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  1. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Multiple sclerosis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a potentially disabling disease of the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system). In MS, the immune system attacks the protective ...

  2. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the ... attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Multiple sclerosis affects women more than men. It often begins ...

  3. Multiple sclerosis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - multiple sclerosis ... The following organizations provide information on multiple sclerosis : Multiple Sclerosis Foundation -- www.msfocus.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/multiple_sclerosis National ...

  4. Tuberous Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or other symptoms can be life-threatening. Tuberous sclerosis has no cure, but treatments can help symptoms. Options include medicines, educational and occupational therapy, surgery, or surgery to ...

  5. Multiple Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on multiple sclerosis is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  6. Multiple Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on multiple sclerosis is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  7. Systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Allanore, Yannick; Simms, Robert; Distler, Oliver; Trojanowska, Maria; Pope, Janet; Denton, Christopher P; Varga, John

    2015-04-23

    Systemic sclerosis is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by a chronic and frequently progressive course and by extensive patient-to-patient variability. Like other autoimmune diseases, systemic sclerosis occurs more frequently in women, with a peak of onset in the fifth decade of life. The exact cause of systemic sclerosis remains elusive but is likely to involve environmental factors in a genetically primed individual. Pathogenesis is dominated by vascular changes; evidence of autoimmunity with distinct autoantibodies and activation of both innate and adaptive immunity; and fibrosis of the skin and visceral organs that results in irreversible scarring and organ failure. Intractable progression of vascular and fibrotic organ damage accounts for the chronic morbidity and high mortality. Early and accurate diagnosis and classification might improve patient outcomes. Screening strategies facilitate timely recognition of life-threatening complications and initiation of targeted therapies to halt their progression. Effective treatments of organ-based complications are now within reach. Discovery of biomarkers - including autoantibodies that identify patient subsets at high risk for particular disease complications or rapid progression - is a research priority. Understanding the key pathogenetic pathways, cell types and mediators underlying disease manifestations opens the door for the development of targeted therapies with true disease-modifying potential. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/lchkcA.

  8. Multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Files, Daniel Kane; Jausurawong, Tani; Katrajian, Ruba; Danoff, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, debilitating disease that can have devastating effects. Presentation varies widely in symptoms, pace, and progression. In addition to a thorough history and physical examination, diagnostic tools required to diagnose MS and exclude other diagnoses include MRI, evoked potential testing, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Although the disease is not curable presently, quality of life can be improved by minimizing the frequency and severity of disease burden. Disease modification, symptom management, preservation of function, and treatment of psychosocial issues are paramount to enhance the quality of life for the patient affected with MS.

  9. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (a-my-o-TROE-fik LAT-ur-ul skluh-ROE-sis), or ALS, is a progressive nervous system (neurological) disease that ...

  10. Multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Boster, Aaron L.; Racke, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Preliminary studies have suggested that a high salt diet may play a role in the development of autoimmune disease and possibly multiple sclerosis (MS). Promising clinical trial results for 2 new therapies for MS have been reported. Dimethyl fumarate, also known by its investigational name BG-12, became the third oral disease-modifying therapy for MS to be Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved in March 2013. Interestingly, dimethyl fumarate served as the active compound used for the treatment of psoriasis for decades. Alemtuzumab remains under investigation and is not currently FDA-approved for treatment of MS. Other drugs currently approved for alternative indications are being investigated for use in MS. Additionally, an investigation of alternative dosing strategies for glatiramer acetate suggests that patients may benefit from a higher dose formulation and less frequent medication administration. Advances in basic science research have identified another potential autoantigenic target in MS, KIR4.1, which may provide further insight into MS pathophysiology. PMID:24175156

  11. [Multiple sclerosis and migration].

    PubMed

    Materljan, E; Sepcić, J; Materljan, B

    1996-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis, original primary demyelination in the central nervous system, is a disease of as yet unknown cause. Epidemiologic research may contribute to the clarification of this problem. Migration studies have proven that susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is associated with ethnic origin and environment, and that the critical age for the disease development is till 15 years. In Croatia, emigrating inhabitants of Gorski Kotar, a region with high exposure to this disease, carry the risk of multiple sclerosis development, provided that have emigrated after adolescence.

  12. Vision and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Simon J; Raoof, Naz; McLean, Rebecca J; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis can affect vision in many ways, including optic neuritis, chronic optic neuropathy, retrochiasmal visual field defects, higher order cortical processing, double vision, nystagmus and also by related ocular conditions such as uveitis. There are also side effects from recently introduced multiple sclerosis treatments that can affect vision. This review will discuss all these aspects and how they come together to cause visual symptoms. It will then focus on practical aspects of how to recognise when there is a vision problem in a multiple sclerosis patient and on what treatments are available to improve vision.

  13. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a nervous system disease that attacks nerve cells called neurons in your ... people with ALS die from respiratory failure. The disease usually strikes between age 40 and 60. More ...

  14. [Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Veldink, J H; Weikamp, J; Schelhaas, H J; van den Berg, L H

    2010-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is one of the most severe and disabling diseases of the nervous system. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis leads to the progressive weakening of the muscles in the arms, legs, face, mouth and trunk. The onset of the disease is insidious, starting with weakness in the hands or feet or with slurred speech. The weakness worsens and patients pass away as a result of weakness of the respiratory muscles on average within 3 years of the onset of the disease. In the Netherlands, approximately 400 patients are diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis every year. There is no diagnostic test for this neuro-muscular disease; the diagnosis is established by excluding other disorders that resemble amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Only one drug is able to inhibit the progression of the disease to any extent: riluzole. Treatment, therefore, is mainly focused on supportive measures and those which enhance the quality of life optimally.

  15. Systemic sclerosis: Recent insights.

    PubMed

    Elhai, Muriel; Avouac, Jérôme; Kahan, André; Allanore, Yannick

    2015-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an orphan connective tissue disease characterized by alterations of the microvasculature, disturbances of the immune system and massive deposition of collagen and other matrix substances in the skin and internal organs. A major achievement of the recent years has been the validation of new classification criteria, allowing earlier diagnosis and earlier treatment of systemic sclerosis, before irreversible fibrosis and organ damage appeared ("window of opportunity"). Raynaud's phenomenon is usually the first sign of the disease and is considered as the main sentinel sign for the identification of very early systemic sclerosis. Systemic sclerosis is clinically heterogeneous and disease course remains unpredictable. Its prognosis depends on cardiopulmonary involvement and recent studies aim to identify serum or genetic biomarkers predictive of severe organ involvement. Moreover, the prospective follow-up of large cohorts has provided and will offer critical material to identify strong prognostic factors. Whereas the outcomes of vascular manifestations of the disease has been recently improved due to targeted therapy, recent data have highlighted that mortality has not changed over the past 40 years. This reflects the absence of efficacy of current available drugs to counteract the fibrotic process. Nevertheless, several targeted immunity therapies, commonly with proven efficacy in other immune diseases, are about to be investigated in systemic sclerosis. Indeed, promising results in small and open studies have been reported. This article deals with recent insights into classification criteria, pathogenesis, organ involvements, outcome and current and possible future therapeutic options in systemic sclerosis.

  16. Hypersexuality, fetishism and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Huws, R; Shubsachs, A P; Taylor, P J

    1991-02-01

    Hypersexuality and fetishism appeared in a patient with multiple sclerosis whose MRI scan showed frontal and temporal lesions. The hypersexuality may have been the presenting symptom of the multiple sclerosis.

  17. Multiple Sclerosis and Vitamin D

    MedlinePlus

    ... Editors David C. Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD Multiple sclerosis and vitamin D Andrew J. Solomon, MD WHAT ... caused by improper immune responses (autoimmune diseases), including multiple sclerosis (MS). A recent Patient Page in Neurology provided ...

  18. Tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    DiMario, Francis J; Sahin, Mustafa; Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius

    2015-06-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is an autosomal-dominant, neurocutaneous, multisystem disorder characterized by cellular hyperplasia and tissue dysplasia. The genetic cause is mutations in the TSC1 gene, found on chromosome 9q34, and TSC2 gene, found on chromosome 16p13. The clinical phenotypes resulting from mutations in either of the 2 genes are variable in each individual. Herein, advances in the understanding of molecular mechanisms in tuberous sclerosis complex are reviewed, and current guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and management are summarized. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Autism and Tuberous Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smalley, Susan L.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the research on the relationship of autism and pervasive developmental disorders to tuberous sclerosis (TSC). Notes that, among TSC cases, the frequency of autism is 25% and among autistic populations, the frequency of TSC is 1% to 4%. It is thought that an abnormal TSC gene may directly influence the development of autism. (DB)

  20. Autism and Tuberous Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smalley, Susan L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A literature review of autism and tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) substantiates a significant association between the two. Studies of 14 autistic probands and 13 TSC probands identified 7 TSC subjects with autism, who had more seizures and mental retardation than those without autism. More male TSC probands with autism than female were…

  1. Regressive systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Black, C; Dieppe, P; Huskisson, T; Hart, F D

    1986-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a disease which usually progresses or reaches a plateau with persistence of symptoms and signs. Regression is extremely unusual. Four cases of established scleroderma are described in which regression is well documented. The significance of this observation and possible mechanisms of disease regression are discussed. Images PMID:3718012

  2. Multiple sclerosis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Popescu, C D

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is one of the main reasons for invalidation of young adults of both sexes. The disease is more common in women than in men. The illness begins most frequently in patients between the ages of 20 and 40 years, which is also the most fertile period for women. MS is an immune-mediated disease with chronic evolution marked by exacerbations and remissions that amplify the degree of disability. The most common clinical picture is the one with relapse and remission whose evolution is greatly improved after immunomodulatory treatment. We have revised the literature together with the data from the national multiple sclerosis society and the cases that are in the National Programme of Multiple Sclerosis, mainly the ones that are assigned to the regional center of Iaşi, at the Neurology Clinic inside the Clinical Rehabilitation Hospital Iaşi. Pregnancy is quite frequent in female patients with MS. Certain risks are present during pregnancy, birth and breastfeeding and certain protocols must be applied, such as interrupting the immunomodulatory treatment before the conception. Child delivery must be closely monitored and it must take into consideration the dysfunction that the patient has and be adapted to the existing deficits. There are some methods that may be used during delivery for female patients with multiple sclerosis in order to make this process smooth and reduce the risk of postpartum complications. Multiple sclerosis is an invalidating disease, with a high prevalence in women. Pregnancy in patients with MS is not such a natural phenomenon as in a healthy female and it requires a multidisciplinary team in order to ensure the safety of both the mother and the newborn.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile primary lateral sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... primary lateral sclerosis juvenile Merck Manual Consumer Version: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Other Motor Neuron Diseases Patient Support and ... domains, is mutated in a form of recessive amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Nat Genet. 2001 Oct;29(2):160-5. ...

  4. Tuberous sclerosis and parathyroid adenoma.

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, L S; Rungby, J

    1991-01-01

    Very little is known about the pathogenesis of tuberous sclerosis. Over the past 10 years, however, increasing numbers of reports on adenomatous diseases in association with tuberous sclerosis have been published. A case of hypercalcaemia and parathyroid adenoma in association with tuberous sclerosis is presented, of which there has been one such report published previously. This association might be another manifestation of this complex disease: it is therefore recommended that plasma calcium concentrations should be measured in such patients. PMID:1752991

  5. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Research Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Research Program Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704...to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Research Program 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...research programs such as the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Research Program (ALSRP) is allo- cated via specific guidance from Congress. Proposal

  6. Conjugal amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dewitt, John D.; Kwon, Julia; Burton, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disease characterized by progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the motor cortex, brainstem, and spinal cord. The incidence of sporadic ALS is 1.5 to 2.7 in 100,000, and the prevalence is 5.2 to 6.0 in 100,000. Conjugal ALS is even rarer than sporadic ALS. We report a case of conjugal ALS encountered in our outpatient neurology clinic. PMID:22275781

  7. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Malik, Rabia; Lui, Andrew; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine

    2014-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting 20,000 to 30,000 people in the United States. The mainstay of care of patients affected by this disease is supportive and given the multifaceted nature of their needs is provided most efficiently through multidisciplinary clinics that have shown to prolong survival and improve quality of life. The authors discuss in detail evidence-based management of individuals affected by this condition.

  8. Hippocampal sclerosis dementia

    PubMed Central

    Onyike, Chiadi U.; Pletnikova, Olga; Sloane, Kelly L.; Sullivan, Campbell; Troncoso, Juan C.; Rabins, Peter V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe characteristics of hippocampal sclerosis dementia. Methods Convenience sample of Hippocampal sclerosis dementia (HSD) recruited from the Johns Hopkins University Brain Resource Center. Twenty-four cases with post-mortem pathological diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis dementia were reviewed for clinical characterization. Results The cases showed atrophy and neuronal loss localized to the hippocampus, amygdala and entorrhinal cortex. The majority (79.2%) had amnesia at illness onset, and many (54.2%) showed abnormal conduct and psychiatric disorder. Nearly 42% presented with an amnesic state, and 37.5% presented with amnesia plus abnormal conduct and psychiatric disorder. All eventually developed a behavioral or psychiatric disorder. Disorientation, executive dysfunction, aphasia, agnosia and apraxia were uncommon at onset. Alzheimer disease (AD) was the initial clinical diagnosis in 89% and the final clinical diagnosis in 75%. Diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) was uncommon (seen in 8%). Conclusion HSD shows pathological characteristics of FTD and clinical features that mimic AD and overlap with FTD. The findings, placed in the context of earlier work, support the proposition that HSD belongs to the FTD family, where it may be identified as an amnesic variant. PMID:24363834

  9. Tuberous sclerosis complex in autism.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Tu, Wen-Jun; Shi, Xiao-Dong

    2012-09-01

    To study the prevalence rate of tuberous sclerosis complex in autistic disorder. We studied one cohort of children followed up since 2005 until 2009, with autistic disorder, to determine the incidence of tuberous sclerosis complex. We established an autistic disorder registry in 2005 at China Rehabilitation Research Center. During the 4-year period (2005-2009), we collected a database of 429 children (390 boys and 39 girls; male to female ratio 10:1) with autistic disorder and pervasive developmental disorders. We routinely examined all children with autistic disorder for any features of tuberous sclerosis complex by looking for neurocutaneous markers such as depigmented spots. In those with infantile spasm or epilepsy, the clinical features of tuberous sclerosis complex were monitored regularly during follow-up. Of these, five had tuberous sclerosis complex. Thus, the prevalence rate of tuberous sclerosis complex in autistic disorder is 1.17%. All of these children were mentally retarded with moderate to severe grades. Their IQ or developmental quotient was less than 70. The prevalence rate of tuberous sclerosis complex in autistic disorder was 1.17% in our region; autism spectrum disorder is a condition that might be associated with development of tuberous sclerosis complex.

  10. Rickettsial Antibodies in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Field, E. J.; Chambers, Mavis

    1970-01-01

    The serum of subjects with multiple sclerosis or other degenerative neurological diseases and that of normal controls does not differ significantly in its content of antibodies to several rickettsial antigens. There is no evidence for a rickettsial aetiology of multiple sclerosis, and no grounds for an extended clinical trial of Le Gac's full method of treatment with antibiotics. PMID:4983591

  11. Multiple sclerosis associated with trismus.

    PubMed Central

    D'Costa, D. F.; Vania, A. K.; Millac, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the case history of a middle-aged lady who presented with symptoms and signs over one year leading to a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. During one of her relapses, she developed trismus--an association that has not been described before in multiple sclerosis. PMID:2099430

  12. Symptomatic therapy in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Frohman, Teresa C.; Castro, Wanda; Shah, Anjali; Courtney, Ardith; Ortstadt, Jeffrey; Davis, Scott L.; Logan, Diana; Abraham, Thomas; Abraham, Jaspreet; Remington, Gina; Treadaway, Katherine; Graves, Donna; Hart, John; Stuve, Olaf; Lemack, Gary; Greenberg, Benjamin; Frohman, Elliot M.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common disabling neurological disease of young adults. The ability to impact the quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis should not only incorporate therapies that are disease modifying, but should also include a course of action for the global multidisciplinary management focused on quality of life and functional capabilities. PMID:21694806

  13. Electroconvulsive Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Katie; Narang, Puneet

    2015-01-01

    We performed a literature search regarding the safety and efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis and comorbid psychiatric symptoms. Literature review was conducted via PubMed databases. Of the cases we reviewed, most subjects with multiple sclerosis reported significant psychiatric symptom relief, with only a handful reporting neurologic deterioration. There was some evidence that active white matter lesions may be predictive of neurologic deterioration when electroconvulsive therapy is used in patients with multiple sclerosis. A brief description of the pathophysiology and effects of depression in patients with multiple sclerosis is also provided. Although no clinical recommendations or meaningful conclusions can be drawn without further investigation, the literature suggests that electroconvulsive therapy for treatment of psychiatric illnesses in patients with multiple sclerosis is safe and efficacious. PMID:26351621

  14. [Hand involvement in systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Mouthon, Luc

    2013-12-01

    Hand involvement is very common in patients with systemic sclerosis and represents an important tool for the early diagnosis of the disease. Vascular involvement of the hands is at the forefront of systemic sclerosis, with Raynaud's phenomenon, which may be complicated by digital ulcers, digital necrosis causing pain, infection and significant disability. Joint inflammation can also be disabling and causes the occurrence of contractures and deformities resulting in a marked hand disability. Skin sclerosis involving fingers and hands leads to the occurrence of pain and functional impairment. Hand involvement contributes to 75 % of global disability in patients with systemic sclerosis. Only a comprehensive care, taking into account the vascular, skin and joint manifestations, including physical therapy if needed can improve hand function in patients with systemic sclerosis.

  15. Electroconvulsive Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Steen, Katie; Narang, Puneet; Lippmann, Steven

    2015-01-01

    We performed a literature search regarding the safety and efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis and comorbid psychiatric symptoms. Literature review was conducted via PubMed databases. Of the cases we reviewed, most subjects with multiple sclerosis reported significant psychiatric symptom relief, with only a handful reporting neurologic deterioration. There was some evidence that active white matter lesions may be predictive of neurologic deterioration when electroconvulsive therapy is used in patients with multiple sclerosis. A brief description of the pathophysiology and effects of depression in patients with multiple sclerosis is also provided. Although no clinical recommendations or meaningful conclusions can be drawn without further investigation, the literature suggests that electroconvulsive therapy for treatment of psychiatric illnesses in patients with multiple sclerosis is safe and efficacious.

  16. Multiple Sclerosis: An Update.

    PubMed

    Faguy, Kathryn

    2016-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common disabling neurologic condition in young adults and imposes high financial and quality of life costs on patients, their families, and society. Yet, developments in the battle against MS include new treatments to slow its progression and updated diagnostic criteria that can accelerate diagnosis and effective treatment. This article offers a review and update on the disease, focusing on risk factors and possible causes, symptoms, forms of MS, diagnostic criteria and tools, and the expanding array of approved treatments. It also reports on the skyrocketing cost of MS drugs, misdiagnosis, and special patient populations with MS.

  17. Ambulation and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Motl, Robert W

    2013-05-01

    Walking impairment is a common consequence of multiple sclerosis (MS) that can result in substantial limitations of daily activities and compromised quality of life. Walking impairment is often monitored as an indicator of disease and neurologic disability progression. The worsening of walking performance while undertaking a cognitive task underscores the role of nonmotor impairments in ambulation limitations. Walking impairment has ubiquitous and life-altering consequences, underscoring the importance of continued efforts to identify approaches to prevent and forestall this event, and to restore walking ability in persons with MS.

  18. [Multiple sclerosis and depression].

    PubMed

    Sánchez López, M P; Olivares Pérez, T; Nieto Barco, A; Hernández Pérez, M A; Barroso Ribal, J

    Depression has frequently been reported in multiple sclerosis. However, prevalence rates must be interpreted in the light of the conceptual and methodological limitations of these studies. Depression has traditionally been associated with response to the diagnosis of this disease, the presence of physical and cognitive limitations, the damage of specific neural systems and inmunomodulatory therapy. To assess the evolution of emotional state and its relationship with motor and cognitive slowness, in relapsing remitting patients with minimal levels of neurological disability. Data are reported for 35 patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis, 27 treated with interferons and 8 without interferon treatment. Mood disturbance (Beck Depression Inventory, BDI), physical disability (Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale, EDSS) and speed of information processing (reaction times) were assessed. The first testing was carried out before the start of treatment and the second testing one year later. The group of patients showed a total BDI score indicative of minimal depression associated with items expressing performance difficulties and somatic complaints. Emotional state was not related to physical disability but was related to processing speed measures. A significant improvement of depression was observed after one year of treatment with inmunomodulatory therapy.

  19. Biosensing in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Andrew; Jonzzon, Soren; Suleiman, Leena; Arjona, Jennifer; Graves, Jennifer S

    2017-10-04

    The goal of using wearable biosensors in multiple sclerosis (MS) is to provide outcome metrics with higher sensitivity to deficits and better inter-test and inter-rater reliability than standard neurological exam bedside maneuvers. A wearable biosensor not only has the potential to enhance physical exams, but also offers the promise of remote evaluations of the patient either at home or with local non-specialist providers. Areas Covered: We performed a structured literature review on the use of wearable biosensors in studies of multiple sclerosis. This included accelerometers, gyroscopes, eye-trackers, grip sensors, multi-sensors and clinical trials. Expert Commentary: Wearable sensors that are sensitive to change in function over time have great potential to serve as outcome metrics in clinical trials. Key features of generalizability are simplicity in the application of the device and delivery of data to the provider. Another important feature to establish is best sampling rate. Having too high of a sampling rate can lead to over interpretation of noisy data On the other hand, a low sampling rate can result in an insensitive test thus missing subtle changes of clinical interest. Of most importance is to establish metrics derived from wearable devices that provide meaningful data in longitudinal studies.

  20. What causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Sarah; Al Khleifat, Ahmad; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a neurodegenerative disease predominantly affecting upper and lower motor neurons, resulting in progressive paralysis and death from respiratory failure within 2 to 3 years. The peak age of onset is 55 to 70 years, with a male predominance. The causes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are only partly known, but they include some environmental risk factors as well as several genes that have been identified as harbouring disease-associated variation. Here we review the nature, epidemiology, genetic associations, and environmental exposures associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:28408982

  1. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Racosta, Juan Manuel; Kimpinski, Kurt; Morrow, Sarah Anne; Kremenchutzky, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is a prevalent and significant cause of disability among patients with multiple sclerosis. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis is usually explained by lesions within central nervous system regions responsible for autonomic regulation, but novel evidence suggests that other factors may be involved as well. Additionally, the interactions between the autonomic nervous system and the immune system have generated increased interest about the role of autonomic dysfunction in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In this paper we analyze systematically the most relevant signs and symptoms of autonomic dysfunction in MS, considering separately their potential causes and implications.

  2. [Future challenges in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Fernández, Óscar

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis occurs in genetically susceptible individuals, in whom an unknown environmental factor triggers an immune response, giving rise to a chronic and disabling autoimmune disease. Currently, significant progress is being made in our knowledge of the frequency and distribution of multiple sclerosis and its risk factors, genetics, pathology, pathogenesis, diagnostic and prognostic markers, and treatment. This has radically changed patients' and clinicians' expectations of multiple sclerosis and has raised hope that there will soon be a way to control the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Orofacial manifestations in tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Scully, C

    1977-11-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is a rare congenital disorder with characteristic neurologic, dermatologic, and orofacial lesions. There have been very few case reports in the dental literature. Four cases demonstrating the range of orofacial anomalies and problems in management are presented.

  4. Tuberous sclerosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cross, Nicola Jayne; Fung, Diane E

    2010-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is an inherited neurocutaneous disorder that occurs in approximately 1 in 7,500 live births. It is characterized by benign neoplasms of the skin, heart, kidneys, lungs, central nervous system, and mucosa. Oral lesions are usually fibrous in nature and most commonly occur on the anterior gingivae. Patients may suffer with epilepsy and learning difficulties, which may complicate dental management. When a 10-year-old girl with a history of tuberous sclerosis was brought in for a routine dental check-up, a leafy growth on the anterior gingiva was detected. An excisional biopsy was carried out. Histologically, the appearance was described as nonspecific, but was consistent with a diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis. Tuberous sclerosis is a rare condition that may exhibit oral manifestations. The patients may also exhibit epilepsy and learning difficulties. Dental management of affected patients may therefore be more complicated and complex.

  5. Lupoid sclerosis: evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, P E; Betts, H B

    1977-01-01

    The history, physical examination and laboratory data are presented of a patient with multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus. The rehabilitation medicine evaluation and course of therapy are reviewed. Other published cases of similar patients are reviewed.

  6. [Current therapy of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Antonio García Merino, J

    2014-12-01

    Since the introduction of interferon beta 1 b for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, there has been a progressive increase in the number of drugs available for this disease. Currently, 11 drugs have been approved in Spain, and their indications depend on specific clinical characteristics. The present article reviews these indications and also discusses other medications without official approval that have also been used in multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Therapeutics for multiple sclerosis symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ben-Zacharia, Aliza Bitton

    2011-01-01

    Symptoms management in multiple sclerosis is an integral part of its care. Accurate assessment and addressing the different symptoms provides increased quality of life among patients with multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis symptoms may be identified as primary, secondary, or tertiary symptoms. Primary symptoms, such as weakness, sensory loss, and ataxia, are directly related to demyelination and axonal loss. Secondary symptoms, such as urinary tract infections as a result of urinary retention, are a result of the primary symptoms. Tertiary symptoms, such as reactive depression or social isolation, are a result of the social and psychological consequences of the disease. Common multiple sclerosis symptoms include fatigue and weakness; decreased balance, spasticity and gait problems; depression and cognitive issues; bladder, bowel, and sexual deficits; visual and sensory loss; and neuropathic pain. Less-common symptoms include dysarthria and dysphagia, vertigo, and tremors. Rare symptoms in multiple sclerosis include seizures, hearing loss, and paralysis. Symptom management includes nonpharmacological methods, such as rehabilitation and psychosocial support, and pharmacological methods, ie, medications and surgical procedures. The keys to symptom management are awareness, knowledge, and coordination of care. Symptoms have to be recognized and management needs to be individualized. Multiple sclerosis therapeutics include nonpharmacological strategies that consist of lifestyle modifications, rehabilitation, social support, counseling, and pharmacological agents or surgical procedures. The goal is vigilant management to improve quality of life and promote realistic expectations and hope.

  8. Pulmonary echography in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Moazedi-Fuerst, F C; Zechner, P M; Tripolt, N J; Kielhauser, S M; Brickmann, K; Scheidl, S; Lutfi, A; Graninger, W G

    2012-11-01

    In systemic sclerosis patients, interstitial lung disease and pulmonary hypertension are highly associated with mortality. The time point of detecting manifestations like pulmonary hypertension and interstitial lung disease (ILD) is of vital importance. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) to date is the gold standard to diagnose ILD. In addition, an ultrasound of the lung is suggested as a noninvasive and radiation-free method of structural monitoring of the lung. We tested the reliability of lung sonography for the assessment of patients with systemic sclerosis. In a pilot study involving 25 patients with systemic sclerosis and 40 healthy volunteers, we screened the pleura and the pulmonary parenchyma for sonographic abnormalities. The occurrence of B lines, comet tail phenomena, and pleural irregularities was scored. All systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients were subjected to computed x-ray tomography of the chest. Forty-four percent of SSc patients showed B line phenomena and pleural thickening. The diagnosis of ILD in these patients was confirmed by HRCT scan. B line phenomena and pleural irregularities were significantly more common in SSc patients. Patients with ILD had higher pleural scores and comet scores when compared to systemic sclerosis patients without radiographic ILD. If our results are confirmed in larger studies, transthoracic ultrasound of the lung might turn out to be a suitable method for screening patients with systemic sclerosis for incipient pulmonary structural changes.

  9. Primary Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Statland, Jeffrey M.; Barohn, Richard J.; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Floeter, Mary Kay; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) is characterized by insidious onset of progressive upper motor neuron dysfunction in the absence of clinical signs of lower motor neuron involvement. Patients experience stiffness, decreased balance and coordination, and mild weakness, and if the bulbar region is affected, difficulty speaking and swallowing, and emotional lability. The diagnosis is made based on clinical history, typical exam findings, and diagnostic testing negative for other causes of upper motor neuron dysfunction. EMG is normal, or only shows mild neurogenic findings in a few muscles, not meeting El Escorial criteria. Although no test is specific for PLS, some neurodiagnostic tests are supportive: including absent or delayed central motor conduction times; and changes in the precentral gyrus or corticospinal tracts on MRI, DTI or MR Spectroscopy. Treatment is largely supportive, and includes medications for spasticity, baclofen pump, and treatment for pseudobulbar affect. The prognosis in PLS is more benign than ALS, making this a useful diagnostic category. PMID:26515619

  10. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hardiman, Orla; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Chio, Adriano; Corr, Emma M; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Robberecht, Wim; Shaw, Pamela J; Simmons, Zachary; van den Berg, Leonard H

    2017-10-05

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease, is characterized by the degeneration of both upper and lower motor neurons, which leads to muscle weakness and eventual paralysis. Until recently, ALS was classified primarily within the neuromuscular domain, although new imaging and neuropathological data have indicated the involvement of the non-motor neuraxis in disease pathology. In most patients, the mechanisms underlying the development of ALS are poorly understood, although a subset of patients have familial disease and harbour mutations in genes that have various roles in neuronal function. Two possible disease-modifying therapies that can slow disease progression are available for ALS, but patient management is largely mediated by symptomatic therapies, such as the use of muscle relaxants for spasticity and speech therapy for dysarthria.

  11. Vaccines in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Eric M L; Chahin, Salim; Berger, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    Vaccinations help prevent communicable disease. To be valuable, a vaccine's ability to prevent disease must exceed the risk of adverse effects from administration. Many vaccines present no risk of infection as they are comprised of killed or non-infectious components while other vaccines consist of live attenuated microorganisms which carry a potential risk of infection-particularly, in patients with compromised immunity. There are several unique considerations with respect to vaccination in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population. First, there has been concern that vaccination may trigger or aggravate the disease. Second, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) employed in the treatment of MS may increase the risk of infectious complications from vaccines or alter their efficacy. Lastly, in some cases, vaccination strategies may be part of the treatment paradigm in attempts to avoid complications of therapy.

  12. Treatment of systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Medsger, T A

    1991-01-01

    Proper classification of patients into diffuse cutaneous and limited cutaneous subsets and the anticipation of complications are the keys to the management of subjects with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma). Patients with early diffuse disease and rapidly progressive skin thickening are at highest risk of developing serious disease of the internal organs (intestine, lung, heart, kidney) and should be considered for disease modifying treatment. The targets of the disease and sites of possible intervention are vascular endothelium (vasoprotective agents), mononuclear cell subsets (immunosuppressive agents), and fibroblasts (colchicine, D-penicillamine). A number of new agents with sound scientific rationale are currently undergoing therapeutic trials. Much can be done to improve the lifestyle of those with scleroderma. The most dramatic recent development is the ability to reverse kidney disease by the prompt use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and modern methods of renal dialysis and transplantation. Scleroderma is not a hopeless disease. PMID:1750801

  13. Multiple Sclerosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    INALOO, Soroor; HAGHBIN, Saideh

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most important immune-mediated demyelinated disease of human which is typically the disease of young adults. A total of 4% to 5% of MS population are pediatric. Pediatric MS is defined as the appearance of MS before the age of sixteen. About 80% of the pediatric cases and nearly all adolescent onset patients present with attacks typical to adult MS. Approximately 97% to 99% of the affected children have relapsing-remitting MS, while 85% to 95% of the adults experience such condition. MS in children is associated with more frequent and severe relapses. Treatment is the same as adults. We aimed to review the epidemiology, etiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of MS in children. PMID:24665290

  14. The tuberous sclerosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Orlova, Ksenia A.; Crino, Peter B.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder that results from mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 genes and is associated with hamartoma formation in multiple organ systems. The neurological manifestations of TSC are particularly challenging and include infantile spasms, intractable epilepsy, cognitive disabilities, and autism. Progress over the past 15 years has demonstrated that the TSC1 or TSC2 encoded proteins modulate cell function via the mTOR signaling cascade and serve as keystones in regulating cell growth and proliferation. The mTOR pathway provides an intersection for an intricate network of protein cascades that respond to cellular nutrition, energy levels, and growth-factor stimulation. In the brain, TSC1 and TSC2 have been implicated in cell body size, dendritic arborization, axonal outgrowth and targeting, neuronal migration, cortical lamination, and spine formation. Antagonism of the mTOR pathway with rapamycin and related compounds may provide new therapeutic options for TSC patients. PMID:20146692

  15. Vertebral sclerosis in adults.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, A S; Percy, J S; Lentle, B C

    1979-01-01

    Narrowing of the intervertebral disc space with sclerosis of the adjacent vertebral bodies may occur as a consequence of infection, neoplasia, trauma, or rheumatic disease. Some patients have been described with backache and these radiological appearances without any primary cause being apparent. The lesions were almost always of 1 or, at most, 2 vertebrae and most frequently involved the inferior margin of L4. We describe 3 patients with far more extensive vertebral involvement and present the clinical, radiological, scintiscan, and histological findings. The only patient we have seen with the better known, isolated L4/5 lesion was shown on biopsy to have staphylococcal osteomyelitis. For this reason we would still recommend a biopsy of all such sclerotic vertebral lesions if they occur in the absence of other rheumatic disease. Images PMID:434941

  16. Tremor in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mostert, Jop; Heersema, Dorothea; De Keyser, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Tremor is estimated to occur in about 25 to 60 percent of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). This symptom, which can be severely disabling and embarrassing for patients, is difficult to manage. Isoniazid in high doses, carbamazepine, propranolol and gluthetimide have been reported to provide some relief, but published evidence of effectiveness is very limited. Most trials were of small size and of short duration. Cannabinoids appear ineffective. Tremor reduction can be obtained with stereotactic thalamotomy or thalamic stimulation. However, the studies were small and information on long-term functional outcome is scarce. Physiotherapy, tremor reducing orthoses, and limb cooling can achieve some functional improvement. Tremor in MS remains a significant challenge and unmet need, requiring further basic and clinical research. PMID:17318714

  17. Vitamin D Levels Predict Multiple Sclerosis Progression

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters February 3, 2014 Vitamin D Levels Predict Multiple Sclerosis Progression Among people ... sclerosis (MS), those with higher blood levels of vitamin D had better outcomes during 5 years of ...

  18. Accelerated Cure Project for Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... main content Accelerating research toward a cure for multiple sclerosis Home Contact Us Search form Search Connect Volunteer ... is to accelerate efforts toward a cure for multiple sclerosis by rapidly advancing research that determines its causes ...

  19. Multiple Sclerosis: Can It Cause Seizures?

    MedlinePlus

    ... it cause seizures? Is there any connection between multiple sclerosis and epilepsy? Answers from B Mark Keegan, M. ... seizures are more common in people who have multiple sclerosis (MS) than in those who don't have ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: tuberous sclerosis complex

    MedlinePlus

    ... phenotype in tuberous sclerosis. J Med Genet. 2004 Mar;41(3):203-7. Citation on PubMed or ... sclerosis complex: a review. Semin Pediatr Neurol. 2006 Mar;13(1):27-36. Review. Citation on PubMed ...

  1. Accelerated Cure Project for Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... main content Accelerating research toward a cure for multiple sclerosis Toggle navigation Search form Search Connect Volunteer Donate ... is to accelerate efforts toward a cure for multiple sclerosis by rapidly advancing research that determines its causes ...

  2. Optineurin and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Hirofumi; Kawakami, Hideshi

    2013-07-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a devastating disease, and thus it is important to identify the causative gene and resolve the mechanism of the disease. We identified optineurin as a causative gene for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We found three types of mutations: a homozygous deletion of exon 5, a homozygous Q398X nonsense mutation and a heterozygous E478G missense mutation within its ubiquitin-binding domain. Optineurin negatively regulates the tumor necrosis factor-α-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Nonsense and missense mutations abolished this function. Mutations related to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis also negated the inhibition of interferon regulatory factor-3. The missense mutation showed a cyotoplasmic distribution different from that of the wild type. There are no specific clinical symptoms related to optineurin. However, severe brain atrophy was detected in patients with homozygous deletion. Neuropathologically, an E478G patient showed transactive response DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa-positive neuronal intracytoplasmic inclusions in the spinal and medullary motor neurons. Furthermore, Golgi fragmentation was identified in 73% of this patient's anterior horn cells. In addition, optineurin is colocalized with fused in sarcoma in the basophilic inclusions of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with fused in sarcoma mutations, and in basophilic inclusion body disease. These findings strongly suggest that optineurin is involved in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. © 2012 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  3. Tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Henske, Elizabeth P; Jóźwiak, Sergiusz; Kingswood, J Christopher; Sampson, Julian R; Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-26

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder that affects multiple organ systems and is caused by loss-of-function mutations in one of two genes: TSC1 or TSC2. The disorder can affect both adults and children. First described in depth by Bourneville in 1880, it is now estimated that nearly 2 million people are affected by the disease worldwide. The clinical features of TSC are distinctive and can vary widely between individuals, even within one family. Major features of the disease include tumours of the brain, skin, heart, lungs and kidneys, seizures and TSC-associated neuropsychiatric disorders, which can include autism spectrum disorder and cognitive disability. TSC1 (also known as hamartin) and TSC2 (also known as tuberin) form the TSC protein complex that acts as an inhibitor of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway, which in turn plays a pivotal part in regulating cell growth, proliferation, autophagy and protein and lipid synthesis. Remarkable progress in basic and translational research, in addition to several randomized controlled trials worldwide, has led to regulatory approval of the use of mTOR inhibitors for the treatment of renal angiomyolipomas, brain subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis, but further research is needed to establish full indications of therapeutic treatment. In this Primer, we review the state-of-the-art knowledge in the TSC field, including the molecular and cellular basis of the disease, medical management, major knowledge gaps and ongoing research towards a cure.

  4. Progressive multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ontaneda, Daniel; Fox, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose to Review To highlight the pathological features and clinical aspects of progressive multiple sclerosis (PMS). To highlight results of clinical trial experience to date and review ongoing clinical trials and perspective new treatment options. Explain the challenges of clinical trial design in PMS. Recent Findings MS has been identified as a chronic immune mediated disease, and the progressive phase of the disease appears to have significant neurodegenerative mechanisms. The classification of the course of PMS has been re-organized into categories of active vs. inactive inflammatory disease and the presence vs. absence of gradual disease progression. This differentiation allows clearer conceptualization of PMS and possibly even more efficient recruitment of PMS subjects into clinical trials. Clinical trial experience to date in PMS has been negative with anti-inflammatory medications used in relapsing MS. Simvastatin was recently tested in a phase II trial and showed a 43% reduction on annualized atrophy progression in secondary progressive MS. Ongoing PMS trials are currently being conducted with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor ibudilast, S1P modulator siponimod, and anti-B-cell therapy ocrelizumab. Several efforts for development of outcome measures in PMS are ongoing. Summary PMS represents a significant challenge, as the pathogenesis of the disease is not well understood, no validated outcome metrics have been established, and clinical trial experience to date has been disappointing. Advances in the understanding of the disease and lessons learned in previous clinical trials are paving the way for successful development of disease modifying agents for this disease. PMID:25887766

  5. Multiple sclerosis and behavior.

    PubMed

    Pinkston, James B; Kablinger, Anita; Alekseeva, Nadejda

    2007-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most frequently seen neurological causes of progressive disability in early to middle adulthood. The disease is variable in its presentation and course, affects roughly 100-300 per 100,000 persons within the United States alone, and is slightly more common among females than males. MS places substantial burdens on patients, families, and caregivers. It negatively affects cognitive abilities and psychiatric functioning, and can add a notably deleterious effect on a patient's quality of life. This chapter reviews the recent literature on the behavioral manifestations of MS. Cognitive domains discussed include executive functioning, processing speed, attention, learning and memory, language functioning, and visual spatial processing. Some attention will also be paid to differential diagnosis and the cognitive effects of treatment. Psychiatric manifestations are also discussed, including symptoms of depression, bipolar disorder, euphoria, pathological laughter and crying, and psychosis, as well as maladaptive personality traits. Finally, the chapter concludes with a discussion of the effects of MS on quality of life including such areas as fatigue, sexual dysfunction, pain, employment, and cognitive functioning.

  6. Thermoregulation in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Thad E.; White, Andrea T.; Frohman, Elliot M.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive neurological disorder that disrupts axonal myelin in the central nervous system. Demyelination produces alterations in saltatory conduction, slowed conduction velocity, and a predisposition to conduction block. An estimated 60–80% of MS patients experience temporary worsening of clinical signs and neurological symptoms with heat exposure. Additionally, MS may produce impaired neural control of autonomic and endocrine functions. This review focuses on five main themes regarding the current understanding of thermoregulatory dysfunction in MS: 1) heat sensitivity; 2) central regulation of body temperature; 3) thermoregulatory effector responses; 4) heat-induced fatigue; and 5) countermeasures to improve or maintain function during thermal stress. Heat sensitivity in MS is related to the detrimental effects of increased temperature on action potential propagation in demyelinated axons, resulting in conduction slowing and/or block, which can be quantitatively characterized using precise measurements of ocular movements. MS lesions can also occur in areas of the brain responsible for the control and regulation of body temperature and thermoregulatory effector responses, resulting in impaired neural control of sudomotor pathways or neural-induced changes in eccrine sweat glands, as evidenced by observations of reduced sweating responses in MS patients. Fatigue during thermal stress is common in MS and results in decreased motor function and increased symptomatology likely due to impairments in central conduction. Although not comprehensive, some evidence exists concerning treatments (cooling, precooling, and pharmacological) for the MS patient to preserve function and decrease symptom worsening during heat stress. PMID:20671034

  7. Blepharoclonus in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jacome, D E

    2001-12-01

    Keane described 2 patients with gaze-evoked blepharoclonus (BLC), a form of reflex BLC, and multiple sclerosis (MS). A search for common areas of demyelination and focal axonal atrophy (T1 black holes) of the central nervous system (CNS) in 11 patients with MS exhibiting eyelid closure BLC was conducted employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Finding lesions in common CNS locations on these patients can help to elucidate the pathogenesis of this restricted movement disorder. Eleven adult patients with relapsing-remitting, primary or secondary progressive MS were studied. MRI views were completed employing a 1.5-tesla scanner. Contrast Axial T1 imaging was obtained in 9 patients. TL blackholes were not identified. Ten patients had multiple, scattered periventricular (PV) areas of demyelination. Four patients exhibited brainstem lesions of diverse but inconsistent locations including midbrain, cerebellar peduncle, pons and medulla. In 2 of the patients the brainstem lesions were transient but BLC persisted after the lesions regressed. No common areas of CNS demyelination or focal axonal atrophy were identified on these patients with MS and BLC. The pathogenesis and clinical significance of BLC in MS remains to be elucidated.

  8. Fatigue and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Béthoux, F

    2006-07-01

    Even if the definition and pathophysiology of fatigue in multiple sclerosis (MS) are still debated, and despite the scarcity of objective markers correlated with the subjective sensation of fatigue, a review of the literature shows the importance of its detection and management, and allows one to propose therapeutic strategies. Fatigue is not only the most frequently reported symptom in MS, but also a frequent source of activity and participation limitations, psychological distress, and impairment of quality of life. Its management, which must be initiated early, is based on a comprehensive evaluation of its characteristics and consequences (sometimes with the use of scales such as the Fatigue Severity Scale and the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale), and on the identification of many potential contributing factors (psychological disorders, sleep disturbances, pain, infections and other comorbidities, medications, and deconditioning). Rehabilitative interventions are essential to the treatment of fatigue. Beyond the traditional energy conservation strategies and cooling techniques, several randomized controlled studies have demonstrated the positive impact of aerobic exercise. Medications are partially beneficial, and with the exception of amantadine, their efficacy has not been confirmed by randomized double-blind trials.

  9. Tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Islam, Monica P; Roach, E Steve

    2015-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a neurocutaneous syndrome that can affect the brain, skin, eyes, kidneys, heart, and lungs. TSC alters cellular proliferation and differentiation, resulting in hamartomas of various organs, tumor formation, and altered neuronal migration. The phenotype is highly variable. Most individuals have seizures, commonly including infantile spasms, and there is variable intellectual disability and autism. Neonates can present with cardiac failure due to intracardiac rhabdomyomas. The likelihood of renal angiomyolipomas increases with age, and renal disease is the most common cause of death in adults with TSC. Pulmonary involvement occurs predominantly in women and carries a high morbidity and mortality. TSC is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, but spontaneous mutations are common. A mutation of either TSC1 on chromosome 9 or TSC2 on chromosome 16 leads to dysfunction of hamartin or tuberin, respectively. These two proteins form a functional complex that modulates the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Medications that inhibit mTOR are being used to treat TSC-related tumors, and current studies are investigating whether these agents could alleviate other TSC complications. Consensus statements guide identification and optimal management of many of the TSC-related complications at diagnosis and throughout the lifespan. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary for optimal management of individuals with TSC.

  10. Albumin and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    LeVine, Steven M

    2016-04-12

    Leakage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a common pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). Following a breach of the BBB, albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, gains access to CNS tissue where it is exposed to an inflammatory milieu and tissue damage, e.g., demyelination. Once in the CNS, albumin can participate in protective mechanisms. For example, due to its high concentration and molecular properties, albumin becomes a target for oxidation and nitration reactions. Furthermore, albumin binds metals and heme thereby limiting their ability to produce reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species. Albumin also has the potential to worsen disease. Similar to pathogenic processes that occur during epilepsy, extravasated albumin could induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and affect the ability of astrocytes to maintain potassium homeostasis thereby possibly making neurons more vulnerable to glutamate exicitotoxicity, which is thought to be a pathogenic mechanism in MS. The albumin quotient, albumin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/albumin in serum, is used as a measure of blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in MS, but it may be inaccurate since albumin levels in the CSF can be influenced by multiple factors including: 1) albumin becomes proteolytically cleaved during disease, 2) extravasated albumin is taken up by macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes, and 3) the location of BBB damage affects the entry of extravasated albumin into ventricular CSF. A discussion of the roles that albumin performs during MS is put forth.

  11. Management of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Perrin Ross, Amy

    2013-11-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), a disease of the central nervous system that disrupts signals within the brain and also the signals between the brain and body, will likely experience symptoms that may negatively impact their quality of life (QOL). Due to the complexity of MS and its disease burden, multidisciplinary management that combines pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic strategies with patient education is necessary. Diagnosing relapses of MS in clinical practice can be difficult due to the multiple subtypes of MS, variations of symptomatology, and pseudo-relapses. Managing relapses also presents its own set of challenges, for example, evaluating if treatment is appropriate and determining which agent would be most effective for a patient if treatment is recommended. Patient education is essential for achieving optimal outcomes for patients with MS and improving patient QOL, and should increase awareness of: (1) the disease itself and its progression; (2) the signs and symptoms of MS; (3) current treatment strategies and plan of care; (4) the recognition and management of relapses; (5) the value of treatment adherence and impact of nonadherence; and (6) hope for the future. The management of active MS may be further complicated by the complex variety of pharmacotherapeutic options, and in some instances, by having to switch between agents and drug classes. Newer agents in development (eg, alemtuzumab, ocrelizumab, laquinimod) offer the opportunity to expand the therapeutic armamentarium, although further long-term data are required to evaluate any safety concerns associated with newer agents.

  12. Pharmacotherapy of Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Postlethwaite, Arnold E.; Harris, L. Jeff; Raza, Syed H.; Kodura, Swapna; Akhigbe, Titilola

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Systemic-sclerosis (SSc) is an uncommon autoimmune disease with variable degrees of fibroproliferation in blood vessels and certain organs of the body. Presently, there is no cure for SSc. The purpose of this article is to review the current literature regarding pathogenesis and treatment of complications of SSc. Areas covered in this review All available articles regarding research related to SSc pathogenesis and treatment listed in the PubMed.gov database were searched, relevant articles were then reviewed and used as sources of information for this review. What the reader will gain This review attempts for the reader to highlight some current thought regarding mechanisms of SSc pathogenesis and how autoimmunity relates to vascular changes and fibrogenesis of the disease plus provide a review of results of completed clinical trials and current on-going clinical trials that address organ specific or global therapies for this disease which can aid physicians who provide medical care for patients with SSc. Take home message SSc is a complex autoimmune disease, the pathogenesis of which although not completely understood is under active study, and new insights into pathogenesis are continuously being discovered. Although there is no effective disease modifying treatment for patients with SSc, quality of life, morbidity and mortality can be improved by using targeted therapy directed at affecting the consequences of damage to lungs, blood vessels, kidneys and the gastrointestinal tract. Innovative approaches to treating SSc are under intense investigation. PMID:20210685

  13. Nanoporous Silicon Ignition of JA2 Propellant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Nanoporous Silicon Ignition of JA2 Propellant Stephen L. Howard Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL Wayne A. Churaman Sensors and... Nanoporous Silicon Ignition of JA2 Propellant by Stephen L. Howard, Wayne A. Churaman, and Luke J. Currano ARL-TR-6950 June 2014...2014 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) June 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Nanoporous Silicon Ignition of JA2 Propellant 5a

  14. Body composition in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dionyssiotis, Y

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis affects central nervous system leading to disability. Among other complications the deterioration of body composition is usually neglected and increases the risk for diseases such as coronary heart disease, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, lipid abnormalities and bone loss leading to fractures in this population. Body mass index values, the effect of spasticity, the increased number of drugs used and the relationship between skeletal muscle and bone which interacts with impaired motor function leading to body composition alterations in multiple sclerosis are reviewed. PMID:23935336

  15. Multiple Sclerosis and its Management

    PubMed Central

    Weinshenker, Brian

    1992-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis, the most common disabling disease of the central nervous system affecting young adults, is diagnosed primarily from a history of typical relapsing and remitting white matter symptoms supported by objective signs. Multiple sclerosis may present in more insidious ways or may be mimicked by other diseases, which seemingly satisfy the diagnostic criteria of dissemination in time and space. Patients need psychological support to deal with an uncertain future. A multidisciplinary team approach can best manage both acute temporary disability and, often later, progressive physical and occasionally mental disability. ImagesFigures 1-3 PMID:21221279

  16. [Current description of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Río, Jordi; Montalbán, Xavier

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a multifocal demyelinating disease leading to progressive neurodegeneration caused by an autoimmune response in genetically predisposed individuals. In the last few years, the knowledge and management of this disease has been revolutionized by a series of findings. The present article reviews pathological features of the disease, in which cortical involvement is increasingly implicated, and aspects related to novel pathogenic mechanisms, such as the role of the microbiota in the genesis of multiple sclerosis, as well as recent contributions from the fields of epidemiology and genetics. Also reviewed are the latest diagnostic criteria, which currently allow a much earlier diagnosis, with clear therapeutic implications.

  17. Tuberous sclerosis with pulmonary involvement.

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, B. A.; Chamberlain, D. W.; Goldstein, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberous sclerosis produced interstitial disease in a woman with normal-sized lungs; numerous hemosiderin-laden macrophages were found in the fluid obtained through bronchoalveolar lavage. The pathological changes seen in the lungs were identical to those of pulmonary lymphangiomyomatosis, in which the constellation of clinical signs usually found in tuberous sclerosis is absent. The two conditions are sufficiently similar in clinical presentation, pathological changes and prognosis to be considered variants of the same disease. The recent findings of progestin receptors in lung tissue from patients with pulmonary lymphangiomyomatosis will likely direct future management towards hormonal manipulation. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:6692213

  18. The Pathogenesis of Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Stern, Edward P; Denton, Christopher P

    2015-08-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a multisystem disorder with a high associated mortality. The hallmark abnormalities of the disease are in the immune system, vasculature, and connective tissue. Systemic sclerosis occurs in susceptible individuals and is stimulated by initiating events that are poorly understood at present. In order for the disease phenotype to appear there is dysfunction in the homoeostatic mechanisms of immune tolerance, endothelial physiology, and extracellular matrix turnover. The progression of disease is not sequential but requires simultaneous dysfunction in these normal regulatory mechanisms. Better understanding of the interplay of these factors is likely to contribute to improved treatment options.

  19. Acute aphasia in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Devere, T R; Trotter, J L; Cross, A H

    2000-08-01

    Acute aphasia is rare in multiple sclerosis. We describe 3 patients with multiple sclerosis who had acute exacerbations presenting as aphasias. One patient had a mixed transcortical aphasia, 1 had a transcortical motor aphasia, and 1 had a Broca aphasia. Magnetic resonance imaging scans of the brain with contrast enhancement revealed new white matter lesions in the left hemisphere in all 3 patients. Two of the 3 patients had a good response to treatment with methylprednisolone sodium succinate. Arch Neurol. 2000;57:1207-1209

  20. Rituximab in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Svenningsson, Rasmus; Alping, Peter; Novakova, Lenka; Björck, Anna; Fink, Katharina; Islam-Jakobsson, Protik; Malmeström, Clas; Axelsson, Markus; Vågberg, Mattias; Sundström, Peter; Lycke, Jan; Piehl, Fredrik; Svenningsson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the safety and efficacy of rituximab in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: In this retrospective uncontrolled observational multicenter study, off-label rituximab-treated patients with MS were identified through the Swedish MS register. Outcome data were collected from the MS register and medical charts. Adverse events (AEs) grades 2–5 according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events were recorded. Results: A total of 822 rituximab-treated patients with MS were identified: 557 relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), 198 secondary progressive MS (SPMS), and 67 primary progressive MS (PPMS). At baseline, 26.2% had contrast-enhancing lesions (CELs). Patients were treated with 500 or 1,000 mg rituximab IV every 6–12 months, during a mean 21.8 (SD 14.3) months. During treatment, the annualized relapse rates were 0.044 (RRMS), 0.038 (SPMS), and 0.015 (PPMS), and 4.6% of patients displayed CELs. Median Expanded Disability Status Scale remained unchanged in RRMS (p = 0.42) and increased by 0.5 and 1.0 in SPMS and PPMS, respectively (p = 0.10 and 0.25). Infusion-related AEs occurred during 7.8% of infusions and most were mild. A total of 89 AEs grades ≥2 (of which 76 infections) were recorded in 72 patients. No case of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy was detected. Conclusions: This is the largest cohort of patients with MS treated with rituximab reported so far. The safety, clinical, and MRI findings in this heterogeneous real-world cohort treated with different doses of rituximab were similar to those reported in previous randomized controlled trials on B-cell depletion therapy in MS. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with MS, rituximab is safe and effective. PMID:27760868

  1. Multiple sclerosis update.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Clyde E

    2013-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic but incurable disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that is often diagnosed in the second or third decade of life. It is more common among women than men, significantly impairs patient quality of life, and is associated with substantial costs to patients, healthcare systems, and society. Of the approximately 2.3 million individuals worldwide that have MS, more than 400,000 reside in the United States. Although the etiology of MS is not completely understood, a great deal of evidence suggests a complex relationship between environmental and genetic factors. The pathophysiology of MS involves an aberrant attack by the host immune system on oligodendrocytes, which synthesize and maintain myelin sheaths in the CNS. There are 4 identified disease courses in MS, and approximately 85% of people with MS present with relapsing-remitting MS, which is characterized by discrete acute attacks followed by periods of remission. Signs and symptoms of MS are dependent on the demyelinated area(s) of the CNS and often involve sensory disturbances, limb weakness, fatigue, and increased body temperature. The criteria for a diagnosis of MS include evidence of damage in at least 2 separate areas of the CNS, evidence that the damage occurred at different time points, and the ruling out of other possible diagnoses. Diseasemodifying drugs (DMDs) that reduce the frequency of relapses, development of brain lesions, and progression of disability are the standard of care for relapsing forms of MS, and the use of DMDs should be initiated as early as possible.

  2. Employment in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Vella, Lea; Vollmer, Tim; Hadjimichael, Olympia; Mohr, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with significant economic burden and high rates of unemployment. This investigation evaluated patient and disease characteristics associated with work loss and work initiation using the NARCOMS patient registry. Patient and disease characteristics associated with transitions to unemployment or employment were evaluated cross-sectionally and prospectively over the course of two assessment periods (mean interval of 1.56 ± 0.93 years). Eligible participants included 8,867 patients for the cross-sectional component, and 8,122 for longitudinal analyses. At Time 1 and Time 2 56–58 % of MS patients were not employed. At Time 1, unemployed participants more likely to have a progressive disease course, had a longer symptom duration, greater levels of disability as measured by the PDDS, and greater functional limitations across all domains of the performance scales (p < 0.0001 for all). At Time 2, increasing MS symptoms in the past 6 months increased the odds of becoming unemployed. In addition, specific problems in mobility, hand function, fatigue, and cognitive performance domains were associated with increased odds of becoming unemployed. Less severe problems in similar areas, including mobility, hand function, and cognitive functioning were also predictive of work initiation among patients not employed. MS is associated with high rates of unemployment. Specific physical and mental health limitations confer risk of employment cessation over time, as well as the likelihood of employment initiation. This study has implications for rehabilitation interventions to target specific MS related limitations that place patients at greatest risk for work status changes. PMID:18677639

  3. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mimic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) misdiagnosis has many broad implications for the patient and the neurologist. Potentially curative treatments exist for certain ALS mimic syndromes, but delay in starting these therapies may have an unfavorable effect on outcome. Hence, it is important to exclude similar conditions. In this review, we discuss some of the important mimics of ALS. PMID:27326363

  4. Childhood Multiple Sclerosis: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, Amy; O'Connor, Erin; Tennekoon, Gihan

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) that is increasingly recognized as a disease that affects children. Similar to adult-onset MS, children present with visual and sensory complaints, as well as weakness, spasticity, and ataxia. A lumbar puncture can be helpful in diagnosing MS when…

  5. Autism in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Griselda C.; Smalley, Susan L.; Tanguay, Peter E.

    1998-01-01

    The frequency and clinical presentation of autism in 28 probands with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by benign tissue growths and a high frequency of seizure disorders and mental retardation, was examined. Eight probands met criteria for autism. Implications for understanding the association of…

  6. Multiple bursitis in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, O; Akimoto, S; Sato, M; Miyachi, Y

    1997-06-01

    Bursitis is a common clinical entity usually induced by trauma and infection. It often occurs in inflammatory diseases such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis. We describe a patient with systemic sclerosis who developed multiple bursitis in the later stage of the disease.

  7. Autism in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Griselda C.; Smalley, Susan L.; Tanguay, Peter E.

    1998-01-01

    The frequency and clinical presentation of autism in 28 probands with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by benign tissue growths and a high frequency of seizure disorders and mental retardation, was examined. Eight probands met criteria for autism. Implications for understanding the association of…

  8. Childhood Multiple Sclerosis: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, Amy; O'Connor, Erin; Tennekoon, Gihan

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) that is increasingly recognized as a disease that affects children. Similar to adult-onset MS, children present with visual and sensory complaints, as well as weakness, spasticity, and ataxia. A lumbar puncture can be helpful in diagnosing MS when…

  9. Defining secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lorscheider, Johannes; Buzzard, Katherine; Jokubaitis, Vilija; Spelman, Tim; Havrdova, Eva; Horakova, Dana; Trojano, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Girard, Marc; Duquette, Pierre; Prat, Alexandre; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Grand'Maison, François; Grammond, Pierre; Hupperts, Raymond; Alroughani, Raed; Sola, Patrizia; Boz, Cavit; Pucci, Eugenio; Lechner-Scott, Jeanette; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Iuliano, Gerardo; Van Pesch, Vincent; Granella, Franco; Ramo-Tello, Cristina; Spitaleri, Daniele; Petersen, Thor; Slee, Mark; Verheul, Freek; Ampapa, Radek; Amato, Maria Pia; McCombe, Pamela; Vucic, Steve; Sánchez Menoyo, José Luis; Cristiano, Edgardo; Barnett, Michael H; Hodgkinson, Suzanne; Olascoaga, Javier; Saladino, Maria Laura; Gray, Orla; Shaw, Cameron; Moore, Fraser; Butzkueven, Helmut; Kalincik, Tomas

    2016-09-01

    A number of studies have been conducted with the onset of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis as an inclusion criterion or an outcome of interest. However, a standardized objective definition of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis has been lacking. The aim of this work was to evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of an objective definition for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, to enable comparability of future research studies. Using MSBase, a large, prospectively acquired, global cohort study, we analysed the accuracy of 576 data-derived onset definitions for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and first compared these to a consensus opinion of three neurologists. All definitions were then evaluated against 5-year disease outcomes post-assignment of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis: sustained disability, subsequent sustained progression, positive disability trajectory, and accumulation of severe disability. The five best performing definitions were further investigated for their timeliness and overall disability burden. A total of 17 356 patients were analysed. The best definition included a 3-strata progression magnitude in the absence of a relapse, confirmed after 3 months within the leading Functional System and required an Expanded Disability Status Scale step ≥4 and pyramidal score ≥2. It reached an accuracy of 87% compared to the consensus diagnosis. Seventy-eight per cent of the identified patients showed a positive disability trajectory and 70% reached significant disability after 5 years. The time until half of all patients were diagnosed was 32.6 years (95% confidence interval 32-33.6) after disease onset compared with the physicians' diagnosis at 36 (35-39) years. The identified patients experienced a greater disease burden [median annualized area under the disability-time curve 4.7 (quartiles 3.6, 6.0)] versus non-progressive patients [1.8 (1.2, 1.9)]. This objective definition of secondary progressive multiple

  10. [Paroxysmal dystonia and multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    El Otmani, H; Benmansour, Y; Araqi-Houssaini, A; Benkirane, N; Dany, F; Abdoh Rafai, M; El Moutawakil, B; Slassi, I

    2014-02-01

    Movement disorders are uncommon in multiple sclerosis, except for tremor. Patients rarely have paroxysmal dystonia (or tonic spasm), which can be the presenting manifestation of the disease. Two videotaped observations are presented. The first patient was a 27-year-old woman, treated for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, who presented daily several short (<1minute) paroxysms of right hemibody dystonia. Brain MRI revealed several areas of cerebral demyelination, including the posterior limb of the left internal capsule with gadolinium enhancement. These events disappeared 7 days after corticosteroid infusion. The second patient was a 62-year-old man who presented brief episodes (<1minute) of daily painful left hemibody dystonia. Three months later, similar paroxysms affecting the right hemibody including the face occurred. At times, the two hemibodies were affected simultaneously. The brain MRI showed multiple areas of white matter hyperintensity, including two symmetrical areas in the posterior limb of the internal capsules. Multiple sclerosis was diagnosed on clinical, MRI and biological data. Four days after starting corticosteroids, these paroxysmal phenomena disappeared totally. Dystonia is an under-recognized aspect of paroxysmal events during multiple sclerosis. It might involve ephaptic transmission among abnormal demyelinated neurons; this ectopic excitation can arise at variable levels of the corticospinal tract, but the analysis of reported cases and those described in this study shows that impairment of the posterior limb of the internal capsule seems to be a prevalent topography. Inflammation is likely to play a role because steroids often improve these phenomena. In this article, we review the clinical aspects, pathophysiology and outcome of paroxysmal dystonia in multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wijesekera, Lokesh C; Leigh, P Nigel

    2009-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterised by progressive muscular paralysis reflecting degeneration of motor neurones in the primary motor cortex, corticospinal tracts, brainstem and spinal cord. Incidence (average 1.89 per 100,000/year) and prevalence (average 5.2 per100,000) are relatively uniform in Western countries, although foci of higher frequency occur in the Western Pacific. The mean age of onset for sporadic ALS is about 60 years. Overall, there is a slight male prevalence (M:F ratio~1.5:1). Approximately two thirds of patients with typical ALS have a spinal form of the disease (limb onset) and present with symptoms related to focal muscle weakness and wasting, where the symptoms may start either distally or proximally in the upper and lower limbs. Gradually, spasticity may develop in the weakened atrophic limbs, affecting manual dexterity and gait. Patients with bulbar onset ALS usually present with dysarthria and dysphagia for solid or liquids, and limbs symptoms can develop almost simultaneously with bulbar symptoms, and in the vast majority of cases will occur within 1–2 years. Paralysis is progressive and leads to death due to respiratory failure within 2–3 years for bulbar onset cases and 3–5 years for limb onset ALS cases. Most ALS cases are sporadic but 5–10% of cases are familial, and of these 20% have a mutation of the SOD1 gene and about 2–5% have mutations of the TARDBP (TDP-43) gene. Two percent of apparently sporadic patients have SOD1 mutations, and TARDBP mutations also occur in sporadic cases. The diagnosis is based on clinical history, examination, electromyography, and exclusion of 'ALS-mimics' (e.g. cervical spondylotic myelopathies, multifocal motor neuropathy, Kennedy's disease) by appropriate investigations. The pathological hallmarks comprise loss of motor neurones with intraneuronal ubiquitin-immunoreactive inclusions in upper motor neurones and TDP-43 immunoreactive inclusions in

  12. Alemtuzumab for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Riera, Rachel; Porfírio, Gustavo J M; Torloni, Maria R

    2016-04-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune, T-cell-dependent, inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, with an unpredictable course. Current MS therapies focus on treating exacerbations, preventing new exacerbations and avoiding the progression of disability. However, at present there is no effective treatment that is capable of safely and effectively reaching these objectives. This has led to the development and investigation of new drugs. Recent clinical trials suggest that alemtuzumab, a humanised monoclonal antibody against cell surface CD52, could be a promising option for MS. To assess the safety and effectiveness of alemtuzumab used alone or associated with other treatments to decrease disease activity in patients with any form of MS. We searched the Trials Register of the Cochrane Multiple Sclerosis and Rare Diseases of the CNS Group (30 April 2015), which contains trials from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS and the trial registry databases ClinicalTrials.gov and WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. There was no restriction on the source, publication date or language. All randomised clinical trials (RCTs) involving adults diagnosed with any form of MS according to the McDonald criteria, comparing alemtuzumab alone or associated with other medications, at any dose and for any duration, versus placebo or any other active drug therapy or alemtuzumab in other dose, regimen or duration. The co-primary outcomes were relapse-free survival, sustained disease progression and number of participants with at least one of any adverse events, including serious adverse events. Two independent review authors performed study selection, data extraction and 'Risk of bias' assessment. A third review author checked the process for accuracy. We used the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool to assess the risk of bias of the studies included in the review. We used the GRADE system to

  13. Managing epilepsy in tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Elizabeth Anne

    2004-09-01

    Epilepsy is very common in tuberous sclerosis complex and occurs in 80 to 90% of affected individuals during their lifetime. Onset usually occurs during childhood, and up to one third of children with tuberous sclerosis complex will develop infantile spasms. Although not completely understood, the incidence of epilepsy is thought to relate to the neuropathologic features of the disorder, including cortical tubers and other dysgenetic features. Individuals with tuberous sclerosis complex frequently have epileptiform features to their electroencephalograms. Treatment of epilepsy in tuberous sclerosis complex is similar to epilepsy resulting from other causes and includes anticonvulsant medications, the vagus nerve stimulator, and the ketogenic diet. Vigabatrin has been shown to be particularly effective in treating infantile spasms in the setting of tuberous sclerosis complex. Epilepsy surgery has a very important role in the management of children and adults with pharmacoresistant epilepsy in tuberous sclerosis complex.

  14. Does vagotomy protect against multiple sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Sundbøll, Jens; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Adelborg, Kasper; Svensson, Elisabeth

    2017-07-01

    To examine the association between vagotomy and multiple sclerosis. We conducted a matched cohort study of all patients who underwent truncal or super-selective vagotomy and a comparison cohort, by linking Danish population-based medical registries (1977-1995). Hazard ratios (HRs) for multiple sclerosis, adjusting for potential confounders were computed by means of Cox regression analysis. Median age of multiple sclerosis onset corresponded to late onset multiple sclerosis. No association with multiple sclerosis was observed for truncal vagotomy (0-37 year adjusted HR=0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.48-1.74) or super-selective vagotomy (0-37 year adjusted HR=1.28, 95% CI: 0.79-2.09) compared with the general population. We found no association between vagotomy and later risk of late onset multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Epidemiology of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Leray, E; Moreau, T; Fromont, A; Edan, G

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most frequently seen demyelinating disease, with a prevalence that varies considerably, from high levels in North America and Europe (>100/100,000 inhabitants) to low rates in Eastern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa (2/100,000 population). Knowledge of the geographical distribution of the disease and its survival data, and a better understanding of the natural history of the disease, have improved our understanding of the respective roles of endogenous and exogenous causes of MS. Concerning mortality, in a large French cohort of 27,603 patients, there was no difference between MS patients and controls in the first 20 years of the disease, although life expectancy was reduced by 6-7 years in MS patients. In 2004, the prevalence of MS in France was 94.7/100,000 population, according to data from the French National Health Insurance Agency for Salaried Workers (Caisse nationale d'assurance maladie des travailleurs Salariés [CNAM-TS]), which insures 87% of the French population. This prevalence was higher in the North and East of France. In several countries, including France, the gender ratio for MS incidence (women/men) went from 2/1 to 3/1 from the 1950s to the 2000s, but only for the relapsing-remitting form. As for risk factors of MS, the most pertinent environmental factors are infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), especially if it arises after childhood and is symptomatic. The role of smoking in MS risk has been confirmed, but is modest. In contrast, vaccines, stress, traumatic events and allergies have not been identified as risk factors, while the involvement of vitamin D has yet to be confirmed. From a genetic point of view, the association between HLA-DRB1*15:01 and a high risk of MS has been known for decades. More recently, immunogenetic markers have been identified (IL2RA, IL7RA) and, in particular thanks to studies of genome-wide associations, more than 100 genetic variants have been reported. Most of these are involved in

  16. Acoustic reflex patterns in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Canale, Andrea; Albera, Roberto; Lacilla, Michelangelo; Canosa, Antonio; Albera, Andrea; Sacco, Francesca; Chiò, Adriano; Calvo, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate acoustic reflex testing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients. Amplitude, latency, and rise time of stapedial reflex were recorded for 500 and 1000 Hz contralateral stimulus. Statistical analysis was performed by the Wilcoxon test and the level of significance was set at 5 %. Fifty-one amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients and ten sex- and age-matched control subjects were studied. Patients were further divided in two groups: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-bulbar (38 cases, with bulbar signs at evaluation) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-spinal (13 cases, without bulbar signs at evaluation). Stapedial reflex was present in all patients. There was a statistically significant difference in the mean amplitude, latency, and rise time between the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients as compared with the controls. Amplitude was lower in both the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-bulbar and the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-spinal patients than in the controls (p < 0.05) and rise time was longer in both patient groups compared with the controls (p < 0.05). These results confirm the presence of abnormal acoustic reflex patterns in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases with bulbar signs and, moreover, suggesting a possible subclinical involvement of the stapedial motor neuron even in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-spinal patients. Amplitude and rise time seem to be good sensitive parameters for investigating subclinical bulbar involvement.

  17. [SCLEROSIS: LOCAL AND GENERAL PATTERNS OF DEVELOPMENT].

    PubMed

    Kats, Ya A; Parkhonyuk, E V

    2015-01-01

    Sclerosis is a final substrate and outcome of structural lesions of different organs and tissues in various pathological conditions, such as hypertensive disease, coronaty heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic scleroderma, etc. Not infrequently it as a determinant of severity and unfavourable outcome of the disease. Elucidation of general patterns of the development of sclerosis requires an integrated approach to the systemic analysis of clinical, genetic, biochemical, and morphological characteristics whereas a local analysis reveals peculiarities of formation of sclerosis in individual patients. Such combination permits to use methods of predictive-preventive personified medicine for planning the treatment of sclerosis.

  18. Multiple sclerosis - New treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Totaro, Rocco; Di Carmine, Caterina; Marini, Carmine; Carolei, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Ever since the introduction of the first disease modifying therapies, the concept of multiple sclerosis treatment algorithms developed ceaselessly. The increasing number of available drugs is paralleled by impelling issue of ensuring the most appropriate treatment to the right patient at the right time. The purpose of this review is to describe novel agents recently approved for multiple sclerosis treatment, namely teriflunomide, alemtuzumab and dimethylfumarate, focusing on mechanism of action, efficacy data in experimental setting, safety and tolerability. The place in therapy of newer treatment implies careful balancing of risk-benefit profile as well as accurate patient selection. Hence the widening of therapeutic arsenal provides greater opportunity for personalized therapy but also entails a complex trade-off between efficacy, tolerability, safety and eventually patient preference. PMID:26831413

  19. Multiple Sclerosis Epidemiology in Europe.

    PubMed

    Bezzini, Daiana; Battaglia, Mario A

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is characterized by a non-homogeneous distribution around the world. Some authors in past described a latitude gradient, with increasing risk from the equator to North and South Poles, but this theory is still controversial. Regarding Europe, there are many articles in the literature concerning the epidemiology of this disease but, unfortunately, they are not always comparable due to different methodologies, they do not cover all countries in the continent, and most of them reported data of small areas and rarely at a national level. In 2012 there were 20 national registries that could help to describe the epidemiology of the disease and, in addition, there is an European Register for Multiple Sclerosis that collect data from already existing national or regional MS registries and databases. Another valid alternative to obtain epidemiological data, also at national level, in a routinely and cost-saving way is through administrative data that are of increasing interest in the last years.

  20. Tolerogenic vaccines for Multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mannie, Mark D; Curtis, Alan D

    2013-05-01

    Tolerogenic vaccines represent a new class of vaccine designed to re-establish immunological tolerance, restore immune homeostasis, and thereby reverse autoimmune disease. Tolerogenic vaccines induce long-term, antigen-specific, inhibitory memory that blocks pathogenic T cell responses via loss of effector T cells and gain of regulatory T cell function. Substantial advances have been realized in the generation of tolerogenic vaccines that inhibit experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in a preclinical setting, and these vaccines may be a prequel of the tolerogenic vaccines that may have therapeutic benefit in Multiple Sclerosis. The purpose here is to provide a snapshot of the current concepts and future prospects of tolerogenic vaccination for Multiple Sclerosis, along with the central challenges to clinical application.

  1. Treating multiple sclerosis with natalizumab.

    PubMed

    Iaffaldano, Pietro; Lucchese, Guglielmo; Trojano, Maria

    2011-12-01

    Natalizumab is the first monoclonal antibody approved for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis. Pivotal trials demonstrated the efficacy of natalizumab on clinical and paraclinical measures of disease activity and disability progression. Although a direct comparison has not been performed yet, natalizumab seems to be more efficacious than the currently available immunomodulant drugs, such as IFN-β and glatiramer acetate. Despite its efficacy, the occurrence of an increased risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with the treatment, raises concerns about its widespread use in multiple sclerosis patients. This paper provides an overview of the most relevant results from the Phase I-IV studies on natalizumab and highlights the challenges addressed to minimize and manage its adverse events in clinical practice.

  2. Multiple sclerosis and birth order.

    PubMed Central

    James, W H

    1984-01-01

    Studies on the birth order of patients with multiple sclerosis have yielded contradictory conclusions. Most of the sets of data, however, have been tested by biased tests. Data that have been submitted to unbiased tests seem to suggest that cases are more likely to occur in early birth ranks. This should be tested on further samples and some comments are offered on how this should be done. PMID:6707558

  3. Bipolar disorder and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ybarra, Mariana Inés; Moreira, Marcos Aurélio; Araújo, Carolina Reis; Lana-Peixoto, Marco Aurélio; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2007-12-01

    Bipolar disorder may be overrepresented in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Although research in this area is limited, studies assessing the nature of this association have focused on genetic aspects, adverse reaction to drugs and brain demyelinating lesions. Herein we report three patients with MS that also presented bipolar disorder. The coexistence of neurological and psychiatric symptoms in most MS relapses highlights the relevance of biological factors in the emergence of mood disorders in these patients.

  4. [Multiple sclerosis: current immunological aspects].

    PubMed

    Cuevas-García, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common inflammatory, chronic and degenerative condition of the central nervous system, and represents the first cause of disability in young adults. In Mexico, 11 to 20 out of every 100 000 people suffer from this disease. The causes of multiple sclerosis remain unknown, but several theories have been proposed: the interaction of environmental factors, viral infectious factors and genetic and immune susceptibility of each individual patient, which induce an autoimmune response and promote neuronal/axonal degeneration. In this review, the immune reaction main components and neurodegeneration present in multiple sclerosis are analyzed, as well as the inflammatory cascade associated with demyelination. Available treatments' main purpose is to modulate aspects related to the adaptive immune response (B and T cells). The therapeutic challenge will be antigen-specific immune-tolerance induction, for example, with the use of tolerance protocols with peptides or DNA or nanoparticles vaccines. Future therapies should aim to control innate components (microglia, macrophages, astrocytes) and to promote remyelination. To optimize the treatment, a combined therapeutic approach targeting the control of inflammatory and neurodegenerative components of the disease and monitoring of biomarkers will be necessary.

  5. Mitochondrial defects in acute multiple sclerosis lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mahad, Don; Ziabreva, Iryna; Turnbull, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease, which leads to focal plaques of demyelination and tissue injury in the CNS. The structural and immunopathological patterns of demyelination suggest that different immune mechanisms may be involved in tissue damage. In a subtype of lesions, which are mainly found in patients with acute fulminant multiple sclerosis with Balo's type concentric sclerosis and in a subset of early relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis, the initial myelin changes closely resemble those seen in white matter stroke (WMS), suggesting a hypoxia-like tissue injury. Since mitochondrial injury may be involved in the pathogenesis of such lesions, we analysed a number of mitochondrial respiratory chain proteins in active lesions from acute multiple sclerosis and from WMS using immunohistochemistry. Functionally important defects of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV [cytochrome c oxidase (COX)] including its catalytic component (COX-I) are present in Pattern III but not in Pattern II multiple sclerosis lesions. The lack of immunohistochemically detected COX-I is apparent in oligodendrocytes, hypertrophied astrocytes and axons, but not in microglia. The profile of immunohistochemically detected mitochondrial respiratory chain complex subunits differs between multiple sclerosis and WMS. The findings suggest that hypoxia-like tissue injury in Pattern III multiple sclerosis lesions may be due to mitochondrial impairment. PMID:18515320

  6. Defining Translational Reprogramming in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS Tuberous sclerosis complex; mTORC1; rapamycin; mRNA; translation; ribosome; quality control; alternative translation 16...pathophysiology. Consistent with this hypothesis, in unpublished data, we have found prevailing alternative translation that re-shapes proteome...re-programming. 2 2. KEYWORDS Tuberous sclerosis complex; mTORC1; rapamycin; mRNA; translation; ribosome; quality control; alternative

  7. Tuberous sclerosis: An uncommon cause of hyperprolactinemia.

    PubMed

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Krishna, Svs; Modi, Kd

    2012-12-01

    Tuberous Sclerosis is a multi system genetic disorder affecting skin, central nervous system,kidney,heart and lungs. We present a case report of a 26 year old female with tuberous sclerosis who presented with galactorrhea and menstrual irregularities due to hyperprolactinemia.

  8. Tuberous sclerosis: An uncommon cause of hyperprolactinemia

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Krishna, SVS; Modi, KD

    2012-01-01

    Tuberous Sclerosis is a multi system genetic disorder affecting skin, central nervous system,kidney,heart and lungs. We present a case report of a 26 year old female with tuberous sclerosis who presented with galactorrhea and menstrual irregularities due to hyperprolactinemia. PMID:23565407

  9. Interhemispheric disconnection effects in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lindeboom, J; ter Horst, R

    1988-01-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis reported less left ear numbers but more right ear numbers than controls in a dichotic listening test. The multiple sclerosis patients were also relatively impaired on three learning tasks; one of these, a test for paired-associate learning of names and faces, correlated with left ear findings; the results are interpreted as supporting a hypothesised disconnection mechanism. PMID:3236021

  10. Multiple sclerosis: a disease of affluence?.

    PubMed

    Buchter, Bernhard; Dunkel, Margrit; Li, Jianghong

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is rare in tropical areas, but quite common in developed countries. Hence, latitude has been accepted as a causal factor for prevalence of multiple sclerosis. However, developed countries have also strong economic power, which may be measured by real gross domestic product per capita. Bivariate and multivariate regression models were used to assess the association of the prevalence of multiple sclerosis of 62 countries with real gross domestic product per capita and latitude. Real gross domestic product per capita and latitude are positively associated with the prevalence of multiple sclerosis. Real gross domestic product per capita is a much stronger predictor of prevalence of multiple sclerosis than latitude. The strong correlation between the real gross domestic product per capita and the prevalence rates of multiple sclerosis is pointing to a new direction in research on the causes of multiple sclerosis. It is plausible that certain lifestyles and consumption behaviors that require high purchasing power might be associated with an increased risk of multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Systemic Sclerosis: Commonly Asked Questions by Rheumatologists

    PubMed Central

    Young, Amber; Khanna, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare autoimmune disorder with significant morbidity and mortality due to multi-organ system involvement. Early diagnosis and screening for organ involvement is critical as earlier treatment appears to improve function and may impact mortality. The purpose of this article is to address some of the commonly asked questions by rheumatologists on systemic sclerosis. PMID:25807095

  12. Demyelination of subcortical nuclei in multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutenkova, E.; Aitmagambetova, G.; Khodanovich, M.; Bowen, J.; Gangadharan, B.; Henson, L.; Mayadev, A.; Repovic, P.; Qian, P.; Yarnykh, V.

    2016-02-01

    Myelin containing in basal ganglia in multiple sclerosis patients was evaluated using new noninvasive quantitative MRI method fast whole brain macromolecular proton fraction mapping. Myelin level in globus pallidus and putamen significantly decreased in multiple sclerosis patients as compared with healthy control subjects but not in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus.

  13. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Systemic Sclerosis (Scleroderma).

    PubMed

    Pellar, Russell E; Tingey, Theresa M; Pope, Janet Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is a rare autoimmune connective tissue disease that can damage multiple organs and reduce quality of life. Patient-reported outcome measures capture the patient's perspective. Some measures are specific to systemic sclerosis and others are general. Patient-reported outcomes in systemic sclerosis are important to aid in understanding the impact of systemic sclerosis on patients.

  14. Multiple sclerosis beyond EDSS: depression and fatigue.

    PubMed

    Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2009-02-01

    Depression and fatigue are common symptoms of multiple sclerosis and are the primary determinants of impaired quality of life in this demyelinating neurological disease. The twelve-month prevalence of major depression in patients with multiple sclerosis is around 15%. Untreated depression is associated with suicidal ideation, impaired cognitive function and poor adherence to immunomodulatory treatment. For these reasons, systematic screening and management of depressive symptoms is recommended for all patients with multiple sclerosis. There is some evidence that interferon-beta treatment may exacerbate depressive symptoms and a switch to glatiramer acetate can be envisaged in patients treated with an interferon-beta in whom depressive symptoms become an issue. Fatigue is present in over three-quarters of patients with multiple sclerosis. It is considered the most debilitating symptom of the disease and is a major reason for work absenteeism. There is growing evidence that immunomodulatory treatments, in particular glatiramer acetate, improve fatigue symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  15. Autonomic dysfunction, immune regulation, and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Racosta, Juan Manuel; Kimpinski, Kurt

    2016-02-01

    To review existing evidence regarding interactions between the autonomic nervous system and the immune system functions in multiple sclerosis. We reviewed the literature regarding new insights linking autonomic dysfunction to immune deregulation in multiple sclerosis, with particular focus on the specific influence of sympathetic and parasympathetic dysfunction on inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes. Autonomic dysfunction is common in multiple sclerosis, representing a significant cause of disability. Several connections between pathologic immune pathways and the autonomic nervous system function were found. Autonomic dysfunction may enhance inflammatory and neurodegenerative pathways that are of major importance in multiple sclerosis. Autonomic dysfunction can present with highly variable manifestations. Sympathetic and parasympathetic dysfunction displays different patterns in multiple sclerosis, with specific impact on inflammation and neurodegeneration.

  16. Intracranial arteriopathy in tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Boronat, Susana; Shaaya, Elias A; Auladell, Maria; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Caruso, Paul

    2014-07-01

    Arterial aneurysms, mostly aortic and intracranial, have been occasionally reported in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. Brain magnetic resonance imaging reports of 404 patients with definite and 16 patients with either probable or possible tuberous sclerosis complex were revised for intracranial aneurysms. Among these patients, brain images of 220 patients with definite and 16 with probable or possible tuberous sclerosis complex were reviewed. Intracranial aneurysms were reported in 3 of 404 patients with a definite diagnosis (0.74%) (general population: 0.35%), including 2 children. A fourth intracranial aneurysm was found in a patient with probable tuberous sclerosis complex, who did not have tubers or subependymal nodules but had clinical manifestations related to neural crest derivatives, including lymphangioleiomyomatosis and extrarenal angiomyolipomas. The authors hypothesize that neural crest dysfunction can have a major role in intracranial arteriopathy in tuberous sclerosis complex, as smooth muscle cells in the forebrain vessels are of neural crest origin. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. [Special features of systemic sclerosis in men].

    PubMed

    Ben Dhaou, Besma; Derbali, Fatma; Aydi, Zohra; Baili, Lilia; Boussema, Fatma; Ketari, Sonia; Kochbati, Samir; Cherif, Ouahida; Rokbani, Lilia

    2012-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SS) is a generalized disorder of connective tissue and microvasculature characterized by tissue fibrosis and obliteration of the vessels. Several features of systemic scleroderma in men are discussed in the literature. To investigate the initial clinical features, evolution and prognosis of systemic sclerosis in men. Patients with systemic sclerosis based on ACR's criteria were included. In this retrospective study we compared a cohort of men to a cohort of women, diagnosed between 2000 and 2010 in department of internal medicine. Fifty four patients were included amongst which nine men. The mean follow-up duration was 39.5 months. A higher proportion of cardiac, renal and lung involvement were noted at diagnosis Localized cutaneous sclerosis was predominant in men. This work has highlighted several features of systemic sclerosis encountered in men. These results warrant confirmation by analyzing a larger population.

  18. Acute cerebral vasculopathy in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Faucher, Benoit; Granel, Brigitte; Nicoli, Francois

    2013-12-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterized by skin and deep organ fibrosis and obliterative microvasculopathy. Cerebral involvement is currently not recognized as a manifestation of the disease, although several morphologic and functional studies suggested a frequent cerebral involvement in systemic sclerosis. We report a new case of acute cerebral vasculopathy in a patient suffering from systemic sclerosis together with five historical cases identified through a literature review. Cerebral acute vasculopathy most often revealed the disease. Affected patients suffered often from limited or diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis. Reversibility of arterial lesions, absence of specific histologic findings, and association with severe peripheral vascular involvement plead for a major role of vasospasm. However, the apparent efficacy of immunosuppressive treatments suggests an association with inflammatory or immune mechanisms. Awareness should be raised because of the severity of the disease, the risk of relapse, and the possible occurrence early in the course of systemic sclerosis.

  19. Symptomatic management in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pushkar

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the commonest cause of disability in young adults. While there is increasing choice and better treatments available for delaying disease progression, there are still, very few, effective symptomatic treatments. For many patients such as those with primary progressive MS (PPMS) and those that inevitably become secondary progressive, symptom management is the only treatment available. MS related symptoms are complex, interrelated, and can be interdependent. It requires good understanding of the condition, a holistic multidisciplinary approach, and above all, patient education and empowerment. PMID:26538847

  20. Spasticity management in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Christina; Howard, Ileana M

    2013-11-01

    Spasticity is a prevalent and potentially disabling symptom common in individuals with multiple sclerosis. Adequate evaluation and management of spasticity requires a careful assessment of the patient's history to determine functional impact of spasticity and potential exacerbating factors, and physical examination to determine the extent of the condition and culpable muscles. A host of options for spasticity management are available: therapeutic exercise, physical modalities, complementary/alternative medicine interventions, oral medications, chemodenervation, and implantation of an intrathecal baclofen pump. Choice of treatment hinges on a combination of the extent of symptoms, patient preference, and availability of services.

  1. [Driving ability with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Küst, J; Dettmers, C

    2014-07-01

    Driving is an important issue for young patients, especially for those whose walking capacity is impaired. Driving might support the patient's social and vocational participation. The question as to whether a patient with multiple sclerosis (MS) is restricted in the ability to drive a car depends on neurological and neuropsychological deficits, self-awareness, insight into deficits and ability to compensate for loss of function. Because of the enormous variability of symptoms in MS the question is highly individualized. A practical driving test under supervision of a driving instructor (possibly accompanied by a neuropsychologist) might be helpful in providing both patient and relatives adequate feedback on driving abilities.

  2. Diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rowland, L P

    1998-10-01

    This review of the differential diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis focuses on two themes. The first is practical, how to establish the diagnosis based primarily on clinical findings buttressed by electrodiagnosis. The main considerations are multifocal motor neuropathy and cervical spondylotic myelopathy. The second theme is the relationship of motor neuron disease to other conditions, including benign fasciculation (Denny-Brown, Foley syndrome), paraneoplastic syndromes, lymphoproliferative disease, radiation damage, monomelic amyotrophy (Hirayama syndrome), as well as an association with parkinsonism, dementia and multisystem disorders of the central nervous system.

  3. Clinical Neurogenetics: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Matthew B.; Baloh, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease, about which our understanding is expanding rapidly as its genetic causes are uncovered. The pace of new gene discovery over the last 5 years has accelerated, providing new insights into the pathogenesis of disease and highlighting biological pathways for target for therapeutic development. This article reviews our current understanding of the heritability of ALS, provides an overview of each of the major ALS genes, highlighting their phenotypic characteristics and frequencies as a guide for clinicians evaluating patients with ALS. PMID:24176417

  4. [Special cases of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Mendibe Bilbao, Mar

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic disease that usually occurs in young people and affects them for the rest of their lives. Patients and their families usually have a series of doubts and questions on everyday matters and all types of situations that occur during the distinct stages of life and which can influence the course of the disease. The aim of this review is to provide specific answers to these questions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Endocannabinoids in Multiple Sclerosis and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pryce, Gareth; Baker, David

    2015-01-01

    There are numerous reports that people with multiple sclerosis (MS) have for many years been self-medicating with illegal street cannabis or more recently medicinal cannabis to alleviate the symptoms associated with MS and also amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These anecdotal reports have been confirmed by data from animal models and more recently clinical trials on the ability of cannabinoids to alleviate limb spasticity, a common feature of progressive MS (and also ALS) and neurodegeneration. Experimental studies into the biology of the endocannabinoid system have revealed that cannabinoids have efficacy, not only in symptom relief but also as neuroprotective agents which may slow disease progression and thus delay the onset of symptoms. This review discusses what we now know about the endocannabinoid system as it relates to MS and ALS and also the therapeutic potential of cannabinoid therapeutics as disease-modifying or symptom control agents, as well as future therapeutic strategies including the potential for slowing disease progression in MS and ALS.

  6. Neurophysiological investigations in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Leocani, L; Comi, G

    2000-06-01

    The advent of magnetic resonance imaging techniques has greatly reduced the diagnostic value of neurophysiological tests, particularly evoked potentials, in multiple sclerosis patients, because of the higher sensitivity in revealing subclinical involvement of the central nervous system. Technical progress and new methods of investigating afferent and efferent nervous pathways would seem to increase the sensitivity in detecting neural dysfunction, but the 'clinical gain' is modest at best. More promising is the utilization of neurophysiological tests to quantify the severity of white matter involvement. Transversal and longitudinal studies have demonstrated good correlations between neurophysiological parameters and disability measures, indicating that a battery of neurophysiological tests could be useful in monitoring the disease evolution in single patients and as surrogate endpoints in clinical trials. Further studies are needed for a better definition of the applications of evoked potentials and other neurophysiological techniques. Finally, event-related potentials and advanced electroencephalogram techniques, such as coherence analysis, could provide useful information on the pathophysiology of cognitive dysfunction, so common in multiple sclerosis patients, and with a strong impact on the quality of life.

  7. Treating systemic sclerosis in 2001.

    PubMed

    Mouthon, L; Agard, C

    2001-10-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SS) is characterized by sclerosis of the dermis and internal organs and by vascular abnormalities. Although the pathophysiology of the disease has been partly elucidated, the efficacy of long-term treatments remains limited, with no significant increase in survival in prospective studies. Conventional drug treatments are disappointing in clinical practice, and in a recent prospective randomized study standard-dose D-penicillamine was not more effective than mini-dose D-penicillamine. New long-term treatments are emerging for diffuse SS, including cyclophosphamide for patients with progressive interstitial lung disease or stem cell transplantation for those with early organ involvement. The most effective treatments remain symptomatic, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors for acute renal crisis, calcium channel antagonists for Raynaud's phenomenon, and proton pump inhibitors for the complications of gastroesophageal reflux. This review article focuses on long-term treatments that are most likely to be effective and suggests symptomatic treatment strategies tailored to specific organ involvements.

  8. Lymphedema in tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Geffrey, Alexandra L; Shinnick, Julianna E; Staley, Brigid A; Boronat, Susana; Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2014-06-01

    Congenital lymphedema has been described as a possible rare association of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), with only six previous cases reported in the literature. TSC is an autosomal dominant, multisystem disorder connected to aberrant regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. The aim of this study is to review cases of lymphedema in a large cohort of TSC patients. The medical records of 268 patients seen at The Herscot Center for Children and Adults with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex at the Massachusetts General Hospital from 2002 to 2012 were retrospectively reviewed for reports of lymphedema or edema of unknown etiology. Genotypic and phenotypic data were collected in accordance with institutional review board (IRB) approval. This cohort presents two new cases of congenital lymphedema in TSC patients and acquired lymphedema was found in eight additional cases. Thus, we report 10 new cases of lymphedema in TSC (4%). The two patients with congenital lymphedema were female, as were the previous six reported cases. The frequency of lymphedema reported here (4%) is higher than the estimated prevalence in the general population (0.133-0.144%), suggesting a higher frequency of lymphedema in TSC. This study shows that patients with TSC and lymphedema are more likely to be females with renal AMLs and suggests that congenital lymphedema is a gender-specific (female) manifestation of TSC. Exploration of the potential role of mTOR antagonists may be important in treatment of lymphedema in TSC patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Echocardiography and genetic counselling in tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, D W; Thomas, R D; Osborne, J P

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess echocardiography as an investigation for the detection of occult gene carriers in tuberous sclerosis. PATIENTS--Sixty parents of children with tuberous sclerosis who had been extensively investigated for signs of the disease and 60 age and sex matched controls. PROCEDURE--Blind study by two experienced echocardiographers and blind interpretation of video recordings by an adult cardiologist. SETTING--Cardiology department of a district general hospital. RESULTS--Two parents and three controls had bright echodense areas interpreted as possible rhabdomyomas. CONCLUSIONS--In our hands echocardiography of adults is not an investigation with a high specificity for gene detection in tuberous sclerosis. Images PMID:1640428

  10. Glatiramer in the treatment of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Syed A; Kim, Edward; Moodie, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system with both an inflammatory and degenerative component. The disease primarily affects young adults and results in significant physical and cognitive disability. Several disease-modifying agents are currently used in the management of multiple sclerosis. Glatiramer acetate (GA, Copaxone®, co-polymer 1) is a disease-modifying agent approved for the treatment of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. Apart from its unique mode of action, there is evidence pointing toward a possible neuroprotective role. This review will critically discuss GA’s potential mechanisms of action, the results of clinical trials, safety profile, and future directions of treatment. PMID:17717969

  11. Ophthalmic manifestations of tuberous sclerosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Nickisa; Kinori, Michael; Goldbaum, Michael H; Robbins, Shira L

    2017-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis or tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), one of the phakomatoses, is characterized by hamartomas of the heart, kidney, brain, skin and eyes. Ophthalmologic examinations are required in all cases of TSC. Retinal hamartomas are the most common ocular finding in tuberous sclerosis. The majority of hamartomas are non-progressive; however, lesions with subretinal fluid and progression have been reported. This paper details the genetics, clinical features and ocular findings of TSC and reviews potential therapeutic options for ophthalmic manifestations. © 2016 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  12. [Standartization of MRI studies in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Bryukhov, V V; Krotenkova, I A; Morozova, S N; Krotenkova, M V

    2016-01-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with multiple sclerosis has markedly increased in recent years. The main task of the MRI studies after the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is to assess the dynamics of MRI for determining disease progression and monitoring the efficacy of therapy. In this regard, it is very important to obtain the most identical baseline and follow-up MRI that is possible when a single standard protocol is used. This article presents the protocol of brain MRI and spinal cord MRI and interpretation of MRI studies in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  13. Multiple sclerosis-associated retrovirus and progressive disability of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sotgiu, S; Mameli, G; Serra, C; Zarbo, I R; Arru, G; Dolei, A

    2010-10-01

    Retrovirus-like particles containing the multiple sclerosis-associated retrovirus RNA, significantly found in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis, have been preliminarily associated with a short-term poor clinical and radiological prognosis of the disease. We asked whether these prognostic indications are still measurable after a long-term clinical evaluation (10 years). Our 10-year blind observational study confirms that the presence of multiple sclerosis-associated retrovirus in the cerebrospinal fluid of early multiple sclerosis patients is associated with a significantly greater rate of relapse-unrelated unremitting disability and secondary progression of the disease.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... amytrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, regulates endosomal trafficking. Hum Mol Genet. 2014 Jul 1;23(13): ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  15. Multiple sclerosis associated with water intoxication.

    PubMed Central

    D'Costa, D. F.; Weston, P.; Millac, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    We present a case of well documented multiple sclerosis which presented with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, following an exacerbation of the disease. This is a poorly documented association. PMID:2217038

  16. Alternating Horner's syndrome in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Pankaj Kumar; Lim, Lik Thai; Park, Soo; Spiteri-Cornish, Kurt; Cox, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Horner's syndrome is well documented in multiple sclerosis (MS). However, alternating Horner's syndrome in MS had not been described before. Here, we report a possible first case of alternating Horner's syndrome in MS.

  17. Progressive systemic sclerosis and autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Sumithran, E.

    1976-01-01

    The development of progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) in a patient with established autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is described. Points favouring an immunological aetiology for PSS are reviewed and discussed. PMID:1264941

  18. Association between polyneuritis and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, C; Lascelles, R G

    1979-01-01

    We report two cases in which multiple sclerosis and inflammatory polyneuritis occurred separately, and suggest that this association supports the idea that the two conditions may have an aetiological link. PMID:228012

  19. Multiple sclerosis: Experimental and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinberg, L.; Raine, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the experimental and clinical aspects of multiple sclerosis. Specifically discussed are - Association of Epstein Barr Virus with pathology of central nervous system; immunology of viruses; and immunosuppression.

  20. Epidemiology in multiple sclerosis: a pilgrim's progress.

    PubMed

    Kurtzke, John F

    2013-09-01

    There was more neurology taught under Harold G. Wolff at Cornell University Medical College in New York than perhaps anywhere else in the country when I attended from 1948 to 1952. I took my residency at the Veterans Administration Hospital in the Bronx, New York, a teaching hospital of Cornell, with Wolff as my Director of Training. While a resident, we thought we had found a treatment for multiple sclerosis. To test our conclusion, the first Class 1 treatment trial ever conducted for multiple sclerosis was performed. This showed no effect, but the participants began investigating multiple sclerosis among the 16 million persons at prime age for symptom onset who had served in the military in World War II. This led me to study its epidemiology worldwide, beginning with a detailed review of all published population-based estimates of frequency. Among these were nationwide surveys from Sweden, Denmark, Switzerland and later Norway and Finland, which showed in each country a concentration of the significantly high regions into contiguous areas forming a single 'focus' in each land, maximal in Denmark under the age of 15 years. The primary locus of high frequency multiple sclerosis seemed to be in the south-central inland lake region of Sweden, with spread to its contiguous neighbours. These concentrations in time and space indicated that multiple sclerosis was a disease probably acquired in early adolescence. Migration studies supported this: moves from high to low showed retention of birthplace risk only for those aged >15 years, whereas opposite moves indicated susceptibility limited to some 11-45 year olds. Epidemics of multiple sclerosis would suggest the disease is not only acquired but also infectious. If an infectious origin were true, transmission would have to occur before clinical onset, and would have to involve a much greater number of subjects than clinically involved. I believe there have been epidemics in Iceland, Shetland-Orkney and the Faroe Islands

  1. The range of multiple sclerosis associated with neurofibromatosis type 1

    PubMed Central

    Perini, P; Gallo, P

    2001-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a very rare event. Seven patients with multiple sclerosis and NF1 are described in the literature, and all were reported to have the primary progressive form of multiple sclerosis. Three new patients with NF1 that developed multiple sclerosis are described and it is shown that the range of multiple sclerosis associated with NF1 includes the relapsing forms of the disease. The risk of having both NF1 and multiple sclerosis in north east Italy is higher than would be expected based on the prevalence rates of the two diseases.

 PMID:11606684

  2. Disease Modifying Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, U. E.; Oparah, S. K.; Philip-Ephraim, E. E.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system characterized by inflammatory demyelination and axonal degeneration. It is the commonest cause of permanent disability in young adults. Environmental and genetic factors have been suggested in its etiology. Currently available disease modifying drugs are only effective in controlling inflammation but not prevention of neurodegeneration or accumulation of disability. Search for an effective neuroprotective therapy is at the forefront of multiple sclerosis research. PMID:27355035

  3. Class II HLA antigens in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D H; Hornabrook, R W; Dagger, J; Fong, R

    1989-01-01

    HLA typing in Wellington revealed a stronger association of multiple sclerosis with DR2 than with DQw1. The association with DQw1 appeared to be due to linkage disequilibrium of this antigen with DR2. These results, when considered in conjunction with other studies, are most easily explained by the hypothesis that susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is influenced by multiple risk factors, with DR2 being an important risk factor in Caucasoid populations. PMID:2732726

  4. Treatment Plan Adherence for Your Child With JA

    MedlinePlus

    ... Juvenile Arthritis Camps Juvenile Arthritis Conference Resources JA Power Pack Educational Rights Kit JA Transition Toolkit Print ... Drevlow Family: Coping Through Community Tiffany Family Nora Powers: Taking Charge Jodi Van Emmerik: Happy Campers Bridget ...

  5. Gait Characteristics in Adolescents With Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kalron, Alon; Frid, Lior; Menascu, Shay

    2017-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a progressive autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. A presentation of multiple sclerosis before age18 years has traditionally been thought to be rare. However, during the past decade, more cases have been reported. We examined gait characteristics in 24 adolescents with multiple sclerosis (12 girls, 12 boys). Mean disease duration was 20.4 (S.D. = 24.9) months and mean age was 15.5 (S.D. = 1.1) years. The mean expanded disability status scale score was 1.7 (S.D. = 0.7) indicating minimal disability. Outcomes were compared with gait and the gait variability index value of healthy age-matched adolescents. Adolescents with multiple sclerosis walked slower with a wider base of support compared with age-matched healthy control subjects. Moreover, the gait variability index was lower in the multiple sclerosis group compared with the values in the healthy adolescents: 85.4 (S.D. = 8.1) versus 96.5 (S.D. = 7.4). We present gait parameters of adolescents with multiple sclerosis. From a clinical standpoint, our data could improve management of walking dysfunction in this relatively young population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hughes syndrome and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Uthman, I; Noureldine, M H A; Berjawi, A; Skaf, M; Haydar, A A; Merashli, M; Hughes, G R V

    2015-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) share common clinical, laboratory and radiological features. We reviewed all the English papers on MS and APS published in the literature from 1965 to 2014 using PubMed and Google Scholar. We found that APS can mimic antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL)-positive MS in many ways in its clinical presentation. Nevertheless, APS diagnosis, clinical manifestations and management differ from those of MS. aPL were found in MS patients with titers ranging from 2% to 88%. The distribution and volume of lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may help to differentiate MS from primary APS. In addition, atypical MS presentation can guide physicians toward an alternative diagnosis, especially when features of thrombosis and/or history of connective tissue disease are present. In that case, an anticoagulation trial could be worthwhile. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  7. Evoked potentials in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kraft, George H

    2013-11-01

    Before the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), evoked potentials (EPs)-visual evoked potentials, somatosensory evoked potentials, and brain stem auditory evoked responses-were commonly used to determine a second site of disease in patients being evaluated for possible multiple sclerosis (MS). The identification of an area of the central nervous system showing abnormal conduction was used to supplement the abnormal signs identified on the physical examination-thus identifying the "multiple" in MS. This article is a brief overview of additional ways in which central nervous system (CNS) physiology-as measured by EPs-can still contribute value in the management of MS in the era of MRIs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Recency effect in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Godoy, J F; Perez, M; Sanchez-Barrera, M B; Muela, J A; Mari-Beffa, P; Puente, A

    1996-05-01

    The main object of this study was to test acquisition-retrieval deficits in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients A Spanish version of the Rey Auditory-Verbal Test (RAVLT) (Rey 1964) was used with an MS group (n=10 subjects) and a control group (n=10) Different measurements were obtained with the RAVLT memory span, a learning curve, and a curve of serial position of words The results revealed no differences between groups in memory span and learning curve, but significant differences were found in the curve of serial position No revency effect in the immediate form of theRAVLT was seen These results are discussed with reference to the work of Baddelaey and Hitch (1993) regarding recency effects and related literature on the acquisition-retrieval deficits in MS patients.

  9. Epigenetic Drugs for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Peedicayil, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that abnormalities in epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression contribute to the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). Advances in epigenetics have given rise to a new class of drugs, epigenetic drugs. Although many classes of epigenetic drugs are being investigated, at present most attention is being paid to two classes of epigenetic drugs: drugs that inhibit DNA methyltransferase (DNMTi) and drugs that inhibit histone deacetylase (HDACi). This paper discusses the potential use of epigenetic drugs in the treatment of MS, focusing on DNMTi and HDACi. Preclinical drug trials of DNMTi and HDACi for the treatment of MS are showing promising results. Epigenetic drugs could improve the clinical management of patients with MS.

  10. VISUALIZING IRON IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Bagnato, Francesca; Hametner, Simon; Welch, Edward Brian

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols that are designed to be sensitive to iron typically take advantage of (1) iron effects on the relaxation of water protons and/or (2) iron-induced local magnetic field susceptibility changes. Increasing evidence sustains the notion that imaging iron in brain of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) may add some specificity toward the identification of the disease pathology. The present review summarizes currently reported in vivo and post mortem MRI evidence of (1) iron detection in white matter and grey matter of MS brains, (2) pathological and physiological correlates of iron as disclosed by imaging and (3) relations between iron accumulation and disease progression as measured by clinical metrics. PMID:23347601

  11. Intensive immunosuppression in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zaffaroni, M; Ghezzi, A; Comi, G

    2006-03-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs have been used out of label in multiple sclerosis (MS) for over 30 years and around 10% of patients are actually under immunosuppressive treatment. The rationale for immunosuppression in MS lies in the hypothesis that MS is an inflammatory immune-mediated disease that can take advantage of strong anti-inflammatory activity. Azathioprine, methotrexate, cyclophosphamide and mitoxantrone are the most utilised agents, but only the latter has been approved for clinically active MS. Many of them are safe in combination with interferon-beta and are under investigation in controlled trials. Plasma exchange is limited to catastrophic attacks in refractory MS whilst bone marrow transplantation is considered in patients with an extremely severe, active disease as the final option in escalation therapy. Although immunosuppressants are best effective in induction therapy, their use is limited by toxicity and potential long-term risk.

  12. Painful and involuntary Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bagnato, Francesca; Centonze, Diego; Galgani, Simonetta; Grasso, Maria Grazia; Haggiag, Shalom; Strano, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Pain, dysphagia, respiratory problems, sexual and cardiovascular dysfunctions may occur in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Areas covered in the field In the present review we attempt to summarize the current knowledge on the impact that pain, dysphagia, respiratory problems, sexual and cardiovascular dysfunctions have in patients with MS. What the reader will gain The current understanding on pain, dysphagia, respiratory problems, sexual and cardiovascular dysfunctions and future research perspectives to expand the knowledge of this field. Take home message To effectively manage MS it is essential that these symptoms are recognised as early as possible and treated by a rehabilitative multidisciplinary approach, based on proven scientific evidence. PMID:21323633

  13. Congenital abnormalities and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ramagopalan, Sreeram V; Guimond, Colleen; Criscuoli, Maria; Dyment, David A; Orton, Sarah-Michelle; Yee, Irene M; Ebers, George C; Sadovnick, Dessa

    2010-11-16

    There is a strong maternal parent-of-origin effect in determining susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS). One hypothesis is that an abnormal intrauterine milieu leading to impaired fetal development could plausibly also result in increased susceptibility to MS. A possible marker for this intrauterine insult is the presence of a non-fatal congenital anomaly. We investigated whether or not congenital anomalies are associated with MS in a population-based cohort. We identified 7063 MS index cases and 2655 spousal controls with congenital anomaly information from the Canadian Collaborative Project on Genetic Susceptibility to MS (CCPGSMS). The frequency of congenital anomalies were compared between index cases and controls. No significant differences were found. Congenital anomalies thus do not appear to be associated with MS. However, we did not have complete data on types and severity of congenital anomalies or on maternal birth history and thus this study should be regarded as preliminary.

  14. Multiple sclerosis, a treatable disease.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Anisha; Chataway, Jeremy

    2016-12-01

    This article reviews our current understanding and modern treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). MS is a disabling condition resulting in devastating social and economic impacts. As MS can affect any part of the central nervous system, the presentation is often diverse; however, there are key features that can be useful in the clinic. We comment on the diagnostic criteria and review the main subtypes of MS, including clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing remitting MS, secondary progressive MS and primary progressive MS. Although the underlying aetiology of MS is still not known, we summarise those with most evidence of association. Finally, we aim to present treatment strategies for managing the acute relapse, disease-modifying therapies and MS symptoms. This review highlights that progressive MS is an area where there is currently a paucity of available disease-modifying treatments and this will be a major focus for future development.

  15. Kidney involvement in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Steen, Virginia D

    2014-10-01

    Kidney involvement in systemic sclerosis (SSc) is primarily manifested by scleroderma renal crisis (SRC). Formerly, it was the most severe complication in scleroderma and was the most frequent cause of death in these patients. More than 30years ago, with the development of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, SRC became a very treatable complication of scleroderma. Although there are still many patients who do not survive and have poor outcomes, early diagnosis of renal crisis and prompt therapeutic intervention can achieve excellent outcomes. Renal abnormalities independent of renal crisis have been noted, but can usually be attributed to other problems. Further understanding of the pathogenesis of renal disease in scleroderma may lead to additional improvement in the therapy of renal crisis and perhaps the disease in general. This chapter reviews the pathogenesis, clinical setting, and therapy of this serious complication of SSc. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Orofacial manifestations of systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Veale, B J; Jablonski, R Y; Frech, T M; Pauling, J D

    2016-09-23

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem disease of unknown aetiology characterised by microangiopathy, dysregulated immune function and tissue remodelling, which commonly involves the oral cavity. Orofacial manifestations of SSc contribute greatly to overall disease burden and yet are regularly overlooked and under-treated. This may reflect a pre-occupation amongst rheumatology clinicians on potentially life-threatening internal organ involvement, but is also a consequence of insufficient engagement between rheumatologists and dental professionals. A high proportion of SSc patients report difficulty accessing a dentist with knowledge of the disease and there is recognition amongst dentists that this could impact negatively on patient care. This review shall describe the clinical features and burden of orofacial manifestations of SSc and the management of such problems. The case is made for greater collaborative working between rheumatologists and dental professionals with an interest in SSc in both the research and clinical setting.

  17. Autonomic Dysregulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pintér, Alexandra; Cseh, Domonkos; Sárközi, Adrienn; Illigens, Ben M.; Siepmann, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, progressive central neurological disease characterized by inflammation and demyelination. In patients with MS, dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system may present with various clinical symptoms including sweating abnormalities, urinary dysfunction, orthostatic dysregulation, gastrointestinal symptoms, and sexual dysfunction. These autonomic disturbances reduce the quality of life of affected patients and constitute a clinical challenge to the physician due to variability of clinical presentation and inconsistent data on diagnosis and treatment. Early diagnosis and initiation of individualized interdisciplinary and multimodal strategies is beneficial in the management of autonomic dysfunction in MS. This review summarizes the current literature on the most prevalent aspects of autonomic dysfunction in MS and provides reference to underlying pathophysiological mechanisms as well as means of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26213927

  18. Alemtuzumab treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Coles, Alasdair J

    2013-02-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against CD52. A single cycle of alemtuzumab, administered over 5 days, depletes lymphocytes. Reconstitution causes prolonged alterations in the lymphocyte repertoire, with relatively increased regulatory T-cell numbers and reduced naïve T cells. It is currently approved for the treatment of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and is being considered for licensing for multiple sclerosis (MS).When first used, alemtuzumab successfully reduced relapses and new lesion formation based on magnetic resonance imaging in people with progressive MS, but this cohort continued to accumulate disability, associated with progressive cerebral atrophy, presumably due to axonal degeneration. From this experience, we advocated that immunotherapies should be given early in the course of the disease. Since then, one phase II and two phase III trials have shown that alemtuzumab reduces the relapse rate, compared with the active comparator interferon beta-1a (IFNβ-1a), in treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced MS up to 10 years from disease onset. Furthermore, in two of these trials, alemtuzumab reduced the risk of accumulating disability compared with IFNβ-1a; indeed alemtuzumab treatment led to an improvement in disability and reduction in cerebral atrophy. Safety issues are infusion-associated reactions, mainly controlled by methyl-prednisolone, antihistamines, and antipyretics; mild to moderate infections; and autoimmunity. After 5 years, 30 to 40% of alemtuzumab patients have developed autoimmunity, largely against the thyroid gland, but rarely (2%) against platelets in immune thrombocytopenia, and in a few cases, Goodpasture's renal syndrome.Alemtuzumab is an effective therapy for early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, offering disability improvement at least to 5 years after treatment. Its use requires careful monitoring so that potentially serious side effects can be treated early and effectively. Thieme Medical

  19. Limb apraxia in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rapaić, Dragan; Medenica, Veselin; Kozomara, Ruzica; Ivanović, Lidija

    2014-09-01

    There are almost no studies on apraxia in people with multiple sclerosis. Although the white matter is damaged in MS, it is not the only location in which the pathological changes are present. Demyelinated lesions in the cortex have recently been recognized as important components of multiple sclerosis pathology. The aim of this study was to determine whether apraxia is present among people with MS, and the importance of demographic characteristics and impairment of functional systems at conceptualization and execution of movements. The experimental group consisted of 30 patients, mean age 51.34 +/- 7.70 years. The patients in the experimental group were diagnosed with MS according to the McDonald criteria. The control group consisted of 30 healthy subjects, mean age 50.30 +/- 10.47 years. For research purposes, we used the following instruments: Questionnaire for Collecting Demographic Data, Kurtzke Functional Systems Scores, Waterloo-Sunnybrook Apraxia Battery (WatAB). Execution of motion tasks that are a part of the WatAB were incorporated in the System for the Observation and Analysis of Motor Behavior. Our study showed that limb apraxia was common in people with MS. Apraxia was present during pantomime in 26.70% of the patients, and during the imitation of movements in 44.80% of the patients. Gender, age, education level, duration of disease and a form of MS did not determine the quality of conceptualization and execution of movements. The time elapsed from the last exacerbation was a determinant of quality of executed movements. Impairments of functional systems predicted impairments of movement execution. The expanded disability scale score correlated with the severity of apraxia. Our study confirm the presence of apraxia in MS. It is necessary to carry out further studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging, as well as the conduct longitudinal studies to determine the precise structure of motor behavior in people with MS.

  20. Effects of MeJA on Arabidopsis metabolome under endogenous JA deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jingjing; Li, Mengya; Chen, Jian; Liu, Pei; Li, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) play important roles in plant growth, development and defense. Comprehensive metabolomics profiling of plants under JA treatment provides insights into the interaction and regulation network of plant hormones. Here we applied high resolution mass spectrometry based metabolomics approach on Arabidopsis wild type and JA synthesis deficiency mutant opr3. The effects of exogenous MeJA treatment on the metabolites of opr3 were investigated. More than 10000 ion signals were detected and more than 2000 signals showed significant variation in different genotypes and treatment groups. Multivariate statistic analyses (PCA and PLS-DA) were performed and a differential compound library containing 174 metabolites with high resolution precursor ion-product ions pairs was obtained. Classification and pathway analysis of 109 identified compounds in this library showed that glucosinolates and tryptophan metabolism, amino acids and small peptides metabolism, lipid metabolism, especially fatty acyls metabolism, were impacted by endogenous JA deficiency and exogenous MeJA treatment. These results were further verified by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of 21 related genes involved in the metabolism of glucosinolates, tryptophan and α-linolenic acid pathways. The results would greatly enhance our understanding of the biological functions of JA.

  1. Effects of MeJA on Arabidopsis metabolome under endogenous JA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jingjing; Li, Mengya; Chen, Jian; Liu, Pei; Li, Zhen

    2016-11-24

    Jasmonates (JAs) play important roles in plant growth, development and defense. Comprehensive metabolomics profiling of plants under JA treatment provides insights into the interaction and regulation network of plant hormones. Here we applied high resolution mass spectrometry based metabolomics approach on Arabidopsis wild type and JA synthesis deficiency mutant opr3. The effects of exogenous MeJA treatment on the metabolites of opr3 were investigated. More than 10000 ion signals were detected and more than 2000 signals showed significant variation in different genotypes and treatment groups. Multivariate statistic analyses (PCA and PLS-DA) were performed and a differential compound library containing 174 metabolites with high resolution precursor ion-product ions pairs was obtained. Classification and pathway analysis of 109 identified compounds in this library showed that glucosinolates and tryptophan metabolism, amino acids and small peptides metabolism, lipid metabolism, especially fatty acyls metabolism, were impacted by endogenous JA deficiency and exogenous MeJA treatment. These results were further verified by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of 21 related genes involved in the metabolism of glucosinolates, tryptophan and α-linolenic acid pathways. The results would greatly enhance our understanding of the biological functions of JA.

  2. Effects of MeJA on Arabidopsis metabolome under endogenous JA deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jingjing; Li, Mengya; Chen, Jian; Liu, Pei; Li, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) play important roles in plant growth, development and defense. Comprehensive metabolomics profiling of plants under JA treatment provides insights into the interaction and regulation network of plant hormones. Here we applied high resolution mass spectrometry based metabolomics approach on Arabidopsis wild type and JA synthesis deficiency mutant opr3. The effects of exogenous MeJA treatment on the metabolites of opr3 were investigated. More than 10000 ion signals were detected and more than 2000 signals showed significant variation in different genotypes and treatment groups. Multivariate statistic analyses (PCA and PLS-DA) were performed and a differential compound library containing 174 metabolites with high resolution precursor ion-product ions pairs was obtained. Classification and pathway analysis of 109 identified compounds in this library showed that glucosinolates and tryptophan metabolism, amino acids and small peptides metabolism, lipid metabolism, especially fatty acyls metabolism, were impacted by endogenous JA deficiency and exogenous MeJA treatment. These results were further verified by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of 21 related genes involved in the metabolism of glucosinolates, tryptophan and α-linolenic acid pathways. The results would greatly enhance our understanding of the biological functions of JA. PMID:27883040

  3. Tuberous sclerosis complex diagnostic criteria update: recommendations of the 2012 Iinternational Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Northrup, Hope; Krueger, Darcy A

    2013-10-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is highly variable in clinical presentation and findings. Disease manifestations continue to develop over the lifetime of an affected individual. Accurate diagnosis is fundamental to implementation of appropriate medical surveillance and treatment. Although significant advances have been made in the past 15 years in the understanding and treatment of tuberous sclerosis complex, current clinical diagnostic criteria have not been critically evaluated or updated since the last clinical consensus conference in 1998. The 2012 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Consensus Group, comprising 79 specialists from 14 countries, was organized into 12 subcommittees, each led by a clinician with advanced expertise in tuberous sclerosis complex and the relevant medical subspecialty. Each subcommittee focused on a specific disease area with important diagnostic implications and was charged with reviewing prevalence and specificity of disease-associated clinical findings and their impact on suspecting and confirming the diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis complex. Clinical features of tuberous sclerosis complex continue to be a principal means of diagnosis. Key changes compared with 1998 criteria are the new inclusion of genetic testing results and reducing diagnostic classes from three (possible, probable, and definite) to two (possible, definite). Additional minor changes to specific criterion were made for additional clarification and simplification. The 2012 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Diagnostic Criteria provide current, updated means using best available evidence to establish diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis complex in affected individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ocrevus Approved to Treat Severe Form of Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Ocrevus Approved to Treat Severe Form of Multiple Sclerosis First drug sanctioned in U.S. for primary progressive ... Drug Administration to treat adults with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) and relapsing forms of the disease, the ...

  5. Atypical face processing in children with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Jeste, Shafali Spurling; Hirsch, Suzanna; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa; Norona, Amanda; Navalta, Mary-Clare; Gregas, Matt C; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Sahin, Mustafa; Nelson, Charles A

    2013-12-01

    There is a high incidence of autism in tuberous sclerosis complex. Given the evidence of impaired face processing in autism, the authors sought to investigate electrophysiological markers of face processing in children with tuberous sclerosis complex. The authors studied 19 children with tuberous sclerosis complex under age 4, and 20 age-matched controls, using a familiar-unfamiliar faces paradigm. Of the children, 6 with tuberous sclerosis complex (32%) had autism. Children with tuberous sclerosis complex showed a longer N290 latency than controls (276 ms vs 259 ms, P = .05) and also failed to show the expected hemispheric differences in face processing. The longest N290 latency was seen in (1) children with autism and tuberous sclerosis complex and (2) children with temporal lobe tubers. This study is the first to quantify atypical face processing in children with tuberous sclerosis complex. This functional impairment may provide insight into a mechanism underlying a pathway to autism in tuberous sclerosis complex.

  6. Atypical Face Processing in Children With Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Jeste, Shafali Spurling; Hirsch, Suzanna; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa; Norona, Amanda; Navalta, Mary-Clare; Gregas, Matt C.; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Sahin, Mustafa; Nelson, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a high incidence of autism in tuberous sclerosis complex. Given the evidence of impaired face processing in autism, the authors sought to investigate electrophysiological markers of face processing in children with tuberous sclerosis complex. The authors studied 19 children with tuberous sclerosis complex under age 4, and 20 age-matched controls, using a familiar–unfamiliar faces paradigm. Of the children, 6 with tuberous sclerosis complex (32%) had autism. Children with tuberous sclerosis complex showed a longer N290 latency than controls (276 ms vs 259 ms, P = .05) and also failed to show the expected hemispheric differences in face processing. The longest N290 latency was seen in (1) children with autism and tuberous sclerosis complex and (2) children with temporal lobe tubers. This study is the first to quantify atypical face processing in children with tuberous sclerosis complex. This functional impairment may provide insight into a mechanism underlying a pathway to autism in tuberous sclerosis complex. PMID:23143725

  7. Devic's neuromyelitis optica and Schilder's myelinoclastic diffuse sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hainfellner, J A; Schmidbauer, M; Schmutzhard, E; Maier, H; Budka, H

    1992-01-01

    An adult patient developed both Devic's neuromyelitis optica and Schilder's myelinoclastic diffuse sclerosis, suggesting that these entities represent rare topographical and aggressive variants within the spectrum of multiple sclerosis. Images PMID:1343820

  8. Multiple Sclerosis, Personal Stories | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Multiple Sclerosis Personal Stories: Nicole Lemelle, Iris Young, Michael Anthony, ... something quite different for a person living with multiple sclerosis, such as his girlfriend's brother, Chuy. The more ...

  9. JA but not JA-Ile is the cell-nonautonomous signal activating JA mediated systemic defenses to herbivory in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Bozorov, Tohir A; Dinh, Son Truong; Baldwin, Ian T

    2017-08-01

    The whole-plant activation of defense responses to wounding and herbivory requires systemic signaling in which jasmonates (JAs) play a pivotal role. To examine the nature of the slower cell-nonautonomous as compared to the rapid cell-autonomous signal in mediating systemic defenses in Nicotiana attenuata, reciprocal stem grafting-experiments were used with plants silenced for the JA biosynthetic gene ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (irAOC) or plants transformed to create JA sinks by ectopically expressing Arabidopsis JA-O-methyltransferase (ovJMT). JA-impaired irAOC plants were defective in the cell-nonautonomous signaling pathway but not in JA transport. Conversely, ovJMT plants abrogated the production of a graft-transmissible JA signal. Both genotypes displayed unaltered cell-autonomous signaling. Defense responses (17-hydroxygeranyllinalool diterpene glycosides, nicotine, and proteinase inhibitors) and metabolite profiles were differently induced in irAOC and ovJMT scions in response to graft-transmissible signals from elicited wild type stocks. The performance of Manduca sexta larvae on the scions of different graft combinations was consistent with the patterns of systemic defense metabolite elicitations. Taken together, we conclude that JA and possibly MeJA, but not JA-Ile, either directly functions as a long-distance transmissible signal or indirectly interacts with long distance signal(s) to activate systemic defense responses. © 2017 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  10. Development of a Novel Microfluidic Platform for Multiple Sclerosis Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Platform for Multiple Sclerosis Study PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: In Hong Yang CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Johns Hopkins University...COVERED 15 Jul 2011 - 14 Jul 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of a Novel Microfluidic Platform for Multiple Sclerosis Study 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...NSC in the pathology and therapy of neurodegenerative disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS) [1-2]. Evidence suggests that NSC proliferation

  11. Exercise therapy for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rietberg, M B; Brooks, D; Uitdehaag, B M J; Kwakkel, G

    2005-01-25

    No intervention has proven effective in modifying long-term disease prognosis in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) but exercise therapy is considered to be an important part of symptomatic and supportive treatment for these patients. To assess the effectiveness of exercise therapy for patients with MS in terms of activities of daily living and health-related quality of life. We searched the Cochrane MS Group Specialised Register (searched: March 2004), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2004), MEDLINE (from 1966 to March 2004), EMBASE (from 1988 to March 2004 ), CINAHL (from 1982 to March 2004), PEDro (from 1999 to March 2004) . Manual search in the journal 'Multiple Sclerosis' and screening of the reference lists of identified studies and reviews. We also searched abstracts published in proceedings of conferences. Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) that reported on exercise therapy for adults with MS, not presently experiencing an exacerbation; outcomes that include measures of activity limitation or health-related quality of life or both. Two reviewers independently extracted data and methodological quality of the included trials. Disagreements were resolved by discussion. The results were analysed using a best-evidence synthesis based on methodological quality. Nine high-methodological-quality RCTs(260 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Six trials focussed on comparison of exercise therapy versus no exercise therapy, whereas three trials compared two interventions that both met our definition of exercise therapy. Best evidence synthesis showed strong evidence in favour of exercise therapy compared to no exercise therapy in terms of muscle power function, exercise tolerance functions and mobility-related activities. Moderate evidence was found for improving mood. No evidence was observed for exercise therapy on fatigue and perception of handicap when compared to no exercise therapy. Finally, no evidence was found

  12. Impaired neurosteroid synthesis in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Ellestad, Kristofor K.; Maingat, Ferdinand; Warren, Kenneth G.; Han, May H.; Steinman, Lawrence; Baker, Glen B.

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput technologies have led to advances in the recognition of disease pathways and their underlying mechanisms. To investigate the impact of micro-RNAs on the disease process in multiple sclerosis, a prototypic inflammatory neurological disorder, we examined cerebral white matter from patients with or without the disease by micro-RNA profiling, together with confirmatory reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis, immunoblotting and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. These observations were verified using the in vivo multiple sclerosis model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Brains of patients with or without multiple sclerosis demonstrated differential expression of multiple micro-RNAs, but expression of three neurosteroid synthesis enzyme-specific micro-RNAs (miR-338, miR-155 and miR-491) showed a bias towards induction in patients with multiple sclerosis (P < 0.05). Analysis of the neurosteroidogenic pathways targeted by micro-RNAs revealed suppression of enzyme transcript and protein levels in the white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis (P < 0.05). This was confirmed by firefly/Renilla luciferase micro-RNA target knockdown experiments (P < 0.05) and detection of specific micro-RNAs by in situ hybridization in the brains of patients with or without multiple sclerosis. Levels of important neurosteroids, including allopregnanolone, were suppressed in the white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis (P < 0.05). Induction of the murine micro-RNAs, miR-338 and miR-155, accompanied by diminished expression of neurosteroidogenic enzymes and allopregnanolone, was also observed in the brains of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (P < 0.05). Allopregnanolone treatment of the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model limited the associated neuropathology, including neuroinflammation, myelin and axonal injury and reduced neurobehavioral deficits (P < 0.05). These multi-platform studies point to

  13. Impaired neurosteroid synthesis in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Ellestad, Kristofor K; Maingat, Ferdinand; Warren, Kenneth G; Han, May H; Steinman, Lawrence; Baker, Glen B; Power, Christopher

    2011-09-01

    High-throughput technologies have led to advances in the recognition of disease pathways and their underlying mechanisms. To investigate the impact of micro-RNAs on the disease process in multiple sclerosis, a prototypic inflammatory neurological disorder, we examined cerebral white matter from patients with or without the disease by micro-RNA profiling, together with confirmatory reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis, immunoblotting and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. These observations were verified using the in vivo multiple sclerosis model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Brains of patients with or without multiple sclerosis demonstrated differential expression of multiple micro-RNAs, but expression of three neurosteroid synthesis enzyme-specific micro-RNAs (miR-338, miR-155 and miR-491) showed a bias towards induction in patients with multiple sclerosis (P < 0.05). Analysis of the neurosteroidogenic pathways targeted by micro-RNAs revealed suppression of enzyme transcript and protein levels in the white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis (P < 0.05). This was confirmed by firefly/Renilla luciferase micro-RNA target knockdown experiments (P < 0.05) and detection of specific micro-RNAs by in situ hybridization in the brains of patients with or without multiple sclerosis. Levels of important neurosteroids, including allopregnanolone, were suppressed in the white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis (P < 0.05). Induction of the murine micro-RNAs, miR-338 and miR-155, accompanied by diminished expression of neurosteroidogenic enzymes and allopregnanolone, was also observed in the brains of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (P < 0.05). Allopregnanolone treatment of the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model limited the associated neuropathology, including neuroinflammation, myelin and axonal injury and reduced neurobehavioral deficits (P < 0.05). These multi-platform studies point to

  14. Emerging drugs and therapeutics for systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason J; Pope, Janet E

    2016-12-01

    Treatment of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is challenging despite advances in medical therapeutics for other rheumatologic diseases. Significant disease modifying therapy is lacking for most patients with SSc, due to the heterogeneous multisystem nature of SSc and its complex pathophysiology. The emergence of organ based management strategies has provided guidance in patient care as well as research and drug development. Areas covered: Design and development of new compounds focused on the underlying fibrotic disease processes have been sparse. Therefore, organ based strategies with targeted approaches have been directed towards the most devastating and life threatening features of systemic sclerosis. These include pulmonary arterial hypertension, interstitial lung disease, peripheral vasculopathy and skin thickening. In this context, new treatment regimens using older drugs as well as discovery of novel compounds based on recent insights of the disease pathophysiology are discussed. Expert opinion: Systemic sclerosis is a heterogeneous rare disease that carries a high burden of morbidity and mortality. Organ based management strategies have improved the natural history of systemic sclerosis using targeted interventions or strategies, particularly vascular features. However, more research is required to better understand disease mechanisms, including an ultimate unifying pathway that explains the multisystem nature of systemic sclerosis.

  15. Multiple sclerosis - etiology and diagnostic potential.

    PubMed

    Kamińska, Joanna; Koper, Olga M; Piechal, Kinga; Kemona, Halina

    2017-06-30

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of autoimmune originate. The main agents responsible for the MS development include exogenous, environmental, and genetic factors. MS is characterized by multifocal and temporally scattered central nervous system (CNS) damage which lead to the axonal damage. Among clinical courses of MS it can be distinguish relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPSM), primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS), and progressive-relapsing multiple sclerosis (RPMS). Depending on the severity of signs and symptoms MS can be described as benign MS or malignant MS. MS diagnosis is based on McDonald's diagnostic criteria, which link clinical manifestation with characteristic lesions demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, and visual evoked potentials. Among CSF laboratory tests used to the MS diagnosis are applied: Tibbling & Link IgG index, reinbegrams, and CSF isoelectrofocusing for oligoclonal bands detection. It should be emphasized, that despite huge progress regarding MS as well as the availability of different diagnostics methods this disease is still a diagnostic challenge. It may result from fact that MS has diverse clinical course and there is a lack of single test, which would be of appropriate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for quick and accurate diagnosis.

  16. Islamic fasting and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Month-long daytime Ramadan fasting pose s major challenges to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in Muslim countries. Physicians should have practical knowledge on the implications of fasting on MS. We present a summary of database searches (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PubMed) and a mini-symposium on Ramadan fasting and MS. In this symposium, we aimed to review the effect of fasting on MS and suggest practical guidelines on management. Discussion In general, fasting is possible for most stable patients. Appropriate amendment of drug regimens, careful monitoring of symptoms, as well as providing patients with available evidence on fasting and MS are important parts of management. Evidence from experimental studies suggests that calorie restriction before disease induction reduces inflammation and subsequent demyelination and attenuates disease severity. Fasting does not appear to have unfavorable effects on disease course in patients with mild disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score ≤3). Most experts believed that during fasting (especially in summer), some MS symptoms (fatigue, fatigue perception, dizziness, spasticity, cognitive problems, weakness, vision, balance, gait) might worsen but return to normal levels during feasting. There was a general consensus that fasting is not safe for patients: on high doses of anti-convulsants, anti-spastics, and corticosteroids; with coagulopathy or active disease; during attacks; with EDSS score ≥7. Summary These data suggest that MS patients should have tailored care. Fasting in MS patients is a challenge that is directly associated with the spiritual belief of the patient. PMID:24655543

  17. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: Perioperative Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Rabito, Matthew J.; Kaye, Alan David

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), also known as Bourneville disease, is an inherited, progressive neurocutaneous disorder characterized by the potential for hamartoma formation throughout the body. TSC is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder, but more than two-thirds of cases are sporadic. Methods Clinical manifestations and treatment options are discussed. Both surgical and anesthetic perioperative considerations are described in this review. Results Routine monitoring is appropriate for minor surgical procedures for patients with TSC who have mild disease manifestations. More extensive monitoring is indicated for major procedures that have the potential for significant blood loss and for patients with more severe pathology. Postoperatively, TSC patients should be admitted for monitoring and treatment after more extensive procedures or if significant organ dysfunction occurs. Postoperative complications, which may be related to either the surgery or the TSC pathology itself, may have origins in many different organs and may include seizures, severe hypertension, and bradyarrhythmias. Conclusion TSC is a rare disease with a highly variable clinical presentation and provides a multitude of challenges for the patient, the family, and the healthcare team. PMID:24940133

  18. [Angiomyolipomas, tuberous sclerosis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Illescas Molina, Tamara; Montalvo Montes, Joaquín; Contreras Cecilia, Esther; Muñoz Muñiz, María del Mar; González González, Antonio; Herraiz Martínez, Miguel Angel

    2009-08-01

    Renal angiomyolipomas are uncommon tumours during pregnancy, but it's important to consider them in the differential diagnosis, for the increased risk of complications such as bleeding, specially during pregnancy. Their characteristics are different depending on if the tumour is associated or not with facomatosis. To show both possibilities, we describe two cases of pregnant women with angiomyolipomas: the first one presented with bleeding of the tumour (Wünderlich's syndrome), but surveillance without treatment was possible until 37th week of gestation, and embolization of the tumour was performed afterwards. The second patient had multiple well known angiomyolipomas, associated to tuberous sclerosis; even though she had required two previous embolizations, she had an uneventful pregnancy, without any episodes of bleeding. Both pregnancies ended successfully by means of a cesarean section. Since there are few papers available in the literature, there is not an agreement about therapeutic management when pregnant women present with bleeding angiomyolipomas (Wünderlich's syndrome). Treatment options include partial or total nephrectomy (with cesarean section simultaneously in patients at 28 weeks of gestation or later), transcateter selective arterial embolization (which can also be preventive), and sometimes, conservative management. If this last option is possible, there's still discussion about the risk of vaginal delivery compared with that of cesarean section, in terms of bleeding of the tumour.

  19. Rehabilitation challenges in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Jack S.; Bigley, George Kim; Hill, Harry Haydon

    2009-01-01

    While current immunomodulating drugs aim to reduce multiple sclerosis (MS) exacerbations and slow disease progression, rehabilitation aims to improve and maintain the functional abilities of patients in the face of disease progression. An increasing number of journal articles are describing the value of the many rehabilitation interventions that can be used throughout the course of the disease, from the initial symptoms to the advanced stages. An integrated team of healthcare professionals is necessary to address a myriad of problems to reduce impairments, disabilities, and handicaps. The problems may be related to fatigue, weakness, spasticity, mobility, balance, pain, cognition, mood, relationships, bowel, bladder, sexual function, swallowing, speech, transportation, employment, recreation, and activities of daily living (ADL) such as dressing, eating, bathing, and household chores. The team can help prevent complications and secondary disabilities, while increasing patient safety. Improving neurologically related function, maintaining good relationships, and feeling productive and creative adds enormously to the quality of life of people with MS and their families. Rehabilitation is more than an ‘extra’ service that is given after medical therapies; it is an integral part of the management of the diverse set of problems encountered throughout the course of the disease. An interdisciplinary team may have many members, including physicians, nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, psychotherapists, social workers, recreational therapists, vocational rehabilitation therapists, patients, families, and other caregivers. PMID:20182578

  20. [Respiratory failure in disseminated sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Popova, L M; Avdiunina, I A; Alferova, V P

    2000-01-01

    The development and patterns of respiratory failure (RF) are analyzed in 9 patients with disseminated sclerosis (DS). Forced ventilation of the lungs was carried out with consideration for main location of the process. Relationship between patterns of respiratory disorders and neuroanatomy of respiratory regulation is discussed. Involvement of the corticospinal routes is paralleled by dissociation during functional pulmonary tests: spontaneous volumes are less than controlled inspirations. The most severe symptom complexes were observed in RF of predominantly bulbar localization: respiratory anarchy, blocking of airways caused by impaired swallowing, impaired mechanism of coughing reflex, loss of spontaneous respiration, sometimes apnea during sleeping. Involvement of the respiratory nuclei of medullary respiratory center and airways and of the corticonuclear routes of caudal cranial nerves causes the development of a triad of symptoms: glossopharyngolaryngeal paralysis, dysfunction of respiratory nuclei of medulla oblongata, and decreased sensitivity of respiratory center to CO2. Aspiration complications caused by dysphagia are characteristic of bulbar DS. Respiratory function in 5 patients without clinical picture of RF are specially discussed. The authors emphasize unfavorable prognostic significance of signs of extracorporeal obstruction indicating the probability of RF long before its manifestation. Special attention is paid to early diagnosis of symptoms of coming RF when evaluating the status of patients with DS during treatment. Timely use of respiratory resuscitation methods reduces the mortality and ensures a good chance for remissions with recovery of respiratory function, which are characteristic of RF.

  1. Neuroendocrine Immunoregulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wai-Ping; Berneman, Zwi N.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, it is generally accepted that multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex multifactorial disease involving genetic and environmental factors affecting the autoreactive immune responses that lead to damage of myelin. In this respect, intrinsic or extrinsic factors such as emotional, psychological, traumatic, or inflammatory stress as well as a variety of other lifestyle interventions can influence the neuroendocrine system. On its turn, it has been demonstrated that the neuroendocrine system has immunomodulatory potential. Moreover, the neuroendocrine and immune systems communicate bidirectionally via shared receptors and shared messenger molecules, variously called hormones, neurotransmitters, or cytokines. Discrepancies at any level can therefore lead to changes in susceptibility and to severity of several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Here we provide an overview of the complex system of crosstalk between the neuroendocrine and immune system as well as reported dysfunctions involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, including MS. Finally, possible strategies to intervene with the neuroendocrine-immune system for MS patient management will be discussed. Ultimately, a better understanding of the interactions between the neuroendocrine system and the immune system can open up new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of MS as well as other autoimmune diseases. PMID:24382974

  2. Erectile dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, H J; Poulsen, E U; Petersen, T; Dørup, J

    1988-09-01

    In a sample of 29 impotent men with multiple sclerosis and erectile problems, penile arterial inflow and venous outflow were within normal limits. In 26 patients, the pudendal evoked potential (PEP) was abnormal, and eight of these also had abnormal bulbocavernous reflex (BCR). Three patients had abnormal PEP and normal BCR, and of these, two had normal and one had abnormal nocturnal erectile activity. The validity of PEP/BCR testing was supported by normal findings in six patients with MS and without erectile problems. Nocturnal erectile activity was normal in 11 patients, of whom nine had abnormal PEP and/or BCR. A high disability score corresponded poorly with both reduced sexual function, insufficient nocturnal erectile activity, and abnormal PEP and/or BCR. Intracavernous injection of papaverine gave erection in 27 patients, the dose needed to create an erection being inversely related to the level of disablement. PEP and BCR testing may be more sensitive in defining neurogenic erectile dysfunction (ED) than nocturnal erectile activity. We considered 26 of the cases to have a neurogenic cause of ED and three to have mainly a psychogenic cause.

  3. Therapeutic targets in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Christopher P

    2007-01-01

    The precise aetiology of systemic sclerosis (SSc) remains elusive, but significant advances over the past few years have improved our understanding of the underlying pathogenic processes and identified key pathways and mediators that are potential therapeutic targets. The situation is complicated by the clinical heterogeneity of SSc and the differential pathogenesis that underlies the two commonest subsets, namely diffuse and limited cutaneous disease. However, there are common mediators that could be targeted to provide clinical benefit in both types of disease. To date, clinical success with therapies directed against logical profibrotic mediators, such as connective tissue growth factor and transforming growth factor-β, is yet to be reported, although studies are ongoing. More promising clinical results have been obtained with the dual endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan, which has been shown to manage two vascular complications of SSc effectively: pulmonary arterial hypertension and digital ulceration. It remains to be determined whether the identification of additional mediators merely furthers our knowledge of the natural history of SSc or presents targets that can be manipulated to manage SSc patients effectively. PMID:17767744

  4. Fibronectin in multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, R. A.; Mitchell, M. E.

    1989-01-01

    Cryostat sections of central nervous system (CNS) tissues of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and other CNS diseases were stained with antibodies to fibronectin, a macrophage fibronectin receptor component, fibrin/fibrinogen, and albumin using immunoperoxidase. In active, but not inactive, MS plaques vessel fibronectin was increased (to approximately 57% of Factor VIII+ vessels) over uninvolved MS and normal control white matter (P less than 0.001 for both). Fibronectin was primarily localized to vessel walls and amount of staining correlated with degree of inflammation. Active plaques and necrotic lesions also had extracellular fibronectin and fibrin/ogen. These molecules and the fibronectin receptor were found on macrophages. Albumin was more widely and diffusely distributed in lesions than fibronectin. Thus, in addition to extravasation from damaged vessels, fibronectin may be deposited on or synthesized by endothelial cells and macrophages in the CNS. Fibronectin could facilitate monocyte adhesion to endothelial cell luminal surfaces, promote migration of mononuclear cells, and enhance myelin phagocytosis in MS lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2528301

  5. Exercise and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, J P Lopes; Silvestre, R; Pinto, A C; de Carvalho, M

    2012-02-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease in which much burden is geared towards end-of-life care. Particularly in the earlier stages of ALS, many people have found both physiological and psychological boosts from various types of physical exercise for disused muscles. Proper exercise is important for preventing atrophy of muscles from disuse-a key for remaining mobile for as long as possible-and as long as it is possible to exercise comfortably and safely, for preserving cardiovascular fitness. However, the typical neuromuscular patient features a great physical inactivity and disuse weakness, and for that reason many controversial authors have contested exercise in these patients during years, especially in ALS which is rapidly progressive. There is an urgent need for dissecting in detail the real risks or benefits of exercise in controlled clinical trials to demystify this ancient paradigm. Yet, recent research studies document significant benefits in terms of survival and quality of life in ALS, poor cooperation, small sample size, uncontrolled and short-duration trials, remain the main handicaps. Sedentary barriers such as early fatigue and inherent muscle misuse should be overcome, for instance with body-weight supporting systems or non-invasive ventilation, and exercise should be faced as a potential non-monotonous way for contributing to better health-related quality of life.

  6. Clinical neurophysiology of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Leocani, Letizia; Comi, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    The availability of new treatments able to modify the natural course of multiple sclerosis (MS) has generated interest in paraclinical measures to monitor disease evolution. Among these, neurophysiologic measures, mainly evoked potentials (EPs), are used in the functional assessment of central sensorimotor and cognitive networks affected by MS. EP abnormalities may reveal subclinical lesions, objectivate the involvement of sensory and motor pathways in the presence of vague disturbances, and provide indications of the demyelinating nature of the disease process. However, their diagnostic value is much lower than that of magnetic resonance imaging, and is more sensitive to brain and cervical spinal cord lesions. The application of EPs in assessing disease severity and monitoring the evolution of nervous damage is more promising, thanks to their good correlation with disability in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies, and potential use as paraclinical endpoints in clinical trials. Recent evidence indicates that EPs performed early in the disease may help to predict a worse future progression in the long term. If confirmed, these data suggest the possible usefulness of EPs in the early identification of patients who are more likely to develop future disability, thus requiring more frequent monitoring or being potential candidates for more aggressive disease-modifying treatments.

  7. Pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Sarah; Orrell, Richard W

    2016-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or motor neuron disease is a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The primary involvement is of motor neurons in the brain, spinal cord and peripherally. There is secondary weakness of muscles and primary involvement of other brain regions, especially involving cognition. Peer-reviewed journal articles and reviews. PubMed.gov The pathogenesis of ALS remains largely unknown. There are a wide range of potential mechanisms related to neurodegeneration. An increasing number of genetic factors are recognized. There remains controversy, or lack of knowledge, in explaining how cellular events manifest as the complex human disease. There is controversy as to how well cellular and animal models of disease relate to the human disease. Large-scale international collaborative genetic epidemiological studies are replacing local studies. Therapies related to pathogenesis remain elusive, with the greatest advances to date relating to provision of care (including multidisciplinary management) and supportive care (nutrition and respiratory support). The identification of C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeats as the most frequent genetic background to ALS, and the association with frontotemporal dementia, gives the potential of a genetic background against which to study other risk factors, triggers and pathogenic mechanisms, and to develop potential therapies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. BG-12 in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J Theodore; Fox, Robert J

    2013-02-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an orally administered agent that has been used for over 40 years for the treatment of psoriasis. Recent work demonstrates both DMF immunomodulatory and neuroprotective actions in vitro and in animal models of autoreactive central nervous system inflammation and neurodegeneration. DMF acts through chemical modification of the repressor protein Keap1, allowing stabilization and nuclear translocation of the transcription factor Nrf2, with subsequent downstream activation of a cascade of several cytoprotective and antioxidant pathways. Additionally, suppression of transcription factor NF-κB-mediated proinflammatory signaling results in the inhibition of proinflammatory responses and induction of anti-inflammatory cytokines. BG-12 is an orally administered, enteric-coated microtablet preparation of DMF. In two phase III, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) trials, BG-12 led to a 44 to 53% reduction in annualized relapse rate and a 71 to 85% reduction in new T2 lesions on magnetic resonance imaging. The most common side effects of BG-12 are cutaneous flushing and gastrointestinal symptoms, with the highest incidence in the first month after starting treatment. No serious safety signals were seen during the phase II and III trials, including no increased risk of opportunistic infections or cancer. Altogether, BG-12's novel mechanism of action appears to provide a favorable balance of efficacy, safety, and tolerability for treatment of relapsing MS. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. [Epidemiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Soriani, M-H; Desnuelle, C

    2009-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common motor neuron disease. Loss of pyramidal and anterior horn motor neurons leads to progressive limb weakness, disability, dysarthria, dysphagia and respiratory insufficiency with a progressive fatal course. The incidence of ALS ranges between 1.5 to 2.5 for 100,000 per year. Although there are familial cases of ALS, about 90% are sporadic and of unknown etiology. Several exogenous risk factors have been documented. However, no convincing evidence has demonstrated in a reproducible manner an association between an environmental or lifestyle risk factor and ALS. Disease duration varies considerably, ranging from a few months to 10-15 years with a mean survival of about 36 months. Prognostic factors such as age, site of disease onset, nutritional, functional and respiratory status at the diagnosis or delay between beginning of the disease and diagnosis have been reported but they appear to be insufficient to explain prognostic variability. These last 15 years, development of supportive care for ALS patients and management in ALS centers may have contributed to improve survival. Finally, ALS centres, and particularly French ALS centres, have developed databases to improve our knowledge of ALS, phenotypic characterization, more accurate phenotype-genotype correlations and thus contribute to new therapeutics developments.

  10. Multiple sclerosis: Prospects and promise.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Stephen L; Chan, Jonah R; Oksenberg, Jorge R

    2013-09-01

    We have entered a golden era in multiple sclerosis (MS) research. Two decades ago, our understanding of the disease was largely descriptive and there were no approved therapies to modify the natural history of MS. Today, delineation of immune pathways relevant to MS have been clarified; a comprehensive map of genes that influence risk compiled; clues to environmental triggers identified; noninvasive in vivo monitoring of the MS disease process has been revolutionized by high-field MRI; and many effective therapies for the early, relapsing, component of MS now exist. However, major challenges remain. We still have no useful treatment for progressive MS (the holy grail of MS research), no means to repair injured axons or protect neurons, and extremely limited evidence to guide treatment decisions. Recent advances have set in place a foundation for development of increasingly selective immunotherapy for patients; application of genetic and genomic discoveries to improve therapeutic options; development of remyelination or neuroprotection therapies for progressive MS; and integrating clinical, imaging and genomic data for personalized medicine. MS has now advanced from the backwaters of autoimmune disease research to the front-line, and definitive answers, including cures, are now realistic goals for the next decade. Many of the breakthrough discoveries in MS have also resulted from meaningful interactions across disciplines, and especially from translational and basic scientists working closely with clinicians, highlighting that the clinical value of discoveries are most often revealed when ideas developed in the laboratory are tested at the bedside. Copyright © 2013 American Neurological Association.

  11. [Diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis complex].

    PubMed

    Belousova, E D; Dorofeeva, M Yu; Pivovarova, A M; Katusheva, O V

    2015-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a autosomal dominant instantly progressing disease, causing the development of benign tumors in all organs and tissues of human body. According to International Consensus Conference (2012), definite or possible TSC diagnosis can be made. For the definite diagnosis of TSC, two major criteria or one major criterion and ≥2 minor criteria have to be present. For a possible diagnosis, 1 major criterion or ≥2 minor criteria should be found. A pathogenic mutation in the TSC1 or TSC2 gene is by itself sufficient for a definite diagnosis. There are following major diagnostic criteria: angiofibromas (≥3) or forehead plaque; hypomelanotic macules (≥3); ungual fibromas (≥2); chagrin patch; multiple retinal hamartomas; cortical dysplasias (≥3, include tubers and cerebral white matter radial migration lines; subependymal nodules; subependymal giant cell astrocytoma; cardiac rhabdomyoma; lymphagioleiomatosis and renal angiomyolipomas (≥2). The minor criteria are the following ones: dental enamel pits (≥3); intraoral fibromas (≥2); non-renal hamartomas; retinal achromatic patch; confetti skin lesions; multiple renal cysts. Diagnosis of TSC is not difficult if a physician is familiar with clinical presentation of the disease.

  12. [Oral treatments in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Meca-Lallana, José Eustasio; Hernández-Clares, Rocío; Carreón-Guarnizo, Ester

    2014-12-01

    The development of new disease-modifying drugs (DMD) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), which share the common denominator of oral administration, considerably improves patient expectations in terms of effectiveness, tolerability and treatment adherence compared with currently available drugs. However, the common route of administration of these drugs does not mean that they are equivalent, since the heading of "oral route" encompasses drugs with distinct indications and mechanisms of action, as well as heterogeneous results in terms of efficacy and safety, allowing treatment to be personalized according to the each patient' s characteristics. Currently, four oral DMD are available or in an advanced stage of clinical development: fingolimod, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate and laquinimod. In pivotal trials versus placebo, these molecules reduced the annualized rate of exacerbations versus placebo by 54%, 31%, 53% and 23%, respectively, the risk of progression of disability by 31%, 30%, 38% and 36%, and the number of active lesions showing contrast uptake on magnetic resonance imaging by 82%, 80%, 90% and 37%, respectively. Based on the risk/benefit ratio, fingolimod is indicated in patients with suboptimal response to initial DMD or in severe rapidly progressing RRMS, while the remaining drugs can be used as first-line options. Clinical experience with these treatments will provide new data on safety and effectiveness, which will be determinant when establishing therapeutic algorithms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Bacterial toxins and Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gay, Frederick

    2007-11-15

    The primary pathogenetic mechanism responsible for the distinctive demyelinating lesions in the Central Nervous System (CNS) in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), first described in remarkable detail by Charcot more than 170 years ago, remains one of the most baffling conundrums in medicine. A possible role for bacterial cell molecules and transportable proteins in the pathogenesis of MS is reviewed. The ability of bacterial toxins to distort immunity and to cause distinctive toxic damage in the nervous system is discussed in the light of largely forgotten data linking bacterial nasopharyngeal infections with optic neuritis, optochiasmatic arachnoiditis and MS. While the blood-brain barrier substantially protects the CNS from hematogenous toxins, there is a route by which the barrier may be by-passed. Data is reviewed which shows that the CSF and extra-cellular fluid circulation is bi-directionally linked to the lymphatic drainage channels of the nasopharyngeal mucosa. While this provides a facility by which the CNS may mount immunological responses to antigenic challenges from within, it is also a route by which products of nasopharyngeal infection may drain into the CNS and be processed by the immune cells of the meninges and Virchow-Robin perivascular spaces. If potentially toxic bacterial products are identified in early MS tissues at these sites, this would provide an entirely new insight into the pathogenetic mechanisms of this frustratingly enigmatic disease.

  14. Role of Chlamydia in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, M V; Kolkova, N I; Morgunova, E Yu; Pashko, Yu P; Zigangirova, N A; Zakharova, M N

    2015-09-01

    Chlamydia and antibodies to them were detected by serological, molecular biological, and culture methods in the sera and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis and in the reference groups of subjects without neurological diseases. Correlations between the agent presence in the biological fluids of patients and clinical characteristics of the disease were analyzed. C. pneumoniae were more incident in the biological liquids of patients with multiple sclerosis than in healthy volunteers. On the other hand, the incidence of the agent in the patients was not high and its presence did not correlate with the clinical manifestations. C. trachomatis was equally rare in the patients and volunteers. The studies indicated the existence of a group of patients infected by C. pneumoniae in the cohort of patients with multiple sclerosis, but the impact of this agent for the disease course remains unclear.

  15. Anti-integrin therapy for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Eiji; Nakahashi, Susumu; Okamoto, Takayuki; Imai, Hiroshi; Shimaoka, Motomu

    2012-01-01

    Integrins are the foremost family of cell adhesion molecules that regulate immune cell trafficking in health and diseases. Integrin alpha4 mediates organ-specific migration of immune cells to the inflamed brain, thereby playing the critical role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Anti-alpha4 integrin therapy aiming to block infiltration of autoreactive lymphocytes to the inflamed brain has been validated in several clinical trials for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. This paper provides readers with an overview of the molecular and structural bases of integrin activation as well as rationale for using anti-alpha4 integrin therapy for multiple sclerosis and then chronicles the rise and fall of this treatment strategy using natalizumab, a humanized anti-alpha4 integrin.

  16. Dropped head syndrome and Systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Edoardo; Rossi, Carmelina; Salsano, Felice

    2009-05-01

    The prominent or isolated weakness of cervical extensor muscles is a relatively rare clinical sign. Commonly, this is known as "dropped-head syndrome". This abnormal flexion of the head may occur in a variety of neuromuscular diseases and in a few non-neurological disorders as well. Systemic sclerosis is a clinically heterogeneous disorder which affects small arteries, microvessels and connective tissue with the involvement of multiple organs such as lung, heart, kidney and gastrointestinal tract. There is no evidence in literature of association between dropped head syndrome and rheumatic diseases, particularly systemic sclerosis. The case we describe concerns a 74-year-old woman with dropped-head syndrome associated to Systemic sclerosis and pulmonary hypertension in absence of myositis signs.

  17. Longitudinal multiple sclerosis lesion segmentation data resource.

    PubMed

    Carass, Aaron; Roy, Snehashis; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L; Magrath, Elizabeth; Gherman, Adrian; Button, Julia; Nguyen, James; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Calabresi, Peter A; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M; Ellingsen, Lotta M; Reich, Daniel S; Prince, Jerry L; Pham, Dzung L

    2017-06-01

    The data presented in this article is related to the research article entitled "Longitudinal multiple sclerosis lesion segmentation: Resource and challenge" (Carass et al., 2017) [1]. In conjunction with the 2015 International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging, we organized a longitudinal multiple sclerosis (MS) lesion segmentation challenge providing training and test data to registered participants. The training data consists of five subjects with a mean of 4.4 (±0.55) time-points, and test data of fourteen subjects with a mean of 4.4 (±0.67) time-points. All 82 data sets had the white matter lesions associated with multiple sclerosis delineated by two human expert raters. The training data including multi-modal scans and manually delineated lesion masks is available for download. In addition, the testing data is also being made available in conjunction with a website for evaluating the automated analysis of the testing data.

  18. Are cannabinoids effective in multiple sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Meza, Rodrigo; Peña, Javier; García, Karen; Corsi, Oscar; Rada, Gabriel

    2017-03-10

    Multiple beneficial effects have been proposed lately for cannabinoids in different clinical situations. Among them, it has been postulated they would control symptoms of multiple sclerosis. However, there is no consensus about their real clinical role. To answer this question, we searched in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening multiple databases. We identified 25 systematic reviews including 35 studies overall, of which 26 were randomized trials. We extracted data, conducted a meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table using the GRADE approach. We concluded cannabinoids in multiple sclerosis do not reduce spasticity or pain, and are probably associated to frequent adverse effects.

  19. Quality of life in mulptiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jaracz, K; Brola, W

    2010-01-01

    An overall aim of treatment in multiple sclerosis is to lower the negative impact of the disease on functioning and quality of life of patients. Therefore, a measurement of functioning and quality of life should be included in the evaluation of the effectiveness of treatment. In this paper the most commonly used quality of life questionnaires, either generic and specific, were presented. Information about clinical and functional status is useful in the interpretation of the quality of life assessment results. Because of that, instruments for the assessment of depression, cognitive functions, functional ability and fatigue in multiple sclerosis were also described. PMID:21254730

  20. [Large vessels vasculopathy in systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Tejera Segura, Beatriz; Ferraz-Amaro, Iván

    2015-12-07

    Vasculopathy in systemic sclerosis is a severe, in many cases irreversible, manifestation that can lead to amputation. While the classical clinical manifestations of the disease have to do with the involvement of microcirculation, proximal vessels of upper and lower limbs can also be affected. This involvement of large vessels may be related to systemic sclerosis, vasculitis or atherosclerotic, and the differential diagnosis is not easy. To conduct a proper and early diagnosis, it is essential to start prompt appropriate treatment. In this review, we examine the involvement of large vessels in scleroderma, an understudied manifestation with important prognostic and therapeutic implications.

  1. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Historical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Katz, Jonathan S; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Barohn, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    This article looks back in time to see where the foundational basis for the understanding of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis originated. This foundation was created primarily in France by Jean-Martin Charcot and his fellow countrymen and disciples, along with key contributions from early clinicians in England and Germany. The early work on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis provides a useful foundation for today's clinicians with respect to tying together genetic and biologic aspects of the disorder that have been discovered over the past few decades. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Medico-legal assessment of systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Graninger, M

    2007-10-01

    Diagnosis and management of the rare disease systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) is a challenge for the physician, not least due to the possible multitude of organ systems involved. The medico-legal assessment is important for the patient claiming insurance benefits or applying for early retirement due to scleroderma. Both the specialist for sclerosis and the impartial medico-legal assessor have to cooperate and understand the respective partner's requirements and terminology. Evaluations of individual organ impairments, handicaps and disabilities have to be taken into account when assessing the degree of impairment of occupational activity.

  3. New targets for treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Lawrence

    2008-11-15

    By studying gene transcripts in active lesions of multiple sclerosis via robotic sequencing and gene chips, as well as studying the very same tissue via proteomics, we have discovered several targets at the tipping points in pathophysiologic pathways controlling relapse and remission in multiple sclerosis. In this Charcot Lecture, I shall focus on osteopontin-the binding partner for alpha4 beta 1 integrin, on alpha B crystallin and on two members of the coagulation cascade tissue factor and the inhibitor of protein C. These four proteins are critical in controlling relapse and remission in MS.

  4. Anal sphincter dysfunction in multiple sclerosis: an observation manometric study.

    PubMed

    Marola, Silvia; Ferrarese, Alessia; Gibin, Enrico; Capobianco, Marco; Bertolotto, Antonio; Enrico, Stefano; Solej, Mario; Martino, Valter; Destefano, Ines; Nano, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Constipation, obstructed defecation, and fecal incontinence are frequent complaints in multiple sclerosis. The literature on the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these disorders is scant. Using anorectal manometry, we compared the anorectal function in patients with and without multiple sclerosis. 136 patients referred from our Center for Multiple Sclerosis to the Coloproctology Outpatient Clinic, between January 2005 and December 2011, were enrolled. The patients were divided into four groups: multiple sclerosis patients with constipation (group A); multiple sclerosis patients with fecal incontinence (group B); non-multiple sclerosis patients with constipation (group C); non-multiple sclerosis patients with fecal incontinence (group D). Anorectal manometry was performed to measure: resting anal pressure; maximum squeeze pressure; rectoanal inhibitory reflex; filling pressure and urge pressure. The difference between resting anal pressure before and after maximum squeeze maneuvers was defined as the change in resting anal pressure calculated for each patient.

  5. Systemic sclerosis and malignancy: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Malignancy is associated with systemic sclerosis in between 3.6 and 10.7% of patients diagnosed with systemic sclerosis. The diagnosis of systemic sclerosis may occur before, concurrent with, or after the diagnosis of malignancy. All published reports of malignancy with systemic sclerosis are reviewed. Lung cancer is the most frequent type of cancer seen in patients with systemic sclerosis, followed by breast cancer. Risk factors for the development of malignancy in patients with systemic sclerosis are female gender, increased age, and diffuse systemic sclerosis. Autoantibodies such as anticentromere and antitopoisomerase I are inconsistent in their risk for developing malignancy. Vigilance is recommended in this group of patients based on their increased risk of developing cancer.

  6. Nutrition Facts in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rossano, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    The question whether dietary habits and lifestyle have influence on the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still a matter of debate, and at present, MS therapy is not associated with any information on diet and lifestyle. Here we show that dietary factors and lifestyle may exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms by modulating the inflammatory status of the disease both in relapsing-remitting MS and in primary-progressive MS. This is achieved by controlling both the metabolic and inflammatory pathways in the human cell and the composition of commensal gut microbiota. What increases inflammation are hypercaloric Western-style diets, characterized by high salt, animal fat, red meat, sugar-sweetened drinks, fried food, low fiber, and lack of physical exercise. The persistence of this type of diet upregulates the metabolism of human cells toward biosynthetic pathways including those of proinflammatory molecules and also leads to a dysbiotic gut microbiota, alteration of intestinal immunity, and low-grade systemic inflammation. Conversely, exercise and low-calorie diets based on the assumption of vegetables, fruit, legumes, fish, prebiotics, and probiotics act on nuclear receptors and enzymes that upregulate oxidative metabolism, downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules, and restore or maintain a healthy symbiotic gut microbiota. Now that we know the molecular mechanisms by which dietary factors and exercise affect the inflammatory status in MS, we can expect that a nutritional intervention with anti-inflammatory food and dietary supplements can alleviate possible side effects of immune-modulatory drugs and the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and thus favor patient wellness. PMID:25694551

  7. Iron chelation and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Kelsey J.; Lynch, Sharon G.; LeVine, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Histochemical and MRI studies have demonstrated that MS (multiple sclerosis) patients have abnormal deposition of iron in both gray and white matter structures. Data is emerging indicating that this iron could partake in pathogenesis by various mechanisms, e.g., promoting the production of reactive oxygen species and enhancing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Iron chelation therapy could be a viable strategy to block iron-related pathological events or it can confer cellular protection by stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor 1α, a transcription factor that normally responds to hypoxic conditions. Iron chelation has been shown to protect against disease progression and/or limit iron accumulation in some neurological disorders or their experimental models. Data from studies that administered a chelator to animals with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of MS, support the rationale for examining this treatment approach in MS. Preliminary clinical studies have been performed in MS patients using deferoxamine. Although some side effects were observed, the large majority of patients were able to tolerate the arduous administration regimen, i.e., 6–8 h of subcutaneous infusion, and all side effects resolved upon discontinuation of treatment. Importantly, these preliminary studies did not identify a disqualifying event for this experimental approach. More recently developed chelators, deferasirox and deferiprone, are more desirable for possible use in MS given their oral administration, and importantly, deferiprone can cross the blood–brain barrier. However, experiences from other conditions indicate that the potential for adverse events during chelation therapy necessitates close patient monitoring and a carefully considered administration regimen. PMID:24397846

  8. Alemtuzumab therapy for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Coles, Alasdair J

    2013-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that is administered daily for 5 days, and then no further therapy is required for 12 months. It causes rapid and prolonged lymphocyte depletion; the consequent homeostatic reconstitution leads to a radically reformed lymphocyte pool with a relative increase in regulatory T cells and expansion of autoreactive T cells. Although previously licensed for the treatment of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, it is now been considered for licensing in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). From a disappointing experience with alemtuzumab in progressive MS, Alastair Compston and I argued that immunotherapies should be given early in the course of the disease. In a unique program of drug development in MS, alemtuzumab has been compared in 1 phase 2 trial and 2 phase 3 trials with the active comparator interferon beta-1a. In all trials, alemtuzumab was more effective in suppressing relapses than interferon beta-1a. In one phase 2 and one phase 3 trial, alemtuzumab also reduced the risk of accumulating disability compared with interferon beta-1a. Indeed, alemtuzumab treatment led to an improvement in disability and a reduction in cerebral atrophy. The safety issues are infusion-associated reactions largely controlled by methylprednisolone, antihistamines, and antipyretics; mild-to-moderate infections (with 3 opportunistic infections from the open-label experience: 1 case each of spirochaetal gingivitis, pyogenic granuloma, and Listeria meningitis); and autoimmunity. Usually autoimmunity is directed against the thyroid gland, but causes (1 %) immune thrombocytopenia, and in a few cases antiglomerular basement membrane syndrome. Alemtuzumab is an effective therapy for early relapsing-remitting MS, offering disability improvement at least to 5 years after treatment. Its use requires careful monitoring so that potentially serious side effects can be treated early and effectively.

  9. Nutrition facts in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Paolo; Rossano, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    The question whether dietary habits and lifestyle have influence on the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still a matter of debate, and at present, MS therapy is not associated with any information on diet and lifestyle. Here we show that dietary factors and lifestyle may exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms by modulating the inflammatory status of the disease both in relapsing-remitting MS and in primary-progressive MS. This is achieved by controlling both the metabolic and inflammatory pathways in the human cell and the composition of commensal gut microbiota. What increases inflammation are hypercaloric Western-style diets, characterized by high salt, animal fat, red meat, sugar-sweetened drinks, fried food, low fiber, and lack of physical exercise. The persistence of this type of diet upregulates the metabolism of human cells toward biosynthetic pathways including those of proinflammatory molecules and also leads to a dysbiotic gut microbiota, alteration of intestinal immunity, and low-grade systemic inflammation. Conversely, exercise and low-calorie diets based on the assumption of vegetables, fruit, legumes, fish, prebiotics, and probiotics act on nuclear receptors and enzymes that upregulate oxidative metabolism, downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules, and restore or maintain a healthy symbiotic gut microbiota. Now that we know the molecular mechanisms by which dietary factors and exercise affect the inflammatory status in MS, we can expect that a nutritional intervention with anti-inflammatory food and dietary supplements can alleviate possible side effects of immune-modulatory drugs and the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and thus favor patient wellness.

  10. Rituximab in early systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Maaike; Meijs, Jessica; Dorjée, Annemarie L; Marsan, Nina Ajmone; Schouffoer, Anne; Ninaber, Maarten K; Quint, Koen D; Bonte-Mineur, Femke; Huizinga, Tom W J; Scherer, Hans U; de Vries-Bouwstra, Jeska K

    2017-01-01

    Objectives (1) Hypothesis testing of the potency of rituximab (RTX) in preventing fibrotic complications and (2) assessing acceptability and feasibility of RTX in early systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods A small, 24-month, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-centre trial in patients with SSc diagnosed <2 years was conducted. Patients received RTX or placebo infusions at t=0, t=15 days and t=6 months. Patients were clinically evaluated every 3 months, with lung function tests and high-resolution CT every other visit. Skin biopsies were taken at baseline and month 3. Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was performed at every visit, except at months 9 and 18. Adverse events, course of skin and pulmonary involvement and B cell populations in skin and peripheral blood were evaluated. Results In total 16, patients (rituximab n=8, placebo n=8) were included. Twelve patients had diffuse cutaneous SSc. Eighty-eight adverse events (RTX n=53, placebo n=35, p=0.22) and 11 serious adverse events (RTX n=7, placebo n=4, p=0.36) occurred. No unexpected RTX-related events were observed. Mean skin score over time did not differ between the groups. Over time, forced vital capacity and extent of lung involvement slightly improved with RTX, but this difference was insignificant. In peripheral blood B cells depletion was demonstrated. Conclusions No unexpected safety issues were observed with RTX in early SSc. Although this small trial could not confirm or reject potential efficacy of RTX in these patients, future placebo-controlled trials are warranted, specifically in the subgroup of patients with pulmonary involvement. Trial registration number EudraCT 2008-07180-16; Results. PMID:28879049

  11. Targeted Therapy in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Murray

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapies use an understanding of the pathophysiology of a disease in an individual patient. Although targeted therapy for systemic sclerosis (SSc, scleroderma) has not yet reached the level of patient-specific treatments, recent developments in the understanding of the global pathophysiology of the disease have led to new treatments based on the cells and pathways that have been shown to be involved in the disease pathogenesis. The presence of a B cell signature in skin biopsies has led to the trial of rituximab, an anti-CD20 antibody, in SSc. The well-known properties of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in promoting collagen synthesis and secretion has led to a small trial of fresolimumab, a human IgG4 monoclonal antibody capable of neutralizing TGF-β. Evidence supporting important roles for interleukin-6 in the pathogenesis of SSc have led to a large trial of tocilizumab in SSc. Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) upon binding of nitric oxide (NO) to the sGC molecule. Processes such as cell growth and proliferation are regulated by cGMP. Evidence that sGC may play a role in SSc has led to a trial of riociguat, a molecule that sensitizes sGC to endogenous NO. Tyrosine kinases (TKs) are involved in a wide variety of physiologic and pathological processes including vascular remodeling and fibrogenesis such as occurs in SSc. This has led to a trial of nintedanib, a next-generation tyrosine-kinase (TK) inhibitor which targets multiple TKs, in SSc. PMID:27824545

  12. Social cognition in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Joseph; Enzinger, Christian; Kontopantelis, Evangelos; Yung, Alison R.; Elliott, Rebecca; Drake, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To quantify the magnitude of deficits in theory of mind (ToM) and facial emotion recognition among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) relative to healthy controls. Methods: An electronic database search of Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Embase was conducted from inception to April 1, 2016. Eligible studies were original research articles published in peer-reviewed journals that examined ToM or facial emotion recognition among patients with a diagnosis of MS and a healthy control comparison group. Data were independently extracted by 2 authors. Effect sizes were calculated using Hedges g. Results: Twenty-one eligible studies were identified assessing ToM (12 studies) and/or facial emotion recognition (13 studies) among 722 patients with MS and 635 controls. Deficits in both ToM (g = −0.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.88 to −0.55, p < 0.001) and facial emotion recognition (g = −0.64, 95% CI −0.81 to −0.47, p < 0.001) were identified among patients with MS relative to healthy controls. The largest deficits were observed for visual ToM tasks and for the recognition of negative facial emotional expressions. Older age predicted larger emotion recognition deficits. Other cognitive domains were inconsistently associated with social cognitive performance. Conclusions: Social cognitive deficits are an overlooked but potentially important aspect of cognitive impairment in MS with potential prognostic significance for social functioning and quality of life. Further research is required to clarify the longitudinal course of social cognitive dysfunction, its association with MS disease characteristics and neurocognitive impairment, and the MS-specific neurologic damage underlying these deficits. PMID:27655736

  13. Rituximab in early systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Maaike; Meijs, Jessica; Dorjée, Annemarie L; Marsan, Nina Ajmone; Schouffoer, Anne; Ninaber, Maarten K; Quint, Koen D; Bonte-Mineur, Femke; Huizinga, Tom W J; Scherer, Hans U; de Vries-Bouwstra, Jeska K

    2017-01-01

    (1) Hypothesis testing of the potency of rituximab (RTX) in preventing fibrotic complications and (2) assessing acceptability and feasibility of RTX in early systemic sclerosis (SSc). A small, 24-month, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-centre trial in patients with SSc diagnosed <2 years was conducted. Patients received RTX or placebo infusions at t=0, t=15 days and t=6 months. Patients were clinically evaluated every 3 months, with lung function tests and high-resolution CT every other visit. Skin biopsies were taken at baseline and month 3. Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was performed at every visit, except at months 9 and 18. Adverse events, course of skin and pulmonary involvement and B cell populations in skin and peripheral blood were evaluated. In total 16, patients (rituximab n=8, placebo n=8) were included. Twelve patients had diffuse cutaneous SSc. Eighty-eight adverse events (RTX n=53, placebo n=35, p=0.22) and 11 serious adverse events (RTX n=7, placebo n=4, p=0.36) occurred. No unexpected RTX-related events were observed. Mean skin score over time did not differ between the groups. Over time, forced vital capacity and extent of lung involvement slightly improved with RTX, but this difference was insignificant. In peripheral blood B cells depletion was demonstrated. No unexpected safety issues were observed with RTX in early SSc. Although this small trial could not confirm or reject potential efficacy of RTX in these patients, future placebo-controlled trials are warranted, specifically in the subgroup of patients with pulmonary involvement. EudraCT 2008-07180-16; Results.

  14. Antinuclear Antibody Negative Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, GA; Assassi, S; Wigley, F; Hummers, L; Varga, J; Hinchcliff, M; Khanna, D; Schiopu, E; Phillips, K; Furst, DE; Steen, V; Baron, M; Hudson, M; Taillefer, SS; Pope, J; Jones, N; Docherty, P; Khalidi, NA; Robinson, D; Simms, R; Silver, R; Frech, TM; Fessler, B; Molitor, J; Fritzler, M; Segal, B; Al-Kassab, F; Perry, M; Yang, J; Zamanian, S; Reveille, JD; Arnett, FC; Pedroza, C; Mayes, MD

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the demographic and clinical characteristics of systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients without antinuclear antibodies (ANA) compared to ANA positive patients. Methods SSc patients enrolled in the Scleroderma Family Registry and DNA Repository were included. Relevant demographic and clinical data were entered by participating sites or obtained by chart review. ANA and SSc related antibodies were determined in all investigated patients using commercially available kits at our laboratories. Results This study included 3249 patients, of whom 208 (6.4%) were ANA negative. The proportion of male patients was higher in the ANA negative group (OR 1.65; p=0.008). ANA negative patients experienced less vasculopathic manifestations of SSc. The percent predicted diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide (DLco) was higher in ANA negative patients (p=0.03). Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) per right heart catheterization was less common in the ANA negative group (OR= 0.28; p=0.03). Furthermore, patients with negative ANA had a lower prevalence of telangiectasias and digital ulcers/pits (OR= 0.59; p=0.03 and OR=0.38; p=0.01, respectively). Although diffuse cutaneous involvement was more common, the modified Rodnan Skin Score (mRSS) was lower in the ANA negative group (2.4 points lower, p=0.05). Furthermore, they experienced more malabsorption (p=0.05). There was no difference in the frequency of pulmonary fibrosis or scleroderma renal crisis. All-cause mortality was not different between the two groups (p=0.28). Conclusions In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that SSc patients who are ANA negative constitute a distinct subset of SSc with less vasculopathy (less PAH, digital ulcers and fewer telangiectasias), a greater proportion of males and possibly, more frequent lower gastrointestinal involvement. PMID:25578738

  15. Defective immunoregulation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Hoffman, P M; Pryjma, J; Hogan, E L; Fudenberg, H H

    1980-11-01

    Imbalances in T cell subpopulations have been reported in multiple sclerosis (MS). In the present study of 31 MS patients, the percentage of T cells with Fc receptors for IgG (Tg) was found to be increased in patients with chronic progressive disease, and another T cell subset binding to the Raji B lymphoid cell line was decreased. An inverse correlation (r = -0.675; < 95% confidence limit) was found between these two subsets, suggesting that they vary inversely in MS. The mitogenic responses of MS mononuclear cells, isolated T cells, and recombinet T and non-T cells to the lectins phytohemagglutinin and pokeweek mitogen (PWM) did not differ from those of normal cells. However, more immunoglobulin (Ig)-producing cells were generated in a PWM-driven system with cells from MS patients than with cells from age-matched controls (p < 0.05). Autologous recombination of separated T and non-T cells did not significantly modify these results. T cells from MS patients added to B cells from normal controls exerted an effect that was related to their percentage of Tg cells; that is, values above 15% were associated with a suppression of Ig production, whereas for Tg values below 12%, a helper effect or no modification was observed. These results suggest that changes in T cell subsets in MS are related to changes in functional ability to modulate Ig production by normal B cells. However, MS B cells partly escape regulation by their own T cells, suggesting an associated B cell hyperactivity.

  16. [Hypothalamic involvement in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Darlix, A; Mathey, G; Monin, M-L; Sauvée, M; Braun, M; Schaff, J-L; Debouverie, M

    2012-05-01

    Hypothalamic involvement is a rare condition in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). We report two patients with a long history of MS who presented with severe acute hypothermia with associated thrombocytopenia and elevated transaminase levels. Several cases of hypothermia or hyperthermia in patients with MS have been reported in the literature. They could be linked with hypothalamic lesions, in particular in the pre-optic area. However, other anatomical locations seem to be involved in thermoregulation and can be affected by MS. Besides, some cases of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion have been reported in patients with MS. Finally, some sleep disorders, particularly hypersomnia or narcolepsy, could be related to hypothalamic lesions, through the fall in hypocretin-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid. Hypocretin-1 is a neuropeptide that is secreted by some hypothalamic cells. It plays a role in the sleep-awake rhythm. We report one patient with narcolepsy and cataplexy before the first symptoms of MS appeared. Hypothalamic signs are rare in MS. However, several series of autopsies have shown a high frequency of demyelinating lesions in the hypothalamic area. Among these lesions, the proportion of active lesions seems elevated. Yet only few of them have a clinical or biological translation such as thermoregulation dysfunction, sleep disorders or natremia abnormalities. Thus, it seems unlikely that inflammatory hypothalamic lesions alone, even when bilateral, could be the explanation of these signs. A sufficient number of inflammatory demyelinating lesions, which we can observe in patients with a long history of MS and an already severe disability, is probably necessary to develop such a rare symptomatology. Hypothalamic signs might be a factor of poor prognosis for the disease course and progression of the disability.

  17. Tuberous sclerosis complex surveillance and management: recommendations of the 2012 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Darcy A; Northrup, Hope

    2013-10-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a genetic disorder affecting every organ system, but disease manifestations vary significantly among affected individuals. The diverse and varied presentations and progression can be life-threatening with significant impact on cost and quality of life. Current surveillance and management practices are highly variable among region and country, reflective of the fact that last consensus recommendations occurred in 1998 and an updated, comprehensive standard is lacking that incorporates the latest scientific evidence and current best clinical practices. The 2012 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Consensus Group, comprising 79 specialists from 14 countries, was organized into 12 separate subcommittees, each led by a clinician with advanced expertise in tuberous sclerosis complex and the relevant medical subspecialty. Each subcommittee focused on a specific disease area with important clinical management implications and was charged with formulating key clinical questions to address within its focus area, reviewing relevant literature, evaluating the strength of data, and providing a recommendation accordingly. The updated consensus recommendations for clinical surveillance and management in tuberous sclerosis complex are summarized here. The recommendations are relevant to the entire lifespan of the patient, from infancy to adulthood, including both individuals where the diagnosis is newly made as well as individuals where the diagnosis already is established. The 2012 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Consensus Recommendations provide an evidence-based, standardized approach for optimal clinical care provided for individuals with tuberous sclerosis complex. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hippocampal sclerosis in association with neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Singla, Monika; Singh, Parampreet; Kaushal, Sandeep; Bansal, Rajinder; Singh, Gagandeep

    2007-09-01

    To discuss the possible mechanisms underlying a dual pathology combining neurocysticercosis and hippocampal atrophy, illustrated by the observation of four patients with epilepsy. The first patient presented at the age of four years with a first episode of status epilepticus, presumably due to an inflamed, calcified, parenchymal cysticercus granuloma. Thereafter, he had occasional seizures. Routine MRI undertaken several years later revealed unilateral hippocampal atrophy and sclerosis. Two other patients with initial imaging evidence of active neurocysticercosis located close to the hippocampus, and occasional seizures, developed ipsilateral hippocampal sclerosis. The seizure disorder of our fourth patient, with medically intractable epilepsy, was initially attributed to a calcified cysticercus granuloma. Clinical description, video-EEG telemetry and imaging work-up suggested a diagnosis of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy due to hippocampal sclerosis. Definitive conclusions as to the underlying mechanisms cannot be derived from the present, retrospective series of only four patients. However, the following suggestions can be made: 1) seizures due to neurocysticercosis may constitute the initial precipitating illness for the development of hippocampal sclerosis, 2) the hippocampus may be involved in host brain inflammation and gliosis in response to a nearby, degenerating cysticercus, 3) the seizure focus formed by the degenerating cysticercus, engenders epileptogenic changes in the hippocampus through kindling, and 4) the two conditions may coexist purely by chance. Systematic and prospective, serial MRI evaluations of hippocampal structures in patients with neurocysticercosis should contribute to further clarify the underlying mechanisms.

  19. Therapeutic strategies in multiple sclerosis. I. Immunotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Hohlfeld, R

    1999-01-01

    This review first addresses several general aspects of the immunotherapy of multiple sclerosis. Next, two approved immunomodulatory treatments, interferon-beta and copolymer-1 (glatiramer acetate), are reviewed in more detail. Finally, other immunosuppressive therapies and experimental strategies are briefly discussed. PMID:10603621

  20. Cognitive and depressive disorders in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Alajbegović, Azra; Loga, Natasa; Tiro, Naida; Alajbegović, Salem; Cindro, Veselin; Hozo, Izet

    2009-03-01

    Among other symptoms, multiple sclerosis can also produce symptoms of affective and cognitive disorders. The majority of patients have certain cognitive dysfunctions, and the' most common affective disorder is reactive depression. The aim of the study was to determine the correlation of the Mini-Mental State (MMS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scale scores with the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score in patients with multiple sclerosis treated at University Department of Neurology, Sarajevo University Clinical Center in Sarajevo. We evaluated 50 randomly selected patients with various types of multiple sclerosis using the MMS, BDI and EDSS instruments. The study included 33 women and 17 men (66% : 34%), mean age 40.74 years (SD 9.236). The mean value of EDSS score was 3.98, ranging from 1.0 to 8.5 in women and from 1.0 to 6.5 in men. BDI scale scores showed a mean value of 12.56. The mean MMS score in baseline sample was 26.88. Statistically significant positive correlation was found between age and EDSS score, and negative correlation between EDSS and MMS, as well as between BDI and MMS. Study results indicated older patients with multiple sclerosis to have a higher EDSS score with more pronounced cognitive disturbances. There was no statistically significant correlation between EDSS score and depression.

  1. Salivary antioxidants in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zalewska, Anna; Knaś, Małgorzata; Gińdzieńska-Sieśkiewicz, Ewa; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Klimiuk, Anna; Litwin, Katarzyna; Sierakowski, Stanisław; Waszkiel, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    In spite of relatively large amount of evidence that oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis, there is no study analyzing antioxidants profile of the saliva of these patients. The aim of this study was to compare salivary antioxidants in subjects with systemic sclerosis and the healthy controls. The unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow and the specific activity of peroxidase, superoxide dismutase 1, the total amount of uric acid, and total antioxidant status were determined in two subgroups of systemic sclerosis women and healthy controls. A significant increase in the specific activity of peroxidase, a significant decrease in the total amount of uric acid and total antioxidants status in unstimulated saliva as well as a significant increase in all antioxidants examined in stimulated saliva of group with normal salivary flow rate as compared to the healthy controls were observed. Our results showed a significant decrease in the specific activity of peroxidase in unstimulated and a significant decrease in all antioxidants examined in stimulated saliva of the group with hyposalivation as compared to the group with normal salivary flow rate. Our results prove that impairment of the salivary glands in the course of systemic sclerosis may be attributed to free radicals, and it is correlated with disease duration. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: the role of exercise.

    PubMed

    Lisle, Stuart; Tennison, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting both the upper and lower motor neurons. Given the deterioration of skeletal muscle function, historically there has been concern regarding exercise and its affect on ALS. This article reviews and explains current research, helping patients, caregivers, and providers be equipped better to make decisions regarding the treatment of ALS with exercise.

  3. Clinical Psychology and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pagnini, Francesco; Rossi, Gabriella; Lunetta, Christian; Banfi, Paolo; Corbo, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a fatal and progressive disease, characterized by progressive muscles weakness, with consequent loss of physical capacities. Psychologists can play an important role in ALS care, by providing clinical activities in every step of the disease, including support and counseling activities directed to patients, their caregivers and to physicians. PMID:21833203

  4. [Lingual involvement in progressive systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Pila Pérez, R; Pila Peláez, R; Pila Peláez, M; Guerra Rodríguez, C; Rojas Casanova, C

    2000-01-01

    A case of a 40 year old female patient who began to present alterations in the tongue and who was diagnosed of Progressive Sclerosis of that organ is presented. The manifestation and diagnostic tools used in this case, as well as the treatment use, is given. The rareness of this disease, which is possible in systemic diseases, stands out.

  5. Natalizumab for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Horga, A; Tintoré, M

    2011-01-01

    Natalizumab is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits leukocyte migration across the blood-brain barrier and has been approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. To provide a review and update of the pharmacological and therapeutic characteristics of natalizumab, with special emphasis on the most recently published data on the efficacy, effectiveness and safety of this drug. Several randomized clinical trials in patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis have demonstrated that natalizumab substantially reduces clinical and radiological disease activity. Post hoc analysis of phase III clinical trials and the results of post-approval observational studies indicate that natalizumab significantly increases the proportion of patients with complete clinical and radiological response and is effective in patients with highly active forms of multiple sclerosis and suboptimal response to other treatments. Like other monoclonal antibodies, natalizumab can cause hypersensitivity reactions, which are severe in 1% of patients. Other adverse effects are generally mild or infrequent. Nevertheless, several cases of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy have been detected in patients treated with natalizumab monotherapy. The risk of this severe complication seems to increase with the number of doses administered. Natalizumab has a favorable risk-benefit ratio in the treatment of relapsing -remitting multiple sclerosis. However, because of the potential risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, patients must be carefully selected and specific protocols must be followed during the drug's administration. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Magnetic resonance sees lesions of multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ziporyn, T.

    1985-02-15

    The value of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and quantitation of the progression of multiple sclerosis is discussed. Magnetic resonance imaging generates images that reflect differential density and velocity of hydrogen nuclei between cerebral gray and white matter, as well as between white matter and pathological lesions of the disease.

  7. Students with Multiple Sclerosis Participating in Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Matthew D.; Brentlinger, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    The participation of a student with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in recess can often be both challenging and rewarding for the student and teacher. This paper will address common characteristics of students with MS and present basic solutions to improve the experience of these students in the recess setting. Initially, the definition and prevalence of…

  8. Pediatric Renal Angiomyolipomas in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Warncke, Jason C; Brodie, Katie E; Grantham, Erin C; Catarinicchia, Salvatore P; Tong, Suhong; Kondo, Kimi L; Cost, Nicholas G

    2017-02-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a genetic disorder characterized by the growth of hamartomas in multiple organs. Up to 80% of patients with tuberous sclerosis complex will have at least 1 angiomyolipoma in their lifetime. We describe the incidence and natural history of angiomyolipoma in a pediatric tuberous sclerosis complex population and analyze tumor growth to determine optimal renal imaging intervals in an effort to improve counseling, treatment and followup. We performed a retrospective chart review of all patients with tuberous sclerosis complex from 2004 to 2014. Patients were included if they had a clinical or genetic diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis complex and had undergone at least 1 renal imaging study. A total of 145 patients were analyzed. Median age was 14 years (range 0 to 28). Overall incidence of angiomyolipoma was 50.3%. Median age at first angiomyolipoma detection was 11 years (range 2 to 26). Median yearly angiomyolipoma growth rate stratified by age at first detection was 0.0 mm for patients 0 to 6 years old, 0.9 mm for those 7 to 11 years old, 2.5 mm for those 12 to 16 years old and 1.8 mm for those 17 years old or older. Median yearly angiomyolipoma growth rate stratified by tumor size at first detection was 0.1 mm for tumors 0.6 to 0.9 cm, 1.8 mm for those 1.0 to 1.9 cm and 4.3 mm for those 2.0 to 2.9 cm. A total of 35 patients (24.1%) received mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitors. Eight patients underwent a total of 13 surgical interventions, of whom 2 had previously been treated with mTOR inhibitors. Median patient age at surgical intervention was 18.0 years and median angiomyolipoma size was 5.0 cm. Angiomyolipoma growth in children with tuberous sclerosis complex can be rapid and unpredictable. We recommend yearly renal ultrasound in all patients with tuberous sclerosis complex, with consideration of magnetic resonance imaging in those at risk for rapid growth and future intervention (ie those older than 11 years and/or those

  9. Strategies to reduce hyperthermia in ambulatory multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Cox, Mary Jude; Long, William B; Winters, Kathryne L; Becker, Daniel G

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 400,000 Americans have multiple sclerosis. Worldwide, multiple sclerosis affects 2.5 million individuals. Multiple sclerosis affects two to three times as many women as men. The adverse effects of hyperthermia in patients with multiple sclerosis have been known since 1890. While most patients with multiple sclerosis experience reversible worsening of their neurologic deficits, some patients experience irreversible neurologic deficits. In fact, heat-induced fatalities have been encountered in multiple sclerosis patients subjected to hyperthermia. Hyperthermia can be caused through sun exposure, exercise, and infection. During the last 50 years, numerous strategies have evolved to reduce hyperthermia in individuals with multiple sclerosis, such as photoprotective clothing, sunglasses, sunscreens, hydrotherapy, and prevention of urinary tract infections. Hydrotherapy has become an essential component of rehabilitation for multiple sclerosis patients in hospitals throughout the world. On the basis of this positive hospital experience, hydrotherapy has been expanded through the use of compact aquatic exercise pools at home along with personal cooling devices that promote local and systemic hypothermia in multiple sclerosis patients. The Multiple Sclerosis Association of America and NASA have played leadership roles in developing and recommending technology that will prevent hyperthermia in multiple sclerosis patients and should be consulted for new technological advances that will benefit the multiple sclerosis patient. In addition, products recommended for photoprotection by The Skin Cancer Foundation may also be helpful to the multiple sclerosis patient's defense against hyperthermia. Infections in the urinary tract, especially detrusor-external sphincter dyssynergia, are initially managed conservatively with intermittent self-catheterization and pharmacologic therapy. In those cases, refractory to conservative therapy, transurethral external

  10. Lung Volume Recruitment in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Srour, Nadim; LeBlanc, Carole; King, Judy; McKim, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary function abnormalities have been described in multiple sclerosis including reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC) and cough but the time course of this impairment is unknown. Peak cough flow (PCF) is an important parameter for patients with respiratory muscle weakness and a reduced PCF has a direct impact on airway clearance and may therefore increase the risk of respiratory tract infections. Lung volume recruitment is a technique that improves PCF by inflating the lungs to their maximal insufflation capacity. Objectives Our goals were to describe the rate of decline of pulmonary function and PCF in patients with multiple sclerosis and describe the use of lung volume recruitment in this population. Methods We reviewed all patients with multiple sclerosis referred to a respiratory neuromuscular rehabilitation clinic from February 1999 until December 2010. Lung volume recruitment was attempted in patients with FVC <80% predicted. Regular twice daily lung volume recruitment was prescribed if it resulted in a significant improvement in the laboratory. Results There were 79 patients included, 35 of whom were seen more than once. A baseline FVC <80% predicted was present in 82% of patients and 80% of patients had a PCF insufficient for airway clearance. There was a significant decline in FVC (122.6 mL/y, 95% CI 54.9–190.3) and PCF (192 mL/s/y, 95% 72–311) over a median follow-up time of 13.4 months. Lung volume recruitment was associated with a slower decline in FVC (p<0.0001) and PCF (p = 0.042). Conclusion Pulmonary function and cough decline significantly over time in selected patients with multiple sclerosis and lung volume recruitment is associated with a slower rate of decline in lung function and peak cough flow. Given design limitations, additional studies are needed to assess the role of lung volume recruitment in patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:23383293

  11. Fructose Malabsorption in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Marie, Isabelle; Leroi, Anne-Marie; Gourcerol, Guillaume; Levesque, Hervé; Ménard, Jean-François; Ducrotte, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The deleterious effect of fructose, which is increasingly incorporated in many beverages, dairy products, and processed foods, has been described; fructose malabsorption has thus been reported in up to 2.4% of healthy subjects, leading to digestive clinical symptoms (eg, pain, distension, diarrhea). Because digestive involvement is frequent in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), we hypothesized that fructose malabsorption could be responsible for intestinal manifestations in these patients. The aims of this prospective study were to: determine the prevalence of fructose malabsorption, in SSc; predict which SSc patients are at risk of developing fructose malabsorption; and assess the outcome of digestive symptoms in SSc patients after initiation of standardized low-fructose diet. Eighty consecutive patients with SSc underwent fructose breath test. All SSc patients also completed a questionnaire on digestive symptoms, and a global symptom score (GSS) was calculated. The prevalence of fructose malabsorption was as high as 40% in SSc patients. We also observed a marked correlation between the presence of fructose malabsorption and: higher values of GSS score of digestive symptoms (P = 0.000004); and absence of delayed gastric emptying (P = 0.007). Furthermore, in SSc patients with fructose malabsorption, the median value of GSS score of digestive symptoms was lower after initiation of standardized low-fructose diet (4 before vs. 1 after; P = 0.0009). Our study underscores that fructose malabsorption often occurs in SSc patients. Our findings are thus relevant for clinical practice, highlighting that fructose breath test is a helpful, noninvasive method by: demonstrating fructose intolerance in patients with SSc; and identifying the group of SSc patients with fructose intolerance who may benefit from low-fructose diet. Interestingly, because the present series also shows that low-fructose diet resulted in a marked decrease of gastrointestinal

  12. Glatiramer acetate for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    La Mantia, Loredana; Munari, Luca M; Lovati, Roberta

    2010-05-12

    This is an updated Cochrane review of the previous version published (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2004 , Issue 1 . Art. No.: CD004678. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004678)Previous studies have shown that glatiramer acetate (Copaxone (R)), a synthetic amino acid polymer is effective in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), and improve the outcome of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). To verify the clinical efficacy of glatiramer acetate in the treatment of MS patients with relapsing remitting (RR) and progressive (P) course. We searched the Cochrane MS Group Trials Register (26 March 2009), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2009), MEDLINE (PubMed) (January 1966 to 26 March 2009), EMBASE (January 1988 to 26 March 2009) and hand searching of symposia reports (1990-2009). All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing glatiramer acetate and placebo in patients with definite MS, whatever the administration schedule and disease course, were eligible for this review. Both patients with RR and P MS were analysed. Study protocols were comparable across trials. No major flaws were found in methodological quality. However, efficacy of blinding should be balanced against side effects, including injection-site reactions. Among 409 retrieved references, we identified 16 RCTs; six of them, published between 1987 and 2007, met the selection criteria and were included in this review. Five hundred and forty RR patients and 1049 PMS contributed to the analysis. In RR MS, a decrease in the mean EDSS score (-0.33 and -0.45), was found respectively at 2 years and 35 months without any significant effect on sustained disease progression. The reduction of mean number of relapse was evident at 1 year (-0.35 ) 2 years (-0.51 ) and 35 months (-0.64), but significant studies ' heterogeneity was found. The number of hospitalisations and steroid courses were significantly reduced. No benefit was shown in P MS patients. No

  13. Fructose Malabsorption in Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Marie, Isabelle; Leroi, Anne-Marie; Gourcerol, Guillaume; Levesque, Hervé; Ménard, Jean-François; Ducrotte, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    The deleterious effect of fructose, which is increasingly incorporated in many beverages, dairy products, and processed foods, has been described; fructose malabsorption has thus been reported in up to 2.4% of healthy subjects, leading to digestive clinical symptoms (eg, pain, distension, diarrhea). Because digestive involvement is frequent in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), we hypothesized that fructose malabsorption could be responsible for intestinal manifestations in these patients. The aims of this prospective study were to: determine the prevalence of fructose malabsorption, in SSc; predict which SSc patients are at risk of developing fructose malabsorption; and assess the outcome of digestive symptoms in SSc patients after initiation of standardized low-fructose diet. Eighty consecutive patients with SSc underwent fructose breath test. All SSc patients also completed a questionnaire on digestive symptoms, and a global symptom score (GSS) was calculated. The prevalence of fructose malabsorption was as high as 40% in SSc patients. We also observed a marked correlation between the presence of fructose malabsorption and: higher values of GSS score of digestive symptoms (P = 0.000004); and absence of delayed gastric emptying (P = 0.007). Furthermore, in SSc patients with fructose malabsorption, the median value of GSS score of digestive symptoms was lower after initiation of standardized low-fructose diet (4 before vs. 1 after; P = 0.0009). Our study underscores that fructose malabsorption often occurs in SSc patients. Our findings are thus relevant for clinical practice, highlighting that fructose breath test is a helpful, noninvasive method by: demonstrating fructose intolerance in patients with SSc; and identifying the group of SSc patients with fructose intolerance who may benefit from low-fructose diet. Interestingly, because the present series also shows that low-fructose diet resulted in a marked decrease of gastrointestinal clinical manifestations

  14. Environmental factors in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pantazou, Vasiliki; Schluep, Myriam; Du Pasquier, Renaud

    2015-04-01

    Although multiple sclerosis (MS) is recognized as a disorder involving the immune system, the interplay of environmental factors and individual genetic susceptibility seems to influence MS onset and clinical expression, as well as therapeutic responsiveness. Multiple human epidemiological and animal model studies have evaluated the effect of different environmental factors, such as viral infections, vitamin intake, sun exposure, or still dietary and life habits on MS prevalence. Previous Epstein-Barr virus infection, especially if this infection occurs in late childhood, and lack of vitamin D (VitD) currently appear to be the most robust environmental factors for the risk of MS, at least from an epidemiological standpoint. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) activates VitD production but there are also some elements supporting the fact that insufficient UVR exposure during childhood may represent a VitD-independent risk factor of MS development, as well as negative effect on the clinical and radiological course of MS. Recently, there has been a growing interest in the gut-brain axis, a bidirectional neuro-hormonal communication system between the intestinal microbiota and the central nervous system (CNS). Indeed, components of the intestinal microbiota may be pro-inflammatory, promote the migration of immune cells into the CNS, and thus be a key parameter for the development of autoimmune disorders such as MS. Interestingly most environmental factors seem to play a role during childhood. Thus, if childhood is the most fragile period to develop MS later in life, preventive measures should be applied early in life. For example, adopting a diet enriched in VitD, playing outdoor and avoiding passive smoking would be extremely simple measures of primary prevention for public health strategies. However, these hypotheses need to be confirmed by prospective evaluations, which are obviously difficult to conduct. In addition, it remains to be determined whether and how Vit

  15. Cardiovascular outcome in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Voilliot, Damien; Magne, Julien; Dulgheru, Raluca; Kou, Seisyou; Henri, Christine; Caballero, Luis; De Sousa, Carla; Sprynger, Muriel; Andre, Béatrice; Pierard, Luc A; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovascular involvement is recognized as a poor prognostic factor in systemic sclerosis (SSc). The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of nailfold video-capillaroscopy (NVC), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) blood level and exercise echocardiography to predict the occurrence of cardiovascular events in SSc. We prospectively enrolled 65 patients with SSc (age 54±14 years, 30% female) followed in CHU Sart-Tilman, Liège, Belgium. All patients underwent graded semi-supine exercise echocardiography. Both baseline resting pulmonary hypertension (PH) and PH during follow-up (FUPH) were defined as systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (sPAP)>35 mmHg, and exercise-induced PH (EIPH) as sPAP>50 mmHg during exercise. EIPH was present in 21 patients. During FU (27±18 months), 13 patients developed FUPH and 9 presented cardiovascular complications. Patients with cardiovascular events were significantly older (63±14 vs 52±13 years; P=0.03), presented more frequently NVC grade>2 (89 vs 43%; P=0.009), had higher resting and exercise sPAP (30±6 vs 24±6; P=0.007 and 57±13 vs 44±13 vs mmHg; P=0.01, respectively), and higher BNP blood level (112±106 vs 26±19 pg/ml; P=0.0001). After adjustment for age and gender, NVC grade>2 (ß=2.4±1.1; P=0.03), EIPH (ß=2.30±1.13; P=0.04), FUPH (ß=0.24±0.09; P=0.01 and ß=3.52±1.16; P=0.002, respectively;) and BNP (ß=0.08±0.04; P=0.02) were independent predictors of CV events. Beyond age, an incremental value of EIPH, BNP and NVC grade>2 was predictive of cardiovascular events (P<0.001). Cardiovascular complications are not rare in SSc (18%). NVC, BNP blood level assessment and exercise echocardiography could be useful tools to identify patients at risk of SSc.

  16. 78 FR 72573 - Specially Adapted Housing Eligibility for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Beneficiaries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... veterans and active servicemembers with service- connected amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) rated... Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Beneficiaries.'' Copies of comments received will be available for public... occasional locomotion by other methods may be possible. (d) Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. VA considers Sec...

  17. [Multiple sclerosis: etiology, epidemiology, some questions of pathogenicity].

    PubMed

    Chuprina, H M

    2012-01-01

    In the article the questions of ways of development of the dissipated sclerosis, as nosologies, are affected from the group of autoimmune diseases. Examined etiology, epidedemiologiya, separate links of pathogeny of the dissipated sclerosis. The analysis of multifaktors of his origin is conducted, with the detailed study of internal and external factors, marked on the important role of inherited predisposition, infectious and klimato-geograficheskogo factors in genesis of the dissipated sclerosis.

  18. Acute Optic Neuritis: Prognosis for the Development of Multiple Sclerosis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    The literature was reviewed in regard to acute optic neuritis: prognosis for the development of multiple sclerosis , with specific reference to our...series, was preselected and not prospective, causing a higher incidence of later multiple sclerosis . The second factor was the definition of multiple ...development of multiple sclerosis in patients affected with acute optic neuritis. This finding leads us to conclude that an incidence of 13% to 17

  19. Localized scleroderma and systemic sclerosis: is there a connection?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajnish A; Fiorentino, David

    2007-12-01

    Excess fibrosis of the skin is a clinical hallmark of both localized scleroderma and systemic sclerosis. Localized scleroderma is generally thought to be a skin-limited disease whereas systemic sclerosis can have a wide range of internal organ involvement. Recent data suggest that a subset of patients with juvenile localized scleroderma can go on to develop systemic involvement of their disease. This raises the question of what the connection is, if any, between localized scleroderma and systemic sclerosis.

  20. Oral health management implications in patients with tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cutando, A; Gil, J A; López, J

    2000-10-01

    We report 6 cases of patients with tuberous sclerosis and concomitant dental pathosis. The multiple manifestations in tuberous sclerosis determine its impact on dental therapy. A lack of awareness of this condition may compound the possible side effects of dental treatment. Possible preventive measures by dentists are highlighted in this presentation. Medical evaluation and the control of risk factors in relation to general anesthesia and sedation are key considerations for the management of patients with tuberous sclerosis.

  1. Role of CTGF in White Matter Development in Tuberous Sclerosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0040 TITLE: Role of CTGF in White Matter Development in Tuberous Sclerosis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mustafa Sahin...2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Role of CTGF in White Matter Development in Tuberous Sclerosis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Development in Tuberous Sclerosis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0040 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Mustafa Sahin Betty

  2. Epidemiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kurtzke, J F

    1982-01-01

    Motor neuron disease (MND) is used in this paper as the generic label, encompassing the clinical variants of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), progressive myelopathic muscular atrophy (PMMA), and progressive bulbar palsy (PBP). ALS is limited to instances of anterior horn cell plus pyramidal tract involvement. When only anterior horn cell lesions are inferred, either PMMA or PBP is used, depending on the levels of involvement; when both cord and brain stem are affected. PBP is the designation. Mortality data on MND have been available for a number of countries since 1949. The coding used under international rules has varied considerably over this interval. Before 1969, hereditary muscular atrophies were included. Since 1979, no subdivision by type of MND is possible. International death rates for MND have all been rather close to 1 per 100,000 population per year, though perhaps nearer to 1.4 on the average in recent years. There has been an increasing proportion of MND deaths coded to ALS between 1949 and 1977. There is no notable geographic variation among countries, nor within countries such as the U.S. and Denmark. A slight upward trend in death rates over time in the U.S. is matched by a slight decrease in Denmark. Death rates from all sources indicate a male preponderance for ALS or MND as a whole, at about 1.5 to 1, male to female. There is also a consistent predilection by age, with few deaths under age 50 or so and a clear maximum in age-specific death rates at about age 70. This holds for both sexes. In the U.S., there is also a white-nonwhite difference, with a ratio of about 1.6:1 but with age and sex differences similar to whites. Average annual incidence rates from among white occidental populations range mostly between 0.6 and 1.8 per 100,000 population for MND and about 0.8 and 1.5 per 100,000 for ALS. Again a male predilection is seen. There is a clear maximum in age-specific incidence rates at about age 65 in all surveys except that of

  3. Endogenous Bioactive Jasmonate Is Composed of a Set of (+)-7-iso-JA-Amino Acid Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jianbin; Li, Suhua; Gu, Min; Yao, Ruifeng; Li, Yuwen; Chen, Juan; Yang, Mai; Tong, Jianhua; Xiao, Langtao; Nan, Fajun; Xie, Daoxin

    2016-12-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) regulate a wide range of plant defense and development processes. The bioactive JA is perceived by its receptor COI1 to trigger the degradation of JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins and subsequently derepress the JAZ-repressed transcription factors for activation of expression of JA-responsive genes. So far, (+)-7-iso-JA-l-Ile has been the only identified endogenous bioactive JA molecule. Here, we designed coronafacic acid (CFA) conjugates with all the amino acids (CFA-AA) to mimic the JA amino acid conjugates, and revealed that (+)-7-iso-JA-Leu, (+)-7-iso-JA-Val, (+)-7-iso-JA-Met, and (+)-7-iso-JA-Ala are new endogenous bioactive JA molecules. Furthermore, our studies uncover the general characteristics for all the bioactive JA molecules, and provide a new strategy to synthetically generate novel active JA molecules.

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells in multiple sclerosis - translation to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dulamea, A

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, characterized by an aberrant activation of the immune system and combining demyelination with neurodegeneration. Studies on experimental models of multiple sclerosis revealed immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stem cells. Clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells therapy in multiple sclerosis patients showed tolerability, safety on short term, some immunomodulatory properties reducing the Th1 proinflammatory response and the inflammatory MRI parameters. The author reviews the data about experimental studies and clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

  5. AMX0035 in Patients With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-21

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Motor Neuron Disease; Neuromuscular Diseases; Neurodegenerative Diseases; Spinal Cord Diseases; TDP-43 Proteinopathies; Nervous System Diseases; Central Nervous System Diseases

  6. Peripheral blood lymphocyte phenotype and function in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, P J; Compston, D A

    1988-01-01

    T suppressor cell function and phenotype are abnormal in patients with multiple sclerosis, especially during the chronic progressive phase but the sub-populations defined by mitogen stimulation and serological methods may not be identical. In this study, involving 45 patients with multiple sclerosis and 33 controls, there was no correlation between T suppressor function and CD8 cell phenotype in patients with multiple sclerosis or in controls. These phenotypic and functional studies cannot therefore be used interchangeably in the assessment of patients with multiple sclerosis since they provide different information about lymphocyte subpopulations. PMID:2976082

  7. Tumefactive Demyelinating Lesions in Multiple Sclerosis and Associated Disorders.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Meredith C; Cameron, Michelle H

    2016-03-01

    Tumefactive demyelinating lesions are rare consequences of central nervous system (CNS) idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Tumefactive demyelinating lesions pose a diagnostic challenge because they can mimic tumors and abscesses and because they can be caused by a heterogeneous range of disorders. This article reviews the recent literature on the clinical presentation; radiographic features; prognosis; and management of tumefactive demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis, acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, neuromyelitis optica, and the rare variants of multiple sclerosis including Schilder's disease, Marburg acute multiple sclerosis, and Balo's concentric sclerosis.

  8. Geochemistry and multiple sclerosis: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Layton, W; Sutherland, J M

    1975-01-18

    A hypothesis is presented and evidence is adduced to show that high-risk areas of multiple sclerosis are related to the ability of the soils of the locality to obtain and fix molybdenum perferentially to copper. Soil conditons capable of such partition are known to be present characteristically in cool temperate zones and are significantly present in acid podsols of these regions. On the other hand, under tropical and subtropical conditions, molybdenum is normally highly mobile and leached from the environment. Copper may also be leached but can accumulate in caliche deposits. This hypothesis is notopposed to the theory of a viral aetology of multiple sclerosis, but rather seeks to show that certain individuals, if exposed to trace element imbalance at a critical period in life, may be rendered susceptible to a slow virus infection.

  9. [Potential pathogens in multiple sclerosis (MS)].

    PubMed

    Zawada, Mariola

    2012-10-22

     Multiple sclerosis is a neuroimmunological disease in which etiologic agents have not been identified yet. The etiology of MS is complex in its nature and may involve many different agents acting simultaneously or in a cascade manner leading to the development of the disease. The causes of MS development were sought among the factors associated with HLA and TCR genes and human endogenous retroviruses (HERV). Environmental factors such as bacterial, fungal and viral infections as well as potential participation of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of the disease have also been examined. The current state of knowledge concerning potential factors participating in the etiopathogenesis of multiple sclerosis has been reviewed in this paper.

  10. Distinguishing Susac's syndrome from multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Buzzard, Katherine A; Reddel, Stephen W; Yiannikas, Con; Sean Riminton, D; Barnett, Michael H; Hardy, Todd A

    2015-07-01

    Susac's syndrome is considered a rare differential diagnosis in the work-up of suspected multiple sclerosis. Over the last decade or so, significant advances in our understanding of Susac's syndrome mean that it can now be readily distinguished from multiple sclerosis in the majority of cases with a careful history and close attention to MR imaging. Supporting investigations such as CSF examination, fluorescein angiogram, visual field perimetry and audiology often yield important clues. In milder cases, however, diagnostic uncertainty can exist, and forme frustes of the disease are recognised. In this article, we discuss the clinical features of Susac's syndrome with emphasis on the findings and investigations that help to differentiate it from MS.

  11. Teriflunomide in relapsing multiple sclerosis: therapeutic utility.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Mark S

    2013-09-01

    Teriflunomide is an oral, once-daily disease-modifying therapy (DMT) approved in the USA, Australia, and Argentina for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (RMS). Teriflunomide reversibly limits the expansion of activated T and B cells associated with the inflammatory process purportedly involved in multiple sclerosis pathogenesis, while preserving lymphocytes for routine immune surveillance. In an extensive clinical development program, teriflunomide demonstrated consistent benefits on both clinical and magnetic resonance imaging outcomes. In long-term studies, teriflunomide treatment was associated with low rates of relapse and disability progression for up to 8 years. The safety profile of teriflunomide has been well characterized, with adverse events generally mild to moderate in nature and infrequently leading to permanent treatment discontinuation. The evidence reviewed here indicates that teriflunomide is an effective addition to the current DMTs used to treat RMS.

  12. [Spasticity and everyday life in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Donzé, C; De Sèze, J

    2012-04-01

    Spasticity is one of the most commonly seen symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis. However, evaluation of the symptom often uses clinical scales that do not incorporate its impact on activities of daily living and quality of life. The everyday life of patients is affected primarily in actions related to mobility and walking capacity, such as the use of transport, gardening, household activities and, ultimately, basic activities such as bathing and dressing. Yet, so far, no study has described the impact of spasticity on the daily life of patients with multiple sclerosis. Nevertheless, assessing the effects of spasticity on such a young population would appear to be essential for meeting the needs of these patients with appropriate therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Anesthesia concerns for children with tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Septer, Steve; Thompson, Edward S; Willemsen-Dunlap, Ann

    2006-06-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TS) is a relatively rare, autosomal dominant syndrome that displays high genetic penetrance in affected families. It is identified by a classic triad of symptoms including epilepsy, skin lesions, and mental retardation. Tuberous sclerosis causes hamartomas in multiple organ systems, including the brain, skin, heart, kidneys, lungs, and liver. Awareness of the signs and symptoms and the organs involved is critical to provide safe and effective anesthesia care. We describe a 10-year-old girl with TS scheduled to receive a general anesthetic for laser treatment of facial angiofibromas. The patient had several coexisting maladies from TS, including hypertension, autism, seizure disorder, cardiac rhabdomyomas, developmental delay, and bilateral polycystic renal disease. The laser procedure was performed, and there were no surgical or anesthetic complications. However, the potential for complications due to TS remained high throughout the provision of anesthesia care. Increased knowledge of TS and diligence in anesthesia practice can greatly reduce these risks.

  14. Musical identity of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Shirlene Vianna; França, Cecília Cavalieri; Moreira, Marcos Aurélio; Lana-Peixoto, Marco Aurélio

    2009-03-01

    Musical autobiographies consist of a powerful therapeutic tool by which individuals define themselves. The use of this technique may help (re)construction personal identities and improve quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Eight adult patients on treatment at CIEM Multiple Sclerosis Investigation Center after selecting 10 to 15 pieces of music most significant in their lives were interviewed. The data collected were classified according to Even Rudd categories, which reveal how a person expresses his personal, social, temporal and transpersonal identities. We observed that recall of musical history makes MS patients get better perception both of their feelings and body awareness, as well as provide them with an alternative way to express themselves, activate and contextualize affective memories, and achieving a sense of life continuity in spite of the disease.

  15. [Evidence-based therapy of systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Genth, E

    2001-12-01

    For the treatment of different forms of systemic sclerosis (SSc), drugs play a predominant role. Depending on disease activity as well as type and severity of cutaneous, vascular and internal organ manifestations, different systemic (antiinflammatory, immunosuppressive, antifibrotic) or organ-specific therapies are used. The scientific basis of most treatment modalities is insufficient and incomplete. There is sufficient evidence for an antiinflammatory and antiproliferative efficacy of glucocorticosteroids, methotrexate, cyclophosphamide and cyclosporine A in the treatment of diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis. Vasoactive therapies play an important role in treating Raynaud's phenomenon (nifedipine or other dihydropyridines, prostaglandin analogs, losartan, prazosine), and arterial (ACE blockers, AT-1 antagonists) or pulmonary (epoprostenol) hypertension. Cyclophosphamide is effective in fibrosing alveolitis, prokinetic substances (metoclopramid, domperidone) in gastroesophageal dysmotility or octreotide in intestinal pseudoobstruction. Physical therapies (e.g., massage) are poorly studied. In particular cases, surgical measures (e.g., removal of calcifications) are necessary.

  16. [Spectrum of neuropsychological changes in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, T G; Boĭko, A N; Gusev, E I

    2000-01-01

    Early disability of patients with multiple sclerosis at the able-bodied age is often caused by both a neurological disorder and the difficulties of their social and psychological adaptation that is aggravated significantly by higher cortical dysfunctions and by behavioral problems. The paper presents the results of the dynamic neuropsychological observation of 124 patients with multiple sclerosis and of their first degree relatives. Even at the early stage of the disease there were some cognitive disorders as worse transitent verbal, semantic, visual memory active attention and slower sensomotor reactions; difficulties in conceptual mentality. The cognitive functions, the activity of the disease, an actual psychological state, depression for example, and the expression of brain atrophy and the localization of the foci are bound by the certain way. The personality traits of patients and their close relatives testified a possible psychosomatic nature of this disease.

  17. Esophageal transit scintigraphy in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kobylecka, Małgorzata; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare connective tissue disease, distinctive features of which are fibrosis and microangiopathy. The esophagus is one of the most commonly involved internal organs. Most patients experience dysphagia, difficulties in swallowing and gastro-esophageal reflux. However, in up to one third of cases, the initial onset of esophageal disease may be clinically silent. There are several diagnostic modalities available for assessing both morphological and functional abnormalities of the esophagus. If structural abnormalities are suspected, endoscopy is the method of choice. Functional evaluation is best achieved with manometry. Both endoscopy and manometry are invasive techniques, with low patient acceptance. Barium-contrast study is well tolerated, but qualitative assessment of functional abnormalities is imprecise. Esophageal scintigraphy is an easy, non-invasive, sensitive and specific diagnostic modality. It can detect esophageal dysfunction even in asymptomatic patients. In patients already diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, scintigraphy is useful in evaluating severity and progression of the disease. PMID:27994270

  18. Esophageal transit scintigraphy in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chojnowski, Marek; Kobylecka, Małgorzata; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare connective tissue disease, distinctive features of which are fibrosis and microangiopathy. The esophagus is one of the most commonly involved internal organs. Most patients experience dysphagia, difficulties in swallowing and gastro-esophageal reflux. However, in up to one third of cases, the initial onset of esophageal disease may be clinically silent. There are several diagnostic modalities available for assessing both morphological and functional abnormalities of the esophagus. If structural abnormalities are suspected, endoscopy is the method of choice. Functional evaluation is best achieved with manometry. Both endoscopy and manometry are invasive techniques, with low patient acceptance. Barium-contrast study is well tolerated, but qualitative assessment of functional abnormalities is imprecise. Esophageal scintigraphy is an easy, non-invasive, sensitive and specific diagnostic modality. It can detect esophageal dysfunction even in asymptomatic patients. In patients already diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, scintigraphy is useful in evaluating severity and progression of the disease.

  19. Monoclonal Antibodies for Multiple Sclerosis Treatment.

    PubMed

    Palavra, Filipe

    2015-01-01

    Since their introduction in medical therapy, in the last quarter of the 20th century, monoclonal antibodies have gained an increasing importance in the treatment of various diseases. Neurology has been one of the medical specialties benefiting of the therapeutic potential of these monoclonal antibodies and certain neurological conditions may now contain such drugs in their therapeutic algorithms. Multiple sclerosis is one of these diseases and, in addition to the monoclonal antibodies already licensed for clinical use, several others are in development for future utilization in this specific area. The future will certainly pass through this kind of drugs and, in this article, a review of the most relevant data related to monoclonal antibodies already in use and also in clinical development for multiple sclerosis treatment will be performed.

  20. [Management of neuropathic bladder in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, A; Patti, F; Reggio, A

    2004-05-01

    It is estimated that almost 70% of patients affected by multiple sclerosis (MS) suffer from urinary symptoms, with devastant impact on Quality of Life (QoL). The major aims of management should be to ameliorate the patients quality of life and to prevent the frequent complications of bladder dysfunction such as infention and renal damage. Therapy can usually eliminate or reduce the symptoms of neuropathic bladder. In the following pages is discussed the complex management of urinary symptoms in MS patients.

  1. Mining Gene Expression Data of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhenli; Huang, Zhengliang; Li, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Microarray produces a large amount of gene expression data, containing various biological implications. The challenge is to detect a panel of discriminative genes associated with disease. This study proposed a robust classification model for gene selection using gene expression data, and performed an analysis to identify disease-related genes using multiple sclerosis as an example. Materials and methods Gene expression profiles based on the transcriptome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a total of 44 samples from 26 multiple sclerosis patients and 18 individuals with other neurological diseases (control) were analyzed. Feature selection algorithms including Support Vector Machine based on Recursive Feature Elimination, Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve, and Boruta algorithms were jointly performed to select candidate genes associating with multiple sclerosis. Multiple classification models categorized samples into two different groups based on the identified genes. Models’ performance was evaluated using cross-validation methods, and an optimal classifier for gene selection was determined. Results An overlapping feature set was identified consisting of 8 genes that were differentially expressed between the two phenotype groups. The genes were significantly associated with the pathways of apoptosis and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction. TNFSF10 was significantly associated with multiple sclerosis. A Support Vector Machine model was established based on the featured genes and gave a practical accuracy of ∼86%. This binary classification model also outperformed the other models in terms of Sensitivity, Specificity and F1 score. Conclusions The combined analytical framework integrating feature ranking algorithms and Support Vector Machine model could be used for selecting genes for other diseases. PMID:24932510

  2. Matrix Metalloproteinases, Synaptic Injury, and Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Szklarczyk, Arek; Conant, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system in which immune mediated damage to myelin is characteristic. For an overview of this condition and its pathophysiology, please refer to one of many excellent published reviews (Sorensen and Ransohoff, 1998; Weiner, 2009). To follow, is a discussion focused on the possibility that synaptic injury occurs in at least a subset of patients, and that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a role in such. PMID:21423441

  3. Oxidative damage in multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Haider, Lukas; Fischer, Marie T; Frischer, Josa M; Bauer, Jan; Höftberger, Romana; Botond, Gergö; Esterbauer, Harald; Binder, Christoph J; Witztum, Joseph L; Lassmann, Hans

    2011-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, associated with demyelination and neurodegeneration. The mechanisms of tissue injury are currently poorly understood, but recent data suggest that mitochondrial injury may play an important role in this process. Since mitochondrial injury can be triggered by reactive oxygen and nitric oxide species, we analysed by immunocytochemistry the presence and cellular location of oxidized lipids and oxidized DNA in lesions and in normal-appearing white matter of 30 patients with multiple sclerosis and 24 control patients without neurological disease or brain lesions. As reported before in biochemical studies, oxidized lipids and DNA were highly enriched in active multiple sclerosis plaques, predominantly in areas that are defined as initial or 'prephagocytic' lesions. Oxidized DNA was mainly seen in oligodendrocyte nuclei, which in part showed signs of apoptosis. In addition, a small number of reactive astrocytes revealed nuclear expression of 8-hydroxy-d-guanosine. Similarly, lipid peroxidation-derived structures (malondialdehyde and oxidized phospholipid epitopes) were seen in the cytoplasm of oligodendrocytes and some astrocytes. In addition, oxidized phospholipids were massively accumulated in a fraction of axonal spheroids with disturbed fast axonal transport as well as in neurons within grey matter lesions. Neurons stained for oxidized phospholipids frequently revealed signs of degeneration with fragmentation of their dendritic processes. The extent of lipid and DNA oxidation correlated significantly with inflammation, determined by the number of CD3 positive T cells and human leucocyte antigen-D expressing macrophages and microglia in the lesions. Our data suggest profound oxidative injury of oligodendrocytes and neurons to be associated with active demyelination and axonal or neuronal injury in multiple sclerosis.

  4. [Pro-angiogenic cytokines in systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Robak, Ewa; Gerlicz, Zofia

    2014-12-15

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multifactorial connective tissue disease characterized by excessive and progressive fibrosis along with microvasculopathy due to poor vascular formation and repair. Despite a general increase in many potent angiogenic factors, the vasculopathy compensatory angiogenesis and vasculogenesis are impaired. In this review, we discuss the role of proangiogenic factors--VEGF, PlGF, endoglin, PDGF, endothelin-1, angiopoietins, SDF-1, uPAR--and the paradoxical paucity of an inadequate angiogenic response in SSc.

  5. The Diagnostic Challenge of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Seland, T. Peter

    1984-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a common cause of many neurological complaints and disabilities among young, adult Canadians. In the absence of a reliable and specific laboratory test for the disease, the diagnosis is established primarily by clinical criteria, which are outlined in this article. Recent advances in immunology, neurophysiology and neuroimaging have provided techniques to improve diagnostic confidence, particularly in early or atypical cases. PMID:21278960

  6. Tuberous sclerosis complex; single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Erol, İlknur; Savaş, Tülin; Şekerci, Sevda; Yazıcı, Nalan; Erbay, Ayşe; Demir, Şenay; Saygı, Semra; Alkan, Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was planned with the aim of retrospectively reviewing the clinical and laboratory findings and therapies of our patients diagnosed with tuberous sclerosis and redefining the patients according to the diagnostic criteria revised by the 2012 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Consensus Group and comparing them with the literature. Materials and Method: Twenty patients diagnosed with tuberous sclerosis complex in the Pediatric Neurology Clinic were examined retrospectively in terms of clinical findings and therapies. The diagnoses were compared again according to 1998 and 2012 criteria. Results: It was observed that the complaint at presentation was seizure in 17 of 20 patients and hypopigmented spots on the skin in 3 of 20 patients. On the initial physical examination, findings related with the disease were found in the skin in 17 of the patients, in the eye in 5, in the kidneys in 7 and in the brain with imaging in 17. No cardiac involvement was observed in the patients. Infantile spasm was observed in 7 of the patients who presented because of seizure (n=17), partial seizure was observed in 7 and multiple seizure types were observed in 3. It was found that sirolimus treatment was given to 9 of 20 patients because of different reasons, 7 of these 9 patients had epileptic seizures and sirolimus treatment had no effect on epileptic seizures. According to 2012 diagnostic criteria, no marked change occured in the diagnoses of our patients. Conclusions: It was observed that the signs and symptoms of our patients were compatible with the literature. Molecular genetic examination was planned for the patients who were being followed up because of probable tuberous sclerosis complex. It was observed that sirolimus treatment had no marked effect on the seizure frequency of our patients. PMID:26078697

  7. Recent advances in managing systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Aringer, Martin; Erler, Anne

    2017-01-01

    How the main components in systemic sclerosis-namely autoimmunity, vasculopathy, and fibrosis-fit together is still not sufficiently clear. However, vascular treatment options are well established, the body of evidence for the efficacy of immunomodulatory approaches is increasing, and now at least one hopeful substance that may directly interfere with fibrosis is being tested. Although we still wait for important breakthroughs, there is grounds for hope that better therapeutic options will be available in the near future.

  8. Evaluation and management of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Valadi, Nojan

    2015-06-01

    Motor neuron diseases can cause progressive impairment of voluntary muscles of movement, respiration, speech, and swallowing. This review discusses the most common motor neuron disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). It reviews the evaluation, diagnosis, and management of ALS, and its epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management. A coordinated approach by the primary care physician and neurologist is necessary with a focus on treatment options, durable medical equipment needs, and end-of-life discussions.

  9. [Esophageal involvement in progressive systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Monastra Varrica, L; Doweck, J; Améndola, R; Farías, R; Schenone, L; Bori, J; Fiorini, A; Musi, A O; Corti, R E

    1994-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a collagen disease with high frequency of oesophageal affection, specially if we use manometry as an evaluation method that has a high rate of clinic complication in high rate of patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of the oesophageal affection through the clinical, radiological, endoscopical and manometrical studies and to compare the results with other authors. Between January 1978 and February 1993, we evaluated 101 patients with different clinical types of scleroderma 89 females and 12 males with ages between 16-83 (mean: 49, 19 years). In order to determine systemic sclerosis diagnosis following Masi Rodman criterion's we found from 101 cases 83 had dysphagia (82.2%) motor 66 (65%) organic 17 (34.7%) GER was seem in 41 cases (40.5%). According to Heitz's radiological classification: I: 26 patients (25%) II: 58 patients (52.4%) III: 19 patients (18.8%) IV: 17 patients (16.9%). In reference to Neschis manometric classification we found II 88 (76%) III 77 (76%) In accordance with endoscopical classification we found I: 16 (15.8%); II: 49 (48.5%); III: 19 (18.8%); IV: 17 (16.9%); Although this motor and organic oesophageal alterations have an evident diagnostic value, they have also been referred in another metabolic and collagen diseases but with lesser frequency than was found in the systemic sclerosis by us.

  10. Registers of multiple sclerosis in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Koch-Henriksen, N; Magyari, M; Laursen, B

    2015-01-01

    There are two nationwide population-based registers for multiple sclerosis (MS) in Denmark. The oldest register is The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry (DMSR), which is an epidemiological register for estimation of prevalence and incidence of MS and survival, and for identifying exposures earlier in life that may affect the risk of MS. This register has no systematic follow-up data except for survival. The DMSR has over the years published nationwide incidence- and prevalence data from Denmark and has been involved in a number of 'historical prospective' studies to elucidate the association between a number of different environmental exposures in the past and the subsequent risk of MS. Some of these studies have been able to exonerate suspected risk factors. The other register, the nationwide Danish Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Register, is a follow-up register for all patients who have received disease-modifying treatments since 1996. It has, in particular, contributed to the knowledge of the role of antibodies against the biological drugs used for the treatment of MS.

  11. Multiple sclerosis: Pregnancy and women's health issues.

    PubMed

    Mendibe Bilbao, M; Boyero Durán, S; Bárcena Llona, J; Rodriguez-Antigüedad, A

    2016-08-18

    The course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is influenced by sex, pregnancy and hormonal factors. To analyse the influence of the above factors in order to clarify the aetiopathogenic mechanisms involved in the disease. We conducted a comprehensive review of scientific publications in the PubMed database using a keyword search for 'multiple sclerosis', 'MS', 'EAE', 'pregnancy', 'hormonal factors', 'treatment', and related terms. We reviewed the advances presented at the meeting held by the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) in March 2013 in London, as well as recommendations by international experts. We provide recommendations for counselling and treating women with MS prior to and during pregnancy and after delivery. Current findings on the effects of treatment on the mother, fetus, and newborn are also presented. We issue recommendations for future research in order to address knowledge gaps and clarify any inconsistencies in currently available data. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Glioblastoma in the setting of tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Dennys; Prayson, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is an autosomal dominant condition commonly manifesting with seizures, mental retardation, cortical tubers and hamartomas. Neoplasms may occasionally arise in this setting with the majority of these tumors being subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (World Health Organization [WHO] grade I). Reports of high grade astrocytic neoplasms arising in patients with tuberous sclerosis are rare. We report a left fronto-parietal mass presenting in a 33-year-old woman with altered mental status and slurred speech. The tumor demonstrated areas of enhancement and was associated with mass effect on CT imaging. The tumor was marked by prominent cellularity, easily identifiable mitotic figures, vascular proliferative changes, necrosis and multinucleated giant cells. A Ki-67 labeling index of greater than 30% was noted. The findings were interpreted as being consistent with a glioblastoma (WHO grade IV). The limited literature on similar cases of malignant gliomas arising in the setting of tuberous sclerosis are reviewed. Few reports of similar tumors have been described in the literature. Presentation appears to depend on where the tumor is situated; locations have been variable in previous reports. For those cases in which survival data were included, the prognosis is poor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Origin of Fibrosing Cells in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ebmeier, Sarah; Horsley, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Systemic sclerosis (SSc), an autoimmune disease of unknown origin, is characterized by progressive fibrosis that can affect all organs of the body. To date, there are no effective therapies for the disease. This paucity of treatment options is primarily due to limited understanding of the processes that initiate and promote fibrosis in general and a lack of animal models that specifically emulate the chronic nature of systemic sclerosis. Most models capitulate acute injury-induced fibrosis in specific organs. Regardless of the model however, a major outstanding question in the field is the cellular origin of fibrosing cells. Recent findings A multitude of origins have been proposed in a variety of tissues, including resident tissue stroma, fibrocytes, pericytes, adipocytes, epithelial cells, and endothelial cells. Developmentally derived fibroblast lineages have recently been elucidated with fibrosing potential in injury models. Increasing data supports the pericyte as a fibrosing cell origin in diverse fibrosis models and adipocytes have recently been proposed. Fibrocytes, epithelial cells, and endothelial cells have been examined, though data does not as strongly support these possible origins. Summary In this review, we discuss recent evidence arguing in favor of and against proposed origins of fibrosing cells in diverse models of fibrosis. We highlight outstanding controversies and propose how future research may elucidate how fibrosing cells arise and what processes can be targeted in order to treat systemic sclerosis. PMID:26352735

  14. [Multiple sclerosis in literature, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Collado-Vazquez, S; Carrillo, J M; Cano-de-la-Cuerda, R

    2016-12-16

    Today, the care of patients with multiple sclerosis and those around them represents a clinical and therapeutic challenge for healthcare professionals. The aim of this study is to analyse the appearance of multiple sclerosis in literature, cinema and television, and to reflect upon the image it has in these media. Several representative works that have addressed multiple sclerosis were reviewed, and many of them were seen to offer a very true-to-life vision of the disease. Likewise, a review was also conducted of the most relevant films and TV series that, on occasions, offer the general public a close look at the impact of the disease on patients or relatives, although they are sometimes somewhat exaggerated for the sake of increased dramatic effect and offer a slightly distorted view of reality. Literature largely reflects the real epidemiology, the symptoms and development of the disease, while less attention seems to be given to the diagnostic and therapeutic options open to patients. Cinema and television have offered a correct image but sometimes with the addition of more dramatic effects. It is important for literature, cinema and television to offer a realistic view of this neurological disease so as to make it better known among the public and to help lessen the stigma attached to it.

  15. Genes and Environment in Multiple Sclerosis project: A platform to investigate multiple sclerosis risk.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zongqi; White, Charles C; Owen, Emily K; Von Korff, Alina; Clarkson, Sarah R; McCabe, Cristin A; Cimpean, Maria; Winn, Phoebe A; Hoesing, Ashley; Steele, Sonya U; Cortese, Irene C M; Chitnis, Tanuja; Weiner, Howard L; Reich, Daniel S; Chibnik, Lori B; De Jager, Philip L

    2016-02-01

    The Genes and Environment in Multiple Sclerosis project establishes a platform to investigate the events leading to multiple sclerosis (MS) in at-risk individuals. It has recruited 2,632 first-degree relatives from across the USA. Using an integrated genetic and environmental risk score, we identified subjects with twice the MS risk when compared to the average family member, and we report an initial incidence rate in these subjects that is 30 times greater than that of sporadic MS. We discuss the feasibility of large-scale studies of asymptomatic at-risk subjects that leverage modern tools of subject recruitment to execute collaborative projects.

  16. [Structure of peripheral blood platelets surface in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Kiktenko, A I; Zlobina, G P; Brusov, O S; Zakharova, M N

    2005-01-01

    Using scanning electronic microscopy of peripheral blood platelets in 32 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 6 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), platelets activation, emerging in pseudopodiums formation, aggregation and lysis, was found. Platelets activation was more pronounced in ALS than in MS. It was most markedly seen for quantitative evaluation of the above traits. The features of platelet activation found in the study support the evidence for considering ALS as a systemic disorder being characterized by a broad spectrum of alterations of biological processes.

  17. Multiple sclerosis and human T-cell lymphotropic retroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, Hilary; Defreitas, Elaine C.; Harper, Mary E.; Sandberg-Wollheim, Magnhild; Sheremata, William A.; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Saxinger, Carl W.; Feinberg, Mark B.; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Gallo, Robert C.

    1985-11-01

    A combination of different types of data suggests that some multiple sclerosis patients respond immunologically to, and have cerebrospinal T cells containing, a retrovirus that is related to, but distinct from, the three types of human T-cell lymphotropic viruses. The role of this virus in multiple sclerosis is uncertain.

  18. Disconnection as a Mechanism for Cognitive Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dineen, R. A.; Vilisaar, J.; Hlinka, J.; Bradshaw, C. M.; Morgan, P. S.; Constantinescu, C. S.; Auer, D. P.

    2009-01-01

    Disconnection of cognitively important processing regions by injury to the interconnecting white matter provides a potential mechanism for cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. The contribution of tract-specific white matter injury to dysfunction in different cognitive domains in patients with multiple sclerosis has not previously been…

  19. Endogenous Task Shift Processes in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stablum, F.; Meligrana, L.; Sgaramella, T.; Bortolon, F.; Toso, V.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a study that was aimed to evaluate executive functions in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. The groups tested comprised 22 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients, and 22 non-brain damaged controls. When one is engaged in two speeded tasks, not simultaneously but with some form of alternation, it is slower…

  20. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension-A Deadly Complication of Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pankey, Edward A; Epps, Matthew; Nossaman, Bobby D; Hyman, Albert L; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease with limited therapeutic options. Moreover, when PAH occurs in patients diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, worse outcomes are observed. The purpose of this review is to discuss the etiologies of PAH found in the systemic sclerosis patient, limitations of current medical therapies, and, finally, potential therapies for patients with this combination. PMID:23626904

  1. Neuroepileptic Correlates of Autistic Symptomatology in Tuberous Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Patrick F.

    2004-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is a genetic condition that is strongly associated with the development of an autism spectrum disorder. However, there is marked variability in expression, and only a subset of children with tuberous sclerosis develop autism spectrum disorder. Clarification of the mechanisms that underlie the association and variability in…

  2. A Prevalence Study of Autism in Tuberous Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Ann; Shepherd, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Prevalence of autism in tuberous sclerosis was estimated by interviewing parents of 21 children (ages 3-11). The estimated prevalence of autism was found to be one in four children in general, and one in two of those with mental retardation. Tuberous sclerosis could be a significant cause of autism and pervasive developmental disorders,…

  3. Challenges in the management of a case of tuberous sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Anubhav; Bhatia, Manjeet Singh; Jhanjee, Anurag

    2012-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a multi-system disorder with autosomal dominant inheritance, which can affect the brain, heart, skin, kidneys, lungs, and retina. We hereby report therapeutic challenges faced in a case of an adolescent male suffering from tuberous sclerosis. PMID:24250049

  4. Multiple sclerosis with clinical and radiological features of cerebral tumour

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, HJ; Warlow, CP; Sheldon, PWE; Esiri, MM

    1982-01-01

    Three cases of multiple sclerosis, all confirmed pathologically, are described in whom both the unusual clinical features and the CT scan appearances suggested cerebral tumours. The failure of mass effect reliably to differentiate plaques and tumours on a CT scan is stressed and the literature relating to CT scanning in multiple sclerosis is reviewed. Images PMID:7131013

  5. Endogenous Task Shift Processes in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stablum, F.; Meligrana, L.; Sgaramella, T.; Bortolon, F.; Toso, V.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a study that was aimed to evaluate executive functions in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. The groups tested comprised 22 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients, and 22 non-brain damaged controls. When one is engaged in two speeded tasks, not simultaneously but with some form of alternation, it is slower…

  6. Disconnection as a Mechanism for Cognitive Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dineen, R. A.; Vilisaar, J.; Hlinka, J.; Bradshaw, C. M.; Morgan, P. S.; Constantinescu, C. S.; Auer, D. P.

    2009-01-01

    Disconnection of cognitively important processing regions by injury to the interconnecting white matter provides a potential mechanism for cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. The contribution of tract-specific white matter injury to dysfunction in different cognitive domains in patients with multiple sclerosis has not previously been…

  7. Clustering of multiple sclerosis in Galion, Ohio, 1982-1985

    SciTech Connect

    Ingalls, T.H. )

    1989-09-01

    Epidemiologic evidence indicates that the outbreak of 30-40 cases of multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating syndromes in Galion, Ohio, USA, during 1982-1985 was related to an excess concentration of heavy-metal wastes, especially of cadmium and chromium in sewage and river water. Both multiple sclerosis and myasthenia gravis were diagnosed by board-certified neurologists.

  8. Coordinate expression of AOS genes and JA accumulation: JA is not required for initiation of closing layer in wound healing tubers.

    PubMed

    Lulai, Edward; Huckle, Linda; Neubauer, Jonathan; Suttle, Jeffrey

    2011-06-15

    Wounding induces a series of coordinated physiological responses essential for protection and healing of the damaged tissue. Wound-induced formation of jasmonic acid (JA) is important in defense responses in leaves, but comparatively little is known about the induction of JA biosynthesis and its role(s) in tuber wound-healing. In this study, the effects of wounding on JA content, expression of JA biosynthetic genes, and the involvement of JA in the initiation of closing layer formation in potato tubers were determined. In addition, the role of abscisic acid (ABA) in wound-induced JA accumulation was examined. The basal JA content in non-wounded tuber tissues was low (< 3 ng g⁻¹ FW). Two hours after wounding, the JA content increased by > 5-fold, reached a maximum between 4 and 6h after wounding, and declined to near-basal levels thereafter. Tuber age (storage duration) had little effect on the pattern of JA accumulation. The expressions of the JA biosynthetic genes (StAOS2, StAOC, and StOPR3) were greatly increased by wounding reaching a maximum 2-4 h after wounding and declining thereafter. A 1-h aqueous wash of tuber discs immediately after wounding resulted in a 94% inhibition of wound-induced JA accumulation. Neither JA treatment nor inhibition of JA accumulation affected suberin polyphenolic accumulation during closing layer development indicating that JA was not essential for the initiation of primary suberization. ABA treatment did not restore JA accumulation in washed tuber tissues suggesting that leaching of endogenous ABA was either not involved or not solely involved in this loss of JA accumulation by washing. Collectively, these results indicate that JA is not required for the induction of processes essential to the initiation of suberization during closing layer development, but do not exclude the possibility that JA may be involved in other wound related responses. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  9. Urticarial vasculitis appearing in the progression of systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yoko; Aoki, Mikako; Kawana, Seiji

    2006-11-01

    We report a case of urticarial vasculitis that appeared during the course of limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis. The urticarial lesions responded to systemic administration of prednisolone. After the appearance of urticarial vasculitis, the progression of scleroderma in distal sites of her elbow and knee joint became apparent. We consider this case to be consistent with limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis. The patient started treatment with prednisolone and her edema as well as scleroderma softened gradually. We analyzed, by immunohistochemistry, the number of tryptase-positive mast cells of this case in the lesions of urticarial vasculitis as well as systemic sclerosis. The number of tryptase-positive mast cells in the lesions of urticarial vasculitis as well as systemic sclerosis was significantly increased compared to normal skin (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively). We demonstrate that, in the present case, mast cells might be involved in both courses of urticarial vasculitis and systemic sclerosis as a common factor.

  10. Hippocampal sclerosis and chronic epilepsy following posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kapina, Viktoria; Vargas, Maria-Isabel; Wohlrab, Gabriele; Vulliemoz, Serge; Fluss, Joel; Seeck, Margitta

    2013-12-01

    Chronic epilepsy has rarely been reported after posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and the association with hippocampal sclerosis has been suggested only once before. We report the case of a girl admitted at the age of 8 years with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. On the second day of admission, she presented with focal complex seizures and cerebral MRI showed posterior encephalopathy and no hippocampal sclerosis. MRI after one month confirmed the diagnosis of PRES. The seizures recurred and the girl developed pharmacoresistant epilepsy and was admitted to our hospital for further investigation. Cerebral MRI three years after the diagnosis of PRES showed hippocampal sclerosis which was not present on the initial MRI. We conclude that there is a triggering role of PRES in the development of hippocampal sclerosis. Hippocampal sclerosis may have resulted from seizure-associated damage, alternatively, hypertensive encephalopathy may have led to hippocampal damage via a vascular mechanism.

  11. [Current aspects of therapy conversion for multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Kolber, P; Luessi, F; Meuth, S G; Klotz, L; Korn, T; Trebst, C; Tackenberg, B; Kieseier, B; Kümpfel, T; Fleischer, V; Tumani, H; Wildemann, B; Lang, M; Flachenecker, P; Meier, U; Brück, W; Limmroth, V; Haghikia, A; Hartung, H-P; Stangel, M; Hohlfeld, R; Hemmer, B; Gold, R; Wiendl, H; Zipp, F

    2015-10-01

    In recent years the approval of new substances has led to a substantial increase in the number of course-modifying immunotherapies available for multiple sclerosis. Therapy conversion therefore represents an increasing challenge. The treatment options sometimes show complex adverse effect profiles and necessitate a long-term and comprehensive monitoring. This article presents an overview of therapy conversion of immunotherapies for multiple sclerosis in accordance with the recommendations of the Disease-Related Competence Network for Multiple Sclerosis and the German Multiple Sclerosis Society as well as the guidelines on diagnostics and therapy for multiple sclerosis of the German Society of Neurology and the latest research results. At the present point in time it should be noted that no studies have been carried out for most of the approaches for therapy conversion given here; however, the recommendations are based on theoretical considerations and therefore correspond to recommendations at the level of expert consensus, which is currently essential for the clinical daily routine.

  12. High-fat and ketogenic diets in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Paganoni, Sabrina; Wills, Anne-Marie

    2013-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a fatal neurodegenerative disease. Epidemiologic data suggest that malnutrition is a common feature in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and being overweight or obese confers a survival advantage in this patient population. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mouse models, a high-fat diet has been shown to lead to weight gain and prolonged survival. However, little research has been conducted to test whether nutritional interventions might ameliorate the disease course in humans. Here we review the currently available evidence supporting the potential role of dietary interventions as a therapeutic tool for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Ultimately, determining whether a high-fat or ketogenic diet could be beneficial in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will require large randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials.

  13. Diagnosis and Management of Systemic Sclerosis: A Practical Approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason J; Pope, Janet E

    2016-02-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a devastating multisystem rheumatologic condition that is characterized by autoimmunity, tissue fibrosis, obliterative vasculopathy and inflammation. Clinical presentation and course of the condition vary greatly, which complicates both diagnosis and corresponding treatment. In this regard, recent advances in disease understanding, both clinically and biochemically, have led to newer classification criteria for systemic sclerosis that are more inclusive than ever before. Still, significant disease modifying therapies do not yet exist for most patients. Therefore, organ-based management strategies are employed and research has been directed within this paradigm focusing on either the most debilitating symptoms, such as Raynaud's phenomenon, digital ulcers and cutaneous sclerosis, or life-threatening organ involvement such as interstitial lung disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The current trends in systemic sclerosis diagnosis, evidence-based treatment recommendations and potential future directions in systemic sclerosis treatment are discussed.

  14. Electrophysiologic abnormalities of cardiac function in progressive systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rokas, S; Mavrikakis, M; Agrios, N; Mylonas, D; Antoniadou, L; Moulopoulos, S

    1996-01-01

    The heart has been generally recognized as a target organ in progressive systemic sclerosis. Noninvasive studies have assessed the incidence and prognostic importance of cardiac arrhythmias in these patients. However, detailed exploration of the function of impulse formation and the conduction system of the heart in these patients has never been reported. Therefore, invasive electrophysiologic studies were performed in 30 patients with systemic sclerosis, all of whom had neither obvious cardiac involvement nor cardiac arrhythmias, and in 32 subjects with no evidence of heart disease, who served as a control group. Corrected sinus node recovery time in patients with systemic sclerosis was significantly longer (P < .001) than in the control group, as was the HV interval (P < .05). Of the 30 patients with systemic sclerosis, 10 had an HV interval of 60 ms or longer. In four patients with systemic sclerosis, the recorded AH interval exceeded 125 ms. The intra-atrial conduction time tended to increase to a significant degree (P < .05) in patients with systemic sclerosis. The interatrial conduction time was much longer (P < .001), and the maximal conduction delay to the atrioventricular junction and to the distal coronary sinus was much greater in the patients with systemic sclerosis than in the control group (P < .001 for both). Supraventricular tachyarrhythmias were induced in 15 patients with systemic sclerosis versus 3 control group subjects (P < .001). With respect to corrected sinus node recovery time, AH and HV intervals, atrial vulnerability, and ventricular tachycardia, 3 of the 30 patients with systemic sclerosis had abnormal findings in one of these parameters and 14 had abnormalities in more than one. These results suggest that a broad spectrum of electrophysiologic abnormalities is present in patients with systemic sclerosis, which can be revealed only by invasive studies. Furthermore, this study provides additional support for the hypothesis that diffuse

  15. RuBPCase activase mediates growth-defense tradeoffs: Silencing RCA redirects JA flux from JA-Ile to MeJA to attenuate induced defense responses in Nicotiana attenuata

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sirsha; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary RuBPCase activase (RCA), an abundant photosynthetic protein is strongly down-regulated in response to Manduca sexta’s oral secretion (OS) in Nicotiana attenuata. RCA-silenced plants are impaired not only in photosynthetic capacity and growth, but also in jasmonic acid (JA)-isoleucine (Ile) signaling, and herbivore resistance mediated by JA-Ile dependent defense traits. These responses are consistent with a resource-based growth-defense trade-off. Since JA+Ile-supplementation of OS restored WT levels of JA-Ile, defenses and resistance to M. sexta, but OS supplemented individually with JA- or Ile did not, the JA-Ile deficiency of RCA-silenced plants could not be attributed to lower JA or Ile pools or JAR4/6 conjugating activity. Similar levels of JA-Ile derivatives after OS elicitation indicated unaltered JA-Ile turnover and lower levels of other JA-conjugates ruled out competition from other conjugation reactions. RCA-silenced plants accumulated more methyl jasmonate (MeJA) after OS elicitation, which corresponded with increased jasmonate methyltransferase (JMT) activity. RCA-silencing phenocopies JMT over-expression, wherein elevated JMT activity redirects OS-elicited JA flux towards inactive MeJA, creating a JA sink which depletes JA-Ile and its associated defense responses. Hence RCA plays an additional non-photosynthetic role in attenuating JA-mediated defenses and their associated costs potentially allowing plants to anticipate resource-based constraints on growth before they actually occur. PMID:24491116

  16. [Lyme disease in patients with multiple sclerosis: clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic features].

    PubMed

    Baranova, N S; Spirin, N N; Fadeeva, O A; Shipova, E G; Stepanov, I O

    2012-01-01

    Lyme disease is one of the most frequent infections in the Russian Federation. In patients with multiple sclerosis, the Borrelia infection may act as a trigger in some cases and also worsens the clinical course of multiple sclerosis. One hundred patients with definite multiple sclerosis were examined including 19 patients with the combination of multiple sclerosis and Lyme disease. The difficulties of diagnosis, clinical features and treatment of Lyme disease in patients with multiple sclerosis are discussed.

  17. Evaluating Walking in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Walking limitations are among the most visible manifestations of multiple sclerosis (MS). Regular walking assessments should be a component of patient management and require instruments that are appropriate from the clinician's and the patient's perspectives. This article reviews frequently used instruments to assess walking in patients with MS, with emphasis on their validity, reliability, and practicality in the clinical setting. Relevant articles were identified based on PubMed searches using the following terms: “multiple sclerosis AND (walking OR gait OR mobility OR physical activity) AND (disability evaluation)”; references of relevant articles were also searched. Although many clinician- and patient-driven instruments are available, not all have been validated in MS, and some are not sensitive enough to detect small but clinically important changes. Choosing among these depends on what needs to be measured, psychometric properties, the clinical relevance of results, and practicality with respect to space, time, and patient burden. Of the instruments available, the clinician-observed Timed 25-Foot Walk and patient self-report 12-Item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale have properties that make them suitable for routine evaluation of walking performance. The Dynamic Gait Index and the Timed Up and Go test involve other aspects of mobility, including balance. Tests of endurance, such as the 2- or 6-Minute Walk, may provide information on motor fatigue not captured by other tests. Quantitative measurement of gait kinetics and kinematics, and recordings of mobility in the patient's environment via accelerometry or Global Positioning System odometry, are currently not routinely used in the clinical setting. PMID:24453700

  18. Exercise Training in Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Paulseth, John E.; Dove, Carin; Jiang, Shucui; Rathbone, Michel P.; Hicks, Audrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is evidence of the benefits of exercise training in multiple sclerosis (MS); however, few studies have been conducted in individuals with progressive MS and severe mobility impairment. A potential exercise rehabilitation approach is total-body recumbent stepper training (TBRST). We evaluated the safety and participant-reported experience of TBRST in people with progressive MS and compared the efficacy of TBRST with that of body weight–supported treadmill training (BWSTT) on outcomes of function, fatigue, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Methods: Twelve participants with progressive MS (Expanded Disability Status Scale scores, 6.0–8.0) were randomized to receive TBRST or BWSTT. Participants completed three weekly sessions (30 minutes) of exercise training for 12 weeks. Primary outcomes included safety assessed as adverse events and patient-reported exercise experience assessed as postexercise response and evaluation of exercise equipment. Secondary outcomes included the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite, the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale, and the Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life–54 questionnaire scores. Assessments were conducted at baseline and after 12 weeks. Results: Safety was confirmed in both exercise groups. Participants reported enjoying both exercise modalities; however, TBRST was reviewed more favorably. Both interventions reduced fatigue and improved HRQOL (P ≤ .05); there were no changes in function. Conclusions: Both TBRST and BWSTT seem to be safe, well tolerated, and enjoyable for participants with progressive MS with severe disability. Both interventions may also be efficacious for reducing fatigue and improving HRQOL. TBRST should be further explored as an exercise rehabilitation tool for patients with progressive MS. PMID:27803637

  19. Vascular involvement in systemic sclerosis (scleroderma)

    PubMed Central

    Pattanaik, Debendra; Brown, Monica; Postlethwaite, Arnold E

    2011-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an acquired multiorgan connective tissue disease with variable mortality and morbidity dictated by clinical subset type. The etiology of the basic disease and pathogenesis of the systemic autoimmunity, fibrosis, and fibroproliferative vasculopathy are unknown and debated. In this review, the spectrum of vascular abnormalities and the options currently available to treat the vascular manifestations of SSc are discussed. Also discussed is how the hallmark pathologies (ie, how autoimmunity, vasculopathy, and fibrosis of the disease) might be effected and interconnected with modulatory input from lysophospholipids, sphingosine 1-phosphate, and lysophosphatidic acid. PMID:22096374

  20. New oral drugs for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gasperini, Claudio; Ruggieri, S

    2009-10-01

    Disease-modifying treatments are now available in relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), and their beneficial effects have been shown in several clinical studies. However, as these treatments are only partially effective in halting the MS disease process and are frequently associated with side effects and suboptimal patient adherence, new oral therapeutic approaches are warranted. This review focuses on advances in current and novel oral treatment approaches for MS. Several pivotal reports have provided promising results for new oral therapies evaluating the safety and efficacy of new agents including fingolimod, fumaric acid, cladribine, teriflunomide and laquinimod.

  1. Paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Iorio, R; Capone, F; Plantone, D; Batocchi, A P

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria are part of the spectrum of transient neurological disturbances that can be frequently encountered in multiple sclerosis (MS). Prompt recognition of these symptoms is important because they can be the only manifestation of a MS relapse and symptomatic therapy is often beneficial. We report a patient who developed paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria, documented by video imaging, while he was recovering from a MS relapse. Treatment with carbamazepine resulted in the complete reversal of the paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pemphigus vulgaris and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Matin, Marzieh; Rajati, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune bullous and erosive mucocutaneous disease. Rarely, it occurs in patients with other autoimmune disease. The relation between PV and neurological disorders is unclear and needs to be more studied. Here, we report a case of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), followed by dermatologic involvement. Histopathological evidence and direct immunofluorescence are consistent with PV. Systemic corticosteroid and azathioprine were effective in the treatment of mucocutaneous lesions. PV seems to be accidentally associated with ALS. Expression of major histocompatibility complex Class II in autoimmune disease and production of autoantibodies have been proposed to describe the association of PV with ALS. PMID:28163728

  3. Complementary and alternative medicine and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bowling, Allen C

    2011-05-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is used by one-half to three-fourths of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Although it is used widely, CAM may not be discussed during a conventional medical visit. In MS, CAM therapies exhibit a broad range of risk-benefit profiles; some of these therapies are low risk and possibly beneficial, whereas others are ineffective, dangerous, or unstudied. Health professionals who provide objective and practical information about the risks and benefits of CAM therapies may improve the quality of care for those with MS.

  4. Myeloproliferative neoplasms in five multiple sclerosis patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Thorsteinsdottir, Sigrun; Bjerrum, Ole Weis; Hasselbalch, Hans Carl

    2013-01-01

    The concurrence of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and multiple sclerosis (MS) is unusual. We report five patients from a localized geographic area in Denmark with both MS and MPN; all the patients were diagnosed with MPNs in the years 2007–2012. We describe the patients' history and treatment. A potential link between MS and MPNs has not been previously recognized. This observation calls attention to potential environmental factors and/or previously unrecognized genetic factors predisposing these patients to both MS and MPNs. PMID:24371783

  5. The neurobiology of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Ess, Kevin C

    2006-03-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multiorgan genetic disease caused by inactivation of either the TSC1 or TSC2 genes. The disorder typically has profound neurologic involvement and often presents early in life with epilepsy, developmental delay, mental retardation, and autism. These features are generally accepted to result from structural brain abnormalities that are found in patients with TSC. Although much progress has recently been made in discerning the function(s) of the TSC genes, many questions remain as to the role of these genes in brain development and homeostasis. This review will summarize recent progress and suggest future avenues of basic science research.

  6. Monthly distribution of multiple sclerosis patients' births

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharanidharan, Padmanabhan

    As part of an integrated geographical and environmental epidemiological study of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Budapest's Pesterzsébet district, many biometeorological variables were specifically examined. Also, the monthly distribution of birthdates of MS patients resident in the district was plotted. Patients reliably diagnosed with MS were found to have been born in greater numbers in the months of April and October, precisely 6 months apart. This finding indicates the presence of natural non-genetic factors in the creation of MS susceptibility, affecting the nervous system at the crucial time of myelination.

  7. Interferon beta for primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Juan Ignacio; Romano, Marina; Ciapponi, Agustín; Patrucco, Liliana; Cristiano, Edgardo

    2009-01-21

    Therapeutic trials with ss-interferon in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) have mainly focused on remitting-relapsing multiple sclerosis (RRMS), demonstrating a reduction in relapse rate. However, there is not enough evidence about their efficacy in patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). Identify and summarize the evidence that ss-interferon is beneficial and safe in patients with PPMS. We searched (until April 2008) the Cochrane MS Group Trials Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) The Cochrane Library, (2008, Issue 3,); MEDLINE (PubMed) (January 1966 to April 2008), EMBASE (January 1974 to April 2008); NICE (January 1999 to April 2008); LILACS (January 1986 to April 2008); Screening of reference lists of all primary studies found; Contact and inquiry of drug manufactures and multiple sclerosis experts. Randomized double or single blind, placebo-controlled trials of recombinant ss-interferon in patients with PPMS including trials of MS which report separate outcomes in subgroups of patients with PPMS. Two reviewers independently extracted and assessed trials' quality according to the criteria outlined in The Cochrane Handbook. Of 1280 potential studies evaluated, only two Randomized Control Trials (123 patients) were included. ss-interferon treatment compared to placebo did not show differences regarding the proportion of patients with progression of the disease (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.55 to1.43), and it was associated with a greater frequency of treatment-related adverse events (RR 1.90, 95% CI 1.45-2.48). One of the trials evaluated the MRI secondary outcome pre-specified in the protocol. This trial showed that at two years the numbers of active lesions on brain MRI scan in ss-interferon arm were significantly lower than in placebo arm (weighted mean difference -1.3, 95% CI -2.15 to -0.45, P = 0.003); also, the number of participants with active lesions was significantly higher in placebo arm vs. ss-interferon arm at two

  8. Heterogeneity versus homogeneity of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Fumitaka; Martinez, Nicholas E; Omura, Seiichi; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2011-01-01

    The 10th International Congress of Neuroimmunology, including the 10th European School of Neuroimmunology Course, was held by the International Society of Neuroimmunology in Sitges (Barcelona, Spain) on 26–30 October 2010. The conference covered a wide spectrum of issues and challenges in both basic science and clinical aspects of neuroimmunology. Data and ideas were shared through a variety of programs, including review talks and poster sessions. One of the topics of the congress was whether multiple sclerosis is a homogenous or heterogenous disease, clinically and pathologically, throughout its course. PMID:21426254

  9. [Risk of affective disorder in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Stenager, Elsebeth Nylev; Stage, Kurt Bjerregaard; Stenager, Egon

    2011-01-10

    An increased risk for depression has been found in multiple sclerosis (MS). The purpose of the present study has been to give suggestions to guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of depression in MS in Denmark based on the international literature and recommendations. The method was a review of the relevant literature. The study recommends assessment of all MS patients for depression. Treatment of depression with serotonin reuptake inhibitors and/or cognitive behavioural therapy is recommended, depending on the severity of the illness. Caution is recommended in patients receiving beta interferon treatment.

  10. Genetics, Epigenetics, and Genomics of Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Gloria; Mayes, Maureen D

    2015-08-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a complex autoimmune disease that occurs in a genetically susceptible host. Genetic studies performed so far reveal that multiple genetic loci contribute to disease susceptibility in SSc. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current knowledge of genetics in SSc by exploring the observational evidence, the different genetic studies, and their modalities as well as the most relevant genes discovered by these. The importance of gene expression variation and the different mechanisms that govern it, including the recently discovered field of epigenetics, are also explored, with an emphasis on microRNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Refractory anemia in systemic sclerosis: myelodisplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sargın, Gökhan; Şentürk, Taşkın; Yavaşoğlu, İrfan

    2015-09-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune connective tissue disease characterized by small vessel vasculopathy, autoantibodies, and skin or visceral organ fibrosis (lung, oesophagus, kidney etc.) as a result of extracellular collagen deposition. The cancer risk is higher in many rheumatic diseases, including SSc. Various defined malignancies may develop in 3%-11% of patients with SSc. These solid tumors are generally observed in the lung, oesophagus, or breast. In addition, an increased risk for hematological cancers were reported in literature. Herein, we describe an interesting case of SSc complicated by myelodisplastic syndrome (MDS). Our aim is to draw attention to developing cancers and the rare occurence of MDS in patients with SSc.

  12. Developing a community multiple sclerosis nursing service.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Debbie; Adams, John

    2014-05-20

    Reforms to the NHS following the passing of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 have created new purchaser organisations with responsibility for planning the configuration of healthcare services in their geographic areas. If a community multiple sclerosis (MS) nursing service is to survive in this environment, it must demonstrate its ability to contribute to achieving the purchaser organisations' objectives. Evaluation data, such as hospital admission avoidance and patient satisfaction, will be crucial in demonstrating the community MS nursing service's clinical and economic effectiveness. A strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis of the issues facing a community MS service in this environment is provided.

  13. [Cerebrospinal fluid diagnostics in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Ruprecht, K; Tumani, H

    2016-12-01

    As a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS), multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with characteristic abnormalities in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Thus, in addition to magnetic resonance imaging, CSF examination is a central diagnostic procedure in patients with MS, which can corroborate a diagnosis of MS and may also help to discern differential diagnoses. The most important CSF finding in MS is the detection of persistent polyspecific intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis. This review summarizes CSF findings of patients with MS and addresses issues of relevance for clinical practice, potential diagnostic pitfalls as well as new developments in CSF diagnostics of MS.

  14. Psychiatric disorders prior to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Goldacre, Raph; Talbot, Kevin; Goldacre, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    It is recognized that neuropsychiatric conditions are overrepresented in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patient kindreds and psychiatric symptoms may precede the onset of motor symptoms. Using a hospital record linkage database, hospitalization with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, or anxiety was significantly associated with a first diagnosis of ALS within the following year. This is likely to specifically reflect the clinicopathological overlap of ALS with frontotemporal dementia. A diagnosis of depression was significantly associated with a first record of ALS ≥5 years later, in keeping with growing evidence for major depressive disorder as an early marker of cerebral neurodegeneration. Ann Neurol 2016;80:935–938 PMID:27761925

  15. [Cardiovascular manifestations in progressive systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Badui, E; Robles, E; Hernández, C; García Rubí, D; Mintz, G

    1985-01-01

    We studied 20 consecutive patients with progressive systemic sclerosis from the cardiological point of view through non invasive methods. Sixteen (80%) patients had some kind of cardiovascular complications as shown by any of the used methods. a) fourteen (70%) referred some type of cardiac symptoms. b) eleven (55%) had an abnormal cardiac examination and 10 (50%) had arterial hypertension. c) Electrocardiogram: sixteen (80%) were abnormal. Among them, three cases (15%) had bifascicular block, complication considered up till now as rare. d) Cardiac X Ray Series: Fourteen (70%) were abnormal mainly due to pulmonary fibrosis (55%). e) Echocardiogram: 45% of them showed some kind of abnormality.

  16. Evoked potentials in monitoring multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Leocani, L; Medaglini, S; Comi, G

    2000-01-01

    The usefulness of evoked potentials (EPs) in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is limited by its relatively low sensitivity to subclinical lesions. However, they are still a good tool to assess the integrity of afferent and efferent pathways and to quantify the severity of white matter involvement. Transversal and longitudinal studies have demonstrated good correlation between EP abnormalities and disability, suggesting that multimodal evoked potentials could be useful in monitoring the disease evolution in single patients and as surrogate end points in clinical trials.

  17. Quantifying Disease Progression in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Neil G; Turner, Martin R; Vucic, Steve; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shefner, Jeremy; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) exhibits characteristic variability of onset and rate of disease progression, with inherent clinical heterogeneity making disease quantitation difficult. Recent advances in understanding pathogenic mechanisms linked to the development of ALS impose an increasing need to develop strategies to predict and more objectively measure disease progression. This review explores phenotypic and genetic determinants of disease progression in ALS, and examines established and evolving biomarkers that may contribute to robust measurement in longitudinal clinical studies. With targeted neuroprotective strategies on the horizon, developing efficiencies in clinical trial design may facilitate timely entry of novel treatments into the clinic. PMID:25223628

  18. Is Multiple Sclerosis an Autoimmune Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Wootla, Bharath; Eriguchi, Makoto; Rodriguez, Moses

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with varied clinical presentations and heterogeneous histopathological features. The underlying immunological abnormalities in MS lead to various neurological and autoimmune manifestations. There is strong evidence that MS is, at least in part, an immune-mediated disease. There is less evidence that MS is a classical autoimmune disease, even though many authors state this in the description of the disease. We show the evidence that both supports and refutes the autoimmune hypothesis. In addition, we present an alternate hypothesis based on virus infection to explain the pathogenesis of MS. PMID:22666554

  19. Current therapy of systemic sclerosis (scleroderma).

    PubMed

    Müller-Ladner, U; Benning, K; Lang, B

    1993-04-01

    Treatment of systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) presents a challenge to both the patient and the physician. Established approaches include long-term physiotherapy, disease-modifying agents such as D-penicillamine, and treatment of organ involvement. These efforts are often unsatisfactory since the results are poor. However, recent advances include treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon (plasmapheresis, stanozolol, and prostacyclin analogues), scleroderma renal crisis (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), and gastric hypomotility (cisapride). This article covers the current approaches to the disease-modifying therapy including those related to the function of collagen-producing fibroblasts, vascular alterations, and the cellular and humoral immune system, as well as treatment of involved organs.

  20. Quantifying disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Simon, Neil G; Turner, Martin R; Vucic, Steve; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shefner, Jeremy; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2014-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) exhibits characteristic variability of onset and rate of disease progression, with inherent clinical heterogeneity making disease quantitation difficult. Recent advances in understanding pathogenic mechanisms linked to the development of ALS impose an increasing need to develop strategies to predict and more objectively measure disease progression. This review explores phenotypic and genetic determinants of disease progression in ALS, and examines established and evolving biomarkers that may contribute to robust measurement in longitudinal clinical studies. With targeted neuroprotective strategies on the horizon, developing efficiencies in clinical trial design may facilitate timely entry of novel treatments into the clinic.

  1. Understanding the Etiology of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    of tuber- ous sclerosis. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991;615:125–127.   2. European  Chromosome  16 Tuberous Sclerosis  Consortium. Identification and...our lesion lacks cytomegalic cells with a mixed neuron-glial or immature phenotype (e.g. immunostaining for nestin or proliferative markers ) called...circuitry of TSC and other mTOR-associated neurodevelopmental disorders. References Alexander GM, Rogan SC, Abbas AI, Armbruster BN, Pei Y

  2. The changing scene of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Robberecht, Wim; Philips, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Several recent breakthroughs have provided notable insights into the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), with some even shifting our thinking about this neurodegenerative disease and raising the question as to whether this disorder is a proteinopathy, a ribonucleopathy or both. In addition, these breakthroughs have revealed mechanistic links between ALS and frontotemporal dementia, as well as between ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases, such as the cerebellar atrophies, myotonic dystrophy and inclusion body myositis. Here, we summarize the new findings in ALS research, discuss what they have taught us about this disease and examine issues that are still outstanding.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tumani, Hayrettin; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Hemmer, Bernhard; Teunissen, Charlotte; Deisenhammer, Florian; Giovannoni, Gavin; Zettl, Uwe K

    2009-08-01

    In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) intensive efforts are directed at identifying biomarkers in bodily fluids related to underlying disease mechanisms, disease activity and progression, and therapeutic response. Besides MR imaging parameters cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers provide important and specific information since changes in the CSF composition may reflect disease mechanisms inherent to MS. The different cellular and protein-analytical methods of the CSF and the recommended standard of the diagnostic CSF profile in MS are described. A brief update on possible CSF biomarkers that might reflect key pathological processes of MS such as inflammation, demyelination, neuroaxonal loss, gliosis and regeneration is provided.

  4. Ocular microtremor (OMT): a new neurophysiological approach to multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bolger, C.; Bojanic, S.; Sheahan, N.; Malone, J.; Hutchinson, M.; Coakley, D.

    2000-01-01

    Using a piezoelectric transducer, the frequency and pattern of ocular microtremor (OMT) between 50 normal subjects and 50patients with multiple sclerosis were compared. Controls were age matched. All records were analysed blindly. The frequency of OMT in the normal group was 86 (SD 6) Hz, which was significantly different from that of the multiple sclerosis group (71 (SD) 10Hz, p<0.001). Those in the multiple sclerosis group with clinical evidence of brain stem or cerebellar disease (n=36) had an average OMT frequency of 67 (SD 9) Hz (p<0.001) compared with normal (n=86), whereas those with no evidence of brain stem or cerebellar involvement (n=14) had a frequency of 81.2 (SD 6) Hz (p<0.05, n=64). The differences between the two multiple sclerosis groups were also significant (p<0.001, n=50). At least one abnormality (frequency and pattern) of OMT activity was seen in 78% of patients with multiple sclerosis. In the presence of brain stem or cerebellar disease 89% had abnormal records whereas in the absence of such disease 50% had abnormal records. This is the first report of the application of this technique to patients with multiple sclerosis. The results suggest that OMT activity may be of value in the assessment of multiple sclerosis.

 PMID:10766897

  5. Ocular microtremor (OMT): a new neurophysiological approach to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bolger, C; Bojanic, S; Sheahan, N; Malone, J; Hutchinson, M; Coakley, D

    2000-05-01

    Using a piezoelectric transducer, the frequency and pattern of ocular microtremor (OMT) between 50 normal subjects and 50 patients with multiple sclerosis were compared. Controls were age matched. All records were analysed blindly. The frequency of OMT in the normal group was 86 (SD 6) Hz, which was significantly different from that of the multiple sclerosis group (71 (SD) 10 Hz, p<0.001). Those in the multiple sclerosis group with clinical evidence of brain stem or cerebellar disease (n=36) had an average OMT frequency of 67 (SD 9) Hz (p<0.001) compared with normal (n=86), whereas those with no evidence of brain stem or cerebellar involvement (n=14) had a frequency of 81.2 (SD 6) Hz (p<0.05, n=64). The differences between the two multiple sclerosis groups were also significant (p<0. 001, n=50). At least one abnormality (frequency and pattern) of OMT activity was seen in 78% of patients with multiple sclerosis. In the presence of brain stem or cerebellar disease 89% had abnormal records whereas in the absence of such disease 50% had abnormal records. This is the first report of the application of this technique to patients with multiple sclerosis. The results suggest that OMT activity may be of value in the assessment of multiple sclerosis.

  6. The management of multiple sclerosis in children: a European view.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, Angelo; Banwell, Brenda; Boyko, Alexey; Amato, Maria Pia; Anlar, Banu; Blinkenberg, Morten; Boon, Maartje; Filippi, Massimo; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Ketelslegers, Immy; Kornek, Barbara; Lim, Ming; Lindstrom, Eva; Nadj, Congor; Neuteboom, Rinze; Rocca, Maria A; Rostasy, Kevin; Tardieu, Marc; Wassmer, Evangeline; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene; Hintzen, Rogier

    2010-10-01

    About 3-5% of all patients with multiple sclerosis experience the onset of their disease under the age of 16. A significant proportion of paediatric multiple sclerosis patients develop significant cognitive disturbances and persistent physical disability. The high relapse rate and the morbidity in the paediatric multiple sclerosis population has triggered the use of disease-modifying therapies that have been shown to reduce relapse rate, disease progression and cognitive decline in adult patients with multiple sclerosis. Hard evidence for the right treatment and its appropriate timing is scarce in paediatric multiple sclerosis. Nevertheless, expertise in this field has grown thanks to recent open-label trials and experience generated in specialized centres. In spring 2009, a first meeting was held in Rotterdam with clinicians from 11 European countries (one from Canada) that are all active in the management of paediatric multiple sclerosis. One of the aims was to generate a common view on the management of paediatric multiple sclerosis patients. The result of this meeting is presented here to help standardize treatment and to support clinicians with less experience in this field.

  7. Gluten sensitivity in multiple sclerosis: experimental myth or clinical truth?

    PubMed

    Shor, Dana Ben-Ami; Barzilai, Ori; Ram, Maya; Izhaky, David; Porat-Katz, Bat Sheva; Chapman, Joab; Blank, Miri; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2009-09-01

    Patients with neurological disease of unknown etiology sometimes present with antigliadin and antitissue transglutaminase antibodies. The association between these antibodies and multiple sclerosis has been previously suggested. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of these antibodies in multiple sclerosis patients. We determined the level of serum immunoglobulin A and immunoglobulin G antigliadin and antitissue transglutaminase antibodies in 98 patients with multiple sclerosis. We found a highly significant increase in titers of immunoglobulin G antibodies against gliadin and tissue transglutaminase in the multiple sclerosis patients. Seven patients had a positive IgG AGA, whereas only 2 controls presented positive titers (P = 0.03). Four patients had positive IgG anti-tTG while all the controls tested negative (P = 0.02). However, immunoglobulin A antibodies against gliadin and tissue transglutaminase were not statistically higher in the multiple sclerosis group in comparison to the control group. Our findings support the associations between antibodies against gliadin and tissue transglutaminase to multiple sclerosis. The specific role of these antibodies in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis remains uncertain and requires additional research. A gluten free diet should be considered in specific cases of patients who present with gluten antibodies.

  8. [Neuraxial anesthesia in patients with multiple sclerosis - a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Bornemann-Cimenti, Helmar; Sivro, Nikki; Toft, Frederike; Halb, Larissa; Sandner-Kiesling, Andreas

    Current guidelines for neuraxial analgesia in patients with multiple sclerosis are ambiguous and offer the clinician only a limited basis for decision making. This systematic review examines the number of cases in which multiple sclerosis has been exacerbated after central neuraxial analgesia in order to rationally evaluate the safety of these procedures. A systematic literature search with the keywords "anesthesia or analgesia" and "epidural, peridural, caudal, spinal, subarachnoid or intrathecal" in combination with "multiple sclerosis" was performed in the databases PubMed and Embase, looking for clinical data on the effect of central neuraxial analgesia on the course of multiple sclerosis. Over a period of 65 years, our search resulted in 37 reports with a total of 231 patients. In 10 patients multiple sclerosis was worsened and nine multiple sclerosis or neuromyelitis optica was first diagnosed in a timely context with central neuraxial analgesia. None of the cases showed a clear relation between cause and effect. Current clinical evidence does not support the theory that central neuraxial analgesia negatively affects the course of multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalence of neuropathic pain in early multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Heitmann, Henrik; Biberacher, Viola; Tiemann, Laura; Buck, Dorothea; Loleit, Verena; Selter, Rebecca C; Knier, Benjamin; Tölle, Thomas R; Mühlau, Mark; Berthele, Achim; Hemmer, Bernhard; Ploner, Markus

    2016-08-01

    Pain is considered a frequent symptom in multiple sclerosis. Neuropathic pain is the type of pain most closely related to the pathology of multiple sclerosis and its prevalence estimates vary largely. We prospectively assessed the prevalence of neuropathic pain in patients with early multiple sclerosis and investigated the association of neuropathic pain with other clinical parameters. A total of 377 outpatients with multiple sclerosis at an early disease stage were included in this prospective study. Mean disease duration was 4.2 years, mean Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score was 1.6, 96.8% of patients were classified as having relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Neuropathic pain was assessed using the PainDETECT questionnaire (PDQ). Depression, fatigue and cognition were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Fatigue Scale for Motor and Cognitive Functions (FSMC) and the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test. PDQ scores indicative of neuropathic pain were found in 4.2% of patients. Regression analysis revealed EDSS, BDI and FMSC scores as strongest predictors of PDQ scores. Neuropathic pain appears to be less frequent in early multiple sclerosis than expected and is significantly associated with disability, depression and fatigue. The assessment and therapy of pain in multiple sclerosis should thus take into account neuropsychiatric symptoms already at early disease stages. © The Author(s), 2015.

  10. Tuberous sclerosis complex: Recent advances in manifestations and therapy.

    PubMed

    Wataya-Kaneda, Mari; Uemura, Motohide; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Hirata, Haruhiko; Osuga, Keigo; Kagitani-Shimono, Kuriko; Nonomura, Norio

    2017-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by generalized involvement and variable manifestations with a birth incidence of 1:6000. In a quarter of a century, significant progress in tuberous sclerosis complex has been made. Two responsible genes, TSC1 and TSC2, which encode hamartin and tuberin, respectively, were discovered in the 1990s, and their functions were elucidated in the 2000s. Hamartin-Tuberin complex is involved in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-protein kinase B-mammalian target of rapamycin signal transduction pathway, and suppresses mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activity, which is a center for various functions. Constitutive activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 causes variable manifestations in tuberous sclerosis complex. Recently, genetic tests were launched to diagnose tuberous sclerosis complex, and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitors are being used to treat tuberous sclerosis complex patients. As a result of these advances, new diagnostic criteria have been established and an indispensable new treatment method; that is, "a cross-sectional medical examination system," a system to involve many experts for tuberous sclerosis complex diagnosis and treatments, was also created. Simultaneously, the frequency of genetic tests and advances in diagnostic technology have resulted in new views on symptoms. The numbers of tuberous sclerosis complex patients without neural symptoms are increasing, and for these patients, renal manifestations and pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis have become important manifestations. New concepts of tuberous sclerosis complex-associated neuropsychiatric disorders or perivascular epithelioid cell tumors are being created. The present review contains a summary of recent advances, significant manifestations and therapy in tuberous sclerosis complex. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  11. Tuberous Sclerosis Associated Neuropsychiatric Disorders (TAND) and the TAND Checklist

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Petrus J.; Whittemore, Vicky H.; Leclezio, Loren; Byars, Anna W.; Dunn, David; Ess, Kevin C.; Hook, Dena; King, Bryan H.; Sahin, Mustafa; Jansen, Anna

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Tuberous sclerosis complex is a multisystem genetic disorder with a range of physical manifestations that require evaluation, surveillance, and management. Individuals with tuberous sclerosis complex also have a range of behavioral, psychiatric, intellectual, academic, neuropsychologic, and psychosocial difficulties. These may represent the greatest burden of the disease. Around 90% of individuals with tuberous sclerosis complex will have some of these difficulties during their lifetime, yet only about 20% ever receive evaluation and treatment. The Neuropsychiatry Panel at the 2012 Tuberous Sclerosis Complex International Consensus Conference expressed concern about the significant “treatment gap” and about confusion regarding terminology relating to the biopsychosocial difficulties associated with tuberous sclerosis complex. METHODS The Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Neuropsychiatry Panel coined the term TAND—tuberous sclerosis complex-associated neuropsychiatric disorders—to bring together these multidimensional manifestations of the disorder, and recommended annual screening for TAND. In addition, the Panel agreed to develop a TAND Checklist as a guide for screening. RESULTS Here, we present an outline of the conceptualization of TAND, rationale for the structure of the TAND Checklist, and include the full US English version of the TAND Checklist. CONCLUSION We hope that the unified term TAND and the TAND Checklist will raise awareness of the importance of tuberous sclerosis complex-associated neuropsychiatric disorders and of the major burden of disease associated with it, provide a shared language and a simple tool to describe and evaluate the different levels of TAND, alert clinical teams and families or individuals of the importance of screening, assessment, and treatment of TAND, and provide a shared framework for future studies of tuberous sclerosis complex-associated neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25532776

  12. Tuberous sclerosis associated neuropsychiatric disorders (TAND) and the TAND Checklist.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Petrus J; Whittemore, Vicky H; Leclezio, Loren; Byars, Anna W; Dunn, David; Ess, Kevin C; Hook, Dena; King, Bryan H; Sahin, Mustafa; Jansen, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a multisystem genetic disorder with a range of physical manifestations that require evaluation, surveillance, and management. Individuals with tuberous sclerosis complex also have a range of behavioral, psychiatric, intellectual, academic, neuropsychologic, and psychosocial difficulties. These may represent the greatest burden of the disease. Around 90% of individuals with tuberous sclerosis complex will have some of these difficulties during their lifetime, yet only about 20% ever receive evaluation and treatment. The Neuropsychiatry Panel at the 2012 Tuberous Sclerosis Complex International Consensus Conference expressed concern about the significant "treatment gap" and about confusion regarding terminology relating to the biopsychosocial difficulties associated with tuberous sclerosis complex. The Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Neuropsychiatry Panel coined the term TAND-tuberous sclerosis complex-associated neuropsychiatric disorders-to bring together these multidimensional manifestations of the disorder, and recommended annual screening for TAND. In addition, the Panel agreed to develop a TAND Checklist as a guide for screening. Here, we present an outline of the conceptualization of TAND, rationale for the structure of the TAND Checklist, and include the full US English version of the TAND Checklist. We hope that the unified term TAND and the TAND Checklist will raise awareness of the importance of tuberous sclerosis complex-associated neuropsychiatric disorders and of the major burden of disease associated with it, provide a shared language and a simple tool to describe and evaluate the different levels of TAND, alert clinical teams and families or individuals of the importance of screening, assessment, and treatment of TAND, and provide a shared framework for future studies of tuberous sclerosis complex-associated neuropsychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Symptom management in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2011-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a complex disease associated with a wide variety of different symptoms that can affect the ability of multiple sclerosis patients to carry out normal activities of daily living. Although a myriad of symptoms can afflict these patients, the most commonly reported include fatigue, mood disorders, changes in cognitive function or memory, sensory changes (numbness, pain, vibrations), motor changes (loss of balance, poor coordination, muscle weakness or stiffness), vision changes (double vision, blurred vision, loss of vision) and bladder or bowel dysfunction. Treatments are available that can help minimise some of these symptoms and relieve patient distress. After the diagnosis has been established and a decision taken regarding initiation of immunomodulatory treatments, the majority of management decisions with which the physician will be confronted will concern symptom management. Whereas some symptoms are relatively easily treated, others are more difficult to manage. Management involves rehabilitation, pharmacological treatments and surgical procedures. Successful symptom management is a key determinant of quality of life for the patient and is the basis for improving physical and psychological function.

  14. Dermatoglyphic features in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sabanciogullari, Vedat; Cevik, Seyda; Karacan, Kezban; Bolayir, Ertugrul; Cimen, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine dermatoglyphic features to clarify implicated genetic predisposition in the etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: The study was conducted between January and December 2013 in the Departments of Anatomy, and Neurology, Cumhuriyet University School of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey. The dermatoglyphic data of 61 patients, and a control group consisting of 62 healthy adults obtained with a digital scanner were transferred to a computer environment. The ImageJ program was used, and atd, dat, adt angles, a-b ridge count, sample types of all fingers, and ridge counts were calculated. Results: In both hands of the patients with MS, the a-b ridge count and ridge counts in all fingers increased, and the differences in these values were statistically significant. There was also a statistically significant increase in the dat angle in both hands of the MS patients. On the contrary, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of dermal ridge samples, and the most frequent sample in both groups was the ulnar loop. Conclusions: Aberrations in the distribution of dermatoglyphic samples support the genetic predisposition in MS etiology. Multiple sclerosis susceptible individuals may be determined by analyzing dermatoglyphic samples. PMID:25274586

  15. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: one or multiple causes?

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Aline Furtado; Orsini, Marco; Machado, Dionis; Mello, Mariana Pimentel; Nader, Sergio; Silva, Júlio Guilherme; da Silva Catharino, Antonio M.; de Freitas, Marcos R.G.; Pereira, Alessandra; Pessoa, Luciane Lacerda; Sztajnbok, Flavio R.; Leite, Marco Araújo; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2011-01-01

    The Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common form of motor neuron disease in the adulthood, and it is characterized by rapid and progressive compromise of the upper and lower motor neurons. The majority of the cases of ALS are classified as sporadic and, until now, a specific cause for these cases still is unknown. To present the different hypotheses on the etiology of ALS. It was carried out a search in the databases: Bireme, Scielo and Pubmed, in the period of 1987 to 2011, using the following keywords: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, motor neuron disease, etiology, causes and epidemiology and its similar in Portuguese and Spanish. It did not have consensus as regards the etiology of ALS. Researches demonstrates evidences as regards intoxication by heavy metals, environmental and occupational causes, genetic mutations (superoxide dismutase 1), certain viral infections and the accomplishment of vigorous physical activity for the development of the disease. There is still no consensus regarding the involved factors in the etiology of ALS. In this way, new research about these etiologies are necessary, for a better approach of the patients, promoting preventive programs for the disease and improving the quality of life of the patients. PMID:21785676

  16. Vitamin D and remyelination in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Matías-Guíu, J; Oreja-Guevara, C; Matias-Guiu, J A; Gomez-Pinedo, U

    2016-06-16

    Several studies have found an association between multiple sclerosis and vitamin D (VD) deficiency, which suggests that VD may play a role in the immune response. However, few studies have addressed its role in remyelination. The VD receptor and the enzymes transforming VD into metabolites which activate the VD receptor are expressed in central nervous system (CNS) cells, which suggests a potential effect of VD on the CNS. Both in vitro and animal model studies have shown that VD may play a role in myelination by acting on factors that influence the microenvironment which promotes both proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and oligodendrocytes. It remains unknown whether the mechanisms of internalisation of VD in the CNS are synergistic with or antagonistic to the mechanisms that facilitate the entry of VD metabolites into immune cells. VD seems to play a role in the CNS and our hypothesis is that VD is involved in remyelination. Understanding the basic mechanisms of VD in myelination is necessary to manage multiple sclerosis patients with VD deficiency. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Suicide and multiple sclerosis: an epidemiological investigation.

    PubMed Central

    Stenager, E N; Stenager, E; Koch-Henriksen, N; Brønnum-Hansen, H; Hyllested, K; Jensen, K; Bille-Brahe, U

    1992-01-01

    In a nationwide investigation the risk of death by suicide for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) was assessed using records kept at the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry (DMSR) and the Danish National Register of Cause of Death. The investigation covers all MS patients registered with DSMR with an onset of the disease within the period 1953-85, or for whom MS was diagnosed in the same period. Fifty three of the 5525 cases in the onset cohort group committed suicide. Using the figures from the population death statistics by adjustment to number of subjects, duration of observation, sex, age, and calendar year at the start of observation, the expected number of suicides was calculated to be nearly 29. The cumulative lifetime risk of suicide from onset of MS, using an actuarial method of calculation, was 1.95%. The standard mortality ratio (SMR) of suicide in MS was 1.83. It was highest for males and for patients with onset of MS before the age of 30 years and those diagnosed before the age of 40. The SMR was highest within the first five years after diagnosis. PMID:1640228

  18. Multiple sclerosis in Brazil: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, C C F; Thuler, L C S; Rodrigues, B C; Calmon, A B; Alvarenga, R M P

    2016-12-01

    The natural history of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Brazil has been available in different regions of country. There is no nationwide population-based studies that express general data in Brazil. To review and synthesize available data about MS in Brazil. Systematic review was performed through a search of medical literature databases to identify Brazilian studies published during 1990-2012. PubMed, SciELO, and Lilacs. "Brazil" or "Brazilian" combined with the following terms: "multiple sclerosis", "clinical profile", "demographic profile", "natural history", "clinical course", "pediatric", or "familial form". In total of 45 pediatric and 1922 adult patients, the median age at onset was 10 years in pediatric patients and 32 years in adult patients. Women were more affected. Motor-control complaints and relapsing-remitting phenotype at onset were the most common. Predictors to disability and progression were number of relapses during the first year of disease, older age, male gender and African ancestry. The profile of the MS in Brazilian seems to correspond to that observed in high-MS-prevalence areas. African ancestry is a risk factor to disability and progression early. In Brazil, factors that limit MS incidence do not interfere with the clinical pattern and outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Supporting work for people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Doogan, Catherine; Playford, E Diane

    2014-05-01

    People with multiple sclerosis experience some of the highest rates of unemployment among groups of individuals with severe and chronic disabilities. While unpredictable relapses, physical and cognitive symptoms all may play a role in job loss, it is more likely that job loss can be attributed to a complex interaction between disease-related factors and contextual factors, such as the working environment, and employer attitudes. This interaction leads to the concept of work instability, that is, the mismatch between work demands and the individual's capacity to meet these demands. Vocational rehabilitation services aim to provide people with multiple sclerosis vocational assessment, rehabilitation and support to enable them to find, regain or remain in work and access other occupational and educational opportunities. Such services consist of a multidisciplinary team with the ability to provide education around disclosure, and work-place accommodations, offer emotional support, maintain work performance, liaise with employers, and support to re-enter the workplace. Helpful interventions include early disclosure, proper workplace accommodation, education of employers, and government-funded initiatives to support disabled employees. Future research needs to agree on methods of recording outcomes and evaluate specific vocational rehabilitation interventions.

  20. Job satisfaction among multiple sclerosis certified nurses.

    PubMed

    Gulick, Elsie E; Halper, June; Costello, Kathleen

    2007-08-01

    Several studies document high levels of job satisfaction among certified nurses, but no study has examined job satisfaction and factors influencing job satisfaction of certified multiple sclerosis (MS) nurses. This study tested a theoretical model proposing that two organizational factors, colleague relationships and benefits, will predict job satisfaction. Job satisfaction was represented by four factors: autonomy, professional status, professional growth, and time efficiency. Participants included MS nurses certified for 6 months or more practicing mostly in three countries (Canada, Great Britain, and the United States) who anonymously completed the Misener Nurse Practitioner Job Satisfaction Scale, an overall job satisfaction rating, and demographic information. Findings indicate that colleague relationships and benefits significantly estimated organization structure and that autonomy, professional status, professional growth, and time efficiency significantly estimated job satisfaction; furthermore, organization factors such as colleague relationships and benefits significantly predict job satisfaction. Among the countries, several statistically significant differences were observed between job satisfaction factors as well as items in both organization and job satisfaction subscales. Average factor scores among the countries were mostly rated satisfactory. The International Organization of Multiple Sclerosis Nurses Executive Board plans to use the study findings to see how it needs to focus efforts as an organization toward enhancing and standardizing MS care and develop MS nurse professionalism worldwide.

  1. The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Register

    PubMed Central

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the database The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Register (DMSTR) serves as a clinical quality register, enabling the health authorities to monitor the quality of the disease-modifying treatment, and it is an important data source for epidemiological research. Study population The DMSTR includes all patients with multiple sclerosis who had been treated with disease-modifying drugs since 1996. At present, more than 8,400 patients have been registered in this database. Data are continuously entered online into a central database from all sites in Denmark at start and at regular visits. Main variables Include age, sex, onset year and year of the diagnosis, basic clinical information, and information about treatment, side effects, and relapses. Descriptive data Notification is done at treatment start, and thereafter at every scheduled clinical visit 3 months after treatment start, and thereafter every 6 months. The longitudinally collected information about the disease activity and side effects made it possible to investigate the clinical efficacy and adverse events of different disease-modifying therapies. Conclusion The database contributed to a certain harmonization of treatment procedures in Denmark and will continue to be a major factor in terms of quality in clinical praxis, research and monitoring of adverse events, and plays an important role in research. PMID:27822098

  2. Cellular immune response in multiple sclerosis plaques.

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, E. A.; McGeer, P. L.

    1990-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis plaques were immunohistochemically stained to exhibit cells expressing immune-system antigens. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR-positive cells formed dense rings around all plaque regions. The majority were reactive microglia/macrophages. Counterstaining with oil red O revealed heavy myelin debris within these cells. They were distinct from astrocytes, which were identified with an antibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and which did not contain oil red O myelin debris. Numerous leukocytes and microglia were stained with antibody to leukocyte common antigen (LCA). Lymphocytes in cuffs around vessels, along the margins of capillary walls, and, sparingly, in the tissue matrix of affected areas, were stained with antibodies to CD4 (T-helper/inducer) and CD8 (T-cytotoxic/suppressor). In experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced in Lewis rats, a similar proliferation of Ia-positive (OX6, OX17) cells displaying reactive microglia/macrophage morphology was observed. These Ia-positive cells also were easily distinguished from GFAP-positive astrocytes. The results suggest that macrophages/reactive microglia, and not astrocytes, express class II MHC antigens in multiple sclerosis and EAE plaques. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:1698025

  3. The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Register.

    PubMed

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2016-01-01

    The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Register (DMSTR) serves as a clinical quality register, enabling the health authorities to monitor the quality of the disease-modifying treatment, and it is an important data source for epidemiological research. The DMSTR includes all patients with multiple sclerosis who had been treated with disease-modifying drugs since 1996. At present, more than 8,400 patients have been registered in this database. Data are continuously entered online into a central database from all sites in Denmark at start and at regular visits. Include age, sex, onset year and year of the diagnosis, basic clinical information, and information about treatment, side effects, and relapses. Notification is done at treatment start, and thereafter at every scheduled clinical visit 3 months after treatment start, and thereafter every 6 months. The longitudinally collected information about the disease activity and side effects made it possible to investigate the clinical efficacy and adverse events of different disease-modifying therapies. The database contributed to a certain harmonization of treatment procedures in Denmark and will continue to be a major factor in terms of quality in clinical praxis, research and monitoring of adverse events, and plays an important role in research.

  4. A biopsychosocial model of resilience for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Black, Rebecca; Dorstyn, Diana

    2015-11-01

    The concept of resilience remains under-researched in the multiple sclerosis literature. Consequently, current understanding of the unique and joint contribution of disability-specific variables, cognitive-behavioural skills and social resources to this dynamic process is limited. A holistic model of resilience was therefore developed and tested. Results of an online survey completed by 196 adults with multiple sclerosis revealed both direct and indirect pathways to resilience, with positive affect and self-efficacy being the strongest predictors. The findings lend support to psychological interventions which focus on promoting the personal resources and assets needed to cope effectively with multiple sclerosis. © The Author(s) 2013.

  5. [Systemic sclerosis and pregnancy. A review of the current literature].

    PubMed

    Németh, A; Szamosi, S; Horváth, A; Schönherr, J; Nicksch, E; Szekanecz, Z; Szűcs, G

    2014-03-01

    Pregnancy in women diagnosed with systemic sclerosis generally has a favorable outcome according to most recent studies. Women with systemic sclerosis who wish to become pregnant should achieve low disease activity for at least 6 months prior to conception. Regular follow-up of pregnant scleroderma patients by an interdisciplinary medical team including gynaecologists and rheumatologists is necessary to control disease activity and avoid possible complications. Severe organ involvement, early diffuse systemic sclerosis with rapid onset, and pulmonary hypertension ought to discourage patients from pregnancy, as these situations are at high risk of complications for both mother and fetus during pregnancy.

  6. Tuberous Sclerosis with Severe Cutaneous Manifestation and Multiples Facial Angiofibromas.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Natália Galvão; de Carli, Marina Lara; Oliveira, Denise Tostes; Soares, Cléverson Teixeira; Ribeiro Júnior, Noé Vital; Sperandio, Felipe Fornias; Hanemann, João Adolfo Costa

    2016-12-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is an extremely variable disease that can affect virtually any organ in the body. The most common findings are cutaneous manifestations, that are critical features in helping to establish diagnosis. We present a case of young man with diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis presenting multiple shagreen patches around the trunk, in the neck and genital region; large plaques with uneven surfaces on the right side of the lower back; and multiple papular lesions in his face, particularly around the nasolabial region, eyebrows and forehead. Considering that tuberous sclerosis is a disease with a highly variable clinical presentation, thus dentists and doctors should be aware of the different manifestations that may be found.

  7. Rapamycin and rapalogs for tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Sasongko, Teguh H; Ismail, Nur Farrah Dila; Zabidi-Hussin, Zamh

    2016-07-13

    Previous studies have shown potential benefits of rapamycin or rapalogs for treating people with tuberous sclerosis complex. Although everolimus (a rapalog) is currently approved by the FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration) and the EMA (European Medicines Agency) for tuberous sclerosis complex-associated renal angiomyolipoma and subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, applications for other manifestations of tuberous sclerosis complex have not yet been established. A systematic review is necessary to establish the clinical value of rapamycin or rapalogs for various manifestations in tuberous sclerosis complex. To determine the effectiveness of rapamycin or rapalogs in people with tuberous sclerosis complex for decreasing tumour size and other manifestations and to assess the safety of rapamycin or rapalogs in relation to their adverse effects. Relevant studies were identified by authors from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Ovid MEDLINE, and clinicaltrials.gov. Relevant resources were also searched by the authors, such as conference proceedings and abstract books of conferences, from e.g. the Tuberous Sclerosis Complex International Research Conferences, other tuberous sclerosis complex-related conferences and the Human Genome Meeting. We did not restrict the searches by language as long as English translations were available for non-English reports.Date of the last searches: 14 March 2016. Randomized or quasi-randomized studies of rapamycin or rapalogs in people with tuberous sclerosis complex. Data were independently extracted by two authors using standard acquisition forms. The data collection was verified by one author. The risk of bias of each study was independently assessed by two authors and verified by one author. Three placebo-controlled studies with a total of 263 participants (age range 0.8 to 61 years old, 122 males and 141 females, with variable lengths of study duration) were included in the review. We found high

  8. Concomitant amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and paraclinical laboratory features of multiple sclerosis: coincidence or causal relationship?

    PubMed

    Borisow, Nadja; Meyer, Thomas; Paul, Friedemann

    2013-01-23

    We report a 55-year-old patient, presenting with paresis, muscle atrophy and dysarthria, all symptoms accordable to definite amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, MRI and cerebrospinal fluid show abnormalities typical of multiple sclerosis (MS). On the basis of this case report, we discuss possible overlaps between both diseases by comparing clinical and paraclinical features including laboratory, radiological and electrophysiological diagnostics. As genetic, as well as environmental, factors are assumed to be involved in the development of both the diseases, literature is reviewed according to similar cases, results of autopsies and possible parallels in pathogenesis. In summary, based on the data currently available, the hypothesis of ALS being a neurodegenerative multisystem disorder, a common pathophysiological pathway or, alternatively, a random comorbidity of ALS and MS in this patient has to be discussed.

  9. Concomitant amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and paraclinical laboratory features of multiple sclerosis: coincidence or causal relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Borisow, Nadja; Meyer, Thomas; Paul, Friedemann

    2013-01-01

    We report a 55-year-old patient, presenting with paresis, muscle atrophy and dysarthria, all symptoms accordable to definite amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, MRI and cerebrospinal fluid show abnormalities typical of multiple sclerosis (MS). On the basis of this case report, we discuss possible overlaps between both diseases by comparing clinical and paraclinical features including laboratory, radiological and electrophysiological diagnostics. As genetic, as well as environmental, factors are assumed to be involved in the development of both the diseases, literature is reviewed according to similar cases, results of autopsies and possible parallels in pathogenesis. In summary, based on the data currently available, the hypothesis of ALS being a neurodegenerative multisystem disorder, a common pathophysiological pathway or, alternatively, a random comorbidity of ALS and MS in this patient has to be discussed. PMID:23349176

  10. Intellectual abilities in tuberous sclerosis complex: risk factors and correlates from the Tuberous Sclerosis 2000 Study.

    PubMed

    Bolton, P F; Clifford, M; Tye, C; Maclean, C; Humphrey, A; le Maréchal, K; Higgins, J N P; Neville, B G R; Rijsdjik, F; Yates, J R W

    2015-08-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is associated with intellectual disability, but the risk pathways are poorly understood. The Tuberous Sclerosis 2000 Study is a prospective longitudinal study of the natural history of TSC. One hundred and twenty-five UK children age 0-16 years with TSC and born between January 2001 and December 2006 were studied. Intelligence was assessed using standardized measures at ≥2 years of age. The age of onset of epilepsy, the type of seizure disorder, the frequency and duration of seizures, as well as the response to treatment was assessed at interview and by review of medical records. The severity of epilepsy in the early years was estimated using the E-Chess score. Genetic studies identified the mutations and the number of cortical tubers was determined from brain scans. TSC2 mutations were associated with significantly higher cortical tuber count than TSC1 mutations. The extent of brain involvement, as indexed by cortical tuber count, was associated with an earlier age of onset and severity of epilepsy. In turn, the severity of epilepsy was strongly associated with the degree of intellectual impairment. Structural equation modelling supported a causal pathway from genetic abnormality to cortical tuber count to epilepsy severity to intellectual outcome. Infantile spasms and status epilepticus were important contributors to seizure severity. The findings support the proposition that severe, early onset epilepsy may impair intellectual development in TSC and highlight the potential importance of early, prompt and effective treatment or prevention of epilepsy in tuberous sclerosis.

  11. Possible association of elevated serum collagen type IV level with skin sclerosis in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Motegi, Sei-Ichiro; Sekiguchi, Akiko; Fujiwara, Chisako; Toki, Sayaka; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2016-08-29

    Collagen type IV is the primary collagen in the basement membranes around blood vessels and in the dermoepidermal junction in the skin. Perivascular collagen type IV is synthesized by endothelial cells and pericytes, and contributes to the homeostasis and remodeling of blood vessels. It has been well recognized that elevated serum collagen type IV levels are associated with the liver fibrosis. The objective was to examine serum collagen type IV levels and their clinical associations in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), and to examine the expression of collagen type IV in the fibrotic skin in SSc. Serum collagen type IV levels in SSc patients and diffuse cutaneous type SSc patients were significantly higher than those in healthy individuals. Serum collagen type IV levels were positively correlated with modified Rodnan total skin score. Serum collagen type IV levels in early stage (disease duration ≤3 years) diffuse cutaneous SSc patients were significantly elevated. Serum collagen type IV levels in SSc patients with digital ulcers (DU) were significantly elevated. In immunohistochemical staining, the expression of collagen type IV around dermal small vessels in the affected skin was reduced compared with those of normal individuals. These results suggest that elevated serum collagen type IV levels may be associated with the skin sclerosis in the early stage of SSc. The measurement of serum collagen type IV levels in SSc patients may be useful as a disease activity marker in skin sclerosis and DU.

  12. Remyelination therapies: a new direction and challenge in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Plemel, Jason R; Liu, Wei-Qiao; Yong, V Wee

    2017-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis is characterized by inflammatory activity that results in destruction of the myelin sheaths that enwrap axons. The currently available medications for multiple sclerosis are predominantly immune-modulating and do not directly promote repair. White matter regeneration, or remyelination, is a new and exciting potential approach to treating multiple sclerosis, as remyelination repairs the damaged regions of the central nervous system. A wealth of new strategies in animal models that promote remyelination, including the repopulation of oligodendrocytes that produce myelin, has led to several clinical trials to test new reparative therapies. In this Review, we highlight the biology of, and obstacles to, remyelination. We address new strategies to improve remyelination in preclinical models, highlight the therapies that are currently undergoing clinical trials and discuss the challenges of objectively measuring remyelination in trials of repair in multiple sclerosis.

  13. Jaw, blink and corneal reflex latencies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, E A; Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Barendswaard, E C; Arts, R J

    1985-01-01

    Jaw, blink and corneal reflexes, which all involve the trigeminal system, were recorded in 54 patients with multiple sclerosis; thirty-seven of these patients were classified as having definite multiple sclerosis and 17 as indefinite multiple sclerosis, according to Schumacher's criteria. The jaw reflex was abnormal less frequently than either of the other two reflexes, but in four cases it was the only abnormal reflex found. Testing a combination of two or three trigeminal reflexes did not yield a higher incidence of abnormalities than testing the blink or corneal reflex alone. Nine patients showed abnormal reflexes which were unexpected on the basis of clinical symptoms. The combined recordings demonstrate at least one abnormal reflex in 74% of the patients. The various types of reflex abnormalities reflect major damage to different parts of the trigeminal system and may therefore make an important contribution to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:4087004

  14. Postsecondary Education for Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis: Issues and Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagodich, Nancy L.; Wolfe, Pamela S.; Boone, Rosalie S.

    2000-01-01

    Describes characteristics of multiple sclerosis and the implications of its manifestations for postsecondary education. Provides a checklist for students selecting a postsecondary institution regarding general considerations, academic accommodations, support and services, and self-assessment. (SK)

  15. Axillary vein thrombosis in adolescent onset systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Leak, A; Patel, K J; Tuddenham, E G; Pearson, J D; Woo, P

    1990-01-01

    A 16 year old girl with a two year history of systemic sclerosis developed left axillary vein thrombosis. Prolonged euglobulin clot lysis time, anti-endothelial cell antibodies, and raised von Willebrand factor antigen were shown. Images PMID:2383084

  16. Autism Phenotypes in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: Diagnostic and Treatment Considerations.

    PubMed

    Gipson, Tanjala T; Poretti, Andrea; Thomas, Emily A; Jenkins, Kosunique T; Desai, Sonal; Johnston, Michael V

    2015-12-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a multisystem, chronic genetic condition characterized by systemic growth of benign tumors and often accompanied by epilepsy, autism spectrum disorders, and intellectual disability. Nonetheless, the neurodevelopmental phenotype of these patients is not often detailed. The authors describe 3 individuals with tuberous sclerosis complex who share common characteristics that can help to identify a distinct profile of autism spectrum disorder. These findings include typical cognitive development, expressive and pragmatic language deficits, and anxiety. The authors also describe features specific to tuberous sclerosis complex that require consideration before diagnosing an autism spectrum disorder. Identifying distinct profiles of autism spectrum disorder in tuberous sclerosis complex can help optimize treatment across the life span. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Postsecondary Education for Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis: Issues and Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagodich, Nancy L.; Wolfe, Pamela S.; Boone, Rosalie S.

    2000-01-01

    Describes characteristics of multiple sclerosis and the implications of its manifestations for postsecondary education. Provides a checklist for students selecting a postsecondary institution regarding general considerations, academic accommodations, support and services, and self-assessment. (SK)

  18. Carnitine for fatigue in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tejani, Aaron M; Wasdell, Michael; Spiwak, Rae; Rowell, Greg; Nathwani, Shabita

    2012-05-16

    Fatigue is reported to occur in up to 92% of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and has been described as the most debilitating of all MS symptoms by 28% to 40% of MS patients. To assess whether carnitine (enteral or intravenous) supplementation can improve the quality of life and reduce the symptoms of fatigue in patients with MS-related fatigue and to identify any adverse effects of carnitine when used for this purpose. A literature search was performed using Cochrane MS Group Trials Register (09 September 2011), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) "The Cochrane Library 2011, issue 3", MEDLINE (PubMed) (1966-09 September 2011), EMBASE (1974-09 September 2011), and www.clinicaltrials.gov for ongoing trials retrieval. Reference lists of review articles and primary studies were also screened. A hand search of the abstract book of recent relevant conference symposia was also conducted. Personal contact with MS experts and a manufacturer (Source Naturals, United States) of carnitine formulation was contacted to determine if they knew of other clinical trials. No language restrictions were applied. Full reports of published and unpublished randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials of any carnitine intervention in adults affected by multiple sclerosis with a clinical diagnosis of fatigue associated with multiple sclerosis were included. Data from the eligible trials was extracted and coded using a standardized data extraction form and entered into RevMan 5. Discrepancies were to be resolved by discussion with a third reviewer, however this was not necessary.The quality items to be assessed were method of randomization, allocation concealment, blinding (participants, investigators, outcome assessors and data analysis), intention-to-treat analysis and completeness of follow up. The search identified one ongoing randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial (expected completion 2013) and one completed randomized, active

  19. Alterations in the hypothalamic melanocortin pathway in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, Pauline; Sinniger, Jérôme; El Oussini, Hajer; Scekic-Zahirovic, Jelena; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Dengler, Reinhard; Meyer, Thomas; Zierz, Stephan; Kassubek, Jan; Fischer, Wilhelm; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Grehl, Torsten; Hermann, Andreas; Grosskreutz, Julian; Witting, Anke; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Spreux-Varoquaux, Odile; Ludolph, Albert C; Dupuis, Luc

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease, leads to death within 3 to 5 years after onset. Beyond progressive motor impairment, patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis suffer from major defects in energy metabolism, such as weight loss, which are well correlated with survival. Indeed, nutritional intervention targeting weight loss might improve survival of patients. However, the neural mechanisms underlying metabolic impairment in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis remain elusive, in particular due to the lack of longitudinal studies. Here we took advantage of samples collected during the clinical trial of pioglitazone (GERP-ALS), and characterized longitudinally energy metabolism of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in response to pioglitazone, a drug with well-characterized metabolic effects. As expected, pioglitazone decreased glycaemia, decreased liver enzymes and increased circulating adiponectin in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, showing its efficacy in the periphery. However, pioglitazone did not increase body weight of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis independently of bulbar involvement. As pioglitazone increases body weight through a direct inhibition of the hypothalamic melanocortin system, we studied hypothalamic neurons producing proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and the endogenous melanocortin inhibitor agouti-related peptide (AGRP), in mice expressing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked mutant SOD1(G86R). We observed lower Pomc but higher Agrp mRNA levels in the hypothalamus of presymptomatic SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistently, numbers of POMC-positive neurons were decreased, whereas AGRP fibre density was elevated in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistent with a defect in the hypothalamic melanocortin system, food intake after short term fasting was increased in SOD1(G86R) mice. Importantly, these findings were replicated in two other amyotrophic

  20. Clinical Usefulness of Aripiprazole and Lamotrigine in Schizoaffective Presentation of Tuberous Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Yup; Min, Jung-Ah; Lee, In Goo; Kim, Jung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is not as rare as once thought and has high psychiatric comorbidities. However, bipolar or psychotic features associated with tuberous sclerosis have been rarely reported. This report first presents a tuberous sclerosis patient, resembling a schizoaffective disorder of bipolar type. A patient with known tuberous sclerosis displayed mood fluctuation and psychotic features. Her symptoms did not remit along with several psychiatric medications. After hospitalization, the patient responded well with lamotrigine and aripiprazole without exacerbation. As demonstrated in this case, tuberous sclerosis may also encompass bipolar affective or psychotic features. We would like to point out the necessity to consider bipolarity in evaluating and treating tuberous sclerosis. PMID:27489387

  1. Clinical Usefulness of Aripiprazole and Lamotrigine in Schizoaffective Presentation of Tuberous Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Yup; Min, Jung-Ah; Lee, In Goo; Kim, Jung Jin

    2016-08-31

    Tuberous sclerosis is not as rare as once thought and has high psychiatric comorbidities. However, bipolar or psychotic features associated with tuberous sclerosis have been rarely reported. This report first presents a tuberous sclerosis patient, resembling a schizoaffective disorder of bipolar type. A patient with known tuberous sclerosis displayed mood fluctuation and psychotic features. Her symptoms did not remit along with several psychiatric medications. After hospitalization, the patient responded well with lamotrigine and aripiprazole without exacerbation. As demonstrated in this case, tuberous sclerosis may also encompass bipolar affective or psychotic features. We would like to point out the necessity to consider bipolarity in evaluating and treating tuberous sclerosis.

  2. Concussion in adolescence and risk of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Scott; Hiyoshi, Ayako; Burkill, Sarah; Alfredsson, Lars; Bahmanyar, Shahram; Olsson, Tomas

    2017-09-04

    To assess whether concussion in childhood or adolescence is associated with subsequent multiple sclerosis risk. Previous research suggests an association but methodological limitations included retrospective data collection and small study populations. The national Swedish Patient (hospital diagnoses) and Multiple Sclerosis registers were used to identify all MS diagnoses up to 2012 among people born from 1964, when the Patient Register was established. The 7292 patients with multiple sclerosis were matched individually with 10 people without MS by sex, year of birth, age/vital status at multiple sclerosis diagnosis, and region of residence (county), resulting in a study population of 80212. Diagnoses of concussion and control diagnoses of broken limb bones were identified using the Patient Register from birth to age 10 years or from ages 11 to 20 years. Conditional logistic regression was used to examine associations with multiple sclerosis. Concussion in adolescence was associated with a raised risk of multiple sclerosis, producing adjusted odds ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) of 1.22 (1.05-1.42, p=0.008) and 2.33 (1.35-4.04, p=0.002) for one diagnosis of concussion, or more than one diagnosis of concussion, respectively, compared with none. No notable association with multiple sclerosis was observed for concussion in childhood, or broken limb bones in childhood and adolescence. Head trauma in adolescence, particularly if repeated, is associated with a raised risk of future multiple sclerosis, possibly due to initiation of an autoimmune process in the central nervous system. This further emphasises the importance of protecting young people from head injuries. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  3. Studying Protein Synthesis-Dependent Synaptic Changes in Tuberous Sclerosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    to neurological symptoms in TSC such as epilepsy , mental retardation and autistic behaviors. 15. SUBJECT TERMS- Tuberous Sclerosis, Synaptic...symptoms of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) such as epilepsy , mental retardation and autistic behaviors. TSC is caused by mutations in two genes, tsc1... pathophysiology of autism where it is elevated in CSF (Veenstra-VanderWeele and Blakely). (3) 5-HT2CR has a PDZ-binding domain and has been shown to interact with

  4. Sit-to-stand biomechanics of individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bowser, Bradley; O'Rourke, Sean; Brown, Cathleen N; White, Lesley; Simpson, Kathy J

    2015-10-01

    It is unclear how people with multiple sclerosis, who often have compromised strength and balance, compare to healthy controls during sit-to-stand movements. The purpose of this study was to compare sit-to-stand biomechanics among three groups: people with multiple sclerosis who exhibit leg weakness, people with multiple sclerosis who have comparable strength to controls, and healthy controls. Twenty-one individuals with multiple sclerosis (n=10 exhibiting leg weakness: n=11 exhibiting comparable strength to controls), and 12 controls performed five sit-to-stand trials while kinematic data and ground reaction forces were captured. ANOVAs followed by Tukey's post-hoc tests (α=0.05) were used to determine group and limb differences for leg strength, movement time, and sagittal-plane joint kinematics and kinetics. Persons with multiple sclerosis exhibiting leg weakness displayed decreased leg strength, greater trunk flexion, faster trunk flexion velocity and decreased knee extensor power compared to the other two groups (p<0.05; d≥0.87), and slower rise times compared to controls(p<0.03; d≥1.17). No differences were found between controls and the multiple sclerosis-comparable strength group. Across all 3 groups, leg strength was moderately correlated with trunk kinematics and knee extensor velocities, moments and powers of the sit-to-stand (p≤0.05). Participants with multiple sclerosis exhibiting leg weakness took longer to stand and appeared to use a trunk-flexion movement strategy when performing the sit-to-stand. The majority of group differences appear to be a result of leg extension weakness. Treatment that includes leg strengthening may be necessary to improve sit-to-stand performance for people with multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. A case-control study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Savettieri, G; Salemi, G; Arcara, A; Cassata, M; Castiglione, M G; Fierro, B

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective case-control study was conducted using 46 patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 92 closely matched healthy controls. Cases were ascertained through typical clinical and instrumental findings. Putative risk factors (bone fractures or major trauma, exposure to domestic animals, surgical operations, disease among first degree relatives and others) were investigated anamnestically using a standard questionnaire. Using Mantel-Haenzsel estimates of the odds ratio, no association was found between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and the investigated variables.

  6. Epstein Barr Virus and Blood Brain Barrier in Multiple Sclerosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    brain-barrier, Epstein-Barr virus; EBV ; BBB; MS, Multiple sclerosis 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF...ABSTRACT Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, autoimmune neurodegenerative disease. Epstein-Barr virus ( EBV ) infection is associated with MS...pathogenesis. However, mechanism for the EBV -MS connection is unclear. The blood– brain barrier (BBB) is a separation of circulating blood and the brain

  7. Systemic Sclerosis Sine Scleroderma in Mexican Patients. Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Vera-Lastra, Olga; Sauceda-Casas, Christian Alexis; Domínguez, María Del Pilar Cruz; Alvarez, Sergio Alberto Mendoza; Sepulceda-Delgado, Jesús

    2017-01-03

    Systemic sclerosis sine scleroderma (ssSSc) is a form of systemic sclerosis that is characterized by Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), visceral involvement without thickening of skin and anticentromere antibodies (ACA). We studied 10 ssSsc patients with a prevalence of 2%. The clinical signs were: RP 9/10, esophageal manifestations 8/10, pulmonary arterial hypertension 4/10, interstitial lung disease 4/10, cardiac signs 3/10 and ACA 8/10.

  8. Co-occurring depression and pain in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Alschuler, Kevin N; Ehde, Dawn M; Jensen, Mark P

    2013-11-01

    Depression and pain are highly prevalent among individuals with multiple sclerosis, and they often co-occur. The purpose of this article is to summarize the literature and theory related to the comorbidity of pain and depression and describe how their presence can impact individuals with multiple sclerosis. Additionally, the article discusses how existing treatments of pain and depression could be adapted to address shared mechanisms and overcome barriers to treatment utilization.

  9. Environmental Mycobiome Modifiers of Inflammation and Fibrosis in Systemic Sclerosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    Whitfield. Stress Granules and RNA Processing Bodies are Novel Autoantibody Targets in Systemic Sclerosis. Arthritis Res Ther. 2016 Jan 22;18:27. doi...Stress granules and RNA processing bodies are novel autoantibody targets in systemic sclerosis. Arthritis Res Ther 2016, 18:27. 10. APPENDIX...Paul J. Anderson, Scott A. Gerber, Michael L. Whitfield. Stress Granules and RNA Processing Bodies are Novel Autoantibody Targets in Systemic

  10. How I treat patients with systemic sclerosis in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Daniela; Zanatta, Elisabetta; Marson, Piero; Sciascia, Savino; Polito, Pamela; Roccatello, Dario; Cozzi, Franco

    2017-10-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) or scleroderma is a disorder of the connective tissue affecting the skin, and it is often associated with visceral involvement. The predominant pathological features of SSc are autoimmunity, vasculopathy, and fibrosis. Progressive fibrosis is associated with changes in the microcirculation of the involved organs. Here, we review the clinical features of systemic sclerosis and describe the best practice approaches for its management, reviewing available guidelines and recommendations and providing experts' insights. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Immunoglobulin G heavy chain (Gm) allotypes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, J P; Goust, J M; Salier, J P; Fudenberg, H H

    1981-01-01

    Serum samples from 70 Caucasian patients with multiple sclerosis were typed for nine Gm markers. Significant association was found with the Gm 1,17;21 phenotype, and the relative risk for individuals with this phenotype was calculated at 3.6. The data indicate that Caucasians positive for Gm 1,17;21 are almost four times more likely to develop multiple sclerosis than those without this phenotype. PMID:6787085

  12. Immunoglobulin G heavy chain (Gm) allotypes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pandey, J P; Goust, J M; Salier, J P; Fudenberg, H H

    1981-06-01

    Serum samples from 70 Caucasian patients with multiple sclerosis were typed for nine Gm markers. Significant association was found with the Gm 1,17;21 phenotype, and the relative risk for individuals with this phenotype was calculated at 3.6. The data indicate that Caucasians positive for Gm 1,17;21 are almost four times more likely to develop multiple sclerosis than those without this phenotype.

  13. Anal sphincter dysfunction in multiple sclerosis: an observation manometric study

    PubMed Central

    Marola, Silvia; Gibin, Enrico; Capobianco, Marco; Bertolotto, Antonio; Enrico, Stefano; Solej, Mario; Martino, Valter; Destefano, Ines; Nano, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Constipation, obstructed defecation, and fecal incontinence are frequent complaints in multiple sclerosis. The literature on the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these disorders is scant. Using anorectal manometry, we compared the anorectal function in patients with and without multiple sclerosis. 136 patients referred from our Center for Multiple Sclerosis to the Coloproctology Outpatient Clinic, between January 2005 and December 2011, were enrolled. The patients were divided into four groups: multiple sclerosis patients with constipation (group A); multiple sclerosis patients with fecal incontinence (group B); non-multiple sclerosis patients with constipation (group C); non-multiple sclerosis patients with fecal incontinence (group D). Anorectal manometry was performed to measure: resting anal pressure; maximum squeeze pressure; rectoanal inhibitory reflex; filling pressure and urge pressure. The difference between resting anal pressure before and after maximum squeeze maneuvers was defined as the change in resting anal pressure calculated for each patient. Results Group A patients were noted to have greater sphincter hypotonia at rest and during contraction compared with those in group C (p=0.02); the rectal sensitivity threshold was lower in group B than in group D patients (p=0.02). No voluntary postcontraction sphincter relaxation was observed in either group A or group B patients (p=0.891 and p=0.939, respectively). Conclusions The decrease in the difference in resting anal pressure before and after maximum squeeze maneuvers suggests post-contraction sphincter spasticity, indicating impaired pelvic floor coordination in multiple sclerosis patients. A knowledge of manometric alterations in such patients may be clinically relevant in the selection of patients for appropriate treatments and for planning targeted rehabilitation therapy. PMID:28352843

  14. Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) in two iron ore mines.

    PubMed

    Martin, J R; Griffin, M; Moore, E; Lochead, J A; Edwards, A C; Williams, J; Khraishi, M M

    1999-04-01

    Six males with systemic sclerosis were observed in the work forces of two iron ore mines. The usual spectrum of clinical features encountered in systemic sclerosis patients were present. Histologic examination of pulmonary tissue was performed on three of the cases and showed features of both silicosis and scleroderma but to different degrees and stages of development. Exposure to high levels of silica-containing dusts had occurred in all six cases.

  15. The University of Jaén Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí, Josep; Luque-Escamilla, Pedro L.; García-Hernández, María T.

    2017-01-01

    We present a description and instrumental characterization of the photometric equipment of the Astronomical Observatory of the University of Jaén. The observatory hosts a 41 cm automated telescope inside a 4 m dome located at the university main campus, in the outskirts of the city of Jaén (Spain). This facility is used for educational, outreach and occasional scientific research on bright stellar objects. Despite the observatory location in a light polluted urban area, its performance for differential photometry studies has proven to be very acceptable. The discovery of the Be star LS I +5979 as a peculiar eclipsing binary system is so far the most relevant achievement.

  16. The Ocular Manifestations of Drugs Used to Treat Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Heath, Gregory; Airody, Archana; Gale, Richard Peter

    2017-03-01

    Recent times have seen an increase in the number of options to treat multiple sclerosis. Ocular manifestations of multiple sclerosis are well known to treating physicians; however, the medications used to treat multiple sclerosis can also have ocular side effects. This review article focuses on the ocular manifestations of corticosteroids and disease-modifying agents such as interferon, fingolomod, natalizumab, alemtuzumab and mitoxantron used to treat the disease. The ocular manifestations of multiple sclerosis treatments can be varied depending on the drug used, and include retinopathy, chronic central serous chorioretinopathy, macular oedema, Graves' ophthalmopathy and cortical blindness. These effects may be specific to the drug or secondary to their immunosuppressive effect. The association of macular oedema with fingolomod is clear and merits ocular screening for toxicity. The immunosuppressive nature of the treatments makes patients prone to acquired infections. Hence, if a patient with multiple sclerosis presents with vision loss, infectious and drug-induced aetiology should be considered alongside relapses of multiple sclerosis itself as a cause.

  17. Is prevalence of PBC underestimated in patients with systemic sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Norman, G L; Bialek, A; Encabo, S; Butkiewicz, B; Wiechowska-Kozlowska, A; Brzosko, M; Shums, Z; Milkiewicz, P

    2009-10-01

    Clinically significant primary biliary cirrhosis occurs in 2.5% of patients with systemic sclerosis. Primary biliary cirrhosis-specific autoantibodies include anti-mitochondrial, anti-glycoprotein 210, and anti-sp100 antibodies. The majority of asymptomatic anti-mitochondrial-positive subjects express histological features of primary biliary cirrhosis. Early detection of primary biliary cirrhosis is important, as timely introduction of ursodeoxycholic acid may improve prognosis. The aim was to assess the prevalence of MIT3 IgG-anti-mitochondrial, gp210, sp100 and other autoantibodies in patients with systemic sclerosis and compare the clinical and biochemical parameters in those who are primary biliary cirrhosis-specific autoantibodies positive and negative. Fifty-two consecutive patients with systemic sclerosis were included. Thirty-three suffered from limited skin SS and 19 from diffuse SS. Eight (15%) patients with systemic sclerosis tested positive for primary biliary cirrhosis-specific autoantibodies. No significant differences were observed between primary biliary cirrhosis-specific autoantibodies positive and negative subjects in terms of various demographic, clinical or biochemical features. A trend towards increased prevalence of chronic fatigue in primary biliary cirrhosis-specific autoantibodies positive patients was observed. Primary biliary cirrhosis-specific autoantibodies were detected in 15% of the systemic sclerosis patients. Since patients with primary biliary cirrhosis-specific antibodies are at high-risk or do suffer from primary biliary cirrhosis, screening for primary biliary cirrhosis-specific autoantibodies may be considered during routine assessment of systemic sclerosis.

  18. A study of oligoclonal band negative multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Zeman, A Z; Kidd, D; McLean, B N; Kelly, M A; Francis, D A; Miller, D H; Kendall, B E; Rudge, P; Thompson, E J; McDonald, W I

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine whether oligoclonal band (OCB) negative multiple sclerosis is a reliable diagnosis and, if so, whether it has a distinctive prognosis. METHODS--Retrospective and matched prospective comparison of the clinical and laboratory features of patients with clinical definite multiple sclerosis with and without intrathecal synthesis of oligoclonal IgG. RESULTS--Thirty four patients were identified with apparent OCB negative clinically definite multiple sclerosis. The results of oligoclonal banding proved to have been equivocal in 14 of 34; the clinical diagnosis of multiple sclerosis was questionable in 8 of 34. The remaining 12 patients with "true" OCB negative multiple sclerosis were significantly less disabled than matched OCB positive controls. Re-examination of CSF-serum pairs from six OCB negative patients showed that three remained OCB negative while three showed evidence of intrathecal synthesis of OCBs. CONCLUSIONS--OCB negative clinically definite multiple sclerosis is rare and should be diagnosed with caution; in unequivocal cases it seems to have a relatively benign prognosis. PMID:8558146

  19. Transitional progressive multiple sclerosis: a clinical and imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Gayou, A.; Brochet, B.; Dousset, V.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To study the prevalence and the natural course of transitional progressive multiple sclerosis (TPMS). This clinical form is defined by a progressive course beginning many years after an isolated bout.
METHODS—214 consecutive outpatients with definite or probable multiple sclerosis were studied. The prevalence of TPMS was established. Patients with TPMS were compared with patients with other progressive forms of multiple sclerosis according to the clinical course. A prospective one year follow up study was performed in a subgroup of patients to compare progression of the disease using clinical indices and MRI.
RESULTS—In this clinical population of 214 outpatients with multiple sclerosis, 55 had secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS), 38 primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS), and 12 TPMS. Retrospective analysis of the clinical data of these patients shows that TPMS is very similar to SPMS at the beginning of the disease (age at onset, time before progression, clinical symptoms at onset, progression index). In addition a cohort of patients was prospectively followed up clinically and by MRI for one year.
CONCLUSIONS—The results did not show any significant differences between the three forms during this follow up. However, all data showed a concordant trend suggesting that at this progressive stage, TPMS is closer to PPMS in terms of progression of disability and new MRI lesions.

 PMID:9328264

  20. Transitional progressive multiple sclerosis: a clinical and imaging study.

    PubMed

    Gayou, A; Brochet, B; Dousset, V

    1997-09-01

    To study the prevalence and the natural course of transitional progressive multiple sclerosis (TPMS). This clinical form is defined by a progressive course beginning many years after an isolated bout. 214 consecutive outpatients with definite or probable multiple sclerosis were studied. The prevalence of TPMS was established. Patients with TPMS were compared with patients with other progressive forms of multiple sclerosis according to the clinical course. A prospective one year follow up study was performed in a subgroup of patients to compare progression of the disease using clinical indices and MRI. In this clinical population of 214 outpatients with multiple sclerosis, 55 had secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS), 38 primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS), and 12 TPMS. Retrospective analysis of the clinical data of these patients shows that TPMS is very similar to SPMS at the beginning of the disease (age at onset, time before progression, clinical symptoms at onset, progression index). In addition a cohort of patients was prospectively followed up clinically and by MRI for one year. The results did not show any significant differences between the three forms during this follow up. However, all data showed a concordant trend suggesting that at this progressive stage, TPMS is closer to PPMS in terms of progression of disability and new MRI lesions.

  1. Neurological and neuropsychiatric aspects of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Curatolo, Paolo; Moavero, Romina; de Vries, Petrus J

    2015-07-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (also known as tuberous sclerosis complex [TSC]) is a multisystem genetic disorder that affects almost every organ in the body. Mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 genes lead to disruption of the TSC1-TSC2 intracellular protein complex, causing overactivation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein complex. The surveillance and management guidelines and clinical criteria for tuberous sclerosis were revised in 2012, and mTOR inhibitors are now recommended as treatment options for subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and renal angiomyolipomas-two common features of the disease. However, most morbidity and mortality caused by tuberous sclerosis is associated with neurological and neuropsychiatric manifestations. Treatment of epilepsy associated with tuberous sclerosis remains a major challenge, with more than 60% of patients having ongoing seizures. Tuberous-sclerosis-associated neuropsychiatric disorders (TAND) are multilevel and occur in most individuals with the disorder, but are rarely assessed and treated. Clinical trials of mTOR inhibitors to treat seizures and TAND are underway. Management of the neurological and neuropsychiatric manifestations of the disorder should be coordinated with treatment of other organ systems. In view of the age-related expression of manifestations from infancy to adulthood, continuity of clinical care and ongoing monitoring is paramount, and particular attention is needed to plan transition of patient care from childhood to adult services. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Acupuncture on Gait of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Criado, Maria Begoña; Santos, Maria João; Machado, Jorge; Gonçalves, Arminda Manuela; Greten, Henry Johannes

    2017-04-14

    Multiple sclerosis is considered a complex and heterogeneous disease. Approximately 85% of patients with multiple sclerosis indicate impaired gait as one of the major limitations in their daily life. Acupuncture studies found a reduction of spasticity and improvement of fatigue and imbalance in patients with multiple sclerosis, but there is a lack of studies regarding gait. We designed a study of acupuncture treatment, according to the Heidelberg model of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), to investigate if acupuncture can be a useful therapeutic strategy in patients with gait impairment in multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. The sample consisted of 20 individuals with diagnosis of multiple sclerosis of relapsing-remitting type. Gait impairment was evaluated by the 25-foot walk test. The results showed differences in time to walk 25 feet following true acupuncture. In contrast, there was no difference in time to walk 25 feet following sham acupuncture. When using true acupuncture, 95% of cases showed an improvement in 25-foot walk test, compared with 45% when sham acupuncture was done. Our study protocol provides evidence that acupuncture treatment can be an attractive option for patients with multiple sclerosis, with gait impairment.

  3. Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis: Genes, Environment, and a Comprehensive Therapeutic Approach.

    PubMed

    Cappa, Ryan; Theroux, Liana; Brenton, J Nicholas

    2017-10-01

    Pediatric multiple sclerosis is an increasingly recognized and studied disorder that accounts for 3% to 10% of all patients with multiple sclerosis. The risk for pediatric multiple sclerosis is thought to reflect a complex interplay between environmental and genetic risk factors. Environmental exposures, including sunlight (ultraviolet radiation, vitamin D levels), infections (Epstein-Barr virus), passive smoking, and obesity, have been identified as potential risk factors in youth. Genetic predisposition contributes to the risk of multiple sclerosis, and the major histocompatibility complex on chromosome 6 makes the single largest contribution to susceptibility to multiple sclerosis. With the use of large-scale genome-wide association studies, other non-major histocompatibility complex alleles have been identified as independent risk factors for the disease. The bridge between environment and genes likely lies in the study of epigenetic processes, which are environmentally-influenced mechanisms through which gene expression may be modified. This article will review these topics to provide a framework for discussion of a comprehensive approach to counseling and ultimately treating the pediatric patient with multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Multiple sclerosis among immigrants in Greater London.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, G; McLoughlin, H; Brady, R; Adelstein, A M; Tallett-Williams, J

    1976-01-01

    Among immigrants resident in greater London from Europe, Ireland, the USSR, the old Commonwealth countries of Australia, Canada, and New Zealand, North and South America, Egypt, Turkey, and Iran the incidence of admission to hospital for probable multiple sclerosis (MS) between 1960 and 1972 was high or moderately high. The incidence was the same order as that found in those born in the United Kingdom. Immigrants from India, Pakistan, and other Asian countries and from new Commonwealth Africa and America, which includes the West Indies, had a low incidence of hospital admission for MS. Immigrants from countries where the risk of MS is low whose parents were born in Europe had a reduced incidence of admission to hospital but not the very low incidence found in those parents were also born in these countries. Emigrating to England from low risk parts of the world did not seem to increase the risk of developing MS. PMID:1260384

  5. A comprehensive review of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Sara; Carr, Karen; Reiley, Luz; Diaz, Kelvin; Guerra, Orleiquis; Altamirano, Pablo Fernandez; Pagani, Wilfredo; Lodin, Daud; Orozco, Gloria; Chinea, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a late-onset fatal neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons with an incidence of about 1/100,000. Most ALS cases are sporadic, but 5–10% of the cases are familial ALS. Both sporadic and familial ALS (FALS) are associated with degeneration of cortical and spinal motor neurons. The etiology of ALS remains unknown. However, mutations of superoxide dismutase 1 have been known as the most common cause of FALS. In this study, we provide a comprehensive review of ALS. We cover all aspects of the disease including epidemiology, comorbidities, environmental risk factor, molecular mechanism, genetic factors, symptoms, diagnostic, treatment, and even the available supplement and management of ALS. This will provide the reader with an advantage of receiving a broad range of information about the disease. PMID:26629397

  6. Dysarthria in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A review.

    PubMed

    Tomik, Barbara; Guiloff, Roberto J

    2010-01-01

    Dysarthria is a motor disorder of speech characterized by abnormalities of the articulation and intelligibility of speech. Phonation and the rate of facial movements may also be affected. Understanding the nature and course of dysarthria in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is important because loss of communication prevents patients from participating in many activities, may lead to social isolation, and reduces the quality of life. The goal of management of dysarthria in ALS patients is to optimize communication effectiveness for as long as possible. The information about dysarthria in ALS is dispersed in physiological, pathological, speech therapy, otorhinolaringological and neurological publications. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on the clinical features, differential diagnosis, pathophysiology, investigations and management of dysarthria in ALS patients. There is a need to compare the different methods used to assess dysarthria and for controlled clinical trials to assess therapeutic strategies.

  7. Autoantibodies in Systemic Sclerosis: Unanswered Questions

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Cristiane; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease characterized by vascular abnormalities, and cutaneous and visceral fibrosis. Serum autoantibodies directed to multiple intracellular antigens are present in more than 95% of patients and are considered a hallmark of SSc. They are helpful biomarkers for the early diagnosis of SSc and are associated with distinctive clinical manifestations. With the advent of more sensitive, multiplexed immunoassays, new and old questions about the relevance of autoantibodies in SSc are emerging. In this review, we discuss the clinical relevance of autoantibodies in SSc emphasizing the more recently published data. Moreover, we will summarize recent advances regarding the stability of SSc autoantibodies over the course of disease, whether they are mutually exclusive and their potential roles in the disease pathogenesis. PMID:25926833

  8. Monoclonal antibodies in treatment of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rommer, P S; Dudesek, A; Stüve, O; Zettl, UK

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are used as therapeutics in a number of disciplines in medicine, such as oncology, rheumatology, gastroenterology, dermatology and transplant rejection prevention. Since the introduction and reintroduction of the anti-alpha4-integrin mAb natalizumab in 2004 and 2006, mAbs have gained relevance in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). At present, numerous mAbs have been tested in clinical trials in relapsing–remitting MS, and in progressive forms of MS. One of the agents that might soon be approved for very active forms of relapsing–remitting MS is alemtuzumab, a humanized mAb against CD52. This review provides insights into clinical studies with the mAbs natalizumab, alemtuzumab, daclizumab, rituximab, ocrelizumab and ofatumumab. PMID:24001305

  9. Genetics of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: an update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder involving both upper motor neurons (UMN) and lower motor neurons (LMN). Enormous research has been done in the past few decades in unveiling the genetics of ALS, successfully identifying at least fifteen candidate genes associated with familial and sporadic ALS. Numerous studies attempting to define the pathogenesis of ALS have identified several plausible determinants and molecular pathways leading to motor neuron degeneration, which include oxidative stress, glutamate excitotoxicity, apoptosis, abnormal neurofilament function, protein misfolding and subsequent aggregation, impairment of RNA processing, defects in axonal transport, changes in endosomal trafficking, increased inflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. This review is to update the recent discoveries in genetics of ALS, which may provide insight information to help us better understanding of the disease neuropathogenesis. PMID:23941283

  10. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Bozzoni, Virginia; Pansarasa, Orietta; Diamanti, Luca; Nosari, Guido; Cereda, Cristina; Ceroni, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that affects central and peripheral motor neuron cells. Its etiology is unknown, although a relationship between genetic background and environmental factors may play a major role in triggering the neurodegeneration. In this review, we analyze the role of environmental factors in ALS: heavy metals, electromagnetic fields and electric shocks, pesticides, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine, physical activity and the controversial role of sports. The literature on the single issues is analyzed in an attempt to clarify, as clearly as possible, whether each risk factor significantly contributes to the disease pathogenesis. After summarizing conflicting observations and data, the authors provide a final synthetic statement. PMID:27027889

  11. Complementary and alternative medicine in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bowling, Allen C

    2010-10-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is used by one-half to three-fourths of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Despite this widespread use, CAM may not be discussed in the course of a conventional medical visit. When considered in the context of MS, CAM therapies have a wide range of risk-benefit profiles. Some CAM therapies, such as acupuncture, cranberry, vitamin D, tai chi, and yoga, are low risk and possibly beneficial. Other CAM therapies, such as immune-stimulating supplements, bee venom, and hyperbaric oxygen, are ineffective, dangerous, or unstudied. Providing access to information about the risks and benefits of CAM therapies may increase the quality of care that is provided to patients with MS.

  12. Multiple sclerosis genetics: leaving no stone unturned.

    PubMed

    Oksenberg, J R; Barcellos, L F

    2005-08-01

    Compelling epidemiologic and molecular data indicate that genes play a primary role in determining who is at risk for developing multiple sclerosis (MS), how the disease progresses, and how someone responds to therapy. The genetic component of MS etiology is believed to result from the action of allelic variants in several genes. Their incomplete penetrance and moderate individual effect probably reflects epistatic interactions, post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, and significant environmental influences. Equally significant, it is also likely that locus heterogeneity exists, whereby specific genes influence susceptibility and pathogenesis in some individuals but not in others. With the aid of novel analytical algorithms, the combined study of genomic, transcriptional, proteomic, and phenotypic information in well-controlled study groups will define a useful conceptual model of pathogenesis and a framework for understanding the mechanisms of action of existing therapies for this disorder, as well as the rationale for novel curative strategies.

  13. Multiple sclerosis in India: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Bhim S.; Advani, Hemali

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is being increasingly diagnosed in India mainly due to increase in the number of practicing neurologists and easy and affordable availability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The clinical features and course are largely similar to those seen in the West. The term optico-spinal MS (Asian MS) was coined in the pre-MRI days. Many such patients turn out to be cases of neuromyelitis optica — a distinct disorder and not a variant of MS. Others have shown the classical features of MS on MRI scan. Several of the disease-modifying agents, not all, are now available in India. Their use, however, has been limited in view of the high cost. PMID:26538844

  14. Diagnostic criteria for pediatric multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Jennifer P; Kuntz, Nancy L

    2013-06-01

    An estimated 2 % to 5 % of all persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) have onset of symptoms before 16 years of age Krupp and Hertz (Neurology 68(Suppl 2), 2007). As in adults, the diagnosis of pediatric MS is a clinical one, requiring recurrent episodes of CNS demyelination with supportive paraclinical data (MRI findings, CSF characteristics) in the absence of another plausible diagnosis. The differential diagnosis is broad and, the more atypical the case and the younger the child, the more consideration is necessary before making a diagnosis of MS. MS must be differentiated from acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) or neuromyelitis optica (NMO). After initial presentation with a CNS demyelinating event or clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), children can meet the diagnostic criteria for MS if serial changes are noted on MRI and other disorders are excluded. Accurate diagnosis of pediatric MS is critical because of the implications of the diagnosis, including the need for long-term disease modifying therapy.

  15. Is multiple sclerosis a mitochondrial disease?

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Peizhong; Reddy, P. Hemachandra

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a relatively common and etiologically unknown disease with no cure treatment. It is the leading cause of neurological disability in young adults, affecting over two million people worldwide. Traditionally, MS has been considered a chronic, inflammatory disorder of the central white matter in which ensuing demyelination results in physical disability. Recently, MS has become increasingly viewed as a neurodegenerative disorder in which axonal injury, neuronal loss, and atrophy of the central nervous system lead to permanent neurological and clinical disability. In this article, we discuss the latest developments on MS research, including etiology, pathology, genetic association, EAE animal models, mechanisms of neuronal injury and axonal transport and therapeutics. In this article, we also focus on the mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction that are involved in MS, including mitochondrial DNA defects, and mitochondrial structural/functional changes. PMID:19607913

  16. Low dose naltrexone therapy in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Y P

    2005-01-01

    The use of low doses of naltrexone for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) enjoys a worldwide following amongst MS patients. There is overwhelming anecdotal evidence, that in low doses naltrexone not only prevents relapses in MS but also reduces the progression of the disease. It is proposed that naltrexone acts by reducing apoptosis of oligodendrocytes. It does this by reducing inducible nitric oxide synthase activity. This results in a decrease in the formation of peroxynitrites, which in turn prevent the inhibition of the glutamate transporters. Thus, the excitatory neurotoxicity of glutamate on neuronal cells and oligodendrocytes via activation of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid class of glutamate receptor is prevented. It is crucial that the medical community respond to patient needs and investigate this drug in a clinical trial.

  17. Benefits of Exercise Training in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Motl, Robert W; Sandroff, Brian M

    2015-09-01

    Exercise training represents a behavioral approach for safely managing many of the functional, symptomatic, and quality of life consequences of multiple sclerosis (MS). This topical review paper summarizes evidence from literature reviews and meta-analyses, supplemented by recent individual studies, indicating that exercise training can yield small but important improvements in walking, balance, cognition, fatigue, depression, and quality of life in MS. The paper highlights limitations of research on exercise training and its consequences and future research directions and provides an overview for promotion of exercise training in MS based on recent prescriptive guidelines. Collectively, the evidence for the benefits of exercise training in MS suggests that the time is ripe for the promotion of exercise by healthcare providers, particularly neurologists as a central part of the clinical care and management of MS patients.

  18. Interferon Beta for primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Juan Ignacio; Romano, Marina; Ciapponi, Agustín; Patrucco, Liliana; Cristiano, Edgardo

    2010-01-20

    This is an updated Cochrane review of the previous version published (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2009, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD006643. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD006643.pub2).Therapeutic trials with ss-interferon in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) have mainly focused on remitting-relapsing multiple sclerosis (RRMS), demonstrating a reduction in relapse rate. However, there is not enough evidence about their efficacy in patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). Identify and summarize the evidence that ss-interferon is beneficial and safe in patients with PPMS. We searched the Cochrane MS Group Trials Register (May 2009); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) The Cochrane Library, (2009, Issue 2); MEDLINE (PubMed) (January 1966 to May 2009), EMBASE (January 1974 to May 2009); NICE (January 1999 to May 2009); LILACS (January 1986 to May 2009); Screening of reference lists of all primary studies found; Contact and inquiry of drug manufactures and multiple sclerosis experts. Randomized double or single blind, placebo-controlled trials of recombinant ss-interferon in patients with PPMS including trials of MS which report separate outcomes in subgroups of patients with PPMS. Two reviewers independently extracted and assessed trials' quality according to the criteria outlined in The Cochrane Handbook. Of 1777 potential studies evaluated, only two Randomized Control Trials (123 patients) were included. ss-interferon treatment compared to placebo did not show differences regarding the proportion of patients with progression of the disease (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.55 to1.43), and it was associated with a greater frequency of treatment-related adverse events (RR 1.90, 95% CI 1.45-2.48). One of the trials evaluated the MRI secondary outcome pre-specified in the protocol. This trial showed that at two years the numbers of active lesions on brain MRI scan in ss-interferon arm were significantly lower than in placebo arm (weighted mean difference

  19. Modifiable environmental factors in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Yara Dadalti

    2014-11-01

    Potential environmental modifiable factors involved in multiple sclerosis (MS) include low adherence to treatment, smoking, obesity, low levels of liposoluble vitamins A and D, high consumption of salt, and a sedentary lifestyle. Chronic tobacco use, obesity, sedentarism and insufficient levels of these vitamins all contribute to maintenance of a proinflammatory state. It is unlikely that there will be noticeable improvement in the inflammatory condition of MS if stopping smoking, reducing weight, exercising, increasing vitamin levels are done in an isolated and erratic manner. Modification of each and every one of these environmental risk factors is likely to be an important approach in the management of MS. The present review presents the arguments for an association between these hazardous modifiable factors and the chronic inflammatory state observed in MS.

  20. [Treatment of multiple sclerosis symptoms and exacerbations].

    PubMed

    Prieto González, José María

    2014-12-01

    In the last few years, there has been an explosion of new drugs acting on the clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS) but less attention has been paid to better knowledge of the symptoms of this disease and their pathogenesis and treatment, which is essential to improve patients' quality of life. Because many patients have numerous concurrent symptoms during their clinical course, their management is complex and consequently it is important to know which symptoms are a direct result of the degenerative lesions of MS. The present article describes all the therapeutic options available for spasticity and its associated pain, paroxystic symptoms, fatigue, genitourinary disorders and sexual dysfunction, tremor, ataxia, gait disorder and cognitive impairment, with special emphasis on novel treatments. The article also defines exacerbations, how to recognize them and the available treatments, mainly oral administration of high-dose methylprednisolone and plasmapheresis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Refractory anemia in systemic sclerosis: myelodisplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sargın, Gökhan; Şentürk, Taşkın; Yavaşoğlu, İrfan

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune connective tissue disease characterized by small vessel vasculopathy, autoantibodies, and skin or visceral organ fibrosis (lung, oesophagus, kidney etc.) as a result of extracellular collagen deposition. The cancer risk is higher in many rheumatic diseases, including SSc. Various defined malignancies may develop in 3%–11% of patients with SSc. These solid tumors are generally observed in the lung, oesophagus, or breast. In addition, an increased risk for hematological cancers were reported in literature. Herein, we describe an interesting case of SSc complicated by myelodisplastic syndrome (MDS). Our aim is to draw attention to developing cancers and the rare occurence of MDS in patients with SSc. PMID:27708945

  2. Stubborn rectal prolapse in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Sven; Tobisch, Alexander; Puhl, Gero; Kötter, Ina; Wollina, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune connective tissue disorder. Anorectal involvement might typically cause fecal incontinence and rarely rectal prolapse. Here we report three female patients, who were admitted with a mean history of 10 years suffering from SSc. All patients presented with the initial symptom of anal incontinence, in all cases this was associated with rectal intussusception or rectal prolapse. The three women faced prolapse recurrence, independent of the initial procedure. After surgical removal of the prolapse, the incontinence remained. In SSc rectal prolapse syndrome might occur at an earlier age, and a primary prolapse of the ventral aspect of the rectal wall seems to be typical for this disease. If patients with prior diagnosis of SSc appear with third degree of fecal incontinence, it is suspected to be associated with rectal prolapse. The prolapse recurrence rate after surgery in SSc patients is high.

  3. [Renal transplantation and Bourneville's tuberous sclerosis].

    PubMed

    De Paepe, J P; Michel, L; Pirson, Y; Squifflet, J P; Alexandre, G

    1987-01-01

    A kidney transplantation was performed in July 1981 on a 29 year old woman who presented the signs of tuberous sclerosis and suffered from chronic renal failure. The frequency and the genetic transmission of Bourneville's disease are explained. The signs of the disease are exposed with special emphasis on the renal lesions. Only the patients with minor neurological symptoms can survive. These patients are able to develop chronic renal failure. This occurs either when the kidneys are destructed by renal cysts or tumors, or when a bilateral nephrectomy must be performed for bleeding or tumoral compression. A kidney transplantation can give them an opportunity to live almost normally. When nephrectomy is not performed, a regularly follow-up is necessary because the unknown future of the renal lesions in place.

  4. Multiple sclerosis in men: management considerations.

    PubMed

    Bove, Riley; McHenry, Allison; Hellwig, Kerstin; Houtchens, Maria; Razaz, Neda; Smyth, Penelope; Tremlett, Helen; Sadovnick, A D; Rintell, D

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a lifelong disease typically affecting individuals in young to middle adulthood. There are recognized sex differences in MS onset and clinical course. MS affects approximately three times more women than men, thus resulting in less attention to the male experience (i.e. diagnosis, management, societal dimensions). Here, we review current scientific evidence on sex differences in MS risk and course, highlight potential sources of bias, and suggest avenues of further inquiry. We then describe what is known about male experiences with MS diagnosis, treatment, and symptom management (particularly mood and sexual function). Finally, we consider ways in which healthcare providers might engage male patients in the broader aspects of living with MS (e.g. familial and societal relationships) to influence their long-term quality of life (QOL). When possible, we draw from published sources to underscore our collective clinical and scientific experiences.

  5. Motoneuron firing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Mamede; Eisen, Andrew; Krieger, Charles; Swash, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is an inexorably progressive neurodegenerative disorder involving the classical motor system and the frontal effector brain, causing muscular weakness and atrophy, with variable upper motor neuron signs and often an associated fronto-temporal dementia. The physiological disturbance consequent on the motor system degeneration is beginning to be well understood. In this review we describe aspects of the motor cortical, neuronal, and lower motor neuron dysfunction. We show how studies of the changes in the pattern of motor unit firing help delineate the underlying pathophysiological disturbance as the disease progresses. Such studies are beginning to illuminate the underlying disordered pathophysiological processes in the disease, and are important in designing new approaches to therapy and especially for clinical trials. PMID:25294995

  6. [Vision aids for multiple sclerosis patients].

    PubMed

    Frieling, E; Kornhuber, H H; Nissl, K

    1986-02-07

    Optical or electronic vision aids enabled 35 of 39 visually handicapped multiple sclerosis patients to read. Six patients had an uncorrected ametropia. 15 could read again with the help of magnifying optical aids and 11 with the help of an electronic television system. An electronic television reader was useful when visual acuities were below 0.1 and in patients with oscillating nystagmus or tremor capitis. Contact lenses helped 3 patients who had a neurogenous visual defect and oscillating nystagmus. Although acquired oscillating nystagmus disappears on eyelid closure and only reappears again on fixation, its amplitude, when unable to read, is greater. On overcoming the neurogenous visual defect with vision aids it becomes smaller.

  7. Longitudinal study of alexithymia and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chahraoui, Khadija; Duchene, Céline; Rollot, Fabien; Bonin, Bernard; Moreau, Thibault

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the course of alexithymia and its relation with anxiety and depression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), over a period of 5 years. Sixty-two MS patients were examined at two timepoints, 5 years apart, and they answered questionnaires collecting socio-demographic, medical, and psychological data (depression, anxiety, alexithymia). Our data show that emotional disorders remain stable over time in patients with MS, particularly as regards alexithymia and anxiety. Conversely, the rate of depression decreased between the two evaluations, falling from 40% to 26%. The two dimensions of alexithymia (i.e., difficulty describing and difficulty identifying feelings) were correlated with anxiety and depression, whereas the third component of alexithymia (externally oriented thinking) was independent, and was the only component to change over time, with a significant fall observed at 5 years. Alexithymia was associated with increased severity of anxiety and attack relapses.

  8. Neuroborreliosis during natalizumab treatment in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Katja; Schultheiss, Thorsten; Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2013-09-10

    We present a case of acute neuroborreliosis in the setting of long-term treatment with natalizumab. A 33-year-old man was diagnosed with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) in 1999. Following failure of various immunomodulatory treatments including interferon and immunoglobulin, he was treated with mitoxantrone from May 2000 to August 2004. Due to persistently high disease activity, he was also treated with cyclophosphamide (December 2005-April 2006) and then azathioprine (April-June 2006), which were both discontinued due to adverse effects. After the patient scored 6.5 on the Expanded Disability Status Scale and had 2 relapses in 2006, we initiated natalizumab therapy (300 mg monthly, starting September 2006). The patient improved significantly in ambulation and the relapse rate slowed as well.

  9. Rehabilitation of multiple sclerosis patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Surya, Nirmal

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease which is one of the leading causes of handicap in young subjects. The large range of symptoms associated with MS lead to continuing decline in neurologic status and quality of life. The coexistence of physical and cognitive impairments, together with the imprevisible evolution of the disease makes MS rehabilitation very challenging. The main objective of rehabilitation is, therefore, to ease the burden of symptoms by improving self-performance and independence. Inpatient, outpatient and Home rehabilitation with multidisciplinary team has been shown to be beneficial in improving disability. Individualized programs elaborated by a multidisciplinary team of experts are the key to success of rehabilitation. Family plays a big role and Family Based Rehabilitation will be important in long term rehab program in MS. PMID:26538848

  10. [Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis--diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Jung, H H; Neumann, M; Bloch, K E

    2012-07-04

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) represents the most common motoneuron disorder in adulthood. It is characterized by selective degeneration of the motoneurons. About 10% of patients have a genetically determined ALS. Clinically, ALS is characterized by coexistence of signs of the first motoneuron, such as spasticity and hyperreflexia, as well as the second motoneuron, such as muscular atrophy and fasciculations. If such signs are present in at least three regions and if other possible causes have been excluded, a definite diagnosis of ALS can be made based on the revised El-Escorial criteria. Initial manifestations are often focalized and generalization develops during the course. The glutamate antagonist riluzole is worldwide the only approved ALS treatment. However, symptomatic treatments to ameliorate spasticity, drooling, speech and swallowing problems, and assisted ventilation to treat respiratory failure are essential.

  11. Evolution of diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Przybek, Joanna; Gniatkowska, Inga; Mirowska-Guzel, Dagmara; Członkowska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that occurs primarily in young adults. There is no single diagnostic test to recognize the disease. The diagnostic criteria, based on clinical examination and laboratory tests, have changed considerably over time. The first guidelines involved only the results of the patient's neurological examination. The diagnostic criteria developed by Poser in 1983 were based largely on the results of additional tests, including visual evoked potentials and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid. The McDonald criteria, developed in 2001 and updated in 2005 and 2010, reflected the diagnostic breakthrough caused by widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Currently, the diagnosis depends largely on the results of the MRI examination. An early diagnosis is particularly important for starting disease-modifying treatments.

  12. Neurobehavioral burden of multiple sclerosis with nanotheranostics

    PubMed Central

    Sriramoju, Bhasker; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating neurological disorder affecting people worldwide; women are affected more than men. MS results in serious neurological deficits along with behavioral compromise, the mechanisms of which still remain unclear. Behavioral disturbances such as depression, anxiety, cognitive impairment, psychosis, euphoria, sleep disturbances, and fatigue affect the quality of life in MS patients. Among these, depression and psychosis are more common than any other neurological disorders. In addition, depression is associated with other comorbidities. Although anxiety is often misdiagnosed in MS patients, it can induce suicidal ideation if it coexists with depression. An interrelation between sleep abnormalities and fatigue is also reported among MS patients. In addition, therapeutics for MS is always a challenge because of the presence of the blood–brain barrier, adding to the lack of detailed understanding of the disease pathology. In this review, we tried to summarize various behavioral pathologies and their association with MS, followed by its conventional treatment and nanotheranostics. PMID:26508863

  13. Systemic sclerosis and localized scleroderma in childhood.

    PubMed

    Zulian, Francesco

    2008-02-01

    Juvenile scleroderma syndromes, including the systemic and the localized varieties, represent the third most frequent chronic rheumatic conditions in pediatric rheumatology practice. In children, systemic sclerosis shows a significantly less frequent involvement of all organs, a higher prevalence of arthritis and myositis, and a better outcome than in adults. Recently, new classification criteria were proposed, which help improve patient care by enabling earlier, more definite diagnoses and by standardizing the conduct of clinical trials. Localized scleroderma is the more frequent subtype of scleroderma in childhood. It comprises a group of distinct conditions that involve mainly the skin and subcutaneous tissues. They range from small plaques of fibrosis involving only the skin to diseases causing significant functional deformity with various extracutaneous features.

  14. Neuroimaging Endpoints in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Menke, Ricarda A L; Agosta, Federica; Grosskreutz, Julian; Filippi, Massimo; Turner, Martin R

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative, clinically heterogeneous syndrome pathologically overlapping with frontotemporal dementia. To date, therapeutic trials in animal models have not been able to predict treatment response in humans, and the revised ALS Functional Rating Scale, which is based on coarse disability measures, remains the gold-standard measure of disease progression. Advances in neuroimaging have enabled mapping of functional, structural, and molecular aspects of ALS pathology, and these objective measures may be uniquely sensitive to the detection of propagation of pathology in vivo. Abnormalities are detectable before clinical symptoms develop, offering the potential for neuroprotective intervention in familial cases. Although promising neuroimaging biomarker candidates for diagnosis, prognosis, and disease progression have emerged, these have been from the study of necessarily select patient cohorts identified in specialized referral centers. Further multicenter research is now needed to establish their validity as therapeutic outcome measures.

  15. Therapeutic neuroprotective agents for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Rachna S.; Zhu, Haining; Li, Wei; Bowser, Robert; Friedlander, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal chronic neurodegenerative disease whose hallmark is proteinaceous, ubiquitinated, cytoplasmic inclusions in motor neurons and surrounding cells. Multiple mechanisms proposed as responsible for ALS pathogenesis include dysfunction of protein degradation, glutamate excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. It is therefore essential to gain a better understanding of the underlying disease etiology and search for neuroprotective agents that might delay disease onset, slow progression, prolong survival, and ultimately reduce the burden of disease. Because riluzole, the only Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved treatment, prolongs the ALS patient’s life by only 3 months, new therapeutic agents are urgently needed. In this review, we focus on studies of various small pharmacological compounds targeting the proposed pathogenic mechanisms of ALS and discuss their impact on disease progression. PMID:23864030

  16. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: update and new developments

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Ashley J; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Perry, J Jefferson P

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common form of motor neuron disease. It is typically characterized by adult-onset degeneration of the upper and lower motor neurons, and is usually fatal within a few years of onset. A subset of ALS patients has an inherited form of the disease, and a few of the known mutant genes identified in familial cases have also been found in sporadic forms of ALS. Precisely how the diverse ALS-linked gene products dictate the course of the disease, resulting in compromised voluntary muscular ability, is not entirely known. This review addresses the major advances that are being made in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms giving rise to the disease, which may eventually translate into new treatment options. PMID:23019386

  17. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, A; Sweeney, B J; Connolly, S

    2001-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common, progressive motor neurone disease but is rare in the obstetric population. Only 4 cases have been described in the English literature since 1975. We describe a 29 year old woman who presented with ataxia, lower limb weakness and dysarthria 4 weeks after the birth of her first child. The symptoms had onset during the pregnancy but had not been considered remarkable. There were clinical features of upper and lower motor neurone involvement without any sensory loss. MRI of brain and spine was normal. CSF analysis was negative. EMG studies confirmed the presence of widespread anterior horn cell dysfunction compatible with ALS. The patient was commenced on Riluzole and has progressed clinically, at 12 months post diagnosis.

  18. Neuroplasticity and functional recovery in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tomassini, Valentina; Matthews, Paul M.; Thompson, Alan J.; Fuglø, Daniel; Geurts, Jeroen J.; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Jones, Derek K.; Rocca, Maria A.; Wise, Richard G.; Barkhof, Frederik; Palace, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    The development of therapeutic strategies that promote functional recovery is a major goal of multiple sclerosis (MS) research. Neuroscientific and methodological advances have improved our understanding of the brain’s recovery from damage, generating novel hypotheses for potential targets or modes of intervention and laying the foundation for the development of scientifically informed strategies promoting recovery in interventional studies. This Review aims to encourage the transition from characterization of recovery mechanisms to the development of strategies that promote recovery in MS. We discuss current evidence for functional reorganization that underlies recovery and its implications for development of new recovery-oriented strategies in MS. Promotion of functional recovery requires an improved understanding of recovery mechanisms modulated by interventions and the development of reliable measures of therapeutic effects. As imaging methods can be used to measure functional and structural alterations associated with recovery, this Review discusses their use as reliable markers to measure the effects of interventions. PMID:22986429

  19. Gastric emptying abnormalities in progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sridhar, K.; Magyar, L.; Lange, R.; McCallum, R.W.

    1985-05-01

    The authors studied gastric emptying (GE) in patients with peripheral manifestations of progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) using a radionuclide method. 18 patients underwent esophageal manometry and a GE study using chicken liver labeled in vivo with Tc-99m sulfur colloid as a marker of solid emptying. GE was also measured in 13 normal volunteers. 4 PSS patients with normal esophageal motility also had normal GE. The GE of 14 PSS patients with abnormal esophageal motility was significantly (p < 0.05) delayed; with 67.4% retention of isotope after 2 hours compared to 49.8 in normals. The authors conclude that GE of solids is slow in approximately 2/3 of PSS patients with abnormal esophageal motility but is normal if the esophagus is uninvolved; Delayed GE may contribute to the severity of gastroesophageal reflux in PSS patients and the degree of dysphasgia; and Metoclopramide accelerates GE in PSS patients and should have a valuable therapeutic role.

  20. Natalizumab in the Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yaldizli, Özgür

    2009-01-01

    Natalizumab reduced the rate of clinical relapse at one year by 68% and the risk of sustained progression of disability by 42-54% over 2 years in its pivotal phase III trial (AFFIRM) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Natalizumab is generally well tolerated, but due to rare and potentially fatal side-effects, it was approved with a restricted-distribution format in 2006. Expert statements and the European Medical Agency recommend the use of natalizumab after failure of first-line disease-modifying therapies in patients with relapsing forms of MS. As part of the risk management plan, worldwide extensive safety programmes aim to provide more data on natalizumab safety in clinical practice. At the end of September 2008, 48 000 patients have received natalizumab and 18000 patients are on treatment for at least 1 year. The assessment of risk and benefit is still ongoing. PMID:21180646

  1. Mitochondrial haplogroups in Basque multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Otaegui, D; Sáenz, A; Martínez-Zabaleta, M; Villoslada, P; Fernández-Manchola, I; Alvarez de Arcaya, A; Emparanza, J I; López de Munain, A

    2004-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that mitochondrial metabolism and/or mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) could be, in conjunction with other genetic or environmental factors, a risk factor for the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). One of these studies establishes that mitochondrial haplogroup JT is a risk factor for developing the disease, in particular the visual manifestations [optic neuritis (ON)]. Nevertheless, as distribution of these haplogroups varies between populations, the observed association may be due to a slanted sample with no physiopathological value. This hypothesis was checked with MS patients, originals from Basque country (this population has peculiar genetic characteristics) and from other Spanish regions. We concluded that such an association does not exist. By contrast, a decrease could be seen in the frequency of the JT haplogroup in the ON group and in the MS-Basque group. That trend could be a protective effect, which needs to be verified in further investigations.

  2. Innovative Monoclonal Antibody Therapies in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kieseier, Bernd C.

    2008-01-01

    The recent years have witnessed great efforts in establishing new therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis (MS), especially for relapsing–remitting disease courses. In particular, the application of monoclonal antibodies provide innovative approaches allowing for blocking or depleting specific molecular targets, which are of interest in the pathogenesis of MS. While natalizumab received approval by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency in 2006 as the first monoclonal antibody in MS therapy, rituximab, alemtuzumab, and daclizumab were successfully tested for relapsing-remitting MS in small cohorts in the meantime. Here, we review the data available from these recent phase II trials and at the same time critically discuss possible pitfalls which may be relevant for clinical practice. The results of these studies may not only broaden our therapeutic options in the near future, but also provide new insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:21180564

  3. Hyperimmune goat serum for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, R; Kiernan, M; McKenzie, D; Youl, B D

    2006-12-01

    The authors report a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) who showed a lessening of deterioration in respiratory muscle strength during treatment with hyperimmune goat serum (HGS) (Aimspro). Respiratory function tests (RFTs) were measured by established protocols, and all measurements were expressed as a percentage of normal predicted values. The rate of decline was calculated by linear regression analysis. Respiratory muscle strength decline was less during 13 months of treatment with HGS (mean 1.3% per month, range 0.8-1.7%) compared to the preceding 13 months (mean 2.3% per month, range 1.2-3.1%), while a greater decline would be expected with disease progression. Comparison with similarly affected patients in the literature suggest that a decline of 4-5% per month of predicted values may be expected during the treatment phase.

  4. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolinsky, J.S.; Narayana, P.A.; Fenstermacher, M.J. )

    1990-11-01

    Regional in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides quantitative data on selected chemical constituents of brain. We imaged 16 volunteers with clinically definite multiple sclerosis on a 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance scanner to define plaque-containing volumes of interest, and obtained localized water-suppressed proton spectra using a stimulated echo sequence. Twenty-five of 40 plaque-containing regions provided spectra of adequate quality. Of these, 8 spectra from 6 subjects were consistent with the presence of cholesterol or fatty acids; the remainder were similar to those obtained from white matter of normal volunteers. This early experience with regional proton spectroscopy suggests that individual plaques are distinct. These differences likely reflect dynamic stages of the evolution of the demyelinative process not previously accessible to in vivo investigation.

  5. Multiple sclerosis in Latter Day Saints (Mormons).

    PubMed

    Hawkes, C H; Ramkumar, N; Baker, R; Lyon, J L

    2007-04-01

    Compliant members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (LDS, Mormons) have a low incidence of heart and lung disease that may relate to their healthy life style. We wished to determine whether multiple sclerosis (MS) was less frequent in this religious body. To ascertain this, diagnostic and treatment coding records were accessed from the Deseret Mutual Benefit Administrators (DMBA) for the 6 year period 1997-2002. DMBA is a medical insurance company that provides medical insurance to all employees of LDS Church in the US. This information was combined with prescribing records for disease modifying treatment, principally beta-interferon and Copaxone which are medications specific to MS. Using various search strategies we derived an approximate MS prevalence of 45-64/100,000. Comparison with MS rates from Utah and other states of comparable latitude suggest that strict LDS have an MS prevalence that is lower than expected and may reflect their healthy life style.

  6. Leg spasticity and ambulation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Balantrapu, Swathi; Sosnoff, Jacob J; Pula, John H; Sandroff, Brian M; Motl, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    Background. Spasticity of the legs is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), but there has been limited research examining its association with ambulatory outcomes. Objective. This study examined spasticity of the legs and its association with multiple measures of ambulation in persons with MS. Methods. The sample included 84 patients with MS. Spasticity of the legs was measured using a 5-point rating scale ranging between 0 (normal) and 4 (contracted). Patients completed the 6-minute walk (6 MW), timed 25 foot walk (T25FW), and timed up-and-go (TUG), and O2 cost of walking was measured during the 6 MW. The patients undertook two walking trials on a GAITRite (CIR systems, Inc.) for measuring spatial and temporal parameters of gait. The patients completed the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12 (MSWS-12) and wore an accelerometer over a seven-day period. Results. 52% (n = 44) of the sample presented with spasticity of the legs. Those with leg spasticity had significantly worse ambulation as measured by 6 MW (P = 0.0001, d = -0.86), T25FW (P = 0.003, d = 0.72), TUG (P = 0.001, d = 0.84), MSWS-12 (P = 0.0001, d = 1.09), O2 cost of walking (P = 0.001, d = 0.75), average steps/day (P < 0.05, d = -0.45), and walking velocity (P < 0.05, d = -0.53) and cadence (P < 0.05, d = -0.46). Conclusion. Leg spasticity was associated with impairments in ambulation, including alterations in spatiotemporal parameters and free-living walking.

  7. Leg Spasticity and Ambulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Balantrapu, Swathi; Sosnoff, Jacob J.; Pula, John H.; Sandroff, Brian M.; Motl, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Spasticity of the legs is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), but there has been limited research examining its association with ambulatory outcomes. Objective. This study examined spasticity of the legs and its association with multiple measures of ambulation in persons with MS. Methods. The sample included 84 patients with MS. Spasticity of the legs was measured using a 5-point rating scale ranging between 0 (normal) and 4 (contracted). Patients completed the 6-minute walk (6 MW), timed 25 foot walk (T25FW), and timed up-and-go (TUG), and O2 cost of walking was measured during the 6 MW. The patients undertook two walking trials on a GAITRite (CIR systems, Inc.) for measuring spatial and temporal parameters of gait. The patients completed the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12 (MSWS-12) and wore an accelerometer over a seven-day period. Results. 52% (n = 44) of the sample presented with spasticity of the legs. Those with leg spasticity had significantly worse ambulation as measured by 6 MW (P = 0.0001, d = −0.86), T25FW (P = 0.003, d = 0.72), TUG (P = 0.001, d = 0.84), MSWS-12 (P = 0.0001, d = 1.09), O2 cost of walking (P = 0.001, d = 0.75), average steps/day (P < 0.05, d = −0.45), and walking velocity (P < 0.05, d = −0.53) and cadence (P < 0.05, d = −0.46). Conclusion. Leg spasticity was associated with impairments in ambulation, including alterations in spatiotemporal parameters and free-living walking. PMID:24999434

  8. A subtle case of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Hitoshi; Otsuka, Atsushi; Kinoshita, Masako

    2015-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is known to cause severe intractable epilepsy and mental retardation; however, diagnosis can be delayed in milder cases. We report a 26-year-old right-handed female patient who started having convulsions at age 7 days. She had several focal seizures per year that were intractable to treatment with carbamazepine or phenytoin. Her two sisters had several episodes of suspected epileptic seizures but had no symptoms related to TSC. Seizure semiology of the patient comprised of visual hallucination, loss of consciousness, and convulsive movements predominantly on the right. Physical examination revealed several small scattered angiofibromas over the nose that were histologically determined by skin biopsy. Hypomelanotic macules, shagreen patches, or periungual fibromas were not seen. Neurological examination showed mental retardation (MMSE: 23/30, WAIS-III: VIQ63, PIQ59, FIQ58) and decreased vibration sensation in both legs. Interictal EEG showed slow waves and epileptiform discharges broadly over the anterior quadrants bilaterally. Brain imaging showed multiple cortical tubers and malformation of cortical development but no subependymal nodules. Interictal IMP-SPECT showed hypoperfusion in the left frontal lobe. Cardiac rhabdomyoma was not noticed by cardiac echography. Truncal CT showed sclerosis of the bilateral lumbosacral joints. There was no abnormality in the lung, major arteries, liver, or kidneys. No hamartomas or retinal achromic patches were noticed by ophthalmologic evaluation. Administration of lamotrigine was effective for her seizures. This patient fulfilled two major features of diagnostic criteria for TSC and was diagnosed as definite TSC. Patients with mental retardation and epilepsy should be carefully evaluated for the possible diagnosis of TSC.

  9. Managing Neuropsychological Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Stephanie; Penner, Iris; Heesen, Christoph; Moritz, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system of potential autoimmune origin that is frequently associated with psychological disorders and cognitive deficits, as well as with fatigue, stress, and psychosocial burden. These factors often cause decreased quality of life, social withdrawal, and unemployment. We describe the development of a cognitive-behavioral group intervention based on the concept of metacognition and evaluation of the feasibility and acceptance of the program as a rehabilitation tool. Methods: Metacognitive Training in MS (MaTiMS) consists of six modules, each 90 minutes in duration. We tested acceptance and design of the program in six focus groups (entire sample, n = 27). Framework analysis of transcripts was used to identify key topics and categories. Program modules were revised in accordance with appropriate recommendations of focus group members. We subsequently evaluated MaTiMS in two groups (n = 5, n = 6) in a rehabilitation center. Neuropsychological functioning as well as coping self-efficacy, depression, stress, perceived cognitive deficit, fatigue, and quality of life were assessed. Acceptance of MaTiMS from the patient perspective was also studied. Results: The modules were highly accepted by patients. Pre-post assessments showed significant improvements in the Coping Self Efficacy Scale (P = .007), the Würzburger Fatigue Inventory for MS Score (P = .028), and the Hamburg Quality of Life Questionnaire in Multiple Sclerosis Mood subscale (P = .046). Conclusions: These preliminary results suggest that MaTiMS represents a feasible psychological group training program that may foster improvements in self-efficacy, fatigue, and mood. The next step will be an evaluation of the program in a randomized controlled trial. PMID:26052258

  10. [Multiple sclerosis: social and economic implications].

    PubMed

    Machado, April; Valente, Francisco; Reis, Mariana; Saraiva, Pedro; Silva, Rita; Martins, Rosa; Cruz, Simão; Rodrigues, Tiago

    2010-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common demyelinating disease of the Central Nervous System. It is more frequently diagnosed in young individuals between 20 and 40 years old. MS is the leading non-traumatic cause for disability in young adults in western countries. Portuguese prevalence of the disease is about 50 per 100,000 inhabitants, which means that there are around 5,000 people with MS in Portugal. Our goal was to determine social and economic implications of MS through the description of patient's quality of life and economic difficulties, and to assess the dividend spent by the National Health System (NHS) with this disease. The studied population consisted of 50 individuals with MS in any stage of the disease to whom no exclusion criteria were used. The following questionnaires were applied: Multiple Sclerosis: Socio-Economic Implications and MS and Quality of Life (MSQoL-54). For data processing purposes we used SPSS v.16 and Microsoft Excel 2003. The confidence interval was 95%. In addition we based the cost calculations on K and C constants (official values from 2002). The results obtained were similar to those described in literature in what concerns the clinical presentation and the onset of the disease. Social implications evaluated by MSQoL revealed the majority of the inquiries had a score above 50 (n = 31). In what concerns economic implications the value of 40 843 250 euro was obtained as the mínimum spent by NHS. This number probably represents an under-valorization of the real value since only the direct costs were analyzed. It is necessary that new studies especially with bigger study populations can determine precisely the economic impact of MS in the Portuguese society.

  11. Sleep and Cognitive Function in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Braley, Tiffany J.; Kratz, Anna L.; Kaplish, Neeraj; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine associations between cognitive performance and polysomnographic measures of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: Participants underwent a comprehensive MS-specific cognitive testing battery (the Minimal Assessment of Cognitive Function in MS, or MACFIMS) and in-laboratory overnight PSG. Results: In adjusted linear regression models, the oxygen desaturation index (ODI) and minimum oxygen saturation (MinO2) were significantly associated with performance on multiple MACFIMS measures, including the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT; 2-sec and 3-sec versions), which assesses working memory, processing speed, and attention, and on the Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised, a test of delayed visual memory. The respiratory disturbance index (RDI) was also significantly associated with PASAT-3 scores as well as the California Verbal Learning Test-II (CVLT-II) Discriminability Index, a test of verbal memory and response inhibition. Among these associations, apnea severity measures accounted for between 12% and 23% of the variance in cognitive test performance. Polysomnographic measures of sleep fragmentation (as reflected by the total arousal index) and total sleep time also showed significant associations with a component of the CVLT-II that assesses response inhibition, explaining 18% and 27% of the variance in performance. Conclusions: Among patients with MS, obstructive sleep apnea and sleep disturbance are significantly associated with diminished visual memory, verbal memory, executive function (as reflected by response inhibition), attention, processing speed, and working memory. If sleep disorders degrade these cognitive functions, effective treatment could offer new opportunities to improve cognitive functioning in patients with MS. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1489. Citation: Braley TJ, Kratz AL, Kaplish N, Chervin RD. Sleep and cognitive function

  12. Malignancies after mitoxantrone for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Seuffert, Linda; Mäder, Uwe; Toyka, Klaus V.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the therapy-related risk of malignancies in mitoxantrone-treated patients with multiple sclerosis. Methods: This retrospective observational cohort study included all mitoxantrone-treated patients with multiple sclerosis seen at our department between 1994 and 2007. We collected follow-up information on medically confirmed malignancies, life status, and cause of death, as of 2010. Malignancy rates were compared to the German national cancer registry matched for sex, age, and year of occurrence. Results: Follow-up was completed in 676 of 677 identified patients. Median follow-up time was 8.7 years (interquartile range 6.8–11.2), corresponding to 6,220 person-years. Median cumulative mitoxantrone dose was 79.0 mg/m2 (interquartile range 50.8–102.4). Thirty-seven patients (5.5%) were diagnosed with a malignancy after mitoxantrone initiation, revealing a standardized incidence ratio of 1.50 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–2.08). Entities included breast cancer (n = 9), colorectal cancer (n = 7), acute myeloid leukemia (n = 4, 0.6%), and others (each entity n = 1 or 2). The standardized incidence ratio of colorectal cancer was 2.98 (95% CI 1.20–6.14) and of acute myeloid leukemia 10.44 (95% CI 3.39–24.36). It was not increased for other entities including breast cancer. Multivariate Cox regression identified higher age at treatment initiation but neither cumulative mitoxantrone dose (>75 vs ≤75 mg/m2) nor treatment with other immunosuppressive drugs or sex as a risk factor. Fifty-five patients had died, among them 12 of a malignancy and 43 reportedly of other causes. Conclusions: While the overall incidence of malignancies was only mildly increased, the risk of leukemia and colorectal cancer was heightened. If confirmed, posttherapy colonoscopy could become advisable. PMID:27170571

  13. Total lymphoid irradiation for multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Devereux, C.K.; Vidaver, R.; Hafstein, M.P.; Zito, G.; Troiano, R.; Dowling, P.C.; Cook, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Although chemical immunosuppression has been shown to benefit patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), it appears that chemotherapy has an appreciable oncogenic potential in patients with multiple sclerosis. Accordingly, we developed a modified total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) regimen designed to reduce toxicity and applied it to a randomized double blind trial of TLI or sham irradiation in MS. Standard TLI regimens were modified to reduce dose to 1,980 rad, lowering the superior mantle margin to midway between the thyroid cartilage and angle of the mandible (to avert xerostomia) and the lower margin of the mantle field to the inferior margin of L1 (to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity by dividing abdominal radiation between mantle and inverted Y), limiting spinal cord dose to 1,000 rad by custom-made spine blocks in the mantle and upper 2 cm of inverted Y fields, and also protecting the left kidney even if part of the spleen were shielded. Clinical efficacy was documented by the less frequent functional scale deterioration of 20 TLI treated patients with chronic progressive MS compared to to 20 sham-irradiated progressive MS patients after 12 months (16% versus 55%, p less than 0.03), 18 months (28% versus 63%, p less than 0.03), and 24 months (44% versus 74%, N.S.). Therapeutic benefit during 3 years follow-up was related to the reduction in lymphocyte count 3 months post-irradiation (p less than 0.02). Toxicity was generally mild and transient, with no instance of xerostomia, pericarditis, herpes zoster, or need to terminate treatment in TLI patients. However, menopause was induced in 2 patients and staphylococcal pneumonia in one.

  14. SUMMIT (Serially Unified Multicenter Multiple Sclerosis Investigation): creating a repository of deeply phenotyped contemporary multiple sclerosis cohorts.

    PubMed

    Bove, Riley; Chitnis, Tanuja; Cree, Bruce Ac; Tintoré, Mar; Naegelin, Yvonne; Uitdehaag, Bernard Mj; Kappos, Ludwig; Khoury, Samia J; Montalban, Xavier; Hauser, Stephen L; Weiner, Howard L

    2017-08-01

    There is a pressing need for robust longitudinal cohort studies in the modern treatment era of multiple sclerosis. Build a multiple sclerosis (MS) cohort repository to capture the variability of disability accumulation, as well as provide the depth of characterization (clinical, radiologic, genetic, biospecimens) required to adequately model and ultimately predict a patient's course. Serially Unified Multicenter Multiple Sclerosis Investigation (SUMMIT) is an international multi-center, prospectively enrolled cohort with over a decade of comprehensive follow-up on more than 1000 patients from two large North American academic MS Centers (Brigham and Women's Hospital (Comprehensive Longitudinal Investigation of Multiple Sclerosis at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (CLIMB; BWH)) and University of California, San Francisco (Expression/genomics, Proteomics, Imaging, and Clinical (EPIC))). It is bringing online more than 2500 patients from additional international MS Centers (Basel (Universitätsspital Basel (UHB)), VU University Medical Center MS Center Amsterdam (MSCA), Multiple Sclerosis Center of Catalonia-Vall d'Hebron Hospital (Barcelona clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) cohort), and American University of Beirut Medical Center (AUBMC-Multiple Sclerosis Interdisciplinary Research (AMIR)). We provide evidence for harmonization of two of the initial cohorts in terms of the characterization of demographics, disease, and treatment-related variables; demonstrate several proof-of-principle analyses examining genetic and radiologic predictors of disease progression; and discuss the steps involved in expanding SUMMIT into a repository accessible to the broader scientific community.

  15. Progressive multiple sclerosis: from pathogenic mechanisms to treatment.

    PubMed

    Correale, Jorge; Gaitán, María I; Ysrraelit, María C; Fiol, Marcela P

    2017-03-01

    During the past decades, better understanding of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis disease mechanisms have led to the development of several disease-modifying therapies, reducing relapse rates and severity, through immune system modulation or suppression. In contrast, current therapeutic options for progressive multiple sclerosis remain comparatively disappointing and challenging. One possible explanation is a lack of understanding of pathogenic mechanisms driving progressive multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, diagnosis is usually retrospective, based on history of gradual neurological worsening with or without occasional relapses, minor remissions or plateaus. In addition, imaging methods as well as biomarkers are not well established. Magnetic resonance imaging studies in progressive multiple sclerosis show decreased blood-brain barrier permeability, probably reflecting compartmentalization of inflammation behind a relatively intact blood-brain barrier. Interestingly, a spectrum of inflammatory cell types infiltrates the leptomeninges during subpial cortical demyelination. Indeed, recent magnetic resonance imaging studies show leptomeningeal contrast enhancement in subjects with progressive multiple sclerosis, possibly representing an in vivo marker of inflammation associated to subpial demyelination. Treatments for progressive disease depend on underlying mechanisms causing central nervous system damage. Immunity sheltered behind an intact blood-brain barrier, energy failure, and membrane channel dysfunction may be key processes in progressive disease. Interfering with these mechanisms may provide neuroprotection and prevent disability progression, while potentially restoring activity and conduction along damaged axons by repairing myelin. Although most previous clinical trials in progressive multiple sclerosis have yielded disappointing results, important lessons have been learnt, improving the design of novel ones. This review discusses mechanisms involved

  16. Natalizumab therapy of multiple sclerosis: recommendations of the Multiple Sclerosis Study Group--Italian Neurological Society.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, A; Grimaldi, L M E; Marrosu, M G; Pozzilli, C; Comi, G; Bertolotto, A; Trojano, M; Gallo, P; Capra, R; Centonze, D; Millefiorini, E; Sotgiu, S; Brescia Morra, V; Amato, M P; Lugaresi, A; Mancardi, G; Caputo, D; Montanari, E; Provinciali, L; Durelli, L; Bergamaschi, R; Bellantonio, P; Tola, M R; Cottone, S; Savettieri, G; Tedeschi, G

    2011-04-01

    Three years after the introduction of natalizumab (NA) therapy for the second line treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), Italian MS centers critically reviewed the scientific literature and their own clinical experience. Natalizumab was shown to be highly efficacious in the treatment of MS. However, the risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy was confirmed and defined better. This article summarizes the MS-SIN Study Group recommendations on the use of NA in MS, with particular reference to the appropriate selection and monitoring of patients as well as to the management of adverse events.

  17. Cognitive-Linguistic Deficit and Speech Intelligibility in Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Green, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis is a disabling neurological disease with varied symptoms, including dysarthria and cognitive and linguistic impairments. Association between dysarthria and cognitive-linguistic deficit has not been explored in clinical multiple sclerosis studies. Aims: In patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis, the…

  18. 76 FR 78823 - Schedule for Rating Disabilities; Evaluation of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... Sclerosis AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of Veterans... criterion provided for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to provide an evaluation of 100 percent for any... revise the evaluation criterion for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in the VA Schedule for...

  19. Cognitive-Linguistic Deficit and Speech Intelligibility in Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Green, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis is a disabling neurological disease with varied symptoms, including dysarthria and cognitive and linguistic impairments. Association between dysarthria and cognitive-linguistic deficit has not been explored in clinical multiple sclerosis studies. Aims: In patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis, the…

  20. 38 CFR 3.318 - Presumptive service connection for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... connection for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. 3.318 Section 3.318 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... sclerosis. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the development of amyotrophic lateral... under this section: (1) If there is affirmative evidence that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis was not...

  1. 38 CFR 3.318 - Presumptive service connection for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... connection for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. 3.318 Section 3.318 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... sclerosis. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the development of amyotrophic lateral... under this section: (1) If there is affirmative evidence that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis was not...

  2. 38 CFR 3.318 - Presumptive service connection for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... connection for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. 3.318 Section 3.318 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... sclerosis. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the development of amyotrophic lateral... under this section: (1) If there is affirmative evidence that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis was not...

  3. 38 CFR 3.318 - Presumptive service connection for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... connection for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. 3.318 Section 3.318 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... sclerosis. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the development of amyotrophic lateral... under this section: (1) If there is affirmative evidence that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis was not...

  4. 38 CFR 3.318 - Presumptive service connection for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... connection for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. 3.318 Section 3.318 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... sclerosis. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the development of amyotrophic lateral... under this section: (1) If there is affirmative evidence that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis was not...

  5. Carnitine for fatigue in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tejani, Aaron M; Wasdell, Michael; Spiwak, Rae; Rowell, Greg; Nathwani, Shabita

    2010-02-17

    Fatigue is reported to occur in up to 92% of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and has been described as the most debilitating of all MS symptoms by 28% to 40% of MS patients. To assess whether carnitine (enteral or intravenous) supplementation can improve the quality of life and reduce the symptoms of fatigue in patients with MS-related fatigue and to identify any adverse effects of carnitine when used for this purpose. A literature search was performed using Cochrane MS Group Trials Register (21 May 2009), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) "The Cochrane Library 2009, issue 2, MEDLINE (PubMed) (1966-21 May 2009), EMBASE (1974-21 May 2009). Reference lists of review articles and primary studies were also screened. A hand search of the abstract book of recent relevant conference symposia was also conducted. Personal contact with MS experts and a manufacturer (Source Naturals, United States) of carnitine formulation was contacted to determine if they knew of other clinical trials. No language restrictions were applied. Full reports of published and unpublished randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials of any carnitine intervention in adults with a clinical diagnosis of fatigue associated with multiple sclerosis were included. Data from the eligible trials was extracted and coded using a standardized data extraction form and entered into RevMan 5. Discrepancies were to be resolved by discussion with a third reviewer however this was not necessary. The quality items to be assessed were method of randomization, allocation concealment, blinding (participants, investigators, outcome assessors and data analysis), intention-to-treat analysis and completeness of follow up. The search identified one randomized cross-over trial. In this study patients were exposed to both acetyl L-carnitine (ALCAR(tm)) 2 grams daily and amantadine 200 mg daily in adult patients with relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive MS. The effects of

  6. "Abnormal" illness behaviour in chronic fatigue syndrome and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Trigwell, P.; Hatcher, S.; Johnson, M.; Stanley, P.; House, A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the presence of abnormal illness behaviour in patients with a diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome. DESIGN--A cross sectional descriptive study using the illness behaviour questionnaire to compare illness behaviour scores and illness behaviour profiles of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and patients with multiple sclerosis. SETTING--A multidisciplinary fatigue clinic and a teaching hospital neurology outpatient clinic. SUBJECTS--98 patients satisfying the Oxford criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome and 78 patients with a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Responses to the 62 item illness behaviour questionnaire. RESULTS--90 (92%) patients in the chronic fatigue syndrome group and 70 (90%) in the multiple sclerosis group completed the illness behaviour questionnaire. Both groups had significantly high scores on the general hypochondriasis and disease conviction subscales and significantly low scores on the psychological versus somatic concern subscale, as measured in relation to normative data. There were, however, no significant differences in the subscale scores between the two groups and the two groups had identical illness behaviour profiles. CONCLUSION--Scores on the illness behaviour questionnaire cannot be taken as evidence that chronic fatigue syndrome is a variety of abnormal illness behaviour, because the same profile occurs in multiple sclerosis. Neither can they be taken as evidence that chronic fatigue and multiple sclerosis share an aetiology. More needs to be known about the origins of illness beliefs in chronic fatigue syndrome, especially as they are important in determining outcome. PMID:7613314

  7. Glatiramer acetate: successful desensitization for treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bains, Sonia N; Hsieh, Fred H; Rensel, Mary R; Radojicic, Cristine; Katz, Hary T; Inamdar, S Rubina; Lang, David M

    2010-04-01

    Glatiramer acetate is an immunomodulatory drug that is widely prescribed for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. It is frequently associated with local injection site reactions and generalized urticaria. It is also associated with immediate postinjection systemic reactions in approximately 10% of patients. To our knowledge, no desensitization protocols for glatiramer acetate have been published to date. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of glatiramer acetate desensitization in a series of patients with multiple sclerosis. Six patients with multiple sclerosis and glatiramer acetate-associated local or systemic reactions underwent a 4-hour outpatient desensitization procedure at Cleveland Clinic between 2003 and 2008. Beginning with 20 ng, we administered subcutaneous glatiramer acetate suspension in increasing dosages every 15 minutes. Patient outcomes were monitored by return clinic visit and telephone follow-up. No episodes of anaphylaxis or serious adverse reactions occurred during or immediately after desensitization. One patient suspended therapy after 14 months due to persistent local injection site reactions. All other patients successfully continued glatiramer acetate therapy. Glatiramer acetate offers significant benefit to patients with multiple sclerosis. Our experience suggests that patients who suspend its use owing to local or systemic reactions can be successfully and safely desensitized and can resume medication use. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful desensitization to glatiramer acetate in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  8. Symptomatic cranial neuralgias in multiple sclerosis: clinical features and treatment.

    PubMed

    De Santi, Lorenzo; Annunziata, Pasquale

    2012-02-01

    In multiple sclerosis, neuropathic pain is a frequent condition, negatively influencing the overall quality of life. Cranial neuralgias, including trigeminal, glossopharyngeal neuralgias, as well as occipital neuralgia, are typical expression of neuropathic pain. Neuralgias are characterised by paroxysmal painful attacks of electric shock-like sensation, occurring spontaneously or evoked by innocuous stimuli in specific trigger areas. In multiple sclerosis, demyelination in the centrally myelinated part of the cranial nerve roots plays an important role in the origin of neuralgic pain. These painful syndromes arising in multiple sclerosis are therefore considered "symptomatic", in contrast to classic cranial neuralgias, in which no cause other than a neurovascular contact is identified. At this time, the evidence on the management of symptomatic cranial neuralgias in multiple sclerosis is fragmentary and a comprehensive review addressing this topic is still lacking. For that reason, treatment is often based on personal clinical experience as well as on anecdotal reports. The aim of this review is to critically summarise the latest findings regarding the pathogenesis, the diagnosis, the instrumental evaluation and the medical as well as neurosurgical treatment of symptomatic trigeminal, glossopharyngeal and occipital neuralgia in multiple sclerosis, providing useful insights for neurologists and neurosurgeons and a broad range of specialists potentially involved in the treatment of these painful syndromes.

  9. Inflammatory Optic Neuritis: From Multiple Sclerosis to Neuromyelitis Optica.

    PubMed

    de Seze, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory optic neuritis represents a frequent clinical situation in neurology and ophthalmology. In those parts of the world where multiple sclerosis is common, it is the condition most discussed as the cause of optic neuritis. However, the risk for conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis is evaluated at only around 50% after 15 years of follow-up. The risk is higher in cases in whom abnormalities typical of multiple sclerosis are found on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and oligoclonal bands found on cerebrospinal fluid protein electrophoresis with no corresponding bands in serum. When these investigations are normal, optic neuritis is usually considered as "idiopathic" with a suspected viral aetiology, but in some cases, a systemic disease such as sarcoidosis, systemic lupus erythematosis, or Sjögren syndrome may be diagnosed. In rare cases, either recurrent optic neuritis or myelitis may occur without any evidence for multiple sclerosis. In the first case, it corresponds to a recently characterised disorder referred to as chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuropathy and in the second case to a recently better identified entity, neuromyelitis optica. In the present paper, the differential diagnosis of inflammatory optic neuritis is presented from multiple sclerosis to infectious optic neuritis, systemic disease, and neuromyelitis optica.

  10. Treatment of multiple sclerosis with the pregnancy hormone estriol.

    PubMed

    Sicotte, Nancy L; Liva, Stephanie M; Klutch, Rochelle; Pfeiffer, Paul; Bouvier, Seth; Odesa, Sylvia; Wu, T C Jackson; Voskuhl, Rhonda R

    2002-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis patients who become pregnant experience a significant decrease in relapses that may be mediated by a shift in immune responses from T helper 1 to T helper 2. Animal models of multiple sclerosis have shown that the pregnancy hormone, estriol, can ameliorate disease and can cause an immune shift. We treated nonpregnant female multiple sclerosis patients with the pregnancy hormone estriol in an attempt to recapitulate the beneficial effect of pregnancy. As compared with pretreatment baseline, relapsing remitting patients treated with oral estriol (8 mg/day) demonstrated significant decreases in delayed type hypersensitivity responses to tetanus, interferon-gamma levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and gadolinium enhancing lesion numbers and volumes on monthly cerebral magnetic resonance images. When estriol treatment was stopped, enhancing lesions increased to pretreatment levels. When estriol treatment was reinstituted, enhancing lesions again were significantly decreased. Based on these results, a larger, placebo-controlled trial of estriol is warranted in women with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. This novel treatment strategy of using pregnancy doses of estriol in multiple sclerosis has relevance to other autoimmune diseases that also improve during pregnancy.

  11. Natural killer cells and their receptors in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurman; Trowsdale, John

    2013-01-01

    The immune system has crucial roles in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. While the adaptive immune cell subsets, T and B cells, have been the main focus of immunological research in multiple sclerosis, it is now important to realize that the innate immune system also has a key involvement in regulating autoimmune responses in the central nervous system. Natural killer cells are innate lymphocytes that play vital roles in a diverse range of infections. There is evidence that they influence a number of autoimmune conditions. Recent studies in multiple sclerosis and its murine model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, are starting to provide some understanding of the role of natural killer cells in regulating inflammation in the central nervous system. Natural killer cells express a diverse range of polymorphic cell surface receptors, which interact with polymorphic ligands; this interaction controls the function and the activation status of the natural killer cell. In this review, we discuss evidence for the role of natural killer cells in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We consider how a change in the balance of signals received by the natural killer cell influences its involvement in the ensuing immune response, in relation to multiple sclerosis. PMID:22734127

  12. How can proteomics elucidate the complexity of multiple sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Farias, Alessandro S; Santos, Leonilda M B

    2015-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis affects more than 2.5 million people worldwide. Although multiple sclerosis was described almost 150 years ago, there are many knowledge gaps regarding its etiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and pathogenesis. Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory, demyelinating, neurodegenerative disease of the CNS. During the last several decades, experimental models of multiple sclerosis have contributed to our understanding of the inflammatory disease mechanisms and have aided drug testing and development. However, little is known about the neurodegenerative mechanisms that operate during the evolution of the disease. Currently, all therapeutic approaches are primarily based on the inflammatory aspect of the disease. During the last decade, proteomics has emerged as a promising tool for revealing molecular pathways as well as identifying and quantifying differentially expressed proteins. Therefore, proteomics may be used for the discovery of biomarkers, potential drug targets, and new regulatory mechanisms. To date, a considerable number of proteomics studies have been conducted on samples from experimental models and patients with multiple sclerosis. These data form a solid base for further careful analysis and validation.

  13. Vision and vision-related outcome measures in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Balcer, Laura J; Miller, David H; Reingold, Stephen C; Cohen, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Visual impairment is a key manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Acute optic neuritis is a common, often presenting manifestation, but visual deficits and structural loss of retinal axonal and neuronal integrity can occur even without a history of optic neuritis. Interest in vision in multiple sclerosis is growing, partially in response to the development of sensitive visual function tests, structural markers such as optical coherence tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and quality of life measures that give clinical meaning to the structure-function correlations that are unique to the afferent visual pathway. Abnormal eye movements also are common in multiple sclerosis, but quantitative assessment methods that can be applied in practice and clinical trials are not readily available. We summarize here a comprehensive literature search and the discussion at a recent international meeting of investigators involved in the development and study of visual outcomes in multiple sclerosis, which had, as its overriding goals, to review the state of the field and identify areas for future research. We review data and principles to help us understand the importance of vision as a model for outcomes assessment in clinical practice and therapeutic trials in multiple sclerosis.

  14. Tomography patterns of lung disease in systemic sclerosis*

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Andréa de Lima; Corrêa, Ricardo de Amorim; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida

    2016-01-01

    Currently, lung impairment is the leading factor responsible for the morbidity and mortality associated with systemic sclerosis. Therefore, the recognition of the various tomography patterns becomes decisive in the clinical management of these patients. In high-resolution computed tomography studies, the most common pattern is that of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. However, there are other forms of lung involvement that must also be recognized. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the main changes resulting from pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis and the corresponding radiological findings, considering the current classification of interstitial diseases. We searched the Medline (PubMed), Lilacs, and SciELO databases in order to select articles related to pulmonary changes in systemic sclerosis and published in English between 2000 and 2015. The pulmonary changes seen on computed tomography in systemic sclerosis are varied and are divided into three main categories: interstitial, alveolar, and vascular. Interstitial changes constitute the most common type of pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis. However, alveolar and vascular manifestations must also be recognized and considered in the presence of atypical clinical presentations and inadequate treatment responses. PMID:27818546

  15. Tomography patterns of lung disease in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Andréa de Lima; Corrêa, Ricardo de Amorim; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida

    2016-01-01

    Currently, lung impairment is the leading factor responsible for the morbidity and mortality associated with systemic sclerosis. Therefore, the recognition of the various tomography patterns becomes decisive in the clinical management of these patients. In high-resolution computed tomography studies, the most common pattern is that of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. However, there are other forms of lung involvement that must also be recognized. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the main changes resulting from pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis and the corresponding radiological findings, considering the current classification of interstitial diseases. We searched the Medline (PubMed), Lilacs, and SciELO databases in order to select articles related to pulmonary changes in systemic sclerosis and published in English between 2000 and 2015. The pulmonary changes seen on computed tomography in systemic sclerosis are varied and are divided into three main categories: interstitial, alveolar, and vascular. Interstitial changes constitute the most common type of pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis. However, alveolar and vascular manifestations must also be recognized and considered in the presence of atypical clinical presentations and inadequate treatment responses.

  16. Vision and vision-related outcome measures in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Balcer, Laura J.; Miller, David H.; Reingold, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Visual impairment is a key manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Acute optic neuritis is a common, often presenting manifestation, but visual deficits and structural loss of retinal axonal and neuronal integrity can occur even without a history of optic neuritis. Interest in vision in multiple sclerosis is growing, partially in response to the development of sensitive visual function tests, structural markers such as optical coherence tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and quality of life measures that give clinical meaning to the structure-function correlations that are unique to the afferent visual pathway. Abnormal eye movements also are common in multiple sclerosis, but quantitative assessment methods that can be applied in practice and clinical trials are not readily available. We summarize here a comprehensive literature search and the discussion at a recent international meeting of investigators involved in the development and study of visual outcomes in multiple sclerosis, which had, as its overriding goals, to review the state of the field and identify areas for future research. We review data and principles to help us understand the importance of vision as a model for outcomes assessment in clinical practice and therapeutic trials in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25433914

  17. Natural killer cells and their receptors in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurman; Trowsdale, John; Fugger, Lars

    2013-09-01

    The immune system has crucial roles in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. While the adaptive immune cell subsets, T and B cells, have been the main focus of immunological research in multiple sclerosis, it is now important to realize that the innate immune system also has a key involvement in regulating autoimmune responses in the central nervous system. Natural killer cells are innate lymphocytes that play vital roles in a diverse range of infections. There is evidence that they influence a number of autoimmune conditions. Recent studies in multiple sclerosis and its murine model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, are starting to provide some understanding of the role of natural killer cells in regulating inflammation in the central nervous system. Natural killer cells express a diverse range of polymorphic cell surface receptors, which interact with polymorphic ligands; this interaction controls the function and the activation status of the natural killer cell. In this review, we discuss evidence for the role of natural killer cells in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We consider how a change in the balance of signals received by the natural killer cell influences its involvement in the ensuing immune response, in relation to multiple sclerosis.

  18. Increased SA in NPR1-silenced plants antagonizes JA and JA-dependent direct and indirect defenses in herbivore-attacked Nicotiana attenuata in nature.

    PubMed

    Rayapuram, Cbgowda; Baldwin, Ian T

    2007-11-01

    The phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA) is known to mediate herbivore resistance, while salicylic acid (SA) and non-expressor of PR-1 (NPR1) mediate pathogen resistance in many plants. Herbivore attack on Nicotiana attenuata elicits increases in JA and JA-mediated defenses, but also increases SA levels and Na-NPR1 transcripts from the plant's single genomic copy. SA treatment of wild-type plants increases Na-NPR1 and Na-PR1 transcripts. Plants silenced in NPR1 accumulation by RNAi (ir-npr1) are highly susceptible to herbivore and pathogen attack when planted in their native habitat in Utah. They are also impaired in their ability to attract Geocorus pallens predators, due to their decreased ability to release cis-alpha-bergamotene, a JA-elicited volatile 'alarm call'. In the glasshouse, Spodoptera exigua larvae grew better on ir-npr1 plants, which had low levels of JA, JA-isoleucine/leucine, lipoxygenase-3 (LOX3) transcripts and JA-elicited direct defense metabolites (nicotine, caffeoyl putrescine and rutin), but high levels of SA and isochorismate synthase (ICS) transcripts, suggesting de novo biosynthesis of SA. A microarray analysis revealed downregulation of many JA-elicited genes and upregulation of SA biosynthetic genes. JA treatment restored nicotine levels and resistance to S. exigua in ir-npr1 plants. We conclude that, during herbivore attack, NPR1 negatively regulates SA production, allowing the unfettered elicitation of JA-mediated defenses; when NPR1 is silenced, the elicited increases in SA production antagonize JA and JA-related defenses, making the plants susceptible to herbivores.

  19. Immunomodulation in the treatment of multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a model for autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, K.; Medenica, R.

    1995-01-01

    Seventeen multiple sclerosis (MS) patients progressing under conventional therapy (average treatment duration: 3 years) with performance status 3-4 (mean Disability Status Scale [DSS]: 82) who demonstrated circulating lymphokine inhibitor factors were selected for a monthly immunomodulatory protocol using plasmapheresis, followed by 3 days of human intravenous immunoglobulin, and low-dose methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide, interferon-a, and interferon-g, as well as octreide. Twelve of the 17 patients presented with visual problems, 12 had lower extremity weakness or paraperesis/paralysis, and 6 had bladder/bowel dysfunction. Following 4 months of therapy, 4 recovered completely, 7 showed loss of paralysis/paraparesis, and 5 had improvement in lower extremity weakness. One patient progressed (mean DSS: 51). Lymphokine inhibitor factors declined in 14 patients with concomitant normalization of circulating immune complexes. Eight patients experienced rises in CD4 levels with stabilization of CD8 levels. Hypotension and hypocalcemia were observed during plasmapheresis. Twelve patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with poor performance status also were studied. Four of the 12 improved with the regimen, whereas six stabilized disease. Similar alterations in laboratory parameters were described. The rationale for this approach is discussed. PMID:7674346

  20. [The Multiple Sclerosis Documentation System MSDS. Discussion of a documentation standard for multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Pette, M; Eulitz, M

    2002-02-01

    The MSDS (multiple sclerosis documentation system) has been developed at the Department of Neurology, Technical University of Dresden, Germany, during the last 4 years. The first version of this database application has been in use since October 2000. The MSDS manages information on MS patients, their treating physicians, patient history (symptoms, other diseases, biographical history, family history, habits, medication), clinical signs, results of laboratory examinations (blood chemistry, autoantibodies, borrelia serology, evoked potentials, cranial and spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging), clinical scores relevant for MS, and biosamples. In principle, MSDS allows online data input and semiautomatically generates reports to all general practitioners and neurologists treating the respective patient. Patient information sheets and internal treatment guidelines are part of the system. During a 3-month evaluation, the first version of MSDS was tested at eight university multiple sclerosis ambulatory care units and one general neurology hospital. The overall judgement was favorable. Suggestions for changes and improvements, as well as practical experiences, were considered when developing MSDS 2.0, which will be available by the end of 2001.

  1. The symptomatic management of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Schapiro, Randall T.

    2009-01-01

    The management of multiple sclerosis (MS) revolves around disease management, symptom management, and person management. Of these, symptom management takes up the bulk of the time of the practicing physician. Some symptoms are easily managed whereas others are more difficult. Decisions have often to be made on whether to treat or to wait and watch. This article discusses the varied symptoms of MS and the approaches to management, which involves rehabilitation, pharmacological treatments, and surgical procedures. The skilled physician managing MS should be familiar with the multiple approaches to improving the quality of life of those with MS. After the diagnosis has been established and the decisions regarding treatment approaches have been made, the talk in a typical office appointment for MS usually turns to symptom management. Thus, the majority of management decisions made by the clinician revolve around that important topic. It is symptom management that will determine quality of life for those with MS, It is the basis for improving function, and, up until twenty years ago, it was the only basis for treating MS. Now, however, we can approach treatment by disease management, symptom management, and person management. The MS specialist must be well versed in all three areas. PMID:20182577

  2. DNA methylation in demyelinated multiple sclerosis hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chomyk, Anthony M; Volsko, Christina; Tripathi, Ajai; Deckard, Sadie A; Trapp, Bruce D; Fox, Robert J; Dutta, Ranjan

    2017-08-18

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated demyelinating disease of the human central nervous system (CNS). Memory impairments and hippocampal demyelination are common features in MS patients. Our previous data have shown that demyelination alters neuronal gene expression in the hippocampus. DNA methylation is a common epigenetic modifier of gene expression. In this study, we investigated whether DNA methylation is altered in MS hippocampus following demyelination. Our results show that mRNA levels of DNA methyltransferase were increased in demyelinated MS hippocampus, while de-methylation enzymes were decreased. Comparative methylation profiling identify hypo-methylation within upstream sequences of 6 genes and hyper-methylation of 10 genes in demyelinated MS hippocampus. Genes identified in the current study were also validated in an independent microarray dataset generated from MS hippocampus. Independent validation using RT-PCR revealed that DNA methylation inversely correlated with mRNA levels of the candidate genes. Queries across cell-specific databases revealed that a majority of the candidate genes are expressed by astrocytes and neurons in mouse and human CNS. Taken together, our results expands the list of genes previously identified in MS hippocampus and establish DNA methylation as a mechanism of altered gene expression in MS hippocampus.

  3. Tuberous sclerosis in a military pilot.

    PubMed

    Wand, Ori; Blum, Shany; Shachar, Eyal; Azaria, Bela; Levite, Ronen; Assa, Amit; Barenboim, Erez

    2009-07-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by hamartomas in various organs. It usually manifests itself during infancy or childhood with neurological features, including mental retardation and seizures. We present the case of a military pilot who was diagnosed with TS at 22 yr. of age after he had completed flight training. Suspicion of TS arose from evaluation of a chronic rash around the pilot's nose, and diagnosis was confirmed based on the presence of multiple calcified nodules on CT imaging of the brain. No neurological abnormalities were found. The primary aeromedical concerns were the risk of seizures or development of tumors at sites that might lead to sudden incapacitation. Hamartomas can be reliably detected at an early stage by means of annual history, physical examination, and imaging of tumor-prone organs. After review of the literature and consultation with medical specialists, we assessed the risk of adult-onset seizures in a TS patient without preexisting neurological findings as scarce. The pilot was therefore granted a waiver limited to flying a two-pilot helicopter with a program of tight medical follow-up.

  4. Evidence of platelet activation in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheremata, William A; Jy, Wenche; Horstman, Lawrence L; Ahn, Yeon S; Alexander, J Steven; Minagar, Alireza

    2008-01-01

    Objective A fatality in one multiple sclerosis (MS) patient due to acute idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and a near fatality in another stimulated our interest in platelet function abnormalities in MS. Previously, we presented evidence of platelet activation in a small cohort of treatment-naive MS patients. Methods In this report, 92 normal controls and 33 stable, untreated MS patients were studied. Platelet counts, measures of platelet activation [plasma platelet microparticles (PMP), P-selectin expression (CD62p), circulating platelet microaggragtes (PAg)], as well as platelet-associated IgG/IgM, were carried out. In addition, plasma protein S activity was measured. Results Compared to controls, PMP were significantly elevated in MS (p < 0.001) and CD62p expression was also markedly elevated (p < 0.001). Both are markers of platelet activation. Platelet-associated IgM, but not IgG, was marginally elevated in MS (p = 0.01). Protein S in MS patients did not differ significantly from normal values. Conclusion Platelets are significantly activated in MS patients. The mechanisms underlying this activation and its significance to MS are unknown. Additional study of platelet activation and function in MS patients is warranted. PMID:18588683

  5. Epigenetic Modifications and Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Aslani, Saeed; Jafari, Naser; Javan, Mohammad Reza; Karami, Jafar; Ahmadi, Majid; Jafarnejad, Mahmoud

    2017-03-01

    Breakthroughs in genetic studies, like whole human genome sequencing and genome-wide association studies (GWAS), have richened our knowledge of etiopathology of autoimmune diseases (AID) through discovery of genetic patterns. Nonetheless, the precise etiology of autoimmune diseases remains largely unknown. The lack of complete concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins suggests that non-genetic factors also play a major role in determining disease susceptibility. Although there is no certain definition, epigenetics has been known as heritable alterations in gene function without changes in the nucleotide sequence. DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNA-associated gene expression suppression are the central mechanisms for epigenetic regulations. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disorder of the central nervous system (CNS), characterized by both inflammatory and neurodegenerative features. Although studies on epigenetic alterations in MS only began in the past decade, a mounting number of surveys suggest that epigenetic changes may be involved in the initiation and development of MS, probably through bridging the effects of environmental risk factors to genetics. Arming with clear understanding of epigenetic dysregulations underpins development of epigenetic therapies. Identifying agents inhibiting the enzymes controlling epigenetic modifications, particularly DNA methyltransferases and histone deacetylases, will be promising therapeutic tool toward MS. In the article underway, it is aimed to go through the recent progresses, attempting to disclose how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of MS and how can be used as therapeutic approach.

  6. Noise in multiple sclerosis: unwanted and necessary

    PubMed Central

    Bordi, Isabella; Ricigliano, Vito A G; Umeton, Renato; Ristori, Giovanni; Grassi, Francesca; Crisanti, Andrea; Sutera, Alfonso; Salvetti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    As our knowledge about the etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) increases, deterministic paradigms appear insufficient to describe the pathogenesis of the disease, and the impression is that stochastic phenomena (i.e. random events not necessarily resulting in disease in all individuals) may contribute to the development of MS. However, sources and mechanisms of stochastic behavior have not been investigated and there is no proposed framework to incorporate nondeterministic processes into disease biology. In this report, we will first describe analogies between physics of nonlinear systems and cell biology, showing how small-scale random perturbations can impact on large-scale phenomena, including cell function. We will then review growing and solid evidence showing that stochastic gene expression (or gene expression “noise”) can be a driver of phenotypic variation. Moreover, we will describe new methods that open unprecedented opportunities for the study of such phenomena in patients and the impact of this information on our understanding of MS course and therapy. PMID:25356421

  7. Multiple sclerosis and pregnancy: current considerations.

    PubMed

    Buraga, Ioan; Popovici, Roxana-Elena

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common neurological disease of young adults that causes major disability. In Romania, it is estimated that this disease has a prevalence of 35-40 per 100,000 inhabitants. It is a disease that begins at the age of 20-40 years and is 2-3 times more common in women than in men. More than half of patients with MS develop the disease in their fertile period of life; therefore, MS patients use contraceptive methods while being under our treatment. Since several therapeutic options have been implemented with good efficiency in the disease stabilization, increasingly more patients begin to wonder about the possibility of having a child and about the possible risks of pregnancy. The evolution during pregnancy and the lactation period has been favorable, with lower relapses and side effects comparable to those in the general population. In addition, babies born to mothers with MS have not had a significantly different mean gestational age or birth weight compared to babies born to healthy mothers.

  8. Repetitive element hypermethylation in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Neven, K Y; Piola, M; Angelici, L; Cortini, F; Fenoglio, C; Galimberti, D; Pesatori, A C; Scarpini, E; Bollati, V

    2016-06-18

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disorder of the central nervous system whose cause is currently unknown. Evidence is increasing that DNA methylation alterations could be involved in inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases and could contribute to MS pathogenesis. Repetitive elements Alu, LINE-1 and SAT-α, are widely known as estimators of global DNA methylation. We investigated Alu, LINE-1 and SAT-α methylation levels to evaluate their difference in a case-control setup and their role as a marker of disability. We obtained blood samples from 51 MS patients and 137 healthy volunteers matched by gender, age and smoking. Methylation was assessed using bisulfite-PCR-pyrosequencing. For all participants, medical history, physical and neurological examinations and screening laboratory tests were collected. All repetitive elements were hypermethylated in MS patients compared to healthy controls. A lower Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score was associated with a lower levels of LINE-1 methylation for 'EDSS = 1.0' and '1.5 ≤ EDSS ≤ 2.5' compared to an EDSS higher than 3, while Alu was associated with a higher level of methylation in these groups: 'EDSS = 1.0' and '1.5 ≤ EDSS ≤ 2.5'. MS patients exhibit an hypermethylation in repetitive elements compared to healthy controls. Alu and LINE-1 were associated with degree of EDSS score. Forthcoming studies focusing on epigenetics and the multifactorial pathogenetic mechanism of MS could elucidate these links further.

  9. Multiple Sclerosis: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Miljković, Djordje; Spasojević, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) involves several components: redox, inflammatory/autoimmune, vascular, and neurodegenerative. All of them are supported by the intertwined lines of evidence, and none of them should be written off. However, the exact mechanisms of MS initiation, its development, and progression are still elusive, despite the impressive pace by which the data on MS are accumulating. In this review, we will try to integrate the current facts and concepts, focusing on the role of redox changes and various reactive species in MS. Knowing the schedule of initial changes in pathogenic factors and the key turning points, as well as understanding the redox processes involved in MS pathogenesis is the way to enable MS prevention, early treatment, and the development of therapies that target specific pathophysiological components of the heterogeneous mechanisms of MS, which could alleviate the symptoms and hopefully stop MS. Pertinent to this, we will outline (i) redox processes involved in MS initiation; (ii) the role of reactive species in inflammation; (iii) prooxidative changes responsible for neurodegeneration; and (iv) the potential of antioxidative therapy. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 2286–2334. PMID:23473637

  10. The Transition to Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Fiona; Brain, Katherine E.; Edwards, Michelle; Jones, Rhiannon; Wallbank, Rachel; Robertson, Neil P.; Edwards, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Identifying the transition from relapsing-remitting to secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) can be challenging for clinicians. Little previous research has explored how professionals experience working with patients during this specific stage of the disease. We explored the experiences of a group of multidisciplinary professionals who support patients in the transition to SPMS to describe this stage from a professional perspective. Methods: This qualitative semistructured interview study included 11 professionals (medical, nursing, and allied health professionals; specialists and generalists) working with patients with MS in South Wales, United Kingdom. Thematic analysis of the interview data was performed. Results: Two overarching themes were identified: the transition and providing support. The transition theme comprised issues related to recognizing and communicating about SPMS. Uncertainty influenced recognizing the transition and knowing how to discuss it with patients. The providing support theme included descriptions of challenging aspects of patient care, providing support for caregivers, using the multidisciplinary team, and working within service constraints. Providing adequate psychological support and engaging patients with self-management approaches were seen as particularly challenging. Conclusions: Caring for patients in the transition to SPMS generates specific challenges for professionals. Further research on health-care interactions and patients'/professionals' experiences regarding the transition phase may help identify strategies for professional development and learning and how to optimize the patient experience at this difficult stage of disease. PMID:27803641

  11. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Clinical features and outcome.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Amy; Ness, Jayne; Pohl, Daniela; Simone, Isabella Laura; Anlar, Banu; Amato, Maria Pia; Ghezzi, Angelo

    2016-08-30

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) in children manifests with a relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) disease course. Acute relapses consist of new neurologic deficits persisting greater than 24 hours, in the absence of intercurrent illness, and occur with a higher frequency early in the disease as compared to adult-onset RRMS. Most pediatric patients with MS recover well from these early relapses, and cumulative physical disability is rare in the first 10 years of disease. Brainstem attacks, poor recovery from a single attack, and a higher frequency of attacks portend a greater likelihood of future disability. Although prospective pediatric-onset MS cohorts have been established in recent years, there remains very limited prospective data detailing the longer-term clinical outcome of pediatric-onset MS into adulthood. Whether the advent of MS therapies, and the largely off-label access to such therapies in pediatric MS, has improved prognosis is unknown. MS onset during the key formative academic years, concurrent with active cognitive maturation, is an important determinant of long-term outcome, and is discussed in detail in another article in this supplement. Finally, increasing recognition of pediatric MS worldwide, recent launch of phase III trials for new agents in the pediatric MS population, and the clear imperative to more fully appreciate health-related quality of life in pediatric MS through adulthood highlight the need for standardized, validated, and robust outcome measures.

  12. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Escalation and emerging treatments.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Tanuja; Ghezzi, Angelo; Bajer-Kornek, Barbara; Boyko, Alexey; Giovannoni, Gavin; Pohl, Daniela

    2016-08-30

    Over the last 20 years, there have been significant advances in multiple sclerosis (MS) therapeutics, with regulatory approval for 13 therapies in adults by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration. However, there is only limited approval for interferon-β and glatiramer acetate use in children 12 years and older by the EMA. Availability of disease-modifying therapies to children and adolescents with MS is variable by region, and is extremely limited in some regions of the world. Up to 30% of children experience breakthrough disease requiring therapies beyond traditional first-line agents. Recent legislation in both the United States and Europe has mandated clinical studies for all new therapeutics applicable to children. Several clinical trials in children are underway that will provide important information regarding the efficacy and safety of newer drugs. This review summarizes the current knowledge of breakthrough disease, escalation, and induction treatment approaches in children with MS, especially pertaining to disease course and disability outcomes in this group of patients. In addition, ongoing clinical trials and approaches and challenges in conducting clinical trials in the pediatric population are discussed.

  13. Therapeutic strategies in childhood multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, Angelo

    2010-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) in children and adolescents accounts for 3-10% of the whole MS population, and is characterized by a relapsing course in almost all cases. The frequency of relapses is higher than in adult onset MS, at least in the first years of evolution. The objective of treatment is to speed the recovery after a relapse, to prevent the occurrence of relapses, and to prevent disease progression and neurodegeneration. The use of drugs for MS in children and adolescents has not been studied in clinical trials, so their use is mainly based on results from trials in adults and from observational studies. There is a consensus to treat acute relapses with intravenous high-dose corticosteroids. The possibility of preventing relapses and disease progression is based on the use of immunomodulatory agents. Interferon-beta (IFNB) and glatiramer acetate (GA) have been demonstrated to be safe and well tolerated in pediatric MS patients, and also to reduce relapse rate and disease progression. Cyclophosphamide and natalizumab could be offered as second-line treatment in patients with a poor response to IFNB or GA. New oral and injectable drugs will be available in the near future: if safe and well tolerated in the long-term follow up of adults with MS, they could be tested in the pediatric MS population.

  14. Narrative discourse deficits in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Menaged, Anna; Olm, Christopher; McMillan, Corey T.; Boller, Ashley; Irwin, David J.; McCluskey, Leo; Elman, Lauren; Grossman, Murray

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We examined narrative discourse in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to assess the role of executive functioning in support of language and the neuroanatomical basis for such support. Methods: We analyzed a semistructured speech sample in 26 patients with ALS and 19 healthy seniors for narrative discourse features of coherence. Regression analyses related a measure of discourse coherence (“local connectedness”) to gray matter atrophy and reduced white matter fractional anisotropy. Results: Patients with ALS were impaired relative to controls on measures of discourse adequacy, including local connectedness and maintenance of the theme. These discourse measures were related to measures of executive functioning but not to motor functioning. Regressions related local connectedness to gray matter atrophy in ventral and dorsal prefrontal regions and to reduced fractional anisotropy in white matter tracts mediating projections between prefrontal regions. Conclusion: Patients with ALS exhibit deficits in their ability to organize narrative discourse. These deficits appear to be related in part to executive limitations. Consistent with the hypothesis that ALS is a multisystem disorder, this deficit is related to disease in prefrontal regions. PMID:24991038

  15. Mimicry between mitochondrial disorder and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Höftberger, Romana; Stöllberger, Claudia; Rolinski, Boris

    2012-06-01

    Under certain conditions or at certain stages of the disease course, multiple sclerosis (MS) and mitochondrial disorder (MID) may be differential diagnoses and thus may be confused with each other. In a 30 years old female MS was diagnosed at age 16 year upon recurrent sensory disturbances of the right lower leg, an "inflammatory" cerebrospinal fluid, and a cerebral MRI with multiple non-enhancing white matter lesions. Steroids were repeatedly given but because of rapid deterioration treatment was switched to interferon and mitoxantrone, without improvement. Fourteen years after onset the patient additionally presented with a history of rhabdomyolysis, hypothyroidism, ophthalmoparesis, anarthria, tetraspasticity, tetraparesis, and joint contractures. After MID had been diagnosed in her mother she was re-evaluated and elevated resting lactate, axonal polyneuropathy, and empty sella were additionally found. Muscle biopsy revealed myophagy, fat deposition, and type-II predominance, and biochemical investigations showed a deficiency of complex I and IV of the respiratory chain. MID was diagnosed also in the index patient. It is concluded that even if CSF investigations or imaging studies suggest MS, differentials such as MIDs need to be excluded before prescribing medication possibly toxic to a MID. An "inflammatory CSF" may also occur in MIDs.

  16. Longitudinal study of alexithymia and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chahraoui, Khadija; Duchene, Céline; Rollot, Fabien; Bonin, Bernard; Moreau, Thibault

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the course of alexithymia and its relation with anxiety and depression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), over a period of 5 years. Methods Sixty-two MS patients were examined at two timepoints, 5 years apart, and they answered questionnaires collecting socio-demographic, medical, and psychological data (depression, anxiety, alexithymia). Results Our data show that emotional disorders remain stable over time in patients with MS, particularly as regards alexithymia and anxiety. Conversely, the rate of depression decreased between the two evaluations, falling from 40% to 26%. The two dimensions of alexithymia (i.e., difficulty describing and difficulty identifying feelings) were correlated with anxiety and depression, whereas the third component of alexithymia (externally oriented thinking) was independent, and was the only component to change over time, with a significant fall observed at 5 years. Conclusion Alexithymia was associated with increased severity of anxiety and attack relapses. PMID:24653957

  17. Multiple sclerosis in India: Iceberg or volcano.

    PubMed

    Zahoor, Insha; Haq, Ehtishamul

    2017-06-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS)(1) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease involving destruction of the myelin sheath around axons of the brain, spinal cord and optic nerve. There has been a tremendous transformation in its perspective across globe. In recent years, its prevalence has changed dramatically worldwide and India is no exception. Initially, MS was believed to be more common in the Caucasians of Northern Europe and United States; however, it has been found to be present in Indian subcontinent as well. There has been a considerable shift in MS prevalence in India and this has really changed the notion of considering India as a low risk zone for MS. In this review, a concise overview and latest update on changing scenario of MS in India is presented along with some major challenges regarding it persisting across globe even today. In India, remarkable upsurge is needed in carrying out large scale population-based epidemiological studies to get an idea about the true incidence and prevalence rates of MS viz a viz disease burden. Through this review, we have probably tried to identify the actual picture of MS prevalence in India and this could serve as harbinger for upcoming research and at the same time it would definitely aid in working out future strategies for MS management in the country. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Risk factors for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ingre, Caroline; Roos, Per M; Piehl, Fredrik; Kamel, Freya; Fang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common motor neuron disease. It is typically fatal within 2–5 years of symptom onset. The incidence of ALS is largely uniform across most parts of the world, but an increasing ALS incidence during the last decades has been suggested. Although recent genetic studies have substantially improved our understanding of the causes of ALS, especially familial ALS, an important role of non-genetic factors in ALS is recognized and needs further study. In this review, we briefly discuss several major genetic contributors to ALS identified to date, followed by a more focused discussion on the most commonly examined non-genetic risk factors for ALS. We first review factors related to lifestyle choices, including smoking, intake of antioxidants, physical fitness, body mass index, and physical exercise, followed by factors related to occupational and environmental exposures, including electromagnetic fields, metals, pesticides, β-methylamino-L-alanine, and viral infection. Potential links between ALS and other medical conditions, including head trauma, metabolic diseases, cancer, and inflammatory diseases, are also discussed. Finally, we outline several future directions aiming to more efficiently examine the role of non-genetic risk factors in ALS. PMID:25709501

  19. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Cognition and mood.

    PubMed

    Amato, Maria Pia; Krupp, Lauren B; Charvet, Leigh E; Penner, Iris; Till, Christine

    2016-08-30

    In comparison with the large body of evidence on cognitive functioning in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS), there is limited information on cognition in pediatric-onset MS (POMS). Unique vulnerabilities in POMS can derive from having a disease that occurs during key periods of age-expected brain growth, active myelination in the CNS, and maturation of neural networks during the learning curve and key formative years in the academic career of the patient. Therefore, the consequences of MS on developing cognitive faculties can be assessed only in the pediatric population and cannot be simply extrapolated from studies carried on in the adult population. Until the last decade, research in the pediatric population was mainly represented by small clinical series, often limited by the narrow scope of neuropsychological assessment and lack of adequate control groups. Over the last decade, however, cognitive functioning and mood-related difficulties have become an increasing concern as awareness of this population has grown. A few specialized MS centers have begun performing more systematic research in the field in order to assess the prevalence of cognitive impairments and mood-related difficulties in patients with POMS, to better characterize the neuropsychological pattern and determine the functional consequences of these problems. This chapter summarizes our current understanding of cognitive and mood-related difficulties in POMS and highlights perceived gaps in knowledge and priorities for future research.

  20. Decisional Capacity in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Khin Khin, Eindra; Minor, Darlinda; Holloway, Amanda; Pelleg, Ayla

    2015-06-01

    The cognitive and behavioral changes that can be observed in the neurodegenerative terminal disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), once characterized as purely a motor neuron disease, have become increasingly recognized over the past century. Detecting cognitive deficits earlier and identifying continued changes at regular intervals can lead to improved care, proactive treatments, and earlier discussions about end-of-life wishes. Although medical decisional capacity is required for every treatment decision made, its importance becomes paramount when making decisions on complex medical treatments that will invariably and significantly affect quality of life or life itself. In this review, we conducted a critical analysis of the evidence-based literature on the cognitive and behavioral impairments in ALS that can compromise medical decisional capacity. We review specific ALS-related clinical scenarios in which decisional capacity is of utmost importance and discuss a practical framework for cognitive and behavioral assessment that can be routinely and efficiently used, while being mindful of the confounding factors associated with ALS. Finally, we review models for preserving patient choices that can be used in patients with ALS to help safeguard autonomy and retain dignity toward the end of life.

  1. Stem cell transplantation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Uccelli, Antonio; Mancardi, Gianluigi

    2010-06-01

    The recent advances in our understanding of stem cell biology, the availability of innovative techniques that allow large-scale acquisition of stem cells, and the increasing pressure from the multiple sclerosis (MS) patient community seeking tissue repair strategies have launched stem cell treatments as one of the most exciting and difficult challenges in the MS field. Here, we provide an overview of the current status of stem cell research in MS focusing on secured actuality, reasonable hopes and unrealistic myths. Results obtained from small clinical studies with transplantation of autologous hematopoietic stem cells have demonstrated that this procedure is feasible and possibly effective in severe forms of MS but tackles exclusively inflammation without affecting tissue regeneration. Results from preclinical studies with other adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem cells and neural precursor cells have shown that they may be a powerful tool to regulate pathogenic immune response and foster tissue repair through bystander mechanisms with limited cell replacement. However, the clinical translation of these results still requires careful evaluation. Current experimental evidence suggests that the sound clinical exploitation of stem cells for MS may lead to novel strategies aimed at blocking uncontrolled inflammation, protecting neurons and promoting remyelination but not at restoring the chronically deranged neural network responsible for irreversible disability typical of the late phase of MS.

  2. Progressive multiple sclerosis and mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Lorefice, Lorena; Fenu, G; Trincas, G; Moro, M F; Frau, J; Coghe, G C; Cocco, E; Marrosu, M G; Carta, M G

    2015-09-01

    Mood disorders are very common among multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, but their frequency in patients with progressive course (PMS) has not been adequately researched. Our study aimed to determine the frequency of mood disorders among patients with PMS compared with those with relapsing-remitting MS (RMS) and to explore the associations with disability and disease duration. The study included consecutive outpatients affected by MS according the 2010 revised Mc Donald diagnostic criteria. Psychiatric diagnoses were determined according to DSM-IV by psychiatrists using structured interview tools (ANTAS-SCID). Demographic and clinical data of patients were also collected. Disease courses were defined according to the re-examined phenotype descriptions by the Committee and MS Phenotype Group. Intergroup comparisons were performed by Chi-square test, while logistic regression analysis was performed to assess possible factors associated with mood disorders. In total, 240 MS patients (167 women) were enrolled; of these, 18 % (45/240) had PMS. The lifetime DSM-IV major depression diagnosis (MDD) was established in 40 and 23 % of the PMS and RMS patients, respectively. Using logistic regression analysis, the presence of MDD was independent from disease duration and disability and dependent on PMS course (P = 0.02; OR 2.2). Patients with PMS presented with MDD more frequently than those with RMS, independently from disease duration and physical disability. These findings highlight the importance of considering mood disorders, especially MDD, in the management of PMS patients.

  3. The pineal gland in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R; Awerbuch, G I

    1991-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease of unknown etiology. Clinical, neurochemical, and neuroradiological data implicate the pineal gland in the pathophysiology of MS. To investigate the relationship of MS to the pineal gland further, we surveyed the prevalence of pineal calcification (PC) on CT scan in a cohort of 29 MS patients (7 men, 22 women, mean age: 40.1 years, SD = 8.9) who were admitted consecutively to a neurological service for acute exacerbation of symptoms. For the purpose of comparison, we also surveyed the prevalence of choroid plexus calcification (CPC) in the sample. Twenty-one age and sex-matched neurological patients served as controls (5 men, 16 women, mean age: 37.0, SD = 9.2). PC was seen in 100% of MS patients, while 72.4% patients (N = 21) had CPC. In the control sample, PC was found in 42.8% (N = 9) and CPC in 28.5% (N = 6). Thus, the strikingly high prevalence of PC in MS provides indirect support for an association between MS and abnormalities of the pineal gland. Moreover, since pineal melatonin is involved in neuroimmunomodulation, we propose, for the first time, that abnormalities of pineal melatonin functions are implicated in the pathophysiology of the disease.

  4. A basic overview of multiple sclerosis immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Grigoriadis, N; van Pesch, V

    2015-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multi-component disease characterized by inflammation, neurodegeneration and failure of central nervous system (CNS) repair mechanisms. Immune dysregulation appears to originate with dendritic cells (antigen-presenting cells) which have an activated phenotype in individuals with MS. Dendritic cells migrate across the blood-brain barrier and induce differentiation of memory T cells into pro-inflammatory T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 lymphocytes. In turn, induction of macrophage and microglial activation produces other pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxygen and nitric oxide radicals responsible for the demyelination and axonal loss. Other known mediators of MS pathology include CD8+ T cells and memory B cells within the CNS. Some pathological hallmarks of MS are early axonal degeneration and progressive decline of brain volume in patients with clinically isolated syndromes who progress to clinically definite MS. Many new options to interfere with the course of MS have become available in recent years. To limit inflammatory demyelinating processes and delay disease progression, intervention to control inflammation must begin as early as possible. Each distinct type of immunotherapy (immunomodulation, immunosuppression and immune-selective intervention - blockade type, sequestering type or depleting type) corresponds to a specific underlying immunopathology of MS.

  5. Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bell, Simon M; Sharrack, Basil; Snowden, John A

    2017-01-01

    Autologous haematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) is an evolving treatment avenue in multiple sclerosis (MS), which may be highly effective in controlling disease activity and improving disability. However, AHCT is associated with intrinsic toxicities and risks compared with conventional therapies. With growing experience in patient selection and treatment delivery, AHCT is increasingly considered an option in patients with aggressive disease that's responding poorly to disease modifying therapy. Areas covered: This article provides an introduction to AHCT and looks at its development as a treatment for MS over the last 20 years. It also highlights potential mechanisms of action, patient selection, and future trends for this treatment approach. Expert opinion: Currently published data suggest that AHCT's use is associated with significant reduction in MS disease activity and marked improvement in disability when used in patients with highly active relapsing remitting disease. Its long term safety and efficacy have not been fully evaluated but as increasing clinical trial data are published, its use is likely to grow. Further randomised controlled studies are needed to compare AHCT with standard disease modifying therapies and to optimise transplant regimens. Mechanistic studies may provide potential markers for response and a better understanding of disease pathogenesis.

  6. Vision and driving in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Schultheis, Maria T; Manning, Kevin; Weisser, Valerie; Blasco, Alison; Ang, Jocelyn; Wilkinson, Mark E

    2010-02-01

    To examine the relationship between measures of visual dysfunction and driving performance in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Between-group comparison. All data were collected in an outpatient research setting. Persons (N=66) with MS of the relapsing remitting type (26 self-reporting visual difficulties; 40 self-reporting no visual difficulties) and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Not applicable. Measures of vision included visual acuity, depth perception, and color perception. Driving was measured using documented accident/violation rate and self-reported driving behaviors. Quantitative analysis only revealed that MS persons with self-reported visual difficulties performed significantly worse than healthy controls on color perception (Kruskal-Wallis; chi(2)(2)=8.89, P=.01). There were no group differences on driving behaviors, and correlational analysis revealed a lack of relationship between the selected visual (visual acuity, depth perception, color perception) and driving performance measures (documented accident/violation rate and self-limiting driving behaviors). Persons with MS who self-reported difficulties with vision had acceptable visual acuity, despite demonstrating impairment in color perception. The fact that visual acuity remains the most common measure for visual fitness to drive remains problematic. There is a need to further define measures of visual dysfunction relevant to driving among this clinical population. Copyright 2010 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ocular Motor Manifestations of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nerrant, Elodie; Tilikete, Caroline

    2017-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system leading to disability, especially in young patients. Acute or chronic lesions of MS within the brainstem and the cerebellum frequently result in ocular motor disorders. This review encompasses the spectrum of ocular motor disorders in patients with MS emphasizing prevalence, examination findings, diagnostic features, functional consequences, classification of MS course, and management of these disturbances of ocular motility. Ocular motor manifestations of MS can occur acutely in relapse or chronically, the latter as a consequence of previous relapses or as a chronic course of the disease. The most frequent and specific acute ocular motor manifestation is uni- or bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO). The most frequent chronic manifestations include INO and cerebellar ocular motor disorders such as gaze-evoked nystagmus, saccadic hypermetria, and lack of vestibulo-ocular reflex inhibition. The most disabling syndrome is pendular nystagmus. The high prevalence of ocular motor manifestations emphasizes the importance of neuro-ophthalmological examination among patients with MS. Because chronic manifestations may cause minimal or no symptoms, a systematic investigation of the most common manifestations should be performed in daily practice. Appropriate treatment may improve visual outcome in some of these ocular motor disorders.

  8. Depression in multiple sclerosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Siegert, R J; Abernethy, D A

    2005-04-01

    Several studies have reported high rates of depression in multiple sclerosis (MS) with a lifetime prevalence of approximately 50% and an annual prevalence of 20% not uncommon. Concern about the potential of new drug treatments to exacerbate or precipitate depression in MS has led to increased interest in the relation between MS and depression. This review on MS and depression identifies the following key issues: How common is depression in people with MS? Is depression in MS associated with lesions in specific regions of the central nervous system? Is there an increased risk of suicide in MS? Is there a higher than expected incidence of anxiety disorders in MS? Are fatigue and depressed mood related in MS? Is there a relation between depression and cognitive impairment in MS? Which psychosocial variables affect the development of depression in MS? Does treatment with interferon increase the risk of depression? How effective are treatments for MS patients with depression? Each of these issues is briefly reviewed with critical commentary, and some priorities for future research are suggested.

  9. Overview and diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Samuel F

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology, involves an immunemediated attack of the central nervous system (CNS) that produces demyelination and axonal/neuronal damage, resulting in characteristic multifocal lesions apparent on magnetic resonance imaging and a variety of neurologic manifestations. The disease pathology is characterized by multifocal lesions within the CNS, in both the white matter and gray matter, with perivenular inflammatory cell infiltrates, demyelination, axonal transection, neuronal degeneration, and gliosis. MS pathogenesis is complex, as it involves both T- and B-cell mechanisms and is heterogeneous in presentation. Relatively recently, the historical 4 core clinical categories of MS were revised in an effort to improve characterization of the clinical course, better identify where a given patient is positioned in the disease spectrum, and to guide clinical studies. In young and middle-aged adults, MS is one of the most common contributors to neurologic disability, and it exerts detrimental effects on a patient's productivity and health-related quality of life. Typically, patients with MS have a long life span, although healthcare utilization increases over time. As a consequence, the disease places a substantial burden on patients and their caregivers/families, as well as employers, the healthcare system, and society.

  10. Role of pathogens in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Libbey, Jane E; Cusick, Matthew F; Fujinami, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Although the etiology of MS is unknown, genetic and environmental factors play a role. Infectious pathogens are the likely environmental factors involved in the development of MS. Pathogens associated with the development or exacerbation of MS include bacteria, such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae, the Staphylococcus aureus-produced enterotoxins that function as superantigens, viruses of the herpes virus (Epstein-Barr virus and human herpesvirus 6) and human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) families and the protozoa Acanthamoeba castellanii. Evidence, from studies with humans and animal models, supporting the association of these various pathogens with the development and/or exacerbation of MS will be discussed along with the potential mechanisms including molecular mimicry, epitope spreading and bystander activation. In contrast, infection with certain parasites such as helminthes (Schistosoma mansoni, Fasciola hepatica, Hymenolepis nana, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, Strongyloides stercolaris, Enterobius vermicularis) appears to protect against the development or exacerbation of MS. Evidence supporting the ability of parasitic infections to protect against disease will be discussed along with a brief summary of a recent Phase I clinical trial testing the ability of Trichuris suis ova treatment to improve the clinical course of MS. A complex interaction between the CNS (including the blood-brain barrier), multiple infections with various infectious agents (occurring in the periphery or within the CNS), and the immune response to those various infections may have to be deciphered before the etiology of MS can be fully understood.

  11. Uphill and Downhill Walking in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Samaei, Afshin; Hajihasani, Abdolhamid; Fatemi, Elham; Motaharinezhad, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various exercise protocols have been recommended for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the effects of uphill and downhill walking exercise on mobility, functional activities, and muscle strength in MS patients. Methods: Thirty-four MS patients were randomly allocated to either the downhill or uphill treadmill walking group for 12 sessions (3 times/wk) of 30 minutes' walking on a 10% negative slope (n = 17) or a 10% positive slope (n = 17), respectively. Measurements were taken before and after the intervention and after 4-week follow-up and included fatigue by Modified Fatigue Impact Scale; mobility by Modified Rivermead Mobility Index; disability by Guy's Neurological Disability Scale; functional activities by 2-Minute Walk Test, Timed 25-Foot Walk test, and Timed Up and Go test; balance indices by Biodex Balance System; and quadriceps and hamstring isometric muscles by torque of left and right knee joints. Analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to investigate the intervention effects on the measurements. Results: After the intervention, significant improvement was found in the downhill group versus the uphill group in terms of fatigue, mobility, and disability indices; functional activities; balance indices; and quadriceps isometric torque (P < .05). The results were stable at 4-week follow-up. Conclusions: Downhill walking on a treadmill may improve muscle performance, functional activity, and balance control in MS patients. These findings support the idea of using eccentric exercise training in MS rehabilitation protocols. PMID:26917996

  12. Therapeutic Yoga: Symptom Management for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kim A; MacDonald, Megan

    2015-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, affecting over 2.3 million people worldwide. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the age of disease onset is typically between 20 and 40 years, with a higher incidence in women. Individuals with MS experience a wide range of symptoms, including declining physical, emotional, and psychological symptoms (e.g., fatigue, imbalance, spasticity, chronic pain, cognitive impairment, bladder and bowel dysfunction, visual and speech impairments, depression, sensory disturbance, and mobility impairment). To date, both the cause of and cure for MS remain unknown. In recent years, more individuals with MS have been pursuing alternative methods of treatment to manage symptoms of the disease, including mind-body therapies such as yoga, meditation, breathing, and relaxation techniques. It has been suggested that the practice of yoga may be a safe and effective way of managing symptoms of MS. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to summarize the most relevant literature on exercise and mind-body modalities to treat MS symptoms and, more specifically, the benefits and potential role of yoga as an alternative treatment of symptom management for individuals with MS. The article also discusses future directions for research.

  13. Relapses in multiple sclerosis: Relationship to disability.

    PubMed

    Goodin, Douglas S; Reder, Anthony T; Bermel, Robert A; Cutter, Gary R; Fox, Robert J; John, Gareth R; Lublin, Fred D; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Miller, Aaron E; Pelletier, Daniel; Racke, Michael K; Trapp, Bruce D; Vartanian, Timothy; Waubant, Emmanuelle

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a recurrent inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, which ultimately causes substantial disability in many patients. A key clinical feature of this disease is the occurrence of relapses, consisting of episodes of neurological dysfunction followed by periods of remission. This review considers in detail the importance of the occurrence of relapses to the ultimate course of MS and the impact of relap setreatment (both acutely and prophylactically) on the long-term outcome for individuals. The ultimate goal of therapy in MS is the reduction of long-term disability. Clinical trials in MS, however, typically only extend for a very short time period compared to the time it takes for disability to evolve. Consequently, short-term outcome measures that are associated with, and predict, future disability need to be identified. In this regard, not only are relapses a characteristic feature of MS, they have also been proven to be associated with the occurrence of long-term disability. Moreover, treatments that reduce the number and severity of these attacks improve the long-term prognosis.

  14. Controversies and priorities in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Martin R; Hardiman, Orla; Benatar, Michael; Brooks, Benjamin R; Chio, Adriano; de Carvalho, Mamede; Ince, Paul G; Lin, Cindy; Miller, Robert G; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi; Nicholson, Garth; Ravits, John; Shaw, Pamela J; Swash, Michael; Talbot, Kevin; Traynor, Bryan J; den Berg, Leonard H Van; Veldink, Jan H; Vucic, Steve; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2015-01-01

    Summary Two decades after the discovery that 20% of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases were linked to mutations in the superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) gene, a substantial proportion of the remainder of cases of familial ALS have now been traced to an expansion of the intronic hexanucleotide repeat sequence in C9orf72. This breakthrough provides an opportunity to re-evaluate longstanding concepts regarding the cause and natural history of ALS, coming soon after the pathological unification of ALS with frontotemporal dementia through a shared pathological signature of cytoplasmic inclusions of the ubiquitinated protein TDP-43. However, with profound clinical, prognostic, neuropathological, and now genetic heterogeneity, the concept of ALS as one disease appears increasingly untenable. This background calls for the development of a more sophisticated taxonomy, and an appreciation of ALS as the breakdown of a wider network rather than a discrete vulnerable population of specialised motor neurons. Identification of C9orf72 repeat expansions in patients without a family history of ALS challenges the traditional division between familial and sporadic disease. By contrast, the 90% of apparently sporadic cases and incomplete penetrance of several genes linked to familial cases suggest that at least some forms of ALS arise from the interplay of multiple genes, poorly understood developmental, environmental, and age-related factors, as well as stochastic events. PMID:23415570

  15. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: New Perpectives and Update.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Marco; Oliveira, Acary Bulle; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M; Reis, Carlos Henrique Melo; Leite, Marco Antonio Araujo; de Souza, Jano Alves; Pupe, Camila; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Bastos, Victor Hugo; de Freitas, Marcos R G; Teixeira, Silmar; Bruno, Carlos; Davidovich, Eduardo; Smidt, Benny

    2015-09-24

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Charcot's disease or Lou Gehrig's disease, is a term used to cover the spetrum of syndromes caracterized by progressive degeneration of motor neurons, a paralytic disorder caused by motor neuron degeneration. Currently, there are approximately 25,000 patients with ALS in the USA, with an average age of onset of 55 years. The incidence and prevalence of ALS are 1-2 and 4-6 per 100,000 each year, respectively, with a lifetime ALS risk of 1/600 to 1/1000. It causes progressive and cumulative physical disabilities, and leads to eventual death due to respiratory muscle failure. ALS is diverse in its presentation, course, and progression. We do not yet fully understand the causes of the disease, nor the mechanisms for its progression; thus, we lack effective means for treating this disease. In this chapter, we will discuss the diagnosis, treatment, and how to cope with impaired function and end of life based on of our experience, guidelines, and clinical trials. Nowadays ALS seems to be a more complex disease than it did two decades - or even one decade - ago, but new insights have been plentiful. Clinical trials should be seen more as experiments on pathogenic mechanisms. A medication or combination of medications that targets more than one pathogenic pathway may slow disease progression in an additive or synergistic fashion.

  16. Nanomaterial applications in multiple sclerosis inflamed brain.

    PubMed

    Ballerini, Clara; Baldi, Giovanni; Aldinucci, Alessandra; Maggi, Pietro

    2015-03-01

    In the last years scientific progress in nanomaterials, where size and shape make the difference, has increased their utilization in medicine with the development of a promising new translational science: nanomedicine. Due to their surface and core biophysical properties, nanomaterials hold the promise for medical applications in central nervous system (CNS) diseases: inflammatory, degenerative and tumors. The present review is focused on nanomaterials at the neuro-immune interface, evaluating two aspects: the possible CNS inflammatory response induced by nanomaterials and the developments of nanomaterials to improve treatment and diagnosis of neuroinflammatory diseases, with a focus on multiple sclerosis (MS). Indeed, nanomedicine allows projecting new ways of drug delivery and novel techniques for CNS imaging. Despite the wide field of application in neurological diseases of nanomaterials, our topic here is to review the more recent development of nanomaterials that cross blood brain barrier (BBB) and reach specific target during CNS inflammatory diseases, a crucial strategy for CNS early diagnosis and drug delivery, indeed the main challenges of nanomedicine.

  17. Current treatment options in systemic Sclerosis (Scleroderma).

    PubMed

    Stummvoll, G H

    2002-01-01

    Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) or Scleroderma is a generalized autoimmune disease with variable involvement of the skin and major organs. Etiology and pathogenesis are still largely unknown, but a variety of humoral and cellular autoimmune phenomena can be observed, and a pivotal role of T lymphocytes in SSc pathogenesis is postulated. The rarity of the disease, the wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and severity as well as a variable course render therapy in SSc a major challenge. In view of the immunopathogenesis of SSc, many (presumed) immunomodulatory agents have been used, but no single agent has been proven to be convincingly effective. Trials with extracorporeal therapies (such as photopheresis, plasmapheresis) or even stem cell transplantation are in progress. In contrast to the hitherto unsuccessful therapeutic approaches for the overall disease course, some life-threatening organ manifestations can often be treated successfully, e.g. interstitial pneumonitis with i.v. cyclophosphamide and scleroderma renal crisis with ACE inhibitors and haemodialysis, respectively. Furthermore, pharmacological and supportive treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon and gastrointestinal involvement can alleviate the burden of the disease. Current therapeutic options as well as hitherto investigated immunomodulators are reviewed in this article.

  18. The topographical model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Karin; De Nino, Scott; Fletcher, Madhuri

    2016-01-01

    Relapses and progression contribute to multiple sclerosis (MS) disease course, but neither the relationship between them nor the spectrum of clinical heterogeneity has been fully characterized. A hypothesis-driven, biologically informed model could build on the clinical phenotypes to encompass the dynamic admixture of factors underlying MS disease course. In this medical hypothesis, we put forth a dynamic model of MS disease course that incorporates localization and other drivers of disability to propose a clinical manifestation framework that visualizes MS in a clinically individualized way. The topographical model encapsulates 5 factors (localization of relapses and causative lesions; relapse frequency, severity, and recovery; and progression rate), visualized utilizing dynamic 3-dimensional renderings. The central hypothesis is that, like symptom recrudescence in Uhthoff phenomenon and pseudoexacerbations, progression clinically recapitulates prior relapse symptoms and unmasks previously silent lesions, incrementally revealing underlying lesion topography. The model uses real-time simulation software to depict disease course archetypes and illuminate several well-described but poorly reconciled phenomena including the clinical/MRI paradox and prognostic significance of lesion location and burden on disease outcomes. Utilization of this model could allow for earlier and more clinically precise identification of progressive MS and predictive implications can be empirically tested. PMID:27648465

  19. Redox Regulation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Parakh, Sonam; Spencer, Damian M.; Halloran, Mark A.; Soo, Kai Y.; Atkin, Julie D.

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that results from the death of upper and lower motor neurons. Due to a lack of effective treatment, it is imperative to understand the underlying mechanisms and processes involved in disease progression. Regulations in cellular reduction/oxidation (redox) processes are being increasingly implicated in disease. Here we discuss the possible involvement of redox dysregulation in the pathophysiology of ALS, either as a cause of cellular abnormalities or a consequence. We focus on its possible role in oxidative stress, protein misfolding, glutamate excitotoxicity, lipid peroxidation and cholesterol esterification, mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired axonal transport and neurofilament aggregation, autophagic stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We also speculate that an ER chaperone protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) could play a key role in this dysregulation. PDI is essential for normal protein folding by oxidation and reduction of disulphide bonds, and hence any disruption to this process may have consequences for motor neurons. Addressing the mechanism underlying redox regulation and dysregulation may therefore help to unravel the molecular mechanism involved in ALS. PMID:23533690

  20. Epidemiologic correlates of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Armon, C.; Kurland, L.T.; Daube, J.R.; O'Brien, P.C. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors evaluated 74 selected patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 201 matched controls for risk factors for ALS by a case-control design and a sequential questionnaire/interview technique to quantitate biographic data. They analyzed occupational and recreational data only for 47 male patients and 47 corresponding patient controls; data for women were insufficient. They used nonparametric analyses to evaluate five primary comparisons of ALS patients with controls: (1) more hard physical labor, p not significant (NS); (2) greater frequency of neurodegenerative disease in family members, p NS; (3) greater exposure to lead, p less than 0.05; (4) more years lived in a rural community, p NS; and (5) more trauma or major surgery, p NS. Men with ALS had worked more frequently at blue-collar jobs (although not a statistically significant difference, p = 0.10) and at welding or soldering (p less than 0.01). These results suggest that there may be an association between ALS in men and exposure to lead vapor. The limited nature of the association favors a multifactorial etiologic mechanism of ALS.