as herpes labialis and herpes genitalis. Disease symptoms often interfere with everyday activities and occasionally HSV infections are the cause of life-threatening or sight-impairing disease, especially in neonates and the immunocompromised patient population. After primary or initial infection the virus persists for life in a latent form in neurons of the host, periodically reactivating and often resulting in significant psychosocial distress for the patient. Currently, no cure is available. In the mid-1950s the first antiviral, idoxuridine, was developed for topical treatment of herpes disease and, in 1978, vidarabine was licensed for systemic use to treat HSV encephalitis. Acyclovir (Zovirax), a potent, specific and tolerable nucleosidic inhibitor of the herpes DNA polymerase, was a milestone in the development of antiviral drugs in the late 1970s. In the mid-1990s, when acyclovir became a generic drug, valacyclovir (Valtrex) and famciclovir (Famvir), prodrugs of the gold standard and penciclovir (Denavir), Vectavir), a close analogue, were launched. Though numerous approaches and strategies were tested and considerable effort was expended in the search of the next generation of an antiherpetic therapy, it proved difficult to outperform acyclovir. Notable in this regard was the award of a Nobel Prize in 1988 for the elucidation of mechanistic principles which resulted in the development of new drugs such as acyclovir. Vaccines, interleukins, interferons, therapeutic proteins, antibodies, immunomodulators and small-molecule drugs with specific or nonspecific modes of action lacked either efficacy or the required safety profile to replace the nucleosidic drugs acyclovir, valacyclovir, penciclovir and famciclovir as the first choice of treatment. Recently though, new inhibitors of the HSV helicase-primase with potent in vitro

  15. Herpes zoster correlates with increased risk of Parkinson's disease in older people

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Chih-Hsueh; Lin, Hsien-Feng; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Little is known on the relationship between herpes zoster and Parkinson's disease in older people. This study aimed to explore whether herpes zoster could be associated with Parkinson's disease in older people in Taiwan. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the claim data of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 10,296 subjects aged 65 years and older with newly diagnosed herpes zoster as the herpes zoster group and 39,405 randomly selected subjects aged 65 years and older without a diagnosis of herpes zoster as the nonherpes zoster group from 1998 to 2010. Both groups were followed up until subjects received a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. This follow-up design would explore whether subjects with herpes zoster were at an increased risk of Parkinson's disease. Relative risks were estimated by adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) using the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model. The incidence of Parkinson's disease was higher in the herpes zoster group than that in the nonherpes zoster group (4.86 vs 4.00 per 1000 person-years, 95% CI 1.14, 1.29). After adjustment for confounding factors, the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model revealed that the adjusted HR of Parkinson's disease was 1.17 for the herpes zoster group (95% CI 1.10, 1.25), compared with the nonherpes zoster group. Older people with herpes zoster confer a slightly increased hazard of developing Parkinson's disease when compared to those without herpes zoster. We think that herpes zoster correlates with increased risk of Parkinson's disease in older people. When older people with herpes zoster seek help, clinicians should pay more attention to the development of the cardinal symptoms of Parkinson's disease. PMID:28207515

  16. Successful treatment of hypertrophic herpes simplex genitalis in HIV-infected patient with topical imiquimod.

    PubMed

    Deza, Gustavo; Martin-Ezquerra, Gemma; Curto-Barredo, Laia; Villar García, Judit; Pujol, Ramon M

    2015-12-01

    Hypertrophic herpes simplex genitalis is an atypical presentation of genital herpes described in the context of immunosuppression, particularly HIV-positive patients. This situation can become a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. For this reason, alternative therapies are currently being discussed in the literature. We report a case of hypertrophic genital herpes in a HIV-positive patient who was successfully treated with topical 5% imiquimod after treatment failures with oral and i.v. antivirals.

  17. A Fusogenic Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for Therapy of Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0434 TITLE: A Fusogenic Oncolytic Herpes Simplex ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Fusogenic Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for Therapy of Advanced Ovarian Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER...oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV) can significantly enhance the anti-tumor effect of the virus. Three specific aims have been proposed and they are: 1

  18. Ube2g2-gp78-mediated HERP polyubiquitylation is involved in ER stress recovery.

    PubMed

    Yan, Long; Liu, Weixiao; Zhang, Huihui; Liu, Chao; Shang, Yongliang; Ye, Yihong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Wei

    2014-04-01

    A large number of studies have focused on how individual organisms respond to a stress condition, but little attention has been paid to the stress recovery process, such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress recovery. Homocysteine-induced ER protein (HERP) was originally identified as a chaperone-like protein that is strongly induced upon ER stress. Here we show that, after ER stress induction, HERP is rapidly degraded by Ube2g2-gp78-mediated ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation. The polyubiquitylation of HERP in vitro depends on a physical interaction between the CUE domain of gp78 and the ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain of HERP, which is essential for HERP degradation in vivo during ER stress recovery. We further show that although HERP promotes cell survival under ER stress, high levels of HERP expression reduce cell viability under oxidative stress conditions, suggesting that HERP plays a dual role in cellular stress adaptation. Together, these results establish the ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation of HERP as a novel mechanism that fine-tunes the stress tolerance capacity of the cell.

  19. Herpes Zoster Duplex Bilateralis in Immuno-Competent Patients: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Atul; Dalela, Gaurav

    2015-12-01

    Herpes Zoster is a common viral disorder, occurs due to reactivation of latent Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) usually in adults or elderly patients, usually confined to a single dermatome. Herpes zoster duplex is a rare but well established entity which is simultaneous, occurring of herpes zoster at two different non contiguous dermatomes, can be unilateralis or bilateralis. Here we are reporting two cases of herpes zoster duplex bilateralis, in case-1 lesions occurs in two different distant dermatomes while in case-2 it appeared in a single dermatome but both sides were involved. Both the patients were healthy immuno-competent male.

  20. Rare Occurrence of Herpes Zoster of Trigeminal Nerve following Extraction of Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Christy, A. Winnifred; Raja Deva Thanmbi, T. Jones; Leelavathy, J.; Rhema Louis, Antoinette

    2015-01-01

    Herpes Zoster also known as Shingles is an acute viral infection which is an extremely painful and incapacitating ailment. It results from the reactivation of the varicella zoster virus. The triggering factors for the onset of an attack of Herpes Zoster include some form of immunosuppression. The diagnosis of Herpes Zoster can be made on proper medical history and a thorough clinical examination. Here is the report of a male patient affected by Herpes Zoster infection which followed after extraction of a lower first molar. PMID:26819783

  1. Herpes labialis in patients with Russell's viper bite and acute kidney injury: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Waikhom, Rajesh; Sapam, Ranjeeta; Patil, Krishna; Jadhav, Jaya Prada; Sircar, Dipankar; Roychowdhury, Arpita; Dasgupta, Sanjay; Pandey, Rajendra

    2011-06-01

    Snake bite is an important health hazard in tropical countries and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Herpes labialis is a common ailment caused by the Herpes simplex virus. There is no published data showing any association between the snake bite and development of Herpes labialis. Here, we present a series of patients who developed Herpes labialis after Russell's viper bite and had acute kidney injury. We attempted to find whether snake bite is an immunosuppressed state and whether it could have pre-disposed the patients to the development of these lesions.

  2. Apparent Rarity of Asymptomatic Herpes Cervicitis in a Woman with Intra-Uterine Contraceptive Device

    PubMed Central

    Okolo, Abu Clement; Manga, Mohammed Mohammed; Anaedobe, Chinenye Gloria; Salami, Ayodeji Akeem; Akang, Effiong Essien Udo

    2013-01-01

    Infection with genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) remains a common viral sexually transmitted disease, often subclinical and a major worldwide problem of women of reproductive age group. Herpes cervicitis is an unusual presentation of Herpes simplex virus infection in females. The finding of herpes cervicitis on routine pap smear of an asymptomatic woman on Intrauterine contraceptive device still further supports the need for increased awareness on the possibility of Herpes simplex virus infection among women, particularly those on Intrauterine contraceptive device. The index case is a 28 years old Nigerian female who was referred to our Special Treatment Clinic on account of an abnormal pap smear cytology which was in keeping with Herpes cervicitis. There was no history of genital ulcer in this patient; however ELISA for HSV 2 IgM was positive in her. We therefore describe a case of herpes cervicitis in an asymptomatic woman on intrauterine contraceptive device. This case highlights to clinicians the need to be aware of the possibility of this association and to carry out relevant investigations so as to identify and treat these patients appropriately. Therefore, there is a need to put in place adequate public health intervention strategy to prevent genital herpes in women of reproductive age group with a view to preventing the possibility of congenital herpes in subsequent pregnancy.

  3. Expression of varicella-zoster virus and herpes simplex virus in normal human trigeminal ganglia

    SciTech Connect

    Vafai, A.; Wellish, M.; Devlin, M.; Gilden, D.H. ); Murray, R.S. Veterans Administration Medical Center, Denver, CO )

    1988-04-01

    Lysates of radiolabeled explants from four human trigeminal ganglia were immunoprecipitated with antibodies to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and to herpes simplex virus. Both herpes simplex virus- and VZV-specific proteins were detected in lysates of all four ganglia. Absence of reactivity in ganglion explants with monoclonal antibodies suggested that herpes simplex virus and VZV were not reactivated during the culture period. In situ hybridization studies demonstrated the presence of RNA transcripts from the VZV immediate early gene 63. This approach to the detection of herpes simplex virus and VZV expression in human ganglia should facilitate analysis of viral RNA and proteins in human sensory ganglia.

  4. Unusual Clinical Presentation and Role of Decompressive Craniectomy in Herpes Simplex Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Pratibha; Saini, Arushi Gahlot; Sahu, Jitendra Kumar; Kumar, Nuthan; Vyas, Sameer; Vasishta, Rakesh Kumar; Aggarwal, Ashish

    2015-08-01

    Decompressive craniectomy in pediatric central nervous infections with refractory intracranial hypertension is less commonly practiced. We describe improved outcome of decompressive craniectomy in a 7-year-old boy with severe herpes simplex encephalitis and medically refractory intracranial hypertension, along with a brief review of the literature. Timely recognition of refractory intracranial hypertension and surgical decompression in children with herpes simplex encephalitis can be life-saving. Additionally, strokelike atypical presentations are being increasingly recognized in children with herpes simplex encephalitis and should not take one away from the underlying herpes simplex encephalitis.

  5. Herpes zoster in Crohn's disease during treatment with infliximab.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaobing; Zhao, Junzhang; Zhu, Siying; Xia, Bing

    2014-02-01

    Infliximab is widely used in both inducing and maintaining remission of patients with Crohn's disease (CD). The efficacy of infliximab has been undoubtedly proven; however, various opportunistic infections have emerged. Herpes virus infections (being a type of opportunistic infection) in CD patients treated with infliximab alone with no other concomitant medications are, however, rare and have not aroused enough attention. Gastroenterologists have limited knowledge of the immunization status of patients with CD, and rarely do they take an adequate immunization history before immunosuppressive therapy. Here we report two herpes zoster (HZ) events in CD patients while using infliximab alone: in the first case, HZ occurred during the patient's 12th infusion for maintance therapy, and in the second case, HZ occurred during the patient's first course of infliximab after surgery for therapy of inducing remission. We hope to increase the gastroenterologists' awareness of this potential infection in CD patients during treatment with infliximab.

  6. Autophagy interaction with herpes simplex virus type-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Douglas; Liang, Chengyu

    2016-01-01

    abstract More than 50% of the U.S. population is infected with herpes simplex virus type-I (HSV-1) and global infectious estimates are nearly 90%. HSV-1 is normally seen as a harmless virus but debilitating diseases can arise, including encephalitis and ocular diseases. HSV-1 is unique in that it can undermine host defenses and establish lifelong infection in neurons. Viral reactivation from latency may allow HSV-1 to lay siege to the brain (Herpes encephalitis). Recent advances maintain that HSV-1 proteins act to suppress and/or control the lysosome-dependent degradation pathway of macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) and consequently, in neurons, may be coupled with the advancement of HSV-1-associated pathogenesis. Furthermore, increasing evidence suggests that HSV-1 infection may constitute a gradual risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders. The relationship between HSV-1 infection and autophagy manipulation combined with neuropathogenesis may be intimately intertwined demanding further investigation. PMID:26934628

  7. Gerstmann's syndrome following an acute herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ilchevsky, S; Boev, I; Kazakova, T

    1998-01-01

    The authors present a rare clinical case of a woman who developed Gerstmann's syndrome following an acute Herpes simplex viral encephalitis. Clinical observation and laboratory evaluation were performed during the acute phase of the disease. After that the follow-up continued for one-year period. The localization of the pathologic process was determined by computerized tomography, conducted periodically. The characteristics of the clinical picture are interpreted in the context of the contemporary concepts of the topical diagnosis of Gerstmann's syndrome. The possibility of a sudden onset of acute Herpes simplex viral encephalitis without a preceding febrile-intoxication syndrome is worth noting. Conclusions are drawn stressing the need of an early etiologic treatment and the importance of the rehabilitation activities during the convalescence period.

  8. Autophagy Stimulation Abrogates Herpes simplex Virus-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yakoub, Abraam M.; Shukla, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) is a double-stranded DNA virus that causes life-long infections. HSV-1 infections may lead to herpetic stromal keratitis that may advance to corneal blindness. HSV-1 infections can also cause fatal conditions, such as herpes encephalitis, or neonatal disease. A major virulence mechanism of HSV-1 is the control of autophagy, an innate immune defense strategy that could otherwise degrade viral particles. Here, to investigate a new mechanism for antiviral therapy, we tested the effect of various autophagy inducers (physiological and pharmacological) on infection. Autophagy stimulation was confirmed to significantly suppress HSV-1 infection in various cell types, without affecting cell viability. This study establishes the importance of autophagy for regulating HSV-1 infection, and provides a proof-of-principle evidence for a novel antiviral mechanism. PMID:25856282

  9. Herpes zoster immunization in older adults has big benefits.

    PubMed

    Breivik, Harald

    2015-06-01

    The value and importance of providing herpes zoster immunization to reduce the incidence and severity of acute herpes zoster neuralgia, especially in older patients, is described. The prevention of postherpetic neuralgia can profoundly impact patients' quality of life. This report is adapted from paineurope 2014; Issue 4, © Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd, and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International, LTD and is distributed free of charge to healthcare professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be viewed via the website: www.paineurope.com at which health professionals can find links to the original articles and request copies of the quarterly publication and access additional pain education and pain management resources.

  10. Autophagy interaction with herpes simplex virus type-1 infection.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Douglas; Liang, Chengyu

    2016-01-01

    More than 50% of the U.S. population is infected with herpes simplex virus type-I (HSV-1) and global infectious estimates are nearly 90%. HSV-1 is normally seen as a harmless virus but debilitating diseases can arise, including encephalitis and ocular diseases. HSV-1 is unique in that it can undermine host defenses and establish lifelong infection in neurons. Viral reactivation from latency may allow HSV-1 to lay siege to the brain (Herpes encephalitis). Recent advances maintain that HSV-1 proteins act to suppress and/or control the lysosome-dependent degradation pathway of macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) and consequently, in neurons, may be coupled with the advancement of HSV-1-associated pathogenesis. Furthermore, increasing evidence suggests that HSV-1 infection may constitute a gradual risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders. The relationship between HSV-1 infection and autophagy manipulation combined with neuropathogenesis may be intimately intertwined demanding further investigation.

  11. [Factual approach to the treatment of genital herpes].

    PubMed

    Nikkels, A F; Piérard, G E

    2000-05-01

    Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease. After the primary infection, the virus establishes a life-long latency in the sacral dorsal root ganglia. Recurrences may occur at an unpredictable rate. The clinical signs are not always easy to recognize and viral identification techniques may be helpful such as immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization on Tzanck smears and muco-cutaneous biopsies. The treatment of genital herpes can follow one of three strategies using antiviral drugs, non-specific immunomodulators, and vaccination. The new oral antiviral drugs decrease the severity of clinical manifestations without, however, providing a definitive cure. In this article recent knowledge about the clinical aspects, differential diagnosis, diagnostic methods, treatment options and management is reviewed.

  12. Valacyclovir for the management of herpes viral infections.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, A; Anderson, N J; Beutner, R; Tyring, S K

    2005-02-01

    The Herpesviridae family (Types 1-8) continues to inflict considerable morbidity and social stigma upon humanity. Once infected with the herpes viruses, especially Types 1-3, they establish permanent residence within our nervous system and reactivate during periods of stress, trauma, and/or other precipitating factors. To date, there is no cure for herpes viral infections but antivirals can attenuate the symptoms and duration of episodic outbreaks. Prophylactic therapy can suppress recurrences. The first antiviral with selective activity against virus-infected cells is considered to be acyclovir. Our article will highlight the clinical indications of the current generation, valacyclovir, which is a prodrug of acyclovir. We consider valacyclovir as a second-generation antiviral, having taken into account the initial selectivity and safety profile of its progenitor, acyclovir.

  13. Trigeminal herpes zoster: early recognition and treatment are crucial

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) is not uncommon in older patients, particularly in cases of chronic autoimmune disorders and in patients taking immunosuppressant drugs. We present a case of a 57-year-old woman presenting with severe herpes zoster infection, involving the maxillary and ophthalmic branches of the trigeminal nerve. Despite an initial delay in instigating crucial antiviral treatment, the patient achieved an excellent recovery, with only some mild scarring at 2 months postinfection. Trigeminal herpes zoster is a potentially devastating clinical occurrence, and is associated with severe long-term neurological sequelae, including encephalitis, vision loss and postherpetic neuralgia. Physicians must be aware of risk factors and treatment modalities. PMID:25795749

  14. Pediatric herpes simplex virus encephalitis: a retrospective multicenter experience.

    PubMed

    Schleede, Lena; Bueter, Wolfgang; Baumgartner-Sigl, Sara; Opladen, Thomas; Weigt-Usinger, Katharina; Stephan, Susanne; Smitka, Martin; Leiz, Steffen; Kaiser, Olaf; Kraus, Verena; van Baalen, Andreas; Skopnik, Heino; Hartmann, Hans; Rostasy, Kevin; Lücke, Thomas; Schara, Ulrike; Häusler, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Knowledge on pediatric herpes simplex virus encephalitis is limited. Here we summarize 6 neonates and 32 children diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction (n = 37) or serological studies (n = 1), respectively. Diagnosis was difficult, as only 15 patients presented neurologic symptoms. Moreover, cerebrospinal fluid glucose, protein, and leukocytes were normal in 6 patients. Subsequently, all but 2 showed neurologic symptoms. Diffusion-weighted neuroimaging was the most sensitive early imaging method. Despite acyclovir treatment, 8 patients experienced early relapses, showing movement abnormalities, impaired vigilance, and seizures. Diffuse white matter changes, found in 3 of 5 relapse patients on neuroimaging, and a negative cerebrospinal fluid herpes simplex virus polymerase chain reaction suggested inflammatory processes. All relapse patients were again treated with acyclovir, and 3 responded to additional corticosteroid treatment. Whereas outcome after relapses was poor, overall outcome was good. No child died; 14 were asymptomatic at discharge, and neuroimaging remained normal in 7 of 30 patients studied.

  15. Fifteen minute consultation: Managing neonatal and childhood herpes encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Le Doare, K; Menson, Esse; Patel, Deepak; Lim, Ming; Lyall, Hermione; Herberg, Jethro

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the most common single cause of viral encephalitis in infants and children. Treated or untreated, it can be associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, and its presentation is usually insidious and non-specific. Prompt and careful investigation is important in order to establish the diagnosis so that treatment can be optimised. We address some common questions arising when diagnosing and treating presumed HSE throughout childhood. PMID:25112286

  16. Laser treatment of recurrent herpes labialis: a literature review.

    PubMed

    de Paula Eduardo, Carlos; Aranha, Ana Cecilia Corrêa; Simões, Alyne; Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; Ramalho, Karen Muller; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella; de Freitas, Patrícia Moreira; Marotti, Juliana; Tunér, Jan

    2014-07-01

    Recurrent herpes labialis is a worldwide life-long oral health problem that remains unsolved. It affects approximately one third of the world population and causes frequent pain and discomfort episodes, as well as social restriction due to its compromise of esthetic features. In addition, the available antiviral drugs have not been successful in completely eliminating the virus and its recurrence. Currently, different kinds of laser treatment and different protocols have been proposed for the management of recurrent herpes labialis. Therefore, the aim of the present article was to review the literature regarding the effects of laser irradiation on recurrent herpes labialis and to identify the indications and most successful clinical protocols. The literature was searched with the aim of identifying the effects on healing time, pain relief, duration of viral shedding, viral inactivation, and interval of recurrence. According to the literature, none of the laser treatment modalities is able to completely eliminate the virus and its recurrence. However, laser phototherapy appears to strongly decrease pain and the interval of recurrences without causing any side effects. Photodynamic therapy can be helpful in reducing viral titer in the vesicle phase, and high-power lasers may be useful to drain vesicles. The main advantages of the laser treatment appear to be the absence of side effects and drug interactions, which are especially helpful for older and immunocompromised patients. Although these results indicate a potential beneficial use for lasers in the management of recurrent herpes labialis, they are based on limited published clinical trials and case reports. The literature still lacks double-blind controlled clinical trials verifying these effects and such trials should be the focus of future research.

  17. Management and Prevention of Herpes Zoster Ocular Disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Elisabeth J

    2015-10-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is caused by reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus (VZV) in people who have had chicken pox, usually resulting in a painful, unilateral, dermatomal, vesicular rash. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus occurs when the first division of cranial nerve V is involved. HZ is common, with approximately 1 million new cases per year in the United States, and occurs in 1 in 3 persons. Although the rate of HZ increases with age, over half of all cases occur under the age of 60 years. Complications of herpes zoster ophthalmicus include eye disease, postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), and strokes. VZV has also been found in temporal arteritis biopsies. There is growing evidence that HZ is followed by chronic active VZV infection contributing to these complications. In view of this, and the efficacy of suppressive antiviral treatment in reducing recurrent herpes simplex keratitis, a randomized controlled trial of suppressive valacyclovir to reduce new or worsening anterior segment disease and/or PHN is needed. The zoster vaccine (ZV) is safe and effective in reducing the burden of illness, severity of PHN, and incidence of HZ. It is Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended for persons aged 60 years and above without impaired cellular immunity, and Food and Drug Administration approved for those aged 50 and older. It is most effective in preventing HZ in recipients in their 50s. Because of underusage of the ZV, it has not impacted the epidemiology of the disease. Barriers to its use include cost, variable reimbursement, frozen storage, and lack of a strong recommendation by doctors.

  18. Practical management measures for patients with recurrent herpes labialis.

    PubMed

    St Pierre, S A; Bartlett, B L; Schlosser, B J

    2009-01-01

    Recurrent herpes labialis (RHL) is a common condition associated with the formation of vesicles around the mouth, often preceded by prodromal symptoms including tingling and burning. Treatment is targeted toward individual episodes, but in severe cases, suppressive therapy may be indicated. At present, no cure exists for this troublesome condition. The purpose of this article is to serve as a practical guide in the management of RHL by summarizing current treatments and discussing potential new therapies.

  19. Relapsing herpes simplex encephalitis resulting in Kluver-Bucy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ku, Bon D; Yoon, Sung Sang

    2011-01-01

    Relapsing herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) rarely occurs after acyclovir treatment. We treated a patient with relapsing HSE of the contralateral temporal lobe, resulting in Klüver-Bucy syndrome, after a full-dose acyclovir treatment. This case suggests that physicians should consider sudden behavioral and emotional changes after HSE treatment as a possible indication of relapsing HSE, as well as possible temporal lobe epilepsy, and the need to administer longer acyclovir treatment for select patients.

  20. Burning mouth syndrome due to herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Maria A; Choe, Alexander; Traktinskiy, Igor; Gilden, Don

    2015-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterised by chronic orofacial burning pain. No dental or medical cause has been found. We present a case of burning mouth syndrome of 6 months duration in a healthy 65-year-old woman, which was associated with high copy numbers of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA in the saliva. Her pain resolved completely after antiviral treatment with a corresponding absence of salivary HSV-1 DNA 4 weeks and 6 months later.

  1. Shingles (herpes zoster) vaccine (zostavax(®)): a review of its use in the prevention of herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia in adults aged ≥50 years.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2013-07-01

    The live, attenuated shingles (herpes zoster) vaccine Zostavax(®) is approved in the EU for use in the prevention of herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia in adults aged ≥50 years. In adults aged ≥60 years, zoster vaccine reduced the burden of illness associated with herpes zoster, with reductions in the incidence of postherpetic neuralgia and herpes zoster, according to the results of the Shingles Prevention Study. Results of subsequent Short- and Long-Term Persistence Substudies indicate that the efficacy of zoster vaccine is maintained in the longer term, albeit with a gradual decline over time. In the Zostavax Efficacy and Safety Trial, zoster vaccine reduced the incidence of herpes zoster in adults aged 50-59 years. Findings of these studies are supported by the results of large, retrospective, cohort studies. Zoster vaccine was generally well tolerated, with injection-site adverse events being the most commonly reported adverse events. In conclusion, zoster vaccine provides an important opportunity to reduce the burden of illness associated with herpes zoster by reducing the incidence of herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia.

  2. Seronegative Herpes simplex Associated Esophagogastric Ulcer after Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Matevossian, Edouard; Doll, Dietrich; Weirich, Gregor; Burian, Maria; Knebel, Carolin; Thorban, Stefan; Hüser, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Herpes simplex infection is characterized by acute or subacute infection, often followed by a chronic carrier state. Consecutive recurrences may flare up if immunocompromise occurs. Herpes simplex associated esophagitis or duodenal ulcer have been reported in immunocompromised patients due to neoplasm, HIV/AIDS or therapeutically induced immune deficiency. Here we report the case of an HSV-DNA seronegative patient who developed grade III dysphagia 13 days after allogeneic liver transplantation. Endoscopy revealed an esophageal-gastric ulcer, and biopsy histopathology showed a distinct fibroplastic and capillary ulcer pattern highly suspicious for viral infection. Immunohistochemistry staining revealed a distinct nuclear positive anti-HSV reaction. Antiviral therapy with acyclovir and high-dose PPI led to a complete revision of clinical symptoms within 48 h. Repeat control endoscopy after 7 days showed complete healing of the former ulcer site at the gastroesophageal junction. Although the incidence of post-transplantation Herpes simplex induced gastroesophageal disease is low, the viral HSV ulcer may be included into a differential diagnosis if dysphagia occurs after transplantation even if HSV-DNA PCR is negative. PMID:21490847

  3. Pentyl Gallate Nanoemulsions as Potential Topical Treatment of Herpes Labialis.

    PubMed

    Kelmann, Regina G; Colombo, Mariana; De Araújo Lopes, Sávia Caldeira; Nunes, Ricardo J; Pistore, Morgana; Dall Agnol, Daniele; Rigotto, Caroline; Silva, Izabella Thais; Roman, Silvane S; Teixeira, Helder F; Oliveira Simões, Cláudia M; Koester, Letícia S

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the antiherpes activity of pentyl gallate (PG), suggesting that it could be a promising candidate for the topical treatment of human herpes labialis. PG low aqueous solubility represents a major drawback to its incorporation in topical dosage forms. Hence, the feasibility of incorporating PG into nanoemulsions, the ability to penetrate the skin, to inhibit herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 replication, and to cause dermal sensitization or toxicity were evaluated. Oil/water nanoemulsions containing 0.5% PG were prepared by spontaneous emulsification. The in vitro PG distribution into porcine ear skin after topical application of nanoemulsions was assessed, and the in vitro antiviral activity against HSV-1 replication was evaluated. Acute dermal toxicity and risk of dermal sensitization were evaluated in rat model. Nanoemulsions presented nanometric particle size (from 124.8 to 143.7 nm), high zeta potential (from -50.1 to -66.1 mV), loading efficiency above 99%, and adequate stability during 12 months. All formulations presented anti-HSV-1 activity. PG was able to reach deeper into the dermis more efficiently from the nanoemulsion F4. This formulation as well as PG were considered safe for topical use. Nanoemulsions seem to be a safe and effective approach for topically delivering PG in the treatment of human herpes labialis infection.

  4. Evasion of early antiviral responses by herpes simplex viruses.

    PubMed

    Suazo, Paula A; Ibañez, Francisco J; Retamal-Díaz, Angello R; Paz-Fiblas, Marysol V; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M; González, Pablo A

    2015-01-01

    Besides overcoming physical constraints, such as extreme temperatures, reduced humidity, elevated pressure, and natural predators, human pathogens further need to overcome an arsenal of antimicrobial components evolved by the host to limit infection, replication and optimally, reinfection. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infect humans at a high frequency and persist within the host for life by establishing latency in neurons. To gain access to these cells, herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) must replicate and block immediate host antiviral responses elicited by epithelial cells and innate immune components early after infection. During these processes, infected and noninfected neighboring cells, as well as tissue-resident and patrolling immune cells, will sense viral components and cell-associated danger signals and secrete soluble mediators. While type-I interferons aim at limiting virus spread, cytokines and chemokines will modulate resident and incoming immune cells. In this paper, we discuss recent findings relative to the early steps taking place during HSV infection and replication. Further, we discuss how HSVs evade detection by host cells and the molecular mechanisms evolved by these viruses to circumvent early antiviral mechanisms, ultimately leading to neuron infection and the establishment of latency.

  5. Possible enhancement of BP180 autoantibody production by herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Koji; Aoyama, Yumi; Suzuki, Takahiro; Niwa, Haruo; Horio, Ai; Nishio, Eiichi; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2016-02-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune blistering disease caused by autoantibodies against type XVII collagen/BP180 (BP180). Although the mechanisms of autoantibody production remain to be elucidated, herpes virus infections have been identified as a possible triggering factor for pemphigus. We report a case of herpes zoster (HZ) having anti-BP180 serum antibodies. The patient developed sudden-onset, tense blisters and edematous erythema on the right anterior chest, shoulder and upper back. Histopathology showed remarkable degeneration of keratinocytes, acantholysis and blister formation with ballooning cells, indicating herpes virus infection. A polymerase chain reaction analysis of varicella zoster virus (VZV) was positive in crusts and effusions from the skin lesions, confirming the definitive diagnosis of HZ. Notably, we found that the patient had anti-BP180 serum antibodies in association with the occurrence of HZ. After successful treatment with valacyclovir hydrochloride for 7 days, the serum levels of anti-BP180 antibodies decreased in accordance with the improvement of skin lesions. These findings suggest that the production of anti-BP180 antibodies could be triggered by the reactivation of VZV.

  6. Eye and Periocular Skin Involvement in Herpes Zoster Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kalogeropoulos, Chris D.; Bassukas, Ioannis D.; Moschos, Marilita M.; Tabbara, Khalid F.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) is a clinical manifestation of the reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection and is more common in people with diminished cell-mediated immunity. Lesions and pain correspond to the affected dermatomes, mostly in first or second trigeminal branch and progress from maculae, papules to vesicles and form pustules, and crusts. Complications are cutaneous, visceral, neurological, ocular, but the most debilitating is post-herpetic neuralgia. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus may affect all the ophthalmic structures, but most severe eye-threatening complications are panuveitis, acute retinal necrosis (ARN) and progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) as well. Antiviral medications remain the primary therapy, mainly useful in preventing ocular involvement when begun within 72 hours after the onset of the rash. Timely diagnosis and management of HZO are critical in limiting visual morbidity. Vaccine in adults over 60 was found to be highly effective to boost waning immunity what reduces both the burden of herpes zoster (HZ) disease and the incidence of post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN). PMID:27800502

  7. [Neuropathic pain due to herpes zoster infection with atypical localization].

    PubMed

    Sağır, Özlem; Özaslan, Sabri; Meriç, Yücel; Arslan, İsmail; Köroğlu, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Acute herpes zoster infection appears in the situation of depression of immune system and reactivation of varicella zoster virus which causes small pox. Pain and maculopapular lesion accompany clinical symptoms. Various pharmacological and invasive methods can be used for treatment. Efficient therapy is important for prevention of postherpetic neuralgia and cure of acute pain and dermatological lesions. A 55 years old, 160 cm height and 65 kg weight female patient with complaints of severe pain, sensation of burning, tingling at the right hand and forearm was admitted to our pain department. The patient who was diagnosed as cervical hernia at an other medical center had a normal physical servical spine examination. Patient history and physical examination findings with acute herpes zoster infection was considered. Right stellate ganglion blockade for diagnosis and treatment was performed because of regressed and atypically located lesions and a visual analog scale score of 10. VAS score decreased 50% at 9th min after block, VAS score at 2nd hour was 2. Antiviral, gabapentin, and tricyclic antidepressant treatment was started after stellat ganglion blockade and patient was discharged. After 3 months complaints dissapeared and drug doses were discreased and stopped. In conclusion we think that stellate ganglion blockade can be useful in diagnosis, acute pain control, improving patient comfort and compatibility to drug therapy in atypically located herpes zoster.

  8. Determinants of disclosure of genital herpes to partners

    PubMed Central

    Green, J; Ferrier, S; Kocsis, A; Shadrick, J; Ukoumunne, O; Murphy, S; Hetherton, J

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To identify factors which determine whether and when patients will disclose infection with genital herpes to sexual partners. Methods: The sample was 26 women and 24 men attending a herpes clinic in a sexually transmitted disease clinic. Semistructured interviews yielded quantitative data and also qualitative data which were subjected to content analysis. Results: Characteristics of partners were very important in determining whether disclosure occurred. Respondents were less likely to tell partners regarded as casual. Perception of the likely reaction of partners was important in deciding whether to tell. Many respondents assumed that they were not infectious if they were not currently having an attack or if they were taking antiviral medication. The decision whether to tell tended to be based on considerations of likely discovery and of honesty towards the partner rather than control of transmission. Of patient characteristics only self rated depressed mood was related to disclosure to the most recent partner. Conclusions: Perception of the partner and anticipated partner response is crucially important in determining whether and when disclosure of genital herpes infection occurs. PMID:12576613

  9. Mother-to-Child Transmission of Herpes Simplex Virus.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Sheffield, Jeanne S; Kimberlin, David W

    2014-09-01

    Infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or type 2 (HSV-2), both alpha herpesviruses, are highly prevalent worldwide. Both HSV types commonly cause genital infection, which, when acquired or reactivated during pregnancy, carries with it the risk of transmission to the fetus or neonate. Women who acquire primary or first-episode genital herpes during pregnancy are at greater risk for transmitting the infection than are women with recurrent genital herpes. Because viral infection and reactivation are frequently asymptomatic, many affected women are unaware of their infection and risk of transmission to their infants. Neonatal HSV infection can have devastating long-term consequences, especially when the central nervous system (CNS) is involved. Treatment of affected neonates with intravenous acyclovir has improved outcomes but there is room for further improvement, especially in regard to CNS disease. Working with pregnant women to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HSV is an important component in reducing the overall disease burden of neonatal HSV infections.

  10. Report of twelve years experience in open study of Skinner herpes simplex vaccine towards prevention of herpes genitalis.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Fink, C; Melling, J; Wiblin, C; Thornton, B; Hallworth, J; Gardner, W; McLeish, P; Hartley, C; Buchan, A

    1992-01-01

    Three hundred and forty-seven subjects at risk for herpes genitalis were vaccinated with Skinner vaccine, NFUAc.HSV1.(S-MRC5), and were followed for an average duration of 2 years representing a total consortship of 664.4 years. Based on survey information obtained during this consortship, there were estimated to be 3076 recurrences which summated to 3.5 years total duration of disease and comprised at least 6794 lesions; there were an estimated 51997 episodes of intercourse including at least 241 episodes of unprotected intercourse in the presence of herpetic lesions. The rate of contraction of herpes genitalis was 6 of 54 consorts (11.1%) who received one vaccination and 7 of 293 (2.4%) who received two, three of four vaccinations. There was no evidence of physical or psychological side effects from vaccination.

  11. [Herpes Zoster, predictive element of human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV). Epidemio-clinical study in Cotonou (Benin)].

    PubMed

    Yedomon, H G; Doango-Padonou, F; Adjibi, A; Latoundji, S; Zohoun, I

    1993-01-01

    An epidemio-clinical study of Herpes Zoster in 39 healthy patients of Benin has permitted to the authors to evaluate the positive predictive value of Herpes Zoster for HIV infection on West Africa; and to compare it with results of central Africa. The mean age of patients is 34.74 years. The positive predictive value of Herpes Zoster for HIV infection is 41.02%. It is increased by the cranial site of Herpes Zoster.

  12. The equine herpes virus 4 thymidine kinase is a better suicide gene than the human herpes virus 1 thymidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Loubière, L; Tiraby, M; Cazaux, C; Brisson, E; Grisoni, M; Zhao-Emonet, J; Tiraby, G; Klatzmann, D

    1999-09-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase suicide gene (HSV1tk) together with ganciclovir (GCV) have been successfully used for in vivo treatment of various experimental tumors, and many clinical trials using this system have been launched. With the aim to improve this therapeutic system, we compared the potential efficacy of different herpes virus derived thymidine kinases (HSV1, varicella-zoster virus, equine herpes virus type-4 and Epstein-Barr virus) as suicide genes in association with the nucleoside analogs acyclovir, ganciclovir and bromovinyldeoxyur- idine. Using various murine and human cell lines expressing these viral tk, we show that HSV1- and EHV4tk are the more efficient suicide genes for the different nucleoside analogs tested. Moreover, EHV4tk expressing murine and human cells were three- to 12-fold more sensitive to GCV than HSV1tk expressing cells. This was correlated with the presence of five-fold higher amounts of the toxic triphosphated-GCV in EHV4- versus HSV1tk expressing cells. Altogether, these experiments underline the potential advantages of the EHV4tk as a suicide gene.

  13. Herpes zoster vaccine effectiveness and manifestations of herpes zoster and associated pain by vaccination status.

    PubMed

    Marin, Mona; Yawn, Barbara P; Hales, Craig M; Wollan, Peter C; Bialek, Stephanie R; Zhang, John; Kurland, Marge J; Harpaz, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Options for managing herpes zoster (HZ)-related pain and complications have limited effectiveness, making HZ prevention through vaccination an important strategy. Limited data are available on HZ vaccine effectiveness against confirmed HZ and manifestations of HZ among vaccinated persons. We conducted a matched case-control study to assess HZ vaccine effectiveness for prevention of HZ and other HZ-related outcomes and a cohort study of persons with HZ to compare HZ-related outcomes by vaccination status. Cases were identified through active surveillance among persons age ≥ 60 years with HZ onset and health-care encounters during 2010-2011 in Southeastern Minnesota. Controls were age- and sex-matched to cases. Data were collected by medical record review and from participants via interviews and daily pain diaries. 266 HZ case-patients and 362 matched controls were enrolled in the vaccine effectiveness studies and 303 case-patients in the cohort study of HZ characteristics by vaccination status. Vaccination was associated with 54% (95% CI:32%-69%) reduction in HZ incidence, 58% (95% CI:31%-75%) reduction in HZ prodromal symptoms, and 70% (95% CI:33%-87%) reduction in medically-attended prodrome. HZ vaccine was statistically significant effective at preventing postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) measured at 30 d after rash onset, 61% (95% CI: 22%-80%). Among persons who developed HZ, no differences were found by vaccination status in severity or duration of HZ pain after rash onset. In this population-based study, HZ vaccination was associated with >50% reduction in HZ, HZ prodrome, and medically-attended prodrome.

  14. Herpes zoster in a 2-year-old vaccinated against varicella.

    PubMed

    Ulman, Catherine A; Trevino, Julian J; Gandhi, Rishi K

    2014-01-15

    Herpes zoster is uncommon in the pediatric population. We report a case of herpes zoster in a 2-year-old boy who received the live attenuated varicella zoster virus vaccination at his 12-month pediatric visit. The child was treated with acyclovir and recovered without complications.

  15. Serologic Screening for Herpes Simplex Virus among University Students: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, Hayley; Nanda, Joy P.; Joffe, Alain; Roberts, Jessica; Rompalo, Anne; Melendez, Johan; Zenilman, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the feasibility of conducting serologic testing for the herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) among university students and assessed the psychosocial impact of an HSV-2 diagnosis. Methods: The authors recruited a convenience sample of 100 students (aged 18-39 years) without a history of genital herpes from 1 university…

  16. A novel vaccine (Zostavax) to prevent herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Holcomb, Katherine; Weinberg, Jeffrey M

    2006-10-01

    Varicella-zoster virus is the causal agent of varicella and herpes zoster in humans. Herpes zoster results from reactivation of latent varicella-zoster virus (VZV) within the sensory ganglia. The incidence and severity of herpes zoster increase with advancing age. More than half of all persons in whom herpes zoster develops are older than 60 years. The most frequent debilitating complication is postherpetic neuralgia, a neuropathic pain syndrome that persists or develops after the dermatomal rash has healed and can be prolonged and disabling. There are many limitations of current therapies for herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia. A live attenuated VZV vaccine has been developed and recently approved by the FDA for the prevention of herpes zoster in individuals 60 years of age and older. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with 38,546 patients 60 years of age or older, the use of the zoster vaccine reduced the burden of illness due to herpes zoster by 61.1% (P < .001), reduced the incidence of postherpetic neuralgia by 66.5% (P < .001), and reduced the incidence of herpes zoster by 51.3% (P < .001). In this review, we will discuss the history of the use of the varicella vaccine in children, and the subsequent development of the new zoster vaccine.

  17. Nd:YAG laser treatment of herpes and aphthous ulcers: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkins, Frederick M.; O'Toole, Thomas J.; Yancey, John M.

    2000-06-01

    Previously herpes labialis and recurrent aphthous ulcers have not been successfully treated. A preliminary study with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser evaluated the results with a protocol of four minute non-contact exposures for both types of lesions. Most patients experienced relief of symptoms. The progress of herpes lesion was halted and aphthous lesions became desensitized.

  18. Routine Testing for Genital Herpes of Little Benefit: U.S. Experts

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_162650.html Routine Testing for Genital Herpes of Little Benefit: U.S. Experts Early diagnosis won' ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Routine blood test screening for genital herpes is not recommended for teens and adults -- including ...

  19. Incidence of Alpha-Herpes virus induced ocular disease in Suriname.

    PubMed

    Adhin, Malti R; Grunberg, Meritha G; Labadie-Bracho, Mergiory; Pawiroredjo, Jerrel

    2012-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection of the corneal stroma is the most prominent cause of scar formation impairing visual acuity and HSV keratitis is the leading cause of corneal opacity throughout the world. Suriname lacked test systems for microbial causes of ocular disease, therefore a polymerase chain reaction-based Herpes virus assay was introduced, enabling prompt recognition, and timely treatment, preventing progressive eye damage. The incidence and epidemiology of Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), type 2 (HSV-2), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) in ocular disease in Suriname was assessed. In a cross-sectional prospective study, ocular swabs were collected from 91 patients with a presumptive α-Herpes virus ocular infection attending the Academic Hospital between November 2008 and August 2010 and were tested by a PCR-based α-Herpes virus assay. Alpha-Herpes virus ophthalmic infections were caused predominantly by HSV-1 with a prevalence of 31%. The prevalences of VZV, HSV-2, and a mixed HSV-1/HSV-2 infection were 4%, 3%, and 2%, respectively. The first reported annual incidence of herpetic induced ocular disease in Suriname was estimated at 11.4 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI, 4.8-18.1). No clear age, ethnic or gender dependent difference in incidence was observed. The information obtained on α-Herpes virus positive ocular infections and the distribution of subtypes provided the first insight in the South American situation of α-Herpes virus induced ocular disease.

  20. Association between Psychopathic Disorder and Serum Antibody to Herpes Simplex Virus (Type 1)

    PubMed Central

    Cleobury, J. F.; Skinner, G. R. B.; Thouless, M. E.; Wildy, P.

    1971-01-01

    The sera of a small of patients has been examined for herpes simplex virus antibody. Three clinically-defined groups of patients were compared: (a) aggressive psychopaths, (b) psychiatric controls, and (c) general hospital patients. The first group had an unusually high average kinetic neutralization constant against type 1 herpes simplex virus. PMID:5543996

  1. Association between psychopathic disorder and serum antibody to herpes simplex virus (type 1).

    PubMed

    Cleobury, J F; Skinner, G R; Thouless, M E; Wildy, P

    1971-02-20

    The sera of a small of patients has been examined for herpes simplex virus antibody. Three clinically-defined groups of patients were compared: (a) aggressive psychopaths, (b) psychiatric controls, and (c) general hospital patients. The first group had an unusually high average kinetic neutralization constant against type 1 herpes simplex virus.

  2. Laboratory diagnosis and epidemiology of herpes simplex 1 and 2 genital infections.

    PubMed

    Glinšek Biškup, Urška; Uršič, Tina; Petrovec, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 are the main cause of genital ulcers worldwide. Although herpes simplex virus type 2 is the major cause of genital lesions, herpes simplex virus type 1 accounts for half of new cases in developed countries. Herpes simplex virus type 2 seroprevalence rises with sexual activity from adolescence through adulthood. Slovenian data in a high-risk population shows 16% seroprevalence of HSV-2. HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNA in genital swabs was detected in 19% and 20.7%, respectively. In most cases, genital herpes is asymptomatic. Primary genital infection with herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 can be manifested by a severe clinical picture, involving the vesicular skin and mucosal changes and ulcerative lesions of the vulva, vagina, and cervix in women and in the genital region in men. Direct methods of viral genome detection are recommended in the acute stage of primary and recurrent infections when manifest ulcers or lesions are evident. Serological testing is recommended as an aid in diagnosing genital herpes in patients with reinfection in atypical or already healed lesions. When herpes lesions are present, all sexual activities should be avoided to prevent transmission of infection. Antiviral drugs can reduce viral shedding and thus reduce the risk of sexual transmission of the virus.

  3. Grover's disease secondarily infected with herpes simplex virus and Staphylococcus aureus: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Bunce, Penelope Am; Stanford, Duncan G

    2013-11-01

    The case of a 73-year old man with herpes simplex and staphylococcus aureus infection complicating established Grover's disease is presented. This was treated successfully with valaciclovir. While reports of bacterial and herpetic infections complicating other acantholytic diseases, such as Darier's disease, have been published previously, only one publication to date shows herpes simplex infection in Grover's disease.

  4. Herpes simplex virus reactivation after subtotal hemispherectomy in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Gong, Tracie; Bingaman, William; Danziger-Isakov, Lara; Tuxhorn, Ingrid; Goldfarb, Johanna

    2010-12-01

    We report herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) in a toddler after a subtotal hemispherectomy for seizures related to HSE 16 months earlier. Herpes simplex virus reactivation in the cerebrospinal fluid shortly after treatment of HSE has been described, but is extremely rare in other situations. HSE reactivation is a potential complication of epilepsy surgery after HSE in children.

  5. Herpes zoster vaccine: clinical trial evidence and implications for medical practice.

    PubMed

    Burke, M Susan

    2007-03-01

    This review of the data from the Shingles Prevention Study (SPS) highlights the efficacy and safety of a high-titer live attenuated herpes zoster virus vaccine in preventing herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) in adults aged 60 years or older. In the SPS, the vaccine reduced the burden of illness due to herpes zoster disease by 61.1% and the incidence of its most common and debilitating sequela, PHN, by 66.5%. In addition, vaccination was associated with a 51.3% reduction in the overall incidence of herpes zoster. Also, subjects in whom herpes zoster did develop had decreased pain and discomfort. The vaccine was safe in the SPS population, with little differentiation from the safety profile of placebo other than an increased risk for reactions at the injection site. Rates of serious adverse events, systemic adverse events, hospitalization, and death were low and similar to those observed in the group that received placebo.

  6. Contacts with children and young people and adult risk of suffering herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Salleras, M; Domínguez, A; Soldevila, N; Prat, A; Garrido, P; Torner, N; Borrás, E; Salleras, L

    2011-10-13

    We carried out a matched case-control study to analyze the possible association between exposure to the children and the risk of suffering herpes-zoster in adulthood. Cases of herpes zoster in immunocompetent healthy patients aged ≥ 25 years seen in the dermatology department of the Sagrado Corazón Hospital in 2007-2008 were matched with four controls. Data were analyzed using conditional logistic regression. 153 cases and 604 matched controls were included. Contacts with children were significantly associated with a reduction in the risk of suffering herpes zoster in adulthood (adjusted OR 0.56 [0.37-0.85]). Herpes-zoster vaccination in immunocompetent people aged ≥ 50 years could counteract the possible negative effects of mass varicella vaccination in childhood on the epidemiology of herpes zoster in adults.

  7. Herpes labialis manifesting as recurrent erythema multiforme and solitary ulcer on face.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Biju; Bahal, Ashish; Raghav, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    A 65-year-old lady presented with recurrent crusting of lips and ulceration on face since the last three weeks. History revealed recurrent herpes labialis during the previous three years. Examination showed hemorrhagic crusting of lips and a solitary crusted ulcer on the right cheek. The patient showed partial improvement with antiviral therapy. On withdrawal of initial therapy, the patient developed classical lesions of herpes labialis and erythema multiforme. Investigations confirmed herpes simplex infection and erythema multiforme. All the lesions including the ulcer on the face responded to maintenance therapy with antivirals. Though herpes infection has been found to cause ulcers especially in the peri-anal region in immunosuppressed individuals, it is the first time in literature that a facial ulcer has been ascribed to herpes simplex virus that too in an immunocompetent individual.

  8. Recurrent Transcortical Motor Aphasia—Another CNS Infectious Syndrome Associated with Herpes Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajan, Raghav; Salgado, Efrain

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis is an acute/subacute illness that causes both general and focal signs of cerebral dysfunction with fever, headache, and confusion as cardinal features. Recurrent herpes simplex meningitis, also known as Mollaret’s meningitis, is another manifestation of central nervous system herpetic infection with recurrent episodes of fever, headache, and nuchal rigidity associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) evidence of active herpes simplex infection. Bell’s palsy is yet another manifestation of a herpes virus infection in at least some reported cases documented by CSF analysis. We report a case of a 70-year-old male who presented with acute transcortical motor aphasia initiating a stroke work-up that was negative. Physical examination revealed genital vesicles, and the CSF was consistent with active herpes simplex infection. PMID:26958155

  9. Increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients with herpes zoster: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Po-yuan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Sung, Fung-Chang; Chou, Tzu-Chieh; Lee, Yuan-Teh

    2014-05-01

    The association between herpes zoster and cardiovascular complications remains vague with limited study on the association between these two disorders. This study evaluated the risk of cardiovascular diseases in patients with herpes zoster. From insurance claims data of Taiwan, 19,483 patients with herpes zoster diagnosed in 1998-2008 and 77,932 subjects without herpes zoster were identified in this study. Both cohorts were followed up until the end of 2010 to measure the incidence of arrhythmia and coronary artery disease. The incidence rate ratio and adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of the cardiovascular complications with 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated. The incidence of arrhythmia was 1.17-fold greater in the herpes zoster cohort than in the non-herpes zoster cohort (13.2 vs. 11.3 per 1,000 person-years), with an adjusted HR of 1.16 (P < 0.01). The coronary artery disease incidence in the herpes zoster cohort was 1.16-fold higher than that in the non-herpes zoster cohort (9.02 vs. 7.83 per 1,000 person-years), with an adjusted HR of 1.11 (P < 0.01). Over the stratified follow-up years, adjusted HRs were 1.22 (95% CI = 1.12-1.34) for arrhythmia and 1.14 (95% CI = 1.02-1.28) for coronary artery disease within 2 years after herpes zoster diagnosis. The risk measured for these disorders declined over time. Comorbidities of hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia also contributed to these cardiovascular disorders with greater extent. It is concluded that the contribution of herpes zoster to the risk of arrhythmia and cardiovascular diseases is less strong than that of hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia.

  10. RNA interference inhibits herpes simplex virus type 1 isolated from saliva samples and mucocutaneous lesions.

    PubMed

    Silva, Amanda Perse da; Lopes, Juliana Freitas; Paula, Vanessa Salete de

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of RNA interference to inhibit herpes simplex virus type-1 replication in vitro. For herpes simplex virus type-1 gene silencing, three different small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the herpes simplex virus type-1 UL39 gene (sequence si-UL 39-1, si-UL 39-2, and si-UL 39-3) were used, which encode the large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, an essential enzyme for DNA synthesis. Herpes simplex virus type-1 was isolated from saliva samples and mucocutaneous lesions from infected patients. All mucocutaneous lesions' samples were positive for herpes simplex virus type-1 by real-time PCR and by virus isolation; all herpes simplex virus type-1 from saliva samples were positive by real-time PCR and 50% were positive by virus isolation. The levels of herpes simplex virus type-1 DNA remaining after siRNA treatment were assessed by real-time PCR, whose results demonstrated that the effect of siRNAs on gene expression depends on siRNA concentration. The three siRNA sequences used were able to inhibit viral replication, assessed by real-time PCR and plaque assays and among them, the sequence si-UL 39-1 was the most effective. This sequence inhibited 99% of herpes simplex virus type-1 replication. The results demonstrate that silencing herpes simplex virus type-1 UL39 expression by siRNAs effectively inhibits herpes simplex virus type-1 replication, suggesting that siRNA based antiviral strategy may be a potential therapeutic alternative.

  11. Relative potencies of different anti-herpes agents in the topical treatment of cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection of athymic nude mice.

    PubMed Central

    Descamps, J; De Clercq, E; Barr, P J; Jones, A S; Walker, R T; Torrence, P F; Shugar, D

    1979-01-01

    Thirteen established anti-herpes compounds have been directly compared in a single assay system for their effects on the development of herpetic skin lesions, and mortality associated therewith, in athymic nude (nu/nu) mice inoculated intracutaneously with herpes simplex virus type 1 (KOS). When applied topically (at 1% in a water-soluble ointment), phosphonoacetic acid, E-5-(2-bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine, acycloguanosine, and trisodium phosphonoformate emerged as the most active agents. PMID:526011

  12. Abdominal distention and constipation followed by herpes zoster infection in a 2-month-old female infant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongfeng; Fang, Fang

    2015-08-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms of herpes zoster in infants are rarely reported. A 2-month-old female infant presented with herpes zoster and additional complication of abdominal distention and constipation. While rashes resolved, abdominal distention and constipation improved soon. To our knowledge, this is the first report of gastrointestinal complication of herpes zoster in infants. Physicians should be aware of the potential for motor involvement of herpes zoster in such infants. Herpes zoster should be considered during the diagnosis in the event of infants presenting with constipation.

  13. Concurrent reactivation of herpes simplex and varicella zoster viruses confirmed by the loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tsukane; Yagami, Akiko; Suzuki, Kayoko; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent reactivation of herpes simplex and varicella zoster viruses is rare. Here, we describe the case of an elderly patient with herpes labialis and herpes zoster manifesting as a right-side facial eruption with vesicles and crusting. The loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay demonstrated the presence of both herpes simplex virus type 1 and varicella zoster virus in swab samples taken from the face, which was confirmed by real-time PCR, suggesting concurrent reactivation of both viruses. The use of the LAMP assay in the present case indicates its usefulness in the diagnosis of atypical herpes infections.

  14. Antigenic relatedness of equine herpes virus types 1 and 3.

    PubMed

    Gutekunst, D E; Malmquist, W A; Becvar, C S

    1978-01-01

    Antiserums prepared in specific pathogen free (SPF) ponies were used in direct and indirect immunofluorescence, immunodiffusion, complement fixation and serum neutralization procedures to study the interrelationships of the three types of equine herpes viruses (EHV-1, EHV-2, and EHV-3). Equine cell cultures infected with each type virus fluoresced when stained with homologous conjugated antiserum. In reciprocal tests EHV-1 and EHV-3 cross-fluoresced, but EHV-2 did not cross-fluoresce. Non-infected cell cultures did not fluoresce when stained with the 3 conjugates. EHV-1 and EHV-3 cross-fluoresced in reciprocal indirect fluorescent antibody tests, but no cross-fluorescence was shown with EHV-2. Antigens representing each type of equine herpes virus reacted with their homologous antiserum in the immunodiffusion test. In reciprocal tests, a common line(s) of identity formed with EHV-1 and EHV-3; however, the precipitin line(s) was not common with EHV-2. Antigen prepared from noninfected embryonic mule skin (EMS) cell cultures did not react with any of the antiserums. Specific complement-fixing antibodies were present in antiserums when tested against their homologous antigens. In reciprocal complement fixation tests EHV-1 and EHV-3 crossreacted, but no cross-reactivity was shown with EHV-2. Significant levels of neutralizing antibody were in an antiserum when tested against homologous virus, whereas cross-neutralization was not detectable in reciprocal tests. These studies indicate that each type of equine herpes virus contains specific antigenic components, and EHV-1 and EHV-3 share a common antigen(s) that is not shared with EHV-2.

  15. Genital Herpes: Insights into Sexually Transmitted Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jaishankar, Dinesh; Shukla, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Etiology, transmission and protection: Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) is a leading cause of sexually transmitted infections with recurring manifestations throughout the lifetime of infected hosts. Currently no effective vaccines or prophylactics exist that provide complete protection or immunity from the virus, which is endemic throughout the world. Pathology/Symptomatology: Primary and recurrent infections result in lesions and inflammation around the genital area and the latter accounts for majority of genital herpes instances. Immunocompromised patients including neonates are susceptible to additional systemic infections including debilitating consequences of nervous system inflammation. Epidemiology, incidence and prevalence: More than 500 million people are infected worldwide and most reported cases involve the age groups between 16-40 years, which coincides with an increase in sexual activity among this age group. While these numbers are an estimate, the actual numbers may be underestimated as many people are asymptomatic or do not report the symptoms. Treatment and curability: Currently prescribed medications, mostly nucleoside analogs, only reduce the symptoms caused by an active infection, but do not eliminate the virus or reduce latency. Therefore, no cure exists against genital herpes and infected patients suffer from periodic recurrences of disease symptoms for their entire lives. Molecular mechanisms of infection: The last few decades have generated many new advances in our understanding of the mechanisms that drive HSV infection. The viral entry receptors such as nectin-1 and HVEM have been identified, cytoskeletal signaling and membrane structures such as filopodia have been directly implicated in viral entry, host motor proteins and their viral ligands have been shown to facilitate capsid transport and many host and HSV proteins have been identified that help with viral replication and pathogenesis. New understanding has emerged on the role of

  16. Evolutionary origins of human herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Wertheim, Joel O; Smith, Martin D; Smith, Davey M; Scheffler, Konrad; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L

    2014-09-01

    Herpesviruses have been infecting and codiverging with their vertebrate hosts for hundreds of millions of years. The primate simplex viruses exemplify this pattern of virus-host codivergence, at a minimum, as far back as the most recent common ancestor of New World monkeys, Old World monkeys, and apes. Humans are the only primate species known to be infected with two distinct herpes simplex viruses: HSV-1 and HSV-2. Human herpes simplex viruses are ubiquitous, with over two-thirds of the human population infected by at least one virus. Here, we investigated whether the additional human simplex virus is the result of ancient viral lineage duplication or cross-species transmission. We found that standard phylogenetic models of nucleotide substitution are inadequate for distinguishing among these competing hypotheses; the extent of synonymous substitutions causes a substantial underestimation of the lengths of some of the branches in the phylogeny, consistent with observations in other viruses (e.g., avian influenza, Ebola, and coronaviruses). To more accurately estimate ancient viral divergence times, we applied a branch-site random effects likelihood model of molecular evolution that allows the strength of natural selection to vary across both the viral phylogeny and the gene alignment. This selection-informed model favored a scenario in which HSV-1 is the result of ancient codivergence and HSV-2 arose from a cross-species transmission event from the ancestor of modern chimpanzees to an extinct Homo precursor of modern humans, around 1.6 Ma. These results provide a new framework for understanding human herpes simplex virus evolution and demonstrate the importance of using selection-informed models of sequence evolution when investigating viral origin hypotheses.

  17. The inactivation of herpes simplex virus by some Solanaceae glycoalkaloids.

    PubMed

    Thorne, H V; Clarke, G F; Skuce, R

    1985-12-01

    The infectivity of herpes simplex virus Type I in tissue culture was inhibited by prior incubation with aqueous suspensions of glycoalkaloids in order of activity alpha-chaconine greater than alpha-tomatine greater than alpha-solasonine but not by the corresponding aglycones, solanidine, tomatidine and solasodine. However, inhibition was not only dependent on the presence of a sugar moiety since the glycone alpha-solanine was inactive under the conditions used. The glycones, but not the aglycones, showed cytopathic effects on cellular membranes of Vero cells and erythrocytes; therefore, it is suggested that inactivation of virus results from insertion of the glycones into the viral envelope.

  18. Orbital apex syndrome secondary to herpes zoster virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Merino-Iglesias, Alexia; Montero, Javier Antonio; Calabuig-Goena, Maria; Giraldo-Agudelo, Luisa Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    A male patient with herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) presented with left exophthalmos, external and internal ophthalmoplegia and decreased visual acuity. A CT scan revealed myositis without significant compression of the optic nerve. Intravenous acyclovir and oral steroids were started with improvement of the symptoms and eventual complete recovery.Orbital apex syndrome is a rare complication of HZO. Multiple pathogenic mechanisms are involved, including a direct cytopathic effect of the virus as in the present case. Early diagnosis and therapy may lead to complete recovery of visual function. PMID:24614776

  19. Celiac Crisis Associated with Herpes Simplex Virus Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Linz, Christopher M.; Tsay, Julie L.; Jin, Ming; El-Dika, Samer S.

    2016-01-01

    Celiac crisis is a rare presentation of celiac disease that is characterized by life-threatening electrolyte abnormalities, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, and diarrhea. Triggers for celiac crisis include major surgeries, pancreatitis, and infections of cytomegalovirus, and salmonella. A 24-year-old woman presented with celiac crisis associated with severe herpes simplex virus (HSV) esophagitis. This case demonstrates that nutritional deficiencies seen in celiac disease can result in a relative immunodeficiency, which may lead to other infectious complications. Additionally, early recognition of celiac crisis is imperative as the metabolic derangements may be life-threatening, and therapy with gluten restriction and nutritional repletion is effective. PMID:27921058

  20. Fulminant herpes simplex hepatitis in a patient with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Shlien, R D; Meyers, S; Lee, J A; Dische, R; Janowitz, H D

    1988-01-01

    A 16 year old girl with ulcerative colitis developed hepatitis with a high fever, leukopenia and a marked rise in serum transaminases without jaundice. There were no skin, oral, or genital lesions. Liver biopsy was precluded by abnormalities in coagulation. Postmortem examination of the liver by light and electron microscopy, culture, immunoperoxidase and immunofluorescent staining confirmed the diagnosis of hepatitis due to type 1 herpes simplex virus. Despite the rarity, this viral aetiology should be included in the differential diagnosis of all patients with severe hepatitis. The absence of mucocutaneous lesions should not exclude the diagnosis, especially when other clinical features are compatible. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3345937

  1. Herpes Simplex Virus Oncolytic Therapy for Pediatric Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Gregory K; Pressey, Joseph G; Reddy, Alyssa T; Markert, James M; Gillespie, G Yancey

    2009-01-01

    Despite improving survival rates for children with cancer, a subset of patients exist with disease resistant to traditional therapies such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. These patients require newer, targeted treatments used alone or in combination with more traditional approaches. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV) is one of these newer therapies that offer promise for several difficult to treat pediatric malignancies. The potential benefit of HSV therapy in pediatric solid tumors including brain tumors, neuroblastomas, and sarcomas is reviewed along with the many challenges that need to be addressed prior to moving oncolytic HSV therapy from the laboratory to the beside in the pediatric population. PMID:19367259

  2. Prevention strategies for herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Myron J.; Gershon, Anne A.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Brisson, Marc; Stanberry, Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Impairment of varicella zoster virus (VZV)-specific cell-mediated immunity, including impairment due to immunosenescence, is associated with an increased risk of developing herpes zoster (HZ), whereas levels of anti-VZV antibodies do not correlate with HZ risk. This crucial role of VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity suggests that boosting these responses by vaccination will be an effective strategy for reducing the burden of HZ. Other strategies focus on preventing the major complication of HZ – post-herpetic neuralgia. These strategies include pre-emptive treatment with drugs such as tricyclic antidepressants, anticonvulsants and analgesics. PMID:20510262

  3. Luxury perfusion phenomenon in acute herpes simplex virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Uesugi, M; Igeta, Y; Kondo, S; Sun, X; Hirai, S

    1995-02-01

    In a patient with acute herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis, positron emission tomography (PET) demonstrated increased cerebral blood flow in the affected temporal lobe accompanied by reduction in the cerebral oxygen extraction fraction and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen, i.e., luxury perfusion. Follow-up PET studies showed reduction in cerebral perfusion until it was more closely coupled with oxygen metabolism after the resolution of the acute inflammation. These findings support previous single photon emission computed tomographic data and provide a pathophysiological background for the occurrence of hyperperfusion in HSV encephalitis. This is an interesting example of the luxury perfusion phenomenon occurring in a disease other than cerebral ischemia.

  4. Extratemporal herpes encephalitis during natalizumab treatment: A case report.

    PubMed

    Haggiag, Shalom; Prosperini, Luca; Galgani, Simonetta; Pozzilli, Carlo; Pinnetti, Carmela

    2016-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSE) is a rare but often fatal disease if left untreated. MRI typically shows the characteristic findings of medial temporal lobe and insular involvement, while diagnosis in confirmed by CSF PCR. In immunocompromised state, HSE may have atypical clinical and radiological features. We report a MS patient under natalizumab treatment with HSE, who presented with MRI lesions exclusively in the right parietal lobe. The patient was timely started on acyclovir resulting in marked improvement. A high index of suspicion for HSE should be maintained when a patient presents with fever and extratemporal lesions, even more in immunocompromised subjects.

  5. Herpes simplex infection in a juvenile orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus pygmaeus).

    PubMed

    Kik, Maria J L; Bos, Jan H; Groen, Jan; Dorrestein, Gerry M

    2005-03-01

    A juvenile orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus pygmaeus) died after 8 days of diarrhea and vomiting. Necropsy showed petechial hemorrhages in the skin, the myocardium, and the peritoneal membranes. The lungs were hyperemic and edematous, and the liver and spleen were enlarged. Histologic changes consisted of interstitial pneumonia, hepatitis, and splenic hyperplasia. Numerous eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies were visible in pulmonary epithelial cells, hepatocytes, and splenic endothelial cells. Electron microscopic examination revealed herpesvirus in hepatocyte nuclei. Polymerase chain reaction of liver tissue demonstrated the presence of a herpes simplex virus-1.

  6. Heat shock and herpes virus: enhanced reactivation without untargeted mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, C.D.; Carney, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Enhanced reactivation of Ultraviolet-irradiated virus has been reported to occur in heat-shocked host cells. Since enhanced virus reactivation is often accompanied by untargeted mutagenesis, we investigated whether such mutagenesis would occur for herpes simplex virus (HSV) in CV-1 monkey kidney cells subjected to heat shock. In addition to expressing enhanced reactivation, the treated cells were transiently more susceptible to infection by unirradiated HSV. No mutagenesis of unirradiated HSV was found whether infection occurred at the time of increased susceptibility to infection or during expression of enhanced viral reactivation.

  7. Herpes simplex virus oncolytic therapy for pediatric malignancies.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Gregory K; Pressey, Joseph G; Reddy, Alyssa T; Markert, James M; Gillespie, G Yancey

    2009-07-01

    Despite improving survival rates for children with cancer, a subset of patients exist with disease resistant to traditional therapies such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. These patients require newer, targeted treatments used alone or in combination with more traditional approaches. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV) is one of these newer therapies that offer promise for several difficult to treat pediatric malignancies. The potential benefit of HSV therapy in pediatric solid tumors including brain tumors, neuroblastomas, and sarcomas is reviewed along with the many challenges that need to be addressed prior to moving oncolytic HSV therapy from the laboratory to the beside in the pediatric population.

  8. Current management and recommendations for access to antiviral therapy of herpes labialis.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Anthony; Griffiths, Paul; Leone, Peter; Mindel, Adrian; Patel, Rajul; Stanberry, Lawrence; Whitley, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Herpes labialis is a common skin infective condition, worldwide, which is primarily caused by HSV-1. Recurrent episodes of herpes labialis, also known as cold sores, can be frequent, painful, long-lasting and disfiguring for infected patients. At present, there are two types of antivirals for the treatment of herpes labialis, topical and oral, which are available over the counter or as prescription-only. The aim of antiviral therapy is to block viral replication to enable shortening the duration of symptoms and to accelerate healing of the lesions associated with herpes labialis. This review examines the evidence for the effectiveness of current topical and oral antivirals in the management of recurrent episodes of herpes labialis. In most countries, oral antivirals for herpes labialis are available as prescription-only. However, in early 2010, the oral antiviral famciclovir was reclassified from prescription-only medicine to pharmacist-controlled status in New Zealand. The benefits and risks associated with moving an antiviral therapy for herpes labialis from prescription-only to pharmacist-controlled status are reviewed here, and the implications for patients, general physicians and pharmacists are considered.

  9. Sex differences in health care provider communication during genital herpes care and patients' health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ports, Katie A; Reddy, Diane M; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L

    2013-01-01

    Research in primary care medicine demonstrates that health care providers' communication varies depending on their sex, and that these sex differences in communication can influence patients' health outcomes. The present study aimed to examine the extent to which sex differences in primary care providers' communication extend to the sensitive context of gynecological care for genital herpes and whether these potential sex differences in communication influence patients' herpes transmission prevention behaviors and herpes-related quality of life. Women (N = 123) from the United States recently diagnosed with genital herpes anonymously completed established measures in which they rated (a) their health care providers' communication, (b) their herpes transmission prevention behaviors, and (c) their herpes-related quality of life. The authors found significant sex differences in health care providers' communication; this finding supports that sex differences in primary care providers' communication extend to gynecological care for herpes. Specifically, patients with female health care providers indicated that their providers engaged in more patient-centered communication and were more satisfied with their providers' communication. However, health care providers' sex did not predict women's quality of life, a finding that suggests that health care providers' sex alone is of little importance in patients' health outcomes. Patient-centered communication was significantly associated with greater quality-of-life scores and may provide a promising avenue for intervention.

  10. Concomitant herpes simplex virus colitis and hepatitis in a man with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Varun K.; Friedman-Moraco, Rachel J.; Quigley, Brian C.; Farris, Alton B.; Norvell, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Herpesvirus infections often complicate the clinical course of patients with inflammatory bowel disease; however, invasive disease due to herpes simplex virus is distinctly uncommon. Methods: We present a case of herpes simplex virus colitis and hepatitis, review all the previously published cases of herpes simplex virus colitis, and discuss common clinical features and outcomes. We also discuss the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of herpes simplex virus infections, focusing specifically on patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Results: A 43-year-old man with ulcerative colitis, previously controlled with an oral 5-aminosalicylic agent, developed symptoms of a colitis flare that did not respond to treatment with systemic corticosteroid therapy. One week later he developed orolabial ulcers and progressive hepatic dysfunction, with markedly elevated transaminases and coagulopathy. He underwent emergent total colectomy when imaging suggested bowel micro-perforation. Pathology from both the colon and liver was consistent with herpes simplex virus infection, and a viral culture of his orolabial lesions and a serum polymerase chain reaction assay also identified herpes simplex virus. He was treated with systemic antiviral therapy and made a complete recovery. Conclusions: Disseminated herpes simplex virus infection with concomitant involvement of the colon and liver has been reported only 3 times in the published literature, and to our knowledge this is the first such case in a patient with inflammatory bowel disease. The risk of invasive herpes simplex virus infections increases with some, but not all immunomodulatory therapies. Optimal management of herpes simplex virus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease includes targeted prophylactic therapy for patients with evidence of latent infection, and timely initiation of antiviral therapy for those patients suspected to have invasive disease. PMID:27759636

  11. [Pain associated with craniofacial and cervical herpes zoster].

    PubMed

    George, B; Lory, C

    2007-10-01

    Ophthalmological and cervical involvement of herpes zoster virus ranks second and third, respectively, in terms of localization frequency. Involvement of the cranial nerves is a particular sign of complications, notably ocular complications, possibly compromising the visual or facial prognosis through involvement of the VIIth nerve, which is responsible for facial paralysis. These types of involvement should be rapidly diagnosed and treated so as to limit these complications. The pain associated with herpes zoster remains frequent and difficult to treat, even if today the criteria for defining postzoster pain is increasingly refined. Antalgic and antiviral treatment should be initiated early, from the very first signs, to attempt to reduce the incidence of this postzoster pain. The risk factors, associated with the development of postzoster pain are age over 50 years, the severity of the skin rash and the intensity of the acute pain, and the existence of a prodromic pain phase before onset. The European Federation of Neurological Societies has recently published guidelines on the pharmacological treatments for postzoster pain. Nerve block treatments remain at a limited evidence level. Patients with postzoster pain should be managed by teams specializing in pain management as soon as conventional treatments fail.

  12. Rapid Detection of Herpes Viruses for Clinical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane; Mehta, Satish

    2013-01-01

    There are eight herpes viruses that infect humans, causing a wide range of diseases resulting in considerable morbidity and associated costs. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a human herpes virus that causes chickenpox in children and shingles in adults. Approximately 1,000,000 new cases of shingles occur each year; post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) follows shingles in 100,000 to 200,000 people annually. PHN is characterized by debilitating, nearly unbearable pain for weeks, months, and even years. The onset of shingles is characterized by pain, followed by the zoster rash, leading to blisters and severe pain. The problem is that in the early stages, shingles can be difficult to diagnose; chickenpox in adults can be equally difficult to diagnose. As a result, both diseases can be misdiagnosed (false positive/negative). A molecular assay has been adapted for use in diagnosing VZV diseases. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay is a non-invasive, rapid, sensitive, and highly specific method for VZV DNA detection. It provides unequivocal results and can effectively end misdiagnoses. This is an approximately two-hour assay that allows unequivocal diagnosis and rapid antiviral drug intervention. It has been demonstrated that rapid intervention can prevent full development of the disease, resulting in reduced likelihood of PHN. The technology was extended to shingles patients and demonstrated that VZV is shed in saliva and blood of all shingles patients. The amount of VZV in saliva parallels the medical outcome.

  13. Animal models of herpes simplex virus immunity and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kollias, Christina M; Huneke, Richard B; Wigdahl, Brian; Jennings, Stephen R

    2015-02-01

    Herpes simplex viruses are ubiquitous human pathogens represented by two distinct serotypes: herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (HSV-1); and HSV type 2 (HSV-2). In the general population, adult seropositivity rates approach 90% for HSV-1 and 20-25% for HSV-2. These viruses cause significant morbidity, primarily as mucosal membrane lesions in the form of facial cold sores and genital ulcers, with much less common but more severe manifestations causing death from encephalitis. HSV infections in humans are difficult to study in many cases because many primary infections are asymptomatic. Moreover, the neurotropic properties of HSV make it much more difficult to study the immune mechanisms controlling reactivation of latent infection within the corresponding sensory ganglia and crossover into the central nervous system of infected humans. This is because samples from the nervous system can only be routinely obtained at the time of autopsy. Thus, animal models have been developed whose use has led to a better understanding of multiple aspects of HSV biology, molecular biology, pathogenesis, disease, and immunity. The course of HSV infection in a spectrum of animal models depends on important experimental parameters including animal species, age, and genotype; route of infection; and viral serotype, strain, and dose. This review summarizes the animal models most commonly used to study HSV pathogenesis and its establishment, maintenance, and reactivation from latency. It focuses particularly on the immune response to HSV during acute primary infection and the initial invasion of the ganglion with comparisons to the events governing maintenance of viral latency.

  14. Herpes simplex keratitis: challenges in diagnosis and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Azher, Tayaba N; Yin, Xiao-Tang; Tajfirouz, Deena; Huang, Andrew Jw; Stuart, Patrick M

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus is responsible for numerous ocular diseases, the most common of which is herpetic stromal keratitis. This is a recurrent infection of the cornea that typically begins with a subclinical infection of the cornea that establishes a latent infection of sensory ganglia, most often the trigeminal ganglia. Recurring infections occur when the virus is reactivated from latency and travels back to the cornea, where it restimulates an inflammatory response. This inflammatory response can lead to decreased corneal sensation, scarring, and blindness. The diagnosis of these lesions as the result of a recurrent herpes simplex virus infection can at times be problematic. Currently, herpetic stromal keratitis is diagnosed by its clinical presentation on the slit-lamp examination, but the literature does not always support the accuracy of these clinical findings. Other diagnostic tests such as polymerase chain reaction assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunofluorescent antibody, and viral cultures have provided more definitive diagnosis, but also have some limitations. That said, accurate diagnosis is necessary for proper treatment, in order to prevent serious consequences. Current treatment reduces the severity of lesions and controls further viral spread, but does not provide a cure.

  15. Valacyclovir. New indication: for genital herpes, simpler administration.

    PubMed Central

    1999-01-01

    Valacyclovir, the metabolic precursor of acyclovir, is now approved for treatment and prevention of genital infection with herpes simplex viruses. The clinical file is bulky and methodologically sound. For treatment of a first episode of genital herpes, a large comparative trial has shown that valacyclovir (1 g twice a day) is as effective as acyclovir (200 mg five times a day) when given for 10 days. For treating recurrences, two trials show that valacyclovir is as effective as acyclovir (200 mg five times a day) with a treatment period of 5 days. A daily dose of 1 g of valacyclovir is as effective as 2 g daily. Valacyclovir can be administered once a day. For prevention among patients with frequent recurrences, the efficacy of valacyclovir (500 mg/d in a single dose) has been proven in a placebo-controlled trial lasting 4 months. In these trials, valacyclovir and acyclovir were both well tolerated, with no major differences between the two drugs. PMID:10424269

  16. Herpes simplex keratitis: challenges in diagnosis and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Azher, Tayaba N; Yin, Xiao-Tang; Tajfirouz, Deena; Huang, Andrew JW; Stuart, Patrick M

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus is responsible for numerous ocular diseases, the most common of which is herpetic stromal keratitis. This is a recurrent infection of the cornea that typically begins with a subclinical infection of the cornea that establishes a latent infection of sensory ganglia, most often the trigeminal ganglia. Recurring infections occur when the virus is reactivated from latency and travels back to the cornea, where it restimulates an inflammatory response. This inflammatory response can lead to decreased corneal sensation, scarring, and blindness. The diagnosis of these lesions as the result of a recurrent herpes simplex virus infection can at times be problematic. Currently, herpetic stromal keratitis is diagnosed by its clinical presentation on the slit-lamp examination, but the literature does not always support the accuracy of these clinical findings. Other diagnostic tests such as polymerase chain reaction assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunofluorescent antibody, and viral cultures have provided more definitive diagnosis, but also have some limitations. That said, accurate diagnosis is necessary for proper treatment, in order to prevent serious consequences. Current treatment reduces the severity of lesions and controls further viral spread, but does not provide a cure. PMID:28176902

  17. Update on herpes zoster vaccine: licensure for persons aged 50 through 59 years.

    PubMed

    2011-11-11

    Herpes zoster vaccine (Zostavax, Merck & Co., Inc.) was licensed and recommended in 2006 for prevention of herpes zoster among adults aged 60 years and older. In March 2011, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of Zostavax in adults aged 50 through 59 years. In June 2011, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) declined to recommend the vaccine for adults aged 50 through 59 years and reaffirmed its current recommendation that herpes zoster vaccine be routinely recommended for adults aged 60 years and older.

  18. Herpes Zoster Meningitis Complicating Combined Tocilizumab and Cyclosporine Therapy for Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsurukawa, Shinichiro; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Shirakawa, Atsunori; Kawahara, Chieko; Shukuwa, Tetsuo; Inamoto, Miwako; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old female with refractory adult-onset Still's disease presented with ocular herpes zoster infection during TCZ treatment. After three days of acyclovir treatment (5 mg/kg), she developed a severe headache and high fever. Viral DNA isolation and cerebral spinal fluid abnormalities led to a herpes zoster meningitis diagnosis. Her meningitis was cured by high doses of intravenous acyclovir (10 mg/kg for 14 days). To our knowledge, this is the first report of meningeal herpes zoster infection in rheumatic diseases under TCZ treatment. PMID:27092286

  19. Isolation of a protein kinase induced by herpes simplex virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, W.T.; Stobbs, D.G.

    1981-04-01

    Researchers have isolated a new cyclic AMP-independent protein kinase activity induced in HeLa cells by infection with herpes simplex virus type 1. Induction of the enzyme does not occur in cells treated with cycloheximide at the time of infection, or in cells infected with UV-inactivated herpes simplex virus type 1. The amount of enzyme induced in infected cells is dependent upon the multiplicity of infection. An enzyme with identical properties to the appearing in infected HeLa cells is also induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 in BHK cells.

  20. Clinical and biological differences between recurrent herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections

    SciTech Connect

    Straus, S.E. )

    1989-12-01

    The major features that distinguish recurrent herpes simplex virus infections from zoster are illustrated in this article by two case histories. The clinical and epidemiologic features that characterize recurrent herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections are reviewed. It is noted that herpesvirus infections are more common and severe in patients with cellular immune deficiency. Each virus evokes both humoral and cellular immune response in the course of primary infection. DNA hybridization studies with RNA probes labelled with sulfur-35 indicate that herpes simplex viruses persist within neurons, and that varicella-zoster virus is found in the satellite cells that encircle the neurons.

  1. Limb hypoplasia resulting from intrauterine infection with herpes simplex virus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Carola, D; Skibo, M; Cannon, S; Cam, K M; Hyde, P; Aghai, Z H

    2014-11-01

    Intrauterine infection with herpes simplex virus, although very rare, has devastating effects on multiple organ systems in the fetus and can lead to in utero fetal demise. Neonates born following intrauterine herpes simplex virus infection commonly manifest with cutaneous lesions, ocular damage and/or brain abnormalities. We describe the case of a dichorionic, diamniotic twin gestation complicated by intrauterine herpes simplex virus infection. This infection led to the fetal demise of twin A and a very uncommon presentation of limb hypoplasia in twin B.

  2. The challenges and opportunities for the development of a T-cell epitope-based herpes simplex vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tiffany; Wang, Christine; Badakhshan, Tina; Chilukuri, Sravya; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-11-28

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) infections have been prevalent since the ancient Greek times. To this day, they still affect a staggering number of over a billion individuals worldwide. HSV-1 infections are predominant than HSV-2 infections and cause potentially blinding ocular herpes, oro-facial herpes and encephalitis. HSV-2 infections cause painful genital herpes, encephalitis, and death in newborns. While prophylactic and therapeutic HSV vaccines remain urgently needed for centuries, their development has been difficult. During the most recent National Institute of Health (NIH) workshop titled "Next Generation Herpes Simplex Virus Vaccines: The Challenges and Opportunities", basic researchers, funding agencies, and pharmaceutical representatives gathered: (i) to assess the status of herpes vaccine research; and (ii) to identify the gaps and propose alternative approaches in developing a safe and efficient herpes vaccine. One "common denominator" among previously failed clinical herpes vaccine trials is that they either used a whole virus or a whole viral protein, which contain both "pathogenic symptomatic" and "protective asymptomatic" antigens and epitopes. In this report, we continue to advocate developing "asymptomatic" epitope-based sub-unit vaccine strategies that selectively incorporate "protective asymptomatic" epitopes which: (i) are exclusively recognized by effector memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells (TEM cells) from "naturally" protected seropositive asymptomatic individuals; and (ii) protect human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic animal models of ocular and genital herpes. We review the role of animal models in herpes vaccine development and discuss their current status, challenges, and prospects.

  3. Amplification of Herpes simplex type 1 and Human Herpes type 5 viral DNA from formalin-fixed Alzheimer brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, John D; Royall, Donald; Daum, Luke T; Kagan-Hallet, Kathleen; Chambers, James P

    2005-12-16

    It is known that nucleic acids from formalin-fixed tissues are not nearly as good templates for DNA amplification as those extracted from fresh tissues. However, specimens stored in most pathologic archives are initially fixed in formalin. The possibility of an infectious etiology of several diseases including Alzheimer's underscores the usefulness of archived tissue in assessing the association of infectious agents with specific pathology. In this report, we describe in detail a method resulting in robust amplification of HSV1 and Human Herpes type (HHV) 5 viral DNA targets using formalin-fixed Alzheimer brain frontal and temporal tissue as source of amplification template. Herpes simplex type 2 viral DNA was not detected in the limited samples examined in this study. Amplicons were verified by sequence analysis. Brain tissue stored in formalin longer than 1 year prior to post-formalin-fixation analysis gave rise to significantly shorter amplicons consistent with the observation that template DNA integrity decreases significantly with increasing time of storage in formalin. Thus, this report should be useful in PCR-based investigations assessing the regional presence of viral DNAs in formalin-fixed brain tissue.

  4. Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Vaccine (Zostavax(®)): A Review in the Prevention of Herpes Zoster and Postherpetic Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2016-06-01

    Zostavax(®) is a live attenuated shingles (herpes zoster) vaccine approved in the EU for the prevention of herpes zoster (HZ) and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) in adults aged ≥50 years. Zoster vaccine protected against HZ in adults aged 50-59 years (ZEST trial) and ≥60 years [Shingles Prevention Study (SPS)], and also reduced the burden of illness associated with HZ and the risk of PHN in adults aged ≥60 years (SPS). A large amount of real-world data also supports the efficacy of zoster vaccine. Results of the SPS Short- and Long-Term Persistence Substudies and real-world studies indicate that zoster vaccine provided continued benefit in the longer term, albeit with a gradual decline in vaccine efficacy over time; long-term effectiveness studies are ongoing. The need for a booster dose is still unknown, but a study showed that, if necessary, a booster dose administered to adults aged ≥70 years who received their first dose of zoster vaccine ≥10 years previously was immunogenic. Zoster vaccine had a favourable safety and tolerability profile, with the most commonly reported adverse events being non-severe injection-site reactions. In conclusion, zoster vaccine reduces the incidence of HZ and PHN, thereby reducing the burden of illness associated with HZ; improved uptake of zoster vaccine is needed.

  5. Psychiatric aspects of herpes simplex encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis and herpes zoster encephalitis among immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Więdłocha, Magdalena; Marcinowicz, Piotr; Stańczykiewicz, Bartłomiej

    2015-01-01

    The psychopathological symptoms occurring in the course of diseases associated with infections are often initially isolated and non-characteristic, and may cause diagnostic difficulties. Moreover, such disorders tend to be less responsive to psychiatric management. Among possible causes such as trauma, neoplasm and vascular changes, inflammatory changes of the brain as a result of a viral infection should also be considered. There were 452 registered cases of viral encephalitis in Poland in 2010, and although not very prevalent they remain a severe and life-threatening condition. What is more, the frequently occurring neurological and psychiatric complications of viral encephalitis often result in permanent disabilities, causing a significant decrease in the quality of life. This article presents the three types of encephalitis that are most prevalent among immunocompetent patients in Poland, i.e. herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE), tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and herpes zoster encephalitis (HZE). The psychopathology of the acute phase of the infection, the residual symptoms, features apparent in imaging studies and some neuropathological aspects are also presented. The paper also focuses on psychiatric aspects of the diagnostics and treatment of the described conditions. The clinical pictures of these infections are quite specific, although they cover a wide range of symptoms, and these characteristic features are described. The aim of this review is also to show the significance of thorough diagnostics and a multidisciplinary approach to patients with viral CNS infections.

  6. Efficacy Results of a Trial of a Herpes Simplex Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Belshe, Robert B.; Leone, Peter A.; Bernstein, David I.; Wald, Anna; Levin, Myron J.; Stapleton, Jack T.; Gorfinkel, Iris; Morrow, Rhoda L. Ashley; Ewell, Marian G.; Stokes-Riner, Abbie; Dubin, Gary; Heineman, Thomas C.; Schulte, Joann M.; Deal, Carolyn D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Two previous studies of a herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) subunit vaccine containing glycoprotein D in HSV-discordant couples revealed 73% and 74% efficacy against genital disease in women who were negative for both HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 antibodies. Efficacy was not observed in men or HSV-1 seropositive women. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind efficacy field trial involving 8323 women 18 to 30 years of age who were negative for antibodies to HSV-1 and HSV-2. At months 0, 1, and 6, some subjects received the investigational vaccine, consisting of 20 μg of glycoprotein D from HSV-2 with alum and 3-O-deacylated monophosphoryl lipid A as an adjuvant; control subjects received the hepatitis A vaccine, at a dose of 720 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) units. The primary end point was occurrence of genital herpes disease due to either HSV-1 or HSV-2 from month 2 (1 month after dose 2) through month 20. Results The HSV vaccine was associated with an increased risk of local reactions as compared with the control vaccine, and it elicited ELISA and neutralizing antibodies to HSV-2. Overall, the vaccine was not efficacious; vaccine efficacy was 20% (95% confidence interval [CI], −29 to 50) against genital herpes disease. However, efficacy against HSV-1 genital disease was 58% (95% CI, 12 to 80). Vaccine efficacy against HSV-1 infection (with or without disease) was 35% (95% CI, 13 to 52), but efficacy against HSV-2 infection was not observed (−8%; 95% CI, −59 to 26). Conclusions In a study population that was representative of the general population of HSV-1– and HSV-2–seronegative women, the investigational vaccine was effective in preventing HSV-1 genital disease and infection but not in preventing HSV-2 disease or infection. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and GlaxoSmithKline; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00057330.) PMID:22216840

  7. [Simultaneous oral and skin manifestations of herpes zoster. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Consolaro, A; Oliveira, D T

    1990-01-01

    A case of herpes zoster involving the trigeminal nerve, with simultaneous skin and oral manifestation is presented. The diagnostic and treatment used are discussed, emphasizing the necessity of an intraoral examination, when skin facial lesions are observed by professionals.

  8. Herpes Zoster Risk Reduction through Exposure to Chickenpox Patients: A Systematic Multidisciplinary Review

    PubMed Central

    Ogunjimi, Benson; Van Damme, Pierre; Beutels, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes chickenpox and may subsequently reactivate to cause herpes zoster later in life. The exogenous boosting hypothesis states that re-exposure to circulating VZV can inhibit VZV reactivation and consequently also herpes zoster in VZV-immune individuals. Using this hypothesis, mathematical models predicted widespread chickenpox vaccination to increase herpes zoster incidence over more than 30 years. Some countries have postponed universal chickenpox vaccination, at least partially based on this prediction. After a systematic search and selection procedure, we analyzed different types of exogenous boosting studies. We graded 13 observational studies on herpes zoster incidence after widespread chickenpox vaccination, 4 longitudinal studies on VZV immunity after re-exposure, 9 epidemiological risk factor studies, 7 mathematical modeling studies as well as 7 other studies. We conclude that exogenous boosting exists, although not for all persons, nor in all situations. Its magnitude is yet to be determined adequately in any study field. PMID:23805224

  9. Legal and Moral Considerations in Educating Children with Herpes in Public School Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guess, Doug; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The article examines legal and moral implications in providing classroom education to children with herpes. Conclusions suggest the integration of the child into educationally appropriate programs during the disease's inactive stage. (CL)

  10. New concepts in herpes simplex virus vaccine development: notes from the battlefield

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Gargi; Chentoufi, Aziz A; Nesburn, Anthony B; Wechsler, Steven L; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2009-01-01

    The recent discovery that T cells recognize different sets of herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 epitopes from seropositive symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals might lead to a fundamental immunologic advance in vaccine development against herpes infection and diseases. The newly introduced needle-free mucosal (i.e., topical ocular and intravaginal) lipopeptide vaccines provide a novel strategy that might target ocular and genital herpes and possibly provide ‘heterologous protection’ from HIV-1. Indeed, mucosal self-adjuvanting lipopeptide vaccines are easy to manufacture, simple to characterize, extremely pure, cost-effective, highly immunogenic and safe. In this review, we bring together recent published and unpublished data that illuminates the status of epitope-based herpes vaccine development and present an overview of our recent approach to an ‘asymptomatic epitope’-based lipopeptide vaccine. PMID:19627185

  11. Immune inhibition of virus release from herpes simplex virus-infected cells by human sera.

    PubMed

    Shariff, D M; Hallworth, J; Desperbasques, M; Buchan, A; Skinner, G R

    1988-01-01

    Human sera contain antibody (IVR antibody) which will inhibit the release of herpes simplex virus type 1 from virus-infected cells. This antibody activity was removed by adsorption of sera with virus-infected cell extract. There was a positive correlation between IVR and neutralizing antibody activity, particularly when measured by augmented neutralization test; measurement of IVR antibody was equally as sensitive as measurement of neutralizing antibody by augmented neutralization test. IVR antibody levels provided indication of a history of recurrent herpes labialis, the pattern of antibody response following primary herpetic infection, and indication of response to Skinner herpes vaccine in human subjects. It is suggested that consideration should be given to measurement of IVR antibody in both clinical and epidemiological studies of herpes and other virus infections.

  12. Experimental ulcerative herpetic keratitis. IV. Preliminary observations on the efficacy of a herpes simplex subunit vaccine.

    PubMed

    Carter, C A; Hartley, C E; Skinner, G R; Turner, S P; Easty, D L

    1981-10-01

    Systemic vaccination of rabbits with an inactivated type 1 virus subunit vaccine induced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Following ocular infection with type 1 herpes virus corneal ulceration and virus excretion were reduced in the vaccinated rabbits.

  13. Imbalanced oxidative stress causes chlamydial persistence during non-productive human herpes virus co-infection.

    PubMed

    Prusty, Bhupesh K; Böhme, Linda; Bergmann, Birgit; Siegl, Christine; Krause, Eva; Mehlitz, Adrian; Rudel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Both human herpes viruses and Chlamydia are highly prevalent in the human population and are detected together in different human disorders. Here, we demonstrate that co-infection with human herpes virus 6 (HHV6) interferes with the developmental cycle of C. trachomatis and induces persistence. Induction of chlamydial persistence by HHV6 is independent of productive virus infection, but requires the interaction and uptake of the virus by the host cell. On the other hand, viral uptake is strongly promoted under co-infection conditions. Host cell glutathione reductase activity was suppressed by HHV6 causing NADPH accumulation, decreased formation of reduced glutathione and increased oxidative stress. Prevention of oxidative stress restored infectivity of Chlamydia after HHV6-induced persistence. We show that co-infection with Herpes simplex virus 1 or human Cytomegalovirus also induces chlamydial persistence by a similar mechanism suggesting that Chlamydia -human herpes virus co-infections are evolutionary shaped interactions with a thus far unrecognized broad significance.

  14. Immunization against Genital Herpes with a Vaccine Virus That has Defects in Productive and Latent Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, Xavier J.; Jones, Cheryl A.; Knipe, David M.

    1999-06-01

    An effective vaccine for genital herpes has been difficult to achieve because of the limited efficacy of subunit vaccines and the safety concerns about live viruses. As an alternative approach, mutant herpes simplex virus strains that are replication-defective can induce protective immunity. To increase the level of safety and to prove that replication was not needed for immunization, we constructed a mutant herpes simplex virus 2 strain containing two deletion mutations, each of which eliminated viral replication. The double-mutant virus induces protective immunity that can reduce acute viral shedding and latent infection in a mouse genital model, but importantly, the double-mutant virus shows a phenotypic defect in latent infection. This herpes vaccine strain, which is immunogenic but has defects in both productive and latent infection, provides a paradigm for the design of vaccines and vaccine vectors for other sexually transmitted diseases, such as AIDS.

  15. Herpes Simplex Virus Sepsis in a Young Woman with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Haag, Lea-Maxie; Hofmann, Jörg; Kredel, Lea Isabell; Holzem, Christina; Kühl, Anja A; Taube, Eliane T; Schubert, Stefan; Siegmund, Britta; Epple, Hans-Jörg

    2015-12-01

    We present the case of a herpes simplex virus-1 [HSV-1] sepsis with severe herpes hepatitis in a young female treated with triple immunosuppressive therapy [adalimumab, azathioprine, prednisolone] for refractory Crohn's disease [CD]. The patient presented with high fever, generalised abdominal tenderness, strongly elevated transaminases, coagulopathy, and pancytopenia. Comprehensive diagnostics including blood HSV-1 polymerase chain reaction [PCR], liver biopsy, and immunohistochemistry revealed the diagnosis of fulminant herpes hepatitis. HSV-1 positivity of cutaneous lesions proved the disseminated nature of the infection. Early treatment with intravenous acyclovir led to a rapid improvement of the patient's condition and resulted in a full recovery of her liver function. This is the first reported case of HSV-sepsis in a patient with CD. Physicians treating inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] patients with combined immunosuppressive therapy should be aware of the possibility of herpes hepatitis, and early empirical antiviral therapy should be considered in immunosuppressed patients presenting with fever and severe anicteric hepatitis.

  16. Reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus infection by ultraviolet light: a human model

    SciTech Connect

    Perna, J.J.; Mannix, M.L.; Rooney, J.F.; Notkins, A.L.; Straus, S.E.

    1987-09-01

    Infection with herpes simplex virus often results in a latent infection of local sensory ganglia and a disease characterized by periodic viral reactivation and mucocutaneous lesions. The factors that trigger reactivation in humans are still poorly defined. In our study, five patients with documented histories of recurrent herpes simplex virus infection on the buttocks or sacrum were exposed to three times their minimal erythema dose of ultraviolet light. Site-specific cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection occurred at 4.4 +/- 0.4 days after exposure to ultraviolet light in 8 of 13 attempts at reactivation. We conclude that ultraviolet light can reactivate herpes simplex virus under experimentally defined conditions. This model in humans should prove useful in evaluating the pathophysiology and prevention of viral reactivation.

  17. Transient lingual papillitis associated with confirmed herpes simplex virus 1 in a patient with kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Andrew C; Kim, Silvia S; Burns, Jane C

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of transient lingual papillitis associated with confirmed herpes simplex virus 1 that developed after a child received intravenous immunoglobulin and infliximab for acute Kawasaki disease.

  18. Herpes zoster reactivation after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, Krishnamoorthy; Pillai, Biju S.; Bansal, Devesh

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a reactivated varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection of the sensory nerve ganglion, peripheral nerve, and its branches. Mechanical trauma to the nervous system can reactivate VZV. It is well known that extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) can produce mechanical damage to the tissue. We report a rare case of herpes zoster reactivation after SWL for treatment of 1.2 cm size renal stone in a 63-year-old male patient. PMID:27555686

  19. Herpes Zoster Lesions on Reconstructed Breast Skin: Rare Objective Proof of Reinervation

    PubMed Central

    Valina, Stephan Wolfgang; Schoeller, Thomas; Ehebruster, Gudrun

    2017-01-01

    Blazed up Herpes zoster lesions have been described in very few patients after free and pedicled flap transfer for reconstructive purpose. Although sensory recovery after flap reconstructions has been studied extensively most studies addressed subjective perceptions of sensation. Objective investigations of spontaneous reinervation of free and pedicled flaps are rare. We would like to present a witnessed herpes zoster infection of a latissimus dorsi skin flap 2 years after breast reconstruction. PMID:28194351

  20. Herpes Zoster Lesions on Reconstructed Breast Skin: Rare Objective Proof of Reinervation.

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Laurenz; Valina, Stephan Wolfgang; Schoeller, Thomas; Ehebruster, Gudrun

    2017-01-01

    Blazed up Herpes zoster lesions have been described in very few patients after free and pedicled flap transfer for reconstructive purpose. Although sensory recovery after flap reconstructions has been studied extensively most studies addressed subjective perceptions of sensation. Objective investigations of spontaneous reinervation of free and pedicled flaps are rare. We would like to present a witnessed herpes zoster infection of a latissimus dorsi skin flap 2 years after breast reconstruction.

  1. Unusual oral complications of herpes zoster infection: report of a case and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Jain, Manoj Kumar; Manjunath, K S; Jagadish, S N

    2010-11-01

    A case of herpes zoster infection with unusual oral complications involving the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve is presented. The post-herpetic complications of osteonecrosis, spontaneous exfoliation of teeth, and subsequent pathologic fracture of mandible in the absence of concurrent predisposing factors in a 65-year-old man are demonstrated. Forty-one cases with osteonecrosis and spontaneous exfoliation of teeth previously presented in the literature are reviewed. This is the first report of pathologic fracture after herpes zoster infection.

  2. Non-healing genital herpes mimicking donovanosis in an immunocompetent man.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vishal; Khute, Prakash; Patel, Anjali; Gupta, Somesh

    2016-01-01

    Although atypical presentations of herpetic infection in immunocompetent individuals are common, they very rarely have the extensive, chronic and verrucous appearances seen in the immunocompromised host. We report a case of genital herpes manifesting as painless chronic non-healing genital ulcers with exuberant granulation tissue in an immunocompetent man. Owing to this morphology, the ulcers were initially mistaken for donovanosis. To the best of our knowledge, such a presentation of genital herpes in an immunocompetent individual has not been described previously.

  3. Increased risk of herpes zoster in children with cancer: A nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiao-Chuan; Chao, Yu-Hua; Wu, Kang-Hsi; Yen, Ting-Yu; Hsu, Yu-Lung; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsueh; Wei, Hsiu-Mei; Wu, Jhong-Lin; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Hwang, Kao-Pin; Peng, Ching-Tien; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Li, Tsai-Chung

    2016-07-01

    Herpes zoster is rare in healthy children, but immunocompromised persons have an increased risk of herpes zoster and severe diseases. Considering the very limited information on herpes zoster in children with cancer, we performed a nationwide population-based cohort study to estimate the incidence of herpes zoster in children with cancer and to explore the association between the 2 diseases.Data were obtained from the National Health Research Institutes Database in Taiwan. A total of 4432 children with newly diagnosed cancer between 2000 and 2007 were identified as the cancer cohort, and 17,653 children without cancer frequency-matched by sex and age at entry were considered the noncancer cohort. The association between herpes zoster and childhood cancer was determined.Children with cancer had a higher risk of herpes zoster. The incidence rate of herpes zoster was higher in the cancer cohort than in the noncancer cohort (20.7 vs 2.4 per 10,000 person-years; IRR = 8.6; 95% CI = 4.8-15.6). The cumulative incidence was significantly higher in the cancer cohort (P < 0.0001). Leukemia, lymphoma, and solid tumor were all associated with the increased risk, and leukemia had the highest magnitude of strength of association.This nationwide population-based cohort study demonstrated that children with cancer were associated with an increased risk of herpes zoster. In addition to early antiviral treatment, vaccination with heat-treated zoster vaccine or adjuvanted subunit vaccine could be an appropriate policy to decrease the incidence in children with cancer.

  4. Engineered Herpes Simplex Viruses for the Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    these tumors. We have been working with genetically engineered human herpes simplex virus (HSV) as a means of treating nervous system tumors. We have... genetically modified these viruses to make them safe and unable to grow in normal cells, but that can grow in tumor cells causing them to die, a...the sporadic susceptibility or resistance to infection of MPNST cells to genetically engineered, oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (oHSVs) in our

  5. Preparation and efficacy of an inactivated subunit vaccine (NFUIBHK) against type 2 Herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Williams, D R; Buchan, A; Whitney, J; Harding, M; Bodfish, K

    1978-11-17

    A vaccine against Herpes simplex virus infection was prepared by Nonidet NP 40 and formalin treatment of a type 1, infected-cell extract; virus particles were removed by ultracentrifugation over sucrose. These procedures were not detrimental to the antigenic quality of the vaccine preparation. The vaccine afforded significant protection to experimental type 2 genital herpes virus infection in mice, as adjudged by clinical observations, cytopathological change, and virus yields.

  6. Herpes simplex hepatitis after liver transplantation: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Côté-Daigneault, J; Carrier, F M; Toledano, K; Wartelle-Bladu, C; Willems, B

    2014-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) hepatitis is an uncommon cause of liver failure, but may have a dramatic outcome. We herein present a case report of a liver graft infection by HSV-1 associated with liver failure and encephalitis. A complete hospital chart review of the case and a literature search were undertaken. Literature review suggests that herpes simplex acute liver failure is rare and associated with a poor prognosis, even with early treatment. Novel diagnostic and preventive approaches need to be instituted.

  7. Herpes simplex type 1 encephalitis restricted to the brainstem in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Arita, Juliana Harumi; Lin, Jaime; Peruchi, Mirella Maccarini; Rodrigues, Marcelo Masruha; Vilanova, Luiz Celso Pereira

    2010-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis is a potentially fatal infection of central nervous system that typically involves frontal and temporal lobes. Occasionally, it presents an extratemporal involvement and in rarer cases, it is limited to the brainstem. We describe a case of an adolescent who presented with fever, sore throat, and vertigo. Clinical picture evolved to lethargy, tetraparesis, consciousness impairment, and respiratory failure. MRI showed lesions restricted to the brainstem. PCR of CSF was positive for herpes simplex type 1.

  8. Assessment of skin test with varicella-zoster virus antigen for predicting the risk of herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Y; Takao, Y; Miyazaki, Y; Ohnishi, F; Okeda, M; Yano, S; Kumihashi, H; Gomi, Y; Maeda, K; Ishikawa, T; Mori, Y; Asada, H; Iso, H; Yamanishi, K

    2013-04-01

    The Shozu Herpes Zoster (SHEZ) Study was designed to clarify the incidence of and predictive and immunological factors for herpes zoster in a defined community-based Japanese population. As part of this series, a total of 5683 residents aged ≥50 years received a varicella-zoster virus (VZV) skin test with VZV antigen, and 48 h later, the erythema and oedema were assessed by measuring the longest diameter. The diameters of both the erythema and oedema decreased with the increasing age of the subject. Sixty-three subjects contracted herpes zoster within a year after receiving the VZV skin test. Analysis of the herpes zoster incidence rate vs. the skin test reaction revealed that the shorter the diameter of erythema or oedema, the greater the likelihood of herpes zoster. These results demonstrated that the VZV skin test is an excellent surrogate marker for predicting the risk of herpes zoster.

  9. The molecular basis of herpes simplex virus latency.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, Michael P; Proença, João T; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2012-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is a neurotropic herpesvirus that establishes latency within sensory neurones. Following primary infection, the virus replicates productively within mucosal epithelial cells and enters sensory neurones via nerve termini. The virus is then transported to neuronal cell bodies where latency can be established. Periodically, the virus can reactivate to resume its normal lytic cycle gene expression programme and result in the generation of new virus progeny that are transported axonally back to the periphery. The ability to establish lifelong latency within the host and to periodically reactivate to facilitate dissemination is central to the survival strategy of this virus. Although incompletely understood, this review will focus on the mechanisms involved in the regulation of latency that centre on the functions of the virus-encoded latency-associated transcripts (LATs), epigenetic regulation of the latent virus genome and the molecular events that precipitate reactivation.

  10. [Two cases of herpes encephalitis with normal cerebrospinal fluid findings].

    PubMed

    Avkan Oğuz, Vildan; Yapar, Nur; Sezak, Nurbanu; Alp Cavuş, Sema; Kuruüzüm, Ziya; Sayiner, Arzu; Ada, Emel; Cakir, Nedim; Yüce, Ayşe

    2006-01-01

    In this report, characteristics of two cases of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis with normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings at the time of admission have been discussed and the current literature has been reviewed. The diagnosis of the cases (one was 23 years old male, and the other was 75 years old female patient) was made on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings concordant with HSV encephalitis, together with HSV-1 DNA positivity by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Both of the patients were treated with acyclovir (3 x 750 mg/day) lasting for 15 days and 21 days, respectively. The first male patient recovered with mild neurological defects, whereas the second female patient died because of nosocomial pneumonia and septicemia. In conclusion, even the CSF findings are normal, in cases considered to be HSV encephalitis, MRI should be the first radiological diagnostic step and the diagnosis should be confirmed by the detection of HSV DNA in CSF by PCR.

  11. Effect of alkaloids isolated from Amaryllidaceae on herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Renard-Nozaki, J; Kim, T; Imakura, Y; Kihara, M; Kobayashi, S

    1989-01-01

    Studies were carried out on the effects of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids and their derivatives upon herpes simplex virus (type 1), the relationship between their structure and antiviral activity and the mechanism of this activity. All alkaloids used in these experiments were biosynthesized from N-benzylphenethylamine; the apogalanthamine group was synthesized in our laboratory; those which may eventually prove to be antiviral agents had a hexahydroindole ring with two functional hydroxyl groups. Benzazepine compounds were neither cytotoxic nor antiviral, but many structures containing dibenzazocine were toxic at low concentrations. It was established that the antiviral activity of alkaloids is due to the inhibition of multiplication and not to the direct inactivation of extracellular viruses. The mechanism of the antiviral effect could be partly explained as a blocking of viral DNA polymerase activity.

  12. Lytic Promoters Express Protein during Herpes Simplex Virus Latency

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Tiffany A.; Tscharke, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has provided the prototype for viral latency with previously well-defined acute or lytic and latent phases. More recently, the deep quiescence of HSV latency has been questioned with evidence that lytic genes can be transcribed in this state. However, to date the only evidence that these transcripts might be translated has come from immunological studies that show activated T cells persist in the nervous system during latency. Here we use a highly sensitive Cre-marking model to show that lytic and latent phases are less clearly defined in two significant ways. First, around half of the HSV spread leading to latently infected sites occurred beyond the initial acute infection and second, we show direct evidence that lytic promoters can drive protein expression during latency. PMID:27348812

  13. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Kucukardali, Yasar; Solmazgul, Emrullah; Terekeci, Hakan; Oncul, Oral; Turhan, Vedat

    2008-01-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) secretion is a common consequence of neurologic and pulmonary infections as well as drug intake and many other clinical situations. This report describes SIADH that developed in an elderly woman with single dermatomal herpes varicella zoster ophthalmicus without evidence of varicella zoster encephalitis or dissemination. A 76-year-old woman was admitted to our department for evaluation of left facial pain, confusion and disorientation. Further investigation revealed hyponatremia 112 mEq/L, low serum osmolality, high urine osmolality, normal renal function, normal adrenal and thyroid hormones, and high plasma vasopressin 40 pg/mL. These results indicate that the hyponatremia in this case was due to SIADH and that SIADH was caused by an increased release of vasopressin probably because of the antiviral drug (acyclovir) or infection of varicella zoster virus (VZV) in a single dermatome.

  14. New-onset refractory status epilepticus mimicking herpes virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Puoti, Gianfranco; Elefante, Andrea; Saracino, Dario; Capasso, Antonella; Cotrufo, Roberto; Anello, Clara Belluomo

    2013-01-01

    New-onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE) is a recently defined clinical entity that describes patients who present with status epilepticus of unclear etiology that is highly refractory to therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of NORSE usually discloses no specific abnormalities except for an occasional mild T2/FLAIR hyperintense signal of the mesial temporal lobe. Here, we report a peculiar case of NORSE in which brain MRI showed massive alteration of both temporal lobes, with features strongly supporting the diagnosis of herpes virus encephalitis, but lacking any laboratory evidence of viral infection in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid. It showed also striking signal alterations in the thalamus, which got worse in the course of the disease. This report emphasizes the possibility that seizure activity alone plays a critical role in both determining the disease and whether it will be self-sustaining.

  15. Chromatin dynamics during herpes simplex virus-1 lytic infection.

    PubMed

    Placek, Brandon J; Berger, Shelley L

    2010-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is a DNA virus that can establish lytic infections in epithelial cells and latent infections in sensory neurons. Upon entry into the nucleus the genome of HSV-1 rapidly associates with histone proteins. Similar to the genomes of the cellular host, HSV-1 is subject to chromatin-based regulation of transcription and replication. However, unlike the host genome, nucleosomes appear to be underrepresented on the HSV genome. During lytic infection, when the genome is transcribed, the HSV-1 chromatin structure appears to be disorganized, and characterized by histone variant sub-types and post-translational modifications representative of active chromatin. In contrast, during latency, when the majority of the viral genome is transcriptionally silent, the chromatin is compacted into a regularly repeating, compact heterochromatic structure. Here we discuss recent studies that underscore the importance of chromatin regulation during the lytic phase of the HSV-1 life-cycle.

  16. Prevention and management of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Allen, Upton D; Robinson, Joan L

    2014-04-01

    Human herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in neonates can result in devastating outcomes, including mortality and significant morbidity. All infants are potentially at risk for neonatal HSV infection. This position statement reviews epidemiology, transmission and risk factors, with a focus on intrapartum infection. It considers diagnosis and prognosis according to infection category, along with testing modalities and limitations. Recommendations for managing newborns known to have been exposed intrapartum to HSV are based on expert opinion because a randomized trial to compare management options is not feasible. Guidance is provided for the empirical management of infants with suspected clinical sepsis, including those who do not respond to antibacterial therapy. The present statement replaces a 2006 position statement by the Canadian Paediatric Society.

  17. New strategies against drug resistance to herpes simplex virus

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu-Chen; Feng, Hui; Lin, Yu-Chun; Guo, Xiu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV), a member of the Herpesviridae family, is a significant human pathogen that results in mucocutaneous lesions in the oral cavity or genital infections. Acyclovir (ACV) and related nucleoside analogues can successfully treat HSV infections, but the emergence of drug resistance to ACV has created a barrier for the treatment of HSV infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. There is an urgent need to explore new and effective tactics to circumvent drug resistance to HSV. This review summarises the current strategies in the development of new targets (the DNA helicase/primase (H/P) complex), new types of molecules (nature products) and new antiviral mechanisms (lethal mutagenesis of Janus-type nucleosides) to fight the drug resistance of HSV. PMID:27025259

  18. Management and prevention of recurrent herpes labialis in immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Stanley C

    2007-12-01

    A range of topical and systemic therapies exists for treating recurrent herpes labialis. Among the topical agents, aciclovir and its derivatives can lessen the symptoms and duration of disease if applied frequently in the proper vehicle and started during the prodromal phase. Delivering these agents to the lesion via novel devices or vehicles may enhance their topical efficacy in the future. Among the systemic agents, new high-dose, 1-day regimens using either famciclovir or valaciclovir offer greater convenience and cost-effectiveness compared with traditional 5-7-day therapy. Combining either topical or systemic antinucleoside agents with topical anti-inflammatories such as corticosteroids may also lead to enhanced efficacy. Novel agents such as docosanol, toll-like receptor agonists, and viral ribonucleoside reductase inhibitors may also play a larger role in the future.

  19. Basal Autophagy Is Required for Herpes simplex Virus-2 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yakoub, Abraam M.; Shukla, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process of the cell, which plays an important role in regulating plethora of infections. The role of autophagy in Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infection is unknown. Here, we found that HSV-2 does not allow induction of an autophagic response to infection, but maintains basal autophagy levels mostly unchanged during productive infection. Thus, we investigated the importance of basal autophagy for HSV-2 infection, using pharmacological autophagy suppression or cells genetically deficient in an autophagy-essential gene (ATG5). Interference with basal autophagy flux in cells significantly reduced viral replication and diminished the infection. These results indicate that basal autophagy plays an indispensable role required for a productive infection. Importantly, this study draws a sharp distinction between induced and basal autophagy, where the former acts as a viral clearance mechanism abrogating infection, while the latter supports infection. PMID:26248741

  20. Herpes simplex virus 1 induces de novo phospholipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, Esther; Oliveira, Anna Paula de; Tobler, Kurt; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Sonda, Sabrina; Kaech, Andres; Lucas, Miriam S.; Ackermann, Mathias; Wild, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes acquiring an envelope composed of phospholipids. Hence, we measured incorporation of phospholipid precursors into these membranes, and quantified changes in size of cellular compartments by morphometric analysis. Incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-choline into both nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes was significantly enhanced upon infection. [{sup 3}H]-choline was also part of isolated virions even grown in the presence of brefeldin A. Nuclei expanded early in infection. The Golgi complex and vacuoles increased substantially whereas the endoplasmic reticulum enlarged only temporarily. The data suggest that HSV-1 stimulates phospholipid synthesis, and that de novo synthesized phospholipids are inserted into nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes to i) maintain membrane integrity in the course of nuclear and cellular expansion, ii) to supply membrane constituents for envelopment of capsids by budding at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes, and iii) to provide membranes for formation of transport vacuoles.

  1. Herpes genitalis without frontiers: from clinical aspects to viral identification.

    PubMed

    Papini, M

    2012-10-01

    Genital herpes simplex virus infection is a recurrent, lifelong disease with no cure. The strongest predictor for infection is a person's number of lifetime sex partners. HSV-2 is the commonest responsible, although infections caused by HSV-1 are rapidly increasing, particularly in adolescents, women and men who have sex with men. The natural history includes first-episode of mucocutaneous infection, establishment of latency in the dorsal root ganglion, and subsequent reactivation. Most infections are transmitted via asymptomatic viral shedding. Atypical manifestations are common. Genital HSV-2 recurs six times more frequently than type 1. Laboratory confirmation of the clinical diagnosis is recommended in all patients in order to guide a correct counselling and management. Real-time PCR and viral culture represent the gold standard for diagnosis. Serologic testing can be useful in persons with a questionable history. Counselling patients about the risk of transmission is crucial and helps prevent the spread of disease and neonatal complications.

  2. First-episode genital herpes: interventions for men and women.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Lisa

    2017-01-25

    The mission of the Cochrane Nursing Care Field (CNCF) is to improve health outcomes through increasing the use of the Cochrane Library and supporting Cochrane's role by providing an evidence base for nurses and healthcare professionals who deliver, lead or research nursing care. The CNCF produces Cochrane Corner columns, summaries of recent nursing-care-relevant Cochrane Reviews that are regularly published in collaborating nursing-related journals. Information on the processes CNCF has developed can be accessed at: cncf.cochrane.org/evidence-transfer-program-review-summaries. This is a Cochrane review summary of: Heslop R, Roberts H, Flower D et al ( 2016 ) Interventions for men and women with their first episode of genital herpes. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Issue 8. CD010684. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD010684.pub2.

  3. Herpes simplex virus encephalitis is a trigger of brain autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Armangue, Thaís; Leypoldt, Frank; Málaga, Ignacio; Raspall-Chaure, Miquel; Marti, Itxaso; Nichter, Charles; Pugh, John; Vicente-Rasoamalala, Monica; Lafuente-Hidalgo, Miguel; Macaya, Alfons; Ke, Michael; Titulaer, Maarten J; Höftberger, Romana; Sheriff, Heather; Glaser, Carol; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-02-01

    In 5 prospectively diagnosed patients with relapsing post-herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE), N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibodies were identified. Antibody synthesis started 1 to 4 weeks after HSE, preceding the neurological relapse. Three of 5 patients improved postimmunotherapy, 1 spontaneously, and 1 has started to improve. Two additional patients with NMDAR antibodies, 9 with unknown neuronal surface antibodies, and 1 with NMDAR and unknown antibodies, were identified during retrospective assessment of 34 HSE patients; the frequency of autoantibodies increased over time (serum, p=0.004; cerebrospinal fluid, p=0.04). The 3 retrospectively identified NMDAR antibody-positive patients also had evidence of relapsing post-HSE. Overall, these findings indicate that HSE triggers NMDAR antibodies and potentially other brain autoimmunity.

  4. The Short- and Long-Term Risk of Stroke after Herpes Zoster: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuechun; Guan, Yeming; Hou, Liang; Huang, Haili; Liu, Hongjuan; Li, Chuanwen; Zhu, Yingying; Tao, Xingyong; Wang, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence indicates that stroke risk may be increased following herpes zoster. The aim of this study is to perform a meta-analysis of current literature to systematically analyze and quantitatively estimate the short and long-term effects of herpes zoster on the risk of stroke. Methods Embase, PubMed and Cochrane library databases were searched for relevant studies up to March 2016. Studies were selected for analysis based on certain inclusion and exclusion criteria. Relative risks with 95% confidence interval (CI) were extracted to assess the association between herpes zoster and stroke. Results A total of 8 articles were included in our analysis. The present meta-analysis showed that the risks of stroke after herpes zoster were 2.36 (95% CI: 2.17–2.56) for first 2 weeks, 1.56 (95% CI: 1.46–1.66) for first month, 1.17 (95% CI: 1.13–1.22) for first year, and 1.09 (95% CI: 1.02–1.16) for more than 1 year, respectively. Conclusion The results of our study demonstrated that herpes zoster was associated with a higher risk of stroke, but the risks decreased along with the time after herpes zoster. PMID:27768762

  5. Herpes Zoster as a Predictor of HIV Infection in Taiwan: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yuan-Ti; Nfor, Oswald Ndi; Tantoh, Disline Manli; Huang, Jing-Yang; Ku, Wen-Yuan; Hsu, Shu-Yi; Ko, Pei-Chieh; Hung, Hung-Chang; Jan, Cheng-Feng; Liaw, Yung-Po

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association between herpes zoster (HZ) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Data were retrieved from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Databases (LHID 2005 and 2010), Taiwan. The International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] codes were used to identify Hz from 2001-2004. Identification of HIV infection was from 2005-2010. The hazard ratios of HIV among herpes zoster infected and non-herpes zoster infected patients were estimated using multiple Cox proportional hazard model. In general, 19685 participants were identified with Hz. The HIV incidence rates (per 104 person-months) in herpes zoster infected and non-infected patients were 0.191(95% CI 0.130-0.280) and 0.079 (95% CI 0.074-0.084), respectively while the hazard ratio (HR) of HIV among infected individuals was 3.518 (95% CI 2.375-5.211). This study concludes that herpes zoster could be considered as a predictor of HIV infection especially among Asian populations, hence it is vital to test herpes zoster infected individuals for HIV antibodies.

  6. Isolation of a new herpes virus from human CD4 sup + T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Frenkel, N.; Schirmer, E.C.; Wyatt, L.S.; Katsafanas, G.; Roffman, E.; Danovich, R.M. ); June, C.H. )

    1990-01-01

    A new human herpes virus has been isolated from CD4{sup +} T cells purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy individual (RK), following incubation of the cells under conditions promoting T-cell activation. The virus could not be recovered from nonactivated cells. Cultures of lymphocytes infected with the RK virus exhibited a cytopathic effect, and electron microscopic analyses revealed a characteristic herpes virus structure. RK virus DNA did not hybridize with large probes derived from herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus, varicella-zoster virus, and human cytomegalovirus. The genetic relatedness of the RK virus to the recently identified T-lymphotropic human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) was investigated by restriction enzyme analyses using 21 different enzymes and by blot hydridization analyses using 11 probes derived from two strains of HHV-6 (Z29 and U1102). Whereas the two HHV-6 strains exhibited only limited restriction enzyme polymorphism, cleavage of the RK virus DNA yielded distinct patterns. Of the 11 HHV-6 DNA probes tested, only 6 cross-hybridized with DNA fragments derived from the RK virus. Taken together, the maximal homology amounted to 31 kilobases of the 75 kilobases tested. The authors conclude that the RK virus is distinct from previously characterized human herpesviruses. The authors propose to designate it as the prototype of a new herpes virus, the seventh human herpes virus identified to date.

  7. Paraneoplastic pemphigus and Castleman's disease in the setting of herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Koch, Laine H; Layton, Christle J; Pilichowska, Monika; Stadecker, Miguel J; Barak, Orr

    2012-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl presented with a 3-week history of mucosal erosions, injected conjunctiva, dehydration, and respiratory distress. She had been treated with intravenous acyclovir for herpes simplex infection with positive herpes simplex virus immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G. Physical examination and imaging revealed a large abdominal mass. Incisional biopsy was obtained, and pathology demonstrated angiofollicular hyperplasia with hyalinized germinal centers and Castleman's syndrome-like features. Based on the mucosal erosions, herpes simplex virus serology and positive herpes simplex virus-1 direct fluorescent antibody, Castleman's disease secondary to overwhelming herpes simplex virus infection was the initial impression. The poor response to antivirals and subsequent development of a bullous eruption on the hands resulted in dermatology consultation. Skin biopsy was obtained from a bullae and revealed suprabasilar acantholysis with necrosis as well as upper dermal, perivascular, and interface infiltrate of lymphocytes and eosinophils. No viropathic changes were present. Direct immunofluorescence was significant for immunoglobulin G deposition intercellularly and along the dermoepidermal junction and focal trace C3 deposition along the dermoepidermal junction consistent with paraneoplastic pemphigus, later confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence. We report this case of paraneoplastic pemphigus secondary to Castleman's syndrome confounded by herpes simplex virus-1 positive mucosal erosions.

  8. Choreoathetosis after herpes simplex encephalitis with basal ganglia involvement on MRI.

    PubMed

    Kullnat, Megan Wills; Morse, Richard P

    2008-04-01

    Children with herpes simplex virus encephalitis have a relapse in approximately 25% of cases, which rarely may present as a movement disorder, most often choreoathetosis. The anatomic basis for herpes simplex virus encephalitis-associated movement disorders has been poorly understood, because neuroimaging, to date, has not been able to show the direct involvement of the areas of the brain that typically govern such movements. We present a patient with abnormal involuntary movements after herpes simplex virus encephalitis, with new lesions on MRI between the time of initial presentation and the development of choreoathetosis. To our knowledge, this is the first patient with a post-herpes simplex virus encephalitis movement disorder with neuroradiographic evidence of thalamic involvement correlating with the onset of abnormal involuntary movements. We describe this patient and review the literature on movement disorders and herpes simplex virus encephalitis. Current understanding of the pathophysiology of post-herpes simplex virus encephalitis movement disorders proposes 2 possible mechanisms that may be responsible: reinfection with the resumption of viral replication, or a postinfectious, immune-mediated process.

  9. Herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chrétien, F; Bélec, L; Hilton, D A; Flament-Saillour, M; Guillon, F; Wingertsmann, L; Baudrimont, M; de Truchis, P; Keohane, C; Vital, C; Love, S; Gray, F

    1996-10-01

    Herpes simplex (HSV) infection of the central nervous system is uncommon in AIDS and usually has an atypical topography. This review is centred around the case of a 49-year-old homosexual patient with AIDS who died from diffuse encephalopathy. Neuropathological examination revealed necrotic and haemorrhagic changes involving both temporal lobes, insulae and cingulate gyri. Cowdry type A intranuclear inclusion bodies were abundant but inflammation was minimal. Electron microscopy confirmed characteristic herpes virus particles. Immunocyto-chemistry was positive for HSV type 1 and 2. In situ hybridization and PCR, however, were positive for HSV type 1 but excluded HSV type 2. There was associated cytomegalovirus ventriculitis but clearly separated from HSV encephalitis. There were no histological features of HIV encephalitis and HIV could not be demonstrated by immunocytochemistry or by PCR to demonstrate proviral DNA. Apoptotic neurons were numerous in areas with a severe macrophage reaction. Only two pathological cases with characteristic limbic distribution and necrotic haemorrhagic histologic have been reported previously. The rarity of these reports suggests that in advanced AIDS, the immune reaction causing a typical necrotizing encephalitis cannot be mounted. Distinction between HSV type 1 and 2 infection may be difficult by immunocytochemistry and usually requires in situ hybridization, tissue culture or PCR. In AIDS patients, HSV-1 has been identified as responsible for encephalitis whereas HSV-2 has been more responsible for myelitis. Associated productive HIV infection of the CNS was found in none of the cases. In contrast, cytomegalovirus encephalitis was found in nine of 11 cases of AIDS-associated HSV encephalitis.

  10. Herpes zoster correlates with increased risk of Parkinson's disease in older people: A population-based cohort study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Chih-Hsueh; Lin, Hsien-Feng; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2017-02-01

    Little is known on the relationship between herpes zoster and Parkinson's disease in older people. This study aimed to explore whether herpes zoster could be associated with Parkinson's disease in older people in Taiwan.We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the claim data of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 10,296 subjects aged 65 years and older with newly diagnosed herpes zoster as the herpes zoster group and 39,405 randomly selected subjects aged 65 years and older without a diagnosis of herpes zoster as the nonherpes zoster group from 1998 to 2010. Both groups were followed up until subjects received a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. This follow-up design would explore whether subjects with herpes zoster were at an increased risk of Parkinson's disease. Relative risks were estimated by adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) using the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model.The incidence of Parkinson's disease was higher in the herpes zoster group than that in the nonherpes zoster group (4.86 vs 4.00 per 1000 person-years, 95% CI 1.14, 1.29). After adjustment for confounding factors, the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model revealed that the adjusted HR of Parkinson's disease was 1.17 for the herpes zoster group (95% CI 1.10, 1.25), compared with the nonherpes zoster group.Older people with herpes zoster confer a slightly increased hazard of developing Parkinson's disease when compared to those without herpes zoster. We think that herpes zoster correlates with increased risk of Parkinson's disease in older people. When older people with herpes zoster seek help, clinicians should pay more attention to the development of the cardinal symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

  11. The Challenges and Opportunities for Development of a T-Cell Epitope-Based Herpes Simplex Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tiffany; Wang, Christine; Badakhshan, Tina; Chilukuri, Sravya; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    The infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) have been prevalent since the ancient Greek times. To this day, they still affect a staggering number of over a half billion individuals worldwide. HSV-2 infections cause painful genital herpes, encephalitis, and death in newborns. HSV-1 infections are more prevalent than HSV-2 infections and cause potentially blinding ocular herpes, oro-facial herpes and encephalitis. While genital herpes in mainly caused by HSV-2 infections, in recent years, there is an increase in the proportion of genital herpes caused by HSV-1 infections in young adults, which reach 50% in some western societies. While prophylactic and therapeutic HSV vaccines remain urgently needed for centuries their development has been notoriously difficult. During the most recent National Institute of Health (NIH) workshop titled "Next Generation Herpes Simplex Virus Vaccines: The Challenges and Opportunities", basic researchers, funding agencies, and pharmaceutical representatives gathered: (i) to assess the status of herpes vaccine research; and (ii) to identify the gaps and propose alternative approaches in developing a safe and efficient herpes vaccine. One “common denominator” among previously failed clinical herpes vaccine trials is that they either used a whole virus or whole viral proteins, which contain both pathogenic “symptomatic” and protective “asymptomatic” antigens/epitopes. In this report, we continue to advocate that using an “asymptomatic” epitope-based vaccine strategy that selectively incorporates protective epitopes which: (i) are exclusively recognized, in vitro, by effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ TEM cells from “naturally” protected seropositive asymptomatic individuals; and (ii) protect, in vivo, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic animal models from ocular and genital herpes infections and diseases, could be the answer to many of the scientific challenges facing HSV vaccine

  12. Temporal and pontine involvement in a case of herpes simplex encephalitis, presenting as kluver bucy syndrome - a case report.

    PubMed

    Thirunavukarasu, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral temporal and frontal lobe involvement is a common characteristic of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). Clinical sequelae of herpes simplex encephalitis may manifest sometimes as Kluver Bucy syndrome (KBS). In herpes simplex encephalitis, apart from frontal lobe, extra temporal involvement is rare and uncommon. We report a case of HSE manifesting clinically as KBS with a rare radiological finding of temporal and extratemporal involvement of pons.

  13. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Antibody Mediated Neurologic Relapse Post Herpes Simplex Encephalitis: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Sarah; Walsh, Aoibhinn; King, Mary D; Lynch, Bryan; Webb, David; Twomey, Eilish; Ronan Leahy, T; Butler, Karina; Gavin, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Despite the advent of antiviral therapy, herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) remains a devastating condition with significant morbidity and mortality. Neurologic relapse after initial improvement is generally attributed to herpes simplex virus reactivation. In 2013, inflammation caused by anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies was reported in association with cases of neurologic relapse after herpes simplex encephalitis. We present 3 such cases and discuss diagnostic and management dilemmas.

  14. Mimicking herpes simplex virus 1 and herpes simplex virus 2 mucosal behavior in a well-characterized human genital organ culture.

    PubMed

    Steukers, Lennert; Weyers, Steven; Yang, Xiaoyun; Vandekerckhove, Annelies P; Glorieux, Sarah; Cornelissen, Maria; Van den Broeck, Wim; Temmerman, Marleen; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2014-07-15

    We developed and morphologically characterized a human genital mucosa explant model (endocervix and ectocervix/vagina) to mimic genital herpes infections caused by herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2). Subsequent analysis of HSV entry receptor expression throughout the menstrual cycle in genital tissues was performed, and the evolution of HSV-1/-2 mucosal spread over time was assessed. Nectin-1 and -2 were expressed in all tissues during the entire menstrual cycle. Herpesvirus entry mediator expression was limited mainly to some connective tissue cells. Both HSV-1 and HSV-2 exhibited a plaque-wise mucosal spread across the basement membrane and induced prominent epithelial syncytia.

  15. Chronic urticaria associated with recurrent genital herpes simplex infection and success of antiviral therapy--a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Zawar, Vijay; Godse, Kiran; Sankalecha, Sudhir

    2010-06-01

    The role of infectious agents as a cause of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) is uncertain. The objective of this study was to investigate whether genital herpes simplex infection is causally related to CIU. We identified two patients with recurrent genital herpes simplex infections associated with CIU. Episodes of genital herpes were especially associated with acute exacerbation of urticaria. Anti-herpes simplex 2 antibodies and Tzanck smears were done in both patients, along with other relevant investigations for CIU. Acyclovir was added to antihistamine therapy. Both patients were apparently in good health and appeared clinically immunologically stable, though one of them was found to be diabetic. Clinical and laboratory investigations for genital lesions supported a diagnosis of herpes simplex. Anti-herpes simplex 2 antibodies were markedly raised in both patients. The Tzanck smear was positive in one case and negative in the other, despite a definitive clinical diagnosis of herpes progenitalis. CIU, which was inadequately controlled with antihistamines alone, responded dramatically to the addition of acyclovir therapy. Our results may not be applicable to other patients with CIU, especially when there is inadequate evidence of an association with genital herpes. CIU may be associated with recurrent genital herpes simplex infection. In such situations, the addition of acyclovir to therapy may be beneficial.

  16. Hospital admissions for herpes zoster in Portugal between 2000 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Margarida; Froes, Filipe

    2013-01-01

    Introdução e Objectivos: O aumento da incidência de herpes zoster e da nevralgia pós-herpética estão associados ao envelhecimento da população. Estas patologias podem ser francamente debilitantes e ter um grande impacto na qualidade de vida dos doentes. Numa população envelhecida como a portuguesa, é esperado que o impacto do herpes zoster e da post-herpetic neuralgia aumentem. No entanto, não existe no país nenhum sistema específico de monitorização da doença e não foram encontrados dados epidemiológicos portugueses nas últimas décadas. A vacina contra o herpes zoster, já recomendada noutros países europeus, ainda não se encontra disponível em Portugal. Conhecer o impacto do herpes zoster é importante para fundamentar medidas de saúde pública relacionadas com a vacinação.Material e Métodos: Procedeu-se a uma análise retrospetiva da base de dados da Administração Central dos Sistemas de Saúde com a informação clínica codificada dos internamentos hospitalares de todos os indivíduos com o diagnóstico principal de herpes zoster (ICD-9-CM 053) e que tiveram alta entre 2000 e 2010.Resultados: Em Portugal, entre 2000 e 2010, ocorreram 1 706 internamentos hospitalares com o diagnóstico principal de herpes zoster. A maioria dos doentes era idosa. Do total de internados, 10,6% tinham formas potencialmente graves de imunocompromisso. A doença predominante de herpes zoster sem complicações, seguido de herpes zoster do sistema nervoso e oftálmico. A duração média dos internamentos foi de 9,3 dias, aumentando com a idade. A letalidade intra-hospitalar foi de 1%. Considerando o período de 2000-2009 e apenas a população adulta, a média anual da incidência dos internamentos hospitalares com o diagnóstico principal deherpes zoster foi de 1,9 por 100 000 habitantes, aumentando com a idade.Conclusão: Este estudo confirma que, em Portugal, as formas graves de herpes zoster estão relacionadas com a idade e associadas a

  17. Balm mint extract (Lo-701) for topical treatment of recurring herpes labialis.

    PubMed

    Koytchev, R; Alken, R G; Dundarov, S

    1999-10-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial was carried out with the aim of proving efficacy of standardized balm mint cream [active ingredient: 1% Lo-701--dried extract from Melissa officinalis L. leaves (70:1)] for the therapy of herpes simplex labialis. Sixty six patients with a history of recurrent herpes labialis (at least four episodes per year) in one center were treated topically; 34 of them with verum and 32 with placebo. The cream had to be smeared on the affected area four times daily over five days. A combined symptom score of the values for complaints, size of affected area and blisters at day 2 of therapy was formed as the primary target parameter. There was a significant difference in the values of the primary target parameter between both treatment groups: verum 4.03 +/- 0.33 (3.0); placebo 4.94 +/- 0.40 (5.0); values given are mean +/- SEM (median) of the symptoms score on day 2 of therapy. The tested formulation is effective for the treatment of herpes simplex labialis. The significant difference in the combined symptom score on the second day of treatment is of particular importance having in mind that the complaints in patients suffering from herpes labialis are usually most intensive at that time. In addition to the shortening of the healing period, the prevention of a spreading of the infection and the rapid effect on typical symptoms of herpes like itching, tingling, burning, stabbing, swelling, tautness and erythema, the balm mint cream has a further advantage. The different mechanism of action of the balm mint extract rules out the development of resistance of the herpes virus. Some indication exists that the intervals between the periods with herpes might be prolonged with balm mint cream treatment.

  18. Neonatal herpes prevention: a minor public health problem in some communities

    PubMed Central

    Mindel, A; Taylor, J; Tideman, R; Seifert, C; Berry, G; Wagner, K; Page, J; Marks, C; Trudinger, B; Cunningham, A

    2000-01-01

    Background: Neonatal herpes is a condition with high morbidity and mortality. The greatest risk occurs when the mother acquires herpes simplex virus (HSV) towards the end of pregnancy. A study from Seattle has suggested that the risk of acquisition of HSV during pregnancy was 3.7%. In Australia, HSV-2 infection is less common in pregnant women than in the United States. Consequently we conducted a study to establish HSV seroprevalence and the rate of HSV seroconversion in this population. Methods: The study was conducted at Westmead Hospital, Sydney, between June 1995 and April 1998. Women completed a questionnaire covering risk factors for the acquisition of genital herpes. A serum sample during pregnancy and a specimen of cord blood were obtained and tested for antibodies to HSV-2 using a type specific indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Equivocal results were resolved by western blot. A subset of the paired sera was tested for antibodies to HSV-1. The data were analysed using SPSS. Results: 326 of the 2616 (12.5%) women were HSV-2 seropositive. Three women (0.15%) acquired HSV-2 infection during pregnancy. None of the three babies of these mothers developed neonatal herpes. 416 maternal cord pairs were tested for HSV-1 antibodies and 330 (79.3%) were positive. No HSV-1 seroconversions occurred. Conclusions: In this population, HSV acquisition was uncommon (0.34% per year) and neonatal herpes was rare. A cost effective analysis suggested that type specific serology to screen pregnant women and their partners in low prevalence communities was not cost effective. Key Words: type specific serology; herpes simplex virus; neonatal herpes PMID:11026885

  19. Zoster vaccine (Zostavax): a review of its use in preventing herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Mark; Keating, Gillian M

    2010-02-01

    Individuals who have been infected with varicella zoster virus (VZV) are at risk for developing herpes zoster and this risk appears to be related to a decline in VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Zostavax (zoster vaccine) is a one-dose, high-potency, live, attenuated VZV vaccine that boosts VZV-specific CMI and this is its presumed mechanism of action. Zoster vaccine is registered in the EU for use in adults aged >or=50 years for the prevention of herpes zoster and herpes zoster-related postherpetic neuralgia. In the Shingles Prevention Study, a placebo-controlled trial in adults aged >or=60 years (n = 38 546), zoster vaccine led to a sustained boost of VZV-specific CMI. Over a mean herpes zoster surveillance period of 3.1 years, zoster vaccine reduced the herpes zoster-related burden of illness by 61%, reduced the incidence of herpes zoster by 51% and reduced the incidence of postherpetic neuralgia by 67%. Zoster vaccine recipients who developed herpes zoster had a shorter illness duration and severity than placebo recipients who developed herpes zoster. Zoster vaccine had continuing efficacy in a Shingles Prevention Study subpopulation followed for 7 years post-vaccination. Zoster vaccine was generally well tolerated in older adults. While cost-effectiveness estimates in pharmacoeconomic analyses varied widely according to vaccine and herpes zoster parameter cost/benefit estimates, an analysis from a UK perspective found a zoster vaccine immunization programme in adults aged 65 years to be cost effective. In older adults, the zoster vaccine has the potential to significantly reduce the herpes zoster burden of illness by decreasing the incidence of herpes zoster or reducing its severity.

  20. Nelfinavir Inhibits Maturation and Export of Herpes Simplex Virus 1

    PubMed Central

    Kalu, Nene N.; Desai, Prashant J.; Shirley, Courtney M.; Gibson, Wade; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nelfinavir (NFV) is an HIV-1 protease inhibitor with demonstrated antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and several other herpesviruses. However, the stages of HSV-1 replication inhibited by NFV have not been explored. In this study, we investigated the effects of NFV on capsid assembly and envelopment. We confirmed the inhibitory effects of NFV on HSV-1 replication by plaque assay and found that treatment with NFV did not affect capsid assembly, activity of the HSV-1 maturational protease, or formation of DNA-containing capsids in the nucleus. Confocal and electron microscopy studies showed that these capsids were transported to the cytoplasm but failed to complete secondary envelopment and subsequent exit from the cell. Consistent with the microscopy results, a light-scattering band corresponding to enveloped virions was not evident following sucrose gradient rate-velocity separation of lysates from drug-treated cells. Evidence of a possibly related effect of NFV on viral glycoprotein maturation was also discovered. NFV also inhibited the replication of an HSV-1 thymidine kinase mutant resistant to nucleoside analogues such as acyclovir. Given that NFV is neither a nucleoside mimic nor a known inhibitor of nucleic acid synthesis, this was expected and suggests its potential as a coinhibitor or alternate antiviral therapeutic agent in cases of resistance. IMPORTANCE Nelfinavir (NFV) is a clinically important antiviral drug that inhibits production of infectious HIV. It was reported to inhibit herpesviruses in cell culture. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infections are common and often associated with several diseases. The studies we describe here confirm and extend earlier findings by investigating how NFV interferes with HSV-1 replication. We show that early steps in virus formation (e.g., assembly of DNA-containing capsids in the nucleus and their movement into the cytoplasm) appear to be unaffected by NFV, whereas later steps (e

  1. Epidemiological Study on the Incidence of Herpes Zoster in Nearby Cheonan

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ho Soon; Kang, Jin Ku

    2015-01-01

    Background Herpes Zoster is a disease that occurs after the virus is reactivated due to infection of the varicella virus in childhood. Risk factors are advanced age, malignant neoplasm, organ transplantation, immunosuppressive agents taking are known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the seasonal effect and other risk factors on the incidence of herpes zoster. Methods The medical records of 1,105 patients admitted to the outpatient diagnosed with herpes zoster were retrospectively examined. The patients' sex, age, dermatome, onset, underlying disease, residential areas were collected. Results The incidence of women outnumbered men and increased for those above the age of 50. The number of occurrences of herpes zoster patients was higher in the spring and summer than in winter. Unlike men, women had the most frequent outbreaks in March. The most common occurrence of dermatome is in the thoracic region. The number of occurrence was similar on the left as the right. Conclusions In this study, herpes zoster occurs more often in women than in men and more frequently occurs in women in the spring and summer. PMID:26175879

  2. Acute herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia: effects of acyclovir and outcome of treatment with amitriptyline.

    PubMed Central

    Bowsher, D

    1992-01-01

    This retrospective study was designed to assess the effects of acyclovir treatment of acute herpes zoster on subsequent postherpetic neuralgia, and to examine the effects of amitriptyline in the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia. Eighty seven patients with postherpetic neuralgia of three or more months' duration were studied: 24 of them had had their herpes zoster treated with oral acyclovir. At first presentation, only 25% of the 24 patients who had had their herpes zoster treated with acyclovir selected the word group containing burning on the McGill pain questionnaire compared with 76% of the 63 patients who had not received acyclovir. A higher proportion of patients who had had acyclovir than had not selected the word group which contains the word aching (63% versus 49%). Acyclovir thus appears to change the nature of postherpetic neuralgia. Postherpetic neuralgia was treated with amitriptyline, alone or in combination with distigmine and/or sodium valproate. There was a strong correlation between pain relief and the interval between the occurrence of herpes zoster and the initiation of treatment with amitriptyline--early treatment is almost twice as likely to be successful as late. Since conventional analgesics and sympatholytic drugs are of no benefit in the treatment of established postherpetic neuralgia, the sequelae of herpes zoster must, therefore, be recognized and treated with amitriptyline as soon as possible. PMID:1419247

  3. Predictive factors of herpes zoster HIV-infected patients: another adverse effect of crack cocaine.

    PubMed

    Nacher, Mathieu; Basurko, Celia; Adenis, Antoine; Gaubert-Marechal, Emilie; Mosnier, Emilie; Edouard, Sophie; Vantilcke, Vincent; Sivapregassam, Sindou; Tressières, Benoit; Cabié, André; Couppié, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 1541 HIV-infected patients to determine variables associated with the incidence of herpes zoster. A single failure Cox model showed that herpes zoster incidence increased following the first 6 months of antiretroviral treatment adjusted hazard ratio (AHR)=5 (95%CI=2.6-9.2), P<0.001; in the >60 years age group AHR=2 (95%CI=1-4), P=0.04; in patients in the top CD8 quartile AHR=2.1 (95%CI=1.3-3.6), P<0.001; and in patients previously reported to use crack cocaine AHR=5.9, (95%CI=1.4-25), P=0.02. Herpes zoster incidence increased in patients with CD4 counts<500 per mm(3) and gradually declined since 1992-1996, with AHR=0.3 (95%CI=0.2-0.5), P<0.001 for the 1997-2002 period and AHR=0.24 (95%CI=0.14-0.4), P<0.001 for the 2002-2008 period. Contrary to what has been described elsewhere, there was no specific effect of protease inhibitors on herpes zoster incidence. The present study is the first to suggest that crack cocaine is associated with an increased incidence of herpes zoster. The neurological or immunological effects of crack are discussed.

  4. Functional decline and herpes zoster in older people: an interplay of multiple factors.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Herpes zoster is a frequent painful infectious disease whose incidence and severity increase with age. In older people, there is a strong bidirectional link between herpes zoster and functional decline, which refers to a decrement in ability to perform activities of daily living due to ageing and disabilities. However, the exact nature of such link remains poorly established. Based on the opinion from a multidisciplinary group of experts, we here propose a new model to account for the interplay between infection, somatic/psychiatric comorbidity, coping skills, polypharmacy, and age, which may account for the functional decline related to herpes zoster in older patients. This model integrates the risk of decompensation of underlying disease; the risk of pain becoming chronic (e.g. postherpetic neuralgia); the risk of herpes zoster non-pain complications; the detrimental impact of herpes zoster on quality of life, functioning, and mood; the therapeutic difficulties due to multimorbidity, polypharmacy, and ageing; and the role of stressful life events in the infection itself and comorbid depression. This model underlines the importance of early treatment, strengthening coping, and vaccine prevention.

  5. Application and tolerability of Herpotherm(®) in the treatment of genital herpes.

    PubMed

    Schlippe, Gerrit; Voss, Werner; Brenn, Lars Christian

    2013-01-01

    Genital herpes is the manifestation of a herpes simplex virus 2 infection. Standard treatment uses both local and systemic approaches. Here, we report on the results of a local therapy approach with 31 female patients at a gynecological practice. In the here-described approach, established genital herpes infection was treated with the medical device Herpotherm(®), with or without virostatic drugs. Herpotherm(®) is a certified medical device operating on the basis of local heat application. Parameters evaluated during the approach were (i) subjective patient assessments and (ii) objective assessment of the physician. In the described therapy approach a positive effect in terms of nature and severity in the course of the disease using Herpotherm(®) could be demonstrated. It could be shown that Herpotherm(®) can also be used for genital herpes and that it is well tolerated. In relation to other therapies using topical treatment for genital herpes, an extremely rapid reduction of pain and herpetic symptoms could be observed. Intolerances or discontinued use as a result of complications were not observed.

  6. Leflunomide in the Treatment of a Pseudotumoral Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in an HIV Patient.

    PubMed

    Roger, Marie R; Anstead, Gregory M

    2017-01-01

    The patient is a 52-year-old African American man with a past medical history of HIV infection (on antiretroviral therapy, CD4 count 399 cells/µL, and undetectable HIV viral load) and recurrent genital herpes. While on valacyclovir, the patient presented with four tumorous lesions on the perineum and scrotum. A biopsy specimen stained positively with HSV-1 and HSV-2 immunostains and displayed a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. The patient received foscarnet and imiquimod for two weeks with minimal improvement. Based on the previous activity of leflunomide, which has both antiviral and immunomodulatory properties, in cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex infections, leflunomide 20 mg orally twice daily was started. The patient received 23 days of foscarnet, 14 days of topical imiquimod, and 11 days of leflunomide with approximately 80% reduction in the size of the perineal lesion. After nine months on leflunomide there was complete regression of the large perineal lesion and only two small ulcerations remained on the scrotum. Pseudotumoral herpes lesions in HIV patients represent an immune reconstitution event and are poorly responsive to the usual anti-herpes agents. This report demonstrates the successful use of leflunomide in the treatment of an HIV patient with pseudotumoral herpes. Thalidomide has also been used with some success.

  7. Leflunomide in the Treatment of a Pseudotumoral Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in an HIV Patient

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Marie R.

    2017-01-01

    The patient is a 52-year-old African American man with a past medical history of HIV infection (on antiretroviral therapy, CD4 count 399 cells/µL, and undetectable HIV viral load) and recurrent genital herpes. While on valacyclovir, the patient presented with four tumorous lesions on the perineum and scrotum. A biopsy specimen stained positively with HSV-1 and HSV-2 immunostains and displayed a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. The patient received foscarnet and imiquimod for two weeks with minimal improvement. Based on the previous activity of leflunomide, which has both antiviral and immunomodulatory properties, in cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex infections, leflunomide 20 mg orally twice daily was started. The patient received 23 days of foscarnet, 14 days of topical imiquimod, and 11 days of leflunomide with approximately 80% reduction in the size of the perineal lesion. After nine months on leflunomide there was complete regression of the large perineal lesion and only two small ulcerations remained on the scrotum. Pseudotumoral herpes lesions in HIV patients represent an immune reconstitution event and are poorly responsive to the usual anti-herpes agents. This report demonstrates the successful use of leflunomide in the treatment of an HIV patient with pseudotumoral herpes. Thalidomide has also been used with some success. PMID:28373917

  8. Replication of type 2 herpes simplex virus in human endocervical tissue in organ culture.

    PubMed

    Birch, J; Fink, C G; Skinner, G R; Thomas, G H; Jordan, J A

    1976-08-01

    The replication of type 2 herpes simplex virus in human endocervical tissue in organ culture was investigated. The temporal profile of virus replication was related to the initial virus inoculum; high input inocula induced a rapid increase in virus titre while lower multiplicities induced a more slow-rising increase in virus titre. Our evidence suggested that explants were capable of initiating and supporting virus replication for at least 2 weeks following establishment of the culture. Virus yields were optimal when explants were cultured at 37 degrees and in serum-supplemented medium. Explants also supported the replication of type 1 herpes simplex virus and a "non-human" herpes simplex virus (pseudo-rabies virus). The optimal conditions for replication of type 2 herpes simplex virus in human endocervical explants have been established and will provide a model permitting precise investigation of lytic or other virus-cervical cell interactions and their possible relationship to herpes virus-induced pre-invasive carcinoma of this organ.

  9. Replication of type 2 herpes simplex virus in human endocervical tissue in organ culture.

    PubMed Central

    Birch, J.; Fink, C. G.; Skinner, G. R.; Thomas, G. H.; Jordan, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The replication of type 2 herpes simplex virus in human endocervical tissue in organ culture was investigated. The temporal profile of virus replication was related to the initial virus inoculum; high input inocula induced a rapid increase in virus titre while lower multiplicities induced a more slow-rising increase in virus titre. Our evidence suggested that explants were capable of initiating and supporting virus replication for at least 2 weeks following establishment of the culture. Virus yields were optimal when explants were cultured at 37 degrees and in serum-supplemented medium. Explants also supported the replication of type 1 herpes simplex virus and a "non-human" herpes simplex virus (pseudo-rabies virus). The optimal conditions for replication of type 2 herpes simplex virus in human endocervical explants have been established and will provide a model permitting precise investigation of lytic or other virus-cervical cell interactions and their possible relationship to herpes virus-induced pre-invasive carcinoma of this organ. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:183806

  10. The use of FTIR microscopy for evaluation of herpes viruses infection development kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Mukmanov, Igor; Talyshinsky, Marina; Souprun, Yelena; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2004-08-01

    The kinetics of Herpes simplex infection development was studied using an FTIR microscopy (FTIR-M) method. The family of herpes viruses includes several members like H. simplex types I and II (HSV I, II), Varicella zoster (VZV) viruses which are involved in various human and animal infections of different parts of the body. In our previous study, we found significant spectral differences between normal uninfected cells in cultures and cells infected with herpes viruses at early stages of the infection. In the present study, cells in cultures were infected with either HSV-I or VZV and at various times post-infection they were examined either by optical microscopy or by advanced FTIR-M. Spectroscopic measurements show a consistent decrease in the intensity of the carbohydrate peak in correlation with the viral infection development, observed by optical microscopy. This decrease in cellular carbohydrate level was used as indicator for herpes viruses infection kinetics. This parameter could be used as a basis for applying a spectroscopic method for the evaluation of herpes virus infection development. Our results show also that the development kinetics of viral infection has an exponential character for these viruses.

  11. To Test or Not to Test? Campus Health Officials Grapple with Questions about Screening Students for Genital Herpes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Elizabeth F.

    2005-01-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control, 17 percent of 20- to 29-year-olds are infected with genital herpes, one of the most common sexually-transmitted diseases in the United States. Because of lack or mildness of symptoms and the tendency to not test for herpes during routine medical exams, the disease can go undiagnosed and can easily be…

  12. Predictive values of prurigo nodularis and herpes zoster for HIV infection and immunosuppression requiring HAART in French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Magand, Florence; Nacher, Mathieu; Cazorla, Céline; Cambazard, Frederic; Marie, Dominique Sainte; Couppié, Pierre

    2011-07-01

    Prurigo nodularis and herpes zoster frequently lead to the diagnosis of HIV in tropical areas. The WHO has established a clinical definition of AIDS for undeveloped countries. Prurigo and herpes zoster are both classified as stage 2. The main objective of this study was to compare the level of immunosuppression of patients diagnosed as HIV-positive after consulting for prurigo nodularis or herpes zoster in French Guiana. A retrospective study was conducted including patients consulting at the Department of Dermatology, Cayenne Hospital (French Guiana) for prurigo nodularis or herpes zoster between 1989 and 2007 for which the systematic HIV test was positive. Demographic data and CD4 counts of both groups were compared. Analysis of 346 patients consulting for herpes zoster (n=192) or prurigo nodularis (n=154) led to the discovery of 129 HIV infections. The positive predictive value (PPV) for HIV positivity was 38.5% for herpes zoster and 36% for prurigo nodularis. The median lymphocyte count was 302/mm(3) in herpes zoster and 87/mm(3) in prurigo nodularis (P<0.001). The PPV for having a CD4 lymphocyte count<200/mm(3) was 26.5% for herpes zoster and 72% for prurigo nodularis. Prurigo nodularis was predictive of advanced immunosuppression. This questions the pertinence of the WHO clinical classification of AIDS. In the absence of CD4 count, the present results suggest that for patients with prurigo nodularis, antiretrovirals should be initiated without delay.

  13. Insights into pediatric herpes simplex encephalitis from a cohort of 21 children from the California Encephalitis Project, 1998-2011.

    PubMed

    To, Tu M; Soldatos, Ariane; Sheriff, Heather; Schmid, D Scott; Espinosa, Natasha; Cosentino, Giorgio; Preas, Christopher P; Glaser, Carol A

    2014-12-01

    Twenty-one children with confirmed herpes simplex encephalitis were identified in the California Encephalitis Project.Noteworthy features included 6 (29%) patients with an initial negative herpes simplex virus cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction test and 13 (62%) patients with extratemporal lobe involvement identified by neuroimaging [corrected]. Eleven cases were <4 years of age, but all 4 fatal cases occurred in adolescents.

  14. Clinical Correlates of Herpes Simplex Virus Viremia Among Hospitalized Adults

    PubMed Central

    Berrington, William R.; Jerome, Keith R.; Cook, Linda; Wald, Anna; Corey, Lawrence; Casper, Corey

    2009-01-01

    Background The quantification of herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA from the peripheral blood is often used to evaluate patients suspected of having disseminated HSV infection. Few studies have examined the clinical correlates of HSV viremia among adults. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of blood samples sent to a reference molecular virology diagnostic facility at a university hospital for quantification of HSV DNA between October 2001 and June 2006. Medical records of patients with detectable HSV DNA were reviewed to abstract relevant clinical characteristics. Results HSV DNA was detected in 37 (4.0%) of 951 samples from 29 individual patients. 19 (65.5%) were >16 years of age, and detailed medical records were available for review from 13 (68.4%) of 19 adults patients. Of the 10 patients whose HSV infection was typed, 6 (60%) had HSV-2, 3 (30%) had HSV-1, and one had evidence of both HSV-1 and HSV-2 infection. All viremic patients were treated with antiviral medications. The most common clinical findings were hepatitis (62%), fever (54%), CNS alterations (46%), skin lesions (38%), abdominal pain (31%), and sepsis (31%). Respiratory failure (23%) was uncommon. Patients with HSV viremia were observed to have a high mortality rate (6 of 10 immunocompromised and 1 of 3 immunocompetent individuals). Conclusions HSV viremia may be associated with a variety of morbid signs and symptoms in hospitalized immunocompetent and immunocompromised adults, and is associated with high rates of mortality, though causality can only be determined by additional studies. PMID:19807272

  15. Evolution and Diversity in Human Herpes Simplex Virus Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gatherer, Derek; Ochoa, Alejandro; Greenbaum, Benjamin; Dolan, Aidan; Bowden, Rory J.; Enquist, Lynn W.; Legendre, Matthieu; Davison, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) causes a chronic, lifelong infection in >60% of adults. Multiple recent vaccine trials have failed, with viral diversity likely contributing to these failures. To understand HSV-1 diversity better, we comprehensively compared 20 newly sequenced viral genomes from China, Japan, Kenya, and South Korea with six previously sequenced genomes from the United States, Europe, and Japan. In this diverse collection of passaged strains, we found that one-fifth of the newly sequenced members share a gene deletion and one-third exhibit homopolymeric frameshift mutations (HFMs). Individual strains exhibit genotypic and potential phenotypic variation via HFMs, deletions, short sequence repeats, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms, although the protein sequence identity between strains exceeds 90% on average. In the first genome-scale analysis of positive selection in HSV-1, we found signs of selection in specific proteins and residues, including the fusion protein glycoprotein H. We also confirmed previous results suggesting that recombination has occurred with high frequency throughout the HSV-1 genome. Despite this, the HSV-1 strains analyzed clustered by geographic origin during whole-genome distance analysis. These data shed light on likely routes of HSV-1 adaptation to changing environments and will aid in the selection of vaccine antigens that are invariant worldwide. PMID:24227835

  16. A novel vaccine (Zostavax) to prevent herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Holcomb, K; Weinberg, J M

    2008-04-01

    Varicella-zoster virus is the causal agent of varicella and herpes zoster (HZ) in humans. HZ results from reactivation of latent varicella-zoster virus (VZV) within the sensory ganglia. The incidence and severity of HZ increase with advancing age; more than half of all persons in whom HZ develops are older than 60 years. The most frequent debilitating complication is postherpetic neuralgia, a neuropathic pain syndrome that persists or develops after the dermatomal rash has healed, and can be prolonged and disabling. There are many limitations of the current therapies for HZ and postherpetic neuralgia. A live attenuated VZV vaccine has been developed and recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Union for the prevention of HZ in individuals 60 years of age and older. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial 38,546 adults of 60 years of age or older, the use of the HZ vaccine reduced the burden of illness due to HZ by 61.1% (P<0.001), reduced the incidence of postherpetic neuralgia by 66.5% (P<0.001), and reduced the incidence of HZ by 51.3% (P<0.001). In this review, the authors will discuss the history of the use of the varicella vaccine in children, and the subsequent development of the new HZ vaccine.

  17. Subassemblies and Asymmetry in Assembly of Herpes Simplex Virus Procapsid

    PubMed Central

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Newcomb, William W.; Cheng, Naiqian; Winkler, Dennis C.; Fontana, Juan; Heymann, J. Bernard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) capsid is a massive particle (~200 MDa; 1,250-Å diameter) with T=16 icosahedral symmetry. It initially assembles as a procapsid with ~4,000 protein subunits of 11 different kinds. The procapsid undergoes major changes in structure and composition as it matures, a process driven by proteolysis and expulsion of the internal scaffolding protein. Assembly also relies on an external scaffolding protein, the triplex, an α2β heterotrimer that coordinates neighboring capsomers in the procapsid and becomes a stabilizing clamp in the mature capsid. To investigate the mechanisms that regulate its assembly, we developed a novel isolation procedure for the metastable procapsid and collected a large set of cryo-electron microscopy data. In addition to procapsids, these preparations contain maturation intermediates, which were distinguished by classifying the images and calculating a three-dimensional reconstruction for each class. Appraisal of the procapsid structure led to a new model for assembly; in it, the protomer (assembly unit) consists of one triplex, surrounded by three major capsid protein (MCP) subunits. The model exploits the triplexes’ departure from 3-fold symmetry to explain the highly skewed MCP hexamers, the triplex orientations at each 3-fold site, and the T=16 architecture. These observations also yielded new insights into maturation. PMID:26443463

  18. Sunlight is an important causative factor of recurrent herpes simplex.

    PubMed

    Ichihashi, Masamitsu; Nagai, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2004-11-01

    To evaluate the role of exposure to solar UV radiation (UVR) in primary and recurrent herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infections, we investigated the self-reported cause of infection among diagnosed patients in Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. Among 4295 infected patients, 3678 had HSV-1, and 2656 of those patients (72.2%) had a recurrent flare-up. Fatigue was the most commonly reported cause of a flare-up among all patients, followed by the common cold and sun exposure. Sun-induced HSV-1 flare-up was reported by 10.4% of the total study population. However, this increased to 19.7% among patients diagnosed in July and August, to 28% among patients younger than 30 years diagnosed in July and August, and to 40% among patients younger than 30 years diagnosed in July and August with a recurrent infection. These results suggest the important role of solar UVR in the development of recurrent HSV-1, possibly due to UVR-induced immunosuppression or direct reactivation of HSV-1 in the neural ganglia.

  19. Cervical cancer: is herpes simplex virus type II a cofactor?

    PubMed Central

    Jones, C

    1995-01-01

    In many ways, cervical cancer behaves as a sexually transmitted disease. The major risk factors are multiple sexual partners and early onset of sexual activity. Although high-risk types of human papillomaviruses (HPV) play an important role in the development of nearly all cases of cervical cancer, other sexually transmitted infectious agents may be cofactors. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is transmitted primarily by sexual contact and therefore has been implicated as a risk factor. Several independent studies suggest that HSV-2 infections correlate with a higher than normal incidence of cervical cancer. In contrast, other epidemiological studies have concluded that infection with HSV-2 is not a major risk factor. Two separate transforming domains have been identified within the HSV-2 genome, but continued viral gene expression apparently is not necessary for neoplastic transformation. HSV infections lead to unscheduled cellular DNA synthesis, chromosomal amplifications, and mutations. These observations suggest that HSV-2 is not a typical DNA tumor virus. It is hypothesized that persistent or abortive infections induce permanent genetic alterations that interfere with differentiation of cervical epithelium and subsequently induce abnormal proliferation. Thus, HSV-2 may be a cofactor in some but not all cases of cervical cancer. PMID:8665469

  20. A Rare Complication of Herpes Zoster: Segmental Zoster Paresis

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Hooi Khee; Chawla, Mayank; Kaushik, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a common presentation in both the community and emergency department; however segmental zoster paresis is a rare complication that can lead to misdiagnosis. We present a case of a 74-year-old Indian gentleman with a background of well controlled diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and ischaemic heart disease who presented with sudden right lower limb weakness. This was preceded by a 5-day history of paraesthesia starting in the right foot and ascending up the right lower limb. On examination, there was a characteristic vesicular rash in the L2/3 region with MRC grading 3/5 in the right hip flexors. The rest of the neurological examination was unremarkable. MRI of the spine did not show any evidence of spinal disease. The patient was initiated on IV acyclovir with improvement of the lower limb weakness to MRC grading 5/5 as the vesicles improved. This is an interesting case as it highlights a rare presentation of zoster: segmental motor paresis that recovered fully with resolution of the rash. It shows the importance of recognizing motor neuropathy as a complication of shingles as it has a very good prognosis with most patients regaining full motor function of the affected limb with treatment. PMID:27313622

  1. A Prospective Study of Herpes Zoster in Children

    PubMed Central

    Katakam, Bhumesh Kumar; Kiran, Geeta; Kumar, Udaya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Herpes zoster (HZ) is a dermatomal viral infection, caused by reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) that persists in the posterior root ganglion. HZ is uncommonly reported in immunocompetent children. It may be due to intrauterine VZV infection or secondary to postnatal exposure to VZV at an early age. Aims: Our study was to review clinico-epidemiological data for HZ in children for early diagnosis and treatment to prevent complications. Materials and Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted from January 2013 to December 2014. Consecutive cases clinically diagnosed as HZ in the pediatric age group were taken up. Results: We report the clinico-epidemiological study of 26 cases of HZ, their benign course and recovery among children. Conclusions: HZ is a rare disease in childhood. Varicella in early childhood is a risk factor of HZ in immunocompromised and immunocompetent children. Childhood zoster occurs in either healthy or underlying immunodeficient children. The appearance of HZ in a young child does not always imply an underlying immunodeficiency or malignancy. But the identification of HZ with or without immunodeficiency is of prime importance from the treatment and prognostic point of view and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of vesicular eruptions. The prognosis is generally good in healthy children. PMID:27688444

  2. Cost-effectiveness of vaccination against herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Pieter T; Wilschut, Jan C; Postma, Maarten J

    2014-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is a common disease among elderly, which may develop into a severe pain syndrome labeled postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). A live-attenuated varicella zoster virus vaccine has been shown to be effective in reducing the incidence and burden of illness of HZ and PHN, providing the opportunity to prevent significant health-related and financial consequences of HZ. In this review, we summarize the available literature on cost-effectiveness of HZ vaccination and discuss critical parameters for cost-effectiveness results. A search in PubMed and EMBASE was performed to identify full cost-effectiveness studies published before April 2013. Fourteen cost-effectiveness studies were included, all performed in western countries. All studies evaluated cost-effectiveness among elderly above 50 years and used costs per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained as primary outcome. The vast majority of studies showed vaccination of 60- to 75-year-old individuals to be cost-effective, when duration of vaccine efficacy was longer than 10 years. Duration of vaccine efficacy, vaccine price, HZ incidence, HZ incidence and discount rates were influential to the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). HZ vaccination may be a worthwhile intervention from a cost-effectiveness point of view. More extensive reporting on methodology and more detailed results of sensitivity analyses would be desirable to address uncertainty and to guarantee optimal comparability between studies, for example regarding model structure, discounting, vaccine characteristics and loss of quality of life due to HZ and PHN.

  3. Herpes Simplex Virus Latency: The DNA Repair-Centered Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Like all herpesviruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) is able to produce lytic or latent infections depending on the host cell type. Lytic infections occur in a broad range of cells while latency is highly specific for neurons. Although latency suggests itself as an attractive target for novel anti-HSV1 therapies, progress in their development has been slowed due in part to a lack of agreement about the basic biochemical mechanisms involved. Among the possibilities being considered is a pathway in which DNA repair mechanisms play a central role. Repair is suggested to be involved in both HSV1 entry into latency and reactivation from it. Here I describe the basic features of the DNA repair-centered pathway and discuss some of the experimental evidence supporting it. The pathway is particularly attractive because it is able to account for important features of the latent response, including the specificity for neurons, the specificity for neurons of the peripheral compared to the central nervous system, the high rate of genetic recombination in HSV1-infected cells, and the genetic identity of infecting and reactivated virus. PMID:28255301

  4. Antiviral activity of Undaria pinnatifida against herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kenneth D; Dragar, Charles

    2004-07-01

    The major component of an aqueous extract of the seaweed Undaria pinnati fi da has been identified previously as a galactofucan (GFS), a sulfated polysaccharide. The galactofucan was partially purified and the material tested in this study is 75% pure galactofucan sulfate. GFS was evaluated for antiviral activity against 32 clinical strains of herpes simplex virus (HSV): 14 strains of HSV-1 and 18 strains of HSV-2. Twelve strains (four HSV-1 and eight HSV-2) were resistant to acyclovir (ACV-R) and 20 strains (10 HSV-1 and 10 HSV-2) were susceptible to ACV (ACV-S). The median IC(50) of GFS for the 14 strains of HSV-1 was 32 micro g/mL. The median IC(50) of GFS for the 18 strains of HSV-2 was 0.5 micro g/mL. GFS is significantly more active against clinical strains of HSV-2 than HSV-1, p < 0.001. The mode of action of the GFS was shown to be the inhibition of viral binding and entry into the host cell. The cytotoxicity of GFS was >4.0 mg/mL in the neutral red dye uptake assay indicating that GFS is non-toxic in this assay.

  5. Bowenoid papulosis at the site of prior herpes progenitalis.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, Eleonora; Cutrì, Francesco Tripodi; Baroni, Adone

    2004-01-01

    A 35-year-old dentist came to the authors' attention for papular and vegetating lesions that had appeared on his penile shaft over the last 2 months. The lesions differed in their features: pink and vegetating on the left side, brown and papular on the right side (Figure 1). The obvious clinical diagnoses of genital warts on the left and Bowenoid papulosis on the right were confirmed by punch biopsies, which showed epithelial hyperplasia with diffuse cell vacuolization (koilocytes)in the left biopsy and moderate nuclear dysplasia in the right one (Figure 2). Human papillomavirus phenotyping was not performed. Interestingly, the patient reported a clear medical history of herpes progenital is (only one episode) that had involved the right side of his glans and prepuce 4 years ago. An immunomodulating treatment with imiquimod was started in the attempt to cure both the genital warts and Bowenoid papulosis lesions (imiquimod was applied three times a week for 8 weeks). At the end of the treatment, the genital warts had disappeared, whereas many Bowenoid papulosis lesions were still present on the right side of the penis (Figure 3). Treated with liquid nitrogen as well, the Bowenoid papulosis lesions disappeared.

  6. Bioreactor production of recombinant herpes simplex virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Knop, David R; Harrell, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Serotypical application of herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors to gene therapy (type 1) and prophylactic vaccines (types 1 and 2) has garnered substantial clinical interest recently. HSV vectors and amplicons have also been employed as helper virus constructs for manufacture of the dependovirus adeno-associated virus (AAV). Large quantities of infectious HSV stocks are requisite for these therapeutic applications, requiring a scalable vector manufacturing and processing platform comprised of unit operations which accommodate the fragility of HSV. In this study, production of a replication deficient rHSV-1 vector bearing the rep and cap genes of AAV-2 (denoted rHSV-rep2/cap2) was investigated. Adaptation of rHSV production from T225 flasks to a packed bed, fed-batch bioreactor permitted an 1100-fold increment in total vector production without a decrease in specific vector yield (pfu/cell). The fed-batch bioreactor system afforded a rHSV-rep2/cap2 vector recovery of 2.8 x 10(12) pfu. The recovered vector was concentrated by tangential flow filtration (TFF), permitting vector stocks to be formulated at greater than 1.5 x 10(9) pfu/mL.

  7. Evaluation of the economic burden of Herpes Zoster (HZ) infection

    PubMed Central

    Panatto, Donatella; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Rizzitelli, Emanuela; Bonanni, Paolo; Boccalini, Sara; Icardi, Giancarlo; Gasparini, Roberto; Amicizia, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the economic burden of Herpes Zoster (HZ) infection. The review was conducted in accordance with the standards of the “Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses” guidelines. The following databases were accessed: ISI/Web of Knowledge (WoS), MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, ProQuest, the Cochrane Library and EconLit. Specific literature on health economics was also manually inspected. Thirty-three studies were included. The quality of the studies assessed in accordance with the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards checklist was good. All studies evaluated direct costs, apart from one which dealt only with indirect costs. Indirect costs were evaluated by 12 studies. The economic burden of HZ has increased over time. HZ management and drug prescriptions generate the highest direct costs. While increasing age, co-morbidities and drug treatment were found to predict higher direct costs, being employed was correlated with higher indirect costs, and thus with the onset age of the disease. Despite some differences among the selected studies, particularly with regard to indirect costs, all concur that HZ is a widespread disease which has a heavy social and economic burden. PMID:25483704

  8. Inhibitors of nucleotidyltransferase superfamily enzymes suppress herpes simplex virus replication.

    PubMed

    Tavis, John E; Wang, Hong; Tollefson, Ann E; Ying, Baoling; Korom, Maria; Cheng, Xiaohong; Cao, Feng; Davis, Katie L; Wold, William S M; Morrison, Lynda A

    2014-12-01

    Herpesviruses are large double-stranded DNA viruses that cause serious human diseases. Herpesvirus DNA replication depends on multiple processes typically catalyzed by nucleotidyltransferase superfamily (NTS) enzymes. Therefore, we investigated whether inhibitors of NTS enzymes would suppress replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. Eight of 42 NTS inhibitors suppressed HSV-1 and/or HSV-2 replication by >10-fold at 5 μM, with suppression at 50 μM reaching ∼1 million-fold. Five compounds in two chemical families inhibited HSV replication in Vero and human foreskin fibroblast cells as well as the approved drug acyclovir did. The compounds had 50% effective concentration values as low as 0.22 μM with negligible cytotoxicity in the assays employed. The inhibitors suppressed accumulation of viral genomes and infectious particles and blocked events in the viral replication cycle before and during viral DNA replication. Acyclovir-resistant mutants of HSV-1 and HSV-2 remained highly sensitive to the NTS inhibitors. Five of six NTS inhibitors of the HSVs also blocked replication of another herpesvirus pathogen, human cytomegalovirus. Therefore, NTS enzyme inhibitors are promising candidates for new herpesvirus treatments that may have broad efficacy against members of the herpesvirus family.

  9. "Armed" oncolytic herpes simplex viruses for brain tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Todo, Tomoki

    2008-01-01

    Genetically engineered, conditionally replicating herpes simplex viruses type 1 (HSV-1) are promising therapeutic agents for brain tumors and other solid cancers. They can replicate in situ, spread and exhibit oncolytic activity via a direct cytocidal effect. One of the advantages of HSV-1 is the capacity to incorporate large and/or multiple transgenes within the viral genome. Oncolytic HSV-1 can therefore be "armed" to add certain functions. Recently, the field of armed oncolytic HSV-1 has drastically advanced, due to development of recombinant HSV-1 generation systems that utilize bacterial artificial chromosome and multiple DNA recombinases. Because antitumor immunity is induced in the course of oncolytic activities of HSV-1, transgenes encoding immunomodulatory molecules have been most frequently used for arming. Other armed oncolytic HSV-1 include those that express antiangiogenic factors, fusogenic membrane glycoproteins, suicide gene products, and proapoptotic proteins. Provided that the transgene product does not interfere with viral replication, such arming of oncolytic HSV-1 results in augmentation of antitumor efficacy. Immediate-early viral promoters are often used to control the arming transgenes, but strict-late viral promoters have been shown useful to restrict the expression in the late stage of viral replication when desirable. Some armed oncolytic HSV-1 have been created for the purpose of noninvasive in vivo imaging of viral infection and replication. Development of a wide variety of armed oncolytic HSV-1 will lead to an establishment of a new genre of therapy for brain tumors as well as other cancers.

  10. Herpes simplex virus induces the replication of foreign DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Danovich, R.M.; Frenkel, N.

    1988-08-01

    Plasmids containing the simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA replication origin and the large T gene are replicated in Vero monkey cells but not in rabbit skin cells. Efficient replication of the plasmids was observed in rabbit cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. The HSV-induced replication required the large T antigen and the SV40 replication origin. However, it produced concatemeric molecules resembling replicative intermediates of HSV DNA and was sensitive to phosphonoacetate at concentrations known to inhibit the HSV DNA polymerase. Therefore, it involved the HSV DNA polymerase itself or a viral gene product(s) which was expressed following the replication of HSV DNA. Analyses of test plasmids lacking SV40 or HSV DNA sequences showed that, under some conditions. HSV also induced low-level replication of test plasmids containing no known eucaryotic replication origins. Together, these results show that HSV induces a DNA replicative activity which amplifies foreign DNA. The relevance of these findings to the putative transforming potential of HSV is discussed.

  11. Stabilising the Herpes Simplex Virus capsid by DNA packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuite, Gijs; Radtke, Kerstin; Sodeik, Beate; Roos, Wouter

    2009-03-01

    Three different types of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) nuclear capsids can be distinguished, A, B and C capsids. These capsids types are, respectively, empty, contain scaffold proteins, or hold DNA. We investigate the physical properties of these three capsids by combining biochemical and nanoindentation techniques. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments show that A and C capsids are mechanically indistinguishable whereas B capsids already break at much lower forces. By extracting the pentamers with 2.0 M GuHCl or 6.0 M Urea we demonstrate an increased flexibility of all three capsid types. Remarkably, the breaking force of the B capsids without pentamers does not change, while the modified A and C capsids show a large drop in their breaking force to approximately the value of the B capsids. This result indicates that upon DNA packaging a structural change at or near the pentamers occurs which mechanically reinforces the capsids structure. The reported binding of proteins UL17/UL25 to the pentamers of the A and C capsids seems the most likely candidate for such capsids strengthening. Finally, the data supports the view that initiation of DNA packaging triggers the maturation of HSV-1 capsids.

  12. Radioimmunoassay for herpes simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    McGuirt, P.V.; Keller, P.M.; Elion, G.B.

    1982-01-30

    A sensitive RIA for HSV-1 thymidine kinase (TK) has been developed. This assay is based on competition for the binding site of a rabbit antibody against purified HSV-1 TK, between a purified /sup 3/H-labeled HSV-1 TK and a sample containing an unknown amount of viral TK. The assay is capable of detecting 8 ng or more of the HSV enzyme. Purified HSV-1 TK denatured to <1% of its original kinase activity is as effective in binding to the antibody as is native HSV-1 TK. Viral TK is detectable at ranges of 150-460 ng/mg protein of cell extract from infected cells or cells transformed by HSV or HSV genetic material. HSV-2 TK appears highly cross-reactive, VZV TK is slightly less so, and the vaccinia TK shows little or no cross-reactivity. This RIA may serve as a tool for monitoring the expression of the HSV TK during an active herpes virus infection, a latent ganglionic infection, or in neoplastic cells which may have arisen by viral transformation.

  13. Higher Throughput Quantification of Neutralizing Antibody to Herpes Simplex Viruses.

    PubMed

    Blevins, Tamara P; Mitchell, Michelle C; Korom, Maria; Wang, Hong; Yu, Yinyi; Morrison, Lynda A; Belshe, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    We report a rapid, higher throughput method for measuring neutralizing antibody to herpes simplex virus (HSV) in human sera. Clinical isolates and sera from the Herpevac Trial for Women were used in a colorimetric assay in which infection of tissue culture (lack of neutralization) was indicated by substrate metabolism by beta-galactosidase induced in the ELVIS cell line. The neutralization assay was optimized by addition of guinea pig complement, which particularly enhanced neutralizing antibody titers to HSV-2. Higher neutralizing antibody titers were also achieved using virus particles isolated from the supernatant of infected cells rather than lysate of infected cells as the source of virus. The effect of assay incubation time and incubation time with substrate were also optimized. We found that incubating with substrate until a standard optical density of 1.0 was reached permitted a better comparison among virus isolates, and achieved reliable measurement of neutralizing antibody activity. Interestingly, in contrast to results in the absence of complement, addition of complement allowed sera from HSV-2 gD-vaccinated subjects to neutralize HSV-1 and HSV-2 clinical and laboratory isolates with equal potency.

  14. Herpes simplex virus hepatitis after pediatric liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hori, T; Ogura, Y; Okamoto, S; Nakajima, A; Kami, K; Iwasaki, J; Yonekawa, Y; Ogawa, K; Oike, F; Takada, Y; Egawa, H; Nguyen, J H; Uemoto, S

    2010-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) hepatitis has a fatal impact on the outcome of organ transplanted recipients. Here, we present a thought-provoking case of HSV hepatitis in a high-risk recipient after living-related liver transplantation (LRLT). A 1-month-old female newborn infant was affected by HSV encephalitis. Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) of unknown etiology occurred suddenly at 4.4 years of age. Viral infections were ruled out as the cause of FHF. Intensive care including plasma exchange (PE) was started, and the preoperative treatments for ABO incompatibility were performed. Thereafter, LRLT was performed emergently. Although strong immunosuppression for ABO incompatibility was continued after LRLT, antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) occurred on postoperative day (POD) 4. PE was repeated and improvements were obtained. However, liver dysfunction appeared on POD 8. Histopathological findings of liver needle biopsy clearly revealed HSV hepatitis, although the results of HSV DNA and antibody titer in blood sample did not clearly indicate HSV infection. On POD 21, thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) occurred and the plasma and immunoglobulin were replenished. Our pediatric recipient recovered successfully from AMR, HSV hepatitis, TMA, and repeated sepsis. We conclude that well considered therapy based on the real-time detection of HSV hepatitis is indispensable for the further improvements of outcome in HSV hepatitis after LRLT.

  15. Herpes simplex virus type 1-derived recombinant and amplicon vectors.

    PubMed

    Fraefel, Cornel; Marconi, Peggy; Epstein, Alberto L

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a human pathogen whose lifestyle is based on a long-term dual interaction with the infected host, being able to establish both lytic and latent infections. The virus genome is a 153 kbp double-stranded DNA molecule encoding more than 80 genes. The interest of HSV-1 as gene transfer vector stems from its ability to infect many different cell types, both quiescent and proliferating cells, the very high packaging capacity of the virus capsid, the outstanding neurotropic adaptations that this virus has evolved, and the fact that it never integrates into the cellular chromosomes, thus avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Two types of vectors can be derived from HSV-1, recombinant vectors and amplicon vectors, and different methodologies have been developed to prepare large stocks of each type of vector. This chapter summarizes (1) the two approaches most commonly used to prepare recombinant vectors through homologous recombination, either in eukaryotic cells or in bacteria, and (2) the two methodologies currently used to generate helper-free amplicon vectors, either using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based approach or a Cre/loxP site-specific recombination strategy.

  16. Acyclovir Prophylaxis Reduces the Incidence of Herpes Zoster Among HIV-Infected Individuals: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Barnabas, Ruanne V; Baeten, Jared M; Lingappa, Jairam R; Thomas, Katherine K; Hughes, James P; Mugo, Nelly R; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Gray, Glenda; Rees, Helen; Mujugira, Andrew; Ronald, Allan; Stevens, Wendy; Kapiga, Saidi; Wald, Anna; Celum, Connie

    2016-02-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons have higher rates of herpes zoster than HIV-uninfected individuals. We assessed whether twice daily treatment with 400 mg of oral acyclovir reduces the incidence of herpes zoster in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial among 3408 persons coinfected with HIV and herpes simplex virus type 2. During 5175 person-years of follow-up, 26 cases of herpes zoster occurred among those assigned acyclovir, compared with 69 cases among those assigned placebo (rates, 1.00 and 2.68/100 person-years, respectively), a relative decrease of 62% (hazard ratio, 0.38; 95% confidence interval, .24-.67; P < .001). Daily acyclovir prophylaxis significantly reduced herpes zoster incidence among HIV-infected persons.

  17. Bilateral subcutaneous fibrosarcomas in a cat following feline parvo-, herpes- and calicivirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    De Man, Marc M G; Ducatelle, Richard V

    2007-10-01

    A crossbred cat developed a subcutaneous fibrosarcoma on the left side of the thorax at the site of previous administration of a feline parvo-, herpes- and calicivirus vaccine. A few months later the cat developed a second mass on the right side of the thorax after a booster vaccine had been administered at this site. This unique case of bilateral fibrosarcomas in a cat shortly after vaccination with parvo-, herpes- and caliciviruses suggests an individual disposition for the development of vaccine-associated sarcomas and a possible triggering of this type of pathological response which could have precipitated the development of the second tumour. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of vaccine-induced fibrosarcomas occurring bilaterally after injection of a feline parvo-, herpes- and calicivirus containing vaccine at different sides of the thorax.

  18. Anterior opercular syndrome as a first presentation of herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed

    De Kleermaeker, Floriaan G C M; Bouwmans, Angela E P; Nicolai, Joost; Klinkenberg, Sylvia

    2014-04-01

    We report a 5-year-old girl who presented with fever, drooling, dysphagia, and anarthria. Moreover, voluntary facial movements were disturbed, but the emotional facial movements were completely normal. This clinical phenomenon is known as the anterior opercular syndrome. There was a positive polymerase chain reaction for herpes simplex in the cerebrospinal fluid. The diagnosis herpes simplex encephalitis was supported by both magnetic resonance images (MRI) as by electroencephalogram (EEG). Herpes simplex encephalitis is a rare, but severe, cause of the anterior opercular syndrome that demands treatment as soon as possible in order to prevent high morbidity or mortality. The phenomenon of autonomic-voluntary dissociation, associated with other clinical and radiologic findings related to an underlying neurologic disorder, alerts clinicians to the anterior opercular syndrome as a critical diagnostic observation with time-dependent therapeutic consequences.

  19. Oral herpes simplex virus infection in pregnancy: what are the concerns?

    PubMed

    Ficarra, Giuseppe; Birek, Catalena

    2009-09-01

    Although epidemiologic data and the potentially serious effects of transmission of genital herpes from mother to infant during birth have been widely reported, published reports on oral herpes disease in pregnancy remain scarce and no clear management guidelines exist. Thus, questions remain about acquisition, transmission and outcome of infection, especially with respect to acute gingivostomatitis in pregnancy. In response to these questions, we summarize previous reports on herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) oral disease in pregnancy and, briefly, present 2 cases of primary gingivostomatitis in the first trimester of pregnancy, resulting in a favourable outcome for both mother and infant. We also point out the most recent data on rare, potentially severe in outcome, but treatable, primary central nervous system HSV-1 infection in later stages of pregnancy. Finally, we emphasize a multidisciplinary approach to oral HSV disease in pregnancy, with dentist participation in the diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Varicella-Zoster Virus Vasculopathy: The Growing Association Between Herpes Zoster and Strokes.

    PubMed

    Powell, David R; Patel, Shiddhi; Franco-Paredes, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is herpes virus that after its reactivation from nerve ganglia to cause herpes zoster may lead to a variety of neurologic complications, including encephalitis, meningitis, retinal necrosis or myelitis. In addition, VZV can spread to arteries in the central nervous system and cause hemorrhagic or ischemic complications due to an inflammatory vasculopathy. In fact, there is a growing epidemiological and clinical recognition that there is an association between VZV reactivation and subsequent strokes. Herein, we present a case of an immune compromised individual with reactivation of VZV causing dermatomal herpes zoster followed by multifocal vasculopathy. We also review the literature to highlight key aspects of VZV-associated vasculopathy.

  1. A virus-particle vaccine prepared from bovine mammillitis virus against herpes genitalis.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Buchan, A; Davies, J; Durham, J; Castrucci, G

    1991-01-01

    A vaccine against herpes genitalis was prepared from the extracellular virus particles from baby hamster kidney cells infected with bovine mammillitis virus (BMV) strain "Allerton". The virus was inactivated by formaldehyde followed by ultracentrifugation to concentrate the virus particles and eliminate formaldehyde to an acceptable concentration for immunisation of human subjects. The vaccine was cross antigenic and cross immunogenic with herpes simplex virus type 1. Thirty-four consorts at high risk of herpes genitalis were immunised with two or three doses each containing 10(9) virus particles equialent to approx. 150 micrograms protein. There has been no evidence of local or general side effect in a follow-up period of over 100 patient years. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of this vaccine in human subjects will be investigated in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

  2. Electrochemical direct immobilization of DNA sequences for label-free herpes virus detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Phuong Dinh; Trung, Tran; Tuan, Mai Anh; Chien, Nguyen Duc

    2009-09-01

    DNA sequences/bio-macromolecules of herpes virus (5'-AT CAC CGA CCC GGA GAG GGA C-3') were directly immobilized into polypyrrole matrix by using the cyclic voltammetry method, and grafted onto arrays of interdigitated platinum microelectrodes. The morphology surface of the obtained PPy/DNA of herpes virus composite films was investigated by a FESEM Hitachi-S 4800. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to characterize the PPy/DNA film and to study the specific interactions that may exist between DNA biomacromolecules and PPy chains. Attempts are made to use these PPy/DNA composite films for label-free herpes virus detection revealed a response time of 60 s in solutions containing as low as 2 nM DNA concentration, and self life of six months when immerged in double distilled water and kept refrigerated.

  3. Latency of Herpes Simplex Virus in Absence of Neutralizing Antibody: Model for Reactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekizawa, Tsuyoshi; Openshaw, Harry; Wohlenberg, Charles; Notkins, Abner Louis

    1980-11-01

    Mice inoculated with herpes simplex virus (type 1) by the lip or corneal route and then passively immunized with rabbit antibody to herpes simplex virus developed a latent infection in the trigeminal ganglia within 96 hours. Neutralizing antibody to herpes simplex virus was cleared from the circulation and could not be detected in most of these mice after 2 months. Examination of ganglia from the antibody-negative mice revealed latent virus in over 90 percent of the animals, indicating that serum neutralizing antibody is not necessary to maintain the latent state. When the lips or corneas of these mice were traumatized, viral reactivation occurred in up to 90 percent of the mice, as demonstrated by the appearance of neutralizing antibody. This study provides a model for identifying factors that trigger viral reactivation.

  4. A nurse practitioner's guide to the management of herpes simplex virus-1 in children.

    PubMed

    Drugge, Janel M; Allen, Patricia Jackson

    2008-01-01

    This state of the science clinical article focuses on ways pediatric clinicians can manage herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infections in children and adolescents. HSV-1 infections can be transmitted during close contact with asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals (Waggoner-Fountain & Grossman, 2004). Recurrent HSV-1 outbreaks are believed to be caused by various endogenous and exogenous triggers. These HSV-1 outbreaks cause physical and emotional consequences in children and their families. HSV-1 infections in children most commonly cause gingivostomatitis, but these infections can also cause various skin infections, including herpetic whitlow, herpes gladiatorum, eczema herpeticum, and herpes genitalis. It is critical for pediatric clinicians to be familiar with the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations in order to effectively identify, manage, and treat HSV-1 infections with a variety of topical or systemic medications, as well as with prevention strategies and nutritional supplementations.

  5. Herpes simplex primo-infection in an immunocompetent host with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Žaja Franulović, Orjena; Lesar, Tatjana; Busic, Nikolina; Tešović, Goran

    2013-06-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis and herpes simplex esophagitis are separately well-described entities, but their simultaneous occurrence may pose a special challenge to the clinician, especially regarding the optimal therapeutic approach. The following case report describes a patient with a history of cow's milk and dairy products intolerance, but without an underlying immunologic defect, in whom eosinophilic esophagitis was diagnosed in the course of primary herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) infection that clinically presented as herpes labialis and severe esophagitis. The diagnosis was confirmed by a polymerase chain reaction from cytological brush and by immunohistochemical staining that detected the presence of HSV1 DNA in esophageal mucosa, and histologically by persistent eosinophil-predominant inflammation, typical of eosinophilic esophagitis. Despite severe clinical presentation, the HSV1 infection was self-limited. After a directed elimination diet was introduced, the clinical course was favorable, without the need for antiviral therapy.

  6. Chronic eosinophilic dermatitis associated with persistent feline herpes virus infection in cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Munson, L; Wack, R; Duncan, M; Montali, R J; Boon, D; Stalis, I; Crawshaw, G J; Cameron, K N; Mortenson, J; Citino, S; Zuba, J; Junge, R E

    2004-03-01

    A chronic ulcerative and eosinophilic dermatitis occurred in 20 captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) with persistent feline herpes virus 1 (FHV1) infection. Affected animals had erythematous, ulcerated plaques primarily on the face and forelegs in sites of contact with lachrymal and salivary secretions. The dermatitis was characterized by dense infiltrates of eosinophils and plasma cells and pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia. Rare keratinocytes within the lesions had nuclei with marginated chromatin and small eosinophilic inclusions composed of herpes virus nucleocapsids. Virus isolated from lesions was confirmed to be FHV1. Lesions persisted and progressed unless removed by cryoexcision. The occurrence of this unusual reaction to FHV1 in approximately 5% of captive North American cheetahs suggests a species propensity for a Th2-dominant response to herpes virus infection. This atypical immune reaction may indicate a heritable trait or modulation of the immune response by other factors such as chronic stress.

  7. Varicella and Herpes Zoster in Madrid, based on the Sentinel General Practitioner Network: 1997–2004

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Farinós, Napoleón; Ordobás, María; García-Fernández, Cristina; García-Comas, Luis; Cañellas, Soledad; Rodero, Inmaculada; Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, Ángeles; García-Gutiérrez, Juan; Ramírez, Rosa

    2007-01-01

    Background Varicella (chickenpox) is the primary disease caused by varicella-zoster virus. It is extremely contagious and is frequent in children. Indeed, in the absence of vaccination, a high proportion of the population is liable to contract it. Herpes zoster -more frequent among adults- is caused by reactivation of the latent virus. The objective of this study is to describe the status of and time trend for varicella and herpes zoster in the Madrid Autonomous Region prior to the introduction of the vaccine to the general population. Methods Data source: individualised varicella and herpes zoster case records kept by the Madrid Autonomous Region Sentinel General Practitioner Network for the period 1997–2004. Cumulative incidences, crude and standardised incidence rates, and age-specific rates of varicella and herpes zoster were calculated for each year. Kendall's Tau-b correlation coefficient was calculated to evaluate whether incidence displayed a time trend. Spectral density in the time series of weekly incidences was estimated using a periodogram. Results Standardised annual varicella incidence rates ranged from 742.5 (95% CI: 687.2 – 797.7) to 1239.6 (95% CI: 1164.5 – 1313.4) cases per 100 000 person-years. Most cases affected children, though complications were more frequent in adults. Varicella incidence displayed an annual periodicity but no trend over time. Most herpes zoster cases occurred at advanced ages, with incidence registering a rising annual trend but no seasonality factor. Conclusion In the absence of vaccination, no significant changes in varicella incidence were in evidence recent years, though these were observed in the incidence of herpes zoster. Sentinel general practitioner networks are a valid instrument for surveillance of diseases such as varicella. Further varicella vaccination-coverage and vaccine-efficacy studies are called for. PMID:17570859

  8. Management of genital herpes by genitourinary physicians: does experience or doctor's gender influence clinical management?

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J M; Cracknell, M; Barton, S E; Catalan, J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the variation in management of genital herpes by genitourinary physicians, and whether their duration of experience or gender influence their clinical management. METHODS--A postal questionnaire was sent to UK consultant genitourinary physicians with detailed questions about management of primary and recurrent herpes. The gender and duration of genitourinary medicine experience of the physicians were also recorded. RESULTS--One hundred and eighty two questionnaires were sent, 112 (62%) returned. Eighty-one (72%) physicians treat all patients with primary genital herpes, but physicians with more than 20 years experience were significantly (p < 0.05) more likely to treat only "severe" primary attacks. Most experienced physicians were also most likely (p < 0.05) to prescribe topical acyclovir. Prescription of suppressive acyclovir was also influenced by the experience of the physician, the least experienced physicians being more likely to prescribe to patients who were HIV antibody positive or to those entering new relationships, whereas the more experienced prescribed to those patients who were particularly anxious (p < 0.05 for each of these). Male physicians were significantly more likely to agree with the proposition that men cope better with genital herpes (54%) than female physicians (24%, p < 0.01). CONCLUSION--The response to the questionnaire illustrates that management of genital herpes is influenced by the duration of the physicians clinical experience. Gender of the physician may have an indirect role to play as we have shown that physicians differ in their perception of how the sexes cope with genital herpes. PMID:8509090

  9. Providers' lack of knowledge about herpes zoster in HIV-infected patients is among barriers to herpes zoster vaccination.

    PubMed

    Aziz, M; Kessler, H; Huhn, G

    2013-06-01

    Identification of perceptions about herpes zoster (HZ) disease, vaccine effectiveness and safety, and vaccine recommendations may impact immunization practices of physicians for HIV-infected patients. A survey was used to quantify knowledge of HZ as well as determine physician immunization perceptions and practices. There were 272/1700 respondents (16%). Correct answers for the incidence of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection in adults and incidence of HZ in HIV-infected patients were recorded by 14% and 10% of providers, respectively. Providers reported poor knowledge of the incidence of disease recurrence in HIV-infected patients (41% correct), potency of HZ vaccine (47.5% correct) and mechanism of protection against reactivation of VZV (66% correct). Most (88%) agreed that HZ was a serious disease, and 73% believed that the burden of disease made vaccination important. A majority (75%) did not vaccinate HIV patients with HZ vaccine regardless of antiretroviral therapy status. Barriers to administration included safety concerns, concern that vaccine would not prevent HZ, risk of HZ dissemination, reimbursement issues and lack of Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines. Only 38% of providers agreed that CDC guidelines were clear and 50% believed that clinical trials were needed prior to use of HZ vaccine in HIV-infected patients. Education about HZ is needed among HIV providers. Providers perceived vaccination as important, but data on vaccine safety and clear guidance from the CDC on this issue are lacking.

  10. Localized linear IgA dermatosis induced by UV light-treatment for herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    He, Chundi; Xu, Honghui; Xiao, Ting; Geng, Long; Chen, Hong-Duo

    2007-05-01

    We report a case of localized linear IgA dermatosis (LID). The patient suffered from herpes zoster on the right waist and received three localized ultraviolet (UV) light treatments. One month later he presented with bullae on the same site. Direct immunofluorescence showed deposition of linear IgA and weak C3 along the basement membrane zone. Indirect immunofluorescence on the salt-split human skin demonstrated that IgA antibodies were bound to the epidermal side. To our knowledge, this is the first case of localized LID induced by UV light treatment for herpes zoster. It is also the third case of LID induced by UV light.

  11. A prospective study of the psychological impact on patients with a first episode of genital herpes.

    PubMed Central

    Carney, O; Ross, E; Bunker, C; Ikkos, G; Mindel, A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess the psychological impact of first episode of genital herpes, and to determine whether this changes over time. SETTING AND SUBJECTS--The Departments of Genitourinary Medicine (GUM), and Dermatology, Middlesex Hospital London. The study group consisted of patients attending the department of GUM with a clinically proven first episode of genital herpes. Two control groups were recruited; firstly patients without herpes attending the GUM Department and secondly patients attending the Dermatology Department out patients with chronic dermatoses. METHODS--Patients and controls completed an 87 item, self-administered psychological questionnaire at 3 monthly intervals for a year. The questionnaire consisted of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ); the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Questionnaire (HADQ); Illness Attitude Scales and Illness Concern. Patients were also asked questions about their sexual behaviour. RESULTS--Ninety one patients (68 women, 23 men) with genital herpes, 61 GUM controls (42 women, 19 men) and 56 dermatology controls (36 women, 20 men) participated. There were no statistically significant demographic differences between patients and controls. At first visit the proportion of patients classified as "cases" by the GHQ (GHQ cases) were similar for primary herpes patients 62% (56/91) and Dermatology controls 52% (29/56) while a significantly smaller proportion of GUM controls 34% (21/61) were classified as GHQ cases. The primary herpes group were significantly more concerned about their illness than either the GUM controls or the Dermatology controls (p < 0.002). The proportion of primary herpes patients classified as "cases" by the GHQ reduced significantly over the initial three month period with 67% of patients classified as "cases" at their first visit becoming "noncases" after three months (p < 0.0001). Also 50% of those classified as "cases" at first visit by the HADQ become "noncases" after the initial three months (p = 0

  12. Amitriptyline/Ketamine as therapy for neuropathic pruritus and pain secondary to herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John R; Davis, Mark D P

    2015-02-01

    Frequent causes of morbidity secondary to herpes zoster include acute pain, secondary infection, and postherpetic neuralgia. A less documented complication is pruritus, which can be either acute or postinfectious when it persists more than 3 months after the rash has healed. We discuss a case of severe, acute neuropathic pruritus and pain secondary to active herpes zoster that was unresponsive to standard medical therapy, including oral antihistamines, topical lidocaine, oral gabapentin, and local wound care. Modest control of the pruritus and pain was achieved with continued multimodal therapy and the addition of topical 2% amitriptyline/0.5% ketamine gel.

  13. Herpes Genitalis in Patients Attending a Clinic for Sexually Transmitted Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lawee, David; Gutman, Mory; Hrytzay, Millie; McLachlin, Jeanette

    1983-01-01

    In a prospective study of 210 patients attending a hospital-based sexually transmitted disease clinic, we documented the prevalence of genital herpes infection (GHI) and its association with gonococcal infection (GI). Herpes simplex virus type 2 was cultured from 58% of symptomatic patients and 0.5% of asymptomatic patients. The ratio of GI to GHI was 41:31 by clinical criteria. The laboratory-confirmed ratio was 41:18. These ratios are much higher than those normally used to estimate the caseload of GHI. PMID:21283317

  14. Herpes Zoster of the Third Division of the Trigeminal Nerve. A Clinical Pathologic Conference.

    PubMed

    Doan, Karen; Stoler, Kenneth; Logan, Keri

    2015-11-01

    Herpes zoster of the trigeminal nerve is a disease that often challenges dentists and dental specialists trying to make the proper diagnosis, as many ulcerative and vesiculobullous diseases of the mouth have a similar clinical appearance. We report a clinical case in which a 27-year-old patient sought care for this vesicular lesion. Included are the differential diagnosis and treatment modalities that we used to diagnose the disease. A clinical pathologic conference is provided to highlight the appropriate courses of action in the management of herpes zoster.

  15. [Kluver Bucy syndrome and central diabetes insipidus: two uncommon complications of herpes simplex encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Locatelli, C; Vergine, G; Ciambra, R; Leone, V; Facchini, S; Suprani, T; Casadei, G; Pocecco, M

    2003-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Encephalitis (HSE) is an uncommon but severe disease with high mortality and morbidity. The major clinical manifestations are deteriorating consciousness with confusion, drowsiness or coma, altered behaviour, convulsions and a variety of neurological signs (hemiplegia, aphasia, ataxia, etc.). An uncommon complication of HSE is Kluver Bucy syndrome (KBS), characterized by hyperorality, bulimia and changes in emotional behaviour. Neuroimaging studies frequently show an involvement of the temporal lobes and limbic areas. Another uncommon complication of HSE is central diabetes insipidus as a result of herpes simplex infection of the hypothalamus. We report two pediatric cases of HSE complicated with Kluver Bucy syndrome and central diabetes insipidus.

  16. Preparation and immunogenicity of vaccine Ac NFU1 (S-) MRC towards the prevention of herpes genitalis.

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, G R; Woodman, C B; Hartley, C E; Buchan, A; Fuller, A; Durham, J; Synnott, M; Clay, J C; Melling, J; Wiblin, C; Wilkins, J

    1982-01-01

    A subunit antigenoid vaccine, Ac NFU1 (S-) MRC, was used to prevent primary herpes genitalis in 60 subjects considered to be at risk of this infection. There was no evidence of serious local or general side effects. Neutralising antibody responses were detected in 59% and 90% of subjects receiving the low and high doses of vaccine respectively; immunoprecipitating antibody was detected at a lower frequency, namely in 23% and 43% of subjects receiving the low and high doses respectively. After a mean follow-up period of 18 months none of the vaccinated subjects contracted herpes genitalis after completing the vaccination course. Images PMID:6293640

  17. Immune inhibition of virus release from herpes simplex virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Mushi, E Z; Whitney, J E

    By treatment of herpes simplex virus-infected cells with virus antiserum with or without complement, the yield of infectious extracellular virus was significantly reduced. This was shown to be due to an immune alteration of the cell membrane which inhibited release of virus particles from the infected cells and not due to neutralization; both type-common and type-specific antigens of herpes simplex virus were involved. The phenomenon was also evident with antisera directed against cell determinants. The experimental findings are presented and their significance in the immunological defense mechanisms of the body and in viral immunotherapy is discussed.

  18. Preparation and immunogenicity of vaccine Ac NFU1 (S-) MRC towards the prevention of herpes genitalis.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Woodman, C B; Hartley, C E; Buchan, A; Fuller, A; Durham, J; Synnott, M; Clay, J C; Melling, J; Wiblin, C; Wilkins, J

    1982-12-01

    A subunit antigenoid vaccine, Ac NFU1 (S-) MRC, was used to prevent primary herpes genitalis in 60 subjects considered to be at risk of this infection. There was no evidence of serious local or general side effects. Neutralising antibody responses were detected in 59% and 90% of subjects receiving the low and high doses of vaccine respectively; immunoprecipitating antibody was detected at a lower frequency, namely in 23% and 43% of subjects receiving the low and high doses respectively. After a mean follow-up period of 18 months none of the vaccinated subjects contracted herpes genitalis after completing the vaccination course.

  19. Bell's palsy and herpes viruses: to (acyclo)vir or not to (acyclo)vir?

    PubMed

    Steiner, I; Mattan, Y

    1999-11-15

    The majority of peripheral seventh cranial nerve palsy cases remain without an identified etiology and will eventually be diagnosed as idiopathic or Bell's palsy. Some features of this condition may be characteristic of a viral infection. Indeed, several herpes viruses have been implicated as potential causative pathogens. Besides varicella-zoster virus, shown to cause Bell's palsy under the Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, recent years have seen an increased interest and focus on the possible herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) etiology in idiopathic facial paralysis. We review the clinical, biological and virological basis for the potential herpetic cause of Bell's palsy and the rational for antiviral therapy in this condition.

  20. Clinical and neuroimaging findings in neonatal herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Monika; Mody, Swati; Natarajan, Girija

    2014-08-01

    In a retrospective review of infants with neonatal herpes simplex virus disease (n=29), we found bilateral multilobar (n=8), pontine (n=3), thalamic (n=6), and internal capsule and corticospinal tract (n=5) involvement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Diffusion-weighted imaging (n=6) performed early revealed additional involvement than detected by conventional MRI. Neurodevelopmental sequelae were correlated with MRI abnormalities. Our findings demonstrate that MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging, is a valuable prognostic adjunct in neonatal herpes simplex virus disease.

  1. Electron Tomography of Nascent Herpes Simplex Virus Virions▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Baines, Joel D.; Hsieh, Chyong-Ere; Wills, Elizabeth; Mannella, Carmen; Marko, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were conventionally embedded or freeze substituted after high-pressure freezing and stained with uranyl acetate. Electron tomograms of capsids attached to or undergoing envelopment at the inner nuclear membrane (INM), capsids within cytoplasmic vesicles near the nuclear membrane, and extracellular virions revealed the following phenomena. (i) Nucleocapsids undergoing envelopment at the INM, or B capsids abutting the INM, were connected to thickened patches of the INM by fibers 8 to 19 nm in length and ≤5 nm in width. The fibers contacted both fivefold symmetrical vertices (pentons) and sixfold symmetrical faces (hexons) of the nucleocapsid, although relative to the respective frequencies of these subunits in the capsid, fibers engaged pentons more frequently than hexons. (ii) Fibers of similar dimensions bridged the virion envelope and surface of the nucleocapsid in perinuclear virions. (iii) The tegument of perinuclear virions was considerably less dense than that of extracellular virions; connecting fibers were observed in the former case but not in the latter. (iv) The prominent external spikes emanating from the envelope of extracellular virions were absent from perinuclear virions. (v) The virion envelope of perinuclear virions appeared denser and thicker than that of extracellular virions. (vi) Vesicles near, but apparently distinct from, the nuclear membrane in single sections were derived from extensions of the perinuclear space as seen in the electron tomograms. These observations suggest very different mechanisms of tegumentation and envelopment in extracellular compared with perinuclear virions and are consistent with application of the final tegument to unenveloped nucleocapsids in a compartment(s) distinct from the perinuclear space. PMID:17215293

  2. Herpes and polyoma family viruses in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    STAMATIOU, DIMITRIS P.; DERDAS, STAVROS P.; ZORAS, ODYSSEAS L.; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.

    2016-01-01

    virus families, the herpes and polyoma family viruses, and we discuss their potential role as causative agents in thyroid carcinogenesis. PMID:26998055

  3. Autoimmune post–herpes simplex encephalitis of adults and teenagers

    PubMed Central

    Armangue, Thaís; Moris, Germán; Cantarín-Extremera, Verónica; Conde, Carlos Enrique; Rostasy, Kevin; Erro, Maria Elena; Portilla-Cuenca, Juan Carlos; Turón-Viñas, Eulàlia; Málaga, Ignacio; Muñoz-Cabello, Beatriz; Torres-Torres, Carmen; Llufriu, Sara; González-Gutiérrez-Solana, Luis; González, Guillermo; Casado-Naranjo, Ignacio; Rosenfeld, Myrna; Graus, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report 14 patients with immune-mediated relapsing symptoms post–herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) and to compare the clinical and immunologic features of the teenage and adult group with those of young children. Methods: Prospective observational study of patients diagnosed between June 2013 and February 2015. Immunologic techniques have been reported previously. Results: Among the teenage and adult group (8 patients, median age 40 years, range 13–69; 5 male), 3 had an acute symptom presentation suggesting a viral relapse, and 5 a presentation contiguous with HSE suggesting a recrudescence of previous deficits. Seven patients developed severe psychiatric/behavioral symptoms disrupting all social interactions, and one refractory status epilepticus. Blepharospasm occurred in one patient. Five patients had CSF antibodies against NMDA receptor (NMDAR) and 3 against unknown neuronal cell surface proteins. In 5/6 patients, the brain MRI showed new areas of contrast enhancement that decreased after immunotherapy and clinical improvement. Immunotherapy was useful in 7/7 patients, sometimes with impressive recoveries, returning to their baseline HSE residual deficits. Compared with the 6 younger children (median age 13 months, range 6–20, all with NMDAR antibodies), the teenagers and adults were less likely to develop choreoathetosis (0/8 vs 6/6, p < 0.01) and decreased level of consciousness (2/8 vs 6/6, p < 0.01) and had longer delays in diagnosis and treatment (interval relapse/antibody testing 85 days, range 17–296, vs 4 days, range 0–33, p = 0.037). Conclusion: In teenagers and adults, the immune-mediated relapsing syndrome post-HSE is different from that known in young children as choreoathetosis post-HSE and is underrecognized. Prompt diagnosis is important because immunotherapy can be highly effective. PMID:26491084

  4. Natural history of sensory function after herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karin L; Rowbotham, Michael C

    2010-07-01

    The natural history of sensory function in the first 6months after herpes zoster (HZ) was determined in a cohort of 94 subjects at elevated risk for developing post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN). All four visits included ratings of pain and sensory symptoms, mapping areas of altered sensation and allodynia, and quantitative thermal and mechanical sensory testing. The last three visits included the capsaicin response test. Sensory thresholds in distant control skin were stable. Mirror-image skin was persistently hyperesthetic to warming and mechanical stimuli and hyperalgesic to heat compared to distant control skin. HZ skin showed deficits in all thermal modalities. Sensory recovery was limited and selective. Allodynia area and severity, hyperalgesia to von Frey hair, and cold detection threshold improved, but deficits to warmth and heat pain did not. Capsaicin on HZ skin significantly aggravated pain and allodynia in the majority of subjects at 6-8weeks after HZ onset. At study entry, eventual PHN subjects had significantly more impairment in detecting warmth and cold, a larger area of altered sensation, a larger area of allodynia, and more severe allodynia. The results support the study hypothesis that severity of initial injury predicts PHN, especially impaired cold sensation in HZ skin. The hypothesis that PHN develops because of a failure to recover normal neural function was not supported. Sensory recovery proceeded at the same rate in eventual pain-free and eventual PHN subjects and is not a requirement for pain resolution. Early interventions that reduce neural injury or enhance recovery should be of benefit.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of vaccination against herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Pieter T; Wilschut, Jan C; Postma, Maarten J

    2014-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is a common disease among elderly, which may develop into a severe pain syndrome labeled postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). A live-attenuated varicella zoster virus vaccine has been shown to be effective in reducing the incidence and burden of illness of HZ and PHN, providing the opportunity to prevent significant health-related and financial consequences of HZ. In this review, we summarize the available literature on cost-effectiveness of HZ vaccination and discuss critical parameters for cost-effectiveness results. A search in PubMed and EMBASE was performed to identify full cost-effectiveness studies published before April 2013. Fourteen cost-effectiveness studies were included, all performed in western countries. All studies evaluated cost-effectiveness among elderly above 50 years and used costs per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained as primary outcome. The vast majority of studies showed vaccination of 60- to 75-year-old individuals to be cost-effective, when duration of vaccine efficacy was longer than 10 years. Duration of vaccine efficacy, vaccine price, HZ incidence, HZ incidence and discount rates were influential to the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). HZ vaccination may be a worthwhile intervention from a cost-effectiveness point of view. More extensive reporting on methodology and more detailed results of sensitivity analyses would be desirable to address uncertainty and to guarantee optimal comparability between studies, for example regarding model structure, discounting, vaccine characteristics and loss of quality of life due to HZ and PHN. PMID:25424815

  6. Human cytomegalovirus function inhibits replication of herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Cockley, K.D.; Shiraki, K.; Rapp, F.

    1988-01-01

    Human embryonic lung (HEL) cells infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) restricted the replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). A delay in HSV replication of 15 h as well as a consistent, almost 3 log inhibition of HSV replication in HCMV-infected cell cultures harvested 24 to 72 h after superinfection were observed compared with controls infected with HSV alone. Treatment of HCMV-infected HEL cells with cycloheximide (100 ..mu..g/ml) for 3 or 24 h was demonstrated effective in blocking HCMV protein synthesis, as shown by immunoprecipitation with HCMV antibody-positive polyvalent serum. Cycloheximide treatment of HCMV-infected HEL cells and removal of the cycloheximide block before superinfection inhibited HSV-1 replication more efficiently than non-drug-treated superinfected controls. HCMV DNA-negative temperature-sensitive mutants restricted HSV as efficiently as wild-type HCMV suggesting that immediate-early and/or early events which occur before viral DNA synthesis are sufficient for inhibition of HSV. Inhibition of HSV-1 in HCMV-infected HEL cells was unaffected by elevated temperature (40.5/sup 0/C). However, prior UV irradiation of HCMV removed the block to HSV replication, demonstrating the requirement for an active HCMV genome. HSV-2 replication was similarly inhibited in HCMV-infected HEL cells. Superinfection of HCMV-infected HEL cells with HSV-1 labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine provided evidence that the labeled virus could penetrate to the nucleus of cells after superinfection. Evidence for penetration of superinfecting HSV into HCMV-infected cells was also provided by blot hybridization of HSV DNA synthesized in cells infected with HSV alone versus superinfected cell cultures at 0 and 48 h after superinfection.

  7. Oncolytic virus therapy using genetically engineered herpes simplex viruses.

    PubMed

    Todo, Tomoki

    2008-01-01

    Genetically engineered, conditionally replicating herpes simplex viruses type 1 (HSV-1) are promising therapeutic agents for cancer. They can replicate in situ, spread, and exhibit oncolytic activity via a direct cytocidal effect. In addition, oncolytic HSV-1 can transfer and express foreign genes in host cells. The phase I clinical study with G207, a double-mutated HSV-1, in recurrent malignant glioma patients has shown that oncolytic HSV-1 can be safely administered into human brains. The therapeutic benefits of oncolytic HSV-1 depend on the extent of both intratumoral viral replication and induction of host antitumor immune responses. We develop new-generation oncolytic HSV-1 by enhancing these properties while retaining the safety features. G47delta was created from G207 by introducing another genetic mutation. Compared with G207, G47delta showed 1) better stimulation of human antitumor immune cells, 2) better growth properties leading to higher virus yields and increased cytopathic effect in vitro, 3) better antitumor efficacy in both immuno-competent and -incompetent animals, and 4) preserved safety in the brain of HSV-1-sensitive mice. Preparation is under way for a clinical trial using G47delta in progressive glioblastoma patients. G47delta is also suited as a backbone vector for expressing foreign molecules. Using bacterial artificial chromosome and two DNA recombinases, we have created an "armed" oncolytic HSV-1 generation system that allows insertion of transgene(s) into the genome of G47delta in a rapid and accurate manner. We found that expression of immunostimulatory molecules can significantly enhance the antitumor efficacy of G47delta. Based on these advances, we anticipate that oncolytic virus therapy using oncolytic HSV-1 will soon be established as an important modality of cancer treatment.

  8. Oral shedding of herpes simplex virus type 2

    PubMed Central

    Wald, A; Ericsson, M; Krantz, E; Selke, S; Corey, L

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 reactivate preferentially in the oral and genital area, respectively. We aimed to define frequency and characteristics associated with oral shedding of HSV-2. Methods: Demographic, clinical and laboratory data of patients with documented HSV-2 infection and at least one oral viral culture obtained were selected from the University of Washington Virology Research Clinic database. Results: Of 1388 people meeting the entry criteria, 44 (3.2%) had HSV-2 isolated at least once from their mouths. In comparison with the 1344 people who did not have HSV-2 isolated from their mouth, participants with oral HSV-2 were more likely to be male (OR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.0 to 3.7), HIV positive (OR = 2.9, 95% CI 1.4 to 6.0), and homosexual (OR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.1 to 4.2), and to have collected a larger number of oral specimens (median 32 v 4, p<0.001). Of the 58 days with oral HSV-2 isolation, 15 (25%) occurred during newly acquired HSV-2 infection, 12 (21%) during a recurrence with genital lesions, three (5%) during a recurrence with oral lesions, and three (5%) during a recurrence with oral and genital lesions; 25 (43%) occurred during asymptomatic shedding. Oral HSV-2 was found less frequently than oral HSV-1 (0.06% v 1%, p<0.001) in people with HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibody, and less frequently than genital HSV-2 (0.09% v 7%, p<0.001). Conclusions: Oral reactivation of HSV-2 as defined by viral isolation is uncommon and usually occurs in the setting of first episode of genital HSV-2 or during genital recurrence of HSV-2. PMID:15295123

  9. Herpes simplex virus 2 infection impacts stress granule accumulation.

    PubMed

    Finnen, Renée L; Pangka, Kyle R; Banfield, Bruce W

    2012-08-01

    Interference with stress granule (SG) accumulation is gaining increased appreciation as a common strategy used by diverse viruses to facilitate their replication and to cope with translational arrest. Here, we examined the impact of infection by herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) on SG accumulation by monitoring the localization of the SG components T cell internal antigen 1 (TIA-1), Ras-GTPase-activating SH3-domain-binding protein (G3BP), and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP). Our results indicate that SGs do not accumulate in HSV-2-infected cells and that HSV-2 can interfere with arsenite-induced SG accumulation early after infection. Surprisingly, SG accumulation was inhibited despite increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α), implying that HSV-2 encodes previously unrecognized activities designed to maintain translation initiation downstream of eIF2α. SG accumulation was not inhibited in HSV-2-infected cells treated with pateamine A, an inducer that works independently of eIF2α phosphorylation. The SGs that accumulated following pateamine A treatment of infected cells contained G3BP and PABP but were largely devoid of TIA-1. We also identified novel nuclear structures containing TIA-1 that form late in infection. These structures contain the RNA binding protein 68-kDa Src-associated in mitosis (Sam68) and were noticeably absent in infected cells treated with inhibitors of viral DNA replication, suggesting that they arise as a result of late events in the virus replicative cycle.

  10. Purification and structural characterization of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, G.E.; Baker, S.A.; Merajver, S.D.; Coligan, J.E.; Levine, M.; Glorioso, J.C.; Nairn, R.

    1987-01-27

    Purification of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C (gC) in microgram amounts yielded sufficient material for an analysis of its secondary structure. Purification was facilitated by using the mutant virus gC-3, which bears a point mutation that interrupts the putative hydrophobic membrane anchor sequence, causing the secretion of gC-3 protein into the cell culture medium. gC-3 protein was purified by size fractionation of concentrated culture medium from infected cells on a gel filtration column of Sephacryl S-200, followed by immunoaffinity chromatography on a column constructed of gC-specific monoclonal antibodies cross-linked to a protein A-Sepharose CL-4B matrix. Purified gC-3 had a molecular weight of 130,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the size expected for gC, was reactive with gC-specific monoclonal antibodies in protein immunoblots, and contained amino acid sequences characteristic of gC as determined by radiochemical amino acid microsequence analyses. Polyclonal antisera obtained from a rabbit immunized with gC-3 reacted with wild-type gC in immunoprecipitation, enzyme immunoassay, and immunoelectroblot (western blot) assays. Deglycosylation by treatment with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid reduced the molecular weight of gC-3 by approximately 35%. Analyses of both native and deglycosylated gC-3 by Raman spectroscopy showed that the native molecule consists of about 17%..cap alpha..-helix, 24% ..beta..-sheet, and 60% disordered secondary structures, whereas deglycosylated gC-3 consists of about 8% ..cap alpha..-helix, 10% ..beta..-sheet, 81% disordered structures. These data were in good agreement with the 11% ..cap alpha..-helix, 18% ..beta..-sheet, 61% ..beta..-turn, and 9% disordered structures calculated from Chou-Fasman analysis of the primary sequence of gC-3.

  11. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoprotein B Epitope-Specific Effector and Memory CD8+ T Cells from Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Individuals with Ocular Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif A.; Srivastava, Ruchi; Spencer, Doran; Garg, Sumit; Fremgen, Daniel; Vahed, Hawa; Lopes, Patricia P.; Pham, Thanh T.; Hewett, Charlie; Kuang, Jasmine; Ong, Nicolas; Huang, Lei; Scarfone, Vanessa M.; Nesburn, Anthony B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein B (gB)-specific CD8+ T cells protect mice from herpes infection and disease. However, whether and which HSV-1 gB-specific CD8+ T cells play a key role in the “natural” protection seen in HSV-1-seropositive healthy asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease) remain to be determined. In this study, we have dissected the phenotypes and the functions of HSV-1 gB-specific CD8+ T cells from HLA-A*02:01 positive, HSV-1 seropositive ASYMP and symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (with a history of numerous episodes of recurrent ocular herpes disease). We found the following. (i) Healthy ASYMP individuals maintained a significantly higher proportion of differentiated HSV-1 gB-specific effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7low CD44high CD62Llow). In contrast, SYMP patients had frequent less-differentiated central memory CD8+ T cells (TCM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7high CD44low CD62Lhigh). (ii) ASYMP individuals had significantly higher proportions of multifunctional effector CD8+ T cells which responded mainly to gB342–350 and gB561–569 “ASYMP” epitopes, and simultaneously produced IFN-γ, CD107a/b, granzyme B, and perforin. In contrast, effector CD8+ T cells from SYMP individuals were mostly monofunctional and were directed mainly against nonoverlapping gB17–25 and gB183–191 “SYMP” epitopes. (iii) Immunization of an HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mouse model of ocular herpes with “ASYMP” CD8+ TEM cell epitopes, but not with “SYMP” CD8+ TCM cell epitopes, induced a strong CD8+ T cell-dependent protective immunity against ocular herpes infection and disease. Our findings provide insights into the role of HSV-specific CD8+ TEM cells in protection against herpes and should be considered in the development of an effective vaccine. IMPORTANCE A significantly higher proportion of differentiated and multifunctional HSV-1 gB-specific effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM

  12. Prevention of type 2 herpes simplex virus induced cervical carcinoma in mice by prior immunization with a vaccine prepared from type 1 herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, M H; Dong, C Y; Liu, Z H; Skinner, G R; Hartley, C E

    1983-12-01

    Repeated intra-vaginal inoculation of mice with inactivated type 2 herpes simplex virus induced cervical carcinoma in approximately 50% of mice. Prior immunization with subunit vaccine Ac NFU1(S-) BHK reduced the frequency of cervical carcinoma to 19%. Inoculation of mice with a control preparation of uninfected cell extract never induced preinvasive or invasive cervical cancer. There was evidence of an antibody response in every vaccinated and/or innoculated animal. Mice developing cervical cancer had a significantly higher antibody titre to type 2 herpes virus than mice not developing cancer. These results are in general accord with sero-epidemiological studies of preinvasive and invasive cervical carcinoma in human subjects and suggests that this experimental model may be appropriate for further investigation of prevention of human cervical cancer by vaccination.

  13. Epidemiology and burden of herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia in Australia, Asia and South America.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Lara Quirino; Macintyre, C Raina; Vujacich, Claudia

    2007-09-01

    Following the development of a herpes zoster vaccine and the successful introduction of widespread varicella vaccination in the USA, many countries are considering similar vaccination programmes. However, before implementing such programmes, it is important to describe the regional baselines of varicella and herpes zoster epidemiology, both to aid the design of vaccination strategies and to observe trends after the introduction of vaccination. In many areas of the world, this information is difficult to gather, and the epidemiology of herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia in these regions is poorly understood. In Australia, available national data sources of varicella and herpes zoster, including serological data, provide reliable estimates of disease and reveal similar rates of incidence and complications to those in Europe and the USA. However, the average age of infection in Australia is higher than in Europe and in the USA. Epidemiological data from Asia and South America are scarce. Unexpectedly for tropical countries, the incidences of herpes zoster in Asia and South America also appear to be comparable with those in Europe and the USA, despite the delayed acquisition of varicella-zoster virus infection in Asia. In Brazil, there is some evidence for higher than expected incidence rates for herpes zoster in young adults. The epidemiology of herpes zoster in Asia and South America suggests that recommendations on treatment and prevention from Europe and the USA may be relevant to these countries.

  14. Multicenter randomized study of inosine pranobex versus acyclovir in the treatment of recurrent herpes labialis and recurrent herpes genitalis in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    You, Yi; Wang, Li; Li, Yafei; Wang, Qianqiu; Cao, Shuanglin; Tu, Yating; Li, Shenqiu; Bai, Li; Lu, Jianyun; Wei, Zhiping; Chen, Wenchieh; Hao, Fei

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral inosine pranobex as compared with acyclovir in the treatment of recurrent herpes labialis (RHL) and recurrent herpes genitalis (RHG). A multicenter double-blind, double-dummy, randomized, controlled, parallel group trial was conducted in 144 patients with RHL and 144 RHG. Patients were assigned to treatment in one of two groups: (i) inosine pranobex group (active inosine pranobex, 1 g four times daily, and acyclovir placebo); or (ii) acyclovir group (active acyclovir, 200 mg five times daily, and inosine pranobex placebo). The total symptom score (TSS) of patients with RHL did not differ in the inosine pranobex and acyclovir group on the 3rd or 7th day of treatment. There was also no difference in the efficacy rates between the two groups. No difference of TSS was observed between patients with RHG taking inosine pranobex and acyclovir on days 3 or 5 of the treatment, respectively. The short-term clinical recurrence rate of RHG at 3-month follow-up was much lower in the inosine pranobex group than acyclovir group. The incidence of hyperuricemia was higher in the inosine pranobex group than acyclovir group. In conclusion, inosine pranobex was as effective as acyclovir in treating RHL and RHG with significantly greater reduction of the short-term recurrence rate of herpes genitalis at 3-month follow up. Long-term recurrence rates at 6 months or longer remain to be determined. Hyperuricemia should be monitored during the treatment.

  15. Effect of preexisting anti-herpes immunity on the efficacy of herpes simplex viral therapy in a murine intraperitoneal tumor model.

    PubMed

    Lambright, E S; Kang, E H; Force, S; Lanuti, M; Caparrelli, D; Kaiser, L R; Albelda, S M; Molnar-Kimber, K L

    2000-10-01

    HSV-1716, a replicating nonneurovirulent herpes simplex virus type 1, has shown efficacy in treating multiple types of human tumors in immunodeficient mice. Since the majority of the human population has been previously exposed to herpes simplex virus, the efficacy of HSV-based oncolytic therapy was investigated in an immunocompetent animal tumor model. EJ-6-2-Bam-6a, a tumor cell line derived from h-ras-transformed murine fibroblast, exhibit a diffuse growth pattern in the peritoneal cavity of BALB/c mice and replicate HSV-1716 to titers observed in human tumors. An established intraperitoneal (ip) tumor model of EJ-6-2-Bam-6a in naive and HSV-immunized mice was used to evaluate the efficacy of single or multiple ip administrations of HSV-1716 (4 x 10(6) pfu/treatment) or of carrier cells, which are irradiated, ex vivo virally infected EJ-6-2-Bam-6a cells that can amplify the viral load in situ. All treated groups significantly prolonged survival versus media control with an approximately 40% long-term survival rate (cure) in the multiply treated, HSV-naive animals. Prior immunization of the mice with HSV did not significantly decrease the median survival of the single or multiply treated HSV-1716 or the carrier cell-treated groups. These studies support the development of replication-selective herpes virus mutants for use in localized intraperitoneal malignancies.

  16. Immunization with a highly attenuated replication-competent herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant, HF10, protects mice from genital disease caused by herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chenhong; Goshima, Fumi; Kamakura, Maki; Mutoh, Yoshifumi; Iwata, Seiko; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Yukihiro

    2012-01-01

    Genital herpes is an intractable disease caused mainly by herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 (HSV-2), and is a major concern in public health. A previous infection with HSV type 1 (HSV-1) enhances protection against primary HSV-2 infection to some extent. In this study, we evaluated the ability of HF10, a naturally occurring replication-competent HSV-1 mutant, to protect against genital infection in mice caused by HSV-2. Subcutaneous inoculation of HF10-immunized mice against lethal infection by HSV-2, and attenuated the development of genital ulcer diseases. Immunization with HF10 inhibited HSV-2 replication in the mouse vagina, reduced local inflammation, controlled emergence of neurological dysfunctions of HSV-2 infection, and increased survival. In HF10-immunized mice, we observed rapid and increased production of interferon-γ in the vagina in response to HSV-2 infection, and numerous CD4(+) and a few CD8(+) T cells localized to the infective focus. CD4(+) T cells invaded the mucosal subepithelial lamina propria. Thus, the protective effect of HF10 was related to induction of cellular immunity, mediated primarily by Th1 CD4(+) cells. These data indicate that the live attenuated HSV-1 mutant strain HF10 is a promising candidate antigen for a vaccine against genital herpes caused by HSV-2.

  17. Different presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae, herpes simplex virus type 1, human herpes virus 6, and Toxoplasma gondii in schizophrenia: meta-analysis and analytical study

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, José; Luna del Castillo, Juan de Dios; Mañanes-González, Sara; Carrillo-Ávila, José Antonio; Gutiérrez, Blanca; Cervilla, Jorge A; Sorlózano-Puerto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we have performed both a meta-analysis and an analytical study exploring the presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae, herpes simplex virus type 1, human herpes virus 6, and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in a sample of 143 schizophrenic patients and 143 control subjects. The meta-analysis was performed on papers published up to April 2014. The presence of serum immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin A was performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. The detection of microbial DNA in total peripheral blood was performed by nested polymerase chain reaction. The meta-analysis showed that: 1) C. pneumoniae DNA in blood and brain are more common in schizophrenic patients; 2) there is association with parasitism by T. gondii, despite the existence of publication bias; and 3) herpes viruses were not more common in schizophrenic patients. In our sample only anti-Toxoplasma immunoglobulin G was more prevalent and may be a risk factor related to schizophrenia, with potential value for prevention. PMID:25848282

  18. Hypertrophic herpes simplex simulating anal neoplasia in AIDS patients: report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Sidney R; Calore, Edenilson E; Manzione, Carmen R; Horta, Sergio C; Ferreira, Aurea F; Almeida, Lis V

    2005-12-01

    Five patients (4 males; mean age, 46.4 years) with painful verrucous perianal lesions caused by herpes simplex virus are described. All patients had had AIDS for a long time and were using highly active antiretroviral therapy. CD4+ counts ranged from 73 to 370/mm3. All lesions were submitted to resection under subdural anesthesia. Histologic examinations revealed epithelial hyperplasia and dense inflammatory process, composed mainly of lymphocytes and plasma cells, extended just to the hypodermis. Immunohistochemistry was positive for herpes simplex virus Type 2 in four patients and for herpes simplex virus Type 1 in one patient, and did not detect human papillomavirus antigens. Three patients had recurrences after 3, 10, and 12 months. Resection was performed on two patients; one had a new recurrence after three months. Oral acyclovir eliminated the lesion in the third patient. The analysis of our patients suggests that herpes simplex virus, Types 1 and 2, may cause verrucous lesions simulating neoplasia in patients with AIDS using antiretroviral therapy.

  19. Spontaneous intraocular lens extrusion in a patient with scleromalacia secondary to herpes zoster ophthalmicus.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Taha Y; Carrim, Zia I; Diaper, Charles J M; Wykes, William N

    2007-05-01

    We report a case of spontaneous intraocular lens (IOL) extrusion in association with scleromalacia 10 years after uneventful endocapsular surgery. The patient had a history of iridocyclitis secondary to herpes zoster ophthalmicus in the affected eye. A minimally invasive approach involving repositioning the IOL and closure with a conjunctival flap resulted in restoration of visual acuity.

  20. Syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone associated with localized herpes zoster ophthalmicus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Chiang; Shiang, Jeng-Chuan; Chen, Jiann-Tomg; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2011-02-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) associated with localized herpes zoster is rarely reported and may be under-appreciated. We describe two diabetic men with herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) who developed hyponatremia (114 and 116 mmol/L) during acute illness. Both were euvolemic and had elevated urine osmolality (435 and 368 mmol/kg.H(2)O) and sodium (Na(+)) concentration (61 and 63 mmol/L) along with normal cardiac, renal, liver, and endocrine function consistent with the diagnosis of SIADH. Thorough investigation for other causes of SIADH, including detailed physical examination, laboratory studies, and computed tomography of the brain, chest, and abdomen, were negative. Despite antiviral therapy (acyclovir) for herpes zoster, ophthalmoplegia, keratitis, and post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) developed. Even with fluid restriction and high salt diet, SIADH lasted for 3 to 4 months and resolved concomitantly with resolution of PHN, suggesting an association between SIADH and HZO. These two cases raise the potential for herpes zoster infection, especially HZO, to involve the regulatory pathway of ADH secretion, contributing to SIADH. The presence of PHN, which reflects greater neural damage may, at least in part, explain the prolonged ADH secretion and hyponatremia.

  1. Immunological Signaling During Herpes Simplex Virus-2 and Cytomegalovirus Vaginal Shedding After Initiation of Antiretroviral Treatment.

    PubMed

    Nason, Martha C; Patel, Eshan U; Kirkpatrick, Allison R; Prodger, Jessica L; Shahabi, Kamnoosh; Tobian, Aaron A R; Gianella, Sara; Kalibbala, Sarah; Ssebbowa, Paschal; Kaul, Rupert; Gray, Ronald H; Quinn, Thomas C; Serwadda, David; Reynolds, Steven J; Redd, Andrew D

    2016-03-01

    Vaginal proinflammatory cytokine expression during herpes virus reactivation was examined in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women before and after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Vaginal swabs were screened for levels of cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interferon-γ. The relative risk (RR) of herpes simplex virus-2 or cytomegalovirus (CMV) shedding being associated with cytokine levels above the median were estimated. Herpes simplex virus-2 shedding was significantly associated with higher levels of IL-6 (RR = 1.4, P = .003) and TNF-α (RR = 1.3, P = .010), whereas CMV shedding was associated with higher IL-6 (RR = 1.3, P = .006) and IL-2 (RR = 1.4, P = .01). The association of viral shedding with higher IL-6 levels suggests that herpes virus reactivation may be playing a role in immune activation after ART initiation.

  2. [Analysis on clinical features and treatment of herpes zoster patients hospitalized in real world].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ling-Lian; Wang, Lian-Xin; Xie, Yan-Ming; Yang, Wei; Yang, Zhi-Xin; Zhuang, Yan; Zhang, Yun-Bi

    2014-09-01

    From the hospital information system (HIS) of 20 national grade III-A general hospitals, 2 960 cases of herpes zoster as the research object, analyzes the relations between the general information, syndrome of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), western medicine combined diseases, the relationship between the solar term and the incidence of herpes zoster, and the combined use of Chinese and western medicine. Among the patients with 46-65 year old has the highest percentage of diseased; admission to general outpatient clinic is the most; the most common medical payment is medicare; combined disease such as hypertension, diabetes and coronary heart disease is more common; early treatment effect of herpes zoster is better than the sequelae; summer and autumn solar term patients is hospitalized more, TCM syndrome is damp heat of liver fire; about drugs, western medicine is the most commonly used vitamin B1 and mecobalamin, traditional Chinese medicine is the most frequently used Danhong injection, combination therapy with promoting blood circulation drugs and neurotrophic drugs. Thus, herpes zoster, more common in elderly patients, with no obvious relationship between solar term, should be early diagnosis and early treatment, often with combination of Chinese traditional and western medicine treatment.

  3. Docosanol: new drug. Herpes labialis: barely more effective than an excipient.

    PubMed

    2009-06-01

    (1) Herpes is a contagious, recurrent viral infection of the skin and mucous membranes. In immunocompetent patients the recurrences can be troublesome but they heal spontaneously. Management is mainly based on lifestyle measures. Local application of an antiviral drug such as aciclovir has modest effects. It reduces healing time by about 2 days provided treatment is started as soon as the first symptoms appear; (2) Docosanol, a fatty alcohol, was recently authorized in France for treatment of episodes of herpes labialis; (3) A trial in 474 patients showed no tangible difference between docosanol and 5% aciclovir in reducing healing time; (4) Clinical evaluation also includes two trials versus an excipient (polyethylene glycol) including 370 and 373 patients. The median healing time was reduced by less than a day; (5) In these trials, the adverse effects of docosanol were similar to those of the excipients. In particular, docosanol cream contains excipients that can provoke allergic reactions; (6) In practice, docosanol cream is barely or no more effective than an excipient in treating acute episodes of herpes labialis. Lifestyle measures are still the cornerstone of herpes management.

  4. Effect of laser phototherapy on recurring herpes labialis prevention: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Renata Rodrigues; de Paula Eduardo, Fernanda; Ramalho, Karen Müller; Antunes, José Leopoldo Ferreira; Bezinelli, Letícia Mello; de Magalhães, Marina Helena Cury Gallottini; Pegoretti, Tatiana; de Freitas, Patrícia Moreira; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    Alternative treatment for recurrent labial infection by herpes simplex virus (HSV) have been considered. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of laser phototherapy in prevention and reduction of severity of labial manifestations of herpes labialis virus. Seventy-one patients, divided into experimental (n = 41) and control (n = 30) groups were followed up for 16 months. Patients in the control group were treated topically with aciclovir and patients in the experimental group were subjected to laser phototherapy (one session per week, 10 weeks): 780 nm, 60 mW, 3.0 J/cm(2) or 4.5 J/cm(2) on healthy (no HSV-1 infection) and affected (with HSV-1 infection) tissues. Patients in the experimental group presented a significant decrease in dimension of herpes labialis lesions (P = 0.013) and inflammatory edema (P = 0.031). The reduction in pain level (P = 0.051) and monthly recurrences (P = 0.076) did not reach statistical significance. This study represents an in vivo indication that this treatment should be further considered as an effective alternative to therapeutic regimens for herpes labialis lesions.

  5. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in a University Health Population: Clinical Manifestations, Epidemiology, and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Robert; Aierstuck, Sara; Williams, Elizabeth A.; Melby, Bernette

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors described clinical presentations of oral and genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in a university health population and implications of these findings. Participants and Methods: Using a standardized data collection tool, 215 records of patients with symptomatic culture-positive HSV infections were reviewed. Results:…

  6. Vitamin D is closely linked to the clinical courses of herpes zoster: From pathogenesis to complications.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2015-10-01

    Vitamin D is renowned for its pleiotropic effects, including but not limited to bone integrity, and it has assumed an important role in the current research era. As vitamin D receptors are present in a variety of human tissues, particularly immune cells, the immunomodulatory potential of vitamin D cannot be overemphasized. Herpes zoster, which presents as grouped cutaneous vesicles over dermatomes or visceral/central nervous system infection in its severe form, has a higher incidence in immune-suppressed patients. Considering the importance of vitamin D in host immunity, we hypothesize that vitamin D acts as an effect-modifier for the entire herpes zoster spectrum with regard to disease susceptibility, manifestation, efficacy of pharmacologic management, and emergent complications during treatment. Moreover, the possibility exists that vitamin D might affect the course of postherpetic neuralgia. In line with this theory, we comprehensively searched the existing herpes zoster literature and provided important insight into the relationship between the disease courses of herpes zoster and vitamin D.

  7. Herpes simplex virus 2 infection: molecular association with HIV and novel microbicides to prevent disease.

    PubMed

    Suazo, Paula A; Tognarelli, Eduardo I; Kalergis, Alexis M; González, Pablo A

    2015-04-01

    Infection with herpes simplex viruses is one of the most ancient diseases described to affect humans. Infection with these viruses produces vexing effects to the host, which frequently recur. Infection with herpes simplex viruses is lifelong, and currently there is no vaccine or drug to prevent or cure infection. Prevalence of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) infection varies significantly depending on the geographical region and nears 20% worldwide. Importantly, HSV-2 is the first cause of genital ulcers in the planet. HSV-2 affects approximately 500 million people around the globe and significantly increases the likelihood of acquiring the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), as well as its shedding. Thus, controlling HSV-2 infection and spread is of public health concern. Here, we review the diseases produced by herpes simplex viruses, the factors that modulate HSV-2 infection, the relationship between HSV-2 and HIV and novel therapeutic and prophylactic microbicides/antivirals under development to prevent infection and pathological outcomes produced by this virus. We also review mutations associated with HSV-2 resistance to common antivirals.

  8. Tooth exfoliation, osteonecrosis and neuralgia following herpes zoster of trigeminal nerve.

    PubMed

    Volvoikar, Preeti; Patil, Shama; Dinkar, Ajit

    2002-01-01

    A case of herpes zoster of the trigeminal nerve with complications of osteonecrosis and neuralgia in the absence of local or systemic predisposing factors is presented. The literature is reviewed and the role of varicella zoster virus in the pathology of tooth exfoliation and osteonecrosis is discussed.

  9. Spontaneous tooth exfoliation, maxillary osteomyelitis and facial scarring following trigeminal herpes zoster infection.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Kamala G; Nayar, Kavitha; Rawal, Yeshwant B

    2006-07-01

    A case of trigeminal herpes zoster (HZ) infection affecting the left maxillary and ophthalmic divisions of the fifth cranial nerve in an immuno-competent patient is presented. Extremely rare complications such as osteonecrosis, spontaneous tooth exfoliation, secondary osteomyelitis and facial scarring were observed. Sequestrectomy, aciclovir and erythromycin stearate were effectively used in managing the case.

  10. Spontaneous tooth exfoliation after trigeminal herpes zoster: a case series of an uncommon complication.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Vikram K; Ranjan, Nitin; Sharma, Sangeet; Sharma, Nand Lal

    2013-05-01

    The most significant and debilitating complication of herpes zoster (HZ) is herpetic neuralgia that accompanies and may persist in 10-15% of all zoster patients, particularly those over 60 years of age. The described 3 cases had an uncommon complication of spontaneous tooth exfoliation after trigeminal HZ that rarely finds mention in dermatology literature.

  11. Characteristics Associated with Genital Herpes Testing among Young Adults: Assessing Factors from Two National Data Sets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Lisa K.; Levandowski, Brooke A.; Roberts, Craig M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives and Participants: In the United States, genital herpes (GH) prevalence is 10.6% among 20- to 29-year-olds and about 90% of seropositive persons do not know their status. This study investigated individual characteristics associated with GH screening and diagnosis in sexually active young adults aged 18 to 24. Methods: Two data sets were…

  12. Agents and strategies in development for improved management of herpes simplex virus infection and disease.

    PubMed

    Kleymann, Gerald

    2005-02-01

    The quiet pandemic of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections has plagued humanity since ancient times, causing mucocutaneous infection such as herpes labialis and herpes genitalis. Disease symptoms often interfere with every-day activities and occasionally HSV infections are the cause of life-threatening or sight-impairing disease, especially in neonates and the immuno-compromised patient population. After infection the virus persists for life in neurons of the host in a latent form, periodically reactivating and often resulting in significant psychosocial distress for the patient. Currently no cure is available. So far, vaccines, ILs, IFNs, therapeutic proteins, antibodies, immunomodulators and small-molecule drugs with specific or non-specific modes of action lacked either efficacy or the required safety profile to replace the nucleosidic drugs acyclovir, valacyclovir, penciclovir and famciclovir as the first choice of treatment. The recently discovered inhibitors of the HSV helicase-primase are the most potent development candidates today. These antiviral agents act by a novel mechanism of action and display low resistance rates in vitro and superior efficacy in animal models. This review summarises the current therapeutic options, discusses the potential of preclinical or investigational drugs and provides an up-to-date interpretation of the challenge to establish novel treatments for herpes simplex disease.

  13. Guidance on management of asymptomatic neonates born to women with active genital herpes lesions.

    PubMed

    Kimberlin, David W; Baley, Jill

    2013-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection of the neonate is uncommon, but genital herpes infections in adults are very common. Thus, although treating an infant with neonatal herpes is a relatively rare occurrence, managing infants potentially exposed to HSV at the time of delivery occurs more frequently. The risk of transmitting HSV to an infant during delivery is determined in part by the mother's previous immunity to HSV. Women with primary genital HSV infections who are shedding HSV at delivery are 10 to 30 times more likely to transmit the virus to their newborn infants than are women with recurrent HSV infection who are shedding virus at delivery. With the availability of commercial serological tests that reliably can distinguish type-specific HSV antibodies, it is now possible to determine the type of maternal infection and, thus, further refine management of infants delivered to women who have active genital HSV lesions. The management algorithm presented herein uses both serological and virological studies to determine the risk of HSV transmission to the neonate who is delivered to a mother with active herpetic genital lesions and tailors management accordingly. The algorithm does not address the approach to asymptomatic neonates delivered to women with a history of genital herpes but no active lesions at delivery.

  14. The effect of lithium chloride on the replication of herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Hartley, C; Buchan, A; Harper, L; Gallimore, P

    1980-01-01

    Lithium chloride inhibited the replication of type 1 and type 2 Herpes simplex virus at concentrations which permitted host cell replication. Virus polypeptide and antigen synthesis were unaffected while viral DNA synthesis was inhibited. The replication of two other DNA viruses, pseudorabies and vaccinia virus, was inhibited but there was no inhibition of two RNA viruses, namely, EMC and influenze virus.

  15. Experimental ulcerative herpetic keratitis. IV. Preliminary observations on the efficacy of a herpes simplex subunit vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, C A; Hartley, C E; Skinner, G R; Turner, S P; Easty, D L

    1981-01-01

    Systemic vaccination of rabbits with an inactivated type 1 virus subunit vaccine induced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Following ocular infection with type 1 herpes virus corneal ulceration and virus excretion were reduced in the vaccinated rabbits. PMID:6274376

  16. Humoral antibody response in patients with herpes genitalis: analysis of factors influencing the pattern of disease.

    PubMed

    Hallworth, J A; Stocker, D I; Shariff, D; Sugrue, D; Buchan, A; Skinner, G R

    1988-01-01

    An investigation was made of the diagnosis of herpes genitalis, the prediction of virus type and the likelihood and frequency of clinical and asymptomatic recurrences in relation to a history of herpes labialis, the virus type isolated from genital lesions and the humoral antibody status against HSV 1 and 2. Diagnosis of herpes genitalis correlated negatively with mean neutralising antibody levels against HSV type 1 and type 2 but positively with the variance of neutralising antibody levels in sequential sera. Virus type in patients with initial episodes was best predicted by initial and mean type 2 antibody levels and in patients with recurrent disease by the ratio of type 1 to type 2 antibody by radioimmune assay. The likelihood and frequency of clinical and asymptomatic recurrences was higher in patients where HSV type 2 was isolated. The likelihood of recurrences in patients with initial episodes was related to high initial neutralising antibody levels against type 2 and to low primary antibody responses against type 1 while frequency of recurrences was best related to low initial antibody levels against type 1 in combination with high levels against type 2. These data will be useful in diagnosis of herpes genitalis. Prediction of the likelihood and frequency of clinical and asymptomatic recurrences will facilitate advice concerning prognosis and risk factors to patients and their consorts.

  17. Content of proinflammatory cytokine in patients with clinical remission of chronic herpes infection during immunocorrection.

    PubMed

    Obukhova, O O; Shvayuk, A P; Gorbenko, O M; Trunov, A N; Trunova, L A

    2008-12-01

    The concentrations of cytokines (interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and interferon-gamma) in blood plasma from patients with remission of chronic herpes infection were measured during immunocorrective therapy. Our results indicate that immunocorrection is pathogenetically substantiated and immunologically effective. It was manifested in reduction of inflammation and activation of antiviral protection.

  18. Quantitative autoradiographic mapping of focal herpes simplex virus encephalitis using a radiolabeled antiviral drug

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.

    1984-12-18

    A method of mapping herpes simplex viral infection comprising administering a radiolabeled antiviral active 5-substituted 1-(2'-deoxy-2'-substituted-D-arabinofuranosyl) pyrimidine nucleoside to the infected subject, and scanning the area in which the infection is to be mapped for the radiolabel.

  19. Molecular requirement for sterols in herpes simplex virus entry and infectivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) required cholesterol for virion-induced membrane fusion. HSV successfully entered DHCR24-/-cells, which lack a desmosterol-to-cholesterol conversion enzyme, indicating entry can occur independently of cholesterol. Depletion of desmosterol from these cells resulted in d...

  20. Amino-terminal sequence of glycoprotein D of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, R.J.; Long, D.; Hogue-Angeletti, R.; Cohen, G.H.

    1984-01-01

    Glycoprotein D (gD) of herpes simplex virus is a structural component of the virion envelope which stimulates production of high titers of herpes simplex virus type-common neutralizing antibody. The authors caried out automated N-terminal amino acid sequencing studies on radiolabeled preparations of gD-1 (gD of herpes simplex virus type 1) and gD-2 (gD of herpes simplex virus type 2). Although some differences were noted, particularly in the methionine and alanine profiles for gD-1 and gD-2, the amino acid sequence of a number of the first 30 residues of the amino terminus of gD-1 and gD-2 appears to be quite similar. For both proteins, the first residue is a lysine. When we compared out sequence data for gD-1 with those predicted by nucleic acid sequencing, the two sequences could be aligned (with one exception) starting at residue 26 (lysine) of the predicted sequence. Thus, the first 25 amino acids of the predicted sequence are absent from the polypeptides isolated from infected cells.

  1. Influence of herpes simplex virus infection on benzo(a)pyrene metabolism in monkey kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, J.H.; Whitcomb, B.; Hall, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    Current research in our laboratory is designed to investigate the intracellular interactions of BP with oncogenic DNA viruses of animals and humans. In this study, our purpose was to determine whether BP is metabolized in herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infected cells and whether HSV-2 infection affects intracellular levels of the aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase system necessary for BP metabolism.

  2. Chronic active herpes simplex type 2 encephalitis in an asymptomatic immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Brown, William D; Bearer, Elaine L; Donahue, John E

    2010-07-01

    A unique form of chronic, active, granulomatous herpes simplex type 2 encephalitis is described in an asymptomatic, immunocompetent 8-year-old girl who acquired the virus as a neonate. The extensive, bilateral cerebral parenchymal involvement was discovered incidentally. Diagnosis was confirmed by a combination of serial neuroimaging, brain biopsy, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeted to DNA sequences in the glycoprotein G gene, allowing differentiation between herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2. The clinical course over a 5-year period, treatment with intermittent intravenous steroids, and daily valacyclovir, diagnostic imaging, and laboratory studies are reviewed in detail. This form of herpes simplex virus type 2 encephalitis hasn't been described previously and is significant because of its prolonged indolent course, absence of neurological findings or suggestive history, and benign behavior in this child, who is now 14 years old. The authors believe this entity can be unsuspected and underdiagnosed in the general pediatric population, especially in those with a prior maternal history of herpes simplex virus type 2 infection.

  3. Pediatric Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis Complicated by N-Methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Antibody Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Bamford, Alasdair; Crowe, Belinda H A; Hacohen, Yael; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Clarke, Antonia; Tudor-Williams, Gareth; Sancho-Shimizu, Vanessa; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming; Pullaperuma, Sunil P

    2015-06-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies (NMDAR-Abs) can contribute to neurological relapse after herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSE). We describe a child with NMDAR-Ab encephalitis after HSE, which was recognized and treated early. We discuss the case in the context of existing reports, and we propose a modified immunotherapy strategy to minimize risk of viral reactivation.

  4. Real-time polymerase chain reaction for the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun-Xin; Wang, Lin-Nong; Zhou, Ru-Xia; Yu, Yang; Du, Tong-Xin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To design, optimize and validate a rapid, internally controlled real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test for herpes simplex virus (HSV) in the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis. METHODS Tears alone or together with corneal epithelium scrapings from 30 patients (30 eyes) suspected of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis were tested for HSV DNA by RT-PCR. The samples were collected during the first visit and then on the subsequent 7, 14, 28, 42, and 56d. The symptoms of the patients were scored before treatment to determine the correlation between HSV concentration in the corneal epithelium scrapings and clinical scores. RESULTS The positive rate (46.4%) in the corneal epithelium group before the therapy was significantly higher than that (13.3%) in the tears group (P=0.006). There were 13 positive HSV patients before the therapy, the concentration of HSV DNA in corneal epithelium scrapings group was significantly higher than that in the tears group (paired t-test, P=0.0397). Multilevel mixed-effects model analysis showed that the difference between the corneal epithelium scrapings group and the tears group was statistically significant (P=0.0049). The Spearman rank correlation analysis indicated a positive correlation between the HSV concentration in the corneal epithelium scrapings and clinical scores before the treatment (r=0.844, P<0.0001). CONCLUSION RT-PCR appears to be a powerful molecular tool for the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis. PMID:27275421

  5. Double encephalitis with herpes simplex virus type II and cytomegalovirus in an elder Chinese: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Chaobiao; Chen, Shaoxian; Lin, Qi; Zhou, Houshi; Huang, Chuming; Lin, Jiyuan; Xie, Weihang; Chen, Kai; Zhou, Dongming; Ma, Wan; Ma, Feiyu; Xu, Haiyun

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis is a rare disease. In adults, most of the reported cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections are seen in immunocompromised patients. We present a case of 67-year-old Chinese male with the coinfection of CMV and herpes simplex virus type II (HSV-II). He had no history of being treated with immunosuppressants, showed symptoms of psychosis and was scored 109 on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. This patient presented with a rare case of coinfection of CMV and herpes simplex virus type II with psychotic symptoms. PMID:26586947

  6. Herpes simplex virus keratitis: an update of the pathogenesis and current treatment with oral and topical antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Tsatsos, Michael; MacGregor, Cheryl; Athanasiadis, Ioannis; Moschos, Marilita M; Hossain, Parwez; Anderson, David

    2016-12-01

    Ophthalmic herpes simplex viral keratitis is responsible for a range of ocular manifestations from superficial epithelial disease to stromal keratitis and endotheliitis. The Herpetic Eye Disease Study has guided the management of herpetic eye disease for almost twenty years, but newer medications such as valacyclovir are now available and are considered to have better bioavailability than acyclovir. In this review, we examine the existing evidence on the pathogenesis of different ophthalmic herpes simplex viral keratitis disease modalities and the role of oral and topically administered antiviral drugs in the treatment of herpes simplex viral keratitis.

  7. Herpes simplex type 2 encephalitis and methotrexate medication: a fortuitous or causative association in a patient with spondyloarthritis?

    PubMed

    Lupo, Julien; Dos Santos, Ophélie; Germi, Raphaele; Baccard-Longère, Monique; Stahl, Jean-Paul; Epaulard, Olivier; Morand, Patrice

    2016-11-23

    It is unclear whether immunosuppression is a risk factor for herpes encephalitis. Herein, we describe a rare case of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 encephalitis in a patient treated with low-dose methotrexate for HLA-B27-associated spondyloarthritis. The patient was successfully treated with acyclovir but presented sequelae of encephalitis. Here we discuss the possible role of low-dose MTX therapy as a risk factor of neurological herpes reactivation and severe disease. The host-related and viral risk factors are also addressed.

  8. Peptic ulcer as a risk factor for postherpetic neuralgia in adult patients with herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Yin; Lan, Kuo-Mao; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Tseng, Su-Feng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is the most common complication of herpes zoster. Identifying predictors for postherpetic neuralgia may help physicians screen herpes zoster patients at risk of postherpetic neuralgia and undertake preventive strategies. Peptic ulcer has been linked to immunological dysfunctions and malnutrition, both of which are predictors of postherpetic neuralgia. The aim of this retrospective case-control study was to determine whether adult herpes zoster patients with peptic ulcer were at greater risk of postherpetic neuralgia. Adult zoster patients without postherpetic neuralgia and postherpetic neuralgia patients were automatically selected from a medical center's electronic database using herpes zoster/postherpetic neuralgia ICD-9 codes supported with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Consequently, medical record review was performed to validate the diagnostic codes and all pertaining data including peptic ulcer, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and ulcerogenic medications. Because no standard pain intensity measurement exists, opioid usage was used as a proxy measurement for moderate to severe pain. In total, 410 zoster patients without postherpetic neuralgia and 115 postherpetic neuralgia patients were included. Multivariate logistic regressions identified 60 years of age and older, peptic ulcer and greater acute herpetic pain as independent predictors for postherpetic neuralgia. Among etiologies of peptic ulcer, H. pylori infection and usage of non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were significantly associated with the increased risk of postherpetic neuralgia; conversely, other etiologies were not significantly associated with the postherpetic neuralgia risk. In conclusion, 60 years of age and older, peptic ulcer and greater acute herpetic pain are independent predictors for postherpetic neuralgia in adult herpes zoster patients.

  9. An update on short-course episodic and prevention therapies for herpes genitalis.

    PubMed

    Corey, Lawrence; Bodsworth, Neil; Mindel, Adrian; Patel, Raj; Schacker, Timothy; Stanberry, Lawrence

    2007-06-01

    The prevalence of herpes genitalis (genital herpes) has increased markedly over the past three decades. The most common cause is infection with the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), but it can also occur as a result of HSV-1 infection. Herpes genitalis can cause substantial psychosexual as well as physical morbidity and, in immunocompromised individuals, such as those who are HIV-positive, HSV infection can result in severe disease with progressive and extensive lesions. The natural history of herpes genitalis and the pathways of infection are now well known; however, the factors associated with reactivation have yet to be fully defined. A number of management approaches with antiviral medications are commonly used, including episodic and suppressive treatments. For episodic therapy, the duration of both lesions and symptoms, as well as the proportion of aborted episodes, are the most important measures of efficacy. For suppressive therapy, the time to first recurrence and frequency of recurrences over time are the most important clinical measures of antiviral benefit. Regarding the duration of episodic regimens, comparisons of 1-, 2- and 3-day antiviral courses with standard 5-day regimens show similar benefits on healing and relief of symptoms, with the obvious improvement in convenience, economy and compliance. In HIV-positive patients, antiherpes therapy has proved effective in speeding healing of lesions and reducing subclinical shedding, and can be used to treat genital HSV-2 infections in this group. Suppressive antiviral therapy has been shown to decrease the risk of HSV transmission in heterosexual couples. New approaches to the prevention of HSV infection, including vaccines and topical microbicides, are under investigation.

  10. An update on short-course intermittent and prevention therapies for herpes labialis.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Stanley; Corey, Lawrence; Cunningham, Anthony; Malkin, Jean-Elie; Stanberry, Lawrence; Whitley, Richard; Spruance, Spotswood

    2007-06-01

    Infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) has increased in prevalence worldwide over the past two decades, making it a major public health concern. Approximately 90% of recurrent HSV type 1 (HSV-1) infections manifest as non-genital disease, primarily as orofacial lesions known as herpes labialis. Improvements in our understanding of the natural history of herpes labialis support the rationale for early treatment (during the prodrome or erythema stages) with high doses of antiviral agents in order to maximize drug benefit. When evaluating the efficacy of different antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents in clinical trials, episode duration, lesion healing time, reduction in maximum lesion size and the proportion of aborted lesions should be used as the most reliable measures of therapeutic efficacy. There has also been considerable research into the most beneficial treatment for recurrent episodes of herpes labialis in immunocompetent individuals. Data from clinical studies confirm that short-course, high-dose oral antiviral therapy should be offered to patients with recurrent herpes labialis to accelerate healing, reduce pain and most likely increase treatment adherence. Optimal benefits may be obtained when these oral antiviral agents are combined with topical corticosteroids, but more research is needed with this combination. Patients undergoing facial cosmetic procedures (i.e.facial resurfacing) are at risk of HSV reactivation, but further data are required on the actual risk according to the specific procedure. Aciclovir, valaciclovir and famciclovir all provide effective prophylaxis against HSV-1 reactivation following ablative facial resurfacing. However, no definitive recommendations can be made regarding prophylactic therapy for minimally invasive procedures at present.

  11. Characteristics of hearing loss in patients with herpes zoster oticus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Hee; Choi, Hyerang; Shin, Jung Eun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with herpes zoster oticus (HZO) may commonly show symptoms associated with 7th and 8th cranial nerve (CN VII and CN VIII) dysfunction. The aim of this study is to investigate the characteristics of hearing loss in patients with HZO and discuss possible mechanisms. Ninety-five HZO patients who showed at least one of the symptoms of CN VII and CN VIII dysfunction between January 2007 and October 2014 were included in this study. Hearing loss was defined when the mean thresholds of pure tone audiometry (PTA) in speech frequency (0.5 kHz + 1 kHz + 2 kHz/3) or isolated high frequency (4 kHz + 8 kHz/2) were greater than 10 dB in the affected ear compared with the healthy ear, and a total of 72 patients were classified as the hearing loss group. The difference of mean PTA thresholds between affected and healthy ears was significantly greater in the high frequency range than in low range (20.0 ± 11.5 dB vs. 12.9 ± 15.7 dB, P = 0.0026) in patients with hearing loss (n = 72). The difference between affected and healthy ear was significantly greater in patients with vertigo (n = 34) than those without vertigo (n = 38) in both the high (P = 0.033) and low (P = 0.024) frequency ranges. In contrast, the differences between affected and healthy ears were not significantly different between patients with facial palsy (n = 50) and those without facial palsy (n = 22) in both the high (P = 0.921) and low (P = 0.382) frequency ranges. In patients with HZO, hearing loss is more severe in the high frequency range than in the low frequency range. Hearing impairment is more severe in patients with vertigo than in those without vertigo in both the high and low frequency ranges, even though the degree of hearing impairment is not significantly different between patients with and without facial palsy. These findings indicate that the mechanisms of viral spread from CN VII to CN VIII may differ

  12. Herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia in Catalonia (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Salleras, Luis; Salleras, Montse; Salvador, Patricia; Soldevila, Núria; Prat, Andreu; Garrido, Patricio; Domínguez, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze the descriptive epidemiology and costs of herpes zoster (HZ) and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) in people aged ≥50 years in Catalonia (Spain). The incidence of HZ in Catalonia was estimated by extrapolating the incidence data from Navarre (Spain) to the population of Catalonia. The incidence of PHN was estimated according to the proportion of cases of HZ in the case series of the Hospital del Sagrado Corazón de Barcelona that evolved to PHN. Drug costs were obtained directly from the prescriptions included in the medical record (according to official prices published by the General Council of the College of Pharmacists). The cost of care was obtained by applying the tariffs of the Catalan Health Institute to the number of outpatient visits and the number and duration of hospital admissions. The estimated annual incidence of HZ was 31 763, of which 21 532 (67.79%) were in patients aged ≥50 years. The respective figures for PHN were 3194 and 3085 (96.59) per annum, respectively. The mean cost per patient was markedly higher in cases of PHN (916.66 euros per patient) than in cases of HZ alone (301.52 euros per patient). The cost increased with age in both groups of patients. The estimated total annual cost of HZ and its complications in Catalonia was € 9.31 million, of which 6.54 corresponded to HZ and 2.77 to PHN. This is the first Spanish study of the disease burden of HZ in which epidemiological data and costs were collected directly from medical records. The estimated incidence of HZ is probably similar to the real incidence. In contrast, the incidence of PHN may be an underestimate, as around 25% of patients in Catalonia attend private clinics financed by insurance companies. It is also probable that the costs may be an underestimate as the costs derived from the prodromal phase were not included. In Catalonia, HZ and PHN cause an important disease burden (21 532 cases of HZ and 3085 de PHN with an annual cost

  13. Structural basis for the antibody neutralization of Herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Cheng-Chung; Lin, Li-Ling; Chan, Woan-Eng; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Lai, Jiann-Shiun; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2013-10-01

    The gD–E317-Fab complex crystal revealed the conformational epitope of human mAb E317 on HSV gD, providing a molecular basis for understanding the viral neutralization mechanism. Glycoprotein D (gD) of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) binds to a host cell surface receptor, which is required to trigger membrane fusion for virion entry into the host cell. gD has become a validated anti-HSV target for therapeutic antibody development. The highly inhibitory human monoclonal antibody E317 (mAb E317) was previously raised against HSV gD for viral neutralization. To understand the structural basis of antibody neutralization, crystals of the gD ectodomain bound to the E317 Fab domain were obtained. The structure of the complex reveals that E317 interacts with gD mainly through the heavy chain, which covers a large area for epitope recognition on gD, with a flexible N-terminal and C-terminal conformation. The epitope core structure maps to the external surface of gD, corresponding to the binding sites of two receptors, herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) and nectin-1, which mediate HSV infection. E317 directly recognizes the gD–nectin-1 interface and occludes the HVEM contact site of gD to block its binding to either receptor. The binding of E317 to gD also prohibits the formation of the N-terminal hairpin of gD for HVEM recognition. The major E317-binding site on gD overlaps with either the nectin-1-binding residues or the neutralizing antigenic sites identified thus far (Tyr38, Asp215, Arg222 and Phe223). The epitopes of gD for E317 binding are highly conserved between two types of human herpesvirus (HSV-1 and HSV-2). This study enables the virus-neutralizing epitopes to be correlated with the receptor-binding regions. The results further strengthen the previously demonstrated therapeutic and diagnostic potential of the E317 antibody.

  14. Herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia in Catalonia (Spain).

    PubMed

    Salleras, Luis; Salleras, Montse; Salvador, Patricia; Soldevila, Núria; Prat, Andreu; Garrido, Patricio; Domínguez, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze the descriptive epidemiology and costs of herpes zoster (HZ) and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) in people aged ≥50 years in Catalonia (Spain). The incidence of HZ in Catalonia was estimated by extrapolating the incidence data from Navarre (Spain) to the population of Catalonia. The incidence of PHN was estimated according to the proportion of cases of HZ in the case series of the Hospital del Sagrado Corazón de Barcelona that evolved to PHN. Drug costs were obtained directly from the prescriptions included in the medical record (according to official prices published by the General Council of the College of Pharmacists). The cost of care was obtained by applying the tariffs of the Catalan Health Institute to the number of outpatient visits and the number and duration of hospital admissions. The estimated annual incidence of HZ was 31 763, of which 21 532 (67.79%) were in patients aged ≥50 years. The respective figures for PHN were 3194 and 3085 (96.59) per annum, respectively. The mean cost per patient was markedly higher in cases of PHN (916.66 euros per patient) than in cases of HZ alone (301.52 euros per patient). The cost increased with age in both groups of patients. The estimated total annual cost of HZ and its complications in Catalonia was € 9.31 million, of which 6.54 corresponded to HZ and 2.77 to PHN. This is the first Spanish study of the disease burden of HZ in which epidemiological data and costs were collected directly from medical records. The estimated incidence of HZ is probably similar to the real incidence. In contrast, the incidence of PHN may be an underestimate, as around 25% of patients in Catalonia attend private clinics financed by insurance companies. It is also probable that the costs may be an underestimate as the costs derived from the prodromal phase were not included. In Catalonia, HZ and PHN cause an important disease burden (21 532 cases of HZ and 3085 de PHN with an annual cost

  15. [Herpes simplex virus vaccine studies: from past to present].

    PubMed

    Us, Dürdal

    2006-10-01

    The dramatical increase in the prevalence of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections and the significant physical and psychosocial morbidity of HSV type 2 infections, generate the need for an efficacious HSV vaccine. The most important properties of HSVs that should be targeted for a successful vaccine are neuronal invasion, latency and reactivation in spite of specific host immune responses. The major expectation for an ideal HSV vaccine candidate is to induce sterilizing immunity, which must be effective at all portals of HSV entry; to prevent or reduce the symptomatic disease and to eliminate or at least to limit the asymptomatic viral shedding. The first vaccine studies have began in the 1920s and in the intervening eight decades there have been many attempts to develop an effective one. Although encouraging findings came from experiments in various animal models, human studies have been disappointing, unfortunately. The vaccine strategies that have undergone clinical evaluation until today included autoinoculation of live HSV, whole inactivated vaccines, attenuated live virus vaccines, modified live virus subunit vaccines, cell culture-derived subunit vaccines, recombinant subunit (glycoprotein) vaccines, DISC (Disabled Infectious Single Cycle) virus vaccines, viral vectors and naked DNA vaccines. In most of the clinical studies the failure of HSV vaccines in spite of inducing very high levels of specific neutralizing antibodies have emphasized that cell-mediated immune response, especially Thl type immunity is important in preventing both primary disease and recurrences with HSV, rather than humoral response. The most hopeful result was obtained with HSV-2 gD and alum/MPL vaccine in clinical studies. This vaccine was found 74% effective in preventing genital disease in HSV seronegative women but was not effective in men or seropositive women. In recent years it is possible to genetically engineer HSV to produce a vaccine strain that is protective without

  16. Herpes zoster in Germany: Quantifying the burden of disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Herpes zoster (HZ) is caused by a reactivation of the varicella-zoster-virus (VZV) and mainly affects individuals aged ≥ 50 years. Vaccines have been licensed or are under development that can protect against HZ and its main complication postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). In Germany, the burden of disease caused by HZ is not well known. To support the decision making process related to a potential vaccination recommendation, we estimated annual HZ disease burden in people aged ≥ 50 years in Germany by utilizing various data sources. Methods We assessed for 2007 and 2008 HZ-outpatient incidence (number of cases per 1,000 person-years, PY) by utilizing the Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians (ASHIP) database, which contains nationwide routine outpatient data. For the same time period annual number of HZ-inpatients and HZ-associated deaths were identified by using the Federal Health Monitoring System (FHM). PHN-incidence and loss of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) caused by HZ were calculated by multiplying number of identified HZ-patients with upper and lower limit estimates for proportion of HZ-cases developing PHN and HZ-related QALY, respectively. Results For the study period we identified an annual average of 306,511 HZ-outpatients aged 50+, resulting in a HZ-incidence of 9.6/1,000 PY. A total 14,249 HZ-associated inpatients and 66 deaths were reported in both years on average. HZ-incidence increased by age from 6.21 in people 50-54 years to 13.19 per 1,000 PY in people aged ≥ 90 years. Females were significantly more frequently affected than males in terms of outpatient HZ-incidence (11.12 vs. 7.8 per 1,000 PY), inpatient HZ-incidence (0.51 vs. 0.38 per 1,000 PY) and mortality (0.29 vs. 0.10 per 100,000 PY). PHN-incidence was estimated to range between 0.43 and 1.33 per 1,000 PY. Based on these figures, there were between 3,065 to 24,094 QALYs lost due to HZ in persons aged ≥ 50 years in Germany per annum. Conclusion Our study

  17. [Postoperative therapy after penetrating keratoplasty in herpes simplex keratitis].

    PubMed

    Süveges, Ildikó; Füst, Ágnes; Imre, László

    2013-12-29

    Bevezetés: A herpes simplex vírus által okozott szaruhártya-gyulladás a leggyakoribb oka a cornea centrumában kialakuló hegnek, amely látásvesztést okozhat. Célkitűzés: A szerzők célul tűzték ki a perforáló keratoplasztika eredményességének felmérését a szisztémás antiherpeses és immunszuppresszív terápia alkalmazásának tükrében. Módszer: Perforáló keratoplasztikán átesett 12 betegen végezték a retrospektív randomizált vizsgálatot. A műtéti beavatkozásig eltelt idő az első keratitis megjelenésétől számítva átlag 18 év volt (5–40 év). A műtéti indikáció 9 esetben a látás javítása, 3 esetben a cornea perforációjának megelőzése volt. Szisztémás kezelésként 9 beteg herpeszvírus elleni (acyclovir) és immunszuppresszív (mycophenolat mofetil), 2 beteg csak herpeszvírus elleni kezelést kapott, egy betegnél nem alkalmaztak szisztémás terápiát. Az átlagos követési idő 53,1 hónap volt (16–84 hó). Eredmények: A látásjavító célú 9 műtét közül 8 esetben a transzplantátum átlátszóan, ereződés nélkül gyógyult. Mind a 8 beteg acyclovir és mycophenolat mofetil kezelésben részesült. Egy esetben – amikor a beteg szisztémás kezelést nem kapott – recidíva és rejectio is fellépett. Az akut gyulladásos tünetekben végzett műtétek közül egyben gyógyult a transzplantátum átlátszóan, recidíva- és rejectiomentesen; a beteg acyclovir és mycophenolat mofetil terápiában részesült. Két esetben recidíva és rejectio is fellépett. Ezek közül egyben a beteg acyclovir és mycophenolat mofetil, egyben csak acyclovirkezelést kapott. A látóélesség minden esetben javult, 3 esetben a látást egyéb tényezők befolyásolták. Következtetések: A szisztémás acyclovir és mycophenolat mofetil terápia sikerrel alkalmazható herpes simplex keratitisben végzett perforáló keratoplasztikák után. Az acyclovir csökkenti a recidívák számát, a

  18. Acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex encephalitis in a patient treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Schepers, Kinda; Hernandez, Antonio; Andrei, Graciela; Gillemot, Sarah; Fiten, Pierre; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Bier, Jean-Christophe; David, Philippe; Delforge, Marie-Luce; Jacobs, Frédérique; Snoeck, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus is the most common cause of severe sporadic encephalitis. We report a case of herpes simplex type 1-encephalitis in a 50-year-old woman receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibodies adalimumab. Although she was an acyclovir naïve patient, a mixed viral population (wild-type and acyclovir-resistant bearing a thymidine-kinase mutation) was identified in the cerebrospinal fluid. The virus in cerebrospinal fluid evolved and a second thymidine-kinase mutant virus emerged. Combined foscavir and acyclovir treatment resolved the herpes simplex encephalitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex encephalitis in a patient treated with adalimumab.

  19. Acyclovir Lauriad(®): a muco-adhesive buccal tablet for the treatment of recurrent herpes labialis.

    PubMed

    Downing, Christopher; Moayyad, Jonathan; Tamirisa, Aparna; Tyring, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    The treatment of recurrent herpes labialis remains a challenge in the 21st century. The virus is ubiquitous and there is no vaccine against the disease. Although recurrence episodes are usually of shorter duration than the primary episode, they are debilitating to patients and there is significant stigma associated with the disease. Acyclovir Lauriad(®) is a new topical agent that was approved by the US FDA in 2013 for the treatment of recurrent herpes labialis, which affects approximately 20-40% of the population worldwide. The drug is a muco-adhesive tablet, applied to the upper gum at the onset of prodromal symptoms. Utilizing Lauriad(®) technology, a biologically active compound traverses the mucous membrane to deliver a high concentration of acyclovir directly to the site of the herpes simplex virus infection. Data from a Phase III clinical trial shows that this may be a promising therapy for patients with recurrent herpes labialis.

  20. Atypical presentations of genital herpes simplex virus in HIV-1 and HIV-2 effectively treated by imiquimod.

    PubMed

    McKendry, Anna; Narayana, Srinivasulu; Browne, Rita

    2015-05-01

    Atypical presentations of genital herpes simplex virus have been described in HIV. We report two cases with hypertrophic presentations which were effectively treated with imiquimod, one of which is the first reported case occurring in a patient with HIV-2.

  1. Results From a Hypothesis Generating Case-Control Study: Herpes Family Viruses and Schizophrenia Among Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Niebuhr, David W.; Millikan, Amy M.; Yolken, Robert; Li, Yuanzhang; Weber, Natalya S.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Herpes family viruses can cause central nervous system inflammatory changes that can present with symptoms indistinguishable from schizophrenia and therefore are of interest in schizophrenia research. Most existing studies of herpes viruses have used small populations and postdiagnosis specimens. As part of a larger research program, we conducted a hypothesis-generating case-control study of selected herpes virus antibodies among individuals discharged from the US military with schizophrenia and pre- and postdiagnosis sera. Methods: Cases (n = 180) were servicemembers hospitalized and discharged from military service with schizophrenia. Controls, 3:1 matched on several factors, were members not discharged. The military routinely collects and stores members' serum specimens. We used microplate enzyme immunoassay to measure immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels to 6 herpes viruses in pre- and postdiagnosis specimens. Conditional logistic regression was used, and the measure of association was the hazard ratio (HR). Results: Overall, we found a significant association between human herpes virus type 6 and schizophrenia, with an HR of 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.04, 1.32). Women and blacks had significant negative associations with herpes simplex virus type 2 and cytomegalovirus; among blacks, there was a significant positive association with herpes simplex virus type 1. Among men, there was a HHV-6 temporal effect with an HR of 1.41 (95% CI = 1.02, 1.96) for sera drawn 6–12 months before diagnosis. Discussion: Findings from previous studies of herpes family viruses and schizophrenia have been inconsistent. Our study is based on a larger population than most previous studies and used serum specimens collected before onset of illness. This study adds to the body of knowledge and provides testable hypotheses for follow-on studies. PMID:18156638

  2. Effect of Prior Immunization on Induction of Cervical Cancer in Mice by Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budd Wentz, W.; Heggie, Alfred D.; Anthony, Donald D.; Reagan, James W.

    1983-12-01

    Previous studies at this laboratory showed that repeated application of inactivated herpes simplex virus type 2 to the mouse cervix produces premalignant and malignant lesions. In the present study mice were inoculated with inactivated herpes simplex virus type 2 or control solution and Freund's adjuvant by intraperitoneal and subcutaneous routes before exposure of the cervix to inactivated virus. It appears that immunization with inactivated virus conferred a protection against the induction of cervical carcinoma.

  3. A Comparative Analysis of Polymerase Chain Reaction and Direct Fluorescent Antibody Test for Diagnosis of Genital Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Patwardhan, Vrushali; Bhalla, Preena; Rawat, Deepti; Garg, Vijay Kumar; Sardana, Kabir; Sethi, Sumit

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare laboratory tests that can simultaneously detect and type herpes simplex virus (HSV) directly from the genital ulcer specimens in clinically suspected cases of genital herpes. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted over 10 months and 44 adult male and female patients clinically suspected with genital herpes were recruited. Genital ulcer swab specimens were subjected to glycoprotein-G gene-based conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and commercially available direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test and the results were compared. Results: PCR for HSV was positive in 82% (36/44) cases. DFA was positive in 68.2% (30/44) cases. There was 100% agreement between HSV types detected by DFA and PCR. The strength of agreement between the results was better in primary genital herpes than recurrent cases. Conclusion: PCR was found to be better in the detection of HSV in recurrent genital herpes patients. It is a better modality, especially when genital herpes clinically presents with ulcerative or crusted lesions, and is also a cheaper alternative as compared to DFA. PMID:28042218

  4. Performance of the BioPlex 2200 multiplexing immunoassay platform for the detection of herpes simplex virus type 2 specific antibodies in African settings.

    PubMed

    LeGoff, Jérôme; Grésenguet, Gérard; Gody, Chrysostome; Longo, Jean De Dieu; Khonde, Nzambi; Weiss, Helen A; Mayaud, Philippe; Bélec, Laurent

    2011-07-01

    The BioPlex platform was evaluated for the detection of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) antibodies in sub-Saharan Africa individuals in comparison to clinicovirological standards and compared to HerpeSelect. The sensitivities and specificities were, respectively, 88.9% and 93.5% for BioPlex and 89.9% and 92.7% for HerpeSelect. The agreement between both assays was 95.7%.

  5. Performance of the BioPlex 2200 Multiplexing Immunoassay Platform for the Detection of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Specific Antibodies in African Settings ▿

    PubMed Central

    LeGoff, Jérôme; Grésenguet, Gérard; Gody, Chrysostome; Longo, Jean De Dieu; Khonde, Nzambi; Weiss, Helen A.; Mayaud, Philippe; Bélec, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The BioPlex platform was evaluated for the detection of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) antibodies in sub-Saharan Africa individuals in comparison to clinicovirological standards and compared to HerpeSelect. The sensitivities and specificities were, respectively, 88.9% and 93.5% for BioPlex and 89.9% and 92.7% for HerpeSelect. The agreement between both assays was 95.7%. PMID:21562116

  6. Expression of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Glycoprotein B by a Recombinant Vaccinia Virus and Protection of Mice against Lethal Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantin, Edouard M.; Eberle, Richard; Baldick, Joseph L.; Moss, Bernard; Willey, Dru E.; Notkins, Abner L.; Openshaw, Harry

    1987-08-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) strain F gene encoding glycoprotein gB was isolated and modified at the 5' end by in vitro oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. The modified gB gene was inserted into the vaccinia virus genome and expressed under the control of a vaccinia virus promoter. The mature gB glycoprotein produced by the vaccinia virus recombinant was glycosylated, was expressed at the cell surface, and was indistinguishable from authentic HSV-1 gB in terms of electrophoretic mobility. Mice immunized intradermally with the recombinant vaccinia virus produced gB-specific neutralizing antibodies and were resistant to a lethal HSV-1 challenge.

  7. Herpes virus-like sequences are specifically found in Kaposi sarcoma lesions.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, E; Henson, T H; Ghorbani, A J; Land, M A; Webber, B L; Garcia, J V

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To detect the prevalence of herpes virus-like DNA sequences in AIDS associated Kaposi sarcoma (KSHV) lesions and normal tissue. METHODS: KSHV detection was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using four different sets of primers. PCR products were cloned, sequenced, and analysed. RESULTS: All of four biopsies of Kaposi sarcoma lesions and all of three paraffin embedded Kaposi sarcoma tissues were positive for KSHV, while normal tissue from the same patients was negative. Sequence analysis of amplification products revealed polymorphisms that result in amino acid changes of the predicted sequence. CONCLUSIONS: KSHV is prevalent in tissues from Kaposi sarcoma, suggesting a role in the development of the tumour. On this basis, anti-herpes virus agents should be considered to control Kaposi sarcoma. Images PMID:8655706

  8. Herpes Zoster Vaccine in the Long-Term Care Setting: A Clinical and Logistical Conundrum.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Katherine Montag; Reidt, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Advancing age is associated with an increased risk of herpes zoster (shingles) infection and latent effects such as postherpetic neuralgia. The herpes zoster vaccine is recommended in those 60 years of age and older and has been shown to prevent both the primary disease and associated complications. While this recommendation applies to those living in long-term care facilities, there is little clinical evidence to support use in this population. Additionally, there are logistical barriers that may complicate the use of the vaccine. The article examines the evidence for vaccinating residents in long-term care facilities and discusses logistical barriers to vaccination. Pharmacists and providers may consider life expectancy and other factors when evaluating which patients should receive the vaccination.

  9. Immune responses in mice against herpes simplex virus: mechanisms of protection against facial and ganglionic infections.

    PubMed Central

    Zweerink, H J; Martinez, D; Lynch, R J; Stanton, L W

    1981-01-01

    We performed experiments with mice to determine the nature of the immune response(s) that prevents primary infections of the skin and the trigeminal ganglia with herpes simplex virus. Immunization with infectious herpes simplex virus, inactivated virus, or material enriched for viral glycoproteins protected hairless mice against primary facial and ganglionic infections. Live and inactivated viruses induced neutralizing antibodies, whereas glycoprotein material did not. Instead, glycoprotein material induced antibodies that were largely directed against two glycopolypeptides with molecular weights of 120,000 to 130,000. Hairless mice immunized with glycoprotein material responded faster than control mice in the synthesis of neutralizing antibodies after challenge with infectious virus. Congenital athymic BALB/c (nu/nu) mice were protected against primary facial infections after immunization with glycoprotein material, but glycoprotein-specific antibodies were not induced. Images PMID:6260662

  10. Psoralen inactivation of influenza and herpes simplex viruses and of virus-infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Redfield, D C; Richman, D D; Oxman, M N; Kronenberg, L H

    1981-01-01

    Psoralen compounds covalently bind to nucleic acids when irradiated with long-wavelength ultraviolet light. This treatment can destroy the infectivity of deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid viruses. Two psoralen compounds, 4'-hydroxymethyltrioxsalen and 4'-aminomethyltrioxsalen, were used with long-wavelength ultraviolet light to inactivate cell-free herpes simplex and influenza viruses and to render virus-infected cells noninfectious. This method of inactivation was compared with germicidal (short-wavelength) ultraviolet light irradiation. The antigenicity of the treated, virus-infected, antigen-bearing cells was examined by immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassay and by measuring the capacity of the herpes simplex virus-infected cells to stimulate virus-specific lymphocyte proliferation. The infectivity of the virus-infected cells could be totally eliminated without altering their viral antigenicity. The use of psoralen plus long-wavelength ultraviolet light is well suited to the preparation of noninfectious virus antigens and virus antigen-bearing cells for immunological assays. PMID:6265375

  11. Nuclear Sensing of Viral DNA, Epigenetic Regulation of Herpes Simplex Virus Infection, and Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) undergoes a lytic infection in epithelial cells and a latent infection in neuronal cells, and epigenetic mechanisms play a major role in the differential gene expression under the two conditions. Herpes viron DNA is not associated with histones but is rapidly loaded with heterochromatin upon entry into the cell. Viral proteins promote reversal of the epigenetic silencing in epithelial cells while the viral latency-associated transcript promotes additional heterochromatin in neuronal cells. The cellular sensors that initiate the chromatinization of foreign DNA have not been fully defined. IFI16 and cGAS are both essential for innate sensing of HSV DNA, and new evidence shows how they work together to initiate innate signaling. IFI16 also plays a role in the heterochromatinization of HSV DNA, and this review will examine how IFI16 integrates epigenetic regulation and innate sensing of foreign viral DNA to show how these two responses are related. PMID:25742715

  12. Detection of aerosolized varicella-zoster virus DNA in patients with localized herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kayoko; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Tomitaka, Akiko; Matsunaga, Kayoko; Asano, Yoshizo

    2004-03-15

    We examined the excretion of varicella zoster virus (VZV) in hospitalized patients with herpes zoster localized to the thoracic region whose skin lesions were covered with either hydrocolloid dressing agents (hydrocolloid group) or conventional gauze bandages (gauze group). The presence of VZV DNA in swab samples from lesion coverings, the throat, and filters of air purifiers was examined by use of a sensitive polymerase chain reaction assay. For the hydrocolloid group, VZV was detected in none of the samples from lesion coverings or air purifier filters; for the gauze group, VZV DNA was detected in samples from gauze coverings and air purifier filters for all 6 patients. VZV DNA was detected less frequently in throat samples from patients in the hydrocolloid group than in those from patients in the gauze group. The results of the present study suggest that hydrocolloid dressing agents prevent excretion of aerosolized VZV DNA from skin lesions of patients with localized herpes zoster.

  13. An outbreak of herpes rugbiorum managed by vaccination of players and sociosexual contacts.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Davies, J; Ahmad, A; McLeish, P; Buchan, A

    1996-11-01

    An outbreak of herpes rugbiorum involved nine players including the scrum half and the full back. The infection was characterized by significant constitutional upset with decreased levels of general fitness and match performance for 1-4 months following the outbreak; one player had herpetic lesions on his right eyelid and corneum. Every infected player, 15 non-infected players and five sociosexual contacts received two vaccinations with intracellular subunit vaccine NFU. Ac. HSV-1 (S-MRC5). None of the players or contacts developed cutaneous herpetic recurrence during a follow-up period of 3 years; the player with ocular disease had one recurrence at 30 months following the original episode. These findings encourage consideration of prophylactic or post-exposure vaccination of participants in rugby or other contact sports with this or other appropriate herpes simplex vaccine.

  14. Spectroscopic investigation of herpes simplex viruses infected cells and their response to antiviral therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Talyshinsky, Marina; Souprun, Yelena; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2006-07-01

    In the present study, we used microscopic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to evaluate the antiviral activity of known antiviral agents against herpes viruses. The antiviral activity of Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) (which is an active compound of propolis) against herpes simplex type 1 and 2 was examined in cell culture. The advantage of microscopic FTIR spectroscopy over conventional FTIR spectroscopy is that it facilitates inspection of restricted regions of cell culture or tissue. Our results showed significant spectral differences at early stages of infection between infected and non-infected cells, and between infected cells treated with the used antiviral agent and those not treated. In infected cells, there was a considerable increase in phosphate levels. Our results show that treatment with used antiviral agent considerably abolish the spectral changes induced by the viral infection. In addition, it is possible to track by FTIR microscopy method the deferential effect of various doses of the drug.

  15. Physical and functional domains of the herpes simplex virus transcriptional regulatory protein ICP4.

    PubMed Central

    DeLuca, N A; Schaffer, P A

    1988-01-01

    A characteristic common to DNA animal viruses is the expression early in infection of viral proteins that act in trans to regulate subsequent RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription of the remainder of the viral genome. The predominant transcriptional regulatory protein specified by herpes simplex virus type 1 is the immediate-early protein ICP4. ICP4 is a complex multifunctional protein required for the activation of many herpes simplex virus type 1 transcriptional units and for repression of its own transcription. In the present study we have introduced nonsense and deletion mutations into both genome copies of the ICP4 gene such that the resulting mutants express only defined subsets of the primary ICP4 amino acid sequence. The partial peptides retain activities and physical properties of the intact ICP4 molecule, permitting one to attribute individual activities and properties to defined amino acid sequences. Images PMID:2828668

  16. Fulminant Hepatic Failure Secondary to Herpes Hepatitis in a Patient With Myasthenia Crisis: An Elusive Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harish; Tariq, Hassan; Gaduputi, Vinaya; Vakde, Trupti; Makker, Jasbir; Daniel, Myrta

    2016-01-01

    Herpes hepatitis is a rare cause of fulminant hepatic failure contributing to less than 1% of all cases. It is most often seen in persons who are immunosuppressed and in pregnant women. The presentation is usually non-specific and rapidly progressive, thus making antemortem diagnosis of this condition rare. We present a patient who was on chronic immunosuppressive therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus and subsequently developed multi-organ failure with anicteric transaminitis as a result of disseminated herpes infection. The diagnosis was only made post-mortem. A confounding factor in this case was the fact that the patient underwent plasmapheresis, which skewed the interpretation of liver function tests in the setting of acute liver failure. PMID:27829961

  17. Fulminant Hepatic Failure Secondary to Herpes Hepatitis in a Patient With Myasthenia Crisis: An Elusive Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Harish; Tariq, Hassan; Gaduputi, Vinaya; Vakde, Trupti; Makker, Jasbir; Daniel, Myrta

    2016-12-01

    Herpes hepatitis is a rare cause of fulminant hepatic failure contributing to less than 1% of all cases. It is most often seen in persons who are immunosuppressed and in pregnant women. The presentation is usually non-specific and rapidly progressive, thus making antemortem diagnosis of this condition rare. We present a patient who was on chronic immunosuppressive therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus and subsequently developed multi-organ failure with anicteric transaminitis as a result of disseminated herpes infection. The diagnosis was only made post-mortem. A confounding factor in this case was the fact that the patient underwent plasmapheresis, which skewed the interpretation of liver function tests in the setting of acute liver failure.

  18. [Atypical case of acute retinal necrosis secondary to the primary herpes simplex infection].

    PubMed

    Terelak-Borys, Barbara; Krzyźewska-Niedzialek, Aldona; Jamrozy-Witkowska, Agnieszka; Borkowski, Piotr K; Ulińska, Magdalena; Grabska-Liberek, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis is a rare manifestation of viral chorioretinitis, accompanied by occlusive vasculitis, which is associated with poor visual prognosis. The main causal factors include varicella-zoster virus in older patients and herpes simplex in younger ones. The disease typically manifests as a reactivation of latent infections. We present a case of a 57-year-old female with atypical clinical manifestation of acute retinal necrosis secondary to the primary viral infection with herpes simplex. The serology panel of vitreous tap and blood sample confirmed viral aetiology (H. simplex). The initial clinical signs included optic disc edema with retinitis presenting as self-limiting, slowly progressing, peripheral lesions, later followed by uveitis. The antiviral therapy resolved the symptoms of uveitis and enabled healing of retinal lesions, however the natural course of disease was later complicated with retinal detachment. It was successfully treated with vitreoretinal surgery. Despite aggressive treatment, the final visual outcome was unfavourable, due to optic nerve atrophy.

  19. Preparation of herpes simplex virus-infected primary neurons for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Saksena, Monica; Boadle, Ross; Cunningham, Anthony L

    2014-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides the resolution necessary to identify both viruses and subcellular components of cells infected with many types of viruses, including herpes simplex virus. Recognized as a powerful tool in both diagnostic and research-based virology laboratories, TEM has made possible the identification of new viruses and has contributed to the elucidation of virus life cycle and virus-host cell interaction. Whilst there are many sample preparation techniques for TEM, conventional processing using chemical fixation and resin embedding remains a useful technique, available in virtually all EM laboratories, for studying virus/cell ultrastructure. In this chapter, we describe the preparation of herpes simplex virus-infected primary neurons, grown on plastic cover slips, to allow sectioning of neurons and axons in their growth plane. This technique allows TEM examination of cell bodies, axons, growth cones, and varicosities, providing powerful insights into virus-cell interaction.

  20. Intravenous Foscarnet With Topical Cidofovir for Chronic Refractory Genital Herpes in a Patient With AIDS.

    PubMed

    Usoro, Agnes; Batts, Alfreda; Sarria, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Few case reports have documented the use of topical cidofovir for refractory genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) ulcers in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients. This drug formulation lacks a standardized concentration or even a procedural outline as to how it should be compounded. We aim to discuss the utilization of topical cidofovir in addition to presenting a procedural means of compounding it for treatment of refractory genital HSV ulcers. Our patient completed 21 days of intravenous foscarnet and 13 days of topical cidofovir with clinical improvement in the penile and scrotal ulcers. Genital herpes is a concern in patients with HIV because it generally manifests as a persistent infection. Physicians should be aware that when patients fail to respond to the conventional treatment regimens for genital HSV in a timely manner, other options are available, such as topical cidofovir as an adjuvant to systemic antivirals.

  1. A system for isolation, transport and storage of herpes simplex viruses.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Billstrom, M A; Randall, S; Ahmad, A; Patel, S; Davies, J; Deane, A

    1997-04-01

    A major difficulty with diagnostic virus isolation concerns the relative thermolability of certain viruses, e.g. herpes simplex virus type 2, which may, therefore, lose infectivity during transport to the laboratory. This study describes a system of virus isolation and transport, which depends on direct inoculation at the bedside or clinic, to a monolayer or suspension of susceptible cells with subsequent incubation for 10 h at approximately 32 degrees C, whereupon the newly synthesised virus becomes very stable if the cells are subsequently maintained at room temperature. This system was found to increase the sensitivity of isolation of herpes simplex virus, particularly under conditions of asymptomatic virus excretion or if there was significant delay in transportation of clinical samples to the virus laboratory. It is envisaged that this system will allow clinical self-sampling by the patient with application to epidemiological surveys in both the developed and underdeveloped world.

  2. Control of herpes simplex virus infections of the genital tract by vaccination.

    PubMed

    Buchan, A; Skinner, G R; Fuller, A; Hartley, C; Hallworth, J; Stocker, D; Melling, J; Wiblin, C

    1985-03-01

    The apparent increasing incidence of herpes simplex virus infections of the genital tract has focused attention on the efficacy of vaccination in preventing infection or modifying established disease. Results of an 'open trial' using a DNA-free inactivated virus subunit vaccine have shown that vaccination of subjects at risk of contracting infection from their sexual partner reduced the transmission rate from 34% in unvaccinated controls to 0.5%. In a separate study, vaccination of patients who had experienced their first overt attack of herpes genitalis (the initial clinical episode) had significantly fewer recurrences over the follow-up period of 12 months than the unvaccinated control group. The results, we feel, justify a placebo controlled trial.

  3. Which plant for which skin disease? Part 1: Atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, acne, condyloma and herpes simplex.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Juliane; Wölfle, Ute; Weckesser, Steffi; Schempp, Christoph

    2010-10-01

    Plant extracts and isolated compounds are increasingly used in cosmetics and food supplements to improve skin conditions. We first introduce the positive plant monographs with dermatological relevance of the former German Commission E. Subsequently clinical studies with botanicals for atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, acne, condylomata acuminata and herpes simplex are discussed. The best studies have been conducted with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis patients. Mahonia aquifolium, Hypericum perforatum, Glycyrrhiza glabra and certain traditional Chinese therapies have been shown to be effective in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Mahonia aquifolium, Indigo naturalis and Capsicum frutescens are effective treatments for psoriasis. Green tea extract and tea tree oil have been investigated in the treatment of acne. Podophyllin and green tea extract are effective treatments for condylomata acuminata. Balm mint and a combination of sage and rhubarb have been shown to be effective in the treatment of herpes simplex in proof of concept studies.

  4. Is viral shedding a surrogate marker for transmission of genital herpes? A discussion document.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Paul

    2004-12-01

    While the concept linking herpes simplex virus (HSV) shedding to transmission is plausible, few data support shedding as a surrogate marker. If shedding is to be used as a surrogate marker in future clinical studies, it must be clear how far shedding must be reduced, and what the shape of the transmission:viral load curve (or transmission:detection frequency curve) is before transmission is reduced. It remains unclear whether peak virus load, frequency of detection of virus, or the area under curve of the time:virus load plot is the critical parameter in the transmission of HSV. This paper reports on an international meeting of experts and a debate at the International Herpes Management Forum (IHMF) Annual Meeting (2004), convened to examine whether a surrogate marker for HSV transmission is necessary, and whether there is any evidence, either in studies involving HSV or other viral infections, to suggest that viral shedding could be used as such a surrogate.

  5. Gene expression of herpes simplex virus. II. Uv radiological analysis of viral transcription units

    SciTech Connect

    Millette, R. L.; Klaiber, R.

    1980-06-01

    The transcriptional organization of the genome of herpes simplex virus type 1 was analyzed by measuring the sensitivity of viral polypeptide synthesis to uv irradiation of the infecting virus. Herpes simplex virus type 1 was irradiated with various doses of uv light and used to infect xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts. Immediate early transcription units were analyzed by having cycloheximide present throughout the period of infection, removing the drug at 8 h postinfection, and pulse-labeling proteins with (355)methionine. Delayed early transcription units were analyzed in similar studies by having 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine present during the experiment to block replication of the input irradiated genome. The results indicate that none of the immediate early genes analyzed can be cotranscribed, whereas some of the delayed early genes might be cotranscribed. No evidence was found for the existence of large, multigene transcription units.

  6. Psoralen inactivation of influenza and herpes simplex viruses and of virus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Redfield, D.C.; Richman, D.D.; Oxman, M.N.; Kronenberg, L.H.

    1981-06-01

    Psoralen compounds covalently bind to nucleic acids when irradiated with long-wavelength ultraviolet light. This treatment can destroy the infectivity of deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid viruses. Two psoralen compounds, 4'-hydroxymethyltrioxsalen and 4'-aminomethyltrioxsalen, were used with long-wavelength ultraviolet light to inactivate cell-free herpes simplex and influenza viruses and to render virus-infected cells noninfectious. This method of inactivation was compared with germicidal (short-wavelength) ultraviolet light irradiation. The antigenicity of the treated, virus-infected, antigen-bearing cells was examined by immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassay and by measuring the capacity of the herpes simplex virus-infected cells to stimulate virus-specific lymphocyte proliferation. The infectivity of the virus-infected cells could be totally eliminated without altering their viral antigenicity. The use of psoralen plus long-wavelength ultraviolet light is well suited to the preparation of noninfectious virus antigens and virus antigen-bearing cells for immunological assays.

  7. Early events in herpes simplex virus type 1 infection: photosensitivity of fluorescein isothiocyanate-treated virions

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, N.; Bzik, D.; Person, S.; Snipes, W.

    1981-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is photosensitized by treatment with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). The inactivation of FITC-treated virions upon subsequent exposure to light is inhibited by the presence of sodium azide, suggesting the involvement of singlet oxygen in the process. Sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that treatment with FITC plus light induces crosslinks in viral envelope glycoproteins. Treatment of virions with high concentrations of FITC (50 ..mu..g/ml) plus light causes a reduction in the adsorption of the virus to monolayers of human embryonic lung cells. For lower concentrations of FITC (10 ..mu..g/ml) plus light, treated virions adsorb to the host cells, but remain sensitive to light until entry occurs. The loss of light sensitivity coincides with the development of resistance to antibodies. These results are most consistent with a mechanism of entry for herpes simplex virus involving fusion of the viral membrane with the plasma membrane of the host cell.

  8. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Palella, T.D.; Silverman, L.J.; Schroll, C.T.; Homa, F.L.; Levine, M.; Kelley, W.N.

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  9. Akathisia in association with herpes simplex encephalitis relapse and opercular syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Kocak, Ozan; Yarar, Coskun; Yakut, Ayten; Ekici, Arzu; Yimenicioglu, Sevgi; Saylisoy, Suzan

    2014-02-01

    We report a 2-year-old boy with herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis (HSE) and opercular syndrome who presented with clinical relapse characterized by chorea-like involuntary movements that suggest akathisia. The patient initially presented with multiple focal seizures that cause epilepsia partialis continua, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for herpes simplex virus type 1 was positive. He developed hypersalivation, speech and swallowing difficulties within 30days. Based on these findings the patient was diagnosed as having opercular syndrome due to HSE. He developed akathisia on 44th day of admission as a relapse and he was successfully treated with propranolol. Opercular syndrome might be seen HSE in children and it may cause neurological suquela. Akathisia might be seen after encephalitic process as a symptom of relapse, however diagnosis of akathisia is difficult in young children. It should be noted that because propranolol effective for these involuntary movements. It can be add additional choice of treatment in these patients.

  10. Application of low-intensity laser in the treatment of Herpes simplex recidivans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunov, Tzonko T.; Uzunov, T.; Grozdanova, R.

    2004-06-01

    We made our aim to investigate the effect of the low intensive laser with λ=630 nm in the visible red spectrum of light at Herpes simplex treatment. For this purpose we carried out a clinical research upon 62 persons with Herpes simplex lesions which have been divided into two groups of 31 persons. At the first group the effect of laser with power density 100 mW/cm2 +/- 5 mW/cm2 and time of exposure 3 min. on field was traced out. At the second group the low intensive laser with the same characteristics has been used but in combination with the patent medicine Granofurin H as a photosensibilizer. The clinical approbations of this method showed high therapeutical effectiveness. The obtained results showed that at both groups there is an expressed anaesthetic, anti-inflammatory and regeneration stimulating effect and at the second group with the use of Granofurin H the reconvalescent period is shorter.

  11. Social Stress and the Reactivation of Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgett, David A.; Sheridan, John F.; Dorne, Julianne; Berntson, Gary G.; Candelora, Jessica; Glaser, Ronald

    1998-06-01

    Psychological stress is thought to contribute to reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus (HSV). Although several animal models have been developed in an effort to reproduce different pathogenic aspects of HSV keratitis or labialis, until now, no good animal model existed in which application of a psychological laboratory stressor results in reliable reactivation of the virus. Reported herein, disruption of the social hierarchy within colonies of mice increased aggression among cohorts, activated the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and caused reactivation of latent HSV type 1 in greater than 40% of latently infected animals. However, activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis using restraint stress did not activate the latent virus. Thus, the use of social stress in mice provides a good model in which to investigate the neuroendocrine mechanisms that underlie behaviorally mediated reactivation of latent herpes-viruses.

  12. Recurrent Labial Herpes Simplex in Pediatric Dentistry: Low-level Laser Therapy as a Treatment Option.

    PubMed

    Stona, Priscila; da Silva Viana, Elizabete; Dos Santos Pires, Leandro; Blessmann Weber, João Batista; Floriani Kramer, Paulo

    2014-05-01

    Recurrent labial herpes simplex is a pathology of viral origin that is frequently observed in children. The signs and symptoms are uncomfortable and, in many cases, the efficacy of treatment is unproven. However, several studies have demonstrated good results from the use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), primarily due to acceleration of the healing process and pain relief, which make it a promising resource for use with this pathology. This paper describes a clinical case of a 7-year-old patient affected by this pathology and the therapeutic resolution proposed. How to cite this article: Stona P, da Silva Viana E, dos Santos Pires L, Weber JBB, Kramer PF. Recurrent Labial Herpes Simplex in Pediatric Dentistry: Low-level Laser Therapy as a Treatment Option. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):140-143.

  13. Comparison of Focus HerpesSelect® and Kalon™ HSV-2 gG2 ELISA serological assays to detect herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) antibodies in a South African population

    PubMed Central

    Delany, Sinéad; Jentsch, Ute; Weiss, Helen; Moyes, Jocelyn; Ashley-Morrow, Rhoda; Stevens, Wendy; Mayaud, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Sero-epidemiological studies of herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) infection in Africa remain difficult to interpret owing to the high rate of false-positive results observed when using the new recombinant gG2 HSV-2 ELISA tests. We compared the performance of two widely used gG2 ELISAs to derive an appropriate testing algorithm for use in South Africa. Methods Sera from 210 women attending family planning clinics in Johannesburg were tested using HerpeSelect® and Kalon™ HSV-2 gG2 assays. Sera from 20 discordant pairs, 44 concordant positive and 33 concordant negative samples were further tested by HSV Western Blot (WB). Sensitivity and specificity of each test and of combination algorithms compared to WB were calculated. Results HerpeSelect® had a sensitivity of 98% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 95–100) and specificity of 61% (95%CI: 48–74). Kalon™ was less sensitive (89%, 95%CI: 83–94) but more specific (85%, 95%CI: 61–100). Seroprevalence may have been overestimated by as much as 14% by HerpeSelect®. Specificity was improved by raising the cut-off index for determination of a positive result for HerpeSelect® (to ≥3.5), but not for Kalon™. HIV-1 infection reduced the specificity of HerpeSelect® to 30%. Improved sensitivity and specificity were obtained by a two-test algorithm using HerpeSelect® (≥3.5) as the first test and Kalon™ to resolve equivocal results (sensitivity 92%, 95%CI: 82–98; specificity 91%, 95%CI: 79–98). Conclusion Newer HSV-2 serological tests have low specificity in this South African population with high HIV-1 prevalence. Two-step testing strategies could provide rational testing alternatives to WB. PMID:19837726

  14. Case report: epithelial intracytoplasmic herpes viral inclusions associated with an outbreak of duck virus enteritis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, B.C.; Jessup, David A.; Docherty, Douglas E.; Lownestine, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    Several muscovy ducks from a free-roaming flock of 65 muscovy and mallard ducks died over a 3-week period. Three muscovy ducks were necropsied. Gross and microscopic changes were compatible with duck virus enteritis, and the virus was isolated. In addition to intranuclear viral inclusion bodies in several tissues, intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were present in esophageal and cloacal epithelium, By electron microscopy, the membrane-bound intracytoplasmic inclusions were found to contain enveloped herpesvirus, and nuclei contained herpes viral nucleocapsids.

  15. Effect of Acyclovir on Viral Protein Synthesis in Cells Infected with Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Furman, Phillip A.; McGuirt, Paul V.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the antiviral agent 9-(2-hydroxyethoxymethyl)guanine (acyclovir) on herpes simplex virus type 1 protein synthesis during virus replication was examined. Treatment of infected cells with acyclovir markedly affected the amounts of the four major glycosylated and certain non-glycosylated viral polypeptides synthesized; other viral polypeptides were made in normal amounts. The reduced amount of late protein synthesis was most likely due to the inhibition of progeny viral DNA synthesis by acyclovir. Images PMID:6301368

  16. An immuno-enzymatic assay for herpes simplex virus tumour associated antigen in gynecological oncology.

    PubMed

    Magli, G; Scimone, C; Flaminio, G; D'Alessandro, G; Mascolo, A; Magli, R; Saladino, I

    1982-01-01

    The authors studied the HSV-TAA (Herpes Simplex Virus Tumor Associated Antigen) in patients affected by female genitale tract tumors, using the immunoenzymatic assay (ELISA). They found a positive frequence of 65% in sera of patients affected by uterine cervical carcinoma and of the 80% in sera of patients affected by vulvar carcinoma. The authors suggest that this enzymatic method has a real value and propose its use in the early diagnosis of the female genital tract neoplasms.

  17. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus progressing to encephalitis: beware pain preceding the rash.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Novoneel; Morris, Paul; Blundell, Adrian

    2013-07-12

    We present a challenging case in which the dermatomal pain associated with herpes zoster ophthalmicus preceded the cutaneous rash by several days. It thus highlights the need to consider this diagnosis among the differentials for severe unilateral headache in the elderly. The patient unfortunately progressed to develop encephalitis, an uncommon but serious complication of zoster reactivation and a reminder that this remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly population.

  18. LATENT HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS IN THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM OF RABBITS AND MICE

    PubMed Central

    Knotts, F. B.; Cook, M. L.; Stevens, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 induces a long-standing latent infection in the central nervous system of mice and rabbits. The infection was extablished in the brain stems of rabbits after corneal inoculation of the virus, and in the spinal cords of mice after rear footpad infection. In these animals, infectious virus could not be recovered by direct isolation from tissues; it was detected only after the tissues were maintained as organ cultures in vitro. PMID:4353820

  19. Herpes Zoster Overlying Recently Placed Central Venous Access Site: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hess, Rebecca A; Gunnerson, Kyle; Kahler, John

    2017-01-01

    Herpes zoster, commonly called shingles, is a disease that results from the reactivation of varicella zoster virus. Local trauma has been reported as a precipitant for reactivation, but this condition is rarely seen localized to a fresh surgical incision. We present the case of a patient who developed shingles overlying the incision site of a recently buried central venous access port, illustrating the need to consider this diagnosis as a unique imposter of localized infection or reaction at sites of recent procedural trauma.

  20. [Gestational herpes. Presentation of a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Tena Alavez, G; Blancas Espinosa, R; Ruiz Medina, J

    1994-12-01

    Herpes gestationis (HG) is a rare autoimmune blistering complication of pregnancy. It is of unknown etiology and it occurs once in every 3,000 to 50,000 pregnancies. The diagnosis can strongly be suggested by the clinical picture, but it must be confirmed using immunopathological methods. The treatment of choice is local measures and systemic corticosteroids. Although the maternal prognosis is excellent, there are controversies on the perinatal outcome. A typical case of HG is presented and the literature is reviewed.